Forte SE Musicians Guide

Forte SE Musicians Guide
SE
TRANSPOSE
REAL - TIME CONTROL
MASTER EQ
SOUND SELECT
ASSIGNABLE SWITCHES
VARIATION
1
ZONE 1
ROTARY S/F
-24
Hi
+15
BRAKE
2
ZONE 2
ON/OFF
3
ZONE 3
CHOR/VIB
4
5
6
ON/OFF
LOUD/SOFT
ZONE 4
DEPTH
VOLUME
A
-24
MID
B
C
7
FX1
CHORUS / VIBRATO
FX2
DECAY F/S
8
DELAY
9
REVERB
PITCH H/L
KEY CLICK
H
I
PERCUSSION
D
E
F
KB3
G
KB3
CHANNEL
LAYER
ZONE
+15
1.4k
CATEGORY
MODE
STORAGE
ACTIVE
ARP ON/OFF
PROGRAM
PIANO
MULTI
STRINGS
E.PIANO
CLAV
BRASS/WINDS ENSEMBLE
GLOBAL
FREQ
7k
LOW
+15
1
1
EDIT
EXIT
PREVIOUS
NEXT
USER
VALUE JUMP
2
2 ABC
9
9 WXYZ
KB3 DISTORTION
-24
LEADS
PADS
SYNTHS
SYNTH BASS
HYBRID
GUITAR/BASS
VOICES/MISC
DRUMS
PERCUSSION
PROGRAM / MULTI
SAVE
200Hz
ORGAN
10
0
3
4
3 DEF
4 GHI
11
SPACE
12
INSERT
PROGRAM
DEMO
5
5 JKL
6
6 MNO
13
14
+/-
DELETE
DEMO
7
7 PQRS
8
8 TUV
15
CANCEL
16
ENTER
PANIC
FAVORITES
1
ON/OFF
FILT/EQ 1
ZONE 1
FILT/EQ 2
ZONE 2
ATTACK
ZONE 3
DECAY/REL
ZONE 4
REL/RATE
FX1
FX2
DELAY
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
REVERB
®
Written for software release v1.01 and OS 3.44.25701
Part Number 91580-001
i
CAUTION
The lightning flash with the arrowhead symbol, within an equilateral
triangle is intended to alert the user to the presence of uninsulated
"dangerous voltage" within the product's enclosure that may be of
sufficient magnitude to constitute a risk of electric shock to persons.
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
CAUTION: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK,
DO NOT REMOVE THE COVER.
NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE.
REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED SERVICE PERSONNEL.
The exclamation point within an equilateral triangle is intended
to alert the user to the presence of important operating and
maintenance (servicing) instructions in the literature
accompanying the product.
IMPORTANT SAFETY & INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
INSTRUCTIONS PERTAINING TO THE RISK OF FIRE ELECTRIC SHOCK , OR INJURY TO PERSONS‌
WARNING: When using electric products, basic precautions should
always be followed, including the following:
1. Read all the Safety and Installation Instructions and Explanation
of Graphic Symbols before using the product.
2. This product must be grounded. If it should malfunction or
break down, grounding provides a path of least resistance for
electric current to reduce the risk of electric shock. This product
is equipped with a power supply cord having an equipmentgrounding conductor and a grounding plug. The plug must be
plugged into an appropriate outlet which is properly installed and
grounded in accordance with all local codes and ordinances.
DANGER: Improper connection of the equipment-grounding
conductor can result in a risk of electric shock. Do not modify the
plug provided with the product – if it will not fit the outlet, have a
proper outlet installed by a qualified electrician. Do not use an
adaptor which defeats the function of the equipment-grounding
conductor. If you are in doubt as to whether the product is properly
grounded, check with a qualified serviceman or electrician.
3. Do not use this product near water – for example, near a bathtub,
washbowl, kitchen sink, in a wet basement, or near a swimming
pool, or the like.
4. This product should only be used with a stand or cart that is
recommended by the manufacturer.
5. This product, either alone or in combination with an amplifier and
speakers or headphones, may be capable of producing sound
levels that could cause permanent hearing loss. Do not operate
for a long period of time at a high volume level or a level that is
uncomfortable. If you experience any hearing loss or ringing in
the ears, you should consult an audiologist.
6. This product should be located so that its location or position
does not interfere with its proper ventilation.
7. The product should be located away from heat sources such as
radiators, heat registers, or other products that produce heat.
8. The product should be connected to a power supply only of the
type described in the operating instructions or as marked on the
product.
9. This product may be equipped with a polarized line plug (one
blade wider than the other). This is a safety feature. If you are
unable to insert the plug into the outlet, contact an electrician to
replace your obsolete outlet. Do not defeat the safety purpose of
the plug.
10. The power supply cord of the product should be unplugged
from the outlet when left unused for a long period of time. When
unplugging the power supply cord, do not pull on the cord, but
grasp it by the plug.
11. Care should be taken so that objects do not fall and liquids are
not spilled into the enclosure through openings.
12. The product should be serviced by qualified service personnel
when:
A. The power supply, power cord or plug have been damaged;
B. Objects have fallen, or liquid has been spilled into the
product;
C. The product has been exposed to rain;
D. The product does not appear to be operating normally or
exhibits a marked change in performance;
E. The product has been dropped, or the enclosure damaged.
13. Do not attempt to service the product beyond that described in
the user maintenance instructions. All other servicing should be
referred to qualified service personnel.
14. WARNING: Do not place objects on the product’s power supply
cord, or place the product in a position where anyone could trip
over, walk on, or roll anything over cords of any type. Do not
allow the product to rest on or be installed over cords of any type.
Improper installations of this type create the possibility of a fire
hazard and/or personal injury.
RADIO AND TELEVISION INTERFERENCE
WARNING: Changes or modifications to the instrument not expressly
approved by Young Chang could void your authority to operate the
instrument.
IMPORTANT: When connecting this product to accessories and/or
other equipment use only high quality shielded cables.
NOTE: This instrument has been tested and found to comply with the
limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules.
These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against
harmful interference in a residential installation. This instrument
generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not
installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause
harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no
guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If
this instrument does cause harmful interference to radio or television
reception, which can be determined by turning the instrument off and
on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or
more of the following measures:
•
ii
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
•
•
Increase the separation between the instrument and the receiver.
Connect the instrument into an outlet on a circuit other than the
one to which the receiver is connected.
• If necessary consult your dealer or an experienced radio/television
technician for additional suggestions.
The normal function of the product may be disturbed by strong
electromagnetic interference. If so, simply reset the product to resume
normal operation by following the instructions in the manual. If normal
function does not resume, please use the product in another location.
NOTICE
This apparatus does not exceed the Class B limits for radio noise
emissions from digital apparatus set out in the Radio Interference
Regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications.
AVIS
Le present appareil numerique n’emet pas de bruits radioelectriques
depassant les limites applicables aux appareils numeriques de la
class B prescrites dans le Reglement sur le brouillage radioelectrique
edicte par le ministere des Communications du Canada.
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
1) Read these instructions.
2) Keep these instructions.
3) Heed all warnings.
4) Follow all instructions.
5) Do not use this apparatus near water.
6) Clean only with dry cloth.
7) Do not block any of the ventilation openings. Install in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
8) Do not install near any heat sources such as radiators, heat registers, stoves, or other apparatus (including
amplifiers) that produce heat.
9) Do not defeat the safety purpose of the polarized or grounding-type plug. A polarized plug has two
blades with one wider than the other. A grounding type plug has two blades and a third grounding
prong. The wide blade or the third prong are provided for your safety. If the provided plug does not fit
into your outlet, consult an electrician for replacement of the obsolete outlet
10)Protect the power cord and power supply adapter from being walked on or pinched, particularly at plugs,
convenience receptacles, and the point where they exit from the apparatus.
11)Only use power adapters andattachments/accessories specified by the manufacturer.
12)Use only with a cart, stand, tripod, bracket, or table specified by the manufacturer,
or sold with the apparatus. When a cart is used, use caution when moving the cart/
apparatus combination to avoid injury from tip-over.
13)Unplug this apparatus during lightning storms or when unused for long periods of
time.
14)Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel. Servicing is required when the apparatus has been
damaged in any way, such as power-supply cord or plug is damaged, liquid has been spilled or objects
have fallen into the apparatus, the apparatus has been exposed to rain or moisture, does not operate
normally, or has been dropped.
Warning: To reduce the risk of fire or electric shock, do not expose this apparatus to rain or moisture. Do not
expose this equipment to dripping or splashing and ensure that no objects filled with liquids, such as vases, are
placed on the equipment.
To completely disconnect this equipment from the AC Mains, disconnect the power supply cord plug from
the AC receptacle.
©2015 Young Chang Co., Ltd. All rights reserved. Kurzweil® is a product line of Young Chang Co., Ltd. Kurzweil®, Young Chang®, V. A. S. T.®,
and Forte SE® are trademarks of Young Chang Co., Ltd. All other trademarks and copyrights are property of their respective companies. Product
features and specifications are subject to change without notice.
You may legally print up to two (2) copies of this document for personal use. Commercial use of any copies of this document is prohibited.
Young Chang Co. retains ownership of all intellectual property represented by this document.
iii
Kurzweil International Contacts
Contact the Kurzweil office listed below to locate your local Kurzweil representative.
US Customers:
Customers outside the US:
American Music & Sound
925 Broadbeck Dr #220
Newbury Park, CA 91320
Young Chang Co., LTD.
178-55, Gajwa-Dong, Seo-Ku
Incheon, Korea
Post Code: 404-714
Tel: 800-431-2609
Fax: 818-597-0411
Email: [email protected]
Tel: +82-32-570-1576
Fax: +82-32-576-2340
www.kurzweil.com
[email protected]
www.facebook.com/kurzweilmusicsystems/
www.twitter.com/KurzweilMusic
www.youtube.com/user/KurzweilTutorials
iv
Contents
Contents

Kurzweil International Contacts......................................................................iv
Introducing Forte SE.............................................. 1-1
Main Features................................................................................................ 1-1
Do You Have Everything?............................................................................. 1-3
Keeping the Forte SE up to date.................................................................. 1-3
Music Rack (Optional)................................................................................... 1-3
Getting Started........................................................ 2-1
Before You Start…......................................................................................... 2-1
Setting up the Forte SE................................................................................. 2-1
Updating the Forte SE................................................................................... 2-2
Using the Forte SE........................................................................................ 2-2
The Rear Panel.............................................................................................. 2-3
The AC Power Jack....................................................................................... 2-3
The USB Ports............................................................................................... 2-3
The MIDI (IN and OUT) Ports........................................................................ 2-4
Basic MIDI Hookup........................................................................................ 2-4
The Pedal Jacks............................................................................................ 2-4
The Audio (LEFT/MONO and RIGHT) Jacks ............................................... 2-8
Connecting to Your Audio System............................................................... 2-8
Connecting to a Computer ........................................................................ 2-10
Forte SE Sounds......................................................................................... 2-10
Features of the Forte SE........................................ 3-1
Powering Up Defaults................................................................................... 3-1
The Front Panel............................................................................................. 3-2
Real Time Controls........................................................................................ 3-3
Master EQ....................................................................................................... 3-8
Mode Buttons................................................................................................. 3-9
Navigation.................................................................................................... 3-10
i
Contents

The Edit Button............................................................................................ 3-12
The Save Button.......................................................................................... 3-12
Sound Select................................................................................................ 3-13
Double Button Presses............................................................................... 3-14
Terminology............................................................ 4-1
The Operating Modes............................................. 5-1
Program Mode............................................................................................... 5-1
Multi Mode...................................................................................................... 5-2
Global Mode................................................................................................... 5-3
Functions....................................................................................................... 5-4
Program Edit Mode........................................................................................ 5-6
Multi Edit Mode.............................................................................................. 5-7
Program Mode........................................................ 6-1
About Program Mode.................................................................................... 6-1
Selecting Programs....................................................................................... 6-2
Transposition................................................................................................. 6-7
Parameter Assignments............................................................................... 6-8
Controller Conventions................................................................................. 6-9
The Split and Layer Functions................................................................... 6-10
The Arp Pages............................................................................................. 6-13
Save User Programs................................................................................... 6-14
Changing the Transmit MIDI Channel........................................................ 6-16
Panic............................................................................................................. 6-17
Program Edit Mode................................................. 7-1
About Program Edit Mode............................................................................ 7-1
Differences Between Regular and Advanced User Type........................... 7-1
Selecting Parameters.................................................................................... 7-2
VAST and KB3 Programs.............................................................................. 7-4
VAST Program Structure.............................................................................. 7-4
Editing VAST Programs................................................................................ 7-6
The Parameters (PARAMS) Page............................................................... 7-10
The Program FX (FX) Page......................................................................... 7-13
ii
Contents

The Layer FX (LYR_FX) Page..................................................................... 7-15
The COMMON Page..................................................................................... 7-16
The KEYMAP Page...................................................................................... 7-19
The LAYER Page.......................................................................................... 7-24
The PITCH Page........................................................................................... 7-30
The AMP Page.............................................................................................. 7-30
The Algorithm (ALG) Page.......................................................................... 7-30
The DSP Control (DSPCTL) Page............................................................... 7-37
The DSP Modulation (DSPMOD) Page....................................................... 7-39
The OUTPUT Page....................................................................................... 7-40
The LFO Page.............................................................................................. 7-43
The ASR Page.............................................................................................. 7-46
The Function (FUN) Page............................................................................ 7-47
The Amplitude Envelope (AMPENV) Page................................................ 7-48
The Envelope 2 (ENV2) and Envelope 3 (ENV3) Pages........................... 7-51
The Envelope Control (ENVCTL) Page...................................................... 7-52
The Arpeggiator Function........................................................................... 7-55
The Utility Soft Buttons, HELP Soft Button and Favorites Buttons Functions 7-69
Editing VAST Programs With KVA Oscillators.......................................... 7-71
KB3 Program Structure.............................................................................. 7-79
Editing KB3 Programs................................................................................ 7-81
KB3 Editor: The Parameters (PARAMS) Page.......................................... 7-82
KB3 Editor: The Program FX (FX) Page.................................................... 7-82
KB3 Editor: The COMMON Page ............................................................... 7-82
KB3 Editor: The Tone Wheels (TONEWL) Page........................................ 7-85
KB3 Editor: The Drawbars (DRAWBR) Page............................................. 7-87
KB3 Editor: The Set Drawbars (SetDBR) Soft Button.............................. 7-88
KB3 Editor: The PITCH Page...................................................................... 7-88
KB3 Editor: The AMP Page......................................................................... 7-89
KB3 Editor: The KEYCLICK Page.............................................................. 7-89
KB3 Editor: The PERC1 Page..................................................................... 7-91
KB3 Editor: The PERC2 Page..................................................................... 7-93
KB3 Editor: The EQ Page............................................................................ 7-94
iii
Contents

KB3 Editor: The OUTPUT Page.................................................................. 7-95
KB3 Editor: The LFO, ASR, FUN, and ARP Pages.................................... 7-95
The Effects Chain Editor........................................ 8-1
The MAIN Page.............................................................................................. 8-1
The MOD Pages............................................................................................. 8-2
FXLFO, FXASR, and FXFUN pages.............................................................. 8-3
INFO page....................................................................................................... 8-3
The Utility Soft Buttons, HELP Soft Button and Favorites Buttons Functions 8-4
Effects Parameters........................................................................................ 8-5
Keymap and Sample Editing................................. 9-1
The Keymap Editor........................................................................................ 9-1
Building a Keymap........................................................................................ 9-9
Editing Samples........................................................................................... 9-10
The TRIM Page............................................................................................. 9-14
Multi Mode............................................................. 10-1
About Multi Mode........................................................................................ 10-1
Selecting Multis........................................................................................... 10-2
About Zones................................................................................................. 10-6
Transposition............................................................................................... 10-6
Parameter Assignments............................................................................. 10-7
The Split and Layer Functions................................................................... 10-9
The ARP Function...................................................................................... 10-12
Save User Multis........................................................................................ 10-12
Multi Edit Mode......................................................11-1
About Multi Edit Mode................................................................................. 11-1
Selecting Parameters.................................................................................. 11-2
Zone Parameters......................................................................................... 11-4
OVERVIEW Page.......................................................................................... 11-5
MAIN Page.................................................................................................... 11-6
KEYVEL (KeyVelocity) Page..................................................................... 11-10
BEND Page................................................................................................. 11-13
CCTLS (CCs/Continuous Controllers) Page........................................... 11-13
iv
Contents

SWITCH (Switches) Page.......................................................................... 11-24
COMMON Page.......................................................................................... 11-27
ARP1 and ARP2 (Arpeggiator 1 & 2) Pages............................................ 11-28
FX Page...................................................................................................... 11-29
AUXFX 1, AUXFX 2 ................................................................................... 11-30
About Auxiliary Effects............................................................................. 11-31
The Utility Soft Buttons, HELP Soft Button and Favorites Buttons Functions 11-32
Save User Multis........................................................................................ 11-33
Global Mode.......................................................... 12-1
About Global Mode...................................................................................... 12-1
Selecting and Editing Parameters............................................................. 12-2
MAIN Page.................................................................................................... 12-2
MAPS Page.................................................................................................. 12-6
Controller Overrides (CNTRLS).................................................................. 12-9
MIDI Page................................................................................................... 12-11
TOOLS Page............................................................................................... 12-14
DELETE Page............................................................................................. 12-17
RESET......................................................................................................... 12-18
FILE (Storage page)................................................................................... 12-19
STORE........................................................................................................ 12-21
System Mode........................................................ 13-1
Run Forte SE................................................................................................ 13-2
System Update............................................................................................ 13-2
Run Diagnostics.......................................................................................... 13-7
System Reset............................................................................................... 13-8
System Utilities.......................................................................................... 13-10
Troubleshooting................................................... 14-1
Maintenance................................................................................................. 14-1
Common Problems...................................................................................... 14-1
MIDI Problems.............................................................................................. 14-4
Pedal Problems........................................................................................... 14-5
If None of the Above.................................................................................... 14-6
v
Contents

MIDI Implementation..............................................A-1
Physical Specifications.........................................B-1
Programs.................................................................C-1
KB3 Programs........................................................D-1
Introducing KB3 Programs...........................................................................D-1
Drawbars........................................................................................................D-2
KB3 Mode Buttons........................................................................................D-2
Multis.......................................................................E-1
Effects...................................................................... F-1
Index......................................................................... I-1
vi
Introducing Forte SE
Main Features
Chapter 1
Introducing Forte SE
Congratulations on your purchase of the Kurzweil Forte SE® Stage Piano!
This manual will help you get acquainted with your new instrument. Be sure to keep the
manual on hand as you continue to familiarize yourself with the features and functions of the
Forte SE.
Main Features
Forte SE is Kurzweil’s latest entry in the Forte line of stage pianos. Some of the key specifications
include:
• FlashPlay technology with support for 2GB of Sound ROM
• High Definition Japanese Grand Piano and High Definition Electric Piano
• ROM sounds included from Kurzweil’s acclaimed PC3 series, KORE64 expansion,
and German D Grand EXP Grand Piano expansion
• New Kurzweil String Resonance Simulation
• Full KB3 organ simulations with 9 sliders as drawbars
• 8 Zone MIDI Controller
• Space for 1024 Factory and 1024 User Programs and Multis (16 Categories of
Programs)
1-1
Introducing Forte SE
Main Features
• • • • Arpeggiator with dedicated On/Off button (1 per Program, up to 8 in Multi Mode)
MP3 player audio input jack
Full 128 voices of polyphony
Hundreds of Effects Chains
Keyboard and Controllers
The Forte SE has an 88-key fully-weighted hammer action keyboard that provides you with
a piano-like feel without adding excessive weight to the instrument. The array of physical
controllers includes:
• • • • • 9 assignable sliders
11 programmable switches
A pitch wheel
A modulation wheel
2 jacks on the rear panel for up to 4 optional switch pedals or 2 half damper pedals:
SW1 (Sustain) & SW2
• 1 jack on the rear panel for an optional continuous controller pedal: CC (Volume)
Pedals (Optional)
As described above, the Forte SE has three jacks on the rear panel for optional pedal
controllers. Two jacks for switch pedals, which are typically used to control two-state (i.e.,
on / off) parameters such as sustain, sostenuto, and mute Zone. The third jack is for a
continuous control (or CC) pedal typically used to control multi-state (i.e., “continuous”)
parameters such as volume or wah.
Your Kurzweil dealer stocks the following pedals:
• • • • 1-2
FS-1 Standard box-shaped switch pedal
KFP-1 Single piano-style switch pedal
KFP-2S Double piano-style switch pedal unit (one stereo plug)
CC-1 Continuous pedal
Introducing Forte SE
Do You Have Everything?
Do You Have Everything?
Your Forte SE package should contain the following in addition to your instrument:
• Power adapter and cable
• Switch pedal
• USB cable (Type-A-to-Type-B)
• 4 self adhesive feet (see page 2-1)
• Forte SE Getting Started Guide
If you are missing any of these components, please contact your Kurzweil / Young Chang
dealer to get them. Don’t connect anything until you make sure the Forte SE is properly and
safely situated. If your Forte SE keyboard has been out in the cold, give it time to warm up
to room temperature before starting it, since condensation may have formed inside.
Keeping the Forte SE up to date
Be sure to check the Kurzweil Music Systems website at www.kurzweil.com for new
documentation and the latest software updates for Forte SE.
Music Rack (Optional)
The optional KMR2 Music Rack attachment is a holder for sheet music or a computer tablet
device. Contact your Kurzweil dealer for the KMR2 Music Rack.
Please refer to the instructions that come with the KMR2 on attaching the music rack to the
Forte SE.
1-3
Getting Started
Before You Start…
Chapter 2
Getting Started
Before You Start…
Don’t connect anything until you make sure the Forte SE is properly and safely situated.
If your Forte SE keyboard has been out in the cold, give it time to warm up to room
temperature before starting it, since condensation may have formed inside.
Setting up the Forte SE
Set the keyboard on a hard, flat, level surface.
Four adhesive-backed rubber feet are provided with Forte SE. Carefully turn the keyboard
over onto a soft surface, remove the paper backing from the rubber feet and attach them.
NOTE : Unless the instrument will always be used with a keyboard stand, attachment of
the rubber feet is strongly advised. Otherwise protruding screws will scratch the tabletop.
2-1
Getting Started
Updating the Forte SE
Connect the AC power cord to the Forte SE. Before plugging the cable into the power outlet,
check that the power is compatible with the Forte SE. The Forte SE runs on AC power
and works with voltages from 80-265 volts 50-60 Hz. The voltage level is detected and set
automatically by the Forte SE. If your power source does not have the standard three hole
outlet, you should take the time to install a proper grounding system. This will reduce the
risk of a shock. If your power outlet is not within these ranges it is recommended you use an
appropriate adaptor.
Plug the power cable into the wall.
Plug the Switch Pedal into the marked SW1 (Sustain) Pedal jack on the Forte SE rear panel.
Connect stereo headphones to the headphone jack on the rear panel or connect the audio
outputs to your mixer or amplifier inputs using standard (1/4-inch) audio cables (use the Left
out for mono). Balanced (“TRS” or “Stereo”) cables are recommended if your mixer or amp
supports balanced inputs.
Make sure your sound system is at a safe volume level. Also make sure that the Forte SE
Master Volume slider (on the far left side of the front panel) is all the way down.
Updating the Forte SE
Please check online at www.kurzweil.com for Forte SE updates. Detailed instructions on
updating the Forte SE are available with the update package. It is important that these
instructions are followed closely for trouble free updating of the Forte SE.
Using the Forte SE
Power up the Forte SE using the power switch on the rear left side of the instrument, and
then raise the Master Volume slider, and mixer/amp volume. Your Forte SE keyboard starts
up in Program Mode by default. Press one of the buttons under the “Mode” label to the right
of the display to switch Modes.
Master Volume Slider
2-2
Mode select buttons
Getting Started
The Rear Panel
If you are connected to a mixing board and hear distortion, reduce the gain level on your
mixing board, or use the pad (a switch that decreases the input audio signal level, typically by
20dB) if it has one.
To hear the capabilities of the Forte SE, you can play the demo songs. Press the 13 & 14
Program/Multi buttons simultaneously to listen to a demo song.
In Program Mode, scroll through the Programs using the Alpha Wheel, the Previous and
Next buttons, or press a Category button to audition the sounds in the Forte SE. The Forte
SE has short demos for each of the factory Programs. To hear a Program Demo for the
current Program, press the 11 & 12 Program/Multi buttons simultaneously.
The Rear Panel
The power switch and most of the Forte SE connections are located on the rear panel.
The AC Power Jack
Please refer to “Setting up the Forte SE” on page 2-1.
The USB Ports
Use the USB ports to connect the Forte SE to a computer/tablet in order to do the following:
• Use the Forte SE as a MIDI controller to play software instruments on a computer.
• Use a computer program to sequence multitrack songs on the Forte SE.
• Use a computer/tablet to manage the user data contents of the Forte SE.
• Update the software and sounds of the Forte SE.
• Store custom Programs and Multis on a USB flash drive.
Be sure to check the Kurzweil Music Systems website at www.kurzweil.com for new
documentation and software updates before using your new instrument.
2-3
Getting Started
The MIDI (IN and OUT) Ports
The MIDI (IN and OUT) Ports
Use the MIDI ports to communicate with other MIDI modules and controllers. The OUT
port is the MIDI transmitting port, and the IN port is the MIDI receiving port.
Basic MIDI Hookup
To use the Forte SE as a MIDI controller for another sound module, use a MIDI cable to
connect the MIDI port marked “Out” to the MIDI input port of the module that you want
to control.
To control the Forte SE using another MIDI controller, use a MIDI cable to connect the
MIDI port marked “In” to the MIDI output port of the controller that you will be using.
For other MIDI connection scenarios, please refer to the Forte SE Musicians Guide.
The Pedal Jacks
Use the three pedal jacks to connect controller pedals to the Forte SE.
2-4
Getting Started
The Pedal Jacks
Switch Pedals
Continuous Control
(CC) Pedals
1/4 inch tip-sleeve (mono) plug or, 1/4 inch tip-ring-sleeve plug
configured as dual switches (TS and RS) or 2 terminal continuous pedal
(half-damper).
10 kΩ linear-taper potentiometer, 1/4 inch tip-ring-sleeve (stereo) plug
with the wiper connected to the tip.
The default function of each pedal can be changed for all Programs and Multis by setting
a pedal override on the Global Control Overrides page in Global Mode. Pedals are also
independently assignable within each Program or each Zone of every Multi.
Here are the default control settings for the five pedals used by Forte SE:
SW 1a Pedal
Sustain (MIDI 64)
SW 1b Pedal
Sostenuto (MIDI 66)
SW 2a Pedal
Sostenuto (MIDI 66)
SW 2b Pedal
Soft (MIDI 67)
CC Pedal
Expression (MIDI 11)
The SW1 (Sustain) and SW2 Jacks
Use the pedal jacks to connect switch pedals. A switch pedal is a physical controller typically
used to control two-state (i.e., “on / off”) parameters, such as sustain, sostenuto, soft and
Mute Zone.
2-5
Getting Started
The Pedal Jacks
NOTE : Do not step on the switch pedals when powering up the Forte SE, as the state of
the pedal is detected as part of the power up sequence.
The Forte SE SW1 and SW2 jacks can support a single or dual switch pedal on each jack, or
a single half-damper pedal on each jack.
NOTE : It is not recommended to plug CC pedals into the SW inputs. Due to the
flexible switch pedal support, CC pedals may not operate as expected in these inputs.
If you are not using a Kurzweil switch pedal, make sure it’s connected before you turn on the
Forte SE. This ensures that the pedal will work properly (it might function in reverse—off
when it’s down and on when it’s up—if you turn on your Forte SE before plugging in the
pedal). Similarly, don’t press any of your switch pedals while powering up, as the Forte SE
verifies each pedal’s orientation during power-up. If you’re pressing a pedal, you might cause
it to work in reverse.
Connecting a Dual Switch Pedal
You can connect a dual switch pedal with a single stereo plug, such as the Kurzweil KFP-2S,
into the SW1 Pedal and SW2 Pedal jacks. Both SW1 and SW2 can support a dual pedal
each allowing up to 4 pedals to be utilized by the Forte SE. These are enumerated as SW1a,
SW1b, SW2a and SW2b. The Forte SE will recognize dual pedals that are wired as TS and
RS, such as the KFP-2S.
2-6
Getting Started
The Audio (LEFT/MONO and RIGHT) Jacks
If you’re not familiar with traditional piano technique, the sostenuto (center) pedal on a
grand piano allows one to hold chords in the bass while continuing to play the melody
without the latter notes sustaining. Any keys that are down when you depress the pedal will
sustain when you let go of the keys, but new notes played afterward will not be sustained.
Releasing the pedal puts things back to normal. Of course it can be programmed to do other
functions as well.
Connecting a Half Damper Pedal
Half Damper pedals where the wiper is connected to the tip (such as the KORG DS-1H)
can be connected to the SW1 and SW2 inputs on the rear panel. Some pedals have the wiper
connected to the ring, and these pedals will require an adaptor to work with the Forte SE.
When connected to the SW1 jack, a Half Damper pedal enables finer control of sustain than
a standard switch pedal. Half Damper control is enabled for programs in the Piano category.
Programs outside of the Piano category will respond to Half Damper pedals as if they are
standard switch pedals. Half Damper pedals can also be used to control external software and
sound modules via MIDI.
The CC (Volume) Jack
A continuous control pedal can be very useful for controlling volume, wah, or other effects
by foot.
The Kurzweil CC-1 continuous control pedal will work best with the Forte SE, but it is also
possible to use third-party continuous control pedals designed for synthesizers.
2-7
Getting Started
The Audio (LEFT/MONO and RIGHT) Jacks
The Audio (LEFT/MONO and RIGHT) Jacks
Please refer to “Connecting to Your Audio System” below.
The Headphones Jack
Use the Headphones jack located on the left rear panel of the instrument to listen to the
Forte SE on stereo headphones. You will need a 1/4-inch-to-1/8-inch adapter in order to use
headphones that have a smaller mini plug connector.
Connecting to Your Audio System
After you’ve turned down the level on your sound system, connect the Forte SE analog audio
outputs to your sound system using a pair of balanced (TRS or “stereo”) or unbalanced
(TS or “mono”) audio cables. Unbalanced cables will always work, but if you’re going into
balanced inputs, use balanced cables for a better signal-to-noise ratio and a bit more volume.
The Forte SE analog outputs are balanced.
You’ll find two 1/4-inch balanced audio output jacks on the rear panel. Connect one end of
each audio cable to your mixing board or PA system inputs, and connect the other end to
the jacks marked Left (Mono) and Right on the rear panel of the Forte SE. If you have only
one input available, use the Forte SE’s Left (Mono) output to get the full signal in mono. Use
the jack marked Headphones to listen to Forte SE on headphones. When headphones are
plugged in, sound still comes through the Left and Right audio jacks.
Forte SE connected to powered speakers and headphones
2-8
Getting Started
Connecting to Your Audio System
AUDIO OUT
Forte SE connected to a mixer, powered speakers and headphones
2-9
Getting Started
Connecting to a Computer
Connecting to a Computer
To connect the Forte SE to a computer/tablet, simply connect the Forte SE using the
provided or compatible cable.
If you wish to use your own cable, make sure that it is a Type-A-to-Type-B USB cable (the
USB port of Forte SE being Type B). By default, the Forte SE will act as a MIDI controller
(rather than a hard drive) when connected to a computer.
NOTE : Some devices like the iPad® will require you to purchase adaptors to connect a
USB cable.
Forte SE Sounds
The Forte SE supports two types of sounds. The first type is a Program, and these are
normally a single instrument, such as a piano, or an organ. A Program is similar to a “preset”
or “patch” on other synthesizers. Both factory and User Programs are arranged into 16
categories of 16 sounds each.
The other type of sound is the more complex Multi. A Multi is a combination of Programs
arranged as layers and splits across the keyboard. They are similar to setups, from the
Kurzweil PC series, SP series and K2 series, and are similar to Combis or Multis from other
synthesizers. Similar to selecting Programs, the Category buttons allow you to navigate
through this list of Multis in groups of 16 Multis at a time, although Multis are not
categorized by instrument type.
The Forte SE has been designed so that it is quick and easy to select Programs and Multis
from the front panel. Use the following guide to audition the factory sounds on the Forte SE.
2-10
Getting Started
Forte SE Sounds
Selecting Programs and Multis
The Forte SE always powers up in Program Mode. If you wish to play a Multi, simply press
the Multi Button. The Multi Button will light up to show that Multi Mode is selected. To
return to Program Mode, from a different mode, simply press the Program button. If the
User button is illuminated, then you are in the User Bank. Press the User button to return to
the Factory Bank, and the light will go out. In the Factory Bank, press one of the Category
Buttons to change Category, and that Category button will light up. Once you are in your
desired Category, press one of the Program/Multi buttons to select the program you want.
To select another Program or Multi within the same Category, just press a Program/Multi
Button, or use the Alpha Wheel, or Next/Previous Buttons.
To select a Program or Multi in another Category, press the desired Category Button,
followed by the desired Program/Multi Button. The Alpha Wheel and Next/Previous Buttons
will select the next Category once you get to the end of the current Category. Pressing a
Category Button will select the Category Default Program/Multi (by default this is set to
the first Program/Multi of each category). For details on changing the Category Default
Program/Multi see Choosing Category Default Programs on page 6-6 or Choosing
Category Default Multis on page 10-5.
Controllers
The Sliders, Wheels, Pedals and Buttons can control each of the factory Programs and Multis,
to produce variations to the sound. Don’t forget to try these out as you explore the factory
sounds on the Forte SE. For details on controller assignments see Controller Conventions on
page 6-9.
Favorites
The Forte SE also features Favorites Buttons to quickly recall your favorite sounds. The
Favorites buttons store a set of 10 Programs and/or Multis. To assign the currently selected
Program or Multi to a Favorites button, press and hold the desired Favorites button for a
few seconds until the display indicates that the favorite has been saved. To recall a favorite
Program or Multi, simply press the one of the Favorites buttons. The Favorites buttons will
work from whichever mode you are currently in, changing to Program Mode or Multi Mode
automatically if required.
2-11
Features of the Forte SE
Powering Up Defaults
Chapter 3
Features of the Forte SE
This chapter will help familiarize you with the features of the Forte SE. Many of these
features have both general functions and mode-specific functions. For more in-depth
descriptions of these features, refer to the chapters on the individual modes.
Powering Up Defaults
In general, the Forte SE will always remember the last selection made by the user. However,
powering up the Forte SE resets some of these settings back to their power-on defaults.
Parameters Reset To Defaults At Power-On
• Transpose set to 0 semitones.
Parameters Remembered After Power-Off
• Currently selected MIDI Channel in Program Mode.*
• Currently selected Program per MIDI Channel in Program Mode.*
• Currently selected Multi.*
• User Programs, Multis and Favorites.
• Default Program and Multi per Category.
• Display View Mode.*
• Master EQ On/Off switch setting.*
• Global Mode parameters.*
* You must exit Global Mode to save settings.
3-1
Features of the Forte SE
The Front Panel
The Front Panel
All the controls for Forte SE, both musical and navigational, are on its front panel.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
3-2
Multi-Function Switches
Master EQ
Variation button
Transpose buttons
Pitch and Modulation wheels
Volume slider
Nine programmable sliders
Arpeggiator On/Off button
Save and Edit buttons
Favorites buttons
Soft buttons
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
KB3 indicator light
LCD display
Display contrast knob
Alpha Wheel
Mode select buttons
Category buttons
Program/Multi buttons
User button
Previous/Next buttons
Navigation buttons
Channel/Layer/Zone select buttons
Features of the Forte SE
Real Time Controls
Real Time Controls
Sliders
In Program Mode, the sliders are used to control various Program parameters, typically
assigned to the functions labeled in white below each slider. If you select a KB3 organ
Program the KB3 LED will light and the nine sliders operate in a similar way to a Hammond
organ, i.e. pulling the slider towards you increases the drawbar amount. For details on
controller assignments see Controller Conventions on page 6-9. In Program mode,
press the Edit button to view the Parameters page, where you can view a list of controller
assignments for the current program. All Program Slider assignments can be changed in
Program Edit Mode.
In Multi Mode, Sliders A-D default to controlling volume for Zones 1-4, while Sliders
E-I generally default to controlling synthesis parameters and effects. The sliders can also
send MIDI continuous controller values to external MIDI equipment. All Multi Slider
assignments can be changed in Multi Edit Mode. See Controlling Program Parameter
Assignments from Multi Mode on page 11-17 to view or change slider assignments for each
Zone.
3-3
Features of the Forte SE
Real Time Controls
Assignable Switches
These nine buttons perform various functions in real time, depending upon the current
performance mode and assignment. The Switch Button LEDs illuminate when the switch is
active.
In Program Mode the switches generally control synthesis parameters and effects as labeled
in white on each switch button. If you select a KB3 organ Program the KB3 LED will light
and the buttons perform the functions labeled in blue below each switch button. For details
on controller assignments see Controller Conventions on page 6-9. In Program mode,
press the Edit button to view the Parameters page, where you can view a list of controller
assignments for the current program. All Program switch assignments can be changed in
Program Edit Mode. In Multi Mode, the first four switches are assigned to mute and enable Zones 1-4, while
the remaining switches generally control synthesis parameters and effects. The switches can
also send MIDI continuous controller values to external MIDI equipment. All Multi switch
assignments can be changed in Multi Edit Mode. See Switch on page 11-24 to view or change
switch assignments for each Zone.
3-4
Features of the Forte SE
Real Time Controls
Variation Button
The Variation button is located on the left side of the front panel, just above the Volume
slider. The Variation Button is a MIDI controller (default MIDI CC#29) that is programmed
in most Programs to modify the sound, such as adding a pad sound, changing the effects or
some other variation suited to changing with a switch.
For KB3 programs, the Variation Button controls the Rotary Speaker speed, switching
between fast and slow.
3-5
Features of the Forte SE
Real Time Controls
Arp On/Off Button
The Arp On/Off button is set by default to turn on and off the Forte SE’s Arpeggiator. It can
also be assigned to control other parameters in Multi Edit mode.
Transpose Buttons
The Transpose buttons are located on the left side of the front panel, just above the Pitch &
Modulation Wheels. They can be used to change the tuning of notes played on the Forte SE
keyboard in semitones (ST), also known as half steps. This is a convenient way to change
the key of a song without learning to play it in a different key. The Transpose buttons also
transpose MIDI notes sent to the USB and MIDI out ports.
Press the Transpose - or + buttons to transpose the Forte SE keyboard down or up by one
semitone. The top line of the display shows the current transposition value. Pressing both
Transpose - and + simultaneously will reset the transposition to 0. To transpose up and down
by octave intervals (12 ST), press the Octav- and Octav+ soft buttons underneath the display.
The maximum transposition value possible is +/–36 semitones.
The LEDs of the Transpose buttons indicate whether the current Program is transposed up
(Transpose + LED is lit) or transposed down (Transpose – LED is lit). When there is no
transposition, neither Transpose button is lit.
3-6
Features of the Forte SE
Real Time Controls
Pitch Wheel
The Pitch Wheel is the left most of the two wheels. It is spring-loaded, such that its center
position is restored when it is not being used. That is because the Pitch Wheel is used for
pitch-bending notes—its “off” position is in the center. Pushing the Pitch Wheel up bends
the pitches of all notes up. Pulling the Pitch Wheel down bends the pitches of all notes
down.
For some Programs the Pitch Wheel will not bend notes that are held by the sustain pedal.
This is how many Guitar and Bass Programs are configured, allowing played notes to be bent
over sustained notes. You can adjust the Pitch Wheel bend amount for each Program/Multi
by using the parameters on the The COMMON Page on page 7-16 (Program Edit Mode) or
Bend Up / Down CT on page 11-13 (Multi Edit Mode).
Modulation Wheel
The Modulation Wheel is the right most of the two wheels. Unlike the Pitch Wheel, the
Modulation Wheel is not spring loaded, and can be set to and left in any position between
fully up and fully down. Typically, the Modulation Wheel is assigned to a parameter that
alters some aspect of the sound (e.g., vibrato, filter depth) when changed.
When a KB3 Program is in use, the Modulation Wheel is assigned to control distortion.
Foot Switches and Controllers
The Forte SE has sophisticated Pedal controller options allowing up to 4 Switch Pedals or
up to 2 Half Damper Pedals as well as a Continous Controller Pedal to be connected. By
default the Switch Pedals control SW1a - Sustain, SW1b - Sostenuto, SW2a - Sostenuto and
SW2b - Soft. The CC Pedal controls expression (volume) by default.
3-7
Features of the Forte SE
Master EQ
Pedal assignments can be changed in each Program and saved in a User Program. Each Zone
in a factory Multi may have different pedal assignments, and pedals are all independently
assignable within each Zone of a user Multi. You can also use Global Mode to set pedal
overrides, which will change the assignment of each pedal for all Programs in Program Mode,
and act as default pedal assignments for all Multis in Multi Mode.
Master EQ
The Master EQ allows you to have realtime control over the frequency
response of all audio generated in either Program or Multi Modes. When
the Master EQ On/Off button is “On”, the rotary knobs can change the
high, middle & low frequencies of the audio.
If the LED on the Master EQ On/Off button is lit, this indicates that the
Master EQ section is now “on.”
The HI & LOW EQ’s are shelving type filters, and the MID has an
adjustable center frequency with a range of approximately 2 octaves up
and down centered around approximately 1.4 kHz
HI
MID*
LOW
Frequency
Gain (+/-)
~1.4 kHz
15 dB
123 Hz
15 dB
~6.6 kHz
15 dB
* center of range
When the Master EQ is on, the audio signal flows as per the diagram above. When it is off,
the signal flows as per the digram below.
3-8
Features of the Forte SE
Mode Buttons
Volume Slider
This controls the audio output level to external speakers and headphones.
Mode Buttons
The Mode buttons are located on the right side of the Forte SE front panel. With these
buttons you can instantly access the Program, Multi or Global Modes. If you are viewing an
edit mode, you will have to press the Exit button before changing modes. On the Program
and Multi mode main pages, press the currently selected mode button again to view the
Banks page for the currently selected mode.
Program Button
Pressing the Program button enters Program Mode (described in further detail in Ch. 6
Program Mode). In Program Mode, you can select and play different sounds (or “Programs”).
This button’s LED is illuminated when you are in Program Mode. Program Mode is the
default Mode­— the Forte SE always boots up in this Mode. In Program mode, press the
Program button again to view the Banks page (see page 6-2 for details).
Multi Button
Pressing the Multi button enters Multi Mode (described in further detail, in Ch. 10 Multi
Mode). In Multi Mode, you can select different configurations of Programs, controller
assignments, and MIDI channel assignments. This button’s LED is illuminated when you
are in Multi Mode. In Multi mode, press the Multi button again to view the Banks page (see
page 10-2 for details).
3-9
Features of the Forte SE
Navigation
Global Button
Pressing the Global button enters Global Mode (described in further detail, in Ch. 12
Global Mode). In Global Mode, you can edit parameters that control the overall behavior
of the Forte SE. These parameters include tuning, transposition, velocity and pressure
(aftertouch) sensitivity. Additionally, you can save or load user Programs and Multis to and
from a computer connected to the Forte SE via USB as well as perform a Reset. This button’s
LED is illuminated when you are in Global Mode.
CAUTION: Performing a Reset will erase ALL User Program and User
Multis, and will reset Global settings to a factory state.
Navigation
The navigation section of the Forte SE front panel includes the LCD display, Previous- &
Next+ buttons, Channel/Layer/Zone buttons, and the Alpha Wheel.
The LCD Display
The top line of the display always shows the name current Mode and/or page. The bottom
line of the display shows the names of any available Soft Buttons for the current page.
On the Program and Multi Mode main pages, the top line of the display shows the MIDI
transposition, and Program Mode also shows the current MIDI channel. The middle of the
display shows the currently selected Program/Multi ID and name, as well as the name of
assignment for the last moved controller. Press the View soft button to switch between Large
view and List view.
In other modes the display will change depending on the available parameter for the current
mode and page.
3-10
Features of the Forte SE
Navigation
Display Contrast Knob
You can adjust the display contrast by turning this small potentiometer knob.
Previous (–) and Next (+) Value Buttons
Use the Previous and Next buttons to scroll through the list of values for the currently selected
parameter. Pressing both the Previous and Next buttons simultaneously is referred to as the
Value Jump double button press. Depending on the selected parameter, Value Jump can
select the next Category default Program/Multi, jump to commonly used values, and reset
parameters to default values. For more information, see Value Jump on page 3-14.
Soft Buttons
These buttons immediately below the display change their functions depending upon which
screen is being displayed. The functions of the soft buttons on each screen are described in the
bottom row of the display.
Navigation Buttons
The Navigation buttons move the cursor in the LCD display and allow you to select the
current parameter to be edited.
Channel/Layer/Zone Buttons
Use the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons to change the current MIDI Channel in Program
mode, the current Layer in Program Edit mode, or the current Zone in Multi Edit mode.
Alpha Wheel
Use the Alpha Wheel to scroll through the list of values for the currently selected
parameter—turning the Alpha Wheel counter-clockwise will select the previous value and
turning the Alpha Wheel clockwise will select the next value. Turn the Alpha Wheel slowly to
change the value by one increment or turn it quickly to jump several increments.
3-11
Features of the Forte SE
The Edit Button
The Edit Button
In Program or Multi Mode, press the Edit button to enter the Program or Multi Editor for
the currently selected Program or Multi. In the Program Editor, press the Edit button to enter an editor for the currently selected
Effects Chain or FX Algorithm; the Arpeggiator Shift Pattern, Velocity Pattern, or Duration
Pattern; and Keymap, Sample, or Algorithm parameters. To change the name of a Program
parameter assignment, select a parameter on the EDIT:Prog Parameters page and press the
Edit button.
In the Program Editor, the Edit button can also be used as a shortcut for viewing modulation
sources. For example, if a parameter on the DSP Mod page has Src1 set to LFO1, select the
Scr1 field and press the Edit button to jump to the LFO1 page. This also works for sources
set to an ASR, FUN, Envelope, or physical controller assigned on the Prog Parameters page.
Naturally, you can find every page in the current editor by using the soft buttons, but often
it’s easier to use the Edit button shortcut.
The Save Button
The Save button is located beneath the “Save” label on the left side of the LCD screen. In
Program Mode, the Save button’s LED lights up when you have made changes to the current
Program either by moving controllers or using Program Edit mode. Pressing the Save button
saves the current position of the sliders, switches and wheels as a User Program.
3-12
Sound Select
Features of the Forte SE
Sound Select
The Sound Select section allows you to quickly and easily get access to sounds in either
Program or Multi Modes. Select the Category of sound you want, then via the Program/
Multi buttons select any of the 16 sounds in that Category.
CATEGORY
In Program Mode, the Category buttons allow you to Select and browse Programs in 16
categories of instruments. In Multi Mode, the Category buttons allow you to navigate
through this list of Multis in groups of 16 Multis at a time (Multis are not categorized by
instrument type).
PROGRAM / MULTI
When a Category has been selected in Program or Multi Mode, you can select any of the 16
sounds of that Category. The Program/Multi buttons are numbered from 1 to 16 to make the
selection easy.
The white print on each of these buttons indicates their secondary alphanumeric functions
when used for data entry.
3-13
Features of the Forte SE
Double Button Presses
KB3 LED
The KB3 LED is on the right side of the Assignable Switches. If the currently selected
Program is a KB3 program, the KB3 button’s LED is lit. This indicates that the front panel
KB3 controls (printed in blue) are active.
FAVORITES BUTTONS
The Favorites buttons can be programmed to immediately take you to your favorite Programs
and Multis. To assign the currently selected Program or Multi to a Favorites button, press
and hold the desired Favorites button for a few seconds until the display indicates that the
favorite has been saved
Double Button Presses
Several pairs of the buttons on the Forte SE have timesaving secondary functions when
pressed simultaneously—think of them as keyboard shortcuts. For convenience of reference,
descriptions of all of the double-button press functions appear below.
Value Jump
3-14
Features of the Forte SE
Double Button Presses
In Program Mode, the Value Jump double button press selects the first Program of each
Category, as well as the Category Default Program of each Category (if a Category Default
Program has been set).
For more information on choosing a new Category Default Program, see Choosing Category
Default Programs on page 6-6.
In Multi Mode, the Value Jump double button press selects the first Multi of each Category,
as well as the Category Default Multi of each Category (if a Category Default Multi has been
set; see Choosing Category Default Multis on page 10-5).
In Program Edit Mode or Multi Edit Mode, pressing the Value Jump double button press
can reset certain parameters to a default value, or jump between multiple useful values.
Channel Reset
In Program Mode, a simultaneous double press of the Channel/Layer/Zone ▲ and ▼
buttons will select MIDI channel 1.
3-15
Features of the Forte SE
Double Button Presses
Reset Transposition
Pressing both Transpose + and Transpose – , or Octave + and Octave - (Soft Buttons)
simultaneously will restore the current Program or Multi to having no transposition.
Program Demo
In Program Mode only, pressing the 11 & 12 Program/Multi buttons performs the Program
Demo Function. The Program Demo Function plays the Demo Song for the currently
selected Program.
If you press these buttons from any other Mode, the display will give you a message
indicating you are not in Program Mode. Press the Cancel soft button to exit the Program
Demo.
A label below the 11 & 12 Program/Multi buttons indicates the Program Demo double
button press.
3-16
Features of the Forte SE
Double Button Presses
Demo
Pressing the 13 & 14 Program/Multi buttons performs the Demo Function (described in
further detail in Demo on page 3-17). With the Demo Function selected, you can hear a
demonstration Song that showcases many of the features of Forte SE.
A label below the 13 & 14 Program/Multi buttons indicates the Demo double button press.
Panic
Pressing the 15 & 16 Program/Multi buttons simultaneously deactivates all sounding notes
and control messages and sends an “all notes off” message and an “all controllers off” message
on all 16 MIDI channels.
A label below the 15 & 16 Program/Multi buttons indicates the Panic double button press.
3-17
Features of the Forte SE
Double Button Presses
Assign
Assign is the secondary function of the Enter button. You can use the Assign function to
quickly select parameters or set values for parameters by holding the Enter button while
moving Forte SE controllers (Sliders, Switch buttons, Keys, Mod Wheel, and Pedals). This is
useful for quickly assigning physical controllers or setting key ranges in Program Edit Mode
or Multi Edit Mode, as well as finding existing controller assignments on the Program Edit
Parameters page. For Program Edit details see Ch. 7 Assign, on page 7-3, and for Multi
Edit details see Ch. 11 Assign, on page 11-3.
Parameters that can use the Assign function are indicated by showing the Assign symbol in
the top right of the display when selected.
3-18
Terminology

Chapter 4
Terminology
This chapter provides definitions and descriptions for all of the Forte SE-specific terms used
in this manual. Some of the terms are also used by other manufacturers.
Since there are no standard definitions for some of these terms, they are described here to
avoid confusion. All of these terms appear with the first letter capitalized as proper nouns in
this manual to make it easy to distinguish between the generic term and the Forte SE specific
term.
In addition to the terms below, and to avoid confusion, any Forte SE specific feature,
connector or control will have the first letter capitalized to distinguish it from the generic
term.
Program
A Program is an instrument sound that plays on a MIDI
channel. The sound of each Program can be modified by
parameters that are assigned to the controllers (Sliders,
Switch buttons, Mod Wheel, and Pedals).
See Program Mode on page 6-1 for more information on
Programs.
Multi
A Multi allows up to 8 instrument sounds (Programs) to
be played from the keyboard at once. A Multi has up to 8
Zones, each with its own keyboard range, Program, MIDI
channel, and controller assignments.
See Ch. 10 Multi Mode, on page 10-1 for more
information on Multis.
4-1
Terminology

KB3
Kurzweil’s organ modelling simulation of the original
Hammond B3 with Leslie rotary speaker emulation.
Zone
A keyboard region of a Multi that has its own Program,
MIDI channel, and controller assignments.
See About Zones on page 10-6 for more information on
Zones.
Split Multi
A Split Multi is a Multi containing at least two Zones that
have keyboard ranges that don’t overlap. This allows different
keyboard ranges to play different instrument sounds.
See the Split Function on page 6-11 for more information
on Splits.
Layer Multi
A Layer Mult is a Multi containing at least two Zones that
have overlapping keyboard ranges. This allows a single
keyboard range to play multiple instrument sounds.
See the Layer Function on page 6-12 for more information
on Layers.
Forte SE Bank
MIDI Bank
4-2
A Forte SE Bank is a group of 256 Programs or Multis that
can be navigated with the Sound Select buttons. On the
main Program Mode or Multi Mode select pages, press the
current Mode button to view the Bank Select page for the
current mode. After selecting a Forte SE Bank on the Bank
Select page, you can use the Sound Select buttons to navigate
within the Bank.
A group of 128 Programs that can be navigated by MIDI
compatible software or hardware.
Terminology

