Concorde 4500 and System 4000EX / ZX - Polycom

Concorde 4500 and System 4000EX / ZX - Polycom

Concorde•4500 and
System 4000EX/ZX
Troubleshooting Guide
Copyright  1997: PictureTel Corporation—Printed in U.S.A.
PictureTel Corporation, 100 Minuteman Road, Andover, MA 01810
Telephone number: 508-292-5000
Chapter 13, “Ascend and Network Provider Information,” Copyright  1996 Ascend Communications, Inc.
PictureTel is a registered trademark of PictureTel Corporation. The PictureTel logo, Concorde, PowerCam,
PowerMic, Look-At-Me-Button, LAMB, WorldCart, QuickPad, SG3, SG4, PT724, M-8000, GroupShare, and
Link-64E are trademarks of PictureTel Corporation.
Bose is a registered trademark of Bose Corporation.
VPN is a registered trademark of Sprint.
The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice. PictureTel assumes no
responsibility for technical or editorial errors or omissions that may appear in this document or for the use of
this material. Nor does PictureTel make any commitment to update the information contained in this
document. This document contains proprietary information which is protected by copyright. All rights
reserved. No part of this document may be photocopied or reproduced in any form without the prior written
consent of PictureTel Corporation.
Edition: 800-0793-01/A
Note: In this document, the term “monitor” is used to refer to the NTSC or PAL television (TV) broadcast
receiver that is part of the Concorde•4500 system. These receivers are governed by different regulations
than computer monitors.
The PictureTel Concorde•4500 complies with EEC Directives 89/336/EEC, 93/68/EEC and European
standards EN 55022B, EN 50082-1, and EN 60950. Consequently, the Concorde•4500 is eligible to display
the following marking:
CC168 X
Warning: Changes or modifications to this unit not expressly approved by the party responsible for
compliance could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant
to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates,
uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed, operated, and maintained in
accordance with PictureTel Corporation guides and manuals, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference
in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his own expense.
Shielded cables must be used with this unit to ensure compliance with the Class A FCC limits.
Notice to Users of Public DATAPHONE Digital Service
The following instructions are provided to ensure that you comply with FCC Rules, Part 68.
1.
All direct connections to DDS lines must be made through standard plugs and jacks furnished by the
telephone company. No connections can be made to party lines or coin lines. Before connecting your
unit, you must do the following:
a.
Tell your local telephone company that you have an FCC registered device and that you wish to
connect to the company’s line. Provide them with the 14-digit FCC registration number listed on the
device’s label. They will also need to know the facility interface code and service code to connect
the necessary service. For your unit, the facility interface code is 04DU5-56 for 56 kbps service.
The service code is 6.0Y.
b.
Inform the local telephone company of the jack arrangement you want to use, which is RJ-48S.
c.
Connect the channel service unit (CSU) with the appropriate cable after the telephone company
has installed the requested jack.
2.
If the unit appears to be malfunctioning, it should be disconnected from the telephone line until you learn
if your equipment or the telephone line is the source of the trouble. If your equipment needs repair, it
should not be reconnected until it is repaired.
3.
The CSU is designed to prevent harm to the DDS network. If the telephone company finds that the
equipment exceeds tolerance parameters, the telephone company can temporarily disconnect service,
although they will attempt to give you advance notice if possible.
4.
Under FCC Rules, no customer is authorized to repair this equipment. This restriction applies
regardless of whether the equipment is in or out of warranty.
5.
If the telephone company alters their equipment or operations in a manner that will affect use of this
device, they must give you advance warning so as to give you the opportunity for uninterrupted service.
You will be advised of your right to file a complaint with the FCC.
6.
In the event of equipment malfunction, all repairs should be performed by PictureTel Corporation or an
authorized agent. It is the responsibility of the users requiring service to report the need for service to
our company or to one of our authorized agents.
Note: It is illegal to export a Concorde•4500 system that contains the encryption option from the United
States without approval from the United States Department of State. See your PictureTel sales
representative for details.
Notice to Canadian Users
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for radio noise emissions from digital apparatus
set out in the Radio Interference Regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications (DOC).
Le présent appareil numérique n’émet pas de bruits radioélectriques dépassant les limites applicables aux
appareils numériques de la class A prescrites dans le Réglement sur le brouillage radioélectrique édicté par
le ministère des Communications du Canada.
The Canadian Department of Communications label identifies certified equipment. This certification means
that the equipment meets certain telecommunications network protective, operational, and safety
requirements. The Department does not guarantee the equipment will operate to the user’s satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to be connected to the facilities
of the local telecommunications company. The equipment must also be installed using an acceptable
method of connection. In some cases, the company’s inside wiring associated with a single line individual
service may be extended by means of a certified connector assembly (telephone extension cord). The
customer should be aware that compliance with the above conditions may not prevent degradation of service
in some situations. Repairs to certified equipment should be made by an authorized Canadian maintenance
facility designated by the supplier. Any repairs or alterations made by the user to this equipment, or
equipment malfunctions, may give the telecommunications company cause to request the user to disconnect
the equipment. Users should ensure, for their own protection, that the electrical ground connections of the
power utility, telephone lines, and internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are connected together.
This precaution may be particularly important in rural areas.
DOC Load Number (LN) = 6
Caution: Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves, but should contact the
appropriate electric inspection authority, or electrician, as appropriate.
FCC Part 68 Notice (U.S.)
The Load Number (LN) assigned to each terminal device denotes the percentage of the total load to be
connected to a telephone loop which is used by the device, to prevent overloading. The termination on a loop
may consist of any combination of devices subject only to the requirement that the total of the Load Numbers
of all the devices does not exceed 100.
Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) = .6B
Connection To United Kingdom Telecommunications Network
The PictureTel Concorde•4500 (if applicable) is approved to connect to the following United Kingdom (UK)
Public Telecommunications Operator (PTO) network services:
❑
Indirect connection to PTO-provided digital switched and point-to-point services through suitable
approved branch systems.
This includes the following types of connections:
❑
Indirect connection to basic rate ISDN services (for example, British Telecom’s ISDN2 service) through
approved terminal adaptors, multiplexers, or PABXs.
❑
Indirect connection to digital leased lines (for example, British Telecom’s Kilostream and Megastream
services) through approved equipment, such as multiplexers or PABXs.
The Approval Number is: NS/3832/1/M/602676
Warning: The Concorde•4500 must not be connected directly to any UK PTO provided services.
The Concorde•4500 as approved above is comprised of the following elements:
❑
Electronics module
❑
Keypad
❑
Line-in microphones
❑
Microphones
❑
X.21 (V.11) connecting cables
All other equipment shipped as part of a Concorde•4500 (for example, cameras or monitors) is approved to
connect indirectly to the UK PTO networks when connected through the Concorde•4500 electronics module
under the terms of General Approval Number NS/G/1234/J/100003.
Contents
About this Guide
Overview........................................................................................................................................... xv
How this Guide Was Compiled..................................................................................................... xv
Troubleshooting ............................................................................................................................... xv
Safety Requirements....................................................................................................................... xvi
Cautions .................................................................................................................................. xvi
Warnings................................................................................................................................. xvi
Required Tools and Test Equipment........................................................................................... xvii
Chapter 1
No System Power ................................................................................................................. 1-1
Chapter 2
Diagnostic Tests (Including Power-On Self-Tests) ....................................................... 2-1
Types of Tests .................................................................................................................................. 2-1
Running Diagnostics in Remote Mode .............................................................................. 2-1
Power-On Diagnostics.................................................................................................................... 2-2
Pass-Fail Status ...................................................................................................................... 2-2
Fault Log .......................................................................................................................................... 2-4
Board Replacements ....................................................................................................................... 2-5
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Chapter 3
Video or Monitor Failure ....................................................................................................3-1
Chapter 4
Audio Failure ........................................................................................................................4-1
Chapter 5
Network or Communications Failure ...............................................................................5-1
Chapter 6
Peripheral Failure .................................................................................................................6-1
Chapter 7
Wireless Keypad Failure .....................................................................................................7-1
DIP Switch Settings .........................................................................................................................7-3
Chapter 8
LimeLight Speaker Location Device Failure...................................................................8-1
LimeLight Start-Up Overview.......................................................................................................8-1
How LimeLight Frames Speakers.................................................................................................8-2
LimeLight and Muting....................................................................................................................8-2
Stopping Automatic Pointing ........................................................................................................8-2
Common Problems and Possible Solutions .................................................................................8-3
LimeLight Troubleshooting Procedure ........................................................................................8-5
Notes to Flowchart.................................................................................................................8-8
Chapter 9
Verifying Electrical Voltage ...............................................................................................9-1
Testing the Current .........................................................................................................................9-1
Testing the Voltage..........................................................................................................................9-1
viii
Chapter 10
Component Checklist and Technical Tips .................................................................... 10-1
Component Checklist ................................................................................................................... 10-1
Technical Tips for Components .................................................................................................. 10-2
Technical Tip for Isolating a Port Problem................................................................................ 10-5
Chapter 11
Loopback Tests ................................................................................................................... 11-1
Loopback Tests .............................................................................................................................. 11-1
Accessing Loopback Tests ........................................................................................................... 11-2
Running the Local Video/Audio Loopback Test..................................................................... 11-3
Running the Local Channel Loopback Test .............................................................................. 11-4
Running the Remote Video/Audio Loopback Test................................................................. 11-5
Running the Remote CSU Loopback Test ................................................................................. 11-6
Chapter 12
Warning Messages ............................................................................................................. 12-1
Chapter 13
E to EX/ZX Upgrade ........................................................................................................... 13-1
Introducing the Upgrade Kits ..................................................................................................... 13-2
Required Tools..................................................................................................................... 13-4
Cautions and a Warning..................................................................................................... 13-4
Recording Speed-Dial Numbers ................................................................................................. 13-5
Recording System Settings ........................................................................................................ 13-10
Opening Up the Electronics Module........................................................................................ 13-19
Removing Existing Boards ........................................................................................................ 13-20
Transferring Daughter Boards .................................................................................................. 13-21
Phone-Add Board.............................................................................................................. 13-21
Network Interface Board and Encryption Chip............................................................ 13-23
Installing New Boards................................................................................................................ 13-25
Placing New Labels .................................................................................................................... 13-26
ix
Installing the PowerCam 100 .....................................................................................................13-29
Installing the PowerMic..............................................................................................................13-30
Installing the Wireless Keypad..................................................................................................13-30
Installing the Look-At-Me-Button.............................................................................................13-30
Installing the Software Cartridge ..............................................................................................13-30
Connecting the Cables ................................................................................................................13-31
Restoring Speed-Dial Numbers.................................................................................................13-33
Restoring System Settings ..........................................................................................................13-33
Verifying Performance................................................................................................................13-38
Chapter 14
Ascend and Network Provider Information .................................................................14-1
Introduction....................................................................................................................................14-1
Procomm Plus Modem Settings ..................................................................................................14-1
Ordering ISDN BRI Service for Ascend Products ....................................................................14-2
Ordering ISDN Service........................................................................................................14-2
Provisioning the AT&T 5ESS..............................................................................................14-3
Provisioning the Northern Telecom DMS-100 ................................................................14-4
Service Profile Identifiers (SPIDs)......................................................................................14-4
SPIDs for a Northern Telecom DMS-100 Switch .............................................................14-6
Multiband Family Frequently Asked Questions ......................................................................14-7
Ascend Multiband VSX BRI.......................................................................................................14-10
Network Solution #1 .........................................................................................................14-12
Network Solution #2 .........................................................................................................14-13
Hardware Specifications ...................................................................................................14-14
Ascend's Remote Networking Products.........................................................................14-15
Technical Sources ........................................................................................................................14-15
Digital Dial-Up Bandwidth on Demand and Inverse Multiplexing...........................14-15
Digital Dial-Up Network Services...................................................................................14-16
Digital Dial-Up: Access Lines...........................................................................................14-19
Other Types of Network Access ......................................................................................14-22
Comparison of Inverse Multiplexing to High Speed Network-Based Services........14-26
x
Figures
Figure 2-1:
Power-On Procedure Flow Chart ............................................................................ 2-3
Figure 7-1:
DIP Switches for Wireless Keypad.......................................................................... 7-3
Figure 8-1:
LimeLight Troubleshooting Procedure (part 1) .................................................... 8-6
Figure 8-2:
LimeLight Troubleshooting Procedure (part 2) .................................................... 8-7
Figure 8-3:
LimeLight Keypad ..................................................................................................... 8-9
Figure 11-1:
Near-End Tests Menu.............................................................................................. 11-2
Figure 11-2:
Far-End Tests Menu................................................................................................. 11-2
Figure 11-3:
Local Video/Audio Loopback Test....................................................................... 11-4
Figure 11-4:
Local Channel Loopback Test ................................................................................ 11-5
Figure 11-5:
Remote Video/Audio Loopback Test................................................................... 11-5
Figure 11-6:
Remote CSU Loopback Test ................................................................................... 11-6
Figure 13-1:
System 4000 Boards ............................................................................................... 13-20
Figure 13-2:
Installing Boards in the System 4000................................................................... 13-25
Figure 13-3:
Placing Labels on the System 4000ZX................................................................. 13-27
Figure 13-4:
Correct Label Positions ......................................................................................... 13-28
Figure 13-5:
Removing the Old Camera ................................................................................... 13-29
Figure 13-6:
Configuration Menu Tree ..................................................................................... 13-36
Figure 14-1:
Switched 56 ............................................................................................................. 14-16
Figure 14-2:
Switched 64 ............................................................................................................. 14-17
Figure 14-3:
Switched 384 and 1536 .......................................................................................... 14-18
Figure 14-4:
ISDN Multirate....................................................................................................... 14-18
Figure 14-5:
Network Access...................................................................................................... 14-19
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Figure 14-6:
Network Access: Switched 56...............................................................................14-19
Figure 14-7:
Network Access: T1................................................................................................14-20
Figure 14-8:
Network Access: ISDN BRI...................................................................................14-21
Figure 14-9:
Network Access: ISDN PRI...................................................................................14-22
Figure 14-10: Network Access via PBX .......................................................................................14-23
Figure 14-11: Network Access via Drop and Insert...................................................................14-24
Figure 14-12: Network Access via Channel Bank......................................................................14-24
Figure 14-13: Access Lines and Services Accessed ....................................................................14-25
Figure 14-14: Access Lines to Access Lines (Available Services) ............................................14-25
Figure 14-15: Inverse Multiplexing..............................................................................................14-26
xii
Tables
Table 1-1:
No Power Checklist ................................................................................................... 1-1
Table 2-1:
Levels of Diagnostic Procedures.............................................................................. 2-1
Table 2-2:
System Fault Codes ................................................................................................... 2-4
Table 3-1:
Display Problems Checklist...................................................................................... 3-2
Table 4-1:
Audio Problems Checklist ........................................................................................ 4-2
Table 5-1:
Network or Communications Failure Checklist ................................................... 5-1
Table 6-1:
Peripheral Failure Checklist ..................................................................................... 6-2
Table 7-1:
Wireless Keypad Problems Checklist ..................................................................... 7-2
Table 8-1:
LimeLight Problems Checklist................................................................................. 8-3
Table 10-1:
Component Checklist .............................................................................................. 10-1
Table 10-2:
Technical Tips for Components ............................................................................. 10-2
Table 11-1:
Loopback Tests......................................................................................................... 11-3
Table 12-1:
System Warning Messages ..................................................................................... 12-1
Table 13-1:
Audio Board Connections .................................................................................... 13-31
Table 13-2:
Video Board Connections ..................................................................................... 13-31
Table 14-1:
Settings for AT&T 5ESS switches .......................................................................... 14-3
Table 14-2:
Settings for Northern Telecom DMS-100 switches ............................................. 14-4
Table 14-3:
Hardware Specifications....................................................................................... 14-14
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About this Guide
Overview
How this Guide
Was Compiled
This manual provides technical tips and describes how to:
❑
Verify the power-on self tests
❑
Isolate and solve problems
❑
Interpret warning messages
❑
Verify electrical current
❑
Understand loopback tests
The information in this guide has been extracted from the
Concorde•4500 Servicing Guide, part number 800-0631-01/A. For
more information, please refer to that servicing guide.
This guide has been compiled by the Continuous Improvement
Team to assist the Technical Support Group in troubleshooting
systems and networks in the field.
Troubleshooting
Using the procedures in this chapter, you can monitor system
functionality, discover where a problem exists, and initiate recovery
procedures to maintain the Concorde•4500 and keep it running at
peak performance.
