Specification - Edexcel
Specification
GCE Music Technology
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Music
Technology (8MT01)
First examination 2014
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Music Technology
(9MT01)
First examination 2014
Issue 3
About this specification
Edexcel GCE in Music Technology is designed for use in school and colleges. It is a part of a suite of GCE
qualifications offered by Edexcel.
Key features of the specification
Embracing new technology
Music technology, like other forms of technology, advances rapidly. This specification provides opportunities to
embrace recent developments in the field.
Emphasis on a wide range of practical work
This Music Technology specification involves much practical work and encourages the cultivation of a wide
range of skills. Students will have opportunities to:
„„ sequence MIDI
„„ sequence audio
„„ record live instruments
„„ produce CDs
„„ compose using music technology.
Understanding technical processes and principles
Students will have opportunities to build understanding of the technical processes and principles that
underpin effective use of music technology, and comment on it in writing.
Progression to higher education (HE) and a career
There are many important opportunities in higher education, and many career possibilities for those proficient
in handling music technology. GCE in Music Technology has been widely accepted by higher education and
will continue to provide valuable experience and preparation for students aiming for HE in the subject. Music
technology careers could include work as a:
„„ sound engineer
„„ record producer
„„ teacher.
Why choose this specification?
Music technology plays a key role in music across the world. This qualification (the only Advanced Subsidiary
and advanced level GCE in Music Technology) is designed to open up a range of exciting and useful tasks
to a wide candidature, and to encourage students to learn about the subject. Students, including those
who do not play a traditional instrument, are encouraged to explore their musicality and create
original materials using technology. Like its predecessor this specification retains an emphasis on
practical tasks, but it is slimmed down and updated, with all tasks appropriate to styles of music
that use music technology.
Supporting you
Edexcel aims to provide the most comprehensive support for our qualifications. We have therefore published
our own dedicated suite of resources for teachers and students written by qualification experts. We also
endorse a wide range of materials from other publishers to give you a choice of approach. For more
information on our wide range of support and services for this GCE in Music Technology qualification, visit our
GCE website: www.edexcel.com/gce2008.
Specification updates
This specification is Issue 3 and is valid for examination from Summer 2014. If there are any significant
changes to the specification Edexcel will write to centres to let them know. Changes will also be posted on our
website. For more information please visit
www.edexcel.com or www.edexcel.com/gce2008.
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Introduction
1
Contents
A Specification at a glance4
B Specification overview9
Summary of assessment requirements
9
Assessment objectives and weightings
13
Relationship of assessment objectives to units
13
Qualification summary 14
C Music Technology unit content17
Course structure
18
Areas of Study (AoS)
19
Unit 1 Music Technology Portfolio 1
21
Unit 2 Listening and Analysing
43
Unit 3 Music Technology Portfolio 2
47
Unit 4 Analysing and Producing
67
D Assessment and additional information71
2
Assessment information
71
Additional information
75
Contents
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Contents
E Resources, support and training79
Resources to support the specification
79
Edexcel’s own published resources 79
Edexcel publications
79
Additional resources endorsed by Edexcel
80
Edexcel support services
80
Training81
FAppendices83
Appendix 1 Unit 1 logbook
85
Appendix 2 Unit 3 logbook
97
Appendix 3 Performance descriptions 109
Appendix 4 Wider curriculum 115
Appendix 5 Codes
117
Appendix 6 Further resources and support
119
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Contents
3
A Specification at a glance
AS Unit 1: Music Technology Portfolio 1
*Unit code 6MT01
70%
of the
total AS
marks
„„ Externally assessed
„„ Availability: June
35% of
the total
GCE
marks
Content summary
Students will learn and use a variety of music and music technology skills in order to
complete this unit. MIDI sequencing and multi-track recording as well as arranging
skills are all key components assessed through the practical work carried out.
Students must complete three tasks which together make the Music Technology
Portfolio 1:
„„ Task 1A: Sequenced Realised Performance
„„ Task 1B: Multi-track Recording
„„ Task 1C: Creative Sequenced Arrangement.
Students will also submit a logbook that will provide information on the resources used
in each task as well as assessed questions on their creative sequenced arrangement.
Assessment
Students will produce an audio CD entitled ‘Music Technology Portfolio 1’, containing
three tracks of work as specified in the three tasks above. They will also present a
logbook.
The work is to be done under coursework conditions between the issue of the stimulus
material in September and the submission date.
The logbook will detail equipment used and be used to answer two assessed questions
on their creative sequenced arrangement.
4
Section A
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Specification at a glance A
AS Unit 2: Listening and Analysing
„„ Externally assessed
„„ Availability: June
*Unit code 6MT02
30%
of the
total AS
marks
15% of
the total
GCE
marks
Content summary
This unit provides students with an opportunity to study the styles most common in
popular music. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate this knowledge using
aural discrimination skills.
Students are required to study the development of popular music styles from 1910 through
to the present day. This is not intended to be a comprehensive and in-depth study of every
popular, jazz or rock music style, but an overview of the main styles and trends during the
development of popular music.
Two special focus styles will be selected each year for more in depth study. For the
special focus styles, in addition to the main fingerprints of the style, students will be
expected to have an extended knowledge and understanding of context.
Assessment
1 hour 45 minute listening examination.
Each student will have a copy of an audio CD supplied by Edexcel, containing recorded
excerpts.
* See Appendix 5 for description of this code and all other codes relevant to this qualification.
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Section A
5
A Specification at a glance
A2 Unit 3: Music Technology Portfolio 2
*Unit code 6MT03
60%
of the
total A2
marks
„„ Externally assessed
„„ Availability: June
30% of
the total
GCE
marks
Content summary
Unit 3 builds on skills acquired in Unit 1, and extends these to include a composition
task. It involves detailed study of Area of Study 3: The Development of Technologybased Music.
Students must complete three tasks which together make the Music Technology
Portfolio 2:
„„ Task 3A: Sequenced Integrated Performance
„„ Task 3B: Multi-track Recording
„„ Task 3C: Composing using Music Technology.
Students will also submit a logbook which will provide information on the resources
used in each task.
Assessment
Students will produce an audio CD entitled ‘Music Technology Portfolio 2’, containing
three tracks of work as specified in the three tasks above. They will also present a
logbook, detailing equipment used.
The work is to be done under coursework conditions between the issue of the stimulus
material in November and the submission date.
6
Section A
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Specification at a glance A
A2 Unit 4: Analysing and Producing
*Unit code 6MT04
40%
of the
total A2
marks
„„ Externally assessed
„„ Availability: June
20% of
the total
GCE
marks
Content summary
Students will be expected to demonstrate their knowledge of music and the principles
of music technology through a series of written commentaries, manipulations and
production tasks using material provided on an examination paper and recorded on an
audio CD.
The examination will test students’ musical understanding, their ability to manipulate
and correct recorded music and their ability to write commentaries on technological
processes. They will also be tested on their ability to produce a balanced stereo mix.
Assessment
This assessment will take the form of a 2-hour examination.
Each student will have an audio CD, which will contain a series of music files to be
imported into music production software. Each student will also have an examination
paper in which some or all of the CD tracks will be notated as conventional staff
notation, editing grids or numerical data.
* See Appendix 5 for description of this code and all other codes relevant to this qualification.
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Section A
7
A Specification at a glance
8
Section A
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
B Specification overview
Summary of assessment requirements
Unit number
and unit title
Level
Assessment information
Number
of marks
allocated
in the unit
Unit 1: Music
Technology
Portfolio 1
AS
Students will produce an audio CD entitled ‘Music Technology
Portfolio 1’, containing three tracks of work as specified in the
three tasks below. They will also present a logbook.
140
The work is to be done under controlled conditions between the
issue of the stimulus material in September and the submission
date.
Task 1A: Sequenced Realised Performance (40 marks)
The sequenced realised performance will be based on a recording
of a piece of music specified by Edexcel. A skeleton score, but not
the recording, will be provided by Edexcel.
Students will be assessed on the following areas:
„„ Realisation of Pitch and Rhythm
„„ Choice of Timbre and Mix
„„ Musicality — Dynamics, Articulation and Phrasing
„„ Music Technology Skills.
Task 1B: Multi-track Recording (40 marks)
Students will record a piece of their own choice from Area of
Study 2: Popular Music Styles since 1910, lasting between two and
four minutes. Recordings must have at least eight live tracks (no
MIDI) of which at least four tracks captured using microphones.
Students will be assessed on the following areas:
„„ Capture
„„ Processing
„„ Mixing.
Task 1C: Creative Sequenced Arrangement (40 marks)
The creative sequenced arrangement will be based on one of two
prescribed stimuli supplied by Edexcel. The chosen stimulus will
be worked in one of two prescribed styles. The work must show
creative development and/or manipulation of the chosen stimulus,
and extend to between two and three minutes.
Students will be assessed on the following areas:
„„ Instrumentation, Timbre and Texture
„„ Melody and Rhythm
„„ Structure, Harmony and Tonality
„„ Music Technology Skills.
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Section B
9
B Specification overview
Unit number
and unit title
Level
Assessment information
Number
of marks
allocated
in the unit
Logbook (20 marks)
Unit 1: Music
Technology
Portfolio 1
(continued)
Students will use this document to detail equipment used and to
answer two questions on their creative sequenced arrangement.
Students must complete their Music Technology Portfolio 1 under
controlled conditions.
Unit 2:
Listening and
Analysing
AS
A 1 hour 45 minute listening examination, externally assessed, in
the summer of the year of entry. The style of questions will range
across multiple choice, short answer and questions requiring a few
sentences of continuous prose.
80
First and foremost the questions will assess knowledge of Area of
Study 2: Popular Music Styles since 1910, but understanding of
Area of Study 1: The Principles and Practice of Music Technology is
also required.
Each student will have a copy of an audio CD supplied by Edexcel
and containing recorded excerpts.
The examination paper has two sections, A and B and will be
structured as follows.
Section A (40 marks)
Questions 1–4 will test students’ aural perception of musical
characteristics and features of the given extracts, including
relevant technological aspects. The extracts will be drawn from
Area of Study 2: Popular musical styles since 1910. These questions
will be equally weighted.
Section B (40 marks)
Questions 5 and 6 will be drawn from the two special focus styles
as detailed above, testing both students’ aural perception and their
wider understanding and knowledge of the style/genre. The two
questions will be equally weighted.
Special focus styles, which will change each year, are listed in the
unit content.
10
Section B
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Specification overview B
Unit number
and unit title
Level
Assessment information
Number
of marks
allocated
in the unit
Unit 3: Music
Technology
Portfolio 2
A2
Students will produce an audio CD entitled ‘Music Technology
Portfolio 2’, containing three tracks of work as specified in the
three tasks below. They will also present a logbook.
120
The work is to be done under coursework conditions between the
issue of the stimulus material in September and the submission
date.
Task 3A: Sequenced Integrated Performance (40 marks)
The sequenced integrated performance will be based on a
recording of a piece of music selected from a choice of two
specified by Edexcel. Neither a skeleton score nor a recording will
be provided by Edexcel.
The sequenced integrated performance must contain a live audio
recording of the vocals and, if the student wishes, other live audio
track(s), which must be integrated with the other sequenced
tracks.
Students will be assessed on the following areas:
„„ Realisation of Pitch and Rhythm
„„ Choice of Timbre and Mix of Timbres and Vocals
„„ Musicality of Sequencing — Dynamics, Articulation and Phrasing
„„ Music Technology Skills.
Task 3B: Multi-track Recording (40 marks)
Students will select one recording topic from a choice of two.
Students will record a piece lasting between three and five
minutes. Recordings must have between 12 and 24 live tracks (no
MIDI). Close-mic and direct-inject (DI) capture will be required
(with at least eight tracks captured using microphones).
Students will be assessed on the following areas:
„„ Capture
„„ Processing
„„ Mixing.
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Section B
11
B Specification overview
Unit number
and unit title
Level
Assessment information
Number
of marks
allocated
in the unit
Task 3C: Composing using Music Technology (40 marks)
Unit 3: Music
Technology
Portfolio 2
(continued)
The task will be based on one of three prescribed briefs set by
Edexcel. Students will compose a piece lasting between three and
four minutes as specified in their chosen brief.
Students will be assessed using four compulsory criteria plus one
optional criterion.
Compulsory criteria:
1. Quality of ideas and outcome
2. Coherence
3. Timbres and textures
4. Music technology skills.
Optional criteria (one is selected from the following three):
1. Harmony
2. Melody
3. Rhythm.
Logbook
Students will use this document to detail equipment used. (There
are no marks available for completing the logbook but students’
work cannot be assessed if this is not completed.)
Students must complete their Music Technology Portfolio 2 under
controlled conditions.
Unit 4:
Analysing and
Producing
A2
This assessment will take the form of a 2-hour examination.
80
There are two sections in the examination paper and students
must complete both.
Section A (62 marks)
„„ Questions 1-4 will test students’ musical understanding, their
ability to manipulate and correct recorded music and their
ability to write commentaries on technological processes.
Section B (18 marks)
„„ Question 5 will be a practical test involving the production of a
balanced stereo mix.
Each student will have an audio CD which will contain a series of
music files to be imported into music production software. Each
student will also have an examination paper in which some or all of
the CD tracks will be notated as conventional staff notation, editing
grids or numerical data.
Students will be required to review the materials, commenting on
musical elements and technological processes, identifying mistakes
and discrepancies and correcting them and, finally, producing a
stereo mix.
12
Section B
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Specification overview B
Assessment objectives and weightings
% in AS
% in A2
% in GCE
AO1
Interpret musical ideas with technical and expressive control
and a sense of style and awareness of occasion and/or
ensemble (performing/realising).
15%
15%
15%
AO2
Create and develop musical ideas with technical control and
expressive understanding making creative use of musical
devices, conventions and resources (composing/arranging).
15%
16%
15.5%
AO3
Demonstrate understanding of, and comment perceptively
on, the structural, expressive and contextual aspects of
music (appraising).
25%
10%
17.5%
AO4
Demonstrate effective use of music technology to capture,
edit and produce musical outcomes.
30%
39%
34.5%
AO5
Demonstrate understanding of and comment perceptively on
the technical processes and principles that underpin effective
use of music technology.
15%
20%
17.5%
100%
100%
100%
TOTAL
Relationship of assessment objectives to units
Unit number
Assessment objectives
AO1
AO2
AO3
AO4
AO5
Total for AO1,
AO2, AO3, AO4
and AO5
Unit 1
7.5%
7.5%
5%
15%
–
35%
Unit 2
–
–
7.5%
–
7.5%
15%
Unit 3
7.5%
8%
–
14.5%
–
30%
Unit 4
–
–
5%
5%
10%
20%
Total for Advanced GCE
15%
15.5%
17.5%
34.5%
17.5%
100%
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Section B
13
B Specification overview
Qualification summary
Subject criteria
The General Certificate of Education is part of the Level 3 provision.
This specification is based on the Advanced Subsidiary GCE and
Advanced GCE Subject criteria for Music Technology; which are
prescribed by the regulatory authorities and are mandatory for all
awarding bodies.
The Advanced Subsidiary GCE and Advanced GCE in Music
Technology has been designed to:
„„ encourage students to extend the knowledge, skills and
understanding of music technology needed to communicate their
creative ideas through composing, performing and listening
„„ encourage students to engage in, and extend their appreciation
of, the diverse and dynamic heritage of music, promoting spiritual
and cultural development
„„ encourage students to develop particular strengths and interests,
encouraging lifelong learning and providing access to musicrelated careers
„„ provide a stimulating, challenging, comprehensive course of
study that broadens experience, develops imagination, fosters
creativity and promotes personal and social development.
