PAC Display User`s Guide - Untitled Document

PAC Display User`s Guide - Untitled Document
Form 1702
PAC DISPLAY
USER’S GUIDE
PAC DISPLAY™
USER’S GUIDE
Form 1712-170711—July 2017
43044 Business Park Drive • Temecula • CA 92590-3614
Phone: 800-321-OPTO (6786) or 951-695-3000
Fax: 800-832-OPTO (6786) or 951-695-2712
www.opto22.com
Product Support Services
800-TEK-OPTO (835-6786) or 951-695-3080
Fax: 951-695-3017
Email: [email protected]
Web: support.opto22.com
PAC Display User’s Guide, Legacy Edition
Form 1712-170711—July 2017
Copyright © 2007–2017 Opto 22.
All rights reserved.
Printed in the United States of America.
The information in this manual has been checked carefully and is believed to be accurate; however, Opto 22 assumes no
responsibility for possible inaccuracies or omissions. Specifications are subject to change without notice.
Opto 22 warrants all of its products to be free from defects in material or workmanship for 30 months from the
manufacturing date code. This warranty is limited to the original cost of the unit only and does not cover installation, labor,
or any other contingent costs. Opto 22 I/O modules and solid-state relays with date codes of 1/96 or newer are guaranteed
for life. This lifetime warranty excludes reed relay, SNAP serial communication modules, SNAP PID modules, and modules
that contain mechanical contacts or switches. Opto 22 does not warrant any product, components, or parts not
manufactured by Opto 22; for these items, the warranty from the original manufacturer applies. Refer to Opto 22 form
1042 for complete warranty information.
Wired+Wireless controllers and brains are licensed under one or more of the following patents: U.S. Patent No(s). 5282222,
RE37802, 6963617; Canadian Patent No. 2064975; European Patent No. 1142245; French Patent No. 1142245; British Patent
No. 1142245; Japanese Patent No. 2002535925A; German Patent No. 60011224.
Opto 22 FactoryFloor, groov, Optomux, and Pamux are registered trademarks of Opto 22. Generation 4, groov Server,
ioControl, ioDisplay, ioManager, ioProject, ioUtilities, mistic, Nvio, Nvio.net Web Portal, OptoConnect, OptoControl,
OptoDataLink, OptoDisplay, OptoEMU, OptoEMU Sensor, OptoEMU Server, OptoOPCServer, OptoScript, OptoServer,
OptoTerminal, OptoUtilities, PAC Control, PAC Display, PAC Manager, PAC Project, PAC Project Basic, PAC Project Professional,
SNAP Ethernet I/O, SNAP I/O, SNAP OEM I/O, SNAP PAC System, SNAP Simple I/O, SNAP Ultimate I/O, and Wired+Wireless
are trademarks of Opto 22.
ActiveX, JScript, Microsoft, MS-DOS, VBScript, Visual Basic, Visual C++, Windows, and Windows Vista are either registered
trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and other countries. Linux is a registered
trademark of Linus Torvalds. ARCNET is a registered trademark of Datapoint Corporation. Modbus is a registered trademark
of Schneider Electric, licensed to the Modbus Organization, Inc. Wiegand is a registered trademark of Sensor Engineering
Corporation. Allen-Bradley, CompactLogix, ControlLogix, MicroLogix, SLC, and RSLogix are either registered trademarks or
trademarks of Rockwell Automation. CIP and EtherNet/IP are trademarks of ODVA. Raspberry Pi is a trademark of the
Raspberry Pi Foundation.
groov includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit. (http://www.openssl.org)
All other brand or product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies or organizations.
Opto 22
Automation Made Simple.
ii
PAC Display User’s Guide, Legacy Edition
Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Welcome to PAC Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
PAC Display Basic and PAC Display Professional. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
About This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Document Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Other PAC Display Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Documents and Online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
For Developers: SNAP PAC REST API . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Product Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Installing PAC Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Compatible Databases (Pro only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Chapter 2: PAC Display Tutorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Opening the Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Examining the Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Configuring a Control Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
If the Control Engine Already Exists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Adding a Control Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Adding a Dynamic Attribute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Adding a Graphic Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Downloading to the Control Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Running the Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Fine-Tuning the Visuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
What’s Next?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Chapter 3: What Is PAC Display? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Configurator and Runtime Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
PAC Display Terminology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Planning a Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Project Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
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Project and Operator Interface Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Window Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Multiple Monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configurator and Runtime Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configurator Main Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configurator Toolbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configurator Draw Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Runtime Main Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Runtime Project Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Runtime Event Log Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 4: Working with Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Projects Are Organized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Protecting a Project with a Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving Versions of a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Archiving a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Closing a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing Project Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Batch File to Open and Run a Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Screen Snapshots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Combining PAC Display Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring an ODBC Data Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How PAC Display Handles Database Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Granting Privileges in Microsoft Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 5: Configuring Control Engines and Tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Control Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Final Controller Configuration with PAC Display Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Final Controller Configuration with PAC Display Professional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ethernet Link Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using OptoOPCServer as a Remote Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Scanner Heartbeat Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hiding or Displaying Runtime Startup Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Quick Tag Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Tag Selection Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Tags for SNAP High-Density Digital Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tag Selection Dialog (High Density Digital Tag Type) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Selecting Tags for I/O Unit Scratch Pad Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Searching for Tags in a PAC Display Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Finding and Replacing Tags in a PAC Display Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Correcting Tags from a Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
When to Use AutoCorrect Tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Using AutoCorrect Tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Configuring a Project with No Control Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Chapter 6: Working with Graphic Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Using Draw Windows and URL Windows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Creating and Deleting Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Adding a groov URL Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
Modifying Draw or URL Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Opening and Closing Draw and URL Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Importing, Exporting, and Saving Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Drawing Graphic Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Using the Graphic Tools and Shortcut Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Selecting Graphic Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Selecting One Graphic Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Selecting More Than One Graphic Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Unselecting One or More Graphic Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Grouping and Locking Graphic Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Applying or Changing Line Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Applying or Changing Fill Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Importing Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Importing a Bitmap Graphic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Importing a Metafile, JPEG, or PNG Graphic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Importing a GIF Graphic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Importing a Graphic from the Symbol Factory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Saving Objects as Bitmaps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Copying, Duplicating, and Pasting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Copying and Pasting a Graphic Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Duplicating a Graphic Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Moving and Resizing Graphic Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Moving Graphic Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Resizing a Graphic Object Using Its Sizing Handles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Resizing Multiple Graphic Objects to Equal Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Resizing a Window and the Graphic Objects Inside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Reshaping Graphic Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
Changing Stacking Order. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Bring to Front, Send to Back, Move Forward, Move Backward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124
Arrange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124
Deleting Graphic Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Aligning Graphic Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Rotating Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
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Flipping Objects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Applying Transparency to Graphic Objects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Working with Text. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Adding Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Editing Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Formatting Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Adding a Windows Button or a PID Button. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Assigning Operator-Driven Dynamic Attributes to a Windows Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Assigning a Control Engine-Driven Dynamic Attribute to Windows Button Text . . . . . . . 133
Configuring a PID Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Adding a Windows Combo Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Creating a Combo Box List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Adding a URL Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Adding a groov URL Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Working with Tables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Creating a Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Configuring a Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Chapter 7: Using Animated Graphic Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
About Animated Graphic Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Assigning a Dynamic Attribute to a Graphic Object. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Editing Tag Names Manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Assigning a Chart State Value to a Graphic Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Adding Hint Text to a Graphic Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Assigning Multiple Dynamic Attributes to a Graphic Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Assigning Operator-Driven Sub-Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Reordering Sub-Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Clearing Dynamic Sub-Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Security Settings for Graphic Objects and Dynamic Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Important Considerations for User- and Group-Level Security Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Configuring Security Permissions for Graphic Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Copying Security Permissions to Other Graphic Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Available Dynamic Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Alarm Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Control Engine Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Download Recipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Execute Menu Item . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Fill Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Horizontal Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Horizontal Size (Width) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Horizontal Slider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Launch Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Line Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Read and Clear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
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Rotate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180
Send Discrete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .181
Send String . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182
Send Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183
Text Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185
Text In from Control Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186
Upload Recipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187
Vertical Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .190
Vertical Size (Height) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191
Vertical Slider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192
Visibility/Blink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .193
Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
Copying and Deleting Dynamic Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Viewing Tags and Dynamic Attributes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Scanning to Update Graphic Objects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Refresh Time Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198
Configuring Scan Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199
Chapter 8: Working with Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
About Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Types of Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Working with Basic Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Creating a Basic Trend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202
Modifying a Basic Trend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203
Configuring Basic Trend Pens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206
Optimizing Pen Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
Working with SuperTrends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Memory Requirements for SuperTrend Pens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
Creating a SuperTrend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
Configuring SuperTrend Setup Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
Configuring X-Axis Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
Configuring Y-Axis Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212
Configuring Zoom Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Configuring Hot Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214
Configuring SuperTrend Pens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215
Setting an Individual Pen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215
SuperTrend Historical Log Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Remote SuperTrend Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218
SuperTrend Historical Log File Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
Configuring SuperTrend Log Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220
Saving a Log in Text or Binary Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .222
Converting SuperTrend Historical Log Files to Text Format for Viewing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224
Saving a SuperTrend to a Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .226
Using XY Plots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Creating an XY Plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229
Modifying an XY Plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229
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Configuring Individual Plots in an Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Chapter 9: Configuring Trigger-Based Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
What is a Trigger-Based Event?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
Historical Data Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
Tag Types You Can Save to a Historical Data Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
Configuring a Historical Data Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Logging Historical Data to a Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
Defining the Historical Data Log File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
Exporting Historical Data Logs to Binary or Comma-Delimited Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Importing Historical Data Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
Structure of Historical Data Log Comma-Delimited File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
Using the Rollover Trigger Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Configuring a Historical Log Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Configuring a Start or Stop Trigger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Notification When a Trigger Has Stopped . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Setting Log File Line Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Naming Historical Data Log Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Historical Data Log Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
Launching Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Configuring an Application Launch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Sounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Configuring a Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261
Configuring Start and Stop Triggers for Sounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Configuring Trigger-Based Window States. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Configuring Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
Using a Database Table as the Source for a Recipe Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
Creating a Recipe Download File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
Creating a Recipe Upload Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Editing a Recipe Download File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
Basic Recipe File Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
Validating a Recipe File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
Configuring a Recipe Upload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
Configuring a Recipe Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
Logging a Recipe File to or from a Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
Configuring Alarm Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
Exporting Alarm Points to a Binary or Comma-Delimited File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
Importing Alarm Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
Structure of Alarm Point Comma-Delimited File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
Alarm, Acknowledge, and Alarm Clear Notifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
Setting Conditional Alarm Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Entering Discrete Alarm Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
Entering Alarm Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
Setting Control Engine Status Alarm Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Adding Alarm Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
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Setting the Alarm Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .301
Assigning Alarm Hot Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .302
Configuring Project Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
Alarm Runtime and User Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .303
Email Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .305
Alarm Logging Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .311
Alarm Sound Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .314
Chapter 10: Configuring and Using PAC Display Runtime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Configuring Runtime. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Runtime Setup: General Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
Setting Up Sound Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .321
Runtime Setup: Windows/Dialogs Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322
Runtime Setup: Control Engine Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
Using Allow Runtime Tooltips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .324
Runtime Setup: Security Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326
Restricting the Operator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .328
Configuring Runtime User Logins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .328
Configuring a Password to Modify Runtime Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .333
Saving User Configuration Information to an External File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .333
Loading User Configuration Information from an External File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .334
Configuring User Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .335
Configuring Global Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .338
Enabling the Event Log Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .341
Logging Runtime Operator Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .341
Configuring a Runtime Operator Log File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .342
Configuring a Runtime Operator Log Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .343
Encrypting and Decrypting the Runtime Operator Log File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .345
Configuring the Event Log File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .346
Runtime Setup: I/O Unit Tag Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
Runtime Regular and Monitor-Only Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
Using Monitor-Only Runtime and Configurator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .351
Using Runtime. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
Opening a Project in Runtime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .352
Logging In to and Out of Runtime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .353
Running Multiple Runtimes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .353
Using the Event Log Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .356
Viewing Logged-In Users in Runtime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .357
Viewing and Changing Control Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .357
Viewing and Changing Scanner Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .359
Switching a Window Between Control Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .360
Viewing Alarm Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .361
Modifying Alarm Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .363
Disabling Alarm Points in Runtime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .365
Using SuperTrends in Runtime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .365
Using XY Plots in Runtime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .368
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Writing Directly to Individual Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369
How a Combo Box Behaves in Runtime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369
Using a PID Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 370
Appendix A: PAC Display Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
How to Begin Troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
1. Read any Error or Event Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
2. Check Communication with the Control Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
3. Review Other Sections in this Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
4. Call Product Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
Hiding or Displaying Runtime Startup Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
PAC Display Configurator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
PAC Display Runtime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
Problems Saving a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376
Making an Empty String Visible . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376
Problems with Windows User Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377
OptoDispLS and PAC Display Runtime. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378
Other Troubleshooting Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378
Checking PAC Project File Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378
Appendix B: PAC Display Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379
Types of Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379
Error Messages in PAC Display Runtime. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380
File Access Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380
Launch Application Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381
Port Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381
Recipe Upload/Download Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381
Scanner Errors (Quality Errors) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 383
System Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385
Appendix C: PAC Display Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387
Appendix D: Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
Configurator Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
File Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
Edit Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 392
View Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400
Style Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401
Text Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403
Configure Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405
Tools Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406
Window Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407
Help Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408
Runtime Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408
File Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408
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View Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .409
Alarm Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .409
Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .410
Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .410
Window Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .411
Help Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .411
Appendix E: International Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413
Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414
Using the Windows Character Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414
PAC Display Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417
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1: Chapter 1
1: Welcome to PAC Display
Welcome to PAC Display™, Opto 22’s human-machine interface (HMI), alarming, and trending
software for Microsoft® Windows® operating systems. PAC Display works with Opto 22 control
programs (or strategies) running on Opto 22 industrial controllers.
PAC Display lets you easily create graphical, on-screen operator interfaces to monitor and manage
control applications running on Opto 22 industrial control engines. With PAC Display, you can
present real-time control engine information to the operator, set alarms to notify the operator of
changing data, visually track trends in the data using graphs, and securely log data to local or
remote computers. Additionally, you can configure the interface to allow a specified operator or
group of operators to change values such as alarm thresholds.
PAC Display Basic and PAC Display Professional
Two versions of PAC Display software are available: Basic and Professional. PAC Display Basic
provides all the HMI functions that are listed above and documented in this user’s guide. PAC Display
Professional adds several capabilities that are important if you need to do the following:
•
Import projects created in Opto 22’s OptoDisplay™ applications
•
Take advantage of redundant Ethernet networking features in Opto 22 SNAP PAC controllers.
•
Access Scratchpad variables on a SNAP PAC controller or brain.
•
Have a PAC Display project connect to an Opto 22 controller that is running an OptoControl
strategy.
This user’s guide covers both PAC Display Basic and PAC Display Professional.
The Professional icon indicates features or functions that apply only to PAC Display Professional.
About This Guide
This user’s guide teaches you how to use PAC Display, including designing a PAC Display project,
configuring and connecting an Opto 22 control engine, and monitoring information in your
operator interface.
This guide assumes that you are already familiar with Microsoft Windows on your personal
computer, including how to use a mouse, standard menus and commands, and how to open, save,
PAC Display User’s Guide, Legacy Edition
11
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
and close files. If you are not familiar with Windows or your PC, see the documentation from
Microsoft and your computer manufacturer.
Here’s what is in this user’s guide:
1: Welcome to PAC Display—This introductory chapter.
2: PAC Display Tutorial—A short lesson to get you up and running with a PAC Display project as
quickly as possible. You’ll use a sample project to learn how to work with graphic objects, assign
dynamic attributes, and run a project.
3: What Is PAC Display?—An introduction to PAC Display, basic design and programming
concepts, and PAC Display controls and windows.
4: Working with Projects—An explanation of what PAC Display projects are, the files they’re made
of, and how they’re organized.
5: Configuring Control Engines and Tags—Detailed procedures on configuring control engines
and I/O from a PAC Control strategy for use in a PAC Display project.
6: Working with Graphic Objects—Detailed steps for working with graphic objects—including
assigning animation attributes—and the windows in which objects appear.
7: Using Animated Graphic Objects—Covers how to assign dynamic attributes to on-screen
objects to create an animated, real-time display of I/O information.
8: Working with Trends—Explains how to create and configure graphs to track data from I/O
points over time.
9: Configuring Trigger-Based Events—Explains how to use historical logging, application
launching, sounds, recipes, and how to change window states based on events.
10: Configuring and Using PAC Display Runtime—Describes how to customize configurable
Runtime features and what you’ll see during a Runtime project session.
A: PAC Display Troubleshooting—Gives tips for solving problems you may encounter while
building and using your PAC Display project.
B: PAC Display Errors—Explains warnings and error messages you may see while running a
program in PAC Display Runtime.
C: PAC Display Files—Lists all PAC Display files located in the PAC Display directory.
D: Menus—Lists commands and other menu bar options.
PAC Display Index—Provides an alphabetical list of key words and their page locations.
Document Conventions
The following conventions are used in this document:
2
•
Italic typeface indicates emphasis and is used for book titles. Example: “For details, see the PAC
Control User’s Guide (form 1700).”
•
Names of menus, commands, dialog boxes, fields, and buttons are capitalized as they appear in
the product. (Example: “From the File menu, select Print.”)
•
File names appear either in all capital letters or in mixed case, depending on the file name itself.
(Example: “Open the file TEST1.txt.”)
•
Key names appear in small capital letters. (Example: “Press Shift.”)
PAC Display User’s Guide, Legacy Edition
CHAPTER 1: WELCOME TO PAC DISPLAY
•
Key press combinations are indicated by hyphens between two or more key names. For
example, Shift+F1 is the result of holding down the Shift key, then pressing and releasing the
F1 key. Similarly, Ctrl+Alt+Delete is the result of pressing and holding the Ctrl and Alt keys, then
pressing and releasing the Delete key.
•
“Click” means press and release the left mouse button on the referenced item. “Right-click”
means press and release the right mouse button on the item.
•
Menu commands are referred to with the MenuCommand convention. For example,
“File  Open Project” means to select the Open Project command from the File menu.
•
Numbered lists indicate procedures to be followed sequentially. Bulleted lists (such as this one)
provide general information.
Other PAC Display Resources
Documents and Online Help
To help learn and use PAC Display, the following resources are provided:
•
Online Help is available in PAC Display, PAC Control, and in most of the utility applications. To
open online Help, choose HelpContents and Index in any screen.
•
PAC Display User’s Guide, Legacy Edition (this document)
Online versions (Adobe® pdf format) of PAC Display documentation are provided on the PAC Display
CD and are also available from the Help menu in PAC Display. To view a document, select Help
Manuals, and then choose a document from the submenu.
PAC Display and PAC Project resources are also available on the Opto 22 website at
www.opto22.com. You can conveniently access this and other sections of the Opto 22 website from
PAC Display’s Help menu. Select HelpOpto 22 on the Web, and then select an online resource
from the submenu.
For Developers: SNAP PAC REST API
If you’re a developer who’d like to use PAC Control strategy tags in communications with other
devices, the Opto 22 SNAP PAC REST API is a secure and powerful way to do just that. The API is
available in SNAP PAC R-series and S-series controllers with PAC firmware R9.5a and higher. To
configure https access to your PAC’s RESTful server and learn how to call the API, visit
developer.opto22.com.
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OTHER PAC DISPLAY RESOURCES
Product Support
If you have any questions about PAC Display, you can call, fax, or e-mail Opto 22 Product Support.
Phone:
800-TEK-OPTO (800-835-6786
toll-free in the U.S. and Canada)
951-695-3080
Monday through Friday,
7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Pacific Time
Fax:
951-695-3017
Email:
[email protected]
Opto 22 website:
www.opto22.com
NOTE: Email messages and phone
calls to Opto 22 Product Support
are grouped together and
answered in the order received.
When calling for technical support, you can help us help you faster if you can provide the following
information to the Product Support engineer:
•
Software product and version (available by clicking Help > About in the application’s menu bar).
(When contacting us, please send a screen capture of the Help > About dialog box.)
•
Opto 22 hardware part numbers or models that you’re working with.
•
Firmware version (available in PAC Manager by clicking Tools > Inspect).
•
Specific error messages you saw.
•
Version of your computer’s operating system.
Installing PAC Display
PAC Display is a component of the PAC Project Software Suite, a comprehensive set of software tools
for industrial automation, remote monitoring, and data acquisition projects in any line of business.
Installation is easy and quick, and you can download PAC Project directly from the Opto 22 Support
> Downloads webpage.
The PAC Project installer includes both the Basic (free) version of the software suite, and the software
for PAC Project Professional. Click here for a comparison of PAC Project Basic and PAC Project
Professional features.
To install PAC Display:
1. Download PAC Project from the Opto 22 Support > Downloads webpage.
2. Navigate to the folder where you downloaded PAC Project, and then double-click the
installation file (PAC_Project_<release number>.exe) to begin installation.
NOTE: You must have an OptoPassword to install the Professional version of PAC Display. For details, see
the Opto 22 website, www.opto22.com, Support > Downloads tab, and click the link for OptoPassword
(located in the text above the Search field).
If you have trouble installing PAC Display, contact Opto 22 Product Support at 800-835-6786
(toll-free in the U.S. and Canada) or 951-695-3080.
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System Requirements
Here’s what you need to install and run PAC Display:
•
A computer with a standard or mainstream core processor and (at least) the minimum memory
required for your version of Microsoft Windows. (Low-end CPUs are not recommended.)
Additional memory may be required for some configurations.
•
One of the following operating systems:
– Microsoft Windows 10 Professional (32-bit or 64-bit)
– Windows 8.1 Professional (32-bit or 64-bit)
– Windows 7 Professional (32-bit or 64-bit)
– Windows Vista® Business (32-bit only)
NOTE: PAC Project will not install on Windows XP or older Windows operating systems. Embedded
operating systems are not tested or supported.
•
Ethernet capability.
•
VGA or higher resolution monitor (Super VGA recommended). Minimum size: 800x600 with
small fonts.
•
Mouse or other pointing device.
•
(Optional) Installed Windows printer.
•
For PAC Display Basic: At least 141 MB available hard disk space.
For PAC Display Professional: At least 158 MB available hard disk space.
•
At least 500MB available RAM.
If your PAC Display project uses many basic trends, SuperTrends, or XY Plots, Opto 22 strongly
recommends adding RAM beyond the minimum requirement. For details, see “Memory
Requirements for SuperTrend Pens” on page 208.
•
If your PAC Display Professional project accesses an M4-series controller (such as a SNAP-LCM4
or M4RTU) via an Ethernet connection, controller firmware version R4.1a or newer is required.
In addition, in order to access strings or string tables, controller firmware R4.1d or newer is
required.
NOTE: If you’re using an operating system such as Windows 10 that supports multiple monitors, you can
display the operator interface you create in PAC Display on more than one monitor as long as all monitors
have identical video cards.
Compatible Databases (Pro only)
•
Microsoft® SQL Server® 2014, 2012, 2008, 2005, and 2000
•
MySQL® 3.51 and 5.1 (32-bit only)
•
Microsoft Access® 2000–2003 and 2007–2016
NOTE: Microsoft has ended support for SQL Server 2005 (and lower) and for Access 2003 (and lower).
If you’re using applications that Microsoft no longer supports, you should consider upgrading.
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OTHER PAC DISPLAY RESOURCES
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2: Chapter 2
2: PAC Display Tutorial
Introduction
The quickest way to become familiar with PAC Display is by working through a simple example. Our
example will use a cookie factory to show you how easy it is to use PAC Display. You’ll learn how to
start PAC Display, open and save a project, and assign a PAC Control strategy to the project. Then
you’ll bring in a bitmap, add some animation attributes, and watch your project in action. We’ll
repeat this process to fine-tune the visuals and we’ll end up with a final “working” cookie factory.
NOTE: If you can’t access an Opto 22 control engine at the moment, you can still do everything in the Quick
Start up to the point of running your project. Or, you can simulate the control engine of an Opto 22
programmable automation controller (PAC) using the Opto 22 SNAP PAC Sim software utility. For more
information, visit the Opto 22 website, www.opto22.com.
In This Chapter
Opening the Project..................................................... 7
Examining the Project ................................................. 9
Configuring a Control Engine ................................10
Adding a Dynamic Attribute ..................................17
Adding a Graphic Object.............................................21
Downloading to the Control Engine......................27
Running the Project.......................................................30
What’s Next? .....................................................................32
Opening the Project
Let’s start by opening our sample project. PAC Display projects contain windows, graphic objects,
and other information needed to produce an animated operator interface.
1. Start PAC Display as follows:
– In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, press the Windows Start key
, and then click
Programs > Opto 22 > PAC Project 9.6 > PAC Display Configurator.
– In Windows 10 and Windows 8.1, press the Windows Start key
Configurator 9.6 and then press the Enter key.
, type PAC Display
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OPENING THE PROJECT
The PAC Display main window opens.
2. Select File > Open Project (or Ctrl+O), and then navigate to C:\Users\Public\Public
Documents\Opto 22\PAC Project 9.6\Display Basic Examples\Display\ioCookies.
3. Double-click the project file cfactory.uui to open it.
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The main window should look like the example shown below.
Examining the Project
This particular PAC Display project models a simple cookie factory that uses the following
components:
•
A tank of pre-mixed cookie dough
•
A tank of chocolate chips
•
An oven
•
A visual inspection station
•
Some plant air to blow out bad cookies
•
A conveyor belt to move material between the different components.
At the start of the process, a measured amount of dough is dropped onto the conveyor belt. The
dough moves first under the chip tank to receive some chips, and then into the oven to be baked.
The next stop is an inspection station, where rejected cookies are blown off the belt. The good
cookies go to shipping. Should anything go wrong, we also have some alarms built in to stop the
process if necessary.
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CONFIGURING A CONTROL ENGINE
The window for the cookie factory project is shown below.
This window is called a draw window, because in PAC Display Configurator this is where you can
create and position graphic objects and other elements for your operator interface. This is also
where you assign animation characteristics, or dynamic attributes, to graphic objects. Floating on top
of the window is a toolbox with all the tools you need to draw graphic objects.
Configuring a Control Engine
We’ll start out by configuring a control engine so that our graphic objects are tied to actual values in
a PAC Control strategy. The strategy will be downloaded to your control engine later so we can
actually see things running. We’ll briefly go through the configuration process, which is covered in
greater detail in Chapter 5, “5: Configuring Control Engines and Tags.”
If the Control Engine Already Exists
If you’ve already completed the Tutorial chapter in the PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700), a control
engine named “Cookie Controller” should be available. Follow the instructions below to check if this
control engine already exists.
1. Choose the Configure > Control Engine(s) menu item.
The Control Engines dialog box opens.
2. Do the following:
– If the control engine “Cookie Controller” is listed in this dialog box, continue with step 3
below.
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– If the control engine “Cookie Controller” is not listed in this dialog box, follow the steps in
“Adding a Control Engine” on page 13.
3. Select “Cookie Controller” in the Control Engines dialog box and click Replace.
4. In the Control Engine Properties dialog box that appears, click Browse in the Strategy section.
NOTE: This dialog box is slightly different in PAC Display Professional, but the Strategy section
and corresponding Browse button are the same.
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CONFIGURING A CONTROL ENGINE
The Strategy File Name Selection dialog box appears. This dialog box is much like the Open
Project dialog box we used to find our cookie factory project.
5. Change directories to C:\Users\Public\Documents\Opto 22\PAC Project 9.6\Display Basic
Examples\Control\ioCookies strategy directory.
6. Select the Cookies.idb file, and then click Open.
The Control Engine Properties dialog box should now show both the name of the control
engine and the PAC Control strategy that will be used.
The PAC Display project is now configured to use your control engine for this Quick Start exercise.
Skip the next section, “Adding a Control Engine,” and continue with the steps in “Adding a Dynamic
Attribute” on page 17.
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Adding a Control Engine
1. Choose the Configure > Control Engine(s) menu item.
The Control Engines dialog box appears.
2. Click the Add button.
The Strategy File Name Selection dialog box appears. This dialog box is much like the Open
Project dialog box we used to find our cookie factory project.
3. Change directories to Program C:\Users\Public\Documents\Opto 22\PAC Project 9.2\Display
Basic Examples\Control\ioCookies strategy directory.
4. Select the Cookies.idb file, and then click Open.
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CONFIGURING A CONTROL ENGINE
The Control Engine Properties dialog box appears. Notice that the PAC Control strategy you just
picked is shown in the Strategy field.
NOTE: This dialog box is slightly different in PAC Display Professional, but the Strategy section
and corresponding Browse button are the same.
5. To define your control engine in the Primary Control Engine field, click the Browse button in the
Primary Control Engine group.
The Select Control Engine dialog box opens.
6. Click Add to add a control engine.
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The Control Engine Configuration dialog box appears.
7. Enter Cookie Controller as the control engine name.
The name can contain letters, numbers, spaces, and most other characters except colons and
square brackets. Spaces cannot be used as first or last characters.
8. Enter the control engine’s IP address.
On hardware such as a SNAP PAC R-series controller, IP address assigned to the device is usually
written on a sticker on the side of the unit. If an IP address has not been assigned to the control
engine, see the user’s guide for that device for configuration instructions.
On a Soft PAC controller, if PAC Control and SoftPAC are on the same PC, use the loopback IP
address, 127.0.0.1. However, if SoftPAC is on a different PC, use the address for that PC’s network
interface card (NIC). In this case, the SoftPAC PC’s NIC must be configured with a static IP
address.
You can also configure a secondary IP address if your system has been designed to have link
redundancy. If a SNAP PAC control engine is used, the second IP address can be the controller’s
second Ethernet interface.
9. Make sure that you have not changed the values in the Port, Retries, and Timeout, and then
click OK.
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CONFIGURING A CONTROL ENGINE
The newly configured control engine appears in the Select Control Engine dialog box.
10. Click the new Cookie Controller control engine to select it, and then click OK.
The Control Engine Properties dialog box appears with the new control engine listed in the
Primary Control Engine group.
11. Click OK.
The Control Engines dialog box appears with the new control engine Cookie Controller.
12. Click OK to finish configuring the control engine.
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Adding a Dynamic Attribute
Let’s assign an attribute to the Start button that will start the cookie factory display.
1. Click the Select tool in the PAC Display Configurator toolbox as shown below.
Select Tool
2. Double-click the Start button in the Cookie Factory window.
Some small black boxes called sizing handles appear around the button. They indicate that the
button is currently selected. The Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box also opens.
Notice that the dialog box has two separate groups of attributes: Control Engine Driven
Attributes and Operator Driven Attributes. Control Engine-driven attributes are attributes that are
driven by tag values from the PAC Control strategy running in the controller. Operator-driven
attributes are driven by an operator’s interaction with a graphic object in PAC Display.
We’re going to choose the operator-driven attribute Send Discrete to send a discrete value to
the control engine. The PAC Control strategy interprets the value as a signal to start the cookie
factory.
3. In Operator Driven Attribute area, select Send Discrete, and then click Edit.
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ADDING A DYNAMIC ATTRIBUTE
The Dynamic Attribute - Send Discrete dialog box opens.
Tag Name field
4. There are two ways to configure a tag for a dynamic attribute:
– The Tag Selection dialog box
– Quick Tag Entry
If you aren't familiar with the tagnames in your PAC Control strategy, use the Tag Selection
dialog box. This option displays all of the tagnames (filtered by type), so you can scroll down to
find the one you want.
If you know at least the first few letters of the tagname, the Quick Tag Entry method is best.
To use Quick Tag Entry:
a. In the Dynamic Graphic - Send Discrete dialog box, click anywhere in the Tag Name field.
Quick Tag Entry appears.
Quick Tag Entry
b. In the Item Name field, start typing: bStartFlag
As you type, PAC Display filters the list of matching values.
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TIP: In a longer list of values, start typing the value you want, and then press the down-arrow
key to scroll through the list of matching values.
When bStartFlag appears in the field, press Tab to save the value and advance to the next
field.
c. In the Field / Bit field, type: 1
d. Press Tab to save your selections and close Quick Tag Entry.
Continue to step 5.
To use the Tag Selection Dialog Box:
a. Click the Tag Selection button
to configure the tag you want to connect to in the PAC
Control strategy.
The Tag Selection dialog box appears. Notice that the Cookie Control Engine is highlighted
in the Control Engine list.
b. Select Integer in the Item Type group and bStartFlag in the Item Name group.
c. Enter 1 in the Bit field, and then click OK.
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ADDING A DYNAMIC ATTRIBUTE
The Dynamic Attribute - Send Discrete dialog box appears with the new tag name listed in
the Tag group.
d. Click OK.
The Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box appears with a check mark next to Send Discrete in
the Operator Driven Attributes list.
5. Click OK to complete adding the dynamic attribute and close the dialog box.
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Adding a Graphic Object
Now let’s add a portion of cookie dough underneath the first tank. Rather than drawing our cookie,
we’re going to use a drawing of a cookie saved as a bitmap graphics file (or bmp). This file is located
in the Display directory.
1. Select File > Choose Bitmap.
The Choose a Bitmap dialog box appears.
2. Navigate to C:\Users\Public\Public Documents\Opto 22\PAC Project 9.6\Display Basic
Examples\Display\ioCookies, and then double-click the Dough.bmp file.
3. Now choose the Bitmap tool in the PAC Display Configurator toolbox as shown below.
4. Click the cursor right above the conveyor belt and underneath the first vessel.
If the graphic object is a little out of place, it can easily be moved to the correct position using
the Select tool.
5. Choose the Select tool in the toolbox, and then click the bitmap graphic object to select it.
Nine square sizing handles appear around the graphic object.
6. Put your cursor within the sizing handles, click your mouse, and drag the cookie to the correct
position above the conveyor belt and underneath the first vessel.
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ADDING A GRAPHIC OBJECT
Besides visually placing the graphic object, you can also use the arrow keys on the keyboard or
use the X: and Y: coordinates displayed in the toolbox to help you place the cookie. We suggest
coordinate locations X:151 and Y:257, but your coordinates may differ.
Now let’s give the bitmap graphic object some attributes to animate it. To make the cookie look like
it’s moving across the conveyor belt, we’ll configure an attribute to affect its horizontal position.
7. Double-click the cookie bitmap graphic object.
The Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box opens.
8. In the Control Engine Driven Attributes list, double-click Horizontal Position.
The Dynamic Attribute - Horizontal Position dialog box appears. We need to configure a tag to
which we will connect the cookie bitmap graphic object. This time we’ll connect it to a value
PAC Display reads from the control engine.
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9. Click the Tag Selection button . (We won’t use Quick Tag Entry this time because the Tag
Selection dialog box has additional field that we want to use.)
The Tag Selection dialog box appears.
10. Select the following:
– Cookie Controller from the Control Engine group
– Down Timer from the Item Type group
– dtCookieMotionTimer from the Item Name group
11. In the Refresh Time drop-down list, select Group 1 (250 ms).
12. Click OK.
13. In the Dynamic Attribute - Horizontal Position dialog box, enter the following values, using the
Tab key to move from field to field:
– Value At Left: 7
– Value At Right: 0
– Movement Left: 0
– Movement Right: 360
– Reference: Left
– Deadband: 0
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ADDING A GRAPHIC OBJECT
When complete, the dialog box should look like the example below.
14. Click OK to close the dialog box.
The Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box appears.
Now we need to configure an attribute that will make the cookie dough appear to drop out of the
first vessel.
15. Double-click Visibility/Blink in the Control Engine Driven Attribute list.
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The Dynamic Attribute - Visibility/Blink dialog box opens.
16. In the group Setup by, select Current Value.
17. Click the Tag Selection button . (We won’t use Quick Tag Entry this time because the Tag
Selection dialog box has additional field that we want to use.)
The Tag Selection dialog box appears.
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ADDING A GRAPHIC OBJECT
18.
19.
20.
21.
Select Down Timer as the Item Type and dtCookieMotionTimer as the Item Name.
In the Refresh Time drop-down list, select Group 1 (250 ms).
Click OK.
Fill in the remaining fields in the Dynamic Attribute - Visibility/Blink dialog box so that it looks
like the example below:
22. Click OK.
In the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box, notice that the Visibility/Blink control
engine-driven attribute is checked. In the Operator-Driven Attributes list, a Not Available
button
appears next to the Horizontal Slider attribute. This means that this attribute cannot
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be configured because other dynamic attributes that have already been configured will conflict
with the attribute.
23. Click OK to close the dialog box.
24. Save the project by selecting File > Save Project (or Ctrl+S).
25. Close PAC Display Configurator by clicking the Close Window button
.
Downloading to the Control Engine
Let’s try running our project and see if there’s anything we need to change.
In order to see our animated display, we have to run the PAC Display Runtime program. But before
we do that, we need to download our PAC Control strategy to the control engine.
NOTE: PAC Control strategies are usually downloaded to a control engine for convenience using the PAC
Control application. However, we’ll download our PAC Control strategy using a PAC utility called PAC
Terminal. To learn more about downloading strategies to a control engine, see the PAC Control User’s
Guide (form 1700).
1. Start PAC Terminal as follows:
– In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, press the Windows Start key
Programs > Opto 22 > PAC Project 9.6 > Tools > PAC Terminal.
– In Windows 10 and Windows 8.1, press the Windows Start key
9.6 and then press the Enter key.
, and then click
, type PAC Terminal
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DOWNLOADING TO THE CONTROL ENGINE
The PAC Terminal window appears, displaying the name of our control engine.
2. Select Cookie Controller, and then choose File > Download Control Engine Forth File to
download the run file for our PAC Control strategy.
The Download File dialog box opens.
3. Click Browse and change directories to C:\Users\Public\Public Documents\Opto 22\PAC Project
9.6\Display Basic Examples\Control\ioCookies strategy.
4. Select “Cookies.crn” and click Open.
The file should be listed in the Download File dialog box.
5. Click OK to continue the download.
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The download progress is shown.
After the strategy has downloaded to the control engine, we’ll start the strategy running on the
control engine. For convenience, we’ll start the strategy using PAC Terminal’s Inspecting dialog box.
A more common method is to start the strategy while running PAC Control.
6. When the download is finished, double-click the control Engine, Cookie Controller.
The Inspecting dialog box opens showing data relating to the control engine.
In addition providing information about the control engine, this dialog box allows you to start
or stop the active strategy.
7. Under Strategy information, click Run.
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RUNNING THE PROJECT
The strategy in our control engine is now running.
8. Close the Inspecting dialog box by clicking the Close.
9. Close PAC Terminal by clicking the button
.
Running the Project
It’s time to run the project and see what our display can do.
1. Start PAC Display Runtime as follows:
– In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, press the Windows Start key
Programs > Opto 22 > PAC Project 9.6 > PAC Display Runtime.
, and then click
– In Windows 10 and Windows 8.1, press the Windows Start key
Runtime 9.6 and then press the Enter key.
, type PAC Display
The main window for PAC Display Runtime appears. The window is empty since we haven’t
loaded our project yet.
NOTE: You can also start Runtime from within the Configurator. See “Using Runtime” on
page 352.
2. In the Runtime window, choose File > Open Project.
3. In the Open Project dialog box that opens, navigate to the C:\Users\Public\Public
Documents\Opto 22\PAC Project 9.6\Display Basic Examples\Display\ioCookies directory, and
then double-click the cfactory.uui project.
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The Event Log Viewer window should appear, displaying messages about the PAC Display
Runtime session. You might see a message showing that the control engine is connecting to
PAC Display’s scanner.
At the bottom of the window, you’ll see the Auto Restore on New Message option selected.
This means anytime PAC Display Runtime issues a message (that is, an error or status message),
the Event Log Viewer will become the active, or topmost, window on the Windows desktop.
You’ll also see the Enable “Awaiting Connection” Messages option, which lets you choose
whether to display some startup messages.
4. Click the Close button to close the Event Log Viewer window.
5. Start the cookie factory by clicking the on-screen Start button.
Watch the cookie dough drop out of the first tank and move down the conveyor. Notice that
the cookie appears to move outside of the oven and inspection stations.
6. Close PAC Display Runtime by clicking the Close Window button
.
Fine-Tuning the Visuals
Remember how the cookie looked traveling outside the oven and inspection stations? We’ll quickly
fix that by making the cookie bitmap graphic object the rearmost object on the screen. This way,
when it travels by the stations, it will appear to go through them.
1. Open PAC Display Configurator.
The Cookie Factory project should open automatically. If it doesn’t, open the project file using
the File menu.
2. With the Select tool, click the portion of dough on the conveyor belt.
3. Right-click the mouse, and from the pop-up menu that appears choose Z-Order > Send to
Back.
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The graphic object will now appear to travel through the oven and inspection stations, not in
front of them.
4. To save the project and start PAC Display Runtime to see the display working properly, select
File > Save Project and Load Runtime.
There are a few more things you can explore on your own. Notice that when you pass your cursor
over the setpoint boxes (SP), a black outline appears. Click on one of the boxes and an attribute
dialog box appears. You can go back to the Configurator and see how this attribute was set up. You
might also want to look at the tank flap attributes.
What’s Next?
After stepping through this chapter, you should have a handle on how simple it is to use PAC
Display. By taking the time up front to step through our short demo, you’re now ready to explore the
many possibilities available.
Proceed to “Chapter 3: What Is PAC Display?,” to learn more about planning and designing an
operator interface. You’ll also find out more about the windows and menus that make up PAC
Display Configurator and PAC Display Runtime.
At some point you may also want to take a look at the sample projects in the “Examples” folder
under C:\Users\Public\Public Documents\Opto 22\PAC Project 9.6. You’ll get ideas for how to use
different PAC Display on-screen objects and learn about various graphic objects you can use within
your own PAC Display projects.
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3: Chapter 3
3: What Is PAC Display?
Introduction
This chapter provides a general overview of using PAC Display, including information on what it’s
used for, project structure and design, and general terms you’ll encounter.
PAC Display is a software package used to create human-machine interfaces (HMIs), or operator
interfaces, for monitoring control systems. You can use PAC Display to create an HMI that will
monitor a PAC Control strategy running on an Opto 22 control engine, providing real-time and
historical information to the operator about the performance of different parts of a control system.
PAC Display works with PAC Control, a flowchart-based control language for writing control
applications. For more information on using PAC Control to create strategies, the PAC Control User’s
Guide (form 1700).
In This Chapter
Configurator and Runtime Applications ..........33
PAC Display Terminology.........................................34
Planning a Project ......................................................35
Configurator and Runtime Environments .......37
Configurator and Runtime Applications
Two primary software applications make up PAC Display: PAC Display Configurator and PAC Display
Runtime.
PAC Display Configurator
Use PAC Display Configurator to define and configure the draw
windows, graphic objects, dynamic attributes, logs, alarms, and sounds that make up your project,
and then to connect these objects to the variables, I/O points, PID loops, and other items defined in
your PAC Control strategy. The project also defines how the graphic objects’ attributes change as
this data changes.
PAC Display Runtime Use PAC Display Runtime to run the project created in PAC Display
Configurator. PAC Display Runtime communicates with the control engine running the PAC Control
strategy, and animates the operator interface by changing the attributes (for example, color, size,
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and position) of on-screen graphic objects based on how the values or states of linked items in the
PAC Control strategy change. If controls such as buttons and sliders are part of the PAC Display
project, the operator can use on-screen controls to change values that appear. This is how PAC
Display is used to control processes as well as monitor them.
PAC Display also includes a separate “monitor-only” version of the PAC Display Runtime application.
This version of PAC Display Runtime is functionally identical to the regular Runtime application,
except that it cannot be used to send values to a control engine. This can be useful for industrial
projects where no operator intervention is required.
The Event Log Viewer, which is part of PAC Display Runtime, starts automatically when PAC Display
Runtime is started. The Event Log Viewer displays a window that posts messages about PAC Display
communication activity. Typically, it pops up above all other windows when a message is posted,
but this feature can be disabled.
PAC Display Terminology
Project A collection of draw windows, data logs, sounds, recipes, graphic objects, and all their
attributes that has been developed with the PAC Display Configurator. When the project is saved,
several files are created.
•
The main project file, which has a .uui extension.
•
Draw window files are created automatically for each draw window used to display graphic
objects in a project. These files have sequentially numbered file extensions starting with an
uppercase .W (for example, .W01, .W02, and so on).
•
Draw window files are created automatically for each draw window used to display graphic
objects in a project. These files have sequentially numbered file extensions starting with an
uppercase .W (for example, .W0001, .W0002, and so on). There is a limit of 5,000 draw windows
per project.
These project files, together with PAC Display Runtime, present an animated graphic objects
interface for a control system. See Appendix C, “C: PAC Display Files,” for a complete list of the files
that make up a PAC Display project.
Windows PAC Display projects have one or more draw windows inside the PAC Display main
window. A draw window is essentially a blank page on which you place, draw, or edit graphic objects
and other elements that will make up your operator interface. A draw window has static attributes
of position, size, and color. It also has visual states of open, closed, or iconified. Your project design
determines the number of draw windows and their contents.
A main window is the area of the display where you can view your application. Following the
conventions used in most Microsoft Windows applications, a main window contains a menu bar that
allows you to select various command options, and a title bar that displays the full project path.
Objects Objects include draw windows, graphic objects, alarm triggers, and trends (or graphs).
There are two types of objects: static and dynamic. Static objects do not change while PAC Display
Runtime is running. Dynamic objects change appearance, or cause the appearance of other PAC
Display objects to change while the project is running.
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Tags A tag refers to data items, such as variables, I/O points, or PID loops, from a PAC Control
strategy. To access tags in a project, select the PAC Control strategies for the project. All tags in the
selected strategies are then available to PAC Display. Tags are used to animate your operator
interface through connections to graphic objects and their dynamic attributes. As the values of tags
change through control engine- or operator-driven attributes, the appearance of the graphic
objects change. Tags are also used as triggers to initiate system events such as sounds, data logging,
and window configurations.
Connections A connection is made in PAC Display when a PAC Control tag is selected as either
the source that will change a graphic object, or as the tag destination for any data changes entered
by the operator.
Planning a Project
A PAC Display project is made up of a collection of windows and other elements you create and
configure in PAC Display Configurator. You add graphic objects to the windows to create an operator
interface, and then connect to I/O data and variables in the tag name database of the associated
PAC Control strategy (the control program running on an Opto 22 control engine).
Once the windows, associated PAC Control strategy and Opto 22 control engine, and other
attributes of the PAC Display project have been set up using PAC Display Configurator, you can run
the project in PAC Display Runtime. When PAC Display Runtime is started, the project communicates
with one or more control engines. As the strategy runs on the control engine, values and states of
tag names in the PAC Control strategy database are continuously updated. This changing data in
turn modifies the attributes (such as size and position) of the graphic objects that are connected to
the tag names. The end result is an animated, continually updated display that shows the status of a
control process.
Project Design
The usefulness of your PAC Display project ultimately depends on how effective the display, or
operator interface, is. To create an effective operator interface, you may want to consider these tips
when you’re designing your project:
•
Know your control process, including both the theoretical operation of the process and the
“hands-on” tasks required of the operator.
•
Identify the information the end user of your project, the operator, needs to know at different
points in time. Use this information to determine what will appear on the display.
•
Consider the following ways to use and organize windows in a display:
– A single window can display an overall picture of the control process, and is helpful in
quickly assessing the general state of all operations.
– Individual windows can display a closer look at the operations associated with different
stations. The individual windows can contain detailed information and provide controls
that would be difficult to present in a single window.
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Project and Operator Interface Security
PAC Display supports several important security features, including operator authentication,
encrypted logging of operator actions, and password protection for project files. You can configure
your PAC Display project to:
•
Allow or deny operator access to individual graphic objects, based on configured, authorized
users and groups. (See “Security Settings for Graphic Objects and Dynamic Attributes” on
page 161.)
•
Allow operator access to the HMI, as well as log all HMI use and operator actions to an
encrypted archive. (See “Runtime Setup: Security Tab” on page 326.)
•
Assign a password to the PAC Display project to prevent unauthorized users from opening it in
PAC Display Configurator. (See “Protecting a Project with a Password” on page 50.)
•
Assign a password to individual windows in a PAC Display project to prevent unauthorized
users from opening them. (See “Modifying Draw or URL Windows” on page 102.)
•
View a list of the users currently logged in to PAC Display Runtime. (See “Viewing Logged-In
Users in Runtime” on page 357.)
Window Design
When you create a new project, a project window and one or more draw windows will be available
in the PAC Display main window. After deciding which windows you will use for your project,
consider the design of individual windows and how they interact with other windows. This is where
the organization of your windows comes into play. For example, you could have the operator use
the Runtime menu commands to view different windows, or you could design buttons to let an
operator jump directly to related windows.
Keep in mind that the visual state of a window can affect the performance of PAC Display and the
control engine. As more windows are opened or iconified, PAC Display will gradually start to update
graphic objects more slowly. Window states, listed below, also affect how the PAC Display Runtime
software application scans the control engine and updates graphic objects.
•
An open window causes Runtime to update graphic objects with data from the built-in
scanner.
•
An iconified window causes Runtime to continue requesting data from the scanner, but graphic
objects in the iconified window are not updated.
•
A closed window removes the associated tags from the scanner.
•
SuperTrends within a window can be configured to have Runtime request data from the
scanner or not.
Other choices you will have to make are whether a window should be pop-up or full-screen, and
whether a window’s visual state is affected by another window. These and other aspects of
configuring windows are covered in “6: Working with Graphic Objects” on page 99 and “10:
Configuring and Using PAC Display Runtime” on page 317.
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Using Multiple Monitors
If your operator interface will run on a version of Microsoft Windows that supports multiple
monitors connected to one computer, an additional project planning decision is whether to design
your PAC Display project to use more than one monitor. The additional display space gained from
using multiple monitors offers advantages such as being able to keep numerous windows open
permanently. However, you should consider the additional hardware cost and extra desktop space a
multiple monitor setup requires.
An important factor to also consider is that each window in a PAC Display project requires computer
memory (RAM). If you plan to display several windows on multiple monitors, the computer running
the PAC Display project may need to have additional memory installed.
Hardware and software requirements for using multiple monitors are described in “System
Requirements” on page 5. For steps to set up a PAC Display project to use multiple monitors, see
“Extending a Project Across Multiple Monitors” on page 50.
Resetting Dialog Box Positions
If multiple monitors are used to develop a project and then the project is re-opened using just one
monitor, a dialog box might open out of view off the edge of the screen. If you can’t find a dialog
box that you think should be open, select View > Reset Dialog Positions. This resets the following
dialog boxes to appear in the middle of the active display window: Alarm Points, Application
Managers, Control Engines, Historical Logs, Event Log Viewer, Sounds, and Window Managers.
Configurator and Runtime Environments
As mentioned previously, PAC Display is composed of two software applications, Configurator and
Runtime. This means there are two environments in which you will use PAC Display. In learning
about the windows that make up PAC Display, we will first discuss the main components of the
Configurator environment, and then explore the Runtime environment.
PAC Display uses standard Microsoft Windows conventions, so as you use Configurator and Runtime,
you’ll recognize familiar window elements such as title bars and the menu bar, as well as controls
such as the Minimize, Maximize, and Close buttons.
NOTE: If you need more information on working with Microsoft Windows, refer to the
documentation from Microsoft and your computer manufacturer.
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Configurator Main Window
When you first start PAC Display Configurator and create a new project and select a control engine,
your screen should look similar to this:
The Configurator main window consists of a title bar and a menu bar, along with other standard
Windows elements, and contains the toolbox and one or more draw windows.
Title Bar
Menu Bar
Toolbox
Draw
Window
Hiding the Menu Bar
If you need additional space to position draw windows, you can hide the menu bar to use the space
it occupies. If you do this, note that you won’t be able to access commands on the menu bar.
To hide the menu bar, do one of the following:
•
Select View > Hide Menu Bar
•
Press Esc on the keyboard.
To view the menu bar again, press Esc on the keyboard.
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Configurator Toolbox
The toolbox contains a set of graphical icons that represent tools you can use in the Configurator.
Click any tool to select it, and then use it in the draw window. Also, below the graphical icons, the
toolbox displays coordinates and object dimensions to aid you in your drawing tasks.
For descriptions of the tools and how to use shortcut keys, see “Using the Graphic Tools and
Shortcut Keys” on page 109. For more details about any tools available in the toolbox, see “6:
Working with Graphic Objects” on page 99.
Toolbox Coordinates
Object Dimensions
If you want to use the space the toolbox occupies, you can hide the toolbox by selecting View >
Hide Toolbox. To open the toolbox again, select View > Show Toolbox.
Toolbox Coordinates and Object Dimensions
Just underneath the tools, you can see the toolbox coordinates and object dimensions. The
coordinates show the cursor’s position (in pixels) when it is over a draw window. The X: and Y:
coordinates are read with the axis zero-points at the top-left corner of the draw window. If you
create an object, the object’s dimensions (width and height) are shown next to W: and H:,
respectively.
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Configurator Draw Windows
Configurator draw windows are where all graphic objects for your PAC Display project are drawn
and edited. They contain the graphic objects and other elements you work with to create your
display.
Title Bar
Draw Window
Workspace
Redrawing an Active Draw Window
You can redraw an active draw window in PAC Display Configurator by selecting View > Redraw.
Incomplete graphic objects (such as an incomplete polygon) in the draw window are removed
when you select this command.
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Runtime Main Window
When you start PAC Display Runtime, what appears on screen should look similar to this:
Title Bar
Menu Bar
Runtime
Main
Window
Open
Project
Windows
Event
Log
Viewer
The Runtime main window consists of a title bar, a menu bar, other standard Windows elements,
project windows, and the Event Log Viewer. Much like a frame, Runtime’s main window contains all
the elements and actions that occur during Runtime use.
If you need additional space to position project windows and other windows in Runtime, you can
hide the menu bar to use the space it occupies. If you do this, note that you won’t be able to access
commands on the menu bar.
Changing How the Main Window Appears in Runtime
You can configure the main window so that it appears without a title bar or menu bar, and also
change several other settings. See “Configuring Runtime” on page 317 to learn how to configure
elements of the main window.
Hiding the Menu Bar
While working with a PAC Display project in Runtime, you can gain additional space on your screen
by hiding the menu bar. To hide the menu bar, do one of the following:
•
Select View > Hide Menu Bar.
•
Press Esc on the keyboard.
To view the menu bar again, Press Esc on the keyboard.
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Runtime Project Windows
After you’ve opened a project in Runtime, you see the project windows.
Title Bar
Draw
Window
Workspace
Project windows are the Configurator draw windows that you created for the project. Notice that
when you launch your project in Runtime, these windows are the same size and in the same relative
position as when you closed the Configurator project. (Depending on certain configuration options,
the relative positions of the windows may differ slightly from those in the Configurator project.)
Project windows are composed of a title bar and a workspace. The title bar displays the name of the
window, and the workspace contains all of the graphic objects work you did in the Configurator.
Configuring How Draw Windows Appear in Runtime
You can define how a draw window appears in PAC Display Runtime, including its visual state
(closed, iconified, or open), relative position, and other settings. See “Using Draw Windows and URL
Windows” on page 99 for instructions and more information.
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Runtime Event Log Viewer
The Event Log Viewer contains a list of system errors and messages that occur during Runtime. The
most recent messages appear in the list, but when there are more messages than can reasonably fit,
scroll bars appear so that you can view older messages.
You can also double-click any message to view its entire contents, if they are not already completely
visible. The Event Log Viewer can be manipulated like any other standard window.
The Auto Restore on New Message option sets whether the Event Log Viewer dialog box
automatically jumps to the foreground when a new event message is received. The Enable
“Awaiting Connection” Messages option is used to hide or display common startup messages.
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4: Chapter 4
4: Working with Projects
Introduction
This chapter explains how to work with projects. You’ll find out how project files are organized, and
then learn how to create, open, and save a project. An optional, advanced procedure for
customizing how PAC Display Configurator starts is also presented.
In This Chapter
How Projects Are Organized.....................................................45
Creating a Project .......................................................................... 46
Protecting a Project with a Password ................................... 50
Opening a Project.......................................................................... 51
Saving a Project ..............................................................................52
Saving Versions of a Project ...................................................... 53
Archiving a Project ........................................................................ 53
Exporting a Project........................................................................ 54
Closing a Project ............................................................................ 54
Customizing Project Properties............................................... 55
Creating a Batch File to Open and Run a Project............. 56
Configuring Screen Snapshots ................................................ 57
Combining PAC Display Projects............................................. 60
Configuring an ODBC Data Source........................................ 61
How Projects Are Organized
A PAC Display project is a collection of all the files created in PAC Display Configurator that define one
operator interface. The project includes the windows you create, bitmaps that appear in them and
their attributes, and any other elements you set up. See “3: What Is PAC Display?,” to learn more
about the various components of a PAC Display project. Also see "Appendix C: PAC Display Files” for a
complete list of files associated with PAC Display.
Each PAC Display project should be located in its own directory. You’ll find that separate directories
make keeping track of any one project’s files easier, especially when you back up the project or copy
the files to disk. Though not recommended, multiple projects can be stored in the same directory if
necessary.
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Creating a Project
To create a new project in PAC Display Configurator, follow these steps:
1. Select File > New Project (or Ctrl+N).
The New Project dialog box appears.
Dialog boxes in PAC Display follow common Microsoft Windows conventions, so you’ll
recognize familiar items such as the file list, the Up One Level button, and the File name field.
NOTE: If you need more information on how to use dialog boxes or other common parts of Microsoft
Windows, refer to the documentation from Microsoft and your computer manufacturer.
2. Type a project name in the File name field.
When you’re done creating the new project file, this name is automatically appended with the
suffix .uui, indicating a PAC Display project file.
3. If you want to save your project in a new directory, follow the sub-steps below, and then
continue with the next step.
a. Click the Create New Folder button.
The new folder you created appears in the list of files and folders. The name of the new
folder should be highlighted, meaning you can enter a new name for the folder.
b. Type a new name for the folder, preferably one that includes the project name.
c. Double-click the new folder to open it.
4. Click Open to create the project.
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Normally, the Control Engines dialog box opens next. However, if you have selected a directory
that already includes a project, a warning message appears, and you’ll be allowed to try again.
5. In the Control Engines dialog box, click Add to locate a PAC Control strategy running on the
control engine you want to connect to.
6. In the Strategy File Name Selection dialog box that opens, navigate to the PAC Control strategy
that is running on the control engine you plan to select.
(Pro only) To locate a legacy OptoControl strategy, click the drop-down menu in the Files of
Type dialog box and select “OptoControl Strategy *.cdb”.
NOTE: The next few steps are for PAC Display Basic. To configure the control engine using PAC Display
Professional, see “Final Controller Configuration with PAC Display Professional” on page 71.
7. Select the strategy file and click Open.
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CREATING A PROJECT
The strategy you selected appears in the Strategy field of the Control Engine Properties dialog box.
Now you need to select the primary control engine from which PAC Display will receive I/O
point information. Remember that this control engine must be running the strategy you selected.
8. Click the Browse button in the Primary Control Engine group.
The Select Control Engine dialog box appears.
All control engines that have been configured to connect to your PC are listed, whether or not
they are associated with your strategy. If you previously configured a control engine for use
with PAC Control, for example, it would appear here, even if it didn’t appear earlier when you
opened the Control Engines dialog box.
NOTE: If the control engine you want to use doesn’t appear in the Select Control Engine dialog box,
you must connect and configure this control engine to make it available. Instructions for adding,
modifying, and deleting control engines appear in Chapter 4, “Working with Control Engines,” in the
PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700).
9. To choose a control engine that connects with PAC Display, select its name and click OK.
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The primary control engine you have added appears in the Control Engine Properties dialog box.
10. To designate a backup control engine, click Browse in the Backup Control Engine group, choose
a control engine from the list and click OK.
The backup control engine you have added appears in the dialog box.
A backup control engine is used automatically in case the primary control engine fails or
becomes unavailable. Control remains on the backup controller until the backup controller
goes offline; control is not automatically returned to the primary control engine when it
becomes available again.
11. To change the path of the strategy to be relative to the current PAC Display project, select Make
Path Relative to Project.
This allows the project to be more easily transferred to other PCs that don't have the exact
same file structure.
12. When all the parameters in the Control Engine Properties dialog box are correct, click OK to
save your settings and close the dialog box.
The control engine appears in the Control Engines dialog box.
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PROTECTING A PROJECT WITH A PASSWORD
NOTE: To complete setting up the control engine, you need to select primary and secondary scanners.
For more information, see “Configuring the Scanner” on page 74
13. Click OK.
When you click OK in the Control Engines dialog box, the project is created, and a draw
window and toolbox appear within the Configurator’s main window.
The untitled draw window is where you will begin drawing your operator interface. The
toolbox contains several icons representing graphic object drawing tools. For more
information, see Chapter 6, “6: Working with Graphic Objects.”
Extending a Project Across Multiple Monitors
If you are designing your PAC Display project to use multiple monitors connected to the same
computer, after creating the project simply extend PAC Display Configurator’s main window across
the monitors you want to use. For hardware and software requirements for using multiple monitors,
see “System Requirements” on page 5.
Protecting a Project with a Password
This function is one of PAC Display’s numerous security features, including the ability to:
50
•
Allow or deny operator access to individual graphic objects, based on configured, authorized users
and groups. (See “Security Settings for Graphic Objects and Dynamic Attributes” on page 161.)
•
Assign a password to individual windows in a PAC Display project to prevent unauthorized users
from opening them. (See “Modifying Draw or URL Windows” on page 102.)
•
Allow operator access to the HMI, as well as log all HMI use and operator actions to an encrypted
archive. (See “Runtime Setup: Security Tab” on page 326.)
•
View a list of the users currently logged in to PAC Display Runtime. (See “Viewing Logged-In Users in
Runtime” on page 357.)
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You can protect your PAC Display project with a password to prevent others from opening and
modifying the project using PAC Display Configurator. (The project can still be opened and run in
PAC Display Runtime.) The maximum length for a project password is 255 characters.
CAUTION: Make sure to keep your password in a safe place. If you forget your password, you will not be able
to open your project in PAC Display Configurator.
To protect your project with a password, do the following:
1. Select File > Password Protect Project.
The Enter Project Password dialog box opens.
2. Type a password in the Enter Password field.
3. Type the same password a second time in the Confirm Password field.
4. Click OK.
Now, your PAC Display project cannot be opened in PAC Display Configurator without first entering
the password.
Opening a Project
To open an existing project in PAC Display Configurator or PAC Display Runtime, follow these steps:
1. Select File > Open Project.
(Configurator only) If you already have an open project, you will be asked if you want to save it.
Click Yes or No, or click Cancel to close the Save Project dialog box.
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The Open Project dialog box appears.
2. Navigate to the folder where your project is located.
3. Double-click the file in the list to open the project. (You can also select the file, and then click
Open.)
The project opens with any windows positioned just as you last left them.
NOTE: If the project has been protected with a password, the Enter Password dialog box appears. Type
the password for this project and click OK to open the project.
Converting an Older Project to PAC Display
A project created in Opto 22’s earlier OptoDisplay software can be converted into a PAC Display
project using conversion utility software included with PAC Display. Converting an OptoDisplay into
PAC Display can save much time and effort that would otherwise be needed to recreate your older
project in PAC Display. For converting an OptoDisplay project to PAC Display, see the FactoryFloor to
PAC Project Migration Technical Note (form 1692).
Saving a Project
There are three options for saving a project in PAC Display Configurator: Save Project, Save Project As,
and Save Project and Load Runtime.
Save Project
To save your project to the same file name you opened or created, Select File > Save Project (or
Ctrl+S). If there have been no changes to the project since you last saved it, no messages appear
when this save occurs.
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Save Project As
1. To save the project with a new name, select File > Save Project As (or Shift+Ctrl+S).
2. In the Save As dialog box, type a project name in the File name field.
When you’re done saving the project file with a new name, this name is automatically
appended with the suffix .uui, indicating a PAC Display project file.
3. If you want to save your project in a new directory, follow the sub-steps below, and then
continue with the next step.
a. Click the Create New Folder button.
The new folder you created appears in the list of files and folders. The name of the new
folder should be highlighted, meaning you can enter a new name for the folder.
b. Type a new name for the folder, preferably one that includes the project name.
c. Double-click the new folder to open it.
4. Click Save to save the project with a new file name.
Save Project and Load Runtime
To save your project to the same file name you opened or created, and then start the project in PAC
Display Runtime, select File > Save Project and Load Runtime. This option is particularly useful when
you are testing a project and switch often between the Configurator and Runtime components.
Saving Versions of a Project
When developing a PAC Display project, you can save progressively numbered versions of the
project files (for example, MyProject_01, MyProject_02, etc.). Having these saved versions of your
project as you develop it can be valuable if you need to return to an earlier version, or need to trace
the steps you took while building the PAC Display project.
To automatically create a numbered version of modified PAC Display project files each time you save
the project, select File > Configurator Options. Then, in the Configurator Options dialog, select Auto
Increment Version on Save. Project (.UUI) and window (.WXX) files will be copied, renamed with a
version number, and placed in the same directory as the current project. Other project files such as
background bitmap images and similar graphic objects are not copied.
Archiving a Project
To archive the current project:
1. Select either File > Archive Project or File > Archive Project and Email to Opto 22.
The project is archived to the current project directory with all the files necessary to transfer the
project to another computer.
If you choose Archive Project and Email to Opto 22, the project is attached automatically to an
email addressed to Opto 22 Product Support. In order for Product Support to better assist you,
a message will advise you to use PAC Control to archive the strategy files to submit along with
the PAC Display archive.
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EXPORTING A PROJECT
When the archiving is finished the following dialog box appears.
2. Click Yes to open the archive’s directory.
NOTE: PAC Control strategy files referenced by the project are NOT automatically archived. Use PAC Control
to archive the strategy files.
A project archive file uses the following naming convention:
XXX_Archive_Year-Month-Day_Hour-Minute-Second.zip
where XXX = name of the PAC Display project.
Example: SuperTrendDemo1.UUI_Archive_2008-03-31_15-00-02.zip. This represents a project
named SuperTrendDemo1 archived on March 31, 2008 at 3:00:26 pm.
Exporting a Project
If you want to compare one project to another—perhaps to see what has changed—you can
export each project to a text file and then use a file comparison utility (such as WinMerge) to
compare the files.
Each exported text file is formatted for easy reading and includes all the information about the
project, including windows, graphic objects, dynamic attributes, alarm points, data logs, recipes, and
so on.
1. Select File > Export Project.
2. In the Export Project As dialog box, navigate to the destination folder and enter a name for the
file.
3. Click Save.
4. Repeat the steps for the next project, and then open the text files in your file comparison utility.
Closing a Project
To close the current project you have open, select File > Close Project. If you’ve modified the project
since it was last saved, you will be asked if you want to save those changes before closing the
project.
Only one project can be open at any one time in PAC Display. Creating or opening a project
automatically closes any currently open project first. When this happens, you will be asked if you
want to save changes if they haven’t been already saved.
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Customizing Project Properties
NOTE: This procedure is not required to run PAC Display Configurator or Runtime, or to open projects.
After you’ve loaded a project for the first time, you’ll notice that every time you start PAC Display
Configurator, the application knows which project to load, what sizes the windows are, and several
other startup conditions. At some point, you may want to change these initial PAC Display
conditions. To do so, you can run the Windows system Registry Editor utility to modify these
conditions.
CAUTION: Use the Windows Registry Editor carefully. It is strongly recommended that you make a backup
copy of your Windows Registry before continuing with this procedure. Without a backup copy, if you delete
the wrong properties and cannot return the Registry to its original state, application and system files can
become unusable and will have to be reinstalled.
1. From the Windows Start menu, select Run.
The Run dialog box appears.
2. In the Open field, type regedit and then and press Enter.
The Registry Editor window appears. You should see several folders listed under My Computer.
3. Open the HKEY_CURRENT_USER folder, and then continue to open each of the following
sub-folders as they appear:
– Software
– Opto22
– PAC Display
– Configurator or Runtime
– Start up
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CREATING A BATCH FILE TO OPEN AND RUN A PROJECT
In the Start up folder you’ll see several properties defined, as shown below.
Delete these
properties to reset
PAC Display’s startup
configuration.
4. Select the following properties:
– Height
– Maximized
– Project Name
– Width
– X
– Y
Do not select the (Default) property.
5. Select Edit > Delete, or press Delete on the keyboard.
6. Select Registry > Exit to close the Registry Editor.
PAC Display has now been initialized to its original startup conditions, and will open as if no project
had ever been loaded.
Creating a Batch File to Open and Run a Project
You can use a batch file to open PAC Display Runtime and run a project. The batch file you create can
be associated with an icon on the Windows desktop. This is a convenient way for an operator to
quickly start a PAC Display project without having to search for the project file in a dialog box.
To create a batch file that opens a project in PAC Display Runtime, do the following:
1. Open an empty text file using Windows Notepad or another text editor.
2. Type DOS commands that perform the following tasks:
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– Change drives to the drive containing the project.
– Change directories to the directory containing the project.
– Start PAC Display Runtime.
3. Save the file using the .bat file extension.
Example Batch File:
C:
cd C:\Program Files\Opto22\PAC Project 9.6\
start DisplayR.pro.exe "c:\Opto 22\Projects\myproject.UUI" 10
Here’s what each line of the batch file does:
•
The first line changes drives to the C: drive.
•
The second line changes the current directory to C:\Program Files\Opto22\PAC Project 9.5\
•
The third line starts PAC Display Runtime and loads the project located at
C:\Opto 22\Projects\myproject.UUI.
The number 10 at the end of the third line delays the start of PAC Display for 10 seconds.
This can be helpful when you want to make sure some other process or program is running
before PAC Display starts.
Once you have created the batch file, you can make a Windows shortcut for your batch file and
place it on the Windows desktop for easy access. Alternately, you can place the shortcut in the
Windows Startup folder so the project starts to run when the computer starts up.
Configuring Screen Snapshots
A Snapshot is a whole-screen capture saved as a bitmap file. You can use snapshots to review what
occurred in Runtime over a period of time, or to capture a triggered event. Snapshots are taken
according to a time interval that you configure. You can use triggers to start and stop the process.
There are four basic ways to configure snapshots:
Time Interval Only: With no start or stop trigger, snapshots start to be taken when Runtime has
fully loaded the project and starts displaying data. Snapshots continue to be taken at the specified
interval until Runtime closes the project or it is shut down.