You will also find background information explaining the various
types of loopback tests. For information on how to perform these
tests, see the Concorde•4500 Administrator's Guide.
xv
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ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Safety
Requirements
Before beginning any maintenance procedure, read this information
carefully. Follow these guidelines whenever you are servicing the
Concorde•4500.
Cautions
A caution indicates an operating practice or procedure that you must
follow correctly to prevent damage to or destruction of equipment.
The Concorde•4500 cautions are listed below.
Cautions
Wear a grounded wrist strap when you remove a board. A
wrist strap helps prevent static electricity from damaging
sensitive chips.
Do not install substitute parts or modify or customize the
system.
Do not let anything obstruct air flow in and around the
electronics module.
Do not let anything fall into the electronics module.
Warnings
A warning indicates an operating practice or procedure that you
must follow correctly to prevent personal injury or loss of life. The
Concorde•4500 warnings are listed below.
Warnings
Before you remove the electronics module cover, make sure
you disconnect the AC power cable to the system.
When you are instructed to plug in the system AC power
cable, make sure that the electronics module is properly
connected to an electrical ground and the cable is plugged
into an approved, three-contact electrical outlet.
xvi
Required Tools and Test Equipment
Required Tools
and Test
Equipment
You need the following tools to service a Concorde•4500:
❑
Phillips and Flatback screwdrivers
❑
Grounded wrist strap
❑
Adjustable wrench/Allen Key’s
Use a Volt ohmmeter to service a Concorde•4500.
xvii
1
No System Power
This chapter describes what to do if your system has no power.
Table 1-1: No Power Checklist
If these symptom appear . . .
The green LED on the power
supply is not lit.
The fans are not rotating.
No board LEDs are lit.
Do this . . .
1. Make sure that power available to the facility and that the
circuit breakers supplying power to the system are not
tripped.
2. Make sure that the system power cable is plugged
securely into the wall outlet and into the electronics
module.
3. Make sure that the line conditioner or noise suppressor
outlet is turned on, if your system plugs into one instead
of into a wall outlet.
4. Make sure that the main power switch is pressed to 1 (on).
5. If your Concord•4500 system is installed in the WorldCart,
make sure that the electronics module and WorldCart
power switches are pressed to 1 (on).
1-1
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4
Notes
1-2
2
Diagnostic Tests
(Including PowerOn Self-Tests)
The Concorde•4500 provides a number of diagnostic tests. You can
run many tests remotely, as well as on site.
Types of Tests
The Concorde•4500 system has three levels of diagnostic
procedures:
Table 2-1: Levels of Diagnostic Procedures
Type of Test
When Test Runs
System power-on self-tests
Run automatically when the
system is powered on.
Board-level tests
Accessed from the Near-End
Tests menu by choosing Run
Automatic Self-Test.
Run-time and loopback tests
Accessed from the Near-End
Tests menu or the Far-End
Tests menu by choosing
specific tests.
Running Diagnostics in Remote Mode
You can run diagnostic tests without traveling to a customer site by
entering remote diagnostics mode. This mode lets the test program
reboot the customer’s system and send data through an external
modem to a PC at your site.
2-1
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DIAGNOSTIC TESTS (INCLUDING POWER-ON SELF-TESTS)
For details on all diagnostic procedures, see Chapter 3, “Using the
Diagnostic Menus,” in the Concorde•4500 Administrator's Guide.
Power-On
Diagnostics
The power-on self-tests check the hardware and verify the presence
of system boards, cameras, and the wired keypad.
TI
P
If the system does not power on, see Chapter 1, “No System
Power.” If you see no video, see Chapter 3, “Video or
Monitor Failure.” If you hear no audio, see Chapter 4,
“Audio Failure.”
Pass-Fail Status
When a test cycle for a board completes, a PASS or FAIL status
message appears next to the board on the screen listing. If a board
fails a test, the remaining tests in the cycle for that board are then
abandoned, and the diagnostics continue with the next board test
cycle in an attempt to power on the system. If any of the boards
failed, a message appears after testing asking you to press any key
to continue system startup.
In addition, if a test fails, the red LED on the failed board is lit
instead of the green LED.
FF.Y.I.
YI
2-2
When you run the power-on self test you can see the slot
number for each board listed next to the board name.
Power-On Diagnostics
The following illustration shows the power-on procedure.
Power On
Load software
(POST)
Yes
Fault count
<7
No
Courtesy outlet
clicks on
Print message “Hit any
key to continue”
Fail
Display “Maximum
fault count exceeded”
On-screen (POST)
Display
PictureTel logo
Halt
Display and log
fault codes
Print “System
Initializing” message
Initialize
System
Failure
detected
Yes
No
Remove message
“System Initializing”
All red lights off
All green LEDS on
System
operational
Figure 2-1: Power-On Procedure Flow Chart
2-3
DIAGNOSTIC TESTS (INCLUDING POWER-ON SELF-TESTS)
Fault Log
If the system fails during normal operation, the software updates
the fault log. The fault log contains a history of system failures and
fault codes which identify the failing components. You can access
the ten most recent fault codes for the system by choosing View
Diagnostics Menu, then Near End Status. From the Near End Status
menu, choose View Last Ten Fault Codes.
The fault codes are grouped into ranges corresponding to the
various components described in Table 2-2.
Table 2-2: System Fault Codes
Fault Code
Description
0000 through 3FFF
Communications board (CP)
4000 through 4FFF
Dual board failure. The last two digits
in the fault code indicate the failing
boards:
8=HP4
9=HP8
B=Video
C=Graphics daughter board
D=Audio
2-4
5000 through 5FFF
Software cartridge/Backplane
6000 through 6FFF
Communications board (CP)
7000 through 7FFF
Data Interface board (DI)
8000 through 8FFF
Array Processor board (HAP)
9000 through 9FFF
Array Processor board
A000 through AFFF
Array Processor board
B000 through BFFF
Video Board (VI)
C000 through CFFF
Graphics Daughter board
D000 through DFFF
Audio board (AI)
FFFF
Software change
Board Replacements
TI
P
When a fault code appears, it does not always mean that
something is seriously wrong. Rebooting the system may
correct the problem.
You can clear the fault log at any time. From the Near End Status
menu, choose Clear Fault Codes.
Board
Replacements
If a power-on self-test fails after you have rebooted the system and
continues to indicate that a board is not functioning properly, try
reseating the board. If the board still fails to respond, replace the
failing board.
2-5
Notes
2-6
3
Video or Monitor
Failure
This chapter lists symptoms for various monitor failures, and
describes possible solutions for each. It covers these problems:
❑
There is no video image on the monitor
❑
There is neither a PictureTel Ready message nor a video image on
the monitor.
❑
The monitor does not power up after leaving System Standby
mode.
3-1
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VIDEO OR MONITOR FAILURE
Table 3-1: Display Problems Checklist
If this symptom appears . . .
No video image.
Do this . . .
1. Make sure that your system is not in Standby mode by
pressing the VIEW FAR END button on the keypad.
If your system is in Standby mode, pressing this button
makes the video image reappear.
2. Make sure that the power switches for the monitor,
electronics module, and cart are pressed to 1 (on).
3. Verify that you have selected a source that is connected
and powered-on for video display.
4. Make sure that ON/STANDBY on the monitor is pressed in.
5. Make sure that the power cable from the electronics
module to the monitor is securely plugged in.
6. Make sure that the video cable from the video board to the
monitor is securely plugged in.
7. Make sure that the monitor is set to Video 1 or Ext 1 video
mode. Also, set EMEA to AV2.
8. Isolate the problem by connecting an RCA cable from the
camera module directly to the monitor:
❑
If the monitor displays video, the problem is in the
electronics module.
❑
If the monitor does not display video, the problem
is with the camera module, monitor, or cable.
9. Isolate the problem to the camera module by having the farend site call you and report if they see the image from your
video source.
3-2
Table 3-1: Display Problems Checklist (Continued)
If this symptom appears . . .
Do this . . .
No PictureTel Ready message on
the screen; the screen is blank.
1. Make sure that the input cables on the back of the monitor
match.
See the section, “Testing the
Current,” on page 9-1.
The video input 1 cable must be plugged into the video
input 1 connector on the back of the monitor.
2. Make sure the monitor has only one video source.
No other video input port on the monitor should have
anything connected to it.
The system comes out of
standby and the monitor does
not power up.
The Mitsubishi monitor model CS-35307 has a factory
options menu. Use the monitor remote to access this menu.
1. Select Main Menu.
2. Press 1370.
The factory options menu appears.
3. Select Power Restore.
The monitor should now power on normally when the
codec comes out of standby.
3-3
Notes
3-4
4
Audio Failure
This chapter lists symptoms for various audio failures, and
describes possible solutions for each. It covers these problems:
❑
There is no system sound, but the monitor displays video.
❑
The far end cannot hear you.
❑
The system speakers echo noise from the microphones.
4-1
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4
AUDIO FAILURE
Table 4-1: Audio Problems Checklist
If this symptom appears . . .
Do this . . .
No system sound. However, a
video image is displayed on
the monitor.
1. If the far-end keypad is a wired keypad, make sure that the
INT MIC switch on the back side of the keypad is set to ON.
2. Make sure all microphone inputs at the far end are
connected.
3. Check to see if the far end is muted.
4. Press the volume up/down button on the keypad.
5. Check the monitor volume.
6. Make sure that the Bose speaker cables are securely
connected to the electronics module. (This includes the
audio input and the power cable.)
7. Isolate the problem by performing a local channel loopback
test or a video-audio loopback test at both sides.
If no audio is heard at one of the sites the problem is at
that site.
8. Perform the Video-Audio Test Pattern at the failing site.
If you do not hear the tone, you may have a defective
audio board. If you do hear the tone, you may have a
defective microphone.
The far end cannot hear you.
1. Check to be sure that the PowerMic and any additional
microphones are plugged in and enabled.
The PowerMic may be enabled and plugged in but the
additional microphones may be disabled.
2. Check to see that you are not muted.
3. Check to see if the far end is muted.
4-2
Table 4-1: Audio Problems Checklist (Continued)
If this symptom appears . . .
Echoing from the
microphones occurs.
Do this . . .
1. Make sure that the microphones are not placed directly in
front of or next to the speaker at both sites.
2. Try to isolate the problem to a single site. Perform a Local
Channel Loopback test at both sites. If echo is heard at one
site then that site is the source of the problem.
3. Make sure that IDEC is enabled at each site. Check the
IDEC setting in the Audio Configuration menus.
4. Try moving the PowerMics further away from the speaker,
and then perform a Local Channel Loopback test. During
the test, talk continuously in a normal voice and walk
slowly around the PowerMics until a full circle has been
completed.
This procedure trains the PowerMic and IDEC systems.
After completing the procedure, check for echo. If it still
exists, there may be a faulty PowerMic or audio
interface board.
4-3
Notes
4-4
5
Network or
Communications
Failure
This chapter lists symptoms for various network problems, and
describes possible solutions for each. It covers these problems:
❑
No Channel Connection error message (network interfaces V.35,
RS-449, X.21, V.25 bis, Switched-56, and nondialed)
❑
No Channel Connection and Network Not Ready error messages
(network interfaces Switched-56 and dialed).
Table 5-1: Network or Communications Failure Checklist
If you get
this
message . . .
With this
network
interface. . .
No Channel
Connection
V.35, RS-449,
X.21, V.25 bis,
Switched-56,
nondialed
It means . . .
Do this . . .
There may be
a problem
with the
network,
communication board,
or cables.
The system is
not receiving
clock signals
from the
data-circuit
terminating
equipment
(DCE).
1. Make sure that all network connections to
the electronics module are securely
attached.
2. Perform a Local Channel Loopback test:
This test checks the audio, video, and CP
boards.
❑
If the test fails, and you know that
the audio and video boards are
working correctly, you may need to
replace the CP board.
❑
If the test is successful, continue
with the next step.
(continues)
5-1
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4
NETWORK OR COMMUNICATIONS FAILURE
Table 5-1: Network or Communications Failure Checklist (Continued)
If you get
this
message . . .
No Channel
Connection
(continued)
With this
network
interface. . .
It means . . .
Do this . . .
3. Perform a local loopback test from the
near-end DCE to the electronics module:
❑
If the test fails, continue with step 4.
❑
If the test is successful, call the
network provider.
4. Replace the network data cables between
the electronics module and DCE, and redo
the local loopback of the near-end DCE.
❑
If the test fails, replace the DCE and
go to step 5.
❑
If the test is successful, then it
indicates that the original cabling
was at fault. Try to make a call using
the new cables.
5. Perform another local channel loopback
test at the DCE.
5-2
❑
If the test fails, replace the
Communications Processor board.
❑
If the test is successful, try placing
normal calls with the new DCE.
Table 5-1: Network or Communications Failure Checklist (Continued)
If you get
this
message . . .
With this
network
interface. . .
No Channel
Connection
and Network
Not Ready
Switched-56,
dialed
It means . . .
Do this . . .
There may be
a problem in
the
electronics
module.
1. Make sure that all network connections to
the electronics module are secure.
Network Not
Ready may
indicate a
problem with
the network
or with the
cables.
2. On the back of the communications board,
make sure that the DTR and DCD LEDs for
both ports are lighted and that all other
LEDs are out, as for a normal idle
condition.
❑
If the NS LED is on for either or both
ports, this indicates that the CSUs
are not seeing -48 volts on the
receive pair. Continue with step 3.
❑
If the LEDs are in formal idle
condition, call the network
provider. If the provider says the
network is operational, replace the
communications processor board.
3. Disconnect the network cable from the
electronics module and check pins 7 and 8
of RF-48S with respect to earth ground for
-48 volts.
4. If the check fails:
❑
Check the same pins at the wall jack.
If this check is successful, replace
the cable(s).
❑
Perform the check at the network
provider’s demarcation point
(DEMARC). If the check is successful,
repair the wiring between the wall
jack and the DEMARC.
5. If your network is still not ready, call the
network provider.
5-3
Notes
5-4
6
Peripheral Failure
This chapter lists symptoms for various peripheral failures, and
describes possible solutions for each. It covers these problems:
❑
No video and/or camera motion from the auxiliary camera.
❑
No video from the document camera or slide film-to-video
camera.
❑
No audio or video from the VCR.
❑
The main monitor does not turn off.
❑
The auxiliary monitor does not turn off.
❑
The settings for the second monitor must be set using the
software.
❑
The monitor PIP (Picture-in-Picture) is overlaid on the
PictureTel PIP.
6-1
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4
PERIPHERAL FAILURE
Table 6-1: Peripheral Failure Checklist
If this symptom appears . . .
No video and/or no camera
motion from your auxiliary
pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) camera.
Do this . . .
1. Press PREVIEW for the AUX A or B video source.
2. Make sure that:
❑
The cables at the back of the camera are securely
connected.
❑
The cables from the camera to the back of the video
board are correctly and securely connected.
3. Make sure that the camera is functioning properly by
connecting an RCA cable from the camera directly to the
monitor. Do not disconnect the 8-pin cable.
Note: When a preset does not work, the problem is
not necessarily the camera. Refer to the
keypad troubleshooting section or the
system operating guide for information
about setting presets.
❑
If video appears, continue with step 6.
❑
If no video appears, power off the Concorde•4500.
Repower it and let the system initialize. If video
appears, preview the camera and attempt PTZ
control. If PTZ control is successful, then stop.
❑
If PTZ control is unsuccessful, remove the RCA
cable. Select Display Software Version from the
Diagnostics menu. Check for a valid software
version (5.0 or greater) display for this camera. If an
invalid version or no version appears, replace the
camera.
(continues)
6-2
Table 6-1: Peripheral Failure Checklist (Continued)
If this symptom appears . . .
No video and/or no camera
motion from your auxiliary
pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) camera.
(continued)
Do this . . .
4. Change the camera cable connection to the video board.
Note: If you are using an older style PTZ camera,
and a wireless keypad, step 4 will not work.
a. Disconnect the cable from the AUX camera
connection on the video board.
b. Plug the cable into the MAIN camera connection in
place of the main (room) camera.
c. Reboot the system.
d. Press PREVIEW MAIN on the keypad.
– If video appears, and PTZ operation is restored,
replace the video board.
– If no video appears, go to step 5.
5. Unplug the cables from the auxiliary camera while
maintaining their connection to the video board, and plug
them into the main camera. Reboot the system and then
PREVIEW the camera.
No video from the document
camera or from the slide filmto-video camera.