For Advanced GCE, this specification aims to:
„„ extend the skills, knowledge and understanding developed in the
AS and provide a basis for further study.
14
Section B
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Aims
Specification overview B
The aims of the Advanced Subsidiary GCE and Advanced GCE in
Music Technology are to:
„„ emphasise the techniques, practices and principles of music
technology as an area of advanced study
„„ encourage the use of music technology as a tool to develop
composing and arranging skills
„„ provide a programme of study that will lead to the development
of accomplished recording and sequencing skills
„„ define musical performance as an interpretative and creative skill
that can use music technology
„„ introduce the technical principles that underpin music technology
and develops a technical vocabulary
„„ develop listening and analysis skills through the study of a wide
range of contemporary music
„„ place a significant emphasis on coursework and practical activities
— 60% externally marked coursework in both AS and A2
„„ prepare students for further academic or vocational study of
music technology and related creative areas.
AS/A2 knowledge
and understanding
This Advanced Subsidiary GCE and Advanced GCE specification
requires students to develop knowledge and understanding of
the use of music technology for music creation and production.
Students will:
„„ learn how to make the correct choice of appropriate equipment
for practical tasks by understanding the theory that underpins the
practice.
„„ investigate the development of music technology and its use in
popular music across time.
AS/A2 skills
This Advanced Subsidiary and Advanced GCE specification requires
students to develop a wide range of practical and analytical skills.
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Section B
15
B Specification overview
16
Section B
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
C Music Technology unit content
Unit 1 Music Technology Portfolio 1
21
Unit 2 Listening and Analysing
43
Unit 3 Music Technology Portfolio 2
47
Unit 4 Analysing and Producing
67
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Section C
17
C Music Technology unit content
Course structure
„„ Edexcel’s GCE in Music Technology comprises four units and
contains an Advanced Subsidiary subset of two AS units.
„„ The Advanced Subsidiary GCE is the first half of the GCE course
and consists of Units 1 and 2. It may be awarded as a discrete
qualification or contribute 50 per cent of the total Advanced GCE
marks.
„„ The full Advanced GCE award consists of the two AS units
(Units 1 and 2), plus two A2 units (Units 3 and 4). Students
wishing to take the full Advanced GCE must, therefore, complete
all four units.
„„ The A2, the second half of the Advanced GCE, comprises the
other 50 per cent of the total Advanced GCE marks.
„„ The structure of this qualification allows teachers to construct a
course of study which can be taught and assessed either as:
uu distinct
modules of teaching and learning with related units of
assessment taken at appropriate stages during the course; or
uu a
18
Section C
linear course which is assessed in its entirety at the end.
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology unit content C
Areas of Study (AoS)
Areas of Study (AoS) underpin the whole specification, encouraging
both breadth and depth of knowledge and understanding. In
addition, within individual units, they provide a contextual focus for
students’ practical and theoretical work.
There are three areas of study:
AoS 1: The Principles and Practice of Music Technology
AoS 2: Popular Music Styles since 1910
AoS 3: The Development of Technology-based Music
In Advanced Subsidiary students take Area of Study 1: The
Principles and Practice of Music Technology and Area of Study 2:
Popular Music Styles since 1910.
At A2 students have to extend Area of Study 1: The Principles and
Practice of Music Technology and, in addition, work on Area of
Study 3: The Development of Technology-based Music.
Area of Study 1:
The Principles and
Practice of Music
Technology
This area of study concerns the music technology knowledge and
skills that underpin the practical activities and some of the written
work in this specification. It involves principally study and practice
of MIDI sequencing, audio sequencing and recording. Each of these
activities demands use of appropriate equipment and technical
processes to capture sounds and manipulate them to produce
musical results. Thus technology is the servant of music, not an end
in itself.
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Section C
19
C Music Technology unit content
Area of Study 2:
Popular Music
Styles since 1910
‘Popular Music’ is taken to include jazz as well as pop and rock.
Students are not expected to study every type of popular music
in detail, but to learn something of the main musical and cultural
characteristics of the major style and trends of the past 100
years. These styles and trends range historically from ragtime and
Dixieland jazz through to recent developments in club music and
electronica. Some areas for investigation are the special focus
styles prescribed in Unit 2. Other are suggested in the Teachers’
Guide.
In studying the various genres and style, students are expected
to have (in addition to technological terms and concepts) an
understanding of relevant musical theory and terminology,
including:
„„ staff notation (both treble and bass clefs)
„„ keys and chord symbols
„„ common types of structure and structural devices (eg verse-
chorus forms, 32-bar structures, riffs, etc)
„„ common performance techniques such as portamento, pitch
bend, fill, backbeat, pizzicato, arco, falsetto.
Area of Study 3:
The Development
of Technologybased Music
The aim of this area of study is to help students understand more
about the development and influence of technology on music since
1910.
Study might include:
„„ instruments involving music technology: notably the electric
guitar and keyboard synthesiser, and significant artists such as
Les Paul, The Edge and the electro-rock bands of the 1980s;
drum machines and decks and their role in the development of
rap and hip hop; PA systems and stadium rock; the theremin in
film and the ondes martinot in the work of Messaien
„„ recording practice: early recordings of jazz and the ‘talkies’, and
the work of significant producers (such as Joe Meek, Phil Spector
and Brian Eno); milestone albums (such as the Beatles’ Sgt.
Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band); significant techniques (such
as multi-tracking, dub reggae and remixing)
„„ related developments in contemporary art music: installations
and electronic music by composers such as Stockhausen and
Steve Reich.
20
Section C
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 1
Unit 1 AS
compulsory unit
Externally assessed portfolio
1.1 Unit description
1 Music
Technology
practical unit
Students will learn and use a variety of music and music technology
skills in order to complete this unit. MIDI sequencing and Multitrack recording as well as arranging skills are all key components
assessed through the practical work carried out under controlled
conditions.
2 Three tasks
Students must complete three tasks which together make the Music
Technology Portfolio 1:
„„ Task 1A: Sequenced Realised Performance
„„ Task 1B: Multi-track Recording
„„ Task 1C: Creative Sequenced Arrangement.
Each task will be submitted as a designated track on the Music
Technology Portfolio 1 audio CD.
3 Logbook
Students will also submit a logbook which will provide information
on the resources used in each task. A copy of the logbook can be
found in Appendix 1.
1.2 Assessment information
1 Task 1A:
Sequenced
Realised
Performance
(40 marks)
Students will produce a sequenced performance based on a
commercially available piece of music, prescribed by Edexcel. A
skeleton score of the piece, but not a recording, will be provided by
Edexcel. Centres must purchase sufficient copies of the recording
for their students. It is essential that students have access
to a recording of the prescribed track, as well as the skeleton
score, in order to complete the task. Students must produce an
accurate musical realisation of the track through sequencing of the
prescribed piece, shaping, editing and mixing MIDI and audio data
accordingly, with the help of appropriate software.
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Section C
21
Unit 1
Music Technology Portfolio 1
2 Task 1B: Multitrack Recording
(40 marks)
Students will select a piece of music lasting 2–4 minutes which
relates to Area of Study 2: Popular Music Styles since 1910, and
make a recording of it. The performance recorded must be played
and sung live, without any MIDI sequenced performance. The
recording should be high quality with careful attention paid to the
efficient capture, processing and mixing of musical information.
3 Task 1C:
Creative
Sequenced
Arrangement
(40 marks)
Students will be required to create an original arrangement,
2 to 3 minutes in length, of a prescribed stimulus in a prescribed
style. There will be a choice of two stimuli, and a choice of two
styles. Stimuli and styles will be associated with Area of Study 2:
Popular Music Styles since 1910.
4Logbook
(20 marks)
Students must complete a logbook detailing the equipment used for
all three tasks, and answering two questions on Task 1C.
A copy of the logbook can be found in Appendix 1.
5Submission
process
22
Section C
Each student’s submissions for Tasks 1A, 1B and 1C are to be
recorded on one audio CD, to create the Unit 1 portfolio. The
portfolio and the logbook will be submitted to Edexcel for external
assessment in the summer of the examination year.
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 1
4Controlled
conditions
Unit 1
Students have the following number of hours to complete the three
tasks in Music Technology Portfolio 1:
„„ a maximum of 20 hours to complete the Sequenced Realised
Performance
„„ a maximum of 20 hours to complete the Multi-track Recording
„„ a maximum of 20 hours to complete the Creative Sequenced
Arrangement.
The hours may be divided into any number of sessions but each
session must be supervised.
Supervision must take place within the examination centre and
students must work on their portfolio only in and during these
hours. At other times students’ work must be kept under secure
conditions in the centre.
Students must not take portfolio home or anywhere else outside
the room(s) in which the controlled conditions apply.
Students’ access to any instruments or computers must be
monitored by the supervisor. Students must not download material
from the internet, or email their work home or anywhere else
outside the room(s) in which the controlled conditions apply.
Back-up copies of the work must not be taken out of the room(s) in
which the controlled conditions apply.
All students should be advised by their teacher that the work must
be their own, and that he/she will not sign their declaration form
if the work appears not to be original. All students will also be
required to sign the declaration form stating that the work is their
own.
More guidance on the management of controlled conditions is
provided in the Getting Started book.
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Unit 1
Music Technology Portfolio 1
1.3 Task 1A: Sequenced Realised Performance
1 What students
need to learn
Study for this task should include:
„„ a range of popular music styles within Area of Study 2: Popular
Music Styles since 1910
„„ sequencing skills, including methods of data entry, the editing
and manipulating of timbres and parts, using controllers,
processing, and audio within the sequencer
„„ the sonic and timbral possibilities available through the use of a
variety of sound sources (eg software instruments, virtual sound
modules, sample libraries and audio samples).
The skeleton score will be provided to centres in the September in
the academic year of examination.
24
Section C
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 1
2 Nature of
Task 1A
Unit 1
Students will be required to create a sequenced realised
performance of a stimulus set by Edexcel and linked to Area of
Study 2: Popular Music Styles since 1910, using a computer-based
Sequencing program.
The sequenced realised performance must:
„„ be based on the prescribed song
„„ reproduce the sound of the original recording as accurately as
possible in terms of pitch and rhythm
„„ come as near as possible to the style and sonic palette of the
original recording, by means of appropriate choices, editing and
blending of available sound sources
„„ be a realistic musical performance, arrived at through detailed
shaping, editing and mixing of MIDI and audio data, together
with the programming and editing of any software instruments
and/or other plug-ins used
„„ demonstrate the ability to use technology creatively.
Task 1A is not an arranging task. Students are required to recreate
the original track as accurately and stylistically as possible.
However, examiners recognise that it may not always be possible
to emulate accurately all the sounds and timbres in the original
recording, especially vocal ones, and will reward students who are
able successfully to circumvent the limitations of the equipment
available to them.
Students may use a range of available sound sources and
programming techniques. These could include GM soundsets,
hardware/software sound modules and synthesisers, audio loops
and samples, virtual studio instruments and sample libraries.
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Section C
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Unit 1
Music Technology Portfolio 1
3 The stimulus
Each year Edexcel will prescribe a song for Task 1A. Centres will be
provided with a skeleton score, which is likely to include:
„„ a vocal/melody line
„„ chord patterns
„„ bass riffs
„„ principal drum patterns and fills
„„ important melodic/harmonic riffs and licks
„„ details of all the instruments that must be included within the
submission (minimum instrumentation).
Centres will not be provided with the recording, but will have to
purchase copies.
The skeleton score will be provided to centres in the September in
the academic year of examination.
4Submission
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Section C
The finished recording must be submitted as Track 1 on the Music
Technology Portfolio 1 audio CD.
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 1
Unit 1
1.4 Task 1B: Multi-track Recording
1 What students
need to learn
Study for this task should include:
„„ capturing, processing and mixing musical performances to make
high-quality recordings
„„ recording between 8 and 12 live tracks, using close-mic and
overdubbing
„„ balanced use of microphones and direct-inject (DI) capture
„„ music from Area of Study 2: Popular Music Styles since 1910,
from which area of study the piece to be recorded must be
selected.
2 Nature of
Task 1B
Students will present for assessment a recording of a piece of music
of their own choice in a style relating to Area of Study 2: Popular
Music Styles since 1910.
Students must record a piece of music that is commercially
available or an accepted rock, pop or jazz standard.
The recording should:
„„ last between 2 and 4 minutes
„„ use a minimum of eight and a maximum of 12 tracks
„„ contain a balanced use of close-mic and direct-inject (DI) capture
„„ have a minimum of four tracks captured using microphones
„„ make use of overdub techniques
„„ use only live musicians, and contain no MIDI sequenced
performance
„„ be a noise-free stereo production with use of appropriate effects.
This task will not involve an assessment of the performance or the
arrangement.
3 Responsibility
During the recording sessions, the student must be the sole person
in control of the recording equipment (ie mixing desk). The student
can retake the recording as many times as practical within the time
available. The recordings must be made under the supervision of
the teacher, and may not be made under professional guidance in
commercial studios.
4 Submission
The finished recording must be submitted as Track 2 on the Music
Technology Portfolio 1 audio CD.
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Section C
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Unit 1
Music Technology Portfolio 1
1.5 Task 1C: Creative Sequenced Arrangement
1 What students
need to learn
Study for this task should include:
„„ a range of popular music styles within Area of Study 2: Popular
Music Styles since 1910
„„ sequencing skills, including methods of data entry, the editing
and manipulating of timbres and parts, using controllers,
processing, and audio within the sequencer
„„ arranging skills, including the understanding of the performance
characteristics of different instruments, and the manipulation
of musical material (melodic, rhythmic, harmonic, textural and
structural)
„„ the sonic and timbral possibilities available through the use of a
variety of sound sources (eg software instruments, virtual sound
modules, sample libraries and audio samples).
2Stimuli
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Section C
Students will be required to develop an original arrangement,
2–3 minutes in length, from a prescribed stimulus. Each year a
choice of two stimuli will be provided by Edexcel. The stimulus
chosen must be developed in terms of one of two specified styles.
Stimuli and styles will be made available to students in September
of each examination year. Stimuli will involve staff notation.
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 1
3 Nature of
Task 1C
Unit 1
The creative sequenced arrangement must:
„„ be between 2 and 3 minutes’ duration
„„ be based on one of two prescribed stimuli
„„ be written in one of two prescribed styles
„„ demonstrate an ability to use the chosen instrumentation
idiomatically and explore a variety of textures within the chosen
style
„„ demonstrate an ability to build on the melodic, rhythmic,
structural, harmonic and tonal implications of the chosen stimulus
in terms of the chosen style
„„ demonstrate the ability to use the technology creatively.
The creative sequenced arrangement is to be more than a cover
version, a remix or a transcription. It is expected that there will be
reworking and extension of the stimulus material.
The arrangement may be undertaken in a number of ways. It might
be realised by using:
„„ MIDI controlled virtual sound modules, eg Hypersonic 2
„„ MIDI and/or software instruments, eg Reason
„„ integrating MIDI and/or software instruments and/or audio
samples and loops
„„ a variety of sound sources which may include:
uu virtual
sound modules
uu virtual
studio instruments
uu sample
library-based virtual Instruments
uu loop-based
sample instruments
uu samples
uu external
sound modules and synthesisers.
Credit will be given for the manipulation, shaping, editing and/or
processing of pre-recorded loops and samples. It is expected that
there will be some form of editing of the patterns provided by loopbased sample instruments (eg Virtual Guitarist).
4 Submission
The finished recording must be submitted as Track 3 on the Music
Technology Portfolio 1 audio CD.
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Section C
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Unit 1
Music Technology Portfolio 1
1.6Logbook
A copy of the logbook can be found in Appendix 1.
