TEDx Organizer`s Manual - Links Website

TEDx Organizer`s Manual - Links Website
Introduction
Organizer’s
Manual
Version 4.0
March 23, 2015
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Introduction
Congratulations,
welcome to the
TEDx community!
You are now part of a global community of doers who believe in the power of
sharing ideas. As a TEDx Organizer, you have full access to a globally
networked platform--one that not only helps promote innovative thinking
locally, but that spreads those ideas globally.
We suspect you already know that organizing any successful event requires
hard work and passion. We’ve actually chosen you to represent TED because
we believe you have the creativity and drive needed to bring a dynamic TEDx
experience to your community. But know that creating a TEDx event isn’t a
solo adventure; you’ve joined a vibrant community that’s ready and willing to
support you every step of the way.
Welcome to the TEDx team!
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How to use this manual
This is a dynamic document sourced from the best practices of
TEDx Organizers and curated by TEDx staff. While the rules and
guidelines will remain consistent, the document is updated
regularly with links to inspiration, rules and resources that the
community finds most relevant.
You can either reference this document in print or keep it handy
on a computer. Hyperlinks are embedded throughout to help you
navigate within the document, as well as link you to resources
beyond it.
Organizer’s Manual - Version 4.0
Topics that are covered in this manual include:
‣ Team Management
‣ Venue
‣ Sponsorship and Finance
‣ Theme and Speakers
‣ Running Order
‣ Branding and Marketing
‣ Audience
‣ Photo and Video
‣ Post Event
We’ve divided the manual into two main sections:
TEDx Basics and How to TEDx.
Organizer’s Manual - Version 4.0
TEDx Basics is a bird’s eye view of what it takes to put on a
TEDx event. It includes a cheat sheet for explaining the value of
TEDx, a Task Timeline that maps out when certain tasks happen
over the course of your event (and also when to start thinking
about them), a Task Timeline Checklist of what to expect before,
during, and after your event as well as our top TEDx Rules to
Live By.
How to TEDx is the meat of the manual. Each chapter contains
a different chunk of content related to a specific facet of your
event, like “Venue” or “Speakers”. Each section includes guiding
principles and best practices; some sections go deeper with
additional considerations as well as links to inspiration and
relevant content. Icons and diagrams within the manual will call
out this deeper content.
Organizer’s Manual - Version 4.0
T
Icons and Diagrams within
Additional Considerations
What to check out once you’ve
got the essentials taken care of
Before
During
Inspiration
Links to educational videos, websites,
and other inspiring TEDx-related media
After
Mini Task Timeline
Know when in the course of your event a particular
chapter is most relevant
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Templates and Samples
Examples to get you started and
tools to get the job done
Difficulty Time
Costs
Rules
•••••
•••••
•••••
•••••
Task Rater
Understand at a glance what a particular task demands
Basics
‣
‣
‣
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The Value of TEDx
TEDx Rules to Live By
Task Timeline
Task Timeline Checklist
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The Value of TEDx
“So, what is TEDx?”
As an Organizer, you will undoubtedly be asked this question many times. See it as an opportunity to
introduce someone new to the spirit and experience of TED. You could be speaking to a potential
volunteer, sponsor, or attendee.
Let them know that TED is an annual event that brings together the world’s leading thinkers and doers
to share ideas that that matter in any discipline—technology, entertainment, design, science,
humanities, business, development. Explain that at a TEDx event, speakers and TED Talks videos
combine to spark deep discussion and connections. And in the spirit of “ideas worth spreading,” TED
created TEDx, a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like
experience.
Explain that the hope for TEDx is that it becomes a local forum for ideas within community that
inspires people to change their lives, their futures and ultimately their world. Let them know why you’re
putting on your event; discuss your theme, tell a story about the process, let them know who’s part of
the community you’re building. Ask if they’d like to get involved!
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TEDx Rules to Live By
The beauty of TEDx is that it’s open and adaptable, and that
Organizers may tailor the program to meet the needs and
interests of diverse audiences. But that openness also means we
need all of our Organizers to stay true to the TEDx rules in order
to maintain a certain consistently worldwide.
We admit that there are a healthy amount of rules, and that we
do want you to follow them all. But if you keep these following
rules top of mind, you’ll be off to a great start.
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TEDx Rules to Live By
1.
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3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
TEDx events must be cross-disciplinary.
Every TEDx event must have a separate license.
TEDx events can only be 1-day in length.
Only events where the Primary Licensee has attended TED can have
over 100 attendees.
You cannot charge more than $100 for tickets, and then only with
TED's approval.
TEDx event names must be location-based. And only of a city,
neighborhood or street, not a region, state, country or continent.
Names co-branded with organizations, non-profts and NGOs are
not allowed. TEDx doesn’t co-brand with other conferences or
seminars.
Always position your self as an independently organized TEDx
event. Clarify this with use of the correct logo and language.
The TEDx event format is: the TEDx intro video, a session/s of talks
under 18 minutes, along with 25% content of videos from TED.com,
with breaks in between. No panels, workshops or Q & A.
TEDx events must stand alone, and can never be co-branded or
associated with another organization. Companies can only interact
with TEDx events as sponsors.
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10. No sponsors are allowed on stage. Sponsors cannot influence your
program.
11. The official TEDx Intro Video featuring TED Curator Chris Anderson
must be played at the beginning of your event.
12. TEDx speakers must must tell a story and argue for an idea using
credible proof. They may not use the TED stage to sell products,
promote themselves, or advance notions that cannot be defended
with well-founded evidence.
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Task Timeline
Before
After
During
Project
Management
Team
Management
___
Venue
Sponsorship
Program
Design
Theme
and
Speakers
Speakers
Running
Order
Marketing
Audience
Photo and Video
Websites
Postscript
How to
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Task Timeline Checklist
Before
Team Management
✓ Have you recruited your team?
✓ Have you developed an
organizational chart for your
team?
✓ Do you have an event day checklist
and script?
✓ Have you thanked your
volunteers?
✓ Does everyone know their tasks and
responsibilities?
✓ Have you laid out a planning
timeline?
✓ Are you meeting with your team
regularly?
✓ Have you checked out the
TEDx HUB for examples and
advice?
✓ Have you looked for a venue
that fits the size, tone, and
equipment needs of your
event?
Venue
After
During
✓ Do you have a backup plan for
equipment, speakers, and
volunteers?
✓ Have you identified a team
storyteller/blogger for the event?
✓ Have you or your event day
manager checked the equipment
and stage layout?
✓ Have you completed all
requirements related to your
venue rental?
✓ Have you looked into insurance
requirements of your venue?
✓ Did you create a plan for the
stage layout of the event?
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Task Timeline Checklist
Before
1 Team
✓ Do you know the accounting
rules in your city, state and
country?
Sponsorship and
Finance
After
During
✓ Did you thank your sponsors at
some point during the program?
✓ Did you thank your sponsors?
✓ Did you complete any
paperwork related to donations
or accounting?
✓ Did you welcome and host your
sponsor representatives?
✓ Have you developed your
budget?
✓ Did you add submit sponsor
details in the TEDx Organizer
Close Out?
✓ Have you looked at what
services and equipment could
be solicited as in-kind
donations?
✓ Did you share a feedback
report with your sponsors?
✓ Have you developed a
sponsorship kit?
✓ Are your sponsors on the list of
TED Sponsors? If yes, did you
complete your TEDx Sponsor
Approval Request Form?
✓ Have you recruited a dynamic
and diverse group of speakers?
Theme and
Speakers
✓ Have your speakers signed
speaker pledge and permission
form?
✓ Have you met with your speakers to
make sure that they understand the
format of the day, where they are
supposed to be, and when?
✓ Did you thank your speakers?
✓ Do your speakers understand
their role and presentation
format?
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✓ Have you reviewed your
speakers’ presentations,
checked their claims, and
rehearsed
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Task Timeline Checklist
Before
✓ Have you chosen your theme?
Running Order
After
During
✓ Does your program design align
with the traditional TED format?
✓ Have you you included a variety
of speaking approaches,
disciplines, lengths and
performances in your program?
✓ Is the onstage host aware of the
TEDx rules and have the event day
script?
✓ Did you thank your onstage
host?
✓ Do have all the speaker
presentations and video stored and
ready to go?
✓ Did you select an onstage host
and explain their responsibilities
to them?
✓ Have you created your unique
identity?
Branding and
Marketing
✓ Have you let your audience know
that tweeting, blogging and
Facebooking is encouraged?
✓ Have you created a website
and the event blog?
✓ Did you put together a blog
post that summarizes the
social messaging and press
coverage related to your
event?
✓ Are your giveaways on display?
✓ Have you filled out and then
updated your event page?
✓ Are your signs properly displayed?
✓ Did you post elements of your
event to the TEDx blog?
✓ Have you publicized your
event? Have you created a
press page on your website?
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Task Timeline Checklist
Before
✓ Have you sent out audience
applications?
Audience
After
During
✓ Have you given everyone a
name tag?
✓ Have you kept your in touch
with your TEDx community?
✓ Have you confirmed your guest
list?
✓ Have you sent out the official
TEDx Attendee Feedback
Form?
✓ Have you thought about
building the larger TEDx
community?
Photo and Video
✓ Have you secured an audio/
visual team and equipment?
✓ Have you and your A/V team
planned camera placement?
✓ Have you designed your video
titles and sponsor messaging?
✓ Have you designed a stage and
lighting plan suitable for video?