❑
If video appears, replace the auxiliary camera.
❑
If no video appears, replace the cable and repeat this
procedure.
1. Make sure that the cables at the back of the camera are
securely connected.
2. Make sure that the cables from the camera to the back of
the video board are correctly and securely connected.
Note: To use more than one connection on the
document camera, use only the BNC/RCA
connectors.
3. Make sure the cameras are powered on.
6-3
PERIPHERAL FAILURE
Table 6-1: Peripheral Failure Checklist (Continued)
If this symptom appears . . .
No audio or video from the
VCR.
Do this . . .
1. Make sure that the VCR tape has both audio and video on it.
2. Make sure the VCR is selected as either a SEND source or
a PREVIEW source.
3. Make sure the VCR channel is set correctly. Use either AUX
or AV.
4. Disconnect the VCR cables from the electronics module,
and plug them directly into the monitor.
5. If no video and/or audio is present, replace the VCR
because it is not functioning.
6. If video and/or audio is present, reconnect the VCR to the
electronics module and check the VCR to see if it is set for
LINE LEVEL input.
Note: If you are using Euro Scart, make sure the cables
are connected correctly. If you are experiencing
a problem, reverse the cables to test them.
Main monitor does not turn
off.
Check to be sure the main monitor is plugged into the
power supply.
If the main monitor is not plugged into the power supply, it
does not turn off when the system goes into sleep mode.
Auxiliary monitor does not
turn on.
Check to be sure the auxiliary monitor is plugged into the
power strip.
If you have an auxiliary monitor, plug it into a power strip
and turn the monitor off manually.
The settings for the second
monitor must be set using the
software.
1. On menu, go to View Configuration.
2. Select Video Configuration.
3. Select Number of Monitors.
4. Select two.
6-4
Table 6-1: Peripheral Failure Checklist (Continued)
If this symptom appears . . .
Monitor PIP is overlaid on the
PictureTel PIP.
Do this . . .
Using the remote, press the PIP button to remove the PIP.
Once the monitor PIP is removed, it should not reappear in
window. Only the PictureTel PIP should be in the window.
6-5
Notes
6-6
7
Wireless Keypad
Failure
This chapter lists symptoms for various wireless keypad failures,
and describes possible solutions for each. It covers these problems:
❑
The system does not respond to wireless keypad keystrokes.
❑
Camera presets cannot be set.
7-1
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4
WIRELESS KEYPAD FAILURE
Table 7-1: Wireless Keypad Problems Checklist
If this symptom appears . . .
System does not respond to
wireless keypad keystrokes.
Do this . . .
1. Hold the keypad up to the camera and then watch yourself
in the PIP. You should be able to see infrared (IR) flashes
when you press a keypad key. Try moving the camera
around and press any key to see if the keypad responds.
There could be a problem with the IR signal.
If the keypad does not respond, try turning out the
lights in the room or closing the drapes. Because the IR
signal is sensitive to light, the lighting in the room could
affect the keypad.
2. Check the DIP switch settings.
For information on setting the DIP switches, see
Figure 7-1 on page 7-3.
3. Make sure that the LOW BATTERY indicator on the keypad
is not flashing.
If the LOW BATTERY indicator is flashing, change the
batteries in the keypad. See the booklet Installing the
Wireless Keypad for more information.
4. Press the HELP button on the keypad, and then try
pressing other keys to see if the system responds. If there
is no response, replace the wireless keypad.
Camera presets cannot be set.
7-2
Presets are set in the camera and not in the keypad. If the
keypad responds to other commands but cannot set
presets, the problem is with the camera and not the keypad.
DIP Switch Settings
DIP Switch
Settings
The following illustration shows how to set DIP switches and
provides the correct DIP switch settings on the wireless keypad.
For more information, see Installing the Wireless Keypad.
ON
0
1 2 3
ON
1 2
3
1
1 2 3
ON
OFF
2
1 2 3
ON
3
1 2 3
ON
4
1 2 3
ON
5
1 2 3
ON
6
1 2 3
ON
1 2 3
7
Figure 7-1: DIP Switches for Wireless Keypad
Note: The QuickPad has no DIP switch settings.
7-3
Notes
7-4
8
LimeLight Speaker
Location Device
Failure
LimeLight is a dynamic speaker location device that senses the
voices of speakers in a conference room and automatically directs
the camera to frame those speakers. LimeLight is a completely selfcontained audio sensing device that has no effect on the audio that
your system sends or receives.
LimeLight works by detecting the audio in the room and pointing
the camera. You do not change the way you place a call when using
LimeLight, and the LimeLight unit does not cause a call to drop or
any other network problems.
LimeLight StartUp Overview
Note: You can force LimeLight to begin pointing at any time by
using the Near End Auto button to cycle the system
through at least one on/off sequence, leaving the Auto
feature on.
This is how LimeLight starts up:
1. The video call connects.
2. The system automatically turns LimeLight off and sets up a wide
“establishing shot” using the system Show Room preset.
This allows the people at the other end to get an idea of who is
in the meeting and how the room is set up.
3. LimeLight automatically turns on and begins pointing.
8-1
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4
LIMELIGHT SPEAKER LOCATION DEVICE FAILURE
How LimeLight
Frames Speakers
LimeLight and
Muting
LimeLight’s built-in intelligence keeps track of who has been
speaking and when, and frames the speaker or speakers
accordingly. LimeLight can:
❑
Point to a single speaker.
❑
Point to groups of speakers.
❑
Frame groups of people who are conversing. If LimeLight
cannot show all the people in the conversation in one frame, it
frames as many people as possible and always includes the
most recent speaker.
❑
Change to a new position when nobody is speaking on the near
end. LimeLight automatically repoints the camera to a wide
angle room shot straight ahead and slightly down. This camera
adjustment takes from 15 to 30 seconds, depending on how
noisy the room is.
Pressing the MUTE button repositions the camera to the SHOW
ROOM preset and turns off audio. Pressing the MUTE button again
unmutes the audio and turns LimeLight back on.
If LimeLight is off when you press the MUTE button, it stays off and
the camera does not move. LimeLight has no effect on the audio that
you hear or send; if you mute the microphone, no audio is sent to the
other end of the call.
Stopping
Automatic
Pointing
8-2
You can stop LimeLight from automatically pointing by turning
LimeLight off using the NEAR END AUTO button on the keypad.
LimeLight also turns off automatically when you press any NEAR
END camera control button. If you turn LimeLight off manually or
by pressing a camera control button, you must manually turn it back
on using the NEAR END AUTO button, LimeLight repositions the
camera and stops moving when the mute button is pushed, but is
not really off, and will start pointing again as soon as your
microphone is unmuted.
Common Problems and Possible Solutions
Common
Problems and
Possible
Solutions
Before you make a video call, make sure that you have followed all
installation and verification procedures properly. Carefully
following these procedures ensures that LimeLight is in good
working order. Whenever you experience problems that you think
might be related to your LimeLight system, check the installation
and verification procedures first.
If they do not solve your problem, consult Table 8-1 for further
instructions.
Table 8-1: LimeLight Problems Checklist
If this symptom appears...
Do this...
The camera responds slowly.
The following factors can cause the camera to respond
slowly with a properly installed and operating LimeLight.
Consider these factors and make any adjustments possible:
❑
A lot of equipment or other types of noise in the room.
❑
A crowded meeting room
❑
Speakers who speak softly or do not face LimeLight
❑
Multiple people speaking at once
❑
A lot of sound from the far end
❑
A large room, or a room with a lot of echo
The audio sounds bad at the
near or far end.
Check audio devices at both ends. LimeLight has no effect
on audio transmitted or received at either end of a call.
The VCS won’t dial or
connect properly, and calls
keep dropping.
Check the VCS and network equipment. LimeLight doesn’t
affect dialing, call connections, or the network.
The power-up diagnostics fail
and display the code F400.
Replace the PowerCam 100.
The Power-up diagnostics fail
and display the code F900.
LimeLight is defective, not the PowerCam 100.
The main camera video is
gone or looks bad.
The camera transmits its video through LimeLight, so
check all or your cable connections. To isolate the problem:
1. Return your system to the state it was in prior to installing
LimeLight and reboot.
(continues)
8-3
LIMELIGHT SPEAKER LOCATION DEVICE FAILURE
Table 8-1: LimeLight Problems Checklist (Continued)
If this symptom appears...
The main camera video is
gone or looks bad.
Do this...
2. If the problem goes away, reinstall your LimeLight.
❑
If the problem returns and your cabling is correct,
your LimeLight may be defective.
❑
If problems persist after removing the LimeLight,
then your camera, VCS, or cables may be defective.
(continued)
LimeLight sometimes points
to the back wall when
someone at the far end
speaks.
The LimeLight audio cable may not be properly installed.
Make sure that:
❑
The audio cable is connected to one female end of the
“Y” connector, and
❑
The male end of the “Y” connector is plugged into the
VCS Line Out connector.
If the cabling is correct and the problem persists, you may
have a defective “Y” connector.
You cannot hear audio from
the far end.
Your system Line Out cable may not be properly installed.
Make sure that:
❑
The cable which was connected to the Line Out
connector before you installed LimeLight is now
connected to one female connector of the “Y”
connector.
❑
The LimeLight audio cable is connected to the other
female end of the “Y” connector.
❑
The male end of the “Y” connector is plugged into the
VCS Line Out connector.
If the cabling is correct and the problem persists, you may
have a defective “Y” connector.
The camera points to a wall
or table when someone at the
near end speaks.
8-4
The LimeLight is designed to work properly in all normal
conference room situations, but may occasionally make
mistakes when people do not face the unit as they speak.
LimeLight works best when the speaker looks at the
monitor on which the LimeLight is mounted.
LimeLight Troubleshooting Procedure
Table 8-1: LimeLight Problems Checklist (Continued)
If this symptom appears...
Do this...
The camera points to some
sound in the room other than
a person speaking.
The LimeLight is designed to point the camera only at
people speaking. However, it may occasionally make
mistakes when there are other strong sounds in the room,
especially when several people are speaking. LimeLight
works best when meeting participants avoid making
excessive noise while others are speaking.
The camera does not frame
speakers properly.
It is normal for there to be some variation in framing
during normal operations. If you are not satisfied with the
way LimeLight frames people, repeat the camera pointing
adjustment procedure in your installation guide. If it seems
impossible to find a satisfactory camera adjustment after
several attempts then your camera may be defective.
The rooms at the near and far
ends are both quiet but the
camera doesn’t move, or
responds slowly, when you
speak.
Check these possible problems in the order given:
❑
Make sure that the system has Auto turned on.
❑
Make sure that all installation and verification
procedures have been followed. Be sure to check the
arm microphone cable and the LimeLight audio cable.
❑
Make sure that:
• The LimeLight audio cable is attached to one female
end of the “Y” connector
• The cable which was attached to the Line Out VCS
connector is not attached to the other female end of
the “Y” connector
• The male end of the “Y” connector is attached to the
VCS Line Out connector.
If the camera still fails to point, your LimeLight may be
defective.
LimeLight
Troubleshooting
Procedure
The following illustrations, part 1 and part 2, provide information
on how to troubleshoot LimeLight. A section on Notes provides
useful information which refers back to the illustrations.
8-5
LIMELIGHT SPEAKER LOCATION DEVICE FAILURE
Start
1. Verify that you are using
the correct S/W cartridge.
2. Verify that all cables are
installed properly. ***(See
note 1.)
3. Verify that you are using
the correct Keypad.
***(See note 5.)
1. Apply AC power to PowerCam 100 camera power
supply.
2. Apply AC power to VCS.
During the “System
Initializing” message,
was the S/W rev displayed 6.11 or higher?
No
Probable wrong cartridge or bad
VCS - check POST messages.
Back
to Start
No
Probable bad VCS - check
POST messages.
Back
to Start
Yes
Did the System make
it to “PictureTel
Ready”?
Yes
Can the dial menu
be activated?
No
Probable bad IR keypad or
PowerCam 100 camera IR
receiver. Also, check to see
if the batteries are installed in
the IR keypad. ***(See note 2.)
Back
to Start
Probable bad PowerCam 100
camera or bad IR keypad button. ***(See note 2.)
Back
to Start
Yes
Can the PowerCam
100 camera be
manually moved?
No
Yes
Activate the Status bar by
pressing the Status button on
the left side of the keypad.
Figure 8-1: LimeLight Troubleshooting Procedure (part 1)
8-6
LimeLight Troubleshooting Procedure
Is “Auto” displayed in
the top right corner of
the monitor?
No
Back
to Start
Check S/W revision.
Yes
Press the Near End Auto button to toggle auto mode on
and off several times, leaving
it in the auto on position.
***(See note 3.)
Is “Auto” on?
No
Probable bad keypad button or
possibly the wrong keypad.
Back
to Start
Yes
Press the “Pip” button on the
keypad to restore the main
camera PIP. Stand out of current display, 8 feet from LimeLight, 3 feet off center. Say a
few normal sentences.
Does the PowerCam 100
turn toward the speaker?
No
Yes
Is the person speaking
well framed?
Is LINE OUT audio “Y” connector installed properly? It must
be connected to the LINE OUT
connector on the VCS.
Yes
No
No
Back
to Start
LimeLight not working.
***(See note 4.)
Go to the LimeLight Camera
Pointing Adjustment Procedure
found in the instructions that
came with LimeLight.
Yes
LimeLight is working properly.
Try other locations to reverify
LimeLight operation.
Done!
Figure 8-2: LimeLight Troubleshooting Procedure (part 2)
8-7
LIMELIGHT SPEAKER LOCATION DEVICE FAILURE
Notes to Flowchart
This section contains notes to supplement the troubleshooting
procedure shown in Figure .
Note 1: Cable Connection Check List
❑
The short LimeLight cable should be plugged into the center
connector on the back of the PowerCam 100 camera.
❑
The main camera cable from the VCS should be plugged into the
back of LimeLight.
❑
The power cord should be plugged into the power pack and a
wall outlet.
❑
The “Y” adapter should be plugged into the LINE OUT connector
on the electronics module. The cable that was originally in the
LINE OUT connector and the long cable from LimeLight should
both be plugged into the “Y” adapter.
Note 2: Verifying Camera Operation
To verify the operation of the PowerCam 100 camera:
1. Turn off the VCS.
2. Remove the main camera cable from LimeLight and plug it into the
PowerCam 100 camera.
3. Disconnect the camera power supply from the PowerCam 100.
4. Turn on VCS and check out the PowerCam 100 operation as usual.
This will verify operation of the PowerCam 100 camera.
If diagnostics fail, the code F400 is displayed.
5. If the PowerCam 100 works correctly, repeat the procedure but leave
the camera power supply connected. This will verify operation of the
power supply.
Keypad operation may be verified by trying the non-LimeLight
version of the IR keypad on the VCS in question after the PowerCam
100 camera has been verified.
8-8
LimeLight Troubleshooting Procedure
Note 3: Determining if LimeLight is On or Off
The word AUTO in the status menu may or may not have a line
through it. It may or may not have a line struck through it. If it does
have a line struck through it, LimeLight is off. If it does not,
LimeLight is on.
Note 4: Physical Positioning
Make sure that the arm microphone cable is plugged in and that
LimeLight is physically positioned according to the instructions that
came with the unit.
Note 5: The LimeLight Keypad
The LimeLight keypad is the one with the two green AUTOMATIC
buttons.
AUTOMATIC button
FAR
END
2
3
1
LOW BATTERY
4
BROWSE
SET
SETUP
ABC
POINT
DEF
1
2
3
GHI
JKL
MNO
4
5
6
PQRS
TUV
WXYZ
7
8
9
0
#
?
AUTOMATIC
RECIEVE
HELP
CALL / ADD
ZOOM
VIEW
FAR END
CHOOSE
MAIN
DOC
SEND
STATUS
HANG UP
AUX
AUX
A
B
VCR
SEND
SNAPSHOT
PREVIEW
ENTER
AUTOMATIC
CANCEL
RECALL
SNAPSHOT
SET
1
2
MUTE
PIP
3
PRINT
SHOW
ROOM
NEAR
END
POINT
ZOOM
AUTOMATIC button
Figure 8-3: LimeLight Keypad
8-9
Notes
8-10
9
Verifying Electrical
Voltage
Warning
A licensed electrician must perform this verification.
The voltages in the Concorde•4500 can cause death.
Testing the
Current
Testing the
Voltage
If the PictureTel Ready message is not displayed, have a licensed
electrician test the current from the electrical wall connection and
make sure that the current meets engineering specification . For
more information see, Table 3-1 on page 3-2.