1.7 Assessment criteria for Task 1A: Sequenced Realised Performance
1 Method of
marking
Each piece of work is marked according to both the holistic
assessment criterion and the detailed assessment criteria. Holistic
marking is used to ensure that the total mark derived from the
other detailed assessment criteria is a true overall reflection of
the standard of the student’s work. If the holistic mark selected
does not match the total of the detailed assessment criteria, the
mark for each detailed criterion and/or the holistic mark must
be reconsidered until a single mark appropriate for the work is
identified.
2 Order in which
the assessment
criteria will be
applied
Either the holistic assessment or the detailed assessment criteria
may be applied first. The holistic criterion is given first below.
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 1
Unit 1
Holistic assessment criterion
Holistic
36–40
Outstanding
A highly accurate sequence. Imaginative work displaying a high level of control
and musicality.
Sense of musical wholeness — the whole piece has been sequenced to a high
standard.
31–35
Excellent
Convincing throughout in terms of accuracy, musicality and control.
Any errors and/or misjudgements do not detract from a successful sequence.
26–30
Good
Convincing for most of the time in terms of accuracy, musicality and control.
Some errors and/or misjudgements, but too few to have a big impact.
21–25
Competent
Generally secure in terms of accuracy, musicality and control.
Some errors and/or misjudgements, but the performance still has a sense of
direction and fluency.
16–20
Adequate
A serious attempt but some insecurity and inconsistency in terms of accuracy,
musicality and control.
Errors, misjudgements and technical problems begin to be intrusive, but the
piece still holds together.
11–15
Basic
The accuracy of the data input is inconsistent. There is a lack of musicality and
control.
Errors, misjudgements and technical problems are intrusive.
6–10
Limited
Positive features are few.
A few encouraging signs, but considerable difficulties — a weak end product in
most areas. The submission may be incomplete.
0–5
Poor
Positive features are heavily outweighed by errors, misjudgements and technical
problems. Insufficient work has been submitted to allow credit in every criteria.
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Section C
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Unit 1
Music Technology Portfolio 1
Detailed assessment criteria
Criterion 1: Realisation of Pitch and Rhythm
RHYTHM
PITCH
1. Realisation of Pitch and Rhythm
8
Excellent accuracy of pitch.
6–7
A few small slips which do not detract from the overall performance.
4–5
Several errors (such as missed accidentals).
2–3
Some significant intrusive errors and/or omissions, with unmusical effect.
0–1
Limited accuracy, seriously compromising the performance.
8
Excellent accuracy of rhythm. A musical performance.
6–7
A few small slips which do not detract from the overall performance.
A rhythmically accurate, but mechanical sequence.
4–5
Some audible errors (such as poor rhythmic ensemble between parts).
2–3
Some significant obtrusive errors and/or omissions, with unmusical effect.
0–1
Limited accuracy, seriously compromising the performance.
Criterion 2: Choice of Timbre and Mix
BALANCE/PAN
TIMBRE
2. Choice of Timbre and Mix
32
4
Well-chosen timbres — timbres have been edited as appropriate to suit the given stimulus
material
3
Appropriate choice of timbres, but no further editing to suit stimulus.
2
Partially successful choice of timbres.
0–1
Limited success in choosing appropriate timbres.
4
A musically balanced mix, faithful to the original. Effective placement in the stereo field.
3
Mostly well balanced with some placement in the stereo field.
2
Some unsuccessful blends or masking of important parts. Some misjudgements in stereo
placement.
0–1
Little sense of balance or blend. Little or no placement in the stereo field/serious
misjudgements in panning.
Section C
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 1
Unit 1
Criterion 3: Musicality — Dynamics, Articulation and Phrasing
ARTICULATION
AND PHRASING
DYNAMICS
3. Musicality — Dynamics, Articulation and Phrasing
4
Detailed and musically effective dynamics throughout. Some dynamic shaping as
appropriate to instrumentation.
3
Good overall dynamic contrasts, but little or no shaping.
2
Some attempts to create dynamic contrasts, but some inconsistencies or misjudgements.
0–1
Mechanical, unmusical and/or erratic. Limited attempt to create dynamic contrasts.
4
Detailed and musically effective articulation and phrasing throughout.
3
Generally effective articulation and phrasing.
2
Some attempts to create articulation and phrasing, but some inconsistencies or
misjudgements.
0–1
Mechanical, unmusical and/or erratic. Little attention to articulation and phrasing.
Criterion 4: Music Technology Skills
QUALITY OF
RECORDING
STYLE AND
CREATIVITY
4. Music Technology Skills
4
Excellent sense of style including musical and controlled use of tempo shaping and effects
as appropriate. Any fills or solos are well executed and stylistic. A musical sequence.
3
A consistent sense of style with some attention to musical detail resulting in a generally
successful sequence.
2
Some inconsistencies in the application of tempo shaping and effects or a mechanical
approach resulting in a more basic sequence.
0–1
Limited sense of style with little attention to musical detail. A mechanical sequence
4
An excellent recording demonstrating a high level of sonic accuracy, editing and
presentation detail.
3
A mostly successful recording but with small areas of inconsistency which do not detract
from the overall presentation.
2
A recording with some areas of inconsistency that detract from the final result – chopped
beginning/ending, some clipping, some significant hiss.
0–1
A poor recording with significant errors — noise or distortion, signal out of one speaker
only, unacceptably low mastering level.
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Section C
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Unit 1
Music Technology Portfolio 1
1.8 Assessment criteria for Task 1B: Multi-track Recording
1 Method of
marking
Each piece of work is marked according to both the holistic
assessment criterion, and the detailed assessment criteria. Holistic
marking is used to ensure that the total mark derived from the
other detailed assessment criteria is a true overall reflection of
the standard of the student’s work. If the holistic mark selected
does not match the total of the detailed assessment criteria, the
mark for each detailed criterion and/or the holistic mark must
be reconsidered until a single mark appropriate for the work is
identified.
2 Order in which
the assessment
criteria will be
applied
Either the holistic assessment or the detailed assessment criteria
may be applied first. The holistic criterion is given first below.
Holistic assessment criterion
Holistic
36–40
Outstanding
An impressive recording in which all parts are clear, well balanced, successfully
processed and mixed.
Sense of wholeness — all aspects of the recording are of a high standard.
31–35
Excellent
Convincing throughout in terms of clarity, processing and mixing.
Any errors and/or misjudgements do not detract from a successful recording.
26–30
Good
Convincing for most of the time in terms of clarity, processing and mixing.
Some errors and/or misjudgements, but too few to have a big impact.
21–25
Competent
Generally secure in terms of clarity, processing and mixing.
Some errors and/or misjudgements, but the recording is still broadly successful.
16–20
Adequate
A serious attempt but some insecurity and inconsistency in terms of clarity,
processing and mixing.
Errors, misjudgements and technical problems begin to be intrusive, but the
recording still has some positive features.
11–15
Basic
There are some significant problems in terms of clarity, processing and mixing.
Errors, misjudgements and technical problems are intrusive.
6–10
Limited
Positive features are few.
A few encouraging signs, but considerable difficulties — a weak end product in
most areas. The submission may be incomplete.
0–5
34
Poor
Section C
Positive features are heavily outweighed by errors, misjudgements and technical
problems. Insufficient work has been submitted to allow credit in every criteria.
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 1
Unit 1
Detailed assessment criteria
Criterion 1: Capture
NOISE AND
DISTORTION
MICROPHONE
PLACEMENT AND
CLARITY OF SIGNAL
1. Capture
6
Fully considered choice and placement of microphones to produce a clear, focused capture of
all tracks. Good depth of field.
4–5
Appropriate choice and placement of microphones. Minor inconsistencies on one or two
tracks.
2–3
Some appropriate choices of microphone. Some poor positioning resulting in an
inconsistency of line.
0–1
Little evidence of appropriate microphone choice and/or placement. Unacceptable lack of
clarity within many parts.
5
Excellent signal-to-noise ratio. No noise or distortion.
3–4
Slight noise or occasional clipping, but not intrusive.
2
Some intrusive noise and/or distortion. Inappropriate gain and level setting.
0–1
Unacceptably noisy and poorly made recording.
Criterion 2: Processing
FX/
AMBIENCE
MANAGEMENT
OF DYNAMICS
MANAGEMENT
OF EQ
2. Processing
6
Excellent, without inappropriate constriction or exaggeration.
4–5
Mainly good — slight EQ errors on some tracks.
2–3
Inconsistent use of EQ — lack of attention to EQ on some tracks detract from the overall
recording
0–1
Limited or inappropriate use of EQ.
6
Excellent, appropriate to the style of music. Compression has been used where appropriate
to good musical effect.
4–5
Mainly good, but some over-compression or one or two tracks do not sit well in the mix due
to lack of compression.
2–3
Inconsistently applied dynamic processing — some intrusive misjudgements.
0–1
Limited or no use of dynamic processing. Dynamics are detrimental to the music.
6
Excellent, creative use of stylistically appropriate effects.
4–5
Well controlled use of appropriate effects.
2–3
Some inconsistency in application of effects processing
0–1
Unacceptably dry, reverberant or uncontrolled use of effects processing.
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Section C
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Unit 1
Music Technology Portfolio 1
Criterion 3: Mixing
BALANCE AND
BLEND
6
Consistently well balanced and effectively blended across all parts of the mix.
4–5
Most tracks are well balanced. Some minor slips on one or two parts. Some effective
blending of sounds.
2–3
Inconsistent balance. Important parts may be masked. Some unsuccessful blends.
0–1
Poorly balanced. Detrimental to the musical outcome.
USE OF
STEREO FIELD
3. Mixing
5
Creative, musically appropriate use of stereo field.
3–4
Mainly good use of stereo field, but with minor inconsistencies
2
Inappropriate or inconsistent use of stereo field.
0–1
Little or no use of stereo field or significant misjudgements in panning.
36
Section C
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 1
Unit 1
1.9 Assessment criteria for Task 1C: Creative Sequenced Arrangement
1 Method of
marking
Each piece of work is marked according to both the holistic
assessment criterion and the detailed assessment criteria. Holistic
marking is used to ensure that the total mark derived from the
other detailed assessment criteria is a true overall reflection of
the standard of the student’s work. If the holistic mark selected
does not match the total of the detailed assessment criteria, the
mark for each detailed criterion and/or the holistic mark must
be reconsidered until a single mark appropriate for the work is
identified.
2 Order in which
the assessment
criteria will be
applied
Either the holistic assessment or the detailed assessment criteria
may be applied first. The holistic criterion is given first below.
3Compulsory
and optional
assessment
criteria for
arrangements
The detailed assessment criteria will consist of three compulsory
criteria plus three optional criteria.
Compulsory criteria:
1. Use of Stimulus
2. Style/Coherence
3. Use of Music Technology
Optional criteria (three are selected from the following):
4. Melody
5. Harmony
6. Rhythm
7. Texture and Instrumentation
8. Form/Structure.
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Section C
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Unit 1
Music Technology Portfolio 1
4 Selecting
optional
assessment
criteria
The examiner will choose the optional assessment criteria that work
to the student’s best advantage.
5Reconciling
holistic and
detailed
marking
The examiner will reconcile the outcomes of holistic and detailed
marking.
Holistic assessment criterion
Holistic
36–40
Outstanding
Impressive and imaginative in style, ideas, development and handling of music
technology.
Displays a clear and intuitive understanding of the chosen style.
Sense of musical wholeness — no passage sub-standard.
31–35
Excellent
Convincing throughout in style, ideas, development and handling of music
technology.
Makes excellent use of the stimulus within the chosen style.
Any errors and/or misjudgements do not detract from a successful piece.
26–30
Good
Convincing for most of the time in style, ideas, development and handling of music
technology.
Good control of arrangement techniques.
Some errors and/or misjudgements, but too few to have a big impact.
21–25
Competent
Generally secure in style and ideas and handling of music technology, but
development may be limited.
Some control of a more narrow range of arrangement techniques.
Some errors and misjudgements, but the piece still has some direction and flow.
16–20
Adequate
A serious attempt to create an arrangement based on the chosen stimulus and
style.
Errors, misjudgements and technical problems begin to be intrusive, but much of
the piece still holds together.
11–15
Basic
Inconsistent/unsophisticated handling of style, ideas and music technology.
Basic use of arrangement techniques.
Errors, misjudgements and technical problems are intrusive.
6–10
Limited
Positive features are few.
A few encouraging signs, but considerable difficulties — a weak end product in most
areas. Perhaps under the required length.
0–5
38
Poor
Section C
Positive features are heavily outweighed by errors, misjudgements and technical
problems. Insufficient work has been submitted to allow credit in every criteria.
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 1
Unit 1
Detailed assessment criteria
Criterion 1: Use of Stimulus (compulsory)
Use of Stimulus (compulsory)
6
Makes imaginative use of the stimulus with extensive and convincing development.
4–5
Makes good use of the stimulus material, developing it in a logical but mostly convincing fashion.
2–3
Makes some use of the stimulus material with little development or with several unconvincing
passages.
0–1
Limited use of the stimulus or simple repetition of the given material. Arrangement too short.
Criterion 2: Style/Coherence (compulsory)
Style/Coherence (compulsory)
6
Excellent and consistent — appropriate to the chosen style. There is a sense of flow, direction and
coherence throughout the arrangement.
4–5
A consistent sense of style. Musical ideas are coherent with a mostly appropriate blend of unity and
diversity.
2–3
Some inconsistency of style resulting in a lack of coherence, or coherent but not appropriate to the
chosen style. The arrangement may be overly repetitive or have a surfeit of ideas.
0–1
Limited sense of style and coherence. Does not reflect the chosen style.
Criterion 3: Use of Music Technology (compulsory)
Use of Music Technology (compulsory)
10
Well chosen timbres, edited to suit the style. The recording is musically balanced including effective
use of the stereo field with musically shaped dynamics, articulation and phrasing throughout.
8–9
Well chosen timbres. The recording is well balanced including good use of the stereo field with some
dynamic shaping, articulation and phrasing.
6–7
Appropriate timbres. The recording is mostly well balanced including some use of the stereo field with
dynamic contrasts and some articulation and phrasing.
4–5
Timbre choices are mostly appropriate. Some inconsistencies in sense of balance and use of stereo
field. Some dynamic contrasts present with some inconsistent articulation and/or phrasing.
2–3
Some inappropriate choices of timbre. Inconsistent sense of balance with little use of stereo field.
Little or inappropriate dynamic contrast. Little articulation and/or phrasing.
0–1
Poor choice of timbre with limited sense of balance, no dynamic contrasts and little or no editing for
articulation and phrasing.
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Section C
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Unit 1
Music Technology Portfolio 1
Criteria 4–6 will only be used to assess melodies, harmonies and rhythms
written by the candidate in addition to that provided in the stimulus or arrived at
through significant manipulation of the stimulus material.
Criterion 4: Melody (optional)
Melody (optional)
6
Excellent and imaginative with a strong sense of melodic flow as appropriate to the style.
4–5
A good melodic sense. Melodies have shape and style.
2–3
Melodies are stiff or formulaic or display inconsistency in shape or flow.
0–1
Limited sense of melodic shape. Melodies lack direction and structure or are inappropriate to the
style.
Criterion 5: Harmony (optional)
Harmony (optional)
6
Excellent and imaginative and appropriate to the style.
4–5
Appropriately chosen harmonies with few misjudgements.
2–3
Some inconsistency in harmonic choices. May be functional but uninteresting.
0–1
Limited control of harmony — detrimental to the music.
Criterion 6: Rhythm (optional)
Rhythm (optional)
6
Excellent and imaginative use of rhythmic elements.
4–5
Appropriate use of rhythms with some development as appropriate to the style.
2–3
Some lack of rhythmic variety or a surfeit of rhythmic ideas.
