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September/October 2OO2
Pottery Making
illustrated
1
Editor’s Corner
Features
The Lazy Way: Throwing a Vase Upside-Down...........................9
by Sumi von Dassow
Making elegant vases is easier than you think using this simple technique.
Two-Way Extruder...................................................................... 15
by Tim Frederick
Add versatility to your extruder with this easy-to-build mounting system.
Lasting Impressions.....................................................................18
by Marj Peeler
Tips and techniques to help you explore the fun you can have making beads.
Maintaining Your Balance...........................................................22
by Bob Cyr
Improve the accuracy of your triple beam balance scale.
The Education Directory 2002-2003 ..........................................25
Continuous Education.................................................................................. 25
Education Guide...........................................................................................26
Education Directory......................................................................................31
Wild Decoration...........................................................................43
by Kurt Wild
Transfer designs and discover the glazing possibilities of soluble salts.
Throw, Cut & Trim Covered Containers.....................................49
by Leon Roloff
Make lidded containers using this step-by-step technique.
Departments
PMI Online.............................................................................................................6
by Helen Bates
Discover a world of potters working together with this virtual tour of guilds around the world.
Safety First: Gloves for the Studio...................................................................... 54
by Jeff Zamek
Protect your hands with the right gloves when working in the studio.
Continuous Education
Welcome to our back-to-school issue
of PMI! With our move to six issues,
it makes sense for the September/
October issue to feature educational
venues so you can plan to begin or
continue your ceramic education.
From one-on-one training at a local
private studio to colleges and univer­
sities offering degree programs, the
Education Directory contains more
than 250 schools and teaching studios
making it the most complete directo­
ry of its kind anywhere.
All entries were submitted by
instructors or directors typically via
our free web site listing form (see
www.potterymaking.org).
Please
note that the information is as accu­
rate as possible, but to get the best
results, make personal inquiries to the
venues of your choice for detailed
information.
If you provide ceramic instruction
and you are not listed, please com­
plete the free listing form to be
included in the 2003-04 directory.
Glaze Storm
I was fortunate to be able to attend
this years Glaze Storm in Indian­
apolis. Glaze Storm is a workshop
sponsored by the University of In­
dianapolis and Amaco to provide an
opportunity for 5-8 invited artists to
work together in a relaxed atmos­
phere. It is an open exchange of ideas
and information that is free of daily
pressures and responsibilities. For
more information about Glaze
Storm, contact David Gamble at
[email protected]
Kid’s Corner: King Tut....................................................................................... 56
by Craig Hinshaw
Teach children a little about ancient Egyptian culture with a fun project.
Working with Rudy Autio...................................................................................58
by Louana M. Lackey
A description of how world-famous Rudy Autio constructs his sculptures.
Down to Business: Tools and Toys.....................................................................60
by Chris Campbell
Equip your studio wisely by knowing the difference between needs and wants.
Ideas from Clayart ..............................................................................................61
Ababi Sharon shares his technique for coloring clays.
Off the Shelf: Back to School..............................................................................62
by Sumi von Dassow
Attendees at this year’s Glaze Storm includ­
ed (from left to right) Richard Zakin, Scott
Bennett, Mark Richardson, George Debikey,
Dee Schaad, David Gamble, and myself.
Diana Faris (not shown) took the photo.
Reviews of textbooks to use in class or as references at home.
Cover: Sumi von Dassow throws the neck to
avase. Inset (left toright):Beads by
Peeler, covered containers by Leon Roloff, and transferring a design byKurt Wild.
September/October 2002
Pottery Making
illustrated
Marj
3
Editor: Bill Jones
Production Manager: John Wilson
Circulation Manager: Cleopatra G. Eddie
Graphic Design: Debi Hampton
Graphic Production: Dave Houghton
Web Developer: Allison Ruuska
Advertising Manager: Steve Hecker
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Publisher: Mark Mecklenborg
Editorial Advisory Board
Tim Frederich, David Gamble, Steven Hill, Anna
Callouri Holcombe, Mel Jacobson, Jonathan Kaplan,
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4
Pottery Making
ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2002
September/October 2OO2
Pottery Making
illustrated
5
Pottery Guilds
Some local and regional guilds provide
members a variety of services, such as
classes, sales venues, training, and educa­
tional programs (some open to the gen­
eral public). There may also be a studio
where members may, for a reasonable fee,
make, glaze, and fire their work. This can
be very helpful for the emerging clay
artist who needs time to plan and build a
private studio.
A guild with a well-designed web site
can further both its sales and the educa­
tional aspects. I’ve tried to find ones that
are generally complete and functional,
by Helen Bates
with a good database of members’ and
others’ work, and possibly useful information relevant to the ceramic arts field. You’ll
find these and additional sites on the PMI Online page at www.potterymaking.org.
The Berkeley Potters Guild (California)
www. be rke I ey potte rs. com/
This well-organized and functional site features links to Guild tours, an excellent
members’ showcase, and a nice slide show "Making a Pot: Step by Step.” It also has a
“Pressroom” section with links to text and images available for publication. Other fea­
tures include links to maps, sales events, the Guild’s year-round weekend gallery.
The Orchard Valley Ceramic Arts Guild (Sunnyvale, California)
www.ovcag.org/
This sophisticated web site has lots to view online, clear text and images and many
cross-indexed text links throughout. Across the tops of the pages are clickable links to
over a dozen subsections within the site. To see artists’ work, click on “Artists,” then
on any of the small images or “thumbnails” to enlarge them. To navigate from artist
to artist, click on the right arrow. Resources include shows, workshops, executives,
classes, administration tools, member tools, book reviews, calendar, and more. Specially
featured: links to numerous other pottery guilds.
The Saskatchewan Potters Association “Sask Terra”
www.saskterra.sk.ca/
Quick loading and attractive, this site has a “featured” member profile section, bulletin
board, and other resources. There are many images from recent guild-juried exhibi­
tions including: “Hips and Lips,” “Best Foot Forward,” “Enough on Our Plate,” “Put
a Lid on It,” “Thick as a Brick,” and others.
The Victorian Ceramic Group (State of Victoria, Australia)
www.vcglink.com
The members of this guild produce a high level of work. Visit the well-conceived
Members’ Gallery and see especially the two Pat Emery Awards and the “Clatter” page
in the “Report” section of the “Events” page. One of the strengths of these potters is
their decorative painterly work and their strong showing in porcelain. Also click on
the Thai Pottery Tour from any page with a menu on the left.
The Ceramic Arts Association of Western Australia
www.ceramicartswa.asn.au/
This is another Australian group with an excellent web site and excellent members’
work on view with artists’ work well presented and well photographed. The major
link of interest is to images of tableware by top international and Australian ceramists
from the virtual exhibition “Is The Dinner Party Dead,” as well as from other major
ceramics events held in Western Australia. You’ll also find thought-provoking articles
positioning contemporary ceramic arts within today’s broader fine arts world.
The London Potters Guild (London, England)
www.londonpotters.com/
This is a site with good page-to-page cross-linking. The Members’ Gallery is set up
in an alphabetical grid format that makes it easy to navigate, although you may need
to scroll down to see the active links once you have arrived at a particular letter of
the alphabet. The site has some useful links to U.K. potters’ associations, suppliers
online resources, and a few members’ personal web sites.
Helen Bates lives in Ontario, Canada. A connoisseur of the ceramic arts and amateur potter, Helen enjoys
surfing the ‘Net to track doum and check out the work of fine potters and ceramic sculptors. Although she
can't promise to answer all e-mails, you are welcome to send suggestions for new and interesting clay-related web sites to her at: [email protected]
Pottery Making
illustrated
September/October2OO2
8
Pottery Making
illustrated
September/October 2OO2
by Sumi von Dassow
I am a lazy potter. I love to throw but I
don’t like to trim if I can avoid it, and I
really don’t like to use a chuck for trim­
ming. On the other hand, I really do like
having a proper foot on my pots. So, I turn
most of my pots upside down and trim a
foot ring onto them, and it’s usually not a
big deal.
However, when I began wanting to
make vases with long necks for pit-firing,
my spirit rebelled against the idea of trim­
ming each one in a chuck. What to do? I
adapted the technique I have long used to
begin pots for coil-building, which
involves throwing the bottom half of the
pot upside down as a cone or egg shape,
then when it is stiff enough to stand up,
flipping it over and adding coils to finish
the form.
For my new vases, I begin with about
five pounds of clay. Working on a bat, I
throw a form with a wide base. I then
bring the rim of this form in until it clos­
es over, and form the closed top into a
foot. When the foot is leather hard, I turn
it over, add some clay, and throw a neck
onto it. The leather-hard base is stiff
enough that it doesn’t collapse or twist as
I work on the neck, allowing me to make
a taller neck or a more flared lip than I
could if I were throwing it in one piece.
Many of my students have tried this
technique as well and had some great
results. It is pretty straightforward, though
as with any throwing technique, practice
makes perfect. Once you have the hang of
it, it really is easier than throwing a wideshouldered form with a long or narrow
neck the standard way. And, best of all,
though I often do some trimming to
refine the form after the whole piece is
leather-hard, I can do it all right-side up
and never have to deal with a chuck!
Making this classic vase form is simple when done in two parts.
Following a simple step-by-step technique, and with a little prac­
tice, you can throw this elegant footed form. The raised ring
around the neck was trimmed in before the neck was added.
Sumi von Dassow is a regular contributor to Pottery
Making Illustrated. She teaches pottery at the
Washington Heights Center for the Traditional Arts in
Lakewood, Colorado. For comments, log onto her web
site at www.well.com/~sumi.
Septembcr/Octobcr 2002
9
THROWING
UPSIDE-DOWN
Step 1
Step 2
Step 3
Center about five pounds of clay on a bat
and make an opening all the way down to
the bat. It’s important for the clay to be per­
fectly centered. Widen the opening at the
base leaving a hole in the center of the bot­
tom. This hole is where the neck will be
attached. The clay at the bottom should be
about ¾-inch thick. Instead of making the
bottom perfectly level, allow it to be slightly
thicker toward the outside, which will make
the shoulder rounded instead of flat.
Bring up the walls as you would any cylin­
der, being careful not to allow them to get
wider toward the top.
Begin to collar in the sides toward the top to
form a cone shape. As it gets narrower, it
will get thicker, so you will have to keep
thinning the walls. Don’t thin the walls too
much before you begin collaring in or the
rim will buckle when you try to bring it in.
Before the opening gets too small to get
your hand inside, make sure the walls are
of even thickness and the bottom is level.
Sponge any excess water from inside.
Step 4
Step 5
Step 6
As the opening gets narrower, continue to
thin the walls with one finger inside and one
outside. You may have to cut a bit off of the
rim with a needle tool before closing the
form completely. Don’t thin the rim too
much. Remember, this will be the foot of
the vase, and it needs to be strong enough
to support the weight of the vase as you
add the neck.
Continue to collar until the opening is so
small you can finally push it closed with one
finger.
Once the pot is completely closed, push
down the top to make it flat or slightly con­
cave.
10
Pottery Making
illustrated
September/October 2002
Step 7
Step 8
Step 9
To form a foot, push clay out from the
center of the concavity and up from below
it until a thick ring of clay builds up.
If necessary, trim the foot level with a nee­
dle tool, then smooth it with a chamois.
Smooth the side of the vase with a rib.
Avoid the temptation to push on the form
too much or the trapped air inside will
cause the form to torque and possibly to
tear at a weak point such as the joint
between the foot and the body.
Step 10
Step 11
Step 12
Use a wood tool to cut away excess clay
where the part that is to become the shoul­
der joins the bat. You can trim a large
amount away because trapped air supports
the closed form. Set the vase aside to stiff­
en. Ideally, the foot becomes leather-hard
while the shoulder area stays fairly moist.
Wire under the piece now or wait until later
after it has stiffened up.
Begin the neck by centering a small
amount of clay (V2 pound or so), and open
it all the way down to the wheelhead.
Widen the ring out until the inside is about
as wide as the opening at the top of the
vase base.
Pull the walls of the ring a little, but make
sure it is still short enough and wide
enough to get your fingers into it.
Step 14
When the base of the vase is leather-hard,
turn it right side up. It will have a hole where
the neck is to be joined. Center the base
and secure it to the wheel with wads of
clay. If the foot is fairly substantial, and
angles outward, the wads will hold it easily.
Be careful when you are finished with the
neck and want to remove the pot. You have
to pull the wads of clay away from the foot.
If you try to lift the pot straight up out of the
wads, you may pull the foot right off (see the
example on p. 13).
Step 13
Trim a little of the excess clay with your
wood tool, then and cut it off the bat with a
needle tool rather than a cutting wire.
September/October 2OO2
Pottery Making
illustrated
11
Step 15
Step 16
Step 17
Trim the vase around the shoulder. The
hole in the center should be big enough to
allow you to get a finger inside and feel how
much trimming you need to do. If it isn’t,
enlarge it with your needle tool.
Set the freshly thrown ring of clay on the
base, matching the opening in the ring with
the opening in the base.
Center the ring by tapping it gently as the
wheel spins, then join it to the base by
pushing down on the base of the ring with
a wet finger as the wheel slowly rotates.
Work the neck and base together the same
way on the inside.
Step 18
Step 19
Step 20
Once the ring is securely joined to the
base, begin pulling it up and thinning it just
as you would any small cylinder. Avoid
allowing large amounts of water to run over
the shoulder of the vase.
Alternate pulling up with collaring in, as if
you were working on a teapot spout. Be
careful not to pull too fast or too hard
because it is possible to pull the neck off
the base or make the joint too thin. It is
easy to get a very tall neck this way, but it
is also easy to make the neck too tall to
look really good.
Allow the lip to flare, if desired, cut off any
unevenness with a needle tool, then
smooth with a chamois.
Tip: As long as the shoulder area of the
base isn’t too stiff, you won’t need to
score it or use slip to attach it.
Step 22
The vase is now basically finished, and
should be lightly covered so the wet neck
doesn’t dry too quickly and crack loose
from the base. I often trim it a little (right
side up) once the neck has stiffened to
leather-hard, just to refine the contour of
the shoulder and neck, but this isn’t always
necessary.
Step 21
Smooth and shape the neck with a rib as
necessary, but be careful because it is easy
to twist a tali neck doing this.
12
Pottery Making
illustrated
September/October 2002
It can be fun to add
an interesting neck.
There are lots of
possibilities.
When I ruined the foot-ring (see Step 14), I threw a pedestal for it,
black-fired it separately, and glued it on.
A vase is not always the end product. If you open up
all the way to the wheel head and don’t leave any
clay on the bottom at all, this is what you’re likely to
end up with when it’s turned right-side up.
September/October 2OO2
Pottery Making
illustrated
13
14
Pottery Making
illustrated
September/October 2002
by Tim Frederich
have three extruders in my studio. Two of them are THE MOUNTING SYSTEM
manually operated, and one is powered by air using a Step 1
hydraulic cylinder. I use my extruders in both the vertical
The mounting system for the extruders are con­
structed using common materials found at any home
and horizontal position depending on the shape being
center or lumberyard. An extruder mount consists of
extruded and the type of project being produced. One
two 7-foot long pieces of 2x10 boards layered
extruder is now dedicated to use for handles and is
together.
Cut a 2x10 that measures exactly 1½ inch­
mounted in the horizontal position to the top of one of
es
longer
than the table height. Bolt this piece to the
the work tables.
I
table leg. I have sturdy 4x4 legs on the table and was
able to bolt this board directly to the leg of the table
The other two extruders are used in both the ver­
(Figure 2). If necessary, attach vertical spacers to the
tical and horizontal positions.They need to be changed
legs so the board will mount even with the table top.
into position without any downtime or extra labor
involved, which my simple mounting system allows. Step 2
This system requires a sturdy, stable work table to sup­
Attach the remaining section of the 2x10 to the
port the extruder mountings. When the extruders are
bolted vertical piece using two heavy-duty door
not in use, they’re kept in the vertical position allowing
hinges as shown in Figure 3.The hinges form a pivot
the table to be used for other projects. This system
point.
allows flexibility in the way the extruder is used and Step 3
saves pace in a smaller studio.
Using 2-inch-long screws, fasten another 7-footlong 2x10 to the top section of the hinged 2x10
already mounted to the table. Test the swing of the
board before you fasten it in place to ensure that it
clears the floor in the upright position.
continued
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
In my studio, I have two tables bolted
together in an “L” configuration, with the
extruders mounted at the end of one of the
tables.
Cut the 2x10 and bolt it to the table leg. The
top of the board should be 1 ½ inches high­
er than the table.
Use two heavy-duty door hinges to assem­
ble the two boards, forming a pivot point.
September/October 2OO2
Pottery Making
illustrated
15
Step 4
Add two heavy-duty screw hook-and-eye sets to fas­
ten the lower section of boards together when in the
vertical position. Attach short sections of 2x4 on the
back side of the extruder mounts to rest on the table
when in the horizontal position, which keep it level
(Figure 4). I left the top 2x10 almost full length so
that there is a work table to support the extrusions
when the extruder is in the horizontal position.This
allows for manipulation of the clay as it is being
extruded.
Figure 4
A second 2x10 is attached to the top hinged section to form the
mounting board for the extruder.
16
Pottery Making
Tim Frederick is a sales and product support specialist for the Orton Ceramic
Foundation. He has a B.F.A. in Ceramics from The Ohio State University
and has been a professional studio potter for more than 32 years doing produc­
tion stoneware and one of a kind pieces. Tim also teaches ceramics at the
Delaware County Cultural Arts Center in Delaware, Ohio.
illustrated
September/October 2002
by Marj Peeler
Worn out from mixing heavy clay and throwing lots of pots? How about a low-energy, fun
project to relax with? With a few common tools, you can make clay beads with an endless
variety of impressed designs. And when you leave them unglazed, you can fire them directly
on the kiln shelf in empty spaces around glazed pots or piled into a shallow unglazed dish.
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Simple tools: pencil, long nail appropriately
sized for bead hole (see Tip box), Popsicle
stick, larger wood craft rounded stick, comb
with crested back, round plastic ends of
marking pens, half of a wooden spring
clothes pin.
Using soft clay, roll out a ½- to ¾-inch thick
coil. To make beads about the same size,
cut the coil into equal-size slugs.
Roll clay pieces into balls between palms of
hands.
TIP
The most important part of a bead is
the hole. If the hole is too small, the
cord can’t go through the fired bead. If
the hole is too large, the beads slop
around on the cord or leather thong.
So, before deciding how big to make
the hole, have some idea about the
size of the cord that the beads will be
strung on. Remember to allow for clay
shrinkage.
Figure 4
Figure 5
To pierce the clay hole, twist the nail or
pencil point as you push it through the clay
ball. Make the holes neat.
Examples of the pattern each tool makes in
the clay.
18
Pottery Making
illustrated
September/October 2002
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 8
With the ball of clay still on the nail/pencil,
roll the clay over the back edge of a plastic
comb.
Examples of long beads showing marks
made by rolling the clay over a comb then
adding “C” marks with a Popsicle stick.
Gently press and rock the Popsicle stick
over the surface of the clay. Don’t just jab
the clay with the tool. It’s rock and roll!
Figure 9
Figure 10
Figure 11
Repeated designs work best around the
diameter of the beads. However, if you
want to get wild and crazy, go ahead! It’s
your bead!
Bisque containers hold a pile of beads—a
great way to stack or keep each person’s
beads separate.
To enhance the design, paint beads with
iron oxide, then sponge off the excess leav­
ing iron in the creases.
Note: Iron oxide stains
clothing, so be careful.
September/October 2OO2
Pottery Making
illustrated
19
Figure 12
Figure 13
To make a pendant, roll out a small slab.
Find a lid the proper size and cut around it
with a pointed knife, or simply cut out a
freehand shape. Use your tools to impress
designs.
Impress the design. Add a bead for the
cord to go through.
Tip: Slightly dome the pendant so it will
be less likely to warp in drying and firing.
These beads were made of three differentcolored low-fire clay bodies. High-fired
stoneware and porcelain also make good
beads, but they shrink more in the firing.
Don’t forget to take that into consideration
when forming the stringing holes.
A string of beads with an owl pendant.
Beads are low-fired clay, two differentcolored clay bodies with blue Egyptian
paste bead accents.
A string of beads with a round pendant
design impressed with Popsicle sticks and
accents of green Egyptian paste beads.
Marj Peeler lives in rural Indiana where she and
her husband, Richard, operated a pottery business
for 30 years before he died. Marj loves clay work of
all kinds.
20
Pottery Making
illustrated
A hanging “dangly” with beads and odd­
shaped clay parts—just for fun!
September/October 2OO2
Maintaining Your Balance
by Bob Cyr
Potters frequently need to accurately weigh glaze ingredients, and they commonly use a triple beam
balance scale for this purpose. To achieve this accuracy; it’s important to maintain the calibration of the scale.
Figure 1
The Ohaus 700 Triple Beam Balance commonly used by potters to
accurately weigh glaze materials. This model is shown with three
attachment weights used to extend the capacity of the unit and the
tare weight used as a counterbalance when using the scoop.
Zero Balance
to drift. Lately I found that the drifting has to do with
my studio practices rather than with any deficiency of
the beam balance. While the owner’s manual recom­
mends placing the unit on a smooth, flat surface, it does
not mention that the scale is sensitive to the levelness
of the surface. (Verify this by adjusting your beam bal­
ance to exact zero and then slide a coin under the right
side of the unit to simulate an out-of-level condition.
You’ll see a small shift in the pointer.) After this dis­
covery, I now routinely consider the first step to be lev­
eling the scale before using it.
Note: All the calibration steps in this article, includ­
ing the simple zero adjustment, are based on the beam
balance being on a level surface.