Have a licensed electrician verify the electrical voltage, as follows:
1. Make sure that the main AC power cable is not connected to the
system, and plug the cable into the wall outlet.
2. Verify that the AC voltage from the wall outlet meets specifications.
Do this by plugging the leads from a digital voltmeter into the
system end of the cable in each of the following two positions:
a. Plug the voltmeter leads into the hot and neutral leads of the
AC cable.
b. Plug the voltmeter leads into the hot and ground leads of the
AC cable.
9-1
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4
VERIFYING ELECTRICAL VOLTAGE
3. Verify the AC power cable by plugging one voltmeter lead into the
ground lead. The reading should be under 1 VAC.
4. Verify that the AC voltage from an additional AC source, used for
optional equipment, is equal to the voltage of the main AC power
source. Do this by plugging the leads from the digital voltmeter
into the system ends of the two cables in each of the following
positions:
a. Plug the voltmeter leads into the ground leads of the AC
cables. The reading should be zero.
b. Plug the voltmeter leads into the neutral lead of one AC
cable and into the ground lead of the other AC cable. The
reading should be under 1 VAC.
5. Verify that the AC phase from an additional AC source, used for
optional equipment, is equal to the phase of the main AC power
source. Do this by plugging the leads from the digital voltmeter
into the hot (powered system end) leads of the two AC cables.
The reading should be under 1 VAC; if the reading is roughly at
or above the nominal line voltage, the two sources are most
likely of a different phase.
9-2
Notes
9-3
Notes
9-4
10
Component
Checklist and
Technical Tips
This chapter describes these topics:
Component
Checklist
❑
Installation checklist
❑
Technical tips for components
❑
Port problem identification
❑
Reasons for loopback test failures
If you are having problems getting equipment to work, be sure that
all of the necessary components have been installed properly. See
Table 10-1 below and the documentation for each component.
Table 10-1: Component Checklist
For information about
this component . . .
See . . .
WorldCart
Installing the WorldCart
Main camera
Installing the PowerCam 100
Keypad
Installing the Keypad
Look-At-Me-Button
Installing the Look-At-Me-Button
Microphone
Installing the PowerMic
Optional Equipment
Document that comes with each piece of
equipment
Modem
Concorde•4500 Modem Card
10-1
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4
COMPONENT CHECKLIST AND TECHNICAL TIPS
Table 10-1: Component Checklist (Continued)
For information about
this component . . .
Software
Technical Tips for
Components
See . . .
Installing the Software Cartridge
The following table offers you some quick technical tips that may
save you time when troubleshooting a problem.
Table 10-2: Technical Tips for Components
Component
Tip
PTZ style camera
Unlike the PowerCam 100, the PTZ style camera cannot be controlled
from the LAMB.
VCR
Use a line-level input VCR with the Concorde•4500.
PowerMic
You can daisy chain a maximum of four PowerMic microphones (for
example, one PowerMic with three daisy chained to it).
Audio — far-end or
long distance check
Any local telephone company can arrange for you to have a local
network loopback number. If there is no audio or video calls but you
can call a loopback number and get audio, there is a problem with the
long distance carrier or the far end.
To verify that you can call out of the building, you can call the central
office (CO). To find out whether the audio signal is getting out of the
building, the telephone company can put a trap on the line. If the
signal is not caught by the trap, then the signal is not getting sent out
properly by the data circuit-terminating equipment.
Switched-56
network interface
board
If the two NS signals on the back of the CSU are lit, the system is not
receiving any signals from the network.
Network — data
rates
A 56 kbps network cannot carry calls at 64 kbps, which is what is
required for ISDN services. Ideally, your network should be able to
operate at both 56 kbps and 64 kbps. Check with your network
provider for more information.
10-2
Technical Tips for Components
Table 10-2: Technical Tips for Components (Continued)
Component
Tip
Private dialing
network
If you are using a private dialing network, for example, a
government network, you cannot call out of your circle without
using pic codes. Call your local telephone company for information
on how to get pic codes for your service.
X.21 Network
Interface board
If you are upgrading your system and using a new X.21 interface
board, be sure to order a network conversion kit when you order the
network board. If the system you are upgrading has a CP board (part
number 500-0070-02) revision M or older, then you also need to order
an upgrade kit that includes the CP board.
PowerMic
Automatic gain control (AGC) and automatic noise suppression
(ANS) are performed on telephone add-on calls, but affect only the
far-end video site.
ANS reduces noise to a maximum of 12 dB. If you are using a
PowerMic and speaking from a distance of 2.4 meters or (7 or 8 feet),
the noise reduction drops under 8 dB.
ANS needs approximately 2 seconds to pick up a loud sound and
start to reduce it.
In SG3 mode: Pressing the MUTE button also causes AGC to increase
its sensitivity and pick up any noise or sound from the telephone
add-on and send it to the far end.
Recommendation: Deactivate AGC on any system that inserts the
audio call into the videoconference.
10-3
COMPONENT CHECKLIST AND TECHNICAL TIPS
Table 10-2: Technical Tips for Components (Continued)
Component
PowerMic
(continued)
Keypads
Tip
When using more than one PowerMic, you may experience echoes
and audio calibration. To avoid these problems:
❑
Keep the minimum distance between the speakers and the
microphones at 1.8 m (6 feet).
❑
Place all microphones facing the same direction.
❑
Keep all PowerMics no more than 762 m (50 feet) from the
speakers. This is a straight line distance measurement.
❑
Separate PowerMics by at least 3 m (10 feet) from each other.
❑
Do not combine tabletop or ceiling microphones with
PowerMics. In this combination, the conventional microphones
severely degrade the performance of the PowerMic.
❑
Use a lapel microphone with a PowerMic only when you can
keep the two microphones at least 3.6 m (12 feet) apart.
Run the POST to get into an extended Power-On-Self-Test (POST)
from system power-on. The POST does these things:
❑
POST software determines the codec configuration and displays
the configuration on the screen.
❑
POST waits about 4 to 5 seconds to determine if Detector is
connected on the CP serial control port. Detector is a software
port which is a part of PictureTel Remote.
❑
If Detector is not present, the message PASS 2 appears on the top
line, on the right side of the screen.
❑
POST waits about 5 seconds to determine if you press the proper
keypad button for extended testing:
• For a wired keypad: Press the right arrow key and hold it down
until Backplane test 10 appears on the monitor.
• For a wireless keypad: Press the right arrow key beside the
CHOOSE label. Press continuously until Backplane test 10
appears on the monitor.
If you press the wrong keypad button, the system goes into rapid
POST.
10-4
Technical Tip for Isolating a Port Problem
Technical Tip for
Isolating a Port
Problem
FF.Y.I.
YI
This troubleshooting tip is valid for any type of data-circuit
terminating equipment (DCE)
If you can’t determine whether a problem is with a Concorde•4500
port, the terminal adapter, or the cable, try the following
suggestions:
In the following illustration, a port, shown by a broken line, will not
sync up with the terminal adapter.
1. Connect a cable to Port 1 on the Concorde•4500 and Port 1 on the
terminal adapter. Do the same for Port 2.
Port1
Port2
Port1
Port2
Concorde•4500
with V.35
Terminal
Adapter
NT1
Network
2. Try flipping the cables to test Port 2. Use the cable that was
originally connected to Port 1 on the Concorde•4500. Connect the
cable to Port 2 on the Concorde•4500 and Port 1 on the terminal
adapter. Follow the broken line in the following illustration.
The result is that Port 2 does not sync up with the terminal
adapter.
So far, the problem seems to be following along the broken line.
Port1
Port2
Port1
Port2
Concorde•4500
with V.35
Terminal
Adapter
NT1
Network
10-5
COMPONENT CHECKLIST AND TECHNICAL TIPS
3. Try flipping the cables at the terminal adapter, since the problem
seems to be at this connection. The cable that was originally
connected to Port 1 on the Concorde•4500 and Port 1 on the
terminal adapter is now connected to Port 2 (on both ends). Do the
same for the other cable. Connect it to Port 1 on the
Concorde•4500 and Port 1 on the terminal adapter.
Port1
Port2
Port1
Port2
Concorde•4500
with V.35
Terminal
Adapter
NT1
Network
The result is that Port 1 will not sync up. The problem has
followed the same port (Port 1) on the terminal adapter. By
experimenting with the cables you can determine that there will
be a problem with any cable connected to Port 1 on the terminal
adapter.
10-6
Notes
10-7
Notes
10-8
11
Loopback Tests
The purpose of loopback testing is to determine if you can receive
error-free audio/visual feedback of your site. Since each of the
loopback tests involves different parts of the system, you can use the
tests to isolate where problems are occurring.
Loopback Tests
Loopback tests verify the operation of various components in the
data path of the system. Failure of a loopback test indicates that one
of the devices in the data path failed to transmit the data.
Typical reasons for device failure are:
❑
The device is not plugged in or turned on.
❑
One or more cables are loose or disconnected.
❑
The device is not set properly (it may have been left in a test
mode).
❑
The device is faulty.
11-1
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4
LOOPBACK TESTS
Accessing
Loopback Tests
When you choose View Near End Tests from the Diagnostics menu, this
menu appears:
Near-End Tests
View Previous Menu
Exit Menu Session
Select System Self Test
Run Video-Audio Test Pattern
Run Video-Audio Loopback
Run Local Channel Loopback
[Run CSU Self Test]*
Set Test Configuration
Stop Test
*Run CSU Self Test is present only when an ICS-4 board is installed.
Figure 11-1: Near-End Tests Menu
When you choose View Far End Tests from the Diagnostics menu, this
menu appears:
Far-End Tests
View Previous Menu
Exit Menu Session
Select System Self Test
Run Remote Video-Audio Test
Run Remote CSU Loopback*
Stop Test
*Run Remote CSU Loopback Test is present only when an ICS-4
board is installed.
Figure 11-2: Far-End Tests Menu
11-2
Running the Local Video/Audio Loopback Test
The following table lists the various loopback tests you can run on a
Concorde•4500. For information on how to perform these tests, see
Chapter 3 in the Concorde•4500 Administrator's Guide.
Table 11-1: Loopback Tests
Test
Definition
Local Video/Audio
Loopback
Loops the video and audio signals from the local
system back through the monitor and speakers.
These signals do not go through the codec. You do
not need to place a call to run this test.
Local Channel Loopback
Loops the audio and video signals from the local
system back through the local codec and the H.320
multiplexer. You do not need to place a call to run
this test.
Remote Video/Audio
Loopback
Requests that the far-end system retrieve data
after passing it through the codec and back.
Displays the near-end video image on your full
screen with accompanying audio after looping
through the far-end electronics module.
Remote Video/Audio
Loopback (continued)
This test is part of the ITU-T H.320
videoconferencing standards and is used by
PictureTel service providers to test PictureTel
systems with other vendors' equipment. You must
make a call to run this test.
Remote CSU Loopback
Displays the near-end video image on your full
screen after looping the signal through both the
near-end and far-end CSUs. You must make a call
to run this test.
Running the
Local Video/
Audio Loopback
Test
When you choose Run Video/Audio Loopback, the video and audio
signals from your local camera and microphones are looped back to
your monitor and speakers. These signals are local to the system and
are not compressed or sent over the telephone lines. The audio is
real time; there is no delay.
11-3
LOOPBACK TESTS
This test verifies the operation of the near-end components and the
cables up to the VCS. If this test runs without errors, the hardware
components (such as video and audio board, cameras and
peripheral equipment) are probably operating correctly and the
problem is elsewhere.
Network
interface card
Coder
Decoder
Audio/video
processor
The following illustration shows how the local video/audio
loopback test runs.
Network
Codec
Electronics module
Figure 11-3: Local Video/Audio Loopback Test
Running the
Local Channel
Loopback Test
When you run the local channel loopback test, the audio, video and
data signals are passed through the codec and up to the network
interface board, and then looped back through the system to your
speakers, monitor and data devices. This test verifies the operation
of the near-end components, cables, and codec.
If you receive errors when you run this test, but not when you run
the local audio/video loopback test, you may have a problem with
the VCS and Communications board.
11-4
Running the Remote Video/Audio Loopback Test
Network
interface card
Coder
Decoder
PC
Audio/video
processor
The following illustration shows how the local channel loopback
test runs.
Network
Codec
Electronics module
Figure 11-4: Local Channel Loopback Test
The remote video/audio loopback test requests that the far-end
system loop the data after passing it through the codec. This test is
part of the ITU-T H.320 videoconferencing standards.
The following illustration shows how the remote video/audio
loopback test runs.
Codec
Electronics module
Audio/video
processor
Decoder
Coder
Network
Network
interface card
Decoder
Network
interface card
Far-end site
Coder
Near-end site
Audio/video
processor
Running the
Remote Video/
Audio Loopback
Test
Codec
Electronics module
Figure 11-5: Remote Video/Audio Loopback Test
11-5
LOOPBACK TESTS
Running the
Remote CSU
Loopback Test
You run the remote CSU loopback test while a call is in progress.
This test directs the near-end signal through the near-end CSU and
sends it over the telephone lines to the far-end CSU. The signal then
loops through the far-end CSU and back through the telephone lines
to the near-end CSU.
The following illustration shows how the remote CSU test runs.
Codec
Electronics module
Audio/video
processor
Decoder
Coder
Network
interface card
Network
Channel
service unit
Channel
service unit
Network
interface card
Coder
Far-end site
Decoder
Audio/video
processor
Near-end site
Codec
Electronics module
Figure 11-6: Remote CSU Loopback Test
11-6
Notes
11-7
Notes
11-8
12
Warning Messages
The following table lists the system warning messages in
alphabetical order, gives a probable cause for each message, and
gives a recovery action, when needed. These messages appear on
the screen preceded by the word Warning.
You can find a list of all system messages in Appendix D of
the Concorde•4500 Administrator's Guide.
FF.Y.I.
YI
Table 12-1: System Warning Messages
If you see . . .
Data rate too high
Data rate too low
It means . . .
There is a network
problem.
Do this . . .
1. Verify that all connections and
cabling are secure.
2. Call the network provider.
Loss of far-end video
No video is
received from the
far-end site.
1. Verify that the far-end site is sending
a valid video source.
2. Verify that all connections and
cabling at the far-end site are secure.
3. Run video loopback diagnostic tests
on the far-end video.
4. Replace the far-end video board, if
indicated by the test.
12-1
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4
WARNING MESSAGES
Table 12-1: System Warning Messages (Continued)
If you see . . .
No channel
connection
It means . . .
Connection to the
network interface
equipment has
been lost.
Do this . . .
1. Verify that all connections and
cabling are secure.
2. Verify performance of the
communications board with its
daughter board.
3. Replace the board, if indicated, or, if
the board tests are acceptable, call
the network provider.
For additional information, see
Chapter 4 in this guide.
Network Not Ready
The network is
temporarily
unavailable.
1. Verify that all connections and
cabling are secure.
2. Verify performance of the
communications board with the CSU
daughter board.
3. Replace the board, if indicated, or, if
the board tests are acceptable, call
the network provider.
For additional information, see
Chapter 4 in this guide.
No video input
Video input is not
being received.
1. Change the video input source on
the keypad.
2. Verify that all connections and
cabling are secure.
3. Run a Video Loopback diagnostic
test.
4. Replace the failed board, if
indicated.
For additional information, see
Chapter 3.
12-2
Notes
12-3
Notes
12-4
13
E to EX/ZX
Upgrade
These instructions describe how to upgrade the System 4000
videoconferencing system to a System 4000ZX.
There are several versions of upgrade kits, which depend on the
model of videoconferencing system you have. You may not have to
install all of the pieces described in these instructions. Please read
the instructions carefully, and follow those that apply to your
system.
13-1
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
Introducing the
Upgrade Kits
13-2
To upgrade your system to a System 4000EX, you need to
❑
Record speed-dial numbers when your current system uses
software version 4.0V (4.0V.01, 4.0V.02) or lower.
(When your system uses software version 4.1V (4.1V.01,
4.1V.02, 4.1V.04) or 4.2, you do not need to record these
numbers.)
❑
Record system configuration settings when your current
system uses software version 4.1V (4.1V.01, 4.1V.02, 4.1V.04)
or lower.
(When your system uses software version 4.2, you do not need
to record these settings.)
❑
Upgrade a System 4000 with a new Communications
(System 4000E) board, if necessary.
❑
Remove the Audio, Video, VGI (if present), and Array
Processor (DAP or QAP) boards and connection brackets.