0–1
Limited use of rhythmic elements.
Criterion 7: Texture and Instrumentation (optional)
Texture and Instrumentation (optional)
6
Imaginative and idiomatic use of texture and instrumentation.
4–5
Good use of texture to create interest. Appropriate use of instrumental resources.
2–3
Some inconsistencies in use of texture and instrumental resources or insufficient textural contrast.
0–1
Limited or inappropriate use of texture and instrumentation.
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 1
Unit 1
Criterion 8: Form/structure (optional)
Form/Structure (optional)
6
Excellent and imaginative organisation of musical ideas.
4–5
Musical ideas are presented with a sense of direction and coherence as appropriate to the style
with few misjudgements.
2–3
Some misjudgements in the organisation of musical ideas. May be excessively unpredictable or
overly repetitive.
0–1
Limited or inappropriate organisation of musical ideas.
1.10 Assessment criteria for the logbook
Assessment criteria for Question 9
10
Substantial and thorough. Perceptive and accurate references to the development of the chosen
stimulus with reference to at least two of the musical elements.
QWC: Very few syntactical and/or spelling errors may be found but these will not detract from
the overall coherence. Excellent organisation and planning. All the skills required to produce
convincing writing are in place.
8–9
Detailed and accurate. Detailed and accurate references to the development of the chosen
stimulus with reference to at least two of the musical elements.
QWC: Few syntactical and/or spelling errors may be found but these will not detract from the
overall coherence. Good organisation and planning. Almost all of the skills required to produce
convincing writing are in place.
6–7
Mostly accurate. There is some detail relating to how the stimulus has been developed with
reference to at least two of the musical elements. There are one or two inaccuracies.
QWC: Some syntactical and/or spelling errors may be found but overall the writing is coherent.
Some organisation and clarity. Most of the skills needed to produce convincing writing are in place.
4–5
Little detail. Most of the comments relating to how the stimulus has been developed are accurate
but lacking in detail. Reference has been made to at least two of the musical elements.
QWC: Some syntactical and/or spelling errors are present. The writing will display some degree of
organisation and clarity but this will not be sustained throughout the response. Some of the skills
needed to produce convincing writing are in place.
2–3
Inaccurate. Many of the comments relating to how the stimulus has been developed are
inaccurate. There is little detail in the response.
QWC: Frequent syntactical and/or spelling errors are present. The writing contains passages which
lack clarity and organisation. A few of the skills needed to produce convincing writing are present.
0–1
Limited. A limited response with very few accurate references to use of the stimulus and lacking in
detail.
QWC: Frequent syntactical and/or spelling errors are present. The writing lacks clarity and
organisation. Few of the skills needed to produce convincing writing are present.
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Section C
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Unit 1
Music Technology Portfolio 1
Assessment criteria for Question 10
10
Substantial and thorough. Perceptive and accurate references to the most important features
of the chosen style with a highly detailed description as to how these have been used in the
arrangement.
QWC: Very few syntactical and/or spelling errors may be found but these will not detract from
the overall coherence. Excellent organisation and planning. All the skills required to produce
convincing writing are in place.
8–9
Detailed and accurate. Detailed and accurate references to the most important features of the
chosen style with a detailed description as to how these have been used in the arrangement.
QWC: Few syntactical and/or spelling errors may be found but these will not detract from the
overall coherence. Good organisation and planning. Almost all of the skills required to produce
convincing writing are in place.
6–7
Mostly accurate. There is some detail in the references to the main features of the chosen style
and in the description as to how they have been used in the arrangement, but there are one or
two inaccuracies.
QWC: Some syntactical and/or spelling errors may be found but overall the writing is coherent.
Some organisation and clarity. Most of the skills needed to produce convincing writing are in place.
4–5
Little detail. There are some references to some of the main features of the chosen style with
some accurate points made as to how these are used in the arrangement. There is little detail in
the response.
QWC: Some syntactical and/or spelling errors are present. The writing will display some degree of
organisation and clarity but this will not be sustained throughout the response. Some of the skills
needed to produce convincing writing are in place.
2–3
Inaccurate. Many of the references to the main features of the chosen style are inaccurate. There
are a few connections made between these features and the arrangement. There is little detail in
the response.
QWC: Frequent syntactical and/or spelling errors are present. The writing contains passages which
lack clarity and organisation. A few of the skills needed to produce convincing writing are present.
0–1
Limited. A limited response with very few accurate references to the main features of the chosen
style and little or no identification of these features in the arrangement.
QWC: Frequent syntactical and/or spelling errors are present. The writing lacks clarity and
organisation. Few of the skills needed to produce convincing writing are present.
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and Analysing
Unit 2 Listening
AS compulsory unit
Externally assessed
2.1 Unit description
1Overview
This unit provides students with an opportunity to study the styles
most common in popular music. Students will have the opportunity
to demonstrate this knowledge using aural discrimination skills.
Students are required to study the development of popular music
styles from 1910 through to the present day, of which two Special
Focus styles will be selected each year.
2.2 Assessment information
1 Exam overview
The assessment of this unit is through a 1 hour 45 minute
examination paper set and marked by Edexcel.
There are two Sections in the examination paper and students must
complete both.
Students will undertake a listening and analysis examination which
consists of a series of musical extracts provided on an audio CD
together with a question paper.
The style of questions will include multiple choice questions,
short answer questions and questions requiring extended prose
in Section B. Questions may also include diagrams, illustrations
and photographs, charts, grids or standard musical notation which
students may be required to refer to, interpret, or complete. The
questions will assess the knowledge and understanding of both
Areas of Study 1 and 2.
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Unit 2
Listening and Analysing
2 Structure of
exam paper
The examination paper has two sections, A and B and will be
structured as follows:
Section A (40 marks)
„„ Questions 1–4 will test students’ aural perception of musical
characteristics and features of the given extracts, including
relevant technological aspects. The extracts will be drawn from
Area of Study 2: Popular musical styles since 1910. These
questions will be equally weighted.
Section B (40 marks)
„„ Questions 5 and 6 will be drawn from the two Special Focus styles
as detailed above, testing both students’ aural perception and
also their wider understanding and knowledge of the style/genre.
The two questions will be equally weighted.
3Resources
Students will each have access to the musical extracts and be
allowed to listen to the examples as many times as they wish. They
will need access to an individual CD player (with a time display)
and high quality headphones. This could be the CD drive or media
player of a computer.
Provided students are isolated from each other within the centre,
and also prevented from contacting students at other centres, it is
permissible to run the examination several times on the date of the
examination to make access to resources easier.
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Listening and Analysing Unit 2
2.3 Unit content
What students need to learn
1 Section A:
Popular Music
Styles
(40 marks)
Students are required to study the development of popular music
styles from 1910 through to the present day. This is not intended
to be a comprehensive and in-depth study of every popular, jazz
or rock music style but an overview of the main styles and trends
during the development of popular music.
Students are expected to have an understanding of these styles
and an overview of:
„„ the principal fingerprints of the style in terms of melodic,
harmonic, rhythmic and structural elements, the key features
of its instrumentation and arrangement and the technological
processes of its recording and production
„„ the main artists, performers, composers, producers and
arrangers.
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Unit 2
Listening and Analysing
2 Section B:
Special Focus
Styles
(40 marks)
Two special focus styles will be selected each year for more in depth
study. In addition to the main fingerprints of the style, students will
be expected to have an extended knowledge and understanding of
context, which might include:
„„ the origins and development of the style, including the social and
cultural conditions that might have influenced this development
„„ specific musical and technological characteristics associated
with the style — melody, harmony, structure, instrumentation,
arrangement, production etc
„„ the influence of the style on other artists.
The following special focus styles will be examined in the year
stated. Students must cover these special focus styles during the
course ready for when they sit their examination:
Examination year 2009 and 2013:
Rock and roll
Rap and hip hop
Examination year 2010 and 2014:
Reggae
Heavy rock
Examination year 2011 and 2015:
Soul
Indie rock
Examination year 2012 and 2016:
Punk and new wave
Club dance
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 2
Unit 3 A2
compulsory unit
Externally assessed portfolio
3.1 Unit description
1Music
Technology
practical unit
Unit 3 builds on skills acquired in Unit 1 and extends these to
include a composition task. It involves detailed study of Area of
Study 3: The Development of Technology-based Music. Students
carry out the work for this unit under controlled conditions.
2 Three tasks
Students must complete three tasks which together make the Music
Technology Portfolio 2:
„„ Task 3A: Sequenced Integrated Performance
„„ Task 3B: Multi-track Recording
„„ Task 3C: Composing using Music Technology.
Each task will be submitted as a designated track on the Music
Technology Portfolio 2.
3Logbook
Students will also submit a logbook which will provide information
on the resources used in each task. A copy of the logbook can be
found in Appendix 2.
3.2 Assessment information
1 Task 3A:
Sequenced
Integrated
Performance
(40 marks)
Students will produce a sequenced performance based on a
recording of one piece of music from a list of two prescribed by
Edexcel. Neither the recording nor a skeleton score of the piece will
be provided by Edexcel. Centres must purchase sufficient copies of
the recording for their students. Students may produce their own
skeleton scores or lead sheets to assist them in sequencing their
chosen piece but they are free to manage the process of listening
and realising as they see fit. Any forms of notation produced by
students need not be submitted and will not be assessed. Students
must produce an accurate musical realisation through sequencing
of their chosen piece, shaping, editing and mixing MIDI and audio
data accordingly, with the help of appropriate software.
Task 3A differs from Task 1A in requiring a live audio recording of
the lead vocal to be integrated with the other sequenced tracks.
Students may record up to a maximum of two further tracks if
desired in addition to the vocal track.
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Unit 3
Music Technology Portfolio 2
2 Task 3B: Multitrack Recording
(40 marks)
Students will select one recording topic from a choice of two (as
shown in Section 2.4). They will choose a piece of music lasting 3–5
minutes which relates to their chosen topic and make a recording
of it. The performance recorded must be played and sung live,
without any MIDI sequenced performance. The recording should
be high-quality, with careful attention paid to the efficient capture,
processing and mixing of musical information.
Task 3B differs from Task 1B in requiring more expert management
of the recording process. It will involve a minimum of 12 tracks and
a maximum of 24 tracks, and a minimum of eight tracks captured
using microphones. According to the topic chosen, students must
use at least four acoustic/orchestral or percussion instruments.
3 Task 3C:
Composing
Using Music
Technology
(40 marks)
Students will create an original composition based upon a brief
supplied by Edexcel. Students will choose one of three published
briefs. The composition should demonstrate a creative approach
to the use of music technology in composition, and will involve
employing a range of sound sources and editing techniques to
achieve a musical outcome.
4Logbook
Students must complete a logbook detailing the equipment used
for all three tasks. (There are no marks available for completing
the logbook, but student’s work cannot be assessed if this is not
completed.)
A copy of the logbook can be found in Appendix 2.
5Submission
process
48
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Each student’s submissions for Tasks 3A, 3B and 3C are to be
recorded on one audio CD, to create the Unit 3 Portfolio. The
portfolio and the logbook will be submitted to Edexcel for external
assessment in the summer of the examination year.
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 2 Unit 3
6Controlled
conditions
Students have the following number of hours to complete the three
tasks in Music Technology Portfolio 2:
„„ a maximum of 20 hours to complete the Sequenced Integrated
Performance
„„ a maximum of 20 hours to complete the Multi-track Recording
„„ a maximum of 20 hours to complete the Composing Using Music
Technology.
The hours may be divided into any number of sessions but each
session must be supervised.
Supervision must take place, within the examination centre and
students must work on their portfolio only in and during these
hours. At other times students’ work must be kept under secure
conditions in the centre.
Students must not take the portfolio home or anywhere else
outside the room(s) in which the controlled conditions apply.
Students’ access to any instruments or computers must be
monitored by the supervisor. Students must not download material
from the internet, or email their work home or anywhere else
outside the room(s) in which the controlled conditions apply. Backup copies of the work must not be taken out of the room(s) in
which the controlled conditions apply.
All students should be advised by their teacher that the work must
be their own, and that he/she will not sign their declaration form if
the work appears not to be original. All students will be required to
sign the declaration form as well, stating that the work is their own.
More guidance on the management of controlled conditions is
provided in the Getting Started guide.
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Unit 3
Music Technology Portfolio 2
3.3 Task 3A: Sequenced Integrated Performance
1 What students
need to learn
Study for this task should include:
„„ a range of popular music styles involving electronic instruments
from Area of Study 3: The Development of Technology-based
Music
„„ sequencing skills, including methods of data entry, the editing
and manipulating of timbres and parts, using controllers,
processing, and audio within the sequencer
„„ the sonic and timbral possibilities available through the use of a
variety of sound sources (eg software instruments, virtual sound
modules, sample libraries and audio samples)
„„ the integration of live audio recording and sequenced tracks.
2 Nature of
Task 3A
Students will be required to create a sequenced performance of
one of two songs set by Edexcel and linked to Area of Study 3: The
Development of Technology-based Music, using a computer-based
sequencing program and live audio equipment. The prescribed
songs will involve electronic instruments and a lead vocal part.
The sequenced integrated performance must:
„„ be based on one of the prescribed songs
„„ reproduce the sound of the original recording as accurately as
possible in terms of pitch and rhythm
„„ come as near as possible to the style and sonic palette of the
original recording, by means of appropriate choices, editing and
blending of available sound sources
„„ be a realistic musical performance, arrived at through detailed
shaping, editing and mixing of MIDI and audio data, together
with the programming and editing of any software instruments
and/or other plug-ins used
„„ contain a live audio recording of the vocals (and, if the student
wishes, other live audio track(s)), which must be integrated with
the other sequenced tracks.
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 2 Unit 3
Task 3A is not an arranging task. Students are required to recreate
the original track as accurately and stylistically as possible.
Examiners recognise that it may not always be possible to emulate
accurately all the sounds and timbres in the original recording,
and will reward students who are able successfully to circumvent
the limitations of the equipment available to them. However, for
Task 3A (unlike 1A) the lead vocal line must be recorded as a live
audio track: substituting synthesised sounds for the lead vocal is
not acceptable.
Students may use a range of available sound sources and
programming techniques. These could include GM soundsets,
hardware/software sound modules and synthesisers, audio loops
and samples, virtual studio instruments and sample libraries.
It is envisaged that students will work primarily with a computerbased workstation for Task 3A. However, the quality of the live
audio track(s) is vital, and should be undertaken in a suitable
recording environment. It is perfectly acceptable for the
programmed tracks to be transferred to a external hard-disk
recorder prior to the recording stage, but students must ensure
that they are able subsequently to undertake the editing of any
individual track, in order to produce an effective integration of the
live and programmed material. Each year Edexcel will prescribe a
choice of two songs for Task 3A.
3 The stimulus
Each year Edexcel will prescribe a choice of two songs for Task 3A.
This information will be communicated to centres in the September
in the academic year of examination.
4Submission
The finished recording must be submitted as Track 1 on the Music
Technology Portfolio 2 audio CD.
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Unit 3
Music Technology Portfolio 2
3.4 Task 3B: Multi-track Recording
1 What students
need to learn
Study for this task should include:
„„ capturing, processing and mixing musical performances to make
high-quality recordings of acoustic/orchestral or percussion
instruments, according to the topic chosen
„„ recording between 12 and 24 live tracks, using close-mic and
overdubbing
„„ balanced use of microphones and direct-inject (DI) capture
„„ music from Area of Study 3: The Development of Technology-
based Music
„„ planning, managing and directing recording sessions of greater
complexity than those required for Unit 1.
