DM Series - Arizona Church Sound
REFERENCE MANUAL
DM Series
Digital Audio Processors
Models:
DM1624F
DM1612F
DM812
Firmware Versions 1.5.0 and higher
Fill in for your records:
Serial Number:
Purchase Date:
Rio Rancho, NM, USA
www.lectrosonics.com
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
2
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
Important Safety Instructions
This symbol, wherever it appears, alerts you to the presence of uninsulated dangerous voltage inside the
enclosure -- voltage that may be sufficient to constitute a risk of shock.
This symbol, wherever it appears, alerts you to important operating and maintenance instructions in the
accompanying literature. Please read the manual.
1)Read these instructions.
2)Keep these instructions.
3)Heed all warnings.
4)Follow all instructions.
5)Do not use this apparatus near water.
6)Clean only with a dry cloth.
7)Do not block any ventilation openings. Install in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
8)Do not install near any heat sources such as radiators, heat registers, stoves, or other apparatus (including
amplifiers) that produce heat.
9)Do not defeat the safety purpose of the polarized or grounding-type plug. A polarized plug has two blades with one wider than the other. A grounding type plug has two blades and third grounding prong. The wider blade or
the third prong are provided for your safety. If the provided plug does not fit into your outlet, consult an electrician for replacement of the obsolete outlet.
10)Protect the power cord from being walked on or pinched particularly at plugs, convenience receptacles, and the
point where they exit from the apparatus.
11)Only use attachments/accessories specified by the manufacturer.
12)Use only with the cart, stand, tripod, bracket, or table specified by the manufacturer, or sold with the apparatus.
When a cart is used, use caution when moving the cart/apparatus combination to avoid injury from tip-over.
13)Unplug this apparatus during lightning storms or when unused for long periods of time.
14)Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel. Servicing is required when the apparatus has been damaged
in any way, such as power-supply cord or plug is damaged, liquid has been spilled or objects have fallen into
the apparatus, the apparatus has been exposed to rain or moisture, does not operate normally, or has been
dropped.
15)WARNING -- TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT EXPOSE THIS APPARATUS
TO RAIN OR MOISTURE.
Rio Rancho, NM
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DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
Table of Contents
Important Safety Instructions................................................3
General Overview....................................................................5
Input Processing....................................................................7
Digital Matrix..........................................................................7
Output Processing.................................................................9
DM Series Controls and Features........................................10
Front Panels.........................................................................10
Rear Panels.........................................................................11
LCD Interface.........................................................................12
Operation with Front Panel Controls....................................12
Boot Sequence Screens......................................................12
General Overview - Menus and Screens.............................13
Top Menu.............................................................................13
Setup Menu..........................................................................13
Setup Screens.....................................................................13
The “Back” Button................................................................13
Input Setup Screen..............................................................14
Matrix Crosspoint (Xpoint) Setup Screen............................15
Preset Setup Screens..........................................................18
System Information Screen..................................................19
Stacking Multiple Units.........................................................19
Locking Front Panel Controls...............................................19
Command View Screen.......................................................21
Serial Port Speed Adjustment..............................................21
Installing LecNet2™ Software and USB Driver....................23
Installation with LecNet2 Device Installer............................23
Manual Installation...............................................................24
Firmware Updates.................................................................25
Using the Update Wizard.....................................................25
Serial Interface and Control Commands.............................28
Wildcards.............................................................................28
Differences between DM units.............................................28
DM General Commands......................................................28
DM1624F Audio Input Commands.......................................31
DM1624F Matrix Crosspoint Commands.............................33
DM1624F Audio Output Commands....................................35
DM1624F Input Compressor Commands............................37
DM1624F Output Compressor Commands.........................38
DM1624F Output Limiter Commands..................................39
DM1624F Programmable I/O Commands............................40
DM1624F Rear Panel Control Commands...........................44
DM1624F ADFE Commands.................................................46
ADFE Filter Numbers Mapped to Center Frequencies........46
DM Command Grammar Rules.............................................47
Macros and Macro Control...................................................48
About Macros.......................................................................48
Rear Panel Control - Hardware.............................................49
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LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
General Overview
All models in the DM Series offer the same signal processing functions, and vary only by the number of audio
inputs and outputs available. The DM’s basic structure
consists of three stages: Input, Matrix and Output.
(See DM1624F Signal Flow Block Diagram below and
DM1624F Functional Block Diagram .)
2 Expansion Signals
26 Automixing Control Data
Output #1
Processing
.
.
.
16 by 24+2
Automatic
Mixing
Matrix
Input #16
Processing
.
.
.
Output #24
Processing
DM1624 Master
with
DM1612 or DM812 Slaves
DM1624 Master
with
DM1624 Slaves
1
1
Outputs
24
Pink Noise
Generator
0 dBu
DM1624
Slave
1
13 Master only
Outputs
24
1
Outputs
12
DM1624F Signal Flow Block Diagram
(Typical of DM Series)
1(13)
12(24)
1
DM1624
Slave
Each input channel includes a high quality analog
preamplifier, with digital and analog level control to
maximize signal to noise ratio and minimize distortion,
followed by a 24-bit A-D converter. Extensive digital
signal processing is provided on each input channel.
Each input channel is processed and filtered as needed
and the signal is delivered into the matrix.
12
1
Outputs
12
DM1612
Slave
2 Expansion Signals
26 Automixing Control Data
Rio Rancho, NM
Master and
Slave Outputs
Tone
Generator
1 kHz, 0 dBu
Outputs
Outputs
1(13)
12(24)
DM812
Slave
24 Output Submixes
2 Expansion Submixes
26 Automixing Aux. Data
12
DM1612 Master
with
DM1612 or DM812 Slaves
Outputs
Outputs
1
DM1612
Slave
Input #1
Processing
The audio and data from all units in the stack are gathered in the matrix in the master unit, which is where the
final mix signals are generated. The first 12 final mix
signals from the master are back propagated through
the DANI to each slave. (See DM Series Back Propagation Diagram.) These signals are available on the
slave unit outputs 1 through 12. If a slave unit is also a
DM1624F, outputs 1 through 12 are also repeated on
outputs 13 through 24. Each output channel on a slave
unit retains its own processing (filters, compressor, etc.)
even though the signal mix is the same as that channel
on the master unit. (See diagram on page 12).
Outputs
12
12
1
1
Outputs
12
DM812
Slave
24 Output Submixes
2 Expansion Submixes
26 Automixing Aux. Data
When multiple units are stacked, mixing data and the
digital audio are passed between the slave units and
the master unit through the DANI. Multiple units can be
stacked in a master/slave configuration to expand the
number of inputs to hundreds of channels.
DM1612
Master
The DM can be configured either via a front panel
mounted LCD and controls, or LecNet2™, a userfriendly, yet powerful control program. LecNet2™ offers
quick configuration and full command of the system
through a USB or RS-232 compatible interface. Once
configured, the units operate independently.
Multiple units can be stacked together using the Digital Audio Network Interface (DANI). DANI connects
the digital audio outputs of the master and slave units
through standard RJ45 connectors.
DM1624
Master
The latest generation DSP microchips and microprocessors are the core of the engineering of the DM Series
products. The focus and purpose is to meet the requirements of modern applications and also the demands for
convenience and automation.
The digital matrix mixer distributes each input signal to
any selected combination of outputs, with level control
at each crosspoint. The matrix processes the signals
and delivers them to the assigned outputs and communicates with other devices in the system. Each
output receives signals from the mixing matrix, the pink
noise generator or the tone generator as needed for
setup, diagnostics or operation. Each of the 24 outputs
includes extensive signal processing to optimize the
mixed signal for the intended purpose, such as sound
reinforcement, recording or teleconferencing.
DM1624
Master
As digital technology continues to advance in a variety of markets and products, considerable benefits
also evolve in audio processing systems for installed
sound systems that employ multiple microphones and
loudspeakers in a common acoustical space. The
DM Series digital processors take advantage of these
advances with hardware/software designs that address
modern applications in boardroom, courtroom, sound
reinforcement and teleconferencing systems.
Outputs
12
5
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
DM1624F Functional Block Diagram
LecNet 2 Conn
1/8 '' Jack
Front & Rear
USB B Conn
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 1
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 2
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 3
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 4
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 5
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 6
Signal Processing
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 7
Signal Processing
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 8
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out
Atten
Out 9
Signal Processing
D/A
Out
Atten
Out 10
16
22
Prog I/O
Port
RS-232
Port
USB
Port
LCD
Micro
Controller
Control
Signals
Buttons &
Rotary
In 1
In 2
In 3
Phan.
On/Off
Phan.
On/Off
Prog
Prog
Prog
A/D
A/D
A/D
M
Signal Processing
Phan.
On/Off
Prog
A/D
Signal Processing
In 5
Phan.
On/Off
Prog
A/D
Signal Processing
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out
Atten
Out 11
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out
Atten
Out 12
In 7
In 8
Phan.
On/Off
Phan.
On/Off
Phan.
On/Off
Prog
Prog
A/D
A/D
Signal Processing
Signal Processing
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 13
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 14
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 15
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 16
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 17
Signal Processing
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 18
Signal Processing
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 19
Signal Processing
D/A
Out 20
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out
Atten
Out 21
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out
Atten
Out 22
Audio Frame Sync
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out
Atten
Out 23
24 + 2 Submixes + Mixing Control
M
S
Signal Processing
D/A
Out
Atten
Out 24
Prog
A/D
Signal Processing
Phan.
On/Off
Prog
A/D
Signal Processing
In 10
Phan.
On/Off
Prog
A/D
Signal Processing
In 12
In 13
Phan.
On/Off
Phan.
On/Off
Phan.
On/Off
Prog
Prog
Prog
A/D
A/D
A/D
Signal Processing
In 14
Phan.
On/Off
Prog
A/D
Signal Processing
In 15
Phan.
On/Off
Prog
A/D
Signal Processing
In 16
Phan.
On/Off
Sync
Tx
Rx
Rx
Tx
Digital
Audio
Network
Interface
(DANI)
Prog
A/D
Signal Processing
M
S
M
12+ 2 Mixes + Mixing Control
12+2 Mixes + Mixing Control
24 + 2 Submixes + Mixing Control
Quad RJ -45 Conn
M
M
S
In 9
In 11
16 by 24 (+ 2) Automatic Mixing Matrix
In 4
M
S
In 6
16 Mic/Line Inputs
Phan.
On/Off
24 Outputs (16 Line + 8 Mic/Line)
Prog I /O Conn
2 x DB25
1 kHz Tone
Generator
Pink Noise
Generator
Cluster of Four
®
SHARC DSPs
SHARC is a registered trademark of Analog Devices , Inc .
6
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
Input Processing
Each input channel provides individual stages for gain,
delay, filtering and compression. (See Typical Input
Signal Processing Blocks.) Processing levels can be
set up with the front panel LCD or with the software GUI
provided with the units. (Details on the signal processing stages are available in the Help available with the
LecNet2™ software.) There are 16 Input Processing
Blocks in the DM1624F and DM1612FF and eight in the
DM812.
Input Gain
The input preamplifier applies software controllable gain
with both analog and digital components, with the ratio
between them automatically optimized for maximum
signal to noise ratio. A single control point is provided
to simplify setup. A level indicator and clipping indicator
are provided in the GUI display.
Delay
A digital delay follows the input stage. A delay of up to
1 second can be applied in 0.5 ms increments.
ADFE Filters
Six ADFE (automatic digital feedback eliminator) filters
are provided on each input to suppress acoustic feedback that may occur. Applying ADFE at the input rather
than at the output allows the filters to deal exclusively
with the unique characteristics of the individual input
channel rather than with the composite of multiple channels that appear at any one output.
Compressor
A sophisticated compressor stage is provided following
the other stages to control the dynamic characteristics
of the input. The compressor provides control over
threshold, compression ratio, plus attack and delay time
constants.
Digital Matrix
The digital matrix provides signal routing and communication with other devices in the system, and applies
automatic mixing and level control. (See Digital Matrix
Functional Block Diagram.)
Automixer Cell
The Automixer Cell is the core of the matrix. It is where
level control for the automatic mixing algorithm, mixing
mode and crosspoint gain is applied to data gathered
from other channels and devices. The cell receives
data from the master unit in a multiple unit stacked
configuration and from the slave units farther down in
the chain.
Digital Matrix Functional Block Diagram
(Typical Matrix Crosspoint)
Submix
Power of the Mix
Audio Input
Power of the
Submix
+
Submix
Automixer
Cell
Power of the
Submix
Typical Input Signal Processing Block
Filters
Six digital filters are provided to compensate for differences between various microphones and other audio
sources.
Rio Rancho, NM
Crosspoint Gain
-70 to 20 dB
1 dB steps
Mixing Mode
- Auto
- Direct
- Override
- Background
- Phantom
7
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
Power of the Mix
The Phantom mode is available only when using DM1624F firmware version 1.5.0 or higher
and then only if the Phantom mix mode option is
enabled. This setting is only available when actually connected to a DM processor. It is not available
when working offline.
The Power of the Mix is the reference used to determine the gain to be applied to each individual output
channel. In a multi-unit stacked configuration, this data
is sent to the slaves from the master unit.
Crosspoint Gain
In a mix-minus reinforcement system with a one-toone relationship in the input and output numbering, the
matrix typically follows a pattern similar to the following illustration. In this example the shaded crosspoints
(magenta/pink color) are enabled, but configured for
the Phantom Mode. These crosspoints participate in
the auto mixing algorithm, but the actual signal from the
input is not present in the mix. This allows each input
to attenuate the return path to loudspeakers near by
attenuating that crosspoint.
Crosspoint Gain is the gain selected either with the
LCD interface or the GUI that determines the level appearing at the output.
Mixing Mode
The automatic mixing algorithm applies a patented
gain proportional algorithm (US Patents 5,414,776 and
5,402,500) allowing each input assigned to a particular
output to behave differently relative to the other inputs
assigned to the output.
IMPORTANT: Phantom crosspoints must be
enabled and the gain set on each one to adjust its
effect on the NOM attenuation in that output group.
Four different mixing modes are available:
Auto - In Automatic mode the input applied to the
crosspoint is mixed into the output channel using the the Adaptive Proportional Gain automixing
algorithm in the normal manner. This is the most
common setting.