Start Trigger Only: When the start trigger is activated, snapshots are taken at the specified interval
until Runtime closes the project or it is shut down.
Stop Trigger Only: With no start trigger, snapshots start when Runtime has fully loaded the project
and starts displaying data. Snapshots continue to be taken at the specified interval until the stop
trigger is activated.
Start Trigger and Stop Trigger: Once the start trigger is activated, snapshots are taken at the
specified interval until the stop trigger is activated.
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CONFIGURING SCREEN SNAPSHOTS
To configure snapshots:
1. Select Configure > Snapshots.
2. In the Snapshots Configuration dialog box, click New.
3. Enter a name for the snapshot.
4. For Save Snapshots To, choose the location where the snapshots will be placed. Use either the
default setting (the Project directory), or click Browse to choose a different location.
5. For Save Snapshot Every, enter a time interval for the snapshots in the range of 1 – 255
Seconds, Minutes, or Hours.
If no start or stop trigger is configured, snapshots will be taken at the specified interval
beginning when Runtime has fully loaded the project and starts displaying data until Runtime
closes the project or the project is shut down.
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6. If you want to use a trigger to activate snapshots, click Start Trigger to launch the Configure
Snapshot Trigger dialog box.
– Use either Quick Tag Entry (see page 82) or the Tag Selection dialog box (see page 82) to
select a PAC controller name tag.
– Select Discrete or Current Value in the Setup By group.
Discrete sets, clears, or toggles the tag’s on or off state. Current Value sets the tag value. To
set a Current Value, select Set or Offset in the Current Values group and then enter a tag
value.
– Click OK to close the dialog box.
7. If you want a stop trigger, click Stop Trigger, and then configure the stop trigger in the same
manner as for the Start Trigger.
8. On the Snapshots Configuration dialog box, click Add.
The Snapshot configuration appears in the list.
9. Repeat the previous steps for each snapshot configuration you want to create.
10. Click OK to close the dialog box.
Modifying a Snapshot
To modify an existing snapshot, click on its name in the list, and make your changes. When finished,
click the Modify link to accept the changes, or click Cancel to cancel any changes
Snapshot Files in Runtime
In Runtime, the snapshot files are saved with the following format:
[Snapshot Name]_YYYY_MM_DD_HH_MM_SS.bmp,
where:
YYYY = year
MM = month
DD = day
HH = hour
MM = minute
SS = second.
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COMBINING PAC DISPLAY PROJECTS
If the name of the snapshot contains an illegal characters (such as “&”), the illegal character is
replaced with an underscore. For example, “Tank & Level 10 seconds” becomes “Tank_Level 10
seconds.”
Combining PAC Display Projects
If you want to combine PAC Display projects, first archive each of the PAC Control strategies and PAC
Display projects to your hard drive as described below. This allows you to recover the original
versions if there are problems at some point. Then use the import and export features in PAC Display
to combine projects. If you are integrating multiple PAC controllers into a single system, make sure
that each control engine and each strategy has a unique name.
The best way to share data between multiple PAC controllers is with the scratch pad using the I/O
Unit—Scratch Pad Commands. For more information, see “Programming with Commands” in the
PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700).
Archiving and Renaming Multiple PAC Control Strategies
NOTE: See also, Archiving Strategies, in Chapter 7 of the PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700).
1. Select File > Archive Strategy to archive each strategy.
2. Make sure each strategy has a unique name.
To re-name a strategy, open it in PAC Control and select File > Save Strategy As.
3. Make sure each control engine has a unique name to distinguish it from other controllers.
To rename a control engine, open a strategy in PAC Control and select Configure > Control
Engines.
4. If you change the name of a strategy or control engine, you’ll need to point the PAC Display
project to the new strategy name or control engine name as follows:
a. Open PAC Display in Configure mode and select Configure > Control Engine(s).
b. Select the control engine, click the Replace button, and then click OK.
c. Select Tools > AutoCorrect Tags.
d. When you download the updated PAC Control strategy, you will need to run the updated
PAC Display project. It is important to keep your PAC Display project in sync with the
strategies that are running on the control engines.
NOTE: For more information, see “Configuring Control Engines” on page 68.
5. Select File > Archive Strategy to manually archive the strategy.
NOTE: In PAC Control you can automatically archive a strategy to your hard drive or to the controller.
This helps you track changes during development and provides a backup in case of a failure on the
control engine or computer. For more information, see the PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700).
Archiving and Combining PAC Display Projects
1. Open your project in PAC Display Configurator and select File > Archive Project.
2. Select Tools > AutoCorrect Tags to identify any existing problems.
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3. Fix any problems in your project before proceeding. If you make changes in the project, save it
and then make another archive.
4. Open the main project (the one you are adding other projects to), and then add each of the
other control engines and strategies.
In order to do this, each strategy and control engine must have a different name as described in
the previous section.
5. Save the main project.
6. To combine your projects, see “Using Draw Windows and URL Windows” on page 99and
“Importing, Exporting, and Saving Windows” on page 106.
Make sure to run Auto Correct tags and the save the project with each window you import.
7. When you have finished combining projects, run AutoCorrect Tags again to check for any
problems.
Configuring an ODBC Data Source
(Pro only) Before you can exchange SuperTrend, historical, Runtime operator data, or recipe data
with a database, you must use Windows to configure one or more ODBC connectors. Then, in PAC
Display, you select the ODBC connector to use for the project.
ODBC connectors tell PAC Display and Windows how to send data to and from a database.
Supported databases include MySQL, Microsoft Access, and Microsoft SQL Server. If your database is
Microsoft Access, see also “Granting Privileges in Microsoft Access” on page 64.
Also see the following sections:
•
“Saving a SuperTrend to a Database” on page 226
•
“Logging Historical Data to a Database” on page 240
•
“Configuring a Runtime Operator Log Database” on page 343
•
“Logging a Recipe File to or from a Database” on page 280
To configure an ODBC connector in Windows and an ODBC data source in PAC Display:
1. In Windows:
a. Press the Windows Start key
, type ODBC Data Sources (32-bit) and then press
the Enter key to open the Windows ODBC Data Source Administrator (32-bit).
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CONFIGURING AN ODBC DATA SOURCE
Configure ODBC
connectors on the
User DSN tab.
b. On the User DSN tab, click Add to open the Create New Data Source dialog box.
c. Highlight the appropriate driver for your data source, and then click Finish. A dialog box
opens for configuring the ODBC connector. To configure the driver, you may need to refer
to the driver’s user documentation.
NOTE: If you’re using Microsoft Access and you don’t see the Access driver in the list, you’ll need to
download the driver and then install it.
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–
For Access 2007, download the driver from:
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=23734
–
For Access 2010 or higher, download the driver from:
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=13255
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For example, here’s a dialog box for the MySQL connector:
d. When you’ve finished configuring the driver, click OK to save the settings.
2. In PAC Display Configurator:
a. In the menu bar, click Configure > ODBC Data Source.
The Select ODBC Data Source dialog box opens.
The field below “ODBC Data Source” shows the data source configured for the project.
If no ODBC data source is configured, the field shows “None.”
b. Under ODBC Data Source, select the ODBC connector that is configured for the target
database.
c. Enter any required username and password.
d. To test the connection to the ODBC Data Source, click the Test button.
If the ODBC connector is set up properly, a pop-up message says, “Successfully connected
to Database!”
e. Click OK to save the settings and close the dialog box.
TIP: When you configure an ODBC data source, PAC Display creates an internal link between the project
and the ODBC connector. If you ever need to temporarily or permanently disassociate your PAC Display
project from the ODBC data source, select “None” as the data source.
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CONFIGURING AN ODBC DATA SOURCE
A warning message reminds you to find all objects in the project that are configured to use the data source,
and then reconfigure the object to use a file as the source (or destination, as the case may be). Otherwise,
if the data source isn’t accessible during Runtime, an error message will be written to the Event Log.
How PAC Display Handles Database Connections
Each time you open a project, PAC Display checks to see if an ODBC database source has been
configured. If so, PAC Display writes to the Event Log a message stating which ODBC data source it’s
monitoring. (For more information about the Event Log, see pages “Enabling the Event Log Viewer”
on page 341 and “Using the Event Log Viewer” on page 356.)
When an object configured to send data to (or receive data from) a database is triggered during
Runtime, PAC Display Runtime attempts to connect to the database.
•
If the attempt is successful, Runtime writes the data to (or from) the database.
•
If the attempt fails, Runtime performs a series of actions to recover:
– First, it writes a message to the Event Log that contains the error message it received about
the failure.
– Then, it will keep trying to connect until either the connection is established or Runtime is
shut down.
– When the connection is established, it writes another message to the Event Log, along
with the time the connection was established.
Granting Privileges in Microsoft Access
If you plan to load recipe files to or from a Microsoft Access database, you must also grant
administrator privileges to the MSysObjects table. How you do this depends on your version of
Microsoft Access.
Microsoft Access 2000
1. Open the target database in Microsoft Access, and then click the menu bar’s Tools > Options.
The Options dialog box opens.
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2. On the View tab, select Hidden Objects and System Objects.
3. Click OK to close the dialog box.
4. In Microsoft Access’s menu bar, click Tools > Security > User and Group Permissions.
The User and Group Permissions dialog box opens.
5. In the User/Group Name pane, select Admin. In the Object Name pane, select MSysObjects.
In the Permissions area, select the Read Data and Update Data check boxes.
6. Click OK to close the dialog box.
Microsoft Access 2002 and higher
1. Open the target database in Microsoft Access, and then press Ctrl+G.
The Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications window opens.
2. In the Immediate pane, type the following command:
CurrentProject.Connection.Execute "GRANT SELECT ON MSysObjects TO Admin;"
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3. Press Enter.
Microsoft Access does not display any messages, but it does grant access to the table.
Now you’re ready to log data to an ODBC database. For more information, see the following sections:
66
•
“Saving a SuperTrend to a Database” on page 226
•
“Logging Historical Data to a Database” on page 240
•
“Configuring a Runtime Operator Log Database” on page 343
•
“Logging a Recipe File to or from a Database” on page 280
PAC Display User’s Guide, Legacy Edition
5: Chapter 5
5: Configuring Control Engines
and Tags
Introduction
This chapter shows how to define the connections to Opto 22 control engine and I/O points, or
“tags,” that PAC Display requires. PAC Display uses the data values a control engine receives from I/O
points and integer, float, and string variables to change the attributes of on-screen graphic objects.
(I/O points are defined when you create a PAC Control strategy; for more information, see the PAC
Control User’s Guide, form 1700.) For a PAC Display project to receive this information on individual
I/O points (called tags), you must first define a connection to an Opto 22 control engine.
PAC Display can also connect to an Opto 22 controller running an OptoControl strategy. Tags in the
OptoControl strategy will be available in your PAC Display project the same way PAC Control tags are.
NOTE: PAC Display can access any PAC Controller or ioControl controller (Ultimate or LCE) as long as each
controller has firmware 7.0 or newer. Therefore, if you are using one integrated project that accesses
multiple Opto 22 systems of varying vintages, in order to ensure proper communication to each
component, make sure each controller has firmware 7.0 or newer.
In This Chapter
Configuring Control Engines................................................ 68
Configuring the Scanner........................................................ 74
Configuring Tags ........................................................................ 81
Correcting Tags from a Strategy.......................................... 91
Configuring a Project with No Control Engine............. 94
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Configuring Control Engines
Follow these steps to select and configure a control engine:
1. If PAC Display isn’t already open, start it as follows:
– In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, press the Windows Start key
, and then click
Programs > Opto 22 > PAC Project 9.6 > PAC Display Configurator.
– In Windows 10 and Windows 8.1, press the Windows Start key
Display Configurator 9.6 and then press the Enter key.
, type PAC
2. Open a project that will be associated with the control engine.
3. Select Configure > Control Engine.
The Control Engines dialog box opens.
If you have not previously configured a control engine for the PAC Display project you opened,
the Name list is empty and only the Add button is available.
4. To locate a PAC Control strategy running on the control engine you want to connect to, click Add.
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5. In the Strategy File Name Selection dialog box that opens, navigate to the PAC Control strategy
that is running on the control engine you plan to select.
To locate an OptoControl strategy, click the drop-down menu in the Files of Type dialog box
and select “OptoControl Strategy *.cdb”.
6. If you have PAC Display Basic, see “Final Controller Configuration with PAC Display Basic” on
page 69 to complete controller configuration. If you have PAC Display Professional, see “Final
Controller Configuration with PAC Display Professional” on page 71.
Final Controller Configuration with PAC Display Basic
NOTE: The next few steps differ between PAC Display Basic and PAC Display Professional. Follow the set of
instructions for your version of PAC Display.
1. Select the strategy file and click Open.
The strategy you selected appears in the Strategy field of the Control Engine Properties dialog box.
Now you need to select the primary control engine from which PAC Display will receive I/O
point information. Remember that this control engine must be running the strategy you selected.
2. Click the Browse button in the Primary Control Engine group.
The Select Control Engine dialog box appears.
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CONFIGURING CONTROL ENGINES
All control engines that have been configured to connect to your PC are listed, whether or not
they are associated with your strategy. If you previously configured a control engine for use
with PAC Control, for example, it would appear here, even if it didn’t appear earlier when you
opened the Control Engines dialog box.
NOTE: If the control engine you want to use doesn’t appear in the Select Control Engine dialog box,
you must connect and configure this control engine to make it available. Instructions for adding,
modifying, and deleting control engines appear in Chapter 4, “Working with Control Engines,” in the
PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700).
3. To choose a control engine that connects with PAC Display, select its name and click OK.
The primary control engine you have added appears in the Control Engine Properties dialog box.
4. To designate a backup control engine, click Browse in the Backup Control Engine group, choose
a control engine from the list and click OK.
The backup control engine you have added appears in the dialog box.
A backup control engine is used automatically in case the primary control engine fails or
becomes unavailable. Control remains on the backup controller until the backup controller
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goes offline; control is not automatically returned to the primary control engine when it
becomes available again.
5. To change the path of the strategy to be relative to the current PAC Display project, select Make
Path Relative to Project.
This allows the project to be more easily transferred to other PCs that don't have the exact
same file structure.
6. When all the parameters in the Control Engine Properties dialog box are correct, click OK to
save your settings and close the dialog box.
NOTE: When you configure the control engine in PAC Display, you should also designate a local or remote
scanner. In PAC Display, a scanner is a software component that manages all communications with one
or more control engines. By default, the scanner runs on the same PC running the PAC Display project, but
your application may benefit from configuring a remote scanner. See “Configuring the Scanner” on
page 74 for more information.
Final Controller Configuration with PAC Display Professional
In PAC Display Pro, final configuration includes selecting the control engine and the primary scanner.
If you also want to set up a secondary scanner, see “Configuring a Remote Scanner in PAC Display
Pro” on page 77.
1. Select the strategy file and click Open.
The strategy you selected appears in the Strategy field of the Control Engine Properties dialog box.
Now you need to select the primary control engine from which PAC Display will receive I/O
point information. Remember that this control engine must be running the strategy you selected.
2. Click the Browse button in the Primary Control Engine group.
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The Select Control Engine dialog box appears.
All control engines that have been configured to connect to your PC are listed, whether or not
they are associated with your strategy. If you previously configured a control engine for use
with PAC Control, for example, it would appear here, even if it didn’t appear earlier when you
opened the Control Engines dialog box.
NOTE: If the control engine you want to use doesn’t appear in the Select Control Engine dialog box,
you must connect and configure this control engine to make it available. Instructions for adding,
modifying, and deleting control engines appear in Chapter 4, “Working with Control Engines,” in the
PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700). To add, modify, and delete FactoryFloor controllers, see the
same chapter in the OptoControl User’s Guide (form 724).
3. To choose a control engine that connects with PAC Display, select its name and click OK.
The primary control engine you have added appears in the Control Engine Properties dialog
box.
4. To select a primary scanner, click the Choose... button.
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5. If you want to use the local computer as the primary scanner, select This Computer and then
click OK to exit the dialog box and finish the configuration. However, to designate a different
computer as the primary scanner, click the Remote OptoOPCServer button.
6. In the list of computers that appears, navigate to the PC that has OptoOPCServer software
installed and configured. Select the computer and click OK.
IMPORTANT: To successfully use OptoOPCServer on a remote computer with PAC Display, Windows
user and application permission settings on both local and remote computers must be correctly
configured. For detailed instructions for configuring OptoOPCServer and OPC clients for network
operation, see the OptoOPCServer User’s Guide (form 1439), included with the purchase of
OptoOPCServer.
7. Click OK to close the dialog box and save your settings.
To set up a secondary scanner, see “Configuring the Scanner” on page 74.
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Ethernet Link Redundancy
NOTE: If you have configured redundant controllers for your control system, the Ethernet link redundancy
feature described in this section cannot be used. For more information on using redundant controllers, see
form 1831, the SNAP PAC Redundancy Option User’s Guide.
The two Ethernet interfaces on a SNAP PAC controller allow you to have redundant Ethernet
network links for your control system. Using PAC Manager, you assign a different IP address for each
interface—a primary and a secondary address. Then, using PAC Control, you assign the two
addresses to the control engine.
Once this has been set up, you can use the primary and secondary IP addresses in a PAC Display
project to access data from the PAC Control strategy running on the control engine.
In a system with link redundancy, one address is always active. If the primary address is unavailable,
then the secondary address becomes the active address and PAC Display will automatically shift to
the secondary address. If the secondary address fails, then the primary address becomes the active
address and it will automatically try the primary address again. If communication to the active
address fails and the control engine is not able to switch to the other address, then communication
to the I/O unit becomes disabled. Communication is tested on each valid address that is enabled
(any address other than 0.0.0.0) when a strategy is started or when communication to an I/O unit is
changed from disabled to enabled.
On a SoftPAC controller, the PC running SoftPAC must have two network interface cards (NICs)
configured with static primary and secondary IP addresses on different subnets.
To set up Ethernet link redundancy:
1. Using PAC Manager, assign the primary and secondary IP addresses to the control engine.
For details, see “Configuring Devices” in the PAC Manager User’s Guide (form 1704).
2. Using PAC Control, configure link redundancy for the control engine.
For details, see “Using Ethernet Link Redundancy in PAC Control” in the PAC Control User’s Guide
(form 1700).
Once you have set up link redundancy for the control engine you are using in your PAC Control
strategy, it works automatically in PAC Display.
To view which control engine is currently running, click View > Configuration in Runtime.
Configuring the Scanner
PAC Display exchanges information with one or more Opto 22 controllers using a software
component called a scanner. This scanner is automatically installed on the same computer as PAC
Display software, but can also run on a different computer. See “Using OptoOPCServer as a Remote
Scanner” below.
NOTE: No configuration is needed to run the scanner on the same computer as PAC Display.
When a PAC Display project is running, PAC Display periodically checks to see if the scanner is
operating. If the scanner is not operating, an error message is displayed in the Runtime Error Log.
Configuring how often the scanner is checked is described in “Setting Scanner Heartbeat Interval”
on page 80.
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Using OptoOPCServer as a Remote Scanner
Different PAC Display projects—or copies of the same project—can run on multiple computers
which are connected on a network. For example, for supervisory reasons you may need to run
several monitor-only versions of PAC Display projects on office computers in addition to using
regular monitor-and-control versions of PAC Display at operator workstations.
If you need to run multiple instances of PAC Display on separate computers, use Opto 22’s
OptoOPCServer software as a centralized scanner. Running on a PC or network server,
OptoOPCServer centralizes communications with Opto 22 control engines. This greatly increases
the efficiency with which computers running PAC Display can exchange information with control
engines. OptoOPCServer software is sold separately from PAC Display, and is available from Opto 22
and local Opto 22 distributors.
Computers running
PAC Display projects
Computer running
OptoOPCServer
Opto 22 industrial
controllers
running PAC
Control strategies
OptoOPCServer provides a
remote scanner for PAC
Display. This centralizes the
exchange of I/O data
between computers
running PAC Display and
controllers.
NOTE: PAC Display software can communicate only with its built-in scanner or with OptoOPCServer
software. PAC Display is not a generic OPC client, and cannot be used with third-party OPC servers.
In addition to serving as a remote scanner for PAC Display, OptoOPCServer supports third-party
SCADA, HMI, data collection, and other OPC-client software. For these third-party OPC clients,
OptoOPCServer can supply I/O point data from SNAP PAC systems that is not supported by PAC
Display.
IMPORTANT: OptoOPCServer must be correctly installed and configured on a network server or
workstation before a PAC Display project can use it as a scanner. For detailed information on installing
OptoOPCServer and configuring it for network operation (including DCOM), see the OptoOPCServer
User’s Guide (form 1439), included with the purchase of OptoOPCServer.
For Basic, see “Configuring a Remote Scanner Location in PAC Display Basic” below.
For Pro, see “Configuring a Remote Scanner in PAC Display Pro” on page 77.
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Configuring a Remote Scanner Location in PAC Display Basic
To use a remote computer running OptoOPCServer as a scanner, do the following:
1. If PAC Display isn’t already open, start it as follows:
– In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, press the Windows Start key
, and then click
Programs > Opto 22 > PAC Project 9.6 > PAC Display Configurator.
– In Windows 10 and Windows 8.1, press the Windows Start key
Display Configurator 9.6 and then press the Enter key.
, type PAC
2. In the PAC Display Configurator menu, click Configure > Scanner Location.
3. In the Select Scanner Location dialog box that opens, click Remote OptoOPCServer.
4. In the list of computers that appears, navigate to the PC that has OptoOPCServer software
installed and configured. Select the computer and click OK.
IMPORTANT: To successfully use OptoOPCServer on a remote computer with PAC Display, Windows
user and application permission settings on both local and remote computers must be correctly
configured. For detailed instructions for configuring OptoOPCServer and OPC clients for network
operation, see the OptoOPCServer User’s Guide (form 1439), included with the purchase of
OptoOPCServer.
5. Click OK to close the dialog box and save your settings.
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Configuring a Remote Scanner in PAC Display Pro
1. Select Configure > Control Engine(s).
2. In the Control Engines dialog box, double-click the control engine you want to configure.
Double-click
the control
engine
3. In the Control Engine Properties dialog box, click the Choose... button.
4. Click the Remote OptoOPCServer button.
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5. In the list of computers that appears, navigate to the PC that has OptoOPCServer software
installed and configured. Select the computer and click OK.
IMPORTANT: To successfully use OptoOPCServer on a remote computer with PAC Display, Windows
user and application permission settings on both local and remote computers must be correctly
configured. For detailed instructions for configuring OptoOPCServer and OPC clients for network
operation, see the OptoOPCServer User’s Guide (form 1439), included with the purchase of
OptoOPCServer.
6. Click OK in each open dialog box to save your changes.
To set up a secondary scanner, see the next section, “Configuring a Secondary Remote Scanner in
PAC Display Pro.”
Configuring a Secondary Remote Scanner in PAC Display Pro
For each local or remote scanner the PAC Display project uses, you can set up a secondary scanner
that will be used when the primary scanner is not available.
1. In PAC Display Configurator, select Configure > Secondary Scanner Location.
The Configure Secondary Scanner dialog box appears.
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2. Make sure the correct computer is selected for Primary Scanner Location and then click Select
Secondary.
3. In the Select Secondary Scanner Location dialog box, click Remote OptoOPCServer and select a
computer from the list tree that you want to use for the remote secondary scanner. Click OK
when done.
IMPORTANT: To successfully use OptoOPCServer on a remote computer with PAC Display, Windows
user and application permission settings on both local and remote computers must be correctly
configured. For detailed instructions for configuring OptoOPCServer and OPC clients for network
operation, see the OptoOPCServer User’s Guide (form 1439), included with the purchase of
OptoOPCServer.
4. Click OK to save your changes and close the Select Secondary Scanner Location dialog box.
5. In the Configure Secondary Scanner dialog box, click OK to save your changes.
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Setting Scanner Heartbeat Interval
When a PAC Display project is running, PAC Display periodically checks to see if the scanner is
operating. If the scanner is not operating, an error message is displayed in the Runtime Error Log.
The Scanner Heartbeat Check Interval is the interval in seconds at which PAC Display will check to
see if the scanner is operating.
To set how often PAC Display checks the operation of the scanner:
1. In PAC Display Configurator Basic, select Configure > Scanner Location.
In Pro, select Configure > Scanner Defaults.
For Basic, the Select Scanner Location dialog box appears.
For Pro, the Configure Scanner Defaults dialog box appears.
2. In Scanner Heartbeat Check Interval, enter the interval in seconds at which PAC Display will
check to see if the scanner is operating.
You can enter a value between 1 and 3600 seconds (integer values only). The default value of
10 seconds is suitable for most applications. If there is a slow communications link between the
computer running the PAC Display project and the computer running the scanner, use a longer
heartbeat interval to reduce network traffic.
3. Click OK to close the dialog box and save your settings.
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Hiding or Displaying Runtime Startup Messages
When a PAC Display project starts in Runtime, multiple “Bad Quality” or “Not Connected” messages
often appear in the Event Log Viewer. These startup messages appear when the PAC Display scanner
has not yet connected to a control engine specified in the project. To hide or display these Runtime
startup messages, do the following:
1. In PAC Display Configurator Basic, select Configure > Scanner Location.
In Pro, select Configure > Scanner Defaults.
The Select Scanner Location dialog box appears.
Select the Enable “Awaiting
Connection” Messages check box
to display all startup messages.
Deselect this check box to hide
Bad Quality and Not Connected
startup messages.
2. Select or deselect the Enable “Awaiting Connection” Messages check box to display or hide any
“Bad Quality” or “Not Connected” messages that may occur when the PAC Display project
starts.
3. Click OK to close the dialog box and save your settings.
Configuring Tags
Graphic objects in PAC Display can be linked directly to the values of PAC Control tags, so you will
configure tags quite often as you develop PAC Display projects. (For detailed information on item
types and names in PAC Control strategies, see the PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700).
There are two ways to configure tags:
•
The Tag Selection dialog box
•
Quick Tag Entry
If you aren't familiar with the tagnames in your PAC Control strategy, use the Tag Selection dialog
box (page 83). This option displays all of the tagnames (filtered by type), so you can scroll down to
find the one you want.
If you know at least the first few letters of the tagname, the Quick Tag Entry method is fast and easy
(page 82).
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Using Quick Tag Entry
To access Quick Tag Entry:
1. Click anywhere in the Tag Name field of a Dynamic Attribute dialog box.
Quick Tag Entry appears.
2. In each text box, start typing the value you want. As you type, PAC Display filters the list of
matching values. When the value you want appears, press Tab to save the value and advance to
the next field.
TIP: In a long list of values, start typing the value you want, and then press the down-arrow key
to scroll through the list of matching values.
3. After you select a value in the last field, press Tab to save your selections and close Quick Tag
Entry.
Using the Tag Selection Dialog Box
You access the Tag Selection dialog box from many dialog boxes in PAC Display Configurator by
clicking the Tag Selection button
.
The tags that appear in the Tag Selection dialog box are actively filtered; rather than display all
possible item types and item names, only the item types available for the selected control engine
appear in the Item Type list, and only the item names available for a selected item type appear in the
Item Name list.
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To configure a tag, complete the fields as described in “Tag Selection Dialog Box” below.
Tag Selection Dialog Box
B
A
D
E
F
G
C
H
I
J
(A) Controller. Select the control engine that contains the tag you wish to use. If only one control
engine is available, it is automatically selected. Choosing a control engine updates the Item Type list
(B) so that it displays only the PAC Control data types available in that control engine’s PAC Control
strategy.
(B) Item Type. Select the type of data you wish to use. The list contains the data types available in
the selected control engine’s PAC Control strategy. (The data types that appear depend on which
data type was selected in the “Setup by” field in the preceding dialog box.) When you select a
specific item type, a list of all the tags of that selection type appears in the Item Name list box (C).
Your Item Type selection also determines the options available in the Selected Fields group (D).
PAC Display can access tags for most types of variables and other information in a PAC Control or
OptoControl strategy. See the PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700) or the OptoControl User’s Guide
(form 724), for information on a specific type of variable.
NOTE: In order to get the value referenced by a pointer, use the variable’s actual type, such Integer, Float,
and so on. You cannot use a variable from a Pointer Table.
PAC Display can also access memory-map-based Scratch Pad variables in SNAP Ultimate
controller/brains, the SNAP-LCE controller, and SNAP PAC controllers; see “Selecting Tags for I/O Unit
Scratch Pad Variables” on page 88 for information on configuring Scratch Pad variables in the Tag
Selection dialog box.
See also, “Tag Types You Can Save to a Historical Data Log” on page 236.
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(C) Item Name. This is an alphabetical list of the available PAC Control tags of the type specified
in the Item Type list. Select the tag you want to use from this list.
(D) Selected Fields. The item type of the tag you select determines which of these fields, if any,
need to have contents specified. If an entry is not needed, then the option is not available.
IMPORTANT: There are differences in how some tags are configured in this dialog box.
If SNAP high-density digital modules are used in your I/O system, see “Tag Selection Dialog (High Density
Digital Tag Type)” on page 86 for more information.
If the Scratch Pad feature available in some SNAP brains is used to store bit, integer, floating point, or string
values, see “Selecting Tags for I/O Unit Scratch Pad Variables” on page 88 for more information.
(E) Field. Specifies the data that is associated with the selected tag. For example, if the selected tag
is of Item Type Digital Input Point, the available field is State. If the tag Item Type is Float, the Field list
box is disabled.
For the Send String tag type:
•
Time returns the control engine’s current time.
•
Date returns the control engine’s current date.
•
Strategy Date returns the date stamp of the strategy file in the control engine.
•
Strategy Time returns the time stamp of the strategy file in the control engine.
For the PID Loop tag type:
•
Auto/Manual Flag This option is not recommended; it is available only for backward
compatibility. It is not available for not-Ethernet PID tags. If PAC Display is configured to scan
I/O tags from the I/O unit (the default), this option determines if the PID loop is in manual
mode (Manual = True (1) = Discrete ON; Auto = False (0) = Discrete OFF). However, if PAC
Display is configured to scan I/O tags through the controller, it will determine whether the PID
loop is in Auto (Auto = True (1); Manual = False (0)). For all new development, use the Is
Manual? option instead.
•
Is Manual? This is the recommended option and should be used for all new development. It is
not available for non-Ethernet PID tags. It determines if the PID loop is in manual mode. When
in manual mode, the value will be True (1); when in Auto mode, the value will be False (0). It is
consistent whether PAC Display is configured to scan the I/O tags through the controller or
directly from the I/O unit.
•
If the PID loop is in manual, it will return a discrete ON. If the PID loop is in Auto, it will return a
discrete OFF.
•
To put the loop in Auto, set the Is Manual? option to discrete OFF. To put the loop into manual,
set it to discrete ON.
NOTE: To set whether tags are retrieved directly from the I/O unit or through the controller, go to
Configure > Runtime and choose the IO Unit Tags tab. If an I/O unit is checked, the tags are retrieved
directly though the I/O unit. If unchecked, the tags are retrieved through the controller. For more
information, see “Runtime Setup: I/O Unit Tag Tab” on page 350
•
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Configuration Flags PID 0: Configuration flags:
1 = Enable square root of Input.
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2 = Force output when Input is out of range.
4 = Switch to manual mode when input goes out of range.
(F) Element. If the selected Item Type is one of the Table types and only a single element of the
table is desired, enter the index of that element in this field.
(G) Bit. If the base type is Integer, a specific bit in the range specified may be selected from the
integer.
For configuring a Discrete control engine-driven dynamic attribute, if you are configuring an integer
tag type and do not specify a bit index and the integer value is 0, the tag will evaluate to FALSE. Any
non-zero value will be considered TRUE. However, if you do specify a bit and the bit is OFF, the tag
will evaluate to FALSE; if the bit is ON, the tag will evaluate to TRUE.
For configuring the Send Discrete operator-driven dynamic attribute, if you specify a bit, the
following message will appear: “No bit index is specified. All bits will be set. OK to continue?”
However, if you select a bit index, then only that bit will be modified.
For more information, see “Available Dynamic Attributes” on page 165.
(H) Start Index. To select multiple elements from Item Type Table, use the Start Index to specify
the first element and Num Elements to specify how many.
(I) Refresh Time. If a control engine-driven attribute is being edited, select the refresh time
group to be used for scanning. All tags that are defined as part of the same refresh time group are
scanned at the same time. A time group with a refresh time of 0 seconds is scanned as quickly as the
speed of the communications link permits.
(J) OK. Click OK to save your settings. (Click Cancel to close the dialog box without making any
changes.)
Selecting Tags for SNAP High-Density Digital Modules
For high-density digital points configured in PAC Control with a name, you can select tags in the
same manner as for standard density digital modules, or you can use the High Density Digital tag
type in the Tag Selection dialog box. For high-density digital points without a name, use the High
Density Digital tag type in the Tag Selection dialog box. See “Tag Selection Dialog (High Density
Digital Tag Type).”
NOTE: Points configured in PAC Control 7.1 or earlier are not named. To select tags for these points, you
must use the High Density Digital tag type.
Using the High Density Digital tag type, it is possible to configure a tag that refers to either a named
high-density digital point or to one that is not named. For example, if a high-density digital point
named HDDI_A has been configured at module 0, channel 15, you can configure a tag for this point
using one of the following methods in the Tag Selection dialog box:
•
Select Digital Input Points as the Item Type. Under Item Name, select HDDI_A.
•
Select High Density Digital as the Item Type. Then under Selected Fields, enter 0 in the Module
field and 15 in the Point field.
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High-Density digital modules provide 32 digital input or output points in one SNAP module. See the
PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700) for information on using these modules in a PAC Control
strategy. For more information, see the SNAP High-Density Digital Module User’s Guide (form 1547).
Tag Selection Dialog (High Density Digital Tag Type)
A
B
C
D
E
(A) Item Type. Select the item type “High Density Digital” to see all I/O units configured in the
PAC Control strategy for your PAC Display project.
If the PAC Control strategy has at least one configured I/O unit, “High Density Digital” always appears
in the Item Type list, even if a SNAP high-density digital module is not used in your I/O system.
(B) Item Name. Select the name of the I/O unit where the SNAP high-density digital module you
want to use is installed.
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(C) Field. Choose a field based on the type of dynamic attribute (control engine-driven or
operator-driven), and whether you want to work with a single point on the high-density module or
all 32 points. One or more of the following fields will be available:
Must specify:
Field
Dynamic Attribute
Tag
Description
Module
Point
Discrete
Returns on/off status of specified
point.
•
•
Value
Returns a 32-bit integer indicating
status of all 32 points.
•
n/a
Discrete
Sends a true/set to set state and a
false/clear to clear state.
•
•
Value
Sends a 32-bit integer to set states
of all 32 points.
•
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Returns a 32-bit integer for a single
point.
•
•
Control engine-driven
State
Operator-driven
Discrete
Control engine-driven
Value
Counts
Discrete
Operator-driven
See “Read and Clear” on page 179.
Value
Discrete
Returns Latch (ON) status of specified point.
•
•
Value
Returns a 32-bit integer indicating
status of all 32 points.
•
n/a
Discrete
Clears ON latch. Choose “Set” to
clear latch if “prompt for value” dialog box is used.
•
•
Value
Sends a 32-bit integer to clear ON
latches of all 32 points.
•
n/a
Discrete
Returns Latch (OFF) status of specified point.
•
•
Value
Returns a 32-bit integer indicating
status of all 32 points.
•
n/a
Discrete
Clears OFF latch. Choose “Set” to
clear latch if “prompt for value” dialog box is used.
•
•
Value
Sends a 32-bit integer to clear OFF
latches of all 32 points.
•
n/a
Control engine-driven
Latch (ON)
Operator-driven
Control engine-driven
Latch (OFF)
Operator-driven
(D) Module. Enter the position (0–16) where the high-density digital module is installed on the
mounting rack.
(E) Point. Enter the number (0–31) of the module’s digital input or output point.
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Selecting Tags for I/O Unit Scratch Pad Variables
Opto 22 SNAP PAC controllers have a section of memory called the Scratch Pad where bit,
integer, floating point, and string values can be stored and accessed. The Scratch Pad is
convenient for making information available to other Ethernet-enabled Opto 22 brains and
controllers, as well as Opto 22 software and custom software applications written using
Opto 22’s OptoMMP Communication Toolkit. See the PAC Manager User’s Guide (form 1704),
and the PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700) for information on using bit, integer, floating point,
and string Scratch Pads.
NOTE: The SNAP controller or brain using the Scratch Pad must be defined as an I/O unit in the PAC Control
strategy that the PAC Display project is using.
In PAC Display, tags for Scratch Pad integer and floating point values are configured the same way as
tags for a PAC Control numeric table variable. Like a table variable, for these Scratch Pads you must
specify an index number and the number of elements to be read. Scratch Pads for integer and
floating point values can have up to 10,240 elements, but unlike PAC Control table variables, the
elements in these Scratch Pads are non-contiguous. This means that when you specify a range that
exceeds 1024 elements (indexes 0–1023), the range must be divided between two tags as shown
below.
Item Name in Tag Selection Dialog Box
Description
First
Element
Last
Element
IO_Unit_Name:SP_INT
Scratch Pad integer value
0
1023
IO_Unit_Name:SP_INT_EXT
Scratch Pad integer value, extended
1024
10239
IO_Unit_Name:SP_FLOAT
Scratch Pad floating point value
0
1023
IO_Unit_Name:SP_FLOAT_EXT
Scratch Pad floating point value,
extended
1024
10239
Example: The I/O unit labeled “Station_01” has floating point values stored in elements 0 to 2047.
To display all these values using, for instance, PAC Display’s Table object you would need to do the
following:
1. Create one table control, which can display up to sixteen separate Table objects.
2. In the Tag Selection dialog box for the first table object, select the Item Name
“Station_01:SP_FLOAT.”
3. For the Start Index value, enter 0, and for Number of Elements, enter 1024.
4. In the Tag Selection dialog box for the second table object, select the Item Name
“Station_01:SP_FLOAT_EXT.”
5. For the Start Index value, enter 1024, and for Number of Elements, enter 1024.
When the project is run in PAC Display Runtime, the first table will show floating point values in
indexes 0 through 1023, while the second table will show values in indexes 1024 through 2047.
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Searching for Tags in a PAC Display Project
You can search a PAC Display project to find where a PAC Control tag has been used.
1. Click View > Find Tag. The Find Tag dialog box appears.
2. Highlight the tag you want to find.
3. Under Find Tag In, choose where to search for the tag.
To quickly select all “Find Tag In” options, click Select All.
4. Under Options, select how to display the results.
5. Click Find Next to find the tag.
6. Click Done to close the dialog box.
See also, “Finding and Replacing Tags in a PAC Display Project” below.
Finding and Replacing Tags in a PAC Display Project
You can find and replace tags in an entire PAC Display project, or just in one or more selected
graphic objects. This find and replace feature works with tags for a control engine, item name, table
index, or bit index.
1. In a draw window in PAC Display Configurator, select the graphic objects you want to search
and replace tags in. To search graphic objects in the entire PAC Display project, select at least
one object on the screen.
2. Select Edit > Replace. (You can also right-click a graphic object and select Replace from the
pop-up menu.)
The Find and Replace dialog box appears.
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Find and Replace Dialog Box
A
B
C
D
E
(A) Search Scope. Select one:
•
All windows to search and replace in all windows in the PAC Display project.
•
Chosen graphics to search and replace tags in just the graphic objects you’ve selected.
•
Entire Project to search and replace tags in all parts of the PAC Display project.
(B) Search For. Select the type of tag to search and replace.
Refresh Group: A refresh time group determines how often the tag is scanned. To change all tags in
the search scope from one refresh group to another, in Find what (C), enter the number of the
refresh group to change from. In Replace with (D), enter the number of the refresh group to change
to. The numbers must be in the range 0–13. For more information, see “Scanning to Update Graphic
Objects” on page 198.
Offset By: If you select Table Index or Bit Index, the Offset By option appears. To offset a bit or table
index, either enter the value or use the up and down arrows.
This feature allows you to select one or several graphic objects and change the index easily. For
example, if you want to copy a set of graphic objects so that the second set of objects looks at a
different table or bit index than the first set, rather than manually changing all the tags, you can just
select all the objects in the new set and use Offset By to change all the table or bit indexes at once.
NOTE: If you enter a value in either the Find what or the Replace with field, the Offset By controls are
disabled.
Exact Text: Search and replace text in tag names, button text, labels, trend pens, refresh group text,
combo box entries, and so on. Choose from the following options to further define the scope of the
search.
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•
Tags: Searches tags, triggers, and notifications.
•
Text on Window Objects: Searches labels, button text, combo box text, and so on. It does not
search/replace the names of the windows themselves.
•
Everywhere: Searches for both Tags and Text on Window Objects. It does not search recipe files.
(C) Find What. Enter the name of the tag to find. If either Control Engine or Item Name is selected
in Search For (B), you can choose the item from a drop-down menu. For Item Name, you can also
enter the exact name of the item directly in the text field. For all other tag types, enter in the text
field the name of the tag exactly as it appears in the PAC Control strategy.
(D) Replace With. Enter the name of the tag to replace the tag found in Find What (C). The
replacement item must be the same kind of item as the item being searched for. If either Control
Engine or Item Name is selected in Search For (B), you can choose the item from a drop-down
menu. For Item Name, you can also enter the exact name of the item directly in the text field. For all
other tag types, enter in the text field the name of the tag exactly as it appears in the PAC Control
strategy.
(E) OK. Click OK to start the search, or click Cancel to close the dialog box without any changes.
Correcting Tags from a Strategy
When you select a PAC Control strategy to use with your PAC Display project, PAC Display
automatically imports that strategy’s tag name database. This is unlike most other HMI software
applications, which require you to create a separate SCADA database in addition to the strategy or
control program itself.
This tight connection with the strategy’s tag name database, however, can sometimes cause
problems when the current PAC Control strategy used by a PAC Display project is modified. PAC
Display may incorrectly read the tags associated with the resulting strategy. PAC Display
Configurator includes a feature called AutoCorrect Tags that fixes most tag errors that may occur this
way.
The AutoCorrect Tags feature works by comparing all tag names, IDs, and table index references that
are used with dynamic attributes in the PAC Display project. If discrepancies are found between the
items in the tag name database and the PAC Display project, the errors that can be corrected are
fixed. Both corrected tags as well as those that could not be corrected are listed in the results report
AutoCorrect Tags generates.
When to Use AutoCorrect Tags
It’s generally advisable to use the AutoCorrect Tags option after making any changes to the PAC
Control strategy associated with your PAC Display project. Specifically, you should run AutoCorrect
Tags in the following situations:
•
If you use a PAC Display project that contains objects you imported or copied from an
OptoDisplay project. (OptoDisplay is the HMI authoring tool for Opto 22’s FactoryFloor Software
Suite.)
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•
If you import a window created in a different PAC Display project. (Window files can be
exported from a PAC Display project, saved as files, and imported into another project. See
“Importing, Exporting, and Saving Windows” on page 106 for information.)
There are some tag errors in a PAC Display project that AutoCorrect Tags cannot fix. These errors
include if you do either of the following:
•
Delete a tag from a strategy
•
Shorten the length of a table in a strategy
You may also get unreliable results if you delete a tag from a strategy, and then create a new tag
with the same name.
Using AutoCorrect Tags
IMPORTANT: Always save changes to your PAC Display project before using the AutoCorrect Tags option.
If you don’t want to use the corrections made by AutoCorrect Tags, simply close the project without
saving. Remember that not saving the project means you will lose any other changes you have
made to the project.
Follow these steps to correct tags in your PAC Display project:
1. Select Tools > AutoCorrect Tags.
The following warning appears.
2. Click Yes. The Select Window dialog box appears.
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3. Select one or more windows to run AutoCorrect Tags on.
This is useful for large PAC Display projects that may contain hundreds of windows, but have
only a few windows that have been modified or imported.
4. If PAC Display finds any problems with the tags and can fix them, it will do so. The changes,
however, won’t become a permanent part of your project until you actually save the project.
5. To correct tags, click Yes. (Click No to close the window and not make any changes.)
The Windows application WordPad launches, displaying a results file that describes any
problems AutoCorrect Tags may have found with the tags from the strategy. The results file has
a name of the form Opton.$$$, where n is an arbitrary number.
The following sample file shows the results created by AutoCorrect Tags:
Title:PAC Display AutoCorrect Tags Results File
Project:C:\Opto22\PAC Display\Examples\Factory.uui
A— File:C:\Temp\Opto2.$$$
B— Date:2001/10/03
Time:13:05:58
Comment:This file is not deleted automatically.
Summary information is provided at the end of this file.
C— Table length changed in strategy (tag corrected):
Tag name: Marvin138:Float Table.RecipeFloatTbl(1)
Old Length: 5
New Length: 3
Location: Window - master, Ellipse at 38,159, DynAttrColor
D— Tag not found in strategy (cannot correct):
Tag name: Marvin138:Integer.HistoricLogTrigger2
Location: Historical Log - Mass Storage, Start Trigger
E— Name changed in strategy (tag corrected):
Old Tag Name: Marvin138:Integer.DOWNLOAD_TRIGGER
New Tag Name: Marvin138:Integer.ACTIVATE_DOWNLOAD
Location: Recipes - Peanut Butter Cookies, Trigger
F—
Name changed in strategy (tag corrected):
Table length changed in strategy (tag corrected):
Index into table out of bounds (cannot correct):
Old Tag Name: Marvin138:Integer Table.RecipeIntegerTbl(4)
New Tag Name: Marvin138:Integer Table.RecipeIndex(4)
Old Length: 5
New Length: 3
Location: Recipes - Peanut Butter Cookies, Notification
---------------------------------------------------G—
Number of tags changed: 4
Number of tags not found: 1
Number of tags index into tables out of bounds: 1
Here’s an explanation of what the results file contains:
(A). Name and location of the results file created by AutoCorrect Tags.
(B). Date and time the file was created.
(C). Warning message that reports that the table length of RecipeFloatTbl changed from an old
length of five elements to a new length of three elements. “Location” shows where the tag was used
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in the PAC Display project. In this example, it was found in a window called “master,” attached to an
ellipse at x: and y: coordinates of 38 and 159, with the color dynamic attribute.
(D). Error message that the tag “HistoricLogTrigger2” is no longer part of the PAC Control strategy,
and this could not be corrected by the AutoCorrect Tags tool. The tag was used as the start trigger
for a data log called “Mass Storage.”
To fix this error, you’ll have to assign another tag in your PAC Display project to use as the start
trigger for this log. (Note that PAC Display won’t recreate the connection to the tag if you open your
PAC Control strategy and add the old tag name again. Internally, PAC Display can’t correlate the old
tag name and the new, similarly named tag.)
(E). Warning message that the tag name “DOWNLOAD_TRIGGER” changed to
“ACTIVATE_DOWNLOAD” in the strategy. The old and new tag names are reported, and the PAC
Display project is corrected to use the new tag name. The tag was used in a recipe called “Peanut
Butter Cookies” as its trigger.
(F). Warning message that multiple errors have been found for one tag name:
•
The table name “RecipeIntegerTbl” changed to “RecipeIndex,” and its length changed from five
elements to three elements. The PAC Display project is updated with this change.
•
An “index into table out of bounds” error was detected and couldn’t be corrected. Specifically,
the project tried to use the fifth element of the table (RecipeIntegerTbl[4]), but the fifth
element no longer exists. To correct this problem you must specify a valid index. The tag was
used in a recipe called “Peanut Butter Cookies.” When the recipe is successfully downloaded,
PAC Display writes a value to this notification tag.
(G). The final tally of all the warnings and errors found by AutoCorrect Tags is reported here.
Note that if you run AutoCorrect Tags again, you will see only those errors that were reported as
“cannot correct.” The other reported errors have been corrected.
When you no longer need the Opton.$$$ file, you can delete the file from your hard drive.
Configuring a Project with No Control Engine
If you have a system with Ethernet I/O but no control engine, you can configure your PAC Display
project to access your Ethernet I/O units. This requires creating a PAC Control strategy and
configuring your I/O units and points as well as a control engine with an IP address that does not
exist on the network.
Before you begin, make sure that you have created a PAC Control strategy that has properly
configured I/O units and points, which PAC Display will use for its tag database. The strategy does
not need to have any logic. For information on creating a PAC Control strategy, see the PAC Control
User’s Guide (form 1700).
1. If PAC Display isn’t already open, start it as follows:
– In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, press the Windows Start key
, and then click
Programs > Opto 22 > PAC Project 9.6 > PAC Display Configurator.
– In Windows 10 and Windows 8.1, press the Windows Start key
Display Configurator 9.6 and then press the Enter key.
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CHAPTER 5: CONFIGURING CONTROL ENGINES AND TAGS
2. Open a project that will be associated with the control engine.
3. Select Configure > Control Engines.
The Control Engines dialog box opens.
If you have not previously configured a control engine for the PAC Display project you opened,
the Name list is empty and only the Add button is available.
4. To locate a PAC Control strategy, click Add.
The Strategy File Name Selection dialog box appears.
NOTE: PAC Display gets its tag database from a PAC Control strategy that you provide with properly
configured I/O units and points. The strategy does not need to have any logic. For information on
creating a PAC Control strategy, see the PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700).
5. Navigate to the PAC Control strategy, select the strategy file and click Open.
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The strategy you selected appears in the Strategy field of the Control Engine Properties dialog box.
NOTE: This dialog box is slightly different in PAC Display Professional, but the Strategy section and
corresponding Browse button are the same.
6. Click the Browse button in the Primary Control Engine group. You do not need to define a
Backup Control Engine.
The Select Control Engine dialog box opens.
7. Click Add to add a control engine.
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The Control Engine Configuration dialog box appears.
8. Enter a Control Engine Name.
The name can contain letters, numbers, spaces, and most other characters except colons and
square brackets. Spaces cannot be used as first or last characters.
9. Enter a valid IP address that does not exist on the network. For assistance, ask your system
administrator.
10. Make sure that you have not changed the values in the Port, Retries, and Timeout, and then
click OK.
The non-existent control engine appears in the Select Control Engine dialog box.
11. Click the new control engine to select it, and then click OK.
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The Control Engine Properties dialog box appears with the new control engine listed in the
Primary Control Engine group.
12. To change the path of the strategy to be relative to the current PAC Display project, select Make
Path Relative to Project.
This allows the project to be more easily transferred to other PCs that don't have the exact
same file structure.
13. Click OK.
The Control Engines dialog box appears with the new control engine.
14. Click OK to finish configuring the control engine.
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6: Chapter 6
6: Working with Graphic
Objects
Introduction
This chapter describes how to use PAC Display Configurator to create and edit graphic objects, and
how to import images. It also describes how to configure the windows in which these items appear.
In This Chapter
Using Draw Windows and URL Windows .........99
Drawing Graphic Objects...................................... 108
Selecting Graphic Objects .................................... 112
Grouping and Locking Graphic Objects......... 113
Applying or Changing Line Attributes............ 114
Applying or Changing Fill Attributes ............... 116
Importing Graphics.................................................. 116
Saving Objects as Bitmaps ................................... 119
Copying, Duplicating, and Pasting.................... 119
Moving and Resizing Graphic Objects............ 120
Changing Stacking Order...................................... 123
Deleting Graphic Objects......................................... 125
Aligning Graphic Objects ......................................... 126
Rotating Objects .......................................................... 127
Flipping Objects ........................................................... 128
Applying Transparency to Graphic Objects...... 128
Working with Text........................................................ 129
Adding a Windows Button or a PID Button...... 131
Adding a Windows Combo Box ............................ 135
Adding a URL Control ................................................ 143
Working with Tables ................................................... 146
Printing............................................................................. 149
Using Draw Windows and URL Windows
Draw windows in PAC Display Configurator are “blank pages” in a PAC Display project where you
place and edit graphic objects (including Trend, SuperTrend, and alarm objects). When you create a
draw window, you can define its size, position, and color, as well as its behavior (child window or
popup window) when the project opens in Runtime.
(Pro Only) In addition to draw windows, you can configure URL window, which are a simplified
browser window that opens a specific URL. For example, you can use a URL window to display
information at a particular website, or display a web-based interface such as Opto 22’s groov (see
“Adding a groov URL Window” on page 101). When you create a URL window, you can define its size
and position, as well as its behavior (child or popup) when the project opens in PAC Display
Runtime. Forward and back buttons are provided for navigation. There is no keyboard support for
static web pages in a URL window. See also, “Adding a URL Control” on page 143.
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Draw windows and URL windows can be protected with a password, and be set up to open when
an alarm is triggered. You can also configure whether menus, borders, and other standard window
elements appear.
Creating and Deleting Windows
When you create a new PAC Display project, one draw window appears in the main project window.
To create additional draw windows, you can create a new window, or copy an existing window and
its attributes.
Making a New Window
1. In Basic, select Window > New.
In Pro, select Window > New > Graphic Window (or URL Window).
The New Window dialog box opens.
2. Enter a name for the window, and configure other settings as necessary.
See “Modifying Draw or URL Windows” below for instructions on configuring windows.
3. Click OK when done.
The new window appears in the project window.
Copying an Existing Window
1. Select Window > Copy.
The Copy Window dialog box opens.
2. Enter a new name for the window, and configure the existing settings if necessary.
See “Modifying Draw or URL Windows” below for instructions on configuring windows.
3. Click OK when done.
The new draw or URL window (in PAC Display Pro only) appears in the project window.
Deleting Existing Draw Windows
1. Select Window > Delete.
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The Delete Window(s) dialog box appears.
2. Select a single window, or select multiple windows by clicking Select All or by holding down
the Ctrl key while selecting windows.
3. Click OK.
If you selected more than one window, a message warns that deleting the windows cannot be
undone.
4. Click Yes in the message box that appears to confirm the deletion.
Adding a groov URL Window
If you have Opto 22’s groov on your network, you can access your groov project in Runtime by
creating a URL window that points to groov. When you create the window, make sure to enter the
exact same URL for groov as you would in a regular browser including “https://.”
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Because groov is a web application rather than a static web page, you can use all of groov features
from within a PAC Display URL window. For more information about groov, see the groov Build and
View User’s Guide (form 2027). Also see, “Adding a groov URL Control” on page 145.
Modifying Draw or URL Windows
This function is one of PAC Display’s numerous security features, including the ability to:
•
Assign a password to the PAC Display project to prevent unauthorized users from opening it in
PAC Display Configurator. (See ““Protecting a Project with a Password” on page 50.)
•
Allow or deny operator access to individual graphic objects, based on configured, authorized users
and groups. (See “Security Settings for Graphic Objects and Dynamic Attributes” on page 161.)
•
Allow operator access to the HMI, as well as log all HMI use and operator actions to an encrypted
archive. (See “Runtime Setup: Security Tab” on page 326.)
•
View a list of the users currently logged in to PAC Display Runtime. (See “Viewing Logged-In Users in
Runtime” on page 357.)
You can change many properties of a new or existing window, such as the window’s position and
behavior, among other properties. These properties are set in the Window Properties dialog box. To
open this dialog box, do one of the following:
•
Create a new window or copy an existing one.
•
Click on a window to select it, and then choose Window > Properties.
The Window Properties dialog box appears. (See “Window Properties Dialog Box” below.)
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Window Properties Dialog Box
G
A
B
C
D
H
E
I
F
J
K
(A) Name. Enter the name of the window. This name appears in the window’s title bar unless the
title bar is hidden by deselecting the Caption option in the Control group (F).
(B) Width and Height. Enter the width and height of the window. Width and height are
measured in pixels.
(C) X and Y Position. Enter the X and Y coordinates where the window appears in the project
window. The X and Y coordinates indicate the location, in pixels, of the draw window’s upper-left
corner; the upper-left corner of the project window has X and Y coordinates of 0.
(D) Rescale on Resize. Check this box to rescale the window graphic objects when the window
size is changed in this dialog box. In order for window graphic objects to be correctly scaled, make
sure to disable “Show window contents while dragging” in Windows as described below. You can
undo a rescaled graphic object using this method. However, undo is not exact, due to rounding
when the graphic object is rescaled. Combo Box graphic objects rescale only their width, not height.
To disable “Show window contents while dragging:”
1. In the Windows Control Panel, click System.
2. On the left sidebar, click “Advanced system settings.”
3. In the Performance section, click Settings.
4. Uncheck “Show window contents while dragging,” and click OK.
(E) (Pro only) URL window options.
URL—Type the URL of the target webpage.
Refresh Every ___ sec.—To refresh the webpage at a specific interval, type the number of
seconds in the text box. This is useful for updating static images like a weather radar or images
from a security camera.
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User Agent— To specify the target browser and operating system, click the User Agent
button, and then, in the User Agent String dialog box, type a correctly formatted user agent
string. This feature lets you override the default User-Agent value in header messages sent to
the web server. (User-agent strings are typically advanced settings used when testing web
applications with different browsers.) For help creating user agent strings, contact your IT
department, or see the Microsoft Developer's Network website
(https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms537503(v=vs.85).aspx).
To set a global user agent string for all URL controls and URL windows in all of your PAC Display
projects (which takes precedence over objects configured with the User Agent button),
perform these steps:
a. In Windows File Explorer, navigate to the folder where PAC Display is installed. (The default
folder is C:\Program Files (x86)\Opto22\PAC Project 9.6.)
b. In the folder, create a text file and name it: PAC DisplayUserAgentString.txt
c. In the text file, type a correctly formatted user agent string. Don’t type anything else in the
text file.
d. Close and save the text file. When a project is loaded in Runtime, PAC Display uses the user
agent string in the PAC DisplayUserAgentString.txt for all URL controls and URL windows
Hide Navigation Controls—Check the box to hide the forward and back navigation buttons.
(F) Control. Use the options in the Control group to configure the appearance of the window.
Select or deselect the following options:
Border—Hides or displays the narrow edge of the window. This option must be selected for
the other options in the Control group to be available.
Caption—Hides or displays the bar at the top of the window where the window name
appears. This option must be selected to move the window within the larger project window.
Size handles—If selected, lets you resize the window by clicking and dragging an edge or
corner of the window.
System menu—Hides or displays the small system menu icon and the Close Window button
located at the top of the window. This option is unavailable if the Caption option has not been
selected.
Minimize box—Hides or displays the standard Windows close box in the upper-right corner
of the window. This option is unavailable if the System menu option has not been selected.
(G) (Draw window only) Runtime Options. (Use the items in the Runtime Options group
to configure how the window opens when the project is run in PAC Display Runtime. Select or
deselect the following options:
Always in memory (fastest access)—If selected, the window’s information is loaded and
saved in the computer’s memory when the project runs. Use this option for a window that you
know will be opened and closed often. This option is selected automatically if you place an
alarm graphic in a window.
Normally, only windows that have been opened or iconified are saved in memory. If you use
this option with many windows, more computer memory is required, and your PAC Display
project will require more time to start up. Using this option with fewer windows uses less
memory, and your project will start up more quickly.
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Open when there are new alarms—If selected, a closed or iconified window that contains
an alarm graphic will open when the alarm is triggered. This option is available only if a
window contains an alarm graphic that is set to summary or detailed view. For more
information on configuring alarms, see “Adding Alarm Graphics” on page 298.
Disable close if there are active alarms—If selected, prevents an open window that
contains one or more active alarms from being closed. All active alarms in a window must be
acknowledged before the window can be closed. For more information on working with
alarms, see “Viewing Alarm Graphics” on page 361, “Modifying Alarm Points” on page 363, and
“Disabling Alarm Points in Runtime” on page 365.
Allow control engine switching—If selected, all graphic objects in the window can use data
from the same PAC Control strategy running on a different control engine. The operator
switches between control engines in Runtime. For more information on using data from
multiple control engines, see “Switching a Window Between Control Engines” on page 360.
(H) Password Protect. To assign a password to a window, click here and then enter a password
in the dialog box that appears. When a password is assigned to a draw window, a closed window
cannot be opened without first entering the password. (Open windows that are iconified or hidden
are not affected.)
You cannot assign a password to a window that both contains an alarm and has the Runtime option
“Open when there are new alarms” selected.
(I) Transparency. (Applicable only when using Windows 8.1 or higher) This feature applies
transparency at Runtime to a draw window or (Pro only) URL window. This way, you can make an
entire window (and all the objects in it) partially or totally transparent to Runtime users. (To apply
transparency to individual graphic objects and not to the window, see page 128.)
To apply transparency to the window and its objects:
1. Click the Transparency button to open the Set Transparency dialog box.
2. Use the slider bar control (or type a number in the Current Transparency field) to define the
window’s transparency. A value of 0 is completely opaque (no transparency); a value of 100 is
completely transparent.
As you change the transparency value, the transparency of the window and its objects change
so that you can see how they will appear in Runtime.
3. Select OK to save the setting and close the dialog box.
When you close the dialog box, the window and its objects are displayed as completely opaque.
This lets you see them so you can configure them. However, in Runtime, the window and its objects
are displayed with the configured transparency setting.
(J) Behavior. Use the options in the Behavior group to set how the window appears on-screen
when the project is run in PAC Display Runtime. Select one of the following options:
Child—prevents the window from being moved or minimized outside the boundaries of the
main project window.
Popup—lets the window be moved or minimized outside of the main project window.
(K) Background Color. (Graphic window only) To set the background color of a window, click
the color square and then select a color in the dialog box that appears.
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Opening and Closing Draw and URL Windows
To open or close a draw or URL window in your PAC Display project, do the following:
1. From the Windows menu, select Open or Close.
The Open Windows or Close Windows dialog box appears.
2. Click the name of the window you want to open or close, and then click OK.
See the next section to learn how to select or deselect multiple window names.
Other ways of opening and closing windows include the following:
•
To open a window that has been opened previously, select its name from the bottom of the
Windows menu.
•
To close a window in which the system menu appears, click the Close Window button
in
the upper-right corner.
Working with Multiple Windows
There are several ways to select or deselect multiple window names in the Open Windows or Close
Windows dialog box.
•
To select individual window names, hold down the Shift key and click each window name.
•
To highlight all names in the list, click Select All.
•
To not select any name in the list, click Deselect All.
•
To easily close or open all but one window, click on a single name and then click Inverse.
Importing, Exporting, and Saving Windows
A PAC Display window can be exported from one project, saved as a file, and then imported into
another PAC Display project. The exported window file contains all the objects and tags that were in
the original window. Exporting and importing draw windows is a convenient way to reuse the same
window in different PAC Display projects.
Exporting Windows
To export a window in a PAC Display project, do the following:
1. Select the window in your PAC Display project that you want to export.
The window must be open within the Configurator window.
2. Select Window > Export Window.
The Export Window As dialog box opens.
3. Navigate to the location where you want to save the exported window file, name the file, and
then click Save.
Importing Windows
To import a window in a PAC Display project, do the following:
1. Select Window > Import Window.
The Import Window dialog box opens.
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2. Navigate to the location where the exported window file is saved, select the file, and then click
Open.
The Choose Imported Window Control Engines dialog box opens.
S
The left pane lists control engines configured in the imported window. The right pane lists
control engines configured for the current project.
3. To map a control engine to the imported window:
a. Select a control engine in the left pane, and then select a current control engine in the
right pane.
The name of the mapped control engine appears in the “Use this” column of the Imported
Window panel (left panel).
“Use this” column
b. Click OK.
The Window Properties dialog box appears.
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4. In the Name field, change the default name “Imported Window” to a suitable name for your
project.
5. Change other properties of the window if needed, and then click OK. See “Modifying Draw or
URL Windows” on page 102 for more information on changing window properties.
The window is added to the PAC Display project.
6. If the new window is not visible in the project window, select Window > Open, choose the
window in the list that appears, and then click OK.
NOTE: When a window is imported into a PAC Display project, the tags used by objects in that window are
not verified for accuracy. Run AutoCorrect tags on the window after importing it. See “When to Use
AutoCorrect Tags” on page 91 for instructions.
Drawing Graphic Objects
Once you’ve opened a project in PAC Display Configurator, you can use the drawing tools in the PAC
Display toolbox to create graphic objects in your active window. For descriptions of the tools and
shortcut keys, see “Using the Graphic Tools and Shortcut Keys” on page 109.
Follow these general steps to draw a graphic object:
1. If your toolbox is not visible, select View > Toolbox to see the toolbox as it appears below. (You
can close the toolbox by selecting View > Hide Toolbox.)
2. Select a drawing tool from the toolbox by clicking on it.
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The cursor will turn into a crosshair.
3. Click the crosshair in a window, then drag it in any direction to create a graphic object.
In the example above, the Round Rectangle tool
was selected.
Using the Graphic Tools and Shortcut Keys
Select a tool either by clicking it in the toolbox or by using a shortcut key shown in the table below.
For some tools, you can use additional keys to change what the tool does.
To use the additional keys:
1. Select the tool using either a button or shortcut key.
2. If you used a shortcut key, release it.
3. Hold down the additional keys as you draw the graphic object.
Tool
Select
Shortcut Key
Additional Keys
Enter or
Spacebar
Use
Select, move, and resize graphic objects.
Draw straight lines.
Line
\
Ctrl
Draw constrained straight lines at angles of 90
degrees.
Draw squares and rectangles.
Rectangle
Ctrl
Draw squares with the reference point in the top left
corner.
Shift
Draw rectangles with the reference point in the center.
Shift+Ctrl
Draw squares with the reference point in the center.
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Tool
Shortcut Key
Additional Keys
Use
Draw squares and rectangles with rounded corners.
Round
Rectangle
Ctrl
Draw squares with rounded corners with the reference point in the top left corner.
Shift
Draw rectangles with rounded corners with the reference point in the center.
Shift+Ctrl
Draw squares with rounded corners with the reference point in the center.
R
Draw circles and ellipses.
Ellipse
Ctrl
Draw circles with the reference point in the top left
corner.
Shift
Draw ellipses with the reference point in the center.
Shift+Ctrl
Draws circles with the reference point in the center.
E
P
Draw polygons as follows:
Drag and click to form vertex points.
Double-click the last vertex to close the polygon.
Sizing handles appear around the object. If you
can’t select the polygon later with the Select tool,
the polygon is not complete. Refresh the window
(ViewRedraw) to remove incomplete graphic
objects.
L
Draw connected lines as follows:
Drag and click to draw connected lines.
Double-click the last line drawn to finish the
polyline.
Sizing handles appear around the object. If you
can’t select the polyline later with the Select tool,
the polyline is not complete. Refresh the window
(ViewRedraw) to remove incomplete graphic
objects.
C
Draw curves as follows:
Click at least four points in the draw window to draw
a curve.
Thereafter, click points one at a time in groups of
three to continue drawing the curve.
Double-click the last point to finish the curve.
Sizing handles appear around the object. If you
can’t select the curve later with the Select tool, the
curve is not complete. Refresh the window (View
Redraw) to remove incomplete graphic objects.
B
Place bitmap graphic files selected with File
Choose Bitmap. Once the bitmap has been chosen,
just click to place the bitmap in the window.
Polygon
Polyline
Bezier Curve
Bitmap
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Tool
Shortcut Key
Additional Keys
Use
T
Write text for labels and titles. Put your cursor
where you want the text to start. Type your text.
When finished, click the mouse away from the text
you just typed or press Enter. Modify text by selecting it with the Select tool and by using EditEdit
Text.
The text tool is also used to create text objects
which, when configured with the Text-In (from Control Engine) dynamic attribute, are used for viewing
strings and other values from the control engine.
See “Text In from Control Engine” on page 186 for
more information.
G
Used to draw graphs that display real-time data
against time.
See Chapter 8, “8: Working with Trends,” for more
information.
Y
Draw graphs that display both real-time and historical data against time.
See Chapter 8, “8: Working with Trends,” for more
information.
A
Draw objects that display alarms and other status
information.
See Chapter 9, “9: Configuring Trigger-Based
Events,” for more information.
X
Draw graphs that display data plotted on x and y
axes.
See Chapter 8, “8: Working with Trends,” for more
information.
Q
Display data from up to sixteen tables.
See “Working with Tables” on page 146 for more
information.
Z
Resize a window and the graphic objects inside at
the same time.
See “Resizing a Window and the Graphic Objects
Inside” on page 121 for more information.
U
Add a Windows button. See also, “Adding a Windows Button or a PID Button” on page 131.
M
Add a combo box. See also, “Adding a Windows
Combo Box” on page 135.
I
(Pro only) Add a PID button. See also, “Adding a
Windows Button or a PID Button” on page 131
Text
Trend
SuperTrend
Alarm
XY Plot
Table
Scale Window
Windows Button
Combo Box
PID
URL
W
(Pro only) Create a URL control. See also, “Adding
a URL Control” on page 143.
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Selecting Graphic Objects
You can use the Select tool to choose one or more graphic objects in a draw window.
When a graphic object is selected, several solid black sizing handles appear, along with one
transparent selection mark. The selection mark shows you whether you’ve selected a single graphic
object or several objects in a group. Each graphic object in a group has a selection mark. Sizing
handles can be used to resize the graphic object, which we’ll talk about a little later in this chapter.
Selecting One Graphic Object
The simplest way to select a graphic object in a window is to click it with the Select tool. You can
also select a graphic object by clicking and dragging.
1. Choose the Select tool
from the toolbox.
2. Click the cursor just outside the graphic object you want to select and drag the cursor
completely over the object.
A selection box should appear as shown below:
NOTE: If you drag the cursor from left to right, you must completely enclose the object in the selection
box to select it. However, you can also select an object by dragging the cursor from right to left over
only part of the object.
3. After you release the mouse button, several sizing handles and one selection mark appear
around the selected object.
Selection Mark
Sizing Handle
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Selecting More Than One Graphic Object
There are a few ways to select multiple graphic objects. The simplest way is to click and drag.
1. Choose the Select tool
from the toolbox.
2. Click the pointer just outside the objects you want to select and drag the pointer across the
group of objects you want to select.
Make sure that you include all the objects within the selection box that appears.
After you release the mouse button, several sizing handles and one selection mark will appear
around the selected objects.
Another way to select several objects is to choose the first graphic object using the Select tool, then
hold down the Shift key and click on each additional object you want included in the selection
group. Notice that a selection handle appears on each object you add to your group of objects.