2 Choice of
topics
Students must choose one of the following two topics:
Either
Topic A: Recording Acoustic and/or Orchestral Instruments
In their recording task for this unit, students must use at least four
acoustic and/or orchestral instruments. If they wish, they may also
use electronic instruments. These may be combined with electronic/
amplified instruments or more acoustic and orchestral instruments
or vocal.
Or
Topic B: Recording Percussion Instruments
In their recording task for this unit students must use at least
four percussion instruments. These may be Latin, tuned, untuned,
orchestral or world, but a standard drum set counts as one
instrument.
These four percussion instruments may be combined with any other
instruments (electronic/amplified/acoustic/orchestral) or vocals.
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 2 Unit 3
3 Nature of
Task 3B
Students will present for assessment a recording of a piece of music
of their own choice relevant either to Topic A or Topic B. Students
must record a piece of music that is commercially available, or an
accepted rock/pop/jazz standard.
The recording should:
„„ last between 3 and 5 minutes
„„ use a minimum of 12 and a maximum of 24 tracks
„„ contain a balanced use of close-mic and direct-inject (DI) capture
„„ have a minimum of eight tracks captured using microphones
„„ make use of overdub techniques
„„ use only live musicians, and contain no MIDI sequenced
performance
„„ involve a minimum of four acoustic and/or orchestral instruments
if Topic A is offered, or a minimum of four percussion instruments
if Topic B is offered
„„ be a noise-free stereo production, with use of appropriate effects.
4Responsibility
During the recording sessions, the student must be the sole person
in control of the recording equipment (ie mixing desk). The student
can retake the recording as many times as practical in the time
available. The recordings must be made under the supervision of
the teacher, and may not be made under professional guidance in
commercial studios.
5Submission
The finished recording must be submitted as Track 2 on the Music
Technology Portfolio 2 audio CD.
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Unit 3
Music Technology Portfolio 2
3.5 Task 3C: Composing Using Music Technology
1 What students
need to learn
Study for this task should include:
„„ a programme of compositional study encompassing a range
of styles and genres. These might include music from Area of
Study 3: The Development of Technology-based Music. They
might also include Western classical styles, particularly those
of the 20th century, music for film, television and theatre, and
relevant world music styles
„„ learning how to compose to a composition brief. Students will
have the choice of three different composition briefs set by
Edexcel
„„ learning how to compose for whatever forces are selected by the
student for his/her chosen brief. An imaginative and wide-ranging
use of music technology resources must be central to each
submission, but students may use a range of resources including
amplified, electronic and virtual instruments, samples, MIDI,
acoustic and orchestral instruments and voices
„„ learning how to develop musical ideas within chosen forms
and structures. Students should understand the principles of
rhythmic, melodic and harmonic construction necessary to make
musical compositions coherent, satisfying and fit for purpose.
2 Nature of
Task 3C
Using music technology, students will be required to compose a
piece based on one of three briefs published by Edexcel. Pieces for
this task must be 3–4 minutes long, although a brief may specify
duration within this range more precisely.
Students may use a range of available sound sources and
programming techniques. These could include GM soundsets,
hardware/software sound modules and synthesisers, audio loops
and samples, virtual studio instruments and sample libraries.
Acoustic and orchestral instruments and voices may be included in
work submitted for Task 3C.
Compositions must be for at least six tracks or six instruments and/
or voices.
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 2 Unit 3
3The
composition
briefs
Each year Edexcel will prescribe a choice of three composition briefs
for Task 3C. The briefs will be published in the September of the
academic year of examination.
Between them, the briefs will give students a choice of composing
tasks which may include:
„„ music for film or television
„„ electro-acoustic music (such as an electronic soundscape)
„„ popular song (with or without vocals, and perhaps, but not
necessarily, for the stage).
4Submission
The finished composition must be submitted as Track 3 of the Music
Technology Portfolio 2 audio CD.
3.6Logbook
A copy of the logbook can be found in Appendix 2.
3.7 Assessment criteria for Task 3A: Sequenced Integrated
Performance
1 Method of
marking
Each piece of work is marked according to both the holistic
assessment criterion and the detailed assessment criteria. Holistic
marking is used to ensure that the total mark derived from the
other detailed assessment criteria is a true overall reflection of
the standard of the student’s work. If the holistic mark selected
does not match the total of the detailed assessment criteria, the
mark for each detailed criterion and/or the holistic mark must
be reconsidered until a single mark appropriate for the work is
identified.
2 Order in which
the assessment
criteria will be
applied
Either the holistic assessment or the detailed assessment criteria
may be applied first. The holistic criterion is given first below.
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Unit 3
Music Technology Portfolio 2
Holistic assessment criterion
Holistic
36–40
Outstanding
A highly accurate sequence. Imaginative work displaying a high level of control and
musicality.
Sense of musical wholeness — the whole piece has been sequenced to a high
standard.
31–35
Excellent
Convincing throughout in terms of accuracy, musicality and control.
Any errors and/or misjudgements do not detract from a successful sequence.
26–30
Good
Convincing for most of the time in terms of accuracy, musicality and control.
Some errors and/or misjudgements, but too few to have a big impact.
21–25
Competent
Generally secure in terms of accuracy, musicality and control.
Some errors and/or misjudgements, but the performance still has a sense of
direction and fluency.
16–20
Adequate
A serious attempt but some insecurity and inconsistency in terms of accuracy,
musicality and control.
Errors, misjudgements and technical problems begin to be intrusive, but the piece
still holds together.
11–15
Basic
The accuracy of the data input is inconsistent. There is a lack of musicality and
control.
Errors, misjudgements and technical problems are intrusive.
6–10
Limited
Positive features are few.
A few encouraging signs, but considerable difficulties — a weak end product in
most areas. The submission may be incomplete.
0–5
56
Poor
Section C
Positive features are heavily outweighed by errors, misjudgements and technical
problems. Insufficient work has been submitted to allow credit in every criteria.
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 2 Unit 3
Detailed assessment criteria
Criterion 1: Realisation of Pitch and Rhythm
RHYTHM
PITCH
1. Realisation of Pitch and Rhythm
6
Excellent accuracy of pitch.
4–5
A few small slips which do not detract from the overall performance.
3
Several errors (such as missed accidentals).
2
Some significant intrusive errors and/or omissions, with unmusical effect.
0–1
Limited accuracy, seriously compromising the performance.
6
Excellent accuracy of rhythm. A musical performance.
4–5
A few small slips which do not detract from the overall performance.
A rhythmically accurate, but mechanical sequence.
3
Some audible errors (such as poor rhythmic ensemble between parts).
2
Some significant obtrusive errors and/or omissions, with unmusical effect.
0–1
Limited accuracy, seriously compromising the performance.
Criterion 2: Choice of Timbre and Mix
BALANCE/PAN
TIMBRE
2. Choice of Timbre and Mix
4
Well-chosen timbres — timbres have been edited as appropriate to suit the given stimulus
material
3
Appropriate choice of timbres, but no further editing to suit stimulus.
2
Partially successful choice of timbres.
0–1
Limited success in choosing appropriate timbres.
4
A musically balanced mix, faithful to the original. Effective placement in the stereo field. Audio
tracks are well blended and balanced with sequenced parts.
3
Mostly well balanced with some placement in the stereo field. Audio tracks sit well in the mix.
2
Some unsuccessful blends or masking of important parts. Some misjudgements in stereo
placement. Audio tracks do not always blend well with sequenced parts.
0–1
Little sense of balance or blend. Little or no placement in the stereo field/serious
misjudgements in panning. Audio tracks feel separate to sequenced parts.
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Unit 3
Music Technology Portfolio 2
Criterion 3: Musicality — Dynamics, Articulation and Phrasing
ARTICULATION
AND PHRASING
DYNAMICS
3. Musicality — Dynamics, Articulation and Phrasing
4
Detailed and musically effective dynamics throughout. Some dynamic shaping as appropriate
to instrumentation.
3
Good overall dynamic contrasts, but little or no shaping.
2
Some attempts to create dynamic contrasts, but some inconsistencies or misjudgements.
0–1
Mechanical, unmusical and/or erratic. Limited attempt to create dynamic contrasts.
4
Detailed and musically effective articulation and phrasing throughout.
3
Generally effective articulation and phrasing.
2
Some attempts to create articulation and phrasing, but some inconsistencies or
misjudgements.
0–1
Mechanical, unmusical and/or erratic. Little attention to articulation and phrasing.
Criterion 4: Music Technology Skills and Capture of Live Audio
CAPTURE OF LIVE
AUDIO
STYLE AND
CREATIVITY
4. Music Technology Skills
58
4
Excellent sense of style including musical and controlled use of tempo shaping and effects as
appropriate. Any fills or solos are well executed and stylistic. A musical sequence.
3
A consistent sense of style with some attention to musical detail resulting in a generally
successful sequence.
2
Some inconsistencies in the application of tempo shaping and effects or a mechanical
approach resulting in a more basic sequence.
0–1
Limited sense of style with little attention to musical detail. A mechanical sequence.
8
Audio tracks are well captured with well managed dynamics and EQ as appropriate to the
style.
6–7
Audio tracks are mostly well captured with minor slips in dynamics or EQ.
4–5
Appropriate mic choice, but some areas of inconsistency — may display insufficient attention
to dynamics or EQ, or may have some clipping.
2–3
Wrong mic choice/poor positioning. One or more areas display significant weaknesses.
0–1
Unacceptable lack of clarity. Little or no attention to dynamics and EQ. A noisy recording.
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 2 Unit 3
3.8 Assessment criteria for Task 3B: Multi-track Recording
1 Method of
marking
Each piece of work is marked according to both the holistic
assessment criterion and the detailed assessment criteria. Holistic
marking is used to ensure that the total mark derived from the
other detailed assessment criteria is a true overall reflection of
the standard of the student’s work. If the holistic mark selected
does not match the total of the detailed assessment criteria, the
mark for each detailed criterion and/or the holistic mark must
be reconsidered until a single mark appropriate for the work is
identified.
2 Order in which
the assessment
criteria will be
applied
Either the holistic assessment or the detailed assessment criteria
may be applied first. The holistic criterion is given first below.
Holistic assessment criterion
Holistic
36–40
Outstanding
An impressive recording in which all parts are clear, well balanced, successfully
processed and mixed.
Sense of wholeness — all aspects of the recording are of a high standard.
31–35
Excellent
Convincing throughout in terms of clarity, processing and mixing.
Any errors and/or misjudgements do not detract from a successful recording.
26–30
Good
Convincing for most of the time in terms of clarity, processing and mixing.
Some errors and/or misjudgements, but too few to have a big impact.
21–25
Competent
Generally secure in terms of clarity, processing and mixing.
Some errors and/or misjudgements, but the recording is still broadly successful.
16–20
Adequate
A serious attempt but some insecurity and inconsistency in terms of clarity,
processing and mixing.
Errors, misjudgements and technical problems begin to be intrusive, but the
recording still has some positive features.
11–15
Basic
There are some significant problems in terms of clarity, processing and mixing.
Errors, misjudgements and technical problems are intrusive.
6–10
Limited
Positive features are few.
A few encouraging signs, but considerable difficulties — a weak end product in
most areas. The submission may be incomplete.
0–5
Poor
Positive features are heavily outweighed by errors, misjudgements and technical
problems. Insufficient work has been submitted to allow credit in every criteria.
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Unit 3
Music Technology Portfolio 2
Detailed assessment criteria
Criterion 1: Capture
MICROPHONE
PLACEMENT AND
CLARITY OF SIGNAL
6
Fully considered choice and placement of microphones to produce a clear, focused capture of
all tracks. Good depth of field.
4–5
Appropriate choice and placement of microphones. Minor inconsistencies on one or two
tracks.
2–3
Some appropriate choices of microphone. Some poor positioning resulting in an
inconsistency of line.
0–1
Little evidence of appropriate microphone choice and/or placement. Unacceptable lack of
clarity within many parts.
NOISE AND
DISTORTION
1. Capture
5
Excellent signal-to-noise ratio. No noise or distortion.
3–4
Slight noise or occasional clipping, but not intrusive.
2
Some intrusive noise and/or distortion. Inappropriate gain and level setting.
0–1
Unacceptably noisy and poorly made recording.
Criterion 2: Processing
FX/
AMBIENCE
MANAGEMENT
OF DYNAMICS
MANAGEMENT
OF EQ
2. Processing
60
6
Excellent, without inappropriate constriction or exaggeration.
4–5
Mainly good — slight EQ errors on some tracks.
2–3
Inconsistent use of EQ — lack of attention to EQ on some tracks detract from the overall
recording
0–1
Limited or inappropriate use of EQ.
6
Excellent, appropriate to the style of music. Compression has been used where appropriate
to good musical effect.
4–5
Mainly good, but some over-compression or one or two tracks do not sit well in the mix due
to lack of compression.
2–3
Inconsistently applied dynamic processing — some intrusive misjudgements.
0–1
Limited or no use of dynamic processing. Dynamics are detrimental to the music.
6
Excellent, creative use of stylistically appropriate effects.
4–5
Well controlled use of appropriate effects.
2–3
Some inconsistency in application of effects processing
0–1
Unacceptably dry, reverberant or uncontrolled use of effects processing.
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Music Technology Portfolio 2 Unit 3
Criterion 3: Mixing
USE OF
STEREO
FIELD
BALANCE AND
BLEND
3. Mixing
6
Consistently well balanced and effectively blended across all parts of the mix.
4–5
Most tracks are well balanced. Some minor slips on one or two parts. Some effective
blending of sounds.
2–3
Inconsistent balance. Important parts may be masked. Some unsuccessful blends.
0–1
Poorly balanced. Detrimental to the musical outcome.
5
Creative, musically appropriate use of stereo field.
3–4
Mainly good use of stereo field, but with minor inconsistencies
2
Inappropriate or inconsistent use of stereo field.
0–1
Little or no use of stereo field or significant misjudgements in panning.
3.9 Assessment criteria for 3C: Composing Using Music Technology
1 Method of
marking
Each piece of work is marked according to both the holistic
assessment criterion and the detailed assessment criteria. Holistic
marking is used to ensure that the total mark derived from the
other detailed assessment criteria is a true overall reflection of
the standard of the student’s work. If the holistic mark selected
does not match the total of the detailed assessment criteria, the
mark for each detailed criterion and/or the holistic mark must
be reconsidered until a single mark appropriate for the work is
identified.
2 Order in which
the assessment
criteria will be
applied
Either the holistic assessment or the detailed assessment criteria
may be applied first. The holistic criterion is given first below.
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Unit 3
Music Technology Portfolio 2
3Compulsory
and optional
assessment
criteria for
compositions
The detailed assessment criteria will consist of four compulsory
criteria plus three optional criteria.
Compulsory criteria:
1. Responding to Set Brief
2. Style/Coherence
3. Manipulation of Sounds
4. Quality of Recorded Submission
Optional criteria (three are selected from the following):
5. Melody
6. Harmony
7. Rhythm
8. Texture
9. Form/Structure
4 Selecting
optional
assessment
criteria
The examiner will choose the optional assessment criteria that work
to the student’s best advantage.
5Reconciling
holistic and
detailed
marking
The examiner will reconcile the outcomes of holistic and detailed
marking.
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Music Technology Portfolio 2 Unit 3
Holistic assessment criterion
Holistic
36–40
Outstanding
Impressive and imaginative in style, ideas, development and handling of music
technology.
Complete control of compositional methods and techniques used.
Sense of musical wholeness — no passage sub-standard.
31–35
Excellent
Convincing throughout in style, ideas, development and handling of music
technology.
Excellent control of compositional methods and techniques used.
Any errors and/or misjudgements do not detract from a successful piece.
26–30
Good
Convincing for most of the time in style, ideas, development and handling of music
technology.
Good control of compositional methods and techniques.