✓ Did you give a copy of and explain
the running order of the day to your
A/V team?
✓ Did you give your editor all of
the assets they need?
✓ Have you secured a video
editor?
✓ Do you have enough people to
capture and direct your production?
✓ Did you edit each talk in the
TED style and export quality
files for each one?
✓ Have you sent and collected
the audience survey?
Post Event
✓ Have you filled out the
organizer survey?
✓ Is your event page updated?
✓ Have you renewed your license
for next time?
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How to
How to
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How To
Contents
1 Team Management
‣ Recruiting your team
‣ Coordinating your team
‣ Running your event
6 Branding and Marketing
‣ Working with the TEDx guidelines
‣ Creating your unique identity and story
‣ Designing your online presence
2 Venue
‣ Selecting your venue
‣ Staging your event
7 Audience
‣ Inviting your guests
8 Photo and Video
‣ Recording your event
‣ Putting your videos online
‣ Sharing your event
3 Sponsorship and Finance
‣ Determining sponsorship needs
‣ Planning your budget
‣ Approaching sponsors
9 Post Event
‣ Sharing your TEDx experience
‣ Feedback and renewal
‣ Taking action as an organizer
4 Theme and Speakers
‣ Choose a theme
‣ Curate Speakers
‣ Prepare speakers
Additional Support
‣ Other organizer resources
5 Running Order
‣ Schedule the day
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Content
Chapter 1
Team
Management
1
‣ Recruiting your team
‣ Coordinating your team
‣ Running your event
Difficulty Time
Costs
Rules
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Chapter 1: Team Management
TED Spirit
The first step for any TEDx Organizer should be assembling your
core team—putting together a brain trust of committed
individuals who will help make the whole thing happen. You are
the Organizer, but TEDx is definitely a group effort! You will be
convening your community’s leading thinkers and doers in order
to share ideas that that matter, and to get there, you’re going to
need to rely on your team.
It’s true that it’s one of the biggest challenges of being a TEDx
Organizer, but in the spirit of building community, it can also be
the most rewarding. Great TEDx events require great team
management, so go team!
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Chapter 1: Team Management
Recruiting your team
Guiding Principles
1 Get the right organizing team
This is the most difficult part. Although it’s important to have people who get the TED vision, favor
organized, self-managed and hard-working individuals.
2 Develop a small core group
The management process can run much more smoothly if you work with a small core group of
dedicated volunteers. They can take ownership of primary tasks. Look for people who have both the
skills needed and the bandwidth.
3 Know when to hire a professional
TEDx events are often put on with dedicated volunteers and limited financial resources. Yet some
expenditures on professional assistance can end up saving time as well as elevating the quality of the
event in the long run. Consider hiring vendors for graphic design, speaker coaching and AV
production.
Best Practices
Choosing the right volunteers can be one of the toughest parts of the TEDx experience, but can yield
some of the greatest rewards.
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Seek critical skills
If you don’t have event planning or project management experience, try to recruit organizing team
members with that kind of experience. They can help provide vital insights and help to navigate the
challenges of putting on the event.
‣
Build a larger team of secondary volunteers
A secondary team of volunteers can assist core group members in their tasks, as well as staff the
event.
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Chapter 1: Team Management
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Invite local TED community members to join your team
TED volunteer translators, TED Fellows and past TED attendees. They are already part of the TED
community, and are probably very passionate about TED's mission, too.
‣
Involve your core team in the recruiting and selecting the volunteers
Core group members may be able to tap into potential volunteers through their respective
networks. Also consider having a core team member tasked with the role of volunteer recruitment
and management.
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Ask volunteers to sign a Volunteer Agreement
This document should list expectations of the volunteers over the course of the event planning
process, including things like guidelines around communication etiquette, time commitment and
deadlines and understanding how to represent the TEDx brand.
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Show your appreciation
Like you, volunteers will be giving significant amounts of their time to this endeavor. Find ways to
express to them their value during the recruitment process as well as throughout event planning.
From perks such as being acknowledged on the website to a volunteer appreciation event, you
can help build and maintain a collective of happy and engaged volunteers.
Templates and Samples
‣
Sample volunteer agreement
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Chapter 1: Team Management
Coordinating your team
Guiding Principles
1 Engage your team in the TEDx spirit
You shouldn’t be the only evangelist of TEDx on your team. Help your team understand the essence of
what they’re trying to create by exposing them to TEDx. Watch a simulcast or attend a TEDx event
together as early as possible in the planning process.
2 Create an organizational plan
Assign specific roles to core team members and create an organizational plan that lays out the overall
team structure as well as key goals, responsibilities and milestones for each role.
3 Meet with your core team regularly
The devil is in the details, so meet with the core team at regular intervals (e.g. weekly) to get updates
and talk about next steps.
Best Practices
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Assign roles related to primary event tasks
Divide the major components listed in this manual into specific roles that core members can take
on. Roles include Sponsorship, Venue, Speakers, Branding and Marketing. Also consider assigning
roles for certain project management duties such as Volunteer Management and Budget.
‣
Designate a Storyteller
Designating one person your official Storyteller is a great and consistent way to keep people
interested and updated about your event--and to make sure that your blog is updated with regular
posts. Recruit a passionate team member to fill this important and productive position.
‣
Understand the rules TEDx Rule
Part of maintaining the consistency of the TEDx brand and experience lies in following the TEDx
rules. In addition to yourself, there should be one other member of your core team who becomes
deeply familiar with the rules. This can help avoid unnecessary problems as you move forward with
your event.
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Chapter 1: Team Management
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Embrace the role of Lead Curator
As event organizer, you are the ultimate steward of the event. Oversee the core team and tackle
individual tasks as needed or desired.
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Identify an understudy
A practice of great leadership is to never keep all of the knowledge within only one person, so try
to keep at least one team member closely informed of the process. Establish a strategy early on
with that person in case there is ever a need for inheritance or succession of your TEDx event.
‣
Utilize project management tools
Consider using free project management software such as Basecamp or Open Atrium. Dropbox,
‣
Develop a project timeline
Use the timeline at the beginning of this guide to develop a general overall plan for planning and
implementation. Also develop a more detailed timeline with key deadlines.
‣
Be flexible
With any event, there is bound to be last minute scheduling conflicts, technical issues and other
unexpected roadblocks. Wherever possible, have backup plans that can be deployed if needed.
‣
Keep things fun
The level of commitment needed to put on a TEDx event can sometimes feel daunting. Helping
everyone, including yourself, to have fun can make the overall process easier. Try to do team
building activities like having potlucks alongside meetings or attending a fun event together.
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Chapter 1: Team Management
Running your event
Guiding Principles
1 Keep track of the details
Event production is one of the most dynamic parts of the TEDx planning process. If you or one of your
team members doesn’t have production experience, considering recruiting team members who do.
Use regular meetings and checklists to stay on top of things.
2 Be flexible
In the hustle and bustle of the event day, something invariably doesn’t happen according to plan. Task
someone with the responsibility of being the event day manager. Have backup options available for as
many things as possible.
Best Practices
‣
Develop an Event Day Script
Develop a script and timeline for the event day that can be referenced by volunteers, including the
event host and vendors.
‣
Do a dry run
Have the volunteers and vendors involved in the event day activities run through the event the day
of to test systems and run through the script.
‣
Confirm everything
In the weeks leading up to the event, confirm venue, vendors, volunteers and speakers. Make sure
everyone is aware of their responsibilities for the day. Include the confirmation process in the
project timeline.
‣
Develop an Event Day Checklist
The checklist can be used to track systems and facilities as they are tested and people as they are
confirmed. Organize the checklist by category.
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Chapter 1: Team Management
Templates and Samples
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Event day rundown - TEDxSanDiego
Project Gannt Chart - TEDxAustinLive
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Chapter 1: Team Management
Chapter 2
Venue
‣ Selecting Your Venue
‣ Staging Your Event
Difficulty Time
Costs
Rules
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Chapter 2: Venue
TED Spirit
Part of the beauty—and the challenge—of a TEDx event is that it
can take place almost anywhere. In the past, TEDx events have
been held in private homes, libraries, cinemas, office conference
rooms, school auditoriums, community centers, municipal
theaters and many others. The possibilities abound!
Whatever venue you choose, remember that the goal of TEDx is
to connect people both to ideas and to each other. Eventappropriate venues and thoughtful stage design are key to
creating that kind intimacy with your audience.
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Chapter 2: Venue
Selecting Your Venue
Guiding Principles
1 Strive for intimacy
Balance the size of your space with the size of your audience.
Bigger does not necessarily mean better.
2 Prioritize comfort
The longer the event, the more space you’ll need to give people
room to stretch, mingle and breathe.
3 Keep it simple
Remember that the venue will set your event’s tone and can dictate
overall complexity.
Best Practices
While the spirit of the event remains the same regardless of size, hosting a dozen people in your living
room is a very different endeavor from inviting a hundred people to a local theater. Here, a few best
practices to help you select the best venue for your event:
Small to Medium TEDx events (5 to 100 people)
‣
Think of your event as an ambitious dinner party with a well-chosen, diverse guest list.
‣
Select a cozy venue. Look for a site that is wide rather than deep, with the shortest possible
distance from audience members to the stage, such as a theater or an auditorium (as opposed to a
conference hall). This helps establish a connection between the speakers and the audience and
among audience members. TED is particularly fond of theaters with “continental style” seating
(deeply spaced rows, no center aisle and a generous slope, giving everyone good sight lines).
