The Royal Conservatory of Music Glenn Gould School Bachelor of

The Royal Conservatory of Music Glenn Gould School Bachelor of
The Royal Conservatory of Music
Glenn Gould School Bachelor of Music;
Performance (Honours) Degree Submission
Prepared For:
The Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, Ontario
August 27, 2015
Program Review
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1 Introduction
Submission Title Page: Organization and Program
Information
Full Legal Name of Organization:
The Royal Conservatory of Music
Operating Name of Organization:
The Royal Conservatory
URL for Organization Homepage:
www.rcmusic.ca/ggs
Proposed Degree Nomenclature:
Glenn Gould School Bachelor of Music;
Performance (Honours)
Location where program to be delivered:
273 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON M5S
1W2
Contact Information for Information
about this submission:
Angela Elster
Senior Vice President, Research and
Education
The Royal Conservatory
273 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON M5S 1W2
Tel: (416) 408-2824 ext. 297
Fax: (416) 408-3096
Email: [email protected]
Site Visit Coordinator:
Jeremy Trupp
Manager, Operations
The Glenn Gould School
The Royal Conservatory
TELUS Centre for Performance and Learning
273 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON M5S 1W2
Tel: (416) 408-2824 ext. 334
Fax: (416) 408-5025
Email: [email protected]
Anticipated Start Date:
September 2016
Anticipated Enrolment for the first 4
years of the program:
125 – 130 students, 55 of whom will be
participating in the Bachelor of Music,
Performance (Honours)
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Table of Contents
Program Review
1
Introduction .......................................................................................................2
Submission Title Page: Organization and Program Information .................................2
Table of Contents ..................................................................................................3
Executive Summary................................................................................................7
Program Abstract ...................................................................................................7
2
Degree-Level .................................................................................................... 16
2.1
3
Degree Level Summary – Honours Bachelor ................................................. 16
Admissions, Promotion, Graduation .................................................................... 19
3.1
Admission Requirements Direct Entry ........................................................... 19
English Language Requirements ........................................................................ 19
3.2
Admission Policies and Procedures for Home-Based Learners ........................ 20
3.3
Promotion and Graduation Requirements ..................................................... 21
Diploma Requirements ...................................................................................... 21
Attendance ....................................................................................................... 21
Minimum Standards .......................................................................................... 21
Double Major .................................................................................................... 21
Juries and Recitals ............................................................................................ 22
3.4
Advanced Standing Policies and Requirements.............................................. 27
Credit Transfer/Recognition Policies and Procedures ........................................... 27
Grade Regulations............................................................................................. 28
Academic Standing............................................................................................ 28
3.5
Student Registration Policies........................................................................ 29
Registration ...................................................................................................... 29
Addition of a Course.......................................................................................... 29
Withdrawal from a Course ................................................................................. 29
Failure in a Course ............................................................................................ 30
Repeating a Course ........................................................................................... 30
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Repeating a Credited Course ............................................................................. 30
General Studies ................................................................................................ 31
Residency Requirements and Completion Times.................................................. 32
Leave of Absence .............................................................................................. 32
Student Cards ................................................................................................... 32
Student Status .................................................................................................. 32
Withdrawal ....................................................................................................... 33
4
Program Content .............................................................................................. 34
4.1
Program Advisory Committee ...................................................................... 34
4.2
Professional Accreditation ............................................................................ 75
4.3
Learning Outcomes ..................................................................................... 76
Relationship between program level learning outcomes, degree expectations, and
curriculum design ............................................................................................. 77
4.4
Course Descriptions .................................................................................... 82
4.5
Sample Undergraduate Course Schedule 1 ................................................. 100
4.6
Work-Integrated Learning Experience ........................................................ 110
4.7
Course Outlines ........................................................................................ 111
Applied Studies Courses .................................................................................. 111
Performance Studies – Common Courses.......................................................... 111
Performance Studies – Instrument Specific Courses .......................................... 112
Music Materials Courses .................................................................................. 114
Humanities Studies Courses ............................................................................. 114
Additional Proposed Courses/Non-musical Studies............................................. 115
4.8
5
6
Bridge Plan ............................................................................................... 116
Program Delivery ............................................................................................ 118
5.1
Quality Assurance of Delivery .................................................................... 118
5.2
Student Feedback ..................................................................................... 118
Capacity to Deliver .......................................................................................... 119
6.1
Learning and Physical Resources ............................................................... 121
6.2
Performance Opportunities ........................................................................ 121
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6.3
Resource Renewal and Upgrading .............................................................. 123
6.4
Communication......................................................................................... 123
6.5
Support Services ....................................................................................... 123
6.6
Faculty ..................................................................................................... 126
Policies on Faculty........................................................................................... 127
Regular review of Program and Faculty Performance......................................... 131
Faculty Availability to Students ........................................................................ 133
Professional Development of Faculty ................................................................ 133
Curriculum vitae Release ................................................................................. 134
Faculty Biographies ......................................................................................... 134
Master Class Instructors (2012 – 2015) and Short Bios...................................... 194
6.7
Business Plan ........................................................................................... 230
Executive Summary ........................................................................................ 230
Business Description ....................................................................................... 235
The Marketplace ............................................................................................. 245
Sales and Marketing ........................................................................................ 246
Business Operations ........................................................................................ 251
Fundraising plan ................................................................................................ 260
Fundraising for the Glenn Gould School ............................................................ 260
Expanding Scholarship Support ........................................................................ 260
Creation of a New Scholarship Architecture ...................................................... 260
Creation of the GGS Scholarship Committee ..................................................... 261
Raising Awareness and Building the Brand of the GGS Scholarship Program ....... 261
Donor Recognition and Stewardship ................................................................. 262
Stewardship ................................................................................................... 262
Donor Recognition .......................................................................................... 263
Expanding Program Support ............................................................................ 263
7
Regulation and Accreditation ........................................................................... 264
8
Nomenclature ................................................................................................. 264
9
Program Evaluation......................................................................................... 265
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10 Optional Material ............................................................................................ 268
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Executive Summary
The Royal Conservatory of Music (RCM) is one of the largest and most respected music
education institutions in the world, providing the definitive standard of excellence in
curriculum design, assessment, performance training, teacher certification, and artsbased social programs. After two recent decades of transformational growth and
innovation The Conservatory now stands on a full foundation on which to advance its
service to Ontarians and nationally in key strategic areas, most pivotal of which is to
achieve degree granting status for the Glenn Gould School.
Program Abstract
The Glenn Gould School Bachelor of Music Degree, Performance (Honours) would
require high school graduation and would build on the highly successful GGS 4-year
Performance Diploma in music (PDP) with unique university-level courses in theory,
marketing, composition, innovation and musicianship, all offered in one location at the
Conservatory’s Bloor Street site. The current PDP is a four-year post-secondary program
structured to help students master their instruments while at the same time acquiring
the theory, comprehensive musicianship, history, and performance skills required to
develop compelling interpretations. Learning is conducted in close working one-on-one
partnerships with a primary studio teacher, supported by exceptional “real world”
performing opportunities in industry performance conditions, as well as the chance to
meet and work with world-famous visiting musicians through an exceptionally rich
master class program.
Participants receive extensive performance opportunities as soloists, chamber
musicians, and orchestra members, both within the magnificent new Koerner Hall and –
increasingly – at performance venues throughout the province. Generous financial
assistance is already made available through the Conservatory’s donor-funded
scholarships programs.
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Benchmarks
The School benchmarks the following specialist performance training institutions:
 The Curtis Institute (Philadelphia)
 The Colburn School (Los Angeles)
 The Juilliard School (New York City)
 The Royal Academy of Music (London)
The GGS compares favorably to benchmark schools across a wide range of dimensions including:
 Small class sizes
 Individual instruction
 Access to guest artists and master classes
 Student performances opportunities
 Capacity to recruit students internationally
 Tuition, scholarships and faculty
 Access to great facilities
RCM Guiding Benchmarks
Small class
sizes
The Royal
Conservatory
of Music
Maximum
enrollment for
The Glenn
Gould School is
130 students of
which
55 students are
The Curtis
Institute
The Colburn
School
The Juilliard
School
The Royal
Academy of
Music
Curtis accepts 170
students to
maintain a full
symphony
orchestra and an
opera program,
plus select
Colburn School has
an enrollment of
approximately 120.
The Institute has
one orchestra
department and a
piano department.
Juilliard’s renowned
Music Division is
the largest and
most diverse of the
School’s three
divisions, with
some 600
650 to 700
students study at
The Royal
annually.
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eligible to enroll
in the proposed
Bachelor of
Music,
Performance
(Honours)
Degree.
Individual
instruction
time
1.5 hours of
private
instruction is
dedicated to
students a
week.
Access to
guest artists
and master
classes
Each year up to
50 guest artists
lead more than
125 master
classes each
year for Glenn
Gould students
to participate
departments in
piano, guitar,
composition,
conducting, organ,
and harpsichord.
students.
Students have
access to multiple
teachers on their
major instrument.
Number of hours of
instruction
unavailable.
However, students
get 1 lesson per
week and a total of
32 hours per
semester.
Each student
receives one-onone weekly lessons
pf 1 hour with a
member of the
academy faculty.
Frequent master
classes and
residencies.
Music Academy
students
participate in
master classes,
lectures and
coaching.
conducted
Students receive
50 minutes of
private instruction
a week.
Each student
receives one hour
of one to-one
tuition per week.
Master teachers
work closely with
students in a wide
range of projects,
often finishing with
a public
performance.
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All GGS students
benefit from 80
to 100 annual
performance
opportunities at
The Royal
Conservatory's
performance
Student
venues and at
performance
major Toronto
opportunities
venues, such as
the Richard
Bradshaw
Amphitheatre at
the Four
Seasons Centre
for the
Performing Arts
Average 30% of
Capacity to
student
recruit
population are
students
international
internationally
students
All GGS students
Tuition,
receive
scholarships
Scholarships
and funding
30% of the
Curtis's 170
students present
more than 150
public
performances each
year to critical
acclaim and
enthusiastic
audiences.
The school
presents its
Conservatory
students in more
than 150 recitals
and
performances each
year, many of
which are free and
open to the public.
100 students from
the United States,
and 70 students
internationally
N/A
All Curtis students
receive meritbased full-tuition
scholarships. As a
Financial support is
available and
provided by The
Colburn School
The 600 students
have the
opportunity to
participate in
selected 700
Juilliard-sponsored
performance
opportunities
presented annually
Many
performances a
year but does not
specify amount.
Approximately 30%
of students come
from more than 40
countries
internationally
Approximately 90%
of students are
eligible for financial
assistance.
Student population
comes from around
40 countries. No
percentage
available.
Some funding is
awarded based on
both merit and
need. In a few
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Access to
great facilities
students are on result, artistic
full scholarships. promise is the only
consideration for
admission.
Generous financial
aid likewise
ensures that every
student accepted
to Curtis can afford
to attend.
The Glenn
The Curtis Institute
Gould School is
of Music on
one of the few
Philadelphia's
music schools in Rittenhouse Square
North America
occupies stately
that is
mansions that pair
integrated with
19th-century
a major
charm with 21stperforming arts century amenities.
centre.
They have a
The Royal
distinguished archit
Conservatory’s
ectural history. A
spectacular
block away, the
Koerner Hall, a
new Lenfest Hall,
1,135-seat
which opened in
venue with
September 2011,
exceptionally
offers a magificent
warm and
rehearsal hall,
through the
generosity of
Richard D. Colburn.
Three halls are
available for
recitals and
chamber music;
45 practice rooms
are accessible 24
hours a day. And
having your
cases the Academy
can assist students
in extreme financial
hardship.
Julliard offers a
Music Technology
Center which is a
three-room
production suite
allowing students
to have hands-on
training and
experience with
recording,
composing, and
performing
technologies. In
addition, students
are also able to
compose, record
and mix their own
compositions in the
100 teaching and
practice studios,
rehearsal and
lecture rooms an
extra 18 practice
rooms plus two
chamber music
spaces at Cross
Keys Close: the
new practice and
rehearsal centre a
few minutes’ walk
down Marylebone
High Street,
opened in January
2014 several large
concert rooms the
120-seat David
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detailed
acoustics that
has been
dubbed “The
Temple of Tone”
by The Globe
and Mail,
Canada’s
national
newspaper.
The Glenn
Gould School’s
facilities in the
TELUS Centre
for Performance
and Learning
give students
every advantage
in performance
and audition
preparation in a
collegial, relaxed
learning
environment.
Mazzoleni
Concert Hall in
the historic
Ihnatowycz Hall
teaching studios,
classrooms, and
practice rooms
equipped with
state-of-the-art
technology, dining
facilities and
residence facilities.
Mix and Record
Suite. Finally, the
Playroom is
dedicated to digital
technology in live
performance.
Josefowitz Recital
Hall the Sir Jack
Lyons Theatre the
Duke’s Hall, a 400seat concert venue
recently updated
recording studios,
with audio links to
major performance
spaces throughout
the building a fully
up-to-date Creative
Technology Suite a
well-equipped
library an excellent
canteen serving
healthy and valuefor-money meals,
including
vegetarian options
a museum which
displays some of
the Academy’s
valuable and
historic instruments
and manuscripts
and which hosts
regular public
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is a 237-seat
concert hall,
The
Conservatory
Theatre is a
multipurpose
venue that hosts
everything from
special lectures
to orchestra
rehearsals.
The School’s 77
practice and
teaching studios
are bright and
airy, with clear
sound and
excellent
acoustical
separation.
Almost all are
equipped with
grand pianos,
and The School
has an
extensive inhouse piano
maintenance
research events
the Academy
Chimes shop,
which stocks a very
wide range of
printed music,
books and
accessories
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program, which
not only looks
after all of the
TELUS Centre
instruments, but
also gives
workshops for
students. Many
of the studios
have built-in
video and audio
recording and
video
conferencing
capabilities.
With The
School’s small
enrollment,
studio
availability for
practice
purposes is
virtually open
ended, including
weekends and
holidays.
Glenn Gould
School students
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also have access
to all the library
resources they
need for their
research and
preparation of
specific
repertoire in the
newly
constructed
Rupert Edwards
Library, located
just off the main
Atrium of The
Conservatory.
Students also
have access to a
well-equipped
music
technology lab
with a full
complement of
music
production,
notation,
sequencing, and
web design
software.
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2 Degree-Level
2.1 Degree Level Summary – Honours Bachelor
The curriculum for the proposed Glenn Gould School Bachelor of Music, Performance
(Honours) Degree was launched, tested and modified over the course of the past 15
years as the Performance Diploma Program. The program was designed in a systematic
and consultative manner always with a view to meet or exceed the requirements of an
Honours Bachelor’s Degree as designated by the Postsecondary Education Quality
Assessment Board (PEQAB). Best practices from the leading universities were
integrated. A curriculum advisory committee – including both internal and external
subject specialists played a significant role in the curriculum development and
subsequent curriculum review and revisions. The program was developed by
referencing established performance schools across the USA and globally. There is no
existing comparison in Canada thus differentiating this degree from all other Canadian
universities.
Depth and Breadth of Knowledge
Graduates of the Glenn Gould School Bachelor of Music, Performance (Honours) will
have experienced an intense and complex level of specialist knowledge in the central
strategies, concepts, methodologies, current best practices, historical approaches, and
contemporary practice in the field of music performance - both solo and ensemble.
Synthesis and application of knowledge is central to the program from the very
beginning and increases as they continue through the four year program of study.
These courses are hands on and practical. They require active participation, ensemble
exposure, practical work, and application of knowledge so that students are able to
develop independent thinking, critical analysis, interpersonal skills, and ability to
collaborate. Many of the classes are so specialized that there may only be 2-3 students
in the class – depending on their instrument specialty.
Knowledge of Methodologies
A large percentage of the courses include knowledge gathering, knowledge of a variety
of methodologies, and knowledge application. Most of the courses apply principles of
music knowledge using critical thinking and problem-solving skills to contribute to
solutions for better music performance. In these courses students learn to plan, design,
and carry out projects from start to finish in a timely manner with well-defined
objectives and outcomes. For example students will be expected to collect, analyze,
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synthesize, display, and interpret musical theory, keyboard harmony and aural skills at
an advanced level. Students are provided with a strong background in music history
and musicianship in order to support them with processing, analysis and presentation of
a variety of musical genres and historical periods. Students are expected to integrate
the use of technologies with current theory and knowledge in the discipline of music to
utilize in methodological studies and to present in performance practice. In addition
they are supported in the use of advanced technical skills for research methodology in
music and in exploring the background of particular music pieces.
Application of Knowledge
Almost all of the courses in the program integrate practical, hands-on application. The
field of music performance requires this approach. The students work collaboratively to
critically evaluate and investigate possible solutions to challenges relevant to music
performance in various instruments – above and beyond their own instrument or voice.
The courses provide opportunities for students to apply the principles of music theory to
contribute to, for example solutions for effective sight reading music scores or partaking
in scene studies. The program supports students in the planning, design, and
implementation of projects from start to finish, in a timely manner, with well-defined
objectives and outcomes.
Communication
Due to the highly specialized field most courses call for excellence in communication
through musical performance. Hence, a focus on written and oral communication skills
as well as presentation skills feature proximately throughout the program. It is fair to
say that communication skills are central to almost every aspect of the program. These
are life skills which will serve the students well in this field or any other field they might
explore in future studies.
Awareness of Limits of Knowledge
The study of music performance consistently involves pushing yourself to practice and
improve, both as a soloist and as a member of a performing ensemble. In order to
progress through and meet graduation requirements students must demonstrate the
ability to manage their own learning and to demonstrate the ability to work in groups.
This highlights the importance of collaboration in music making. These opportunities
allow students to gain insight into their own limitation of knowledge, and the limitation
of knowledge of others performing with them. It also supports students with the
understanding that each participant brings their own unique strength to the ensemble.
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It is the integration of these strengths that leads to improving musical performances
and breaking new ground in this highly specialized field.
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3 Admissions, Promotion, Graduation
All Glenn Gould School policies relating to admissions, promotion, and graduation
standards in this section were approved by The Royal Conservatory of Music’s Academic
Council.
3.1 Admission Requirements Direct Entry
Admission into the Performance Diploma Program has three requirements; an Ontario
Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent with a minimum GPA of 2.00 (C or
65%), English language proficiency, and a competitive entrance audition. The Glenn
Gould School recognizes OSSD-equivalency for home based learners as outlined in
section 1.22 of the GGS Academic Calendar. The language of instruction at The Glenn
Gould School is English, and a strong command of the English language is necessary for
success in our programs. It is for this reason that proof of adequate proficiency in the
English language is required before a candidate can be admitted to the school. Please
note that an OSSD (or equivalent) is not adequate proof of proficiency for non-native
English speakers. Applicants whose first language is not English must have successfully
completed a minimum of four years in an English language school system in a country
where the dominant language is English and have finished Grade 12 English
(ENG4U/EAE4U in Ontario) or equivalent in order to be exempt from providing proof of
proficiency. Please note that these four years of schooling must immediately precede
attending The Glenn Gould School.
English Language Requirements
1. Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores are required of every
applicant whose first language is not English and are used for the purpose of evaluating
applicants for admission.
2 Applicants whose first language is not English, but who have completed secondary or
post-secondary studies at institutions where the primary language of instruction is
English, may be exempt from TOEFL pending review of transcripts. An interview may
be required.
3. MELAB and IELTS testing services are also acceptable. Please contact the Academic
office for details
4. Minimum TOEFL Scores:
DIPLOMA / DEGREE PROGRAM
MINIMUM TOEFL SCORE
Performance Diploma - all disciplines
79-80 internet based test score (iBT)
Artist Diploma - Piano
61 internet based test score (iBT)
Artist Diploma - Orchestral Instruments
61 internet based test score (iBT)
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Artist Diploma - Voice
79-80 internet based test score (iBT)
5. Thompson Rivers University—Open Learning also has TOEFL requirements of 79-80
iBT for students planning to pursue the B.Mus. option through the Articulation
Agreement detailed on p. 9 of this document.
3.2 Admission Policies and Procedures for Home-Based
Learners
The Glenn Gould School welcomes home based learners and requires that such
students supply:
1. a document detailing the courses that have been covered in grades 11 and 12
2. a statement from your home educator explaining your readiness to handle
university level subject matter
3. a confidential evaluation letter from a third party indicating your readiness for
university level study
In addition to these documents, the prospective student must complete ONE of the
following standardized tests:






GED: Successful completion
SAT 1: minimum combined score of 1100 (critical reading-550 and math-550)
SAT 2: minimum score of 650 on one subject examination
ACT: minimum average of 24
University: minimum grade of 60% in one university course in a relevant
admission subject
High School: minimum grade
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3.3 Promotion and Graduation Requirements
Diploma Requirements
To qualify for graduation from their program a student must complete all program
requirements as stated in the Academic Calendar published in the student’s first year of
admission.
Attendance
Regular and punctual attendance is required at all lessons, classes, and rehearsals.
1. Students are required by The Glenn Gould School to be in attendance for all classes,
master classes, rehearsals, and concerts. The maximum allowable number of absences
(excused or unexcused) for a one term course is 3; the maximum allowable number
of absences (excused or unexcused) for a full-year course is 5.
2. Failure to attend the minimum requirements of any class shall seriously affect a
student’s grade, and will place the student at risk for probation or dismissal.
3. In the case of the Royal Conservatory Orchestra or the Opera, planned absences
must be pre-approved by GGS Administration via the Absence Request Form process.
Students will be required to make arrangements for a suitable replacement at their own
cost.
4. Students receiving financial assistance through government assistance, including but
not restricted to the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) are advised that
absence from school for more than twenty-eight (28) consecutive days (including
Saturdays and Sundays) may no longer be eligible for OSAP or other loans.
5. Three or more incidents of late arrival for a given class shall constitute one absence.
Minimum Standards
In order to progress to the next year of study, students must achieve an overall
minimum GPA of 2.00 (C) AND a minimum GPA of 3.67 (A-) in their Applied Music. In
addition, students must obtain at least a GPA of 2.67 (B-) on their yearly recitals or 1st
year jury. Students whose GPA falls below 2.00 (C) will be placed on academic
probation or may be de-registered for one academic year.
NOTE: In order to maintain scholarship, students must maintain a 75% average (B, 3.0
GPA).
Double Major
The Glenn Gould School does not offer a double major; however, students in the
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Performance Diploma Program who pursue serious studies in more than one instrument
may, after auditioning for both, request to take courses in a second area of study,
including recital, lessons and literature courses. Students who choose to take lessons
beyond the allotted 1.5 hours per week will be charged an additional fee. Credits
earned in this manner will appear on the student’s transcript, but not the term “Double
Major”.
Juries and Recitals
Juries
Performance Diploma Program - Year 1 students (only)





LENGTH: 20 minutes
DATE: exam week
INSTRUMENT: All
REPERTOIRE: must consist of four (4) contrasting works representative of different
styles, eras, and genres
GRADING: Juries will count for 40% of the first year Applied Music credit, the other
60% coming from the instructor’s mark.
General Regulations
 Performance Diploma students must obtain a passing mark of 70% (GPA 2.67) on
their recitals in order to continue or graduate.
 Once a recital date is scheduled, it can only be changed for documented reasons of
medical or family emergency.
 Students must provide the Adjudicator with copies of all pieces on the program
 Programmes must submitted by the student’s teacher to the Performance Manager
two weeks prior to the recital and must include all opus numbers, catalogue
numbers, movements of works, timings, song collection titles, accompanists, and
the names of additional musicians
 Using previously graded repertoire in a recital is prohibited, unless approved by the
private instructor and GGS administration.
 Non Credit Recitals: Students who wish to perform solo or chamber recitals for noncredit purposes can book directly with the Performance Manager.
Recital Booking Process
 Graduating students (2nd Year ADP, 4th Year PDP)
 Graduating students have the option of selecting a recital date. These dates must be
booked with the Performance Manager.
 Non-graduating students (1st Year ADP, 2nd & 3rd Year PDP )
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
All non-graduating students will be assigned a recital date.
Cancellations and Deferrals
 All recitals must be completed by May 31st.
 Recital dates may NOT be changed. Notwithstanding this general policy, the GGS
recognizes that occasionally there will be exceptions of documented illness or
bereavement that may allow for a deferral, without financial penalty. In this
circumstance the following documentation must be provided:
o 1.A detailed letter, explaining the circumstances
o 2.A letter of support and acknowledgement from the student’s private
instructor
o 3.A doctor’s note
 For exceptional cases in which the GGS Administration has granted a formal request
for reasons other than illness, financial penalties will apply
 Permission to defer a recital is given only in the case of illness or family
emergency. Requests for deferral of a recital on medical grounds will be accepted
only when they are accompanied by a valid medical certificate and will then be sent
to the Academic Review Committee for review.
 Recitals may not be deferred: for reasons of change in schedule or unavailability of
a private instructor, friends or family, cultural holidays, lack of preparation,
overwork/stress/exhaustion unless medically diagnosed, or because the programme
was not approved by your Department Coordinator and GGS Administration.
 Failure to complete a recital by May 31 will lead to a recital deferral fee of $100.
Specialization in Woodwinds, Brass, Harp & Percussion
 Recital Length
o Year 2 – 1 Recital (45 - 70 minutes)
o Year 3 – 1 Recital (50 - 70 minutes)
o Year 4 – 1 Recital (60 - 70 minutes)
 Recital Repertoire
o Programme must be submitted by the student’s studio teacher two weeks
in advance of the recital date. Each credit recital must contain repertoire
representing various styles and periods. Over the course of the three
credit recitals each student must present:
 A minimum of one (1) Canadian composition
 One (1) Chamber work
 One (1) complete concerto
o In addition:
23 | P a g e




All works must be solo, except for the Chamber Music component
(see above).
Additional Chamber works must be approved in advance by the
Department Coordinator.
Intermissions must be limited to 10 minutes and the inclusion of an
intermission cannot result in the total length of the recital
exceeding the time booked.
Memorization
o Woodwinds/Brass/Percussion: Memorization of material not required.
o Harp: All material must be memorized except duo sonatas and chamber
music.
o At the adjudicator’s discretion, a deduction of up to 10% may be incurred
for failing to respect the memorization guidelines.
Specialization in Strings & Piano
 Recital Length (not including intermission)
o Year 2 – 1 Recital (60 - 70 minutes)
o Year 3 – 1 Recital (60 - 70 minutes)
o Year 4 – 1 Recital (60 - 70 minutes)
 Recital Repertoire
o Programme must be submitted by the student’s studio teacher two weeks
in advance of the recital date. Each credit recital must contain repertoire
representing various styles and periods. Over the course of the three
credit recitals each student must present:
 A minimum of one (1) Canadian composition
 One (1) Chamber work (or a set of art songs, for pianists)
 One (1) complete concerto
o In addition:
 All works must be solo, except for the Chamber Music component
(see above).
 Additional Chamber works must be approved in advance by the
Department Coordinator.
 Encores that are not listed on the program will not be adjudicated.
 Intermissions must be limited to 10 minutes and the inclusion of an
intermission cannot result in the total length of the recital booking
exceeding the time booked.
 Memorization
o Piano – All material must be memorized except duo sonatas, chamber
music and art songs.
24 | P a g e
o Strings – All works for one instrument unaccompanied must be
memorized. Sonatas with keyboard or other accompaniment and works
for 2 or more players need not be memorized.
o Contemporary Music – Repertoire in a contemporary idiom need not be
memorized.
o At the adjudicator’s discretion, a deduction of up to 10% may be incurred
for failing to respect the memorization guidelines.
Specialization in Voice
 Recital Length (for each recital)
o Year 2 – 1 Recital (40 - 50 minutes)
o Year 3 – 1 Recital (50 - 60 minutes)
o Year 4 – 1 Recital (55 - 65 minutes)
 Recital Repertoire
o Programme must be submitted by the student’s studio teacher two weeks
in advance of the recital date. Each credit recital must contain repertoire
representing various styles, periods, and languages.
 Over the course of the three credit recitals, each student must
present:
 A minimum of one (1) Canadian composition
 Repertoire in English, Italian, French, and German. (Other
languages are optional).
o In addition:
 All works must be solo, except for the Chamber Music component
(see above).
 Chamber music must be approved in advance by the Department
Coordinator.
 Concert and Oratorio arias are permitted.
 Opera arias are not permitted.
 Instrumental interludes between vocal works are not permitted.
 Encores that are not listed on the program will not be adjudicated.
 Intermissions must be limited to 10 minutes and the inclusion of an
intermission cannot result in the total length of the recital booking
exceeding the time booked.
 Memorization
o All art songs and arias, including oratorio arias with obbligato instruments,
must be memorized.
o Any piece of chamber music character that includes instruments in
addition to or instead of the piano need not be memorized.
25 | P a g e
o Contemporary Music – Repertoire in a contemporary idiom need not be
memorized.
o At the adjudicator’s discretion, a deduction of up to 10% may be incurred
for failing to respect the memorization guidelines.
Master Classes
Frequent Master Classes are given by international artists and by GGS faculty. Student
performance opportunities are at the discretion of the visiting artist, Master Class
Coordinator, the private teacher and the Dean.
Students are required to attend all Master Classes in their instrument group during the
course of the Academic Year. Attendance is mandatory, and strict attendance policies
are enforced—student’s grades will reflect any absences. It is highly recommended that
students attend masterclasses from other categories.
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3.4 Advanced Standing Policies and Requirements
Credit Transfer/Recognition Policies and Procedures
Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition
Course Challenge
1. Course Challenge is a Prior Learning Assessment mechanism which enables students
to receive credit for specified courses by examination, instead of in the classroom. For
a list of these courses, please ask the Registrar.
2. Course Challenge examinations will be scheduled by the Administration.
3. A “PC” (Passed Challenge) grade is recorded on the student’s permanent record for
students who satisfactorily complete a Course Challenge examination. PC courses will
not be included in the GPA.
Challenge Restrictions
1. Students who are registered in a course and have submitted two or more
assignments or have written the final examination are not permitted to write a
challenge examination for the course.
2. Students are not permitted to challenge a course for which they have previously
received credit at The Glenn Gould School.
3. Challenge Exams will be administered prior to each semester’s deadline date to drop
a course.
Transfer Credit/Advanced Standing
1. Transfer credits are evaluated for all studies taken through an accredited or similarly
recognized post-secondary education institution.
2. Transfer credits are awarded to all qualifying courses passed with a minimum B- (7073%) provided that the sending institution is recognized by The Glenn Gould School.
3. Students applying for transfer credit must declare all previous formal studies and
arrange for official transcripts from all previously attended post-secondary institutions at
the time of initial application for transfer credit, as well as course descriptions and
detailed course outlines for all courses for which the student is applying for transfer
credit.
4. Authenticated translation is required for official documents submitted in a language
27 | P a g e
other than English or French.
5. Credit may be granted on a course-by-course basis or for a combination of courses.
Grade Regulations
Grading System
Grade Range
Standing
Grade
Range
Standing
A+
90-100
4.33 Distinguished
C
64-66
2.00 Average
A
85-89
4.00 First Class
C-
60-63
1.67 Average
A-
80-84
3.67 First Class
D+
57-59
B+
77-79
D
54-56
B
74-76
D-
50-53
B-
70-73
C+
67-69
3.33 Above
Average
3.00 Above
Average
2.67 Above
Average
2.33 Average
1.33 Below
Average
1.00 Below
Average
0.67 Below
Average
0.00 Failure
F
49 & below
IN
Incomplete
P
Pass
Grade Point Average (GPA)
The grade point average is the weighted sum of the grade number of courses in which
grade points were earned. Courses noted as transfer credit or PC (Passed Challenge)
are not included in the GPA.
Incomplete (IN)
An IN grade will be given when a student is late in completing course work due to
professional engagements or sudden medical, family, or personal situations. Late work
will not be accepted without proper documentation. Once the course work has been
completed and a grade has been issued, the IN will be changed accordingly. Students
have one month from the close of the semester to compete all course work.
Academic Standing
Academic Probation
Academic Probation is for a period of one academic year. Students who fail 2 or more
courses in an academic year will be placed on probation in the following year.
Additionally, students who are not meeting expectations at mid-term may be placed on
probation for the remainder of the academic year. Failure to meet the terms of
28 | P a g e
probation may lead to further disciplinary action, including expulsion and deregistration.
Dean’s List
The Deans’ List is a means of recognizing students who have achieved a standard of
excellence on both the academic and performance fronts. Students meeting a GPA of
3.9 will qualify for the Dean’s List.
Graduation/Convocation
Students who plan to complete all requirements for their diploma by the end of the
current academic year must complete an Application for Graduation Form and submit it
to the Office of the Registrar for approval before March 1st of the current academic
year. Students are strongly advised to make an appointment with the Registrar to
confirm their eligibility for graduation. Diplomas will be withheld if students have
outstanding assistantship hours, or unpaid accounts with the Office of the Registrar, the
Dean’s office and/or the Library.
3.5 Student Registration Policies
Registration
1. All confirmed students for an upcoming academic year will be pre-registered by the
Registrar in the suggested course-load based on their academic progress to date. Each
student will meet individually with the Registrar to confirm these selections, and to
return their completed student contracts.
2. A minimum first installment of tuition fees (the 1st Semester tuition) must be paid, or
fees deferred (through Scholarship or OSAP) by the deadline date specified in the
“Important Dates” section of the Calendar in order for a student to be considered
registered.
Addition of a Course
A student may add a course selection to their academic schedule at any time up to the
deadline date specified in the “Important Dates” section of this Calendar by way of
submitting a completed and signed Course Add/Drop Request form to the Registrar’s
Office. This can be done in the form of an email.
Withdrawal from a Course
1. A student may withdraw from a course by way of submitting a completed and signed
Course Add/Drop Request form to the Registrar’s Office. This can be done in the form
of an email.
29 | P a g e
2. After the first month of instruction, the student may drop the course freely and
without penalty by informing the Registrar in writing.
3. At the midterm of any class, the student requires written permission from the
instructor to drop the class.
4. Students in extreme cases can drop a course immediately before the final
examination by petitioning the Academic Review Committee. Petitions are heard on a
case by case basis.
5. All degree and diploma requirements must be met by the student in order to
graduate. Dropped courses must be completed at a later date. All dropped courses
must be done in consultation with the Registrar.
Failure in a Course
1. A student who receives a grade of 49% or less in a given course shall be deemed to
have failed the course. The student must then register for and repeat the course at the
first opportunity.
2. A student who receives 2 academic failures in a year will be placed on Academic
Probation.
3. A student who receives a failing grade in three courses in a given academic year will
likely face disciplinary action, such as being de-registered, expelled or placed into
General Studies.
Repeating a Course
1. A student who receives a grade of 49% or less in a given course must repeat the
course. If credit is not obtained in the repeated attempt, the student may undertake
one more attempt to achieve the credit. If credit is not obtained in the third attempt,
the student will be given the status of “Failed – Refused Further Registration”.
2. Where possible, a student who has been given the status of “Failed - Refused
Further Registration” may appeal to the Academic Review Committee for approval to
substitute another course in order to make up the missed credit. In this instance the
student will identify the proposed substitute course, and will provide the Committee
with a full course outline and syllabus, as well as a written statement of rationale as to
how the substitute course will provide a comparable body of knowledge that will
satisfactorily meet the student’s program requirements.
Repeating a Credited Course
A student may not repeat a course for credit when a passing grade has been achieved.
30 | P a g e
However, a student who has achieved credit for a course may audit that course in
subsequent semester offerings in order to improve their understanding of the subject
material.
General Studies
General Studies is a non-diploma status that is available for current Glenn Gould
School students who:



In the previous academic year, failed to meet the Minimum Standards as outlined
in the Academic Calendar concerning course failures.
Have completed the full scheduled duration of their program, but have not
acquired all of the necessary credits to obtain their diploma.
Need a reduced course load due to personal or professional reasons.
Please Note: This classification is not open to incoming students. Students enrolled in
General Studies are not eligible for Provincial or Federal Student Loan Programs.
Eligibility

This classification is only open to current students who are Canadian citizens
and/or landed immigrants.
Course Load


General Studies students will be limited to four (4) full year courses and a
maximum of 1.5 hours of private instruction.
The General Studies classification is not full-time, and for that reason, is not
open to international students.
Accreditation of General Studies


Upon completion of a course in General Studies, the student will receive a
Certificate of Completion for said course.
Students who successfully complete a course within the General Studies
classification may seek to have the course credited within the Performance or
Artist Diploma Programs, provided the minimum grade requirement has been
met per Glenn Gould School academic requirements. The decision to grant the
credit will be at the discretion of the Academic Review Committee.
Length of Study

The General Studies classification is limited to one year of study.
31 | P a g e
Cost and Financial Information


Costs for General Studies will be set on an individual basis and will take into
account the current direct cost per course.
Students who are in General Studies due to unsatisfactory academic standards
will not be eligible for Ontario Student Assistant Program (OSAP) or any other
provincial or federal loan program, tuition remission, scholarships, bursaries, or
work study positions.
Residency Requirements and Completion Times
The Performance Diploma Program requires four (4) years of full-time study and the
Artist Diploma Program requires two (2) years of full-time study. Transfer students are
accepted into the Performance Diploma Program, but must complete a minimum
residency of 2 years at the GGS.
Leave of Absence
A Leave of Absence may be granted for a period of a few days or up to a portion of a
semester, upon the express written approval of The Glenn Gould School Administration,
as determined in consultation with the student’s private instructor. A student on an
approved Leave of Absence will remain registered for the semester and will still be
responsible for all course work, examinations, juries, outstanding or incomplete course
activities, and for all associated academic and ancillary fees.
Students are advised that absence from school for twenty-eight (28) consecutive days
(including Saturdays and Sundays) is grounds for forfeiture of government funding,
including but not restricted to the province of Ontario (OSAP).
Student Cards
Students are issued a photo ID card at the beginning of each new academic year of
their studies at The Glenn Gould School. Government-issued photo ID (ex. passport or
driver’s license) must be presented in order for the card to be released.
Replacement cards are subject to a $10 processing fee.
Student Status
Full-time Diploma Status
The Office of the Registrar must have a signed Offer of Admission or Confirmation of
Enrollment before students can be registered for full-time studies. To be considered
full-time, students must be registered in a minimum of 20 hours of class/private
instruction per week. Students enrolled in the Performance Diploma Program or the
32 | P a g e
Artist Diploma Program may be eligible, if qualified, for loans, grants, or awards granted
under the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP). Only full-time diploma students
are eligible for OSAP and other government assistance funding, scholarship funding,
and work study placements.
Part-Time Diploma Status
The Glenn Gould School does not offer a part-time diploma program.
Withdrawal
Students who wish to be away from The Glenn Gould School for a semester or more
must formally withdraw in writing to the Registrar. Students who withdraw, and who
wish to return to The School, must re-apply.
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4 Program Content
The program curriculum provides students with a balance between theoretical and
practical application – both required for achieving a high level of musical performance.
The courses are designed to provide the experiences required to develop discipline
specific knowledge and skills as well as to develop and support the sheer talent of each
musician. In all cases, the courses will be continuously reviewed and modified to ensure
the content is current and relevant. Student performances will demonstrate knowledge
integration and understanding.
4.1 Program Advisory Committee
Academic Review Committee of the Glenn Gould School
The Glenn Gould School Academic Review Committee is comprised of the Dean (or his
designate), two GGS Departmental Coordinators, and the GGS Registrar. The Academic
Review Committee meets to address academic and administrative issues within The
GGS.
Divisional Committee of the Glenn Gould School
The Glenn Gould School Divisional Committee is comprised of the Department
Coordinators for Piano, Voice, Strings, Woodwinds/Brass/Percussion, Humanities,
Theory/History, and members of the GGS Administration. The GGS Divisional Committee
meets quarterly to discuss curriculum and academic policy issues. Motions approved at
the divisional committee level are presented for approval at Academic Council meetings.
34 | P a g e
4.1.1.1
Program Advisory Committee Minutes
Academic Council Minutes
Wednesday May 15, 2015: 9:30 am
Angela Elster, presiding
Present: Dianne Aitken, Scott Brubacher, Susan Cook, Loretta Ho, Robert Loewen, Bill
Parsons, Gilles Thibodeau, Jeremy Trupp, Peteris Zarins
Regrets: Chris Au, Brian Current, Julia Galieva, Tom Green, Andrew Kwan, Joy Reeve,
Stanley Rosenzweig, Jason Van Eyk
Absentia Votes Received From: James Anagnoson, Janet Lopinski, Elaine Rusk,
Barry Shiffman
CALL TO ORDER
Meeting called to order at 9:35 am
1.0
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
Moved: Robert L.
Seconded: Gilles T.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
2.0
APPROVAL OF THE January 28, 2015 MINUTES (as amended)
Moved: Gilles T.
Seconded: Scott B.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
3.0
3.1
DIVISIONAL COMMITTEE REPORTS:
The Glenn Gould School
3.1.1 MOTION: That the following teachers be approved according to the applicable
type of appointment.
35 | P a g e
Name
Position
Appointment Type
Amanda
Goodburn
Chamber Music Coach – Phil and Eli Taylor
Academy
Probationary/Perman
ent
Csaba Koczo
Chamber Music Coach – Phil and Eli Taylor
Academy
Probationary/Perman
ent
Moved: Gilles T.
Seconded: Robert L.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
3.1.2 MOTION: That PDP Piano Keyboard Harmony 3 and Keyboard Harmony 4 be
returned to full-year courses status, to now constitute 24 hours of class time
each (previously 12 and 18 hours respectively).
Moved: Gilles T.
Seconded: Peteris Z.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
3.1.3 MOTION: That GGS Academic Calendar clause 2.10 be amended to include all
criminal activity, not just drugs and alcohol, pending final approval of wording
from COO.
Current Clause:
2.10 DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY
The Royal Conservatory is committed to maintaining a drug-free school and workplace.
The GGS is dedicated to excellence in musical performance and academic achievement;
to promote this goal, The Glenn Gould School requires that faculty, staff, and students
maintain the highest standards of personal and professional conduct. The use of drugs
and alcohol on campus adversely affects the quality of academic life and the mission of
the institution. Due to the violent and/or potentially fatal reactions to various
substances, the use of drugs or alcohol on the premises is strictly forbidden and may
lead to immediate dismissal.
Future Clause:
2.10 DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND CRIMINAL ACTIVITY
36 | P a g e
The Royal Conservatory is committed to maintaining a safe, drug-free school and
workplace. The GGS is dedicated to excellence in musical performance and academic
achievement; to promote this goal, The Glenn Gould School requires that faculty, staff,
and students maintain the highest standards of personal and professional conduct. The
use of drugs and alcohol on campus adversely affects the quality of academic life and
the mission of the institution. Due to the violent and/or potentially fatal reactions to
various substances, the use of drugs or alcohol on the premises is strictly forbidden and
may lead to immediate dismissal. Additionally, any criminal act performed by a student,
either on or off school property, including but not limited to vandalism or harassment,
may lead to immediate dismissal or other forms of repercussion as deemed appropriate
by GGS and RCM administration.
3.2
Royal Conservatory School
3.2.1 MOTION: That the Group Carnatic Violin course be approved.
Moved: Susan C.
Seconded: Gilles T.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
3.2.2 MOTION: That the Fiddling for Violin Teachers course be approved.
Moved: Susan C.
Seconded: Gilles T.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
3.2.3 MOTION: That the Learn to Play: Ukelele Level 1 course be approved.
Moved: Susan C.
Seconded: Gilles T.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
UPDATES: Second Annual Wide Open House is occurring on June 7. Sample
Smart Start courses will be available to the public and Dr. Hutchins will speaking
about his related research.
3.3 Royal Conservatory Examinations
No motions.
37 | P a g e
UPDATES



Spring Examiner Professional Development events were completed across
Canada and in the U.S. Apprentice Examiners in the Adjudicator Certification
Program were also in attendance (for the first time).
Celebration Series and Piano Syllabus launch events have been occurring
across the country. Sales and general reception very good.
Work continues on the Theory Syllabus, 2016 Edition. Release planned for
spring 2016.
3.4 Learning Through the Arts
No formal motions.
UPDATES


4.0
ACADEMIC COUNCIL STRUCTURAL SUBCOMMITTEE REPORT

5.0
Reviewed motions via email.
OTHER BUSINESS


6.0
The 20th anniversary of LTTA was celebrated at the Canadian National Arts
and Learning conference earlier this spring, hosted by Mary Walsh and Russell
Braun.
LTTA is moving into a year of rethinking and reimagining the LTTA framework.
A reminder was issued to vet academic documents for spelling etc.
Andrea Hansen (founder of Strings Across the Sky), Academic Council member
passed away December 3, 2014.
ADJOURNMENT
Council Adjourned at 10:09 am
Moved: Robert L.
38 | P a g e
Academic Council Minutes
Monday, January 28, 2015: 9:30 am
Angela Elster, presiding
Present: James Anagnoson, Scott Brubacher, Susan Cook, Loretta Ho, Robert Loewen,
Janet Lopinski, Bill Parsons, Karen Quinton, Joy Reeve, Stanley Rosenzweig, Barry
Shiffman, Gilles Thibodeau, Jeremy Trupp, Jason Van Eyk, Peteris Zarins
Regrets: Chris Au, Brian Current, Tom Green, Andrew Kwan, Elaine Rusk
CALL TO ORDER
Meeting called to order at 9:35 am
1.0
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
Moved: Joy R..
Seconded: Karen Q.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
APPROVAL OF THE November 5, 2014 MINUTES (as
amended)
2.0
Moved: Stanley R.
Seconded: Joy R.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
DIVISIONAL COMMITTEE REPORTS:
3.1 The Glenn Gould School
3.0
No motions.
39 | P a g e
3.2 Royal Conservatory School
No motions.
UPDATES
 January enrollment is up slightly from last year at this time.
 Working on summer programming. We are hoping to have brochure and
registration open by the beginning of March
 June 1st , Fall 2014 registration will open
 Nathan Shreve, 15 years old, pianist and student of Janet Fothergill will be
playing for Emmanuel Ax at Roy Thompson Hall on Saturday, February 14. He
will be performing Brahms, Intermezzo, Op.117 No.3 in E minor.
 RCS should have a new Public Program Manager in place by end the end of
February. We finished a second round of interviews during the last week of
January.
3.3 Royal Conservatory Examinations
3.3.1 MOTION: That Lydia Miller (Strings) be admitted to the College of Examiners as
a Practical Examiner.
Moved: Janet L.
Seconded: Peteris Z.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
3.3.2 MOTION: That the proposed Piano Syllabus, 2015 Edition be approved.
Moved: Barry S.
Seconded: Karen Q.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
UPDATES
 The Academic Office is beginning a series of Examiner Professional
Development events across Canada and in the U.S. Normally these happen in
the fall, but we elected to do online professional development in the fall and
in-person meetings in the new year to begin informing examiners about the
new Piano Syllabus. Apprentice Examiners in the Adjudicator Certification
Program will also be invited to attend examiner PD, both for piano and the
non-piano disciplines.
40 | P a g e



The Adjudicator Certification Program continues to flourish, with
approximately 45 apprenticeship days scheduled in the upcoming January
examination session.
Excitement is mounting for the upcoming launch of the Piano Syllabus, 2015
Edition and Celebration Series, 2015 Edition. Launch events have included an
online Video Countdown event, with students posting videos of performances
of selected pieces from the Celebration Series.
Work continues on the Theory Syllabus, 2016 Edition. More information on
this project will be shared in the coming year.
3.4 Learning Through the Arts
No formal motions.
UPDATES: See Attached document
4.0
ACADEMIC COUNCIL STRUCTURAL SUBCOMMITTEE REPORT

5.0
OTHER BUSINESS

6.0
Reviewed motions via email.
RCS students will perform at APA. Stanley will present a proposal that music
be made an integral part of education from K - onwards.
ADJOURNMENT
Council Adjourned at 10:31 am
Moved: Stanley R.
41 | P a g e
Academic Council Minutes
Monday, November 15, 2014: 9:30 am
Angela Elster, presiding
Present: Scott Brubacher, Susan Cook, Travis Freeman, Helen Jacob-Stein, Robert
Loewen, Lala Loon, Janet Lopinski, Joy Reeve, Barry Shiffman, Gilles Thibodeau, Jeremy
Trupp, Jason Van Eyk, Peteris Zarins
Regrets: James Anagnoson, Chris Au, Brian Current, Tom Green, Andrew Kwan,
Stanley Rosenzweig, Elaine Rusk
CALL TO ORDER
Meeting called to order at 9:33 am
1.0
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
Moved: Barry S.
Seconded: Jason V.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
2.0
APPROVAL OF THE May 12, 2014MINUTES.
Moved: Gilles T.
Seconded: Janet L.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
DIVISIONAL COMMITTEE REPORTS:
3.1 The Glenn Gould School
3.0
3.1.1 MOTION: That the following teachers be approved according to the applicable
type of appointment.
42 | P a g e
Name
Position
Appointment Type
Eve Egoyan
PDP Piano Literature: 1890-present
Probationary/Permanent
Moved: Joy R.
Seconded: Susan C.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
UPDATES
 Taylor Academy student Emma Meinreiken and RCM Faculty Li Wang will be
travelling to Beijing to perform for Prime Minister Harper at the APEC summit.
This is a joint venture between the RCM and the Glenn Gould Foundation.
3.2 Royal Conservatory School
3.2.1 MOTION: That the following teachers be approved according to the applicable
type of appointment.
Name
Position
Appointment Type
Marlena Coate
RCS Theory/Musicianship
Probationary/Permanent
Moved: Barry S.
Seconded: Peteris Z.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
UPDATES
 RCS is off and running. Revenue has increased slightly this year but student
enrollment has dropped. Have begun the process of collecting data to complete
an analysis of enrollment figures from this year to last year at this time.
 3 RCS students played for the Royal Conservatory Examinations Workshop led
and coached by Jennifer Snow and Janet Lopinski on Wednesday, October 29, in
the Conservatory Theatre
 RCS held the first of three lecture series for parents presented by Clayton Scott
on Sunday, October 26. The series is designed to help guide parents on how to
support their students through their musical studies.
 The RCS held its first private lesson recital on Sunday, November 2. Upcoming
recitals will be on November 30 and December 14.
43 | P a g e