❑
Place new labels on the connection panels.
❑
Remove the Phone-Add daughter board (if present) from the
existing Audio board and install it on the new Audio board.
❑
Install the new Audio, Video, and Array Processor boards.
❑
Install the Half Array Processor board if necessary.
❑
Install the Data Interface board if necessary.
❑
Install the PowerMic.
❑
Remove your old camera and install the PowerCam 100 .
❑
Install the wireless keypad.
❑
Install the Look-At-Me-Button .
❑
Connect the cables.
❑
Restore speed-dial numbers and configuration settings, if
needed.
Introducing the Upgrade Kits
Verify that you have the correct kit by checking your system:
1. Power off your system.
2. Wait one minute.
Be ready to record the information listed on the screen; it
appears on the screen for a short time when you power on the
system.
3. Power on the system, and record which boards are installed with
your system, paying particular attention to slot 4:
Slot Number
Board Name
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
4. Record the system software version by displaying the Local Status
Menu, available from the Diagnostics Menu, and selecting View
Software Version:
System version:____________
13-3
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
5. Make sure you have the correct upgrade kit:
Your system already has a new Communications board if one of
these is true:
❑
Slot 4 lists a VCP board, and the system version is 4.1V, or
greater.
❑
Slot 4 lists a CP board, and the system version is 4.0V.
If your system does not have either one, you need the kit that
includes a new Communications board.
Required Tools
You need these tools to install the upgrade kit:
❑
Flat-blade screwdriver
❑
Phillips screwdriver
❑
8-mm (3/16-inch) hex socket wrench
❑
Chip removal tool, required only if you are replacing the
Communications board and have an optional encryption chip
❑
Grounded electrostatic wrist strap
❑
Antistatic surface, such as an antistatic mat or an antistatic
board-shipping envelope
Cautions and a Warning
Please observe the following cautions and warning:
13-4
❑
Wear a grounded wrist strap when you remove a board to
prevent static electricity from damaging sensitive chips.
❑
Set the boards on antistatic surfaces, such as antistatic mats or
antistatic shipping envelopes.
❑
Disconnect the system AC power cord from the wall socket
before you pull out the electronics module from the cart or
cabinet.
Recording Speed-Dial Numbers
This section describes how to record current speed-dial numbers.
Note: If your current system uses software version 4.1V
(4.1V.01, 4.1V.02, 4.1V.04) or 4.2, skip this section and go
to the next section, “Recording System Settings” on
page 13-10.
Before replacing the Communications board or when your current
system uses software version 4.0V (4.0V.01, 4.0V.02), you need to record
the speed-dial numbers. These numbers are deleted when you
replace the Communications board and are not retained for systems
using software version 4.0V.
After you complete the upgrade, you have to reenter the speed-dial
numbers.
Follow these steps to record the speed-dial numbers:
1. Record the speed-dial numbers and the corresponding location
names in the next chart by following these steps:
a. Display the Set Video Speed Dial screen, available from the
Configuration Menu.
▼
b. Press
and
under CAMERA CONTROLS to display each
video speed-dial number.
▼
Recording
Speed-Dial
Numbers
13-5
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
SpeedDial
Number
13-6
Telephone Numbers
1
a.
b.
2
a.
b.
3
a.
b.
4
a.
b.
5
a.
b.
6
a.
b.
7
a.
b.
8
a.
b.
9
a.
b.
10
a.
b.
11
a.
b.
12
a.
b.
13
a.
b.
Location
Recording Speed-Dial Numbers
SpeedDial
Number
Telephone Numbers
14
a.
b.
15
a.
b.
16
a.
b.
17
a.
b.
18
a.
b.
19
a.
b.
20
a.
b.
21
a.
b.
22
a.
b.
23
a.
b.
24
a.
b.
25
a.
b.
26
a.
b.
27
a.
b.
Location
13-7
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
SpeedDial
Number
13-8
Telephone Numbers
28
a.
b.
29
a.
b.
30
a.
b.
31
a.
b.
32
a.
b.
33
a.
b.
34
a.
b.
35
a.
b.
36
a.
b.
37
a.
b.
38
a.
b.
39
a.
b.
40
a.
b.
41
a.
b.
Location
Recording Speed-Dial Numbers
SpeedDial
Number
Telephone Numbers
42
a.
b.
43
a.
b.
44
a.
b.
45
a.
b.
Location
13-9
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
Recording
System Settings
This section describes how to record current system settings.
Note: If your current system uses software version 4.2, skip
this section and go to the next section, “Opening Up the
Electronics Module” on page 13-19.
Before you begin the upgrade installation procedure, you need to
record your current system configurations. These settings revert to
the factory-set default settings when you install the new software
version. After you complete the upgrade, you have to configure the
system for your special needs.
Follow these steps to record the system configurations:
1. Record the channel and port configurations by selecting each
menu item in turn from the Set Channel and Port Configuration
screen, available from the Configuration Menu:
❑
Set Channel Configuration
Choice
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
13-10
Switched-56
RS-449
X.21
V.35
V.25
Setting
❑
Dialed
❑
Nondialed
❑
Dialed
❑
Nondialed
❑
Dialed
❑
Nondialed
❑
Dialed
❑
Nondialed
Recording System Settings
❑
Set Control Port A Configuration
Choice
❑
Disabled
❑
C-3000
❑
VideoSlate
If Type is C-3000, record these settings:
Setting
❑
Choice
Baud Rate
____ bits per second
# Bits/Parity
❑
8 bits, None
❑
8 bits, Odd
❑
8 bits, Even
Set Control Port B Configuration
Type
❑
Disabled
❑
Net Mgr
❑
Async
❑
VideoSlate
If Type is Net Mgr or Async, record some or all of these
settings:
Setting
Choice
Baud Rate
____ bits per second
# Bits/Parity
❑
7 bits, None
❑
7 bits, With
❑
8 bits, None
❑
8 bits, Odd
❑
8 bits, Even
13-11
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
Setting
RTS/DTR
Xon/Xoff
❑
Choice
❑
Ignored
❑
Not Ignored
❑
Enabled
❑
Disabled
❑
Disabled
Set DI Port A Configuration
Type
❑
Async
❑
Sync
❑
VideoSlate
If Type is Disabled or Async, record these settings:
Setting
Choice
Baud Rate
____ bits per second
# Bits/Parity
❑
7 bits, None
❑
7 bits, With
❑
8 bits, None
❑
8 bits, Odd
❑
8 bits, Even
❑
Ignored
❑
Not Ignored
❑
Enabled
❑
Disabled
RTS/DTR
Xon/Xoff
If Type is Sync, record these settings:
Setting
Baud Rate
13-12
Choice
____ bits per second
Recording System Settings
Setting
RTS/DTR
❑
Choice
❑
Ignored
❑
Not Ignored
❑
Disabled
❑
Async
❑
Sync
❑
VideoSlate
Set DI Port B Configuration
Type
If Type is Disabled or Async, record these settings:
Setting
Choice
Baud Rate
____ bits per second
# Bits/Parity
❑
7 bits, None
❑
7 bits, With
❑
8 bits, None
❑
8 bits, Odd
❑
8 bits, Even
❑
Ignored
❑
Not Ignored
❑
Enabled
❑
Disabled
RTS/DTR
Xon/Xoff
If Type is Sync, record these settings:
Setting
Choice
Baud Rate
____ bits per second
RTS/DTR
❑
Ignored
❑
Not Ignored
13-13
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
❑
Set DI Port C Configuration
Type
❑
Disabled
❑
Async
❑
Sync
❑
VideoSlate
If Type is Disabled or Async, record these settings:
Setting
Choice
Baud Rate
____ bits per second
# Bits/Parity
❑
7 bits, None
❑
7 bits, With
❑
8 bits, None
❑
8 bits, Odd
❑
8 bits, Even
❑
Ignored
❑
Not Ignored
❑
Enabled
❑
Disabled
RTS/DTR
Xon/Xoff
If Type is Sync, record these settings:
Setting
13-14
Choice
Baud Rate
____ bits per second
RTS/DTR
❑
Ignored
❑
Not Ignored
Recording System Settings
❑
Set DI Port D Configuration
Type
❑
Disabled
❑
Async
❑
Sync
❑
VideoSlate
If Type is Disabled or Async, record these settings:
Setting
Choice
Baud Rate
____ bits per second
# Bits/Parity
❑
7 bits, None
❑
7 bits, With
❑
8 bits, None
❑
8 bits, Odd
❑
8 bits, Even
❑
Ignored
❑
Not Ignored
❑
Enabled
❑
Disabled
RTS/DTR
Xon/Xoff
If Type is Sync, record these settings:
Setting
Choice
Baud Rate
____ bits per second
RTS/DTR
❑
Ignored
❑
Not Ignored
13-15
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
2. Record settings by selecting each menu item in turn from the
Installation Menu screen, available from the Configuration Menu:
Menu Choicea
Setting
Set Node Name
____________________
Set Remote Node Name Viewing
❑
No View
❑
View
❑
Momentary
❑
SG3
❑
SG3 721
❑
HVQ
❑
C-2000
❑
Automatic
❑
SG3
❑
SG3 721
❑
HVQ
❑
Link-64E
❑
One
❑
Two
❑
Left
❑
Right
❑
Normal
❑
Delayed
❑
60 Hz Filter
❑
50 Hz Filter
Set Multipoint Protocol
Set Point-to-Point Protocol
Set Number of Monitors
Set Camera Pan
Set Delayed Second Line Dialing
Set 50/60 Hz Filter Mode
a. Set Y/C Output is not a setting with the System 4000EX.
13-16
Recording System Settings
3. Record settings by selecting each of the remaining menu items
from the Configuration Menu screen:
Menu Choice
Set Transmission Mode
Set Audio Mode
Set Video Answer Mode
Set Audio Answer Mode
Set Encryption
Set Far End Control
Set VCR Operation
Setting
❑
Point-to-Point
❑
Multipoint
❑
Int
❑
Ext
❑
Delay
❑
Automatic
❑
Manual
❑
Automatic
❑
Manual
❑
Multipoint
❑
None
❑
Auto Key
❑
Manual Key
❑
External
❑
Disabled
❑
Enabled
Number of VCRs:
❑
One
❑
Two
Record Mode:
❑
Local
❑
Far End
13-17
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
4. Record settings by selecting each menu item in turn from the
Link-64E Settings Menu screen.
You can select this screen from the Extended Configuration
menu, which is a Main Menu choice when your system is
configured with the H.320 (Link-64E) option:
Menu Choice
Audio Mode
G.711 Mode
G.722 Mode
Video Mode
13-18
Setting
❑
G.711
❑
G.722
❑
µ_LAW
❑
A_LAW
❑
Automatic
❑
56
❑
48
❑
CIF
❑
QCIF
Opening Up the Electronics Module
Opening Up the
Electronics
Module
Follow these steps to gain access to the boards:
Notes: Leave the electronics module on the drawer slides, on
the pull-out tray, or on the fully extended stabilizer bar,
if any one of these is available, while replacing boards.
Do not disconnect the power and fault LED cable.
1. Power off the system.
2. Disconnect the AC power cord.
3. Label each cable connected to the Audio board, Video board, and
VGI board (if present).
The labels help you transfer the cables to the correct connections
on the new panels.
4. Note the MIC1 and MIC2 settings for DESK/LAPEL on the Audio
board so that you can later configure the System 4000EX MICA and
MICB settings for tabletop or lapel microphones.
5. Disconnect all cables from the following boards:
❑
Audio
❑
Video
❑
VGI, if present
❑
Communications, if you are replacing this board
6. Make sure that you have removed all shipping brackets and gain
access to the electronics module by pulling the module out on its
slides, if necessary.
7. Unscrew and remove the Phillips screws on the cover of the
electronics module, and lift off the cover.
8. Attach your electrostatic wrist strap to a known ground, such as
the electronics module frame.
13-19
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
Removing
Existing Boards
Follow these steps to remove the boards from the electronics
module:
1. Locate the ribbon cables and boards you are removing in the
following diagram of the System 4000 electronics module.
Slot
8
7
6
5
4
3 2 1
Board
AI
VI
VGI
DI
CP
QAP (DAP 1)
QAP 2 (DAP 2)
QAP, with Link-64E
(DAP 3)
Power supply
Software cartridge
Figure 13-1: System 4000 Boards
2. Disconnect the ribbon cables between the Audio and Video boards
and between the Audio board and the VGI board, if present, by
pushing the black holding clamps backward until both cable plugs
are free from their sockets.
13-20
Transferring Daughter Boards
3. Unscrew the spring-loaded screw, if present, that holds each
board to the electronics module frame until the screw pops up.
4. Remove each board by pulling up on the white ejector tabs at each
end of the board or on the plastic lift knobs until the board pops
free from the backplane.
Set each board on an antistatic surface.
Transferring
Daughter
Boards
You need to transfer daughter boards from your existing system
boards to the new system boards if you meet any of these criteria:
❑
If your system has the Phone-Add option
❑
You are replacing your Communications board
❑
Your system has encryption
You have to remove daughter boards from the Audio board, if your
system has the Phone-Add option, and from the Communications
board, if you are replacing this board. You install the daughter
boards on the new boards. In addition, if your system is configured
with encryption, you need to transfer the encryption chip from the
existing Communications board to the new board.
If you are not transferring a daughter board, go to the section,
“Installing New Boards” on page 13-25.
Phone-Add Board
If the existing Audio board has a two-wire Phone-Add board, follow
the next procedures.
Note: The System 4000ZX does not support the four-wire
Phone-Add board.
Removing the Daughter Board
Follow these steps to remove the Phone-Add board from your
existing Audio board:
1. If the Phone-Add daughter board uses metal board standoffs,
unscrew and remove the screw and lock washer on the standoffs;
if the daughter board has nylon standoffs, proceed to the next
step.
13-21
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
2. Remove the daughter board from the Audio board, using your
fingers to pry the sides of the board gently away from the Audio
board and to release the RJ-11 connectors from the cutouts on the
connection panel.
3. Set the daughter board on an antistatic surface.
Installing the Daughter Board
To install the Phone-Add board on the new Audio board:
1. Follow the next steps if the Phone-Add board used metal
standoffs; if not, proceed to Step 2:
a. Remove the 2 nylon standoffs from the plastic bag.
b. Insert the nylon standoffs into the Audio board by placing
the pointed end in the right side of the Audio board and
snap in place.
2. Hold the two boards, one in each hand, and bring the board front
surfaces close together.
Make sure that the two RJ-11 connectors on the Phone-Add
board are aligned with the PHONE WALL and PHONE SET
cutouts on the Audio board connection panel.
3. Insert the RJ-11 connectors through the cutouts on the connection
panel.
4. Mate the 32-pin connector on the Phone-Add board with the
header on the Audio board, taking care to align the two snap-in
standoffs on the Phone-Add board with the holes on the Audio
board.
5. Make sure that all 32 pins are correctly seated, and then push the
Phone-Add board against the Audio board until the standoffs snap
in place.
13-22
Transferring Daughter Boards
Network Interface Board and Encryption Chip
If you are replacing the Communications board, follow the next
procedures.
Removing the Daughter Board and Chip
Follow these steps to remove the interface daughter board and
encryption chip, if present:
1. Unscrew and remove all the screwlocks and lock washers on the
face of the connection bracket with the socket wrench.
Set these aside.
2. Remove the connector bracket from the board by unscrewing and
removing the two Phillips screws that secure the connector
bracket to the board.
Set the screws and bracket aside.
3. Unscrew and remove the Phillips screws that secure the interface
daughter board to the Communications board.
Set these aside.
4. Remove the interface daughter board from the Communications
board, using your fingers to alternately pry the top and bottom
sides of the board gently away from the Communications board.
Set aside the hexagonal standoffs that fall out as you remove the
daughter board.
Set the daughter board on an antistatic surface.
5. Remove the encryption chip from the socket if the
Communications board has one installed at location U360.
Note the alignment of the pins with the socket on the board,
especially pin 1.
Set the chip aside carefully.
13-23
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
Installing the Daughter Board and Chip
Follow these steps to install the interface daughter board and chip
on the new Communications board:
1. Place the new Communication board on an antistatic surface.
2. Install the encryption chip, if you removed one from the old
Communications board, on the new Communications board at
location U046.
Make sure that pin 1 is located in the same location on the new
board.
3. Install the interface daughter board on the Communications board
by positioning the daughter board over the connector on the
Communications board.
Be sure all the pins on the daughter board connector fit within
the connector on the Communications board.
