A 4-Week Unit Plan Designed for the Study of The Scarlet Letter

A 4-Week Unit Plan Designed for the Study of The Scarlet Letter
1
Our “Civilized” Society
A 4-Week Unit Plan Designed for the Study of The Scarlet Letter
Misty Lynn Foster
Fall 2011
The Florida State University
2
Contents
Rationale: ........................................................................................................................................ 3
Goals and Objectives: ..................................................................................................................... 5
Common Core Standards: ............................................................................................................... 6
Grade Distribution: ......................................................................................................................... 9
Materials: ...................................................................................................................................... 10
WEEK 1 ........................................................................................................................................ 11
Day 1 (Monday) ........................................................................................................................ 11
Day 2 (Tuesday) ........................................................................................................................ 12
Day 3 (Wednesday)................................................................................................................... 13
Day 4 (Thursday) ...................................................................................................................... 15
Day 5 (Friday) ........................................................................................................................... 16
WEEK 2 ........................................................................................................................................ 18
Day 6 (Monday) ........................................................................................................................ 18
Day 7 (Tuesday) ........................................................................................................................ 18
Day 8 (Wednesday)................................................................................................................... 19
Day 9 (Thursday) ...................................................................................................................... 20
Day 10 (Friday) ......................................................................................................................... 21
WEEK 3 ........................................................................................................................................ 23
Day 11 (Monday) ...................................................................................................................... 23
Day 12 (Tuesday) ...................................................................................................................... 23
Day 13 (Wednesday)................................................................................................................. 24
Day 14 (Thursday) .................................................................................................................... 25
Day 15 (Friday) ......................................................................................................................... 26
WEEK 4 ........................................................................................................................................ 28
Day 16 (Monday) ...................................................................................................................... 28
Day 17 (Tuesday) ...................................................................................................................... 28
Day 18 (Wednesday)................................................................................................................. 29
Day 19 (Thursday) .................................................................................................................... 30
Day 20 (Friday) ......................................................................................................................... 30
Appendix of Selected Materials .................................................................................................... 32
Bibliography ................................................................................................................................. 49
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Rationale:
Eleventh-graders at Leon County High School have demonstrated a dislike for classic
texts and seem unable to relate these canonical works to their everyday lives. Furthermore,
recent developments in the school, the community and the nation have prompted a need to
discuss the issues of social prejudices and discrimination. I have developed a unit plan that
covers these topics while also relating them to a classic American Literature text, The Scarlet
Letter. This unit will help students understand this text through a modern lens and apply it to
their lives to think critically about the behaviors that society deems civilized. Students will learn
to challenge societal norms that teach race, religious, gender and sexual orientation prejudices.
Week one of the unit will ask the question: ―Is society really civilized?‖ Week two will include
supplemental texts that reflect on racial injustices in society; week three, religious intolerance;
and week four, narrow-mindedness regarding sexual orientation.
This unit plan is intended for an 11th-grade English Language Arts (American Literature)
class with a regular 50-minute class period schedule. Group work is designed based on a group
of 30 students but can be adjusted to fit the needs of each individual class. The coursework and
material is dense and is recommended for an honors level course or highly-motivated students in
other tracks, and it can be adapted to meet the needs of students at all levels.
One way that this unit plan helps students relate classic texts and social prejudices to their
everyday lives is through Literature Circles. Within their Literature Circles, students will choose
a secondary young adult literature text to compare and contrast with Hester Prynne‘s plight in the
main text. Furthermore, the unit uses several genres of relatable resources including: short
stories, current event news articles, pop culture grammar mini-lessons, movie and TV video
excerpts, music, YA literature selections and historical biographies.
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This unit is dense in writing and in reading. Writing is spread out throughout the unit in
various forms including the following: journal entries, reading quizzes, summarizing news
stories for presentation, Literature Circle exercises, impromptu writing, forming arguments for a
debate and writing peer evaluations. Because there are so many great writing opportunities
throughout the unit, I did not want to require students to write a final paper or book report at the
end of the unit. Instead, they will produce a multi-genre project, which I will talk more about
below.
As stated above, the unit strongly emphasizes reading. Students are expected to do
reading at home; however, the reading for The Scarlet Letter is chunked into very manageable
pieces and the students will set their own pace for their Literature Circle texts. There will also be
a day each week where students will have extensive class time to catch up on reading.
The final project for the unit will be a multi-genre project that synthesizes the main text
and the students‘ Literature Circle text. It must also incorporate the social issues that we will be
dealing with in class and have a technology component. The technology component will ensure
that students are engaging in 21st Century education. This project requires higher-order thinking
and synthesis of multiple kinds of texts. Students will be expected to work on this on their own
time, but they will also be given class time to work in the computer lab.
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Goals and Objectives:
Goals:
Students will…

Learn to challenge societal norms that teach social prejudice for any reason.

Find an appreciation for a classic American text.

Understand ways that canonical texts can still relate to their everyday lives.

Work well together in groups.

Improve vocabulary and grammar through reading.
Objectives:
Students will be able to…

Analyze more than one text to find common themes among them.

Think critically about the society around them to identify areas of prejudice.

Identify themes found in The Scarlet Letter.

Use contextual clues to define unknown words in the text.

Recall and summarize information in a written news story.

Analyze newspaper articles to locate instances of uncivilized behavior.

Understand the impact and relevance of lingual stereotypes in daily society.

Recognize the sources or inspirations of lingual stereotypes.

Distinguish why a video clip about lingual stereotypes is absurd and ironic.

Acknowledge their own existing perceptions of lingual stereotypes, and see what could
be changed about them.

Read together and participate in Literature circles.

Write a reflection of their reading of a text.

Analyze a video and identify racial prejudices.

Read silently by themselves and stay on task

Synthesize information from two different kinds of texts to draw conclusions and form
judgments.

Express their ideas through composition of artwork.

Recognize errors in syntax.

Understand how a text‘s syntax impacts semantics.

Understand the effects of a writer‘s decision to intentionally break grammar rules.

Analyze a text in isolation and in its original context.

Demonstrate understanding of their reading by forming an opinion about characters in the
novel.

Write about religious intolerance that they have witnessed or heard about.

Gather information from several sources and compile notes for use later.

Respond in writing to a provided prompt.

Distinguish between common homophones.

Choose the correct homophone to use in a given sentence.

Demonstrate understanding of their reading by summarizing events.

Demonstrate knowledge of the text by participation in a debate about the characters.

Analyze a text for instances of prejudice against people with different sexual orientation.
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Common Core Standards:
RL.11-12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves
matters uncertain.
RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their
development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to
produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
RL.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning
and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh,
engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)
RL.11-12.6. Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is
directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
RL.11-12.10. By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas,
and poems, in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed
at the high end of the range.
RI.11-12.3. Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific
individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.
RI.11-12.6. Determine an author‘s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is
particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or
beauty of the text.
W.11-12.1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using
valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
W.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts,
and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis
of content.
W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style
are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are
defined in standards 1–3 above.)
W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or
shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or
information.
W.11-12.7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question
(including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when
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appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the
subject under investigation.
W.11-12.8. Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources,
using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms
of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the
flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard
format for citation.
W.11-12.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.
SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues,
building on others‘ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker‘s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric,
assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone
used.
SL.11-12.4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and
distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing
perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are
appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
SL.11-12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and
interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and
evidence and to add interest.
SL.11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal
English when indicated or appropriate.
L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different
contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when
reading or listening.
L.11-12.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
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L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in
word meanings.
L.11-12.6. Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases,
sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level;
demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or
phrase important to comprehension or expression.
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Grade Distribution:
Assignment
Daily Participation
Reading Quizzes
Literature Circle Participation
Journal Entries
Impromptu Writing
Debate Participation
Multi-Genre Project
Peer Evaluations
TOTAL
900-1000 points = A
800-899 points = B
700-799 points = C
600-699 points = D
0-599 points = F
Points
Each
6
30
50
15
50
65
350
10
Times
Total
20
4
4
3
1
1
1
5
120
120
200
45
50
65
350
50
1000
10
Materials:

DVD or other multi-media copy of a clip from the TV Show ―Glee‖

DVD or other multi-media copy of a clip from the movie ―Easy A‖

Computer with multi-media player and Internet connection

Classroom Projector and Screen (hooked up to computer)

30 copies of the Literature circle book choices list (Appendix A)

30 copies of the text The Scarlet Letter

30 copies of the unit calendar (subject to change) (Appendix B)

30 copies of the News Report Assignment Sheet (Appendix D)

Students‘ composition notebooks (journals)

Eight copies each of four current news articles

6 copies of the Supplemental Text Selection Sheet (Appendix E)

YouTube access

30 copies of the short story ―Roman Fever‖

Audio of the short story ―Roman Fever‖

Copies of Literature Circle texts

30 copies of the Literature Circle Roles Description Sheet (Appendix G)

6 copies of the Literature Circle Roles Assignment Sheet (Appendix H)

30 copies of the Multi-Genre Project Assignment sheet (Appendix I)

Copy of video excerpt from ―The Help‖

30 copies of excerpt from The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

Audio recording of song ―Run to the Hills‖ by Iron Maiden

Construction paper and drawing paper

Markers, Crayons, Colored Pencils, Glue sticks

YouTube Clip ―The Man Your Man Could Smell Like‖:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owGykVbfgUE

30 copies of the handouts containing the text from ―The Man Your Man Could Smell
Like,‖ as taken from http://lybio.net/old-spice-the-man-your-man-could-smelllike/commercials/ (Appendix J)

90 copies of the Literature Circle Participation sheets (Appendix K)

Pictures and bios from 15 different Holocaust victims found here (Bios are reproducible
for free from the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum website.) The entire list of printable
bios is attached below as Appendix L.