RCS vocal student, Meg Gibson, will be performing the Canadian National
Anthem in both English and French for the Annual Meeting of the Provincial
Assembly for OSSTF on Saturday, March 14.
3.3 Royal Conservatory School
3.3.1 MOTION: That Fabiana Claure, Jennifer Cruz, Aya Higuchi, Victoria Holland,
Moira Hopfe-Ostensen, Sheryl Iott, Luba Kravchenko, and Sharon Townsend
Roth be admitted to the College of Examiners as Practical Examiners.
Moved: Scott B.
Seconded: Joy R..
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
UPDATES
 Canadian certification training took place July 16 – 18 with approximately 50
participants, including several RCS faculty members.
 2015 piano syllabus is currently in production
 5th edition of the piano Celebration Series will published in March 2015
 Examiner PD has been offered online for the first time in the form of a webinar.
There is a library of training videos available that were filmed in 12-13, which are
being used for professional development. In person pd will still be required
yearly, and will take place in the spring this year.
 Academic Office changes: Colleen Skull accepted a Voice Faculty position at
Mount Allison university, and is no longer in the office. Anne Marie Page (a
current examiner) has joined the team as Academic Communications Manager.
Jennifer Guillen has returned to the Academic Office (after several years in the
Candidate Services division) in the new position of Administrator, College of
Examiners, Theory. Christopher Foley (RCS Faculty) has joined one day per week
as Adjudicator Certification Program Specialist, providing feedback to apprentice
examiners, in collaboration with Chief Examiner, Thomas Green.
3.4 Learning Through The Arts
No formal motions.
UPDATES
20th anniversary Year Celebration

Thanks to Angela, LTTA will be a primary focus of the Canadian Network of
Arts and Learning (CNAL) National Conference, which takes place March 25 in
44 | P a g e




Koerner Hall. LTTA will invite all our regional staff, and a school board
representative of their choice, to join us for the conference and a separate
one-day LTTA retreat.
Strategic Review: We will be spending this year in creative enquiry focused
on renewing LTTA’s programming.
Our key objectives are to:
o Better understand the needs of educators, administrators and their
students; and
o Develop new tools, resources, and services that will allow more
schools across Canada to participate in LTTA programming.
This means that we will be reimagining our digital offerings and developing
new approaches to delivering programming in and outside of schools.
Keywords here are Relevancy, Affordability and Accessibility, especially when
considering service provision to remote, northern, and rural school districts.
We worked with NeXus Consulting out of the Rotman School of Business to
develop our roadmap for this work.
IN-School Programming Continues with all School District level partners


Hamilton (HWDSB – Core, YEP, and Music Champion)
Windsor (GEDSB – Core, YEP, Music Champion, and Aspire focused on All-Day
Kindergarten)
 Thunder Bay (Lakehead DSB – Core and YEP with continued focus on
advancing the FNMI perspective)
 Fort McMurray (FMPSD and FMCSD – Core, YEP, and afterschool, as well as
FNMI Liaison support)
 While FNMI perspective continues to be a primary focus in Fort McMurray, we
are also exploring: Digital outreach to outlying regions through Telepresence
technology, in partnership with Cisco Systems. The first test will be between
Fort McMurray Public (Thickwood School) and a school in Fort Chipewyan.
Planning is underway for first a test project to be executed in Winter 2015.
We are also looking into how the technology could benefit other LTTA
partners in their outreach (e.g. Athabasca Tribal Council, Indspire…)
 Aspire program model to help teachers who have had 5 or more units of
LTTA programming take a step forward to delivering their own LTTA projects
independent of an Artist-Educator in the classroom (starting with ten Grade 8
& 9 teachers)
Music Champion Program Continues in:
45 | P a g e





Toronto (31 classrooms)
Hamilton (13 classrooms)
Winnipeg (11 classrooms – partnership with WSO)
Windsor (12 classrooms – partnership with WSO)
NEW: Vancouver (8 classrooms – partnership with Vancouver Opera)
Building new partnership-based relationships with other key School Districts
Calgary Board of Education


CBE is spearheading a new arts curriculum prototype for Alberta Education, in
collaboration with 17 other school districts, as part of the full Alberta
Curriculum Redesign.
LTTA is focusing on developing a blended online / in-person model of
program / service delivery with a curriculum focused on supporting teachers
in successfully delivering the new curriculum.
a. Our proposal was submitted to CBE on Monday Nov. 3 and will be
followed up shortly
b. A copy of the proposal is available for perusal and comment upon
request
Toronto District School Board



We filed a new partnership agreement with the Board on Oct. 30 following
recent changes to their system.
We are exploring a less management-heavy approach to program delivery
through a pilot consultancy model (this may transfer to CBE as well.)
In tandem, we are speaking with our contacts to explore how we and help
them better meet their objectives:
a. Connecting Arts to STEM education priorities
b. Supporting FNMI curriculum
c. Supporting better use of technology in the classroom
d. Advancing teacher PD around arts integration
Research
Safe Communities Innovation Fund (FNMI Programming in Wood
Buffalo Region 2010-2013)

3-year Summative Research report is complete and available on the RCM
website
46 | P a g e



a. Distribution campaign is generating interest in many smaller Alberta
communities (High Prairie, Slave Lake, and Athabasca so far.)
LTTA was recognized by Alberta Justice as delivering one of top projects.
Possible Invitation to new Social Innovation Endowment Fund to scale up the
results province-wide.
Increased support from Suncor over 3 years to capitalize on this work at a
provincial level.
Inspire
Signed MOU



1st Phase of research underway: Successful Practice Documentations
a. Team has met with researcher Shauna Bruno the week of Oct. 20, and
follow-up have been done.
b. Shauna will visit Fort McMurray the week of Dec. 1.
LTTA will have a booth at the upcoming National Gathering (Nov. 20-22 in
Toronto.)
We are considering how we can align other Indspire programs to LTTA
initiatives (e.g. Inspire Realizing Project tied to remote delivery program for
Fort Chip.)
Artist Training



Foundations and Level 1 courses running this Fall.
OAC Proposal for 5 Foundations courses submitted Nov. 4.
o Asking for additional funding to continue FNMI Foundations course
development
Working with RCS / IT to port over our Drupal registration module to new
ActiveNet system.
Teacher Training

Launching pilots under the New Vukets teacher Development program this
winter
a. Teaching Music for the Generalist Teacher
i. Please help disseminate info to any interested public school
teachers.
ii. We have 10 reduced-priced openings to offer (60% off) to
generate interest – first come first serves.
47 | P a g e
iii. Course just revised to match new OISE requirements for inclass and online learning.
b. LTTA AQ
i. Offered in collaboration with OISE.
ii. Please help disseminate info to any interested public school
teachers.
Living Through the Arts




Exploring a consultancy-based service model with existing clients.
Primary focus is on ARTS-REHAB Project:
c. 2-hosptial pilot study is complete.
d. OTF progress report filed Nov. 3.
e. We are now moving towards continuous programming in 8 hospitals over
the next 2.5 years, accompanied by a full primary research study.
f. We’re very excited about the possibility of what this means to achieve a
vision of having an artist in every hospital across Canada (either
physically or virtually.)
This is the 20th anniversary year of LTTA. LTTA will be a primary focus of the
Canadian Network of Arts and Learning (CNAL) National Conference, which
takes place March 25 in Koerner Hall.
Spending this year in creative enquiry focused on renewing LTTA’s
programming
4.0

ACADEMIC COUNCIL STRUCTURAL SUBCOMMITTEE REPORT
5.0

OTHER BUSINESS

Reviewed motions via email. As a follow up to the May 12, 2014 minutes, it is
confirmed that discussions regarding changing the by-laws to reflect the current
divisional structure have been passed along to Senior Management.
A major research initiative is underway with RCM’s Department of Research. For
more information, please contact Dr. Sean Hutchins at [email protected]
Mark O’Connor recently published a method books in which negative remarks are
made towards the Suzuki method. This is garnering recent media attention. It
was suggested that the RCM should have a prepared response. Donna Takacs to
be notified.
6.0 ADJOURNMENT
Council Adjourned at 10:23 am
Moved: Joy. R.
48 | P a g e
Academic Council Minutes
Monday, May 12, 2014: 9:30 am
Janet Lopinski, presiding
Present: Scott Brubacher, Julia Galieva-Szokolay, Helen Jacob-Stein, Meghan Moore,
Robert Loewen, Bill Parsons, Stanley Rosenzweig, Elaine Rusk, Barry Shiffman, James
Stager, Gilles Thibodeau, Jeremy Trupp
Regrets: James Anagnoson, Neil Bishop, Brian Current, Angela Elster, Travis Freeman,
Tom Green, Andrea Hanson, Jennifer Tung, Joy Reeve, Jason Van Eyk, Peteris Zarins
CALL TO ORDER
Meeting called to order at 9:35am
1.0
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
Moved: Robert L.
Seconded: Stanley R.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
2.0
APPROVAL OF THE March 17, 2014 MINUTES
Moved: Scott B.
Seconded: Gilles T.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
DIVISIONAL COMMITTEE REPORTS:
3.1 The Glenn Gould School
3.0
3.1.1 Motion: That PDP students who sing in the fall or spring opera in any capacity
be granted academic credit for the work accomplished. The current situation
has them gaining valuable experience, but no academic credit. All PDP vocalists
49 | P a g e
will be required to audition for both operas as per the current process. Those
assigned a role will be granted 1.5 credits per term.
Moved: Jeremy T.
Seconded: Meghan M.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
3.1.2 Motion: That the attached course outline for Advanced Musicianship/Aural
Analysis be approved as a new course, to be implemented for Academic Year
2014-15. The course would be available as an elective to any PDP or ADP
students who meet the pre-requisites. Full year, 2 hours, once a week, worth 3
credit hours.
Moved: Gilles T.
Seconded: Elaine R.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
3.2
Royal Conservatory School
No formal motions.
UPDATES
 Work progressing on repacking offerings for 14-15, concentration on private
lesson bundling for children/youth.
 Wide Open House is on Sunday June 1.
3.3
RCM Examinations
3.3.1 Motion: That the proposed Clarinet Syllabus, 2014 Edition be approved.
Moved: Stanley R.
Seconded: James S.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
Clarinet Syllabus, 2014 Edition overview
Compilers: Peter Stoll (primary); Helen Russell and Michele Verheul
(contributors)
Reviewers: Wesley Ferreira and Barbara Hankins
1. New examinations:
a. Inclusion of “Preparatory” grade, which will be given a mark out of 100.
b. Addition of Grades 3, 5, and 7, which were omitted from the Woodwind and
Brass syllabi in the past.
50 | P a g e
c. Introduction of the split Grade 10 exam, as in Piano and the new String
syllabi.
2. Changes to the Technical Requirements:
a. The range and keys required for technical tests correspond to those of the
repertoire and etude selections, where possible.
b. Marking scheme adjusted for Grades 1–6: etudes out of 20 marks, and
technical tests out of 10 marks (consistent for all levels).
c. Number of keys and elements required for Preparatory to Grade 9 is reduced;
keys required rotate at the early and intermediate grades, and become
cumulative at the advanced grades; all keys required by Grade 10.
d. Whole tone scales no longer tested.
e. Dominant 7th arpeggios added at Grade 4. Overlapping arpeggios added at
Grade 8.
f. Number of studies/etudes adjusted throughout (reduced in most cases):
Level
Studies
required in
2006
Syllabus
Etudes
required in
2014
Syllabus
Preparatory
—
2
1
3
2
2
3
2
3
—
4
4
5
4
5
—
4
6
6
4
7
—
4
8
6
4
9
5
4
10
4
4
51 | P a g e
3. Adjustments to the Repertoire Lists and Breakdown:
a. Early grades expand the playing range gradually from left-hand notes only, to
the lower chalumeau, before crossing the break.
b. Preparatory to Grade 8: List A includes rhythmic pieces in a faster tempo; List
B includes lyrical pieces in a slower tempo.
c. Grade 9: List A – Baroque, Classical, and Romantic Repertoire; List B – 20thand 21st-century Repertoire.
d. List C introduced at Grade 10 for Unaccompanied Repertoire; mark
breakdown for 3 lists becomes 14/13/13.
e. Grade 10: List A – Baroque, Classical, and Romantic Repertoire; List B – 20thand 21st-century Repertoire; List C – Unaccompanied Repertoire.
f. ARCT: List A – Concertos; List B – Sonatas and Suites; List C –
Unaccompanied Repertoire.
g. Optional E flat clarinet repertoire selections have been added to certain
grades.
h. Repertoire lists expanded to include more contemporary and jazz options, in
particular pieces from James Rae and Christopher Norton, and many new
selections from the Canadian Music Centre.
4. Orchestral Excerpts:
a. Orchestral excerpts begin at Grade 7; total number of excerpts required for
each level is reduced, and specified at each grade.
Level
Excerpts
required in
2006
Syllabus
Excerpts
required in
2014
Syllabus
7
—
3
8
all (5)
4
9
all (6)
5
10
all (7)
5
5. Teacher’s ARCT:
a. Undergoing a major revision to bring it more in alignment with the Piano
Pedagogy program.
b. Information will be made available online rather than in the Syllabus, as this
is expected to change within the next two years.
52 | P a g e
6. Additional information:
a. Provides improved clarity about examination requirements and standards in
order to help teachers and candidates prepare for examinations.
b. Prose description of skills expectations provides teachers and students with
information about what is expected for each level.
Note: A complete pdf of the Clarinet Syllabus, 2014 Edition is available electronically
upon request from Scott Brubacher, [email protected]
UPDATES
 US apprenticeship program is ongoing with another 40 apprenticeship training
dates scheduled in the near future.
 Work is ongoing on the upcoming revisions of the piano syllabus and series,
and the theory syllabus
 Canadian apprentice training program is ongoing with intensive sessions
planned July 16 – 18 at RCM
3.4
Learning Through The Arts
No formal motions.
4.0

ACADEMIC COUNCIL STRUCTURAL SUBCOMMITTEE REPORT
5.0

OTHER BUSINESS
6.0
ADJOURNMENT
Motions were reviewed by email in the week preceding the Academic Council
meeting.
Request to have Structural Subcommittee investigate changing the by-laws to
reflect current academic departments (ex. Inclusion of Taylor Academy,
Research, E-Learning).
Council Adjourned at 9:55 am
Moved: Stanley R.
53 | P a g e
Academic Council Minutes
Monday, March 17, 2014: 9:30 am
Jeremy Trupp, presiding
Present: Scott Brubacher, Travis Freeman, Julia Galieva-Szokolay, Meghan Moore,
Robert Loewen, Joy Reeve, James Stager, Gilles Thibodeau, Jeremy Trupp, Jason Van
Eyk, Peteris Zarins
Regrets: James Anagnoson, Neil Bishop, Brian Current, Angela Elster, Tom Green,
Andrea Hanson, Janet Lopinski, Stanley Rosenzweig, Elaine Rusk, Barry Shiffman,
Jennifer Tung
Absentia votes received from: James Anagnoson, Janet Lopinski, Barry Shiffman
CALL TO ORDER
Meeting called to order at 9:40am
1.0
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
Moved: Meghan M.
Seconded: Robert L.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
2.0
APPROVAL OF THE Jan 27, 2014 MINUTES as amended.
Moved: Travis F.
Seconded: James S.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
3.0
3.1
DIVISIONAL COMMITTEE REPORTS:
The Glenn Gould School
3.1.1 Motion: That the following changes to the PDP piano program be approved, to
be implemented for Academic Year 2014-15.
54 | P a g e
Both streams of Sonata Repertoire to be worth 3 credit hours, from the
current 2. The purpose is to give these courses equal weighting with
Chamber Music.
 Collaborative Piano to be worth 3 credit hours, from the current 2. This
allows the total credit hours for the PDP to remain stable.
 Currently, PDP pianists are required to take 3 Sonata Repertoire classes (2
strings, 1 wind), 3 Chamber Music credits, 1 Collaborative Piano and one
Piano Duos, as per Table 1 (current) – the suggested changes would lead to
the altering of the program grid, as per Table 2 (Revision).
Moved: Gilles T.

Seconded: Joy R.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
3.1.2 Motion: That the proposed course outline for ADP Piano Technology be
approved, (to be mandatory for ADP pianists; 1 term, 1 hour per week,
worth 1 credit hour.)
Moved: Gilles T.
Seconded: Scott B.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
Comments: Interest in offering this course to RCS faculty and as a workshop
for the public.
UPDATES: Annual staged opera is occurring this Wednesday and Friday in
Koerner Hall.
3.2
Royal Conservatory School
No formal motions.
Discussion on “Focus on Technique: Flute” course submission

Suggestion to run it as a pilot in 14-15

Interest in exploring the use of FH publications as required
materials for the course
UPDATES
 Nancy Lee hired as Student Program Manager, starting today.
 Sarah Gleadow hired as Public Programs Manager, starting today.
55 | P a g e
3.3
RCM Examinations
3.3.1 Motion: That Dr. Diane Petrella (Piano) and Clinton Pratt (Piano) be admitted
to the College of Examiners as Practical Examiners.
Moved: Peteris Z.
Seconded: Robert L.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
UPDATES
 US apprenticeship program is ongoing. Expectations for another 5 or 6
graduates before the end of the year.
 Work is ongoing on the upcoming revisions of the piano syllabus and series,
and the theory syllabus
 The Summer Summit this year is on July 12 & 13. Focus on technology.
 The launch of the online History 1 was delayed by to the beginning go March.
Currently have 60 active participants.
3.4
Learning Through The Arts
No formal motions.
UPDATES
 Have recently reconstituted their Divisional Committee
 20th anniversary task force has been established and has had their first
meeting
 Teacher training to offered in Fall. Teaching music in the classroom 14F/15S,
LTTA A/Q 15S
 March Break camps successful – enrolment doubled this year.
 Music Champions celebration event to occur June 11 in Koerner Hall with
performances by Afiara Quartet (GGS Quartet in residence, and MC outreach
collaborators), MC Singers (directed by Joy Reeve). The culmination of the
international project on iScore will also be presented.
4.0
ACADEMIC COUNCIL STRUCTURAL SUBCOMMITTEE REPORT

5.0
Motions were reviewed by email in the week preceding the Academic Council
meeting.
OTHER BUSINESS
 None
6.0
ADJOURNMENT
Council Adjourned at 10:10 am
Moved: Joy R.
56 | P a g e
Academic Council Minutes
Monday, January 27, 2014: 9:30 am
Janet Lopinski, presiding
Present: Scott Brubacher, Travis Freeman, Meghan Moore, Robert Loewen,Lala Loon,
Janet Lopinski, Joy Reeve, Barry Shiffman, James Stager, Jeremy Trupp, Jason Van Eyk,
Peteris Zarins
Regrets: James Anagnoson, Neil Bishop, Brian Current, Tom Green, Andrea Hanson,
Stanley Rosenzweig, Elaine Rusk, Jennifer Tung
CALL TO ORDER
Meeting called to order at 9:35 am
1.0
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
Moved: Robert L.
Seconded: Meghan M.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
2.0
APPROVAL OF THE Nov 18, 2013 MINUTES as amended.
Moved: Barry S.
Seconded: Robert L.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
57 | P a g e
DIVISIONAL COMMITTEE REPORTS:
3.1 The Glenn Gould School
3.0
3.1.1. MOTION: That the following teacher be approved according to the applicable
type of appointment.
Name
Position
Appointment Type
Sara Maida-Nicol
ADP Italian
Probationary/Permanent
Moved: Robert L.
Seconded: Joy R.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
UPDATES: Application/Audition season is underway and very busy. Applicant
numbers are on par with last year.
3.1 Royal Conservatory School
3.2.1 MOTION: That the course proposal for Smart Start en francais be approved.
Moved: Meghan M.
Seconded: Joy R.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
UPDATES
 Private lesson package elements are ongoing, with workshop presenters from
across the RCM.
 Successes include recent simulated exams, and a student showcase
performance
3.3 RCM Examinations
3.3.1 MOTION: That the proposed Saxophone Syllabus, 2014 Edition be approved.
Moved: Barry S.
Seconded: Peteris Z.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
3.3.2 Motion: That Dr. Nathaniel LaNasa and Dr. Sara Ernst be admitted to the
College of Examiners as Practical Examiners.
Moved: Peteris Z.
Seconded: James S.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
UPDATES
58 | P a g e




Staffing Changes
o Practical Program Manager position filled by Dr. Colleen Skull
Adjudicator Certification
o Canadian program underway – currently reviewing applicants
Piano Syllabus, 2015 Edition
o Final draft in last stages
Launching beta test of online History 1 Feb 3.
o Is available to committee members to audit - contact Janet Lopinski
o First draft of syllabus content and sample tests for Elementary levels
prepared for external review
3.4 Learning Through The Arts
No formal motions.
UPDATES

Core Program: Demand for programming is bouncing back nicely after last
year’s labour unrest in Ontario, and we continue to sustain high levels of
programming in Northern Alberta despite the sunsetting of Alberta
Government funding, but with renewed 3-year commitment from Suncor
Energy Foundation. Highlights of school board commitments from across the
country includes:
Site / School Board
No of Classes Committed
FortMcMurray – FMPSD and FMCSD:
205 classes
Windsor – GECDSB
165 classes
Thunder Bay – Lakehead DSB
185 classes
Hamilton – Hamilton-Wentworth DSB
Calgary – CBE

65 classes
40 classes
o Toronto is also bouncing back quite well. A targeted e-marketing campaign to
over 2,800 principals in the GTA district school boards has generated a
number of new leads and subsequent school visits that are turning into new
activity. Of special note is our first-ever placements in the Peel DSB.
o Eastern Ontario, from Kingston to Ottawa, offer an untapped market from
LTTA and one that we will look at pursuing with more effort in the coming
year.
Music Champion: Expanding Winnipeg, Hamilton and possibly Vancouver has
ensured our ability to reach program targets while also satisfying an objective for
national program expansion.
59 | P a g e




Youth Empowerment Program: Continued support from the Ontario Ministry of
Education has been recently confirmed, which will allow us to sustain support to
economically disadvantage schools and those communities most in need of receiving
the program at more affordable rates.
Staffing: To support growth efforts across the country, we have made strategic
investment in our Regional Managers and Program Leaders. This includes:
o Increasing all Regional Manager contracts from 4 to 5 days per week and all
Program Leader contracts from 1.5 to 2days per week.
o Adding a Program Leader position in Fort McMurray so that our Alberta
Regional Manager can work to develop both Edmonton and Calgary sites
more freely.
o Adding a BC Program Leader to reignite sale in the 3rd largest school market
in the country.
Artist & Teacher Training:
o We have renewed our relationship with the Ontario Arts Council to delivery
Artist-Educator Foundations training in six sites across the province this
spring. New to this year is a pilot course on Manitoulin Island that focuses on
Aboriginal education issues and intercultural sensitivity through arts-based
teaching and learning. Documentation of this course will be completed in
partnership with Indspire (i.e. the Aboriginal Achievement Foundation.)
o Artist-Educator Level I & II courses are running this spring semeste
o Banff Teacher Institute is running Jan. 31 – Feb. 2 focusing on Arts,
Technology and 21st Century Learning.
Pilot Programming
o ARTS-REHAB: We have secured 3-year funding from the Ontario Trillium
Foundation to pilot this natural extension of our Living Through the Arts
programming, moving into the rehabilitation hospital environment. We’re
thrilled to be involved in the health care arena (10 hospitals across five sites,
employing 20 Artist-Facilitators to work with 30 patients twice per year) with
a goal of improving patients’ optimism toward recovery and positive views of
life after recovery. The objective is to help reduce recovery times, with added
benefit of reducing wait times and financial burdens on the Ontario’s health
system. We will be training our Artist-Facilitators for this pilot program on
Feb. 10 and have hired a Research consultant to work on the impact
assessment.
o Aspire: This is a test model for a lighter version of the LTTA Core program
focused on performing arts disciplines and delivered to two classes at once.
Aspire was approved for pilot implementation in November 2013. Training for
60 | P a g e

LTTA Regional Managers and selected Artist-Educators took place January 23,
2014 and sales are underway. Interest within Early Years classes in Ontario is
an interesting development.
o VideoFlip: Sufficient funding has been secured to scale the ‘proof of concept’
stage of this pilot program. This flipped classroom, technology-enabled
version of the LTTA’s programming builds off of our knowledge of changing
classroom teaching habits, and the needs of rural and remote communities
that have issues of access and affordability. We will work in three sites
(Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver) with three school and six Artist Educators
to develop the first round for VideoFlip content.
o Teacher Training: Pilot Teacher Training courses (Teaching Music in the
Classroom, LTTA Advanced Qualification) have been moved to the summer.
Preparations for LTTA 20th Anniversary Year (2014-15)
o The LTTA team began the process of envisioning the LTTA 20th Anniversary
early in 2013. Two visioning sessions since have been encapsulated in a
discussion document. In support of this planning, LTTA is forming a task
force involving marketing, development, PAD and IT to look at all possible
opportunities to leverage the 20th Anniversary as an RCM milestone, and an
opportunity for positive new fundraising, promotions and programming
benefits.
4.0
ACADEMIC COUNCIL STRUCTURAL SUBCOMMITTEE REPORT

5.0
OTHER BUSINESS



6.0
Met on January 20 to review motions.
Summer Summit occurring on July 19, 20. Focus on technology.
Discussion around formalizing a policy for students recording classes and
lessons.
Request from faculty to update current A/V inventory for classroom use.
ADJOURNMENT
Council Adjourned at 10:20 am
Moved: Scott B.
61 | P a g e
Academic Council Minutes
Monday, November 18, 2013: 9:30 am
Angela Elster, presiding
Present: Scott Brubacher, Travis Freeman, Julia Galieva, Meghan Moore, Robert
Loewen, Janet Lopinski, Karen Quinton, Joy Reeve, Stanley Rosenzweig, Margot Rydall,
Barry Shiffman, Jeremy Trupp, Jason Van Eyk, Peteris Zarins
Regrets: James Anagnoson, Neil Bishop, Brian Current, Tom Green, Helen Jacob-Stein,
Andrew Kwan, Elaine Rusk, James Stager, Jennifer Tung
Guests: Sean Hutchins
CALL TO ORDER
Meeting called to order at 9:35 am
1.0 APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
Moved: Barry S.
Seconded: Jason V.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
2.0 APPROVAL OF THE May 6, 2013 MINUTES.
Moved: Barry S.
Seconded: Robert L.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
3.0 DIVISIONAL COMMITTEE REPORTS:
3.1 The Glenn Gould School
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3.1.1. MOTION: That the following teachers be approved according to the applicable
type of appointment.
Name
Position
Appointment Type
Kathleen Kajioka
PDP/ADP Historical Performance Strings
Probationary/Permanent
Brett Kingsbury
PDP History
Probationary/Permanent
Gabriel Radford
Academy, PDP, ADP Horn
Probationary/Permanent
Lori Riva
PDP Art History
Probationary/Permanent
Moved: Robert L.
Seconded: Meghan M.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
3.1.2.
3.1.3.
3.1.4.
MOTION: That Performance Awareness be required instead of elective for all
ADP streams.
MOTION: That Orchestral Literature be required instead of elective for ADP
Orchestral.
MOTION: That Sonata Repertoire be required instead of elective for ADP
Piano. A second year of Sonata Repertoire would remain elective.
Motions 3.1.2 – 3.1.4
Moved: Robert L.
Seconded: Meghan M.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
UPDATES

The Rebanks Family Fellowship and International Performance
Residency Program successfully launched this year with an event on
October 18. The program is already showing great success – Fellow
Britt Riley recently won Associate Cello with The Calgary Philharmonic,
Fellow Luri Lee will have her Edmonton Symphony debut later this
year.
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


RCO’s first concert was one of the best yet. The orchestra has made
huge strides, especially in the strings, due to the increase in
scholarship.
The Taylor Academy is much better financially place, due to the deficit
offset by the Taylor gift..
Many Taylor Academy student successes recently in competitions.
3.2 Royal Conservatory School
3.2.1. MOTION: That Introduction to Jazz and Blues Improvisation for
Instrumentalists course by approved.
Moved: Meghan M.
Seconded: Barry S.
All in favour, none opposed: Motion carried.
UPDATES



Private lesson package launched this year. Includes 2 forms of
assessment, and lecure/workshop series options.
Admin is working on revising a policies and procedures manual looking
towards implementing a new registration system
Currently undergoing a review of RDP assessments
3.3 RCM Examinations
No formal motions.
UPDATES


Staffing Changes
 Appointment of Dr. Janet Lopinski as Director, Academic Programs,
Examinations
 Renewal of Dr. Thomas Green as Chief Examiner
 New Discipline Specialists: ACP Review, Peteris Zarins; Keyboard
Harmony, Joe Ringhofer
 New Practical Program Manager position
New Syllabi and Series
 Violin, Viola, Cello, and Trumpet Syllabi, 2013 Editions and corresponding
instrument series are published and available
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Saxophone and Clarinet Syllabi and corresponding series to be released in
2014
College of Examiners
 New expectations in regards to advocacy, availability, candidate
submission and faster return of marking forms articulated in the 2013/14
contracts
 12 Examiner Professional Development sessions held across Canada and
the U.S.
Program Revitalization Proposal
 Model created for revised prerequisites and co-requisites for all
instruments, including alignment of theory component with all practical
levels
Piano Syllabus, 2015 Edition
 Revision of Repertoire Lists, Technical Requirements, Musicianship Skills,
and Pedagogy
 Call for repertoire submissions sent out to examiners and teachers — over
500 new repertoire submissions received for consideration
Theory Syllabus, 2015 Edition
 First draft of syllabus content and sample tests for Elementary levels
prepared for external review
Adjudicator Certification
 Planned for 2014 – 70 applications received






3.4 Learning Through The Arts
No formal motions.
UPDATES


LTTA in the UK – As part of the Royal Conservatory’s relationship with the
Prince’s Charities, LTTA Media Manager John Scully and Artist-Educator
Training Manager Nicole Fougère delivered two training sessions on the
subject of Artist-Teacher Collaboration this past August to teaching artists
who work with the UK firm ARTIS. This training was offered in advance of
ARTIS’ planned delivery of the LTTA model of arts-based teaching and
learning in a number of sites throughout the UK starting in 2014 (under the
auspices of the Prince’s Charities, funding permitting.)
LTTA in Germany – Now entering our 7th year. LTTA Mentor Artist Paula
Wing recently visited Wurzburg to provide training to both Artist-Educators
and Teachers; undertake job-embedded training for teachers in the
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

classroom; and observe German artist-educators deliver lessons in the
classroom. Paula reported back that LTTA Germany is feeling very strong
programmatically and functioning well under a renewed management
structure. LTTA Germany will hold its first international congress in arts and
learning in 2014, at which Angela Elster and Nicole Fougère will attend as our
representatives. We look forward to providing future mentorship for up to
two German artists to work towards their RCM Level III Artist-Educator
certification.
LTTA In-School Programs – To date, programming has been confirmed in
Calgary, Fort McMurray, Thunder Bay, Winnipeg, Toronto, Hamilton, and
Windsor for the 2013-14 academic year. Total confirmations to date have
brought us to 69% of our annual target. We will also be testing a lighter
version of the LTTA Core program under the “Aspire” banner starting in the
New Year. We have already confirmed 10 classes that are interested in Aspire
and aim to bring 200 classes into the LTTA fold through it.
Music Champion Program – Now in commencing our 5th year, the program
has expanded nationally to cover Toronto, Hamilton, Windsor, and now
Winnipeg, with expectation to add Vancouver before the end of 2013-14. This
will generate a total of 70 participating classrooms, with 58 confirmed to
date. We anticipate working in partnership with the Windsor Symphony
Orchestra again this year, and are in discussion with the Winnipeg Symphony
and the Hamilton Symphony orchestras to join as Music Champion program
partners.
4.0 ACADEMIC COUNCIL STRUCTURAL SUBCOMMITTEE REPORT
Met on November 11 to review GGS and RCS motions.
5.0 OTHER BUSINESS
 Introduction of Sean Hutchins, Director of Research. Is in the process of setting
up a lab on-site in which he will conduct experimental psychology and
neuroscience studies, which will involve students of the RCM. He will be on-site
fulltime in Spring 2014.
 The Marilyn Thomson Early Childhood Education Centre was launched in
October. RCM will begin to deliver Smart Starts outside of the RCM, starting with
18 classes in Winnipeg.
6.0 ADJOURNMENT
Council Adjourned at 10:23 am Moved: Stanley R.
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Motions from the GGS Divisional Committee (Nov 18, 2013)
PUT FORWARD FOR APPROVAL TO ACADEMIC COUNCIL:
MOTION: That the following teachers be approved according to the applicable type of
appointment.
Name
Position
Appointment Type
Kathleen Kajioka
PDP/ADP Historical Performance Strings
Probationary/Permanent
Brett Kingsbury
PDP History
Probationary/Permanent
Gabriel Radford
Academy, PDP, ADP Horn
Probationary/Permanent
Lori Riva
PDP Art History
Probationary/Permanent
MOTION: That Performance Awareness be required instead of elective for all ADP
streams.
MOTION: That Orchestral Literature be required instead of elective for ADP Orchestral.
MOTION: That Sonata Repertoire be required instead of elective for ADP Piano. A
second year of Sonata Repertoire would remain elective.
Motions from the RCS Divisional Committee (Nov 18, 2013)
PUT FORWARD FOR APPROVAL TO ACADEMIC COUNCIL:
MOTION: That Introduction to Jazz and Blues Improvisation for Instrumentalists
course by approved.
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GGS Divisional Committee Meeting Minutes
Friday, May 1, 2015
11:00 am EST
RM-351
Committee Members: James Anagnoson (Dean), Barry Shiffman (Associate Dean,
Strings), Gilles Thibodeau (Registrar), Jeremy Trupp (Manager, Operations), Julia
Galieva (Theory), Jennifer Tung (Voice), Andrew Kwan (Humanities), Craig Butosi (exofficio), Brian Current (Member at Large), David Louie (Piano), Gordon Wolfe
(Winds/Brass/Percussion), Angela Elster
Regrets: Andrew Kwan, Gordon Wolfe, David Louie, James Anagnoson
Voted by proxy: James Anagnoson, Gordon Wolfe
MINUTES
1.0
Approval of the Agenda:
Motion: That the Agenda be approved.
Moved By: Barry
Seconded: Brian
Carried via unanimous vote
2.0
Approval of the minutes from the March 6, 2015meeting
Motion: That the minutes of the March 6, 2015 Divisional Committee minutes be
approved.
Moved by: Jeremy
Seconded: Julia
Carried via unanimous vote.
3.0
New Faculty Appointments for Approval
Motion: That the following teachers be approved according to the applicable type of
appointment.
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Name
Position
Appointment Type
Amanda
Goodburn
Chamber Music Coach – Phil and Eli Taylor
Academy
Probationary/Perman
ent
Csaba Koczo
Chamber Music Coach – Phil and Eli Taylor
Academy
Probationary/Perman
ent
Amanda
Moved by: Barry
Seconded: Gilles
Carried via unanimous vote
Csaba
Moved by: Barry
Seconded: Julia
Carried via unanimous vote
4.0
Academic Scheduling Change
Motion: That the minutes of the April 21, 2014 Divisional Committee minutes be
approved.
At Jeremy’s request, the motion was altered to:
Motion: That Keyboard Harmony 3 and Keyboard Harmony 4 be returned to full-year
courses status, to now constitute 24 hours of class time each.
Moved by: Gilles
Seconded: Chris
Carried via unanimous vote
5.0 Academic Calendar Changes: Addition of language to clause 2.10 to
include all criminal activity, not just drugs and alcohol
Motion: That the new language be approved as a formal policy to be included in the
next Academic Calendar.
Current Clause:
2.10 DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY
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The Royal Conservatory is committed to maintaining a drug-free school and workplace.
The GGS is dedicated to excellence in musical performance and academic achievement;
to promote this goal, The Glenn Gould School requires that faculty, staff, and students
maintain the highest standards of personal and professional conduct. The use of drugs
and alcohol on campus adversely affects the quality of academic life and the mission of
the institution. Due to the violent and/or potentially fatal reactions to various
substances, the use of drugs or alcohol on the premises is strictly forbidden and may
lead to immediate dismissal.
Future Clause
2.10 DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND CRIMINAL ACTIVITY
The Royal Conservatory is committed to maintaining a safe, drug-free school and
workplace. The GGS is dedicated to excellence in musical performance and academic
achievement; to promote this goal, The Glenn Gould School requires that faculty, staff,
and students maintain the highest standards of personal and professional conduct. The
use of drugs and alcohol on campus adversely affects the quality of academic life and
the mission of the institution. Due to the violent and/or potentially fatal reactions to
various substances, the use of drugs or alcohol on the premises is strictly forbidden and
may lead to immediate dismissal. Additionally, any criminal act performed by a student,
either on or off school property, including but not limited to vandalism or harassment,
may lead to immediate dismissal or other forms of repercussion as deemed appropriate
by GGS and RCM administration.
Moved: Jeremy
Seconded: Barry
Carried via unanimous vote.
6.0
Dean’s Report:
Positive year overall
Flagship RCO events hugely successful – Sir R. Norrington in particular was thrilled with
the performance of Vaughan Williams Symphony #5 – CBC to broadcast nationally
Moving forward – looking to add support for students by attempting to “tap into” or join
a university health network, either UofT or Ryerson. This would assets greatly in terms
of gym access and access to mental health resources. Both of these are very important
and desired by students as discussed through the recent mental health survey.
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RCO to begin touring next year – starting with the new Isabel Bader theatre in Kingston
7.0
Academy Report:
Another great year, capped by a full house in Koerner for the Academy Orchestra
concert – very popular and free offering
Academy will participate in an international student program beginning next year in
collaboration with the Toronto District School Board
8.0
Library Report:
Currently following up on the distribution rights for RCO & CBC as mentioned in Dean’s
report
Production of recordings is now being shared with the Technology Lab. The TL edits
the material, but physical disks are produced by the library. This has massively
improved access for students and academy parents.
Summer Projects: instrument bank – cataloguing and circulation will move to the
library. Instruments will be treated like scores. Academy office (Gillian) is charged with
the administration of paper-work and who gets what, but the library handles the
circulation.
Capital Ugrades:
New management system – project plan has evolved. The choosing, installing
and migrating of data is now being done in partnership with IT. ETA of 8-12
months.
Security: many items are being returned that had never been signed out – this is
an “upgrade” that should have been installed prior to doors opening and is a
priority.
Plagiarism: Is a big concern, as per a conversation initiated by Joel Katz, who
identified the need to join “turnitin.com”. Craig is investigating the costs
involved. While a great tool, we will need to manage how it is used, as it can
have pitfalls. As it is a popular application, we should be able to so. Craig
doesn’t mind being on point for this.
9.0
Departmental Reports:
Theory Department
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Copying is an issue – better communication needed on the Integrity Policy. Perhaps
integrate on Course Outline.
Julia continuously reviews her courses to tailor them efficiently to the students’ needs.
The move currently will be to reduce the number of technical exercises to increase the
aural component in an effort to tie the course more closely with performing.
Vocal Department:
Attendance at masterclasses an issue – policy clarified during discussion, coordinator
empowered to reflect poor attendance in grades. Encourage faculty to mention these
types of issues when they first occur, when they can be addressed, not at the end of
the year when the damage is done.
Humanities: n/a
Winds/Brass/percussion: n/a
Piano: n/a
Strings: n/a
10. Student Council Report:
Facebook page created – good participation, very positive, affirmative use thus far.
Great to help identify issues.
Nice “end of year” event held at the Duke after the fourth and final RCO.
Council voted to raise student fees buy $20 – pending approval by the PCC/MTCU.
Student performances and outreach – Ema Nikolovska singled out as having done a
great job organizing the events that occurred, but suggestion that we might want to
look into creating a work-study position to organize more of them.
11.0 Other Business
11.1 Discussion around the new Advanced Musicianship course:
It should continue according to Chris and Julia
Class size should remain small – this should remain an elective course
Perhaps reduce the length of the course, but continue to offer it every year, not
alternative years
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Julia and Gilles to discuss in August how best to position the course to avoid mass
withdrawals such as occurred this year.
11.2 Curriculum Review Update: Internal review under way. Background
provided.
11.3 @rcmusic.ca Email Update: To become only means of communication with
faculty as of September. Jeremy and IT working to implement same system for all
students – no solid ETA available.
11.4 As Necessary: Brian mentioned that failure of freight elevator is of massive
consequence/inconvenience to the New Music Ensemble. Also mentioned that one of
the percussionists seemed to be out of their depth – Barry to take the discussion offline.
11.5 Degree Granting Update: Little to report at the time of the meeting, other
than the groundwork is setup, consultants and contract employees are in place to
assist, and the initial push is to begin shortly.
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GGS Divisional Committee Meeting Minutes
Friday, March 6, 2015
11:00 am EST
Rm-305
Committee Members: James Anagnoson (Dean), Barry Shiffman (Associate Dean,
Strings), Gilles Thibodeau (Registrar), Jeremy Trupp (Manager, Operations), Julia
Galieva (Theory), Jennifer Tung (Voice), Andrew Kwan (Humanities), Craig Butosi (exofficio), Brian Current (Member at Large), David Louie (Piano), Gordon Wolfe
(Winds/Brass/Percussion), Chris Au (Student Representative) Angela Elster
Regrets: Chris Au
MINUTES
Due to an agenda consisting only of approving the last meeting’s minutes, it was
agreed to forgo a physical meeting and to have voting members cast their votes via
email. No members of the committee voiced concerns or forwarded additional business
when approached with this suggestion.
1.0
Approval of the minutes from the January 16, 2015 meeting
Motion: That the minutes of the April 21, 2014 Divisional Committee minutes be
approved.
Moved by: Gilles
Seconded: Jeremy
Carried via email – majority vote (10 yeas, 2 abstained with no response)
2.0
Motion to Adjourn
Meeting adjourned
Next Meetings
Friday, May 1, 2015, 11am
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4.2 Professional Accreditation
There is no professional accreditation body associated with musical performance in
Canada. However it is well established that The Royal Conservatory of Music has set the
national standards for music learning for 128 years.
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4.3 Learning Outcomes
Program Content and Learning Outcomes
GGS currently offers in-house several of the General Education/Breadth requirements
that are necessary in a Bachelor’s degree program: these include English, art history,
research methodology and foreign languages (German and Italian), as well as music
history and theory. GGS plans to expand its General Education offerings to include the
disciplinary areas that are not yet represented in the curriculum: these will primarily be
in social sciences, science and psychology. Course proposals for Psychology (general
and applied), Physics of Sound, Philosophy and English (Poetry and Drama) are
presently in preparation to support the degree and to replace offerings currently
available through our degree-granting partner, Thompson Rivers University. As they do
currently, all B. Mus. candidates will complete 15 credits of General Education in
addition to the currently required 7 credits of academic coursework presently part of the
PDP and offered at GGS.
All General Education courses provide historical context, theoretical underpinnings and
introduction of the methodologies typical of the academic discipline at hand. Critical
thinking is introduced and reinforced at each level through discussion, presentations
and written assignments of increasing length and complexity.
During the four years of study, students move along a gradual scale from beginning
processes of self-assessment, identification of own values and personal response
through skills development in performance and critical analysis, acquisition of research
skills and methodologies, and ability to communicate results. At the end of the
program, students will demonstrate research and contextual understanding, integrating
problem-solving and methodology, apply a valuing process, make and defend
qualitative judgments, establish and employ critical frameworks, and demonstrate
leadership in addressing professional and social issues. They will demonstrate these
skills as musicians and as young people developing important life skills.
An additional benefit of the General Education or Breadth courses offered at the Glenn
Gould School is that many of the faculty members teaching in this area have a
background or practice in music as well as a terminal degree in their liberal arts
discipline. This means these faculty members are capable of slanting the general
studies material to engage the interests of the students, understanding the relevance of
the material to music performance practitioners and helping the students bridge the
gap across disciplines.
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Relationship between program level learning outcomes, degree expectations, and
curriculum design
The chart below indicates how the program learning outcomes are related to the categories in the University
Undergraduate Degree Level Expectations (UUDLES) and also shows examples of the courses which have learning
activities to contribute to the achievement of each outcome.
Outcomes which have a strong breadth component have been flagged as “Breadth”; however the comprehensive nature
of the program requires that knowledge and skills from breadth courses are integrated with the discipline-specific
outcomes and that the discipline-specific courses help to develop some of the breadth requirements.
Degree Level
Standard Category
Depth and Breadth of
Knowledge
Related Program Learning Outcome(S)




Display a broad and comprehensive knowledge
of the theoretical approaches, key concepts,
methodologies, and current advances in the
discipline of music in local, regional, national,
and international contexts and at various time
dimensions.
Evaluate and interpret information and
approaches that address musical dimensions of
socio-economic, cultural and political issues.
Integrate knowledge and perspectives across
traditional disciplinary boundaries between
human development and music.
Recognize the interrelationships between
music and human processes.
Course, Course Segments or Workplace
Requirements that contribute to this
outcome
Applied Studies :
Applied Music
Master Class
Performance Studies –
Piano/Orchestral Instruments/ Voice :
Choir/Collegium
Sonata Repertoire Strings
Sonata Repertoire Winds/Brass
Collaborative Piano: Voice
Chamber Music
Piano Duos
Music Materials:
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


Knowledge of
methodologies



Appreciate a theoretical framework for music
which examines relationships between the rich
history of music, the practicality of playing an
instrument and being well-versed in music
literature.
Understand the diversity of approaches to
acquisition of knowledge in the discipline of
music including knowledge of and experience
in research
Display a broad and comprehensive knowledge
of the key concepts, methodologies, and
current advances relating to applied music,
performance studies, music history, and music
literature and art history.
Apply principles of music knowledge using
critical thinking and problem solving skills to
contribute to solutions for better music
performance
Plan, design, and carry out projects from start
to finish in a timely manner, well-defined
objectives and outcomes.
Integrate the use of technologies with current
theory and knowledge in the discipline of
Introduction to Music History
Music History- Bibliography
Music Literature I – ca. 1600 to 1890
Music Literature II – 1890 to present
Music History 20th and 21st Centuries
Humanities:
Art History I
Art History II
Art History III
Art History IV
Art Song/Operatic Repertoire
Science Studies:
Psychology (applied, general)
Psychology and Social Science
Music and the Mind
Physics of Sound
Performance Studies Common:
Teaching Methodology
Performance Studies –
Piano/Orchestral Instruments/ Voice :
Keyboard Harmony 3 – Improvisation
Keyboard Harmony 4 – Jazz
Historical Performance Practices
Introductory Conducting and Score Reading
Advanced Conducting and Score Reading
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



Application of
knowledge






music to utilize in methodological studies.
Collect, analyze, synthesize, display, and
interpret musical theory, keyboard harmony
and aural skills at an advanced level.
Use advanced technical skills for research
methodology in music and exploring the
background of particular music pieces.
Evaluate appropriateness of different
approaches to problem solving.
Devise and sustain arguments.
To evaluate critically
Work collaboratively to critically evaluate, and
investigate possible solutions to challenges
relevant to music performance in various
instruments.
Apply principles of music theory to contribute
to solutions for effective sight reading music
scores as well as partaking in scene studies.
Able to review, present and critically evaluate
qualitative and quantitative information.
Able to use a range of established techniques
to evaluate, frame questions and solve
problems.
Able to make critical use of scholarly reviews
and primary sources.
Music Materials:
Materials 1 – Rhythmic Practices
Materials 1 – Theory
Materials 2 – Theory
Materials 3 – Theory
Materials 1 – Keyboard Harmony
Materials 2 – Keyboard Harmony
Materials 1 – Aural Skills
Materials 2 – Aural Skills
Humanities:
Research Methodology
Applied Studies:
Recital
Music Materials:
Canadian Repertoire
Advanced Musicianship
Performance Studies –
Piano/Orchestral Instruments/ Voice :
Royal Conservatory Orchestra
Opera – Scene Study
Sight singing
Humanities/Social Science/Science
Studies
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Communication skills

Communicate information, argument and
analyses effectively using oral, written,
graphic, and information technology skills to a
wide range of audiences. “Breadth”
Performance Studies - Common
Communications
Performing Arts Criticism
Performance Studies –
Piano/Orchestral Instruments/ Voice :
English Diction 1 & 2
German Diction
Italian Diction
French Diction
Humanities Studies:
English 100
English 101
German 100
Italian 100
French 100
Awareness of Limits
of Knowledge


Understand the bounded scope of practice
based on level of knowledge and training.
“Breadth”
Appreciate the uncertainty, ambiguity and
limits to knowledge and how this might
influence analyses and interpretations –
“Breadth”
Social Science Studies
Performance Studies - Common
Technology for performance: Directed Study
Performance Awareness
Performance Studies –
Piano/Orchestral Instruments/ Voice :
Orchestral Repertoire
Vocal Coaching
Vocal Stagecraft
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Autonomy/
Professional Capacity