Direct - Direct mode bypasses the automixing
algorithm.
Override - Override mode is selected when it is
required that the input applied to the crosspoint
always dominates the output channel when it becomes active.
Background - Background mode is selected when
it is required that the input applied to the crosspoint
dominates the output channel only when all other
inputs are inactive.
Phantom - This special mode is useful in mixminus reinforcement systems with difficult acoustic
environments where system gain is lacking and
cross coupling between loudspeaker zones is taking place. The Phantom mode allows an input applied to the crosspoint to participate in the automixing algorithm as in Auto mode, but with a twist - the
signal received from that input does not actually
appear in the mix at that output.
NOTE: The M/S (master/slave) switch selects the
signal that the output channel will deliver when
the unit is operating as a slave in a “stacked”
configuration.
NOTE: certain output channels
provide an attenuator to reduce the
signal to microphone level.
M
S
Tx
Rx
Rx
Tx
Digital
Audio
Network
Interface
(DANI)
12+ 2 Mixes + Mixing Control
12+2 Mixes + Mixing Control
24 + 2 Submixes + Mixing Control
Digital Matrix
24 + 2 Submixes + Mixing Control
Signal Processing
D/A
/
Out
Atten
1 kHz Tone
Generator
Pink Noise
Generator
Quad RJ -45 Conn
Typical Output Channel
8
IMPORTANT: Even though the output level adjustment provides up to 70 dB of attenuation,
a line level output should not be used to deliver a mic level signal. Using a line level output
will cause the signal to noise ratio to be reduced by 40 dB. Always use a mic/line switchable
output for mic level signals.
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
Output Processing
Filters
Each output can receive signals from either the matrix, the
pink noise generator, the tone generator, or, if it is operating in a multi-unit “stacked” configuration, from the master
unit Digital Audio Network Interface (DANI) source.
Output Source Select
The digital matrix delivers the audio signals used in
normal operation. The pink noise source can be used
for sound masking during operation, and for equalization during setup. The tone generator is used for level
adjustments and signal routing diagnostics.
The Master/Slave switch selects whether the audio
signal at the output channel will come from the digital
matrix or the DANI source. When the unit is operating
as a slave, the signal will come from the DANI source.
Mic/line Output Channels
Some outputs include an attenuator to reduce the output level from line to mic level. The passive attenuator
does not change the signal to noise ratio of the signal,
but simply applies 40 dB of attenuation to reduce the
signal level.
Output Signal Processing Stages
Each output channel provides a delay, nine filters, plus
a compressor and limiter to idealize the channel for
its function in the sound system. (See Typical Output
Signal Processing Block.)
Digital Delay
Delay on the output signal is normally used for time
alignment when loudspeakers are positioned in different
locations with overlapping coverage patterns that cause
comb filtering. The signal can be delayed up to 5 seconds in 0.5 ms increments to eliminate comb filtering
and improve intelligibility.
Up to nine filters can be implemented at each output to
idealize the output channel equalization and implement
crossover networks for bi-amped or tri-amped loudspeaker systems.
The filter types include:
Low pass
High pass
Band pass
Parametric EQ
Low shelving
High shelving
Filter slopes can be selected with 6 or 12 dB per octave
Butterworth or Bessel parameters. Multiple filters can
be assigned to creater steeper slopes in 6 dB steps.
Compressor and Limiter
A versatile compressor and limiter are provided at each
output to control the average level and dynamics of the
audio signal, and restrict the maximum output level to
optimize the channel for its purpose. Compression is
often needed when the channel is feeding a recorder,
and limiting is often used to protect a loudspeaker system and reduce distortion and amplifier overload.
Compressor adjustment parameters include:
Threshold
Attack
Release
Compression ratio
Makeup gain
Limiter adjustment parameters include:
Threshold
Attack
Release
Output Gain and Level Indicator
The output level can be adjusted from - 70 dBu to +20
dBu in 1 dB steps to perfectly match the requirements
of the device being fed by the channel. A bar graph is
provided by the on screen GUI to accurately indicate
the output level as it operates and is adjusted.
Indicator
Activity Indicator
Gain Reduction Indicator
Activity Indicator
Delay
Filter Stages
Compressor
Limiter
0 - 5s
0.5 ms steps
Off, LP, HP, BP,
PEQ, LS, HS
6 or 12 dB/oct.
Butterworth or Bessel
when applicable
Threshold
Comp. Ratio
Attack TC
Release TC
Threshold
Comp. Ratio
Attack TC
Release TC
Level Meter
Output Gain
-70 - +20 dB
1 dB steps
Typical Output Signal Processing Block
Rio Rancho, NM
9
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
DM Series Controls and Features
Front Panels
DM1624F - 16 inputs, 24 outputs
Reserved Button
LCD Interface
BACK Button
PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT
Rotary Control
Item Select Buttons
USB Port
POWER On/Off Switch
DM1612F - 16 inputs, 12 outputs
DM812 - 8 inputs, 12 outputs
The front panels of the DM Series include a USB port
and LCD interface in addition to Power On/Off and other
system controls. The front panel controls can be locked
out with special button presses to prevent tampering
and inadvertent adjustments. (See Locking/Unlocking
Front Panel Controls.
The control interface is the same for all three models,
since the difference between them is simply the number
of inputs and outputs.
POWER On/Off Switch
The POWER On/OFF Switch is used to turn the DM
unit on (1) or off (0).
LCD Interface
The LCD Interface is a graphics type interface that can
be used to set up and operate a DM system or provide
feedback on system operation.
PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT Rotary Control
is often used for minor tweaking after the original setup
has been downloaded from a computer system via the
USB port.
USB Port
Standard USB Version 1.1 connector for setup and control of the DM from a Windows-based computer system
with USB interface.
Reserved Button
Currently used with the BACK Button to lock or unlock
the front panel controls.
BACK Button
The BACK button is used to return to the previous
screen or menu.
Item Select Buttons
The Item Select Buttons are used to select items from
setup screens.
The PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT rotary control is used
to select a menu, submenu or setup screen and for
selecting or setting operating parameters. This control
10
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
Rear Panels
DM1624F - 16 inputs, 24 outputs
POWER Plug
RS232 Port
USB Port
Programmable Input and
Output Ports
DANI
Audio Inputs and Outputs
DM1612F - 16 inputs, 12 outputs
DM812 - 8 inputs, 12 outputs
POWER Plug
Standard NEMA 5-15 three-pin power plug capable of
accepting 100-240 VAC, 47-63 Hz.
RS-232 Port
A serial RS-232 interface is provided for setup and
control via a computer, or for connecting RS-232 serial
control devices from other companies.
USB Port
DANI
DANI, or Digital Audio Network Interface, is used to
connect the digital audio outputs of the master and
slave units in stacked configurations.
Audio Inputs and Outputs
Analog audio input and output connectors. The function
of these inputs and outputs is consistent between units.
Only the number of analog inputs and outputs vary.
Standard USB Version 1.1 connector for setup and control of the DM from a Windows-based computer system
with USB interface.
Programmable Input and Output Ports
Programmable inputs or outputs used to enable control
over a variety of parameters or to indicate either channel activity or the current state of a programmable input.
Rio Rancho, NM
11
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
LCD Interface
Operation with Front Panel Controls
Some adjustments, such as levels and mute status, can
be made to DM Series processors without a computer
using the front panel LCD interface. While it is highly
recommended that the supplied DM Control Panel software (GUI) be used, the ability to make minor adjustments without a computer is often valuable.
Direct interaction with the processor is provided using
the front panel buttons, the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT
rotary encoder control and the LCD. A variety of menus
and setup screens are provided. This interface is used
mainly for minor adjustments to rear panel input and
output levels. The GUI is used for other functions, such
as system setup and control.
PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT
Used with the BACK button to lock or
unlock the front panel controls.
BACK
Rotary encoder control. Rotate
to highlight a menu item or adjust
operating parameter and press to enter
a submenu or setup screen.
BACK button used to return to
previous menu.
Item select buttons used on setup screens.
NOTE: Adjustments made with the LCD controls
are real time. As each setting is made, the result
will be heard immediately.
Boot Sequence Screens
The first screen displays the model number.
A second screen briefly displays the serial number and
the firmware version.
The display then returns to the first screen showing the
model number, indicating that the unit has completed
boot sequence.
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LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
General Overview - Menus and Screens
The information presented in the front panel LCD
includes a TopMenu, various Setup Menus and supporting Setup Screens. Pressing the PUSH FOR MENU/
SELECT control opens the TopMenu.
Top Menu
Pressing the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control after a
DM completes the Boot Sequence opens the TopMenu.
The TopMenu lists the Setup Menus used to access the
Setup Screens used to configure the DM’s operating
parameters. Rotate the control to highlight a item from
the list, then press the control to select that item.
Setup Menu
The Setup Menu lists the various setup screens used
to set the operating parameters for the system’s inputs,
mixing matrix and outputs. A fourth item on the list is
used to set the system as a Master or Slave unit. Rotate the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control to highlight
an item on the list, then press the control to select that
item.
Setup Screens
The Setup Screens are used to change system operating parameters for the selected channels. The Setup
Screen will display the type of setup (Input, Matrix,
Outputs or General) in the upper left corner and, if
necessary, the channel or channels that the action will
be performed.
A row of setup actions along the bottom of the LCD are
selected via one of the six Item Select Buttons. This
example shows an Input Setup Screen with the RPG
(Rear Panel Gain) button selected for Channel 1. The
gain is currently set for 0 dB.
Item Select buttons
The “Back” Button
Returns LCD to previous screen. Also used with upper
button to change lock code.
PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT
BACK
Rio Rancho, NM
13
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
Input Setup Screen
RP Gain
The Input Setup Screen is used to control the rear
panel analog inputs. The settings are accomplished in
“real time,” i.e., you will immediately hear the result of
any changes. When finished, use the front panel BACK
button to exit the Input Setup Screen and return to the
Setup Menus.
⇓
RPG is used to view or change the attenuation applied to the rear panel input for the selected analog
input channel. Select RPG by pressing the Item Select
Button below RPG. Rotate the PRESS FOR MENU/
SELECT control until the desired Rear Panel Gain is
displayed in the Parameter Display Area.
This setting is normally controlled by hardware (such as
variable resistors or switches) connected to the programmable input ports on the rear panel of the unit.
NOTE: RP Gain is an attenuator only, with a range
from 0 dB to -30 dB.
⇓
Screen Title
Items List
Channel
Gain
GAI is used to view or change the input gain for the selected channel. Select GAI by pressing the associated
Item Select Button. Rotate the PRESS FOR MENU/
SELECT control until the desired input channel gain is
displayed in the Parameter Display Area.
Parameter
Display Area
To open the Input Setup Screen, navigate to the Setup
Menu, highlight Inputs and press the PRESS FOR
MENU/SELECT control.
There are four sections to the Input Setup Screen:
Screen Title, Items List, Parameter Display Area and
Channel. The various entries in the Items List are
accessed via the Item Select Buttons below the LCD.
The Channel is the currently selected channel and the
Parameter Display Area displays the name and current
setting of the various parameters that can be adjusted
through this screen.
Input Channel Select
Up to 70 dB of gain that can be applied to each input
ranges (-10 dB to +60 dB) in 1 dB increments.
Mute
MUT is used to view or change the mute state (Mute
or Unmute) of the selected channel. Select MUT by
pressing the associated Item Select Button. Rotate the
PRESS FOR MENU/SELECT control to select Mute or
Unmute. In this example, Input 1 is Unmuted - in other
words, the sound from this channel is turned on.
This section is used to view or change the current input
channel. This section is selected by pressing the associated Item Select Button. Rotate PUSH FOR MENU/
SELECT until the desired channel number is displayed
in the upper right corner of the LCD.
Phase Inv
NOTE: Select the input channel to be modified
with the item select buttons before moving to the
following steps.
14
INV is used to set the audio phase invert status (Off
or On) of the selected input channel. Select INV by
pressing the associated Item Select Button. Rotate the
PRESS FOR MENU/SELECT control to turn on or off
the audio phase invert function.
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Reference Manual
PhanPwr
PHA is used to turn phantom power on or off for the
selected input channel. Select PHA by pressing the
associated Item Select Button. Rotate PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT change the current setting.
(Routing input channel 1 to output channel 1.) Changing either input or output channel changes the matrix
crosspoint.
Matrix Crosspoint (Xpoint) Setup Screen
The Matrix Setup Screen is used to apply automatic
mixing and level control to the digital matrix crosspoints.
The settings are accomplished in “real time,” i.e., you
will immediately hear the result of any changes. When
finished, use the front panel BACK button to exit the
Input Setup Screen and return to the Setup Menus.
To change the output channel, press the Item Select
Button below OUT in the Item List. Rotate PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT until the desired output channel is
displayed.
To change the input channel, press the Item Select
Button below IN in the Item List. Rotate PRESS FOR
MENU/SELECT until the desired input channel is displayed. Press PRESS FOR MENU/SELECT to set the
current matrix crosspoint input to the selected channel.
⇓
NOTE: Select the desired matrix crosspoint before
making the following adjustments.
MixMode
⇓
Input
Channel
Defines the mixing mode used to combine the inputs to
the selected matrix crosspoint. Four modes are available: Auto, Direct, Override and Background. (See Digital Matrix, Mixing Mode for a description of the various
mixing modes.)
Output
Channel
Screen Title
Items List
Parameter
Display Area
To select the Matrix setup screen, navigate to the Setup
menu, highlight Matrix and press the PRESS FOR
MENU/SELECT control.
There are four sections to the Matrix (Xpoint) Setup
Screen: Screen Title, Items List, Parameter Display
Area, and Input and Output Channels. The various
entries in the Items List are accessed via corresponding Item Select Buttons below the LCD. The Input and
Output Channel are the currently selected channels
and the Parameter Display Area displays the name and
current setting of the various parameters that can be
adjusted through this screen.
To view or change the mixing mode for the selected
crosspoint, press the Item Select Button below MIX in
the Item List, then rotate PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT
to display the desired mixing mode in the Parameter
Display Area.
