Matrix Family Ethernet - ID

Matrix Family Ethernet - ID
Matrix Family
ETHERNET SERVICE GUIDE
DATALOGIC S.p.A.
Via Candini 2
40012 - Lippo di Calderara di Reno
Bologna - Italy
Matrix Family Ethernet Service Guide
Ed.: 03/2006
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Datalogic S.p.A. reserves the right to make modifications and improvements without prior notification.
Datalogic shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein, nor for incidental or
consequential damages resulting from the use of this material.
Product names mentioned herein are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks and or
registered trademarks of their respective companies.
© Datalogic S.p.A. 2000 - 2006
20/03/06
CONTENTS
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
GENERAL DESCRIPTION ........................................................................... 1
Introduction ................................................................................................... 1
Physical Networks......................................................................................... 2
Protocol Stack............................................................................................... 3
Data Exchange ............................................................................................. 7
Device Addressing And Identification.......................................................... 10
Socket ......................................................................................................... 12
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
SETTING NETWORK COMMUNICATION................................................. 13
Using DHCP Client ..................................................................................... 14
Using Static IP Addressing.......................................................................... 16
Using An Ethernet Crossover Cable ........................................................... 18
Remotely Managing a Reader .................................................................... 21
3
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
MATRIX NETWORK SERVICES................................................................ 23
Data Socket ................................................................................................ 24
Image Socket .............................................................................................. 27
Image FTP Client ........................................................................................ 29
HTTP Server ............................................................................................... 31
E-mail Client................................................................................................ 33
4
4.1
4.2
ETHERNET HARDWARE BASICS ............................................................ 35
Cabling........................................................................................................ 35
LAN System Components........................................................................... 38
iii
iv
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
1
1.1
1
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
INTRODUCTION
Ethernet is the most popular physical layer LAN technology in use today.
Ethernet was created by Xerox Corporation (in cooperation with DEC and Intel) in
1976. Ethernet uses a Bus or Star topology and supports data transfer rates from 10
Mbps to 100 Mbps.
The newest versions of Ethernet, called Gigabit Ethernet, support data rates from 1
to 10 Gigabits per second (1000 Mbps to 10000 Mbps).
Ethernet uses the CSMA/CD access method to handle simultaneous demands.
Ethernet is popular because it strikes a good balance between speed, cost and ease
of installation. These benefits combined with wide acceptance in the computer
marketplace and the ability to support virtually all popular network protocols, make
Ethernet an ideal networking technology for most computer users today.
The Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) defines the Ethernet
standard as IEEE Standard 802.3.
This standard defines rules for configuring an Ethernet network as well as specifying
how elements in an Ethernet network interact with one another.
By adhering to the IEEE standard, network equipment and network protocols can
communicate efficiently.
1
MATRIX FAMILY
1
1.2
PHYSICAL NETWORKS
Standard 10 Mbps Ethernet (IEEE 802.3)
A networking standard that supports data transfer rates up to 10 Mbps. The most
common physical networks are:
•
•
•
•
10Base-T standard (or Twisted Pair Ethernet): uses Unshielded Twisted Pair
(UTP) cables with maximum segment length of 100 meters in Star topography.
10Base-2 (or Thinnet): uses a string of RJ-58 coaxial cables with maximum
segment length of 500 meters in Bus topography
10Base-5 (or Thicknet): uses a single 75Ω coaxial cable with maximum
segment length of 500 meters in Bus topography
10Base-FL: is a set of optical fiber media specifications, which define
connectivity between devices. It allows Ethernet segments to be connected over
long distances (max 1km point-to-point)
100 Mbps Ethernet or Fast Ethernet (IEEE 802.3u)
A networking standard that supports data transfer rates up to 100 Mbps.
•
100Base-T: is a series of specifications based on the older Ethernet standard,
which operates over normal-quality twisted-pair cables (100Base-T4), highquality twisted-pair cables (100Base-TX) and fiber optic cables (100Base-FX) in
a Star topology.
The 100Base-TX standard is the most popular due to its close compatibility with
the 10BASE-T Ethernet standard.
Gigabit Ethernet (IEEE 802.3z/802.3ab)
This new version of Ethernet supports data transfer rates of 1 Gigabit (1000
Megabits) per second over twisted-pair cables and fiber optic cables.
10 Gigabit Ethernet (IEEE 802.3ae)
This new version of Ethernet supports data transfer rates of 10 Gigabits (10000
Megabits) per second over fiber optic cables.
Currently the most widely used version of Ethernet technology is the 10 Mbps
Twisted Pair variety (10Base-T).
Matrix readers support 10Base-T and 100Base-T physical networks.
2
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
1.3
1
PROTOCOL STACK
The TCP/IP protocols enable communication between pairs of hosts, or 'peers', on a
network. The Protocol Stack structure can be conceptualized as a series of layers
or 'stack', between an application and the physical network.
Each protocol layer on one peer has a corresponding layer on the other peer. To the
application, it appears that it has a virtual connection to an application running on
another host. In reality, data is passed over the network in the physical form that the
network can handle.