‣
Avoid ballrooms. Flat orientation makes it difficult for people to see, and the high ceilings and
bright lights make it hard to create a TED-like atmosphere.
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Chapter 2: Venue
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Seek out a venue with built-in infrastructure. Universities and corporate and municipal auditoriums
tend to work well. The venue should have:
✓ An ability to project and watch videos
✓ A location for food and beverage setup
✓ Conveniently located bathrooms
✓ Exhibit space for sponsors, speakers’ materials, a bloggers’ lounge, etc.
✓ Party space for sponsored lunches and other events
‣
Find out whether your venue is union-operated. This will impact your budget.
Large TEDx events (more than 100 people)
‣
Take into consideration our recommendations for a 5- to 100-person event.
‣
Confirm that your TEDx license allows you to invite more than 100 people.
‣
The longer and larger your event, the more challenging it is to create intimacy. Remember that your
goal is not to secure the largest venue in your area; it is to select the venue that best fits your
needs and the anticipated size of your audience. A 300-person venue looks and feels very different
from a 1,000-person venue. You’ll lose the feeling of intimacy if there’s ample empty space.
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Chapter 2: Venue
Additional Considerations
Special Areas
Consider designating spaces outside the venue’s main area, whether that’s your living room or a large
auditorium, for extras. In the past, select TEDx events have included special areas such as:
‣
Event Lab: An area for attendees to try out new software, gadgets, technologies and other products.
This is also a great place to creatively integrate your sponsors/partners.
‣
Bloggers’ Alley: Consider setting up a dedicated bloggers’ area outside the auditorium, with desks,
chairs and power outlets (laptops inside the auditorium can be a distraction).
‣
Simulcast Lounge: If you anticipate an overflow crowd, set up viewing monitors outside the main
auditorium.
Transportation
If possible, choosing a venue that’s accessible by public transportation is preferable. This makes your
event more reachable by a larger audience and helps keep the environmental impact as low as possible.
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Chapter 2: Venue
Staging Your Event
Guiding Principles
1 Create focus
Keep a tidy stage -- power cables, multiple laptops, and projection rigs are distracting. Give your
speakers a specific place to stand (they may wander, but try to keep that at a minimum). Position the
screen where everyone can see it.
2 Make lighting important
Showcase your region, city, or culture through your stage design. Use culturally specific props and
visual elements. They will give your whole event -- and your videos -- a unique personality.
3 Consider the view
Position your speakers, the screen, and any other props so that you can get the shots you want.
Remember that you are lighting for a video production which is very different from your standard stage
lighting. Check out our production guide for more details.
Best Practices
Here are some basic elements of optimal stage design that will give your speakers confidence in their
presentations—and make sure everyone can give a fantastic talk.
‣
Use your full official logo
Every stage MUST include your official TEDx logo with your full event name. Never use the TEDx
logo without your location name. Never, ever use the TED logo.
‣
Do not use a black backdrop
If you are using drape or a curtain as your backdrop, do not use black or very dark colors. If you
must, try to break-up the black background with other stage elements. These will help create
separation between the speaker and the background on your video recordings.
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Presentation screen
Use a screen with a 16:9 aspect ratio -- large enough to display text that is legible in the back row.
Raise your screen well above the head of your speaker to ensure all cameras get a clean shot of
the speaker. And if you can’t raise your screen high enough, place the speakers’ “home-base”
position to the side of the screen.
‣
Pay attention to noise
Try to block out background or outside noise.
‣
Decoration
Without a little decoration, your stage will look cold and flat. An interesting piece of art, technology,
or furniture (such as an object that speaks to your event’s theme) will give your event a distinct
personality and accent the speakers onstage. TED’s favorite simple stage set is a library: two
armchairs, a side table, bookshelves with books and objects, a large globe and an area rug. You
can go vintage or modern; either works.
‣
Light the speaker for video
Plan on a three-point lighting scheme. If possible, consult a Lighting Director familiar with video
production. Consult our production guide for more details.
‣
Light the stage
Light enough of the stage so the speakers can roam around. Put a light on your TEDx event’s logo
and if possible, light or colored light your drape or background.
‣
Keep light off the screen
Do everything you can to prevent light from spilling onto the screen. It would hugely damage both
the live and recorded experiences.
‣
Easy entrance and exit
Offer your host and speakers a simple way to get on and off the stage. There’s no need for a green
room: participants and host can even enter the stage from the audience.
‣
Consider the view
Carefully consider the seating arrangements. Make sure that everyone can see the screen and/or
the speakers.
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Chapter 2: Venue
Additional Considerations
Environmental Responsibility
In the spirit of TED, make your event as sustainable and low-impact as possible. Follow these suggestions
for a more eco-friendly event: ‣
‣
‣
‣
Energy consumption
‣
Turn off lights and air-conditioning when rooms are not in use.
‣
Set computers, printers and other electronic devices to “sleep” after a few minutes.
Transportation
‣
Communicate mass-transit options to your speakers and attendees.
‣
Provide free passes for public transit.
‣
Offset TEDx event staff and attendee air travel through carbon credits.
‣
Encourage carpools.
‣
Use hybrid or high-efficiency vehicles.
‣
If taxis are used, choose taxi companies with hybrid vehicles.
Event design
‣
Design signs that can be reused.
‣
Produce signs and programs from recycled materials.
‣
For production lighting, replace incandescent light bulbs with CFLs or LED ones.
‣
Purchase furniture made from recycled products; recycle or donate items when they’re no longer needed.
‣
Order lanyards made from recyclable products.
Paper
‣
Use e-mail instead of paper-based communication.
‣
Print and make copies on double-sided paper.
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‣
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Food service
‣
Choose beverages and snacks whose packaging is biodegradable.
‣
Use reusable containers for coffee or water.
‣
If disposables must be used, purchase compostable plates, cups and silverware.
‣
Provide natural and/or organic food.
‣
Serve organic and fair-trade coffees, teas and other beverages.
‣
Use bulk dispensers for salt, pepper, ketchup, etc., for buffet meals.
‣
Offer sustainable seafood and vegetarian meals.
Water
‣
‣
‣
Use recycled paper products.
Provide drinking water in pitchers or bulk coolers, rather than in individual plastic bottles.
Garbage
‣
Minimize waste through a comprehensive recycling and reuse system at the venue.
‣
Provide clearly labeled (words and pictures) recycling bins.
‣
Set up separate recycling bins for paper and bottles.
Restrooms
‣
Use biodegradable toilet tissue, soaps and paper towels.
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Chapter 2: Venue
Chapter 3
Sponsorship
and Finance
‣ Determining sponsorship needs
‣ Planning your budget
‣ Approaching sponsors
Difficulty Time
Costs
Rules
•••••
•••••
•••••
•••••
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Chapter 3: Sponsorship and Finance
TED Spirit
At TED, we approach sponsorship differently. We see our
sponsors as partners who are getting involved with a project.
Because of this, it’s important to take the time to educate them
about the both the philosophy and value of TED.
Look for businesses and organizations that aim to make the
world better through technology, entertainment, design, science,
arts, food, media and collaboration. Let sponsors know that
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Chapter 3: Sponsorship and Finance
Rules
1.
If your potential sponsors are on our TED Sponsor list, submit them to
the TEDx Sponsor Approval Form. Submitted sponsors must be approved by
the TED team Before you approach any potential sponsors on the TED
Sponsors list, they must be approved by the TED team. Note: All other sponsor
companies are automatically approved. Make sure to check our list of
unacceptable sponsors below for types of companies that cannot sponsor TEDx
events.
2.
Follow TED’s policy on approved sponsors. TED strictly forbids sponsorship
by companies or organizations who deal in:
‣
Tobacco/cigarettes
‣
Adult-oriented products/services
‣
Weapons/ammunition
3.
Sponsors cannot influence content. Sponsors may have no editorial control
or veto power over your program.
4.
Sponsorship is not allowed on stage. Sponsors may not present on the
TEDx stage and sponsor logos may not appear onstage. Sponsors may not
pitch their company or product from the TEDx stage.
5.
Keep your social media presence sponsor-free. You are not allowed to
promote your sponsors on Twitter, Facebook, or any other social media.
6.
Limit use of sponsor logos. Multiple sponsors are allowed a logo on one slide
at the beginning and end of each TEDx video. This slide may appear on screen
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Chapter 3: Sponsorship and Finance
for a maximum of 3 seconds. Pre- and post-roll sponsor logo cards must match
the format specified in the TEDx templates.
7.
Do not look for sponsors at other TED Conferences. TEDx Organizers
cannot approach or engage in discussions with existing TED sponsors or
partners at the TED Conferences – TED, TEDActive and TEDGlobal.
8.
Organizers must find their own sponsors. The TED team will not provide
introductions to sponsors, or negotiate sponsorships on behalf of TEDx
Organizers.
9.
Respect funding limits. Total sponsorship funding for events with equal to or
less than 100 attendees may not exceed $10,000 in cash (not including in-kind,
or venue cost). For events with more than 100 attendees, the limit is $20,000
per sponsor. Any requests to exceed these amounts must be approved in writing
by TED.
10.
TEDx events may not be used as fundraisers. TEDx events should not be
used to raise money for any causes or charities. If the event is run through an
existing nonprofit, the event can’t be used as a fundraiser for that nonprofit. All
money must go into production costs of the TEDx event itself
11.
Uphold payment rules. Wherever possible, have sponsors pay vendors
directly.
12.