Selecting All Graphic Objects
To select all the graphic objects that appear in your active window, choose EditSelect All
(Alt+E+S). You can also right-click and choose Select All from the pop-up menu.
Unselecting One or More Graphic Objects
The easiest way to unselect one or all graphic objects is to click anywhere outside the sizing handles.
All of the handles disappear and no graphic objects are selected.
From a selected group of objects, you may need to pick some graphic objects you actually want as
part of a final selection group. You can do this by using key combinations.
•
To unselect an object within a group of selected objects, hold down the Shift key and click the
object you don’t want to include.
•
To select only one object within a group of selected objects, hold down the Ctrl key and click
the object. This unselects all other objects.
Grouping and Locking Graphic Objects
You can combine two or more graphic objects into a group so that they are handled as one object.
You can then manipulate the graphic object as one unit. As a unit, the grouped graphic objects can
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be selected, moved, resized, and have dynamic attributes assigned. You can also lock the position of
a graphic object in a draw window so it can’t be moved.
NOTE: You can't group:
•
Buttons
•
URL controls
•
Combo boxes
•
PID buttons
CAUTION: If you group objects, PAC Display Runtime processes only the dynamic attributes assigned to the
group. Dynamic attributes assigned to individual members of a group are ignored. If a group is later
ungrouped, any previously configured dynamic attributes of the individual graphic objects will be
recognized and processed in Runtime.
To group objects:
1. Select two or more graphic objects.
2. Choose EditGroup. (You can also right-click and choose Group from the pop-up menu.)
There will be no visible change, but the objects are collected into one group.
To ungroup objects:
1. Select a set of graphic objects that were previously grouped.
2. Choose EditUngroup, or right-click and choose Ungroup from the pop-up menu.
You will see the sizing handles still appear around the former group. Click off the graphic
objects and then click on an individual object. You will see it’s not part of the group anymore.
To lock objects in position:
After you’ve arranged several objects in a draw window, sometimes it can be useful to lock the
position of one or more items so they aren’t accidentally moved. To lock one or more graphic
objects, select the item(s) and choose EditLock Position. To unlock graphic objects, select the
item(s) and choose EditUnlock Position.
Applying or Changing Line Attributes
NOTE: If you select more than one graphic object and the objects have different line or fill attributes, no
attributes will appear in the menus and dialog boxes for each attribute. However, you can still select new
attributes for all selected lines.
1. Do one of the following:
– To change attributes for one or more existing objects, select the object(s) using the Select
tool.
– To set attributes for subsequent graphic objects that you create, do not select any object.
2. Choose the line attributes you want to apply to the selected object(s).
– To change the line color, select StyleLine Color, then choose a color from the Color
dialog box and click OK. (You can also right-click the line, and then choose LineColor
from the pop-up menu.)
– To change the line width of a solid line:
a. Right-click the line, and in the pop-up menu, click Line > Width (or select Style > Line
Style from the menu bar).
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b. In the Pen Width dialog box, type the desired pen width. (Pen widths are measured in
pixels.)
c. Click OK to close the dialog box and save the setting.
Non-solid (for example, dotted or dashed) lines have a maximum pen width of 1 pixel,
unless you apply the transparency feature (described on page 128) before configuring the
line width. For example, if you create a dashed line (without first applying the transparency
feature) and then change the width to a value greater than 1 pixel, the dashes disappear
and the line becomes a solid line.
To create a non-solid line that is greater than 1 pixel wide:
a. Right-click the line, and in the pop-up menu, click Line > Style. Select the desired style,
and the pop-up menu automatically closes.
b. Right-click the line again, and in the pop-up menu, click Transparency. In the Set
Transparency dialog box, type a value greater than 0. (100—completely transparent—
is the maximum value.)
c. Click OK to close the dialog box and save the setting.
d. Right-click the line again, and in the pop-up menu, click Line > Width.
e. In the Pen Width dialog box, type the desired with in pixels, and then click OK to close
the dialog box and save the setting.
– To change the line style, select StyleLine Style, then choose a line style from the list that
appears (shown below). (You can also right-click the object, choose LineStyle from the
pop-up menu, then select a line style from the list that appears.)
– To change the opaque or transparent attributes of a line, select the appropriate attribute
from the Style menu.
The opaque attribute lets the background color of the window show between the dashes
in a line.
The transparent attribute lets an object’s color show between the dashes in a line.
(The transparent attribute is not the same as the transparency feature. To apply
transparency to a line, see page 128.)
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Samples of opaque and transparent line attributes are shown in the image below.
Opaque
Transparent
Applying or Changing Fill Attributes
NOTE: If you select more than one object and the graphic objects have different line or fill attributes, no
attributes will appear in the menus and dialog boxes for each attribute. However, you can still select new
attributes for all selected lines.
1. Do one of the following:
– To change attributes for one or more existing graphic objects, select the object(s) using the
Select tool.
– To set attributes for subsequent graphic objects that you create, do not select any object.
2. Choose the fill attributes you want to apply to the selected object(s):
– To change the fill color, select StyleFill Color, then choose a color from the Color dialog
box and click OK. (You can also right-click, choose FillColor from the pop-up menu,
choose a color from the Color dialog box, and click OK.)
– To change the fill pattern, select StyleFill Pattern and choose a fill attribute. A fill color
other than white needs to be in effect in order to see the new fill pattern. (You can also
right-click, choose FillPattern from the pop-up menu, and choose a pattern.)
– To change the background color used behind a fill pattern, select StyleBackground
Color, then choose a color from the Color dialog box and click OK. (You can also right-click,
choose BackgroundColor from the pop-up menu, choose a color from the Color dialog
box, and click OK.)
Importing Graphics
You can easily import bitmap graphics, Windows Metafile graphics, JPEG, PNG, and GIF images into
a PAC Display window to enhance or add detail to your operator interface. For your convenience,
PAC Display also includes the Symbol Factory, a large library of graphics designed especially for
industrial applications.
In this section:
“Importing a Bitmap Graphic” (below)
“Importing a Metafile, JPEG, or PNG Graphic” on page 117
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“Importing a GIF Graphic” on page 117
“Importing a Graphic from the Symbol Factory” on page 118
Importing a Bitmap Graphic
A bitmap graphic is a picture, drawing, or other image saved in Microsoft Windows BMP file format.
Bitmap graphic files have the file extension .bmp. If you’d like to use bitmap graphics in your project
which have been saved in another graphic file format, such as TIFF (file extension .tif ), you must first
convert the file to BMP format. Commercial and shareware applications that can do this are widely
available; two popular commercial image editing and conversion applications for Microsoft
Windows are Paint Shop Pro® and Photoshop®.
To import a bitmap graphic into your PAC Display project, first choose the bitmap image you want to
use, and then use the Bitmap tool to place the bitmap in the window.
1. Select FileChoose Bitmap.
2. In the Choose a Bitmap dialog box that appears, navigate to the folder that contains the bitmap
graphic you want to use, and then select the file name and click Open.
3. Select the Bitmap tool
in the toolbox and click the pointer in the desired location in the
window.
The bitmap is centered at the location you have clicked.
Importing a Metafile, JPEG, or PNG Graphic
The Microsoft Windows Metafile (WMF) format was first introduced by Microsoft in 1988. Like GIF
and PNG, the WMF format supports transparency. However, PNG and GIF images usually look better
than WMF images in PAC Display.
The Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) file format is a highly compressed format commonly
used for photographs. This format is often used for displaying images in a Web browser.
The Portable Network Graphics (PNG) file format provides transparency, and it supports lossless data
compression so that the image is perfectly reconstructed from the compressed data. PNG images
are a good choice for use in your PAC Display project.
To import a Windows Metafile, JPEG, or PNG graphic into your PAC Display project, do the following.
1. Select EditPaste from FileImport (Metafile, JPEG, or PNG). (You can also right-click and
select Import Metafile, Import JPEG, or Import PNG from the pop-up menu.)
2. In the Import dialog box that appears, navigate to the folder that contains the graphic you
want to use, and then select the file name and click Open.
The selected file is placed in the active draw window.
You can also import a Metafile, JPEG, or PNG graphic used in another program by copying or cutting
the graphic to the Windows clipboard, and then pasting it in the project draw window.
Importing a GIF Graphic
You can import either static or animated GIF images into a PAC Display project. When using GIF
images in PAC Display, keep the following things in mind:
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•
Once imported, GIF images cannot be resized or rotated.
•
Animated GIFs appear as static GIFs in Configurator, displaying only the first frame of the
animation. Animation occurs in Runtime.
•
The GIF image's transparent color may not be set or changed in PAC Display. Use another
image editing program to change the transparent color before importing the image into PAC
Display.
•
Visibility/Blink is the only Control Engine Driven attribute that can be applied to GIF images.
The only options are Visible and Invisible. Blink options are not available for GIF images.
To import a GIF graphic:
1. Select EditPaste from FileImport GIF. (You can also right-click and select Import GIF from
the pop-up menu.)
2. In the Import dialog box that appears, navigate to the folder that contains the graphic you
want to use, and then select the file name and click Open.
The selected file is placed in the active draw window.
Importing a Graphic from the Symbol Factory
To import a graphic as a Windows Metafile graphic from the Symbol Factory into your PAC Display
project, do the following:
1. Select EditPaste from FileSymbol Factory. (You can also right-click and select Symbol
Factory from the pop-up menu.)
The Symbol Factory window opens.
2. Browse through the categories and thumbnails of graphics until you find the graphic that you
want to use.
3. Click the graphic and drag it into the PAC Display draw window.
You can also select EditPaste as Picture (.wmf ) Only.
The selected graphic is now available as a Metafile graphic in the active draw window. The Symbol
Factory window will remain open until you close it, or until you exit PAC Display Configurator.
Bitmap Graphics in Symbol Factory
Although Symbol Factory graphics are provided as Metafiles, you can also import these graphics as
bitmaps. To import a graphic as a bitmap graphic from the Symbol Factory into your PAC Display
project, do the following:
1. Select EditPaste from FileSymbol Factory. (You can also right-click and select Symbol
Factory from the pop-up menu.)
The Symbol Factory window opens.
2. Browse through the categories and thumbnails of graphics until you find the graphic that you
want to use.
3. Click the graphic and then select EditCopy.
4. Switch to the PAC Display draw window and select EditPaste.
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The selected graphic is now available as a bitmap graphic object in the active draw window. The
Symbol Factory window will remain open until you close it, or until you exit PAC Display
Configurator.
Saving Objects as Bitmaps
After creating one or more objects in a draw window, you may want to save the object as a bitmap
graphic file. This is useful, for example, if you want to document your operator interface.
NOTE: Saving a graphic object as a bitmap graphic file is not the same as copying an object, then pasting
it into another window. When a graphic object is saved as a bitmap, it loses all dynamic attributes and
other properties it has been configured with.
1. Use the Select tool to select the graphic object you want to save as a bitmap.
If you don’t select a graphic object, the entire active window will be saved as a bitmap file.
2. Select FileSave as Bitmap.
3. In the Save as Bitmap dialog box that appears, navigate to the desired folder and enter a file
name. (You can enter a three-letter extension other than .bmp, but the file will still be saved as
a bitmap image.)
4. Click Save to save the image.
Copying, Duplicating, and Pasting
There are two ways that you can make copies of graphic objects you’ve created or added to a
window. You can copy one or more graphic objects to the Windows clipboard, or duplicate the
selected object(s) in the same window without affecting the contents of the clipboard.
You can also copy graphic objects into your PAC Display project from another project, but both
projects must be created with the same version of PAC Display. Graphic objects created in an
OptoDisplay project cannot be used in a PAC Display project. (OptoDisplay is an HMI application
similar to PAC Display that is part of Opto 22’s FactoryFloor software suite.)
In this section:
“Copying and Pasting a Graphic Object”
“Duplicating a Graphic Object”
Copying and Pasting a Graphic Object
1. Select one or more graphic objects.
2. Choose EditCopy. (The keyboard shortcut for this command is Ctrl+C or Ctrl+Ins. You can
also right-click and choose Copy from the pop-up menu.)
The selected objects are copied to the Windows clipboard.
3. Click the window where you want to paste the object(s).
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4. Choose EditPaste. (The keyboard shortcut for this command is Ctrl+V. You can also
right-click and choose Paste from the pop-up menu.)
The clipboard contents are pasted in the center of the active window.
Duplicating a Graphic Object
1. Select one or more graphic objects.
2. Choose EditDuplicate. (The keyboard shortcut for this command is Ctrl+D. You can also
right-click and choose Duplicate from the pop-up menu.)
A copy of the graphic object is placed immediately below the selected object. Note that the
contents of the Windows clipboard are not affected by duplicating a graphic object.
Moving and Resizing Graphic Objects
To build your operator interface, you will need to be able to position, resize, and reshape graphic
objects. This is done using the Select tool with different options. (Objects can also be positioned and
resized by entering values in the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box; see “6: Working with
Graphic Objects” on page 99 for more information.)
In this section:
“Moving Graphic Objects” (below)
“Reshaping Graphic Objects” on page 123
Moving Graphic Objects
1. Choose one or more graphic objects to move using the Select tool
.
2. To move a graphic object, click the object (but not on a sizing handle) and drag it to the new
position.
You can’t drag graphic objects from one window to another. You must copy or cut graphic
objects to move them between windows.
Moving object
from here...
...to here.
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Resizing a Graphic Object Using Its Sizing Handles
1. Select one or more graphic objects to resize using the Select tool
.
2. To resize a graphic object, position the pointer over a square handle, click, and drag.
As illustrated below, the pointer turns into an arrow, and the size of the graphic object changes
relative to the sizing handle you’re dragging.
3. When the graphic object(s) are the size you want, release the mouse button.
Resizing Multiple Graphic Objects to Equal Dimensions
When multiple graphic objects are selected, they can be resized equally so that all the objects have
the same height and width.
1. Using the Select tool
, choose two or more graphic objects to resize.
2. Select EditSize, then one of the following options:
– Grow to Largest Height—All selected objects are resized to the height of the tallest
object selected.
– Grow to Largest Width—All selected objects are resized to the width of the widest
object selected.
– Shrink to Smallest Height—All selected objects are resized to the height of the smallest
object selected.
– Shrink to Smallest Width—All selected objects are resized to the width of the least wide
object selected.
You can also select these options by right-clicking on the selected objects, selecting Size from
the pop-up menu, and then choosing a Grow or Shrink option.
Resizing a Window and the Graphic Objects Inside
The Scale Window tool allows you to resize a window and the graphic objects inside at the same
time.
NOTE: Resizing graphic objects in this manner is not exact. Graphic objects are resized in units of
whole-number percentages, not fractional percentages, and the vertical and horizontal dimensions are
resized independently. So if a window is returned to its original size after it has been modified, it may not
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look exactly the same as it did before it was resized. Also, resizing a window using this method cannot be
undone.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
In the Windows Control Panel, click System.
On the left sidebar, click “Advanced system settings.”
In the Performance section, click Settings.
Make sure that “Show window contents while dragging” is unchecked, and then click OK.
(Recommended) Make a copy of the window to test the results.
Click in the window you want to resize to activate that window.
7. Choose the Scale Window tool
from the toolbox.
The Scale Window Tool Selected dialog box appears.
8. Click Yes to continue.
NOTE: If you click in a window other than the active one, the dialog box will close and the Scale
Window tool will revert to the Select tool, just as though you had clicked the No button.
9. Grab the border of the active window to resize both the window and the graphic objects
inside. The new size is shown in the Toolbox.
NOTE: If you click in or try resize a different window, or if you move the cursor back inside the drawing
area of the active window, the Scale Window reverts to the Select tool.
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Choose the Scale Window tool and
then grab the border of the window
to resize both the window and the
graphic objects inside.
Reshaping Graphic Objects
You can adjust the individual points that make up a polyline, polygon, or Bezier curve object.
1. Using the Select tool
, select a polyline, polygon, or Bezier curve object.
2. Select EditEdit Points, or right-click and choose “Edit Points” from the pop-up menu.
3. Move the cursor over a point on the selected object.
When the cursor is over a point on the object, the point is highlighted with a small black
square.
4. Click the highlighted point, drag it to the desired location, and then release the mouse button.
The highlighted point will appear in the new location.
5. When you are done adjusting points on the object, click outside of the object to deselect it.
Changing Stacking Order
When graphic objects in a window overlap, they’re assigned a stacking order (or “Z-order”) to define
which object appears in front of or in back of another object. With the Z-Order function, you can
change the order in which objects are stacked. (When graphic objects are grouped, the group is
treated as a single object in the stack. For details about grouping objects, see page 113.)
NOTE: You can't change the Z-order of:
• Buttons
• Combo boxes
•
•
Alarm graphics
Table controls
•
•
URL controls
SuperTrends
•
PID buttons
To change the Z-order of overlapping graphic objects, right-click an object in the stack, and from
the pop-up menu, click Z-Order. (Alternatively, you can select an object and click Edit > Z-Order
from the menu bar.) Then, choose from these options:
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•
Arrange (described on page 124)
•
Bring to Front
•
Move Forward
•
Send to Back
•
Move Backward
Bring to Front, Send to Back, Move Forward, Move Backward
If you select Bring to Front, the graphic object is moved to the front of other objects.
Likewise, if you select Send to Back, the graphic object is moved behind all other objects.
The commands Move Forward and Move Backward work similarly, except that the graphic object
you select is moved ahead or behind one object, not ahead or behind all other objects.
Before Bring to Front
After Bring to Front
Arrange
The Arrange feature is the easiest way to rearrange the order of overlapping objects. You can also
use the Arrange feature to quickly open an object’s Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box (or the
Trend Configuration dialog box, if the object you select is a trend.)
When you choose the Arrange option, the Z-Order dialog box displays thumbnails and descriptions
of the object you selected and the ones beneath it in the stack, in order from top to bottom.
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To re-arrange the Z-order, click an item in the list, and then drag and drop it to a different position
in the stack. As you drag the item, a guideline shows its new position.
Alternatively, you can click the item, and then click a button to move the object up, down, to the
top, or to the bottom of the stack. Buttons that aren’t applicable to the item you’ve selected are
grayed out. (For example, if you’ve selected the top item in the list, the Move to Top and Move Up
buttons are grayed out.
The Note on page 123 lists graphic objects whose Z-order cannot be changed. If any of these
objects are contained in your selection, they will not appear in the Z-Order dialog box.
To display an object’s Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box, double-click an item in the list.
This feature lets you configure an object’s dynamic attributes without having to separate it from the
stack. (If the item you selected is a trend, the Trend Configuration dialog box is displayed.)
Deleting Graphic Objects
There are several ways to delete a graphic object in a window. Depending on the commands you
use, the method you choose may affect the contents of the Windows clipboard.
1. Select one or more graphic objects. (Use EditSelect All to select all objects.)
2. Delete the graphic objects using one of the following methods:
– To cut a graphic object and save it in the Windows clipboard so you can use it elsewhere,
choose EditCut, or press Shift+Del, or press Ctrl+X, or right-click and choose Cut from
the pop-up menu.
You can paste the graphic object into another window or elsewhere in the same window.
– To permanently delete a graphic object, choose EditDelete, or press the Del key, or
right-click and choose Delete from the pop-up menu.
The graphic objects are not copied to the clipboard and cannot be retrieved.
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Aligning Graphic Objects
You can align selected graphic objects based on common edges, or based on common centers
through objects. You can also adjust the space between graphic objects.
1. Select the graphic objects you want to align.
You have to select at least two objects to enable this command.
2. Select the EditAlign command and choose an option to base the alignment on. (You can
also right-click and choose Align from the pop-up menu.)
The following illustration shows the results of applying the different alignment options:
Before Alignment
After Left Align
After Center Align
After Right Align
After Top Align
After Middle Align
After Bottom Align
After Space Evenly Vertically
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Rotating Objects
You can rotate the following objects: Bitmaps, Metafiles, Curves, Polygons, Ellipses, Polylines, JPEGs,
PNGs, Rectangles, Lines, and Text.
To rotate an object or a group of objects:
1. Select one or more objects.
2. Choose EditFlip/Rotate > Rotate to open the Rotate Object dialog box.
3. For one object:
Enter the degrees of rotation, then click OK.
For more than one object:
Enter the degrees of rotation, select one of the Rotation Options, and then click OK.
Rotate each object individually rotates each object the specified number of degrees around
its own center.
Rotate all objects around center of group rotates each object around the center point of all
the selected objects
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Each object rotated individually
Unrotated objects
All objects rotated around center of the group
Flipping Objects
You can flip the following objects: Curves, Polygons, Ellipses, Polylines, Rectangles, and Lines.
To flip an object around a central horizontal or vertical axis:
1. Select one or more objects.
2. Choose EditFlip/Rotate and select an option, or right-click and choose Flip/Rotate from the
pop-up menu.
– To flip a graphic object from right to left (or vice versa), choose Flip Horizontal.
– To flip a graphic object from top to bottom (or vice versa), choose Flip Vertical.
Applying Transparency to Graphic Objects
NOTE: To apply transparency to a draw window or (Pro only) URL window, see “Window Properties Dialog
Box” on page 103.
You can apply transparency to graphic objects (with a few exceptions1) so that in Runtime,
operators can see through them. By using a slider control or by entering a value between 0 and 100,
you can set the transparency of an object (or group of objects) from completely invisible to entirely
opaque.
Note that some PAC Display controls support transparency only in Windows 8.1 or higher.2
1 All graphic image formats support transparency except Microsoft Windows-format metafiles (.WMF
and .EMF).
2 Windows 8.1 or higher: SuperTrends, alarms, tables, buttons, PID buttons, combo boxes, URL con-
trols, and URL windows.
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To apply transparency to an object or group of objects:
1. Select one or more objects, and then right-click to display the pop-up menu. (For graphic
objects, the Transparency feature is available only from the pop-up menu. It is not an option in
the PAC Display menu bar.)
2. From the pop-up menu, click Transparency.
The Set Transparency dialog box is displayed.
3. Use the slider bar control (or type a number in the Current Transparency field) to define the
object’s transparency. A value of 0 is completely opaque (no transparency); a value of 100 is
completely transparent. When applying the transparency feature to a line
NOTE: When applying the transparency feature to a non-solid (for example, dotted or dashed) line,
you must first set the transparency value, and then you can configure the line style. For details about
line styles, see “Applying or Changing Line Attributes” on page 114.
When you stop moving the slider (or after typing a number in the Current Transparency field),
the selected graphic objects appear with the configured transparency.
Graphic objects are displayed
in their transparency setting
4. Select OK to save the setting and close the dialog box. Otherwise, click Cancel to reset the
graphic objects to their original transparency.
Working with Text
The Text tool is a convenient way to label, title, and add impact to your graphic objects. Text that you
add to a graphic object can be changed at any time, and formatted using different fonts, font sizes,
and colors.
IMPORTANT: The text tool is also used to create objects that display values and string data from a control
engine. Configure the text object you create using the Text In (from control engine) dynamic attribute; see
“Text In from Control Engine” on page 186 for specific instructions.
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In this section:
“Adding Text” (below)
“Editing Text” on page 130
“Formatting Text” on page 130
Adding Text
1. Choose the Text tool from the toolbox, or right-click and select Text from the pop-up menu.
2. Click the cursor where you want to place your text.
You can also choose to place the text somewhere other than its final location, work on the text
until it’s ready to use, and then move it to the desired location.
3. Type the text.
4. When you’re done with the text you want to type, either press Enter on the keyboard or click
outside the text area.
The text you’ve typed is now an object that you can select and manipulate like other objects.
Editing Text
1. With the Select tool, choose the text object you want to modify.
2. Choose EditEdit Text, or right-click and choose Edit Text from the pop-up menu.
3. Enter the new text in the Edit Text dialog box that appears, then click OK.
The text object is now modified with the new text.
Formatting Text
1. With the Select tool, choose the text object you want to modify.
2. Choose a formatting option from the Text menu, or right-click the text object and select an
option from the pop-up menu. The following formatting options are available:
– Font—Changes the font family used for the text in a text object. You can use any fixed or
TrueType font family installed on the computer.
– Size—Changes the size of the characters in a text object.
– Color—Defines the color in which the text appears.
– Background—Defines the color of the area directly behind a text object. This formatting
option is visible only when the Opaque attribute is selected.
– Style—Changes the weight, italicization, and other characteristics of the characters in a
text object. Styles available are Normal, Bold, Italic, Underline, and Strikeout.
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– Opaque—Determines how text appears when overlapping other objects. Opaque style is
applied to text just like any other style. If the text is set to Opaque, objects under the text
will be overwritten by the text background color.
Example of Opaque Text
– Transparent—Determines how text appears when overlapping other objects. The
opposite of opaque, if the text is set to transparent, objects under the text will remain
visible and unaffected by the text background color.
Example of Transparent Text
The text object is now modified with the format changes.
See “Text Menu” on page 403 of Appendix D, “D: Menus,” for additional information on creating and
formatting a text object.
Adding a Windows Button or a PID Button
The Button tool
adds an unlabeled Windows button to the active display window. The PID
Button
tool (Pro only) adds PID button.
1. If your toolbox is not visible, select View > Toolbox to open the toolbox.
2. Select either the Button tool or the PID Button tool.
The cursor turns into a crosshair.
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3. Click the crosshair in a window, then drag it in any direction to create a frame for the button.
4. To add a label to the button, right-click and select Edit Text from the pop-up menu.
The Set Button Text dialog box opens.
5. Enter the text, and then click OK.
If you want to add control engine-driven dynamic text, see “Assigning a Control Engine-Driven
Dynamic Attribute to Windows Button Text” on page 133.
The new label appears on the button.
6. To change the font on the label, right-click the button and select Change Font from the pop-up
menu.
NOTE: Buttons cannot be grouped or have their Z-order changed.
In this section:
“Assigning Operator-Driven Dynamic Attributes to a Windows Button”
“Configuring a PID Button”
Assigning Operator-Driven Dynamic Attributes to a Windows
Button
Assign to it any of the operator-driven dynamic attributes except the Read and Clear attribute. For
more information on adding dynamic attributes, see “Assigning a Dynamic Attribute to a Graphic
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Object” on page 152. As described in step 5 of “Adding a Windows Button or a PID Button,” you can
also assign a dynamic attribute to the button’s text.
NOTE: The focus-frame enabled option is disabled for Windows buttons, since Windows automatically
highlights the button when the mouse is moved over it. For more information on the “Focus-frame
enabled” option, see “Assigning a Dynamic Attribute to a Graphic Object” on page 152.
Assigning a Control Engine-Driven Dynamic Attribute to
Windows Button Text
Using this feature, a Windows button can display varying dynamic text depending on the button’s
current function. For example, a Windows button could be configured with the text, “Begin # batch,”
where the # is tied to a string variable in the strategy that indicates what kind of cookie is supposed
to be made. The # would be replaced by either “Peanut Butter“ or “Chocolate Chip,“ and the button
would display “Begin Peanut Butter batch“ or “Begin Chocolate Chip batch.“
To add a control engine-driven dynamic attribute to text on a Windows button:
1. Create a Windows button as described in “Adding a Windows Button or a PID Button” on
page 131.
2. Insert a pound sign (#) sign in the button’s text to indicate where to place a string that reads a tag
from a control engine and displays a string based on a received numeric value, string, or discrete
value. You can use more than one pound sign, or you can combine text and pound signs:
Pound sign only
Text and pound sign
3. Double-click the button to open the Configure Dynamic Attributes dialog box.
Below the Visibility/Blink option, you’ll see the Text in From Controller option.
Text In from
Control Engine
NOTE: You must have entered a pound sign on the Windows button in the previous step. Otherwise,
the Text In from Control Engine option is not displayed.
4. Double-click Text In from Control Engine to configure this control engine-driven dynamic
attribute. See “Text In from Control Engine” on page 186 for specific instructions.
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Configuring a PID Button
Double-clicking a PID button opens the PID Configuration dialog box.
To configure a PID button:
1. Select an IO Unit from the “Select IO Units” pane, and then select a configured PID that appears
in the right pane.
I/O unit
PID
Part of the PAC Display Runtime PID Window is a SuperTrend that plots the Input, Output and
Setpoint values.
2. Enter the minimum and maximum values to display on the SuperTrend that appears the PAC
Display Runtime PID Window.
The PID SuperTrend plots the Input, Output, and Setpoint values. In general, you should obtain
the initial values from the control strategy, but you can modify them to suit your needs.
NOTE: These values are for the SuperTrend display only. The values configured in the PAC Control
strategy are not changed.
3. You can configure the Options as follows:
– Enable Auto / Manual: Select this check box to allow a user to switch between Auto and
Manual mode from within the PID window in Runtime. Also, you can configure a password
to allow changing the mode in Runtime.
– Enable Tune: Select this check box to allow a user to adjust PID tuning parameters in
Runtime. The available parameters include Gain, Integral, Derivative, and Scan Rate. You
can configure a password to allow tuning in Runtime.
– Trend Time Span (min): This is the time span (in minutes) of the SuperTrend in the Runtime
PID Window. The default is 5 minutes. Enter a new time span if desired.
4. If desired, click Security to configure security attributes for the PID Button itself. This is
configured the same way as for any other graphic dynamic attribute (see “Security Settings for
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Graphic Objects and Dynamic Attributes” on page 161). PID button security allows only
specified users to launch the Runtime PID Window.
NOTE: PID Buttons may not be grouped with other PAC Display graphic objects or have their Z-order
changed.
For information on using a PID button in Runtime, see “Using a PID Button” on page 370.
Adding a Windows Combo Box
See also, “How a Combo Box Behaves in Runtime” on page 369
The Combo Box tool
adds a Windows combo box to the active display window.
1. If your toolbox is not visible, select View > Toolbox to open the toolbox.
2. Select the Combo Box tool.
The cursor turns into a crosshair.
3. Click the crosshair in a window, then drag it in any direction to create a frame for the button.
A combo box appears in the display window.
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ADDING A WINDOWS COMBO BOX
NOTE: The height of the combo is fixed and cannot be changed. Using the Select tool, you can change
only the width.
Creating a Combo Box List
Each list item that you add to the new combo box can be assigned one or more of the following
dynamic attributes.
Control Engine Driven: Text-in from Control Engine
Operator Driven:
•
Send Value
•
Send Discrete
•
Send String
•
Window
•
Download Recipe
•
Upload Recipe
•
Launch Application
•
Execute Menu Item
NOTE: The operator-driven dynamic attribute Read and Clear cannot be used with a combo box.
See the following two sections to add a list item to a combo box, and then assign one or more
dynamic attributes to the item.
“Adding a List Item to a Combo Box” (below)
“Assigning One or More Dynamic Attributes to a Combo Box List Item” on page 138
Adding a List Item to a Combo Box
1. Using the Select tool, double click on the combo box.
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This opens the Combo Box Dynamic Attributes dialog box:
You’ll add individual list items for the combo box to the Items text box.
2. Click the Add button to open the Add Entry dialog box.
3. Enter text for the list item, then click OK.
List item text
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The new list item appears in the Items list:
To modify the text of an item, click the Modify button, make changes to the text, and then click
OK.
If there is more than one item in the list and you want to re-arrange the order of the items,
select the item you want to move and click the Move Up or Move Down button.
Follow the instructions in the next section to assign one or more dynamic attributes to an item.
Assigning One or More Dynamic Attributes to a Combo Box List Item
1. In the Combo Box Dynamic Attributes dialog box, highlight an item to activate the Dynamic
Attributes controls:
Dynamic
Attributes
controls
NOTE: If no “Text-in from control engine” placeholder character (#) is embedded in the text, the Text In
fields are disabled. See “Text In from Control Engine” on page 186 for more information.
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As mentioned previously, you can assign one or more dynamic attributes to each entry in the
list. For example, “Download peanut butter cookie recipe” item may have a Send Value, a Send
Discrete, and a Download Recipe assigned to it.
2. To configure a dynamic attribute, click the link for the desired attribute.
Click the link
This opens a Dynamic Attribute dialog box for that specific attribute.
3. Configure the dynamic attribute, and then click OK.
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ADDING A WINDOWS COMBO BOX
Once an attribute has been configured, the Enabled check box is selected. To disable the
attribute, uncheck this check box. Also, the Security button becomes enabled.
Dynamic
attribute
selected
Security button
Changing the Font or Spacing of Combo Box Items
Using the Change Font and Multiply Runtime Height By commands you can change the font or
spacing of text items listed in a combo box.
To access these commands in Configurator, right-click on a combo box with the Select tool.
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•
Change Font opens the standard font dialog box. If you change the size of the text, the height
of the combo box is changed to accommodate the new size.
•
Multiply Runtime Height By... increases the space beneath each item in the list by a factor of
1, 2, 3, 4, or 5. This does not change the text height, nor does it change the size of the closed
comb box. Note that there is no visible change in Configurator because there are no items in
the list in Configurator. (They are added only in Runtime.)
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Example 1: The combo box has the default font, but has a Runtime Height Multiplier of 2. This
results in additional space between each item, but the combo box size stays the same.
Example 2: The font has changed to Myriad Pro 16, but the Height Multiplier has the default value
of 1. The result is that the text is larger and so is the size of the combo box. The spacing between
items remains unchanged.
Example 3: As in example 2, the font has changed to Myriad Pro 16. However, the Height
Multiplier is now 3. The combo box will be the same size as in example 2, but the spacing between
each item increases by a factor of 3.
Adding Security to a Combo Box
To add security to a combo box, click on Security button. This is configured in the manner as for
other graphic objects in PAC Display. For more information, see “Security Settings for Graphic
Objects and Dynamic Attributes” on page 161.
The following characteristics apply to combo box security:
•
Security is applied to all configured dynamic attributes of the item. However, in Runtime, the
Security dialog box appears only once per selected list item. For example, if a single entry has
Send Value, Send String and Menu Item, rather than the security dialog box appearing three
times (once per dynamic attribute) it appears only once for the list item.
•
Each list item may have its own security configured
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•
Security attributes may be copied and pasted from one item to another
•
It is not possible to configure security for the combo box as a whole
Once security has been configured for a dynamic attribute, the security may be copied and pasted
to other entries in the Items list as described below.
To copy and paste security attributes from one item to another:
1. Open the Dynamic Attributes dialog box for the Combo Box.
2. Select an item that has one or more dynamic attributes assigned to it.
3. Right-click on the item and choose Security > Copy Security Attributes from the pop-up menu.
4. Right-click on a different item and choose Security > Paste Security Attributes from the pop-up
menu.
NOTE: The “Focus-frame enabled” option is disabled for combo boxes, since Windows automatically
highlights the combo box when the mouse is moved over it. For more information on the “Focus-frame
enabled” option, see “Assigning a Dynamic Attribute to a Graphic Object” on page 152.
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NOTE: Combo boxes may not be grouped with other PAC Display graphic objects or have their Z-order
changed.
Adding a URL Control
(Pro only) The URL Control tool
adds a simplified browser to the active display window. Like a
URL window (see “Using Draw Windows and URL Windows” on page 99), this allows you to display a
specific website within your project, or a web application such as Opto 22’s groov (see “Adding a
groov URL Control” on page 145). However, unlike a URL window, a URL control browser is placed
within a draw window. While this allows you to add other graphic objects within the same draw
window, in Runtime the user cannot resize a URL control browser. But the browser does provide
scrollbars to allow you to see the entire page, and forward and back buttons are provided for
navigation. There is no keyboard support for static web pages in a URL control.
NOTE: A window cannot contain both an alarm control and a URL control.
NOTE: If a window in Configurator contains a URL control, the Always in Memory option in the
Window > Properties dialog box is disabled and cannot be used for that window.
1. If your toolbox is not visible, select View > Toolbox to open the toolbox.
URL Control tool
2. Select the URL Control tool.
The cursor turns into a crosshair.
3. Click the crosshair in a window, and then drag it in any direction to create a frame for the
browser.
NOTE: Remember that the browser cannot be resized in Runtime, so make sure that the frame is big
enough to display the information in the target website.
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4. Using the Select tool, double-click the control to open the URL Control Options dialog box.
A
B
C
D
A
URL—Type the URL of the target webpage.
B
Refresh Every ___ sec.—To refresh the control at a specific interval, type the number of
seconds in the text box. This is useful for updating static images like a weather radar or images
from a security camera.
C
User Agent— To specify the target browser and operating system, click the User Agent
button, and then, in the User Agent String dialog box, type a correctly formatted user agent
string. This feature lets you override the default User-Agent value in header messages sent to
the web server. (User-agent strings are typically advanced settings used when testing web
applications with different browsers.) For help creating user agent strings, contact your IT
department, or see the Microsoft Developer's Network website
(https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms537503(v=vs.85).aspx).
To set a global user agent string for all URL controls and URL windows in all of your PAC Display
projects (which takes precedence over objects configured with the User Agent button),
perform these steps:
a. In Windows File Explorer, navigate to the folder where PAC Display is installed. (The default
folder is C:\Program Files (x86)\Opto22\PAC Project 9.6.)
b. In the folder, create a text file and name it: PAC DisplayUserAgentString.txt
c. In the text file, type a correctly formatted user agent string. Don’t type anything else in the
text file.
d. Close and save the text file. When a project is loaded in Runtime, PAC Display uses the user
agent string in the PAC DisplayUserAgentString.txt for all URL controls and URL windows
D Hide Navigation Controls—Check the box to hide the forward and back navigation buttons.
When finished, click OK to save your changes and close the dialog box.
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The URL you entered appears in the center of the control to show which webpage will be loaded in
Runtime. In Runtime, the browser looks like this:
Adding a groov URL Control
If you have Opto 22’s groov on your network, you can access your groov project in Runtime by
creating a URL control in Build that points to groov. When you create the control, make sure to enter
the exact same URL for groov as you would in a regular browser including “https://.”
Because groov is a web application rather than a static web page, you can use all of groov features
from within a PAC Display URL control. Keep in mind that a user cannot change the size of a URL
control, but they can change the size of a URL window (see “Adding a groov URL Window” on
page 101).
If the groov project has a URL link to an external webpage, when you click the URL in Runtime, the
webpage will open in a new popup window. When the popup containing the external webpage is
closed, any popup windows that originated from that window will also be closed.
For more information about groov, see form 2027, the groov User’s Guide.
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Working with Tables
Using PAC Display’s Table tool
, you can add an object to display the contents of tables used in a
PAC Control project. In a single on-screen object, you can display the contents of up to sixteen
separate tables. The tables can contain 32-bit and 64-bit integers, floating point values, or text
strings.
For information on changing individual table elements in PAC Display Runtime, see “Writing Directly
to Individual Elements” on page 369. For information on changing multiple table elements at the
same time, see “” on page 263.
In this section:
“Creating a Table” on page 146
“Configuring a Table” on page 147
Creating a Table
1. Select the Table tool in the toolbox.
2. Click the mouse button, drag the mouse to the desired size, and then release the mouse
button.
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The table object appears.
Configuring a Table
After creating a table object in a draw window, you must specify which table(s) will be displayed. For
each table, you can optionally specify which table elements will be displayed.
1. Double-click the table object with the Select tool.
The Configure Table dialog box appears.
2. In the Appearance area:
– If desired, type a new title for the Index Column. (By default, the title is “Index.”)
– If desired, choose the background color and font used in the table object.
– To select a background color, click the white square next to Background Color, select a
color in the Windows color selector that appears, and then click OK.
– To select the font, click Font, select a font in the Windows font selector that appears,
and then click OK.
– To use the selected font in the header of each table column, select “Use same font for
header.”
– When Use Relative Offsets is selected, all table data will begin at the top row of the
table control, regardless of which actual data table index is being displayed.
For example, if Table 1 is configured to show elements 0 – 50 of a table, and Table 2
shows elements 200-250 of a different table, then the top row of the table control for
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Table 1 corresponds to the data at element 0, and the top row of the table control for
Table 2 corresponds to the data at element 200.
NOTE: If the Use Relative Offsets option is selected, in Runtime, no “Index” column is
displayed in the table control; only the table data itself is displayed.
3. In the Configure Tables area, click Table 1. The Configure Tables dialog box appears.
4. If desired, type a description. Up to 12 characters of the description will appear on the Table
button when you close the dialog box. (If you don’t type a description, after you configure a
tag, the tag’s item name is displayed in the Description field.)
5. Click the Tag Selection button
table.
, and in the Tag Selection dialog box that appears, select a
– To display a range of table elements, type a start index (usually 0) and the number of
elements (10240 maximum) to be displayed.
Enter a starting index (usually 0) and
the number of table elements to use.
6.
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– You can also configure a refresh time for the table object. For details, see “Refresh Time
Groups” on page 198.
Click OK to exit the Tag Selection dialog box. The Configure Tables dialog box appears, where
you can configure additional options:
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– Align Data. To align the data in the table, select the appropriate option for left, center, or
right-justified data.
– Display Integer 64 Values As. By default, discrete bits and digital point states stored in an
Integer 64 value are displayed in decimal format. To see four bits at a time, select
Hexadecimal. To see each bit or point state, select Binary. (This option is disabled if you did
not select an integer-64 table.)
– Floating Point Decimal Places. To configure the number of floating point decimal places
to be displayed in the table, select a value from 0 to 6. (This option is disabled if you did not
select a float table.)
– Table Options. By default, Enabled is selected to allow the operator to use the table in
Runtime.
Allow Edit is also enabled, and allows the Runtime operator to click on a cell in the table,
and then enter a new value. To prevent an operator from editing the data, deselect Allow
Edit.
To require a password to edit data in a table, select the table’s Allow Edit option, and then
click Password. In the dialog that appears, type the password, confirm it, and then click OK.
7. Click OK to exit the Configure Tables dialog box and return to the Configure Table dialog box.
8. To configure additional tables, click its Table button, and then repeat steps 4 through 7. When
you have finished configuring tables, click OK to close the Configure Table dialog box.
To delete a table, click its Table button, and then click Delete Table. The remaining tables are
reordered.
Printing
To print the displayed windows, select FilePrint to display the Print dialog box. If the settings are
correct for your printer, click OK.
If you need to change printer settings, click the Properties button in the Print dialog box. You can
also change the printer settings without printing the Configurator screens by selecting the File
Printer Setup command.
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7: Chapter 7
7: Using Animated Graphic
Objects
Introduction
This chapter describes how to animate graphic objects to show how I/O data and other values
change in real time. It also describes how PAC Display scans data from control engines to update its
graphic objects, and how you can adjust this scanning to optimize your PAC Display project for best
performance.
In This Chapter
Assigning a Dynamic Attribute to a Graphic Object.........................................................152
Assigning Operator-Driven Sub-Attributes...........................................................................158
Security Settings for Graphic Objects and Dynamic Attributes...................................161
Available Dynamic Attributes .....................................................................................................165
Copying and Deleting Dynamic Attributes ..........................................................................196
Viewing Tags and Dynamic Attributes....................................................................................197
Scanning to Update Graphic Objects......................................................................................198
About Animated Graphic Objects
As your PAC Control strategy runs on the control engine, values and states of tags in the PAC Control
strategy database are continuously updated. PAC Display uses this changing data to modify
attributes (such as size, position, and color) of the graphic objects that you have connected to the
tags. The end result is an animated, continually updated display that shows status information about
a control process.
To animate graphic objects, you must assign dynamic attributes to objects you’ve drawn. These are
attributes that make the graphic object change based on the values read from or sent to control
engines, based on events that happened, or based on how the operator interacts with the interface.
Two types of dynamic attributes can be assigned to a graphic object: control engine-driven
attributes and operator-driven attributes.
Control engine-driven attributes are always assigned to a particular tag (I/O point, value, etc.) in
a PAC Control strategy running on an attached control engine. This type of attribute changes a
graphic object as tags are read from a control engine. For example, if a tag reflects a lower-level
alarm condition for a process, the attached graphic object can change color to red to alert the
operator.
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Operator-driven attributes are assigned to a graphic object. These attributes change the graphic
object as an operator interacts with the interface. As a result, events may be triggered, or new tag
values may be sent to an attached control engine. For example, if an operator clicks a graphic object
that looks like a button, a valve is closed.
Assigning a Dynamic Attribute to a Graphic Object
As you finish drawing your operator interface, you can start assigning dynamic attributes to some of
the on-screen graphic objects.
1. Choose the Select tool from the toolbox and double-click the graphic object that you want to
assign a dynamic attribute to. (You can also click the graphic object once, and then click Edit
Edit Dynamic Attributes in the menu bar.)
NOTE: Dynamic attributes can be assigned to only one object at a time. If you want several objects to
have the same attributes, select the objects, and then choose EditGroup to make them one object.
(You can also right-click on the selected graphic objects and choose Group from the pop-up menu.)
Remember that if you ungroup the objects, the attributes you configured when they were a group
aren’t retained.
The Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box appears.
At the top of the dialog box is a brief description of the item selected, including its location (x
and y coordinates) and dimensions (width and height) in the draw window. You can change
the location and dimensions of the graphic object by entering new values in place of the
current ones. (You can’t change the dimensions of a text graphic object.)
2. To include hint text that is displayed when the mouse is hovered over the graphic object in
Runtime, click the Hint button to open the Hint Text dialog box. For more information, see
“Adding Hint Text to a Graphic Object” on page 157. Note that hint text works only with basic
graphic objects such as lines, rectangles, ellipses, and text.
3. Choose an attribute you want to configure in either the Control Engine-Driven Attributes or
Operator-Driven Attributes list, and then click the Edit button for that list.
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The dialog box that appears will differ depending on the attribute you selected. The options
and features of each attribute are covered in detail in “Available Dynamic Attributes” on
page 165.
NOTE: For the operator-driven attributes, Send Value, Send Discrete, and Send String, you can assign
multiple sub-attributes. For more information, see “Assigning Multiple Dynamic Attributes to a
Graphic Object” on page 158.
4. Configure the attribute as required, and then click OK to return to the Graphic Dynamic
Attributes dialog box.
5. If you made any changes to operator-driven attributes, complete these options:
– Focus-frame enabled—If this option is checked, a light border will appear around the
graphic object in Runtime when the operator moves the cursor over it. This border can be
used as a visual aid to let the operator know that an event will occur when the graphic
object is clicked. (You must still configure additional dynamic attributes for the graphic
object so these events can occur.)
– Beep enabled—If this option is checked, the operator will hear a beep when the graphic
object is clicked. Use this as an audio confirmation.
– Hot Key—This feature associates a keystroke sequence with a graphic object that has a
dynamic attribute assigned and configured. A hot key is a key on the keyboard that, when
pressed (sometimes in combination with an optional Ctrl or Shift key), will activate the
associated graphic object’s operator-driver attributes. This lets the operator use a keystroke
sequence instead of using the mouse to click on the graphic object, allowing PAC Display
Runtime to be operated without a mouse or similar device.
NOTE: The hot key works only for graphic objects that are in an opened or minimized window;
closed windows are not affected.
6. To configure operator security for this graphic object, click Security. See “Security Settings for
Graphic Objects and Dynamic Attributes” on page 161 for configuration information.
7. To clear an attribute you’ve configured, simply highlight the attribute and click Clear.
You should see an empty check box beside the attribute. Sometimes after you configure an
attribute and return to the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box, the Not Available indicator
appears in the check box for another attribute. This symbol means that you cannot
configure that type of dynamic attribute for this object as a result of the attribute you just
configured.
8. When you’re done configuring dynamic attributes for this object, click OK to save your settings
and close the dialog box.
Editing Tag Names Manually
When editing tags for dynamic attributes, notifications and triggers, you can manually type in a valid
tag name for a control engine, item name, table index, or bit index.
CAUTION: Use caution with this feature, as unexpected results may occur if you enter an invalid tag.
For best results when configuring and editing tags, use Quick Tag Entry (see page 82) or the Tag Selection
dialog box (see page 82).
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Use the following guidelines for tag names:
•
Make sure the new tag name is the same item type. For example, if a strategy contains two
Integer32 variables called MyInt_1 and MyInt_2, as well as a float variable called MyFloat, you
are allowed to change MyInt_1 to MyInt_2 because they are both Integer32 variables.
However, changing MyInt_1 to MyFloat will result in an error because MyFloat is a different
item type.
•
Modify only pre-existing tags. You cannot create a new tag by entering the name. If no tag has
been configured, double-clicking on the tag name field will sound a beep, and the field will
remain read-only.
•
If the existing tag has a field attribute (such as Pid.Setpoint or ControlEngine.Date), you can
change only the field attribute.
For example, ControlEngine.Date is a string tag and has a field attribute ( .Date ). You cannot
change ControlEngine.Date to My_String_Variable, even though both are string types. You can
change only the .Date field attribute to .Time, .StrategyName, etc. This applies to PIDs and other
tags that have field attributes.
To edit a tag:
1. On a Dynamic Attribute dialog box, double-click in the Name field.
Double-click in
the Name field
A message box warns that Opto 22 does not recommend manually changing the tag name.
2. Click OK, and then edit the name using the guidelines detailed above.
3. Click OK.
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If the name is not valid, a message appears.
4. Click OK to exit the message dialog, and then enter a valid tag name, or select a valid tag name
in the usual manner.
Assigning a Chart State Value to a Graphic Object
You can assign chart states (such as stop and start) to a graphic object either as control
engine-driven attributes or as operator-driven attributes.
Control Engine-Driven. To assign chart states as control engine-driven attributes, do the
following:
1. Double-click the graphic object to which you will assign a chart state attribute.
2. Under Control Engine Driven Attributes, double-click one of the color attributes you want to
use (such as Fill Color). See also, “Fill Color” on page 171.
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3. Under Cutoff values, enter the values as shown above. Each value (except 0, which is a
placeholder) correlates to one of the following chart states.
Value
Chart State
1
Stopped
2
Suspended
3
Running
4. Select a color for each value.
5. Configure a tag for this dynamic attribute, then click OK. (See also, “Configuring Tags” on
page 81.)
6. Click OK again to close the dialog box.
Operator-Driven. To assign a chart state as an operator-driven attribute, do the following:
1. Double-click the graphic object to which you will assign a chart state attribute.
2. Under Operator Driven Attributes, double-click Send Value. See also, “Send Value” on page 183.
3. Under Source, select either Fixed data or Prompt for data. For Fixed Data, enter one of the
following values:
Value
Chart State
1
Stop
2
Suspend
3
Start
4
Continue
Or, for Prompted Data, do the following:
a. Create a User Message.
b. Enter a Min Value of 1.
c. Enter a Max Value of 4.
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In Runtime, the user enters 1, 2, 3, or 4 to stop, suspend, start, or continue the chart as indicated
in the table above.
4. Configure a tag for this dynamic attribute, then click OK. (See also, “Configuring Tags” on
page 81.)
5. Click OK again to close the dialog box.
Adding Hint Text to a Graphic Object
Follow the steps below to add hint text to the Tooltips box of a basic graphic object such as a line,
rectangle, ellipse, or text. The Tooltips box is displayed when the mouse is hovered over the graphic
object in Runtime.
NOTE: Only one instance of hint text can be applied to a graphic object. Hint text is not attribute-specific.
1. Double-click the graphic object to which you will provide hint text. This opens the Graphic
Dynamic Attributes dialog box.
2. On the right side of the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box, click the Hint... button to open
the Hint Text dialog box.
3. Enter the hint text.
For example, you might enter, “To start the process, click the Start button.” Hint text is limited to
80 characters.
To wrap text to the next line, add \r to the text. For example, if you enter the following text,
Boiler Door Open?\rYellow = Yes\rRed = No
the portions of text beginning with “Yellow” and “Red” will each wrap to the next line. In
Runtime, the Tooltips box in Runtime will appear like this:
4. Click OK.
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5. Choose Configure > Runtime to open the Runtime Setup dialog box.
6. On the Control Engine tab, select Allow Runtime Tooltips, then click OK.
Assigning Multiple Dynamic Attributes to a Graphic Object
If you assign more than one dynamic attribute to a graphic object, the attributes will execute in the
order they appear in the Operator Driven Attributes list. For example, if you assign a button the Send
Discrete dynamic attribute, and then assign the same button the Send Value dynamic attribute, that
is the order in which the attributes will execute when the operator clicks the button.
Assigning Operator-Driven Sub-Attributes
You can assign multiple sub-attributes for three operator-driven attributes: Send Value, Send
Discrete, and Send String.
1. Choose the Select tool from the toolbox and double-click the graphic object to which you
want to assign a dynamic attribute.
2. Configure an initial attribute for Send Value, Send Discrete, or Send String. For more
information, see “Assigning a Dynamic Attribute to a Graphic Object” on page 152.
3. In the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box, click the + icon next to attribute you just
configured. In this example, Send Value is used.
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A Send Value sub-attribute is now available.
Available
sub-attribute
4. Select the item marked <available>, and then click Edit to configure a new Send Value
sub-attribute for this graphic object.
A second Send Value sub-attribute is now available.
Second
available
sub-attribute
The Send Value item is now displayed in a bold italic font. This indicates that the dynamic
attribute has at least one sub-attribute configured. As more sub-attributes are added,
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additional <available> items appear in the attribute tree. If you collapse the Send Value item,
you can still see the sub-attributes by hovering over Send Value.
Tooltip shows
sub-attributes
Reordering Sub-Attributes
Dynamic sub-attributes are sent to the device in the order displayed in the list. To change the order
of the sends, select a sub-attribute, and then drag it to a new position in the list.
NOTE: Only sub-attributes can be reordered. A parent attribute (such as Send Value) cannot be moved.
Clearing Dynamic Sub-Attributes
To clear a single dynamic sub-attribute:
1. Expand the attribute tree and select the sub-attribute.
2. Click Clear.
Any sub-attributes below the cleared sub-attribute will move up in the list.
To clear more than one sub-attribute:
1. Select the top-most dynamic attribute, such as Send Value, and then click Clear.
The Clear Operator Driven Attribute dialog box opens.
2. Choose one of the options:
– Clear Selected Attribute Only clears the top-most attribute, such as Send Value. The first
sub-attribute moves up to replace the top-most attribute. All other sub-attributes move up
in the list.
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Top-most attribute
to be cleared
First sub-attribute
becomes the new
top Send Value
attribute
– Clear All Attributes clears the top-most attribute and all sub-attributes below it.
Security Settings for Graphic Objects and Dynamic Attributes
This function is one of PAC Display’s numerous security features, including the ability to:
•
Assign a password to the PAC Display project to prevent unauthorized users from opening it in
PAC Display Configurator. (See “Protecting a Project with a Password” on page 50.)
•
Assign a password to individual windows in a PAC Display project to prevent unauthorized users
from opening them. (See “Modifying Draw or URL Windows” on page 102.)
•
Allow operator access to the HMI, as well as log all HMI use and operator actions to an encrypted
archive. (See “Runtime Setup: Security Tab” on page 326.)
•
View a list of the users currently logged in to PAC Display Runtime. (See “Viewing Logged-In Users in
Runtime” on page 357.)
Your application requirements and the environment in which it is used may require strict control
over access to the operator interface you create in PAC Display. You can configure PAC Display to
provide this level of security by defining user authentication permissions for individual graphic
objects.
When the PAC Display project is launched in PAC Display Runtime and an operator clicks a graphic
object that is configured for security, Runtime prompts the operator for a username and password. If
the login information is incorrect or if the operator is not permitted to use that object, an alert
message is displayed. If Runtime operator logging is active for the project, the login attempt
(successful or not) is added to the Runtime operator log.
In this section:
“Important Considerations for User- and Group-Level Security Settings” on page 161 (below)
“Configuring Security Permissions for Graphic Objects” on page 162
“Define Security Permissions Dialog Box” on page 163
“Copying Security Permissions to Other Graphic Objects” on page 163
Important Considerations for User- and Group-Level Security
Settings
There are several important considerations to keep in mind when configuring user- and group-level
authentication for a graphic object.
•
If you don’t configure security (either Runtime user logins or security for a graphic object),
anyone who can log in to PAC Display can use a graphic object in Runtime.
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It isn’t necessary to configure security if anyone in your company is allowed to use Runtime. But
if that’s not the case, you should configure Runtime user logins (see page 328) to prevent
unauthorized users from accessing the graphic objects in your projects.
After you configure at least one Runtime user, Runtime displays a login screen each time a
project is loaded in Runtime.
•
By default, all operators have permission to use the graphic objects in a project. To prevent
unauthorized users from using a particular graphic object, configure security permissions for
the object (see page 162).
•
Security permissions cannot be configured for the Send Discrete dynamic attribute when it is
configured as “Direct” or “Reverse.” See “Send Discrete” on page 181 for descriptions of these
options.
•
When the project is running in Runtime and a restricted graphic object is clicked, “Deny Access”
security permissions have priority over “Grant Access” permissions. This means that if an
operator has been granted access, but is a member of a group that has been denied access, the
operator will not be able to use the on-screen object.
Configuring Security Permissions for Graphic Objects
NOTE: Security permissions are applied to all dynamic attributes selected before you click the Security
button. If a graphic object needs to have multiple dynamic attributes, make sure to select and configure all
attributes before configuring security settings.
To assign user- and group-based security permissions to a graphic object:
1. Double-click the graphic object to which you will assign one or more operator-driven dynamic
attributes.
The Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box opens. Note that the Security button on the right
side is not active.
2. Double-click an operator-driven attribute that you want to use, configure it as needed, and
then click OK. (To configure operator-driven attributes, see “Assigning a Dynamic Attribute to a
Graphic Object” on page 152.)
The Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box is again visible, and the Security button is now active.
After configuring one or
more operator-driven
dynamic attributes, click
Security to configure
user- and group-level
authentication for the
graphic object.
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3. Click Security to configure user- and group-level authentication for the graphic object.
The Define Security Permissions dialog box opens.
Define Security Permissions Dialog Box
A
B
C
D
E
F
(A) Domain. To set permissions based on Windows authentication, select the Windows domain
that contains the operator (or group) to whom you want to grant or deny access. To select a
custom-configured user or user group, select Runtime Users / Groups.
(B) User/Groups. Select the user or group to whom you want to grant or deny access to the
object.
(C) Permissions. For the selected user or group, select Grant Access or Deny Access.
(D) Show Configured Users. Click Show Configured Users to view all permissions currently
assigned for the graphic object.
(E) Clear All. Click Clear All to erase all configured permissions for the graphic object.
(F) OK. Click OK to save changes, or click Cancel to close the dialog box without any changes being
made.
Copying Security Permissions to Other Graphic Objects
To make security configuration easier and less error-prone, you can copy a graphic object’s security
permissions and then apply them to:
•
One or more selected graphic object
•
All graphic objects in a PAC Display window
•
All graphic objects in a project
To copy and apply security permissions:
1. Click the graphic object whose security permissions you want to copy.
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(Sizing handles—the small black boxes around the graphic object—indicate that it has been
selected.)
2. To copy the graphic object’s permissions, you can either:
– Click the graphic object, and from the menu bar, click Edit > Security Permissions > Copy.
NOTE: This method is required when copying or applying permissions to Alarms, XY Plots, Trend,
and SuperTrends.
or
– Right-click the graphic object, and from the pop-up menu, click Security Permissions >
Copy Security Permissions > Copy.
NOTE: If “Copy” is grayed out, it means the graphic object you selected doesn’t have configured
security permissions. Configure permissions for the graphic object first, and then Copy will be enabled
when you select the object.
3. Select the graphic object to receive the copied security permissions.
– To select more than one graphic object, press and hold the Shift key while clicking the
objects.
– To select all graphic objects in a window or all graphic objects in the project, click anywhere
in the window.
NOTE: In order to receive the copied permissions, the target graphic object must have at least one
configured operator-driven dynamic attribute.
4. Right-click to display the pop-up submenu (or in the menu bar, click Edit > Security Permissions).
– Select Paste to overwrite the target graphic objects’ existing security permissions.
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– Select Merge to keep the target graphic objects’ existing permissions and add the copied
permissions.1
The Security Attributes dialog box opens.
If you select Merge, the Merge Security Attributes
dialog box opens.
It has the same options as the Paste Security Attributes
dialog box.
5. Choose the target:
– Chosen graphics—Selects only the currently selected graphic object (or objects).
– This Window—Selects all graphic objects in the current window.
– All windows—Selects all graphic objects in all windows in the project.
6. Click OK to save the settings and close the dialog box.
Available Dynamic Attributes
You can add the dynamic attributes listed below to a graphic object. Note that not all attribute types
are available for all types of graphic objects; only attributes that can be used with a particular
graphic type appear in the Dynamic Attributes dialog box.
For Discrete control engine-driven attributes and the Send Discrete operator-driven dynamic
attribute, you have the option of specifying a bit index for integer tag types by using either Quick
Tag Entry (see page 82) or the Tag Selection dialog box (see page 82).
Dynamic Attribute
Type
Alarm Point, page 166
control engine-driven
Control Engine Status, page 167
control engine-driven
Download Recipe, page 169
operator-driven
Execute Menu Item, page 170
operator-driven
Fill Color, page 171
control engine-driven
Horizontal Position, page 173
control engine-driven
Horizontal Size (Width), page 174
control engine-driven
1 When permissions conflict—for example, when you paste a Grant Access permission to a graphic object
that is already configured with Deny Access for the same user (or user group)—PAC Display always applies the most restrictive permission. In this example, the user (or group) would be denied access to the
graphic object.
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Dynamic Attribute
Type
Horizontal Slider, page 175
operator-driven
Launch Application, page 176
operator-driven
Line Color, page 177
control engine-driven
Read and Clear, page 179
operator-driven
Rotate, page 180
control engine-driven
Send Discrete, page 181
operator-driven
Send String, page 182
operator-driven
Send Value, page 183
operator-driven
Text Color, page 185
control engine-driven
Text In from Control Engine, page 186
control engine-driven
Upload Recipe, page 187
operator-driven
Vertical Position, page 190
control engine-driven
Vertical Size (Height), page 191
control engine-driven
Vertical Slider, page 192
operator-driven
Visibility/Blink, page 193
control engine-driven
Windows, page 194
operator-driven
Alarm Point
Use this attribute to change the color of a graphic object based on the state of an alarm point. You
can use this attribute with circles, rectangles, and polygons. By default, the color of the graphic
object corresponds to the Normal, or unalarmed, state. See also, “Configuring Alarm Points” on
page 280 and “Configuring Project Alarms” on page 303
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Double-click Alarm Point in the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the Dynamic
Attributes-Control Alarm Point dialog box.
A
B
C
D
(A) Alarm Points. The names of the alarm points configured for the project appear here. Click an
alarm point in the list, and then set the colors that will be used for the graphic object in the Discrete
group or the Value group.
Alarm points that monitor digital points are configured as discrete alarm points, and have four
states: On, Off, Ack’ed, and Silenced. Alarm points that monitor analog points are configured as value
alarm points, and have six states: HiHi, Hi, Normal, Lo LoLo, Ack’ed, and Silenced. See “Configuring
Alarm Points” on page 280 for more information about setting up alarm points.
(B) Discrete. To select colors for a discrete alarm point’s On and Off states, click the color box for
each state and then choose a color in the dialog box that appears. If you have selected an alarm
point for a digital I/O point, only the Discrete group will appear in the Dynamic Attribute - Alarm
Point dialog box.
(C) Value. To select colors for a value alarm point’s HiHi, Hi, Normal, Lo LoLo, Ack’ed, and Silenced
states, click the color box for each state and then choose a color in the dialog box that appears. If
you have selected an alarm point for an analog I/O point, only the Value group will appear in the
Dynamic Attribute - Alarm Point dialog box.
(D) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Control Engine Status
Use this attribute to change the color of a graphic object based on the status of one or more control
engines. You can use this attribute with circles, rectangles, and polygons.
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NOTE: When the Control Engine Status dynamic attribute is selected, all other Control Engine-driven
attributes are disabled.
If the Control Engine Status attribute is used to monitor multiple control engines, the graphic object
will display the status color for the control engine that is in the most critical condition. Least critical
to most critical status is shown below:
Least Critical
Most Critical
Attached
Last Known
Value
Comm
Failure
Double-click Control Engine Status in the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
Dynamic Attributes-Control Engine Status dialog box.
Dynamic Attributes – Control Engine Status Dialog Box
A
B
C
D
(A) Select Controller. The names of the control engines configured for the project appear here.
Select a control engine. To select multiple control engines, hold down the Ctrl key and click each
one you want to select.
(B) Select All. To select all control engines in the list, click Select All.
(C) Colors. To select colors for a control engine’s state, click the color box for the state and then
choose a color in the dialog box that appears.
(D) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
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Download Recipe
Use this attribute to download a recipe file to a control engine when a graphic object is clicked. This
is an operator-driven attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons,
bitmaps, and text. For more information about recipes, see “Configuring Recipes” on page 263.
To display the Dynamic Attribute - Download Recipe dialog box, double-click Download Recipe in
the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box (Edit > Edit Dynamic Attributes).
A
B
C
D
E
G
F
H
Name (Trigger-based recipe download). Enter a name for this recipe. This name is used to
refer to this trigger-based recipe in the Recipe Managers list dialog box. The name can be up to 40
characters long.
(A) Directory. Enter the directory location of the recipe file. Use the Browse button B to quickly
enter a directory name.
(B) Browse. (Basic only) Click to quickly find the recipe file directory for A. Use the Select
Download File Directory dialog box that appears to navigate to the desired directory, and then click
OK.
(B) Log From. (Pro only) Click to select whether to log from an ASCII recipe file or from a
database table.
•
If you click Log File in the pop-up menu, use the Browse for Folder dialog box to navigate to the
desired directory, and then click OK.
•
If you click Log File in the pop-up menu, use the Select Database Table dialog box to select the
desired table, and then click OK. For more information about logging to a database table, see
“Configuring an ODBC Data Source” on page 61.
(C) Make Path Relative to Project. When selected, if you copy the project and recipe files to a
different computer, PAC Display will look in the same relative location to find the recipe files in
Configurator and Runtime.
For example, if the project is saved in C:\proj\ and you configure recipes files to be in
C:\proj\recipes\, then the relative path would be this: .\recipes\
If you then saved the project to C:\temp\newproj\, PAC Display would look for recipe files in the new
location’s relative path: C:\temp\newproj\recipes\
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(D) File Name. Choose the source of the recipe file name:
Fixed Name
Check this if the recipe file is a file name you want to configure at this time. If this option is
selected, the File Name edit box appears, prompting you for a file name. Make sure the file
exists in the Directory entry, otherwise an error is posted. The file name may not be changed at
Runtime.
The Extension parameter also appears and prompts for a one to three character long extension
that's appended to the Fixed Name. The extension must not contain a period or a DOS wild
card character. The default extension is "rcp".
Prompt For Name
Check this if the recipe file name is to be prompted at Runtime when the trigger occurs. If this
option is selected, the Extension parameter also appears. Enter a one to three character long
extension which does not contain a period or a DOS wild card. This extension is used as a filter
to select which files are displayed when prompting a user for the recipe name at Runtime,
however files with different extensions may be selected.
From Strategy
Check this option if you want to use a string tag name from the control engine strategy to
specify the recipe file name. If this option is selected, the String Name edit box appears,
prompting for the name of the PAC Control tag name you want to use. Use the Tag Selection
button
to enter the tag name from the Tag Selection dialog box.
(E) Fixed Name. If Fixed Name was selected in File Name (D), enter the name of the recipe file
located in Directory (A). Notice the file extension is .rcp.
(F) Extension. Specify the file extension for the recipe files available to this dynamic attribute by
entering the extension in the File Extension field. The extension must be one to three characters
long and must not contain a period or DOS wild card characters.
If Fixed Name is checked, this extension will be appended to the File Name entry to create the name
for the recipe file. If Prompt For Name is checked, this extension will be used as a filter to select the
files for display in a file selection dialog box when PAC Display Runtime executes this dynamic
attribute; however, you may override this filtering if you wish to select a file with a different
extension.
(G) String Name. If From strategy was selected in Fixed Name (D), use the Tag Selection button
to enter a tagname of type string that contains the recipe file name. The Tag Selection dialog
box is displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information
about this dialog box.
See “” on page 263 for details on recipe files and downloading and uploading recipes.
(H) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
. Execute Menu Item
Use this attribute to run a single Runtime command when an object is clicked. This is useful if you
want to hide the menu bar and allow only limited access to certain items. This is an operator-driven
attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons, bitmaps, and text.
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Double-click Execute Menu Item in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
Runtime Menu Commands.
Select a command from the Menu Item list and click OK. (Click Cancel to close the dialog box
without making any changes.) For more information on the Runtime commands, see “Runtime
Menus” on page 408.
Fill Color
Use this attribute to change a graphic object’s fill color based on a tag value from the control engine.
This is a control engine-driven attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses,
and polygons.
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Double-click Fill Color in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the Dynamic
Attribute - Fill Color dialog box.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection Button, B. As this tag
value changes in the PAC Control strategy, its value will determine the color you want.
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about this
dialog box.
(C) Setup By. Choose whether the tag you’re configuring is a Discrete value (with a value of ON or
OFF), or whether it’s a Current Value you’re looking for. For example, an integer will return a value of
either ON or OFF, so you would choose Discrete. However, a chart will return the following three
values: 1 = stopped, 2 = suspended, or 3 = running, so you would choose Current Value. To change
chart states, use the following parameters: If you choose Discrete, the Discrete group (D) is
highlighted; if you choose Current value, the Cutoff Values group (E) is highlighted.
(D) Discrete. Select the color you want for the ON state by clicking on the color field below ON.
The Color dialog box appears; choose a color and click OK. Repeat this step for the OFF state.
(E) Cutoff Values. Enter a value in each Cutoff Value box to specify the range of values for each
color group configured in the color fields. Values entered must be in increasing order. Each Cutoff
value box must have a numeric value entered or you will get a warning to enter one. After the
warning, the cursor blinks in the first Cutoff Value box requiring a value.
(F) Color Fields. To configure a color for the range set up in Cutoff Values (E), click on a color field.
The Color dialog box appears from which you can choose a color and then click OK to accept.
Repeat this step for each color field you want to change.
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(G) Hysteresis. Enter a value to be applied to each cutoff value as it moves toward lesser values to
determine the actual value at which the color will change to the next color field.