Work as a part of a multidisciplinary and
multicultural team, in both membership and
leadership capacities, to solve problems in
varied settings. “Breadth”
Manage, own learning in changing
circumstances, within and outside music
Exhibit behavior consistent with academic
integrity and social responsibility
Performance Studies – Common
Technology for Performers
Career Management
Performance Studies –
Piano/Orchestral Instruments/ Voice :
Opera Workshop
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4.4 Course Descriptions
APPLIED STUDIES - All Instruments
APPLIED MUSIC
3 credits
Each student receives 1.5 hours of private instruction per week, the equivalent of 39
hours per academic year. Those students whose major instrument is not piano must
successfully complete an Royal Conservatory Grade 6 Piano examination or equivalent
prior to graduation (www.examinations.rcmusic.ca). Students may use up to 30
minutes of their private lesson time in the study of a secondary instrument, or towards
the preparation of their Grade 6 Piano requirement. First year students perform a juried
evaluation in the Spring. Jury marks represent 40% of the first year applied music
mark. Students are required to practice a minimum of 2 hours per day.
RECITAL
Year 1 639-003 (elective)
Year 2 639-004 (2 credits)
Year 3 639-005 (3 credits)
Year 4 639-006 (4 credits)
Students in first year are encouraged, but not required, to perform a non-credit recital.
The decision to perform a recital in first year would be made in consultation with the
private teacher. Students must perform a public recital in the second, third and fourth
years of the program.
MASTER CLASS
Strings (626-001) Paul Widner
Voice (626-002) Roxolana Roslak
Woodwinds (626-003) Kathleen Rudolph
Brass (626-004) Gabriel Radford
Piano (626-006) James Anagnoson
Percussion (626-007) John Rudolph
Harp (626-008) Judy Loman
2 credits
Frequent master classes are given by international artists and by our own faculty.
Please note that student performance opportunities are at the discretion of the visiting
artist, the Master Class Coordinator, the private teacher, and the Dean. The Master
Class Schedule are available at the beginning of the school year. Updates and changes
will be posted regularly outside Glenn Gould School Administrative Offices.
Note - Master Class is compulsory in Years 2, 3 and 4.
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MUSIC MATERIALS - All Instruments
MATERIALS 1 – THEORY (627-002)
3 CREDITS
Instructor – Julia Galieva Szokolay
The course examines, through creative compositional and practical work, approaches to
harmonic language and form building in a variety of musical styles of the Baroque and
Classical periods. Students learn to harmonize passages, write melodies and analyze
simple formal procedures of tonal music.
Co-requisite – Materials 1 – Keyboard Harmony (623-007), Aural Skills (627-010)
MATERIALS 1 – KEYBOARD HARMONY (623-007)
1.5 credits
Instructor – TBA
The course targets first-year students and focuses on study of basic harmonic skills at
the keyboard, including playing chord progressions, realizing figured bass, score
reading, improvising and harmonizing melodies, transposing, and other related skills.
The course is designed to supplement Materials 1 and Aural Skills 1 by providing a
‘hands-on’ practical approach which allows translating theoretical concept into sounds
at the keyboard.
Co-requisites - Materials 1 - Theory (627-002), Aural Skills (627-010)
MATERIALS 1 – AURAL SKILLS (627-010)
1.5 credits
Instructor – Julia Galieva Szokolay
Music reading and related aural skills are developed through the practice and
application of sight-reading techniques and ear-training procedures. This course
includes singing and/or identification of scales, modes, intervals, cadences, and
progressions, rhythmic training and sight singing of simple rhythms and melodies.
Co-Requisites – Materials 1 – Theory (627-002), Keyboard Harmony (623-007)
MATERIALS 2 – THEORY (627-001)
3 credits
Instructor – Julia Galieva Szokolay
The course examines, through creative compositional and practical work, approaches to
harmonic style and form building in a variety of musical styles of the Classical and
Romantic periods. It builds on concepts learned in Materials 1, expanding beyond the
world of diatonic harmony into the expressive realm of chromaticism. Students will
learn to harmonize passages, write melodies and analyze advanced formal procedures
of tonal and post-tonal music.
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Pre-requisites – Materials 1 – Theory (627-002), Keyboard Harmony (623-007),
Aural Skills (627-010)
Co-requisites – Materials 2 – Keyboard Harmony (623-005), Aural Skills (627-014)
MATERIALS 2 – KEYBOARD HARMONY (623-005)
1.5 credits
Instructor – TBA
A continuation of Keyboard Harmony 1, the course targets second-year students and
focuses on study of basic harmonic skills at the keyboard, including playing chord
progressions, realizing figured bass, score reading, improvising and harmonizing
melodies, transposing, and other related skills. The course is designed to supplement
Materials 2 and Aural Skills 2 by providing a ‘hands-on’ practical approach which allows
translating theoretical concepts into sounds at the keyboard.
Pre-requisites – Materials 1 – Theory (627-002), Keyboard Harmony (623-007),
Aural Skills (627-010)
Co-requisites – Materials 2 – Theory (627-001), Aural Skills 2 (627-014)
MATERIALS 2 – AURAL SKILLS (627-014)
1.5 credits
Instructor – Julia Galieva Szokolay
A continuation of Aural Skills 1,the course provides a dictation, ear-training and sightsinging element to the harmonic, rhythmic/metric, structural and contrapuntal practices
of music from the nineteenth century to the present, corresponding with related topics
in written music theory and keyboard courses.
Pre-requisites – Materials 1 – Theory (627-002), Keyboard Harmony (623-007),
Aural Skills (627-010)
Co-Requisites – Materials 2 – Theory (627-001), Keyboard Harmony (623-005)
MATERIALS 3 – THEORY (627-008)
4 credits
Instructor: Julia Galieva Szokolay
A study of the techniques and styles in twentieth-century and contemporary music, with
an emphasis on the critical analysis of pioneering works. The course includes discussion
of forms and selected compositional procedures of the contemporary tonal and posttonal music practice, and incorporates assignments in analysis and composition.
Pre-requisites – Materials 2 – Theory (627-001), Keyboard Harmony (623-005),
Aural Skills 1 (627-014)
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INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC HISTORY (618-008)
4 credits
Instructor – Joel Katz
An introduction to a diverse range of repertoire and the cultural, technological, and
stylistic contexts from which it emerged.
Pre-requisite – None
MUSIC HISTORY - BIBLIOGRAPHY (618-005)
1 credit
Instructor – Craig Butosi
Practical work in library and internet research methods and
bibliography.
Pre-requisite – None
Co-requisite – Introduction to Music History (618-008)
MUSIC HISTORY - 20th and 21st Centuries (618-011)
4 credits
Instructor – Dean Burry
A course for students in their graduating year which covers the music of the 20th and
21st centuries
Pre-requisites – Introduction to Music History (618-008), Music Literature 1 (625027), Music Literature 2 (625-022)
*MUSIC LITERATURE 1 (ca.1600 to 1890)
Piano (625-027) Andrea Botticelli
Strings (625-028) Patrick Jordan
Voice (625-029) Joel Katz, Chris Foley
Winds (625-030) Kathleen Rudolph
Harp (625-031) Judy Loman
Brass (625-033) Gabriel Radford
Percussion (625-035) David Kent
3 credits
A study of styles and works for the student’s principal area of applied study from ca.
1600-1890.
Pre-requisite – Introduction to Music History (618-008)
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*MUSIC LITERATURE 2 (1890 to present)
Piano (625-022) Eve Egoyan
Strings (625-023) Patrick Jordan
Voice (625-026) Joel Katz
Winds (625-024) Kathleen Rudolph
Harp (625-022) Judy Loman
Brass (625-034) TBA
Percussion (625-036) John Rudolph
3 credits
A study of styles and works for the student’s principal area of applied study from ca.
1890 to the present.
Pre-requisite – Introduction to Music History (618-008)
CANADIAN REPERTOIRE (627-019)
3 credits
Instructor – Dean Burry
An in depth study of Canadian compositions in a variety of genres and styles; links to
developments in Canadian art and literature will be noted. Each student will
investigate extensively at least two works; this research will culminate in substantial
papers and when feasible, performances---one of these works should be a composition
the student believes has been unjustly overlooked and for which s/he can be a
persuasive advocate.
Pre-requisite – Materials 2 – Theory (627-001)
PERFORMANCE STUDIES - All Instruments
TECHNOLOGY FOR PERFORMERS (646-001)
2 credits
Instructor – Michael White
Students will acquire proficiency in the computer and new media tools useful for a
career as a professional musician. Topics covered will include: electronic press kits,
internet, music sequencing, hard disc recording and editing, CD mastering and creation.
Students will be expected to apply lessons learned in the course toward the completion
of assignments in lab work between sessions.
Pre-requisite – Materials 1 – Theory (627-002)
TECHNOLOGY FOR PERFORMERS - DIRECTED STUDY (646-004)
1 credit
Advisor – Michael White
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Using the tools learned in Technology for Performers, students will select their own
course of study, i.e. creating Web pages, CDs or electronic media packages.
Pre-requisite – Technology for Performers (646-001)
COMMUNICATIONS – MUSIC & COMMUNITY (602-002)
3 credits
Instructor – Andrew Kwan
Students will explore the meaning of art, its relation to each individual, the artist,
audience, and concert, and then apply performance/psychological aspects in a
practicum with the Toronto community. Participants will learn new ways to
communicate their art to the public. The goal of this class is to reach out to the
community and perform concerts in schools, concert halls, as well as in hospitals,
prisons, and other less-fortunate settings.
Pre-requisite – Completed 2nd year
CAREER MANAGEMENT (598-001)
1 credit
Instructor – Andrew Kwan
Designed specifically to prepare the music student for the complex demands of a
performing career, this course facilitates the learning of business, writing, marketing,
and negotiation skills. Course relies on the expertise of professionals in the field.
Pre-requisite – Completed 2nd year
PERFORMING ARTS CRITICISM (621-003)
3 credits
Instructor – William Littler
Students attend performances and submit reports and reviews for class discussion no
later than 48 hours after the event. Critical models will be examined.
Pre-requisite – Completed 2nd year
*PERFORMANCE AWARENESS (636-002)
2 credits
Instructor – Dr. John Chong
Students learn the basic concepts of the artists’ psychophysiology and ergonomic risk
factors for injury and disease. Study is focused on how to identify problems related to
the performance activities of motor control, autonomic regulation, and lifestyle.
Pre-requisite – Completed 1st year
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*TEACHING METHODOLOGY (633-001)
1 credit
Instructor – James Anagnoson
Topics will include cognitive psychology, unlocking each student's potential through
neuro-linguisitic programming, developmental issues, and methods to inspire and
motivate students.
Pre-requisite – Completed 2nd year
*TEACHING METHODOLOGY
Strings (633-002) Katharine Rapoport
Piano (633-003) Janet Lopinski
Voice (633-005) Joel Katz
Woodwinds (633-006) Kathleen Rudolph
Harp (633-009) Angela Schwarzkopf
Brass (633-010) Gabriel Radford
Percussion (633-011) TBA
1 credit
A continuation of Teaching Methodology (Fall). In the 2nd semester, Royal
Conservatory faculty and guest artists will act as Coordinators to deliver further topics
such as Elements of Style, Sound Production, and Concert/Audition/Festival preparation.
Pre-requisite – Teaching Methodology (633-001)
ACADEMIC STUDIES – GENERAL EDUCATION All Instruments
ENGLISH 100 – Literature and Composition (621-004)
3 credits
Instructor – Burke Cullen
This basic literature and composition course is split equally between a thorough review
of the mechanics of writing and an introduction to reading and writing about works of
literature. Each course unit includes a selection of composition (grammar, punctuation,
sentence structure and diction) and a section on literature. During the year, students
will read approximately 20 short stories, one novella and a novel.
Pre-requisite – Grade 12 English or equivalent
*ART HISTORY 1 - PREHISTORY TO 1400 (621-016)
1.5 credits
Instructor – Lise Hosein
A contextual survey of representative art and architecture ranging from prehistorica
through 1400.
Pre-requisite – None
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*ART HISTORY 2 - RENAISSANCE & BAROQUE (621-017)
1.5 credits
Instructor – Lise Hosein
A contextual survey of representative Renaissance and Baroque art and architecture.
Pre-requisite – None
*ART HISTORY 3- 18TH AND 19TH CENTURY (621-018)
1.5 credits
Instructor – Lise Hosein
A contextual survey of representative 18th and 19th centuries art and architecture.
Pre-requisite – None
*ART HISTORY 4- MODERN ERA & CONTEMPORARY (621-019)
1.5 credits
Instructor – Lise Hosein
A contextual survey of representative modern era and contemporary art and
architecture.
Pre-requisite – None
*GERMAN 100 (621-010)
3 credits
Instructor – Richard Mehringer
An introduction to the German Language.
*ITALIAN 100 (621-013)
3 credits
Instructor – Steven Leigh
An introduction to the Italian Language.
RESEARCH METHODOLOGIES (621-011)
1 credit
Instructor – TBA
This course builds a framework to assist students in the identification and evaluation of
internet-based music materials and sources. Students will acquire tools and strategies
to aid them in critical thinking as they develop their abilities to write about music.
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ELECTIVE STUDIES – All Instruments
*Materials 1 – Rhythmic Practices (627-020)
1.5 credits
Instructor – David Kent
A study of rhythm from both western and non-western music systems. Students will
strengthen their own rhythmic understanding and skills in performance. Required for
Percussionists only.
ENGLISH 101 – Poetry & Drama (621-009)
3 credits
Instructor – Burke Cullen
One of the central themes of the first six weeks of the course is the relationship
between poetry and music. Students study both formal poetic practices and
conventions of free verse. Three plays are studied in the second half of the course.
Students examine the principles of both tragedy and comedy and are asked to consider
staging techniques, characterization, and social issues.
Pre-requisite – English 100 (621-004) or equivalent
ADVANCED MUSICIANSHIP (627-011)
3 credits
Instructor – Julia Galieva Szokolay
Musical structure is best understood when one can hear it; this course will train
students to comprehend musical form - by eye, by ear, or by combining the two, and
to be attentive to the tendencies of musical materials, points of arrival, moments of
climax, "tight-knit" and "loose" themes, sections of stability and instability, order and
disorder.
Pre-requisite – Theory 2, Aural Skills 2, Keyboard Harmony 2
ADDITIONAL REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE DIPLOMA IN PERFORMANCE
STUDIES – PIANO
*CHOIR/COLLEGIUM (600-003)
3 credits
Instructor – Jennifer Tung
Students explore vocal ensemble works of various centuries.
Pre-requisite – None
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SONATA REPERTOIRE Strings (645-002)
3 credits
Instructor – Peter Longworth
Students prepare and perform standard sonata repertoire for piano and one instrument.
NOTE: All efforts will be made to accommodate assignments and student interests in
Sonata Repertoire.
Pre-requisite—None
SONATA REPERTOIRE Winds/Brass (645-005)
3 Credits
Instructor – Virginia Weckstrom
Students prepare and perform standard sonata repertoire for piano and one instrument
Pre-requisite—None
*COLLABORATIVE PIANO: VOICE (645-002)
3 credits
Instructor – Jennifer Tung
Students prepare and perform standard song repertoire for piano and voice.
Pre-requisites - Piano Duos (638-001)
CHAMBER MUSIC (667-001)
3 credits
Co-ordinator – Paul Widner
Students prepare and perform chamber music. Regular chamber music coaching is
provided. A room will be assigned to each group for two hours each week; this time
must be used for either rehearsals or coachings. Attendance is mandatory. There will be
3 performance classes per term, to be presented by Glenn Gould School Faculty and
guest artists. NOTE: All efforts will be made to accommodate student interests in
Chamber Music.
Pre-requisite – None
ADDITIONAL REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE DIPLOMA IN PERFORMANCE
STUDIES – ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS
ROYAL CONSERVATORY ORCHESTRA (630-001)
4 credits
Resident Conductor– Joaquin Valdepenas
The Royal Conservatory Orchestra, under the baton of guest conductors, performs
representative works from the orchestral repertoire.
Pre-requisite – Placement audition in September and other auditions as scheduled
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SONATA REPERTOIRE - Strings (645-002)
2 credits
Instructor – Peter Longworth
Students prepare and perform standard sonata repertoire for piano and one instrument.
NOTE: this course is not required of Double Bass students
Pre-requisites - None
CHAMBER MUSIC
Strings and Piano (667-001) Paul Widner
Woodwinds (667-002) Kathleen Rudolph
Brass (667-004) Gordon Wolfe
3 credits
Students prepare and perform chamber music. Regular chamber music coaching is
provided. A room will be assigned to each group for two hours each week; this time
must be used for either rehearsals or coachings. Attendance is mandatory. There will be
3 performance classes per term, to be presented by Glenn Gould School Faculty and
guest artists. NOTE: All efforts will be made to accommodate student interests in
Chamber Music.
Pre-requisite – None
INTRODUCTORY CONDUCTING AND SCORE READING (607-004)
2 credits
Instructor – Uri Mayer
A study of basic conducting techniques including score-reading, score preparation,
baton technique, and rehearsal skills.
Pre-requisite – Completed 1st year of RCO (630-001), or by permission of instructor
ADVANCED CONDUCTING AND SCORE READING (607-001)
2 credits
Instructor – Uri Mayer
Advanced in-depth study of orchestral score reading covering elements of style, form,
instrumental balance, articulation, and phrasing.
Pre-requisite – Introductory Conducting and Score Reading (607-004)
ORCHESTRAL REPERTOIRE (515-008)
Instructors – Various
2 credits
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Standard orchestral excerpts are studied in instrumental, sectional, and full orchestra
settings. Prep auditions, reading sessions, and excerpt classes with guest artists
augment classroom work.
Pre-requisite – Completed 2nd year of RCO (630-001)
*HISTORICAL PERFORMANCE PRACTICES – Strings (619-002)
2 credits
Instructor – Kathleen Kajioka
A study of styles and techniques of performance practice of music composed between
ca. 1590-1740 using historical treatises and Baroque techniques specific to the student’s
instrument.
Pre-requisite—Completed 2nd year
*HISTORICAL PERFORMANCE PRACTICES – Woodwinds (619-006)
2 credits
Instructor – John Abberger
A study of styles and techniques of performance practice of music composed between
ca. 1590-1740 using historical treatises and Baroque techniques specific to the student’s
instrument.
Pre-requisite – Completed 2nd year
*Materials 1 – Rhythmic Practices (627-020)
1.5 credits
Instructor – David Kent
A study of rhythm from both western and non-western music systems. Students will
strengthen their own rhythmic understanding and skills in performance. Required for
Percussionists only.
ADDITIONAL REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE DIPLOMA IN PERFORMANCE
STUDIES – VOICE
* CHOIR/COLLEGIUM (600-003)
3 credits
Instructor – Jennifer Tung
Students explore vocal ensemble works of various centuries
Pre-requisite – None
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VOCAL COACHING (657-001)
2 credits
Instructors – Various
A private instruction forum for specific problems that the student may encounter with
any repertoire. Voice students will receive 60 minutes per week of private instruction
with a vocal coach to develop expression, emotional content and presentation.
Pre-requisite: None
*VOCAL STAGECRAFT (658-001 – Year 1, 658-002 Year 2, 658-003 Year 3)
2 credits
Instructors – Stephanie Bogle, Tom Diamond, Joel Katz, Jennifer Tarver, Jayne Smiley
Group work in practical exercises dealing with body awareness, concentration, simple
co-ordination between physical and mental skills, and improvisatory techniques. An inclass performance incorporates these techniques.
Pre-requisite – None
*ENGLISH DICTION 1 (608-001)
2 credits
Instructor – Jean MacPhail
The introduction of the International Phonetic Alphabet as a tool for learning the basics
of pronunciation. English diction and repertoire are the focus.
Pre-requisite – None
*ENGLISH DICTION 2 (608-005)
2 credits
Instructor – Jean MacPhail
Continued study and application of English language with grammar and written work.
Pre-requisite – English Diction 1 (608-001)
*ITALIAN DICTION (608-008)
2 credits
Instructor – Steven Leigh
Italian diction will be studied with written and sung examples from the song and
operatic repertoires.
Pre-requisite – None
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*ITALIAN 100 (608-013)
3 credits
Instructor – Steven Leigh
Study and application of the Italian language with grammar and written work.
Pre-requisite—None
*FRENCH DICTION (608-007)
2 credits
Instructor – Jason Nedecky
'French Diction for Singers' provides instruction in the French style soutenu. Authentic
lyric pronunciation is developed through in-class coaching, and with written work using
the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Special attention shall be paid to the French
Art Song repertoire in coaching sessions, with recorded examples incorporated into
class discussion.
Pre-requisite – Completed 1st year
*FRENCH 100 (621-014)
3 credits
Instructor – TBA
Study and application of French language with grammar and written work.
*GERMAN DICTION (608-004)
2 credits
Instructor – Robert Loewen
German diction will be studied with written and sung examples from the song and
operatic repertoires.
*GERMAN 100 (621-010)
3 credits
Instructor – Richard Mehringer
Study and application of the German language with grammar and written work.
OPERA – SCENE STUDY (817-001)
2 credits
Instructor – Joel Katz, Tom Diamond
This ensemble provides a special opportunity for singers to study and perform opera
excerpts in production. Participants will broaden their experience, develop their vocal
technique further through encountering appropriate vocal material, and learn new
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repertoire. Their ability to handle professional level stage work will be significantly
strengthened.
Pre-requisite – Vocal Stagecraft (658-003) or by permission of the instructor
*ART SONG/OPERATIC REPERTOIRE –
20th Century Art Song (597-001)
1.5 credit
Instructor – Roxolana Roslak
Collaborative Pianist – Brahm Goldhamer
Offers singers and pianists an intensive study of the modern Art Song Repertoire,
allowing for emphasis on the relationship between poetic text and music.
Pre-requisite – Completed 2nd year
*ART SONG/OPERATIC REPERTOIRE –
Oratorio (597-002)
1.5 credit
Instructor – Vicki St. Pierre
Collaborative Pianist – Brahm Goldhamer
A study of the Oratorio repertoire, allowing for emphasis on the relationship between
poetic text and music.
Pre-requisite – Completed 2nd year
* ART SONG/OPERATIC REPERTOIRE - French Art Song (597-003)
1.5 credit
Instructor – Jason Nedecky
Collaborative Pianist – Brahm Goldhamer
'French Art Song' explores the repertoire of French Mélodie, with a focus on the
development of lyric pronunciation, interpretation, and authentic style. Weekly sessions
shall consist of in-class coachings. Each semester shall conclude with student
performance exams of repertoire coached in class.
Pre-requisite – Completed 2nd year
*ART SONG/OPERATIC REPERTOIRE – Lied Study (597-004)
1.5 credit
Instructor – TBA
Collaborative Pianist – Brahm Goldhamer
Offers singers and pianists an intensive study of the 19th-century Lied, allowing for
emphasis on the relationship between poetic text and music.
Pre-requisite – Completed 2nd year
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*SIGHT SINGING (644-004)
2 credits
Instructor – Jennifer Tung
In conjunction with Collaborative Piano: Voice students learn song repertoire of varying
styles.
*HISTORICAL PERFORMANCE PRACTICES – Voice (619-003)
2 credits
Instructor – Ann Monoyios
A study of style and techniques of vocal music composed between ca. 1600-1750;
aspects covered include Italian monody; English, German, and French repertory,
ornamentation, and recitatives.
Pre-requisite – Completed 2nd year
INTRODUCTORY CONDUCTING AND SCORE READING (607-004)
2 credits (elective)
Instructor – Uri Mayer
A study of basic conducting techniques including score-reading, score preparation,
baton technique, and rehearsal skills.
Pre-requisite – Completed 1st year of RCO (630-001), or by permission of instructor
OPERA WORKSHOP
1.5 credits (elective)
Students performing in an opera will be granted 1.5 credits per production. Auditioning
is mandatory. There is no penalty for not being assigned a role.
Proposed New Courses (All Levels)
MANDATORY COURSES: English 100 and English 101 (half term each)
ENGLISH 100 – Literature and Composition (621-004)
1.5 credits
Instructor – Burke Cullen
This literature and composition course is split equally between a thorough review of the
mechanics of writing and an introduction to reading and writing about works of
literature. Each course unit includes a selection of composition (grammar, punctuation,
sentence structure and diction) and a section on literature. During the year, students
will read approximately 20 short stories, one novella and a novel.
Pre-requisite – Grade 12 English or equivalent
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ENGLISH 101 – Poetry & Drama (621-009)
1.5 credits
Instructor – Burke Cullen
One of the central themes of the first six weeks of the course is the relationship
between poetry and music. Students study both formal poetic practices and
conventions of free verse. Three plays are studied in the second half of the
course. Students examine the principles of both tragedy and comedy and are asked to
consider staging techniques, characterization, and social issues.
Pre-requisite – English 100 (621-004) or equivalent
STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO TAKE 6 OF THE FOLLOWING OFFERINGS: (half
term each)
Science 100 – The Physics of Sounds
1.5 credits
Instructor – TBA
Students will learn about the properties of sound waves, intonation, the harmonic
series. They will also explore what characterizes the timbre and sound of musical
instruments, as well as how sound is generated, and how individuals perceive sound.
ART HISTORY 1 - PREHISTORY TO 1400 (621-016)
1.5 credits
Instructor – Lise Hosein
A contextual survey of representative art and architecture ranging from prehistorical
through 1400.
Pre-requisite – None
*ART HISTORY 2 - RENAISSANCE & BAROQUE (621-017)
1.5 credits
Instructor – Lise Hosein
A contextual survey of representative Renaissance and Baroque art and architecture.
Pre-requisite – None
*ART HISTORY 3- 18TH AND 19TH CENTURY (621-018)
1.5 credits
Instructor – Lise Hosein
A contextual survey of representative 18th and 19th centuries art and architecture.
Pre-requisite – None
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*ART HISTORY 4- MODERN ERA & CONTEMPORARY (621-019)
1.5 credits
Instructor – Lise Hosein
A contextual survey of representative modern era and contemporary art and
architecture.
Pre-requisite – None
Psychology 200 – Know Thyself: Understanding Yourself and Others
1.5 credits
Instructor – TBA
This course is an introductory survey of psychology from a social science perspective
which examines research findings in psychology that may be applied to the student’s
life and work.
Areas of study include intelligence and cognition, motivation, emotion, health
psychology, social psychology, personality, stress and coping, and interpersonal
communication.
Psychology 300 – Applied Psychology
1.5 credits
Instructor – Dr. Sean Hutchins
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the ways in which
psychological evidence and techniques can be applied to the practice of law, business,
education, health sciences, etc.
Psychology 400 – Music and the Mind
1.5 credits
Instructor – Dr. Sean Hutchins
This course looks at research on the cognitive science of music, and its applications.
This course covers music perception and cognition, from acoustics to mental structures.
Other specific topics include musical development, absolute pitch, music-language
connections, the neuroscience of music, and the psychology of music performance.
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4.5 Sample Undergraduate Course Schedule 1
Program Requirements for Glenn Gould School Bachelor of Music
(Honours) in Performance
SPECIALIZATION IN PIANO
The Royal Conservatory has an Articulation Agreement with Thompson Rivers University
- Open Learning. Students who successfully complete the PDP program have the option
to apply to TRU-OL for their Bachelor of Music program.
Required courses and recommended sequence
Lower
Level
Upper
Level
1
2
3
4
3
3
3
3
Recital (639-003—Yr 1 elective) (639-004—Yr 2) (639005—Yr 3) (639-006—Yr 4)
2
3
4
Master Class (626-006)
2
2
2
Credits for Progam
YEAR
APPLIED STUDIES
Applied Music
PERFORMANCE STUDIES - COMMON
Technology for Performers (646-001 or 646-003)
2
Technology for Performers - Directed Study (646-004)
1
Communications (602-002)
3
Career Management (598-001)
1
Performing Arts Criticism (621-003)
3
Performance Awareness (636-002)*
2
Teaching Methodology - Fall/Spring (633-001/633-003)*
2
PERFORMANCE STUDIES - PIANO
Choir/Collegium (600-003)*
3
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Sonata Repertoire (Winds/Brass 645-005) (Strings 645002) or Chamber Music (667-001)
3
Collaborative Piano: Voice (645-004)*
3
Piano Duos (638-001)
2
3
3
Keyboard Harmony 3 - Improvisation (623-008)
2
Keyboard Harmony 4 - Jazz (623-009)
2
Historical Performance Practices (619-001)*
2
Introductory Conducting and Score Reading (607-004)
(elective)
3
(2)
MUSIC MATERIALS
Materials 1 - Rhythmic Practices (627-020)*
Materials 1 - Theory (627-002)
(1.5)
3
Materials 2 - Theory (627-001)
3
Materials 3 - Theory (627-008)
Materials 1 - Keyboard Harmony (623-007)
4
1.5
Materials 2 - Keyboard Harmony (623-005)
Materials 1 - Aural Skills (627-010)
1.5
1.5
Materials 2 - Aural Skills (627-014)
1.5
Introduction to Music History (618-008)
4
Music History - Bibliography (618-005)
1
Music Literature 1 - ca. 1600 to 1890 (625-027)*
Music Literature 2 - 1890 to present (625-022)*
3
3
Music History - 20th and 21st Centuries (618-011)
4
Canadian Repertoire (627-019)
3
Advanced Musicianship (627-011) (elective)
(3)
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HUMANITIES STUDIES
English 100 - Literature and Composition (621-004)
3
Art History Courses - Any two (621-016, 621-017, 621018, 621-019)*
3
German 100 (621-010)* (elective)
(3)
Italian 100 (621-013)* (elective)
Research Methodology (621-011)*
Credits Per Year
(3)
1
29
26
Total Credits Required for PDP - Piano:
29
24
108
Bachelor of Music General Education Requirement in addition to the above
English 101 (621-009)
Science
3
3
Humanities (The remaining two Art History Courses can
be taken as Humanities credit)*
3
Social Science
6
* indicates course offered in alternating years
Total General Education Requirements
Total Credits Required for TRU-OL Bachelor of
Music degree option (Piano)
15
123
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SPECIALIZATION IN ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS
The Royal Conservatory has an Articulation Agreement with Thompson Rivers University - Open
Learning. Students who successfully complete the PDP program have the option to apply to
TRU-OL for their Bachelor of Music program.
All PDP Orchestral Instruments co-requisite: Royal Conservatory Grade 6
Piano Examination
Require courses and recommended sequence
Lower
Level
Upper
Level
1
2
3
4
3
3
3
3
Recital (639-003—Yr 1 elective) (639-004—Yr 2) (639005—Yr 3) (639-006—Yr 4)
2
3
4
Master Class - Strings (626-001), Woodwinds (626-003),
Brass (626-004), Harp (626-008), Percussion (626-007)
2
2
2
Credits for Program
YEAR
APPLIED STUDIES
Applied Music
Grade 6 Piano Requirement (no credit weight attributed)
PERFORMANCE STUDIES - COMMON
Technology for Performers (646-001 or 646-003)
2
Technology for Performers - Directed Study (646-004)
1
Communications (602-002)
3
Career Management (598-001)
1
Performing Arts Criticism (621-003)
3
Performance Awareness (636-002)*
Teaching Methodology - Fall/Spring (633-001/633-002
(Strings) or 633-006 (Winds))*
2
2
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PERFORMANCE STUDIES - ORCHESTRAL
INSTRUMENTS
Royal Conservatory Orchestra (630-001)
4
Sonata Repertoire - Strings (645-002) (not required for
double-bass or harp)
2
4
4
Sonata Repertoire—Winds/Brass (645-005)
2
Chamber Music - Strings (667-001)
Chamber Music - Woodwinds/Harp/Percussion (667-002),
Brass (667-004)
4
3
Introductory Conducting and Score Reading (607-004)
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
Advanced Conducting and Score Reading (607-001)
2
Orchestral Repertoire (515-008)
2
Historical Performance Practices- Strings (619-002)*
,Woodwinds(619-006)* (not required for harp or brass
instruments)
2
2
MUSIC MATERIALS
Materials 1 - Rhythmic Practices (627-020)*
Materials 1 - Theory (627-002)
(1.5)
3
Materials 2 - Theory (627-001)
3
Materials 3 - Theory (627-008)
Materials 1 - Keyboard Harmony (623-007)
4
1.5
Materials 2 - Keyboard Harmony (623-005)
Materials 1 - Aural Skills (627-010)
1.5
1.5
Materials 2 - Aural Skills (627-014)
Introduction to Music History (618-008)
1.5
4
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Music History - Bibliography (618-005)
1
Music Literature 1 - ca. 1600 to 1890 (Strings 625-028,
Winds 625-030, Harp 625-031, Brass 625-033, Percussion
625-035)*
3
Music Literature 2 - 1890 to present (Strings 625-023 or
Winds 625-024, Harp 625-032, Brass 625-034, Percussion
625-036)*
3
Music History - 20th and 21st Centuries (618-011)
4
Canadian Repertoire (627-019)
3
Advanced Musicianship (627-011) (elective)
(3)
HUMANITIES STUDIES
English 100 - Literature and Composition (621-004)
3
Art History Courses - Any two (621-016, 621-017, 621018, 621-019)*
Research Methodology (621-011)*
3
1
German 100 (621-010)* (elective)
(3)
Italian 100 (621-013)* (elective)
Approximate Credits Per Year for PDP OrchestralALL
Graduation Credits Required for PDP
(Strings and Woodwinds)
Graduation Credits Required for PDP (Percussion)
(3)
27
32
31
32
122
121.5
Graduation Credits Required for PDP (Brass)
120
Graduation Credits Required for PDP (Double Bass
and Harp)
118
Bachelor of Music General Education Requirement in addition to the above
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English 101 (621-009)
Humanities (The remaining two Art History Courses can
be taken as Humanities credit)*
3
3
Science
3
Social Science
6
* indicates course offered in alternating years
Total General Education Requirements
Total Credits Required for TRU-OL Bachelor of
Music degree option (Orchestral-ALL)
15
Total Credits Required for TRU-OL Bachelor of
Music degree option (Strings and Woodwinds)
137
Total Credits Required for TRU-OL Bachelor of
Music degree option (Percussion)
136.5
Total Credits Required for TRU-OL Bachelor of
Music degree option (Brass)
135
Total Credits Required for TRU-OL Bachelor of
Music degree option (Double Bass and Harp)
133
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SPECIALIZATION IN VOICE
The Royal Conservatory has an Articulation Agreement with Thompson Rivers University - Open
Learning. Students who successfully complete the PDP program have the option to apply to
TRU-OL for their Bachelor of Music program.
All PDP Voice co-requisite: Royal Conservatory Grade 6 Piano Examination
Required courses and recommended
Lower
Level
Credits for Program
YEAR
Upper
Level
1
2
3
4
3
3
3
3
2
3
4
2
2
2
APPLIED STUDIES
Applied Music
Recital (639-003—Yr 1 elective) (639-004—Yr 2) (639005—Yr 3) (639-006—Yr 4)
Master Class (626-002)
Grade 6 Piano Requirement (no credit weight attributed)
PERFORMANCE STUDIES - COMMON
Technology for Performers (646-001 or 646-003)
2
Technology for Performers - Directed Study (646-004)
1
Communications (602-002)
3
Career Management (598-001)
1
Performing Arts Criticism (621-003)
3
Performance Awareness (636-002)*
2
Teaching Methodology - Fall/Spring (633-001/633-005)*
2
PERFORMANCE STUDIES - VOICE
Choir/Collegium (600-003)
3
Vocal Coaching (657-001)
2
2
2
Vocal Stagecraft (658-001 - Yr 1) (658-002- Yr 2) (658001 - Yr 3)
Opera - Scene Study (817-001)
2
2
2
English Diction 1 & 2 (608-001 & 608-005) *
4
Italian Diction (608-008)*
2
2
2
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French Diction (608-007)*
2
German Diction (608-004)*
2
Opera Workshop (629-002, 629-003)
Art Song/Operatic Repertoire (597-001, 597-002, 597003, 597-004)*
Sight Singing (644-004)*
(1.5)
(1.5)
(1.5)
3
(1.5)
3
2
Historical Performance Practices (619-003)*
2
Introductory Conducting and Score Reading (607-004)
(2)
MUSIC MATERIALS
Materials 1 - Rhythmic Practices (627-020)*
(1.5)
Materials 1 - Theory (627-002)
3
Materials 2 - Theory (627-001)
3
Materials 3 - Theory (627-008)
Materials 1 - Keyboard Harmony (623-007)
4
1.5
Materials 2 - Keyboard Harmony (623-005)
Materials 1 - Aural Skills (627-010)
1.5
1.5
Materials 2 - Aural Skills (627-014)
1.5
Introduction to Music History (618-008)
4
Music History - Bibliography (618-005)
1
Music Literature 1 - ca. 1600 to 1890 (625-029)
3
Music Literature 2 - 1890 to present (625-026) *
3
Music History - 20th and 21st Centuries (618-011)*
4
Canadian Repertoire (627-019)
3
Advanced Musicianship (627-011) (elective)
(3)
HUMANITIES STUDIES
English 100—Literature and Composition (621-004)
3
Art History Courses - Any two (621-016, 621-017, 621018, 621-019)*
German 100 (621-010)*
Italian 100 (621-013)*
3
3
3
French 100 (621-014)*
Research Methodology (621-011)*
3
1
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Credits Per year for Performance Diploma
Credits Required for PDP - Vocal Graduation:
34
130
39
29
28
Bachelor of Music General Education Requirement in
addition to the above
Bachelor of Music General Education Requirement in addition to the above
English 101 (621-009)
Humanities (The remaining two Art History Courses can
be taken as Humanities credit)
Science
3
3
3
Social Science
6
* indicates course offered in alternating years, ( ) Credits
indicated in parentheses are elective courses
Total General Education Requirements
Total Credits Required for TRU-OL Bachelor of
Music degree option (Vocal):
15
145
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4.6 Work-Integrated Learning Experience
The Glenn Gould School offers several avenues of financial assistance to its
students. The School has a robust work-study program, offering more than 70
positions including accompanying, peer tutoring, and a slate of part-time administrative
assistant positions. In addition to the compensation, the students gain valuable
working experience and arts administration mentorship.
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4.7 Course Outlines
Course outlines are located on the USB submitted with this application.
Applied Studies Courses
Course Name
Course Code
Applied Music
N/A
Recital – Yr 1 elective
639-003
Recital – Yr 2
639-004
Recital – Yr 3
639-005
Recital – Yr 4
639-006
Master Class
626-006
Performance Studies – Common Courses
Course Name
Course Code
Technology for Performers
646-001 or 646-003
Technology for Performers - Directed Study
646-004
Communications
602-002
Career Management
598-001
Performing Arts Criticism
621-003
Performance Awareness*
636-002
Teaching Methodology - Fall/Spring*
633-001/633-003
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Performance Studies – Instrument Specific Courses
PIANO
Course Name
Course Code
Choir/Collegium*
600-003
Sonata Repertoire (Winds/Brass)
645-005
Sonata Repertoire (Strings)
645-002
Sonata Repertoire (Chamber Music)
667-001
Collaborative Piano: Voice *
645-004
Piano Duos
638-001
Keyboard Harmony 3 - Improvisation
623-008
Keyboard Harmony 4 - Jazz
623-009
Historical Performance Practices*
619-001
Introductory Conducting and Score Reading (elective)
607-004
ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS
Course Name
Course Code
Royal Conservatory Orchestra
630-001
Sonata Repertoire - Strings (not required for double-bass
or harp)
645-002
Sonata Repertoire—Winds/Brass
645-005
Chamber Music - Strings
667-001
Chamber Music - Woodwinds/Harp/Percussion
667-002
Chamber Music - Brass
667-004
Introductory Conducting and Score Reading
607-004
Advanced Conducting and Score Reading
607-001
Orchestral Repertoire
515-008
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Historical Performance Practices- Strings*
(not required for harp or brass instruments)
619-002
Historical Performance Practices- Woodwinds*
(not required for harp or brass instruments)
619-006
VOICE
Course Name
Course Code
Choir/Collegium
600-003
Vocal Coaching
657-001
Vocal Stagecraft - Yr 1
658-001
Vocal Stagecraft - Yr 2
658-002
Vocal Stagecraft - Yr 3
658-003
Opera - Scene Study
817-001
English Diction 1*
608-001
English Diction 2*
608-005
Italian Diction*
608-008
French Diction*
608-007
German Diction*
608-004
Opera Workshop
629-002
629-003
Art Song/Operatic Repertoire*
597-001
597-002
597-003
597-004
Sight Singing*
644-004
Historical Performance Practices*
619-003
Introductory Conducting and Score Reading
607-004
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Music Materials Courses
Course Name
Course Code
Materials 1 - Rhythmic Practices*
627-020
Materials 1 - Theory
627-002
Materials 2 - Theory
627-001
Materials 3 - Theory
627-008
Materials 1 - Keyboard Harmony
623-007
Materials 2 - Keyboard Harmony
623-005
Materials 1 - Aural Skills
627-010
Materials 2 - Aural Skills
627-014
Introduction to Music History
618-008
Music History - Bibliography
618-005
Music Literature 1 - ca. 1600 to 1890*
625-027
Music Literature 2 - 1890 to present*
625-022
Music History - 20th and 21st Centuries
618-011
Canadian Repertoire
627-019
Advanced Musicianship (elective)
627-011
Humanities Studies Courses
Course Name
Course Code
English 100 - Literature and Composition
621-004
Art History Courses - Any two
621-016
621-017
621-018
621-019
German 100* (elective)
621-010
Italian 100* (elective)
621-013
Research Methodology*
621-011
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Additional Proposed Courses/Non-musical Studies
Course Name
Course Code
English 101
621-009
Humanities (The remaining two Art History Courses can be
taken as Humanities credit)*
621-016
621-017
621-018
621-019
The Physics of Sound
Introduction of Psychology
The Psychology of Performing
Psychology 200 – Know Thyself: Understanding Yourself
and Others
Psychology 300 – Applied Psychology
Psychology 400 – Music and the Mind
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4.8 Bridge Plan
Transfer and bridging from the Performance Music Program to the Glenn
Gould School Bachelor of Music, Performance (Honours).
Current Glenn Gould School students in the Performance Diploma Program will transfer
into the equivalent year of the new Glenn Gould School Bachelor of Music, Performance
(Honours) degree (Bmus) program.
This program proposal aims to be inclusive – all active PDP students will be
automatically transferred to the Bmus program upon implementation. This is possible
because:
The existing Performance Diploma Program already achieves learning outcomes that
very closely mimic those of a Bmus.
All of these students play at a very high standard (the overall level of ability matches or
exceeds any other Canadian institutions).
While courses are being improved yearly, the fundamental structure of the program
remains, and isn’t expected to change in any material way in the near future.
Students will complete their Bmus program requirements as they would have if they
were still enrolled in the PDP. The difference is limited to the credential earned at the
completion of their studies. All credits previously completed as part of the PDP will be
transferred as Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) credits for transcript
purposes.
General Education courses (non-music electives) will now be offered in-house, as
opposed to students completing them through Thompson Rivers University – Open
Learning (TRU-OL).
GGS has a “course by course approval” methodology to grant transfer credits – as a
general rule, all previously completed courses with TRU-OL will be granted as transfer
credits, applicable towards “general education” requirements.
Students who may have transferred into the PDP from another institution’s degree
program may have some General Education credits that could be eligible for transfer
into the Bmus – these will be analysed on a course-by-course basis.
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Bridging plan for alumni:
Past PDP graduates who have yet to take up the option of completing a B.Mus. through
TRU-OL may return to The Royal Conservatory of Music, Glenn Gould School in the
future, hoping to earn this credential.
The relative stability of the program from years past should allow an easy solution –
students wishing to complete a Bmus will simply be able to take the Gen. Ed. courses
through the GGS.
This would require that they actually attend physical classes in Toronto, which is not the
expectation they were given while studying – however, they will also be able to
complete their work with TRU-OL, as the Articulation Agreement was in place at the
time of their studies. To our knowledge, there is not statute of limitation or “expiry
date” on the Agreement, and PDP graduates going back to the first of these
Agreements are eligible for enrolment in TRU-OL’s Bmus program. These past students
should therefore be eligible despite the current Agreement coming to an end when the
Degree program begins.
As part of this bridge plan, the GGS would honour any “new” TRU credits for past
alumnus.
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5 Program Delivery
The current PDP program is delivered using a wide range of activities and experiences
aligned with this highly specialized field of study. These include master classes,
ensemble, lecture, tutorial, small group work, and project-based field work. The
learning activities are also skilfully developed to support life skills such as team work,
leadership, communication, management, marketing and public relations. These are all
essential to success in this field and transferable to many other fields. Also of note is
the physical space and milieu in which learning takes place. Students enjoy some of the
most acoustically advanced practice studios available at any music school in the world,
perform regularly in one of Canada’s leading arts venues, and participate in
partnerships, master classes and shared performances with leading arts organizations
such as the Canadian Opera Company and the Toronto Symphony.
5.1 Quality Assurance of Delivery
Stringent quality assurance protocols continue to be followed as part of the
commitment to maintaining global academic standards in both program content and
program delivery. As outlined in previous sections the program has several layers of
oversight including the Academic Review Committee, the Academic Council, the Glenn
Gould School Divisional Committee and an internal senior staff program evaluation
committee. As well there is an overall curriculum evaluative process conducted on an
annual basis which includes student feedback, faculty feedback through 360 evaluation
and an internal review of all courses by senior program staff and the Dean of the GGS.
Every five to seven years there is a comprehensive external curriculum and program
review by leading academics from globally recognized peer institutions.
5.2 Student Feedback
On an annual basis student feedback is collected in the form of course surveys. In
addition, senior academic staff are on-hand on a regular basis during the academic year
to consult with students and guide them through their course of study or solve
academic issues.
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6 Capacity to Deliver
Situated within the Royal Conservatory: Unique venue, established brand
For 125 years, the Royal Conservatory has translated the latest thinking about creativity
into effective programs benefiting millions of Canadians. The Conservatory’s founders
built a national system for musical development that has produced dozens of
internationally acclaimed artists and helped millions of Canadians incorporate creativity
into their working lives. Over the past two decades, the Conservatory has developed
innovative programs that inject creativity into early childhood development, teaching
and learning in public schools, youth empowerment, and the care of the elderly. Today,
the Conservatory has become a recognized global leader in designing large-scale
systems that nurture creativity, reaching more than 500,000 students each year.
Millions of Canadians have participated over the past several decades, making the
system truly one of the building blocks of Canadian society. This sense of belonging
comes from the knowledge that the Conservatory is truly the standard-setting music
institution in Canada. Even though only a fraction of the Canadians have attended the
magnificent main campus – the Telus Centre for Performance and Learning – at 273
Bloor Street West, hundreds of thousands of Canadians derive a sense of affiliation
from studying with a teacher affiliated with the Royal Conservatory, using the
Conservatory’s distinctive publications, and taking examinations with qualified
Conservatory examiners. The Conservatory is the ideal place to launch a specialized
new degree in performance to fill a critical gap in Canada’s arts education
infrastructure.
Excellence in Performance is the Primary Goal
At the heart and soul of the Conservatory is our elite performance academy, the Glenn
Gould School. Glenn Gould epitomized the life of the creative artist in his quest for
perfection and his reputation for innovation. Since it was founded in 1997, the GGS has
become one of the world’s most sought-after destinations for outstandingly gifted
young performers from across Canada and around the world, inspired by Gould’s legacy
and a vision for the future of creative life.
The GGS provides highly customized and enriched training specific to the proficiency
and learning style of each student. While excellence in performance is the primary goal,
students are also introduced to a broad range of communication skills that include
technology-based initiatives as a means to explore the frontiers of the art form and
connect with a broad range of audiences.
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Unlike any other music education program in the country, the GGS would be
differentiated by a set of unique and intersecting variables that work together to create
a learning environment and program that simply can’t be duplicated anywhere else.
Upon obtaining ministerial consent to grant a degree, the GGS would be able to add to
its already highly competitive attributes, with benefits accruing to students, to
education in Ontario, and to the arts across Canada and around the world:
 Hard-working, excellent students reap benefits of having our brand on their
qualifications for grad school
 We have an elite degree brand to help elevate careers and inspire donors
 More cost effective for students, because they no longer need to pay additional
tuition at Thompson Rivers
 Students can finally complete their whole degree in one institution
 The value of the GGS degree is higher, hence attracting more of the best
students and adding value to our existing alumni
 More quality control over courses, as the Conservatory and GGS can ensure the
training is tailored to the needs of students and meets the standards of an elite
performance degree
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6.1 Learning and Physical Resources
Please refer to Business Plan, Section 6.7.
6.2 Performance Opportunities
Chamber Music
Chamber music is an integral component of The Glenn Gould School curriculum.
Numerous performance opportunities exist at The Royal Conservatory, off site venues,
and as part of outreach programming. As well, students are often engaged by local and
regional concert presenters. In the past, Glenn Gould School students have participated
in concert series at the Canadian Opera Company (Noon Hour Concerts), The Arts and
Letters Club, Toronto Music Garden, Stratford Summer Music, CBC Glenn Gould Studio,
Music at Cookstown, Barrie Colours of Music Festival, the Royal Ontario Museum, and
Royal St. George’s College.
Concerto Competition
Every year the Glenn Gould School administers a Concerto Competition for GGS
students. Winners of the Concerto Competition perform with The Royal Conservatory
Orchestra.
Freelance Engagements
The Glenn Gould School is approached regularly by members of the public for specific
musical services. In response to this need, The GGS compiles a list of student
musicians available for hire. Interested students provide their contact information to the
Student Services Manager.
Master Classes
The Glenn Gould School presents over 100 master classes annually by acclaimed GGS
faculty and guest artists such as Leon Fleisher, Robert McDonald, William VerMeulen,
Donald Wailerstein, Leonidas Kavakos, Timothy Noble, Dawn Upshaw, Martin Beaver,
Russell Braun, Richard Goode and Geoff Nuttall. Student performance opportunities are
at the discretion of the visiting artist, Master Class Coordinator, the private teacher and
the Dean.
Students are required to attend all Master Classes in their instrument group during the
course of the Academic Year. Attendance is mandatory, and strict attendance policies
are enforced—student’s grades will reflect any absences. It is highly recommended that
students attend masterclasses from other categories.
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Promotional Engagements
Occasions may arise when an individual student or student ensemble will be called upon
to perform at special events that promote The Glenn Gould School and/or The Royal
Conservatory. Invitation to participate in such events is considered an honour, and
services are provided without payment.
Showcase Concerts
Each department of The Glenn Gould School (Piano, Voice, Strings, Harp, Woodwinds,
Brass, and Percussion) may propose a concert to showcase their department’s students.
These concerts are an initiative of faculty and students.
Opera
Recent works performed include: Mozart, The Marriage of Figaro, Die Zauberflöte, and
Cosi fan tutte; Bernstein, Trouble in Tahiti; Purcell, Dido and Aeneus; Massenet,
Cendrillon; Britten, Turn of the Screw; Ravel, L’enfant et les Sortileges; and Vaughan
Williams, Riders to the Sea.
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6.3 Resource Renewal and Upgrading
Not Applicable
6.4 Communication
eBulletin
The eBulletin is an electronic newsletter sent once per week to all Glenn Gould School
students, staff, and faculty. It contains information about auditions, competitions,
housing, and any other important news that the administration wishes to transmit to
students.
Letters from the Dean
The Dean is pleased to provide letters of recommendation for students applying to
summer camps, competitions, grants, festivals, and other music programs. The Dean
cannot provide letters related to immigration or work visas.
Newsworthy
Please send detailed information about your competition winnings, scholarships, grants,
concert reviews, and other achievements. Email the Student Services Manager with
your news.
6.5 Support Services
Collaborative Artists for Students
The Glenn Gould School provides a limited number of accompanying hours for students.
Official accompanying privileges and regulations are published in the Student Agenda
and/or distributed at the beginning of the school year.
Health Insurance
Full emergency medical insurance is mandatory as a condition of acceptance at The
Glenn Gould School. Proof of valid emergency medical insurance must be submitted
before the first day of class.
International students who are unable to present proof of full emergency medical
insurance must enroll in The Glenn Gould School’s Guard.Me group policy for the
duration of the academic year.
Housing
The Royal Conservatory does not have on-campus housing or dormitory facilities. We
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recommend that students contact the Student Services Manager for information about
independent student residences.
Jobs/Continuing Education/Competitions/Summer Festivals
The Glenn Gould School maintains a comprehensive collection of brochures and
application forms for other music schools, competitions, and summer music festivals in
the GGS Administrative Offices.
Student Council
The Student Council organizes special events such as orientation, parties, and social
outings. The Council also acts as the students’ representative with Glenn Gould School
Administration, as well as the academic committees and various councils of The Royal
Conservatory.
Royal Conservatory Awards
1. All students of The Glenn Gould School are eligible for Royal Conservatory Awards,
which take the form of scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial aid.
Students who require financial assistance greater than that provided by The Glenn
Gould School should consider their government’s student aid program. Financial
assistance is specific to each academic year; awards may vary from year to year.
2. Awards, scholarships, or bursaries may be revoked at any time if the following
requirements are not met:
Scholarship and bursary recipients must be students in good standing and must
maintain satisfactory academic progress.
Scholarship and bursary recipients are required to write a detailed thank you letter to
their patron(s) and may be called upon for a performance(s).
Bursary recipients are required to disclose any changes to their financial situation
which would affect their need for financial assistance.
3. A student whose scholarship and/or bursary has been revoked may appeal the
decision in writing to the Academic Review Committee by providing a letter outlining the
basis of the appeal and any special circumstances which warrant consideration.
4. Bursaries. Students who can demonstrate financial need beyond the support
provided by scholarship awards may apply for Bursary assistance. Bursary applications
are available in the Office of the Registrar.
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5. Work Study students who require additional financial aid may apply for one or
more assistantship position(s). Assistantship applications and a list of assistantships are
available in the Office of the Student Services Manager. Due to the limited number of
assistantships, The Glenn Gould School cannot guarantee a position for every student.
6. Scholarships. The Glenn Gould School offers Patron and other Scholarships to
outstanding students. These scholarships are awarded to incoming students based on
audition results and to returning students based on progress and performance levels.
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6.6 Faculty
The numbers below represent the number of faculty in each specialization at the Glenn
Gould School.
Department
Humanities
Piano
Strings
Theory/History/Composition
Voice
Woodwind, Brass, Percussion, Harp
Faculty Members
6
13
19
6
24
20
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Policies on Faculty
Any faculty member who perceives the need for a new position may raise the matter
with other members of the department. If the need is endorsed by the faculty of that
department, the Department Head or Department Representative will inform the Dean.
The Dean may perceive the need for a new position. In that case, the Dean will consult
the Department Head or the Department Representative and may also discuss the new
position with other members of the Department, and representatives of the Faculty
Association as needed.
Once the need for the position has been established, the administration will take such
steps as examining applications on file and/or consulting with the Department and/or
advertising within and/or outside The RCM, according to the nature of the position to be
filled.
The Dean, Associate Dean or Director of Academic Studies, together with The GGS
Department Representative and one other expert Faculty member, appointed by the
Dean, will form a Search and Selection Task Force (SSTF) to examine all new and file
applications, and extract a short list, as applicable. Selected candidates will be asked to
submit a curriculum vitae and appropriate support evidence of their work such as
videotapes, audio tapes, references, or evidence of a strong professional reputation.
The SSTF will review materials, and interview or audition candidates as it sees fit and
make a recommendation to The GGS Divisional Committee.
The GGS Divisional Committee will review the process and approve the
recommendation for forwarding to Academic Council.
Upon approval by Academic Council, The GGS Divisional Committee will make a
recommendation to the CEO. Following approval by the CEO, the position will be
offered to the successful candidate.
If time does not allow for a full process, the CEO may make short term appointments
based directly on the Dean’s recommendations, without receiving the recommendations
of GGS Divisional Committee, or Academic Council. This may be necessary in cases
such as emergency replacements, mid-year replacements, last-minute appointments, or
appointments the timing for which is not synchronous with Divisional Committee and
Academic Council meeting schedules. The GGS Divisional Committee and Academic
Council will be kept informed of such appointments, and will review them at the first
realistic opportunity. If either body were to object to any appointment and the CEO
were to accept the objection, the teacher would finish out the term of his/her initial
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appointment before being replaced, whether by another appropriate candidate or by
initiating a subsequent search process.
Anyone hired on an emergency replacement basis should be advised that their
appointment is for the current academic year only and that he/she will be required to
go through the normal hiring procedure in order to be appointed to the position as a
regular GGS faculty member.
It is understood that students who audition for and are admitted to The GGS must
study with GGS faculty.
Notwithstanding confirmed policies, in certain special circumstances it may be in the
best interests of The GGS to allow a student to study with a teacher who is not on GGS
Faculty. Such special circumstances include, but are not limited to: (a) attracting
student(s) who play particular instruments (ex. violin), (b) attracting students of
extraordinary talent, and/or (c) attracting teachers of extraordinary talent and
reputation. Said teachers would be engaged on a temporary basis as “Visiting Faculty”,
at the end of which he/she would either apply to be added to The GGS Faculty List, or
terminate the engagement.
CEO approval will not be required in order to engage a Visiting Faculty member under
the terms of paragraph 1.8.1.
Notwithstanding all of the preceding, it is understood that, under the terms of Bill pr70
which received Royal Assent on June 27, 1991, the CEO may exercise his/her powers
concerning all recommendations made to him by Academic Council, whether or not in
agreement with Academic Council, and that the CEO’s decision is final.
Hiring Criteria
Note: The following criteria are required in accordance with regulations imposed on
degree granting institutions.
In examining applications, the Search Committee will be guided by a weighting of
various factors according to the needs and requirements of the position. These factors
will include:
(a) All faculty must be recognized or emerging professionals in their fields
(performance, composition, scholarship, journalism, etc.). Normally they will have
earned advanced degrees or diplomas appropriate to their areas of expertise, will
be active members of professional organizations, and will be contributing to and
recognized for their art nationally and internationally.
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(b) All faculty must clearly articulate an understanding of current pedagogical theory
and practice and should employ methods and strategies capable of preparing
students for professional life.
(c) All faculty will be evaluated based on the success of their students’ performances
in recitals, juries, master classes and open lessons, and in course work. Further,
faculty will be expected to produce students who, upon completion of their studies
at The GGS, embark upon more advanced studies here or elsewhere, or enter the
professional world.
(d) Faculty will be expected to attract students both by the excellence of their
teaching and by their ongoing professional activities. They will have demonstrated
the ability to teach advanced repertoire, literature and concepts effectively, and
advise students in matters of career development and creative programming.
(e) Faculty will be expected to contribute to the well-being of The GGS, as expertise
and time allow, through activities such as participating on committee(s) or the
Faculty Artist series, and in recruitment endeavours.
(f) Faculty will be expected to avail themselves of professional development
opportunities at The RCM, attend master classes and conferences, and interact
with professional colleagues locally and elsewhere.
Faculty Excellence
The faculty of the Glenn Gould School is widely regarded among the most elite in North
America, and is made up predominantly of active virtuoso performing musicians and
teachers. Faculty are involved in countless public performances locally, nationally and
around the globe each year and travel frequently to give master classes. Consider just a
few of these highlights demonstrating the breadth of their involvement and
accomplishment:
GGS Faculty hold positions of esteem internationally including Associate Dean Barry
Shiffman, Director of Summer Music Programs at The Banff Centre, and John O’Conor,
Artistic Director and Chairman of the Jury of the Dublin International Piano Competition.
GGS Faculty have also been engaged as jury members for many international and
national competitions including the Toronto International Piano Competition (James
Anagnoson, John O’Conor), Osaka International Competition (Mayumi Seiler), Canadian
Music Competition (Jennifer Tung), National Piano Competition in Shanghai (John
O’Conor), Dublin International Piano Competition (James Anagnoson, John O’Conor)the
Lennox International Young Artists Competition for Strings (Andres Diaz).
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Recently recognized faculty include R. Murray Schafer, GGS Composer-In-Residence,
who was appointed to the Order to Canada in September 2014 and Atis Bankas (violin)
who received the Laureate Prize for Best Teacher at Kocian International Competition in
Czech Republic in May 2014.
Several faculty members have been nominated for Juno Awards in the past two years
including Nadina Mackie-Jackson, R. Murray Schafer, and Brian Current. Dr. Current’s
composition Airline Icarus was awarded the 2015 Juno award for Classical Composition
of the Year.
GGS faculty members published in a variety of formats over the past two years. Dr.
Julia Galieva-Szokolay submitted Romantic Individualism and Doleful Folk Melodies:
Kurtag's Reading of Lermontov's "So weary, so wretched" to the Slavic and East
European Journal of the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European
Languages. Trombonist Gord Wolfe released a new CD titled REFLECTIONS, David Kent
published a method book Timpani Playing in the 21st Century, and Patrick Jordan’s
transcriptions of Beethoven's Spring Sonata and Schumann's Dichterliebe were recorded
by the Gallery Players of Niagara.
In addition to being selected as one of top 25 Canadian pianists of all time by the CBC
in 2015, Eve Egoyan received several Canada Council grants including an International
Touring Grant, Grant to Professional Musician (to develop new works), Music Touring
Grant (Western tour), and an Audience and Market Development Office Travel Grant
(CAPACOA Halifax)
Master Class instructors are engaged based on the professional recommendation of
GGS faculty and GGS Department Coordinators. Master Class artists are instructors and
pedagogues of distinction and are frequently college professors of postsecondary
institutions across North America, high-profile touring artists, as well as tenured
musicians from leading orchestras.
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Regular review of Program and Faculty Performance
Formal, Institutionally Approved Policy for the Periodic Review of Programs:
In order to insure the continuing excellence and relevance of its programs, the GGS has
a process in place by which a periodic review occurs every 5-7 years.
The first of these occurred in 2009, and another is taking place in the spring of 2015.
A less formal review occurs at the end of every academic year with the review of
course/instructor evaluations and other student feedback – any pressing issues or
required changes are addressed immediately.
Criteria for Program Review:
assessment of the continuing consistency of the program with the organization’s
mission, educational goals, and long-range plan
assessment of the learning outcome achievements of students/graduates by
comparison with
i. the program’s stated learning outcome goals and standards
ii. the degree level standard
iii. the opinions of employers and students/graduates
iv. the standards of any related regulatory, accrediting, or professional
association
where appropriate, assessment of
i.
graduate employment rates
ii.
graduate satisfaction level
iii.
employer satisfaction level
iv.
student satisfaction level
v.
graduation rate
vi.
the default rate on the Ontario Student Assistance Program or other student
loan plan
vii.
student retention rates
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viii.
in the case of graduate programs, time to completion
assessment of the continuing relevance of the program to the field of practice it serves,
including evidence of revisions made to adapt to changes in the field of practice
assessment of the continuing appropriateness of the method of delivery and curriculum
for the program’s educational goals and standards
assessment of the continuing appropriateness of the program’s structure, method of
delivery, and curriculum for its educational goals and standards
assessment of the continuing adequacy of the methods used for evaluating student
progress and achievement
assessment of the efficient and effective utilization and adequacy of existing human,
physical, technological, and financial resources
indicators of faculty performance, including the quality of teaching and supervision and
demonstrable currency in the field of specialization
assessment of individual student work in the terminal stage of the program that reflects
exemplary, average, and minimally acceptable performance and demonstrates that the
degree level standard has been achieved.
Program Review Program:
Self Study: a self-study is undertaken, with student input, by faculty members and
administrators of the program based on evidence relating to program performance
against the criteria stated above, including strengths and weaknesses, desired
improvements, and future directions.
Program Evaluation Committee: is struck by the senior administration to evaluate the
program based on
i) the self-study
ii) a site visit during which members of the committee normally meet with faculty
members, students, graduates, employers, and administrators to gather information. A
majority of the members must be senior academic peers (both scholars and
administrators) with relevant expertise from both outside the institution and internal to
the institution but outside the program, and free of any conflict of interest.
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The overarching purpose of the Program Evaluation Committee report is to assess
program quality and recommend any changes needed to strengthen that quality. The
report must be addressed to the senior administration and shared with the academic
council, governing board, faculty members and students in the program, together with
a plan of action responding to the recommendations in the report.
Faculty Availability to Students
As mentioned previously The GGS takes great pride in providing each student with a
weekly 90 minute private lesson. This rare allocation offers each student a rich one–onone growth and learning opportunity. In addition the very small classes, sometimes as
small as two students in a class, offer semi individual attention. All faculties are
available for one-on–one time outside of regular classroom hours.
Professional Development of Faculty
GGS Faculty are amongst the most excellent in their field. Their own performing and
leadership provides them with growth and constant professional development.
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Curriculum vitae Release
The organization has on file and available for inspection, from all faculty and staff
whose CVs are included in this submission, signatures that attest to the truthfulness
and completeness of the information contained in their CV and agreeing to the inclusion
of their CV in any documents/websites associated with the submission, review, and final
status of the program application.
Faculty Biographies
Although the CVs are not attached included in the hard copy of this application, they
are available on the USB key submitted with this application and, in most cases, on
their own websites due to high profile name recognition.
Faculty biographies:
PIANO
James Anagnoson
Coachings with Claude Frank and Karl Ulrich Schnabel. Member of Anagnoson-Kinton
Piano Duo. Concerts and radio broadcasts in Canada, USA, Europe and Asia. Mr.
Anagnoson’s students have won prizes in International Competitions such as the Maria
Canals, the International Franz Liszt, the Gina Bachauer, and the Dublin International
competitions, and repeatedly are prizewinners in Canada’s National Competitions such
as the Canadian Music Competition and the Toronto Symphony Competition. He has
given master classes in various parts of Europe, North America, and Asia, and he has
been a juror for competitions such as the Dublin International Piano Competition, the
Hong Kong International Piano Competition, the Canadian Chopin Competition, the Prix
d'Europe, the International e-Competition, the Toronto International Piano Competition,
and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra Competition. James Anagnoson has been heard
nationally on the CBC radio as a guest host on The Arts Tonight, and as a piano
commentator for both the Esther Honens International Piano Competition and the CBC
Young Performer's Competition. RCM faculty since 1976.
Andrea Botticelli
Andrea Botticelli is a graduate of the University of Toronto, the GGS and the Royal
Conservatory of Music's Phil and Eli Taylor Performance Academy for Young
Artists. Currently, she is a doctoral candidate in Piano Performance at the University of
Toronto. She has completed additional studies at the Banff Centre for the Arts, the
Gijon International Piano Festival, the Young Artists' Experience in Whistler, B.C. and
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the Vancouver Early Music Festival. Her teachers include Marina Geringas, Marek
Jablonski, Marc Durand, Andrew Burashko, Marietta Orlov and Boris Lysenko.
Andrea has performed as a soloist and chamber musician across Canada and abroad in
England, France, Italy, Spain and the United States. Her performances have been
praised as "brilliant and dynamic", with "poetic nuances" and "virtuosity" (Corriere
Canadese). She has performed in prestigious venues such as the George Weston
Recital Hall, Massey Hall, Rolston Recital Hall and Roy Thomson Hall. A versatile artist,
Andrea performs on the modern piano as well as the harpsichord and fortepiano.
Andrea's students have been accepted into professional music programs at McGill
University, the University of Toronto, the University of Western Ontario and Wilfrid
Laurier University.
Andrew Burashko
Andrew Burashko made his debut at the age of seventeen with the Toronto symphony
orchestra and has since established himself as one of Canada's premier soloists. Known
for his passionate performances and eclectic repertoire, Burashko has performed with
most of the Canadian orchestras, collaborating with conductors Sir Andrew Davis,
Yannick Nezet-Seguin, Jukka-Pekka Saraste and Pinchas Zukerman among many others.
As a soloist he has performed extensively throughout Canada, the United States, and
Europe, and as a chamber musician, he regularly collaborates with Canada's top artists
and performs in festivals throughout Canada and Europe. For the past 16 years, he has
also been involved in an important and ongoing collaboration with modern dancer
Peggy Baker. Born in Moscow into a family of musicians, Andrew began his studies with
Marina Geringas at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. He went on to study
with Lee Kum-Sing in Vancouver, Leon Fleisher and Marek Jablonski in Toronto, and
Bella Davidovich in New York. Andrew's musical dexterity and passion for artistic
experimentation have now brought him to the artistic directorship of the Art of Time
Ensemble, a chamber music collective comprised of the best artists on the Canadian
scene. Since 1998, Art of Time Ensemble has been committed to redefining the
experience of music performance and exploring the juxtaposition of high art and
popular culture. The ensemble has received wide acclaim for its thoughtful and
challenging programming, its brilliant performances, and its ability to reach across the
borders that often separate artistic genres and audiences. Andrew Burashko has
recorded for CBC SM5000, Naxos, Analekta, Pheromone, and Centerdisc labels, and his
recording of Prokofiev's 6th Sonata and Romeo and Juliet suite has been released on
the Opening Day label. A dedicated teacher, he gives master classes throughout North
America and is presently a member of the faculty at the GGS in Toronto.
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Peter Longworth
Peter Longworth has studied with Marek Jablonski, Marc Durand, and Leon Fleisher. He
has also studied at Northwestern University with Arthur Tollefson, and at the University
of Michigan with Louis Nagel and Eckhart Sellheim. In Toronto, Peter performs in
numerous solo and chamber concerts. He was the winner of the Chicago Symphony
Orchestra, Skokie Valley Symphony Orchestra, and World Youth Symphony
competitions, a prize winner in the Young Keyboard Artist Competition, and a finalist in
the Busoni International Piano Competition.
David Louie
David received a grant from the Canada Council for the Arts, studied with John Perry
and Boris Zarankin, and graduated summa cum laude from the University of Southern
California (Master's of Music, Artist Diploma). He resides in Toronto and serves on the
faculty of The Royal Conservatory’s Glenn Gould School. Hailed as "a pianistic
sensation" (Rhein-Zeitung, Germany), David Louie has performed throughout Canada,
the United States, Great Britain, Germany, Spain, Sweden, and Australia. A major prize
winner at the CBC Radio Competition, Santander International Competition, and the
Sydney International Competition, David made his New York debut at the Peoples'
Symphony Concerts. His recital appearances include the Dame Myra Hess Memorial
Concerts (Chicago), Mosel Festwochen (Germany), and National Auditorium of Music
(Madrid). He has performed as soloist with numerous orchestras including the
Vancouver Symphony, National Arts Centre Orchestra (Ottawa), Gulbenkian Chamber
Orchestra (Lisbon), and Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (London). An accomplished
chamber musician, David is a member of the ARC Ensemble (Artists of the Royal
Conservatory) and has recorded for RCA Red Seal, for which he has receivedtwo
Grammy nominations. He has also collaborated with the Takács String Quartet and
members of the Toronto Symphony and Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra. As a
harpsichord recitalist, he has presented Bach's Goldberg Variations and The WellTempered Clavier at Canada's Grand River Baroque Festival. In addition to
performance, David has conducted masterclasses in Canada, USA, UK, and Australia,
and has served as adjudicator at national and international competitions.
Charlotte Nediger
Charlotte Nediger joined the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra as principal keyboard
player in 1980, at the age of 21, and has held that position ever since. She has an
extensive background in research and musicology, and works behind the scenes at
Tafelmusik as assistant to the music director, librarian, and program editor. Charlotte is
also artistic coordinator of the annual Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Institute. As a
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performer, she is one of only a few keyboard players to specialize in orchestral continuo
playing. She has also remained active as a recitalist, chamber musician, and concerto
soloist. She appears frequently as soloist with Tafelmusik and is featured on their
recordings of J. S. Bach's Brandenburg Concertos and W. F. Bach’s instrumental music,
both on Sony's Vivarte label. Charlotte teaches harpsichord at the University of Toronto
as well as historical performance practice (piano) at The Glenn Gould School of The
Royal Conservatory.
John O’Conor
The Irish pianist John O'Conor has earned a worldwide reputation as a masterful
interpreter of the Classic and early-Romantic repertoires. Following initial studies in his
native Dublin he studied in Vienna with the renowned pedagogue Dieter Weber, won
First Prize at the Beethoven International Piano Competition in Vienna in 1973 and
made a special study of Beethoven with the legendary German pianist Wilhelm Kempff.
Since then he has toured the world in recital and concerto appearances and makes
regular visits to Europe, the USA, Japan, Korea and China. His recordings on the Telarc
label have brought him particular renown. CD Review described his box set of the
complete Beethoven Sonatas as "Beethoven playing at its best"; the New York Times
named his recording of the Beethoven Bagatelles as the best available; his recording of
the John Field Nocturnes spent many weeks on the Billboard charts and his recently
released recordings of the complete Beethoven Piano Concertos with the London
Symphony Orchestra conducted by Andreas Delfs have been greeted with great
acclaim. For his services to music he has been decorated with "l'Ordre des Arts et des
Lettres" by the French Government, the "Ehrenkreuz fur Wissenschaft und Kunst" by
the Austrian Government, the Order of the Rising Sun by the Japanese Government and
has received many other awards.
Marietta Orlov
Coachings with Musicescu (teacher of Dinu Lipatti and Radu Lupu). Marietta Orlov has
given master classes in Berlin and Vienna. She is also an adjudicator and a professor of
performance at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Music. In addition, Marietta has
given solo and chamber music performances in Europe, Canada, and international
festivals. Her roles include vice-president and music director of the CMC - Ontario
Committee and member of the American Federation of Musicians. A prize winner at the
Berlin International Youth Competition and Rumania National Competition, she has
made recordings and live broadcasts in Canada and Europe. RCM faculty since 1978.
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John Perry
John Perry, distinguished artist and teacher, earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees
at the Eastman School of Music where he was a student of Cecile Genhart. During
those summers, he worked with the eminent Frank Mannheimer. Recipient of a
Fulbright Scholarship, he continued studies in Europe for four years where he worked
with Wladyslav Kedra, Polish concert artist and professor at the Akademie für Musik in
Vienna, and Carlo Zecchi, renowned conductor, pianist, and head of the piano
department at the Santa Cecilia Academy of Music in Rome.
Mr. Perry has won numerous awards including the highest prizes in both the Busoni and
Viotti international piano competitions in Italy and special honours at the Marguerite
Long International Competition in Paris. Since then he has performed extensively
throughout Europe and North America to great critical acclaim. Also a respected
chamber musician, Mr. Perry has collaborated with some of the finest instrumentalists
in the world. He also enjoys an international reputation as a teacher, presenting master
classes throughout the world. He often is a jury member at some of the most
prestigious international piano competitions. His students have been prize winners in
most major competitions and include two first-prize winners in the Rubinstein, four firstprize winners in the Music Teacher's National Association national competition, and firstprize winners in the Naumburg National Chopin competition, the Cleveland Competition,
Beethoven Foundation competition, the Federated Music Clubs, and the YKA, AMSC,
and YMF competitions, and finalists in the Chopin International in Warsaw, the Van
Cliburn, the Queen Elisabeth, Leeds, Dublin, Busoni, Viotti and the Three Rivers
competitions.
Mr. Perry is professor at the Glenn Gould School of the Royal Conservatory of Music in
Toronto, professor of piano at California State University Northridge in Los Angeles,
visiting artist faculty at Boston University, and Professor Emeritus of the USC Thornton
School of Music. In addition, he recently founded a music school, Southern California
Music Institute in Los Angeles, where he serves as Artistic Director. During the summer
he is artist professor at the Lake Como International Piano Academy, the Banff Center
in Alberta, Canada, the Sarasota Music Festival in Florida, the Orford Music Festival in
Quebec, the Morningside Music Bridge Program in Calgary, Alberta, the Internationaler
Klaviersommer Cochem, Germany, the International Music Festival in Perugia, Italy, the
Amalfi Coast Music Festival in Italy, Montecito International Music Festival in Santa
Barbara, and the Southern California Music Institute Summer Festival in California. In
January he is main guest artist at the Sydney Piano Festival in Australia. His recordings
are available on the Telefunken, Musical Heritage Society, CBC, ACA and Fox labels.His
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recordings are available on the Telefunken, Musical Heritage Society, CBC, ACA and Fox
labels.
Li Wang
In the arena of international piano competitions, Li Wang was awarded both the second
prize and Best Concerto prize from a field of 62 pianists competing at the AXA Dublin
International Piano Competition in May 2003. In addition, he was first prize winner in
Brazil's Arts Livre Competition, a gold medallist in the First Canadian Chopin
Competition (and also received a special prize for best mazurka and best polonaise), a
silver medallist in the 9th Southern Missouri International Piano Competition, third prize
winner in the 37th Maria Canals International Piano Competition in Barcelona, and a
finalist (from a field of 80 pianists) at the prestigious Liszt Competition in Budapest.
As a soloist and chamber musician, Li has been heard in Canada, the United States,
South America, Europe, and Asia. In Canada he has performed in venues such as the
Ford Centre for the Performing Arts and Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto, and the
Vancouver Playhouse. As well, he has been broadcast on CBC and CJRT radio, Bravo!
arts channel, and CityTV. His recital appearances in the United States include Jordan
Hall in Boston.
Li has performed in Europe numerous times, including France, Spain, the Netherlands,
Russia, and Ireland. He has also performed in China as well as Japan, in a concert
sponsored by the Canadian Embassy that was attended by their Royal Highnesses,
Prince and Princess Takamado. Li's appearances with orchestras include concerto
performances with the Hungarian Symphony Orchestra, the Sinfonia Cultura Orchestra,
and the National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland.
Li was born in Beijing, China, in 1974. He began his piano studies under his father, YanQiao Wang, a composer of distinction in China, and was accepted to study at the
Beijing Central Conservatory of Music at age six. His studies later continued in Japan
under the renowned pedagogue Hiroko Edo, and in France at the Conservatoire national
supérieur de musique et de danse de Paris, under the tutelage of Brigitte Engerer. He
went on to study in Canada at The Glenn Gould School of the Royal Conservatory,
where he was a student of James Anagnoson. Li resides in Toronto.
Virginia Weckstrom
Virginia Weckstrom’s teachers have included Ruby Hamlin, Eleanore Vail, John
Kirkpatrick, John Perry, Jacqueline Marcault, and Lilian Kallir. She was director of
chamber music and taught piano at the Residential College of the University of
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Michigan, and she has been on the artist faculty of the Aspen Music School and Festival
during the summer for about 30 years.
Active in both solo and chamber music performances, Virginia has been heard on
National Public Radio with the Wall Street Chamber Players. She was
pianist/harpsichordist with the New Haven Symphony and has performed with the Ann
Arbor and Flint Symphony Orchestras in Michigan. Deeply committed to arts education,
she served as chair of the piano department at the Neighborhood Music School in New
Haven, Connecticut, and was a founder of the School for Performing Arts in Ann Arbor,
creating successful educational programs and concert series at both institutions.
A frequent adjudicator, Virginia has presented lecture recitals and master classes
throughout the Midwest, in Texas, and Australia. She was appointed to the Cleveland
Institute of Music faculty in 2003 and has taught at The Glenn Gould School of The
Royal Conservatory since 2008. She is married to violinist and fellow Conservatory
faculty member Paul Kantor.
VOICE
Rachel Andrist
Canadian pianist Rachel Andrist studied at the Cleveland Institute of Music with Ann
Epperson and Warren Jones. In 1997, she moved to Europe and joined the music staff
of the Theatre Royale de la Monnaie in Brussels, Belgium. Since then she has been a
regular guest at the Salzburg Festival, the Salzburg Easter Festival, and the Bavarian
State Opera in Munich, and has also been on the staff of the Glyndebourne Festival, De
Nederlandse Opera in Amsterdam, English National Opera, and Scottish Opera.
Rachel has worked extensively with conductors Sir Simon Rattle, Antonio Pappano, Ivor
Bolton, Rene Jacobs, Valery Gergiev, Philippe Jordan, and Kazushi Ono. Since 2008 she
has been the head coach for the Young Singers Project at the Salzburg Festival, the
head of Musical Projects at the Royal Danish Opera Academy, and a guest at the
Chicago Opera Theater. In the fall of 2010, Rachel returned to Canada to join the music
staff at the Canadian Opera Company.
Stephanie Bogle
Stephanie Bogle is one of Canada's foremost sopranos. She has performed to
widespread acclaim on opera stages throughout the world, including those of Germany,
Austria, France, Italy, the United States, Mexico, and Canada. Her oratorio and concert
work are equally distinguished.
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Stephanie’s exceptional technical and interpretive abilities are well known, and critics
have consistently lauded her ravishing quality of voice, soaring upper register, graceful
and easy coloratura, and rich expression. "Her soprano is staggering," notes
the Charlotte Observer. "Her touching voice is equally prepossessing in the lyric as well
as the dramatic parts" (Badische Zeitung). "She has the ability to project emotion with
unaffected grace and ease" (Toronto Star). "She has demonstrated an incredible higher
voice expertise and immense ability" (Kultur Umschau). "Her voice is fluid in all
registers; and as Donna Anna she gave the best singing performance of the evening:
clear and precisely sung, rich in expression; exactly Mozart" (Frankfurter Rundschau).
"She has been noted for her rapturous expression and vocal steadiness" (The Globe and
Mail). "Singing Magda, she displayed a voice that was gorgeous with a secure ringing
top, fully expressive middle register, and beautiful phrasing throughout" (Opera
Canada).
The recipient of a Canada Council grant, Stephanie began her European career with the
Kammeroper Schoenbrun Festival in Vienna. Thereafter, she was immediately engaged
to sing in the opera houses of Germany, including Braunschweig, Darmstadt, Essen,
Mannheim Frankfurt, and Hamburg. She went on to sing on the opera and concert
stages of France, Italy, Mexico, the United States, and Canada.
Stephanie has amassed an extensive operatic repertoire. She received recognition as
Marguerite in Faust, which she sang opposite Jerome Hines and repeated in a film
version for Opera Hamilton. At L'Opera de Nice, she was acclaimed for her Alicia Ford
in Falstaff, which she sang opposite Louis Quilico. She returned to Nice with great
success for repeat engagements as the Countess in Le Comte Ory with Maestro
Campanello and John Cox, and as Rosalinde in Die Fledermaus. Stephanie's Desdemona
was recorded for the CBC radio and film production of Otellowith Jon Vickers. Other
acclaimed roles have included Violetta in La Traviata, Cio Cio San in Madama Butterfly,
and Donna Anna in Don Giovanni.
Stephanie made her Carnegie Hall debut in 1991, creating the role of Angie in the world
premiere of American composer Robert DeGaetano's opera Moneta. She was engaged
for a second world premiere at Carnegie Hall in 1995, where she sang
DeGaetano's Four Shakespearean Sonnets. In addition, she is featured as soprano
soloist in an internationally released film version of Bach's Magnificat. She replaced
Dame Joan Sutherland as Ophelie in a Canadian Opera Gala Concert of
Thomas's Hamlet, and has worked with such well-known conductors as Franz Paul
Decker, Sir David Willcocks, Carlo Felice Cillario, Alfredo Camponella, Franco Mannino,
and Klaus Weise. Stephanie was acclaimed for her interpretation of bel canto roles such
as Imogene in Il Pirata and Giovanna in Giovanna D'Arco and has made a recording of
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bel canto arias with the CJRT Radio Orchestra. She can also be heard on the soundtrack
of Golden Girl, a film about Olympic athlete Silken Laumann.
At home in Canada, Stephanie has also performed with most major companies including
the Calgary Opera, Canadian Opera Company, Opera in Concert, Toronto Operetta
Theatre, Opera Hamilton, Pacific Opera, and Opera Lyra Ottawa. As well, she has
performed coast to coast with symphonies including those in Vancouver, Edmonton,
Winnipeg, Kitchener-Waterloo, Toronto, the National Arts Centre Ottawa, Halifax,
Newfoundland, and many more. As a soloist, Stephanie has performed with many
choral groups including the Orpheus Choir, Mendelssohn Choir, Isler Singers, Ottawa
Choral Society, London Fanshawe Chorus, Bach Elgar Choir, Tudor Singers of Montreal,
and Choral Federation Concert. She has delighted audiences at such festivals as the
Sharon Festival, Algoma Festival, Guelph Spring Festival, and at many performances
across Atlantic Canada and southern Ontario.
Following her passion for music and arts education, Stephanie founded her own
company, Creative Artist Productions (CAP), in 1995. CAP is dedicated not only to
providing Canadian singers with vocal instruction of the highest quality, but also to offer
a wider range of professional training and more performance opportunities.
Adi Braun
Adreana (Adi) Braun began her musical studies in Europe and continued her training in
Canada at the Royal Conservatory of Music and the University of Toronto’s Faculty of
Music from which she received her Bachelor of Music in Vocal Performance (Honours).
This fall she will commence doctoral studies at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of
Music, focusing on European Cabaret from 1870-1935.
Her teachers have included Irene Jessner, Patricia Kern, and Mary Morrison. As a
classical vocalist Adreana has performed in a solo and ensemble capacity with Opera
Atelier, Toronto Operetta Theatre, and the Canadian Opera Company, among others, as
well as in recital and oratorio. For over a decade Adi Braun has delighted audiences in
Canada, the United States and Europe as a jazz and cabaret artist, performing at
venues such as the Rose Theatre, Jazz at Lincoln Centre, Birdland, and The
Metropolitan Room in New York City, the Jazz Bistro (formerly The Top o’ the Senator),
the Montreal Bistro, Hugh’s Room and the Four Seasons Centre in Toronto, and Club
Unterfahrt and the Maschinenhalle in Germany.
She has four CD recordings to her credit, including her debut disc “Delishious” which
was short-listed for a Juno award, and her most recent recording, “Canadian Scenes I”
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which features her songwriting talents. In 2007 Adi was nominated for a New York
MAC Award as Best Major Jazz Vocalist of the Year.
Adi is a sought-after voice teach and coach. She is particularly well-known for her work
with German diction and Lieder interpretation. She teaches and conducts masterclasses
at the Glenn Gould School, the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Music, for the JCC’s
SICA summer program, and is head coach for the Canadian Children’s Opera Company
(CCOC). Adi Braun is the German Diction coach for the Canadian Opera Company and
works with a veritable “who’s who” of international opera singers.
Tom Diamond
Theatre and opera director Tom Diamond has a long and impressive résumé that
includes nine productions with the Canadian Opera Company and five with Pacific Opera
Victoria. Currently Resident Director and Dramaturg at Tapestry New Opera Works, Mr.
Diamond is perhaps most often recognized for his participation in both seasons of the
Gemini Award-winning television series Bathroom Divas.
In October 2000 Tom Diamond directed The Barber of Seville for Pacific Opera Victoria.
Of this production Times Colonist critic Adrian Chamberlain said, There's a sharpness
and pluckiness to Diamond's direction – a thinking man's theatricality that transforms
this chestnut into a superior production. Mr. Diamond returned to Pacific Opera to
direct The Marriage of Figaro (2003), Norma (2004), Rigoletto (2006) and Manon
Lescaut (2006); Rigoletto was also performed with Orchestra London in London,
Ontario. Mr. Diamond returns to POV in October 2010 to direct Rossini's great comic
opera Cinderella (La Cenerentola).
Following an early career as an actor and theatre director, Tom Diamond began his
operatic work as a member of the Canadian Opera Company's Ensemble Studio. Career
highlights include developing and directing world premieres of Timothy
Sullivan's Florence, The Lady With The Lamp for the 1992 Elora Festival (Chalmers
Award). His 1999 production of Squonk was an off-Broadway hit and transferred to
Broadway where it won the American Theatre Wing's Hewes Award.
His stagings for the Canadian Opera Company have included internationally acclaimed
productions of Giasone and La Calisto by Cavalli, a Dora award winning production of
Handel's Julius Caesar and most recently Don Giovanni by Guiseppe Gazzaniga.
For Tapestry New Opera Works, Mr. Diamond developed and staged the world premiere
of Chan Ka Nin's Iron Road (with librettist Mark Brownell), a bilingual (CantoneseEnglish) opera about the building of the Canadian railroad, which won the Dora Mavor
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Moore award as 2001's Outstanding New Musical. He also developed and staged
Tapestry's national tour of Theresa Tova's Still the Night; several seasons of Opera to
Go, and the 2009 world premiere of Omar Daniel and Alex Poch-Goldin's The Shadow.
Mr. Diamond's first short film, The Perfect Match, premiered to unanimous critical
acclaim as part of Tapestry's 2008 Opera to Go at Harbourfront's World Stage Festival.
A short operatic film about two lonely sock puppets, The Perfect Match has been seen
at film festivals across North American and was nominated for Best Experimental Film at
the Miami Short Film Festival.
Mr. Diamond is also one of the most renowned and sought after teachers on the
continent. He is the Acting Coach for the COC Ensemble Studio. He has directed and
coached at many universities, Conservatories and Young Artist Programmes including
Merola, the Eastman School of Music, the New England Conservatory, Indiana
University, the Royal Conservatory of Music's Glen Gould Studio, The Centre for Opera
Studies in Italy, and in summer programmes for Queen of Puddings and in Saint
Andrews By The Sea, New Brunswick, with Wendy Nielsen.
Dr. Christopher Foley
Christopher Foley is a pianist dedicated to the fields of teaching, chamber music, art
song, opera, and contemporary music. At the Eastman School of Music, he received a
Doctor of Musical Arts degree in 1994, majoring in piano accompanying and chamber
music as a student of Jean Barr and David Burge. Other notable studies include
Academy of the West, Aspen Music Festival, and Holland Music Sessions. He is a former
teacher at the University of British Columbia and the Vancouver Academy of Music.
In 1989 at the Eckhardt-Gramatté Competition for the Performance of Contemporary
Music, he won first prize for the performance of the commissioned work (Walter
Buczinski's Mosaics) and third prize overall. In 1991, he won first prize in piano at the
Kneisel Competition for the Performance of German Lieder in Rochester, New York.
Christopher is the vice president of the Ontario chapter of the National Association of
Teachers of Singing and a member of the Toronto Musicians’ Association. He is also a
resident pianist for the Bowdoin Summer Music Festival and Tapestry New Opera
Works, and has appeared with Continuum, Vancouver New Music Ensemble, Eastman
Musica Nova, and Eastman Intermusica. Christopher has been a Royal Conservatory
faculty member since 2003.
Brahm Goldhamer
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Brahm Goldhamer is one of Torontoʼs most experienced and respected accompanists
and vocal coaches. He has performed across Canada, the U.S. and Europe, and is in
great demand as recital collaborator with some of Canadaʼs most celebrated soloists.
For the past thirty years he has been a faculty member of the Royal Conservatory of
Music and the Glenn Gould School, where in addition to his studio coaching, he is the
founder and Artistic Director of the Opera Ensemble Program, and a collaborator in Art
Song and Operatic Repertoire classes. His performances include work with Opera in
Concert, Toronto Operetta Theatre, CBCʼs Music Around Us, the Elora Festival, Debut
Atlantic and Opera Anonymous. He was nominated for a Dora Award for Best Musical
Direction following his work with Comus Music Theatre.
Since 1990, Mr. Goldhamer has worked in Italy as music director and vocal coach in a
variety of educational settings and summer music festivals, including “Oberlin at
Casalmaggiore” and “Flagstaff at Fidenza. ” In addition, he worked for five summers as
a music director with Highlands Opera Studio in Haliburton, Ontario, with Co-Artistic
Directors, Canadian tenor Richard Margison and Metropolitan Opera Director Valerie
Kuinka. This summer, he is very much looking forward to his work as music director
with the Maritime Concert Opera in their production of “I Pagliacci.” For over thirty
years, Mr. Goldhamer has been a choral director and music director at a number of
synagogues within Toronto. Currently, he is music director at Beth Sholom
Congregation.
Joel Katz
Joel Katz is one of Canada's most prominent teacher/performers. Chairman of the Voice
Department at the Glenn Gould School of the Royal Conservatory from 2005-2009, Joel
has been a prizewinner and finalist at vocal competitions in Munich, Rio di Janeiro, and
Philadelphia, and has won the Schubert Prize for Lieder (Austria). He has performed
with the Canadian Opera Company, the Edmonton Opera, the Calgary Opera, the Pacific
Opera, the Winnipeg Opera, and Opera Hamilton in Canada, the Opera Theater of St.
Louis and the Chattanooga Opera in the United States, and the Pfalztheater
Kaiserslautern and the Landestheater Hof in Germany.
Known for his “sonorously deep voice” (Toronto Star) and strong dramatic presence,
Joel Katz has taught at the Bayreuth Festival (1996-1998), in Manchester, England, and
at the Theatre de La Monnaie in Brussels, Belgium. He has recently fulfilled the
requirements for the Master's in Music Psychology at the University of Sheffield in
England, and holds a BA from Bennington College, and Artist and Opera Diplomas from
the University of Toronto.
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Joel has prepared artists for roles at the Metropolitan Opera (New York), the Staatsoper
(Berlin), La Scala (Milan), and the Wiener Staatsoper (Vienna). Mr. Katz’ work with the
Canadian Opera Company can be seen in the video, “The Making of an Opera”, and as
the Marchese of Calatrava in Verdi’s “La Forza del Destino”, distributed internationally.
He has appeared in two of Alexina Louie’s new operas for the television special “Burnt
Toast”, broadcast on CBC tv’s “Opening Night”: for Bravo! television’s Arts & Minds, he
participated in a tribute to the work of Ricardo Muti.
His recent work with Opera Hamilton includes Benoit/Alcindoro in La Bohéme
(conducted by Cal Stewart Kellogg), the Sacristan in Tosca, and the Ancien Evreu in
Samson et Dalilah under Maestro Daniel Lipton. He has created roles in a number of
new Canadian works, including Thomas Dusatko’s “Joseph Brant” for Opera Ontario, the
Blue Man in the premiere of Murray Schafer’s opera, “The Palace of the Cinnabar
Phoenix”, and the Devil in Alexina Louie’s latest project, the opera “Mulroney, The
Opera”, shown in theatres across Canada as part of the “Met in HD” series.
Joel has sung with the Ludwigsburger Festspiele, Munich Radio Orchestra, Schaffhausen
Festival Orchestra, Taipei Symphony, Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Toronto
Mendelssohn Choir, Quebec Symphony, Edmonton Symphony, Winnipeg Chamber
Players, and the Royal Conservatory Orchestra among others. He has worked with
many notable conductors, including Leonard Slatkin, Mario Bernardi, Wolfgang
Gonnenwein, Elmer Iseler, Maurizio Arena, Julius Rudel, Catherine Comet, Daniel
Lipton, Victor Feldbrill, and Timothy Vernon.
Steven Leigh
Steven Leigh is a devoted vocal linguist and pedagogue. After completing his Licentiate
in Vocal Performance (with distinction) from McGill University, he focused his studies on
speech and sound as they relate to vocal technique. He also completed his Honours
Bachelor of Arts (with distinction), majoring in Second Language Learning (Italian) with
a double minor in Italian Culture and Communication Studies and Near and Middle
Eastern Studies (Arabic Language and Linguistics).
Already conversant in French, Hebrew, modern Greek, and Russian as a child, in his 20s
Steven added Italian and German and discovered the field of dialectology and language
variation. This led him to investigate the phonetics and structure of two Semitic and 11
Indo-European languages.
Steven has developed courses teaching the international phonetic alphabet, language,
and culture for opera singers and stage actors at the City University of New York, McGill
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University, Opera on the Avalon in Newfoundland, and most recently at the Summer
Opera Program at The Royal Conservatory.
Steven is an accomplished singer, pianist, and coach. Highlights as a singer include the
world premiere of Srul Irving Glick’s A Life's Journey (Songs for Isaac) in Toronto, Don
José with the Illinois Opera Theater, the Duke in Rigoletto at Fairfield Halls, England,
and appearances in Montreal with the Cantabile Chorale and Orchestra. His extensive
vocal work includes studies with Joan Dornemann, Lucy Arner, Nico Castel, Mignon
Dunn, Louis Quilico, Puli Toro, Deborah Birnbaum, and Norma Newton (New York),
Stuart Hamilton and Lynn Blaser (Toronto), Maria Cleva (International Vocal Arts
Institute), and Margaret Lobo (London).
Robert Loewen
Dr. Robert Loewen teaches voice to a wide range of singers including high school and
college students, young professionals, and avocational mature individuals. His students
have been accepted into leading music programs, including The Curtis Institute, and are
working in the profession. Dr. Loewen has also taught the choral scholars of Trinity
College at the University of Toronto. He was particularly blessed to have had a brilliant
first piano teacher, and children's choir conductor, Olga Friesen, in Manitoba, who
nurtured his love and respect for the art of music, especially his love of singing, from an
early age. Significant influences in Robert Loewen's singing career have included studies
with William Neill, Dixie Ross Neill, and Daniel Ferro. Other teachers and coaches of
influence have been Michael McMahon, Stuart Hamilton, and Dr. Robert Evans.
Recently Dr. Loewen has served as presenter and clinician for the Royal Conservatory
Music Development Program, work that has taken him to cities across the United
States. Presentations for Royal Conservatory Examinations have also been an exciting
highlight. Other workshops have included The Royal Conservatory Voice Summit
presentation on the maturing voice, choral/vocal workshops for various choirs, and
school masterclasses. Robert's adjudicating activities include recent trips to adjudicate
for the Royal Conservatory Music Development Program. Music Festival adjudicating has
included Senior Voice for the Winnipeg Music Festival, as well as festivals in Windsor,
Ottawa, Oshawa, Fredericton and other locations across Canada. Performance
highlights include singing as soloist with choirs across Canada, touring Ukraine as a
soloist, appearing frequently as soloist while on faculty at The Crane School of Music,
and touring with both the Edmonton Opera Ensemble and the Canadian Opera
Company Ensemble Residency Tour.
Robert's committee work has included chairing the Music Committee for the Mennonite
Bi-Centennial Festival (1986) and serving on various committees while on faculty at
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SUNY Potsdam. He currently serves on Academic Council of The Royal Conservatory as
President of The Royal Conservatory Faculty Association, and as a Voice Specialist for
Royal Conservatory Examinations.
Jean MacPhail
Jean MacPhail also pursued graduate studies at the University of Toronto. She studied
with Irene Jessner, Herman Geiger Torel, Luigh Ricci, Vera Rosza, Daniel Ferro, Robert
Weede, and R. Favoretto. In addition, she has performed throughout the United States
and England, with various opera companies, and for major Canadian orchestras. A
festival adjudicator, lecturer, master class instructor, and recipient of a Canada Council
senior arts grant, Jean has been a Royal Conservatory faculty member since 1980.
Sara Maida-Nicol
Sara Maida-Nicol, native of Niagara Falls, Canada, is a lyric soprano who studied under
Professor Jean MacPhail in Toronto, Canada. She graduated from the Faculty of Music
at University of Toronto in Voice Performance. Whether performing in song, concert or
opera, Ms. Maida-Nicol is noted for her passion and energy on stage.
Early in her career, Sara was accepted into the prestigious Opera Arts Training Program
in San Francisco geared towards aspiring young opera singers. She worked intensively
with famous leading mezzo-soprano Blanche Thebom and Metropolitan Opera stage
director Elizabeth Bachman. Shortly there after, Ms. Maida-Nicol discovered her love for
opera and the bel canto genre. That love took her to Italy where she studied as an
advance participant with Daniel Ferro (The Juilliard School) for four summers in the
Daniel Ferro Vocal Program (Greve-in-Chianti), after which she proceeded to the region
of Marche to study operatic repertoire with Maestro Raffele Ponti at the Festival di
Musica da Camera. Other teachers/coaches with whom she has worked individually
include Luciano Roberti (Maggio Musicale), Giovanni Reggioli (Washington Opera),
Robert Kopleson (Juilliard, MSM), Janice Harper Smith (Germany), Bruno Rigacci (Italy),
Mary Morrison (UofT), Cameron Stowe (NEC) and Stuart Hamilton (COC). She has
performed in numerous masterclasses, singing for notable artists that include Federica
Von Stade, Russell Braun, Daniel Ferro, Stuart Hamilton, Ambra Vespasiani, Ettore
Nova, Blanche Thebom, Martin Katz, and Marshall Pynkoski just to name a few.
Ms. Maida-Nicol has performed a diverse array of operatic, oratorio, and solo recital
repertoire in Toronto and Italy. This includes Mozart’s Mass in C minor and Bach’s
Magnificat with world-renowned conductor Helmuth Rilling and the MacMillan Singers at
Roy Thomson Hall in Toronto. She has performed numerous concerts with The Daniel
Ferro Vocal Program in and around the region of Tuscany and through Middlebury
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College’s Scuola Italiana. She has also appeared with New Opera Concerts (Mila
Filatova) as Desdemona in Verdi excerpts and as Baba in OATP’s excerpts from The
Medium. Ms. Maida-Nicol has frequented the stage as a solo recitalist in Canada, USA
and Italy.
While completing her Masters in Florence, Italy she developed a passion for her Italian
experience leading her to pursue a Ph.D. in Linguistic Anthropology integrating the
various areas of her expertise into an overall anthropological-semiotic analysis of the
phenomenon of Italian language in music.
Ms. Maida-Nicol is active on the lecture circuit and an advocate for continuing education
through the University of Toronto’s School of Continuing Studies where she teaches the
highly successful “Opera Italian”. She also teaches Italian lyric diction in the
undergraduate program at the Faculty of Music (UofT) while maintaining her own
private studio. She will be publishing a new, relevant book on Italian diction for singers
in 2014.
Richard Mehringer
Born in Germany. Stud. phil. at Munich University. Linguistics and Comparative
Literature at Cornell. M.A. from Carleton. Visiting lecturer at the University of
Saskatchewan, University of Victoria and Washington State University. Language
teacher in Paris. Ph.d. studies and teaching fellow at the University of Toronto. Teacher
in French Immersion and Head of Department at Malvern Collegiate Institute. Since
2009 teaching at RCM German for Singers and German 100-101.
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Ann Monoyios
Soprano Ann Monoyios performs extensively throughout Europe and North America in a
wide range of repertory—opera, oratorio, chamber music, and recitals—extending from
the baroque to the contemporary. She has collaborated with the major baroque
specialists of the world including John Eliot Gardiner, Gustav Leonhardt, Christopher
Hogwood, Frans Brueggen, Trevor Pinnock, William Christie, René Jacobs, and Reinhard
Goebel as well as the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra. She has been a featured soloist
with the Paris Opera, the Flemish Opera, the opera houses of Bremen and Halle, the
Staatsoper of Basel, as well as the symphonies of San Francisco, Montreal, Houston,
San Antonio, Jacksonville, and the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra.Ann can be heard
on recordings by Sony Vivarte, Deutsche Grammophon Archiv, EMI, Deutsche Harmonia
Mundi, Erato, Decca/L'Oiseau Lyre, Capriccio, and Vox as well as the BBC, WDR Köln,
NDR Hamburg, CBC Canada, and Radio France.
Jason Nedecky
Jason Nedecky appears regularly in concert and in recital, having performed with the
National Arts Centre Orchestra, the Manitoba Chamber Orchestra, Toronto
Philharmonia, the Toronto Chamber Choir, the Aldeburgh Connection Recital Series, the
Mountain View Connection Recital Series in Calgary, and on tours in Europe as soloist
with Consort Caritatis. He has performed roles with the Canadian Opera Company,
Saskatoon Opera, Toronto Masque Theatre, and Opera Atelier, and can be heard on the
Naxos label in several recent baroque recordings with the Aradia Ensemble. Mr.
Nedecky continued studies in Baden bei Wien, Austria, at the Britten-Pears Young Artist
Programme in Aldeburgh, England, at L'Académie Musicale de Villecroze in Provence,
France, and at the Banff Centre.
Mr. Nedecky has acted as Language Coach for the Canadian Opera Company, the
Luminato Festival, Radio-Canada, the University of Toronto Opera Division, and RCM
opera productions at the Glenn Gould School. He teaches Lyric Diction at the University
of Toronto, and has given masterclasses at York University and the University of
Calgary. He is the author of French Diction for Singers: A Handbook of Pronunciation for
French Opera and Mélodie.
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Jurgen Petrenko
Born in Toronto, Jurgen Petrenko has both a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree in music
from the University of Toronto. During the day, he works for CBC Radio Two, as a
producer of Choral Concert and Saturday Afternoon at the Opera, as well as the
presenter of a weekly “Organ Thursday” feature on Take Five. He is the artistic director
of the Toronto Classical Signers, and has conducted numerous major choral/orchestral
works. He has adjudicated for the University of Toronto, the Elora Festival Young
Performers’ Competition, and the CSC Choral Competition, and teaches a seminar on
oratorio performance for graduate voice majors at the Glenn Gould Professional School
of the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. He is also in demand as an organ
accompanist, and is the titular organist of St. John’s Anglican Church in Elora, Ontario.
His spare time is taken up with sailing, computer games, fine wine, and karate, where
he is proud to have earned a black belt.
Roxolana Roslak
Roxolana Roslak has performed at Covent Garden, Lincoln Center, Canadian Opera
Company, and Opera in Concert. She has made frequent appearances with the Toronto
Mendelssohn Choir, Elmer Iseler Singers, and Canadian orchestras under the batons of
Andrew Davis, Karel Ancerl, Julius Rudel, Frühbeck de Burgos, and Robert Kraft. This
adjudicator is a jury member of the Canada Council for the Arts, the George London
International Vocal Competition, and the National Association of Teachers of Singing.
She has made recordings on the RCA, CBS, and Centrediscs labels, including the Juno
Award-winning Das Marienleben with Glenn Gould. Roxolana is chair of the voice
department at The Royal Conservatory, where she has been a faculty member since
1984.
Guillermo Silva-Marin
“Ten Most Influential Hispanic-Canadians” (2008) award-winner Guillermo Silva-Marin is
founder and the continuing General Director of Toronto Operetta Theatre. A Modern
Renaissance man, Guillermo Silva-Marin can claim experiences as a performer, stage
director, writer, set and lighting designer, teacher and producer. Performance highlights
include appearances with the Canadian Opera Company, New York City Opera, the
Metropolitan Opera, Cincinnati Opera, and Symphony orchestras in Toronto, Ottawa,
Edmonton, El Paso, Mexico and Puerto Rico. He became the General Director of the
prestigious Opera in Concert in 1994 and founded Summer Opera Lyric Theatre in 1986.
His commitment to the advancement and promotion of Canadian singers has been
exemplary. He has maintained a minimalist philosophy as stage director and has, to a
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fault, emphasized dramatic truth and high excellence in performance with admirable
results and enthusiastic responses from audiences, critics and artists alike.
He was instrumental in the CD recording of three operas under the Naxos label for
international release including Castor Et Pollux by Rameau, Rinaldo by Handel and La
Griselda by Vivaldi.
Mr. Silva-Marin has staged a significant number of operas and operettas with companies
including the Toronto Operetta Theatre, Summer Opera Lyric Theatre, Opera de San
Juan, Memorial University and the Aspen, Huntsville and Courteney Music Festivals. He
made his debut in Ireland for Opera Cork’s The Merry Widow in 2007 in association with
conductor Kevin Mallon. His Carmen Flamenco! with Arte Flamenco! Spanish Dance Co.
received two separate productions. Mr. Silva-Marin joined Opera McGill at McGill
University in Montreal as stage director for Ravel’s L’enfant Et Les Sortileges in 1998. In
the following 8 years he staged Ward’s The Crucible. Mozart’s Le Nozze Di Figaro,
Weisgall’s Six Characters in Search of an Author, Handel’s Semele, a semi-staged
version of Verdi’s Fallstaff, Mozart’s Idomeneo and Bernstein’s Candide. He was
appointed Co-Director of Opera McGill, sharing duties with conductor Julian Wachner in
2007. He was instrumental in bringing to a successful completion the World Premiere of
Earnest, The Importance of Being by Canadian composer Victor Davies and librettist
Eugene Benson in February 2008, the World Premiere of Kamouraska by Charles Wilson
in 2009 as well as World Premieres of Isis and Osiris by Colin Mack and Sharon Singer
and Taptoo! by John Beckwith and James Reaney in 2012. Mr. Silva-Marin now appears
in the Canadian WHO’S WHO 2008 Edition.
Jayne Smiley
With 25 years of experience Jayne Smiley has taught voice in numerous Canadian
institutions including York UniversityTheatre Department, the Randolph Academy for the
Performing Arts, the National Ballet School, Opera East, and was head of the Voice
Department at the Toronto Film School. Currently Jayne teaches in her private voice
studio, at the Glenn Gould School, and is a director with the Royal Conservatory of
Music Summer Opera Programme in Toronto. She regularly gives master classes and
adjudicates festivals. Additionally, Jayne has a strong background in movement and
dance, and currently runs a yoga studio,Lokaya Yoga, in Toronto. She has had an
extensive performing career singing musical theatre, opera, oratorio and concerts
across Canada and internationally.
Jennifer Tarver
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Jennifer Tarver is a Canadian director and creator working internationally in both
theatre and opera. Based primarily in Toronto, she has directed for the major theatre
companies of the region including The Taragon, Canadian Stage Company, Nightwood
Theatre, and the Stratford Shakespeare Festival. Over the past five seasons at
Stratford her works have included The Homecoming, Krapp’s Last Tape, Zastrozzi and
the world premiere of George F. Walker’s King of Thieves. In the coming season she
will direct Waiting for Godot starring Brian Dennehy and Stephen Ouimette.
Her original works include Not Faust, History Play and the award winningShe’s Gone
Away a collaboration with choreographer Susanna Hood. Her latest creation What
Makes a Man, an original theatre piece based on the songs of Charles Aznavour, is
currently in development at Stratford.
She has directed opera at the Royal Conservatory of Music, the Opera Centre in
Sulmona, Italy and the University of Toronto.
Since 2004 Jennifer has been the Associate Director at The Theatre Centre in Toronto
leading their new work development program where she mentored over 30 dance,
opera and theatre companies providing creative and dramaturgical support for
numerous interdisciplinary creations. From 2007-2009 she was the Director of the
Opera Studio at the Centre for Opera Studies in Sulmona Italy. Jennifer is on the
faculty of the Royal Conservatory of Music and has been a guest artist teaching and
directing at The National Theatre School of Canada, Ryerson University, George Brown
College, Sheridan College and York University.
Katerina Tchoubar
“Tchoubar's agile voice often seemed like a kite that took flight at the slightest gust of
the wind; her physical involvement in the role conveyed a similar volatility”- wrote
Tamara Bernstein in the National Post review about Katerina in the role of Blanch de la
Force inDialoque des Carmelites. Since that performance Tchoubar received similar
compliments about her other opera roles including Geoff Chapman's in The Toronto
Star about her as Magda in La Rondine: “Katerina Tchoubar exploited rich, rounded
notes, pleasing vibrato and a growing sense of longing and pain....she achieved what
most others don't – connecting with with impassioned confessional to the audience.”
Katerina's previous opera roles include Fiordiligi in Cosi fan tutte by Mozart, Anna
Glawari in Merry Widow by Lehar, Lucy in The Threepenny Opera by K.
Weill, Violetta in La Traviata by Verdi, Tytania in Britten's Midsummer Night's
Dream, Valetto in Coronation of Poppea by Monteverdi, Frasquita in Carmen by Bizet,
Dew Fairy in Hansel and Gretel by Humperdinck.
In the recent Memorial Concert dedicated to the 70th Anniversary of the Great
Ukrainian famine-genocide of 1932, she premiered the "Voice of Hope", a piece for
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soprano and string orchestra, written by Larisa Kusmenko, conducted by Gary
Kulesha. Katerina appeared at the CBC's Glenn Gould Studio performing a series of
songs by Chopin at the Chopin Anniversary Concert, and asFirst Nymph in the Feast of
the Water Nymphs by Leontovich and conducted by Kvitka Kondracki. For the last three
years she has been a regular guest performer at the Vesnivka choir's semiannual
concerts. Recently Katerina completed her second year as a member of Canadian Opera
Company Chorus.
Mrs. Tchoubar, an alumni of the Royal Conservatory of Music, graduated from both the
Professional Diploma Program of the Glenn Gould Professional School and ARCT. She is
a distinguished graduate of the University of Toronto Opera School, where she studied
voice with Lorna MacDonald. Katerina's first vocal teacher - Eraine Schwing-Braun, still
remains her advisor, coach and friend. Her awards include a first prize in the National
Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) Competition, two first prizes and one second
prize in the three categories of the Kiwanis Music Festival , as well as theJean Marie
Scott Memorial Scholarship. In the NATS Artist Award International CompetitionKaterina
was awarded the Second Grand Prize and The Dorothy Kirsten-James Browning
Award for most promising young singer. At the Opera School she received the Anne and
Jack Crane Memorial Scholarship and was awarded a full scholarship by Peter and
Helene Hunt.
Katerina Tchoubar enjoyed to be a part of of Toronto Operetta Theatre's production
of “Wiener Blut” by Johann Strauss as Gabi, “Gypsy Violins” by Kalman as Sari,
and received numerous praises for Opera in Concert's production of “Mazepa” by
Tchaikovsky as Maria and of “Snow Maden” by Rimsky-Korsakov as Kupava with Bill
Silva-Marin as a General Director.
Peter Tiefenbach
Peter Tiefenbach enjoys a multifaceted career as a performer, composer, and
broadcaster. He and Mary Lou Fallis first performed together in 1997. Highlights of their
collaboration include successful Toronto runs of her shows Primadonna and Primadonna
Does Shakespeare (2002).
A familiar presence on CBC Radio, Peter is the former host of the Radio Two
program The Arts Tonight. He has orchestrated and conducted a concert for CBC radio
and television and of music by Noel Coward and Ivor Novello with the Canadian Opera
Company Orchestra. He has also collaborated with baritone Russell Braun and soprano
Donna Brown. In addition, Peter made his acting debut as Gerhard Krachmann in the
playSimpl at Toronto's Tarragon Theatre and Ottawa’s National Arts Centre.
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In 2005, Peter gave a recital in Calgary with soprano Valdine Anderson and mezzosoprano Kimberley Barber (broadcast by the CBC), and served as music director for
Calgary Opera's production of Kurt Weill'sSeven Deadly Sins. That year he performed
with Miss Fallis and Kiosque for CBC Radio's OnStage, and toured through Iceland
together.
Peter has participated in the Indian River Festival (Prince Edward Island), Niagara
International Chamber Music Festival, and Festival Vancouver, where he reprised the
Coward-Novello program.
Among his commissions are works for violinist Mark Fewer and pianist Jean Marchand,
the Elora Festival Singers, trumpeter Stuart Laughton, and the Toronto Children's
Chorus. Other projects include a composition for the Saskatoon Children's Chorus (for
the World Children's Choir Festival in Hong Kong) and for the Canadian Brass. His
recordings include Jean Stilwell's Kabarett (CBC Records, 2003) and Les chemins de
l'amour(CBC Records, 2000), Isabel Bayrakdarian's Azulão (CBC Records, 2003), and
Stuart Laughton's Remembrance (Marquis Classics, 2003).
Jennifer Tung
Jennifer Tung is an acclaimed musician and versatile artist who performs and teaches
vocal performance as well as piano. She completed her Bachelor of Music in Vocal
Performance and her Master of Music in Piano Accompanying and Chamber Music from
the Eastman School of Music.
The Hong Kong native began her music education at the age of nine, capturing
numerous first prizes in voice and piano from national competitions in Hong Kong and
China. Among her other distinctions are the Ann Fern Award for best vocal
accompaniment at the Kneisel Competition and the Barbara M.H. Koeng Award for best
vocal accompanist of the year at the Eastman School of Music. At the age of 16, she
made her vocal debut with the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra for the opening
celebration of the Hong Kong Cultural Arts Centre, giving the world premier of
the Green Cantata by Swiss composer Heinrich Schweitzer, which was subsequently
recorded for CD. She was soprano soloist in Handel’s Messiah and
Bach’s Magnificat with the Rochester Chamber Orchestra and St. Paul’s Festival
Orchestra, and she sang Mozart’s Exultate Jubilate with Sinfonia Mississauga.
Jennifer has performed at prestigious Canadian venues such as Roy Thompson Hall, the
Muskoka Lakes Music Festival, and the Toronto Centre for the Performing Arts, among
others. She gave the world premiere of Shakespeare’s Aviary by Canadian composer
Alexander Rapoport with the Mississauga Chamber Music Society at the Living Arts
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Centre. She also toured northwestern Ontario with the quartet Rhapsody Junction and
performed with the Thunder Bay Symphony Orchestra. As a vocal coach, she was
invited to be the music director with the Summer Opera Lyric Theatre for three
consecutive years.
Jennifer is active as a vocal coach and accompanist with some of Toronto’s leading
vocalists. She was invited to join the faculty as staff accompanist at leading summer
festivals such as the Algonquin International Music Institute and International School for
Musical Arts. Her students have successfully auditioned for entry to the University of
Toronto, McGill University, Boston Conservatory, Indiana University, and Eastman
School of Music. She was appointed the vocal program coordinator at the Young Artists
Performance Academy of the Royal Conservatory in 2004.
Monica Whicher
Style and musical elegance combined with an intuitive theatrical sense are the
hallmarks of soprano Monica Whicher’s performances on the concert and opera
stage. In recent seasons, the varied aspects of her artistry have been reflected in
performances with the Toronto Symphony (Strauss’ Vier Letzte Lieder), Houston’s
Mercury Baroque (Vivaldi’s Motezuma), the Colorado Symphony (Handel’s Messiah,
Beethoven Mass in C), the Calgary Philharmonic and the Edmonton Symphony
(Mendelssohn’sElijah), the Elmer Iseler Singers (Bach’s Mass in B Minor, for CBC radio),
Symphony Nova Scotia (Fauré Requiem, Brahms Requiem) and in recitals across
Canada.
Operatic roles include Thaïs (Massenet’s Thaïs), the Countess (Mozart’sLe Nozze di
Figaro), Pamina and Erste Dame (Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte), Zerlina (Mozart’s Don
Giovanni), (Anna Maurant (Kurt Weill’s StreetScene), Dido (Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas),
The Governess (Britten’s Turn of the Screw), Female Chorus (Britten’s The Rape of
Lucretia), and Mérope (Lully’s Persée) with companies such as The Canadian Opera
Company, Opera Atelier, Pacific Opera Victoria, Vancouver Opera, The Cleveland Opera,
Opera in Concert and the Nürnberg International Chamber Music Festival.
Further credits include performances with orchestras, opera companies and at chamber
festivals across Canada and in the United States, Mexico, Europe and Asia with
conductors including Helmuth Rilling, Peter Oundjian, Jukka-Pekka Saraste, Franz Paul
Decker, Steuart Bedford, Yannick Nezet-Seguin, Duane Wolff, Trevor Pinnick, Hervé
Niquet, Andrew Parrott, Harry Bicket and Timothy Vernon.
Nominated for a Juno Award for “Singing Somers Theatre” (Centrediscs) as well as two
Dora Mavor Moore Awards, Ms. Whicher was praised for her Naxos recording of Castor
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et Pollux. Her critically acclaimed portrayal of Mérope in Lully’s PERSEE can be seen on
the EuroArts/Naxos DVD and she is featured on the Juno-Award winning CDs Mozart’s
Magic Fantasy, Beethoven Lives Upstairs and Daydreams and Lullabies. Recent
recordings include Lullabies and Carols for Christmas, with harpist Judy Loman, and The
Art Songs of Mykola Lysenko, The Art Songs ofYakov Stepovyi, and The Galicians, all for
the Ukrainian Art Song Project.
A former member of the Canadian Opera Company Ensemble Studio, Ms. Whicher
studied at the Banff School of Fine Arts, the Britten-Pears School of Music (Aldeburgh,
England), the Steans Institute (Ravinia Festival, USA), and was a recipient of the
George London Award, Sullivan Foundation Grants, and a Canada Council Career
Development Grant. She is a graduate of the University of Toronto, where she was a
student of the renowned Canadian soprano, Lois Marshall. Monica Whicher is on the
Voice Faculty of the University of Toronto and the Glenn Gould School of the Royal
Conservatory of Music.
ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS – STRINGS
Atis Bankas
Atis Bankas’ roles include artistic director of the Canadian Chamber Academy and
Niagara International Chamber Music Festival and director of the International School
for Musical Arts. Atis has been a member of the New World Trio, Krieghoff String
Quartet, Toronto Piano Trio, and Trio Rachmaninoff, and has made solo appearances in
the former Soviet Union, Europe, United States, and Canada as well as with many
orchestras under Jaarvi, Iona Brown, and Andrew Davis. His solo and chamber music
appearances have been featured on CJRT, CFMX, CBC, and NPR radio. He won first
prize at the Inter-Republican Violin Competition in Tallinn, Estonia. In addition, his
students have been top prize winners at the Canadian Music Centre's symphony
competition and Kiwanis festivals. A former professor at Lawrence University in
Wisconsin and a University of Toronto faculty member since 1993, Atis has been on the
faculty of The Royal Conservatory School since 1982.
Jeffrey Beecher
Jeffrey Beecher began his musical education in New York, where he attended the
Manhattan School of Music and The Juilliard School. He completed his studies at the
Curtis Institute of Music with Harold Robinson and Edgar Meyer.
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He serves as principal bass with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. He has also
performed with the Philadelphia Orchestra, Philadelphia Chamber Orchestra, Minnesota
Orchestra, Detroit Symphony, and Orchestra of St. Luke’s. In addition, he has been
principal bass of the Verbier Festival Orchestra, Schleswig-Holstein Musik Festival, New
York String Seminar, and Tanglewood Music Festival.
An active chamber musician, Jeffrey has performed at such venues as Bargemusic, Weill
Recital Hall, Zankel Hall, the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, 92nd Street Y,
and Merkin Concert Hall. He has also enjoyed several summers at the Marlboro Music
Festival. He is a regular member of Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble, which has travelled
not only to many of the major musical centers of the United States and Europe, but also
to Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, India, Egypt, Iran, Syria, and a number of the
Central Asian Republics. In addition, he has participated as a mentor along with other
members of the Silk Road Ensemble in Weill Institute Professional Training Workshops
at Carnegie Hall.
As a touring member of the Silk Road Ensemble, Jeffrey has presented master classes
at Harvard University, the Rhode Island School of Design, Northwestern University, and
University of California Santa Barbara. He also composed and produced music for the
PBS television show, Travels to the Edge with Art Wolfe.
Marie Bérard
In addition to her work as concertmaster of the Canadian Opera Company Orchestra
and assistant concertmaster of the Mainly Mozart Festival in San Diego, Marie Bérard is
a sought-after soloist, chamber musician, and teacher. A member of the ARC Ensemble
(Artists of The Royal Conservatory), she has also worked with Amici, ArrayMusic, and
New Music Concerts and has premiered sonatas by Bright Sheng and Anthony Davis as
well as several new works with the Accordes String Quartet.
Among her solo recordings are works by Alfred Schnittke (Concerto Grosso No.1 and A
Paganini), and the Meditation from Thaïs for violin and orchestra. Her recording of the
concerto for violin and brass ensemble by Henry Kucharzyk was released in 2002. She
performs regularly at chamber music festivals, notably Ottawa, Speedside, and Music in
Blair Atholl, Scotland. Marie plays a 1767 Pietro Landolfi violin.
Victor Danchenko
An internationally-renowned artist and pedagogue, Victor Danchenko is faculty member
of the Curtis Institute of Music and the Peabody Conservatory of Music. His students
have won major awards and competitions and appeared in concerts and recitals on all
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continents. Among his successful students there are concertmasters of various
orchestras and members of the New York Philharmonic, Boston Symphony, Los-Angeles
Philharmonic, St. Louis Symphony, National Symphony, Toronto Symphony, European
and Asian orchestras. Among his outstanding students are: Martin Beaver, 1st violinist
of the Tokyo String Quarter, Soovin Kim, 1st prize winner of the Paganini International
Competition and a recipient of the Avery Fisher Career Award, Nicholas Kendall, winner
of the YCAA, Timothy Fain, Winner of the YCAA and recipient of the Avery Fisher Career
Award, Ryu Goto and Misha Simonyan, both of whom appeared with major orchestras
and major conductors, and others.
Recognized as one of the leading teachers of today, he has conducted numerous
master classes in the U.S., Canada, Europe ( including three major schools in London Royal College, Royal Academy and Guildhall School, Paris National Conservatory
Superior and Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory), South America, Asia (including the
National University of the Arts in Seoul, and the Shanghai Conservatory). Member of the
faculty of the prestigious Encore Summer School for strings for many years, Mr.
Danchenko has also frequently participated in various other summer schools and
festivals around the world, such as Keshet Eilon master course in Israel, Ishikawa Music
Festival in Japan, Euro Arts Festival in Germany, Niagara on the Lake International
Festival in Canada, Seoul International Music Festival Academy, Summit Music Festival
(N.Y.), etc.
In June-July 2010 Victor Danchenko conducted unique Master Course in St. Petersburg,
Russia entitled “The art of playing concertos with symphony orchestra”. All the
participants got a rare chance to work with the St. Petersburg Symphony during this
master course and perform with this orchestra at the Gala Concert at the conclusion of
the course. After resounding success of this course this summer the "Victor Danchenko
International Violin Master Course" will be held again in the Summer of 2011 in St.
Petersburg, Russia.
In addition to these duties, he has served as a jury member of major international
competitions.
Steven Dann
Steven Dann’s career covers the gamut of violistic possibilities. As principal viola of
some of the world’s leading orchestras, a veteran of the string quartet and chamber
music world, a soloist, recitalist, and dedicated teacher, he enjoys all of what his
instrument and his abilities can put in his path.
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Steven's foremost teacher and mentor was the late Lorand Fenyves. In addition, he
studied with William Primrose, Robert Pikler, and Bruno Giuranna. Steven spent six
summers studying the string quartet repertoire with Zoltan Szekely and members of the
Hungarian String Quartet.
Upon graduation from university, Steven was named principal viola of the National Arts
Centre Orchestra in Ottawa, a position he has subsequently held with the Tonhalle
Orchestra in Zurich, the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam, the Vancouver
Symphony, and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. He has also been a guest principal of
the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Seiji Ozawa, the City of Birmingham Symphony
Orchestra under Sir Simon Rattle, and, in both performance and recordings, with the
Chamber Orchestra of Europe under Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Paavo Berglund, and Pierre
Boulez.
Steven has collaborated as a soloist with such Maestros as Sir Andrew Davis, Rudolph
Barshai, Jiri Belohlavek, Sir John Elliott Gardiner, Jukka-Pekka Saraste, and Vladimir
Ashkenazy. Since 1990, Steven has been a member of the Smithsonian Chamber
Players in Washington, DC, and was a founding member of the Axelrod String Quartet,
who are resident at the Smithsonian Institute. Steven has been a featured performer on
the Smithsonian’s series of recordings for the Sony Classical Vivarte label. Two of these
recordings have won the Diapasson d’Or in France. Solo recordings include A Portrait of
the Viola, Winter Music for viola and orchestra by Alexina Louie (which was written for