Gain
Select GAI to view or change the gain for the selected
crosspoint. After the desired input and output have been
selected, adjust the gain to be applied at this crosspoint. Values range from -70 dB to +20 dB in 1 dB
increments.
In/Out Channel Select
The In/Out Channel Select Screen is used to configure individual matrix crosspoints. The selected input
and output channels for the current matrix crosspoint
are displayed at the upper right section of the LCD. In
this example the settings for crosspoint 1,1 are shown.
Rio Rancho, NM
15
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
Mute
Select MUT to view/change the mute state of the selected crosspoint. Rotate the encoder knob to toggle
between choices Mute and Unmute.
NOTE: Select the desired output channel with the
item select buttons before making the following
adjustments.
RP Gain
Outputs Setup Screen
The Outputs Setup Screen controls the rear panel
outputs. The settings are accomplished in “real time,”
i.e., you will immediately hear the result of any changes.
When finished, use the front panel BACK button to
exit the Outputs Setup Screen and return to the Setup
Menus.
RPG is used to view or change the rear panel gain
setting for the selected output channel. This setting
is normally controlled by hardware connected to the
programmable input ports on the rear panel of the unit,
i.e., variable resistors (pots), switches, etc. (Refer to
the Online Help supplied with the software for more
information on rear panel gain.)
⇓
NOTE: RP Gain is an attenuator only, with a range
from 0 dB to -61 dB.
⇓
RPG is accessed by pressing the appropriate Item
Select Button below the LCD. Rotate the PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT control to set the level of attenuation,
then press the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control to
accept the selection.
Output
Channel
Source
Screen Title
Items List
Parameter
Display Area
To open the Outputs Setup Screen, navigate to the
Setup Menu, highlight Inputs and press the PRESS
FOR MENU/SELECT control.
There are four sections to the Input Setup Screen:
Screen Title, Items List, Parameter Display Area and
Channel. The various entries in the Items List are
accessed via the Item Select Buttons below the LCD.
The Channel is the currently selected channel and the
Parameter Display Area displays the name and current
setting of the various parameters that can be adjusted
through this screen.
Output Select
The Output Select setting is used to view or change the
current output channel. It is accessed by pressing the
appropriate Item Select Button below the LCD. Rotate
the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control until the appropriate output channel is displayed in the upper right
corner of the LCD. Press the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control to accept the selection.
16
SOU is used to view or change the signal source setting
for the selected output channel. The signal sources
can be the matrix, the 1 kHz Tone generator, the pink
noise generator, or the DANI if the unit is a slave in a
stacked configuration.
SOU is accessed by pressing the appropriate Item
Select Button below the LCD. Rotate the PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT control to set the output source, then
press the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control to accept
the selection.
Level
M/L is used to view or change the output channel level
setting: Mic (microphone) or Line level. The Mic setting
applies 40 dB attenuation to reduce signal level. Only
certain channels support the Mic setting, which is a
hardware feature and the number of Mic level channels
available varies with the unit.
DM1624F
DM1612F
DM812
8 Mic/Line Switchable Outputs
4 Mic/Line Switchable Outputs
4 Mic/Line Switchable Outputs
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
General Settings
The General Setup Screen is used to configure the DM
unit as a master or as a slave (M/S). The selected mode
is stored and set as the default when the unit is initially
powered up.
To open the General Setup Screen, navigate to the
Setup Menu, highlight General and press the PRESS
FOR MENU/SELECT control.
All other channels operate at Line level only. When this
option is selected for an output channel that does not
support the Mic level feature, the value N/A will appear
on the screen. (See screen samples.)
⇓
M/L is accessed by pressing the appropriate Item
Select Button below the LCD. Rotate the PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT control to set the output source, then
press the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control to accept
the selection.
⇓
Gain
GAI is used to view or change the gain for the selected
output channel.
Screen Title
GAI is accessed by pressing the appropriate Item
Select Button below the LCD. Rotate the PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT control to set the output gain, then
press the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control to accept
the selection. The gain that can be applied to each output is adjustable from -70 dB to +20 dB in 1 dB increments.
Mute
Items List
Parameter
Display Area
There are four sections to the Input Setup Screen:
Screen Title, Items List, Parameter Display Area and
Channel. The various entries in the Items List are accessed via the Item Select Buttons below the LCD.
Master/Slave Mode
M/S is used to configure the DM as a Master or a Slave
unit. A change made through this screen comes into
effect the first time power is cycled after the value is set.
The MUT control is used to mute or unmute the selected output channel.
MUT is accessed by pressing the appropriate Item
Select Button below the LCD. Rotate the PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT control to set the output source, then
press the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control to accept
the selection. Select “Mute” to silence the output from
the selected channel, or “Unmute” to allow the output to
pass.
Rio Rancho, NM
M/S is accessed by pressing the appropriate Item
Select Button bel ow the LCD. Rotate the PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT control to set the value (MASTER or
SLAVE), then press the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT
control to accept the selection.
17
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
After cycling the power, navigate to the SysInfo screen
and check the status of the unit (see System Information Screen). A stand-alone unit must be set to the
MASTER mode and will present itself as “Unit: 01 of 01”
on the SysInfo screen. If a unit is set to SLAVE, but is
running by itself or not connected to a Master unit, an
error message will appear at power up stating that no
Master is detected.
Preset Setup Screens
Preset setup screens differ from the other setup
screens in that changes in a Preset screen makes permanent changes in the DM’s nonvolatile memory.
In order for the change to become effective, the change
must be “OK’d” prior to exiting the screen to prevent accidental loss of data.
NOTE: As a safeguard, the OK button must be
pressed to confirm an action before pressing the
PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control to initiate the
action.
In the example, the STO (store active setup) action has
been selected, with preset 1 as the destination. In the
lower screen, “OK” has been selected. When PUSH
FOR MENU/SELECT control is pressed, preset 1 will
be overwritten with the contents of the active setup. In
this case, Act: 3 is the active setup.
If “OK” had not been selected, pressing the PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT control would have had no effect.
To open the Presets Setup Screen, navigate to the TopMenu, use the PRESS FOR MENU/SELECT control
to highlight Presets, then press the control to open the
Presets Setup Screen.
The Preset screens require an additional step to
apply the action selected - the OK button. This
provides a safeguard against accidental preset
activities or overwriting a stored preset.
⇓
DEF - PowUpDef
⇓
Default Setup
DEF is used to view or change the setting for the
powerup default preset. This preset then becomes the
active (default) configuration the next time the unit’s
power is cycled.
Active Setup
Screen Title
Items List
Parameter
Display Area
There are four sections to the Input Setup Screen:
Screen Title, Items List, Parameter Display Area and
Default/Active Setup. The various entries in the Items
List are accessed via the Item Select Buttons below the
LCD.
Using the “OK” Item on all screens
Because actions available through the Preset Control
screens result in permanent changes to the DM’s nonvolatile memory, a three-step sequence is required to
make changes.
The first step is to select the Preset Control screen and
make the necessary changes in that screen. The second step is to use “OK” to authorize the change. Finally,
the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control is pressed to
change the units nonvolatile memory.
18
DEF is accessed by pressing the appropriate Item
Select Button below the LCD. Rotate the PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT control to set the value, then, using the Item Select Button, select “OK.” Finally, press
the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control to accept the
selection.
FAC - SetToFac
FAC is used to reset the contents of a memory preset
location to factory default settings.
FAC is accessed by pressing the appropriate Item
Select Button below the LCD. Rotate the PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT control to set the value, then, using the Item Select Button, select “OK.” Finally, press
the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control to accept the
selection.
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Reference Manual
STO - Store To
STO is used to copy the contents of the active setup to
a selected memory preset location.
DM’s can be used as stand-alone units or as part of
a multiply unit chain. A unit’s placement as “01 of 01”
indicates that it is a stand-alone system. If a unit is
part of a multiple unit stack, it’s placement in that stack
would be identified – “02 or 03”, “03 of 03”, etc.
Stacking Multiple Units
STO is accessed by pressing the appropriate Item
Select Button below the LCD. Rotate the PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT control to set the value, then, using the Item Select Button, select “OK.” Finally, press
the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control to accept the
selection.
NOTE: STO is typically used the permanently store
changes made to a preset configuration so that they are
not “forgotten” when the device is powered down.
When two or more units are stacked together, one must
always be configured as MASTER and all others as
SLAVE. (See General Settings, Master/Slave Mode for
setting the appropriate mode.)
In the example, three units are stacked, with the MASTER on top and two SLAVE units below. The MASTER
unit is identified as “01 of 03” in the unit’s placement
section of the System Information Screen. The two
slave units are identified as “02 of 03” and “03 of 03.”
REC - Recall
REC is used to recall an existing preset configuration
from memory.
REC is accessed by pressing the appropriate Item
Select Button below the LCD. Rotate the PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT control to set the value, then, using the Item Select Button, select “OK.” Finally, press
the PUSH FOR MENU/SELECT control to accept the
selection.
System Information Screen
The SysInfo screen provides the basic information
about the unit and its present state in the system. This
screen has four sections: firmware version, serial number, active preset and unit’s placement.
The Active Preset is the last preset recalled; however, it
may not reflect the unit’s current configuration. Changes
to the unit’s configuration may have been made after
the preset was called.
⇓
The SysInfo screen is used to verify the correct installation and wiring of multiple units. At power up, slave
units will wait for a sync signal from the master and then
position themselves in order below the master according to their physical position in the chain. Miswiring of
the expansion cables, a bad connection or other problems will produce an error message on one or more
screens.
Locking Front Panel Controls
The front panel controls can be locked to prevent accidental configuration changes. When the front panel
controls are locked, pressing any key will result in the
Locked screen being displayed.
Firmware
Version
Serial
Number
Unit’s placement in
multiple unit chains
Rio Rancho, NM
Active
Preset
19
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
The LockSet Setup Screen is passcode protected. This
passcode is required to lock or unlock the front panel
controls.
Press the Item Select Buttons below the display in the
sequence shown at below to enter the default passcode.
To open the LockSet Setup Screen, navigate to the
TopMenu, use the PRESS FOR MENU/SELECT control to highlight LockSet, then press the control to open
the LockSet Setup Screen. The LockSet Setup Screen
that opens depends on whether the panel controls have
been locked, or if they are unlocked.
After the passcode is entered, four symbols will appear
in the upper right section of the screen to confirm the
button presses. Press the PRESS FOR MENU/SELECT control to accept the passcode.
⇓
Passcode Item Select Button
confirmation
Locked/Unlock State
If the passcode is correct the LOCKED/UNLOCKED
state will toggle to the opposite state. If the passcode is
invalid an “Invalid” error message will briefly appear.
Changing the Passcode
or
The unit comes from the factory with a default passcode
of 1,2,3,4. To change the passcode, navigate to the
LockSet Setup Screen. (It does not matter if the front
panel controls are locked or unlocked.)
⇓
⇓
Entering the Passcode
A passcode is needed to lock or unlock the front panel
controls. This passcode consists of four Item Select
Buttons with the buttons pressed in a preset sequence.
The factory default passcode is 1,2,3,4, corresponding
to the first four Item Select Buttons reading from left to
right. The passcode can be changed, but must always
consist of a sequence of four numerals from 1 to 6 with
each number representing an Item Select Button.
Simultaneously press the BACK and Reserved push
buttons to open the Passcode Change screen. You will
be prompted to enter the existing passcode.
Reserved Button
PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT
BACK
Back Button
Item Select Buttons
⇓
1
2
3
4
The factory default passcode is 1, 2, 3, 4
from left to right.
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LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
Use the Item Select Buttons to enter the existing passcode. Symbols will appear in the upper right section of
the screen to confirm button presses as you enter the
passcode. Press the PRESS FOR MENU/SELECT
control to accept the old passcode. If the passcode
is not correct, an “Invalid” error message will appear
briefly on the screen.
Passcode Item Select Button
confirmation
PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT
BACK
Button 2
Button 5
Item Select Buttons
Command View Screen
The Command View Screen is a convenient utility to
assist in verifying correct serial commands have been
sent from an external device, such as a computer
system, to the unit. This screen is used primarily for
diagnostics when setting up or troubleshooting serial
remote control systems.
Item Select Buttons
When the existing passcode has been accepted, the
“Old” screen will be replaced by the “New:” screen.
⇓
Use the Item Select Buttons to enter the new four digit
passcode. Like before, symbols will appear in the upper right section of the screen to confirm button presses
as you enter the new passcode.
Passcode Item Select Button
confirmation
Navigate to the TopMenu and use the PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT control to highlight CmdView.
The Command View Screen displays a rolling list of the
serial commands as they arrive in the unit. Each command that is received will appear on a separate line in
the screen.
Serial Port Speed Adjustment
The Serial Port Screen is used to set the baud rate for
the units RS-232 serial input port.
Item Select Buttons
Navigate to the TopMenu, then rotate the PUSH FOR
MENU/SELECT control to highlight SerPort. Press the
control to access the Serial Port Setup Screen.
NOTE: The passcode must always include four
button presses
Restoring the default passcode
NOTE: Hold in buttons 2 and 5 while powering up
to restore the factory default passcode: 1, 2, 3, 4
Rio Rancho, NM
Parameter
Display Area
⇓
To restore the passcode to the factory default setting,
press and hold Item Select Buttons 2 and 5 in while
powering up the power. Hold the buttons through the
entire Boot Sequence. The passcode will be reset to
the factory default: 1, 2, 3, 4.
Screen Title
Items List
21
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
The current Baud Rate is displayed. Rotate the PUSH
FOR MENU/SELECT control to change the baud rate,
The new baud rate takes effect immediately.
NOTE: When using the RS-232 serial port in conjunction with the GUI software, the baud rate must be set
to 57600 or the GUI will not be able to connect to the
device.
EXIT
To exit the TopMenu, rotate the PUSH FOR MENU/
SELECT control to highlight EXIT, then press the control. This exits the TopMenu and returns to the screen
displaying the Model number.
⇓
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Reference Manual
Installing LecNet2™ Software and USB Driver
The LecNet2 USB drivers are installed from the Installation Disk which comes with each processor by running
the LecNet2 Device Installer. Normally, this is done
before connecting a processor for the first time, however, it can done afterwards if necessary. The driver
installation only needs to be done once.