For example, let’s say the cutoff values are 1, 10, 20, and 30, and the color fields are red, yellow,
green, blue, and black. The hysteresis is 3. A tag with a value of 11 is read, corresponding to the color
green. The next tag value read is 9. The graphic object’s color remains green because the value read
is within the hysteresis value of 3, even though a value of 9 is in the yellow range.
(H) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Horizontal Position
Use this attribute to adjust the horizontal position of a graphic object based on a tag value from the
control engine. This is a control engine-driven attribute and is available for lines, rectangles, round
rectangles, ellipses, and polygons, polylines, curves, bitmaps, and text.
Double-click Horizontal Position in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As the tag
value changes, the graphic object’s horizontal position is changed.
(B) Tag Selection button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about
configuring this dialog box.
(C) Value at Left/Right. Enter the leftmost and rightmost value for the tagname in A. For
example, if you know your tag values will be from 0 to 100, you may wish to enter a range of 0 to 100
or a subset of this range, such as 0 to 50.
(D) Movement Left/Right. Enter the leftmost and rightmost movement the object can
change. The movement units are in pixels. Suppose your left and right values are 0 and 100, and
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your left and right movements are 0 and 200. When the tag value is 50, the object will be moved
100 pixels to the right.
(E) Reference. Select the reference point for the object. The choices are left, center, and right. The
Horizontal Size (Width) dynamic attribute must also be configured in order for this option to affect
the graphic object.
(F) Deadband. Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine if the graphic object’s movement will actually change. Using our previous example in D,
let’s say the deadband is 5. A tag is read and has a value of 50. The next tag reading must be greater
than 55 in order for the graphic object to move.
(G) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Horizontal Size (Width)
Use this attribute to adjust the width of a graphic object based on a tag value from the control
engine. This is a control engine-driven attribute and is available for lines, rectangles, round
rectangles, ellipses, polygons, polylines, and curves.
Double-click Horizontal Size (Width) in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
Dynamic Attribute - Width dialog box.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As the tag
value changes in the PAC Control strategy, the graphic object’s width is changed.
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about this
dialog box.
(C) Maximum/Minimum Value. Enter the maximum and minimum value for the tagname in
A. For example, if you know your tag values will be from 0 to 100, you may wish to enter a range of 0
to 100 or a subset of this range, such as 0 to 50.
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(D) Max/Min Percent Width. Enter the maximum and minimum percentage the object can
change. The percentage range is from 0 to 1,000 percent. Suppose your minimum value is 0 and
your maximum value is 10, and the minimum and maximum percentages range is 0 to 200. When
the tag value is 10, the object will be twice as big as you’ve originally drawn it. When the tag value is
5, the object will be the same size you’ve drawn it, which is 100 percent.
(E) Anchor. Enter the anchor point for the object. This is the reference point on the object from
which the graphic object changes. The choices are left, center, and right.
(F) Deadband. Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine if the graphic object’s width will actually change. For example, let’s say the values are 0 to
100, the percentages are 0 to 100, and the deadband is 5. A tag is read and has a value of 10. The
next tag reading must be greater than 15 in order for the graphic object to change.
(G) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
. Horizontal Slider
Use this attribute to configure a horizontal slider when a graphic object is clicked. This is an
operator-driven attribute and is available for lines, rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons,
and bitmaps.
Double-click Horizontal Slider in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. The distance
the horizontal slider is moved affects the value sent to the tag in the control engine.
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about this
dialog box.
(C) Value at Left/Right. Enter the leftmost and rightmost value for the tagname in A. For
example, if you know your tag values can be from 0 to 100, you may wish to enter a range of 0 to
100 or a subset of this range, such as 0 to 50.
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(D) Movement Left/Right. Enter the leftmost and rightmost movement the object can
change. The movement units are in pixels. Suppose your left and right values are 0 and 100, and
your left and right movements are 0 and 200. If you move the tag 100 pixels to the right, the tag
value sent will be 50.
(E) Reference. Select the reference point for the object. The choices are left, center, and right.
Note that you must also separately configure the Horizontal Size (Width) dynamic attribute to use
this option.
(F) Deadband. Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine whether the tag value should be changed.
Using our previous example in D, let’s say the deadband is 5. A tag is read and has a value of 50. The
next graphic object movement must be greater than 55 in order for the tag value to change.
(G) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
. Launch Application
Use this attribute to start an application when a graphic object is clicked. This is an operator-driven
attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons, bitmaps, and text.
Double-click Launch Application in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following.
A
C
E
F
B
D
G
H
(A) Working Directory. (Optional) Enter the working directory you want to be in when you
start the application. Use the Browse button B to quickly enter a directory name. If a working
directory is not specified, the current PAC Display Runtime directory is used when launching the
application. You can change the working directory at any time.
(B) Browse. Click to find the directory for A. The Working Directory Selection dialog box appears.
Use it to navigate to the desired directory and click OK when you’re done.
(C) Command Line. Enter the complete path and file name of the application you want to
launch. Use the Browse button (D) to quickly enter the path.
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(D) Browse. Click to find the path and application name for C. The Application Manager
Executable File Selection dialog box appears. Use it to select an application and click Open when
you’re done.
(E) Append String. (Optional) Enter the name of a string tag to use to append to the path
entered in Command Line (C). The string appended may be a file name the launched application
should open. Use the Tag Selection button
to choose the tagname. The Tag Selection dialog
box is displayed so you can select a tag. Use the Delete button
to clear an entry you may have
made in this field. Only tag names may be entered. Literal strings are not accepted. If the appended
string is a parameter, a space must be included in the Command Line string to separate it from the
main command line.
(F) Launch Options. Select Single instance to have PAC Display Runtime check whether the
graphic object has previously launched an application that is currently running. If the object has not
previously started a currently running application, the application will be launched.
Select Multiple instances to allow the graphic object to start more than one instance of an
application. Some applications allow only one session of an application to run, while others allow
multiple sessions.
Note that the Single Instance option doesn’t limit the number of active sessions of an application
that is launched by other graphic objects and triggers. For example, if the graphic object launches a
Microsoft Word session, that object can’t launch any other application until the Word session ends.
However, a trigger-based event can launch a second, separate session of Word, so two Microsoft
Word sessions will be running concurrently.
(G) Show Options. Click here to configure how the application window will appear. Your choices
are Normal, Minimized, and Maximized.
(H) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Line Color
Use this attribute to change a line color or the line color around a graphic object based on a tag
value from the control engine. This is a control engine-driven attribute and is available for lines,
rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons, polylines, and Bezier curves.
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Double-click Line Color in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection Button, B. As this tag
value changes in the PAC Control strategy, its value will determine the color you want.
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about this
dialog box.
(C) Setup By. Choose whether the tag you’re configuring is a Discrete value (with a value of ON or
OFF), or whether it’s a Current Value you’re looking for. For example, an integer will return a value of
either ON or OFF, so you would choose Discrete. However, a chart will return the following three
values: 1 = stopped, 2 = suspended, or 3 = running, so you would choose Current Value. To change
chart states, use the following parameters: If you choose Discrete, the Discrete group (D) is
highlighted; if you choose Current value, the Cutoff Values group (E) is highlighted.
(D) Discrete. Select the color you want for the ON state by clicking on the color field below ON.
The Color dialog box appears; choose a color and click OK. Repeat this step for the OFF state.
(E) Cutoff Values. Enter a value in each Cutoff Value box to specify the range of values for each
color group configured in the color fields. Values entered must be in increasing order. Each Cutoff
value box must have a numeric value entered or you will get a warning to enter one. After the
warning, the cursor blinks in the first Cutoff Value box requiring a value.
(F) Color Fields. To configure a color for the range set up in Cutoff Values (E), click on a color field.
The Color dialog box appears from which you can choose a color and then click OK to accept.
Repeat this step for each color field you want to change.
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(G) Hysteresis. Enter a value to be applied to each cutoff value as it moves toward lesser values to
determine the actual value at which the color will change to the next color field.
For example, let’s say the cutoff values are 1, 10, 20, and 30, and the color fields are red, yellow,
green, blue, and black. The hysteresis is 3. A tag with a value of 11 is read, corresponding to the color
green. The next tag value read is 9. The graphic object’s color remains green because the value read
is within the hysteresis value of 3, even though a value of 9 is in the yellow range.
(H) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Read and Clear
Use this attribute to read a tag value and then clear (reset) it. This is an operator-driven attribute and
is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons, bitmaps, and text.
Double-click Read and Clear in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following.
B
A
C
D
E
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the tag selection button B.
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here.
The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you can select a tag. Only tags that are supported by
the item selected in Action (C) will be available. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more
information about this dialog box.
(C) Action. Choose the item to be read and cleared when the operator clicks the graphic object:
•
Counts (returns an integer value and then clears counts)
•
On time total
•
Off time total
•
Latch (ON)
•
Latch (OFF)
•
On pulse measure
•
Off pulse measure
•
Period
•
Minimum
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•
Maximum
(D) Options. Formatting options for how values appear when read appear here. Depending on
the item you selected in Action (C), one of the following option groups will be available:
•
Numerical formats—Decimal, binary, hexadecimal, and exponential formats are available for
values returned as numbers (for example, the state of all 32 points on a high-density module).
•
Text formats—Custom text that corresponds to a discrete value’s on and off states can be
entered here.
(E) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
When using this dynamic attribute, please note the following:
•
If the Read and Clear dynamic attribute has been assigned to an object, a “Text In from Control
Engine” dynamic attribute cannot also be assigned to that same object.
•
If a text placeholder ( ## ) is used to view return values, these placeholder characters will
appear that way in Runtime until the operator triggers the read and clear. Once this has
happened, the graphic object will not change until the read and clear is triggered again.
•
If more than one graphic object in a PAC Display window is configured with the same Read and
Clear dynamic attribute, each object is treated independently. The graphic objects are not
linked to each other, so when one object is read and cleared, the other object will not reflect
this.
Rotate
Use this control engine-driven to rotate any of the following graphic objects based on a tag value
from the control engine: Bitmap, Metafile, Curve, Polygon, Ellipse, Polyline, JPEG, PNG, Rectangle,
Line, or Text.
NOTE: Dynamic rotation can be a CPU intensive. Use dynamic rotation judiciously.
Double-click Rotate in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following.
A
B
C
D
E
G
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(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As this tag
value changes in the PAC Control strategy, the graphic object’s line rotates.
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about this
dialog box.
(C) Value at Max. These fields are used to specify the return data from the tag that will produce
the maximum counterclockwise (CCW) and maximum clockwise (CW) rotation. The Value at Max
CCW may be either less than or greater than the Value at Max CW, so that rotation may proceed in
either direction as the data from the tag increases or decreases. Therefore, the term “exceeds” is used
below to indicate a value that may be either greater than or less than the CCW or CW Max value.
When the tag returns data that is equal to or exceeds the Value at Max CCW to PAC Display, the
graphic object will rotate counterclockwise as far as possible, as specified by the Max CCW Rotation
value explained below. When the tag returns data that is equal to or exceeds the Value at Max CW
Rotation to PAC Display, the graphic object will rotate clockwise as far as possible, as specified by the
Max CW Rotation value explained below.
(D) Max Rotation. These fields are used to specify the maximum counterclockwise and
clockwise rotation angle that the graphic object may undergo (in degrees from its configured
location). The entered values must be non-negative numbers. The Max CCW Rotation angle is
achieved when the tag returns data that is equal to or exceeds the Value at Max CCW, as explained
above. The Max CW Rotation angle is achieved when the tag returns data that is equal to or exceeds
the Value at Max CW, as explained earlier in this section.
(E) Rotation Anchor Point. The rotation anchor point is used to specify the fixed location that
the graphic object rotates around. This location is specified in terms of an offset (in units of pixels)
from the center point of the graphic object at its configured location.
In the Horizontal field, enter a negative value to specify a position that is to the left of the configured
location or enter a positive value to specify a position that is to the right of the configured location.
In the Vertical field, enter a negative value to specify a position that is above the configured location
or enter a positive value to specify a position that is below the configured location. If a value of zero
is specified for both fields, then the graphic object will rotate about its center point.
(F) Deadband. Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine if the line’s rotation angle should change.
For example, let’s say the deadband is 2. A tag with a value of 50 is read. The next tag value read is
51. The line does not rotate because the value read is within the deadband range.
(G) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Send Discrete
Use this attribute to send a discrete value to a tag in the control engine when a graphic object is
clicked. This is an operator-driven attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses,
polygons, bitmaps, and text.
Double-click Send Discrete in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following.
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A
B
C
D
E
F
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. This tag will
receive the tag value entered by the operator or configured in this dialog box.
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about this
dialog box.
(C) Source. Select the source of the value to be sent to the tag. If you select Fixed data, the setting
selected in the Fixed Data field (D) is sent to the tag. If you select Prompt for data, the Prompted
Data field (E) is activated and you can enter a message that will prompt the operator to select a
discrete state for the tag.
(D) Fixed Data. If Fixed Data was selected in Source (C), enter the setting to be sent to the tag.
The Set option turns the tag on; Clear turns the tag off; Toggle changes the tag to the opposite of
its current state (from on to off, or from off to on); Reverse changes the tag’s state to off when the
mouse is clicked on the graphic object, and on when the mouse button is released; Direct changes
the tag state to on when the mouse is clicked on the graphic object, and off when the mouse is
released.
(E) Prompted Data. If Prompt for Data was selected Source (C), enter a message here that will
prompt the operator to select a tag state. Two buttons will be displayed to the operator. Enter the
labels for the Set Button and the Clear Button. The Set Button sends a discrete value to set the tag to
the on state, and the Clear Button sends a discrete value to set the tag to the off state.
(F) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Send String
Use this attribute to send a string to the control engine when a graphic object is clicked. This is an
operator-driven attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons,
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bitmaps, and text. Double-click Send String in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display
the following.
A
B
C
D
E
F
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. This tag will
receive the string tag entered by the operator or configured in this dialog box.
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about this
dialog box.
(C) Source. Select the source of the value to be sent to the tag. If you select Fixed data, the setting
selected in Fixed Data (D) is sent to the tag. If you select Prompt for data, the field in Prompted Data
(E) is activated and you can enter a message that will prompt the operator to enter a string to send
to the tag.
(D) Fixed Data. If Fixed Data was selected in Source (C), enter the string to send to the tag.
(E) Prompted Data. If Prompt for Data was selected in Source (C), enter a message to prompt
the operator to enter a string. Choose the Hide characters option if you don’t want the text entered
by the operator to be displayed.
(F) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Send Value
Use this attribute to send a value to a tag name in the control engine when a graphic object is
clicked. This is an operator-driven attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses,
polygons, bitmaps, and text.
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Double-click Send Value in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. This tag will
receive the tag value entered by the operator or configured in this dialog box.
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about this
dialog box.
(C) Source. Select the source of the value to be sent to the tag. If you select Fixed data, the value
entered in the Fixed Data field (E) is sent to the tag. If you select Prompt for data, the Prompted Data
field (F) is activated and you can enter a message that will prompt the operator to input a value to
send to the tag.
(D) Destination. Choose Set to assign the sent value to the tag, or choose Offset to add the value
to the tag.
(E) Fixed Data. If Fixed Data was selected in Source (C), enter the value to send to the tag.
This value can be either a decimal or hexadecimal number. If entering a hexadecimal number, the
number must be preceded by “0x” and contain no spaces (for example, “0x7FFFFFFF” and not “0x
7FFF FFFF”).
(F) Prompted Data. If Prompt for Data was selected in Source (C), enter a message to prompt
the operator for a value. Enter a minimum and maximum value the entered data should be within.
IMPORTANT: If using hexadecimal numbers, enter a minimum number of 0x80000000 and a maximum
number of 0x7FFFFFFF.
(G) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
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Text Color
Use this attribute to change the color of text in the interface based on a tag value from a control
engine. This is a control engine-driven attribute and is available for grouped objects and text.
Double-click Text Color in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection Button, B. As this tag
value changes in the PAC Control strategy, its value will determine the color you want.
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about this
dialog box.
(C) Setup By. Choose whether the tag you’re configuring is a Discrete value (with a value of ON or
OFF), or whether it’s a Current Value you’re looking for. For example, an integer will return a value of
either ON or OFF, so you would choose Discrete. However, a chart will return the following three
values: 1 = stopped, 2 = suspended, or 3 = running, so you would choose Current Value. To change
chart states, use the following parameters: If you choose Discrete, the Discrete group (D) is
highlighted; if you choose Current value, the Cutoff Values group (E) is highlighted.
(D) Discrete. Select the color you want for the ON state by clicking on the color field below ON.
The Color dialog box appears; choose a color and click OK. Repeat this step for the OFF state.
(E) Cutoff Values. Enter a value in each Cutoff Value box to specify the range of values for each
color group configured in the color fields. Values entered must be in increasing order. Each Cutoff
value box must have a numeric value entered or you will get a warning to enter one. After the
warning, the cursor blinks in the first Cutoff Value box requiring a value.
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(F) Color Fields. To configure a color for the range set up in Cutoff Values (E), click on a color field.
The Color dialog box appears from which you can choose a color and then click OK to accept.
Repeat this step for each color field you want to change.
(G) Hysteresis. Enter a value to be applied to each cutoff value as it moves toward lesser values to
determine the actual value at which the color will change to the next color field.
For example, let’s say the cutoff values are 1, 10, 20, and 30, and the color fields are red, yellow,
green, blue, and black. The hysteresis is 3. A tag with a value of 11 is read, corresponding to the color
green. The next tag value read is 9. The graphic object’s color remains green because the value read
is within the hysteresis value of 3, even though a value of 9 is in the yellow range.
(H) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Text In from Control Engine
Use this attribute to read a tag from a control engine and display various strings to the operator. You
can read in a numeric value, a string, or a discrete value, and set up a string that will be displayed
based on what was received. This is a control engine-driven attribute and is available for a text
object.
A # sign in the text object indicates where the text string should be displayed. Only one # is needed
to display an entire string. If there’s no # sign within the text object, then the string will be appended
to the end of the text object. You can configure how a floating point number is displayed by using a
decimal point along with the # signs. For every decimal place you want displayed after a decimal
point, use a # sign. For example, your text object could say: “Low level reading: ###.#.” Your tag value
is 200.55, so your displayed string is: “Low level reading: 200.6.”
NOTE: The extra # signs to the left of the decimal point aren’t required, but are useful for determining how
much space the text will require in your display.
Double-click Text In (from control engine) in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display
the following.
A
B
C
E
F
D
G
H
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(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As this tag
changes value in the PAC Control strategy, its value will determine the effects on the graphic object.
The tagname you enter is affected by the setting for Setup By (C).
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about this
dialog box.
(C) Setup By. Choose whether the tag you’re reading is a numeric value, a discrete value (with ON
and OFF values), or a string. If you choose Value, the Deadband and Text Justification fields (D and E)
are activated. If you choose Discrete, the Numerical Format group (F) is activated. The choice you
make in this selection must match the choice you made in Name (A).
If you choose Value, the value read will be converted into a string based on the rules mentioned at
the beginning of this “Text In” section.
If you choose Discrete, use Numerical Format group (F) to enter the strings that will be displayed for
the ON and OFF states. If you choose String, the text string from the control engine is displayed.
(D) Deadband. If you selected Value in Setup By (C), enter the value to be added and subtracted
from the previously read tag value to determine whether the new value is displayed.
(E) Text Justification. Select the format in which numeric values will be displayed: decimal,
hexadecimal, binary, or exponential. Hexadecimal numbers are prefixed with “0X” and appear in
uppercase letters. Float values may not be displayed as hexadecimal or binary.
(F) Numerical Format. Select the text justification for the string from the control engine.
(G) Discrete. This section is highlighted if Discrete was chosen in Setup By (C). Enter the string to
be displayed if the tag’s discrete value is ON, and enter the string to be displayed if the tag’s discrete
value is OFF.
(H) OK. Click here to save your settings. (Click Cancel to close the dialog box without making
changes.)
Upload Recipe
Use this attribute to upload a recipe file from a control engine when graphic object is clicked. This is
an operator-driven attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons,
bitmaps, and text. For more information about recipes, see “” on page 263.
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Double-click Upload Recipe in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following.
A
B
D
C
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
(A) Name. Enter the directory location of the recipe format file. Use the Browse button B to
quickly select a directory name. The recipe format file is used to tell the control engine what data to
read. Often, it’s the original downloaded recipe. For example, the number of lines with data values
represents how many values should be read from the control engine.
(B) Browse. Click to quickly find the recipe format file directory for A. The Select Format File
Directory dialog box appears. Use it to navigate to the desired directory and click OK when you’re
done.
(B) Log To. (Pro only) Click to select whether to log to an ASCII recipe file or to a database table. If
you click Log File in the pop-up menu:
•
Use the Browse for Folder dialog box to navigate to the desired directory, and then click OK.
•
Use the Select Database Table dialog box to select the desired table, and then click OK. For
more information about logging to a database table, see “Configuring an ODBC Data Source”
on page 61.
(C) Make Path Relative to Project. When selected, if you copy the project and recipe format
files to a different computer, PAC Display will look in the same relative location to find the recipe
format files in Configurator and Runtime.
For example, if the project is saved in C:\proj\ and you configure recipes format files to be in
C:\proj\recipes\, then the relative path would be this: .\recipes\
If you then saved the project to C:\temp\newproj\, PAC Display would look for recipe format files in
the new location’s relative path: C:\temp\newproj\recipes\
(D) File Name. Choose the source of the recipe format file name:
•
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If you choose Fixed name, the Fixed Name field (E) is highlighted.
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•
If Prompt for name is selected, the operator is prompted for the recipe format file name.
•
If From strategy is selected, the String Name field (F) is highlighted.
(E) Fixed Name. If Fixed Name was selected in D, enter the name of the recipe format file located
in directory A. Notice the file extension is .rcp.
(F) String Name. If From strategy was selected in D, use the Tag Selection button
to enter a
tagname of type string that contains the recipe format file name. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about this
dialog box. “Configuring Tags” on page 81
(G) Directory. Enter the directory location of the recipe file that will receive the information. Use
the Browse button (H) to quickly enter a directory name.
(H) Browse. Click to quickly find the recipe file directory for G. The Select Destination File
Directory dialog box appears. Use it to navigate to the desired directory and click OK when you’re
done.
(I) File Name. Choose the file name for the recipe data that will be read from the control engine.
•
Fixed Name—Check this if the template file is a file name you want to configure at this time. If
this option is selected, the File Name edit box appears, prompting you for a file name. Make
sure the file exists in the Directory entry, otherwise an error is posted. The file name may not be
changed at Runtime.
The "Extension" parameter also appears and prompts for a one to three character long
extension that's appended to the "Fixed Name". The extension must not contain a period or a
DOS wild card character. The default extension is "rcp".
•
Prompt For Name—Check this if the template file name is to be prompted at Runtime when
the trigger occurs. If this option is selected, the Extension parameter also appears. Enter a one
to three character long extension which does not contain a period or a DOS wild card. This
extension is used as a filter to select which files are displayed when prompting a user for the
recipe name at Runtime, however files with different extensions may be selected.
•
From Strategy—Check this option if you want to use a string tag name from the control
engine strategy to specify the template file name. If this option is selected, the String Name
dialog box appears, prompting for the tag name you want to use. Use the "?" button to enter
the tag name from the Tag Selection dialog box.
(J) Fixed Name. If Fixed Name was selected in I, enter the name of the file to receive the
information. This file will be located in the Directory field (G).
(K) Extension. Specify the file extension for the recipe files available to this dynamic attribute by
entering the extension in the File Extension field. The extension must be one to three characters
long and must not contain a period or DOS wild card characters.
If Fixed Name is checked, this extension will append to the File Name entry to create the name for
the recipe file. If Prompt For Name is checked, this extension will be used as a filter to select the files
for display in a file selection dialog box when Runtime executes this dynamic attribute. However,
you may override this filter if you wish to select a file with a different extension.
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(L) Mistic String. If From strategy was selected in I, use the Tag Selection button
to enter a
tagname of type string that contains the file name. The Tag Selection dialog box is displayed so you
can select a tag.
(M) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Vertical Position
Use this attribute to adjust the vertical position of a graphic object based on a tag value from the
control engine. This is a control engine-driven attribute and is available for lines, rectangles, round
rectangles, ellipses, and polygons, polylines, curves, bitmaps, and text.
Double-click Vertical Position in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the
following.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As the tag
value changes, the graphic object’s horizontal position is changed.
(B) Tag Selection button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about
configuring this dialog box.
(C) Value at Top/Bottom. Enter the top and bottom values for the graphic object. For example,
if you know your tag values will be from 0 to 100, you may wish to enter a range of 0 to 100 or a
subset of this range such as 0 to 50.
(D) Movement Up/Down. Enter the maximum top and bottom movement the object can
change. The movement units are in pixels. For example, if your bottom and top values are 0 and 100,
your bottom and top movements are 0 and 200, and your point of reference (E) is from the bottom
when the tag value is 50, the object will be moved 100 pixels from the bottom.
(E) Reference. Enter the reference point for the object. This is the reference point from which the
object will move. The choices are top, center, and bottom. The Vertical Size (Height) dynamic
attribute must also be configured in order for this option to affect the graphic object.
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(F) Deadband. Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine whether the graphic object’s position will actually change. Using our previous example in
D, let’s say the deadband is 5. A tag is read and has a value of 50. The next tag reading must be
greater than 55 in order for the graphic object to move.
(G) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Vertical Size (Height)
Use this attribute to change the height of a graphic object based on a tag value from the control
engine. This is a control engine-driven attribute and is available for lines, rectangles, round
rectangles, ellipses, and polygons.
Double-click Vertical Size in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As this tag
changes value in the PAC Control strategy, its value will determine the effects on the graphic object.
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about this
dialog box.
(C) Maximum/Minimum Value. Enter the maximum and minimum value for the tagname in
A. For example, if you know your tag values will be from 0 to 100, you may wish to enter a range of 0
to 100 or a subset of this range, such as 0 to 50.
(D) Max/Min Height. Enter the maximum and minimum percentage the object can change.
The percentage range is from 0 to 1,000. Suppose your minimum value is 0 and your maximum
value is 10, and the minimum and maximum percentages range from 0 to 200. When the tag value
is 10, the object will be twice as big as you’ve originally drawn it. When the tag value is 5, the object
will be the same size you’ve drawn it, which is 100 percent.
(E) Anchor. Enter the anchor point from which the object will “grow.” The choices are Top, Center,
and Bottom. For example, if you want to create a bar that grows up from the bottom, select Bottom.
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If you want to create an object that grows both up and down from the center, select Center. An
object with a Top anchor grows down from the top.
(F) Deadband. Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine whether the graphic object’s height will actually change. For example, let’s say the values
are 0 to 100, the percentages are 0 to 100, and the deadband is 5. A tag is read and has a value of 10.
The next tag reading must be greater than 15 in order for the graphic object to change.
(G) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Vertical Slider
Use this attribute to configure a vertical slider when a graphic object is clicked. This is an
operator-driven attribute and is available for lines, rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons,
and bitmaps.
Double-click Vertical Slider in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. The amount
of movement the vertical slider makes affects the value sent to the tag in the control engine.
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about this
dialog box.
(C) Value at Top/Bottom. Enter the top and bottom values for the tagname in A. For example,
if you know your tag values can be from 0 to 100, you may wish to enter a range of 0 to 100 or a
subset of this range, such as 0 to 50.
(D) Movement Up/Down. Enter the maximum top and bottom movement the object can
change. The movement units are in pixels. This means if your bottom and top values are 0 and 100,
and your bottom and top movements are 0 and 200, if you move the tag 100 pixels toward the
bottom, the tag value sent will be 50.
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(E) Reference. Select the reference point for the object. The choices are top, center, and bottom.
Note that you must also separately configure the Vertical Size (Height) dynamic attribute to use this
option.
(F) Deadband. Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine whether the tag value should be changed.
Using our previous example in D, let’s say the deadband is 5. A tag is written and has a value of 50.
The next graphic object movement must be greater than 55 in order for the tag value to change.
(G) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Visibility/Blink
Use this attribute to make a graphic object visible or invisible or to cause it to blink based on a tag
value from the control engine. This is a control engine-driven attribute and is available for lines,
rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons, polylines, curves, bitmaps, Windows button
controls, and text.
Double-click Visibility/Blink in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes dialog box to display the following.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button B. As this tag
changes value in the PAC Control strategy, its value will determine the effects on the graphic object.
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about this
dialog box.
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(C) Setup By. Choose whether the tag you’re configuring is a discrete value (with ON and OFF
values), or whether it’s a current value you’re looking for. If you choose Discrete, the D group is
highlighted; if you choose Current value, the E group is highlighted. The choice you make in this
selection must match the tag choices you made in the Name field (A).
(D) Discrete. Select the visibility state you want for the ON state from the drop-down list options.
Your choices are Invisible, Visible, Slow Blink, Med. Blink, and Fast Blink. In the same manner, choose
the visibility state for the OFF state.
(E) Cutoff Values. Enter a value in each Cutoff Value field to specify the range of values for each
visibility group configured in the visibility fields. Values entered must be in increasing order. Each
Cutoff Value field must have a numeric value entered or you will get a warning to enter one. After
the warning, the cursor blinks in the first Cutoff Value field requiring a value.
(F) Visibility. To configure a visibility state for the ranges set up in Cutoff Values (E), click a visibility
field’s drop-down button. Your choices are Invisible, Visible, Slow Blink, Med. Blink, and Fast Blink. In
the same manner, choose the visibility state for each range of values.
(G) Deadband. Enter a value to be added and subtracted from the previously read tag value to
determine whether the graphic object’s visibility will actually change.
For example, let’s say the Cutoff values are 1, 10, 20, and 30, and the visibility fields are Invisible,
Visible, Slow Blink, Med. Blink, and Fast Blink. The Deadband is 2. A tag is read with a value of 10. The
next value read must be greater than 12 in order for the graphic object to change.
(H) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
. Windows
Use the Windows attribute to change window states when a graphic object is clicked. This is an
operator-driven attribute and is available for rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, polygons,
bitmaps, and text.
To display the Pop Window dialog box, double-click Windows in the Graphics Dynamic Attributes
dialog box.
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A
B
C
D
F
E
G
H
I
(A) Windows. Initially, this list shows all the windows available for the project. Select the window
that has the window state you want to change. You can also select more than one window by using
a couple of key combinations. One way is to select a window, press Shift, and then click on another
window name in the list. This selects all the windows in between the two window names. Another
way is to select a window name, press the Ctrl key, and click on each window name you want
selected.
(B) Insert. Use to insert the selected window(s) in Action/Affected Windows (D). The window
name will be inserted above the highlighted window(s) in (A).
(C) Append. Use to add the selected window(s) to the bottom of the window list in
Action/Affected Windows (D). The window name will be inserted after the last window in
Action/Affected Windows (D).
(D) Action/Affected Windows. Lists the windows and what window state they will go to
when the graphic object is clicked.
(E) Default. Use this group as a handy window state assignment key for the windows you’ve
highlighted in (A). When the windows are copied over to Action/Affected Windows (D), you will see
they all have the default window state you’ve assigned. The window state choices are Open, Close,
and Iconify.
(F) New Action. Use this group to change any window states listed in Action/Affected Windows
(D). Highlight one or more windows and select the new window state action. Your choices are
Open, Close, and Iconify.
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(G) Remove/Deselect. Use this group to modify the window name list in Action/Affected
Windows (D). The Remove Selected option removes only those windows you’ve highlighted; the
Remove All option removes all windows from the list; and the Deselect All option deselects and
quickly unhighlights all window names.
(H) All Others. For all windows left in (A), use this grouping to affect their window states. For
example, if a window state is open and the graphic object is clicked, the window state can stay the
same, be iconified, or be closed. Likewise, you can alter the window states of closed and iconified
windows.
(I) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Copying and Deleting Dynamic Attributes
Once a dynamic attribute has been added to an on-screen graphic object, you can easily assign
those attributes to other objects using copy and paste. You can also quickly delete all dynamic
attributes from a graphic object.
Copying Dynamic Attributes from a Graphic Object
To copy a set of dynamic attributes from one graphic object to another, do the following:
1. With the Select tool
, click the graphic object whose dynamic attributes you want to copy.
2. Choose EditCopy Dynamic Attributes (or use Shift+Ctrl+C) to copy the attributes to the
Windows clipboard.
Another way you can do this is to right-click the graphic object and select Dynamic Attributes
Copy.
You can now assign these dynamic attributes to another graphic object using EditPaste
Dynamic Attributes.
Pasting Dynamic Attributes to a Graphic Object
To paste a set of dynamic attributes that were copied to the Windows clipboard, do the following:
1. With the Select tool
, choose one or more graphic objects to which you want to paste the
dynamic attributes.
2. Choose EditPaste Dynamic Attributes, and then do one of the following:
– To delete any existing dynamic attributes the graphic object may already have, choose
Delete Existing.
– To add the copied attributes to existing attributes and replace any that might be of the
same type, select Replace Duplicates.
– To add the attribute to existing attributes and not change any attributes that might be of
the same type, select Ignore Duplicates.
You can also perform these tasks by right-clicking the graphic object and selecting the paste
option from Dynamic AttributesPaste.
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Deleting Dynamic Attributes from a Graphic Object
To delete all dynamic attributes from a graphic object, do the following:
1. With the Select tool
, choose one or more graphic objects that have dynamic attributes you
want to delete.
2. Choose EditDelete Dynamic Attributes.
Another way you can do this is to right-click the graphic object and select Dynamic Attributes
Delete Existing from the pop-up menu.
Viewing Tags and Dynamic Attributes
As you develop or document a PAC Display project, it can be useful to know about the dynamic
attributes and tags used by the objects in the project’s windows.
Dynamic Attributes for Individual Objects
To view the dynamic attributes configured for an individual graphic object or a group of objects,
select one or more objects in a window, right-click the mouse, and select Dynamic Attributes
View from the pop-up menu. The dynamic attributes assigned to that object or objects will be
shown in the Dynamic Attributes window.
Viewing Tags for One or More Objects
To view the tags that a particular object or objects is connected to, click the object (or group of
objects), and move the cursor over it. The tags used will be shown next to the cursor.
Dynamic Attributes for All Objects
To generate a report that lists the dynamic attributes for all objects in all project windows, as well as
all the alarm points configured for a project, do the following:
1. In PAC Display Configurator, select ViewDynamic Attributes.
2. In the dialog box that opens, select one or more windows whose dynamic attributes you want
to view and click OK.
The Microsoft Windows Notepad application opens and displays a report similar to the
following example:
Project Name: C:\Opto22\PAC
Display\Examples\ioCookies\Display\cfactory.uui
---------------------------------------------------------------------Window: Cookie Factory
**********************
GroupX = 530Y = 332W = 86H = 28
Operator-Driven Dynamic Attribute Tags
Send Value:
Cookie Control Engine:Conveyor_Speed_Control.Value
Refresh Group: Group 0
Source
: Prompt for Data
Destination: Set
Message
: Enter Conveyor Speed
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Min. Value : 0.00
Max. Value : 100.00
GroupX = 133Y = 213W =
21H =
3
control engine-Driven Dynamic Attribute Tags
Visibility/Blink:
Cookie Control Engine:Dough_Dispense_Valve.State
Refresh Group: Group 0
Setup By : Discrete
On
: Invisible
Off
: Visible
Using the TagInfoView Utility Program
After you have selected ViewDynamic Attributes, you can use a small utility program called
TagInfoView to sort and view the tag information in greater detail.
1. Select ViewLaunch TagInfoView Utility.
2. In the Tag Information Viewer dialog box that opens, verify that the TagInfo.txt file appears in
the file field at the top.
3. In the Sort By sections, select how you want the tag information sorted.
4. Click Display Results.
Scanning to Update Graphic Objects
As you configure your project and connect PAC Control tags to PAC Display graphic objects, you are
setting up the connections that will animate your objects in PAC Display Runtime as the tag data
changes. PAC Display acquires this tag data using an internal scanner that monitors one or more
control engines. Understanding how the scanner works and how it gets its data will help you
optimize your system’s performance.
Scanning is PAC Display’s process of requesting data about I/O points and variables from the
Opto 22 control engine. When the control engine receives this request, it must first determine if its
data for the requested tags is current. If the data is not current, the control engine will access the I/O
units connected to it and request the latest readings. This tag information is then sent back to PAC
Display. Depending on the data and how it is connected to objects in your PAC Display project,
graphic objects then change their attributes.
In this section:
“Refresh Time Groups” on page 198
“Configuring Scan Rates” on page 199
Refresh Time Groups
Each tag connected to a PAC Display graphic object belongs to a refresh time group that determines
how often the tag is scanned. You define the characteristics of refresh time groups by setting a scan
rate. See “Configuring Scan Rates” (below) to learn how to set these values.
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System performance is affected by how a refresh time group is set up, so it’s important to define
refresh time groups carefully. Follow these guidelines when configuring refresh time groups for your
project:
•
Select scan rates that reflect the rate at which the process variables change. For example, the
outside air temperature changes slowly, and could be scanned every 15 minutes or so.
•
As a good engineering practice, select the slowest possible scan rate that is acceptable for your
application. This will help prevent the system from being overloaded by needlessly scanning
too much information too quickly.
•
If the amount of data being scanned is too much for the selected scan rate, decrease the scan
rate to better match what the actual throughput will allow.
If you have tried the preceding guidelines and scanning speed does not improve, then there
may be too much data being requested from one control engine, or there may be too much
data being scanned by one computer, or both. To eliminate the bottlenecks, you may need to
add more control engines, divide the PAC Display projects over multiple computers, or both.
Configuring Scan Rates
You assign refresh time groups whenever you configure a tag based on how often you think it
makes sense to update the tag. (Note that the same refresh time group is usually used by several
tags.) For example, an analog point reading an outside temperature would use a longer scan rate
since the temperature isn’t likely to change suddenly. On the other hand, a digital point that’s
monitoring the on/off state of a valve would need a shorter scan rate to accurately reflect whether a
valve is open or closed.
To configure scan rates, choose ConfigureRefresh Times.
The Refresh Times dialog box appears.
Refresh Times Dialog Box
A
B
C
D
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(A) Group Tabs. Up to fourteen refresh time groups are available, divided between two tabs in
the Refresh Times dialog box.
(B) Name. In the Name column, you will see the refresh time group names. By default, their names
are “Group 0", “Group 1", and on up to “Group 6." You can change these default names if you wish.
Names can be up to 15 characters long, but avoid using the exclamation point ( ! ) and vertical bar (
| ) characters in the name. Spaces are also valid characters, but when referencing names with spaces,
don’t omit the spaces or substitute the underscore ( _ ) character for spaces.
(C) Scan Rate. In the Value field of the Scan Rate column, enter a number from 1 to 9999. In the
Units field, select a unit of time from the Units drop-down list. (Unit options are milliseconds,
seconds, minutes, hours, days, and months.)
The greater the value, the more time between I/O readings and the fewer times the control engine
is scanned.
(D) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
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8: Chapter 8
8: Working with Trends
Introduction
This chapter describes how you can create and configure graphs that display real-time and historical
information about selected I/O points.
In This Chapter
About Trends .............................................................. 201
Types of Trends .......................................................... 202
Working with Basic Trends.................................... 202
Working with SuperTrends...................................... 207
SuperTrend Historical Log Files.............................. 217
Using XY Plots ............................................................... 228
About Trends
PAC Display trends are objects that visually plot control engine values, including I/O points and
results of a calculation. Using a trend, you can show how real-time and historical data changes over
time, or how one set of data relates to another one. In PAC Display Runtime, trends are created when
active I/O point values, or tags, are read from a PAC Control strategy running on a control engine and
visually plotted.
Tag values are graphed on a two-dimensional x-axis and y-axis coordinate system. Depending on
the type of trend used, the x-axis can represent time or a set of tag values. The y-axis can represent
either the range of values for a tag or a set of tag values. You can set features for each trend line
used, and there is no limit to the number of trends that can be displayed in a window. For trends
that graph data over time, the maximum time span supported is 14 days.
You can easily set or modify the following elements in a trend:
•
x- and y-axis ranges and the major and minor divisions that appear on the graph
•
Graph backgrounds and border colors
•
Pen colors for trend lines
•
Tag value scanning, which can be turned on or off for a specific trend.
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Types of Trends
There are three types of trends that you can use in a PAC Display project: basic trends, SuperTrends,
and XY plots. Basic trends and SuperTrends display tag values as trend lines plotted over time; XY
plots graph data from two numeric tables, using data from one table for x-axis values and data from
the other table for y-axis values.
•
Basic Trends—Using a basic trend, up to four trend lines can be displayed on a graph. Basic
trends can plot only real-time data (not historical data). For details, see “Working with Basic
Trends” (below).
•
SuperTrends—Using a SuperTrend, up to 16 trend lines can be displayed on a graph.
SuperTrends can plot both real-time and historical data. For details, see “Working with
SuperTrends” on page 207.
•
XY Plots—Using an XY plot, up to six individual trend lines can be displayed on a graph.
XY plots can plot only data in numeric tables. For details, see “Using XY Plots” on page 228.
Working with Basic Trends
You use basic trends to plot real-time values for up to four tags.
In this section:
“Creating a Basic Trend” on page 202
“Modifying a Basic Trend” on page 203
“Configuring Basic Trend Pens” on page 206
“Optimizing Pen Settings” on page 207
Creating a Basic Trend
1. Select the basic trend tool
from the toolbox and position the cursor where you want the
trend to begin in the window.
2. Click the mouse button, drag the mouse to the desired size, and then release the mouse
button.
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The trend that appears should resemble the example below:
Y-axis Layout
• Label Position = Left
• Label Range:
- Max Val = 100
- Min Val = 0
• Minor Divisions = 4
• Major Divisions = 5
• Label Intervals = 1
X-axis Layout
• Minor Divisions = 2
• Major Divisions = 4
• Label Intervals = 2
Label Position = Bottom
Label Format = Hours, Minutes, and Seconds
Modifying a Basic Trend
Choose the Select tool and double-click the trend.
The Trend Configuration dialog box appears.
Trend Configuration Dialog Box
A
B
E
F
G
C
D
H
M
N
O
I
J
K
L
P
Q
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(A) Name. Enter the name of the trend here.
(B) Pen Configuration Buttons. Use these pen configuration buttons to associate each pen
with one PAC Control tag, to define its pen color and width, and to specify a range of values for the
tag. You can configure up to four pens per trend. See “Optimizing Pen Settings” on page 207 for
more information.
(C) Chart Color. Click here to select a background color for the trend graph. In the Color dialog
box that appears, choose a color and click OK.
(D) Border Color. Click here to enter the graph’s border color. In the Color dialog box that
appears, choose a color and click OK.
(E) Time Span. Enter the time span the trend represents. (Remember that the time span is
indicated on the x-axis). Choose the time units from the drop-down list. Your choices are seconds,
minutes, or hours. The maximum time span is 14 days, or 336 hours.
(F) Refresh Time. Select one of fourteen refresh time groups. The scan rate appears in
parentheses alongside the refresh group number. All tags associated with the pens in B are scanned
at the same rate.
You can find out more about refresh times in “Scanning to Update Graphic Objects” on page 198.
Also see “Optimizing Pen Settings” on page 207 to learn how pen settings affect how PAC Display
communicates with a control engine.
(G) Disable Trend. Choose whether to disable a trend based on the state of its window. If you
disable the trend, the tags associated with the pens in B won’t be updated with new data from the
PAC Control strategy until the trend is enabled again. Disabling a trend saves the control engine
processing time, since it doesn’t have to respond to regular requests from PAC Display for tag
updates.
NOTE: Trends that are enabled are always updated, regardless of the window’s visual state (normal,
iconified, etc.). This means PAC Display continually requests data from the control engine to update its
trends. Keep this in mind when you’re considering the number of enabled trends you are including in the
project. The more enabled trends you have, the more the control engine has to spend time reading its I/O
to update the data.
(H) Number of Major Divisions (X Axis). Enter the number of major x-axis divisions for the
trend. This is the number of main sections the trend is divided into. You can also choose a color for
the major divisions by clicking the Color field. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color
and click OK.
NOTE: For both x- and y-axis divisions, the lines dividing the major divisions appear thicker than the minor
divisions.
(I) Number of Minor Divisions (X Axis). Enter the number of minor x-axis divisions for the
trend. This will be the number of sections the major divisions are divided into. The minimum
number of divisions is one.
You can also choose a color for the minor x-axis divisions by clicking the Color field. In the Color
dialog box that appears, choose a color and click OK.
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(J) Label Interval in Major Divisions (X Axis). Enter how often you want the major x-axis
labeled.
NOTE: For both x- and y-axis labels, if you enter 1, every major division is labeled; if you enter 2, every other
major division is labeled.
(K) Label Position (X Axis). Choose the label position for the x-axis. By default, the x-axis is
labeled at the bottom, but you can choose to label the top, top and bottom, or have no labeling at
all.
(L) Label Format (X Axis). Enter the label format by checking off any combination of hours,
minutes, and seconds. The label appears in the following format: HH:MM:SS, where HH is hours, MM
is minutes, and SS is seconds.
(M) Number of Major Divisions (Y Axis). Enter the number of major y-axis divisions for the
trend. This is the number of main sections the trend is divided into. You can also choose a color for
the major divisions by clicking the Color field. In the dialog box that appears, choose a color and
click OK.
(N) Number of Minor Divisions (Y Axis). Enter the number of minor y-axis divisions for the
trend. This will be the number of sections the major divisions are divided into. The minimum
number of divisions is one.
You can also choose a color for the minor y-axis divisions by clicking the Color field. In the Color
dialog box that appears, choose a color and click OK.
(O) Label Interval in Major Divisions (Y Axis). Enter how often you want the major y-axis
labeled.
(P) Label Position (Y Axis). Choose the label position for the y-axis. If you choose Left, Right, or
Left and Right, only pens that fall within the minimum and maximum values of the Label Range are
displayed; pen data outside the range is not displayed.
However, if you choose None, no labels are shown on the y-axis, multiple ranges appear to overlap,
and all pens are displayed. As shown in the following example, if pen A has a range of 0-100 and pen
B has a range of 300-400, the y-axis has a range of 0-100 and 300-400 simultaneously and both pens
are displayed.
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Pen 1
Pen 2
305
(Q) Label Range (Y Axis). Enter the minimum and maximum values for the y-axis.
(R) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Configuring Basic Trend Pens
Click a pen configuration button in the Trend Configuration dialog box.
The Trend Pen Configuration dialog box appears.
Trend Pen Configuration Dialog Box
A
C
B
D
E
F
(A) Name. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection Button (B).
(B) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag Selection dialog box is
displayed so you can select a tag. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 to learn more about
configuring tags in your project.
(C) Maximum/Minimum Value. Enter the maximum and minimum value the tag selected in
A can be.
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(D) Pen Color. Click here to choose a pen color. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose a
color and click OK.
E) Pen Width. Enter the width of the line you want created by the pen. The width is specified in
pixels.
(F) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Optimizing Pen Settings
The scan rates you select when configuring a pen can impact the speed and performance of your
PAC Display project and the control engine. When selecting scan rates for long trends, you should
choose optimal scan times for the pens as follows:
1. Determine the trend width in pixels by using the X: value in the Coordinates window.
First, subtract the X: value of the left trend border from the X: value of the right trend border.
Then divide the trend width in seconds by the trend width in pixels.
For example, an eight-hour trend that is 500 pixels wide yields a number of 57.6 seconds
(8 x 3600/500).
2. Round this to the nearest increment of 10.
In the example, the value would be rounded up to 60 seconds. This means that for optimum
PAC Display performance, the trend should not be updated more frequently than every 60
seconds.
NOTE: A small compromise to increase the accuracy of the trend is to divide the result by four. In our
example, this would result in a scan time of every 15 seconds. Using a 15-second scan time allows a
maximum of four readings per pixel on the trend. Updating any faster than that is counterproductive;
the excess data is discarded, and the extra requests for data from the control engine add overhead to
the control system.
Working with SuperTrends
SuperTrends are trends that can track both real-time and historical data. You can also use up to 16
pens with a SuperTrend; basic trends support only four pens. SuperTrends are drawn and configured
in PAC Display Configurator, like any other on-screen object, but the graphs can also be manipulated
by the operator in PAC Display Runtime. See “Using Runtime” on page 352 to learn how to use
SuperTrend options in Runtime.
In this section:
“Memory Requirements for SuperTrend Pens” on page 208
“Creating a SuperTrend” on page 208
“Configuring SuperTrend Setup Parameters” on page 209
“Configuring X-Axis Parameters” on page 211
“Configuring Y-Axis Parameters” on page 212
“Configuring Zoom Parameters” on page 213
“Configuring Hot Keys” on page 214
“Configuring SuperTrend Pens” on page 215
“Setting an Individual Pen” on page 215
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Memory Requirements for SuperTrend Pens
When several SuperTrends—each using several pens—are used in a PAC Display project,
the memory requirements for the PC running the project can become very high. Keep this in
mind when developing your PAC Display project. Use the following formula to determine the
amount of RAM required for each pen in a SuperTrend:
RAM required per pen (bytes) = 19.2 × SuperTrend’s x-axis time span (sec.)
SuperTrend’s scan rate (sec.)
For example, the memory required for each pen in a SuperTrend having a six-hour scan time (21,600
sec.) and a 500 ms scan rate (0.5 sec.) would be calculated as follows:
19.2 × 21600 sec. = 829,400 bytes
0.5 sec.
This is approximately 800 KB for each pen. If this example SuperTrend contains five pens, it would
use approximately 4,000 KB of RAM, or just under 4 MB.
Each time you configure a SuperTrend, the approximate amount of RAM required for that object is
displayed.
Creating a SuperTrend
1. Select the SuperTrend tool
from the toolbox and position the cursor where you want the
trend to begin in the window.
2. Click the mouse button, drag the mouse to the desired size, and then release the mouse
button.
The SuperTrend appears.
If you do not draw the SuperTrend wide enough, some of the command buttons are placed in
a second row.
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Configuring SuperTrend Setup Parameters
To configure a SuperTrend, choose the Select tool, and then double-click the SuperTrend.
The SuperTrend Setup dialog box appears.
SuperTrend Setup Dialog Box, Setup Tab
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
(A) Trend Type. Select Real-Time to configure the selected SuperTrend graph to display real-time
data in Runtime; select Historical to display SuperTrend historical data. When a Runtime operator
clicks a SuperTrend historical graph, Runtime prompts the operator for the historical log file that
contains the data to display. If you select Combined, you can configure one SuperTrend graph that
allows the Runtime operator to switch between real-time and historical trending when the project is
running.
(B) Size / Position. Enter the X and Y coordinates to position the SuperTrend. To change the size,
enter the width in pixels (W) or height (H).
(C) Computer Saving Data to File. This read-only field displays the computer that is
configured to collect and process data for SuperTrend historical log files. “Local Computer”—the
default value—means that the computer running PAC Display Runtime will collect and process the
SuperTrend data. Any other value in this field means that one specific PAC Display Runtime
computer (sometimes called the “remote computer”) has been configured to process the data.
IMPORTANT: In a system with multiple nodes of PAC Display Runtime, Opto 22 recommends designating a
remote computer to handle SuperTrend historical data logging. This way, only this one computer will be
writing to the log file, and this avoids file access issues when more than one computer is configured to write
to the same destination. For details, see “Remote SuperTrend Logging” on page 218.
Note that the location where the files are saved is configured in the Historical Log File Configuration
dialog box, page 221.
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(D) Log To. Allows you to log to a file or to a database.
Log File
Displays the Historical Log File Configuration Dialog Box (page 221). In this dialog box, you can
specify file parameters such as the rollover period and the amount of data to buffer in memory.
For details, see “SuperTrend Historical Log File Names” on page 219.
(PAC Display Professional only) Log to Database
Displays the Database Table dialog box that allows you to configure a table for logging
SuperTrend data. For details, see “Saving a SuperTrend to a Database” on page 226.
(E) Color. Click here to select a background color for the SuperTrend graph. In the Color dialog box
that appears, choose a color and click OK.
(F) Text File/Binary File. Select whether the SuperTrend historical log will be saved to a file in
text or binary format. When the SuperTrend data is saved in ASCII text format, the data in the file is
human-readable, and the file includes a header that contains information about tags assigned to
the SuperTrend pens. When the data is saved in binary format, the data in the file is not
human-readable, and the file does not include a header.
NOTE: Trend data from a binary file usually plots more quickly than trend data from a text file.
If there are existing data files for a SuperTrend and you reconfigure the SuperTrend to switch the file
format between text and binary, the Select Log File To Convert To dialog box appears. In this dialog
box, you can select a log file to convert to the appropriate format. See page 224 to learn more about
switching between text and binary file formats.
(G) Refresh Time. Choose one of fourteen refresh time groups. The scan rate appears in
parentheses alongside the refresh group number. You can find out more about refresh times in
“Scanning to Update Graphic Objects” on page 198. All tags associated with the pens in this trend
are scanned at the same rate.
(H) Disable Scanning. Choose whether to disable a trend based on its window’s state. If you
disable the trend, the tags associated with the pens won’t be updated with new data from the
PAC Control strategy until the trend is enabled again. Disabling a trend saves processing time since
the control engine doesn’t have to respond to regular requests for tag updates from PAC Display.
The trend retains its recorded data at the time the trend was disabled.
Never: The trend is never disabled. It always collects data.
When Window Closed: The trend stops scanning when its window is closed. It starts
scanning again when the window is restored.
When Window Minimized: The trend stops scanning when its window is minimized. It starts
scanning again when the window is restored.
(I) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
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Configuring X-Axis Parameters
Click the X-axis tab to configure x-axis parameters for the SuperTrend.
SuperTrend Setup Dialog Box, X-axis Tab
A
B
C
D
E
(A) Time Span. Enter the time span (x-axis) the trend represents. Choose the time units from the
drop-down list. Your choices are seconds, minutes, hours, and days. The maximum time span is 49
days, or 1,176 hours.
(B) Major Divisions. Enter the number of major x-axis divisions for the trend. The trend will be
divided into this number of main sections. You can choose a color for the main section dividers in
Colors (D). The lines dividing the main sections will appear thicker than the lines dividing the minor
sections.
(C) Minor Divisions. Enter the number of minor x-axis divisions for the trend. The major sections
will be divided into this number of minor sections. The minimum number of divisions is one. You
can choose a color for the minor section dividers in Colors (D).
(D) Colors. Click on the boxes to set the colors for the major divisions, minor divisions, and labels.
In the Color dialog box that appears for each item, choose a color and click OK.
(E) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
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Configuring Y-Axis Parameters
Click the Y-axis tab to configure y-axis parameters for the SuperTrend.
SuperTrend Setup Dialog Box, Y-axis Tab
A
B
C
D
E
F
(A) Major Divisions (Grid). Enter the number of major y-axis divisions for the trend.
(B) Minor Divisions (Grid). Enter the number of minor y-axis divisions for the trend.
(C) Scale. Click here to select the scaling.
•
If you choose Default, the trend will always have the same fixed scale. You must enter values for
the Default Max. Value and Default Min. Value. These values specify the range of pen tag values.
This scaling is static and cannot be changed in Runtime.
•
If you choose Pen, the trend will have the scale of the active pen.
NOTE: To see all pens scaled the same in Runtime when using Pen scaling, see “Using SuperTrends in
Runtime” on page 365.
•
If you select the Logarithmic check box, the trend will have a logarithmic y-axis based on the
scale of the active pen. The logarithmic y-axis is determined by rounding down the minimum
pen value to the next lowest factor of ten, and rounding up the maximum pen value to the
next greatest factor of ten. For example, if a pen’s range has a minimum value of 500 and a
maximum value of 8500, the y-axis will have a minimum value of 100 and a maximum value of
10,000.
(D) Label Numeric Format. Click this button to open the Y-Axis Numeric Format dialog.
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Fill in the options as you like for displaying the Y-axis labels. Y-axis values can be shown in decimal or
exponent form, or a mixture of both.
(E) Colors. Click on the boxes to set the colors for the major divisions, minor divisions, and labels in
the trend. If you want the y-axis to use the color of the pen that’s currently active, select Active Pen
Color.
In the Color dialog box that appears for each item, choose a color and click OK.
(F) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Configuring Zoom Parameters
When a SuperTrend is in historical mode, the operator can zoom in to view a more detailed section
of the trend, or zoom out to view a less detailed section of the trend. Click the Zoom tab to set
magnification levels. The Zoom page, shown below, configures the zoom levels by defining scales
for the x-axis.
SuperTrend Setup Dialog Box, Zoom Tab
A
B
C
D
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(A) Time. Enter the amount of time to display on the trend while in zoom in/zoom out mode. Unit
choices, selected from the dropdown box, are seconds, minutes, hours, or days.
(B) Major Divisions. Enter the amount of time that constitutes one major division while in zoom
in/zoom out mode. Unit choices, selected from the dropdown box, are seconds, minutes, hours, or
days.
(C) Minor Divisions. Enter the number of minor divisions per major division while in zoom
in/zoom out mode. This number must be 1 or greater.
(D) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Configuring Hot Keys
All of the buttons that appear at the bottom of a SuperTrend can be associated with a combination
of keystrokes called a hot key. Hot keys allow the Runtime operator to use the SuperTrend without
needing a mouse. If a button has a hot key configured, the operator can either click the button or
press the hot key combination.
NOTE: If a command is available only in historical mode, its associated hot key will work only in historical
mode.
To configure hot keys, click the Hot Keys tab.
SuperTrend Setup Dialog Box, Hot Keys Tab
A
B
C
D
(A) Commands. This field displays the Runtime commands that may be associated with a hot
key. Highlight a command to configure a hot key for it, or to view the existing hot key settings.
(B) Modifiers. Check the box labeled Ctrl if you want the Ctrl key to be part of the hot key. Check
the box labeled Shift if you want the Shift key to be part of the hot key. You may select none, one, or
both.
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(C) Key. This drop-down box lists all available keys that can be hot keys. Make sure not to assign
the same hot key to more than one SuperTrend command.
(D) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Configuring SuperTrend Pens
Unlike a basic trend, a SuperTrend can plot trend lines for up to 16 tag values (pens). Pens 1 through
8 are configured on the “Pens 1-8” tab shown below. Pens 9 through 16 are configured identically on
the “Pens 9-16” tab. There is one row for each pen.
SuperTrend Setup Dialog Box, Pens 1–8 Tab
C
D
E
A
B
F
(A) Pen #. Check this box to enable the pen in this row (or uncheck the box to disable the pen).
The pen is enabled automatically when it is first created.
(B) Name. Once a pen is configured, its name appears here.
(C) Color. Click here to select the pen color. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color
and click OK.
(D) Modify. Click here to configure a pen or to modify its configuration. The SuperTrend Pen #
configuration dialog box appears. Configure the pen and click OK. The pen name will be listed in B.
(E) Clear. Click here to clear the pen configuration.
(F) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
Setting an Individual Pen
Click the Modify button for a pen in the SuperTrend Setup dialog box.
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The SuperTrend Pen dialog box appears. (The number of the pen to be configured is shown in the
title bar.)
A
B
C
F
G
D
E
H
I
J
K
(A) Name. Enter a SuperTrend pen name, if desired. By default, when a tag is selected in B, the
name will be the same as the tagname. In Runtime, this name is displayed in the SuperTrend’s Active
Pen drop-down list.
(B) Tag. Enter a PAC Control tagname here by clicking the Tag Selection button in C.
(C) Tag Selection Button. To enter a tagname in B, click here and select a tag in the Tag
Selection dialog box that appears. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about
selecting and configuring tags.
(D) Range. These fields configure the range of displayed data points:
•
The Max Value, or maximum value, is the tag value that will position the pen at the top of the
trend. If a scanned value of the tag is greater than the Max Value, the point will be plotted but
will not be visible on the trend.
When graphing integers, the Max Value must be a multiple of the y-axis major divisions,
otherwise there will be rounding errors. For example, if the y-axis major divisions is 7, the Max
Value might be 21 (3x7), 49 (7x7), or 84 (12x7). The y-axis major divisions is set on the Y-axis tab.
See “Configuring Y-Axis Parameters” on page 212.
•
The Min Value, or minimum value, is the tag value that will position the pen at the bottom of
the trend. If a scanned value of the tag is less than the Min Value, the point will be plotted but
will not be visible on the trend.
(E) Line. Click in the box next to Color to choose a pen color. In the Color dialog box that appears,
choose a color and click OK. Enter the width of the line you want created by the pen. The width is
specified in pixels.
(F) Point Marker Enabled. Click here to have point markers displayed for every scanned point.
Point markers make it easy to identify scanned data. In historical mode, you can click on a scanned
point to display its data (value, time scanned, etc.).
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(G) Point Marker Size. Choose a point marker width, which is measured in pixels.
(H) Runtime Options. Select Cannot Disable to prevent the pen from being manually disabled
in Runtime.
(I) Deadband. If a SuperTrend’s Trend Type is set to Combined on the Setup tab of the
SuperTrend Setup dialog box, use Deadband to produce smaller, more manageable log files.
Without deadbanding, a combined SuperTrend writes point data to a log file even when the data
does not change. The resulting log file might contain many hundreds or even thousands of identical
entries.
No Deadband: Choose this option if you do not want deadbanding.
Enable Discrete Deadband: Logging occurs only when the specified discrete value toggles either a
tag’s on or off state, or the bit in an integer.
NOTE: Use Enable Discrete Deadband only for discrete values. PAC Display actually uses a value of 0.5 for
the deadband amount. If a floating point value is being trended, and Enable Discrete Deadband is
selected, unexpected results may occur.
Enable Value Deadband: Logging occurs only at the specified refresh time if the newly plotted point
value exceeds the previous point by more than this value. Only positive values are accepted.
(J) Force Logging. When deadbanding is enabled, use this option to force a log file entry to be
generated even if the value for the pen has not exceeded the specified deadband amount. This is
useful for logging values that rarely change more than the deadband amount, but you need
verification that logging occurred over a set time span.
Enter a positive whole number, and select either Minutes or Hours.
(K) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
SuperTrend Historical Log Files
NOTE: In PAC Display Professional, data can also be logged to a database. For details, see page 226.
Runtime operators use the buttons and controls on a SuperTrend graph to open and view
SuperTrend historical log files. (For details, see page 365.) Tag data from SuperTrend graphs can also
be saved to historical log files for later viewing and analysis.
SuperTrend historical log files are similar to historical data log files; the major difference is that
SuperTrend historical log files also contain the additional pen information that a SuperTrend collects.
This section shows how to configure options for creating and saving SuperTrend historical log files.
In this section:
“Remote SuperTrend Logging” on page 218
“SuperTrend Historical Log File Names” on page 219
“Saving a SuperTrend to a Database” on page 226
“Saving a Log in Text or Binary Format” on page 222
“Converting SuperTrend Historical Log Files to Text Format for Viewing” on page 224
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Remote SuperTrend Logging
When you run a PAC Display project on more than one Runtime computer, all of the Runtime
computers can plot and display trend data in SuperTrend graphs. As data is received, a date/time
stamp is recorded, and the date/time stamp and data are buffered in the computer's memory until they
reach the configured buffer-size limit. When the limit is reached, the buffer contents are written to a
SuperTrend historical log file. (To select the location where the log files are saved, see “Historical Log
File Configuration Dialog Box” on page 221.)
You can configure whether each individual Runtime computer performs the work to process the data
for SuperTrend historical log files, or if just one of them—the remote computer—does all the work.
IMPORTANT: In a system with multiple nodes of PAC Display Runtime, Opto 22 recommends designating a
remote computer to handle SuperTrend historical data logging. This way, only this one computer will be
writing to the log file, and this avoids file access issues when more than one computer is configured to write
to the same destination.
•
Configure a remote computer for Super Trend logging.
•
Copy the project to Runtime computers.
The remote computer must also run the project to collect and
process the data.
•
The remote computer processes SuperTrend data.
•
All Runtime computers can display the data in SuperTrend graphs.
PC 1
PC 2
Remote SuperTrend Logging Dialog Box
To configure which computer will process SuperTrend historical log files:
1. In the PAC Display Configurator menu bar, click ConfigureSuperTrend Remote Logging.
The Remote SuperTrend Logging dialog box appears.
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2. Select the computer:
– If only one computer will run the project in Runtime, select Local Computer, and then click
OK. By default, SuperTrend historical log files are saved in the PAC Display project folder.
If more than one computer will run the project and you select Local Computer, each
computer running the project will collect, process, and save SuperTrend historical log files
in the configured destination.
– When more than one computer will run the project in Runtime, Opto 22 recommends you
choose the Remote Computer option. Having one computer process SuperTrend historical
log files can prevent issues caused by multiple computers sending data to the same
destination.
a. Select Remote Computer, and then click Browse.
b. In the Choose Remote Logging Computer dialog box, expand the network computer
tree until you find the computer you want.
c. Click the computer to select it, and then click OK.
In a multi-computer environment, the remote computer must be running the project in order to
collect the data and create and save the log files to the configured location.
SuperTrend Historical Log File Names
(PAC Display Professional only) Also see, “Saving a SuperTrend to a Database” on page 226.
SuperTrend historical log file names are created automatically. Because the file names are referenced
internally by the PAC Display application, you should never manually change the name of a
SuperTrend historical log file.
SuperTrend historical log file names are based on the date the file was created and a configured
rollover period. File rollover is used to separate data log files according to configured time periods;
when a rollover period ends, the active log file is closed and a new data log file is created. You can
configure monthly, weekly, daily, and hourly rollover periods; you can even configure logs to be
created when a PAC Control strategy tag's value matches configured conditions. You can also
choose a “None” rollover period, in which case all data is stored in a single file.
Key
yy = year
mm = month
pp = day that the file was started (applicable only to weekly rollovers)
dd = day
hh = hour
MM_SS = minutes and seconds
.H = file extension prefix for a historical data log
.T = file extension prefix for a SuperTrend historical data log
#### = an internal ID number for the historical data log or SuperTrend.
Rollover period
Naming Format
Monthly
RMyymm.H####
RMyymm.T####
Weekly
RWyymmpp.H####
RWyymmpp.T####
Daily
RDyymmdd.H####
RDyymmdd.T####
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Hourly
RHmmddhh.H####
RHmmddhh.T####
Trigger
RT_yy_mm_dd_hh_MM_SS.H####
RT_yy_mm_dd_hh_MM_SS.T####
None
HISTLOG.H####
STREND.T####
For more information, see “When Are Rollover Files Created?” on page 254.
Configuring SuperTrend Log Files
To save SuperTrend historical data:
1. Choose the Select tool and double-click the SuperTrend.
The SuperTrend Setup dialog box appears.
2. Click Log To.
– In PAC Display Basic, the Historical Log File Configuration dialog box appears.
Continue to step 3.
– In PAC Display Professional, a pop-up menu appears.
Select Log File to display the Historical Log File Configuration dialog box. (To log to a
database, see “Saving a SuperTrend to a Database” on page 226.)
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Note that in the File Name area, only the Automatic option is available; user-defined names are
not allowed for SuperTrend historical log files. Likewise, in the Lines area, Line Format is grayed
out because you can’t change the log file format of a SuperTrend historical log file.
3. Do one of the following:
– To save the log files for this SuperTrend locally in the PAC Display project directory, select
Use Project Directory and click OK.
SuperTrend historical log files will now be saved locally in the same directory as your
PAC Display project. The Use Project Directory setting applies to each computer that is
running this PAC Display project, which means that each computer will save SuperTrend
historical log files in its local project directory.
NOTE: If you have configured a remote computer to save SuperTrend historical log files, the Use
Project Directory option is not available. You must click Browse and select a directory from the list
of network directories that appears, even if the directory you select is the same as the project
directory.
– To save the files to a folder relative to the folder that the project is in, select Make Path
Relative to Project. If you then save the project to a different folder (or even to a different
computer), PAC Display will save the files to the relative path.
For example, if the project is saved in C:\proj\ and you configure the files to be saved in
C:\proj\data\, then the relative path would be this: .\data\
If you then saved the project to C:\temp\newproj\, the files would be saved to the new
location’s relative path: C:\temp\newproj\data\
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– To save the log files for this SuperTrend in a location other than the PAC Display project
directory, perform the steps below. If there are lots of log files, you can speed up the display
time by saving the log files for each SuperTrend in its own folder.
i. Select Name and click Browse.
If you have selected remote SuperTrend logging, the Choose Remote Logging
Location dialog box appears. Otherwise, the Select Directory dialog box appears.
ii. Navigate in the file dialog box that appears until you find a computer and directory
(Choose Remote Logging dialog box) or mapped local or network drive and directory
(Select Directory dialog box) where you want to save the log files for this SuperTrend.
iii. Select the directory where the files will be saved and click OK.
When your project is running, SuperTrend historical log files are saved in the directory path
you configured. This setting applies to each computer that is running the PAC Display
project; each computer will save SuperTrend historical log files in the directory path you
configured.
Saving a Log in Text or Binary Format
When you configure the SuperTrend object, you can choose to save a SuperTrend historical log file
in either text or binary format.
Text—When saved as an ASCII text file, a SuperTrend historical log file includes a header with
information about tags assigned to the SuperTrend pens. One advantage of saving a log file in text
format is accessibility—the file can be opened and viewed using any text editor, such as Windows
Notepad. The disadvantage to this file format is that when a large amount of historical trend
information is opened and plotted in a SuperTrend graph, the graph may be drawn slowly.
Binary—When a SuperTrend historical log file is saved in binary format, the file does not include a
header containing information about tags assigned to the SuperTrend pens. A major advantage to
saving a log file in binary format is speed—historical trend information from a binary file is usually
graphed much more quickly than when using the same information from a text file. A disadvantage
to binary file format is that the data cannot be opened and read using a text editor.
To change the file format of an existing SuperTrend historical log file between text and binary in
PAC Display Configurator, perform the steps below. (For log files to be present, you will need to have
previously run your PAC Display project and collected historical data.)
1. Double-click a previously configured SuperTrend object that has generated one or more log files.
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The SuperTrend Setup dialog box appears with either Text File or Binary File selected,
depending on how you originally configured the SuperTrend.