Each layer is required, by design, to handle communications in a predetermined
fashion. Each protocol formats communicated data and appends information to or
removes information from the data. Then the protocol passes the data to a lower
layer on the sending host or a higher layer on the receiving host.
Figure 1 - Protocol Stack Scheme
3
MATRIX FAMILY
1
Physical Network
The physical medium used to carry Ethernet signals between computers.
Ethernet signals are transmitted serially, one bit at a time, over the shared signal
channel to every connected station.
Data Link Layer
This layer consists of:
•
Framing:
A station transmits its data in the form of an Ethernet Frame, or
Packet
•
MAC:
Abbreviation of Medium Access Control.
A set of rules embedded in the Ethernet interface located in each
station, that allows multiple computers to fairly arbitrate access to
the shared Ethernet channel. The Medium Access Control
mechanism is based on a system called Carrier Sense Multiple
Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD).
This standard enables devices to detect a collision. After detecting a
collision, a device waits a random delay time and then attempts to
re-transmit the message. If the device detects a collision again, it
waits twice as long to try to re-transmit the message. This is known
as Exponential Back Off.
Network Layer
This layer is based on the Internet Protocol (IP), which uses a set of rules to send
and receive messages at the Internet address level.
The following table represents the most popular and known protocols:
•
DHCP:
Abbreviation of Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol.
A protocol for assigning dynamic IP addresses to devices on a
network. With dynamic addressing, a device can have a different IP
address every time it connects to the network.
DHCP also supports a mix of static and dynamic IP addresses
•
IP:
Abbreviation of Internet Protocol version 4.
Specifies the format of packets, also called datagrams, and the
addressing scheme. Most networks combine IP with a higher-level
protocol called Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or User
Datagram Protocol (UDP), which establishes a virtual connection
between a destination and a source.
4
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
1
Transport Layer
This layer is based on one of the Internet transport Layer protocols, either the
Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or the User Datagram Protocol (UDP). These
protocols use a set of rules to exchange messages with other stations at the
information packet level.
The following table represents the most popular and known protocols:
•
TCP:
Abbreviation of Transmission Control Protocol.
Whereas the IP protocol deals only with packets, TCP enables two
hosts to establish a connection and exchange streams of data.
TCP guarantees delivery of data and also guarantees that packets
will be delivered in the same order in which they were sent.
•
UDP:
Abbreviation of User Datagram Protocol.
A connectionless protocol that, like TCP, runs on top of IP networks.
Unlike TCP/IP, UDP/IP provides very few error recovery services,
offering instead a direct way to send and receive datagrams over an
IP network. It's used primarily for broadcasting messages over a
network.
Application Layer
This layer groups the Session, Presentation and Application layers.
Networking application programs send messages or streams of data to one of the
Internet Transport Layer protocols.
The following table represents the most popular and known protocols:
•
DNS:
Abbreviation of Domain Name System (or Service).
An Internet service that translates alphabetic domain names (e.g.
www.datalogic.com) into IP addresses. Since the Internet is really
based on IP addresses, every time you use a domain name, a DNS
service must translate the name into the corresponding IP address.
•
FTP:
Abbreviation of File Transfer Protocol.
It is a protocol used to upload files from a workstation to an FTP
server or download files from an FTP server to a workstation.
It is the way that files get transferred from one device to another in
order for the files to be available on the Internet.
5
1
MATRIX FAMILY
•
HTTP:
Abbreviation of HyperText Transfer Protocol.
This protocol defines how messages are formatted and transmitted,
and what actions Web Servers and Browsers should take in
response to various commands.
For example, when you enter a URL in your browser, this actually
sends an HTTP command to the Web Server directing it to fetch and
transmit the requested Web page.
The terms HTTP Server and Web Server are interchangeable and
mean the application using the HTTP protocol in charge of replying
to the requests coming from a Client application (like Internet
Explorer or Netscape).
•
POP3:
Abbreviation of Post Office Protocol version 3.
A protocol used to recover e-mail from a Mail server. Most e-mail
applications use the POP3 protocol, although some can use the
newer IMAP4 (abbreviation of Internet Message Access Protocol
version 4).
This protocol can be used with or without SMTP.
•
SMTP:
Abbreviation of Simple Mail Transfer Protocol.
A protocol for sending E-mail messages between servers. Most Email systems that send mail over the Internet use SMTP to send
messages from one server to another; the messages can then be
retrieved with an e-mail client using either POP or IMAP.
In addition, SMTP is generally used to send messages from a mail
client to a mail server. This is why you need to specify both the POP
(or IMAP) server and the SMTP server when you configure your email application.
•
Telnet:
TCP/IP Terminal Emulation Protocol.
A terminal emulation program for TCP/IP networks such as the
Internet. The Telnet program runs on your computer and connects
your PC to a server on the network.
6
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
1.4
1
DATA EXCHANGE
The following figure shows how each layer adds (or removes) header information to
data traveling away from (or toward) the application layer.
The process of adding header information is termed Encapsulation; removing
header information is termed Decapsulation.