Step 2
The LecNet2 Device Installer opens:
If a LecNet device is connected to a PC without prior
installation of the driver from the Installation Disk,
manual installation is possible in the cases of Windows
XP and Vista operating systems using the New Hardware Found wizard. In the case of Windows 7, there is
no New Hardware Found wizard, so manual installation
is a bit more involved. In any of these cases, it’s not
really necessary - just cancel the New Hardware Found
wizard (if open) and run the LecNet2 Device Installer
from the Installation Disk.
Installation with LecNet2 Device Installer
Step 1
Place the LecNet2 Installation Disk into the CD-ROM
drive on the computer. If Auto Run is enabled on that
drive, the installation utility will open.
Click Next to proceed
Step 3
The EULA is presented:
If AutoRun is not enabled, use Start>Run to run autoRun.exe on the drive holding the LecNet2 Installation
Disk.
If the CD-ROM drive is assigned as drive E: then type
E:\autoRun.exe in the window and press Enter to open
the LecNet2 utility.
Accept, then click Next to proceed.
With Windows Vista and 7 operating systems, click on
the Windows logo at the bottom left of the desktop, then
type E:\autoRun.exe into the search field just above
the Windows logo.
Two versions of the USB driver installer are provided for
different types of Windows PC:
• 32-bit Windows, click on Install USB Drivers (32-bit)
• 63-bit Windows, click on Install USB Drivers (64-bit)
Click on the option that is correct for your PC.
Rio Rancho, NM
23
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
Manual Installation
If the USB drivers have not been pre-installed on a PC
prior to connecting a LecNet2 device for the very first
time, you may install the manually if you wish.
On Windows XP and Vista operating systems, the
Found New Hardware Wizard will open when the device is detected. It will walk you through the process of
installing the LecNet2 drivers. To proceed, you will need
the LecNet2 Installation Disk. Click on the following link
and follow the instructions:
Windows XP USB driver manual installation guide
The drivers are installed from the CD. When installation
is complete, the final page of the installer will appear.
On Windows 7 operating systems, the system attempts
to find a driver automatically when the device is detected. If it cannot find one, it notifies the user that driver
installation failed. In this case, the Windows Device
Manager is used to install the drivers. To proceed, you
will need the LecNet2 Installation Disk. Follow these
instructions:
Windows 7 USB driver manual installation guide
The Driver Name and Status are displayed. Click on
Finish to close the installer. You may new connect any
LecNet2 device to the PC and drivers will be loaded
automatically.
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LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
Firmware Updates
Using the Update Wizard
The control panel can be used to download firmware
updates to the DM units. The Update Wizard guides you
through the steps of the update process. Since a failed
firmware update can leave the DM in an unusable state,
it is important to follow the instructions in the Update
Wizard exactly. This procedure uses a DM1624F; however, it applies to all units in the DM series.
NOTE: The update process is possible only using
a USB connection.
Firmware updates are distributed as a file whose name
follows the pattern “DM1624F-vX_X_X.update”, where
the “X_X_X” is a placeholder for a firmware version
number. For example a firmware update for version
number “1.1.12” would have the filename “DM1624Fv1_1_12.update”. The dots normally used to separate
the three parts of the version number are replaced with
underscores in the filename for clarity.
Before starting make sure that the proper update file is
on hand. Connect the DM1624F to a computer system with a USB cable. Apply power to the DM1624F
and start the control panel software on the computer
system.
3. Any LecNet2 device detected on the USB port will
be listed. Click the DM unit to be updated. If nothing
appears on the list, or the unit to be updated does
not appear, check that the USB cable is connected
and click Refresh List.
Once the DM1624F is selected, click Next to move
to SELECT UPDATE FILE.
1. Choose File->Update... from the Control Panel
Menu Bar to open the Update DM1624F Firmware
Wizard.
2. The first page of the Wizard displays instructions
for the process of forcing the DM1624F into update
mode. Follow them carefully and then click Next to
move to the SELECT DEVICE FOR UPDATE.
Rio Rancho, NM
25
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
4. Enter the file name for the update in the Path to
Update File field or click the browse button next
to the filename field to locate the update file. If the
browse button is clicked, the Select DM1624F update file dialog opens. If the file name was entered
manually, click Next.
26
If the browse button was clicked, select the update
file from the list and click Open to transfer that filename to the Path to Update File field. Then click
Next.
5.Click Start Update to begin the firmware update.
The update is made in two stages, an update of the
DM controller firmware, followed by an update of
the DSP firmware. The progress bar indicates the
status of each update stage.
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Reference Manual
The entire process will take 15 minutes or so. A
notification message appears when the update is
finished. Follow the instructions in the message to
verify that the DM1624F restarts with the updated
firmware version.
Click Finish to close the Wizard. At this point you
can connect to the newly updated DM1624F with
the control panel. The updated firmware version
number should appear in the status bar.
Click OK to dismiss the message. At this point the
process is complete and the Wizard will be ready to
close.
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27
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
Serial Interface and Control Commands
Serial commands are delivered to the unit via the USB
or RS-232 interfaces to allow remote control of the
device. The command language is simple and intuitive
to ease the task of programming.
Wildcards
The only wildcard available for use with the DM commands is the “*”. This wildcard is used to mean “all” in
the commands.
Differences between DM units
The DM1624F, DM1612F and DM812 operate the
same, only differing in the number of inputs and outputs
available. The DM1624F has 16 inputs and 24 outputs. The DM1612F has 16 inputs and 12 outputs. The
DM812 has eight inputs and 12 outputs. (The DM812
is also physically half the height of the other DM units.)
The following explanations refer to a DM1624F; however, the commands work with other DM units as long
as the correct inputs and output parameters are used.
DM General Commands
CommandDescription
actpre
Active preset number
baud
Serial port baud rate
default
Set a memory preset to factory defaults
defpre
Location of memory preset recalled
on powerup
desc
Device description string
id
Device id string
macro
Macro command
macroti
Macro title
phmixen
Phantom mix mode enable
predesc
Preset description
premsk
Prset load mask
rank
Rank of device in group of connected
devices
recall
Recall a memory preset
run
Run a macro
serial
Device serial number string
sleep
Suspend macro execution
store
Store settings to a memory preset location
version
Device firmware version
NOTE: All commands are terminated with an
ASCII carriage return character (hex code 0x0D),
represented by <CR> in the examples. All
responses are terminated with an ASCII carriage
return, line feed pair (hex codes 0x0D, 0x0A),
represented by <CRLF> in the examples. An
ellipsis (...) represents members of an array that
have been omitted from an example for the sake
of brevity.
actpre (active preset)
This command is used as a query to determine which
memory preset is active. The active preset is the last
preset called from memory. The data is an integer type
in the range 1 to 24. The active preset value is not be
assigned directly, but is assigned through the use of the
recall command. (See recall (recall preset).)
Example:
Request
actpre?<CR>
Query
OK 12<CRLF>
baud (baud rate)
This command is used as a query to determine the
baud rate setting for the serial port, or as an update to
set the baud rate. The data is an integer type. The following values are allowed:
9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, 115200
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
Response
baud?<CR>
OK 57600<CRLF>
baud=57600<CR>OK<CRLF>
default (default settings)
This command is used to restore a memory preset to
the factory defaults. The preset location to be modified
is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses
must be in the range 1 to 24. No data is transferred.
Example:
Request
Response
default(3)<CR>OK<CRLF>
Command
defpre (default preset)
This command is used as a query to determine the
memory preset location used as the powerup default,
or as an update to set the default preset. The data is
an integer type in the range 0 to 24, where “0” has the
special meaning. If the data is a “0”, that means the
preset that was active when the unit was last powered
down will be recalled. This provides a “memory” capability useful for some applications, and is called the Last
Preset option.
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
defpre?<CR>
Response
OK 11<CRLF>
defpre=2<CR>OK<CRLF>
desc (description)
This command is used as a query to read the user
defined device description, or as an update to set the
description. The data is a string type, with a limit of 32
characters.
Examples:
Request
Response
Query
desc?<CR>
OK “Aloha Room
East”<CRLF>
Update
28
Response
desc=”Courtrm12”<CR>OK<CRLF>
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
id (device id)
This command is used as a query to read the device id
string. This is the “name” of the device used by the Lecnet2 protocol and is always “DMXXXX”, where “XXXX”
is the model number (DM1624F, DM1612F, DM812,
etc.). The data is a string type.
Example:
Request
Query
id?<CR>
Response
OK “DM1624F”<CRLF>
This command may be used as a query to determine
the “phantom” mix mode enable status. It may also be
used as an update to enable/disable this mix mode.
When enabled, the behavior of the “background” mix
mode for matrix crosspoints is changed:
The input at the crosspoint does participate in the
Adaptive Proportional Gain automixing process to the
extent that it’s level influences the gain of other inputs
assigned to the same output (NOM bus).
However the input signal at the crosspoint does not
actually get mixed into the output channel.
macro (macro command)
This command is used as a query to read one command from a macro, or as an update to set a command.
The command is specified by using a two dimensional
address syntax. Addresses for the first dimension
specify the macro and must be and integer in the range
1 to 128. Addresses for the second dimension specify
the index of the command within the macro and must
be and integer in the range 1 to 64. The data type is
string, with a limit of 110 characters.
Examples:
Request
phmixen (phantom mix mode enable)
Response
This is a global setting - it affects all matrix crosspoints
that have been configured to use “background” mix
mode (the behavior of the other mix modes is unchanged). The data type is integer, either “1” meaning
enabled, or “0” meaning disabled. Note: this command
available with DM1624F firmware version 1.5.0 or
higher only.
Examples:
RequestResponse
Query
phmixen?<CR>
OK 0<CRLF>
Updatephmixen=0<CR> OK<CRLF>
Query
macro(1,3)?<CR>OK”ingn(3)=55”
<CRLF>
Update
macro(12,50)=
”xpmt(2,10)=1”<CR>
OK 12<CRLF>
macroti (macro title)
This command is used as a query to read the title of
a macro, or as an update to set the title. The macro
is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses
must be integers in the range 1 to 128. The data type is
string, with a limit of 30 characters.
Examples:
Request
Response
Query
macroti(1)?<CR>
OK”Sidebar nbr 2”
<CRLF>
Update
OK<CRLF>
macroti(12)=
”Setup #3 West”<CR>
predesc (preset description)
This command is used as a query to read the user
defined preset description, or as an update to set the
description. The data is a string type, with a limit of 60
characters.
Examples:
RequestResponse
Query
predesc?<CR>
OK”Wedding #1, no
hallway speakers”
<CRLF>
Updatepredesc=”Weekly
Rotary Club breakfast
meeting.”<CR>OK<CRLF>
premsk (default preset mask)
This command is used as a query to determine the
default preset mask in effect, or as an update to set the
default mask. The preset mask is a number that determines if certain mute and rear panel gain settings are
preserved or overwritten when a preset recall occurs.
The default mask is in effect unless overridden by the
recall command. The data is an integer type formed by
adding together one or more of the following values:
1 - preserves input channel rear panel gain settings
2 - preserves input channel mute settings
4 - preserves output channel rear panel gain settings
8 - preserves output channel mute settings
16 - preserves the state of programmable inputs
32 - preserves programmable input fu nction
definitions
Rio Rancho, NM
29
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
For example, to preserve input and output mutes on
preset recalls, but not the rear panel gains, the mask
value would be calculated as 2 + 8 = 10. A value of “0”
means that the preset recall is “hard”, with all mutes
and rear panel gains overwritten by the values contained in the newly active preset.
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
premsk?<CR>
Response
OK 2<CRLF>
premsk=5<CR>OK<CRLF>
Example:
Request
run(3)<CR>OK<CRLF>
Command
run(1,3,5)<CR>OK<CRLF>
Update
serial (serial number)
This command is used as a query to read the device
serial number. The data is a string type.
Example:
Request
Query
rank (rank in Lecnet2 chain)
This command is used as a query to determine the
rank of the unit within a chain in interconnected Lecnet2
devices. For example, in a group of 3 devices, the “top,”
or “master” unit will have the rank “1 of 3,” while the last
unit in the chain will have rank “3 of 3.” The data type is
array of integer, of size two. The first value indicates the
position of the unit, the second indicates the number of
devices in the chain.
Example:
Request
Query
rank?<CR>
Response
OK {1,2}<CRLF>
Request
Query
Update
Example:
Request
recall(4)=1<CR>OK<CRLF>
This command is used to run a macro (an internally
stored group of DM commands). A single macro may be
run using the command form. In this case, the macro is
specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must
be in the range 1 to 128. More than one macro may be
run with a single command by using the Update form. In
this case, the data is array of integer, with the variable
length in the range 1 to 16. The values contained in the
array specify which macros to be run. (Note: the Update
form is available with frimware verions 1.3.1 or higher.)
No data is transferred.
30
Response
sleep=2000<CR>OK<CRLF>
store (store settings to preset)
This command is used to store current settings to a
memory preset. The preset location to be updated is
specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must
be in the range 1 to 24. No data is transferred.
Example:
Request
Response
store(3)<CR>OK<CRLF>
Command
Response
recall(3)<CR>OK<CRLF>
run (run a macro)
OK {1234}<CRLF>
This command is used as an update to suspend the execution of commands within a macro for a fixed period
of time specified in milliseconds. The data is an integer
type in the range 0 to 30000. This allows the timing of a
series of actions performed by the macro to be controlled. (Note: This command is available with firmware
version 1.3.1 or higher only.)
recall (recall preset)
Example:
Response
serial?<CR>
sleep (suspend macro execution)
Update
This command is used to recall a memory preset, making it the active preset. The preset location to be recalled
is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses are
integers and must be in the range 1 to 24. If used as a
simple command, no data is transferred, and the preset
recall is controlled by the default preset mask. If used as
an update, the data type is an integer whose value serves
as the preset mask for the recall operation, overriding the
default preset mask. (See premsk.)
Response
version (firmware version)
This command is used as a query to read the device
firmware version number. The data is a string type.