Most of us know the basics of adjusting the zero
point before making any critical measurements, but
I found that there is more to it than this. When I
consulted the owner’s manual of my Ohaus 700 Series
Triple Beam Balance, I found that only the basic zero
adjustment was described. I wanted to learn how to
calibrate the entire unit and decided to develop my
own procedure.
Figure 3
A beam balance resting on a leveling platform. The platform
includes a bubble level and leveling screw on the right side.
Attachment Weight Pivots
Figure 2
To adjust the scale to zero, remove everything from the platform
then set all moveable poises (a “poise” is a known weight) to zero.
Take care to align the pointer of the sliding gram weight to the exact
zero point. Adjust the knurled knob located on the left side of the
unit for an exact zero.
Is It Level?
Your beam balance may include pivots for suspend­
ing attachment weights. Pivots are actually small, slot­
ted screws threaded into the beam on the right side of
the unit. Two pivots are included on the Ohaus Model
700 and play a part in the calibration. If your beam bal­
ance does not include pivots, the only step required for
calibration is the adjustment to zero as described above.
If your scale has attachment weight pivots, but you do
not use them, check that the pivots are tight. If needed,
tighten them then recheck the zero adjustment.
I’ve calibrated my scale countless times over the
years, but found that I had to fme-tune the adjustment
more than expected. It was annoying to find that the
zero point would not hold calibration and would seem
22
Pottery Making
illustrated
September/October 2002
Note: Do not adjust the knurled knob on the left of
the unit to achieve balance.
Figure 4
The beam balance includes two pivot screws for suspending extra
weights. These pivots are small screws with companion nuts for
locking them in place. If you do not use attachment weights, make
sure the pivots are secure.
Adjusting Weight Pivots
If you use attachment weights, the pivots must be
attended to. The suspension point of the attachment Figure 6
weight can be adjusted by rotating the pivot screw in With all poises set at zero, suspend a 500-gram attachment weight.
If necessary, loosen the locking nut enough to free the turning of the
or out. Keep in mind that the position of the pivots pivot
screw. Adjust the pivot screw then retighten the locking screw.
influence the calibration of the instrument even when
attachment weights are not used. Calibrate the scale as Step 4. Repeat steps 1-3 with the other beam. If the
follows:
second beam needs significant adjustment, recheck
Step 1. Assure that the beam balance is on a level sur­
the calibration of the first beam and adjust if necessary.
face, then with no attachment weights suspended, Step 5. There may be an interaction between the pivot
accurately zero your unit by setting all of the poises
screws and the zero adjustment made with the
to zero and adjusting the knurled knob on the left of knurled knob. Recheck the scale for exact zero. If a
the unit.
significant adjustment of the knurled knob was
Step 2. Set the 100-poise to the 500-gram position,
required, recheck the calibration of the pivot screws.
and place a container with at least a 500-mL capac­
ity in the center of the platform, and add water to
achieve an exact balance. When nearing the balance
point, use a slip trailer bottle or pipette to add water
a drop at a time.
Figure 7
The weight of any container (such as the scoop shown here) is
referred to as the “tare.” If your scale has a tare weight, suspend it
from one of the pivot points. Use the knurled knob on the left to
make any adjustments to zero the scale. If your scale does not
have a tare weight, weigh the tare and add that number to any
ingredient you are weighing out. Do NOT adjust either of the pivots.
Figure 5
With the 100-poise in the 500-gram position, the container and
water are adjusted to equal exactly 500 grams.
Step 3. Move the 100-poise from the 500 position to
the zero position then suspend the 500-gram attach­
ment weight on the pivot nearest you. If the balance
is not exact, adjust the pivot.
September/October 2OO2
Pottery Making
Bob Cyr is a retired electrical engineer whose love of pottery started 15 years
ago while biking through Vermont. He became fascinated with the hand-thrown
pots he observed while staying at a country inn on a cross-country bicycle tour.
Bob's e-mail address is [email protected]
illustrated
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Pottery Making
illustrated
September/October 2OO2
2002 - 2003
Continuous Education
Becoming proficient in any skill is time-consuming
and often involves repetitive practice. Working alone
and teaching yourself is central to learning pottery, but
knowing when you’ve reached a plateau is important.
When both time and effort are needlessly wasted try­
ing to master a new technique or discover the cause of
a technical problem, it’s time to look to other sources
for stimulation.
College Programs
Colleges and universities offer four-year undergrad­
uate and two-year graduate degree programs.The usual
course of study in undergraduate programs is two years
of basic design curriculum followed by two years of
intensive specialization in ceramics. Most graduate and
some undergraduate programs offer courses in art his­
tory, glaze calculation, kiln building, raw materials and
mold making. Graduate schools usually provide indi­
vidual studio space for making pots that are critiqued
periodically by the faculty. Each college offers a differ­
ent array of courses and unique requirements to quali­
fy for a degree.
Undergraduate and graduate schools require college
entrance exams, portfolios of artwork and supplemen­
tal information that’s dependent on the specific college
considered. The advantages besides a college degree are
the opportunity to work with other students and
receive training in a formal course of study from an
academically qualified instructor.
Each college has different
strengths and weaknesses. Some
colleges are strong in functional
ceramics, while lacking incentive or
expertise in the teaching of sculp­
tural ceramics. Always visit the col­
lege and contact the admission
office for a tour of the campus
grounds and buildings. Concentrate
your time on campus by sitting in
on as many ceramics classes as your
visit will allow. Contact students
currently in the program and get
the names of students who have
recently graduated from the program. After a few ques­
tions and phone calls, you can generally decide if the
college is offering what you need.
Because a useful, enlightened education is a com­
modity you’re buying, make every effort to investigate
the content of the ceramics program. Try not to be
unduly influenced by the degree-granting status of the
institution or the amount of pottery equipment in
their studios.
Craft Centers
Craft centers offer an alternative to college-based
ceramic arts programs. Several centers offer certificate
programs consisting of studio space, classroom partici­
pation and teacher critiques. A craft center can offer
access to pottery equipment, kiln, wheels, slab rollers,
tools and raw materials, at a relatively low cost as com­
pared to equipping your own private studio. The artistin-residence programs within some centers can offer
unlimited studio use and the time required to develop a
body of work. Many students enrolling in such pro­
grams have college degrees in fields other than ceram­
ics, and they’re returning to formal ceramics training to
learn particular skills or to pursue a second career as a
potter. Another major advantage of a craft center is the
opportunity to interact with teachers and other students
that often expose you to new techniques and concepts.
Note: This article is an excerpt from “A Lifetime of Learningby Jeff Zamek
that appeared in the Winter 1998 issue of PMI. -Ed.
Whether you’re beginning
or continuing your ceram­
ic education, hundreds of
choices are available
among the schools, uni­
versities, art centers, craft
schools and private stu­
dios. For example, Laloba
Ranch Clay Center (right)
is an art school dedicated
solely to the advancement
of ceramic arts. Emphasis
is on developing tech­
niques and encouraging
individual creative vision.
Tuition includes 24-hour
studio access, semi-private room, 3 meals per
day, firing, spa, incredible
sunsets and elk viewing.
September/October 2OO2
Pottery Making
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September/October 2OO2
APPALACHIAN CENTER FOR CRAFTS
615-597-6801
Tennessee Tech University
Fax: 615-597-6803
1560 Craft Center Dr.
Smithville, TN 37166
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.craftcenter.tntech.edu
AMERICAN CERAMIC SUPPLY CO.
2442 Ludelle St.
Ft. Worth, TX 76105-1060
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.americanceramics.com
Fax:
817-535-2651
817-536-7120
25 years educating the ceramics industry: traditional,
contemporary, potters, art educators, finished-ware pro­
ducers, providing certification seminars in all major color
brands and specialty classes and consultation. Certified
international teachers. Visit our website and click on
classes for upcoming schedule and more information on
facilities, directions and lodging.
ANDERSON RANCH ARTS CENTER
5263 Owl Creek Rd.
PO Box 5598
Snowmass Village, CO 81615-5598
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.andersonranch.org
970-923-3181
Fax: 970-923-3871
Our ceramics program offers a time and place where clay
artists can come together to discuss, interact, and make
ceramic art and pottery. Summer workshops inform, chal­
lenge, and inspire, and provide a broad range of instruction
for beginners through professional ceramists and sculp­
tors. Our winter residency program provides artists focused
time for open exploration and completion of work in a sup­
portive setting.
ANGELO STATE UNIVERSITY
Station ASU
PO Box 10906
San Angelo, TX 76909
E-mail: [email protected]
915-942-2085x222
All new BFA program and new ceramics facility (2600 sq.
ft.). 2 Bailey gas kilns, 1 raku kiln, 18 Brent electric wheels,
clay mixer and pug mill. Ceramic professor is Esteban
Apodaca, (MFA Univ. of Arizona and BFA New Mexico
State). Working relationship with San Angelo Museum of
Fine Arts (major focus is ceramics) and local production
potter for internships.
ANGELWOOD GALLERY AND STUDIO 419-832-0625
24195 Front St.
Toll-free: 888-617-6565
Grand Rapids, OH 43522
E-mail: [email protected]
Angelwood Gallery and Studio teaches pottery in its on-site
studio by resident potter Julie Beutler, with a focus on
beginning to intermediate students. Students learn in a car­
ing, open environment. Our class size is small for hands-on
approach to learning. The space also features an art gallery.
The Appalachian Center for Crafts, a division of Tenn.Tech
Univ., offers a BFA degree, craft certificate program, artist
residencies and non-credit workshops in ceramic studies.
The 10,000 sq. ft. ceramics studio offers a variety of firing
and glazing options. Vince Pitelka, Assoc. Prof. and author
of Clay: A Studio Handbook, heads the program.
ARCHIE BRAY FOUNDATION
406-442-2521
2915 Country Club Ave.
Fax: 406-443-0934
Helena, MT 59602-9240
Toll-free: 800-443-6434
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.archiebray.org
A non-profit organization dedicated to the enrichment of the
ceramic arts, offers artist residencies to potters and ceram­
ic sculptors from around the world, as well as community
ceramics classes for adults and children. Residents have
access to a variety of kilns and equipment.
561-832-1776
Fax: 561-832-0191
Toll-free: 888-276-6791
ARMORY ART CENTER
1703 S. Lake Ave.
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.armoryart.org
Year-round classes in all mediums. State-of-the-art facility
for all levels of ceramic artists. Master artist workshops
offered January through March. Under the direction of
ceramics chairman Harvey Sadow, the clay program also fea­
tures assistantships, a residency program, foreign exchange
program and the Ceramics National Invitational Exhibition.
ARROWMONT SCHOOL OF ARTS & CRAFTS 865-436-5860
556 Parkway, PO Box 567
Fax: 865-430-4101
Gatlinburg, TN 37738
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.arrowmont.org
Arrowmont offers one- and two-week, and weekend art
intensives during spring, summer and fall. Wheel throwing
and handbuilding clay techniques taught by nationally and
internationally recognized faculty. Credit is offered through
the Univ. of Tennessee. Residencies, studio assistantships,
work-study and scholarships available.
ART & CLAY
1804 Espinacitas St.
Santa Fe, NM 87505
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.artandclay.com
ANNIE’S MUD PIE SHOP
3130 Wasson Rd.
Cincinnati, OH 45209
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.anniesmudpieshop.com
513-871-2529
Fax: 513-871-5576
Toll-free: 866-GET-CLAY
Annie’s Mud Pie Shop offers classes in both handbuilding
and throwing on the wheel. Both classes take students
through the entire sequence of steps required to go from
wet clay to a glazed and fired finished product. Classes
are offered in a 6-week cycle throughout most of the year.
ANTJE’S POTTERY STUDIO
4 High Crest Lane West
St. Jacobs, Ontario, NOB 2N0
Canada
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.antjespottery.com
519-664-2372
Fax: 519-664-3082
European Trade Master, wheel and sculpting potter with
unique developed talent, shares knowledgable workman­
ship with students.
September/October 2002
505-662-9331
Fax: 505-662-9334
Beginning and intermediate classes taught by professional
artists, children’s classes, clay sculpture, functional and
decorative art, studio rental available.
ART LEAGUE SCHOOL
Ceramics Program
305 Madison St.
Alexandria, VA 22314
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.theartleague.org
703-683-5358
Our program offers a diverse range of classes in hand­
building and throwing, functional or non-functional, a resi­
dency and assistants program. A fully equipped studio with
4 electric kilns, a 32 cu. ft. gas kiln, 32 wheels, 2 extruders,
2 slab rollers and a fully stocked glaze lab.
219-347-1669
ARTIFACT POTTERY
508 North Shore Dr.
Kendallville, IN 46755
E-mail: [email protected]
Pottery Making
ATELIER 64
Rua Parati 64
13280-000 Vinhedo SP, Brazil
E-mail: [email protected]
55-193-886-2356
International studio which offers classes for beginners and
advanced students in handbuilding and throwing. We speak
English, German and Portuguese and offer weekly classes
as well as international workshops and accommodations
for foreign students for longer periods. Kilns include elec­
tric, gas, raku and anagama.
AZUSA PACIFIC UNIVERSITY
901 East Alosta Ave.
Azusa, CA 91702-7000
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.apu.edu
626-815-6000
Fax: 626-815-3880
APU offers a sound all around art degree (BA) with a con­
centration in ceramics. We believe that traditional throwing
and formation of aesthetically pleasing functional vessels
are skills all should master before moving in an individual
direction. 18 wheels, 3 large gas kilns, smaller electric kilns,
clay mixer, outdoor workspace and proximity to galleries
are advantages to our near-LA location.
BAKER UNIVERSITY
PO Box 65
Baldwin City, KS 66006
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.bakeru.edu
785-594-4537
Fax: 785-594-2522
Toll-free: 800-873-4282
Strong, small art department offering a BA in studio art, art
history or art education. Gas and electric kilns, raku, 12
electric wheels, slab roller, spray booth, 2 galleries (one
student run). Home of the International Edward Orton Cone
Box Show. 4 full-time professors, 1 in ceramics.
BALL STATE UNIVERSITY
Art Dept/Ceramics, AJ Bldg.
Muncie, IN 47306
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.bsu.edu
765-285-5800
We offer a BFA program in a new state-of-the art facility. We
have two instructors (MFA, Cranbrook and Edinboro, PA) 3
large gas Alpines, 9 electrics, outside raku and pitfire area.
Lots of room, beautiful environment and emphasis on indi­
vidual and personal attention to each student.
505-989-4278
Art and Clay is a ceramic and arts center. We offer yearround classes in pottery, sculpture, drawing, writing and
painting for kids, teens and adults.
ART CENTER AT FULLER LODGE
2132 Central Ave.
Los Alamos, NM 87544
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.artfulnm.org
Adult or children demonstrations and classes in functional
pottery, stoneware, raku, slab, extruded and wheel work.
illustrated
BALTIMORE CLAYWORKS
410-578-1919
5706 Smith Ave.
Fax: 410-578-0058
Baltimore, MD 21209
E-mail: [email protected]
We b: htt p ://ww w. bait i m o rec I ay wo r ks. o rg
Baltimore Clayworks provides affordable studio space,
equipment and opportunities for ceramic artists; a year­
long fellowship for an emerging artist based on a national
search: year-round, hands-on studio classes and work­
shops for adults and children; teachers who are profes­
sionals in the field; and both on-and off-site exhibitions.
BARECLAY
1103 Michigan Ave.
Columbus, OH 43201
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.bareclay.com
Classes at Bareclay Studio are fun! The classes are small
(five students per class) and run in 6-week sessions.
Students are given the freedom to express themselves
through clay on the wheel, handbuilding, sculptural and
surface techniques. Classes are open to all levels of skill
and are taught in Columbus, Ohio. For a registration form
and current schedule go to www.bareclay.com.
BENNETT’S POTTERY SUPPLY
431 Enterprise St.
Ocoee, FL 34761
407-877-6311
A BETTER POTTER
292 Ridge Rd. Ste. 9
Lafayette, LA 70506
E-mail: [email protected]
337-988-5456
31
Formed in May of 2002 to assist others in improving their
pottery skills. Includes wheel instruction and handbuilding.
Also introduces students to processes such as spraying
glazes, mold making, pug-mill introduction, slab roller use,
glaze formulation, and kiln use. Strives to make students
more self-sufficient.
Byrdcliffe is a multi-faceted art colony which offers summer
residencies, community classes and workshops. Summer
residents in ceramics receive private studio and housing
from May to October. Facilities include gas, soda, raku and
electric kilns. Clay mixing and raw materials room. Please
specify ceramics with all inquiries.
BIRCH MOUNTAIN POTTERY
223 Merrow Rd., PO Box 422
Tolland, CT 06084
E-mail: [email protected]
CAMPBELL’S CERAMIC SUPPLY INC. 703-750-9437
5704 D General Washington Dr.
Fax: 703-750-9442
Alexandria, VA 22312
Toll-free: 800-657-7222
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.claysupply.com
860-875-0149
Birch Mountain Pottery offers 8 week sessions for adult
beginner through advanced. Classes meet once a week for
2-1/2 hours and include handbuilding, throwing on the
wheel, glazing and decorating techniques. Also special
workshops for private groups.
BLACK HAWK COLLEGE
6600 34th Ave.
Moline, IL 61265-5899
E-mail: [email protected]
309-796-1311
Beginning and advanced courses in handbuilding and
wheel-thrown ceramics. Cone 10 reduction in both electric
and gas kilns. 50+ year old 2-yr. college AA degree program
leading to Univ. of Iowa or Western Illinois Univ. programs.
BLOOMINGTON AREA ARTS COUNCIL 812-334-3100
John Waldron Arts Center
Fax: 812-323-2787
122 South Walnut St.
Bloomington, IN 47404
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.artlives.org
The Center offers children’s, teen’s and adult ceramic class­
es four times a year. Classes meet once a week for either a
6, 8 or 13 week session.
BODINE POTTERY & ART STUDIO
108 Jeff Davis Ave.
Long Beach, MS 39560
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.bodinepottery.com
228-863-4734
Fax: 228-864-3596
In downtown Long Beach, Mississippi, just blocks from the
beach, this full-time working studio offers classes in wheel
throwing, handbuilding, raku and precious metal clay. Week
long clay camps are held in the summer for kids (or adults).
Tour groups are offered 4 hr. mini-classes, 45 minute tours
or demos.
BRECKSVILLE CENTER FOR THE ARTS 440-526-6232
8997 Highland Dr.
Fax: 440-526-1214
Brecksville, OH 44141
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.digitalprime8.com/todd
Beginners will learn the basics of throwing on the potters
wheel and basic handbuilding techniques. Experienced stu­
dents will refine and expand their skills while learning new
techniques. Open to adults at all levels.
BUFFALO STATE COLLEGE
Design Dept.
1300 Elmwood Ave.
Buffalo, NY 14222
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.buffalostate.edu/~des
716-878-4414
Fax:716-878-4231
A comprehensive State University of New York (SUNY)
undergraduate liberal arts college with the largest visual
arts program in the SUNY system offering a BFA and BS
degree. A 10,000 sq. ft. well-equipped studio space includ­
ing 3 primary classrooms/studios, clay and glaze mixing
rooms, 30 wheels, slab roller, extruder, 15 kilns, and more.
BURLINGTON ART CENTRE
905-632-7796
1333 Lakeshore Rd.
Fax: 905-632-0278
Burlington ON L7S 1A9, Canada
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.burlingtonartcentre.on.ca
The largest collection of contemporary Canadian ceramics
in the world. Exhibitions and educational activities in a full
range of craft and art subjects throughout the year. A pub­
lic non-profit organization.
BYRDCLIFFE ART COLONY
Woodstock Guild, 34 Tinker St.
Woodstock, NY 12498
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.woodstockguild.org
845-679-2079
Fax: 845-679-4529
CARBONDALE CLAY CENTER
970-963-2529
135 Main St.
Fax:970-963-4492
Carbondale, CO 81623
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.carbondaleclay.com
Carbondale Clay Center’s mission is to serve the communi­
ty, both locally and beyond by offering strong, diversified,
high-quality ceramic arts educational programs and provid­
ing support for working ceramic artist/potters through res­
idency, teaching, exhibiting and educational opportunities.
CARLOW COLLEGE
Art Department
3333 Fifth Ave.
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.carlow.edu
412-578-6033
Carlow is a small, Catholic, urban, liberal arts college. We
offer a BA in Art and in Art Ed. We have a 1500 square foot
throwing and handbuilding studio, an outbuilding for gas
and raku kilns, and wood kiln access.
CASPER RECREATION CENTER
1801 E. 4th
Casper, WY 82601
E-mail: [email protected]
307-235-8383
We provide a program of handbuilding and thrown pottery
to all ages and skill levels. Current staff includes myself, for
adult pottery, and teachers for youth pottery and china
painting. Facilities limited to oxidation firing only. Classes
usually limited to ten students.
CENCAL
351-262-840-110
Rua Luis Caldas
Fax: 351-262-842-224
Apdo 39
Caldas da Rainha 2504-909, Portugal
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.cencal.pt
A professional ceramics school since 1985, located in a tra­
ditional region of ceramics in our country. The ceramics
industry is very important in our region, so this school
offers everyone a foundation in ceramics.
CENTRAL FLORIDA CERAMIC SUPPLY 407-657-1505
4760 Palmetto Ave.
Fax: 407-681 -4151
Winter Park, FL 32792
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ceramic-store.com
Seminars/classes held throughout the year nearly every
weekend, usually one to two days. Cover various aspects of
the fired arts; cast pieces, coil, slab, handbuilding, glass,
glazing, scraffito, decals, firing instruction, kiln repair. Fees
range from $30.00 to $75.00.
CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
Art Department
132 Wightman Hall
Mt. Pleasant, Ml 48859
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.cmich.edu
517-774-1157
Fax: 517-774-2278
Our Art Department offers a BA, BFA, MA and MFA in
ceramics. We have a diverse program with a large and wellequipped facility in mid-Michigan.
CERAMIC ASSOCIATION OF THAILAND 66-2-223-2790
18/3 Soi Nakbumrung
Fax: 66-2-226-0327
Bumrungmuang Rd., Pamprab
Bangkok 10100, Thailand
E-mail: [email protected]
Private studio with one-on-one instruction.
CERAMIC CORRESPONDENCE INSTITUTE 614-794-5817
735 Ceramic Place
Fax:614-794-5812
Westerville, OH 43081
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ceramics.org/cci
The American Ceramic Society’s Ceramic Correspondence
Institute (CCI) offers courses that are proven tools for gain­
ing practical education in ceramic technology. CCI courses
offer the convenience of studying at home and setting your
own pace. Students receive the personal attention of a qual­
ified instructor. Ten courses are currently offered including
Glaze Technology and Art.
CERAMIC DESIGN AND CREATION
99 Factory St.
Nashua, NH 03060
E-mail: [email protected]
603-889-0843
We make our own casting molds from plaster. We use cast­
ing rubber to make master molds for mold reproduction.
We have classes for mold and slip casting!
CERAMIC TILE EDUCATION FOUNDATION 864-222-2131
5326 Hwy. 76
Fax:864-222-1299
Pendleton, SC 29670
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://tileschool.org
Classes for aspiring tile installers, floor covering installers,
salespersons, architects, designers, contractors and con­
sumers. CTEF classes cover information regarding ceramic
tile, tile setting materials and installation techniques.
Students use the latest in tools and materials to install a
variety of ceramic tiles in room-sized practice modules
under real world conditions. All the information presented
in the classroom is based on current tile industry specifica­
tions and standards.
CERAMICSPLUS
410-666-0238
49 Cedar Knoll Rd.
Fax: 410-666-0239
Cockeysville, MD 21030
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ceramicsplusstudio.com
Classes for adults and children in a studio setting that
focuses on stoneware clay techniques on the wheel and
handbuilding. Also available are slip cast ceramic pieces
with myriad glazes and non-fire applications. Birthday par­
ties and work with private and public schools. We also
teach art as therapeutic experience.
CHASTAIN ARTS CENTER
135 W. Wieuca Rd. NW
Atlanta, GA 30342
404-252-2927
Fax: 404-851 -1270
Gas kiln, electric kiln, raku kiln, kick wheels and electric
wheels, and a separate handbuilding room.
CHELTENHAM CENTER FOR THE ARTS 215-379-4660
439 Ashbourne Rd.
Fax: 215-663-1946
Cheltenham, PA 19012
Cheltenham Center for the Arts offers classes for beginners
and a professional clay guild. Faculty inspire students
through handbuilding, pottery, tile making, sculpture, raku,
glaze chemistry and more. Our studios include: 1 gas, 1
raku and 3 electric kilns, a pit-firing area, 10 electric wheels
and low- and high-fire glazes.
CHEROKEE COUNTY ARTS COUNCIL 770-704-6244
PO Box 1503
Canton, GA 30114
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.cherokeearts.org
Various levels of clay classes offered throughout the year
for adults and children. Open studio time for students.
CHESTER RIVER ARTWORKS
PO Box 606
Chestertown, MD 21620
E-mail: [email protected]
410-778-6300
Chester River Artworks is a non-profit art center offering
classes and workshops in fine arts and crafts. We are locat­
ed in a rustic mill in historic Chestertown on the eastern
shore of Maryland. Please call or write us for information
on current classes and workshops in the clay studio.
CHILDREN’S AID SOCIETY
Greenwich Village Center
219 Sullivan St.
New York, NY 10012
E-mail: [email protected]
212-254-3074
Fax: 212-420-9153
Children’s Aid Society offers pottery classes for children,
32
Pottery Making
illustrated
September/October 2OO2
teens and adults in both handbuilding and wheel throwing.
The facilities include 4 electric wheels, 3 kick wheels, 2
electric kilns and a slab roller. The children enjoy painting
with the bright underglazes while the teens and adults learn
to use Cone 6 glazes.
ing 3 hours once a week with additional open workshop
times. Enrollment is limited and instructors are profession­
al clay artists from our Resident Artist program. We also
offer workshops in conjunction with our lecture series of
nationally known artists.
CIRCLE D CERAMICS INC.
706 Arrawanna
Colorado Springs, CO 80909
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.circledceramics.com
THE CLAYGROUND POTTERY STUDIO 704-523-6585
4836 Park Rd.
Charlotte, NC 28209
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.geocities.com/claygroundpottery
Certified teachers,
Education program.
hobby
ceramics
719-632-1188
Fax: 719-632-1157
class,
Coloramic
CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE
434-970-3269
PO Box 911
Fax: 434-970-3596
Charlottesville, VA 22902
E-mail: [email protected]
Throwing and handbuilding for beginners, intermediate and
advanced students, fall, winter and spring. Open studio with
8 wheels available to enrolled students. High energy, expe­
rienced, supportive staff. Individualized attention given to
students. Electric, cone 6. Fee: $115 includes clay, glazes
and firing.
CITYARTS CENTER
3000 General Pershing Blvd.
Oklahoma City, OK 73107
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.cityartscenter.com
405-951-0000
13 electric wheels, a high-fire gas kiln and a large spacious
studio.
CLAY ART CENTER
40 Beech St.
Port Chester, NY 10573
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.clayartcenter.org
914-937-2047
Fax: 914-935-1205
The Clayground specializes in beginner and intermediate
level wheel instruction, and handbuilding techniques for
adults. The studio has a 24-hour access policy for current­
ly enrolled adults. We also offer birthday parties, private
lessons and summer camp programs for kids. We use Cone
6 stoneware and oxidation firing.
CLAYMAKERS
705 Foster St.
Durham, NC 27701
E-mail: [email protected]
919-530-8355
Fax:919-530-8306
Claymakers is a full-service center for potters and ceramic
artists offering several classes for beginners and continuing
potters. Teachers are professional potters who also enjoy
teaching and sharing.
CLAYSPACE ON PUGET SOUND
PO Box 1339
Suquamish, WA 98392
E-mail: [email protected]
360-598-3688
ClaySpace offers workshops with internationally known
potters and sculptors. Our focus is on handbuilding, archi­
tectural ceramics and sculpture. Located on scenic Puget
Sound with views of Mount Rainier, ClaySpace is just 45
minutes from downtown Seattle.
CONNER PRAIRIE
13400 Allisonville Rd.
Fishers, IN 46038-4499
Web: http://www.connerprairie.org
317-776-6000
Fax: 317-776-6013
Toll-free: 888-508-1836
CORNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE
1 Academic Dr.
Corning, NY 14830
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.corning-cc.edu
607-962-9297
Associate degrees and transfer program offers beginning,
intermediate, independent study courses, well-equipped
studio with clay mixing facility, 13 electric wheels, 2 large
electric kilns, visiting artists, active school gallery. Corning
is a great arts town in western New York.
COYOTE CLAY SCHOOL & STUDIOS 505-344-2250
5125 Edith Blvd. NE
Albuquerque, NM 87107
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.coyoteclay.com
Coyote Clay School is dedicated to providing expert quality
instruction in a relaxed and supportive atmosphere. We
teach all skill levels, from complete beginner to practicing
professional. We also rent studio space, and sell supplies
manufactured by our sister company, Coyote Clay & Color.
CRAFT ALLIANCE
6640 Delmar Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63130
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.craftalliance.org
314-725-1177
Fax: 314-725-2068
Established in 1964, Craft Alliance is a not-for-profit visual
arts center dedicated to excellence in arts education and
reaching a diverse public through instruction and exhibition
of fine art in the craft media.
The Clay Art Center, dedicated to the teaching and nourish­
ment of ceramic artists, has been a nationally recognized
center for the advancement of the ceramic arts since 1957.
The center offers classes for adults and children.
CLAYWORKS ON COLUMBIA, INC.
718-694-9540
195 Columbia St.
Fax: 212-656-1697
Brooklyn, NY 11231
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.clayworksoncolumbia.org
CRAFT STUDENTS LEAGUE
212-735-9804
610 Lexington Ave.
Fax: 212-223-6438
New York, NY 10022
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ywcanyc.or/csl/ceramics.html
THE CLAY GARDEN
34 Second St.
Hopewell, NJ 08525
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.theclaygarden.com
Our mission is to provide learning opportunities through
the use of clay for artistic expression. We offer our services
to all ages and levels of ability. We also provide master pot­
ters with equipment, glazes, kilns, exhibitions and support
to enhance skills and improve access to Brooklyn’s expand­
ing art communitiy.
The ceramic studios are spacious, air-conditioned and fully
equipped with electric wheels, slab rollers, extruder, sepa­
rate glaze laboratory and storage and lockers. Firing is Cone
6 oxidation. Surface decoration and studio glazes are
included in all courses. Instructors are artists with excellent
training, teaching skills and professional backgrounds.
The Clay Garden offers handbuilding and potters wheel
classes for children, teens and adults, as well as workshops
for scouts and birthday parties. Artist creates unique white
stoneware and porcelain pieces which are for sale directly
from her studio.
CLEVELAND INSTITUTE OF ART
11141 East Blvd.
Cleveland, OH 44106
E-mail: [email protected]
CLAY HORSE STUDIO
1806 South 800 East
Elwood, IN 46036
E-mail: [email protected]
The C.I.A. is a 5 year BFA undergraduate program. The pro­
fessors are Judith Salomon and William Brouillard.
Working in the ceramic studio involves pottery making,
vessel making, architectural ceramics and sculpture. We
have a well-equipped studio facility, about 6000 sq. ft. and
a kiln facility with gas, electric and raku kilns.
THE CRAFTS CENTER NCSU
919-515-2457
Corner of Jenson & Dunn
Fax: 919-515-3679
Campus Box 7320
Raleigh, NC 27695-7320
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ncsu.edu/crafts
609-466-2637
Fax: 609-333-0732
765-552-6018
Fax: 765-552-3946
Clay Horse Studio specializes in educational programs for
children. Emphasis is on the basics of handbuilding tech­
niques. Classes and studio space are also offered for adults.
THE CLAY QUEEN POTTERY
2303 Mt. Vernon Ave.
Alexandria, VA 22301
E-mail: [email protected]
703-549-7775
CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY
24th and Euclid Ave.
Cleveland, OH 44115
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.allfired-up.com
216-421-7353
Fax: 216-421-7333
Toll-free: 800-223-4700
216-687-2086
Fax: 216-687-2275
I teach adults and children how to make functional pots on
the wheel. Slab work and handbuilding are also available.
Classes are limited to 10 people each Monday, Tuesday or
Thursday nights from 7-10PM and on Saturday there is a
practice session from 12-5 PM. 10 weeks for $290.
BA in Art. We have a large studio space, 15,000 sq. ft. Our
equipment consists of the following: gas and electric kilns,
3 slab rollers, pneumatic extruder, jigger wheel, mold mak­
ing equipment, casting equipment, 22 wheels (electric and
kick), spray booth, Venco extruder, Soldner clay mixers.
Emphasis is on functional ware and sculpture.
THE CLAY STUDIO OF MISSOULA
910 Dickens St.
Missoula, MT 59802
E-mail: [email protected]
COASTAL CLAY CO., INC.
59 Luther Warren Dr.
St. Helena Island, SC 29920
E-mail: [email protected]
406-543-0509
The Clay Studio of Missoula is a nonprofit community clay
center offering classes and studio work facilities for adults
and children.
THE CLAY STUDIO
139 N. Second St.
Philadelphia, PA 19106
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.theclaystudio.org
215-925-3453 x11
Fax: 215-925-7774
The Clay Studio offers daytime and evening classes meet-
September/October 2OO2
843-838-7040
Fax: 843-838-1187
Fax: 941-953-5892
Toll-free: 888-211-3740
Workshops available in many phases of ceramics and
bronzecasting. Apprenticeships available. Contact us for
information.
Pottery Making
CREATIVE ARTS GROUP
108 N. Baldwin Ave.
Sierra Madre, CA 91024
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.creativeartsgroup.org
626-355-8350
Creative Arts Group, a non-profit art center, offers ceramic
classes taught by talented and professional instructors for
adults and children in all phases of wheel throwing, hand­
building techniques in small intimate studio. Cone 10
stoneware clays and procelain are predominately used. All
work fired on site.
CREATIVE ARTS WORKSHOP
203-562-4927
80 Audubon St.
Fax: 203-562-2329
New Haven, CT 06510
E-mail: [email protected]
Private and group lessons.
COLSON SCHOOL OF ART, INC.
1666 Hillview St.
Sarasota, FL 34239
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.colsonart.com
The Crafts Center at NC State offers college level classes in
a wide variety of traditional studio crafts. The Crafts Center
provides one of the most specialized and unique programs
of its kind on any university campus. Class sizes are limit­
ed to ensure an optimum student/instructor ratio and many
classes fill up within a few days of the start of registration.
illustrated
Various techniques are taught in an encouraging environ­
ment to students of all ages and skill levels. Our very tal­
ented and highly accredited faculty provide a diverse range
of skills and expertise to continually challenge and educate
students. Studio potters manage the studio.
CREATIVE CLAY STUDIOS
5704D General Washington Dr.
703-750-9480
Fax: 703-750-9442
33
Alexandria, VA 22312
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.claysupply.com
Toll-free: 800-657-7222
Creative Clay Studios offers studio rentals, beginning to
advanced pottery classes, special interest workshops and
reduction firings for the clay artist in the D.C. area.
CREATIVE INDUSTRIES
1946 John Towers Ave.
El Cajon, CA 92020
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.creative-ind.com
619-449-1834
Fax: 619-449-1854
Toll-free: 800-748-5530
CYNTHIA CURTIS POTTERY
80 Pigeon Hill St.
Rockport, MA 01966
E-mail: [email protected]
978-546-6186
I teach pottery classes to adults and children year round in
Rockport, MA. Classes include instruction on wheel and
handbuilding and glazing. Classes are small and one-onone instruction a main focus.
DART STUDIO
253-404-1130
747 S. Fawcett Ave.
Fax: 253-627-5889
Tacoma, WA 98402
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.geocities.com/dartceramics
We are a non-profit organization offering studio space for
rent for artists and classes in wheel throwing, handbuilding
and sculpture. For more details check our website.
DECORDOVA MUSEUM
Dept, of Education
51 Sandy Pond Rd.
Lincoln, MA 01773
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.decordova.org
781-259-0505
Fax: 781-259-3651
DeCordova’s Department of Education offers a comprehen­
sive studio program for all levels of ceramics artists. Each
term includes a range of workshops to ensure students
have access to a broad array of topics pertaining to the
ceramic arts. Programs can be found on our website or call
for a copy of our free brochure.
DRAGONFLY JOURNEYS
PO Box 2539
Taos, NM 87571
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.taosartretreat.com
505-751-3220
Fax:505-751-0131
On the high road to Taos a river flows through ancient cedar
trees at Taos Art Retreat. In addition to a clay studio, raku
area and b&w darkroom space, workshops and art instruc­
tion by two award winning artists, we offer fine art for sale
and nightly accommodations with full breakfast.
EARTH ‘N VESSEL POTTERY STUDIO 631 -665-0060
67 W. Main St.
Bay Shore, Ny 11751
Earth ‘n Vessel Pottery Studio offers beginner and interme­
diate classes four times per year. Students learn a wide
range of wheel-throwing techniques, including open and
closed forms, as well as slip and glaze applications.
Advanced techniques are offered as mini-workshops by
regular instructors and guest potters.
EARTH WORKS POTTERY SCHOOL
413-525-5075
Heritage Park Plaza
436 N. Main St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.earthworksclay.homestead.com
We are a non-profit organization offering pottery and
ceramics classes for all ages, kids to seniors. Our classes
encompass many techniques including wheel throwing,
handbuilding, and some decorating of pre-cast ceramic
forms. We also offer many programs to fit your individual
needs as well as clay for kids.
EARTHSTONE POTTERY
7221 West North Ave.
Wauwatosa, Wl 53213
E-mail: [email protected]
34
414-443-9402
We offer evening clases year around for 13 years to adult.
Summertime children’s classes offered starting in June or
July and run for 7 classes. These are divided by age, 3-6
years and 7-13 year olds. Older children will be introduced
to the potters wheel. Call for more information.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
School of Art
Jenkins Bldg. No. 2000
Greenville, NC 27858
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ecu.edu
252-328-6665
Fax: 252-328-6441
We offer BA, BFA, MA, MFA degrees. 4 faculty: salt, raku, 3
high-fire, wood coffin-type and 9 electric kilns; 28 wheels,
2 slab rollers. NASAD accredited.
EAST CENTRAL UNIVERSITY
Art Department
PO Box L-3 ECU
Ada, OK 74820
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ecok.edu
580-310-5353
Fax: 580-436-3329
ECU offers a BA or a BA with Teachers Certification.
Facilities include 8 new Lockerbie kickwheels, a Bailey highfire kiln, two electric kilns, two raku kilns and a wood fire
kiln. Courses include Ceramics l-IV and are taught by
Wayneath Weddle.
ENCHANTED EARTH
830-990-7938
603 Ivydale Rd. Ste. 1102
Toll-free: 888-990-7938
Fredericksburg, TX 78624
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.enchantearth.com
An artist’s studio open to the public for classes in hand­
building and private lessons on the wheel. Personal creativ­
ity is encouraged. Pleasant and clean working environment.
All classes taught by professional artist with MFA degree.
FIRE & CLAY POTTERY
44 North Lake St.
Boyne City, Ml 49712
E-mail: [email protected]
321-582-7689
We teach the fundamentals of handbuilding in 4 sessions to
small groups of people (5 or 6). Students spend 3 classes
making pots and they glaze in the fourth. After a student
has completed the basic session, wheel throwing is offered
one-on-one sessions with studio time available for practice.
954-455-3099
Fax: 954-977-9012
FIRE AND MUD CERAMICS
134 NE 1st Ave.
Hallandale, FL 33009
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fireandmud.com
We are an open ceramics studio inviting potters and handbuilders of all skill levels to create in a relaxed environment.
Studio access available by the day or through monthly
memberships. Bring your tools, friends, creativity and
come join us! We also have classes in beginning wheel.
Check us out on the web for more information.
FIREFLOWER POTTERY
10 West Mather Lane
Bratenahl, OH 44108
E-mail: [email protected]
216-851-3555
Fax: 216-851 -3555
Small classes, individually geared to students ability and
experience, hand building and throwing and mold pouring.
Have apprentices teach.
FLETCHER FARM SCHOOL FOR THE 802-228-8770
ARTS & CRAFTS
Fax: 802-228-7402
611Rt 103 South
Ludlow, VT 05149
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fletcherfarm.com
Contact us for workshop offerings and course listings.
EXPRESSIONS POTTERY WORKSHOP 860-844-0138
9 School St.
Granby, CT 06026
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.expressionspottery.com
FORT HAYS STATE UNIVERSITY
785-628-4273
600 Park St.
Fax: 785-628-4087
Hays, KS 67601
Toll-free: 800-628-3478
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fhsu.edu
A cooperative studio started in 1972. There are 25 mem­
bers with many different and unique styles and talents.
Expressions is maintained without an overall manager, all
work performed by the members. This includes clay and
glaze making, bisque, stoneware and raku kiln firings,
teaching and gallery maintenance. We offer beginner and
intermediate pottery courses.
Students explore ceramics as a material self-expression in
functional pottery, the vessel, ceramic sculpture and instal­
lation. Developing a personal style in clay is pursued in our
fully equipped large studio space. Electric, gas, wood, raku
kilns, pitfire. Career plan developed. Workshops and trips.
BA, BFA, MFA degrees.
FAT CAT POTTERY INC.
436-A Raleigh St.
Wilmington, NC 28412
E-mail: [email protected]
We b: http ://www.fatcatpottery.com
910-395-2529
Fax: 910-395-4684
Fat Cat Pottery offers classes and workshops for all ages as
well as all levels of ability. We have a large, fully-equipped
studio. Our teachers have had many years in the pottery
field and can help expand and fire your imagination.
FERNANDO ARRANZ
Moliere 2255
Buenos Aires 1408, Argentina
E-mail: [email protected]
54-011-4568-1071
FERNHILL STUDIOS
8304 S. Park
Tacoma, WA 98408
E-mail: [email protected]
253-404-1130
Fernhill Studios is a great place dedicated to providing an
inexpensive facility for artists to create. We have a great
gallery for displaying and selling work. Lessons are offered
in clay sculpture, pottery and glass. Private art studios are
available for rent.
THE FINE LINE CREATIVE ARTS
CENTER
6N 158 Crane Rd.
St. Charles, IL 60175
E-mail: [email protected]
630-584-9443
Fax: 630-584-9490
Classes are taught to adults from beginning to advanced.
Emphasis is on self expression through the arts. Low fire,
high fire, reduction/oxidation, raku and other alternative fir­
ing methods are explored during classes and workshops.
Gallery has monthly exhibits of local and national artists.
Pottery Making
illustrated
FRANCIS MARION UNIVERSITY
PO Box 100547
Florence, SC 29505-0547
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fmarion.edu
843-661-1535
Fax: 843-661-1529
Francis Marion offers a BA degree in Visual Arts and a BS
degree in Art Education. Visual Arts majors can specialize in
painting, photography, graphic design and ceramics. All
programs are nationally accredited through NASAD. The
ceramics program offers instruction in pottery, sculpture,
glaze formulation and various firing processes. Financial
assistance and work-study positions are available.
FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY
Visual Arts Dept.
101 Braddock Rd.
Frostburg, MD 21532
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.frostburg.edu
301-687-4797
BFA degrees in ceramics, printmaking, sculpture, photo,
painting,
graphic
design.
Also
art
certification
program.
Small rural setting, a great learning environment. Soda,
wood, reduction, raku, electric kilns. Glaze chemistry class
offered.
GEORGE GRIFFIN POTTERY
& SCHOOL
One SunCat’s Ridge
Sopchoppy, FL 32358
850-962-9311
A spirited approach to clay. Individualized functional
stoneware, single-fire oxidation, fast-fire wood, business as
an art form. Fee $400 includes materials, firing, lodging.
Beginning and intermediate. Limited to four students. For
dates contact George Griffin Pottery, One SunCat’s Ridge,
Sopchoppy, Fla. 32358, (850) 962-9311.
September/October 2002
GREAT NECK ADULT PROGRAM
30 Cumberland Ave.
Great Neck, NY 11020-1499
E-mail: [email protected]
516-773-1713
Fax: 516-482-8685
Our goal is to give students a love of clay. We emphasize
both wheel throwing and handbuilding. By learning the
techniques used by potters, old and new, one comes to
understand the qualities of the clay.
GREATER DENTON ARTS COUNCIL
207 S. Bell
Denton, TX 76201
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.dentonarts.com
940-382-2787
Fax: 940-566-1486
The Center for the Visual Arts is operated by the Greater
Denton Arts Council (GDAC), which is a nonprofit organiza­
tion serving Denton and the surrounding North Texas area.
GDAC provides facilities, exhibitions, programs, classes,
artist-in-school programs, support, services, original pro­
gramming, and arts education opportunities for all ages.
GREENBELT COMMUNITY CENTER
City of Greenbelt
15 Crescent Rd.
Greenbelt, MD 20770
E-mail: [email protected]
301-397-2208
The City of Greenbelt offers a series of ceramic courses
including introduction to the wheel, handbuilding for chil­
dren and adults, tilemaking, daily open studio and work­
shops with visiting artists. Studio facilities include 10 elec­
tric wheels, slab roller, extruder, and 2 electric kilns.
GREENWICH HOUSE POTTERY
212-242-4106
16 Jones St.
Fax:212-645-5486
New York, NY 10014
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.gharts.org/greenwichhousepottery
Since 1909, Greenwich House Pottery has been a major
center for ceramic arts, offering quality instruction to all
ages in handbuilding, sculpture, wheel throwing and tech­
nical processes. The Jane Hartsook Gallery maintains an
ongoing exhibition series and the pottery also offers artist
residencies and intern opportunities.
GSM ENTERPRISES KILN REPAIR
5847 Castle Hunt
San Antonio, TX 78218-4112
E-mail: [email protected]
210-656-0360
Fax: 210-656-2234
Kiln repair and firing seminars. Also seminars in ceramics,
stoneware and porcelain, glass painting-fusing-draping and
slumping. Also teach kiln safety, operation and rebuild.
HAND WORKSHOP ART CENTER
804-353-0094
1812 W. Main St.
Fax:804-353-8018
Richmond, VA 23220
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.handworkshop.org
The Hand Workshop Art Center offers a wide range of
ceramic classes for children and adults. Classes have dif­
ferent skill levels including beginner, intermediate and
advanced. HWAC has been bringing art to the community
and community to art since 1963.
HANDS ON CLAY, INC.
128 Old Town Rd.
East Setauket, NY 11733
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.handsonclay.com
631-751-0011
Fax: 631-751-9133
Hands on Clay is a center for learning and the appreciation
of the ceramic arts. Our mission is to provide classes and
workshops that are available to everybody, beginner
through advanced, and all ability levels. We aim to provide
an environment for self-expression and creativity.
HARRISBURG AREA COMMUNITY COLLEGE 717-780-2435
1 HACC Dr.
A120
Harrisburg, PA 17110
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.hacc.edu
Contemporary Crafts Marketing AA degree or Certificate
emphasizes production and marketing practices. We sup­
port 2 large ceramics studios with 25 wheels, 6 electric
kilns, gas car kiln, wood salt kiln, slip casting/moldmaking
area, 2 mixers, extruders and raku. Jewelry, metal and glass
blowing studios encourage mixed-media production.
September/October 2OO2
HARTFORD ART SCHOOL
200 Bloomfield Ave.
West. Hartford, CT 06117
E-mail: [email protected]
860-768-4029
The Hartford Art School at the University of Hartford offers
a BFA in Ceramics as well as a Special Student Program
one-year post-baccalaurate. The fully-equipped studio
offers 25 potters wheels and gas, electric, raku and soda
kilns. There is a separate glaze lab as well as a clay mixing
room with three clay mixers. Private studio spaces are
available for ceramic majors and special students.
HARVARD UNIVERSITY
Ceramics Program
219 Western Ave.
Boston, MA 02134
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~ofa
617-495-8680
Fax:617-496-9787
A university-based program with community/professional
participation offering excellent instruction from profession­
al faculty: 10,000 sq ft studio facility; classes, independent
study, and specialized seminars in architectural ceramics,
ceramics history, and glaze chemistry; visiting artists;
shared workspace; gas, electric, soda, raku kilns; exhibition
opportunities; diverse enrollment of students, professionals
and life-long learners.
HAYSTACK MOUNTAIN SCHOOL OF CRAFTS 207-348-2306
PO Box 518
Fax:207-348-2307
Deer Isle, ME 04627
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.haystack-mtn.org
Haystack is a studio program in the arts providing summer
workshops in ceramics and other media.
HEART IN HAND POTTERY
609-518-7808
Mill Race Village, 37 White St.
Fax: 609-518-7809
Mt. Holly, NJ 08060
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.heartinhandpottery.com
Small classes in handbuilding and workshops with electric
kiln, raku, sagger and pit firing. Held in studio area adjacent
to retail gallery. Taught by resident potter Annie Smith.
Occasional guest artists.
HERRON SCHOOL OF ART, IUPUI
1701 N. Pennsylvania St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.herron.iupui.edu
317-920-2416
Fax:317-920-2401
Our $3 million sculpture and ceramics facility houses a
metal fabrication shop; bronze and aluminum foundry with
a 5-ton overhead crane system; wood sculpture shop, 3
ceramic studios; ceramic kiln space; studios for wax, plas­
ter, figure modeling, fiberglass and resin; a 1,000 sq. ft.
gallery and 4,000 sq. ft. of covered courtyards.
HOLLAND POTTERY
408 West Portage Ave.
Muscle Shoals, AL 35661
E-mail: [email protected]
256-386-0099
Fax: 256-383-5403
Mexico. Both our travel programs and our scenic location
in western MA draw staff and participants nationwide, with
workshops structured for all levels.
HOWARD UNIVERSITY
Dept, of Art-Ceramics Program
College of Arts and Science
Washington, DC 20059
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.howarduniversity.edu
202-806-7073
Fax: 202-806-9258
The ceramics program offers a BFA and MFA. Located with­
in minutes of the Smithsonian museums. The instructors:
Reginald ‘Yazid’ Pointer is an expert on the wheel and
shows nationally. Winnie Owens-Hart shows internationally
and has been the steward for African and African American
ceramics. The studio is equipped with Brent and Randall
wheels; a pugmill and clay mixer; three electric kilns, one
downdraft gas kiln, raku and smoke-firing facilities.
HUNTINGTON COLLEGE
2303 College Ave.
Huntington, IN 46750
E-mail: [email protected]
219-359-4272
We are a Christian liberal arts college. Students are intro­
duced to handbuilding and throwing in Ceramics I. In
Ceramics II students have the opportunity to develop their
skills in firing kilns, developing clay and glazes and throw­
ing and handbuilding techniques. Our Ceramic Sculpture
course provides the students with the opportunity to
explore a variety of sculptural techniques and concepts.
HURRICANE MOUNTAIN CLAY STUDIO 518-576-9121
24 Hurricane Rd.
Fax:518-576-9121
Keene, NY 12942
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.hurricanemtnclay.com
In the magnificent Adirondack mountains of New York,
HMCS offers classes for people from beginners through
professionals who love to play with clay. Large, new studio
space and excellent equipment provide for enjoyable learn­
ing. We are both a school for the greater community and a
summer residency.
HYDE PARK CRAFT STUDIO
813-259-1687
702 S. Albany
Fax:813-274-7744
Tampa, FL 33606
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.tampagov.net/recreation
A low-cost, high-quality ceramics program funded by the
city of Tampa. Equipment includes 12 wheels, slab roller,
extruder, electric, raku, salt and gas firings up to Cone 10.
Talented and experienced instructors make this studio a
special environment for all ages and levels.
IDYLLWILD ARTS
PO Box 38
Idyllwild, CA 92549
909-659-2171
Fax: 909-659-5463
BS degree in fine arts from the University of North Alabama.
Ceramic pottery shop for twenty years with classes for indi­
vidual students.
The Idyllwild Arts Foundation, an uncompromising force in
arts education for all ages since 1950, offers both a sum­
mer program and the arts academy, a private residential
arts high school, during the academic year. The Laura
Steere ceramics studio is well equipped and supports handbuilt and wheel-thrown functional and sculptural forms.
Firings include gas, wood, salt, raku and saggar.
HOOD COLLEGE CERAMICS PROGRAM 301-696-3456
401 RosemontAve.
Fax:301-846-0035
Frederick, MD 21701
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.hood.edu/art dept
INDIAN HILLS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 641-683-5149
525 Grandview Ave., Bldg. 6
Fax: 641-683-5206
Ottumwa, IA 52501
Toll-free: 800-683-5000
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ihcc.cc.ia.us
Courses and hands-on workshops for all skill levels.. Small
classes allow for individual attention. Through study, studio
experience and subjective analysis students will develop
technical proficiency and focus on universal design princi­
ples to refine personal expression. Our accelerated format
and weekend scheduling meets the special needs of stu­
dents, teachers and professionals.
AA degree offered. We have two instructors teaching in the
ceramics area. Work is mainly in mid- to high-fire
stoneware and raku.
HORIZONS
108 N. Main St.
Sunderland, MA 01375
E-mail: [email protected]
413-665-0300
Fax:413-665-4141
Horizons has two bases of operation—our western MA art
center with housing for up to 80 people and our interna­
tional and nationwide travel programs, which include clay
workshops in New Mexico, southern Utah, Spain, Italy and
Pottery Making
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INDIANA UNIVERSITY
School of Fine Arts
Fine Arts R123
Bloomington, IN 47405
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fa.indiana.edu
812-855-7766
Fax:812-855-7498
The ceramics program emphasizes the student’s growth
and development as a creative clay artist. A conceptual
foundation, technical expertise and a commitment to art are
considered essential qualities for ceramic students.
Students explore aesthetic interests ranging from vessels
to ceramic sculpture; students are expected to develop a
35
knowledge of art history and a critical understanding of
contemporary art issues.
INSTITUTION LA MERIDIANA
Loc. Bagnano 135
Certaldo 50052
Italy
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.pietro.net
39-0571-660084
Fax:39-0571-660821
La Meridiana is a professional and well equipped ceramic
studio that in the last decade has become an international
center for seminars and workshops. The beautiful geo­
graphical setting in Tuscany and the standard of the faculty
has made it an ideal place for a short and intensive practice
in ceramics.
INTERLAKEN SCHOOL OF ART
PO Box 1400
Stockbridge, MA 01262
E-mail: [email protected]
JEFF BROWN POTTERY
162 B, 1st NH Turnpike
Northwood, NH 03261
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.jeffbrownpottery.com
413-298-5252
Fax:413-298-0274
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.kean.edu
Ceramic program with a broad approach. Stress is on basic
techniques in beginning courses to allow students to gain
the skills, techniques and critical skills necessary to do
advanced work and explore sculptural, vessel and produc­
tion techniques. MA program in studio arts designed
specifically for teachers and portfolio development.
KENTUCK ASSOCIATION
503 Main Ave.
Northport, AL 35476
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.kentuck.org
205-758-1257
Fax:205-758-1258
The Kentuck Art Center is home to the Gallery at Kentuck, the
Kentuck Museum, the gallery gift shop, artist studios and the
Kentuck Festival of the Arts. Both the gallery and museum
offer exhibitions to craftspeople, while the gallery shop and
the Kentuck festival feature many artists. Kentuck’s studio
artist, Mark Rigsby, teaches all levels of pottery.
603-942-8829
Beginners/intermediate/experienced. There will be many
demonstrations, and one-on-one instruction, with a little
coaxing to experiment with clay in new ways. Clay and glaze
will be provided with the class fee. Ambitious potters may
buy more clay and kiln space if desired. Twenty-three years
experience with clay.
THE KILN DOCTOR INC.
202 East Main St.
Front Royal, VA 22630-6179
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.thekilndoctor.net
Fax:
Toll-free:
540-636-6016
540-635-8699
877-KILNDOC
Workshops on kiln safety and preventive maintenance.
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OF 301-881-0100 x6734
GREATER WASHINGTON
Fax: 301-296-2489
6125 Montrose Rd.
Rockville, MD 20854
E-mail: [email protected]
We offer a high-level recreational art program. Classes are
offered to preschool through adult in both fine art (painting
and drawing) and ceramics.
JOHN C. CAMPBELL FOLK SCHOOL 828-837-2775
1 Folk School Rd.
Fax: 828-837-8637
Brasstown, NC 28902-9603 Toll-free:
800-365-5724
Web: http://www.folkschool.com
JOHN MICHAEL KOHLER ARTS CENTER 920-458-6144
608 New York Ave., PO Box 489
Fax: 920-458-4473
Sheboygan, Wl 53082
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.jmkac.org
The Arts/Industry artist-in-residence program has given
hundreds of artists worldwide access to the plumbingware
firm, Kohler Co., through 2- to 6-month residencies and
other programming. Available media: vitreous china, iron,
enamel, and brass. Residencies include 24-hour studio,
materials, housing, travel reimbursement (within continen­
tal U.S.), and a weekly stipend.
JOYCE MICHAUD GALLERY
9043 W. Allington Manor Cir.
Frederick, MD 21703
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.hood.edu/artdept
301-698-0929
Fax: 301 -846-0035
Joyce Michaud is an internationally recognized master pot­
ter as well as a ceramics professor at Hood College. An MFA
from George Washington Univ., Joyce is available to teach
master-level skills, eastern coil, glaze application and
design techniques.
KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY
322A Willard Hall
Manhattan, KS 66506-3705
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ksu.edu/artdept.html
785-532-6605
Fax: 785-532-0334
The Ceramics area at KSU has an active graduate program.
Graduate students are given private studio space and
undergraduate majors have shared studio space. A variety
of kilns are available for reduction, oxidation, wood, soda
and raku. Students have the opportunity to study abroad in
summer programs such as the Faenza, Italy program, or on
exchanges with schools in Scotland and England.
KEAN UNIVERSITY
1000 Morris Ave.
Union, NJ 07083
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908-527-2831
Fax: 908-527-2804
KRUEGER POTTERY INC.
314-963-0180
8153 Big Bend Blvd.
Fax: 314-963-7712
St. Louis, MO 63119
Toll-free: 800-358-0180
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.kruegerpottery.com
Krueger Pottery offers classes for adults and children in
wheel throwing and handbuilding techniques. We also have
specialty workshops taught by guest artists.
L&R SPECIALTIES INC
202 East Mount Vernon
PO Box 309
Nixa, MO 65714
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.claydogs.com
417-725-2606
Fax: 417-725-2607
Toll-free: 877-454-3914
Wheel-throwing classes, meeting one evening per week
from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. for six weeks. We also host a Raku
Day annually the first Sunday in November. Glazes, kilns
and assistance are provided. Bisque ware can be purchased
or call for details on bringing your own.
LACONIA POTTERY
45 Court St.
Laconia, NH 03246
E-mail: [email protected]
603-528-4997
Fax: 603-528-0498
LANGARA COLLEGE
100 West 49th Ave.
Vancouver BC V5Y 2Z6, Canada
E-mail: [email protected]
604-323-5711
Fax: 604-323-5555
Fine arts program with approximately 20 faculty members.
LEON NIGROSH/CERAMIC DESIGNER 508-757-0401
11 Chatanika Ave.
Worcester, MA 01602
Web: http://www.leonnigrosh.com
A unique opportunity to study one-on-one with an acknowl­
edged master of the ceramic arts and author of the best­
selling ceramic text, daywork: Form and Idea in Ceramic
Design. Each course is tailored to suit individual needs.
Rolling enrollment.
LEXINGTON ARTS & CRAFTS SOCIETY 781-862-9696
Ceramics Guild
130 Waltham St.
Lexington, MA 01730
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.lexingtonma.org/lacs/index.html
The Ceramics Guild is one of many guilds within the
Lexington Arts & Crafts Society. We have a fully-equipped
studio. Adult and teen classes are offered with a waiting list
being maintained. Membership is available pending a
prospective membership period.
LIBERTYTOWN ARTS WORKSHOP
916 Liberty St.
Fredericksburg, VA 22401
540-371-7255
Our pottery school offers a wide range of classes from
beginner to advanced for both children and adults. While
most of our classes are structured for amateurs, we also
provide a means for serious pottery students to grow.
Facility includes two classrooms, practice studio and gallery.
LONDON POTTERS GUILD
519-659-2911
East Lions Artisans Ctr. 1731 Churchill Ave.
London, ON N5W 5P4, Canada
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.members.home.net/londonpotters
The London Potters Guild offers classes from September
through June on an annual basis. Classes are held in the
Guild’s studio and meet for weekly three-hour sessions for
an eight-week period. More information is on our website.
LONG BEACH ISLAND FOUNDATION 609-494-1241
OF THE ARTS & SCIENCE
Fax: 609-494-0662
120 Long Beach Blvd.
Loveladies, NJ 08008
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.lbifoundation.org
The Foundation offers ceramic workshops and classes for
all levels. Workshops with visiting artist held primarily in
the summer months. Large ceramic studio with electric,
gas and raku kilns.
Learn wheelthrowing basics from a potter with 30 years
experience. Classes are small and casual. High fire
stoneware and raku functional and decorative techniques
are emphasized.
LONG ISLAND UNIVERSITY ART DEPT 718-488-1051
1 University Plaza, Brooklyn Campus Fax: 718-488-1372
Brooklyn, NY 11201
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.liu.edu/bfastu
LAKESIDE POTTERY
543 Newfield Ave.
Stamford, CT 06905
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.lakesidepottery.com
Located in the heart of NYC, LIU’s art dept, offers access to
major museums, galleries and artists. Our skylit studio
looks out over lower Manhattan and downtown Brooklyn.
Every summer we offer the only raku workshop in NYC. We
are strong on individual mentoring and offer a BFA in Studio
Art. We also offer special woodfire workshops.
203-323-2222
Lakeside Pottery offers classes for the beginner, intermedi­
ate and advanced potters, adult and children using the
wheel, hand-building and glazing. Open studio, custom
classes, summer camp, workshops and demonstrations for
families and organizations are also available.
LALOBA RANCH CLAY CENTER
PO Box 773628
Steamboat Spgs., Co 80477
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.lalobaranch.com
970-870-6423
Fax: 970-870-6452
Laloba Ranch Clay Center is an art school dedicated solely
to the advancement of ceramic arts. Emphasis is on devel­
oping techniques and encouraging individual creative
vision. Tuition includes 24-hour studio access, semi-private
room, 3 meals per day, firing, spa, incredible sunsets and
elk viewing.
L0NGW00D COLLEGE ART DEPT.
201 High St
Farmville, VA 23909
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.lwc.edu
434-395-2287
Fax: 434-395-2775
Well-equipped state college ceramics program with empha­
sis on functional, high-fire pottery. Electric, gas and raku
kilns. Access to salt kiln, anagama kiln and noborigama kiln
at nearby professional studios. One full-time professor.
Active visiting artist program. Offers BFA degree in crafts.
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN POTTERY
3005 Plum Nelly Rd.
Rising Fawn, GA 30738
E-mail: [email protected]
706-398-3232
Lookout Mountain Pottery, home of potter Mark Issenberg,
Pottery Making
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September/October 2OO2
has electric kilns, raku kiln, and Cone 10 gas kiln. Mark
does mostly ash glazes on high fire stoneware. Mostly
spraying ash glazes, learning the proper techniques. Also 2
miles from Cloudland Canyon State Park and only 30 min­
utes from Chattanooga, Tenn.
M.T. SHERMAN CERAMICS
1220 12th St. SE
Salem, OR 97302
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.salemart.org
CENTER 503-581-7275
Fax:503-581-9801
A 6800 sq. ft. studio equipped with 22 wheels, slab roller,
extruder, 60 cu. ft. reduction kiln, 3 computerized bisque
kilns, 2 glass kilns and 2 raku kilns. Professional artists
teach lessons in: wheelthrowing, sculpture, handbuilding,
raku, mosaic, stained glass, cast and fused glass, and other
specialized classes. Our workshops are presented by local
and internationally recognized artists.
MANASSAS CLAY
9122 Center St.
Manassas,
VA 20110
E-mail:
[email protected]
Web: http://www.manassasclay.com
Fax:
703-330-1040
703-330-1040
Manassas Clay is a gallery featuring the work of over 40
local potters and offering classes in wheel and hand­
building. We have studio memberships, rentals and carry
a full line of supplies.