Figure 2 - Data Exchange Scheme
Encapsulation
Networking Application programs send messages or streams of data to one of the
Internet Transport Layer protocols, either the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) or the
Transmission Control Protocol (TCP).
The Transport layer protocols receive the data from the application, divide it into
smaller pieces called TCP segments or UDP packets, add a destination address, and
then pass the packets down to the next protocol layer, the Network layer.
The Network layer encloses the packet in an Internet Protocol (IP) frame, adds the
frame header, decides where to send the datagram (either directly to the destination
system or indirectly via a router or gateway), and passes the datagram down to the
Data Link layer.
The Data Link layer accepts IP datagrams, encapsulates them within frames that are
specific to the network hardware such as Ethernet, Token-Ring or Fiber Distributed
Data Interface (FDDI), and transmits these over the network.
7
MATRIX FAMILY
1
Decapsulation
Frames received by a host are processed through the Protocol layers in the reverse
order. Each layer strips off the corresponding header information, until the data ends
up at the application layer.
Frames are received by the Data Link layer, which strips off the frame header and
trailer, and sends the Datagram up to the Network layer.
The Network layer strips off the IP header and sends the packet up to the Transport
layer.
The Transport layer strips off the TCP or UDP header and sends the data up to the
networking Application programs.
The Internet Protocol (IP) defines addressing, routing, and data block handling over
the network. The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) assures that no data is lost or
duplicated, and that everything sent to the connection arrives correctly at the target.
IP Frame Header
The Internet Protocol (IP) defines addressing, routing, and data block handling over
the network. The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) assures that no data is lost or
duplicated, and that everything sent to the connection arrives correctly at the target.
The IP frame header contains routing information and control information associated
with datagram delivery. It does it on the basis of an IP address (32 Bytes long).
IP implementations must accept at least packets of 576 bytes (maximum-size IP
header is 64 bytes).
The IP header structure is as follows:
Bits
0-3
Ver.
Bits
Bits
Bits
4-7
8-15
16-31
IHL
Type of Service
Total length
Identification
Flags
Fragments Offset
Time to Live
Protocol
Header Checksum
Source address
Destination address
Option + Padding
Figure 3 - IP Header structure
8
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
1
TCP Frame
TCP (defined by IETF RFC793) provides a reliable stream delivery and virtual
connection service to applications through the use of sequenced acknowledgment
with retransmission of packets when necessary.
Virtual connection relies upon PORT concept: for each IP address 65536 ports are
available. Some of them are dedicated to specific Application Layer Services (FTP,
Telnet, etc.).
The TCP frame structure is as follows:
Bits 0-15
Source Port
Bits 16-31
Destination Port
Sequence Number
Acknowledgment Number
Res.
U A P R S F
Window
Checksum
Urgent Pointer
Option + Padding
Data
Offset
Figure 4 - TCP Frame structure
UDP Frame
UDP (defined by IETF RFC768) provides a simple, but reliable message service for
transaction-oriented services.
Each UDP header carries both a source port identifier and destination port identifier,
allowing high-level protocols to target specific applications and services among hosts
(Sockets etc).
The UDP frame structure is shown as follows:
Bits 0-15
UDP Source Port
UDP Message Length
Bits 16-31
UDP Destination Port
UDP Checksum
Data
Figure 5 - UDP Frame structure
9
MATRIX FAMILY
1
1.5
DEVICE ADDRESSING AND IDENTIFICATION
Every device connected to a TCP/IP network is identified by a set of parameters,
which manage the main system characteristics of the Ethernet communication.
•
IP Address:
Every device connected to a TCP/IP network must have a
unique IP (Internet Protocol) address. This address is used to
reference the specific device.
Networks using the TCP/IP protocol route messages based on
the IP address of the destination. The format of an IP address
is a 32-bit numeric address written as four numbers separated
by periods.
Each number can be zero to 255. For example, 172.16.11.220
could be an IP address.
The four numbers in an IP address are used in different ways
to identify a particular network and a host on that network.
Three regional Internet registries assign Internet addresses
from the following three classes:
- Class A: supports 16 million hosts on each of 127 networks.
- Class B: supports 65,000 hosts on each of 16,000 networks.
- Class C: supports 254 hosts on each of 2 million networks.
•
Subnet Mask:
A mask used to determine what subnet an IP address belongs
to. An IP address has two components, the Network address
and the Host address.
For example, consider the IP address 172.16.11.220.
Assuming this is part of a Class B network, the first two
numbers (172.16) represent the Class B network address, and
the second two numbers (11.220) identify a particular Host on
this network.
The related Subnet Mask is: 255.255.255.0.
Note: Class A: 24 bits; Class B: 16 bits; Class C: 8 bits.
•
10
Gateway:
The Gateway address, or router, allows communication to
other LAN segments. The Gateway address should be the IP
address of the router connected to the same LAN segment.
In enterprises, the Gateway is the computer that routes the
traffic from a workstation to the outside network that is serving
the Web pages. In homes, the Gateway is the ISP that
connects the user to the Internet.
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
1
•
DNS Address:
The DNS is used to resolve alphabetic computer names.
Consult your network administrator to obtain a new address.