Example:
Request
Query
version?<CR>
Response
OK “1.0.1”<CRLF>
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
DM1624F Audio Input Commands
incl (input clipping)
CommandDescription
inact
incl
indel
ingn
iniv
inlb
inlv
inmt
inmttog
inph
Audio input activity status
Audio input clipping status
Audio input delay
Audio input gain
Audio input phase invert status
Audio input channel label
Audio input level (dBu RMS)
Audio input mute status
Audio input mute toggle
Audio input phantom power status
NOTE: All commands are terminated with an
ASCII carriage return character (hex code 0x0D),
represented by <CR> in the examples. All
responses are terminated with an ASCII carriage
return, line feed pair (hex codes 0x0D, 0x0A),
represented by <CRLF> in the examples. An
ellipsis (...) represents members of an array that
have been omitted from an example for the sake
of brevity.
inact (input activity)
This command is used to determine if an audio input
channel is active. An audio input channel is considered
active if it has less than 3 dB of attenuation assigned to
it by the automixing algorithm for some particular output
channel. Two forms exist for this command:
• Query for input channel activity on ANY output The input channel is specified by using the address
syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 16.
The data type is integer, either “1” meaning that
the channel is active on at least one of the output
channels, or “0” meaning that it is not. If the channel
address is a wildcard, then the data type is an array
of integer of size 16.
Examples:
• Query for input channel activity on a SPECIFIC
output - An output channel/input channel pair
is specified by using the 2 dimensional address
syntax. Addresses for the first dimension (output
channel) must be in the range 1 to 24. Addresses
for the second dimension (input channel) must be in
the range 1 to 16. The data type is integer, either “1”
meaning that the channel is active on the specified
output channel, or “0” meaning that it is not. If the
input channel address is a wildcard, then the data
type is an array of integer of size 16. The output
channel address may not be a wildcard.
NOTE: This form was introduced with DM1624F
firmware version 1.2.0 and will will not work
correctly on earlier versions.
Examples:
Request
Query
inact(15)?<CR>
Response
This command is used to determine if an audio input
channel is clipping, i.e., it is being overdriven by the
input signal to the point of saturating the analog to
digital converter. The input channel is specified by using
the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range
1 to 16. The data type is integer, either “1” or “0.” A “1”
means the channel is in clipping. A “0” means that it is
not in clipping. If the channel address is a wildcard, then
the data type is an array of integer of size 16.
Examples:
Request
Query
incl(7)?<CR>
Response
OK 1<CRLF>
Query
incl(*)?<CR>OK
{0,0,0,...,0,0,0}
<CRLF>
indel (input delay)
This command is used as a query to read the input
delay, or as an update to set the delay. The input channel is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses
must be in the range 1 to 16. The data type is integer,
in the range 0 to 2000, representing the time delay in
one half millisecond increments. If the channel address
is a wildcard, then the data type is an array of integer
of size 16. In this case the value 9999 may be used in
an update to indicate that a particular input delay is to
remain unchanged by the command.
Examples:
Request
Query
indel(1)?<CR>
Response
OK 42<CRLF>
Query
indel(*)?<CR>OK
{0,40,0,...,0,0}
<CRLF>
Update
Update
indel(15)+30<CR>OK<CRLF>
indel(*)=
{12,0,...,8,9999}<CR>OK<CRLF>
ingn (input gain)
This command is used as a query to read the input
channel gain, or as an update to set the gain. The input
channel is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 16. The data type is
integer, in the range -10 to +60, representing the gain
in dB. If the channel address is a wildcard, then the
data type is an array of integer of size 16. In this case
the value 99 may be used in an update to indicate that
a particular input gain is to remain unchanged by the
command.
OK 0<CRLF>
Query
inact(*)?<CR>OK
{0,1,0,...,0,0,0}
<CRLF>
Rio Rancho, NM
31
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
Examples:
Request
Query
ingn(1)?<CR>
Response
OK 42<CRLF>
Query
ingn(*)?<CR>OK
{40,40,50,...,0,0,0}
<CRLF>
Update
Update
ingn(15)=30<CR>OK<CRLF>
ingn(*)=
{40,40,50,...,8,99,99}<CR>OK<CRLF>
This command is used as a query to read the input
channel phase invert status, or as an update to set
the status. The input channel is specified by using the
address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to
16. The data type is integer, either “1” meaning that
the input has the audio phase inverted (shifted by 180
degrees), or “0” meaning that it is not. If the channel
address is a wildcard, then the data type is an array
of integer of size 16. In this case the value 99 may be
used in an update to indicate that a particular input
invert state is to remain unchanged by the command.
Examples:
Query
Query
Update
Update
iniv(9)?<CR>
Response
OK 0<CRLF>
iniv(*)?<CR>OK{0,1,...,0,0}<CRLF>
iniv(2)=1<CR>OK<CRLF>
iniv(*)=
{0,0,1,...,99,99,99}<CR>OK<CRLF>
inlb (input channel label)
This command is used as a query to read the input
channel text label, or as an update to set the label. The
input channel is specified by using the address syntax.
Addresses must be in the range 1 to 16. The data type
is string, with a limit of 15 characters.
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
Response
inlb(1)?<CR>OK”Chairman”<CRLF>
inlb(12)=”#3 West”<CR>
This command is used as a query to read the input
channel mute status, or as an update to set the status.
The input channel is specified by using the address
syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 16. The
data type is integer, either “1” meaning that the input is
muted, or “0” meaning that it is not. If the channel address is a wildcard, then the data type is an array of integer of size 16. In this case the value 99 may be used
in an update to indicate that a particular input mute is to
remain unchanged by the command.
Examples:
iniv (input phase invert)
Request
inmt (input mute)
OK<CRLF>
Request
Query
Query
Update
This command is used as a query to read the input channel level. The input channel is specified by using the
address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 16.
The data type is integer, in the range -70 to +20, representing the RMS audio level in dBu as measured AFTER
the input preamplifier. If the channel address is a wildcard,
then the data type is an array of integer of size 16.
inmt(9)?<CR>
OK 1<CRLF>
inmt(*)?<CR>OK{0,1,...,0,0}<CRLF>
inmt(2)=0<CR>OK<CRLF>
Update inmt(*)=
{0,0,...,99,99}<CR> OK<CRLF>
inmttog (input mute toggle)
This command is used as a simple command to toggle
the input channel mute status. The input channel is
specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must
be in the range 1 to 16.
Examples:
Request
Response
inmttog(4)<CR>OK<CRLF>
Command
inph (input phantom power)
This command is used as a query to read the input
phantom power status, or as an update to set the status. The input channel is specified by using the address
syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 16. The
data type is integer, either “1” meaning that phantom
power is enabled, or “0” meaning that it is not. If the
channel address is a wildcard, then the data type is an
array of integer of size 16.
Examples:
Request
Query
inlv (input level)
Response
inph(9)?<CR>
Query
inph(*)?<CR>
OK{1,1,...,0,0}<CRLF>
Update
Response
OK 1<CRLF>
inph(14)=0<CR>OK<CRLF>
Update inph(*)=
{0,1,...,1,1}<CR>OK<CRLF>
Examples:
Request
Query
inlv(1)?<CR>
Response
OK -23<CRLF>
Update inlv(*)?<CR>OK
{-2,4,...,-53,-71}
<CRLF>
32
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
DM1624F Matrix Crosspoint Commands
CommandDescription
xpgn
xpmode
xpmt
xpmttog
Matrix crosspoint gain
Matrix crosspoint mix mode
Matrix crosspoint mute status
Matrix crosspoint mute toggle
NOTE: All commands are terminated with an
ASCII carriage return character (hex code 0x0D),
represented by <CR> in the examples. All
responses are terminated with an ASCII carriage
return, line feed pair (hex codes 0x0D, 0x0A),
represented by <CRLF> in the examples. An
ellipsis (...) represents members of an array that
have been omitted from an example for the sake
of brevity.
This command is used as a query to read the matrix
crosspoint gain, or as an update to set the gain. The
crosspoint is specified by using the 2 dimensional address syntax. Addresses for the first dimension (input
channel) must be in the range 1 to 16. Addresses for
the second dimension (output channel) must be in the
range 1 to 24, or wildcard. If the output channel is a
wildcard, then the command applies to the entire row
of the matrix associated with the specified input channel. The data type is integer, in the range -70 to +20,
representing the gain in dB. If an entire row is being
transmitted then the data type is array of integer of size
24. In this case the value 99 may be used in an update
to indicate that a particular crosspoint gain is to remain
unchanged by the command.
Examples:
Query
xpgn(1,17)?<CR>
Response
OK -3<CRLF>
Query
xpgn(1,*)?<CR>OK{0,3,0,...,0,0,0}
<CRLF>
Update
Update
Examples:
RequestResponse
UPDATE
xpgnst(2,2)=2<CR>OK<CRLF>
UPDATE
xpgnst(*,3)={2,2,2,...0,0,0}<CR>OK<CRLF>
UPDATE
xpgnst(3,*)={-1,-1,-1,...0,0,0}<CR>OK<CRLF>
xpmode (crosspoint mix mode)
xpgn (crosspoint gain)
Request
-6 to +6, representing the gain step in dB. A positive
value increments the gain, a negative value decrements
the gain. If an entire column is being transmitted then
the data type is array of integer of size 16. If an entire
row is being transmitted then the data type is array of
integer of size 24.
xpgn(15,22)=5<CR>OK<CRLF>
xpgn(15,*)=
{0,5,...,99,99}<CR>OK<CRLF>
This command is used as a query to read the matrix
crosspoint mix mode, or as an update to set the mode.
The crosspoint is specified by using the 2 dimensional
address syntax. Addresses for the first dimension (input
channel) must be in the range 1 to 16. Addresses for
the second dimension (output channel) must be in the
range 1 to 24, or a wildcard. If the output channel is a
wildcard, then the command applies to the entire row
of the matrix associated with the specified input channel. The data type is integer, with the following values
allowed:
0 - means that the crosspoint is in DIRECT mode
1 - means that the crosspoint is in OVERRIDE mode
2 - means that the crosspoint is in BACKGROUND
mode
3 - means that the crosspoint is in AUTO mode
If an entire row is being transmitted then the data type
is array of integer of size 24. In this case the value 99
may be used in an update to indicate that a particular
crosspoint mix mode is to remain unchanged by the
command.
Examples:
Request
Query
xpgnst (matrix crosspoint gain step change)
This command is used as an update to step the gain by
the amount specified, either up or down. The crosspoint
is specified by using the 2 dimensional address syntax.
Addresses for the first dimension (input channel) must
be in the range 1 to 16, or wildcarded. Addresses for
the second dimension (output channel) must be in the
range 1 to 24, or wildcarded. If the input is wildcarded,
then the command applies to the entire column of the
matrix associated with the specified output channel. If
the output is wildcarded, then the command applies to
the entire row of the matrix associated with the specified input channel. The data type is integer, in the range
Rio Rancho, NM
Query
Update
Update
xpmode(5,9)?<CR>
Response
OK 3<CRLF>
xpmode(1,*)?<CR>OK{3,0,...,3,3}<CRLF>
xpmode(16,1)=0<CR>OK<CRLF>
xpmode(15,*)=
{3,1,3,...,99,99,3}<CR>OK<CRLF>
33
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
xpmt (crosspoint mute)
This command is used as a query to read the matrix
crosspoint mute status, or as an update to set the status. The crosspoint is specified by using the two dimensional address syntax. Addresses for the first dimension
(input channel) must be in the range 1 to 16. Addresses
for the second dimension (output channel) must be in
the range 1 to 24, or a wildcard. If the output channel is
a wildcard, then the command applies to the entire row
of the matrix associated with the specified input channel. The data type is integer, either “1” meaning that the
crosspoint is muted, or “0” meaning that it is not muted.
If an entire row is being transmitted then the data type
is array of integer of size 24. In this case the value 99
may be used in an update to indicate that a particular
crosspoint mute is to remain unchanged by the command.
Examples:
Request
Query
Query
Update
Update
xpmt(3,19)?<CR>
Response
OK 1<CRLF>
xpmt(5,*)?<CR>OK{0,0,...,1,0}<CRLF>
xpmt(16,1)=0<CR>OK<CRLF>
xpmt(15,*)=
{3,1,3,...,99,99,3}<CR>OK<CRLF>
xpmttog (crosspoint mute toggle)
This command is used as a simple command to toggle
the matrix crosspoint mute status. The crosspoint is
specified by using the two dimensional address syntax.
Addresses for the first dimension (input channel) must
be in the range 1 to 16. Addresses for the second dimension (output channel) must be in the range 1 to 24.
Example:
Request
Command
Response
xpmttog(3,19)<CR>OK<CRLF>
CommandDescription
outdel
outgn
outlb
outlv
outmic
outmt
outmttog
outsrc
Audio output delay
Audio output gain
Audio output channel label
Audio output level (dBu RMS)
Audio output mic/line level status
Audio output mute status
Audio output mute toggle
Audio output channel signal source
NOTE: All commands are terminated with an
ASCII carriage return character (hex code 0x0D),
represented by <CR> in the examples. All
responses are terminated with an ASCII carriage
return, line feed pair (hex codes 0x0D, 0x0A),
represented by <CRLF> in the examples. An
ellipsis (...) represents members of an array that
have been omitted from an example for the sake
of brevity.
34
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
DM1624F Audio Output Commands
outdel (output delay)
This command is used as a query to read the output
channel delay, or as an update to set the delay. The
output channel is specified by using the address syntax.
Addresses must be in the range 1 to 24. The data type
is integer, in the range 0 to 10000, representing the
time delay in one half millisecond increments. If the
channel address is a wildcard, then the data type is an
array of integer of size 24. In this case the value 20000
may be used in an update to indicate that a particular
output delay is to remain unchanged by the command.
Examples:
Request
Query
outdel(1)?<CR>
Response
Update
outdel(22)=500<CR>OK<CRLF>
outdel(15,*)=
{0,0,...,100,20000}<CR>OK<CRLF>
outgn (output gain)
This command is used as a query to read the output
channel gain, or as an update to set the gain. The
output channel is specified by using the address syntax.
Addresses must be in the range 1 to 24. The data type
is integer, in the range -70 to +20, representing the gain
in dB. If the channel address is a wildcard, then the
data type is an array of integer of size 24. In this case
the value 99 may be used in an update to indicate that
a particular output gain is to remain unchanged by the
command.