Mode
An operating status with a unique group of operations.
See Ch. 5 The Operating Modes, on page 5-1 for more
information on Modes.
Reset
A process that returns Forte SE back to a Factory state. All
User Programs & User Multis are erased. All Global Mode
parameters are reset back to their default settings as well.
Object
Anything that can be named, saved, deleted, or edited (i.e., a
Program or a Multi).
KUF file
KUF (Kurzweil Unified File) file is a special file that has the
objects and operating system combined that is used to update
the Forte SE.
4-3
The Operating Modes
Program Mode
Chapter 5
The Operating Modes
This chapter will help familiarize you with the operating Modes of the Forte SE.
Each of the five Modes (Program, Program Edit, Multi, Multi Edit, Global) has its own
individual chapter.
The four Functions (Split, Layer, Program Demo, and Song Demo) are described in this
chapter in Functions on page 5-4.
Program Mode
Program Mode is the default Mode for the Forte SE.
In Program Mode, instrument sounds (Programs) can be selected and played. The sound of
each Program can be modified by parameters that are assigned to the controllers (Sliders,
Assignable Switch buttons, Zone buttons, Mod Wheel, Pitch Wheel, and Pedals). Modified
Programs can be saved as User Programs by pressing the Save button.
To enter Program Mode from another Mode, press the Program Mode button.
For more detailed information on Program Mode, see Ch. 6 Program Mode.
5-1
The Operating Modes
Multi Mode
Multi Mode
Multi Mode allows you to select and play Multis.
A Multi allows up to 8 instrument sounds (Programs) to be played from the keyboard at
once. A Multi has up to eight Zones, each with its own keyboard range, Program, MIDI
channel, and controller assignments. To enter Multi Mode from another Mode, press the
Multi Mode button.
For more detailed information on Multi Mode, see Ch. 10 Multi Mode.
5-2
The Operating Modes
Global Mode
Global Mode
CAUTION: THIS MODE CONTAINS CERTAIN OPERATIONS THAT
CANNOT BE UNDONE. Read About Global Mode on page 12-1 for info.
Global Mode allows you to edit global parameters and MIDI settings, load and save User
Programs and Multis, use diagnostic tools, view system information, and restore the Forte SE
back to factory default settings. To enter Global Mode from another Mode, press the Global
Mode button.
5-3
The Operating Modes
Functions
Functions
In addition to the four primary Modes, there are five Functions. Some Functions are
available through dedicated buttons, others are available as Soft buttons accessed via the
buttons under the LCD screen. These Functions are not as complex as the primary Modes
and are described below.
The Split Function
Pressing the Split Soft button while in either Program or Multi Mode performs the Split
Function. The Split Function allows you to split Programs and Multis such that keys in one
region of the keyboard produce different sounds than another region.
Creating Splits in Program Mode is slightly different from creating Splits in Multi Mode. See
the Split Function on page 6-11 (for Splits in Program Mode) and the Split Function on
page 10-10 (for Splits in Multi Mode).
The Layer Function
Pressing the Layer Soft button while in either Program or Multi Mode performs the Layer
Function. The Layer Function allows you to layer Programs and Multis such that more than
one sound can be produced by striking one key.
5-4
The Operating Modes
Functions
Creating Layers in Program Mode is slightly different from creating Layers in Multi Mode.
See the Layer Function on page 6-12 (for Layers in Program Mode) and the page 5-5 (for
Layers in Multi Mode).
Demo Function
Pressing the 13 & 14 Program/Multi buttons simultaneously performs the Demo Function.
Use the Demo Function to play built-in Demo Songs designed to demonstrate the
capabilities of the Forte SE.
While using the Demo Function, the top line of the display shows the text “Demo”, the
Demo number, and the total number of available Demos. The center of the display shows
the ID number and name of selected Demo Song. Use the Alpha Wheel, Value buttons or
the Channel/Layer/Zone ▲ or ▼ buttons to select another demo from the list. The 13 & 14
Program/Multi button LEDs blink when using the Demo Function.
Press the Cancel Soft button to exit the Demo Function.
5-5
The Operating Modes
Program Edit Mode
Program Demo Function
Pressing the 11 & 12 Program/Multi buttons simultaneously performs the Program Demo
Function.
In Program Mode, use the Program Demo Function to play a built-in Demo Song that
demonstrates the selected Program. The 11 & 12 Program/Multi button LEDs blink when
using the Program Demo Function.
Press the Cancel soft button to exit the Program Demo Function.
Program Edit Mode
Program Edit Mode allows you to edit pre-existing Programs. To enter Program Edit Mode
press the Edit button while in Program Mode.
For more detailed information on Program Edit Mode, see Ch. 7 Program Edit Mode.
5-6
The Operating Modes
Multi Edit Mode
Multi Edit Mode
Multi Edit Mode allows you to edit pre-existing Multis. To enter Multi Edit Mode press the
Edit button while in Multi Mode.
For more detailed information on Multi Edit Mode, see Ch. 11 Multi Edit Mode.
5-7
Program Mode
About Program Mode
Chapter 6
Program Mode
This chapter will help familiarize you with the features of Program Mode.
Programs are essentially the different sounds of a MIDI instrument—they are preset
instrument sounds equivalent to the “patches,” “presets,” or “voices” that you find on other
keyboards.
About Program Mode
Program Mode is the default Mode of the Forte SE. It will always boot up in this Mode.
To enter Program Mode from another Mode, press the Program Mode button. While you are
in Program Mode, the Program button’s LED is illuminated.
The Forte SE starts up with Program 1 selected, or the Program that was selected the last
time Global mode was exited.
If you enter Program Mode from another Mode, the current Program will be the last selected
Program on the current MIDI Channel.
6-1
Program Mode
Selecting Programs
Selecting Programs
The Forte SE can provide up to eight Program Banks (Factory Banks A-D and User
Banks A-D). Factory Banks B-D are reserved for future Forte SE program updates. When
announced, free updates can be downloaded at kurzweil.com.
Each Forte SE Bank has space for 256 Programs, for a total of 2048 possible programs. Each
Bank is split into 16 categories of 16 Programs each.
When you are in Program Mode, there are a few ways to select Programs.
• To select a Program in the current Category, press the relevant Program/Multi button.
• To select a Program in a different Category, press the Category button of choice and
then a Program/Multi button to select from the 16 Programs in the Category.
• To select the default Program from a Category, simply press the relevant Category
button.
• Choosing a Program in the User Categories, while in the factory Categories, or
choosing a Program in a factory Category while in a User Category, requires pressing
the User button, followed by a Category button and then a Program/Multi button.
• The Alpha Wheel and the Next and Previous buttons allow you to advance through
the Programs one at a time. When you reach the end of the Category, advancing
further will go the the next Category.
• If a Program is assigned to a Favorite button, pressing that button will go directly to
the assigned Program.
• To select a program in a different Forte SE Bank, press the Program mode button
while in Program Mode to view the Select Bank page. On the Select Bank page use
the navigation buttons to select a Bank and press the OK soft button, then use any of
the methods above to select a program in that Bank.
• When the Global Mode User Type parameter is set to Advanced, and the Global
Mode Sound Sel parameter is set to ID number, programs can be selected by typing
in an ID number using the numbers printed on the Program/Multi buttons, followed
by pressing the Enter button.
For a full list of factory Programs, see Appendix.
6-2
Program Mode
Selecting Programs
Program Demo
If you want to quickly hear what a Program sounds like, try the Program Demo Function.
In Program Mode only, pressing the 11 & 12 Program/Multi buttons performs the Program
Demo Function. The Program Demo Function plays a Demo Song for the currently selected
Program.
Press the Cancel soft button to exit Program Demo.
6-3
Program Mode
Selecting Programs
The Display
In Program Mode, the top line of the display shows the current Mode, MIDI transposition,
and MIDI Channel. The Program ID number and name are displayed in the center of the
display. The current Bank and Category are displayed above the program ID and name.
When a controller is moved, the controller assignment and value is briefly displayed below
the program ID and name. The Soft buttons are displayed along the bottom line.
Changing View
The View soft button will toggle the display and allow you to see available Programs as a list.
Buttons and controllers will behave as usual. When a controller is moved, the controller
name, assignment and value is briefly displayed in the box at left of the screen. KB3
information is also shown if a KB3 program is selected in any MIDI channel:
Pop Up Messages
Some actions cause the display to show pop up messages. After a short time the display
returns to show the current Program.
6-4
Program Mode
Selecting Programs
Alpha Wheel & Previous (–) and Next (+) Value Buttons
Use the Alpha Wheel or the Previous (-) and Next (+) buttons, to the right of the display
below the Alpha Wheel, to change the current Program. Turning the Alpha Wheel counterclockwise or pressing the Previous button will select the previous Program and turning the
Alpha Wheel clockwise or pressing the Next button will select the next Program. When
the highest or lowest Program is reached, the list will wrap back to the last or first Program
respectively.
When scrolling through the Program list, the list moves through each Category, both factory
and User.
Value Jump Buttons
In Program Mode, the Value Jump double button press selects the first Program of each
Category, as well as the Category Default Program of each Category (if a Category Default
Program has been set).
For more information on choosing a new Category Default Program for each Category, see
Choosing Category Default Programs on Choosing Category Default Programs on page
6-6 (for Program Mode) or Choosing Category Default Multis on page 10-5 (for Multi
Mode).
If the User button is selected, Value Jump works the same way.
6-5
Program Mode
Selecting Programs
Category & Program/Multi Buttons
The Category buttons allow you to select Programs by instrument type simply by pressing a
button. You can select one Category button at a time and the current Category button’s LED
is lit.
Each Category contains 16 Programs of a single instrument type. First select the Category
you want, then select one of the 16 Programs by pressing any of the Program/Multi buttons
numbered from 1 to 16.
You can also press one of the instrument Category buttons, then turn the Alpha Wheel
clockwise or press the Next button to advance to the next Program in the Category. When
you reach the end of a Category, the Forte SE automatically advances to the beginning of the
next Category. This will also work in reverse if you turn the Alpha Wheel counter-clockwise
or press the Previous button. In this case when you reach the beginning of a Category, Forte
SE automatically advances to the end of the previous Category. The 16 User Categories come
after the factory ones, but only non-empty programs can be selected this way.
Choosing Category Default Programs
You can choose a “Category default program” from each Category that will be recalled each
time you press that Category’s button. To save a Category default program, first select a
Program using any Program select method (Alpha wheel, Previous-/Next+ buttons, Category
buttons, Program/Multi buttons). A Category button for the current Category will have a
lit LED. Next, press and hold the currently lit Category button until the display shows the
message “Category default program saved.” The Category default program has now been
successfully saved.
6-6
Program Mode
Transposition
Choosing Favorites
You can save ten Favorite Programs (or Multis) from any Category to the ten Favorite
buttons beneath the display. Once saved, these favorite Programs can be recalled from any
Mode with a single button press. To save the currently selected Program to a Favorite button,
press and hold a Favorite button until the display shows the message “Favorite (#) saved.”
Transposition
The Transpose buttons can be used to change the tuning of notes played on the Forte SE
keyboard in semitones (ST), also known as half steps. This is a convenient way to change the
key of a song without learning to play it in a different key. The Transpose buttons are located
to the left of the keyboard, above the Pitch and Mod Wheels. The Transpose buttons also
transpose MIDI notes sent to the USB and MIDI Out ports.
6-7
Program Mode
Parameter Assignments
Press the Transpose - or + buttons to transpose the Forte SE keyboard down or up by one
semitone. The top line of the display shows the current transposition value. Pressing both
Transpose - and + simultaneously will reset the transposition to 0. To transpose up and down
by octave intervals (12 ST), press the Octav- and Octav+ soft buttons underneath the display.
The maximum transposition value possible is +/–36 semitones.
The LEDs of the Transpose buttons indicate whether the current Program is transposed up
(Transpose + LED is lit) or transposed down (Transpose – LED is lit). When there is no
transposition, neither Transpose button is lit.
Parameter Assignments
In Program Mode, each Program has factory-set Program and Effect parameters assigned
to physical controllers (Sliders, Switch buttons, Mod Wheel, and Pedals). A parameter
assignment can modify an instrument sound during a performance to add variation or
expression. Moving a controller changes the value of the parameter. Any time you do this,
the display shows the assigned parameter and value.
Front panel labels show the typical controller assignments, but these may vary with different
Programs. The Variation button often enables an effect or additional Program layer.
If you make changes to the current Program using any of the controllers, the Save button’s
LED lights to indicate that a change has been made to that Program. For more information
on the Save button, see Save User Programs on page 6-14. See Ch. 7 Program Edit Mode
for details on changing parameter controller assignments.
6-8
Program Mode
Controller Conventions
Controller Conventions
Forte® SE Controller Conventions
Synthesis
(Variation 2
(Variation 3
(Amplitude
or
or
Envelope
Pad Octave Down) Pad Octave Up) Impact Enable)
(Filter Freq
or EQ)
(Filter
Resonance or EQ)
(Amplitude
Envelope
Attack Rate)
Wheels/Variation
Var
Pitch
Up/Down
Pad Volume/
Tremolo Amount
Effects
(Release
Sample
Enable)
(Tremolo/Vibrato/
LFO Shape)
(Amplitude
(Amplitude
Envelope
Envelope
Decay or
Release or
Release Rate) Tremolo/Vibrato/
LFO Rate)
(FX1
Enable)
(FX2
Enable)
(Delay
Enable)
(Reverb
Enable)
(FX1
Amount)
(FX2
Amount)
(Delay
Amount)
(Reverb
Amount)
CC Pedal
Expression/Wah
SW Pedals
Sustain
SW
Ped 1
Sostenuto
SW
Ped 2
Sostenuto
SW
Ped 1
Soft
SW
Ped 2
Pad/Wah
Enable
Pitch
Mod
CCPed 1
SW1a
SW1b
SW2a
SW2b
6-9
Program Mode
The Split and Layer Functions
The Split and Layer Functions
The soft buttons Split and Layer perform slightly different functions, but offer identical
parameters.
The Split Function allows you to quickly create a Multi such that keys in one region of the
keyboard produce different sounds than another region.
The Layer Function allows you to layer Programs and Multis such that more than one sound
can be produced by striking one key.
This is convenient, as you do not need to use Multi Edit Mode to configure Zone key ranges,
Programs, and volumes. You can simply hit the soft button while in Program Mode to select
the Function. You can then configure additional Zones, each of which may have its own
Program and controller assignments. The result may be saved as a new Multi (see Ch. 10
Multi Mode, for more information on Multis).
6-10
Program Mode
The Split and Layer Functions
Split Function
When you create a Split in Program Mode, you are creating a Multi with two active Zones.
The Program you were using in Program Mode is used in the right hand of the Split as the
Program for Zone 1. After this you can choose a Program that will be used in the left hand of
the Split as the Program for Zone 2.
The default Program parameter for a Split is 210 P-Bass, and the default keyboard range is
C1 - E3. These may be changed, as described below.
Other parameters that determine the behavior of the Split are described in “Split/Layer
parameters” on page 6-12. Use the navigation buttons to access each of the Split/Layer
parameters.
6-11
Program Mode
The Split and Layer Functions
Layer Function
When you create a Layer in Program Mode, you are also creating a Multi with two active
Zones, each using the same keyboard range. The Program you were using in Program Mode
is used as the Program for Zone 1. After this you can choose a Program that will be used for
Zone 2.
The default Program parameter for a Layer is 130 Adagio Strings, and the default keyboard
range is C1 - G9. Use the navigation buttons to access each of the Split/Layer parameters.
Other parameters that determine the behavior of the Multi are described below. Use the
navigation buttons to access each of the Split/Layer parameters.
Split/Layer parameters
Zn and Stat (Zone and Status)
Selecting Split or Layer makes Zone 2 active. You can continue to add Zones to the Multi
by activating additional Zones with the Stat parameter or the front panel Zone buttons. The
Forte SE will display a message if you have already reached the maximum number of active
Zones (see Ch. 10 Multi Mode, for more information on Multis).
6-12
Program Mode
The Arp Pages
Program (Split or Layer Program)
The default Program will appear in Zone 2. Choose a different Program using the Category
and Program/Multi buttons, the Alpha Wheel, or the Previous-/Next+ buttons.
Low/Hi (Keyboard range)
The Low and Hi parameters set the keyboard boundaries for each Zone. Using Split sets the
boundary between Zone 1 and Zone 2 to E3. Using Layer sets the Zone 2 keyboard range to
C1 - G9.
The low and high keys for each Zone can be selected using Assign
(holding down the
Enter button and then striking the desired key on the keyboard). Keys can also be selected by
using the Alpha Wheel or the Previous-/Next+ buttons.
Vol (Zone Volume)
The VOL parameter determines the volumes of each Zone. By default, VOL is set to 127,
which results in each Zone having the same volume. To change volumes use the Alpha Wheel
or Previous-/Next+ buttons. A Zone volume can be set to any number between 0 and 127.
Pan (Zone Pan)
To change the panning of a Zone (left/right stereo placement), use the navigation buttons to
select the Pan parameter for one of the Zones. To set a Pan value, use the Alpha Wheel, the
Previous-/Next+ buttons, or use the keypad function of the Category buttons to type a pan
value (0-127) followed by the Enter button. A value of 0 is full left, 64 is center, and 127 is
full right. Other values will move the stereo placement in between these positions. A value of
“None” will use the last pan value used by the Zone’s MIDI channel. A value of “None” can
be entered by scrolling below 0, or by using the keypad function of the Category buttons to
type negative 1 by pressing the small +/- button and then the 1 button, followed by the Enter
button.
Saving a Split or Layer
After setting the Split/Layer parameters, the Split can be saved as a Multi so that it can easily
be recalled in Multi Mode. Press the Save button to the left of the display to begin the saving
process. See Save User Programs below for more details. Once you have saved your Split or
Layer as a Multi, you can edit controller assignments and other Multi parameters in Multi
Edit Mode (see Ch. 11 Selecting Parameters for details).
The Arp Pages
Selecting the Arp soft button will call up the Arpeggiator settings on the ARP1page, and put
you into Program Edit Mode. See The Arpeggiator Function on page 7-55 for details on
using the Arpeggiator function.
6-13
Program Mode
Save User Programs
Save User Programs
If you make changes to the current Program using any of the controllers, the Save button’s
LED lights to indicate that a change has been made to that Program.
To save the changes you’ve made, press the Save button once to use the Save Dialog. This
will allow you to specify the ID number to save to, and to rename the Program if you wish.
When viewing the Save Dialog, you can quickly save the Program to the displayed ID
number by pressing the Save button again.
Changing ID Numbers
The display shows the first available ID number and the current Program name. You can
save Programs with ID numbers from 1024 to 2047. If you are saving a Program that has
not been previously edited, the next available unused ID number will be selected. If you are
saving a previously edited User Program, the ID number that the Program was last saved
with will be selected. Press the Value Jump double button press (Previous-/Next+) to toggle
between selecting the ID number that the Program was last saved with and the next available
unused ID number.
6-14
Program Mode
Save User Programs
To change the ID number, turn the Alpha Wheel or use the Previous-/Next+ buttons to
select the new ID number. If you select a previously used ID# the display will show a prompt
to allow you to decide whether to replace it.
Naming a User Program
To rename the Program, first press the Rename soft button. You should see the following in
the display:
The display shows the current Program name. Program names can total 16 characters in
length. To enter the new Program name you may use the letters and numbers printed on the
Program/Multi buttons, or use the Alpha wheel or Previous-/Next+ buttons to cycle through
the alphabet.
Press the center soft buttons (<<< and >>>) or the navigation buttons to move the cursor.
The Insert soft button will insert a blank space (the selected character and all characters to
the right will move one space to the right), and the Delete button will delete the current
character (all the characters to the right will move one space to the left).
When you are satisfied with your name, press the OK soft button to return to the Save
screen.
6-15
Program Mode
Changing the Transmit MIDI Channel
Saving a User Program
Press the Save button or Save soft button to complete the saving process, or press the Cancel
soft button to exit without saving.
The display will confirm a successful save by displaying a brief message.
After successfully saving, the Program will be selected in Program Mode in the User Bank.
To find the Program again later, make sure to press the User bank button under the Mode
buttons.
Changing the Transmit MIDI Channel
The current MIDI Transmit channel is shown on the right side of the top line of the display.
A different Program can be selected for each MIDI Channel. All channels can be triggered
simultaneously from an external MIDI sequencer or computer. The Aux FX Chains of the
Program on the currently selected MIDI Channel are used for Programs on all Channels.
Press the Channel/Layer/Zone (▲ or ▼) buttons to change the MIDI Transmit channel
Pressing both ▲ and ▼ at the same time will reset the current MIDI Transmit channel to 1.
6-16
Program Mode
Panic
Panic
Pressing the 15 and 16 Program/Multi buttons simultaneously deactivates all sounding
notes and resets controller values by sending an “All Notes Off ” message and a “Reset All
Controllers” message on all 16 MIDI channels.
6-17
Program Edit Mode
About Program Edit Mode
Chapter 7
Program Edit Mode
This chapter will help familiarize you with the features of Program Edit Mode.
About Program
Edit
NOTE: Before you
read thisMode
chapter, be sure to read Ch. 6 Program Mode for a full
description of Programs.
Program Edit Mode allows you to edit and customize Programs. Any Program can be edited
in Program Edit Mode and saved to one of the 1024 User locations.
To enter Program Edit Mode, first press the Program Mode button to enter Program Mode,
then press the EDIT button at the bottom left of the display.
Once you are in Program Edit Mode, press the soft buttons at the bottom of the screen to
navigate to each of the Program Edit Mode pages. See the following sections for details on
navigating and changing parameters. All parameters apply only to the currently selected
Program.
Differences Between Regular and Advanced User
Type
When the Global Mode User Type parameter is set to Regular, you can access a Program’s
parameter controller assignments, effects, arpeggiator, and common settings. When the
Global Mode User Type parameter is set to Advanced, you can access the Regular User Type
pages as well as additional VAST or KB3 pages. The User Type parameter can be selected in
Global Mode on the Global Main page (see User Type on page 12-3 for details).
Note: This chapter describes how Program Edit Mode works when the Global
Mode User Type parameter is set to Advanced. Program Edit Mode works the
same way when the Global Mode User Type parameter is set to Regular, except
that fewer pages are shown, and some settings will be hidden when scrolling
through Arpeggiator settings.
7-1
Program Edit Mode
Selecting Parameters
Selecting Parameters
The Display
In Program Edit Mode, the top line of the display shows the current Mode, Page, and Layer.
Current Page
Current Parameter
Soft button options for Program Edit mode
Alpha Wheel & Previous (–) and Next (+) Value Buttons
Use the Alpha Wheel or the Value buttons to the right of the display below the Alpha Wheel,
to change the selected parameter value. Turning the Alpha Wheel counter-clockwise or
pressing the Previous- button will select the previous value and turning the Alpha Wheel
clockwise or pressing the Next+ button will select the next value.
7-2
Program Edit Mode
Selecting Parameters
Assign
Assign is the secondary function of the Enter button. You can use the Assign function to
quickly select parameters or set values for parameters by holding the Enter button while
moving Forte SE controllers (Sliders, Switch buttons, Keys, Mod Wheel, and Pedals).
Parameters that can use the Assign function are indicated by showing the Assign symbol in
the top right corner of the display when selected.
Assign symbol
Pressing a key, switch, or moving a controller while holding down the Enter button will
perform Assign in the following cases.
Enter + Controller
On the Program Edit Mode Parameters page, select any parameter in the Parameter column,
hold the Enter button and move a controller (a Slider, Switch button, Mod Wheel or Pedal).
Doing this will jump to selecting the parameter that is assigned to the moved controller (if a
parameter is assigned to that controller).
On the Program Edit Mode Parameters page, select any parameter in the Control column,
hold the Enter button and move a controller (a Slider, Switch button, Mod Wheel or Pedal).
Doing this will assign the selected parameter to be controlled by the moved controller.
On other Program Edit Mode pages, the assign symbol appears whenever the selected
parameter can use a MIDI controller as a control source. When the assign symbol appears,
hold the Enter button and move a controller (a Slider, Switch button, Mod Wheel or Pedal).
Doing this will assign the selected parameter to be controlled by the moved controller.
7-3
Program Edit Mode
VAST and KB3 Programs
VAST and KB3 Programs
It is important to understand the difference between VAST programs and KB3 programs.
VAST programs contain up to 32 layers, each of which contains a keymap or KVA oscillator.
Keymaps consists of a number of samples assigned to a particular keyboard range. KVA
oscillators use powerful DSP (digital signal processors) to generate a range of simple and
complex waveforms. See Editing VAST Programs With KVA Oscillators on page 7-71) for
more details. See VAST Program Structure below for details on VAST programs.
KB3 programs use a much different architecture. There are no layers or algorithms, just
a set of oscillators (designed to emulate the tonewheels in a Hammond Organ) that start
running as soon as you select a KB3 program. See KB3 Program Structure for details on KB3
programs.
VAST Program Structure
You might want to take a look at Figure 7-1 on page 7-9, which depicts the hierarchy of a
VAST program, from individual samples all the way up to Multis, which can contain up to
16 programs.
Every VAST program contains at least one layer. A layer consists of a keymap and an
algorithm for processing the samples contained in the keymap. Each sample is a separate
digital recording of some kind of sound: musical, vocal, industrial, any sound at all.
Individual samples are assigned to specific key ranges (from A 2 to D 3, for example), and
are also assigned to be triggered at specific attack velocities. These assignments constitute the
keymap.
When you trigger a note, the Forte SE looks to the keymap of each layer of the currently
active VAST program(s) to determine which samples to play. The sound engine then fetches
the requested samples and generates a digital signal representing the sound of the samples.
This signal first passes through the DSP functions that make up the algorithm. It then passes
through the Forte SE’s effects processor, and finally appears—with some level of effects
applied to it—at one or more of the audio outputs.
The layer is the VAST program’s basic unit of polyphony, that is, each layer constitutes one
of the 128 voice channels the Forte SE can activate at any time. If you have a program that
consists of two layers covering the note range from A 0 to C 8, each key you strike triggers
two voice channels.
Note: One exception to this structure is when using a KVA oscillator, the sound source
for that layer is not derived from a keymap, but is generated at the algorithm stage
(though keymap information is still used to set key range and maximum amplitude).
After this, the structure is the same as described above. See Editing VAST Programs
With KVA Oscillators on page 7-71 for more details.
7-4
ProgramProgram
Edit Mode
Mode
VAST Program
Structure
VAST Program
Structure
Zone Zone Zone Zone Zone
1
2
3
4
5
MULTI
Zone Zone
6
7
Zone
8
16 keyboard zones—
16 keyboard
zones—
each
with independent
each withMIDI
independent
program,
channel,
program,
channel,
and
controlMIDI
assignments
and control assignments
Selected
Selectedfor
for performance
performance
and
andediting
editingininProgram
Program
mode;
per
mode;up
upto
to32
32 layers
layers per
program
program
PROGRAM
LAYER
keymapprocessed
processed
AAkeymap
throughan
analgorithm,
algorithm,
through
modulatedby
bycontrol
control
modulated
sources
sources
Up to 128 sample
Up
to 128
sample
roots,
assigned
to play
roots,
assigned to key
play
at programmable
atand
programmable
key
velocity ranges
and velocity ranges
KEYMAP
Individual digital sound
recordingsdigital
storedsound
in
Individual
ROM; stereo
samples
recordings
stored
in
use two
voices
of
ROM;
stereo
samples
polyphony
use
two voices of
polyphony
SAMPLE ROOTS
Figure 6-1
VAST Program Structure
Figure 7-1 VAST Program Structure
7-5
6-5
Program Edit Mode
Editing VAST Programs
Editing VAST Programs
The Forte SE offers two powerful editing features: Cascade Mode and Dynamic VAST .
• Cascade Mode lets you route any layer of a program into the DSP of any other layer.
Any of the 32 layers of a program can go into any other layer.
• Dynamic VAST lets you “wire” your own algorithms. You can combine different
DSP functions in any order you like, including parallel and serial configurations.
The Program Editor is where you begin to modify the Forte SE’s resident sounds, and to
build your own sounds around sample keymaps or KVA oscillators (see Editing VAST
Programs With KVA Oscillators on page 7-71 for some differences). There’s virtually no
limit to the sounds you can create using the tools in the Program Editor.
Note: This section describes the Program Editor as it applies to VAST programs. See
Editing KB3 Programs on page 7-81 for information about editing KB3 programs.
To enter the Program Editor, start in Program mode and press the Edit button. The Program
Parameters PARAMS page will appear.
The top line of the display indicates your location and which layer you’re viewing, and how
many layers there are in the program (if you are viewing a layer specific page). You can use
the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons to scroll through the layers, if the program has more than
one.
Here’s a method for jumping quickly to a specific layer in a program—it’s especially useful
in multi-layered drum programs. Hold the Enter button and strike a key. The display will
show the layer(s) assigned to that key. If more than one layer is assigned to the same key,
repeatedly striking the key (while continuing to hold the Enter button) will cycle through all
layers assigned to that key. This method will work in most places within the Program Editor,
but there is an exception: if the parameter you have highlighted has a note number or control
source as its value, then holding Enter and striking a note will call up that note or control
source. For all other parameters, however, this method will switch between layers.
7-6
Program Edit Mode
Editing VAST Programs
The Soft Buttons in the Program Editor
The Program Editor’s soft buttons are labeled by the words that appear in the bottom line of
the display. These buttons have two important jobs in the Program Editor: selecting pages,
and selecting specific functions. If a soft button is labeled in all uppercase letters, pressing
it will take you to the page it describes. If the button is labeled in mixed uppercase and
lowercase letters, pressing it will execute the software function described by the label. Pressing
the LAYER soft button, for example, will take you to the Layer page, while pressing the Save
soft button will initiate the process for saving the currently selected program.
There are more pages and functions in the Program Editor than there are soft buttons.
Therefore, two of the soft buttons are dedicated to scrolling through the list of pages and
functions. If you don’t see the button for the page or function you want to select, press one
of the soft buttons labeled more, and the labels will change. This doesn’t change the currently
selected page, it merely changes the selection of available soft buttons.
Two of the soft buttons in the Program Editor are special cases. They’re the soft buttons that
select the editing pages for the first and last DSP functions (Pitch and Level, respectively) of
the current program’s algorithm. One of these soft buttons is labeled PITCH, and pressing it
will take you to the DSPCTL (DSP Control) page with the Pitch parameter highlighted. The
other one of these soft buttons is labeled AMP, and pressing it will take you to the DSPCTL
page with the Level parameter highlighted. Pressing the LAYER soft button, for example, will
take you to the Layer page, while pressing the ArpSav soft button will initiate the process for
saving the current Arpeggiator preset.
Assigning VAST Parameters to Control Sources
Many Forte SE program parameters can be assigned to be controlled by the Forte SE’s
physical controllers or by MIDI CCs from an external MIDI device. For details on
controllable parameters of VAST programs, see the following sections:
Common DSP Control Parameters on page 7-32
The DSP Control (DSPCTL) Page on page 7-37
The DSP Modulation (DSPMOD) Page on page 7-39
The LFO Page on page 7-43
The ASR Page on page 7-46
The Function (FUN) Page on page 7-47
The Amplitude Envelope (AMPENV) Page on page 7-48
The Envelope 2 (ENV2) and Envelope 3 (ENV3) Pages on page 7-51
The Envelope Control (ENVCTL) Page on page 7-52
For KB3 programs, see the following sections:
7-7
Program Edit Mode
Editing VAST Programs
KB3 Editor: The PITCH Page on page 7-88
KB3 Editor: The AMP Page on page 7-89
KB3 Editor: The PERC1 Page on page 7-91
KB3 Editor: The PERC2 Page on page 7-93
KB3 Editor: The KEYCLICK Page on page 7-89
For each program, the Program Editor can be used to assign the Forte SE’s physical
controllers or external MIDI controller CC numbers to control program parameters. When
editing a factory program, the Parameters page will list all parameters that have already been
assigned to a physical controller or MIDI CC. To add additional controller assignments for
parameters that are not listed on the Parameters page, an assignment must be made on one of
the VAST pages.
In the VAST editor pages, controllable parameters each have a source field. Make
assignments to the source field for the desired parameter. Source fields are named differently
depending on their page: Src1, Src2, RateCt, Trigger, Input a, Input b, and Source. Internal
control sources can also be selected here such as LFOs, Envelopes, Key Number, Key
Velocity, Key Pressure, FUNs, Clocks, and more.
To assign a Forte SE physical controller, select the source field for the parameter, hold the
Enter button and move the controller.
To assign a CC number to a source field, enter a number from 1-31 or 64-95 with the
alphanumeric pad, then press Enter. A CC number for an external controller can also be set
by selecting the source field for the parameter, holding the Enter button, and sending a CC
value from the external MIDI controller. The Forte SE’s physical controllers each use one of
the available MIDI CC numbers, so you must choose one of the other available CC numbers
when using an external MIDI control source or else the parameter will also be controlled
by a Forte SE physical controller. See the PARAMETER CONTROLS on page 7-11 for
a list of CC numbers used by the Forte SE’s physical controllers. Some MIDI CCs are also
hard wired to control certain program parameters or functions such as MIDI 5 (Portamento
Time), MIDI 7 (Program Volume), MIDI 10 (Pan), MIDI 11 (Expression/Program
Volume), MIDI 64 (Sustain), MIDI 66 (Sostenuto), so if you use one of these numbers the
CC will always perform the hard wired function, in addition to any other assignment you
make.
Note: When assigning a physical controller or CC number to a source field, the source field will
either show a MIDI CC number, or the standard MIDI name associated with that MIDI CC
number. For example, when assigning a parameter to be controlled by Slider A, the source field
will show MIDI 12 when Slider A is selected, because MIDI 12 does not have a standard MIDI
name. When assigning a parameter to be controlled by the Mod Wheel, the source field will show
MWheel when the Mod Wheel is selected, because MWheel is the standard MIDI name for CC
1. When assigning a parameter to be controlled by MIDI CC 16, the source field will show Ctl
A, keep in mind that Ctl A is the standard MIDI name for CC 15 and is unrelated to Slider A.
MIDI CCs 17-19 and 80-83 are also respectively named Ctl B-H, but are unrelated to Sliders
B-H.
7-8
Program Edit Mode
Editing VAST Programs
VAST Sources and the Parameters Page
When assigning a physical controller or CC number to a source field, a Parameter is
automatically added to the Parameters Page with the name of the first assigned VAST
parameter.
If you are assigning a physical controller or CC number that is already used by a parameter
on the Parameters Page, a new parameter will not be added to the Parameters Page. The
new assignment will share the existing Parameter on the Parameters Page (Name, Control
assignment and initial Value). The previously existing Parameter’s name will not change based
on the new assignment. If you have assigned one physical controller/MIDI CC to multiple
VAST parameters, you may wish to edit the Parameter name to reflect this. For details on
renaming a Parameter see the Parameter Edit page on page <?>.
When a VAST parameter source has been assigned to a physical controller or CC number,
there will be an associated parameter on the Parameters Page (unless it has been manually
deleted from the Parameters Page). To quickly find the associated parameter, select the
VAST source field and press the Edit button to jump to selecting the associated parameter
on the Parameters Page. When a VAST parameter source is selected which has an associated
parameter on the Parameters Page, the top bar of the page will show the Parameter symbol.
PARAMETER Symbol
Relationship Between Controller Assignments on the
Parameters Page and the VAST Pages
By default, when a new parameter is automatically added to the Parameters Page, the physical
controller or CC number in the Control column will be the same CC number that was
selected as a VAST source. If you select a different physical controller or CC number in the
Control column of the Parameters page, that physical controller or CC number will now
control the VAST parameter, though the CC number that was originally selected as a VAST
source will not change. For example, if you make your original VAST source assignment with
MIDI 12 (aka Slider A), but then change Slider A to Slider B on the Parameters Page, Slider
B will now control the VAST assignment, but the original VAST source will still show MIDI
12.
7-9
Program Edit Mode
The Parameters (PARAMS) Page
On the Parameters page, you can press the Edit button to see a Parameters Destination field,
which shows the CC number that it sends to parameters on the VAST pages. A parameter’s
Destination is automatically set when the Parameter is created, and can not be changed.
Alternatively, if you have changed Control assignments on the Parameters page and are no
longer sure which VAST source assignment goes with which Parameter on the Parameters
page, you can quickly find the associated parameter by selecting the VAST source field
and pressing the Edit button. This will jump to selecting the associated parameter on the
Parameters Page.
The Parameters (PARAMS) Page
Press the PARAMS soft button to display the Parameters page.
Parameter
Range Of Values
Default Value
Parameter
Program / Effect Chain dependent
-
Control
Physical controller or MIDI CC
None
Value
None, 0 to 127
None
The Parameters page shows a list of every parameter in the current program that has been
assigned to be controlled by one of the Forte SE’s physical controllers (or by an external
MIDI CC number). The Parameters page allows you to edit the name displayed for each
controller assignment, select a different controller assignment, and set an initial MIDI value
for each controller assignment. All VAST, KB3 and FX parameters that have been assigned
to a controller or MIDI CC number are shown. When controller or MIDI assignments
are made on other Program or FX Edit pages, or if an FX Chain is selected which contains
controller assignments, these parameters are automatically added to the Parameters page.
Parameter
The Parameter (left) column shows a list of every parameter in the current program that has
been assigned to be controlled by one of the Forte SE’s physical controllers (or by an external
MIDI CC number). Effect Chain parameters are named with prefixes based on their effect
type, either “INS” for parameters from Insert effects, or “AUX1/AUX2” for parameters from
Aux effects.
7-10
Program Edit Mode
The Parameters (PARAMS) Page
Use the navigation buttons to move up and down in the list. To quickly find a parameter that
is already assigned to a controller, select the parameter column, hold the Enter button and
move a controller to jump to it’s assigned parameter.
Control
The Control (middle) column determines which physical controller (or external MIDI CC
number) will control the parameter in the selected row. To quickly assign one of the Forte
SE’s physical controllers to a parameter, select the control column in the row of the desired
parameter, hold the Enter button and move the desired controller. Alternatively, you can
use the Alpha Wheel or the Value buttons to select a controller from the list, or type in the
controller’s MIDI number followed by the Enter button. See below for a list of Forte SE
physical controllers and their associated MIDI numbers.
If you want to disable the controller for a parameter, you can select a value of None by
scrolling to the bottom of the controller list (using the Alpha Wheel or the Value buttons), or
type -1 followed by the Enter button.
To choose an external MIDI CC number as a control source, you can enter the number of
the controller followed by the Enter button, or use the Alpha Wheel or the Value buttons.
The Forte SE’s physical controllers each use one of the available MIDI CC numbers, so you
must choose one of the other available CC numbers when using an external MIDI control
source or else the parameter will also be controlled by a Forte SE physical controller. The list
below shows the available choices for the Control column. MIDI CC numbers associated
with the Forte SE’s physical controllers are highlighted in bold type.
PARAMETER CONTROLS
None
Slider E (MIDI 24)
Switch 1 (MIDI 80)
MIDI 0
Slider F (MIDI 25)
Switch 2 (MIDI 81
Mod Wheel (MIDI 1)
Slider G (MIDI 26)
Switch 3 (MIDI 82)
MIDI 2 to MIDI 10
Slider H (MIDI 27)
Switch 4 (MIDI 83)
MIDI 5 to MIDI 10
Slider I (MIDI 28)
MIDI 84
CC Pedal (MIDI 11)
Variation (MIDI 29)
Switch 5 (MIDI 85)
Slider A (MIDI 12)
MIDI 30 to MIDI 63
Switch 6 (MIDI 86)
Slider B (MIDI 13)
Sw. Pedal 1a (MIDI 64)
Switch 7 (MIDI 87)
MIDI 14 to MIDI 21
MIDI 65
MIDI 88
Slider C (MIDI 22)
Sw. Pedal 2a (MIDI 66)
Switch 8 (MIDI 89)
Slider D (MIDI 23)
Sw. Pedal 2b (MIDI 67)
Switch 9 (MIDI 90)
MIDI 68 to MIDI 79
MIDI 91 to MIDI 127
7-11
Program Edit Mode
The Parameters (PARAMS) Page
Important note about selecting a Control source
When you change the control source for a parameter, the new control source immediately sets its
current value for the MIDI value of the current parameter. If the MIDI value of the parameter
was set to None before changing the control source, changing the control source will set a new
MIDI value, but the Value column for the parameter will still display None (see Important note
about values of “None”). This can be troublesome if for example you were to change the Control
Source for the Expression parameter, you may accidentally set the MIDI Value to 0, but wouldn’t
know it because None would still be displayed. Also, if you set a MIDI Value to None by scrolling
below 0, the MIDI value will be 0 until you change the value with the assigned controller
(though None will still be displayed). If you edit the parameters of a program and suddenly can’t
produce any sound from the program, this may be the cause. In this case, either set the Value for
Expression to something other than None, or use the Control Source that you set for Expression
to increase the Value.
Value
The Value (right) column sets the initial MIDI value that the Parameter in the selected row
and it’s assigned controller will have when the Program is selected. This value changes as you
move the assigned controller, so don’t move the assigned controller if you have set a value
that you wish to save. To set a specific value, use the cursor button to highlight the right
column and type a value followed by the Enter button (or select a value of None by typing
-1, followed by the Enter button). You can also use the Alpha Wheel or Value buttons to
enter a MIDI value from 0-127, or a value of None by scrolling below 0. If you set a Value
to None by scrolling below 0, the value will be 0 until you change the value with an assigned
Important
note about
values
controller
(though
None will
still of
be “None”
displayed).
For factory programs, standard parameters like Expression (program volume), Sustain, and
Sostenuto are always set to None by default. If you change one of these values, either on the
Parameters page in the Program Editor, or with a physical controller from Program Mode (or the
Program Editor,) the same value will be used for any other program you select, if you select
another program that uses a value of None for the same parameter. These values remain set even
if you don’t save the program.
This can be useful, for example, when using an expression pedal to control program volume.
By default, all factory programs have their Expression parameter set to a value of None, and
Expression (program volume) by default can be controlled by an expression pedal plugged into
the CC Pedal jack. With an expression pedal plugged into the CC Pedal jack, you can control
the volume of any factory program, but when you select another factory program, it will have
the same volume that you set with the expression pedal in the last program. This way, the volume
of your programs will stay consistent, and can always be changed by the expression pedal. If
you want a program to have a default volume, you must set a Value other than None for the
Expression parameter.
For all parameters with a Value of None, any values set with a physical control will not
be saved when saving the program. You must set the Value column for that parameter to
something other than None in order to set and save a value. These values will remain set
until changed with a controller, or until a program is loaded on the current MIDI channel
that does not have a value of None for these parameters.
7-12
Program Edit Mode
The Program FX (FX) Page
The Parameter Edit Page
When the Global Mode User Type parameter is set to Advanced, press the Edit button with
a Parameter selected to view the Parameter Edit page. The Parameter Edit Page allows you to
view the Parameter’s Destination (MIDI CC that it sends to VAST parameters), as well as the
currently assigned Control, Text name, and Value. Press the Edit button again to enter the
Parameter Text page, where you can change the name displayed for the Parameter. You can
also press the Delete soft button to delete the current Parameter. Press Exit or the Back soft
button to return to the Parameters page
The Program FX (FX) Page
Press the FX soft button to call up the Program FX (FX) page. This is the page that you will
use to apply effects to a program, and to configure the routing of the various pre- and postFX audio signals. Effects chosen on this page affect every layer of the current program. The
section The Layer FX (LYR_FX) Page on page 7-15 contains information on using layerspecific effects. The FX page looks like this:
Parameter
Range of Values
Default
Insert
Chain List
0 None
Aux 1, Aux 2
Chain List
0 None
Output
Auxiliary Send
Parameters
Aux Modulation
Main, Sec.
Main
Aux Send (dB)
off, -95 to 24 decibels
0
Aux Send (%)
0 to 100%
0
Aux Pre/Post Insert
Post, Pre
Post
Type
dB, %
dB
Control Source List
On
On the Forte SE, a program can have up to 11 insert effects and 2 aux effects using up to
16 DSP “units.” An insert is essentially just an effect that you apply to a program or layer,
while aux effects receive signal from all active programs’ aux sends. Note the 0/0 Units in the
middle of the top line of the page. This figure indicates how many of the total units are being
used by the highlighted insert; the left-hand number is the size of the insert, and the righthand number is the total number of units being used by the program.
7-13
Program Edit Mode
The Program FX (FX) Page
If you exceed the maximum number of DSP units, the Forte SE will notify you that you have
done so, and no effects will be applied to the program.
Insert
The Insert effect is the effects chain that is applied to the main audio bus. When the Insert
field is selected, you can press the Edit button to edit the current Chain. For details on Chain
editing see Chapter 8, The Effects Chain Editor.
Aux 1, Aux 2
The Aux effect is the effects chain that is applied to the selected auxiliary audio bus. When
the Aux 1 or Aux 2 field is selected, you can press the Edit button to edit the current Chain.
For details on Chain editing see Ch. 8 The Effects Chain Editor.
Auxiliary Send Parameters
The Auxiliary Send parameters determines the level of the program signal sent to the
auxiliary effects chain.
Aux Send
The Aux Send parameter determines the level of the program signal sent to the auxiliary
effects chain.
Pre/Post Insert
The Pre/Post Insert parameter determines the point at which the auxiliary effect is applied to
the signal. When this parameter is set to Post, the Forte SE applies the auxiliary effect to the
signal post-insert, i.e., after the insert effect has been applied. When this parameter is set to
Pre, the Forte SE applies the auxiliary effect to the signal pre-insert.
To hear a program put through two effects in series (i.e., through two cascaded effects),
choose your desired effects for the Insert and either Aux (for whatever Aux you choose,
the other should be set to 0 None), set each bus’ Output to Main, and set the Aux Send
parameter to either 0 dB or 100%. Then, set the Pre/Post Insert parameter to Post.
To hear a program put through two effects in parallel (i.e., through two distinct effects),
choose your desired effects for the Insert and either Aux (again, for whatever Aux you choose,
the other should be set to 0 None), set each bus’ Output to Main, and set the Aux Send
parameter to either 0 dB or 50%. Then, set the Pre/Post Insert parameter to Pre.
With respect to each other, the Auxes are always in parallel, that is, they cannot be cascaded.
7-14
Program Edit Mode
The Layer FX (LYR_FX) Page
Type
The Type parameter determines how the selected wet aux signal (i.e., with effects applied)
is mixed into the final signal. Additionally, it determines the units in which the Aux Send
parameter values are.
When Type is set to dB, the Aux Send parameter values are in units of decibels (dB). The
value specified in the Aux Send parameter is the amount of program signal sent to the aux
effects chain. To hear equal parts wet signal and dry signal (the signal with no effects applied)
on the main audio output, set the main Insert effect to 0 None and the Insert Output to
Main, and set the Aux 1 effect to your desired effect and the Aux 1 Output to Main. Then,
set the Aux1 Send to 0dB. If you want only wet signal on the main audio output, set the
main Insert Output to Sec.—keep in mind that by this method, the dry signal is sent to the
auxiliary audio outputs.
When Type is set to %, the Aux Send parameter values are in units of percent (%). The
value specified in the Aux Send parameter is the percentage of which the wet auxiliary signal
comprises the final signal—the insert signal comprises the rest of the final signal. To hear
equal parts wet signal and dry signal on the main audio output, set the main Insert effect to 0
None and the Insert Output to Main, and set the Aux 1 effect to your desired effect and the
Aux 1 Output to Main. Then, set the Aux1 Send to 50%. If you want to hear only the wet
signal, set the Aux1 Send to 100%.
Aux1 Mod, Aux2 Mod
The Aux Mod parameter gives you real-time control over the amount of program signal sent
to the aux effects chain. You can set the Aux Mod parameter to any Forte SE control source.
The amount that you specify for the Aux Send parameter is the maximum value that the Aux
Mod control source can send—the minimum value is 0.
The Layer FX (LYR_FX) Page
Press the LYR_FX soft button to call up the Layer FX (LYR_FX) page. On this page, you can
apply layer-specific effects. There are three Layer FX Modes: Use Program FX, Layer-Specific
FX, and Use Another Layer’s FX.
Use Program FX Mode
With Use Program FX Mode selected, the current layer will use the effects configured on the
Program FX (FX) page. See The Program FX (FX) Page on page 7-13 for more information
on program FX.
Layer-Specific FX Mode
With Layer-Specific FX selected, you can configure the effects for the current layer. This
mode’s parameters are similar to those of the FX page. This mode is shown in the following
display:
7-15
Program Edit Mode
The COMMON Page
All of the Layer-Specific FX mode parameters have the same functions and ranges of values
as their corresponding parameters on the FX page. See The Program FX (FX) Page on page
7-13 for more information on these parameters.
Use Another Layer’s FX Mode
With Use Another Layer’s FX selected, you can put the current layer through the effects of
another layer. You can specify the layer through whose effects you wish to put the current
layer.
The COMMON Page
The COMMON page is reached by pressing the COMMON soft button in the Program
Editor. Here’s where you find 12 frequently-used parameters that affect the entire current
program, not just the current layer.
Notice that when the Monophonic parameter is set to its default value of Off, the five
monophonic parameters do not appear on the page.
7-16
Parameter
Range of Values
Default
Pitch Bend Range Up
± 7200 cents
200
Pitch Bend Range Down
± 7200 cents
-200
Monophonic
Off, On
Off
(Legato Play)
Off, On
Off
(Portamento)
Off, On
Off
(Portamento Rate)
1 to 3000 keys per second
70
(Attack Portamento)
Off, On
On
(Mono Sample XFade)
Off, On
Off
Globals
Off, On
Off
Program Edit Mode
The COMMON Page
Parameter
Range of Values
Default
Output Gain
-96 to 24 decibels
0
Output Pan
± 64
0
Output Pan Mode
Fixed, +MIDI
+MIDI
Demo Song
Demo Song List
0 None
Pitch Bend Range Up and Down
Use these parameters to define how much the pitch will change when you move your Pitch
Wheel. For both Pitch Bend Range parameters, positive values will cause the pitch to bend
up, while negative values will cause the pitch to bend down. Large positive values can cause
samples to bend to their maximum upward pitch shift before the Pitch Wheel is fully up (or
down). This will not happen when bending pitch down.
Monophonic
When off, the program is polyphonic—it can play up to 128 notes at a time. Notice that
when the Monophonic parameter is off, the LegatoPlay parameter and the three Portamento
parameters do not appear on the COMMON page. This is because only monophonic
programs can use portamento.
When On, the program will play only one note at a time. This makes it possible to use and
to determine the behavior of the portamento feature. Do not set Ignore Release On (page
6-20) when you are using Monophonic programs, since the lack of Note Off messages will
prevent you from switching programs properly.
Legato Play
When Legato Play is on, a note will play its attack only when all other notes have been
released. This is useful for realistic instrumental sounds.
7-17
Program Edit Mode
The COMMON Page
Portamento
This parameter is either on or off. The default value of Off means that portamento is disabled
for the current program.
Portamento is a glide between pitches. On actual acoustic instruments like violin and
bass, it’s achieved by sliding a finger along a vibrating string. On most keyboards that offer
portamento, it’s achieved by holding down a key that triggers the starting note, then striking
and releasing other keys. The pitch glides toward the most recently triggered note, and
remains at that pitch as long as the note remains on. The Forte SE gives you two ways to get
portamento. See the Attack Portamento parameter below.
When applying portamento to multi-sampled sounds (Acoustic Guitar, for example), the
Forte SE will play more than one sample root as the pitch glides from the starting pitch
to the ending pitch. This may cause a small click at each sample root transition. You can
eliminate clicks by using the Mono Sample XFade parameter below.
Portamento Rate
The setting for Portamento rate determines how fast the current note glides from starting
pitch to ending pitch. The value of this parameter tells you how many seconds the note takes
to glide one semitone toward the ending pitch. At a setting of 12 keys/second, for example,
the pitch would glide an octave every second. The list of values is nonlinear; that is, the
increments get larger as you scroll to higher values.
Attack Portamento
This parameter toggles between two types of portamento. When set to On, the Forte SE
remembers the starting pitch so you don’t have to hold a note on to achieve portamento. The
pitch always glides to each new note from the previously triggered note. When set to Off, the
pitch will glide to the most recently triggered note only when the previous note is still on (in
other words, you must use legato fingering).
Mono Sample XFade
When applying portamento to multi-sampled sounds (Acoustic Guitar, for example), the
Forte SE will play more than one sample root as the pitch glides from the starting pitch
to the ending pitch. This may cause a small click at each sample root transition. You can
eliminate clicks by setting the Mono Sample XFade parameter to On. When the Mono
Sample XFade parameter is set to On, the Forte SE performs a crossfade at each sample root
transition to eliminate clicks.
7-18
Program Edit Mode
The KEYMAP Page
Globals
This is another toggle, which affects LFO2, ASR2, FUNs 2 and 4. When off, these three
control sources are local; they affect each individual note in the layers that use them as a
control source. They begin operating each time a note in that layer is triggered.
When the Globals parameter is set to On, these control sources become global, that is
they affect every note in every layer of the current program, they’re not specific to any one
layer. When these control sources are global, they begin operating as soon as the program
is selected. When Globals are on, LFO2, ASR2, and FUNs 2 and 4 will appear on their
respective pages preceded by the letter G to indicate that they’re global.
You’ll use global control sources when you want to affect all notes in a program uniformly,
and local control sources when you want to affect each note independently. For example,
you’d use a global LFO controlling pitch to create a Leslie effect on an organ sound, since you
want the effect applied to all the notes you play. You’d use a local LFO controlling pitch to
create a vibrato for a solo violin, since you want to be able to vary the rate and depth of the
vibrato for each note.
Output: Gain, Pan, and Pan Mode
The Output parameters on the COMMON page allow you to adjust the final-stage gain
and panning of the post-FX signal. Use the OutGain parameter to cut or boost the signal.
Use the OutPan parameter to pan the signal; negative values pan the audio signal to the left
channel, positive values to the right, and a value of zero pans to the center.
When the OPanMode is set to Fixed the pan position remains as defined with the OutPan
parameter, ignoring MIDI pan messages. When the OPanMode is set to +MIDI, MIDI pan
messages (MIDI 10) will shift the sound to the left or right of the Pan parameter setting.
Message values below 64 shift it left, while those above 64 shift it right.
The KEYMAP Page
Press the KEYMAP soft button to call up the KEYMAP page. The parameters on this page
affect sample root selection, i.e., which samples are played on which keys.
7-19
Program Edit Mode
The KEYMAP Page
Parameter
Range of Values
Default
Keymap
Keymap List
1 Piano f Left
Transpose
-128 to 127 semitones
0
Key Tracking
± 2400 cents per key
100
Velocity Tracking
± 7200 cents
0
Alt Method
Switched, Continuous
Switched
Stereo
Off, On
Off
Timbre Shift
± 60 semitones
0
Playback Mode
Norm, Rvrs, Bidirectional, Noise
Normal
Alt Control
Control Source List
Off
Piano Resonance
Off, On
Off
Stereo
You’ll use this parameter when you’re working with stereo samples.
When you set this parameter to On, the KEYMAP page changes slightly:
An additional Keymap parameter appears. The two keymap parameters are distinguished as
Keymap 1 and Keymap 2. The KEYMAP page parameters will affect both keymaps. When
the Stereo parameter is set to On, the OUTPUT page for the current layer will show an
additional pair of Pan parameters.
The Forte SE contains both stereo and mono samples. Keymaps designed for stereo use are
labeled with names beginning with “Stereo” or ending in “Left,” “Right,” “L,” or “R.” For
stereo keymap playback, set Stereo “On” and assign corresponding Left and Right keymaps
to Keymap1 and Keymap2 respectively. For keymaps beginning with “Stereo,” assign the
same keymap to both Keymap1 and Keymap2. If you select the same keymap for Keymap1
and Keymap2, the Forte SE automatically uses the left side for Keymap1 and the right side
for Keymap2.
7-20
Program Edit Mode
The KEYMAP Page
Once you have the keymaps assigned, go to the OUTPUT page and set the panning for
each sample as desired. Keep in mind that using stereo keymaps reduces the polyphony of
the program. For example, if you had a two-layer program with stereo keymaps in each layer,
each note you play would use 4 of your 128 voices, allowing a total of 32 notes before all the
voices have been used.
If you’re not using stereo samples, you should set this parameter’s value to Off.
Keymap
Assign a keymap from ROM to the current layer. Keymaps are collections of samples
assigned to note and velocity ranges. With the Keymap parameter selected, press the Edit
button to enter the Keymap editor (see Ch. 9 Keymap and Sample Editing for details).
Transpose (Xpose)
Transpose the current keymap up as much as 127 semitones (ten octaves and a perfect fifth)
or down as much as 128 semitones (ten octaves and a minor sixth).
Key Tracking (KeyTrk)
This is one of the six common DSP control parameters. On the KEYMAP page, key tracking
affects the interval between notes. The default value of 100 cents (a cent is a hundredth of a
semitone) gives you the normal semitone interval between each note. Higher values increase
the interval; lower values decrease it. Negative values will cause the pitch to decrease as you
play higher notes.
When you make changes to this parameter, you’ll need to keep in mind that KeyTrk on
the KEYMAP page works in conjunction with KeyTrk on the PITCH page. Therefore,
you’ll need to check the KeyTrk value on both pages to see how key tracking works within
a program. Unless you’re looking for nonstandard note intervals, the values of the KeyTrk
parameters on the PITCH and KEYMAP pages should add up to 100 cents.
Velocity Tracking (VelTrk)
This is another common DSP control parameter. As with the other parameters on the
KEYMAP page, this shifts the position of the keymap. Different attack velocities will play
different pitch shifts of the sample root assigned to that note range. If the shift is great
enough, the next higher or lower sample root will be played, which in some cases (many
drum programs, for example) will play an entirely different sound. Positive values will play
higher pitches of the sample root when you use hard attack velocities (they shift the keymap
downward), while negative values will play lower pitches.
7-21
Program Edit Mode
The KEYMAP Page
Method (AltMethod)
See Alternative Switch (AltControl and AltMethod) on page 7-22.
Timbre Shift
This parameter works only on multi-sample keymaps, and changes the root selection for
each key you play. With this parameter you can radically alter the current layer’s timbre
(basic sound characteristics). The nature of the change depends on the timbre itself, so this
parameter calls for experimentation. Basically, timbre shifting changes a note’s timbre by
imposing different harmonic qualities onto the note. A timbre-shifted note retains its original
pitch, but its harmonics are those of the same timbre at a higher or lower pitch. Positive
values for this parameter tend to brighten a sound, while negative values darken.
Here’s an example. If you shift the timbre up 4 semitones, then playing C 4 will result in
the pitch C 4, but will actually play the sample normally assigned to G# 3, and shift its
pitch up four semitones. This will increase the playback rate of the sample, so although the
pitch remains normal, the timbre is brighter. You’d get the same effect by setting the Xpose
parameter on the KEYMAP page to -4 semitones, then setting the Adjust on the PITCH
page to +4 semitones. For multi-sample layers with narrow key ranges, large amounts of
timbre shifting will cause different sample roots to be played back.
Playback Mode
This gives you numerous options for manipulating the samples in the current layer as you
trigger them. Normal leaves the samples unaffected, while Reverse plays them in reverse.
At a value of Reverse, the samples will continue to loop as long as notes are sustained. To
play them just once in reverse, you would adjust the length of the layer’s amplitude envelope
(explained later in this chapter). BiDirect (bidirectional) causes the samples to loop infinitely,
alternating between normal and reversed playback. Noise replaces the samples with a white
noise generator.
Alternative Controller (AltControl)
See Alternative Switch (AltControl and AltMethod) below.
Alternative Switch (AltControl and AltMethod)
Many, but not all, Forte SE sample roots have been pre-assigned a carefully chosen alternate
sample start point that can be selected using the Alternate Switch feature (AltControl and
AltMethod parameters). This feature allows you to control the sample playback start/end
time triggered by any control source. (The alternate sample start point can be adjusted by
7-22
Program Edit Mode
The KEYMAP Page
editing a sample, see Editing Samples on page 9-10 and The TRIM Page on page 9-14 for
details).
Use the AltControl parameter to specify a control source that will cause the sample to begin
or end at the Alt point. Then use the AltMethod parameter to choose between switched and
continuous calculation of the Alt point. If the value of AltMethod is Switched, the Forte SE
will use the Alt point when the relevant control source is at a value greater than 64 at Note
Start. If AltMethod is Continuous, the Alt point will vary depending on the value of the
relevant control source at Note Start.
As an example, suppose you’re working with a flute keymap and wish to control the amount
of chiff heard at the beginning of the sound. On the KEYMAP page in the Program Editor,
set AltControl to MWheel. Now the Mod Wheel controls how much of the initial sample
attack is used. If you set AltMethod to Switched and move the Mod Wheel at least halfway up, at Note Start the sample will begin at the pre-set alternate start point (in this case,
slightly past the initial chiff). If you set the AltMethod to Continuous, the Forte SE will
interpolate the sample’s starting point based on the position of the Mod Wheel. If the Mod
Wheel is 75% of the way up at Note Start. the sample will begin 75% of the way between
normal and alternate start points.
Emulating Legato Play
If you place the Alt point after the initial attack transients of the sample, then you can
use the Alt Switch to emulate legato playing in an acoustic instrument. As an example, set
Keymap to 14 Flute. Now set the AltControl parameter to Chan St (Channel State). Now
if you play notes separately, the initial breathy chiff will be heard. But if you play the notes
legato (connecting them smoothly), the Alt point is used and you do not hear the chiff.
This is because the Chan St is turned on as long as any note is being held. Most of the Forte
SE’s ROM samples have their Alt points set for purposes of legato play. In most cases the
difference in attacks is subtle, but for some sounds, like drums, the difference can be more
noticeable.
Pno.Resonanc (Kurzweil String Resonance)
Sympathetic string resonance in an acoustic piano is the phenomenon of undamped piano
strings resonating as a result of sound from other notes/keys. This can be observed if one
plays a C, continues holding down the key after the sound has decayed, and then forcibly
presses and quickly releases another C key. The undamped strings of the held-down C key
will audibly ring, providing a highly tuned “echo”, commonly known as sympathetic string
resonance.
The Pno.Resonanc parameter works in conjunction with the FX preset “600 String
Resonance” to emulate the sound of strings resonating in an acoustic piano. When
combined, these two components create KSR (Kurzweil String Resonance). Factory programs
in the Piano category are set up to use KSR, and they provide a good example of how the
two components should be used. When making your own program with KSR, it may be
easiest to use an FX Chain from one of these programs, since they already contain controller
7-23
Program Edit Mode
The LAYER Page
assignments for KSR. In these Programs and Chains the dry/wet mix of the KSR effect can
be controlled with slider F, and the effect can be enabled or disabled with assignable switch
6. When making your own Chain, the FX preset “600 String Resonance” should be used for
the first box of the Program’s insert Chain.
When a layer has the Pno.Resonanc parameter set to On, the FX preset “600 String
Resonance” monitors which keys are being held on that layer and uses them to tune the
algorithm in the FX preset. Any audio that passes though the FX preset while these keys are
held will cause emulated strings to resonate based on this tuning. When using KSR, layers
which contain samples of piano notes should have the Pno.Resonanc parameter set to On.
Layers that do not play samples of piano notes (such as layers for mechanical key release
noise, pedal noise, string/synth layers etc) should have the Pno.Resonanc parameter set to
Off. (Layers set to Off will still resonate any other strings that have been emulated.) If more
than one layer in a program is set to play piano notes for the exact same velocity and key
range, the FX preset will function the best if only one of those layers has the Pno.Resonanc
parameter set to On.
In an acoustic piano, it is possible to strike and hold a key very lightly so that a note is not
played, but the key’s strings will still become undamped and will resonate when other keys
are played. KSR can simulate this behavior. To do so, select the layer in the program which
has the lowest velocity range and which has the Pno.Resonanc parameter set to On. On the
Layer page, set the Enable parameter to GAttVel, and set the Enable Min parameter to 2.
This will allow notes played with a velocity of 1 to tune the algorithm in FX preset “600
String Resonance”, without playing a note. (This only works for velocities of 1. Velocities
above 1 will not tune the algorithm without playing a note, even if the Enable Min
parameter is set to a higher value.)
The LAYER Page
Press the LAYER soft button to call up the LAYER page. Here you’ll set a number of
parameters that affect the current layer’s keyboard range, attack and release characteristics,
and response to various controls.
7-24
Parameter
Range of Values
Default
Low Key
C -1 to G 9
C0
High Key
C -1 to G 9
C8
Program Edit Mode
The LAYER Page
Parameter
Range of Values
Default
Low Velocity
ppp to fff
ppp
High Velocity
ppp to fff
fff
Bend
Off, Key, All
All
Trig
Normal, Reversed, Pedal
Down, Pedal Up
Normal
Delay Control
Control Source list
Off
Minimum Delay
0 to 25 seconds
0
Maximum Delay
0 to 25 seconds
0
Layer Enable
Control Source list
On
Enable Sense
Enable Min
Enable Max
Normal, Reversed
± 127
± 127
Normal
64
127
Opaque Layer
Off, On
Off
Sustain Pedal
Off, On, On2, On3
On
Sostenuto Pedal
Off, On
On
Freeze Pedal
Off, On
On
Ignore Release
Off, On
Off
Hold Through Attack
Off, On
Off
Hold Until Decay
Off, On
Off
Low Key (LoKey)
This sets the lowest active note for the current layer. This parameter’s value cannot be set
higher than the value for HiKey. The standard MIDI key range is C 1—G 9 (0-127). Middle
C is C 4.
High Key (HiKey)
Here you set the highest active note for the current layer. This parameter’s value cannot be set
lower than the value for LoKey.
Low Velocity (LoVel)
With this parameter you define the lowest attack velocity at which the layer will be enabled
(generate a sound). The values for this parameter and the next are expressed in the standard
musical dynamics markings, similar to the values available for the velocity maps. Attack
velocities that are below this threshold will not trigger notes. If you set this parameter’s value
higher than the HiVel value, the layer will not play at all.
7-25
Program Edit Mode
The LAYER Page
High Velocity (HiVel)
Similarly, this will set the highest attack velocity at which the layer will be enabled. Attack
velocities above this threshold will not trigger notes in this layer.
Using LoVel and HiVel, you can set up velocity switching between up to eight layers. If you
need even more, you can do it using the Enable and Enable Sense (S) parameters on page
7-27.
Pitch Bend Mode (Bend)
This determines how Pitch bend control messages will affect the current layer. A value of All
bends all notes that are on when the Pitch bend message is generated. A value of Key bends
only those notes whose triggers are physically on when the Pitch bend message is generated
(notes held with the sustain pedal, for example, won’t bend). This is great for playing guitar
solos on top of chords—play a chord, hold it with the Sustain pedal, then play your licks and
bend them all you want; the chord won’t bend with it. A value of Off disables Pitch bend for
the current layer. To apply the same Pitch Bend Mode setting to the entire program, make
sure to set the same setting for each layer.
Trigger (Trig)
The Trigger parameter determines how notes in the current layer are triggered. The default
setting is Norm, which causes notes to be triggered when a key is pressed down and a MIDI
note on message is received by the layer. A setting of Rvrs causes notes to be triggered when
a key is released and a MIDI note off message is received by the layer (velocity is determined
by the release velocity of the released key).
A setting of PdlDN or PdlUP causes a note to be triggered when the sustain pedal is
respectively pressed down or released (typically used for triggering mechanical pedal noise
samples). The sustain pedal will trigger MIDI note 60 with a velocity of 64.
Delay Control (DlyCtl)
Here you select, from the Control Source list, a control source that will delay the start of all
notes in the current layer. The length of the delay is determined by MinDly and MaxDly
(described below). You’ll assign a continuous control like MWheel for the DlyCtl parameter
when you want to vary the delay time, and a switch control if you want the delay to either
be its minimum value (switch off), or its maximum (switch on). The delay control will affect
only those notes triggered after the delay control source is moved; the delay time is calculated
at each note start, based on the status of the delay control source at that time.
7-26
Program Edit Mode
The LAYER Page
Minimum Delay (MinDly), Maximum Delay (MaxDly)
The length of the delay is determined by these two parameters. When the control source
assigned to DlyCtl is at its minimum, the delay will be equal to the value of MinDly. The
delay will be equal to the value of MaxDly when the control source is at its maximum. If
DlyCtl is set to OFF, you get the minimum delay. If it’s set to ON, you get the maximum
delay. This doesn’t change the note’s attack time, just the time interval between the Note On
message and the start of the attack. The delay is measured in seconds.
Enable
This assigns a control source to activate or deactivate the layer. When the value of the
assigned control source is between the minimum and maximum thresholds set by the Sense
(S) parameter, the layer is active. When the value of the assigned control source is below
the minimum or above the maximum, the layer is inactive. By default, many layers have
the Enable parameter set to ON, so the minimum and maximum thresholds don’t matter.
They’re relevant only when Enable is set to a specific control source (like MWheel).
Some local control sources (KeyNum and AttVel, for example) are not valid for the Enable
parameter. In these cases, you should use the global equivalent (GKeyNum and GAttVel in
this example).
Enable Sense (S)
This parameter determines how and when a layer is enabled by the control source assigned
for the Enable parameter. Enable Sense has three values: orientation, minimum, and
maximum.
Suppose for a moment that you’re editing a program, and in the current layer you’ve set the
value of Enable to MWheel, which causes the Mod Wheel to control whether the layer is
active. The default values for Enable Sense are as follows: orientation is Norm; minimum is
64, and maximum is 127. This means that when the Mod Wheel is less than halfway up, the
layer is disabled. The layer plays only when the Mod Wheel is more than halfway up.
Change the orientation to Rvrs, and the layer plays only when the Mod Wheel is less than
halfway up. Change the orientation back to Norm, and change the minimum to 127. Now
the layer plays only when the Mod Wheel is all the way up.
You could use this parameter to set up a two-layer program that would let you use a MIDI
control to switch between layers, say a guitar sound and a distorted guitar. Both layers would
have their Enable parameters set to the same control source, say MWheel. One layer would
have its Enable Sense orientation set to Norm, and the other would have it set to Rvrs. Both
layers would have their Enable Sense minimums set to 64, and their maximums to 127. The
first layer would play when your Mod Wheel was above its midpoint, and the second layer
would play when the Mod Wheel was below its midpoint. (You could achieve the same effect
by having the Enable Sense orientation in both layers set to Norm, and the minimum and
7-27
Program Edit Mode
The LAYER Page
maximum values set as follows: minimum 0 and maximum 63 for one layer; minimum 64
and maximum 127 for the other).
Using this parameter in conjunction with the Enable parameter, you can easily create
velocity-switching for as many layers as you have in your program. This is useful for drum
programs, since you can define a different velocity-trigger level for each of the 32 layers
available in drum programs.
First, set the Enable parameter for the Layer 1 to a value of GAttVel (global attack velocity).
This causes the layer to play based on the attack velocity of your keystrokes. Then set the
Enable Sense (S) parameter to a value of Norm, and adjust its minimum and maximum
values (the two numerals to the right of Norm) to a narrow range. Don’t use negative values,
since they don’t apply when you’re using GAttVel as the layer enabler.
Repeat this for each layer in the program. Bear in mind that if you want to set up 32
different velocity levels for a program, with equal intervals between each layer, then you have
a range of 4 for each level (Layer 1 is 0–3, Layer 2 is 4–7, and so on). It won’t be easy to play
precisely enough to trigger the layer you want. On the other hand, if you’re using Song mode
or an external sequencer, you can edit attack velocity levels, and get exactly the results you
want.
Opaque
An opaque layer blocks all higher-numbered layers in its range, allowing only the opaque
layer to play. This is an easy way to change a small range of notes in a program, leaving the
original sound playing above and below the new sound.
Start with a one-layer program, and create a new layer (Layer 2) with the NewLyr soft
button. On the KEYMAP page for Layer 2, select the keymap you want to use, then on the
LAYER page, set Layer 2’s range (say, C 3 to D 3), and set its Opaque parameter to On.
Then go to Layer 1, and duplicate it (with the DupLyr soft button); the duplicate layer
becomes Layer 3. You now have a three-layer program. Delete Layer 1 (the original layer);
Layer 2 (the new layer you created) becomes Layer 1, and Layer 3 becomes Layer 2. Now
Layer 2 blocks out Layer 3 (the duplicate of the original layer) at the notes C 3–D 3.
Sustain Pedal (SusPdl)
When this parameter is on, the layer will respond to all sustain messages (Controller
destination 64, Sustain). When off, the current layer will ignore sustain messages. On2
means that the sustain pedal will not catch the release of a note that is still sounding when
the sustain message is received; this can be very useful in a program that uses amplitude
envelopes with a long release time.
7-28
Program Edit Mode
The LAYER Page
On3 enables the use of half damper pedal techniques when using a compatible continuous
switch pedal (such as the Korg DS-1H). On3 emulates the behavior of an acoustic piano’s
sustain pedal by increasing the release portion of the current layer’s amplitude envelope as the
pedal is pressed down, before becoming fully sustained. This allows you to use a sustain pedal
to control note release length and sustain.
Sostenuto Pedal (SosPdl)
When Sostenuto is on, the layer will respond to all sostenuto messages (Controller
destination 66, Sostenuto). When off, the layer ignores sostenuto messages. Sostenuto, as
you may know, is a feature found on pianos that have three pedals. Pressing the Sostenuto
pedal on a piano (usually the middle pedal) sustains the notes whose keys you were holding
down when you pressed the pedal. Notes played after the pedal is already down do not get
sustained.
Freeze Pedal (FrzPdl)
This parameter activates or deactivates the layer’s response to Freeze pedal messages
(Controller destination 69, Freeze). The Freeze pedal control causes all notes that are on to
sustain without decay until the Freeze pedal control goes off. If a note is already decaying, it
will freeze at that level.
Ignore Release (IgnRel)
When IgnRel is off, the layer responds normally to Note Off messages. When on, the layer
will ignore all Note Off messages that it receives. This should be used only with sounds that
decay to silence when a note is held, otherwise the sounds will sustain forever (press the
Cancel and Enter buttons simultaneously to stop sustained notes). This parameter can come
in handy when your Forte SE is slaved to a drum machine or sequencer, which sometimes
generates Note Ons and Note Offs so close together that the envelope doesn’t have time to
play before the note is released. If used in combination with ThrAtt or TilDec (see below).
IgnRel allows you play staccato, yet still hear the entire length of the attack and decay
sections of the amplitude envelope.
Hold Through Attack (ThrAtt)
When on, this parameter causes all notes in the layer to sustain through the entire first attack
segment of their amplitude envelopes, even if the notes have been released. If you have a
sound with a slow attack, or an attack that’s delayed with the delay control, setting this
parameter to On will make sure your notes reach full amplitude even if you’re playing fast.
When set to Off, notes will release as soon as you release the note (generate a Note Off). If
the first attack segment of the layer’s amplitude envelope is very short, you probably won’t
notice a difference between values of On and Off.
7-29
Program Edit Mode
The PITCH Page
Hold Until Decay (TilDec)
When on, this parameter causes all notes in the layer to sustain through all three attack
segments in their amplitude envelopes even if the notes have been released. Looped
amplitude envelopes will not loop, however, if the notes are released before reaching the end
of the final attack segment. Notes will go into their normal releases if they are released after
the envelope has looped. When set to Off, notes will release as soon as a Note Off message is
generated.
The PITCH Page
Pressing the PITCH soft button takes you to the DSPCTL page with the Pitch function
highlighted. See The DSP Control (DSPCTL) Page on page 7-37 for more information on
the Pitch function.
The AMP Page
Pressing the AMP soft button takes you to the DSPCTL page with the Amp function
(labeled as “Level”) highlighted. See The DSP Control (DSPCTL) Page on page 7-37 for
more information on the Amp function.
The Algorithm (ALG) Page
Press the ALG soft button to call up the Algorithm (ALG) page. The top line of the display
gives you the usual mode reminder, and tells you which layer you’re looking at, as well as how
many layers are in the current program. You can view the ALG pages of any other layers in
the program by using the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons.
The basic definition: an algorithm is the “wiring” (signal path) of a sample to the audio
outputs, through a series of digital signal processing (DSP) functions that you select. The
Forte SE’s algorithms are the core of Variable Architecture Synthesis Technology. The DSP
functions are synthesis tools (filters, oscillators, etc). that you assign to the various stages of
the algorithm. The DSP functions you choose determine the type of synthesis you use.
7-30
Program Edit Mode
The Algorithm (ALG) Page
The central portion of the page shows the algorithm for the currently selected layer. You see
the number of the algorithm (from 1 to 28, 101 to 131, and the IDs for any user-defined
algorithms) and a graphic representation of the signal path, as well as the currently selected
DSP functions within the signal path.
To use a different algorithm, select the Algorithm parameter and use any data entry method
to select a different one. To change the DSP function within an algorithm, move the cursor
to the block you want to change, then use the Alpha Wheel or Plus/Minus buttons. There’s a
staggering number of combinations of algorithms and DSP functions alone, not to mention
the numerous controls that can be used to modify the DSP functions.
Note: Changing a layer’s algorithm can affect the layer’s sound drastically. It’s a good idea to bring
down the volume of your Forte SE or your sound system before changing algorithms.
See Algorithm Basics below for information on editing algorithms.
Algorithm Basics
Each of the 59 available algorithms represents a preset signal path. With our new Dynamic
VAST feature, you can edit any preset signal path and make your own, unique algorithms,
but that will be explained further on in this section. Take a look at Algorithm 1 in the
diagram below. It’s one of the simplest algorithms.
The DSP functions are represented by the rectangular blocks. The lines connecting the
blocks together indicates the flow of the digital signal from left to right; they represent what
we call the “wire” of the algorithm: the actual physical path that the signal follows through
the algorithm. Selecting different algorithms can be compared to connecting different DSP
functions with different wiring diagrams.
Think of the left side of each block as its input, and the right side as its output. Depending
on the algorithm, the signal may split into two wires, enabling part of the signal to bypass
certain portions of the algorithm. Split wires may rejoin within the algorithm, or they may
pass all the way through as split signals. If the last block has two wires at its output, we call it
a double-output algorithm. If it has one wire, it’s a single-output algorithm, even if there are
two wires in earlier portions of the algorithm.
7-31
Program Edit Mode
The Algorithm (ALG) Page
Each block of the algorithm represents a certain function in the signal path. In every noncascaded algorithm (see Alt Input for Algorithms (Cascade Mode) on page 7-35 below), the
signal flows first through a one-stage DSP function that controls the pitch of the samples in
the keymap (this function is represented as a block labeled PITCH in the upper right-hand
corner of the display). In fact, the first DSP function in each algorithm always controls pitch,
even though it doesn’t apply in every instance and, as will be explained later in this section, it
is bypassed in cascaded algorithms. Similarly, the last DSP function always controls the final
amplitude of the signal (this function is represented as a block labeled AMP in the upper
right-hand corner of the display).
The number of function-parameters a DSP function can have depends on the relative size of
its function-block on the Algorithm page (four slots is the largest block size). For instance,
a function-block that is three slots long can have up to three function-parameters, whereas
a function-block that is two slots long can have up to two function-parameters. For each
function-parameter, there’s a corresponding “subpage” on both the DSPCTL and DSPMOD
pages. On the DSPCTL subpages, there are fine adjust and hard-wired parameters with
which you can make fixed adjustments to the function-parameter. On the DSPMOD
subpages, there are programmable parameters that you can assign to any control source in
the Controller List to modulate the function-parameter. The above italicized parameter-types
are described in Common DSP Control Parameters on page 7-32. More information on the
subpages can be found in The DSP Control (DSPCTL) Page on page 7-37 and The DSP
Modulation (DSPMOD) Page on page 7-39.
Highlighting any of the function-blocks on the ALG page and pressing the Edit button takes
you to the DSPCTL page.
Common DSP Control Parameters
The type of DSP function available for any function block depends on the algorithm. Some
of the specialized functions like the PANNER are always located just before the final AMP
function. Others, like the two-input functions, appear only in algorithms that are structured
for two-input functions.
You can change the nature of each layer of a program simply by assigning different DSP
functions to the layer’s algorithm. Your level of control goes much deeper than that, however.
Each DSP function has one or more parameters to which you can patch a variety of control
sources to modify the behavior of the DSP functions themselves.
The parameters on the various control-input pages are very similar; in fact, there are six
parameters that appear on almost every page. Consequently we refer to them as the common
DSP control parameters. Although the parameters on the control-input pages differ slightly
from function to function, you can expect to see some or all of the common DSP control
parameters whenever you select the control-input page for any of the DSP functions.
7-32
Program Edit Mode
The Algorithm (ALG) Page
You’ll recognize the common DSP control parameters, along with several other parameters.
Keep in mind that there’s a set of common control parameters for each of the DSP functions;
in this case we’re describing them only as they apply to the pitch control function.
Function-parameter
Unlike the other five common DSP parameters, the function-parameters are accessible on
both the DSPCTL page and the DSPMOD page. They are listed along the left-hand side of
each page; any changes made to them on one page are reflected in the other. The label of each
function-parameter depends on its function in the current program’s algorithm. For example,
the Pitch function’s function-parameter is labeled Pitch; whereas the two-block Lopass
function’s function-parameters are labeled LP Frq and LP Res.
By adjusting the function-parameter, you can add a fixed amount of adjustment to any DSP
function. For the Pitch function, adjusting the function-parameter will change the pitch in
semitone increments. Use this as a starting point to set the pitch where you want it to be
normally. This will shift the pitch of the currently selected layer, and will affect the playback
rate of sampled sounds. Sampled sounds have an upper limit on pitch adjustment. It’s
normal for the pitches of sampled sounds to “pin” (stop getting higher) when you adjust the
pitch upward in large amounts. The oscillator waveforms can be pitched higher. Any sound
can be pitched downward without limit.
The primary use of adjusting the function-parameter or fine adjust parameter (which will
be explained under the next heading) is to offset the cumulative effects of the other DSP
function parameters. For example, you might set a high value for key tracking (defined
below) for a dramatic change in effect across the keyboard. The effect might be too much at
one end of the keyboard, however, so you could use one of the adjust parameters to reduce
the initial amount of that effect.
The Forte SE always uses real values of measurement, rather than just arbitrary numbers, for
adjustable parameters. This means that you specify pitch in semitones (ST) and cents (ct),
and amplitude in decibels (dB).
Remember that the parameters on the control-input pages are cumulative—they can add to
or subtract from the effects of the other parameters on the page, depending on their values.
For example, even if you’ve adjusted the pitch of a sample so high that it pins, the effects of
the other parameters may bring the pitch back down to a workable range.
7-33
Program Edit Mode
The Algorithm (ALG) Page
Fine Adjust Parameter
You can add slight detuning to the pitch with the fine adjust parameters. Notice that there
are actually two fine adjust parameters for the Pitch function: one that changes the pitch
in cents (100ths of a semitone), and one that changes it according to its frequency (in
increments of Hertz—cycles per second). Since we’re discussing the universal control sources
here, and not specifically pitch, we’ll move on for now, as the Hz parameter applies only to
pitch-related functions. See The PITCH Page on page 7-30 for a more thorough description
of Hz.
Hard-wired Parameters
Key Tracking
This is a quick way to get additional control based on the MIDI note number of each note
you trigger. Key tracking applies a different control signal value for each note number. In
the case of pitch, key tracking enables you to change the tuning of each note relative to its
normal pitch.
Middle C is the zero point. Regardless of the key tracking value, there is no effect on Middle
C. If you set a nonzero value for key tracking, the effect increases for each note above or
below Middle C. In the case of pitch, for example, say you assign a value of 5 cents per key
for the key tracking parameter. Triggering Middle C (C 4 on the Forte SE) will play a normal
C 4. Triggering C# 4 will play a note 5 cents higher than C# 4. Triggering D 4 will play a note
10 cents higher than D 4, and so on. Notes below Middle C will be tuned lower than their
normal pitches. If you set a negative value for key tracking, notes above Middle C will be
tuned lower than their normal pitches.
Keep in mind that key tracking on the PITCH page works in conjunction with the key
tracking parameter on the KEYMAP page. This is why you can set the KeyTrk parameter on
the PITCH page to 0ct/key, and notes still increase in pitch by 100 cents/key as you go up
the keyboard. It’s because the KeyTrk parameter on the KEYMAP page is already set at 100
cents per key.
Velocity Tracking
A positive value for velocity tracking will raise the pitch as you trigger notes with higher
attack velocities. This is great for getting a trace of detuning based on your attack velocity,
especially in drum programs, where you can make the pitch of the drum samples rise slightly
with higher-velocity Note Ons, just as drums do when you strike them harder. Negative
values will lower the pitch as you increase the attack velocity.
Programmable Parameters
Source 1 (Src1)
This parameter takes its value from a long list of control sources including every MIDI
control number, a host of LFOs, ASRs, envelopes and other programmable sources.
7-34
Program Edit Mode
The Algorithm (ALG) Page
Src1 works in tandem with the parameter beneath it on the page: Depth. Choose a control
source from the list for Src1, then set a value for Depth. When the control source assigned
to Src1 is at its maximum, the pitch will be altered to the full depth you set. For example,
if you set Src1 to MWheel, and set Depth to 1200 ct, the pitch will rise as you push the
Mod Wheel up on your Forte SE or MIDI controller, reaching a maximum of 1200 ct (12
semitones, or one octave).
Source 2 (Src2)
This one’s even more programmable. Like Src1, you choose a control source from the list.
But instead of setting a fixed depth, you can set a minimum and maximum depth, then
assign another control source to determine how much depth you get. Try this example.
(Make sure Src1 is set to OFF first, so the two sources don’t interact). Start with Program
199, and press Edit. Press the PITCH soft button to select the PITCH page. Set the Src2
parameter to a value of LFO1, then set the Minimum Depth parameter to 100 ct, and
Maximum Depth to 1200 ct. Then set the Depth Control parameter to MWheel. This lets
you use the Mod Wheel to vary the depth of the oscillation in pitch generated by the LFO.
Now, when the Mod Wheel is down, the pitch will oscillate between a semitone (100 ct) up
and a semitone down (the default waveform for LFO1 is a sine wave, which goes positive
and negative). With the Mod Wheel up, the pitch will oscillate between an octave up and an
octave down.
Since the Mod Wheel is a continuous control, you can achieve any amount of depth control
between the minimum and maximum. If you had set the Depth Control to Sustain, for
example, then you’d get only two levels of depth control: the maximum (1200 cents) with
your MIDI controller’s sustain pedal down, or the minimum (100 cents) with the sustain
pedal up.
Alt Input for Algorithms (Cascade Mode)
Cascade mode is a particularly powerful feature of the Forte SE that allows you to create
unique algorithms of previously unattainable levels of complexity. The following three figures
show the signal path of a program configured using the Forte SE’s Cascade mode:
7-35
Program Edit Mode
The Algorithm (ALG) Page
On the ALG (Algorithm) page of every layer, the Alt Input parameter lets you select any
other layer to go through the current layer’s DSP. You can set it up so that layer 1 goes into
layer 2 into 3 (as shown above). If you turn down the volume on layers 1 and 2, then you are
hearing true cascading—it’s like a big chain with each algorithm feeding into the next, and
what you hear is layer 3’s output. You can also have the volumes of all three layers turned up,
which will mix the signal of all three layers. You could, in the same program, also decide to
run layer 4 into 5 into 6 into 13 into 25 if you wanted. Any of the 32 layers can go into any
other layer.
The Cascade mode algorithms (very much like triple mode on a K2600) start at ID 101.
Note in the above figures how algorithm 101 looks very similar to algorithm 1. Each Cascade
mode algorithm corresponds to its non-cascade equivalent, which has the same ID number
minus 100. For example, algorithm 105 is a cascade mode version of algorithm 5. On the
Alg page, select which layer you want to have running through your cascade layer with the
Alt Input parameter. Make sure to turn down the Amp volume on your source layers if you
only want to hear what’s coming out of the final cascade layer.
Dynamic VAST
The Dynamic VAST editor is yet another particularly powerful feature of the Forte SE that
allows you to edit the wiring of an algorithm. With Dynamic VAST, literally thousands of
wiring schemes are possible. Using Cascade mode in conjunction with Dynamic VAST gives
you almost infinite control over your program’s sound and behavior by enabling you to create
your own unique, complex algorithms.
To enter the Dynamic VAST editor, select the ALG (Algorithm) page by pressing the ALG
soft button. Highlight the Algorithm parameter, select an algorithm, and press the edit
button. This action calls up the Edit Algorithm (EditAlg) page in which you can edit the
wiring of the selected algorithm.
7-36
Program Edit Mode
The DSP Control (DSPCTL) Page
Parameter
Range of Values
Default
Inputs
1, 2
1
Outputs
1, 2
1
Number of Blocks
1 to 4
2
Output Mode
Normal, Sep. L/R
Normal
In addition to having a selectable function, each function block has three editable
parameters: number of inputs, number of outputs, and block size (the Output Mode
parameter is an editable parameter of the algorithm as a whole). When you first enter
the EditAlg page, there will be a cursor in the parameter field, and the first block of the
algorithm will be highlighted. To select a block for editing, move the cursor down the display
until no parameter field is highlighted; then, using the < and > buttons, highlight the block
you wish to edit. Press the ^ button to move the cursor back into the parameter fields, and
then select the parameter you wish to edit.
The Output Mode parameter determines the number of outputs from the algorithm. With
Output Mode set to Normal, the algorithm has one output. With Output Mode set to Sep.
L/R, the algorithm has two outputs, each of which is sent to a separate stereo channel.
To edit the signal path, select either an input of a block or an output of the entire algorithm.
By scrolling with Alpha Wheel or the Previous- and Next+ buttons, you can see every
possible configuration for that selected signal path.
The DSP Control (DSPCTL) Page
Before reading further, be sure to read Algorithm Basics on page 7-31 and Common DSP
Control Parameters on page 7-32.
Press the DSPCTL soft button to call up the DSP Control (DSPCTL) page, which is
displayed below:
7-37
Program Edit Mode
The DSP Control (DSPCTL) Page
Function
Parameter
Range of Values
Default
Pitch
-128 to 127 semitones
0
Fine Adjust
± 100 cents
0
Hertz Adjust
± 10.00 Hertz
0
Key Tracking
± 2400 cents/key
0
Velocity Tracking
± 7200 cents
0
(Function)
(Function-Parameter)
(Depends on Function)
(Depends on Function)
(Function)
(Function-Parameter)
(Depends on Function)
(Depends on Function)
(Function)
(Function-Parameter)
(Depends on Function)
(Depends on Function)
(Function)
(Function-Parameter)
(Depends on Function)
(Depends on Function)
Level
-96 to 24 decibels
-6
Key Tracking
± 2.00 decibels/key
0
Velocity Tracking
± 96 decibels
35
Pitch
Level
Each field in the left-hand column of the page is a function-parameter of the current layer’s
algorithm. You can coarsely adjust the function-parameter in these left-hand fields—as noted
in Common DSP Control Parameters, any adjustments made to the function-parameters on
the DSPCTL page are reflected in the corresponding function-parameters on the DSPMOD
page. The right-hand side of the DSPCTL page is the subpage of the highlighted functionparameter—on the subpage are the fine adjust parameters and hard-wired parameters. To
access the parameters on the subpage, highlight the function-parameter you wish to edit,
and then press the > button to move the cursor into the subpage.The label of a functionparameter depends on its corresponding function-block in the current layer’s algorithm. The
above DSPCTL page corresponds to the following algorithm:
7-38
Program Edit Mode
The DSP Modulation (DSPMOD) Page
The DSP Modulation (DSPMOD) Page
Before reading further, be sure to read Algorithm Basics on page 7-31 and Common DSP
Control Parameters on page 7-32.
Press the DSPMOD soft button to call up the DSP Modulation (DSPMOD) page, which is
displayed below:
Parameter
Range of Values
Default
Source 1
Control Source List
Off
Depth
(Depends on Function)
0
Source 2
Control Source List
Off
Depth Control
Control Source List
Off
Minimum Depth
(Depends on Function)
0
Maximum Depth
(Depends on Function)
0
Each field in the left-hand column of the page is a function-parameter of the current layer’s
algorithm. You can coarsely adjust the function-parameter in these left-hand fields—as noted
in Common DSP Control Parameters, any adjustments made to the function-parameters on
the DSPMOD page are reflected in the corresponding function-parameters on the DSPCTL
page. The right-hand side of the DSPCTL page is the subpage of the highlighted functionparameter—on the subpage are the programmable parameters. To access the parameters on
the subpage, highlight the function-parameter you wish to edit, and then press the > button
to move the cursor into the subpage.
Each function-parameter’s subpage contains the programmable parameters of the highlighted
function-parameter. By assigning control sources to modulate a function-parameter, you
can enable real-time control of your program’s sound and behavior. You can assign Src1 to
any control source, and can specify its maximum value with the Depth parameter. Src2 is
different—you can assign it to any control source, but can also assign a control source to its
maximum value with the DptCtl parameter. You can then specify the range of Src2’s depth
with the MinDepth and MaxDepth parameters.
7-39
Program Edit Mode
The OUTPUT Page
Note: The Forte SE features an easy shortcut for quickly assigning any of the Forte SE’s
realtime controllers (sliders, wheels, buttons, etc). to a currently selected parameter (such
as the Src1 and Src2 parameters above). Simply hold the Enter button and move the
desired controller.
The label of a function-parameter depends on its corresponding function-block in the current
layer’s algorithm. The above DSPMOD page corresponds to the following algorithm:
The OUTPUT Page
Press the OUTPUT soft button to get to the OUTPUT page, where you set the layer’s preand post-FX panning. There are actually four different configurations of the OUTPUT page;
which one you see depends on whether the current layer uses a stereo keymap, and whether it
uses program FX or layer-specific effects (more on this in The Program FX (FX) Page on page
7-13 and The Layer FX (LYR_FX) Page on page 7-15).
Regardless of the page’s configuration, there are parameters for adjusting the pan position,
the pan mode, the pan table (if any), the crossfade control, and the crossfade sense. Layers
that use stereo keymaps, or that use layer-specific FX, have additional parameters on their
OUTPUT pages. The following page is for a mono keymap program that uses program FX:
7-40
Parameter
Range of Values
Default
Pan (or Pan 1)
± 64
0
(Pan 2)
± 64
63
Pan Mode
Fixed, +MIDI, Auto, Reverse
+MIDI
Program Edit Mode
The OUTPUT Page
Parameter
Range of Values
Default
(Output Pan)
± 64
0
(Output Gain)
-96 to 48 decibels
0
(Output Pan Mode)
Fixed, +MIDI
+MIDI
Pan Table
Pan Table List
0 None
Crossfade Control
Control Source List
Off
Crossfade Sense
Normal, Reversed
Norm
Drum Remap
Off, Kurz1, Kurz2
Off
Exclusive Zone Map
Zone Map List
0 None
Pan
Use this parameter to position the current layer’s pre-FX signal. Negative values pan the
signal to the left channel, positive values pan to the right, and a value of zero pans to the
center. To adjust the post-FX, final-stage gain and panning of the current program, go to the
COMMON page and adjust the Output parameters (see The COMMON Page on page
7-16); or to adjust a layer’s post-FX audio signal individually, go to the LYR_FX page and
set the Layer FX Mode parameter to Layer-Specific FX (see The Layer FX (LYR_FX) Page on
page 7-15), and then return to the OUTPUT page and adjust the output parameters.
An additional pan parameter (Pan2) appears if you have the Stereo parameter on the
KEYMAP page set to a value of On.
Pan Mode
When the mode is Fixed the pan position remains as defined with the Pan parameter,
ignoring MIDI pan messages. When the mode is +MIDI, MIDI pan messages (MIDI 10)
will shift the sound to the left or right of the Pan parameter setting. Message values below
64 shift it left, while those above 64 shift it right. A setting of Auto assigns the pan setting of
each note based on its MIDI note number. In this case, Middle C (MIDI note number 60)
is equivalent to the Pan parameter’s setting. Lower notes shift increasingly left, while higher
notes shift increasingly right. A setting of Reverse shifts low notes right, and high notes left.
MIDI pan messages will also affect the pan position when values of Auto and Reverse are
selected.
7-41
Program Edit Mode
The OUTPUT Page
Output: Pan, Gain, and Mode
When the Layer FX Mode parameter is set to Layer-Specific FX on the LYR_FX page, three
additional parameters appear on the OUTPUT page: Out Pan, Out Gain, and Out Pan
Mode.
These parameters are analogous to the output parameters on the COMMON page, but are
layer-specific—the COMMON output parameters apply to all layers. You can use the output
parameters on the OUTPUT page to adjust the panning and gain of the post-FX signal of
the current layer.
Pan Table
The factory preset pan tables are key-specific panning schemes by which the note that each
key produces is uniquely panned. These tables are particularly useful for producing the stereo
image of a drum set when creating percussion programs, or for producing the stereo image of
a piano when creating piano programs.
Crossfade and Crossfade Sense (XFadeSense)
The Crossfade parameter lets you select a control source to fade the current layer’s amplitude
from zero to maximum. When XFadeSense is Normal, the layer is at full amplitude when
the Crossfade control is at minimum. With XFadeSense set to Reverse, the layer is at zero
amplitude when the Crossfade control is at minimum.
This parameter is similar to the Src1 and Depth parameters for the Amp function on the
DSPCTL and DSPMOD pages, but the attenuation curve for the Crossfade parameter is
optimized specifically for crossfades.
To crossfade two layers in the same program, assign the same control source for the
CrossFade parameters in both layers, then set one of their XFadeSense parameters to a value
of Norm, and the other’s to Rvrs.
7-42
Program Edit Mode
The LFO Page
Drum Remap
The Drum Remap parameter should generally not be changed. This parameter lets the Forte
SE know how drum programs are mapped so that drum sounds can be properly remapped
when using the General MIDI (GM) drum map (see below). Kurz1 designates that the
current drum program was originally a PC2 program, and that it uses the PC2 drum map
(programs 113-119 use this map). Kurz2 designates that the current drum kit uses the new
Forte SE drum map (all other factory drum programs use this map: 120, 241-248, 369-376).
The new drum map is similar to that of the PC2, except tom-tom sounds have been moved
into octave C3-C4, so they are more easily playable with the main kick and snare drum
sounds in that octave. When editing a kit, make sure to follow the layout of the drum map
being used if you want to be able to properly remap the kit to the GM drum map. Programs
that have the Drum Remap parameter set to Off will not be viewed by the Forte SE as drum
programs and will not be affected when remapping to the GM drum map.
In most keyboards and synthesizers, drum programs are mapped as dictated by the General
MIDI (GM) industry standard. The GM drum map isn’t optimally intuitive in terms of
playability, so we developed our own unique keymap that is more intuitive and lends better
to performance. However, the GM drum map is so commonplace that many players feel
most comfortable playing drum programs with the GM drum map. So, we designed the
Forte SE such that you can remap drum programs to the GM drum map. You can set drum
programs to remap to the GM drum map in Master Mode. On the Master Mode MAIN
page set the drum remap parameter to GM. To return drum programs to their original maps,
set this parameter to None. See Drum Remap on page 7-43 in the Master Mode chapter for
more information.
Exclusive Zone Map
The Exclusive Zone Map is another parameter that applies principally to drum programs.
When using a drum program, you may want the closed hi-hat sounds to “cut off” open hihat sounds. Since you can remap the keymaps of drum programs, this parameter remaps “cut
off keys” accordingly.
Like Drum Remap, you can use this parameter on any program, but you probably won’t
want to do this.
The LFO Page
LFOs are low-frequency oscillators. LFOs are used to automate the modulation of a
parameter based on the shape and frequency of an audio waveform. You’ll use the LFO page
to define the behavior of the two LFOs available to each layer. LFOs are periodic (repeating)
control sources. The basic elements are the rate, which defines how frequently the LFO
repeats, and shape, which defines the waveform of the modulation signal it generates.
7-43
Program Edit Mode
The LFO Page
With the Forte SE, you can set upper and lower limits on each LFO’s rate, and assign a
control source to change the LFO’s rate in realtime, if you wish.
Because of its periodic nature, the LFO is perfect for creating effects like vibrato (cyclic
variation in pitch) and tremolo (cyclic variation in amplitude). When you’re editing LFOs,
or any control source, remember that it must be assigned to control some parameter before
you’ll hear the effects of your edits.
LFO1 is always local, meaning that it’s triggered with each Note On event, and runs
independently for each note in the layer. LFO2 is local by default, but can be made global.
This is done on the COMMON page, by setting the Globals parameter to On, which causes
LFO2, ASR2, FUN2 and FUN4 all to become global. Global controls uniformly affect every
note in each layer.
Parameter Group (Available for
each of LFO1 and LFO2)
Range of Values
Default
Minimum Rate
1/4 note, 1/8 note, 1/8 triplet, 1/16 note, 0
to 24 Hz
0.00
Maximum Rate
0 to 24 Hz
0.00
Rate Control
Control Source List
Off
LFO Shape
LFO Shape List (Ref. Guide)
Sine
LFO Start Phase
0, 90, 180, 270 Degrees
0
Minimum Rate
This is the slowest rate at which the LFO runs. When its Rate Control is set to OFF, or
when the control source assigned to it is at its minimum, the LFO runs at its minimum rate.
As previously mentioned, the values 1/4 note, 1/8 note, 1/8 triplet, and 1/16 note sync the
Minimum Rate with the Forte SE’s system tempo. Of course, if you choose to tempo sync
your LFO, then the LFO rate is fixed, and you can specify neither Maximum Rate nor Rate
Control. The display changes as shown below:
7-44
Program Edit Mode
The LFO Page
Maximum Rate
This is the fastest possible rate for the LFO. When its Rate Control is set to ON, or when the
control source assigned to it is at its maximum, the LFO runs at its maximum rate.
Rate Control
Assign any control source in the list to modulate the LFO’s rate between its minimum and
maximum. A continuous control like the Mod Wheel is a natural choice, enabling you to
get just about any rate between minimum and maximum. But you can use a switch control
too, to get just the minimum or maximum with nothing in between. Assigning MPress
(aftertouch) as the rate control for an LFO vibrato gives you an easy way to increase the
vibrato rate in realtime, as you can on many acoustic instruments.
LFO Shape
The shape of the LFO waveform determines the nature of its effect on the signal its
modulating. An easy way to check the effects of the different LFO shapes is to set LFO1
as the value for the Src1 parameter on the PITCH page, and set the Depth for Src1 to 400
cents or so. Then go to the LFO page, set the Min and Max rates for LFO1 at 0.00 Hz
and 4.00 Hz or so, and set the Rate control to MWheel. Now play your MIDI controller
and you’ll hear the LFO’s rate change when you move its Mod Wheel. Select different LFO
Shapes and check out the effect on the pitch.
LFO Phase
Use this parameter to determine the starting point of the LFO’s cycle. One complete cycle of
the LFO is 360 degrees. 0 degrees phase corresponds to a control signal value of 0, becoming
positive. Each 90-degree increment in the phase represents a quarter-cycle of the LFO.
When an LFO is local, the phase parameter gives you control over the starting point of the
LFO for each note (for example, you could make sure every vibrato started below the pitch
you played instead of at the pitch you played). The LFO’s phase also affects global LFOs,
although it’s often indistinguishable, since global LFOs start running as soon as the program
containing them is selected, even if you don’t play any notes.
7-45
Program Edit Mode
The ASR Page
The ASR Page
ASRs are three-section unipolar envelopes—attack, sustain, and release. The Forte SE’s ASRs
can be triggered by a programmable control source, and can be delayed. ASR1 is always
a local control. ASR2 is local by default, but becomes global if the Globals parameter on
the COMMON page is set to On. ASRs are frequently used to ramp the depth of pitch or
amplitude in a vibrato or tremolo, enabling delays in those effects. The ASR page consists of
two rows of five parameters, one row for each of the ASRs.
Parameter
Range of Values
Default
Trigger
Control Source List
Off
Mode
Normal, Hold, Repeat
Normal
Delay
0 to 30 seconds
0 seconds
Attack
0 to 30 seconds
0 seconds
Release
0 to 30 seconds
0 seconds
Trigger
This defines the control source that starts the current layer’s ASRs. The ASR starts when the
trigger switches from off to on. If the Trigger parameter is set to ON, a global ASR starts
running immediately when you select a program that contains it. A local ASR starts running
as soon as you trigger a note in the layer that contains it. Switch controls are better suited for
ASR triggers because of their binary (on/off) nature. A continuous control will trigger the
ASRs when its signal value is above its midpoint.
Mode
This parameter sets the sustain section of the ASR. The ASR’s mode determines what the
ASR does when it finishes its attack section. If the Mode parameter is set to Normal, the
ASR will run directly from its attack section to its release section (no sustain). At a setting of
Repeat, the ASR will cycle through the attack and release sections, then loop forward and
cycle through again until the ASR’s trigger switches off. If the mode is set to Hold, the ASR
maintains its position at the end of the attack section until the ASR’s trigger switches off.
7-46
Program Edit Mode
The Function (FUN) Page
The ASR then goes into its release section. If the ASR’s trigger switches off before the attack
section is complete, the ASR goes directly to its release section.
Delay
When the ASR’s trigger switches on, the ASR will start immediately if this parameter is set to
zero. Nonzero values will cause a corresponding delay between the ASR trigger and the start
of the ASR.
Attack
This defines how long the ASR takes to ramp up from minimum to maximum effect on
whatever it’s patched to.
Release
This defines how long the ASR takes to fade to minimum from its maximum. If the ASR’s
trigger switches off before the ASR has reached maximum, the ASR releases from that level.
The Function (FUN) Page
FUN is short for function. The Forte SE’s four FUNs greatly extend the flexibility of the
control sources. Each FUN accepts input from any two control sources, performs a selectable
function on the two input signals, and sends the result as its output, which can be assigned
like any other control source. Using the FUNs involves defining them on the FUN page,
then assigning one or more of them as control sources. The FUN page looks like this:
There are three parameters for each FUN. Inputs a and b can be any control source from the
Control Source list. The control sources you want to combine are the ones you’ll assign as the
values for these parameters.
The Function parameter determines what mathematical function is applied to the two
inputs. When a FUN has been assigned as a control source, the Forte SE reads the values of
the two control sources defined as Inputs a and b. It then processes them according to the
setting for the Function parameter, and the resulting value is the FUN’s output.
7-47
Program Edit Mode
The Amplitude Envelope (AMPENV) Page
The Amplitude Envelope (AMPENV) Page
Amplitude envelopes have three sections: attack, decay, and release. The attack section
determines how long each note takes to reach its assigned amplitude level after you trigger a
Note On event. The decay section determines how quickly and how much a sustained sound
fades before a Note Off is triggered. The release section determines how quickly a sound
fades to silence after a Note Off is triggered.
Press the AMPENV soft button to reach the Amplitude Envelope page. For many programs,
it will look like the diagram below, which tells you that the amplitude envelope for the
current layer is the sample’s default “natural” envelope. Many factory ROM programs use the
natural envelope, which is custom designed for each sample and waveform during its original
development process. A natural envelope usually contains more detail than a user envelope,
and may make samples of acoustic instruments sound more realistic.
If you want to build your own amplitude envelope, just turn the Alpha Wheel a click. The
value Natural will change to User, and a set of AMPENV parameters will appear. The sound
will change when you do this, because the default settings for the User envelope, as shown
in the diagram below, take effect as soon as you leave Natural mode. Returning to Natural
mode applies the original amplitude envelope once again.
7-48
Program Edit Mode
The Amplitude Envelope (AMPENV) Page
You’ll tweak the parameters on the AMPENV page when you want to shape the amplitude
characteristics of your sounds. A graphic view of the amplitude envelope will appear on the
display to give you a visual sense of the envelope’s characteristics. The dots along the envelope
graphic indicate the breakpoints between the envelope’s various segments.
The AMPENV page’s top line gives you the usual location reminder, points out the currently
selected layer, and tells you the relative scale of the envelope’s graphic view. The envelope
graphic shrinks in scale as the segment times get longer. This auto-zoom feature maximizes
the available display space. Try lengthening one of the segment times. The envelope graphic
will stretch to fill the display from left to right. When it fills the display, it will shrink to half
its size, and the top line will indicate that the scale has changed (from [1/1] to [1/2], for
example).
Each parameter on this page has two values, as listed below. For the envelope segments, the
first (upper) value is the duration of the segment, and the second is the amplitude level at
the completion of the segment. For the Loop parameter, the values define how the envelope
loops, and how many times the loop cycles.
Parameter Group
Attack Segment 1, 2, 3
Decay Segment
Release Segment 1, 2, 3
Loop
Parameter
Range of Values
Time
0 to 60 seconds
Level
0 to 100%
Time
0 to 60 seconds
Level
0 to 100%
Time
0 to 60 seconds
Level
0 to 150% (Release Segment
3 is always set to 0%)
Type
Off, Forward, Bidirectional
# of loops
Infinite, 1 to 31 times
Attack Segment Times
These indicate how long it takes for the current layer’s amplitude to reach its final level from
its starting level.
Attack Segment Levels
These are the final levels that each segment achieves at completion. The levels are expressed
as percentages of the maximum possible amplitude for the current layer. Attack segment 1
always starts at zero amplitude, and moves to its assigned level in the time specified by its
time value. So the default settings of 0 seconds and 100% mean that the first segment of the
attack section moves instantly from zero amplitude to 100% amplitude. Increase the time of
Attack segment 1 if you want the sound to ramp up more slowly.
7-49
Program Edit Mode
The Amplitude Envelope (AMPENV) Page
Attack segments 2 and 3 affect the sound only when you set a nonzero value for time. They
will then move to their assigned levels in the time specified. Their starting levels are equal to
the final levels of the preceding segment.
Decay Segment
The decay section has only one segment. It has values for time and level, just as for the attack
section. The decay section begins as soon as the attack section has been completed. It starts
at the same amplitude level as the attack segment preceding it, and moves to its assigned
level in the time specified. You’ll hear a note’s decay section only when the attack section is
completed before a Note Off message is generated for that note.
To create a sustaining envelope, simply set the Decay segment’s level to a nonzero value.
Release Segments
Like the attack and decay sections, each of the three segments in the release section has
values for time and level. Each segment reaches its assigned level in the time specified for
that segment. Release segment 1 starts at the Note Off event for each note, at the current
amplitude level of that note—whether it’s in the attack section or the decay section. It then
moves to its assigned level in the time specified. Release segments 2 and 3 start at the final
levels of the segments before them.
Release segments 1 and 2 can be set to any level from 0 to 150%. Release segment 3
always has a level of 0%, so you can’t adjust its level. In place of its Level parameter you see
a parameter that lets you toggle between User envelopes and the sound’s preprogrammed
natural envelope.
Loop Type
There are seven different values for Loop type.
A value of Off disables looping for the current layer’s amplitude envelope.
Values of seg1F, seg2F, and seg3F are forward loops. In each case, the amplitude envelope
plays through the attack and decay sections, then loops back to the beginning of the first,
second, or third attack segments, respectively.
Values of seg1B, seg2B, and seg3B, are bidirectional loops. The amplitude envelope plays
through the attack and decay sections, then reverses and plays backward to the beginning of
the first, second, or third attack segment, respectively. When it reaches the beginning of the
assigned attack segment, it reverses again, playing forward to the end of the decay section,
and so on.
7-50
Program Edit Mode
TheEnvelope2(ENV2)andEnvelope3(ENV3)Pages
Number of Loops
A value of Inf makes the amplitude envelope loop until a Note Off is generated. Values of 1
through 31 indicate how many times the loop will repeat after the amplitude envelope has
played once through its normal cycle.
Regardless of the loop type and the number of loops, each note goes into its release section
as soon as its Note State goes off (that is, when a Note Off is generated). The envelope
will continue to loop as long as Note State remains on, whether it’s held on by a pedal, by
the IgnRel parameter (described in the section entitled The LAYER Page on page 6-17), or
anything else.
The Envelope 2 (ENV2) and
Envelope 3 (ENV3) Pages
The Forte SE offers two envelopes in addition to AMPENV. Like AMPENV, ENV2 and
ENV3 can be assigned like any other control source. Unlike AMPENV, however, ENV2
and ENV3 can be bipolar. This means that you can set negative values for them. (Obviously,
you can’t have an amplitude less than zero, so AMPENV is unipolar—the values range from
either 0 to 100% or 0 to 150%). A bipolar envelope controlling pitch, for example, could
modulate the pitch both above and below its original level.
Another difference is that AMPENV always controls the amplitude of the layer, so even if
you use it as a control source for other functions, it will still affect the layer’s amplitude.
ENV2 and ENV3 affect only those layers that have them assigned as a control source. Also,
AMPENV uses an exponential attack (the amplitude rises much faster at the end of the
attack segment than it does at the beginning), while ENV2 and ENV3 use linear attacks (the
attack segment increases at the same rate from start to finish).
The pages for Envelopes 2 and 3 are reached with the soft buttons ENV2 and ENV3. When
you select these pages, you’ll find a display that looks very much like the AMPENV page.
The only differences are that you can program an amount for Rel3; the Rel1 and Rel2 limits,
which are ±100%; and in the envelope graphic, which has a dotted line running horizontally
across the display. This is the zero level line; negative level values for the various envelope
segments will cause the envelope graphic to dip below this line.
7-51
Program Edit Mode
The Envelope Control (ENVCTL) Page
The Envelope Control (ENVCTL) Page
The Envelope Control page gives you realtime control over the rates of each section of
the amplitude envelope for both natural and user envelopes (see The Amplitude Envelope
(AMPENV) Page on page 7-48). Press the ENVCTL soft button to reach the ENVCTL
page.
The display’s top line reminds you of the current layer. The column on the left lists the
three section types of the amplitude envelope, and each corresponding line lists the values
for the five DSP control parameters that are available for each section type. The DSP
control parameters are: Adjust, Key tracking, Velocity tracking, and Source/Depth, which
are listed at the top of each corresponding column. When AMPENV is set to User mode,
the Attack and Release sections on this page apply to the attack and release sections on the
AMPENV page. It’s important to keep in mind that the values for the various parameters
are cumulative, meaning that if for example you set attack to be controlled by Keytrk and
VelTrk, the resulting change on Attack would be affected by the combination of the values
produced by KeyTrk and VelTrk. Also note that unlike previous Kurzweil models, ENVCTL
does affect the attack sections of natural envelopes. Additionally, the bottom line of this page
lets you make use of the Impact feature, which lets you boost or cut the amplitude of the first
20 milliseconds of a note’s attack.
The parameters and values in the following parameters list (see below) apply to each of the
three envelope sections—attack, decay, and release. We’ll describe them only once, since their
functions are largely the same for each envelope section. The only difference is with velocity
tracking, which is only available as a parameter to control attack sections of the amplitude
envelope (however, you can assign attack velocity as the value for the Source parameter in
each of the sections).
The values of each of these parameters multiply the rates of the envelope sections they
control. Values greater than 1.000x make the envelope sections run faster (they increase the
rate), while values less than 1.000x make the envelope sections run slower. Say for example
that on the current layer’s AMPENV page you had set the Decay section’s time at 2.00
seconds, and its level at 0%. This sets the layer’s amplitude to fade to silence two seconds
after the completion of the last attack segment. The decay time is two seconds; the decay rate
is 50% per second. Now if you select the ENVCTL page and set the Decay Adjust parameter
to a value of 2.000x, you’ve increased the decay rate by a factor of two, making it twice as
7-52
Program Edit Mode
The Envelope Control (ENVCTL) Page
fast. The rate increases to 100% per second, and the decay time is now one second instead of
two.
Note: Since 0 multiplied by any number equals 0, the envelope parameters on
this page will have no effect on any AMPENV sections set to 0 seconds. A way
around this is to change any AMPENV sections set to 0 to 0.02 seconds.
Parameter Group (Available for
each of Att, Dec, Rel, Imp)
Range of Values
Adjust
0.018 to 50.000x (-24.0 to 24.0 dB for Imp)
Key Tracking
0.018 to 50.000x (-2.00 to 2.00 dB for Imp)
Velocity Tracking
0.018 to 50.000x (Not available for Dec or Rel; -24.0 to 24.0 dB for Imp)
Source
Control Source List
Depth
0.018 to 50.000x (-24.0 to 24.0 dB for Imp)
Adjust
This is the familiar Coarse adjust found on many other pages. Use it here to change the rate
of one of the envelope sections without reprogramming the envelope itself. This parameter
doesn’t give you realtime control over the envelope. It is, however, a good way to adjust
the natural envelopes without switching to a User envelope and trying to approximate the
Natural envelope.
Key Tracking
This uses the MIDI note number of each key as the control input for the current layer’s
corresponding envelope section. When the value of this parameter is greater than 1.000x,
notes above C 4 will make the envelope section run faster, while notes below C 4 will make it
run slower. When the value of this parameter is less than 1.000x, notes above C 4 will make
the envelope section run slower, and notes below C 4 will make it run faster. This gives you
realtime envelope control right from your MIDI controller. You might use it, for example, to
cause an acoustic guitar sound to decay quicker at the high end of the keyboard (set the key
tracking to a positive value).
7-53
Program Edit Mode
The Envelope Control (ENVCTL) Page
Velocity Tracking
Use your attack velocity as the control input for the current layer’s attack section (this
parameter doesn’t apply to decay or release). When the value of this parameter is greater
than 1.000x, attack velocities greater than 64 make the attack section run faster, and attack
velocities below 64 make it run slower. This gives you realtime attack control over the
envelope.
Source, Depth
These two parameters work together to let you assign a control like the Mod Wheel to affect
the current layer’s amplitude envelope in realtime. The value of the Source parameter defines
which control affects the envelope section, and the value of the Depth parameter defines how
much the rate is multiplied when the control is at its maximum value, 127. No effect is had
when the control is at its minimum value, 0, and Depth values are scaled for controller values
in between.
Note: For each note triggered, you can only set the controller value that will scale the
Depth parameter of an envelope section before that section of the envelope is triggered.
For controllers assigned for Attack, the controller value used will be the last received
before the note is triggered. For controllers assigned for Decay, the controller value
used will be the last received before the final section of the attack envelope reaches its
maximum amplitude. For controllers assigned for Release, the controller value used will
be the last received before the note is released. To put it another way, for each envelope
section, you cannot change the rate of a note’s envelope once that section of the envelope
has been triggered.
Impact
Impact can boost or cut note volume by up to 24 dB during the first 20 milliseconds of the
attack of an envelope. This feature is an easy way to get more “thump” from your bass and
drum sounds.
7-54
Program Edit Mode
The Arpeggiator Function
The Arpeggiator Function
The Arpeggiator takes note input from the keyboard (or via MIDI) and outputs a rhythmic
and/or melodic pattern of MIDI notes. The Arpeggiator can affect both the internal
programs and external MIDI instruments.
The Arpeggiator processes notes by playing them repeatedly, and/or transposing them
up and down the keyboard. You have control over note output velocity, order, duration,
transposition, and more. You can control several arpeggiator parameters in real time. You
can also assign and edit specific patterns for note shifting, velocity shifting, and duration,
either as separate patterns, or as a combination of all three in Step Sequencer mode. The
Arpeggiator also has several different “latch” settings, which allows the arpeggiator to
continue to play after you have released the keys.
Arp Switch (On/Off)
Forte SE Programs use a global arpeggiator, which can be toggled on and off with the Arp
switch. This changes the “State” parameter of the Program Arpeggiator, which can also
be switched on using Controller number 147 (ArpOn) and switched off using Controller
number 148 (ArpOff). These controllers can, of course, be assigned as the destination of a
Forte SE physical controller other than the Arp Switch.
Arp soft button
Hitting the Arp soft button brings upthe Arpeggiator editor, where you can adjust many
parameters.
7-55
Program Edit Mode
The Arpeggiator Function
Some Arpeggiator parameters may be determined by the ArpPreset, which can be saved with
the Program. An ArpPreset of 0 (none) will default to the parameter values shown below.
ARP1 Page
7-56
Parameter
Range of Values
Default
Arp Preset
0-148 factory presets; 1024 user presets
0 (None)
State
On/Off
Off
Arp Mode
Classic, StepSeq (see ARP2 page for further parameters)
Classic
Tempo
System, 20-320 bpm
System
Latch
Standard, Overplay, Arpeg, Add, Auto, AutoHold, 1NoteAuto,
1NoteAutLo, 1NoteAutHi
Standard
Limit Option
Stop, Reset, Unipolar, Bipolar, Float Res, Float Uni, Float Bip
Unipolar
KeyRange
all keys
C1 - G9
Beats
1/1 (Whole Notes) to 1/384 (96 notes per beat)
1/16 (16th Notes)
Program Edit Mode
The Arpeggiator Function
Parameter
Range of Values
Default
ShiftMode
Alg (algorithm) or Patt (pattern)
Alg
ShiftLimit
0-60 semitones
24
Shift (Alg)
Shift Pattern (Patt)
± 88 Semitones
1-69 Preset patterns
0
Off
Play Order
Played, Upwards, Downwards, UpDown, UpDown Repeat,
Random, Shuffle, Walking, Simultaneous
Played
Arp Preset
Use the Arp Preset parameter to recall factory or user created Arpeggiator settings. An Arp
Preset contains settings for all of the parameters on the Arp1 and Arp2 pages (except for the
State parameter). Scrolling through the Arp Presets is an easy way to discover the different
possibilities of the arpeggiator, or to find a preset similar to what you want and continue to
edit it from there.
You can save your current settings as an Arp Preset by pressing the ArpSav soft button. If
you select a different Arp Preset before saving your current Arpeggiator settings, the current
Arpeggiator settings will be replaced by the settings from the preset without showing a
warning. Be sure to save your settings as an Arp Preset if you want to be able to recall them
after making additional changes. Even if you don’t save the current Arpeggiator settings as an
Arp Preset, the most recent settings will always be saved with the program when the program
is saved.
State
Use the State parameter to turn the Arpeggiator On or Off. The State parameter does the
same thing as the front panel Arp On/Off switch.
If you save a Program with the Arp State On you may then use the Arp switch to change the
state to Off as you play.
Arp Mode
The two Arpeggiator modes, Classic and StepSeq, offer different means of shaping and
editing Arpeggiator patterns. Depending upon this mode, the ARP2 page will provide
access to different options and editable patterns. In Classic mode, ARP2 will offer factoryprogrammed note-Shift Patterns, and editable Velocity and Duration patterns. In StepSeq
mode, you can use ARP2 to edit sequences step-by-step, specifying Note, Velocity, Duration
and Beat for each step in a sequence.
7-57
Program Edit Mode
The Arpeggiator Function
Tempo
The Arpeggiator tempo parameter specifies beats-per-minute. When set to System it will
use the the value set on the TEMPO page in Global Mode (see TEMPO on page 12-16) for
details). If a specific Arpeggiator tempo is saved with an Arp Preset, the Global tempo will be
set to that value when the preset is selected.
For quick access to the Global TEMPO page from any other page, press the left and right
navigation buttons simultaneously. You can then use the Alpha Wheel for real time control
over the Arpeggiator tempo, overriding the saved preset value.
Latch
Latch determines how the Arpeggiator responds to notes when they are they are triggered.
Keys means that the Arpeggiator plays only while you are holding one or more keys down
(or note triggers on). As you play different notes, they get added to the Arpeggiator, and as
you release notes, they get taken out. If you play notes faster than the Arpeggiator’s current
tempo, each subsequent note will be added to the arpeggiation at the next division of a
beat. This can cause a lag between the time you play the note and the time you hear it in the
arpeggiation.
In the next three modes, the Arpeggiator latches notes only when MIDI Controller 157
(Latch) sends a value of On (64 or higher). An easy way to experiment with these modes is to
assign the Mod Wheel to send MIDI 157.
In Overplay mode, the Arpeggiator latches any notes that are being held when Latch turns
on, and continues playing them, even after you let them go, until Latch turns off. Any
notes that you play after Latch is already on do not get arpeggiated, even if they’re in the
arpeggiation range.
Arpeg is similar: any notes held when Latch goes on are latched and arpeggiated, and keep
going until Latch goes off. Any notes you play outside the arpeggiation range play normally.
Notes that you play inside the arpeggiation range do not play normally; rather, if you hold
them on, they become part of the arpeggiation. They drop out of the arpeggiation as soon as
you release them.
Like Overplay and Arpeggiation, Add means that all notes being held when Latch goes on
get latched, and keep playing until Latch goes off (even if you’ve released the notes). Any
notes you play after Latch is already on also get latched.
Auto is independent of Latch; every note you play is automatically latched, and the
Arpeggiator runs as long as you hold at least one arpeggiated note. As long as you keep
holding on at least one note (it doesn’t have to be the same note the whole time), every note
you play in the arpeggiation range gets latched.
Pedals is sort of a combination of Keys, Add, and Overplay modes. It relies on both Latch
(MIDI 157) and Latch2 (MIDI 158). If neither latch controller is on, notes will arpeggiate
only while you are holding down keys (similar to Keys mode). If you activate Controller 158,
the keys currently held down will latch, and any additional keys played while Controller 158
7-58
Program Edit Mode
The Arpeggiator Function
is on will also latch (similar to Add mode). When Controller 158 is off, any keys that are
not currently held down will be removed from the arpeggiation. If you activate Controller
157, keys currently held down will latch, and any additional keys played while Controller
157 is on will play normally (similar to Overplay mode). This mode is called Pedals mode
because you might want to assign Footswitch 1 to Latch (Controller 157) and Footswitch
2 to Latch2 (Controller 158) to make the pedals function similarly to sustain and sostenuto
pedals. Additionally, you could assign one Footswitch to SusLatch (Controller 160)—doing
this makes the Footswitch act as a sustain pedal when Arp is off, and as a Latch pedal when
Arp is on.
Autohold is similar to Auto. Holding at least one arpeggiated note on and playing other
notes latches those notes. Unlike in Auto mode, if you stop holding at least one arpeggiated
note on, the arpeggiation continues playing (although you can’t latch any more notes). In
this case, if you strike another key within the Multi’s arpeggiation range, you start a new
arpeggiation sequence. Autohold is useful for arpeggiating chords: when you play a chord, it
gets latched, and continues arpeggiating after you release the chord. When you play another
chord, the previous chord gets unlatched, and the new one gets latched. You can use the
Panic soft button to stop arpeggiation at any time.
1NoteAuto is similar to Autohold, except only the last note played is latched (even if
previously played notes are still being held.) 1NoteAuto is specifically designed for use with
Shift Patterns (see above) because Shift Patterns are designed to be played from one note at
a time (though you can use 1NoteAuto without a Shift Pattern as well.) Using 1NoteAuto
for zones that use a Shift Pattern ensures that Shift Patterns will sound correct by only
allowing one note at a time to trigger the pattern. You can use the Panic soft button to stop
arpeggiation at any time. 1NoteAutoLow and 1NoteAutoHi are also designed for use with
Shift Patterns. They work similarly to 1NoteAuto, except 1NoteAutoLow always latches the
lowest note when holding multiple notes, and 1NoteAutoHi always latches the highest note
when holding multiple notes. You can also use these latch types without a Shift Pattern if
desired.
Limit Option
This parameter determines what the Arpeggiator does when it has shifted the currently
latched notes up (or down) to the shift limit. Stop causes the Arpeggiator to stop when it
reaches the shift limit. Reset causes the Arpeggiator to return to its original pitch and repeat
the latched cycle of notes, transposing each cycle according to the settings for Shift Amount
and Shift Limit. If the limit allows the notes to go out of MIDI range (for example, if you set
Shift to 12, set the limit to 60, and play C6), then those “ghost” notes don’t sound, but they
take up rhythmic space: the Arpeggiator waits for the cycle to play itself out before starting
over.
Unipolar means that after playing up to the shift limit, the Arpeggiator begins shifting
notes in the opposite direction, until it reaches the original pitch, where it reverses again.
To determine the next note when it reaches the shift limit, the Arpeggiator calculates the
interval between the shift limit and what the next note would be if the shift limit weren’t
there. It then plays the note that is the calculated interval lower than the last note before the
7-59
Program Edit Mode
The Arpeggiator Function
shift limit. The same thing happens in reverse when the arpeggiated notes get back down to
the original pitch. The following table makes this easier to visualize by showing the result of
arpeggiating one note (C4) in Unipolar mode, with Shift Amount set to 3 ST and various
values for Shift Limit.
Shift Limit
Resulting Arpeggiation (When LimitOption is Unipolar)
Comment
Up
Down
Up
6 ST (F#4)
C4, D#4, F#4,
D#4, C4
D#4, …
Same notes play in both directions when Shift
Limit is a multiple of Shift Amount
7 ST (G4)
C4, D 4, F 4,
E4, C 4,
D 4, …
Last upward note before shift limit is F#4, next
upward note would be A4, which is 2 ST from
shift limit (G4); therefore first downward note is
E4 (2 ST below last upward note)
8 ST (G#4)
C4, D#4, F#4,
F4, D4,
D#4, …
A4 is 1 ST from shift limit, therefore first
downward note is F4 (1 ST lower than last
upward note)
9 ST (A4)
C4, D#4, F#4, A4
F#4, D#4, C4,
D#4, …
All symmetrical again; now A4 is within shift limit
10 ST (A#4)
C4, D#4, F#4, A4,
G4, E4, C#4,
D#4, …
Next upward note would be C5, which is 2 ST
from shift limit
11 ST (B4)
C4, D#4, F#4, A4,
G#4, F4, D4,
D#4, …
C5 is 1 ST from shift limit
12 ST (C5)
C4, D 4, F 4, A4,
C5,
A4, F 4, D 4,
C4,
D#4, …
Symmetrical again, including C5
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
Bipolar starts out the same way as Unipolar, but during downward note shifting, it
continues past the original pitch until it hits the shift limit in the opposite direction, where it
reverses again.
Float Res adds a bit of apparent randomness to the process. “Float” means that when the
Arpeggiator reaches the shift limit, it resets—but not to its original pitch as with plain
Reset. Like Unipolar and Bipolar, it looks at the first note that would exceed the shift limit,
and calculates the interval between that note and the shift limit. It then restarts the cycle of
latched notes, transposing the entire cycle by the interval it just calculated, then shifting each
subsequent cycle by the value of Shift Amount, until it reaches the shift limit again.
Here’s a very simple example. Suppose that the only note in the Arpeggiator cycle is C4,
Shift Amount is 4 (a third), and Shift Limit is 7 (so notes won’t get shifted above G4). The
Arpeggiator plays C4, then E4. The next note should be G#4, but that’s above the shift
limit—so the Forte SE calculates the difference between that G#4 and the shift limit (G4):
one semitone. It adds that difference to the original starting note (C4) and plays that note
next—C#4. The next note (F4) is within the shift limit, but the next note (A4) isn’t, so it gets
translated into D4—and so on.
7-60
Program Edit Mode
The Arpeggiator Function
Float Uni uses the same concept and applies it to Unipolar mode: when the Arpeggiator
reaches the shift limit, it calculates the difference between the next note and the limit, and
transposes the next cycle of notes down by that interval, then shifts each subsequent cycle
down until it reaches the original pitch. Float Bip is similar to Float Uni, but the downward
shift limit isn’t the original pitch, it’s the negative of the Shift Limit value.
The Arpeggiator can be a lot of fun, even if you don’t always understand exactly what it’s
doing. Keep in mind that the stranger the algorithm you set up, the more unlikely the notes
will stay close to one key, so if you want to create something that’s going to sound at all
diatonic, keep it simple.
Key Range (Low Key and High Key)
The Arpeggiator processes notes within the range of these parameters. Notes outside the
specified range play normally, and do not become part of the arpeggiation sequence. Set the
LoKey and HiKey parameters using the data entry wheel or buttons.
Beats
The Beats parameter sets the number of notes per beat. The tempo is based on quarter notes.
Therefore, if you set Beats to 1/4, you will get one note per beat of the clock. At 1/16, you
will get 4 notes per beat, and so forth. The maximum value is 96 notes per beat (1/384), but
at most tempos, divisions smaller than 1/64 will sound pretty much the same.
To find a Beats value, multiply the notes you want per beat by 4. For example, 4 notes per
beat (16th notes) would be 4*4=16, a Beats value of 1/16. Three notes per beat (8th note
triplets) would be 3*4=12, a Beats value of 1/12. Six notes per beat (16th note triplets)
would be 6*4=24, a Beats value of1/24.
Shift Mode
The Alg (algorithm) option will let you create note sequences based upon a fixed Shift
Amount. When you select Patt (pattern), the ShiftPatt parameter option will appear,
allowing you to select one of several factory- defined patterns.
Shift Limit
Limit determines how far up or down the Arpeggiator shifts from the original note. The
minimum value is 0, and the maximum is 60. When the Arpeggiator reaches the limit, the
Arpeggiator responds according to the setting for the Limit Option parameter.
Shift (Shift Amount)
You can tell the Arpeggiator to transpose all of the currently latched notes each time it plays
through them. Shift Amount determines how much transposition will occur for each cycle of
notes. For example, if you have latched C4 and F4, and you assign a Shift Amount of 2, the
Arpeggiator will play C4, F4, D4, G4, E4, A4, and so on until it reaches the Limit value. The
Shift Amount values can range from -88 to 88, with 0 (the default) being no transposition.
7-61
Program Edit Mode
The Arpeggiator Function
Shift Pattern (ShiftPatt)
When the Shift Mode is set to Pattern, ShiftPatt engages a step sequencer for arpeggiator
note patterns. The inputted note number of each played key is shifted according to a
sequenced pattern, thus “Shift Pattern.” The Forte SE has 69 pre-programed shift patterns
including many useful chords, intervals, and rhythms. (You can also create your own custom
patterns using the StepSeq editor.) Steps are played back at the rate set for Beats. Keep in
mind that Shift Patterns are affected by every parameter on the ARP1 page, which can be the
cause of unexpected variation, or a way to add interesting variation to a pattern.
Shift Patterns are most easily used and understood when triggered by only one key at a
time. One way to prevent triggering from multiple keys is to use one of the Latch types
1NoteAuto, 1NoteAutoLow, or 1NoteAutoHi when using a shift pattern. Triggering shift
patterns from one key allows the pre-programed patterns to sound like what you would
expect from their names. If no other keys are playing, patterns will start over each time a key
is pressed (there are some exceptions to this when using Arpeggiator Latch parameters other
than “Keys,” though a newly triggered pattern will always start at step 1). When triggering
Shift Patterns from more than one key at a time, each consecutive step of the pattern shifts
the note from a different inputted key, the order of which is decided by the Play Order
parameter on the ARP1 page. This means that each key will not be shifted by every step of
the pattern, causing you to only hear part of the pattern from each key, often making the
pattern unrecognizable. Though triggering a Shift pattern from multiple keys can be used
creatively, it can also make it hard to predict what the output will be.
Play Order
This parameter determines the order in which the Forte SE plays arpeggiated notes. Played
causes them to play back in the chronological order in which you played and latched them.
Upwards means that notes play in ascending pitch order, regardless of their chronological
order. Downwards means descending pitch order. UpDown causes notes to play from lowest
pitch to highest, then from highest pitch to lowest, repeating the cycle until you stop the
arpeggiation. The notes at the very top and very bottom only play once. UpDown Repeat is
similar to UpDown, except that the notes at the top and bottom play twice (repeat) when the
Arpeggiator reverses direction.
Random plays the currently latched notes in completely random order. Shuffle plays them
at random, but keeps track of the notes so that no note repeats until all of the others have
played. Walk is a “random walk” order: each successive note is either the next or previous
note (in chronological order). For example, suppose you’ve latched four notes—G4, B4, D5,
and F5—in that order. The first note the Arpeggiator plays is the G4. The second note will
be either B4 (the next note chronologically), or F5 (the “previous” note chronologically—
that is, the last latched note). If the second note is B4, the third note will be either D5 or G4.
If the second note is F5, the third note will be either G4 or D5.
7-62
Program Edit Mode
The Arpeggiator Function
Simultaneous makes the Arpeggiator latch each note you play and repeat it in time with the
Tempo value, sort of like a digital delay with no decay. If you play a C and hold it while you
play an E and a G, the Arpeggiator will play all three notes at the same time and at the same
tempo. Simultaneous also works well with Shift and Limit, allowing you to shift multiple
notes simultaneously.
The ARP2 Page
Editing Patterns in Classic Mode
The ARP2 page will allow you to set different parameters depending upon the Arp Mode
selected. When set to “Classic” the ARP2 page will give access to these parameters:
With Arp Mode set to Pattern, Velocity Mode and Duration Mode include step sequencers
for note and velocity shifting, allowing you to more precisely control how your Arpeggiator
(or MIDI note input) is processed.
Velocity Mode
First, Played, Last, Aftertouch, MIDI 109,
Fixed, Pattern (1-74 factory patterns plus
user created patterns) Human1-4,
Chimp1-4, MissNotes1-9
Played
Velocity (Fixed)
1 to 100
100
Duration Mode
Fixed, Pattern
Duration (Fixed)
1% to 100%
100%
ShftPattrn (Shift
Pattern)
Off, 1-69 factory patterns
Off
Velocity Mode
Velocity sets the attack velocity of the played notes. With Velocity set to First, all notes play
at the velocity of the first played note. With Velocity set to Played, each note repeats with
the same velocity you played it at. With Velocity set to Last, all notes play at the velocity of
the most recently played note. With Velocity set to Aftertouch, the velocities are controlled
by keyboard pressure: as you hold and push down on any key, the velocities get higher, and as
you ease up they get lower.
7-63
Program Edit Mode
The Arpeggiator Function
With Velocity set to MIDI 109, MIDI controller 109 continually sets the arpeggiator
velocity. This works well when MIDI controller 109 is set to a knob or expression pedal.
With Velocity set to Fixed, all notes play with the same velocity. The default Fixed velocity
is 100. Like MIDI 109, You can control this velocity amount in real-time by assigning
a controller to VelFixed, controller destination number is 175. Input from any physical
controller assigned to send VelFixed (or any entry value for a controller assigned to send
VelFixed) overrides the programmed value of the Velocity parameter, disabling it until you
select a different Multi (or in Program mode, until you select a different control setup on the
MIDI‑mode TRANSMIT page).
Velocity Pat
The Pattern option engages a step sequencer for arpeggiator velocity patterns, which shifts
the velocity of each arpeggiated note according to a sequenced pattern. There are XX pre
programed velocity patterns to choose from, some of which create rhythms by using velocity
values of -127 or “none” to leave rests in the arpeggiation. The sequencer uses the velocity
received from the first note played as the center position to shift velocities up or down from.
If no other keys are playing, patterns will start over each time a key is pressed (there are some
exceptions to this when using ARP1 Latch parameters other than “Keys,” though a newly triggered
pattern will always start at step 1.) When triggering velocity patterns from more than one key
at a time, each consecutive step of the pattern shifts the velocity from a different inputted
key, the order of which is decided by the Play Order parameter on the ARP1 page.
Note: For patterns with negative velocity values, if the velocity of the first played note is
low enough that a pattern step could result in a velocity of zero, some notes may have a
velocity of zero and therefore produce no sound.
7-64
Program Edit Mode
The Arpeggiator Function
Editing Velocity Patterns
You can edit the included patterns by pressing the Edit button when a pattern is highlighted
in the VelocityPat field.
The top line of the “EditVelocityPatt” page displays the pattern’s name and total number
of steps. Each pattern can have up to 48 steps, and each step can shift velocities by ± 127
steps. You can insert a step with a value of “none” by entering -127 and then shifting down
one more step. A step with the value “none” causes the arpeggiator to play nothing for that
step, allowing you to create rhythmic patterns by using “none” to leave spaces. Pressing Stepremoves the last step in the list, pressing Step+ inserts a new velocity step at the end of the
list (the pattern editor remembers the values of removed steps until you save or exit.) Use the
navigation buttons to move between pattern steps, use the Alpha Wheel, or Previous-/Next+
buttons to enter the velocity shift amount for each step. Press More to see a second page for
patterns with more than 24 steps.
Press Delete to delete the pattern from memory. Press Rename to rename the pattern and
save. Pressing Save gives you the option to save the pattern or rename and save. To create a
new VelPatt, edit an existing pattern and choose Rename when saving. Press Exit to return to
the ARP2 page. When exiting the Progam editor, it will automatically give you the option to
save the pattern with a User Program if changes have been made.
The Velocity Modes Human1 through Human4 randomly change played note velocity
within a range in order to make arpeggiation sound more human like, with each note varying
slightly in velocity. The Human settings use the velocity received from the first note played as
the center of the randomization range. Each note of the arpeggiator will randomly choose a
velocity within the given range. (See the table below for velocity ranges.)
The Velocity Modes Chimp1 through Chimp4 function in a similar fashion to the Human
settings (see above.) Like the Human settings, the Chimp settings randomly change played
note velocity within a range, but the Chimp settings have larger randomization ranges.
The Chimp settings use the velocity received from the first note played as the center of the
randomization range. Each note of the arpeggiator will randomly choose a velocity within
the given range. (See the table below for velocity randomizationranges.)
Note: For Human and Chimp modes, if the velocity of the first played note is low enough
that the selected randomization range could result in a velocity of zero, some notes may
have a velocity of zero and therefore produce no sound..
7-65
Program Edit Mode
The Arpeggiator Function
Velocity Setting
Velocity Randomization Range
Human1
±3
Human2
±6
Human3
± 10
Human4
± 15
Chimp1
± 25
Chimp2
± 35
Chimp3
± 50
Chimp4
± 64
Velocity Modes MissNotes1 through MissNotes9 makes the Forte SE randomly miss playing
a percentage of inputted notes. See the table below for percentages and their equivalent
settings. Each of these settings also randomly changes some of the inputted velocities in a
range of ± 5, with the purpose of simulating a more human played sound.
Note: Missed Notes are actually output as notes with a velocity of zero.
Velocity Setting
Approximate % of Notes Missed
MissNotes1
% 10
MissNotes2
% 20
MissNotes3
% 30
MissNotes4
% 40
MissNotes5
% 50
MissNotes6
% 60
MissNotes7
% 70
MissNotes8
% 80
MissNotes9
% 90
Duration
Duration determines how long each arpeggiated note plays. 100% means that a note sustains
until the next one sounds—very legato. 50% means that the note fills half the space between
itself and the next note. The lowest value is 1%—stacattissimo. This parameter has no effect
on percussion sounds or other sounds whose duration is fixed.
Duration Pattern
Selecting Pattern as the Duration Mode engages a step sequencer for arpeggiator note
duration patterns. There are 7 pre-programed duration patterns you may choose from, and
1024 locations in which to save user-generated patterns.
7-66
Program Edit Mode
The Arpeggiator Function
Editing Duration Patterns
Press the Edit button when a pattern is highlighted in the DurationPatt field to access the
editor.
The top line of the “Edit:DurationPatt” page shows the pattern number and name. This page
also displays the pattern’s total number of steps, as well as pattern direction. Pressing Stepremoves the last step in the list, pressing Step+ inserts a new note step at the end of the list
(the pattern editor remembers the values of removed steps until you save or exit.) Use the
navigation buttons to move between pattern steps, use the Alpha Wheel, alphanumeric pad,
or Previous-/Next+ buttons to enter the note shift amount for each step. Press More to see a
second page for patterns with more than 24 steps.
Press Delete to delete the pattern from memory. Press Rename to rename the pattern and
save. Pressing Save gives you the option to save the pattern or rename and save. To create a
new Duration pattern, edit an existing pattern and choose Rename when saving. Press the
Exit button to return to the ARP2 page. Your pattern will be available in the Duration Patt
parameter.
Press the ArpSave soft button to save your new pattern as an Arp Preset. When you hit Exit
to leave the Program editor, you will be given the option to save a new User Program with
any changes you have made. See Save User Programs on page 6-14 for details.
Editing Patterns in StepSeq Mode
Many ArpPresets use StepSeq for the ArpMode. In this mode, the ARP2 page will give you
the ability to create a unique Arpegiattor pattern step-by-step. Select a parameter using the
navigation buttons (to change steps, first put the cursor on the Step line, then move left or
right). Use the soft buttons as labelled to add or subtract steps.
7-67
Program Edit Mode
The Arpeggiator Function
The Step Seq specifies four fixed parameters: for each step Note, Velocity, Duration and
Beat. Use the navigation buttons to move between pattern steps, use the Alpha Wheel,
alphanumeric pad, or plus/minus buttons to enter the parameter values for each step.
Note values create the shift pattern for the Step sequence. Notes are specified in half-steps
from the last latched note (represented as 0). Thus, this series of notes: 0, 4, 7 will play a
triad in sequence. Note values can range from -128 to +127, with negative numbers shifting
below the latched note.
Velocity values shift each steps velocity up or down from the last latched note played or
received. Values range from -127 to +127 (with 0 representing the origin value).
Duration is specified in cents, from 0-100, as a percentage of the specified Beat.
Beats sets the pattern rhythm, using fractions of the Beat rate set by the Tempo parameter. A
Beat to 1/4 will be a quarter note based on the clock Tempo.
To find a Beats value, multiply the notes you want per beat by 4. For example, 4 notes per
beat (16th notes) would be 4*4=16, a Beats value of 1/16. Three notes per beat (8th note
triplets) would be 3*4=12, a Beats value of 1/12. Six notes per beat (16th note triplets)
would be 6*4=24, a Beats value of 1/24.
ArpSave
If you have adjusted any Arpeggiator settings, you have the option of saving a new Arp Preset
to a User location, where it will be available to use with other Programs and Multis. The Arp
Preset is saved independently from the Program itself.
Press ArpSave to initiate a save. You will have the option to select the location and name for
your Arp Preset, using the Alpha Wheel or alphanumeric buttons.
When you hit Exit to leave the Program editor, you will be given the option to save a new
User Program with any changes you have made. See Save User Programs below for details.
7-68
Program Edit Mode
TheUtilitySoftButtons,HELPSoftButtonandFavoritesButtonsFunctions
The Utility Soft Buttons, HELP Soft Button and
Favorites Buttons Functions
Some of the soft buttons in Program Edit Mode perform a function when pressed, as well
as some of the Favorites buttons. The soft buttons described below appear when the Global
Mode User Type parameter is set to Advanced.
New Layer (NewLyr)
Create a new layer, numbered one above the highest existing layer. When you press this
button, the Forte SE will tell you that it is creating a new layer, then will return to the page
you were on. The new layer becomes the current layer, and is the highest-numbered layer in
the program. If the current program already has its maximum number of layers, the Forte SE
will tell you that you can’t add any more.
Duplicate Layer (DupLyr)
Create a copy of the current layer, duplicating the settings of all its parameters. The copy
becomes the current layer, and is the highest-numbered layer in the program.
Import Layer (ImpLyr)
Copy a specific layer from another program into the current program. This button brings
up a dialog that prompts you to select a layer number and a program number. The dialog
tells you the currently selected layer, and the total number of layers in the program. Use
the Layer– or Layer+ soft buttons (or the alpha wheel) to change the layer number. If the
current program has only one layer, pressing these buttons will have no effect. Use Prog– or
Prog+ soft buttons (or the alpha wheel) to change the program number.
While you are in this dialog, you can listen to the layer you are selecting to import, along
with all other layers in the current program. If you want to hear the layer to be imported by
itself, you must mute the other layers.
When you have selected the desired layer from the desired program, press the Import soft
button, and the selected layer will be copied from the selected program, becoming the
current layer. Importing layers is a convenient alternative to creating layers from scratch. If
you have a favorite string sound, for example, and you want to use it in other programs, just
import its layer(s) into the program you’re building. This will preserve the envelopes and all
the control settings so you don’t have to reprogram them.
7-69
Program Edit Mode
TheUtilitySoftButtons,HELPSoftButtonandFavoritesButtonsFunctions
Delete Layer (DelLyr)
Delete the current layer. When you press this button, the Forte SE asks you if you want to
delete the layer; press the Yes soft button to start the deletion process, or the No soft button
to cancel it. This prompt prevents you from accidentally deleting a layer.
Delete
Press the Delete soft button to delete the current Program (factory Programs can not be
deleted). Press Delete, and you will be given a choice to Delete or Cancel. Press Delete again,
and an “Are You Sure?” message will appear. Press Yes to delete the Program, or Cancel to
cancel.
Help
Press the HELP soft button to view the Help page, where you can view a description of
functions assigned to the Favorites buttons.
Favorites 1: Help
Press the Favorites 1 button to view the HELP page.
Favorites 2: Compare
Press the Favorites 2 button to temporarily recall an unedited version of the program,
allowing you to compare your edited program with the original program. Press the Favorites
2 button again to return to the edited version of the Program
Favorites 3: Solo Layer
Press the Favorites 3 button to temporarily solo the currently selected Layer. Press the
Favorites 3 button again to un-solo the currently selected Layer.
Favorites 4: Mute Layer
Press the Favorites 4 button to mute the currently selected Layer. Press the Favorites 4 button
again to un-mute the currently selected Layer.
Favorites 5: Bypass FX
Press the Favorites 5 button to temporarily bypass the Insert and Aux FX Chains. Press the
Favorites 5 button again to re-enable the Insert and Aux FX Chains.
Bypassing the FX is useful for checking the output level of a program with and without
its FX Chains. If the output level of a program is the same with and without the FX being
bypassed, it will prevent sudden jumps in volume that can occur when switching programs
while notes are being held. When a new program is selected while notes from the last
program are still being held, the FX Chains from the last program may be “stolen” by the
7-70
Program Edit Mode
Editing VAST Programs With KVA Oscillators
new program if there are not enough FX resources for both programs. You may hear a sudden
jump in volume If the output of a program is too quiet or too loud without its FX Chains.
To fix this, usually the output gain in the last box of the Insert Chain should be adjusted
until the program volume is the same with and without bypassing the FX. Afterwards, you
may need to adjust the Common Page OutGain of the program to match its level with other
programs.
Favorites 6: New Parameter
When assigning a physical controller or CC number to a VAST source field, a Parameter
is automatically added to the Parameters Page (unless the physical controller/MIDI CC is
already being used by an existing Parameter on the Parameters Page). In other cases it may
be desirable to manually create a new Parameter. Press the Favorites 6 button to create a
new Parameter. At the prompt, choose a Destination and then name the Parameter. The
Parameter Destination is the default MIDI CC number that the Parameter will send to the
Program. The Destination also becomes the default Control for the Parameter. Once the
parameter is created, you can change its Control on the Parameters Page.
Editing VAST Programs With KVA Oscillators
The Forte SE uses KVA oscillators as another way to generate sounds in VAST programs.
Unlike keymaps, which play samples stored in ROM, KVA oscillators create DSP-generated
waveforms every time they are triggered. The KVA oscillators can create a range of
waveforms, from high quality simple waveforms familiar to users of classic analog synths, to
complex waveforms which take advantage of the Forte SE’s internal processing power and
complex signal routing capabilities. Though the Forte SE does have keymaps containing
samples of basic synth waveforms, the use of KVA oscillators provides users with better
portamento, more modulation options, higher sound quality, and other advantages which
will be explained in this section. Learning to use KVA oscillators instead of keymaps (where
appropriate) is simple and will increase the versatility of your VAST editing capabilities.
VAST programs using layers with KVA oscillators can also be combined with other layers
using keymaps.
Basic Use of KVA Oscillators
Minimal Settings for Basic Use of KVA Oscillators:
These are the minimal settings that a KVA layer needs in order to function in the style of a
classic analog synth:
1. EditProg:KEYMAP Page: Set the Keymap parameter to 999 Silence.
2. EditProg:AMPENV Page: Set the Envelope mode to User, and adjust the amplitude
envelope to your liking (see The Amplitude Envelope (AMPENV) Page on page 7-48).
7-71
Program Edit Mode
Editing VAST Programs With KVA Oscillators
3. EditProg:ALG Page: Pick an Algorithm and set an Oscillator (see Setting KVA Oscillator
Type on page 7-72).
Further basic VAST settings that you will likely want to adjust are:
• Monophonic On/Off (see The COMMON Page on page 7-16)
• Level Velocity Tracking (see The DSP Control (DSPCTL) Page on page 7-37)
Read the Setting KVA Oscillator Type section below to learn about how to set each type of
oscillator. After doing this, you can experiment with making KVA programs by following
the above settings, and then setting and listening to each type of oscillator. Once you
understand how to do this, read on to the Advanced Use Of KVA Oscillators on page 7-74
(see below) to learn how to make your KVA patches more expressive through the use of DSP
modulation.
Pitch Settings for KVA Oscillators
Each oscillator (except for noise functions) has its own pitch parameters, and is unaffected by
pitch settings that would normally affect keymaps (such as those on the Keymap page). On a
program layer, the coarse pitch parameter for the oscillator in use can be found on both the
DSPCTL and DSPMOD pages, in the parameters list below the standard Pitch parameter
for keymaps. For each oscillator, its coarse pitch parameter is named by an abbreviation
of the oscillator name followed by “Pch.” For example, the coarse pitch parameter for a
saw wave oscillator will be called Saw Pch. On the DSPCTL sub page for any oscillator
Pch. parameter, you can adjust fine pitch by cents and Hertz, as well as KeyTrk and VelTrk
settings for pitch.
Note: Be sure to differentiate between the different pitch parameters, each used
either only for keymaps or only for KVA oscillators. The Pitch parameter on the
top left of the DSPCTL and DSPMOD pages always appears in VAST programs
but only affects the pitch of keymaps. If a KVA oscillator is being used, this Pitch
parameter will have no affect on the layer’s pitch, in which case the oscillator Pch.
parameter described above must be used to control the pitch of the oscillator.
Setting KVA Oscillator Type
The Forte SE comes with 22 Different KVA oscillators. There are 11 high quality anti-aliased
oscillators (free of digital artifacts) and 11 oscillators that exhibit some aliasing (digital
artifacts) in the higher octaves. The anti-aliased oscillators use up more DSP resources than
the ones with aliasing, but the improvement in sound quality is quite noticeable. We strongly
recommend using the anti-aliased oscillators for most applications.
7-72
Program Edit Mode
Editing VAST Programs With KVA Oscillators
The tables below list KVA oscillators by type and function block size. Before setting an
oscillator, you must choose an algorithm which includes a block that matches the block size
for the oscillator that you wish to use. See The Algorithm (ALG) Page on page 7-30 and
Algorithm Basics on page 7-31 for more on selecting algorithms. Once you have picked an
algorithm with the desired block size, highlight the block and use the Alpha Wheel to scroll
through the available functions until you find the desired oscillator.
The SYNC SQUARE oscillator is an 8 block oscillator that requires the use of two layers (4
blocks each) and the Alt Input feature of cascade mode. See below for details on setting up
the Sync Square oscillator.
Note: If you put more than one oscillator in an algorithm, you will only hear the
output of the last oscillator in the algorithm, unless an algorithm is used to route
the earlier oscillator around the last oscillator and into a MIX function block, or
if the last oscillator processes its audio input.
Anti-Aliased Oscillators
Size
Name/Type
Aliased Oscillators
Size
1 Block
Name/Type
1 Block
LPNOIZ (noise + low pass filter)
2 Blocks
SINE
SAW
SINE+
TRI
SAW
SQUARE
RES NOISE (noise + low pass
filter with resonance)
NOISE
SQUARE
SINE+
3 Blocks
PWM (Pulse Width Modulation)
SAW+
4 Blocks
SYNC SAW
NOISE+
SUPER SAW
TRIPLE SAW
8 Blocks
SYNC SQUARE (master) >>,
>>SYNC SQUARE (slave)
(4 blocks each)
SINE
SW+SHP (Sawtooth + Shaper)
2 Blocks
SHAPED SAW
PWM (Pulse Width Modulation)
Setting Up The Sync Square Oscillator:
The Sync Square oscillator is actually comprised of two oscillators, a master and a slave, set
up to emulate the way sync square oscillators worked on classic analog synthesizers. To create
a program using Sync Square, select Program 1023 Editor Template. Select “none” on the
Keymap page. Select “user” on the Ampenv page for an amp envelope. On the ALG page,
select Algorithm 5 at the top of the page. Use the cursor buttons to select the function block
and use the alpha wheel to select the “SYNC SQUARE (master) >>” function. Next, press
the << soft button to change soft button pages until you see “DupLyr.” Press DupLyr to
7-73
Program Edit Mode
Editing VAST Programs With KVA Oscillators
duplicate the layer, creating layer 2. In layer 2, on the ALG page, change the function block
to “>> SYNC SQUARE (slave)”, and set the Alt Input parameter to “Layer 1.” The final step
is to go to Layer 1’s DSPCTL page and turn the Level parameter all the way down, to -96dB
(this ensures that you will only hear the output of the slave oscillator on layer 2, which is the
intended function of Sync Square).
Now the Sync Square oscillator should be working. The “Syncoff” parameter, Sync Offset, is
the main parameter for shaping the tone of this sound. Syncoff sets the sync offset between
the master and slave square waves in each corresponding oscillator, which changes the shape
of the waveform output by the slave oscillator. The Sync Square oscillator is most expressive
when the Syncoff parameter is modulated during performance. Use the DSPMOD page to
assign an envelope or continuous controller like the Mod Wheel for this parameter to hear
the effect (see The DSP Modulation (DSPMOD) Page on page 7-39, as well as The DSP
Control (DSPCTL) Page on page 7-37 and Common DSP Control Parameters on page
7-32 in Algorithm Basics on page 7-31, for details on setting up modulation and other
ways to control parameters, and see The Envelope 2 (ENV2) and Envelope 3 (ENV3) Pages
on page 7-51 for details on using envelopes as modulation sources). See Advanced Use Of
KVA Oscillators on page 7-74 below for some similar examples of how to set and control
modulation for oscillator specific functions and other parameters.
To add a DSP function to the Sync Square oscillator, you’ll need to use cascade mode. For
example, to add a filter, duplicate one of the layers to create layer 3. On layer 3, select the
ALG page and choose one of the cascade mode algorithms, algorithms 101-131. For this
example, lets use alg 105 with the filter “4Pole Mogue LP” selected for the function block.
For the Alt Input parameter, select Layer 2. This routes a pre-Level parameter copy of Layer
2’s output into Layer 3. Go to layer 2’s DSPCTL page and turn its level down to -96dB
(otherwise the un-filtered sound from layer 2 will be audible as well as the filtered sound in
layer 3). Now you can hear the Sync Square from layers 1 and 2 running through the filter in
layer 3. See Advanced Use Of KVA Oscillators on page 7-74 below for examples of how to
set and control modulation of filter parameters.
Advanced Use Of KVA Oscillators
Read the KVA sections above before moving on to this section.
If you have tried the program described above in Basic Use of KVA Oscillators, you may have
noticed that there is no variation in the notes played aside from pitch. Layers and programs
created with KVA oscillators can become much more expressive by introducing variation
with DSP modulation. For a KVA oscillator layer, you can use DSP modulation just as you
would for keymap layers (see Common DSP Control Parameters on page 7-32, The DSP
Modulation (DSPMOD) Page on page 7-39, and The DSP Control (DSPCTL) Page on
page 7-37). Several KVA oscillators also have their own modulation parameters that must be
accessed to control the oscillator’s intended function. Aside from these methods, KVA layers
can also be altered by using keymaps with natural amplitude envelopes. See below for details
on each method.
7-74
Program Edit Mode
Editing VAST Programs With KVA Oscillators
Examples of Simple DSP Control and Modulation:
Select the Program 1023 Editor Template, and press the Edit button. Go to the KEYMAP
page and set Keymap to 999 Silence. Next, go to the AMPENV page, and set the mode to
User, set Att1 time to .002, Rel1 time to .260, and Dec1 time to 30.0 and 0% (this gives you
basic control of attack, decay and release envelopes with sliders C, D, and E). Press the ALG
soft button and select Algorithm 8. Select the leftmost empty function block and use the
alpha wheel to scroll to the PWM oscillator. Play some notes to hear the sound of the PWM
oscillator.
You should immediately hear a difference in the sound of the program, because the LOPASS
function is set by default to cut some of the high frequencies from any signal that passes
through it, in this case the PWM signal is passing through. With the LOPASS function still
selected, press the Edit button. This brings you to the main parameter for the LOPASS object
on the DSPCTL page, which is LP Frq (you can also reach this page using the DSPCTL
soft button). Here you can adjust the initial value of the function, in this case it is cut off
frequency for the low pass filter. For this example, leave this initial value set to its default.
With the LP Frq parameter selected, press right on the cursor button to get to this function’s
sub page (the right half of the display). Select the Veltrk parameter and use the alpha wheel
or alpha numeric pad to turn it all the way up to 10800ct. Now keyboard velocities will
affect the LP Frq parameter. A velocity of 127 will cause the filter’s cut off frequency to
move up 10800 cents from its initial value, a velocity of 0 will have no effect on the cut off
frequency, and values in between will increase the cut off frequency by a scaling between
0 and 10800 cents. Overall, this will cause higher played velocities to increase the cut off
frequency, making the oscillator sound brighter, and lower velocities to lower the cut off
frequency, making the oscillator sound duller. This method can be used to control any DSP
function that is loaded into an algorithm. See Common DSP Control Parameters on page
7-32, for other control parameters available on the DSPCTL page.
Alternatively, you could assign cut off frequency to be controlled by any continuous
controller, such as the Mod Wheel. Start again with the unedited Program 1023 Editor
Template. Follow the same steps as above, but instead of changing any parameters on the
DSPCTL page, press the DSPMOD soft button to reach the DSP Modulation page. On
the left side of the screen, choose the parameter for LP Frq, and then press the right cursor
button to reach the LP Frq sub page. On this sub page, you can assign any continuous
controller to control the cut off frequency of the LOPASS function (or the main parameter
for any function loaded in the current algorithm). Select the Src1 parameter, hold the Enter
button and move the Mod Wheel to quickly select MWheel (the Mod Wheel) as your
control source. Next, press the cursor down button to select the Depth parameter, then use
the alpha wheel or alpha numeric pad to turn it all the way up to 10800ct. Now the Mod
Wheel will affect the LP Frq parameter. Moving the Mod Wheel all the way up (a value of
127) will cause the filter’s cut off frequency to move up 10800 cents from its initial value,
moving the Mod Wheel all the way down (a value of 0) will have no effect on the cut off
frequency, and values in between will increase the cut off frequency by a scaling between 0
and 10800 cents. Now you have the same control over cut off frequency as you did in the
previous example, but now it is controlled by the Mod Wheel. Overall, moving the Mod
7-75
Program Edit Mode
Editing VAST Programs With KVA Oscillators
Wheel up will increase the cut off frequency, making the oscillator sound brighter, and
moving the Mod Wheel down will lower the cut off frequency, making the oscillator sound
duller. This is useful to control a classic “filter sweep” sound. The above method can be
used to control any DSP function that is loaded into an algorithm, and you can choose any
continuous controller as a control source.
Oscillator Specific Control And Modulation Parameters:
Several KVA oscillators also have their own modulation parameters that must be accessed
to control the oscillator’s intended function. Below is a list of these oscillators and their
distinctive parameters, grouped by block size. Though the following parameters could be left
at one setting, utilizing one of the DSPCTL or DSPMOD techniques described in the above
examples will expose a wider range of expression from each oscillator.
1 Block:
LPNOIZ
A noise generator combined with a low pass filter. Use the Noiz Frq parameter to control the
cut off frequency of the filter.
NOISE
A simple noise generator. Use the Noise parameter to control the noise initial amplitude.
SW + SHP (Sawtooth + Shaper)
This oscillator is capable of basic FM Synthesis. Its distinctive parameter is Pch Coar. This
oscillator must come after the sound source in an algorithm (either keymap or oscillator)
in order to hear the effect of Pch Coar, which can radically change whatever the oscillator
receives as an input. Works well placed after a Sine source.
SINE+ [Aliased (not recommended)]
Same as 2 block version, but without the Sine+Am parameter.
SAW+ [Aliased (not recommended)]
A saw oscillator that can add an input signal to its output.
NOISE+ [Aliased (not recommended)]
A noise oscillator that can add an input signal to its output.
2 Block:
SINE+
A sine oscillator that can add an input signal to its output. The Sin+ Pch and Sine+ Am
parameters affect the pitch and amplitude of the sine waveform without affecting the pitch of
the input source.
7-76
Program Edit Mode
Editing VAST Programs With KVA Oscillators
RES NOISE
A noise generator combined with a low pass filter with resonance control. Use the Noiz Frq
parameter to control the cut off frequency of the filter. Use the Noiz Q parameter to control
the amplitude of the resonance (a boost or cut at the cut off frequency). One technique for
use of this function is to set a high value for Noiz Q (so that you hear a the resonance create
a tone,) and then on the DSPCTL page set C4 as an initial frequency for Noiz Frq, and
set Keytrk to 100ct/key on the Noiz Frq sub page. Doing this causes the noise resonance
frequency to match the note of the key played.
SHAPED SAW
The Shaped Saw oscillator is a sawtooth oscillator with the ability to morph its output shape
between sawtooth and sine wave (without crossfading). This oscillator’s distinctive parameter
is Shape, which controls the morphing. With Shape set to 0, the oscillator produces a pure
sawtooth wave. With Shape set to 127, the oscillator produces a pure sine wave. Values in
between morph between the two wave shapes.
PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) [Aliased (not recommended)]
This oscillator’s distinctive parameter is PWM Wid, which adjusts pulse width from values of
1-99. With PWM Wid set to a value of 50, PWM produces a square wave. The further the
PWM Wid parameter is set from 50, the narrower the pulse width becomes, changing the
shape of the output waveform and thus altering the oscillator’s tonal quality.
3 Block:
PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) [Anti-Aliased (recommended)]
Same as 2 Block PWM, See above.
4 Block:
SYNC SAW
Sync Saw consists of two saw waves, one that you hear (the slave) and one that controls the
slave (the master). This oscillator’s distinctive parameter is SyncOff, which controls the offset
of the slave and master waves. With SyncOff set to 0, the master has no effect on the slave.
When an offset is set, the slave restarts its wave cycle every time the master wave completes
a cycle. Offsets cause the slave to restart its cycle in the middle of normal sawtooth cycles,
which causes the slave’s waveform shape and sound to be altered.
SUPER SAW
The Super Saw oscillator consists of two saw waves. This oscillator’s distinctive parameter is
Detune, which has settings from 0-50 cents, allowing you to detune both of the saw waves
by up to 50 cents away from the root pitch of the key played. Detune affects both saw waves,
one is detuned above the original root pitch, and the other is detuned below the original root
pitch.
7-77
Program Edit Mode
Editing VAST Programs With KVA Oscillators
TRIPLE SAW
The Triple Saw oscillator consists of three saw waves. This oscillator’s distinctive parameter
is Detune, which has settings from 0-50 cents, allowing you to detune two of the saw waves
by up to 50 cents away from the root pitch of the key played. Detune affects two of the
saw waves, one is detuned above the original root pitch, and the other is detuned below the
original root pitch. The third saw wave always plays the root pitch and is not affected by
Detune.
8 Block:
SYNC SQUARE (master) >>, >>SYNC SQUARE (slave)
See above, Setting Up The Sync Square Oscillator: on page 7-73.
Use Of Keymaps and Natural Amplitude Envelopes With KVA Oscillators:
Keymaps are important in layers using KVA oscillators, even though their samples are
not usually heard in these layers (see the note below for exceptions). Keymap selection is
important because the maximum amplitude set for each key in the keymap is applied to the
oscillator. For most uses of KVA oscillators, users will want to use the 999 Silence keymap
because each key in the keymap is set to the same maximum amplitude, unlike many
instrument keymaps. The 999 Silence keymap ensures uniform amplitude behavior of an
oscillator, and with the amplitude envelope set to user mode, users can easily shape all aspects
of an oscillator’s amplitude. The Forte SE also has the ability to apply natural amplitude
envelopes to oscillators. With an amplitude envelope set to natural mode, each oscillator
note takes on the amplitude qualities of each sample in a keymap (with each note relative
to sample key placement). Each sample in a keymap has a natural envelope that was created
during it’s original development process. Natural envelopes have much more detail than what
is possible to create with the user amplitude envelope, and they are useful when trying to
mimic specific instrument amplitude envelopes. When using this technique, remember that
the maximum amplitude of each key is set by the current keymap. You can still control the
overall parameters of a natural envelope by using the ENVCTL page.
Note: The samples from a keymap are not heard when using an oscillator, unless an
algorithm is used to route the keymap signal around the oscillator and into a MIX
function block, or unless it is an oscillator that processes its audio input.
7-78
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Program Structure
KB3 Program Structure
There’s nothing quite like the sound of the classic Hammond™ B-3 tone wheel organ,
especially when played through a Leslie™ rotating speaker system. We’ve done extensive
testing and analysis with several tone wheel organs, and created our own models to emulate
the unique tone wheel sound. We even took into account the way that older organs start to
sound different (and arguably better) as their capacitors begin to leak—and we included a
parameter that lets you vary the amount of grunge (leakage) in your sound.
KB3 programs use oscillators to emulate the tone wheel sound. Each oscillator operates
independently, and has its own pitch and amplitude control. You can control how many
oscillators are used for a KB3 program. There are two oscillators per voice, for a total of 256.
You can use up to 91 of them in a KB3 program (the 92nd is reserved to produce key click).
Because the oscillators start running as soon as you select a KB3 program, there are always
voices available—unlike VAST programs, which start “stealing” notes when you reach the
polyphony limit.
The oscillators—we’ll call them tone wheels from here on—are divided into an upper and
lower group. The upper tone wheels use the samples in the Forte SE’s keymaps to generate
sound, while the lower tone wheels use sine waves. You can change the keymap of a KB3
program’s upper tone wheels to produce a large array of sounds. By changing the keymap
from sine to a saw wave it is possible to emulate the sound of classic combo organs like the
Vox™ and Farfisa™ models.
KB3 programs are also routed through vibrato, rotary speaker, preamp and distortion effects,
see below for details.
KB3 Mode
KB3 programs are different enough from VAST programs that we use the term KB3 mode to
describe what’s going on when you play a KB3 program. Whenever you play a KB3 program,
you are in KB3 mode. The blue LED on the front panel will light when the current program
is a KB3 program. You can play KB3 programs only on a single channel at a time.
If you want to create your own KB3 program, start by editing an existing KB3 program.
KB3 Effects And Real-time Controls
You have real-time control over many components of KB3 programs directly from the front
panel. The sliders emulate the drawbars that are so essential to the tone wheel sound, while
the buttons above them (the Assignable Switches) can control the KB3 effects: Leslie, vibrato,
chorus, and percussion.
7-79
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Program Structure
Drawbars
One of the standard performance features of many tone wheel organs is the set of drawbars
for emulating the stops on a pipe organ. Moving the drawbars controls the amplitude of
either the fundamentals or the harmonics of the notes. The Forte SE’s sliders serve as the
nine drawbars found on most tone wheel organs. Pushing the sliders up is the equivalent of
pushing the drawbars in (removing fundamentals or harmonics).
Subharmonics
Fundamental
Harmonics
16’
5 1/3’
8’
4’
2 2/3’
2’
1 3/5’
1 1/3’
1’
Slider A
Slider B
Slider C
Slider D
Slider E
Slider F
Slider G
Slider H
Slider I
Table 7-1 Standard Drawbar Settings for the Hammond B3
KB3 Mode Effects Buttons (Assignable Switches)
When using a KB3 program, the switches above the sliders control KB3 effects, and the blue
KB3 LED is lit. The KB3 function is labeled below each switch, their LEDs indicate the
status of the various effects for the current KB3 program. This status is saved as part of each
program. You can change the effects in real time by pressing the switches.
In KB3 mode these switches also respond to and send MIDI Controller messages.
Effect
Category
Rotary
Vibrato
Percussion
Button Name
LED Color
(relative to
button name/
state)
Corresponding
Page and
Parameter
Fast / Slow
red/green
MISC: SpeedCtl
On / Off
red/off
MISC: VibChorCtl
Chorus / Vibrato
red/green
MISC: VibChorSel
Disabled if Button 2 is off
Depth 1 / 2 / 3
green/orange/red
MISC: VibChorSel
Disabled if Button 2 is off
On / Off
red/off
PERC: Percussion
Volume Loud / Soft
red/green
PERC: Volume
Disabled if Button 5 is off
Decay Fast / Slow
red/green
PERC: Decay
Disabled if Button 5 is off
Pitch High / Low
red/green
PERC: Harmonic
Disabled if Button 5 is off
Comments
Table 7-2 KB3 Mode Effects Buttons and Corresponding Parameters
Additional Controller Assignments In KB3 Mode
Other default assignments for factory KB3 programs include:
CC Pedal 1 (volume) controls preamp volume, which emulates the volume control of an
organ preamp. The PreampResp parameter must be set to On for this to work (the default
setting). See PreampResp on page 7-83 for details.
7-80
Program Edit Mode
Editing KB3 Programs
The Mod Wheel controls Distortion Drive.
Switch Pedal 1 (sustain) controls the SpeedCtl parameter, which toggles the Rotary speed
between slow or fast. See SpeedCtl on page 7-83 for details. This has the same effect as using
Rotary S/S (Variation button).
Editing KB3 Programs
You can edit a wide assortment of any KB3 program’s parameters. You can also create your
own KB3 programs, though you must start with an existing KB3 program to do this. A
regular Forte SE program cannot be turned into a KB3 program. If you’re not sure whether
the current program is a KB3 program, check the KB3 button (located above the right most
slider). If the blue LED is on, then the current program is a KB3 program.
Enter the KB3 program editor by pressing the Edit button while a KB3 program is selected
in program mode. You’ll quickly see that the KB3 editor differs from the standard VAST
program editor.
KB3 Programming Tips
This following section provides some starting points for creating your own KB3 programs.
The most prominent difference between organ vintages is the number of tone wheels used.
Keep in mind, however, that the sound of an actual tone wheel organ will depend not only
on its age, but also on how well it has been maintained.
Octave folding, where an octave (or part of an octave) is repeated at the top or bottom of the
keyboard, is handled automatically by KB3 Mode, emulating the folding done on actual tone
wheel organs.
Early Tone Wheel Organs. Instruments of this period had 91 tone wheels. To get this sound,
go to the TONEWL page, select 91 tone wheels, and set lowest pitch to C 1. Start with the
Junky Wheel Volume Map and Bob’s Organ Map. You may also want to increase the Key
Click level, since this tends to become louder on older organs.
Middle Period Organs. To model one of these instruments, set 82 tone wheels and a low
note of A 1. Use the Mellow Wheel Volume Map and Eric’s Organ Map. Set Key Click to a
moderate level.
The Classic B-3. For this sound, choose 79 tone wheels and set the low note to be C 2. The
best settings here are the Bright Wheel Volume Map and Peck’s Organ Map. You may also
want to reduce the Key Click level.
7-81
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Editor: The Parameters (PARAMS) Page
KB3 Editor: The Parameters (PARAMS) Page
This page is the same as the VAST editor Parameters page; see The Parameters (PARAMS)
Page on page 7-10.
KB3 Editor: The Program FX (FX) Page
This page is the same as the VAST Program editor FX page (see page 7-13) except for one
important difference: there is no Pre/Post insert parameter for the auxiliary sends.
KB3 Editor: The COMMON Page
The COMMON page contains an assortment of control parameters, including Leslie speed
control and vibrato/chorus selection.
7-82
Parameter
Range of Values
Preamp/Expression Response
Off, On
Leakage
-96.0 to 0.0 dB, in 0.5-dB increments
Leak Mode
None, Type A, Type X, Type Y, Type Z, Type R
Speed Control
Slow, Fast
Vibrato/Chorus Control
Off, On
Vibrato/Chorus Type Selection
Vib1, Vib2, Vib3, Chor1, Chor2, Chor3
Volume Adjust
-96 to 96 dB
Bend Range Up
± 7200 cents
Bend Range Down
± 7200 cents
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Editor: The COMMON Page
Parameter
Range of Values
Sustain
Off, On
Sostenuto
Off, On
Leslie Pedal
None, Sustain, Sost, Soft
PreampResp
Set this parameter On or Off to enable or disable the preamp+expression pedal part of the
KB3 model. Turning this On (the default) makes KB3 programs function like stock organs.
The expression pedal in this case is more than a volume pedal; it actually functions like a
“loudness control,” varying the frequency response to compensate for the ear’s sensitivity at
different volumes. In addition, the preamp provides a de-emphasis curve to compensate for
the built-in tone wheel volume pre-emphasis. Turning preamp response Off emulates organs
that have been modified to have a direct out (before the preamp and expression pedal).
Leakage
Controls the level of the simulated crosstalk and signal “bleed” of adjacent tone wheels in
the model. This is provided to help “dirty up” the sound to make it a bit more realistic. A
setting of ‑96 dB gives the purest tones; other values add more simulated leakage. This level
is scaled by the drawbar levels, as well as the expression pedal level. The leakage level can
also be controlled by MIDI CC 90; value 0 = -96 dB, value 127 = 0 dB, values between 0
and 127 scale between -96 dB and 0 dB. When using CC 90, the value displayed for the
Leakage parameter will not change.
LeakMode
Selects between different leakage models, determining which leakage harmonics are
emphasized. TypeA provides an overall tone wheel leakage, with all tone wheels leaking a
small amount. TypeX, TypeY, TypeZ, and TypeR emulate different degrees of drawbar
leakage, where the leakage components correspond to the nine drawbars, instead of all the
tone wheels.
SpeedCtl
Select either Fast or Slow to choose the speed of the rotary speaker emulation. You can toggle
between fast and slow speed using the Rotary S/F button (Variation).
7-83
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Editor: The COMMON Page
VibChorCtl
Choose On or Off to turn on or off either vibrato or chorus (as selected with the VibChorSel
parameter). You can toggle between on and off using Assignable button 2 (labeled [Chorus/
Vibrato] On/Off).
VibChorSel
Choose the vibrato or chorus program (there are three of each) you wish to use with this
KB3 program. Note that you must set VibChorCtl (also on the MISC page) to On to hear
the effect. You can select the vibrato or chorus you want using Assignable buttons 3 and 4
(labeled [Chorus/Vibrato] Chor/Vib and Depth).
VolAdjust
Provides an overall volume adjust for the KB3 model. Use this parameter to “normalize” KB3
programs with other programs.
BendRngUp, BendRngDn
Respectively control the upward and downward pitch bend ranges of the KB3 program.
Sustain
Set On or Off to enable or disable response to MIDI sustain (MIDI 64). By default MIDI
sustain (MIDI 64) is sent by Switch Pedal 1.
Sostenuto
Set On or Off to enable or disable response to MIDI sostenuto (MIDI 66). By default MIDI
sostenuto (MIDI 66) is sent by Switch Pedal 2.
LesliePedal
Set the pedal source (Sustain=Switch Pedal 1, CC 64 by default, Sost=Switch Pedal 1, CC 66
by default, Soft=Switch Pedal 3, CC 67 by default) to toggle between Fast and Slow for the
Leslie™ speaker rotation speed.
7-84
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Editor: The Tone Wheels (TONEWL) Page
KB3 Editor: The Tone Wheels (TONEWL) Page
KB3 Mode uses DSP-generated waveforms for the lower half of its tone wheels and samples
for the upper half of its tone wheels. Using the parameters on the TONEWL page, you can
specify which sample you wish to use, the number of tone wheels (which will affect how
many other voices are available to you), and other related settings.
Parameter
Range of Values
Upper Tone Wheel Keymap
Sample List
Upper Volume Adjust
-96 to 96 dB
Number of Tone Wheels
24 to 91
Organ Map
Equal, Peck’s, Bob’s, Eric’s
Wheel Volume Map
Equal, Bright, Mellow, Junky
Globals
On, Off
Lower Transposition
-120 to 127 semitones
Upper Transposition
-168 to 87 semitones
Upper Tone Wheel Keymap
Use this parameter to indicate the keymap (and thereby the samples) to use for the upper
tone wheels. You can use any keymap from ROM, though you must specify a keymap that
uses looped samples for KB3 Mode to work correctly. When in Program mode, the keymap
assigned to the program appears in the info box.
Upper Volume Adjust
Since sample volumes can vary, while the volume of DSP-generated waveforms will remain
consistent, you may find it necessary to adjust the level of the sample-based tone wheels. This
parameter lets you adjust the amplitude of the upper (sample-based) tone wheels relative to
amplitude of the waveform-generated tone wheels.
7-85
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Editor: The Tone Wheels (TONEWL) Page
Number of Tone Wheels
This parameter lets you specify the number of tone wheels used by a KB3 program. The
classic tone wheel organs used 91 tone wheels, though the lowest 12 were for the pedals
only. Therefore, you may find 79 a good number of tone wheels to specify for realistic organ
emulations. This would leave you 88 voices for other programs. You can specify up to 91
tone wheels. The number of Forte SE voices used by a KB3 program is (number of tone
wheels + 1) / 2, rounded to the next highest whole number if the result is a fraction. So, for
example, with 79 tone wheels specified you would use 40 voices. Keep in mind that these
voices are permanently allocated and running while the KB3 program is selected, and cannot
be stolen. The additional voice used by KB3 programs is for keyclick.
Organ Map
The organ map controls the relative amplitude of each key, per drawbar. Like the wheel
volume maps, these maps are based on measurements we’ve made on actual organs. Equal
uses the same volume for each key and drawbar, and is not based on a real B3. Peck’s is a
good normal map, from a B3 in good condition. Eric’s is a bit more idealized; it’s smoothed
out, but less realistic. Bob’s is more uneven, based on an old B3.
Wheel Volume Map
The wheel volume map determines the volume level for each tone wheel. We’ve provided
several tone wheel volume maps here, based on measurements we’ve taken on different
organs. Equal is a map with all tone wheels at the same volume. It’s not based on a real B3.
Bright is a good normal map, based on a B3 in good condition. Junky is based on a B3 with
an uneven, rolled-off response. Mellow is somewhere between Bright and Junky.
You can also apply EQ to control wheel volumes based on the frequencies of each tone
wheel. See KB3 Editor: The EQ Page on page 7-94.
Globals
This is another toggle, which affects LFO2, ASR2, FUNs 2 and 4. When off, these three
control sources are local; they affect each individual note in the layers that use them as a
control source. They begin operating each time a note in that layer is triggered.
When the Globals parameter is set to On, these control sources become global, that is they
affect every note in every layer of the current program, not just the one to which they’re
applied. When these control sources are global, they begin operating as soon as the program
is selected. When Globals are on, LFO2, ASR2, and FUNs 2 and 4 will appear on their
respective pages preceded by the letter G to indicate that they’re global. You’ll use global
control sources when you want to affect each note in a given layer uniformly, and local
control sources when you want to affect each layer’s note independently.
7-86
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Editor: The Drawbars (DRAWBR) Page
Lower Transpose / Upper Transpose
These two parameters let you transpose the upper and/or lower tone wheels in semitone steps
away from their default tunings.
KB3 Editor: The Drawbars (DRAWBR) Page
Press the Drawbr soft button to view the DRAWBR Page. This page lets you edit KB3’s
drawbars.
Mode
When you set Mode to Preset, the preset drawbar settings on this page will be installed at
program selection. The drawbar values will immediately change, however, as soon as you
move the corresponding drawbar. Set Mode to Live if you want the drawbar volume settings
at program selection to be determined by the positions of the drawbar controllers (sliders).
With either setting, any engagements of the drawbar controllers subsequent to program
selection will affect drawbar volumes.
Steps
This parameter lets you specify the increments by which drawbar volumes will change.
Choose either 0–8, to approximate the drawbar settings on actual organs, or choose 0–127
for a finer degree of resolution.
Volume
This parameter appears only if you’ve set Mode (see above) to Preset. Use the Volume
parameter to set the preset volume of each of the nine drawbars. The available values will be
0–8 or 0–127, depending on the setting of the Steps parameter.
7-87
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Editor:The Set Drawbars (SetDBR) Soft Button
Tune
This parameter lets you tune each of the nine drawbars up or down in semitone steps. The
values for the Tune parameter on the DRAWBR page shown above represent standard
drawbar settings on a real B3, as shown in the table below.
Subharmonics
Fundamental
Harmonics
16’
5 1/3’
8’
4’
2 2/3’
2’
1 3/5’
1 1/3’
1’
Slider A
Slider B
Slider C
Slider D
Slider E
Slider F
Slider G
Slider H
Slider I
Figure 7-2 Standard Drawbar Settings for the Hammond B3
KB3 Editor: The Set Drawbars (SetDBR) Soft Button
Press the SetDBR soft button to capture the current position of the drawbars, and use those
positions as the preset drawbar positions on the DRAWBR page.
KB3 Editor: The PITCH Page
The PITCH page parameters for KB3 programs is much like the PITCH page parameters for
VAST programs. The only difference is that for KB3 programs, there are no Hz, KeyTrk, or
VelTrk parameters. For a full description of the PITCH-page parameters, see Common DSP
Control Parameters on page 7-32, The DSP Control (DSPCTL) Page on page 7-37 and
The DSP Modulation (DSPMOD) Page on page 7-39.
7-88
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Editor: The AMP Page
KB3 Editor: The AMP Page
The AMP page parameters for KB3 programs is much like the AMP page parameters for
VAST programs. The only difference is that for KB3 programs, there are no KeyTrk or VelTrk
parameters. For a full description of the AMP page parameters, see Common DSP Control
Parameters on page 7-32, The DSP Control (DSPCTL) Page on page 7-37 and The DSP
Modulation (DSPMOD) Page on page 7-39.
KB3 Editor: The KEYCLICK Page
The Key Click feature adds a decaying burst of pitched noise to the attack of notes. Unlike
the percussion, the key click is “multi-triggered,” which means that every new note will
trigger it. The parameters on this page primarily control the decay, volume, and pitch of the
key click.
Parameter
Range of Values
Key Click
Off, On
Volume
-96.0 to 0.0 dB, in 0.5-dB increments
Decay
0.005 to 1.280 seconds, in 0.005-second increments
VelTrk
0 to 100%
Pitch
1 to 120
Random
0 to 100%
7-89
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Editor: The KEYCLICK Page
Parameter
Range of Values
Retrig Thresh
-96.0 to 0.0 dB, in 0.5-dB increments
Note Attack
Normal, Hard, PercHard
Note Release
Normal, Hard
KeyClick
This is where you turn Key Click on or off. With KeyClick set to Off, you may still hear a
click depending on your Note Attack and Note Release settings (see below).
Volume
This parameter sets the level of the keyclick; the noise decays from the level you set here.
This level is scaled by the drawbar levels, as well as the expression pedal level. Keyclick
volume can also be scaled by MIDI CC 89; value 0 = -96 dB, value 127 = the level set for the
Volume parameter. Values between 0 and 127 scale between -96 dB and the level set for the
Volume parameter. When using CC 89, the value displayed for the Volume parameter will
not change.
Decay
Sets the basic decay time of the noise envelope. Smaller values produce a shorter burst.
VelTrk
Controls the degree to which key velocity affects the key click volume. A value of zero means
that the key velocity has no effect on the key click volume (which is like a real tone wheel
organ). Other values add volume as the velocity increases.
Pitch
Sets the basic pitch of the key click noise, relative to the highest tonewheel’s pitch. The pitch
is controlled by a steep lowpass filter applied to white noise. The filter’s cut off frequency
is controlled relative to key number, higher keys move the cutoff frequency up, lower keys
move the cutoff frequency down.
Random
Controls the degree to which a random amount of amplitude variation is added to the key
click.
7-90
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Editor: The PERC1 Page
ReTrigThresh
This parameter lets you set the volume level below which key click must decay before it will
be retriggered.
Note Attack
Controls the attack characteristic of notes. Normal provides a smoothed attack, while a
setting of Hard has an instant attack and will produce an audible click, in addition to any
amount of key click specified with the other parameters on this page (you might prefer not to
specify any additional key click when you use this setting). PercHard sets a hard attack level
for percussion only; notes without percussion use a normal attack.
Note Release
Controls the release characteristic of notes. A setting of Normal has a smoothed release,
while a setting of Hard has an instant release. Hard will produce an audible click.
KB3 Editor: The PERC1 Page
Percussion is a characteristic feature of tone wheel organs. It’s especially useful while soloing,
since percussion adds an extra “plink” (actually an extra tone at a defined harmonic) to the
attack. You can reach the percussion parameters by pressing the Perc1 and Perc2 soft buttons.
Parameter
Range of Values
Percussion
Off, On
Volume
Soft, Loud
Decay
Slow, Fast
Harmonic
Low, High
Velocity Tracking
0 to 100%
Low Harmonic
Drawbar 1 to 9
High Harmonic
Drawbar 1 to 9
Steal Bar
Drawbar 1 to 9
7-91
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Editor: The PERC1 Page
Percussion
This is where you turn the percussion effect on or off. Percussion is created by a decaying
envelope applied to one of the nine drawbars. The percussion effect is “single-triggered,”
which means that once it’s triggered, it won’t trigger again until all keys (or whatever you’re
using to trigger notes) go up. So if no keys are down, and you play a chord, percussion gets
applied to all notes in the chord (and in fact, to all notes that are triggered during the short
duration of the percussion envelope). Once the envelope runs its course, any notes you play
while at least one key is held down get no percussion. You can turn percussion on or off by
pressing Assignable button 5 (labeled [Percussion] On/Off).
Volume
This parameter switches between loud and soft percussion settings. The actual amplitude is
set on the PERC2 page. You can toggle between loud and soft by pressing Assignable Button
6 (labeled [Percussion] Loud/Soft).
Decay
This parameter switches between fast and slow percussion settings. The actual decay rate is
set on the PERC2 page. You can toggle between slow and fast decay by pressing Assignable
button 7 (labeled [Percussion] Decay F/S).
Harmonic
This parameter switches between high and low harmonic percussion settings. The actual
pitch is controlled by the LowHarm and HighHarm parameters. You can toggle between low
and high harmonics by pressing Assignable Button 8 (labeled [Percussion] Pitch H/L).
VelTrack
Here is where you specify the degree to which key velocity controls percussion volume. A
value of zero corresponds to no velocity tracking, which is like a real tone wheel organ. Other
values add velocity tracking, so that increased velocity results in louder percussion.
LowHarm
Controls which drawbar is used as the basis for the percussion when Harmonic is set to Low.
On an actual tone wheel organ, this is Drawbar 4 (2nd harmonic). The actual pitch obtained
depends on the drawbar tuning.
7-92
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Editor: The PERC2 Page
HighHarm
Controls which drawbar is used as the basis for the percussion when Harmonic is set to
High. On an actual tone wheel organ, this is Drawbar 5 (3rd harmonic). The actual pitch
obtained depends on the drawbar tuning.
StealBar
Controls which drawbar is disabled when the percussion effect is turned on. On an
unmodified tone wheel organ, the ninth drawbar is the one disabled. Any drawbar can be
selected.
KB3 Editor: The PERC2 Page
Parameter Group (Available for each combination of
the Volume and Decay parameters on the PERC1 page)
Range of Values
Percussion Level
0 to 24.0 dB
Decay Time
0.01 to 5.10 seconds, in 0.02-second increments
Organ Volume Level
-12.0 to 12.0 dB
PercLevel, DecayTime, OrgLevel
With these parameters you can control the amplitude and decay time of the percussion effect
for all combinations of the Volume and Decay parameters (on the PERC1 page). You can
also adjust the level of the organ relative to the percussion, for accurate emulation of classic
organs.
7-93
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Editor: The EQ Page
KB3 Editor: The EQ Page
The four column headers on this page represent two shelving bands of equalization and
two parametric bands. The KB3 EQ offered here, though, is not implemented as a true EQ
section; instead, it adjusts the volume of the tone wheels based on frequency. If the tone
wheels are based on sine waves, then this acts similarly to a real EQ.
Parameter Group (Available for each EQ band)
Range of Values
Gain
-24.0 to 24.0 dB, in 0.2-dB increments
Frequency
16 to 25088 Hz, in varying increments
Width
-128 to 128 Semitones, in 2-semitone increments
Each EQ section has Gain (G), Frequency (F), and Width (W) controls. Frequency controls
the center frequency of the band. Width controls the bandwidth. Gain controls the amount
of boost or cut.
7-94
Program Edit Mode
KB3 Editor: The OUTPUT Page
KB3 Editor: The OUTPUT Page
Use this page to route the current program’s post-FX signals. The two Pan parameters
correspond to those of the VAST Program editor OUTPUT page (See page 7-40 ). The Out
Gain parameter corresponds to those of the VAST Program Editor COMMON page (See
page 7-16).
Exp Pedal
Use this parameter to set which rear panel CC Pedal input will control volume for the
current KB3 program. With a setting of Expression/Foot, volume can be controlled by a CC
pedal plugged into either the rear panel input labeled CC Pedal 1 (volume), or the rear panel
input labeled CC Pedal 2 (wah). With a setting of Expression, volume can be controlled by
a CC pedal plugged into the rear panel input labeled CC Pedal 1 (volume). With a setting
of Foot, volume can be controlled by a CC pedal plugged into the rear panel input labeled
CC Pedal 2 (wah). With a setting of None, volume control from both CC pedal inputs is
disabled.
KB3 Editor: The LFO, ASR, FUN, and ARP Pages
The rest of the pages—LFO, ASR, FUN, ARP1 and ARP2 — are the same for KB3
programs as they are for VAST programs, so we won’t describe them again here. For
descriptions of these pages see:
The LFO Page on page 7-43
The ASR Page on page 7-46
The Function (FUN) Page on page 7-47
The Arpeggiator Function on page 7-55
7-95
Chapter 8
The Effects Chain Editor
The Effects Chain Editor
The MAIN Page
Pressing the Edit button while a Chain (other than 0 None) is highlighted—on any of the
various effects pages—will call up the Chain editor. From the Program editor, the program’s
Insert and Aux Chains can be edited from the PROGFX and LYRFX pages. In Effect mode
Chains selected for Aux overrides can be edited from the Aux 1 Override and Aux 2 Override
pages. In Multi Edit Mode, Chains selected for Aux overrides can be edited from the AUX1
and AUX2 pages.
A Chain is made up of one or more effect-boxes, with each box containing a single effect.
You can have up to 16 effect-boxes in a Chain. The settings for all of the parameters of
each effect-box are also stored within the Chain. There are 15 Mod Controls that allow for
real-time control over any parameter from any effect-box in the Chain. Per Chain Control
sources are also provided to be used as inputs to the effect Mods (two FXLFOs, two FXASRs,
and four FXFUNs.) These work similarly to the LFOs, ASRs and FUNs in Program mode,
but are only available for use with the effect Mods.
The MAIN Page
In the Chain Editor, pressing the MAIN soft button calls up the MAIN page. The MAIN
page is where you configure the length of a Chain and select the individual effects that make
up the Chain. The Chain editor MAIN page of the Chain 269 PnoEnhancRvb3 appears as
shown below:
At the top right of the display is the number of DSP units used by the currently selected
effect- box, and by the Chain as a whole. 2/5 Units indicates that the current effect-box is
using two DSP units and the Chain is using a total of five DSP units for all of its effects
boxes. There are a total of 16 units available for all of the Chains that are currently loaded by
programs and any active Aux overrides from Multi Mode.
8-1
The Effects Chain Editor
The MOD Pages
NOTE: In some configurations, not all 16 units are available for use with multi-unit
effects because of the way the DSP is allocated internally.
Like all other representations of signal paths in the Forte SE display, the program signal
moves from left to right through the Chain. Use the cursor buttons to select an effect-box
or empty spot in the Chain. The effect loaded into the selected effect-box can be changed
by numeric entry, with the Alpha Wheel, or with the +/– buttons; and can be changed with
either the effect-box or the Effect field at the bottom of the page highlighted. The +/- double
button press will jump to the next effect “category.”
Pressing the Insert soft button adds a new effect-box to the Chain in the currently selected
block-slot, and pushes the currently selected effect-box down the Chain to the right. (If you
have run out of DSP units, you will not be able to create additional effects boxes.) Pressing
the Remove soft button takes the currently selected effect out of the Chain.
Editing Effect-boxes
To edit the parameters of an effect, select its effect-box on the MAIN page and press the Edit
button. For each effect, there are one or more pages of parameters that are specific to that
effect. See Effects Parameters on page 8-5 for details on parameters for each type of effect.
Any parameter controlled by an effect Mod will display a value of FxMod and cannot be
edited. To return to the MAIN page of the chain editor, press the Exit button.
The MOD Pages
There are six pages for configuring effects mods: MOD1 - MOD6. All pages are essentially
identical in appearance and function. See below for an example MOD page:
Box
The Box parameter specifies which effect-box in the Chain to which the Mod will be applied.
Param
The Param parameter selects which parameter of the specified box’s effect will be modulated.
8-2
The Effects Chain Editor
FXLFO, FXASR, and FXFUN pages
Adjust
The Adjust parameter sets a fixed value for the specified parameter (Param) that is applied
before any modulation.
Source
The Source parameter determines the Control source that will modulate the parameter
(Param) in real-time. This can be any of the normal channel Control sources (sliders, mod
wheel, pedals, etc.) or one of the Chain-specific Control sources (FXLFOs, FXASRs, and
FXFUNs).
Depth
The Depth parameter determines the range of modulation that the Controller will apply.
When the Control source has a value of 0, the parameter’s (Param’s) value will be the Adjust
value. When the control source is all the way up, the parameter’s (Param’s) value will be the
Adjust value plus the Depth value.
FXLFO, FXASR, and FXFUN pages
The FXLFO, FXASR, and FXFUN pages are the pages from which you edit the Effectsonly Control sources. These are Control sources that can be used by the effects Mods in the
current Chain. The parameters on these pages work exactly like those of the corresponding
Control sources in program mode (see The LFO Page on page 7-43, The ASR Page on page
7-46, and The Function (FUN) Page on page 7-47.
INFO page
Press the INFO soft button to go to the Chain Info page where you can edit the controller
assignment info for the current Chain. Chain Info allows you to add a description for each
FX Mod you have assigned. On the Chain Info page, use the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons
to scroll through the current Chain’s list of controller assignment info. Each assignment Info
entry has a MIDI controller number and a Text parameter to describe what the assignment
controls. One Info entry can be made for each MIDI CC number.
Chain Info allows you to see a name for each FX Mod controller assignment, as well as set
an initial controller value for each FX Mod in each Program. When assigning a physical
controller or CC number to a source field on one of the FX Mod pages, a Chain Info entry
is automatically added to the Chain Info Page with the name of the FX parameter. Chain
Info entries are also automatically deleted when their associated FX Mods are removed or
unassigned from the FX Mod pages.
8-3
The Effects Chain Editor
The Utility Soft Buttons, HELP Soft Button and Favorites Buttons Functions
When an FX Chain is selected in a Program, the Chain Info entries appear on the Program
Parameters page. Chain Info names are also shown on the main Program and Multi Mode
Pages when moving an assigned controller. The Program Parameters page allows you to
remap existing Chain FX Mod controller assignments, as well as set an initial MIDI value
for each assignment. This allows you to reuse the same Chain in several Programs, and each
of the Chain FX Mods can have a different controller assignment or initial value in each
Program.
Each MIDI CC number can have one Chain Info entry. When setting an FX Mod source
field, if the selected physical controller or CC number is already used by a different FX Mod
in the Chain, a new Chain Info entry will not be added to the Chain Info Page. The new FX
Mod will share the existing Chain Info entry for the same physical controller/MIDI CC. The
name of the previously existing Chain Info entry will not change based on the new FX Mod.
If you have assigned one physical controller/MIDI CC to multiple FX Mods, you may wish
to edit the Info name to reflect this.
To edit an Chain Info name, first go to the Chain Info page, then use the Channel/Layer/
Zone buttons to select the Info entry from the list. Press the Text soft button to enter the
text editor for the currently selected Info entry. After making text changes, press the OK soft
button, or press the cancel soft button to exit the text editor without making changes. Be
sure to save the Chain when exiting the Chain editor in order to save your changes.
In some cases it may be desirable to manually create a new Chain Info entry. Press the New
soft button, then choose an available MIDI CC. Once the Info entry is created, you can
change its name using the Text soft button.
If you have edited the Info text for an FX Mod, but wish to change to physical controller or
CC number for the source field of that FX Mod, you can duplicate the Info entry to preserve
the edited text. First, go to the Chain Info page, then use the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons
to select the Info entry from the list. Press the Dup soft button and select an available CC to
use for the new FX Mod source assignment. Lastly, select the desired FX Mod source field on
one of the FX Mod pages, and select the same CC for the source field.
You can delete a Chain Info entry by selecting it on the Chain Info page and pressing the
Delete soft button.
The Utility Soft Buttons, HELP Soft Button and
Favorites Buttons Functions
Some of the soft buttons in the Chain Editor perform a function when pressed, as well as
some of the Favorites buttons.
8-4
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
Delete
Press the Delete soft button to delete the current Chain (factory Chains can not be deleted).
Press Delete, and you will be given a choice to Delete or Cancel. Press Delete again, and an
“Are You Sure?” message will appear. Press Yes to delete the Chain, or Cancel to cancel.
HELP
Press the HELP soft button to view the Help page, where you can view a description of
functions assigned to the Favorites buttons.
Favorites 1: Help
Press the Favorites 1 button to view the HELP page.
Favorites 5: Bypass Box
Press the Favorites 5 button to temporarily bypass the currently selected FX box in the
Chain. Press the Favorites 5 button again to re-enable the selected box.
Effects Parameters
This section contains descriptions of the Forte SE’s many effects parameters, and instructions
on how to use them. Read through this section to get a good general understanding of the
parameters.
The descriptions here do not include all of the parameters associated with every effect, and
some effects may not have some of the parameters described here for their category. A more
complete reference, with every effect and the meaning and range of every parameter, arranged
in the order they appear on the screen, can be found in the KSP8 Algorithm Reference Guide
on the Kurzweil website, www.kurzweil.com.
General Parameters
There are a number of parameters that are common to all or almost all effects, and we’ll deal
with those first.
Wet/Dry balances the levels of the processed and unprocessed signals output from the effect.
Wet represents the processed signal, while dry represents the unprocessed signal. The range
is 0% wet (the signal is unprocessed) through 100% wet (no dry signal is present). Values
between 0% and 100% blend the two signals, for example, at 20% the output signal is
20% wet (processed) and 80% dry (unprocessed.) A setting of 50% wet means the dry and
processed signals are roughly equal in level. In some effects, separate Wet/Dry parameters
are provided for the Left and Right input channels. In some cases, this parameters can have
negative values, which indicate that the Wet signal is polarity-inverted.
8-5
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
When an effect with the Wet/Dry parameter is used in Chain that has been selected as an
Aux effect, Wet/Dry is automatically set to 100% wet and cannot be adjusted. This is because
when using an Aux effect, the dry signal is already effectively at 100% on the main audio bus
(not routed through the Aux effect.) In this case, turning up the Aux send level will blend the
100% wet signal (from the Aux bus) with the dry signal on the main audio bus.
Out Gain sets the gain at the output of an effect.
In/Out enables or disables the effect. You can think of it as a Wet/Dry parameter with only
two
HF Damping (high frequency damping) is the cutoff (-3 dB) frequency of a 6dB/octave
lowpass filter that’s inserted before the processor. High frequencies above the set cutoff
frequency will be filtered out. In the case of processors where multiple iterations of the signal
are heard, such as in a delay, each iteration of the signal will pass through the filter, and will
therefore be duller.
XCouple (Cross Couple). In stereo effects, this controls how much of any signal being
fed back is going to the channel opposite to the one where it first appeared. At 100%, all
feedback from signals at the left input goes to the right channel and vice versa, causing a
“spreading” or in the case of delay lines, a “ping-pong” effect. At 0%, fed-back signals stay
with the channel they came in on.
A->B cfg (configuration). In combination effects that contain two (or more) components,
the order in which the signal passes through the two components can be changed with this
parameter. Combination effects are usually named with a “->”, as in 484 “Flange->Shaper.”
For example, 484 “Flange->Shaper” can be configured so the signal passes through the
flanger first and then the shaper, or through the shaper first and then the flanger. The cfg
parameter determines the configuration, and its value is context-sensitive—in this example,
the choices would be “Fl->Shp” and “Shp->Fl.”
A/Dry->B is also found in many combination effects, and controls the amount of signal
that will pass dry (unprocessed) through the first component into the second component.
Different combination effects use different variations on this parameter, depending on the
context. The range is 0 to 100%.
Reverbs
Room Type changes the configuration of the effect to simulate a wide array of room types
and sizes including booths, small rooms, chambers, halls and large spaces. Because this
parameter changes the structure of the reverb effect, you need to be careful when assigning it
a MOD— changing it in real time while signal is passing through it is likely to cause audible
artifacts. Room types in different effects with similar names do not necessarily sound the
same.
8-6
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
Rvrb Time is the RT60—the time it takes for the reverb to decay to 60 dB below its initial
level—in seconds. It is accurate assuming that several other parameters (HF Damping, Diff
Scale, Size Scale, and Density) are at their nominal levels. It is adjustable up to “Inf ”, which
creates an infinitely-sustaining reverb.
LateRvbTim adjusts the basic decay time of the late portion of the reverb after diffusion.
L Pre Dly and R Pre Dly (Pre-Delay) is the time between the start of a sound and the output
of the first reverb reflections from that sound. Longer pre-delays can help make larger spaces
sound more realistic. Longer times can also help improve the clarity of a mix by separating
the reverb signal from the dry signal, so the dry signal is not obscured. You can set a separate
time for the left and right reverb signals using L Pre Dly and R Pre Dly.
EarRef Lvl adjusts the mix level of the early-reflection portion of effects which offer early
reflections.
Late Lvl adjusts the mix level of the late-reverb portion of effects which offer early
reflections.
Diff Scale scales the “diffusion“ of the early reflections, that is, how spread out they are as a
group over time. At very low settings, the early reflections start to sound quite discrete, and
at higher settings the early reflections are seamless. It is adjustable from 0.00 to 2.00, with
1.00 being nominal for the given Room Type.
Density controls how tightly the early reflections are packed in time. Low Density settings
group the early reflections close together, while higher values spread the reflections for a
smoother reverb. It is adjustable from 0.00 to 4.00, with 1.00 being nominal (and usually
optimal) for the given Room Type.
Expanse controls the amount of late reverb energy biased toward the edges of the stereo
image. A setting of 0% will bias energy towards the center. Moving away from 0% will bias
energy towards the sides. Positive and negative values will have a different character.
Build adjusts the envelope of certain portions of the reverb. Positive values speed up the
envelope, and negative values slow it down.
Size Scale changes the size of the current room. Altering this parameter will change the
reverb time and also cause some coloration of the reverb. It is adjustable from 0.00 to 4.00,
with 1.00 being nominal (and usually optimal) for the given Room Type.
InfinDecay, when turned “On”, causes the reverb tail to decay infinitely. When it’s “Off”,
the decay time is determined by the “Rvrb Time” or “LateRvbTim” parameters. This is a
good parameter to control with a footswitch.
Wet Bal (Wet Balance). Some reverb effects are actually two stereo reverbs in one, with each
one receiving a different mono signal. This balances the outputs of the two reverbs—0%
means they are being mixed equally.
8-7
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
Delays
There are two types of taps in the Multitap delays: The “Loop” tap, which has a feedback
loop back to its input, and the numbered taps. The numbered taps can be single iterations or
they can repeat as part of a loop, but they do not have individual feedback paths.
Fdbk (Feedback) Level controls the repeating function of the Loop Tap. A setting of 0%
means there will only be a single delay, while a setting of 100% means the signal keeps
repeating without ever stopping.
Both types of taps are individually adjustable from 0 to 2.55 seconds. The Loop Crs and
Tapn Crs (n being the number of the tap) parameters set the coarse value of the loop in 20ms increments, while the Loop Fine and Tapn Fine parameters set the fine value in 0.2-ms
increments.
In Delay effects that use tempo to determine tap lengths, there is a Tempo parameter which
can be set from 1 to 255 BPM or to “System.” The Loop Length and Tapn Delays are then
expressed in beats relative to that overall Tempo.
Hold is a switch that, when turned on, “locks” any signal currently in the delay and plays it
until Hold is turned off. When Hold is on, no signal can enter the delay and Feedback is set
to 100%. A good parameter to control with a footswitch.
Dry Bal (Balance) is the left/right balance of the dry signal. At -100%, only the left dry
signal goes to the left output, while at 100% only the right dry signal passes to the right
output, and at 0%, equal amounts of the left and right dry signals pass to their respective
outputs.
Tapn Level is the level of each numbered tap, from 0% to 100%, relative to the overall
output of the effect.
Tapn Bal is the left/right balance of each of the numbered taps. At -100%, only the left
channel of tap n goes to the left output, while at 100% only the right channel of tap n goes
to the right output. At 0%, equal amounts of the left and right channels of the tap pass to
their respective outputs. In some delays, pairs of taps (1 and 5, 2 and 6, etc.) are controlled
together as stereo pairs.
DelayScale lets you change the lengths of all the taps together. Its range is 0 to 10x.
Note: It is possible for the Forte SE to run out of delay memory with over-generous
settings of DelayScale or very slow Tempos. Some Delay effects will simply go to a
maximum value and stay there, while in some, a calculation is made that automatically
cuts the delay times in half, thereby maintaining a relationship with tempo.
8-8
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
Complex Echo
This effect has two feedback taps per channel as well as three independent taps, and also
a feedback diffuser for “smearing” the delays. Feedback line 1 feeds the signal back to the
delay input of the same channel, while feedback line 2 feeds the signal back to the opposite
channel.
FB2/FB1>FB is a balance control between feedback lines 1 and 2. 0% (minimum) turns off
feedback line 2, only allowing use of feedback line 1. 50% is an even mix of both lines, and
100% (maximum) turns off line 1.
L Diff Dly and R Diff Dly adjusts the delay lengths of the diffusers. Range is 0 to 100 ms.
Diff Amt adjusts the diffuser intensity. Range is 0 to 100%.
C Fdbk n Dly adjusts the delay length of the C channel’s nth feedback tap, fed back to the C
channel’s delay input. Range is 0 to 2600 ms.
Spectral Multitap Delays
These 4- and 6-tap delays have their feedback and output taps modified with shapers and
filters. In the feedback path of each tap are a diffuser, hipass filter, lopass filter, and imager.
Each delay tap has a shaper, comb filter, and balance and level controls.
Fdbk Image sets the amount that the stereo image is shifted each time it passes through the
feedback line. Range is -100 to 100%.
Tap n Shapr adjusts the intensity of the shaper at each output tap. Range is 0.10 to 6.00 x.
Tap n Pitch adjusts the frequency of the comb filter at each output tap. Range is C-1 to C8,
in semitones.
Tap n PtAmt adjusts the intensity of the comb filter at each output tap. Range is 0 to 100%.
Gated Ducking Delay
This runs the last thing you played through a looping delay, but only outputs the delay signal
when you aren’t playing. Gated Ducking Delay is great for that announcer sound, sound,
sound, so popular in Monster Truck radio spots.
DegenRegen
This one’s a big looping delay with lots of gain, distortion and filtering, and with a
compressor to keep it all under control.
Equalizers (EQ)
The Forte SE has both Graphic and Parametric EQ effects. Parametric EQ sections are also
found on a number of combination effects.
8-9
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
The Graphic equalizer is available as stereo (linked parameters for left and right) or dual
mono (independent controls for left and right). It has 10 bandpass filters per channel, each of
whose gain is adjustable from -12 dB to +24 dB.
Like all graphic equalizers, the filter response is not perfectly flat when all gains are set to the
same level (except at 0 dB), but rather has ripple from band to band. To minimize this ripple,
it is best to center the overall settings around 0 dB.
The Parametric equalizer (“5-Band EQ”) has two bands of shelving filters and three bands of
true parametric EQ.
Treb Freq and Bass Freq set the center frequencies for the shelving filters. Both of these are
adjustable over the full range of 16 to 25088 Hz, in increments of a semitone.
Treb Gain and Bass Gain control the amount of cut or boost above (Treb) or below (Bass)
the center frequency. The range is -79 to +24 dB.
Midn Gain sets the cut or boost for the parametric band n, with a range of -79 to +24 dB.
Midn Freq sets the center frequency for parametric band n, with a range of 16 to 25088 Hz,
in increments of a semitone.
Midn Width set the bandwidth of the filter on band n, with a range of 0.01 to 5 octaves.
Enhancers
Enhancers modify the spectral content of the input signal by boosting existing spectral
content, or stimulating new ones. Two and three-band versions are provided.
Drive adjusts the input into each band. Increasing the drive will increase the effects. Range is
-79.0 to 24.0 dB.
Xfer adjusts the intensity of the transfer curves. Range is -100 to 100%.
EQ Morpher
This effect uses two four-band bandpass filters, A and B, and moves between them. This can
produce very convincing human vocal type sounds.
FreqScale offsets the filter frequencies for each set of filters. After setting the filter parameters
(Freq, Gain, and Width), the FreqScale parameters will move each of the four filter
frequencies together by the same relative pitch. Range is -8600 to 8600 cents.
Morph A>B. When set to 0% the “A” parameters are controlling the filters, and when set
to 100%, the “B” parameters control the filters. Between 0 and 100%, the filters are at
interpolated positions. When morphing from A to B settings, the A filter #1 will change to
the B filter #1, A filter #2 moves to B filter #2, and so on. Range is 0 to 100%.
Compressors, Expanders, and Gates
A wide range of Compression and Expansion effects is available in the Forte SE. The various
effects include different combinations of:
8-10
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
• compressors with soft-knee characteristic—the compression action comes in gradually
as the signal level approaches the threshold
• compressors with hard-knee characteristic—the compression action comes in
abruptly when the signal reaches the threshold
• expanders
• multiband compressors that break the signal up into three frequency bands and
compress them all separately
• sidechains or output EQs
• reverbs and compressors in combination
• gates
• gated reverbs
All of the Compression effects use these parameters:
FdbkComprs (Feedback Compression) selects whether to use feed-forward (set this to
“Out”) or feed-back (set this to “In”) compression. The feed-forward configuration uses the
input signal as a side-chain source, which is useful when the compressor has to act really
quickly. The feed-back configuration uses the compressor output as the side-chain source,
which lends itself to more subtle, but not as quick-reacting, compression.
Atk (Attack) Time for the compressor is adjustable from 0.0 to 228.0 ms. Rel (Release) Time
for the compressor is adjustable from 0 to 3000 ms.
SmoothTime smooths the output of the expander’s envelope detector by putting a lowpass
filter in the control signal path. Smoothing will affect the Attack or Release times only when
this parameter is longer than one of the other times. The range is 0.0 to 228.0 ms.
Signal Dly (Delay) puts a small delay in the signal relative to the sidechain processing, so
that the compressor (or gate) “knows” what the input signal is going to be before it has
to act on it. This means the compression can kick in before an attack transient arrives. In
the SoftKneeCompress and HardKneeCompress effects, delay is really only useful in feedforward configuration (FdbkComprs is “Out”). For other compressors, the delay can be
useful in feedback configuration (FdbkComprs is “In”). The range is 0 to 25 ms.
Ratio is the amount of gain reduction imposed on the compressed signal, adjustable from
1.0:1 (no reduction) to 100:1, and Inf:1.
Threshold is the level in dBFS (decibels relative to full scale) above which the signal begins
to be compressed. Adjustable from -79.0 to 0 dB.
MakeUpGain allows additional output gain to compensate for gain reduction in the
compressor. It is essentially the same parameter as Out Gain, with which it is summed. The
minimum is -79.0, and the maximum summed gain (MakeUpGain + Out Gain) is +24.0
dB.
Expansion
Effects containing Expanders have these controls:
8-11
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
Atk or Exp Atk (Attack), how fast the expander turns off when the input signal rises above
the threshold level, adjustable from 0.0 to 228.0 ms.
Rel or Exp Rel (Release), how fast the expander turns back on after the signal drops below
the threshold level, adjustable from 0 to 3000 ms.
Ratio or Exp Ratio, how much the gain is reduced below the expansion threshold, adjustable
from 1:1.0 (no expansion) to 1:17 (extreme downward expansion).
Threshold or Exp Threshold, the level below which the signal is expanded, adjustable from
-79.0 to 0 dB.
In addition, the two-segment compressors with expander have separate Ratio and Threshold
controls for each of the compression segments.
Multiband Compression
The Multiband Compression effect has Attack, Release, Smooth, Signal Delay, Ratio,
Threshold, and MakeUp Gain parameters for each of the three bands (“Low”, “Mid”, and
“High”). In addition, it has:
Crossover1 and Crossover2. These set the frequencies which divide the three compression
frequency bands. The two parameters are interchangeable, so either may contain the higher
frequency value. The range is 16 to 25088 Hz, in increments of a semitone.
Gates
SC Input lets you select which input channel(s) will control the sidechain, which is
responsible for opening and closing the gate. It can be set to L, R, or the average of the
two channels, (L+R)/2. You can use this, if you arrange the signal paths and pan controls
appropriately, to gate one mono signal with a different mono signal.
Gate Time is the time that the gate will stay open after the sidechain signal reaches the
Threshold. Its range is 0 to 3000ms.
Ducking reverses the action of the gate. Normally this if set to “Off”, and the gate opens
when the input signal rises above the threshold. But when this is “On”, the gate closes when
the input signal rises above the threshold.
Super Gate
Super Gate is a more sophisticated gate that includes these two functions:
Env Time is the amount of time it takes for the sidechain signal envelope to drop below the
threshold. If this time is too short, the gate can close and open too quickly from amplitude
modulation in the sidechain signal. If it is too long, the gate may stay closed until the
envelope has a chance to fall, and some signals would not get through. This parameter is only
in effect when Retrigger is Off.
8-12
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
Retrigger determines whether the gate timer will reset itself each time the sidechain signal
goes above the threshold. If it is “On”, the timer resets itself, and therefore the gate stays
open as long as the signal is above the threshold, or keeps going above the threshold, within
the interval specified by Gate Time. If it is “Off”, the gate closes down after Env Time
has elapsed, regardless off the sidechain level, and the sidechain level must fall below the
threshold and come back up again before the gate will open again.
Chorus
Chorus is an effect which gives the illusion of multiple voices playing in unison. The effect
is achieved by detuning copies of the original signal and summing the detuned copies back
with the original. Low frequency oscillators (LFOs) are used to modulate the positions of
output taps from a delay line. The movement of the taps causes the pitch of the signal to shift
up and down, producing the required detuning.
The choruses are available as stereo or dual mono. The stereo choruses have the parameters
for the left and right channels ganged, while the dual mono choruses have separate left and
right controls.
Fdbk Level is the level of the feedback signal from the LFO1 delay tap into the delay line.
Negative values polarity-invert the feedback signal.
Tap Lvl sets the levels of the LFO-modulated delay taps. Negative values polarity-invert the
signal. Setting any tap level to 0% turns it off.
Tap Pan sets the stereo position for a given tap’s output. The range is -100% for fully left, to
100% for fully right.
Atk Time (attack time) is the time for the gate to ramp from closed to open (reverse if
Ducking is on) after the signal rises above threshold, adjustable from 0.0 to 228.0 ms.
Rel Time (release time) is the time for the gate to ramp from open to closed (reverse if
Ducking is on) after the gate timer has elapsed, adjustable from 0 to 3000 ms.
LFO Rate sets the speed of modulation of the delay lines with a range of 0.01 to 10 Hz.
LFO Dpth sets the maximum detuning depth of the LFO-modulated delay lines, with a
range from 0 to 50 cents (= 1/2 semitone).
Tap Dly adds extra delay in front of the LFO modulated delay taps from 0 to 230 ms.
L/R Phase or LFOn LRPhs adjusts the relative phases of the LFOs for the left and right
channels in the stereo Choruses.
8-13
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
 Flanger
Flanging is the process of adding or subtracting a signal with a time-displaced replica of itself,
which results in a series of notches in the frequency spectrum, generally referred to as a comb
filter. In the Forte SE, the flanger is a multi-tap delay line, all (but one) of whose taps can
have their lengths modulated up and down by a low frequency oscillator (LFO). The rate of
the LFO is expressed in Tempo.
StatDlyLvl (Static Delay Level) is the level of the first, non-moving tap. Negative values
invert the polarity of the tap. The range is -100 to 100%; 0% turns the tap off.
DlyCrs and DlyFin are the coarse and fine length controls for the Static delay (StatDly...)
and for the minimum value of the moving delays (Dlyn...). The coarse range is 0 to 228 ms,
and the fine range adjusts the coarse range in samples (= 1/48,000 sec = 20.8μsec) from -127
to 127.
Xcurs Crs and Xcurs Fin determine how far the LFO-modulated delay taps can move from
the center of their ranges. The total range of the LFO sweep is twice the excursion. If the
excursion is set to 0, the LFO does not move and the tap behaves like a simple delay line set
to the minimum delay. The coarse range is 0 to 228 ms; the range 0 to 5 ms is most effective
for flanging. The fine range adjusts the coarse range in samples from -127 to 127.
Quantize
This effect produces digital distortion known as quantization noise, by limiting the number
of bits available to the signal. See effect 329 “Aliaser.”
DynamRange (dynamic range) controls how many bits to remove from the signal data
words. The lower the level, the greater the distortion. At 0 dB the hottest of signals will
toggle between only two quantization levels, thereby producing a square wave. Every 6 dB
added doubles the number of quantization levels, reducing the noise and getting closer to
the original signal. If the signal has a lot of headroom (available signal level before digital
clipping), then not all quantization levels will be reached. Range is 0 to 144 dB.
Headroom sets the available signal level before digital clipping. Setting this properly
prevents the signal from getting too loud at low levels of DynamRange. You want to have it
match the amount of level still available above the input signal: this is done by finding the
DynamRange level at which the signal starts getting louder, and setting Headroom to match
the DynamRange value. Range is 0 to 144 dB.
DC Offset adds a positive DC Offset to the input signal, which allows you to alter the
position where digital zero is with respect to your signal. At low DynamRange settings, this
can cause the output to “sputter.” Range is Off/-79.0 to 0.0 dB.
8-14
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
LaserVerb
LaserVerb is a type of reverb which produces a delayed train of closely spaced reflections,
or impulses. As time passes, the spacing between the impulses gets wider, which creates a
discernible buzzy pitch that gets lower as the spacing increases. The signal can be fed back
into itself to extend the effect.
Dly Coarse is the overall delay length, which controls the duration or decay time. 0.5 sec is a
good starting point. Range is 0 to 1.3 seconds in the 2 DSP unit version of the effect, and 0
to 2 seconds in the 3 DSP unit version.
Dly Fine adjusts the delay with a resolution down to 0.2 ms. Range is -20.0 to 20.0 ms.
Spacing determines the starting pitch of the descending buzz and how fast it descends,
by setting the initial separation of impulses and the subsequent rate of increasing impulse
separation. The spacing between impulses is given in samples (20.8μs). At low values, the
buzz starts at high frequencies and drops slowly, while at high values the buzz starts at a lower
pitch and drops rapidly. Range is 0.0 to 40.0 samples, with a resolution of 0.2 sample.
Contour controls the overall shape of the reverb. When set to a high value, sounds passed
through the reverb start at a high level, and it slowly decays. As the control value is reduced,
it takes more time for the effect to build up before decaying. At a value of around 34%, the
reverb behaves like a reverse reverb, building up to a hit. When it is set to zero, the effect acts
like a simple delay. Range is 0 to 100%.
Filters
Resonant Filter
Frequency (or Freq) is the fixed resonant frequency of the filter. Its range is 16 to 8372 Hz.
Envelope Filter
Envelope Filter is a resonant filter whose center frequency can be made to vary according to
the level of the incoming signal.
There are four types of Resonant Filter effects in the Forte SE. All of them have these
parameters in common:
Filter Type (or FiltType) can be Lowpass, Highpass, Bandpass, or Notch (band-cut).
Resonance is the resonance of the filter, adjustable from 0 to 50 dB.
Filter Type can be Lowpass, Highpass, Bandpass, or Notch (band-cut).
Min Freq is the minimum resonant frequency of the filter, that is, the filter frequency when
the input gain is below the triggering threshold. Its range is 16 to 8372 Hz.
8-15
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
Sweep determines how far the resonant frequency moves when the input level increases.
At positive levels it moves up in pitch, and at negative levels it moves down. The highest
possible resonant frequency is 8372 Hz, the lowest is 0 Hz. This parameter’s range is -100%
to +100%.
Resonance is the resonance of the filter, adjustable from 0 to 50 dB.
Atk Rate adjusts the upward slew of the attack portion of the envelope detector. Range is 0
to 300.0 dB/sec.
Rel Rate adjusts the downward slew of the release portion. Range is 0 to 300.0 dB/sec.
Smooth Rate slows down the envelope follower. If it is set to a lower rate than Atk Rate or
Rel Rate, it can dominate those parameters. Range is 0 to 300.0 dB/sec.
Triggered Filter
The Triggered Filter is a sweeping resonant filter that triggers when a certain input threshold
is reached, and then follows its own envelope, consisting of an instantaneous attack and an
exponential release, rather than the envelope of the input signal.
Max Freq is the resonant frequency of the filter at the peak of the internal envelope. It can
be set lower than Min Freq (above), in which case the filter will sweep downwards, then back
up. Range is 16 to 8372 Hz.
Trigger is the input-signal threshold at which the envelope detector triggers. Range is -79 to
0 dB.
Retrigger is the input-signal threshold at which the envelope detector resets, so that it can
trigger again. This parameter is only useful when it is set below the value of Trigger. Range is
from -79 to 0 dB.
Env Rate is the envelope detector decay rate. This can be used to prevent false triggering.
When the signal envelope falls below the retrigger level, the filter can be triggered again
when the signal rises above the trigger level. Since the input signal can fluctuate rapidly, it
is necessary to adjust the rate at which the signal envelope can fall to the retrigger level. The
range is 0 to 300.0 dB/sec.
Rel Rate is the downward slew (release) rate of the triggered envelope generator. The range is
0 to 300.0 dB/sec.
Smth Rate slows down the envelope follower. If set lower than the release rate, it will
dominate it. You can also use the smoothing rate to lengthen the attack of the internal
envelope. The range is 0 to 300.0 dB/sec.
LFO Filter
The LFO filter is continuously swept between two resonant frequencies over a period of time.
The LFO frequency, expressed in BPM and beats, can be fixed or set to follow System tempo.
8-16
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
Min Freq and Max Freq are the low and high limits of the resonant frequency as the filter is
swept. You can set the Min Freq higher than the Max Freq, in which case the filter will sweep
“upside down” relative to the controlling clock. The range for both is 16 to 8372 Hz.
LFO Shape is the waveform type for the LFO. Choices are Sine, Saw+, Saw-, Pulse, and Tri.
LFO PlsWid (Pulse Width). When the LFO Shape is set to Pulse, this sets the pulse width
as a percentage of the waveform period. When the width is set to 50%, the result is a square
wave. This parameter has no effect if other waveform types are chosen. Range is 0 to 100%.
LFO Smooth smooths (removes the higher harmonics from) the Saw+, Saw-, and Pulse
waveforms. A Sawtooth wave becomes more like a triangle wave, and a Pulse wave becomes
more like a sine wave. Range is 0 to 100%.
Distortion
Distortion effects on the Forte SE may also include a parametric equalizer or a cabinet
simulator.
Dist Drive applies a boost to the input signal to overdrive the distortion effect into soft
clipping. This will tend to make the signal very loud, so you may have to reduce the Out
Gain as this parameter is increased. Range is 0 to 96 dB.
Warmth is a lowpass filter in the distortion control path. This filter may be used to reduce
some of the harshness of some distortion settings without reducing the bandwidth of the
signal. Range is 16 to 25088 Hz.
Highpass allows you to reduce the bass content of the distortion content in the smaller
distortion effects that don’t have true parametric EQ. Range is 16 to 25088 Hz.
Cab Preset selects from eight cabinet simulations which have been created based on
measurements of real guitar amplifier cabinets. The presets are: Basic, Lead 12, 2x12, Open
12, Open 10, 4x12, Hot 2x12, and Hot 12.
Cab Bypass switches on and off the cabinet-simulation part of the effect. When this is set to
“In”, the cabinet simulation is active; when it is “Out”, there is no cabinet action.
Cabinet HP and Cabinet LP are highpass and lowpass filters to set the frequency response
limits of the cabinets. Range of both filters is 16 to 25088 Hz.
Polydistort
This is a more complex distortion effect that provides two, four, or six stages of distortion.
Curve n controls the curvature of the individual distortion stages. 0% is no curvature (no
distortion at all). At 100%, the curve bends over smoothly and becomes perfectly flat right
before it goes into clipping. Maximum value is 127%.
8-17
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
LP n Freq are shelving frequencies for one-pole lowpass filters on each of the distortion
stages. LP0 Freq handles the initial low pass prior to the first distortion stage. The other low
pass controls follow their respective distortion stages. Range is 16 to 25088 Hz.
Rotating Speakers
An effect that includes Rotating Speakers breaks the signal into two frequency bands,
“rotates” each band separately through a virtual speaker, and then combines the outputs with
a pair of virtual “microphones” whose angle relative to the speakers is adjustable. A number
of very sophisticated parameters have been included in the Rotating Speakers effect, to give
the effect a great degree of realism. Because of the complexity of the effects, you might want
to approach any parameters that seem a little obscure to you with caution.
Roto InOut engages or bypasses the rotary speaker effect.
There are four virtual microphones, with two each on the woofer (LoMic A and LoMic B)
and on the tweeter (HiMic A and HiMic B). Each microphone has:
Pos (position), the angle of the microphone from the front of the virtual speaker, from -180
to 180degrees;
Lvl (level) from 0 to 100%; and Pan, the left/right panning of the microphone’s output,
from -100% (full left) to 100% (full right). Other parameters:
Lo Beam W and Hi Beam W set the acoustic radiation patterns (“beam width”) of the two
drivers in the rotating speaker. If you imagine looking down on the rotating speaker, this is
the angle between the -6 dB levels of the beam. The range is from 45° to 360°. At 360°, the
driver is omnidirectional.
Xover (Crossover) is the frequency at which high and low frequency bands are split and sent
to separate rotating drivers. The range is 16 to 25088 Hz.
Lo Gain and Hi Gain are the gains of the signal passing through the rotating woofer or
tweeter, respectively. The range is Off/-79.0 to 24.0 dB.
Lo Size and Hi Size are the effective sizes (radius of rotation) of the rotating speakers in
millimeters. This affects the amount of Doppler shift or vibrato of the low frequency signal.
The range is 0 to 250 mm.
Lo Trem and Hi Trem control the depth of tremolo (amplitude modulation) of the signals. It
is expressed as a percentage of full scale tremolo. The range is 0 to 100%.
LoResonate and HiResonate are simulations of cabinet resonant modes expressed as a
percentage. For realism, you should use very low settings. The range is 0 to 100%.
Lo Res Dly and Hi Res Dly are the number of samples of delay in each resonator circuit in
addition to the rotation excursion delay. The range is 10 to 2550 samples.
LoResXcurs and HiResXcurs are the number of samples of delay to sweep through the
resonator at the rotation rate of each rotating speaker. The range is 0 to 510 samples.
8-18
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
ResH/LPhs sets the relative phases of the high and low resonators. The angle value in degrees
is somewhat arbitrary and you can expect the effect of this parameter to be rather subtle. The
range is 0 to 360.0 degrees.
Mic Angle is the angle of the virtual microphones in degrees from the “front” of the rotating
speaker. For the left microphone the angle increases clockwise (when viewed from the top),
while for the right microphone the angle increases counter-clockwise. Assigning a MOD to
this parameter should be done with caution: real-time adjustments to it will result in large
sample skips, which will cause clicks in the signal passing through. The range is 0 to 360.0
degrees. (In Distort + Rotary only.)
The following parameters relate to rotation speed:
Speed sets the rotating speakers to run at either the slow rate or the fast rate. Brake, when set
to “On”, slows the rotating speakers to a halt.
Lo Mode, in the “Normal” setting, will give you full control of the low frequency speaker
with the Speed parameter. The “NoAccel” setting will hold the low frequency speaker at the
slow speed, and the Speed parameter will have no effect on its speed, though Brake will still
work. In the “Stopped” position, the low frequency speaker will not spin at all.
Lo Slow and Hi Slow are the rotation rates in hertz (Hz) of the speakers when Speed is set to
“Slow.”
Lo Fast and Hi Fast are the rotation rate in hertz (Hz) of the speakers when Speed is set to
“Fast.” LoSlow>Fst and HiSlow>Fst are the times for the speakers to accelerate from the slow
speed to LoFst>Slow and HiFst>Slow are the times for the speaker to decelerate from the fast
speed to the slow speed.
LoAccelCrv and HiAccelCrv are the shapes of the acceleration curves for the speakers. 0%
is a constant acceleration. Positive values cause the speaker to speed up slowly at first then
quickly reach the fast rate. Negative values cause a quick initial speed-up then slowly settle in
to the fast speed. If set to a low negative value, it will overshoot.
LoSpinDir and HiSpinDir are the directions of rotation of the speakers. The choice is
clockwise (CW) or counter-clockwise (CCW).
Vibrato/Chorus
The Vibrato/Chorus effect simulates the vibrato and chorus effects on a tone wheel organ,
and is used in conjunction with the Rotary Speaker. It has several unique parameters:
VibChInOut is an in/out switch for the Vibrato/Chorus effect.
Vib/Chor is the type of Vibrato/Chorus effect to be used. The choices are from three
vibratos, “V1”, “V2”, “V3”, or three choruses, “C1”, “C2”, “C3.”
8-19
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
Tremolo and AutoPan
Tremolo is amplitude modulation using an LFO. AutoPan moves the signal between the
left and right channels, using an LFO. They have several parameters in common and several
unique ones.
LFO Rate is the rate of the LFO. The range is 0 to 10.00 Hz, or 0 to 12.00 x the tempo.
Rate Scale multiplies the speed of the LFO rate into the audio range. The range is 1 to
25088 x. When above 16x, the values increment in semitone steps. When the LFO Rate is
set to 1.00 Hz, the value of this parameter is equal to the LFO frequency in Hertz.
LFO Shape is the waveform type for the LFO. Choices are Sine, Saw+, Saw-, Pulse, and Tri.
LFO PlsWid or Pulse Width. When the LFO Shape is set to Pulse, this sets the pulse width
as a percentage of the waveform period. When the width is set to 50%, the result is a square
wave. This parameter has no effect if other waveform types are chosen. Range is 0 to 100%.
AutoPan
Origin determines the axis for the panning motion. At 0%, the panning is centered between
the speakers. Positive values shift the axis to the right, while negative values shift it to the left.
At -100% or +100% (the range limits), there is no panning action.
ImageWidth is the width of the original input program material before it is auto-panned.
At 0% (minimum), the input image is shrunk to a single point source, allowing maximum
panning excursion. At 100% (maximum), the original width is maintained so no panning
can occur.
Pan Width controls the amount of pan excursion. It is the percentage of total panning
motion available after Origin and ImageWidth are set. Range is 0 to 100%.
CentrAtten (Attenuation) is the amount the signal level drops as it is panned through the
center of the stereo image. For the smoothest tracking, a widely accepted subjective reference
is -3dB. Values above -3dB will cause somewhat of a bump in level as an image passes
through the center, while values below -3dB will cause a dip. Range is -12 to 0 dB.
Tremolo
Depth controls the amount of attenuation applied when the LFO is at its deepest excursion
point. Range is 0 to 100%.
LFO Phase shifts the phase of the tremolo LFO relative to the beat reference. Range is 0.0 to
360.0 degrees.
50% Weight is the relative amount of attenuation added when the LFO is at the -6dB point.
This causes the LFO shape to bow up (positive values) or down (negative values). Range is
-16 to 3 dB.
L/R Phase sets the phase relationship of the channels. “In” flips the left channel’s LFO out of
phase, with the result that the effect turns into an auto-balancer. “Out” leaves the left LFO
alone.
8-20
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
Pitcher
Pitcher applies a filter to the input signal which has a series of peaks in the frequency
response.
These peaks are normally adjusted so that their frequencies are all multiples of a specific,
selectable frequency, which imposes a strong sense of pitch at the selected fundamental
frequency.
Pitch. The fundamental pitch imposed upon the input, in MIDI note numbers from C-1 to
G9. Ptch Offst is an offset from the pitch frequency in semitones, from -12.0 to 12.0. It can
be useful to assign pitch bend, a ribbon, or another continuous controller to this parameter
through a MOD.
Odd Wts, Pair Wts, Quartr Wts, Half Wts are parameters that control the shape of the
frequency response of Pitcher. An exact description of what each one does is, unfortunately,
impossible, since there is a great deal of interaction between them. For more information
and examples, see the KSP8 Algorithm Reference Guide available as a free download at www.
kurzweil.com.
Ring Modulation
Ring modulation multiplies two signals (the “carrier” and the “modulator”) together to
produce unusual, often non-harmonic, overtones. The Ring Modulator effect in the Forte
SE has two modes: “L*R” in which two mono signals are modulated together; and “Osc”,
in which the input is stereo, and it is modulated with the sum of five waveforms that are
generated from oscillators within the effect itself. Four of these oscillators are sine waves,
while one (Oscillator 1) offers a selection of waveforms.
Wet/Dry. When the effect is in “L*R” mode, this controls how much of the left signal only is
passed dry (the right signal isn’t passed dry at all).
Mod Mode selects between the two modes, L*R or Osc.
Osc1 Lvl is the level of Oscillator 1, from 0 to 100%.
Osc1 Freq is the frequency of Oscillator 1, from 16 to 25088 Hz.
Osc1 Shape is the waveshape of Oscillator 1, selectable from Sine, Saw+, Saw-, Pulse, and
Tri.
Osc1PlsWid (Pulse Width). When Osc1 Shape is set to Pulse, this sets the pulse width as
a percentage of the waveform period. When the width is set to 50%, the result is a square
wave. This parameter has no effect if other waveform types are chosen. Range is 0 to 100%.
Osc1Smooth smooths (removes the higher harmonics from) the Saw+, Saw-, and Pulse
waveforms. A Sawtooth wave becomes more like a triangle wave, and a Pulse wave becomes
more like a sine wave. Range is 0 to 100%.
The other four oscillators, Sine2 through Sine5, each have Lvl and Freq controls.
8-21
The Effects Chain Editor
Effects Parameters
Stereo Simulation
The Mono to Stereo effect converts a monaural input to simulated stereo output.
In Select selects the input signal to be “stereo-ized.” It can be Left, Right, or both: (L+R)/2.
CenterGain is the level of the summed left and right channels. Range is Off/-79.0 to 24.0
dB.
Diff Gain is the level of the difference signal produced, which is the spatial component of
the stereo signal. Range is Off/-79.0 to 24.0 dB.
DiffBassG controls the gain of a bass-shelf filter on the difference signal. By boosting the
low frequency components of the difference signal, you can increase the sense of acoustic
envelopment. Range is -79.0 to 24.0 dB.
DiffBassF is the transition frequency for the bass-shelf frequency. Range is 16 to 25088 Hz.
The processed signal is split into three frequency bands—Lo, Mid, and High—each of which
can be delayed and panned separately.
Crossover1 and 2 are the two Crossover frequencies at which the band-split filters split the
signal into three bands. The two parameters are interchangeable: either may have a higher
frequency than the other. Range is 16 to 25088 Hz.
Pan [High/Mid/Low] sets the pan position for each band. Range is -100% (fully left) to
100% (fully right.)
Delay [High/Mid/Low] sets the delay for each band. Range is 0 to 1000 ms.
Stereo Image
This effect provides enhancement for a stereo signal. It also features a stereo correlation meter.
It uses some parameters from Mono to Stereo and some from Stereo Analyze (following).
8-22
Keymap and Sample Editing
The Keymap Editor
Chapter 9
Keymap and Sample Editing
The Keymap Editor
The Keymap Editor lets you customize the Forte SE’s factory preset keymaps and save them
to RAM. You can also build your own keymaps from scratch (see Building a Keymap on page
9-9).
Keymaps are an integral part of every layer of a program. Each keymap contains a set of
parameters determining which sample(s) the Forte SE will play when you trigger a note.
Each layer has at least one keymap, but it can have two keymaps when you’re working with
stereo samples. Each of these stereo keymaps uses two of the 128 available voices.
Each keymap consists of a set of key (note) ranges—C 4 to G 4, for example. The entire span
of each keymap is from C 0 to G 10. Each range has a sample root assigned within the range.
Each sample root is a distinct ROM or RAM sample. Within each key range, the sample root
is transposed up and down to play on each of the range’s notes. You can view each range by
changing the value of the Key Range parameter on the Keymap‑editor page. You can mix
samples of different timbres within a single keymap, and even tune individual keys to any
pitch by defining key ranges to single notes and assigning samples to each of those notes.
When you trigger a note, the Forte SE identifies the key range where the Note On event
occurred. It also checks the attack velocity value of the note. It then addresses its memory,
and retrieves the sample root that’s assigned to that key range and attack velocity value.
If the note that’s triggered is not the note where the sample root is assigned, the sample is
transposed to play at the correct pitch. The Forte SE then generates the digital signal that
represents the sound of the note. At this point the keymap’s job is done, and the signal
proceeds through the layer’s algorithm and on to the audio outputs.
You can assign as many key ranges to a keymap as you like, even creating a separate range
for each note. This would allow you to tune each key independently, to create microtonal
tunings. For keymaps that use a single timbre, like the Grand Piano, there’s a key range for
each sample root stored in memory. For acoustic instrumental sounds, the more key ranges
you have for a keymap, the more realistic the sound will be, since there will be less pitch
shifting of the sample root within the key range.
9-1
Keymap and Sample Editing
The Keymap Editor
Of course, you can assign sample roots with different timbres within the same keymap.
Many of the drum kit keymaps in ROM, for example, have about 20 key ranges, with several
different timbres assigned as the sample roots. You can also create a keymap with a single
key range that spans from C 0 to G 10, if you want to stretch a single sample root from C 0
to G 10. Keep in mind, however, that samples can only be transposed upward by an octave
from the sample’s original pitch. Samples can be transposed downward without limit.
Think of a keymap as if it were a single piece of string, divided into different sections that
adjoin one another. Sections cannot overlap. If you have one range that goes from C4 to F4
and another that goes from F#4 to C5, then if you change the first range to be C4 to G4, the
second one will change to be G#4 to C5.
Also, you can’t have “nothing” assigned to a key range. Even if it is Silence (#999), there will
always be a sample assigned to every range in the keymap. This is something to watch out
for when creating drum programs. For example, let’s say you are creating a program with
20 layers. Each layer has its own keymap, which has just one sample assigned to part of the
keyboard with the rest of the key range assigned to Silence. Make sure that you limit the
note range of each layer using the LoKey and HiKey parameters on the LAYER page in the
Program Editor. If each layer covers the entire range, then each note you played would trigger
20 voices (one for each layer). You would only hear one drum per note because all the other
layers are triggering “Silence.” Because of the voice-stealing algorithms in the Forte SE, the
voices would almost immediately become available again, since they have no amplitude. But
for one brief instant, the voice would be triggered, which could cause other voices to be cut
off.
You can also create multi-velocity keymaps—that is, keymaps that will play different timbres
depending on the attack velocities of your Note On events. For example, Keymap 7 Piano
3Vel L has 3 velocity ranges. Each key range in a multi-velocity keymap contains two or
more distinct sample roots that the Forte SE chooses between, according to the attack
velocity of the note. See Velocity Range (VelRange) on page 9-4.
The Keymap Editor is nested within the Program Editor. The first step in using the Keymap
Editor is to select the keymap you want to edit. This is done on the KEYMAP page in the
Program Editor, using the Keymap parameter. Once you’ve done this, just press the Edit
button, and you’ll enter the Keymap Editor. If you want to edit a different keymap, press
the Exit button to return to the KEYMAP page in the Program Editor and select the desired
keymap. If you want to build a keymap from scratch, start with the keymap 999 Silence
(Building a Keymap on page 9-9). This keymap template contains one key range from C 0
to G 10, and is a convenient starting point for adding key ranges and assigning sample roots.
The Keymap‑editor page looks like this:
9-2
Keymap and Sample Editing
The Keymap Editor
Parameter
Range of Values
Sample
Sample Root list
Key Range
Variable from C0-G10
Low Key
C 0 to G 10
High Key
C 0 to G 10
Velocity Range (VelRange)
Variable from ppp-fff
Low Velocity (Lo)
ppp-fff
High Velocity (Hi)
ppp-fff
Coarse Tune
–128 to 127 semitones
Fine Tune
-49 to 50 cents
Master Transpose
-126 ST to127 semitones
Volume Adjust
± 24 dB
Keymap Editor Parameters
Sample
This is where you assign a sample root to the current key range. Depending on the nature of
the sample root—an individual sample or a block of sample roots—the sample’s name looks
a bit different in the display. Each sample’s name consists of three parts: a numeral, a name,
and a note number—for example, 999 Silence-C4. Additionally, the name of stereo samples
will end with an S. (To use a stereo sample, the Stereo parameter must be set to On in the
Program Editor, and two keymaps must be selected.)
The numeral is the sample block ID. If the sample object is an individual sample, the sample
block ID is the same as the sample’s object ID. If the sample object is a group of sample
roots, the object ID of the first root in the group determines the sample block ID. The
remaining roots in the block have the same ID, and differ only in their note numbers.
Next comes the name of the sample, which typically describes the sample’s timbre. The final
part of the sample’s name refers to the pitch at which it was originally sampled. For many
timbres, multiple samples are made at various pitches. As you scroll through the Sample
list, you’ll see only the pitch of the sample change until you reach the next sample block.
The sample’s original pitch is set in the Sample Editor (see Root Key on page 9-12). This
determines which key will play the sample at its original pitch when a sample is used in a key
range (see Key Range below).
9-3
Keymap and Sample Editing
The Keymap Editor
Key Range
A keyrange is a range of keyboard keys that plays one sample (per velocity range, see Velocity
Range (VelRange) below for details). Each sample in a key range (per velocity range) is
transposed based on each sample’s RootKey parameter so that it plays at the correct pitch
on the keyboard relative to its root key (see Editing Samples on page 9-10 for details on the
RootKey parameter). Other keys within the key range transpose the sample chromatically
relative to the root key. Sample pitch relative to the root key can also be offset using the
Coarse Tune and Fine Tune parameters, see below).
The KeyRange parameter shows you which key range you’re currently viewing or editing
(key ranges are named by their lowest and highest notes). Changing the value of the
KeyRange parameter selects from the available key ranges, and allows you to view or edit
the sample assignment and other parameters of the selected key range. When the Key Range
parameter is selected, you can also scroll through available key ranges using the Alpha Wheel
or the Previous-/Next+ buttons. Multiple key ranges are only shown if the current Keymap
uses more than one key range. If the top line of the EditKeymap page displays KeyRange,
you can scroll through the available key ranges with any parameter on the page selected
using the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons. (Press the Toggle soft button to toggle the top line
between displaying KeyRange and VelRange.)
With the Keyrange parameter selected, keyranges can also be selected by holding the Enter
button and playing a key. The keyrange assigned to that key will be selected.
Low Key (Lo), High Key (Hi)
With these parameters you can use any of the data entry methods to change the low and high
notes of the current key range. You can extend a key range to the full capacity of the Forte SE
(C 0 to G 10). If you extend the current key range into another, the boundaries of the other
key range will become shortened to accommodate the key range you are extending. If the
keyrange you are extending covers another keyrange, the other key range will be deleted.
The setting for the low key cannot be higher than the setting for the high key. Similarly, the
setting for the high key cannot be lower than the setting for the low key.
Velocity Range (VelRange)
This parameter shows the keyboard velocity range (in dynamic levels) that will trigger a
sample for the current KeyRange. In a key range with more than one velocity range, each
velocity range can use a different sample, as well as different CoarseTune, FineTune, and
VolumeAdjust settings. Velocity ranges are intended for use with instrument samples
recorded at different velocities. This helps to make playing sampled instruments sound more
realistic. Sample volumes are also scaled based on keyboard velocity within each velocity
range. Velocity ranges for the current Keymap are set using the VelRng soft button (see
Velocity Range (VelRange) on page 9-4 or the Low Velocity (Lo), High Velocity (Hi)
parameters (see below). All keyranges in a Keymap share the same set of velocity ranges. Up
to eight velocity ranges can be used.
9-4
Keymap and Sample Editing
The Keymap Editor
When the VelRange parameter is selected, you can scroll through available velocity ranges
using the Alpha Wheel or the Previous-/Next+ buttons. Multiple velocity ranges are only
shown if the current Keymap uses more than one velocity range. If the top line of the
EditKeymap page displays VelRange, you can scroll through the available velocity ranges
with any parameter on the page selected using the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons. (Press the
Toggle soft button to toggle the top line between displaying VelRange and KeyRange.)
Low Velocity (Lo), High Velocity (Hi)
Use these parameters to set the velocity range of the current key range. If you extend the
current velocity range into another, the boundaries of the other velocity range will become
shortened to accommodate the velocity range you are extending. If the velocity range you are
extending covers another velocity range, the other velocity range will be deleted.
Coarse Tune
Coarse Tune allows you to transpose a sample for a given range. This is extremely useful
when you have set the Root key of the sample for one note but want to assign the sample to
a different part of the keyboard and still be able to play it without transposition (see Root
Key on page 9-12 for details.) For example, if you originally set the Root key at C4 but
want the sample assigned to C3, you would set Coarse Tune to 12ST, transposing it up one
octave. Now the original pitch will play at C3, one octave down. If you examine the drum
and percussion kit keymaps in ROM, you will see that we have done this. Most of our ROM
drum samples have the Root key set at C4.
There’s a short cut for adjusting the Coarse Tune automatically so that the sample plays with
minimal transposition in the assigned key range. See Special Double Button Presses in the
Keymap Editor on page 9-8.
Fine Tune
This gives you further pitch control. Once the sample’s pitch is close to the desired note, use
the Fine tune to sharpen or flatten it as much as a half-semitone.
Master Transpose (MasterXpose)
This parameter does not really pertain to the keymap itself. Instead it is identical to the
Transpose amount set with the front panel Transpose buttons or Octav-/Octav+ soft buttons
on the Program and Multi mode select pages. If you change the transpose value here, the
same value will be reflected by the transpose button LEDs as well as in the top bar of the
Program and Multi mode select pages, and vice versa. It transposes the entire instrument
globally. The MasterXpose parameter allows you to easily see the transpose value while in the
keymap editor. It is also useful for assigning samples across the entire keyboard when using a
keyboard that has fewer than 88 notes.
Volume Adjust
Here you can adjust the volume of the notes in the current key range. This enables you to
make each key range play at the same volume even if the samples in the various ranges were
recorded at different volumes.
9-5
Keymap and Sample Editing
The Keymap Editor
The Soft Buttons in the Keymap editor
Toggle
Pressing the Toggle soft button switches the function that the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons
perform while on the EditKeymap page. Press the Toggle soft button to toggle the top line
between displaying KeyRange or VelRange. If the top line of the page displays KeyRange,
then the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons will scroll between the available key ranges in the key
map (if the current key map has more than one key range). The note range for each key range
will also be displayed on the top line. If the top line of the page displays VelRange, then the
Channel/Layer/Zone buttons will scroll between the available velocity ranges in the key
map (if the current key map has more than one velocity range). The dynamic range for each
velocity range will also be displayed on the top line.
Velocity Ranges (VelRng)
Press the VelRng soft button to view the VEL RANGES page (see below). Use the VEL
RANGES page to add, edit or delete velocity ranges for the current keymap. The VEL
RANGES page shows a chart of a keymap’s entire available dynamic range, from most quiet
(ppp) to most loud (fff ). Velocity ranges can also be adjusted from the EditKeymap page,
but the VEL RANGES page provides a chart as a visual aid. Each keymap can be split into
a maximum of eight velocity ranges. Each key range in a keymap can use its own sample for
each velocity range. All key ranges in a keymap share the same velocity ranges.
Press the Split soft button to split the currently selected velocity range into two ranges
(until the maximum of eight velocity ranges have been created). Press the Delete soft button
to delete the currently selected velocity range. Press the Exit soft button to return to the
EditKeymap page.
On the VEL RANGES page, the currently selected velocity range is highlighted in the chart,
and its name is displayed in the VelRange field. With the VelRange field selected, you can use
the Alpha Wheel or Previous-/Next+ buttons to move between the available velocity ranges
(if there is more than one velocity range available). You can also use the Channel/Layer/
Zone buttons at any time to move between the available velocity ranges. If there is more
than one velocity range available, you can adjust the dynamic range of each using Lo and
Hi parameters. These Hi and Lo parameters are the same as the Low Velocity (Lo) and High
Velocity (Hi) parameters on the EditKeymap page (see Low Velocity (Lo), High Velocity (Hi)
on page 9-5 for details). Changes made with either set of parameters are shown on both
pages.
9-6
Keymap and Sample Editing
The Keymap Editor
New Range (NewRng)
The NewRng button lets you define a new keyrange to edit, whether it’s to assign a different
sample, or to adjust the pitch or volume. Just press NewRng, then play the note you want
as the low note, then the high note. The Forte SE will prompt you for each note. When you
trigger the high note, you’ll return to the Keymap‑editor page, and the new keyrange you
defined will be selected. The next change you make will affect only that edit range.
If you set a new keyrange that’s completely within an existing key range, the existing key
range will be split into two keyranges, with the new keyrange between the two. At this
point, you must change at least one parameter of the new keyrange before editing a different
keyrange, otherwise the new keyrange will be merged with the adjacent keyranges. If you
set a new keyrange that overlaps part or all of another key range, the sample assigned to the
lower key range will be applied to the new keyrange. Again, at this point you must change
at least one parameter of the new keyrange before editing a different keyrange, otherwise the
new keyrange will be merged with the lower keyrange that it overlapped.
Assign
The Assign soft button lets you select a sample, then specify the key range to which it’s
assigned. This enables you to insert a new key range within the current keymap. When you
press the Assign soft button, a dialog appears that prompts you to select a sample from the
Samples list. Scroll through the list, then press the OK soft button. You’ll then be prompted
to define the new key range by playing the notes you want to be the lowest and highest notes
of the range. (Press the Cancel soft button if you change your mind.) When you trigger the
low and high notes, the new key range is inserted. If the new key range partially overlaps an
adjacent key range, the existing key range will be adjusted to accommodate the new range.
If the new key range completely overlaps an existing key range, the original key range will be
replaced.
9-7
Keymap and Sample Editing
The Keymap Editor
Saving Changes to a Keymap
When you hit the Exit button from the Keymap Main page, a page will come up with option
to rename, save or cancel your changes:
Rename
Call up the page that enables you to change the name of the current keymap.
Save Yes/No
Start the process of saving the current keymap, or return to the Keymap page
Cancel
Cancel the changes and return to the Keymap Main editor page.
Special Double Button Presses in the Keymap Editor
Suppose you have a sample whose root key is C 4, and you want to assign it to A 0, because
you don’t expect to play it often. If you want it to play back without transposition, you’ll
have to adjust the Coarse Tune parameter. Calculating the right value for Coarse Tune can
get tedious if you’re assigning a large number of samples. Fortunately, there’s a short cut.
1. Assign a sample root to a key range, either using the Lo, Hi, and Sample parameters or
using the Assign soft button.
2. Highlight the value of the Coarse Tune parameter.
3. Press the Plus/Minus buttons at the same time. The value of Coarse Tune changes
automatically. If the sample is assigned to one note, the Forte SE sets Coarse Tune so
that the note plays the sample without transposition. If the sample is assigned to a range
of notes, the Forte SE sets Coarse Tune so that the middle note of the range plays the
sample without transposition.
9-8
Keymap and Sample Editing
Building a Keymap
Building a Keymap
Read below for detailed directions on manually creating and editing a keymap. To build
a keymap, start in Program Mode and select program 1022 Clear Program. Then go to
Program Edit Mode by pressing the Edit button. Next press the KEYMAP soft button, and
the KEYMAP page will appear. The Keymap parameter 999 Silence will be automatically
selected. This makes it easier to recognize the key ranges that have samples assigned to them
when you start assigning samples. You can actually choose any program or keymap you want
to start with, but by choosing these, you are starting with a “blank slate.”
With the Keymap parameter still selected, press the Edit button, and you’ll enter the
Keymap Editor. The Key Range parameter will be automatically selected, and you see its
values: C 0 to G 10 (the entire MIDI keyboard range). The Sample parameter will have a
value of 999 Silence-C 4.
Now you’re ready to start assigning samples to key ranges within the keymap. We’ll assume
that you’ve loaded samples with roots at C 1, C 2, C 3, etc. and that you plan to assign a
root to each octave. To begin, press the Assign soft button. The display will prompt you
to select a sample. Use the Alpha Wheel to scroll to one of your samples, or type its ID on
the alphanumeric pad and press Enter. When you’ve found the sample you want to use,
press the OK soft button. The display will say “Strike low key…” Trigger A 0 (MIDI note
number 21, the lowest A on a standard 88-note keyboard). The display will change to say
“Strike High Key…”Now trigger F 1 (MIDI note number 29). The display will return to
the Keymap‑editor page. The Key Range parameter will show A 0–F 1, and the Sample
parameter will show the sample you selected when you started the range assignment.
Each sample in a key range is automatically transposed based on each sample’s RootKey
parameter so that it plays at the correct pitch on the keyboard relative to its root key (see
Editing Samples on page 9-10 for details on the RootKey parameter). Other keys within
the key range transpose the sample chromatically relative to the root key. Automatic
transposition based on each sample’s RootKey is important if you want your sample to play
in tune with other Forte SE programs or other instruments. The Forte SE makes this easy
if your samples have the correct RootKey settings (as the Forte SE’s factory samples do).
Generally you should set a keyrange so that the sample’s RootKey (displayed at the end of
the sample name) is in the middle of the range. If you set a key range that does not cover the
sample’s RootKey, the sample will have to automatically transpose by many semitones, and
will likely not sound correct. Samples are also limited to an octave of upward transposition
from the sample’s original pitch. If you set a keyrange too high based on the Root Key, some
samples may not be able to transpose upward far enough to play in tune, and many keys
may play the same note (the highest note that the sample can be transposed to). Automatic
transposition relative to the root key can be offset using the Coarse Tune and Fine Tune
parameters on the EditKeymap page (see Coarse Tune and Fine Tune on page 9-5).
9-9
Keymap and Sample Editing
Editing Samples
Continuing with the example, press the Assign soft button again. Select another sample root
at the prompt, and press the OK soft button. Now trigger F# 1 for the Low Key prompt, and
F 2 for the High Key prompt. At this point you’ve defined two key ranges, the first from A
0 to F 1, and the second from F# 1 to F 2. You can repeat the process as many times as you
want, creating a new key range each time.
Once you have your samples assigned, you may need to transpose them so that they play
back at the correct pitch within the range you have chosen. To do this, highlight the Key
Range parameter, scroll to the range you need, then highlight the Coarse Tune parameter.
Adjust Coarse Tune to bring the sample to the proper pitch within that key range. Then
scroll back up to the Key Range parameter, select the next range, and continue as needed.
Here’s a fairly important point that may or may not affect your keymap construction.
Suppose you want to build a keymap that uses the same sample in several adjacent key
ranges, and you plan to add a bit of detuning to the samples in each range. You might think
that you could build the keymap first, then go into the Sample Editor and tweak the sample
settings of each keyrange when the keymap is finished. Yes, but…
Suppose you used the technique we described above to assign a vocal sample whose root was
C 4 to a key range from A 3 to E 4. Then you assigned the same sample to a key range from
F 4 to B 4. You might be surprised to find that when you finished the F 4–B 4 key range
and the Keymap‑editor page reappeared, the current key range would not be F 4 to B 4,
but A 3 to B 4! This is because the Forte SE automatically merges adjacent key ranges that
are identical (this is done to save memory). Therefore, some parameter must be different in
each adjacent key range you create if you want to build keymaps using the technique we just
described. So if you want to use the same samples in adjacent key ranges with, for example,
minor pitch or volume modification, you should make those changes to the current sample
on the Keymap‑editor page before assigning the next range.
Editing Samples
To enter the Sample Editor, first select the program you wish to edit in Program mode. With
the program selected, press the Edit button to enter the Program Editor. In the program
editor the KEYMAP page will be selected (if not press the KEYMAP soft button). With the
KeyMap parameter selected on the KEYMAP page, press the Edit button again to enter the
Keymap Editor. On the EditKeymap page, select the KeyRange parameter and use the Alpha
Wheel or Previous-/Next+ buttons to choose one of the available key ranges (if there is more
than one keyrange). You can edit the existing sample of a keyrange, or choose a new sample
for the keyrange and edit that. When the Keymap parameter is selected you can hold the
Enter button and trigger notes to select different key ranges.
9-10
Keymap and Sample Editing
Editing Samples
If you want to select a different sample, use the cursor buttons to select the Sample
parameter. Use the Alpha Wheel to select a sample. Press the Edit button once more, and
you’ll enter the Sample Editor. The sample will play through the effects of the current
program. The name of stereo samples end with an S. To use a stereo sample, the Stereo
parameter must be set to On in the Program Editor, and two keymaps must be selected, see
The KEYMAP Page on page 7-19.
There are two sample editing pages—MISC (Miscellaneous) and TRIM. The soft buttons for
these pages are visible when you enter the Sample Editor. You can trigger notes at any time
while you’re editing, to hear your changes as you make them.
The Miscellaneous (MISC) Page
On the MISC page, you’ll set several parameters that affect the behavior of the current
sample. These parameters affect the entire sample. The right side of the top line displays the
root number and RootKey of the sample. For stereo samples, L or R is displayed after the
Root# parameter to indicate that you are viewing parameters for the left or right channel
of the sample. Use the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons to move between channels of stereo
samples. Although you can edit parameters for the left and right channels of a sample, both
channels can only be heard if the Stereo parameter is set to On in the Program Editor, and
the same keymap is selected for the Keymap1 and Keymap2 parameters in the Program
Editor. If the Stereo parameter is set to Off in the Program Editor, only the left channel of
stereo samples will be heard in mono. If the sample is part of a group of sample roots, you
can also use the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons to scroll through each sample in the group. A
representative MISC page is shown below:
Parameter
Range of Values
Root Key Number
C -1 to G 9
Pitch Adjust
Variable (depends on sample rate)
Volume Adjust
-64.0 to 63.5 dB
Alternative Volume Adjust
-64.0 to 63.5 dB
Decay Rate
0 to 5000 dB per second
Release Rate
0 to 5000 dB per second
Loop Switch
Off, On
Playback Mode
Normal, Reverse, Bidirectional
Alternative Sample Sense
Normal, Reverse
Ignore Release
Off, On
9-11
Keymap and Sample Editing
Editing Samples
Root Key
The root key represents the keyboard key at which the sample will play back without
transposition (that is, at the same pitch as the pitch of the original sample). Use the
Previous-/Next+ buttons or Alpha Wheel to select a RootKey note, or use the alphanumeric
pad followed by the Enter button to enter a RootKey by MIDI note number.
Pitch Adjust
Use this parameter to change the pitch of the sample relative to the key from which it’s
played. Setting a value of 100cts, for example, will cause the sample to play back one
semitone higher than normal. This parameter is handy for fine tuning samples to each other
if they’re slightly out of tune.
Volume Adjust
Uniformly boost or cut the amplitude of the entire sample.
Alternative Start Volume Adjust (AltVolAdjust)
This parameter sets the amplitude of the sample when the alternative start is used. See page
7-22 for a discussion of AltSwitch.
Decay Rate
This parameter defines how long the sample takes to decay (fade) to zero amplitude (silence).
Decay Rate affects each sample individually, and is in effect only when the amplitude
envelope for the program (the Mode parameter on the AMPENV page in the Program
Editor) is set to Natural. If Mode is User, the settings on the AMPENV page override the
setting for DecayRate.
DecayRate takes effect in the loop portion of the sample, after all the attack stages of the
amplitude envelope are complete.
Release Rate
The release rate determines how long the sample will take to decay to zero amplitude when
the note trigger is released. The higher the value, the faster the release rate. This release affects
each sample individually, and is in effect only when the amplitude envelope for the program
(the Mode parameter on the AMPENV page in the Program Editor) is set to Natural. In this
case, the release begins as soon as the note is released. If Mode is User, the settings on the
AMPENV page override the setting for ReleaseRate.
To create an extended sample loop that will play data after the sample’s loop on key-up, set
the Alternative Start sample pointer after the sample end pointer, then set a relatively low
value for the release rate.
9-12
Keymap and Sample Editing
Editing Samples
Loop Switch
This parameter activates or deactivates the looping of the currently selected sample. When set
to On, the sample will loop according to the settings on the TRIM page. When set to Off,
the sample will play through to its End point and stop.
Playback Mode (Playback)
This parameter lets you modify the direction in which the sample is played. Set it to a value
of Reverse if you want the sample to play from its End point to its Start point. Choose a
value of Bidirectional to cause the sample to play from Start to End, then reverse direction
and play again from End to Loop and back, repeating until the note trigger is released (this
works only when the Loop Switch parameter is set to On).
Alternative Sample Sense (AltSense)
This provides a convenient way to activate the alternative start of a sample. When set to
Normal, the alternative start will be used when the Alt Switch control is On (this is set on
The KEYMAP Page), or when the control source assigned to it is above its midpoint. When
set to Reverse, the alternative start will be used when the Alt Switch control is Off, or when
the control source assigned to it is below its midpoint.
Ignore Release (IgnRelease)
When set to a value of Off, the sample will release normally when the note trigger is released.
When set to On, the note will not release, even when the note trigger is released. This setting
should be used only with samples that normally decay to silence; nondecaying samples will
play forever at this setting. This parameter is equivalent to the IgnRelease parameter on the
LAYER page, but affects only the currently selected sample.
SampleRate and NumSamples
These parameters cannot be edited, but show the sample’s sample rate and the sample’s length
in samples. Samples that are longer than 1 million samples are displayed a 1Ms.
9-13
Keymap and Sample Editing
The TRIM Page
The TRIM Page
The TRIM page lets you set the Start, Alternative Start, Loop, and End points of the current
sample. The right side of the top line displays the root number of the sample. If the sample
is part of a group of sample roots, you can use the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons to scroll
through each sample in the group.
The four parameters on this page are Start, Alternative Start, Loop, and End. Selecting these
parameters and adjusting their values enables you to modify how the sample plays back
when notes are triggered. Each of these parameter points are expressed in individual samples.
For example, a one second sample at a sample rate of 44,100Hz would have 44,100 values
available to adjust for each of these parameters.
The Start point determines the beginning of the current sample. You can truncate the
beginning of the sample by increasing the value of the Start parameter. You might do this to
remove silence at the beginning of a sample, or to remove some or all of the attack. You can’t
decrease the Start point of samples below zero.
The Alternative Start parameter lets you set a second, optional start or end point for the
current sample. The Alternative Start will be used when the Alt Switch parameter on the
KEYMAP page is set to On, or when it’s set to a specific control source and that control
source is generating a value of more than +.5. (For example, if you assign MWheel as the
control source for the Alt Switch parameter, the Alternative Start will be used when the Mod
Wheel—or whatever control source you have set to send MWheel—is above its halfway
point.) The Alternative Start can be set before, after, or at the same point as the Start or End.
If you set the Alternative Start after the End, you can extend the play of looped samples.
Normally, looped samples will play through to the End, then will loop back to the Loop
point, and continue looping like this until the note is released, when they go into their
normal release. If the Alternative Start is set after the End, looped samples will loop in the
same way while notes are sustained. As soon as you release the notes, however, the samples
will play through to the Alternative Start point before going into release.
The Loop parameter sets the beginning of the looped portion of the current sample. The
Loop can be set at any point before the End, including before the Start and Alternative Start.
If you try to move it after the End, the End will move with it.
9-14
Keymap and Sample Editing
The TRIM Page
The End parameter sets the point at which the current sample will stop playback. Typically
you’ll use this parameter to trim unwanted silence off the end of a sample, although you can
use it to shorten a sample as much as you want.
Note On Saving Samples: Trimmed portions of a sample are not saved. Trimmed
portions before the Start, or Alternative Start points. Trimmed portions of a sample
saved to a user ID will be deleted. Trimmed portions before the Start or Alternative Start
points (whichever has a lower value) will be lost upon saving to a user ID, and whichever
parameter had a lower value will have a value of zero the next time it is loaded (values for
all other sample point parameters will be adjusted relatively). Trimmed portions after the
Alternative Start or End points (whichever has a higher value) will be lost upon saving
to a user ID. The original untrimmed sample is always available by selecting the sample’s
original factory ID number. Saving trimmed factory samples to user IDs will not change
the sound of factory samples, keymaps, or Programs.
Zero- and Zero+
Pressing the Zero- or Zero+ buttons will search left or right respectively for the sample’s next
zero-crossing. A zero-crossing is a point where the sample waveform is neither positive or
negative (crossing the horizontal line in the middle of the waveform display). The currently
selected parameter (Start, Alternative Start, Loop, or End) will be set to this point in the
sample. Setting these parameters to zero-crossings can help minimize clicks at the start, end,
or loop point of a sample. It’s best to have each of these points set first by adjusting each
parameter and listening to the sample, then if needed search for a nearby zero-crossing.
9-15
Multi Mode
About Multi Mode
Chapter 10
Multi Mode
This chapter will help familiarize you with the features of Multi Mode.
Multis are configurations of up to eight Zones (explained below in About Zones), each of
which may have its own Program, controller assignments, and MIDI transmit channel. A
Zone can also be configured to control an external sound module or computer software
through a MIDI or USB cable.
About Multi Mode
To enter Multi Mode from another Mode, press the Multi Mode button.
Bank
While you are in Multi Mode, the Multi button’s indicator LED is illuminated.
When you enter Multi Mode after powering on the Forte SE, Multi 1 will be selected, or the
Multi that was selected the last time Global Mode was exited.
10-1
Multi Mode
Selecting Multis
Selecting Multis
The Forte SE features eight Multi Banks (Factory Banks A-D and User Banks A-D). Each
Forte SE Bank has space for 256 Multis, for a total of 2048 possible Multis. Each Bank is
split into 16 groups of 16 Multis each, selectable by using the Category buttons. Because
each Multi can contain multiple instrument sounds, Multis are not organized by instrument
category. If your Forte SE does not include Factory Banks B-D, visit kurzweil.com to
download new factory Banks for free, when available.
When you are in Multi Mode, there a few ways to select Multis.
• To select any Multi in the current Category, press a Program/Multi button.
• To select a Multi in a different Category, press the Category button of choice and
then the Program/Multi button to select from the 16 Multis in the Category.
• To select the Category Default Multi, simply press a Category button.
• To switch between the Factory and User Multis, press the User button, followed by a
Category button and then a Program/Multi button.
• The Alpha Wheel and the Previous-/Next+ buttons allow you to advance through the
Multis one at a time. When you reach the end of the Category, advancing further will
go to the next Category.
• If a Multi is assigned to a Favorite button, pressing that button will go directly to the
assigned Multi.
• To select a Multi in a different Forte SE Bank, press the Multi mode button while
in Multi Mode to view the Select Bank page. On the Select Bank page use the
navigation buttons to select a Bank and press the OK soft button, then use any of the
methods above to select a Multi in that Bank.
• When the Global Mode User Type parameter is set to Advanced, and the Global
Mode Sound Sel parameter is set to ID number, Multis can be selected by typing in
an ID number using the numbers printed on the Program/Multi buttons, followed by
pressing the Enter button.
See Appendix for a full list of factory Multis.
10-2
Multi Mode
Selecting Multis
The Display
In Multi Mode, the top of the display shows the current Mode and MIDI transposition.
Bank
Changing View
The View soft button will toggle the display and allow you to see available Multis as a list.
Buttons and controllers will behave as usual. Moving a controller will cause information to
appear in the box at left of the screen:
Pop Up Messages
Some actions cause the display to show pop up messages. After a short time the display
returns to show the current Multi.
10-3
Multi Mode
Selecting Multis
Alpha Wheel & Previous– and Next+ Value Buttons
Use the Alpha Wheel or the Value buttons, to the right of the display below the Alpha
Wheel, to change the current Multi. Turning the Alpha Wheel counter-clockwise or pressing
the Previous button will select the previous Multi and turning the Alpha Wheel clockwise
or pressing the Next button will select the next Multi. When the highest or lowest Multi is
reached, the list will wrap back to the last or first Multi respectively.
Value Jump Buttons
In Multi Mode, the Value Jump double button press selects the first Multi of each Category,
as well as the Category Default Multi of each Category (if a Category Default Multi has
been set). For more information on choosing a new Category Default Multi, see Choosing
Category Default Multis on page 10-5. If the User button is selected, Value Jump works the
same way.
10-4
Multi Mode
Selecting Multis
Category & Program/Multi Buttons
The Category buttons allow you to select Multis simply by pressing a button. You can
select one Category button at a time and the current Category button’s LED is lit. In Multi
mode each category button represents a group of 16 Multis (Multis are not organized by
instrument category because each Multi can contain multiple instrument sounds). First
select the Category you want, then select one of its Multis by pressing any of the numbered
Program/Multi buttons.
Choosing Category Default Multis
You can choose a “Category Default Multi” from each Category that will be recalled each
time you press that Category’s button. To save a Category Default Multi, first select a Multi
using any Multi select method (Alpha wheel, Previous-/Next+ buttons, Category buttons,
Program/Multi buttons). A button for the current Category will have a lit LED. Next, press
and hold the currently lit Category button until the display shows the message “Category
default multi saved.” The Category default Multi has now been successfully saved.
You can save one Category Default Multi per active Category button.
10-5
Multi Mode
About Zones
Choosing Favorites
You can save ten Favorite Multis (or Programs) from any Category to the ten Favorite
buttons beneath the display. Once saved, these Favorite Multis can be recalled from any
Mode with a single button press. To save the currently selected Multi to a Favorite button,
press and hold a Favorite button until the display shows the message “Favorite (#) saved.”
About Zones
Zones are the independent regions of the keyboard that make up a Multi.
A Multi has up to four Zones (or eight when the Global Mode User Type parameter is set to
Advanced), each one having its own Program, controller assignments, and MIDI transmit
channel. Zones can be mutually exclusive regions of the keyboard, or they can overlap. A
Zone can also be configured to control an external sound module or computer software
through a MIDI or USB cable.
Muting Zones
Pressing a Zone button will mute or unmute the Zone. An active/unmuted Zone button has
a lit LED. The LED of an inactive/muted Zone button is not lit. See Ch. 11 Multi Edit
Modefor details on adding additional Zone mute button assignments when using more than
four Zones.
Transposition
The Transpose buttons can be used to change the tuning of notes played on the Forte SE
keyboard in semitones (ST), also known as half steps. This is a convenient way to change the
key of a song without learning to play it in a different key. The Transpose buttons are located
to the left of the keyboard, above the Pitch and Mod Wheels. The Transpose buttons also
transpose MIDI notes sent to the USB and MIDI out ports.
Press the Transpose - or + buttons to transpose the Forte SE keyboard down or up by one
semitone. The top line of the display shows the current transposition value. Pressing both
Transpose - and + simultaneously will reset the transposition to 0. To transpose up and down
by octave intervals (12 ST), press the Octav- and Octav+ soft buttons underneath the display.
10-6
Multi Mode
Parameter Assignments
The maximum transposition value possible is +/–36 semitones.
The LEDs of the Transpose buttons indicate whether the current Multi is transposed up
(Transpose + LED is lit) or transposed down (Transpose – LED is lit). When there is no
transposition, neither Transpose button is lit.
NOTE: The transposition is applied to all Programs in the Zones within the Multi. The
Zone layout on the keyboard however still remains fixed.
Parameter Assignments
In Multi Mode, each Multi has factory-set Program and Effect parameters assigned to
physical controllers (Sliders, Switch buttons, Mod Wheel, and Pedals). A parameter
assignment can modify an instrument sound during a performance to add variation or
expression. Moving a controller changes the value of the parameter. Any time you do this,
the display shows the Controller name, assigned parameter, and value. Selecting the View
soft button will show current parameters on the left side of the display.
10-7
Multi Mode
Parameter Assignments
Controller Conventions
In Multi Mode, the Zone Mute Switches above Sliders A through D control the Active/Muted
status of Zones 1 through 4. In the Factory Multis, Sliders A through D generally control the
volume for Zones 1 through 4. Sliders H and I generally control Delay and Reverb amount.
The remaining Sliders and Switches generally control various effects and synthesis parameters.
Forte® SE Controller Conventions
Synthesis
(Zone Mute)
(Zone
Volume)
10-8
(Zone Mute)
(Zone
Volume)
(Zone Mute)
(Zone
Volume)
Effects
(Zone Mute)
(Zone
Volume)
(FX1
Enable)
(FX2
Enable)
(Delay
Enable)
(Reverb
Enable)
(FX1
Amount)
(FX2
Amount)
(Delay
Amount)
(Reverb
Amount)
Multi Mode
The Split and Layer Functions
The Split and Layer Functions
The soft buttons Split and Layer perform slightly different functions, but offer identical
parameters.
The Split Function allows you to quickly create a Multi such that keys in one region of the
keyboard produce different sounds than another region.
The Layer Function allows you to layer Programs and Multis such that more than one sound
can be produced by striking one key.
This is convenient, as you do not need to use Multi Edit Mode to configure Zone key ranges,
Programs, and volumes. You can simply hit the soft button while in Multi Mode to select the
Function. You can then configure additional Zones, each of which may have its own Program
and controller assignments. The result may be saved as a new Multi.
10-9
Multi Mode