This information is necessary only if the name must be used
instead of the IP address to set up an Ethernet service.
•
MAC Address:
Abbreviation of Media Access Control address
It is a hardware address that uniquely identifies each node of a
network. In IEEE 802 networks, the Data Link Control (DLC)
layer of the OSI Reference Model is divided into two sub
layers:
- Logical Link Control (LLC);
- Media Access Control (MAC).
The MAC layer interfaces directly with the network media.
Consequently, each different type of network media requires a
different MAC layer.
The Ethernet address is also referred to as the hardware
address or the MAC address.
The Ethernet (MAC) address is available on an externally
visible label on the Matrix readers.
NOTE
11
MATRIX FAMILY
1
1.6
SOCKET
It represents a single virtual connection between two network applications. Two
applications usually run on different computers and they can create multiple socket
instances to communicate each other.
The virtual connection relies upon the Port concept: in TCP/IP and UDP/IP networks,
a Port is an endpoint to a logical connection.
For each IP address 65536 ports are available. Some of them are dedicated to
specific Application Layer Services (FTP, Telnet, etc.).
In order to identify both the location and application to which a particular packet is to
be sent, IP Address (location) and Port Number (application) are combined into a
functional address called Socket.
NOTE
Matrix supports one Data Socket for data transmission, one
Image Socket for image files transmission and one System
Socket (reserved for the VisiSet™ configuration tool and
Host Mode programming).
Each Socket activated on the Matrix reader can be Client or Server:
Server
Matrix plays the passive role. It waits for connection from the Host (Client) side and
can open a maximum of three clients simultaneously.
As soon as the Host (Client) starts the communication then the reader will send all
the messages to the Host through the programmed Socket (IP Address + Port
Number).
The Host can decide to close the communication at any time; normally in this case all
further data transmitted by the Matrix Server device will be lost.
Client
Matrix plays the active role. It attempts a connection towards the Server as soon as it
has something to send (a reading event occurs).
Data Exchange can be terminated by the Host Server application at any time. The
Matrix Client device will re-attempt a new connection at the next reading event.
12
SETTING NETWORK COMMUNICATION
2
2
SETTING NETWORK COMMUNICATION
When using TCP/IP, the Matrix reader can use the Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol (DHCP) client service for dynamic IP addressing. It is also possible to
configure the reader using a “static” IP address.
If a network connection is available, please consult your network administrator to
verify the DHCP server availability within the network or to get a new static IP
address.
It is possible to set up network communications:
•
•
•
Using DHCP Client (refer to Paragraph 2.1).
Using Static IP Addressing (refer to Paragraph 2.2)
Using an Ethernet Crossover cable (refer to Paragraph 2.3).
Using the VisiSet™ configuration tool it is possible to access all the features and
functionalities of the Matrix and monitor/control any reader on your Ethernet network
(refer to Paragraph 2.4).
Since the Matrix Ethernet board is factory disabled, it is
necessary to connect the reader using the serial
communication port to enable it first.
NOTE
13
MATRIX FAMILY
2
2.1
USING DHCP CLIENT
Use the following procedure to set up communication on the Matrix when a DHCP
server is available within your network:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Consult your network administrator to verify the DHCP server availability within
the network.
Connect the Ethernet cable to the Matrix reader.
Connect the Auxiliary serial port of the reader to the PC and run the VisiSet™
configuration tool.
Select Connect to communicate with the reader.
Select Get Pars From Temporary Memory from the Reader Parameters
menu, the Parameter Setup window will be displayed.
From the ETHERNET menu, enable the ETHERNET SYSTEM Status
parameter.
Enable the DHCP Client parameter (refer to Figure 6).
Figure 6 - Ethernet Board Configuration Window
8.
9.
14
Send the configuration to the permanent memory of the reader.
Verify that the COM LED on the top of the reader is blinking, which indicates
Ethernet data activity.
SETTING NETWORK COMMUNICATION
2
10. Select Connect to communicate with the reader, the Ethernet board welcome
message will be displayed (refer to Figure 7).
Figure 7 - VisiSet™ Main Window - Serial Communication
Now the Matrix is ready for use.
The IP, Subnet Mask, Gateway, DNS1 and DNS2 addresses
are dynamically and automatically set when using the DHCP
client.
NOTE
15
MATRIX FAMILY
2
2.2
USING STATIC IP ADDRESSING
Use the following procedure to set up communication on the Matrix using static IP
addressing:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Consult your network administrator to obtain a unique static IP address.
Connect the Ethernet cable to the Matrix reader.
Connect the Auxiliary serial port of the reader to a PC and run the VisiSet™
configuration tool.
Select Connect to communicate with the reader.
Select Get Pars From Temporary Memory from the Reader Parameters
menu, the Parameter Setup window will be displayed.
From the ETHERNET menu, enable the ETHERNET SYSTEM Status
parameter.
Figure 8 - Ethernet Board Configuration Window
16
SETTING NETWORK COMMUNICATION
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
2
In the IP Address field, enter the IP address provided by your network
administrator (refer to Figure 8).
In the Subnet Mask field, enter the subnet mask provided by your network
administrator (refer to Figure 8).