Examples:
Request
Query
Query
Update
Update
outgn(1)?<CR>
Response
OK -3<CRLF>
outgn(*)?<CR>OK{3,-4,...,0,0}<CRLF>
outgn(22)=5<CR>OK<CRLF>
outgn(15,*)=
{0,-5,6,...,0,99,99}<CR>OK<CRLF>
This command is used as a query to read the output
channel text label, or as an update to set the label. The
output channel is specified by using the address syntax.
Addresses must be in the range 1 to 24. The data type
is string, with a limit of 15 characters.
Examples:
Query
outlb(1)?<CR>
Update outlb(12)=
”Gallery”<CR>
Request
Query
outlv(21)?<CR>
Response
OK -23<CRLF>
Query
outlv(*)?<CR>OK
{-4,-66,...,-59,-4}
<CRLF>
outmic (output mic level)
This command is used as a query to read the output
mic level status, or as an update to set the status.
The output channel is specified by using the address
syntax. Only select outputs are capable of this action,
addresses must be in the range 9 to 12 or 21 to 24. The
data type is integer, either “1” meaning that the output is
attenuated to mic level (40 dB), or “0” meaning that it is
not attenuated.
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
outmic(9)?<CR>
Response
OK 1<CRLF>
outmic(24)=0<CR>OK<CRLF>
outmt (output mute)
This command is used as a query to read the output
channel mute status, or as an update to set the status.
The output channel is specified by using the address
syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 24. The
data type is integer, either “1” meaning that the output
is muted, or “0” meaning that it is not. If the channel address is a wildcard, then the data type is an array of integer of size 24. In this case the value 99 may be used
in an update to indicate that a particular output mute is
to remain unchanged by the command.
Examples:
outlb (output channel label)
Request
Examples:
OK 0<CRLF>
Query
outdel(1,*)?<CR>OK{0,44,...,1,1}
<CRLF>
Update
This command is used as a query to read the output
channel level. The output channel is specified by using the
address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 24.
The data type is integer, in the range -70 to +20, representing the RMS audio level in dBu as measured AFTER
the mixing matrix. If the channel address is a wildcard,
then the data type is an array of integer of size 24.
Response
Request
Query
Query
Update
Update
outmt(19)?<CR>
Response
OK 0<CRLF>
outmt(*)?<CR>OK{0,1,...,0,0}<CRLF>
outmt(11)=0<CR>OK<CRLF>
outmt(*)=
{0,1,...,0,99}<CR>OK<CRLF>
OK “Zone 3”<CRLF>
OK<CRLF>
outlv (output level)
Rio Rancho, NM
35
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
outmttog (output mute toggle)
This command is used as a simple comand to toggle
the output channel mute status. The output channel is
specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must
be in the range 1 to 24.
Examples:
Request
Response
outmttog(24)<CR>OK<CRLF>
Command
outsrc (output signal source)
This command is used as a query to read the output
signal source status, or as an update to set the status.
The output channel is specified by using the address
syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 24. The
data type is integer, unless the channel address is a
wildcard, in which case the data type is an array of integer of size 24. The following values are allowed:
0 - normal operation, the output channel is fed by the mixing matrix
1 - the output channel is fed by a 0 dBu pink noise
source
2 - the output channel is fed by a 0 dBu, 1 kHz tone
source
In the case of an update with the channel address a
wildcard, the value 99 may be used to indicate that a
particular output source is to remain unchanged by the
command.
Examples:
Request
Query
Query
Update
Update
36
outsrc(9)?<CR>
Response
OK 0<CRLF>
outsrc(*)?<CR>OK{0,1,...,0,2}<CRLF>
outsrc(24)=2<CR>OK<CRLF>
outsrc(*)=
{0,1,...,99,99}<CR>OK<CRLF>
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
DM1624F Input Compressor Commands
Examples:
CommandDescription
incpatt
incpgn
incpmug
incprat
incprel
incpthr
Input compressor attack time
Input compressor gain
Input compressor makeup gain
Input compressor ratio
Input compressor release time
Input compressor threshold level
NOTE: All commands are terminated with an
ASCII carriage return character (hex code 0x0D),
represented by <CR> in the examples. All
responses are terminated with an ASCII carriage
return, line feed pair (hex codes 0x0D, 0x0A),
represented by <CRLF> in the examples. An
ellipsis (...) represents members of an array that
have been omitted from an example for the sake
of brevity.
incpatt (input compressor attack time)
This command is used as a query to read the attack
time, or as an update to set the attack time. The input
channel is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 16. The data type is
integer, in the range 5 to 2000, representing the time in
one tenth millisecond increments.
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
incpatt(1)?<CR>
Response
OK 42<CRLF>
incpatt(15)=30<CR>OK<CRLF>
Request
Query
Update
incpmug(1)?<CR>
This command may be used as a query to read the
compressor gain. The input channel is specified by using
the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to
16. The data type is integer, representing the gain in dB,
which is always a negative value if the compressor is active, or zero.
Example:
Request
Query
incpgn(1)?<CR>
Response
OK -5<CRLF>
incprat (input compressor ratio)
This command is used as a query to read the ratio, or
as an update to set the ratio. The input channel is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must be
in the range 1 to 16. The data type is float, in the range
0.0 to 50.0, representing the compression ratio, with 0.0
meaning that the compressor is “off”.
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
incprat(1)?<CR>
This command is used as a query to read the makeup
gain, or as an update to set the makeup gain. The input
channel is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 16. The data type is
integer, in the range 0 to 30, representing the gain in
dB. The allowable upper limit of makeup gain values
is dynamically determined by the threshold and ratio
settings of the compressor, and may be less than the
absolute maximum of 30 dB. If the value sent in an
update request exceeds this upper limit, it will be forced
to the limit value.
Rio Rancho, NM
Response
OK 2.1<CRLF>
incprat(15)=5.55<CR>OK<CRLF>
incprel (input compressor release time)
This command is used as a query to read the attack
time, or as an update to set the attack time. The input
channel is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 16. The data type
is integer, in the range 100 to 10000, representing the
time in one tenth millisecond increments.
Examples:
Query
Update
incprel(1)?<CR>
Response
OK 500<CRLF>
incprel(15)=2000<CR>OK<CRLF>
incpthr (input compressor threshold level)
This command is used as a query to read the threshold,
or as an update to set the threshold. The input channel
is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses
must be in the range 1 to 16. The data type is integer, in
the range -80 to +20, representing the level in dBu.
Examples:
Request
incpmug (input compressor makeup gain)
OK 5<CRLF>
incpmug(15)=12<CR>OK<CRLF>
Request
incpgn (input compressor gain)
Response
Query
Update
incpthr(1)?<CR>
Response
OK -3<CRLF>
incpthr(15)=-20<CR>OK<CRLF>
37
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
DM1624F Output Compressor Commands
Examples:
CommandDescription
outcpatt
outcpgn
outcpmug
outcprat
outcprel
outcpthr
Output compressor attack time
Output compressor gain
Output compressor makeup gain
Output compressor ratio
Output compressor release time
Output compressor threshold level
NOTE: All commands are terminated with an
ASCII carriage return character (hex code 0x0D),
represented by <CR> in the examples. All
responses are terminated with an ASCII carriage
return, line feed pair (hex codes 0x0D, 0x0A),
represented by <CRLF> in the examples. An
ellipsis (...) represents members of an array that
have been omitted from an example for the sake
of brevity.
outcpatt (output compressor attack time)
This command is used as a query to read the attack
time, or as an update to set the attack time. The output
channel is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 24. The data type is
integer, in the range 5 to 2000, representing the time in
one tenth millisecond increments.
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
outcpatt(1)?<CR>
Response
OK 42<CRLF>
outcpatt(15)=30<CR>OK<CRLF>
Request
Query
Update
outcpmug(1)?<CR>
This command is used as a query to read the compressor gain. The output channel is specified by using the
address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to
24. The data type is integer, representing the gain in dB,
which is always a negative value if the compressor is
active, or zero.
Example:
Request
Query
outcpgn(21)?<CR>
Response
OK -11<CRLF>
OK 5<CRLF>
outcpmug(15)=12<CR>OK<CRLF>
outcprat (output compressor ratio)
This command is used as a query to read the ratio,
or as an update to set the ratio. The output channel is
specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must
be in the range 1 to 24. The data type is float, in the
range 0.0 to 50.0, representing the compression ratio,
with 0.0 meaning that the compressor is “off”.
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
outcprat(1)?<CR>
Response
OK 2.1<CRLF>
outcprat(15)=5.55<CR>OK<CRLF>
outcprel (output compressor release time)
This command is used as a query to read the attack
time, or as an update to set the attack time. The output
channel is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 24. The data type
is integer, in the range 100 to 10000, representing the
time in one tenth millisecond increments.
Examples:
Request
outcpgn (output compressor gain)
Response
Query
Update
outcprel(1)?<CR>
Response
OK 500<CRLF>
outcprel(15)=2000<CR>OK<CRLF>
outcpthr (output compressor threshold level)
This command is used as a query to read the threshold, or as an update to set the threshold. The output
channel is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 24. The data type is
integer, in the range -80 to +20, representing the level
in dBu.
Examples:
outcpmug (output compressor makeup gain)
This command is used as a query to read the makeup
gain, or as an update to set the makeup gain. The
output channel is specified by using the address syntax.
Addresses must be in the range 1 to 24. The data type
is integer, in the range 0 to 30, representing the gain
in dB. The allowable upper limit of makeup gain values
is dynamically determined by the threshold and ratio
settings of the compressor, and may be less than the
absolute maximum of 30 dB. If the value sent in an
update request exceeds this upper limit, it will be forced
to the limit value.
38
Request
Query
Update
outcpthr(1)?<CR>
Response
OK -3<CRLF>
outcpthr(15)=-20<CR>OK<CRLF>
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
DM1624F Output Limiter Commands
outlmthr (output limiter threshold level)
CommandDescription
outlmatt
outlmrel
outlmthr
Output limiter attack time
Output limiter release time
Output limiter threshold level
NOTE: All commands are terminated with an
ASCII carriage return character (hex code 0x0D),
represented by <CR> in the examples. All
responses are terminated with an ASCII carriage
return, line feed pair (hex codes 0x0D, 0x0A),
represented by <CRLF> in the examples. An
ellipsis (...) represents members of an array that
have been omitted from an example for the sake
of brevity.
This command is used as a query to read the threshold,
or as an update to set the threshold. The output channel is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses
must be in the range 1 to 24. The data type is integer, in
the range -50 to +20, representing the level in dBu.
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
outlmthr(1)?<CR>
Response
OK 10<CRLF>
outlmthr(15)=15<CR>OK<CRLF>
outlmatt (output limiter attack time)
This command is used as a query to read the attack
time, or as an update to set the attack time. The output
channel is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 24. The data type is
integer, in the range 1 to 500, representing the time in
one tenth millisecond increments.
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
outlmatt(1)?<CR>
Response
OK 20<CRLF>
outlmatt(15)=30<CR>OK<CRLF>
outlmrel (output limiter release time)
This command is used as a query to read the attack
time, or as an update to set the attack time. The output
channel is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 24. The data type is
integer, in the range 20 to 5000, representing the time
in one tenth millisecond increments.
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
outlmrel(1)?<CR>
Response
OK 200<CRLF>
outlmrel(15)=1000<CR>OK<CRLF>
Rio Rancho, NM
39
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
DM1624F Programmable I/O Commands
prgindef (programmable input definition)
CommandDescription
prgin
prgindef
prginundef
prgout
prgoutdef
prgoutht
prgoutiv
prgoutqt
Programmable input state
Programmable input definition
Programmable input un-definition
Programmable output state
Programmable output definition
Programmable output hold time
Programmable output invert
Programmable output qualification time
NOTE: All commands are terminated with an
ASCII carriage return character (hex code 0x0D),
represented by <CR> in the examples. All
responses are terminated with an ASCII carriage
return, line feed pair (hex codes 0x0D, 0x0A),
represented by <CRLF> in the examples. An
ellipsis (...) represents members of an array that
have been omitted from an example for the sake
of brevity.
prgin (programmable input state)
This command may be used to simulate a momentary
contact closure on a programmable input, or as a query
to read the state of programmable inputs. The programmable input is specified by using the address syntax.
Addresses must be in the range 1 to 22.
NOTE: Simulated contact closures have no effect
for programmmable inputs configured for analog
gain control.
The data returned is integer, with the possible values
depending on the nature of the function assigned to
the programmable input. For analog gain functions, the
values are in the range 0 to 255, representing the voltage sensed by the programmable input (0 is for 0 Volts,
255 is for 5 Volts). For all other funcitons, the value is
either “1”, meaning that the input is active (closed), or
“0” meaning that it is not active (open). If the channel
address is a wildcard, then the data type is an array of
integer of size 22.
NOTE: Use as a command to simulate a contact
closure is possible only with firmware version 1.3.1
of higher.
Examples:
Request
Command
Query
prgin(3)<CR>OK<CRLF>
prgin(9)<CR>
Query
prgin(*)<CR>
40
Response
OK 1<CRLF>
OK {0,0,1...0,0,0}
<CRLF>
This command may be used as a query to read a programmable input definition, or as an update to modify
the definition. The programmable input is specified by
using the address syntax. Addresses must be in the
range 1 to 22. The data type is array of integer, with a
variable length. The values contained in the array represent the definition of a programmable input, using the
following scheme:
• The first integer is a code that specifies the function
that is assigned to the programmable input. It may
be in the range 0 to 16, with the following meanings:
CodeFunction
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
No Function Assigned
Analog input gain control
Increment input gain 1 dB
Decrement input gain 1 dB
Analog output gain control
Increment output gain 1 dB
Decrement output gain 1 dB
Recall preset from memory
Toggle mute on input
Toggle mute on output
Toggle mute on crosspoint
Momentary mute on input
Momentary mute on output
Momentary mute on crosspoint
Run a macro on close
Run macros on close/open
Momentary unmute on input (PTT)
The choice of function determines what happens
when the programmable input is asserted. The
choice of function affects the interpretation of the
subsequent values in the array, which identify the
target of the function.