TEDx events can’t be used to make money. All proceeds from your TEDx
event must go into your TEDx event. If you have excess money available
afterward, you might invest it in your next TEDx event, in a TEDx in a Box event,
or consider giving it to a school so that it can host a TEDx event. This kind of
donation is not considered “fundraising.”
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Chapter 3: Sponsorship and Finance
13.
Uphold rules around TEDx-branded products. Branded products may be
given away. TEDx-branded products may only be sold at your event -- not pre-, post or online. Profits from these items must go back to support your event. The
TEDx logo/brand may not be licensed for commercial purposes.
14.
No crowdfunding. TEDx events cannot use crowdfunding platforms -- such as
IndieGoGo, Kickstarter, or other local platforms -- to raise money for any aspect
of a TEDx event.
15.
Regulate onsite bookstores. If you partner with a bookstore to present
attendees with a selection of works, make sure that:
1. All revenues from book sales should go to the bookstore. The bookstore
should provide staffing and shipping of all orders.
2. Revenue from customized items such as t-shirts and mugs can be shared
between the TEDx event and the bookstore.
3. Speakers’ books can be part of a TEDx bookstore but must be sold
alongside other titles.
4. Speaker’s can sign books but only as part of a larger book sale and
bookstore presence.
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Chapter 3: Sponsorship and Finance
Determining sponsorship needs
Guiding Principles
1 Prioritize budget needs
Making a project budget before you begin and prioritizing the most important cost elements for your
event can help you approach potential sponsors in a targeted way.
2 Consider in-kind contributions
Many TEDx event costs can be covered through in-kind contributions from sponsors. Other costs
require cash. Determining how much of each kind of contribution you need can help you prioritize who
to approach.
3 Make use of the TEDx sponsor marketplace
TEDx has compiled a list of companies that have provided in-kind services to TEDx events in the past.
Make sure you consult this list when thinking through your budget.
Best Practices
The TEDx Sponsor Marketplace
‣
The companies on the following page offer in-kind services or products to TEDx Organizers who
seek sponsorship partners for their events. Follow the instructions beside each listing.
‣
It is up to each Organizer, along with the representative of each company, to determine the terms
of any given partnership, within the sponsorship rules.
‣
For the most updated partner list, please check the TEDx website.
Costs that are commonly covered by sponsorship
‣
Venue Cost (Cash or in-kind)
‣
Venue Insurance (In-kind)
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Chapter 3: Sponsorship and Finance
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Banners and Signage (In-kind)
‣
T-Shirts (Cash)
‣
Business Cards (Cash or in-kind)
‣
Speaker Badges (Cash or in-kind)
‣
Attendee Badges (Cash or in-kind)
‣
Event Programs (In-kind)
‣
Event Production (In-kind)
‣
Catering (Cash or in-kind)
Sponsor Package Examples
‣
Logo appears in printed program / Logo appears on the stage on its own slide during pre-show,
intro and breaks / Logo appears on website
‣
Special 'thank you' will be given by MC during event intro
‣
Can provide items in a gift bag and/or a speaker gift
‣
Product demonstration during pre-conference event (or at a sponsor meal)
‣
Sponsor logo printed on TEDx t-shirts -- always smaller than TEDx event logo.
‣
Dedicated partner area at the event location, outside of main stage area.
‣
Sponsor logos on select slides on your TEDx videos.
Templates and Samples
‣
Sample sponsorship package - TEDxMcGill
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Chapter 3: Sponsorship and Finance
Planning your budget
Guiding Principles
1 Understand accounting rules
Rules differ from country to country, so the way you set up your event’s finances and accounting
system depends on where you live. You may set up a nonprofit, but if you do so, it can’t be anything
related to TED, TEDx or your event’s name. You can also run the event through an existing nonprofit.
2 Estimate more
Unless you have extensive event planning experience, the rule of thumb in budgeting is 1.5x your
estimate.
Best Practices
‣
Make a detailed budget from the beginning
Develop a budget that includes a line by line breakdown of key categories such as Venue
(including food and beverage), Photo and Video (during and after the event), Marketing, Speaker,
Administration and Audience. Use the budget to also track sponsorship and donations.
‣
Work closely with the Sponsorship Organizer
Meet regularly with the volunteer in charge of sponsorship development. Together, you can
strategize around needs and opportunities and oversee fundraising progress.
‣
Make note of bills that need to be paid upfront
Funding doesn’t always come through in sync with your schedule. People sometimes put off
purchasing tickets until the last minute and sometimes there are delays with sponsorship
donations so don’t count on the cash from these things to always offset expenses that occur
before the event. Make a note of what expenses need to be paid upfront and what can be paid
after the event.
‣
Be aware of expensive line items
Expenses such as catered food can be very high. Make note early in the process of these high
ticket items. They can help focus your sponsorship efforts.
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Templates and Samples
‣
‣
Budget template
Sample budget - TEDxDuke
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Chapter 3: Sponsorship and Finance
Approaching sponsors
Guiding Principles
1 View sponsors as partners
With TEDx, sponsorship is really about partnership and collaboration around your theme and the ideas
you hope to spread. Seeking sponsors that share your vision, understand the TED brand, and can
collaborate on innovative ideas with you is critical to successful sponsorship.
2 Show the value of TEDx
While the TED brand is strong in many areas, stress the value of TEDx and the benefits corporate
sponsors will have if they are associated with the brand.
2 Make it easy to contribute
The best incentive for sponsorship is to make it easy and accessible for the sponsors. Creating
mechanisms such as an entity to receive cash donations and a tiered level of sponsorship make it
easier for sponsors to contribute and will go a long way in successfully funding your event.
Best Practices
The recruitment of sponsors is a challenge for many Organizers, and the initial challenge is translating
TED and TEDx into a language corporation will understand. Generally, when approaching a potential
sponsor, you will need to explain what a TEDx event is, generate excitement about the opportunity
and convince potential sponsors that supporting your endeavor is worth their while.
‣
Embrace the spirit of collaboration
We call our sponsors partners. We encourage our partners to think of their sponsorship as a
collaboration and an opportunity to be part of something meaningful. We seek partners who want
to have an authentic dialogue with the TED/TEDx community. We encourage partners to be as
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Chapter 3: Sponsorship and Finance
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Consider sponsors for spaces and programs beyond the main stage
Create a TEDx demo lab and explore spaces outside of the main stage; set up a TEDx studio with
a host to interview partners; produce content at the event itself, but outside of the main stage;
encourage the idea of TEDx being the launch pad of new ideas happening in the community; host
an on-site Ideas Lab to experiment with new ideas; engage the community in meaningful ways
(think about TED initiatives and how sponsors might support them in a local way, such as TED-ED).
‣
Use the sponsorship slide presentation
TED created a slide presentation that you are free to use (or draw from) when approaching
potential sponsors. For a copy of this presentation, check the email you received from TED when
your event license was approved, or access it from the TEDx Wiki.
‣
Send out a sponsorship letter
It’s important to educate potential sponsors about TED and TEDx and reach out to them in the
spirit of collaboration. We’ve created a template that you may use to reach out to sponsors that
you can find linked to at the end of this section.
‣
Set up a mechanism to receive cash contributions
The easiest way for sponsors to contribute is for them to pay vendors directly or provide in-kind
contributions. However, many potential sponsors find this difficult to manage and you may need to
set up structures to enable you to appropriately receive money. Many TEDx Organizers both in the
US and overseas have set up 501(c)3 or non-profit organizations to be able to receive funds.
Others have found partner organizations to receive the money on the Organizers behalf and pay
vendors for services.
‣
Create tiers for sponsorship
Creating levels of sponsorship can help engage more sponsors and yet keep control of the budget.
Previous TEDx events have had $100, $500, and over $1000 sponsorship tiers.
‣
Create a sponsorship kit
Creating a special kit for sponsors to show them the plan, the value and what they will get out of
the event can be helpful.
‣
Choose sponsors that fit the tone and theme of your event
Remember that not every company is a good match for TED or your particular TEDx event.
‣
In-Kind vs cash contributions
It is important to identify early on, which needs can be filled with in-kind contributions and which
need to be filled with cash contributions. Approaching companies for cash donations versus inkind contributions requires a slightly different approach.
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Chapter 3: Sponsorship and Finance
‣
Explain TED and TEDx
When we talk to potential sponsors, we always explain what a TED Talk is, because that in itself
distinguishes the TED from other conferences. Tell potential partners that a TED and a TEDx
presentation is “a talk of 18 minutes or less that conveys some of the most innovative ideas on the
planet with a passion.” Explain that TED and TEDx speakers tackle humanity's toughest questions,
attempting to answer them with innovation, enterprise and enduring optimism. Indicate to your
sponsors that your TEDx event is a place in their community that inspires people to change their
lives, their futures and ultimately their world. The TEDx audience is a remarkable group of people
that’s open-minded, curious, intelligent and eager to learn. If you have hosted a TEDx event
before, look for stories in your community that demonstrate how people have been positively
affected by your TEDx event, whose lives have been made better by access to a broad spectrum
of ideas and who have been inspired to create a better life for others as a result.
‣
Find ways for sponsors to get involved:
‣
Engage in authentic dialogue with your community
‣
Engage with thought leaders of the community
‣
Engage with speakers and experts in a specific area
‣
Support action around a meaningful topic
‣
Receive different point of views
‣
Support meaningful pre-conference activities
‣
Contacting sponsors
Get creative with communicating your vision for the event, the themes you’ve selected and any
speakers you’ve already nailed down or are planning to recruit. Equally important is
communicating the anticipated benefits for the company. These may include an opportunity to
launch a new product, networking, showcase a project, provide entertainment and marketing to
guests. And last but not least, giving potential sponsors a detailed budget showing the money that
you are asking for so they can see exactly where their money will go.