If your network administrator provided a Gateway address, enter it in the
Gateway Address field; otherwise, leave it at 0.0.0.0 (refer to Figure 8).
If your network administrator provided a Domain Name Server address, enter it
in the DNS1 Address field; otherwise, leave it at 0.0.0.0 (refer to Figure 8).
Send the configuration to the permanent memory of the reader.
Verify that the COM LED on the top of the reader is blinking, which indicates
Ethernet data activity.
Select Connect to communicate with the reader, the Ethernet board welcome
message will be displayed (refer to Figure 9).
Figure 9 - VisiSet™ Main Window - Serial Communication
Now the Matrix is ready for use.
17
MATRIX FAMILY
2
2.3
USING AN ETHERNET CROSSOVER CABLE
Use the following procedure to set up communication between a single Windows PC
and a single Matrix reader using a crossover cable.
1.
2.
3.
Log into the PC using an account with Administrator access rights.
Select Start, Settings, Control Panel.
Open the Network window (refer to Figure 10).
Figure 10 - Network Window
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
18
Select the TCP/IP Protocol option from the Protocols menu and click the
Properties button.
Select the Specify an IP Address option, IP Address, Subnet Mask and Default
Gateway fields will become active (refer to Figure 11).
It is advised to document your old settings before changing the TCP/IP
properties of your PC.
In the IP Address field, enter the selected address (e.g. 172.16.11.200).
Replace the Subnet Mask with 255.255.0.0.
Remove any information in the Default Gateway field.
SETTING NETWORK COMMUNICATION
2
Figure 11 - TCP/IP Properties Window
Now the PC is ready for use.
This procedure is referenced to a Windows NT PC. The
screens will appear different with other Windows operating
system versions.
NOTE
10. Connect the Ethernet crossover cable between the PC and the Matrix reader.
11. Connect the Auxiliary serial port of the reader to the PC and run the VisiSet™
configuration tool.
12. Select Connect to communicate with the reader.
13. Select Get Pars From Temporary Memory from the Reader Parameters
menu, the Parameter Setup window menu will be displayed.
14. From the ETHERNET menu, enable the ETHERNET SYSTEM Status
parameter.
19
MATRIX FAMILY
2
Figure 12 - Ethernet Board Configuration Window
15.
16.
17.
18.
In the IP Address field, enter the selected address (e.g. 172.16.11.230).
In the Subnet Mask field, specify 255.255.0.0.
Send the configuration to the permanent memory of the reader.
Verify that the COM LED on the top of the reader is blinking, which indicates
Ethernet data activity.
19. Select Connect to communicate with the reader, the Ethernet board welcome
message will be displayed (refer to Figure 9).
The PC and the Matrix can now communicate using the crossover cable.
20
SETTING NETWORK COMMUNICATION
2.4
2
REMOTELY MANAGING A READER
Use the following procedure to remotely manage a Matrix reader connected on your
Local Area Network:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Connect the Ethernet cable to your PC and run the VisiSet™ configuration tool.
Select Communication from the Options menu.
Click Ethernet button, the Ethernet communication window will be displayed.
Click Look for Devices on Network button, VisiSet™ displays a list of Datalogic
Ethernet devices that are currently on the network (refer to Figure 13).
Figure 13 - Options - Ethernet Communication Window
5.
6.
Select the reader to be connected by double clicking on it, the address of the
selected reader will be displayed in the IP Address field.
Select Connect to communicate with the reader, the Ethernet board welcome
message will be displayed (refer to Figure 14).
The VisiSet™ welcome message indicates that the reader is connected and the
connection is over the Ethernet communication channel.
21
2
MATRIX FAMILY
Figure 14 - VisiSet™ Main Window - Ethernet Communication
22
MATRIX NETWORK SERVICES
3
3
MATRIX NETWORK SERVICES
On the Matrix Ethernet interface the following communication channels are available:
•
•
•
•
•
Data Socket (refer to Paragraph 3.1)
Image Socket (refer to Paragraph 3.2)
Image FTP Client (refer to Paragraph 3.3)
HTTP Server (refer to Paragraph 3.4)
E-mail Client (refer to Paragraph 3.5)
This chapter describes how to set and verify the correct functioning of Matrix network
services.
23
MATRIX FAMILY
3
3.1
DATA SOCKET
It is a point-to-point bi-directional communication channel available for the Ethernet
communication allowing only to transmit and to receive decoded data.
Use the following procedure to set up and test Data Socket network service.
1.
2.
3.
Connect the Matrix reader to your PC and run the VisiSet™ configuration tool.
Select Connect to communicate with the reader.
Select Get Pars From Temporary Memory from the Reader Parameters
menu, the Parameter Setup window menu will be displayed.
Figure 15 - Data Socket Configuration Window
4.
5.
From the ETHERNET menu, enable the DATA SOCKET Status parameter.
Set the other DATA SOCKET parameters as follows:
Header:
Terminator:
Protocol:
Port:
Type:
24
User Defined
User Defined
TCP
User Defined (e.g. 51236)
User Defined (Client or Server)
MATRIX NETWORK SERVICES
NOTE
6.
