Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide

Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote
Intelligent Remote Site Management Device
Configuration Guide
Version 3.3x
Part Number 65-000086 Rev 2
© 2010 by Kentrox, Inc. All rights reserved.
Copyright © 2010 by Kentrox, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The material discussed in this publication
is the proprietary property of Kentrox, Inc. Kentrox retains all rights to reproduction and
distribution of this publication.
Kentrox is a registered trademark of Kentrox, Inc. Applied Innovation, Applied Innovation Inc., the
AI logo, and other names are the intellectual property of Kentrox. All other product names are
trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
Information published here is current as of this document’s date of publication, but is subject to
change without notice. You may verify product information by contacting our headquarters.
Kentrox is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer.
Kentrox, Inc.
5800 Innovation Dr.
Dublin, Ohio USA 43016-3271
Toll Free: (800) 247-9482
International: +1 (614) 798-2000
Fax: +1 (614) 798-1770
About this Document
This document explains how to install, configure, and operate the Remote intelligent remote site
management device.
Remote system administrators should have a working knowledge of:

Telecommunications networks, TCP/IP networking, including Telnet and FTP

FTP tools

Radius and/or TACACS+

SNMP or TL1

TBOS
Remote script developers should also have a working knowledge of:

The Python script language

XML syntax
i
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
About this Document: Document Conventions
Document Conventions
Table 1 describes the text conventions used in this document.
Table 1 Document Conventions
Convention
Meaning
Screen Text, Menu
Items, System
Prompts, Messages
and Reports
This style indicates Kentrox configuration screen text,
menu items, system prompts, messages, and reports.
Static Command Text
In a command statement, this style indicates text that
should be entered exactly as shown at a command line.
Variable Command
Text
In a command statement, this style indicates
user-specified text.
...
In a command statement, ellipses (...) signify that the
preceding parameter can be repeated a number of
times.
[ ]
In a command statement, square brackets indicate an
optional parameter. Two or more parameters in square
brackets with a vertical bar ( | ) between them indicate a
choice of optional parameters.
[ | ]
ii
{ | }
In a command statement, two or more parameters in
braces with a vertical bar ( | ) between them indicate a
choice of required parameters.
Menus and Menu
Commands
This style indicates menu and menu commands. A right
arrow ( > ) separates the menus from the submenus or
menu commands. The right arrow also indicates the
order in which you should click the menus, submenus,
and menu commands.
Dialog Boxes, Tabs,
Fields, Check Boxes,
and Command Buttons
This style indicates dialog boxes, tabs, fields, check
boxes, and command buttons.
Variable Field Text
This style indicates variable information you type in a
dialog box field.
KEYS
Uppercase body text indicates keys on a keyboard,
such as the TAB or ENTER keys. Keys used in
combination are connected with a plus symbol (+).
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
About this Document: Document Conventions
Table 1 Document Conventions (Continued)
Labels

Note:
Important:
Tip:
This style designates physical components on Kentrox
products such as jumpers, switches, and cable
connectors.
Note messages emphasize or supplement important
points of the main text.
Important messages provide information that is
essential to the completion of a task.
Tip messages provide information that assists users in
operating equipment more effectively.
iii
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
About this Document: Cautions and Warnings
Cautions and Warnings
Electrostatic Discharge Caution
CAUTION: Kentrox equipment and its peripherals contain electrostatic sensitive
components. Proper handling, shipping, and storage precautions must
be exercised:

You must remove and install cards in a static-free environment. Wear
an antistatic wrist strap that is plugged into the Kentrox equipment so
you are grounded at the same point as the equipment.

Do not remove cards from their antistatic plastic bags until you are
ready to install them into the chassis.

Immediately after you remove a card from the chassis, you must
insert it into its antistatic bag.

When the cards are not in use, keep them in their antistatic plastic
bags.

Do not ship or store cards near strong electrostatic, electromagnetic,
or radioactive fields.
Ground Caution
CAUTION: For Kentrox equipment to operate safely and correctly, there must be a
safety ground strap between the equipment ground bolts and the office
ground.
FCC Warning
The Federal Communications Commission has set limits for emitted radio
interference, and Remote is constructed with this electromagnetic interference (EMI)
limitation in mind. Remote is classified under FCC regulations as a Class A device,
that is, a device for use in commercial environments and not in residential areas. This
device has been tested and shown to comply with the following FCC rule: Part 15
Subpart J. Operation of this equipment in a residential area may cause interference to
radio and TV reception, requiring the user to take whatever steps are necessary to
correct the interference.
Information is available from the FCC describing possible corrective actions. To
maintain low EMI levels, we suggest that you use only metal connectors and shielded
cable grounded to the frame.
Specifications are subject to change without notice.
iv
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
About this Document: Customer Assistance
Customer Assistance
All customers, partners, and resellers who have a valid Kentrox Support and Services
Agreement have complete access to the technical support resources.
Kentrox offers technical support from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Eastern time, Monday - Friday.
Before you contact Kentrox for assistance, please have the following information
available:

The version of hardware and software you are currently running

The error number and exact wording of any messages that appeared on your
screen

What happened and what you were doing when the problem occurred

How you tried to solve the problem
Kentrox Online Knowledge Base
The Kentrox Online Knowledge Base provides online documents and tools to help
troubleshoot and resolve technical issues with Kentrox products and technologies.
To access the Kentrox Online Knowledge Base, use this URL:
http://kb.kentrox.com
Email Support
Email support is available. You may send email at any time during the day; however,
responses will be only be provided during normal business hours, in accordance with
your Service and Support Agreement.
To contact Technical Support, send email to:
[email protected]
Telephone Support
Pre-sales support
Available, at no charge, to anyone who needs technical assistance in determining
how Kentrox products or solutions can help solve your technical needs.
Phone number: 800-733-5511, option 2
Hours of Operation: 8 a.m. – 8 p.m. Eastern Time
Post-sales support
Available to qualified Kentrox customers or partners who have not been able to
resolve their technical issue by using our online services. To qualify for support, you
must have a valid Support and Services Agreement.
v
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
About this Document: Customer Assistance
Phone number: 800-733-5511, option 3
Normal Business Hours: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Eastern time
After-Hours Support: Available to qualified customers who are experiencing serviceaffecting outages that cannot wait until the next business day. To qualify for afterhours support, you must have a valid 24x7 Support and Services Agreement. Call the
number above, option 3, and follow the prompts for after-hours service.
Product Documentation
You can also access and view the most current versions of Kentrox product
documentation on our Web site at:
http://www.kentrox.com
vi
Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Remote Product Overview ...................................................1-1
Remote Product Overview ........................................................................................... 1-2
Summary of Remote Functions ........................................................................ 1-3
Remote Features .............................................................................................. 1-3
Remote Hardware Configuration .................................................................................. 1-4
Remote RMM-1200 Overview ...................................................................................... 1-5
Expansion Peripheral Modules .................................................................................... 1-6
Expand-D Expansion Module ........................................................................... 1-6
RME-1000 Expansion Module .......................................................................... 1-7
Product Specification Summary ................................................................................... 1-8
Chapter 2: Getting Started .....................................................................2-1
Accessing the CLI Using a Local Connection .............................................................. 2-2
With Kentrox Kickstart ...................................................................................... 2-2
Without Kentrox Kickstart ................................................................................. 2-3
Setting Up the Initial Remote Configuration ................................................................. 2-5
Accessing the CLI Using a Remote Connection .......................................................... 2-8
Accessing the Web Interface ....................................................................................... 2-9
Chapter 3: Configuring Users in the CLI ................................................3-1
Adding a New User ...................................................................................................... 3-2
Enabling the Strong Password Feature ....................................................................... 3-3
Changing a User Password ......................................................................................... 3-4
Deleting a User ............................................................................................................ 3-5
Creating a Custom Profile ............................................................................................ 3-6
Chapter 4: Saving and Applying Configurations ....................................4-1
Saving the Running Configuration ............................................................................... 4-2
Applying Configuration Fragments to an Existing Configuration File ........................... 4-3
Restoring Factory Defaults ........................................................................................... 4-4
Restoring Basic Network Settings ................................................................................ 4-5
Chapter 5: Configuring Network Setup Parameters ...............................5-1
Configuring the Domain Name, DNS Servers, and IP Forwarding .............................. 5-2
Configuring NTP ........................................................................................................... 5-4
TOC-1
Table of Contents
Configuring System Clock Settings .............................................................................. 5-6
Configuring Default Settings ............................................................................. 5-6
Configuring Custom System Clock Settings ..................................................... 5-7
Configuring a Timezone Definition File ............................................................ 5-8
Configuring RAS Settings .......................................................................................... 5-10
Configuring SNMP ..................................................................................................... 5-12
Chapter 6: Understanding Controllers and Interfaces ............................6-1
Controller Descriptions ................................................................................................. 6-2
Bridge Controllers ............................................................................................. 6-2
Ethernet Controllers ......................................................................................... 6-2
OpenVPN Controllers ....................................................................................... 6-2
Serial Controllers .............................................................................................. 6-3
Interface Descriptions .................................................................................................. 6-4
Bridge Interfaces .............................................................................................. 6-4
Ethernet Interfaces ........................................................................................... 6-4
OpenVPN Interfaces ........................................................................................ 6-4
Serial Interfaces ............................................................................................... 6-5
Chapter 7: Configuring Controllers and Interfaces .................................7-1
T1 and E1 Overview ..................................................................................................... 7-2
Configuring T1/E1 Line Settings .................................................................................. 7-3
Configuring T1/E1 Controller Channel Group Settings ................................................ 7-5
Configuring T1/E1 Line Encapsulation Settings ........................................................... 7-7
Configuring T1/E1 Interface Settings ......................................................................... 7-11
PPPoE Overview ........................................................................................................ 7-12
Configuring PPPoE Encapsulation Settings ............................................................... 7-13
Port VLAN Overview .................................................................................................. 7-15
Application ...................................................................................................... 7-15
Port Modes ..................................................................................................... 7-15
Port Capabilities ............................................................................................. 7-16
Configuring a Port VLAN ............................................................................................ 7-17
Chapter 8: Configuring the Bridge Group ...............................................8-1
Overview ...................................................................................................................... 8-2
Configuring Controllers for Bridging ............................................................................. 8-3
Configuring STP on the Bridge Group ......................................................................... 8-5
Chapter 9: Configuring Static Routes .....................................................9-1
Adding a Static Route to the IP Routing Table ............................................................. 9-2
Adding the Default Static Route to the IP Routing Table ............................................. 9-3
TOC-2
Table of Contents
Chapter 10: Configuring a Wireless Network with Remote .................. 10-1
Getting Started ........................................................................................................... 10-2
Wireless Network Overview ........................................................................... 10-2
Required Components ................................................................................... 10-2
Initial Setup ..................................................................................................... 10-3
Sample Configuration ................................................................................................. 10-4
Configuring the Wireless Modem ............................................................................... 10-5
Configuring the VPN .................................................................................................. 10-8
Chapter 11: Configuring Actions, Events, and Responses .................. 11-1
Overview .................................................................................................................... 11-2
Event Components ..................................................................................................... 11-3
Response Components .............................................................................................. 11-4
Action Components .................................................................................................... 11-5
Configuring an Event, Response, and Action ............................................................ 11-6
Chapter 12: Configuring Technician Laptop Access for Remote ......... 12-1
Configuration Overview .............................................................................................. 12-2
Assigning IP Addresses to Technician Laptops ......................................................... 12-4
Configuring IPTables for Network Address Translation ............................................. 12-6
Chapter 13: Configuring Event Correlations ........................................ 13-1
Overview .................................................................................................................... 13-2
Event Correlation Components ...................................................................... 13-2
Correlation Expression Components ......................................................................... 13-3
Originator Types and States ........................................................................... 13-3
Operators ....................................................................................................... 13-4
Expression Evaluation .................................................................................... 13-4
Configuring a Time Period (Optional) ............................................................. 13-5
Configuring an Event Correlation ............................................................................... 13-6
Chapter 14: Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table ...... 14-1
Overview .................................................................................................................... 14-2
Alarm Protocol Formats ............................................................................................. 14-3
Raw ................................................................................................................ 14-3
SNMP ............................................................................................................. 14-3
TL1 ................................................................................................................. 14-3
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Temperature Sensor .............................................. 14-4
Configuring Analog Input Values .................................................................... 14-6
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Discrete Input ......................................................... 14-8
TOC-3
Table of Contents
Configuring an Alarm Entry for Ethernet Interface MAC Security Violations ............ 14-10
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Serial Connection Failure .................................... 14-12
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Power Supply Failure ........................................... 14-14
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a TCP Connection that Goes Down ........................ 14-16
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Telnet Connection that Comes Up ....................... 14-18
Testing Alarm Table Configurations ......................................................................... 14-20
Chapter 15: Configuring Measurements and the Measurement Table 15-1
Overview .................................................................................................................... 15-2
Use with Alarm Table Entries ......................................................................... 15-3
Use with Event Correlations ........................................................................... 15-3
Use with Proxied SNMP NEs ......................................................................... 15-3
Configuring a Measurement Table Entry for a Temperature Sensor ......................... 15-4
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Measurement ......................................................... 15-6
Configuring an Event Correlation for a Measurement ................................................ 15-9
Chapter 16: Configuring Mediation Connections ................................. 16-1
Overview .................................................................................................................... 16-2
Secure Terminal Server Access ................................................................................. 16-3
Terminal Server User Access ......................................................................... 16-4
TACACS+ Configuration ................................................................................ 16-4
Configuring a TCP to Asynchronous Serial Connection ............................................ 16-5
Configuring a Telnet to Asynchronous Serial Connection .......................................... 16-7
Configuring a SSH to Asynchronous Serial Connection ............................................ 16-9
Configuring an Asynchronous Serial to Asynchronous Serial Connection ............... 16-11
Configuring an Asynchronous Serial to TCP Connection ........................................ 16-14
Chapter 17: Configuring and Connecting TL1 Infrastructure ................ 17-1
Overview .................................................................................................................... 17-2
Configuring a TL1 Multiplexer .................................................................................... 17-3
Configuring a Virtual TL1 NE ..................................................................................... 17-4
Configuring the TCP Port for a TL1 Multiplexer ......................................................... 17-5
Configuring a Telnet Connection to a TL1 Multiplexer ............................................... 17-7
Configuring a Telnet Connection to a Virtual TL1 NE ................................................ 17-8
Chapter 18: Configuring DHCP ............................................................ 18-1
DHCP Server Overview ............................................................................................. 18-2
Configuring a DHCP Server ....................................................................................... 18-4
Configuring a DHCP Server Subnet ........................................................................... 18-6
Configuring a Host on a DHCP Server ....................................................................... 18-8
Configuring BOOTP/DHCP Relay .............................................................................. 18-9
Configuring DHCP Client Support ............................................................................ 18-10
TOC-4
Table of Contents
Chapter 19: Configuring Relay Outputs ............................................... 19-1
Overview .................................................................................................................... 19-2
Configuring the Mediation TL1 Command ................................................................. 19-3
Configuring TL1 Commands to Control a Relay Output ............................................. 19-5
Configuring SNMP to Operate a Relay Output .......................................................... 19-7
Directly Controlling a Relay Output ............................................................................ 19-9
Chapter 20: Configuring TBOS Settings .............................................. 20-1
Overview .................................................................................................................... 20-2
TBOS Alarm/Status Point Management ......................................................... 20-2
TBOS Control Point Management .................................................................. 20-2
TBOS Definition File Support ......................................................................... 20-3
Central Alarm Table Support .......................................................................... 20-4
Cut-Through Support ...................................................................................... 20-4
AID and TL1 NE Support ................................................................................ 20-5
Loading a TBOS Definition File .................................................................................. 20-6
Configuring TBOS Polling Settings ............................................................................ 20-7
Configuring an Equipment Type for a TBOS Display ................................................. 20-9
Configuring the TBOS “Points All” Method ............................................................... 20-12
Manually Configuring TBOS Display Points ............................................................. 20-13
Configuring Cut-Through Support ............................................................................ 20-15
Configuring a TBOS Control Response with an Event ............................................. 20-16
Chapter 21: Configuring the SNMP Proxy ............................................ 21-1
SNMP Proxy Feature Overview ................................................................................. 21-2
SNMP Proxy Configuration Information ..................................................................... 21-3
SNMP Templates ........................................................................................... 21-3
SNMP NE ....................................................................................................... 21-4
SNMP Manager .............................................................................................. 21-4
Configuring a Mediation SNMP Event Template ........................................................ 21-5
Configuring a Mediation SNMP Point Template ......................................................... 21-6
Configuring a Mediation SNMP NE Template ............................................................ 21-9
Configuring a Mediation SNMP Measurement Template ......................................... 21-11
Configuring a Mediation SNMP Network Element ................................................... 21-14
Configuration Results ............................................................................................... 21-16
Chapter 22: Configuring Jobs .............................................................. 22-1
Job Configuration Overview ....................................................................................... 22-2
Script Package Components .......................................................................... 22-2
Configuring Access to a Central FTP Package Server .............................................. 22-4
Creating and Installing a Script Package ................................................................... 22-5
TOC-5
Table of Contents
Configuring a Job with a Script Package and Script .................................................. 22-7
Configuring a Job with a Job Property ....................................................................... 22-8
Configuring a Job with a Job Task ........................................................................... 22-10
Configuring Job Start Times ..................................................................................... 22-12
Configuring Dynamic Memory for a Job ................................................................... 22-13
Chapter 23: Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem ....... 23-1
Peripheral Management Subsystem Overview .......................................................... 23-2
Expand-D Expansion Unit .............................................................................. 23-2
RME-1000 Unit ............................................................................................... 23-3
RME-S8 .......................................................................................................... 23-4
RME-B64 ........................................................................................................ 23-4
RME-E8 .......................................................................................................... 23-5
Expansion Unit Configurations ................................................................................... 23-6
Expansion Peripheral Unit Discovery ......................................................................... 23-7
Expansion Peripheral States ...................................................................................... 23-8
Configuring Remote to Manage an Expansion Peripheral ....................................... 23-10
Configuring Discrete I/O Points on an Expansion Peripheral ................................... 23-12
Configuring Alarms for an Expansion Peripheral ..................................................... 23-14
Configuring a Serial Controller on an Expansion Peripheral .................................... 23-16
Disconnecting a Managed Expansion Peripheral .................................................... 23-17
Chapter 24: Using Configuration Wizards ............................................ 24-1
Configuration Wizard Overview .................................................................................. 24-2
Using the initsetup Wizard ......................................................................................... 24-3
Using the bistate-alarms Wizard ................................................................................ 24-7
Using the serial-port Wizard ....................................................................................... 24-9
Chapter 25: Drop and Continue Functionality ...................................... 25-1
Description ................................................................................................................. 25-2
Functional Specifications ........................................................................................... 25-3
Alarm Behavior ............................................................................................... 25-3
Configuration .................................................................................................. 25-4
Failover ...................................................................................................................... 25-5
Chapter 26: Remote TL1 Commands .................................................. 26-1
Overview .................................................................................................................... 26-2
Default TL1 VNE Commands ..................................................................................... 26-3
ACT-USER ..................................................................................................... 26-3
ALW-MSG-ALL ............................................................................................... 26-5
CANC-USER .................................................................................................. 26-6
RTRV-ALM-ALL ............................................................................................. 26-7
TOC-6
Table of Contents
RTRV-ALM-DS3 ............................................................................................. 26-8
RTRV-ALM-EC1 ............................................................................................. 26-9
RTRV-ALM-ENV .......................................................................................... 26-10
RTRV-ALM-EQPT ........................................................................................ 26-11
RTRV-ALM-OC3 .......................................................................................... 26-12
RTRV-ALM-T1 .............................................................................................. 26-13
RTRV-HDR ................................................................................................... 26-14
Unsupported TL1 Commands .................................................................................. 26-15
Appendix A: Backing Up and Restoring the Remote Configuration ...... A-1
Backing Up the Configuration ......................................................................................A-2
Restoring the Configuration .........................................................................................A-3
Appendix B: WAN Port Availability ........................................................ B-1
WAN Port Types ..........................................................................................................B-2
WAN Port Availability ...................................................................................................B-3
Appendix C: Command Identifications .................................................. C-1
Glossary .......................................................................................Glossary-1
TOC-7
Table of Contents
TOC-8
1
Remote Product Overview
This chapter provides a high level overview of Remote and Remote RMM-1200 features,
functionality, architecture, and associated peripherals.
Guide to this Chapter
Remote Product Overview
Remote Hardware Configuration
Remote RMM-1200 Overview
Expansion Peripheral Modules
Product Specification Summary
1-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote Product Overview: Remote Product Overview
Remote Product Overview
The Remote product family includes Remote, Remote RMX-3200, Remote RMM1400, and Remote RMM-1200 (previously known as Remote Mini). Both Remote and
Remote RMX-3200 consist of several models that provide various features, as well as
a number of peripheral units that provide additional functionality. In general, the
Remote products are monitoring and control devices that provide IP management
connectivity to remote sites, including environmentally hardened locations.
An integral part of the Kentrox Optima Site Manager solution, the Remote products
reside at your network’s remote locations and connect to each element via a wide
variety of interface options. The Remote products perform protocol mediation and
interface conversion, collect alarms and monitoring data, and support bi-directional
management control with the Optima Management Portal via Ethernet, T1/E1, or
wireless communication options. Together, Remote and the Optima Management
Portal provide detailed monitoring, remote control, and management for virtually all
remote site devices. Figure 1-1 depicts the Remote and Optima Management Portal
functionality.
Figure 1-1 Remote and Optima Integration for Remote Site Management
1-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote Product Overview: Remote Product Overview
Summary of Remote Functions
Remote functions include:

WAN options to extend your management network

Compatibility with Optima Management Portal or any standard SNMP-based
management system

Intelligent connectivity to remote network elements

Powerful event-response subsystem

Custom application extension support

Security and network access control
Remote Features
Remote provides the following features:

Telnet to asynchronous craft and alarm ports

Discrete and analog input alarm mediation and reporting

Operations Support Systems (OSS) to relay output mediation

Aggregation of performance data

Mediation between OSS equipment and network elements

Scripts designed for performing corrective actions on monitored equipment
For smaller locations with space constraints and fewer interface requirements,
Kentrox provides the Remote RMM-1200. See Figure 1-3 on page 1-5.
1-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote Product Overview: Remote Hardware Configuration
Remote Hardware Configuration
Remote has the following connectors as shown in Figure 1-2 and described below:

Factory-modular WAN options (T1/E1 single, dual, fiber, or wireless)

Six 10/100 Ethernet switch interfaces

RS232 console interface

Six asynchronous serial interfaces (RS232/RS422)

Two Alarm I/O (Telco 50) connectors, which provide an interface to alarm inputs
and outputs

Dual Input Power (+24VDC or -48VDC) and grounding
Console Interface
T1/E1 T1/E1
Ethernet
Serial 7 Serial 8 Switch
Async Serial
Ports
Alarm I/O Connectors
Input Power
Figure 1-2 Remote Front Panel
Remote can be configured with various optional interfaces. The numbering scheme of
the various interfaces is dependent on the options purchased.
1-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote Product Overview: Remote RMM-1200 Overview
Remote RMM-1200 Overview
The Remote RMM-1200, which provides functionality similar to the Remote, can be
used in locations further from a central office and with limited space. The Remote
RMM-1200 operates at low power levels, allowing it to be used at sites that have only
solar and/or battery power available.
Figure 1-3 Remote RMM-1200 Front Panel
For additional Remote RMM-1200 configuration information, refer to Table 1-1 on
page 1-8.
1-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote Product Overview: Expansion Peripheral Modules
Expansion Peripheral Modules
Remote and Remote RMM-1200 can support up to 12 expansion modules (four
shelves). Expansion modules provide additional alarm and port capacity, which are
managed through Remote or Remote RMM-1200.
This section provides a high level view of these two modules. Details on configuring
the peripherals are covered in Chapter 23: Configuring the Peripheral Management
Subsystem.
Expand-D Expansion Module
The Remote Discrete Expansion Peripheral (DEP) module, known as the Expand-D,
is a fixed 88 I/O port expansion shelf, which provides the following:

64 digital inputs

16 analog inputs

8 digital outputs
These additional I/O points are managed through Remote. The Expand-D connects to
Remote via Ethernet. The module has no intelligence; it is configured and controlled
from the host Remote.
Figure 1-4 For details on the Expand-D expansion module, see Expand-D Expansion
Unit on page 23-2.
Figure 1-4 Expand-D Expansion Module
1-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote Product Overview: Expansion Peripheral Modules
RME-1000 Expansion Module
The RME-1000 expansion module provides three expansion slots to accommodate
the following plug-in expansion peripherals:

RME-S8 module provides eight asynchronous serial ports

RME-B64 module provides 80 I/O ports

RME-E8 module provides eight Ethernet ports
For details on RME-1000 and the individual plug-in peripherals, see Chapter 23:
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem.

Note: The RME-B64 replaces the Expand-FDCI; however, Kentrox will continue to
support the FDCI peripheral.
S8 Peripheral
B64 Peripheral
Available Slot
Figure 1-5 RME-1000 Chassis with RME-S8 and RME-B64 Peripherals
1-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote Product Overview: Product Specification Summary
Product Specification Summary
Table 1-1 summarizes the number and types of ports, outputs, and inputs for the
Remote, Remote RMM-1200, and expansion modules.

Note: For information about the Remote RMX-3200 and Remote RMM-1400, see
the Remote RMX-3200 Configuration Guide and Remote RMM-1400
Configuration Guide.
Table 1-1 Product Specifications Summary
Product
Async
Ports
Console
Ports
Ethernet
Ports
Discrete
Outputs
Control
Outputs
Analog
Inputs
Remote
6
1
6
26
16
6
Remote
RMM-1200
3
1
2
10
8
6
Expand-D*
--
--
--
64
8
16
RME-B64**
--
--
--
64
4
12
RME-S8**
8
--
--
--
--
--
RME-E8**
--
--
8
--
--
--
* Requires host Remote, Remote RMM-1200, Remote RMM-1400, or Remote RMX3200
**Requires host Remote, Remote RMM-1200, Remote RMM-1400, or Remote RMX3200. Requires RME-1000 chassis when not installed into expansion slot on Remote
RMX-3200.
1-8
2
Getting Started
This chapter provides information on getting started with Remote. It includes step-by-step
scenarios on how to access the CLI, set up the initial configuration, and access the Web
interface.
Guide to this Chapter
Accessing the CLI Using a Local Connection
Setting Up the Initial Remote Configuration
Accessing the CLI Using a Remote Connection
Accessing the Web Interface
2-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Getting Started: Accessing the CLI Using a Local Connection
Accessing the CLI Using a Local Connection
In this scenario, you will:

Connect and log into Remote locally through the console port

(optional) Access help information

Note: When a new Remote is booted for the first time, it does not have a
configured IP address. As a result, the initial configuration for Remote must
be performed onsite using the console port. For information about
configuring an IP address for remote logins, refer to Setting Up the Initial
Remote Configuration on page 2-5.
With Kentrox Kickstart
To access the CLI using a local connection (using Kickstart):
1. If you haven’t already done so, install Kentrox Redirect software on your laptop or
PC. When the installation is complete, Kentrox Redirect and Kentrox Kickstart
icons appear on your desktop.
2. Use a standard CAT5 Ethernet cable (such as Kentrox part number CAB182-10)
to connect the PC or laptop to an Ethernet port on Remote.
3. Launch Kentrox Kickstart. Kickstart discovers the Remote device, as shown
below (RMM-1400 shown - Remote is similar).

Note: If the Remote device is not discovered within one minute, select Help >
About in Kentrox Kickstart, then click the Network Troubleshooting
Guide link for instructions.
4. Click Telnet Terminal (or select Tools > Telnet Terminal). A Telnet window
opens, displaying the Remote login prompt.
2-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Getting Started: Accessing the CLI Using a Local Connection
5. At the login prompt, enter your user name:
admin
6. At the password prompt, enter your password:
password

Notes: Passwords are case-sensitive.

admin is the default user name and password is the default password.
Remote allows you to log in only five times using the default password.
On your sixth login, Remote will prompt you to change the default
password to a new password.
The main CLI prompt appears.
_
__
| | / /
| |/ /
|
(
| |\ \
|_| \_\
_____ _
_ _______ _____
____ __
__
| ___|| \ | ||___ ___|| _ \ /
\ \ \ / /
| |___ | \ \| |
| |
| (_) || -- | \ \/ /
| ___|| |\ \ |
| |
| _ / | ( ) | ) (
| |___ | | \ |
| |
| | \ \ | -- | / /\ \
|_____||_| \_|
|_|
|_| \_\ \____/ /_/ \_\
Remote
login: admin
Password:
You have 4 grace logins remaining using the default user password.
(Kentrox)>
7. (optional) Access help information:
help
or
?

Note: For more information on using the CLI, refer to section “CLI Overview” in the
Remote Command Reference Guide.
Without Kentrox Kickstart
To access the CLI using a local connection (without Kickstart):
1. Use a PC or laptop with terminal emulation software such as HyperTerminal or
Procomm to connect to Remote. For information on operating your particular
terminal emulation software, refer to the documentation provided with the
program.
2. Set up your terminal emulation software to connect using COM port 1 (COM1).
2-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Getting Started: Accessing the CLI Using a Local Connection
3. Configure COM port 1 with the following parameters:

Bits per second: 9600

Data bits: 8

Parity: None

Stop bits: 1

Flow control: None
4. From within your terminal emulation software, press ENTER to request a login
prompt.
5. At the login prompt, enter your user name:
admin
6. At the password prompt, enter your password:
password

Notes: Passwords are case-sensitive.


Remote allows you to log in only five times using the default password.
On your sixth login, Remote will prompt you to change the default
password to a new password.
The default user name is admin and the default password is password.
The main CLI prompt appears.
_
__
| | / /
| |/ /
|
(
| |\ \
|_| \_\
_____ _
_ _______ _____
____ __
__
| ___|| \ | ||___ ___|| _ \ /
\ \ \ / /
| |___ | \ \| |
| |
| (_) || -- | \ \/ /
| ___|| |\ \ |
| |
| _ / | ( ) | ) (
| |___ | | \ |
| |
| | \ \ | -- | / /\ \
|_____||_| \_|
|_|
|_| \_\ \____/ /_/ \_\
Remote
login: admin
Password:
You have 4 grace logins remaining using the default user password.
(Dub)>
7. (optional) Access help information:
help
or
?

Note: For more information on using the CLI, refer to section “CLI Overview” in the
Remote Command Reference Guide.
2-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Getting Started: Setting Up the Initial Remote Configuration
Setting Up the Initial Remote Configuration
In this scenario, you will:

Configure a new user with a supervisor profile

Configure the login banner

Configure a CLI session timeout

Configure a hostname

Configure an IP address for remote logins

Configure a default route (gateway)

Configure the remote access protocol to accept Telnet and FTP connections
To set up the initial Remote configuration:
1. At the main prompt, add user janedoe and assign the supervisor profile:
config users add janedoe supervisor
2. At the password prompt, enter the password mypassword. For security purposes,
the characters that you enter do not display, but appear as asterisks as shown
below:
**********
3. When prompted to confirm, re-enter the password. Again, the characters that you
enter appear as asterisks:
**********
4. Configure a banner with # as the delimiting character:
config banner #
The following message appears:
Enter the banner text.
End the banner with a # character.
5. Configure the banner with display text This is my banner and the current date
and time:
This is my banner.
\d
\t
#
The prompt re-appears.
2-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Getting Started: Setting Up the Initial Remote Configuration
6. Configure the CLI session timeout as 20 minutes:
config timeout 20
7. Configure the host name as Dub:
config hostname Dub
8. Configure IP address 10.40.57.90 and subnet mask 255.255.0.0:
config interface bridge switch ip address 10.40.57.90 255.255.0.0

Note: The bridge switch interface routes IP packets to the switched Ethernet
ports. You must assign an IP address to allow remote access to Remote.
This IP address is the primary Remote IP address.
9. Add a default route with gateway address 10.40.0.1:
config ip route default 10.40.0.1
10. Configure the remote access protocol as telnet-ftp.
config remote-access telnet-ftp enable

Note: Additional remote access protocols supported include SSH-SFTP, HTTP,
and HTTPS. Refer to the remote access configuration commands in the
Remote Command Reference Guide for more information.
11. (optional) Verify that the user environment has been set up properly:
running-config
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>running-config
# Product: Remote
# Version: 3.30
# Created: 2010-11-01,14:52:35.0,-0500
# User:
janedoe
# Stage2 Version: 3.30
config banner #
This is my banner.
\d
\t
#
config hostname Dub
config ip route default 10.40.0.1
config timeout 20
config users add janedoe supervisor -e$1$KwadE3g5$OzZeYQxk1CqLoyvm8/5pU. -e$1$Kw
adE3g5$OzZeYQxk1CqLoyvm8/5pU.
config interface bridge switch ip address 10.40.57.90/16
(Dub)>
2-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Getting Started: Setting Up the Initial Remote Configuration

Notes: The preceding example was obtained using a supervisor profile, which
displays the entire configuration; users with management and status
profiles can view limited configuration data.

The -e preceding the encrypted text indicates that the password and
password confirmation have been encrypted.
12. Save the configuration. (Refer to Saving the Running Configuration on page 4-2.)
2-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Getting Started: Accessing the CLI Using a Remote Connection
Accessing the CLI Using a Remote Connection
In this scenario, you will connect and log into Remote remotely using either a Telnet
or an SSH connection.

Note: You can also connect remotely to Remote using the HTTP or HTTPS
protocols.
To access the CLI using a remote connection:
1. Use a PC or laptop with terminal emulation software to connect to Remote. For
information on operating your particular terminal emulation software, refer to the
documentation provided with the program.
2. Set up your terminal emulation software to connect using either a Telnet or an
SSH connection.

Notes: Individual procedures for making this connection will vary based on the
type of software you are using.

To log into Remote via SSH, you must execute command
config remote-access ssh-sftp enable
3. Enter the IP address of the Remote to which you want to connect.
4. At the login prompt, enter your user name:
janedoe
5. At the password prompt, enter your password:
mypassword

Notes: Passwords are case-sensitive.

2-8
Remote lets you log in only five times using the default password. On
your sixth login, Remote will prompt you to change the default password
to a new password.
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Getting Started: Accessing the Web Interface
Accessing the Web Interface
From the Remote Web interface, you can perform the following functions:

Enable/disable alarm test mode

Save, restore or erase system configuration

View the system log

Manage jobs, packages and scripts

Display system information, including version number
Before you can access the Remote Web interface you must:

Enable the remote access protocol (either HTTP or HTTPS).

Configure the IP address. For more information, refer to Setting Up the Initial
Remote Configuration on page 2-5.
Important: If using the HTTPS protocol and accessing the Web interface for the first
time, an error page will display indicating that there is a problem with the
website's security certificate. Click Continue to this website to accept
the security certificate and continue with the acceptance options as
prompted.
In this scenario, you will:

Enable the remote access protocol (either HTTP or HTTPS).

Open a Web browser and access Remote using a specific IP address.
To access the Remote Web interface:
1. At the main prompt, enable the remote access protocol as http:
config remote-access http enable
2. Open a Web browser.
3. In the URL address field, enter the Remote IP address:
http://10.40.57.233
The login window appears.
4. Enter your user name:
janedoe
5. Enter your password:
mypassword
The Remote Web interface opens to the Home page as shown in Figure 2-1.
2-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Getting Started: Accessing the Web Interface
6. To display the system information, click the System button on the left side of the
screen, or click the System Info link.
Figure 2-1 Remote Web Interface Home Page
2-10
3
Configuring Users in the CLI
This chapter provides step-by-step scenarios on how to configure users.
Guide to this Chapter
Adding a New User
Enabling the Strong Password Feature
Changing a User Password
Deleting a User
Creating a Custom Profile
3-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Users in the CLI: Adding a New User
Adding a New User
In this scenario, you will add a new user.
To add a new user:
1. At the main prompt, add a new user with user name johndoe and assign profile
status:
config users add johndoe status
2. At the password prompt, enter the new password. For security purposes, the
characters that you enter do not display, but appear as asterisks:
**********
3. When prompted to confirm, re-enter the password. Again, the characters that you
enter appear as asterisks:
**********

Notes: User names and passwords are case-sensitive.

Available profiles are status, management, supervisor, and
restricted. For more information on these, refer to the Remote
Command Reference Guide.
4. (optional) Verify that the new user has been added properly:
show users
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show users
Login Name
1.
janedoe
2.
johndoe
3.
test
(Dub)>
5. Save the configuration.
3-2
Profile
supervisor
status
supervisor
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Users in the CLI: Enabling the Strong Password Feature
Enabling the Strong Password Feature
The strong password is an optional security feature that enforces additional
validations on new or changed user passwords. The password validations apply to
passwords entered for local users only. RAS users will use rules enforced by the
Radius or TACACS+ server.
The strong password feature is disabled by default.
In this scenario, you will:

Enable the strong password feature.

Change an existing user password.
To enable the strong password feature:
1. At the main prompt, enable the strong password:
config users strong-password enable
2. (optional) Verify that the strong-password feature is enabled:
show users
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show users
Strong Password Support: enabled
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
(Dub)>
Login Name
bob
ebh
jeff
tech
test
Profile
restricted
restricted
status
management
supervisor
3. Change the existing password for user ebh. The following example shows the
additional restrictions of the strong password feature.
(Dub)>config users password ebh
Please enter the new password. ********
Please confirm the new password. ********
[ATHM0029] Password must contain at least one character from three of the
following types: upper-case, lower-case, numerical, and special
punctuation.
(Dub)>config users password ebh
Please enter the new password. *********
Please confirm the new password. *********
(Dub)>
3-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Users in the CLI: Changing a User Password
Changing a User Password
In this scenario, you will change the password for an existing user.
To change a user password:
1. At the main prompt, change the password for user johndoe to oldguy:
config users password johndoe
The following message appears:
Please enter the new password.
2. Enter the new password:
oldguy

Note: Passwords are case-sensitive and appear as asterisks (*) on the screen
as you type them.
The following message appears:
Please confirm the new password.
3. Re-enter the new password.
oldguy

Note: Passwords always appear in an encrypted format within the system.
There is no way to verify that the user password has been changed.
4. Save the configuration.
3-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Users in the CLI: Deleting a User
Deleting a User
In this scenario, you will delete a user.
To delete a user:
1. At the main prompt, delete user johndoe:
config users delete johndoe
2. (optional) Verify that the user has been deleted properly:
show users
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show users
Login Name
1.
janedoe
2.
test
(Dub)>
Profile
supervisor
supervisor

Note: If the user has been deleted, it will no longer appear in the list of users.
3. Save the configuration.
3-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Users in the CLI: Creating a Custom Profile
Creating a Custom Profile
In this scenario, you will:
 Create a custom user profile to include and exclude specific command sets
(IDs) for that profile.

Add a user to the newly created custom profile.
To configure a custom profile:
1. At the main prompt, configure a new profile with the name tech and privilege level
5 (status):
config profile tech priv-lvl 5
2. Configure the base type for the new tech profile as status:
config profile tech copy status
3. Include the command sets /config/controller/eth (config controller ethernet)
and /config/interface/eth (config interface ethernet) in the tech profile:
config profile tech include /config/controller/eth
config profile tech include /config/interface/eth

Note: For a list of valid command identifications, see Appendix C: Command
Identifications.
4. Exclude the command set /show/resource-tracking from the tech profile:
config profile tech exclude /show/resource-tracking
5. Add user ebh to the newly created tech profile with password technician.
config users add ebh tech technician technician
6. (optional) Verify that the custom profile has been configured properly:
show profile tech
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show profile
Name:
Base Type:
Privilege Level:
tech
tech
status
5
Command ID
/config/controller/eth
/config/interface/eth
/show/resource-tracking
(Dub)>
7. (Optional) Save the configuration.
3-6
Action
include
include
exclude
4
Saving and Applying
Configurations
This chapter provides information on saving and applying configurations.
Guide to this Chapter
Saving the Running Configuration
Applying Configuration Fragments to an Existing Configuration File
Restoring Factory Defaults
Restoring Basic Network Settings
4-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Saving and Applying Configurations: Saving the Running Configuration
Saving the Running Configuration
In this scenario, you will save the running configuration.