‣
Timing the sponsorship contact
Some potential sponsors will be intimately familiar with TEDx and the TED brand, others will have
never heard of it before. Timing your approach should differ depending on how familiar the
sponsor is. Many TEDx Organizers have staged approach that includes a letter, followed by a one
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Chapter 3: Sponsorship and Finance
page project brief, followed by a phone call, followed by an in person presentation of slides or a
portfolio, ending with follow up phone calls and detailed discussions.
‣
Sign clear and focused sponsor agreements
TEDx sponsorship differs from other conferences and so it’s important to make sure your sponsor
agreements highlight specifically what the sponsor intends to provide, how they will provide it and
what they will get in return.
‣
Don’t approach potential sponsors at TED Conferences
TEDx Organizers cannot approach or engage in discussions with existing TED sponsors/partners
at the TED Conferences — TED, TEDActive and TEDGlobal. The TED team does not provide
introductions to sponsors, or negotiate sponsorships on behalf of TEDx Organizers.
Additional Considerations
What you can offer sponsors
‣
A "thank you" to the sponsor from the stage (including a slide with their logo, briefly shown)
‣
Acknowledgment of the sponsor in the printed program or on your website. (Note: The sponsor's logo may not appear
on the front or back page of your printed program. It may not appear on the homepage of your website. It must always
be smaller than the TEDx logo.)
‣
Placement of the sponsor's logo on video monitors during breaks
‣
A "sponsored meal": an announcement that a meal or snack was provided by the sponsor
‣
A gift from the sponsor to all the attendees
‣
A short demo, given by the sponsor, to exhibit a new technology outside the main venue space
‣
You may offer sponsors the option to show their logo on one slide at the beginning and end of your TEDx videos in the
following order:
✓ Intro graphics
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Chapter 3: Sponsorship and Finance
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
Your TEDx event logo
Sponsor pre-roll card (3 seconds max)
Talk
Sponsor pre-roll card (3 seconds max)
Post roll card
What you can CANNOT offer sponsors
‣
Product advertisements or long-form presentations by sponsors.
‣
Editorial control over your event or creative direction on any content.
‣
The right to dictate who or what appears on your stage, or who attends your event.
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Chapter 3: Sponsorship and Finance
Chapter 4
Theme and
Speakers
‣ Choose a theme
‣ Curate speakers
‣ Prepare speakers
Difficulty Time
Costs
Rules
•••••
•••••
•••••
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TED Spirit
Selecting, inviting and preparing speakers is one of the most
important things you and your team will do for the event. This is
your chance to highlight the innovative minds in your community
while exposing the global TED audience to smart local thinking.
Rules
1.
Speaker’s must come from a range of disciplines. Your TEDx event should
feature talks that show no obvious relation to each other.
2.
Ideas should be new (to most). Highlight ideas that most people haven't
thought about before. Don’t aim to reinforce world views.
3.
Ideas should be realistic. TEDx Talks must maintain arguments that can be
defended by well-founded evidence. Be wary of bad science. TED reserves the
right to remove any video from the TEDx Talks YouTube channel that do not
meet our standards.
4.
Talks may be no longer than 18 minutes. This is the maximum length, but it
may be shorter. TED often asks speakers to present for 3, 5, or 9 minutes.
5.
Never pay speakers.
6.
Speakers may not support or fund any portion of your TEDx event.
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Chapter 4: Theme and Speakers
7.
Speakers must sign the official release form.
8.
Speakers must confirm authorship. Each speaker must affirm that he or she
is the sole author of his or her presentation and owns all rights to its content.
9.
Each speaker must agree to inform you about any third-party material.
They must also be able to supply you with written permission to use this material
from its original source, which you must keep for your records—and provide to
TED upon request in case the talk is selected to appear on TED.com.
10.
Speakers must properly license all presentation media. Images, music and
video clips that appear in TEDx presentations for TED’s use in worldwide video
and online distribution must be cleared. Do not use third-party images from the
Web unless they are clearly licensed by Creative Commons (Attribution /
NonCommercial/NonDerivative) for re-use.
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Choose a theme
Guiding Principles
1 Broad is best
Your theme should allow for a wide range of topics. Don’t let your theme limit the kinds of ideas you
can spotlight.
2 A topic is not a theme
Specific topics, like “sustainability,” “medicine” or “happiness,” however important in their own rights,
are not acceptable themes.
Best Practices
‣
Look to past TED Conferences for examples. The TED conferences that TEDx events mirror are
multi-disciplinary; their themes are broad enough so that they can spotlight the work of individuals
from a wide range of fields. Here are some examples:
✓ The Great Unveiling
✓ The Big Questions
✓ Icons, Geniuses, Mavericks
✓ Inspired by Nature
✓ The Pursuit of Happiness
✓ The Substance of Things Not Seen
‣
Choose a theme that can be interpreted loosely. For example, “The Substance of Things Not
Seen” included:
✓ An artist who creates microscopic sculptures
✓ A politician talking about the un-seen poor
✓ An astrophysicist explaining the existence of black holes, even though we cannot see them.
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Chapter 4: Theme and Speakers
Inspiration
Sample event themes
‣
From TED Conferences: The Great Unveiling, The Big Questions, Inspired by Nature, The Pursuit
of Happiness, and Icons, Geniuses, and Mavericks
‣
From TEDx events: TEDxUSC: Ideas Empowered, TEDxAmsterdam: Breakthrough, TEDxBoston:
Revolutionary Ideas, TEDxTelAviv: Thriving on Turmoil, and TEDxBucharest: The Essence of a
Changing World
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Chapter 4: Theme and Speakers
Curate speakers
Guiding Principles
1 Look for ideas, not speakers
The goal of every TED Talk is not just to tell a story, or to inspire or invoke emotions -- it’s simply to
communicate an idea.
2 Seek out dynamic local voices
Give the global TED community access to perspectives they may not otherwise encounter.
3 Champion diversity
Make sure your program truly represents your regions demographics and interests.
Best Practices
‣
‣
Assemble a curation team
‣
Bring together people you admire and trust can collaborate to help select speakers
‣
Draft clear rules for how you will choose speakers. This includes setting out how your selection
process will proceed. The process you choose depends on the nature of your team, but it often
includes a mix of these systems:
‣
Full democracy -- Every speaker requires a reasonable consensus
‣
Divided territory -- Sections of the larger team will be given full responsibility for portions of
the line-up
‣
Absolute power -- One member of the team takes full command of the speaker line-up and
the rest of the team merely offers suggestions.
Develop a concept
‣
Using your event’s theme as a landmark, plot out a list of the topics you hope to cover. Your
list should include a balance of big issues, academic and scientific fields and locally
relevant subjects and innovations.
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Outline your sessions using that list of topics. Decide on the number of sessions you hope
to have (accounting for a mix of different talk lengths that should add up to 90 minutes or
less per session) and take each session as an opportunity to explore your theme from a
particular -- still multi-disciplinary and multi-topical -- angle.
Select speakers
‣
Keep focus on the ideas, not the people
You should focus on finding people who will add new, important and realistic ideas to the
global conversation -- look for interesting, nuanced insights. Ultimately, your speakers will need
the ability to stand in front of a crowd, too, but that’s a skill people can learn.
‣
Look everywhere, but especially near by
Take several tracks at once to draft your list of prospective speakers. Here are a few options:
‣
Make a list of everyone you admire -- Utilize your teams’ varying interests and expertise to
identify big names in different arenas.
‣
Research the faculty at your local universities -- Contact different departments or check out
university publications to uncover the stand-out work. University’s are some of the best
places to find riveting talks from people who would otherwise toil away in obscurity.
‣
Research local businesses and charities -- Find the innovative, important work uniquely
done in your region.
‣
Read a local paper -- Local papers are a great source for discovering individuals with
accomplishments that truly represent your region.
‣
Work your social network -- Look to your most impressive friends and their friends for
surprising talks. Be warned however, this strategy can result in talks that only you find
interesting.
‣
Take applications -- An open platform can sometimes be a great way to find speakers you
would never know to look for. But remember that applications mostly attract extroverts and
occasionally fanatics.
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Additional Considerations
Do due diligence
It is your job, before any speaker is booked, to check them out, and to reject bad science, pseudoscience and
health hoaxes.
‣
As TEDx organizers, your audience’s trust is your top priority, over and above any other
personal or business relationship that may have brought this speaker to your attention. It is not
your audience’s job to figure out if a speaker is offering legitimate science or not. It is your job.
‣
All talks on the TEDx Talks channel represent the opinion of the speaker, not of TED or TEDx,
but we feel a responsibility not to provide a platform for misleading information. This does not
include talks around opinion, belief and individual experience, but talks that present material as
if it were broadly scientifically valid when it is provably not so. TED and TEDx are exceptional
stages for showcasing advances in science, and we can only stay that way if the claims
presented in our talks stand up to peer review.
‣
We take this seriously -- the consequence of bad science and health hoaxes are not trivial.
Presenting bad science on the TEDx stage is grounds for revoking your license.
‣
For more information on the subject, including tips on how to spot and deal with bad science,
please see this letter, written to the TEDx community in response to several publicly criticized
talks that defied these rules.