4. Place the hexagonal standoffs over the screw holes between the
daughter board and the Communications board.
5. Press the daughter board securely into place.
6. Secure the daughter board to the Communications board with the
screws you removed in step 3 of the last procedure.
7. Attach the new connector bracket to the board with the screws you
removed from the old daughter board connector bracket.
8. Use the socket wrench and screw the lock washers and
screwlocks through the face of the connector bracket into the
board.
13-24
Installing New Boards
Follow these steps to install the boards from the kit in your
electronics module:
1. Locate the correct slot for each board.
Data Interface
Communications
Array Processor
Board
Slot
Video
Note: No board is installed in slot 7 between the Audio and
Video boards—this space is taken up by the Graphics
daughter board when one is installed on the Video
board.
Audio
Installing New
Boards
8
6
5
4
2
Power supply
Software cartridge
Figure 13-2: Installing Boards in the System 4000
13-25
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
2. Install the new boards by matching each board to its correct slot
and carefully lowering the board into the slot.
Make sure that the spring-loaded screw aligns with the hole in
the electronics module frame.
3. Push down on the white ejector tabs until the board is fully seated
in the slot and is engaged securely with the backplane.
The metal flange holding the spring-loaded screw on the end of
the board should be flat (or nearly flat) against the frame.
4. Secure the board in place by tightening the spring-loaded screw
securely against the frame.
Placing New
Labels
Follow these steps to insert the blank panel, close the electronics
module, and place new labels on the connection panels:
1. Install the blank panel from the kit by lowering it into the empty slot
between the Audio and Video boards.
Make sure that the spring-loaded screw aligns with the hole in
the electronics module frame.
13-26
Placing New Labels
Figure 13-3: Placing Labels on the System 4000ZX
2. Secure the panel in place by tightening the screw against the
frame.
3. Replace the cover on the electronics module, and tighten the
screws.
4. Push the electronics module into the system cabinet, if necessary.
5. Unscrew and remove the cable tie-down brackets to give an
unobstructed access to the connection panels.
Set the brackets and screws aside.
6. Place the new label strips on the electronics module frame, by
peeling off the paper backing as you stick on each of the following
label strips (see the illustration on the next page):
13-27
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
a. Stick the text label on the blank panel you just installed.
b. Stick the two icon labels on the panels at the sides of the
Audio and Video boards
c. Stick the board name label below the boards.
d. Stick the System 4000ZX label on the serial number plate,
covering “System 4000.”
7. Replace the cable tie-down brackets.
KEYPAD
CONTROLES
PAVE DE CONTR
NUMERISCHER
TASTENBLOCK
MAIN CAMERA
CAMERA PRINC
CAMERA PRINC
HAUPTKAMERA
A
8
EXP AUDIO
AUDIO AMP
AUDIO AMP
ERW. AUDIO
AUX VIDEO
VIDEO AUX
VIDEO AUX
ZUS. VIDEO
B
7
8
A
MIC A
MICRO A
MICRO A
MIKRO A
AUX GRAPHICS
GRAFICOS AUX
GRAPHIQUES AUX
ZUS. GRAFIK
B
MIC B
MICRO B
MICRO B
MIKRO B
DOC CAMERA
CAMERA DOCS
CAMERA DOC
DOK.-KAMERA
8
LINE IN
ENTRADA
ENTREE
LIETUNG EIN
VCR IN
VCR IN
ENTRADA VIDEO
ENTRADA VIDEO
MAGNETO
ENTREE
MAGNETO
ENTREE
VIDEO EIN
VIDEO EIN
VCR OUT
SALIDA VIDEO
MAGNETO SORTIE
VIDEO AUS
VCR OUT
SALIDA VIDEO
MAGNETO SORTIE
VIDEO AUS
LINE OUT
SALIDA
SORTIE
LIETUNG AUS
MAIN MONITOR
MONITOR PRINC
MONITEUR PRINC
HAUPTBILDSCHIRM
PHONE WALL
TELEFONO PARED
PRISE TELEPHONE
TEL.-WAND
AUV MONITOR
MONITOR AUX
MONITEUR AUX
ZUS. BILDSCHIRM
A
B
PHONE SET
TELEFONO
TELEPHONE
TEL.-APPARAT
Electronics Module
S/N
AUDIO
VIDEO
DATA INTERFACE
COMMUNICATIONS
Figure 13-4: Correct Label Positions
13-28
System 4000EX
Installing the PowerCam 100
Installing the
PowerCam 100
You need to remove your old camera from the top of your monitor
before you can install the new PowerCam 100.
To remove your old camera:
1. Make sure your videoconferencing system is turned off.
2. Unscrew the two thumbscrews that secure the cable-holding
clamp to the camera-mounting base and remove the clamp.
3. Attach a grounded wrist strap to your arm.
4. Disconnect the cable from the CONTROL port on the back panel of
the camera by sliding the cable collar back toward you using your
index finger and thumb; then gently remove the cable from its
socket.
1
2
V
S
8
8
8
8
POWER
CONTROL
Y/C OUT
(8-pin mini DIN) (S Video)
COMP
OUT
(RCA)
DC
power
(+12V)
12V
8
S
Figure 13-5: Removing the Old Camera
5. Grasp the camera module by its base, pull up on the camera
module, and release it from the two Velcro strips.
6. You may want to remove the remaining Velcro strips from the top
of your monitor. Do this by scraping the strips off with a razor
blade or other sharp, flat object.
13-29
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
To install the PowerCam 100, refer to the booklet Installing the
PowerCam 100 located in the shipping box for the camera.
Installing the
PowerMic
Refer to the documentation in the PowerMic packaging for
information on installing the PowerMic with the System 4000ZX.
Installing the
Wireless
Keypad
To install the batteries in the keypad and to find out where to place
it for optimal performance, refer to the booklet Installing the Wireless
Keypad located in the shipping box for the keypad.
Installing the
Look-At-MeButton
To install the batteries in the Look-At-Me-Button (LAMB) and
find out how to mount it on a conference room wall, refer to the
booklet Installing the Look-At-Me-Button located in the shipping box
for the LAMB.
Installing the
Software
Cartridge
Follow these steps to install the new software cartridge:
1. Unscrew the Phillips screw that secures the pullout tray on the
back of the electronics module, and pull out the tray.
2. Remove the old software cartridge from the tray.
3. Insert the new software cartridge.
4. Push in the tray, and replace the Phillips screw.
13-30
Connecting the Cables
Connecting the
Cables
Follow these steps to connect the cables:
1. Connect the cables to the new panels by referring to Table 13-1
and Table 13-2 to find the equivalent connections.
Note: When you upgrade to the System 4000ZX, you no
longer need to use jumper cables, even if you are
connecting a dual-monitor system configured with
the graphics option.
Table 13-1: Audio Board Connections
Connect this System 4000
cable. . .
To this System 4000ZX
connection. . .
Keypad
KEYPAD
PowerMic
EXP AUDIO
Microphones (lapel and/or
tabletop—not PowerMic)
MIC A
MIC B
Line-level input
LINE IN
VCR audio to system
VCR IN
VCR audio from system
VCR OUT
Speakers
LINE OUT
Phone-Add to wall
PHONE WALL
Phone-Add from phone
PHONE SET
Table 13-2: Video Board Connections
Connect this System 4000
cable. . .
Main (system) PTZ camera
To this System 4000EX
connection. . .
MAIN CAMERA with one 8-pin
Y-adapter cable (part number
180-0189-01) for 4- and 8-pin
PTZ camera connectors
13-31
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
Table 13-2: Video Board Connections (Continued)
Connect this System 4000
cable. . .
Auxiliary PTZ camera
To this System 4000EX
connection. . .
AUX VIDEO using an 8-pin
Y-adapter cable (part number
180-0189-01) for 4- and 8-pin
PTZ camera connectors
Auxiliary PTZ camera, used
to send snapshots
AUX GRAPHICS using an 8-pin
Y-adapter cable (part number
180-0189-01) for 4- and 8-pin
PTZ camera connectors
Second document camera or
other composite video or
graphics source
AUX VIDEO or AUX GRAPHICS
Second document camera or
other S-VHS video or
graphics source
AUX VIDEO or AUX GRAPHICS
Document camera video
DOC CAMERA
VCR video in
VCR IN
VCR video out
VCR OUT
Main monitor
MAIN MONITOR
Second monitor
AUX MONITOR using the
RCA-to-RCA adapter cable
(part number 510-0173-01)
and connecting the end
closest to the ferrite to the
System 4000EX
2. Reconnect the AC power cord.
13-32
using the composite (RCA)
video adapter cable (part
number 510-0192-01)
using the S-VHS video
adapter cable (part number
510-0193-01)
Restoring Speed-Dial Numbers
3. Power on the system.
After the power-on self test and system initialization finishes,
you will either see the message PictureTel Ready (if your system
is not connected to another system using a dedicated network
connection) or a video call in progress (if your system is
connected to another system using a dedicated network
connection).
4. Make sure each board passes its power-on self-test.
Check that error code FFFF is displayed in the error log. This
code is present when you upgrade the software.
Restoring
Speed-Dial
Numbers
This section describes how to restore your speed-dial numbers.
Note: If you did not record your speed-dial numbers, skip this
section and continue with the next section, “Restoring
System Settings”
Follow these steps to reenter the speed-dial numbers you recorded
earlier:
1. Display the Main Menu by pressing MENU.
2. Choose Enter or Modify Speed Dial Numbers.
3. Reenter the speed-dial numbers, referring to Appendix C in the
System 4000 User’s Guide for the procedure to add numbers.
Restoring
System Settings
This section describes how to restore your system settings.
Note: If you did not record your system software
configuration, skip this section and continue with the
next section, “Verifying Performance”
13-33
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
Follow these steps to reenter the software configuration choices you
recorded earlier:
1. Display the Main Menu by pressing MENU.
2. Display the Configuration Menu by choosing View Configuration
Menu.
3. Restore the factory-set default settings by choosing Restore
Default Configuration. . ., and then choosing Yes.
Notes: Restoring the default settings with a new
Communications board sets the number of monitors
configured with the system to one. If you have a dualmonitor system, you must configure your system for
two monitors.
If you are upgrading a dual-monitor Model 800 (or
Model 800E) to a Model 800EX, refer to the System 4000
Installation Guide Model 800EX for specific instructions to
power on a Model 800EX dual-monitor system.
4. Reenter the software configuration choices for your system, as
follows:
a. Refer to the information you wrote down in the section
“Recording System Settings” on page 13-10.
b. Find the comparable setting on the new menus by referring
to the Configuration Menu tree in Figure 13 and to the menu
conversion list in the table following the menu tree.
c. Set MICA and MICB for lapel (default setting) or tabletop by
choosing Set Microphones on the Set Audio Configuration
screen.
If you have connected a PowerMic to your system, this
microphone replaces the keypad and other tabletop
microphones. You can always use a lapel microphone with the
PowerMic. You can include all microphones by choosing Enable
All Tabletop Microphones under Set Tabletop Microphone Mode, a
choice on the Set Microphones screen.
13-34
Restoring System Settings
5. Because some configuration settings require reinitialization to
take effect, power off your system for ten seconds, and then power
it back on.
When you see either the message PictureTel Ready (if your
system is not connected to another system using a dedicated
network connection) or a video call in progress (if your system
is connected to another system using a dedicated network
connection), your configuration is now properly loaded.
13-35
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
Configuration Menu
View Previous Menu
Exit Menu Session
Set General Configuration
Set Video Configuration
Set Audio Configuration
Set Data Port Configuration
Set Network Configuration
Set Phone-Add Configuration1
Restore Default Configuration...
Set General Configuration
View Previous Menu
Exit Menu Session
Set Display of Far-End Site Name
Set Screen Message Display
Set Encryption Mode
Set Password for Menus
Set Near-End Site Name
Select AC Power Frequency
Set Data Port Configuration
View Previous Menu
Exit Menu Session
Set Control Port A
Set Control Port B
Set Data Port A3
Set Data Port B3
Set Data Port C3
Set Data Port D3
Set Video Configuration
View Previous Menu
Exit Menu Session
Set Video Transmission Format
Set Camera Operation
Set VCR Operation
Select Number of Monitors
Set Network Configuration
View Previous Menu
Exit Menu Session
Select Interface
Select Answer Mode
Select Two-Line Dialing Mode
Set Audio Configuration
View Previous Menu
Exit Menu Session
Set Microphones
Set Audio Transmission Format
Set Audio Signal Processing2
Select Initial G.711 Format
Set Phone-Add Configuration1
View Previous Menu
Exit Menu Session
Select Answer Mode
1
2
Displayed only when the Phone-Add option is installed
Displayed only when either or both the echo cancelation (IDEC II) and noise suppression (automatic gain control) options
are installed
3
Displayed only when an optional Data Interface board is installed
Figure 13-6: Configuration Menu Tree
13-36
Restoring System Settings
System 4000EX
System 4000 Configuration
Menu Choice
Configuration Menu
Choice
Submenu Choice
Set Channel Configuration
Set Network Configuration
Select Interface
Set Control Port A/B
Configuration
Set Data Port Configuration
Set Control Port A/B
Set DI Port A/B/C/D
Configuration
Set Data Port Configuration
Set Data Port A/B/C/D
Installation Menu:
Set Node Name
Set General Configuration
Set Near-End Site Name
Installation Menu:
Set Remote Node Name
Viewing
Set General Configuration
Set Display of Far-End Site
Name
Installation Menu:
Set Multipoint Protocol
[Broadcast mode is not supported with this release.]
Installation Menu:
Set Point-to-Point Protocol
Set Video Configuration
Set Video Transmission Format:
Set Automatic Mode
Installation Menu:
Set Number of Monitors
Set Video Configuration
Select Number of Monitors
Installation Menu:
Set Camera Pan
Set Video Configuration
Set Camera Operation:
Change Pan Direction
Installation Menu:
Set Delayed Second Line
Dialing
Set Network Configuration
Select Two-Line Dialing Mode
Installation Menu:
Set 50/60 Hz Filter Mode
Set General Configuration
Select AC Power Frequency
Set Transmission Mode
[Broadcast mode is not supported with this release.]
Set Audio Mode
Set Audio Configuration
Set Audio Transmission Format:
Set Automatic Mode
Set Video Answer Mode
Set Network Configuration
Select Answer Mode
13-37
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
System 4000EX
System 4000 Configuration
Menu Choice
Configuration Menu
Choice
Submenu Choice
Set Audio Answer Mode
Set Phone-Add Configuration
Select Answer Mode
Set Encryption
Set General Configuration
Set Encryption Mode
Set Far End Control
Set Video Configuration
Set Camera Operation:
Set Control by Far End
Set VCR Operation
Set Video Configuration
Set VCR Operation
Extended Configuration Menu:
Audio Mode
Set Audio Configuration
Set Audio Transmission Format:
Set Automatic Mode
Extended Configuration Menu:
G.711 Mode
Set Audio Configuration
Select Initial G.711 Format
Extended Configuration Menu:
G.722 Mode
Set Audio Configuration
Set Audio Transmission Format:
Set Automatic Mode
Extended Configuration Menu:
Video Mode
Set Video Configuration
Set Video Transmission Format:
Set Automatic Mode
Verifying
Performance
After you have completed upgrading your system, check system
operation by placing and receiving calls listed in the next procedure
using first SG3 and then Link-64E (H.261) video transmission
formats.
If your system has the encryption option, also place and receive
encrypted calls.
Note: You cannot use DES encryption on a video call that uses
the Link-64E (H.261) video transmission format.
13-38
Verifying Performance
Follow these steps to check system operation:
1. Set the video format to SG3 by choosing Select Manual Format
from the Set Video Transmission Format screen.
The Set Video Transmission Format screen is available with this
progression of menus: Main Menu, Configuration Menu, and
Set Video Configuration.
2. Place these video calls to a far-end site:
a. A manually dialed call using one line
b. A manually dialed call using two lines
c. A speed-dialed call using the onscreen menus
d. A speed-dialed call using the keypad to enter the number
3. Have the far-end site place dialed video calls to you, and follow
these steps:
a. Answer a call manually.
b. Configure the system to answer a call automatically by
using the Set Network Configuration menu, available from
the Configuration Menu.