Note: You should save the configuration each time you make a change that you
want to keep. If you reset Remote without first saving the configuration, any
unsaved changes will be lost.
To save the configuration, copy the running configuration to the startup configuration:
copy running-config startup-config
You can also save the running configuration from the Remote Web interface as
follows:
1. Click the Configuration button on the left side of the screen or Configuration
from the Main Menu.
2. In the Save section of the screen, click one of the three options and make the
appropriate selection or entry as required.
3. Click the Save link. The screen refreshes and confirms your selection.
See Accessing the Web Interface on page 2-9 for details.
4-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Saving and Applying Configurations: Applying Configuration Fragments to an Existing Configuration File
Applying Configuration Fragments to an Existing
Configuration File
In this scenario, you will apply a configuration fragment (patch file) to an existing
configuration file. This feature lets you apply a group of configuration commands
without individually entering each one in the CLI.
Patch files are transferred to their own directory on Remote (/config/patches)
with an FTP utility. Once a patch file is in this directory, the user can show, copy, or
erase it using the existing CLI commands.

Note: Patches are separated into supervisor and non-supervisor groups. A user
with a supervisor profile can read, upload, and apply supervisor patches
only. Non-supervisor users have a separate set of patches to read, upload,
and apply. Remote checks user permissions to ensure appropriate
safeguards for uploading and applying all patch files.
Important: Before you begin this procedure, you must obtain or create a
configuration patch file with a .pat extension. Files without this
extension cannot be saved in the patch file directory. The patch file
cannot have the same name as any configuration file already loaded on
Remote.
To apply a configuration fragment to an existing configuration file:
1. Using an FTP utility, transfer the patch file (patch1.pat) to Remote directory
/config/patches.
2. At the CLI prompt, apply patch file patch1 to file running-config:
config apply-patch patch1 running-config
The individual command lines are displayed as the patch file is applied:
(Dub)>config apply-patch patch1 running-config
config users add manager1 manage test test
config no timeout
config ntp disable
config clock daylight-savings DST
(Dub)>
4-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Saving and Applying Configurations: Restoring Factory Defaults
Restoring Factory Defaults
In this scenario, you will restore Remote’s factory default settings.
Important: When you copy the factory configuration to the running configuration, all
configured settings are removed. You need a console port connection to
re-establish communications with Remote.
To restore the factory default settings, copy the factory configuration to the running
configuration:
copy factory-config running-config
4-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Saving and Applying Configurations: Restoring Basic Network Settings
Restoring Basic Network Settings
In this scenario, you will restore Remote’s basic network settings. These settings
are entered in the initsetup wizard. The running-config file is now automatically
saved to a network-recovery file when the you run the initsetup wizard and apply
the output to the running-config file. If the running configuration is lost, users can
save file network-recovery to file running-config to restore the initial system
configuration.

Note: For more information on the initsetup wizard, refer to Using the initsetup
Wizard on page 24-3.
To restore the basic network settings, copy the network recovery file to the running
configuration:
copy network-recovery running-config
You can also restore the network settings from the Remote Web interface as follows:
1. Click the Configuration button on the left side of the screen or Configuration
from the Main Menu.
2. In the Restore section of the screen, click From backup file:, then select
network-recovery from the drop-down menu.
3. Click the Restore link. The screen refreshes and confirms your selection.
See Accessing the Web Interface on page 2-9 for details.
4-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Saving and Applying Configurations: Restoring Basic Network Settings
4-6
5
Configuring Network Setup
Parameters
This chapter provides step-by-step scenarios on how to configure network setup parameters for
Remote.
Guide to this Chapter
Configuring the Domain Name, DNS Servers, and IP Forwarding
Configuring NTP
Configuring System Clock Settings
Configuring Custom System Clock Settings
Configuring a Timezone Definition File
Configuring RAS Settings
Configuring SNMP
5-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Network Setup Parameters: Configuring the Domain Name, DNS Servers, and IP
Forwarding
Configuring the Domain Name, DNS Servers, and IP
Forwarding
In this scenario, you will:

Configure a domain name

Configure a primary and secondary DNS server

Enable IP forwarding
To configure the IP settings:
1. At the main prompt, configure domain name www.kentrox.com:
config ip domain-name www.Kentrox.com
2. Configure the primary DNS server with IP address 10.25.2.5:
config ip name-server 10.25.2.5
3. Configure the secondary DNS server with IP address 10.25.2.20:
config ip name-server 10.25.2.20
4. Enable IP forwarding:
config ip forward
5. (optional) Verify that the IP settings have been configured properly:
running-config
5-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Network Setup Parameters: Configuring the Domain Name, DNS Servers, and IP
Forwarding
The command response appears similar to the following display:
(Dub)>running-config
# Product: Remote
# Version: 3.30
# Created: 2010-11-01,14:52:35.0,-0500
# User:
test
# Stage2 Version: 3.30
config banner #
This is my banner.
\d
\t
#
config hostname Dub
config ip domain-name www.Kentrox.com
config ip forward
config ip name-server 10.25.2.5
config ip name-server 10.25.2.20
config ip route default 10.40.0.1
config timeout 20
config users add janedoe supervisor -e$1$KwadE3g5$OzZeYQxk1CqLoyvm8/5pU. -e$1$Kw
adE3g5$OzZeYQxk1CqLoyvm8/5pU.
config interface bridge switch ip address 10.40.57.90/16
(Dub)>
Tip: You can also use the show ip domain-name, show ip forward, and show
ip name-server commands to verify the individual IP configurations.
6. Save the configuration.
5-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Network Setup Parameters: Configuring NTP
Configuring NTP
In this scenario, you will:

Configure a primary and secondary NTP server

Configure a minimum and maximum NTP polling interval

Enable NTP
To configure system clock parameters using the common clock time maintained by
the Remote NTP server:
1. At the main prompt, configure the preferred NTP server with IP address
10.50.18.32:
config ntp server 10.50.18.32
Tip: The first server configured becomes the preferred server and the second
server configured becomes the secondary server, unless indicated
otherwise by entering prefer as in step 2.
2. Configure the second NTP server with IP address 10.50.18.33 and set it as the
preferred server:
config ntp server 10.50.18.33 prefer
3. Define the minimum NTP polling interval as 7 (128 seconds) and maximum NTP
polling interval as 12 (4096 seconds):
config ntp poll-interval 7 12
Tip: The value for the interval is 2 raised to the power of the value entered.
4. Enable NTP on Remote:
config ntp enable
5-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Network Setup Parameters: Configuring NTP
5. (optional) Verify that the clock parameters have been configured properly:
running-config
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>running-config
# Product: Remote
# Version: 3.30
# Created: 2010-11-01,14:52:35.0,-0500
# User:
janedoe
# Stage2 Version: 3.30
config banner #
This is my banner.
\d
\t
#
config hostname Dub
config ip domain-name www.Kentrox.com
config ip forward
config ip name-server 10.25.2.5
config ip name-server 10.25.2.20
config ip route default 10.40.0.1
config ntp enable
config ntp poll-interval 7 12
config ntp server 10.50.18.33 prefer
config ntp server 10.50.18.32
config timeout 20
config users add janedoe supervisor -e$1$KwadE3g5$OzZeYQxk1CqLoyvm8/5pU. -e$1$Kw
adE3g5$OzZeYQxk1CqLoyvm8/5pU.
config interface bridge switch ip address 10.40.57.90/16
(Dub)>
Tip: You can also use the show ntp command to verify the NTP configuration.
6. Save the configuration.
5-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Network Setup Parameters: Configuring System Clock Settings
Configuring System Clock Settings
Remote lets you configure timezones and daylight savings rules for any location.
Three methods are available for configuring timezone and daylight savings settings:

Configure a timezone and use the default daylight savings settings. See
Configuring Default Settings for details.

Configure a timezone and define custom daylight savings settings. See
Configuring Custom System Clock Settings for details.

Apply daylight savings rules from a timezone definition file. See Configuring a
Timezone Definition File for details.
Each method has a specific format for configuring a timezone. Depending upon the
format used, the daylight savings command will have different usages.
Configuring Default Settings
In this scenario, you will:

Configure the timezone in default mode

Enable daylight savings default parameters

Configure the local time and date
Important: You must disable NTP before you can configure the Remote system
clock locally.
1. At the config clock prompt, configure the timezone as EST with an offset of
-5:00. This puts the daylight savings configuration into default mode:
config clock timezone EST -5:00
2. Enable U.S. daylight savings rules and configure the name that displays when
daylight savings time is in effect:
config clock daylight-savings EDT
3. Configure the local time as 11:22:30 and the local date as 04/09/2010:
config clock local-time 11:22:30 04/09/2010
4. (optional) Verify that the clock parameters have been configured properly:
show clock
5-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Network Setup Parameters: Configuring System Clock Settings
The command response appears similar to the following display:
(Dub)>show clock
Fri Apr 9 11:22:30 EDT 2010
Uptime 4 days, 0:17
The timezone is named EST and has an offset of -05:00 GMT.
Daylight savings time is named EDT and using default U.S rules.
Log timestamps are using GMT.
(Dub)>
Tip: In the command response for show clock, the name assigned to indicate
that daylight savings is enabled will appear in the timestamp during daylight
savings. After daylight savings, the name of the configured timezone will
appear in the timestamp.
5. Save the configuration.
Configuring Custom System Clock Settings
If you configure the timezone in custom mode, you can use subcommands to
customize the daylight savings parameters.
In this scenario, you will:

Configure the timezone in custom mode

Enable daylight savings in custom mode

Configure custom daylight savings time parameters
Important: You must disable NTP before you can configure the Remote system
clock locally.
1. At the config clock prompt, configure the timezone as EST with an offset of
-5:00, and set the daylight savings configuration in the custom mode:
config clock timezone custom EST -5:00
5-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Network Setup Parameters: Configuring System Clock Settings
2. Set the following custom daylight savings time parameters:
(Dub)>config
(Dub) config>clock
(Dub) config clock>daylight-savings
(Dub) config clock daylight-savings
->indicator EDT
(Dub) config clock daylight-savings
->start-month march
(Dub) config clock daylight-savings
->start-day 23
(Dub) config clock daylight-savings
->start-time 01:00:00
(Dub) config clock daylight-savings
->end-month november
(Dub) config clock daylight-savings
->end-time 02:00:00
(Dub) config clock daylight-savings
->save-amount 01:45:00
(Dub) config clock daylight-savings
->
3. (optional) Verify that the clock parameters have been configured properly:
show clock
The command response appears similar to the following display:
(Dub)>show
(Dub) show>clock
Fri Apr 9 14:18:24 EST 2010
Uptime 9 days, 17:48
The timezone is named EST and has an offset of -05:00 GMT.
Daylight savings time is named EDT and using custom rules:
Starts on 23 of March at 01:00:00, saving 01:45:00.
Ends on 23 of November at 02:00:00.
Log timestamps are using GMT.
(Dub) show>
4. Save the configuration.
5-8
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Network Setup Parameters: Configuring System Clock Settings
Configuring a Timezone Definition File
You can load and apply daylight savings rules to your system from a timezone
definition file. A timezone definition file is derived from the public domain timezone
database and consists of:

Zone entries, which identify the available timezones with their GMT offsets
and any applicable rules

Rules, which define valid date and time ranges and the amount of time saved.
In this scenario, you will:

Install the timezone definition file

Apply daylight savings rules from the timezone definition file
1. To install a timezone definition file, establish an FTP connection into the system
and upload the definition file from your local workstation. A new directory will be
added under the config directory with a single file named timezones.def.
2. At the config clock prompt, apply the installed timezone definition file:
config clock timezone from-file EST
3. (optional) Verify that the clock parameters have been configured properly:
show clock
The command response appears similar to the following display:
(Dub)>show
(Dub) show>clock
Fri Apr 9 14:18:24 EST 2010
Uptime 9 days, 17:48
The timezone is named EST and has an offset of -05:00 GMT.
Daylight savings time is currently active and is saving 01:00.
These settings were loaded from the timezone definition file.
(Dub) show>
4. Save the configuration.
5-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Network Setup Parameters: Configuring RAS Settings
Configuring RAS Settings
In this scenario, you will:

Configure the RAS server type

Configure the RAS server address and settings

Enable RAS accounting

Configure the RAS authorization mode

Configure the number of times Remote attempts to connect to the RAS server

Configure the RAS timeout period for a remote authentication attempt
To configure RAS settings:
1. At the main prompt, configure the RAS server type as tacacs+ with fallback
enabled:
config ras shell tacacs+ fallback

Note: A message appears saying that the shell type configuration will not take
effect until the server is configured.
2. Configure the primary RAS server with the following settings:

IP address 10.50.18.32

Port 100

Secret tserver1

Phases accounting, authentication, and authorization:
config ras server 10.50.18.32 port 100
config ras server 10.50.18.32 secret tserver1
config ras server 10.50.18.32 phase accounting authentication
authorization
3. Enable RAS accounting:
config ras accounting enable
4. Configure privilege level RAS authorization:
config ras authorization privilege

Note: RAS accounting and authorization take effect only when TACACS+ is
configured as the server type.
5-10
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Network Setup Parameters: Configuring RAS Settings
5. Configure Remote to make 5 connection attempts to the RAS server before
failing:
config ras retry 5
6. Configure how long Remote waits for a response from the RAS server before
falling back on local authentication:
config ras timeout 30
7. (optional) Verify that the remote authentication settings have been configured
properly:
show ras
The command response appears similar to the following display:
(Dub)>show ras
Shell RAS option: TACACS+ with Local Fallback
RAS Accounting: enabled
RAS Authorization: privilege
RAS Retry: 5
RAS Timeout: 30
RAS Servers
IP
10.50.18.32
Port
100
Secret
tserver1
Phases
authen author account
(Dub)>
8. Save the configuration.
5-11
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Network Setup Parameters: Configuring SNMP
Configuring SNMP
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an SNMP version 1 community string

Configure an SNMP management station

Configure an SNMP manager for version 2 inform requests

Enable authentication trap transfer

Enable the SNMP trap queue

Configure the priority level on a trap OID

Note: This scenario applies only when an SNMP management system, such as
AppliedView, is used to manage Remote.

Note: The following management information bases (MIBs) are available for
Remote:

aiMediationV2.mib

aiPeriphDiscrete.mib

aiPeripheral.mib

aiSysCfg.mib

aiSysCfgConfig.mib

aiSystem.mib

aiSystemInv.mib

aiRosetta.mib
To access the available MIBs for Remote, go to:
http://www3.kentrox.com/Support/Documentation-Library.aspx.
To configure SNMP:
1. At the main prompt, configure an SNMP version 1 community string named
newadministrator and assign read-only access to objects in the MIB:
config snmp community public v1 readonly
5-12
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Network Setup Parameters: Configuring SNMP
2. Configure a management station with IP address 10.34.3.84, port number 162,
and community string public for sending SNMP traps:
config snmp host 10.34.3.84 162 public v1
3. Configure a management station for a version 2 inform request:
config snmp host 10.34.3.83 162 public v2-inform
4. Enable the sending of authentication traps:
config snmp auth-trap enable
5. Enable the SNMP trap queue:
config snmp trap-queue enable

Notes: The queuing state occurs on an SNMP host when a ping fails and traps are
waiting to be sent. The sending state occurs on an SNMP host for all other
conditions related to trap queuing.

Trap queuing is always enabled for v2-inform type hosts, however ping is
not used. Instead, the oldest request in the queue is retried until a response
is received.
6. Assign a high priority for a linkDown trap with OID .1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.3:
config snmp trap-queue priority .1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.3 high
7. (optional) Verify that SNMP has been configured properly:
show snmp summary
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show snmp summary
Authentication traps: enabled
Trap queue: enabled
Communities:
Name
Type Mode
administrator
v1
readwrite
public
v1
readonly
Hosts:
IP Address
Port
Type
Community
10.34.3.84
162
v1
public
10.34.3.83
162
v2-inform
public
Priority:
Trap OID
Priority
.1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.3
high
(Dub)>
Trap Queue
sending
queuing
8. Save the configuration.
5-13
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Network Setup Parameters: Configuring SNMP
5-14
6
Understanding Controllers and
Interfaces
This chapter provides information about controllers and interfaces and how they operate on
Remote.
Guide to this Chapter
Controller Descriptions
Interface Descriptions
6-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Understanding Controllers and Interfaces: Controller Descriptions
Controller Descriptions
A controller is a software object on Remote that serves as a destination for a data bit
stream. It can be a physical device, such as a serial transceiver or a T1 framer, or it
can be a virtual entity, such as a T1 channel group. There are four types of controllers
that can be configured in the Remote CLI:

Bridge Controllers

Ethernet Controllers

OpenVPN Controllers

Serial Controllers
Bridge Controllers
There is only one bridge controller on Remote in its current release. The controller is
named bridge switch because it is a bridge that (by default) includes all six of the
Ethernet switch ports. Controller bridge switch can be configured to include or
exclude Ethernet, serial, and WAN ports.
This and the next section imply that Ethernet controllers are always on the bridge.
Some previous Remote releases have allowed them to be separated.
Ethernet Controllers
There are six Ethernet controllers on every Remote model. They represent the six
local switched Ethernet ports and can be included or excluded on the bridge
controller. Fiber WAN Remote models may include Ethernet controllers 7 and 8. For
more information about Ethernet WAN port availability, refer to appendix WAN Port
Availability on page B-1.
OpenVPN Controllers
OpenVPN controllers use the OpenVPN software package, which establishes a VPN
between Connect SCS and Remote. SSL is used to manage the VPN connection,
and encrypted UDP packets are used for data transmission. Both the management
and data traffic are passed as UDP packets on a single port. The customer’s external
firewall needs to open one port to the Connect SCS for all connected client network
elements.
Connections are initiated from Remote, so they should have no problems traversing
the service provider’s firewalls, provided the firewalls are stateful and allow return
UDP packets. Keep-alive packets are sent by both Remote and Connect SCS to
detect connection failures and to keep an active firewall state.
6-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Understanding Controllers and Interfaces: Controller Descriptions
Serial Controllers
All Remote models have six asynchronous serial controllers. T1/E1 Remote models
have serial controller 7 and sometimes 8. For more information about serial WAN port
availability, refer to WAN Port Types on page B-2.
Remote models that have drop and continue (DAC) capability for their T1/E1
controllers have a “D” in their model number (for example, Remote-TDM). DAC
provides a way to share the bandwidth of a single T1 or E1 link among multiple
devices. For more information about DAC functionality, refer to Chapter 25: Drop and
Continue Functionality.
Remote also includes models with wireless and standard modems. Remote-G1
includes a GSM/GPRS backhaul interface option for customers who want to use a
GPRS data network to manage remote sites. Remote-C1 includes a CDMA/EvDO
backhaul interface option for customers who want to use a CDMA/EvDO data network
to manage remote sites. Remote-xxM includes a standard modem.
6-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Understanding Controllers and Interfaces: Interface Descriptions
Interface Descriptions
An interface is an entity to which you can route IP packets. Interfaces must be
associated with controllers, which may be underlying physical ports. There are four
types of interfaces that can be configured in the Remote CLI:

Bridge Interfaces

Ethernet Interfaces

OpenVPN Interfaces

Serial Interfaces
Bridge Interfaces
The bridge interface works in conjunction with the bridge controller switch. It is used
to bridge Ethernet ports and serial WAN ports, and permanently includes the six
switched Ethernet ports. An IP address can be assigned to the bridge switch
interface, providing a mechanism to route IP packets to the six switched Ethernet
ports and any bridged WAN port on Remote. The IP address assigned to the bridge
interface is Remote’s primary IP address. Until this IP address is configured, Remote
cannot be managed remotely via Telnet or SNMP. For more information, refer to
Setting Up the Initial Remote Configuration on page 2-5.
Ethernet Interfaces
Ethernet interfaces are individually configurable on Remote, allowing you to set them
up with static routes. By default, Ethernet interfaces are part of the bridge switch. To
configure an Ethernet interface with its own IP address, you must first remove it from
the bridge switch with the command:
config controller ethernet port no bridge
Refer to the Remote Command Reference Guide for details on using this command.
OpenVPN Interfaces
Like Ethernet interfaces, OpenVPN interfaces are individually configurable on
Remote. This capability lets users set them up with static routes.
6-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Understanding Controllers and Interfaces: Interface Descriptions
Serial Interfaces
Interfaces are configurable for both asynchronous and WAN serial ports. The WAN
interface is unchannelized and has a single channel group called group. The channel
group treats all 24 channels of a T1 port and all 31 data channels of an E1 port as a
single data stream.
The asynchronous serial interface represents an asynchronous port running PPP
through an external modem; it has no channel group and is configurable by the user.
The modem interface works in conjunction with the serial controller connected to the
wired or wireless modem. By configuring an IP address for the modem interface, IP
packets can be routed through the modem.
6-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Understanding Controllers and Interfaces: Interface Descriptions
6-6
7
Configuring Controllers and
Interfaces
This chapter provides step-by-step scenarios on how to configure the basic parameters for a
T1/E1 serial controller and interface (known as IPCP); a T1/E1 controller as part of a bridge
(known as BCP); PPPoE (Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet) encapsulation settings; and port
based VLAN identifiers.
Guide to this Chapter
T1 and E1 Overview
Configuring T1/E1 Line Settings
Configuring T1/E1 Controller Channel Group Settings
Configuring T1/E1 Line Encapsulation Settings
Configuring T1/E1 Interface Settings
PPPoE Overview
Configuring PPPoE Encapsulation Settings
Port VLAN Overview
Configuring a Port VLAN
7-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: T1 and E1 Overview
T1 and E1 Overview
Remote supports a single channel group (called group) of channelized T1/E1 WAN
links. The channel group includes any combination of timeslots 1 to 24 for T1
applications, and timeslots 1 to 31 for E1 applications. The user selects the available
timeslots. The T1/E1 WAN links can function as either routed or bridged interfaces.
HDLC and PPP are the available encapsulation protocols. These are the mechanisms
for framing data across a serial port.

Notes: On DAC units, you cannot configure serial 8 independently from serial
7. You must configure them together in a drop and continue network. For
more information about DAC, refer to Chapter 25: Drop and Continue
Functionality.

BCP (bridging) is not available for HDLC encapsulation on Remote. IPCP
(static routing) is the only protocol available for HDLC encapsulation on
Remote.
For information about the available Remote models and the corresponding WAN port
availability, refer to Appendix B: WAN Port Availability.
7-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Configuring T1/E1 Line Settings
Configuring T1/E1 Line Settings
In this scenario, you will:

Set the WAN line buildout value

Set the WAN line framing format

Set the WAN line bit-level encoding method

Disable loopback detection.
To configure the T1/E1 line settings:
1. At the main prompt, configure the line buildout for controller serial 7 as -7.5db:
config controller serial 7 buildout -7.5db

Notes: On DAC Remote models, serial 8 buildout is automatically configured
based on the serial 7 buildout setting. This causes the sum of the line
buildout for serial 7 and serial 8 to not exceed the maximum allowable
buildout. In the event of an Remote system failure (in which case internal
relays provide T1 continuity across Remote) the automatic buildout
setting assures that the line buildout will not exceed the maximum
allowable level.

Buildout is not configurable on E1 Remote models.
2. Configure the line framing format as d4 for a T1 serial controller or crc4 for an E1
serial controller:
config controller serial 7 framing d4
config controller serial 7 framing crc4
3. Configure the bit-level encoding method as b8zs:
config controller serial 7 linecode b8zs
4. (Optional) Disable the T1 loopback detection.
config controller serial 7 loop-detect disable

Note: The loopback detection option is not available on E1.
7-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Configuring T1/E1 Line Settings
5. (Optional) Verify that controller serial 7 has been configured properly:
show controller serial 7
The command response appears similar to the following (for a T1 controller):
(Dub)>show controllers serial 7
serial 7 status=enabled
resource-state=unassigned
rx-link-state=LOF
tx-link-state=up
local-loop=norm
remote-loop=norm
buildout=-7.5dB
clock=loop
framing=d4
linecode=b8zs
loop-detect=disable
framer-crc-errors=0
framing-errors=57562691
line-coding-violations=0
severely-errored-framing-events=0
desc=T1 port
channel-group=group status=enabled
system-name=hdlc0
speed=64
encap=ppp
timeslot=1-24
(Dub)>
6. Save the configuration.
7-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Configuring T1/E1 Controller Channel Group Settings
Configuring T1/E1 Controller Channel Group Settings
In this scenario, you will:

Configure the controller speed

Configure the DS0 channels to include in the channel group

Enable the channel group.
To configure the T1/E1 controller channel group settings:
1. At the main prompt, configure the controller speed as 64 kbps for serial controller
7:
config controller serial 7 channel-group group speed 64

Note: 64 can be used only when the bit-level encoding method for the controller
is B8ZS.
2. Configure channel group group to include DS0 channels 1-5,7-16:
config controller serial 7 channel-group group timeslot 1-5,7-16
3. Enable channel group group:
config controller serial 7 channel-group group enable
7-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Configuring T1/E1 Controller Channel Group Settings
4. (optional) Verify that controller serial 7 has been configured properly:
show controllers serial 7
The command response appears similar to the following (for a T1 controller):
(Dub)>show controllers serial 7
serial 7 status=enabled
resource-state=unassigned
rx-link-state=LOF
tx-link-state=up
local-loop=norm
remote-loop=norm
buildout=-7.5dB
clock=loop
framing=d4
linecode=b8zs
framer-crc-errors=0
framing-errors=403315940
line-coding-violations=0
severely-errored-framing-events=0
desc=T1 port
channel-group=group status=enabled
system-name=hdlc0
speed=64
encap=hdlc
timeslot=1-5,7-16
(Dub)>
5. Save the configuration.
7-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Configuring T1/E1 Line Encapsulation Settings
Configuring T1/E1 Line Encapsulation Settings
In this scenario, you will:

Configure PPP encapsulation for a T1/E1 serial controller

(optional) Configure a default route for PPP encapsulation

Configure the local method and local identity for authentication

Configure the MRU and MTU values

Configure the remote method and remote identity for authentication

Configure the inactivity timeout

Configure the T1/E1 serial controller with PPP encapsulation for bridging (BCP)

(optional) Configure HDLC encapsulation for another T1/E1 serial controller.
To configure the T1/E1 line encapsulation settings:
1. Configure PPP encapsulation for controller serial 7:
config controller serial 7 channel-group group encapsulation ppp
2. (optional) Configure a default route for PPP encapsulation that uses the same
subnet as the corresponding interface:
Important: This command overrides the default route assigned to Remote via
command config ip route default.
config controller serial 7 channel-group group encapsulation ppp
defaultroute
3. Configure the local authentication method as chap for controller serial 7:
config controller serial 7 channel-group group encapsulation ppp
local method chap
4. Configure local username userb and local password secretpass for
authentication on controller serial 7:
config controller serial 7 channel-group group encapsulation ppp
local identity userb secretpass
5. Configure maximum number of data bytes that can be received (mru) in a single
PPP frame as 5200 on controller serial 7:
config controller serial 7 channel-group group encapsulation ppp
mru 5200
7-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Configuring T1/E1 Line Encapsulation Settings
6. Configure maximum number of data bytes that can be transmitted (mtu) in a
single PPP frame as 5400 on controller serial 7:
config controller serial 7 channel-group group encapsulation ppp
mtu 5400
7. Configure the inactivity-timeout on controller serial 7 for 20 minutes:
config controller serial 7 channel-group group encapsulation ppp
inactivity-timeout 20
8. Configure the remote authentication method as pap on controller serial 7:
config controller serial 7 channel-group group encapsulation ppp
remote method pap
9. Configure remote username usera and remote password password for
authentication on controller serial 7:
config controller serial 7 channel-group group encapsulation ppp
remote identity usera password
10. Configure controller serial 7 to be part of bridge switch (this is BCP
configuration):
config controller serial 7 channel-group group bridge switch
11. (optional) Verify that the encapsulation settings on controller serial 7 have been
configured properly:
show controllers serial 7
The command response appears similar to the following (for a T1 controller):
7-8
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Configuring T1/E1 Line Encapsulation Settings
(Dub)>show controllers serial 7
serial 7 status=enabled
resource-state=unassigned
rx-link-state=LOF
tx-link-state=up
local-loop=norm
remote-loop=norm
buildout=-7.5dB
clock=loop
framing=d4
linecode=b8zs
framer-crc-errors=0
framing-errors=403315940
line-coding-violations=0
severely-errored-framing-events=0
desc=T1 port
channel-group=group status=enabled
system-name=hdlc0
speed=64
encap=ppp
timeslot=1-5,7-16
ppp defaultroute=true
local-method=chap local-identity=userb
remote-method=pap remote-identity=usera
mru=5200 mtu=5400
lcp-requests=enabled
inactivity-timeout=20
(Dub)>
12. (optional) Configure HDLC encapsulation for controller serial 8:
config controller serial 8 channel-group group encapsulation hdlc

Note: Remote does not support HDLC bridging.
13. (optional) Verify that the encapsulation settings on controller serial 8 have been
configured properly:
show controllers serial 8
The command response appears similar to the following (for a T1 controller):
7-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Configuring T1/E1 Line Encapsulation Settings
(Dub)>show controllers serial 8
serial 8 status=enabled
resource-state=unassigned
rx-link-state=LOF
tx-link-state=up
local-loop=norm
remote-loop=norm
buildout=-7.5dB
clock=loop
framing=d4
linecode=b8zs
framer-crc-errors=0
framing-errors=403315940
line-coding-violations=0
severely-errored-framing-events=0
desc=T1 port
channel-group=group status=enabled
system-name=hdlc0
speed=64
encap=hdlc
timeslot=1-5,7-16
(Dub)>
14. Save the configuration.
7-10
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Configuring T1/E1 Interface Settings
Configuring T1/E1 Interface Settings
This scenario configures an IP interface for static routing of packets to and from
T1/E1 link serial 7. You will:

Configure the T1/E1 serial interface with the channel group

Configure a description for the T1/E1 serial interface

Configure an IP address for the T1/E1 port and an IP address to the connected
device. This configures IP packet routing on the interface.
To configure a T1/E1 serial interface:
1. At the main prompt, configure interface serial 7 with channel group group:
config interface serial 7 channel-group group

Note: When an interface is configured for the first time, it is automatically
enabled.
2. Configure description T1 interface serial 7 for interface serial 7:
config interface serial 7 channel-group group description T1
interface serial 7
3. Configure an IP address for the T1/E1 port (192.168.0.12) and an IP address to
the connected device (192.168.0.13) for controller serial 7:
config interface serial 7 channel-group group ip address
192.168.0.12 pointopoint 192.168.0.13
4. (optional) Verify that interface serial 7 has been configured properly:
show interfaces serial 7
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show interfaces serial 7
serial 7 group channel-group=group system-name=hdlc0
status=enabled link-state=down
desc=T1 interface serial 7
address=192.168.0.12 pointopoint=192.168.0.13
Stats:
Bytes
Packets
Errors
Dropped
Rx
0
0
0
0
Tx
0
0
0
0
(Dub)>
Overrun
0
0
Framing
0
0
5. Save the configuration.
7-11
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: PPPoE Overview
PPPoE Overview
PPPoE (Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet) is a protocol for encapsulating PPP
frames in Ethernet. PPP is a data-link-level protocol typically used to encapsulate
network-level packets over an asynchronous serial line.

Note: PPPoE is not available on Remote RMM-1200.
PPPoE is commonly used with ADSL services. It offers standard PPP features such
as authentication, encryption, and compression. In other words, PPPoE is used to
virtually “dial” to another Ethernet machine and make a point to point connection,
which is then used to transport IP packets, based on the features of PPP.
The main driver for PPPoE is for interfacing with third party modem equipment for
various DSL and wireless providers. This allows Remote to create a PPPoE for
purposes such as backhaul and public network connections. Figure 7-1 provides a
high level example of a PPPoE configuration.
Figure 7-1 PPPoE High Level Configuration
To create a PPPoE scenario on Remote, you need to first remove an Ethernet
controller from the bridge, configure it to have encapsulation for PPP, and then
configure the associated PPP parameters for the link. Finally, you need to enable the
Ethernet interface corresponding to the controller.
7-12
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Configuring PPPoE Encapsulation Settings
Configuring PPPoE Encapsulation Settings
This scenario establishes PPPoE encapsulation on an Ethernet controller and
configures the associated settings. You will:

Remove Ethernet controller 4 from the bridge

Configure Ethernet controller 4 for PPPoE encapsulation

Configure the associated PPPoE parameters for Ethernet controller 4.
To configure an Ethernet controller for PPPoE encapsulation:
1. At the main prompt, remove Ethernet controller 4 from the bridge:
config controller ethernet 4 no bridge
2. Configure Ethernet controller 4 for PPPoE encapsulation:
config controller ethernet 4 encapsulation ppp
3. Enable Defaultroute functionality:
config controller ethernet 4 encapsulation ppp defaultroute
4. Configure the remote identity as user2 and the secret for remuse:
config controller ethernet 4 encapsulation ppp remote identity
user2 remuse
5. Configure chap as the remote authentication method:
config controller ethernet 4 encapsulation ppp remote method chap
6. Configure the inactivity timeout to 20 (minutes):
config controller ethernet 4 encapsulation ppp inactivity-timeout
20
7. (optional) Verify that the Ethernet controller for PPPoE has been configured
properly:
show controller ethernet 4
7-13
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Configuring PPPoE Encapsulation Settings
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show controller ethernet 4
ethernet 4 system-name=mii1
status=enabled link-state=down
admin-speed=auto oper-speed=10H
hardware-address=00:40:72:04:2D:9C
default-address=00:40:72:04:2D:9C
proxy-arp=enabled
resource-state=assigned
desc=Ethernet 4
mac-security admin-state=disabled oper-state=disabled
address=00:E0:52:CC:0B:00
address=22:22:22:22:22:22
ppp defaultroute=false
local-method=none local-identity=
remote-method=chap remote-identity=user2
mru=1492 mtu=1492
lcp-requests=enabled
inactivity-timeout=20
(Dub)>
8. Save the configuration.
7-14
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Port VLAN Overview
Port VLAN Overview
The port VLAN feature provides the capability to group ports together such that they
operate as separate network segments. Packets are tagged using the IEEE 802.1Q
standard for Ethernet tagging.

Note: The port VLAN feature is not available on Remote RMM-1200.
Application
Figure 7-2 shows a typical application of port based VLANs. Networks A, B, and C are
located on either side of a Connect and an Remote. The traffic on each network is
segregated from the other networks, then bundled and sent over a common link
between Connect and Remote. The networks may or may not have overlapping IP
network addresses. To provide the isolation of the networks, packets traversing
common network links are tagged with an identifier for their particular network.
Network A
Network B
P
O
R
T
P
4
O
R
T
1
Network A
Network B
Network C
Network C
Figure 7-2 Port Based VLAN Configuration
Port Modes
In Remote, there is a single bridge controller. Ports connected to a bridge controller
can be in one of three modes: native, port VLAN, or trunk.
Native Mode
A port in native mode transmits and receives all traffic without modifying any 802.1Q
tags. Traffic received that has a tag which is used by a port VLAN is dropped. All
other traffic received by a native mode port is forwarded to other native mode ports
and trunk ports.
7-15
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Port VLAN Overview
Port VLAN Mode
Port VLANs are contained within the bridge controller to provide the ability to group
ports into separate networks.
A port which is a part of a port VLAN uses an 802.1Q tag to identify the VLAN. Traffic
received by the port that does not have an 802.1Q tag has the VLAN tag added
before it is forwarded to other ports in the VLAN or any trunk ports. Traffic received by
the port that does contain an 802.1Q tag is dropped if the tag does not match the
VLAN tag for the port. Traffic transmitted by the port has the tag removed.
VLAN identifiers can range from 1- 499 with a default of 1.
Trunk Mode
A port in trunk mode transmits and receives all traffic without modifying any 802.1Q
tags. Traffic received by the port is forwarded to all ports in any mode.
Port Capabilities
Ports that can be associated with a bridge controller have the following capabilities.
Switched Ethernet Ports
The six front-panel Ethernet ports are switched Ethernet ports. They can be either
native or port VLAN mode ports. The default is native mode for all ports.
Switched Ethernet ports which have been removed from the bridge controller cannot
be configured as any type of bridge port (native, port VLAN, or trunk).
WAN Ports
WAN ports which are added to the bridge controller always act as trunk ports. The
ports include T1, E1, and other BCP mode PPP connections, and fiber Ethernet ports.
Bridge CPU Port
The CPU port on the bridge controller (the bridge switch interface) always acts as a
native mode port.
7-16
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Configuring a Port VLAN
Configuring a Port VLAN
In this scenario you will configure the port-vlan mode and the associated port
VLAN identifier for an Ethernet controller.

Note: The port VLAN feature is not available on Remote RMM-1200.
To configure a VLAN identifier for an Ethernet controller:
1. Configure the port-vlan mode for ethernet 2:
config controller ethernet 2 bridge switch mode port-vlan
2. Configure the port’s VLAN identifier as 22:
config controller ethernet 2 bridge switch vlan 22
3. (optional) Verify that the VLAN identifier for Ethernet controller 2 has been
configured properly:
show controller bridge switch
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show controller bridge switch
bridge switch system-name=br_switch status=enabled oper-state=up stp=disabled
forward-delay=15 hello-time=2 max-age=20 priority=32768
description=10/100 ethernet switch
ethernet 2 mode=port-vlan vlan=22 cost=100 priority=128
stp_state=unmanaged
ethernet 3 mode=native cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=unmanaged
ethernet 5 mode=native cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=unmanaged
ethernet 6 mode=native cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=unmanaged
(Dub)>
4. Save the configuration.
7-17
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Controllers and Interfaces: Configuring a Port VLAN
7-18
8
Configuring the Bridge Group
This chapter provides information on how to configure controllers for bridging and how to
configure STP on the bridge.
Guide to this Chapter
Overview
Configuring Controllers for Bridging
Configuring STP on the Bridge Group
8-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Bridge Group: Overview
Overview
Bridging is the forwarding of Ethernet frames. On Remote, there is a single bridge
group referred to as switch. Serial WAN controllers can be added to and removed
from the bridge group. The six switched Ethernet ports are part of the bridge group by
default. However, they can be manually removed from the bridge group and
configured with individual interfaces.
An IP interface can be associated with the bridge group, allowing IP packets to be
routed to the bridge. In addition, the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) can be enabled
and configured to help prevent loops in the bridged network on which Remote
participates.