Some errors and/or misjudgements, but too few to have a big impact.
21–25
Competent
Generally secure in style and ideas and handling of music technology, but
development may be limited.
Some control of a more narrow range of compositional methods and techniques.
Some errors and misjudgements, but the piece still has some direction and flow.
16–20
Adequate
A serious attempt but some inconsistent/unsophisticated handling of style, ideas
and music technology.
Some effective use of a narrow range of compositional methods and techniques.
Errors, misjudgements and technical problems begin to be intrusive, but much of
the piece still holds together.
11–15
Basic
Inconsistent/unsophisticated handling of style, ideas and music technology.
Basic use of compositional methods and techniques.
Errors, misjudgements and technical problems are intrusive.
6–10
Limited
Positive features are few.
A few encouraging signs, but considerable difficulties — a weak end product in
most areas. Perhaps under the required length.
0–5
Poor
Positive features are heavily outweighed by errors, misjudgements and technical
problems. Insufficient work has been submitted to allow credit in every criteria.
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Unit 3
Music Technology Portfolio 2
Detailed assessment criteria
Criterion 1: Responding to Set Brief (compulsory)
Responding to Set Brief (compulsory)
6
Fully and imaginatively reflects all elements of the brief.
4–5
Most aspects of the brief have been successfully addressed.
2–3
A few of the elements of the brief have been reflected.
0–1
Limited response to the brief. Composition too short.
Criterion 2: Style/Coherence (compulsory)
Style/Coherence (compulsory)
6
Excellent and consistent sense of style. Ideas have been imaginatively developed demonstrating a
sense of flow, direction and coherence throughout the composition.
4–5
A consistent sense of style. Musical ideas are coherent and have been developed with a mostly
appropriate blend of unity and diversity.
2–3
Some inconsistency of style resulting in a lack of coherence. Some insufficient development. The
composition may be overly repetitive or have a surfeit of ideas.
0–1
Limited sense of style and coherence. Insufficient development of ideas.
Criterion 3: Manipulation of Sounds (compulsory)
Manipulation of Sounds (compulsory)
6
Excellent use of sound shaping and/or effects to create an imaginative and coherent sonic palette.
4–5
Successful use of sound shaping and/or effects as appropriate to the style.
2–3
Some inconsistency in the use of effects/restricted use of technology to manipulate sound.
0–1
Limited or inappropriate manipulation of sound/use of effects.
Criterion 4: Quality of Recorded Submission (compulsory)
Quality of Recorded Submission (compulsory)
4
A well presented, high quality recording.
3
A mostly well presented recording with few flaws.
2
Some inconsistencies in the quality of the recording. Insufficient attention to detail.
0–1
A poorly presented recording with little attention to detail.
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Music Technology Portfolio 2 Unit 3
Criterion 5: Melody (optional)
Melody (optional)
6
Excellent and imaginative with a strong sense of melodic flow as appropriate to the style.
4–5
A good melodic sense. Melodies have shape and style.
2–3
Melodies are stiff or formulaic or display inconsistency in shape or flow.
0–1
Limited sense of melodic shape. Melodies lack direction and structure or are inappropriate to the
style.
Criterion 6: Harmony (optional)
Harmony (optional)
6
Excellent and imaginative and appropriate to the style.
4–5
Appropriately chosen harmonies with few misjudgements.
2–3
Some inconsistency in harmonic choices. May be functional but uninteresting.
0–1
Limited control of harmony — detrimental to the music.
Criterion 7: Rhythm (optional)
Rhythm (optional)
6
Excellent and imaginative use of rhythmic elements.
4–5
Appropriate use of rhythms with some development as appropriate to the style.
2–3
Some lack of rhythmic variety or a surfeit of rhythmic ideas.
0–1
Limited use of rhythmic elements.
Criterion 8: Texture (optional)
Texture (optional)
6
Excellent, imaginative and coherent throughout.
4–5
Good use of texture to create interest in the piece with few misjudgements.
2–3
Some textural inconsistencies or insufficient contrast.
0–1
Limited or inappropriate use of texture.
Criterion 9: Form/Structure (optional)
Form/Structure (optional)
6
Excellent and imaginative organisation of musical ideas.
4–5
Musical ideas are presented with a sense of direction and coherence as appropriate to the style with
few misjudgements.
2–3
Some misjudgements in the organisation of musical ideas. May be excessively unpredictable or overly
repetitive.
0–1
Limited or inappropriate organisation of musical ideas.
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C Music Technology unit content
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
and Producing
Unit 4 Analysing
A2 compulsory unit
Externally assessed
4.1 Unit description
Students will be expected to demonstrate their knowledge of music
and the principles of music technology through a series of written
commentaries, manipulations and production tasks using material
on an examination paper and recorded on an audio CD.
4.2 Assessment information
1 Exam focus
This assessment will take the form of a 2-hour examination.
There are two sections in the examination paper and students have
to complete both.
Each student will have an audio CD, which will contain a series of
music files to be imported into music production software. Each
student will also have an examination paper which will include
some or all of the CD tracks notated as conventional staff notation,
editing grids or numerical data.
Students will be required to review the materials, commenting on
musical elements and technological processes, identifying mistakes
and discrepancies and correcting them and, finally, producing a
stereo mix. The tasks may involve adding and editing MIDI data,
and may involve vocal track(s).
The final mix will consist of four tracks totalling, approximately,
one minute of music. Some of the material on the audio CD may
take the form of separate sections or samples which will have to be
assembled into a complete track.
„„ The first track will consist of a melody which may be original, a
popular song or jazz standard, folk tune or film/TV theme.
„„ The second will consist of backing chords for keyboard(s),
guitar(s), wind or string instruments.
„„ The third will consist of a bass line.
„„ The fourth will be a drum and/or percussion part.
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Unit 4 Analysing and Producing
2 Structure of
exam paper
The examination paper has two sections, A and B, and will be
structured as follows:
Section A (62 marks)
„„ Questions 1–4 will test students’ musical understanding, their
ability to manipulate and correct recorded music and their ability
to write commentaries on technological processes.
Section B (18 marks)
„„ Question 5 will be a practical task involving the production of a
balanced stereo mix.
3Resources
Students will require a good quality computer workstation with
MIDI keyboard and headphones. Internet access will not be
permitted during the examination.
Students will require sufficient working space to be able to operate
their equipment and to write in their answer booklet.
Provided students are isolated from each other within the centre,
and also prevented from contacting students at other centres, it is
permissible to run the examination several times on the date of the
examination to make access to resources easier.
4Submission
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Students will be required to produce their stereo mix on an audio
CD. This must be submitted with the completed answer book to
Edexcel.
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Analysing and Producing Unit 4
4.3 What students need to learn
1Music
technology in
practice
Study for this unit should include the capture, mixing and
processing of music and musical data, including:
„„ recording, importing and inputting data (including MIDI data)
„„ audio sequencing, sampling and editing
„„ MIDI sequencing and editing
„„ correcting technical errors
„„ copying, pasting and compiling tracks
„„ mixing, processing and burning to CD.
2Musical
elements and
the principles
of music
technology
Study for this unit should also prepare students for its written
demands which will include:
„„ making comparisons between musical extracts and commenting
perceptively on musical features including melody, harmony,
rhythm and structure using appropriate musical vocabulary
„„ following a skeleton score, identifying and correcting errors and
discrepancies in pitch and rhythm, identifying features such as
chords and cadences and notating drum patterns and riffs
„„ identifying and commenting perceptively on the technological
features of music including its method of recording, capture or
data production, techniques of audio and MIDI sequencing and
sampling, mixing and processing
„„ identifying technical errors and suggesting remedies.
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Unit 4 Analysing and Producing
4.4 Assessment criteria for Section B
USE OF
EFFECTS
USE OF
STEREO
FIELD
BLEND AND
BALANCE
Mixdown (AO4)
70
6
Consistently well balanced and effectively blended across all parts of the mix.
4–5
Most tracks are well balanced. Some minor slips on one or two parts. Some effective
blending of sounds.
2–3
Inconsistent balance. Important parts may be masked. Some unsuccessful blends.
0–1
Poorly balanced. Detrimental to the musical outcome.
6
Creative, musically appropriate use of stereo field.
4–5
Mainly good use of stereo field, but with minor inconsistencies.
2–3
Inappropriate or inconsistent use of stereo field.
0–1
Little or no use of stereo field or significant misjudgements in panning.
6
Excellent, creative use of stylistically appropriate effects.
4–5
Well controlled use of appropriate effects.
2–3
Some inconsistency in application of effects processing.
0–1
Unacceptably dry, reverberant or uncontrolled use of effects processing.
Section C
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
D Assessment and additional information
Assessment information
Assessment
requirements
For a summary of assessment requirements and assessment
objectives, see Section B.
Entering candidates
for this qualification
Details of how to enter candidates for the examinations for this
qualification can be found in Edexcel’s Information Manual, copies
of which are sent to all examinations officers. The information can
also be found on Edexcel’s website: www.edexcel.com.
Resitting of units
There is no limit to the number of times that a student may retake
a unit prior to claiming certification for the qualification. The best
available result for each contributing unit will count towards the
final grade.
After certification all unit results may be reused to count towards
a new award. Students may re-enter for certification only if they
have retaken at least one unit.
Results of units held in the Edexcel unit bank have a shelf life
limited only by the shelf life of this specification.
Awarding and
reporting
The grading, awarding and certification of this qualification will
comply with the requirements of the current GCSE/GCE Code of
Practice, which is published by the Office of Qualifications and
Examinations Regulation (Ofqual). The AS qualification will be
graded and certificated on a five-grade scale from A to E. The full
GCE Advanced level will be graded on a
six-point scale A* to E. Individual unit results will be reported.
A pass in an Advanced Subsidiary subject is indicated by one of
the five grades A, B, C, D, E of which Grade A is the highest and
Grade E the lowest. A pass in an Advanced Level GCE subject
is indicated by one of the six grades A*, A, B, C, D, E of which
Grade A* is the highest and Grade E the lowest. To be awarded an
A* students will need to achieve an A on the full GCE Advanced
level qualification and an A* aggregate of the A2 units. Students
whose level of achievement is below the minimum judged by
Edexcel to be of sufficient standard to be recorded on a certificate
will receive an unclassified U result.
Performance
descriptions
Performance descriptions give the minimum acceptable level for
a grade. See Appendix 3 for the performance descriptions for this
subject.
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D Assessment and additional information
Unit results
The minimum uniform marks required for each grade for each
unit:
Unit 1
Unit grade
A
B
C
D
E
Maximum uniform mark = 140
112
98
84
70
56
Candidates who do not achieve the standard required for a
grade E will receive a uniform mark in the range 0–55.
Unit 2
Unit grade
A
B
C
D
E
Maximum uniform mark = 60
48
42
36
30
24
Candidates who do not achieve the standard required for a
grade E will receive a uniform mark in the range 0–23.
Unit 3
Unit grade
A
B
C
D
E
Maximum uniform mark = 120
96
84
72
60
48
Candidates who do not achieve the standard required for a
grade E will receive a uniform mark in the range 0–47.
Unit 4
Unit grade
A
B
C
D
E
Maximum uniform mark = 80
64
56
48
40
32
Candidates who do not achieve the standard required for a
grade E will receive a uniform mark in the range 0–31.
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Qualification results
Assessment and additional information D
The minimum uniform marks required for each grade:
Advanced Subsidiary Cash-in code 8MT01
Qualification grade
A
B
C
D
E
Maximum uniform mark = 200
160
140
120
100
80
Candidates who do not achieve the standard required for a
grade E will receive a uniform mark in the range 0–79.
Advanced GCE Cash-in code 9MT01
Qualification grade
A
B
C
D
E
Maximum uniform mark = 400
320
280
240
200
160
Candidates who do not achieve the standard required for a
grade E will receive a uniform mark in the range 0–159.
Language of
assessment
Assessment of this specification will be available in English only.
Assessment materials will be published in English only and
all work submitted for examination and moderation must be
produced in English.
Quality of written
communication
Students will be assessed on their ability to:
„„ write legibly, with accurate use of spelling, grammar and
punctuation in order to make their meaning clear
„„ select and use a form and style of writing appropriate to
purpose and to complex subject matter
„„ organise relevant information clearly and coherently, using
specialist vocabulary when appropriate.
Students will be given the opportunity to demonstrate quality of
written communication in Units 1, 2 and 4.
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D Assessment and additional information
Assessment objectives and weighting
% in AS
% in A2
% in GCE
AO1
Interpret musical ideas with technical and expressive control
and a sense of style and awareness of occasion and/or
ensemble (performing/realising).
15%
15%
15%
AO2
Create and develop musical ideas with technical control and
expressive understanding making creative use of musical
devices, conventions and resources (composing/arranging).
15%
16%
15.5%
AO3
Demonstrate understanding of, and comment perceptively on,
the structural, expressive and contextual aspects of music
(appraising).
25%
10%
17.5%
AO4
Demonstrate effective use of music technology to capture, edit
and produce musical outcomes.
30%
39%
34.5%
AO5
Demonstrate understanding of and comment perceptively on
the technical processes and principles that underpin effective
use of music technology.
15%
20%
17.5%
100%
100%
100%
TOTAL
Synoptic
assessment
In synoptic assessment there should be a concentration on the
quality of assessment to ensure that it encourages the development
of the holistic understanding of the subject.
Synopticity requires students to connect knowledge, understanding
and skills acquired in different parts of the Advanced GCE course.
Unit 3 Task 3C requires students to apply what they have learnt at
Advanced Subsidiary to produce a composition and brings all three
Areas of Study together.
Unit 4 requires students to demonstrate aural perception and to
make connections between all the skills and activities that they
have encountered within the practical music technology work within
the course.
Unit 4 aims to undertake synoptic assessment of the skills
and knowledge gained in all other aspects of the qualification.
It is designed to provide students with the opportunity to
demonstrate their understanding of the principles that underpin
music technology through a series of task-focused questions and
production tasks. It is expected that the vast majority of the skills
and knowledge assessed within this unit will have been taught and
learnt as an integral part of the practical activities inherent within
the other units in the qualification.
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Assessment and additional information D
Stretch and
challenge
Students can be stretched and challenged in A2 units through the
use of different assessment strategies, for example:
„„ use of a wider range of question types to address different skills
— for example problem solving, working to a brief, mixing down
under examination conditions
„„ introducing topics in Unit 3 Task 3B to encourage them to use a
wider range of sounds, more tracks required, working to a higher
level of complexity
„„ composing rather than arranging
„„ integrating live recording tracks with sequenced tracks.
Additional information
Malpractice and
plagiarism
For up-to-date advice on malpractice and plagiarism, please refer
to the latest Joint Council for Qualifications (JCQ) Instructions for
Conducting Coursework document. This document is available on
the JCQ website: www.jcq.org.uk.
For additional information on malpractice, please refer to the latest
Joint Council for Qualifications (JCQ) Suspected Malpractice in
Examinations And Assessments: Policies and Procedures document,
available on the JCQ website.
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D Assessment and additional information
Access
arrangements
and special
requirements
Edexcel’s policy on access arrangements and special considerations
for GCE, GCSE, and Entry Level is designed to ensure equal access
to qualifications for all students (in compliance with the Equality Act
2010) without compromising the assessment of skills, knowledge,
understanding or competence.
Please see the Joint Council for Qualifications (JCQ) website (www.
jcq.org.uk) for their policy on access arrangements, reasonable
adjustments and special considerations.
Please see our website (www.edexcel.com) for:
„„ the forms to submit for requests for access arrangements and
special considerations
„„ dates to submit the forms.