Split Function
When you create a Split in Multi Mode, you are in fact activating a new Zone within the
current Multi. If the current Multi already has the maximum number of active Zones and
you press the Split Function soft button, then a message will appear on the display indicating
that you have reached the maximum number of Zones. Alternatively, you can mute one of
the active Zones by using the Zone Mute buttons, and then continue to create the Split.
The Multi you were using becomes the right hand of the Split. After this you can choose a
Program that will be used in the left hand of the Split as the Program for another available
zone.
The default Program parameter for a Split is 203 Finger Bass, and the default keyboard range
is C1 - E3. These may be changed, as described below.
Other parameters that determine the behavior of the Split are described below. Use the
navigation buttons to access each of the Split/Layer parameters.
Layer Function
When you create a Layer in Multi Mode, you are in fact activating a new Zone within
the current Multi. If the current Multi already has the maximum number of active Zones
and you press the Layer Function soft button, then a message will appear on the display
indicating that you have reached the maximum number of Zones. Alternatively, you can
mute one of the active Zones by using the Zone Mute buttons, and then continue to create
the Layer.
Choose a Program that will be used for the next available Zone. The active Zones of the
Multi you were originally using will remain unchanged.
The default Program parameter for a Layer Multi is 130 Adagio Strings,, and the default
keyboard range is C1 - G9. Use the navigation buttons to access each of the Split/Layer
parameters.
10-10
Multi Mode