Note: Fiber Ethernet interfaces can also be a part of the bridge.
On Remote RMM-1200, both Ethernet ports are permanently bridged. Unlike Remote,
individual ports cannot be removed from the bridge group, and STP is not supported.
8-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Bridge Group: Configuring Controllers for Bridging
Configuring Controllers for Bridging
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an Ethernet controller as part of the bridge group with a cost and
priority level

Configuring an asynchronous serial controller as part of the bridge group

Configure the modem controller as part of the bridge group

Configure a T1/E1 serial controller as part of the bridge group.
To configure controllers for bridging:
1. At the main prompt, configure controller ethernet 3 as part of bridge group
switch with STP path cost 10000 and STP priority level 120:
config controller ethernet 3 bridge switch stp cost 10000
config controller ethernet 3 bridge switch stp priority 12
2. Configure controller serial 5 as part of bridge group switch:

Note: Before configuring an asynchronous serial controller as part of the bridge
group, you must configure PPP encapsulation for the controller.
config controller serial 5 encapsulation ppp
config controller serial 5 bridge switch
3. Configure the modem controller as part of bridge group switch:
config controller serial modem encapsulation ppp
config controller serial modem bridge switch
4. Configure controller serial 7 as part of bridge group switch:

Note: Before configuring a T1/E1 serial controller as part of the bridge group,
you must configure PPP encapsulation for the controller and disable any
interface configured on the controller.
config controller serial 7 channel-group group encapsulation ppp
config no interface serial 7
config controller serial 7 channel-group group bridge switch
8-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Bridge Group: Configuring Controllers for Bridging
5. (optional) Verify that the controllers on bridge group switch have been configured
properly:
show controllers bridge switch
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show controllers bridge switch
bridge switch system-name=br_switch status=enabled oper-state=up stp=enabled
forward-delay=15 hello-time=2 max-age=20 priority=32768
description=10/100 ethernet switch
ethernet 1 cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=forwarding stp_root_port
ethernet 2 cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=disabled
ethernet 3 cost=10000 priority=120 stp_state=disabled
ethernet 4 cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=disabled
ethernet 5 cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=disabled
ethernet 6 cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=disabled
serial 7 group cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=unmanaged
serial 5 cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=unmanaged
serial modem cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=unmanaged
(Dub)>
6. Save the configuration.
8-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Bridge Group: Configuring STP on the Bridge Group
Configuring STP on the Bridge Group
In this scenario, you will configure STP settings for the bridge group.
To configure STP on the bridge group:
1. At the prompt, configure the STP forward delay time as 20 seconds:
config controller bridge switch stp forward-delay 20
2. Configure the STP hello time as 5 seconds:
config controller bridge switch stp hello-time 5
3. Configure the maximum age before STP information is discarded as 30 seconds:
config controller bridge switch stp max-age 30
4. Configure the STP priority level as 10000:
config controller bridge switch stp priority 10000
5. (optional) Verify that bridge controller switch has been configured properly:
show controllers bridge switch
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show controllers bridge switch
bridge switch system-name=br_switch status=enabled oper-state=up stp=enabled
forward-delay=20 hello-time=5 max-age=30 priority=10000
stp_root_bridge
description=10/100 ethernet switch
ethernet 1 cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=forwarding
ethernet 2 cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=disabled
ethernet 3 cost=10000 priority=120 stp_state=disabled
ethernet 4 cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=disabled
ethernet 5 cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=disabled
ethernet 6 cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=disabled
serial 7 group cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=unmanaged
serial 5 cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=unmanaged
serial modem cost=100 priority=128 stp_state=unmanaged
(Dub)>
6. Save the configuration.
8-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Bridge Group: Configuring STP on the Bridge Group
8-6
9
Configuring Static Routes
This chapter provides step-by-step scenarios on how to configure static routes in the IP routing
table.
Guide to this Chapter
Adding a Static Route to the IP Routing Table
Adding the Default Static Route to the IP Routing Table
9-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Static Routes: Adding a Static Route to the IP Routing Table
Adding a Static Route to the IP Routing Table
In this scenario, you will add a static route to the IP routing table.
To add a static route to the IP routing table:
1. At the main prompt, add a static route with destination address 128.14.0.0,
subnet mask length 16, and gateway address 10.40.2.18:
config ip route 128.14.0.0/16 10.40.2.18
2. (optional) Verify that the static route has been added properly:
show ip route
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show ip route
Destination
Gateway
10.40.0.0/16
0.0.0.0
127.0.0.0/8
0.0.0.0
127.0.0.1/32
0.0.0.0
128.14.0.0/16
10.40.2.18
(Dub)>
3. Save the configuration.
9-2
Interface
bridge switch
*
lo
bridge switch
Flags
Up
Reject Up
Host Up
Up
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Static Routes: Adding the Default Static Route to the IP Routing Table
Adding the Default Static Route to the IP Routing Table
In this scenario, you will add a default static route to the IP routing table.
To add the default static route to the IP routing table:
1. At the main prompt, add the default static route with gateway address 10.40.0.1:
config ip route default 10.40.0.1
2. (optional) Verify that the default static route has been added properly:
show ip route
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show ip route
Destination
0.0.0.0/0
10.44.0.0/16
127.0.0.0/8
127.0.0.1/32
169.254.0.0/16
(Dub)>
Gateway
10.44.0.1
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
Interface
bridge switch
bridge switch
*
lo
bridge switch
Flags
Up
Up
Up Reject
Up Host
Up
3. Save the configuration.
9-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Static Routes: Adding the Default Static Route to the IP Routing Table
9-4
10
Configuring a Wireless Network
with Remote
This chapter provides information about configuring a wireless network with Remote.
Guide to this Chapter
Getting Started
Sample Configuration
Configuring the Wireless Modem
Configuring the VPN
10-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring a Wireless Network with Remote: Getting Started
Getting Started
This section discusses the following topics:

Wireless Network Overview

Required Components

Initial Setup
Wireless Network Overview
Remote models are available with CDMA/EvDO or GPRS wireless modems. These
modems allow users to locate Remotes in locations that do not have traditional WAN
connectivity. Additionally, Remotes located at cell sites do not require a dedicated
T1/E1 channel for management. Full T1/E1 bandwidth is available for wireless
customers, and management data can be carried over the customer network.
A wireless Remote should appear as if it is a wired extension of the management
network. The goal is to provide two-way, reliable connections with no restrictions on
protocols over the network.
The wireless Remote communicates with the service provider’s management network
by delivering alarms to it. The management network tries to establish connections to
Remote or to network elements connected to the Remote.
Required Components
When operating in a wireless network, Remote works in conjunction with the following
Kentrox products:
Connect SCS
Connect SCS acts as the VPN server for Remote. For more information about
Connect SCS, refer to the Connect SCS Configuration Guide.
Director SCD
Director SCD manages VPN clients and servers. It uses Director models and
protocols to identify NEs as VPN clients or servers and manages associations
between the clients and servers. Additionally, Director SCD manages client and
server tokens.

Note: A token is created by the SCD for each VPN client or server. The token must
be installed on the client or server before it can connect to the VPN. The token
is contained in a configuration bundle with a patch file for configuring the VPN.
10-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring a Wireless Network with Remote: Getting Started
Initial Setup
Users must set up the following configurations for Remote to operate in a wireless
network.
To set up the initial configurations:
1. Connect to the craft port, log into the CLI, and run the initsetup wizard using
command config use-wizard initsetup.
2. Configure the standard configuration parameters (such as users, SNMP,
networking, and time).
3. (optional) If the management network is available, then connect to it and run the
Director SCD client application. Once the Director SCD client application is
running, the technician must:

Add Remote as a new client

Create an association between Remote and the appropriate Connect SCS
VPN server

Generate a new token for Remote
4. (optional) If management network access is not available, then the technician
must:

Access the SCD client from a location that has network access.

Add the Remote to be installed

Generate a new token

Save the token as a file on the laptop

Use a local Ethernet connection to the Remote bridge to transfer the token via
FTP/SFTP to file /config/openvpn/bundle/bundle.cfg on the Remote.
5. Verify that Remote is connected to the management network.
10-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring a Wireless Network with Remote: Sample Configuration
Sample Configuration
Figure 10-1 displays Remote being used in a wireless network with Connect SCS,
which acts as the VPN server, and Director, which manages the VPN client and
server.
Figure 10-1 Wireless Network Example
Sections Configuring the Wireless Modem on page 10-5 and Configuring the VPN on
page 10-8 provide procedures for making the above configurations on Remote.

Note: Figure 10-1 shows the GPRS WAN option. The EvDO WAN option would be
configured the same way.
10-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring a Wireless Network with Remote: Configuring the Wireless Modem
Configuring the Wireless Modem
Important: If you use the initsetup wizard to provision the wireless modem, then this
procedure is unnecessary.

Note: This procedure configures a GPRS wireless modem. However, users can
apply the same steps to an EvDO wireless modem.
In this scenario, you will:

Configure a description for the GPRS wireless modem

Configure a connection string for the GPRS wireless modem

Assign the GPRS wireless modem as a resource

Configure the PPP encapsulation settings

Configure the GPRS wireless modem interface
To configure the GPRS wireless modem settings:
1. Configure description GPRS wireless modem for controller serial gprs:
config controller serial gprs description GPRS wireless modem
2. Configure the GPRS serial controller’s connection string as @gprsChat.txt:
config controller serial gprs connect string @gprsChat.txt

Note: The user must upload the chat file to directory /config/chat on Remote
before it is entered as the connect string in the CLI.
3. Assign controller serial gprs as a resource:
config controller serial gprs assign
10-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring a Wireless Network with Remote: Configuring the Wireless Modem
4. Configure the following ppp encapsulation settings:

Remote method pap

Remote username [email protected] and password PROVIDER1

A default route that uses the same subnet as the corresponding interface

Note: This command overrides the default route assigned to Remote via
command config ip route default. PPP configured with the default
route option and command config ip route default are mutually
exclusive. You should not have both configured.

Disabled LCP requests
config controller serial gprs encapsulation ppp
config controller serial gprs encapsulation ppp remote method pap
config controller serial gprs encapsulation ppp remote identity
[email protected] PROVIDER1
config controller serial gprs encapsulation ppp defaultroute
config controller serial gprs encapsulation ppp lcp-requests
disable
5. (optional) Verify that the GPRS serial controller has been configured properly:
show controllers serial gprs
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show controllers serial gprs
serial gprs status=enabled link-state=up encapsulation=ppp
[email protected]
resource-state=assigned
signal-strength=good (-57 dBm)
description=GPRS wireless modem
ppp defaultroute=true
local-method=none local-identity=
remote-method=pap [email protected]
mru=1520 mtu=1520
lcp-requests=disabled
inactivity-timeout=3
(Dub)>show
10-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring a Wireless Network with Remote: Configuring the Wireless Modem

Note: If the Preferred Roaming List (PRL) is activated, the show controllers
command will display the PRL version number (prl-version) for the
modem, as shown in the following example.
(Dub)>show
(Dub) show>controllers serial evdo
serial evdo status=disabled link-state=down encapsulation=ppp
[email protected]
resource-state=unassigned
signal-strength=fair (-83 dBm)
prl-version=51240
Next PRL update in: (unavailable)
description=EVDOmodem
ppp defaultroute=false
local-method=none local-identity=
remote-method=pap remote-id[email protected]
mru=1520 mtu=1520
lcp-requests=disabled
inactivity-timeout=1
(Dub) show>
6. Enable interface serial gprs:
config interface serial gprs enable

Note: The IP address of the serial GPRS interface is assigned automatically by
PPP.
7. (optional) Verify that the GPRS serial interface has been configured properly:
show interfaces serial gprs
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show interface serial gprs
serial gprs name=serial gprs system-name=ppp_gprs
status=enabled link-state=up
address=167.214.133.56 pointopoint=10.0.0.1
Stats:
Bytes
Packets
Errors
Dropped
Rx
31242388
182608
0
0
Tx
29748523
173100
0
0
(Dub)>
Overrun
0
0
Framing
0
0
10-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring a Wireless Network with Remote: Configuring the VPN
Configuring the VPN
Important: Most users will use the Director SCD extension to either configure the
VPN, or to send a configuration bundle (containing the VPN
configuration) to Remote. If you used one of these methods to configure
the VPN, then you do not need to do this procedure.
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an OpenVPN controller

Configure an OpenVPN interface
To configure the VPN:
1. Enable OpenVPN controller client:
config controller openvpn client enable
2. Configure encryption option aes-256 for OpenVPN controller client:
config controller openvpn client cipher aes-256

Note: The cipher configured for Remote must match what is configured on the
Connect SCS. If there's a mismatch, the VPN will not be established.
3. Configure server IP address 205.245.180.48 and port number 1194 for
OpenVPN controller client:
config controller openvpn client server 205.245.180.48 1194
4. (optional) Verify that the OpenVPN controller has been configured properly:
show controllers openvpn
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show controllers openvpn
openvpn client system-name=ovpn_client status=enabled link-state=up
hardware-address=00:FF:8C:A5:63:89
default-address=00:FF:8C:A5:63:89
mode=client server=205.245.180.48:1194 cipher=aes-256
vpn-state=connected, Tue Sep 19 19:28:33 GMT 2006
cert-subject=/O=AI/CN=VPN-client3
cert-validity-start=Mon Sep 18 04:00:00 GMT 2006
cert-validity-end=Sun Sep 18 04:00:00 GMT 2011
vpn-rx-bytes=10993237 vpn-tx-bytes=11163685
(Dub)>
10-8
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring a Wireless Network with Remote: Configuring the VPN
5. Configure IP address 192.168.100.80 and subnet mask length 24 for OpenVPN
interface client:
config interface openvpn client ip address 192.168.100.80/24
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show interfaces openvpn
openvpn client system-name=ovpn_client status=enabled link-state=up
address=192.168.100.80/24
(Dub)>
10-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring a Wireless Network with Remote: Configuring the VPN
10-10
11
Configuring Actions, Events, and
Responses
This chapter provides information about actions, events, and responses.
Guide to this Chapter
Overview
Event Components
Response Components
Action Components
Configuring an Event, Response, and Action
11-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Actions, Events, and Responses: Overview
Overview
Actions are rules in Remote that provide a flexible mechanism for managing system
mediation by letting users associate events and responses. Actions provide the ability
to configure an extensive range of behavior in response to external or internal events.
Actions consist of three components:

Events—System occurrences related to changes in Remote’s equipment or the
environment.

Responses—Behaviors that are executed in response to system events.

Actions—Rules that create associations between responses and events.
During normal Remote operation, internal event messages are generated. A
subsystem called the Action Manager keeps a list of actions and monitors all the
event messages. When an event message matches an event configured in an action,
the Action Manager generates the corresponding response message. Each
responder in the system monitors the response messages and executes responses
directed to it.
Figure 11-1 illustrates the sequence of events that occurs when action MyActions’s
event (MyEvent) occurs.
Discrete
I/O
Subsystem
Event: input 0/1 close
ACTION
MANAGER
Response: output 0/3 close
Discrete
I/O
Subsystem
Actions
EVENTS
RESPONSES
input 0/1 open
open output 0/3
input 0/1 close
close output 0/3
input 0/2 open
close output 0/1
input 0/2 close
open output 0/1
serial 7 down
serial 7 up
...
enable serial
modem
disable serial
modem
...
Figure 11-1 Sequence of Events

Note: Several commands exist in the Remote CLI that display diagnostic information
related to actions: show actions, show events, show responses, show
audit actions, show audit events, show audit responses, and diag
mmdisplay. For more information about display and diagnostic commands,
refer to the Remote Command Reference Guide.
11-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Actions, Events, and Responses: Event Components
Event Components
Figure 11-2 illustrates a sample event configuration:
event name
originator
event type
config event MyEvent content input 0/1 close
Figure 11-2 Example of the Event Command
Event declarations consist of the following elements:

An event name, which is a user-defined name for the event.

An event originator, which is a system component that generates the event.

An event type, which is a system occurrence that signifies the event. Options for
the event type vary based on the event originator.

Note: For more information about event configuration commands and parameters,
refer to the Remote Command Reference Guide.
11-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Actions, Events, and Responses: Response Components
Response Components
Figure 11-3 illustrates a sample response configuration:
response name
responder
response type
config response MyResponse content output 0/3 close
Figure 11-3 Example of the Response Command
Response declarations consist of the following elements:

A response name, which is a user-defined name for the response.

A responder, which is a system component that processes the response.

A response type, which defines what the response does when the associated
event occurs. Options for the response type vary based on the responder.

Note: For more information about response configuration commands and
parameters, refer to the Remote Command Reference Guide.
11-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Actions, Events, and Responses: Action Components
Action Components
Figure 11-4 illustrates a sample action configuration:
action name
event name
response name
config action MyAction event MyEvent response MyResponse
Figure 11-4 Example of the Action Command
Action declarations consist of the following elements:

An action name, which is a user-defined name for the action.

An event name, which is a previously user-defined name of an event.

The response name, which is a previously user-defined name of a response.

Note: For more information about this command, refer to the Remote Command
Reference Guide.
11-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Actions, Events, and Responses: Configuring an Event, Response, and Action
Configuring an Event, Response, and Action
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an event that occurs when the internal chassis temperature goes
above a high threshold

Configure a response that opens a relay output point

Configure an action that associates the event with the response.
To configure the event, response, and action:
1. At the main prompt, configure event High_Temp with event originator
analog 0/temperature and event type high:
config event High_Temp content analog 0/temperature high

Note: For information about specific event originators and event types, refer to
command config event content in the Remote Command Reference
Guide.
2. Configure response Output0_3 with responder output 0/3 and response type
open:
config response Output0_3 content output 0/3 open

Note: For information about specific responders and response types, refer to the
response configuration commands in the Remote Command Reference
Guide.
3. Configure action Chassis_Temp_High with event High_Temp and response
Output0_3:
config action Chassis_Temp_High event High_Temp response Output0_3
11-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Actions, Events, and Responses: Configuring an Event, Response, and Action
4. (optional) Verify that the action has been configured properly:
show actions Chassis_Temp_High
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show actions Chassis_Temp_High
Action Name
: Chassis_Temp_High
Action Description
:
Event
Event
Event
Event
Name
Description
Originator
Type
: High_Temp
:
: analog 0/temperature
: high
Response Name
: Output0_3
Response Description :
Response Responder
: output 0/3
Response Type
: open
Response Parameters :
No parameters configured for this response.
(Dub)>
5. Save the configuration.
11-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Actions, Events, and Responses: Configuring an Event, Response, and Action
11-8
12
Configuring Technician Laptop
Access for Remote
This chapter provides information on configuring Remote network access to locally-connected
technician laptops.
Guide to this Chapter
Configuration Overview
Assigning IP Addresses to Technician Laptops
Configuring IPTables for Network Address Translation
12-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Technician Laptop Access for Remote: Configuration Overview
Configuration Overview
Figure 12-1 displays what happens when a technician’s laptop accesses the network
by connecting to Remote.
64.152.3.27
(Public Address)
IP Network
Server
IPTables rules allow laptops
on the private network to
send packets to the WAN with
Remote’s public address.
184.155.22.36
(Remote’s Public Address)
IPTables
DHCP Server
The DHCP Server
assigns a private IP
address to the
technician laptop.
Remote
10.10.10.12 (Private Address)
Technician Laptop
Figure 12-1 Technician Laptop Access via Remote
12-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Technician Laptop Access for Remote: Configuration Overview
When the technician’s laptop is connected to one of the Ethernet ports on Remote,
the DHCP server automatically assigns an IP address to the laptop. IP addresses that
may be assigned to the technician’s laptop are configured using DHCP server
configuration commands in the Remote CLI. For more information on configuring the
DHCP server, refer to section Assigning IP Addresses to Technician Laptops on page
12-4.
IPTables is configured for Network Address Translation (NAT) to allow multiple
laptops to use private IP addresses on the local network and a single public IP
address on the WAN. For more information on configuring IPTables and NAT, refer to
section Configuring IPTables for Network Address Translation on page 12-6.
Tip: If you have available public IP addresses, DHCP can assign them to connected
laptops, which lets you skip the IPTables configuration.
12-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Technician Laptop Access for Remote: Assigning IP Addresses to Technician Laptops
Assigning IP Addresses to Technician Laptops
Remote uses the DHCP server to assign IP addresses to network devices. CLI
commands are entered to specify valid ranges of IP addresses that may be
assigned.
Important: For a laptop to access the network through Remote using this
procedure, the laptop must be configured to obtain its IP address
automatically.
In this scenario, you will:

Enable the DHCP server

Configure a secondary bridge switch IP address

Configure the DHCP server interface

Configure the DHCP server subnet

Configure the DHCP server router

Configure the DHCP server IP address range

Configure the default time that a network device can keep a DHCP
server-assigned IP address

Configure the maximum time that a network device can keep a DHCP
server-assigned IP address.
To configure the DHCP server to assign IP addresses to technician laptops:
1. Enable the DHCP server:
config dhcp-server enable
2. Configure secondary bridge switch IP address 10.10.10.1/24:
config interface bridge switch ip address 10.10.10.1/24 secondary
Important: This step is important because an interface must exist on the same
subnet that the DHCP server will be servicing. If this interface does
not exist, the DHCP server will not start up.
3. Configure the DHCP server interface as bridge switch:
config dhcp-server interface bridge switch
4. Configure the DHCP server subnet as 10.10.10.0/24:
config dhcp-server subnet 10.10.10.0/24
5. Configure the DHCP server router as 10.10.10.1:
config dhcp-server subnet 10.10.10.0/24 router 10.10.10.1
12-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Technician Laptop Access for Remote: Assigning IP Addresses to Technician Laptops
6. Configure the DHCP server IP address range as 10.10.10.7 to 10.10.10.12:
config dhcp-server subnet 10.10.10.0/24 range 10.10.10.7
10.10.10.12

Note: When the DHCP server assigns IP addresses to network devices, it
automatically starts with the highest value IP address in the range.
7. Configure the default time that a network device can keep an IP address assigned
by the DHCP server as 4500 seconds:
config dhcp-server subnet 10.10.10.0/24 default-lease 4500
8. Configure the maximum time that a network device can keep an IP address
assigned by the DHCP server as 6000 seconds:
config dhcp-server subnet 10.10.10.0/24 max-lease 6000
9. (optional) Verify that the DHCP server has been configured properly:
show dhcp-server
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show dhcp-server
Admin State:
enabled
Broadcast:
disabled
Authority:
disabled
Config file:
Note: User specified configuration files will override configured
DHCP server settings.
Interfaces:
bridge switch
Subnets:
10.10.10.0/24 range=10.10.10.7/10.10.10.12 router=10.10.10.1
default-lease=4500 max-lease=6000
DNS:
Hosts:
test MAC=00:00:00:00:00:00 IP=0.0.0.0
(Dub)>
10. Save the configuration.
12-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Technician Laptop Access for Remote: Configuring IPTables for Network Address
Translation
Configuring IPTables for Network Address Translation
IPTables rules must be configured to enable network address translation for laptops
on the private network. Without NAT, devices with private addresses cannot send
packets to devices outside the LAN.

Note: For more information on IPTables, refer to an IPTables man page (version
1.2.7a).
In this scenario, you will:

Flush all Iptables

Configure a rule in the PREROUTING chain that accepts all packets from a
source subnet that go to a specified destination address

Set the default action for the PREROUTING chain to drop all packets

Configure a rule in the POSTROUTING chain that masquerades all TCP
packets from a specified source subnet.
To configure IPTables for address translation:
1. Flush all IPTables:
config iptables -t nat -F
config iptables -t filter -F
config iptables -t mangle -F
2. Configure a rule in the PREROUTING chain in the mangle table that accepts all
packets from source subnet 10.10.10.0/24 and to destination address
184.155.22.36:
config iptables -t mangle -A PREROUTING -s 10.10.10.0/24 -d
184.155.22.36 -j ACCEPT
3. Set the default action for the PREROUTING chain to drop all packets:
config iptables –t mangle –P PREROUTING DROP
CAUTION: If you are connected to Remote via a Telnet connection and you set
the default action to drop all packets without first configuring a rule to
accept packets between your workstation and Remote (as in step 2),
your connection to Remote will be lost.
4. Configure a rule in the POSTROUTING chain that masquerades all tcp packets from
source subnet 10.10.10.0/24:
config iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -s 10.10.10.0/24 -p tcp -j
MASQUERADE
12-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Technician Laptop Access for Remote: Configuring IPTables for Network Address
Translation
5. (optional) Verify that the IPTables commands have been configured properly:
show iptables configuration
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show iptables configuration
Table nat
------------------------------------------------------Chain PREROUTING (policy ACCEPT)
Chain POSTROUTING (policy ACCEPT)
-s 10.10.10.0/24 -p tcp -j MASQUERADE
Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
Table filter
------------------------------------------------------Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT)
-i lo -j ACCEPT
Chain FORWARD (policy ACCEPT)
Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
-d 127.0.0.0/8 -j ACCEPT
Table mangle
------------------------------------------------------Chain PREROUTING (policy DROP)
-i lo -j ACCEPT
-s 10.10.10.0/24 -d 184.155.22.36 -j ACCEPT
Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT)
-i lo -j ACCEPT
Chain FORWARD (policy ACCEPT)
Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
-d 127.0.0.0/8 -j ACCEPT
Chain POSTROUTING (policy ACCEPT)
-d 127.0.0.0/8 -j ACCEPT
(Dub)>
6. Save the configuration.
12-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Technician Laptop Access for Remote: Configuring IPTables for Network Address
Translation
12-8
13
Configuring Event Correlations
This chapter provides information about event correlations.
Guide to this Chapter
Overview
Correlation Expression Components
Configuring an Event Correlation
13-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Event Correlations: Overview
Overview
Event correlation is the ability to identify a unique condition by comparing the states of
multiple events and aggregating into a single event.
The goals of Remote event correlation are to:

Report the correlated condition to a network management system

Include the correlated condition as an individual component in other event
correlations (if defined)

Perform an automatic response (if defined)
Event Correlation Components
Event correlation is represented by an event originator named correlation and the
following components:
13-2

A description of the event correlation

A boolean-like expression to define the event correlation

Properties controlling how the expression is evaluated. The evaluation of the
correlation expression results in a true or false state for the event correlation.
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Event Correlations: Correlation Expression Components
Correlation Expression Components
The following illustrates a basic expression configuration:
Term
OriginatorType Instance State
Operator
and
Term
OriginatorType Instance State
Figure 13-1 Correlation Expression Example
A Term in a correlation expression is used to test the current state of an originator.
The Term consists collectively of the following elements:

Originator Type, which is one of the Remote event originator types. The type can
also be correlation, which refers to other event correlations.

Instance value, which is one of the valid instances for the specified type, for
example, 0/1, 2.

State, which is a valid state for the originator. In the case of a measurement, the
state may be a relational operator and a numeric value (for example, < 48 or >
95).
Originator Types and States
Table 13-1 lists the types of originators that are valid for the correlation expressions,
the associated events that are valid as a state comparison, and those originators that
can be used as multi-originators. Multi-originators must have either an any or an all
operator before the multiple instance token. See Operators on page 13-4 for details.
Table 13-1 Event Originator Types and States
Originator Type
Valid State Events
Multi Support
analog
high, in-band, inputsaturated, loss of signal, low
yes - point ranges
input
close, open
yes - point ranges
output
close, open
yes - point ranges
correlation
false, true
no
measurement
high, in-band, inputsaturated, loss of signal,
low, <, <=, =, >=, >, !=
yes - point ranges
13-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Event Correlations: Correlation Expression Components
Examples
Examples of these components combined are shown below:
analog 12/1 high
correlation examplecorr false
measurement ExtTemp1 > 90
Operators
The valid operators that can be used in a correlation expression are listed in the
following table, along with possible usages and example results for each.
Table 13-2 Operators and Usage
Operator
Usage
Example Result
and
expression analog 12/1
high and output 0/16
open
When both expressions are true, the
evaluation is true.
or
expression analog 12/1
high or measurement
extTemp > 110
When either expression is true, the
evaluation is true.
not
expression not analog
12/1 in-band
When negating a true expression, the
evaluation is false.
all
expression all output
12/1-4 close
When all expressions are true, the
evaluation is true.
any
expression any 3 input
0/1-5 close
When at least three (3) expressions are
true, the evaluation is true. If no number is
entered after any, the default value is 1.
Expression Evaluation
In an expression, the precedence order for evaluation is as follows:
1. Term
2. not
3. and
4. or
If a Term is a nested expression, it is fully evaluated as the evaluation of the Term, as
is typical with most programming languages. Nested expressions in parentheses are
supported, allowing complex expressions to be contained in a single correlation
expression. The use of parentheses can improve the readability of expressions which
mix and, not, and or operators.
13-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Event Correlations: Correlation Expression Components
Example Expressions
The examples below show various forms of Terms in nested expressions.




all input
0/1 low )
not ( any
false )
all input
all input
0/1-4 open and ( analog 0/1 loss-of-signal or analog
3 analog 0/1-4 in-band and correlation myCorrelation
1/1,3,5,7 open and correlation myCorrelation true
0,2/1-4 open
Configuring a Time Period (Optional)
You can optionally configure a time period (duration) during which a correlation
expression must remain in a true or false state before the correlation itself changes
state to match the expression.
For example, you may want to configure a scenario where an alarm is generated
when a door is open for an extended period of time rather than a brief open/close
situation.
13-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Event Correlations: Configuring an Event Correlation
Configuring an Event Correlation
In this scenario, you will:

Configure a correlation expression for two open door alarm events

Configure the time (duration) for which the expression must remain true or false
before the correlation matches the expression’s state

Create two alarm table entries for the open door events.
To configure an event correlation for two open door alarm events:
1. At the main prompt, configure an event correlation named DoorAlarms with a
description of Correlation for open door alarms:
config correlation DoorAlarms description Correlation for open
door alarms
2. Configure the true duration time in the expression for 900 seconds, meaning an
alarm will be sent if the door is open for 15 minutes; set the false duration time to
0 seconds (immediate), meaning an alarm will be sent immediately upon closure:
config correlation DoorAlarms duration 900 0
3. Configure the correlation expression for the two doors as input 0/1 open and
input 0/2 open:
config correlation DoorAlarms expression input 0/1 open and input
0/2 open
4. (optional) Verify that the action has been configured properly:
show correlation DoorAlarms
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show correlation DoorAlarms
Name
: DoorAlarms
Expression
: input 0/1 open and input 0/2 open
True Duration : 900
False Duration : 0
Evaluation
: false and false = false
Value
: false
Description
: Correlation for open door alarms
(Dub)>
13-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Event Correlations: Configuring an Event Correlation
To configure the alarm table entry for the open door correlation:
1. At the main prompt, configure the alarm entry name dooropen:
config alarm-entry dooropen
2. Configure the alarm entry dooropen with the following parameters:

event originator correlation DoorAlarms


event type true
event severity major

alarm message Door is open
config alarm-entry dooropen event correlation DoorAlarms true
major Door is open
3. Configure the alarm entry doorclosed with the following parameters:

event originator correlation DoorAlarms


event type false
event severity normal

alarm message Door is closed
config alarm-entry dooropen event correlation DoorAlarms false
normal Door is closed
4. Save the configuration.

Note: For an example of configuring an event correlation using a measurement, see
section Configuring an Event Correlation for a Measurement in Chapter 15:
Configuring Measurements and the Measurement Table.
13-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Event Correlations: Configuring an Event Correlation
13-8
14
Configuring Alarm Entries in the
Central Alarm Table
This chapter provides an overview of the central alarm table along with step-by-step scenarios
for configuring and using alarm entries in the central alarm table.
Guide to this Chapter
Overview
Alarm Protocol Formats
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Temperature Sensor
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Discrete Input
Configuring an Alarm Entry for Ethernet Interface MAC Security Violations
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Serial Connection Failure
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Power Supply Failure
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a TCP Connection that Goes Down
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Telnet Connection that Comes Up
Testing Alarm Table Configurations
14-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Overview
Overview
The central alarm table collects and communicates the state of all alarms reported by
Remote. It is a table of alarm entries that contains information for each attainable
severity level, and has the the following features:

Event/alarm associations—The central alarm table lets users associate events
with alarm responses in a single command. This is easier than configuring events
and alarm responses using the action subsystem, which requires three
commands for associating events with alarm responses.

Alarm Nagging—Alarm nagging causes an alarm entry to send an alarm message
in all formats enabled for that entry at a specified time interval. For information
about configuring the alarm nagging interval, refer to section Configuring an
Alarm Entry for a Temperature Sensor on page 14-4.

Alarm reporting in a variety of formats—The central alarm table can report alarm
statuses in raw, SNMP, or TL1 format. For more information on these formats,
refer to section Alarm Protocol Formats on page 14-3.
For information about commands that configure central alarm table entries and data,
refer to the Remote Command Reference Guide.
14-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Alarm Protocol Formats
Alarm Protocol Formats
The central alarm table supports multiple alarm protocol formats, including:

Raw

SNMP

TL1
You can enable and disable each alarm protocol format independently of the others
(meaning that you can have more than one format enabled at a time).
Raw
The central alarm table supports raw alarm output that can be used for alarm formats
that are not directly supported by Remote. A script or application can take the alarm
information from the raw output and translate it into any type of alarm message.
SNMP
The central alarm table supports SNMP through alarm traps in the aiMediationV2.mib.
Alarm traps are sent to all enabled SNMP management hosts. In order to receive
alarm traps, at least one SNMP management host must be configured.
TL1
The central alarm table supports TL1 reporting through virtual TL1 NEs. You must
configure and enable the desired virtual TL1 NEs to use them with the central alarm
table.
14-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Temperature
Sensor
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Temperature Sensor
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an alarm entry description

Configure a category name

Configure SNMP trap support

Configure the interval at which the alarm will send its state

Configure a network element name

Configure the alarm actions that signal when the detected temperature has
exceeded a maximum threshold, passed below a minimum threshold, or
entered into an acceptable range

Optionally configure average measurement values for analog inputs to
compensate for measurement fluctuations.
To configure the temperature sensor alarm entry:
1. At the main prompt, configure description Temperature sensor:
config alarm-entry tempSensor description Temperature sensor
2. Configure category name envAlms:
config alarm-entry tempSensor category envAlms
3. Enable SNMP trap support:
config alarm-entry tempSensor trap enable
4. Configure the SNMP trap priority level to high:
config alarm-entry tempSensor trap priority high
5. Configure the interval at which the alarm entry sends its state information to 5
seconds when the alarm state is critical:
config alarm-entry tempSensor nagging 5 critical
6. Configure network element name sensorUnit:
config alarm-entry tempSensor ne-name sensorUnit
14-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Temperature
Sensor
7. Configure an event for alarm entry tempSensor with the following settings:

Event originator analog 0/1

Event trigger high

Event severity level critical

Alarm event message Temperature above safe threshold - followed by
the actual high value for the alarm entry.
config alarm-entry tempSensor event analog 0/1 high critical
Temperature above safe threshold - $(value)

Note: Keyword $(value) is replaced with the current value of the analog input. If the
event associated with the analog input does not contain an event message
value, no substitution takes place.
8. Configure a second event for alarm entry tempSensor with the following settings:

Event originator analog 0/1
Important: All events configured for an alarm entry must have the same event
originator.