Options to choose the file
format of a SuperTrend
historical log file
2. If Text File is selected, choose Binary File; if Binary File is selected, choose Text File.
The Select Log File to Convert to dialog box appears. In the example below, text files that can
be converted to binary format appear in the list:
3. Highlight a log file to convert and then click OK.
4. Now click OK to close the SuperTrend Setup dialog box.
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Converting SuperTrend Historical Log Files to Text Format for
Viewing
While you can’t view the contents of a SuperTrend historical log file saved in binary format, a simple
software utility (including source code) is included with PAC Display that lets you convert binary log
files to text format in order to view their contents. (The utility can also convert text files to binary
format.) Once you have converted a binary SuperTrend historical log file to text format, you can
easily view its contents using a text editor or other application.
NOTE: This utility creates a separate, new file in text (or binary) format that is not used by PAC Display. The
format of the original SuperTrend historical log file is not changed. If you want to change the format in
which this original log file is saved, see “Saving a Log in Text or Binary Format” on page 222.
Important Guidelines for Using This Utility
•
Do not rename or modify any original SuperTrend historical log files. These are files with
the file extension .T#### (for example, .T0003, .T0004, and so forth). PAC Display uses the file
names to access and update log files.
•
If you rename the new files that are created by the utility, do not use the name or file
extension of the original SuperTrend historical log file.
•
If you convert a text file to binary format, the header information in the text file will be
removed. This information cannot be recovered, even if you convert the binary file back to
text format.
Converting a SuperTrend Historical Log File for Viewing
The utility for converting SuperTrend historical log files is available in PAC Display and also in a
command line version.
To use the PAC Display version:
This utility is available in both PAC Display Configurator and Runtime.
1. Select Tools > Convert SuperTrend Files to open the Convert SuperTrend Files application.
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The current project folder is selected by default. To browse to a different folder, click the Browse
for Folder link. All SuperTrend files located in that folder are listed with either Text or Binary
shown as the type.
2. Check the box next to one or more file names, and then click Convert.
The files are converted to the correct format even if files of both types are selected.
Files are converted as follows:
– Text to Binary: Each new binary file has the same name as the original with “.bin” appended
to the end. For example, RD160319.T0000 becomes RD160319.T0000.bin.
– Binary to Text: Each new text file has the same name as the original with “.txt” appended to
the end. For example, RD160319.T0000 becomes RD160319.T0000.txt.
To use the command line version of the conversion utility:
1. Open a command prompt window:
– In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, press the Windows Start key
, and then click Run.
– In Windows 10 and Windows 8.1, press the Windows Start key
, type Run and then
press the Enter key.
2. At the command prompt, enter the command to navigate to the folder where PAC Display is
installed. For example, if PAC Display version 9.6 is installed on your computer’s C:\ drive, the
command would be:
cd “C:\Program Files (x86)\Opto22\PAC Project 9.6”
This image shows the command and the response:
Type this command, and
then press Enter.
The response shows the
directory you are currently in
3. At the command prompt, enter the conversion command and the log file’s path and filename.
Syntax: STRNDCVT.EXE [path\log filename]
where STRNDCVT.EXE is the conversion command
and [path\log filename] is the name of the SuperTrend historical log file to be converted.
For example, to convert a log file named RD161005.T0000 and located in the
C:\PAC Display\Logs folder, you would enter:
STRNDCVT.EXE “C:\PAC Display\Logs\RD161005.T0000”
The format change occurs automatically: If the log file is in binary format, it will be converted to text;
the new text file has the extension .txt. If the file is in text format, it will be converted to binary; the
new binary file has the file extension .bin.
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Saving a SuperTrend to a Database
(Pro only) If you have configured an ODBC-compliant database (such as Microsoft SQL Server,
MySQL, or Microsoft Access), you can also log SuperTrend data to a database. For information about
configuring ODBC data sources, see page 61.
1. From the SuperTrend Setup dialog, click the Log To button and choose Log to Database from
the popup menu.
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If a database is configured, a dialog shows the default settings for the table that will be created
and logged to.
2. If desired, modify the table name or the column names.
To modify a column name:
a. Click the name to highlight the row.
b. Click the name once again to make it editable.
c. Type a new name, and then press Enter.
d. Click OK to confirm your changes and close the dialog box.
NOTES
•
Table and column names may not contain the following characters: (space) [ ] :
•
Column names cannot begin with a SQL reserved word for that database type.
Examples: INTEGER, VALUE, BACKUP, CURRENT_DATE
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Here is a sample of a table created using a Microsoft Access database:
Changing the Database Table Name
When you create or modify a table for logging SuperTrend data in a database, you can change the
database table name. However, after Runtime logs data to the database, if you then try to change
the database table name in Configurator, a message is displayed, that says the table already exists.
When the message appears, do one of the following:
•
Click Yes to create a new table and start logging to that table.
•
Click No to rename the existing table and continue logging to that table.
Using XY Plots
You can use XY plots to graph real-time tag information. XY plots do not graph data over time, but
instead plot points on a two-dimensional graph using data from two float or integer tables in the
PAC Control strategy. (For information on using numeric tables in a strategy, see the PAC Control
User’s Guide, form 1700.)
The value in each element of the numeric tables defines the coordinates for a single point on the
x-axis and y-axis coordinate system. The example below shows how two numeric tables, each
having three elements, would be used to draw three consecutive points on an XY plot.
Table Element
Numeric_Table_1
Numeric_Table_2
XY Coordinates
0
3
8
(3,8)
1
5.25
10
(5.25,10)
2
2
3.3
(2,3.3)
An XY plot is useful in applications where one value must be graphed against another value.
Common examples in industrial settings include graphing temperature versus pressure,
displacement versus input, or voltage versus current.
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In this section:
“Creating an XY Plot” on page 229
“Modifying an XY Plot” on page 229
“Configuring Individual Plots in an Object” on page 232
Creating an XY Plot
1. Select the XY Plot tool
from the toolbox and position the cursor where you want the XY
plot object to begin in the window.
2. Click the mouse button, drag the mouse to the desired size, and then release the mouse
button.
The XY plot that appears should resemble the example below:
Y-Axis Layout
• Label Position =
Bottom
• Max. Val = 100
• Min. Val = 0
• Major Divisions = 5
• Minor Divisions = 2
X-Axis Layout
• Label Position = Left• Major Divisions = 5
• Min. Val = 0• Minor Divisions = 2
• Max. Val = 100
Modifying an XY Plot
Choose the Select tool and double-click the XY plot.
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The XY Plot Configuration dialog box appears.
XY Plot Configuration Dialog Box
A
D
E
B
C
F
G
J
K
H
I
L
M
N
The XY Plot Configuration dialog box is used to set the parameters of an XY plot, including the
number of plotted lines that are displayed and the scaling used for the x-axis and y-axis.
(A) Title. Enter the title of the XY plot here.
(B) Border and Chart Color. Click a color button to enter the color for the chart, the chart’s
background, and the chart’s border. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color and click
OK.
(C) Allow Range Change in Runtime. Select the Allow Range Change in Runtime check box
to allow the user to change the x-axis and y-axis range values in PAC Display Runtime.
(D) Pens. Use the plot configuration buttons to define up to six individual plotted points in the XY
plot. Each individual plot uses x-axis and y-axis coordinates from two PAC Control tags. You can also
define the plotted point’s color and width, and specify line style and whether a legend should
appear. See “Configuring Individual Plots in an Object” on page 232 for more information.
(E) Pen Check Box. Check this box to display a configured individual plot. Uncheck the box to
hide the plot.
(F) X-Axis Number of Major Divisions. Enter the number of major x-axis divisions for the XY
plot. This is the number of main sections the graph is divided into. You can also choose a color for
the major divisions by clicking the Color field. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color
and click OK.
NOTE: For both x- and y-axis divisions, the lines dividing the major divisions appear thicker than the minor
divisions.
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(G) X-Axis Number of Minor Divisions. Enter the number of minor x-axis divisions for the XY
plot. This will be the number of sections the major divisions are divided into. The minimum number
of divisions is one.
You can also choose a color for the minor x-axis divisions by clicking the Color field. In the Color
dialog box that appears, choose a color and click OK.
(H) X-Axis Min/Max Value. Enter the minimum and maximum values for the x-axis. In addition
to whole numbers and decimals, you can also use negative exponents for numbers less than 1. For
example, for the number .0000001, you would enter 1.00e-07.
(I) X-Axis Labels on Left/Right. Enter the label position for the x-axis. By default, the x-axis is
labeled on the left, but you can also choose to have the label on the right or on both sides.
(J) Y-Axis Number of Major Divisions. Enter the number of major y-axis divisions for the XY
plot. This is the number of main sections the graph is divided into. You can also choose a color for
the major divisions by clicking the Color field. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose a color
and click OK.
NOTE: For both x- and y-axis divisions, the lines dividing the major divisions appear thicker than the minor
divisions.
(K) Y-Axis Number of Minor Divisions. Enter the number of minor y-axis divisions for the XY
plot. This will be the number of sections the major divisions are divided into. The minimum number
of divisions is one.
You can also choose a color for the minor y-axis divisions by clicking the Color field. In the Color
dialog box that appears, choose a color and click OK.
(L) Y-Axis Min/Max Value. Enter the minimum and maximum values for the y-axis. In addition
to whole numbers and decimals, you can also use negative exponents for numbers less than 1. For
example, for the number .0000002, you would enter 2.00e-07.
(M) Y-Axis Labels on Top/Bottom. Enter the label position for the y-axis. By default, the y-axis
is labeled at the bottom, but you can also choose to have the label at the top, or at both top and
bottom.
(N) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
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Configuring Individual Plots in an Object
Click the configuration button for an individual plot in the XY Plot Configuration dialog box. For
example, Pen 1.
The Configure XY Plot dialog box appears.
Configure XY Plot Dialog Box
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
(A) X-Axis Table. Enter a PAC Control tagname here that will provide the x-axis values. Click the
Tag Selection Button (B) to open the Tag Selection dialog box.
(B) Tag Selection Dialog Button (X-Axis). To enter a tagname in A, click here. The Tag
Selection dialog box is displayed so you can select a tag for a numeric table. For the table you select,
also enter the starting index (usually 0) and the number of table elements to be used in the plot.
The fields for these values are shown in the illustration below. To learn more about configuring tags
in your project, see “Configuring Tags” on page 81.
For a selected numeric
table, enter a starting
index (usually 0) and the
number of table elements
to use (50 maximum).
(C) Y-Axis Table. Same as the X-Axis Table setting (A) above, but sets the tag for the y-axis.
(D) Tag Selection Dialog Button (X-Axis). Same as the x-axis tag selection (B) above, but
selects the tag used for the y-axis.
(E) Pen Color. Click here to choose a pen color. In the Color dialog box that appears, choose a
color and click OK.
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(F) Pen Width. Type the width of the line for the pen to create. The width is specified in pixels.
(G) Show Legend in Runtime. Select the Show Legend in Runtime check box to have the
names of the tags used appear under the graph’s x-axis.
(H) Draw Connecting Lines. Select Draw Connecting lines to have lines connect each x-y
coordinate.
(I) OK. Click OK to save your settings.
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9: Chapter 9
9: Configuring Trigger-Based
Events
Introduction
In this chapter, you will learn how to make different types of events occur based on the value of a
tag in a PAC Control strategy. These events include saving a historical data log, launching an
application, playing a sound, changing a window’s state, downloading and uploading a recipe to
the control engine, and starting an alarm.
In This Chapter
What is a Trigger-Based Event?........................... 235 Configuring Recipes.................................................... 263
Historical Data Logs................................................. 235 Configuring Alarm Points......................................... 280
Launching Applications......................................... 256 Adding Alarm Graphics............................................. 298
Sounds........................................................................... 260 Configuring Project Alarms ..................................... 303
Configuring Trigger-Based Window States ... 262
What is a Trigger-Based Event?
In PAC Display, you can make things happen based on the value of a tag in a PAC Control strategy.
When the tag equals a specific value or falls within a defined range of values, it starts, or triggers, an
event that you have specified.
You can use trigger-based events in many different ways. Here are a few examples:
•
Monitoring temperature—Play a recorded warning sound to indicate an alarm condition if a
tag exceeds a value.
•
Changing control system parameters for different products—Download a new recipe
(series of values) to a control engine when a tag reaches a set value.
•
Logging non-standard conditions or errors—Print a log whenever monitored tags fall
outside a previously defined range of values.
Historical Data Logs
A historical data log lets you collect and store data from your control process to a file on your
computer, or on a remote computer on a network. Once it is saved in a file, historical data about
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your control process can be used by spreadsheet applications (such as Microsoft Excel) to generate
reports, or the data can be archived for later reference.
By default, PAC Display saves historical data logs as text files in Unicode (UTF-16) format. To save all
logs in ASCII format, select the Save log files in ASCII format check box in the Runtime Setup dialog
box. For details, see “Runtime Setup: General Tab” on page 318.
NOTE: To ensure that the correct time and date information appear in a historical data log, make sure to
set the time and date on your PC prior to starting PAC Display.
Historical data logging begins when PAC Display starts scanning the control engine for data, and
ends when PAC Display stops scanning the control engine for data. (Scanning starts when the PAC
Display project is opened in Runtime, and stops when the project is closed.) You can use a start or
stop trigger, however, to start or stop historical data logging only (for example) when a tag is within
a range of preset values, or a preconfigured number of samples have been taken. Start and stop
triggers may be attached to any control engine variable.
In this section:
“Tag Types You Can Save to a Historical Data Log” (below)
“Configuring a Historical Data Log” on page 237
“Logging Historical Data to a Database” on page 240
“Defining the Historical Data Log File” on page 242
“Using the Rollover Trigger Option” on page 249
“Configuring a Historical Log Point” on page 250
“Configuring a Start or Stop Trigger” on page 251
“Notification When a Trigger Has Stopped” on page 252
“Setting Log File Line Format” on page 253
“Naming Historical Data Log Files” on page 253
“Historical Data Log Elements” on page 255
Tag Types You Can Save to a Historical Data Log
You can record the following types of tags in a historical data log:
•
Integers and integer tables
•
Floats and float tables
•
Strings and string tables
NOTE: If a historical data log is logging string tables, make sure that only string tables are used in that
log. You cannot log string tables and integers in the same log file.
•
Discretes
With integer tables and float tables, you can select individual elements, groups of elements, or all
elements in the table. For more information on working with tables in a PAC Control strategy, the
PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700).
NOTE: To save data from more than one control engine, you must create a separate historical data log file
for each control engine that will be monitored. Data from multiple control engines cannot be saved in the
same historical data log file.
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Configuring a Historical Data Log
To configure an historical data log in your PAC Display project, choose ConfigureHistorical Data Log.
The Historical Logs dialog box that appears allows you to add new historical data logs to the project
or modify or delete previously configured historical data logs. You can add up to 1000 historical data
logs per project.
A
B
C
D
E
F
IMPORTANT: To save data from more than one control engine in an historical data log file, you must create
a separate historical data log file for each control engine that will be monitored. If data from multiple
control engines is saved in the same historical data log file, it is difficult to extract and use the log data from
each control engine.
If there are no historical data logs in the project, the Modify and Delete buttons cannot be selected.
Selecting a configured historical data log enables the Modify, Delete, and Duplicate buttons.
(A) Add. Click Add to create a new historical data log in the Historical Log Configuration dialog box
that appears.
(B) Modify. Highlight an existing log and click Modify to change it in the Historical Log
Configuration dialog box that appears.
(C) Delete. Highlight an existing log and click Delete to remove it.
(D) Duplicate. Highlight an existing log and click Duplicate to create a copy of the log.
(E) Import. Click this button to display the following import options.
Import from Subfolder: Select one or more binary (.hle) files import into the current project.
Import from Comma Delimited File: Select one or more comma-delimited (.csv) files to
import into the current project.
(F) Export. Highlight one or more files you want to export, then click this button to display the
following options.
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Export to Subfolder: Exports the selected historical data logs in binary format to the current
project’s Exported Historical Logs subfolder. Each file has the name of the historical data log
with the .hle extension. For example: Pressures Log.hle
Export to Comma Delimited File: Exports the selected historical data logs in binary format to
the current project’s Exported Historical Logs subfolder. Each file has the name of the historical
data log with the .csv extension (so it automatically opens in Excel).
For example: Water Log.csv
Historical Log Configuration Dialog Box
To open the Historical Log Configuration dialog box, choose ConfigureHistorical Data Log, and
then click the Add button.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
(A) Name. Enter the name of the historical data log here. Use this name to refer to the historical
log group you’re configuring. (This name does not affect the name of the historical data log file that
is saved to disk.)
NOTE: The name in this field must be different from all historical data logs within the project or you will get
an error message when you exit the dialog box.
(B) ID. This field shows a unique numeric identifier for the historical data log. This identifier, which
starts out at 00 and increases sequentially, is used as the last two characters of the three-character
file name extension for an historical data log file. The first character of this file name extension is an
uppercase “H”, so with the identifier, a typical file name extension for a historical data log would be
“.H00”
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(C) Refresh Time. Select a previously configured refresh time group to scan the historical log
point tags. This scan rate applies to every log point configured within this historical data log. For
more information on setting up refresh time groups, see “Refresh Time Groups” on page 198.
(D) Samples per Refresh Time. Enter the number of times per each Refresh Time unit that a
tag value is scanned. This does not change how often the historical data log is written to (the
Refresh Time); it only changes how often a tag value is scanned.
To calculate the actual time interval between each scan, divide the Refresh Time by the Samples per
Refresh Time. For example, if the Refresh Time scan rate is 1 second, a Samples per Refresh Time
value of 3 will sample the tag value every .333 seconds. If the Refresh Time scan rate is 2 seconds, a
value of 3 will sample the tag value every .666 seconds. To ensure that the freshest data is added to
the historical data log, enter an odd number greater than 1 and less than 10.
(E) Log To. Allows you to log to a file or to a database.
Log File
Click to specify the directory where the historical data log file should be saved, the file name
and format, and, if applicable, the rollover parameters for the file. See “Defining the Historical
Data Log File” on page 242 for more information.
Log to Database
Click to configure a table for logging SuperTrend data. See “Saving a SuperTrend to a Database”
on page 226.
(F) Historical Log Points. This list shows all configured historical log points for this log file. The
order of the points in the list (top to bottom) is the order in which the points will be logged. To
change the order of the list, select a point, and then choose one of the Move buttons in J.
(G) Append. Click to add a historical log point to the end of the historical log point list (E). See
“Configuring a Historical Log Point” on page 250 for more information.
(H) Insert. Click to insert a historical log point above a highlighted historical log point.
(I) Modify. Lets you modify the highlighted historical log point.
(J) Delete. Deletes the highlighted historical log point from the list (E).
(K) Move Up/Down. Highlight the log point you want to move, and then click Move Up or Move
Down to change the position of the point in the historical log point list.
(L) Start Trigger. Using a start trigger is optional. Click to configure the PAC Control tag that will
start scanning the listed historical log points. Check the Enabled box to make the start trigger active.
See “Configuring a Start or Stop Trigger” on page 251 for more information.
Since the start trigger can be activated only from a non-triggered state, you must also configure a
stop trigger at L or a number of scan times at M.
(M) Stop Trigger. Click to configure the PAC Control tag that will stop scanning the listed
historical log points. Check the Enabled box to make the stop trigger active. A stop trigger is
required only when you have configured a start trigger. Additionally, a stop trigger is edge-sensitive
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and only activates on a false-to-true state transition. See “Configuring a Start or Stop Trigger” on
page 251 for more information on setting up a stop trigger.
(N) Number of Samples. Another way to stop scanning the historical log points is to set the
number of samples, or times the points are scanned. Select Number of Samples, and then enter a
discrete number of samples to take once the start trigger occurs.
(O) Notification. Click this button to assign a value to a tag when historical log sampling has
stopped. Check the Enabled box to make notification active. See “Notification When a Trigger Has
Stopped” on page 252 for more information.
(P) OK. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Now we’ll look at the additional steps needed to complete the settings in the Historical Log
Configuration dialog box.
Logging Historical Data to a Database
(Pro only) If you have configured an ODBC-compliant database (such as Microsoft SQL Server,
MySQL, or Microsoft Access), you can also log historical data to a database. For information about
configuring ODBC data sources, see page 61. Also, see “Defining the Historical Data Log File” on
page 242.
To log to a database:
1. Choose Configure > Historical Data Log.
2. Click the Add button to display the Historical Log Configuration dialog box.
3. Click the Log To button and then choose Log to Database from the popup menu.
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If there is a database configured, a dialog shows the default settings for the table that will be
created and logged to.
No matter what the point names are, they appear under the Point_Name column, and the
values appear under the Point_Value column. The Point_Value column is always a string
representation of the value. So if the point is a FLOAT (for example, temperature) the
Point_Value might show 78.4, but this is not a FLOAT. It is the literal string “78.4”. Any queries
performed against this table will need to convert the string to a float (if needed).
4. If desired, modify the table name or the column names.
Modify a column name as follows:
a. Click the name to highlight the row.
b. Click the name once again to make it editable.
c. Type a new name, and then press Enter.
d. Click OK to confirm your changes and close the dialog box.
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NOTES:
•
Table and column names may not contain the following characters: (space) [ ] :
•
Column names cannot begin with a SQL reserved word for that database type.
Examples: INTEGER, VALUE, BACKUP, CURRENT_DATE
Changing the Database Table Name
When you create or modify a table for logging historical data in a database, you can change the
database table name. However, when some data has been logged in Runtime, if you then change
the database table name in Configurator, a message will appear saying that the table already exists.
When the message appears, do one of the following:
•
Click Yes to create a new table and start logging to that table.
•
Click No to rename the existing table and continue logging to that table.
Defining the Historical Data Log File
You can name the historical data log file, determine where it will be located, configure how the data
lines will appear, and define its rollover parameters in the Historical Log File Configuration dialog
box.
Note that a historical data log file is not the same log file used to record data from a SuperTrend. A
SuperTrend historical log file contains different data about log points, and is configured separately
from a historical data log file. See “SuperTrend Historical Log Files” on page 217 for more
information. Alarm log files, which contain data about alarms that have been triggered, are also
different from Historical data log files. See “Alarm Logging Options” on page 311 for more
information.
If you want to save data from more than one control engine, you should create a separate historical
data log file for each control engine that will be monitored. If data from multiple control engines is
saved in the same historical data log file, it is difficult to identify data that corresponds to a specific
control engine.
To define a historical data log file, click the Log To button in the Historical Log Configuration dialog
box and enter information in the Historical Log File Configuration dialog box that appears.
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A
B
C
D
E
F
G
L
H
I
J
K
(A) Name. Choose the directory where the historical data log file will be saved. Click Name and
enter the directory path in the field next to it, or click Browse to find a directory path.
Click Use Project Directory to save the historical data log file to the PAC Display project directory.
(This occurs by default if you don’t specify a location.)
Select Make Path Relative to Project to save the files to a folder relative to the folder that the project
is in. If you then save the project to a different folder (or even to a different computer), PAC Display
will save the files to the relative path.
For example, if the project is saved in C:\proj\ and you configure the files to be saved in C:\proj\logs\,
then the relative path would be this: .\logs\
If you then saved the project to C:\temp\newproj\, the files would be saved to the new location’s
relative path: C:\temp\newproj\logs\
(B) Source. Select Automatic, Fixed, or From strategy to determine how the historical data log file
name will be created, and then fill in additional information as needed for that option.
If the Automatic option is used, historical data log files are named based on internal naming rules
described in “Naming Historical Data Log Files” on page 253. If rollover is not used, the file is named
“HISTLOG.H####,” where #### is the four-digit historical data log ID number. The Automatic option is
used by default if you do not select another option.
(C) Fixed Name. If you selected the Fixed option in B, enter a file name here. The file name can
be any valid, eight-character DOS file name and doesn’t require a three-character file extension.
Note that if you don’t specify an extension, one is not added automatically.
You must configure and enable a Start Trigger for this type of file (see page 251). When the trigger
starts the historical data log, the new data is appended to the file if the file already exists. If the file
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doesn’t already exist, it is created. The rollover naming convention doesn’t apply to this type of file
name.
(D) String Name. If you selected the From strategy string option, enter a PAC Control string
tagname here. Use the Tag Selection button
to quickly enter the tag containing the name of the
historical data log file. You must configure and enable a Start Trigger for this type of file (see
page 251). When the trigger starts the historical data log, the string containing the file name is read,
and the new data is appended to the log file if the file already exists. If the file doesn’t already exist, it
is created. The rollover naming convention doesn’t apply to this type of file name.
If the string name in D is an invalid file name, the default name of the log file is created using the
following rules:
•
If the string is empty, the project directory is added to the Default Name (E) and the extension
is an uppercase “H” followed by the historical data log ID number.
•
If the string is not empty and a project directory is not specified as the directory path, the Name
in A is added to the Default Name (E).
•
If the project directory is specified as the path, or the previous step failed, the project directory
is added to the Default Name (E) and the extension is an uppercase “H” followed by the
historical data log ID number. If the project directory is read-only or there is not enough room
left on the drive containing the project directory, an error message indicates the file could not
be created.
(E) Default Name. Enter a default file name in E in case the file name in String Name (D) is
invalid. The file name can be any valid, eight-character DOS file name. The five-character file
extension is assigned by PAC Display, and will start with an uppercase “H” followed by the historical
data log’s ID (for example: .H0000, if the ID is 0000).
(F) Line Format. Click to configure the character, or delimiter, used to separate the data in the log
file, to choose the type of quotes used for each data line, and where to insert carriage returns. You
configure these parameters in the Line Format dialog box that appears. See page 253 for more
information.
(G) Lines Buffered. Enter the number of lines of data your PC will save to a memory buffer
before writing the information to the historical data log file. When choosing a number, keep in mind
that the lower the number of buffered data lines, the more frequently the computer has to write to
the file. Alternately, the higher the number of data lines buffered in memory, the more data that will
be lost if your PC loses power or has a system failure. A valid entry is any number between 0 and
999; the default is 20 lines.
(H) Number of Files to Retain. Enter the maximum number of historical data log files that can
be created using rollover before the oldest file is overwritten. For example, if you enter 10 and your
rollover time period is set to hours, you will have 10 historical data log files created for 10 hours of
data before the oldest file is overwritten with new data. See page 253 for more information on
rollover settings.
(I) Rollover. Choose the rollover time period here. Select None to have all logged data placed in a
single data file named HISTLOG.H####, where #### is the ID number assigned to the historical data
log. If you select Weeks, also select the day of the week to have the files rollover. Logging begins
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when the PAC Display project is loaded, and data collected will be appended to the existing data file.
The size of the file is limited only by available disk space.
To use the Trigger option, see page 249. Logging begins when the Start Trigger is activated, and
data collected is appended to the existing data file. For more information about rollover files, see
“Naming Historical Data Log Files” on page 253.
(J) Use 0.01 Sec Resolution. Select this option to log the time in hundredths of a second.
(K) Keep File Open. Select Keep file open to leave the log file open to allow data to be
appended to the historical data log file more quickly. If you leave this box unchecked (the default
setting), the file is closed after each time data is written to it. This provides greater data integrity than
leaving the file open.
(L) OK. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Exporting Historical Data Logs to Binary or Comma-Delimited
Files
You can export the historical data logs from your project to either a binary file or a comma-delimited
file, and then import the file into another project. Both projects must refer to the same tag
database(s) for the historical data logs that are to be imported. The database may be a PAC Control,
ioControl (Pro only), or OptoControl tag database file.
If you want to export and import historical data logs quickly, use a binary file (the Export to
Subfolder command) to export and import historical data logs. However, if you want to use a
spreadsheet program (such as Excel) to view, edit, or create the attributes of the historical data logs
before importing them into another project, use a comma-delimited file.
To export one or more historical data logs to a file:
1. In Configurator, choose ConfigureHistorical Data Log to display the Historical Logs dialog
box.
2. Select one or more historical data logs from the list.
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3. Click Export, and then choose from the pop-up menu either Export to Subfolder (for a binary
file) or Export to Comma-Delimited File.
A message confirms success.
Each historical data log is automatically exported in a separate file to the Exported Historical
Logs subfolder of the current project.
Comma-delimited files have the format:
<Name of historical data log>.csv
Binary files have the format:
<Name of historical data log>.hle
To import the alarm points into another project, see the next section, “Importing Historical Data Logs.”
Importing Historical Data Logs
Historical data logs may be imported from one project into another project that both refer to the
same tag database. Before importing, you must export the historical data logs to a file as described
in “Exporting Historical Data Logs to Binary or Comma-Delimited Files” on page 245.
1. In Configurator, choose ConfigureHistorical Data Log to open the Historical Logs dialog box.
2. Click the Import button.
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3. Select either Import from Subfolder (for a binary file) or Import from Comma-Delimited File
from the pop-up menu.
An Import Historical Log dialog box opens for you to navigate to the folder containing the file.
4. Select the file (either .hle or .csv) to import.
5. Click Open. The files are imported and added to the list.
6. Click OK to confirm.
NOTE: If there are errors during the import, PAC Display displays a message indicating the error. The
import fails at the first error. PAC Display makes no attempt to guess what the intended field should
contain nor does it try to correct the error or present possible solutions. If an error is encountered, check
the contents of each field with the table below. The table details the possible values for the fields.
Structure of Historical Data Log Comma-Delimited File
The structure of the comma-delimited file for historical data logs is described below. The length of
the data will be a minimum of 58 fields, plus an additional 14 fields for each historical log point
configured.
Tag Definition Format. The following table describes a single Tag definition in the
comma-delimited file. There are ten fields, all of which are required for tags that are configured.
If tags are not configured, only the first three fields may be blank. The remaining fields (4-10) must
have the default values indicated. See “Tag Definition Format” on page 287.
Notification Definition Format. This table describes the definition for the notifications.
There are a total of 13 fields per notification. See “Notification Definition Format” on page 287.
NOTE: If notifications are not configured for an alarm point, the seven required tag fields (fields 4-10 in the
previous table) are still required.
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Exported CSV File Format. This table shows the format of an exported comma-delimited
(.csv) historical data log file.
Field
Description
Values
1
Historical Log Name
Name of the historical data log
2
Refresh Time Group
Refresh group for the historical data log
Entries 3-28 are the Log File Settings:
3
Log Path
Path to file location if not project directory;
otherwise blank
4
Rollover
Index of rollover drop-down menu
5
Lines Buffered
# lines buffered
6
Keep File Open
0=unchecked; 1=checked
7
Max Files
Maximum # of files to keep
8
Delimiter
ASCII value of delimiter character
9
QuoteType
Index of “Quotes around strings”
drop-down menu
10
UseCREvery
1 = checked;
0 = not checked
11
Nth Element
Value of the “carriage return every [value]
elements” entry
12
Add Space
Value of “Include space after delimiter”;
0=not checked;
1=checked
13
Use Project Dir
0=false;
1=true
14
File Source
0=Automatic;
1=Fixed;
2=From Strategy
15
Fixed Name
User defined fixed name of file (if “File
Source” = 1)
16
Default if Bad
Default Name if “Name from Strategy”
String is invalid (i.e., File Source = 2)
17
Weekday
0=Sunday;6=Saturday
18
Use.01
Value of “Use.01 sec resolution” option;
0=false;1=true
19-28
Strategy tag for file name
See Tag Definition Format table
The following fields are for each historical log point configured:
248
1-10
Tag to be logged
See Tag Definition Format table
11
Name
User defined name
12
FloatResolution
Floating point resolution
13
reserved
Do not edit this value
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Field
14
Description
Values
LogFormat
Integer64 display format
0=decimal;
1=hexadecimal;
2=binary
After the Historical Log Point information is the Trigger information:
1-10
Start Trigger Tag
See Tag Definition Format table
11
Value
The value that the start trigger is tested
against (if not using a Discrete test)
12
Condition
0: >
1: =
2: <
3: >=
4: <=
5: not=
13
SetupType
0=Discrete; 1=Value
14
DiscreteCond
0=On;1=Off
15
Enabled
0=no;1=yes
16
StopT
Stop trigger type
0=from tag;
1= number of samples
17
NumSamples
Number of samples collected if no stop
trigger
After the Trigger information is the Notification information:
1-13
Notification
See Notification Definition Format table
Using the Rollover Trigger Option
When configuring a historical data log or a SuperTrend log, in addition to the time frame rollovers
(such as Hours, Days, Weeks, etc.), you can configure the files to rollover based on a user-defined
trigger.
To use a tag to trigger a rollover:
1. Open the Historical Log File Configuration dialog box (see “Defining the Historical Data Log
File” on page 242).
2. In the Files group, select Trigger from the combo box next to Rollover.
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3. Click the question mark
to open the File Trigger dialog box.
4. Use either Quick Tag Entry (see page 82) or the Tag Selection dialog box (see page 82) to
choose a tag to trigger the rollover.
5. In the Setup by area, select Discrete or Current Value.
Discrete triggers the rollover based on the tag’s on or off state (which you Choose in the
Discrete area).
Current Value allows you to choose the tag value that triggers the rollover. To configure the
value, select an operator in the Current Value drop-down list, and then enter the trigger value.
When the tag’s current value meets the configured conditions, PAC Display creates the rollover
file.
Configuring a Historical Log Point
This dialog box allows you to select tags whose values are recorded to the historical data log file
during runtime.
IMPORTANT: Although you can select tags from different control engines that have been configured for
your PAC Display project, it is not recommended to do so. To save data from more than one control engine
in an historical data log file, create a separate historical data log file for each control engine that will be
monitored.
1. To add or change a historical log point in the Historical Log Configuration dialog box, click
Append or Insert to add a point, or click Modify to change a point.
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The Historical Log Point Configuration dialog box appears.
2. (Optional) Enter a user-defined name for the historical log point.
3. Click the Tag Selection button
and select a PAC Control tag to be an historical log point.
See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for more information about selecting tags.
NOTE: When creating log tables using table variables, the number of elements can be modified in the
Tag Selection dialog box. The maximum number of elements in a log table is 1 million.
4. (Optional) If you picked a float tag type, enter a number in the Floating Point Resolution box to
specify how many places to the right of the decimal point are recorded for floating point
numbers.
5. (Optional) If you picked an Integer 64 tag type, select the format: Decimal, Hexadecimal, or
Binary.
6. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Configuring a Start or Stop Trigger
1. To configure which tag and value will start or stop historical logging, click Start Trigger or Stop
Trigger in the Historical Log Configuration dialog box.
The Historical Log Configuration dialog box for either Start Triggers or Stop Triggers appears.
These dialog boxes are identical. (The Historical Log Start Trigger Configuration dialog box is
shown below.)
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2. Use either Quick Tag Entry (see page 82) or the Tag Selection dialog box (see page 82) to select
a PAC Control tag to be a Start or Stop Trigger.
3. Select Discrete or Current Value in the Setup By group.
Discrete makes the tag’s on or off state trigger the log. Current Value sets the tag value that will
trigger the log. To set a Current Value, select an operator in the drop-down menu, and then
enter a value to compare the tag to.
Notification When a Trigger Has Stopped
When logging has stopped, you can set a tag to a given state or value. This tag setting will act as a
flag to indicate data isn’t being added to the log file anymore.
1. Click Notification in the Historical Log Configuration dialog box.
The Historical Log Stop Trigger Notification dialog box appears.
2. Use either Quick Tag Entry (see page 82) or the Tag Selection dialog box (see page 82) to select
a PAC Control tag name.
3. In the Setup By group, select Discrete or Current Value.
Discrete. Select the Discrete option to specify an on/off trigger state for tags that have a discrete
base type. Once Discrete is selected, choose one of the following options to define the desired
trigger state.
•
•
•
Set: Switches the trigger state to On.
Clear: Switches the trigger state to Off.
Toggle: Switches the trigger state from its current condition to the opposite (for example, an
On setting is switched to Off ).
Current Value. Select the Value option to define the floating point or integer value written to the
specified tag. The specific value is defined using the Set/Offset options and the Value Out field.
252
•
Set: Select Set if you want the value used as a replacement for the tag's current value.
•
Offset: Select Offset if you want the value added to the tag's current value.
•
Value Out: Enter the floating point or integer value to be written to the specified tag.
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Setting Log File Line Format
1. To define how lines of data are stored in the historical and log file, click Line Format in the
Historical Log File Configuration dialog box. The Line Format dialog box appears.
2. In the Line Format dialog box, select from the choices in the Delimiter group a character
(delimiter) that will separate data in the log file. To use a delimiter that’s not listed, choose
Other and enter the character you want to use. Select Include space after delimiter to put a
space after each delimiter.
3. From the choices in the drop-down list “Quotes Around Strings,” select the quotes that will
appear around each string in the log file.
4. To insert a carriage return after a certain number of data elements, select the check box
“Carriage return every” and enter the number of data elements.
The maximum number of elements that can be entered is 99,999. This option is intended for
historical logs with very long data lines which are read by programs that cannot handle long
data lines. The date and time information at the beginning of a data line are not counted as
data elements. See “Historical Data Log Elements” below for more information about data
elements in log files.
Naming Historical Data Log Files
There are three ways to name a historical data log file: by using a fixed name, by using a PAC Control
strategy string tag name, or by using the File Rollover feature (described below) which bases the file
name on the date the file was created and a configured rollover period. (Note that PAC Display
automatically creates files name for SuperTrend historical log files. For details, see page 219.)
File Rollover
File rollover is used to separate data log files according to configured time periods; when a rollover
period ends, the active log file is closed and a new data log file is created. You can configure
monthly, weekly, daily, and hourly rollover periods; you can even configure logs to be created when
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a PAC Control strategy tag's value matches configured conditions. You can also choose a “None”
rollover period, in which case all data is stored in a single file.
Key
yy = year
mm = month
pp = day that the file was started (applicable only to weekly rollovers)
dd = day
hh = hour
MM_SS = minutes and seconds
.H = file extension prefix for a historical data log
.T = file extension prefix for a SuperTrend historical data log
#### = an internal ID number for the historical data log or SuperTrend.
Rollover period
Naming Format
Monthly
RMyymm.H####
RMyymm.T####
Weekly
RWyymmpp.H####
RWyymmpp.T####
Daily
RDyymmdd.H####
RDyymmdd.T####
Hourly
RHmmddhh.H####
RHmmddhh.T####
Trigger
RT_yy_mm_dd_hh_MM_SS.H####
RT_yy_mm_dd_hh_MM_SS.T####
None
HISTLOG.H####
STREND.T####
When Are Rollover Files Created?
When you enable data file logging in your PAC Display project, logging begins when the project is
loaded—or, in the case of trigger-based logging, when a configured start trigger occurs.
For historical data logs, logging continues until either a specific number of samples has been
collected, or a tag's value matches the conditions of a configured stop trigger. (Note that SuperTrend
historical log files stop when Runtime is stopped.) You can also use the Notification feature to
configure a flag to write a value to a tag when logging stops (see page 246).
Hours. If you select Hours, a new data file is created at the top of every hour. For example, if data
logging begins at 8:30 a.m., the first data file will contain data from 8:30 a.m. through 8:59:59 a.m.
After that, data files contain one hour’s worth of data for every hour thereafter: 9:00 a.m. through
9:59:59 a.m.; 10:00 a.m. through 10:59:59 a.m.; and so forth.
Days. Select Days for a new data file to be created at the beginning of every day at 12:00 a.m. For
example, if data logging is triggered at 7:00 p.m. on the 5th, the first data file will contain data from
7:00 p.m. through 11:59:59 p.m. on the 5th. After that, data files contain data from 12:00 a.m.
through 11:59:59 p.m. on the 6th; 12:00 a.m. through 11:59:59 p.m. on the 7th; and so forth.
Weeks. If you select Weeks as the rollover period, logging begins when the project is loaded, and a
new data file is created every week at the beginning of the selected day at 12:00 a.m. For example, if
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data logging starts on a Wednesday and the rollover period is set for every Monday, the first data file
will contain data from Wednesday through 11:59:59 p.m. on Sunday night. After that, the weekly
data files contain data from Monday at 12:00 a.m. through Sunday at 11:59:59 p.m.
In the weekly rollover file name, pp represents the day that the log file was started. For example, if
weekly logging is set to rollover every Saturday, and the project is loaded on Tuesday, October 4,
2016, a log file named RW161004.T0001 is created (assuming 0001 is the SuperTrend’s internal ID).
The file will contain data collected from Tuesday through 11:59:59 p.m. on Friday night. At 12:00 a.m.
on Saturday, October 8, a new file named RW161008.T0001 is created. The new file will contain a
week’s worth of data, from Saturday, October 08 through 11:59:59 p.m. on Friday, October 14.
Months. Select Months for a new data file to be created on the first day of every month at 12:00
a.m. For example, if data logging started on January 27th, the first data file will contain data from the
27th of January through 11:59:59 p.m. on January 31st. After that, data files contain data from
12:00 a.m. on February 1st through the end of February, 12:00 a.m. on March 1st through the end of
March, and so forth.
Trigger-based. Trigger-based log files are created when the configured tag’s value matches the
conditions configured in the Historical Log Start Trigger Configuration dialog box (see page 251).
None. If you select None, logging begins when the project is loaded. All logging is done is a single
file, and logging continues until the conditions of a configured stop trigger are met. If you don’t
configure a stop trigger, data logging continues indefinitely. (Note that SuperTrend historical log
files stop when Runtime is stopped.)
Historical Data Log Elements
Historical data logs consist of header lines and data lines.
Header Line. The first line of the file, a header line shows the name of each data field. Lines of
data samples then follow the header line.
Here’s an example:
Date,Time,CNTR1:Float.TEMP208,CNTR1:Float.PRES209,CNTR1:Float.LEVEL218
Date and Time show where time stamp information will appear in the data lines.
CNTR1:TEMP208, CNTR1:PRES209, and CNTR1:LEVEL218 show that information will be
recorded for three PAC Control tags: TEMP208, PRES209, and LEVEL218. These tags are all on the
control engine named CNTR1.
Data Lines. Data lines follow a header line, and have the following format:
Date<delimiter>Time<delimiter>TAG1<delimiter>TAG2. . .TAG1000<crlf>
Date is the current system date with the format: YYYY/MM/DD, where YYYY=year, MM=month,
DD=day.
Time is the current system time with the format: hh:mm:ss, where hh=hour, mm=minute,
ss=seconds.
TAG1...TAG1000 are valid PAC Control tags with the format: control engine_Name:Item_Type.Tag.
<delimiter> is any printable ASCII character.
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<crlf> is a carriage return, line feed.
Here’s an example of what the file may look like:
Date,Time,Cookie:Float.TEMP208,Cookie:Float.PRES209,Cookie:Float.LEVEL218
2010/03/01,17:00:00,120.02,14.96,12.09
2010/03/01,18:00:00,120.06,14.98,12.03
2010/03/01,19:00:00,120.03,14.99,12.02
2010/03/01, 20:00:00,120.04,15.01,12.05
In this sample file, data is being sampled every hour from a control engine named “Cookie,” and a
temperature (TEMP208), pressure (PRES209), and tank level (LEVEL218) are being recorded.
Launching Applications
You can use PAC Display to start, or launch, other applications in two ways:
•
By configuring a dynamic attribute for a graphic object, and then selecting the object during
Runtime. See “7: Using Animated Graphic Objects” on page 151 to learn how to do this in PAC
Display Configurator.
•
By configuring an application manager to associate a tag with an application, and then
launching the application using triggers. See “Configuring an Application Launch” below.
Configuring an Application Launch
To use PAC Display Configurator to configure an application launch using a trigger, choose Configure
Applications, and in the Application Managers dialog box that appears do the following:
•
To create a new application manager, click Add. You can configure up to 1,000 application
managers per project.
•
To change an existing application manager, highlight it and click Modify.
•
To remove an existing application manager, highlight it and click Delete.
If you are creating or changing an application manager, the Application Manager Dialog Box will
open (see below).
In this section:
“Application Manager Dialog Box” (below)
“Selecting a Working Directory for a Launched Application” on page 258
“Selecting the Application File to Run” on page 258
“Selecting a Trigger to Launch an Application” on page 259
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Application Manager Dialog Box
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
(A) Name. Enter the name of the application manager here. This name refers to this application
launch setup, and must be different from all application managers within the project.
(B) Working Directory. Enter the path name of the working directory to use after launching the
application. If a working directory isn’t specified, the current project directory is used. Click Browse to
quickly choose a directory path in the Working Directory Selection dialog box (see page 258).
(C) Command Line. Enter the path and file name of the program you want to run when the
trigger condition occurs. Click Browse to quickly choose the path and file name in the standard
Windows file selection dialog box.
(D) Append String. (Optional) Select a string tag from the PAC Control strategy to be appended
to the Command Line string in C. If the appended string is a command line option, a space must be
included in the Command Line string to separate it from the main command line.
Use the Tag Selection button
to select the string tag name. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81
for more information on tags. Click the Clear button
to quickly remove an entry from D.
(E) Launch Options. Select Single instance to have PAC Display Runtime check whether the
trigger has already launched a session, or instance, of an application. If the trigger hasn’t already
launched the application, it will be started. Select Multiple instances to let the trigger start any
number of sessions of the same application.
The Single Instance option doesn’t prevent an application from being launched by other graphic
objects and triggers, so multiple instances of an application can still occur. For example, if a trigger
launches a Microsoft Word session, it can’t launch any other application until this Word session ends.
A toggled graphic object or another trigger, however, could launch another session of Word, so two
instances of the same application would be running concurrently.
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CAUTION: Running multiple instances of the same application on your PC is not recommended. Just like
running several different applications at the same time, running multiple instances of the same
application requires additional memory and other system resources. This may slow your PC’s performance,
as well as that of PAC Display Runtime.
(F) Show Options. Select how the application’s window will appear on-screen: Normal,
Minimized, or Maximized.
(G) Trigger. Click Trigger to select the PAC Control tag used to trigger the application launch. The
trigger is edge-sensitive and activates only from a non-triggered state. See “Selecting a Trigger to
Launch an Application” on page 259 for more information.
(H) Notification. Click Notification to assign a value to a tag when an application is successfully
launched. See “Notification When an Application Has Been Launched” on page 260 for more
information. A check mark in the Notification enabled box indicates a notification tag is configured.
(I) OK. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Now we’ll look at the additional steps needed to complete the settings in the Application Manager
dialog box.
Selecting a Working Directory for a Launched Application
1. To set up the working directory the launched application should use, click Browse in the
Application Manager dialog box.
2. In the Working Directory Selection dialog box that appears, navigate to the working directory
path and click OK. (Click Network to select a network drive.)
Selecting the Application File to Run
1. To choose the application you want to run, in the Application Manager dialog box click the
Browse button next to the Command Line field.
2. In the Application Manager Executable File Selection dialog box that appears, navigate to the
application you’d like to run, highlight it, and click OK.
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Selecting a Trigger to Launch an Application
1. To select the trigger that will launch an application, click Trigger in the Application Manager
dialog box.
The Application Manager Trigger Selection dialog box appears.
2. Use either Quick Tag Entry (see page 82) or the Tag Selection dialog box (see page 82) to
choose a tag to trigger the application launch.
3. Select Discrete or Current value in the Setup by group.
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Discrete makes the tag’s on or off state trigger the application. Current Value sets the tag value
that will trigger the application. To enter a value in the Current Value field, select an operator in
the drop-down menu, and then enter a value to compare the tag to.
Notification When an Application Has Been Launched
You can set a tag to a given state or value when an application has been successfully launched by a
trigger.
1. Click Notification in the Application Manager dialog box.
The Launch Application Trigger Notification dialog box appears.
2. Use either Quick Tag Entry (see page 82) or the Tag Selection dialog box (see page 82) to select
a PAC Control tag as the flag to indicate the application was launched successfully.
3. Select Set or Offset, and then enter the value that will be sent to the tag in the Value Out field.
Choose Set to replace the tag’s current value with the number in the Value Out field. Choose
Offset to add that number to the tag’s current value.
Sounds
Sounds can provide important feedback, such as alerts or warnings, for the operator using your PAC
Display project. You can add sounds to your PAC Display project by configuring triggers to start and
stop standard Windows sound files. To use this capability, the PC running the project must have a
properly configured sound card and corresponding system software, as well as a set of speakers. You
can use both digitized sound (.WAV) and MIDI music (.MID) files in your project.
Sounds can also be used with project alarms. See page 314 for more information.
In this section:
“Configuring a Sound” (below)
“Configuring Start and Stop Triggers for Sounds” on page 262
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Configuring a Sound
To configure a sound, choose ConfigureSounds. The Sounds dialog box that appears lists all of
the sound events that are configured for the current PAC Display project.
•
Click Add to add a new sound event. You can configure up to 1,000 sound events per project.
•
Highlight an existing sound event and click Modify to change it.
•
Highlight an existing sound event and click Delete to remove it.
NOTE: If there are no sound events in the project, the Modify and Delete buttons cannot be selected.
If you are creating or changing a sound event, the Sound Configuration dialog box will appear.
A
B
C
D
E
F
(A) Name. Enter a name for the sound event. No two sound events in a project may have the
same name.
(B) Sound File. Click Browse and select the sound file you want to play in the standard Windows
file selection dialog box that appears. If the Use project directory option is checked, you can choose
only those sound files located in your project directory.
To use a sound file in a folder relative to the folder that the project is in, select Make Path Relative to
Project. If you then save the project to a different folder (or even to a different computer), PAC
Display will look for files in the relative path.
For example, if the project is saved in C:\proj\ and you configure the file to be in C:\proj\sounds\,
then the relative path would be this: .\sounds\
If you then saved the project to C:\temp\newproj\, PAC Display would look for the file in the new
location’s relative path: C:\temp\newproj\sounds\
(C) Start Trigger. Click Start Trigger to configure a trigger to start playing the sound. See
“Configuring Start and Stop Triggers for Sounds” below to learn how to configure this trigger.
(D) Play Sound. Select the Play sound option if you want the sound to play a specific number of
times before stopping. Enter the number of times the sound will play in the field next to the option.
The default value is one.
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(E) Stop Trigger. Click Stop Trigger to configure a trigger to stop the sound that is playing. See
“Configuring Start and Stop Triggers for Sounds” below to learn how to configure this trigger.
(F) OK. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Configuring Start and Stop Triggers for Sounds
1. To configure the tag and value that will start or stop a sound, click Start Trigger or Stop Trigger
in the Sound Configuration dialog box.
The Sound Trigger Configuration dialog box for either Start Triggers or Stop Triggers appears.
These dialog boxes are identical. (The Sound Start Trigger Configuration dialog box is shown
below.)
2. Use either Quick Tag Entry (see page 82) or the Tag Selection dialog box (see page 82) to
choose a tag from the Tag Selection dialog box.
3. Select Discrete or Current Value in the Setup by group. Current value sets the tag value that will
trigger the sound. Select an operator in the drop-down menu, and then enter a value to
compare the tag to. Discrete makes the tag’s on or off state trigger the sound.
Configuring Trigger-Based Window States
You can use a trigger to modify the appearance of windows that appear in Runtime. Changing the
appearance of windows can be effective when you want to immediately attract an operator’s
attention, or to prompt operators to take the next action.
To configure a window state, choose ConfigureWindow State, and in the Window Managers
dialog box that appears.
•
Click Add to add a new window manager. You can configure up to 1,000 window managers
per project.
•
Highlight an existing window manager and click Modify to change it.
•
Highlight an existing window manager and click Delete to remove it.
If you are creating or changing a window manager, the Window Manager Configuration dialog box
will appear.
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NOTE: If there are no window manager events in the project, the Modify and Delete buttons cannot be
selected.
To set up a window manager, do the following:
1. Enter the name of the window manager in the Name field.
2. Click Pop Window to configure window states for one or more windows. See “Windows” on
page 194 for more information about changing window states.
3. Click Trigger to configure the trigger that will change the window state.
The Window Manager Start Trigger Configuration dialog box appears.
4. Use the Tag Selection button
to quickly choose a tag from the Tag Selection dialog box.
5. Select Discrete or Current Value in the Setup By group. Current Value sets the tag value that will
trigger the change in window state. Select an operator in the drop-down menu, and then enter
a value to compare the tag to. Discrete makes the tag’s on or off state trigger the change in
window state.
Configuring Recipes
Recipes are a way of exchanging data between a control engine and a PC running PAC Display:
recipe download files send process data and chart control instructions to a control engine;
recipe upload files create a record of the values currently being used in a strategy table. For example,
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you can use recipe upload files to save a controller’s critical process settings; recipe download files
can be used to restore a system’s data after a failure, or to make changes to program variables
without the need for manual intervention. Recipes are also handy for batch processes when system
variables are predetermined and vary between runs or product types. For important information
about using a database table as the source for a recipe download, see page 264.
Recipes can be configured to perform their specified actions by:
•
Animated Graphic—The recipe action happens when an operator selects a graphic object.
•
Trigger—The recipe action occurs when a tag value meets a defined value.
In PAC Display Basic, recipes are ASCII text files. In PAC Display Professional, recipes can be ASCII text
files or they can be a configured database table and columns. (To configure a database for use with
PAC Display Professional, see “Configuring an ODBC Data Source” on page 61.)
The basic steps to using recipes are:
1. Configure a recipe file that identifies the PAC Control strategy, control engine, and data you
want to send or receive.
– To configure a recipe download file that copies data down to a controller, see “Creating a
Recipe Download File” on page 265.
2.
– To configure a recipe upload file that sends data to an ASCII recipe file or (Pro only) to a
database, see “Creating a Recipe Upload Template” on page 267.
Activate the recipe so that the controller can send or receive data.
– To activate the recipe by using an animated graphic object, see “Download Recipe” on
page 169 and “Upload Recipe” on page 187.
– To activate the recipe by using a trigger, see “Configuring a Recipe Upload” on page 274
and “Configuring a Recipe Download” on page 278.
Using a Database Table as the Source for a Recipe Download
If you’re going to use a database to store data for recipe downloads, you’ll need a database table
with the following columns in the order specified below. PAC Display doesn't accept spaces or
reserved words in columns names. (In database languages such as SQL, reserved words are
programming commands; examples include Alter, Delete, Rename, Update, and Stop.) Otherwise,
the column name doesn't matter; what's important is that the columns contain the data in the order
shown.
Column
Position
Data Type
Contains
1
String
Controller name or IP address
2
String
Tag type
3
String
Tag name
4
String
Indexes and values for each element to be downloaded
IMPORTANT: A space character must precede the first index bracket.
(See example below.)
This table structure ensures that PAC Display gets the data it needs to successfully process the
downloaded recipe.
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Example: Microsoft Access table structure
Example: Space characters must precede download data
A space must precede the first bracket in each set of download recipe data.
Creating a Recipe Download File
To create a recipe download file to send data from a recipe to a control engine:
1. From PAC Display Configurator’s menu bar, click ToolsCreate Recipe File.
The Create Recipe File dialog box appears. By default, the recipe file type is Download, and the
strategy file is from the current PAC Display project.
2. Select the PAC Control strategy and control engine for this recipe file.
3. In the Table area, select a table, and then click Add
.
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The Recipe Table Data dialog box appears.
The Index column lists all the available indexes for the currently selected table.
NOTE: Using the Create Recipe Dialog you can enter only one set of indexes for each table in a recipe
file. If you want to enter another set of indexes for the table later in the recipe you must use a text editor
to edit the recipe. For details, see “Basic Recipe File Format” on page 270.
4. Enter values using the following guidelines. PAC Display automatically limits the index value to
the maximum configurable index for the selected table.
– Float Table: Use numeric data only. Spaces, commas or other non-numeric characters are
not accepted. A decimal point is not required.
– Integer Table: Decimal points are not accepted. Spaces, commas or other non-numeric
characters are not accepted.
– String Table: You may use any character except square brackets ([ and ]) which are reserved
for marking table indexes and cannot be included in strings. To enter a single string for one
index, click in the Value field next to the index number and enter the string.
– (Integer and Float Tables only) To enter the same value for more than one index, select
multiple items using the either the Shift key or the Ctrl key, and then click Configure
Multiple. In the dialog box that opens, enter the value and a comment (if any), and click OK.
NOTE: PAC Display validates your entries and automatically clears invalid data. For example, if you
type a string in a float table, your entry is deleted and a message like this is displayed:
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5. In the Charts area, select a chart, and then click the Add button
The Recipe Chart Action dialog box appears.
.
6. In the Recipe Chart Action dialog box, select a chart action (Start, Stop, Suspend, or Continue)
and then click OK.
The action is added to the recipe file, and the dialog box closes.
To add an individual integer, float, or string tag:
1. Click Choose Variable Type, and then select a type from the pop-up menu.
2. Click the down-arrow below Choose Variable Type, and then select a variable.
3. Click the Add button
to open a configuration dialog box.
1. Choose Variable
Type
2. Down arrow
3. Add button
Configuration dialog
box
4. Enter a value and a comment (if desired), and then click OK.
5. If you need to remove the last entry, click Undo. Clicking Undo again removes the next to last
entries, and so on. The Redo button restores entries in the same order they were removed.
6. Click OK to close the Create Recipe File dialog box and confirm the configuration.
The Save Recipe File As dialog box opens.
7. Type a filename for the file.
If you want to use an extension other than .RCP or .TXT, place quotation marks around the
filename (for example, “My Recipe File.myExt”).
8. Click Save to save the recipe file and close the dialog box.
Creating a Recipe Upload Template
Create a recipe upload template to send data from a strategy table to a recipe file or (Pro only) to a
database:
1. From PAC Display Configurator’s menu bar, select ToolsCreate Recipe File.
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The Create Recipe File dialog box appears.
2. Select Upload as the file type.
3. Select the PAC Control strategy and control engine for this recipe file.
4. In the Table area, select a table, and then click the Add button
The Recipe Upload Table Elements dialog box opens.
.
5. To select or deselect an individual index, click the square next to the Index number. The
Select All button selects all table indexes. The Clear All button deselects them.
6. To add a comment, select an index, click in the comment field, and type the comment.
7. Click OK to close the dialog box.
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The selected indexes are listed. Comments are displayed above the index number.
This area is read-only.
You edit a recipe file by
selecting different options in
this dialog box, or by
opening the recipe file in a
text editor and making
changes.
8. If you need to remove the last entries, click Undo. Clicking Undo again removes the next to last
entries, and so on. The Redo button restores entries in the same order they were removed.
9. To add an individual integer, float, or string tag, click Choose Variable Type, and then select a
type from the pop-up menu.
10. Click the down-arrow, and then select a variable.
11. Click the Add button
next to the variable you just selected to add a comment about the
variable.
The Enter Value field is disabled for uploads because the value is obtained from the control
engine.
12. Click OK to close the Create Recipe File dialog box and confirm the configuration.
The Save As dialog box opens.
13. Select the filename and extension for the file.
If you want to use an extension other than .RCP or .TXT, place quotation marks around the
filename (for example, “My Recipe File.myExt”).
14. Click OK, and then click OK again.
Editing a Recipe Download File
To edit a recipe file:
1. Choose ToolsEdit Recipe File to open the Select Recipe File dialog box.
2. Browse to the file, select the file type, and then click OK.
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The Edit Recipe File dialog box appears.
3. To edit the file, you select different options in the Edit Recipe File dialog box. (For details, see
either “Creating a Recipe Download File” on page 265 or “Creating a Recipe Upload Template”
on page 267.)
Note that you cannot edit the file by typing in the Edit Recipe File view pane—the data in the
pane is read-only.
Another alternative is to edit the recipe file in a text editor. For details, see “Basic Recipe File
Format” on page 270.
Basic Recipe File Format
NOTE: To create a new recipe file, see “Creating a Recipe Download File” on page 265 or “Creating a Recipe
Upload Template” on page 267.
When you use the Create or Edit Recipe File dialog box, you can enter only one set of indexes for
each table in a recipe file. If you want to enter another set of indexes or make other changes that you
can’t do using the Create or Edit Recipe File dialog box, you can use a text editor to edit the recipe.
PAC Display expects the recipe file to follow a predefined format (syntax) according to the format
described in this section. Note that the text editor must be able to save files in ASCII format.
After you edit the file, use the Validate Recipe File utility to check for formatting errors. For details,
see “Validating a Recipe File” on page 273.
As shown in the example below, each recipe file contains at least one PAC Control table tag followed
by data values and blank lines. Recipes may also contain comments, and a download recipe might
include chart control instructions as well.
Comment
PAC Control
table tag
Table element
values
Blank lines
(two carriage
returns)
/Recipe file for Peanut Butter Cookies
/
Cookie_Controller:Float Table.Temps
1:300.0
2:350.0
4:200.0
7:150.0
/End of recipe file
Comment Line—Any line that starts with a / (forward slash) is a comment, and is ignored by PAC
Display. Use comments to explain the recipe and to make notes.
PAC Control Tag—Identifies the table tag in the PAC Control strategy that the recipe uses. Only
integer, float, and string tags are valid tag types. The tag is in the following format:
<Control Engine Name>:<Type>.<Name>
270
•
<Control Engine Name> is the Opto 22 control engine name.
•
<Type> includes one of the following keywords: Integer Table, Integer 64 Table, Integer, Float
Table, Float, String, or String Table. They identify the variable type and are separated from
<Control Engine Name> by a colon (:).
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•
<Name> is the PAC Control table tag name. It must be of the type specified by <Type>. A
period (.) separates it from <Table Type>.
Element values—These are the values downloaded to the control engine or uploaded to the PC.
Blank line—This is a required element of a recipe file. Make sure to create a blank line at the end of
a data list and at the end of the file by entering two carriage returns.
Example: Recipe Download File
This example has four table elements, one chart control instruction, and one single variable:
Table
elements
Single variable
Chart control
instruction
A
B
C
D
/Recipe file for Chocolate Chip Cookies
/
/My_table is a table with 10 elements
/This recipe will download values to 4 elements
/
Cookie_Controller:Float Table.My_table
34.0
3:98.6
35
9:2.5
Cookie_Controller:INTEGER.My_counter
4
Cookie_Controller:Chart.My_Chart
RUN
/End of recipe file
The table elements in the example are used as follows:
A—No index reference is indicated for the first data value, 34.0. Therefore, by default it is assigned to
zero or My_table[0].
B—The next line, 3:98.6, has an index reference of 3. This means the value 98.6 would be sent to
My_table[3], the fourth element of the table.
C—The next value, 35, would be sent to My_table[4].
D—The last data line, 9:2.5, would send 2.5 to the tenth element, My_table[9]. Make sure to leave
the next line blank by entering two carriage returns after the last data line. The blank line indicates
that all the data for that particular table has been specified. Do not put blank lines between lines
that contain data for the table.
Single variable. The example, Cookie_Controller:INTEGER.My_counter, would set the value of the
integer tag "My_counter" to 4.
Chart control instructions such as STOP, SUSPEND, START, and CONTINUE control the execution
state of one or more PAC Control charts when a recipe file is downloaded. You can use a chart
control instruction to start a chart that can then move downloaded table values to other program
variables.
Chart control instructions have the following format:
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<Control Engine Name>:Chart.<Chart Name>
<Chart State>
•
<Control Engine Name> is the name of the Opto 22 control engine.
•
Chart identifies the keyword identifying this line as a chart instruction. “Chart” is separated
from <Control Engine Name> by a colon (:).
•
<Chart Name> is the PAC Control strategy chart name, and is separated from Chart by a
period (.).
•
<Chart State> is the chart instruction, and must include one of the following keywords: STOP,
SUSPEND, START, and CONTINUE. This instruction must be on the line following the <Chart
Name>. The last line in a chart control instruction must be a blank line and contain only a
carriage return.
Example: Recipe Upload File
A recipe upload file tells PAC Display which table elements to upload to a destination file on the PC or
(Pro only) a database table. A recipe upload file uses the basic recipe file format (see page 270), but
does not usually contain data.
A recipe upload file must have at least one table element index and an index for every table element
to be uploaded. The example below shows that you can include table element indexes for multiple
tables, as long as you put a blank line before each new section of data and at the end of the file.
You create a blank line by pressing the Enter key twice at the end of a line.
Table element
indexes
/Recipe file for macadamia Nut Cookies
/
Cookie_Controller:Float Table.Temps
0:
1:
2:
34:
40:
41:
Cookie_Controller:Float Table.My_table
0:
2:
5:
/End of upload format file
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Reusing a Destination File
After an upload, the destination file contains data, and it may contain chart control instructions.
To save time, you can reuse a destination file as a recipe download file, because the control engine
ignores the data and any control instructions.
/Recipe file for macadamia Nut Cookies
/
My_Controller:Integer Table.My_Int_Table
0: 1
1: 100
Data
Chart control
instructions
My_Controller:Float Table.My_Float_Table
0: 1.234
1: 100.567
Cookie_Controller:Chart.My_Chart
RUN
/End of download recipe file
Validating a Recipe File
If you manually edit a recipe file, use the Validate Recipe File utility to make sure you haven’t made
any formatting errors. The utility validates the format of a recipe file, including the structure, tags,
and index values by checking the following:
•
Are the lines correctly formatted?
Are values specified in a download file?
Are colons present in an upload template file?
•
Is the referenced control engine part of the current PAC Display project?
•
Can the strategy file referenced by the controller be opened?
•
Are the available types correctly spelled (for example, “Integer Table”, “Integer 64 Table”, “Float
Table”, “String Table” or “Chart”)?
•
Are the table and/or chart names valid?
•
If a table is referenced, is an index out of range?
•
Are carriage return / line feed pairs properly placed?
•
Are there blank lines between table / chart entries?
NOTE: The utility does not test whether the values for a table in a download file match the table type.
To validate a recipe file:
1. Choose ToolsValidate Recipe File.
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The validation dialog box opens.
2. Select the type of file to be validated, either Upload or Download.
3. Click Browse.
The Open Recipe File dialog box opens.
4. Locate the recipe file, and then click Open.
The utility validates the file and displays the results.
5. If there are any errors, click Edit Recipe File to open a text editor and make the corrections. Save
the file, and then use the Re-test button to check the file again.
6. Click OK to close the dialog box.
Configuring a Recipe Upload
To configure a recipe to upload using a trigger:
1. From PAC Display Configurator’s menu bar, click ConfigureRecipes.
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The Recipe Managers dialog box appears.
2. In the Upload Recipes section of the Recipe Managers dialog box:
•
To create a new upload recipe manager, click Add.
•
To change an existing upload recipe manager, highlight it and click Modify.
•
To remove an existing upload recipe manager, highlight it and click Delete.
If you are creating or changing an upload recipe manager, the Upload Recipe Manager dialog box
appears.
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Upload Recipe Manager Dialog Box
A
B
C
E
F
G
D
(In Pro only,
the label says
“Log To.”
I
J
H
K
L
M
N
(A) Name. Enter the name of the upload recipe manager. This name is used to refer to the recipe
group you’re configuring in the Configurator. The name in this field must be different from all recipe
managers in this project.
(B) Format File Directory. Choose the directory the recipe file resides in. You can type the
directory in the edit box or click Browse to quickly find and enter the path.
(C) Make Path Relative to Project. When selected, if you copy the project and recipe
manager files to a different computer, PAC Display will look in the same relative location to find the
recipe manager files in Configurator and Runtime.
For example, if the project is saved in C:\proj\ and you configure recipe manager files to be in
C:\proj\recipes\, then the relative path would be this: .\recipes\
If you then saved the project to C:\temp\newproj\, PAC Display would look for recipe manager files
in the new location’s relative path: C:\temp\newproj\recipes\
(D) File Name. Choose the source of the recipe file name.
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•
If you choose Fixed name, E is highlighted.
•
If you choose Prompt for name, the operator will be asked for the name of the recipe file to be
uploaded.
•
If you choose From strategy, F is highlighted.
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(E) Fixed Name. If Fixed name was selected in C, enter the name of the recipe file located in
directory B.Notice the file extension is .rcp.
(F) String Name. If From strategy was selected in C, click the Tag Selection button
to enter a
tagname of type string that contains the recipe file name. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for
more information about using tags.
(G) File Directory. Click Browse and choose the directory location of the recipe file that will
(uploads only) receive the data or (downloads only) be the source of the data.
(Pro only) In PAC Display Professional, Browse is replaced by a “Log To” button. (For a recipe
download file, the button is “Log From.”)
Click Log To (or Log From) to select whether to log the data to (or from) an ASCII file or a database
table. For details on logging to or from a database table, see page 280.
(H) File Name. Choose the source of the recipe file name.
•
If you choose Fixed name, I is highlighted.
•
If you choose Prompt for name, the operator will be asked for the name of the recipe file to be
uploaded to.
•
If From strategy string is selected, K is highlighted.
(I) Fixed Name. If Fixed name was selected in D, enter the name of the recipe file located in
directory B.
(J) Extension. Specify the file extension for the recipe files available to this dynamic attribute by
entering the extension in the File Extension field. The extension must be one to three characters
long and must not contain a period or DOS wild card characters.
If Fixed Name is checked, this extension will append to the File Name entry to create the name for
the recipe file. If Prompt For Name is checked, this extension will be used as a filter to select the files
for display in a file selection dialog box when Runtime executes this dynamic attribute. However,
you may override this filter if you wish to select a file with a different extension.
(K) String Name. If From strategy was selected in C, click the Tag Selection button
to enter a
tagname of type string that contains the recipe file name. See “Configuring Tags” on page 81 for
more information about using tags.
(L) Trigger (Trigger-based recipe upload). Click Trigger to select a PAC Control tagname
that will trigger the upload recipe action. The trigger can be activated only from a non-triggered
state. See “Selecting a Trigger to Start the Recipe Upload/Download” on page 278 to learn how to
configure this trigger. Pressing the Trigger button displays the Recipe Trigger Configuration dialog
box.
(M) Notification (Trigger-based recipe upload). Click Notification to assign a value to a
tag when a recipe has successfully uploaded. Pressing this button displays the Recipe Upload
Completed Notification dialog box. Check the Enabled box to make notification active. See
“Notification When Recipe Has Been Downloaded/Uploaded” on page 279 for more information.
(N) OK. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
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Configuring a Recipe Download
Use the Recipe Managers dialog box to configure conditions which trigger a recipe download or
upload.
In either the Download Recipes or Upload Recipes section of the dialog box:
•
Click Add to create a new recipe manager.