30 copies of the Impromptu Writing 1 Assignment sheets (Appendix M)

30 copies of the Debate Participation sheets (Appendix O)

30 copies of the film permission slips (Appendix P)

Extended video clip of an excerpt from the show ―Glee‖

Full video copy of the PG-13 movie ―Easy A‖
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WEEK 1
This week, we will begin reading The Scarlet Letter. We will introduce the novel and the theme
of the unit: Our ―Civilized‖ Society. Most of week one will be spent focusing on defining the
concept of a ―civilized society‖ and analyzing behaviors that our modern society deems civilized.
In addition to the main text, we will also read newspaper articles and short stories. Students, by
the end of this week, will also select a second novel from a pre-selected group of supplemental
texts that are related to the theme.
Day 1 (Monday)
Materials:

DVD or other multi-media copy of a clip from the TV Show ―Glee‖

DVD or other multi-media copy of a clip from the movie ―Easy A‖

Computer with multi-media player and Internet connection

Classroom Projector and Screen

30 copies of the literature circle book choices list (Appendix A)

30 copies of the text The Scarlet Letter

30 copies of the unit calendar (subject to change) (Appendix B)

Students‘ composition notebooks (journals)
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Anticipatory set: (20 minutes)
As an introduction to the thematic unit, the students will view one clip from the TV show ―Glee‖
where a homosexual teen is seen being bullied by another student. (Teacher will choose any
appropriate scene from ―Glee‖ where the character ―Kurt‖ is harassed by students. See Season 1,
Episode 20: ―Theatricality.‖) A second clip will be shown from the movie ―Easy A.‖ In the
scene chosen, the heroine is seen being harassed by fellow students because of rumors that she
has been sexually promiscuous. After the clips have ended, I will begin a discussion regarding
over-arching themes seen in both clips. Students will be given 1-2 minutes to brainstorm quietly
in their journals before a large-group discussion. Ultimately, after connections between the two
texts have been identified, we will identify the theme of intolerance in society. I will then
introduce the students to the theme for the next six weeks of class: Our ―Civilized‖ Society. We
will discuss what this means and why there are quotation marks around the word ―civilized.‖ I
will inform the students that throughout the next several weeks, we will be thinking critically
about the behaviors that society deems civilized, and we will also be challenging societal norms
that teach racial, religious or sexual orientation prejudices. They will also be given a copy of the
unit calendar with due dates and homework assignments (Appendix B), with the caveat that
some dates are subject to change with plenty of notice.
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(10 minutes) After the theme opener, students will be split into six groups of five. I will inform
students that these will be their literature circle groups for the rest of the unit. Students will be
spending time in literature circles once a week. They will each receive a list of the supplemental
texts they may choose from. The list will have a short description of each text. (See Appendix
A) In groups, students will be given the remaining time to read over the list and start discussing
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which of the texts sound the most interesting. Students will be informed that they must select a
first, second and third choice text as a group, by the end of class on Wednesday.
(15 minutes) Students will each receive a copy of the main text, The Scarlet Letter. As a whole
class, we will read the Introduction together, just to get students started on the text. (The teacher
should use their best judgment to decide who should read aloud during this time. The teacher
can model good reading by reading the text aloud themselves. In many classes, a few students
who are good readers may also want to read aloud. Gauge each class individually, based on the
needs and ability-level of students.) At various points, I will pause the reading to ask for
summaries and see if there are any questions. If there is time, students will be allowed to
continue reading silently.
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be given their reading homework assignment (see
below), and will be allowed to pack-up.
Assessment: As an introductory lesson, points for today‘s class will be based on staying on task
and participation in both groups and whole-class discussions.
Homework/follow-up assignment: Students will read chapters 1-2 of The Scarlet Letter tonight
as homework. They will also write down any unfamiliar or unknown words (and page number)
from the reading in their journal.
Attachments:

Appendix A: Literature Circle Book Choices List

Appendix B: Unit Calendar with Due Dates
Accommodations/adaptations: Groups for literature circles will be decided ahead of time by
the teacher. Groups should be arranged according to student needs and levels of ability.
Personality may also be considered. (For example, two chatty best friends may not work well
together in a group setting with other students.) For this unit‘s intents and purposes, I believe it
is best to mix ability levels among the groups. All groups should have high-performing students,
average-performing students and struggling or reluctant students, to even the playing field for all
in the classroom.
Day 2 (Tuesday)
Materials:

Projector connected to computer
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(15 minutes) Students will be asked to share any difficult or unknown words that they
encountered in the text from the reading homework. I will type these on the overhead projection
screen with their page numbers. After several words have been shared, I will also add any
additional words that I think are important from the text. (An online educational resource for
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selected vocabulary words can be found here. See also Appendix C.) Students will then be
asked to partner-up with the person sitting next to them. Together, students will use context
clues from the text to provide a possible definition for each of the vocabulary words.
(10 minutes) Students will be asked to separate and return their attention to the front of the
classroom. We will then define each word as a class, using a consensus method of each pair‘s
possible definition. Students should write each word and its definition (in their own words) in
their composition notebooks. The teacher should redirect students if some of the definitions are
off-base.
(20 minutes) For the remainder of class, we will have an open discussion about the reading
homework, chapters one and two of The Scarlet Letter. I will first ask students if they have any
questions about the reading. Together, we will discuss these questions. Then, I will ask if
students have additional comments or observations from the text. If there is a lull in the
discussion, I may direct students to a particular passage for further discussion. However, I would
like for the discussion to be as student-led as possible, as long as it is kept on point. (Whereas
the previous day served as an introduction to the whole unit, today‘s lesson should serve mainly
as a more in-depth introduction to the main text itself.)
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) I will wrap up the discussion with some concluding comments,
and students will be allowed to pack-up.
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on participation in the vocabulary and
reading-reflection discussions and staying on task. If it becomes very clear that many students
did not do the assigned reading, it may be a good idea to have a quick pop-quiz consisting of one
or two very simple questions that demonstrate only that the reading was completed. This will
help set the tone for the unit, hopefully indicating that the outside reading homework is necessary
for class-time participation. The teacher can decide how much this quiz will weigh in on class
points. (I would suggest that this should be the students‘ first and only freebie.)
Homework/follow-up assignment: There will be no official homework, but students will be
instructed to catch-up on the reading if they have already fallen behind. They will also be
reminded that tomorrow is the first reading quiz.
Attachments: None
Accommodations/adaptations: Class discussion may indicate that some students have
legitimately attempted the reading, but they are having trouble understanding the story. Students
may be referred to ―The Scarlet Letter Wiki‖ found here and told to read each chapter summary
before beginning reading a new chapter. The summaries on this wiki are vague enough not to
create ―spoilers,‖ but are helpful enough to give students a jumping-off point so that they can
understand the main plot points before beginning each reading.
Day 3 (Wednesday)
Materials:
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