Requests for access arrangements and special considerations must
be addressed to:
Special Requirements
Edexcel
One90 High Holborn
London WC1V 7BH
Equality Act 2010
Please see our website (www.edexcel.com) for information on the
Equality Act 2010.
Prior learning and
progression
Prior learning
Students who would benefit most from studying a GCE in Music
Technology are likely to have a Level 2 qualification such as a GCSE
in Music at grades A*–C or a BTEC First Certificate or BTEC First
Diploma in Music.
Progression
This qualification supports progression into further education,
training or employment, such as a degree in Music Technology or a
vocational course such as a BTEC HNC or HND in Music Production.
Combinations of
entry
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Section D
There are no forbidden combinations.
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Student
recruitment
Assessment and additional information D
Edexcel’s access policy concerning recruitment to our qualifications
is that:
„„ they must be available to anyone who is capable of reaching the
required standard
„„ they must be free from barriers that restrict access and
progression
„„ equal opportunities exist for all students.
The wider
curriculum
This qualification provides opportunities for developing an
understanding of spiritual, moral, ethical, social and cultural issues,
together with an awareness of environmental issues, health and
safety considerations, as applied to Music Technology. Appendix 4:
Wider curriculum maps the opportunities available.
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D Assessment and additional information
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
E Resources, support and training
Resources to support the specification
In addition to the resources available in the Getting Started
book, Edexcel produces a wide range of resources to support this
specification.
Edexcel’s own published resources
Edexcel aims to provide the most comprehensive support for our
qualifications. We have therefore published our own dedicated
suite of resources for teachers and students written by qualification
experts.
Edexcel publications
You can order further copies of the specification and SAMs
documents from:
Edexcel Publications
Adamsway
Mansfield
Notts NG18 4FN
Telephone:
Fax:
Email:
Website:
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
01623 467467
01623 450481
[email protected]
www.edexcel.com
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Section E
79
E Resources, support and training
Additional resources endorsed by Edexcel
Edexcel also endorses additional materials written to support this
qualification.
Any resources bearing the Edexcel logo have been through a
rigorous endorsement procedure to ensure complete and accurate
coverage of the specification.
For up-to-date information about endorsed resources, please visit
www.edexcel.org.co.uk/endorsement.
Please note that while resources are checked at the time of
publication, materials may be withdrawn from circulation and
website locations may change.
The resources listed are intended to be a guide for teachers and
not a comprehensive list. Further suggestions can be found in
Appendix 6.
Please see www.edexcel.com/gce2008 for up to date information.
Edexcel support services
Edexcel support
services
Edexcel has a wide range of support services to help you implement
this qualification successfully.
ResultsPlus – ResultsPlus is an application launched by Edexcel
to help subject teachers, senior management teams, and students
by providing detailed analysis of examination performance. Reports
that compare performance between subjects, classes, your centre
and similar centres can be generated in ‘one-click’. Skills maps that
show performance according to the specification topic being tested
are available for some subjects. For further information about which
subjects will be analysed through ResultsPlus, and for information
on how to access and use the service, please visit www.edexcel.
com/resultsplus
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Resources, support and training E
Ask the Expert – to make it easier for our teachers to ask
us subject specific questions we have provided the Ask the
Expert Service. This easy-to-use web query form will allow you
to ask any question about the delivery or teaching of Edexcel
qualifications. You’ll get a personal response, from one of our
administrative or teaching experts, sent to the email address you
provide. You can access this service at www.edexcel.com/ask
Support for Students
Learning flourishes when students take an active interest in their
education; when they have all the information they need to make
the right decisions about their futures. With the help of feedback
from students and their teachers, we’ve developed a website for
students that will help them:
„„ understand subject specifications
„„ access past papers and mark schemes
„„ learn about other students’ experiences at university, on their
travels and when entering the workplace.
We’re committed to regularly updating and improving our online
services for students. The most valuable service we can provide is
helping schools and colleges unlock the potential of their learners.
www.edexcel.com/students
Training
A programme of professional development and training courses,
covering various aspects of the specification and examination, will
be arranged by Edexcel each year on a regional basis. Full details
can be obtained from:
Training from Edexcel
Edexcel
One90 High Holborn
London WC1V 7BH
Email:
Website:
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
[email protected]
www.edexcel.com/training
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
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E Resources, support and training
82
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
F Appendices
Appendix 1 Unit 1 logbook
85
Appendix 2 Unit 3 logbook
97
Appendix 3 Performance descriptions 109
Appendix 4 Wider curriculum 115
Appendix 5 Codes
117
Appendix 6 Further resources and support
119
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Section F
83
F Appendices
84
Section F
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Appendix 1
Unit 1 logbook
Task 1A: Sequenced Realised Performance
1 Complete the following information about the equipment that
you used when working on your sequenced performance:
(a) Computer and processor (eg Dell Dimension, Intel Core 2
duo)
(b) Main Digital Audio Workstation software (eg Cubase 4,
Logic Pro7)
(c) Additional software (including plug ins) (eg Reason 2.5,
Hypersonic 2, Virtual Guitarist)
(d) Audio/MIDI interface (eg MOTU 828)
(e) Other external hardware (eg sound module(s) or effects
processors)
(f) Keyboard (eg M Audio Oxygen)
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Appendix 1
Unit 1 logbook
2 List the sources of any commercial loops or samples used
(ie any that are not included with the software listed in
Question 1), (eg Sample Labs: iLoops).
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Unit 1 logbook
Appendix 1
Task 1B: Multi-track Recording
Title of piece recorded, with details of composer/original band or
artist:
3 Complete the following information about the equipment that
you used when working on your recording:
(a)Microphones
(b) Multi-track hard disk recorder or software
(c)Mixing desk
(d) Dynamic processing and effects
(e) Other equipment (eg DI box)
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Appendix 1
Unit 1 logbook
4 Using the space below, and continuing on a separate page if
necessary, draw and label diagrams to show how you arranged
the microphones you used. You may attach photographs if you
prefer.
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Unit 1 logbook
Appendix 1
5 Complete the table below to show how you recorded each track.
Track
Instrument
Mic used/DI
Position and capture
Example
Guitar
SM58
Tune guitar, check lead, mic positioned in cradle in front
of amp in corner of room. Played/captured with rhythm
section
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
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Appendix 1
Unit 1 logbook
6
Complete the track sheet below.
Track sheet
Track 1
Track 2
Track 3
Track 4
Track 5
Track 6
Track 7
Instrument/
voice
EQ
FX
Dynamic
processing
Panning
(L-R)
Level
90
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Unit 1 logbook
Track 8
Track 9
Track 10
Track 11
Appendix 1
Track 12
Instrument/
voice
EQ
FX
Dynamic
processing
Panning
(L-R)
Level
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Appendix 1
Unit 1 logbook
Task 1C: Creative Sequenced Arrangement
Show which one of the two prescribed stimuli, and which one of the
two prescribed styles, you have used for your arrangement.
Stimulus chosen:
Style chosen:
7 Complete the following information about the equipment that
you used when working on your sequenced arrangement:
(a) Hardware (eg computer, keyboard etc)
(b) Sequencing software (eg Cubase, Logic)
(c) Sound sources (eg GM, Hypersonic 2)
(d) Other software or resources (eg additional plug-ins, samples
etc)
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Unit 1 logbook
Appendix 1
8 List the sources of any loops or samples used.
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Appendix 1
Unit 1 logbook
Each of the following questions is worth 10 marks.
Both questions refer to Task 1C: Creative Sequenced
Arrangement.
Your answers to Questions 9 and 10 may be in note form, bullet
points, or in continuous prose.
9 Explain how you developed your completed sequenced
arrangement from your chosen stimulus. Refer to at least two of
the following: structure; texture; harmony and tonality; melody;
rhythm.
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Unit 1 logbook
Appendix 1
10 Identify the most important features of your chosen style, and
explain how you have used them in your arrangement.
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F Appendices
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Appendix 2
Unit 3 logbook
Task 3A: Sequenced Integrated Performance
Show which one of the two prescribed songs you have used for your
sequenced performance.
Song chosen:
1 Complete the following information about the equipment that
you used when working on your sequenced performance:
(a) Computer and processor (eg Dell Dimension, Intel Core 2 duo)
(b) Main Digital Audio Workstation software (eg Cubase 4,
Logic Pro7)
(c) Additional software (including plug-ins) (eg Reason 2.5,
Hypersonic 2, Virtual Guitarist)
(d) Audio/MIDI interface (eg MOTU 828)
(e) Other external hardware (eg sound module(s) or effects
processors)
(f) Keyboard (eg M Audio Oxygen)
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Appendix 2 Unit 3 logbook
2 Complete the following information about the equipment that
you used to complete your audio track capture.
(a)Microphones
(b) Multi-track hard disk recorder or software
(c) Mixing desk
(d) Dynamic processing and effects
(e) Other equipment (eg DI box)
3 List the sources of any commercial loops or samples used (ie any
that are not included with the software listed in Question 1)
(eg Sample Labs: iLoops).
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Unit 3 logbook Appendix 2
Task 3B: Multi-track Recording
Title of piece recorded, with details of composer/original band or
artist:
4 Complete the following information about the equipment that
you used when working on your recording:
(a)Microphones
(b) Multi-track hard disk recorder or software
(c) Mixing desk
(d) Dynamic processing and effects
(e) Other equipment (eg DI box)
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Appendix 2 Unit 3 logbook
5 Using the space below, and continuing on a separate page if
necessary, draw and label diagrams to show how you arranged
the microphones you used. You may attach photographs if you
prefer.
100
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Unit 3 logbook Appendix 2
6 Complete the table below to show how you recorded each track.
Track
Instrument
Mic used/DI
Position and capture
Example
Guitar
SM58
Tune guitar, check lead, mic positioned in cradle in front
of amp in corner of room. Played/captured with rhythm
section.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
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Appendix 2 Unit 3 logbook
Track
Instrument
Mic used/DI
Position and capture
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
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Unit 3 logbook Appendix 2
7
Complete the track sheet below.
Track sheet
Track 1
Track 2
Track 3
Track 4
Track 5
Track 6
Track 7
Instrument/
voice
EQ
FX
Dynamic
processing
Panning
(L-R)
Level
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Appendix 2 Unit 3 logbook
Track 8
Track 9
Track 10
Track 11
Track 12
Track 13
Track 14
Instrument/
voice
EQ
FX
Dynamic
processing
Panning
(L-R)
Level
104
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Unit 3 logbook Appendix 2
Track 15
Track 16
Track 17
Track 18
Track 19
Track 20
Track 21
Instrument/
voice
EQ
FX
Dynamic
processing
Panning
(L-R)
Level
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Appendix 2 Unit 3 logbook
Track 22
Track 23
Track 24
Instrument/
voice
EQ
FX
Dynamic
processing
Panning
(L-R)
Level
106
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Unit 3 logbook Appendix 2
Task 3C: Composing using Music Technology
Show which one of the three briefs you have used, and give the
name of your composition.
Brief chosen:
Name of
composition:
8 Complete the following information about the equipment that
you used when working on your sequenced arrangement:
(a) Hardware (eg computer, keyboard etc)
(b) Sequencing software (eg Cubase, Logic)
(c) Sound sources (eg GM, Hypersonic 2)
(d) Other software or resources (eg additional plug-ins, samples
etc)
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Appendix 2 Unit 3 logbook
9 List the sources of any loops or samples used.
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Appendix 3
Performance descriptions
Introduction
Performance descriptions have been created for all GCE subjects.
They describe the learning outcomes and levels of attainment likely
to be demonstrated by a representative candidate performing at
the A/B and E/U boundaries for AS and A2.
In practice most candidates will show uneven profiles across the
attainments listed, with strengths in some areas compensating
in the award process for weaknesses or omissions elsewhere.
Performance descriptions illustrate expectations at the A/B and
E/U boundaries of the AS and A2 as a whole; they have not been
written at unit level.
Grade A/B and E/U boundaries should be set using professional
judgement. The judgement should reflect the quality of candidates’
work, informed by the available technical and statistical evidence.
Performance descriptions are designed to assist examiners in
exercising their professional judgement. They should be interpreted
and applied in the context of individual specifications and their
associated units. However, performance descriptions are not
designed to define the content of specifications and units.
The requirement for all AS and A level specifications to assess
candidates’ quality of written communication will be met through
one or more of the assessment objectives.
The performance descriptions have been produced by the
regulatory authorities in collaboration with the awarding bodies.
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110
Section F
A/B
boundary
performance
descriptions
objectives
Assessment
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
a demonstrate a
high level of aural
perception in
comprehensively
identifying a
wide range of
instruments and
effects, and in
recognising and
describing the
creative use of
music technology
a demonstrate
a highly
accomplished
use of a wide
range of music
technology skills to
produce excellent
recordings
b capture, process
and mix sound
to produce
consistently
well-balanced
and effectively
balanced tracks.
a make critical
judgements about
music heard and
show a breadth
of understanding
across the
genres, styles and
traditions studied
bdemonstrate
a thorough
understanding of
the development of
music technology.
a produce convincing
arrangements
that show musical
imagination and
expression and
make appropriate
and creative use
of a wide range
of resources and
techniques.
a produce musical
recordings and
sequences which
show a high level
of control and
understanding,
and a creative and
imaginative use,
of the technology.
bsuccessfully
identify a range of
shortcomings in
earlier recordings
and suggest
how they might
be overcome
using modernday recording
techniques.
Candidates
characteristically:
Demonstrate
understanding
of and comment
perceptively on the
technical processes
and principles that
underpin effective
use of music
technology.
Assessment
objective 5
Candidates
characteristically:
Demonstrate
effective uses of
music technology
to capture, edit and
produce musical
outcomes.
Assessment
objective 4
Candidates
characteristically:
Demonstrate
understanding
of, and comment
perceptively on, the
structural, expressive
and contextual
aspects of music.
Assessment
objective 3
Candidates
characteristically:
Create and develop
musical ideas with
technical control
and expressive
understanding making
creative use of musical
devices, conventions
and resources
(composing/arranging).
Assessment
objective 2
Candidates
characteristically:
Interpret musical
ideas with technical
and expressive
control and a sense of
style and awareness
of occasion and/
or ensemble
(performing/realise).
Assessment
objective 1
Appendix 3 Performance descriptions
AS performance descriptions for Music Technology
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
E/U
boundary
performance
descriptions
Candidates
characteristically:
ademonstrate
limited aural
perception
in identifying
instruments and
effects and show
only modest
awareness of the
creative use of
music technology
Candidates
characteristically:
ademonstrate
limited use of
some basic music
technology skills to
produce recordings
with some
encouraging signs
b mix sound
to produce
recordings with
a lack of clarity,
poor balance
and inconsistent
management of
the resources,
leading to tracks
of limited success.
Candidates
characteristically:
a comment on
music heard,
showing some
understanding
across the
genres, styles and
traditions studied
b show some
understanding of
the development of
music technology.
Candidates
characteristically:
aproduce
arrangements
with sufficient
control and
understanding of
relevant resources
and techniques
to achieve the
intended effect
Candidates
characteristically:
a use technology
with sufficient
control and
understanding to
produce musical
recordings and
sequences.
b identify some
shortcomings in
earlier recordings
and suggest
some ways in
which they might
be overcome
using modernday recording
techniques.