7.
8.
3
Port numbers 51230, 51234, 51235, 65530 are reserved for
the VisiSet™ configuration tool. It is strongly recommended
not to use these numbers for the Data Socket network
service.
In the Server Address field (only when the socket is configured as Client), enter
the IP address or the alphabetic name of the PC on which the Server application
program is running.
Send the configuration to the permanent memory of the reader.
Select Disconnect or Run to start the Matrix data transmission.
Use the following procedure to test Data Socket network service:
9.
Log into your PC and run a TCP/IP (Winsock) connection using a standard
terminal emulation program (like HyperTerminal) to simulate a Client or Server
device.
10. In the Host Address field, enter the IP address of your Matrix reader (e.g.
172.16.11.200).
11. In the Port Number field, enter the Port Number selected for the Data Socket
service (e.g. 51236).
Figure 16 - HyperTerminal Connection window
25
MATRIX FAMILY
3
12. Select Call option from the Call menu if the socket is configured as Server or
select Wait For A Call option from the Call menu if the socket is configured as
Client (refer to Figure 17).
Figure 17 - Hyperterminal Call menu
Now the remote PC is ready for use.
When the terminal emulation program is launched it will detect and listen on the
selected port. Verify the connection with the reader using the terminal emulator to
display transmitted data.
26
MATRIX NETWORK SERVICES
3.2
3
IMAGE SOCKET
Image Socket is a point-to-point bi-directional communication channel available for
Ethernet communication allowing to transmit image files only.
When transmitted, the image buffer is preceded by a header (refer to Figure 18):
Figure 18 - Image Header Structure
•
•
•
•
A fixed 4-byte pattern: 0xab, 0xcb;0x12, 0x34;
A 4-byte image identification number, which is a progressive number;
A 4-byte number giving the size of the image buffer;
A 4-byte number giving the size of the image, where the first 2 bytes indicate the
image columns while the last 2 bytes indicate the image lines.
Use the following procedure to set up the Image Socket network service.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Connect the Matrix reader to your PC and run the VisiSet™ configuration tool.
Select Connect to communicate with the reader.
Select Get Pars From Temporary Memory from the Reader Parameters
menu, the Parameter Setup window menu will be displayed.
From the ETHERNET menu, enable the IMAGE SOCKET Status parameter (On
Successful Decoding, On Decoding Failure, Always Enabled).
Set the other IMAGE SOCKET parameters as follows:
Image Sub-sampling:
Image Format:
JPG Quality (1-100):
Protocol:
Port:
Type:
Server Address:
User Defined
User Defined (BMP or JPG)
User Defined
User Defined (TCP or UDP)
User Defined
User Defined (Client or Server)
User Defined
27
MATRIX FAMILY
3
NOTE
6.
7.
8.
Port numbers 51230, 51234, 51235, 65530 are reserved for
the VisiSet™ configuration tool. It is strongly recommended
not to use these numbers for the Image Socket network
service.
In the Server Address field (only when the socket is configured as Client), enter
the IP address or the alphabetic name of the PC on which the Server application
program is running.
Send the configuration to the permanent memory of the reader.
Select Disconnect or Run to start the Matrix image file saving.
Figure 19 - Image Socket Configuration Window
28
MATRIX NETWORK SERVICES
3.3
3
IMAGE FTP CLIENT
The Image FTP Client is a high-level protocol channel available for Ethernet
communication allowing to transmit images and save them to a file on a standard
FTP server.
Use the following procedure to set up the Image FTP Client network service.
13. Log into your PC using an account with Administrator access rights and create
the folder where the image files will be saved.
14. Run FTP Server program.
15. Create a new User profile entering your User name and your Password and add
the folder where the image files will be saved to the FTP Server root.
16. Modify the permission settings of the folder where the image files will be saved
(at least Download permission must be assigned).
Now the remote PC is ready for use. When the FTP Server is launched it will detect
and listen to Port 21 of all available interfaces that it finds.
It is strongly recommended to disable the Connection
Timeout parameter (if present in your FTP Server) to avoid
connection losses.
NOTE
17. Connect the Matrix to your PC and run the VisiSet™ configuration tool.
18. Select Connect to communicate with the reader.
19. Select Get Pars From Temporary Memory from the Reader Parameters
menu, the Parameter Setup window menu will be displayed.
20. From the ETHERNET menu, enable the IMAGE FTP CLIENT Status parameter
(On Successful Decoding, On Decoding Failure, Always Enabled).
21. In the Server Address field, enter the IP address or the alphabetic name of the
PC on which the FTP Server is running.
22. In the User Name field, enter the User name for your profile.
23. In the Password field, enter the Password selected for your profile.
24. In the Image Saving Path field, enter the path of the folder where the image
files will be saved.
25. Set the other IMAGE FTP CLIENT parameters as follows:
29
MATRIX FAMILY
3
Image Sub-sampling:
Image Format:
JPG Quality (1-100):
Image File Name:
Max. Files to Save:
User Defined
User Defined (BMP or JPG)
User Defined
User Defined
User Defined
26. Send the configuration to the permanent memory of the reader.
27. Select Disconnect or Run to start the Matrix image file saving.
Figure 20 - Image FTP Client Configuration Window
30
MATRIX NETWORK SERVICES
3.4
3
HTTP SERVER
The HTTP server allows starting remote monitoring.