‣
To preserve the integrity of TED and TEDx content, and maintain our effectiveness as a
platform for science, we reserve the right to remove any video from the official TEDx Talks
YouTube channel if the talk maintains arguments that cannot be defended by well-founded
evidence.
‣
When a talk is flagged, we will inform the respective TEDx license holder, and we will vet the
argument with experts in its relevant field. If they agree that the assertions are misleading or
false, we may add a cautionary disclaimer to the YouTube video or remove the video outright
and provide the TEDx organizer with a template for informing the speaker of the decision.
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Inspiration
Video
‣
Check out the workshop “How to design a program and recruit speakers”
‣
Watch: TED’s June Cohen and Emily McManus on “‪How we prepare speakers and select talks‬”
‣
Watch: TED’s June Cohen on “What makes a great TED Talk?”
Templates and Samples
‣
‣
‣
‣
TEDx Speaker Guide
TEDx Speaker Guide (Spanish)
Sample speaker invitation - TEDxBangalore
Letter to the TEDx community about curating good science talks
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Chapter 4: Theme and Speakers
Prepare speakers
Guiding Principles
1 Let speakers know what to expect
Make sure that they understand the TED format and the type of work you will expect from them.
2 Provide prep strategies
Offer written suggestions for how they can prepare their talk.
3 Act as a sounding board and a resource
Since this experience is new to most speakers, make sure they know you’re available to help. Insist on
several check-ins to track their progress and know precisely what to expect come showtime.
Best Practices
‣
‣
Ask speakers to sign a pledge. The pledge asks them to:
‣
Meet deadlines, including dates when concepts, outlines, various drafts, and slides are due for
approval
‣
Participate in calls and meetings to review their presentation
‣
Participate in all required rehearsals
‣
Work with a speaker coach (if needed)
‣
Keep their talk does within the time allowed (and always under 18 minutes)
‣
Guarantee that all claims will be supported with well-founded evidence.
Familiarize speakers with the format and the rules
Suggest a few TED Talks that each speaker should watch to understand the format and provide
them with a list of specific rules including:
‣
Presentations must be 18 minutes or less
‣
Content must be original and give credit where appropriate
‣
Content must be in compliance with copyright law
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Speaker should avoid industry jargon and never sell products or promote themselves and their
businesses
‣
Speakers must be able to confirm the claims presented in every talk
‣
Speakers should not promote a inflammatory political or religious agenda, nor use polarizing
“us vs them” language
Provide speaking guidelines
The goal of every TED Talk is not just to tell a story or to inspire -- it’s to communicate an idea
effectively. Provide guidelines to help speakers hone their idea and craft their talk. Check in with
them as they develop each of these elements:
‣
Idea -- Every idea should be new, realistic, and important (or, at least, interesting).
‣
Outline + Script -- Make the audience care, explain the idea clearly and with conviction,
describe the evidence, explain why the idea is plausible, and end by addressing how the idea
could affect the audience if they were to accept it.
‣
Slides -- Slides can be distracting, so only use them when a simple visual communicates the
information more clearly than the spoken word can. Keep slides visually simple. The less text
on a slide the better (try not to go over 2 words). Don’t use bullet points. And make sure slides
fit the necessary technical specifications of the theater (ideally 1920x1080 pixels at a 16:9
aspect ratio).
Check the facts
Your audience’s trust is your top priority, over and above any other personal or business
relationship that may have brought this speaker to your attention. It is not your audience’s job to
figure out if a speaker is offering legitimate science or not. It is your job.
‣
If you haven’t already, read through this letter.
‣
All talks on the TEDx Talks channel represent the opinion of the speaker, not of TED or TEDx,
but we feel a responsibility not to provide a platform for misleading information. This does not
include talks around opinion, belief and individual experience, but talks that present material as
if it were broadly scientifically valid when it is provably not so. TED and TEDx are exceptional
stages for showcasing advances in science, and we can only stay that way if the claims
presented in our talks stand up to peer review.
‣
If a speaker seems to be pushing “bad science,” is speaking about any red flag topics, or
exhibiting red flag behavior, check the facts behind their argument.
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‣
Start with some basic web research. You should be able to understand at least the big
issues in every field you present onstage. Wikipedia is your first stop to gain a basic
background. Following primary-source links from Wikipedia, work out from there to
university websites, science and health blogs, and databases of papers published in
respected journals.
‣
Ask your local university’s PR office to connect you to a professor you can speak to. Make
sure it is someone totally unconnected with the potential speaker. Another place to start is
the local university library, if you have access to that; a research librarian can help you find
relevant journal articles.
‣
If you have a team member who is a journalist, ask them to fact-check the speaker’s work
to journalistic standards.
‣
If a talk is uploaded to the TEDx Talks site and subsequently flagged, we will inform the
respective TEDx license holder, and we will vet the argument with experts in its relevant
field. If they agree that the assertions are misleading or false, we may add a cautionary
disclaimer to the YouTube video or remove the video outright and provide the TEDx
organizer with a template for informing the speaker of the decision.
‣
Conduct rehearsals.
Rehearsals are essential to a good presentation that stays within the time limit. Early rehearsals
may be in-person or virtual (via a video-chat service such as Skype). Suggest that speakers
rehearse as much as possible with as many people as possible. Schedule an on-site dress
rehearsal for all speakers either the day before or day of the event before guests arrive.
‣
Prepare speakers for the big day
Make sure they know where they will sit, when and where they should expect to get mic’d, how
they will step on stage, how you will cue them when their time runs out, and how to exit the stage.
They are encouraged to stay for the whole event and to mingle during breaks.
‣
Make speakers feel special
Do everything within your means to give your speakers the full rock star treatment. You can
organize exclusive activities with them, gift some special thank you swag, or simply shower them
with praise. And follow up with each speaker after the event to thank them personally for their
participation.
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Chapter 4: Theme and Speakers
Additional Considerations
The TED Commandments
These ten tips are given to all TED Conference speakers as they prepare their TED Talks. They can help your
TEDx speakers craft talks that will have a profound impact on your audience.
1. Dream big
Strive to create the best talk you have ever given. Reveal something never seen and heard before. Do
something the audience will remember forever. Share an idea that could change the world.
2. Show us the real you
Share your passions, your dreams, your fears. Be vulnerable. Talk about failure as well as success.
3. Discuss complex issues in plain talk
Don’t try to dazzle people with your intellect or speak in abstractions. Explain everything. Give examples.
Tell stories. Be specific.
4. Connect with people’s emotions
Make us laugh! Make us cry!
5. Don’t flaunt your ego
Don’t boast. It’s the surest way to switch everyone’s attention off.
6. No selling from the stage!
Unless TED specifically asks you to do so, do not talk about your company or organization. Don’t even
think about pitching your products or services or asking for funding from stage.
7. Feel free to comment on other speakers’ talks, to praise or to criticize. Controversy energizes!
Enthusiastic endorsement is powerful!
8. Don’t read your talk
Notes are fine. If the choice is between reading or rambling, then read.
9. End your talk on time
Doing otherwise is to steal time from the speakers who follow you. We won’t allow it.
10. Rehearse your talk in front of a trusted friend for timing, clarity and impact.
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Inspiration
Video
‣
“How to TEDx: How to give a great TEDx Talk”
Templates and Samples
‣
Speaker toolkit - TEDxMcGill
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Chapter 4: Theme and Speakers
Chapter 5
Running Order
‣ Schedule the day
Difficulty Time
Costs
Rules
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Chapter 5: Running Order
TED Spirit
The ideal TEDx program includes heavy subjects, light
performances and satisfying breaks to inspire your audience
without overwhelming them. The choices you make at this stage
will set the tone of your event and drive its conversations. Be
thoughtful and have fun!
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Chapter 5: Running Order
Rules
1.
Talks may be no longer than 18 minutes. This is the maximum length, but it
may be shorter. TED often asks speakers to present for 3, 5, or 9 minutes.
2.
Play the short, official video introduction featuring TED Curator Chris
Anderson at the beginning of your event. It ensures your audience
understands what TEDx is and the difference between TEDx and TED.
3.
A minimum of two official TED Talks (talks featured on TED.com) must
be shown. This rule applies to events that are less than half a day (two 90minute sessions) in length. For longer events, one out of every four talks—or 25
percent of your total content—must be made up of official, pre-recorded TED
Talks. Talks from the TEDx Talks site do not apply.
4.
Everyone who appears onstage during your event must sign a TEDx
Speaker Release Form. This gives TED and others the right to edit and
distribute video of their appearance and/or presentation.
5.
Speakers may not use a podium or lectern unless special circumstances
warrant it. These objects disconnect the speaker from the audience, create an
overly formal atmosphere, and encourage presenters to read from their notes,
which is always boring to watch.
6.
You must record all original stage content (live talks, performances, etc.)
on video. After your event, you must make this video accessible to TED and the
public by uploading footage to the TEDx Talks Channel on YouTube.
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Chapter 5: Running Order
7.
No panels, break-out sessions, Q&As and keynote speeches. These
formats are strictly forbidden; they do not conform to the TED format.
8.
Your event may not exceed one day in length.
9.
The official TEDx licensee may not give a talk at their own event.
10.
You may not feature speakers directly affiliated with your event’s
sponsors. Sponsors of your event cannot be speakers.
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Chapter 4: Running order
Schedule the day
Guiding Principles
1 Follow the traditional TED format
A typical TED session is 90-minutes: four 18-minute speakers plus a few shorter presentations.