Other parameters that determine the behavior of the Multi are described below. Use the
navigation buttons to access each of the Split/Layer parameters.
Split/Layer parameters
Zn and Stat (Zone and Status)
Selecting Split or Layer makes a new Zone active. You can continue to add Zones to the
Multi by activating additional Zones with the Stat parameter or the front panel Zone
buttons. The Forte SE will display a message if you have already reached the maximum
number of active Zones (see About Zones on page 10-6 for more information on Zones).
Program (Split/Layer Program)
The default Program will appear in the next available Zone. Choose a different Program
using the Category and Program/Multi buttons, the Alpha Wheel, or the Previous/Next
buttons.
Low/Hi (Keyboard range)
The Low and Hi parameters set the keyboard boundaries for each Zone.
The low and high keys for each Zone can be selected using Assign
(holding down the
Enter button and then striking the desired key on the keyboard). Keys can also be selected by
using the Alpha Wheel or the Previous-/Next+ buttons.
Vol (Zone Volume)
The VOL parameter determines the volumes of each Zone. By default, VOL is set to 127,
which results in each Zone having the same volume. To change volumes use the Alpha Wheel
or Previous/Next buttons. A Zone volume can be set to any number between 0 and 127.
Pan (Zone Pan)
To change the panning of a Zone (left/right stereo placement), use the navigation buttons to
select the Pan parameter for one of the Zones. To set a Pan value, use the Alpha Wheel, the
Previous-/Next+ buttons, or use the keypad function of the Category buttons to type a pan
value (0-127) followed by the Enter button. A value of 0 is full left, 64 is center, and 127 is
full right. Other values will move the stereo placement in between these positions. A value of
“None” will use the last pan value used by the Zone’s MIDI channel. A value of “None” can
be entered by scrolling below 0, or by using the keypad function of the Category buttons to
type negative 1 by pressing the small +/- button and then the 1 button, followed by the Enter
button.
10-11
Multi Mode
The ARP Function
Saving a Split or Layer
After setting the Split/Layer parameters, the Split can be saved as a Multi so that it can easily
be recalled in Multi Mode. Press the Save button to the left of the display to begin the saving
process. See Save User Multis below for more details. Once you have saved your Split or
Layer as a Multi, you can edit controller assignments and other Multi parameters in Multi
Edit Mode (see Ch. 11 Multi Edit Mode for details).
The ARP Function
Selecting the Arp soft button will bring up the Arpeggiator editor page Arp1. Arpeggiator
options and parameters are described in detail in “The Arpeggiator Function” on page 7-55.
From Multi Mode, you can set Arpeggiators for each Zone in a Multi. The Arp soft button
also put you into Multi Edit mode, where you can access other editor pages.
For real-time control of Arpeggiator options, see “The Controller Destination List” on page
11-17 and “Shift Key Number, Shift Key (ShKeyNum, ShiftKey)” on page 11-20.
Save User Multis
Use the Save button to save a Split or Layer Multi as a User Multi (to save a changed
Zone Mute status, switch/button state, or slider state, you must set an entry value for each
controller in Multi Edit mode). Press the Save button once to view the Save Dialog. This will
allow you to specify the ID number to save to, and to rename the Multi if you wish. When
viewing the Save Dialog, you can quickly save the Multi to the displayed ID number by
pressing the Save button again.
10-12
Multi Mode
Save User Multis
Changing ID Numbers
The display shows the first available ID number and the current Multi name. You can save
Multis with ID numbers from 1024 to 2047. If you are saving a Multi that has not been
previously edited, the next available unused ID number will be selected. If you are saving
a previously edited User Multi, the ID number that the Multi was last saved with will be
selected. Press the Value Jump double button press (Previous-/Next+) to toggle between
selecting the ID number that the Multi was last saved with, and the next available unused ID
number.
To change the ID number, turn the Alpha Wheel or use the Previous-/Next+ buttons to
select the new ID number. If you select a previously used ID# the display will show a prompt
to allow you to decide whether to replace it.
Naming a User Multi
To rename the Multi, first press the Rename soft button. The display then shows the current
Multi name. Multi names can total 16 characters in length.
10-13
Multi Mode
Save User Multis
Press the center soft buttons (<<< or >>>) or the navigation buttons to move the cursor. To
enter the new Multi name you may use the letters and numbers printed on the Program/
Multi buttons, or use the Alpha wheel or Previous-/Next+ buttons to cycle through the
alphabet. The Insert soft button will insert a blank space (the selected character and all
characters to the right will move one space to the right), and the Delete button will delete
the current character (all the characters to the right will move one space to the left).
When you are satisfied with your name, press the OK soft button to return to the Save
screen.
10-14
Multi Mode
Save User Multis
Saving a User Multi
Press the Save button or Save soft button to complete the saving process, or press the Cancel
soft button to exit without saving.
After successfully saving, the Multi will be selected in Multi Mode in the selected Bank. To
find the Multi again later, make sure to press the User bank button under the Mode buttons.
10-15
Multi Edit Mode
About Multi Edit Mode
Chapter 11
Multi Edit Mode
About Multi Edit Mode
NOTE : Before you read this chapter, be sure to read Ch. 10 Multi Mode for a full
description of Multis.
Multi Edit Mode allows you to edit and create Multis and gives you access to a Multi’s
Common parameters and Zone specific parameters. Multis are configurations of up to eight
Zones, each of which may have its own Program, controller assignments, and MIDI transmit
channel. A Zone can also be configured to control an external sound module or computer
software through a MIDI or USB cable.
In Multi Edit Mode, you can customize the Program, controller assignments, and MIDI
transmit channel of the Zones in a Multi, in addition to many other parameters. Any Multi
can be edited in Multi Edit Mode and saved to one of the 1024 User IDs.
To enter Multi Edit Mode, first press the Multi Mode button to enter Multi Mode, and then
press the EDIT button.
Once you are in Multi Edit Mode, press the soft buttons at the bottom of the screen
to navigate to each of the Multi Edit Mode pages. See the sections below for details on
navigating and changing parameters and Zones. All parameters apply only to the currently
selected Zone, except for parameters on the Common Page and certain controller parameters,
which apply to all Zones. On the Multi CCs and Multi Switches pages, if a parameter is
selected which applies to all Zones, “All Zones” will be displayed in the top right corner of
the display.
11-1
Multi Edit Mode
Selecting Parameters
Differences Between Regular and Advanced User Type
This chapter describes how Multi Edit Mode works when the Global Mode User Type
parameter is set to Advanced. Multi Edit Mode works the same way when the Global
Mode User Type parameter is set to Regular, except that the NewZn, DupZn, ImpZn, and
DelZn soft buttons are not shown, and some settings will be hidden when scrolling through
Arpeggiator settings.
Selecting Parameters
The Display
In Multi Edit Mode, the top line of the display shows the current Mode, Page, and current
selected Zone.
Current Page
Current Zone
Current Parameter
Soft button options for Multi Edit mode
Changing Zones
Use the Channel/Layer/Zone ▲ and ▼ buttons to change the currently
selected Zone.
The top right corner of the display of the each page shows the currently
selected Zone out of all available Zones, or “All Zones” if the parameter
applies to all Zones.
On the Multi Edit Overview page the Channel/Layer/Zone ▲ or ▼ buttons will change
Zones in reverse order from how they do on other Multi Edit pages. Pressing Zone Down
will select a higher Zone and pressing Zone Up will select a lower Zone. The buttons are
reversed on this page so that pressing Zone (▲ or ▼) will move you visually up/down on
the display. A simultaneous double button press of ▲/▼ will jump to Zone 1.
11-2
Multi Edit Mode
Selecting Parameters
Alpha Wheel & Previous (–) and Next (+) Value Buttons
Use the Alpha Wheel or the Value buttons, to the right of the display below the Alpha
Wheel, to change the selected parameter value. Turning the Alpha Wheel counter-clockwise
or pressing the Previous button will select the previous value and turning the Alpha Wheel
clockwise or pressing the Next button will select the next value.
Assign
Assign is the secondary function of the Enter button. You can use the Assign function to
quickly select parameters or set values for parameters by holding the Enter button while
moving Forte SE controllers (Sliders, Switch buttons, Keys, Mod Wheel, and Pedals).
Parameters that can use the Assign function are indicated by showing the Assign symbol in
the top right corner of the display when selected.
Assign Symbol
Pressing a key, switch, or moving a controller while holding down the Enter button will
perform Assign in the following cases.
Enter + Controller
On the Multi CCs or Multi Switches page, when the Controller or Switch parameter is
selected, holding the Enter button and moving a controller (a Slider, Switch button, Mod
Wheel or Pedal) will jump to selecting that controller in the current Zone. This allows you to
quickly select a controller.
On the Multi CCs or Multi Switches page, when the Dest parameter is selected, Enter
+ Switch/Controller will assign the default Destination of the touched controller to the
selected switch or controller. This is an easy way assign a Multi controller/switch to the same
assignment it had in Program mode.
11-3
Multi Edit Mode
Zone Parameters
On the Multi CCs or Multi Switches page, when the Entry Pos, Exit Value, OnValue,
or OffValue parameter is selected, you can change the value of the selected parameter by
holding Enter and moving any Controller or Switch.
Enter + Key
In Multi Edit Mode, on the Overview page, with the Low Key Range or High Key Range
parameter selected, hold the Enter button and strike a key to set the Low Key or High Key.
On the Multi Switches page, when Mode = Chord and one of the Key1-8 parameters is
selected, hold the Enter button and strike a key to set a key value.
Zone Parameters
Each of the available Zones in a Multi has multiple parameters that determine its behavior.
Since the Zones of a Multi are independent of each other, changing a parameter for a certain
Zone will not affect the parameters of any other Zone. There are some exceptions to this,
for example, the parameters on the Common Page are common to all available Zones. Also,
on the Controllers Page for Switch Controllers, the parameters Type, Entry State, and Exit
State are common to all available Zones. Lastly, on the Controllers Page for Continuous
Controllers, the parameters Entry Position and Exit Value are common to all available Zones.
The top right corner of the display of the each page shows the currently selected Zone out of
the available Zones, or “All Zones” if the parameter applies to all Zones.
Also, on the Multi CCs Page, the parameters Entry Position and Exit Value are common to
all available Zones. Lastly, on the Multi Switches Page, the parameters Type, Entry State and
Exit State are common to all available Zones.
11-4
Multi Edit Mode
OVERVIEW Page
OVERVIEW Page
The Overview Page shows basic settings for 4 of the available Zones. The current Program,
Volume and Panning position of the Zone, along with the state and active keyboard region
can be quickly set on this page. If a Multi has more than 4 Zones, the other Zones can be
accessed by using the Channel/Layer/Zone Up/Down buttons to the right of the display.
Parameter
Range Of Values
Default Value
Status
Active, Muted
Active
Program
Program List
-
Key Range
C-1 to G9
Pan
None, 0 to 127
64
Volume
None, 0 to 127
127
C-1 to G9
Zn and Stat (Zone and Status)
Zn lists the available Zones. The Status parameter determines whether the currently selected
Zone is active or muted. You can set this parameter to either of two states: Active or Muted.
Program
The Program parameter determines the Program to be loaded for the currently selected
Zone. You can set this parameter to any Forte SE Program (1 – 2047). The display shows the
Program number and name.
The Value Jump double button press (Previous and Next buttons) jumps to selecting the first
Program of each Category, as well as the Category Default Program of each Category (if a
Category Default Program has been set).
Low and Hi (Key Range)
The Low and Hi parameters define the key range of the currently selected zone. Keys played
within this range will trigger a note for the selected Zone. The easiest way to change these
values is to select one, hold the Enter button and press the key of the note you wish to enter.
You can set these values with normal data entry methods as well.
You can also set the lowest key higher then the highest key and vice versa. This allows you to
split a Zone into two areas where the lowest and highest keys now define the region that the
Zone does not play on.
11-5
Multi Edit Mode
MAIN Page
Vol (Zone Volume)
The VOL parameter displays the volumes of each Zone. By default, VOL is set to 127, which
results in each Zone having the same volume. To change volumes use the Alpha Wheel or
Previous/Next buttons. A Zone volume can be set to any number between 0 and 127.
Pan
The Pan parameter determines the Pan MIDI message that the currently selected Zone sends
when the Multi is loaded. You can set this parameter to any pan setting from None, 0 (full
left pan) to 127 (full right pan). To pan to center, select 64 for this parameter.
MAIN Page
The Main Page shows the current settings that are specific for the currently selected Zone.
The top right hand corner of the display indicates the currently selected Zone of the total
available Zones.
Parameter
Range Of Values
Default Value
1
Channel
1-1027
NONE, LOCAL, MIDI, MIDI+LOCAL,
USB, USB+LOCAL, USB+MIDI,
USB+LOCAL+MIDI
1 to 16
MidiBank
None, 0 to 16383
BankMode
None, Ctl 0, Ctl 32, Ctl 0/32, K2600
MidiProg
(Depends on BankMode)
EntryPrgChg
On, Off
Status
Active, Muted
Program
Destination
USB+LOCAL+MIDI
1
Ctl 0/32
On
Current Zone Status
Program
The Program parameter determines the Program to be loaded for the currently selected
Zone. You can set this parameter to any Forte SE Program (1 – 2047). The display shows the
Program number and name.
The Value Jump double button press (Previous- and Next+ buttons) jumps to selecting the
first Program of each Category, as well as the Category Default Program of each Category (if
a Category Default Program has been set).
11-6
Multi Edit Mode
MAIN Page
Destination
The Destination parameter determines whether MIDI data generated by the keyboard and
physical controllers of the currently selected Zone is sent to a Forte SE Program, through
the MIDI Out/USB ports, or all three. You can set this parameter to any of the eight
combinations for the three destinations for this parameter:
Note that this parameter works in conjunction with the Global parameter of the same name
(see Dest (Destination) on page 12-11) and both are active. They act like filters, so if one
is set to MIDI, and the other is set to Local + MIDI, transmission will be limited to MIDI
only.
CAUTION: It is possible to stop all MIDI transmission, in Multi Mode, if
one Destination parameter is set to Local, and the other is set to MIDI.
Setting
MIDI Out
USB
NONE
LOCAL
MIDI
MIDI + LOCAL
USB
USB + LOCAL
USB + MIDI
USB + LOCAL + MIDI
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
FORTE
SE
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
NONE
Unused Zones are set to None to avoid transmitting MIDI on these zones. The Zone
will still be able to receive incoming MIDI.
LOCAL
When Destination is set to LOCAL, MIDI data from the Zone is sent only to the
Forte SE Program. MIDI data from this Zone is not sent to the MIDI Out or USB
ports.
MIDI
When Destination is set to MIDI, MIDI data from the Zone is sent only to the
MIDI Out ports. MIDI data is not sent to a Forte SE Program or the USB ports
from this Zone.
MIDI + LOCAL
When Destination is set to MIDI+LOCAL, MIDI data from the Zone is sent to a
Forte SE Program and to the MIDI Out ports.
11-7
Multi Edit Mode
MAIN Page
USB
When Destination is set to USB, MIDI data from the Zone is sent only to the USB
ports.
USB + LOCAL
When Destination is set to USB+LOCAL, MIDI data from the Zone is sent to a
Forte SE Program and to the USB ports.
USB + MIDI
When Destination is set to USB+MIDI, MIDI data from the Zone is sent to the USB
& MIDI Out ports only. MIDI data is not sent to a Forte SE Program on this Zone.
USB + LOCAL + MIDI
When Destination is set to USB+LOCAL +MIDI, MIDI data from the Zone is sent
to the USB & MIDI Out ports, as well as the Forte SE Program on this Zone.
Channel
The Channel parameter determines the MIDI transmit and receive channel for the currently
selected Zone. You can set this parameter to any of the 16 MIDI channels (1-16).
You can assign different Zones to the same channel, but only one Program can be loaded in a
channel at a particular time. The Program loaded will be whichever program change message
is received last.
BankMode
The Bank Mode parameter determines the controller number with which MIDI Bank change
messages are transmitted. For MIDI Bank change messages, various manufacturers have
chosen different MIDI controller numbers. Most have chosen 0, 32, or both. In the case of
the Kurzweil K2600, it responds to controller 32, but is limited to 100 programs per bank.
You can set this parameter to any of the following:
None
11-8
MIDI Bank change messages are disabled.
Ctl0
MIDI Bank change messages are sent with controller number 0.
Ctl32
MIDI Bank change messages are sent with controller number 32.
Ctl0/32
MIDI Bank change messages are sent with both controller numbers 0 and 32.
K2600
MIDI Bank change messages are sent with controller number 32. (K2600 Program
numbers 0-99.)
Multi Edit Mode
MAIN Page
MidiBank
The MIDI Bank parameter determines the MIDI Bank change message that the currently
selected Zone sends when the Multi is loaded. You can set this parameter to a MIDI Bank
change message from 0 to 16383.
When using the Forte SE as a MIDI controller, sending a MIDI Bank change message (along
with a MIDI Program change message) when a Multi is loaded ensures that the Program
loaded on the other sound modules in your MIDI chain is the Program that you want.
For example, if you’ve configured a Multi to work in a specific way with Program 32 in
Bank 5 of a connected sound module, then set MIDI Bank to 5 and MIDI Program to 32.
This way, whenever you load this Multi, the sound module will automatically load Program
32 in Bank 5.
NOTE : When you change the Program parameter, the MIDI Bank and MIDI Program parameters will automatically change to match the Bank and Program numbers of the Program that you select for Local Program. For example, if you choose
Program 178, then MIDI Bank will change to 1 and MIDI Program will change to
50.
MidiProg
The MIDI Program parameter determines the MIDI Program change message that the
currently selected Zone sends when the Multi is loaded. You can set this parameter to a
MIDI Program change message from 0 to 127.
When using the Forte SE as a MIDI controller, sending a MIDI Program change message
(along with a MIDI bank change message) when a Multi is loaded ensures that the Program
loaded on the other sound modules in your MIDI chain is the Program that you want. For
example, if you’ve configured a Multi to work in a specific way with Program 32 in Bank 5
of a connected sound module, then set MIDI Bank to 5 and MIDI Program to 32. This
way, whenever you load this Multi, the sound module will automatically load Program 32 in
Bank 5.
EntryPrgChg
The Entry Program Change parameter determines whether or not the currently selected
Zone will send a MIDI Program change message when the Multi is loaded. You can set this
parameter to either Off or On. When set to On, the Zone will send a MIDI Program change
message with the Program specified for the MIDI Program parameter.
Status
This displays the current Zone status (active or muted).
11-9
Multi Edit Mode
KEYVEL (KeyVelocity) Page
KEYVEL (KeyVelocity) Page
LoKey and HiKey (Key Range)
The Low and Hi parameters define the key range of the currently selected zone. Keys played
within this range will trigger a note for the selected Zone. The easiest way to change these
values is to select one, hold the Enter button and press the key of the note you wish to enter.
You can set these values with normal data entry methods as well.
You can also set the lowest key higher then the highest key and vice versa. This allows you to
split a Zone into two areas where the lowest and highest keys now define the region that the
Zone does not play on.
Transpose
The Transpose parameter changes the pitches generated by the Zone, without changing its
position on the keyboard. This is done by changing the MIDI note numbers generated by
the keys in the Zone. The range is -128 to 127 semitones. If you transpose out of the range of
the active Zone Program, no notes will sound, though MIDI notes will still be transmitted.
Note Map
Note Map lets you change the way notes are sent from the Forte SE.
The default setting is Linear: all notes go out as played. Pressing the Minus button takes you
to Off; no notes are sent, but controllers and other non-note data are.
Setting Note Map to Inverse effectively turns the keyboard upside-down, with the highest
key being A 0 and the lowest C 9. If you set Note Map to Constant, all of the keys on the
keyboard will play the same note. The note defaults to C4, but you can change this with the
Transpose parameter. This works well when you want the sound from a particular key to play
with every note of another zone. For example, playing a ride cymbal with every note in a bass
line.
Next are the alternating note maps, which let you divide the keyboard in some unique
ways. If you are using two or more MIDI devices (including the Forte SE), you can expand
polyphony by assigning each zone to a different alternating note map. For example, if you
have two Forte SEs, you can assign two zones to each play the same program on a different
Forte SE, thereby doubling polyphony.
11-10
Multi Edit Mode
KEYVEL (KeyVelocity) Page
To split a zone into one of two alternating note maps, set Note Map to 1 of 2; now the zone
plays on every second key, starting on C, but won’t play on any other keys. Set another zone
to 2 of 2, and this zone will play on every second key, starting on C#, thus covering the
remaining keys. Three and four-zone alternating notemaps work the same way, but cause
each zone to play only on every third and every fourth key, respectively.
VelMode
The Velocity Mode parameter determines the method that the Forte SE maps the keyboard’s
strike velocity to MIDI velocity. Set to “Traditional” the keyboards velocity will translate to a
MIDI velocity depending how hard you strike it. With a setting of “Fixed”, the velocity is set
to a pre-determined value regardless of how hard or soft the keyboard is played.
A setting of “Fixed” will remove some of the other Velocity settings in the MAIN page and
replace it with a parameter called Velocity that has range of values from 0 to 127.
VelScale
The Velocity Scale parameter lets you amplify or diminish velocity response from -300%
to 300%. Normal response is 100%. Higher values make the keyboard more sensitive (you
don’t need to play as hard to get higher MIDI velocities) while lower values make it less
sensitive (playing harder doesn’t change MIDI velocity as much). You can also set the scale to
a negative number, in which case the velocity response is turned upside-down: playing harder
produces a softer sound and vice versa. This is useful for creating velocity-based crossfades
between zones.
See the following section on VelOffset for ideas about negative scaling.
VelOffset
The Velocity Offset parameter also changes the velocity response, but in a more direct way, by
adding or subtracting a constant to the key velocity.
For example, if this is set to 25 (assuming a scale of 100%), then 25 is added to the velocity
of every keystroke, usually making the sound that much louder. The softest possible keystroke
will have a value of 25, while a keystroke with velocity of 102 will produce the same sound
as a note with velocity 127 (102+25=127). Negative values diminish the response: a setting
of -25 means the loudest velocity available will be 102, while any keystroke 25 or below will
produce a velocity of 1 (a velocity value of zero has a special meaning in MIDI and cannot be
used for Note Ons).
You can think of Scale as being a proportional change to the velocity, while Offset is a linear
change. The maximum values for Offset are ±127.
Offset and Scale work together. If scaling takes the velocity out of the ballpark — for
example, you want to set it to 300% but that puts all of your notes at maximum velocity —
using a negative offset, say around -60, can make it possible to still play at different volumes,
although your curve will still be a lot steeper than normal. If you use a negative scaling,
then you must use an offset: otherwise all of your velocities will end up as zeroes (well, ones
11-11
Multi Edit Mode
KEYVEL (KeyVelocity) Page
actually, since a MIDI note-on with velocity zero is interpreted by some modules as a noteoff message). So to get true inverse scaling (that is, minus 100%), you must set an offset of
127 to get the full range of velocities. Setting the offset to 127 and the scale to -100% (which
is the same as the reverse linear curve):
NOTE: Offset and Scale affect only MIDI velocities; that is, these parameters don’t
change Velocity Tracking in the programs themselves. Therefore, some programs (such as
organ sounds,which often have low VelTrk values) may respond only subtly to Offset and
Scale, or not at all.
VelCurve
The Velocity Curve parameter lets you taper the velocity response. The default setting is
Linear, which means that the output velocity changes directly proportionally to the played
velocity.
Expand produces a curve that is less steep than the linear curve at keystrike velocities below
64, and steeper than the linear curve at keystrike velocities above 64. In other words, when
you’re playing softly, you’ll notice velocity differences less than with a linear curve, while
when you’re playing hard, you’ll notice velocity differences more.
Compress produces a velocity curve that is the opposite of the expanded curve—that is,
you’ll notice velocity differences more when you’re playing softly than when you’re playing
hard.
Crossfade is designed to be used in tandem with the Reverse Crossfade curve, enabling you
to perform smooth crossfades between different programs.
Bump tapers velocity response to resemble a bell curve, so that notes are loudest when your
keystrike velocity is 64. Notes get softer as the keystrike velocity approaches 0 or 127.
The next four velocity curves are Reverse Linear (Rvrs Linear), Reverse Expand (Rvrs
Expand), Reverse Compress (Rvrs Compress), and Reverse Crossfade (Rvrs Crossfade).
These taper velocity in reverse of the five curves we just covered. For example, Reverse
Linear’s response is such that striking a key harder will produce a lower volume, striking it
softer will produce a higher volume, and so on. This provides a convenient way to achieve
negative scaling, by letting you set one parameter instead of two.
LoVel, HiVel
LoVel (Low Velocity) and HiVel (High Velocity) set the minimum and maximum velocity
limits that the current zone transmits.
A keystroke in the current zone whose velocity — after it has been scaled and offset —
is below the minimum does not generate a Note On. Neither does a keystroke whose
velocity after processing is above the maximum. These parameters are useful for “velocity
switching”—having a key play different sounds depending on how hard you strike it.
11-12
Multi Edit Mode
BEND Page
The values can be anywhere from 1 to 127. As with other parameters, zones can overlap or
be totally discrete, or be identical. Usually, LoVel will have a smaller value than HiVel, but as
with LoKey and HiKey, you may also create a gap in velocity response, by setting HiVel to a
lower value than LoVel.
BEND Page
Parameter
Range Of Values
Default Value
Bend Up ST
Prog, 0 to 127 ST (semitones)
2 ST
Bend Down ST
Prog, 0 to 127 ST (semitones)
2 ST
Bend Up cT
0 to 100 cents
2 ST
Bend Down cT
0 to 100 cents
2 ST
Bend Up / Down ST
Bend Up ST and Bend Down ST sends a bend range message to an internal program or
a MIDI device, telling it how to define subsequent pitch bend messages. You can set this
parameter to any value between 0 semitones and 127 semitones, or to Prog, which uses the
Bend Range Up / Down of the currently selected Program for the Zone. The value can be
entered numerically, and entering -1 will select Prog. (value that the Program would use in
Program Mode).
Bend Up / Down CT
Bend Up CT and Bend Down CT lets you fine tune the value for Bend Up ST & Bend
Down ST (semitones). 100 cents equals one semitone, or one half step; you can set this
parameter anywhere between 0 and 100 cents.
CCTLS (CCs/Continuous Controllers) Page
Parameter
Range Of Values
Default Value
Controller
See Continuous Controllers List
-
Mode
Off, MIDI CC
-
Destination
See Controller Destination List
Scale
-300% to +300%
Add
-128 to 127
100%
0
11-13
Multi Edit Mode
CCTLS (CCs/Continuous Controllers) Page
Parameter
Entry Position
Range Of Values
Linear, Compress, Expand, Crossfade, Bump, Rvrs Linear, Rvrs
Expand, Rvrs Compress, Rvrs
Crossfade
None, 0 to 127
Exit Value
None, 0 to 127
Curve
Default Value
Linear
-
Controller
The Controller parameter allows you to assign any of the Forte SE’s continuous controllers
(sliders, mod and pitch wheels, expression pedal and pressure) to control a program specific
parameter or MIDI controller number for the currently selected Zone.
First, use the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons to the left of the display to select the desired zone
that you wish to assign a controller for. Next, on the Multi CCs page, use the navigation
buttons to select the “Controller” field, hold the Enter button and then move any of the
Forte SE’s continuous controllers. This will select that controller and display its available
parameters. (You can also scroll through the list of controllers on the Control page by
selecting the Controller field with the navigation buttons and using the Alpha Wheel or the
Value buttons to scroll through the list.) If a pedal is selected which has a pedal override
enabled in Global mode, a message “(Global Override)” will display when that pedal is
viewed to remind you that the Global mode pedal override settings are being used instead of
the Multi mode pedal settings.
FORTE SE CONTINUOUS
CONTROLLERS
Mod Wheel
Slider A
Slider F
Pressure
Slider B
Slider G
Pitch Wheel Up
Slider D
Slider I
CC Pedal
Pitch Wheel Down
Slider C
Slider E
Slider H
Mode
Continuous Controllers have two modes: Off, or MIDI CC.
With a value of Off, the controller is disabled for this zone.
With a value of MIDI CC, the controller has the ability to transmit MIDI control messages.
Dest (Destination)
Use the Destination parameter to assign the Forte SE continuous controllers (Sliders,
Wheels, Expression Pedal, or pressure) to control Program parameters or send MIDI
continuous controller messages (CCs) to external MIDI gear. If a controller number (MIDI
CC number) is assigned to a parameter in the Program of the current Zone, the parameter
11-14
Multi Edit Mode
CCTLS (CCs/Continuous Controllers) Page
name will be listed in the Destination list to the right of the CC number. Some CC numbers
also show a default MIDI name if the CC number is not assigned in the Zone’s program.
For example, CC 6 is generally unassigned in programs, in which case CC 6 will show the
standard MIDI name “data.”
The Destination parameter determines the MIDI CC controller number that a physical
controller will send to the Program in the currently selected Zone. By default, these CC
messages are also sent to the MIDI Out and USB ports on the Channel of that Zone.
The list of CC controller numbers below (see page 11-17) shows the default assignments for
each destination. Programs respond to some of these CCs for standard MIDI functions like
volume and panning. Other external MIDI gear (sound modules, computer software) may
respond to standard MIDI CC messages as well. Standard MIDI CC’s range from 0-127
and can be received by the Forte SE from external devices, while destinations 128-146 are
internal to the Forte SE only.
Scale
After you’ve selected a continuous physical controller, you can modify the controller’s
response in a similar way that you can modify velocity response.
Scale lets you amplify or diminish the action of the controller. Full scale is 100%. Higher
values will make the controller more sensitive, and lower values will make it less so. Setting
the scale to a negative number makes the controller action work in reverse. As with velocity,
you can use a controller to crossfade between two zones by setting the scaling for one zone
positive and the other negative. Maximum scale values are +300% and -300%.
Add
This adds or subtracts a constant to the controller, and at the same time sets minimum or
maximum values. If Add is 25, the minimum value of the controller will be 25. If it is -25
(and scale is 100%) the first one-fifth of the controller’s movement (25/127 ≈ 1/5) will send a
value of 0, and the maximum value of the controller will be 102 (= 127-25). As with velocity,
Scale is a proportional change to the controller, while Add is a linear change. The values for
Add range from -128 to 127.
Curve
The Curve parameter lets you taper the velocity response. The default setting is Linear,
which means that the output velocity changes directly proportionally to the played velocity.
Expand produces a curve that is less steep than the linear curve at keystrike velocities below
64, and steeper than the linear curve at keystrike velocities above 64. In other words, when
you’re playing softly, you’ll notice velocity differences less than with a linear curve, while
when you’re playing hard, you’ll notice velocity differences more.
Compress produces a velocity curve that is the opposite of the expanded curve—that is,
you’ll notice velocity differences more when you’re playing softly than when you’re playing
hard.
11-15
Multi Edit Mode
CCTLS (CCs/Continuous Controllers) Page
Crossfade is designed to be used in tandem with the Reverse Crossfade curve, enabling you
to perform smooth crossfades between different programs.
Bump tapers velocity response to resemble a bell curve, so that notes are loudest when your
keystrike velocity is 64. Notes get softer as the keystrike velocity approaches 0 or 127.
The next four velocity curves are Reverse Linear (Rvrs Linear), Reverse Expand (Rvrs
Expand), Reverse Compress (Rvrs Compress), and Reverse Crossfade (Rvrs Crossfade).
These taper velocity in reverse of the five curves we just covered. For example, Reverse
Linear’s response is such that striking a key harder will produce a lower volume, striking it
softer will produce a higher volume, and so on. This provides a convenient way to achieve
negative scaling, by letting you set one parameter instead of two.
Entry Position
The Entry Position value allows you to specify an initial value for a controller in a setup that
will be sent whenever you select that Multi. For example, if you want to make sure that all of
the modulation in a zone is turned off when you select a Multi, assign a physical controller to
a destination of MIDI 01 (MWheel) and set Entry Value to 0.
Entry Position refers to the position of the physical controller. The Entry Position is common
to all Zones, however the Curve, Scale and Add modifiers are applied to the Entry Position
(and the controller value) individually on each zone, allowing the one controller to send
different values to the assigned destinations on different zones, if desired.
Entry Position ignores the current position of the physical controller when the Multi is
selected. In fact, if the Multi Controllers parameter in Global Mode (page 12-5) is set to
Pass Entry, and the physical controller is above or below the entry value when the Multi is
selected (which it often is), moving the controller will have no effect until it is past the entry
value. In the modulation example above, moving the assigned controller won’t turn on any
modulation until it’s pushed all the way down, and then up again.
If the Multi Controllers parameter is set to Instant, any movement of the physical controller
will immediately be assigned to the controller. This may cause an abrupt change in the
sound.
An Entry Position of None is quite different from a value of 0. None means that there will be
no initial controller command when the Multi is selected, and any subsequent movement of
the physical controller will be effective.
Exit Value
The Exit Value tells the Forte SE to send a value for that controller whenever you leave the
Multi, either by selecting another Multi or by selecting a different mode altogether. It can be
very useful when a controller is doing something to the sound, and you don’t want that effect
to continue after you leave the Multi.
For example, if you want to make sure a zone’s modulation wheel returns to normal
whenever you leave a Multi, you would set Exit Value to 0.
11-16
Multi Edit Mode
CCTLS (CCs/Continuous Controllers) Page
A setting of None means no message is sent when exiting the Multi.
Controlling Program Parameter Assignments from Multi
Mode
Commonly you will want to assign a physical controller in a Multi to control the same
Program parameter that it controlled in Program Mode. In the Destination parameter list,
destinations that are assigned to parameters for the Program of the current Zone will show
the Program Parameter name in place of the standard Controller Destination name. Select
one of these destinations to control an assigned Program parameter.
You can also use the Enter button’s secondary “Assign” function to quickly assign a Multi
mode controller to a program mode assignment. First make sure you have the correct
Zone selected for the program you wish to control. Next, go to the Multi CCs or Multi
Switches page and select the desired control. Lastly, select the Dest parameter for the
desired controller, hold the Enter button and move the desired controller. This will set the
controller’s destination to the same assignment it had in Program mode. You can also move a
different controller if you want to set a different program mode assignment.
The Controller Destination List
The table below contains the available values for the MIDI CC (continuous controller)
destinations. The Forte SE’s physical controllers can send MIDI values to these destinations
in order to control the parameters of Forte SE Programs, Multis, Forte SE system parameters,
or external MIDI equipment.
Controller
Number
Controller
Destination
Description
0
OFF/Bank
By default, when you enter 0 or Clear for the Destination parameter, the destination
will be assigned to OFF. To select Bank as the destination, use the Value buttons.
1
MWheel
Default destination for the Modulation Wheel
2
Breath
Default assignment for breath controller in compatible synths
3
MIDI 03
MIDI Controller 3
4
Foot
5
PortTim
6
Data
Default assignment for continuous foot controller in compatible synths
Monophonic Forte SE Programs respond to this Controller if portamento is turned
on.
MIDI Controller 6
7
Volume
MIDI Volume
8
Balance
MIDI Balance
MIDI Controller 9
9
MIDI 09
10
Pan
11
Express
Default assignment for CC Pedal. In most Programs it acts as a volume control. It
scales between 0 and the current value of Volume.
12
MIDI 12
Default assignment for Slider A
13
MIDI 13
Default assignment for Slider B
14-21
MIDI 14-21
MIDI Pan
MIDI Controllers 14-21
11-17
Multi Edit Mode
CCTLS (CCs/Continuous Controllers) Page
11-18
Controller
Number
Controller
Destination
22
MIDI 22
Default assignment for Slider C
23
MIDI 23
Default assignment for Slider D
24
MIDI 24
Default assignment for Slider E
25
MIDI 25
Default assignment for Slider F
26
MIDI 26
Default assignment for Slider G
27
MIDI 27
Default assignment for Slider H
28
MIDI 28
Default assignment for Slider I
29
MIDI 29
Default assignment for Variation switch
30-31
MIDI 30-31
MIDI Controllers 30–31
32
MIDI Bank
MIDI Bank change message
33–63
MIDI 33–63
MIDI Controllers 33–63
64
Sustain
65
MIDI 65
66
Sostenuto
Description
Default destination for Sustain Pedal
Default destination for Sostenuto Pedal (Sustains notes that are currently down, but
not notes played subsequently.)
67
Soft
68
Legato
Lowers the volume by a preset amount and may soften the timbre as well.
Forces mono playback.
Envelopes freeze at current state.
69
Freeze
70–79
MIDI 70–79
80
MIDI 80
Default assignment for Switch 1 (Zone 1 Switch)
81
MIDI 81
Default assignment for Switch 2 (Zone 2 Switch)
82
MIDI 82
Default assignment for Switch 3 (Zone 3 Switch)
83
MIDI 83
Default assignment for Switch 4 (Zone 4 Switch)
84
Portamento
85
MIDI 85
Default assignment for Switch 5 (Assignable Switch 5)
86
MIDI 86
Default assignment for Switch 6 (Assignable Switch 6)
87
MIDI 87
Default assignment for Switch 7 (Assignable Switch 7)
89
MIDI 89
Default assignment for Switch 8 (Assignable Switch 9)
90
MIDI 90
Default assignment for Switch 9 (Assignable Switch 5)
91–95
MIDI 91–95
96
Data Inc
Equivalent to pressing the Next Value button
97
Data Dec
Equivalent to pressing the Previous Value button
98
NRegParL
Non–Registered Parameter Least Significant Byte
99
NRegParM
Non–Registered Parameter Most Significant Byte
100
RegParL
Registered Parameter Least Significant Byte
Registered Parameter Most Significant Byte
MIDI Controllers 70–79
Standard MIDI controller for setting Portamento starting note
MIDI Controllers 94–95
101
RegParM
102–109
MIDI 102–109
MIDI Controllers 102–109
110-119
MIDI 110–119
Reserved - Not available for use in the Forte SE.
120
Sound Off
121
RstCtls
122
Local
123
Notes Off
Stops all sound in the corresponding channel.
Resets Controllers to defaults in the corresponding channel.
Sends Note Off Message to all playing notes in the corresponding channel.
Multi Edit Mode
CCTLS (CCs/Continuous Controllers) Page
Controller
Number
Controller
Destination
124
Poly
Description
125
Omni
126
Mono On
127
Mono Off
128
Pitch
Values above 64 and below 64 bend the pitch up and down, respectively.
129
PitchRev
Values above 64 and below 64 bend the pitch down and up, respectively
130
PitchUp
Values above 0 bend the pitch up
131
PitchDwn
Values above 0 bend the pitch down
132
Pressure
Default Destination for Pressure
133
Tempo
134
KeyNum
135
KeyVel
Key Velocity
136
ProgInc
Program Increment—increments current Program number.
137
ProgDec
Program Decrement—decrements current Program number.
138
ProgGoto
Go to Program—selects Program.
139
MultiInc
Multi Increment—increments current Multi number.
140
MultiDec
Multi Decrement—decrements current Multi number.
141
SetpGoto
Go to Multi—selects Multi.
145
TransUp
Transpose Up (ST)
146
TransDown
147
Arp
149
MuteZn
150
ArpOrder
Arpeggiator Order,each range of values selects one of nine options in order on
parameters list: 0-14, 15-28, 29-42, 43-56, 57-70,71-84, 85-98, 99-112, 113-127.
(See ARP1 Page on page 7-56)
151
ArpBeats
Arpeggiator Beats, each range of values selects one of seven options in order on
parameters list: 0-18, 19-36, 37-54, 55-72, 73-90, 91-108, 109-127. (See Beats on
page 7-61)
152
ArpShift
The 88 Arpeggiator Shift steps are scaled over the 128 MIDI controller values, so
that 0 = 0 steps and 127 = 88 steps. (See Shift (Shift Amount) on page 7-61)
153
ArpLimit
The 60 Arpeggiator Shift Limit steps are scaled over the 128 MIDI controller values,
so that 0 = 0 steps and 127 = 60 steps. (See Shift Limit on page 7-61)
154
ArpLmtOp
Arpeggiator Shift Limit Option, each range of values selects one of seven options
in order on parameters list: 0-18, 19-36, 37-54, 55-72, 73-90, 91-108, 109-127.
(See Limit Option on page 7-59)
155
ArpVel
Arpeggiator Velocity, each range of values selects one of twenty-three options in
order on parameters list: 0-5, 6-10, 11-15...101-105, 106-110, 111-127. (See Velocity Mode on page 7-63)
156
Arp Dur
The Arpeggiator Duration % values are scaled over the 128 MIDI controller values,
so that 0 = 1% and 127 = 100%. (See Duration on page 7-66)
157
Latch
158
Latch2:
For Arpeggiator Latch Pedals mode, 0-63 = off, 64-127 = on.
159
ArpGliss
Arpeggiator Gliss, 0-63 = off, 64-127 = on. When Arp Gliss is On, the Arpeggiator plays chromatically between inputted notes, and ignores the Arpeggiator Shift
Amount, Shift Limit, and Limit Option parameters.
160
SusLatch
For Arpeggiator Latch Pedals mode, 0-63 = off, 64-127 = on.
Tempo
Triggers playback of notes by Key Number—e.g., C4 is 60. Send a velocity first with
Destination135, KeyVel.
Transpose Down (ST)
Values 0-63 turn the arpeggiator Off, Values 64-127 turn the arpeggiator On
Mute Zone – Values above 64 will mute the zone that sends values to this destination, values below or equal to 64 will unmute the zone.
For Arpeggiator Latch Pedals mode, 0-63 = off, 64-127 = on. (See Latch on page
7-58)
11-19
Multi Edit Mode
CCTLS (CCs/Continuous Controllers) Page
Controller
Number
Controller
Destination
161
Panic
Description
Sends an “all notes off” message and an “reset all controllers” message on all 16
MIDI channels.
Solo Zone - Values above 64 will solo the zone that sends values to this destination, values below or equal to 64 will unsolo the zone. When a zone is soloed, the
Zone Mute button LED for the soloed Zone will turn red. All other Zones will be
muted and their Zone Mute button LEDs will turn orange. Pressing any muted/orange Zone buttons will make that Zone the soloed zone. Pressing the soloed zone
button will cancel solo mode. To return to Solo mode the original controller assigned
to Solo Zone (162) will need to be re-engaged.
162
SoloZn
168
TapTempo
170
-Arp Shift
Sets ARPEGGIATOR values for Shift to negative. 0-63 = off, 64-127 = on. (SeeShift (Shift Amount) on page 7-61)
171
ShiftPatt
Selects one of the 128 patterns in the current ARPEGGIATOR ShiftPatt Bank. (See
Shift Pattern (ShiftPatt) on page 7-62)
172
ShiftPBank
A controller value selects the corresponding ShiftPatt Bank for the ARPEGGIATOR
page of a controller’s zone. For example, controller value 2 selects ShiftPatt bank 2,
controller value 7 selects ShiftPatt bank 7.
173
VelPatt
174
VelPBank
A controller value selects the corresponding VelPatt Bank for the ARPEGGIATOR
page of a controller’s zone. For example, controller value 2 selects VelPatt bank 2,
controller value 7 selects VelPatt bank 7.
175
VelFixed
Set’s arpeggiator velocity when ARPEGGIATOR velocity is set to Fixed. (Velocity
Mode on page 7-63)
176
ShKeyNum
177
ShiftKey
178
ShKeyNuV
180
Chan Intonation
Selects the Intonation Map (IDs 0-127) in a MIDI channel in real time. On the Multi
Edit CONTROLS page, when setting a switch controller to this Destination the
name of the selected Intonation Map will be displayed. For example: 18 (EastMed).
Chan Int Key
Selects the Intonation Key (C through B) in a MIDI channel in real time. On the Multi
Edit CCTLS page, when setting a switch controller to this Destination the MIDI number and note name of the selected Intonation Key will be displayed. For example:
41 (D#).
181
Tap Tempo (See TEMPO on page 12-16)
Selects one of the 128 patterns in the current ARPEGGIATOR VelPatt Bank.
(SeeVelocity Pat on page 7-64)
Shift Key Number (see below)
Shift Key (see below)
Same as 176 ShKeyNum, but the Shift Pattern’s velocity will be modified by the
current velocity pattern of the zone.
Shift Key Number, Shift Key (ShKeyNum, ShiftKey)
These controller destinations allow you to play musical scales and single note patterns on any
programmable continuous controller in a Multi, without the need of playing the physical
keys of the keyboard. These features are especially useful for playing fast arpeggiations. These
destinations only work when combined with other destinations and features, so be sure to
read this whole section to gain a complete understanding.
Shift Key Number (ShKeyNum, controller destination 176) works in a similar way to
Key Number (KeyNum, controller destination 134). Both controllers basically generate a
monophonic stream of notes. The difference is that Key Number plays through all notes
chromatically, while Shift Key Number only plays notes relative to a Shift Pattern.
11-20
Multi Edit Mode
CCTLS (CCs/Continuous Controllers) Page
For example, when controlling Shift Key Number from a slider, notes are triggered from
a Shift Pattern in forwards order as you move the slider up, and backwards order as you
move the slider down. If in our zone we have selected the Shift Pattern 2: minor, the notes
being played by the slider will be only the root, the minor third and fifth in the chosen key,
triggering notes in any octave up and down the keyboard. (See Shift Key below for details on
selecting the root note and octave.)
Selecting The Desired Notes:
You must select a Shift Pattern for the desired zone in order for Shift Key Number to have an
effect. To select a Shift Pattern for the current zone in a Multi, enter the Multi editor, go to
the Arpeggiator 1 page and set Arp Mode to Classic. Select a Shift Pattern from the ShiftPatt
field. If using multiple zones, a different pattern can be selected for each. The ShiftPatt field
is usually used with the arpeggiator, but can also be used in combination with the controller
destinations Shift Key Note, Shift Key, and Key Velocity. These destinations can use a zone’s
Shift Pattern whether the arpeggiator is on or off without conflict. For more information on
Shift Patterns such as editing and saving, see Shift Pattern (ShiftPatt) on page 7-48. (Note
that the ShiftPatt Up or Down options, as well as any of the arpeggiator parameters other
than ShiftPatt do not have an effect on Shift Key Number.) You can also set controllers to
destination 171 (ShiftPatt) to select a pattern from the current bank of 128 shift patterns,
and destination 172 (ShiftPBank) to select a bank from banks of 128 shift patterns each.
Selecting The Desired Velocity:
In order to have a note sound when using Shift Key Number, you first need to send a Key
Velocity message (KeyVel, controller destination 135) with a non zero velocity. You must
set a controller to this destination, it’s useful to set a slider or other continuous controller in
order to control velocity while playing. The next notes to be triggered by Shift Key Number
will be played with the last received KeyVel velocity. One note triggered by these controllers
sounds until another note is triggered or until a KeyVel message with velocity 0 is sent.
11-21
Multi Edit Mode
CCTLS (CCs/Continuous Controllers) Page
Selecting The Desired Key (Root Note):
Shift Key (ShiftKey, controller destination 177) allows the user to select the key (root note)
of the Shift Pattern triggered by Shift Key Number. A Shift Pattern is a relative pattern based
on a root note. All notes triggered by a Shift Pattern are shifted from the root note by the
value of each pattern step (in half-steps.)
Shift Key Settings
Value
Key (Root note)
0-9
10-19
20-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
60-68
69-78
79-88
89-98
99-108
109-118
119-127
C
C#
D
D#
E
F
F#
G
G#
A
A#
B
Last Note Played
When using a Shift Pattern with Shift Key Number you can select the key with one or more
controllers set to the Shift Key destination. You can use a continuous controller such as a
slider to cycle through keys, or switches set to predetermined keys. For example, if you are
playing a song that moves between 2 or 3 keys, a couple of switches could be programmed
in order to send the appropriate Shift Key message for each key change. That way all the
notes you are triggering with a Shift Key Number controller will be in the appropriate scale.
You could also create a Multi for a song with multiple zones, each with its own pre-set key
and appropriate shift pattern. That way, for each chord change you could move a different
controller that would create the correct harmony.
Another way to choose a key is to set Shift Key to Last Note Played mode, in which the
last note played in the zone will set the key. For example, you could set the zone being used
for Shift Key Number to have a Key Range that covers only a few of the keyboard’s lowest
octaves. This would allow you to play root note bass lines that change the key that Shift Key
Number plays in, leaving the upper octaves of the keyboard open for use by other zones.
A Note About Octave Range:
When using Shift Key Number, shift patterns with more than 12 steps begin triggering notes
in higher octaves. This is done because longer shift patterns use up more of a controller’s
range, and limit the number of octaves that a single controller can trigger. Since the lowest
octave of a program is often too low to be musically useful, the Forte SE will automatically
start triggering notes from longer shift patterns in higher octaves. This saves room in the
controller’s range of values for triggering more useful octaves. See the table below for Shift
Pattern step ranges and their corresponding starting octave.
11-22
Multi Edit Mode
CCTLS (CCs/Continuous Controllers) Page
If Shift Key is set to Last Note Played and no note is played, the default key is C. Each zone
can have a different Shift Key, so you can have zones preprogrammed with the keys you want
to use, or have them all in the same key, or just change the key in real time while you are
playing.
Default Octave Shifting
Total # of Shift Pattern Steps
1-12
13-24
25-36
37-48
Starting Octave
C0-C1
C1-C2
C2-C3
C3-C4
Selecting The Desired Octave Range:
You adjust the starting octave manually, using the Add parameter on the corresponding
controller’s setup page. In the Add field, the addition or subtraction of the number of steps
in your current shift pattern will raise or lower the starting octave in relationship to the
default starting octave. For example, in a shift pattern with 3 steps, an Add value of 9 would
cause a controller value of 0 to make Shift Key Number trigger notes in octave C3-C-4, 3
octaves above the default C0-C1. Add values that are not multiples of the number of current
shift pattern steps will change which step the pattern begins on at controller value 0, thus
offsetting the relationship between all of the controller’s values and current shift pattern’s
steps.
Adjusting Controller Range:
When using Shift Key Number, the number of steps in the Shift Pattern also affects the
range of values that will cause a controller to trigger a shift pattern step, and in turn affect
the useful range of the physical controller. With a shift pattern of 12 notes, the 128 different
notes that the Forte SE can trigger are evenly spaced over the range of the controller. Patterns
with less than 12 steps will trigger notes in every octave over a shorter range of the controller.
For example, in a shift pattern with 3 steps, by default the controller values 0 to 2 will
trigger notes starting in the lowest possible octave, and controller values 27 to 30 will trigger
notes in the highest possible full octave. Using a slider for this controller, only about 1/4th
of the length of the slider would be triggering notes. This decreased useful range makes the
controller harder to use accurately. To remedy this, you can adjust a controllers behavior by
using the Scale parameter on the corresponding controller’s setup page (see Scale below.)
Adjust the Scale value to stretch the useful values of the controller across it’s whole physical
range. A scale value of less than 100% will be helpful for patterns with fewer than 12 steps.
Experiment by adjusting the scale value until the highest desired note is triggered at the
top of the controller’s physical range. See Scale on page 11-15 for more details on the Scale
parameter. For shift patterns with more than 12 steps, you will run out of controller values
before your shift pattern triggers in every octave. If you want to be able to access all of the
available octaves, you can achieve this by setting multiple controllers to Shift Key Number.
Next, use the Scale and Add parameters for each controller, adjusting each to trigger the
desired range of octaves (see Add on page 11-15)
11-23
Multi Edit Mode
SWITCH (Switches) Page
SWITCH (Switches) Page
Press the Switch soft button to view pages where you can set parameters for each of the Forte
SE switch controllers.
Parameter
Range Of Values
Switch
See Switch Controllers List
Type
Momentary, Toggled
Mode
Off, MIDI CC, Chord
Dest (Destnation)
See Multi Destination Control List
OnValue
None, 0 to 127
OffValue
None, 0 to 127
Entry State
None, Off, On
Exit State
None, Off, On
You can select any of the Forte SE’s switch controllers by moving the cursor to the “Switch”
parameter, and using either the Alpha Wheel or Value buttons to scroll through the list.
Alternatively, you can also position the cursor in the “Switch” parameter, hold down the
Enter button and press the Switch you wish to edit.
Switch
The Switch parameter allows you to assign any of the Forte SE’s physical Switches (assignable
switches, switch pedals and certain buttons) to control a program specific parameter or MIDI
controller number for the currently selected zone.
First, use the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons to the right of the display to select the desired
Zone that you wish to assign a switch for. Next, on the Multi Switches page, use the
navigation buttons to select the “Switch” field, hold the Enter button and then push the
Forte SE switch you want to assign. This will select that switch and display its available
parameters. (You can also scroll through the list of switches by using the Alpha Wheel or the
Value buttons to scroll through the list).
If a pedal is selected which has a pedal override enabled in Global mode, a message “(Global
Override)” will display when that pedal is viewed to remind you that the Global mode pedal
override settings are being used instead of the Multi mode pedal settings.
11-24
Multi Edit Mode
SWITCH (Switches) Page
FORTE SE SWITCHES
Sw.Pedal1a
Sw.Pedal1b
Sw.Pedal2a
Sw.Pedal2b
Variation Button
ArpSwitch
Switches 1-9
Key 1-12
Mode
Switch Controllers have three modes: Off, MIDI CC, or Chord.
With a value of Off, the controller is disabled for this zone.
With a value of MIDI CC, the controller has the ability to transmit MIDI control messages.
Switch controls can also be set to Chord mode. In Chord mode, the switch can play a chord
containing up to 8 notes.
Velocity
The Velocity parameter only appears if the Mode is set to “Chord” and is for use with switch
controllers. Use the Velocity parameter to select a MIDI attack velocity (0-127) for the
note(s) designated in the Key1 to Key8 field(s). Alternatively, set the Velocity field to Auto
and the note’s velocity will be the velocity set by the KeyVel Multi Destination (see KeyVel
on page 11-17).
Key1.....Key8
The Key1, Key2, Key3, Key4, Key5, Key6, Key7, Key8 parameters are available when the
Mode is set to “Chord” . Use the Key(1 to 8) parameters to select the note to be played. The
note is displayed by MIDI note name.
To select a note, select the KeyNum field with the navigation buttons, hold the Enter button
on the alphanumeric pad, then play the desired note on the keyboard. You can also change
the note in the field by using the Alpha Wheel or Previous-/Next+ buttons.
Key
When the Switch parameter is set to a Key (Key1-Key12) and Mode is set to something
other than “Off”, the Key parameter appears. Use the Key parameter to select which of the
Forte SE’s Keys you wish to use as a switch controller. With the Key parameter selected, you
can set a key by holding the Enter button and striking the desired key.
Do
When the Switch parameter is set to a Key (Key1-Key12) and Mode is set to something
other than “Off,” the Do parameter appears. The Do parameter determines whether the key
will play a note and perform a switch function, or whether the key will only perform a switch
function. Set the Do parameter to “Both” to play a note and perform a switch function, or
set it to “OnlySw” to only perform a switch function.
11-25
Multi Edit Mode
SWITCH (Switches) Page
Dest (Destination)
Use the Destination parameter to assign Forte SE switches to control Program parameters
or send MIDI continuous controller messages (CCs) to external MIDI gear. If a controller
number (MIDI CC number) is assigned to a parameter in the Program of the current Zone,
the parameter name will be listed in the Destination list to the right of the CC number.
Some CC numbers also show a default MIDI name if the CC number is not assigned in the
Zone’s program. For example, CC 6 is generally unassigned in programs, in which case CC 6
will show the standard MIDI name “data.”
The Destination parameter determines the MIDI controller number that a physical controller
will send to the Program in the currently selected Zone. By default, these messages are also
sent to the MIDI Out and USB ports on the Channel of that Zone.
The list of controller numbers below (see page 11-17) shows the default assignments for each
destination. Programs respond to some of these for standard MIDI functions. Standard
MIDI CC’s range from 0-127 and can be received by the Forte SE from external devices,
while destinations 128-146 are internal to the Forte SE only.
Type
The Type parameter determines the switching behavior of Switch pedals and buttons. This is
a Common parameter that affects all Zones.
Momentary
A momentary switch is one that is only in the “on” state when it is pressed.
As soon as you release the switch, it goes into the “off” state.
Toggled
A toggled switch is one that maintains its state after it is pressed. So, if the
switch is currently in the “off” state, pressing it once will put it in the “on”
state. Pressing it again will put it back in the “off” state.
On Value
The On Value is the MIDI value sent when a switch controller is set to On. You can set this
parameter to any number between 0 and 127, or to None.
Off Value
The Off Value is the MIDI value sent when a switch controller is set to Off. You can set this
parameter to any number between 0 and 127, or to None.
Entry State
The Entry State parameter determines the state of the Foot Switch or button that is sent as a
MIDI message when the current Multi is loaded. You can set this parameter to None, On, or
Off. This parameter is common to all Zones.
11-26
Multi Edit Mode
COMMON Page
None can be entered with the alphanumeric function of the Category buttons as -1.
If Sound Select is set to None, then when you load the current Multi, no value will be
transmitted. If you specify an Entry State, then a MIDI controller message with this value
will be sent when you load the current Multi.
Exit State
The Exit State parameter determines the state of the Foot Switch or button that is sent as a
MIDI message when the current Multi is exited. You can set this parameter to None, On, or
Off. This parameter is common to all Zones.
None is entered with the alphanumeric function of the Sound Select buttons as -1.
If Exit State is set to None, then when you leave the current Multi by selecting another Multi
or Program, the Foot Switch or button will remain at whatever value corresponds to its
current position. If you specify an Exit State, then a MIDI controller message with this value
will be sent when you select a different Multi or Program.
COMMON Page
The COMMON page contains parameters that affect every zone in the current Multi. Press
the COMMON soft button to enter the COMMON page.
Parameter
Range Of Values
Default Value
Tempo
20 to 400 BPM
120
Clock Source
Internal, External
Aux FX Chan
1 to 16
1
KB3 Channel
1 to 16
1
Internal
Tempo
When Clock Source (see page 12-4) is set to Internal, the Tempo parameter sets the Forte
SE’s system tempo for this Multi. The Tempo parameter values are in units of BPM (beats
per minute). This controls the tempo the Arpeggiators as well as of any tempo based effects.
11-27
Multi Edit Mode
ARP1 and ARP2 (Arpeggiator 1 & 2) Pages
Clock Source
With the Clock Source parameter, you can set the Forte SE—within the current Multi—to
generate its own tempo by setting Clock Source to Internal, or you can set the Forte SE to
sync up with the tempo from another device—assuming the device is sending MIDI clock
data to the Forte SE via MIDI or USB—by setting Clock Source to External. When Clock
Source is set to External, the Tempo parameter disappears from the display.
Aux FX Chan
The Aux FX Channel determines the FX channel through which the aux sends of all of the
zones in the current Multi are sent.
For example, if a zone 2 in a Multi has a program with 25 Basic Delay 1/8 as an Aux FX, and
zone 2 is assigned to channel 5, then setting the Aux FX Channel to 5 sends the programs of
all of the zones in the Multi through zone 2’s Program’s Aux FX (i.e., through 25 Basic Delay
1/8).
KB3 Channel
If KB3 Programs are selected for more than one Zone, this parameter specifies which MIDI
Channel has priority to load a KB3 Program. Only one KB3 Program can be loaded at a
time. You can set this parameter to a value between 1 and 16. If you want a KB3 Program to
play in a zone, you should set the KB3 channel to the channel of the Zone.
ARP1 and ARP2 (Arpeggiator 1 & 2) Pages
The Arpeggiator in Multi Mode is very similar to the Program Mode arpeggiator. See page
<?> in the Program Edit Mode Chapter for a full description of each arpeggiator parameter.
In Multi Mode, the Arpeggiator works the same as in Program Mode, except there is one
arpeggiator per Zone. The Arpeggiator in each Zone can each have different settings, and
they can be played at the same time. Also, in Multi Mode the Arpeggiator 1 page does not
have the Tempo parameter, instead the Tempo parameter on the Multi Common page should
be used.
For Most Factory Multis and Multis made by using the Split/Layer functions, the Arp On/
Off button is only assigned to control the Arpeggiator in Zone 1. To assign the Arp On/Off
button (or a different assignable switch) to control the Arpeggiator in other Zones, follow
these steps:
1. Go to the Multi Switches page and select ArpSwitch for the Switch parameter (or select a
different assignable switch if desired).
2. Use the Channel/Layer/Zone buttons to select the desired Zone.
3. Set the Mode parameter to MIDI CC.
4. Set the Type parameter to Toggled.
11-28
Multi Edit Mode
FX Page
5. Set the Dest parameter to 147 Arp. You can select this Dest setting by selecting the Dest
parameter and typing in 147 followed by the Enter button.
6. Set the On Value parameter to 127, and the Off Value parameter to 0.
7. Lastly, set the Entry State parameter to On if you want the switch to be on by default
when the Multi is selected.
FX Page
The Forte SE contains Kurzweil’s acclaimed effects processor, and when combined with Multi
Mode it puts the power of an entire studio of audio effects at your fingertips. This section
contains everything you’ll need to know in order to use the Forte SE’s effects in Multi Mode.
Press the FX soft button to enter the FX page.
Parameter
Range Of Values
Allocate FX
Y, N, (Y)
Program Insert
Effects Chain List (Appendix F)
Default Value
Y
No
Allocate FX per channel
Use the Allocate parameter to enable or disable the Insert effects Chain of the Program in
each MIDI channel. (The MIDI channel for each Zone can be set on the Zone Main page.)
Each MIDI channel can be set to Y to enable Insert effects, or to N to disable Insert effects.
Use the Alpha Wheel or Value buttons to change between Y and N. Some MIDI channels set
to Y may be displayed as (Y). This means that there are not enough effects resources available
for that channel, and that channel’s Insert effects are not loaded. If you want to use the Insert
effects Chain for a channel displayed as (Y), try setting other channels to N.
Program Insert
When each channel is selected, the Prog Insert field shows the name of the Insert Effects
Chain used by the selected channel. The Chain can be enabled or disabled using the “Allocate
FX per channel” section of the page. To edit or select a different Insert Effects Chain, the
Program must be edited in Program Edit mode.
11-29
Multi Edit Mode
AUXFX 1, AUXFX 2
AUXFX 1, AUXFX 2
Parameter
Range Of Values
Default Value
Override
Yes, No
Chain
See Effects Chains, Appendix F
No
Send Levels
[p], 0-100%
[p]
Pre/Post
[p], pst, pre
[p]
0 None
The AUXFX1 (Auxiliary Effects 1) & AUXFX2 (Auxiliary Effects 2) pages determine the
behavior of the current Multi’s Auxiliary Effects. Each Multi can use up to two Aux Effects
Chains, and the program in each MIDI channel can send its audio to be processed by one
or both of the Chains. Send level and pre/post insert effects settings can be adjusted for the
program in each MIDI channel. By default, the Aux 1 and Aux 2 Chains are determined by
the program in the Aux FX Channel (set on the Multi Common page with the AuxFXChan
parameter). If you don’t want to use the Aux Chains from the program in the Aux FX
Channel, you can use the Override parameter to select a different Chain for one or both Aux
effects.
AUX1 Override, AUX2 Override
Normally, the Aux Effects Chains are specified by the program on the specified Aux Effects
channel. When Override is set to Yes, the Chain parameter appears, allowing you to choose a
different Aux effect Chain.
Set Override to Yes to select an override Aux Chain on this page. Set Override to No to use
the Aux FX chain of the specified Aux FX Channel.
11-30
Multi Edit Mode
About Auxiliary Effects
Chain
When AUX1 Override or AUX2 Override is set to Yes, the Chain parameter appears. The
Chain parameter allows you to set select an override Aux Chain for the corresponding
Aux Effect. The Aux Override Chain is used instead of the chain of the specified Aux FX
Channel. (See Appendix for a full list of available Effect Chains.)
Send Levels and Pre/post Ins.
On the bottom half of the page, there are two parameters for each of the 16 MIDI channels:
Send Level (top row) and Pre-/Post-Insert (bottom row).
The setting for each Send Level parameter determines if each channel’s Aux Send Level is
overridden, and if so, by what value (value is in dry/wet percent, 0=fully dry, 100=fully
wet). A value of [p] means “no override” (i.e., use the dB or percent values specified in the
program). A value of [p] can be set by entering -1 and then pressing the Enter button, or by
using the Alpha wheel or -/+ buttons to scroll below 0.
Note: In most factory ROM programs, the send level for Aux 1 is controlled by an Aux
mod set to MIDI28 (slider I). If a send level override is set, it will be scaled by the current
value of slider I.
The setting for each Pre-/Post-Insert parameter determines if the Aux routing for each
channel is overridden, and if so, by what routing. Pre means that the Aux Send takes place
before any Insert Effect is applied, whereas a setting of Pst means that the Aux Send takes
place post-Insert Effect. (Of course, if the program on the channel has no Insert Effects
loaded, then this parameter will make no difference.) A value of [p] means “no override” (i.e.,
use the values specified in the program).
About Auxiliary Effects
Programs and Multis both have an auxiliary effect send. An auxiliary effect is an effect that is
not in the direct path of the sound, but rather, it “receives” and processes the sound applying
the effect, which is mixed back with the original sound. The following diagram illustrates
the signal path of a sound through the auxiliary effect: On the Forte SE, the auxiliary effects
are global to all channels and Zones, Programs and Multi’s. One effect chain can be loaded
into each of Aux1 and Aux2, and these are used for any Program or Multi that has active Aux
Sends.
11-31
Multi Edit Mode
The Utility Soft Buttons, HELP Soft Button and Favorites Buttons Functions
The AUX1 and AUX2 parameters (on the FX page) determines the level the auxiliary effect
will process the sound for that Zone.
The Utility Soft Buttons, HELP Soft Button and
Favorites Buttons Functions
Some of the soft buttons in Multi Edit Mode perform a function when pressed, as well as
some of the Favorites buttons. Soft buttons that perform a function are named with a mix of
lower case and capital letters. In addition to the Delete soft button, there are four additional
function soft buttons (NewZn, DupZn, ImpZn, and DelZn) described below which appear
when the Global Mode User Type parameter is set to Advanced.
New Zone (NewZn)
Press NewZn to create a new Zone, which will be the highest numbered Zone.
Duplicate Zone (DupZn)
Press DupZn to duplicate the currently selected Zone. A new zone with the same parameters
as the current zone will be created, and will be the highest numbered Zone.
Import Zone (ImpZn)
You can import, or “bring in,” any Zone from any Multi in memory. Press ImpZn to view
the Import Zone page, choose a Multi and Zone to import from, then press the Import soft
button. The Zone you selected will be added to the current Multi, and will be the highest
numbered Zone.
Delete Zone (DelZn)
Press DelZn to delete the currently selected Zone.
11-32
Multi Edit Mode
Save User Multis
Delete
Press the Delete soft button to delete the current Multi (factory Multis can not be deleted).
Press Delete, and you will be given a choice to Delete or Cancel. Press Delete again, and an
“Are You Sure?” message will appear. Press Yes to delete the Multi, or Cancel to cancel.
HELP
Press the HELP soft button to view the Help page, where you can view a description of
functions assigned to the Favorites buttons.
Favorites 1: Help
Press the Favorites 1 button to view the HELP page.
Favorites 2: Set Mute Switches
Press the Favorites 2 button to automatically set the Assignable switches to mute and enable
each Zone. For example, in a Multi with 5 Zones, this will set Assignable switches 1-5 to
mute and enable Zones 1-5, respectively.
Favorites 3: Set Program Switches
Press the Favorites 3 button to automatically set the Assignable switches for each Zone to the
assignments they had in Program Mode. This is an easy way to disable the default Zone Mute
settings of the Assignable switches, and enable switch assignments for FX control.
Save User Multis
For details on saving user Multis, see Save User Multis on page 10-12 of the Multi Mode
chapter.
11-33
Global Mode
About Global Mode
Chapter 12
Global Mode
About Global Mode
Global Mode gives you access to the global parameters of the Forte SE. It allows you to edit
the master settings of the unit. It also allows you to restore factory defaults on the unit by
performing a Reset.
CAUTION: Performing a Reset will erase ALL User Programs, User Multis
and reset Global settings to a factory state.
To enter Global Mode from another Mode, press the Global Mode button.
Current Page
Current Parameter
Soft button options for Global mode
While you are in Global Mode, the Global button’s indicator LED is lit.
When you enter Global Mode, the last selected parameter since power-up (or the Tune
parameter if you’re entering Global Mode for the first time since power-up) will be the
currently selected parameter.
12-1
Global Mode
MAIN Page
Selecting and Editing Parameters
Use the soft buttons underneath the display to select the page you need. To scroll through
the parameters of Global Mode, use the Navigation buttons.
To edit the currently selected parameter, use the Alpha Wheel or the Previous- and Next+
buttons. Some parameters can be reset to a default value by pressing the Previous-/Next+
buttons simultaneously (Value Jump).
MAIN Page
The MAIN page in Global Mode allows you to adjust global tuning and other basic settings.
Be sure to read about the User Type parameter, which enables additional features in all modes
when set to Advanced.
Parameter
Range of Values
Tune
-100 to 100 Cents (Ct)
Default Value
Transpose
-128 to 127 Semitones (ST)
User Type
Regular, Advanced
FX Mode
Performance, Multitrack
Auto Power Off
On, Off
Power Off Time
15 & 30 mins, 1 hr, 2 hr, 4 hr, 8hr
Out Clock
Off, On
Clock Source
Internal, External
Audio Input
Off, -86dB to 10dB
0dB
Multi Controllers
Instant, Pass Entry
Instant
0ct
0ST
Regular
Performance
On
4 hours
Off
Internal
Tune
The Tuning parameter allows you to fine-tune the unit in cents—one cent is one hundredth
of a semitone (100 cents comprise a semitone). You can select any tuning from -100 cents to
100 cents. By default this parameter is set to 0.
12-2
Global Mode
MAIN Page
Transpose
The Transpose parameter allows you to tune the pitch of the unit in semitones. The value set
here is independent from the value set with the front panel Transpose buttons, and the two
values are cumulative.
User Type
The User Type parameter allows you to show or hide advanced features of the Forte SE. By
default, User Type is set to Regular. Setting User Type to Regular hides advanced features
and makes some modes easier to navigate. Setting User Type to Advanced gives you access to
additional features.
See the chapter for each mode for details on Advanced features in each mode. Setting User
Type to Advanced enables the following features:
• Global Mode: Access the ProgTempo and Sound Sel parameters.
• Program and Multi mode: Access 16 Banks of Favorite Programs and Multis using
the Channel/Layer/Zone Up/Down buttons.
• Program Edit mode: Access all VAST editor pages.
• Multi Edit mode: Access 8 Zones.
FX Mode
The FX Mode parameter determines how the Forte SE responds to interrupts with regards to
effects. You can set this parameter to either Performance or Multitrack.
With FX Mode set to Performance, the Forte SE minimizes disruption of existing effects
when changing Programs, and entry values will not disrupt sustained notes when changing
Programs in Program Mode. When controlling the Forte SE from an external sequencer in
Program Mode, setting FX Mode to Multitrack will minimize effect disruption.
12-3
Global Mode
MAIN Page
Auto Power Off
The auto power off parameter turns the power saving feature on. When the Auto Power Off
parameter is set to On, the Forte SE will automatically power off after the Power Off Time
has expired, from the last key press (physical or MIDI), button press, controller movement,
or USB MIDI activity.
Power Off Time
If the Auto Power Off parameter is set to On, then the Forte SE will power off after the
time selected by the Power Off Time parameter has elapsed. The Forte SE will display the
following warnings before powering off. Press a key or move any Forte SE control to dismiss
the warning message. After dismissing this message, the Forte SE will wait the selected
amount of time before showing this warning again.
Out Clock
To send a MIDI clock pulse to the MIDI Out port, set this parameter to On. Otherwise, set
it to Off.
Clock Source
With the Clock Source parameter set to Internal, Forte SE plays using its own Tempo. If you
wish to sync the Forte SE to the tempo of an external device, use the External setting.
ProgTempo
The ProgTempo parameter is shown when the User Type parameter is set to Advanced.
The ProgTempo parameter determines whether each program in Program Mode will use
its own tempo, or if each program will use the Global Mode System Tempo. A setting of
“Program” will use the tempo from each program, and a setting of “System” will use the
Global Mode System Tempo. When the User Type parameter is set to “Regular”, program
tempo will be used.
12-4
Global Mode
MAIN Page
In Program Mode, tempo controls the rate of each Program’s arpeggiator, as well as the
rate of any tempo based Insert or Aux effects that each program may use. In Multi Mode,
program tempos are ignored and the Multi Common Tempo of each Multi is used for all
programs in a Multi.
For details on setting a tempo for each program, see the Tempo parameter on the Prog
Arpeggiator page in the Program Edit Mode chapter. When the Global Mode ProgTempo
parameter is set to “Program”, programs can still use the System tempo by setting Tempo to
“System” on the Program Edit Prog Arpeggiator page.
Audio Input
The Audio Input parameter controls the volume of devices plugged into the rear “Audio In”
jack. The default setting of 0dB should work well for most sources (such as MP3 players).
Adjust this parameter if the Audio Input signal is too quiet or too loud in comparison to the
sounds of the Forte SE.
Sound Sel
The Sound Sel parameter is shown when the User Type parameter is set to Advanced.
The Sound Sel parameter determines the behavior of the Program/Multi Sound Select
buttons when selecting Program or Multis. When Sound Sel is set to Category, the Program/
Multi Sound Select buttons select one of the 16 IDs in the currently selected category. When
Sound Sel is set to ID number, the Program/Multi Sound Select buttons behave as a numeric
pad, allowing you to select any Program or Multi (regardless of the currently selected
category) by typing the ID number and pressing the Enter button.
When the User Type parameter is set to “Regular”, category based sound selection will be
will be used.
Multi Controllers
When a multi is selected, this parameter determines how the sliders respond to movement.
When set to instant, moving a slider will result in the assigned parameter immediately
jumping to the slider position. With some parameters an abrupt change to the sound may
be undesirable. In this case set this parameter to PassEntry and the slider will only become
active when the slider is moved past the Multi Entry Value. This results in smooth changes to
the sound.
12-5
Global Mode
MAPS Page
MAPS Page
The MAPS page in Global Mode allows you to set up the feel and response of the Forte
SE keyboard to your playing style, the intonation key of music, as well as how pianos and
drums respond.
Parameter
Range of Values
Default Value
Velocity Map
Linear, Light1, Light2, Light3, Hard1, Hard2,
Hard3, PianoTouch, Easy Touch, GM Receive
Linear
Pressure Map
Easiest, Easier, Easy, Linear, Hard, Harder,
Hardest
Linear
Intonation Map
0 None, 1 Equal, 2 Just,3 Just/b7th, 4 Harmonic, 5 JustHarm, 6 Werkmeister, 7 1/5thComma,
8 1/4thComma, 9 IndianRaga, 10 Arabic, 11
BaliJava1, 12 BaliJava2, 13 BaliJava3, 14
Tibetan, 15 Carlos A, 16 Pyth/aug4, 17 Pyth/
dim5, 18 EastMed
Int. Key
C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B
DrumRemap
None, GM
1 Equal
C
None
Velocity Map
The Velocity Map parameter determines the way the Forte SE generates MIDI velocity
information. Different maps generate different MIDI velocity values for the same physical
key strike velocity.
The default map (Linear) provides the widest range of velocity expression, but you may want
to choose a different map if the default does not suit your playing style. You can select from
any of the following settings:
Light3
Light2
Light1
Linear
Hard1
Hard2
Hard3
PianoTouch
12-6
Makes it increasingly easier to produce high MIDI velocity values for the
same key strike velocity (with Light3 being the easiest). These maps
work best for those with a light touch.
The Forte default map. Linear, allows MIDI velocities to pass
unchanged. It follows a linear response.
Makes it increasingly harder to produce high MIDI velocity values for the
same key strike velocity (with Hard3 being the hardest). These maps
work best for those with a heavy touch.
Simulates the general velocity response of an acoustic piano, and is
best suited for playing acoustic piano programs.
Global Mode
MAPS Page
Easy Touch
GM Receive
Similar to the Light1/Light2/Light3 settings. Makes higher velocities
easier to play, but allows more sensitive control over playing high
velocities by not boosting the MIDI velocity for fast strike velocities as
much as it does for medium strike velocities.
Mimics the velocity response commonly used by keyboards that use the
General MIDI (GM) sound set. The GM Receive map makes medium
strike velocities produce higher MIDI velocities compared to the Linear
map.
Pressure Map
The Pressure Map parameter determines the way the Forte SE controls Pressure (Aftertouch).
Different maps generate different MIDI pressure values for the same physical key depending
on how hard you press and hold the key.
Easiest
Easier
Easy
Linear
Hard
Harder
Hardest
Makes it increasingly easier to produce high MIDI pressure values. (with
Easiest being the easiest).
The Forte default map. Linear, allows MIDI pressure (aftertouch) to pass
unchanged. It follows a linear response.
Makes it increasingly harder to produce high MIDI pressure values (with
Hardest requiring most pressure).
Intonation Map
Most modern western music uses what is known as equal temperament. This means that
the interval between each semitone of the 12 tone octave is precisely the same as every other
semitone.
However, many different intonation intervals have evolved over the centuries and across
cultures and instruments, so equal temperament will not sound appropriate for certain styles
of music. The Forte SE supplies you with 18 different factory intonation maps which are
useful for a range of different styles. Each of these maps defines different intervals between
each of the semitones in a single octave (used for all octaves) by setting pitch offsets for each
note in cents.
Like many instruments before the adaptation of equal temperament, most of these
intonation maps were designed to sound best in one specific key. Though some may have
historically been in a different key, all of the Forte SE’s factory intonation maps are set to root
note C by default. You can change the root key of the current intonation map by using the
Int.Key parameter (see the Intonation Key (Int.Key) section below).
12-7
Global Mode
MAPS Page
0 None
No intonation map is used, intonation is equal.
2 Just
Tunings are defined based on the ratios of the frequencies between
intervals. The original tuning of Classical European music.
1 Equal
3 Just/b7th
4 Harmonic
5 JustHarm
6 Werkmeister
7 1/5thComma
8 1/4thComma
9 IndianRaga
10 Arabic
11 BaliJava1
12 BaliJava2
13 BaliJava3
14 Tibetan
15 Carlos A
16 Pyth/aug4
17 Pyth/dim5
18 EastMed
No detuning of any intervals. The standard for modern western music.
Similar to Just, but with the Dominant 7th flatted an additional 15 cents.
The perfect 4th, Tritone, and Dominant 7th are heavily flatted.
Approximation of a historical intonation.
Named for its inventor, Andreas Werkmeister, it was developed to enable
transposition with less dissonance than classic equal temperament.
Approximation of a historical intonation based on the comma system.
Approximation of a historical intonation based on the comma system.
Based on the tunings for traditional Indian music.
Oriented toward the tunings of Mid-Eastern music.
Based on the pentatonic scale of Balinese and Javanese music.
A variation on BaliJava1, slightly more subtle overall.
A more extreme variation.
Based on the Chinese pentatonic scale.
Developed by Wendy Carlos, an innovator in microtonal tunings, this
intonation map flats each interval increasingly, resulting in an octave with
quarter-tone intervals.
This is a Pythagorean tuning, based on the Greek pentatonic scale. The
tritone is 12 cents sharp.
This is a Pythagorean tuning, based on the Greek pentatonic scale. The
tritone is 12 cents flat.
Eastern Mediteranean. The Major 3rd and Major 7th are flat by 50 cents.
Int. Key (Intonation Key)
This sets the tonic, or base note from which the currently selected intonation map calculates
its intervals. If you select G as the intonation key, for example, and the intonation map you
select tunes the minor 2nd down by 50 cents, then G# will be a quartertone flat relative to
equal intonation. If you change the intonation key to D, then D# will be a quartertone flat.
If you use nonstandard intonations, you’ll want to set Int.Key to the key you’re playing in.
If the Intonation parameter is set to Equal, changing Int.Key has no effect.
12-8
Global Mode
Controller Overrides (CNTRLS)
Drum Remap
This parameter will remap all Drum programs to conform to the General MIDI (GM)
drum map, a standard drum map used in many keyboards and synthesizers. The GM drum
map isn’t optimally intuitive in terms of playability, so by default the Forte SE uses a unique
keymap that is more intuitive and lends better to performance. However, the GM drum map
is so commonplace that many players feel more comfortable playing drum programs with
the GM drum map. Because of this, the Forte SE is designed such that you can remap drum
programs to the GM drum map.
When the Drum Remap is set to None, no remapping takes place in Program mode.
When the Drum Remap is set to GM, the Forte SE remaps Drum programs to the GM
drum map.
Controller Overrides (CNTRLS)
Select the CNTRLS soft button to enter this page.
Switch Pedal Overrides
The Switch Pedal Override parameters (SW1a-SW2b Override) allow the controller
assignments for the Switch Pedals to be changed for all Programs and Multis. (KB3 organ
programs have a separate override for the SW1a pedal, see the Rotary Override section below
for details). The alternative assignments available for the Switch Pedal Overrides include
the standard pedal controls of Sustain, Sostenuto and Soft as well as DataInc, DataDec,
FavoriteInc and FavoriteDec, which can be used to change Programs, Multis or Favorites
by using a pedal. The Arp On/Off and Arp Latch assignments allow for easy control of
arpeggiator functions.
Use the DataInc and DataDec assignments (data increment/decrement) to select the next or
previous ID when you depress the pedal. If you are in Program mode, DataInc and DataDec
will select the next or previous Program. If you are in Multi mode, DataInc and DataDec will
select the next or previous Multi.
Use the FavoriteInc and FavoriteDec assignments (Favorite increment/decrement) to
select the next or previous Favorite when you depress the pedal. If you are not playing any
Favorites, FavoriteInc and FavoriteDec will select the first Favorite, or the last Favorite that
was selected since turning on the Forte SE.
12-9
Global Mode
Controller Overrides (CNTRLS)
Use the Arp On/Off and Arp Latch assignments to easily control arpeggiator functions.
The Arp On/Off assignment allows you to toggle the arpeggiator on and off by pressing
a switch pedal. The Arp Latch assignment allows you to latch held notes to be played by
the arpeggiator by holding down a switch pedal. When using the Arp Latch assignment,
make sure the arpeggiator is turned on. Play the notes you wish to latch, press and hold the
assigned pedal, then release the notes. The notes will continue to arpeggiate until the pedal is
released.
In Multi Edit Mode, if a pedal is selected which has a pedal override enabled in Global
mode, a message “(Global Override)” will display when that pedal is viewed to remind you
that the Global mode pedal override settings are being used instead of the Multi mode pedal
settings.
In Multi Edit Mode, setting a Pedal Mode to “Off” will disable the override for that Pedal
in the selected Zone. It can be useful in Multi Mode to disable the Pedal Override for some
Zones. For example, you may want to use a Pedal Override to control Sustain in all Zones of
a Multi, but disable Sustain for one Zone.
When a Pedal Switch Override is used, the pedal will behave in Multi Mode as if the
OnValue and OffValue are set to 127 and 0 respectively (this will not be shown in Multi
Edit Mode). When a Pedal Switch Override is set to Sustain, Sostenuto or Soft, the pedal
will behave in Multi Mode as if Pedal Type is set to Momentary (this will not be shown in
Multi Edit Mode). When set to DataInc, DataDec, FavoriteInc or FavoriteDec the pedal will
behave in Multi Mode as if Pedal Type is set to Toggle (this will not be shown in Multi Edit
Mode).
CC Pedal Override (CC1 Override)
In a similar manner to Switch Pedal Overrides, the CC1 Override parameter allows the
Continuous Control Pedal assignment to be changed for all Programs and Multis. The
alternative assignments available for the CC Pedal Override include Mod Wheel (MIDI CC
1), Foot/Wah (MIDI CC 4), Volume (MIDI CC7), Expression (MIDI CC11) and Pressure.
In Multi Edit Mode, if a pedal is selected which has a pedal override enabled in Global
mode, a message “(Global Override)” will display when that pedal is viewed to remind you
that the Global mode pedal override settings are being used instead of the Multi mode pedal
settings.
Rotary Override
By default KB3 organ programs have the Slow/Fast speed control for the Rotary speaker
effect assigned to the Variation Button and the Sustain Pedal (SW1a). The Rotary Override
parameter allows you set the sustain pedal to function as sustain for all KB3 Programs,
instead of Rotary Slow/Fast. The Variation button will always control the Rotary speed,
regardless of this parameter’s setting.
12-10
Global Mode
MIDI Page
MIDI Page
The Forte SE can transmit and receive MIDI via its MIDI ports and USB. The MIDI page in
Global Mode allows you to configure how this will be handled.
Parameter
Range of Values
Default Value
Destination
NONE, LOCAL, MIDI, MIDI+LOCAL, USB, USB+LOCAL, USB+MIDI, USB+MIDI+LOCAL
USB+MIDI+LOCAL
ChangeMultis
Immediate, AllKeysUp
Immediate
Bank Select
Ctl 0, Ctl 32, Ctl 0/32
Ctl 0/32
PrgChangeMode
Extended, K2600
Extended
LocalKbdChan
None, 1 to 16
None
SysExID
0 to 127
0
Dest (Destination)
The Destination parameter determines the destination of MIDI data generated by striking
keys or activating controllers. This data can be sent to the Forte SE sound engine, through
the MIDI out ports, or both. You can set this parameter to NONE (aka Local Off), or any
combination of the three available destinations.
Note that this parameter is always active and works in conjunction with the Multi Mode
Destination parameter (see Destination on page 11-7). These parameters act like filters, so if
the Multi Mode Destination parameter is set to USB+MIDI+LOCAL and the Global Mode
parameter is set to LOCAL, the MIDI data will only be transmitted locally.
NONE
LOCAL
MIDI
MIDI+LOCAL
USB
USB+LOCAL
USB+MIDI
USB+MIDI+LOCAL
No MIDI data transmission from the Forte. The Forte can still receive incoming
MIDI data.
MIDI data is sent only to the Forte sound engine. MIDI Out is disabled.
MIDI data is sent only through MIDI Out. The sounds of the Forte are disabled
MIDI data is sent both to the Forte sound engine and through the MIDI Out.
MIDI data is sent only through the USB port. The sounds of the Forte are
disabled
MIDI data is sent both to the Forte sound engine and through the USB port.
MIDI data is sent both to the MIDI OUT and USB port.
MIDI data is sent to the MIDI OUT, USB port. and to the Forte sound engine.
12-11
Global Mode
MIDI Page
If you want to play the Forte SE, but not send any MIDI information to other MIDI
instruments, then select LOCAL.
If you want to use the Forte SE strictly as a MIDI controller for the other modules in your
MIDI chain using the MIDI port, then select MIDI.
If you want to make use of the Forte SE’s sounds as well as use it as a MIDI controller (MIDI
port), then select MIDI+LOCAL.
If you want to use the Forte SE strictly as a MIDI controller for the other modules in your
MIDI chain using the USB (Computer) port, then select USB.
If you want to use the Forte SE strictly as a MIDI controller for the other modules in your
MIDI chain using the MIDI port and the USB (Computer) port , then select USB+MIDI.
If you want make use of the Forte SE‘s sounds and use it as a MIDI controller for the other
modules in your MIDI chain using the MIDI port and the USB (Computer) port , then
select USB+MIDI+LOCAL.
CAUTION: It is possible to stop all MIDI transmission, in Multi Mode, if
the Destination parameter is set to LOCAL, and the other is set to MIDI or
USB.
Chng Multi (Change Multis)
The Change Multis parameter determines the exact timing of Multi changes when you
select a different Multi, either by a normal data entry method or via MIDI program change
commands.
Choose AllKeysUp to indicate that you want Multi changes to take place only when you’ve
released all currently held notes.
Choose Immediate to indicate that you want such changes to happen immediately when you
select the Multi.
Bank Sel (Bank Select)
The Bank Mode parameter determines the controller number with which MIDI Bank change
messages are received.
For MIDI Bank change messages, various manufacturers have chosen different MIDI
controller numbers. Most have chosen Ctl 0, Ctl 32, or both. You can set this parameter to
any of the following three controller IDs:
12-12
Global Mode
MIDI Page
Ctl 0
MIDI Bank change messages are sent with controller number 0.
Ctl 32
MIDI Bank change messages are sent with controller number 32.
Ctl 0 / 32
MIDI Bank change messages are sent with both controller numbers 0 and 32.
PrgChgMod (Program Change Mode)
The Program Change Mode parameter determines the format of program change messages
received by the Forte SE.
Program Change Type
Extended
K2600
For Use With
Bank changes and Program changes. A bank has 128 IDs. Note
that our system will recognize 16 banks, from 0 to 15. (2048 IDs).
This is for connecting a generic MIDI device as a controller
device..
Bank changes and Program changes. A bank has 100 IDs. Our
system will recognize in this case 21 banks, from 0 to 20. For
example, with MIDI out from a K2600 into the MIDI in of the Forte
SE, if you scroll or enter a number in the K2600, you will see the
same numbers in the K2600 and in the Forte if the programs exist.
LocKbdChan (Local Keyboard Channel)
Changing the setting of the Local Keyboard Channel parameter is useful only when the Forte
SE is receiving MIDI information from an external source. Perhaps you have a favorite MIDI
keyboard that you use to control all the gear in your studio, or you use a lot of outboard
sequencing. If you’re using the Forte SE as a standalone music workstation or performance
keyboard, you can ignore this parameter and leave it set to None.
The local keyboard channel enables the Forte SE to receive MIDI information on a single
channel, then rechannelize that information so you can play and control all Zones of a Multi,
even if your MIDI source transmits on only one channel.
Program Mode
When you’re in Program Mode, the local keyboard channel remaps incoming information
to the Forte SE’s current channel. When using the local keyboard channel, all the MIDI
information received on the Local Keyboard Channel gets sent, after being remapped to the
Forte SE’s MIDI Out and USB ports.
You may find it more convenient to use the local keyboard channel. In this case, the Forte SE
remaps incoming MIDI to the Forte SE’s current channel, so in Program Mode, you’ll always
play the Program on the Forte SE’s current channel. Incoming MIDI also gets sent to the
Forte SE’s MIDI Out and USB port. When this parameter is set, you will need to transmit
on the local keyboard channel from your DAW or controller keyboard for the Forte SE to
respond correctly.
12-13
Global Mode
TOOLS Page
Multi Mode
Things are a bit different for playing Multis. In this case, you must use the LocalKbdChan to
be able to play and control all of the Multis Zones. Set LocalKbdChan to match the channel
your external MIDI source is using (for example: your MIDI source transmits on Channel
1, set LocalKbdChan to 1). All MIDI information that the Forte SE receives on the local
keyboard channel gets remapped to the channels and control destinations used by the Zones
in the Multi.
The Forte SE also remaps certain MIDI Controller messages that it receives on the Local
Keyboard Channel so that they correspond (in most cases) to the default assignments for the
Forte SE’s physical controllers (Mod Wheel, sliders, etc.). Physical controller assignments are
handled by Multis and are defined per Zone in Multi Edit Mode. Each Zone of a Multi has
its own controller assignments.
Sysex ID
The SysEx ID parameter determines the ID number for the unit if you are using more than
one device with the same MIDI manufacturer ID number. You can set this parameter to any
number from 0 to 127.
Unless you have multiple Forte SE keyboards receiving Sysex messages from a single source,
you will not need to change the Sysex ID from the default setting of 0.
If you do have multiple Forte SEs receiving Sysex messages from a single source, make sure
each Forte SE has a different Sysex ID. This will allow you to direct Sysex messages to the
appropriate Forte SE by specifying which unit with the Sysex ID byte that’s included with
every Sysex message.
To have the unit respond to Sysex messages regardless of the Sysex ID, set Sysex ID to 127.
TOOLS Page
Pressing the TOOLS soft button calls up a page that gives you access to four analytic and
diagnostic tools.
Press the “EXIT” button when finished using a Tool.
12-14
Global Mode
TOOLS Page
MIDI MON
Press the MIDIMON soft button to view MIDI messages sent from the Forte SE. This is
useful for making sure controls are assigned as you want them, checking note numbers and
velocities, and checking controller values or other MIDI messages. The most recently sent
message will be at the bottom of the list.
VOICES
Pressing the Voices soft button calls up the Voice Status page, which shows the Forte SE’s
active voice channels as you play. The Voice Status pages displays each active voice as a solid
rectangular block—for mono voices—or displays stereo pairs of voices as a > for the left
channel voice and a < for the right channel voice. Whatever symbol the page displays, when
the key of a voice is released, that voice’s symbol on the Voices Status page turns into a dot
during the release portion of that voice’s envelope. When the voice decays to silence, it is no
longer active, and the dot disappears.
The Voice Status pages displays each active voice as an “M” for mono voices or displays
stereo pairs of voices as an “S”. Whatever symbol the page displays, when the key of a voice
is released, that voice’s symbol on the Voices Status page turns into a “D” during the release
portion of that voice’s envelope. When the voice decays to silence, it is no longer active, and
the “D” disappears.
The Voices utility works a bit differently for KB3 programs. The Forte SE uses one mono
voice of polyphony for every two tone wheels in a KB3 program. When a KB3 program
is loaded in any of the Forte SE’s 16 MIDI channels (In Program or Multi Mode), a solid
rectangular block will be shown for every two tone wheels in the KB3 program, even if you’re
not playing any notes. KB3 voices are always on, and these voices remain dedicated to the
KB3 program as long as it is loaded. KB3 voices can not be stolen by VAST programs. Any
voices not dedicated to a KB3 program behave normally.
KB3 Programs that simulate Hammond™ organs do not use any of the Forte SE’s 128 voices
of polyphony (this does not apply to KB3 Programs that emulate Vox™ or Farfisa™ organs).
Only one KB3 Program can be active on the Forte SE’s 16 MIDI channels at any time. The
bottom of the voices page indicates which of the Forte SE’s 16 MIDI channels (if any) has an
active KB3 program.
12-15
Global Mode
TOOLS Page
TEMPO
Press the TEMPO soft button to go to the TEMPO page (see below). When the Clock
Source parameter is set to Internal (see Clock Source on page 12-4), the Tempo parameter
sets the Forte SE’s System Tempo. The Tempo parameter values are in units of BPM (beats
per minute).
Note: You can also call up the TEMPO page from any other page by pressing the left and
right navigation buttons simultaneously.
In Program Mode, System Tempo can control the rate of each Program’s arpeggiator, as
well as the rate of any tempo synced Insert or Aux effects that each program may use.
Most programs will default to using the System Tempo, though some programs may be
programmed use their own tempo (for details see Tempo on page 7-58) All programs can be
set to use the System Tempo by setting the Global Mode User Type parameter to Advanced,
then setting the Global Mode ProgTempo parameter to “System”. For details see User Type
on page 12-3 and ProgTempo on page 12-4.
In Multi Mode, System Tempo is is ignored and the Multi Common Tempo of each Multi is
used for all programs in a Multi.
Set the Tempo parameter with the Previous-/Next+ buttons, the Alpha Wheel, or
alphanumeric entry. You can also set the system tempo by tapping the Tap soft button at the
desired speed. You need to tap at least twice for a tempo to be calculated, though tapping
several times (like on each beat of one or more measures) works best. The newly tapped
tempo is displayed in the tempo field.
Alternatively, a temporary controller can be set for use in the Temporary TAP controller field,
instead of using the Tap soft button. The Temporary TAP controller field lists groups of Forte
SE controllers in order of their usefulness for tapping. Listed first are the foot switches and
switch buttons. After these is Note On, which lets you tap the tempo with any keyboard
key. Last are the MIDI controller numbers, which includes all of the continuous controllers,
though continuous controllers (such as a slider) are not easy or recommended for tapping
the tempo. The Temporary TAP controller works only while on the TEMPO page and will
remain selected when accessing the TEMPO page from other modes, but the selection will
return to OFF the next time the Forte SE is turned on.
12-16
Global Mode
DELETE Page
INFO
The INFO page contains the system information indicating what version of operating system
and objects is currently installed in your Forte SE keyboard.
Go to the Kurzweil website at http://www.kurzweil.com and make sure that you have the
latest operating system available.
STATE
This utility shows the internal state of the MIDI CCs and pitch bend in any channel at a
particular time.
Typical use: “My channel X does not make any sound”. Is it MIDI 7 (Volume), is it MIDI
11 (Expression) or is it something else? With STATE you can check the status for various
CCs per channel. Use the navigation buttons to select the Channel or MIDI CC fields, then
use the alpha wheel or previous/next buttons to select the desired Channel and MIDI CC to
view.
ABOUT
The ABOUT Page displays the Forte SE splash screen and automatically scrolls a list of
credits and acknowledgments.
DELETE Page
The DELETE page is useful in deleting unwanted user-created objects in your Forte SE.
12-17
Global Mode
RESET
Select the object that you wish to delete and press the delete soft button.
CAUTION: Be aware that deleting user objects will permanently remove
them from the Forte SE. If you wish to load the object back into the Forte
SE in the future, ensure that you save the object to a USB device (such
as a thumb drive) or computer/tablet before deleting them.
RESET
Press the Reset soft button to view the Global Reset page, where you can choose to reset the
Forte SE to its original factory settings. This restores all Global mode settings to their factory
defaults, and deletes all user Programs and Multis.
CAUTION: Be aware that performing a reset on the Forte will result in
changes that can not be reversed. Kurzweil recommends that you save
(STORE) any user objects that you wish to keep (such as user Programs
and Multis) before performing a reset on the Forte SE.
Press the RESET button to enter the reset process. You can CANCEL at any time if you are
unsure, or do not want to proceed.
All User objects (Programs, Multis, Chains, et cetera) will be permanently erased. This
cannot be undone. Make sure you have used the Store function to backup all of the user
objects that you wish to keep. All Global Mode parameters will be reset to default settings.
12-18
Global Mode
FILE (Storage page)
Press the “Yes” soft button on the Global Reset page to perform a Reset, and you will be
prompted to confirm.
Press “Yes” if you wish to proceed with the Reset.
Press “No” if you are unsure, or do not wish to proceed with the Reset.
FILE (Storage page)
Press the File soft button to view the Storage page, which lets you use a USB device (such as
a thumb drive) or a computer to load, store, back up, and copy files between the Forte SE
and the outside world.
The Storage page also allows you to organize files by creating directories (aka folders).
The rear panel connections used for storing and loading files are:
•
USB (Type A) Storage port
•
USB (Type B) Computer/Tablet port
Use this page to select the storage device you wish to use with the navigation arrows or the
Alpha wheel. When a device is selected, you can then chose to Load or Store. If a storage
device is not connected, Forte SE will prompt you with a message to do so.
When the temporary PC Virtual Drive is selected, there will be a prompt telling you that
the USB-MIDI connection will be disconnected. You must acknowledge this prompt to
continue.
12-19
Global Mode
FILE (Storage page)
When you leave Storage Mode or select the USB device, there will be a prompt telling you
that the Forte SE is turning back into a USB MIDI device. You must acknowledge this
prompt to continue. The Forte SE virtual drive will unmount from your computer.
NOTE : Depending on your computer’s operating system, you may see a device removal
warning on your desktop after using the Forte SE virtual drive. You may disregard such a
message without worries of damage to your Forte SE or computer.
The following features are used in storage mode when saving or loading files:
Directories
A directory lets you group files together as you might separate documents using folders in
a file cabinet. By default all storage devices have at least one “root” directory. To organize
files in a USB device; you can create additional directories, as well as subdirectories within
directories. Directories appear in the file list with the indicator <DIR> to the right of the
directory name.
Path
When you choose the STORE or LOAD soft buttons on the Storage mode main page, you
will have to choose exactly where in the storage device you wish to store to, or load from.
This location is called a directory. When you need to choose a directory, you will see the Path
field. The Path field shows the current directory on the current device.
When you choose a storage function for a connected device, Forte SE automatically chooses
the root (top-level) directory for the Path field. The root directory is displayed as a backslash:
Path:\
When viewing a page that has the Path field, if their are any directories available in the root
directory, you will be able to choose them from a list using the alpha wheel, navigation
buttons, or - /+ (Previous/Next) buttons. Then, press the Open soft button to open that
directory. The name of the directory will be displayed in the Path field. For example, if you
have a directory called SOUNDS that is located in the current device’s root directory, the
Path field will appear as:
Path:\SOUNDS\
The backslash character is a directory separator, as in the following Path:
Path: \BACKUP\COVERBAND\SONGS\
This represents the directory SONGS, which is a subdirectory of the COVERBAND
directory, which is a subdirectory of the BACKUP directory in the root directory. If the path
is too long to fit on the display, it gets abbreviated. The maximum length of a path in the
Forte SE is 64 characters (including the backslash characters).
12-20
Global Mode
STORE
Using the Open soft button causes you to navigate into directories and their subdirectories,
away from the root directory. To navigate out of subdirectories back towards the root
directory, use the Parent soft button to move one level back from the current directory
STORE
Press the STORE soft button when you have a storage device plugged into a USB port.
If no USB connection is detected by the Forte SE, you will see the error message “Error: No
valid device inserted.”
Store All
Press the “All” soft button to store all user objects into a single file, or press Cancel to return
to the previous page. Pressing “All” calls up the Select Directory dialogue. The Forte SE
stores files using the file extension .FSE. After storing, the Forte SE will display a message
indicating if the store was successful or if a problem occurred.
Store Advanced
Press the “Advanced” soft button to go to the Storage Advanced page where you can select
one or multiple individual objects to store, instead of saving all user objects. The Storage
Advanced page shows a list of all user objects grouped by type. Use the cursor up/down
buttons to navigate through the list. The object that is currently highlighted can be selected
or deselected for storing by pressing the “Select” soft button. An asterisk (*) appears between
the ID and object type of selected objects.
After selecting objects to store, press the “Store” soft button to store the selected objects to
the current storage device, or press Cancel to return to the previous page. Pressing “Store”
calls up the Select Directory dialogue. The Forte SE stores files using the file extension .FSE.
After storing, the Forte SE will display a message indicating if the store was successful or if a
problem occurred.
12-21
Global Mode
STORE
The Select Directory Dialogue
When storing, the Forte SE will prompt you to select a directory in which to store.
There are three navigating soft buttons on the left side of the bottom of the page:
NewDir
Create new directory. Calls up the New Directory dialogue
(see the following section)
Open
Opens the highlighted directory
Parent
Moves you up one level in the directory hierarchy. If the
display is already at the root directory, this button has no
effect.
When you have chosen your directory, press the OK soft button to call up the File Name
dialogue (see the following section) and complete the storing process.
The File Name / New Directory Dialogue
When you create a new file in Storage mode, or create a new directory, the Forte SE prompts
you to enter the name. This File Name dialogue appears as shown below:
New file names will default to either FILENAME (after a powerup), or the name of the most
recent file stored or loaded. New directory names will default to either DIRNAME (after a
power up), or the name of the most recent directory created. You can edit the name using the
keypad, alpha wheel, Previous-/Next+ buttons, Left and Right navigation buttons, the Delete
and Insert soft buttons, and the << and >> soft buttons.
Press the OK soft button to finish the operation.
12-22
Global Mode
STORE
LOAD
The LOAD button calls up the LOAD page where you can load compatible files from a
storage device.
Before you press the LOAD selection button in StorageMode, make sure you have plugged
the USB device containing your User Programs and/or Multis into the back of the Forte SE.
If your User Programs/Multis are located on your computer or Tablet, then use the cable that
plugs into the computer/Tablet USB port on the rear panel of the Forte SE.
If your User Programs/Multis are located on a USB flash drive, plug them into the Device
USB port on the rear panel of the Forte SE.
Press the LOAD button when you have the hardware containing your User Programs/Multis
plugged into the USB port.
If no USB connection is detected by Forte SE, you will see the error message “Error: No
valid device inserted.”.
Use the navigation buttons, Previous-/Next+ buttons or the Alpha Wheel to browse the files
in the currently selected storage device.
After selecting a file to load, press the FILL or OVWRTE soft button to continue
OPEN
PARENT
FILL
OVERWRITE
(OVWRTE)
Pressing the Open soft button will open the highlighted folder.
Selecting Parent will close an existing open folder.
Selecting FILL means you would like to keep the existing User objects.
Forte SE will now load the User objects into the first empty ID slot it
finds, and then subsequent empty slots.
Selecting OVWRTE first deletes all the existing User objects, and then
loads the new User objects into the first user location at ID number
1024 onwards.
During the load process the screen will show information about the objects that are being
loaded. At the end, the screen will display a message indicating if the load process was
successful, or if there were errors.
12-23
Global Mode
STORE
Example Using LOAD
The following example shows how each different loading methods affect how four programs
load into the User bank that already contains programs.
Example: Starting with the following objects already stored in the Forte SE User bank:
Programs currently in Forte SE
Program ID
Program Name
1024
3rd World Order
1025
PC3 Strings
1028
JuPiTaR BazZ
1031
VA1 Lead
1053
Rhoady EP
Suppose you were to load a FSE (Forte SE) file containing the following Programs:
File to be Loaded
Program ID
Program Name
1025
Synth Horn
1026
NYJazzy
1027
Saxxy
1028
Stabbatha
The two tables below show the results if you use FILL or OVWRTE with the User Bank.
Forte SE Bank after using FILL
Program ID
Program Name
1024
3rd World Order
1025
PC3 Strings
1026
Synth Horn
1027
NYJazzy
1028
JuPiTaR BazZ
1029
Saxxy
1030
Stabbatha
1031
VA1 Lead
1053
Rhoady EP
12-24
Forte SE Bank after using OVWRITE
Program ID
Program Name
1025
Synth Horn
1026
NYJazzy
1027
Saxxy
1028
Stabbatha
Global Mode
STORE
Compatible Files
The Forte SE can load its own .FSE files, as well as file types from other Kurzweil products
such as .FOR, .ASE, .ART, .P3A, .PC3, .P3K, .PLE, and .SPX files. When loading file
types other than .FSE, the Forte SE will attempt a conversion of the objects in those files.
The Forte SE can often exactly match the sound and function of the original objects. In
some cases object parameters may not be converted and must be adjusted by the user after
conversion (see below for details.)
Importing Program Objects
When importing a Program object from a .P3A, .P3K, .PC3, .PLE, or .SPX file, Parameter
info names and some controller assignments may need to be manually adjusted.
Importing Multi/Setup Objects
When importing a Setup or Multi object from a .FOR, .P3A, .PC3, .P3K, .PLE, or .SPX
file, any Zone above Zone 8 will not be imported. Riffs will not be imported.
Importing Forte (.FOR) and PC3K (.P3K) objects
Some Forte Programs (stored in .FOR files) may not be compatible if they use keymaps
and samples that are not available on the Forte SE. It may be possible to import and edit
these Programs on the Forte SE and select Forte SE keymaps that sound very similar to the
incompatible Forte keymaps. For example, the Forte SE does not have the same Japanese
Grand Piano keymaps and samples that the Forte has, but it does have similar keymaps that
use a reduced set of the Forte Japanese Grand Piano samples.
Some Forte Programs and Multis (stored in .FOR files) may not be compatible if their
effects Chains use more resources than are available in the Forte SE. It may be possible to
import and edit these Programs and Multis on the Forte SE and select a different Chain or
combination of Chains that sound very similar to the incompatible Forte Chains.
When importing .P3K files, any included user sample data will not be loaded, because the
Forte SE can not load samples.
12-25
System Mode