•
To change an existing recipe manager, highlight it and click Modify.
•
To remove an existing recipe manager, highlight it and click Delete.
When you click Add or Modify, the Recipe Manager dialog box appears.
Download Recipe Manager Dialog Box
G In Pro only,
A
D
the label says
“Log From.”
C
E
F
L
M
N
For descriptions of the items on this dialog box, please see “Upload Recipe Manager Dialog Box” on
page 276.
Selecting a Trigger to Start the Recipe Upload/Download
1. To select the trigger that will start a recipe upload or download, click Trigger in the
Download/Upload Recipe Manager dialog box.
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The Recipe Trigger Configuration dialog box appears.
Directory field
shows the selected
database table
2. Use either Quick Tag Entry (see page 82) or the Tag Selection dialog box (see page 82) to
choose a tag to trigger the recipe upload/download.
3. Select Discrete or Current value in the Setup by group. Current value sets the tag value that will
trigger the recipe download/upload. Select an operator in the drop-down menu, and then
enter a value to compare the tag to. Discrete makes the tag’s on or off state trigger the
application.
Notification When Recipe Has Been Downloaded/Uploaded
1. Click Notification in the Download/Upload Recipe Manager dialog box.
The Recipe Download Completed Notification dialog box opens.
2. Use either Quick Tag Entry (see page 82) or the Tag Selection dialog box (see page 82) to select
a PAC Control tag as the flag to indicate the recipe upload or download was successful.
3. Select Discrete or Current Value in the Setup By group.
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Discrete sets, clears, or toggles the tag’s on or off state. Current Value sets the tag value. To set a
Current Value, select Set or Offset in the Current Values group and then enter a tag value.
Logging a Recipe File to or from a Database
(Pro only) The Directory fields in the Recipe Manager and Dynamic Attribute - Recipe dialog boxes
have a “Log To” (or “Log From”) button. (In PAC Display Basic, the label says “Browse.”) When you click
the button, you can choose to load the recipe file to (or from) a database.
This image shows the Directory field configured for a recipe download:
Recipe file downloads can be used to collect snapshots of your variable data at specific points in
time; uploads are useful for copying data from a database table to variables in a strategy, and for
restoring data to a strategy. To create or configure a recipe file, see:
•
“Creating a Recipe Download File” on page 265 and “Configuring a Recipe Upload” on
page 274.
•
“Creating a Recipe Upload Template” on page 267 and “Configuring a Recipe Upload” on
page 274.
To log a recipe to or from a database:
1. Make sure you have configured the ODBC data source to be used with PAC Display. For details,
see page 61.
2. To open the Open either:
– The Recipe Manager dialog box (Configure > Recipes > Add or Modify); or
3.
– The Dynamic Attribute dialog box (Edit > Edit Dynamic Attribute, and then, in the Operator
Drive Attributes area, double-click either Download Recipe or Upload Recipe).
Click Log To (or Log From), and then select Database in the pop-up menu i
In the Download (or Upload) Recipe Manager dialog box, click Log to, and then select Log to
Database from the pop-up menu.
The Database Table dialog box opens, displaying a default table and columns.
In the Table Name field, you can type the name of a different database table, but the
database table must contain the columns listed in the Table Columns pane. You cannot
change the column names or column types.
Configuring Alarm Points
You can incorporate alarm features into your operator interface by adding a PAC Display alarm
graphic (see also “Adding Alarm Graphics” on page 298). In a project, alarm graphics monitor alarm
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points associated with PAC Control tags, and alert the operator when predefined alarm conditions
are reached. Alarm information can be logged to a file or sent to a printer.
In this section:
“Exporting Alarm Points to a Binary or Comma-Delimited File” on page 285
“Importing Alarm Points” on page 286
“Structure of Alarm Point Comma-Delimited File” on page 287
“Alarm, Acknowledge, and Alarm Clear Notifications” on page 292
“Setting Conditional Alarm Points” on page 293
“Entering Discrete Alarm Conditions” on page 294
“Entering Alarm Values” on page 296
“Setting Control Engine Status Alarm Points” on page 297
Like a historical log point, an alarm point is linked to a PAC Control tag. When an alarm point
matches a defined alarm state, it is displayed on all alarm graphics that include that alarm point. If
configured to do so, an alarm point can also be sent to any configured file or printer log.
Once it is set up, an alarm point can be included in any number of alarm graphics in a PAC Display
project. (Data for an alarm point can still be collected if the alarm point has not been included in a
graphic.) You can easily generate a report that lists all the alarm points for a project; see “Viewing
Tags and Dynamic Attributes” on page 197 for more information.
1. To configure an alarm point, choose Configure > Alarm Points.
The Alarm Points dialog box lists configured alarm points. The “Ref Count” column shows the
number of alarm windows in which each alarm point is used.
2. Do one of the following:
– Click Add to create a new alarm point.
– Highlight an existing alarm point and click Modify to change it.
– Highlight one or more alarm points and click Delete to remove them. To select multiple
alarm points, hold down either the Shift key (for selecting contiguous items) or the Ctrl key
(for selecting non-contiguous items) and click an alarm point name.
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– Highlight one or more alarm points and click Duplicate. In the dialog box that appears for
each alarm point, enter a new name, and then click OK to add each duplicate to the list.
– Click Import to import alarm points from a comma-delimited file. Or, click Export to export
alarm points to a comma-delimited file. See, “Importing Alarm Points” on page 286.
– Click Ref Counts to update the values in the Reference Count column.
If you are creating or changing an alarm point, the Alarm Point dialog box appears.
Alarm Point Dialog Box
A
B
D
E
K
C
F
G
H
I
J
L
M
N
(A) Name. Enter a name for the alarm point here. The name of each alarm point in a project must
be unique and must be less than 128 characters. The PAC Control tag name appears by default.
(B) Tag. Displays the name of the PAC Control tag that you select with the Tag Selection button.
(C) Tag Selection Button. Click the Tag Selection button
to select a PAC Control tag for the
alarm point. Note that the choice of tags available is determined by the type of tag you select in
Setup By (E).
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(D) Hysteresis. Enter a hysteresis value that is applied to the tag value of a triggered alarm point
as it moves toward the Normal alarm value. The alarm point will remain in the triggered state until it
reaches its threshold value plus the hysteresis value (if the alarm point is below Normal) or minus
the hysteresis value (if the alarm point is above Normal).
For example, for a triggered HiHi alarm point, suppose the threshold value is 50, the hysteresis value
is 5, and the current triggered alarm point value is 53. If the next tag read has a value of 49 (that is, it
has descended past the configured threshold of 50), the alarm point will still remain in the triggered
HiHi state until the tag reading is less than 45.
(E) Setup By. Select the type of tag to be linked to the alarm point.
•
Choose Discrete for discrete tags, such as a digital input. Selecting this option enables the
Discrete page in the Alarm Point dialog box. See “Entering Discrete Alarm Conditions” on
page 294 for configuration information.
•
Choose Value for analog points, floats, or similar values. Selecting this option enables the Value
page in the Alarm Point dialog box. See “Entering Alarm Values” on page 296 for configuration
information.
•
Choose Control Engine Status to link the status of a control engine to the alarm point. The
alarm will be triggered whenever the linked control engine is not in Attached state. See
“Setting Control Engine Status Alarm Points” on page 297 for configuration information.
(F) Alarm. Click here to display the Alarm Notification dialog box, where you can have a specified
value written to a selected tag when the alarm point enters an alarm condition. See “Alarm,
Acknowledge, and Alarm Clear Notifications” below for information on setting up alarm notification.
Select Enabled to make Alarm Notification active. (You can’t select Enabled until Alarm Notification
is configured.)
(G) Alarm Clear. Click here to display the Alarm Clear Notification dialog box. Use this dialog box
to have a tag value be set or cleared when the current alarm returns to Normal from an alarmed
state. See “Alarm, Acknowledge, and Alarm Clear Notifications” below for information on setting up
alarm notification.
Select Enabled to make Alarm Clear Notification active. (You can’t select Enabled until Alarm Clear is
configured.)
(H) Display Dialog When Alarmed. Check this box to display the alarm dialog when the
alarm point goes into an alarmed state in Runtime. This check box defaults to the current Display
Message Box for New Alarm Points setting in the Alarming Setup dialog. See “Alarm Runtime and
User Options” on page 303 to adjust this setting globally.
NOTE: Setting or clearing the Display Message Box for New Alarm Points setting in the Alarming Setup
dialog will set or clear this option for all alarm points. Therefore, it is highly recommended to set this global
default first, and then adjust the setting on a per-alarm point basis.
(I) Show Warning State. Check this option to enable this alarm point to display in the alarm
graphic when this point enters the warning state.
An alarm point is considered to be in a warning state when in one or both of the following
conditions:
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•
A persistence time has been configured for the alarm point (see “Entering Discrete Alarm
Conditions” on page 294 and “Entering Alarm Values” on page 296 and the alarm has been
triggered, but is waiting for the persistence time to expire.
•
An alarm point has the Re-Alarm Time option configured and is still in the triggered state after
being acknowledged. To see the Re-Alarm option, select Configure > Alarm Points. Then click
the Add or Modify button, click the Discrete or Value tab (depending on the alarm type), and
click one of the More buttons.
See also “Alarm Runtime and User Options” on page 303.
(J) Acknowledge. Click here to display the Acknowledge Notification dialog box, where you can
have a specified value written to a selected tag when the alarm point is acknowledged by the
operator. See “Alarm, Acknowledge, and Alarm Clear Notifications” below for information on setting
up acknowledge notification.
Select Enabled to make Acknowledge Notification active. (You can’t select Enabled until
Acknowledge Notification is configured.)
(K) Enable. Choose Condition to make the alarm point dependent on the value of another tag.
Click the Modify button (J) to select the tag and define the conditions it needs to meet.
Select Always Enabled for the alarm point not to be dependent on the value of another PAC Control
tag.
(L) Modify. If you’ve selected Condition under Enable (I) to make the alarm point dependent on
the value of another tag, click Modify and configure the tag and conditions in the Alarm Point
Conditional Enabling Setup dialog box that appears. See “Setting Conditional Alarm Points” on
page 293 for configuration information.
(M) Sound Options. Click the Browse button to select a sound file in a specific folder. Make sure
Play Sound When Alarmed is selected. Otherwise, the sound will not play when the point is in an
alarmed state.
Click the Clear button to remove the sound file.
See also, “Configuring a Sound” on page 261.
NOTES: If no sound file is configured, and the Play Sound When Alarmed check box is selected (the default),
then the global sound file will be used. If no global sound file has been configured a message appears
warning you that no sound will play when this alarm point is in an alarmed state unless you select a sound
file either for the alarm point or for the global sound. The global sound file is configured in the Configure
Alarming Setup dialog on the Sound tab.
If you do not select a sound file for this alarm point and no global sound file is specified on the Sound tab
of the ConfigureAlarming Setup dialog box, you cannot enable this option and an error message will
appear if you try.
If an alarm point has been configured to play the global sound file, but then the global sound file is cleared
in the Sound tab of the ConfigureAlarming Setup dialog box, a message will warn you that no sound
will play when an alarm point is in an alarmed state unless you configure a default sound or change the
sound options for the alarm points.
(N) OK. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
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Now we’ll look at the additional steps needed to complete the settings in the Setup, Discrete, and
Value pages of the Alarm Point dialog box.
Exporting Alarm Points to a Binary or Comma-Delimited File
Alarm Points may be exported from a project to either a binary file or a comma-delimited file, and
then imported from the file into another project. Both projects must refer to the same tag
database(s) for the alarm points that are to be imported. The database may be a PAC Control,
ioControl (Pro only), or OptoControl tag database file.
If you want to export and import alarm points quickly, use a binary file (the Export to Subfolder
command) to export and import alarm points. However, if you want to use a spreadsheet program
(such as Excel) to view, edit, or create the attributes of the alarm points before importing them into
another project, use a comma-delimited file.
To export one or more alarm points to a file:
1. In Configurator, choose ConfigureAlarm Points to display the Alarm Points dialog box.
2. Select one or more alarm points from the list.
3. Click Export, and then choose from the pop-up menu either Export to Subfolder (for a binary
file) or Export to Comma-Delimited File.
If you select Export to Subfolder (for a binary file), a message confirms success.
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Each alarm point is automatically exported in a separate file to the Exported AlarmPoints
subfolder of the current project. These binary files have the format:
<Name of Alarm Point>.ape
Readable text files are also created that provide details for each exported alarm point.
If you select Export to Comma-Delimited File, the Export Alarm Points dialog box opens.
Select the target directory, name the file, and click Save. These files have the format:
<Name you assign>.adl
NOTE: If you select the same file again later, you will have the option of overwriting the existing file. If
you select No, the alarm points are appended to the selected file.
If there are errors, the message displays up to 10 alarm points in an error list.
To import the alarm points into another project, see the next section, “Importing Alarm Points.”
Importing Alarm Points
Alarm Points may be imported from one project into another project that both refer to the same tag
database. Before importing, you must export the alarm points to a file as described in “Exporting
Alarm Points to a Binary or Comma-Delimited File” on page 285.
1. In Configurator, choose ConfigureAlarm Points to open the Alarm Points dialog box.
2. Click the Import button.
3. Select either Import from Subfolder (for a binary file) or Import from Comma-Delimited File
from the pop-up menu.
For a binary file, an Import Alarm Point dialog opens showing exported alarm point files in the
Exported Alarm Points subfolder under the current project.
For a comma-delimited file, navigate to the folder containing the file.
4. For a binary file, select one or more alarm point files (.ape) to import. Or, for a comma-delimited
file, select the single file (.adl) to import.
5. Click Open. The alarm points are imported and added to the list.
6. Click OK to confirm.
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NOTE: If there are errors during the import, PAC Display displays a message indicating the error. The
import fails at the first error. PAC Display makes no attempt to guess what the intended field should
contain nor does it try to correct the error or present possible solutions. If an error is encountered, check
the contents of each field with the table below. The table details the possible values for the 160 fields
of each alarm point.
Structure of Alarm Point Comma-Delimited File
The structure of the comma-delimited file for alarm points is described below. There are a total of
165 fields.
Tag Definition Format. The following table describes a single Tag definition in the
comma-delimited file. There are ten fields, all of which are required for tags that are configured.
If tags are not configured (i.e., no alarm point notifications, conditional tag, HiHi tag, etc.), only the
first three fields may be blank. The remaining fields (4-10) must have the default values indicated.
Field
Description
Values
1
Control Engine Name
The case-sensitive name of the control engine.
2
Item Name
The case-sensitive name of the item.
NOTE: If Configuring a Controller Status alarm point, this value
must be the same as the Control Engine Name.
3
Field Type
The case-sensitive name of field (Value, Gain, Counts, etc.).
NOTE: If Configuring a Controller Status alarm point, this value
must be “# Of Errors”.
4
Element Index
Element index or –1 if not used.
5
Bit Index
Bit index or 255 if not used.
6
Start Index
Start Index or –1 if not used.
7
Number of Elements
Number of elements or –1 if not used.
8
Refresh Group
0-based index of refresh group (0 – 13) or 0 if not used.
9
Reserved1
If file has been exported, do not modify this value.
For a new alarm point, must be –1.
10
Reserved2
If file has been exported, do not modify this value.
For a new alarm point, must be 0.
Notification Definition Format. This table describes the definition for the notifications
(Alarm, Acknowledge, and Clear) used in describing an alarm point. There are a total of 13 fields per
notification.
NOTE: If notifications are not configured for an alarm point, the seven required tag fields (fields 4-10 in the
previous table) are still required.
Field
1-10
Description
Tag Description
Values
(See “Tag Definition Format” on page 287)
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Field
Description
Values
11
Send Type
Must be one of the following:
Set (the default if not configured)
Discrete Set
Clear
Toggle
Offset
12
Send Value
The value or offset if configured, blank if
not needed
13
Enabled Flag
Must be ENABLED or NOT_ENABLED
(the default if not configured)
Alarm Point Definition Format. The entire alarm point definition file is described below.
Field
1
Values
Required
Alarm Point Name
The name of the alarm point
Yes
Alarm Point Tag
(See “Tag Definition Format” on
page 287)
Yes
12
Deadband
Deadband Value or 0 if not used
Yes
13
Setup Type
Must be one of the following:
Current Value
Discrete
Controller
Yes
14-26
Acknowledge Notification
(See “Notification Definition Format” on
page 287)
No*
27-39
Alarm Notification
(See “Notification Definition Format” on
page 287)
No*
40-52
Clear Notification
(See “Notification Definition Format” on
page 287)
No*
53
Display Dialog When Alarmed?
0 if No, 1 if Yes
Yes
54
Include Warning State
0 if No, 1 if Yes
Yes
55
Always Enabled?
0 if No, 1 if Yes
Yes
Conditional Tag
(See “Tag Definition Format” on
page 287)
No**
66
Conditional Tag Comparison
Condition
Must be one of the following (numbers):
0 - Not Used or Greater Than (>)
1 – Equal To (=)
2 – Less Than (<)
3 – Greater or Equal (>=)
4 – Less or Equal (<=)
5 – ON (Discrete)
6 – OFF (Discrete)
Yes
67
Conditional Value Compare
0 or value used
No
68
Alarm Point Specific Sound File
Full path to sound file or blank if not used
No
69
Play Sound when Alarmed?
0 = No (or N/A) ; 1 = Yes
Yes
2-11
56-65
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Field
Description
Values
Required
70
Discrete – Alarm When:
0 = Off/False (or Not Used);
1 = On/True
Yes, even if not a discrete alarm point
71
Discrete Alarm Priority
Priority or 0 if Not Used
Yes, even if not a discrete alarm point
72
Discrete Alarm Comment
Comment or blank if Not Used***
73
Discrete Normal Enabled
0 = False (or Not Used)
1 = True
Yes, even if not a discrete alarm point
74
Discrete Normal Priority
Priority or 0 if Not Used
Yes, even if not a discrete alarm point
75
Discrete Normal Comment
Comment or blank if Not Used***
76
Discrete Persistence Time
(msec)
Persistence time, in milliseconds, or 0 if
not used
Yes, even if not a discrete alarm point
77
RESERVED
MUST BE 0
Yes, even if not a discrete alarm point
78
Discrete Re-Alarm time (msec)
Re-alarm time, in milliseconds, or 0 if not
used
Yes, even if not a discrete alarm point
79
RESERVED
MUST BE 0
Yes, even if not a discrete alarm point
80
HiHi Enabled?
0 = No (default); 1 = Yes
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
81
HiHi Value
HiHi value or 0 if Not Used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
82
HiHi Priority
Priority or 0 if Not Used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
83
HiHi - Use Tag?
0 if FALSE 1 if TRUE
Yes
HiHi Tag
(See “Tag Definition Format” on
page 287)
No**
94
HiHi Comment
Comment or Blank if Not Used***
95
HiHi Runtime Adjustable?
0 = No or if Not Used;
1 = True
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
96
HiHi Persistence Time (msec)
Persistence time, in milliseconds, or 0 if
not used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
97
RESERVED
MUST BE 0
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
98
HiHi Re-Alarm Time (msec)
Re-alarm time, in milliseconds, or 0 if Not
Used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
99
RESERVED
MUST BE 0
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
100
Hi Enabled?
0 = No (default); 1 = Yes
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
101
Hi Value
Hi value or 0 if Not Used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
84-93
No
No
No
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Field
Values
Required
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
102
Hi Priority
Priority or 0 if Not Used
103
Hi - Use Tag?
0 if FALSE 1 if TRUE
Yes
Hi Tag
(See “Tag Definition Format” on
page 287)
No**
114
Hi Comment
Comment or Blank if Not Used***
115
Hi Runtime Adjustable?
0 = No or if Not Used;
1 = True
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
116
Hi Persistence Time (msec)
Persistence time, in milliseconds, or 0 if
not used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
117
RESERVED
MUST BE 0
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
118
Hi Re-Alarm Time (msec)
Re-alarm time, in milliseconds, or 0 if Not
Used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
119
RESERVED
MUST BE 0
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
120
Normal Enabled?
0 = No or if Not Used;
1 = Yes
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
121
Normal Priority
Priority or 0 if Not Used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
122
Normal Comment
Comment or Blank if Not Used***
123
Lo Enabled?
0 = No (default); 1 = Yes
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
124
Lo Value
Lo value or 0 if Not Used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
125
Lo Priority
Priority or 0 if Not Used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
126
Lo Use Tag?
0 if FALSE 1 if TRUE
Yes
Lo Tag
(See Tag Description)
No**
137
Lo Comment
Comment or Blank if Not Used***
138
Lo Runtime Adjustable?
0 = No or if Not Used;
1 = True
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
139
Lo Persistence Time (msec)
Persistence time, in milliseconds, or 0 if
not used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
140
RESERVED
MUST BE 0
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
141
Lo Re-Alarm Time (msec)
Re-alarm time, in milliseconds, or 0 if Not
Used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
142
RESERVED
MUST BE 0
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
143
LoLo Enabled?
0 = No (default); 1 = Yes
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
104-113
127-136
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CHAPTER 9: CONFIGURING TRIGGER-BASED EVENTS
Field
Description
Values
Required
144
LoLo Value
LoLo value or 0 if Not Used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
145
LoLo Priority
Priority or 0 if Not Used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
146
LoLo - Use Tag
0 if FALSE 1 if TRUE
Yes
LoLo Tag
(See “Tag Definition Format” on
page 287)
No**
157
LoLo Comment
Comment or Blank if Not Used***
158
LoLo Runtime Adjustable?
0 = No or if Not Used;
1 = True
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
159
LoLo Persistence Time (msec)
Persistence time, in milliseconds, or 0 if
not used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
160
RESERVED
MUST BE 0
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
161
LoLo Re-Alarm Time (msec)
Re-alarm time, in milliseconds, or 0 if Not
Used
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
162
RESERVED
MUST BE 0
Yes, even if not a
Value alarm point
163
Control Engine Name for Controller Status Alarm Point
Control Engine Name or blank if Not Used
No
164
Last Known Value Priority
Priority or 99998 if Not Used
Yes
165
Comm Failure Priority
Priority or 99999 if Not Used
Yes
147-156
No
* Even if no notifications are configured, there are required fields. See “Notification Definition Format” on page 287.
** Even if the tag is not configured, there are required fields. See “Tag Definition Format” on page 287.
*** Alarm Point Comments may not contain commas.
Sample alarm point entries:
Controller Status,10.192.54.68,10.192.54.68,# Of
Errors,-1,255,-1,-1,0,-1,37,0.000000,Controller,,,,-1,255,-1,-1,0,-1,0,Se
t,,NOT_ENABLED,,,,-1,255,-1,-1,0,-1,0,Set,,NOT_ENABLED,,,,-1,255,-1,-1,0,
-1,0,Set,,NOT_ENABLED,0,0,1,,,,-1,255,-1,-1,0,-1,0,0,0.000000,C:\Projects
\GLASS.WAV,0,0,0,,1,0,,0,0,0,22,1,0.000000,0,0,,,,-1,255,-1,-1,0,-1,0,,0,
0,31588528,0,0,1,0.000000,0,0,,,,-1,255,-1,-1,0,-1,0,,0,0,0,0,17,1,0,,1,0
.000000,0,0,,,,-1,255,-1,-1,0,-1,0,,0,0,22,0,31588528,1,0.000000,0,0,,,,1,255,-1,-1,0,-1,0,,0,0,433212520,0,0,10.192.54.68,99998,99999
10.192.54.68:MyTable[1].BIT01,10.192.54.68,MyTable,,1,1,-1,-1,0,0,5,0.000
000,Discrete,,,,-1,255,-1,-1,0,-1,0,Set,,NOT_ENABLED,,,,-1,255,-1,-1,0,-1
,0,Set,,NOT_ENABLED,,,,-1,255,-1,-1,0,-1,0,Set,,NOT_ENABLED,0,0,1,,,,-1,2
55,-1,-1,0,-1,0,0,0.000000,C:\Projects\DRUMROLL.WAV,1,1,0,,1,0,,0,0,0,0,1
,0.000000,0,0,,,,-1,255,-1,-1,0,-1,0,,0,0,0,0,0,1,0.000000,0,0,,,,-1,255,
-1,-1,0,-1,0,,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,,1,0.000000,0,0,,,,-1,255,-1,-1,0,-1,0,,0,0,0
,0,0,1,0.000000,0,0,,,,-1,255,-1,-1,0,-1,0,,0,0,0,0,0,,99998,99999
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CONFIGURING ALARM POINTS
Alarm, Acknowledge, and Alarm Clear Notifications
You can have a value sent to a tag when any of the following alarm events occur:
•
An alarm occurs
•
An active alarm is acknowledged
•
An active alarm returns to Normal from an alarmed state.
To configure an alarm point for these events, click Alarm, Alarm Clear, or Acknowledge in the Alarm
Point dialog box (Configure > Alarm Points > Add or Modify button > Set up tab).
The Alarm Notification, Alarm Clear, or Acknowledge Notification dialog box appears. These dialog
boxes are identical. (The Alarm Notification dialog box is shown below.)
1. Use either Quick Tag Entry (see page 82) or the Tag Selection dialog box (see page 82) to select
a PAC Control tag name.
2. In the Setup By group, select Discrete or Value.
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Discrete specifies an on/off trigger state for the selected tag. After you select Discrete, define
the trigger value by choosing one of the following options:
– Set—Switches the trigger state to On.
– Clear—Switches the trigger state to Off.
– Toggle—Switches the trigger state from its current condition to the opposite (for example,
On is switched to Off ).
Value defines the floating point or integer value that is written to the tag. After you select
Value, define the value by choosing one of the following options, then entering a value in the
Value Out field:
– Set—Replaces the tag’s current value with the value you enter in the Value Out field.
– Offset—Adds the value you enter in the Value Out field to the tag’s current value.
3. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Setting Conditional Alarm Points
1. To make the alarm point dependent on the value of another tag, select Condition in the Alarm
Point > Setup tab, then click Modify.
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The Alarm Point Conditional Enabling Setup dialog box opens.
2. Configure the tag and conditions.
3. Use either Quick Tag Entry (see page 82) or the Tag Selection dialog box (see page 82) to select
a PAC Control tag. This tag’s value will be compared to a value you define.
4. Select Discrete or Current value in the Setup by group. Current Value sets the tag value that will
trigger the alarm point. Select an operator in the drop-down menu, and then enter a value to
compare the tag to. Discrete makes the tag’s on or off state trigger the alarm point.
NOTE: Triggers are edge sensitive, and activate only on a positive transition from a non-triggered state.
5. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Entering Discrete Alarm Conditions
If you selected Discrete in the Setup by field on the Alarm Point Setup page, complete the alarm
point setup by configuring the alarm’s state in the Discrete page.
1. To select the state of the alarm condition tag, select True/On to have the alarm point be in the
alarm state when the associated tag is “on” for Discretes, or “true” for integer bits. Select
False/Off to have the alarm point be in the alarm state when the associated tag is “off” for
Discretes or “false” for integer bits.
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2. Select the check box next to Normal to have the normal state displayed in history windows and
logs. The normal state is the opposite of the alarm state.
3. When an alarm point state occurs, you can define how long it must be in that state (the
persistence time) before the alarm point is triggered. Click More and enter the Persistence Time
in milliseconds or seconds.
4. When an alarm point state remains after the alarm has been triggered and acknowledged, you
can define how much time must elapse before the alarm point is re-triggered. Click More and
enter the Re-Alarm Time in milliseconds or seconds.
5. Enter an integer value between 0 and 999 in the fields to define an alarm value for each alarm
level. The highest priority is represented by 999, and 0 represents the lowest. Priority values can
be useful in Runtime for displaying the relative importance of alarm points, and for filtering out
alarms with lower priorities.
6. (Optional) In the Comment fields, enter text that will be displayed in alarm graphics for each
alarm level. The comment can have a maximum of 256 characters. This comment can display
information about the alarm point, for example, or provide instructions to the operator.
7. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
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Entering Alarm Values
If you selected Current Value in the Setup by field on the Alarm Point Setup page, complete the
alarm point setup by configuring the alarm’s state in the Value page.
You must define values for each alarm level that will be used with the alarm point. The following
alarm levels are available:
•
HiHi alarms occur when the tag value is greater than or equal to the HiHi value.
•
Hi alarms occur when the tag value is greater than or equal to the Hi value and less than the
HiHi value.
•
Normal is between the Hi and Lo values.
•
Lo alarms occur when the tag value is less than or equal to the Lo value and greater than the
LoLo value.
•
LoLo alarms occur when the tag value is less than or equal to the LoLo level.
For each alarm level you want to use with the alarm point, do the following:
You must define values for each alarm level that will be used with the alarm point. The following
alarm levels are available:
296
•
HiHi alarms occur when the tag value is greater than or equal to the HiHi value.
•
Hi alarms occur when the tag value is greater than or equal to the Hi value and less than the
HiHi value.
•
Normal is between the Hi and Lo values.
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•
Lo alarms occur when the tag value is less than or equal to the Lo value and greater than the
LoLo value.
•
LoLo alarms occur when the tag value is less than or equal to the LoLo level.
For each alarm level you want to use with the alarm point, do the following:
1. To select the state of the alarm condition tag, select True/On to have the alarm point be in the
alarm state when the associated tag is “on” for discretes, or “true” for integer bits. Select
False/Off to have the alarm point be in the alarm state when the associated tag is “off” for
discretes or “false” for integer bits.
2. Select the check box next to Normal to have the normal state displayed in history windows and
logs. The normal state is the opposite of the alarm state.
3. When an alarm point state occurs, you can define how long it must be in that state (the
persistence time) before the alarm point is triggered. Click More and enter the Persistence Time
in milliseconds or seconds.
4. When an alarm point state remains after the alarm has been triggered and acknowledged, you
can define how much time must elapse before the alarm point is re-triggered. Click More and
enter the Re-Alarm Time in milliseconds or seconds.
5. Enter an integer value between 0 and 999 in the Priority fields to define an alarm value for each
alarm level. The highest priority is represented by 999, and 0 represents the lowest. Priority
values can be useful in Runtime for displaying the relative importance of alarm points, and for
filtering out alarms with lower priorities.
6. (Optional) In the Comment fields, enter text that will be displayed in alarm graphics for each
alarm level. The comment can have a maximum of 256 characters. This comment can display
information about the alarm point, for example, or provide instructions to the operator.
7. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Setting Control Engine Status Alarm Points
If you selected Controller Status in the Setup by field on the Alarm Point Setup page, complete the
alarm point setup by selecting a control engine from the list on the control engines page. Only
control engines that have been added to the PAC Display project are available. See “Configuring
Control Engines” on page 68 for more information on adding primary and backup control engines to
a PAC Display project.
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NOTE: When the Control Engine Status option is selected, no other feature in the Alarm Point dialog box is
available.
To configure an alarm point based on control engine status, do the following:
1. Click the Control Engines tab in the Alarm Point dialog box.
2. In the list of available control engines, select the control engine that will be linked to the alarm
point.
3. If you want to change the Last Known Value Priority or Comm Failure Priority levels, enter a new
value in the corresponding field.
Using the default settings, these priority levels cannot be filtered out by the user since they are
higher than 999. If you want the user to be able to filter out control engine status alarms, set
either—or both—values to 999 or less.
4. Click the Setup tab and enter a name for the alarm point in the Name field.
5. Click OK to close the dialog box and save your settings.
Adding Alarm Graphics
Alarm graphics monitor alarm points associated with PAC Control tags, and alert the operator when
pre-defined alarm conditions are reached.
Alarm graphics can be placed and resized just like a trend or any other graphic object. You can place
multiple alarm graphics in any window. See also, “Configuring Alarm Points” on page 280.
In this section:
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“Setting the Alarm Format” on page 301
“Assigning Alarm Hot Keys” on page 302
To create an alarm graphic:
1. Select the Alarm tool
from the Toolbox.
2. Click and drag a large rectangle, and release the mouse.
An alarm graphic similar to the example below appears.
TIP: Use your mouse pointer to manually adjust columns to the preferred width, or use the Column
Format button (page 1) to set the width in pixels.
3. To configure alarms for this graphic, choose the Select tool
The Alarm Configuration dialog box opens.
and double-click the graphic.
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Alarm Configuration Dialog Box
A
B
C
D
F
G
E
H
I
J
K
L
(A) Alarm Points. The Alarm Points list shows configured alarm points that are associated with
the alarm graphic. To add an alarm point to the list, click Add (B). To remove an alarm point from the
list, click Delete (C).
(B) Add. Click Add to add an alarm point to the PAC Display project. In the Alarm Points dialog box
that appears, you can select previously configured alarm points or configure new points as needed.
To select more than one alarm point at a time, press and hold the Ctrl key and then click each point
you want to add. See “Configuring Alarm Points” on page 280 for information on adding and
configuring alarm points.
(C) Delete. Select an alarm point in the list and click Delete to remove it from the alarm graphic.
The alarm point is not deleted from the PAC Display project or from any other alarm graphic.
(D) Alarm Type. Choose the type of the alarm graphic by selecting Detailed, Summary, or
History.
•
Detailed alarms treat each alarm point state as a separate alarm condition. The operator must
acknowledge each alarm point before its name is cleared from the alarm graphic.
For example, if an alarm is in the Lo state and changes to the LoLo state, alarms for both states
are listed in the graphic. Alarm points can be selected and acknowledged from a detailed
alarm.
•
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Summary alarms display only the state of the current alarm.
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For example, if an alarm is in the Lo state and changes to the LoLo state, only the LoLo state
alarm is listed in the graphic. Alarm points can be selected and acknowledged from a summary
alarm.
•
History alarms list each change of state for each alarm point. Alarm points cannot be
acknowledged from a history alarm.
(E) Color. For each of the following items, click a color square and select a color in the Color dialog
box that appears.
•
Alarm—Alarm points in an alarm condition
•
Normal—Alarm points that have returned to their normal state
•
Warning—Warning state text
•
Ack’d—Alarm points that have been acknowledged
•
Silenced—Alarm points that have been silenced
•
Background—Background color of an alarm graphic
(F) Alarm Font. Click Alarm Font to select the font used in the alarm graphic.
(G) Use for Header. Select Use for Header to have the alarm font you selected appear in the
alarm graphic’s column headers.
(H) Column Format. Click Column Format to set the information that appears on the alarm
graphic. In the Alarm Format dialog box that appears, select the information the alarm graphic will
display, and the width alarm graphic columns will appear on screen. See “Setting the Alarm Format”
below for configuration information.
(I) Hot Keys. Click Hot Keys to configure keys on the keyboard that the operator can use to
acknowledge alarms. In the Alarm Hot Keys dialog box that appears, select keys or key combinations
the operator can use to acknowledge one or more alarms. Only detailed and summary alarm
graphics can have hot keys. See “Assigning Alarm Hot Keys” on page 302 for more information.
(J) Max Lines. Enter a number to set the maximum number of alarm point lines a history alarm
graphic can contain. When this number is exceeded, the oldest alarm point is removed to make
room for the new point. The History alarm type must be selected for this option to be available.
(K) Lock Ascending/Descending. You can lock the history alarm display in either ascending
or descending order. By default, the display order is not locked. If locked, no sort arrow appears in
the column header and clicking on a column header does not sort by the column.
(L) OK. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Now we’ll look at the additional steps needed to complete the settings in the Alarm Configuration
dialog box.
Setting the Alarm Format
You can customize the alarm information that appears when an alarm graphic is displayed on
screen, or when an alarm log file is sent to a printer.
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1. Click the Column Format button on the Alarm Configuration dialog box.
The Alarm Format dialog box appears.
2. Select the check box next to the name of each column that you want to appear in the alarm
graphic or printed alarm log.
3. For each column name that you want to use, enter the desired column width (in pixels) in the
Width field.
For alarm graphics, the widths are an approximate guideline for how wide the columns will
appear on screen. For printed alarm logs, the widths are absolute values. If a number or text
cannot fit into a printer column, it will be truncated.
Assigning Alarm Hot Keys
Alarm hot keys are keystrokes or keystroke combinations that the operator can quickly use to
respond to alarms. When a hot key is defined for an alarm, pressing a key on the keyboard (along
with an optional Ctrl or Shift key) performs the same action as clicking the mouse on an object.
NOTE: Hot keys can also be defined for dynamic objects in a PAC Display project, but these hot keys are
defined separately from alarm hot keys. See “Assigning a Dynamic Attribute to a Graphic Object” on
page 152 to learn how to set up hot keys for a dynamic graphic.
To configure hot keys for an alarm,
1. Click the Hot Keys button on the Alarm Configuration dialog box.
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2. Select a key in the drop-down list for the function you want to use:
– Acknowledge. This hot key will have the same effect as pushing the alarm’s
"Acknowledge" button
– Acknowledge All. This hot key will have the same effect as pushing the alarm’s
"Acknowledge All" button
– Select List. This highlights the alarm point list on the display. Once the alarm point list is
highlighted, cursor keys can be used to select alarm points for acknowledgment.
3. If you want to use the Ctrl and/or Shift keys in combination with the key you’ve chosen, select
Ctrl, Shift, or both.
Configuring Project Alarms
To configure alarm features for the whole project, select ConfigureAlarming Setup and configure
the following settings as needed in the Alarming Setup dialog box described in:
“Alarm Runtime and User Options” on page 303
“Email Options” on page 305
“Alert Window OptionsUse the Alert Window tab to enable alarm points that have entered a
Warning state to appear in the Alert Window in Runtime.” on page 310
“Alarm Logging Options” on page 311
“Alarm Sound Options” on page 314
Alarm Runtime and User Options
The Options tab allows you to configure how an alarm appears in PAC Display Runtime. It also
provides options for how a user can work with alarms in a PAC Display project.
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To set how an alarm appears in PAC Display Runtime, select one or more of the following options in
the Runtime Options group:
•
All alarms enabled at startup—Enables all alarms when the project starts in Runtime.
•
Alarms Enabled menu item—Makes the Alarms Enabled menu available for the user to enable
and disable all alarms.
•
Priority Filter menu item—Makes the Priority Filter menu available for the user to control
whether to view all alarms, or only alarms exceeding a specified priority value.
•
Set Priority Alarm Colors—Click the link to display the Alarm Priority Colors dialog box where
you can customize the color of alarms and warnings based on priority.
•
a. Click a color to display the Color dialog box, where you can select a color or configure a
custom color. When you’ve finished configuring the color, click OK to close the dialog box.
b. If desired, configure additional alarm and warning colors. When you’ve finished, click OK to
close the Alarm Priority Colors dialog box.
Display message box for new alarm points—Makes a dialog box appear containing
information about the alarm point. The user can acknowledge the alarm in this dialog box, or
close it and acknowledge the alarm at a later time. See also, “Configuring Alarm Points” on
page 280 to adjust this setting on a per-alarm basis.
NOTE: Setting or clearing this setting in the Alarming Setup dialog will set or clear this option for all
alarm points. Therefore, you should set this global default first, and then adjust the setting on a
per-alarm point basis.
•
304
Show Warning State—An alarm point is considered to be in a warning state when in one or
both of the following conditions:
c. A persistence time has been configured for the alarm point (see “Entering Discrete Alarm
Conditions” on page 294 and “Entering Alarm Values” on page 296) and the alarm has
been triggered, but is waiting for the persistence time to expire.
d. An alarm point has the Re-Alarm Time option configured and is still in the triggered state
after being acknowledged. To see the Re-Alarm option, select Configure > Alarm Points.
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Then click the Add or Modify button, click the Discrete or Value tab (depending on the
alarm type), and click one of the More buttons.
When selected, the Show Warning State option enables all alarm points to be displayed in the
alarm graphic when these points enter the warning state. If alarm points have already been
configured, you can select specific alarm points to be displayed in the warning state. To do this,
first select this option, then click Choose... to open the Choose Warning State dialog box. Select
the alarm points you to display in the alarm state, then click OK. Select All to select all of the
alarm points. Select Clear All to de-select them.
See also, “Configuring Alarm Points” on page 280.
NOTE: To override this behavior when configuring new alarm points or modifying existing alarm
points, use the Show Warning State option in the Notification Options section of the Alarm Point
dialog. See “Configuring Alarm Points” on page 280.
To define the changes a user can make to an alarm in PAC Display Runtime, select one or more of the
following options in the User Adjustable group:
•
Enable/Disable Alarm Levels—Allows the user to enable or disable alarm points
•
Alarm Level Values—Allows the user to change alarm point values
•
Alarm Level Priority—Allows the user to change alarm point priorities
Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Email Options
Use the Email tab to configure email to be sent when alarms occur:
1. Select Configure > Alarming Setup, and then click the Email tab.
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2. To enable sending emails, make sure Enable Alarm Point Email is selected, and then click
Configure Email.
The Configure Email dialog box appears.
A
B
C
D
a. From the drop-down list, select the email server that will send the email:
– AOL®—uses TLS protocol
– Custom—allows you to configure an email server that is not in the list
– Gmail™—uses SSL protocol
– Gmail™—uses TLS protocol
– Hotmail®—uses TLS protocol
– System default—uses Outlook Express®
– Yahoo®—uses SSL protocol
b. If you selected Custom in step a, continue to step 3.
If you did not select Custom in step a:
For all options except System Default, in the (A) Username and (B) Password fields,
type the email address and password to be used when PAC Display logs on to the
email server.
When an email is sent, the email address in the Username field will appear in the
email’s “From” field.
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NOTE: The Username and Password fields are disabled for the System Default option, because the
system uses the default Microsoft Outlook user name and password for the computer where PAC
Display is installed.
c. To test the email server configuration, type a recipient’s email address in the
(C) Send Test Email To field, and then click (D) Test.
If your configuration is valid, a “Mail sent successfully!” message is displayed, and an
email with the subject “Test Email message from PAC Display” is sent to the
recipient.
If the test is fails, an error message is displayed.
d. Click OK to save the changes and close the dialog box.
The Alarming Setup dialog box is again displayed.
Continue to step 4.
3. If you selected Custom in step 2a, the Configure Email dialog box looks like this:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
a. Complete the fields:
A Email Server—The IP address or domain name of your outgoing email server.
B Port Number—The port number that the Email Server listens on.
C Security—Select the cryptographic Internet protocol that the server uses.
Options are None, SSL, or TLS.
b. In the (D) Username and (E) Password fields, type the email address and password to be
used when PAC Display logs on to the email server.
When an email is sent, the email address in the Username field will appear in the
email’s “From” field.
c. To test the email server configuration, type a recipient’s email address in the
(F) Send Test Email To field, and then click (G) Test.
If your configuration is valid, a “Mail sent successfully!” message is displayed, and an
email with the subject “Test Email message from PAC Display” is sent to the
recipient.
If the test is fails, an error message is displayed.
d. Click OK to save the changes and close the dialog box.
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The Alarming Setup dialog box is again displayed.
4. In the Email options area of the Alarming Setup dialog box, select one of the following options:
– Send Email for all alarm points—Creates and sends an email to the recipients you enter.
– Send Email only for alarm points I choose—Click Choose to open a dialog box listing all
alarm points currently configured.
–
–
5.
6.
308
Check the alarm points for which an email is to be sent. Choose Select All to
select all alarm points. Choose Clear All to clear all selected alarm points.
Click OK to save your selections and close the dialog box.
– Send Email for alarm points with priorities >= —Sends email only for alarm points with a
priority greater than or equal to that specified. This is useful for alarm points where only a
specific state (such as HiHi or LoLo) warrant an email, or for other critical alarm points.
In the Email Details area of the Alarming Setup dialog box, select the level of information that
will be sent in the email. By default, all emails will include the name of the alarm point. You can
also select State, Value, Comment and Priority to be included.
Select Include Warning State if you want to send an email when the alarm point enters the
Warning state.
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7. Click Send To to launch the Email Recipients dialog box:
a. Click To, Cc, or Bcc to open a dialog to enter the email addresses of the recipients. When
you have entered an email address, you can do any of the following things:
– To modify an entry, double-click the entry in the list to open the Email
Recipient dialog box:
.
–
–
Enter the change, and then click OK.
To delete an entry from any list, click on the entry and press the Delete key. In
the confirmation dialog box, click Yes to delete the entry.
b. (Optional) To allow users to make changes to the configured email recipients, select Allow
Email to be edited before sent.
When enabled, this option displays the email in the default email window, so the
user can edit the email before sending it. If this option is not selected, Runtime
sends the email with no user interaction.
NOTE: When an email is sent with no user interaction, a prompt may appear asking whether you
want to send the email. Click Yes to send the email. For information on how to set up your mail
client to handle this kind of message, see the documentation for your mail client.
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Alert Window OptionsUse the Alert Window tab to enable alarm points that have
entered a Warning state to appear in the Alert Window in Runtime.
1. Select Enable Alarm Point Alert Window to enable alarm points that have entered a Warning
state to appear in the Alert Window in Runtime.
2. Under When No Alarm Points in Alert Window select one of the following options:
– Hide the Window—Removes the Alert Window from the screen when the last alarm point
has been removed from the window.
– Minimize Window but Leave Visible on Screen—Collapses the contents of the window to
just the caption bar when the last alarm point has been removed from the window, and
leaves the collapsed window on screen.
– Leave Window Open and Visible on Screen—Leaves the window open and visible when
the last alarm point has been removed from the window.
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Alarm Logging Options
Use the Logging tab to configure how alarm data is sent to a printer or saved in a file.
1. To choose a printer to send alarm data to, select Printing Enabled and then choose a printer
from the Selected Printers list. If you want to use a printer that does not appear on the list, you
will need to install the printer so that it can be accessed from your PC. If you aren’t sure how to
do this, refer to documentation from Microsoft and your computer manufacturer.
Note that if you move the PAC Display project from one Windows operating system to another,
you must reselect the printers.
2. To choose the alarm information that appears on the printed alarm log, click the Column
Format button. In the Alarm Format dialog box that appears, set the format in which the alarm
graphic will appear on screen and the information it will contain. See “Setting the Alarm
Format” on page 301 for configuration information.
3. If you want History Alarm windows to be refreshed (have their contents updated) each time
they open, select Reload History Alarms. This option is available only when file logging has also
been enabled.
4. To save a log file of alarm data to disk, select File Logging Enabled and click File Setup.
In the Alarm Logging File Access dialog box that opens, you can configure the name, location, line
format, and other settings for the log file where the alarm data will be saved. By default, PAC Display
saves alarm logs as text files in Unicode (UTF-16) format. To save all logs in ASCII format, select the
“Save log files in ASCII format” check box in the Runtime Setup dialog box. For details, see “Runtime
Setup: General Tab” on page 318.
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A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
(A) Directory Path. Choose the directory where the alarm log file will be saved. Click Name and
enter the directory path in the field next to it, or click Browse to find a directory path.
Click Use Project Directory to save the alarm log file to the PAC Display project directory. (This occurs
by default if you don’t specify another location.)
To save alarm log files in a folder relative to the folder that the project is in, select Make Path Relative
to Project. If you then save the project to a different folder (or even to a different computer), PAC
Display will save and look for files in the relative path.
For example, if the project is saved in C:\proj\ and you configure log files to be in C:\proj\alarms\,
then the relative path would be this: .\alarms\
If you then saved the project to C:\temp\newproj\, PAC Display would save and look for log files in
the new location’s relative path: C:\temp\newproj\alarms\
(B) File Name. Select Automatic, Fixed, or From strategy to determine how the alarm log file
name will be created, and then fill in additional information as needed for that option.
If the Automatic option is used, log files are named based on the rules described in “Naming
Historical Data Log Files” on page 253. If you select this option, files are named using the rollover
convention if required; this is described in more detail on page 253. If rollover is not used, the file is
named “alarmlog.alm.” The Automatic option is used by default if you do not select another option.
(C) Fixed Name. If you selected the Fixed option in B, enter a file name here. The file name can
be any valid, eight-character DOS file name and doesn’t require a three-character file extension.
Note that if you don’t specify an extension, one is not added automatically.
(D) String Name. If you selected the From strategy option in B, enter a PAC Control string
tagname here. Use the Tag Selection button
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CHAPTER 9: CONFIGURING TRIGGER-BASED EVENTS
alarm log file. When the trigger starts the alarm log, the string containing the file name is read, and
the new data is appended to the log file if the file already exists. If the file doesn’t already exist, it is
created. The rollover naming convention doesn’t apply to this type of file name.
If the string in D is an invalid file name, the default name of the log file is created using the following
rules:
•
If the string is empty, the project directory is added to Default Name (E) and the extension .alm
is used.
•
If the string is not empty and a project directory is not specified as the directory path, the Name
in A is added to Default Name (E) .
•
If the project directory is specified as the path, or the previous step failed, the project directory
is added to Default Name (E) and the extension .alm is used. If the project directory is read-only
or there is not enough room left on the drive containing the project directory, an error message
indicates that the file could not be created.
(E) Default Name. Enter a default file name here in case the file name used in String Name (D) is
invalid. The file name can be any valid, eight-character DOS file name. The three-character file
extension .alm is assigned by PAC Display.
(F) Line Format. Click to configure the character, or delimiter, used to separate the data in the log
file, to choose the type of quotes used for each data line, and where to insert carriage returns. You
configure these parameters in the Line Format dialog box that appears. See page 253 for more
information.
(G) Lines Buffered. Enter the number of lines of data your PC will save to a memory buffer
before writing the information to the alarm log file. When choosing a number, keep in mind that the
lower the number of buffered data lines, the more frequently the computer has to write to the file.
Alternately, the higher the number of data lines buffered in memory, the more data that will be lost
if your PC loses power or has a system failure. A valid entry is any number between 0 and 999; the
default is 20 files.
(H) Number of Files to Retain. Enter the maximum number of alarm log files that can be
created using rollover before the oldest file is overwritten. For example, if you enter 10 and your
rollover time period is set to hours, you will have 10 alarm log files created for 10 hours of data
before the oldest file is overwritten with new data. See page 253 for more information on rollover
settings.
(I) Rollover. Choose the rollover time period here. Select None to have all logged data placed in a
single data file named ALARMLOG.ALM. If you select Weeks, also select the day of the week to have
the files rollover. Logging begins when the PAC Display project is loaded, and data collected will be
appended to the existing data file. The size of the file is limited only by available disk space.
To use the Trigger option, see “Using the Rollover Trigger Option” on page 249. Logging begins
when the Start Trigger is activated, and data collected is appended to the existing data file.
(J) Use 0.01 Sec Resolution. Select this option to log the time in hundredths of a second.
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(K) Keep File Open. Select Keep File Open to allow buffered data to be appended to the alarm
log file more quickly. If you leave this box unchecked (the default setting), the file is closed after each
time data is written to it. This provides greater data integrity than leaving the file open.
(L) OK. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Alarm Sound Options
NOTE: To play sound files, the PC running the project must have a properly configured sound card and
corresponding system software, as well as a set of speakers. You can use both digitized sound (.wav) and
MIDI music (.mid) files in your project.
The Sound tab allows you to define an alarm sound and the conditions when it is played
1. To enter the name of the sound you want played, click Browse and locate the sound file.
If you select Use Project Directory, the sound file must reside in the project directory. This
option is useful if the project directory might be moved to a different location.
NOTE: Only one sound file can be selected in the Alarming Setup dialog box, but PAC Display has other
ways of playing sounds. See “Configuring a Sound” on page 261 and “Configuring Alarm Points” on
page 280 for more information.
2. Select an option to determine how many times the sound will play when a new alarm occurs:
– Play sound once when any alarm is active—The sound plays once, then stops.
– Play sound continuously when any alarm is active—The sound continues to play until the
operator acknowledges all active alarms.
– Play sound continuously until any alarm is acknowledged—The sound continues to play
until the operator acknowledges at least one active alarm.
3. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
See also “Configuring Alarm Points” on page 280 to assign a sound to a specific alarm point.
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NOTE: If an alarm point has been configured to play the global sound file, but then the global sound file is
cleared in this dialog box, a message will ask you to configure a default sound or proceed with this choice
for the alarm point.
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10: Chapter 10
10: Configuring and Using
PAC Display Runtime
Introduction
This chapter describes the versions of PAC Display Runtime that can be used, and explains how to
customize features that are available when your project runs in PAC Display Runtime. It also explains
how to use features that an operator sees and works with when using Runtime.
In This Chapter
Configuring Runtime .........................................................................................317
Runtime Setup: General Tab ...........................................................................318
Runtime Setup: Control Engine Tab ............................................................323
Runtime Setup: Security Tab...........................................................................326
Runtime Setup: I/O Unit Tag Tab...................................................................350
Runtime Regular and Monitor-Only Versions .........................................351
Using Runtime ......................................................................................................352
Configuring Runtime
You can configure some of the ways that a PAC Display project appears in Runtime. Using
PAC Display Configurator, you can specify which windows are open or closed, whether the menu is
displayed, and whether or not the operator can exit the program. You can also customize options for
the Event Log Viewer, a window that displays messages about the status and other characteristics of
a PAC Display project. And you can control whether a PAC Display project gathers I/O unit
information, such as I/O point states and values, from tags on a control engine or directly from an
I/O unit itself.
NOTE: If you want to run your PAC Display project on a computer with multiple monitors, in PAC Display
Configurator simply extend the project’s main window across the monitors you want to use. When you
open the project in Runtime, the main window will appear the way you positioned it over the monitors. For
more information on using multiple computer monitors, see the “System Requirements” on page 5 and
“Using Multiple Monitors” on page 37.
To set up a project for Runtime, select ConfigureRuntime from the PAC Display Configurator, then
configure the settings in the Runtime Setup dialog box.
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See the following sections:
“Runtime Setup: General Tab” (below)
“Runtime Setup: Windows/Dialogs Tab” on page 322
“Runtime Setup: Control Engine Tab” on page 323
“Runtime Setup: Security Tab” on page 326
“Runtime Setup: I/O Unit Tag Tab” on page 350
Runtime Setup: General Tab
A
F
B
C
D
E
G
(A) Draw Window Initial State. Use these options to configure how the project’s windows
will look when the project is first opened in Runtime. To set the default options, check the Use
Default check box, and then click Define Default to set the default options. In the Pop Window
dialog box that opens, select windows and configure whether the window is opened, closed, or
iconified. See “Using Draw Windows and URL Windows” on page 99 for additional options for
configuring window states in Runtime.
(B) Main Window Style Options. Use these options to customize the PAC Display Runtime
application window.
•
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Always Maximized keeps the main window completely open, covering the entire screen.
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When this option is selected, the Minimize and Maximize button options are not available;
deselect Always Maximize if you want to choose the minimize or maximize options.
•
Use Custom Caption lets you enter a title that will appear in the title bar of the main window.
Enter the title in the Custom Caption field.
If a customized caption ends with a hyphen (-), the project file name is added to the caption.
•
Title Bar displays the Windows title bar for the main window. If space is limited on your
operator interface, deselect this option to slightly increase the viewable area that’s available.
If you deselect the Title Bar option, note that all options within the group except for Always
Maximized are unavailable.
(C) Keyboard Setup. Use these options to set up your PAC Display project to run on a touchscreen
terminal.
•
Use On-Screen Keyboard for Touchscreens. Check this option to enable the use of an
on-screen keyboard with the Send String and Send Value Dynamic Attributes. Use this option
when PAC Display Runtime is running on a computer without a physical keyboard and has a
touchscreen. Selecting this option enables all Send String and Send Value Dynamic Attributes
in a project.
•
Include 'Insert ASCII' in Screen-Keyboard. Select this option to include the 'Insert ASCII'
parameter in the On-Screen Send String dialog box. The 'Insert ASCII' feature allows a user to
enter any character value between 0-255. This option is available only for the Send String
Dynamic Attribute. The Use On-Screen Keyboard for Touch Screens option must be checked in
order for this option to be available.
(D) Runtime Options.
Use these options to configure the following:
•
Format Value Data with Commas. Displays large numbers using commas. For example, one
million displays as 1,000,000. However, if a data field in an existing project is too small to display
large numbers with commas, you can de-select this option. Without commas, one million
displays as 1000000.
•
Trend Backward Compatibility. Displays Trend data in the same manner as it is displayed in
OptoDisplay. This is the same effect as selecting None as the y-axis Label Position on the Trend
Configuration dialog box, except that the labels are displayed. Multiple ranges appear to
overlap, and all pens are displayed. As shown in the following example, if pen 1 has a range of
0-100 and pen 2 has a range of 300-400, the y-axis has a range of 0-100 and 300-400
simultaneously and both pens are displayed. By default, this option is disabled.
•
Save log files in ASCII format. Saves all alarm logs, event logs, historical data logs, and
Runtime operator logs in ASCII format.
•
Disable Exit Confirmation. Keeps PAC Display Runtime from displaying a confirmation
message when you close the program.
•
Send +1 for Discrete Integer Writes. Allows PAC Display Runtime to mimic OptoDisplay
Runtime when sending Discrete Writes to integer variables that have no bit index specified (the
bit index field is left blank). This is helpful when upgrading projects from FactoryFloor or
OptoDisplay, or when there is incorrect logic in strategies that tests against true rather than not
false.
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If the bit index field is left blank when configuring a discrete write to an integer, a message says,
“No Bit Index specified. All bits will be modified.” By using this option, Runtime sets only the first
bit of the integer to a 1, resulting in an actual integer value of +1 (the same as OptoDisplay).
This option affects all the discrete write options: Set, Toggle, Direct, and Reverse.
•
Use Legacy Log Date Format. Ensures that the date/time format for records in historical data
logs is YYYY/MM/DD, HH:MM:SS.SSS. This option is selected by default. Unselect this option to
log records using the MM/DD/YYYY, HH:MM:SS.SSS date/time format.
(E) Sound Options. If you want all sounds to play as they occur, select “Play sounds
simultaneously.” This allows each sound that occurs to play at the same time other sounds are
playing. If this option is not selected, each sound that occurs will play one at a time in a round-robin
fashion.
(F) Date Format. Use the Date Format options to change how the date appears in Alarm windows,
SuperTrend objects, and historical data log files. When you switch from one date format to another,
any SuperTrends placed in a window are immediately updated to reflect the selected date format.
You can select one of two date formats:
•
MM-DD-YYYY displays the date as month, day, and year.
For example, October 31, 1999 would be displayed as 10-31-1999.
•
DD-MM-YYYY displays the date as day, month, and year.
For example, October 31, 1999 would be displayed as 31-10-1999.
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Pen 1
Pen 2
305
If the “Play sounds simultaneously” is checked, sounds start playing immediately, regardless if other
sounds are still playing, and will overlap any currently playing sounds.
For examples, see “Setting Up Sound Options” on page 321
(G) Allow Multiple Runtimes. Select this option to allow multiple runtimes to run at the same
time.
CAUTION: Before using this option, consider the following:
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•
If each project is logging to files (SuperTrend, Historical, Operator Logging, etc.), are the projects
saving data to the same file(s)? If so, system instability or a crash may occur.
•
Performance will be reduced for each Runtime project.
See also, “Running Multiple Runtimes” on page 353
Setting Up Sound Options
If you want all sounds to play as they occur, select “Play sounds simultaneously.” This allows each
sound that occurs to play at the same time other sounds are playing. If this option is not selected,
each sound that occurs will play one at a time in a round-robin fashion.
If the “Play sounds simultaneously” is checked, sounds start playing immediately, regardless if other
sounds are still playing, and will overlap any currently playing sounds
In the following examples, sounds A and B may be configured for alarms, triggers, etc. Sound A is
configured to repeat five times. Sound B is configured to repeat three times.
Scenario 1. Sound A and sound B are triggered at the same time.
•
If the “Play sounds simultaneously” is not checked, sound A will play five times, and then sound
B will play three times.
AAAAABBB
(time —> )
•
If the “Play sounds simultaneously” is checked, sounds A and B will play at the same time with
sound A playing five times, and sound B playing three times.
AAAAA
BBB
(time —>)
Scenario 2. Sound A is triggered. While it is playing, sound A is triggered again.
•
If the “Play sounds simultaneously” is not checked, the initial five instances of sound A will
continue to play until all five have played. Then the next five instances of sound A will play.
AAAAAAAAAA
(time —> )
•
If the “Play sounds simultaneously” is checked, when sound A is triggered the second time, it
will start immediately, and it may overlap the initial five sounds from the first trigger.
AAAAA
AAAAA
(time —>)
Scenario 3. Both sounds are triggered at the same time. Sound A is one second long, and sound B
is three seconds long.
•
If the “Play sounds simultaneously” is not checked, the sounds will play one after the other.
AAAAAB--B--B-(time —> )
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•
If the “Play sounds simultaneously” is checked, the sounds will play at the same time. Sound A
will end before sound B.
AAAAA
B--B--B-(time —> )
If you deselect the Title Bar option, note that all options within the group except for Always
Maximized are unavailable.
Runtime Setup: Windows/Dialogs Tab
Multi-Monitor Options: Center Dialogs on. Select this option to specify where PAC Display
Runtime dialog boxes should open when Runtime is running on a computer with more than one
monitor.
Note that these options don’t apply to Microsoft Common Dialogs, such as Open, Save, Save As,
Print, Font, and Color dialog boxes. These dialog boxes open where they were last positioned.
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•
Center of Runtime Window. (Default) Dialog boxes are centered on the main Runtime window.
They will keep centering on the main window, even if you move it to a different monitor.
•
Overall center of monitors. (For use with an odd number—3, 5, 7, and so forth—of monitors.)
Dialog boxes are centered at the center of all monitors. (The center of all monitors is defined by
your computer’s graphics card settings or Microsoft Windows display settings.)
•
Primary monitor (n,n - nnnn,nnnn). Dialog boxes are centered on the primary monitor,
regardless of which monitor displays PAC Display Runtime. (The primary monitor is defined by
your computer’s graphics card settings or Microsoft Windows display settings.)
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The numbers in the parentheses are the top left and bottom right coordinates of the primary
monitor. These numbers may differ depending on the monitor’s size and position relative to
the other monitors being used.
•
Secondary monitor (nnnn,nnnn - nnnn,nnnn). Dialog boxes are centered on the secondary
monitor(s). All monitors other than the primary monitor are displayed in the list as “Secondary”
monitors.
The numbers in parentheses are the monitor’s top left and bottom right coordinates relative to
the primary monitor. For example, a secondary monitor with coordinates of (-1920,0 - 0,1080)
would be to the "left" of the primary monitor, and a secondary monitor with (1920,0 3840,1080) coordinates would be to the “right” of the primary.
Runtime Setup: Control Engine Tab
A
B
C
D
(A) Off-line Control Engine Color Options. If one or more control engines stops
communicating, you can have all graphics with dynamic attributes tied to the control engine(s)
change color to indicate the control engine’s state.
•
Last Known Value color—If communication is lost during Runtime, PAC Display Runtime
changes the colors configured for the graphic object’s dynamic attributes (for example, Text
Color, Control Engine Status color, or Text In from Control Engine color) to the color you
configure here. Data displayed in the Last Known Value color represents the last value returned
before communication was lost.
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•
Comm Failure color—PAC Display Runtime changes the graphic object’s normal color to the
color you configure if communication cannot be established when Runtime launches.
When your PAC Display project includes data from multiple control engines, configuring colors for
both conditions makes it easier to know whether communication for a particular source was lost or
was never established.
If any graphic object in the project uses the View Control Engine Status dynamic attribute, the
object will still change color based on control engine status. If the color used for this dynamic
attribute is different from the “Offline control engine” color, you must confirm which color setting to
use.
(B) Synchronize Control Engine Clocks to PC Clock. Enable control engine clocks to be
synchronized with the PC clock on the PC that is running OptoOPCServer.
•
Enable Auto Synchronization: When enabled, set the day and time that the control engine
clock is automatically synchronized with the PC clock.
•
Synchronize at Runtime startup: When enabled, the control engines are synchronized with
the PC clock every time Runtime is started.
•
Synchronize Control Engine With: When enabled, choose which PC to use to sync the
control engine's clock. If you choose Remote Computer, a dialog box appears to browse to the
remote computer. This option is useful if there are several PCs running the same PAC Display
project gathering data from the same control engine because clocks may vary considerably
from one PC to the next.
(C) Controller Driven Dynamic Attributes. If Allow Runtime Tooltips is enabled, when a
user places the cursor over a graphic object that has control engine-driven attributes in Runtime,
the current values are displayed in a pop-up tooltip. See also, Using Allow Runtime Tooltips.
(D) Read/Write Timeout. Enter the read/write timeout in seconds. The default is 3 seconds.
This is the timeout setting for Send Value, Send Discrete and Send String (writes) and Discrete
Toggles (reads), and other operator-driven actions that require an immediate read of a value. This
does not apply to control engine-driven attributes where the values are read (text-in, fill color, etc.)
or things like historical data log and SuperTrends. If the tag can’t be written to (or read from) in the
configured time, a message is put in the event log.
Using Allow Runtime Tooltips
If Allow Runtime Tooltips is selected on the Control Engine tab of the Runtime Setup dialog box,
when a user places the cursor over a graphic object that has Control Engine-driven dynamic
attributes in Runtime, the current values are displayed in a pop-up tooltip.
NOTE: The tooltip will NOT display for Trends, SuperTrends, XY-Plots or Alarm Graphics.
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Examples
This example shows a graphic object with two different dynamic attributes: a line and fill color from
two different tags.
If a graphic object is configured with the Control Engine Status dynamic attribute, the tooltip will
display the status of each control engine that is currently being monitored. The next example shows
the status of two control engines. The color is always the color of the worst-case control engine—in
this case, the one that has a COMM FAILURE.
If a graphic object is displaying a Control Engine-driven dynamic attribute for an alarm point status,
the tooltip shows the state of the alarm point as well as the value of the point as shown here.
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Runtime Setup: Security Tab
NOTE: This function is one of PAC Display’s numerous security features, including the ability to:
•
Assign a password to the PAC Display project to prevent unauthorized users from opening it in
PAC Display Configurator. (See ““Protecting a Project with a Password” on page 50.)
•
Assign a password to individual windows in a PAC Display project to prevent unauthorized users
from opening them. (See “Modifying Draw or URL Windows” on page 102.)
•
Allow or deny operator access to individual graphic objects, based on configured, authorized users
and groups. (See “Security Settings for Graphic Objects and Dynamic Attributes” on page 161.)
•
View a list of the users currently logged in to PAC Display Runtime. (See “Viewing Logged-In Users in
Runtime” on page 357.)
The options on the Security tab control allow you to control who can log in to Runtime and whether
to log their actions during Runtime. The options also control some general PAC Display features
available to the operator during Runtime.
A
D
B
E
C
(A) Security Options.
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•
Select Prevent user exit to prevent the Runtime operator from exiting PAC Display Runtime
once the project starts in Runtime. This also prevents the operator from changing the project
currently open in PAC Display Runtime.
•
Hide menu bar permanently hides the PAC Display Runtime menu bar from the Runtime
operator. This restricts operator interaction with Runtime menu commands to only what you’ve
defined in the project itself. For example, pressing the ESC key will not activate the menu bar,
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and pressing F1 won’t invoke the Runtime online help system. (To offer access to the online
help system when the menu bar is hidden, you should configure a graphic object using an
Execute Menu Item dynamic attribute that specifies the Help menu item. For details, see
“Execute Menu Item” on page 170.)
•
Clear Send Dialog Input Fields. Normally, Runtime copies the last value sent into the Send
Value and Send String dialog boxes. However, you might want to prevent this when the last
sent value is, for example, the operator’s password. Select Clear Send Dialog Input Fields to
clear the last sent value, which prevents it from being visible the next time the Send Value or
Send String dialog box is displayed.
(B) Global Operator Configuration.
•
User / Group Permissions lets you grant or restrict users and user groups from accessing all of
the project’s graphics objects that have been configured for security. For details, see
“Configuring Global Operators” on page 338.
•
Apply permissions to all Operator Driven Attributes. Check this option to apply the
selected permission (grant or deny access) to all graphic objects with operator-driven
attributes. (Note that this applies even if no individual graphic object security permissions are
set up.)
If you don't select this option, permissions for global operators are automatically added only to
graphic objects that have been individually configured for security (see page 162).
(C) Runtime Logging.
•
Enable Runtime Operator Action Logging. Check this option to enable the Header Line,
Log To, and Encrypt file features for logging Runtime operator actions.
•
Header Line. Enter text that will appear at the top of the Runtime Operator Action log file.
(Pro only) If you choose to log actions to a database table:
– Header Line text will be the table name.
– PAC Display replaces spaces in the Header Line with underscores ( _ ) because table names
cannot contain spaces.
•
Log To. Click this button to specify the name and contents of the Runtime Operator Action log.
If you choose to log actions to an ASCII text file:
– Configure the file name and other parameters in the Event Log Configuration dialog box
that appears.
(Pro only) If you choose to log actions to a database table:
•
Encrypt Log File. Check this option to encrypt data that is logged to an Operator Log File.
(This option is not available when logging to a database.)
(D) Event Log Options.
•
Prevent Disabling. Select this option to prevent a user from disabling the Event Log Viewer
during Runtime. You must first select Start enabled to get this option.
•
Start Enabled. Select this option to enable the Event Log Viewer at startup.
•
Start Hidden. Select this option to prevent the Event Log Viewer from displaying when
Runtime launches; it runs in the background instead-. In this mode you can see the Event Log
Viewer by choosing ViewEvent Log in Runtime.
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See also, “Enabling the Event Log Viewer” on page 341.
(E) Users and Groups.
•
Users. Choose this option to add, modify, and delete logins for users who are allowed to log in
to PAC Display Runtime. You can also copy the permissions of an existing user to create new
users with the same permissions. For details, see “Configuring Runtime User Logins” on
page 328. To prevent authorized users from accessing specific graphic objects, see “Security
Settings for Graphic Objects and Dynamic Attributes” on page 161.
•
Groups. Choose this option to create, modify, and delete user groups, and to see a list of users
in a group. Generally speaking, all users in a group have the same security permissions to the
project’s graphic objects. However, you can override group permissions on an individual basis.
See also “Configuring Global Operators” on page 338 and “Security Settings for Graphic Objects
and Dynamic Attributes” on page 161.