Steven and nominated for a Juno award), and Mega4 Meta4 by Christos Hatzis, all for
CBC records, and Sequenza VI by Luciano Berio for the Naxos label. A recording of the
viola music of Brahms with pianist Lambert Orkis and mezzo-soprano Susan Platts for
ATMA Classique was released in June 2006.
Recent performances include concerti of Peter Lieberson, Giya Kancheli, Wolfgang
Amadeus Mozart, Alexina Louie, Mark-Anthony Turnage (with the Toronto Symphony
Orchestra and Oliver Knussen conducting), and a world premiere of a new concerto by
Christos Hatzis. Steven has also performed with the Tokyo String Quartet in Toronto
and New York and, as guest principal viola, Wagner’s Ring Cycle with the Canadian
Opera Company for the opening of Toronto's new opera house. He has recorded two
more CDs for ATMA and the second disc in a series of the complete piano chamber
music of Brahms and Schumann with the Smithsonian Chamber Players. Steven has
commissioned many new works from such composers as Alexina Louie, Peter Lieberson,
R. Murray Schafer, Frederick Schipitsky, and Christos Hatzis.
As both a performer and teacher, Steven is a regular guest at many international
festivals including the National Arts Centre’s Young Artist Program, Le Domaine Forget
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in Charlevois, Québec, and the Banff School of Fine Arts. He teaches viola and chamber
music at The Royal Conservatory's Glenn Gould School and plays a viola of Joseph
Gagliano, circa 1780.
Andrés Diaz
Mr. Diaz is the inaugural Alexandra Koerner Yeo Chair in Cello at the Royal
Conservatory.
Born in Chile, Mr. Diaz and his family moved to Atlanta, Georgia when he was a toddler.
Mesmerized by a concert by celebrated cellist Pierre Fournier when he was four years
old, he embarked on a lifelong love affair with the cello. Following his first prize win at
the 1986 Naumberg International Cello Competition, Mr. Diaz earned a reputation as
being among the world’s elite cellists. He has appeared with symphony orchestras
across five continents while regularly performing at music festivals around the world.
He is a founding member of the acclaimed string group Diaz Trio, and was nominated
for a 2009 Latin Grammy Award.
Mr. Diaz studied at the Georgia Academy of Music. He graduated from the New England
Conservatory where he worked with Laurence Lesser and Colin Carr, and continues to
play an active role at the school. He served for five years as Associate Professor of Cello
at Boston University, and Co-Director of the Boston University Tanglewood Institute
Quartet Program. He is on faculty at The Banff Centre and artist-in-residence at
Brevard Music Center in North Carolina. Mr. Diaz currently serves as Professor of Cello
and head of the strings department at Southern Methodist University.
Mr. Diaz plays a 1698 Matteo Goffriller cello, using a bow crafted by his father Manuel
Diaz.
Bryan Epperson
One of Canada's most charismatic chamber musicians, Bryan Epperson is principal
cellist of the Canadian Opera Company Orchestra and, during the summer, the Santa Fé
Opera Orchestra, as well as a regular performer at the internationally acclaimed Santa
Fe Chamber Festival.
He made debuts in Milan, Venice, Siena, and Florence at the recommendation of
Claudio Abbado and has since received regular invitations to perform throughout
Europe and North America. Collaborations include performances with such legendary
musicians as David and Igor Oistrakh, Christian Ferras, and Tibor Varga. Bryan is a
founding member of the string trio Triskelion, the Cambridge Chamber Players, and the
ARC Ensemble (Artists of The Royal Conservatory). In addition, he has recorded on the
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Naxos and Musica Viva labels and has been broadcast on NPR, the BBC, CBC, and RCA
Red Seal.
In 2004, Bryan led the cello ensemble on Isabel Bayrakdarian's Juno Award-winning
album Azulao. A graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music, Bryan's initial studies were
with Leonard Rose, André Navarra, and George Neikrug. He subsequently served as an
assistant to Antonio Janigro at the Salzburg Mozarteum. Bryan is devoted to both a
1752 Paulo Antonio Testore cello and a 928 s Porsche of almost equivalent vintage.
Between the months of July and September, this machine speeds across the highways
of the New Mexican desert, leaving in its wake the reverberation of Jimi Hendrix guitar
riffs and the aroma of expensive Cuban cigars.
David Hetherington
A native of St. Catharines, Ontario, David Hetherington is the Toronto Symphony
Orchestra (TSO)'s assistant principal cellist. He received his musical training at The
Royal Conservatory and the University of Toronto, and furthered his studies in New
York, Italy, and Germany with Claus Adam, André Navarra, and Paul Tortelier.
A member of the TSO since 1970, David also teaches cello and chamber music at The
Royal Conservatory and the University of Toronto. He coaches the cello sections of the
Toronto Symphony Youth Orchestra and the National Youth Orchestra of Canada, and is
music director of the Inter-Provincial Music Camp near Parry Sound, Ontario.
As a soloist, David has performed with the TSO, Niagara Symphony, and Symphony
Orchestra of Canada. As a chamber musician, he has toured Canada, the United States,
Mexico, and Europe, and has performed at the Ottawa, Elora, and Kincardine Music
Festivals.
David is a founding member of the Amici Chamber Ensemble, which presents an annual
series of concerts at the Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto. He is also a founding member
of the string quartet Accordes, which performs regularly for New Music Concerts and
other contemporary music organizations. In 2001, the Canadian Music Centre, through
Centrediscs, released Accordes's recording of Harry Somers's String Quartets, for which
it received a Juno Award nomination.
David has appeared on several recordings for the CBC and Centrediscs, with whom he
made the Canadian premier recording of Talivaldis Kenins's prize-winning cello sonata.
In addition, he has recorded nine discs with Amici for Summit Records, Naxos, and CBC
Records.
Desmond Hoebig
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Desmond Hoebig , Professor of Cello at the Shepherd School of Music; Rice University,
has had a distinguished career as a soloist, orchestral and chamber musician.
Desmond was born in 1961 and raised in Vancouver, Canada. He studied with James
Hunter, Jack Mendelsohn and Ian Hampton. In 1978 he moved to Philadelphia to study
with David Soyer at the Curtis institute of Music. He received his BM and MM at the
Juilliard School with Leonard Rose and Channing Robbins, and participated in master
classes with Janos Starker and Tsuyoshi Tsutsumi at the Banff Centre.
Mr. Hoebig won the First Prize at the Munich International Competition (1984), the
Grand Prize of the CBC Talent Competition (1981) and the Canadian Music Competition
(1980). He was also an award winner at the Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow
(1982).
Mr. Hoebig has been a soloist with many prominent orchestras in North America,
including Cincinnati, Cleveland, Houston, Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver. His
international orchestral engagements have been in Germany, Spain, Portugal, Japan,
Mexico and Columbia.
As a chamber musician, Desmond was the cellist with the Orford String Quartet when
they won a Juno award for best classical album in 1990. He has also performed for 30
years with the Hoebig-Moroz Trio and a duo with Andrew Tunis. Mr. Hoebig has taught
and performed at festivals throughout North America, including; Aspen, Banff, La Hoya,
Marlboro, Music Bridge, Orcas Island, Sarasota and Steamboat Springs.
Before joining the faculty of the Shepherd School, Mr. Hoebig had been Principal Cellist
of the Cleveland, Houston, and Cincinnati Symphony Orchestras.
Patrick Jordan
“Who knew violists could have so much fun?” – Toronto Globe and Mail,fairly sums
up Patrick Jordan’s professional musical career. A native of West Texas, and student
of Susan Schoenfeld, his studies continued in Boston with Walter Trampler and Eugene
Lehner. He is currently co-principal viola of Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra, principal
violist of the Carmel Bach Festival and the Boston Early Music Festival Orchestra. Patrick
is also violist with the Gallery Players of Niagara, and is on the faculty of the Royal
Conservatory of Music in Toronto. He is a member of the Eybler Quartet, a period
instrument string quartet, which recently released its second CD featuring works for
clarinet and string quartet by Mozart and J.G.H Backofen with clarinetist Jane Booth.
The Eybler Quartet will be recording the entirety of Haydn’s op. 33 in the winter of
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2011-12. When not busy with the viola, he is an enthusiastic cook and student of the
culture of food.
Kathleen Kajioka
Kathleen Kajioka has achieved a reputation as a musical multilinguist, moving between
worlds with agility and uncompromising depth. Kathleen appears regularly as a baroque
violist and violinist with Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra, as a modern violist with the
critically acclaimed Via Salzburg Chamber Orchestra, and as an Arabic violinist with
Maryem Tollar, Maza Mezé, and the Arabesque Orchestra, led by Bassam Bishara.
Always open for a swing through the pop world, Kathleen has recorded for the likes of
Jesse Cook, Luke Doucet and Kos.
It was in the public school system that Kathleen began learning the violin, switching to
viola two years later. She attended the Royal Conservatory of Music and the Banff
Centre for the Arts, where she studied with Karen Tuttle, Rivka Golani and Gerald
Stanick, among others. In Banff she met her most influential teacher, the reknowned
violist and pedagogue Martha Strongin-Katz, with whom she pursued undergraduate
studies on scholarship at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, N.Y.
Upon her return to Toronto, Kathleen began performing with most of that city’s
venerable classical music institutions; however, her focus quickly shifted, and she began
broadening her musical range. The recipient of several arts council grants, her studies
of Baroque, Medieval and Middle Eastern music have taken her to the US, France and
Egypt.
While at Eastman, Kathleen discovered Baroque performance practice, playing in the
Eastman Collegium led by lutenist Paul O’Dette. Her interest in early music was further
stimulated by her work with Les Violons du Roy in Québec City. She has since become
an active member of the early music scene, having shifted her focus to baroque violin,
which she has studied with Elizabeth Blumenstock, Manfredo Kraemer, and others. In
addition to Tafelmusik, Kathleen has performed with Scaramella, Aradia, Toronto
Masque Theatre, Texas Early Music Concerts and Musica Ad Rhenum in the
Netherlands. In 2005, she launched the baroque music organization, Past Perfect.
Kathleen’s interest in Middle Eastern music began with a chance encounter with the
Toronto-based Arab and Greek fusion band, Maza Mezé in 1997. In collaborating with
some of its members, she discovered a love for this sensual and impulsive musical
language. She travelled to Brooklyn, NY to study with North America’s Arab music
luminary, Simon Shaheen, and then to Egypt, where she studied both violin and ‘oud
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with Cairo’s Alfred Gamil. Kathleen has combined her interests in a series of
compositions, funded by the Toronto Arts Council, which explore the convergence of
Western Baroque and Middle Eastern musics. The most recent exploration in Kathleen’s
musical landscape is Medieval music, which she has studied and performed with the
incomparable Medieval fiddler Shira Kammen.
Paul Kantor
Paul Kantor is one of the leading violin pedagogues and one of the most sought-after
teachers in North America today. Appointed Eleanor H. BiGlenn Gould School Memorial
Distinguished Professor of Violin at the Cleveland Institute of Music in 2002, he received
his Bachelor of Music and Master of Music degrees from The Julliard School. Paul's
principal teachers were Margaret Graves, Dorothy DeLay, and Robert Mann. He served
as chair of the string department at the University of Michigan for 13 years and has
served on the faculties of The Julliard School, New England Conservatory, and Yale
University.
For the past 30 years, Paul has been an artist/faculty member of the Aspen Music
Festival and School, where he was a concertmaster of both the Festival Orchestra and
Chamber Symphony. He has performed with the New York String Quartet, Berkshire
Chamber Players, Lenox Quartet, and National Musical Arts Chamber Ensemble. He
served as concertmaster of the New Haven Symphony, Aspen Chamber Symphony,
Lausanne Chamber Orchestra, and Great Lakes Festival Orchestra, and as guest
concertmaster of the New Japan Philharmonic and Toledo Symphony Orchestra.
Paul has performed the world premieres of Dan Welcher’s Violin Concerto and John
Corigliano’s Red Violin Caprices. His recordings are on the Equilibrium, CRI, Delos, and
Mark Records. Paul is married to the distinguished pianist Virginia Weckstrom.
Jeannie Lamon
Music Director of Tafelmusik since 1981, Jeanne Lamon C.M., has been praised by
critics in Europe and North America for her virtuosity as a violinist and her strong
musical leadership. Under her direction, Tafelmusik has achieved international stature
and is considered “one of the world's top baroque orchestras" (Gramophone Magazine).
In addition to performing with and directing Tafelmusik, Ms. Lamon regularly guest
directs symphony orchestras in North America and abroad. Recent and upcoming
engagements include The Detroit Symphony, Les Violons du Roy, l’Orchestre
Métropolitain de Montréal, Symphony Nova Scotia, Victoria Symphony and Orchestra
London. A passionate educator, Jeanne Lamon teaches at the University of Toronto and
Toronto’s Royal Conservatory of Music. In recognition of her outstanding leadership and
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contribution to music education in Canada, Ms. Lamon received an honorary Doctor of
Humane Letters from Mount Saint Vincent University in the spring of 2007. Ms. Lamon
has won numerous awards for her work with Tafelmusik. She received an honorary
Doctorate of Letters from York University in 1994. In 1996 Ms. Lamon became the first
recipient of the Muriel Sherrin Award, which is presented by the Toronto Arts Council
Foundation to artists and creators who have excelled at international initiatives in the
fields of music or dance. In 1997 the Alliance Française of Toronto awarded Ms. Lamon
with its newly created Prix Alliance for her contributions to cultural exchanges and
artistic ties between Canada and France. In September 1997 Ms. Lamon received the
Joan Chalmers Award for Creativity and Excellence in the Arts for her artistic direction
of Tafelmusik. Jeanne Lamon received the Canada Council's prestigious Molson Prize in
1998 for her lifelong commitment to the arts and excellence in her field. In July 2000
Ms. Lamon was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada in recognition of her
exceptional achievements as a baroque violinist, teacher, and Music Director of
Tafelmusik. In April 2004 Ms. Lamon received the Musician of the Year Award from the
Toronto Musicians’ Association for outstanding Canadian musical achievement and
artistic excellence. Ms. Lamon was the 2006 recipient of the Roy Thomson Hall Award
of Exceptional Achievement in Music and the 2007 recipient of the Betty Webster Award
for Musical Leadership.
Judy Loman
Judy Loman studied harp with Carlos Salzedo at the Salzedo Harp Colony in Camden,
Maine, from 1947–56, and at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia. She was his assistant
in the Salzedo Harp Ensemble in 1957. That year she moved to Toronto and became
the principal harp of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) in 1959, and continued in
that position until 1991.
Her many appearances as soloist with the TSO have included performances of the
Weinzweig Concerto, which was written for her, and of Somers' Suite for Harp and
Chamber Orchestra, which she played with the orchestra on its 1965 European tour.
The TSO commissioned Schafer's Concerto for Harp and Orchestra for her, and they
premiered the work in 1988.
Judy appeared as soloist with the TSO on its 1979 Canadian and US tour, and in 1987
on its tour to northern Canada and the Arctic. She has also appeared as soloist with the
Calgary Philharmonic, Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, and CBC Vancouver Orchestra.
She has given many recitals and has performed on CBC radio and television, and with
the Festival Singers, at the Festival of the Sound, at the Elora and Stratford festivals,
and with the York Winds. Robert Turner and John Felice have written works for her,
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and she premiered Schafer's Crown of Ariadne in 1979 for New Music Concerts, playing
both percussion and harp; her recording of the work received a Juno Award as best
classical album of 1979, and the Canadian Music Council's Grand Prix du Disque.
Judy gave the premieres of Schafer's Theseus in 1986 with the Orford String Quartet, of
Weinzweig's 15 Pieces for Harp in 1986, and of Glen Buhr's awardwinning Tanzmusik in 1987 in Pittsburgh as part of the American Harp Society's annual
composition competition. Some of Judy’s own arrangements, realizations, and
transcriptions of music for harp may be heard on her recordings. She became a
member of the Faculty of Music, University of Toronto, in 1966 (and continued to teach
there in 1991) and established a summer school for harpists near Fenelon Falls,
Ontario, in 1977. Her pupils have included Gianetta Baril, Nora Bumanis, Sarah
Davidson, Erica Goodman, and Elizabeth Volpe.
Judy became a board member of the World Harp Congress in 1985. She adjudicated at
the 1985 Israel International Harp Contest, for the American Harp Society's annual harp
composition competitions, and at the 1989 USA International Harp Competition.
Katharine Rapoport
Katharine Rapoport also studied in Siena (Italy) and Detmold (Germany) and at Vienna
Hochschule für Musik with Bruno Giuranna and Hatto Beyerle. She is an active freelance
violist in Toronto as well as an adjudicator. Her articles have been published in
the University of Toronto Quarterly and The Strad magazine. In addition, Katharine
authored the 2001 Royal Conservatory viola syllabus, coauthored the 1999 violin
syllabus, and was series editor of The Encore Series for Violin and two teachers'
manuals. Her recordings include Classical Kids and the Sunset Boulevard soundtrack,
and she has recorded with the Esprit Orchestra. A member of the American Federation
of Musicians and the American String Teachers Association, Katharine has been on The
Royal Conservatory faculty since 1983.
Erika Raum
Erika Raum has played the violin professionally since age 12. Since winning the Joseph
Szigeti International Violin Competition in 1992, she has been invited to Europe on
many occasions, including Portugal, Austria, Germany, England, Italy, France, and
Hungary, where she appeared with the Budapest Radio Orchestra, the AustroHungarian Orchestra, and the Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra. Erika has performed
throughout Canada: at the Parry Sound, Ottawa, and Vancouver chamber festivals and
regularly at The Banff Centre. She also performs with the ARC Ensemble (Artists of The
Royal Conservatory), and has attended festivals abroad at Caramoor, Budapest, and
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Prussia Cove. In high demand as a chamber musician, Erika performs regularly with the
distinguished pianist Anton Kuerti, with whom she recorded a landmark CD of Czerny's
piano and violin works (on CBC's Musica Viva label).
Mayumi Seiler
Mayumi Seiler began her musical upbringing in Osaka, Japan, where she was born of
Japanese/German parentage. Wedded to the violin from the age of three, Ms. Seiler
received her musical education at the renowned Mozarteum during the formative years
of her childhood in Salzburg, Austria. She is currently based in Toronto, Canada where
she lives with her two greatest accomplishments, her daughter Hana and her son Seiji.
With a busy schedule as a soloist and chamber musician throughout Europe, Japan and
North America, Ms. Seiler is also the Artistic Director and founder of Via Salzburg
Chamber Music, a Toronto based chamber music organization whose chamber orchestra
Ms Seiler leads form the first desk. Via Salzburg is entering the 10th season with
wonderfully imaginative programming and international guest artists performing with
the best Canadian talent.
Ms. Seiler has performed with numerous renowned orchestras and conductors including
Neville Marriner, Christopher Hogwood, Peter Oundjian, Sandor Vegh and has been the
featured soloist with orchestras such as the City of London Sinfonia, the Royal
Philharmonic, the Berlin Symphony, the Moscow Symphony, the Hong Kong
Philharmonic, the Australian Chamber Orchestra, Camerata Academica Salzburg and the
Toronto Symphony Orchestra. She was invited by legendary violinist Ruggiero Ricci to
perform with him in his final concert in Washington DC. Her performances as soloist
with the UBS Verbier Festival Chamber Orchestra under the baton of Maxim Vengerov
saw her perform to critical acclaim in such major venues at Toronto's Roy Thompson
Hall, New York's Carnegie Hall, Amsterdam's Concertgebouw and Vienna's Musikverein
and the Barbican in London.
Ms. Seiler has recorded many of the violin concertos and chamber repertoire for such
labels as Virgin Classics, JVC Victor, Hyperion, and Capriccio.
Ms. Seiler is very proud to have received the sponsorship of Acura Canada. Thanks to
the very generous support of a private benefactor, her faithful partner in her musical
travels is an exquisite J.B. Guadagnini violin, circa 1740.
Barry Shiffman
Barry Shiffman joined The Glenn Gould School as Associate Dean and Director of
Chamber Music in September 2010. He comes to The Royal Conservatory from The
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Banff Centre, where he has served as Director of Music Programs and Executive
Director of the Banff International String Quartet Competition since 2006.
At The Banff Centre, Mr. Shiffman revitalized existing music programs and launched
major new initiatives in chamber music, orchestral studies, popular music, and jazz.
Some of his most dramatic achievements were in the field of new music; under his
direction, the music program of The Banff Centre became one of western Canada's
largest presenters of contemporary works. He increased the number of faculty
residencies, attracting notable composers including John Adams, Osvaldo Golijov, Brett
Dean, and Louis Andriessen. In the spring of 2009, he oversaw the coproduction of
EVOLUTION, the CBC’s competition for young composers, held at The Banff Centre.
Through Mr. Shiffman’s leadership of the Banff International String Quartet
Competition, it has grown to include career development, outreach, and commissioning
programs, along with a program to nurture the talents of young artists. Its endowment
has doubled, and Mr. Shiffman played an active and ongoing role in major gift
fundraising and stewardship.
He also serves as Executive Artistic Director of Vancouver's Music in the Morning
Concert Society, overseeing all programming for the celebrated concert presenter.
Beyond his achievements at The Banff Centre, Mr. Shiffman has had a rich and varied
career as a performer and recording artist. Debuting with the Toronto Symphony
Orchestra at the age of 15, he has appeared with orchestras and in recital throughout
North America, Europe, and Japan. Recent appearances include his debut with the Los
Angeles Philharmonic at Disney Hall and a Canadian tour as guest violist with the
Gryphon Trio.
In 1989, Mr. Shiffman cofounded the St. Lawrence String Quartet through a joint
program of The Royal Conservatory and the University of Toronto. During his 17 years
with the Quartet he appeared in over 2,000 concerts in venues around the globe and
recorded several critically acclaimed discs under an exclusive contract with EMI Classics.
Passionately committed to contemporary composers, he has been involved in the
premieres of hundreds of new works, both in the Quartet and beyond.
In addition to performing and recording, Mr. Shiffman is a sought-after violin and viola
teacher and chamber music coach. He is the recipient of the Nadia Boulanger Prize for
Excellence in the Art of Teaching awarded by the Longy School of Cambridge,
Massachusetts. In 2009, he received an honorary doctorate from the University of
Calgary. He served as artist-in-residence at Stanford University from 1998 to 2006 and
as visiting artist at the University of Toronto from 1995 to 2006
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Paul Widner
An active cellist in Toronto, Paul Widner is resident cellist of several contemporary
music ensembles, including Continuum Contemporary Music and Arraymusic. He is also
principal cellist of the Esprit Orchestra and performs regularly with New Music Concerts.
He has toured throughout Canada and Europe with these groups and appears on
several recordings of contemporary Canadian music.
Paul is also the assistant principal cellist of the Canadian Opera Company Orchestra and
performs with the Amadeus Ensemble and the National Ballet Orchestra.
Orchestra – Winds and Brass
John Abberger
John Abberger, one of North America’s leading performers on historical oboes, is
principal oboist with Tafelmusik and the American Bach Soloists (San Francisco). He has
performed extensively in North America, Europe and the Far East with these ensembles,
and appears regularly with other prominent period-instrument ensembles, including
Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, Washington Bach Consort, Portland Baroque
Orchestra, Ensemble Voltaire, Handel and Haydn Society, and Boston Baroque. His
recording of the Concerto for Oboe by Alessandro Marcello with Tafelmusik was
glowingly reviewed byGramophone Magazine as “one of the best there is” and “alone
worth the price of the disc, even if you have other versions.” In addition to many
recordings with Tafelmusik and other period instrument ensembles, he has produced
and recorded two discs of concertos and suites by J.S. Bach that have been released on
the Analekta label: the recording of orchestral suites in their original instrumentation
was chosen as CD of the Month by the German magazine Toccata/Alte Musik Actuell.
John serves on the faculty at the University of Toronto, and has taught at the City
College of New York. A native of Orlando, Florida, he received his training at the
Juilliard School and Louisiana State University. In addition, he holds a Performers
Certificate in Early Music from New York University.
Keith Atkinson
Keith Atkinson has been associate principal oboe of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra
(TSO) since 1985. In addition to his symphonic duties, he is an active recitalist and
chamber musician. He is a founding member of the Meridian Trio, which specializes in
unusual wind chamber music. The group has released a CD featuring music for flute,
oboe, and piano.
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Keith has appeared regularly on the Evening Overtures chamber series of the TSO and
plays with the Bach Consort, which has released two CDs of Bach arias and cantatas.
He also performs with New Music Concerts in Toronto, the Mississauga Choral Society,
and Music at Metropolitan United (Toronto) and has played principal oboe with the
National Arts Centre Orchestra (Ottawa) and the Hamilton (Ontario) Philharmonic.
In demand as a teacher and chamber music coach, Keith is on the faculties of the
University of Toronto, The Royal Conservatory, and the National Youth Orchestra of
Canada. He is also a woodwind coach for the Toronto Symphony Youth Orchestra.
Raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, Keith began piano studies at age five, clarinet at age nine,
and oboe at age 12. His first oboe teachers included Richard Johnson, William Harrod,
and Adrian Gnam. He earned a Bachelor of Music degree with High Distinction from
Indiana University, studying with Jerry Sirucek, and a Master of Music degree from
Northwestern University, where he was a student of Ray Still. While in graduate school,
he was principal oboe of the Civic Orchestra of Chicago and played extra with the
Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Upon graduation in 1981, he joined the San Francisco
Symphony as second oboe.
Neil DeLand
Neil Deland is principal horn of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, a position he has held
since 2006. Previously he worked as a freelancer in Boston and as a member of the
Boston Philharmonic Orchestra, Boston Modern Orchestra Project, Portland Symphony
Orchestra, Rhode Island Philharmonic, and Emmanuel Music. He appears in numerous
recordings from many of the above mentioned Boston orchestras.
Neil frequently substituted for the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Pops
Orchestra, with whom he recorded and toured many times. His chamber music credits
include the Boston Symphony Chamber Players and Moab Music Festival. Teaching
engagements included Boston College, the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and
the University of New Hampshire.
Richard Dorsey
Oboist Richard Dorsey is a former (retired) member of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra
(TSO) and has held positions with other orchestras in Canada. Before joining the TSO,
he held principal positions with the US Air Force Symphony Orchestra and Band, and
performed throughout the United States with the Air Force Woodwind Quintet. He held
principal oboe positions with the Oklahoma Symphony and the Kitchener-Waterloo
Symphony.
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In addition, Richard was the original principal oboist with the Canadian Chamber
Ensemble originating at Stratford, with the Stratford Shakespeare Festival. He has had a
long relationship with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, having performed at both the
Tanglewood Music Festival and at Symphony Hall in Boston, and toured in New York’s
Carnegie Hall. He has also performed many times with the National Arts Centre
Orchestra in Ottawa and appears on numerous recordings with Maestro Pinchas
Zuckerman. Richard has been on the faculty of the University of Oklahoma, Wilfred
Laurier University, University of Toronto, and The Royal Conservatory. Other teaching
experience includes the Courtenay Music Festival.
Richard’s own education was at Boston University. He studied with the principal oboist
of the Boston Symphony, Ralph Gomberg. Richard attained a Master's degree from the
Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. In 1972 and 1973, he was recognized
with performance prizes at the Tanglewood Music Center in Massachusetts.
Christopher Gongos
In 1998, Christopher Gongos joined the Toronto Symphony Orchestra as associate
principal horn. He has also held the positions of principal horn of the KitchenerWaterloo Symphony, associate principal horn of the Winnipeg Symphony, and second
horn of the Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra.
Christopher is on faculty at The Royal Conservatory's Glenn Gould School and the
University of Toronto. He was a student of Kay McCallister at the University of Alberta
and John Zirbel at McGill University, and is an alumnus of Tanglewood and the National
Youth Orchestra of Canada.
Jeffrey Hall
Jeffrey Hall is a member of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. The Ottawa-born
trombonist received his musical training at McGill University (Montreal) and New
England Conservatory of Music (Boston). His principal teachers include Ted Griffith,
Douglas Yeo, and Richard Erb. Jeffrey is an alumnus of the National Youth Orchestra of
Canada and a former member of Orchestre symphonique de Québec. A teacher of
trombone and bass trombone, he is on faculty at the University of Toronto and The
Royal Conservatory's Glenn Gould School.
Susan Hoeppner
Appreciated for being a “born soloist” (Toronto Globe & Mail), where “one can almost
hear the words in her flute song” (Washington Post), Canadian flutist Susan Hoeppner
is highly regarded for her flawless lyricism, dazzling virtuosity and “no holds barred”
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approach to performing. She is an established international soloist and chamber
musician, and her appearances include prestigious venues spanning the continents of
North America, South America, Europe, and Asia.
Ms. Hoeppner has performed as a guest soloist with orchestras around the world,
beginning her professional career in Buenos Aires at the famed Teatro Colon. Following
her debut in South America, she went on to be guest soloist with the Lisbon Radio
Orchestra (Portugal), Kyoto Symphony Orchestra (Japan), Takefu Int’l Festival
Orchestra (Japan), Northern Lights Festival Orchestra (Mexico), Sacramento
Symphony, New York Chamber Ensemble, among others. Closer to home in Canada,
she has performed with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Edmonton Symphony,
Calgary Symphony, Orchestre Métropolitain de Montréal, Manitoba Chamber Ensemble,
Canadian Chamber Ensemble, Kitchener/Waterloo Symphony, Toronto Chamber
Players, Regina Symphony and the Hamilton Philharmonic.
A celebrated recording artist, her numerous discs have been received with critical
acclaim. Recently, Ms. Hoeppner was nominated for a JUNO Award with her latest
recording on the Marquis Classics label entitled “American Flute Masterpieces”, with
pianist Lydia Wong, in the category of “Classical Album of the Year: Chamber or Solo”
in 2012. In this same year, Susan became the only Canadian flutist to be appointed a
Haynes Artist. The Boston-based Wm. S. Haynes Flute Company is one of the world’s
top flute makers; Susan will represent Haynes in performances, masterclasses, lectures,
and other appearances. She was invited by the well-known music publisher Frederick
Harris Music Company to record, represent and showcase their newly established
repertoire series entitled “Overtones: A Comprehensive Flute Series”. She performed
this series in presentation recitals across North America, with its launch beginning at the
National Flute Convention 2010 in California
Susan Hoeppner is proud to introduce works by Canadian composers to her audiences,
and has been invited to perform in Canadian Embassies worldwide where she programs
new and exciting works. In August, 2011 she gave the world premiere of a new flute
Concerto written for her by Christos Hatzis called “Departures:Concerto for Flute and
String Orchestra” with the Kyoto Symphony Orchestra in Japan. This Concerto is part
of her new recording project on the Marquis Classics label to be released in 2014. She
recently commissioned a new flute Sonata by Gary Kulesha and will premiere this work
in her upcoming 2013-14 season in Canada and Mexico.
She maintains an active media presence and can be heard frequently on Canada’s
national broadcaster, on CBC Radio 2, Classical 96.3FM, on live Bravo! TV broadcasts
and Galaxie TV radio. Susan Hoeppner graduated from The Juilliard School in New York
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where she studied with the renowned flutist Julius Baker. An esteemed mentor herself,
Susan is on faculty at the Royal Conservatory of Music’s Glenn Gould School and the
University of Toronto. Each summer she joins the international music faculty at Le
Domaine Forget in Charlevoix, Québec to teach and perform. Ms. Hoeppner resides in
Toronto.
Fraser Jackson
Gramophone magazine calls Fraser Jackson “sophisticated” and “delightful,” and The
Double Reed has described his playing as “dazzling,” “awesome,” and “groovy.” He has
been the contrabassoonist and utility bassoonist of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra
since 1990 and has also performed and toured with such groups as the National
Symphony Orchestra (Washington, DC) and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
(Amsterdam). Fraser founded two chamber groups, The Caliban Quartet and Musica
Franca, whose recordings on the BIS, ATMA, and MSR Classics labels are known the
world over for their inventive programming, virtuosity, and stylistic variety.
Also in great demand as a bassoonist, Fraser is a regular member of Toronto’s premier
new-music ensembles, New Music Concerts and Soundstreams, and is a regular guest
of the Ottawa International Chamber Music Festival. On period bassoon and
contrabassoons, he has performed and recorded with the Aradia Ensemble and
Montreal Baroque Band and was a featured performer at the 2006 Grand River Baroque
Festival.
Fraser teaches bassoon and chamber music at the University of Toronto and The Glenn
Gould School of The Royal Conservatory, where he is also head of winds, brass, and
percussion. Known as a dedicated and innovative teacher, he has taught for many years
with such organizations as Le Festival du Domaine Forget, Le Camp musical des
Laurentides, the Toronto Symphony Youth Orchestra, Interprovincial Music Camp
(Ontario), and National Youth Orchestra of Canada. In 2002, he was the featured guest
artist at the 5th International Contrabassoon Festival in Park City, Utah.
Originally from Ottawa, Fraser holds music degrees from the Eastman School of Music
and University of Southern California. His principal teachers included David VanHoesen,
David Carroll, Christopher Millard, and Norman Herzberg.
Sarah Jeffrey
Sarah Jeffrey is principal oboe of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO), a position
she assumed during the 2005-06 season. She has previously held principal oboe
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positions with the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony Orchestra, Orchestre Symphonique de
Québec, and Windsor Symphony Orchestra.
This Toronto native holds a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Toronto, where
she studied with former principal oboe of the TSO, Richard Dorsey. As a recipient of the
Chalmers Award from the Ontario Arts Council, she continued her studies at the New
England Conservatory of Music in Boston, achieving a Masters' degree with Laura
Ahlbeck, former member of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra for 11 years and currently
principal oboe of the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra.
Sarah has performed as a recitalist, chamber musician, and soloist with numerous
orchestras. As a member of the Paragon Winds, she was awarded the Grand Prize at
the Coleman Chamber Music Competition in Pasadena, California, in 2000. Notable
engagements included Jacques Hetu's Concerto for Oboe and English Horn with the
Windsor Symphony Orchestra, performing as soloist on tour with the TSO, and
performing Bach's Concerto for Oboe and Violin with Itzhak Perlman and the TSO.
Sarah is on the faculties of the University of Toronto and The Glenn Gould School at
The Royal Conservatory.
Sasha Johnson (Alexander David Johnson)
Sasha Johnson began his musical training at age 16, studying brass chamber music and
tuba with Sam Pilafian at the Empire Brass Seminar of the Boston University
Tanglewood Institute. He went on to study at the University of Toronto with both Mark
Tetreault and Murray Crewe of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, with Toby Hanks at
the Manhattan School of Music, and with Alain Cazes at the Conservatoire de Musique
de Montréal. His additional private teachers have included Arnold Jacobs, Gene
Pokorny, Mel Culbertson, Dennis Miller, and Richard Erb.
In 1997, Sasha was the first Canadian tuba player to be accepted to the Von Karajan
Academy of the Berlin Philharmonic. This program trains a small number of young
professionals in the sound, style, traditions, and standard of the Berlin Philharmonic
Orchestra. Having begun his professional career in Berlin, Sasha went on to perform
with many other European orchestras including the Berlin Symphony, Berlin State
Opera, Radio Orchestra Berlin, Orchestre Symphonique de Radio France, Orchestre de
Paris, Ensemble Modern, and Orchestre National Bordeaux. He has performed in such
music festivals and concert venues as the Lucerne Festival, Festival d'Aix en Provence,
Concertgebouw, Wiener Konzerthaus, Theatre Champs-Elysées, Schleswig-Holstein
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Musik Festival, Salzburg Festival, and BBC Proms, under such eminent conductors as
Claudio Abbado, James Levine, Pierre Boulez, Kent Nagano, Essa-Pekka Salonen,
Charles Dutoit, Kurt Masur, and Seiji Ozawa.
Sasha returned to Canada in 2001 and has established himself as a prominent
performer and pedagogue. He performs regularly with Orchestre Symphonique de
Montréal. He is the instructor of tuba at The Royal Conservatory’s Glenn Gould School
and an instructor of low brass and chamber music at McGill University. In January 2009,
Sasha was appointed principal tuba of the National Ballet of Canada Orchestra.
David Kent
Toronto-born David Kent has been principal timpanist with the Toronto Symphony
Orchestra (TSO) since 1981. He received his Bachelor's and Master's degrees in music
from the University of Toronto. During the course of these studies he focused on new
music as well as ethnomusicology and anthropology. In addition to studying timpani
with Fred Hinger in New York, he studied the mrdangam with the Master South Indian
drummer Trichy Sankaran. While travelling throughout the world, David acquired an
extensive collection of percussion instruments from Africa, Asia, Indonesia, the
Caribbean, South America, and Europe.
Several new compositions have been written for and recorded by David, often
incorporating his instrument collection. These pieces include Henry Kucharzyk's Walk
The Line, John Hawkins's Breaking Through, and Claude Vivier's Cinque chansons pour
percussions. David has also played timpani with the World Philharmonic Orchestra and
has appeared as a soloist with the TSO, Festival Singers, New Music Concerts, National
Youth Orchestra, and ArrayMusic. He was a founding director of both ArrayMusic and
the Via Salzburg chamber music series. He is also active as a teacher and performer at
music festivals throughout Canada, and has contracted many orchestras such as those
for the Three Tenors concerts.
Nadina Mackie Jackson
According to the National Post, “…Jackson performs with effortless musicality, making
the bassoon sound like a human voice.” One of the world’s leading bassoon soloists,
Nadina’s seven solo recordings feature repertoire ranging from the baroque and
classical sonatas and concerti to contemporary love songs and show pieces. More
recent releases includeBacchanale and Romanza on the MSR label with Guy Few and
the Toronto Chamber Orchestra.
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Performing frequently as a recitalist with piano, strings, or alone in venues ranging from
the outdoor Music Garden in Toronto to international recital halls and orchestral stages,
more than a dozen new works have been written for her as a soloist and with artists
such as Guy Few, Patrick Gallois, David Swan, and The Caliban Quartet of Bassoonists.
Heard regularly on CBC Radio, National Public Radio, and at North American festivals
such as Domaine Forget, Scotiafest, Windfest, Grand River Baroque, and the Ottawa
Chamber Music Festival, Nadina was a featured soloist at the 2006 and 2007
conventions of the International Double Reed Society.
An active chamber musician, she has formed many chamber groups in Toronto and
Montreal, including The Caliban Quartet of Bassoonists, the baroque chamber group
Musica Franca, and Duo Affinité with fellow soloist Guy Few. “Few and Jackson play
with polished tone, immaculate intonation, and infectious high spirits; it's obvious
they're having a blast.” (All Music Guide, 2007)
As an orchestral musician, Nadina records and performs as principal bassoon of the
Toronto Chamber Orchestra, the baroque ensemble Aradia, and often with Les Violons
du Roy. She has served as principal bassoonist of the Canadian Opera Company
Orchestra, and spent the first decade of her career as a member of the Montreal
Symphony Orchestra, participating in more than 50 recordings on London Decca.
Nadina is on faculty at Wilfrid Laurier University, University of Toronto, and The Royal
Conservatory's Glenn Gould School. A founding member of The Council of Canadian
Bassoonists, she is also on the advisory board for the Meg Quigley Vivaldi Competition.
Andrew McCandless
Andrew McCandless has held the position of principal trumpet with the Toronto
Symphony Orchestra since 1999. A native of Louisville, Kentucky, he began playing the
trumpet at age nine, focusing on marching band and jazz until his first experience
playing classical music at the Youth Performing Arts School in Louisville. Subsequently,
he studied the trumpet at Boston University and the Eastman School of Music. At age
20 and in his junior year of college, he was offered his first orchestral position as
coprincipal trumpet of the Savannah Symphony.
Building upon his orchestral experience, Andrew left Savannah for appointments with
the Kansas City Symphony as associate principal trumpet, the Buffalo Philharmonic as
principal trumpet, and the San Francisco Symphony as associate principal trumpet.
Dr. Frank Morelli
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Frank Morelli, bassoon, studied with Stephen Maxym at the Manhattan and Juilliard
schools of music, and holds the distinction of being the first bassoonist to be awarded a
doctorate by the Juilliard School.
Since his Carnegie Hall concerto debut in 1973, Mr. Morelli has been heard
internationally as a soloist and with chamber and orchestral ensembles. One of the
most active bassoonists recording today, he has well over one hundred recordings for
major record labels to his credit. His performances and recording of the Mozart bassoon
concerto with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra on the Deutsche Grammophon label met
with international critical acclaim, and his recording of Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante for
Winds and Orchestra with Orpheus for Nonesuch Records was named Recording of
Special Merit by Stereo Review. Mr. Morelli’s recording with Orpheus of Copland’s
Appalachian Spring won a 1990 Grammy nomination for best classical recording, and
his recording with Orpheus of music by Stravinsky, Shadow Dances, won a Grammy in
2001.
Mr. Morelli has appeared often with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and is
principal bassoonist of the New York City Opera Orchestra, Orpheus, Brooklyn
Philharmonic, and the American Composers Orchestra. He is a member of the acclaimed
woodwind quintet Windscape. He is the editor of Stravinsky: Difficult Passages, a
collection of excerpts published by Boosey and Hawkes. He also serves on the faculties
of the Juilliard School, the Manhattan School of Music, Stony Brook University, and Yale.
Gabriel Radford
Gabriel was born and raised in Toronto, Canada. He is currently Third Horn of the
Toronto Symphony Orchestra, a position he has held since 2002. Prior to joining the
TSO, Gabriel was Associate Principal Horn of the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra.
Over the course of his career, Gabriel has played with many orchestras, including
several guest appearances and Carnegie Hall performances with the Boston Symphony
Orchestra and Les Violons du Roy. He has also played with the National Arts Centre
Orchestra, the Kirov Orchestra, l’Orchestre Symphonique de Quebec, and many others.
In recent years, chamber music highlights have included commissioning and performing
“Chaconne” by Toronto Composer Erik Ross for Horn, Oboe and Piano, a solo
appearance with the Evergreen Gamelan Ensemble, performances of the Brahms Trio,
the Reinecke Trio and the Schubert Octet. In October he will perform the premiere of
“rhapsody” for Horn, Oboe and Orchestra.
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Gabriel is a devoted teacher. He has given lectures and masterclasses at the University
of Lethbridge, University of Toronto, Glenn Gould School, University of Manitoba, and
others. Gabriel has spent several summers teaching in the Masterclass program at the
Banff Centre for the Arts, teaches a full studio of students at the University of Toronto,
and is a member of the faculty at the National Youth Orchestra Canada. Gabriel was
honoured to adjudicate auditions for the first-ever YouTube Symphony Orchestra.
In July 2012, he was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for his
work fundraising, mentoring, coaching and teaching at the National Youth Orchestra
Canada.
Gabriel is married to, and has two children with Sarah Jeffrey, Principal Oboist of the
Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Dr. Kathleen Rudolph
Kathleen Rudolph has been hailed as "a major artist" (CD Review) and as "a virtuoso
flutist" (Washington Star). The principal flute of the CBC Radio Orchestra, she is much
in demand as a recitalist, chamber musician, and teacher. After 17 years of playing
piccolo and serving as assistant principal flute with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra,
Kathleen was appointed teacher of flute and wind coordinator of The Glenn Gould
School at The Royal Conservatory in Toronto. She is also an adjunct professor at the
University of Western Ontario.
Kathleen has performed in some of the most prestigious chamber music series in the
United States and Canada, including Masterpiece Music, the Vancouver Chamber Music
Festival, Music in the Morning, the Sarasota Festival, Ottawa Chamber Music Festival,
and Tanglewood.
While a student, Kathleen was a member of the Kennedy Center Opera House
Orchestra and the orchestra at the Wolf Trap Center for the Performing Arts. She was
previously principal flute of the Vancouver Opera Orchestra and has been guest
principal of the National Arts Centre Orchestra.
Often featured as a soloist with the CBC Radio Orchestra, Kathleen gave the North
American broadcast premiere of the Strathclyde Concerto No. 6by Sir Peter Maxwell
Davies, with the composer conducting; and the Canadian premiere of Paul
Schoenfeld's Klezmer Rondos. The CBC commissioned a concerto for flute and marimba
by John Wyre of Nexus, to be performed by Kathleen and her husband John Rudolph.
She gives frequent concerts for flute, viola, and percussion with her husband and
daughter.
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Kathleen has recorded a solo CD on the CBC Musica Viva label (Silver Sounds for Flute)
and is featured with the orchestra on Entre Amis,Northern Landscapes, and Stravinsky
and Somers.
The recipient of a Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the Catholic University of America,
Kathleen was an adjunct professor at the University of British Columbia and on the
faculty of the Vancouver Academy of Music and the Courtenay Youth Music Centre. She
has given master classes at the Shanghai Conservatory, the Montreal Conservatory,
Wilfrid Laurier University, and the Orford Centre for the Arts. Her former students hold
positions in orchestras in Canada and the United States.
John Rudolph
John Rudolph was appointed principal percussionist of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra
(TSO) in 1997. He was formerly principal percussionist of the Vancouver Symphony
Orchestra and the CBC Vancouver Orchestra for 21 seasons. John appeared often as
featured soloist in Vancouver, including pops, family, masterworks, and new-music
series concerts. Other solo appearances have included the Edmonton, Okanagan, and
Peterborough Symphony Orchestras, the Pacific Symphonic Wind Ensemble, University
of British Columbia Wind Ensemble, and US Air Force Band in Washington, DC. He has
also been featured in TSO primary school concerts and family concerts with Percussion
Power, a special program he developed for young audiences.
John can be heard frequently on CBC radio and in numerous chamber music and
orchestral recordings. In addition, he has been invited to perform with the percussion
sections of the Calgary, Montreal, and National Symphony Orchestras. His teachers
have included Alan Abel of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Tony Ames of the National
Symphony Orchestra, and Russell Hartenberger of the University of Toronto and Nexus.
He teaches at The Royal Conservatory's Glenn Gould School, the University of Toronto,
and National Youth Orchestra, and coaches the percussion section of the Toronto
Symphony Youth Orchestra. John was formerly adjunct professor of music at the
University of British Columbia.
Joaquin Valdepeñas
Winner of the 2004 Juno Award for best classical record (Jacques Hétu Concertos),
Joaquin Valdepeñas is considered one of the most prominent classical musicians in
Canada. He has conducted the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) more than a dozen
times, as well as the New Creations Festival at Roy Thompson Hall, and was one of the
conductors at the Aspen Music Festival.
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Considered one of the most distinguished clarinetists in the world, Joaquin is principal
clarinetist of the TSO and makes international appearances as soloist, chamber
musician, and conductor. He has performed at festivals throughout the world including
those of Aspen, Banff, Curitiba (Brazil), Casals, Edinburgh, Marlboro, Mostly Mozart,
Nagano (Japan), and Vancouver.
Joaquin has performed with musicians Barbara Bonney, Kathleen Battle, Joshua Bell,
Cho Liang Lin, Vladimir Feltsman, Glenn Gould, Steven Isserlis, Yo-Yo Ma, Nadja
Salerno-Sonnenberg, and Pinchas Zukerman. He has collaborated with the American,
Emerson, Muir, St. Lawrence, Orford, and Ying string quartets, the Kalichstein-LaredoRobinson Trio, the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and the International
Sejong Soloists. Commissioning many works by Canadian composers, Joaquin gave the
American premiere of Arias for clarinet and orchestra by Michael Colgrass with the
Buffalo Philharmonic.
As a conductor, soloist, and clarinet coach and teacher, he has taken part in the Aspen
Music Festival and School for over 10 years. The Aspen Music Festival and School is an
internationally renowned classical music festival that presents the world's finest music in
an intimate, small-town setting. This performance is part of the nine-week summer
Festival that comprises more than 200 events, including orchestral concerts, chamber
music, opera, contemporary music, master classes, lectures, and children's programs.
Joaquin made his European debut with the BBC-Welsh Symphony on BBC television,
with Sir Andrew Davis conducting, and has recorded the Mozart Clarinet Concerto with
the English Orchestra (Summit DCD131). He has also recorded extensively for CBC,
Centrediscs, Naxos, Sony, and Summit and was featured in a PBS documentary about
the Aspen Music Festival, as clarinetist and conductor. He is a faculty member of The
Glenn Gould School, and many of his past students hold positions in orchestras around
the world. As an exclusive Yamaha artist, he was instrumental in the design of the new
CSG Yamaha clarinet combining the French and German traditions into a unique voice.
Joaquin’s chamber group the Amici Ensemble released the CD Majestic Flair, featuring
music by composer Chan Ka Nin (on the CBC label), and a disc of D'Indy and Bruch on
the Naxos label. The entire set of Luciano Berio's Sequenzas has also been released on
the Naxos label. Joaquin is the Resident Conductor of the Royal Conservatory
Orchestra.
Gordon Wolfe
Gordon Wolfe joined the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) in 2001 as associate
principal trombone and took over the role of principal trombone in 2006. In addition to
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his work with the TSO, Gordon has spent much of his time south of the border as
principal trombone of the Lancaster Summer Festival Orchestra in Ohio, the Colorado
Music Festival Orchestra in Boulder, and the Sun Valley Summer Symphony in Idaho.
Prior to his move to Toronto, he held positions with the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra
and the Victoria Symphony Orchestra. He has also performed as a guest with the Los
Angeles Philharmonic and the National Arts Centre Orchestra.
Outside of his orchestral work, Gordon has been featured as a soloist with the TSO,
Orchestra Toronto, and Hannaford Street Silver Band. He was a founding member of
the Central Park Brass, a privately funded ensemble with the goal of providing free
concerts and musical education for young people in New York's Central Park throughout
the summer.
Hailing from British Columbia, Gordon received his musical training at the University of
Victoria and McGill University, studying with Ian McDougall, Peter Sullivan, and Thomas
Eadie. He has been consistently active as a teacher, previously on faculty at the
University of Manitoba and University of Toronto, and currently The Royal
Conservatory's Glenn Gould School.
THEORY/HIST/COMP
Dean Burry
Dean Burry was born in St. John’s, Newfoundland in 1972, but grew up in the small
town of Gander. As both his parents’ families came from small outport communities, he
spent a great deal of time by the ocean and out in his father’s boat. Music is in the
blood of Newfoundlanders, and it was in this environment that Burry began his own
artistic journey. Early piano lessons were not completely satisfying, and it wasn’t until a
teacher encouraged his desire for composition, at age 10, that music became a
passion. Theatre was another great interest and soon he was writing plays and music
for the school drama club. His first produced script, Good Gods, won the local drama
festival in 1987.
Following high school, Burry began studies as a saxophone major at Mount Allison
University in Sackville, New Brunswick. In seeking ways to combine his love of theatre
and music, he began composing operas and musicals. In his firsts three years at Mt.A,
he wrote, produced and conducted three major dramatic musical works: The
Resurrection, Joe and Mary Had a Baby and Unto the Earth: Vignettes of a War.
Shortly after completing composition studies at the University of Toronto, Burry began
working in the box office at the Canadian Opera Company while composing incidental
music for small theatrical productions. Working in the box office was the opening he
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needed to begin immersing himself in the Canadian opera world. Most lunches were
spent upstairs in the library or chatting with the Education and Outreach
Coordinator. He was able to attend rehearsals and learn a great deal about the ways to
create successful opera. In 1997, Burry was hired to create and run the After-school
Opera Program; a community program designed to expose children to all the elements
of opera. The program has met with great success and is approaching its fifteenth
season.
In 1998, while working as an educator with the Canadian Opera Company in Toronto,
he was commissioned to write The Brothers Grimm. The opera was a great success
and was the first work to put the composer on a national stage. The Brothers
Grimm has been seen by over 150,000 school children across Canada, the United States
and Europe since 2001. In December, 2012, the Canadian Opera Company celebrated
the 500th performance of the opera with a fairy tale festival called GrimmFest. The
performance coincided with the 200th anniversary of the publication of the Grimm’s
work. The Brothers Grimm is believed to be the most performed Canadian opera ever
and possibly the most performed 21st century opera.
Other major works include Under the Night, The Heart That Knows and Home and
Away for Live Bait Theatre, Songs of the Island for the Charlottetown Festival,The
Hobbit and The Secret World of OG for the Canadian Children’s Opera Company, Isis
and the Seven Scorpions for the Canadian Opera Company, Pandora’s Locker for The
Glenn Gould School, A Creature of Habit and Beacon of Light for Rising Tide
Theatre. The Mummers’ Masque for Toronto Masque Theatre, the CBC serial radio
opera Baby Kintyre (subsequently nominated for a Prix Italia International Broadcast
Award) The Bremen Town Musicians with Opera Lyra, Angela and Her Sisters for the
University of Manitoba and The Vinland Traveler and Le nez de la sorcière for Memorial
University of Newfoundland. Current projects include a setting of the Alfred Noyes
poem The Highwayman for soprano and chamber ensemble and The Sword in the
Schoolyard, a King Arthur opera for Toronto's VIVA! Youth Singers. Burry’s radio
opera, Baby Kintyre (commissioned by CBC Radio) was nominated for a Prix Italia and
he was given the prestigious Louis Applebaum Composers Award in 2011 for his work in
music for young people.
Dr. Brian Current
A 2005 Guggenheim Fellow and recipient of the 2003 Barlow Prize, Brian Current has
established himself as one of North America's leading young composers. His music,
lauded and performed internationally as well as broadcast in over 35 countries, is
renowned for its energy, wit, and daring bravado.
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Other recent prizes include the Selected Work (under 30) at the International Rostrum
of Composers in Paris and the Grand Prize in the CBC National Competition for Young
Composers, Canada's highest distinction for composers under 30 years old.
The Ottawa native studied music at McGill University in Montreal with Bengt Hambreaus
and John Rea. He later completed his PhD in composition on full fellowship from the
University of California at Berkeley in 2002, where he was also active as a conductor. In
2000, he was chosen as a participant in the National Arts Centre's conductor training
workshop with Jorma Panula and Pinchas Zukerman. Brian has since been featured
conducting his own music and other works with New Music Concerts, Soundstreams,
CBC's In Performance, and the Esprit Orchestra's New Waves Festival.
Brian's music has been performed across North America and abroad by the American
Composers Orchestra (Carnegie Hall), Esprit Orchestra, Oakland Symphony,
Indianapolis Symphony, Winnipeg Symphony, Warsaw National Philharmonic, Deagu
Ensemble (Korea), CBC Radio Orchestra, Nouvel Ensemble Moderne, Gryphon Trio,
Sirius Ensemble, and others.
In 2002, his work For the Time Being opened the inaugural concert of the Warsaw
Autumn Festival, conducted by Antoni Wit. The piece has now been released
commercially on the Atma label.
"Brian Current toyed with speeds and textures, using the orchestra in much the same
way that a precomputer electronic musician might use a tape deck. Different sections
played at different tempos… Occasionally, almost from nowhere, a brief passage of
straightforward symphonic chords would emerge and then dissolve into the changeable
fabric." - Allan Kozinn, about Symphonies in Slanted Time (The New York Times), May
2006
Eve Egoyan
Eve Egoyan is an artist whose medium is the piano. Her performances encompass
extremely contrasting sensibilities: from Alvin Curran’s five-hour long Inner Cities to Erik
Satie’s miniatures; from minimalist Simple Lines of Enquiry by Ann Southam to
maximalist complexity works by Michael Finnissy; from the barely audible to roaring
overtone-filled resonances; from the rigorous interpretation of a score to free
improvisation.
Eve Egoyan has firmly established herself as an internationally recognized interpreter of
contemporary piano concert music. She has won numerous awards and consistently
receives acclaim for her performances and recordings. Renowned composers James
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Tenney (U.S./Canada), Alvin Curran (U.S.), Ann Southam (Canada), Rudolf Komorous
(Canada), Maria de Alvear (Germany), Michael Finnissy (Britain) and Jo Kondo (Japan)
amongst others have written for her. She continues to commission works and is
presently exploring writing for herself (Chalmers Arts Fellowship). Egoyan’s definitive
style continues to take her to new levels of artistic achievement, creative collaboration
and audience engagement. In 2016 she begins to tour Earwitness, an umbrella name
given to a group of works commissioned by Eve exploring sound and visual elements.
Through this meeting of sound and image, audience members are able to deepen their
experience of both art forms.
Eve has released nine critically acclaimed discs, eight of works by living composers and
one disc of works by Erik Satie. Her discs have been selected as "Top Classical Disc of
the Year", The Globe and Mail (2011), and one of "Ten Top" classical discs, The New
Yorker magazine (2009). Her most recent disc, "5", world première recordings by Ann
Southam, received four out of four stars by the Toronto Star and was the featured disc
of the week on New York's classical radio station WQXR. Her first disc,
“thethingsinbetween" (1999), was selected one of the top ten discs of any genre byThe
Globe and Mail. These accolades are particularly remarkable for contemporary solo
piano repertoire of mostly Canadian compositions.
Honours include numerous commissions and awards from the Canada Council, Ontario
and Toronto Arts Councils, FACTOR, a University of Victoria Distinguished Alumna
Award, a K.M. Hunter Award, a Chalmers Award and a Chalmers Arts Fellowship. Eve is
a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada (FRSC) and one of fifty Canadian performers
and conductors given the designation of "CMC Ambassador" by the Canadian Music
Centre. Eve was recently selected as one of the 25 greatest Canadian classical pianists
by the CBC.
Dr. Julia Galieva-Szokolay
Since her arrival in Toronto in 1995 Julia Galieva-Szokolay has taught piano, music
theory, music history, aural skills, and musicianship at The Royal Conservatory.
She studied with the distinguished Russian musicologists Yuri Kholopov, Valentina
Kholopova, Mark Aranovsky, and Tatiana Tcherednichenko.
Dr. Galieva-Szokolay has presented at Music Theory Professional Development
workshops and seminars in Toronto, Vancouver, and Edmonton. She has presented
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academic research papers at the University of Toronto, the University of Calgary,
György Kurtág 80 Festival in Budapest, the Hungarian Cultural Center in Paris, and the
State Tchaikovsky Conservatory in Moscow.
Julia is a music history and harmony examiner, a member of the College of Examiners,
and a senior harmony specialist.
Dr. Galieva-Szokolay continues to conduct academic research, specializing in the music
of Eastern and Central-Eastern Europe. She has published several articles on the works
of György Kurtág and other contemporary composers of Hungary and Russia.
Dr. George Thurgood
George Thurgood studied composition and arranging at the Berklee College of Music.
He also studied with Reginald Godden, Antonin Kubalek, Derek Holman, and Talivaldis
Kenins. A composer, church organist, and founding member of the new-music
organization Continuum, George has been active for many years as a pianist in jazz and
popular music. His teaching spans piano, theory, and music history at the University of
Toronto. A member of the American Federation of Music and the Society of Composers,
Authors and Music Publishers of Canada, George is Chair of The Royal Conservatory’s
theory department. He has been a faculty member since 1990.
HUMANITIES
Tanya Bénard
Tanya Bénard serves on the faculty of the Glenn Gould School, teaching an ongoing
Alexander Technique program that she developed. She first discovered the Technique
while pursuing a career as a professional clarinettist, and was so impressed with its
benefits that she decided to train as a teacher. Tanya specializes in working with
musicians. In addition to her work with the students in the professional training
program, Tanya also offers private lessons in the Alexander Technique through the
Royal Conservatory School, and is very active as a workshop presenter and
clinician. Past presentations have included the Toronto Musicians’ Union (AFM Local
149), the Ontario Registered Music Teachers’ Association and the Ontario Music
Educators’ Association, as well as various local and national conferences and musical
organizations.
Tanya serves as the Alexander Technique teacher in residence at various summer music
institutes and festivals. She is a member of both the Canadian and the American
Societies of Teachers of the Alexander Technique, as well as the Performing Arts
Medicine Association.
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As a clarinettist, Tanya has performed with the Winston-Salem Piedmont Triad
Symphony, the Salisbury Symphony, and the Carolina Chamber Symphony, and has
been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Sarah Graham Kenan Scholarship,
runner-up in the International Music Program Concerto Competition, a Semans Art Fund
Career Development Grant, and First Prize in the Euterpe Music Competition.
In addition to her training and experience as a performer, Tanya is also trained as a
teacher of musicianship. She has taught music and movement in a wide range of
settings, has served as a music festival adjudicator, and has helped to train music
teachers, both through the Toronto District School Board and the Royal Conservatory
School. Tanya has been awarded the Gunild Keetman Scholarship (Carl Orff Canada),
the Keith Bissell Scholarship (Carl Orff Canada), and the Robert & Donna Wood
Scholarship (Early Childhood Music Association). She is a member of the Early
Childhood Music Association of Ontario and Music for Children - Carl Orff
Canada. Tanya joined The Royal Conservatory faculty in 2005.
Dr. John Chong
After an injury to his right hand from piano performance at age 14, John went on to
study electronic music, composition, electrical engineering, medicine, clinical
epidemiology and biostatistics, occupational health, public health and preventive
medicine, acupuncture, and psychotherapy. As the Medical Director of the Musicians’
Clinics of Canada, he has treated musicians with repetitive strain injuries, motor control
problems, anxiety, depression, neuropathic pain, nerve entrapments, and stress-related
disorders since 1986. His current clinical and research interest is regulation of the
autonomic nervous system using neuro-biofeedback techniques for the prevention of
repetitive strain injuries, focal dystonia, chronic pain, and depression. He was a
founding member and is now the President-Elect of the Performing Arts Medicine
Association. He teaches Performance Awareness at the Glenn Gould School, Royal
Conservatory of Music in Toronto.
Dr. Burke Cullen
Dr. Burke Cullen received his PhD in English Literature from UofT, his MA from UBC and
his BA (Hons) from Carleton. His research interests include English Composition,
Canadian Literature, Canadian Folk Music, and Professional Communication. During his
graduate work he studied under W.J. Keith, W.H. New, and Sherrill Grace. His thesis
carved out the first full-length study of British Columbia fiction, and he has published
and presented on a range of Canadian figures, including Douglas Coupland, Ethel
Wilson, and Malcolm Lowry. As well as teaching the first-year English composition and
literature courses in the Glenn Gould School, Burke Cullen is a full-time professor at
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[email protected], where he also serves as Seneca’s Academic Liaison for York University’s
partnered Programme in Professional Writing. He has been with the RCM for 10 years.
Lise Hosein
Lise Hosein is a writer, curator, and doctoral candidate at the University of Toronto,
specializing in the role of animals and violence in contemporary art. In addition, she is a
former President of the Board of Directors at Mercer Union, A Centre for Contemporary
Art. Lise teaches at the Ontario College of Art and Design, the University of Toronto,
and The Royal Conservatory.
Andrew Kwan
Since 1991, Andrew J. Kwan has developed and cultivated his agency, Andrew Kwan
Artists Management Inc. (AKAM) to continue its initial goal: the successful career
development of Canadian artists both domestically and internationally. He represents
many of Canada's finest classical instrumentalists--Jane Coop, Gryphon Trio, Anagnoson
& Kinton, to name a few. It remains the philosophy that AKAM represents artists of the
highest calibre, and is totally committed to the nurturing of these artists. AKAM
continues to provide management services, tour management, and production support
for the artists on the roster as well as a variety of artists and special projects.
In addition to his management firm, Andrew has served as an advisor or panellist to the
arts councils of Ontario, British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, The
Canada Council, and the Honens International Piano Competition. He also enjoys being
an educator on the subject of career development for young artists. In Canada, he has
been invited to present workshops at many provincial conferences as well as lecture at
various universities. Internationally, he has been invited to hold workshops in Ohio,
California, and the European Access Symposium in Brussels, Belgium. In 2005, he
advised and contributed to The Canada Council for the Arts online publication
artsontour.ca, a guide for touring artists and concert presenters.
Andrew has been on the faculty of The Royal Conservatory’s Glenn Gould School since
1996 as the Humanities Department representative. At The Glenn Gould School, he
offers courses on career management and communications. He is also on the Faculty of
Music at the University of Toronto, lecturing on the business of music. Prior to entering
the artists management industry, he held a business administrative position at The
Royal Conservatory and a financial analyst role in Toronto. Andrew holds a Bachelor of
Arts in Economics as well as a Non-Profit Management and Leadership Diploma, both
from York University. He also holds diplomas in piano performance from The Royal
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Conservatory and Trinity College (London, England), whereby he is a fellow of the
College.
William Littler
William (Richard Arthur) Littler. Critic, teacher, b Vancouver 12 Jul 1940; BA (British
Columbia) 1963. He began piano lessons at 11 with Dorothea Limpus, a pupil of J.D.A.
Tripp, and studied theory with Limpus, A.B. Hendrickson, and Desmond BurdonMurphy. Though a general arts student at the University of British Columbia, he
attended Harry Adaskin's classes in the repertoire of music and Leonard Wilson's in
criticism. He wrote his first music reviews for the university paper Ubyssey and in 1962
began freelancing for the Vancouver Sun. He joined that daily as music and dance critic
in 1963 and remained there until 1966, when he was appointed music critic of
the Toronto Daily Star, a position he continued to hold in 1991. In 1971 he added
regular dance criticism to his duties at the Star, and in that connection took summer
courses in dance music, technique, composition, and criticism at Connecticut College in
1971 and 1972.
Littler's concurrent career as a broadcaster began in 1964 in Vancouver and continued
in Toronto. His reviews have been heard frequently on many different CBC radio series.
While in Vancouver he was writer and host for the 1965 nine-week CBC TV series
'Summer Concert'. In Toronto he was writer-host for CBC TV specials on the NACO and
the TS.
Littler began giving courses in music and the theatre, and in dance criticism, at York
University in 1974, and he directed a workshop in interdisciplinary criticism there in
1978. He has given courses at McMaster University, the University of Waterloo, and
the RCMT, and has been a guest lecturer at other universities in Canada and the USA.
He has served on numerous performance and composition juries, both in Canada and
the USA.
Littler was vice-president 1969-77 of the Music Critics' Association, and in 1973 he
participated in the first Canada-US exchange organized by that association, trading
positions for the summer with the music critic of the Houston Post. In 1974 he became
the founding chairman of the Dance Critics' Association of North America. He directed
the first Critics' Institute in Canadian Music, held in 1975 in Toronto, Ottawa, and
Montreal. Littler was a founding vice-president in 1986 of the Paris-based International
Music Critics' Association and continued as a board member in 1990.
Littler's own occasionally equivocating reviews have become known for their graceful
and amusing prose style and balanced argument. As well as regularly in the Toronto
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Star, they have appeared occasionally in the Edmonton Journal, the New York
Times, Opera News, Opera Canada, The Canadian, Today, and several dance
publications. He has written for Encyclopedia Americana and prepared liner notes for
CBC, Deutsche Harmonia Mundi, Golden Crest, Moss Music Group, and Sefel recordings.
He was the first music critic to receive the National Newspaper Award for critical writing
in 1980. In 1990 he was the recipient of the Roy Thomson Hall Award.
Master Class Teachers
Leon Fleisher
Mr. Fleisher is the inaugural Ihnatowycz Chair in Piano at the Royal Conservatory.
Renowned pianist and conductor Leon Fleisher is a native of San Francisco, where he
began his keyboard studies at age four and gave his first public recital at age eight. One
year later he became a student of the legendary Artur Schnabel. In 1944, at age 16,
Mr. Fleisher made his debut with the New York Philharmonic under Pierre Monteux. He
went on to become the first American to win the Queen Elisabeth International
Competition in Belgium. Regular appearances with orchestras and in recital on the
world's great concert stages followed. His celebrated collaboration with George Szell
and the Cleveland Orchestra resulted in a series of recordings, among them the
Beethoven and Brahms piano concertos, which have remained touchstones of the
classical catalogue to this day.
Midway through the 1964-65 season, Mr. Fleisher's illustrious career was interrupted by
the onset of a debilitating ailment affecting his right hand, later diagnosed as focal
dystonia. During the intervening years, he devoted his musical career to teaching,
conducting (which he has pursued actively since 1967) and, eventually, to the left-hand
alone piano literature. His performances and recordings of the repertoire for the left
hand, beginning in the 1980s, won him immediate critical and popular acclaim, as well
as two Grammy nominations for his Sony Classical recordings (both solo works for the
left hand and the Ravel and Prokofiev concertos). It was in 1995, at a concert with the
Cleveland Orchestra, that Mr. Fleisher was able to play the Mozart Concerto in A Major,
K. 414 successfully with both hands again. He now performs both the left-hand
repertoire and select works for two hands.
Mr. Fleisher has performed the Brahms Piano Concerto No. 1 with the San Francisco
Symphony (under Michael Tilson Thomas), the Orchestre de Paris (under Carlo Maria
Giulini), the Berlin Staatsoper Orchestra (under Daniel Barenboim), and the Chicago
Symphony (under Ivan Fischer), among other orchestras. He has also continued to play
the Mozart Concerto K. 414 with such orchestras as the Boston Symphony, Chicago
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Symphony (at Ravinia), Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, New York Chamber Symphony,
Chamber Orchestra of Europe (which he also conducted), and the Ravel Piano Concerto
for the Left Hand with the Toronto Symphony, Indianapolis Symphony, BBC Symphony,
and Orchestre de Paris (as soloist on its European tour in the fall of 1997). His recitals,
which have included appearances in Vienna and London (Wigmore Hall), combine twohand and left-hand alone repertoire.
Mr. Fleisher's reputation as a conductor was quickly established when he founded the
Theatre Chamber Players at the Kennedy Center in 1967 and became music director of
the Annapolis Symphony in 1970. He made his New York conducting debut at the 1970
Mostly Mozart Festival. In 1973, he became associate conductor of the Baltimore
Symphony. Since that time he has appeared as guest conductor with the Boston
Symphony, Chicago Symphony, Cleveland Orchestra, Detroit Symphony, Montreal
Symphony, and the San Francisco Symphony, among others. He conducted his first
opera in Baltimore during the 1988-89 season. He also had a regular association with
the New Japan Philharmonic as its principal guest conductor, leading the orchestra in a
series of concerts each season, as well as with the Chamber Music Orchestra of Europe
and the Gustav Mahler Chamber Orchestra.
Holder of the Andrew W. Mellon Chair at the Peabody Conservatory of Music since
1959, Mr. Fleisher also serves on the faculties of the Curtis Institute of Music in
Philadelphia and The Royal Conservatory. From 1986–97, he was artistic director of the
Tanglewood Music Center. Teaching has been an important element of his activities at
the Aspen, Lucerne, Ravinia, and Verbier festivals, among others. He has also given
master classes at the Salzburg Mozarteum, the Paris Conservatory, the Ravel Academy
at St. Jean de Luz, the Reina Sofia School in Madrid, the Mishkenot in Jerusalem, and
the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
Mr. Fleisher holds honorary doctorates from The Juilliard School, the Cleveland Institute
of Music, the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, and Towson University, and he is a
Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 1994, Musical America named
him Instrumentalist of the Year. He has also been the recipient of The Johns Hopkins
University's President's Medal. In addition, he received the Decoration of Commander in
the Order of King Leopold II from the Belgian government in 2000. That year Mr.
Fleisher became the first living pianist to be inducted into the Classical Music Hall of
Fame.
Leslie Kinton
Leslie Kinton was born in Toronto, and was a scholarship student at the Royal
Conservatory of Music where he studied the piano with Pierre Souvairan and Boris
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Berlin, and composition with Samuel Dolin. He also studied the piano in New York City
with Jeaneane Dowis and Karl Ulrich Schnabel. Mr. Kinton is a Ph.D. candidate in music
theory at the University of Toronto with a specialization in Schenkerian analysis; for his
dissertation, he is working on an exhaustive study of Dvořák’s Symphony # 7 with two
of the world’s most renowned Schenkerian theorists, David Beach and Edward Laufer.
From 1976 to the present, as a member of the Anagnoson & Kinton piano duo, Leslie
Kinton has performed throughout North America, Europe, and Asia. The duo has
played with the major orchestras across Canada including the Toronto Symphony
Orchestra, the Winnipeg Symphony, the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony, the Calgary
Philharmonic, Symphony Nova Scotia, the Victoria Symphony, and the C.B.C. Vancouver
Orchestra. Anagnoson & Kinton are on C.B.C. radio almost every week, and they have
also broadcast on the B.B.C., National Public Radio in the U.S.A., Hilversum Radio in
Holland, Hong Kong Radio, and Radio Suisse Romande. In December, 2004, they had
an eight-concert tour of China, and returned for another eight concerts in October of
2006. In December of 2007, they are performing in Prague as part of the annual
Martinu Festival in the Czech Republic. Anagnoson & Kinton recordings include
"Poulenc and Matton concertos, with Stravinsky, Milhaud" (CBC SM 5000), "Complete 2Piano Suites of Arensky" (CBC Musica Viva); "Complete Slavonic Dances of Dvořák"
(CBC Musica Viva); "Mozart 2-Piano Sonata, Gallant, Clementi" (IBS), "Carnival of the
Animals" (CBC SM 5000), "2-Piano Works by Gershwin" (Pro Arte), "Premiere Recording
of 'The Miraculous Mandarin'" (Melbourne), "Debussy, Satie, Weber, Klein" (National
Ballet), "Ravel, Strauss, Lutoslawski, Gallant" (Scrimshaw).
Leslie Kinton is one of Canada’s best-known and most sought-after chamber
musicians. Fellow artists he has performed with include Bryan Epperson, the St.
Lawrence Quartet, Martin Beaver, Ifor James, Joel Quarrington, the Amici Chamber
Ensemble, Erika Raum, Steven Dann, Mark Fewer, Dennis Brott, James Sommerville,
James Campbell, Joaquin Valdepeñas, Raymond Luedeka, Avram Galper, Nora Shulman,
the York Winds, and actor Colin Fox (for Strauss’s Enoch Arden).
Mr. Kinton is a founding member of ARC (Artists of the Royal Conservatory), the
resident chamber ensemble of The Glenn Gould School. He is on the faculties of both
The Glenn Gould School at The Royal Conservatory of Music, and the Faculty of Music
at the University of Toronto.
Nora Shulman
Nora Shulman joined the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) in 1974 and has been the
principal flautist since 1986. The Los Angeles native has performed at the Berkshire
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Music Center in Tanglewood and the Aspen Music Festival and has been a member of
the Denver Symphony Orchestra.
As a soloist, she has appeared with many orchestras including the Detroit Symphony,
National Arts Centre Orchestra, and the TSO. An active chamber performer, Nora has
participated in the Faculty Artists' Series of the University of Toronto, the Guelph Spring
Festival, and Ottawa Chamber Music Festival. She has recorded for CBC Records and
the Naxos, Centrediscs, and Marquis labels. She has collaborated on disc with such
artists as Judy Loman, Norbert Kraft, Karina Gauvin, and Catherine Robbin.
An influential teacher of the flute, Nora is an adjunct associate professor at the
University of Toronto's Faculty of Music in addition to faculty member at The Royal
Conservatory.
Dianne Werner
After initial training at The Royal Conservatory with Margaret Parsons-Poole, Ms.
Werner continued her studies with Peter Katin, György Sebok, and Alicia de Larrocha.
She went on to win a number of major prizes including the Silver Medal at the
prestigious Viotti-Valsesia International Piano Competition in Italy and second prize in
the Young Keyboard Artists Association Competition in the United States. Ms. Werner
also received a number of major awards in Canada, including three Canada Council
Grants and a Floyd Chalmers Award from the Ontario Arts Council.
An exceptional soloist, accompanist, and chamber musician, her collaborations include a
national tour and recordings with soprano Nancy Argenta, and a wide array of
performances with the principal players of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, the New
York Philharmonic, and the Canadian Opera Company Orchestra. Acclaimed for her
lyrical and poetic style, she has given solo recitals across Canada, the United States,
and Europe. Ms. Werner has appeared as soloist with several orchestras including
recitals in Stockholm and London. She is a faculty member of The Royal Conservatory
and a member of the ARC Ensemble (Artists of the Royal Conservatory. In just a few
years, the ARC Ensemble has become one of Canada's pre-eminent cultural
ambassadors, performing throughout Canada, the United States, Europe, and Asia, and
its first two CDs were both nominated for the prestigious Grammy Awards in the Best
Chamber Music Recording category.
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Master Class Instructors (2012 – 2015) and Short Bios
Categories
Instrument
Name
(Last,First):
Strings
Violin
Ikeda, Kikuei
Strings
Viola
Amory, Mischa
Harp and
Percussion
Harp
Anraku, Mariko
Harp and
Percussion
Harp
Dr. Lynne Aspnes
Woodwinds
Oboe
Atherholt, Robert
Bio
Kikeui Ikeda, violinist, was born in Yokosuka and studied violin at
the Toho Academy of Music with Saburo Sumi and Josef Gingold
and chamber music with Hideo Saito. While still living in Japan, he
performed as soloist with the Yomiuri Symphony and the Tokyo
Metropolitan and Tokyo Symphony orchestras and toured Europe as
concertmaster of the Toho String Orchestra. He has played the
Mozart Violin Concerto with the Aspen Chamber Orchestra, given
many recitals in Italy, New York and Tokyo, and has performed
chamber music with numerous ensembles.
Since winning the 1991 Naumburg Viola Award Misha Amory has
been acclaimed as on one of the leading American violists of his
generation. Mr. Amory is a member of the Brentano String Quartet
and serves on the faculty of the Juilliard School and the Curtis
Institute.
Mariko Anraku is one of the worlds outstanding harpists. She has
appeared with the Vienna Chamber Orchestra, the New Japan
Philharmonic Orchestra, the Yomiuri Symphony Orchestra, the
Tokyo Symphony, the Israel Philharmonic, and the Toronto
Symphony. Ms Anraku’s career as a recitalist has taken her around
the world and pushed the traditional boundaries of harp repertoire.
Robert Atherholt has been principal oboist of the Houston
Symphony for more than 20 years.
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His artistry has been celebrated in numerous solo appearances and
festival residencies all over the world. Only 2 years after graduating,
he won his first principal oboe position. First serving in that capacity
with the New Jersey Symphony, he soon moved on to the Opera
Orchestra of New York, Orpheus Chamber Orchestra and the
Orchestra of St. Luke’s.This season he has appeared as guest
principal oboist of The St. Paul Chamber Orchestra. Atherholt has
toured Japan and Europe as part of the Houston Symphony
Chamber Players and recorded Schoenberg’s Woodwind Quintet,
Opus 26 with that group. He is professor of oboe at the Shepherd
School of Music, Rice University, and conducts guest clinics at
various festivals and universities across the country including the
National Orchestral Institute and The New World Symphony.
Piano
Piano
Ax, Emanuel
Harp and
Percussion
Percussion
Babor, James
Brass
Trumpet
Balsom, Alison
Jim Babor has been a member of the Los Angeles Philharmonic
since 1993. In addition to his performances with the Los Angeles
Philharmonic, Babor regularly participates in concerts for the
Philharmonic’s Green Umbrella Series. His solo engagements have
included performing the Xylorimba Solo in Oliver Messiaen’s Des
Canyons Aux Etoles with Esa Pekka Salonen and the Los Angeles
Philharmonic.
Alison Balsom studied trumpet at the Guildhall School of Music, the
Paris Conservatoire, and with Håkan Hardenberger.
She was a concerto finalist in the BBC Young Musician competition
in 1998 and received the Feeling Musique Prize for quality of sound
in the 2001 Maurice André International Trumpet Competition.
Alison performs a wide range of recital and concerto repertoire,
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from Albinoni to Zimmermann and performs on both modern and
baroque trumpets.
Strings
Double Bass
Barker, Edward
(Edwin)
Strings
Violin
Beaver, Martin
Edwin Barker graduated with Honours from the New England
Conservatory in 1976, where he studied double bass with Henry
Portnoi.
That same year, while a member of the Chicago Symphony, he was
appointed at age 22 to the position of principal bassist of the Boston
Symphony Orchestra. Barker is a sought- after solo/ ensemble
performer and musician, having performed all around the world in
North America, Europe, and Asia.
Violinist, Martin Beaver, is one of North America's most active
artists. He has been praised by critics and audiences alike for his
thrilling performances in chamber music, recital and concerto
appearances. In May 2002, he was appointed First Violin of the
world-renowned Tokyo String Quartet. As such, he has maintained a
busy performance schedule in the major musical centers of North
America, Europe, Asia and Australia.
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Harps and
Percussion
Percussion
Becker, Bob
Harp
Harp
Blassel, Sylvain
Voice
Voice
Braun, Russell
Strings
Cello
Jeffrey Kahane,
Carter Brey
A founding member of the percussion ensemble Nexus and a
virtuoso on xylophone, marimba and tabla, Bob Becker received
Bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the Eastman School of Music
where he studied percussion with William Street and John Beck and
composition with Warren Benson. He also did post-graduate study
in the World Music program at Wesleyan University. For several
years Becker was percussionist with the Paul Winter Consort and a
regular member of the ensemble Steve Reich and Musicians. Becker
is also a founding member of the Flaming Dono West African Dance
and Drum Ensemble in Toronto. He also appears regularly as an
independent soloist and clinician. Becker’s compositions and
arrangements are performed regularly by percussion groups
worldwide, and he has a long association with dance and has
created music for the Joffrey Ballet in New York among others.
Russell Braun is a Canadian operatic lyric baritone, Juno Award
winner. Much sought-after as a soloist and for opera roles, Russell
Braun performs regularly at the Metropolitan Opera, the Salzburg
Festival, the Lyric Opera of Chicago, l'Opéra de Paris, the San Diego
Opera, the San Francisco Opera and the Canadian Opera Company
in Toronto.
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Woodwinds
Flute
Buyse, Leone
Voice
PDP/ADP
Caine, Rebecca
Strings
Violin
Cardenes, Andres
Strings
Cello
Carr, Colin
Widely recognized as one of America's foremost flute pedagogues,
Ms. Buyse has taught at the University of Michigan, the New
England Conservatory, Boston University, the Tanglewood Music
Center, the Boston University Tanglewood Institute, and as a
visiting Associate Professor at the Eastman School of Music. Her
students hold positions in many major orchestras, including the
symphony orchestras of Cleveland, San Francisco, St. Louis,
Houston, Kansas City, and San Diego, the Minnesota Orchestra, the
Rochester Philharmonic, the Colorado Symphony, the New Zealand
Symphony, the Singapore Symphony, and the Adelaide Symphony.
Others are professors at such schools as the University of Texas at
Austin, the University of Colorado at Boulder, Arizona State, the
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, San Diego State, and the
University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh.
Cellist Colin Carr “is a musician who reaches deeply inside the music
and uses his instrument to deliver surprising discoveries.” (The
Washington Post) Hear him perform all of Bach’s Six Suites for
Unaccompanied Cello in the intimate Mazzoleni Concert Hall. Carr
achieves that rare balance between personal interpretation and
scrupulous consideration of the score that epitomizes musical
performance at its loftiest. Whether it is in the driving energy of
these interpretations, profoundly moving and gentle effusions, or in
his exquisite taste and musical intelligence, these performances
capture a truly extraordinary event. "Carr's velvety tone is a delight
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in itself, and his music making is no less satisfying." (Strad
Magazine)
Strings
Woodwind
Viola
Clarinet
Causa, Ettore
Cope, Todd
Harp
Harp
Costanzi, Rita
Woodwinds
Bassoon
Crockett, Whitney
Harpist Rita Costanzi is a dynamic and versatile artist: concert
performer, recording artist, actor, teacher, composer, writer,
fundraiser, and public speaker. She was Principal Harp of the
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra and the CBC Radio Orchestra and
on the faculties of the University of British Columbia School of
Music, the Comox Valley Youth Music Center, and the Symphony
Orchestra Academy of the Pacific. Adding a new dimension to her
performance art, Rita Costanzi astounds audiences with the three
monodramas written especially for her. Costanzi’s distinguished
teaching career includes master casses in conjunction with her solo
appearances as well as at the Juilliard and Eastman Schools, the
Peabody Conservatory, Boston Conservatory, the University of
Toronto School of Music, McGill University, The Glenn Gould School
and New York University, where she subsequently taught for three
years as Adjunct Professor of Harp.
Whitney Crockett joined the Los Angeles Philharmonic as Principal
Bassoon in April as one of Gustavo Dudamel’s first appointments.
He came to Los Angeles after 12 years as Principal Bassoon of the
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Metropolitan Opera Orchestra under James Levine.
Harp and
Percussion
Percussion
Currie, Colin
Voice
Voice
Curry, CarrolAnne
Woodwinds
Bassoon
Strings
Violin
Recognized for his “athletic percussionism, compulsive
showmanship and deep musicality” (Guardian), Colin Currie is a solo
and chamber artist at the peak of his powers. Championing new
music at the highest level, Currie is the soloist of choice for many of
today’s foremost composers and he performs regularly with the
world’s leading orchestras and conductors.
Ole Kristian Dahl is currently professor at the Staatliche Hochschule
Dahl, Ole Kristian
für Musikund Darstellende Kunst – Mannheim and solo bassoon in
the WDR Symphony Orchestra – Cologne
Internationally-renowned artist and pedagogue Victor Danchenko
graduated from the Moscow Conservatory, where he studied with
David Oistrakh. His numerous awards include the gold medal in the
Soviet National Competition and the Ysaye Gold Medal. Prior to his
emigration to the West henjoyed a distinguished solo career,
appearing with orchestras and in recitals throughout the U.S.S.R.
and abroad. Since then, he has performed as a soloist in the United
Danchenko, Victor
States, Canada, Europe, and South America to high critical acclaim
while developing an immensely successful teaching career. He is
currently on faculty at the Curtis Institute of Music and the Peabody
Conservatory of Music. In addition to these duties, he participates
as a jury member of major international competitions and conducts
master classes around the world, where he remains in great
demand.
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Piano
Piano
Denk, Jeremy
Strings
Viola
Diaz, Roberto
American pianist Jeremy Denk has steadily built a reputation as one
of today’s most compelling and persuasive artists with an unusually
broad repertoire. He has appeared as soloist with major orchestras,
including the Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, New World, St. Louis, and
San Francisco Symphonies, the Philadelphia Orchestra, Orchestra of
St. Luke’s, Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, and London Philharmonia.
Denk also maintains working relationships with a number of living
composers and has participated in many premieres. He is an avid
chamber musician, collaborating with many of the world’s finest
ensembles and appearing at renowned chamber festivals. He
regularly collaborates with cellist Stephen Isserlis, is a member of
the Bard Conservatory Faculty, and gives numerous lectures and
master classes. In 2004, Denk first performed with violinist Joshua
Bell at the Spoleto Festival, sparking off a musical partnership that
continues today. The artist’s blog, “Think Denk” (jeremydenk.net),
is highly praised and frequently referenced by many in the music
press and industry.
A violist of international reputation, Curtis Institute of Music
President Roberto Díaz follows in the footsteps of renowned
artist/directors Gary Graffman, Efrem Zimbalist, Rudolf Serkin, and
Josef Hofmann. As a member of the Curtis viola faculty since 2000
and as principal viola of the Philadelphia Orchestra from 1996 to
2006, Mr. Díaz has already had a significant impact on American
musical life and continues to do so in his dual roles as performer
and educator.
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Strings
Cello
Díaz, Andrés
Piano
Piano
Durand, Marc
Piano
Piano
Durand, Marc
Since winning the First Prize in the 1986 Naumburg International
Cello Competition, Mr. Díaz has exhilarated both critics and
audiences with his intense and charismatic performances. Andrés
Díaz’s numerous orchestral appearances have included return
engagements with the Atlanta Symphony under the late conductor
Robert Shaw; performances with the American Symphony at
Carnegie Hall, the symphony orchestras of Milwaukee, Seattle,
Rochester under Christopher Seaman, the Boston Pops and
Esplanade Orchestras, the Chicago Symphony at the Ravinia Festival
with Edo de Waart conducting, and the National Symphony
Orchestra. Presently, he is Associate Professor at Southern
Methodist University.
Canadian pianist Marc Durand enjoys a versatile career as a soloist,
accompanist, chamber musician, and pedagogue. He is professor of
piano at the Faculty of Music of the University of Montreal and a
visiting artist and program advisor at The Glenn Gould School of
The Royal Conservatory. Marc has become one of Canada’s most
sought-after performers and pedagogues. As a soloist, Marc has
appeared with a number of orchestras and has been heard regularly
on Canadian radio and television. He has also toured North America,
Europe, and Asia, and has given concerts in Egypt, Indonesia, and
Australia.
Canadian pianist Marc Durand enjoys a versatile career as a soloist,
accompanist, chamber musician, and pedagogue. He is professor of
piano at the Faculty of Music of the University of Montreal and a
visiting artist and program advisor at The Glenn Gould School of
The Royal Conservatory. Marc has become one of Canada’s most
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sought-after performers and pedagogues. As a soloist, Marc has
appeared with a number of orchestras and has been heard regularly
on Canadian radio and television. He has also toured North America,
Europe, and Asia, and has given concerts in Egypt, Indonesia, and
Australia.
Voice
Strings
Voice
Double Bass
Eliasen, Mikael
Danish-born coach and accompanist Mikael Eliasen received his
early training in Copenhagen, Montreal, and Vienna. He has
collaborated with numerous singers in recital worldwide, including
Robert Merrill, Tom Krause, John Shirley-Quirk, Elly Ameling, Edith
Mathis, Florence Quivar, Mira Zakai, Sarah Walker, and Joan
Patenaude-Yarnell. He has a long association with the young-artist
programs at the Royal Danish Opera and the Opera Studio of
Amsterdam. In the United States, he works regularly at the Lyric
Opera of Chicago, LA Opera, Houston Grand Opera, Pittsburgh
Opera, Santa Fe Opera, and the Metropolitan Opera. Mr. Eliasen
was music director of the San Francisco Opera Center from 1994 to
1996 and artistic director of the European Center for Opera and
Vocal Art in Belgium from 1984 to 1994. For twenty years he has
taught at Chautauqua's Voice Program during the summers. Mr.
Eliasen joined the faculty of the Curtis Institute of Music in 1986
and became the head of the department in 1988.
Ellison, Paul
Performing solo and ensemble concerts as well as giving master
classes on the double bass and period instruments on four
continents, Paul Ellison is the Lynette S. Autrey Professor of Double
Bass and chair of strings at Rice University’s Shepherd School of
Music, Visiting Artist-Faculty University of Southern California and
guest tutor at the Yehudi Menuhin School, the Royal College of
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Music, and Bass Club, England. Current summer positions include
principal bass at the Grand Teton Music Festival, faculty/performer
at the Sarasota Music Festival and faculty/performer at Festival
Domaine Forget, Quebec. Ellison was the first to receive both the
diploma and teaching certificate from Institut International Rabbath,
Paris.
Clarinet
Percussion
Percussion
LudewigVerdehr, Elsa
Falk, Erwin
Austrian percussionist Erwin Falk is a member of the Vienna State
Opera Orchestra and Vienna Philharmonic. He has won first prizes
at the competition "Gradus ad Parnassum" and the competition "das
Podium" of the Bruckner Conservatory in Linz. He has worked with
the Cleveland Orchestra, the Vienna Radio Symphony, the Salzburg
Mozarteum Orchestra and the Bruckner Orchestra Linz, and has
belonged to such ensembles as "die Reihe", and "Kontrapunkte".
Together with Martin Grubinger he founded "Duo Battuta" in 1999.
He also belongs to the ensemble "Supercussion Vienna" and has
also performed diverse world premieres, such as the project "Den
Bach runter" of Otto M. Zykan and the Artis Quartet in the
auditorium of the Austrian Radio, and appeared at the Beethoven
Festival 2007 in Bonn.
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Voice
Voice
Fanning, John
Piano
Piano
Fialkowska,
Janina
Woodwind
Oboe
Fischer, Jonathan
Strings
Violin
Fleezanis, Jorja
Piano
Piano
Fleisher, Leon
Recently invested as a Member of the Order of Canada, John
Fanning's schedule of engagements is evidence of his pre-eminent
position among today's baritones. A veteran of nine seasons at the
Metropolitan Opera, he has also appeared at the San Francisco
Opera and other opera houses around the world, toured the USA as
soloist in Mozart’s Requiem with Bernard Labadie and Les Violons du
Roy, and sang Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 with Zukerman in
Ottawa with the National Arts Centre Orchestra. Fanning also has
considerable experience in musical theatre. He was a member of
the Canadian touring production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's
Phantom of the Opera 1991-2, and in 2004 he played the title role
in Sondheim's Sweeney Todd with the Calgary Opera. He also
appeared in the feature film Moonstruck in 1987.
Jorja Fleezanis was concertmaster of the Minnesota Orchestra from
1989 to 2009—the longest-tenured concertmaster in the orchestra's
history and only the second woman in the U.S. to hold the title of
concertmaster in a major orchestra when appointed. Prior to
Minnesota, she was associate concertmaster with the San Francisco
Symphony for eight years.
Renowned pianist and conductor Leon Fleisher became a student of
the legendary Artur Schnabel at the age of 9, and made his debut
with the New York Philharmonic under Pierre Monteux at the age of
16. Holder of the Andrew W. Mellon Chair at the Peabody
Conservatory of Music since 1959, Mr. Fleisher also serves on the
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faculties of the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia and The
Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto, as well as the Aspen,
Lucerne, Ravinia, and Verbier festivals.
Woodwind
Flute
Sir James Galway
Strings
Cello
Geringas, David
Piano
Piano
Gerstein, Kirill
Winds
Clarinet
Gilad, Yehuda
The multifaceted pianist Kirill Gerstein has rapidly ascended into
classical music’s highest ranks. With a masterful technique,
discerning intelligence, and a musical curiosity that has led him to
explore repertoire spanning centuries and styles, he has proven to
be one of today’s most intriguing and versatile musicians. His early
training and experience in jazz has contributed an important
element to his interpretive style, inspiring an energetic and
expressive musical personality that distinguishes his playing.
Clarinetist Yehuda Gilad takes an innovative approach to musicmaking, which has earned him a reputation as one of today’s most
dynamic and charismatic artists. A conductor, instrumentalist, and
teacher, he strives for “total musicianship,” and as a result, he has
won the acclaim of both critics and audiences alike. Currently Music
Director of the Colburn Orchestra, his appearances as a guest
conductor have garnered critical acclaim in the United States, Asia,
and Europe. Over the course of his career, he has collaborated with
nearly every leading artist, including Gil Shaham, Joshua Bell, Sarah
Chang, Pepe Romero, Joseph Kalichstein, Vladimir Feltsman, and
Anne-Marie McDermott. Gilad is also a renowned teacher, having
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developed one of the most prestigious clarinet studios in the
country. In addition to his professorship at the University of
Southern California and position as master teacher at the Colburn
School Conservatory of Music, Gilad is regularly invited to present
master classes at conservatories and festivals worldwide.
Harp and
Percussion
Piano
Harp
Piano
Giles, Alice
Goode, Richard
Richard Goode has been hailed for music-making of tremendous
emotional power, depth, and expressiveness, and has been
acknowledged worldwide as one of today’s leading interpreters of
Classical and Romantic music. In an extensive profile in The New
Yorker, David Blum wrote: “What one remembers most from
Goode’s playing is not its beauty—exceptional as it is—but his way
of coming to grips with the composer’s central thought, so that a
work tends to make sense beyond one’s previous perception of it ...
The spontaneous formulating process of the creator [becomes]
tangible in the concert hall.” According to the New York Times, “It
is virtually impossible to walk away from one of Mr. Goode’s recitals
without the sense of having gained some new insight, subtly or
otherwise, into the works he played or about pianism itself.”
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Harp
Harp
Goodman, Erica
Harp and
Percussion
Harp
Gorton, Heidi
A native of Toronto, Erica Goodman is acclaimed as one of the
world's outstanding solo harpists. She received her training at the
Royal Conservatory of Music (Toronto), the National Music Camp
(Interlochen, Michigan) and the Curtis Institute of Music
(Philadelphia). Already a concert performer in her teens, Ms.
Goodman played under the baton of Igor Stravinsky when he
recorded in Toronto. Ms. Goodman can be heard on several
recordings for the BIS, Marquis, Opening Day and CBC labels with
such artists as Robert Aitken, Paul Brodie, James Campbell, the
Amadeus Ensemble and in solo concert. In 1980, Erica Goodman
won the Grand Prix du Disque Canada for her recording, "Flute and
Harp" with Robert Aitken. In 1995, she won a Juno for her solo
album, "Erica Goodman Plays Canadian Harp Music".
Recently hailed by the Pittsburgh Post Gazette as a performer who
plays “with a flair that we are coming to know well,” Heidi Van
Hoesen Gorton joins the
Toronto Symphony Orchestra as Principal Harp. She has been
described as one of the most outstanding solo, chamber and
orchestral musicians of her generation and has performed solo
recitals the world over from New York to Los Angeles, Vancouver to
Vienna. As an orchestral player Heidi has performed with the
Pittsburgh, Boston and Hartford Symphony Orchestras. She has
been a member of the Sun Valley Summer Symphony since 2001,
after having participated in the National Repertory Orchestra of
America. Heidi has been an active participant in the Strings
Chamber Music Festival, as well as the Music Festivals at Aspen,
Tanglewood and Interlochen.
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Winds
Clarinet
Hawley, Richie
Brass
Trombone
Higgins, Timothy
Piano
Piano
Hough, Stephen
Richie Hawley is a versatile and critically acclaimed artist who ranks
among the most distinguished clarinetists of his generation. As
Principal Clarinet of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, he
impressed audiences around the world with a wide-ranging talent
that blended virtuosity and the velvety, sonorous tone that has
become his trademark. As an educator, Mr. Hawley is highly sought
after and has recently relocated to Houston to serve as the
Professor of Clarinet at the Shepherd School of Music at Rice
University. He formerly held the position of Assistant Professor and
head of the clarinet studio at UC’s College-Conservatory of Music in
Cincinnati.
Trombonist Timothy Higgins has performed and recorded with a
number of orchestras, including the Milwaukee Symphony, Virginia
Symphony, Chicago Symphony, Civic Orchestra of Chicago,
Washington National Opera, and the Baltimore Symphony
Orchestra. In addition to a busy orchestral life, Higgins also founded
a prize-winning trombone quartet (CT3) and was the winner of the
2005 Robert Marstellar Solo Trombone Competition. In 2008 he
became principal trombone with the San Francisco Symphony.
Higgins has studied with Michael Warny (Houston Grand Opera and
Ballet) and Michael Mulcahy.
Named by The Economist as one of 20 Living Polymaths, British
pianist Stephen Hough is a rare renaissance man of our time. Over
the course of a long and distinguished career as one of the world’s
leading concert pianists, he has also excelled as a writer and
composer. Mr. Hough combines an exceptional facility and tonal
palette with a uniquely inquisitive musical personality, and his
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musical achievements have resulted in many awards and accolades
for his concerts and a discography of more than fifty recordings.
Strings
Viola
Huang, Hsin-Yun
Harp and
Percussion
Percussion
Huang, Aiyun
Piano
Piano
Jalbert, David
Strings
Cello
Johnson, Joseph
Piano
Piano
Kalish, Gil
Violist Hsin-Yun Huang, recognized as one of the leading violists of
her generation, came to international prominence in 1993 when she
was winner of the top prize of the ARD International Music
Competition in Munich and the Bunkamura Orchard Hall Award.
Currently residing in New York City, she is a dedicated teacher,
serving on the faculties of The Juilliard School and the Mannes
College of Music and has given master classes at Guildhall School in
London, the Curtis Institute, the Juilliard School, the McDuffie
Center for the Strings the Taipei Normal University, and East
Carolina University.
Pianist David Jalbert is one of the most remarkable talents of the
new generation. With his personal style, incomparable stage
presence, and refined ear, he has wowed audiences and critics
everywhere in North America.
The profound influence of pianist Gilbert Kalish as an educator and
pianist in myriad performances and recordings has established him
as a major figure in American music-making. In 2006 he was
awarded the Peabody Medal by the Peabody Conservatory for his
outstanding contributions to music in America. He was the pianist of
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Strings
Violin
Kaplan, Mark
Piano
Piano
Kaplinsky, Veda
Strings
Viola
Kashkashian, Kim
Winds
Flute
Khaner, Jeffrey
the Boston Symphony Chamber Players for 30 years, and was a
founding member of the Contemporary Chamber Ensemble. He is
particularly known for his partnership of many years with mezzosoprano Jan DeGaetani, as well as for current collaborations with
soprano Dawn Upshaw and cellists Timothy Eddy and Joel Krosnik.
As an educator and performer he has appeared at the Banff Centre,
the Steans Institute at Ravinia, the Marlboro Music Festival, and
[email protected]; from 1985 to 1997 he served as chairman of the
Tanglewood faculty. A distinguished professor at SUNY Stony Brook,
Mr. Kalish has been an Artist of The Chamber Music Society of
Lincoln Center since 2006.
Mark Kaplan is an American violinist who studied at the Juilliard
School under Dorothy DeLay. He is currently a professor at Indiana
University's Jacobs School of Music. Before teaching at Indiana, Mr.
Kaplan taught at UCLA in California. He has performed in all the
principal cities of Europe, including London, Berlin, Paris, Vienna,
Prague, Zurich, Amsterdam, Copenhagen and Milan, as well as the
Far East and Australia and in the United States he has played with
nearly every major orchestra.
Canadian-born flutist Jeffrey Khaner has been Principal Flute of the
Philadelphia Orchestra since 1990. From 1982 to 1990 he was
principal of the Cleveland Orchestra, and has also served as
principal of the New York Mostly Mozart Festival, the Atlantic
Symphony in Halifax, and as co-principal of the Pittsburgh
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Strings
Violin
Kim, Soovin
Symphony. A noted soloist, Mr. Khaner has performed concerti with
orchestras throughout the United States, Canada and Asia. His
concerto repertoire is extensive and he has premiered many works
including the concerto by Ned Rorem, written for him in 2003. Mr.
Khaner is on faculty at The Juilliard School and the Curtis Institute.
Mr. Khaner has also participated as a performer and teacher at
festivals and seminars including the Solti Orchestral Project at
Carnegie Hall, The New World Symphony, the Pacific Music Festival
and the Hamamatsu Festival in Japan, the Sarasota and Grand
Teton Festivals, and the Lake Placid Institute. Mr. Khaner’s editions
of repertoire including the Brahms sonatas are published by
Theodore Presser Company.
American violinist Soovin Kim is an exciting young player who has
built on the early successes of his prize-winning years to emerge as
a mature artist equally gifted in concerto, recital, and chamber
music repertoire. Mr. Kim won first prize at the Paganini
International Competition when he was only 20 years old. He was
later named the recipient of the Henryk Szeryng Career Award, an
Avery Fisher Career Grant, and a Borletti-Buitoni Trust Award.
Subsequently he went on to perform with premier orchestras
around the globe. He has given solo recitals at Weill Hall in New
York, Terrace Theater in Washington D.C., Ravinia, Tokyo’s Casals
Hall, and the Seoul Arts Center. Mr. Kim is on faculty at Stony Brook
University and Bard College. He is a graduate of the Curtis Institute
of Music where he studied with Jaime Laredo and Victor Danchenko,
and was a student of David Cerone and Donald Weilerstein at the
Cleveland Institute of Music. Soovin Kim plays on the 1709 “exKempner” Stradivarius, which is on loan to him.
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Woodwind
Woodwind
Strings
Oboe
Bassoon
Violin
Klein, Alex
Kolkay, Peter
Kopelman, Mikhail
Brass
Trumpet
Krauss, David
Piano
Piano
Kuerti, Anton
Voice
PDP
Woodwind
Flute
David Krauss was appointed principal trumpet of the Metropolitan
Opera Orchestra in 2001. He attended Juilliard as a student of
William Vacchiano and Chris Gekker, earning both bachelor's and
master's degrees. He studied further with James Pandolfi, Henry
Nowak, and Wynton Marsalis. While at Juilliard, he was a soloist
with the Juilliard Chamber Orchestra in Lincoln Center and on tour
in France. Currently, besides of the MET orchestra, Mr. Krauss
teaches at Manhattan School of Music, Columbia University, Queens
College, and New York University and has recently given master
classes at Juilliard and London's Royal Academy of Music.
Throughout his prodigiously successful career, pianist Anton Kuerti
has been acclaimed for the clarity of his musical vision and the
immense technique with which he serves a wide choice of
repertoire. In Canada, Mr.Kuerti has appeared in 140 communities
from coast to coast, and has played with every professional
orchestra, including 39 concerts with the Toronto Symphony.Mr.
Kuerti is one of today’s most recorded artists, having put on disc all
the Beethoven concertos and sonatas, the Schubert sonatas, the
Brahms concertos, and works by many other composers. His
recordings are heard almost daily on the CBC.
Landry,
Rosemarie
Langevin, Robert
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Piano
Piano
Lortie, Louie
Voice
Voice
MacDonald, Lorna
French-Canadian pianist Louis Lortie has attracted critical acclaim
throughout Europe, Asia, and the United States. The London Times,
describing his playing as "ever immaculate, ever imaginative", has
identified the artist's "combination of total spontaneity and
meditated ripeness that only great pianists have". Louis Lortie has
performed with, among other conductors, Riccardo Chailly, Lorin
Maazel, Kurt Masur, Seiji Ozawa, Charles Dutoit, Kurt Sanderling,
Neeme Järvi, Sir Andrew Davis, Wolfgang Sawallisch, Sir Mark Elder
and Osmo Vänskä. He has also been involved in many chamber
music projects, with musicians such as Frank Peter Zimmermann,
Leonidas Kavakos, Renaud and Gautier Capuçon, Jan Vogler,
Augustin Dumay, the Takacs Quartet and Gidon Kremer. His regular
piano-duo partner is fellow Canadian Hélène Mercier, with whom he
has made successful recordings on the Chandos label. Louis Lortie
has made over 30 recordings for Chandos, covering repertoire from
Mozart to Stravinsky.
Canadian soprano Lorna MacDonald enjoys a career of distinction as
an active performer, voice teacher, Professor of Voice and the Lois
Marshall Chair in Voice Studies at the University of Toronto. From
1994-2007 she served as Head of Voice Studies, and she is a
recipient of Ontario’s prestigious OCUFA Award. In recent years she
made her début in Los Angeles’ Disney Hall in a new performance
edition of Leonard Bernstein’s Mass and sang the title role in
Mozart’s Zaide for Opera Nova Scotia. In 2012 she sings Konstanze
in Mozart’s Die Entfuhrung aus dem Serail. Lorna is an active
adjudicator of major festivals and competitions such as Metropolitan
Opera National Council, Canadian Opera Company, Canadian
National Music Competition Finals, Eckhardt-Grammatée, and the
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Canadian JUNO awards. The Toronto Star noted her as a “master of
transformation” in a master class at the Canadian Opera Company.
Voice
Voice
Major, Leon
Brass
Bass
Trombone
Markey, James
Leon Major, director, is currently the artistic director of the Maryland
Opera Studio at the University of Maryland School of Music. He was
also Artistic Director for the Boston Lyric Opera from 1998‐2003.
Upcoming productions under Mr. Major’s direction include the world
premiere of the new opera Volpone (Wolf Trap Opera); Les Contes
d’Hoffmann and the world premiere of Clara (Maryland Opera
Studio); Faust and Don Pasquale (Opera Company of Philadelphia),
Cosi fan tutte (San Diego Opera); and L'Italiana in Algeri (Boston
Lyric Opera). In addition to his work as an independent director
throughout the United States, Leon Major has directed plays and
operas for companies in Canada and Europe.
James Markey was appointed bass trombone of the New York
Philharmonic in 2007, after serving as associate principal trombone
since 1997. He is on the faculty of the Juilliard School and Mannes
college of music.
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Piano
Piano
McDonald, Robert
Piano
Piano
McDonald, Robert
Pianist Robert McDonald tours extensively as a soloist and chamber
musician throughout the United States, Europe, Asia, and South
America. He has appeared with major orchestras in the United
States and was the recital partner for many years to Isaac Stern
and other distinguished instrumentalists. He has played with the
Takács, Vermeer, Juilliard, Brentano, Borromeo, American,
Shanghai, and St. Lawrence string quartets, as well as Music from
Marlboro. His discography includes recordings for Sony Classical,
Bridge, Vox, Musical Heritage Society, ASV, and CRI. Mr. McDonald's
prizes include the gold medal at the Busoni International Piano
Competition, the top prize at the William Kapell International
Competition, and the Deutsche Schallplatten Critics Award.
Robert McDonald tours extensively as a soloist and chamber
musician
throughout the United States, Europe, Asia, and South America. He
has
appeared with major orchestras in the United States and was the
recital
partner for many years to Isaac Stern and other distinguished
instrumentalists.
He has played with the Takács, Vermeer, Juilliard, Brentano,
Borromeo,
American, Shanghai, and St. Lawrence string quartets, as well as
Music from Marlboro. His discography includes recordings for Sony
Classical, Bridge, Vox, Musical. Heritage Society, ASV, and CRI. A
member of the piano faculty at Juilliard
since 1999, Mr. McDonald joined the faculty of the Curtis Institute
of Music in 2007.
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Woodwinds
Oboe
McEwen, Mark
Woodwind
Bassoon
McGill, David
Voice
Voice
McMahon, Michael
Strings
Double Bass
Meyer, Edgar
A native of Saskatoon, Canada, and a graduate of the Curtis
Institute of Music, Mark McEwen joined the Boston Symphony
Orchestra oboe section in September 1996. An alumnus of the
Tanglewood Music Center, he has also held fellowships at the Aspen
Music Festival and with the Colorado Philharmonic. Mr. McEwen is
on the faculty of New England Conservatory
Pianist and vocal coach Michael McMahon studied at McGill
University with Charles Reiner. With the aid of the Canada Council
for the Arts, he completed his studies in Vienna at the Franz
Schubert Institute and the Hochschule für Musik und darstellende
Kunst, and in Salzburg at the International Summer Academy held
at the Mozarteum.
Mr. Meyer began studying bass at the age of five under the
instruction of his father and continued further to study with Stuart
Sankey. In 1994 he received the Avery Fisher Career Grant and in
2000 became the only bassist to receive the Avery Fisher
Prize. Currently, he is Visiting Professor of Double Bass at the Royal
Academy of Music and at the Curtis Institute of Music in
Philadelphia.
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Voice
Voice
Noble, Timothy
Strings
Violin
Nuttall, Geoff
Baritone Timothy Noble has enjoyed an international career
spanning 44 years, performing leading roles at major opera houses,
including the Metropolitan Opera, San Francisco Opera, Chicago
Lyric Opera, Canadian Opera Company, La Fenice, Netherlands
Opera, Santa Fe Opera, and The Glyndebourne Festival.
He has performed in concert with the London Philharmonic,
Concertgebouw Orchestra, Chicago Symphony, Cleveland Orchestra,
and Cincinnati Symphony
and has appeared at Carnegie Hall, the Hollywood Bowl, and the
Ravinia Festival, to name a few. Noble is now beginning his
eleventh year at the Jacobs School of Music and was
elevated to Distinguished Professor in 2004. He serves as vocal
trainer/coach for the Canadian Opera Company Ensemble and is the
founder and director of the Charley Creek Vocal Workshop held
each June in Wabash, Ind.
In 1989, Mr. Nuttall, co-founded the St. Lawrence String Quartet. As
first violinist of this world-renowned foursome, he has performed
well over 1,500 concerts throughout North and South America,
Europe, Australia, and Asia. Currently under an exclusive contract
with EMI Classics, they received two Grammy nominations for their
latest release Yiddishbbuk, they also won a Juno award for their
premiere recording of Robert Schumann Quartets.With the St.
Lawrence Quartet, Mr. Nuttall served as graduate ensemble-inresidence at the Juilliard School, Yale University, and Hartt School of
Music, acting as teaching assistants to the Juilliard, Tokyo, and
Emerson String Quartets, respectively.He is now on faculty at
Stanford University, where the St. Lawrence Quartet has been
ensemble-in-residence since 1999.
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Piano
Piano
O'Conor, John
Piano
Piano
O'Hora, Ronan
Brass
Tuba
Olka, Christopher
Strings
Violin
Oundjian, Peter
Pianist John O’Conor has earned a reputation as a masterful
interpreter of the Classic and Early Romantic piano repertoires. He
has been praised for his technique and through his eloquent
phrasing, mastery of keyboard colour, and his unique sound he has
been called a true Poet of the Piano. Mr. O’Conor is deeply
committed to the development of young pianists around the world.
For his services to music he has been awarded Honourary
Doctorates by the National University of Ireland, by Trinity College
Dublin, and by Shenandoah University, Virginia, and an Honourary
Fellowship by the Royal Irish Academy of Music.
Ronan O'Hora has generally eschewed the role of flashy virtuoso,
choosing instead to develop a versatility and maturity in his
interpretive persona, reserving his considerable technical skills for
more demanding and musically appropriate passages. While his
style can thus be viewed
as steady and dependable, a description that might suggest routine
performance he is nearly always compelling and spirited in his
interpretations, not given to bouts of waywardness or random
whim. Thus, critical assessments of his playing often point out his
grasp of form and his tendency to sidestep momentary effect.
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Strings
Cello
Perron, Johanne
Piano
Piano
Perry, John
Strings
Violin
Perry, David
Woodwind
Flute
Piccinini, Marina
An international cello artist, Johanne Perron presently pursues a
career as chamber musician, solo performer and educator. As soloist
she has played with orchestras including the Montreal, Mexico and
Lisbon Symphonies among others under the direction of Charles
Dutoit, Franz-Paul Decker, Arthur Weisberg, Otto Werner Muller and
the assistant conductor of the Israel Philharmonic Zeev Doorman.
Critics of the Musical America magazine have described her as “an
artist of extraordinary musical dimension, compelling intensity and
deep inner serenity.”
John Perry, distinguished artist and teacher, has performed
extensively throughout Europe and North America to great critical
acclaim. He also enjoys an international reputation as a teacher,
presenting master classes throughout the world. Mr. Perry is
Professor of Piano at the Colburn Conservatory of Music in Los
Angeles, Thornton School of Music of the University of Southern
California in Los Angeles, visiting artist teacher at The Glenn Gould
School of the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. He is also a
guest faculty member of the Banff Center in Alberta, Canada, and
the International Piano Academy Lake Como in Italy.
David Perry has been a violinist with the Pro Arte Quartet and
member of the University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty since 1995.
He is concertmaster of the Aspen Chamber Symphony and the
Chicago Philharmonic. He has performed with the Orpheus
Chamber Orchestra and the China National Symphony.
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Voice
Voice
Polegato, Brett
Voice
Voice
Pomakov, Robert
Harp and
Percussion
Percussion
Prieto, Dafnis
Voice
Voice, ADV
Pynkoski, Marshall
Baritone Brett Polegato's artistic sensibility has earned him the
highest praise from audiences and critics: “his is a serious and
seductive voice” says The Globe and Mail, and The New York Times
has praised him for his “burnished, well-focused voice” which he
uses with “considerable intelligence and nuance.”
Canadian bass Robert Pomakov has earned critical acclaim for his
unique voice and musicianship in opera, concert and recital. In
addition to his operatic and concert appearances on the world’s
most renowned stages, Robert Pomakov has been a prizewinner in
several of the world's premier singing competitions: a finalist in the
Queen Elizabeth Competition in Belgium, second place at the
Belvedere Competition in Vienna and third place in Plácido
Domingo's Operalia. In September 2006, Mr. Pomakov was
decorated with the Simeon, the First Honorary Medal from the
Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Bulgaria, and with a diploma
from the Minister of Culture for his achievements in opera's art and
special merit to Bulgarian culture and its dissemination all over the
world. Pomakov is a graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music.
Marshall Pynkoski kindled his fascination with the music, theatre
and dance of the 17th and 18th centuries in classes with the late
Leonard Crainford and John Marshall, followed by in-depth study in
the Paris both with renowned damaturge and dance experts as well
as from original documents housed in the Bibliothèque Nationale
and the Paris Opera. Since founding Opera Atelier with his wife
Jeannette Zingg, Mr. Pynkoski has won numerous awards including
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the distinction of Chevalier dans l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres from
the Government of France and the Toronto Arts Award. For three
years he was a principal guest instructor at the Centre de Musique
Baroque de Versailles, collaborating with Marc Minkowski and Les
Musiciens de Louvre. In March 2003, Time Magazine recognized Mr.
Pynkoski as one of Canada’s Best in Music. Most recently, Mr.
Pynkoski received the Muriel Sherrin Award for outstanding
contribution to music in Toronto.
Strings
Brass
Strings
Double Bass
Trumpet
Violin
Robsinson, Hal
Rolfs, Thomas
Thomas Rolfs serves as Principal trumpet of the Boston Symphony
Orchestra and the Boston Pops. Rolfs has been a soloist with the
Boston Symphony, the Boston Pops Orchestra, and the Saint Paul
Chamber Orchestra. At John Williams’s request, he was a featured
soloist on Williams’s Grammy-nominated soundtrack to the Academy
award-winning film Saving Private Ryan. His varied musical
background includes performances with the Minnesota Orchestra,
the Vienna Philharmonic, the Empire Brass, the Saint Petersburg
Philharmonic, the Lyric Opera of Chicago, and the American Ballet
Orchestra, as well as teaching at New England Conservatory and
Boston University.
Rosenberg, Sylvia
Violinist Sylvia Rosenberg has performed throughout the United
States and abroad with major orchestras and at the most
prestigious summer festivals. A graduate of the Juilliard School, she
studied with Ivan Galamian. Ms. Rosenberg also worked with
Szymon Goldberg and received a Fulbright scholarship for study
with Nadia Boulanger in Paris. She has given numerous master
classes worldwide at conservatories, music schools, and universities
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and frequently serves as juror for international competitions. Sylvia
Rosenberg also gives annual masterclasses at London’s Royal
Academy of Music, from which she recently received an honorary
degree. Sylvia Rosenberg joined the faculty of the Juilliard School in
autumn 2007, and has been a member of the Manhattan School of
Music faculty since 1989.
Voice
Brass
Strings
Soprano
Solos
Violin
Rozario, Patricia
Sachs, Michael
SalernoSonnenberg,
Nadja
Electrifying performances, fearless interpretations and musical
depth have established violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg as one
of the leading violinists of our time. Her exceptional artistry is paired
with great musical intelligence which, along with her unique
personality, have served her well in numerous environments--on
camera, hosting a Backstage/Live from Lincoln Center program for
PBS, appearing in the PBS/BBC series The Mind, even talking to Big
Bird on Sesame Street. Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg's professional
career began in 1981 when she won the Walter W. Naumburg
International Violin Competition. In 1983 she was recognized with
an Avery Fisher Career Grant, and in 1988 was Ovations Debut
Recording Artist of the Year. In 1999 she was honored with the
prestigious Avery Fisher Prize, awarded to instrumentalists who
have demonstrated "outstanding achievement and excellence in
music." An American citizen, Ms. Salerno-Sonnenberg was born in
Rome and emigrated to the United States at the age of eight to
study at The Curtis Institute of Music. She later studied with
Dorothy DeLay at The Juilliard School.
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Voice
Voice
Shicoff, Neil
Strings
Harp and
Percussion
Violin
Smirnoff, Joel
Percussion
Stephan, Ed
Strings
Viola
Tapping, Roger
Brass
Bugle
Thiessen, John
Neil Shicoff is a widely-known American tenor. He has a strong,
sweet lyric voice and an intensely dramatic stage presence.
Roger Tapping, now chair of New England Conservatory's chamber
music program, was violist of the Takács Quartet for ten years
beginning in 1995. Their recordings for Decca/London, including the
complete quartets of Bartók and Beethoven, have won three
Gramophone Awards, a Grammy and three more Grammy
nominations, three Japan Record Academy Chamber Music Awards,
the BBC Music Disc of the Year Award, and the Classical Brits Award
for Ensemble Album of the Year. Born in England, Tapping played in
a number of London's leading chamber ensembles before joining
the Allegri Quartet in 1989. He taught at the Royal Academy of
Music in London, was principal viola of the London Mozart Players,
and was a member of the English Chamber Orchestra. He was a
founding member of the Chamber Orchestra of Europe, and a
frequent participant in Sandor Végh's International Musicians'
Seminar in Cornwall, England. Summer festivals include the Banff
Viola Master Classes, the Yellow Barn Festival, the Perlman
Chamber Music Workshop, and the Tanglewood String Quartet
Seminar.
TBD
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Brass
French Horn
Thomas, Brian
Woodwinds
Flute
Thorne, John W.
Piano
Piano
Trifonov, Daniil
Voice
Voice
Upchurch, Liz
Second Horn of the Houston Symphony since 1995, Brian Thomas
has performed with the orchestras of Minnesota, Cincinnati and San
Diego and played for many years in both the Colorado Music
Festival in Boulder and the Skaneateles Festival in upstate New
York. He has been Second Horn in the prestigious Sun Valley
Summer Symphony since 1999 and is a frequent guest artist at
Rice's Shepherd School of Music. Mr. Thomas was recently an Artistin-Residence at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas. He has also
performed with the Scottish band The Rogues and recorded a CD
and a live DVD with the group.
John W. Thorne began his career as a member of the New World
Symphony in Miami under the direction of Michael Tilson Thomas.
He has held principal flute positions with the Florida West Coast
Symphony and the San Antonio Symphony. In 1992, he became the
Associate Principal Flutist of the Houston Symphony.
Liz Upchurch is a graduate of the Royal Academy of Music in
London, England, where she won several prizes as solo pianist and
accompanist. As a music director, vocal coach and repetiteur she
has worked in 21st-century and traditional opera, music theatre and
theatre. She has also covered a wide range of working techniques
with singers, actors and instrumentalists in community and
educational projects. For many years she worked with young artists
at the Britten-Pears School in Aldeburgh where she played for
masterclasses with artists such as Anthony Rolfe Johnson, Suzanne
Danco, William Pleeth and Dame Joan Sutherland. Upchurch has
also worked at the Kammeroper Schloss Rheinsberg festival in
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Germany and the National Theatre in London. She held a faculty
position in the 20th-century Opera and Song program at the Banff
Centre for the Arts and was repetiteur and chorus director at
Edmonton Opera. As a pianist she has performed all over Europe
and has been broadcast with the BBC, Norwegian Radio and the
CBC.
Brass
Brass
Trombone
Horn Class
van Rijen, Jörgen
VerMeulen, Bill
Strings
Violin
Weilerstein,
Donald
Brass
Horn
VerMeulen,
William
Donald Weilerstein has concertized extensively as soloist and
chamber musician throughout the world. For twenty years (19691989) Mr. Weilerstein was the first violinist of the renowned
Cleveland Quartet with whom he toured the world.
Hailed as “one of today’s superstars of the international brass
scene,” William VerMeulen leads a varied musical life of Soloist,
Orchestral Principal, Chamber Musician, Master Teacher and Music
Publisher. Mr. VerMeulen has been Principal Horn of the Houston
Symphony since 1990 and has performed as a guest Principal Horn
with many of the nation’s premier orchestras. As a soloist and
chamber musician, he has performed to critical acclaim on four
continents and is a popular artist at Horn Symposiums as well as a
member of the Advisory Council of the International Horn Society.
He has recorded numerous compact discs among which are the
Complete Mozart Horn Concerti and the popular Texas Horns. A
champion of new music, Mr. VerMeulen has had numerous pieces
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written for him including concerti by esteemed American
composers Samuel Adler and Pierre Jalbert and Anthony DiLorenzo.
Brass
Horn
Williams, Gail
Woodwinds
Clarinet
Williamson,
Stephen
Woodwinds
Flute
Wincenc, Carol
Stephen Williamson joined the New York Philharmonic as Principal
Clarinet in July 2013. Prior to the Philharmonic, he served as
principal clarinet of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, appointed by
Riccardo Muti, from 2011 to 2013.
Carol Wincenc is one of the most respected and acclaimed flutists
performing today. She appears with orchestras worldwide and has
premiered works written for her by numerous prominent composers.
She is a professor of flute at both the Juilliard School of Music and
Stony Brook University. Ms. Wincenc was First Prize Winner of the
Walter W. Naumburg Solo Flute Competition; she resides in New
York City.
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Winds
Bassoon
Wolfe Jensen,
Kristin
Strings
Woodwind
Viola
Clarinet
Zhurbin, Lev
Zukovsky, Michele
Percussion
Percussion
Zweifel, Feza
Kristin Wolfe Jensen, renowned performer and teacher, has been
the bassoon professor at The University of Texas at Austin since
1995, and is also on the faculty of the International Festival
Institute at Round Top and Principal Bassoonist with the River Oaks
Chamber Orchestra. In addition she has made a number of
acclaimed solo and chamber music recordings. Ms. Jensen is Codirector of the biennial Meg Quigley Vivaldi Competition for young
women bassoonists from the Americas, providing the largest prizes
of any bassoon competition in the world. An esteemed pedagogue,
she has given guest recitals and master classes at many major
American music schools and her former UT students hold major
orchestral positions and university teaching positions around the
country. Her extensive online bassoon method,
MusicandtheBassoon.org, provides an innovative, multimedia
approach to learning the bassoon.
Currently timpanist of the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa,
ON, Feza Zweifel maintains an active schedule as a versatile
performer and arranger. A graduate of the Curtis Institue of Music,
Mr. Zweifel appears regularly as an extra or substitute
percussionist/timpanist with the Cleveland Orchestra. He has been a
guest assistant principal timpanist of the Boston Symphony, NY
Philharmonic, and guest principal timpanist of the LA
Philharmonic. He is co-founder of Burning River Brass; a founding
member of Proteus 7; and has arranged extensively for both
ensembles. As an educator, Mr. Zweifel has served on the faculties
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of Cleveland St. University, Youngstown State University, and Case
Western Reserve University.
*Please be advised that this master class will occur at University of
Toronto
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6.7 Business Plan
Executive Summary
A. Introduction
B. The Key Goal
C. The Market
D. Financial Highlights
A. Introduction
The Glenn Gould School (The School) was created to advance the mission of The Royal
Conservatory (The RCM) – to develop human potential through music and arts
education – by training Canada’s most gifted young artists for careers in classical music
and opera. The School contributes to the renewal of Canada’s performing arts
institutions by training future leaders whose artistic excellence is matched by a capacity
for innovative thought, a dedication to social service, and an appreciation of the unique
ethos and values of Canada. The School focuses exclusively on performance training at
the highest level, and benchmarks leading US performance training schools that actively
compete with The GGS for Canada’s brightest young talents. The School offers postsecondary music performance training in piano, voice and orchestral instruments
currently at three levels:



Performance Diploma Program Post-Secondary
Artist Diploma Program Post-Bachelor
Rebanks Family Fellowship Program Post-Graduate
The School offers a performance-based curriculum, taught in an individualized manner
by an exceptional faculty to a small number of the most talented and hardworking
students. The School offers a unique curriculum designed to prepare students with the
st
skills required for success and relevance in the 21 century. It promotes innovative
thinking and content creation through technology programs, social service through
communications courses and outreach activity, and integrative thinking through
coursework connections.
B. The Key Goal
The Glenn Gould School aspires to be one of the five leading music performance
schools in the world. The School is one of a handful of institutions in North America,
and the only one in Canada, that concentrate exclusively on music performance training
for instrumentalists and singers who wish to pursue professional careers as performers
of classical and operatic repertoire.
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The School benchmarks the following specialist performance training institutions:
o
o
o
o
The
The
The
The
Curtis Institute (Philadelphia)
Colburn School (Los Angeles)
Juilliard School (New York City)
Royal Academy of Music (London)
The Glenn Gould School compares favourably to these benchmark schools in many
measures of program quality and its facilities in the TELUS Centre for Performance and
Learning are arguably the finest in the world. Its piano and strings faculty, with the
recent addition of US-based Canadian cellist Desmond Hoebig and violinist Victor
Danchenko, are on a par with the leading US schools. Its Vocal Department has a
superb track record of developing talent, having placed ten singers in recent years as
soloists with leading opera companies such as New York City Opera, The Metropolitan
Opera, the Canadian Opera Company, and Royal Opera House, Covent Garden.
C. The Market
The Glenn Gould School is primarily a school for Canada’s aspiring professional
musicians in the classical and operatic traditions. In any given year, Canadian students
represent approximately 70-75% of the School’s 125 – 130 students.
The School attracts gifted students from the United States, Europe and Asia who are
attracted by the opportunity to work with one of the School’s internationally acclaimed
faculty members. This international dimension enriches the experience of Canadian
students, challenges them to meet international standards in the field, and allows them
to build relationships within what is increasingly a global profession.
The School’s ideal applicant is in individual who has both ambition and talent, and is
prepared to invest the thousands of hours of effort it takes to distinguish oneself in a
very competitive international field.
Students are initially drawn to The Glenn Gould School by the high caliber and
acknowledged success of faculty members. Once they begin the process of exploring
what the School has to offer, they are also attracted by the small scale, supportive
culture, access to master classes, performance opportunities, practice facilities, and
nearby cultural amenities.
Knowledgeable applicants, particularly those applying for post-graduate programs,
realize that networking is the key to obtaining employment in this field, and they
especially value the School’s extraordinary master class program, one of the finest
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available in the world. The School’s main competitive weakness in attracting students is
the lack of Glenn Gould School Degree.
D. Financial Highlights
• The projected expense budget of The GGS in the 2015/16 year is $6,062,146
• The main projected revenue elements of the 2015/16 budget are:
i.
Earned revenue, RCM financial contribution, Scholarship revenues, Bursary
Assistance, and Sponsorships totaled: $4,301,145
ii.
Government grants totalling $2,031,000, including Canadian Heritage’s
contribution of $1,750,000.
In order to entice the most gifted Canadians to stay in Canada at The GGS for their
professional training – the rationale for the School’s existence - The Royal Conservatory
has made GGS scholarships a priority for its fund raising program.
Since 2011/12, the Conservatory has worked to increase its scholarship and sponsorship
support and is now able to offer 40% of its student body full tuition scholarships, each
of which offset the full published tuition of the GGS ($25,000 value). A further 9 full
tuition scholarships are in various stages of negotiation.
The Conservatory’s endowment, interest from which is directed to GGS scholarships,
has also grown substantially over the past few years, from $8.6 million as recently as
2008 to over $20 million in February 2015.
In 2013/14 the Conservatory launched the Growing Greatness Campaign, with a private
sector fund raising goal of $40 million. A key plank of the Campaign is to generate full
tuition scholarships for additional GGS students. The campaign has brought in an
additional 11 full scholarships since its launch.
The Conservatory has requested an increase in its annual operating grant from the
Canada Arts Training Fund of $500,000 for 2016/17 in support of the effort to provide a
tuition-free environment for the best Canadian students.
This investment will help the Conservatory make a stronger case to private sector
donors who typically want to see the Government participate in major funding projects.
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Included in the $40 million campaign goal are several endowed chairs over the next
several years. Michael and Sonja Koerner have recently endowed a Chair in Cello at the
GGS, the first of its kind for the School.
RCM President Peter Simon, GGS Dean James Anagnoson, and Associate Dean Barry
Shiffman will lead the GGS fund raising efforts. Both Dean Anagnoson and Associate
Dean Shiffman are performers of national, and indeed international, reputation.
Dr. Simon, a gifted pianist, is one of Canada’s most dynamic fund raisers, and networks
extensively with leaders and acclaimed faculty of the world’s best music schools. Dean
Anagnoson is the founder of the Anagnoson and Kinton piano duo that has toured
Canada and internationally for more than three decades. Associate Dean Shiffman was
a founding member of the St. Lawrence String Quartet. Both have national visibility and
extensive networks within the music community.
While the focus of the Scholarship Campaign is to increase private sector funding for
GGS students through scholarships, the campaign is also designed to build relationships
with the philanthropic community that, in time, will lead to future investments in
programming at the GGS.
Given that the School’s US competitors The Curtis Institute and The Colburn School
offer full room and board to each student, the GGS anticipates that the focus of its fund
raising will shift to providing support for living expenses for the most sought after
students, once the Growing Greatness Campaign has been completed.
In addition to scholarships, The GGS has two other priorities for future investment that
are necessary to sustain the growth of the School’s program excellence and reputation,
and attract the most promising Canadian students.
1. Faculty Development
The School aims to recruit a new Vocal Artist in Residence by the 2016/17 school year
to assist the School in attracting the most gifted singers in Canada and internationally,
and to build connections for the School with leading opera companies. The GGS has
requested an increase in its base funding from the Canada Arts Training Fund of
$125,000 annually beginning in 2016/17 for this purpose. The GGS has demonstrated
through its great success in placing soloists with leading opera companies that it is
ready for the increased international visibility and connections that the Artist in
Residence will bring to the School.
2. Marketing/Recruitment
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To realize its goal of recruiting the finest Canadian students, The GGS must add a fulltime Recruitment Officer to identify and engage gifted youth, build relationships with
their families, and guide applicants through the application process.
The School’s leading competitors all have well-funded recruitment offices. At the
moment, there is no one on the GGS staff assigned specifically to scout for the top
prospects and to coordinate faculty visits and communications.
The most gifted students and their families begin to explore post-secondary training
opportunities as early as age 12-13. A number of prestigious international music
competitions, such as the Gina Bachauer Competition, have created younger age
divisions to offer competition experience to gifted students. Top music schools send
their recruiters to identify and engage gifted students and their families at these events.
The Royal Conservatory was fortunate to have a personal introduction to Calgary pianist
Jan Lisiecki, thanks to its relationship with Yamaha Canada representative Jun Fujimoto,
who met Lisiecki when the latter was 12 years of age, and encouraged him to attend
The GGS. Lisiecki, who has launched an international performing career while studying
at The GGS, was highly sought after by several of the world’s leading music schools.
Recruitment officers from The GGS’ benchmark peers are able to make personal contact
of this kind with all of the top Canadian students from age 12 onwards. Often, they
invite top prospects to visit their institution. They aim to be included in the final short
list for the top prospects by the time they are making their final decision around the age
of 17-18.
By contrast, The GGS is currently only able to engage gifted prospects when they meet
its faculty at summer music festivals, or through the good graces of partners like
Yamaha Canada.
The recruitment officer’s relationship with the family is often decisive, as the student
and family increasingly come to rely on his or her guidance over time. Needless to say,
the recruiter is often on the road, visiting family, attending concerts, competitions, or
summer festivals.
The GGS has requested that Canadian Heritage increase its core funding under the
Canada Arts Training Fund to cover the cost of a Recruitment Officer, beginning in
2016/17 The combined cost of salary, benefits, production of support materials, and
travel for this position are estimated at $120,000 annually.
The Recruitment Officer will double as Alumni Officer for the GGS, tracking the
whereabouts of graduates, encouraging them to list the GGS in their concert programs,
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and producing an e-newsletter to help them stay informed of the achievements of peers
and of the progress of the GGS.
The GGS will benefit by learning of the outstanding career achievements of its
graduates. This information will help The GGS engage private sector donors and report
to the Canada Arts Training Fund and other government programs on the outcomes of
its training program.
Business Description
A. Vision
B. History
C. The Programs
D. Program Cost and Tuition
E. Key Goals and Strategies
F. What Makes The Glenn Gould School Unique
A. Vision
The School aspires to become one of the world’s top five institutions for the training of
performers in the classical music and operatic traditions. It will achieve this goal
through: the work of a faculty made up of the very finest musicians; a personalized
teaching approach within a supportive environment; exceptional facilities; competitive
student aid; a unique and forward looking curriculum that stresses excellence of
artistry, innovation, social responsibility, integration of knowledge, and a strong
understanding of and connection to the music profession.
B. History
The Glenn Gould School was formally instituted in 1997 as a Canadian alternative to
leading international performance training institutions. The Royal Conservatory has a
long and distinguished history in performance training. Its Senior School was Canada’s
leading performance training institution in the pre- and post-World War II era, when
future legends such as pianist Glenn Gould, opera stars Teresa Stratas and Jon Vickers,
and conductor Mario Bernardi all studied there.
Beginning in 1953, the Conservatory’s operations were merged with the Faculty of
Music of the University of Toronto. Over the next three decades, the Conservatory’s
Opera Division and other professional training programs were transferred to the
University. During the 1960’s, 1970’s and early 1980’s, the Conservatory’s advanced
training programs were merged with the programs of the University of Toronto’s Faculty
of Music.
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The renaissance of the Conservatory’s advanced performance training began in the late
1980’s when The Royal Conservatory began to plan for a formal separation from the
University, which took effect in 1991.
In 1987, the Conservatory added an Artist Diploma program for advanced piano. During
the early 1990’s, voice and string programs were added. Following designation of these
programs as a nationally important resource by Canadian Heritage in 1997, a full
orchestra program was added and enrolment grew to a high of 165 before it settled at
the ideal level of 125.
The performance programs were rebranded as The Glenn Gould School, in honour of
the Conservatory’s most famous graduate. The School continues to be inspired by the
artistic achievements and the vision of its legendary namesake. The School aims to
carry on the ground-breaking work of Glenn Gould in performance, content creation, as
well as communications and technology, by training students in the use of technology
for career promotion and development, as well as teaching, and by offering them
hands-on experience in creating community-oriented programming.
Since its inception The School has produced a new generation of acclaimed performers
and artistic leaders who have established careers with many of our nation’s arts
organizations as well as with international opera companies and orchestras.
C. The Programs
The Glenn Gould School offers university level music performance training in piano,
voice and orchestral instruments:



Performance Diploma Program (Post-Secondary)
Artist Diploma Program (Post-Bachelor)
Rebanks Family Fellowship Program (Post-Graduate)
Performance Diploma Program (PDP)
Four year program, post-secondary, full-time. This is the program that has
been selected for degree granting purposes.
Instruction in: Materials (Theory, Keyboard Harmony, Aural Skills), Music History,
Research Methodology, Conducting, Performance Awareness, Career Management,
Communications, Teaching Methodology, Technology for Performers, Performing Arts
Criticism, Chamber Music (including Sonata Repertoire and Piano Duos), Art Song,
Opera Scene Study, Language and Diction, Canadian Repertoire, Orchestra, Choir, Art
History, English, German, Italian
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PDP graduates have the opportunity to obtain a Bachelor of Music (Performance) with
Thompson Rivers University-Open Learning (TRU-OL) via an articulation agreement
between The School and TRU-OL. It is critical that this program becomes
approved for its own Glenn Gould School Bachelor of Music, Performance
(Honours) Degree.
Artist Diploma Program (ADP)
Two year program, post-bachelor, full-time
Instruction in: Performance Awareness, Communications, Performing Arts Criticism,
Chamber Music (including Sonata Repertoire and Piano Duos), Vocal Repertoire,
Orchestral Literature, Opera, Languages, Orchestra, New Music Ensemble,
Programming Classical Music, Theory/Analysis
Rebanks Family Fellowship Program
One-year program that offers six emerging artists who have already completed a
graduate degree or diploma a supportive environment for refining repertoire, exploring
career opportunities, and building relationships in the music industry
Fellows take master classes, private studio lessons, performance opportunities, and
coaching opportunities as they are able to benefit from, while serving as mentors for
GGS students, and performing in the RCO as section leaders.
The GGS provides additional opportunities for career development and networking,
including the creation of professional promotional video and CD recordings.
The School arranges for each Fellow to be placed in a prestigious international summer
music festival.
The unique program is directed by Barry Shiffman, founding member of the St.
Lawrence String Quartet, which received substantial support during its formative period
through a pilot quartet presidency project in 1990.
D. Program Cost and Tuition
In this business plan and its ongoing financial planning, The School differentiates
between the actual cost per student of the program, the published tuition cost, and
average tuition paid by students.
The actual cost per student is derived by dividing the expense of The School by the
number of students:
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Total Program Cost
Number Students
Average Program Cost/Student
2016/17
2017/18
2018/19
2019/20
2020/21
(Budget)
(Budget)
(Budget)
(Budget)
(Budget)
$6,743,000
$6,888,000
$7,125,000
$7,250,000
$7,300,000
125
125
125
125
125
$53,944
$55,104
$57,000
$58,000
$58,400
E. Three Key Goals and Strategies
The Glenn Gould School’s goal is to become one of the top five music performance
schools in the world. In order to achieve this goal The School needs additional funds to
address several competitive disadvantages in relation to its benchmark peers.
First and foremost, The School must become more competitive by offering its own
degree. This is central to the sustainable success of The Glenn Gould School.
Secondly, The School must raise its level of private sector support and available
scholarship funding. While the program of study is competitive in many respects with
leading US competitors, Canadian students may still elect to attend a US school solely
because they can attend tuition-free. Top US institutions like Curtis Institute and The
Colburn School also provide room and board free of charge. Meanwhile, the GGS has
full scholarships for only 40% of its students and only a few which include room and
board.
Thirdly, The Glenn Gould School must create a strong recruitment function if it is to
realize its goal of attracting the finest Canadian students, supplemented by leading
international students. The School’s reputation has been built primarily by word of
mouth. However, many Canadian teachers and students still do not know the School
exists, and The School also suffers from the lack of a recruitment officer to help gifted
young students develop a sense of affiliation to The GGS and negotiate the application
process. The addition of a recruitment function and greater support for marketing will
also yield significant returns in terms of strengthening awareness of The School among
the philanthropic community.
F. What Makes The Glenn Gould School Unique
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The School undertakes comparative analysis of its strengths and weaknesses compared
to leading performance oriented schools such as the Curtis Institute, The Juilliard
School, and The Colburn School. It looks at such key measures as