Event trigger low

Event severity level minor

Alarm event message Temperature below low threshold - followed by
the actual low value for the alarm entry.
config alarm-entry tempSensor event analog 0/1 low minor
Temperature below low threshold - $(value)
9. Configure a third event for alarm entry tempSensor with the following settings:

Event originator analog 0/1

Event trigger in-band

Event severity level normal

Alarm event message Temperature in normal range.
config alarm-entry tempSensor event analog 0/1 in-band normal
Temperature in normal range
14-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Temperature
Sensor
10. (optional) Verify that the alarm entry has been configured properly:
show alarm-entries name tempSensor
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show alarm-entries name tempSensor
Name
- tempSensor
State
- normal
Current Message Description
- Temperature sensor
Nagging Interval - 5
Nagging Level
- critical
Trap
- enabled
Trap Priority
- high
Raw
- enabled
TL1
- disabled
TL1 AID
TL1 Class
- env
TL1 Affect
- nsa
TL1 Type
TL1NE
- 1
Category
- envAlms
NE Name
- TempSensor
Alarm Actions:
Severity
Originator
Trigger
Message
-----------------------------------------------------------------critical
analog 0/1
high
Temperature above sa
minor
analog 0/1
low
Temperature below lo
normal
analog 0/1
in-band
Temperature in norma
(Dub)>
11. Save the configuration.
Configuring Analog Input Values
The values reported by Remote analog inputs oftentimes show rapid fluctuations as
compared to the values read from a digital multi-meter. This is by design and does not
indicate a problem with the Remote. Digital multi-meters utilize sophisticated internal
circuitry to minimize these inherent fluctuations when displaying measurements to the
user. To compensate for these variations, Remote provides two analog input features:
analog averaging and analog adjustment.
Analog Averaging
Users can specify the level at which Remote will average measurement values. The
goal is for a reasonable, steady-state value to measure consistently with both the
Remote and an external meter. Summarized in Table 14-1 are the valid averaging
values with typical examples of when they may be applied to a measurement.
14-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Temperature
Sensor
.
Table 14-1 Analog Averaging Values
Measurement
Example
Value
Description
high
Provides the most averaging, but provides
slower response to rapid changes in the
measured value. This setting is typically
used with environmental or other sensors
which measure conditions that do not
change quickly.
Temperature/Humidity
medium
The typical value used when the unscaled
value fluctuates by +/- .01 V or mA. This
setting is recommended for measurements
which are not expected to change
instantaneously, but may change
significantly over a short period of time (for
example, 1 minute).
Fuel Level
low
Provides faster response to value fluctuation
while still providing a small level of
averaging. This setting is recommended for
measurements which may change very
rapidly during alarm conditions, but which
will still benefit from the smoothing feature
during steady-state operation.
Battery Voltage
none
No averaging will be applied and raw values
will be reported. This is the default value.
The following example shows how to configure discrete analog 0/1 with medium
level averaging:
config discrete analog 0/1 averaging medium
Analog Adjustment
A fixed adjustment can be applied to an analog input value to raise or lower the value
to match a reference value. By adjusting both the minimum and maximum sensor
readings by the same amount, the offset can be applied without changing the scaling
factor of the analog input. Note that these values affect only the current conditions.
For example, to configure a voltage sensor for 0-10V scaling to 0-100 gallons of fuel,
an offset of +7 gallons can be applied by scaling the 0-10V to 7-107 gallons. This
scenario is configured as follows:
config discrete analog 0/1 minimum 0 7
config discrete analog 0/1 maximum 10 107
14-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Discrete Input
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Discrete Input
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an alarm entry description

Configure TL1 alarm protocol support

Configure an alarm action that occurs when a light turns off, which opens an
input

Configure an alarm action that occurs when a light turns on, which closes an
input.
Important: This scenario does not show how to configure the discrete input that is
associated with the alarm entry. For information on configuring
discrete inputs, refer to command config discrete input in the
Remote Command Reference Guide.
To configure the open input alarm entry:
1. At the main prompt, configure description Light switch:
config alarm-entry input0_1 description Light Switch
2. Enable tl1 alarm protocol support and set the TL1 alarm class to eqpt
(equipment) and the TL1 service state to sa (service-affecting):
config alarm-entry input0_1 tl1 enable
config alarm-entry input0_1 tl1 eqpt
config alarm-entry input0_1 tl1 sa

Note: For information on configuring the TL1 NE and TL1 MUX that monitor the
alarm, refer to Chapter 17: Configuring and Connecting TL1
Infrastructure.
3. Configure an event for alarm entry input0_1 with the following settings:

Event originator input 0/1

Event trigger open

Event severity level major

Alarm event message Light off.
config alarm-entry input0_1 event input 0/1 open major Light off
14-8
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Discrete Input
4. Configure an event for alarm entry input0_1 with the following settings:

Event originator input 0/1

Event trigger close

Event severity level major

Alarm event message Light on.
config alarm-entry input0_1 event input 0/1 close major Light on
5. (optional) Verify that the alarm entry has been configured properly:
show alarm-entries name input0_1
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show alarm-entries name input0_1
Name
- input0_1
State
- normal
Current Message Description
- Light Switch
Nagging Interval - 0
Nagging Level
- major
Trap
- enabled
Raw
- disabled
TL1
- enabled
TL1 AID
TL1 Class
- eqpt
TL1 Affect
- sa
TL1 Type
TL1NE
- 1
Category
NE Name
Alarm Actions:
Severity
Originator
Trigger
Message
-----------------------------------------------------------------major
input 0/1
open
Light off
major
input 0/1
close
Light on
(Dub)>
6. Save the configuration.
14-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for Ethernet Interface
MAC Security Violations
Configuring an Alarm Entry for Ethernet Interface MAC
Security Violations
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an alarm entry description

Configure SNMP alarm protocol support for the alarm entry

Configure a category name for the alarm entry

Configure a network element name for the alarm entry

Configure an alarm action that signals that a MAC security violation has
occurred.
Important: This scenario does not show how to configure the Ethernet port that is
associated with the alarm entry. For information on configuring
Ethernet ports, refer to command config controller ethernet in
the Remote Command Reference Guide.
To configure the MAC security violation alarm entry:
1. At the main prompt, configure description MAC security violation:
config alarm-entry MACviolation description MAC security violation
2. Enable SNMP trap alarm protocol support:
config alarm-entry MACviolation trap enable
3. Configure category name Equipment:
config alarm-entry MACviolation category Equipment
4. Configure network element name discretePanel:
config alarm-entry MACviolation ne-name discretePanel
5. Configure an event for alarm entry MACviolation with the following settings:

Event originator ethernet 3

Event trigger mac-violation

Event severity level major

Alarm event message A MAC violation has occurred.
config alarm-entry MACviolation event ethernet 3 mac-violation
major A MAC violation has occurred
14-10
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for Ethernet Interface
MAC Security Violations
6. (optional) Verify that the alarm entry has been configured properly:
show alarm-entries name MACviolation
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show alarm-entries name MACviolation
Name
- MACviolation
State
- normal
Current Message Description
- MAC security violation
Nagging Interval - 0
Nagging Level
- major
Trap
- enabled
Raw
- disabled
TL1
- disabled
TL1 AID
TL1 Class
- env
TL1 Affect
- nsa
TL1 Type
TL1NE
- 1
Category
- Equipment
NE Name
- eth_3
Alarm Actions:
Severity
Originator
Trigger
Message
-----------------------------------------------------------------major
ethernet 3
mac-violat A MAC violation has
(Dub)>
7. Save the configuration.
14-11
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Serial Connection
Failure
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Serial Connection Failure
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an alarm entry description

Configure SNMP alarm protocol support

Configure an alarm action that signals that a serial connection failure has
occurred.
Important: This scenario does not show how to configure the serial port that is
associated with the alarm entry. For information on configuring serial
ports, refer to command config controller serial in the Remote
Command Reference Guide.
To configure an alarm entry for a serial connection failure:
1. At the main prompt, configure description Serial connection failure:
config alarm-entry SerConnFail description Serial connection
failure
2. Enable SNMP trap alarm protocol support:
config alarm-entry SerConnFail trap enable
3. Configure an event for alarm entry SerConnFail with the following settings:

Event originator serial 3

Event trigger conn-failed

Event severity level major

Alarm event message The serial connection has failed.
config alarm-entry SerConnFail event serial 3 conn-failed major
The serial connection has failed
14-12
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Serial Connection
Failure
4. (optional) Verify that the alarm entry has been configured properly:
show alarm-entries name SerConnFail
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show alarm-entries name SerConnFail
Name
- SerConnFail
State
- normal
Current Message Description
- Serial connection failure
Nagging Interval - 0
Nagging Level
- major
Trap
- enabled
Raw
- disabled
TL1
- disabled
TL1 AID
TL1 Class
- env
TL1 Affect
- nsa
TL1 Type
TL1NE
- 1
Category
NE Name
Alarm Actions:
Severity
Originator
Trigger
Message
-----------------------------------------------------------------major
serial 3
conn-faile The serial connectio
(Dub)>
5. Save the configuration.
14-13
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Power Supply
Failure
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Power Supply Failure
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an alarm entry description

Configure TL1 alarm protocol support

Configure an alarm action that signals that a power supply failure has occurred.
To configure an alarm entry for a power supply failure:
1. At the main prompt, configure description 5 volt power supply failure:
config alarm-entry powerFail5 description 5 volt power supply
failure
2. Enable tl1 alarm protocol support and set the TL1 alarm class to eqpt
(equipment) and the TL1 service state to sa (service-affecting):
config alarm-entry powerFail5 tl1 enable
config alarm-entry powerFail5 tl1 eqpt
config alarm-entry powerFail5 tl1 sa

Note: For information on configuring the TL1 NE and TL1 MUX that monitor the
alarm, refer to Chapter 17: Configuring and Connecting TL1
Infrastructure.
3. Configure an event for alarm entry powerFail5 with the following settings:

Event originator system

Event trigger power-fail-5

Event severity level critical

Alarm event message 5 volt power supply failure.
config alarm-entry powerFail5 event system power-fail-5 critical 5
volt power supply failure
14-14
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Power Supply
Failure
4. (optional) Verify that the alarm entry has been configured properly:
show alarm-entries name powerFail5
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show alarm-entries name powerFail5
Name
- powerFail5
State
- normal
Current Message Description
- 5 volt power supply failure
Nagging Interval - 0
Nagging Level
- major
Trap
- enabled
Raw
- disabled
TL1
- enabled
TL1 AID
TL1 Class
- eqpt
TL1 Affect
- sa
TL1 Type
TL1NE
- 1
Category
NE Name
Alarm Actions:
Severity
Originator
Trigger
Message
-----------------------------------------------------------------critical
system
power-fail 5 volt power supply
(Dub)>
5. Save the configuration.
14-15
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a TCP Connection
that Goes Down
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a TCP Connection that
Goes Down
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an alarm entry description

Configure SNMP alarm protocol support

Configure an alarm action that signals that a TCP connection has gone down.
To configure an alarm entry for a TCP connection that goes down:
1. At the main prompt, configure description TCP connection down:
config alarm-entry TCPConnDown description TCP connection down
2. Enable SNMP trap alarm protocol support:
config alarm-entry TCPConnDown trap enable
3. Configure an event for alarm entry TCPConnDown with the following settings:

Event originator tcp 192.168.0.12:5001

Event trigger conn-down

Event severity level major

Alarm event message TCP connection down.
config alarm-entry TCPConnDown event tcp 192.168.0.12:5001 conndown major TCP connection down
14-16
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a TCP Connection
that Goes Down
4. (optional) Verify that the alarm entry has been configured properly:
show alarm-entries name TCPConnDown
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show alarm-entries name TCPConnDown
Name
- TCPConnDown
State
- normal
Current Message Description
- TCP connection down
Nagging Interval - 0
Nagging Level
- major
Trap
- enabled
Raw
- disabled
TL1
- disabled
TL1 AID
TL1 Class
- env
TL1 Affect
- nsa
TL1 Type
TL1NE
- 1
Category
NE Name
Alarm Actions:
Severity
Originator
Trigger
Message
-----------------------------------------------------------------major
tcp 192.168.0.12
conn-down
TCP connection down
(Dub)>
5. Save the configuration.
14-17
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Telnet Connection
that Comes Up
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Telnet Connection that
Comes Up
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an alarm entry description

Configure SNMP alarm protocol support

Configure an alarm action that signals that a Telnet connection has come up.
To configure the Telnet connection up alarm entry:
1. At the main prompt, configure description Telnet connection up:
config alarm-entry TelnetConnUp description Telnet connection up
2. Enable SNMP trap alarm protocol support:
config alarm-entry TelnetConnUp trap enable
3. Configure an event for alarm entry TelnetConnUp with the following settings:

Event originator telnet 192.168.0.4:6001

Event trigger conn-up

Event severity level normal

Alarm event message Telnet connection now up.
config alarm-entry TelnetConnUp event telnet 192.168.0.4:6001
conn-up normal Telnet connection now up
Tip: This same scenario can be followed to configure a connection up alarm entry for
SSH. Simply substitute SSH for Telnet.
14-18
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Telnet Connection
that Comes Up
4. (optional) Verify that the alarm entry has been configured properly:
show alarm-entries name TelnetConnUp
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show alarm-entries name TelnetConnUp
Name
- TelnetConnUp
State
- normal
Current Message Description
- Telnet connection up
Nagging Interval - 0
Nagging Level
- major
Trap
- enabled
Raw
- disabled
TL1
- disabled
TL1 AID
TL1 Class
- env
TL1 Affect
- nsa
TL1 Type
TL1NE
- 1
Category
NE Name
Alarm Actions:
Severity
Originator
Trigger
Message
-----------------------------------------------------------------normal
telnet 192.168.0
conn-up
Telnet connection no
(Dub)>
5. Save the configuration.
14-19
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Alarm Entries in the Central Alarm Table: Testing Alarm Table Configurations
Testing Alarm Table Configurations
After you configure alarm table entries, you can simulate test traps from the alarm
table to test your alarm table configurations before actual alarm traps are sent. Test
mode traps are sent to the management station.
In this scenario, you will:

Enable the alarm table test mode.

Simulate a test trap from Remote for a specific alarm entry.
To simulate a test trap from the Remote alarm table:
1. At the main prompt, enable the alarm table test mode using the default timeout
period (10 minutes):
diag test mode enable
2. Simulate a test trap for alarm entry GPS_Failure:
diag test alarm-entry GPS_Failure
3. (optional) Verify that the GPS_Failure alarm entry is being simulated:
show test alarm-entries
This command response displays the alarm entries that are currently being
simulated (in test mode).
(Dub)>show
(Dub) show>test
(Dub) show test> alarm-entries
Name
State
Current alarm message
---------------------------------------------------------------------Explosive_Gas
normal
Explosive Gas Not Detected
GPS_Failure
normal
GPS Normal
Generator_OilPressur normal
--NewTest
normal
--Toxic_Gas
normal
--(Dub) show test
14-20
15
Configuring Measurements and the
Measurement Table
This chapter provides an overview of Remote’s measurement table along with step-by-step
scenarios for configuring a measurement table entry, an alarm entry for a measurement, and an
event correlation for a measurement.
Guide to this Chapter
Overview
Configuring a Measurement Table Entry for a Temperature Sensor
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Measurement
Configuring an Event Correlation for a Measurement
15-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Measurements and the Measurement Table: Overview
Overview
In addition to its central alarm table, Remote provides a measurement table that
collects analog measurement values and reports these values to a central
management station, such as Optima. These measurement values can be sourced
from one of Remote’s analog inputs, from a script running on Remote that monitors an
attached network element, or via SNMP from a network element that is monitored by
SNMP proxy. The Remote measurement table stores a 24-hour history of collected
values.
Figure 15-1 Remote Measurement Table
Each entry in the measurement table is identified by a name and contains an analog
value, units of measure (such as V, %, deg C, or deg F), the originator of the data
(such as analog 0/1 or script jobname_measurementname), the NE name, an
optional description and category, and the maximum, minimum, and average
measured values over the reporting interval.
You can configure a measurement table entry such that the state of the measurement
will change based on the current value of the measurement. These states include:
15-2

Loss-of-signal—The value has passed below the minimum measurable threshold

Low—The value has passed below the minimum value that is considered normal
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Measurements and the Measurement Table: Overview

In-band—The value falls between the minimum normal value and the maximum
normal value

High—The value has passed above the maximum value that is considered normal

Input-saturated—The value has passed above the maximum measurable
threshold

Offline—The originator of the value has gone offline and is not reporting a value
Use with Alarm Table Entries
Measurement table entries can be used in connection with Remote’s alarm table. You
can set up alarm entries with different events that are triggered in response to
fluctuations in the current state of a measurement.
See section Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Measurement for an example.
Use with Event Correlations
You can create event correlations to be used with measurement table entries. The
example in section Configuring an Event Correlation for a Measurement correlates a
temperature measurement exceeding a specified value with an input being open to
create an alarm for fire danger.
For more information on configuring correlations, see Chapter 13: Configuring Event
Correlations.
Use with Proxied SNMP NEs
See Chapter 21: Configuring the SNMP Proxy for information on how to use the
measurement table with proxied SNMP NEs. Relevant topics include Configuring a
Mediation SNMP Measurement Template and Configuring a Mediation SNMP
Network Element.
15-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Measurements and the Measurement Table: Configuring a Measurement Table Entry for a
Temperature Sensor
Configuring a Measurement Table Entry for a Temperature
Sensor
In this scenario, you will:

Configure a measurement table entry with name and description

Configure a category name

Configure measurement units

Configure a network element name

Configure the normal (in-band), maximum, and minimum values

Configure the originator for a measurement table entry

Enable the measurement table entry
To configure the temperature sensor alarm entry:
1. At the main prompt, configure measurement table entry ExtTemp1 with
description External temperature sensor:
config meas-table entry ExtTemp1 description External temperature
2. Configure category name envAlms:
config meas-table entry ExtTemp1 category envAlms
3. Configure measurement units Degrees F:
config meas-table entry ExtTemp1 units Degrees F
4. Configure network element name sensorUnit:
config meas-table entry ExtTemp1 ne-name sensorUnit
5. Configure the normal range for measurement values:
config meas-table entry ExtTemp1 band 65 80
6. Configure the maximum measurable value:
config meas-table entry ExtTemp1 maximum 130
7. Configure the minimum measurable value:
config meas-table entry ExtTemp1 minimum -30
8. Configure the originator for this measurement:
config meas-table entry ExtTemp1 originator analog 0/4
9. Enable the measurement table entry:
config meas-table entry ExtTemp1 enable
15-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Measurements and the Measurement Table: Configuring a Measurement Table Entry for a
Temperature Sensor
10. (optional) Verify that the measurement table entry has been configured properly:
show meas-table entries ExtTemp1
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show meas-table entries ExtTemp1
Name
- ExtTemp1 (static)
Status
- offline
Originator
- analog 0/4
Description
- External temperature sensor
NE Name
- sensorUnit
Category
- envAlms
Report Interval - 0
Low-Band
- 65.
High-Band
- 80.
Hysteresis
- 0.
Max-Limit
- 130.
Min-Limit
- -30.
Units
- Degrees F
Current Value
Interval Value
Interval Minimum
Interval Maximum
Interval Average
(Dub)>
-
?
?
?
?
?
11. Save the configuration.
15-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Measurements and the Measurement Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Measurement
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Measurement
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an alarm entry description and category

Configure the network element name associated with this alarm entry

Configure SNMP trap alarm protocol support

Configure different alarm actions that occur when a measurement is normal,
low, high, falls below the measurable range, or rises above the measurable
range
To configure the measurement alarm entry:
1. At the main prompt, configure alarm entry ExtTemp with description External
temperature alarm:
config alarm-entry ExtTemp description External temperature alarm
2. Configure category name envAlms:
config alarm-entry ExtTemp category envAlms
3. Configure network element name sensorUnit:
config alarm-entry ExtTemp ne-name sensorUnit
4. Enable SNMP trap alarm protocol support with priority normal:
config alarm-entry ExtTemp trap enable
config alarm-entry ExtTemp trap priority normal
5. Configure an event for alarm entry ExtTemp with the following settings:

Event originator measurement ExtTemp1

Event trigger high

Event severity level major

Alarm event message $(value).

Note: Keyword $(value) is replaced with the current measurement value.
config alarm-entry ExtTemp event measurement ExtTemp1 high major
$(value)
15-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Measurements and the Measurement Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Measurement
6. Configure an event for alarm entry ExtTemp with the following settings:

Event originator measurement ExtTemp1

Event trigger low

Event severity level major

Alarm event message $(value).
config alarm-entry ExtTemp event measurement ExtTemp1 low major
$(value)
7. Configure an event for alarm entry ExtTemp with the following settings:

Event originator measurement ExtTemp1

Event trigger in-band

Event severity level normal

Alarm event message $(value).
config alarm-entry ExtTemp event measurement ExtTemp1 in-band
normal $(value)
8. Configure an event for alarm entry ExtTemp with the following settings:

Event originator measurement ExtTemp1

Event trigger input-saturated

Event severity level critical

Alarm event message Input saturated.
config alarm-entry ExtTemp event measurement ExtTemp1 inputsaturated critical Input saturated
9. Configure an event for alarm entry ExtTemp with the following settings:

Event originator measurement ExtTemp1

Event trigger loss-of-signal

Event severity level critical

Alarm event message Signal loss.
config alarm-entry ExtTemp event measurement ExtTemp1 loss-ofsignal critical Signal loss
10. (optional) Verify that the alarm entry has been configured properly:
show alarm-entries name ExtTemp
The command response appears similar to the following:
15-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Measurements and the Measurement Table: Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Measurement
(Dub)>show alarm-entries name ExtTemp
Name
- ExtTemp
State
- normal
Current Message Description
- Exterior temperature alarm
Nagging Interval - 0
Nagging Level
- major
Trap
- enabled
Trap Priority
- normal
Raw
- disabled
TL1
- disabled
TL1 AID
TL1 Class
- env
TL1 Affect
- nsa
TL1 Type
TL1NE
- 1
Category
- envAlms
NE Name
- sensorUnit
Originator
- measurement ExtTemp1
Alarm Actions:
Severity
Trigger
Message
-----------------------------------------------------------------major
high
$(value)
major
low
$(value)
normal
in-band
$(value)
critical
input-saturated
Input saturated
critical
loss-of-signal
Signal loss
(Dub)>
11. Save the configuration.
15-8
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Measurements and the Measurement Table: Configuring an Event Correlation for a
Measurement
Configuring an Event Correlation for a Measurement
In this scenario, you will:

Configure a correlation expression for fire danger, when a measurement from a
temperature sensor exceeds a specified value while an alarm event from a
smoke detector (connected to input 0/3) exists

Configure the time (duration) for which the expression must remain true or false
before the correlation matches the expression’s state

Create two alarm table entries for the correlation.
To configure an event correlation for fire danger:
1. At the main prompt, configure an event correlation named FireDanger with
description Correlation for temperature and smoke:
config correlation FireDanger description Correlation for
temperature and smoke
2. Configure the correlation expression for the value of measurement ExtTemp1 as
greater than or equal to 90 and the smoke detector (input 0/3) as open:
config correlation FireDanger expression measurement ExtTemp1 >=
90 and input 0/3 open
3. Configure the true duration time in the expression for 120 seconds, meaning an
alarm will be sent if these conditions persist for two minutes; set the false duration
time to 0 seconds (immediate), meaning an alarm will be sent immediately when
either condition no longer exists:
config correlation FireDanger duration 90 0
4. (optional) Verify that the action has been configured properly:
show correlation FireDanger
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show correlation FireDanger
Name
: FireDanger
Expression
: measurement ExtTemp1 >= 90 and input 0/3 open
True Duration : 90
False Duration : 0
Evaluation
: false and false = false
Value
: false
Description
: Correlation for temperature and smoke
(Dub)>
15-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Measurements and the Measurement Table: Configuring an Event Correlation for a
Measurement
To configure the alarm table entry for the fire danger correlation:
1. At the main prompt, configure the alarm entry name dooropen:
config alarm-entry fireDanger
2. Configure the alarm entry dooropen with the following parameters:

event originator correlation FireDanger


event type true
event severity critical

alarm message Fire alarm exists
config alarm-entry fireDanger event correlation FireDanger true
critical Fire alarm exists
3. Configure the alarm entry doorclosed with the following parameters:

event originator correlation FireDanger


event type false
event severity normal

alarm message Fire alarm is cleared
config alarm-entry dooropen event correlation FireDanger false
normal Fire alarm is cleared
4. Save the configuration.
15-10
16
Configuring Mediation Connections
This chapter provides information about how to configure mediation connections, events,
responses, and actions.
Guide to this Chapter
Overview
Secure Terminal Server Access
Configuring a TCP to Asynchronous Serial Connection
Configuring a Telnet to Asynchronous Serial Connection
Configuring a SSH to Asynchronous Serial Connection
Configuring an Asynchronous Serial to Asynchronous Serial Connection
Configuring an Asynchronous Serial to TCP Connection
16-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Overview
Overview
Mediation connections allow you to connect different protocols. Examples of
mediation connections include:

Asynchronous to TCP connections and TCP to asynchronous connections

Asynchronous to asynchronous connections

TCP to TL1 multiplexer connections and TL1 multiplexer to network element (NE)
connections
A mediation connection can be configured to have multiple hops; however, the
connection must have a source endpoint and a destination endpoint at a minimum. In
addition, the connection can have data filters in the middle, for example, the Telnet
filter acts as a Telnet server proxy.
Except for mediation connections between an NE and a TL1 multiplexer, mediation
connections are established through the configuration of events, responses, and
actions.

Note: For more information on how to configure mediation connections between an
NE and a TL1 multiplexer, refer to Chapter 17: Configuring and Connecting
TL1 Infrastructure.
16-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Secure Terminal Server Access
Secure Terminal Server Access
The secure terminal server access feature provides a layer of encryption and
authentication, creating a secure connection from a workstation to Remote to access
a connected NE. The connection from Remote to the NEs is not secure.
The Secure Shell Protocol (SSH) is used to provide the secure connection and is
suitable for both an interactive user session via a client like PuTTY or through any
available SSH client library.
The Redirect application provides SSH as an option for a virtual serial port’s protocol
in addition to TCP and Telnet protocols. Redirect also allows for user authentication
options to be configured.
Figure 16-1 shows the secure connection using SSH and a non-secure connection
using Telnet.
Figure 16-1 Secure and Non-Secure Connections
16-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Secure Terminal Server Access
Terminal Server User Access
A built-in user profile called restricted is available for users, which allows terminal
server access but no CLI or FTP access. At the CLI, a user with the restricted
profile will only be able to logout; no files will be available for retrieval via FTP.
TACACS+ Configuration
If your Remote is configured for TACACS+, authorization and accounting of the
secure terminal server login is performed according to your Remote’s configuration.
The authorization uses a TACACS+ service, aimediation, which is different from the
one used for CLI logins. The aimediation service must be added to the TACACS+
server and associated with the appropriate users and groups.
See the config mediation tacacs-service command in the Remote Command
Reference Guide for more information.
16-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Configuring a TCP to Asynchronous Serial Connection
Configuring a TCP to Asynchronous Serial Connection
In this scenario, you will configure a mediation connection between a TCP port and
an asynchronous serial controller. You will set up an action, event, and response
that cause the TCP port and controller to connect.
To configure a TCP connection to an asynchronous connection:
1. Configure event tcp40010 with originator tcp 10.40.57.5:40010 and event type
incoming-connection:
config event tcp40010 content tcp 10.40.57.5:40010 incomingconnection

Note: The TCP originator IP address is optional if it is the same as the Remote
bridge switch interface IP address.
2. Configure response tcp40010ToSerial4 with responder tcp 10.40.57.5:40010
and response type dest serial 4:
config response tcp40010ToSerial4 content tcp 10.40.57.5:40010
connect dest serial 4
3. Configure action tcpToSerial4 with event tcp40010 and response
tcp40010ToSerial4:
config action tcpToSerial4 event tcp40010 response
tcp40010ToSerial4
4. (optional) Verify that the TCP to asynchronous connection has been configured
properly:
show actions tcpToSerial4
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show actions tcpToSerial4
Action Name
: tcpToSerial4
Action Description
:
Event
Event
Event
Event
Name
Description
Originator
Type
Response
Response
Response
Response
Response
Name
Description
Responder
Type
Parameters
: tcp40010
:
: tcp 10.40.57.5:40010
: incoming-connection
: tcp40010ToSerial4
:
: tcp 10.40.57.5:40010
: connect
:
dest=serial 4
(Dub)>
16-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Configuring a TCP to Asynchronous Serial Connection
5. Configure controller serial 4 to connect and disconnect as DCD goes active and
inactive:
config controller serial 4 connect mode dcd
config controller serial 4 disconnect mode dcd
6. Configure the application mode as destination:
config controller serial 4 application destination
7. (optional) Verify that a connection is established:
show connections
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show connections
tcp 10.40.57.5:40010:4 -> serial 4
(Dub)>

Note: The 4 that comes after the TCP port number is an internal reference
number generated by Remote.
8. Save the configuration.
16-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Configuring a Telnet to Asynchronous Serial Connection
Configuring a Telnet to Asynchronous Serial Connection
In this scenario, you will configure a mediation connection between a Telnet port
and an asynchronous serial controller. You will set up an action, event, and
response that cause the Telnet port and controller to connect.
To configure a Telnet to asynchronous serial connection:
1. Configure event IncTelnetConn to signal that an incoming telnet connection
request has been received on port 60002 at IP address 10.40.57.5:
config event IncTelnetConn content telnet 10.40.57.5:60002
incoming-connection
2. Configure response telnet60002ToSerial5 to connect Telnet port 60002 at IP
address 10.40.57.5 to destination serial 5:
config response telnet60002ToSerial5 content telnet
10.40.57.5:60002 connect dest serial 5
3. Configure response telnet60002ToSerial5 to cause a Telnet connection from
port 60002 at IP address 10.40.57.5 to operate in binary mode:
config response telnet60002ToSerial5 content telnet
10.40.57.5:60002 connect options -b
4. Configure action telnetToSerial to associate event IncTelnetConn with
response telnet60002ToSerial5:
config action telnetToSerial event IncTelnetConn response
telnet60002ToSerial5
5. (optional) Verify that the Telnet to asynchronous connection has been configured
properly:
show actions telnetToSerial
The command response appears similar to the following:
16-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Configuring a Telnet to Asynchronous Serial Connection
(Dub)>show actions telnetToSerial
Action Name
: telnetToSerial
Action Description
:
Event
Event
Event
Event
Name
Description
Originator
Type
Response
Response
Response
Response
Response
Name
Description
Responder
Type
Parameters
: IncTelnetConn
:
: telnet 10.40.57.5:60002
: incoming-connection
: telnet60002ToSerial5
:
: telnet 10.40.57.5:60002
: connect
:
dest=serial 5
options=-b
(Dub)>
6. Configure controller serial 5 to connect and disconnect as DCD goes active and
inactive:
config controller serial 5 connect mode dcd
config controller serial 5 disconnect mode dcd
7. Configure the application mode as destination:
config controller serial 5 application destination
8. (optional) Verify that a connection is established:
show connections
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show connections
telnet 10.40.57.5:40010:4 -> serial 5
(Dub)>

Note: The 4 that comes after the TCP port number is an internal reference
number generated by Remote.
9. Save the configuration.
16-8
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Configuring a SSH to Asynchronous Serial Connection
Configuring a SSH to Asynchronous Serial Connection
In this scenario, you will configure a mediation connection between an SSH port
and an asynchronous serial controller. You will set up an action, event, and
response that cause the SSH port and controller to connect.
In addition, you will configure:
 A user profile authorized for terminal server access

A service that is passed to the TACACS+ server when authenticating users for
mediation
To configure an SSH to asynchronous serial connection:
1. Configure event IncSSHConn to signal that an incoming SSH connection request
has been received on port 20001 at IP address 10.40.57.5:
config event IncSSHConn content ssh 10.40.57.5:20001
incoming-connection
2. Configure response SSH20001ToSerial6 to connect SSH port 20001 at IP
address 10.40.57.5 to destination serial 6:
config response SSH20001ToSerial6 content ssh 10.40.57.5:20001
connect dest serial 6
3. Configure action SSHToSerial to associate event IncSSHConn with response
SSH20001ToSerial6:
config action SSHToSerial event IncSSHConn response
ssh20001ToSerial6
4. (optional) Verify that the SSH to asynchronous connection has been configured
properly:
show actions SSHToSerial
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show actions SSHToSerial
Action Name
: SSHToSerial
Action Description
:
Event
Event
Event
Event
Name
Description
Originator
Type
Response
Response
Response
Response
Response
Name
Description
Responder
Type
Parameters
: IncSSHConn
:
: ssh 10.40.57.5:20001
: incoming-connection
: ssh20001ToSerial6
:
: ssh 10.40.57.5:20001
: connect
:
dest=serial 6
(Dub)>
16-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Configuring a SSH to Asynchronous Serial Connection
5. Configure controller serial 6 to connect and disconnect as DCD goes active and
inactive:
config controller serial 6 connect mode dcd
config controller serial 6 disconnect mode dcd
6. Configure the application mode as destination:
config controller serial 6 application destination
7. (optional) Verify that a connection is established:
show connections
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show connections
ssh 10.40.57.5:20001:4 -> serial 6
(Dub)>

Note: The 4 that comes after the TCP port number is an internal reference
number generated by Remote.
8. (Optional) Create a new user named ebh, password jimbo, with the
restricted profile, authorizing this user for terminal server access:
config users add ebh restricted jimbo jimbo
9. (Optional) Configure the aimediation service (the default) on the TACACS+
server, which will be used when authenticating users for mediation:
config mediation default tacacs-service

Note: You will need to add priv_lvl=0 to the aimediation service on the
TACACS+ server.
10. Save the configuration.
16-10
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Configuring an Asynchronous Serial to Asynchronous Serial
Connection
Configuring an Asynchronous Serial to Asynchronous
Serial Connection
In this scenario, you will configure a mediation connection between two
asynchronous serial controllers. You will set up an action, event, and response that
cause the controllers to connect.
To configure an asynchronous serial to asynchronous serial connection:
1. Configure event serial2Up with originator serial 2 and event type up:
config event serial2Up content serial 2 up
2. Configure response serial2Connect with responder serial 2 and response
type connect with destination serial 1:
config response serial2Connect content serial 2 connect dest
serial 1
3. Configure action serial2ToSerial1 with event serial2Up and response
serial2Connect:
config action serial2ToSerial1 event serial2Up response
serial2Connect
4. (optional) Verify that the asynchronous to asynchronous connection has been
configured properly:
show actions serial2ToSerial1
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show actions serial2ToSerial1
Action Name
: serial2ToSerial1
Action Description
:
Event
Event
Event
Event
Name
Description
Originator
Type
Response
Response
Response
Response
Response
Name
Description
Responder
Type
Parameters
: serial2Up
:
: serial 2
: up
: serial2Connect
:
: serial 2
: connect
:
dest=serial 1
(Dub)>
16-11
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Configuring an Asynchronous Serial to Asynchronous Serial
Connection
5. (optional) At the main prompt, configure controller serial 1 with application
mode destination:
config controller serial 1 application destination

Note: By default, asynchronous serial controllers are configured to act as both
sources and destinations for connections, which makes configuration of
this command optional.
6. (optional) Configure connection mode activity:
config controller serial 1 connect mode activity
7. Configure controller serial 2 application mode as source:
config controller serial 2 application source
8. Configure connection mode dcd:
config controller serial 2 connect mode dcd
9. (optional) Verify that the serial controllers have been configured properly:
show controllers serial 1
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show controllers serial 1
serial 1 status=enabled link-state=down encapsulation= baud=9600 databits=8
stopbits=1 parity=none resource-state=unassigned
flow-control=none
linemode=rs232
dial-timer=1
init-string=
connect-mode= activity
rts-connect-mode=on
dtr-connect-mode=on
disconnect-mode=
rts-disconnect-mode=off
dtr-disconnect-mode=off
parity-errors=0
description=Asynchronous port
application=destination
(Dub)>
16-12
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Configuring an Asynchronous Serial to Asynchronous Serial
Connection
show controllers serial 2
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show controllers serial 2
serial 2 status=enabled link-state=down encapsulation= baud=9600 databits=8
stopbits=1 parity=none resource-state=unassigned
flow-control=none
linemode=rs232
dial-timer=1
init-string=
connect-mode=dcd
rts-connect-mode=on
dtr-connect-mode=on
disconnect-mode=
rts-disconnect-mode=off
dtr-disconnect-mode=off
parity-errors=0
description=Asynchronous port
application=source
(Dub)>
10. (optional) Manually connect a device to controller serial 2 and send data.
11. (optional) Verify that a connection is established:
show connections
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show connections
serial 2 -> serial 1
(Dub)>
12. Save the configuration.
16-13
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Configuring an Asynchronous Serial to TCP Connection
Configuring an Asynchronous Serial to TCP Connection
In this scenario, you will configure a mediation connection between an
asynchronous serial controller and a TCP port. You will set up an action, event, and
response that cause the controller and TCP port to connect.
To configure an asynchronous to TCP connection:
1. Configure event serial3Up with originator serial 3 and event type up:
config event serial3Up content serial 3 up
2. Configure response serial3ConnectToNOC with responder serial 3 and
response type connect. The destination of the connect response is TCP port
5001 at IP address 10.40.57.5:
config response serial3ConnectToNOC content serial 3 connect dest
tcp 10.40.57.5:5001
3. Configure action serial3ToNOC with event serial3Up and response
serial3ConnectToNOC:
config action serial3ToNOC event serial3Up response
serial3ConnectToNOC
4. (optional) Verify that the asynchronous to TCP connection has been configured
properly:
show actions serial3ToNOC
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show actions serial3ToNOC
Action Name
: serial3ToNOC
Action Description
:
Event
Event
Event
Event
Name
Description
Originator
Type
Response
Response
Response
Response
Response
Name
Description
Responder
Type
Parameters
: serial3Up
:
: serial 3
: up
: serial3ConnectToNOC
:
: serial 3
: connect
:
dest=tcp 10.40.57.5:5001
(Dub)>
5. Configure the application mode as source:
config controller serial 3 application source
16-14
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Configuring an Asynchronous Serial to TCP Connection
6. (optional) Verify that a connection is established:
show connections
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show connections
serial 3 -> tcp 10.40.57.5:5001
(Dub)>
7. Save the configuration.
16-15
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Mediation Connections: Configuring an Asynchronous Serial to TCP Connection
16-16
17
Configuring and Connecting TL1
Infrastructure
This chapter provides information about how to configure a TL1 multiplexer and a virtual TL1 NE.
This chapter also provides step-by-step scenarios on how to configure a meditation connection
from a TL1 multiplexer to an NE with a TCP or asynchronous connection and how to configure a
virtual TL1 NE to establish a meditation connection to a TL1 multiplexer.
Guide to this Chapter
Overview
Configuring a TL1 Multiplexer
Configuring a Virtual TL1 NE
Configuring the TCP Port for a TL1 Multiplexer
Configuring a Telnet Connection to a TL1 Multiplexer
Configuring a Telnet Connection to a Virtual TL1 NE
17-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring and Connecting TL1 Infrastructure: Overview
Overview
In order to configure TL1 alarms and mediation connections on Remote, you must
configure the infrastructure for TL1 reporting. TL1 is an ASCII-based language for
management of network elements. The TL1 infrastructure on Remote consists of TL1
multiplexers and virtual TL1 NEs (VNEs).
A TL1 multiplexer is a software component that uses TIDs to multiplex several TL1
data streams onto a single TCP connection. It can be configured to connect to
varbinds, real TL1 NEs, and scripts that generate TL1. A TL1 multiplexer acts like a
TL1 GNE, which provides a single point of contact to multiple subtending NEs.
A virtual TL1 NE is a simulation of a TL1 NE environment for generating TL1 alarms
and responding to TL1 commands. A VNE typically might be used for generating
alarms based upon digital and analog inputs and controlling relay outputs.

Note: If you only want to configure TL1 alarming for digital and analog inputs with a
single socket, tl1ne 1 and tl1mux 1 are enabled and connected by default.
17-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring and Connecting TL1 Infrastructure: Configuring a TL1 Multiplexer
Configuring a TL1 Multiplexer
In this scenario, you will:

Configure a mediation connection from the TL1 multiplexer to a Varbind (VNE)

Configure a TCP mediation connection from the TL1 multiplexer to a real NE

Configure an asynchronous mediation connection from the TL1 multiplexer to a
real NE.
The traffic from these NE’s will be multiplexed onto a single TCP connection
through a TL1 multiplexer.
To configure a TL1 multiplexer:
1. At the main prompt, configure a mediation connection from tl1mux 2 to tl1ne 2:
config mediation tl1mux 2 conn tl1ne2
2. Configure a mediation connection from tl1mux 2 to a real NE with IP address
192.172.3.4, TCP port 5003, and whose TID is TCPTID:
config mediation tl1mux 2 conn 192.172.3.4:5003-TCPTID
3. Configure a mediation connection from tl1mux 2 to a real NE connected to
asynchronous port async4 and whose TID is ASYNCTID:
config mediation tl1mux 2 conn async4-ASYNCTID
4. Enable tl1mux 2:
config mediation tl1mux 2 enable
5. (optional) Verify that tl1mux 2 has been configured properly:
show mediation tl1muxes 2
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show mediation tl1muxes 2
Mux-ID
- 2
State
- enabled
Connection Strings:
tl1ne2
192.172.3.4:5003-TCPTID
async4-ASYNCTID
(Dub)>
6. Save the configuration.
17-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring and Connecting TL1 Infrastructure: Configuring a Virtual TL1 NE
Configuring a Virtual TL1 NE
In this scenario, you will configure the login information, TID, and message settings
for a virtual TL1 NE.