MARIE WYNN STUDIO
27 Bay View Rd.
Sag Harbor, NY 11963
E-mail: [email protected]
631-725-1195
Fax:631-725-1195
MFA Alfred Univ. retired professor of art Southampton
College of Long Island University teaching ceramics, pot­
tery, handbuilding, wheel and sculpture. Individual atten­
tion, beginner or advanced. Fee $180 for 6 3hr. Sessions.
All materials and tools provided. Beautiful studio on the
water in the Hamptons.
MARSHALL UNIVERSITY
400 Hal Greer Blvd.
Huntington, WV 25755-2200
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.marshall.edu
304-696-6760
Fax: 304-696-6505
Toll-free: 800-642-3499
Students who pursue the BFA or MA degree in ceramics
have 24-hour access to a well-equipped ceramic facility,
which includes separate areas for handbuilding, wheel
throwing, glaze formulation and clay making; a kiln room
equipped with updraft and downdraft gas kilns and outdoor
raku and primitive firing area.
MCPHERSON COLLEGE
1600 E. Euclid
McPherson, KS 67460
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mcpherson.edu
620-241-0731
Fax: 620-241-8443
McPherson College is a small 4-year liberal arts institution
that offers a BA in art. Students in ceramics work with
stoneware, raku, porcelain, terra cotta, oxidation and reduc­
tion firing and some salt firing. Emphasis is on functional
thrown pottery.
MEIKLEM KILN WORKS
139 Yantic Rd., PO Box 225
Yantic, CT 06389
E-mail: [email protected]
860-887-5182
Meiklem Kiln Works is a privately run teaching studio which
offers beginner and intermediate pottery classes for adults
and children. Classes are 8 weeks long, 1 class per week
with additional studio time offered. Class size is limited to
10 students. All classes are instructed by Lyndsay Rae
Meiklem. In addition to her own pottery business, Meiklem
has taught pottery in Montreal, Quebec and Maine.
fication of ceramic materials. The unique process of
reduced saggar lusters on terra sig and low fire reduced
copper reds. Guided tour of Guatemalan Mayan Highlands
and traditional potters.
including Brent wheels, spacious handbuilding stations,
slab roller, extruder, hand tools, slump molds and a library.
We have four kilns and daily firings. Monthly and annual
memberships available.
MENDOCINO ART CENTER
707-937-5818
45200 Little Lake St., PO Box 765
Fax: 707-937-1764
Mendocino, CA 95460
Toll-free: 800-653-3328
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mendocinoartcenter.org
MUDFLAT POTTERY SCHOOL & STUDIO 617-628-0589
149 Broadway
Fax:617-628-2082
Somerville, MA 02145
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mudflat.org
Located in Mendocino, a picturesque Victorian northern
California coastal village about 150 miles north of San
Francisco. Hosts a prestigious visiting faculty for weekend
workshops at all levels. The year-round art/retreat campus
has two ceramics studios equipped with wood, salt, soda,
raku, sagger, reduction and electric kilns.
Mudflat offers classes and workshops in wheelthrowing,
handbuilding and sculpture for adults and children in 3
semesters each year. Mudflat also offers studio rentals for
20 clay artists, including one funded artists residency stu­
dio. Facilities include 3 classrooms with 27 electric wheels
and 3 gas and 3 electric kilns.
METCHOSIN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL 604-478-5591
650 Pearsons College Dr.
Fax: 604-370-2324
Victoria, BC V9C 4H7, Canada
E-mail: [email protected]
MUDPIE POTTERS
413-548-3939
13 Montague Rd., PO Box 3
Leverett, MA 01054
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.community.masslive.com/cc/mudpiepotters
MILE HI CERAMICS INC.
303-825-4570
77 Lipan St.
Fax: 303-825-6278
Denver, CO 80223
Toll-free: 800-456-0163
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.milehiceramics.com
MILKHOUSE POTTERY
30 Sharon River Rd.
Cornwall Bridge, CT 06754
E-mail: [email protected]
860-672-6450
Personalized small classes of 3 or 4 students 9 years old to
adult. I’m an experienced professional potter and teacher.
I’ll be happy to give references.
MINT MUSEUM OF ART
2730 Randolph Rd.
Charlotte, NC 28207
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mintmuseum.org
704-337-2000
Fax: 704-337-2101
The museum offers a wide variety of educational opportu­
nities in connecting artists, collectors and the public. An
active schedule of changing exhibitions, lectures, artist
demonstrations, workshops, guided tours and travel oppor­
tunities are available.
MONTGOMERY COMMUNITY COLLEGE 910-576-6222
PO Box 787
Fax:910-576-2176
Troy, NC 27371-0787
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.montgomery.cc.nc.us
Clay curriculum designed to prepare individuals for
employment as professional potters in pottery related
fields. Using traditional and contemporary concepts,
instruction includes technical knowledge, design skills, and
marketing/business essentials. Course work includes
development of basic and advanced throwing skills with
emphasis on form and design.
MT. HOOD COMMUNITY COLLEGE
26000 SE Stark St.
Gresham, OR 97030
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mhcc.cc.or.us
503-491-7149
Fax: 503-491-6949
Vessel-oriented program that teaches both recent high
school grads and returning adults. Three instructors with
strong vessel orientation. Anagama wood firing and soda
firing are strong components. Ceramic club for fundraising
and field trips.
MUD ALLEY POTTERY
105 Emerald Ave.
Westmont, NJ 08108
E-mail: [email protected]
856-858-6790
All students are welcome, as I will approach each one on
their own level. I encourage each student to express
him/herself through good technique, a thorough under­
standing of clay and various glazing techniques.
MELINDA COLLINS CLAY STUDIO 011-502-832-4356
32 Callejon del Burrito
Antigua, Guatemala
E-mail: [email protected]
MUDFIRE
1441 Dresden Dr. Ste. 260
Atlanta, GA 30319
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mudfire.com
With professional potter and geologist, explore Guatemala,
dig your own materials for micaceous clay pots and identi-
MudFire pottery studio is housed in a sunlit loft in Atlanta.
Open daily until 10pm. Furnished with new equipment,
September/October 2002
Pottery Making
404-931-4935
illustrated
Mudpie Potters Community Clay Center offers instruction in
all aspects of working with clay. Anyone may take small
classes, join our shared studio for independent learning or
take a summer workshop taught by guest potters and
sculptors who are accomplished in their field.
THE MUDPIT
228 Manhattan Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11206
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mudpitnyc.com
718-218-9424
Fax: 718-218-9424
The Mudpit is a fully-equipped clay studio offering classes
in all aspects of clay. Learn wheelthrowing, handbuilding,
tilemaking, mosaics or moldmaking in an informal and
relaxed atmosphere. As of summer 2002, The Mudpit also
offers raku in the city. Hourly and monthly studio rentals as
well as firing and supplies also available.
MUNSON WILLIAMS PROCTOR 315-797-0000 x2176
ARTS INSTITUTE
Fax: 315-797-9349
310 Genesee St.
New York, NY 13501
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.mwpi.edu
Foundation studies in studio art (freshman and sophomore
years) include ceramics at the introductory level; estab­
lished continuing education program; beginning through
advanced ceramics courses offered in our newly renovated
completely equipped studio.
MUSKINGUM COLLEGE ART DEPT.
163 Stormont St.
New Concord, OH 43762
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.muskingum.edu/~art
740-826-8102
Fax: 740-826-8109
We offer all levels of sculpture and ceramics. We also offer
opportunities for our students to show their works in our
gallery as well as other exhibitions.
NEIL ROYSTON WARR POTTERY
15 Waushacum Ave.
Sterling, MA 01564
E-mail: [email protected]
978-263-2709
Private classes in my studio, maximum 3 students per
night. Teaching is at your pace and level from beginner to
expert. Throwing classes are blocks of ten nights, Tuesday,
Thursday or by private arrangement.
NETRAARTS
7/128 Swaroop Nagar
Kanpur Uttar Pradesh 208002, India
E-mail: [email protected]
NEW ART CENTER
61 Washington Park, PO Box 330
Newtonville, MA 02460-1915
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.newartcenter.org
91-512292390
617-964-3424
Fax: 617-630-0081
New Art Center provides students an opportunity to devel­
op their aesthetic eye and technical ability in clay. Classes
focus on wheel work, offering handbuilding for those inter­
ested. Students may also pursue individual projects,
exchanging ideas and approaches to the process in group
critique and independent study.
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NEW HAMPSHIRE INSTITUTE OF ART 603-623-0313 x548
148 Concord St.
Fax: 604-641 -1832
Manchester, NH 03104-4858
Adult education offering lifelong learning, certificate pro­
gram and Bachelor of Fine arts degree with a concentration
in ceramics. Courses are available for all levels of interest
and expertise. Faculty
consists of noted New England
ceramic artists withworkshops
taught by regionally and
nationally known artists.
NEW WORLD SCHOOL OF THE ARTS 305-237-3593
300 NE 2 St.
Fax: 305-237-3794
Miami, FL 33132
E-mail: [email protected]
New World School of the Arts offers a BFA in Visual Arts.
The pottery program at this time is part of the sculpture
major and is not an independent major. The facility offers
potters wheels, a clay mixer and oxidation firing.
NORTHERN VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE703-845-6075
Alexandria Campus
Fax: 703-845-6060
3001 N. Beauregard St.
Alexandria, VA 22311
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.nv.cc.va.us
The Alexandria campus ceramics program offers a range of
courses and study, from beginning basic handbuilding to
advanced, individually based, self study.
NOTTINGHAM CENTER FOR THE ARTS 760-752-1020
PO Box 460
San Marcos, CA 92079
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.nottinghamarts.org
Supports the studio arts in north San Diego county with
meeting space, event assistance, workshops, artist residen­
cies and facilities use for artists. Our main focus is in the 3D arts such as ceramics.
NY/NJ ACADEMY OF CERAMIC ART 201 -432-9315
279 Pine St.
Jersey City, NJ 07304
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.nynjceramics.com
Variety of classes offered both day and night with excellent
clean facility and wonderful people. Friendly, clean and pro­
fessional - a cut above the rest!
OCEAN SPRINGS PARK COMMISSION 228-875-8460
Moving Arts Center
Middle St.
Ocean Springs, MS 39553
E-mail: [email protected]
A community-based program teaching nine classes each
week in wheel-thrown pottery. Classes meet once a week
for three hours. Eight wheels and two kilns.
OHIO UNIVERSITY
740-593-9725
The School of Art Ceramics Dept.
Athens, OH 45701-2979
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ohiou.edu/~artdept/soamain.html
Emphasis on realization of individual goals, diversity, chal­
lenging contemporary standards while producing work of
exceptional craftsmanship. Fully-equipped studio including
electric wheels; clay mixers; dry materials room; slab
rollers; ball mills; sandblaster; Slipomatic; spray booth;
extruder. Kilns: electric, salt, soda, wood, reduction, gas car
kiln. Visiting artists program.
OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE STATE UNIV. 580-349-1484
Aggie Blvd., PO Box 430
Fax: 580-349-2302
Goodwell, OK 73939 Toll-free: 800-664-6778 x1484
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.opsu.edu
We offer AAS, BA and BFA degree programs in art. In our
program we emphasize marketing skills for the finished
work of art. We have a close relationship with regional art
galleries where student work is exhibited and sold.
OLD CHURCH CULTURAL CENTER
SCHOOL OF ART
561 Piermont Rd
Demarest, NJ 07624
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.occcartschool.org
201 -767-7160
Fax: 201 -767-0497
Our courses are designed to give students a basis in aes­
thetics as well as technique. We also host Annual Pottery
Show and Sale held the first weekend in December every
year, an incredible opportunity for clay lovers to view muse­
um quality work.
OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY
Art Department
113 Studio Art Bldg.
Norfolk, VA 23529
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://odu.edu/al/art
757-683-4779
Fax: 757-683-5923
Small clay studio with electric kilns, gas kiln, raku kiln; clay
sculpture courses, advanced independent study (sculpture)
courses.
ONEILL POTTERY
18125 N. High One
Fort Bragg, CA 95437
E-mail: [email protected]
707-964-1310
A graduate from OCC in Michigan with a ceramic tech
degree, my studio is nestled on the coast of Mendocino
with tropical gardens. Offer a 6 week class in handbuilding
and wheelthrowing to finished glazed projects with a high
fire white stoneware body. All tools and materials included.
OPELIKA ARTS CENTER
PO Box 267
Lafayette, AL 36862
E-mail: [email protected]
334-705-5558
Comprehensive techniques involving all aspects of pottery
and handbuilding classes are designed for one-on-one and
independent study. Apprenticeships occasionally available.
ODYSSEY CENTER FOR THE
CERAMIC ARTS
236 Clingman Ave., PO Box 18284
Asheville, NC 28814
E-mail: [email protected]
Fax:
828-285-0210
828-253-3853
OREGON COLLEGE OF ART AND CRAFT 503-297-5544
8245 SW Barnes Rd.
Fax: 503-297-9651
Portland, OR 97225
Toll-free: 800-390-0632
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ocac.edu
The mission of the studio school is to promote under­
standing, appreciation and professional development in
the ceramic arts. This is accomplished through a com­
munity-based educational program which includes lec­
tures and gallery exhibitions, as well as hands-on class­
es and workshops for beginners, pre-professional and
professional artists and craftspeople.
BFA and certificate degree in craft, post-Baccalaureate stud­
ies with portfolio development and business practices, as
well as studio school. We support both pottery and sculp­
ture. Facilities include handbuilding and wheel throwing
areas; electric, gas-fired-reduction, vapor glaze, and raku
kilns; spray booth; sand blaster; welding equipment.
THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY
146 Hopkins Hall
Columbus, OH 43210
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.osu.edu
OTAGO POLYTECHNIC
Cnr Albany St. & Anzac Ave.
Dunedin, New Zealand
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.tekotago.ac.nz/art
614-292-5072
Fax:614-292-1674
We have a deep commitment to the development of an indi­
vidual proficiency in the medium at OSU. Faculty: Mary Jo
Bole, Rebecca Harvey and Steven Thurston. Paul Simon:
ceramic area technician. Visiting Faculty Program has been
a significant part of the department for over 20 years.
Artists brought in for 10-week residencies each quarter.
38
64-3-477-3014
The only art school in New Zealand offering full-time mas­
ters and bachelor degrees and a diploma in ceramic arts.
The school where Matrix Glaze Software was developed.
OX-BOW SUMMER SCHOOL OF ART 312-899-7455
3435 Rupprecht Way
Fax: 312-899-1453
Pottery Making
illustrated
Saugatuck, Ml 49453
Web: http://www.ox-bow.org
Toll-free: 800-318-3019
PAINT-N-POT CLAY STUDIOS
1705 Zephyr Way
Sparks, NV 89431
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.paint-n-pot.com
775-324-1022
We bring in local artists to make it more interesting and
educational.
PALMS UP POTTERY
413 Flagler Ave.
New Smyrna Beach, FL 32169
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.palmsuppottery.com
386-428-3726
Palms Up Pottery is a full-time production studio featuring
wheel thrown, handbuilt and sculpted stoneware. We also
offer a 6 week basic wheel throwing course. The class is
limited to only 6 per session, which allows me to focus on
each person’s needs. For intermediate potters we also offer
private sessions with the instructor. You can contact us 105:30, 7 days a week.
PENLAND SCHOOL OF CRAFTS
PO Box 37
Penland, NC 28765-0037
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.penland.org
828-765-2359 x20
Fax: 828-765-7389
Penland School of Crafts is a national center for craft edu­
cation located in the North Carolina mountains offering res­
idential one-, two- and eight-week workshops in ceramics
and other media. Classes include wheelthrowing, hand­
building, functional ware, sculpture and many firing
options, including wood. Guest instructors are invited from
around the country and internationally.
THE PERSIAN POTTER
25 Sierra Roja Cr.
Sedona, AZ 86351
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.persianpotter.com
928-284-3399
My classes are small (5-7) so that I can work closely with
each student. We produce sculptural pieces, tiles and func­
tional pottery fired from cone 5-10 in oxidation and reduc­
tion, raku and vapor.
PETERS VALLEY CRAFT EDUCATION CTR. 973-948-5200
19 Kuhn Rd.
Fax:973-948-0011
Layton, NJ 07851
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.pvcrafts.org
Peters Valley ceramics offers a diverse range of workshops
from handbuilding and sculpture to wheel thrown pottery
and offers students opportunities to participate in the firing
of our wood kilns. Summer workshops are typically 2-12
days long beginning in May and running through
September. A full listing of workshops is available online.
PEWABIC POTTERY
10125 E. Jefferson Ave.
Detroit, Ml 48214
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.pewabic.com
313-822-0954
Fax: 313-822-6266
Pewabic Pottery, Michigan’s only historic pottery, produces
nationally renowned vessels, tiles, architectural ornamenta­
tion for public and private installations. We are a multifac­
eted institution with active and growing education, exhibi­
tion, museum as well as design and fabrication programs.
PORCELAIN PAINTERS INT’L ONLINE 615-824-2609
125 Vulco Dr.
Hendersonville, TN 37075
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.porcelainpainters.com
Online lessons on porcelain painting, luster/gold work
(overglaze) plus a free mailing list discussion group which
provides networking for porcelain artists all over the world.
THE POTTER’S OBSESSION
512 East 135th St.
Kansas City, MO 64145
E-mail: [email protected]
816-941-2555
Fax: 816-331 -3951
The Potter’s Obsession, celebrating its 10th year, offers six
classes a week at its well-equipped studio in south Kansas
City, Missouri. Judy Thompson and a friendly, knowl-
September/October 2OO2
edgable staff, instruct students in beginning through
advanced wheel throwing and handbuilding, as well as
Cone 6 electric kiln decorating techniques and glazes.
POTTERS GUILD OF BALTIMORE
3600 Clipper Mill Rd.
Baltimore, MD 21211
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.pottersguild.org
410-235-4884
The Potters Guild of Baltimore is a cooperative of clay
artists providing a year-round program of pottery instruc­
tion for adults. Classes in throwing, handbuilding, sculpture
and a variety of special topic workshops are offered to the
public. For more information, visit our website at www.pottersguild.org.
POTTERS OF HICKORY STREET
802 Hickory St.
Abilene, TX 79601
E-mail: [email protected]
915-673-6445
No tests and no grades. We teach non-traditional students
beginning handbuilding and wheelthrowing, electric glaze
firing, pit fire and more. Thirty years experience.
THE POTTERS SCHOOL
31 Thorpe Rd.
Needham, MA 02494
E-mail: [email protected]
Beaufort, NC 28516
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.angelfire.com/nc/clayworkshop
Priddy Clay Studio provides private classes in production
and design for clay workers at any level. Clay workshops
can be arranged on site or at the client’s studio or work­
shop. PCS specializes in production design and brush
painting. Group classes and references available.
PROVIDENCE COLLEGE
River Ave.
Providence, Rl 02918
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.providence.edu
401-865-2401
Fax: 401 -865-2410
Providence College is a liberal arts college offering a BA
with a concentration in ceramics. Two gas kilns, four elec­
tric kilns, area for raku, smoke and soda firings. Two slab
rollers, two extruders, twelve electric wheels, two
kick/motor wheels and two clay mixers. One full-time day
school instructor and two evening instructors. We have one
studio technician and student work program.
RAINBOW CENTER
14741 MacArthurWay
Scotland, MD 20687
E-mail: [email protected]
301-872-5134
Sharing knowledge and skills.
RAY F. SENNETT MIDDLE SCHOOL
502 Pflaum Rd., Rm. 110
Madison, Wl 53716
E-mail: [email protected]
608-221-6600
Our pottery club program introduces clay as a serious
medium. The students work with basic building technique
and glaze application. The afterschool pottery club is oper­
ated to give those interested in going further with clay an
opportunity to learn wheelthrowing techniques. We are also
adding raku capability. Adults from the community are wel­
come to participate. The club runs October through April.
RED STAR STUDIOS
821 W. 17th
Kansas City, MO 64108
816-474-7316
781 -449-7687
Fax: 781-449-9098
Professional school/studio offering classes for children
through adults and at all levels. Well-equipped facility
with 10 wheels, slab roller, extruder, electric and gas
kilns.
Resident
and
non-resident
potter
memberships,
internships, work-exchange and staff positions available.
Established in 1977.
THE POTTERS WHEEL
120-33 83rd Ave.
Kew Gardens, NY 11415
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.potterswheelny.com
718-441-6614
Peaceful and supportive work environment with a wide vari­
ety of teacher artists who can instruct and develop throw­
ing and handbuilding skills at all levels. Those with little or
no experience are welcome. A wide variety of classes.
Beautiful and spacious studio setting.
POTTERY CENTRAL
3534 Central Ave.
Charlotte, NC 28205
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.potterycentral.com
704-537-4477
The primary function of Pottery Central is to provide quali­
ty instruction in an environment that will foster creativity. To
do this, we provide many different options for firing, con­
structing and decorating, as well as many different types of
clay. The Basic 8 week class @ $150.00 includes: 2.5 hours
of class instruction and 7 hours per week of open studio,
25# of clay, bisque and glaze firing.
THE POTTERY STUDIO
313 Main St.
Oley, PA 19547
E-mail: [email protected]
610-987-0273
Fax:610-987-0274
Adult and children’s classes, children’s summer art pro­
gram. Concentration in handbuilding.
THE POTTERY WORKSHOP
2 Lower Albert Rd
Hong Kong 00000
China
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ceramics.com.hk
852-2525-7949
Fax: 852-2525-7091
THE POTTERY WORKSHOP
2nd FI. 220 Taikang LU
Shanghai 200025, China
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.ceramics.com.hk
86-21 -6445-0902
Fax: 86-21 -6445-0937
PRIDDY CLAY STUDIO
308 Moore St.
September/October 2OO2
252-504-2622
Pottery Making
illustrated
39
degrees, as well as great facilities, including soda and
wood-fired kilns.