Eight copies each of four current news articles
6 copies of the Supplemental Text Selection Sheet (Appendix E)
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(10 minutes) Students will be asked to clear their desks and take out a pen and a sheet of paper.
They will be asked to demonstrate that they have finished the reading from the introduction
through chapter two by writing a brief summary of the events that have occurred so far. In
addition to the summary, they must make a prediction of what they think will happen in the
coming pages, using evidence from the text to support their theory.
(20 minutes) Students will be divided into four groups. Each group will be given copies of a
different news article. (The teacher should choose news articles ahead of time for this activity.
Stories should be current articles from local, national and world news. Each of the stories should
contain information about an incident that displays the uncivilized nature of society. Examples
include white collar crimes that rob hard-working people of their money, sexual crimes, crimes
against children or the elderly, or hate crimes against people because of religion, race or sexual
orientation, etc.) In groups, students will read the articles together. Then, they will write a live
news report (45-90 seconds long) to present to the class. The assignment sheet is attached below
as Appendix D.
(10 minutes) Students will present their summarized news stories in the front of the classroom.
After each story is presented, we will have a brief class discussion about the news story to review
specifically for intolerance and uncivilized behavior. Finally, we will discuss if any of these
news stories relate to Hester Prynne and her story in The Scarlet Letter.
(5 minutes) Students will report to their Literature Circles. In the last few minutes of class,
students will choose their supplemental text for the unit plan. Each group will fill out one of the
Supplemental Text Selection Sheets (Appendix E) to select their first, second and third choice
books. I will do my best to assign each group at least their second-choice text. Each group will
be assigned a different text.
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will turn in their selection sheets, return to their desks
and pack up for dismissal.
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on participation in group activities and
staying on task. The quiz will also count as one quiz grade for the unit.
Homework/follow-up assignment: Students will read chapters 3-4 of The Scarlet Letter for
homework.
Attachments:

Appendix D: News Report Assignment Sheet

Appendix E: Supplemental Text Selection Sheet
15
Accommodations/adaptations: For the group activity, students should be staggered in groups
according to level of ability. That way, the best readers in class can help reluctant readers with
comprehension of the news story. They must also choose only one or two ―news anchors‖ to
present the news to the class; therefore, shy students or struggling readers do not have to present.
Day 4 (Thursday)
Materials:

Computer with Internet connection

Projector hooked up to computer and screen

YouTube access and video

30 copies of the short story ―Roman Fever‖

Audio of the short story ―Roman Fever‖

Copies of Literature Circle texts
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(12-15 minutes) The following Grammar in Popular Culture Mini-Lesson has been borrowed
(and adapted) from a colleague, Daniel Do, a graduate student at The Florida State University.
His original mini-lesson is attached below as Appendix F.
First, students will view a clip from an episode of the NBC sitcom ―30 Rock.‖ The clip can be
found here. After the video, we will discuss the lingual stereotypes seen in the clip. We will
also discuss how lingual stereotypes can contribute to prejudice.
―This clip from NBC‘s sitcom ‗30 Rock‘ features high-brow media mogul Jack Donaghy
imitating Tracy Jordan‘s parents for the sake of a therapy role-playing session. On top of acting
like his perception of inner city working-class African Americans, Jack also does an
impersonation of a few other figures from Jordan‘s past. The humor of this clip revolves around
the irony of Jack‘s highly stereotypical impressions actually being incredibly accurate depictions
of Jordan‘s family. One of the jokes, however, is that Jack‘s impression of a nerdy white man
prompted Jordan to call him out for using ‗ugly stereotypes.‘ Upon watching this clip, students
are encouraged to discuss what lingual stereotypes were shown in the video, as well as what
literary or media sources the stereotypes could have come from.‖
(28-30 minutes) Students will each be given a printed copy of the short story ―Roman Fever.‖ I
will give a very brief introduction to the characters and the setting. The class will read silently
along with the audio recording of the story. During this time, I will take attendance, since time
did not allow for this at the beginning of class. At various points, we may pause the recording to
paraphrase and summarize. After the reading, we will discuss the story and its implications
toward civilized behavior, even among life-long friends. We will relate the story to Hester‘s
journey and will discuss characters who, up to this point, seem to be perfectly civilized people
but have exhibited very uncivilized behavior.
Summary/Closure: (5 minutes) Students will be told which book has been assigned to them for
Literature Circles, and the books will be distributed accordingly. Students will then be asked to
pack up for dismissal.
16
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on participation in class discussions.
Homework/follow-up assignment: Students will watch a TV show, movie, or internet clip of
their own choice that shows a distinctive dialect or lingual pattern, and write a brief report on
whether or not the example is a stereotype or an accurate portrayal. Students will also continue
their reading of The Scarlet Letter. Chapters 5-6 are to be finished before the weekend.
Attachments: None
Accommodations/adaptations: Audio, video and text resources will all be used in this lesson.
Day 5 (Friday)
Materials:

30 copies of the Literature Circle Roles Description Sheet (Appendix G)

6 copies of the Literature Circle Roles Assignment Sheet (Appendix H)
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(5 minutes) Before students are split into Literature Circles, they will each receive a copy of the
Literature Circle Roles Description sheet (Appendix G). We will briefly discuss the different
roles. Students will then report to their circles.
(10 minutes) Each group will receive a copy of the Literature Circle Roles Assignment Sheet
(Appendix H). They will decide as a group who will fill each role during each Literature Circle
and fill out the form accordingly. I will note that the roles that are starred and in bold font
MUST be filled each week and it must be a different person. No one student is allowed to fill a
single role twice. They must also decide how many chapters will be read before each lit circle.
The sheets will be handed in, and I will later put them on the wall for students to reference later
if they need to.
(30 minutes) Students will read their selected texts together in the Literature Circles. They may
read silently or take turns reading aloud.
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be asked to clean up and pack up for dismissal.
Assessment: Assessment for today will be based on participation and staying on task.
Homework/follow-up assignment: Students will read chapters 7-10 of The Scarlet Letter for
homework over the weekend. They will also continue reading their self-selected novel.
Attachments:

Appendix G: Literature Circle Roles Description sheet

Appendix H: Literature Circle Roles Assignment Sheet
17
Accommodations/adaptations: Literature Circles are staggered by ability-level and classroom
performance.
18
WEEK 2
Week two will mark the beginning of our focus on social prejudices in society. For week two,
we will briefly cover supplemental material that comments on the issue of racism in particular.
Day 6 (Monday)
Materials:

30 copies of the multi-media project assignment sheet (Appendix I)

Copy of video excerpt from ―The Help‖

Computer or DVD player hooked to projector with screen
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(5 minutes) As bell-work, students will be asked to write a reader response in their journals. The
journal may be about The Scarlet Letter or their book from Literature Circles. There will be no
particular prompt; students may write about anything they find interesting.
(25 minutes) I will show a 5-10 minute clip of the film adaptation of ―The Help.‖ I would avoid
choosing any selection that might be a ―spoiler‖ for the group that is reading the nove. Any clip
can be used that shows racial prejudice, discrimination and/or intolerance. After the video, we
will discuss the social implications of the clip, including racial intolerance and discrimination.
Then, we will relate it to Hester‘s situation in The Scarlet Letter.
(20 minutes) Students will each receive a copy of the Multi-Genre Project Assignment sheet
(Appendix I). We will discuss the project assignment in detail to assure that it is wellunderstood. I will answer any questions that students have about the project.
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be asked to turn in their composition notebooks so
that I may read their journal entries. They may then pack up and prepare for the dismissal bell.
Assessment: Points for today will be based on participation in class discussions. Their journal
entry will also count as one journal grade for the unit.
Homework/follow-up assignment: None.
Attachments:

Appendix I: Multi-Genre Project Assignment sheet
Accommodations/adaptations: Video sources will be used in this lesson, as well as text
references and live discussions.
Day 7 (Tuesday)
Materials:

Student copies of The Scarlet Letter
19

Computer with projector and screen
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(10 minutes) A condensed list of words from this website will be displayed on the overhead
projector for vocabulary words in chapters 3-10 of The Scarlet Letter. Using a similar method as
the Day 2 Vocabulary Lesson in this unit, students will partner-up with the person sitting next to
them. Together, students will use context clues from the text to provide a possible definition for
each of the vocabulary words.
(10 minutes) Next, students will form groups of four or five students around them and compare
their definitions. Students should write each word and its definition (in their own words) in their
composition notebooks. I will circulate the room to assure students are on task and to help
students who struggle to make sense out of difficult words.
(25 minutes) The remainder of class time will be spent in silent reading. Students may read The
Scarlet Letter or their Literature Circle text.
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be reminded of the reading homework and will be
allowed to pack up for dismissal.
Assessment: Informal assessment will be taken of students during the vocabulary group
exercise. Points today will be based on participation and staying on task.
Homework/follow-up assignment: Students are to read chapters 11-12 of The Scarlet Letter for
homework.
Attachments: None.
Accommodations/adaptations: This lesson contains paired activity, group work, and individual
work time.
Day 8 (Wednesday)
Materials:

30 copies of excerpt from The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