Note: A virtual NE listens for a connection from a TL1 multiplexer above it in the
TL1 infrastructure. Once a multiplexer has made a connection to the VNE, a
user or OSS can log in using the ACT-USER command. Currently, each
VNE supports a single user session.
To configure a virtual TL1 NE:
1. At the main prompt, configure a user with login name JohnDoe and password
Password for tl1ne 2:
config mediation tl1ne 2 user JohnDoe Password
2. Configure tl1ne 2 and its TID as mytid:
config mediation tl1ne 2 tid mytid
3. Enable tl1ne 2:
config mediation tl1ne 2 enable
4. Configure tl1ne 2 to send autonomous messages without a login:
config mediation tl1ne 2 automsgs nologon
5. Configure tl1ne 2 to send header messages without a login:
config mediation tl1ne 2 rtrvhdr nologon
6. (optional) Verify that tl1ne 2 has been configured properly:
show mediation tl1nes 2
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show mediation tl1nes 2
NE-ID
- 2
State
- enabled
AutoMsgs - nologon
RtrvHdr - nologon
TID
- mytid
Description:
Users:
UID
PID
---------- ---------JohnDoe
Password
(Dub)>
7. Save the configuration.
17-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring and Connecting TL1 Infrastructure: Configuring the TCP Port for a TL1 Multiplexer
Configuring the TCP Port for a TL1 Multiplexer
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an event that matches an incoming TCP connection on TCP port
40002

Configure a response that connects the incoming TCP connection to a TL1
multiplexer

Configure an action that associates the event with the response. When Remote
receives the incoming TCP connection, the action connects it to the TL1
multiplexer.
To configure an incoming TCP connection to connect to a TL1 multiplexer using
events, responses, and actions:
1. At the main prompt, configure event ossConnection with originator as tcp 40002
and event type as incoming-connection:
config event ossConnection content tcp 40002 incoming-connection
2. Configure response connectToMux2 with the responder as tcp 40002 and with
the response type as connect. The destination is tl1mux 2:
config response connectToMux2 content tcp 40002 connect dest
tl1mux 2
3. Configure action ossToMux with event ossConnection and response
connectToMux2:
config action ossToMux event ossConnection response connectToMux2
4. (optional) Verify that action ossToMux has been configured properly:
show actions ossToMux
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show actions ossToMux
Action Name
: ossToMux
Action Description
:
Event
Event
Event
Event
Name
Description
Originator
Type
Response
Response
Response
Response
Response
Name
Description
Responder
Type
Parameters
: ossConnection
:
: tcp 40002
: incoming-connection
: connectToMux2
:
: tcp 40002
: connect
:
dest=tl1mux 2
(Dub)>
17-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring and Connecting TL1 Infrastructure: Configuring the TCP Port for a TL1 Multiplexer
5. Save the configuration.
17-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring and Connecting TL1 Infrastructure: Configuring a Telnet Connection to a TL1 Multiplexer
Configuring a Telnet Connection to a TL1 Multiplexer
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an event to signal that an incoming Telnet connection request has
been received on a port

Configure a response to connect a Telnet port to a TL1 multiplexer destination

Configure an action to associate the event with the response.
To configure a Telnet connection to a TL1 multiplexer:
1. At the main prompt, configure event telnetConn to signal that an incoming
telnet connection request has been received on port 40004:
config event telnetConn content telnet 40004 incoming-connection
2. Configure response telnet40004ToMux3 to connect Telnet port 40004 to
destination tl1mux 3:
config response telnet40004ToMux3 content telnet 40004 connect
dest tl1mux 3
3. Configure action telnetToMux to associate event telnetConn with response
telnet40004ToMux3:
config action telnetToMux event telnetConn response
telnet40004ToMux3
4. (optional) Verify that the connection has been configured properly:
show actions telnetToMux
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show actions telnetToMux
Action Name
: telnetToMux
Action Description
:
Event
Event
Event
Event
Name
Description
Originator
Type
Response
Response
Response
Response
Response
Name
Description
Responder
Type
Parameters
: telnetConn
:
: telnet 40004
: incoming-connection
: telnet40004ToMux3
:
: telnet 40004
: connect
:
dest=tl1mux 3
(Dub)>
5. Save the configuration.
17-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring and Connecting TL1 Infrastructure: Configuring a Telnet Connection to a Virtual TL1 NE
Configuring a Telnet Connection to a Virtual TL1 NE
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an event to signal that an incoming Telnet connection request has
been received on a port

Configure a response to connect a Telnet port to a VNE destination

Configure an action to associate the event with the response.
To configure a Telnet connection to a VNE:
1. At the main prompt, configure event telnetConn to signal that an incoming
telnet connection request has been received on port 40004:
config event telnetConn content telnet 40004 incoming-connection
2. Configure response telnet40004ToVne3 to connect Telnet port 40004 to
destination tl1ne 3:
config response telnet40004ToVne3 content telnet 40004 connect
dest tl1ne 3
3. Configure action telnetToVne to associate event telnetConn with response
telnet40004ToVne3:
config action telnetToVne event telnetConn response
telnet40004ToVne3
4. (optional) Verify that the connection has been configured properly:
show actions telnetToVne
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show actions telnetToVne
Action Name
: telnetToVne
Action Description
:
Event
Event
Event
Event
Name
Description
Originator
Type
Response
Response
Response
Response
Response
Name
Description
Responder
Type
Parameters
: telnetConn
:
: telnet 40004
: incoming-connection
: telnet40004ToVne3
:
: telnet 40004
: connect
:
dest=tl1ne 3
(Dub)>
5. Save the configuration.
17-8
18
Configuring DHCP
This chapter provides information on configuring the DHCP server with an associated host and
subnet, and configuring DHCP client support.
Guide to this Chapter
DHCP Server Overview
Configuring a DHCP Server
Configuring a DHCP Server Subnet
Configuring a Host on a DHCP Server
Configuring BOOTP/DHCP Relay
Configuring DHCP Client Support
18-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring DHCP: DHCP Server Overview
DHCP Server Overview
The DHCP server lets hosts connected to Remote's Ethernet interfaces or bridge
WAN interfaces request and obtain IP addresses from Remote. It also lets hosts
discover information about the network to which they are attached. Available IP
addresses are allocated by a network administrator who enters them into a DHCP
configuration file. The DHCP protocol then automatically assigns new IP addresses to
hosts from the pool of IP addresses.
At startup, the DHCP server reads the DHCP configuration file and stores a list of
available addresses on each subnet in memory. When a client requests an address,
the DHCP server allocates an address for it. Each client is assigned a lease that
expires after an amount of time chosen by the administrator. Clients to which leases
are assigned are expected to renew them in order to continue to use the addresses.
Once a lease has expired, the client to which that lease was assigned is no longer
permitted to use the leased IP address. For more information on the DHCP
client/server interaction, refer to Figure 18-1 on page 18-3.
18-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring DHCP: DHCP Server Overview
The following example displays how the DHCP server distributes an IP address to a
requesting client:
Client Sends Broadcast
Packet
DHCP Client
Server receives
packet and offers
available IP address
to the client.
DHCP Server
Client receives the IP
address and sends an IP
address lease request
DHCP Client
Server receives the
DHCP request packet
and officially grants the
IP address lease.
DHCP Server
DHCP Client
Client requests extension
on lease before it expires
DHCP Server
Server sends acknowledgement
to the client granting extension
on the lease
DHCP Client
Figure 18-1 DHCP Client/Server Interaction

Note: For more information on DHCP, refer to the dhcpd linux man page.
18-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring DHCP: Configuring a DHCP Server
Configuring a DHCP Server
In this scenario, you will:

Enable DHCP authority mode

Enable DHCP broadcast mode

Configure the DHCP server to use a configuration file

Configure the DHCP server to run on the bridge interface

Configure the DHCP server subnet with an IP address and subnet mask.
To configure the DHCP server settings:
1. At the main prompt, enable the DHCP authority mode:
config dhcp-server authority
2. Enable the DHCP broadcast mode:
config dhcp-server broadcast
3. Configure the DHCP server to run on interface bridge switch:
config dhcp-server interface bridge switch
4. Configure the DHCP server subnet with IP address 234.55.83.0 and subnet
mask 255.255.0.0:
config dhcp-server subnet 234.55.83.0 255.255.0.0

Note: Up to 25 subnets are configurable on the DHCP server. For information on
further DHCP server subnet configurations, refer to section Configuring a
DHCP Server Subnet on page 18-6.
18-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring DHCP: Configuring a DHCP Server
5. (optional) Verify that the DHCP server has been configured properly:
show dhcp-server
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show dhcp-server
Admin State:
disabled
Broadcast:
enabled
Authority:
enabled
Config file:
Note: User specified configuration files will override configured
DHCP server settings.
Interfaces:
bridge switch
Subnets:
234.55.0.0/16 range=0.0.0.0/0.0.0.0 router=0.0.0.0
default-lease=3600 max-lease=28800
DNS:
Hosts:
(Dub)>
6. Save the configuration.
Tip: Remote lets you specify a DHCP server configuration file. This file overrides any
DHCP server settings configured in the Remote CLI. If you do not specify the
correct DHCP server configuration file, Remote generates an error. The
following command specifies file dhcpconfig1.txt as the DHCP configuration
file:
config dhcp-server config-file dhcpconfig1.txt
The DHCP server configuration file must exist in Remote directory
/config/dhcp before you can specify it as the configuration file in the Remote
CLI. For information about creating a DHCP server configuration file, refer to the
dhcpd.conf man page.
18-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring DHCP: Configuring a DHCP Server Subnet
Configuring a DHCP Server Subnet
In this scenario, you will set up the following items for a DHCP server subnet:

Configure a maximum lease time

Configure a default lease time

Configure a domain name server address

Configure an IP address range

Configure a router address.
To configure settings for DHCP server subnet 234.55.83.0/16:
1. Configure maximum lease time 40000:
config dhcp-server subnet 234.55.83.0/16 max-lease 40000
2. Configure default lease time 36000:
config dhcp-server subnet 234.55.83.0/16 default-lease 36000
3. Configure domain name server 10.51.2.67:
config dhcp-server subnet 234.55.83.0/16 domain-name-server
10.51.2.67
4. Configure IP address range 234.55.83.2 to 234.55.83.30:
config dhcp-server subnet 234.55.83.0/16 range 234.55.83.2
234.55.83.30
5. Configure router 234.55.83.1:
config dhcp-server subnet 234.55.83.0/16 router 234.55.83.1
18-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring DHCP: Configuring a DHCP Server Subnet
6. (optional) Verify that the DHCP server has been configured properly:
show dhcp-server
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show dhcp-server
Admin State:
disabled
Broadcast:
enabled
Authority:
enabled
Config file:
Note: User specified configuration files will override configured
DHCP server settings.
Interfaces:
bridge switch
Subnets:
234.55.0.0/16 range=234.55.83.2/234.55.83.30 router=234.55.83.1
default-lease=36000 max-lease=40000
DNS:
10.51.2.67
Hosts:
(Dub)>
7. Save the configuration.
18-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring DHCP: Configuring a Host on a DHCP Server
Configuring a Host on a DHCP Server
In this scenario, you will:

Configure a DHCP server host

Configure a host hardware address

Configure a host IP address.
To configure a host on a DHCP server:
1. Configure host firstHostConfig with hardware address 12:e3:a2:45:c5:b3:
config dhcp-server host firstHostConfig hardware-address
12:e3:a2:45:c5:b3
2. Configure host firstHostConfig with IP address 234.55.83.4:
config dhcp-server host firstHostConfig ip address 234.55.83.4

Note: The host IP address must be within one of the subnetworks being served
by the DHCP server. For more information, refer to section Configuring a
DHCP Server Subnet on page 18-6.
3. (optional) Verify that the DHCP server has been configured properly:
show dhcp-server
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show dhcp-server
Admin State:
disabled
Broadcast:
enabled
Authority:
enabled
Config file:
Note: User specified configuration files will override configured
DHCP server settings.
Interfaces:
bridge switch
Subnets:
234.55.0.0/16 range=234.55.83.2/234.55.83.30 router=234.55.83.1
default-lease=36000 max-lease=40000
DNS:
10.51.2.67
Hosts:
firstHostConfig MAC=12:E3:A2:45:C5:B3 IP=234.55.83.4
(Dub)>
4. Save the configuration.
18-8
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring DHCP: Configuring BOOTP/DHCP Relay
Configuring BOOTP/DHCP Relay
In this scenario, you will configure the BOOTP/DHCP server and enable
BOOTP/DHCP relay.
When BOOTP/DHCP relay is enabled, Remote acts as a BOOTP/DHCP relay
agent; it passes BOOTP/DHCP configuration information between BOOTP/DHCP
clients and servers.
To configure and enable BOOTP/DHCP relay:
1. Configure the BOOTP/DHCP server IP address as 172.56.110.2:
config dhcp-relay server 172.56.110.2
2. Enable BOOTP/DHCP relay:
config dhcp-relay enable
3. (optional) Verify that the BOOTP/DHCP relay settings have been configured
properly:
show dhcp-relay
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show dhcp-relay
bootp/DHCP relay is enabled
bootp/DHCP relay servers:
172.56.110.2
(Dub)>
4. Save the configuration.
18-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring DHCP: Configuring DHCP Client Support
Configuring DHCP Client Support
In this scenario, you will enable DHCP client support and configure a ten-minute
interval for Remote to retry contacting the DHCP server.

Note: DHCP client support cannot be enabled on the bridge group switch if a
static IP address has already been configured. You must remove the static
IP address before enabling DHCP client support.
To enable DHCP client support and configure the retry-timeout interval:
1. Enable DHCP client support:
config interface bridge switch ip dhcp enable
2. Configure the DHCP retry-timeout value as 10 minutes:
config interface bridge switch ip dhcp retry-timeout 10
3. (optional) Verify that the DHCP client settings have been configured properly:
show interface bridge switch
The command response appears similar to the following:

Note: The DHCP-related statements (shown below in boldface type) do not
appear unless DHCP client support is enabled.
(Dub)>show interface bridge switch
bridge switch system-name=br_switch
status=enabled link-state=up
address=10.44.57.5/16
dhcp-status=enabled dhcp-state=bound
dhcp-retry-timeout=10
dhcp-address=10.44.7.8/16
dhcp-lease-acquired=Fri Apr 16 13:57:37 EST 2010
dhcp-lease-expires=Sun Apr 18 13:57:37 EST 2010
dhcp-routers=10.44.0.1 dhcp-server-id=10.25.2.102
Stats:
Bytes
Packets
Errors
Dropped
Overrun
Rx
2348892
12929
0
0
0
Tx
2050152
11687
0
0
0
ethernet 1
Stats:
Rx
Tx
Bytes
2587084
2618834
Packets
12964
19175
Errors
0
0
Dropped
0
0
Overrun
0
0
Framing
0
0
ethernet 2
Stats:
Rx
Tx
Bytes
0
0
Packets
0
0
Errors
0
0
Dropped
0
0
Overrun
0
0
Framing
0
0
--More--
18-10
Framing
0
0
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring DHCP: Configuring DHCP Client Support
4. Save the configuration.
18-11
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring DHCP: Configuring DHCP Client Support
18-12
19
Configuring Relay Outputs
This chapter provides information about how to configure relay outputs.
Guide to this Chapter
Overview
Configuring the Mediation TL1 Command
Configuring TL1 Commands to Control a Relay Output
Configuring SNMP to Operate a Relay Output
Directly Controlling a Relay Output
19-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Relay Outputs: Overview
Overview
In this chapter, you will complete a scenario that activates a relay output using a TL1
command. You will configure a Varbind (VNE) to generate an event when it receives a
specific TL1 command. Relay outputs have two states: open and close.
You will configure a VNE to generate an event when a matching TL1 command is
received. The TL1 VNE will compare the incoming command code, TID, and AID
against a configured command. If there is a match, the TL1 VNE will generate the
event, which triggers the response to turn on the device (a fan).

Note: For more information on how to configure a TL1 multiplexer and a TL1 VNE,
refer to Configuring a TL1 Multiplexer on page 17-3 and Configuring a Virtual
TL1 NE on page 17-4.
19-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Relay Outputs: Configuring the Mediation TL1 Command
Configuring the Mediation TL1 Command
Remote TL1 VNEs can generate events in response to TL1 commands. VNEs
match up incoming command codes, TIDs, and AIDs against preconfigured
command, TID, and AID tuplets. If the VNE finds a match, it generates a
corresponding event. This event can trigger any response in the system and is
used to create a command for relay output activation.
In this scenario, you will configure a fan control application that supports configured
TL1 commands OPR-EXT-CONT and RLS-EXT-CONT.

Note: For information about valid default Remote TL1 commands, refer to Chapter
26: Remote TL1 Commands. All available TL1 commands are documented in
the Telcordia GR 833-CORE documentation.
To configure TL1 command patterns for a fan application:
1. Configure TL1 command pattern identifier fanOn with TL1 command OPR-EXTCONT, TID mytid, and AID 1-fan:
config mediation tl1command fanOn OPR-EXT-CONT mytid 1-fan
2. Configure TL1 command pattern identifier fanOff with TL1 command RLS-EXTCONT, TID mytid, and AID 1-fan:
config mediation tl1command fanOff RLS-EXT-CONT mytid 1-fan
3. (optional) Verify that TL1 command pattern fanOn has been configured properly:
show mediation tl1commands fanOn
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show mediation tl1commands fanOn
Name
- fanOn
Command Pattern - OPR-EXT-CONT
TID
- mytid
AID
- 1-fan
(Dub)>
4. (optional) Verify that TL1 command pattern fanOff has been configured properly:
show mediation tl1commands fanOff
19-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Relay Outputs: Configuring the Mediation TL1 Command
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show mediation tl1commands fanOff
Name
- fanOff
Command Pattern - RLS-EXT-CONT
TID
- mytid
AID
- 1-fan
(Dub)>
19-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Relay Outputs: Configuring TL1 Commands to Control a Relay Output
Configuring TL1 Commands to Control a Relay Output
In this scenario, you will:

Configure events that occur when specific TL1 commands are received on a
virtual TL1 NE

Configure responses that open and close a relay output

Configure actions that associate the events with the responses.
To configure TL1 commands to control relay outputs:
1. At the main prompt, configure event fanOnCmd with originator tl1ne 2 and event
type tl1cmd-rcvd with command fanOn:
config event fanOnCmd content tl1ne 2 tl1cmd-rcvd fanOn
2. At the main prompt, configure event fanOffCmd with originator tl1ne 2 and event
type tl1cmd-rcvd with command fanOff:
config event fanOffCmd content tl1ne 2 tl1cmd-rcvd fanOff
3. (optional) At the main prompt, add description Fan control to discrete output
0/1:
config discrete output 0/1 description Fan control
4. Configure response fanOnReponse with responder output 0/1 and response
type close:
config response fanOnResponse content output 0/1 close
5. Configure response fanOffReponse with responder output 0/1 and response
type open:
config response fanOffResponse content output 0/1 open
6. Configure action fanOnAction with the event fanOnCmd and response
fanOnResponse:
config action fanOnAction event fanOnCmd response fanOnResponse
7. Configure action fanOffAction with the event fanOffCmd and response
fanOffResponse:
config action fanOffAction event fanOffCmd response fanOffResponse
19-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Relay Outputs: Configuring TL1 Commands to Control a Relay Output
8. (optional) Verify that action fanOnAction has been configured properly:
show actions fanOnAction
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show actions fanOnAction
Action Name
: fanOnAction
Action Description
:
Event
Event
Event
Event
Name
Description
Originator
Type
: fanOnCmd
:
: tl1ne 2
: tl1cmd-rcvd fanOn
Response Name
: fanOnResponse
Response Description :
Response Responder
: output 0/1
Response Type
: close
Response Parameters :
No parameters configured for this response.
(Dub)>
9. (optional) Verify that action fanOffAction has been configured properly:
show actions fanOffAction
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show actions fanOffAction
Action Name
: fanOffAction
Action Description
:
Event
Event
Event
Event
Name
Description
Originator
Type
: fanOffCmd
:
: tl1ne 2
: tl1cmd-rcvd fanOff
Response Name
: fanOffResponse
Response Description :
Response Responder
: output 0/1
Response Type
: open
Response Parameters :
No parameters configured for this response.
(Dub)>
10. Save the configuration.
19-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Relay Outputs: Configuring SNMP to Operate a Relay Output
Configuring SNMP to Operate a Relay Output
In this scenario, you will:

Configure SNMP events to generate manager sets

Configure relay output close and open responses

Configure actions to associate the events with the responses.
To configure SNMP to manage a relay output:
1. Configure SNMP event snmpClose with manager set output5_close:
config event snmpClose content snmp manager-set output5_close
2. Configure SNMP event snmpOpen with manager set output5_open:
config event snmpOpen content snmp manager-set output5_open
3. Configure response switchClose to close output 0/5:
config response switchClose content output 0/5 close
4. Configure response switchOpen to open output 0/5:
config response switchOpen content output 0/5 open
5. Configure action snmpOutputClose to associate event snmpClose with response
switchClose:
config action snmpOutputClose event snmpClose response switchClose
6. Configure action snmpOutputOpen to associate event snmpOpen with response
switchOpen:
config action snmpOutputOpen event snmpOpen response switchOpen
19-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Relay Outputs: Configuring SNMP to Operate a Relay Output
7. (optional) Verify that action snmpOutputClose has been configured properly:
show actions snmpOutputClose
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show actions snmpOutputClose
Action Name
: snmpOutputClose
Action Description
:
Event
Event
Event
Event
Name
Description
Originator
Type
: snmpClose
:
: snmp
: manager-set output5_close
Response Name
: switchClose
Response Description :
Response Responder
: output 0/5
Response Type
: close
Response Parameters :
No parameters configured for this response.
(Dub)>
8. (optional) Verify that action snmpOutputOpen has been configured properly:
show actions snmpOutputOpen
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show actions snmpOutputOpen
Action Name
: snmpOutputOpen
Action Description
:
Event
Event
Event
Event
Name
Description
Originator
Type
: snmpOpen
:
: snmp
: manager-set output5_open
Response Name
: switchOpen
Response Description :
Response Responder
: output 0/5
Response Type
: open
Response Parameters :
No parameters configured for this response.
(Dub)>
9. Save the configuration.
10. To cause the events to occur, issue an SNMP set on the aiMediation event object,
which is in the aiMediationV2 MIB. Use the same names that were used for the
manager sets in the SNMP events (output5_close and output5_open).
19-8
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Relay Outputs: Directly Controlling a Relay Output
Directly Controlling a Relay Output
In this scenario, you will directly open and close a relay output.
To directly open and close a relay output:
1. Open output 0/8:
diag output 0/8 open
2. Close output 0/8 for 10 seconds:
diag output 0/8 close 10
3. (optional) Verify the status of output 0/8:
show discrete outputs 0/8
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show discrete outputs 0/8
ID
- 0/8
Description
Resource State
- unassigned
Value
- open
(Dub)>
19-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Relay Outputs: Directly Controlling a Relay Output
19-10
20
Configuring TBOS Settings
This chapter provides background information and examples to assist users when configuring
TBOS on Remote.
Guide to this Chapter
Overview
Loading a TBOS Definition File
Configuring TBOS Polling Settings
Configuring an Equipment Type for a TBOS Display
Configuring the TBOS “Points All” Method
Manually Configuring TBOS Display Points
Configuring Cut-Through Support
Configuring a TBOS Control Response with an Event
20-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Overview
Overview
The following TBOS features are implemented on Remote:

TBOS Alarm/Status Point Management

TBOS Control Point Management

TBOS Definition File Support

Central Alarm Table Support

Cut-Through Support
TBOS Alarm/Status Point Management
Remote supports 512 TBOS alarm/status points and 512 TBOS control points per
asynchronous serial interface. TBOS alarm/status points are arranged in eight bit
characters, with a TBOS display comprising a group of 8 characters. Each
TBOS-enabled port supports up to 8 displays for a total of up to 512 alarm/status
points. By default, all displays and points on a TBOS port are disabled and are not
polled.
Once a display is enabled, the TBOS subsystem sequentially polls each enabled
character in the display to find out which alarm/status points are enabled. Each
character is queried twice in succession. If the responses to both queries are not
identical, the response is considered invalid. Responses are analyzed to determine if
any of the character’s eight status points have changed state. When a point state
change is detected, a mediation event is generated.
TBOS Control Point Management
Users can configure an action to cause the TBOS subsystem to send a TBOS
command to activate or deactivate a specific control point on a TBOS Network
Element (NE). TBOS commands use three bytes: The first identifies the display and
type of operation (latch on, latch off, or momentary); the second identifies the point (1
to 64); and the third contains an execute operation code. The TBOS NE must
immediately echo each character back to indicate that the operation is being
accepted.
20-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Overview
TBOS Definition File Support
Remote uses a TBOS definition file to populate TBOS displays. Each definition file
contains a group of TBOS equipment type definitions (TBOS NE display templates). A
TBOS definition file can be in either comma-separated value or tab-separated value
format, so it can be generated from a spreadsheet. Each of the equipment type
definitions defines the individual TBOS point configurations for a particular type of
equipment. The format for an equipment type definition is as follows (in commaseparated format):
equipment_name,hardware_version,software_version,point_id,point_n
ame,normal_state,normal_text,alarm_state,alarm_text
equipment_name
Defines the name of the equipment type.
hardware_version
Defines the hardware version that the equipment type
supports. This value is not currently used.
software_version
Defines the software version that the equipment type
supports. This value is not currently used.
point_id
Defines an identifier for a point. Valid values are A1 to A64
for alarm points and C1 to C64 for control points.
point_name
Defines the name that describes the point.
normal_state
Defines the severity of the normal state of the point. The
only valid value is normal.
normal_text
Defines the text to be used when the point transitions to the
normal state.
alarm_state
Defines the severity level for the point’s alarm state. Valid
values are critical, major, minor/minor_a, and
warning/minor_b.
alarm_text
Defines the text to be used when the point transitions to the
alarm state.
A TBOS definition file can contain multiple TBOS equipment type definitions, which
can each define up to 64 total alarm and control points. After the TBOS definition file
has been loaded onto Remote (on directory /config/tbos), the equipment type
definitions listed in the file can be applied to TBOS displays. Refer to section
Configuring an Equipment Type for a TBOS Display on page 20-9 for more
information about applying TBOS equipment type definitions to TBOS displays.
20-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Overview
The following rules apply to TBOS definition files, equipment types, and displays:

When you apply a TBOS equipment type to a display, configuration is generated
that implements the display settings on the specified port. Execute command
copy running-config startup-config to save the running configuration and
make the display persist across Remote reboots.

The TBOS definition file is not needed after the running configuration is saved.
You only need the TBOS definition file when creating a new display or
reconfiguring an existing display with a new equipment type.

To apply TBOS equipment types, you have to load the TBOS definition file into
Remote memory from either the Remote file system or from a server file system.
When you reboot Remote, the TBOS definition file is erased from memory. You
must reload it before you reapply TBOS equipment types to displays.
Central Alarm Table Support
The TBOS subsystem provides internal support for the central alarm table. When the
TBOS definition file is loaded and an equipment type is associated with a TBOS
display on a serial port, entries are automatically created in the central alarm table.
This interaction provides automatic configuration for translating TBOS state changes
into SNMP traps and TL1 messages.
Each enabled TBOS status/alarm point has an alarm entry in the central alarm table
that is triggered when the point changes state. When displaying the central alarm
table, TBOS alarm entries are identified with the following naming format:
tbos_port_display_point
port
Specifies the serial port instance.
display
Specifies the TBOS display instance.
point
Specifies the TBOS point instance.
Cut-Through Support
Remote provides a set of commands that configure a cut-through from a user
specified TCP port to a TBOS port. Users can then Telnet to the configured TCP port
to establish a cut-through that is connected directly to the TBOS port. Refer to section
Configuring Cut-Through Support on page 20-15 for more information.
20-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Overview
AID and TL1 NE Support
Optional AID and TL1 NE support is configurable for individual displays by using the
equipment type configuration command and loaded types from a TBOS TL1 definition
file. For more information on this feature, refer to section Manually Configuring TBOS
Display Points on page 20-13, and command config tbos port serial display
points in the Remote Command Reference Guide.
20-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Loading a TBOS Definition File
Loading a TBOS Definition File
A user can load a definition file either by transferring the file to Remote’s TBOS
configuration directory (/config/tbos) and loading the file, or by loading the file from
a central server. This procedure provides the steps for loading a TBOS definition file
from a central server.
In this scenario, you will:

Configure the TBOS definition file central server

Load a TBOS definition file from the central server.
To load a TBOS definition file from a central server:
1. At the main prompt, configure TBOS server address 192.168.5.1:
config tbos server address 192.168.5.1
2. Configure server directory /tmp/tbos:
config tbos server directory /tmp/tbos
3. Configure server user name test and password test:
config tbos server user test test
4. (optional) Verify that the TBOS central server has been configured properly:
show tbos server
The command response appears similar to the following example:
(Dub)>show tbos server
IP Address: 192.168.5.1
IP Port:
21
Directory: /tmp/home
User:
test
(Dub)>
5. Load TBOS definition file tbosdefinitions.def from the central server:
config tbos load tbosdefinitions.def fromserver

Note: You can load a TBOS definition file directly from the Remote configuration
directory by entering the above command without keyword fromserver.
6. Save the configuration.
20-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Configuring TBOS Polling Settings
Configuring TBOS Polling Settings
In this scenario, you will configure the settings for TBOS polling.
To configure TBOS polling settings on TBOS port serial 1:
1. At the main prompt, set to 8 seconds the amount of time that Remote waits
between receiving a response and sending the next poll:
config tbos port serial 1 poll-delay 80

Note: The entered poll delay time is in tenths of seconds.
2. Set to 12 seconds the amount of time Remote waits for a response before moving
on to the next poll:
config tbos port serial 1 response-timeout 120

Note: The entered response timeout is in tenths of seconds.
3. Enable the discarding and logging of responses that are received too soon after a
TBOS poll:
config tbos port serial 1 timed-response enable
20-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Configuring TBOS Polling Settings
4. Verify that the TBOS polling settings have been configured properly:
show tbos port serial 1
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show tbos port serial 1
State:
Description:
Poll-delay:
Respose-timeout:
Timed-response:
disabled
80 (tenths of secs)
120 (tenths of secs)
enabled
Cut-Through:
IP Port:
1
State:
disabled
Display Poll State
Equipment Type
Description
-----------------------------------------------------------------1
disabled
none
2
disabled
none
3
disabled
none
4
disabled
none
5
disabled
none
6
disabled
none
7
disabled
none
8
disabled
none
--More-(Dub)>
20-8
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Configuring an Equipment Type for a TBOS Display
Configuring an Equipment Type for a TBOS Display
In this scenario, you will:

Configure a TBOS port description for a TBOS serial port.

Configure polling on the equipment type.

Configure a TL1 NE to receive alarms from the TBOS alarm entry.

Configure text to substitute for two of the TL1 AID fields in the TBOS definition
file.

Enable polling on the associated display.

Enable SNMP traps in the central alarm table.
To configure an equipment type for a TBOS display:
1. (optional) Configure TBOS port description TBOS port 1 for TBOS port serial 1:
config tbos port serial 1 description TBOS port 1
2. (Optional) Configure the following items for TBOS alarm display 1 on port serial
1. These parameters will be set on the alarm table entries for the TBOS points.

Category TBOS-points

Network element name Alcatel-MDR6000

Note: If configuring the category or network element name, each should be
configured before the equipment type in order to save from reconfiguration
of the alarm entries.
config tbos port serial 1 display 1 category TBOS-point
config tbos port serial 1 display 1 ne-name Alcatel-MDR6000
20-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Configuring an Equipment Type for a TBOS Display
3. Configure the following items for TBOS alarm display 1 on serial port 1:

Polling on equipment type Alcatel_MDR6000

Setup of tl1ne 2 to receive alarms

Setup of substitutions farend=florida and nearend=ohio

Notes: TL1 AID values farend and nearend must match TL1 AID fields listed in
the TBOS definition file. If the TL1 AID values do not match, the raw AID
text from the definition file gets loaded into the alarm table entry as the
AID.

If no TL1 NE is provided, the default value of 1 is used.
config tbos port serial 1 display 1 points type Alcatel_MDR6000
tl1ne 2 farend=florida nearend=ohio
4. Enable polling on display 1 and serial 1:
config tbos port serial 1 display 1 enable
config tbos port serial 1 enable
5. Enable SNMP traps in the central alarm table:
config alarm-entry * trap enable
20-10
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Configuring an Equipment Type for a TBOS Display
6. Verify that the equipment type for the TBOS display has been configured properly:
show tbos port serial 1 display 1
The command response displays the default poll states, severity levels, and alarm
messages for all points on display 1:
(Dub)>show tbos port serial 1 display 1
State:
Description:
TL1NE:
Substitution1
Substitution1
Substitution2
Substitution2
Category:
NE Name:
enabled
Key:
Value:
Key:
Value:
2
farend
florida
nearend
ohio
TBOS-points
Alcatel MDR-6000
Point
Poll State
Severity
Alarm Message
-----------------------------------------------------------------1
enabled
minor
A COMMON LOSS ALM
2
enabled
minor
A PWR SUPPLY
3
enabled
major
A RF XMT PWR ALM
4
disabled
5
disabled
6
enabled
major
A ATPC High Pwr
7
enabled
major
A DS1 Mux Fail
8
enabled
major
Alarm A DS1 Input
9
enabled
minor
B COMMON LOSS ALM
10
enabled
minor
B PWR SUPPLY
11
enabled
major
B RF XMT PWR ALM
--More--
7. Save the configuration.
20-11
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Configuring the TBOS “Points All” Method
Configuring the TBOS “Points All” Method
In this scenario, you will configure the TBOS “points all” method for a display. The
“points all” method configures generic default values for all points on a TBOS
display, as well as all corresponding alarm entries.
To configure the TBOS “points all” method:
1. Enter the following command to configure all points for display 2 on port serial
5:
config tbos port serial 5 display 2 points all
2. Verify that the TBOS display has been configured properly:
show tbos port serial 5 display 2
The command response displays the default poll states, severity levels, and alarm
messages for all points on display 2:
(Dub)>show tbos port serial 5 display 2
State:
Description:
TL1NE:
Substitution1
Substitution1
Substitution2
Substitution2
enabled
Key:
Value:
Key:
Value:
Point
Poll State
Severity
Alarm Message
-----------------------------------------------------------------1
enabled
major
tbos_5_2 1 In Alarm
2
enabled
major
tbos_5_2 2 In Alarm
3
enabled
major
tbos_5_2 3 In Alarm
4
enabled
major
tbos_5_2 4 In Alarm
5
enabled
major
tbos_5_2 5 In Alarm
6
enabled
major
tbos_5_2 6 In Alarm
7
enabled
major
tbos_5_2 7 In Alarm
8
enabled
major
tbos_5_2 8 In Alarm
9
enabled
major
tbos_5_2 9 In Alarm
10
enabled
major
tbos_5_2 10 In Alarm
11
enabled
major
tbos_5_2 11 In Alarm
--More--

Note: Execute command show alarm-entries to display all alarm entries that
correspond to the configured points.
3. Save the configuration.
20-12
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Manually Configuring TBOS Display Points
Manually Configuring TBOS Display Points

Note: Manually configuring TBOS points is not a common procedure. Generally,
TBOS points are configured using equipment types from a TBOS definition
file. For more information on this, refer to sections TBOS Definition File
Support on page 20-3 and Configuring an Equipment Type for a TBOS
Display on page 20-9.
In this scenario, you will:

Configure a TBOS port description.

Configure a TBOS point description.

Configure an alarm severity level and message for the TBOS point.

Enable polling on the display.

Enable SNMP traps in the central alarm table.
To manually configure the TBOS display point:
1. (optional) Configure TBOS port description TBOS port 5 for TBOS port serial
5:
config tbos port serial 5 description TBOS port 5
2. (optional) Configure description Antennae Failure for TBOS point 6 in display 2:
config tbos port serial 5 display 2 point 6 description Antennae
Failure
3. Configure alarm severity level major and message Antennae Failure for TBOS
point 6 in display 2:
config tbos port serial 5 display 2 point 6 message major Antennae
Failure
4. Enable TBOS point 6 in display 2:
config tbos port serial 5 display 2 point 6 enable
5. Enable polling on display 2 and serial 5:
config tbos port serial 5 display 2 enable
config tbos port serial 5 enable
6. Enable SNMP traps in the Central Alarm Table:
config alarm-entry * trap enable
20-13
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Manually Configuring TBOS Display Points
7. (optional) Verify that the TBOS display point has been configured properly:
show tbos port serial 5 display 2 point 6
The command response appears similar to the following example:
(Dub)>show tbos port serial 5 display 2 point 6
Number:
Name :
Poll State:
Severity :
Alarm Message:
Normal Message:
Description :
6
tbos_5_2
enabled
major
Antennae
tbos_5_2
Antennae
(Dub)>
8. Save the configuration.
20-14
6
Failure
6 Normal
Failure
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Configuring Cut-Through Support
Configuring Cut-Through Support
In this scenario, you will configure cut-through support from a TBOS serial port to a
TCP port.
To configure cut-through support:
1. Configure cut-through from TBOS serial port 5 to TCP port 50001:
config tbos port serial 5 cut-through port 50001
2. Enable cut-through on TBOS serial port 5:
config tbos port serial 5 cut-through enable
3. (optional) Verify that cut-through support has been enabled for TCP port 50001:
show tbos port serial 5
The command response appears similar to the following example:
(Dub)>show tbos port serial 5
State:
Description:
enabled
TBOS port 5
Cut-Through:
IP Port:
50001
State:
enabled
Display Poll State
Equipment Type
Description
-----------------------------------------------------------------1
enabled
Alcatel_MDR4000E
2
enabled
all
3
disabled
none
4
disabled
none
5
disabled
none
6
disabled
none
7
disabled
none
8
disabled
none
(Dub)>
4. Save the configuration.
20-15
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Configuring a TBOS Control Response with an Event
Configuring a TBOS Control Response with an Event
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an event to occur when an input closes.

Configure a TBOS control response to set a control point into “latch on” state.