Chapter 13
System Mode
CAUTION: DO NOT ATTEMPT TO MAKE ANY CHANGES IN SYSTEM
MODE UNTIL YOU HAVE READ AND FULLY UNDERSTOOD THIS
CHAPTER
This chapter will help you familiarize yourself with the functions of System Mode.
System Mode allows you manage and upgrade the OS software of your Forte SE as well as
perform diagnostic tests of the instrument’s various internal systems and processes. Note that
the functions that you have access to in System Mode govern the operation of your Forte SE,
so only use System Mode when you must perform essential maintenance tasks.
To enter System Mode, follow these steps:
1. Power off your Forte SE.
2. Press and the hold the ENTER button, and power on the unit. Make sure to keep
holding the ENTER button until the display shows the following:
3. Release the ENTER button—at this point, you are in System Mode.
FORTE SE System Mode
Run
Forte
System
Update
Run
Diags
v.3.44.25695
System
Reset
System
Utilities
13-1
System Mode
Run Forte SE
Run Forte SE
This is the first System Mode menu item.
Pressing the “Run Forte SE” soft button will load the OS and the Forte SE will start up as if
you just switched on the unit.
If the Forte SE operating system fails to load up, you will see an error message with an error
code.
System Update
Caution: Before Updating, back up your user objects (Programs/Multis
etc.) by storing them to an external device in Global Mode.
System Update allows you to keep your Forte SE running the latest available OS (Operating
System), which you can download from the Kurzweil website.
The file that is used to install a new OS version with sounds is combined into one file called a
KUF file (.KUF).
A USB flash drive or computer (using a USB cable) can be used to perform the System
Update.
Caution: It is important that the install is not disrupted once loading
begins. Powering off the Forte or your PC, removing the USB device or
USB cable in the middle of loading could leave the Forte inoperable and
then require repair service to restore.
Install using a USB flash drive
1. Download the System Update file from the Kurzweil website or another reliable source
and save it in a known folder or directory on your flash drive.
13-2
System Mode
System Update
2. Connect the flash drive to the USB STORAGE slot of Forte SE.
3. Follow the instructions specified on page 13-1 to enter System Mode.
4. In System Mode, select System Update.
5. Select USB Device as the storage type.
6. If the system was able to read the USB flash drive that was plugged in, it will display
a list of files and folders as shown above. You can use the navigation buttons or Alpha
wheel to move up and down the list. Select the UP soft button if you want to go up to
the parent directory level. If the KUF file is selected, select the OK button.
13-3
System Mode
System Update
You will see a progress bar indicating the progress. If update was successful you will see a
confirmation message. If there was a failure you will see a self-explanatory failure message
(with error code) to indicate the failure.
Install using a computer/tablet
1. Download the System Update file from the Kurzweil website or another reliable source
and save it in a known folder or directory on your flash drive.
2. Connect the Forte SE (powered off) to the computer/tablet with the USB cable provided
into the USB COMPUTER slot.
3. Follow the instructions specified on page 13-1 to enter System Mode.
4. In System Mode, select System Update.
5. Select PC USB as the storage type.
13-4
System Mode
System Update
6. If the Forte SE cannot detect a connection to the computer it will display the message
below.
7. If the connection was detected, you will be prompted with the above message. Copy the
KUF file to the virtual drive that appears on the PC and press OK.
13-5
System Mode
System Update
8. Select the file from the list displayed on the next screen and Press OK.
You will see a progress bar indicating the progress. If update was successful you will see a
confirmation message. If there was a failure you will see a self-explanatory failure message
(with error code) to indicate the failure.
13-6
System Mode
Run Diagnostics
Run Diagnostics
You will most likely not need to use the Run Diagnostics operations in normal cases.
These operations are mostly used at the factory and service centers by technicians for
troubleshooting hardware problems. But, in some cases you might be required to run these
diagnostics for troubleshooting and diagnosing symptoms. In these cases, following the
direction of Kurzweil Technical Support.
FORTE SE System Mode
Run
Forte
System
Update
Run
Diags
v.3.44.25701
System
Reset
System
Utilities
13-7
System Mode
System Reset
System Reset
CAUTION: THIS OPERATION ERASES ALL USER USER OBJECTS
(PROGRAMS/MULTIS ETC.).
System Reset willrestore the Forte SE back to a Factory State. In addition to all user objects
(Programs/Multis etc.) being deleted, Global Mode settings will be restored to factory
defaults.
Caution: Before Updating, back up your user objects (Programs/
Multis etc.) by storing them to an external device in Global Mode. See
instructions in STORE on page 12-21.
To clear all user objects (Programs/Multis etc.) and restore the factory default state, select the
System Reset menu option.
FORTE SE System Mode
Run
Forte
System
Update
Run
Diags
v.3.44.25695
System
Reset
System
Utilities
The Forte SE will now ask the question “This will delete all user objects. Are you sure?”
If you are not sure what you are about to do, select CANCEL. This will exit the System Reset
process and take you back to the System Mode menu.
If you select OK you are now erasing all the user objects (Programs/Multis etc.) in the Forte
SE and restoring the instrument back to a Factory State.
13-8
System Mode
System Reset
If you have completed the System Reset, select OK.
13-9
System Mode
System Utilities
System Utilities
You will most likely not need to use the System Utilities. In some cases you might be
required to use these utilities for troubleshooting and diagnosing symptoms. In these cases,
following the direction of Kurzweil Technical Support.
FORTE SE System Mode
Run
Forte
System
Update
Run
Diags
v.3.44.25695
System
Reset
System
Utilities
Select “Back” if you wish to exit and return back to the System Mode menu.
13-10
System Mode
System Utilities
Format Flash
CAUTION: THIS OPERATION ERASES THE OPERATING SYSTEM, ALL
FACTORY OBJECTS AND ALL USER OBJECTS.
Performing this operation will format the Forte SE’s system flash memory and erase the OS
software as well as all Objects. Do not do this unless you think it is necessary in order to
improve the performance of your Forte SE. Should you decide to do so, be sure to back up
all of your files and software. After you do this, System Mode will still be available, so you
can run updates and get your Forte SE up-and-running again. After a Format the unit will
come up in System Mode by default.
Caution: Before formatting, back up your user objects (Programs/Multis
etc.) by storing them to an external device in Global Mode.
To perform a Format, follow these steps:
1. Follow the instructions specified on page 13-1 to enter System Mode.
2. Select System Utilities.
FORTE SE System Mode
Run
Forte
System
Update
Run
Diags
v.3.44.25695
System
Reset
System
Utilities
13-11
System Mode
System Utilities
3. Press Format Flash.
4. The next screen wants to make sure that formatting the flash and deleting everything
is really what you want to do. Select OK to format the internal flash memory. Select
CANCEL if you do not wish to proceed.
13-12
System Mode
System Utilities
5. When formatting of the internal flash memory is completed, the display will show the
message “Done formatting flash.” Press OK.
Update Module
This option allows the installation of individual files. You may be guided by Kurzweil
Technical Support to use this option if needed.
Restore Older
This option allows the restoration of a previously installed OS or Objects version. You may
be guided by Kurzweil Technical Support to use this option if needed.
13-13
Troubleshooting
Maintenance
Chapter 14
Troubleshooting
Maintenance
Aside from normal care in handling and use, your Forte SE requires no regular maintenance.
Clean with a soft cloth dampened with water. Never use abrasives or solvents as they
may damage the unit’s paint, markings and display lens. There are no batteries inside to
replace—ever. Instead of volatile SRAM used in most other instruments, your Forte SE uses
nonvolatile Flash Memory for storage, which retains information without power.
Common Problems
Below is a list of the most commonly encountered problems and diagnoses for each.
Power Problems
This is the normal power-up sequence:
1. The display backlight turns on.
2. “Loading...” appears on the display for a few seconds.
3. The Forte SE enters Program Mode with Program 1 or the default boot up program
selected.
If nothing at all happens when you turn the power switch on, check if one of the following
might be the issue:
The power cable is not plugged
securely into the wall outlet.
Plug the power cable securely into the wall
outlet.
The power cable is not plugged
securely into the Forte SE power jack.
Plug the power cable securely into the Forte
SE power jack.
14-1
Troubleshooting
Common Problems
The wall outlet, power strip, or
extension cord is defective or
damaged.
Use a different wall outlet, power strip, or
extension cord.
If there’s evidence of the unit receiving power, but operation is abnormal, check if one of the
following might be the issue:
The wall outlet voltage is below 90
volts due to overload.
Try a different outlet on a different circuit.
Powers up, Display is Blank
The Display is blank or difficult to
read.
Slowly turn the Display contrast knob
(located above the Alpha Wheel) to adjust the
Display.
Audio Problems
CAUTION: Do not trouble shoot audio problems using headphones.
Additionally, always be aware of the volume levels on the Forte SE and
on the connected audio system or mixer.
NOTE: When diagnosing audio problems, set the Forte SE to play its Demo Song rather
then intermittently pressing keys. This will prevent any unexpectedly loud volume changes.
If there is no sound from your Forte SE, check if one of the following might be the issue:
14-2
The volume slider is turned down.
Slowly push the volume slider up.
The volume control on the audio
system or mixer is turned down.
Slowly turn the volume control up.
The signal source selection on the
audio system or mixer is incorrect.
Set the volume of the audio or mixer to the
lowest level, select the correct signal source,
and then slowly turn up the volume.
Troubleshooting
Common Problems
The audio cables are not securely
plugged into the Forte SE, audio
system, or mixer.
Set the volume of the audio or mixer to the
lowest level, securely plug in the audio cables
on both ends, and then slowly turn up the
volume.
The Destination parameter stops
MIDI Data
Change the Global Destination parameter to
USBMIDI+MIDI+LOCAL (see page 12-11)
The audio cable is of an incorrect type.
Obtain and securely connect an audio cable
of the correct type. The Forte SE accepts both
balanced (TRS) and unbalanced (TS) 1/4inch audio cables.
If you can hear sound but it is low or distorted, check if one of the following might be the
issue:
The audio cables are not securely
plugged into the Forte SE, audio
system, or mixer.
Set the volume of the audio system or mixer
to the lowest level, securely plug in the audio
cables on both ends, and then slowly turn up
the volume.
A received MIDI volume message has
specified a low volume.
Set the volume of the audio system or
mixer to the lowest level. Disconnect
all MIDI cables, set the Destination
parameter in Global Mode to Local or
USBMIDI+MIDI+LOCAL, and reset the
volume level on the Forte SE, by pressing
Panic (see page 3-17). Finally, slowly turn up
the volume level of the audio system or mixer.
The current Multi has another
controller assigned to volume, and it is
turned down.
Select a different Multi. Or change the
problematic controller setting by editing the
Multi in Multi Edit Mode.
The input to the audio system is set
for low impedance instead of high
impedance.
Set the volume of the audio or mixer to the
lowest level, change the impedance setting,
and then slowly turn up the volume of the
audio system or mixer.
The input trim to the audio system or
mixer is set too low.
Slowly turn up the trim.
14-3
Troubleshooting
MIDI Problems
MIDI Problems
If you are experiencing problems sending MIDI to an external module, check if one of the
following might be the issue:
The MIDI cable is not securely
plugged in at both ends.
Securely plug in the MIDI cable at both ends.
The MIDI connections are wrong.
To send MIDI, plug the MIDI cable into
the Forte SE’ MIDI Out port and into the
module’s MIDI In port.
The MIDI cable is defective.
Obtain and securely connect a new MIDI
cable.
The MIDI transmit channel does not
match that of the receiving device.
Change the channel on either the Forte SE or
on the device such that the channels match.
If there are problems with the internal sound module receiving MIDI from an external
device like a computer sequencer, check if one of the following might be the issue:
14-4
The MIDI transmit channel of
transmitting device does not match
that of the receiving Program or Zone
on the Forte SE.
Change the channel on either the Forte SE
or on the computer such that the channels
match.
The MIDI cable is not securely
plugged in at both ends.
Securely plug in the MIDI cable at both ends.
The MIDI connections are wrong.
To receive MIDI, plug the MIDI cable into
the Forte SE’ MIDI In port and into the
module’s MIDI Out port.
Troubleshooting
Pedal Problems
Pedal Problems
Before you consult this section, be sure to read The Pedal Jacks on page 2-4.
Switch Pedal Problems
If you are having problems with connecting or using a switch pedal, check if one of the
following might be the issue:
• Sustain or Sostenuto is stuck “on”. Be sure the pedal is plugged in before switching on
the power. Turn power off, then on, if necessary.
• The pedal is acting backwards (“on” when up instead of down). Power cycle the unit
making sure to NOT press on the pedal during startup.
• A dual switch pedal is not working correctly, see Connecting a Dual Switch Pedal on
page 2-6. A dual switch pedal must be wired as shown below. Any other wiring
pattern will not work correctly.
Sleeve
Left Pedal
Ring
Tip
Right Pedal
Continuous Control and Half Damper Pedal Problems
The continuous control pedal must be wired to a single stereo 1/4-inch plug as follows:
• Wiper to Tip
• Top end of resistance element to Ring
• Bottom end of resistance element to Sleeve
These connections are shown schematically below:
Increasing Foot Pressure
10KOhm Linear Taper
Sleeve
Ring Tip
Use the correct impedance, taper, and range
14-5
Troubleshooting
If None of the Above...
For best results, use a Kurzweil CC-1 continuous control pedal, available from your
dealer. The CC-1 meets all of the requirements described above at an economical price. A
continuous control pedal should have an impedance between 5,000 and 100,000 ohms. An
impedance less than 5,000 may overload the reference voltage source in the Forte SE and
interfere with operation of other controls like the Master Volume slider or the other sliders.
An impedance more than 100,000 may result in electrically noisy operation, which may
cause your Forte SE to send MIDI controller messages constantly.
The taper of the control should be linear for easy, predictable control. Pedals designed for
volume control typically have an exponential (or anti log) taper, which results in most of
their range being concentrated in the upper half of pedal’s path of travel.
Pedals may have a control range that is less than 100%. Make sure that when the pedal is
in the fully down position, its impedance is 0, and when it is in the fully up position, the
impedance is at its maximum rating.
If None of the Above...
If your problem is not covered above, or none of the suggestions seems to work, first check
back and review the relevant sections of this manual. Many difficulties are just programming
problems caused by settings of Multi parameters. If you want to be sure that all of the factory
defaults are in place, see “Restoring Factory Defaults” below.
Also be sure to check out Kurzweil’s website for additional Forte SE information that may
have been published since this manual was written: www.kurzweil.com.
If you still have problems, contact Kurzweil support in your country or at www.kurzweil.
com/support/. You may also find unofficial help at some of the internet communities listed at
www.kurzweil.com/community/.
Service Centers
Contact the nearest Young Chang office Kurzweil service representative. See page iv in the
front matter of this manual for contact information.
Restoring Factory Defaults
There are two ways to restore factory defaults, both of which delete all User Programs and
User Multis. The first method is described on RESET on page 12-18. The second is described
in System Reset on page 13-8.
CAUTION: Restoring factory defaults cannot be undone. Back up your
files before doing so by following the procedure in STORE on page 12-21.
14-6
Troubleshooting
If None of the Above...
Diagnostics
You will most likely not need to use the System Mode diagnostic operations in normal
cases. These operations are mostly used at the factory and service centers by engineers for
troubleshooting hardware problems. But, in some cases you might be required to run these
diagnostics for troubleshooting and diagnosing symptoms. In these cases, follow the direction
of an authorized Kurzweil technician.
14-7
MIDI Implementation