Audio recording of song ―Run to the Hills‖ by Iron Maiden

Overhead projector and computer with Internet connection

Audio playing device

Construction paper and drawing paper

Markers, Crayons, Colored Pencils, Glue sticks
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
20
(5-8 minutes) Students will listen and follow along as I read an excerpt from The Absolutely
True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, beginning on page 54 on the chapter entitled ―How to Fight
Monsters.‖
(5-8 minutes) I will display the lyrics to the song ―Run to the Hills‖ by Iron Maiden on the
overhead projector. Then, we will listen to the song while reading along with the lyrics.
Afterwards, we will discuss the lyrics and the background information regarding European
settlers passing disease-ridden blankets on to the Native Americans when they arrived.
(29-35 minutes) I will select a student to read aloud a second excerpt from page 95 of The
Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, where Junior talks about his art and why he draws.
Students will then be asked to use the materials provided to make a work of art that expresses
how they would feel if a different race decided that it was their job to eliminate the student‘s
entire race of people. Near the end of the activity, I may ask a few students to share their
artwork, especially if it appears that most students are finishing up early.
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be asked to help clean up the drawing materials,
turn in their artwork and pack up for dismissal.
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on participation. Students‘ artwork will be
graded for effort and not talent.
Homework/follow-up assignment: None.
Attachments: None.
Accommodations/adaptations: This lesson utilizes text and auditory aids. It also has a handson component for kinesthetic learners.
Day 9 (Thursday)
Materials:

Computer with Internet connection and projector

YouTube Clip ―The Man Your Man Could Smell Like‖:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owGykVbfgUE

30 copies of the handouts containing the text from ―The Man Your Man Could Smell
Like,‖ as taken from http://lybio.net/old-spice-the-man-your-man-could-smelllike/commercials/ (Appendix J)
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(12-15 minutes) The following Grammar in Popular Culture Mini-Lesson has been borrowed
(and adapted) from a colleague, Katie Donoher, a graduate student at The Florida State
University. Her original mini-lesson is attached below as Appendix R.
21
The teacher will post the sentence ―What‘s in your hand, back at me.‖ on the projection screen.
Then, the teacher will ask for volunteers to analyze the sentence. After distinguishing that the
first sentence is a question (―What is in your hand?‖), she will ask students to determine the
minimal amount of words that should be added to the phrase ―back at me‖ to make it a complete
sentence. The teacher will write several students‘ suggestions as potential sentences. This will
allow students to predict the meaning of the original sentence ―What‘s in your hand, back at me‖
before evaluating the sentence in its original context.
Next, the teacher will distribute the handout (Appendix J) to each student and play the 33
second YouTube clip of the Old Spice commercial. Then the teacher will ask students to discuss
the role of diction in the commercial, particularly referencing the sentence that they previously
dissected. They should also discuss the use of punctuation, imperative sentences, comma
splices, etc. and how they relate to the genre of the text as a commercial.
The teacher will ask questions such as ―What affect does the punctuation have on how the
speaker presents the text in the commercial?‖ ―Why does the writer include so many commas
and how would the text be different if he used periods instead?‖ and ―How do the writer‘s
grammatical choices impact the meaning of the text in written form versus orally?‖ This should
result in a discussion about the fast-paced, back-and-forth nature that the speaker utilizes to
capture the audience‘s attention and captivate the ―ladies‖ with his sexual appeal as an
advertising ploy. Furthermore, the syntax results in a comedic effect that simultaneously reflects
the quick paced change in absurdly unrelated topics from ―your man‖ to the speaker to a boat to
the speaker to ―your hand‖ to the speaker to an oyster to tickets to diamonds to the speaker.
(5 minutes) Students will go to the computer lab.
(25-29 minutes) Students will spend the remainder of the period starting or continuing to work
on any media portion of their Multi-Genre Projects.
Summary/Closure: (1 minute) Students will be asked to pack up for dismissal.
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on participation and staying on task.
Homework/follow-up assignment: Students will read chapters 13-14 of The Scarlet Letter for
homework.
Attachments:

Appendix J: ―The Man Your Man Could Smell Like‖ Text handout
Accommodations/adaptations: This lesson utilizes text and audio/visual aids. It also has a
hands-on multi-media component.
Day 10 (Friday)
Materials:

30 copies of the Literature Circle Participation sheets (Appendix K)
22
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(10 minutes) Students will have their second reading quiz through chapter 14 of The Scarlet
Letter. I will ask students to choose a side: Decide if Hester Prynne is a villain or a victim.
Then, use evidence from the text to support that opinion. Students do not have to actually
believe whichever side they choose; they just must be able to defend their opinion by referencing
the text.
(35 minutes) Students will report to their Literature Circles. The discussion leader will ensure
that each student shares his or her findings for the week with the group. Then, they will each fill
out the Literature Circle Participation sheets (Appendix K).
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be asked to turn in their worksheets and pack up
for dismissal.
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on participation and staying on task. The
Literature Circle Participation sheets will count as one Literature Circle grade for the unit.
Homework/follow-up assignment: Students will read chapters 15-18 of The Scarlet Letter for
homework over the weekend and continue their Literature Circle texts, as well.
Attachments:

Appendix K: Literature Circle Participation sheets
Accommodations/adaptations: Literature Circles are staggered by ability-level and classroom
performance.
23
WEEK 3
For week three, we will briefly cover supplemental material that comments on the issue of
religious intolerance and discrimination in particular.
Day 11 (Monday)
Materials:

students‘ copies of their texts

students‘ composition notebooks (journals)
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(10 minutes) Students will be asked to write a journal entry that explains their feelings regarding
intolerance and discrimination against others based on religious beliefs. They must include a
real-life story they have witnessed or heard about and discuss how the issue of religion plays into
Hester Prynne‘s situation. They will then turn in their journals to be checked for completion.
(35 minutes) Students will use the remainder of class time to read silently at their desks. They
read either The Scarlet Letter or their selected Literature Circle text only.
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be asked to pack up for dismissal.
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on participation and staying on task while
reading. Their journal entry will also count as one journal grade for the unit.
Homework/follow-up assignment: None.
Attachments: None.
Accommodations/adaptations: This lesson allows students to read their texts at their own pace
and back-track to check comprehension, instead of keeping up with others‘ rate of reading.
Day 12 (Tuesday)
Materials:

pictures and bios from 15 different Holocaust victims found here (Bios are reproducible
for free from the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum website.) The entire list of printable
bios is attached below as Appendix L.
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(45 minutes) The room will be set up somewhat like a museum with 15 different ―exhibits‖
featuring the pictures and biographies of 15 selected Holocaust victims. Students will walk
through the ―museum‖ and spend 2-3 minutes at each station. They will be instructed to take
24
notes of names and interesting facts in their journals. They will be reminded that they must
include biographical information from Holocaust victims in their Multi-Genre Project at the end
of the unit.
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Journals will be collected and graded to assure that students
participated in the day‘s activities. Students will be asked to pack up for dismissal.
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on participation and staying on task while
taking part in the make-shift museum exhibits.
Homework/follow-up assignment: Students will finish reading chapters 19-20 of The Scarlet
Letter.
Attachments:

Appendix L: US Holocaust Memorial Museum ID Cards
Accommodations/adaptations: This lesson gives students a hands-on exhibit-style learning
experience that is not unlike taking a field-trip to a local museum.
Day 13 (Wednesday)
Materials:

30 copies of the Literature Circle Participation sheets (Appendix K)
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(45 minutes) Students will report to their Literature Circles. The discussion leader will ensure
that each student shares his or her findings for the week with the group. Then, they will each fill
out the Literature Circle Participation sheets (Appendix K).
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be asked to turn in their worksheets and pack up
for dismissal.
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on participation and staying on task. The
Literature Circle Participation sheets will count as one Literature Circle grade for the unit.
Homework/follow-up assignment: None.
Attachments:

Literature Circle Participation sheets (Appendix K)
Accommodations/adaptations: Literature Circles are staggered by ability-level and classroom
performance.
25
Day 14 (Thursday)
Materials:

30 copies of the Impromptu Writing Assignment sheets (Appendix M)