Quality and international standing of leading faculty members
Quality of and frequency of contact with visiting artists
Performance and master class opportunities per student
Length of time each student receives over the school year with core instructor
Access to administration and faculty members
Access to practice facilities
Acoustical quality of performance spaces
Access to professional caliber orchestral/operatic performance space
Access to Rehearsal Hall for chamber music, orchestra sectionals
Library holdings per student
Endowment funds per student
Scholarship funds per student
Tuition paid per student
Since its inception in 1997 The School has assembled an exceptional teaching faculty
led by internationally recognized musicians. There are a number of factors that provide
a framework for evaluating the quality of faculty. These include:




The success of students in international competitions
Recognition by peers through inclusion in international competition juries and
summer music festivals drawing students from around the world
The capacity to recruit students internationally
International performing careers or positions with leading orchestras and opera
companies.
On these measures, The Glenn Gould School compares favourably to benchmark
schools. The piano program has had the most international success and recognition,
drawing students from around the world, a number of whom have won or placed highly
in leading international music competitions.
Dean James Anagnoson, John Perry, John O’Conor, and Leon Fleisher, the core piano
faculty members, all attract leading talent, have participated by invitation on the juries
of major international competitions. Leon Fleisher is universally acknowledged to be
among the greatest pianists and piano pedagogues of his generation.
The Strings program has had success recruiting students internationally, and placing
graduates in Principal Chairs with leading orchestras around the world. GGS faculty
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member Paul Kantor, one of the most successful violin instructors in North America, has
attracted high caliber students from the US and internationally as well as from Canada.
The recruitment of Barry Shiffman, GGS Associate Dean and Director of Chamber Music,
has made it possible for Mr. Kantor to double his violin class; Mr. Shiffman co-teaches
these students as well as teaching students he has personally recruited to the GGS. Mr.
Shiffman has an international network within the strings world thanks to his career with
the St. Lawrence String Quartet and his leadership of the Banff International String
Quartet Competition, through which he is in touch with the leading violin instructors
and programs around the world.
Mr. Shiffman has already taken several measures to strengthen the chamber music
program – a core component of the string program – notably with the addition of a
chamber music competition within the School. Mr. Shiffman was also instrumental in
creating the Rebanks Family Fellowship post-graduate program, filling the need for a
bridge in Canada between the completion of formal training and the launch of a
performing career, for the most promising young artists.
The Strings faculty has been greatly enhanced by the addition of cellists Andrés Diaz
and US-based Canadian cellist Desmond Hoebig, and violinist Victor Danchenko, a
former student of the legendary Russian violinist David Oistrakh.
The Brass and Woodwinds program’s key faculty leaders are Joaquin Valdepeñas,
Principal Clarinet of the Toronto Symphony, who is a highly regarded Aspen Music
Festival faculty member and performer and was recently appointed Resident Conductor
of the Royal Conservatory Orchestra, and Andrew McCandless, Principal Trumpet,
Toronto Symphony Orchestra, who formerly played and taught in the US and has a
large network there.
Students of Jean MacPhail of the Vocal Department have achieved remarkable
international success over the past decade; they include soprano Isabel Bayrakdarian
who has appeared with the Metropolitan Opera and leading opera houses in Europe.
Ten recent graduates of the GGS Vocal Program have become regular soloists with the
Canadian Opera Company and Opera Atelier, including Mireille Asselin who made her
debut as a soloist with the Metropolitan Opera in 2014/15.
Further development of the Vocal Department through the creation of a Vocal Artist-inResidence is a key priority for the School. The Artist in Residence will help position the
School to attract the finest young talents both in Canada and internationally, and will
help The GGS build connections to leading opera companies around the world.
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The School’s faculty has recruited students from across Canada and from a dozen
countries around the world annually (principally from the United States, Eastern Europe
and Asia), despite the fact that the School lacks a full-time recruiter to provide support
and visibility at festivals and workshops.
The Glenn Gould School has a small enrolment of 125 students allowing for individual
attention within a nurturing environment. The small enrolment provides opportunities
for each student to take part in master classes, orchestra concerts, and chamber music
from their first year onwards. In many larger schools, such as The Juilliard School,
participation in the orchestra or opera production is reserved for senior students (e.g.
rd
th
3 and 4 year undergraduate students and graduate students).
The ratio of master classes to student population is greater than one to one, meaning
that each student has the opportunity to appear in several master classes each year
(typically 3-4 students appear in each class). The master class program offers all
students the opportunity to learn by observing the world’s finest musicians coaching
students in both technical and interpretative details of various performance traditions
and repertoire.
Students also have access - through complimentary rush tickets - to several concerts
each year by the world’s finest performers taking place in Koerner Hall, The Royal
Conservatory’s spectacular concert venue. A number of these performers also
participate in the GGS master class program.
Glenn Gould School students receive significantly more time with their core instructor
over the course of the school year than in several benchmark schools. The School’s
students receive 39 hours of core instrumental instruction compared to 24 at the Royal
Academy of Music, for instance.
The tradition of classical music training is based upon the passing down of many
intricate details and specialized techniques from one generation to the next. Prior to the
advent of organized schools of music, many performers received their training by living
and working with a master musician – a form of apprenticeship. The Glenn Gould
School recognizes that the most important part of its students’ education is the time
they spend with their primary instructor.
Students and graduates of The Glenn Gould School have reached the highest level of
excellence, enabling many to go on to international performing careers and leadership
positions in orchestras, ensembles and schools of music.
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The School is especially proud that 100% of recent graduates have either found
employment in their chosen field, or have continued their studies at the post graduate
level.
In September 2008, The School moved into the TELUS Centre for Performance and
Learning, a brand new state of the art facility that is fully competitive with any music
school facility in the world.
The TELUS Centre’s new facilities provide every student with virtually unlimited access
to practice studios equipped with fine pianos that are well maintained through an inhouse maintenance program.
The ratio of practice studios to students – at nearly one studio to every two students –
is significantly better than at leading benchmark schools such as The Colburn School in
Los Angeles (just under three students per studio).
The TELUS Centre has three performing spaces that meet the highest international
acoustical standards. Koerner Hall is a 1135-seat venue that has earned accolades from
leading international performers since its opening in 2009. The Emerson Quartet have
described it as one of the top five Halls of its size in the world. The Glenn Gould
School’s Royal Conservatory Orchestra concerts and annual Spring Opera Production
take place in Koerner Hall.
The School’s students perform their annual recitals in the acoustically refined and
beautifully appointed 240-seat Mazzoleni Concert Hall. The Royal Conservatory
Orchestra and chamber music ensembles rehearse in the Conservatory Theatre, a 150seat venue with excellent acoustics that also hosts intimate concerts, lectures, and
cabaret events.
The School’s student body has access on an as-needed basis to members of the faculty
and administration, including Dean James Anagnoson and Associate Dean and Director
of Chamber Music Barry Shiffman. The Student Council organizes annual meetings for
all students with members of the administration, where policy matters and resource
needs and scheduling issues are openly discussed. The School has earned the trust of
students by listening carefully to their needs and responding quickly when changes in
policy or scheduling are required.
The School’s Library is relatively new, but on the basis of holdings per student is
already competitive with its benchmark schools. The Library’s central location is an
asset to students and offers excellent access to resources and to computers for on-line
research.
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The Library’s overall holdings of 47,000 books, scores, and recordings compares
favourably with the Colburn School (20,000), and on a holdings per student basis, with
the Juilliard School (376 per student for The GGS compared to 195 per student for
Juilliard). Only The Curtis Institute has a higher ratio of holdings to students.
Glenn Gould School students have access to a multitude of large and small arts
organizations located in the Greater Toronto Area, including the Toronto Symphony
Orchestra, the Canadian Opera Company, the National Ballet, Tafelmusik Baroque
Orchestra, the Esprit Orchestra, Music Toronto Chamber Music, the Royal Ontario
Museum, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Toronto International Film Festival, and
numerous instrument shops and music stores, and two classical radio stations.
Orchestral Program
Two-thirds of the student body is orchestral; approximately 80 students each year.
Every student plays in the Orchestra in every school year throughout their time at the
GGS, unlike most large school programs where third and fourth year students make up
the orchestra.
The GGS produces four Royal Conservatory Orchestra (RCO) concerts each year. RCO
concerts are directed by guest conductors including the Music Directors of the Toronto
Symphony Orchestra and the Canadian Opera Company.
The RCO performs in a professional concert venue, with professional production values;
its concerts are scheduled during Project Weeks where all students are released from
their regular academic schedules, devoting their time to rehearsing and practicing for
the RCO performance.
The Project Weeks introduce GGS students to the time constraints and intensive
preparation cycle typical of professional orchestras
A majority of The GGS’s orchestral faculty are Principal players from the Toronto
Symphony Orchestra and the Canadian Opera Company Orchestra. During the Project
Weeks, the orchestral faculty lead sectionals for the RCO; TSO clarinetist and RCO
Resident Conductor Joaquin Valdepeñas conducts the RCO in read-throughs of
repertoire each year.
At the end of each term of orchestral study is The GGS Preparatory Audition - every
orchestral student takes part in a true-to-life orchestral audition.
Several senior GGS students are engaged yearly to perform new works by Canadian and
international composers as part of the resident ensemble for the annual 21C Festival at
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The Royal Conservatory, gaining impressive experience in contemporary performance
techniques, and networking with Canada’s and the world’s leading composers and
conductors.
Vocal Program
The GGS Vocal Program mounts an annual Fall semi-staged opera production in
Mazzoleni Concert Hall. The Fall opera may be semi- or full staged and may involve an
orchestral ensemble. Preparation for the Fall production begins in September, with
performances in November.
The GGS mounts a fully-staged opera each Spring in Koerner Concert Hall, accompanied
by The Royal Conservatory Orchestra. Given the size of the Vocal program, not only are
all post-bachelor level students cast in the opera, but so are many of the postsecondary level students, which is almost unheard of in most university-level vocal
programs. Training for the Spring opera production begins in January, with
performances in late March.
Being resident in a city that is home to the Canadian Opera Company, Opera Atelier and
a number of contemporary music theatre companies, The GGS has access to visiting
artists, and experienced voice and acting coaches and adjudicators.
Piano Program
The GGS is fortunate to have Leon Fleisher, John Perry, Dean James Anagnoson, and
Dr. John O’Conor on its piano faculty. It is widely acknowledged that these faculty
members are among the leading teachers in the world today. Piano students participate
in an extensive master class program and numerous outreach opportunities, and as a
result have distinguished themselves repeatedly in arenas such as international
competitions.
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Music Technology Laboratory
The RCM operates a Music Technology Laboratory that is outfitted with the hardware
and software necessary to equip GGS students with the technological knowledge they
now need in the outside world – e.g. recording and editing skills, and website design.
The Marketplace
A. The Customer
B. Industry Factors and Trends
C. The Competition
A. The Customer
Customer Segments
Post-Secondary:Piano, Voice, Orchestral Instruments
Post-Bachelor: Piano, Voice, Orchestral Instruments
Post-Graduate: Piano, Voice, Orchestral Instruments
The Target Customer
The GGS target customer is a highly talented post-secondary, post-bachelor or
post-graduate music student whose gifts are at such a level that they have a
realistic possibility for an international performing career or a leadership position
in an important performing organization.
Typically, such students self-identify at an early age of 12-13 through their
success in the youth divisions of international competitions such as the Gina
Bachauer Competition
Availability of Places
The GGS student enrolment is approximately 125 students, comprising
approximately 20 pianists, 25 vocalists, and 80 orchestral musicians.
Of this group, approximately 70-75% are typically Canadians, with the balance
split between Americans and students from Asia and Eastern Europe.
Annually, The GGS graduates 40 – 50 students, which results in the same
number of available spaces in the School for the next academic year.
Because The GGS is a small program, with set maximum numbers of
instruments, the 40 – 50 available spaces cannot simply be filled with talented
musicians – they must be filled with talented musicians of specific instruments.
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B. Industry Trends
Performance-oriented Conservatories
The leading performance training institutions offer superb faculty members, full
scholarships, strong connections to the profession, an abundance of performing
opportunities, great facilities and a richly diverse and broad cultural environment.
Currently the four leading American schools are:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
The
The
The
The
Curtis Institute (Philadelphia)
Colburn School (Los Angeles)
Juilliard School (New York)
Yale School of Music (New Haven)
Other great international schools such as the Moscow Conservatory (Russia), the Liszt
Academy (Hungary) and the Royal Academy of Music (United Kingdom) offer excellent
instruction, but are limited financially. In practice, the American schools are the leaders
in attracting the best students from around the world, including many of the finest
Canadian students.
Demographic:
The GGS student body:



Ranges in age from 17-31
Is split between the Performance Diploma Program (17-26 year olds) and the
Artist Diploma Program (22-31 year olds)
Is divided 45% Male and 55% Female
Sales and Marketing
A. Positioning
B. Pricing
C. Promotion
D. Sales and Customer Service
A. Positioning
The Glenn Gould School is known as a place where students receive sufficient attention
and time to develop their full capacity as artists and are connected to the great artists
of the world.
The School’s innovative curriculum provides students with the skills to utilize technology
and to expand their communication ability in order to engage audiences. Subjects are
fully integrated and the faculty works as a team for the benefit of the student.
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GGS faculty members are among the world’s most respected artist-teachers.
The TELUS Centre facilities are state of the art.
Numerous performing opportunities are provided for our students.
The level of financial assistance is generally high.
Urban location exposes students to a wide range of cultural experiences and
connections.
o A significant weakness is the School’s matriculation agreement with Thompson
Rivers University, under which GGS undergraduate students can earn a BMus
degree; Thompson Rivers is a relatively new university, and lacks standing with the
parents of many prospective students.
o The GGS has made it a priority to have its own degree no later than September
2016, the 20th anniversary of the Glenn Gould School.
o
o
o
o
o
B. Pricing PDP/ADP Domestic
Average Published Tuition
Average Tuition Paid
Average Financial Assistance to
offset Tuition
Comparisons:
As of 2015/16
$25,000
$3,369
$21,631
Advertised Tuition:
School
Bachelor’s Degree
2012/2013 (Domestic/Visa)
Glenn Gould School
(CAD$)
$25,000
American
Curtis Institute of Music (1)
$0
The Juilliard School (2)
$35,140 USD
The Colburn School
$0
Yale School of Music (3)
N/A
International
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Royal Academy of Music
$13,613/$28,964 USD
Moscow Conservatory
$9,200 USD
Liszt Academy
$7,596-$9,299 USD
Sources: Websites: Curtis Institute, Juilliard School, Colburn School, Yale School of
Music, Royal Academy of Music
Notes:
(1) Scholarship at the Curtis Institute is valued at $36,000 US for a Bachelor of Music.
Room and board also board provided.
(2) Many Juilliard students receive considerable reductions of tuition with most receiving
full tuition waivers.
(3) Many Yale students are provided with fellowship to cover living expenses.
Program Promotional Materials
Prospectus
The GGS prospectus contains general information about The RCM, the School and the
Programs, and is distributed to prospective students through agreements with other
institutions, at summer camps and festivals, and by leading faculty, the Dean and
Associate Dean, as well as on an as-requested basis. All of the information contained in
the prospectus is duplicated on the website. The prospectus was redesigned and
published in summer 2010, and has a five year lifespan. The prospectus does not
include pricing information (as this changes year to year).
Flyers
The GGS produces program-specific flyers in-house for specific initiatives
Postcards
The GGS produces program-specific postcards for specific initiatives – e.g. a brass
postcard for the International Women’s Brass Conference 2010
Performance Promotional Materials
Concert Season Brochure
GGS concerts are included in The Royal Conservatory concert season brochure;
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350,000 are printed of which 6,000 are direct-mailed;
150,000 are distributed through The Globe & Mail;
75,000 are distributed through a tourism mailing;
40,000 are displayed in racks, both locally and regionally;
and the remaining brochures are distributed at “street level” through The RCM Box
Office,
and events
Newsletters
The RCM produces two printed newsletters and one electronic newsletter:
Motif is produced by The RCM Development Department 2 - 4 quarterly and distributed
to 10,000 donors, sponsors (representing individuals, corporations and foundations),
and (representing volunteers, the Board of Directors, the Campaign Cabinet, and the
Conservatory Council.)
Music Matters is the official newsletter of Royal Conservatory in Canada and the USA.
It is published 4 – 6 times per year and distributed to teachers and examiners across
North America.
Interlude is a RCM electronic newsletter that is distributed quarterly via e-mail to
The RCM’s mailing list (currently 70,000), which comprises patrons, RCM Examinations
clients, students and staff.
The GGS’s students and programs are regularly featured in the newsletters, which
exposes The GGS and its programs to knowledgeable and interested audiences across
the country.
Word of Mouth
Private Teachers
(1) The RCM and GGS private teaching faculty promote The GGS’s programs to their
talented, pre-university students.
(2) Many faculty members adjudicate at music festivals (e.g. Canadian Music
Competition, Kiwanis) across Canada and can advise GGS Administration about
promising prospects.
(3) Many GGS faculty teach and perform at summer music festivals (e.g. Banff, Orford,
Aspen, Domaine Forget) and use these opportunities to recruit prospective students.
Current Students
GGS students interact with non-GGS students in part-time jobs, at summer festivals,
and in RCO concerts when extra musicians are required. Their testimonials about The
GGS serve as encouragement to those students to investigate The GGS and its
programs.
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Graduates
GGS graduates leave The GGS to pursue Master’s degrees, win orchestral positions,
form chamber ensembles, etc. These students speak highly about their time at The
GGS, they include The GGS in their bios, and they encourage fellow students and
performers to consider The GGS and its programs.
Visiting Artists
The GGS invites over 60 different visiting artists to The GGS each academic year. These
Artists listen to and work with The GGS’s highly talented students, and they speak
highly about The GGS’s programs to their colleagues and their students when they
return home.
D. Sales and Customer Service
In an effort to make The GGS accessible and to better serve our present, future and
potential customers:
Pre-screening by DVD is required of all applicants.
Live auditions are scheduled in Toronto.
In the event that candidates are unable to attend a live audition, they may submit a
DVD and complete the interview component by telephone. Typically such students are
only admitted if a GGS faculty member vouches for their performance ability.
The GGS employs a Student Services Manager, whose responsibilities include providing
housing information, liaising with The GGS Student Council, and interfacing daily with
GGS students.
The Student Services Manager creates and distributes a weekly e-bulletin newsletter,
which includes academic information, notes of congratulation for competitions won and
major performances, and job and accommodation postings.
We actively promote our student “Musicians for Hire”, which allows students to get
playing engagements through the course of the year and therefore earn some money.
The GGS Administration actively pursues paid special event engagements for students,
which provide both income and performance opportunities.
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The GGS offers substantial scholarship funding to all students, including some full
scholarships; the list of scholarships continues to grow.
The GGS offers bursary assistance for students who demonstrate financial need.
The GGS operates an extensive “work study” program which offers approximately
seventy positions ranging in hours from 1 – 10 per week, thereby enabling students to
earn money with which to pay their tuition.
Business Operations
A. GGS Administration
B. RCM Administration
C. Committees and Advisors
D. Facilities
E. Information Technology
F. Suppliers and Alliances
A. GGS Administration
RCM President: Dr. Peter Simon
Doctorate in Music Performance; proven track record in fundraising and relationship
building; visionary
Key Responsibilities
Growing Greatness campaign leadership; external relationship building; some faculty
recruitment
Dean: James Anagnoson
Master of Music degree from The Juilliard School; Bachelor of Music Degree from The
Eastman School of Music; highly regarded Canadian performer and pedagogue
Key Responsibilities
Artistic and academic vision and direction of school; external relationship building;
financial management; faculty recruitment
Associate Dean & Director of Chamber Music: Barry Shiffman
Bachelor of Music in Performance; founding member of the St. Lawrence String
Quartet; Director of the Banff String Quartet Competition
Key Responsibilities
Academic programming; chamber music; relationship building with students and
faculty; outreach
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Manager, Operations: Jeremy Trupp
Bachelor of Music – Brandon University; Artist Diploma, - The Glenn Gould School
Key Responsibilities
Day-to-day operations; budgeting and monitoring; internal and external relationship
building; committee management; contracts, special events
Registrar: Gilles Thibodeau
Bachelor of Music –University of Western Ontario; Artist Diploma - The Glenn Gould
School
Key Responsibilities
Student registration; relationship building with students; academic schedule; student
record keeping; academic liaison with Thompson Rivers University
Performance Manager: Gillian Cummings
Bachelor of Arts in Music - University of Toronto, Master of Arts in Journalism University of Western Ontario; experience working with artists and musicians; event
management and marketing experience
Key Responsibilities
Management of all publicized performances, master classes; concert marketing;
manages Recital Program
Orchestra & Opera Production Manager: Ariel Martin-Smith
Experience in opera productions; Bachelor of Music
Key Responsibilities
Management of opera productions and vocal program performances; main contact for
orchestra students and faculty; plans RCO concert season, liaison with guest conductors
and artists
Admissions and Student Services Manager: Michaela Dawalibi
Bachelor of Music
Key Responsibilities
Main contact for new students; recruitment; admissions and auditions; Work Study
Program, tuition collection; liaison with provincial and national student assistant
programs
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B. RCM Administration
RCM President: Dr. Peter Simon
Doctorate in Music Performance; proven track record in fundraising and relationship
building
Key Responsibilities
Growing Greatness campaign; external relationship building; some faculty recruitment
RCM Chief Operating Officer: Tony Flynn
Held senior management positions as a financial executive with some of Canada’s best
known companies
Key Responsibilities
Responsible for The RCM’s Finance, Human Resources, Information Systems and
Facilities functional areas
Senior Vice-President, Research and Education: Angela Elster
Bachelor of Arts (Music Education); Master of Arts (Curriculum); PhD Candidate;
musician, researcher and educator by training; proven track record in arts
administration
Key Responsibilities
Facilitates program planning processes, assessment and evaluation to insure high
quality programming, consistency and excellence of instruction in meeting Royal
Conservatory objectives
Executive Director, Performing Arts
Mervon Mehta
Key Responsibilities
Experience programming and presenting concerts, including negotiating with artists
Develop and implement artistic programming for Koerner Hall; work with The GGS to
ensure that guest artists also deliver master classes to GGS students
VP, Institution Advancement: Shawn St. Michael
Key Responsibilities
Experience fundraising in the not-for-profit sector; ever increasing knowledge of the art
form; working in partnership with The GGS Dean to achieve GGS fundraising targets for
scholarships, special events, and sponsorships
Accounting Department
Experience in accounting and finance
Key Responsibilities
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Administering payroll; accounts payable and receivable; bank financing; internal, public
and funders reporting
Marketing & Communications Department
Experience in concert promotion, artist relationships, special event planning, branding,
marketing
Key Responsibilities
RCM Branding, and external marketing
Information Technology Department
Software and Hardware
Key Responsibilities
Providing information technology; strategizing with The GGS, The RCM Library and the
Technology Lab determine and meet their respective IT needs
Service Desk
Key Responsibilities
Experience in scheduling and customer service; manage studio and classroom usage
RCM Piano Technical Services
Key Responsibilities
Experience tuning, maintaining and rebuilding pianos ;piano maintenance and tunings
C. Committees and Advisors
Academic Review Committee
Comprised of five members: Dean, Associate Dean, Registrar, and two GGS Faculty
Department Head
Meets monthly to review prospective and ongoing programs and make academic policy
recommendations to GGS Divisional Committee. Deals with requests and appeals from
individual students
Divisional Committee
Comprised of 13 members: Dean, three GGS Administrators, one student
representative, and seven Faculty Department Heads
Meets three times per year to review prospective and ongoing programs and make
academic policy recommendations to RCM Academic Council
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Curriculum Review Committee
Comprised of GGS and RCM faculty and administration, with input from internal and
external experts
Regularly reviewing the PDP and ADP curriculums to ensure quality and relevancy
RCM Academic Council
Comprised of Administrative and Faculty members of the five RCM divisions, and one
GGS student representative
Meets three times per year to receive, review and, if applicable, approved
recommendations brought forward by the five Divisional Committees
GGS Appeal Committee of RCM Academic Council
Comprised of five members: Chair of Academic Council, two Faculty Department Heads,
one GGS student, and The GGS Dean
Members are chosen at the beginning of each academic year; meets on an as-needed
basis to deal with student academic appeals.
Core Faculty Advisory Group
International careers as performing artists; proven track record teaching at the postsecondary level; recruitment; advice about students and curriculum; adjudications;
performances
Advisory Council
Members of the business, philanthropic and arts communities; raise funds for and
awareness about GGS
D. Facilities
Studios
Classrooms
Library
Concert Hall
Other Performance Spaces
49
11
1
1
3
E. Information Technology
Microsoft
Office Suite
Word, Excel, Outlook
Software upgraded to Office 2010, so
that all staff are using the same version
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AS400
Registration and Tuition
Collection
Requires significant manipulation and
manual duplication
Publisher
Creation of brochures,
prospectus, Academic
Calendar
Software upgraded in December 2006 to
Microsoft Office 2003 so that all staff are
using the same version
DRUPAL
Website
New content management system for
the www.rcmusic.ca website. Launched
in June 2011.
EMS
GGS Scheduling Software
Used by GGS as internal scheduling tool.
Was purchased in Summer 2005, and
installed in Fall of 2008.
AutoCad
Architectural drawing and
design software
To be used by GGS to produce rehearsal
and performance drawings for orchestral
and opera productions. Installed in
October 2007.
Raiser’s Edge
Tracking of donors and
alumni
Used exclusively by The RCM
Development Department. Has
improved tracking of donors and
sponsors. Used to produce mailing lists
for specific purposes.
VideoConferencing
Remote instruction
Used (1) to deliver select academic
curriculum, and (2) to connect with other
schools and programs.
F. Suppliers and Alliances
Supplier/Alliance
Instruments
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Remenyi House of Music
Advice about pianos; piano appraisals; piano sales;
music purchase
The Sound Post
String Instrument appraisals; supplies
George Heinl & Co.
String Instrument appraisals; supplies
Yamaha Music
Advice about pianos; piano sales; percussion
instruments
Long and McQuade
Music purchase; ordering of curriculum related
texts; instrument rental
The Woodshed
Instrument rental and cartage
Music
Music Publishing Companies
Music rental and purchase
Canadian Music Centre
Music rental; Resource for Canadian composition
Faculty, Visiting Artists, Adjudicators
Canadian Opera Company
Faculty; opera production resource; venue for GGS
student performance opportunities.
Toronto Symphony Orchestra
Faculty; music Library resource; production
resource; source of visiting artists
National Arts Centre Orchestra
Partner in development of NACO Academy program
for pre-professional musicians
Music Toronto
Visiting Artists
Other Music Schools and Faculties
of Music in Canada and the U.S.
Faculty exchanges
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Video-Conferencing
Manhattan School of Music
Video-Conferencing partner
Mount Royal College
Video-conferencing partner
Memorial University Newfoundland
Video-conferencing partner
Acadia University
Video-conferencing partner
New World Symphony
Video-conferencing partner
National Arts Centre Orchestra
Video-conferencing partner
Marketing & Promotion
GTA Arts Organizations
Free Flyer swaps; performance opportunities
Select Music Training Organizations
Partner in audition hosting; Aspen Music Festival;
Schleswig-Holstein Festival; National Youth
Orchestra; Royal Academy of Music; Tanglewood
Music Centre; New World Symphony
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Glenn Gould School Finances
The Glenn Gould Schools offers a variety of programs which have expenses distributed
throughout as shared costs. The following lists projected annual expenses per student.
Cost of Program:
2016/17
Total program cost: $6,743,000
Number of students: 125
Average Program cost per Student: $53,944
2017/18
Total program cost: $6,888,000
Number of students: 125
Average Program cost per Student: $55,944
2018/19
Total program cost: $7,125,000
Number of students: 125
Average Program cost per Student: 57,000
2019/20
Total program cost: $7,250,000
Number of students: 125
Average Program cost per Student: 58,000
2020/21
Total program cost: $7,300,000
Number of students: 125
Average Program cost per Student: 58,400
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Fundraising plan
Fundraising for the Glenn Gould School
In 2014, The Royal Conservatory identified The Glenn Gould School as a primary focus
for its fundraising activities, seeking to increase the number and value of scholarships
available to students, and ultimately, to secure support for other elements of its
academic program
Expanding Scholarship Support
In order for The Glenn Gould School to remain a preferred choice for students
considering comparator institutions such as The Curtis Institute or the Colburn School,
which provide a wide range of grants and scholarships, The Royal Conservatory has set
the goal of securing full scholarships for each of its students for the entire course of
their studies at GGS. To support this ambition, the Conservatory has undertaken a
series of initiatives to increase philanthropic support for the scholarship program at The
Glenn Gould School.
Creation of a New Scholarship Architecture
In 2011, as part of celebrations to mark The Royal Conservatory’s 125th Anniversary,
the RCM launched “The 125 Scholarship Program”, which secured commitments to fund
the total cost of a student’s study not already supported by funding from Heritage
Canada for four years of study at $25,000 a year – a $100,000 commitment. The
program was extremely successful, and secured 22 scholarships supporting a total of 35
students when launched.
In 2014 it was recognized that with the passing of the anniversary, this funding concept
was outdated and would be confusing to prospective donors if maintained. In order to
create a structure that would both resonate in the long term and reposition the
program for broader support, The Conservatory developed a new scholarship
architecture that would enable the RCM to speak with greater clarity about the levels
and types of scholarships to prospective donors. It also allowed the RCM to
differentiate between levels of giving in donor recognition vehicles, providing a
mechanism to encourage increased private support.
Chancellor’s Scholarships: the highest level of scholarship support, providing
full tuition plus living expenses; $25,000 tuition plus a minimum living
stipend of $12,500 each year for four years— a total commitment of
$150,000
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Dean’s Scholarships: full-tuition scholarships for the duration of a student’s
program; $25,000 a year for four years—a total commitment of $100,000.
Annual Scholarships: scholarships of $500 to $24,999
The Conservatory has also encouraged donors to consider establishing endowments
with The Royal Conservatory of Music Foundation to fund named scholarships in
perpetuity. The minimum investment required to do so is $50,000, and endowed
scholarships are recognized at the appropriate level in the scholarship architecture
above based on the annual distribution amount.
Creation of the GGS Scholarship Committee
RCM students and staff speak passionately about the value and importance of
scholarships; however, it is through contact with existing scholarships supporters that
some prospective donors will come to appreciate how personally rewarding the act of
supporting these talented young artists can be.
To facilitate these conversations, The Royal Conservatory is in the process of forming
The GGS Scholarship Committee to help secure new scholarships and renew support
from existing donors. Comprised of RCM Board members and volunteers, all Committee
members will be full tuition scholarship donors themselves, and will take a leadership
role in advocating for the importance of scholarship support at The GGS with their
colleagues and peers in the donor community.
Raising Awareness and Building the Brand of the GGS Scholarship
Program
To support this greater focus on scholarship support, The Royal Conservatory has taken
a number of steps to raise the awareness and profile of the program. Most importantly,
new fundraising materials are being created exclusively for The GGS and its scholarship
program. Materials such as a dedicated GGS Scholarship Brochure will speak to the
importance of developing the new generation of great artists, the exceptional program
and facilities it provides, and will feature the School’s graduates and their success on
the world stage. They will also clearly articulate the need for major gift support to
establish full tuition scholarships at The GGS.
The Royal Conservatory has also identified opportunities to raise awareness of The GGS
Scholarship Program in the broader community. Scholarships are featured prominently
in the house program for Koerner Hall, where a dedicated advertisement speaks to the
important role a scholarship can play for a student, helping to transform an aspiring
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young artist to a world-class musician. Donor listings in the book have also been
redesigned to give greater prominence to the need for scholarship support.
Donor Recognition and Stewardship
Scholarship funding is most often an annual pledge of support for a specific academic
year; it must therefore be renewed annually, although appeals are typically made for
support over four years. To help secure the continued support of donors, and to build
awareness and attract new funding, The Royal Conservatory is developing a
comprehensive donor recognition and stewardship program for GGS scholarship
supporters.
Stewardship
The flagship event of this stewardship program is the annual Dean’s Dinner. This
exclusive event for donors who have established a Dean’s or Chancellor’s scholarship
takes place early in the academic year, and provides a forum for donors to meet or
reconnect with their scholarship student and celebrate the upcoming year. Hosted by
Chancellor Michael Koerner and James Anagnoson, Dean of The GGS, this event allows
donors to learn more about the School and its offerings, and to be inspired through
performances by some of the talented young artists of GGS. Most importantly, the
event creates a sense of community among The Conservatory’s most generous
scholarship donors, helping to develop a shared understanding of the important role
they play in developing the great artists of tomorrow, which helps to solidify their
continued and increasing support.
The Conservatory also holds the GGS Scholarship Reception, which brings together
donors at all levels with their scholarship students. Held in conjunction with a rehearsal
of The Royal Conservatory Orchestra, this event allows the students and their donors to
mingle in a more casual setting, and helps to further strengthen the bond between the
donor and the student their scholarship supports.
However, it is by seeing GGS students in performance that donors gain the best
understanding of the transformational experience their funding helps to make happen.
Throughout the academic year, RCM staff look for opportunities for scholarship donors
to connect with the students they support. They receive notification when their students
are performing in master classes or student recitals, and donors all receive invitations to
performances of The Royal Conservatory Orchestra. Where possible, GGS staff
endeavour to match the same scholarship donors and students in subsequent years,
allowing donors to watch the student’s progression over time, ideally culminating with
their graduation recital. It is by fostering these long-term relationships that The
Conservatory seeks to build a cadre of committed scholarship donors.
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Donor Recognition
A robust donor recognition program plays a vital role for fundraising organizations,
demonstrating that the institution has earned the trust and support of the donor
community, while at the same time providing a visible means of thanking its supporters.
Consequently, The Royal Conservatory has increased the recognition it provides for
scholarship donors and created new opportunities to highlight scholarship support as a
central focus of its fundraising activities.
As mentioned above, listings of full scholarship donors now appear as a separate
section in recognition listings in the Koerner Hall program. These listings also feature
prominently in The Glenn Gould School Student Brochure, which provides pictures and
home city information for every GGS student. Students who receive a Dean’s or
Chancellor’s Scholarship also have their scholarship name listed. These booklets are
made available at student performance throughout the academic year and are
frequently referred to by audience members, so they have become an important vehicle
both to recognize donors and raise awareness of the scholarship program.
Expanding Program Support
Over time, as a consistent, renewable group of scholarship supporters becomes
established, The Royal Conservatory will further develop the fundraising framework for
The Glenn Gould School to enhance support for the School on a variety of Fronts.
Precedents already exist of some of these opportunities, but they will be expanded
upon and added to over time.
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7 Regulation and Accreditation
There is no professional accreditation body associated with musical performance in
Canada. However, it is well established that The Royal Conservatory of Music has set
the national standards for music learning for 128 years.
8 Nomenclature
The nomenclature of the Glenn Gould School Honours Bachelor of Music in Performance
was assigned after reviewing programs alike across Ontario and specialized schools
such as The Juilliard School of Music. The name of this degree is intended to accurately
reflect the focus and level of program from the Glenn Gould School to prospective
students, employers, academics and the public.
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9 Program Evaluation
As previously outlined, Program evaluation and Faculty evaluation is an integrated
process. In addition to the annual program evaluation outlined below The GGS holds
full curriculum evaluation every 5-7 years. (See USB key Curriculum review 2009) as
well as internal course by course evaluation ( see USB key July 22, 2015 review and
follow-up)
Formal, Institutionally Approved Policy for the Periodic Review of Programs:
In order to insure the continuing excellence and relevance of its programs, the GGS has
a process in place by which a periodic review occurs every 5-7 years.
The first of these occurred in 2009, and another is taking place in the spring of 2015.
A less formal review occurs at the end of every academic year with the review of
course/instructor evaluations and other student feedback – any pressing issues or
required changes are addressed immediately.
CRITERIA FOR PROGRAM REVIEW:
Assessment of the continuing consistency of the program with the organization’s
mission, educational goals, and long-range plan
Assessment of the learning outcome achievements of students/graduates by
comparison with
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
the program’s stated learning outcome goals and standards
the degree level standard
the opinions of employers and students/graduates
the standards of any related regulatory, accrediting, or professional association
where appropriate, assessment of
i)
graduate employment rates
ii)
graduate satisfaction level
iii)
employer satisfaction level
iv)
student satisfaction level
v)
graduation rate
vi)
the default rate on the Ontario Student Assistance Program or other
student loan plan
vii)
student retention rates
viii) in the case of graduate programs, time to completion
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Assessment of the continuing relevance of the program to the field of practice it serves,
including evidence of revisions made to adapt to changes in the field of practice
Assessment of the continuing appropriateness of the method of delivery and curriculum
for the program’s educational goals and standards
Assessment of the continuing appropriateness of the program’s structure, method of
delivery, and curriculum for its educational goals and standards
Assessment of the continuing adequacy of the methods used for evaluating student
progress and achievement
Assessment of the efficient and effective utilization and adequacy of existing human,
physical, technological, and financial resources
Indicators of faculty performance, including the quality of teaching and supervision and
demonstrable currency in the field of specialization
Assessment of individual student work in the terminal stage of the program that reflects
exemplary, average, and minimally acceptable performance and demonstrates that the
degree level standard has been achieved.
PROGRAM REVIEW PROCESS:
Self-Study: a self-study is undertaken, with student input, by faculty members and
administrators of the program based on evidence relating to program performance
against the criteria stated above, including strengths and weaknesses, desired
improvements, and future directions.
Program Evaluation Committee: is struck by the senior administration to evaluate the
program based on
i.
ii.
the self-study
a site visit during which members of the committee normally meet with faculty
members, students, graduates, employers, and administrators to gather
information. A majority of the members must be senior academic peers (both
scholars and administrators) with relevant expertise from both outside the
institution and internal to the institution but outside the program, and free of any
conflict of interest.
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The overarching purpose of the Program Evaluation Committee report is to assess
program quality and recommend any changes needed to strengthen that quality. The
report must be addressed to the senior administration and shared with the academic
council, governing board, faculty members and students in the program, together with
a plan of action responding to the recommendations in the report.
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10 Optional Material
Letters of Support
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