Appendix A
MIDI Implementation
Function
Basic Channel
Mode
Transmitted
Recognized
Remarks
Default
1
1
Changed
1–16
1–16
Default
Mode 3
Mode 3
Messages
Velocity
Aftertouch
0–127
True Voice
0–127
0–127
Note ON
O
O
Note OFF
O
O
Keys
O
O
Channels
O
O
O
O
Pitch Bender
O
Control Change
Program Change
True #
System Exclusive
System Common
System Real Time
Aux Messages
Use Multi-track mode (see FX Mode
(Global Mode) on page 12-3 for
multi-timbral applications)
Altered
Note Number
Memorized
0–31
32–63 (LSB)
64–127
O
0–31
32–63 (LSB)
64–127
0 to 2,097,151
0–511
0–127
0–127
O
O
Song Pos.
X
X
Song Sel.
X
X
Tune
X
X
Clock
O
O
Messages
O
O
Local Control
O
O
All Notes Off
O
O
Active Sense
X
X
Reset
X
X
Notes
Manufacturer’s ID = 07
Device ID: default = 0;
programmable 0–127
Mode 1: Omni On, Poly
Mode 3: Omni Off, Poly
Mode 2: Omni On, Mono
Mode 4: Omni Off, Mono
Controller assignments are
programmable
Standard and custom formats
O = Yes
X = No
A-1
Physical Specifications