4. Select the appropriate calls to place and answer:
❑
If your system has the encryption option installed, place
these calls to the far-end site.
a. An automatically encrypted dialed call using the menu
b. An automatically encrypted dialed call using the
keypad to enter the number
c. A manually encrypted dialed call using the menu
d. A manually encrypted dialed call using the keypad to
enter the number
❑
If your system has the Phone-Add option installed, place
these calls to the far-end site:
a. An audio call while a video call is in progress
b. An audio call when no video call is in progress
13-39
E TO EX/ZX UPGRADE
❑
If your system has the Phone-Add option installed, have the
far-end site place audio calls to you during a video call, and
follow these steps:
a. Answer a call manually.
b. Configure the system to answer a call automatically by
using the Set Phone-Add Configuration menu,
available from the Configuration Menu.
❑
If your system has the Phone-Add option installed, have the
far-end site place audio calls to you when no video call is in
progress, and follow these steps:
a. Answer a call manually.
b. Configure the system to answer a call automatically by
using the Set Phone-Add Configuration menu,
available from the Configuration Menu.
5. Repeat the procedure setting the video format to Link-64E (H.261)
video format, except for DES-encrypted calls.
13-40
Notes
13-41
Notes
13-42
14
Ascend and
Network Provider
Information
Introduction
This chapter provides information about Ascend products. All
information in this chapter is copyrighted by Ascend
Communications, Inc.
Procomm Plus
Modem Settings
Set your Procomm Plus modem as follows for VT100 emulation:
❑
Alt-Z
❑
Alt-S
❑
Modem option
• General Option
• Send init if CD high = NO
❑
Terminal option
• Hard Flow Control = OFF
• Software Flow Control = OFF
❑
General option
• CD High Exit = IGNORE
❑
Protocol option
• General Option
• Abort XFER if CD lost = NO
14-1
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4
ASCEND AND NETWORK PROVIDER INFORMATION
Ordering ISDN
BRI Service for
Ascend Products
This section explains how to order ISDN Basic Rate Interface (BRI)
service in North America for all Ascend products that use BRI
service except the Pipeline 25 and Pipeline 75. It also provides
information that your telephone company needs to provision
(configure) an ISDN BRI line for your Ascend product.
For information on ordering ISDN BRI service in North America for
a Pipeline 25 or Pipeline 75, see the document “Ordering ISDN
Service for the Pipeline 25 and 75" that is included in Pipeline 25 and
75 packages.
For information on ordering Primary Rate Interface (PRI) ISDN
service, see the manuals for Ascend products that use this service.
Note: Use the information in this section in place of any BRI
provisioning information in the manuals for your
Ascend product.
This section contains the following subsections:
❑
Ordering ISDN service
❑
Provisioning the AT&T 5ESS
❑
Provisioning the Northern Telecom DMS-100
❑
Service profile identifiers (SPIDs)
Ordering ISDN Service
To order ISDN BRI service for your Ascend product, follow these
steps:
1. Call your telephone company's ISDN ordering center and ask what
type of switch the telephone company uses for your ISDN service.
In most cases, the switch is an AT&T 5ESS or a Northern
Telecom DMS-100.
2. Ask what type of ISDN service is available to you.
If the switch for your area is an AT&T 5ESS, this is National
ISDN-1 (NI-1), AT&T Custom Multipoint, or AT&T Custom
Point-to-Point. If the switch for your area is a Northern Telecom
DMS-100, this is National ISDN-1 (NI-1) or DMS-100 Custom.
3. Read the section in this document that applies to your switch type.
4. Place the order.
14-2
Ordering ISDN BRI Service for Ascend Products
Request 2 ISDN telephone numbers and 2 service profile
identifiers (SPIDs) for your ISDN line if they are available for
your ISDN service.
5. If the telephone company does not already have the correct
provisioning settings for your Ascend product, fax or mail them
the provisioning information for your switch and service type that
is included in this document.
6. When the telephone company installs your ISDN BRI line, obtain
the following information:
❑
The type of telephone switch used for the line
❑
The telephone number or numbers for the line
❑
The Service Profile Identifiers (SPIDs), if any, for the line
Note: AT&T Custom Point-to-Point service includes only
one telephone number. There are no SPIDs for Custom
Point-to-Point service.
Provisioning the AT&T 5ESS
Table 13-1 lists the proper provisioning settings for the AT&T 5ESS
switch used for any the following service types:
❑
National ISDN-1 (NI-1)
❑
AT&T Custom Multipoint
❑
AT&T Custom Point-to-Point
Table 14-1: Settings for AT&T 5ESS switches
Provisioning Feature
Setting
Terminal Type A Circuit Switched Data (CSD)
2
Circuit Switched Voice (CSV)
1
Call Appearances Quantity (CA QTY)
1
Display is Y/N
No
Ringing/Idle Call Appearances Idle Autohold
is Y/N
No
Onetouch is Y/N
No
14-3
ASCEND AND NETWORK PROVIDER INFORMATION
Provisioning the Northern Telecom DMS-100
Table 13-2 lists the proper provisioning settings for the Northern
Telecom DMS-100 switch used for either of the following service
types:
❑
National ISDN-1 (NI-1)
❑
DMS-100 Custom (NTI)
Table 14-2: Settings for Northern Telecom DMS-100 switches
Provisioning Feature
Setting
Signaling Functional Protocol version
control (PVC)
1 or 2
TEI assignment Dynamic Maximum
number of keys (maxkeys)
3 (any number
from 1 to 64 is OK)
Release key
No
Ringing indicator
No
Electronic Key Telephone System (EKTS)
No
Service Profile Identifiers (SPIDs)
A Service Profile Identifier (SPID) is a number that identifies ISDN
equipment attached to your ISDN line. Depending on the type of
ISDN service you have, there are one, two, or no SPIDs. When you
order ISDN service, the telephone company should give you the
necessary SPID or SPIDs, which you then use when configuring
your Ascend product.
Note: You normally don't need to know about SPIDs; you
simply enter the numbers when configuring the Ascend
product. If, however, the telephone company does not
provide the necessary SPIDs or provides SPIDs that are
incorrect, the information in the following sections can
help you explain to the telephone company what you
need.
14-4
Ordering ISDN BRI Service for Ascend Products
About SPID formats
A SPID is normally derived from a telephone number for the ISDN
BRI line. It may or may not include the area code, and it may have a
special prefix and/or suffix. The SPID formats used by most
telephone companies are described in the following sections.
Generic SPIDs for NI-1 and NI-2 Service
A generic SPID format for National ISDN-1 (NI-1) and National
ISDN-2 (NI-2) service is used by some telephone companies. The
format for these generic SPIDs, which is the same for all switches, is
as follows:
aaannnnnnnsstt
❑
aaa is the 3-digit area code and nnnnnnn is the 7-digit phone
number for the ISDN BRI line.
❑
ss is the Sharing Terminal Identifier (ID), which a two-digit
number from 01 to 32. These two digits are normally 01.
❑
tt is a 2-digit code Terminal ID code (TID), which is a two-digit
number from 01 to 08. These two digits are normally 01.
For example, if the telephone company assigns the telephone
numbers 510-769-6001 and 510-769-6002 to the ISDN BRI line, the
SPIDs are most likely to be 51076960010101 and 51076960020101.
SPIDs for an AT&T 5ESS Switch
For National ISDN-1 (NI-1) service from an AT&T 5ESS switch,
SPIDs are normally in this format:
01nnnnnnn0tt
❑
nnnnnnn is a 7-digit phone number (not including the area
code) of the ISDN BRI line.
❑
tt is a 2-digit code Terminal ID code (TID) from 00 to 62, which
you must assign. We recommend that you always use 00 for
this 2-digit code.
For example, if the telephone company assigns the telephone
numbers 769-6001 and 769-6002 to the ISDN BRI line, and you use
00 for the two-digit code for both numbers, the SPIDs are
017696001000 and 017696002000.
14-5
ASCEND AND NETWORK PROVIDER INFORMATION
SPIDs for AT&T Custom Multipoint service are normally in this
format:
01nnnnnnn0
❑
nnnnnnn is a 7-digit phone number (not including the area
code) of the ISDN BRI line.
For example, if the phone number is 555-1212, the SPID is
0155512120.
There are no SPIDs for AT&T Custom Point-to-Point service.
SPIDs for a Northern Telecom DMS-100 Switch
For National ISDN-1 (NI-1) service from a Northern Telecom DMS100 switch, SPIDs are normally in this format:
aaannnnnnnsstt
❑
aaa is the 3-digit area code and nnnnnn is the 7-digit phone
number for the ISDN BRI line.
❑
ss is the SPID suffix, which can be empty or can be 1 or 2 digits:
• 1 and 2 (one for each number used by the ISDN BRI line)
• 01 and 02 (one for each number used by the ISDN BRI line)
❑
tt is a 2-digit code from 00 to 62, which you must assign. We
recommend that you always use 00 for this 2-digit code.
For example, if the phone numbers assigned to the ISDN BRI line are
510-769-6001 and 510-769-6002, and you use 00 for the two-digit
code for both numbers, the SPIDs are 51076960010100 and
51076960020200.
For DMS-100 Custom service from a Northern Telecom DMS-100
switch, SPIDs are normally in this format:
aaannnnnnnss
❑
aaa is the 3-digit area code and nnnnnn is the 7-digit phone
number of the ISDN line.
❑
ss is the SPID suffix, which can be optional or can be 1 or 2
digits:
• 1 and 2 (one for each number used by the ISDN BRI line)
• 01 and 02 (one for each number used by the ISDN BRI line)
14-6
Multiband Family Frequently Asked Questions
For example, if the phone number is 415-555-1212, the SPID is
415555121201.
Multiband Family
Frequently Asked
Questions
This section reviews customers’ most frequently asked questions
about the Multiband family of products.
1. What is inverse multiplexing?
Inverse multiplexing is the ability to aggregate discrete data
channels on one side of a “black box” and create a single large
data channel out the other side. In the products discussed below,
discrete switch digital channels (such as 56k or 64k) may be
aggregated to deliver a single synchronous serial data stream on
a V.35 or RS499 interface.
2. What applications use inverse multiplexing?
The most common applications today need inverse
multiplexing for direct dial videoconferencing and WAN
connection backup/overflow over the switch digital network.
3. What is BONDING, AIM and MPP?
They are forms of inverse multiplexing. In 1990, Ascend created
an inverse multiplexing protocol for serial synchronous data.
This protocol provided five management methods of delivering
data for specific applications. This became known as Ascend
Inverse Multiplexing or AIM. In 1991, a consortium of
companies including Ascend formed to agree on an
interoperability standard for inverse multiplexing. This group
became known as the Bandwidth ON Demand Interoperability
Networking Group, hence the acronym BONDING.
Over time, the term BONDING lost its specific meaning of
aggregating channels to a wideband serial data stream. Its
meaning became to include any form of data delivery sent
across multiple channels. An example is Multilink Protocol
(RFC1717) or Multilink Protocol Plus (acronym MPP) which
defines adding and/or deleting switch digital channels for the
delivery of packet data in bridging and routing networks.
14-7
ASCEND AND NETWORK PROVIDER INFORMATION
4. What kind of inverse multiplexing equipment does Ascend
provide?
Ascend offers products for AIM, BONDING, and MPP. The
Pipeline series handle MPP type of inverse multiplexing. The
Multiband product line handles the AIM and BONDING
version of inverse multiplexing.
5. Why are Ascend Multiband inverse multiplexers a better choice?
The BONDING consortium has only ratified 1 mode of
operation at this time. While Ascend will upgrade at no charge
for future modes, there are current needs for the five
management modes that AIM can provide.
6. Which switch digital networks does Ascend support?
The Multiband product family has network interfaces for sw56
2 wire, sw56 4wire, Basic Rate ISDN, T1, PRI, E1 and DPNSS.
7. How many countries can I reach?
Ascend is currently homologated in over 26 countries. Ascend is
continually adding new countries to its list. You can obtain
current listings off of the Ascend web site at www.ascend.com.
8. How can an Ascend inverse multiplexer be efficient with a full T1
access if only some channels are used?
On our T1 models, a second T1 interfaced can be used for “drop
and insert” or PRI-T1 conversion for taking PRI from a carrier
and providing T1 tandem trunking to a PBX. In this way, extra
channels can be use to carry voice circuits to and from a PBX.
9. Can Ascend handle carrier diversity?
Yes, many customers currently have T1 circuits from different
carriers to ensure switched network access reliability for critical
missions.
14-8
Multiband Family Frequently Asked Questions
10. What are the different models and where would they be needed?
In the Multiband Plus series, we have models for sw56 2-wire,
sw56 4-wire, Basic Rate ISDN, T1, PRI, E1 and DPNSS. The VSX
series have models for Basic Rate ISDN and T1/PRI. The VSX is
a single application level product for switch services access. Its
primary design was providing switch dial up access for
videoconferencing applications. It has also turned out to be
popular dial backup solutions for intelligent routers. It supports
the dialing protocols of RS366, X21, and V25bis.
The Multiband Plus (also known as MB+) is a multiple
application product with up to 4 configurable host ports and
supports both switched and leased services. When used for
videoconferencing, two ports are typically slaved for use as a
single application. The MB+ also supports leased circuits. It
main differentiation from the VSX is that MB+ supports
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation for automatic Backup and
Overflow applications. This functions monitors the data traffic
across the host port and can determine when to add or remove
switch channels based on user defined parameters.
11. What is important about RS366, X.21 and V25bis dialing?
They are dialing protocols which permit any data terminal
equipment such as a router or videocodec to communicate with
a Multiband product for destination dialing. For example, most
codecs have a keypad to send a data string. This string of
numbers is relayed to the Multiband equipment via special data
leads. The Multiband uses this information to interpret a
programmed calling type (such as setting up a session of six
channels) with a destination dial number to reach the far end.
This method has become common in the industry to allow
interoperability with most codecs available on the market today.
12. How large is the bandwidth can you provide?
The Multiband Plus T1 units can inverse multiplex up to two
full T1s through a single host port. This is approximately
3 Megabits per second.
14-9
ASCEND AND NETWORK PROVIDER INFORMATION
13. What does it take to install a unit?
The Multiband Plus and the Multiband VSX has a DB9 serial
interface for connection with a VT100 monitor. Mostly,
customers use a PC which emulates a VT100 to manage the
configuration and installation of the unit. The installation time
can be as short as 10 minutes, depending upon the readiness of
the carrier lines and data terminal equipment.
Ascend
Multiband VSX
BRI
The Multiband(TM) VSX BRI is a notebook-sized inverse
multiplexer that extends your corporate videoconferencing network
to remote sites using ISDN BRI circuits. The bandwidth on demand
capabilities of the Multiband VSX BRI allow you to operate your
video network at substantial savings by using only the bandwidth
that is needed. An expansion module can be added to give you even
greater bandwidth for more sophisticated applications.
The Multiband VSX BRI fits into any room system rack or on any
desktop and provides inverse multiplexing, dial-up
videoconferencing, call and device management, and global
connectivity. These features are well-suited for applications such as
group and desktop videoconferencing, distance learning, electronic
banking, telemedicine file transfer, and dial backup. The Multiband
VSX BRI is a powerful tool that helps you build flexible and costeffective multimedia solutions.
Bandwidth on demand maximizes performance and decreases
cost
14-10
❑
Digital dial-up connections are transparently established and
removed as required. The expansion module can be added to
give you additional bandwidth up to 512 Kbits/s.
❑
Base unit functions as ISDN Terminal Adapter (TA) to set up
sessions at speeds up to 128 Kbits/s
❑
Supports Nx56 and Nx64
❑
A 3-BRI expansion module allows for inverse multiplexing of 4
ISDN BRI lines and boosts data rate to 512 Kbits/s
❑
Ascend Inverse Multiplexing (AIM) offers feature-rich
bandwidth management among Ascend Multiband units
Ascend Multiband VSX BRI
❑
Conforms to Bandwidth ON Demand INteroperability Group
(BONDING) standards for interoperability with other vendors'
inverse multiplexers
❑
U-interface (internal NT1) or S/T interface
Communicates with multiple switched services for flexible
network access
The Multiband VSX BRI is fully compatible and can communicate
with a broad range of existing network access equipment.
Applications can choose a switched service on a call-by-call basis.
❑
Switched 56 Kbits/s DSUs
❑
ISDN Terminal Adapters
❑
Inverse multiplexers conforming to the BONDING standard
❑
Integrates seamlessly with Ascend Multiband and MAX
product families
Ensures compatibility with a broad range of videoconferencing
manufacturers
Dial-access features allow the VSX BRI to interoperate with multiple
manufacturers' videoconferencing equipment.