Computer and projector with Internet connection
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(This grammar mini-lesson is partially adapted from a lesson plan entitled ―To, Too, or Two:
Developing an Understanding of Homophones‖ by Sarah Dennis-Shaw found here and a
Linguistic Lesson Series developed previously by me in the summer of 2011.)
(3 minutes) I will begin the lesson by writing the word homophone on the board. I will ask
students if they know what this word means. After a couple of responses, I will draw a slash
between the two syllables like this: ―homo/phone.‖ We will discuss the definition of each part of
the word and combine them to come up with a definition of the word together.
(2 minutes) I will ask the students if they know the difference between homophones and
homonyms. We will very briefly discuss that homophones sound the same, have different
meaning, and may or may not be spelled the same. However, homonyms sound the same, have
different meaning, and are always spelled the same. I will explain that all homonyms are
homophones, but not all homophones are homonyms. I will display the following website on the
board: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Homograph_homophone_venn_diagram.png. This is a
Venn diagram visualizing the relationships between words regarding pronunciation, meaning and
spelling. For our purposes today, we will only be looking at the section in blue (homophones)
and the section where sound and spelling overlap (homonyms).
(5 minutes) I will ask the class to share homophones that they think are most-often confused.
After some students have volunteered, I will share with the class some common ones we see in
our writing: there/their/they‘re, here/hear, its/it‘s, except/accept, no/know, your/you‘re. We will
discuss as a class the definition of each of these words and how they are different from their
homophonic counterparts.
(5 minutes) Students will take a few minutes to look through their writing journal to find words
that have homophones. They will circle or highlight the words. If the homophone is the correct
word, they will place a checkmark above the word. If the homophone is not the correct word,
they will cross it out and write the correct word above it.
(90 seconds) For a moment of review (with a bit of fun and silliness), I will play the homophone
song video found here.
(30 minutes) Students will clear their desks and take out two sheets of paper. One sheet can be
used for drafting. They will then respond to the writing prompt on the Impromptu Writing
Assignment Sheet (Appendix M).
26
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be asked to turn in all three sheets and pack up for
dismissal.
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on participation and staying on task. The
writing assignment will count as the impromptu writing grade for the unit.
Homework/follow-up assignment: None.
Attachments:

Appendix M: Impromptu Writing Assignment sheet

Appendix N: Impromptu Writing Grading Rubric
Accommodations/adaptations: This lesson incorporates audio and visual aids as well as written
text.
Day 15 (Friday)
Materials:

30 copies of the Debate Participation sheets (Appendix O)

signed permission slips for all students (Appendix P)
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(10 minutes) Students will have their third reading quiz through chapter 22 of The Scarlet Letter.
I will ask students to summarize what has happened in the story up until now and to make a
prediction about what will happen in the last two chapters of the book. They must support their
prediction using examples from the text. They will also say whether or not they have changed
their mind about Hester. ―Is she still a victim/villain to you? Why or why not?‖
(35 minutes) Students will be split into two groups on opposing sides of the room facing each
other. One side will be assigned to defend Hester as a victim; the other side must attempt to
prove that Hester is a villain in the story. Groups will be given 10 minutes to confer with their
members to locate examples from the text that prove their side. Then, the debate will
commence. I will proctor the debate and ask for clarification or supporting contextual evidence
if the information given is vague. Students much each speak at least once and must each fill out
a Debate Participation sheet (Appendix O).
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be asked to turn in their worksheets and pack up
for dismissal. They will also be given a permission slip for a film-viewing next week. Students
must return the form by next Wednesday, or they will spend the class time in the library instead.
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on participation and staying on task. The
Debate Participation sheets will count as the Debate grade for the unit.
27
Homework/follow-up assignment: Students will read chapters 23-24 of The Scarlet Letter for
homework over the weekend and continue their Literature Circle texts, as well.
Attachments:

Appendix O: Debate Participation sheet
Accommodations/adaptations: The sides of the debate will each have high-performing
students, middle-performing students and lower-performing students. Ability levels will be
staggered so that students can help one another during this lesson.
28
WEEK 4
For week four, we will briefly cover supplemental material that comments on the issue of gender
and/or sexual orientation intolerance and discrimination in particular.
Day 16 (Monday)
Materials:

students‘ composition notebooks (journals)

video clip of an excerpt from the show ―Glee‖

computer and video player with connection to projector
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(30 minutes) I will show an extended clip from the TV show ―Glee‖ that is longer and more indepth than the short clip shown on Day 1 of this unit plan. This clip will not only include a scene
where ―Kurt‖ is bullied by ―Karofsky,‖ but also where he is called ―faggy‖ by the character
―Finn.‖ Finally, it will resolve with a scene where ―Finn‖ supports ―Kurt‖ and stands up to the
bullies. I will ask students if they have ever witnessed this kind of bullying. We will attempt to
discuss why it is that people seem to be more openly aggressive against people because of their
sexual orientation. Finally, we will relate this situation to that of Hester Prynne.
(15 minutes) Students will be asked to write a journal entry expressing if they have changed their
mind about anything through the course of this unit. They will write how they feel about
discrimination against others because of their race, religious beliefs or sexuality. They must also
include ways that they themselves can stop the pattern of cruelty and prejudice in their schools,
families and communities.
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be asked to pack up for dismissal.
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on participation and staying on task during
the discussion. Their journal entry will also count as one journal grade for the unit.
Homework/follow-up assignment: None.
Attachments: None.
Accommodations/adaptations: This lesson uses audio/visual aids.
Day 17 (Tuesday)
Materials:

30 copies of the Literature Circle Participation sheets (Appendix K)
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
29
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(45 minutes) Students will report to their Literature Circles. The discussion leader will ensure
that each student shares his or her findings for the week with the group. Then, they will each fill
out the Literature Circle Participation sheets (Appendix K).
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be asked to turn in their worksheets and pack up
for dismissal.
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on participation and staying on task. The
Literature Circle Participation sheets will count as one Literature Circle grade for the unit.
Homework/follow-up assignment: None.
Attachments:

Literature Circle Participation sheets (Appendix K)
Accommodations/adaptations: Literature Circles are staggered by ability-level and classroom
performance.
Day 18 (Wednesday)
Materials:

Computer lab (reserved ahead of time)
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(5 minutes) Students will have their final reading quiz. I will simply ask students to write a
paragraph answering the following question: Who is your favorite character in the novel, besides
Hester Prynne? Why? What happens to this character at the end of the story?
(5 minutes) Students will pack up and head to the computer lab.
(35 minutes) Students will spend the remainder of the period continuing to work on any media
portion of their Multi-Genre Projects.
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be asked to pack up for dismissal.
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on participation and staying on task. The
quiz will also count as the unit‘s final quiz grade.
Homework/follow-up assignment: Students will work on their Multi-Genre Projects, which are
due Friday by 11:59 PM.
Attachments: None.
30
Accommodations/adaptations: This lesson utilizes a hands-on multi-media component.
Day 19 (Thursday)
Materials:

full video copy of the PG-13 movie ―Easy A‖

video playing device and projection system

signed permission slips for all students (Appendix P)
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(45 minutes) The class will view the movie ―Easy A,‖ a modern adaptation of The Scarlet Letter.
Since the film is rated PG-13, permission slips were handed out last Friday. All students who
were not given permission by parents to view the film will spend the period in the school library.
Other students who would like to spend the time working on their Multi-Genre Project may also
spend the period in the library.
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be asked to pack up for dismissal.
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on staying on task and not being disruptive.
Homework/follow-up assignment: Students will work on their Multi-Genre Projects, which are
due Friday by 11:59 PM.
Attachments:

Appendix P: Film permission slips
Accommodations/adaptations: This lesson utilizes audio/visual aids. It also provides extra
time for students to work on projects and for students whose parents do not agree with the
assignment.
Day 20 (Friday)
Materials:

full video copy of the PG-13 movie ―Easy A‖

video playing device and projection system

signed permission slips for all students (Appendix P)
Housekeeping/Attendance: (3 minutes)
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
(45 minutes) The class will conclude the movie ―Easy A,‖ a modern adaptation of The Scarlet
Letter. Since the film is rated PG-13, permission slips were handed out last Friday. All students
who were not given permission by parents to view the film will spend the period in the school
31
library. Other students who would like to spend the time working on their Multi-Genre Project
may also spend the period in the library.
Summary/Closure: (2 minutes) Students will be asked to pack up for dismissal. They will be
handed a peer evaluation assignment sheet (Appendix Q).
Assessment: Points for today‘s class will be based on staying on task and not being disruptive.
Homework/follow-up assignment: Students will work on their Multi-Genre Projects, which is
due online tonight by 11:59 PM. Students must also write peer evaluations on 5 other students‘
projects by Sunday night at 11:59 PM.
Attachments:

Appendix P: Film permission slips

Appendix Q: Peer Evaluation Directions sheet
Accommodations/adaptations: This lesson utilizes audio/visual aids. It also provides extra
time for students to work on projects and for students whose parents do not agree with the
assignment.
32
Appendix of Selected Materials
Appendix A
Literature Circle Book Choices List
1. Muslim Child: Understanding Islam Through Stories and Poems
―This insightful collection of stories and poems is a child-centered introduction to Islam. In one
story, a boy feels guilty when he short-changes his prayer. In another story, a girl buys candy
she can't eat because it contains pork by-products.‖ Source
2. Will Grayson, Will Grayson
―One cold night, in a most unlikely corner of Chicago, Will Grayson crosses paths with . . . Will
Grayson. Two teens with the same name, running in two very different circles, suddenly find
their lives going in new and unexpected directions, and culminating in epic turns-of-heart and
the most fabulous musical ever to grace the high school stage. Told in alternating voices from
two YA superstars, this collaborative novel features a double helping of the heart and humor that
have won them both legions of fans.‖ Source
3. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
―Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane
Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled
school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the
school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a
Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author's own experiences, coupled with poignant
drawings that reflect the character's art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native
American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he thought he was destined to live.‖
Source
4. To Kill a Mockingbird
―‘Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a
mockingbird.‘ A lawyer's advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper
Lee's classic novel—a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes
of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with rich humor and unswerving honesty the
irrationality of adult attitudes toward race and class in the Deep South of the 1930s. The
conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence, and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina and
quiet heroism of one man's struggle for justice—but the weight of history will only tolerate so
much.‖ Source
5. The Help
―Twenty-two-year-old Skeeter has just returned home after graduating from Ole Miss. She may
have a degree, but it is 1962, Mississippi, and her mother will not be happy till Skeeter has a
ring on her finger. Skeeter would normally find solace with her beloved maid Constantine, the
woman who raised her, but Constantine has disappeared and no one will tell Skeeter where she
has gone. Aibileen is a black maid, a wise, regal woman raising her seventeenth white child.
Something has shifted inside her after the loss of her own son, who died while his bosses looked
the other way. She is devoted to the little girl she looks after, though she knows both their hearts
33
may be broken. Minny, Aibileen‘s best friend, is short, fat, and perhaps the sassiest woman in
Mississippi. She can cook like nobody‘s business, but she can‘t mind her tongue, so she‘s lost yet
another job. Minny finally finds a position working for someone too new to town to know her
reputation. But her new boss has secrets of her own.‖ Source
6. American Born Chinese
―Jin Wang starts at a new school where he‘s the only Chinese-American student. When a boy
from Taiwan joins his class, Jin doesn‘t want to be associated with an FOB like him. Jin just
wants to be an all-American boy, because he‘s in love with an all-American girl. Danny is an
all-American boy: great at basketball, popular with the girls. But his obnoxious Chinese cousin
Chin-Kee‘s annual visit is such a disaster that it ruins Danny‘s reputation at school, leaving him
with no choice but to transfer somewhere he can start all over again. The Monkey King has lived
for thousands of years and mastered the arts of kung fu and the heavenly disciplines. He‘s ready
to join the ranks of the immortal gods in heaven. But there‘s no place in heaven for a monkey.
Each of these characters cannot help himself alone, but how can they possibly help each other?
They‘re going to have to find a way—if they want fix the disasters their lives have become.‖
Source
Appendix B
Our ―Civilized‖ Society – Unit Calendar
~ January 2012 ~
WEEK ONE:
Is our society
civilized?
Mon
2
3
Intro to The Scarlet
Letter
Tue
Wed
4
Reading Quiz #1
Thu
5
Fri
6
Sat & Sun
7-8
Literature Circle Weekend
HW: Read Ch.3-4 HW: Read Ch.5-6 #1
Homework:
Read Ch.7-10
HW: Read Intro.Ch.2
9
WEEK TWO: Journal #1
Racial
Intolerance and
Discrimination
in Society
10
11
12
Impromptu Writing COMPUTER
LAB DAY
16
WEEK THREE: Journal #2
Religious
Intolerance and
Discrimination
in Society
17
HOLOCAUST
MUSEUM DAY
23
WEEK FOUR: Journal #3
Gender or
Sexual
Orientation
Intolerance and
Discrimination
in Society
24
25
Reading Quiz #4
Literature Circle
#4
COMPUTER
LAB DAY
13
14-15
Reading Quiz #2
Literature Circle Weekend
#2
Homework:
HW: Read Ch.13Read Ch.15-18
14
HW: Read Ch.1112
18
Literature Circle
HW: Read Ch.19- #3
20
19
20
21-22
Impromptu Writing Reading Quiz #3
DEBATE DAY
Weekend
Homework:
Read Ch.23-24
27
FILM DAY
(or library/lab)
28-29
HW: Read Ch.2122
26
FILM DAY
(or library/lab)
Multi-Genre
Projects Due
Online by 11:59
PM
Weekend
Homework:
5 Peer Evaluations
- Due by Sunday at
11:59 PM
34
Appendix C
Full text of this appendix is 8 pages long. Please follow this link to print or view all pages.
Appendix D
News Report Assignment sheet
In your group, read the article that you have been provided with. Once you understand the
story, work together to compose a 45-90 second news bulletin to present to the class. The news
bulletin should include the who, what, when, where, why and how of the story.
Next, choose one or two ―anchors‖ to present the news story to the rest of the class.
Appendix E
Supplemental Text Selection sheet
Group Members:
First Choice Text:
Second Choice Text:
Third Choice Text:
PLEASE do not give us this text:
Appendix F
Sociolinguistics as Seen in Popular Culture
by Daniel Do
Purpose/rationale: This clip from NBC‘s sitcom ―30 Rock‖ features high-brow media mogul
Jack Donaghy imitating Tracy Jordan‘s parents for the sake of a therapy role-playing session. On
top of acting like his perception of inner city working-class African Americans, Jack also does an
impersonation of a few other figures from Jordan‘s past. The humor of this clip revolves around
the irony of Jack‘s highly stereotypical impressions actually being incredibly accurate depictions
of Jordan‘s family. One of the jokes, however, is that Jack‘s impression of a nerdy white man
prompted Jordan to call him out for using ―ugly stereotypes‖. Upon watching this clip, students
are encouraged to discuss what lingual stereotypes were shown in the video, as well as what
literary or media sources the stereotypes could have come from.
Sunshine State Standards: This lesson is targeted for any student in grades 11-12.
35





L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in
different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend
more fully when reading or listening.
SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker‘s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and
rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of
emphasis, and tone used.
SL.11-12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual,
and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings,
reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
SL.11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of
formal English when indicated or appropriate.
RH.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse
formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a
question or solve a problem.
Objectives: Students will be able to…
 Understand the impact and relevance of lingual stereotypes in daily society
 Recognize the sources or inspirations of lingual stereotypes
 Distinguish why the video clip was absurd and ironic
 Acknowledge their own existing perceptions of lingual stereotypes, and see what could
be changed about them
Materials:
 Video Clip
Anticipatory set: The video will be shown after reading a novel focusing on a set of poor or
working class characters (To Kill a Mockingbird, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn) with a strong
presence of distinctive speech patterns. Following the reading of the novel and before the video
clip will be a discussion of whether or not the dialects presented in the text are still relevant
today.
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
 20 minute lesson
 Anticipatory set (review of prior text, 10 minutes)
 View video (5 minutes)
 Class discussion of clip‘s relevance (20 minutes)
Summary/Closure: The activity is based on the question of whether or not linguistic stereotypes
still exist, and how relevant past media and literature are in their impact on our perception of
certain demographics today. The students will be required to draw upon their readings of
southern literature. At the end of the class period, students should be able to distinguish between
what are actual dialects, and which are caricatured stereotypes.
Assessment: Evaluation will be based on student participation, as well as the comprehension and
relevance of the students‘ responses.
36
Homework/follow-up assignment: Students will watch a TV show, movie, or internet clip of
their own choice that shows a distinctive dialect or lingual pattern, and write a brief report on
whether or not the example is a stereotype or an accurate portrayal.
Attachments: Excerpts from To Kill a Mockingbird and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
Accommodations/adaptations: Students will be reminded that the video clip is from a sitcom,
thus being warned that the context is purely humorous.
Citation:
30 Rock - Therapy, Jack Style - YouTube." YouTube - Broadcast Yourself. Web. 12 July 2011.
<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTj47rcuM-4>.
Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1960. Print.
Twain, Mark, Victor Fischer, Lin Salamo, and Walter Blair. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
Berkeley: University of California, 2003. Print.
Appendix: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTj47rcuM-4
Novel excerpts:
To Kill a Mockingbird
"that one could be a ray of sunshine in pants just as well, but Aunty said that ... I was born good
but had grown progressively worse every year . . . . but when I asked Atticus about it, he said
there were already enough sunbeams in the family and to go on about my business, he didn't
mind me much the way I was."
"'Mockingbirds don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don't eat up people's
gardens, don't nest in corncribs, they don't do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That's
why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.'"
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
"Oh, yes, this is a wonderful govment, wonderful. Why, looky here. There was a free nigger
there from Ohio – a mulatter, most as white as a white man. He had the whitest shirt on you ever
see..."
Please take it," says I, "and don't ask me nothing – then I won't have to tell no lies."
"Oh, yes, this is a wonderful govment, wonderful. Why, looky here. There was a free nigger
there from Ohio – a mulatter, most as white as a white man.‖
37
Appendix G
Literature Circle Roles Description sheet
Discussion Director - develops questions for the group to discuss
Literary Luminary - chooses a selection that the group rereads and discusses because it is
interesting, informative, the climax, well written, etc.
Vocabulary Enhancer - chooses words that are difficult or used in an unfamiliar way
Connector - finds a connection between the story and another book, event in their personal
life or the outside world
Illustrator - draws a picture related to the reading
Summarizer - prepares a brief summary of the passage read that day
Investigator - looks up background information related to the book
These Literature Circle role descriptions are adapted from information found here:
http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/de/pd/instr/strats/literaturecircles/index.html
38
Appendix H
Literature Circle Roles Assignment sheet
Please write the appropriate person‘s name on the line for each role. Remember that each person in your group
may NOT serve the same role twice. Also remember that the roles starred in bold text MUST be filled for each
Literature Circle. The others may be chosen from the remaining roles.
LITERATURE CIRCLE #1
*Discussion Director: ___________________________________
*Literary Luminary: ____________________________________
*Vocabulary Enhancer: __________________________________
Connector: ___________________________________________
Illustrator: ____________________________________________
Summarizer: __________________________________________
Investigator: __________________________________________
LITERATURE CIRCLE #2
*Discussion Director: ___________________________________
*Literary Luminary: ____________________________________
*Vocabulary Enhancer: __________________________________
Connector: ___________________________________________
Illustrator: ____________________________________________
Summarizer: __________________________________________
Investigator: __________________________________________
LITERATURE CIRCLE #3
*Discussion Director: ___________________________________
*Literary Luminary: ____________________________________
*Vocabulary Enhancer: __________________________________
Connector: ___________________________________________
Illustrator: ____________________________________________
Summarizer: __________________________________________
Investigator: __________________________________________
39
Appendix I
Multi-Genre Project Assignment sheet
Your final project for this unit will be a multi-genre product consisting of at least three
different genres. Here are only a few examples of some of the genres you may choose from to
create your product:
Social Network site
Letter
Research Paper
Website
Prezi
Glogster
PowerPoint
Music
Lyrics
Recipe Book
You will choose any three genres and integrate them (all three genres must be connected and
entwined) to produce a final product. This project is worth a lot of points, so here are some
things to remember:




Your project must include equal reflection of both The Scarlet Letter and your
Literature Circle text.
Your project must also include responses to each of the weeks‘ themes of our unit
(racial, religious, and sexual-orientation intolerance).
Your project must demonstrate clear understanding of both of your texts.
Your product must include at least one genre of technology-integration.
THIS PROJECT IS DUE BY 11:59 PM on Friday, January 27th online on the class blog.
Please feel free to come see me if you have any questions.
Appendix J
―The Man Your Man Could Smell Like‖ handout
―Hello, ladies, look at your man, now back to me, now back at your man, now back to me. Sadly,
he isn‘t me, but if he stopped using ladies‘ scented body wash and switched to Old Spice, he
could smell like he‘s me. Look down, back up, where are you? You‘re on a boat with the man
your man could smell like. What‘s in your hand, back at me. I have it. It‘s an oyster with two
40
tickets to that thing you love. Look again, the tickets are now diamonds. Anything is possible
when your man smells like Old Spice and not a lady. I‘m on a horse.‖[Smell like a man, man.
Old Spice]
Appendix K
Literature Circle Participation sheet
My name:
My Literature Circle Role this Week:
What did I bring to the group this week?
What could I have done better?
What other suggestions do I have for the next person who fills this role?
Appendix L
List of printable bios from the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
Full text of this appendix is 39 pages long. Please follow this link to print or view all pages.
Appendix M
Impromptu Writing Assignment sheet
Is bullying always wrong, or is it just for fun? Explain why you feel the way you do.
Think about a time when you witnessed a person harassing or bullying another person. If you
cannot think of a time, make one up. What did or would you do in the situation? Were you the
bully? Would you be the victim? Think about the reasons people pick on others and write an
essay that supports your answer to the question at the top of the page?
41
Appendix N
Impromptu Writing Grading Rubric
CATEGORY
Attention Grabber
Focus or Thesis
Statement
Evidence and
Examples
Transitions
Sequencing
Closing paragraph
5 Points
The introductory
paragraph has a
strong hook or
attention grabber
that is appropriate
for the audience.
This could be a
strong statement,
a relevant
quotation,
statistic, or
question
addressed to the
reader.
The thesis
statement names
the topic of the
essay and outlines
the main points to
be discussed.
4 Points
The introductory
paragraph has a
hook or attention
grabber, but it is
weak, rambling or
inappropriate for
the audience.
3 Points
The author has an
interesting
introductory
paragraph but the
connection to the
topic is not clear.
1 Point
The introductory
paragraph is not
interesting AND
is not relevant to
the topic.
The thesis
statement names
the topic of the
essay.
The thesis
statement does not
name the topic
AND does not
preview what will
be discussed.
All of the
evidence and
examples are
specific, relevant
and explanations
are given that
show how each
piece of evidence
supports the
author's position.
A variety of
thoughtful
transitions are
used. They clearly
show how ideas
are connected
Arguments and
support are
provided in a
logical order that
makes it easy and
interesting to
follow the author's
train of thought.
Most of the
evidence and
examples are
specific, relevant
and explanations
are given that
show how each
piece of evidence
supports the
author's position.
Transitions show
how ideas are
connected, but
there is little
variety
The thesis
statement outlines
some or all of the
main points to be
discussed but does
not name the
topic.
At least one of the
pieces of evidence
and examples is
relevant and has
an explanation
that shows how
that piece of
evidence supports
the author's
position.
Some transitions
work well, but
some connections
between ideas are
fuzzy.
A few of the
support details or
arguments are not
in an expected or
logical order,
distracting the
reader and making
the essay seem a
little confusing.
The author's
position is
restated within the
closing paragraph,
but not near the
beginning.
Many of the
support details or
arguments are not
in an expected or
logical order,
distracting the
reader and making
the essay seem
very confusing.
There is no
conclusion - the
paper just ends.
The conclusion is
strong and leaves
the reader solidly
understanding the
writer's position.
Effective
restatement of the
position statement
begins the closing
Arguments and
support are
provided in a
fairly logical
order that makes
it reasonably easy
to follow the
author's train of
thought.
The conclusion is
recognizable. The
author's position
is restated within
the first two
sentences of the
closing paragraph.
Evidence and
examples are
NOT relevant
AND/OR are not
explained.
The transitions
between ideas are
unclear OR
nonexistent.
Score
42
paragraph.
Grammar &
Spelling
Author makes no
errors in grammar
or spelling that
distract the reader
from the content.
Author makes 1-2
errors in grammar
or spelling that
distract the reader
from the content.
Author makes 3-4
errors in grammar
or spelling that
distract the reader
from the content.
Capitalization &
Punctuation
Author makes no
errors in
capitalization or
punctuation, so
the essay is
exceptionally easy
to read.
Author makes 1-2
errors in
capitalization or
punctuation, but
the essay is still
easy to read.
Support for
Position
Includes 3 or
more pieces of
evidence (facts,
statistics,
examples, real-life
experiences) that
support the
position
statement. The
writer anticipates
the reader's
concerns, biases
or arguments and
has provided at
least 1 counterargument.
Demonstrates a
clear
understanding of
the potential
reader and uses
appropriate
vocabulary and
arguments.
Anticipates
reader's questions
and provides
thorough answers
appropriate for
that audience.
Includes 3 or
more pieces of
evidence (facts,
statistics,
examples, real-life
experiences) that
support the
position
statement.
Author makes a
few errors in
capitalization
and/or
punctuation that
catch the reader's
attention and
interrupt the flow.
Includes 2 pieces
of evidence (facts,
statistics,
examples, real-life
experiences) that
support the
position
statement.
Audience
Demonstrates a
general
understanding of
the potential
reader and uses
vocabulary and
arguments
appropriate for
that audience.
Demonstrates
some
understanding of
the potential
reader and uses
arguments
appropriate for
that audience.
Author makes
more than 4 errors
in grammar or
spelling that
distract the reader
from the content.
Author makes
several errors in
capitalization
and/or
punctuation that
catch the reader's
attention and
interrupt the flow.
Includes 1 or
fewer pieces of
evidence (facts,
statistics,
examples, real-life
experiences).
It is not clear who
the author is
writing for.
Total
Appendix O
43
Debate Participation sheet
My name:
Is Hester a villain or a victim?
Provide at least three pieces of evidence from the text to support your opinion:
Use this section to write down rebuttal responses to the opposing team‘s points:
44
Appendix P
Film Permission Slip
Dear Families:
Your student‘s 11th-grade English Language Arts class is currently studying a unit called ―Our
‗Civilized‘ Society.‖ The unit aims to challenge students to question societal norms that teach
prejudice and bigotry against others because of race, religion, gender or sexual orientation.
Over the last couple of weeks, we have been reading the classic American novel The Scarlet
Letter. There was a film released in 2010 that is a modern adaptation of the novel‘s themes
called ―Easy A.‖ After we finish the book at the end of the unit, I will be showing the film in
class.
―Easy A‖ is rated PG-13 and does deal with contemporary issues of sexuality among teenagers.
A synopsis of the movie can be found here: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1282140/ Because of
the film‘s rating and content, I would like for all parents to decide for themselves if their
students should be allowed to view the film. If you do not want your child to view this movie,
the student may work in the library during the two days we will be watching the film.
Please check one:
____ I DO give my full permission for my student to view the film ―Easy A‖ in English
Language Arts class.
____ I DO NOT give my permission for my student to view the film ―Easy A.‖ Please send my
child to the library to work during the viewing of the movie.
_______________________________
Parent Signature
_______________________________
Date
45
Appendix Q
Peer Evaluation Directions sheet
To receive full credit, you must answer the following questions for at least five of your peers‘
projects. Responses are due online by 11:59 PM by January 29th.
What do you love about this project?
What genre do you think was utilized the best?
What could be improved?
Any additional comments.
Appendix R
Katie‘s Donoher‘s Grammar in Popular Culture Mini-Lesson
Lesson Plan: Syntax and Semantics in an Old Spice Commercial
Purpose: This lesson seeks to increase students‘ awareness of the effects of varying syntax and
the significance of reading (viewing or listening to) text in context. This lesson focuses on how
the 2010 Old Spice Super bowl commercial utilizes syntax for a comedic effect to capture the
audience‘s attention, as well as how the meaning of words is dependent upon knowledge of their
context. By analyzing how professionals intentionally break grammatical conventions, students
will understand why knowledge and application of grammar rules is important.
Sunshine State Standards:
 LA.1112.1.6.2: The student will listen to, read, and discuss familiar and conceptually
challenging text;
 LA.1112.1.7.1: The student will use background knowledge of subject and related
content areas, prereading strategies (e.g., previewing, discussing, generating questions),
text features, and texts structure to make and confirm complex predictions of content,
purpose, and organization of a reading selection;
 LA.1112.1.7.4: The student will identify cause-and-effect relationships in text;
 LA.1112.2.2.2: The student will use information from the text to answer questions or to
state the main idea or provide relevant details;
 LA.1112.2.2.4: The student will identify and analyze the characteristics of a variety of
types of text (e.g., reference, reports, technical manuals, articles, editorials, primary
source historical documents, periodicals, job-related materials, practical/functional text)
Objectives:
Students will be able to…
 Recognize errors in syntax
46