Appendix B
Physical Specifications1
1
Keyboard:
88-key, fully-weighted hammer-action with velocity and pressure (After Touch) sensitive
adjustable keys. 88-key model uses Fatar TP100LR with pressure.
Display:
240x64 pixel monochrome LCD with front-panel contrast adjust.
Polyphony:
128 Voice Polyphony, dynamically allocated.
Multitimbral:
16 parts (one per MIDI channel).
Quick Split / Layer:
Easy access with adjustable volume and panning.
Programs:
Space for 1024 Factory and 1024 User Programs (in 16 instrument Categories)
Multis:
Space for 1024 Factory Multis, plus 1024 User Multi locations with up to 8 programmable zones for
splits and layers.
Effects:
Hundreds of editable effects chains.
Controllers:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Analog Outputs:
Two 1/4” TRS Balanced Outputs (Stereo Pair)
24-bit D-to-A Converters
Frequency Response 20Hz-20kHz +/- 0.1dB
+21dBu Maximum Output Level
-113dB Signal-to-Noise Ratio (A-weighted)
0.003% THD+N (1kHz @ -1 dBFS)
Headphones:
1/4” Rear-Mounted Stereo Headphone Output
Frequency Response 20Hz-20kHz +/- 0.5dB
Maximum Output Power 130mW into 32 Ohms
-100dB Signal-to-Noise Ratio (A-weighted)
0.03% THD+N (1kHz @ 100mW Output into 32 Ohm Load)
Output Impedance: < 1 Ohms
Load Impedance: > 24 Ohms
MIDI:
IN, OUT
USB:
Complete MIDI functionality over USB
User Program / Multi file transfer to/from PC / Mac / Tablet/ USB Flash Drives.
Operating System updates from PC / Mac / USB Flash Drive
Height:
(5.2”) (13.2cm)
Depth:
(15.2”) (38.6cm)
Length:
(48.9”) (124.2cm)
Weight:
(40.8 lb.) (18.5 kg)
Power:
Internal Power Supply, free voltage 100-265VAC 50/60Hz, 10W max
Pitch wheel
Modulation wheel
Volume Slider
9 front panel sliders
11 switches (assignable / zone mutes / KB3 control)
1 Variation switch
4 Master EQ Knobs with one EQ On/Off switch
2 switch pedal inputs, each supporting a dual switch pedal or single half damper pedal.
1 continuous control pedal input
2 Transpose buttons
Specifications subject to change without notice
B-1
Programs

Appendix C
Programs
ID
Object Version : 1.01
PIANO
ID
Solo Grand 7ft
18
1
RecitalGrand 9ft
3
E. PIANO
ID
Classic Wurly EP
34
17
StereoSuitcaseEP
Fierce Rock 9ft
19
4
Studio Grand 7ft
6
Bright Jazz 9ft
2
5
7
Rich Grand 7ft
Bright PnoPad7ft
CLAV
33
Clav BC Env Filt
EZ Touch Tube EP
35
Clavi AC
20
Fagen's Phase EP
36
Clavi BC Phaser
22
Daft Wurly EP
38
AC Clav Tube
40
Slap Wah Clav
21
FM+Tines EPiano
23
Tube & Trem EP
39
Clavi AC Wah
BC Clav Tube
8
Glam Rock Pno9ft
9
Smooth Grand 9ft
25
E Acoustic Grand
41
Classic Harpsi
10
VintageGrand 7ft
26
27
Sly Ballad EP
Bright Fusion EP
42
Simple Harpsi
12
Intimate Pno 7ft
28
Tube Amp EP
44
Harpsi Flute
13
Piano & Strings
29
FM Growler EP
45
Harpsi Lute
15
Dark & Distant
31
Warble Rd. EP
47
Must Be Harpsick
16
Olde Pub Piano
48
PPG Comp
49
Classic B3
81
Prophet Pad
83
OBX Pad
11
14
ID
Upright Piano
R&B Stack
24
37
Clavi BC
30
Dyno Suitcase EP
32
BrokenSparkleEP
65
AlaskanWild Lead
67
Prophet Sync
ORGAN
ID
50
Soul Perc Organ
66
52
Hot Tube Gospel
54
55
51
53
Prog Drawbars
68
80's Lead Synth
82
Cars Square Lead
Mr. Smith
70
VAST-ly Organ
71
Doors Vox Organ
73
58
Farfisa Draws
46
ID
SimpleHipHopLead
VAST Bars1-3,8&9
43
LEADS
69
Magic Carpet B3
56
57
Thick FM Digital
84
HarpsiTar
Harp-Secco-Rd.
PADS
Arpeggi Pad
MW S&H Filt
85
Film Score Pad
Dark Wobbles
86
JunoWhatIMean?
Robin's Org Lead
87
Omni Strings
Squeeze Lead
89
Pan Strings
72
Keytar Hero(Wah)
74
5ths Lead MP
88
PPG Pad
90
Warm Encounter
59
Farfisa Leslie
75
Seongdeok Lead
91
Wavetable Pad
60
AllStops AllVox
76
SquareChirpLead
92
Mesosphere Pad
62
Pipes & Voices
78
Dogs Lead
94
5th-Scape
61
63
64
Chapel Organ
Accordian Brazil
ParisCmboAccordn
77
79
80
Snap Lead
2 Hand Tap Lead
Soy Incident
93
95
96
Pan Motion Pad
Water Buffalo
Insta - Spooky
C-1
Programs

ID
ID
SYNTH/BASS
114
The Phattest
97
Quadra Comp
113
99
Super Saw Stabs
115
The Way It Is
101
Detuned Polysyn
117
Smooth Mooger
102
OBX Filter Sweep
118
MiniFunk Bass
103
Tomita's Tomato
119
ANGRYBass
104
Frozen Sawdust
120
Uptown Bass
Pattern Machine
122
Leviathan Bass
98
100
80s Saws
Clone Bandit
105
Poly Vector Lead
107
Prophesied Six
106
108
Vintage Woobler
110
Cosmic Intervals
111
116
121
123
Dolby Bass
Dread Bass
Dub Wob
Poppit SynBass
124
Woodhouse Bass
126
Instaprince
Poly Arpeggiator
127
APG-ish Bass
112
Static Charge
128
Decepticon Bass
129
109
ID
Throaty S&H
STRINGS
125
Alias Bass
Arco Strings Ens
ID
145
BRASS/WINDS
130
Adagio Strings
146
High-End Horns
131
Weeping Strings
147
Sax Section
132
Punchy Strings
148
MiamiBrassSects
Lorde Bari Hits
133
Power Trem Strgs
149
150
Sylvan Dbl Reeds
135
ProperPizzicatos
151
Clarinet
136
137
DBass & Violins
MarmaladeStrings
152
SoloBassoon&Oboe
138
Dulcet Strings
154
Full Blown
139
Tutti Strings
155
Epic Low Brass
140
BritishMTStrings
156
Lead Trumpet
141
Moby Tron-table
157
Solo Trombone
134
142
143
144
C-2
SYNTH
OversizedQuartet
153
Sax Splits+Flute
BClar/Clar/Flute
Solo Violin fast
158
Dyn Orch Fr Horns
Gliss/Arp Harp
160
Classic SynBrass
Solo Cello fast
159
Fruity Floot
Programs

ID
ENSEMBLE
ID
HYBRID
161
Epic Vox&Strings
177
Ambience
Full Fellowship
179
Cirque du Synth
181
Pressure Cooker
183
Armonica Wurly
162
LayeredStrgsWnds
164
Strings/ClarOboe
166
Gothic Climax
163
165
167
Cello & Reeds
3Way Split MTron
178
180
182
Pizzynth
Analog Sparkle
168
AvengersAssemble
169
Broadway Backup
185
TouchMeAfter3pm
170
Matadores (sftP)
186
Jet Set Martini
171
Mandolinese
187
Touch Vocoder
172
Dave & David
188
Dulciliere
Singapore Sling
190
ChirpingStompbox
192
BrimstonCalliope
173
174
Gypsy Reggae
184
Shokudo Enka
189
DigitalFairyDust
175
CelesteGlockHarp
ID
GUITAR/BASS
ID
VOICES/MISC
193
Rob's Caster
209
Ooh So G'oohD
195
Boutique 12 Str
211
176
194
H'Arps & Harp
191
Yucatan Vibe
Mixed Strummah
210
OohDBopTouchEcho
Real Nylon
212
In A Good Place
197
SuperflyWahCast
213
Choir Redux
198
Chunky Comper
214
DapPer Dudes
200
Noisy Feedbacker
216
202
Motown Bass
204
Flea/Bootsy
196
199
201
203
205
Boutique 6 Str
Twin Peaks
P-Bass
Finger Bass
Jaco Fretless
206
AC Buzzer Bass
208
Levin/GabrlFrtls
207
Beasties Bass
215
217
218
219
EnvelopingVoices
Bummer Dudes
BaDaDah-Doop
Flesh&TheMachine
Carnival Ricoche
Metal Vibe Pulse
220
Suspense Scene
222
Drowning At 7
221
223
224
Creepy Crawlies
Scorby-Doo
Blues Harmonica
C-3
Programs

ID
225
242
Orchestral Perc
244
Vocal Percussion
246
Steel Drum
248
Real Vibes
East Space Kit
243
228
Birch Wood Kit
230
Los Angeles Kit
232
Superfly Kit
231
PERCUSSION
241
Copper Ring Kit
229
ID
Full Room Kit
226
227
25th Anniv Kit
Ring-tone Kit
245
247
Essential Perc
Just Jammin'
Tabla Bars
Xylophone
233
Fin-Essence Kit
249
Stereo Marimba
234
Procs'd Pop Kit
250
Bell Keys
236
Brushes Kit
252
Crotales Hits
235
80's Power Kit
237
Touch Tone Kit
238
239
Celeste
Bowed Crotales
DJ- Dub Kit
254
Chimes
Rhythmcon Kit
255
Hit'n Chew
Radio Echo Kit
ID
Utility
1022
Silent Program
1024
251
253
240
1023
C-4
DRUMS
Editor Template
Clear Program
256
Tabla Arp
KB3 Programs
Introducing KB3 Programs
Appendix D
KB3 Programs
Introducing KB3 Programs
There’s nothing quite like the sound of the classic Hammond™ B-3 tone wheel organ,
especially when played through a Leslie™ rotating speaker system. We’ve done extensive
testing and analysis with several tone wheel organs, and created our own models to emulate
the unique tone wheel sound. We even took into account the way that older organs start to
sound different (and arguably better) as their capacitors begin to leak—and we included a
parameter that varies the amount of grunge (leakage) in your sound.
First Some History
Countless blues, jazz, and rock recordings have centered around the distinctive sound created
by classic tone wheel organs (such as the Hammond B-3) played through rotating speaker
systems like the Leslie. Not only is the sound great, but it’s supremely versatile, since the
player can control timbre in real-time by adjusting drawbars that add or remove harmonics
from the fundamental tone. Other cool sound-shaping tools include a percussive emphasis
that can be added to each note and the capability to change speaker rotation speed. Many
people, in fact, feel that the tone wheel organ was the first popular synthesizer. And although
these organs haven’t been made for years, they are still sought after, restored, and lugged
about by legions of dedicated keyboard players. This despite archaic electronics, inscrutable
wiring, and an unwieldy heft that tops 400 pounds.
Duplicating the sound and flexibility of these organs – without the nasty side effects – is the
goal of KB3 Mode.
D-1
KB3 Programs
Drawbars
Drawbars
The drawbars on a tone wheel organ emulate pipes of different lengths on a pipe organ. In
either case, they are controlled by changing the positions of a number of “stops”. As the
organist pulls out or pushes in these stops, he adds or reduces harmonics. Whether it’s pipes
or drawbars, though, the stops work like this: pull one out to add more of an overtone; push
it in to reduce the volume of the overtone.
The stops on the most popular tone wheel organs are: 16’, 51/3’, 8’, 4’, 22/3’, 2’, 13/5’, 11/3’.
and 1’. Note that they are still measured in feet, a carryover from pipe organ days. The 16’
and 51/3’ stops are considered the subharmonic group, while the third stop, 8’, produces the
fundamental of a tone, and stops 4-9 produce harmonics above the fundamental. By making
use of different combinations of these harmonics, a rich sort of additive synthesis is possible.
Best of all, you can make radical changes to the tone dynamically as you play.
The nine sliders of the Forte SE are set to control the drawbars. Pulling the slider towards
the keyboard increases the amount of the drawbar that is heard.
KB3 Mode Buttons
The nine buttons above the sliders on the Forte SE have special capabilities in KB3 Mode
that are listed in blue, below the Multi Zone Mute Buttons and Programmable Switches.
These are:
Brake
Brake starts and stops the rotary speaker effect. This effect is not immediate, instead the
rotary speaker effect gradually slows down and speads up, in a similar way that a real rotary
speaker reacts.
Chorus/Vibrato
On/Off
This parameter turns the chorus or vibrato effect on and off.
Chor/Vib
This parameter determines which modulation effect is used. The choice is Vibrato or
Chorus.
D-2
KB3 Programs
KB3 Mode Buttons
Chorus/Vibrato Depth
This parameter determines how much of the effect is applied to the KB3 sounds. There are
two levels of both Chorus and Vibrato available, depending on the setting for the Chor/Vib
button.
Percussion
Percussion is a characteristic feature of tone wheel organs. It’s especially useful while soloing,
since percussion adds an extra plink (actually an extra tone at a defined harmonic) to the
attack of individual notes. When you play more than one note simultaneously, only the first
note you play will trigger the envelope of the percussion tone, though notes played shortly
afterwards will also be affected by this envelope. When you play chords, all of the notes
played simultaneously will get the percussive effect (provided percussion hasn’t already been
triggered.)
Percussion On/Off
This is where you turn the percussion effect on or off. Percussion is created by a decaying
envelope applied to one of the nine drawbars (usually the 4th drawbar for the low pitch
and the 5th drawbar for high pitch. The highest drawbar is normally stolen to generate the
percussion sound). The percussion effect is “single-triggered”, which means that once it’s
triggered, it won’t trigger again until all keys go up.
The KB3 engine in the Forte SE is capable of generating the Percussion effect without
stealing any of the drawbars, and while not authentic, is occasionally used on Forte SE
Programs.
Percussion Loud/Soft
This parameter switches between loud and soft percussion settings.
Percussion Decay F/S
This parameter switches between fast and slow percussion settings.
Percussion Pitch H/L
This parameter switches between high and low harmonic percussion settings.
KeyClick
The Key Click feature adds a decaying burst of pitched noise to the attack of notes. Unlike
the percussion, the key click is “multi-triggered”, which means that every new note will
trigger it. The parameters on this page primarily control the decay, volume, and pitch of the
key click.
This button controls whether the Keyclick parameter is switched on or off.
D-3
KB3 Programs
KB3 Mode Buttons
Rotary S/F
The Rotary S/F button acts as a Slow/Fast switch for the Rotary speaker effect. By default,
the sustain pedal (SW1) also controls Rotary Slow/Fast. You can set the sustain pedal to
function as sustain for all KB3 Programs (instead of Rotary Slow/Fast) by using the Rotary
Override parameter in Global mode. You can also make different Rotary Slow/Fast controller
assignments for each Program or Multi by using the Parameters page in Program Edit Mode
or the Multi Switches page in Multi Edit Mode.
D-4
Multis

Appendix E
Multis
ID
1
2
MULTI
ID
MULTI
ID
Sunset Mirage
37
Yankee Doodle
72
39
Organic Organ
41
Gospel B3 & Pno
43
Universe Pad
Fuzzy Bottom
3
Bass EPiano Lead
5
Floating Spirits
4
Vocal Pad Scape
6
Flowing Orinico
8
Menangerie Motif
10
Bummer&Bummer
12
Sm-Oo-th David
7
9
11
13
Mello Keys
Dummer Dudes
Dreamy Calliope
Dulce De Luthier
14
VOX Versa Combo
16
Organ & Strings
15
Vivaldi's Mando
17
Auto VOX Versa
19
CallMeInTheDark
21
Harp & Flute
18
20
Harpsic n Pad
Woodland Stroll
22
Effervescence
24
Piano & Friends
26
Sweet Celeste
23
25
Soft Landing
The Combo-ista
27
Ben's Goodmen
29
The Maestro
28
30
31
Guitano Tender
Belle Aires
Flutey Organ
32
Strgs & Harpsich
34
Hallelujah!
33
35
Object Version : 1.01
Concert Harpsi
Your Majesty
36
38
40
42
44
Tribute
Coronation
Pad Machine
Min Ho Worship
Triumphant!
45
Massive Mono
47
The Shire w Oboe
49
Vox n Glox
46
48
50
Sea Breeze
Futurescape
Blues Harp Jam
51
Cloudwalk Keys
53
Gtr/Bass Ballad
52
Hollow Keys
54
Piano, Steel+Pad
56
Euro Chords
55
Hip Hop Thirds
57
Distorted Stack
59
EP & Synbass
58
CP, FM & Pad
60
AsTheWorldTurns
62
Tranquil Moods
61
The Day After
71
75
Chill Kit/Chords
74
76
77
Pizz & Glock
81
84
Celestial Mallet
83
Pad Organ
85
Mohawk Monophono
87
Glass Zimmer
86
LatinLoungeSplit
88
Jazzy Key Trigs
90
Aftermath
89
91
Piano Rave
Traveler
92
Expansive Pad
94
Hero's Journey
93
Pan N' Jam
95
Electric LeadPad
97
Arping Weird
96
253
69
Clock Shop
Pluck The Stars
Torch Lead
Introspektakular
Dream on Windham
70
Synth & Strings
82
67
Helter Skelter
Big Choir 5ths
80
79
100
68
Daydream EP
Plucked Sus Strs
Lonely Companion
Sunrizer Synth
Mind Of It's Own
78
65
66
Nervous Eaters
UnderGroundRails
DreamWorks Segue
Synths In Abyss
4-Piece Suit
73
63
64
MULTI
98
99
Metallicscape
XxxOoo
Apollo
Boson Dance
101
Dunmire's Court
254
Layer Default
256
Clear Multi
255
Split Default
Forte Control
E-1
Appendix F
Effects
ID
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
EFFECT
Little Booth
Soundboard
Small Dark Room
Sax Chamber
Small Hall
Medium Hall
Green Room
Opera House
Real Nice Verb
Empty Stage
Med Drum Room
AbbeyPianoHall
Predelay Hall
Sweeter Hall
Concert Hall
Symphony Hall
Cathedral Chorus
DeepChorsDlyHall
Omni Stage
Classic Plate
MediumWarm Plate
Real Plate
Smooth Plate
Gated Plate
Basic Delay 1/8
4-Tap Delay BPM
Echo Plecks BPM
Timbered Taps
Dub Delay
Sm Stereo Chorus
Chorusier
Stereo Chorus
Dense Chorus
Effects

ID
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
EFFECT
Soft Flange
Wetlip Flange
Flanged Taps
Slow Deep Phaser
Fast&Slow Phaser
Phaser EGT
Thin Phase Sweep
Tremolo BPM
Simple Panner
Thin Phase Sweep
Leslie start
SubtleDistortion
EPiano Distortzn
Distortion + EQ
Ray's EP
Scooped Distort
Burning Tubes!
3BandDrumComp
Snare Compressor
Snare Cmp w/Rvb
Kick Compressor
Hard Knee Comprs
Bass Comp Mutrn
PnoEnhancement
LA2A for Strings
Resonant Filter
Aux Echoplex
Bandsweep Filter
Hi FrequencyStim
Ring Modulation
Frequency Offset
Lazer Tag Flange
Fallout PitchLFO
Object Version : 1.01
ID EFFECT
67 Reverse Reverb
68 Reverse Reverb 2
69 Oil Tank Reverb
70 Laser Reverb
71 Gated Laserverb
72 ReverseLaserverb
73 Envelope Followr
74 Envelope Filter2
75 Trip Filter
76 Stereoizer
77 Barberpole Phzr
78 Laser Dly Reverb
79 Degenerator
80 Basic Delay 1/8
81 Arp Delay Loop
82 HipHop Piano DDL
121 Sly Leslie K
129 Basic Delay 1/8
147 Deeper Water
176 Lead EGT6
193 LitePad2
203 PhaseDly1
204 ThinphaseSweep
206 hhpitchr1
209 Snarcmp1
210 SymphonyHall 1
211 SymphonyHall 2
212 SymphonyHall 3
213 Jazz Stage
214 Live Room
215 String Chamber
216 Fife Stage
217 Live RecitalHall
F-1
Effects

ID
218
219
220
223
224
226
229
230
233
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
255
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
F-2
EFFECT
AbbeyBrasHall2
Smooth Long Hall
kickcmp3
kickcmp4
snarcmp4
kickcmp5
Bright Hat Room
BrightFlange
snarshaper6
Reverb2
500msDelay K
Organ Chamber1
TapChorusLes LE2
Organ Latch 1/8
Organ Phaser
Organ CDR 1
nuLeslie122K
Mitch's Leslie K
TapChorusLes K2
Flange+Delay
Empty Stage II
AbbeyPianoHall 2
Opera House II
Vintage Strings2
Classic Plate II
Recital Hall II
Small Hall II
Real Niceverb II
Medium Hall II
Small Dark Room2
PnoRvb II
ShortPnoRvb III
PnoEnhancRvb3
RevComp5
Clunker II
St CHDly II
OmniStage
ID
274
275
276
277
278
279
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
323
324
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
EFFECT
OmniStage
gshot vrb
deep part1
DblSloFlangeCmp
alphacentauri1
Timbered Taps 2
GospelDistLes K
GimmeSumLeslieK
DF OrganRoom
GimmeSomeLesl
GimmeSomeLesl2
500msDelay K
Organ Chamber1
Organ Latch 1/8
Organ Phaser
Organ CDR 1
AcceleratLes2 K
ExpressLeslie K
Leslie 122 a K
Mitch's LeslieK
Melvin'sLeslieK
Greg's Leslie K
RoomyLeslie122K
SoftLeslie122 K
CrnchLesli147 K
Thimmer Leslie
Jimmy's Leslie 2
Organ Taps
Leslie Clean K
Leslie 122 K
Jimmy'sBrake
Jimmy'sBrake K
Greg's LatcherK
Nice Leslie K
Clean Leslie K
Warm Leslie K
NewLord 1 K
ID
333
334
335
336
337
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
363
364
365
366
367
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
375
376
377
378
379
380
381
382
383
384
385
386
EFFECT
CrunchLesl122 K
HotLeslie122b K
BostonLeslieK
CrunchLesl122 K
Hot Leslie 122e
HotLeslie122f K
Soul Leslie122 4
Leslie B 122 K
JoeyLeslie122 K
HotLeslie122g K
HotLeslie122h K
TapChorusLes K
SlwPhasdLeslieK
NonKB3 A K
Warm Leslie12 K
WrmDstlLes1dwK
BrighDistlLes1K
DistleratLes6 K
BrightDistlLesK
DistlLes HotGs
Prog Leslie1K
LightDistlLes2K
DW Leslie13 K
LeeMichaels 1 K
NonKB3 A K
DWLeslie12 K
DistlLes 5 K
Sly Leslie K
LightDistlLes K
FisherLeslie
SoulLeslie122 K
Big Pop PianoCmp
PianoVerb1
Pro Piano Cmp
DistlLes HotGs
NewLord 1
SystemTemp Tap
Effects

ID
387
388
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396
397
399
400
401
403
405
406
407
408
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420
421
422
423
424
425
426
EFFECT
WaterDistSynth
FlangeVoiceHall
BrightFlangeHall
SoulLeslie122 K
FlngRecitalHall
Med Drum Room
Dual Filters +
Dual Filterzz
Cathedral Vx
BurningTubes5
PunchBassAmp
RevverLeslie
Bradley's Barn 1
Bradley's Barn 2
LA2A for Strings
DrmCDR 1
DrumFatty
DrumFattyDry
AS Drum Room2
DrumFattyRoom
RealDrmComp2
ChrsDly
RealDrmComp
DrumSlap Sys
RealDrmComp2
TiteDrmComp
Marimba Hall
Gated Plate 144m
AS Dub Delay
HipHop Hall
AGT Reverb
Gated Plate2144m
WarmCruncher
DrumFatty3
Fierce Lead
CompTrem
12StWarmCrunch
ID
427
428
429
430
431
432
433
434
435
436
437
439
440
441
442
443
445
446
447
448
449
450
451
452
454
455
456
457
458
459
461
462
463
464
465
466
467
EFFECT
Phaser EGT
SnareComp1
ASDrumComp1
KickComp1
60's BigDrumRoom
AS SynthDist2
AS CmpVerb4Drms
AGT EnhCD
CDRecitalHall
Nylon EnhCD
RealDrmComp3
ChrsDblRoom
EnhcBassAmp
FlangVoiceHall2
Vocals w FXnMic
RealDrmComp4
Harpolicious
ChrsDly
EGT Hall
Burning Tubes
Chorus AGT
SynthLead
SynthBassAmp
MosqueySwirl
PadFX2
PadFX1
Chr & Echo
Vocals w FX
DrySynthCDR
WetSynthCDR
VibesRoom
PercussionRoom
CagesRoom
CmpRecitalHall
StrRecitalHall1
StrRecitalHall2
RecitalHall
ID
468
469
470
472
473
474
477
478
479
480
482
483
484
485
486
487
488
489
491
492
493
496
500
501
517
518
519
520
521
522
523
524
525
526
527
528
529
EFFECT
MyJacoART
UprightBassRoom
Levin Chorus
Bright Room
Med Dark Room
BasicReverb
Medium Hall 4U
KickComp2
ColdPliano 2
FDR PercRoom
NylonAgtVerb
3BandDrumComp
KikComp 4:1
ToxicStrings
3BandDrumComp2
Scoopd Dist EGT2
NotScoopd Dist
HeavyBuckers
ProBassComp
NYCTripStrings
ProBassComp2
DirtLordAmp LE
Setup Aux Verb
Setup Aux DDL
Early Reflection
Pad Depth Pt1
Gunshot Verb
AlphaCentauri 1
BasicCDR
Synthorc BPM
BPM Flange Dly
DblSloFlangeCmp
Deep ChorusVerb
ChorDlyWet26-28
Light ChorusVerb
Chor Delay 26 27
Pitcher Slider A
F-3
Effects