❑
Field-selectable dual V.35, RS-449/422 or X.21 data ports
❑
RS366, V.25 bis, X.21 and control-lead dialing
❑
Exact clocking and 56-64 Kbits/s rate adaption
❑
Speed dialing and stored call profiles
❑
Supports high-speed desktop videoconferencing
Operates with domestic and international services for global
connectivity
Ascend's Multiband products are certified in 30 countries and
provide global connectivity with switched services from multiple
vendors.
❑
AT&T ACCUNET Services
❑
AT&T Switched Digital International
❑
MCI VPDS 56/64 Kbits/s
❑
Sprint VPN 56/64 Kbits/s
14-11
ASCEND AND NETWORK PROVIDER INFORMATION
❑
Local Exchange Carrier 56/64 Kbits/s
❑
International PTT 64 Kbits/s
Network Solution #1
A Chicago site uses a VSX BRI base unit with an expansion module
to send video traffic over a dial-up network. Dallas uses an ISDN
Terminal Adapter. New YOrk uses a VSX T1 to channel aggregate
video traffic from the field. The VSX T1 drop-and-insert capability
allows PBX voice traffic in New York to travel over the same line
with videoconferencing traffic. Multiband products are compatible
with any vendors' ISDN Terminal Adapter
Extensive management features offer simplified setup and
administration
An inband remote management capability allows you to modify
and control your system remotely or from the central site. Features
support local or remote diagnostics and provide menu-driven
management.
14-12
❑
Dial-up remote management from any Ascend Multiband
product
❑
Local and remote loopbacks
❑
Channel bit error rate testing
❑
Configuration backup
❑
Password security
Ascend Multiband VSX BRI
❑
Field software upgradability
❑
Controllable from a palmtop or VT-100 terminal
Network Solution #2
The Multiband VSX, Multiband Plus and MAX provide a complete
video network solution. The MAX WAN access switch in Seattle and
the Multiband Plus inverse multiplexer in Los Angeles provide
videoconferencing access to a global dial-up network over switched
56 and T1 circuits. They also provide dial-up access for LAN routers.
The VSX inverse multiplexer connects a customer's video system in
Chicago to the video network over BRI lines. Remote Port Modules
(RPMs) extend the Multiband's ports to videoconferencing rooms at
distances of up to 3,400 feet.
14-13
ASCEND AND NETWORK PROVIDER INFORMATION
Hardware Specifications
Table 14-3: Hardware Specifications
Hardware Feature
Specification
Dimensions
Base Unit
12.63 x 12.25 x 1.75 in (1U) [32.1 x 31.1 x 4.5 cm]
Module
7.38 x 11 x 0.88 in [18.7 x 27.9 x 2.2 cm]
Weight
Base Unit
4 lbs 4.1 oz
Module
14.2 oz
Power Requirements
90-130VAC, 0.2-0.4A/220-40VAC, 0.1-0.2A
Operating Requirements
14-14
Operating temperature:
32-104 degrees F [0-40 degrees C]
Storage temperature
40-176 degrees F [-71.4-80 degrees C]
Humidity
0-90% (non-condensing)
Base System
Multiband VSX BRI with ISDN basic rate
interfaces, 2 host ports, D-channel signaling for
ISDN, RS366/V.25 bis/X.21 dialing protocols,
Ascend inverse multiplexing, and BONDING
Modules
ISDN BRI-3 bandwidth expansion module adds 3
BRI ports for a total unit capacity of 512 Kbits/s
Cabling
Palmtop to DB9 for terminal access
DTE Connectors
Two DB-44 connectors support V.35, RS449/422
standard and X.21
Control Terminal
Palmtop hand-held terminal VT-100 access
Technical Sources
Ascend's Remote Networking Products
MAX Family
Designed specifically for remote access server applications.
Supports ISDN BRI, ISDN PRI, T1/E1 and Ethernet on the base
unit.* Allows simultaneous calls from ISDN BRI, frame relay and/
or modem users over ISDN PRI, channelized T1/E1, or ISDN BRI
lines.
Pipeline Family
Pipeline products are designed to connect users in small or home
offices to backbone networks and/or the Internet. Pipeline models
support Ethernet to ISDN, Switched 56 or Leased 56 services, and
Ethernet to 56 Kbits/s or 64 Kbits/s frame relay services.*
Multiband Family
Multiband bandwidth-on-demand controllers are designed
primarily for videoconferencing applications and let users dial-up
bandwidth in increments of 56/64 Kbits/s up to 4 Mbits/s, using all
types of digital access lines*-Switched 56, T1/E1, ISDN BRI, ISDN
PRI and network carrier services.
Technical
Sources
This section contains a technical paper that describes the following
topics:
❑
Digital Dial-Up Network Services
❑
Digital Dial-Up Access lines
❑
Inverse Multiplexing
Digital Dial-Up Bandwidth on Demand and Inverse
Multiplexing
Jay Duncanson
Co-Founder, Ascend Communications
Dynamic Bandwidth U.S. Patent 5,231,649
This paper provides an overview of digital dial-up services and
access lines available in the U.S. and Canada, and provides basic
information on inverse multiplexing.
14-15
ASCEND AND NETWORK PROVIDER INFORMATION
Digital Dial-Up Network Services
Digital Dial-Up Services are offered by the IXCs (Interexchange
Carriers, such as AT&T, MCI, and Sprint) and the LECs (Local
Exchange Carriers). You can either connect directly to the IXC
service, or subscribe to the LEC service and use it to connect to the
IXC service for calls out of the LEC serving area.
Here is a brief description of each service offered by the carriers:
Switched 56
The oldest and most commonly-used North American service, it's
available from both IXCs and LECs.
Here's a good place to clear up a common misconception. Because
Switched 56 was the first available digital dial-up service, both the
service itself and the original lines used to access it were called
“Switched 56". But today, there are multiple ways to access Switched
56 service (such as switched 56 lines, T1, PRI, and BRI), and there are
other new services in addition to Switched 56. Always be aware that
when the term “Switched 56" is used, it could be referring to
EITHER the Service itself or the access line type.
Switched 56 service uses the 64 kbit/s architecture of the network
for transport, but allocates one bit out of every 8 for signaling
purposes. This is known as “in-band signaling”. Switched 56 is the
“lowest common denominator” service because all types of access
lines can connect to it.
On a DS1 (T1) trunk, 24 64 kbps channels are time-divisionmultiplexed onto one 1536 kbps circuit. Each frame contains 24
eight-bit octets.
Figure 14-1: Switched 56
14-16
Technical Sources
Switched 56 service costs vary from provider to provider. Generally,
the cost of a switched 56 channel can be considered to be the same
or somewhat more than that of a voice call. When accessing IXC
switched 56 service via an LEC, a per-minute surcharge is incurred.
This surcharge varies from state to state.
Switched 64
Available from both IXCs and LECs. Similar to switched 56 except
that it uses all 8 bits of each octet for data. The signaling information
is sent along an independent path. This is called “out-of-band
signaling”. To access Switched 64 service, you must use either an
ISDN BRI or ISDN PRI line, since these access lines have an out-ofband signaling channel, known as the “D channel”.
Figure 14-2: Switched 64
Switched 64 service costs vary from provider to provider, but are
generally the same as switched 56 service costs.
Switched 384
Available from AT&T, this service takes six 64 kbit/s network
channels and provides them to the user as a single 384 kbit/s call.
You must use an ISDN PRI line to access Switched 384. Switched 384
service costs are about 5/6 that of six individual 64 kbit/s channels
from AT&T.
Switched 1536
Available from AT&T, this service takes 24 64 kbit/s network
channels and provides them to the user as a single 1536 kbit/s call.
14-17
ASCEND AND NETWORK PROVIDER INFORMATION
You must use an two ISDN PRI lines to access Switched 1536. One
line carries the full 1536 kbit/s data stream, and the other line
contains the signaling D channel (and excess bandwidth for other
uses).
Figure 14-3: Switched 384 and 1536
ISDN Multirate
This service has been approved by standards bodies and is currently
being rolled out some carriers. It allows the user to specify the
bandwidth of a call to be any 64 kbit/s multiple. Therefore, a user
can dial a first call at 384 kbit/s (which is 6x64kbit/s), and later dial
a second call at 512 kbit/s (which is 8x64 kbit/s). You must use an
ISDN PRI line to access ISDN Multirate.
Figure 14-4: ISDN Multirate
Inverse Multiplexing
In addition to dialing single channel calls using the services
described above, a user can dial multiple calls using these services
and combine them together into a single high-speed data stream
using a piece of customer equipment called an Inverse Multiplexer.
We'll go into inverse multiplexing in more detail later on.
14-18
Technical Sources
Digital Dial-Up: Access Lines
There are 4 primary types of lines used to access Digital Dial-Up
services. These are T1, ISDN BRI, ISDN PRI, and switched 56 lines.
These lines can connect either to the LEC or IXC networks.
Figure 14-5: Network Access
Switched 56 access lines
These lines provide a single 56 kbit/s data channel with in-band
signaling. They can only connect to Switched 56 service.
Figure 14-6: Network Access: Switched 56
A switched 56 access line contains one 56 kbps data channel with inband signaling.
Switched 56 access line costs have dropped dramatically in the last
two years. Check with your service provider for current costs.
14-19
ASCEND AND NETWORK PROVIDER INFORMATION
T1 access lines
Note that T1 lines used to access digital dial-up services are different
than dedicated point-to-point leased T1 lines which connect two
sites without the ability to dial other locations. T1 access lines
connect the user site to the nearest IXC or LEC network node.
These lines each provide 24 56 kbit/s data channels with in-band
signaling. They can only connect to Switched 56 service.
Figure 14-7: Network Access: T1
A T1 access line contains 24 56 kbps data channels with in-band
signaling.
T1 access line costs vary with distance from the central office. Prices
also vary with service provider and geography. A very rough rule of
thumb is to expect to pay between $500 and $1500 per month for
access charges.
14-20
Technical Sources
ISDN BRI lines
These lines each contain two 64 kbit/s data channels (“B-channels”)
and a single out-of-band signaling channel (“D-channel”). They can
connect to Switched 64 or Switched 56 services.
Figure 14-8: Network Access: ISDN BRI
An ISDN BRI access line contains two 64 kbps data channels with
one out-of-band signaling channel (“D channel”).
ISDN BRI lines offer the best data deal going, since a single line
(with two 64 kbit/s data channels) runs from about $55/month
(California) to $35/month (Illinois) to $55/month (NYNEX). The
drawback is that BRI lines are not yet universally available. Check
with your LEC provider for more information.
ISDN PRI lines
These lines each contain 23 64 kbit/s data channels (“B-channels”)
and a single out-of-band signaling channel (“D-channel”). They can
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ASCEND AND NETWORK PROVIDER INFORMATION
connect to ISDN Multirate, Switched 1536, Switched 384, Switched
64 or Switched 56 services.
Figure 14-9: Network Access: ISDN PRI
An ISDN PRI access line contains 24 64 kbps data channels with one
out-of-band signaling channel (“D channel”).
ISDN PRI access lines cost the same as a T1 access line plus an
additional charge for the D channel. The D channel cost varies with
provider and other factors. The range is typically from $100 to $545
per month for the D channel. Contact your service provider for more
information.
Other Types of Network Access
PBX
The digital dial-up network can be accessed through a PBX. Since a
PBX is a switch, the access equipment views the PBX as another part
of the network. The PBX uses another trunk card to pass T1, PRI, or
BRI lines back to the access equipment. The big advantages to this
scenario are 1) wiring can be readily distributed throughout a
facility and 2) the bandwidth on the line from the PBX to the
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Technical Sources
network is efficiently utilized, allowing both voice and video to
share the bandwidth.
Figure 14-10: Network Access via PBX
Drop and Insert
The access equipment can accept a PRI or T1 line and use some of
the channels for its own use and pass along the remaining channels
downstream for another device, a PBX or perhaps another piece of
access equipment. This method allows sharing of bandwidth on the
access line, but unlike the PBX scenario above, does not allow
dynamically allocatable bandwidth with the line. Note that if the
PBX is performing the drop and insert function, the access
equipment can sit behind the PBX.
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ASCEND AND NETWORK PROVIDER INFORMATION
Figure 14-11: Network Access via Drop and Insert
Channel Bank
Access to digital dial-up services can also be obtained by dividing
up the access bandwidth through a channel bank. Some of the
bandwidth can be sent to a PBX for voice usage, and some can be
sent to the access equipment for video usage.
Figure 14-12: Network Access via Channel Bank
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Technical Sources
Service and Access Line Interoperability
The following graph shows which services each access line type can
reach. Note that Switched 56 service is the “lowest common
denominator”, in that it is accessible via all types of access lines.
ISDN PRI is the most flexible type of access line, providing access to
all dial-up services.
Figure 14-13: Access Lines and Services Accessed
The following graph shows what services can be used to
communicate between access types. Note that full interoperability
requires end-to-end service, especially for international
connections.
Figure 14-14: Access Lines to Access Lines (Available
Services)
Inverse Multiplexing
An inverse multiplexer allows individually-dialed channels across
the network to be combined into a single, higher-speed data stream.
For example, one site might have 3 ISDN BRI lines connected to an
inverse mux. Another site might have a T1 access line connected to
an inverse mux. The user at the first site can place a 336 kbit/s call
to the second site using inverse multiplexing. Since each BRI line has
two 64 kbit/s channels, six individual calls are placed by the inverse
mux over Switched 56 service to the answering T1-based inverse
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ASCEND AND NETWORK PROVIDER INFORMATION
mux. The two inverse muxes combine the six independent calls into
a single data stream, and the two sites are now communicating at
336 kbit/s (336 = 6x56).
Figure 14-15: Inverse Multiplexing
An inverse multiplexer aggregates multiple 56, 64, or 384 kbps
channels into a single higher speed channel.
Comparison of Inverse Multiplexing to High Speed NetworkBased Services
There are some reasons why inverse multiplexing may be preferred
to high-speed network-based services (Switched 384, 1536, and
ISDN Multirate). On the other hand, the network-based services
have some advantages as well.
The key points can be summarized as follows:
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❑
Inverse multiplexing is more flexible than network-based
services today because it's based upon existing, established
network services and also supports all types of access lines.
❑
Future H-channel and Multirate pricing, lower access
equipment costs, and universal deployment could negate other
inverse multiplexing advantages.
❑
Today's judicious user should obtain access equipment that
supports both Inverse Multiplexing and Network-Based
Services, and should use a combination of both to minimize
costs and maximize flexibility.
Technical Sources
Ascend Communications, Inc. Worldwide and North American
Headquarters
1275 Harbor Bay Parkway
Alameda, CA 94502
telephone: (510) 769-6001 or (800) 621-9578
Fax: 510.814.2300
E-mail: info@ascend.com
Toll Free: 800.621.9578
Fax Server: 415.688.4343
Web Site: http://www.ascend.com
European Headquarters
Rosemount House
Rosemount Avenue
West Byfleet
Surrey KT14 6NP
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0) 1932.350115
Fax: +44 (0) 1932.350199
Asia-Pacific Headquarters
Level 14 Shinjuku Daiichi Seimei Bldg.
2-7-1 Shinjuku, Tokyo 163-07
Japan
Tel: 81.3.5322.2850
Fax: 81.3.5322.2860
Web Site: http://www.ascend.co.jp
Remote Networking Solutions That Work.
Ascend Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ: ASND) is a leading,
worldwide provider of remote networking solutions for corporate
central sites, Internet Service Provider points of presence, remote
offices, mobile workers and telecommuters. Ascend develops,
manufactures, markets, sells and supports products with
bandwidth on demand to extend existing corporate networks for
applications such as remote LAN access, Internet access,
telecommuting, SOHO connectivity and videoconferencing/
multimedia access.
Ascend markets the MAX, Pipeline and Multiband families of
products.
Ascend products are available in more than 30 countries worldwide.
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ASCEND AND NETWORK PROVIDER INFORMATION
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation(TM) (U.S. Patent No. 5,231,649),
MAX(TM), Multiband(TM), Multilink Protocol Plus(TM), and
Pipeline(TM) are trademarks of Ascend Communications, Inc.
Other trade names mentioned in this publication belong to their
respective owners. Specifications are subject to change without
notice.
Ascend Communications holds the Quality System Certificate ISO
9001 from the ISO 9000 series, whose scope covers the design,
manufacture, sale and service of the bandwidth-on-demand
products. ISO 9000/9001 is one of the most highly regarded and
most difficult to obtain quality certifications in the world.
 Copyright 1996, Ascend Communications, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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Notes
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Notes
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