Remote monitoring allows checking the functioning of the reader via Ethernet. In
particular, a remote monitoring PC can communicate with a Matrix reader by means
of the Data Socket and Image Socket.
Use the following procedure to set up the HTTP Server network service.
1.
2.
3.
Connect the Matrix reader to your PC and run the VisiSet™ configuration tool.
Select Connect to communicate with the reader.
Select Get Pars From Temporary Memory from the Reader Parameters
menu, the Parameter Setup window menu will be displayed.
Figure 21 - HTTP Server Configuration Window
4.
5.
From the ETHERNET menu, enable the DATA SOCKET Status parameter.
Set the other DATA SOCKET parameters as follows:
Header:
Terminator:
Protocol:
Port:
Type:
6.
User Defined
<13><10>
TCP
51236
Server
From the ETHERNET menu, enable the IMAGE SOCKET Status parameter (On
Successful Decoding, On Decoding Failure, Always Enabled)
31
MATRIX FAMILY
3
7.
Set the other IMAGE SOCKET parameters as follows:
Image Sub-sampling:
Image Format:
JPG Quality (1-100):
Protocol:
Port:
Type:
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
User Defined
JPG
User Defined
TCP
51237
Server
From the ETHERNET menu, enable the HTTP SERVER Status parameter.
Send the configuration to the permanent memory of the reader.
Select Disconnect or Run to start the Matrix Web page transmission.
Run a Web Browser on your PC (e.g. Microsoft Internet Explorer).
Select Open and enter the IP address of the reader to be connected, the
monitoring Web page will appear on the screen showing a real-time image and
data (refer to Figure 22).
Figure 22 - Matrix-2000™ Web Page
32
MATRIX NETWORK SERVICES
3.5
3
E-MAIL CLIENT
Upon an #n number of occurrences of a specific event during an #m number of
collections, the reader is able to automatically sends an e-mail message.
The e-mail message has the following format:
From:
To:
Subject:
Text:
MACNUMBER@IPAddress
Addressee e-mail address (defined by the user)
Subject (defined by the user)
Text (defined by the user)
Use the following procedure to set up E-mail Client network service.
1.
2.
3.
Connect the Matrix reader to your PC and run the VisiSet™ configuration tool.
Select Connect to communicate with the reader.
Select Get Pars From Temporary Memory from the Reader Parameters
menu, the Parameter Setup window menu will be displayed.
Figure 23 - E-mail Client Configuration Window
33
MATRIX FAMILY
3
4.
5.
From the ETHERNET menu, enable the E-MAIL CLIENT Status parameter.
Set the other E-MAIL CLIENT parameters as follows:
Sending Events:
Num of Collections:
Sending Event
Occurrences:
To:
Subject To Send:
Text To Send:
6.
7.
8.
9.
User Defined
User Defined
User Defined
User Defined (e.g. example@it.datalogic.com)
User Defined
User Defined
In the SMTP Address field, enter the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol address
assigned by your network administrator.
In the POP3 Address field, enter the Post Office Protocol address assigned by
your network administrator.
Send the configuration to the permanent memory of the reader.
Select Disconnect or Run to start the Matrix application program.
The length of the Addressee field (To parameter) is currently
limited to 31 alphanumeric characters.
NOTE
34
ETHERNET HARDWARE BASICS
4
4.1
4
ETHERNET HARDWARE BASICS
CABLING
ISO/OSI model uses acronyms to indicate a particular kind of physical layer (e.g.
10Base5, 10BaseT, 100Base, 10Broad36).
The first number (1, 10, 100, 1000) indicates the transmission speed in Megabits per
second.
The second term indicates the transmission type:
•
Broad:
•
Base:
Broadband (communication channel with a greater bandwidth and
potentially capable of greater transmission rates)
Opposite of Broadband
The last number indicates the cable type:
•
•
•
•
•
2:
5:
T:
F:
36:
Coaxial cable with 0.25 inch diameter
Coaxial cable with 0.50 inch diameter
Twisted Pair cable
Fiber cable
Television type cable
The most used types of cabling for Standard Ethernet and Fast Ethernet are:
10BaseT (Standard Ethernet)
In 1990 IEEE approved 802.3i 10BaseT a completely new physical LAYER.
•
•
•
•
•
10BaseT uses two pairs of Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) telephone-type cable
(one to transmit data and one to receive data) and RJ45 connectors according to
EIA 568A and 568B specifications.
The maximum length is 100m for each segment and the “4 repeater/5 segment”
rule must be applied. So a 10BaseT LAN can have a maximum length of 500m.
The physical topology of the standard is a Star, with nodes connected to a wiring
hub or concentrator.
Media has to be at least CAT3 (category 3) cabling, unshielded, voice grade
telephone cable.
Maximum Data Rate is 10 Mbps.