ID
530
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
538
539
540
541
542
543
544
545
546
547
548
549
550
551
552
553
554
555
556
557
558
559
560
561
562
563
558
559
F-4
EFFECT
Pad Depth Pt1
PolyPitcher 2
LFO Pitcher
Wet Hall for Pad
DrmCMP4PrgFX2
Kick Compressor2
Snare Compresso2
DrmCMP4PrgFX
Kick Compressor2
Snare Compresso3
Snare Compresso4
HOP Drum Reverb5
Stereoizer2/Verb
CmPhDiRe4Drms2
Stereoizer3/Verb
Stereoizer5/Verb
DrmCMP4PrgFX5
HOP Drum Reverb5
Stereoizer6/Verb
DrmCMP4PrgFX6
CmPhDiRe4Drms2
CmPhDiRe4Drms3
DrumFXcmpdly1a
CmEqDeRe4DrmsST2
GatePltPhs3bnd2
SynthDist4Drms2
CmPhDiRe4Drms4
DirtLordAmp 2
JADrumAmp2a
CmEqDeRe4DrmsST3
CmPhDiRe4Drms5
JADrumAmp2b
DrmFatener/ Ech2
DrmCMP4PrgFX7
JADrumAmp2a
CmEqDeRe4DrmsST3
ID
564
565
566
567
568
569
570
571
572
573
574
575
576
577
578
579
580
581
582
583
584
585
586
587
588
589
590
591
592
600
601
602
603
604
601
602
EFFECT
EnhCD4DRUMS2
Little Booth2
DrmFlngDlyVrbCm2
CmEqDeRe4DrmsSTa
CmEqDeRe4DrmsSTb
DrumFattyDry2
DrumFattyDry3
AS Drum Room2a
Gated Plate2144b
DrumFatty4
DrumFattyRoom3
ASDrumComp1a
AS Drum Room2a
DrumFatty3a
AS SynthDist2b
HipHop Hall2
AS CmpVerb4Drms4
DrumFattyRoom4
DrumFattyRoom5
AbbeyBrushHall
HOP Drum Reverb6
HOP Drum Reverb7
CmPhDiRe4Drms
DrmFatener/ Ech2
Tuna Hall
Gated Plywood
PlywoodDrumFuzz
AnvilDrumFuzz
Drum Pad Reverb1
DrumFuzz
Snare Comp/EQ
hhpitchrja
Gated Plate
JAJazzCmps
Snare Comp/EQ
hhpitchrja
ID
605
606
607
608
609
610
611
612
613
614
615
616
617
618
619
620
621
622
623
624
625
626
627
628
629
630
631
632
633
634
635
636
637
638
637
638
EFFECT
JA Rl Nce Verb
JADrumAmp1
JADrumAmp2
DrumFXcmpdly1
Drum Freq Offset
CheapDrmDist
SynthDist4Drms
DrmCMP4PrgFX4
DrmThnphseSweep
StereoizerW/Verb
DrmCMP4PrgFX2
CmPhDiRe4Drms
CmPhDeRe4Drms
CmEqDeRe4Drms
CmEqDeRe4DrmsST
DrmFatener/ Ech
DrmPhaseVerb
DrmFlngDlyVrbCmp
Drum VerbW/Ster
Verb/Str/Cmp
Verb/Str/Dist
EnhCD4DRUMS
GatePltPhs3bnd
RevVrbFlgV
DrmCMPVb4PrgFX2
3BndCmp4Snr
HOP Drum Reverb1
StereoW/VerbHFD
SnrFatener& Ech
Warm Drum Plate
Dly/vrb BPM
Drm vrb Long
Real drm plate
Deep Fuzz Vrb
Real drm plate
Deep Fuzz Vrb
Effects

ID
639
640
641
642
643
644
645
646
648
651
652
654
655
656
657
658
659
660
661
662
663
664
665
666
667
668
670
671
675
676
680
681
682
685
687
690
EFFECT
Flange+Delay
MySynthDist
DrmphseDlySweep
CmDeRe4Drms
Sweet drum Hall
StevieTrem EP 1
Beater EP1
Jamerson1
SlyBASSComp1
Trampler 1
HipHop Drms1
HipHop Drms2
TOP Drum Reverb1
HOP Drum Reverb1
HopKickcmp1
NoQuarter
TechnoHHDly 1/8
HOP Drum Reverb3
HopKickcmp7
Roomverb1
Kickcmp6
Snarcmp11
Reverb3
Small Dark Room
Snarcmp12
Kickcmp13
BeastieDrums
Clunker13
Funksnare9
Funksnare8
EPDistPhase1
RayEP 1
Deep Fuzz 1
Deep Fuzz 31
ReverseVerb1
Acidflute
ID
691
692
694
695
696
697
700
701
702
703
704
705
706
707
708
709
710
711
712
713
714
715
716
717
718
719
720
721
722
723
724
725
726
727
728
729
EFFECT
Blueman1
CompDelay12
SmallDarkRoom3
PlainComp15
RevComp4
EP RotoAmp12
HiMutron 1
Sax Chamber 21
BigDarkRoomDW
New Gtr 31
PnoRvb 14
Small Hall11
PnoRvb21
Empty Stage 11
Mutron 2
Double Leslie 12
Double Leslie 5
PlainComp12
Double Leslie 11
CDR Synth
SynthFlangenDely
QuantzEnhanceSyn
BladerunnrRvb
Deep FuzzBass 1
Eber Bass
SynFatener& Ech2
CP80Enhanc1
Fisher'sHarm Mic
AbbeyPianoHall2
Medium Hall 2
Fagen Phaser
Double Leslie 10
SmallWurly
Basic WurlyEP
Double Leslie 13
Cheese Horns
ID
730
731
732
733
734
735
736
737
738
739
740
741
742
743
744
745
746
747
750
754
756
757
758
759
760
762
764
765
766
768
771
772
773
775
780
781
EFFECT
BasicChorusDly 2
Double Leslie 8
Wallflower Ch
ChPanDlyComp
CheeseChorus
Double Leslie 14
CompDelay
SynFatener& Ech3
BIGCompDelay
UprightPiano
SitarCmpRvb
AC Bass 3
VoxKB3
Blackfriday
Blackestfriday
Flange 4
DoubldistLslie20
Double Leslie15
Good Leslie1
Good Leslie4
GoodLeslie 6
WhitrShadeLeslie
Inagadadavita
GoodLordLeslie
Small HallComp1
GoodLeslie 5
ShortPnoRvb31
St CHDly
Synphase1
St CHDly
Walrus EP
EPChr16
Siberia
Deep Fuzz 5
Flange Echo 2
ARPMosque Room
F-5
Effects

ID
782
784
785
786
787
788
790
792
793
794
795
797
798
799
801
802
803
804
805
806
807
808
809
810
811
812
813
814
815
816
817
818
819
820
821
822
F-6
EFFECT
Chr & Echo
Mutron Clav 2
Siberia II
EnhanceComp1
Shaper->Reverb2
Clav Phase1
SynlaserFlange 1
RockyRaccoon
Squire
Flange 4
Deep Fuzz Clav
Clav Comp1
SmallClav
Synth Shimmer
PhaseDly1
Shredlead1
ThinphaseSweep
EnvComp41
MoogBASSComp11
SynFatener& Ech4
Shredlead15
PlainComp21
Garth
BassFleaCompMu
Chr & Echo 2
BasicCDR2
ShaperFuzzLead 2
AM Big Band
Clunker20
PadFX3
SynFatener& Ech5
MarleyClav1
Flange Echo 4
Deep Fuzz Clav 3
GetBack1
Deep Fuzz Clav 5
ID
823
824
825
827
828
829
830
831
832
833
834
835
836
838
839
840
841
842
843
844
845
846
847
848
849
850
851
852
853
854
855
856
857
858
859
860
EFFECT
ChrsDly4
Leslie Basic
MoogBASSComp5
EPChr1 Dyno
Synphase17
Leslie Comp 1
PhaseDly104
GoodLeslie 52
CPChrRvb1
DistLeslie Basic
CompKit111
CarlosSyn
MaroonSynbass
FloydEP1
PnoCmpSndBoard 1
SuperTrmpPhase
Wurly 1
ShortPlate4EPs
ShortPlate4EPs2
Aux Dark Room 2
Elton1
Aux Chamber
BowiePno1
BluesPnoCmpRvb 1
New Gtr 31
Soundboard 3
OmniStage
Double Leslie
MedPlateJazFlute
MistyMntn EP 2
PnoEnhanc22
ClavPhase1
MedRoom10
EPChr11
HardRhds1
PnoEnhancement
ID
861
862
863
864
865
866
867
868
869
870
871
872
873
874
875
876
877
878
879
880
881
882
883
884
885
886
887
888
889
890
891
892
893
894
895
896
EFFECT
Little Mu
SmallHornChamber
OmniStageDW
Clunker50
PnoEQCmp3
Comp4
3DogEP 1
CompDelay
PnoEnhanc22
cheap Chamber
EPChr11
Old Chamber
ChefAid 1
Zep Fuzz 1
Bernie Clav
ClavRotoAmp
Dark Niceverb
Basic RayEP 3
LatinHornCmp
Basic RayEP 2
Raffas DX7
EPChr6
PnoEnhanc3
SynEnhancement
CompKik11
VintChamber
SmallWurly2
Deep FuzzPnt 1
Comp70
FooldAgainVox
CompKik111
Vintage Horns 3
Leslie Gospl
EPChr60
Syn Lead A
Deep Fuzz 51
Effects

ID
897
898
899
900
901
902
903
904
905
906
907
908
909
910
911
912
913
914
915
916
917
918
919
920
921
922
923
924
925
926
927
928
929
930
931
932
EFFECT
4-Tap Delay BPM2
Shredlead3
Synphase1
Synphase2
SynthTrem2
DWAuxRvb1
Small Dark Room2
Sax Chamber2
Small Hall2
Medium Hall2
Real Niceverb
Opera House2
Mosque Room2
Bright Hall
Echplex 1
AbbeyPianoHall
Recital Hall 2
Echplex 2
Medm Warm Plate2
EQVelMorph
Aux Echplex
Farfisa1
Good Leslie33
Zep Leslie
Snarcmp801
kickcmp401
Deep Fuzz 6
SynEnv4
SmallComp9
KickComp201
GoodLeslie 9
Falgor Gtr
KickComp701
Good Leslie34
Syncblip
CompDelay3
ID
933
934
935
936
937
938
939
940
941
942
943
944
945
946
947
948
949
950
951
952
953
954
955
956
957
958
959
960
961
962
963
964
965
966
967
968
EFFECT
Cheese Horns2
SynthCDR20
Vintage Horns 2
Chorus Pan Delay
Snarcmp101
Filter1
Syncpulsedw
Kickcmp501
Snarshaper601
ProBassComp3
SynEnv5
SnareComp101
BostonLeslie2
Kickcmp104
Leslie MShoals
Snarcmp121
WhitrShadeLesli3
Snarcmp112
Snarcmp113
EnvKickcmp1
Kickcmp602
Snarcmp112
HipHop Drms101
PnoCmpSndBoard10
Epicsnare1
JumpSynth
Funksnare88
Kickcmp441
Upright3
HopKickcmp701
Leslie Comp 2
Kickcmp301
PnoRvb 1
PnoRvb2
HipHop Drms201
Breakdrums1
ID
969
970
971
972
973
974
975
976
977
978
979
980
981
982
983
984
985
986
987
988
989
990
991
992
993
994
995
996
997
998
999
1000
1001
1003
1004
1005
EFFECT
Blackfriday2
CompDelay101
Sax Chamber 2
Clunker501
Horn Plate 1
Vintage Horns
BrightFlange2
ThinphaseSweep2
Small Comp102
EPPhase1
NonKB3LesliePdl2
FlangeComp3
Mutron Clav 201
SynChorusDly202
RayEP 1
EnhanceComp121
Clunker IIa
Pad Depth Pt1
AuxChorusHall
TechnoSyn1
Synphase102
CompDelay
CompMeltrn
ARP
Triplet delay
Bigverb
Syncpulse
compbass 2
CompDelay3
Comp501
RMIPhase1
Joey Leslie 122
SynChorusDlydw2
ECello2
violin2
Small StringRoom
F-7
Effects

ID
1006
1007
1008
1009
1010
1011
1012
1013
1014
1015
1016
1017
1018
1019
1020
1021
2050
2051
2052
2053
2054
2055
2101
2102
2103
2104
2107
2108
2110
2150
2200
2201
2202
2203
2204
2205
F-8
EFFECT
Viola2
Cello2
FalgorwahGtr
Accdn Booth
BRASS EQ/Comp
SynTrem
InfinSynCathedr
Delay + Plate1
SEM TRIdw
SynthLeaddw
SynPadDW
AGT EnhCDdw
CasterTremdw
LesTremdw
StdioCasterRigdw
PercVerb1
Concert Piano FX
Studio Piano FX
Dampers Up Forte
Pad Depth Forte
ChorVerb for Pad
Symphony Harpsi
ChoDistDly2
Dark Room 2
Carrot Rev
Carrot 1a
Cabbage 1a
Cab-Reverb
PithrFlngDistDly
MarquisPiano3
BluesPnoCmpRvb 1
BluesPnoCmpRvb 2
BluesPnoCmpRvb 3
ArtEQDW1
ArtEQCMPDW5
ArtEQCMPDW6
ID
2206
2207
2208
2209
2210
2211
2212
2300
2303
2500
2501
2502
2560
3200
3201
3202
3203
3204
3205
3206
3207
3208
3209
3210
3211
3212
3213
3214
3215
3216
3217
3218
3219
3220
3221
3222
EFFECT
ChessRecords1
ArtEQCMPDW7
MarquisPiano1
MarquisPiano2
Rachverb
MarquisPiano5
ChessRecords2
JK FX Template
jk AUX1
Pianarma EQ+Cmp
Pianarama! verb
KikComp 4:1
MarimbDelay BPM
SEM TRI
RAVE WIND
Chroma FM
Chroma FM2
Iceman Bass
Mandocaster
Daft Lead
Tenor Sax
GANGsta Wrap
Basic Delay 3/16
DblSloFlangeCmp
Pan Trem BPM
Pan Trem BPM OOP
BPM Pad ChDeRv
supersaw 2
Slow Phase
BPM Trance
Lazer DUB
Krafty Monks
dist Booth
Delay + Plate
Dist Booth Dly
Sonny More | )
ID
3223
3224
3225
3226
3227
3228
3229
3230
3231
3232
3233
3234
3235
3236
3237
3238
3239
3240
3241
3242
3243
3244
3245
3246
3247
3248
3249
3250
3251
3252
3253
3254
3255
3256
3257
3258
EFFECT
JSP Synth CDL
Synker1
SynCompMu1
Shred Gtr
Shred Gtr Wah
Chunky G 1
AuxGtrEchplex
Synth Delay 1/4
Bari Sax
Electric Mermaid
Solo Trumpet
FLIP'n Chorus!
FLIP'n Delay!
RedHot Dst/Cho
RedHot Reverb
RedHot Delay
Miami Gated Room
Miami Plate Rvb
SnarkyDimplix Rb
FLIP'n Distortn!
Synth Brass Env
Van BrownSound
Van Reverb
Gated Plate
Van EQ
WarmCruncher2
Scorb4Tap/Rv BPM
Scorb-olo BPM
Here Lil' Boy!
DiPulsulator
PadmePlecks BPM
ToodleTrem
ToodleDelay 1/8
Zap Chamber
CasterTrem
LesTrem
Effects

ID
3259
3260
3261
3262
3263
3264
3265
3266
3267
3268
3269
3270
3271
3272
3273
3274
3275
3276
3277
3278
3279
3280
3281
3282
3283
3284
3285
3286
3287
3288
3289
3290
3291
3292
3293
3294
EFFECT
AS Laser Reverb
as Laser Reverb
NuBeautyDist
AmbientPanner
NuBeautyDist2
HammerDulceComp
Dulcimer Chorus
HammerDulceRoom3
HammerDulceComp2
LesChorus
EGT Multi 1
Kinda Krunchy2
Pan Trem BPM OOP
SEM Shape
Bright Syn Pad
Synth Delay/RVB
Syn Chor DDL
Syn Dist/Delay
huge space 2
SynPad
Synth Bass CDR
BOC Deverb
Gtr Niceverb
TripleCaster1
TripleCaster2
TripleCaster3
TripleCaster4
TripleCaster5
TripleCaster6
TripleCasterWah
TripleCasterEQ
TripleCaster31
TrumpetWah
E-Bow
1/2-1/4DlyBPM
Phase
ID
3295
3296
3297
3298
3299
3300
3301
3302
3303
3304
3305
3306
3307
3308
3309
3310
3311
3312
3313
3314
3315
3316
3317
3318
3319
3320
3321
3322
3323
3324
3325
3326
3327
3328
3329
3330
EFFECT
EQVelMorph L
EQVelMorph R
HF Stim
InstantHillbilly
HoRnYFlAnGePaRtY
BRASS EQ/Comp
MouthyFilter
Super8 Horn Dly
BrassMod+AMRadio
7thHeaven Plate
7thHeavenCmpSlap
Bullitt PDlyHall
Bunny Delay 3
Van Brown LITE
Van ChDly LITE
Sax-susolo Plate
THX
StdioCasterFXRig
BonzoCompLTE
BonzoLTE GateRvb
Syn Brass Plate
Syn Str Hall
E-Bow 1
THX
WorldCDR1
WarmCDR
Chunky G 1
OBI 1
SYnBassCompMu
MarimbDelay BPM
DW GatedLaserver
Chillwave Chords
Burning Keys 3
EnhanceSyn
Burning Keys 6
StTaps1
ID
3331
3332
3333
3334
3335
3336
3337
3338
3339
3340
3341
3342
3343
3344
3345
3346
3347
3348
3349
3350
3351
3352
3353
3354
3355
3356
3357
3358
3359
3360
3361
3362
3363
3364
3365
3366
EFFECT
Flange Mayhem2
Mute Gtr1
SynthCDR
3str Gtr Wah2
WorldMandolinCDR
Padme's lil' Pal
Squeeze Cmp
Klockwork
Bass Fishing
Wave Rider
TripleCaster6
TripleCasterWah
Mr.West Horns
TripleCaster31
SynPnoPhase1
PBS on VHS
Attack Trance
HPF Drum Taps
Lectro Plate
Nasty Syn Brass
Syn Str Hall
BOC Deverb
Popcorn Plate
Plantasia Plate
New Horns 1
Phase DW
SynChor&Dly1
Mando EQ
WorldMandolnCDR1
Dist Booth Dly
Synth Bass CDR
Infin Cathedral
Forte Pad Insert
Punch-a-ghost
ElecMandolin
Gallo Dist+ EQ
F-9
Effects

ID
3367
3368
3369
3370
3456
3457
3458
3459
3460
3461
3462
3463
3464
3465
3466
3467
3468
3469
3470
3471
3472
3473
3474
3475
3476
3477
3478
3479
3480
3481
3482
3483
3484
3485
3486
3487
F-10
EFFECT
UnderCurrnts
UnderCurAux
DW Laser Reverb
Cathedral ChorDW
BreakdrumsNEWKIK
Lil' Drum Booth
Small Drum Space
Small Cmpsd Spce
More Drum Air
Full Drum Room
Brite Drum Space
Garage Drums
Expandn'DrumHall
Expandn'Drum 481
Expandn'DrumPLTE
Expandn'Drum GYM
SnappyDrumCmpVrb
Drum Enhancer
DrumComp subtle
Snare Enhancer
SnrEnhanceComp
NewKickComp 1
CmpVerb4Drms2
DistCompRev4Drms
DrmCMP4PrgNew
Ricochet Verb
VerbW/Stereo 2
DubDelayer
DarkDrumSlap Sys
ExpStereoDrmHall
Snr Enhnce HiCut
Trans DrmComp
CmEqDeRe4DrmsSTb
CmpDistRev4Drms
VinylDistImage
Dub hall
ID
3488
3489
3490
3491
3492
3493
3494
4001
4002
4003
4004
4005
4006
4007
4008
4009
4010
4011
4012
4013
4014
4015
4016
4017
4018
4019
4020
4021
4022
4023
4024
4025
4026
4027
4028
4029
EFFECT
JK Timbered Taps
JK GatedLaserver
JK Marimba Hall
JK Green Room
JK Laser Reverb
Dubstep Drumz
DubDelayer
Rich 9 Ft Grand
Rich 7 Ft Grand
Rock 9 Ft Grand
Bright 7ft Grand
Solo 9 Ft Grand
Solo 7 Ft Grand
Vintage Upright
Vintage Grand
Elegant Grand
New Orleans
Dark & Distant
Piano + Pad
Piano & Strings
Punchy Edge
R&B Stack
Super Pop
70s Album
Artis Grand
Legacy Grand
New Age Grand
Piano & Harp
Piano & Choir
Mood Ring
Ambience
Film Piano
Soul Piano
Pub Piano
Double Grand
Mono Upright
ID
4030
4031
4032
4033
4034
4035
4036
4037
4038
4039
4040
4041
4042
4043
4044
4045
4046
4047
4048
4049
4050
4051
4052
4053
4054
4055
4056
4057
4058
4059
4060
4061
4062
4063
4064
4065
EFFECT
Double Squash
Vintage Squash
House Piano
Rooftop 73 Rhds
Steely Dyno 77
Vintage Amp Wrly
Amped Bell 73
BarkDist 77 Rhds
Becks Retro Wrly
Phasey 73 Rhds
Mr. SparkleTop73
Aged Tolex 77
Smooth 70's 73
FusionChorDyno73
Chorus 77 Rhds
73/77 StereoBels
Env Filt Rhds
Ray's Wurly
Deep Fuzz Wurly
T-Bone Wurly
Phase Dist Wurly
Bright Fuzz Wrly
Tramp Amp Wurly
FM EP 1
FM EP 2
Rhotary Rhds 73
Elec Grand Stack
BrightRMI Pn/Hrp
Tight Bright FM
Gabriel's Melt
CP80 Enhanced
VideoKilledRadio
UK Pop CP70
MistyMountain EP
No Quarter Pnt
Black Friday
Effects

ID
4066
4067
4068
4069
4070
4071
4072
4073
4074
4075
4076
4077
4078
4079
4080
4081
4082
4083
4084
4085
4089
4090
4091
4092
4093
4094
4095
4096
4097
4098
4099
4100
4101
4102
4103
4104
EFFECT
Sly Ballad
RoyalKingWakeman
StageTines Soft
Suitcase Tines
Rooftop 73 Rhds2
Suitcase EP
Wurly 200
Chaka Clav
SupaStevie CB
Funkadelic Relic
ZEP Clav
HeartbreakerWAH
Chameleon Wah
Stevie Fuzz Amp
OutOfPhasPickups
Fr Harpsi L84U8
Fr Harpsi L48
Fr Harpsi Lute
Fr Harpsi L8
Fr Harpsi U8
ClassicBLesFstvX
FunkyPerc Les X
SoulPerc Les X
FirstThree LesX
PerfectStrLes X
70s Drwbars LesX
Prog Bars Les X
Ezra II Les X
CrunchLesl122 X
SoulLeslie122 X
Jimmy'sBrakeX
DistlLes HotGsX
NonKB3 A KX 2
VoxKB3
VoxKB3
Farfisa1
ID
4105
4106
4107
4108
4109
4110
4111
4112
4113
4114
4115
4116
4117
4118
4119
4120
4121
4122
4123
4124
4125
4126
4127
4128
4129
4130
4131
4132
4133
4134
4135
4137
4138
4139
4140
4141
EFFECT
All Stops
AllStopsAllVox
Pipe Stops
Chapel Organ
Pipes & Voices
16' Open Flute
16' Ped Reed
16' Reed A
16' Viol
Leslie 122 K X
LightDistlLes KX
Clean Leslie KX
Fisher'sHarm Mic
ParisCmboAccordn
Mellow Accordion
BrasilAccordion
Press Lead
Cars Square Lead
Keytar Hero(Wah)
Voyage Lead
SimpleHipHopLead
SquareChirpLead
Vector Lead
80s Lead Synth
Dark Wobbles
Daft Lead
Minipulse 4Pole
Frankenstein Wah
Candy*O Sync
Raw & Bleedin
Dist Filter Lead
Film Score Pad
Majestic Pad
So Lush Pad
Bladerunner ARP
CrotaleScape Pad
ID
4142
4143
4144
4145
4146
4147
4148
4149
4150
4151
4152
4153
4154
4155
4156
4157
4158
4159
4160
4161
4162
4163
4164
4165
4166
4167
4168
4169
4170
4171
4172
4173
4174
4175
4176
4177
EFFECT
UnderCurrents
Fairlight Pad
Phase Shimmer
Evolving Pad
Lush Pad
Deeper Water
Lush Rhythm Pad
Cosmic Sus Pedal
Solo Syn Orch
Add A Pad 1
Add A Pad 2
Super Saw
Bright Vector
Classic SynBrass
MW S&H Filt
80's Heaven
PolySynth Stack
Chillwave Chords
Classic Saws
Big Old Jupiter
Punchy Synth
Touch Trance
Square Bell
Perc Vector
Tesla Coil
Warbly Pong SQR
Gangsta Wrap
Woodhouse Bass
Aggro OctoBass
KneeDeepMiniMoog
Squeeze Mini
Iceman Bass
ANGRY Bass
Big Synth Bass
Noise Bass
The Way It Is
F-11
Effects

ID
4178
4179
4180
4181
4182
4183
4184
4185
4186
4187
4188
4189
4190
4191
4192
4193
4194
4195
4196
4197
4198
4199
4200
4201
4202
4203
4204
4205
4206
4207
4208
4209
4210
4211
4212
4213
F-12
EFFECT
Dolby Bass
Adagio Strings
Big LA Strings
Fast Strings
Slow String Trem
AdagioTutti 8ves
Adagio Octaves
NashvilleStrings
Poltergeist Pad
Full Pizzicato
Lead Violins II
AggressDivisiStr
Yesesis Tron Str
Moby TurntblTron
Solo Violin Fast
Solo Cello Fast
Solo Harp
Session Hornz
High-End Horns
Split SectionSW
Mancini Brass
GB Hornz+Syn
Super-8 Horn Dly
Brass Fanfare
Low Orch Brass
Lead Trumpet
Solo Trombone
Jubilee Trumpets
Wah Trumpet
Mr. West Horns
Bullit Brass
Dr. Stab'N SwEll
MiamiBrassSectns
Mostly Saxes
UniSaxSection
Bassoon/Oboe
ID
4214
4215
4216
4217
4218
4219
4220
4221
4227
4228
4229
4230
4231
4232
4233
4234
4235
4236
4237
4238
4239
4240
4241
4242
4243
4244
4245
4246
4247
4248
4249
4250
4258
4259
4260
4267
EFFECT
Solo Alto Sax
Solo Tenor Sax
Flute/Clarinet
Solo Bari Sax
StrawberryFlutes
Gothic Climax
Winds & Strings
3Way Split Mltrn
Rich 'Caster
Rich Les
Studio 'Caster
Phaser Elec Gtrs
TimeWarpCaster
Kinda Krunchy
Brown Sound LTE
Stompbox Les
SuperFlyWahCast
Jack the Ripper
Boutique Six Str
Boutique 12 Str
Real Nylon
Mandolin Plus
Banjo Plus
Dulciere
P-Bass
Motown Bass
Finger Bass
Flea/Bootsy
Jaco Fretless
AC Buzzer Bass
Beasties Bass
Levin/Gabrlfrtls
Motown Bass
Finger Bass
Flea/Bootsy
Celeste
ID
4268
4269
4270
4271
4272
4273
4274
4275
4276
4277
4278
4279
4280
4283
4284
4285
4286
4287
4288
4289
4290
4291
4292
4293
4294
4295
4296
4297
4298
4299
4300
4301
4302
4303
4304
4305
EFFECT
Octave Celeste
Bells
Carillon
Basic Orch Perc
Orch Timpani
Natural Perc
Percussionist
Bongo Conga
Talking Drum
Accessory
Carnival Perc
Vocal Percussion
Celeste
Mixed Choir
Manhattan Voices
Choir Complete
NYC in LA
Crystal Voices
Cathedral Vox
Silent Sorrow
Swept Tron Voice
Slo Orch Chorus
Aaah Vocals
Jazzy Ballad Vox
Bright Syn Vox
AntiqueAhhChorus
Vox Angel
Aaahlicious
PolyTechnobreath
Glockenspiel
Real Vibes
Stereo Marimba
Xylophone
XHarmonicStlDrum
Chimes
Bigger Chimes
Effects

ID
4306
4307
4308
4309
4315
4316
4317
4318
4319
4320
4321
4322
4323
4324
4325
4326
4327
4330
4331
4332
4340
4350
4351
4352
4353
4501
4502
4503
4504
4505
4506
4507
4508
4509
4510
4511
EFFECT
Crotales Hits
Metal Marimba
SteamPunkMallets
CeleseGlockHarp
Celeste Palette
Bellestrum VTrg
Toy Piano
Bunch of Bells
Synthy 73
Wurzzicato
Comp Cro + Pad
Clavestrum
Bowed Crotales
Bells and Bows
Bass Pedal
Creepy Crawlies
RockLesl122 X
Reverse Universe
Pan Strings 3
5th-Scape
SyncoDeMayo
Power Bottom
Deception Bass
Latch Bass
APG-ish Bass
ART2 Recital 587
ART2 Solo 988
ART2 Fierce 1175
ART2 Studio 831
ART2 Rich 1175
ART2 Jazzy 831
ART2 Bright 2794
ART2 Modern 415
ART2 Smooth 440
ART2 Vintage 330
ART2 Upright 466
ID
4512
4513
4514
4515
4516
4517
4518
4519
4520
4521
4522
4523
4524
4525
4526
4527
4528
4529
4530
4531
4532
4533
4534
4535
4536
4537
4538
4540
4544
4545
4546
4547
4548
4549
4550
4552
EFFECT
ART2Intimate 554
FSE W/Pad 4435
ART2 Warm AGG2
Dark & Distant
Air Rhds 5
74 Suitcase SE
Lite Touch Tube
Rhodes+FM
Fagen Rhodes
Tube EP Trem
Sustain Dyno
Reduced 73 Rhds
DX7 Chain NG
DX7 Chain
Sustain Dyno 2
Warble Rhodes
Subtle EP Verb
Reduced 73 Rhdsd
Air Rhds 5
Wurly 200 SE
Wurly 200 SE 2
Tube Amp Clav 10
Tube Amp Clav12"
Clavinet
Tube Amp Clavint
VAST Clav
VAST Clav Autowa
Harpsitar
Classic Harpsic
Simple Harpsic
MustBeHarpsick
Harp-Secco-rd
Clavinet2
ClassicBLesFstvX
SoulPerc Les X
DistlLes HotGsX
ID
4555
4558
4559
4565
4567
4568
4569
4570
4571
4572
4573
4574
4576
4577
4581
4582
4583
4584
4585
4586
4587
4588
4589
4590
4592
4593
4594
4595
4596
4597
4598
4599
4600
4602
4603
4604
EFFECT
Single2xLeslie
Farfisa Delay
Farfisa Leslie
Prophet Sync
Keytar Hero(Wah)
Clone Bandit
5ths Lead 4
Robin's Org Lead
Snap Lead
Sine Stuff
Seondek Lead
AlaskanWild Lead
Poly Vector Lead
Dogs Lead
Omni Strings 3
OBX FX
OBX FX
Juno Chorus
Omni Strings
Detuned PolySyn
OBX Pad
PPG
Arpeggi Pad
Prophet Pad
Warm EncounterFX
Mesoshere
Water Buffalo
Pan Motion Pad
Deeper Water
NG 5th Synth
80s Saws
Throaty S&H
OBX FX
Frozen Sawdust
Tomita's Tomato
Vintage Wobbler
F-13
Effects

ID
4606
4607
4608
4609
4610
4611
4612
4613
4614
4615
4616
4617
4618
4619
4620
4624
4629
4631
4632
4636
4637
4638
4639
4647
4648
4649
4650
4653
4654
4655
4656
4658
4659
4660
4661
4662
F-14
EFFECT
Quadra Comp FX
Clav Template
80s Saws
Static Charge
Poly Arp MH
Poly Arp 3
poly Arpeggiator
Dread Bass
Uptown Bass
Phattest
Poppit SynBass
MiniFunk
SmoothMoogerCR
RC Little Booth
Dub Wob
Uptown
Phser Mod Delay
Trem Layer
Strangs Chain
DBass & Violins
MarmaladeStrings
Dulcet Strings
Tutti Strings
UniSaxSection
Lourde1
Full Blown
Epic Low Brass
Solo Saxes
Sylvan Dbl Reeds
Clarinet
Fruity Floot
SoloBassoon&Oboe
BClar/Clar/Flute
Dyn Orch Fr Horn
TonyStarkAmp
EPIC VOX & STRG
ID
4663
4664
4665
4666
4667
4668
4672
4673
4674
4675
4676
4677
4678
4679
4680
4681
4682
4683
4684
4687
4688
4689
4690
4691
4692
4698
4699
4700
4709
4710
4711
4712
4713
4714
4715
4716
EFFECT
Winds & Strings2
Congregation
Matadores
Cello & Reeds
Dave & David
H'Arps n Harp
Mandolinese
BroadwayBackup
Gypsy Reggae
Delay Amount
Shimmer Pluck
Shokdo Enka
Yucatan Vibe
MR Kite1
Mixed Strummah
ChripingStompbox
TouchMeAfter3pm
Pizzynth
Cirque du Synth
PrivateVibes2
Broken Sparkle
Touch Vocoder
Pressure Cooker
Armonica Wurly2!
Ambience
Chunky Comper 2
Twin Peaks
Noisy Feedacker
Ooh So G'oohD
DapPer Dudes
Bummer Dudes
BaDaDah-Doop
Choir Redux
EnvelopingVoices
OohDBopTouchEcho
In a good place2
ID
4718
4721
4722
4723
4724
4741
4742
4743
4744
4745
4746
4747
4748
4749
4750
4751
4752
4753
4757
5000
5001
5002
5003
5004
5005
5006
5007
5008
5009
5010
5011
5012
5013
5014
5015
5016
EFFECT
Dark Wobbles
Daft Lead
Minipulse 4Pole
Frankenstein Wah
Candy*O Sync
Raw & Bleedin
Dist Filter Lead
Film Score Pad
Majestic Pad
So Lush Pad
Bladerunner ARP
CrotaleScape Pad
UnderCurrents
Fairlight Pad
Phase Shimmer
Evolving Pad
Lush Pad
Deeper Water
Lush Rhythm Pad
Cosmic Sus Pedal
Solo Syn Orch
Add A Pad 1
Add A Pad 2
Super Saw
Bright Vector
Classic SynBrass
MW S&H Filt
80's Heaven
PolySynth Stack
Chillwave Chords
Classic Saws
Big Old Jupiter
Punchy Synth
Touch Trance
Square Bell
Perc Vector
Effects

ID
5017
5018
5019
5020
5021
5022
5023
5024
5025
5026
5027
5028
5029
5030
5031
5032
5033
5034
5035
5036
5037
5038
5039
5040
5041
5042
5043
5044
5045
5046
5047
5048
5049
5050
5051
5052
EFFECT
Green Room
AbbeyBrasHall2
MedRoom10
Medium Hall
CDR Just Reverb
Real Niceverb
Small Hall
Mosque w/Inf Rev
CDR Aux Reverb
Live RecitalHall
MosqueySwirl Aux
BladerunnrRvb
Dark Room 2
UnderCurAux
AbbeyPianoHall2
JK GatedLaserver
SymphonyHall 1
Gunshot Verb
SuperSaw Aux
7ft Aux Verb1
Cathedral Chorus
SymphonyHall Aux
Bradley's Barn 1
SymphonyHall 2
Empty Stage II
AbbeyPianoHall 2
Sax Chamber 21
Smooth Long Hall
Horn Plate 1
Super8 Horn Dly
Solo Trumpet
Predelay Hall
Gtr Niceverb
Bullitt PDlyHall
7thHeaven Plate
Miami Gated Room
ID
5053
5054
5055
5056
5057
5058
5059
5060
5061
5062
5063
5064
5065
5066
5067
5068
5069
5070
5071
5072
5073
5074
5075
5076
5077
5078
5079
5080
5081
5082
5083
5084
5085
5086
5087
5088
EFFECT
Miami Plate Rvb
Tenor Sax
Bari Sax
Small Dark Room2
Small Hall II
Omni Stage
DeepChorsDlyHall
AGT Reverb
NylonAgtVerb
Small Dark Room
HammerDulceRoom3
AbbeyPianoHall
Lil' Drum Booth
Gated Plate 144m
SnappyDrumCmpVrb
More Drum Air
Full Drum Room
Expandn'DrumHall
DrmCMPVb4PrgFX2
Aux Dark Room 2
CmpVerb4Drms2
Garage Drums
SymphonyHall 3
Med Drum Room
PercussionRoom
PercVerb1
Med Drum Room
Elegant Hall Aux
FlangVoXHall2Aux
Cathedral Vx Aux
Classic Plate II
Real Niceverb II
BigDarkRoomDW
Empty Stage 11
Cab-Reverb
jk AUX1
ID
5089
5090
5091
5092
5093
5094
5095
5096
5097
5098
5099
5100
5101
5102
5103
5104
5105
5106
5107
5108
5109
5110
5111
5112
5113
5114
5115
5116
5117
5118
5119
5120
5121
5122
5123
5124
EFFECT
Empty Stage
DF OrganRoom
KB3 Aux2 Booth
KB3 Aux2 Booth 2
Organ Chamber2
KB3 Cab 1
KB3 Cab 2
Plebe Chamber
1.6ms Hall
Artis KHall
2.0ms Hall
Sweet PnoHall 2
FM Hall
.78ms Hall
Album Plate
OmniStage
Artis LrgKHall
Sweet PnoHall 2
Lrg Ambience l
Upright Room
Upright Room
.78ms Hall
OmniStage 200
Omni Stage Short
Omni Stage 3
Empty Stage
Empty Stage
Scoring Stage
ElegantHallAuxJK
SymphonyHall1 JK
Dulcet Hall
huge space 2
ShimphonyHall 1
PredelayHall2 J1
PredelayHall2 J2
Sax Chamber21 JK
F-15
Effects

ID
5125
5126
5127
5128
5129
5130
5131
5132
5133
5134
5135
5136
5137
5138
5139
5140
5141
5143
5144
5146
6000
6025
6026
6027
6028
6029
6030
6031
6032
6033
6034
6035
6036
6037
6038
6039
F-16
EFFECT
SymphonyHarp JK
PredelayHall2 J1
Sax Room JK AUX
PredelayHall2 J3
Subtle EP Verb
VinylDistImage2
Dampers Up 2.5ms
damperverb 4unit
Dampers Up Forte
damper verb
DubDelayer
80s Saws verb
SymphonyHall Inf
Harmonica Mic
Ricochet Verb
Brite Drum Space
Lil' Drum Booth
Full Drum Room
AS CmpVerb4Drms4
Little Booth2
VS Wave 122
Rhodes FX 1
Small Hall
Tweet piano
Y Grand EQ 2
Soundboard 3
9-Ft Piano FX2
77DWVintAmp2hi
Tremolo BPM
Pianarama! verb
Solaris
SolarisGateLazer
Existential Taps
URage_CmpRvb
77DWDYNOAmp1
LintBuster LD
ID
6040
6041
6042
6043
6044
6045
6046
6047
6048
6049
6050
6051
6052
6053
6054
6055
6056
6057
6100
6101
6102
6103
6104
6105
6106
6107
6108
6109
6110
6111
6112
6113
6114
6115
6116
6117
EFFECT
RSessionGTR
77DWDYNOAmp2
77DWDYNOAmp3
Y DW Rock EQ
Y DW Rock EQ2
Heartbreaker
S DW AlbumEQ1
DynoChor73
73DWPHASE2
Double Grand3
Dampers Up Forte
ChorVerb for Pad
dyn77Template
SynChor&Dly1
Dampers Up Forte
German Grand4
Ezra II Les X
tmbshiftComp
Small Hall
steincoNcert2
steincoNcert3
warm stein1
9ft ppp
Studio Piano as
dancestudioyam1
Slo Attack Hall
7-Ft Piano asFN
big stein 1
77ClikFix01
crtalsdelay 1
brtpunch yam
7ft RockVerb1
7Ft Vintage Rock
Vintage Class C
Dance Studio
DanceStudioVerb
ID
6118
6119
6120
6121
6122
6124
6125
6126
6127
6128
6129
6130
6131
6132
6133
6134
6135
6136
6137
6138
6139
6140
6141
6142
6143
6144
6145
6146
6147
6148
6149
6150
6151
6152
6153
6154
EFFECT
OldSquashed D
New Age Stn 1
big warm stein
big warm C
Darker D
damperverb 2unit
7ft Solo
D TMP flat EQ
7ft Squashed
7ft Warm Jazz
9ft Classic
Rhodes Multi as1
77ClikFix02
7ft Smooth
9ft w Strings
German Grand
Concert Grand
Warm Grand 1
D Template 3
Rich 7 ft Grand
7ft Vintage Rock
Darker D
Oscar's Grand eq
7ft Squashed2
Clear 9ft Grand
2.0ms Hall
Warm 7ft Grand
.78ms Hall
House 7ft Grand
New Age Grand
Rhodes MultiFX 1
Rhodes Aux Verb1
Rhodes MultiFX 2
Rhodes Aux Verb2
1.6ms Hall
1.6ms Plate
Effects

ID
6155
6156
6157
6158
6159
6160
6161
6162
6163
6164
6165
6166
6167
6168
6169
6170
6171
6172
6173
6174
6175
6176
6177
6178
6179
6181
6182
6184
6185
6200
6201
6202
6203
6204
6205
6206
EFFECT
9ft Solo Grand
9ft DarkDistant
7ft C
9ft Bright Grand
7ft Bright Grand
Harpsichord 1
Harpsichord 2
Vintage Squashed
House 9ft Grand
Super Pop eq
Scoop 9ft Grand
Brt Scoop 9ft
Brt Scoop 7ft
ARTISCncertPnAS1
9ft Solo Grand2
Dampers Upright
German Grand2
Double Grand1
Piano + Pad
9ft w Strings2
FM n K EQ2
Artis Pluck EQ2
German Grand3
Double Grand3
German Grand4
Mono Upright
CMartPiano 1
Brt Upright7ft
Concert GrandEQ7
JSP Comp & EQ
Album Plate
DW 70s AlbumEQ1
Y DW Elton EQ2
DW70sAlbumEQSoft
Ghost EQ Soft
DarkUpright EQ
ID
6207
6208
6209
6210
6211
6212
6213
6214
6230
6231
6232
6233
6234
6235
6236
6237
6238
6239
6240
6241
6242
6300
6301
6400
6401
6402
6403
6404
6405
6406
6407
6408
6409
6410
6411
6412
EFFECT
BriteUpright EQ
Upright Room
70s Blues 7ft
Tramp Amp
Soft Rhodes
Soft Rhodes2
SoftStTrem Rhds
73SparkleTop
Supa Clav
Heartbreaker
Relic Clav
Steely Fuzz
Stevie Fuzz
Trampler
Trampler2
OutaPhasePickups
Chaka Wah
ChameleonWah
Beck Wurly
BlkCrows Wurly
Clav Chamber
Weapon Chain
Double Chorus
73DWPHASE1
77NAMMChor1
77NAMMChor2
73NAMMPHASDist1
77DWDstTrem1Wah
73DWStTrem1
73NAMMStTremDst1
73NAMMStTremDst2
77NAMMVintAmp1
DWWurlyVintAmp1
WurlyRayAmp1
NAMMSuperTrmpPha
DWWurlyPhasDst1
ID
6413
6414
6415
6416
6417
6418
6419
6420
6421
6422
6423
6424
6425
6426
6427
6428
6429
6430
6431
6432
6440
6500
6501
6502
6503
6504
6505
6506
6507
6508
6509
6510
6511
6512
6513
6514
EFFECT
DWWurlyBriteAmp1
NAMMWrlyDeepFuzz
NAMMWrlyDeepFuz2
NAMMClavTrampler
NAMMClavFuzz1
ClavNAMMPhasDst1
ClavNAMMPhasDst2
73DWPHASE2
77DWChor2
73DWPHASDist1
73DWPHASDist2
73DWPHASDistWah
77DWPHASDstWah1
73DWPHASDistWah2
73DWVintamp2
77DWVintAmpWah
DampersUp
Sweet PnoHall
77 cdr g1 t
Sweet PnoHall 2
DeepfuzWurly1
Rds AuxVerb Long
Comp Piano FX
Piano MultiFX 1
Dist Clav FX
Dist Clav CB FX
Synth HF Stim
Synth HF Stim 2
SuperSaw Aux
SuperSaw
Chroma FM3
KB3 Aux2 Booth
GANGsta Wrap 2
KB3 Aux2 Booth 2
Organ Chamber2
NonKB3 A KX 2
F-17
Effects

ID
6520
6521
6522
6530
6531
6532
6533
6534
6550
6551
6552
6553
6554
6555
6556
6557
6558
6559
6606
6610
6611
6612
6613
6617
6619
6627
6628
6630
6632
6633
6634
6635
6640
6643
6648
6649
F-18
EFFECT
String Multi FX1
SymphonyHall Aux
MltiFX for Stngs
Rhodes-Chorus
Rhodes-Flange
Rhodes-Phaser
Rhodes-Rotary
Rhodes-Env Filt
Rhodes1 Aux
Rhodes Aux Room1
DampersUp
Tines FX
9-Ft Piano FX
DampersUp
Sweet PnoHall
Sweet PnoHall 2
Tines FX
9-Ft Piano FX
Artis KHall
Artis LrgKHall
Upright EQ
Artis LrgKHall
ConcertGrand1
ModJazz Plate 1
Punch Room
Concert Grand EQ
Y Grand EQ 2
Bright Y EQ2
Artis K Pop EQ
Dark n Distant
Artis Pluck EQ1
Artis Y EQ
Bebop Piano
ModJazz K1
Piano + Pad
Delay Piano
ID
6650
6651
6655
6656
6657
6658
6659
6660
6661
6662
6663
6664
6665
6667
6668
6669
6670
6671
6672
6673
6674
6675
6676
6677
6680
6681
6682
6683
6684
6685
6686
6687
6688
6689
6692
6693
EFFECT
Mono EQ
RecitalHall
BigChorusPiano2
Lrg Ambience l
Ambient Pno EQ
Blown Spkr Ins
Recital Piano3
FM n K EQ
FM Hall
ConcertK lite1
ConcertK lite2
Soundboard as
ConcertK 4sc
ConcertK EQonly
Artis Y Grand2a
Artis YHall 2
Upright Room
ParlorPianoEQ
ParlorVerb
PianoTmplateEQ1
ModJazz K2
Brgt Soundboard
Recital EQ
Radio Pop EQ
Concert GrandEQ4
Soundboard 4
ModJazz K3
Upright EQ2
Pianarma EQ+Cm4
JSP Comp & EQ2
Recital Piano 3
ArtEQCMPas2
Weapon Chain2
MarquisPiano3
ClassicBLesFstv4
Concert GrandEQ6
ID
6694
6696
6700
6701
6702
6703
6704
6705
6706
6707
6708
6709
6710
6711
6712
6713
6714
6715
6716
6717
6718
6719
6720
6721
6722
6723
6724
6725
6726
6727
6728
6729
6800
6802
6803
6804
EFFECT
ClassicBLesFstv4
ClassicBLesFstvX
kb3 cab1
FunkyPerc Les 01
SoulPerc Les 01
PerfectStrLes01
70s Drwbars Les1
Prog Bars Les01
FirstThree Les03
Ezra II Les 01
kb3 cab1
FunkyPerc Les 01
SoulPerc Les 01
FunkyPerc Les X
70s Drwbars Les1
Prog Bars Les01
FirstThree Les03
Ezra II Les 01
SoulPerc Les X
FirstThree LesX
PerfectStrLes X
70s Drwbars LesX
Prog Bars Les X
Ezra II Les X
CrunchLesl122 X
SoulLeslie122 X
Jimmy'sBrakeX
DistlLes HotGsX
NonKB3 A KX
Leslie 122 K X
LightDistlLes KX
Clean Leslie KX
Wurly Template
Rhodes Aux Huge
7ft Aux Verb1
9-Ft Piano FX
Effects

ID
6805
6806
6807
6808
6809
6810
6811
6812
6813
6814
6815
6816
6817
6818
6819
6820
6821
6822
6823
6824
7000
7001
7002
7003
7004
7005
7006
7007
7008
7009
7010
7011
7012
7013
EFFECT
Yam ppp
CDR Aux Reverb
Dark Wobbles
Tines Aux Rev
Synth Dist CDly
Mosque w/Inf Rev
MosqueySwirl Aux
Forte Lead Insrt
Comp Lead Insert
CDR Just Reverb
Wah Synth Insert
Forte Lead GTR
Phase+CH+Delay
Dist/Wah Insert
Comp Plex Insert
Comp Mu Aliaser
Elegant Hall Aux
FlangVoXHall2Aux
FlangVoiceInsert
Cathedral Vx Aux
GM Reverb
GM Chorus
Indie Piano
BluesPnoCmpRvb 2
ArtEQ3
ArtEQDW4
ArtEQDW5
ArtEQDW7
ArtEQDW8
ArtOddHarm
SoftPnoCmpRvb 1
SterPnoCmpRvb 2
SoftPnoCmpRvb 2
SterPnoCmpRvb 3
F-19
Index
A
Add parameter 11-15, 11-16, 11-23.
Advanced 7-1, 7-13, 7-69, 10-6, 11-2, 12-3, 12-5. See
also User Type: Advanced.
Use of KVA oscillators 7-74.
Aftertouch. See Mono Pressure.
Algorithm 7-30, 7-31, 7-32, 7-36.
Allocate parameter 11-29.
Alphanumeric Entry 3-13. See also Program/Multi buttons.
Alpha Wheel 3-10, 3-11, 6-2, 6-5, 6-6, 6-15, 7-2, 7-58, 10-4,
11-3, 12-2.
Alternative Controller 7-22.
Alternative Switch 7-22.
AMPENV 7-48.
Arpeggiator 6-13, 7-55, 11-2, 11-28.
ARP1 Page 7-56, 11-28.
ARP2 Page 7-63, 11-28.
Arp Mode 7-57, 7-63.
ArpSave 7-67 to 7-68, 7-68.
Preset 7-57.
Tempo 11-28.
ArpSav 7-57.
ASR 7-46.
Assign 3-18, 6-13, 7-3, 10-11, 11-3.
Enter + Controller 7-3, 11-3.
Enter + Key 6-13, 11-4.
Assignable Switches 3-4.
Audio Cables 2-2, 2-8.
Audio In 3-9, 12-5.
Audio Jacks 2-8.
Audio Problems 14-2.
Auto Power Off 12-4.
AUX1 and AUX2 7-10, 7-14, 11-31, 11-32.
Override 11-30.
Send Level 11-31.
Aux Effects 6-16, 7-14.
Chains 11-30.
Channel 11-28.
B
Balanced Cable 2-2, 2-8.
Bank
Change 12-12, 12-13. See MIDI: Bank Changes.
MIDI 4-2, 12-13.
Mode 12-12.
Index

Select 10-2, 12-11, 12-12.
Banks 10-2.
factory 6-2.
Shift Patterns 11-21.
Bend 3-7, 11-19.
Down Ct 11-13.
Down ST 11-13.
Up Ct 11-13.
Up ST 11-13.
Brake D-2.
Bump 11-12, 11-14, 11-16.
Buttons 3-2. See also Zone: buttons; See also Edit: button;
See also Enter: button; See also Program/Multi: buttons.
Category 6-2, 6-6, 10-5.
Channel/Layer/Zone 3-10, 6-16, 7-6.
Double Press
Demo 3-17.
Panic 3-17, 6-17.
Program Demo 3-16, 5-6, 6-3.
Reset Transposition 3-15.
Value Jump 3-11, 3-14, 3-15, 6-5, 11-5, 11-6.
Global 3-10.
Multi 3-9.
Mute D-2.
Next 3-10, 3-11.
Previous 3-10, 3-11, 6-2, 6-5.
Program 3-9.
Soft 5-4, 5-5.
Transpose 3-6, 6-7.
Value 10-4.
Value Jump 3-11, 6-5, 7-2, 10-4, 10-13, 11-3.
Variation 3-5. See also Variation: buttons.
C
Cascade Mode 7-6, 7-35, 7-74.
Category Buttons 2-11, 3-13, 6-2.
Category Default 10-2. See Default (Category).
Multi 10-4 to 10-5.
CC number 7-8. See MIDI: CC numbers.
CC Pedal Jack 2-5, 2-6, 2-7.
CCTLS Page 11-13.
Chain 8-1, 8-3, 11-31.
Chain Info 8-3 to 8-4.
Change Multis Parameter 12-12.
Channel 3-9, 4-1, 4-2, 6-1, 6-16, 11-1, 11-8.
local keyboard 12-13, 12-14.
Parameter 11-8.
Reset 3-15.
Chord 11-4, 11-25.
Chorus 8-13, D-2.
Clock Source 11-28, 12-4, 12-16.
Index

COMMON page 7-16, 7-41, 7-42, 11-26, 11-27.
KB3 7-82.
Common Parameters 11-1.
Compatible Files 12-25.
Compress 11-12, 11-15.
Compression 8-12.
Connecting Audio 2-2, 2-3, 2-8.
Connecting MIDI 2-4, 2-9 to 2-10.
Connecting Pedals 2-4.
Continuous Controllers
Destination list 11-17.
Continuous (Control) Pedals 2-7, 3-7.
Contrast Knob 3-11.
Control 7-11.
Controller 2-3, 2-4, 2-5, 2-10, 3-9, 4-2, 5-1, 6-8, 6-10, 6-13,
6-14, 6-17, 10-3, 11-1, 11-3, 11-8, 11-9, 11-13 to 1117, 12-11 to 12-14. See also Arpeggiator: Controllers.
Conventions 6-9, 10-8.
Destination 11-27.
Control Sources 7-7, 7-12.
Controls Page 11-10.
Crossfade 7-18, 7-42, 11-12, 11-16.
Curve Parameter 11-15.
D
Default. See also Factory defaults.
Category 6-5, 6-6.
keyboard range 6-11, 6-12.
Power up 3-1.
Delay 7-26, 7-27, 8-8, 10-8.
Delete 6-15, 7-70, 8-5, 10-14, 11-32, 11-33.
DELETE Page 12-17.
Demo Function 5-5, 6-3.
Demo Song 3-16, 3-17, 5-5.
Destination 11-6, 12-11.
Local 11-5, 11-7, 11-8, 11-18, 12-11.
MIDI 11-6, 11-7, 12-11.
Destination Parameter 11-6, 11-14, 11-26.
Diagnostics 13-7, 14-7.
Directories 12-20.
Display 3-10, 6-4, 7-2, 11-2.
Contrast Knob 3-11.
Distortion 8-17.
Double Button Presses 3-14 to 3-17, 6-5, 11-5, 11-6.
Drawbars 7-87, D-2.
Drum Remap 7-43, 12-9.
DSP 7-6, 7-7, 7-14, 7-21, 7-30, 7-31, 7-32, 8-1.
Dual Switch Pedal 2-5, 2-6.
E
Edit button 3-12, 5-7, 7-1, 7-6, 7-65, 7-67, 11-1.
Editing Parameters 3-12, 6-11 to 6-12, 7-1, 7-2, 7-10, 11-1
to 11-6, 11-13, 12-1, 12-2, 12-6.
Effects 7-13, 7-40, 11-31, F-1.
Aux 11-31, 11-32.
Insert 7-14.
Layer-specific 7-15.
parameters 8-5.
Enable 7-27.
Enter. See also Assign.
button 3-18, 7-6, 11-3, 11-10, 13-1.
Entry
Position 11-16.
Program Change Parameter 11-9.
State 11-26 to 11-28.
Value 12-5.
Entry Program Change. See Program Change: Entry.
Envelopes 7-46, 7-48 to 7-52.
EQ 8-9. See Master EQ.
Page 7-94.
Exit 7-67.
Exit Value 11-16.
Expand 11-12, 11-15.
Expanders 8-11.
Expression 12-17.
F
Factory
Banks 2-11, 6-2, 10-2.
Multis 10-2, 10-7.
programs 2-10, 6-5, 6-6.
state 3-10, 4-3.
Factory Defaults 12-1, 13-8, 14-6.
Factory service 13-7.
Favorite buttons 3-14, 6-2, 6-7, 10-2.
Favorites
Help buttons 7-70, 8-5, 11-32, 11-33.
Features 3-1.
Feet (Rubber) 2-1.
File Name 12-22.
Files 13-3, 13-11, 13-13.
Delete All 13-8.
Load (Fill) 12-23.
Loading 3-10, 11-9, 11-27, 12-23, 13-2.
Load (Overwrite) 12-23.
Saving. See Store.
FILL 12-23, 12-24.
Filters 8-15.
Flanger 8-14.
Flash Drive. See USB Flash Drive.
Flash Memory
Format System 13-11 to 13-12.
Freeze Pedal 7-29.
Index

Front Panel 2-2, 2-10, 3-2, 3-9, 3-10.
Function
Page 7-47.
Functions 5-1, 5-4. See also Arpeggiator; See also Demo
Function; See also Layer: Function; See also Split:
Function.
FX. See Effects.
Mod controller 8-3.
FX Chain 7-10.
FX Mode Parameter 12-3.
FX Page 11-29.
G
Gates 8-12.
General MIDI (velocity) 12-7.
Global Button 3-10.
Global Mode 3-10, 4-3, 5-2, 5-3, 10-1, 12-1, 12-2, 12-11,
12-23, 13-8.
User Type 7-1.
Global Parameters 11-7, 12-1.
Globals 7-19.
H
Half Damper Pedal 2-5, 7-29. See Pedal: Half Damper.
Half Damper pedals 2-7.
Hammond B3 4-2, 7-79.
Headphones 2-2, 2-8.
HELP 8-5.
Help Soft Button 7-69, 7-70, 11-32, 11-33.
High Key 6-13, 11-4.
HiVel Parameter 11-12.
I
ID Numbers 5-5, 6-14, 10-2, 10-13, 12-14, 12-23.
Impact 7-54.
Info 12-17.
INFO page 8-3.
Insert 6-15, 10-14, 11-29, 11-31.
Intonation Key 12-8.
Intonation Map 12-7.
J
Jump. See Buttons: Value Jump.
K
K2600 12-13.
Bank Mode 11-8.
KB3 7-1, 7-4, 7-10.
Channel 11-28.
Controls 3-5, 3-7, D-2 to D-4.
indicator light 3-2, 3-4.
LED 3-13, 3-14.
Mode 7-79, D-1, D-2.
Programs 4-2, 6-4.
Key 9-4.
Key1-8 parameter 11-25.
Keyboard 2-1, 2-2, 4-1, 4-2, 5-4, 6-13, 11-7, 12-17, D-1.
local channel 12-13, 12-14.
range 6-11, 6-13, 7-24, 10-11.
zones 10-7.
KeyClick 7-86, 7-90, D-3.
Key High. See High Key.
Key Low. See Low Key.
Keymap 7-19, 7-21.
Keymap Editor 9-1.
Key parameter 11-25.
Key Range Parameter 11-5, 11-10.
Key tracking 7-21.
Knob 3-8, 3-9, 3-11.
KUF File 4-3, 13-2, 13-3, 13-5.
KVA oscillator 7-4, 7-6, 7-71, 7-72, 7-74 to 7-78.
L
LaserVerb 8-15.
Latch 7-58.
Layer 4-2, 6-10, 10-9.
Function 5-4, 6-12, 10-9, 10-10.
Page 7-24.
Layer FX 7-15, 7-42.
LCD Display 3-10, 5-4.
LED 3-6, 3-8, 3-9, 3-10, 3-14, 6-1, 6-6, 12-1.
Legato 7-17, 7-23, 7-66.
Leslie 7-84.
Level
audio volume 2-2, 2-3, 2-8.
parameter 7-7.
voltage 2-2.
LFO 7-43, 7-44, 7-45.
Rate 7-44.
Linear 11-12, 11-15.
Load 12-20. See also Files: Loading.
Page 12-23.
PC 2-10, 13-4, 13-5.
USB 2-3, 2-10, 3-10, 12-4, 12-11, 12-13, 12-21, 12-23, 132, 13-3, 13-4.
LOCAL 11-7.
Local Keyboard Channel 12-13, 12-14.
Loop 7-50, 9-13.
Low Key 6-13, 11-4.
M
Main Page 11-6, 12-2.
Index

MAIN Page 8-1.
Maintenance 13-1, 14-1.
Master EQ 3-8, 3-9.
Method 7-22.
MIDI 12-15.
Bank 4-2, 11-9.
CC numbers 7-8 to 7-10, 11-14, 11-17.
Channel 3-9, 4-1, 4-2, 6-1, 6-16.
Channel Transmit 6-16, 12-11, 12-13.
Connecting. See Connecting MIDI.
Implementation Chart A-1.
Page 12-11.
Ports 2-4, 12-11.
Problems 14-4.
Program Change 12-11.
Program Parameter 11-9.
transmit channel 6-16, 10-1, 10-6, 11-1.
transposition 10-3.
MISC page 9-11.
Mod Controls 8-1.
Mode 2-2, 3-8, 3-13, 4-3, 5-1, 5-4.
Buttons 2-2, 3-9, 6-16, 11-1, 12-1, D-2.
Continuous controller 11-14.
Global. See Global Mode.
Multi 2-11, 3-9, 3-13, 3-15, 5-2 to 5-7, 6-12, 6-13, 10-1,
11-7, 12-11 to 12-14.
Multi Edit 5-6, 5-7, 11-1 to 11-4, 12-14.
Program 2-2, 2-11, 3-9, 3-15, 3-16, 5-1 to 5-6, 6-1 to 6-17.
Switch controller 11-25.
System. See System Mode.
MOD Pages 8-2.
Mod Wheel 3-7, 4-1, 5-1, 6-8, 12-14.
Momentary 11-24, 11-26.
Mono 2-2, 2-8.
Monophonic 7-16, 7-17.
Mono Pressure 3-10, 12-7.
Multi button 3-9.
Multi Controllers 12-5.
Multi Edit Mode 5-6, 5-7, 6-10, 11-1, 11-2, 11-4, 12-14.
Multis 3-9, 3-13, 4-1, 5-2, 10-2. See also Mode: Multi.
Deleting. See DELETE page.
Editing. See Multi Edit Mode.
Favorites. See also Favorite Buttons.
Parameters List. See Zone: Parameters.
Zones. See Zone.
Music Rack 1-3.
Muting Zones 2-5.
N
Naming 6-15, 11-5, 11-6.
Navigation Buttons 3-2, 3-10.
New Directory 12-22.
Next+ 6-2, 6-5.
Note Map Parameter 11-10.
Numeric Entry. See Alphanumeric Entry.
O
Objects 4-3.
Deleting All 13-8.
Importing 12-25.
Programs. See Program.
Octave 3-16, 6-8, 10-6, 11-22.
Off Value 11-26.
On Value 11-26.
Output parameters 7-19.
Overview Page 11-5.
OVWRTE 12-23, 12-24.
P
Pan 6-13, 7-41.
Entry 11-6.
Parameter 11-6.
Zone Pan 10-11.
Panic 3-17, 6-17. See also Buttons: Double Press: Panic.
Param 8-2.
Parameter 7-10, 12-2.
Edit Page 7-13.
PARAMS Page 7-4, 7-6.
Parameter Assignments 6-8, 10-7, 11-17.
Path 12-20.
PC 2-10, 13-4, 13-5.
Pedal 2-4 to 2-7, 2-11, 4-1, 5-1.
Dual Switch 2-6.
freeze 7-29.
jacks 2-4.
Problems 14-5.
Percussion 7-91, 7-92, D-3. See also Category buttons.
Pitch 7-7, 9-12.
Pitch Bend 7-17, 7-26.
Range 7-17.
Pitcher 8-21.
Pitch Wheel 3-6, 3-7, 5-1, 7-17.
Playback mode 7-22.
Polyphony 7-4.
Pop Up Messages 6-4, 10-3.
Portamento 7-18.
Power ii, iii, 2-2 to 2-8, 3-1, 12-1, 12-4, 13-1.
Problems 14-1.
Power Cable iii.
Power Off. See Auto Power Off.
Pre/Post Insert 7-14, 7-82, 11-31.
Pressure. See Mono Pressure.
Pressure Map 12-7.
Index

Previous-/Next+ 6-15. See also Buttons: Value Jump.
Program 3-9, 3-13, 4-1, 5-1, 6-1 to 6-17, 6-13, 7-1, 10-1.
See Mode: Program.
Banks 6-2.
Demo 6-3.
Favorites. See Favorite Buttons.
List C-1.
Mode 12-3, 12-13. See Mode: Program.
Parameter 11-5, 11-6.
Selection 2-10, 6-2, 6-6.
Split/Layer 10-11.
Program Change. See MIDI: Program Change.
Entry 11-9.
Mode 12-13.
Program Edit Mode 5-6, 7-1.
Program FX 7-13.
Program/Multi 12-5.
buttons 3-13, 6-6, 6-15, 10-5.
Q
Quantize 8-14.
R
Real Time Control 3-3.
Rear Panel Connections 2-3, 2-8.
Regular 11-2.
Rename 6-15, 10-13.
Reset 4-3.
controllers 6-17.
MIDI transmit 6-16.
System 13-8, 13-9.
transposition 6-8.
Restore 13-13.
Reverb 8-6, 10-8.
Ring Modulation 8-21.
Root 9-12.
RootKey 9-11.
Root Note 11-22. See Shift Key.
Rotary S/F D-4.
Rotating Speakers 8-18.
Rubber Feet. See Feet (Rubber).
Run Forte SE 13-2.
Rvrs (Reverse) 11-12, 11-16. See also VelCurve.
S
Sample Editor 9-11.
Samples 7-4, 7-20 to 7-45, 7-48, 7-71, 9-3, 9-10, 9-14.
mono 7-18.
Save. See Saving; See also Store.
Save button 3-9, 3-12, 6-8, 6-13, 10-12.
LED 6-8, 6-14.
Saving
arpeggiator patterns 7-65, 7-67, 7-68.
keymap 9-8.
samples 9-15.
split or layer 6-13.
user multi 9-1, 10-12, 10-15.
user program 6-16.
Scale Parameter 11-15, 11-23.
Select Directory Dialogue 12-22.
Send 7-14, 11-31.
Service Centers 14-6.
Shift Key 11-20, 11-22.
Shift Pattern 11-21.
Sliders 2-11, 3-2, 3-3, 4-1, 5-1, 6-8, 10-8, 12-5, 12-14, D-2.
Soft Button 3-11, 6-4, 7-7. See also Buttons: Soft.
Soft Buttons 7-69.
Soft Pedal 11-18.
Software
Restore. See Restore.
Update 1-3. See System Update.
Sostenuto 2-5, 2-7, 3-7, 7-84, 11-18.
Sound Select 3-13.
Sound Sel parameter 6-2, 12-5.
Specifications B-1.
Split 4-2.
Button 6-10, 10-9.
Function 5-4, 6-10, 6-11, 10-9 to 10-10.
Program 6-13.
Split/Layer parameters 6-12, 10-11.
STATE 12-17.
Status 6-12, 10-11, 11-5.
Stereo 7-20.
simulation 8-22.
Store 12-18, 12-20, 12-21.
Support 2-6, 13-7, 13-13.
Sustain 2-5, 2-7, 3-7, 7-84.
pedal 7-26.
SW1 and SW2 Pedal. See also Switch Pedal; See also Pedal.
Switch 2-5, 3-2, 4-1, 5-1, 6-8, 11-24, D-2, D-3.
Switches 10-8.
SWITCH Page 11-24.
Switch Pedal 2-5, 4-3, 2-6, 3-7. See also Pedal.
Sync Square 7-73.
Sysex ID 12-14.
System Mode 13-1.
System Update 13-10.
T
Tablet 2-3, 2-10, 13-4.
TAP controller 12-16.
Tempo 11-27.
Page 7-58, 12-16.
Index

Text soft button 8-4.
Thumb Drive. See USB Flash Drive.
Timbre Shift 7-22.
Toggle 6-4, 6-14, 7-18, 7-50, 7-55, 7-81, 7-83, 7-84, 7-86, 7-92, 10-13, 11-26, 12-10.
definition 11-24.
soft button 9-4, 9-5, 9-6.
TOOLS Page 12-14.
Transpose
Buttons 3-6, 6-8, 10-6.
LEDs 6-8, 10-7.
Reset 3-6, 3-15.
Transpose Parameter 11-10, 12-3.
Xpose parameter 7-21.
Transposition 3-10, 3-16, 6-7, 10-6.
Tremolo 8-20.
Trigger 7-26.
TRIM Page 9-11, 9-14.
Troubleshooting 13-7, 14-1.
Tune Parameter 12-2.
Tuning 3-6, 3-10, 6-7.
Type Parameter 11-26.
U
Update 2-3.
Update Module 13-13.
USB 10-6.
USB Flash Drive 13-2, 13-3.
USB MIDI 12-4, 12-11, 12-13.
USB Port 2-3, 11-7, 11-15, 11-26, 12-13, 12-21.
User
Bank 2-11, 6-16, 12-24.
button 2-11, 6-5, 10-2.
Categories 6-6.
User Objects
Deleting all. See Files: Delete All.
Multi 10-12, 10-13.
Programs 5-1, 6-13, 6-15.
User Type 6-2, 7-1, 10-2, 10-6, 11-2, 11-32, 12-3, 12-5.
Advanced 6-2, 7-1.
Regular 7-1.
Utility Soft Buttons 7-69, 11-32.
V
Value 7-12.
Value of None 7-12, 10-11, 11-7.
Variation
Button 3-5, 6-8.
VAST 7-1, 7-4, 7-10.
Dynamic VAST 7-36.
Velocity 3-10, 7-25, 11-19.
General MIDI 12-7.
Index

Map 12-6.
Parameter 11-25.
Tracking 7-21.
VelCurve 11-12.
VelMode 11-11.
VelOffset 11-11.
VelScale 11-11.
Vibrato 8-19.
View 3-10, 6-4, 10-3, 10-7.
VOICES 12-15.
Volume 6-13, 12-17. See also Level: audio volume.
Slider 2-2.
Zone Volume 6-13, 10-11.
W
Wheel. See Alpha Wheel; See also Mod Wheel; See also Pitch Wheel.
Z
Zero 9-15.
Zn and Stat 6-12, 10-11, 11-5.
Zone 4-1 to 4-2, 5-2, 6-10 to 6-12, 10-1, 10-6, 10-10, 11-1 to 11-33, 12-13 to 12-14, D-2.
Activating. See Activating Zones.
buttons 3-4, 5-1.
New Zone 11-32.
Zone buttons 10-6.
additional 10-6.
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