2 Build in breaks
People need time to think about what they’ve seen (and to use the restroom). A full day should be
broken up by casual “conversation breaks” and lunch and conclude with a reception/dinner.
3 Keep a comfortable pace
Resist the urge to program too much; it’s stressful for you and for your audience.
Best Practices
‣
Craft your sessions
Within each session, cover a mix of topics that relate loosely to each other, allowing the audience
to make connections and draw their own conclusions. Take each session as an opportunity to
explore your theme from a particular angle.
‣
Don’t over-program. Sessions should add up to 90 minutes or less.
‣
Remember that 25% of your total content must be made up of official, pre-recorded TED
Talks.
‣
Start Strong. Each session should open with a talk or performance that animates your
audience and prepares them for thinking deeply.
‣
End with emotion. Save the most emotionally gripping speakers and TED Talks for the end
of the day. This is when your attendees are most open to being moved. It will leave them
with a feeling that will stay with them—and perhaps motivate them to take action.
‣
Mix it up. Vary the pace of your program by mixing standard 18-minute presentations with a
few shorter talks or counterpoints. Schedule in performances and relevant videos, in
addition to the required TED Talks. These may include:
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Chapter 4: Running order
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‣
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Music -- Good music has a way of refreshing overwhelmed minds. It’s also a great
opportunity to show off local talent.
‣
Dance -- Another chance to highlight local artists. Make sure that your stage and video
crew are capable of handling the particulars required for a good dance performance.
‣
Spoken word poetry -- Poetry is well suited for the TED stage and should represent an
easy set-up for your tech crew.
‣
Videos -- Short videos can act as the perfect bridges between two talks. Make sure the
obtain the rights to anything you use. Play videos about the TED community at-large,
include this Why I translate TEDTalks video about the OTP.
Manage media
Planning how you handle multimedia for your speakers’ presentations will make your program go
smoother. Delays and glitches are frustrating to speakers and the audience.
‣
Store presentations -- Load all presentations onto one house computer that has all necessary
fonts installed. This ensures compatibility and helps to speed transitions between presenters.
‣
Run tech rehearsal -- Rehearse every tech cue so thoroughly that nothing could possibly go
wrong. Then make sure you have a contingency plan, just in case everything goes wrong.
Find a great host
In an ideal situation, the TEDx event Organizer is not the onstage host. The onstage host—the
master of ceremonies—is the public face of your TEDx event. The host will be responsible for:
‣
Introductions -- The host provides short intros of the speakers, videos and other parts of
your program. 30 seconds is a good length of time for each intro. Tease, but don’t reveal,
what each speaker is going to say.
‣
Time-keeping -- The host keeps speakers on track by enforcing the clock and by
encouraging quick transitions.
‣
Troubleshooting -- The host responds quickly to technical difficulties or delays in the
program—and should be able to help speakers rapidly and painlessly resolve technical
glitches.
‣
Announcements -- The host announces any changes to the program.
‣
Connections -- The host helps link the onstage content with the event’s theme, drawing
connections that fuel conversation during the session breaks.
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Audience participation -- The host encourages the audience to engage with the speakers:
applause, laughter, cheering, etc. A lively audience is not only more fun to speak to, but
also plays better in video recordings. Set up a positive feedback loop early on in your
event. Your speakers and your attendees will thrive on it!
Plan compelling breaks
Next to the talks, the breaks between sessions can affect the overall event experience. To make
the most of this time, we highly recommend that you:
‣
Facilitate conversation -- Your job is to reduce tension and make everyone comfortable talking
to strangers. You could have audience members provide some basic biographical information
or a list of interests that you can print on their badge -- others at the event will use those clues
to start conversations. Or you could have your host suggest essential questions that everyone
should discuss before each break. There are countless ways to make random conversation as
pleasant and easy as possible.
‣
Provide food and drinks -- This depends on your budget. Ideally you should offer full meals (or
at least the chance to purchase a meal) during breaks that coincide with breakfast, lunch or
dinner time. Make filling snacks available at all times. And keep the coffee and water stations
constantly stocked.
‣
Set up activities -- Create stations with hands-on activities. These can be related to your
speakers’ topics, local interest, or even feature your sponsors’ products and projects.
Inspiration
Video
‣
‣
TED’s own hosts Kelly and Rives on “How we emcee”
TEDxNaperville’s Arthur Zards explain how name badges can enhance your breaks
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Chapter 4: Running order
Chapter 6
Branding and
Marketing
‣ Working with the TEDx guidelines
‣ Creating your unique identity and story
‣ Designing your online presence
Difficulty Time
Costs
Rules
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Chapter 6: Branding and Marketing
TED Spirit
TEDx is an amazing community made of people that organize
incredible events around the world. But what defines TED and
TEDx goes beyond just the event format: it’s the way we tell our
stories, the voice with which we speak to our community and
how we present ourselves to the world.
Your license gives you more than an event--it gives you access
to the open, adaptable platform that is TEDx. But in order for
Organizers like you to continue to tailor this global program to
meet your community’s needs, we must all agree to follow the
communication standards put forth by TEDx. These guidelines
help us speak with a unified voice while embracing our own
unique accents.
If you have any questions about marketing or promoting your TEDx event after reviewing this
section, please contact TED at tedxbranding@ted.com.
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Chapter 6: Branding and Marketing
Rules
Identity
1.
You must follow the TEDx Branding Guidelines. The guidelines have been
created in order to maintain the quality and strength of the TEDx brand identity.
The guidelines cover proper use of the TEDx logo and identity and complete
specifications for print and onscreen applications.
2.
Never use the TED or TEDx logo. Only your event's approved TEDx logo that
includes the TEDx tagline may be used. The required tagline is "x=independently
organized TED event". Your approved TEDx logo must appear on every page of
your website, all outbound communication and all marketing materials. Always
use your approved event name with not space between “TEDx” and the place
name. Never use the TED logo, even in images.
3.
Use the official TEDx logo template. Download the logo template from the
website. You may adjust to include your approved event name. You may not
adjust the letter spacing, alignment, proportion, case, or color of the logo
template. Always use Helvetica. If you do not have Helvetica, Arial is allowed as
a substitution. Your TEDx event logo can only be placed on a solid white or solid
black background. The logo must always have a buffer of space around it, and
not be in a “lock-in” relationship
4.
Always include the TEDx mission description. The official TEDx description
(see the TEDx website for copy) must appear on all outbound communication,
marketing materials and website.
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Chapter 6: Branding and Marketing
TEDx Press
1.
Get approval for press releases. All press releases must be routed through
and approved by the head of TEDx media relations, Melody Serafino,
TEDxPR@groupsjr.com. Only use official language when describing TEDx.
2.
Place required copy on your website’s press page. The required copy can
be found on the PR page of the TEDx website.
3.
Don’t speak for TED. Always represent yourself as a participating Organizer in
your specific TEDx event. TED staff should be the official spokespeople for TED
and the program as a whole.
Online Presence
1.
Fill out your TEDx event page. Add as much information as you can
immediately after your license has been approved. Required fields include your
event website, your event date, social media pages, Twitter handle, venue
location, ticket price (your ticket price must be approved by TED) and webcast
URL (if you plan to do a webcast).
2.
Always use your approved TEDx name online. The URL for your event
website, Twitter handle, Facebook page name, etc, may only use your approved
TEDx event name. Do not purchase a domain name or start any other social
properties until your event name is approved. If your license is transferred or not
renewed, you must relinquish or transfer ownership of any online event branded
sites or accounts. TEDx cannot be held liable for any expenses incurred during
the purchase, transfer or re-sale of TEDx-related domain names.
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Chapter 6: Branding and Marketing
3.
Never display prohibited content. TEDx event websites may not display
advertising or commercial endeavors. They also may not show content related to
weapons manufacturers, ammunition companies, cigarette companies, online
gambling organizations, sex related businesses and other conference and
seminars. Never display TED images. Sponsor logos are not allowed on the
homepage but may appear on other pages. When displayed, they must be
smaller than the TEDx logo.
4.
Your website and Facebook page must have the required information
about TEDx. On the homepage of your website and websites tab in Facebook,
there must be a visible link to the TEDx Program page. Your website homepage
must also include a description of “What is TEDx?”. If your website is not in
English, the text for the TEDx description must be translated exactly. Both the
translated copy and the English version must appear on the page.
5.
You cannot put sponsor logos on your TEDx event homepage. They
should go on a dedicated “Sponsor” page on your website.
6.
Sponsorship rules apply to social media. Never endorse your sponsors via
your event’s Facebook page, Twitter account or other social media properties.
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Working with the TEDx guidelines
Guiding Principles
1 Keep the TEDx branding guidelines in mind
The TEDx website contain both required and recommended copy for describing TEDx to the outside
world. Refer to them as you are developing your communication materials and online presence.
2 The TEDx brand has power. Use it!
TED and TEDx both have unique and connected brands. The TEDx team at TED has provided detailed
instructions on branding so that you can have the proper brand recognition for your event. Adhering to
these guidelines is not only a strict rule, but really connects your event to the whole TEDx community
and public. It also allows you to celebrate and promote the uniqueness of your own TEDx event’s
brand.
Best Practices
‣
Use the TEDx Template to customize your logo
The TEDx program has strict parameters around the appearance of the logo. Your event logo
should always include the placename. Use the TEDx logo template to create your own event logo.
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Typeface: The typeface (Helvetica) is an integral part of our visual identity and should not be changed or substituted. Helvetica
comes pre-installed on most computers, but if you do not have access to it, use Arial. If you have a different version of Helvetica
(Helvetica Neue, for example) use the Regular weight of your version.