•
“Add / Modify User” Password. Choose this option to create a password that Runtime users
must enter before they can modify the list of users with permission to log in to Runtime. See
also “Configuring a Password to Modify Runtime Users” on page 333.
Restricting the Operator
In addition to securing access to graphic objects (see page 161) and preventing login access to
Runtime (see page 328), there are a few more ways to control an operator’s interactions with
PAC Display Runtime:
•
To prevent the operator from exiting PAC Display Runtime, select Prevent User Exit in the
Security Option group. Once the project starts in Runtime, an operator won’t be able to exit the
PAC Display Runtime application.
•
To hide the menu bar from the operator, select Hide Menu Bar Permanently. This restricts
operator interaction with Runtime menu commands to only what you’ve defined in the project
itself. The ESC key will not activate the menu bar, and pressing the F1 key won’t invoke the
Runtime online help system.
•
To allow selected users to log in to PAC Display Runtime or to set up global operator-driven
permissions, see “Configuring Runtime User Logins” below.
You can also configure a graphic object so that Runtime commands execute when the object is
clicked. This is done by assigning Runtime menu commands to the graphic object using the Execute
Menu Item dynamic attribute; see “Execute Menu Item” on page 170 for instructions.
Configuring Runtime User Logins
NOTE: If no Runtime users are configured, anyone with access to PAC Display can open and use Runtime.
To control access to PAC Display Runtime, graphic objects, and operator-driven dynamic attributes,
you configure users and (optionally) user groups. When a PAC Display project is launched in
Runtime, Runtime prompts the operator for a username and password. (To prevent operators from
accessing specific Runtime graphic objects, see “Security Settings for Graphic Objects and Dynamic
Attributes” on page 161.)
You can add, modify, delete, and copy Runtime users in:
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•
PAC Display Configurator > Configure > Runtime > Security tab > Users
•
PAC Display Runtime > Security > Add / Modify User
NOTE: To configure Runtime users in Runtime, you must first configure an “Add / Modify User”
password. For details, see page 333.
When considering security for your Runtime environment, keep the following points in mind:
•
If no Runtime users are configured, anyone with access to PAC Display can open and user
Runtime.
•
Runtime user logins are a special kind of login that you create in PAC Display Configurator; they
are not the same as Windows logins that allow users to login to a particular computer or
network.
•
Logging in and out of Runtime does not change the user currently logged in to the PC in
Windows. The user who initially logged in to Windows remains the Windows user.
•
If no Runtime users are configured, the option to log out of Runtime is disabled in Runtime.
Open the Runtime Users Dialog Box.
In Configurator, click ConfigureRuntime > Security tab > Users.
Or, in Runtime, click Security > Add / Modify User.
The Runtime Users dialog box opens.
NOTE: The Save and Load buttons
are not available in the Runtime version
of this dialog box.
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Add a Runtime User Login.
1. In the Runtime Users dialog box, click Add to open the Add Runtime User dialog box.
2. In the Add Runtime User dialog box:
a. In the Runtime User Name field, type a username.
b. In the Password field and in the Re-enter Password field, type a password.
This is the username and password that the operator will use to log in to Runtime, and also
when prompted for access to a security-restricted graphic object.
NOTE: The Runtime username and password are case-sensitive.
c. (Optional) In the Allowed Log In Schedule area, configure the days and times that the
operator is allowed to log in to Runtime. You can choose a specific day of the week,
weekdays, weekends, never, or any time.
For each additional login period, select “Enable additional scheduled time,” and then select
the login time. To disable a schedule, deselect “Enable additional scheduled time” for that
time period.
d. To automatically log an operator out of Runtime after a specified period of inactivity, in the
Inactivity Timeout fields, type an amount and select the time unit (Minutes, Hours, Days, or
Weeks). To disable the automatic log out feature, type a 0 (zero) in the text box.
A PAC Display Runtime project is considered “inactive” if (within the configured time
period):
– The mouse has not moved; or
– A menu command has not been performed; or
– An operator-driven attribute is not been clicked.
NOTE: Trigger-based commands are not included in the above list. For example, if a window
opens or closes, a recipe uploads or downloads, or an alarm point state changes, these are not
considered to be operator interactions in PAC Display.
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3. To require an operator to change his or her password after a specified amount of time, under
Require Password Change Every, enter the amount of time. The units can be set in Days, Weeks,
and Months.
Beginning 14 days prior to the expiration of a password, the operator will be notified when
logging in that the password will expire, and be given the option to change it.
To disable this feature, enter a 0 in the text entry field.
4. To map an operator’s Runtime login user name to his or her global operator-driven user name,
select Has Global Operator Driven Access, and then enter the global operator-driven user
name. This option must be configured in order for the operator logged in to PAC Display
Runtime to modify operator-driven attributes without having to log in for each attribute. See
also, “Configuring Global Operators” on page 338.
5. Click OK. The new username is added to the list of Runtime users.
Modify a Runtime User.
1. In the Runtime Users dialog box, highlight the username, and then click Modify (Configure >
Runtime > Security tab > Users).
2. Make the desired changes, and then click OK to close the dialog box and save the changes.
Delete a Runtime User.
When you delete a Runtime user, PAC Display also removes the user from any groups he or she may
belong to. For information on user groups, see page 335.
1. In the Runtime Users dialog box, highlight the username, and then click Delete (Configure >
Runtime > Security tab > Users).
2. Click OK to confirm the deletion and save the change.
Copy a Runtime User.
To save time when configuring Runtime users, you can copy an existing user’s permissions and
group memberships, and then assign them to a new Runtime user. (The Copy feature does not copy
the selected user’s password.)
NOTE: The user you copy must belong to at least one User Group.
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1. In the Runtime Users dialog box, highlight a Runtime user whose permissions and group
memberships you want to duplicate.
2. Click Copy. A new Runtime user is added to the list.
3. To change the new user’s name and create a password, highlight the name, and then click
Modify.
4. In the Modify Runtime User dialog box, make the desired changes, and then:
a. Click OK to close the Modify Runtime User dialog box.
b. Click OK to save the new user and close the Runtime Users dialog box.
The new Runtime user has the same permissions and group memberships as the user you copied.
You can also modify the new user’s permissions for individual graphic objects. For details, see
“Security Settings for Graphic Objects and Dynamic Attributes” on page 161.
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Configuring a Password to Modify Runtime Users
The “Add / Modify Password” function lets you configure a password that operators can enter in
Runtime to modify the list of Runtime users.
1. In Configurator, choose ConfigureRuntime > Security tab, and in the Users and Groups area,
click “Add / Modify User” Password. The Enter Password dialog box opens.
2. Type the new password in both fields, and then click OK to close the dialog box and save the
changes. In Runtime, the operator is prompted to enter the password when Security > Add /
Modify User is clicked.
In Runtime, an operator types the configured
password in this dialog box after he clicks
Security > Add / Modify User.
Saving User Configuration Information to an External File
Once users have been configured, you can save the user information to an encrypted file external to
the project file. By saving user permissions information to an external file, you can simply load the
user information file to a new project (instead of having to reconfigure users for the new project).
A login configuration file has the extension .pdlin.
1. Make sure you have one or more users configured for this project. See “Configuring Runtime
User Logins” on page 328.
2. In Configurator, choose ConfigureRuntime > Security tab, and then, in the Users and Groups
area, click Users.
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The Runtime Users dialog box opens.
3. In the Runtime Users dialog box, click Save.
The Save Options dialog box appears.
4. For each of the following options, click Browse to locate the target directory, then enter a
filename and click OK.
a. Click External File to specify the primary location for the user login configuration file.
b. Click Copy To to specify the backup location for the user login configuration file. This
option is enabled when you select External File. The backup copy is used if the primary file
becomes corrupted or is otherwise unavailable.
5. Click OK to close the Save Options dialog box.
Loading User Configuration Information from an External File
Once the user login configuration information has been saved to an external file, you can load that
user information into another PAC Display project. The user names in the external file will replace
any user names currently in the target project.
1. In the Runtime Users dialog box, click Load, browse to the external file, and then click Open.
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The users in the file appear in the list of Runtime users.
2. Click OK to close the dialog box.
NOTE: Once a file is loaded via the Load button, the file’s location is automatically set to be the primary
external file location.
Configuring User Groups
To reduce the amount of configuration needed to restrict access to PAC Display Runtime and
graphic objects, you can assign individual Runtime users to user groups. A user group is a set of users
who typically perform the same job function. For example, you can configure a “Supervisors” group,
and then assign all the individual supervisors to the group.
Generally speaking, all users in a group have the same security permissions to the project’s graphic
objects. However, for greater flexibility, you can override permissions to graphic objects on an
individual basis. This means that an individual Runtime user’s permissions can differ from the group
(or groups) he or she is assigned to. For example, you can create a Supervisors group and set very
liberal permissions for anyone assigned to the group. But if there is a certain supervisor who
shouldn’t have access to one certain graphic object, you can deny access at the user level, and an
error message will be displayed if the operator tries to access the graphic object.
Such flexibility can be very helpful, but because a Runtime user can be assigned to multiple user
groups, it can also be confusing. Simply stated, “Deny Access” security permissions have priority over
“Grant Access” permissions. This means that if a user has been granted access, but is a member of a
group that has been denied access, the user will not be able to use the on-screen object.
Note: You must configure at least one Runtime User before you can configure a user group.
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Add a User Group.
1. In Configurator, click ConfigureRuntime > Security tab, and in the Users and Groups area,
click Groups to open the Runtime User Groups dialog box.
2. Click Add Group. In the Add Group dialog box, type the group name, and then click OK to save the
change and close the dialog box. The User Count is 0 (zero) because the group has no members.
Add Members to a User Group.
1. In the Runtime User Groups dialog box, click the group name to highlight it, and then click
View Users.
The Group Member dialog box opens.
2. In the Group Member dialog box, click Add User.
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The Add User to Group dialog box opens.
Click the group name to highlight it,
and then click View Users.
Click Add User to select
Runtime users for the group.
3. Click the names to add to the group, and then click OK.
The member names appear in the Group Members dialog box.
4. Click OK to save the changes. The Runtime User Group dialog box opens, and the number of
members is displayed in the User Count column.
Remove Members from a User Group
1. In the Runtime User Groups dialog box, click the group name to highlight it, and then click
View Users. The Group Member dialog box opens.
2. In the Group Member dialog box, click the user to delete.
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To delete more than one user, hold down the Ctrl key and click the users to delete.
3. Click Remove User, and at the prompt, click Yes.
Then click OK to save the changes and close the dialog box.
Modify a User Group.
1. In the Runtime User Groups dialog box, click the group name to highlight it, and then click
2.
Modify Group.
Type the new name, and then click OK to save the change and close the dialog box.
If you modify a user group and then decide to add more members, you must first save the changes
by clicking OK to close the Runtime User Groups dialog box. When you click Groups to reopen the
Runtime User Groups dialog box, the View Users button is enabled so you can click it and add new
members to the group.
Delete a User Group.
1. In the Runtime User Groups dialog box, click the group name to highlight it, and then click
2.
Delete Group.
At the prompt, click Yes to delete the group and close the dialog box.
Configuring Global Operators
Configuring global operators is an easy way to grant or deny access to all operator-driven attributes
in a PAC Display project. Users (or user groups) configured as global operators are automatically
added to graphic objects that have been individually configured for security (see page 162). In
addition, when a global operator logs in using the special Global Operator Access login, he or she
can execute any operator-driven dynamic attribute without having to enter a username and
password each time (PAC Display Runtime menu bar > Security > Global Operator Access > Log in).
Simply stated, global operator security is similar to graphic object security, with the added benefit
that the global operator can execute security-configured operator-driven attributes without having
to enter login credentials each time.
Note that a global operator is different from a Runtime user (see page 328). Typically, you configure
Runtime user logins for people who use PAC Display Runtime as part of their day-to-day work, and
you configure global operators for people who occasionally need temporary access to a project’s
graphic objects (for example, to approve an override). However, you can configure a Runtime user as
a global operator; when that’s the case, the Runtime is automatically logged in with global operator
permissions when he or she user logs in to PAC Display Runtime.
You also have the option to allow or restrict access to all graphic objects with operator-driven
attributes—even if security has not been configured for an individual object.
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To configure global operators:
1. In Configurator, select ConfigureRuntime to open the Runtime Setup dialog box, and then
click the Security tab.
2. In Global Operator Configuration area, click User / Group Permissions to open the Define
Security Permissions dialog box.
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3. Select the Domain, and then select the user or group from the Users/Groups drop-down list.
Then, select either Grant Access or Deny Access.
Click Show Configured Users to see the list of users and user groups that have been granted
and denied global permissions.
Click Clear All to remove all global permissions from all users and user groups.
4. Click OK to close the dialog box and save the changes.
5. (Optional) When a graphic object is configured for security (see page 161), operators must
login every time they try to modify an operator-driven attribute. To prevent the system from
requiring a login for every secure graphic object, select the Apply permissions to all Operator
Driven Attributes check box.
6. Select the Apply permissions to all Operator Driven Attributes check box to apply the global
permissions (from step 3) to all graphic objects configured with operator-driven attributes.
(This way, you don’t have to individually configure security permissions for each graphic that
needs security.)
7. On the Runtime Setup > Security tab, click OK to close the dialog box and save the changes.
Logging In to and Out of Operator Driven Attribute Access in Runtime. If global
users are configured (see “Configuring Global Operators” on page 338), a configured user can log in
and access any security-configured operator-driven dynamic attribute.
See also, “Logging In to and Out of Runtime” on page 353.
NOTE: The Operator Driven Attribute Access submenu is not available in the Read Only version of Runtime.
1. In Runtime, choose SecurityOperator Driven Attribute AccessLog In (or Log Out).
2. Select the user name from the drop-down list, type the password in the Password field, and
then click OK.
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CAUTION: As long as a globally configured user is logged in, anyone can access the security-configured
operator-driven dynamic attributes. To prevent unauthorized access, it is the responsibility of the
configured user to log out when finished.
Enabling the Event Log Viewer
Use the Event Log Options on the Security tab of the Runtime Setup dialog box to configure the
Event Log Viewer. The Event Log Viewer displays messages in PAC Display Runtime about system
events and a project’s communication transactions. By default, the Event Log Viewer is enabled
when Runtime starts.
Prevent disabling. Select this opt ion to prevent a user from disabling the Event Log Viewer
during Runtime. You must first select Start enabled to get this option.
Start enabled. Select this option to enable the Event Log Viewer at startup. Uncheck this option to
keep the Event Log Viewer running in the background rather than on top.
Start hidden. Select this option to prevent the Event Log Viewer from displaying when Runtime
launches. In this mode you can see the Event Log Viewer by choosing ViewEvent Log in Runtime.
See “Using the Event Log Viewer” on page 356 for information on using the Event Log Viewer in
Runtime, and “Configuring the Event Log File” on page 346 to learn about enabling saving the event
log to a file and setting the format in which event log files are saved. By default, the event log is not
saved to a file.
Logging Runtime Operator Actions
When an operator uses a PAC Display project in Runtime, general information about how and when
the project is used can be recorded in the Runtime operator log file. Detailed information such as
which on-screen controls were used and which values or states were changed can also be recorded
in this log file. For security, the log file can be optionally encrypted.
By default, PAC Display saves Runtime operator logs as text files in Unicode (UTF-16) format. To save
all logs in ASCII format, select the Save log files in ASCII format check box in the Runtime Setup
dialog box. For details, see “Runtime Setup: General Tab” on page 318.
NOTE: You can also configure security settings for an object to restrict its use to authenticated users and
groups. See “Security Settings for Graphic Objects and Dynamic Attributes” on page 161 to learn how to
configure user and group authentication for a graphic object.
Data Recorded in the Runtime Logging File
When the PAC Display project runs in PAC Display Runtime, the following information about
operator actions is recorded:
•
Date—Date of action (month/day/year)
•
Time—Time of action (24-hour)
•
Action Taken—Description of action and PAC Display project file used
•
Control Engine—Control engine running the PAC Control strategy that the PAC Display project
is accessing
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•
Tag—Complete name of tag being modified
•
Old Value—tag value before being modified
•
New Value—tag value after being modified
•
User—Name of user logged into computer running PAC Display project
•
Computer—Computer running the PAC Display project
Discrete controller variables display Off values as 0, and On/Set values as 1. Discrete I/O points are
logged as 0 (Off ) and -1 (minus 1) - for On/Set.
In this example, the log shows that the operator “edgar” opened and closed the PAC Display project
“cfactory.UUI” using the computer “MFG-00”.
PAC Display Runtime Operator Log File
Line Formats:
Date
Time
Action Taken
User
Computer
12/11/2010
10:22:28.230
Open project: cfactory.UUI executed
edgar
MFG-00
12/11/2010
10:59:57.442
Close project: cfactory.UUI executed
edgar
MFG-00
The next example shows that the same operator “edgar” changed the setpoint value of
“fTemperatureSetpoint” from 200 to 150 on the same project.
PAC Display Runtime Operator Log File
Line Formats:
Date
Time
Control Engine
Tag
12/11/2010 10:56:06.852 Cookie Controller Cookie Controller:fTemperatureSetpoint
Old Value New Value
User
200.0000
edgar MFG-00
150.0000
Computer
Configuring a Runtime Operator Log File
Also see “Configuring a Runtime Operator Log Database” on page 343.
To record operator actions in a log file:
1. In Configurator, select ConfigureRuntime to open the Runtime Setup dialog box.
2. Click the Security tab, and select Enable Runtime Operator Action Logging.
3. If necessary, change the header line to meet your application’s requirements.
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4. Click Log To, and then choose Log File from the popup menu.
The Runtime Logging File Setup dialog box appears. Configuring a Runtime operator log file is
identical to configuring an event log file; follow the instructions in “Configuring the Event Log
File” on page 346 and then go to the next step below.
NOTE: To create a single networked file that logs the operator actions of all the networked PCs running
PAC Display, make sure each PC writes to the same networked file. This allows you to view all the
operator actions of the networked PCs from a central location. In order for the date and time stamps
to be useful, make sure that the time on each PC is synchronized with the standard network server
time.
5. Select Encrypt Log File if you want the log file saved as an encrypted document. See
“Encrypting and Decrypting the Runtime Operator Log File” on page 345 for information on
using encrypted files.
Configuring a Runtime Operator Log Database
(Pro only) If you have configured an ODBC-compliant database (such as Microsoft SQL Server,
MySQL, or Microsoft Access), you can also Runtime operator log action log data to a database. For
information about configuring ODBC data sources, see page 61. Also, see “Configuring a Runtime
Operator Log File” on page 342.
To log operator actions to a database:
1. In Configurator, select ConfigureRuntime to open the Runtime Setup dialog box.
2. Click the Security tab, and select Enable Runtime Operator Action Logging.
3. If necessary, change the header line to meet your application’s requirements.
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4. Click Log To, and choose Database from the popup menu.
If a database is configured, a dialog box shows the default settings for the table that will be
created and logged to.
5. If desired, modify the table name or the column names.
Modify a column name as follows:
a. Click the name to highlight the row.
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b. Click the name once again to make it editable.
c. Type a new name, and then press Enter.
d. Click OK to confirm your changes and close the dialog box.
NOTES
•
Table and column names may not contain the following characters: (space) [ ] :
•
Column names cannot begin with a SQL reserved word for that database type.
Examples: INTEGER, VALUE, BACKUP, CURRENT_DATE
Changing the Database Table Name
When you create or modify a table for logging operator actions in a database, you can change the
database table name. However, after Runtime logs data to the database, if you then try to change
the database table name in Configurator, a message is displayed, that says the table already exists.
When the message appears, do one of the following:
•
Click Yes to create a new table and start logging to that table.
•
Click No to rename the existing table and continue logging to that table.
Encrypting and Decrypting the Runtime Operator Log File
To save a Runtime operator log file in an encrypted format, select Encrypt Log File in the Security tab
of the Runtime Setup dialog box.
To decrypt the log file, do the following:
1. In PAC Display Configurator, select ViewDecrypt Operator Log File.
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The log file decryption window opens.
2. Click Browse next to the “Log file to decrypt” field and locate the encrypted operator action log
file.
3. Click Browse next to the “Destination log file name” field and select a filename and location
where the decrypted file will be saved.
Skip this step if the default name and destination for the decrypted file is acceptable.
4. Select “View decrypted file in Notepad” to automatically open the file in Windows Notepad
after it is decrypted.
When this option is selected, you can also select “Delete decrypted file after viewing” to have
the file deleted automatically when Notepad closes.
5. Select “Delete encrypted log file” to have the encrypted log file deleted automatically after it is
decrypted.
6. Click Decrypt to decrypt the file.
7. Click OK to close the log file decryption window.
Configuring the Event Log File
As events occur in a project in Runtime, messages with a date and time stamp are posted to the
Event Log Viewer. These messages can be saved to an event log file and archived to provide an
operations record for a PAC Display project.
NOTE: A project can have only one event log file active (open) at a time.
By default, PAC Display saves event logs as text files in Unicode (UTF-16) format. To save all logs in
ASCII format, select the Save log files in ASCII format check box in the Runtime Setup dialog box. For
details, see “Runtime Setup: General Tab” on page 318.
(Pro only) If you have configured an ODBC-compliant database (such as Microsoft SQL Server,
MySQL, or Microsoft Access), you can also send event log messages to a database. For information
about configuring ODBC data sources, see page 61.
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1. To configure an event log, select ConfigureEvent Log.
Event Log Configuration Dialog Box
PAC Display Basic
PAC Display Professional
2. To create an event log file when you start the project in Runtime, select Enabled (next to the
File Setup button), and then click File Setup.
The Event Log File Configuration dialog box appears. In the Event Log File Configuration dialog
box, you configure where the event log data will be stored, how the data lines will appear, and
the log’s rollover parameters. For details, see “Event Log File Configuration Dialog Box” on
page 348.
3. (Pro only) To send event log messages to a database:
a. Select Enabled (next to the Database Record button). Note that you can select the Enabled
check box only if an ODBC data source has already been configured. For details, see
page 61.
b. Click the Database Record button.
The Database Table dialog box appears, showing the default database table and columns
that the event messages will be logged to.
To change the Table Name, highlight the name and then type a new name. Note that the name
cannot contain a space.
If Runtime logs data to the database, a message appears, saying that the table already exists.
•
Click Yes to create a new table and start logging to that table.
•
Click No to rename the existing table and continue logging to that table.
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To change a column name, click the name to highlight the row. (You cannot change a column
type.) Click the name once again to make it editable.
1. Type a new name, and then press Enter.
The name cannot contain spaces, and it cannot begin with a SQL reserved word for that
database type. Examples: INTEGER, VALUE BACKUP CURRENT_DATE
2. Click OK to confirm your changes and close the dialog box.
Event Log File Configuration Dialog Box
A
B
C
D
I
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(A) Name. Choose the directory where the event log file will be saved. Click Name and enter the
directory path in the field next to it, or click Browse to find a directory path. Click Use Project
Directory to save the event log file to the PAC Display project directory. (This occurs by default if you
don’t specify a location.)
NOTE: To create a single networked file that logs the events of all the networked PCs running PAC Display,
make sure each PC writes to the same networked file. This allows you to view all the events of the
networked PCs from a central location. In order for the date and time stamps to be useful, make sure that
the time on each PC is synchronized with the standard network server time.
(B) Source. Automatic is the only choice for creating the event log file name, and is selected by
default.
(C) Line Format. Click to configure the character, or delimiter, used to separate the data in the
log file, to choose the type of quotes used for each data line, and where to insert carriage returns.
You configure these parameters in the Line Format dialog box that appears. See “Setting Log File
Line Format” on page 253 for more information.
(D) Lines Buffered. Enter the number of lines of data your PC will save to a memory buffer
before writing the information to the event log file. When choosing a number, keep in mind that the
lower the number of buffered data lines, the more frequently the computer has to write to the file.
Alternately, the higher the number of data lines buffered in memory, the more data that will be lost
if your PC loses power or has a system failure. A valid entry is any number between 0 and 999; the
default is 20 files.
(E) Number of Files to Retain. Enter the maximum number of event log files that can be
created using rollover before the oldest file is overwritten. For example, if you enter 10 and your
rollover time period is set to hours, you will have 10 event log files created for 10 hours of data
before the oldest file is overwritten with new data. See “Naming Historical Data Log Files” on
page 253 for more information on rollover settings.
(F) Rollover. When you enable file logging, the default rollover period is Daily. To configure a
different rollover period, select an option in the Rollover drop-down list. (For details about rollover
files, see “Naming Historical Data Log Files” on page 253.) The size of the data log files is limited only
by available disk space.
To save all data in a single data log file, select None. The file is named EVENTLOG.MSG.
If you select Weeks, also select the day of the week to have the files rollover. A new data file is
created every week on the selected day at midnight. For example, if the configured rollover period is
Monday, and data logging starts on Wednesday, the first log file will contain data from Wednesday
until 11:59:59 on Sunday night. A new log file is created at 12:00 a.m. on Monday; thereafter, the
weekly data files will contain data from 12:00 a.m. on Monday through 11:59:59 on Sunday night.
To use the Trigger option, see “Using the Rollover Trigger Option” on page 249. Logging begins
when the Start Trigger is activated, and data collected will be appended to the existing data file.
(G) Use 0.01 Sec Resolution. Select this option to log the time in hundredths of a second.
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(H) Keep File Open. Select Keep File Open to allow buffered data to be appended to the event
log file more quickly. If you leave this box unchecked (the default setting), the file is closed after each
time data is written to it. This provides greater data integrity than leaving the file open.
(I) OK. Click OK to save your settings and close the dialog box.
Runtime Setup: I/O Unit Tag Tab
For the current PAC Display project, any Ethernet-based I/O units that are configured in the
associated PAC Control strategy will be listed on the I/O Unit Tags tab of the Runtime Setup dialog
box. All I/O units are selected by default. For each I/O unit, do the following:
•
Select the check box to have the PAC Display project communicate directly with that I/O unit.
•
Deselect the check box to have the PAC Display project not communicate directly with that I/O
unit, and instead access I/O tags through the control engine.
NOTE: To protect a strategy in case of a power loss, be sure to save the strategy to flash memory. You can
save it to flash just once, when needed, or save every time the strategy is downloaded. For more
information, see the PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700).
Your control system probably uses Ethernet-based I/O units, which combine Opto 22 SNAP PAC
R-series controllers or EB-series brains with I/O modules and an I/O rack. In the I/O Unit Tags tab, you
can configure how the PAC Display project communicates with these units. Controlling how the PAC
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Display project communicates with an I/O unit can improve the response time for reading and
writing remote I/O points over getting that information from the controller.
Normally a PAC Display project running on a PC gets information such as I/O point state or value by
communicating directly with the I/O unit itself. Other information, however, is not obtained from an
I/O unit (for example, the result of a calculation). Instead, this information comes from the tag
variables on the control engine running the PAC Control or OptoControl strategy. In the I/O Unit Tags
tab, you can configure whether the PAC Display project accesses I/O unit information directly from
the unit, or accesses that information only from the control engine.
NOTE: Being able to specify how this communication occurs also allows you to use the dual Ethernet
interfaces of the SNAP PAC R-series brains to segment part of an Ethernet network.
Runtime Regular and Monitor-Only Versions
Two versions of PAC Display’s Runtime application are provided with PAC Display: the regular version
and a monitor-only version. The primary difference between these two versions is that the
monitor-only version of PAC Display Runtime does not allow values to be sent to a control engine.
This is a useful feature when operator intervention is not required or must be prohibited.
The monitor-only version of PAC Display Runtime has the following features:
•
The File and Help menus are the only menu items displayed. If the PAC Display project has been
configured to hide the menu bar, however, even these menus are not visible. See “Restricting
the Operator” on page 328 for information on configuring the menu bar in Runtime.
•
Opening and closing windows are the only operator-driven dynamic attributes that can be
used in the Runtime monitor-only version. Keep this in mind when developing the PAC Display
project; if, for example, there is a window that you do not want the operator to see, do not use
the open/close dynamic attribute with a graphic object.
Using Monitor-Only Runtime and Configurator
To use the monitor-only version of Runtime with this feature, you must change the file name of the
application.
1. In Windows Explorer, change the file name of the regular version of PAC Display to a temporary
name.
For example, change “DisplayR.basic.exe” to “orig_DisplayR.basic.exe” or something similar.
2. Now change the file name of the monitor-only Runtime application to the original name of the
regular version. This is done by changing “DisplayX.basic.exe” to “DisplayR.basic.exe”.
After making these changes, the monitor-only version of Runtime will start when you select Save
Project and Load Runtime in PAC Display Configurator.
To use the regular version of Runtime again, reverse the steps above.
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Using Runtime
“Opening a Project in Runtime” on page 352
“Logging In to and Out of Runtime” on page 353
“Running Multiple Runtimes” on page 353
“Using the Event Log Viewer” on page 356
“Viewing and Changing Control Engines” on page 357
“Viewing and Changing Scanner Status” on page 359
“Switching a Window Between Control Engines” on page 360
“Viewing Alarm Graphics” on page 361
“Modifying Alarm Points” on page 363
“Disabling Alarm Points in Runtime” on page 365
“Using SuperTrends in Runtime” on page 365
“Using XY Plots in Runtime” on page 368
“Writing Directly to Individual Elements” on page 369
“How a Combo Box Behaves in Runtime” on page 369
“Using a PID Button” on page 370
Opening a Project in Runtime
When your PAC Display project is complete and you’re ready to open it in Runtime, there are two
ways you can do this:
•
Using PAC Display Configurator:
– In the PAC Display Configurator menu bar, click FileSave Project and Load Runtime.
Changes to the current project in PAC Display Configurator are saved, and the project is opened
in Runtime. The Save Project and Load Runtime feature lets you switch quickly from
Configurator to Runtime, and is a convenient way to test a PAC Display project as you develop
it.
•
Using PAC Display Runtime:
– Start PAC Display Runtime as follows:
– In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, press the Windows Start key
Programs > Opto 22 > PAC Project 9.6 > PAC Display Runtime.
, and then click
– In Windows 10 and Windows 8.1, press the Windows Start key
Runtime 9.6 and then press the Enter key.
, type PAC Display
– In the PAC Display Runtime menu, click File > Open Project.
– In the Open Project dialog box that appears, select the PAC Display project you want to
open.
When the project opens, it will start running and you’ll see the operator interface created in PAC
Display Configurator. The initial state of the draw windows that appear (open, closed, or iconified) is
determined by the Runtime setup configuration. Unless you chose to hide the menu bar when you
configured the project, the menu bar for the main window also appears.
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Logging In to and Out of Runtime
If multiple users have been configured in Configurator, you can log out of Runtime to allow another
user to log in.
See also, “Logging In to and Out of Operator Driven Attribute Access in Runtime” on page 340.
1. To log out of Runtime, choose SecurityLog Out of PAC Display Runtime.
A dialog box asks you to confirm logging out.
2. Click Yes.
If Enable Runtime Operator Action Logging is enabled on the Runtime setup dialog box, an
entry is made in the log and the Log In dialog box opens for the next user.
3. To log in, select your name from the drop-down list, type the password, and then click OK.
Or, click Exit Runtime to shut down PAC Display Runtime.
IMPORTANT: During the time this dialog is displayed, there can be no interaction between a user and
PAC Display Runtime. The current Windows user cannot log off, nor can Windows be shut down.
If the Runtime operator log is enabled, an entry in the log is made indicating whether the log in was
successful or not and the operator who attempted or succeeded at the log in.
Also, the newly logged in user is set as the user whose actions will be logged in the Runtime
operator log file.
Running Multiple Runtimes
You can run more than one Runtime on the same PC either for the same project or for multiple
projects.
CAUTION: Before using this option, consider the following things:
•
If each project is logging to files (SuperTrend, Historical, Operator Logging, etc.), are the projects
saving data to the same file(s)? If so, system instability or a crash may occur.
•
Performance will be reduced for each Runtime project.
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To configure Runtime to allow more than one Runtime:
1. Select Configure > Runtime to open the Runtime Setup dialog box.
2. At the bottom of the General tab under Allow Multiple Runtimes, select Allow Multiple
Instances to Run.
3. Click OK.
Running the Same Project in a New, Separate Runtime
1. Launch the first Runtime in Configurator by selecting File > Save Project and Load Runtime.
2. Launch a second Runtime directly through Windows.
In the PAC Display Runtime menu, click File > Open Project.
Navigate to the location of the project file.
Click the project to select it, and then click Open.
Running a Different Project in a New, Separate Runtime
To run a different project in a new, separate Runtime, you can use a Launch Application dynamic
attribute tied to a graphic object in a currently running Runtime. Alternatively, you can use a
command line or a batch file.
Using a Launch Application Dynamic Attribute.
1. Using the Select tool, double-click the graphic object to which you want to assign the dynamic
attribute.
For more information, see “Assigning a Dynamic Attribute to a Graphic Object” on page 152.
2. In the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box, under Operator Driven Attributes, double-click
Launch Application.
The Dynamic Attribute – Launch Application dialog box appears.
3. For the Working Directory, enter the full path to Runtime.
For example, C:\Program Files (x86)\Opto22\PAC Project 9.6
4. For the Command Line, enter DisplayR.basic.exe “<Full Path To .UUI Project File>”
For example,
DisplayR.basic.exe "C:\My Projects\My PAC Display Project.UUI"
NOTES:
– You can substitute DisplayR.pro.exe.
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– Make sure to include the surrounding quotes.
– There is a space between DisplayR.pro.exe and "<Full ...>"
5. Next to Launch Options, select Multiple instances.
6. Click OK, then click OK again.
Using a Command Line or Batch File.
To start one or more Runtimes using a command line or batch file, use the following format:
cd “<Full Path To Runtime>”
DisplayR.basic.exe "<Full Path To .UUI Project File>"
For example:
cd "C:\Program Files\Opto22\PAC Project 9.6"
DisplayR.basic.exe "C:\My Projects\ProjectA\ProjectA.UUI"
Example: Using Batch Files to Run Multiple Projects
The following example shows one way to use batch files to run multiple Runtimes on the same PC.
A master batch file launches two project batch files, each of which launches a different project.
NOTE: The following procedure is known to work on a computer equipped with Windows 7 Professional,
64-bit.
1. Create a batch file for each project. In this example there are two different projects, Project A
and Project B.
Each project batch file has the following format:
cd “<Full Path To Runtime>”
DisplayR.basic.exe "<Full Path To .UUI Project File>"
exit
The Project A batch file is named LaunchProjectA.bat:
cd "C:\Program Files\Opto22\PAC Project 9.6"
DisplayR.basic.exe "C:\My Projects\ProjectA\ProjectA.UUI"
exit
The Project B batch file is named LaunchProjectB.bat:
cd "C:\Program Files\Opto22\PAC Project 9.1"
DisplayR.basic.exe "C:\My Projects\ProjectB\ProjectB.UUI"
exit
NOTE: You can substitute DisplayR.pro.exe. Make sure to include the surrounding quotes.
2. Create a master batch file that will run both of the project batch files. This is the batch file that is
actually invoked.
The master batch file has the following format.
cd “<Full Path To The Directory Containing Project Batch Files>”
START <Name of Project A Batch File>
START <Name of Project B Batch File>
exit
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Both LaunchProjectA.bat and LaunchProjectB.bat are in the same directory, C:\batch:
cd "C:\batch"
START LaunchProjectA.bat
START LaunchProjectB.bat
exit
Using the Event Log Viewer
The Event Log Viewer is started at Runtime by default. This window displays a list of communication
transactions and error messages for a project. If the Event Log Viewer is not open, choose View
Event Log to open it.
The window that appears will be similar to the following example.
A
B
C
D
E
(A) List Area. The list area posts event messages as they occur. Messages will have a date and
time stamp, and a brief message describing the communications event that occurred.
See also, "Appendix A: PAC Display Troubleshooting”.
Messages posted to the event log can also be saved to a disk file. Refer to “Configuring the Event Log
File” on page 346 for more information about doing this.
(B) Auto Restore on New Message. To make the Event Log Viewer appear in the foreground
whenever a new message is posted, select Auto Restore on New Message. This option won’t be
available if Prevent disabling was selected when the project was set up in PAC Display Configurator.
(C) Enable “Awaiting Connection” Messages. To display or hide common error messages
that occur when a PAC Display project starts, select or deselect the Enable “Awaiting Connection”
Messages option.
(D) Clear. Click Clear to erase the list of event messages.
(E) Close. After reviewing an event message, you can keep the Event Log Viewer window open, or
close it using the Close button (E).
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Viewing Logged-In Users in Runtime
NOTE: This function is one of PAC Display’s numerous security features, including the ability to:
•
Assign a password to the PAC Display project to prevent unauthorized users from opening it in
PAC Display Configurator. (See ““Protecting a Project with a Password” on page 50.)
•
Assign a password to individual windows in a PAC Display project to prevent unauthorized users
from opening them. (See “Modifying Draw or URL Windows” on page 102.)
•
Allow or deny operator access to individual graphic objects, based on configured, authorized users
and groups. (See “Security Settings for Graphic Objects and Dynamic Attributes” on page 161.)
•
Allow operator access to the HMI, as well as log all HMI use and operator actions to an encrypted
archive. (See “Runtime Setup: Security Tab” on page 326.)
In the Runtime menu bar, click Security > View Logged-in User to view users who are currently
logged in to the project.
Viewing and Changing Control Engines
To view and change the control engines and I/O units configured for the PAC Display project, choose
ViewConfiguration Status to open the Current Device Configuration window and then click the
Devices tab. The information in this window updates automatically as control engines and I/O
units—or devices—are enabled or disabled, or change states between active and inactive.
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The Current Device Configuration window can be left open or minimized while the PAC Display
project is running.
A
B
C
D
E
(A) IP Addresses. IP addresses for both primary and secondary control engines, as well as any
Ethernet-based I/O units used with those control engines, are listed here. For each device the
following information is displayed:
Device IP Address Assigned IP address for the device. If a secondary control engine or an
I/O unit has been configured for that device, a plus sign “+” appears in front of the IP address.
Click the plus sign “+” to see the IP address and status information for that device. Primary
control engine IP addresses are displayed in red, and other devices are displayed in blue.
Enabled/Disabled State Device availability status; if the device is enabled, it is available for
use with a PAC Display project and can be made active. If the device is disabled, it cannot be
made active.
Active/Inactive State Device activity status; an active device is a control engine or I/O unit
that the PAC Display project is currently trying to communicate with. An inactive device is one
that is not being used for communication.
Timeout When a connection has been established with a device, this is the length of time
(in ms) that the PAC Display project will attempt to communicate with the control engine after
no communications are received.
Retries When sending and receiving information to and from the primary control engine,
this is the number of times that the PAC Display project will attempt to communicate with the
control engine after no communications are received.
Connect Timeout When trying to connect to the primary control engine, this is the length
of time (in ms) that the PAC Display project will try to communicate before switching to
another control engine.
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(B) Enable/Disable. Select a device and do one of the following:
•
Click Enable to make that device available for use by the PAC Display project.
•
Click Disable to make the selected device unavailable to the PAC Display project.
•
Click Set Active to de-activate any currently active device and make the selected device active.
Timeouts and Retries—For any control engine that’s selected, you can also change Timeout,
Retries, and Connect Timeout values.
(C) Expand/Collapse All. Click Expand All to show primary and secondary control engines plus
any Ethernet-based I/O units. Click Collapse All to show only the primary control engines and I/O
units.
(D) View Log. Click View Log to open the file ConfigInfo.txt in Windows Notepad. This text file is
created and updated whenever any of the listed device parameters are modified.
(E) Close. Click Close to close the window and save any changes you made.
Viewing and Changing Scanner Status
To view and change the status of scanners used in the PAC Display project, choose View
Configuration Status to open the Configuration Status window, and then click the Scanners tab. This
window updates automatically as the scanners are enabled or disable, or change states between
active and inactive, and can be left open or minimized while the PAC Display project is running. (For
information on what a scanner is, see “Configuring the Scanner” on page 74.)
A
B
C
D
(A) List Area. Scanners used by the PAC Display project are listed here by the Windows Network
name of the computer the scanner is running on. For each scanner the following information is
displayed:
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Scanner Location Name of the PC running the scanner. Primary scanners are displayed in
red, and secondary scanners are displayed in blue.
Active/Inactive State Scanner activity status; an active scanner is checking control engine
tags and I/O unit values, while an inactive one is not.
Enabled/Disabled State Scanner availability status; if the scanner is enabled, it can be used
with a PAC Display project and can be made active. If the scanner is disabled, it cannot be made
active.
Backup Node If a secondary scanner has been configured, that scanner is listed here. (See
“Configuring a Remote Scanner in PAC Display Pro” on page 77 for instructions on doing this.)
(B) Disable/Activate. For an inactive scanner, select the scanner and do the following:
•
Click Disable to prevent the PAC Display project from using this scanner.
•
Click Activate to force the PAC Display project to switch to this scanner from the scanner listed
under Backup Node.
For a currently active scanner, select the scanner and do the following:
Click Disable to stop this scanner and force the PAC Display project to switch to the secondary
scanner (if one has been defined).
(C) View Log. Click View Log to open the file ConfigStatus.txt in Windows Notepad. This text file is
created and updated whenever any of the device parameters listed in B are modified.
(D) Close. Click Close to close the window and save any changes you made.
Switching a Window Between Control Engines
If a draw window’s properties have been set to allow switching between control engines, you can
access different control engines that are running the same PAC Control strategy. When you switch
control engines in Runtime, graphic objects that display control engine data will be updated to
show data from the newly selected control engine. For example, if five control engines are all
running the identical strategy, you create only one draw window instead of making a separate
window for each control engine. For instructions on setting up a draw window, see “Modifying Draw
or URL Windows” on page 102.
There are some important considerations to note when using this feature:
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•
Additional control engines that you want to switch between must be associated with the PAC
Display project using the ConfigureControl Engines menu item.
•
If you switch to a different control engine and then exit PAC Display Runtime, when the project
is restarted the default control engine for the project—not the one you switched to earlier—
will be selected.
•
Trends and SuperTrends must have the Disable Scanning option set to either “When Closed” or
“When Minimized and Closed.”
•
All tags for the graphic objects in the window must reference the same control engine.
•
Tag names should not include the name of a control engine. For example, in PAC Control you
shouldn’t name a variable “Control Engine1_flowrate” if the strategy uses a control engine
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•
Control engine names must be at least three characters in length.
•
The “Always in memory” windows property should not be selected.
•
Alarms and graphic objects using the Alarm Point control engine-driven attribute may not be
used.
•
Recipes cannot be used.
To switch between control engines, start the PAC Display project and do the following:
1. Select WindowSwitch Control Engines.
The Select Window(s) for Control Engine Switching dialog box appears.
2. Select the name of the window you want to view.
3. Select the name of the control engine you want to view.
4. Click OK.
Graphic objects with dynamic attributes now use values from the control engine you selected.
The name of the currently connected control engine appears in the window’s title bar.
Viewing Alarm Graphics
You may see detailed, summary, and history alarms in a PAC Display project if it has been configured
to let the operator do so. See “Adding Alarm Graphics” on page 298 to learn more about these types
of alarms.
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The image below shows an example of three types of alarm graphics: Detailed, Summary, and
History. Note that alarm data can be configured to indicate its status (Alarm, Normal, Warning,
Acknowledged, and Silenced).
A
B
C
D
E
F
(A) List Area. To sort the information, click the column name of the item you’d like to sort by. Click
the column name again to reverse the sort order. To change the location where columns appear in
an alarm graphic, click the name of a column and drag it to a new location.
(B) Acknowledge. To acknowledge and turn off a single active alarm, select an alarm and click
Acknowledge.
(C) Acknowledge All. Click this button to acknowledge and turn off all active alarms.
(D) Silence. (Detailed alarms only) To silence a single active alarm, select an alarm and click
Silence. Silencing an alarm is similar to acknowledging an alarm, and the alarm will not re-alarm
until it has been unsilenced.
(E) UnSilence. (Detailed alarms only) To unsilence an alarm that has been silenced, select the
alarm and click UnSilence.
(F) Clear. (History alarms only) Clears the list of alarms.
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Modifying Alarm Points
You may be able to modify alarm points in the PAC Display project if it has been configured to let the
operator do so. See “Configuring Alarm Points” on page 280 to learn more about configuring alarm
points. Also see “Configuring Project Alarms” on page 303 for information about setting alarm
options in Runtime.
Alarm point settings can be changed in each one of the four alarm ranges available: HiHi, Hi,
Normal, Lo, and LoLo. Each alarm point state has a value that defines its range:
•
HiHi alarms are greater than or equal to the HiHi Value.
•
Hi alarms are greater than or equal to the Hi value and less than the HiHi value.
•
Lo alarms are less than or equal to the Lo value and greater than the LoLo value.
•
LoLo alarm are less than or equal to the LoLo level.
The normal state is between the Hi and Lo values. Each level can enabled or disabled, but at least
one alarm state (HiHi, Hi, Lo, or LoLo) must be enabled.
To view the alarm point settings:
1. Select AlarmModify Alarm Points to open the Alarm Points dialog box.
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2. Select the alarm point name and then click Modify.
A
B
C
D
(A) Enable. Select this check box to enable the alarm level for an alarm range.
(B) More. Click the More button to change the Persistence Time or the Automatic Re-Alarming
Time in milliseconds or seconds. The persistence time is the time that elapses before the alarm point
is triggered. The re-alarming time is the time that elapses before the alarm point is re-triggered.
(B) Value. Enter the value for an alarm level in the Value field.
(C) Priority. To set a priority for an alarm point, enter an integer value between 0 and 999.
Priority fields define an integer value for each alarm level, and can be useful for displaying the
relative importance of different alarm points. Additionally, you can filter out alarms with lower
priorities.
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Disabling Alarm Points in Runtime
You can disable individual alarm points in Runtime for the current Runtime session only. This is not a
persistent option. Disabling an alarm point takes effect after any current processing is being
performed on the selected alarm point.
To disable one or more alarm points:
1. Select Alarm > Disable Alarm Points.
2. In the Disable Alarm Points dialog box, select individual that want to disable, or select Select All.
3. Click OK.
NOTE: If you re-enable an alarm point, re-enabling will not actually take effect until the current value of
the alarm point changes. If the alarm point is re-enabled while in an alarmed state, this could mean that
an alarm point will not appear in an alarm graphic, and its configured sound may not play.
Using SuperTrends in Runtime
If a SuperTrend is included in a PAC Display project, you can control how you view the trend data
that appears in the SuperTrend window. For example, you can zoom in to see a smaller slice of a
trend line, or, if historical data is being collected, you can switch between views of real-time and
historical data.
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A sample SuperTrend window appears below. It shows the controls you can use to display
SuperTrend information. Note that most of the controls that appear below are available only when
historical mode has been selected.
To beginning
Back one screen
Active pen selector
Active pen scaling adjustment
Zoom out
Historical mode
Normal view Zoom
Real-time mode
Controls
Zoom in
Back one major division
Forward one major division
Forward one screen
To end
Scrolling Controls
•
Use scrolling controls to move back and forth in a graph of historical data.
•
Use zoom controls to increase or reduce the image visible in the graph.
•
To select an active pen, click the drop-down list and select a pen from the names that appear.
If the y-axis scaling was based on pens (see “Configuring Y-Axis Parameters” on page 212), the
scale of the active pen will be displayed.
•
To change the scale of an active pen, click the Active pen scaling tool and enter new
minimum and maximum values in the dialog box that appears.
If the y-axis scaling is Logarithmic (see “Configuring Y-Axis Parameters” on page 212), the pen
Default Min and Default Max values are limited to powers of ten. For example, if you want to
plot a pen in the range of 1 to 50 with a logarithmic SuperTrend, the SuperTrend will calculate
the Default Max value to 100, since that is the smallest factor of 10 greater than 50. If you want
to be able to zoom in on the active pen, use a range such as 1–10, 0.1–1, or .001–10. If you
want to zoom out, use something like 10–1000 or 1–1000.
•
To see all pens scaled the same when using Pen scaling, select a pen, click the scaling
button (magnifying glass), enter the scale, and hold the Shift key down while clicking OK.
SuperTrends are normally set up in Configurator with Pen scaling (see “Configuring Y-Axis
Parameters” on page 212). But with Pen scaling, when one pen is selected in the display, only
that pen matches the scaling shown; other pens do not appear to be at the correct value. By
holding down the Shift key while clicking OK, Default scaling is used so that all pens are scaled
the same.
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•
To revert to Pen scaling (each pen individually scaled), select a pen, click the scaling button
(magnifying glass) and hold the Ctrl key while clicking OK. Nothing needs to be entered or
changed in this dialog box. All pens will revert to Pen scaling.
Switching between Historical and Real-Time Modes
If a SuperTrend is both a historical and a real-time trend (that is, historical data is being collected),
you can easily change views to see real-time or collected historical data.
1. To switch between historical and real-time modes, click the Historical mode button
Real-time mode button
or the
.
When you switch from Real-time mode to Historical mode, the SuperTrend Historical Log Files
dialog box opens, listing the names of SuperTrend historical log files and the time each log
started and stopped recording.
NOTE: If there are a lot of historical log files, it can take a long time to display the files. To view the files
more quickly, hold down the Shift key when you click the Historical mode button. This lists the log files
by name only without the start and end times. You can also speed up the display time by having each
SuperTrend log its files to a different folder. See “SuperTrend Historical Log File Names” on page 219.
2. To view SuperTrend historical log files, select one or more files and click OK.
To select multiple log files, hold down either the Shift key (for selecting contiguous items) or
the Ctrl key (for selecting non-contiguous items) and click a file name.
To open a different SuperTrend historical log file, click the Browse button and browse to the
folder containing the file.
The information in the log file will be shown in the SuperTrend graph. Use the controls at the
bottom of the graph to view the information. (See “Using SuperTrends in Runtime” on
page 365.)
3. When you are finished viewing the SuperTrend historical log file, click the Real-time Mode
button to return to the real-time view of SuperTrend information. Note that you will need to
reselect log files each time you switch to historical mode.
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Enabling and Disabling SuperTrend Pens
Individual SuperTrend pens can be displayed (enabled) or hidden (disabled) in Runtime.
1. Right-click a SuperTrend.
The Enable SuperTrend Pen dialog box appears.
2. Click a pen name to toggle it between these states:
– Enabled—pen data is being scanned and logged to a file (if configured).
– Hidden—pen data is being scanned and logged to a file (if configured), but the pen data
is not graphed on the SuperTrend.
– Not Scanning—pen data is not scanned or logged to a file (if configured).
When enabling and disabling SuperTrend pens, note that the active pen in the SuperTrend object
cannot be toggled between enabled, hidden, and not scanning.
Converting SuperTrend Historical Log Files
A software utility is included with PAC Display that converts binary log files to text format in order to
view their contents. This utility is also available in PAC Display Configurator. For guidelines and
instructions, see “Converting SuperTrend Historical Log Files to Text Format for Viewing” on
page 224.
Using XY Plots in Runtime
You can change the range of values used for the x-axis and y-axis of an XY plot object if this option
has been set in PAC Display Configurator. To change range values, right-click the XY plot and in the
dialog box that appears enter new minimum and maximum values for each axis.
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Writing Directly to Individual Elements
If you use tables in PAC Control to organize variables used for similar tasks, you can modify individual
integer, float, and string table elements in PAC Display Runtime. For example, you can change things
such as the setpoint of a PID controlling the AC, an oven temperature or cook time, or the speed of a
conveyer belt. To learn how to modify multiple variables all at once, see “” on page 263.
NOTE: You can use this feature only if the table has the Allow Edit feature turned on in PAC Display
Configurator. See “Creating a Table” on page 146.
To modify an individual table element:
1. Click the table element.
The element is selected and a border appears around the table element.
2. Enter the new value and then press Enter to confirm, or press ESC to cancel.
How a Combo Box Behaves in Runtime
In Runtime, a combo box you created in Configurator behaves as follows:
•
A combo box appears initially with no items selected.
•
Once you select an item from the list, its operator-driven dynamic attributes are executed (after
verifying Security, if configured).
•
Any items that have the “Text-in” attribute are updated in real time when you click the
drop-down arrow to display the list, and when the item is the item you have selected in the list.
See also, “Adding a Windows Combo Box” on page 135.
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Using a PID Button
Click on a configured PID Button in Runtime (see “Adding a Windows Button or a PID Button” on
page 131) to display a SuperTrend in the PIDViewer for the configured PID loop. If Security has been
configured for the PID button, then security restrictions may apply for a given user or group.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
(A) Plots. The SuperTrend plots the Setpoint in red, the Input in green, and the Output in blue.
(B) Pen Scale. Click the icon to change the scale of an active pen. In the dialog box that appears,
enter new minimum and maximum values.
(C) Pen Value. Shows the numerical value for the Input, Output, and Setpoint pens. To change a
value, see “Changing the PID Values in Runtime” below.
(D) Source/Destination. Indicates the source/destination of the field: Host, I / O, or PID.
(E) PID Tuning. Use Gain, Tune I, Tune D, and Scan Rate to tune the PID.
For more information on PID tuning, see the PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700). See also, the
OptoTutorial: SNAP PAC PID (form 1641), which we highly recommend for detailed information on
PIDs on Ethernet-based I/O units. Both forms are available for download from our website at
www.opto22.com.
(F) Manual/Auto. The PIDViewer starts in its current mode, either auto or manual. Switch to
manual mode by clicking the Man button, or switch to auto mode by clicking the Auto button. A
password will need to be entered if one has been assigned.
(G) Tune/Hide. Click Tune to display the four PID tuning fields (Gain, Tune I, Tune D, and Scan
Rate). Click Hide to hide them. A password will need to be entered if one has been assigned.
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Changing the PID Values in Runtime
The following chart shows whether the fields may be changed in Auto and Manual mode,
depending on the Source or Destination of the fields:
Mode
Source/Destination
Input
Output
Setpoint
I/O (PID)
No
Yes
No
Host
No
Yes
Yes
I/O (PID)
No
No
No
Host
No
No
Yes
Manual:
Auto:
The fields update in real-time as the values of the PID change. To manually send a value to the field,
click in the field and enter a new value.
For touchscreen terminals, if “Use on-screen keyboard for touchscreens” is set in the Configure >
Runtime preferences dialog, an on-screen keyboard will appear for a writable edit field when the
user clicks inside the field. For more information, see the description for Keyboard Setup in “Runtime
Setup: General Tab” on page 318.
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Appendix A
A: PAC Display
Troubleshooting
This appendix provides tips and procedures for resolving problems you may encounter while
creating or running your PAC Display project.
If you are having problems with creating a PAC Control strategy, see Appendix A, “PAC Control
Troubleshooting,” in the PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700). For information about types of errors
and lists of error messages that may appear in PAC Display Runtime, see "Appendix B: PAC Display
Errors.”
How to Begin Troubleshooting
Most errors that you encounter in PAC Display occur when you run your project in the Runtime
component. Runtime errors can be the result of several factors: problems communicating with the
control engine, problems in communication between the control engine and I/O, or problems in
how an on-screen object is configured. Errors occurring in PAC Display Configurator, on the other
hand, are usually due to incorrect values being entered in dialog boxes.
The following steps may help you track down the cause of a PAC Display error:
1. Read any Error or Event Messages
Error messages in PAC Display Configurator appear in standard message windows. These messages
usually indicate how to correct the reported problem, as shown in the examples below:
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HOW TO BEGIN TROUBLESHOOTING
Error or event messages in PAC Display Runtime appear in the Event Log Viewer as the project runs.
To open the Event Log Viewer window, select ViewEvent Log. The messages appear along with
other diagnostic information related to your project, as shown in the example below:
Diagnostic
information from
the control engine.
The time and date of
the event message
appears here.
The error or
event message
appears here.
See "Appendix B: PAC Display Errors” for information about error messages that may appear in PAC
Display Runtime.
2. Check Communication with the Control Engine
If no error message appears, or the error indicates that there may be a communication problem, first
check whether the computer running PAC Display is communicating with the control engine.
Next, check that communication settings specific to PAC Display are configured correctly.
1. Follow the communication troubleshooting procedure in Appendix A, “Checking
Communication with the Control Engine,” in the PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700).
2. Check the refresh time settings used in the PAC Display project (Configure > Refresh Times).
These settings determine how frequently a tag on a control engine is scanned by PAC Display.
See “Chapter 5: Configuring Control Engines and Tags,” and “Scanning to Update Graphic
Objects” on page 198 to learn how these settings are configured and optimized.
3. Review Other Sections in this Appendix
Check the other sections in this appendix for the following items:
374
•
If multiple “Bad Quality” or “Not Connected” messages appear when PAC Display Runtime
starts, see “Hiding or Displaying Runtime Startup Messages” on page 375.
•
If you are having problems saving project files to your hard drive or other storage location, see
“Problems Saving a Project” on page 376.
•
If an on-screen text string object disappears when you run the project, see “Making an Empty
String Visible” on page 376.
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APPENDIX A: PAC DISPLAY TROUBLESHOOTING
4. Call Product Support
If you cannot find the help you need in this book or in the PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700), call
Opto 22 Product Support. See “Product Support” on page 4 for contact information.
Hiding or Displaying Runtime Startup Messages
When a PAC Display project starts in Runtime, multiple “Bad Quality” or “Not Connected” messages
may appear in the Event Log Viewer. These startup messages appear when the PAC Display project
requests values from the scanner before the scanner communicates with the control engine.
PAC Display Configurator
You can use PAC Display Configurator to prevent these messages from appearing. To hide or display
these Runtime startup messages, do the following:
1. If PAC Display Configurator isn’t already open, start it as follows:
– In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, press the Windows Start key
, and then click
Programs > Opto 22 > PAC Project 9.6 > PAC Display Configurator.
– In Windows 10 and Windows 8.1, press the Windows Start key
, type PAC Display
Configurator 9.6 and then press the Enter key.
2. In PAC Display Configurator’s menu, click ConfigureScanner Location.
The Select Scanner Location dialog box appears.
3. Select or deselect the Enable “Awaiting Connection” Messages check box to display or hide any
“Bad Quality” or “Not Connected” messages that may occur when the PAC Display project
starts.
4. Click OK to close the dialog box and save your settings.
PAC Display Runtime
When running the project in PAC Display Runtime, the operator can also prevent these error
messages from appearing in the Event Log Viewer. To hide or display these Runtime startup errors,
do the following:
1. If PAC Display Runtime isn’t already open, start it:
– In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, press the Windows Start key
Programs > Opto 22 > PAC Project 9.6 > PAC Display Runtime.
, and then click
– In Windows 10 and Windows 8.1, press the Windows Start key
, type PAC Display
Runtime 9.6 and then press the Enter key.
2. In PAC Display Runtime’s menu, click ViewEvent Log.
3. In the Event Log Viewer window that appears, select or deselect the Enable “Awaiting
Connection” Messages check box to display or hide any messages that may appear when the
PAC Display project starts.
4. Click OK to close the Event Log Viewer.
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Problems Saving a Project
When trying to save a project in PAC Display Configurator, you may see an error message stating that
no storage space is available on the computer’s hard drive. If this message appears, yet you know
that there is enough storage space for the PAC Display project files, check to see if one or more files
are marked “Read Only.”
To do this, open the PAC Display project folder in Windows Explorer, right-click a project file, and
select Properties from the pop-up menu that appears. If the file is marked Read Only, the check box
“Read Only” at the bottom of the Properties window is checked. Clear this check box, click OK to
close the Properties window, and try saving the project again in PAC Display Configurator.
For additional information on viewing file properties in Windows, see the documentation from
Microsoft and your computer manufacturer.
Making an Empty String Visible
In a PAC Display project, if a text string object in a display sends an empty string to a control engine,
the text string object becomes invisible and can’t be selected again. This might happen, for
example, if an operator accidentally cleared a field while entering values in a display.
This problem occurs because the control engine’s string variable is empty, so when the text string
object linked to this variable checks the control engine, it has nothing to display.
To correct this condition, do the following:
1. Open the PAC Display project.
2. Draw or import a graphic object to be used as a push button.
The object should be approximately the same size as the text string object.
3. Double-click the new graphic object and, in the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box that
opens, double-click “Send String” from the Operator Driven Attributes list.
4. In the Dynamic Attributes - Send String dialog box that appears, select “Prompt for Data” in the
Source group and click OK.
5. Click OK to close the Graphic Dynamic Attributes dialog box and save your changes.
6. Now place the new graphic object behind the text string object as follows:
a. Using the Select tool, select the graphic object and move it until it’s directly over the text
string object.
b. With the graphic object still selected, choose EditZ-OrderSend to Back.
7. Save your project and run it in PAC Display Runtime.
If you click in the area of the text string object and new push button graphic object, the Enter
String dialog box should appear, even if an empty string has been sent to the control engine.
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Problems with Windows User Permissions
When you set up controllers on a computer running the Microsoft Windows operating system,
typically you are using the computer with top-level “administrator” privileges. If someone later uses
this same computer to run PAC Control or PAC Display, but logs in to the computer with lower-level,
non-administrator privileges, the application may not recognize control engines that have been
previously configured.
If this problem occurs, you can modify the permissions to let specific users access previously
configured control engines without having administrator access. This is done using the Registry
Editor utility. Follow the steps below.
CAUTION: Use the Windows Registry Editor carefully. It is strongly recommended that you make a
backup copy of your Windows Registry before continuing with this procedure. Without a backup copy, if you
delete the wrong properties and cannot return the Registry to its original state, application and system files
can become unusable and will have to be reinstalled.
1. Log on as an administrator on the computer where PAC Control or PAC Display is installed.
2. On your keyboard, press the Windows Start key, type run and then press Enter. The Run
dialog box appears.
3. In the Open field, type regedt32 and then press Enter:
NOTE: This is NOT regedit.exe, which is a similar tool.
If a User Account Control window appears, click Yes to continue.
The Registry Editor window appears.
4. In the left pane, double-click the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE folder to expand it.
5. In the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE folder, double-click the SOFTWARE folder to expand it.
6. Navigate to the Opto 22 folder by following the instructions for your system type.
– For 32-bit operating systems, in the SOFTWARE folder, click the Opto22 folder to highlight
it.
– For 64-bit operating systems:
– In the SOFTWARE folder, double-click the WOW6432Node folder to expand it.
– In the WOW6432Node folder, click the Opto22 folder to highlight it.
7. With the Opto22 folder highlighted, click Edit > Permissions on the Registry Editor menu bar.
The Permissions for Opto22 dialog box opens.
8. Click Add.
9. In the Select Users, Computers, or Groups dialog box, type the name of the user or group that
should have control engine access, and then click OK.
The Permissions for Opto22 dialog box reappears.
10. If it is not already selected, check the “Full Control—Allow” box in the Permissions area.
11. Click OK to save your changes and close the dialog box.
12. Click FileExit to close the Registry Editor.
The added users will need to restart their computers for the new permissions to take effect. Then
they will be able to use control engines without having administrator access.
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OPTODISPLS AND PAC DISPLAY RUNTIME
OptoDispLS and PAC Display Runtime
Applicable only to PAC Display versions R9.4g and lower—OptoDispLS.exe is a Windows
service that is installed with PAC Display versions R9.4g and lower. This file is not used in PAC Display
R9.5a and higher.
For PAC Display Runtime versions R9.4g and lower to launch properly, Windows must start the
OptoDispLS.exe service before it starts PAC Display Runtime. Under normal circumstances, Windows
starts OptoDispLS.exe when the computer boots up. However, if you have added PAC Display
Runtime to your Windows Startup menu, OptoDispLS.exe may not finish loading by the time
Windows starts Runtime.
To make sure that the OptoDispLS.exe service starts first, you can create a batch file that delays the
automatic startup of Runtime. For details, see “Creating a Batch File to Open and Run a Project” on
page 56.
Other Troubleshooting Tools
Checking PAC Project File Versions
Sometimes problems may be caused by older or misplaced files. Product Support may ask you to
run OptoVersion to check the versions and paths of your Opto 22 .DLL and .EXE files. Here’s how:
1. Start OptoVersion as follows:
2.
– In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, press the Windows Start key
Programs > Opto 22 > PAC Project 9.6 > Tools > OptoVersion.
, and then click
– In Windows 10 and Windows 8.1, press the Windows Start key
9.6 and then press the Enter key.
In the OptoVersion window, click Find.
, type OptoVersion
The utility searches your hard drive and prints a list of Opto-related files found.
3. To see more information on any file, double-click its name. To sort the list in a different order,
click any column heading.
4. To e-mail the information to Opto 22 Product Support, click E-mail.
The utility saves the list to a file named Version.bd in the same directory that contains
OptoVersion.exe. If you use Microsoft Outlook as your e-mail program, a new message
automatically appears addressed to Product Support, with the version file attached.
5. If you use Microsoft Outlook, add comments to the new message and click Send.
6. If you use another e-mail program, attach the Version.bd file to an e-mail message and address
the message to [email protected], along with an explanation of the problem you’re
experiencing.
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Appendix B
B: PAC Display Errors
This appendix lists error messages you may see while running a project in PAC Display Runtime. The
cause of each error message is described, and, if possible, corrective action you can take to resolve
the problem.
“Types of Errors” on page 379
“Error Messages in PAC Display Runtime” on page 380
Types of Errors
While using the Configurator and Runtime components of PAC Display, several types of errors may
occur due to incorrect equipment setup, out-of-date files, or equipment failure. These errors
generally fall into three categories:
•
Runtime Errors—These may occur while running a project in PAC Display Runtime. Most of
these errors can be traced to control engine configuration problems or configuration problems
with the I/O unit(s) connected to the control engine. Runtime errors can be further grouped
into several subcategories based on the type of error that occurs; see “Error Messages in PAC
Display Runtime” on page 380 for lists of error messages in each subcategory.
•
Configurator Errors—These may occur as you use PAC Display Configurator to create a
project (for instance, adding a dynamic attribute to a graphic object). Errors most commonly
occur when entering data into a dialog box; if an error occurs while doing this, simply re-enter
an appropriate value and continue.
•
Windows Errors—These may occur while using either the Runtime or Configurator
components of PAC Display. The most common Windows errors occur when too many
applications are running at the same time, reducing the amount of memory available for the
operating system. These errors are issued by the Microsoft Windows operating system running
on your computer; see the documentation from Microsoft and your computer manufacturer
for more information about Windows errors.
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Error Messages in PAC Display Runtime
Error messages that may appear in PAC Display Runtime can be grouped into several categories,
which appear in the table below. Messages for each category, as well as possible causes for the error
and corrective actions to resolve it, are listed for each category.
NOTE: Many of these error messages also appear when running PAC Control. For additional
troubleshooting information, see Appendix A, “PAC Control Troubleshooting,” and Appendix B, “PAC
Control Errors,” in the PAC Control User’s Guide (form 1700).
Runtime Error Category
See
File Access Errors
page 380
Launch Application Errors
page 381
Port Errors
page 381
Recipe Upload/Download Errors
page 381
Scanner Errors (Quality Errors)
page 383
System Errors
page 385
File Access Errors
The File Access errors listed below are generated by PAC Display if an error occurred while PAC
Display is working with files or with historical logs.
File access errors usually occur because PAC Display is attempting to modify a file that is marked as
Read Only. If a file access error occurs, first check the Windows file settings for the file being modified
(or written to). Make sure that Read Only is not selected, and verify that the file has the correct access
permissions for the operators who need to use the PAC Display project.
380
Error Message
Possible Causes
Bad string, using default file name.
The tag name used as a source for a file name could not be used.
The default file name will be used instead. The default file name was
set up in the Configurator.
Can’t make directory
A directory could not be created. Check if the directory is being created in a read-only directory. Change the protection to allow you to
create it.
Directory now created.
Status message indicating that the directory was created.
Drive is full. Writing has been suspended.
A file was being written to a drive, but not enough free space was
available to complete the transaction. Free up some space on the
drive to continue.
Drive is no longer full. Writing has
been resumed.
Status message indicating that the destination drive has enough
space available to complete the file writing transaction.
Initial Writing of file: File name
Status message indicating that a file name is going to be created.
Invalid directory bad directory name.
Using default.
The specified directory could not be used. The default directory will
be used instead. The default directory was set up in the Configurator.
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APPENDIX B: PAC DISPLAY ERRORS
Launch Application Errors
The following error messages may appear if an error occurred while working with the Launch
Applications feature of PAC Display:
Error Message
Possible Causes
File not found
The executable file specified for a launch application setup could not
be found. Verify the directory where the file actually resides.
Path not found
The drive/directory path specified for the executable in a launch
application setup does not exist. Verify the actual path of the executable file.
WinExec error #
A Windows executable error occurred. Check Microsoft help sources
for clarification about the error number.
Working directory invalid
The working directory specified for a launch application setup is
incorrect. Verify the drive and path.
Port Errors
The following errors are generated by PAC Display if a port-related error occurred:
Error Message
Possible Causes
Could not read value(s) from Registry
The registry could be corrupt. Contact Opto 22 Product Support.
Could not write new entry to Registry.
Make sure you have administrative
rights for the computer.
There was a problem writing information to the registry. Contact your
network administrator.
Please reboot for changes in the Registry to take effect
Reboot your computer so that changes to the registry are activated.
Recipe Upload/Download Errors
The following error messages are displayed if an error occurs while downloading or uploading a
recipe:
Error Message
Possible Causes
Could not find the selected directory
for the recipe destination file. Please
check to ensure the path is correct.
(Recipe Upload)
The path configured for the destination file of the uploaded recipe is
invalid. Make sure the drive/directory path is correct.
Could not find the selected directory
for the recipe format file. Please check
to ensure the path is correct. (Recipe
Upload)
The path configured for the format file of the uploaded recipe is
invalid. Make sure the drive/directory path is correct.
Could not find the selected recipe format file. Please check to ensure the
file name is correct.
The file name configured for the format file of the uploaded recipe
was not found. Make sure you configured the correct tag name.
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382
Error Message
Possible Causes
Could not make directory for Destination File: (Recipe Upload)
The path configured in the destination path could not be created.
Check the drive specified in the path. Also check the read/write protection of the directory.
Invalid type specified. Valid types are:
“Integer Table, Integer 64 Table, Float
Table, String Table, and Chart”
An invalid type was specified in the recipe. Only tags of types integer
table, float table, string table, and chart are allowed in a recipe.