Understand how a text‘s syntax impacts semantics
Understand the effects of a writer‘s decision to intentionally break grammar rules
Analyze a text in isolation and in its original context
Materials:
 Promethean Board
 Computer
 YouTube Clip—―The Man Your Man Could Smell Like‖:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owGykVbfgUE
 Handouts: Copy of text from ―The Man Your Man Could Smell Like‖ as taken from
http://lybio.net/old-spice-the-man-your-man-could-smell-like/commercials/
Anticipatory Set:
In a whole class setting, students discuss elements of a commercial. The teacher will make a list
on the board. If students do not suggest the role diction, the teacher will prompt them to consider
this aspect. This exercise is intended to prepare students to consider the impact of varying syntax
and how it affects semantics in the written and oral forms of the text from an Old Spice
commercial. Students will reference this list later in the lesson during their group work and again
during whole class discussion. (3-4 minutes)
Procedures:
Anticipatory Set: (3-4 minutes)
Whole Class Discussion: The teacher will ask students to divide into groups of 4-5. Meanwhile,
the teacher will post the sentence ―What‘s in your hand, back at me.‖ on the Promethean board.
Then the teacher will ask for volunteers to analyze the sentence. The teacher should direct
students to recognize the grammatical features of the sentence. She may ask the students for
input while she rewrites the sentence so that it is grammatically correct. After distinguishing that
the first sentence is a question (―What is in your hand?‖), she will ask students to determine the
minimal amount of words that should be added to the phrase ―back at me‖ to make it a complete
sentence. Students will identify the parts of speech in addition to possible words. The teacher
will write several students‘ suggestions as potential sentences. This will allow students to predict
the meaning of the original sentence ―What‘s in your hand, back at me‖ before evaluating the
sentence in its original context. (5 minutes)
Video Viewing/Group Work: The teacher will play the 33 second YouTube clip of the Old Spice
commercial. Then the teacher will ask students to analyze the commercial in their groups and
discuss the role of diction, particularly referencing the sentence that they previously dissected.
While the groups finish their conversations, the teacher will distribute handouts to each student.
After 2-3 minutes, the teacher will ask students to read and annotate the text on the handout and
to pay particular attention to the use of mechanics during the next 3 minutes. Throughout the
group work, the teacher will walk around the classroom to observe student participation and the
groups‘ progress. (5-6 minutes total)
Whole Class Discussion: The teacher will ask each group to share their findings. They should
discuss the use of punctuation, imperative sentences, comma splices, etc. and how they relate to
47
the genre of the text as a commercial. The teacher will ask questions such as ―What affect does
the punctuation have on how the speaker presents the text in the commercial,‖ ―Why does the
writer include so many commas and how would the text be different if he used periods instead,‖
and ―How do the writer‘s syntax choices impact the meaning of the text in written form versus
orally?‖ This should result in a discussion about the fast-paced, back-and-forth nature that the
speaker utilizes to capture the audience‘s attention and captivate the ―ladies‖ with his sexual
appeal as an advertising ploy. Furthermore, the syntax results in a comedic effect that
simultaneously reflects the quick paced change in absurdly unrelated topics from ―your man‖ to
the speaker to a boat to the speaker to ―your hand‖ to the speaker to an oyster to tickets to
diamonds to the speaker. (The teacher may choose to write this sequence on the board when
discussing the content of the commercial with students.) If necessary, the teacher will prompt
students to consider how watching the commercial affords meaning to the grammatically
incorrect sentence ―What‘s in your hand, back at me‖ that the text in isolation lacks. She will ask
questions such as ―Why did the writer condense the two sentences,‖ ―Why does the writer
combine two sentences about different topics,‖ ―How does watching the commercial affect your
reading of the text in contrast to reading the text by itself,‖ and ―Do you think it is wrong to
promote incorrect grammar in commercials?‖ If there is time, the teacher will bring attention to
the play on words and the grammar decisions in the Old Spice quotation from the YouTube link:
―We're not saying this body wash will make your man smell into a romantic millionaire jet
fighter pilot, but we are insinuating it.‖ (5-8 minutes)
Summary: Students will examine how grammar decisions impact the meaning of a text, the
differences in the reception of these decisions in written form versus oral form and in isolation
versus in a context, and how professionals break grammar rules intentionally for a particular
purpose. This lesson intends to make students aware that popular culture, particularly the
advertising industry and commercials, employ ―poor grammar‖ as a strategy to promote products
because of its effects on consumers, and that this strategy may be highly effective depending on
the context of the poor grammar.
Assessment: Students will be assessed by their participation in the whole class discussion and
their contribution to the group work.
Homework: None
Attachments: Handout with text from ―The Man Your Man Could Smell Like‖
Accommodations: Accommodations will be made as necessary. For the visually impaired, the
teacher will provide enlarged text on the handout, an enlarged copy of the sentence ―What‘s in
your hand, back to me.‖ earlier in the lesson, and these students will be allowed to view the
video clip on a computer screen as necessary. ELLs will be paired with native English speakers
who will provide additional assistance and explanations if necessary. If the ELLs have low
proficiency levels, they will annotate and discuss the handout with the teacher during the allotted
time for group work.
Citations:
Admin. (2010). Old Spice—The Man Your Man Could Smell Like. Retrieved from
http://lybio.net/old-spice-the-man-your-man-could-smell-like/commercials/
48
OldSpice. (2010, February 4). The Man Your Man Could Smell Like [Video file]. Retrieved
from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owGykVbfgUE
Text from “The Man Your Man Could Smell Like”
―Hello, ladies, look at your man, now back to me, now back at your man, now back to me. Sadly,
he isn‘t me, but if he stopped using ladies‘ scented body wash and switched to Old Spice, he
could smell like he‘s me. Look down, back up, where are you? You‘re on a boat with the man
your man could smell like. What‘s in your hand, back at me. I have it. It‘s an oyster with two
tickets to that thing you love. Look again, the tickets are now diamonds. Anything is possible
when your man smells like Old Spice and not a lady. I‘m on a horse.‖[Smell like a man, man.
Old Spice]
―We're not saying this body wash will make your man smell into a romantic millionaire jet
fighter pilot, but we are insinuating it.‖ –Old Spice Channel YouTube quotation
49
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