Configure an action to associate the response with the event.
1. Configure event powerFail to occur when input 0/1 closes:
config event powerFail content input 0/1 close
2. Configure TBOS control response latchOn to set control point 5 on display 2 on
TBOS serial port 5 into latch on state:
config response latchOn content tbos-control serial 5 2 5 latch-on
3. (optional) Configure response description TBOS point 5 is latched on for
response latchOn:
config response latchOn description TBOS point 5 is latched on
4. (optional) Verify that the response has been configured properly:
show responses latchOn
The command response appears similar to the following example:
(Dub)>show responses latchOn
Response Name
: latchOn
Response Description : TBOS point 5 is latched on
Response Responder
: tbos-control serial 5:2:5
Response Type
: latch-on
Response Parameters :
No parameters configured for this response.
(Dub)>
5. Configure action systemPower to associate event powerFail with response
latchOn:
config action systemPower event powerFail response latchOn
20-16
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Configuring a TBOS Control Response with an Event
6. (optional) Verify that the action has been configured properly:
show actions systemPower
The command response appears similar to the following example:
(Dub)>show actions systemPower
Action Name
: systemPower
Action Description
:
Event
Event
Event
Event
Name
Description
Originator
Type
: powerFail
:
: input 0/1
: close
Response Name
: latchOn
Response Description : TBOS point 5 is latched on
Response Responder
: tbos-control serial 5:2:5
Response Type
: latch-on
Response Parameters :
No parameters configured for this response.
(Dub)>
7. Save the configuration.
20-17
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring TBOS Settings: Configuring a TBOS Control Response with an Event
20-18
21
Configuring the SNMP Proxy
This chapter provides information about how to configure the Remote SNMP Proxy feature.
Guide to this Chapter
SNMP Proxy Feature Overview
SNMP Proxy Configuration Information
Configuring a Mediation SNMP Event Template
Configuring a Mediation SNMP Point Template
Configuring a Mediation SNMP NE Template
Configuring a Mediation SNMP Measurement Template
Configuring a Mediation SNMP Network Element
Configuration Results
21-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: SNMP Proxy Feature Overview
SNMP Proxy Feature Overview
The Remote SNMP Proxy feature allows for virtual network elements (NEs) to
represent devices which are subtended from Remote. Remote acts as the SNMP
manager for the real NE. This means that an NE can be “hidden” on the network, yet
still monitored by Remote.
The various states of the NEs are represented in Remote’s alarm table, which
provides a mechanism for management systems to query the state and receive
alarms.
One major benefit of this feature is a reduction in IP address requirements for sites,
where private addressing can be used between the SNMP device and Remote.
Figure 21-1 shows the interaction of the mediation NEs (snmp ne1 and snmp ne2)
inside Remote with the “real” SNMP NEs, and the action and alarm table mediation
subsystems.
Figure 21-1 Remote SNMP Proxy Configuration
21-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: SNMP Proxy Configuration Information
SNMP Proxy Configuration Information
At a high level, the following information must be configured for the SNMP proxy
feature:

SNMP NE name and associated host information, points, and events

The address of the SNMP Manager
SNMP Templates
The mapping of incoming SNMP traps to mediation events utilizes a template
mechanism which allows for a common mapping to be shared among multiple
mediation SNMP NEs or multiple instances within the same NE. The templates define
how the proxied device’s SNMP MIB is used by the proxy SNMP NE.
There are three types of user-definable templates.
Point Template
The point template defines how a stateful item on the proxied device is managed by
Remote. For each state, the following information is configurable: severity; message;
varbind; offline state message and severity; and trap OID. The varbind and trap OID
are used to match incoming traps.
Event Template
Events are simple stateless mappings between an SNMP trap and a mediation event.
Events are not mapped to the Remote alarm table. An event template consists, at a
minimum, of a trap-oid and a message parameter.
NE Template
The NE template contains device model definitions for a proxied SNMP network
element. This template can then be referenced by other NEs of that model. The
templates can be stored and applied as individual patch configurations for easy
distribution to multiple Remotes.
Measurement Template
The measurement template describes parameters such as poll OID, trap OID, and
varbind value used to obtain the value for a point on a proxied NE. This template can
then be applied to other proxied NEs.
Using Variables in Templates
Template events and points can contain variables in their OID and varbind values.
The values of the variables are defined when the template is referenced in the event
or point configuration of a mediation SNMP NE.
21-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: SNMP Proxy Configuration Information
The predefined variables that are available for use in these templates are described in
Table 21-1 on page 21-4.
Table 21-1 Predefined Template Variables
Variable
Description
$(point)
Contains the name of the point configured on the
mediation SNMP NE
$(event)
Contains the name of the event configured on the
mediation SNMP NE
$(measurement)
Contains the name of the measurement configured on
the mediation SNMP NE
$(snmpne)
Contains the name of the mediation SNMP NE
SNMP NE
The mediation SNMP NE is a mediation event originator. The originator type is
snmpne, and the originator instance is the name of the mediation NE. The snmpne
contains site-specific information, and can be linked with a previously created event
template, point template, or measurement template for part of its definition.
The name of the NE is used as the NE name value for mediation alarm table entries
and responses.
SNMP Manager
The configurable information for the SNMP manager is the port on which the SNMP
manager listens for incoming SNMP notifications. The default port is 162.
21-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: Configuring a Mediation SNMP Event Template
Configuring a Mediation SNMP Event Template
In this scenario, you will configure a mediation SNMP event template named
coldStartDef, which creates a reboot event for the proxied NE.
Note that not all possible parameters are used in this example. See the Remote
Command Reference Guide for details on each parameter.
To configure a mediation SNMP event template:
1. Configure event template name coldStartDef:
config mediation snmp event-template coldStartDef
2. (optional) Configure an associated description Reboot event:
config mediation snmp event-template coldStartDef description
Reboot event
3. Configure the trap OID .1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.1:
config mediation snmp event-template coldStartDef trap-oid
.1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.1
4. Configure the message $(event) event on $(snmpne):
config mediation snmp event-template coldStartDef message $(event)
event on NE $(snmpne)
5. (optional) Verify that the event template has been configured properly:
show mediation snmp event-template coldStartDef
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show mediation snmp event-template coldStartDef
Name: coldStartDef
Description: Reboot event
Message: $(event) event on NE $(snmpne)
Trap OID: .1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.1
(Dub)>
6. Save the configuration.
21-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: Configuring a Mediation SNMP Point Template
Configuring a Mediation SNMP Point Template
In this scenario, you will configure a mediation SNMP point template named
ifEntryDef, which is a template for a row in the interface table on the proxied NE.
For each state (up and down) you will configure the:
 poll value

dynamic poll table and trap map, or the poll OID

trap OID

varbind match

severity

message

poll default state
To configure a mediation SNMP point template:
1. Configure the point template name ifEntryDef:
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef
2. (optional) Configure an associated description Entry in IfTable:
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef description Entry
in IfTable
3. Configure the dynamic poll table with the following settings:

table oid .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1

match column (number) 2

match value (for specified column) $(ifDescr)

state (table) column 8
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef
poll-table .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1 2 $(ifDescr) 8

Note: If you configure a dynamic poll table (Step 3), you will not configure a poll ID
(Step 4) and vice versa.
4. Configure the poll OID .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.8.$(ifIndex)for template
ifEntryDef:
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef poll-oid
.1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.8.$(ifIndex)
5. Configure the up state:
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef state up
21-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: Configuring a Mediation SNMP Point Template
6. Configure the poll value of 1 for the up state:
config mediation snmp event-template ifEntryDef state up pollvalue 1
7. Configure the trap oid .1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.4 for the up state:
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef state up trap-oid
.1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.4
8. Configure the varbind match .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.1 $(ifIndex) for the up
state, that is, the OID equals the value of $(ifIndex):
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef state up varbindmatch .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.1 $(ifIndex)
9. Configure the severity as normal for the up state:
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef state up severity
normal
10. Configure the message as $(point) is up for the up state:
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef state up message
$(point) is up
You will now configure similar parameters for the down state using the same point
template, ifEntryDef.
11. Configure the down state for point template ifEntryDef:
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef state down
12. Configure the poll value of 2 for the down state:
config mediation snmp event-template ifEntryDef state down pollvalue 2
13. Configure the trap OID .1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.3 for the down state:
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef state down trapoid .1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.3
14. Configure the varbind match .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.1 $(ifIndex) for the down
state:
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef state down
varbind-match .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.1 $(ifIndex)
15. Configure the severity as major for the down state:
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef state down
severity major
16. Configure the message as $(point) is down:
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef state down message
$(point) is down
21-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: Configuring a Mediation SNMP Point Template
17. Configure the default polling state for points in this template as up.
config mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef poll-default-state
up
18. (optional) Verify that the point template has been configured properly:
show mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show mediation snmp point-template ifEntryDef
Name: ifEntryDef
Description: Entry in IfTable
Poll OID: .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.8.$(ifIndex)
State: down
Message: $(point) is down
Poll Value: 2
Severity: major
Trap OID: .1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.3
Varbind Match: .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.1 = $(ifIndex)
State: up
Message: $(point) is up
Poll Value: 1
Severity: normal
Trap OID: .1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.4
Varbind Match: .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.1 = $(ifIndex)
(Dub)>
19. Save the configuration.
21-8
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: Configuring a Mediation SNMP NE Template
Configuring a Mediation SNMP NE Template
In this scenario, you will configure a mediation SNMP NE template, which is a
template containing device model definitions for a proxied SNMP network element.
For this template, you will configure the:
 template name Template1

description

point, which refers to an existing point template and associated values

event, which refers to an the existing event template and associated values

NE template, which refers to the existing NE template and an associated value.
To configure a mediation SNMP NE template:
1. Configure the NE template name Template1:
config mediation snmp ne-template Template1
2. (optional) Configure a description for Template1 called Sample template:
config mediation snmp ne-template Template1 description Sample
template
3. Configure point modem with the following settings:

point template ifEntryDef

parameter ifDesc

value serial_modem
config mediation snmp ne-template Template1 point modem ifEntryDef
ifDesc serial_modem
4. Configure event runningConfigChange with the following settings:

event template (existing) configChangeDef

parameter file

value running-config
config mediation snmp ne-template Template1 event
runningConfigChange configChangeDef file running-config
21-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: Configuring a Mediation SNMP NE Template
5. Configure NE template alarm1 with the following settings:

NE template (existing) alarms

parameter num

value 1
config mediation snmp ne-template Template1 ne-template alarm1
alarms num 1
6. (optional) Verify that the NE template has been configured properly:
show mediation snmp ne-template Template1
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show mediation snmp
(Dub) show mediation snmp>ne-templates Template1
Name: Template1
Description: Sample template
Event: runningConfigChange
Template: configChangeDef
Parameter: file = running-config
Point: modem
Template: ifEntryDef
Parameter: ifDescr = serial_modem
Template Reference: alarm1
Template: alarms
Parameter: num = 1
(Dub) show mediation snmp>
7. Save the configuration.
21-10
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: Configuring a Mediation SNMP Measurement Template
Configuring a Mediation SNMP Measurement Template
In this scenario, you will configure a mediation SNMP measurement template,
which defines the way a mediation SNMP NE obtains the value for a point on a
proxied SNMP network element. We will look at two examples of measurement
templates: an example that configures an individual measurement, and a second
example that configures a group of measurements.
For the first template, you will configure the:
 template name alDef and description Single measurement

poll OID

which numeric value to consider significant if the response is a string

trap OID, varbind match, and varbind value.
For the second template, you will configure the:
template name alTableDef and description Measurement group


dynamic poll table

which numeric value to consider significant if the response is a string

trap OID, varbind ID, and varbind value.
To configure a mediation SNMP measurement template that configures an individual
measurement:
1. Configure the point template name alDef:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alDef
2. (optional) Configure an associated description Single measurement:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alDef description
Single measurement
3. Configure the poll OID .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.5.$(alIndex) for
template alDef:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alDef poll-oid
.1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.5.$(alIndex)
4. Configure the template alDef to consider as significant the second numeric value
in a string response:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alDef value-match 2
5. Configure an SNMP trap named critical, with a trap OID
1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.0.5 for the critical state:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alDef trap critical
trap-oid 1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.0.5
21-11
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: Configuring a Mediation SNMP Measurement Template
6. Configure the varbind-match .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.1 for the critical
state; that is, the OID to use to retrieve the value of $alIndex:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alDef trap critical
varbind-match .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.1 $alIndex
7. Configure a varbind value of for .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.5 for the
critical state:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alDef trap critical
varbind-value .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.5
8. Configure the template alDef to consider as significant the second numeric value
in a string response for critical traps:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alDef trap critical
value-match 2
9. (optional) Verify that the point template has been configured properly:
show mediation snmp measurement-template alDef
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show mediation snmp measurement-templates alDef
Name: alDef
Description: Single measurement
Poll OID: .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.5.$(alIndex)
Value Match Index: 2
Value Conversion Multiplier: 1
Trap: critical
Trap OID: .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.0.5
Varbind Value: .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.5
Value Match Index: 2
Varbind Match: .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.1 = $alIndex
(Dub)>
10. Save the configuration.
To configure a mediation SNMP measurement template that configures a group of
measurements:
1. Configure the point template name alTableDef:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alTableDef
2. (optional) Configure an associated description Measurement group:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alTableDef description
Measurement group
21-12
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: Configuring a Mediation SNMP Measurement Template
3. Configure the dynamic poll table with the following settings:

table OID .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2

match column (number) 7

match value (for specified column) 5
config mediation snmp measurement-template alTableDef poll-table
.1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2 7 5
4. Configure the template alTableDef to consider as significant the second numeric
value in a string response:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alTableDef value-match
2
5. Configure an SNMP trap named critical, with a trap OID
1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.0.5 for the critical state:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alTableDef trap
critical trap-oid .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.0.5
6. Configure the varbind OID .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.7 for the critical
state:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alTableDef trap
critical varbind-id .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.7
7. Configure a varbind value of for .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.5 for the
critical state:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alTableDef trap
critical varbind-value .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.5
8. Configure the template alTableDef to consider as significant the second numeric
value in a string response for critical traps:
config mediation snmp measurement-template alTableDef trap
critical value-match 2
9. (optional) Verify that the point template has been configured properly:
show mediation snmp measurement-template alTableDef
21-13
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: Configuring a Mediation SNMP Measurement Template
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show mediation snmp measurement-templates alTableDef
Name: alTableDef
Description: Measurement group
Poll Table OID: .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2
ID Column: 7
Value Column: 5
Value Match Index: 2
Value Conversion Multiplier: 1
Trap: critical
Trap OID: .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.0.5
Varbind Value: .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.5
Value Match Index: 2
Varbind ID: .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.7
(Dub)>
10. Save the configuration.
21-14
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: Configuring a Mediation SNMP Network Element
Configuring a Mediation SNMP Network Element
In this scenario, you will configure information specific to a mediation SNMP NE
including:
 The host parameters
 A link to the previously defined event template, coldStartDef, which defines
the associated event
 A link to the previously defined point template, ifEntryDef, which defines the
associated event
 A link to the previously defined measurement template, alTableDef, which
defines a means of obtaining a value for a point on a proxied NE.
To configure a mediation SNMP NE:
1. Configure the name, ProxyNE, for the mediation SNMP NE:
config mediation snmpne ProxyNE
2. Configure the network element name, ProxyNE:
config mediation snmpne ProxyNE ne-name ProxyNE
3. Configure the host with an IP address of 10.40.65.90, port number 161,
community name administrator, and SNMP version number v1. These
parameters are used for polling the device.
config mediation snmpne ProxyNE host 10.40.65.90 161 administrator
v1
4. Configure the category as NECategory:
config mediation snmpne ProxyNE category NECategory
5. Configure status point ethernet1 with a link to the previously defined
ifEntryDef point template, a replaceable parameter name ifIndex, and a
value for that parameter as 1:
config mediation snmpne ProxyNE point ethernet1 ifEntryDef ifIndex
1
6. Configure status point ethernet2 with a link to the previously defined
ifEntryDef point template, a replaceable parameter name ifIndex, and a value
for that parameter as 2:
config mediation snmpne ProxyNE point ethernet2 ifEntryDef ifIndex
2
7. Configure an event named reboot, with a link to the previously defined
coldStartDef event template:
config mediation snmpne ProxyNE event reboot coldStartDef
21-15
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: Configuring a Mediation SNMP Network Element
8. Configure a measurement named analog, with a link to the previously defined
alTableDef measurement template:
config mediation snmpne ProxyNE measurement analog alTableDef
9. (optional) Verify that the ProxyNE SNMP NE has been configured properly:
show mediation snmpne ProxyNE
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show mediation snmpne ProxyNE
Name: ProxyNE
Description:
Host: 10.40.65.90:161
SNMP Community: administrator
SNMP Version: v1
Category: NECategory
NE Name: ProxyNE
Measurement Poll Interval: 60
Point Poll Interval: 3600
Connectivity OID: .1.3.6.1.2.1.1.2.0
Connectivity State: offline
Last Connectivity Poll Reply: unknown
Event: reboot
Template: coldStartDef
Last Trap: Unknown
Point: ethernet1
Template: ifEntryDef
Current State: down
Last Trap: Unknown
Last Poll Reply: Unknown
Parameter: ifIndex = 1
Point: ethernet2
Template: ifEntryDef
Current State: down
Last Trap: Unknown
Last Poll Reply: Unknown
Parameter: ifIndex = 2
Measurement: analog
Template: alTableDef
Last Poll Reply: unknown
(Dub)>
10. Save the configuration.
21-16
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: Configuration Results
Configuration Results
The following is a partial example of a running-config, which shows the results of
the template points and events used to construct a mediation SNMP NE containing a
port with two states (up and down), Ethernet ports 1 and 2, and a reboot notification.
config mediation snmp
event-template coldStartDef
description Reboot event
message $(event) event on NE $(snmpne)
trap-oid .1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.1
exit
config mediation snmp
measurement-template a1TableDef
description Measurement group
poll-table .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2 7 5
value-match 2
trap critical
trap-oid .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.0.5
varbind-id .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.7
value-match 2
exit
trap critcal
varbind-value .1.3.6.1.4.1.539.42.2.2.1.5
exit
exit
config mediation snmp
point-template ifEntryDef
description Entry in IfTable
poll-oid .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.8.$(ifIndex)
state up
message $(point) is up
poll-value 1
trap-oid .1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.4
varbind-match .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.1 $(ifIndex)
exit
state down
message $(point) is down
poll-value 2
severity major
trap-oid .1.3.6.1.6.3.1.1.5.3
varbind-match .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.1 $(ifIndex)
exit
poll-default-state up
exit
config mediation snmp
ne-template Template1
description Sample template
event runningConfigChange configChangeDef file running-config
point modem ifEntryDef ifDesc serial_modem
ne-template alarm1 alarms num 1
exit
config mediation snmpne ProxyNE
category NECategory
ne-name ProxyNE
host 10.40.65.90 161 administrator v1
event reboot coldStartDef
measurement analog a1TableDef
point ethernet1 ifEntryDef ifIndex 1
point ethernet2 ifEntryDef ifIndex 2
(Dub)>
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Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the SNMP Proxy: Configuration Results

Note: Alarms, events, actions, and responses for SNMP proxy will not display in
running-config as they are implicitly added to the configuration. Only if the
user makes a change to one of the entities will these four items display in
running-config. This applies only to new SNMP proxy configurations, not
those loaded from saved configurations.
The configuration will add the following alarm entries and actions automatically.
config alarm-entry ProxyNE_ethernet1_snmpne
event snmpne ProxyNE point ethernet1 trap up event $(message)
event snmpne ProxyNE point ethernet1 trap down event $(message)
ne-name MyNE
category some-category
config alarm-entry ProxyNE_ethernet2_snmpne
event snmpne ProxyNE point ethernet2 trap up event $(message)
event snmpne ProxyNE point ethernet2 trap down event $(message)
ne-name ProxyNE
category some-category
config event ProxyNE_reboot_snmpne content snmpne ProxyNE trap reboot
config response ProxyNE_trap_snmpne content snmp trap
message $(message)
ne-name ProxyNE
category some-category
config action ProxyNE_reboot_snmpne
event ProxyNE_reboot_snmpne
response ProxyNE_trap_snmpne
21-18
22
Configuring Jobs
This chapter includes scenarios that contain step-by-step procedures on how to configure jobs
for Remote.
Guide to this Chapter
Job Configuration Overview
Configuring Access to a Central FTP Package Server
Creating and Installing a Script Package
Configuring a Job with a Script Package and Script
Configuring a Job with a Job Property
Configuring a Job with a Job Task
Configuring Job Start Times
Configuring Dynamic Memory for a Job
22-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Jobs: Job Configuration Overview
Job Configuration Overview
A job contains the specifications for running an instance of a script. It refers to a script
defined within a package and specifies the parameters for execution on Remote.
Scripts are defined in packages and specify the parameters for execution when the
associated jobs run. Figure 22-1 on page 22-3 illustrates how scripting operates in
Remote.

Note: All job configuration examples in this document are set up in the CLI; however,
similar functions can also be performed from the Remote Web interface. See
Accessing the Web Interface on page 2-9 for details.
Script Package Components
Before you configure a job on Remote, you must first create a script package. A script
package (.pkg file) contains two basic components:

Python modules

A package manifest file
Python Modules
A script package can contain one or more Python modules (.py or .pyc files). Each
Python module can contain one or more scripts or it can be empty. A script is a
Python class that defines a run and stop method, which implements the scripting
interface on Remote. A script can define job properties, which pass runtime
parameters and/or settings (such as, connection information for a network element,
baud rates, TID’s, phone numbers, software version, and user name and password
information) to Remote when a job is executed. In addition, a script can define job
tasks and the properties required to request IP configuration for a device or open a
server socket connection to receive and transmit data.
In addition to Python modules, the script package can also contain Python packages.
A Python package is a way to store Python modules in a hierarchical directory
structure. For example, a Python package named PkgA will be created when you
create a directory named PkgA. This directory will store additional modules or
subpackages. In order for Python to recognize the directory as a Python package, the
directory needs to include a file named __init__.py. However, the file can be empty.
Package Manifest File
A Package Manifest file is an XML file that acts as a table of contents for the script
package. The package manifest lists which scripts the package contains, what tasks
must be configured to use the scripts, and any supported properties for the script.
Once a script package is created on a local workstation, you can use an FTP utility to
transfer the script package either directly to the pkgstage directory on Remote, or to a
22-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Jobs: Job Configuration Overview
directory on a central FTP package server that contains script packages. After you
transfer the script package, you can install it onto Remote.
When a script package is installed on Remote, it is stored in a database for executing
jobs. A job must refer to a script package and a script in order for it to execute
properly. Basically, a job configured through the Remote CLI runs the function(s)
within the script module. After configuring and executing a job, the script package is
retrieved from the package database and run by the script engine.
Remote
Remote
Remote
Remote
Figure 22-1 Remote Scripting Architecture
22-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Jobs: Configuring Access to a Central FTP Package Server
Configuring Access to a Central FTP Package Server
Important: This procedure only applies if you plan to store script packages on a
central FTP package server and install the script packages from the
server to the pkgstage directory on Remote.
In this scenario, you will:

Configure the central FTP package server

Configure the script package directory location

Configure the server user name and password

Enable remote access to the central FTP package server
To configure the central FTP package server:
1. At the main prompt, configure Remote to use an FTP server with IP address
11.8.77.3 and the default port number:
config pkgs server address 11.8.77.3
2. Configure the directory that contains the script packages as /packages/test:
config pkgs server directory /packages/test
3. Configure the server user name as test and password as test:
config pkgs server user test test

Note: The user name and password must match the user name and password
configured on the central FTP package server.
4. Enable remote access to the central FTP package server:
config pkgs server enable
5. (optional) Verify that the central FTP package server has been configured
properly:
show pkgs server
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show pkgs server
FTP server: enabled
Address: 11.8.77.3
Port: 21
User: test
Password: test
Directory: /packages/test
(Dub)>
6. Save the configuration.
22-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Jobs: Creating and Installing a Script Package
Creating and Installing a Script Package
Important: This procedure assumes that files named captureScript.py,
echoScript.py, PackageManifest.xml, and __init__.py have been
authored on a local workstation.
In this scenario, you will:

Create a working directory for packages

Copy files to the working directory

Create a script package

Use an FTP utility to transfer the script package to the Remote staging area or
to the configured central FTP package server
Tip: For more information on how to configure a central FTP package server,
refer to procedure Configuring Access to a Central FTP Package Server
on page 22-4.

Install the script package
To create and install a script package:
1. On a Linux/Unix workstation, create a working directory named packages:
% mkdir packages
cd packages
2. Copy the PackageManifest.xml file into working directory packages from the
directory in which the Package Manifest file was created.
3. Under the packages directory, create directory exampleScript:
% mkdir exampleScript
4. Copy the captureScript.py, echoScript.py, and __init__.py files to the
exampleScript directory.
5. Create the script package exampleScript-1.0.0.pkg by packing the
PackageManifest.xml file and files under the exampleScript directory
(captureScript.py, echoScript.py, and __init__.py) into a tar file:
tar -cvzf exampleScript-1.0.0.pkg PackageManifest.xml
examplescript/*
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Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Jobs: Creating and Installing a Script Package
6. Using an FTP utility, do one of the following:

Transfer exampleScript-1.0.0.pkg from the local workstation to the
pkgstage directory on Remote. Continue to step 7.

Transfer exampleScript-1.0.0.pkg to the central FTP package server
default directory of /, which contains all script packages. Continue to step 8.
7. At the main CLI prompt, install script package exampleScript-1.0.0.pkg to
Remote:
config pkgs install name exampleScript
Continue to step 9.
8. At the main CLI prompt, install script package exampleScript-1.0.0.pkg to
Remote from the central FTP package server:
config pkgs install name exampleScript-1.0.0 fromserver
Important: To install a script package from a central FTP package server, you
need to configure a static route. For more information, refer to
Configuring Static Routes on page 9-1.
9. (optional) Verify that the script package has been installed properly:
show pkgs summary
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show pkgs summary
Package
examplescript
(Dub)>
Version
1.0.0
Tip: To display the contents and attributes of script package examplescript,
enter show pkgs name examplescript.
10. Save the configuration.

Note: Some jobs need to be restarted when the configuration changes, including:
22-6

Battery Monitor (including the Battery Learner)

Analog Monitor
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Jobs: Configuring a Job with a Script Package and Script
Configuring a Job with a Script Package and Script
Important: This procedure assumes that files named captureScript.py,
echoScript.py, PackageManifest.xml, and __init__.py have been
authored on a local workstation and the procedure, Creating and
Installing a Script Package on page 22-5 has been completed.
In this scenario, you will configure a job with a script that prints a string of text to two
log files (stdout.log and stderr.log).
To configure a job with a script package and script:
1. At the main prompt, create job printlog:
config jobs name printlog
2. Configure job printlog to use script package examplescript and script
capture_example and define the minimum acceptable version level for an
installed package as 1.0.0:
config jobs name printlog script examplescript capture_example
1.0.0
3. (optional) Verify that the job has been configured with the proper script package
and script:
show jobs name printlog status
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show jobs name printlog status
Job: printlog
Package: examplescript
Min version: 1.0.0
Script: capture_example
Cron start: disabled
Start at boot: disabled
Memory limit (Kb): 1024
Output capture: disabled
Max start attempts: 1
Run state: idle
(Dub)>
4. Save the configuration.
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Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Jobs: Configuring a Job with a Job Property
Configuring a Job with a Job Property
Important: This procedure assumes that files named captureScript.py,
echoScript.py, PackageManifest.xml, and __init__.py have been
authored on a local workstation and the procedure, Configuring a Job
with a Script Package and Script on page 22-7 has been completed.
In this scenario, you will configure a job that uses a script that prints a string of text
to two log files. During runtime, the two files will be created in the job’s data
directory when job capture is enabled.
To configure a job with a job property:
1. At the main prompt, enable output capture for job printlog:
config jobs name printlog capture
2. Configure job printlog with job property capture_text and assign it the
property value of Hello World:
config jobs name printlog property capture_text “Hello World”

Note: To include spaces or special characters, quotes must be included.
By entering job property value hello world, job printlog will run script
capture_example and pass runtime job property capture_text. This indicates
that value Hello World will be written to the stdout.log and stderr.log files located
in the job’s data directory on Remote.
3. (optional) Verify that the job has been configured with the proper job property:
show jobs name printlog properties
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show jobs name printlog properties
Name
Value
capture_text
Hello World
(Dub)>
4. Save the configuration.
5. Run job printlog:
exec-job printlog run
A run ID is assigned.
22-8
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Jobs: Configuring a Job with a Job Property
6. (optional) Verify that the job has been executed successfully:
show jobs name printlog history
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub) show jobs name printlog>history
Run ID
Start time
End time
1 2008/11/03 22:35:32 2008/11/03 22:35:33
(Dub) show jobs name printlog>
Exit state
normal
7. (optional) FTP to Remote to verify that the output of the job has been recorded to
the stdout.log and stderr.log files located in the job’s data directory
(jobdata/printlog).
22-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Jobs: Configuring a Job with a Job Task
Configuring a Job with a Job Task
Important: This procedure assumes that the captureScript.py, echoScript.py,
PackageManifest.xml, and __init__.py files have been authored on
a local workstation and the procedure, Creating and Installing a Script
Package on page 22-5 has been completed.
In this scenario, you will configure a job with a job task. The job uses a script that
starts a server, which accepts an incoming socket connection. When a connection
is established, the script listens for data from the connection. When data is sent, the
script determines if it should modify the data based on the value yes entered for job
property upper_case and then writes back the changed data in uppercase.
To configure a job with a job task:
1. At the main prompt, create and configure job echodata to use script package
examplescript and script echo_example. Define the minimum acceptable
version level for an installed package as 1.0.0:
config jobs name echodata script examplescript echo_example 1.0.0
2. Create task new_ip and assign the task type as ifconfig:
config jobs name echodata task new_ip type ifconfig
3. Assign address property value 192.168.0.215 to task new_ip:
config jobs name echodata task new_ip property address
192.168.0.215
4. Assign controller property br_switch to task new_ip:
config jobs name echodata task new_ip property controller
br_switch
5. (optional) Verify that the task new_ip has been configured properly:
show jobs name echodata task new_ip
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show jobs name echodata task new_ip
Task: new_ip
Position: 1
Type: ifconfig
Properties:
Name
Value
address
192.168.0.215
controller
br_switch
(Dub)>
6. Create task server_sock and assign the task type as serversocket:
config jobs name echodata task server_sock type serversocket
22-10
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Jobs: Configuring a Job with a Job Task
7. Assign the task property port as 50008, ifconfig as new_ip, type as STREAM,
and listen as 5 to task server_sock:
config jobs name echodata task server_sock property port 50008
config jobs name echodata task server_sock property ifconfig
new_ip
config jobs name echodata task server_sock property type STREAM
config jobs name echodata task server_sock property listen 5
8. (optional) Verify that the task server_sock has been configured properly:
show jobs name echodata task server_sock
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show jobs name echodata task server_sock
Task: server_sock
Position: 2
Type: serversocket
Properties:
Name
Value
address
10.40.57.50
ifconfig
new_ip
listen
5
port
50008
type
STREAM
(Dub)>
9. Enable capture output for job echodata:
config jobs name echodata capture
10. Configure job echodata with the job property upper_case and assign it with the
value of yes:
config jobs name echodata property upper_case yes
11. (optional) Verify that job echodata has been configured with the proper job
properly:
show jobs name echodata properties
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show jobs name echodata properties
Name
Value
upper_case
yes
(Dub)>
12. Save the configuration.
13. Run job echodata:
exec-job echodata run
A run ID is assigned.
22-11
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Jobs: Configuring Job Start Times
Configuring Job Start Times
In this scenario, you will configure a job to start on August 7 and to run through
September 30 at 12:30 p.m., 5:30 p.m., and 7:30 p.m. every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday.
To configure start times for a job:
1. At the main prompt, configure job printlog to start on August 7 and to run
through September 30 every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 12:30 p.m., 5:30
p.m., and 7:30 p.m.:
config jobs name printlog start-at 8-9 7-30 12,17,19 30 1,3,5
A start-at index number of 1 is assigned.
2. (optional) Verify that job printlog has been configured with the proper starting
times:
show jobs name printlog starts *
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show jobs name printlog starts *
Cron start: disabled
Start at bootup: disabled
Start-at index: 1
Month: 8-9
Day: 7-30
Hour: 12,17,19
Minute: 30
Weekday: 1,3,5
No scheduled start time
(Dub)>
3. Save the configuration.
22-12
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Jobs: Configuring Dynamic Memory for a Job
Configuring Dynamic Memory for a Job
In this scenario, you will configure the amount of dynamic memory that Remote can
use while running job printlog.
To configure dynamic memory for a job:
1. At the main prompt, configure Remote to use 2024 kilobytes of dynamic memory
while running job printlog:
config jobs name printlog memory 2024
2. (optional) Verify that the dynamic memory has been configured properly for job
printlog:
show jobs name printlog status
The command response appears similar to the following:
(Dub)>show jobs name printlog status
Job: printlog
Package:
Min version: any
Script:
Title:
Cron start: disabled
Start at boot: disabled
Memory limit (Kb): 2024
Stack size (Kb): 1024
Output capture: enabled
Max start attempts: 1
Run state: idle
(Dub)>
3. Save the configuration.
22-13
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring Jobs: Configuring Dynamic Memory for a Job
22-14
23
Configuring the Peripheral
Management Subsystem
This chapter provides information on the expansion peripheral management subsystem and
gives examples of how to configure expansion peripherals. This subsystem provides
communication, coordination, auto-discovery, and state maintenance for Remote peripheral
management.
Guide to this Chapter
Peripheral Management Subsystem Overview
Expansion Unit Configurations
Expansion Peripheral Unit Discovery
Expansion Peripheral States
Configuring Remote to Manage an Expansion Peripheral
Configuring Discrete I/O Points on an Expansion Peripheral
Configuring Alarms for an Expansion Peripheral
Configuring a Serial Controller on an Expansion Peripheral
Disconnecting a Managed Expansion Peripheral
23-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Peripheral Management Subsystem Overview
Peripheral Management Subsystem Overview
Remote, Remote RMX and Remote RMM-1200 can support up to 12 expansion
peripherals. Expansion peripherals provide additional alarm and port capacity that is
easily managed through the Remote or Remote RMM-1200 Command Line Interface.
Expand-D Expansion Unit
Expand-D expansion units allow the user to add digital inputs, analog inputs, and
relay outputs to Remote. Expand-D contains the following inputs and outputs:

64 digital inputs

16 analog inputs

8 relay outputs
Figure 23-1 displays the Expand-D expansion unit.

Note: Users can physically connect an Ethernet cable to Expand-D. However, they
cannot directly log into or communicate with Expand-D.
Figure 23-1 Expand-D Expansion Unit
Expand-D Connections
The following characteristics apply to Expand-D units connected to Remote:

All connections from Remote to Expand-D are via Ethernet.

Two external switched Ethernet ports are available for connections.

User devices can connect to the open Ethernet port on Expand-D.

Expand-D does not run the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) on its Ethernet ports.
Important: Because Expand-D units do not run STP, users should never
network Expand-D units in an environment where Ethernet switching
loops can exist.
23-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Peripheral Management Subsystem Overview
Expand-D Peripheral Identification
Each Expand-D peripheral has a name that is defined in the following format:
DEP-XXXXXX
XXXXXX represents the low order 3 bytes of the peripheral’s MAC address (for
example, DEP-305E7D). DEP stands for Discrete Expansion Peripheral.
RME-1000 Unit
The RME-1000 unit provides three expansion slots for the following plug-in
peripherals:

RME-S8

RME-B64

RME-E8
The RME-1000 provides a power supply and an Ethernet switch, otherwise has no
intelligence. The Ethernet switch is connected to the two front panel Ethernet
connectors and to each slot in the unit. Figure 23-2 displays the RME-1000 unit.
RME-S8 Peripheral
RME-B64 Peripheral
Figure 23-2 RME-1000 Unit with RME-S8 and RME-B64 Peripherals
RME-1000 Connections
The following characteristics apply to the RME-1000 unit when it is connected to
Remote:

All connections from Remote to RME-1000 are via Ethernet.

Two external switched Ethernet ports are available for connections.

User devices can connect to the open Ethernet port on RME-1000.

RME-1000 does not run the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) on its Ethernet ports.
Important: Because the RME-1000 does not run STP, users should never
network RME-1000 peripherals in an environment where Ethernet
switching loops can exist.
23-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Peripheral Management Subsystem Overview
RME-S8
RME-S8 is an eight port asynchronous serial RS232/422 card. It has a processor and
memory subsystem and runs software similar to Expand-D. Figure 23-3 displays the
RME-S8 card.
Figure 23-3 RME-S8 Card (8 Port Async Serial)
RME-S8 Peripheral Identification
Each RME-S8 peripheral has a name that is defined in the following format:
SER8-XXXXXX
XXXXXX represents the low order 3 bytes of the peripheral’s MAC address (for
example, SER8-305E7D).
RME-B64
RME-B64 has 64 discrete inputs, 4 discrete outputs, and 16 analogs. It has a
processor and memory subsystem and runs software similar to Expand-D. Figure 234 displays the RME-B64 card.

Note: The RME-B64 replaces the Expand-FDCI; however, Kentrox will continue to
support existing FDCI peripherals.
Figure 23-4 RME-B64 Card
23-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Peripheral Management Subsystem Overview
RME-B64 Peripheral Identification
Each RME-B64 peripheral has a name that is defined in the following format:
FB64-XXXXXX
XXXXXX represents the low order 3 bytes of the peripheral’s MAC address (for
example, FB64-305E7D).
RME-E8
RME-E8 contains eight Ethernet switch ports. It has a processor and memory
subsystem and runs software similar to Expand-D. Figure 23-5 displays the RME-E8
card.
Important: RME-E8 does not run the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) on its
Ethernet ports; therefore, users should never network RME-1000
peripherals in an environment where Ethernet switching loops can
exist.
Figure 23-5 RME-E8 Card
RME-E8 Peripheral Identification
Each RME-E8 peripheral has a name that is defined in the following format:
FE8-XXXXXX
XXXXXX represents the low order 3 bytes of the peripheral’s MAC address (for
example, FE8-305E7D).
23-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Expansion Unit Configurations
Expansion Unit Configurations
The Remote peripheral management subsystem lets Remote manage up to 12
expansion units. These units can be connected to Remote in several different
configurations:

By daisy-chaining them together

By connecting them to individual Remote Ethernet ports

By connecting them to a third-party Ethernet switch
Figure 23-6 displays three expansion units daisy-chained together, which is the most
common configuration.
Figure 23-6 Expansion Unit Daisy-Chain Configuration
23-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Expansion Peripheral Unit Discovery
Expansion Peripheral Unit Discovery
Expansion peripheral units announce themselves at all times to all locally-connected
Remotes. These announcements do not cross bridged or routed WAN links, but they
do traverse Ethernet bridges and hubs.
When Remote discovers an expansion unit, it is made available for association with a
unit number by user command. The unit number configuration settings are applied to
the unit, which puts the unit under Remote’s management control. For more
information on setting up unit number/peripheral associations, refer to Configuring
Remote to Manage an Expansion Peripheral on page 23-10.
Important: Only one Remote at a time can manage a peripheral unit. The first one
that connects to the unit will manage it. However, if the management
connection drops, another Remote could become the new managing
device. This situation is a misconfiguration.
23-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Expansion Peripheral States
Expansion Peripheral States
Every discovered peripheral has an “Admin state” and “Oper state” field. The values
associated with these states appear in the output for command show peripherals.
The Administrative State is the configured state of the peripheral. Table 23-1 lists the
potential administrative states.
Table 23-1 Potential Expansion Peripheral Administrative States
Administrative
State
Description
Managed
Indicates that Remote is ready to actively manage the
peripheral. This state goes into effect when the user issues
command config peripheral manage for the specified
peripheral.
Unmanaged
Indicates that Remote is not ready to actively manage the
peripheral.
The Operation State is the actual, operational state of a discovered peripheral. Table
23-2 lists the potential operation states.
Table 23-2 Potential Expansion Peripheral Operation States
Operation State
Description
Unmanaged
Specifies that the peripheral has been discovered, but
has not been configured for management.

Note: The Administrative State will also be
Unmanaged.
OtherManaged
Specifies that the peripheral is under the management of
another Remote.
AdminManaged
Specifies that the peripheral has been configured under
the management of Remote, but has not actively been
managed.

Note: This state usually occurs when the expansion
peripheral is configured, but is not connected to
Remote.
Connecting
23-8
Specifies that Remote is attempting to establish a
management connection to the peripheral.
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Expansion Peripheral States
Table 23-2 Potential Expansion Peripheral Operation States (Continued)
Operation State
Description
Initializing
Specifies that Remote has established a management
connection to the peripheral and is exchanging initial
setup messages with it.
IncompatibleManaged
Specifies that the following conditions exist:
 Remote has successfully set up and initialized a
management connection to the peripheral.
 The peripheral’s firmware is incompatible with
Remote’s firmware.
 Remote is not currently downloading compatible
firmware to the peripheral (and perhaps cannot, for
some reason).
When a peripheral is in this state, only basic peripheral
management functions are available, such as updating
the image and reloading.
Downloading
Specifies that Remote is downloading a new firmware
image to the peripheral.
Managed
Specifies that Remote has successfully set up and
initialized a management connection to the peripheral.
Online
Specifies that the peripheral is fully operational. Remote
has established a management connection to it and it is
fully functioning as part of Remote.
23-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Configuring Remote to Manage an Expansion
Peripheral
Configuring Remote to Manage an Expansion Peripheral
An expansion peripheral is managed by Remote when it is:

Configured through the Remote

Connected to the Remote

Capable of operating as an extension of the Remote’s discrete I/O subsystem.
Management of a peripheral by Remote requires peripheral type and peripheral name
configuration.
In this scenario, you will:

Configure a discrete peripheral unit

Configure a description for the discrete peripheral unit

Configure the Remote unit to manage the peripheral device.
To configure Remote to manage an expansion peripheral:
1. Configure description Unit manages DEP-362A4C for peripheral unit 2:
config peripheral 2 description Unit manages DEP-362A4C

Note: The peripheral type is inferred from the peripheral name prefix (for
example, DEP = discrete-expansion). If desired, you can explicitly
configure the peripheral type with command config peripheral type.
2. Configure Remote peripheral unit 2 to manage peripheral device DEP-362A4C:
config peripheral 2 manage DEP-362A4C

Notes: Configuring the peripheral name associated with a unit number causes
Remote to attempt active management of the specified device. If the
device has been discovered, Remote connects to it and starts managing
it immediately. If the device has not been discovered, Remote begins
actively managing it as soon as it is discovered.