String for destination file was empty:
(Recipe Upload)
A PAC Control tag name was configured to contain the name of the
destination file, but its contents were empty. Make sure you configure
the correct tag name.
String for format file was empty
A PAC Control tag name was configured to contain the name of the
format file, but its contents were empty. Make sure you configured
the correct tag name.
The recipe file does not exist! (Recipe
Upload)
The recipe upload file does not exist. Verify the spelling of the file.
The specified chart state is invalid.
Valid states are Stop, Suspend, Start,
or Continue.
Make sure the chart state sent in a chart control instruction was Stop,
Suspend, Start, or Continue.
The specified control engine does not
exist in this project.
The control engine specified in the recipe’s PAC Control tag is not
recognized by this project. Verify the control engine name for the tag
name requested. Check the control engine’s spelling.
The tag info is formatted incorrectly.
Should be: “Control Engine:Tag
Type.Tag Name”
The syntax for the PAC Control tag is incorrect. Make sure it follows
this pattern: Control Engine Name:Tag Type.Tagname, where Control Engine Name is the name of the control engine; Tag Type is
“Integer Table,” “Integer 64 Table,” “Float Table,” “String Table,” or
“Chart;” and Tagname is the name of a PAC Control tag or chart
name of the type specified in Tag Type.
The tag value is formatted incorrectly.
Should be: “Index (optional): Value”
Check the syntax of the tag value(s) specified for the indexes. Make
sure a colon separates the index from the actual value, and also verify that the index is within the table’s range.
Uploaded/Downloaded to File: file
name
Status message indicating file name was uploaded or downloaded.
PAC Display User’s Guide
APPENDIX B: PAC DISPLAY ERRORS
Scanner Errors (Quality Errors)
The PAC Display Runtime error messages listed below are displayed if an error occurs with the
scanner.
Error Message
Possible Causes
Non-specific
The value is bad but no specific reason is known.
There is some server-specific problem with the configuration. For example, the
item in question has been deleted from the configuration.
Reading a tag that is a type that should contain a floating point value (analog
input, Float variable, or Float table element) that does not contain a valid floating
point number (it contains an invalid floating point number); in other words, the
value is "not a number", which is sometimes represented as "NAN", "nan",
"-1.#QNAN", or "1.#QNAN".
Configuration Error
A "NAN” can occur in the following situations:
• A floating point variable that is the result of a division by zero
• An analog input point where the analog module is not installed
An analog input point where the brain cannot read the analog module (the brain
thinks the module is not installed).
To troubleshoot the root cause:
1. Use the PAC Control Debugger to inspect the variable or analog input point
to find out what the current value is.
2. Inspect the controller's message queue, which may contain related errors or
warning messages.
3. Inspect the I/O unit using PAC Manager to check the I/O point configuration
and view the Status Read page to check the "Smart Modules Present" mask and
the "Module <module number> Times Discovered" fields.
4. Measure the voltage downstream of the fuse on the rack where the analog
appropriate input module is installed. The voltage should be 5.00 to 5.20 VDC.
Awaiting Connection
The input is required to be logically connected to something but is not. This may
reflect that no value is currently available, for reasons such as the value not having been provided by the data source.
Device Failure
The control engine has returned an Undefined Command error (-1).
This error usually occurs because the requested tag is not defined in the downloaded strategy.
Sensor Failure
A sensor failure had been detected (the Limits field can provide additional diagnostic information in some situations).
Last Known Value
Communications have failed, but the last known value is available. Note that the
“age” of the value may be determined from the TIMESTAMP in the
OPCITEMSTATE.
Comm Failure
Communications have failed and no last known value is available.
Out of Service
The block is off scan or otherwise locked. This quality is also used when the
active state of the item or the group containing the item is Inactive.
Last Usable Value
Whatever was writing this value has stopped doing so. The returned value
should be regarded as ‘stale’. Note that this differs from a bad value with Substatus 5 (Last Known Value). That status is associated specifically with a detectable communications error on a ‘fetched’ value. This error is associated with the
failure of some external source to ‘put’ something into the value within an
acceptable period of time. Note that the ‘age’ of the value can be determined
from the TIMESTAMP in OPCITEMSTATE.
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Error Message
Possible Causes
Sensor Not Accurate
Either the value has reached a sensor’s minimum or maximum limit (in which
case the limit field should be set to 1 or 2), or the sensor is otherwise known to
be out of calibration via some form of internal diagnostics (in which case the limit
field should be 0).
Engineering Units
Exceeded
The returned value is outside the limits defined for this parameter. Note that in
this case (per the Fieldbus Specification) the ‘Limits’ field indicates which limit
has been exceeded but does not necessarily imply that the value cannot move
farther out of range.
Sub-Normal
The value is derived from multiple sources and has less than the required number of Good sources.
Local Override
The value has been Overridden. Typically this is means the input has been disconnected and a manually entered value has been 'forced'.
0xC0040008
Invalid item ID. PAC Display generated an invalid ID (typically, for an MMIO tag).
Verify:
• Port numbers of affected tags. (Be sure you’re using port 2001 and not port
22001.)
• IP addresses of affected I/O units.
After verifying IP addresses and port numbers, use the PAC Display > Tools
menu to autocorrect the tags and regenerate I/O scanner tag names.
This invalid class string is usually caused by an improperly-installed
OptoOPCServer.
To test this, start the OptoOPCServer Registry Checker as follows:
• For Windows 7 and Windows Vista, press the Windows Start key
, and
then click Programs > Opto22 > PAC Project 9.6 > OptoOPCServer >
Registry Checker.
• For Windows 10 and Windows 8.1, press the Windows Start key
, type
Registry Checker 9.6 and then press the Enter key.
If any entries in the Value column read "Key not found" or something similar,
then OptoOPCServer is installed improperly.
0x800401F3
To correct this problem:
Re-install PAC Project. This is likely to fix it. If it doesn’t, open a command
prompt, navigate to the Windows\system32\OptoCom\ folder, and try the next
solution.
• If the error is for the first entry (OptoOPC.exe), run this command:
OptoOPC.exe -regserver
• For any of the other dynamic-link library files (DLLs), if they are located in the
OptoCom folder, run this command: regsvr32.exe -<dllname>
If it is successful, a message will appear saying "DllRegisterServer succeeded
for <DLL name>"
NOTE: Some of the DLLs are located in the Program Files\...\PAC Project X.X
folder. If that is the case, navigate to that folder in the command window and run
the same command.
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System Errors
The following error is displayed if a system error occurred:
Error Message
Possible Causes
System: Floating point error N caught
by signal handler
The data returned from the control engine was detected to have a
floating point error. This error could have occurred during data
manipulations at the control engine. Verify that the data has been
handled or cast properly according to its type.
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Appendix C
C: PAC Display Files
This appendix lists the files used in a PAC Display project, including those created automatically
when a project is saved. Use this information as a reference when you are looking through your PAC
Display files or working directory.
DisplayC.basic.exe
PAC Display Configurator Basic executable program file.
DisplayC.pro.exe
PAC Display Configurator Professional executable program file.
DisplayR.basic.exe
PAC Display Runtime Basic Runtime executable program file.
DisplayR.pro.exe
PAC Display Runtime Professional executable program file.
DisplayX.basic.exe
PAC Display Runtime Basic monitor-only version executable program file.
DisplayX.pro.exe
PAC Display Runtime Pro monitor-only version executable program file.
*.$$$
ASCII text file created by PAC Display Configurator using the AutoCorrect Tags
option. The file displays any changes made by the AutoCorrect Tags tools to
tag names in strategies that were incompatible with PAC Display. The file also
lists tag name errors that could not be corrected.
*.alm
Alarm log file.
*.bin
SuperTrend historical log file saved in binary format.
*.bmp
Bitmap file, created by other programs or by PAC Display. Graphic objects
saved as bitmaps from PAC Display are not saved with any dynamic attributes
that may have been configured.
*.H####
Historical data log file, created by PAC Display Runtime. (#### represents the
data log file’s internal ID number.)
*.idb
Main strategy file from a PAC Control program. Lists all objects and other
global information used in a program, as well as control engine configuration
information.
*.ini
The PAC Display initialization file created by PAC Display Configurator.
Microsoft Windows typically names the file type as a Configuration Settings
file.
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*.ixw
Exported window file created using PAC Display Configurator. Contains all
objects and tags in a specified window in a PAC Display project.
*.uui
Main project file for a PAC Display project.
*.msg
Event log file, created by PAC Display Runtime.
*.rcp
Recipe file, created by a text editor. Used to send a set of parameters or to read
a set of parameters from a control engine.
*.smb
Symbol file, created by PAC Display Configurator. Symbol files contain graphic
objects and their configured attributes for use in PAC Display projects.
*.T####
SuperTrend historical log file, created by PAC Display Runtime. (####
represents the SuperTrend’s internal ID number.)
*.txt
Dynamic attribute (or “tag info”) report file, created by PAC Display
Configurator.
*.W####
Draw window file, generated by the PAC Display Configurator.
*.adl
Comma-delimited file containing exported alarm points.
*mpdlin
Internal use only.
*pdlinh
Internal use only.
*pdlin
Saved user login file.
PAC Display User’s Guide
Appendix D
D: Menus
This section lists in detail the contents of PAC Display menus for both Configurator and Runtime
components:
•
“Configurator Menus” (below).
•
“Runtime Menus” on page 408
Note that if a keyboard shortcut is available for a menu command, the shortcut is listed next to the
command in the menu as shown in the example below:
Keyboard
shortcut
Command
Many menu commands can also be accessed by right-clicking on an object or in a window, and
then choosing the command from the pop-up menu that appears.
Configurator Menus
File Menu
New Project. (Ctrl+N) Creates a new project. After selecting this menu option, choose a location
and provide a name for the project in the dialog box that appears. See “Creating a Project” on
page 46.
Open Project. (Ctrl+O) Opens an existing project. After selecting this menu option, navigate to
and select the project you want to open in the dialog box that appears. Only one PAC Display
project may be open at a time. See “Opening a Project” on page 51.
Close Project. Closes the project that is currently open. If the project has been modified, you are
prompted to save changes. See “Closing a Project” on page 54.
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Save Project. (Ctrl+S) Saves any modifications to the files for the current project. See “Saving a
Project” on page 52.
Save Project As. (Shift+Ctrl+S) Saves any modifications to the current project to a name and
project directory. This menu option is similar to Save Project, except that you can specify a new
name and location for the saved project in the dialog box that appears. This is a good way to make a
copy or a backup version of a project. See “Saving a Project” on page 52.
You can also copy a PAC Display project to a different computer or drive without using the Save
Project As menu option. To do this, use Archive Project listed below.
Save Project and Load Runtime. Saves the current project and then opens it in PAC Display
Runtime. This is a quick way of switching between Configurator and Runtime when you are
developing a project. See “Saving a Project” on page 52.
Archive Project. The project is archived to the current project directory with all the files necessary
to transfer the project to another computer. See “Archiving a Project” on page 53.
Archive Project and Email to Opto 22. The project is archived to the current project directory
with all the files necessary to transfer the project to another computer. The project is attached
automatically to an email addressed to Opto 22 Product Support. In order for Product Support to
better assist you, a message will advise you to use PAC Control to archive the strategy files to submit
along with the PAC Display archive. See “Archiving a Project” on page 53.
Export Project. Exports the project to a text file, which can be used to compare to another
project’s exported text file using a file comparison utility. See “Exporting a Project” on page 54
Each exported text file is formatted for easy reading and includes all the information about the
project, including windows, graphic objects, dynamic attributes, alarm points, historical logs,
recipes, and so on.
Project Path. Displays the full directory path to the project’s saved location. The project’s path is
also displayed in the title bar, but if it is too long to fit there, you can use this command to see the
directory path. Click the Open Folder button to open the project’s folder in Windows File Explorer.
Password Protect Project. Protects your PAC Display project with a password to prevent others
from opening and modifying the project using PAC Display Configurator. The project can still be
opened and run in PAC Display Runtime. See “Protecting a Project with a Password” on page 50.
CAUTION: Make sure to keep your password in a safe place. If you forget your password, you will not be able
to open your project in PAC Display Configurator.
Configurator Options. Opens the Configurator Options dialog box.
Load Previous Project at Startup—Select this option to have last project that was opened in
Configurator open automatically the next time the application is run.
Auto Increment Version on Save—Select this option to have a numbered version of the PAC Display
project file created each time the project is saved.
Search Grouped Objects—Select this option if you want AutoCorrect Tags to search the dynamic
attributes of individual graphic objects inside a group of objects. If this option is not selected
(default), AutoCorrect Tags searches the dynamic attributes only of the graphic object group (and not
of the individual objects in the group). Selecting this option results in a more thorough search and
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prevents errors caused when a graphic object with dynamic attributes that refer to invalid tags is
separated from a group. See also “Saving Versions of a Project” on page 53.
Multi-Monitor Options: Center Dialogs on—Select this option to specify where PAC Display
Configurator dialog boxes should open when you have more than one monitor.
Note that these options don’t apply to Microsoft Common Dialogs, such as Open, Save, Save As,
Print, Font, and Color dialog boxes. These dialog boxes open where they were last positioned.
•
Center of Configurator Window. (Default) Dialog boxes are centered on the main window of PAC
Display Configurator. They will keep centering on PAC Display’s main window, even if you move
the main window to a different monitor.
•
Overall center of monitors. (For use with an odd number—3, 5, 7, and so forth—of monitors.)
Dialog boxes are centered at the center of all monitors. (The center of all monitors is defined by
your computer’s graphics card settings or Microsoft Windows display settings.)
•
Primary monitor (n,n - nnnn,nnnn). Dialog boxes are centered on the primary monitor,
regardless of which monitor displays PAC Display Configurator. (The primary monitor is defined
by your computer’s graphics card settings or Microsoft Windows display settings.)
The numbers in the parentheses are the top left and bottom right coordinates of the primary
monitor. These numbers may differ depending on the monitor’s size and position relative to
the other monitors being used.
•
Secondary monitor (nnnn,nnnn - nnnn,nnnn). Dialog boxes are centered on the secondary
monitor(s). All monitors other than the primary monitor are displayed in the list as “Secondary”
monitors.
The numbers in parentheses are the monitor’s top left and bottom right coordinates relative to
the primary monitor. For example, a secondary monitor with coordinates of (-1920,0 - 0,1080)
would be to the "left" of the primary monitor, and a secondary monitor with (1920,0 3840,1080) coordinates would be to the “right” of the primary.
Choose Bitmap. Selects a bitmap file for use in the project. After selecting this menu option, in the
dialog box that appears, navigate to and select the bitmap you want to include in the project. Use
the Bitmap tool to place the selected bitmap in the project’s draw window. See “Adding a Graphic
Object” on page 21.
Save As Bitmap. Saves the selected graphic object(s) as a bitmap. After selecting this menu
option, in the dialog box that appears, specify a file name and location for the new bitmap. If no
graphic objects are selected, then everything in the draw window is saved to the bitmap file name.
Any dynamic attributes you have configured are not saved with the bitmap. See “Saving Objects as
Bitmaps” on page 119.
Printer Setup. Selects an available printer and sets its attributes. See “Printing” on page 149.
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Print. Prints the contents of any displayed main and draw windows. You can specify the number of
copies to be printed and other options in the Printer Setup command. See “Printing” on page 149.
(Previous File List). The names and directory paths of projects that had been previously opened in
Configurator are listed near the bottom of the File menu.
Exit. Closes the current Configurator windows and exits the application. If you modified the current
project, you will be prompted to save it.
Edit Menu
Undo/Redo. (Available only when you have performed an action that can be undone or redone.)
Reverses an earlier action you have performed, or repeats an action performed earlier. For example,
if you have deleted a graphic object from a window, select Undo to restore the object. If, after
restoring the graphic object, you decide again to delete it, select Redo to repeat the earlier deletion.
You can undo up to 50 actions.
Cut. (Ctrl+X) (Available only when you have selected something.) Copies selected graphic objects
onto the clipboard and removes them from the draw window. Cutting something replaces anything
stored there previously. See “Deleting Graphic Objects” on page 125.
Copy. (Ctrl+C) (Available only when you have selected something.) Copies selected graphic objects
onto the clipboard without removing them from the draw window. Copying something to the
clipboard replaces anything stored there previously. See “Copying, Duplicating, and Pasting” on
page 119.
Paste. (Ctrl+P) (Available only when something has been copied or cut into the clipboard.) Inserts a
copy of the clipboard contents into the middle of the active draw window. See “Copying,
Duplicating, and Pasting” on page 119.
Delete. (Del) (Available only when you have selected something.) Removes selected graphic
object(s) from a draw window. Unlike the Cut command, Delete removes the selection without
placing it in the clipboard; once you delete something, you cannot retrieve it. See “Deleting Graphic
Objects” on page 125.
Duplicate. (Ctrl+D) (Available only when you have selected something.) Creates a duplicate of the
selected graphic object(s). The duplicate is placed directly below the selected graphic objects.
Duplicating a selected graphic object does not use the clipboard. See “Copying, Duplicating, and
Pasting” on page 119.
Select All. Selects all the completed graphic objects in the active draw window. Anything that is
not selected within the active draw window when you use this command may be incomplete.
Incomplete graphic objects can be erased by using the Redraw command under the View menu.
See “Selecting All Graphic Objects” on page 113.
Replace. Modifies tag names attached to a graphic object or objects. Allows you to link graphic
objects to a different control engine, item name, table index, or bit index. You can find and replace
tags in the entire project, or just in the selected graphic object(s). See “Finding and Replacing Tags in
a PAC Display Project” on page 89.
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Z-Order. (Available only when you have selected something.) As objects are placed in draw
windows, they’re assigned a stacking order (or “Z-order”) to define which object appears in front of
or in back of another object. See “Changing Stacking Order” on page 123.
The position of objects in this stacking order can be modified as follows:
•
Bring to Front—(Available only when you have selected something.) Positions the selected
graphic objects in front of any other objects in the window.
Before Bring to Front
After Bring to Front
•
Move Forward—(Available only when you have selected something.) Moves the selected
graphic objects one position forward in the stack.
•
Send to Back—(Available only when you have selected something.) Positions the selected
graphic objects in back of any other objects in the window.
Before Send to Back
•
After Send to Back
Move Backward—(Available only when you have selected something.) Moves the selected
graphic objects one position backward in the stack.
Align. (Available only when you have selected more than one object.) Aligns selected objects in a
variety of ways. See “Aligning Graphic Objects” on page 126.
The following choices are available:
•
Left—Aligns the left edges of the selected graphic objects. All selected graphic objects are
moved left to align with the left-most object in the group.
Before Left-Align
After Left-Align
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•
Center—Aligns the vertical centers of the selected graphic objects. All selected graphic
objects are moved left or right to align their centers with an imaginary vertical line down the
center of the selected objects.
Before Center-Align
•
Right—Aligns the right edges of the selected graphic objects. All selected graphic objects are
moved right to align with the right-most object in the group.
Before Right-Align
•
After Top-Align
Middle—Aligns the horizontal centers of the selected graphic objects. All selected graphic
objects are moved up or down to align their centers with an imaginary horizontal line running
across the center of the selected object.
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After Right-Align
Top—Aligns the top edges of the selected graphic objects. All selected graphic objects are
moved up to align with the top-most object in the group.
Before Top-Align
•
After Center-Align
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•
Bottom—Aligns the bottom edges of the selected graphic objects. All selected graphic
objects are moved down to align with the bottom-most object in the group.
Before Bottom-Align
•
After
Space Evenly Vertically—Distributes the selected graphic objects so there is an equal
amount of vertical space between each object.
Before Space Evenly Vertically
•
After Space Evenly Vertically
Space Evenly Horizontally—Distributes the selected graphic objects so there is an equal
amount of horizontal space between each object.
Before Space Evenly Horizontally
After Space Evenly Horizontally
Size. When multiple graphic objects are selected, they can be resized equally so that all the objects
have the same height and width. See “Resizing Multiple Graphic Objects to Equal Dimensions” on
page 121.
The following choices are available:
•
Grow to Largest Height—All selected objects are resized to the height of the tallest object
selected.
•
Grow to Largest Width—All selected objects are resized to the width of the widest object
selected.
•
Shrink to Smallest Height—All selected objects are resized to the height of the smallest
object selected.
•
Shrink to Smallest Width—All selected objects are resized to the width of the least wide
object selected.
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Flip/Rotate. (Available only when you have selected one or more objects.) Changes the orientation
and rotation of objects. See “Rotating Objects” on page 127.
•
Flip Horizontal—Removes selected graphic objects and replaces them with mirror images of
the objects flipped over a vertical center point. Text, trends, bitmaps, and metafiles have their
positions changed but are not mirrored.
Horizontal Flip of a single graphic object
Horizontal Flip of multiple selected graphic objects
•
Flip Vertical—Removes selected graphic objects and replaces them with mirror images of the
objects flipped over a horizontal center point. Text, trends, bitmaps, and metafiles have their
positions changed but are not mirrored.
Vertical Flip of a single graphic object
Vertical Flip of multiple selected graphic objects
•
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Rotate—Rotates the selected graphic object clockwise.
You can rotate the following objects: Bitmaps, Metafiles, Curves, Polygons, Ellipses, Polylines,
JPEGs, PNGs, Rectangles, Lines, and Text
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•
For one object:
Enter the degrees of rotation, then click OK.
For more than one object:
Enter the degrees of rotation, select one of the Rotation Options, and then click OK.
Rotate each object individually rotates each object the specified number of degrees around
its own center.
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Rotate all objects around center of group rotates each object around the center point of all
the selected objects.
Each object rotated individually
Unrotated objects
All objects rotated around center of
Group. (Available only when you have selected more than one object.) Gathers any combination of
two or more graphic objects into a single object. You can then select the graphic object, move it,
size it, or assign dynamic attributes to it as a single entity. In Runtime, only the dynamic attributes
assigned to the grouped object are processed; any dynamic attributes assigned to individual objects
that make up the group are ignored, including trends. See “Grouping and Locking Graphic Objects”
on page 113.
Ungroup. (Available only when you have selected a grouped object.) Splits a graphic object on
which the Group command has been used into its original individual components. This allows each
graphic object to be individually selected. If any of the graphic objects had individual dynamic
attributes prior to grouping, those dynamic attributes will be restored, and then configured and
processed at Runtime. See “Grouping and Locking Graphic Objects” on page 113.
Copy to File. (Available only when you have something selected.) Saves the selected object(s) to a
file and saves any dynamic attributes you’ve assigned to the object(s). Specify the file name,
location, and file format when prompted. The default file name extension is .smb.
Save Metafile As. (Available only when you have a metafile graphic selected.) Saves a selected
Windows metafile graphic to a file. Specify the file name, location, and file format when prompted.
You can save the selected metafile graphic to the Windows Metafile (WMF) format or to the
Enhanced Metafile (EMF) format. Windows metafiles have the file name extensions .wmf and .emf.
Paste from File. Retrieves graphics from a file or from an included library of industrial graphics. See
“Importing a Metafile, JPEG, or PNG Graphic” on page 117.
You can select a graphic using the following menu commands:
– Built-in symbols—Select this to choose a graphic that has been saved as a PAC Display
symbol file. A dialog box prompts you for the file name, location, and file format of the file
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you’d like to open. (Symbol files have the file extension .smb.) Click the Open button to
import the selected graphic.
– Symbol Factory—Select this to choose a graphic from a large library of graphics
designed for industrial applications. These graphics are in Windows metafile (WMF) and
other file formats. When the Symbol Factory window opens, browse through the
categories and thumbnails provided to find an appropriate graphic, and then double-click
the graphic to copy it to the Windows clipboard. (Another way to copy a graphic in the
Symbol Factory is to select it and click the Copy button.)
Now click the PAC Display project draw window to make it active, and then select Paste
from the Edit menu to add the copied graphic to the window. (You can also paste the
graphic by pressing Ctrl+V on the keyboard, or by right-clicking and selecting Paste from
the pop-up menu.)
– Import metafile—Select this to choose a graphic that has been saved in either WMF or
EMF (Enhanced Metafile) format. A dialog box prompts you for the file name, location, and
file format of the file you’d like to open. (Metafiles have the file extensions .wmf and .emf.)
Click the Open button to import the selected graphic. You are asked to navigate to and
select an appropriate file.
– Import JPEG—Select this to choose a graphic that has been saved in either JPEG format.
A dialog box prompts you for the file name, location, and file format of the file you’d like to
open. (JPEG files have the file extensions .jpg.) Click the Open button to import the
selected graphic. You are asked to navigate to and select an appropriate file.
– Import GIF—Select this to choose a graphic that has been saved in either GIF format. A
dialog box prompts you for the file name, location, and file format of the file you’d like to
open. (GIF files have the file extensions .gif.) Click the Open button to import the selected
graphic. You are asked to navigate to and select an appropriate file. GIF graphics behave
differently than JPEG graphics in PAC Display. For more information, see “Importing a GIF
Graphic” on page 117.
– Import PNG—Select this to choose a graphic that has been saved in either PNG format. A
dialog box prompts you for the file name, location, and file format of the file you’d like to
open. (PNG files have the file extensions .png.) Click the Open button to import the
selected graphic. You are asked to navigate to and select an appropriate file.
Edit Dynamic Attributes. (Available only when an object is selected.) Connects a graphic object
to a PAC Control data item. See “Assigning a Dynamic Attribute to a Graphic Object” on page 152.
After selecting this menu option, all applicable dynamic attributes are shown in the dialog box that
opens. (You may need to scroll down or enlarge the dialog box to see all applicable attributes.)
In the Control Engine Driven Attributes area, you configure attributes that are driven by tag values
from the PAC Control strategy running in the controller; for example, you can set up connections so
the value of a PAC Control tag changes the color and fill size of a graphic object.
In the Operator Driven Attributes area, you configure attributes driven by an operator’s interaction
with a graphic object in PAC Display; for example, operators can change the value of a tag in the
controller as they “slide” the object on the screen.
You can configure many different combinations of dynamic attributes for a graphic object. The fields
you need to configure often vary from one dynamic attribute to another.
Copy Dynamic Attributes. (Shift+Ctrl+C) (Available only when you have a single graphic object
selected and a control engine is configured.) Creates and stores in the clipboard a copy of the
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selected graphic object’s dynamic attributes. See “Copying and Deleting Dynamic Attributes” on
page 196.
Paste Dynamic Attributes. (Available only when you have something selected and have
previously copied dynamic attributes to the clipboard.) Assigns copied dynamic attributes to a
graphic object. You can paste dynamic attributes to one or more selected graphic objects. You can
delete existing attributes, or replace or ignore any duplicate attributes. See “Copying and Deleting
Dynamic Attributes” on page 196.
Delete Dynamic Attributes. (Available only when you have something selected.) Removes
dynamic attributes of a selected graphic object. You can delete the dynamic attributes of more than
one selected graphic object. See “Copying and Deleting Dynamic Attributes” on page 196.
Edit Text. (Available only when you have a text object selected.) Changes text in a text object.
Select the text with the Select tool, choose this menu item, and then edit the text in the dialog box
that appears. See “Working with Text” on page 129.
Edit Points. (Available only when you have a polygon, polyline, or Bezier curve selected.) Changes
individual points in a polygon, polyline, or Bezier curve. Select the object with the Select tool,
choose this menu item, and then click and move individual points on the object. See “Reshaping
Graphic Objects” on page 123.
Lock/Unlock Position. (Available only when you have something selected.) Locks the position of
one or more items in a draw window. See “Grouping and Locking Graphic Objects” on page 113.
View Menu
Hide Menu Bar. Hides the menu bar. The Esc key toggles the menu bar on and off. See “Hiding the
Menu Bar” on page 41.
Hide/Show Toolbox. (Ctrl+T) Hides or displays the Toolbox. The Toolbox shows the tools you
need to create a project in PAC Display Configurator. If the Toolbox is hidden, the Show Toolbox
command is displayed in this menu. See “Configurator Toolbox” on page 39.
Configure Grid. Displays a Grid dialog box that prompts you to toggle on or off both the Grid and
the Snap On feature. Grids can aid your work in the draw window. You can also enter a Grid size in
the Grains/Units area of the dialog box. The Grid size refers to the spacing of Grid points, measured
in pixels. For example, a Grid size of 10 means a grid point will appear every 10 pixels. Sometimes
grids do not appear because the grid size is too big for the draw window. You cannot display the
Grid without specifying a Grid size first.
Hide/Show Grid. (The Grid must first be displayed using the Grids menu item.) Hides or shows the
Grid. If the Grid is hidden, the Show Grid command is displayed.
Turn Snap On/Off. (The Grid must first be displayed using the Grids menu item. Also activate the
Snap On feature in the same dialog box.) Toggles the Snap On feature on or off. Snap On cannot
work without an active Grid. If Snap On is enabled, the Turn Snap Off command is shown.
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Redraw. Redraws the contents of the active draw window. Incomplete graphic objects (such as an
incomplete polygon) in the draw window are removed when you select this command. See
“Redrawing an Active Draw Window” on page 40.
Reset Dialog Positions. Resets the following dialogs to appear in the middle of the active display
window: Alarm Points, Application Managers, Control Engines, Historical Data Logs, Event Log
Viewer, Sounds, and Window Managers. This can help you find a dialog that you think should be
open.
Dynamic Attributes. Generates a text file listing the dynamic attributes of objects in one or more
draw windows. This report also lists the configured alarm points in the PAC Display project. The text
file can be analyzed with the next command, Launch TagInfo View Utility. See “Viewing Tags for One
or More Objects” on page 197.
Launch TagInfoView Utility. Starts a small utility program that lets you sort the order in which
tags in the PAC Display project are displayed. See “Using the TagInfoView Utility Program” on
page 198.
Find Tag. Used to locate specific tags used in a PAC Display project. See “Searching for Tags in a PAC
Display Project” on page 89.
Decrypt Runtime Operator Log File. Starts a small utility program that decrypts encrypted
Runtime operator log files.
Style Menu
Use the Style Menu to control the drawing attributes of the graphic tools. Whenever a graphic
object such as a line or rectangle is drawn, the selected style attributes are applied. Combining
different style settings allows you to draw an almost infinite variety of graphic objects. Text
attributes, including font style, color, and size, are assigned in the Text menu.
NOTE: Trends and bitmaps are not affected by style settings.
Line Color. Presents a color palette you can use to assign or change the line color of the selected
graphic object. If no graphic object is selected, the color you choose is set as the default and is then
applied as the line color to all objects you subsequently draw. See “Applying or Changing Line
Attributes” on page 114.
Line Width. Assigns or changes the line width of the selected graphic object. Line widths are
shown in pixels. If no graphic object is selected, the line width you choose is set as the default and is
then applied to all objects you subsequently draw. See “Applying or Changing Line Attributes” on
page 114.
Sample Line Widths
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Line Style. Assigns or changes the line style of the selected graphic object. If no graphic object is
selected, the line style you choose is applied to all objects you subsequently draw. Line styles other
than solid apply only to objects with a line width of 1. Line widths greater than 1 are always solid.
The Invisible line style is used with rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, and polygons. If these
objects are drawn with the invisible line style, the border line around the object is not displayed; in
order to see them, you must apply a fill. See “Applying or Changing Line Attributes” on page 114.
Sample Line Styles
Example of Invisible Line Style
Fill Color. Assigns or changes the fill color of the selected graphic object. If no graphic object is
selected, the fill color you choose is applied to all objects you subsequently draw. Fill colors affect
only rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, and polygons. See “Applying or Changing Fill Attributes”
on page 116.
Background Color. Assigns or changes the color used behind the fill pattern of the selected
graphic object. If no graphic object is selected, the background color you choose is applied to the fill
pattern of all objects you subsequently draw. Background colors for fill patterns affect only
rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, and polygons. See “Applying or Changing Fill Attributes” on
page 116.
Fill Pattern. Assigns or changes the fill pattern of the selected graphic object. If no graphic object
is selected, the fill pattern you choose is applied to all objects you subsequently draw. See “Applying
or Changing Fill Attributes” on page 116.
Fill patterns affect only rectangles, round rectangles, ellipses, and polygons. If you select a Fill Pattern
and your selected objects still remain unfilled, it may be that the Fill Color is set to white (or a color
equal to its background), or that the Fill Pattern is set to Invisible. Also, you cannot apply more than
one Fill Pattern to any graphic object. This includes using a Percent fill, which fills an object with a
percentage of black, creating levels of gray.
Example of Solid and Invisible Fill
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Example of Percent Fills
Example Fill Patterns
Opaque. Determines how non-solid primary graphic objects, such as dotted and dashed lines,
interact with overlapping objects and background colors. When the opaque style is set, overlapped
graphic objects and background colors are overwritten. See “Applying or Changing Line Attributes”
on page 114.
Transparent. The opposite of Opaque, Transparent also determines how non-solid primary
graphic objects, such as dotted and dashed lines, interact with overlapping objects and background
colors. When the transparent style is set, overlapped graphic objects and background colors are
overwritten only by the solid portion of the line. See “Applying or Changing Line Attributes” on
page 114.
Text Menu
The Text menu items allow you to control text attributes. Text attributes may be set before the text is
placed in the draw window, or changed after it is placed. Style attributes selected from the Style
menu do not affect text. See “Formatting Text” on page 130.
Font. Assigns or changes the font of the selected text. If no text is selected, the font you choose is
set as the default and is then used for all text you subsequently place.
PAC Display supports all TrueType fonts, as well as the ones shown below:
Examples of Supported Fonts
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Size. Assigns or changes the size of the selected text. If no text is selected, the size you choose is set
as the default and is then used for all text you subsequently place. Specify the size of the text in
points; any value between 5 and 500 may be used.
Examples of Prop Serif Font at Different Point
Color. Assigns or changes the color of the selected text. If no text is selected, the color you choose
is applied to all text you subsequently place. PAC Display also supports custom color creation.
Background. Assigns or changes the background color of the selected text. If no text is selected,
the background color you choose is applied to all text you subsequently place. Background colors
apply only to opaque text; transparent text is not affected by this setting.
Text Style. Assigns or changes the style of the selected text. If no text is selected, the style you
choose is applied to all text you subsequently place. PAC Display supports normal, bold, italics,
underline, and strikeout text styles. You can apply multiple styles to text. For instance, you can apply
both bold and italics to any text.
Examples of Text Style
Opaque. Determines how text appears when overlapping other objects. Opaque style is applied to
text just like any other style. If the text is set to Opaque, objects under the text will be overwritten by
the text background color.
Example of Opaque Text
Transparent. Determines how text appears when overlapping other objects. The opposite of
opaque, if the text is set to transparent, objects under the text will remain visible and unaffected by
the text background color.
Example of Transparent Text
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Configure Menu
Control Engine(s). Selects which PAC Control strategy (or strategies) are used for this project. The
PAC Display Configurator uses the tag database from the strategy to connect the appropriate PAC
Control data item to the dynamic attribute of a dynamic object. The control engine Properties dialog
box prompts for the PAC Control strategy. If a PAC Control strategy is not configured for this project,
dynamic attributes cannot be assigned to any dynamic objects. See “Configuring Control Engines”
on page 68.
Refresh Times. Changes the scan time for a refresh time group. The Refresh Time dialog box
prompts you for the new times. See “Configuring Scan Rates” on page 199 for more information
about configuring refresh times.
Alarm Points. Displays all configured alarm points by user-specified names. This dialog box also
allows you to add, modify, or delete alarm points. See “Configuring Alarm Points” on page 280.
Alarming Setup. Configures alarming features. The Options page sets up various Runtime options,
the Logging page sets up file and printer logging, and the Sound page sets up sound functions. See
“Configuring Project Alarms” on page 303 for more information.
Historical Data Log. Creates historical data logs. A Historical Log List dialog box is displayed and
lists the historical data log files that have been created. This command allows you to modify which
points are recorded and how frequently data is logged to the files. See “Configuring a Historical Data
Log” on page 237 for more information about historical data logs.
Event Log. Records a message caused by an event which can be configured to log to a disk file. You
can change parameters such as the number of messages saved, the delimiter used between
messages, and the file rollover period. File name extensions are .msg. The number of files retained
on disk for an event log is also set within the dialog box. When the limit is reached during Runtime,
the file with the oldest time stamp is deleted. See “Using the Event Log Viewer” on page 356.
(Pro only) You can also log event messages to an ODBC-compliant database. See “Configuring the
Event Log File” on page 346.
SuperTrend Remote Logging. If the same PAC Display project is running on more than one
computer, this menu item allows you to select the computer that will collect and process
SuperTrend historical data. See “Remote SuperTrend Logging” on page 218.
Applications. Adds or modifies application managers for use in the project. The Application
Manager List dialog box displays available application managers for the project. The Application
Manager Configuration dialog box lets you select the program file, working directory, launch
options, initial display view, and trigger for the application manager. See “Launching Applications”
on page 256 for more information about launching applications based on a trigger.
Recipes. Configures download or upload of recipes to a control engine by a trigger. This method of
recipe management does not require a graphic object to be selected during Runtime for the recipe
action to occur. See “Configuring a Recipe Upload” on page 274 and “Configuring a Recipe Upload”
on page 274 for more information about trigger-based recipe uploads and downloads.
Snapshots. Captures the whole screen and saves it as a bitmap file. You can use snapshots to
review what occurred in Runtime over a period of time, or to capture a triggered event.
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Snapshots are taken according to a time interval that you configure. You can use triggers to start and
stop the process. See “Configuring Screen Snapshots” on page 57.
Sounds. Selects sounds and assigns their trigger for use in the project. The Sounds dialog box lists
the available sounds for the project. The Sound Configuration dialog box lets you configure start and
stop triggers with the Trigger dialog box. The Sound Configuration dialog box also prompts you for
the sound file. See “Configuring a Sound” on page 261 for more information about triggering
sounds.
Window State. Adds or makes changes to existing window managers. The Window Manager List
dialog box displays all currently configured window managers and allows access to the Window
Manager Configuration dialog box. The Window Manager Configuration dialog box allows you to
change triggers with the Window Manager Start Trigger dialog box and control the draw window
visual state with the Pop Window dialog box. See “Configuring Trigger-Based Window States” on
page 262 for more information about trigger-based window states.
Scanner Location. (Basic only) Allows you to use a remote computer running OptoOPCServer as a
scanner. And, you can set the Scanner Heartbeat Check Interval, the interval in seconds at which
PAC Display will check to see if the scanner is operating. Select the Enable “Awaiting Connection”
Messages check box to display all startup messages. See “Configuring the Scanner” on page 74.
Scanner Defaults. (Pro only) Opens a dialog box for you to set the Scanner Heartbeat Check
Interval (the interval in seconds at which PAC Display will check to see if the scanner is operating).
Select the Enable “Awaiting Connection” Messages check box to display all startup messages. See
“Configuring the Scanner” on page 74.
Secondary Scanner Location. (Pro only) Opens a dialog box for you to set up a secondary
scanner that will be used when the primary scanner is not available. See “Configuring a Remote
Scanner in PAC Display Pro” on page 77.
ODBC Data Source. (Pro only) Opens a dialog that allows you to select an ODBC database that
has been set up to log SuperTrend, historical, and Runtime operator data. Currently supported
databases are MySQL, Microsoft Access, and Microsoft SQL Server. In order to use this feature, the
database must already have been created, and the ODBC connector must be configured. For details,
see page 61.
Runtime. Opens a configuration dialog for setting up the PAC Display Runtime session, including
appearance, security configuration, and much more. Using PAC Display Configurator, you can
specify which windows are open or closed, whether the menu is displayed, and whether or not the
operator can exit the program. You can also customize options for the Event Log Viewer, a window
that displays messages about the status and other characteristics of a PAC Display project. And you
can control whether a PAC Display project gathers I/O unit information, such as I/O point states and
values, from tags on a control engine or directly from an I/O unit itself. For more information,
“Configuring Runtime” on page 317.
Tools Menu
AutoCorrect Tags. Run this tool when you first configure a strategy for your project and after
making changes to your project. The tool verifies tag names from a strategy for compatibility with
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PAC Display and changes the tag names where necessary. The tool creates a text file with the file
extension .$$$ that summarizes the changes that the tool made to any tag names. Refer to
“Correcting Tags from a Strategy” on page 91 for more information about this command.
Regenerate IO Scanner Tag Names. Use this option to regenerate I/O scanner tag names This is
typically done after autocorrecting invalid tags. See also error 0xC0040008, “Scanner Errors (Quality
Errors)” on page 383.
Create Recipe File. Opens the Create Recipe File dialog box for creating either recipe download
file or a recipe upload template. For more information, see “Creating a Recipe Download File” on
page 265 and “Creating a Recipe Upload Template” on page 267.
Edit Recipe File. Allows you to edit an existing recipe file. See “Editing a Recipe Download File” on
page 269.
Validate Recipe File. Validates the format of a recipe file, including the structure, tags, and index
values. See “Basic Recipe File Format” on page 270.
Convert SuperTrend Files. Converts a SuperTrend either from text to binary format, or from
binary to text format. See “Converting a SuperTrend Historical Log File for Viewing” on page 224.
Window Menu
PAC Display Configurator allows you to configure several draw windows per project. The Window
menu items control the number and properties of each draw window in a project. You can create
draw windows, delete draw windows, copy draw windows, and change properties of existing draw
windows.
New. Creates a new draw or URL (Pro only) window and adds it to your project. You can specify the
new window’s name, size, behavior, and other attributes. You must provide a unique name for each
draw window. See “Creating and Deleting Windows” on page 100.
Open. Opens draw and URL (Pro only) windows that are configured but are currently closed.
Select which window to open from a list of all draw that are closed. Windows that are open when a
project is saved are open when the project is started at Runtime. This can be modified using the
ConfigureRuntime menu command. See “Creating and Deleting Windows” on page 100.
Close. Closes draw and URL (Pro only) windows that are currently open. Select which window to
close from a list of all windows that are open. Windows that are closed when a project is saved are
closed when the project is started at Runtime. This can be modified by using the Configure
Runtime menu command.
Copy. Duplicates the active draw window. You must enter a unique name for the duplicate and
specify any properties you wish to change. All graphic objects and their connections in the copied
window remain the same in the new copy. See “Creating and Deleting Windows” on page 100.
Delete. Removes the active draw window from the project. All graphic objects and their
connections in the active draw window are also deleted. Use caution since deleted draw windows
cannot be recovered. See “Creating and Deleting Windows” on page 100.
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Properties. Modifies the properties of the active draw window. You can change the window’s
name, size, behavior, position, color, and other attributes. See “Modifying Draw or URL Windows” on
page 102.
Export/Import Window. A PAC Display window can be exported from one project, saved as a file,
and then imported into another PAC Display project. The exported window file contains all the
objects and tags that were in the original window. Exporting and importing draw windows is a
convenient way to reuse the same window in different PAC Display projects. See “Importing,
Exporting, and Saving Windows” on page 106.
(Open Window List). Displays at the bottom of the Window menu the names of up to nine
currently open or iconified windows. Select a draw window’s name from this list to display that draw
window and bring it to the front. If more than nine windows are open, a menu item named More
Windows is added, which you can use to select a window’s name from a list to display it. A window
must be open or iconified to be listed.
Help Menu
Contents and Index. Starts Help and displays help topics for PAC Display Configurator.
Manuals. Opens the online version of the PAC Display User’s Guide. This document is in Adobe pdf
format, and the Adobe Reader application is required to view it.
Opto 22 on the Web. Lists useful links to information on the Opto 22 website. Your PC must have
an installed Web browser and be connected to the Internet to access these links.
About PAC Display Configurator. Displays version information about PAC Display Configurator.
Runtime Menus
Runtime menus provide access to the Runtime commands. These commands allow you to open
and close projects, view the event log, and view the control engine configurations.
File Menu
Open Project. Loads an existing project created in PAC Display Configurator. You must navigate to
and select the project you want to open. Scanning and animation begin immediately once the
project is loaded. See “” on page 357.
Project Path. Displays the full directory path to the project’s saved location. The project’s path is
also displayed in the title bar, but if it is too long to fit there, you can use this command to see the
directory path. Click the Open Folder button to open the project’s folder in Windows File Explorer.
Printer Setup. Selects an available printer and sets its attributes.
Print. Prints the PAC Display Runtime window. You can specify the number of copies to be printed
and also set up the options available in the Printer Setup command.
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Exit PAC Display Runtime. Stops the scanner, closes all Runtime windows, and exits the PAC
Display Runtime.
View Menu
Hide Menu Bar. Hides the menu bar. The Esc key toggles the menu bar on and off.
Event Log. Displays the Runtime system event log. This log contains system errors and messages
received during Runtime. The list box contains the most recent system event messages generated
by PAC Display. Each message consists of a date and time stamp, and message text. The message
text describes events such as communications and I/O errors. Use the scroll bar to view prior
messages. If the text of the message is too wide to completely fit in the list box area, you can
double-click the message to display it all. See “Using the Event Log Viewer” on page 356.
Configuration Status. (Pro only) Opens a dialog that allows you to view and change the control
engines and I/O units configured for the PAC Display project, or to view and change the status of
scanners used in the PAC Display project. See “Viewing and Changing Control Engines” on page 357
and “Viewing and Changing Scanner Status” on page 359.
Sync Control Engine Time to PC. Synchronizes the control engine clocks with the clock on the
PC used to sync the control engine’s clock. To choose which PC to use to sync the control engine’s
clock, see “Runtime Setup: Control Engine Tab” on page 323. See also, “Using the Event Log Viewer”
on page 356.
Alarm Menu
Modify Alarm Points. Allows the operator to change parameters for alarm points in the PAC
Display project if it has been configured to let the operator do so. See “Modifying Alarm Points” on
page 363. Also see “Configuring Alarm Points” on page 280 to learn more about configuring alarm
points.
Alarm point settings can be changed in each one of the five alarm ranges available: HiHi, Hi, Normal,
Lo, and LoLo. Each alarm point state has a value that defines its range.
Alarms Enabled. Disables alarming, including all alarm graphics, sound, and logging. This can be
useful when starting or stopping a process during which alarm conditions may be expected to
happen. This menu item can be initially enabled or disabled through the Alarming Setup dialog box
in the Configurator. See “Configuring Project Alarms” on page 303. It can also be permanently
grayed out and made inaccessible by unchecking the Alarms Enabled menu item option in the
Alarming Setup dialog box. This option toggles alarms between enabled and disabled. A check
mark next to Alarms Enabled indicates that alarms are enabled. No check mark indicates that alarms
are not enabled.
Disable Alarm Points. Opens a dialog box that allows you to select individual alarm points to
disable for the current Runtime session only. This is not a persistent option. Disabling an alarm point
takes effect after any current processing is being performed on the selected alarm point. See
“Disabling Alarm Points in Runtime” on page 365.
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NOTE: Re-enabling an alarm point will not take effect until the current value of the alarm point changes.
If the alarm point is re-enabled while in an alarmed state, this could mean that an alarm point will not
appear in an alarm graphic, and its configured sound may not play.
Priority Filter. The priority filter level menu items can be used to accept only those alarm points
with a certain priority level. For example, during a startup or shutdown procedure, you may wish to
receive only the most serious alarms. The priority for each alarm point is configured in the Alarm
Point dialog box in the Configurator. See “Configuring Project Alarms” on page 303.
View Alarm Point Details. Lists the configured alarm points and their details.
Security
Log Out of PAC Display Runtime. If multiple users have been configured in Configurator, you
can log out of Runtime to allow another user to log in. See “Logging In to and Out of Runtime” on
page 353.
Change Login Password. Opens a dialog box for the currently logged-in user to change his or
her password.
View Logged-in User. Opens a window showing the user who is currently logged in. Also, a
message is displayed if no one is logged in. See “Logging In to and Out of Runtime” on page 353.
Operator Driven Attribute Access. If global users are configured, a configured user can log in
and access any security-configured operator-driven dynamic attribute. See “Configuring Global
Operators” on page 338).
Add/Modify User. Add, modify, or delete a user name in the list of users allowed to log in to
Runtime. See “Configuring Runtime User Logins” on page 328.
Tools
Convert SuperTrend Files. Converts a SuperTrend either from text to binary format, or from
binary to text format. See “Converting SuperTrend Historical Log Files to Text Format for Viewing” on
page 224.
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Window Menu
Open. Opens any Runtime window that is currently closed. An Open Window dialog box displays a
list of closed windows from which you can select the window to open.
Close. Opens the Close Window dialog box. Use this dialog box to close windows. All currently
open and iconified windows are listed and any number of them may be selected for closing. If
windows are closed in PAC Display Runtime, any scanning of tag values associated with the
windows ceases until the window is opened again.
Switch Control Engines. Use to connect to different control engines running the same PAC
Control strategy. Select one or more project windows and then select a control engine. All objects
with dynamic attributes will now use tag values from that control engine. See “Switching a Window
Between Control Engines” on page 360 for more information.
(Open Window List). Displays currently open or iconified windows. Up to nine window names are
displayed. Select a window’s name from this list to display that draw window and bring it to the
front. If more than nine windows are open, a menu item named More Windows is added; use More
Windows to select a window’s name from a list to display it. A window must be open or iconified for
it to be listed.
Help Menu
Contents and Index
Starts Help and displays help topics for PAC Display Runtime.
Manuals. Opens the online version of the PAC Display User’s Guide. This document is in Adobe pdf
format, and the Adobe Reader application is required to view it.
Opto 22 on the Web. Lists useful links to information on the Opto 22 website. Your PC must have
an installed Web browser and be connected to the Internet to access these links.
About PAC Display Runtime. Displays version information about PAC Display Runtime.
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Appendix E
E: International Characters
PAC Display and the Tag Information Viewer both support Unicode (UTF-16) text to support Asian,
Middle Eastern, and other international languages in an HMI. International characters can be used in
the following PAC Display items:
•
Text tool objects
•
Alarm point names and comments
•
SuperTrend pen names
•
Window names
•
Historical data log names and point names
•
Table control
•
Refresh group names
•
Recipe managers
•
Window managers
•
Application managers
•
XY plot titles
•
Button and PID button text
•
Combo box control items
•
View > Dynamic Attributes file
•
Project export file
•
Alarm point comma delimited file
•
Operator Runtime logging file
•
Alarm History file
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EXAMPLES
Examples
Text tool
objects
Table description
Window names
Alarm point names
Using the Windows Character Map
You can insert Unicode characters using the Windows Character map as follows:
1. Press the Windows Start key, type Character Map and then press the Enter key.
2. In the Character Map dialog box:
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– Click the Font list, and then select the font you want to use.
– Click the special character you want to insert into the document.
– Click Select, and then click Copy.
3. Open your document and click the location in the document where you want the special
character to appear.
4. In your document, click the Edit menu, and then click Paste.
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USING THE WINDOWS CHARACTER MAP
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Appendix FPAC Control
PAC Display Index
A
acknowledging alarms, 292
active address, 74
Add a Runtime user login, 330
Add Members to a User Group, 336
Add/Modify User menu item, 357, 410
adding
alarm, 281
control engine, 68
graphic object, 108
historic data log, 237
sounds, 260
alarm point
disabling in Runtime, 365
dynamic attributes, 166
send email, 305
Alarm Points menu item, 281, 405
Alarming Setup menu item, 303, 405
alarms
acknowledging, 292
adding, 281
configuring alarm points, 280
configuring for entire project, 405
configuring individually, 405, 410
deleting alarm points, 280
disabling, 409
displaying comments for operator, 295, 297
graphic objects, 298, 301
hot keys, 302
logging, 311
modifying in PAC Display Runtime, 363
notification, 292
printing log, 311
silencing, 362
sounds, 314
viewing in PAC Display Runtime, 361
Alarms Enabled menu item, 409
alert window, 310
Align menu item, 126, 393
allow multiple runtimes, 320
animated graphics
and PAC Control tags, 35, 81
configuring, 151
dynamic attributes, 151
Applications menu item, 256, 405
applications, launching, 256, 405
Applying Transparency to Graphic Objects, 128
Archive Project and Email to Opto 22 menu item,
53, 390
Archive Project menu item, 390
Archive Project or File menu item, 53
AutoCorrect Tags, 91, 406
results file, 93
AutoCorrect Tags menu item, 92, 406
B
Background Color menu item, 116, 402
Background menu item, 130, 404
batch (.BAT) file
starting project from, 56
batch (.BAT) file, using for startup, 56
bitmap graphic
importing, 116
saving graphic object as, 119
C
change appearance of combo box, 140
Change Font menu item, 140
Change Login Password menu item, 410
changing
control engine properties, 68
PID values in Runtime, 371
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size of graphic objects, 120
tag names, 392
window state, 262
chart states
assigning to a graphic, 155
recipe download file, 271
Choose Bitmap menu item, 21, 391
Clear All, 340
Close menu item (Configurator), 407
Close menu item (Runtime), 411
Close Project menu item, 54, 389
closing
project, 54
Color menu item, 130, 404
combining projects, 60
combo box, 135
changing the appearance, 140
using in Runtime, 369
communication
Ethernet link redundancy, 74
with I/O unit or control engine, 350
comparing projects, 54
Configuration Status menu item, 357, 359, 409
Configurator, 135
Configurator Options menu item, 53, 390
Configure Grid menu item, 400
configuring
basic trends, 206
control engine, 68
date format, 320
historic data log, 405
hot keys, 153
no control engine, 94
on-screen keyboard, 319
scanner, 74
security settings, 161
snapshots, 57
sounds, 261
SuperTrends, 209, 215
tags, 81, 85
tags for high-density digital modules, 84
window states, 262
XY plots, 229
Configuring Runtime, 317
Configuring User Groups, 335
control engine
adding to project, 68
checking communications with, 374
communicating with, 350
configuring, 68
configuring without, 94
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optimizing communications with, 198
retrieving text from, 186
switching between, 105, 360
Control Engine menu item, 68, 405
control engine status dynamic attributes, 167
control engine-driven attributes, 151
definition, 151
controllers, legacy, 67
Convert SuperTrend Files menu item, 224, 407,
410
converting SuperTrend log files, 224, 368
Copy Dynamic Attributes menu item, 196, 399
Copy menu item, 100, 119, 392, 407
Copy to File menu item, 398
copying
dynamic attributes, 196
graphic objects, 119
project files, 390
correcting tags from a strategy, 91
Create Recipe File menu item, 265, 267, 407
creating
basic trend, 202
project, 46
SuperTrend, 207
Cut menu item, 125, 392
D
data logs, 253
date, setting format of, 320
Decrypt Runtime Operator Log File menu item,
401
Delete an Existing Runtime User, 331
Delete Dynamic Attributes menu item, 197, 400
Delete menu item, 100, 125, 392, 407
deleting
alarm points, 280
dynamic attributes, 197
graphic objects, 125
designing a PAC Display project, 35
direct communication with I/O unit, 350
Disable Alarm Points menu item, 365, 409
displaying alarm comments to operator, 295, 297
download recipe file, 265, 269
chart states, 271
dynamic attributes, 169
to a control engine, 169
downloading
OptoControl strategy, 27
PAC Control strategy using PAC Term, 28
downloading recipe file
to a control engine, 278
draw window
closing, 106
creating, 100
definition, 34
deleting, 100
modifying, 102
opening, 106
using in project, 99
drawing tools, 39, 108, 400
Duplicate menu item, 120, 392
dynamic attributes, 165
alarm point, 166
assigning a chart state, 155
assigning to graphic object, 151, 399
control engine status, 167
controller-driven, 151
copying, 196
deleting, 197
download recipe, 169
Execute menu item, 170
fill color, 171
granting or denying operator use of, 161
horizontal position, 173
horizontal size, 174
horizontal slider, 175
launch application, 176
line color, 177
multiple, 158
operator-driven, 152
operator-driven sub-attributes, 158
pasting, 196
read and clear, 179
rotate, 180
send discrete, 181
send string, 182
send value, 183
text color, 185
text in, 186
upload recipe, 187
vertical position, 190
vertical size, 191
vertical slider, 192
viewing, 197, 401
visibility/blink, 193
windows, 194
Dynamic Attributes menu item, 197, 401
E
Edit Dynamic Attributes menu item, 152, 399
Edit Points menu item, 123, 400
Edit Recipe File menu item, 269, 407
Edit Text menu item, 130, 400
email for alarm points, 305
errors
error messages, 374, 379
Event Log, 346, 405, 409
Event Log Viewer, 43, 341, 356
Ethernet link redundancy, 74
Event Log, 346, 405, 409
menu item
Configurator, 405
Runtime, 356, 409
Viewer, 43, 341, 356
definition, 34
Execute menu item
dynamic attributes, 170
Exit PAC Display Runtime menu item, 409
export
alarm points, 285
graphic objects, 119
historic logs, 245
Export Project menu item, 54, 390
Export Window menu item, 106, 408
F
fill color
dynamic attributes, 171
Fill Color menu item, 116, 402
Fill Pattern menu item, 116, 402
Find Tag menu item, 89, 401
finding and replacing tags, 89
finding tags, 89
Flip menu item, 396
Flip/Rotate menu item, 127
Flipping Objects, 128
Font menu item, 130, 403
G
GIF, 116
GIF graphic
importing, 117
global operator driven access, 331
Global Operator Driven Permissions, 338
global operators, 339
graphic objects
alarms, 298, 301
aligning, 126, 393
PAC Display User’s Guide
419
419
and Symbol Factory, 116, 118
assigning dynamic attributes to, 399
changing size, 39, 120
copying, 119
deleting, 125
drawing, 108
exporting, 119
fill color and pattern, 116, 402
flipping, 128, 396
grouping, 113, 398
handles, 112
importing bitmap graphic, 116
importing GIF graphic, 117
importing JPEG graphic, 117
importing Windows metafiles, 116
locking position of, 114
moving, 120
opacity, 128
rotating, 127, 396
selecting, 112, 113
transparency, 128
ungrouping, 113, 398
updating, 198
XY plot, 202
Graphic Window menu item, 100
groov, 101, 145
Group menu item, 114, 398
H
hardware requirements, 5
heartbeat interval
setting, 80
help
error messages, list of, 380
online, 3
Opto 22 Product Support, 4
Product Support, 4
See also troubleshooting, 373
Hide Grid menu item, 400
Hide Menu Bar menu item, 41, 400
Hide Toolbox menu item, 39, 400
Hint button, 152
hint text, 157
historic data log
configuring a database, 240
Historic Data Log menu item, 405
historic data logs
adding, 237
configuring log files, 405
exporting, 245
420
PAC Display User’s Guide
file formats, 219, 253
importing, 246
notification when logging stops, 252
Historical Data Log menu item, 237
historical data logs
configuring points, 250
definition, 235
filenames, 253
saving, 219, 253
tag types recorded, 236
Historical Log File Configuration dialog box (SuperTrends), 221
historical trending
switching to in PAC Display Runtime, 367
horizontal position
dynamic attributes, 173
horizontal size
dynamic attributes, 174
horizontal slider
dynamic attributes, 175
hot keys
in alarms, 302
in SuperTrends, 214
I
I/O unit, communicating with, 350
Import Window menu item, 106, 408
importing
alarm points, 286
bitmap graphic, 116
GIF graphic, 117
historic logs, 246
JPEG graphic, 116, 117
PNG graphic, 116
installing PAC Display, 4
international characters, 413
J
JPEG graphic
defined, 117
importing, 116, 117
K
keyboard
configuring
hot keys, 153
on-screen keyboard, 319
hot keys in SuperTrends, 214
L
launch application dynamic attribute, 176
Launch TagInfoView Utility menu item, 198, 401
launching applications, 256, 405
notification, 260
trigger, 259
working directory, 258
legacy controllers, 67
line color
dynamic attributes, 177
Line Color menu item, 114, 401
Line Style menu item, 115, 402
Line Width menu item, 401
link redundancy
SoftPAC controller, 74
Lock Position menu item, 114, 400
log files
alarm, 311
converting a SuperTrend log file, 224
decrypting, 345
discrete controller variables, 342
discrete I/O points, 342
encrypting, 345
Log Out of PAC Display Runtime menu item, 353,
410
logging operator actions, 341
login
for Runtime, 333
log out user when idle, 330
login schedule, 330
requiring new password, 331
M
main window
options, 318
Make Path Relative to Project, 243
menu bar
hiding from operator, 326
hiding in PAC Display Configurator, 38
menus
PAC Display Configurator, 389
PAC Display Runtime, 408
messages
Event Log, 346, 409
Event Log Viewer, 43, 356
Modify Alarm Points menu item, 363, 409
Modify an Existing Runtime User, 331
monitor-only version of PAC Display Runtime
features, 351
monitors, multiple
requirements, 5
using, 37, 50, 317
mouse
hot keys in alarms, 302
multiple dynamic attributes, 158
multiple instances of PAC Display Runtime, 75,
320
multiple Runtimes, 353
multiple runtimes, 320
Multiply Runtime Height By menu item, 140
N
network redundancy, 74
New menu item, 100, 407
New Project menu item, 46, 389
notification
alarms, 292
application launched, 260
historic log files, 252
recipe download/upload, 279
O
objects
definition, 34
ODBC
configuring data source, 61
historic log database, 240
Runtime Operator Action Log database, 343
SuperTrend log database, 226
Opaque menu item
graphic, 403
text, 131, 404
Open menu item
Configurator, 407
Runtime, 411
Open Project menu item
Configurator, 51, 389
Runtime, 51, 408
Open the Runtime Users Dialog Box, 329
operator
restricting activity, 326
Operator Driven Attribute Access menu item, 340,
410
operator-driven attributes, 151
definition, 152
sub-attributes, 158
PAC Display User’s Guide
421
421
optimizing communications with control engine,
198
Opto 22 Product Support
contacting, 4
OptoOPCServer
using as remote scanner, 75
OptoTerm, using to download strategy, 27
OptoVersion, 378
P
PAC Display
Basic, 1
built-in graphics library, 118
Configurator
draw window, 40
hiding menu bar, 38
main window, 38
menus, 389
files, list of, 387
firmware requirements, 5
hardware requirements, 5
Professional, 1
differences from PAC Display Basic, 1
Runtime
definition, 33
Event Log Viewer, 43
interacting with SuperTrends, 365
interacting with XY plots, 368
main window, 41
menus, 408
monitor-only version, 351
project options, 317
project window, 42
restricting the operator, 326
running project, 35
setting date format, 320
system requirements, 5
PAC Term, 28
Password Protect Project menu item, 51, 390
passwords
protecting a project with, 51
Paste Dynamic Attributes menu item, 196, 400
Paste from File menu item, 117, 118, 398
Paste menu item, 120, 392
pasting
dynamic attributes, 196
graphic objects, 119
422
PAC Display User’s Guide
pens
configuring basic trend pens, 204, 206
configuring SuperTrend pens, 215
optimizing settings, 207
performance
and visual state of windows, 36
PID
button, 131, 370
values, changing in Runtime, 371
planning a PAC Display project, 35
PNG graphic
defined, 117
importing, 116
pointer table, 83
pointer variable, using, 83
Print menu item (Configurator), 392
Print menu item (Runtime), 408
Printer Setup menu item, 391
printing, 408
displayed windows, 149
Priority Filter menu item, 410
project
closing, 54
combining projects, 60
components of, 35
copying, 390
creating, 46
customizing, 56
customizing startup
by modifying default startup properties, 55
definition, 34, 45
designing, 35, 45
opening, 51
options in PAC Display Runtime, 317
organizing files, 45
protecting with a password, 51
running, 30
saving, 52
windows, 42
project comparison, 54
Project Path menu item (Configurator), 390
Project Path menu item (Runtime), 408
Properties menu item, 102, 408
Q
Quick Tag Entry, 18
R
S
read and clear
dynamic attributes, 179
real-time mode
switching to in PAC Display Runtime, 367
recipes
chart states, 271
download file, 265, 269
downloading to a control engine, 169, 278
file formats, 270
notification, 279
selecting a trigger, 278
upload file, 267
uploading from a control engine, 274
validating, 267
Recipes menu item, 274, 405
Redo menu item, 392
Redraw menu item, 40, 401
redundant communication links, 74
refresh time groups, 198
Refresh Times menu item, 199, 405
Regenerate IO Scanner Tag Names menu item,
Save as Bitmap menu item, 119, 391
Save Metafile As menu item, 398
Save Project and Load Runtime menu item, 53,
407
relative offsets, 147
remove global permissions, 340
Remove Members from a User Group, 337
Replace menu item, 89, 392
Reset Dialog Positions menu item, 37, 401
Restricting the Operator, 328
rollover trigger option, 249
rotate
dynamic attributes, 180
Rotate menu item, 396
rotating objects, 397
running a project, 30
Runtime, 370
changing PID values, 371
login, 331, 333
multiple Runtimes, 353
tooltips, 324
Runtime menu item, 317, 406
Runtime Operator Action Log database, 343
Runtime Operator Action Log File
configuring, 342, 343
decrypting, 345
encrypting, 341, 345
Runtime Users dialog b, 329
390
Save Project As menu item, 53, 390
Save Project menu item, 52, 390
saving
graphic object as bitmap graphic, 119, 391
project, 52
scan rates
configuring, 199
scanner
configuring, 74
setting heartbeat interval, 80
using OptoOPCServer, 75
Scanner Defaults menu item, 80, 81, 406
Scanner Location menu item, 76, 80, 81, 406
scanning, 198
optimizing, 198
refresh times, 405
Secondary Scanner Location menu item, 406
security
and the Event Log Viewer, 341
configuring, 161
described, 36
logging operator actions, 341
restricting the operator, 326
setting in Runtime, 326
setting Windows user- and group-based authentication, 161
Select All menu item, 113, 392
selecting
graphic objects, 112, 113
send discrete
dynamic attributes, 181
send string
dynamic attributes, 182
Send String tags, 84
send value
dynamic attributes, 183
setting data format in project, 320
Show Configured Users, 340
Show Grid menu item, 400
Show Toolbox menu item, 39, 400
silencing alarms, 362
Size menu item, 121, 130, 395
Size menu item (text), 404
SNAP 32-channel digital modules, 84
SNAP high-density digital modules, 85
PAC Display User’s Guide
423
423
Snapshots menu item, 57, 405
SoftPAC
adding a control engine, 15
link redundancy, 74
sounds, 260, 406
adding to alarms, 314
configuring, 261
digitized sound files (.WAV), 260
MIDI music files (.MID), 260
options, 320, 321
play sounds simultaneously, 320, 321
start and stop triggers, 262
Sounds menu item, 261, 406
static objects, 34
strategy
date, 84
downloading, 27
time, 84
Style menu item, 130
SuperTrend data logs
filenames, 253
SuperTrend log database, 226
SuperTrend Remote Logging menu item, 218,
405
SuperTrends
configuring
pens, 215
settings, 209
x-axis, 211
y-axis, 212
converting log files, 224, 368
creating, 207
definition, 202
hot keys, 214
log files, 217
using in PAC Display Runtime, 365
zoom parameters, 213
Switch Control Engines menu item, 361, 411
Symbol Factory, 118
Sync Control Engine Time to PC menu item, 409
Synchronize Control Engine Clocks, 324
system requirements, 5
T
tables
creating, configuring, and displaying, 146
relative offsets, 147
writing to elements, 369
tags
424
PAC Display User’s Guide
configuring, 81
correcting, 91
definition, 35
finding, 89
finding and replacing, 89
Replace menu item, 392
SNAP 32-channel digital modules, 84
SNAP high-density digital modules, 85
verifying, 406
viewing, 197
tags for Send String, 84
Technical Support. See Opto 22 Product Support,
4
text
adding, 130
changing
color, 404
font, 403
style, 403
color
dynamic attributes, 185
display value or string from control engine,
186
editing, 130
formatting, 130
in dynamic attributes, 186
transparency with other objects, 131, 404
Text Style menu item, 404
title bar custom caption, 318
toolbox, 39, 108
hiding or showing, 400
tooltips, 324
graphic hint text, 157
Transparent menu item, 403
Transparent menu item (text), 131, 404
trends
and system performance, 204
configuring
basic trend pens, 206
SuperTrend axes, 211
SuperTrend pens, 215
configuring SuperTrend axes, 212
creating
a basic trend, 202
a SuperTrend, 208
hot keys in SuperTrends, 214
interacting
with SuperTrends, 365
with XY plots, 368
types of trends, 202
trigger option, rollover, 249
trigger-based events
alarms, 281
definition, 235
historic data logs, 235
launching applications, 256
sounds, 260
window states, 262
troubleshooting
errors and messages, 379
Opto 22 Product Support, 4
problems saving project files, 376
problems using Windows NT, 377
steps to diagnose problems, 373
text string object disappears, 376
Turn Snap On/Off menu item, 400
U
Undo menu item, 392
Ungroup menu item, 114, 398
Unicode text, 413
Unlock Position menu item, 114, 400
updating graphics, 198
upload recipe
configuring, 274
creating template, 267
dynamic attributes, 187
URL control, 143
URL window
closing, 106
creating, 100
deleting, 100
modifying, 102
opening, 106
using in project, 99
URL Window menu item, 100
Use Project Directory, 243
user group, 335
user login
log out when idle, 330
login schedule, 330
requiring new password, 331
validating recipe files, 267
verifying tags, 406
vertical position
dynamic attributes, 190
vertical size
dynamic attributes, 191
vertical slider
dynamic attributes, 192
View Alarm Point Details menu item, 410
View Logged-in User menu item, 410
viewing alarms in PAC Display Runtime, 361
visibility/blink
dynamic attributes, 193
W
Window State menu item, 262, 406
windows
and control system performance, 36
definition, 34
designing, 36
draw, 99, 407
dynamic attributes, 194
main window options, 318
project, 42
states, 262
ways to use in a display, 35
Windows button, 131
Windows combo box, 135
Windows metafiles
importing, 117
Windows NT
modifying permissions in, 377
writing to table elements, 369
X
XY plots, 202
and numeric tables, 228
configuring individual trend lines, 232
creating, 229
modifying, 229
using in PAC Display Runtime, 368
V
Z
Validate Recipe File menu item, 273, 407
Z-Order menu item, 393
PAC Display User’s Guide
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425
426
PAC Display User’s Guide
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