NOTE: Functions which control matrix crosspoints
are limited to affecting a group of crosspoints that
are members of a single row of the matrix. A row
consists of all crosspoints associated with one
particular input channel.
NOTE: All gain changes made by programmable
input functions affect rear panel gain only.
• The remaining values specify the target of the
function. These values are simply a list of one or
more integers which identifies the thing(s) that are
controlled by the function. The interpretation of the
target values depends on the function that is assigned:
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
Function
Target Values
Analog input gain
control
A sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 16. These identify which input channels are to
be controlled by the function.
Increment input
gain 1 dB
A sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 16. These identify which input channels are to
be controlled by the function.
Decrement input
gain 1 dB
A sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 16. These identify which input channels are to
be controlled by the function.
Analog output
gain control
A sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 24. These identify which input channels are to
be controlled by the function.
Increment output
gain 1 dB
A sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 24. These identify which input channels are to
be controlled by the function.
Decrement output gain 1 dB
A sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 24. These identify which input channels are to
be controlled by the function.
Recall preset
from memory
A single integer value in the range 1 to 24. This
identifies which preset is to be recalled by the
function.
Toggle mute on
input
A sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 16. These identify which input channels are to
be controlled by the function.
Toggle mute on
output
A sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 24. These identify which output channels are
to be controlled by the function.
Toggle mute on
crosspoint
A single integer in the range 1 to 16, followed by
a sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 24. Together these values specify a group of
cross-points by identifying a single input channel
and zero or more output channels.
Momentary mute
on input
A sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 16. These identify which input channels are to
be controlled by the function.
Momentary mute
on output
A sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 24. These identify which input channels are to
be controlled by the function.
Momentary mute
on crosspoint
A single integer in the range 1 to 16, followed by
a sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 24. Together these values specify a group of
cross-points by identifying a single input channel
and zero or more output channels.
Run a macro on
close
A single integer value in the range 1 to 128. This
identifies which macro is to be run by the function
when the programmable input is asserted.
Run macros on
close/open
Two integer values in the range 1 to 128. The first
identifies which macro is to be run by the function
when the programmable input is asserted. The
second identifies which macro is to be run when
the programmable input is subsequently deasserted.
NOTE: Available with firmware version 1.3.0 or
higher only.
Momentary
unmute on input
(PTT)
A sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 16. These identify which input channels are to
be controlled by the function.
NOTE: Available with firmware version 1.3.0 or
higher only.
Examples:
Request
Query
prgindef(9)?<CR>OK{4,1,3,4,10}<CRLF>
(Function “Analog output gain
control” is assigned to
programmable input 9. The
input channels under control are 1, 3, 4, and 10)
Query
prgindef(2)?<CR>OK{14,22}<CRLF>
(Function “Run a macro” is
assigned to programmable
input 2. Macro number 22 will
be run if the programmable
input is asserted.)
Query
prgindef(3)?<CR>OK{13,3,1,7,8}<CRLF>
(Function “Momentarily mute
on crosspoint” is assigned to
programmable input 3. The
crosspoints under control are
{3,1} {3,7} and {3,8}, which
are member of the matrix row
associated with input channel 3.)
Query
prgindef(4)?<CR>OK{0}<CRLF>
(No function is assigned to
programmable input 4.)
Update prgindef(11)={7,5}
<CR> (Function “Recall
preset from memory” is
assigned to programmable
input 11. The preset to be
recalled is specified as
number 5.)OK<CRLF>
Update prgindef(2)=
{8,1,2,4,5,6}<CR>
(Function “Toggle mute
on input” is assigned to
programmable input 2.
The preset to be
recalled is specified as
1,2,4,5 and 6.)OK<CRLF>
Update
prgindef(4)={0}<CR>
(“No function” is assigned
to programmable input 4,
so that asserting it will
have no effect.)OK<CRLF>
Update
prgindef(1)=
{10,5,9,10} <CR>
(Function “Toggle mute
on crosspoint” is
assigned to programmable
input 1. The crosspoints to
be controlled are specified
as {5,9} and {5,10}, which
are members of the matrix
row associated with input
channel 5.)OK<CRLF>
prginundef (programmable input un-definition)
This command may be used as an update to un-define
one or more programmable inputs, meaning that it no
longer has any function assigned to it. The data type is
array of integer, with a variable length. The values contained in the array represent the address of a programmable input to be un-defined.
NOTE: Available with firmware version 1.3.1 or
higher only.
Examples:
Request
Update
Rio Rancho, NM
Response
Response
prginundef={3,4,5}<CR>OK<CRLF>
41
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
prgout (programmable output state)
This command is used as a query to read a programmable output state. The programmable output is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must be
in the range 1 to 22. The data type is integer with the
value either “1”, meaning that the output is active, or “0”
meaning that it is not. If the channel address is a wildcard, then the data type is an array of integer of size 16.
Examples:
Request
Query
prgout(9)?<CR>
Target Values
Monitor audio
input activity
OK 20<CRLF>
OK {0,0,1,...,0,0,0}
<CRLF>
prgoutdef (programmable output definition)
This command may be used as a query to read a programmable output definition, or as an update to modify
the definition. The programmable output is specified by
using the address syntax. Addresses must be in the
range 1 to 16. The data type is array of integer, with a
variable length. The values contained in the array represent the definition of a programmable output, using the
following scheme:
• The first integer is a code that specifies the function
that is assigned to the programmable output. It may
be in the range 0 to 3, with the following meanings:
0 - No Function Assigned
1 - Monitor audio input activity
2 - Monitor programmable input state
3 - Monitor active preset
• The choice of function determines what conditions
or events control the state of the programmable output. The choice of function affects the interpretation
of the subsequent values in the array, which identify
the event source which is monitored by the function.
• The remaining values specify the source of the
function. These values are simply a list of one or
more integers which identifies the thing(s) that are
controlled by the function. The interpretation of the
sourcevalues depends on the function that is assigned:
Examples:
Response
Query
prgoutdef(8)?<CR>OK{3,1,3,4}<CRLF>
(Function “Monitor active
preset” is assigned to
programmable input 8. The
presets being monitored are
1, 3 and 4.)
42
Function
Response
Query
prgout(*)?<CR>
Request
Query
prgoutdef(1)?<CR>OK{2,3}<CRLF>
(Function “Monitor program
mable input state” is assigned
to programmable output 1.
The logical state of program
mable input 3 is being
monitored.)
Monitor programmable
input state
Monitor active
preset
A single integer in the range 1 to 25, followed by
a sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 16. The first identifies which NOM bus (audio
output channel) is to be referenced by the function. The special value 25 has the meaning “ANY
Output Channel”. The integers that follow identify
the audio input channels that are to be monitored.
A single integer in the range 1 to 22. This identifies
which programmable input is monitored by the
function.
A sequence of zero or more integers in the range
1 to 24. These identify which presets are to be
monitored by the function. Note: available with
DM1624F firmware version 1.3.0 or higher only.
Query
prgoutdef(3)?<CR>OK{1,3,1,7,8}<CRLF>
(Function “Monitor audio input
activity” is assigned to program
mable input 3. The NOM bus
(audio output) being referenced
is channel 3, and the audio
inputs being monitored for
activity are channels 1, 7, and 8.)
Update prgoutdef(1)=
{2,5}<CR>
(Function “Monitor
programmable input
state” is assigned to
programmable output 1.
The programmable
input being monitored
is specified as number 5.)OK<CRLF>
Update
prgoutdef(2)=
{3,1,2,4}<CR>
(Function “Monitor active
preset” is assigned to
programmable output 2.
The presets to be
monitored are
specified as 1, 2, and 4.)OK<CRLF>
Update prgoutdef(4)={0}<CR>
(“No function” is assigned
to programmable output 4,
so that it will become
inactive.)OK<CRLF>
Update
prgoutdef(1)=
{1,5,3,4}<CR>
(Function “Monitor
audio input activity” is
assigned to programmable output 1. The NOM
bus (audio output) being
referenced is channel 5,
and the audio inputs to
be monitored are
channels 3 and 4.OK<CRLF>
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
prgoutht (programmable output channel
activity hold time)
This command is used as a query to read the hold time,
or as an update to set it. The data type is integer, in the
range 1 to 255, representing the hold time in one tenth
second increments.
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
prgoutht?<CR>
prgoutht=10<CR>
Response
OK 4<CRLF>
OK <CRLF>
prgoutiv (programmable output invert)
This command is used as a query to read the programmable output invert status, or as an update to set the
status. The programmable output is specified by using
the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range
1 to 16. The data type is integer, either “1” meaning that
the programmable output is inverted (contacts open
when asserted), or “0” meaning that it is not (contacts
closed when asserted, the normal case). If the address
is wildcarded, then the data type is an array of integer
of size 16. In this case the value 99 may be used in
an update to indicate that a particular programmable
output invert state is to remain unchanged by the command.
NOTE: This command available with firmware
version 1.3.0 or higher only.
Examples:
Request
Query
prgoutiv(3)?<CR>
OK 4<CRLF>
prgoutiv(2)=1<CR>
OK <CRLF>
Query
prgoutiv(*)?<CR>
Update
Response
Update prgoutiv(*)=
{0,5,0,...,99,99,99}
<CR>
OK {0,1,0,...,0,0,0}
<CRLF>
OK <CRLF>
prgoutqt (programmable output channel
activity qualification time)
This command is used as a query to read the qualification time, or as an update to set it. The data type is integer, in the range 1 to 255, representing the qualification
time in one tenth second increments.
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
prgoutqt?<CR>
prgoutqt=10<CR>
Rio Rancho, NM
Response
OK 4<CRLF>
OK <CRLF>
43
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
DM1624F Rear Panel Control Commands
rpingnmin (rear panel audio input gain minimum)
CommandDescription
rpingn
rpingnmin
rpingnpre
rpingnst
rpoutgn
rpoutgnmin
rpoutgnpre
rpoutgnst
rpsave
rprest
Rear panel audio input gain
Rear panel audio input gain minimum
Rear panel audio input gain preset
Rear panel audio input gain step
Rear panel audio output gain
Rear panel audio output gain minimum
Rear panel audio output gain preset
Rear panel audio output gain step
Save rear panel settings
Restore rear panel settings
NOTE: All commands are terminated with an
ASCII carriage return character (hex code 0x0D),
represented by <CR> in the examples. All
responses are terminated with an ASCII carriage
return, line feed pair (hex codes 0x0D, 0x0A),
represented by <CRLF> in the examples. An
ellipsis (...) represents members of an array that
have been omitted from an example for the sake
of brevity.
rpingn (rear panel audio input gain)
This command may be used as a query to read the
rear panel input gain, or as an update to set the rear
panel gain. The input channel is specified by using
the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range
1 to 16. The data type is integer, in the range -61 to 0,
representing the gain in dB (the feature acts as an attenuator), where -61 has the special meaning “Off.” The
actual allowable range of values is determined by the
gain minimum value. If the value sent in an update request is less than the gain minimum or greater than 0, it
is ignored (no change is made). If the channel address
is wildcarded, then the data type is an array of integer
of size 16. In this case the value 99 may be used in an
update to indicate that a particular rear panel input gain
is to remain unchanged by the command.
Examples:
Request
Query
rpingn(1)?<CR>
Query
rpingn(*)?<CR>
Update
Response
OK -3<CRLF>
OK {-13,-4,...0,0}
<CRLF>
rpingn(2)=0<CR>OK<CRLF>
Update rpingn(*)={0,-5,0,...
,99,99,-10}<CR>OK<CRLF>
44
This command is used as a query to read the rear
panel input gain minimum, or as an update to set the
gain minimum. All rear panel audio input gains are controlled by this minimum value. The data type is integer,
in the range -60 to 0, representing the minimum gain in
dB (i.e. the maximum attenuation possible using rear
panel gain control).
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
rpingnmin?<CR>
Response
OK -60<CRLF>
rpingnmin=15<CR>OK<CRLF>
rpingnpre (rear panel audio input gain preset)
This command is used as a query to read the rear
panel input gain preset, or as an update to set the gain
preset. All rear panel audio input gains are controlled
by this preset value, which is the value loaded when
the device is powered up. The data type is integer, in
the range -60 to 0, representing gain in dB (i.e. the
minimum attenuation possible using rear panel gain
control).
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
rpingnpre?<CR>
Response
OK 0<CRLF>
rpingnpre=-5<CR>OK<CRLF>
rpingnst (rear panel input gain step change)
This command is used as an update to step the gain
by the amount specified, either up or down. The input
channel is specified by using the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range 1 to 16. The data type
is integer, in the range -6 to +6, representing the gain
step in dB. If the channel address is a wildcard, then
the data type is an array of integer of size 16. A positive
value increments the gain, a negative value decrements
the gain.
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
Response
rpingnst(2)=-2<CR>OK<CRLF>
rpingnst(*)=
{-2,-2,...,-2,-2}<CR>OK<CRLF>
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
rpoutgn (rear panel audio output gain)
This command may be used as a query to read the
rear panel output gain, or as an update to set the rear
panel gain. The output channel is specified by using
the address syntax. Addresses must be in the range
1 to 12. The data type is integer, in the range -61 to 0,
representing the gain in dB (the feature acts as an attenuator), where -61 has the special meaning “Off”. The
actual allowable range of values is determined by the
gain minimum value. If the value sent in an update request is less than the gain minimum or greater than 0, it
is ignored (no change is made). If the channel address
is wildcarded, then the data type is an array of integer
of size 12. In this case the value 99 may be used in an
update to indicate that a particular rear panel output
gain is to remain unchanged by the command.
Examples:
Request
Query
rpoutgn(1)?<CR>
Query
rpoutgn(*)?<CR>
Update
OK -3<CRLF>
OK {-13,-4,...0,0}
<CRLF>
Update rpoutgn(*)={0,-5,0,...
,99,99,-10}<CR> OK<CRLF>
rpoutgnmin (rear panel audio
output gain minimum)
This command is used as a query to read the rear
panel output gain minimum, or as an update to set
the gain minimum. All rear panel audio output gains
are controlled by this minimum value. The data type is
integer, in the range -60 to 0, representing the minimum
gain in dB (i.e. the maximum attenuation possible using
rear panel gain control).