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www. redstarstud ios.org
Steven and Susan Hill’s Red Star Studios features a gallery
of contemporary functional clay, ceramics classes and pri­
vate/shared studio space. Red Star is a large, well-equipped
facility with reduction, soda and electric kilns. Workshops
presented regularly by renowned potters, including Steven
Hill’s single-firing workshops, are a highlight.
RIVER STREET POTTERY
621 River St.
Troy, NY 12180
E-mail: [email protected]
518-274-2722
Emphasis on throwing from beginning to advanced students.
Six students per class with practice time after classes and
one evening a week. Individual instruction stressed. Fully
equipped teaching studio plus 22 working studio spaces.
Cone 6 oxidation and cone 10 reduction firing for classes.
845-358-0877
ROCKLAND CENTER FOR THE ARTS
Fax: 845-358-0971
27 S. Greenbrush Rd.
West Nyack, NY 10994
Web: http://www.rocklandartcenter.org
The Rockland Center for the Arts offers a ceramics program
for both children and adults. Well equipped with potter’s
wheels, a slab roller, and gas, electric, raku and wood firing
kilns, the Center offers courses in sculpture, wheel throw­
ing and handbuilding. Call for catalog.
ROSWELL MUSEUM AND ART CENTER 505-624-6744
100
W. 11th
Fax:505-624-6765
Roswell, NM 88201
Web: http://www.roswellmuseum.org
We are a non-graded K through adult ceramics program in
which a structured yet individualized program is taught. We
fire Cone 7 stoneware, soda, saggar, raku both hand build
and thrown. 8 week term in fall, winter, spring and summer.
Our workspace is 28x78 with attached storage, studio, kiln
yard and raku yard.
RUBY’S CLAY STUDIO &
552 A Noe St.
San Francisco, CA 94114
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://rubysclaystudio.org
GALLERY
415-558-9819
Ruby’s Clay studio is an arts center whose primary objec­
tives are to promote community appreciation of the ceram­
ic arts and to encourage self-expression, technical and
artistic development through exhibitions, classes and the
resources provided by a shared learning facility.
RUSSO PARK RECREATION CENTER 215-685-8747
Cottman and Torresdale Avenues
Philadelphia, PA 19135
E-mail: [email protected]
We hold affordable pottery classes for both youth and
adults. Each two-hour class is held once a week and runs
for ten weeks. Local clay artist teaches all levels of students
all aspects of handbuilding in order to create functional and
sculptural objects. Other topics include handmade tiles,
mosaics and moldmaking.
RUTH’S POTTERY
770-924-1174
1178 Wiley Bridge Rd.
Woodstock, GA 30188
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.hycomdesign.com/pages/ruthspottery.html
Pottery classes in my private studio. Small classes in wheel
pottery and handbuilding. Individualized instruction with
encouragement in personal creative expression. All levels,
days or evenings.
SANDY RECREATION CENTER
15500 Proctor
Sandy, OR 97055
E-mail: [email protected]
503-668-5569
Emphasis on creative exploration of self, life and living.
Students are free to participate in demonstration projects or
run off in a direction of their own under the guiding hand of
the instructor. Child and adult classes in hand building and
basic sculpture at this facility.
SANTA FE CLAY
1615 Paseo de Peralta
Santa Fe, NM 87501
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.santafeclay.com
505-984-1122
Fax: 505-984-1706
Santa Fe Clay is a full ceramic art center. We offer yearround classes and workshops for all ages: children, teens
and adults. We also have a gallery representing national
clay work and a full retail ceramic supply operation. We
have 25 resident artists in 14 private studios on site as well
as approximately 150 students a week.
SARA SWINK HOME STUDIO
669 Salberg Ave.
Santa Clara, CA 95051
E-mail: [email protected]
408-249-8206
Fax: 408-249-2971
Emphasis is on fueling creativity with a process approach
to clay. Multimedia exercises to mine the unconscious for
imagery and following that imagery in clay, wherever it
takes you. Public and private workshops and small, private
ongoing studio classes. Suitable for all levels of experience.
SCHOOL OF ART
2222 East CR 7130
Lubbock, TX 79404
E-mail: [email protected].net
806-745-6018
Jeanie Jones, BFA, Art Ed, Elementary Ed. TTU. Twenty
years teaching experience. Country studio, near city, fea­
tures six electric wheels, with oxidation, reduction, raku and
salt firings. Plenty of studio and kilnhouse room. Year
around access, with classes. We sponsor workshops by
well known potters.
SCHOOL OF THE ART INST. OF CHICAGO 312-899-5219
37 S. Wabash
Fax:312-899-1840
Chicago, IL 60603-3103
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.artic.edu/saic
BFA and MFA degree programs.
SCOTLIN CERAMICS
236 Main St., PO Box 179
McGregor, IA 52157-0179
E-mail: [email protected]
319-873-2289
Fax: 319-873-2366
In our three-year diploma program we offer students a
thorough education with an emphasis on production skills.
Our 7500 sq. ft. studio is well equipped and offers many
solutions from electric and gas kilns to salt/soda and wood
firings. Field trips to Toronto round out the students expe­
rience and access to markets.
SIERRA
NEVADA
COLLEGE/LAKE
775-831-1314
x5039
TAHOE
Fax:775-832-1727
999 Tahoe Blvd.
Toll-free: 800-332-8666
Incline Village, NV 89451
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.sierranevada.edu/ceramics
SNC, Lake Tahoe, is located on the north shore of the gor­
geous, inspirational lake. The studio is well equipped
with 6 electric, 2 gas, wood fired kiln, 2 raku kilns, 20
electric wheels, extruder, Soldner mixer and pugmill,
and fully equipped glaze room with spray booths. BA and
BFA degrees. Great summer workshops!
SOUTHERN OREGON UNIVERSITY
541-552-6331
1250 Siskiyou Blvd.
Fax: 541 -552-6047
Ashland, OR 97520
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.sou.edu/ecp/staff.htmI
The Southern Oregon University Ceramics Dept, boasts a
new (2002), fully equipped, state-of-the art studio which
accommodates the full spectrum of contemporary ceramic
arts endeavors. Internationally acclaimed artist Jim
Romberg (MFA, Clairmont) head the department, and Jack
Coelho (MFA, Instituto Allende) offers ceramics through the
Extended Campus Program.
SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
Art Department
Georgetown, TX 78626
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.southwestern.edu
512-863-1370
Fax:512-863-1422
We provide instruction and certification in various finishing
media. We teach everything from handbuilding to brushwork and accessorizing. We have certified staff and guest
professional instructors.
SECOND WIND POTTERY
90 Yoe Dr.
Red Lion, PA 17356
E-mail: [email protected]
SPERRYVILLE POTTERY
42 Main St., PO Box 408
Sperryville, VA 22740
E-mail: [email protected]
717-246-2354
Daytime and evening classes offered with emphasis on
wheel throwing; however, basic handbuilding instruction
also available. Classes run 6 weeks, 2-1/2 hrs. per class,
four or five times a year. E-mail for current schedule.
SETON HILL UNIVERSITY
College Dr.
Greensburg, PA 15601
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.setonhill.edu
Seven ceramic classes with a comprehensive handbuilding
and wheel throwing program with extruders, 6 electric and
5 gas kilns, slab roller, ram press and much more.
BA or BFA in clay combined with a liberal arts foundation.
Stoneware, raku; functional and sculptural approaches.
Mixed media and series or thematic work.
SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY
619-594-6511
School of Art, Design and Art History Fax: 619-594-1217
San Diego, CA 92182-4805
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.sdsu.edu/art
SHADOW BAY POTTERY STUDIO
561 -692-9712
AND GALLERY
Fax: 561-285-2663
344 NW Alice Ave.
Stuart, FL 34994
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.shadowbaypottery.com
40
SHERIDAN COLLEGE
905-845-9430x2589
1430 Trafalgar Rd.
Fax: 905-815-4043
Oakville, ON L6H 2L1, Canada
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.sheridanc.on.ca
Small classes with individualized instruction. Excellent
facilities including woodfire kiln, vapor glaze kiln, reduction
kilns, raku kiln, electric kilns, clay mixing and pugging
equipment, fully-equipped glaze room and workshop.
Visiting artist program, 2000 sq. ft. gallery for display of
student and professional ceramic exhibitions, and scholar­
ships ranging from $3000 to $5000 per year.
SAN DIEGO MESA COLL. CERAMIC PROGAM 858-627-2612
Mesa College Dr.
San Diego, CA 92111
E-mail: [email protected]
SDSU offers a full ceramics program with BA and MFA
Professional artist studio and gallery with a fully-equipped
teaching facility offering an array of classes and space
rentals in a creative and stimulating environment. Our
waterfront location, coupled with blue skies, palm trees and
gentle breezes serve to further enhance your experience.
Pottery Making
724-830-1020
Fax: 724-830-1294
Toll-free: 800-826-6234
illustrated
540-987-1000
Fax: 540-987-8770
Quaint pottery in the foothills of the Blue Ridge now offer­
ing classes for beginning and advanced throwing and hand­
building. Functional and non-functional work alike. Small
classes emphasize classic learning and exploration. Bi­
annual student show and sale.
SPOKANE POTTERS’ GUILD
1404 N. Fiske
Spokane, WA 98202
E-mail: [email protected]
509-533-3770
We are a non-profit organization offering four evening
classes and two morning classes in beginning to interme­
diate throwing and handbuilding, oxidation and reduction
firings, and raku firings.
SPRINGHOUSE SCHOOL OF THE ARTS 802-482-2840
206 Commerce St.
Fax: 802-482-2841
Hineburg, VT 05461
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.springhousearts.com
September/October 2OO2
Springhouse is a school for all arts, but we focus on ceram­
ics. We have a large handbuilding and wheel throwing stu­
dio with 12 wheels. Our kiln room exists of three electric
kilns and access to a wood kiln. Classes are held year round
and are for both children and adults. We are located 15
miles southeast of Burlington.
ST. PAULS SCHOOL
Torres Strait
Moa Island
Queensland Thursday Island
Australia
E-mail: [email protected]
61-07-409-00241
A ceramics art education program is established in our
small island school.
STARFLOWER STUDIOS
941 Jackson Rd.
Monroe, ME 04951
E-mail: [email protected]
207-525-3593
Located in mid-coast Maine, the studios have ample space
for any kind of artistic endeavor. Guests are housed in a ren­
ovated 175-year-old farmhouse surrounded by 110 acres of
gardens, fields, pond and woods. Calm atmosphere allows
immersed relaxation and focus. Our teaching enhances and
strengthens personal art practices. We interweave contact
with clay with contact with one’s fundamental self.
STATE UNIVERSITY OF
CAMPINAS-UNICAMP
Caixa Postal 6159
Sao Paulo 13084-570, Brazil
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.iar.unicamp.br
TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
361-825-5987
6300 Ocean Dr.
Corpus Christi, TX 78412
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.2tamucc.edu/~dvpa/artsite/default.html
A small yet diverse program with close personal attention.
Two instructors, a soda kiln, raku and good studio space.
We offer an MFA, MA, BA and BFA, as well as a BFA with
teacher’s certification. We also offer an MA in interdiscipli­
nary studies.
TUSCARORA POTTERY SCHOOL
PO Box 6
Tuscarora, NV 89834-0006
775-756-5526
Fax: 775-756-6598
During the summer we offer three, two-week sessions for
all skill levels.
UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE 907-786-1321
3211 Providence Dr.
Fax:907-786-1799
Anchorage, AK 99508-8116
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.uaa.alaska.edu
The Art Department at UAA offers BA and BFA degree pro­
grams. Two ceramic faculty members teach in traditional
handbuilding and wheel throwing studios.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CERAMICS PROGRAM
School of Art & Art History 302 FAC
Gainesville, FL 32611
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.arts.ufl.edu
352-392-0201 x218
Fax: 352-392-8453
The Ceramics Program at the University of Florida is one of
the major programs in the southeast. The program is
designed to promote growth in aesthetics, technical knowl­
edge and conceptual approaches. The strength of the pro­
gram lies in its diversity: no one style, aesthetic, or techni­
cal focus is stressed over others. Experimentation is
encouraged. Excellent well-equipped facilities.
UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE
502-852-6796
Hite Art Institute
Fax: 502-852-6791
104 Schneider Hall
Louisville, KY 40292
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.louisville.edu
We offer a BA, BFA and MA in Studio Art. Ceramics program
features an emphasis on functional pottery, but all expres­
sions are supported. Scholarships and assistantships are
available. A good place to build a strong portfolio.
55-19-3788-7172
Art institute with laboratory of students ceramics.
STIRLING HALL
847-615-7480
60 E. Old Mill Rd.
Fax:847-615-4251
Lake Forest, IL 60045
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.citylf.lfc.edu/cs/rec/cs_rec2d4.htm
Located on twenty-seven wooded acres, Stirling Hall is a
brand new, state-of-the-art ceramic studio. The south walls
of the classrooms are virtually all glass, providing a relax­
ing and inspirational view of the wooded campus. A high
fire gas kiln, raku kiln, slab roller, pottery wheels and an
experienced faculty are available to beginning and advanced
students for classes and open studio times.
STUDIO POTTER
76 N. Adams St.
Manchester, NH 03104
E-mail: [email protected]
603-669-1601
Small classes for the beginner and intermediate student.
Studio has 3 wheels and ample handbuilding space.
SUBURBAN FINE ARTS CENTER
1933 Sheridan Rd.
Highland Park, IL 60035
E-mail: [email protected]
847-432-1888
SFA provides beginning through advanced wheel throwing
instruction with opportunities for lowfire, mid-range and
raku firings. Classes for children and adults available.
SUNFLOWER POTTERY
352-529-2699
1391 NE 157th Terrace
Fax: 352-529-2699
Williston, FL 32696
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.hometown.aol.com/annmarievl/mypottery.html
I offer lessons in handbuilding, wheelthrowing, glaze mak­
ing, raku art as well as raku firing. Lessons are private. You
must make an appointment. Visit our web address for more
details.
TAOS ART SCHOOL
PO Box 2245
Ranchos de Taos, NM 87557
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.taosartschool.org
TAOS INSTITUTE OF ART
108 Civic Plaza Dr.
Taos, NM 87571
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.taosnet.com/tia
September/October 2002
505-758-0350
Fax: 505-758-0350
505-758-2793
Fax: 505-737-2466
Toll-free: 800-822-7183
Pottery Making
illustrated
41
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA-SPLIT
ROCK ARTS PROGRAM
306 Wesbrook Hall
77 Pleasant St SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455-0216
E-mail: [email protected]
612-624-6800
Fax: 612-625-2568
UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI
Art Department
204 Bryant Hall
University, MS 38677
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.olemiss.edu
662-915-6985
Fax: 662-915-5013
BFA, MFA degrees offered. Maintain a diverse program,
with equal emphasis on ceramic sculpture and pottery.
Work in all temperature ranges. Well-equipped studio with
gas reduction, salt/soda, raku and electric kilns. Ron Dale is
area head (BA Goddard College, MFA LSU).
UNIVERSITY OF
MISSOURI-COLUMBIA
A 126 Fine Arts Bldg.
Columbia, MO 65211
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.bedeclarkestudio.com
573-882-7120
Fax:573-884-6807
BA, BFA and MFA offered in ceramics. Vessel and sculptur­
al orientations. Facilities include 2 wood kilns, soda kiln,
electric, gas and raku kilns. Professor Bede Clarke,
Professor David East.
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH FLORIDA
4567 St. Johns Bluff Rd. S.
Jacksonville, FL 32224
E-mail: [email protected]
904-620-2650
Fax: 904-620-2652
The main thrust of the 30-year-old ceramic program is the
development of the individual student as an artist. New $26
million Fine Arts Center with equipment arriving weekly to
complement the 18 wheels and 6 kilns that we already have.
BA and BFA degrees. Located in 1000-acre woods and close
to the beach and large metro area.
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 803-777-7077
McMaster College
Fax: 803-777-0535
1615 Senate St.
Columbia, SC 29208
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.sc.edu
State-of-the-art ceramic facility with 10 computerized elec­
tric kilns, salt, raku and gas car kiln. Private studio space
and assistantships for MA and MFA graduate students.
Three-year program with individual attention, artistic free­
dom and international student body.
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN
CALIFORNIA
School of Fine Arts
Watt Hall 104 University Park
Los Angeles, CA 90089-0292
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.usc.edu/dept/finearts
213-740-2787
Fax: 213-740-8938
USC Fine Arts offers a BA, BFA and MFA with emphasis in
fine art ceramics/sculpture. Internationally known ceramic
sculptor Ken Price heads our dynamic program, along with
majolica expert Karen Koblitz and production expert Kevin
Myers. Huge, well-equipped studios. MFA Teaching assist­
antships available.
THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS OF
THE PERMIAN BASIN
Visual Arts Studio
4901 East University
Odessa, TX 79762-0001
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.utpb.edu/courses/arts4365
VISUAL ARTS STUDIOS
470 West Highland Dr.
Camarillo, CA 93010
E-mail: [email protected]
805-987-0746
Fax: 805-987-0746
We offer a comprehensive art experience for all ages K-12
in a 16-week after-school program of drawing, painting,
print making, sculpture and ceramics. Age and abilitygrouped classes of 6 or less and adult evening classes.
WALNUT CREEK CIVIC ARTS
EDUCATION CLAY ARTS GUILD
1313 Civic Dr., PO Box 8039
Walnut Creek, CA 94596
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.arts-ed.org
WASHBURN UNIVERSITY
1700 College
Topeka, KS 66621
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.washburn.edu/cas/art
925-943-5800 x407
Fax: 925-937-ARTS
785-231-1010
Fax: 785-231-1089
After building a solid foundation of knowledge about clay
and glazes in beginning classes, students are encouraged
to follow their own ceramic interests. Past students have
explored wall tiles, photographic images, figure sculpture,
paper clay, pottery, raku, alternative firing, multimedia con­
struction and more. Students and faculty work together to
achieve aesthetic and technical goals.
WASHINGTON HEIGHTS CENTER
6375 W. 1st Ave.
Lakewood, CO 80226
E-mail: [email protected]
303-987-5436
Fax: 303-987-5437
Once-a-week classes for students of all skill levels cover
handbuilding, wheel throwing, glazing and decorating.
Equipment includes electric and kickwheels, slab roller, an
extruder and a spray booth. Firing is to Cone 6 in oxidation.
Occasional special classes and workshops include raku,
Southwest pottery, pit firing and children’s classes.
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
ST. LOUIS
The Lewis Center
721 Kingsland Ave.
St. Louis, MO 63130
E-mail: [email protected]
314-935-8408
Focus is on preparing young artists with the technical and
conceptual framework to pursue a career in the ceramic
arts. Much time is spent in critique of what a good idea is
and why it is meaningful to ceramic history. We have a very
open definition of ceramics. We are equipped with 4 gas
and 9 electric kilns, hot glass and a foundry.
WESLEYAN POTTERS
350 S. Main St.
Middletown, CT 06457'
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://wesleyanpotters.com
860-347-5925
Fax:860-343-1096
Instruction in pottery and other crafts is scheduled during
four terms each year, with one class offered per week for
nine weeks. Equipment includes two large gas kilns suitable
for high-fire reduction stoneware and porcelain, as well as
five electric kilns used for bisque and low fire.
915-552-2287
All levels of ceramics from introductory to clay and glaze
calculation and kiln building. We have two wood kilns, a
soda kiln, a raku kiln, and two Alpine gas kilns. We also
teach printmaking, painting, drawing, graphic design, art
history and photography. BA in art only.
VERMONT CLAY STUDIO
802-244-1126
2802 Waterbury Stowe Rd
Fax: 802-244-8760
Waterbury Center, VT 05677
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.vermontclaystudio.com
A nonprofit educational center, dedicated solely to the clay
42
arts. 65 classes per year, plus clay workshops, private
lessons, studio rental, a traveling Claymobile, firing ser­
vices and lending library.
WESTERN STATE COLLEGE OF
COLORADO
Adams St.
Gunnison, CO 81231
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.western.edu
970-943-3083
Fax: 970-943-2329
The department offers several multilevel courses in pottery,
sculpture and theory. Complete clay facilities are available
for students: several styles of wheels, bulk materials clay,
slip, and glazes. Most styles of kilns are available, including
soda and raku, as well as separate facilities for electric and
reduction firing.
WHITE MOUNTAIN ACADEMY OF
705-848-4347
THE ARTS
Fax: 705-848-0588
99 Spine Rd.
Toll-free: 800-368-8655
Elliot Lake, ON P5A 3S9, Canada
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.whitemountainacademy.edu
Pottery Making
illustrated
THE WICHITA CENTER FOR THE ARTS 316-634-2787
9112 E. Central
Fax:316-634-0593
Wichita, KS 67206
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://wcfta.com
Pottery and ceramics classes for ages six through adult
offered trimesterly. Previous workshops by Eddie
Dominguez, Ken Ferguson, Marko Fields, Scott Dooley,
Michael Smith, Paul Soldner and Chris Staley. Home of the
Wichita National. Features gas, electric, wood-fire kilns;
soda kiln in development.
WICHITA STATE UNIVERSITY
1845 Fairmount
Wichita, KS 67260-0067
E-mail: [email protected]
316-978-3518
Fax: 316-978-5418
The focus of our program is to develop a personal state­
ment through the use of the ceramics medium by idea
development and excellence in craftsmanship. Our program
supports a wide range of artistic investigation. Functional
pottery, interpretation of the vessel, sculptural ceramics,
and installation are all supported by our program.