Assessment
objective 5
Assessment
objective 4
Assessment
objective 3
Assessment
objective 2
Assessment
objective 1
Performance descriptions Appendix 3
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112
Section F
A/B
boundary
performance
descriptions
objectives
Assessment
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
b demonstrate a
thorough and
comprehensive
understanding of
the contexts and
development of
music technology.
c make mature and
sophisticated use
of appropriate
music technology
in a composition
which produces
a thoroughly
satisfying outcome
for the listener.
b capture, process
and mix sound
to produce
consistently
well balanced
and effectively
blended tracks
b apply their skill,
knowledge and
understanding
to produce
an excellent
final balanced
stereo mix using
appropriate
effects where
any small slips or
misjudgements
are unobtrusive.
a demonstrate a
comprehensive
knowledge of
the technical
processes and
principles which
can be employed
to achieve a
completely
successful
recording
ademonstrate
a highly
accomplished use
of a wide range of
music technology
skills to produce
excellent
recordings
a make critical
judgements
about, and
justify personal
opinions on, music
heard and show
some depth of
understanding
within the genres,
styles and
traditions studied,
making perceptive
and informed
connections
between the
structural,
expressive and
contextual aspects
of music
aproduce
compositions
that show an
imaginative
and effective
use of technical
resources,
musical devices
and conventions,
and meet all the
requirements of
the brief.
a produce musical
recordings
that effectively
integrate
sequencing and
recording skills
b demonstrate an
authoritative use
of a wide range
of resources and
techniques.
Candidates
characteristically:
Demonstrate
understanding
of and comment
perceptively on the
technical processes
and principles that
underpin effective use
of music technology.
Assessment
objective 5
Candidates
characteristically:
Demonstrate
effective uses of
music technology
to capture, edit and
produce musical
outcomes.
Assessment
objective 4
Candidates
characteristically:
Demonstrate
understanding
of, and comment
perceptively on, the
structural, expressive
and contextual
aspects of music.
Assessment
objective 3
Candidates
characteristically:
Create and develop
musical ideas with
technical control
and expressive
understanding making
creative use of musical
devices, conventions
and resources
(composing/arranging).
Assessment
objective 2
Candidates
characteristically:
Interpret musical
ideas with technical
and expressive
control and a sense of
style and awareness
of occasion and/
or ensemble
(performing/realise).
Assessment
objective 1
Appendix 3 Performance descriptions
A2 performance descriptions for Music Technology
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
E/U
boundary
performance
descriptions
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
b demonstrate a
broad but basic
understanding of
the contexts and
development of
music technology.
c make some
attempt to use
music technology
to produce a
basic composition
but one which
has some
inconsistencies
and technical
problems.
b apply their skill
knowledge and
understanding
to produce a
final balanced
stereo mix using
appropriate
effects where
the handling is
adequate but
where there are
some intrusive
errors.
a demonstrate a
basic knowledge
of the technical
processes and
principles which
can be employed
to achieve a
satisfactory
recording
ademonstrate
limited use of
some basic
music technology
skills to produce
recordings with
some encouraging
signs but where
there are areas of
inconsistency
a comment in
some detail on
music heard,
showing some
understanding
across the
genres, styles
and traditions
studied and the
ability to make
some connections
between the
structural,
expressive and
contextual aspects
of music
aproduce
compositions that
show sufficient
technical control
and understanding
of resources,
musical devices
and conventions
to meet the
minimum
requirements of
the brief.
a produce musical
recordings
that integrate
sequencing and
recording skills
b capture, process
and mix sound
to produce
recordings where
inconsistent
management of
the resources
leads to tracks of
limited success
Candidates
characteristically:
Candidates
characteristically:
Candidates
characteristically:
Candidates
characteristically:
Candidates
characteristically:
b demonstrate a
broad but basic
use of a range
of resources and
techniques.
Assessment
objective 5
Assessment
objective 4
Assessment
objective 3
Assessment
objective 2
Assessment
objective 1
Performance descriptions Appendix 3
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Appendix 4
Wider curriculum
Signposting
Issue
Unit 1
Unit 2
Unit 3
Spiritual


Moral


Ethical


Social


Cultural

Environmental



Health and safety


Unit 4




Development suggestions
Issue
AS/A2 units
Opportunities for development or internal assessment
Spiritual
Units 1 and 3
Music technology provides opportunities for candidates to express
their creativity through the creation of recordings, arrangements and
compositions. Such expression can be seen as an important part as an
individual’s spirituality.
Moral
Units 1, 3
Owing to the ever widening availability of MIDI on the internet, candidates
will need to exercise moral judgement that all the work they submit is their
own.
Ethical
Units 1, 3
Owing to the ever-widening availability of MIDI on the internet, and the
fact that candidates will be working with examples of a number of styles
of music, candidates will need to ensure that they do not copy ideas from
previous composers’ work and take credit.
Social
Units 1, 3
When creating a multi-track recording, candidates will need to work with a
group of instrumentalists to create the recording. They may need to set up
schedules for the recordings and work in a group.
Cultural
Units 1, 2,
3, 4
Candidates will be studying music from different decades and cultures.
They will be asked to evaluate, analyse and contextualise both familiar and
unfamiliar music in the written exams.
Environmental
Units 2, 4
Candidates may discuss, through the principles of music technology
in practice area of study the fact that music technology equipment is
continually developing. Therefore, there is a continual need for more up to
date systems and hardware. Computers and technology equipment quickly
become obsolete and candidates should be aware of what happens to the
out-of-date equipment.
Health and
safety
Units 1, 2,
3, 4
Candidates should learn how to use the equipment in the recording studio
in a safe way. They should be taught of what to do in event of an electrical
problem.
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F Appendices
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Section F
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Appendix 5Codes
Type of code
Use of code
Code number
National
classification codes
Every qualification is assigned to a national classification
code indicating the subject area to which it belongs.
Centres should be aware that students who enter
for more than one GCE qualification with the same
classification code will have only one grade (the highest)
counted for the purpose of the school and college
performance tables.
7040
National
Qualifications
Framework (NQF)
codes
Each qualification title is allocated a National
Qualifications Framework (NQF) code.
The QNs for the
qualifications in this
publication are:
The National Qualifications Framework (NQF) code is
known as a Qualification Number (QN).
This is the code that features in the DfE Section 96, and
on the LARA as being eligible for 16–18 and 19+ funding,
and is to be used for all qualification funding purposes.
The QN is the number that will appear on the student’s
final certification documentation.
Unit codes
Cash-in-codes
Entry codes
Advanced Subsidiary —
500/3103/x
Advanced GCE —
500/3102/8
Each unit is assigned a unit code. This unit code is used
as an entry code to indicate that a student wishes to take
the assessment for that unit. Centres will need to use
the entry codes only when entering students for their
examination.
Unit 1 — 6MT01
The cash-in code is used as an entry code to aggregate
the student’s unit scores to obtain the overall grade for
the qualification. Centres will need to use the entry codes
only when entering students for their qualification.
AS — 8MT01
The entry codes are used to:
Please refer to the Edexcel
Information Manual
available on the Edexcel
website.
1 enter a student for the assessment of a unit
2 aggregate the student’s unit scores to obtain the
overall grade for the qualification.
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Unit 2 — 6MT02
Unit 3 — 6MT03
Unit 4 — 6MT04
A2 — 9MT01
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Section F
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Appendix 6
Further resources and support
Please note that while resources are checked at the time of publication, materials may be
withdrawn from circulation and website locations may change at any time.
Books
Sequencing and
recording
As an initial resource for centres wishing to offer AS/A2 Music
Technology to their students the series of BASIC books by Paul
White is recommended. It is possible to buy the complete range
of 13 books at reasonable cost. All volumes are relevant to this
course. Website: www.sanctuarypublishing.com
Fast guides to various sequencer packages
There are many valuable books which guide the reader in mastering
the techniques of a particular sequencer; ensure the book covers
the specific version of your software.
Website: www.pc-publishing.com
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Appendix 6 Further resources and support
Composing and
arranging
Aschmann L — 500 Songwriting Ideas (Omnibus Press, 1998)
ISBN 10: 0918371155, ISBN 13: 978-0918371157
Benham H — A Student’s Guide to Harmony and Counterpoint
(Rhinegold, 2004) ISBN 10: 1904226310
Bennett R — Fortissimo! (Cambridge, 1996) ISBN 10: 0521569230,
ISBN 13: 978-0521569231
Cole B — The Pop Composer’s Handbook (Schott & Co Ltd, 2006)
ISBN 10: 1902455606
Perricone J — Melody in Songwriting (IMP, 2000)
ISBN 10: 063400638X, ISBN 13: 978-0634006388
Runswick D — Rock, Pop and Jazz Arranging (Faber, 1993)
ISBN 10: 0571511082, ISBN 13: 978-0571511082
Scott R — Chord Progressions for Songwriters
(iUniverse.com, 2003) ISBN 10: 0595263844,
ISBN 13: 978-0595263844
Stewart D — Inside the Music: The Musician’s Guide to
Composition, Improvisation and the Mechanics of Music (Backbeat
UK, 2000) ISBN 10: 0879305711, ISBN 13: 978-0879305710
Turkel E — Arranging Techniques for Synthesists (Music Sales Ltd,
2003) ISBN 10: 082561130X, ISBN 13: 978-0825611308
Wyatt K — Harmony and Theory: A Comprehensive Source for All
Musicians (Hal Leonard Corporation, 1998) ISBN 10: 0793579910,
ISBN 13: 978-0793579914
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Contexts
Further resources and support Appendix 6
Barrow S and Dalton P — Reggae (Rough Guide Music Guides)
(Rough Guides, 2004) ISBN 10: 1843533294,
ISBN 13: 978-1843533290
Bidder S — Pump Up the Volume: A History of House Music
(Channel 4 Books, 2001) ISBN 10: 0752219863,
ISBN 13: 978-0752219868
Easlea D — ‘Chic’: Everybody Dance — The Politics of Disco (Helter
Skelter, 2004) ISBN 10: 1900924560, ISBN 13: 978-1900924566
George N — The Death of Rhythm and Blues (Penguin, 2008)
ISBN 10: 0142004081, ISBN 13: 978-0142004081
George N — Where Did Our Love Go? (Omnibus, 2003)
ISBN 10: 0711995117, ISBN 13: 978-0711995116
Griffiths P — Modern Music and After: Directions Since 1945
(Oxford University Press, 2011) ISBN 10: 0199740505,
ISBN 13: 978-0199740505
Guralnick P — Sweet Soul Music (MOJO Books, 2002)
ISBN 10: 1841952400, ISBN 13: 978-1841952406
Harvey E — Jazz in the Classroom (Boosey and Hawks, 1988)
ISBN 10: 0851620442, ISBN 13: 978-0851620442
Holmes T — Electronic and Experimental Music (Routledge, 2012)
ISBN 10: 0415896363, ISBN 13: 978-0415896368
Kettlewell B — Electronic Music Pioneers (Course Technology, 2001)
ISBN 10: 1931140170, ISBN 13: 978-1931140171
Levine M — The Jazz Theory Book (Sher Music, 1995)
ISBN 10: 1883217040, ISBN 13: 978-1883217044
Lincoln-Collier J — The Making of Jazz (Papermac, 1981)
ISBN 10: 0333316479, ISBN 13: 978-0333316474
Nyman M — Experimental Music: Cage and Beyond (Music in the
Twentieth Century) (Cambridge University Press, 1999)
ISBN 10: 0521653835, ISBN 13: 978-0521653831
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Appendix 6 Further resources and support
Palmer R — Dancing in the Street (BBC, 1996)
ISBN 10: 0563369965, ISBN 13: 978-0563369967
Prendergast M — The Ambient Century: From Mahler to Moby —
The Evolution of Sound in the Electronic Age (Bloomsbury, 2003)
ISBN 10: 0747557322, ISBN 13: 978-0747557326
Savage J — England’s Dreaming: Sex Pistols and Punk Rock
(Faber and Faber, 2005) ISBN 10: 0571227201, ISBN 13: 9780571227204
Schaefer J — New Sounds: The Virgin Guide to New Music (Virgin
Books, 1989) ISBN 10: 086369375X, ISBN 13: 978-0863693755
Schaefer J — New Sounds: The Virgin Guide to New Music (Harper
and Row, New York, 1989) ISBN 10: 086369375X,
ISBN 13: 978-0863693755
Schuker R — Key Concepts in Popular Music (Routledge, 1998)
ISBN10: 0415161045, ISBN 13: 978-0415161046
Taylor T — Strange Sounds: Music, Technology, and Culture
(Routledge, 2011) ISBN 10: 0415936845,
ISBN 13: 978-0415936842
Winterson J — Pop Music: the Textbook (Peters Ed, 2003)
ISBN 10: 1843670070, ISBN 13: 978-1843670070
Listening
Bowman D — Aural Matters (Schott, 1993) ISBN 10: 0946535221,
ISBN 13: 978-0946535224
Taylor E — The AB Guide to Music Theory Volume I (OUP, 1989)
ISBN 10: 1854724460, ISBN 13: 978-1854724465
Taylor E — The AB Guide to Music Theory Part II (OUP, 1991)
ISBN 10: 1854724479, ISBN 13: 978-1854724472
Audio sequencing
Bennett S — Emagic Logic Virtual Instruments: A User’s Guide
(PC Publishing, 2003) ISBN 10: 1870775848,
ISBN 13: 978 1870775847
Collins M — Pro Tools for Music Production: Practical Recording,
Editing and Mixing for Music Production (Focal Press, 2001)
ISBN 10: 0240516400, ISBN 13: 978-0240516400
122
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© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
Recording
Further resources and support Appendix 6
Bartlett B — Practical Recording Techniques (Focal press, 2008)
ISBN 10: 0240811445, ISBN 13: 978- 0240811444
Eargle J — The Microphone Book: From Mono to Stereo to
Surround, A Guide to Microphone Design and Application (Focal
Press, 2011) ISBN 10: 0240820754, ISBN 13: 978-0240820750
Gibson B — Sound Advice on Microphone Techniques (Music Sales,
2002) ISBN 10: 1931140278, ISBN 13: 978-1931140270
Guerin R — Inside the Recording Studio (Course Technology, 2004)
ISBN 10: 1592001319, ISBN 13: 978-1592001316
Mansfield R — Studio Basics: What You Should Know Before Going
into the Recording Studio (Billboard Books, US, 1998)
ISBN 10: 0823084884, ISBN 13: 978-0823084883
Owsinski B — The Mixing Engineer’s Handbook (Mix Pro Audio
Series) (Music Sales, 2006) ISBN 10: 1598632515,
ISBN 13: 978-1598632514
Runstein R — Modern Recording Techniques (Focal Press, 2009)
ISBN 10: 0240810694, ISBN 13: 978-0240810690
Sound of picture
Davis R — Complete Guide to Film Scoring (Berklee Guide, 2010)
ISBN 10: 0876391099, ISBN 13: 978-0876391099
Karlin F — On the Track: A Guide to Contemporary Film Scoring
(Routledge, 2004) ISBN 10: 0415941369,
ISBN 13: 978-0415941365
Rona J — The Reel World: Scoring for Pictures (Backbeat, UK,
2006) ISBN 10: 0879305916, ISBN 13: 978-0879305918
Production
Burgess R — The Art of Record Production (Omnibus, 1997)
ISBN 10: 0711955522, ISBN 13: 978-0711955523
Massey H — Behind the Glass: Top Record Producers Tell How They
Craft the Hits (Backbeat UK, 2000) ISBN 10: 0879306149,
ISBN 13: 978-0879306144
Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
© Pearson Education Limited 2013
Section F
123
Appendix 6 Further resources and support
Useful websites
www.edexcel.com/gce2008
Sound on Sound
The monthly music technology journal produces an annual CD. Each
disc contains all the magazine contents from that year including
technique-based tutorials useful to students.
Website: www.soundonsound.com
Other support
Dave Moulton KIQ — Golden Ears Music Technology Ear Training CDs
Dave Moulton KIQ — Total Recording, 0.9674304.0.2
124
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Pearson Edexcel Level 3 GCE in Music Technology
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