Examples:
Query
Update
rpoutgnmin?<CR>
This command is used as an update to step the gain
by the amount specified, either up or down. The output channel is specified by using the address syntax.
Addresses must be in the range 1 to 24. The data type
is integer, in the range -6 to +6, representing the gain
step in dB. If the channel address is a wildcard, then
the data type is an array of integer of size 24. A positive
value increments the gain, a negative value decrements
the gain.
Examples:
Request
Query
Response
rpoutgnst(2)=-2<CR>OK<CRLF>
Update rpoutgnst(*)=
{-2,-2,-2,...,-2,-2,-2}
<CR>
OK<CRLF>
Response
rpoutgn(22)=0<CR>OK<CRLF>
Request
rpoutgnst (rear panel output gain step change)
Response
OK -30<CRLF>
rpoutgnmin=-15<CR>OK<CRLF>
rpoutgnpre (rear panel audio output gain preset)
This command is used as a query to read the rear
panel output gain preset, or as an update to set the
gain preset. All rear panel audio output gains are controlled by this preset value, which is the value loaded
when the device is powered up. The data type is integer,
in the range -60 to 0, representing gain in dB (i.e. the
minimum attenuation possible using rear panel gain
control).
rprest (restore rear panel settings)
This command is used to restore the state of rear panel
settings previously saved with the rpsave command.
If used as a simple command, all rear panel settings
are overwritten with the saved values. If used as an
update, the data type is an integer whose value serves
as a mask which specifies which settings are restored
and which are not. This mask has the same format as
the preset mask. (See also DM General Commands,
premsk.)
Example:
Request
Query
Update
Response
rprest?<CR>OK<CRLF>
rprest=1<CR>OK<CRLF>
rpsave (save rear panel settings)
This command is used to save the current rear panel
settings so that they can be restored at some future
time by use of the rprest command. (See rpest (restore
rear panel settings).) In this way a “snapshot” of the
current rear panel gain and mute settings can be taken
prior to some temporary reconfiguration of the device.
Example:
Request
Command
Response
rpsave<CR>OK<CRLF>
Examples:
Request
Query
Update
rpoutgnpre?<CR>
Response
OK -0<CRLF>
rpoutgnpre=-5<CR>OK<CRLF>
Rio Rancho, NM
45
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
DM1624F ADFE Commands
adfefil (adfe filter deployment)
CommandDescription
adfeen
Automatic digital feedback elimination enable
adfefil
Automatic digital feedback elimination filter
deployment
NOTE: All commands are terminated with an
ASCII carriage return character (hex code 0x0D),
represented by <CR> in the examples. All
responses are terminated with an ASCII carriage
return, line feed pair (hex codes 0x0D, 0x0A),
represented by <CRLF> in the examples. An
ellipsis (...) represents members of an array that
have been omitted from an example for the sake
of brevity.
adfeen (adfe enable)
This command is used as a query to read the adfe filter
deployment status, or as an update to deploy an adfe
filter. The input channel and filter index are specified by
using the 2 dimensional address syntax. Addresses for
the first dimension (input channel) must be in the range
1 to 16. Addresses for the second dimension (adfe
filter index) must be in the range 1 to 6. The data type
is integer, unless the adfe filter index is a wildcard, in
which case the data type is an array of integer of size
6. This is allowed for queries only. The data values are
in the range 0 to 95, where 0 means that no filter is
deployed, and the others represent adfe filters covering
the frequency range 105 to 9773 Hz. (See ADFE Filter
Numbers Mapped to Center Frequencies table.)
Examples:
This command is used as a query to read the adfe enable status, or as an update to set the status. The audio
input channel is specified by using the address syntax.
Addresses must be in the range 1 to 16. The data type
is integer, either “1” meaning that the adfe feature is
enabled, or “0” meaning that it is not.
Request
Query
Response
adfefil(9,2)?<CR>
Query
adfefil(11,*)=0<CR>
Update
adfefil(4,1)=15<CR>
OK 0<CRLF>
OK{12,0,0,0,0,0}
<CRLF>
OK<CRLF>
Examples:
Request
Query
Query
adfeen(9)?<CR>
Response
OK 1<CRLF>
adfeen(11)=0<CR>OK<CRLF>
ADFE Filter Numbers Mapped to Center Frequencies
0 None
16 375 Hz
32 1031 Hz
48 2063 Hz
64 3750 Hz
80 6281 Hz
1 105 Hz
17 410 Hz
33 1090 Hz
49 2156 Hz
65 3891 Hz
81 6492 Hz
2 117 Hz
18 445 Hz
34 1148 Hz
50 2250 Hz
66 4031 Hz
82 6703 Hz
3 129 Hz
19 480 Hz
35 1207 Hz
51 2344 Hz
67 4172 Hz
83 6914 Hz
4 141 Hz
20 516 Hz
36 1266 Hz
52 2438 Hz
68 4313 Hz
84 7125 Hz
5 152 Hz
21 551 Hz
37 1324 Hz
53 2531 Hz
69 4453 Hz
85 7336 Hz
6 164 Hz
22 586 Hz
38 1383 Hz
54 2625 Hz
70 4594 Hz
86 7547 Hz
7 176 Hz
23 621 Hz
39 1441 Hz
55 2719 Hz
71 4734 Hz
87 7758 Hz
8 188 Hz
24 656 Hz
40 1500 Hz
56 2813 Hz
72 4875 Hz
88 7969 Hz
9 211 Hz
25 703 Hz
41 1570 Hz
57 2930 Hz
73 5051 Hz
89 8227 Hz
10 234 Hz
26 750 Hz
42 1641 Hz
58 3047 Hz
74 5227 Hz
90 8484 Hz
11 258 Hz
27 797 Hz
43 1711 Hz
59 3164 Hz
75 5402 Hz
91 8742 Hz
12 281 Hz
28 844 Hz
44 1781 Hz
60 3281 Hz
76 5578 Hz
92 9000 Hz
13 305 Hz
29 891 Hz
45 1852 Hz
61 3398 Hz
77 5754 Hz
93 9258 Hz
14 328 Hz
30 938 Hz
46 1922 Hz
62 3516 Hz
78 5930 Hz
94 9516 Hz
15 352 Hz
31 984 Hz
47 1992 Hz
63 3633 Hz
79 6105 Hz
95 9773 Hz
46
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
DM Command Grammar Rules
Augmented BNF[1] Rules for the Lecnet2 command grammar:
OCTET = %x00-FF; <any 8-bit sequence of data>
CHAR = %x01-7F; any US-ASCII character except NUL (1 - 127)
UPALPHA = %x41-5A; any US-ASCII uppercase letter “A”..”Z”
LOALPHA = %x61-7A; any US-ASCII lowercase letter “a”..”z”
DIGIT = %x31-39; any US-ASCII digit “0”..”9”>
LF = %x0A; US-ASCII LF, linefeed (10)
CR = %x0D; US-ASCII CR, carriage return (13)
SP = %x20; US-ASCII SP, space (32)
HT = %x09; US-ASCII HT, horizontal tab (9)
DQUOTE = %x22; US-ASCII double-quote mark (34)
QCHAR = %x01-21 / %x23-7F; any CHAR except DQUOTE
WS = SP / HT
SIGN = “-” / “+”
OFFSET = 1*DIGIT / “*”
ALPHA = UPALPHA / LOALPHA
ALPHANUM = ALPHA / DIGIT
HEX = “A”|”B”|”C”|”D”|”E”|”F”|”a”|”b”|”c”|”d”|”e”|”f”|DIGIT
STR_TOK = ALPHA *(ALPHANUM)
INT_TOK = *1SIGN 1*DIGIT
FLT_TOK = *1SIGN *DIGIT “.” *DIGIT ; note that bare “.” is valid
QSTR_TOK = DQUOTE *(QCHAR) DQUOTE
CRLF = CR LF
OK_TOK = %x4F %x4B ; uppercase string “OK”
ERROR_TOK = %x45 %x52 %x52 %x4F %x52 ; uppercase string “ERROR”
input = (query / hquery / update / target) *WS CR
output = response *WS CRLF
query = target *WS “?”
hquery = target *WS “?” *WS “$”
update = target *WS “=” *WS (argument / hargument)
status = OK_TOK / ERROR_TOK
response = status *WS *1(argument / hargument)
argument = INT_TOK / FLT_TOK / QSTR_TOK / intarray / fltarray
hargument = “$” 1*(*WS 2HEX) ; note that size of data must be > 0
target = STR_TOK *1(*WS (arraydims | memloc))
arraydims = “(“ *WS arrayoffsets *WS “)”
memloc = “[“ *WS 4HEX *WS “]”
arrayoffsets = OFFSET [ *WS “,” *WS OFFSET ]
intarray = “{“ *WS intsequence *WS “}”
intsequence = INT_TOK *( *WS “,” *WS INT_TOK)
fltarray = “{“ *WS fltsequence *WS “}” )
fltsequence = FLT_TOK *( *WS “,” *WS FLT_TOK)
[1] c.f. RFC 2234 <http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2234.txt>
Rio Rancho, NM
47
DM Series Digital Matrix Processors
Macros and Macro Control
About Macros
DM devices can be remotely controlled using commands sent over USB, a serial port, or a network connection. An extensive text-based command language
is defined for the DM. Touch panel controllers, for
instance, use this command interface.
NOTE: Refer to the Online Help for details of using
Macros as a powerful remote control option.
Macros are predefined groups of commands that
are stored internally by the DM. All of the commands
contained in the macro can then be executed by issuing
a single Run command to the DM. There are two two
advantages to this approach:
Efficiency - only one command needs to be sent
to the DM to execute complex actions, which may
involve dozens of individual commands.
Modularity - frequently executed sequences can
be implemented as a macro which can be reused
in other control designs, or combined with other
macros to form complex actions.
Macros are stored in the DM nonvolatile memory. 128
macros are available, each are global in scope, meaning that they are not associated with any particular
preset.
Macros may be given a descriptive title which is stored
along with the command list.
Queries, commands which request information from
the DM, make no sense within a macro.
Macros can be chained if necessary, meaning that
one macro can call another macro by virtue of containing a run command. It is important to know that a run
command issued from within a macro will be delayed
until after the first macro has finished running. In other
words, macros aren’t nested, they always run sequentially (chaining). The best practice when chaining
macros is to make the run command the last command
in a macro.
The control panel contains a Macro Editor which is
used to create new macros or edit existing ones when
the PC is connected to a DM. Macros may also be
opened and saved as files, making it possible to work
with them in offline mode as well.
The control panel also contains a Macro Recorder
which allows a sequence of commands to be captured
as a macro without typing them into the Macro Editor.
The Macro Recorder works by capturing the commands
generated by the control panel when the mouse and
keyboard are used to make changes to DM settings.
The macro recorder can be while connected to a DM or
used in offline mode to create command sets in advance of the installation.
It is important to know that when a macro is run, the
response messages normally returned when the commands are executed individually are discarded. This
means that ill-formed or unsuccessful commands fail
silently, as the error message is discarded.
48
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Reference Manual
Rear Panel Control - Hardware
The DM processor has programmable inputs which
can be used to control a wide variety of functions.
Depending on the function assigned to them, these
programmable inputs may be connected to momentary
contact switches, toggle switches, or potentiometers.
When used with a switch, the inputs are activated by by
connecting them to ground through the switch contacts,
called a “contact closure”. When used with a variable
resistor, the inputs respond to the applied voltage in the
range 0 to 5 VDC.
An important application of the rear panel control interface is to manage what is called the rear panel gain for
input and output audio channels. This is an additional
gain value that is added to the “main” gain value for a
channel to give the total gain applied. Rear panel gain
is limited to the range -61dB to 0dB, and therefore is
actually intended to function as a variable attenuator
for the audio channel. The purpose is to allow some
amount of gain or level control by the end user in a safe
manner, using one of the programmable inputs.
Another feature of the rear panel control interface are a
set of programmable outputs which can be set up to
indicate either audio input channel activity or programmable input status. Programmable outputs act as an
electronic “contact closure” to ground. When the output
is active, the contact is closed (conducting to ground).
When the output is inactive, the contact is open (not
conducting to ground).
A typical application of rear panel gain is to allow
adjustment of the level of an audio output (driving a
speaker) downward from some maximum by means of
turning a potentiometer connected to a programmable
input which has been set up to use the Analog Output
RP Gain Control function.
Rio Rancho, NM
Complete details on the use of Rear Panel control is
provided in the Installation Guide and in the Control
Panel GUI provided with the unit.
49
LIMITED ONE YEAR WARRANTY
The equipment is warranted for one year from date of purchase against defects in
materials or workmanship provided it was purchased from an authorized dealer. This
warranty does not cover equipment which has been abused or damaged by careless
handling or shipping. This warranty does not apply to used or demonstrator equipment.
Should any defect develop, Lectrosonics, Inc. will, at our option, repair or replace any
defective parts without charge for either parts or labor. If Lectrosonics, Inc. cannot
correct the defect in your equipment, it will be replaced at no charge with a similar new
item. Lectrosonics, Inc. will pay for the cost of returning your equipment to you.
This warranty applies only to items returned to Lectrosonics, Inc. or an authorized
dealer, shipping costs prepaid, within one year from the date of purchase.
This Limited Warranty is governed by the laws of the State of New Mexico. It states the
entire liablility of Lectrosonics Inc. and the entire remedy of the purchaser for any
breach of warranty as outlined above. NEITHER LECTROSONICS, INC. NOR
ANYONE INVOLVED IN THE PRODUCTION OR DELIVERY OF THE EQUIPMENT
SHALL BE LIABLE FOR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, PUNITIVE, CONSEQUENTIAL,
OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE
THIS EQUIPMENT EVEN IF LECTROSONICS, INC. HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE
POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE LIABILITY OF
LECTROSONICS, INC. EXCEED THE PURCHASE PRICE OF ANY DEFECTIVE
EQUIPMENT.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights. You may have additional legal rights which
vary from state to state.
581 Laser Road NE • Rio Rancho, NM 87124 USA • www.lectrosonics.com
(505) 892-4501 • (800) 821-1121 • fax (505) 892-6243 • sales@lectrosonics.com
22 July 2011
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