WINDMILL HILL POTTERY
842 Grassy Brook Rd.
Brookline, VT 05345
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.fireandfiber.com
802-348-9300
Small classes, adults and children. Electric firing at Cone 6.
Instructor trained in Switzerland; can offer bauernmalerei
design instruction. Instruction in handbuilding and throwing.
WOMEN’S STUDIO WORKSHOP
PO Box 489
Rosendale, NY 12472
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.wsworkshop.org
845-658-9133
Fax: 845-658-9031
The WSW clay program offers residencies, fellowships and
classes. Studios are equipped for potters and sculptors. A
limited number of residencies are available for potters to
trade bowls for time. Summer weekend workshops in clay
sculpture and functional ceramics are taught by top profes­
sionals from across the country.
WORCESTER CENTER FOR CRAFTS 508-753-8183 x3014
25 Sagamore Rd.
Fax: 508-797-5626
Worcester, MA 01605
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.craftcenter.worcester.org
The Worcester Center for Crafts ceramics studio provides
education and direction to students of all skill levels and
ages in a creative, supportive environment. A broad range
of classes, workshops, and special events are provided in
our spacious, well-equipped studio. We also offer a full­
time two-year certificate program and an artists-in-residence program.
YOUNGBERG POTTERY
203-319-0706
1159 Bronson Rd.
Fax: 203-254-2701
Fairfield, CT 06430
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.youngbergpottery.homestead.com
A studio pottery run by potter, Trevor Youngberg. Children
and adults welcome for weekly classes. Class size is 1-3
students at a time. Glazed terra cotta pots and sculpture are
emphasized.
YOUTH ARTS CORPS
1000
28th St. South
St. Petersburg, FL 33712
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.youthartscorps.org
727-552-1825
Fax: 727-893-1660
A free after-school and summer arts and job training pro­
gram for youth ages 13-17. Clay classes offered include
beginning and advanced instruction in hand building, wheel
and commercial production.
ZAPPA POTTERY
18800 P-61 Trail
Montrose, CO 81401
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.zappapottery.com
970-249-6819
Toll-free: 877-504-6819
Full-time potters for over 25 years. We teach privately and
have a wonderful studio set up. We work with people who
have never touched clay to those who have had a lot of
experience. We do raku, cone 10 gas firing.
September/October 2OO2
Transferring patterns from photocopies is a simple way to I have been purchasing thrown bisqued pots in the last few years because I’d
get elegant designs onto a surface. On these vases, I much rather spend my tyime decorating than throwing. These bottles were
repeated the design three times.
decorated with soluble salts over a base glaze.
by Kurt Wild
This article focuses on my work at cone 9 reduction,
but some of the information is not necessarily cone 9
specific. For example, the process of making and trans­
ferring multiple copies of an image to an unfired glaze
surface can also be applied to low fire, the popular mid­
fire cone 6 work, and to bisqueware for underglaze
painting. As for the soluble salts, the original source of
information for my work came from Karl Martz’s arti­
cle “The Lively Art of Earthenware—Soluble
Colorants: Quick, Versatile...” (Ceramics Monthly;
January 1960). The material presented here expands on
my earlier articles “Using Soluble Colorants at
Stoneware Temperatures,” (Ceramics Monthly September
1996) and “Paths to Surface Design” (Clay Times,
May/June 2001).
In the last few years I have been purchasing thrown
bisqued pots from other potters simply because I’d
much rather spend my time decorating than throwing.
I usually glaze a group of pots by pouring the insides
and spraying the outsides. I prefer the even coat of glaze
that spraying affords me.
Sometimes I begin the decorating process by search­
ing through my collection of sketches and photos until
I find an image that I feel like working with that day.
Next I look at my available bisqueware for a pot I feel
will work with the image I’ve selected. Alternatively, I
may select a bisqued pot and then search through my
sketches and photos for an image I feel might work
with that pot. Next, I scan the image into my comput­
er then “play” with it by manipulating and stylizing the
image, using Photoshop software, to adjust the image
proportions to fit the selected pot. Four copies of the
final image are printed and drawn over with a perma­
nent felt marker in preparation for transfer to the pot.
Those copies are set aside until later.
Step 1
Covered jar, 15% inches, high, thrown by Bill Gosman with glazing
and decoration by Kurt Wild.
The image I chose for the pot for this article is a woodpecker. From
left to right, the original sketch, the manipulated image and a copy
of the final image drawn over with a black permanent felt marker.
September/October 2002
illustrated
Pottery Making
43
Step 2
I wanted to repeat the image two times on
the pot, so the next step was dividing the
pot into four divisions to assure proper
alignment. The glazed but unfired pot was
set on a turntable fixed with a “Dividing
Web” (see “Dividing Web” by Sylvia Shirley,
PMI, Summer 2001). Vertical guidelines
were lightly drawn on the pot with a felt
marker.
1 he cone V glaze 1 currently use
almost exclusively, is a slight modifi­
cation of a glaze found in Introduction
to Ceramics by Graham Flight.
Step 3
Step 4
Standard 20-pound computer paper mea­
sures 8 1/2 x1 1 inches, but a sheet that size
and shape will not satisfactorily bend to the
contour of most pots. In most cases, I cut
the pattern into strips that will more easily
conform to the contour of the pot.
To transfer the pattern, hold the strip in
place with the felt marker side toward the
pot, then daub the whole strip with a cloth
saturated with rubbing alcohol.
FBGN
Add Mason stain #6407................. 7.0%
Pale cream.
Add
Note: I have a reference number
system for glazes and I refer to
glazes based on this recipe, for
example, FBGN for Flight Book
Glaze No-iron.
FBGN Base Glaze
Cone 9
Cornwall stone..............................60
EPK (kaolin)................................. 20
Dolomite...................................... .20
100
Following are my current four
favorite color variations on the
FBGN base.
FBGN-C
Cobalt carbonate .................0.30%
Red iron oxide ......................0.05%
Cobalt blue.
FBGN-C3
Add C3 mix........................................ 0.33%
Softer blue than FBGN-C, more like a pale
blue sky.
C3 Mix
Cobalt carbonate............................ 24 parts
Red iron oxide.................................. 4 parts
Mason stain #6266........................... 6 parts
FBGN-E
Add Chromelcobalt mix .................... 0.45%
A little softer than grass green.
Chrome/Cobalt Mix
Chromium oxide............................... 3 parts
Cobalt carbonate.............................. 2 parts
FBGN-EE
Mason stain #6378............................ 5.0%
Turquoise on the bluish side.
44
Pottery Making
illustrated
Note: Use 91% rubbing alcohol, although
the standard drugstore 70% will work OK.
Periodically check to ensure sufficient
transfer of the image.
I useVee Gum Cer as a suspen­
sion agent and to help prevent the
glaze from rubbing off easily while
decorating. I usually make a fairly
large batch of the solution by
adding 100 grams ofVee Gum Cer
to 300 ounces of water in a fivegallon pail and mixing it well with
a power drill mixer. I let the
gum/water mixture soak for a day
or so and mix it again before use.
When I mix my glazes, I add
slightly less than 0.9 oz. of the solu­
tion to every 100 grams of dry
glaze. For example, 10 times the
FBGN recipe equals 1000 grams of
dry glaze. I put 22 ounces of water
in a bucket (additional water may
be added later if desired), and add 9
ounces ofVee Gum Cer solution
(0.9 times 10) and mix well. Then I
add the glaze ingredients, mix and
sieve it through a 30-mesh sieve.
September/October 2OO2
Steps 5A and 5B
Step 6
Front and back views of the vase showing transferred image.
After a drawing is transferred to a pot, I
continue to stylize and manipulate while
sgraffitoing the transferred shapes using
drafting templates (see Step 2). I also add
freehand plant forms.
Some soluble salts are highly toxic and can be absorbed
through the skin. Read and follow all warnings concerning
the safe handling, storage and disposal of any raw ingredi­
ents. Check with a local regulatory body in your area to
ensure proper disposal of used solutions.
On food surfaces, it is worthy of note that I had mugs dec­
orated with soluble salts that were tested by the Alfred
Analytical Laboratory, and had the report examined by a
professional who stated: “All of the lab’s detection limits are
well below the drinking water MCLs and all your test results
except the copper are below those detection limits. And the
copper, at 0.18 mg/L is still approximately 10 times less that
the 1.3 mg/L MCL. Excellent results.” Another professional
advised me that “all of those numbers are extremely low. I
wouldn’t worry about any of them on a food surface.”
Soluble salts are available from some pottery
supply stores and chemical suppliers. One
source I used was U.S. Pigment, 135 N.
Manchester Lane, Bloomingdale, IL 60108;
(800) 472-9500: www.uspigment.com/
September/October 2OO2
Pottery Making
Soluble salts may be freely brushed on an unglazed
surface; however, they tend to bleed, somewhat like ink
on a blotter. The beauty of using sgraffitoed shapes is
that the salt will stay confined within the shape, bleed­
ing only as far as there is glaze. By developing different
solutions and using them in different areas on a pot I
have been able to create a multicolored pot using only
one glaze over the whole pot. It should be noted that a
given solution may appear differently, depending upon
the color of the glaze it has been applied to.
Prepare soluble salts by simply adding the dry mate­
rial to warm water. Stir the mixture well and let it sit
overnight. The next day, strain the solution through a
100 mesh sieve or an old T-shirt. Mixtures listed below
result in nearly saturated solutions, so discard remaining
undisolved particles. I develop more intermediate
colors by intermixing solutions in various proportions.
Tip: Soluble salt solutions tend to disappear into
the glaze upon application and make it difficult to
see where a particular solution had been applied.
Add food coloring to the solutions to readily identi­
fy where solutions have been applied and also to
tell them apart.
illustrated
45
“Woodpecker,” 11% inches high, cone 9 reduction. Thrown by Reg Behrends, glazed and
decorated by Kurt Wild.
Step 7
I use soluble salts to stain image, but
underglazes would also work with a clear
overglaze.
Now an emeritus professor of art, Kurt Wild retired
from the University of Wisconsin—River Falls
after 33 years of teaching. He currently maintains a
studio at his home in River Falls. For comments
and to view his more recent work, visit his web site
www.uwrf.edu/~kwll/
46
Vase with cat decoration, 12 inches high, thrown by Reg Behrends, glazed and decorated
by Kurt Wild, utilizing sgraffito and soluble salt decoration.
Pottery Making
illustrated
September/October 2002
Small covered containers are useful for everything from pins and paper clips, coins and
candy, to lotions and potions.
Throw, Cut & Trim
Covered Containers
by Leon RolofF
Over the years, I’ve made
thousands of covered utilitarian
containers such as casseroles,
cookie jars and these small con­
tainers that I throw in one piece.
For these containers, I don’t
measure the clay out exactly or
strive for identical forms. I’ll cut
a 25-pound block of clay into 12
pieces, and the approximately
two-pound pieces will make
covered containers about 4½
inches in diameter and 6 inches
in height before cutting the lid.
You can make somewhat larger
covered containers using this
technique; however, if the diam­
eter gets much larger it becomes
impossible to conveniently lift
the lid with one hand unless a
handle of some kind is attached.
September/October 2OO2
Small covered container. I have often made the
sides of these small containers vertical, but I think
that the pots that appear to be expanding outward
(even slightly) have much more vitality. It is as
though there is a “life force” pushing out from
within, and the effect is pleasing.
Pottery Making
illustrated
Leon Roloff taught ceramics for 35 years, 32 of
them for the Grossmont Union High School
District. He has been retired for 10 years, and
he now enjoys working in his studio and showing regularly with the Allied Craftsmen of San
Diego. You can e-mail comments to Leon at
[email protected] k!2.ca. us.
49
Step 1
Step 2
Step 3
Throw a cylinder keeping the walls vertical
or slightly concave. Do not allow the top to
flare or the rim to become too thin.
Begin collaring the top using your fingertips
as you alternately squeeze in the top and
pull it up and in to work out wrinkles. While
you can still get your fingers inside the
form, you can bulge out the lower part
slightly as you continue to gradually close
in the top.
Completely close in the form and pinch off
any surplus clay on the top. Air pressure
inside the pot helps hold it up.
Blowing Up Your Pot
When collaring the top of the form, it may begin to
collapse slightly. Take a piece of paper towel, and bite a
small hole out of the center. Drape the paper over the
pots small opening and gently blow The form will
expand like a balloon and will hold its shape when the
hole is plugged. When you inadvertently blow out the
side of the pot you’ll learn the meaning of the word
“gently.” I do this as a matter of course when throwing
bottles as it adds just a bit of expansion. In an emer­
gency, forget the paper, as a little clay on your mouth is
a small price to pay to save your pot.
50
Pottery Making
For trimming pots I use a couple of Kemper 6-inch wire loop tools
(D2 and D8). I also made a simple modeling tool out of thin scrap
wood about 6 inches long and an inch or so wide. One end is
rounded, and the other cut at an angle to make a point useful for
cleaning the bottom edge of pots. Another handy tool is an ice
cream bar (Popsicle) stick with one end squared off. Do not make
the corners of the squared off end too sharp or the tool may cut too
deep. The needle tool is from my dentist. I asked her if she had any
dull tools that she was going to throw away, and she cleaned out a
drawer where she’d been dumping them. I cut off some of the var­
ious hooks and cutters, straightened them and carefully sharpened
the point using a very fine grinder and lots of cooling water. The
opposite end is ground down and rounded.
illustrated
September/October 2002
Step 4
Step 5
Step 6
Round off and smooth the top with a rib.
Any type of rib should work but I prefer a
flexible steel rib.
Using your fingertip, squeeze in the area
for the lid’s seat.
Using a Popsicle stick with a squared-off
end, square the bottom of the lid seat
groove you made in the previous step.
Allow the pot to become barely leather
hard.
Note: You may have to puncture a small
hole in the top with your needle tool to
release the air pressure, then reseal it
when you’ve completed this step.
Screeching Lids!
Many years ago I watched a potential customer pick
up the lid of one of my casseroles and turn it slightly. It
made a terrible, scraping sound, and I saw her wince,
put the pot down and move on. A sale lost! Now, on
covered containers, I always smooth the lids edge and
the flange area where it touches. First I swipe both bare
clay edges with a fine sandpaper, and then use a small
sponge to coat them with a paste of whiting and water.
I turn the lid in place for half a minute or so, and then
rinse off the whiting paste. You can use kitchen clean­
er instead of whiting. The covered container will have
a pleasant (and saleable) glass-like sound. Some hearing
protection is also prudent during this process.
September/October 2OO2
Pottery Making
Plan on cutting a few of your first covered containers in half so you
can see the cross section. Look closely at the area where the clay
has been pushed in to see that it has not been thinned excessive­
ly. In particular, look at the area where you’ve used the Popsicle
stick tool and check to see if you’ve cut too deeply into the wall.
You can also check to see how the lid is going to fit. The goal is to
keep trimming to a minimum.
illustrated
51
52
Step 7
Step 8
After the pot stiffens enough, and with it still
attached to the bat, put it back on the wheel
and use a really sharp needle tool to make
the first cut to remove the lid.
A second cut is required to create a 1/4-inch
high flange. After making this cut, clean up
the rough edge with a loop tool.
Step 11
Step 12
These small containers don’t need foot
rings for utilitarian purposes but the bottom
needs to thrown flat and a bit thinner. I like
the foot ring because it gives a small pot an
elegant and finished look. I use a Giffin Grip
(optional) with short arms attached to the
sliders because I don’t have to push any­
thing against the flange.
To begin the decoration, I paint a thin slip
mixed with a little vinegar on the area to be
decorated.
Pottery Making
illustrated
September/October 2OO2
Step 9
Step 10
Leave the base of the pot attached to the
bat to use as a chuck to clean up the edges
of the lid, and trim the lid to get a good fit.
If the piece has been thrown well, there will
be very little trimming to do, but repeat the
previous step as needed. When completed,
carefully cut from the bat.
Tip: Hold the lid down with a finger on
your left hand while trimming.
Step 13
Step 14
I extrude a strip of clay and cut it into equal­
sized pieces that I roll into small balls. I dab
a bit of slip on each ball, press them onto
the pot, and finish by stamping with a small
bisque-fired stamp.
I use a variety of decorating techniques on
the lids and/or or the entire forms. For this
series, I used this technique of attaching
small pellets and stamping them with small
bisque fired stamps. Some pellets have
been darkened by mixing cobalt or iron
oxide with a small amount of clay.
September/October 2002
Pottery Making
illustrated
53
DISPOSABLE POLYETHYLENE GLOUES
Gloves for the Studio
by JefF Zamek
A primary concept behind operat­
ing a safe ceramics studio involves
consistent housecleaning proce­
dures, such as cleaning up spills
when they occur and keeping all
dry materials in clearly marked
unbreakable containers. Another
concept incorporates a barrier sys­
tem that protects you from clays,
glazes, and raw materials in their
wet or dry form. Wet-mopping the
studio and using the correct vacu­
ums, respirators and gloves affords
many levels of protection. In addi­
tion, a multilevel barrier system
prevents accidental inhalation,
absorption, or ingestion of ceramic
materials into your body.
Fortunately, there are a number of
reasonably priced safety products
that can protect you when working
your studio, and this is the first in a
series of articles to discuss these
products.
Latex-free polyethylene gloves are both water and solvent tight.
These heavy-duty gloves will keep hands clean from paints, glaze,
chemicals, clay and other materials found in the ceramics studio.
The gloves have an anti-slip textured surface with one size fitting
right and left hands. The gloves are 10 cents each or 100 for about
$5.
DISPOSABLE LATEX GLOVES
These snug fitting latex gloves protect the hands from chemicals,
paints and cleaners. They are reversible with small, medium and
large sizes. They range in price from 90 cents each to about 25
cents each when purchased in quantity.
GLOVES FOR MATERIALS
Various kinds of gloves can be
used when handling dry or wet
glaze materials. Protective gloves
should be considered anytime there
is a cut or any break in the skin.
Polyethylene, latex or rubber gloves
should not be used in any high-heat
environment because they will
melt.
54
Pottery Making
RUBBER GLOVES
The rubber glove offers protection against absorption through the
skin. They resist chemicals and snags and have nonslip embossed
fingers and palm. They are excellent for manual dexterity. They
come in small, medium and large sizes and are 12 inches long.
They cost approximately $1.70 each and are cheaper in bulk.
illustrated
September/October 2OO2
GLOVES FOR HEAT
Protective gloves are highly recommended when
unloading kilns. One of the three major causes for
injury in the studio is from burns on the hands and arms
from reaching into a “cooling” kiln. Another significant
factor in studio injury are cuts to the hands caused by
sharp edges on glazed pieces.
LIGHT DUTY KILN GLOVES
MEDIUM DUTY KILN GLOVES
Light-duty kiln gloves are designed for protection against heat
when handling warm ware while unstacking kilns. These washable
gloves have safety cuffs and are reversible from left to right hand.
One size fits all. Pair $3.50.
Medium-duty gloves will withstand high temperatures and heavy
labor. Grip N® gloves are flexible and strong with nitrile pattern on
both sides extending life and improving the grip when handling
slippery material. Knit Kevlar/cotton blend shell with cotton/acrylic
liner. One size fits all hands. $7.50.
KEVLAR KILN GLOVES
KEVLAR KILN MITTENS M23
High-heat protective Kevlar (nonasbestos) from Dupont Kevlar.
Inherently flame resistant, they will withstand 900°F and are light­
weight, flexible and comfortable (although somewhat bulky). They
come in two lengths, 14 and 23 inches long, that cost approxi­
mately $30 and $44 a pair, respectively.
These high-heat protective Kevlar (non-asbestos) gloves from
Dupont Kevlar are similar to the Kevlar kiln gloves but do not offer
as good a grip on pots or raku tongs. They do, however, add arm
protection due to the greater length. A pair runs about $34.
Jeff Zamek provides technical consulting on clays, glazes, raw materials, casting slips,
safety equipment, and clay body /glaze formulas. He is the author of Safety in the
Ceramics Studio and What Every Potter Should Know, both published by
Krause Publishing. For more information these books, contact Jeff at 6 Glendale
Woods Dr., Southampton, MA 01073 or visit his web site at wwu\fixpots.com.
September/October 2OO2
Pottery Making
illustrated
55
by Craig Hinshaw
Now when he was a young man,
He'd never thought he'd see,
King Tut
These are the beginning lyrics from comedian Steve Martin s song “King
Tut.” I played the recording for second-grade students as a prelude to an
art lesson on Egyptian mummies. Even though the 1978 hit was released
years before the students were born, they knew the music, sang along and
even danced like Steve Martin.
The second-graders had recently toured the Detroit Institute of Arts.
The Egyptian gallery, with its highly decorated sarcophagi standing erect
behind glass display cases and a 2,000-year-old, linen-wrapped mummy
captivated their interest.
Ancient Egyptian Art
There were three activities the
students could create during the
hour-long class—a sarcophagus, a
mummy, and jewelry. Before getting
to work, I discussed the visuals (giv­
ing a short art history lesson about
each) that related to the three activ­
ities I had taped to the wall. After
demonstrating the procedures, the
students began working at any one
of the three stations.
referred to handouts on Egyptian
hieroglyphics to add their own
cryptic text around the sides.
Terror Cotta Mummies
Students used terra cotta clay to
create an ancient-looking mummy.