23-10
All peripherals have a hard-coded, unique name.
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Configuring Remote to Manage an Expansion
Peripheral
3. (optional) Verify that the expansion peripheral has been configured properly:
show peripherals unit 2
The output will look similar to the following:
(Dub) show>peripherals unit 2
Unit number: 2
Description:
Type: discrete-expansion
Admin state: Managed
Name: DEP-362A4C
IP address: 169.254.16.199
Oper state: Online
Manager name: AI101
Manager IP address: 10.34.64.101
Type: discrete-expansion
Model: B160.B
Firmware version: 1.10
Firmware build date: 2006-09-12,18:37:03.0,-04:00
Firmware build ID: 005
Serial number: 23028069
Manufacture date: 07/01/05
Stage2 bootloader version: 3.10
Stage2 bootloader build date: Thu Jul 6 13:52:11 EDT 2006
MAC address: 00:40:72:04:A0:A9
Discrete-I/O 2 subsystem: Online
(Dub) show>

Note: The output above shows the expansion peripheral in online mode, which
indicates that the peripheral is fully operational. Remote has established a
management connection to it and it is fully functioning as part of Remote.
For more information on management states, refer to section Expansion
Peripheral States on page 23-8.
4. Save the configuration.
23-11
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Configuring Discrete I/O Points on an Expansion
Peripheral
Configuring Discrete I/O Points on an Expansion
Peripheral
Display points on an expansion peripheral are configured using the same commands
that configure and display Remote’s on-board I/O points.
In this scenario, you will:

Configure a default alarm entry for a discrete input point on a peripheral unit

Enable the discrete input point on the peripheral unit

Configure a description for a discrete output on the unit

Enable a discrete analog point on the unit.
To configure discrete I/O points for the discrete expansion peripheral:
1. Configure default alarm entries for discrete input 2/2:
config discrete input 2/2 alarm-default
2. Enable discrete input 2/2:
config discrete input 2/2 enable
3. Configure description Output 12 for discrete output 2/12:
config discrete output 2/12 description Output 12
4. Enable discrete analog 2/3
config discrete analog 2/3 enable

Note: For more information on discrete analog input settings, refer to section
Configuring an Alarm Entry for a Temperature Sensor on page 14-4.
5. (optional) Verify that the discrete I/O points have been configured properly:
show discrete inputs 2/2
The display will look similar to the following for the discrete input:
(Dub)>show discrete inputs 2/2
ID
- 2/2
Description
State
- enable
Value
- open
(Dub)>
23-12
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Configuring Discrete I/O Points on an Expansion
Peripheral
show discrete outputs 2/12
The display will look similar to the following for the discrete output:
(Dub)>show discrete outputs 2/12
ID
- 2/12
Description
- Output 12
Value
- closed
(Dub)>
show discrete analogs 2/3
The display will look similar to the following for the analog input:
(Dub)>show discrete analogs 2/3
ID
- 2/3
Description
State
- disable
Low Band
- 0
High Band
- 0
Hysteresis
- 2
Interval
- 0
Max Loop Value
- 30
Min Loop Value
- 30
Max Sensor Reading - 40
Min Sensor Reading - 40
Units
- mA
Mode
- current
Value
- 0 mA
(Dub)>
6. Save the configuration.
23-13
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Configuring Alarms for an Expansion Peripheral
Configuring Alarms for an Expansion Peripheral
Alarms configured for expansion peripheral I/O points are set up the same way as
alarms configured for on-board Remote I/O points—the same commands are used.
In this scenario, you will:

Configure an alarm entry that signals when a serial connection on a peripheral
unit goes down

Configure an alarm entry that signals when the serial connection comes back
up
To configure alarms for an expansion peripheral:
1. Configure alarm entry serConnDown as a major alarm that signals when serial
controller 3/5 goes down:
config alarm-entry serConnDown event serial 3/5 down major Serial
controller 3/5 is down
2. Configure alarm entry serConnUp as a normal alarm that signals when serial
controller 3/5 comes up:
config alarm-entry serConnUp event serial 3/5 up normal Serial
controller 3/5 is up
3. (optional) Verify that the alarm entries have been configured properly:
show alarm-entries name serConnDown
23-14
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Configuring Alarms for an Expansion Peripheral
The display will look similar to the following for alarm entry serConnDown:
(Dub)>show alarm-entries name serConnDown
Name
- serConnDown
State
- normal
Current Message Description
Nagging Interval - 0
Nagging Level
- major
Trap
- enabled
Raw
- disabled
TL1
- disabled
TL1 AID
TL1 Class
- env
TL1 Affect
- nsa
TL1 Type
TL1NE
- 1
Category
NE Name
Alarm Actions:
Severity
Originator
Trigger
Message
-----------------------------------------------------------------major
serial 3/5
down
Serial controller 3/
(Dub)>
show alarm-entries name serConnUp
The display will look similar to the following for alarm entry serConnUp:
(Dub)>show alarm-entries name serConnUp
Name
- serConnUp
State
- normal
Current Message Description
Nagging Interval - 0
Nagging Level
- major
Trap
- enabled
Raw
- disabled
TL1
- disabled
TL1 AID
TL1 Class
- env
TL1 Affect
- nsa
TL1 Type
TL1NE
- 1
Category
NE Name
Alarm Actions:
Severity
Originator
Trigger
Message
-----------------------------------------------------------------normal
serial 3/5
up
Serial controller 3/
(Dub)>
4. Save the configuration.
23-15
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Configuring a Serial Controller on an Expansion
Peripheral
Configuring a Serial Controller on an Expansion Peripheral
Serial controllers configured on RME-S8 ports are set up the same way as serial
controllers configured on on-board Remote serial ports—the same commands are
used.
In this scenario, you will configure a serial controller on an RME-S8 port.
To configure a serial controller on an RME-S8 port:
1. Configure and enable controller serial 3/4:
config controller serial 3/4 enable
2. Assign controller serial 3/4 as a resource:
config controller serial 3/4 assign
3. Configure description FA unit 3: port 4 for controller serial 3/4:
config controller serial 3/4 description FA unit 3: port 4
4. Configure controller serial 3/4 to accept (but not receive) mediation
connections:
config controller serial 3/4 application destination
5. (optional) Verify that controller serial 3/4 is configured properly:
show controllers serial 3/4
The display will look similar to the following for controller serial 3/4:
(Dub)>show controllers serial 3/4
serial 3/4 status=enabled link-state=down encapsulation= baud=9600 databits=8
stopbits=1 parity=none resource-state=assigned
flow-control=none
linemode=rs232
dial-timer=1
init-string=
connect-mode=
rts-connect-mode=on
dtr-connect-mode=on
disconnect-mode=
rts-disconnect-mode=off
dtr-disconnect-mode=off
parity-errors=0
description=FA unit 3: port 4
application=destination
(Dub)>
6. Save the configuration.
23-16
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Disconnecting a Managed Expansion Peripheral
Disconnecting a Managed Expansion Peripheral
When Remote is disconnected from a managed peripheral, a trap is generated.
Remote notices physical disconnections 20 to 30 seconds after they occur.
In this scenario, you will disconnect the managed peripheral unit.
To disconnect a managed expansion peripheral, configure the unit 2 expansion
peripheral to become unmanaged:
config peripheral 2 no manage
When Remote is reconnected to an expansion peripheral after a temporarily
disconnection:

Output state changes that occurred during the disconnection are applied to the
output’s points.

Events are generated that report on the current state of enabled expansion
peripheral inputs. This includes changes that occurred and persisted during the
disconnection.
23-17
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Configuring the Peripheral Management Subsystem: Disconnecting a Managed Expansion Peripheral
23-18
24
Using Configuration Wizards
This chapter provides information on the three available configuration wizards.
Guide to this Chapter
Configuration Wizard Overview
Using the initsetup Wizard
Using the bistate-alarms Wizard
Using the serial-port Wizard
24-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Using Configuration Wizards: Configuration Wizard Overview
Configuration Wizard Overview
A configuration wizard is a script or program accessed from the CLI that prompts you
for configuration information, then generates and applies the associated commands
in running the configuration.
When you execute the command config use-wizard from the CLI, you can set up
a configuration without entering individual CLI commands.
Three wizard scripts are provided for Remote:
24-2

A setup wizard for initial connectivity configuration on an unconfigured Remote

A wizard for common serial port setups

A wizard that configures alarm table entries for bi-state points.
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Using Configuration Wizards: Using the initsetup Wizard
Using the initsetup Wizard
In this scenario, you will configure the initial setup for Remote with the initsetup
wizard. The scenario describes the options for both the GPRS and EVDO wireless
configurations.

Note: The running-config file is automatically saved to a network-recovery
file when you run the initsetup wizard and apply the output to the
running-config file. If the running configuration is lost, you can copy file
network-recovery to file running-config to restore the initial system
configuration.
To configure the initial setup:
1. From the main prompt, access the initsetup wizard:
config use-wizard initsetup
The initsetup wizard screen appears:
(Dub)>config use-wizard initsetup
------------------------- initsetup ------------------------This wizard configures initial connectivity settings.
An asterisk (*) in a selection list denotes the default value.
Ctrl-c aborts the wizard.
NOTE:
This wizard provides only basic configuration. For additional
configuration options, consult the command reference guide.
Hostname of this device:
2. Enter the desired hostname.
The wizard prompts you for an IP address.
3. Enter the desired IP address.
The wizard prompts you for a subnet mask or mask length.
4. Enter the desired subnet mask length.
The wizard asks if you want to add login accounts.
5. (optional) Enter the desired login account information.
24-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Using Configuration Wizards: Using the initsetup Wizard
If your Remote has a GPRS or EVDO modem, the wizard asks if you want to
configure a wireless WAN connection.
If you enter Y and are using GPRS, go to step 6.
If you enter Y and are using EVDO, go to step 7.
If you enter N, skip to step 8.
6. (optional - for GPRS only) Select a GPRS service provider from the list provided.
Enter the desired wireless WAN connection settings. The following settings may
be configurable depending upon the GPRS service provider you select:

Chat file option

Modem initialization string (if the chat file option is not selected)

PPP encapsulation option

Remote username and password information

LCP echo request option

Access Point Name.
7. (optional - for EVDO only)
The wizard asks if you want to configure the EVDO phone for service. If Y, enter
the following:

Directory number

Mobile phone number

System ID

Network ID
The wizard asks you to select an EVDO service provider from the list provided.
The wizard prompts you for the following configurable settings depending upon
the EVDO service provider you select:

Chat file option

Modem initialization string (if the chat file option is not selected)

PPP encapsulation option

Remote username and password information

LCP echo request option.
The wizard asks if you want to configure a default route.
8. (optional) Enter the desired IP address for the default route or none.
24-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Using Configuration Wizards: Using the initsetup Wizard
The wizard asks if you would like to configure a DHCP server.
9. (optional) Enter the desired DHCP server settings. The following settings are
configurable:

DHCP router IP address

Subnet mask or mask length

The lowest address to serve

The number of addresses to serve.
The wizard asks if you would like to configure clock settings.
10. (optional) Enter the desired clock settings. The following settings are
configurable:

The standard timezone

Daylight savings time

The current time and date.
The wizard asks if you would like to configure NTP.
11. (optional) Enter the desired NTP settings. The wizard asks you for the primary
and secondary server IP addresses.
The wizard asks if you would like to configure SNMP community strings.
12. (optional) Enter the desired SNMP community string settings. The following
settings are configurable:

The read-only community string

The read-write community string

The SNMP version.
The wizard asks if you would like to configure an SNMP manager.
13. (optional) Enter the desired SNMP manager settings. The following settings are
configurable:

An IP address

A community string for traps

An SNMP version.
14. (optional) Configure another SNMP manager. Multiple SNMP managers can be
configured.
The wizard asks if you would like to configure an application package server.
24-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Using Configuration Wizards: Using the initsetup Wizard
15. (optional) Enter the desired application package server settings. The following
settings are configurable:

An IP address

A package directory on the server

An FTP username and password.
The wizard asks you to select one of the following options:

Apply the settings to running-config

Save the commands to a patch configuration file

View the commands

Cancel.
16. Select one of the options.
You are returned to the main CLI.
24-6
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Using Configuration Wizards: Using the bistate-alarms Wizard
Using the bistate-alarms Wizard
In this scenario, you will configure a bi-state point on Remote with the
bistate-alarms wizard.

Note: This wizard also allows you to configure bi-state points on expansion units.
To configure bi-state points:
1. From the main prompt, access the bistate-alarms wizard:
config use-wizard bistate-alarms
The bistate alarm entry wizard screen appears:
(Dub)>config use-wizard bistate-alarms
------------------------------------------ bistate alarm entry wizard -----------------------------------------This wizard configures alarm entries for bistate (discrete input) points.
Ctrl-c aborts the wizard.
NOTE:
This wizard provides only basic configuration.
options, consult the command reference guide.
For additional configuration
Enter number of the unit containing point(s) to configure.
the base unit. Use 1-12 for a peripheral unit.
Enter unit number (leave blank for base unit):
Use 0 or blank for
2. Enter the desired unit number (0 is the base unit).
The wizard states which point is currently selected and lists options for:

Choosing a different point

Configuring the selected point

Ending the configuration.
3. Select one of the options.
The wizard asks you to configure a description for the point.
4. (optional) Enter the desired description.
The wizard asks you to enter an alarm name.
5. Enter the desired alarm name.
The wizard asks you to select the state of the point when it is alarmed.
24-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Using Configuration Wizards: Using the bistate-alarms Wizard
6. Select the desired alarmed point state.
The wizard asks you to select the severity level for the alarmed point.
7. Select the desired severity level.
The wizard asks you to configure a new alarm message or accept the default alarm
message.
8. Enter a new alarm message or accept the default alarm message.
The wizard asks you to configure a new normal state message or to accept the
default normal state message.
9. Enter a new normal state message or accept the default normal state message.
The wizard asks you to enter a nagging interval.
10. (optional) Enter the desired nagging interval.
The wizard asks you to enter a network element name for the alarm entry.
11. (optional) Enter the desired network element name.
The wizard asks you for an alarm category for the alarm entry.
12. (optional) Enter an alarm category for the alarm entry.
The wizard takes you back to the initial bi-state point prompt (configured in step 2).
13. If desired, follow this procedure again to configure another bi-state point.
When you are finished configuring points, the wizard asks you to select one of the
following options:

Apply the settings to running-config

Save the commands to a patch configuration file

View the commands

Cancel.
14. Select one of the options.
You are returned to the main CLI.
24-8
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Using Configuration Wizards: Using the serial-port Wizard
Using the serial-port Wizard
In this scenario, you will configure an Remote serial port with the serial-port wizard.
To configure an Remote serial port:
1. From the main prompt, access the serial-port wizard:
config use-wizard serial-port
The serial port wizard screen appears:
(Dub)>config use-wizard serial-port
---------------------------------------- serial port setup wizard ---------------------------------------This wizard configures serial ports.
An asterisk (*) in a selection list denotes the default value.
Ctrl-c aborts the wizard.
NOTE:
This wizard provides only basic configuration. For additional
configuration options, consult the command reference guide.
Enter number of the unit containing the port(s) to configure.
for the base unit. Use 1-12 for a peripheral unit.
Enter unit number (leave blank for base unit):
Use 0 or blank
Port currently selected is 1
<port number> choose a different port (range 1-6)
(c)
configure this port
(d)
done
Choose option (leave blank to skip this port):
2. Enter the desired port number.
The wizard states which port is currently selected and lists options for:

Choosing a different port

Configuring the selected port

Ending the configuration.
3. Select one of the options.
The wizard asks you to configure a description for the port.
4. (optional) Enter the desired description.
The wizard lists the default line settings and asks if you would like to accept those
settings.
24-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Using Configuration Wizards: Using the serial-port Wizard
5. (optional) Enter the desired line settings. The following settings are configurable:

The line mode

The baud rate

The parity

The number of databits

The number of stop bits.
The wizard asks you to select an application for the serial port. Application options
include terminal server, serial-to-IP, TBOS, or none (basic async port).
6. Select an application for the serial port.

Note: The remaining prompts for the serial port configuration will vary based
upon the application you select.
7. Enter the desired values for the application as prompted.
8. If desired, follow this procedure again to configure another serial port.
When you are finished configuring serial ports, the wizard asks you to select one
of the following options:

Apply the settings to running-config

Save the commands to a patch configuration file

View the commands

Cancel.
9. Select one of the options.
You are returned to the main CLI.
24-10
25
Drop and Continue Functionality
This chapter provides information about Remote drop and continue (DAC) capabilities and
functionality.
Guide to this Chapter
Description
Functional Specifications
Failover
25-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Drop and Continue Functionality: Description
Description
Remote DAC provides a way to share the bandwidth of a single T1 or E1 link among
multiple devices. Devices with DAC capabilities can do this because they require only
one path for connecting to multiple devices. Networks of single-WAN devices without
DAC capability require a separate physical path for each device. Figure 25-1 displays
a network of DAC devices linked together in one path.
Operations
Center
DAC
Device
DAC
Device
DAC
Device
Figure 25-1 DAC Device Chain
Figure 25-2 displays a network of single-WAN devices without DAC capabilities.
Operations
Center
DAC
Device
DAC
Device
DAC
Device
Figure 25-2 Single WAN Device Chain
DAC lets T1 and E1 lines multiplex several communication channels over a single
physical path. Each DAC-capable device in the series consumes one or more of the
timeslots for its own communication and lets the rest continue to the next device. The
data that a device takes for itself is dropped from the signal that passes to the next
device. Figure 25-3 displays the how timeslots drop from the T1 or E1 line at each
device.
Operations
Center
24
Timeslots
DAC
Device
23
Timeslots
DAC
Device
22
Timeslots
Figure 25-3 DAC Device Chain with Timeslots
The maximum number of devices that can be strung together using DAC on a T1/E1
link is the same as the number of timeslots multiplexed on the link:
25-2

24 for T1

30 for multiframe E1

31 for non-multiframe E1.
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Drop and Continue Functionality: Functional Specifications
Functional Specifications
Alarm Behavior
Remote generally sends Remote Alarm Indications (RAIs) back in the direction of a
received alarm and sends Alarm Indication Signals (AISs) when there is no other valid
data to send. RAIs are usually referred to as Yellow Alarms and AISs are usually
referred to as Blue Alarms. Table 25-1 displays the alarm condition inputs and results
that can be detected when the channel-group on serial port 7 is disabled.
Table 25-1 Alarm Conditions When the Serial Port 7 Channel-Group is Disabled
Input
Result
serial port 7
rx-link-state
serial port 8
rx-link-state
serial port 7
tx-link-state
serial port 8
tx-link-state
up (or RAI*)
LOS, LOF, or AIS
AIS
Disabled
test
AIS
test
LOS, LOF, or AIS
up (or RAI*)
RAI*
AIS
test
up (or RAI*)
test
AIS

Note: An asterisk (*) specifies that RAI is neither generated nor detected when using
D4 framing.
Table 25-2 displays the alarm condition inputs and results that can be detected when
the channel-group on serial port 7 is enabled.
Table 25-2 Alarm Conditions When the Serial Port 7 Channel-Group is Enabled
Input
Result
serial port 7
rx-link-state
serial port 8
rx-link-state
serial port 7
tx-link-state
serial port 8
tx-link-state
up
LOS, LOF, or AIS
up
RAI*
test
up
test
LOS, LOF, or AIS
up (or RAI*)
RAI*
AIS
test
up (or RAI*)
test
AIS
25-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Drop and Continue Functionality: Functional Specifications
Configuration
Remote models with DAC capabilities do not have any configuration commands
beyond those that are available for non-DAC models. However, there are notable
differences between the dual-WAN and DAC Remote models. The following
commands exhibit these differences:
config controller serial clock
This command does not exist for DAC Remote models. Clocking for DAC is set
internally and cannot be changed.
config controller serial buildout (for controller serial port 8)
This command does not exist for DAC Remote models. The buildout level is set to
0to133ft for DAC and cannot be changed.
config controller serial framing (for controller serial port 8)
This command does not exist for DAC Remote models. The framing for both links
must match, so the framing for serial port 8 follows the framing for serial port 7
automatically.
config controller serial linecode (for controller serial port 8)
This command does not exist for DAC Remote models. The linecode for both links
must match, so serial port 8 linecode follows serial port 7 linecode automatically.
config controller serial channel-group (for controller serial 7)
Command config controller serial channel-group group timeslots defines
the set of T1/E1 channels that comprise the channel-group. These channels are
dropped from the data stream (and the data from these channels goes to Remote's
CPU) and the remaining channels continue on to serial port 8.

Note: Remote fills the dropped channels with all 1s when it transmits data on serial
port 8.
config controller serial channel-group (for controller serial port 8)
This command does not exist for DAC Remote models. Data from channels on serial
port 8 in a DAC model cannot be routed to Remote's CPU. To do this, you must
access a router or bridge with serial port 7.
25-4
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Drop and Continue Functionality: Failover
Failover
Remote with DAC capability has safeguards against both power failure and software
failure. A drawback to using long chains of devices connected by a single path is that
the failure of one device in the chain can disrupt communication with every other
device beyond it. This type of failure can affect both dual-WAN and DAC devices, but
there is a simple failover solution for DAC.
When a failure occurs, relays built into Remote T1/E1 ports snap closed, which
connects both cables together and allows data in all timeslots and in the T1 facilities
data link (FDL) to pass in both directions. This enables other devices in the chain to
communicate as if Remote were not there.
After the failure is corrected, Remote prepares itself to manage both links and
switches itself back into the data path. There is no down time while Remote boots
because it keeps itself out of the data path. The length of the interruption when
Remote cuts back in is the same as the amount of time it takes the relays to switch.
25-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Drop and Continue Functionality: Failover
25-6
26
Remote TL1 Commands
This chapter lists the default TL1 commands that Remote’s Virtual Network Elements (VNEs)
support.
Guide to this Chapter
Overview
Default TL1 VNE Commands
Unsupported TL1 Commands
26-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Overview
Overview
This chapter discusses the following topics:

The default Remote TL1 command set

Recognizing the failure messages associated with TL1 commands that aren’t
supported by Remote.
You should be familiar with Remote actions and TL1 on Remote before reading this
chapter. For more information on these topics, refer to Chapter 11: Configuring
Actions, Events, and Responses and Chapter 17: Configuring and Connecting TL1
Infrastructure.
26-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Default TL1 VNE Commands
Default TL1 VNE Commands
The default TL1 commands supported by Remote are a small subset of all available
TL1 commands. The following default commands are supported:

ACT-USER

ALW-MSG-ALL

CANC-USER

RTRV-ALM-ALL

RTRV-ALM-DS3

RTRV-ALM-EC1

RTRV-ALM-ENV

RTRV-ALM-EQPT

RTRV-ALM-OC3

RTRV-ALM-T1

RTRV-HDR
ACT-USER
Description
This command lets a remote user log into the VNE on Remote.
Format
ACT-USER:tid:user:ctag::password;
Parameters
tid
Defines the target identifier for a VNE on Remote.
user
Defines the user name for a VNE on Remote.
ctag
Defines the correlation tag used to correlate responses to commands.
Each command has a unique correlation tag. A response includes the
identical correlation tag to the one used for the corresponding
command.
password
Defines the user password for a VNE on Remote.
26-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Default TL1 VNE Commands
Examples
This example displays a normal response when command ACTUSER:Remote:ai:1::ai; is entered.
M
;
26-4
Remote 08-09-24 16:58:44
1 COMPLD
/* 1 User(s) Logged On */
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Default TL1 VNE Commands
ALW-MSG-ALL
Description
This command causes Remote to resume transmission of automatic messages after
being in the inhibit message mode.

Note: Remote does not currently support the inhibit message TL1 command.
Because of this, Remote is always in ALW-MSG-ALL mode.
Format
ALW-MSG-ALL:tid:[ aid ]:ctag;
Parameters
tid
Defines the target identifier for a VNE on Remote.
aid
Defines the user name for a VNE on Remote.
cta
g
Defines the correlation tag used to correlate responses to commands. Each
command has a unique correlation tag. A response includes the identical
correlation tag to the one used for the corresponding command.
Examples
This example displays a normal response when command ALW-MSGALL:Remote:AID:1; is entered.
M
Remote 09-01-24 17:47:44
1 COMPLD
/* ALW-MSG-ALL:Remote:AID:1 */
;
26-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Default TL1 VNE Commands
CANC-USER
Description
This command lets the connected user log out of the VNE on Remote.
Format
CANC-USER:tid:aid:ctag;
Parameters
tid
Defines the target identifier for a VNE on Remote.
aid
Defines the user name for a VNE on Remote.
ctag
Defines the correlation tag used to correlate responses to commands. Each
command has a unique correlation tag. A response includes the identical
correlation tag to the one used for the corresponding command.
Examples
This example displays a normal response when command CANCUSER:Remote:ai:1; is entered.
M
;
26-6
Remote 09-01-09-25 10:07:18
1 COMPLD
/* CANC-USER:Remote:ai:1 */
/* Your session has been disconnected. */
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Default TL1 VNE Commands
RTRV-ALM-ALL
Description
This command causes Remote to return all alarms.
Format
RTRV-ALM-ALL:tid:[ aid ]:ctag::;
Parameters
tid
Defines the target identifier for a VNE on Remote.
aid
Defines the user name for a VNE on Remote.
ctag
Defines the correlation tag used to correlate responses to input commands.
Each input command has a unique correlation tag. A response includes the
identical correlation tag to the one used for the corresponding input
command.
Examples
This example displays a normal response when command
RTRV-ALM-ALL:Remote::1::; is entered.
M
Remote 09-01-27 14:00:02
1 COMPLD
/* RTRV-ALM-ALL:Remote::1:: */
"INPUT0_19,ENV:CR,MISC,NSA,09-27,09-48-45,,,:\"INPUT 0/19 CLOSE\",:,"
;
26-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Default TL1 VNE Commands
RTRV-ALM-DS3
Description
This command causes Remote to return all alarms designated with the DS3 modifier
during Remote configuration. Points associated with class DS3, which transmits
digital signals at 44.736 Mbps over a T-3 facility, are generally programmed with this
modifier.
Format
RTRV-ALM-DS3:tid:[ aid ]:ctag::;
Parameters
tid
Defines the target identifier for a VNE on Remote.
aid
Defines the user name for a VNE on Remote.
ctag
Defines the correlation tag used to correlate responses to input commands.
Each input command has a unique correlation tag. A response includes the
identical correlation tag to the one used for the corresponding input
command.
Examples
This example displays a normal response when command
RTRV-ALM-DS3:Remote::1::; is entered.
M
;
26-8
Remote 09-01-18 12:46:19
1 COMPLD
/* RTRV-ALM-DS3:Remote::1:: */
"INPUT0_1,DS3:CR,MISC,NSA,09-18,12-36-34,,,:\"INPUT 0/1 CLOSE\",:,"
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Default TL1 VNE Commands
RTRV-ALM-EC1
Description
This command causes Remote to return all alarms designated with the EC1 modifier
during Remote configuration. Points associated with class EC1, which is a facility with
electrical levels at 51.84 Mbps, are generally programmed with this modifier.
Format
RTRV-ALM-EC1:tid:[ aid ]:ctag::;
Parameters
tid
Defines the target identifier for a VNE on Remote.
aid
Defines the user name for a VNE on Remote.
ctag
Defines the correlation tag used to correlate responses to input commands.
Each input command has a unique correlation tag. A response includes the
identical correlation tag to the one used for the corresponding input
command.
Examples
This example displays a normal response when command
RTRV-ALM-EC1:Remote::1::; is entered.
M
Remote 09-01-18 13:08:18
1 COMPLD
/* RTRV-ALM-EC1:Remote::1:: */
"INPUT0_2,EC1:CR,MISC,NSA,09-18,13-07-17,,,:\"INPUT 0/2 CLOSE\",:,"
;
26-9
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Default TL1 VNE Commands
RTRV-ALM-ENV
Description
This command causes Remote to return all alarms for points designated with
environment modifiers during Remote configuration. Points associated with
environmental alarms, such as high temperature, are generally programmed with this
modifier.
Format
RTRV-ALM-ENV:tid:[ aid ]::ctag;
Parameters
tid
Defines the target identifier for a VNE on Remote.
aid
Defines the user name for a VNE on Remote.
ctag
Defines the correlation tag used to correlate responses to commands. Each
command has a unique correlation tag. A response includes the identical
correlation tag to the one used for the corresponding command.
Examples
This example displays a normal response when command
RTRV-ALM-ENV:Remote::1; is entered.
M
;
26-10
Remote 09-01-25 12:19:02
1 COMPLD
/* RTRV-ALM-ENV:Remote::1 */
"INPUT0_19:CR,MISC,09-27,09-48-45,\"INPUT 0/19 CLOSE\""
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Default TL1 VNE Commands
RTRV-ALM-EQPT
Description
This command causes Remote to return all alarms for points designated with
equipment modifiers during Remote configuration. Points associated with equipment
alarms, such as link down, are generally programmed with this modifier.
Format
RTRV-ALM-EQPT:tid:[ aid ]::ctag;
Parameters
tid
Defines the target identifier for a VNE on Remote.
aid
Defines the user name for a VNE on Remote.
ctag
Defines the correlation tag used to correlate responses to commands. Each
command has a unique correlation tag. A response includes the identical
correlation tag to the one used for the corresponding command.
Examples
This example displays a normal response when command
RTRV-ALM-EQPT:Remote::1; is entered.
M
Remote 09-01-18 13:27:36
1 COMPLD
/* RTRV-ALM-EQPT:Remote::1:: */
"INPUT0_4,EQPT:CR,MISC,NSA,09-18,13-27-06,,,:\"INPUT 0/4 CLOSE\",:,"
;
26-11
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Default TL1 VNE Commands
RTRV-ALM-OC3
Description
This command causes Remote to return all alarms designated with the OC3 modifier
during Remote configuration. Points associated with class OC3, which is an optical
fiber line that carries 155mbps, are generally programmed with this modifier.
Format
RTRV-ALM-OC3:tid:[ aid ]::ctag;
Parameters
tid
Defines the target identifier for a VNE on Remote.
aid
Defines the user name for a VNE on Remote.
ctag
Defines the correlation tag used to correlate responses to commands. Each
command has a unique correlation tag. A response includes the identical
correlation tag to the one used for the corresponding command.
Examples
This example displays a normal response when command
RTRV-ALM-OC3:Remote::1; is entered.
M
;
26-12
Remote 09-01-18 13:16:00
1 COMPLD
/* RTRV-ALM-OC3:Remote::1:: */
"INPUT0_3,OC3:CR,MISC,NSA,09-18,13-15-29,,,:\"INPUT 0/3 CLOSE\",:,"
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Default TL1 VNE Commands
RTRV-ALM-T1
Description
This command causes Remote to return all alarms designated with the T1 modifier
during Remote configuration. Points associated with class T1, which is a digital
transmission link with a capacity of 1.544 Mbps, are generally programmed with this
modifier.
Format
RTRV-ALM-T1:tid:[ aid ]::ctag;
Parameters
tid
Defines the target identifier for a VNE on Remote.
aid
Defines the user name for a VNE on Remote.
ctag
Defines the correlation tag used to correlate responses to commands. Each
command has a unique correlation tag. A response includes the identical
correlation tag to the one used for the corresponding command.
Examples
This example displays a normal response when command
RTRV-ALM-T1:Remote::1; is entered.
M
Remote 09-01-18 13:30:34
1 COMPLD
/* RTRV-ALM-T1:Remote::1:: */
"INPUT0_5,T1:CR,MISC,NSA,09-18,13-30-14,,,:\"INPUT 0/5 CLOSE\",:,"
;
26-13
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Default TL1 VNE Commands
RTRV-HDR
Description
This command causes Remote to send its TL1 System Identifier (SID) header to the
OSS. The SID is used primarily to check the status of the communications link.
Format
RTRV-HDR:tid::ctag;
Parameters
tid
Defines the target identifier for a VNE on Remote.
ctag
Defines the correlation tag used to correlate responses to commands. Each
command has a unique correlation tag. A response includes the identical
correlation tag to the one used for the corresponding command.
Examples
This example displays a normal response when command RTRV-HDR:Remote::1; is
entered.
IP 1
<
M
;
26-14
Remote 09-01-25 15:18:17
1 COMPLD
/* RTRV-HDR:Remote::1 */
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Unsupported TL1 Commands
Unsupported TL1 Commands
Remote TL1 VNE’s only take action when default or configured TL1 commands are
entered. A failure message occurs when an invalid command is entered, which
causes Remote to give a deny response. Responses include a ctag that is identical to
the invalid command.
Example
This example displays the failure message that occurs when unsupported command
REPT-ALM-ENV:Remote:ALL:1; is entered.
M
Remote 09-01-26 12:01:37
1 DENY
ICNV
/* Input, Command Not Valid */
/* The command code entered is not a valid command code. */
;
26-15
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Remote TL1 Commands: Unsupported TL1 Commands
26-16
A
Backing Up and Restoring the
Remote Configuration
This appendix provides step-by-step scenarios on how to back up and restore the Remote
configuration.
Guide to this Appendix
Backing Up the Configuration
Restoring the Configuration
A-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Backing Up and Restoring the Remote Configuration: Backing Up the Configuration
Backing Up the Configuration
In this scenario, you will back up the Remote configuration file.
Important: There are two configuration files. The startup configuration file
(primary.cnf) is the configuration used to start Remote. The running
configuration file (running-config) includes configuration changes that
have been made since startup.

Note: This procedure refers only to the FTP utility for backing up the configuration.
However, you may be required to use an SFTP utility, depending on the
remote access protocol option. Refer to the remote access configuration
commands in the Remote Command Reference Guide for information on
enabling FTP or SFTP.
To back up the configuration:
1. Using an FTP utility, connect to and log into Remote.
2. Change the current directory to the config directory on Remote.
3. Locate the Remote configuration file (primary.cnf or running-config) in the config
directory.
4. Using ASCII mode, get the configuration file from the config directory on Remote.
The configuration file is copied to the working directory on your workstation.

Note: The running-config file is an ASCII file—it should only be transferred with
an ASCII mode FTP.
5. Close the FTP connection to Remote and exit the FTP utility.
A-2
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Backing Up and Restoring the Remote Configuration: Restoring the Configuration
Restoring the Configuration
In this scenario, you will restore the Remote configuration file.

Notes: You must have supervisor permissions to completely restore the Remote
configuration. Users with management permission can restore the
configuration; however, user information will not be modified.

This procedure refers only to the FTP utility for restoring the configuration.
However, you may be required to use another utility, depending on the
remote access protocol used (SSH-SFTP, HTTP, and HTTPS). Refer to
the remote access configuration commands in the Remote Command
Reference Guide on enabling the protocols
Important: There are two configuration files. The startup configuration file
(primary.cnf) is the configuration used to start Remote. The running
configuration file (running-config) includes configuration changes that
have been made since startup.
To restore the configuration:
1. Using an FTP utility, connect to and log into Remote.
2. Change the local current directory to the working directory on your workstation.
3. Locate the Remote configuration file (primary.cnf or running-config) file in the
working directory.
4. Change from the current directory to the config directory on Remote.
5. Using ASCII mode, put the configuration file in the config directory.

Note: The running-config file is an ASCII file—it should only be transferred with
an ASCII mode FTP.
6. Close the FTP connection to Remote and exit the FTP utility.

Note: Changes to the startup configuration file (primary.cnf) will not take effect
until Remote is rebooted or command copy startup-config
running-config is entered.
A-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Backing Up and Restoring the Remote Configuration: Restoring the Configuration
A-4
B
WAN Port Availability
This appendix describes all available types of Remote WAN ports and lists each Remote model
with associated WAN port and modem availability.
Guide to this Appendix
WAN Port Types
WAN Port Availability
B-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
WAN Port Availability: WAN Port Types
WAN Port Types
Table 1 displays the available types of WAN ports for Remote.
Table 1 WAN Port Types
B-2
WAN Port Type
Description
Single T1
Specifies the WAN port that uses two wire pairs (one to transmit
and one to receive) and TDM to combine 24 64-Kbps voice or
data channels. T1 ports transmit at 1.544 Mbps.
Single E1
Specifies the European equivalent to the T1 port. E1 ports
transmit at 2.048 Mbps.
T1/E1 DAC
Specifies the WAN port with drop and continue capabilities. This
feature extracts a group of timeslots from the T1 or E1 and uses
it for traffic management.
100 FX
Specifies the 100 Mb Ethernet over fiber WAN port (also
referred to as fiber WAN).
Dual T1/E1
Specifies that the Remote model has two E1 or T1 ports.
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
WAN Port Availability: WAN Port Availability
WAN Port Availability
Table 2 displays all available Remote models, along with:

Associated WAN ports

Valid port number values for corresponding WAN port types
Table 2 Remote Models and Associated Ports
Remote Model
WAN Port Option
WAN Port Number
Remote-E
Single E1
serial 7
Remote-ED
E1 DAC
serial 7 and 8
Remote-EE
Dual E1
serial 7 and 8
Remote-FX
100 FX
ethernet 7
Remote-G1
GSM/GPRS
serial gprs
Remote-T
Single T1
serial 7
Remote-TD
T1 DAC
serial 7 and 8
Remote-TT
Dual T1
serial 7 and 8
Remote
Remote RMM-1200
B-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
WAN Port Availability: WAN Port Availability
B-4
C
Command Identifications
Command identifications are used when including and excluding commands for a
user-defined profile. The IDs are contained in the supervisor command tree. For
information on configuring user-defined profiles, see Creating a Custom Profile on
page 3-6.
The following are some of the valid command identifications for Remote:
Commands
Identifications
config
/config
config action
/config/action
config alarm-entry
/config/alarm-entry
config apply-patch
/config/apply-patch
config banner
/config/banner
config clock
/config/clock
config clock daylight-savings
/config/clock/daylight-savings
config clock local-time
/config/clock/local-time
config clock timezone
/config/clock/timezone
config controller
/config/controller
config controller bridge
/config/controller/bridge
config controller ethernet
/config/controller/eth
config controller ethernet assign
/config/controller/eth/assign
config controller ethernet bridge
/config/controller/eth/bridge
config controller ethernet description
/config/controller/eth/description
config controller ethernet disable
/config/controller/eth/disable
config controller ethernet enable
/config/controller/eth/enable
config controller ethernet
hardware-address
/config/controller/eth/hwaddr
C-1
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Command Identifications:
C-2
Commands
Identifications (Continued)
config controller ethernet mac-security
/config/controller/eth/mac-security
config controller ethernet proxy-arp
/config/controller/eth/proxy-arp
config controller ethernet speed
/config/controller/eth/speed
config controller ethernet unassign
/config/controller/eth/unassign
config controller openvpn
/config/controller/openvpn/
config controller serial (wan)
/config/controller/wan
config correlation
/config/correlation
config dhcp-relay
/config/dhcp-relay
config dhcp-server
/config/dhcp-server
config discrete
/config/discrete
config event
/config/event
config hostname
/config/hostname
config interface
/config/interface
config interface bridge
/config/interface/bridge
config interface ethernet
/config/interface/eth
config interface ethernet description
/config/interface/eth/description
config interface ethernet disable
/config/interface/eth/disable
config interface ethernet enable
/config/interface/eth/enable
config interface ethernet ip
/config/interface/eth/ip
config interface openvpn
/config/interface/openvpn
config interface serial
/config/interface/wan
config ip
/config/ip
config ip arp
/config/ip/arp
config ip domain-name
/config/ip/domain-name
config ip name-server
/config/ip/name-server
config ip route
/config/ip/route
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Command Identifications:
Commands
Identifications (Continued)
config iptables
/config/iptables
config jobs
/config/jobs
config meas-table
/config/meas-table
config mediation
/config/mediation
config ntp
/config/ntp
config ntp disable
/config/ntp/disable
config ntp enable
/config/ntp/enable
config ntp poll-interval
/config/ntp/poll-interval
config ntp server
/config/ntp/server
config peripheral
/config/peripheral
config pkgs
/config/pkgs
config profile
/config/profile
config profile copy
/config/profile/copy
config profile exclude
/config/profile/exclude
config profile include
/config/profile/include
config profile priv-lvl
/config/profile/priv-lvl
config ras
/config/ras
config ras accounting
/config/ras/accounting
config ras authorization
/config/ras/authorization
config ras retry
/config/ras/retry
config ras server
/config/ras/server
config ras shell
/config/ras/shell
config ras timeout
/config/ras/timeout
config remote-access
/config/remote-access
config response
/config/response
config snmp
/config/snmp
C-3
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Command Identifications:
C-4
Commands
Identifications (Continued)
config snmp auth-trap
/config/snmp/auth-trap
config snmp community
/config/snmp/community
config snmp host
/config/snmp/host
config tbos
/config/tbos
config timeout
/config/timeout
config use-wizard
/config/use-wizard
config users
/config/users
config users add
/config/users/add
config users delete
/config/users/delete
config users password
/config/users/password
copy
/copy
debug
/debug
debug ethernet
/debug/ethernet
debug ethernet all
/debug/ethernet/all
debug ethernet controller
/debug/ethernet/controller
debug ethernet interface
/debug/ethernet/interface
debug level
/debug/level
debug mediation
/debug/mediation
debug serial
/debug/serial/
diag
/diag
diag break
/diag/break
diag clear
/diag/clear
diag controller
/diag/controller
diag fan
/diag/fan
diag ip
/diag/ip
diag line-monitor
/diag/line-monitor
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Command Identifications:
Commands
Identifications (Continued)
diag line-status
/diag/line-status
diag mediation
/diag/mediation
diag mmdisplay
/diag/mmdisplay
diag output
/diag/output
diag peripheral
/diag/peripheral
diag ps
/diag/ps
diag snapshot
/diag/snapshot
diag tcpdump
/diag/tcpdump
diag test
/diag/test
diag top
/diag/top
diag who
/diag/who
diag whoami
/diag/whoami
erase
/erase
exec-job
/exec-job
exit
/exit
halt
/halt
help
/help
password
/password
ping
/ping
reload
/reload
running-config
/running-config
show
/show
show actions
/show/actions
show alarm-entries
/show/alarm-entries
show audit
/show/audit
show banner
/show/banner
C-5
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Command Identifications:
C-6
Commands
Identifications (Continued)
show bootp
/show/bootp
show clock
/show/clock
show compact-flash
/show/compact-flash
show config-file
/show/config-file
show connections
/show/connections
show controllers
/show/controllers
show correlations
/show/correlations
show debugging
/show/debugging
show dhcp-relay
/show/dhcp-relay
show dhcp-server
/show/dhcp-server
show discrete
/show/discrete
show events
/show/events
show expansion-images
/show/expansion-images
show interfaces
/show/interfaces
show inventory
/show/inventory
show ip
/show/ip
show iptables
/show/iptables
show jobs
/show/jobs
show listeners
/show/listeners
show log-file
/show/log-file
show meas-table
/show/meas-table
show mediation
/show/mediation
show ntp
/show/ntp
show peripherals
/show/peripherals
show pkgs
/show/pkgs
show product
/show/product
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Command Identifications:
Commands
Identifications (Continued)
show profiles
/show/profiles
show pydoc
/show/pydoc
show ras
/show/ras
show remote-access
/show/remote-access
show resource-tracking
/show/resource-tracking
show responses
/show/responses
show running-config
/show/running-config
show snmp
/show/snmp
show tbos
/show/tbos
show test
/show/test
show timeout
/show/timeout
show users
/show/users
show version
/show/version
telnet
/telnet
trace-route
/trace-route
C-7
Remote Version 3.3x Configuration Guide
Command Identifications:
C-8
Glossary
Symbols
__init__.py
The __init__.py file is required in the script package for each module directory so that
Python will recognize and search the directory for Python code. Content is not
required in the file; however, it generally contains a Python document string. If Python
module subdirectories are not used, this file does not need to exist.
A
action
An action is a correlation between an event and response that controls system
alarming, logging, and connection behavior on Remote.
AID
AID is an acronym for access-identifier. It identifies the NE system component to
which the TL1 alarm applies.
alarm affect
The alarm affect designates a TL1 alarm as service-affecting or non-service-affecting.
Glossary-1
Glossary
alarm class
An alarm class is a designation of a TL1 alarm as environmental or
equipment-related. TL1 alarms designated as environmental signal the occurrence of
events such as temperature or pressure changes. TL1 alarms designated as
equipment-related signal the occurrence of events such as device failures or
malfunctions.
alarm code
The alarm code identifies the severity of an automatic alarm message based on a
condition. The alarm conditions are critical (CR), major (MJ), minor (MN), and
nonalarmed (NA).
alarm message
The alarm message is the text displayed for a TL1 alarm when a specified
environmental event occurs.
alarm type
The alarm type is the value for TL1 environmental alarm response. For valid alarm
type values, refer to the Bellcore GR-833-CORE documentation.
analog reporting interval
The analog reporting interval is the rate at which events are generated for an analog
input.
analog input
Analog inputs monitor input current and support five different events that represent
input current transitions.
application mode
The application mode sets up a serial controller as a destination for internal
connections or gives the controller the ability to initiate internal connections when a
system event occurs.
Glossary-2
Glossary
B
band
The band sets the high and low threshold values for analog input event generation.
banner
The banner is the initial text that appears when the user logs into Remote.
baud rate
The baud rate is the speed of a connection in bits per second.
bit-level encoding
Bit-level encoding is the method by which binary codes represent characters of data.
T1 lines have available linecode options Binary 8 Zeros Substitution (B8ZS) and
Alternate Mark Inversion (AMI). E1 lines have available linecode options High Density
Bipolar Three (HDB3) and Alternate Mark Inversion (AMI).
boolean
An expression whose value can be either true or false.
bridge controller
The bridge controller groups controllers into an Ethernet bridge group. Remote has
one bridge group that includes the six local Ethernet ports. It is referred to as switch
in the CLI.
bridge group
A bridge group is a set of controllers assigned to a single bridge unit and network
interface. Each bridge group runs a separate Spanning Tree and is addressable using
a unique IP address.
Glossary-3
Glossary
bridge interface
The bridge interface routes packets to and from the bridge controller.
C
CDMA
Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) is a digital technology that uses spread
spectrum techniques for transmitting voice or data over the air. Spread spectrum
technology separates users by assigning digital codes within the same broad
spectrum. The benefit of CDMA is that it provides higher user capacity and immunity
from interfering signals. CDMA is available in 800 megahertz or 1900 megahertz
frequencies.
central alarm table
The central alarm table is a table that maintains the state of all alarms on Remote. It
can be configured to communicate alarm state changes in a variety of management
protocols.
channel group
A channel group consists of one or more channels in a T1/E1 link grouped together as
a high-speed virtual path. A channel group treats all 24 channels of the T1 and all 32
channels of an E1 as a single data stream. A user can create one channel group for
each serial controller.
chat file
A chat file contains the connection initialization string for ports that are configured for
PPP encapsulation. It is stored in the /config/chat directory on Remote. The user must
FTP the chat file to the /config/chat directory on Remote prior to configuring the file as
the connection initialization string.
Glossary-4
Glossary
CLI
Command line interface. A user interface whereby the user types one line of
instructions at a time at a command prompt.
CLI session timeout
The command line interface (CLI) session timeout is the amount of time (in minutes)
that can elapse before an Remote session expires due to inactivity.
clock source
The clock source determines how a serial controller’s clock is set. The two options are
loop and internal. The loop option frames Remote controller packets based on the line
timing from the incoming T1 link. The internal option frames Remote controller
packets based on the Remote generated clock.
community string
A community string is a password used with the SNMP protocol that is used for both
read-only and read-write privileges.
condition type
A condition type refers to a TL1 alarm type that is based on standards listed in the
Bellcore GR-833-CORE documentation.
configuration wizard
A configuration wizard is a user-friendly utility accessed from the CLI that prompts the
user for configuration information, then generates and applies the associated
commands in the running configuration.
connection mode
The connection mode specifies how an asynchronous serial controller determines
that it is up (for example, has an asynchronous connection).
Glossary-5
Glossary
connection string
The connection string is a string of characters sent to the attached device at
initialization by an Remote asynchronous serial controller. Depending on the
connection settings, this string may or may not be sent to the attached device.
controller
A controller is a concept that is applied throughout the CLI. It is a software object on
Remote that sends and receives a stream of bytes. A controller can be a physical
device, such as an Ethernet transceiver or a T1 framer, or it can be a virtual entity,
such as a T1 channel group.
cost
Cost is a metric used in spanning tree calculations to determine the best path for
reaching a destination. The higher a path's cost, the less desirable it is to use that
path and the more likely the spanning tree algorithm is to disable the port if a network
loop occurs.
cut-through
Cut-through support lets users connect directly to a TBOS serial port and issue TBOS
commands directly to TBOS network elements.
D
data bits
Data bits are the number of bits per character transmitted or received by an
asynchronous serial controller.
daylight savings
Daylight savings time is when clocks are set ahead one hour the first Sunday in April
and back one hour the last Sunday in October to provide an extra hour of daylight
during summer.
Glossary-6
Glossary
default lease time
The default lease time is the amount of time, in seconds, a device can use an IP
address assigned by the DHCP server. The default lease time is assigned to a device
when no other lease time is specified by the user.
default static route
The default static route is used to route a packet to a destination when there is no
other better route in the IP routing table.
delimiting character
The delimiting character defines the beginning and ending of the banner. Most
characters, such as (, @, #, ~, %, *, and ), can be applied as the delimiting character.
destination address
In a static route, the destination address is the IP address of the network.
DHCP authority mode
The DHCP authority mode configures the DHCP server to respond to misconfigured
DHCP clients with DHCP negative acknowledgement (DHCPNAK) messages. If this
option is not configured, the client must wait until the old IP address lease has expired
before obtaining correct IP address information after moving to a new subnetwork.
DHCP broadcast mode
The DHCP broadcast mode configures the DHCP server to send DHCP request
responses as broadcast packets instead of unicast packets.
DHCP protocol
The DHCP protocol lets a host that is unknown to the network administrator
automatically access a new IP address for its network. The network administrator
allocates address pools in each subnet and enters them into the DHCP configuration
file.
Glossary-7
Glossary
DHCP server
The DHCP server provides automatic IP address and network configurations to
remote devices. For example, the DHCP server can provide dynamic IP address
information to a technician’s laptop.
DHCP server host
The DHCP server host is a host that is served by the DHCP server. It can access and
obtain IP address and network configurations from the server.
digital input
Digital inputs generate two events that reflect the state of the input: open and close.
disconnect mode
The disconnect mode is a handshake from a device attached to Remote that
terminates or accepts termination of an asynchronous connection.
discrete expansion peripheral
A discrete expansion peripheral is a component that allows the user to add additional
discrete inputs, analog inputs, and relay outputs to Remote’s configuration. These
additional I/O points are managed through Remote.
discrete peripheral unit
The discrete peripheral unit is a space on Remote that holds the I/O configuration
information for a discrete peripheral. Units are numbered 0 to 4, with 0 representing
the on-board discrete I/O subsystem.
domain name
Domain names are used to represent IP addresses on a network and are formatted
as a series of alphanumeric characters separated by periods (for example,
www.domainname.com).
Glossary-8
Glossary
DNS server
A DNS server translates alphanumeric addresses into corresponding IP addresses.
DTR signal
DTR is a control signal on an Remote asynchronous RS-232 serial port.
E
encapsulation
Communications encapsulation is a method for transmitting multiple protocols within
the same network. The frames of one type of protocol are carried within the frames of
another. The available communications encapsulation formats for Remote are HDLC
and PPP.
equipment type
See TBOS equipment type definition.
EvDO
EvDO (Evolution-Data Only) is an upgraded version of the cdma2000 system. The
1xEvDO system uses the bandwidth of one or more 1.23 MHz radio channels as the
existing cdma2000 system. It provides for multiple voice channels and medium rate
data services. The EvDO version changes the modulation technology to allow for a
maximum data transmission rate of approximately 2.4 Mbps on the forward channel.
The EvDO system uses the same reverse channel, which limits the uplink data
transmission rate to approximately 200 kbps. The EvDO system has an upgraded
packet data transmission control system that allows for “bursty” data transmission
rather than for more continuous voice data transmission. The industry standard for
EvDO is IS-856.
Glossary-9
Glossary
event
An event is an incident that is triggered by an external or internal event. An event can
be anything from a discrete input opening or closing, a serial controller going up or
down, a TCP connection request, or a power supply failure.
event originator
An event originator is the system component that generates an event.
event type
An event type identifies the cause of the generated event.
F
filter
A filter is an intermediate connection point that performs a processing operation on
data passing through a mediation connection. A telnet filter is a telnet session to a
device that does not support Telnet, such as a craft port on an NE, to function
smoothly.
flow control
Flow control allows a receiving device to tell a sending device to stop sending data
when the data comes in faster than the receiver can process it and to start sending it
when the receiver is ready.
forward delay
Forward delay defines the amount of time a controller participating in a bridge group
that is running the spanning tree protocol (STP) spends in the listening state before
entering the learning state, the amount of time a controller spends in the learning
state before entering the forwarding state, and the aging time for dynamic entries in
the filtering database during a network topology change.
Glossary-10
Glossary
framing
Framing is an error control procedure with multiplexed digital channels, such as T1,
where bits are inserted so that the receiver can identify the timeslots that are
allocated to each subchannel. Refer to the Remote Command Reference Guide for
information on the framing formats Remote utilizes.
FTP
FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is a communications protocol that governs the transfer of
files from one computer to another over a network.
G
gateway address
The gateway address is the IP address of the next node location in a route.
GPRS
GPRS (General Packet Radio Service) is a packet-switched mobile datacom service
that is widely expected to be the next major step forward in the evolution of GSM
technology. It enables high-speed mobile datacom and is most useful for data
applications such as mobile internet browsing, e-mail, and push technologies. It has
demonstrated transmission rates as fast as 115Kbps.
H
hello time
The hello time is the interval between the generation of configuration bridge PDUs
when the bridge is either the root bridge or when it is trying to become the root bridge.
Glossary-11
Glossary
history runs
The history runs is the number of history entries kept for a job.
HTTP
HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) provides a standard for Web browsers and
servers to communicate. It provides less security for sensitive information than
HTTPS.
HTTPS
HTTPS (Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure) provides the necessary security to
protect sensitive data. On Remote, HTTPS is implemented by incorporating an SSL
layer that encrypts the HTTP packets between the web server and client/browser.
hysteresis
Hysteresis is a guard region around high and low thresholds on an analog input that
prevents rapid generation of events when input current oscillates rapidly across the
threshold.
I
inactivity timeout
The inactivity timeout sets the frequency (in minutes) that RX statistics will be
checked on a link in the event that a wireless service provider does not provide lcprequests (keep alives) in their network, or imposes time limitations on the network
connections.
interface
An interface is another concept that is applied throughout the CLI. It is an entity to
which you can route IP packets. An interface must be associated with a controller,
which may be an underlying physical port.
Glossary-12
Glossary
IP forwarding
IP forwarding allows IP packets received on an interface to be forwarded to other
interfaces.
IP routing table
The IP routing table is a database in a router that keeps track of paths to particular
networks and network destinations. More specifically, it associates network
addresses with gateway addresses.
Iptables
Iptables is the method by which IP packets are filtered or manipulated for Remote. IP
packets are filtered or manipulated using three iptables: filter, which filters IP
packets, mangle, which manipulates IP packets, and NAT, which routes IP packets.
J
job
A job contains the specifications for running an instance of a script. It refers to a script
defined within a package and specifies the parameters for execution on Remote.
job property
A job property is a runtime parameter for a job on Remote. These properties are used
within a Python script.
job task
A job task is an optional initialization step for a job before it runs a script. Tasks are
used when a super user is required for job configuration, since scripts cannot be run
by a privileged user on Remote.
Glossary-13
Glossary
K
keep-alive disconnect time
The keep-alive disconnect time defines the number of seconds that a peer receives
no packets before it is considered to be disconnected. Valid values are 20 to 3600.
keep-alive inactivity time
The keep-alive inactivity time defines the number of seconds that a session must be
inactive before a ping packet is transmitted. Valid values are 5 to 60.
keep-alive packets
Keep-alive packets are sent from both the client and server when no user data is
being transmitted. When one side of the connection fails to receive packets, a
notification is sent to indicate a disconnected peer. These packets also maintain an
active firewall state.
L
LCP echo request
An LCP echo request is a packet sent from a client-side controller to a server-side
controller to signal if a PPP link is still available. PPPD stops if LCP echo requests are
not received by the server. LCP echo requests are sent only if LCP is enabled.
line buildout
Line buildout refers to the length of the cable (in feet) that is connecting the devices
on each end of a T1 line or the level of attenuation (in decibels) required for the
devices on each end of a T1 line to communicate. Buildout is usually specified by
cable length for shorter connections and by level of attenuation for longer
connections.
Glossary-14
Glossary
linemode
Linemode is the type of hardware connection of an asynchronous link. There are two
values for linemode: RS232 and RS422. RS232 is a set of standards that specify the
type of interfaces connected to an asynchronous controller. The three types of
interfaces are electrical, functional, and mechanical, which are used for
communicating to computers, terminals, and modems. RS422 is a standard that
defines a balanced interface that does not accompany a physical connector.
local fallback
Local fallback indicates local user authentication will be used when attempts to
contact the primary and secondary RAS servers fail.
local identity
The local identity is supplied by the local site and sent to a remote device. The identity
is similar to a user name for CHAP and PAP authentication on a point-to-point
connection.
local method
The local method specifies the protocol Remote uses to authenticate a peer device on
a serial controller PPP link. The two available methods are challenge handshake
authentication protocol (CHAP) and password authentication protocol (PAP).
local secret
The local secret is supplied by the local site and sent to a remote device. The secret is
similar to a password for CHAP and PAP authentication on a point-to-point
connection.
M
MAC address
A MAC address is the address for a device as it is identified at the Media Access
Control layer in the network architecture.
Glossary-15
Glossary
MAC address capture
MAC address capture refers to the process of listening to traffic on an Ethernet
controller and then adding any MAC addresses learned to the controller’s MAC
address table.
MAC address table
A MAC address table is a list containing the MAC addresses of all the devices that are
permitted access to Remote through an Ethernet controller. A MAC address table can
contain a maximum of 32 MAC addresses.
management information base
A Management Information Base (MIB) is a repository of characteristics managed in a
network device. Each managed device knows how to respond to standard queries
issued by network management protocols (such as SNMP).
maximum current
The maximum current is the highest valid current allowed on a specified analog input
and the sensor value associated with that current.
maximum lease time
The maximum lease time is the maximum amount of time, in seconds, a device can
use an IP address assigned by the DHCP server.
mediation connection
Mediation connections are connections that allow the interconnection of different
protocols. The protocols on each side are terminated in the middle so that the
interconnection can occur.
minimum current
The minimum current is the lowest valid current that will be present on the specified
analog input and the sensor value associated with that current.
Glossary-16
Glossary
MRU
The MRU sets the maximum number of data bytes that can be received in a single
PPP frame on a WAN port.
MTU
The MTU sets the maximum number of data bytes that can be transmitted in a single
PPP frame on a WAN port.
N
nagging
Nagging is the process of repeatedly generating an alarm message at fixed intervals
even in the absence of an alarm state change. This is particularly useful for SNMP
traps which do not provide guaranteed delivery.
nagging interval
The nagging interval configures the number of seconds between instances of an
alarm sending its state to all enabled protocols.
nagging level
The nagging level defines the severity level at which an alarm will repeatedly send its
state to all enabled protocols.
Network Address Translation
Network Address Translation (NAT) is an iptables chain that allows multiple devices
on a private network to share a single, globally routable public address.
Glossary-17
Glossary
network element
A network element is a processor controlled entity on the telecommunications
network that provides switching and transport network functions and contains network
operations functions.
notification code
The notification code provides an indication of the severity of a TL1 alarm.
NTP polling interval
The minimum and maximum NTP polling intervals indicate the timeframe each host
on a network has to connect to the NTP server to retrieve and transmit data.
NTP server
An NTP server maintains a common clock time among hosts within a network.
O
OID
OID (Object Identifier) points to a specific parameter in the SNMP agent.
offset
When configuring the timezone for Remote, offset is the number of hours and minutes
difference between the desired time zone and the default time zone, which is standard
GMT +0.00.
Glossary-18
Glossary
OpenVPN
OpenVPN is a software package that establishes a VPN between an AI VPN server
and AI network element clients. SSL is used to manage the VPN connection and
encrypted UDP packets for data transmission. Both the management and data traffic
are passed as UDP packets on a single port. The customer’s external firewall needs
to open one UDP port for all connected client network elements.
originator
An originator is a physical and visible component within Remote that generates the
event, such as an analog input or digital input, serial controller, TL1 multiplexer, or an
Ethernet controller.
output signal
There are two types of output signals on Remote asynchronous serial ports: DTR and
RTS. DTR and RTS may be used as part of the connect and disconnect handshake.
RTS may be used for hardware flow control.
P
package manifest
The package manifest is an XML file that serves as a “table of contents” for the
attributes of a script package.
packet framing
Packet framing refers to the method by which packets are sent over a serial line.
Framing options for T1 serial lines are D4 and ESF. Framing options for E1 serial lines
are CRC4, no-CRC4, multiframe-CRC4, and multiframe-no-CRC4.
parity
Bit parity is the process for detecting whether or not bits of data have been altered
during data transmission.
Glossary-19
Glossary
peripheral device
A peripheral device is a system component that expands Remote’s functionality. The
only peripheral device currently available for Remote is the discrete expansion
peripheral, which adds additional I/O points that are controlled by Remote.
peripheral management subsystem
The peripheral management subsystem is the subsystem that lets Remote manage
up to 12 discrete expansion peripherals at remote locations.
PID
A PID is the TL1 password.
position
A position indicates where in the list order a task should appear and when it should be
executed.
PPP
PPP (Point to Point Protocol) is a data link level protocol typically used to encapsulate
network level packets over an asynchronous serial line.
PPPoE
PPPoE (Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet) is a protocol for encapsulating PPP
frames in Ethernet frames. PPPoE is used to virtually “dial” to another Ethernet
machine, making a point to point connection. This connection can then be used to
transport IP packets, based upon the features of PPP.
preferred roaming list (PRL)
On a CDMA/EVDO cellular modem, the PRL (Preferred Roaming List) is used to
configure the radio channels and network carriers used by the modem. When carriers
change their network, it is typical to update the PRL to pick up the changes.
Glossary-20
Glossary
priority level
The priority level determines which interface within a standby group will become the
master router. The higher the priority level, the more likely an interface will become
the master router. A priority level of 255 specifies that an interface will become the
master router.
privilege level
The privilege level is configured for a user-defined profile when RAS mode
authorization is set to priv-lvl. The RAS server returns a privilege level to Remote and
matches it up with the correct profile.
profile
A profile gives a user designated permissions for operating commands in Remote.
User profiles can be status, management, supervisor, or restricted.
Python package
A Python package is a directory used to store Python modules. The package can
contain subpackages, resulting in a hierarchical directory structure. Each package
directory must include a file named __init__.py to indicate to Python that this is a
package. However, the file can be empty.
R
RADIUS
RADIUS authenticates a user and authorizes a profile from a remote location.
RAS accounting
RAS accounting is the method for tracking user logins and command entry when
Remote is configured for TACACS+ remote authentication. An accounting start packet
or stop packet is issued each time a user logs into or out of Remote. An accounting
start packet is also issued for each command that is entered.
Glossary-21
Glossary
RAS authorization
RAS authorization is the method by which Remote grants command access when
TACACS+ remote authentication is configured. Access can be granted based on
command level or privilege level. Command level authorization requires Remote to
contact the TACACS+ server for each command the user runs. Individual commands
are then allowed or denied. Privilege level authorization configures the TACACS+
authorization method based on the privilege returned from the TACACS+ server.
RAS server
A RAS server is a device that provides user authentication and provisioning for
access into the network using RADIUS software or the TACACS+ protocol.
RAS timeout
The RAS timeout is the amount of time that the device waits for a response from the
RAS servers before falling back on local authentication.
raw alarm output
Raw alarm output is an Remote alarm format that contains all information about the
alarm and the event that caused it. It can be used for alarm formats that are not
directly supported by Remote. A script or application can take the alarm information
from the raw output and translate it into any type of alarm message.
relay output
Relay outputs can close or open an external circuit to cause connected devices to
respond.
remote access protocol
The remote access protocol defines the methods for establishing a CLI session and
transferring files.
remote authentication
Remote authentication is the method by which users are granted access to Remote
through a remote server. Available remote authentication methods are RADIUS and
TACACS+.
Glossary-22
Glossary
remote identity
The remote identity is supplied by a remote device and sent to the local device.
remote method
The remote method specifies the protocol a peer device uses to authenticate Remote
for a controller PPP link.
remote secret
The remote identity secret is supplied by a remote device and sent to the local device.
required task property
A required task property is a value dependent on the task type required for a job. Both
the ifconfig and serversocket task types have their own required properties defined
within the package manifest XML, which are needed to run a job.
responder
A responder is a visible component within Remote, such as a serial or Ethernet
controller, that implements responses.
response
A response is an executed result associated with a system event by configuration of
an action rule on Remote.
response type
A response type defines the activity that can be executed by the responder, such as
disable, enable, or close.
restart attempts
The number of times Remote will attempt to restart a job if it stops abnormally.
Glossary-23
Glossary
RTS signal
The RTS signal is a control signal that may be used as part of the connect and
disconnect handshake or for hardware flow control. The RTS signal is ignored if flow
control is enabled.
running configuration
The running configuration (current Remote configuration) displays the current user
modifications to the configuration.
S
script
A script is a Python class that defines a run and stop method, which implements the
scripting interface on Remote. A script can define job properties, which pass runtime
parameters and/or settings (such as, connection information for a network element,
baud rates, TID’s, phone numbers, software version, and user name and password
information) to Remote when a job is executed. In addition, a script can define job
tasks and the properties required to request IP configuration for a device or open a
server socket connection to receive and transmit data.
script package
A script package is a compressed file that stores Python modules, Python packages,
and the Package Manifest file. The modules included in the script package will be
referenced by jobs, which are configured to run on Remote.
secret
A secret is a shared encryption key that matches the encryption key configured on the
server to provide secure access.
Glossary-24
Glossary
secure sockets layer
The Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) is the dominant security protocol for Internet/Web
monetary transactions and communications. Information being transmitted is
encrypted—only the client and the server at the other end have the encryption key.
server type
Server type is the type of remote user authentication used to provide security on a
RAS server. The two supported options are TACACS+ and RADIUS.
service effect
The service effect is the effect on customer telephone service of the condition
reported by a TL1 alarm.
SNMP management station
Management stations are used to oversee network activity generated by SNMP
agents, which are hardware and/or software processes that report on each network
device. The trap table is a list of all available management stations.
SNMP management system
An SNMP management system is a system that can manage virtually any network
type. It is widely deployed in TCP/IP networks, but actual transport independence
means it is not limited to TCP/IP.
SNMP trap
SNMP traps are SNMP alarm messages.
SNMP trap queue
The SNMP trap queue saves SNMP traps when network connectivity is lost. When
the network comes back up, the SNMP traps are sent. This feature accommodates
wireless connections on Remote, which are less reliable than regular connections.
When trap queuing is enabled, pings are sent to SNMP hosts before traps are sent.
Traps are queued when the ping to the SNMP host fails.
Glossary-25
Glossary
Spanning Tree Protocol
The Spanning Tree Protocol deactivates links between networks so that information
packets are channeled along one path and do not search endlessly for a destination.
SSH
Secure Shell Protocol. An encrypting data transmission protocol used particularly for
encryption of terminal connections. SSH permits secure remote access over a
network from one computer to another.
staging area
The staging area is the pkgstage directory on Remote that stores script packages
prior to their installation.
stop bits
A stop bit is a zero bit appended to a character transmitted on an asynchronous port.
STP maximum age
The STP maximum age specifies the maximum amount of time allowed before
protocol information for the spanning tree protocol (STP) is discarded.
T
TACACS+
TACACS+ is a protocol that provides remote user authentication.
task position
A task position is the order in which a task will be executed within Remote. The
position indicates where in the list a task should appear. Unless a user specifies a
new position for a task, Remote adds new tasks to the end of the list.
Glossary-26
Glossary
task property
A task property is a required or optional parameter for a task. These parameters differ
depending on the task type (ifconfig or serversocket) configured for a task.
task type
There are two types that can be assigned to a task. The task type ifconfig creates a
subinterface for the job, which lasts for the lifetime of the job. The task type
serversocket binds a socket for the lifetime of the job.
TBOS alarm/status points
TBOS alarm/status points represent individual alarm points on an attached TBOS
display.
TBOS control points
TBOS control points control relay outputs on attached TBOS devices.
TBOS definition file
A TBOS definition file is a tab-delimited or comma-separated file that contains
equipment type definitions (TBOS NE display templates).
TBOS display
A TBOS display is a component on a TBOS port that contains 8 characters. Each
character contains 8 points, which gives the TBOS display a total of 64 points.
TBOS equipment type definition
A TBOS equipment type definition is an entry in a TBOS definition file that contains
comma or tab-separated values that define individual TBOS points for a monitored
device.
Glossary-27
Glossary
TBOS port
A TBOS port is a serial port can have up to eight TBOS alarm displays. Each TBOS
alarm display can have 64 points. Disabling polling on a TBOS port disables polling
on all of its TBOS alarm displays, thus disabling polling on all of its points.
text block
A text block is a field of a TL1 alarm response. The TL1 text block is a quoted text line
in the response block of a TL1 autonomous message. The exact format of a TL1 text
block varies based on the type of autonomous message being created. For more
information about the exact TL1 text block formats for different types of TL1
autonomous messages, refer to the Bellcore GR-833-CORE documentation.
TID
The TID is the TL1 target identifier.
TL1 command
A TL1 command pattern can generate a system event. TL1 commands are delivered
through a communication path to a virtual NE.
TL1 multiplexer
A TL1 multiplexer is a device that multiplexes more than one TL1 data stream onto a
single TCP connection.
trap
A trap is an SNMP alarm message.
U
UID
The UID is the TL1 user name.
Glossary-28
Glossary
units
Units is the unit name for measurements associated with analog inputs.
user datagram protocol
The user datagram protocol (UDP) is part of the TCP/IP protocol suite. It was created
to provide a way for applications to access the connectionless features of IP. UDP
provides for exchange of datagrams without acknowledgements or guaranteed
delivery. This protocol is normally bundled with IP-layer software.
V
Varbind
In an SNMP message, a varbind consists of a sequence of two fields: an Object ID
and the value for/from that Object ID.
virtual TL1 NE
A virtual TL1 NE is a simulation of a TL1 NE environment that provides the ability to
generate TL1 alarms on behalf of a digital and analog inputs state changes, and other
system events. It also can be used to generate system responses, such as closing
and opening relay outputs upon receipt of TL1 commands.
VLAN
The term VLAN is specified by IEEE 802.1Q. It defines a method of differentiating
traffic on a LAN by tagging the Ethernet frames. By extension, VLAN is used to mean
the traffic separated by Ethernet frame tagging or similar mechanisms.
VPN client
The VPN client is the device that requests for a VPN session to be established on the
VPN network.
Glossary-29
Glossary
VPN server
The VPN server is a device that provides a VPN session to clients on the VPN
network.
W
wireless backhaul
Wireless backhaul is the wireless connection from an individual base station (tower)
to the central network (backbone). The Kentrox wireless backhaul solution layers a
VPN on top of the wireless network. The VPN network is a logical extension of the
overall private management network.
Glossary-30
Index
Numerics
100 FX WAN port B-2
A
accessing
CLI locally 2-2
help 2-2
web interface 2-9
accessing the CLI
using local connection 2-2
action
command example 11-5
components 11-5
configuring 11-6
description 11-2
alarm
behavior 25-3
conditions 25-3
nagging 14-2
reporting 14-2
simulation 14-20
Alarm Indication Signals 25-3
alarm table
central 14-2
description 14-2
features 14-2
test mode 14-20
analog
adjustment 14-7
averaging 14-6
architecture 22-3
B
banner
configuring 2-5
bi-state points
configuring 24-7
BOOTP/DHCP relay
configuring 18-9
bridge group
configuring STP 8-5
bridging 7-2
configuring controllers 8-3
description 8-2
C
central alarm table
protocol formats 14-3
raw alarm support 14-3
SNMP support 14-3
TL1 reporting support 14-3
channel group settings 7-5
CHAP 1-15
CLI
accessing with remote connection 2-8
commands
excluding 3-6
identifications C-1
including 3-6, C-1
configuration
backing up A-2
factory 4-4
file 4-3
fragment 4-3
restoring A-3
running 4-2, 4-5
configuration file A-3
configuring
alarm entry 14-4, 14-8, 14-12, 14-14
alarm entry for TCP connection failure
14-16
alarms for expansion peripheral 23-14
asynchronous serial to asynchronous
serial connection 16-11
asynchronous to TCP connection 1614
banner 2-5
BOOTP/DHCP relay 18-9
bridge group 8-1
central FTP package server 22-4
CLI session timeout 2-6
controller 8-3
controller on Expand FA 23-16
controller serial gprs as a resource 105
controllers 7-1, 8-3
controllers for bridging 8-3
custom profile 3-6
default route 2-6
DHCP client 18-10
DHCP server 12-4, 18-4, 18-6
domain name 5-2
event, response, action 11-6
expansion peripherals 23-10
GPRS 10-5
HDLC encapsulation for controller 7-9
host name 2-6
host on DHCP server 18-8
I/O points for discrete expansion
peripheral 23-12
initial setup using wizard 24-3
IP address 2-6
IP settings 5-2
IPTables 12-6
jobs 22-1
MAC security 14-10
measurement table entry 15-4
mediation TL1 command 19-3
modem controller 8-3
NTP 5-4
OpenVPN 10-8
port VLAN 7-17
PPoE encapsulation settings 7-13
PPP encapsulation 7-7
ppp encapsulation settings 10-6
remote access protocol 2-6
script package 22-5
serial port using wizard 24-9
session timeout 2-6
SNMP event template 21-5
SNMP measurement template 21-11
SNMP NE 21-14
SNMP point template 21-6, 21-9
SNMP to manage a relay output 19-7
SSH to asynchronous serial
connection 16-9
static routes 9-1
STP on bridge group 8-5
strong password 3-3
system clock parameters 5-4
T1/E1 controller 7-1, 7-5
T1/E1 line encapsulation settings 7-7
T1/E1 line settings 7-3
T1/E1 serial interface 7-11
TBOS control response with an event
20-16
TBOS cut-through support 20-15
TBOS display point 20-13
TBOS points all 20-12
TBOS polling settings 20-7
TCP connection to asynchronous
connection 16-5
Telnet 14-18, 16-7, 17-7, 17-8
TL1 commands to control relay
outputs 19-5
TL1 multiplexer 17-3
VPN 10-8
wireless modem 10-5
wireless network 10-1
Connect SCS 10-2, 10-3
controller
bridge 6-2
definition 6-2
Ethernet 6-2
OpenVPN 6-2
serial 6-3
types 6-2
copy
Index-1
Index
network recovery file 4-5
correlation expression
configuring a time period 13-5
evaluation 13-4
operators 13-4
originator types and states 13-3
term 13-3
D
DAC
commands 25-4
safeguards 25-5
DHCP client 18-10
DHCP server
configuring 18-4
configuring a host 18-8
configuring subnet 18-6
example 18-3
Director SCD 10-2, 10-3
drop and continue
commands 25-4
description 25-2
network 7-2
safeguards 25-5
Dual T1/E1 WAN ports B-2
E
Ethernet 6-4
controllers 6-2
interfaces 1-4, 6-4
Point-to-Point Protocol 7-12
ports 1-7, 1-8, 6-2, 6-4, 7-16
event
alarm associations 14-2
command example 11-3
components 11-3
configuring 11-6
correlation 13-2
description 11-2
event correlation
components 13-2
configuring 13-6
description 13-2
expression components 13-3
expression example 13-3
expansion modules 1-6
I
interface
asynchronous serial 6-5
bridge 6-4
definition 6-4
description 6-4
Ethernet 6-4
modem 6-5
OpenVPN 6-4
serial 6-5
J
job
configuring dynamic memory 22-13
configuring start times 22-12
configuring with a job property 22-8
configuring with a job task 22-10
description 22-2
script package and script 22-7
K
Kentrox Kickstart 2-2
L
laptop
access for Remote 12-1
assigning IP addresses 12-4
M
measurement table
entries
configuration examples 15-4
states 15-2
use with alarm table 15-3
use with event correlations 15-3
overview 15-2
mediation connections
description 16-2
N
G
Network Address Translation
configuring IPTables 12-6
enabling for laptop 12-6
NTP 5-4
GPRS
WAN option 10-4
wireless modem 10-5
P
H
HDLC encapsulation 7-2, 7-9
help
accessing 2-2
HTTP 2-8
HTTPS 2-8
Index-2
Package Manifest file 22-2
PAP 1-15
password
changing 3-4
entering 2-3, 2-4
strong 3-3
peripherals
administrative states 23-8
configuring a serial controller 23-16
configuring alarms 23-14
configuring discrete I/O points 23-12
disconnecting a managed 23-17
Expand D 23-2
Expand FA 23-4
Expand FE8 23-5
expansion configurations 23-6
expansion discovery 23-7
expansion states 23-8
mangement configuration 23-10
operation states 23-8
overview 1-6, 23-2
Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet 7-1
port
bridge CPU 7-16
capabilities 7-16
switched Ethernet 7-16
WAN 7-16
port VLAN
802.1Q tag 7-16
configuration 7-15
mode 7-16
overview 7-15
PPP encapsulation 7-7
PPPoE 7-1
configuring encapsulation settings 713
high level configuration 7-12
overview 7-12
Preferred Roaming List 10-6
profile
configuring C-1
creating custom 3-6
protocols 16-2
Python modules 22-2
R
relay output
configurig TL1 commands 19-5
configuring SNMP 19-7
description 19-2
open and close 19-9
Remote
features 1-2
front panel connectors 1-4
RMM-1200 1-5
Remote Alarm Indications 25-3
Remote RMM-1200 1-5
responder 11-4
response
components 11-4
configuring 11-6
description 11-2
restore
network settings 4-5
running configuration 4-2
running-config 2-6
S
script 22-3
components 22-2
Package Manifest file 22-2
Index
Python modules 22-2
script package
configuring a job 22-7
creating and installing 22-5
SNMP
event template 21-5
manager 21-4
mediation event originator 21-4
NE template 21-9
network element 21-14
point template 21-6
SNMP proxy
configuration 21-2
configuration information 21-3
description 21-2
Spanning Tree Protocol 8-2, 23-2
STP 8-2, 8-5
strong password 3-3
T
T1/E1
configure interface settings 7-11
configure line encapsulation 7-7
configure serial controller 7-7
configure serial interface 7-11
DAC WAN port B-2
line settings 7-3
overview 7-2
TBOS
central alarm table support 20-4
control response with an event 20-16
cut-through support 20-4, 20-15
definition file 20-3, 20-6
display point 20-13
equipment type 20-9
features 20-2
points all 20-12
polling settings 20-7
rules 20-4
templates
event 21-5
NE 21-9
point 21-6
SNMP types 21-3
terminal emulation software 2-3
TL1 default commands 26-2
overview 7-15
VNE 17-8
VPN
configuring 10-8
server 10-2, 10-3, 10-4
W
WAN
configuring wireless connection 24-4
dual model 25-4, 25-5
EvDO/GPRS options 10-4
interfaces 18-2
line bit-level encoding 7-3
line buildout 7-3
line framing format 7-3
port availability B-2
port capabilities 7-16
port types B-2
serial controllers 8-2
single devices 25-2
T1/E1 7-2
web interface
accessing 2-9
functions 2-9
Home page 2-10
job configuration 22-2
restore network settings 4-5
save running configuration 4-2
wireless network
configurations 10-3, 10-4
configuring for Remote 10-2
example 10-4
overview 10-2
required components 10-2
with Connect SCS 10-4
wizards
bistate-alarms 24-7
description 24-2
initsetup 24-3
serial-port 24-9
types 24-2
U
users
adding 3-2
deleting 3-5
V
verify user environment 2-6
Virtual NE 17-4, 17-8
Virtual Network Elements 26-1
VLAN
802.1Q tag 7-16
configuring 7-17
identifiers 7-1
Index-3
Index
Index-4
Copyrights and License
Statements
Copyright © 1983-2010 by Kentrox, Inc.
The material discussed in this publication is the
proprietary property of Kentrox, Inc. Kentrox retains all
rights to reproduction and distribution of this publication.
You should have received a copy of the GNU General
Public License along with this program; if not, write to
the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 675 Mass Ave,
Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
This product includes software copyrighted by the GNU
General Public License and/or the GNU Lesser General
Public License. The source for the GPL portions of the
software is available by sending an email request to
[email protected]
TRADEMARKS:
Kentrox, Applied Innovation, Applied Innovation Inc., the
AI logo, and other names are intellectual property of
Kentrox, Inc.
Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.
All other trademarks or registered trademarks appearing
in this publication are property of their respective
companies.
THIRD PARTIES:
OpenVPN (TM) -- An Open Source VPN daemon
Copyright (C) 2002-2005 OpenVPN Solutions LLC
<[email protected]> This distribution contains multiple
components, some of which fall under different licenses.
By using OpenVPN or any of the bundled components
enumerated below, you agree to be bound by the
conditions of the license for each respective component.
Copyright © 2000-2002 by the netfilter coreteam
([email protected]): Paul ‘Rusty’ Russell
([email protected]), Marc Boucher
([email protected]), James Morris
([email protected]), Harald Welte
([email protected]), Jozsef Kadlecsik
([email protected]).
This program is free software; you can redistribute it
and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General
Public License as published by the Free Software
Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at your
Option) any later version.
This program is distributed in the hope that it will be
useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even
the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
GNU General Public License for more details.
Copyrights-1
Copyrights and License Statements
Copyrights-2
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