35
MATRIX FAMILY
4
100BaseTX (Fast Ethernet)
IEEE standard is 802.3u: it is the extension of 10BaseT at 10 times the speed.
•
•
•
•
100Base-T uses two pairs of Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) Category 5 (100Ω
impedance) or Type 1 Shielded Twisted Pair (STP – 150Ω impedance) cable
(one pair to transmit data and one to receive data) and RJ45 connectors
according to EIA 568A and 568B specifications.
The maximum length is 100m for each segment and the “4 repeater/5 segment”
rule must be applied. So a 100BaseTX LAN can have a maximum length of
500m.
Media has to be CAT5 (Category 5) cabling.
Maximum Data Rate is 100 Mbps.
An RJ45 connector is used in Twisted-Pair 10BaseT and 100BaseT Ethernet.
It is similar to a phone plug/jack but has eight pins. Looking at the plug (male) with
the pins down, the pins are numbered from left to right 1 through 8.
Pin 1 and pin 2 are paired with each other, and pin 3 and pin 6 are paired with each
other. The other pins (pins 4, 5, 7, and 8) are not used in Ethernet.
Pin No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Contact Designation
TIA/EIA 568A
TIA/EIA 568B
White/Green
White/Orange
Green
Orange
White/Orange
White/Green
Blue
Blue
White/Blue
White/Blue
Orange
Green
White/Brown
White/Brown
Brown
Brown
Figure 24 - RJ45 Connector
36
Meaning
TX+
TXRX+
RX-
ETHERNET HARDWARE BASICS
4
The TIA/EIA-568A standard is supposed to be used in new network installations.
Most of the Ethernet cables are still the TIA/EIA-568B standard; however, it makes
absolutely no functional difference in which you choose.
Both the T-568A and the T-568B standard Straight-Through cables are used most
often as patch cords for your Ethernet connections (refer to Figure 25).
Figure 25 - EIA-568A and EIA-568B Straight-Through Cables
Two Ethernet stations can be directly attached to each other, but the cabling will be
wired differently than a normal 10BASE-T Ethernet network connection. The 802.3
specifications refer to this direct connection between two stations as a Crossover
cable (refer to Figure 26).
Figure 26 - EIA-568A and EIA-568B Crossover Cables
37
MATRIX FAMILY
4
4.2
LAN SYSTEM COMPONENTS
Local Area Network (LAN) is a group of interconnected computers with the ability to
share resources confined to a limited geographical area (typically about 3.000 m).
Different components could be present in a LAN depending on the topology; the
following table represents the most popular and used components:
Repeaters
Repeaters are the simplest components that we can find in a network. It simply
retransmits incoming electrical signals without considering any possible collisions.
Although repeaters are probably the cheapest way to extend a network, they do so
without separating the collision domains, or network traffic. They simply extend the
physical size of the network. All segments joined by repeaters therefore share the
same bandwidth and collision domain.
Bridges
Bridges are used to connect two separate networks to form a single large continuous
Local Area Network (LAN). The overall network, however, still remains one network
with a single network ID (NetID).
The bridge only divides the network up into two segments, each with its own collision
domain and each retaining its full bandwidth. All nodes on both sides of the bridge
see the Broadcast transmissions.
The bridge exists as a node on each network and passes only valid messages
across to destination addresses on the other network. Bridges can be used to extend
the length of a network but in addition they improve network performance.
Hubs
Hubs are used to interconnect hosts in a physical star configuration.
All hosts connected to the hub share the available bandwidth since they all form part
of the same collision domain.
A passive Hub serves simply as a conduit for the data, enabling it to go from one
device (or segment) to another. So-called Intelligent Hubs include additional features
that enable an administrator to monitor the traffic passing through the Hub and to
configure each port in the Hub.
A third type of hub, called a Switching Hub, actually reads the destination address of
each packet and then forwards the packet to the correct port.
38
ETHERNET HARDWARE BASICS
4
Switches
Ethernet switches are expansion of the concept of bridging and are, in fact, intelligent
(self-learning) multi-port bridges. Each port on the switch represents a separate
segment with its own collision domain.
A typical use for a switch is a Backbone: for example, in a building we can have
many PCs on several floors (different LANs). It’s possible collect single LAN floor
traffic with a hub and connect all the hubs with a switch.
Routers
Routers operate at the Network layer (level 3 of the ISO/OSI model). They forward
packets to their destination, using the most direct available path.
A Router passes data packets using logical addresses and algorithms, which enable
it to select the best route by which to transmit data packets based on the IP address.
In the Internet, a Router could be a hardware device or software, which defines the
best route by which to reach the different nodes.
Gateways
Because routers are unable to connect LANs that are using different protocols, a
Gateway is needed. A Gateway is a combination of hardware devices and software,
which connects networks of different protocols.
It transmits data, which it has translated into a format that is compatible with the
protocol used by other networks.
In enterprises, the gateway node often acts as a Proxy server and a Firewall. The
gateway is also associated with both a Router, which uses headers and forwarding
tables to determine where packets are sent, and a Switch, which provides the actual
path for the packet in and out of the Gateway.
39
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