A handful of the clay was flattened,
then a cardboard mummy template
was laid over the clay and cut out
with a needle tool. A thick white
slip was brushed over the clay then
Hot D03 Sarcophagi
kids scratched through the slip with
Styrene hot dog take-home a wood skewer to reveal the red clay
boxes (available in bulk at a restau­ beneath, simulating a wrapped, aged
rant supply company for about 7 mummy.
cents each) were used to form the
sarcophagi. Students colored the
heads with liquid gold permanent
markers to simulate the gold leaf on
King Tuts mask, then used regular
permanent markers to decorate the
rest of the sarcophagus. The students
Decorating a sarcophagus.
56
Pottery Making
illustrated
Brushing on white slip.
September/October 2002
Jewelry Fit for Royalty
The ancient Egyptians wanted to
be beautifully adorned in their
afterlife and included dazzling jew­
elry in their entombments. Students
shaped a scarab and a few small
beads from Egyptian paste (a selfglazing material available from
many pottery supply stores). The
scarab, a large beetle considered
sacred, was traditionally carved from
green stone and bound in the wrap­
pings of the mummy. The mummies
and beads were fired together to
cone 06 and placed together in
their sarcophagi.
A second-grader’s completed sarcophagus
with mummy and scarabs.
Assuming the students might
not have any prior knowledge of
the subject, I provide lots of visu­
al aids on a lesson like this.
Throughout the lesson, students
studied the posters of King Tut
and Queen Nefertiti for clues in
drawing and adding color. They
also handled a metal pencil box
in the shape of a mummy case
and a small inexpensive scarab
bead I had purchased at a muse­
um shop.
Here’s a white slip good to
cone 9, or just use a commercial­
ly prepared white underglaze.
White Slip ^
Ball clay........................................20
Kaolin (EPK).................................20
Nepheline Syenite ....................... 26
Flint ............................................. 29
Borax...................................................5
100
Add Zircopax................................. 10%
Scptembcr/Octobcr 2OO2
Photocopy the patterns for the sarcopha­
gus and the scarab and transfer the design
to the clay.
Craig Hinshaw is an elementary school art spe­
cialist in Madison Heights, Michigan. He spent
time in China this summer and is planning to give
a version of the King Tut project at the annual
Michigan Art Education Conference in October.
Pottery Making
illustrated
57
Working with
Rudy Autio has been called one of the most impor­
tant and influential ceramic artists working in the
United States in the last fifty years. The following
excerpt from the book Rudy Autio by Louana
Lackey provides some insight into his working style.
Rudy began to develop his pottery
techniques in the late 1950s and
early 1960s. These techniques
evolved from some of the methods
he had polished earlier at the
Archie Bray, making ceramic sculp­
ture and architectural terra cotta.
Unfortunately, he no longer has
records, or even good pictures, of
some of his pieces from this period,
a time when he made some rather
large freestanding sculptures in sec­
tions, not reliefs, but pieces. He
recalls:
My pots and my vessels were very
controlled. That is, I could control
their volumes and shapes. They
were very organized shapes, almost
geometric solids. Then, somewhere in
the mid-1960s, I became very loose
with the work and started to
emulate the freedom of the
Abstract Expressionists.
58
by Louana M. Lackey
To handbuild his pots, Rudy uses
clay slabs. Recently, these slabs have
been made by Hugh Warford, who
comes to the studio periodically to
mix clay, roll slabs, build and pack
crates, and give assistance. Using a
slab roller to prepare the slabs,
Hugh then cuts them into boardlike rectangles using a pattern.
When finished, the slabs are gently
laid one on top of another, covered
with plastic to keep them pliable,
and stacked near Rudys work sta­
tion to be easily reached. The slabs
are almost always the same size—21
in. by 7V2 in. by about 5/s in.
thick—a size that enables Rudy to
build pieces in a wide variety of
shapes, using a variety of tech­
niques. He can join the slabs on
their edges, use them like bricks, or
lay them into molds.
Before he starts to make a pot,
Rudy assembles everything he will
need—slabs, tools, water, a stool to
sit on as he works, a modeling stand
or easel to hold the work, and a bat
or work board. These work boards
are made by screwing lazy Susan
hardware to the bottoms of eigh­
teen-inch squares of heavy plywood.
Rudy uses these work boards to
turn the piece as he works on it and
to carry it to another place in the
studio when he is not working on it.
Rudy starts a pot by cutting a
slab into a circular shape for use as
a base. He makes the bottom of the
vessel concave, to keep it from
cracking. To do this, he lays the slab
over a convex form, such as a
dome-shaped piece of Styrofoam,
which he places on the work board.
Around the base, he adds narrower
slabs, wetting and joining the ends,
and standing them on edge in a cir­
cle so that, Rudy says, “It looks like
a dog bowl, a large dog bowl.”
Next, he scratches the edges of
the slabs a little with an ordinary,
stiff-bristled kitchen brush, a quick
Pottery Making
illustrated
and simple way to roughen the sur­
faces. Rudy then puts the slabs
together, edge to edge, joining
them with his fingertips, knitting
the clay together by applying pres­
sure from both the inside and the
outside. He works very rapidly,
using his fingers to support the
pieces both inside and out. He finds
this a very versatile way to shape
the form—sometimes the result is a
cylindrical shape, sometimes coni­
cal, and sometimes even a truncated
cone. Rudy uses a thin construc­
tion as he has found that the thin­
ner he builds the pieces, the
stronger they are during the build­
ing stages. They dry more quickly
and can sooner support the struc­
tures that he puts on top.
Rudy continues to work around
the vessel, adding levels until the
piece looks about ready to collapse.
He will then stop for a while, pos­
sibly starting another piece while
the first one is setting up, or go to
another area of the studio and start
building parts that he calls “ears” or
“attachments.” These attachments,
which he also forms from slabs, are
built in the form of an envelope
open on one long side. These also
must be allowed to dry somewhat
before they are ready to be
attached. By that time, the center
section of his first cylinder will be
dry. Then, usually with help, Rudy
will lift the appendages and attach
them to the cylinder.
After the “ears” are in place, the
cylinder begins to assume its final
shape. Two or three sides—some­
times four—will emerge, depending
September/October 2OO2
on the number of attachments. With two or four of these,
the piece will have a front and a back; with three, it
becomes asymmetrical. After the attachments have set,
Rudy begins to cut away the clay between them and the
main cylinder—hollowing out those areas underneath,
and smoothing the joint until the piece has a continuous,
even-sided wall of uniform thickness. As it continues to
dry, the body becomes tougher and is easier to work
with. To finish the top, Rudy then adds more slabs, refin­
ing the shape of the piece as he does so. A day or two after
he starts the piece, Rudy removes the Styrofoam base; if
he is careful, he can reuse it. He then cleans the bottom
edge of the leather-hard base with a rib.
In his studio, Rudy may have two or three unfired
pots in progress at the same time. Here he can add a level
to one pot and go on to another while he sets aside the
first to dry a little. By the time he has worked on a sec­
ond or third piece, the first will be ready for his atten­
tion again. When he gives a workshop, Rudy does not
usually have the luxury of this wait­
ing period, and he or a helper must
use a propane torch or electric hair
dryer to speed the drying process.
Rudy Autio by Louana M. Lackey is published by
The American Ceramic Society. For more informa­
tion about this and other titles related to pottery and
the ceramic arts, visit the Society's web site at
www.ceramics.org.
September/October 2002
Pottery Making
illustrated
59
Toys and Tools
by Chris Campbell
The July/August issue of PMI was
bursting with information on
“where to buy” and “what to buy”
and “how to buy” all of the para­
phernalia of a modern potter’s stu­
dio. Whether you’re setting up your
first studio or adding to an existing
one, it’s hard to resist the allure of
new “stuff” All the suppliers will
send you their shiny catalogs to
tempt you even further. So, how to
decide what you really need?
Obviously, you could make do
with the basics. Some potters throw
using only their hands, a wheel and
a cut-off wire. They center with a
tap and trim with a sharpened piece
of iron. If they need a special tool,
they make it themselves.
The rest of us choose to facilitate
the pottery process with “tools” and
“toys.” Tools, of course, being vital
and toys optional. Even after you
decide on the very basic needs for
your studio, you still need some
kind of guide to prioritize your
choices.
Every situation is different, but
try using my simple guide of
“health, wealth and happiness.”
Health
Almost every potter I’ve met
wants to be able to work with clay
for a lifetime. This means taking
care of your body. If a piece of
equipment can eliminate painful
repetitive stress it should get high
priority on your wish list.
Clay mixers, pug mills and slab
rollers are obvious candidates, but
here are some others: A compressor
with attachments simplifies spray­
ing, dusting and chipping. A ware
cart transports pots without heavy
lifting. A good adjustable seat eases
60
your back, shoulders and legs
whether throwing or handbuilding.
Don’t forget the safety equip­
ment. You need a breathing mask if
you mix your own glazes or sand
your green ware. Kiln users may
need welder’s glasses, a face shield,
tongs and heat-proof gloves. Both
you and your kiln will benefit from
a good ventilation system and your
eyes will appreciate good lighting.
Wealth
I equate time with money. Any
tools that save time and increase
production will naturally boost
income. If a thrower needs a wheel,
then a hand builder needs a slab
roller. Sure you can throw slabs, but
if you use slabs six or seven hours
every day, it gets a little old. The
same goes for the extruder. While
not as critical as some other acces­
sories, it expedites a lot of tiresome,
repetitive jobs. If you spend two
days recycling your clay by hand,
you’ve made the most expensive
clay on earth. Clay mixers and pug
mills speed up these jobs.
Because every step of the process
figures into your final costs, small
items count, too. A good sieve
makes glaze mixing a breeze. A cen­
tering device speeds the trimming
job for low-volume producers. A
banding wheel facilitates hand
building and decorating.
Another “tool” that fits in here is
education. Whether you are earning
a degree, participating in a work­
shop or studying reference books,
you are increasing your knowledge
and skills. Theoretically, this could
increase your ability to produce
higher-value wares.
Pottery Making
illustrated
Happiness
Now we are wandering into the
warm, fuzzy area of “toys.” I don’t
know if potters are the worst group
for loving toys, but we surely rank
in the top 10. Mud people are
always on the lookout for “stuff”
and, when pressed, we can all justi­
fy our choices with a solid rationale
of necessity. Here are some “toys” I
believe can save you time and
money:
• Airbrushes: For glazes and
underglazes
• Blender: Keep one in the studio
for mixing glaze and slips.
• Brushes: A selection of mop,
hake and camel-hair brushes.
• Glazes: Professionally formulat­
ed glazes offer reliable results.
• Grinder: To buff glaze from
pots, make ribs and shape tools.
• Pyrometer: If you raku fire, this
tool eliminates guesswork.
• Rolling pins and pony rollers:
Avoid those carved in one
piece.
• Scales: One for weighing clay
and a finer one for glaze ingre­
dients.
• Sponges: Good natural sponges
as well as synthetic.
• Stilts: A selection of stilts saves
your pots from glaze disasters.
• Trimming tools: If you throw a
great deal, upgrade these tools.
I can’t go any further into “toys”
with you and keep up an image of
“Business Common Sense.” I have
too many impulse toys in my own
studio waiting to betray any cau­
tious words of wisdom I might
offer. All I can say is, keep your
July/August “Potters Guide” handy
and have fun.
Chris Campbell is a full-time studio potter resid­
ing in Raleigh, North Carolina. E-mail comments
to her at [email protected]
September/October 2OO2
Clay and Glaze Tips
by Ababi Sharon
Here are some tips concerning clays and glazes. I
invite you to my web site to see results of tests I have
made. You can leave me a message in the visitors
book and I shall answer your questions or remarks.
Ababi Sharon
Kibbutz Shoval, Israel
http://members4.clubphoto.com/ababi306910
Coloring Clay Bodies
I have been curious about tinting
clays since reading the Daniel
Rhodes and Robin Hopper book,
Clay and Glazes for the Potter.
Following the explanations I tried
adding several materials to tint the
claybody, and I discovered several
things. First, of the oxides I tested,
black iron oxide worked the best.
Although it is not as “delicate” and
some of the glazes do not work
well, other glazes turn out great.
Mixing
While tinting clays is a lot easier
with a clay mixer, here’s how you
can get the same results by hand.
First of all, to get consistent results,
make sure the clay you blend is
dried. To do this, cut prepared clay
into thin slices so it can dry out
quickly. (Note: I usually blend con­
trasting bodies, e.g., a terra cotta
body with a white or buff body.
Because I live in Israel, I use SM
0.2 and R2502 Fuchs-Ton clays.
Check with your local supplier for
similar clays or to make a different
selection.)
One claybody I made had 3 kg
(by dry weight) of terra cotta and
10 kg white stoneware (both con­
tained fine grog). I placed the clay
into a bucket of water and blended
it with a power mixer. I then added
two sizes of granular manganese in
varying amounts but usually 5
grams of the 24-40 mesh and 15
grams of the 60-80 mesh.
Drying Clay
A good way to dry the clay slur­
ry is in plaster baths, but since I have
been using paperclay lately, I have
made two paperclay bats that are
lightweight. I put a cloth inside to
keep the slurry from touching the
bat, then allow it to dry until it is
soft.
Paperclay
I have begun to mix paperclay
out of my blended bodies. Paperclay
is very forgiving, and you can make
the parts one day and connect them
the next even if they are bone dry,
and fires in the same range as regu­
lar clay. Lately I have been burnish­
ing the greenware with good
results. A good tinted clay I’ve had
success with as a paperclay is
Laguna’s Calico (first dried) plus 5%
black iron oxide and 0.2% granular
manganese. To find out more about
paperclay, visit Rosette Gault’s web
site at www.paperclayart.com/ and
Graham Hay’s site w ww.gr ahamhay.com.au/.
Layering Glazes
I use two glazes that I layer one
on top of the other. One has the rich
effect of a high alumina gloss glaze
with three colorant oxides and I
layer it on top of a low alumina gloss
glaze. This is a winning combination
for me. I developed two versions
using different feldspars for the first
glaze as follows.
KOREN 27 Version 1
Cone 6
Silica.............................................31.5
Calcium carbonate....................... 12.0
Kaolin (EPK)................................ 13.5
Zinc oxide..................................... 10.0
Nepheline syenite........................ 10.0
Strontium carbonate.......................7.0
Frit 3110.......................................16.0
100.0
On top of the Koren 27 I apply a second layer
by brush or spraying. The heavier the applica­
tion, the better the results, although on flat
parts of bowls or plates the glaze crawls if it is
too thick. With high relief decorations, the
glaze breaks nicely. The glaze that I use for
the second layer is a variation of one that I
found in PMI.
SPECKLES 3134
Cone 6
Ferro frit 3134 ...........................27.6
Cryolite ....................................... 7.4
Bali clay..................................... 26.7
Magnesium carbonate light....1.0
Silica.......................................... 37.2
99.9
Add: Titanium dioxide.................. 5.0
Red Iron oxide.................. 1.5
Cobalt oxide...................... 3.0
I use this glze for a second layer. I tried differ­
ent colorings but did not like them. If you try
other colorants, leave the red iron oxide and
the titanium dioxide.
A Recent Glaze Success
Lately I have been trying to
develop durable glazes. Here is an
example “hot” from the kiln, that
looks good on a buff white clay­
body but best on cone 6 porcelain.
STRONTIUM 4B
TURQUOISE
Cone 6
Silica.........................................29
Kaolin .......................................30.5
Strontium carbonate................. 15.7
Calcium carbonate ............ 12
Wollastonite....................... 18.1
Kaolin (EPK).............................14
Zinc oxide................................. 10
Custer feldspar......................... 13
Strontium carbonate................... 7
Frit 3110 .................................. 15
100
September/October 2002
KOREN 27 Version 2
Cone 6
Pottery Making
illustrated
Cryolite .....................................10.5
Tin oxide..................................... 5.0
Copper oxide.............................. 3.0
The cryolite mottles the glaze. After mixing the
glaze, do not sieve! The beauty comes from
the big particles of tin and copper as well as
the strontium carbonate.
61
Whether you’re involved in a formal program of study or
working on your own, if you’re seriously interested in pottery
you’ll find it helpful to have at least one basic textbook for ref­
erence. The following books are of two types: two cover only
clay and glaze formulation and chemistry, and are meant to
help the student understand the nature of these materials; the
other two cover how to use clay and glazes in addition to the
more technical information. Any of these books might be used
either as textbooks in a college-level ceramics class, or to aug­
ment a course of independent study. Which book you choose
will depend on how deeply you wish to delve into under­
standing the nature of the material you are learning about.
Ceramics: A Potter’s
Handbook,
Nelson, Glenn C.,revised by Richard
at least three different ways of making a lid for a slab box are
described, but there isn’t even one sample glaze formula.
Pitelka also omits any discussion of ceramic art history and
doesn’t include any color pictures of contemporary pottery - in
Burkett
fact, there are no color pictures at all, no photos of finished
(Thomson Learning, USA 2002)
This is the quintessential college text­ work, and relatively few process photos. For the serious stu­
book, covering every aspect of creating dent who has a good idea of what he wants to do with clay, or
pottery and ceramics in 400+ pages. The a good instructor, these omissions won’t reduce the value of
first version, published in 1960, was one the book. While there are many books full of pictures, Pitelka’s
of the earliest pottery how-to books. book fills a serious void by including in one volume an intro­
This edition is almost unrecognizable next to an early version. duction to every aspect of being a potter.
It is still largely illustrated with black and white process pho­
Clay and Glazes for the
tos, but they are all new and very clear and helpful.
Potter,
3rd Edition
After a short chapter describing and defining clay types, the
Rhodes,
Daniel,
revised and expand­
book begins with a lengthy review of ceramic history up to the
ed by Robin Hopper
present. It then covers clay formulation, preparation and han­
(Krause Publications, lola, Wl 2000)
dling before launching into chapters on hand-building and
This was the first textbook available for
throwing techniques, surface and glazing, glaze formulation
serious
pottery study, and it has remained
and calculation, and kilns and firing.
a
benchmark
for 45 years. It explains in
The text is precise and informative, with highly visible “safe­
depth
what
clay
is and what makes a clay
ty cautions” in bold type sprinkled throughout. If there is a
body
suitable
for
applications;
downside to this comprehensive tome, it is that it is a trifle dry, and what a glaze is, how to understand various
and
formulate
containing more information than many students need or recipes, and the characteristics and function of all the glaze
basic
want. It is hard to imagine opening it to random pages and glaze materials. Though there are now several very good books
being struck with inspiration. But as a reference work it will dealing with glaze formulation which are easier to use and
prove valuable, and will be a source to turn to when those understand, it is still appropriate for anybody seriously
inspirational books aren’t informative enough.
involved with pottery to have some grasp of the basic theory
and mathematics of glaze calculation. This book does not con­
Clay:
A
Studio
Handbook
tain any information about how to form clay, presuming that to
Pitelka, Vince
(The American Ceramic Society, Westerville, OH, be the job of the classroom instructor.
2001)
As revised by Robin Hopper, this edition retains Rhodes’
This is the most comprehensive text; text intact, though it is somewhat reorganized - for instance,
Pitelka covers everything from what clay information on engobes, slips and terra sigillatas is gathered
is to how to pack and ship pottery. This into the clay chapter rather than scattered through the glaze
book is intended to guide the novice chapter. Information on new technology including paper clay
potter through every stage of the learn­ and computer glaze calculation software is added, as well as
ing curve, beginning with preparing clay safety information - for instance, a health warning about
and finishing with setting up your own studio. In between, Rhodes’ pioneering technique of mixing fiberglass into clay.
Pitelka covers handbuilding and throwing; slip-casting and Sample glazes in the appendices have been revised to avoid
mold-making; surface decoration and glazing; kilns and firing; unavailable or toxic materials (such as Gerstley Borate or lead)
safety practices; making tools; buying, building and repairing . The biggest change is in the illustrations - the book now
kilns, and much more.
includes six sections of color plates featuring Daniel Rhodes’
Obviously, to cover all this material in a book roughly the work, historical work, contemporary work, and low-fire, mid­
same size as Nelson’s, something had to be left out. Compared fire and high-fire work. As revised this is possibly the best ref­
to Nelson, Pitelka skimps on preparing clay and formulating erence work for in-depth information about the basic materi­
glazes, in favor of using clay and applying glazes - for instance, als we all work with.
September/October 2OO2
Pottery Making
62
illustrated
Clays and Glazes in Studio
Ceramics
Scott, David
(Crowood Press, Ramsbury, Marlborough Wiltshire,
England 1998)
Scott covers the same ground as Rhodes,
but his book is less formal, more readable,
and more profusely illustrated. On the other
hand, it is also less exhaustive. It contains all
the information most potters need about
clay and glaze composition and formulation, but for unanswered
questions, you would probably turn to Rhodes.
Scott begins with the types and structure of clay, then moves
on to clay bodies, ingredients, and formulation. Raku clay and
paperclay are included, and sample recipes are given for each
type of clay body. Slips and engobes are included in the clay
chapter, and some analysis of the firing process. The bulk of
the book is devoted to glaze chemistry and formulation. Scott
begins with the major glaze oxides, then discusses raw materi­
als. Then comes a quick overview of glaze chemistry and cal­
culation. Two sections, Sources of Colour in Glazes and Glaze
Types, helpfully illustrate each major coloring oxide and type
of glaze with sample glaze recipes and photos. The basic meth­
ods of glaze development and testing, glaze application, firing,
and glaze defects finish out the book.
One major problem with this book is the British author’s lax
attitude towards materials which American potters often avoid
as toxic. Sample recipes include large amounts of lead, barium,
and manganese oxides, without any warning about toxicity
either to potter or patron. There is plenty of good information
in this book - but ask your instructor or check another text
before trying the recipes.
September/October 2OO2
Pottery Making
illustrated
63
64
Pottery Making
ILLUSTRATED
September/October 2002
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