‣
Kerning: Letter-spacing in the TEDx logo templates is set to 0. Do not adjust this setting.
‣
Alignment: The name of your event should always align left in relation to the "TEDx" part of the logo, and should be sized to be
exactly the same height as the "TEDx" part of the logo. Letter-spacing in the TEDx logo templates is set to 0. Do not adjust this
setting.
‣
Color: your TEDx event's logo should always include a red "TEDx", and either black or white text for the other words. Use a
solid, all-white or all-black background. (For your event's profile on TED.com, we recommend a white background.) Do not
place your TEDx event's logo on other colors or on photographic, patterned or illustrative backgrounds.
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Additional things to avoid including putting the place name in caps and using the two-line tagline (see below) for short names.
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Choose the color mode for the TEDx logo based on display format
When offset printing, use spot color (Pantone) where possible. If spot color is unavailable, use four
color process (CMYK). When working in onscreen or web formats, use RGB or web colors. For
TED Red, the color mode specs are Pantone 485, CMYK 01/100/100/0, RGB 255/43/6, and Web
FF 2B 06. For TED Black, the color mode specs are Pantone Black, CMYK 0/0/0/100, RGB 0/0/0,
Web 00 00 00.
‣
Follow the guidelines for the official one- or two-line TEDx tagline
The TEDx logo is unique artwork that has been created to brand and market all TEDx events. TEDx
has an official tagline that is in a lockup relationship with TEDx, with some exceptions: "x =
independently organized TED event" must be included in the logo, either as one line or two lines.
(Do not change the wording of the tagline -- the only approved versions are shown here.)
The one-line tagline logo is preferable. However in situations where there is not enough room to
use a logo of this width, the two-line tagline logo may be used.
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Use the two-line taglines for place names with descenders
For place names that contain lower-case letters with descenders (p, q, g, j, y) use the two-line
stacked tagline so that the descenders do not touch the tagline.
‣
Keep a buffer zone around your logo
To remain completely legible and ensure that your TEDx event's logo is presented in the best
possible manner, a minimum buffer zone of clear space should always be maintained around the
entire perimeter of the logo. Other logos, graphics or copy must be kept out of this zone. (Logos
may not be "locked up" with any other logos or images. Other logos cannot appear as if they are a
part of your TEDx event's logo.)
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Increase the legibility of your event logo by keeping its overall width greater than 2.0 inches
Proportions must stay consistent when your logo is resized. To ensure legibility, never use your
TEDx event's logo with an overall width that is less than 2.0 inches. At widths that are smaller than
2.0 inches, the tagline will become illegible.
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Inspiration
TEDxRamallah’s Bilingual Branding: TEDxRamallah used both English and Arabic language and
visual branding in all aspects of their event. On stage, in the program and in the venue—the Arabic
and English version of the TEDxRamallah logo were side by side.
Templates and Samples
‣
‣
TEDx logo template
TEDx logo generator
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Creating your unique identity and story
Guiding Principles
1 Get local
The purpose of a TEDx is to bring TED to your community in your own way. Harnessing the creativity
and uniqueness of your own city, town, school or community will go far in making your event special.
2 Be creative, different, and participatory
TEDx is all about inspiration, ideas, and community, so get creative, be different and really invite your
community in.
3 Tell your story: why TEDx, why here?
At its heart, TED is about storytelling. Yours will be a unique identity for your event and a useful
marketing tool as well.
Best Practices
To avoid confusion with the TED brand, it is imperative that you make it clear that your event is
independently organized at all stages of preparation and presentation.
‣
Go beyond the logo
There are many places that you can get creative with the visual branding of your event that go
beyond the logo, for example: your TEDx program book, your Twitter wallpaper, promotional
posters, stage design and promotional materials and gift bag items. Think about symbols from
your community or of a strong visual element that can be pulled from your theme and expanded.
‣
Craft your story
By presenting your TEDx event, and the TEDx program as a whole, as a cohesive story through a
variety of media (videos, images, blog posts), you will draw in more people and grow your
platform. Here’s how you might implement storytelling into your marketing and promotion strategy:
‣
Appoint an official “Storyteller” to your event team – a writer who is responsible for unearthing
and sharing your TEDx story with the TED staff and your community.
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‣
Brainstorm with others what makes your event unique and what stories you would like to
capture—and then implement this strategy into all aspects of your TEDx event.
‣
Recruit a volunteer editorial team to write weekly blog posts on your website’s blog. ‣
Interview speakers about one topic that interests them and create a series of short video clips
to tweet and/or post to Facebook.
‣
Capture the stories and interactions that occur at your TEDx event, from the viewpoint of
attendees. For example, make a poster board with your speakers on it and ask attendees to
write what they liked best about each talk. Or ask attendees to promise to act on an “Idea
Worth Doing.”
‣
Encourage the audience to blog and tweet during the event.
‣
After your event, put together a blog post that summarizes the tweets, blogs, Facebook posts,
images and press coverage related to your event.
‣
Email us and tell us your story! We’ll work with you to shape your story and share it through the
TEDx platforms, including Twitter, Facebook, the TEDx blog and the TEDx newsletter.
Create a press page on your website.
This can help direct all your media request to a single, consistent source. Ask local journalists to
visit the page. Provide a link on the page to the TEDx program so that they can detailed
information on the nature of the TED program. Remember all questions about TED should be
directed towards Melody Serafino, TEDxPR@groupsjr.com. Any press releases must also be
approved by her.
Inspiration
‣
TEDxAmoskeagMillyard goes Inside Out: At TEDxAmoskeagMillyard, they participated in
TEDprize winner JR’s “Inside Out” project and pasted huge photos of the town and community
through out Manchester, New Hampshire where the event was held. This gave a small town the
opportunity to showcase their community and gain international recognition.
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Superheroes abound at TEDxUSC: The theme of TEDxUSC 2011 was “Actions Speak
Louder,” and this theme incorporated as a cool superhero motif into all of the event’s collateral,
including a comic book-style program, speaker introduction slides and name tags.
Websites
‣
Sunglasses at TEDxGuelphU: For its TEDx event themed “Envision 2020,” TEDxGuelphU
featured a red pair of sunglasses on its online properties, including on its website and its
Twitter background, and then waged a guerilla campaign at the event, taking pictures of
attendees and speakers wearing the signature sunglasses.
‣
Going to school at TEDxAcademy: At TEDxAcademy, a TEDx event in Greece, the team
executed a cohesive brand strategy across all of their printed materials that with a notebook/
school theme. Everything from the speaker guidelines to the program followed this theme.
Templates and Samples
‣
‣
Sample posters, signs, and banners
Sample press releases
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Designing your online presence
Guiding Principles
1 Social media is your friend
Social media is the communication tool of our times and TEDx has its roots in technology and
innovation, so its only natural that this would be a good way to spread the word about your event.
2 Reach out, but don’t overextend
It is important to keep your audience and public informed about critical dates, speaker updates and
event activities. But too much information and they will tune you out.
3 Keep communication simple
When developing communications material, simple and straightforward is always best.
Best Practices
‣
Make regular updates to your TEDx Event Page
Keeping your Event Page updated can help avoid any confusion with TED or the general public
around changes that occur to your event.
‣
Regular updates
Update any key data at least once a week. It's crucial that you keep the general public, and
TED, aware of what may have changed about your event. If your Event Page has not been
updated with the most current information by your event date, your next event will not be
approved.
‣
Date changes
Our system will allow you to change the date of your event after your license has been
approved. If you want to change your event's date, follow these steps:
✓ Go to the world map of TEDx events and review other TEDx events happening in your
region/local area
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✓ If your date change could affect another TEDx event -- i.e. if it is within the same 4-8 week
period and close enough in proximity that your audiences might overlap -- reach out to the
other TEDx Organizer and discuss
✓ Once you have settled on a new date and confirmed it's acceptable to other organizers in
your region, change it on your event page
✓ Tell us the new date
‣
‣
Create a website
‣
Domain acquisition
We strongly encourage you to purchase a dedicated domain name, because a specific domain
name (as opposed to a free blog address) will make your site easier to find. You may choose to
buy Web hosting from a paid service or opt for a free hosting account. However, we do not
permit any TEDx site to feature advertising of any kind, so make sure that whatever hosting
service you choose does not require you to do so.
‣
Your site’s URL
For the greatest visibility, the URL of your website’s homepage should be the name of your
TEDx event, such as www.TEDxTokyo.com. The .com top-level domain should be your first
choice, followed by the top-level domain of your country (www.TEDxTokyo.jp). If those are
unavailable, .org and .net should be your next choices.
‣
Domain name
When you purchase your TEDx domain name, you are entitled to keep the domain name as
long as you are the TEDx licensee whose event name corresponds exactly to the domain name
in question. Please do not register domain names that correspond to other TEDx events,
including prospective events that have not yet been licensed, without permission from TED. We
frown upon squatters.
‣
Site content
Include the date and location of your event, information about your speakers, a description of
your venue and information about both TEDx and TED.
Create a Facebook page
We suggest setting up a fan page, as opposed to a group. Why? Because when people join a fan
page, it sends a notification to every one of their friends’ newsfeeds. Your fan page must include
information in the “Info” tab (i.e., links to TED.com/tedx, About TED, About TEDx and About Your
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TEDx Event). Use your page to start engaging your audience before the event! On your Facebook
page, you can:
‣
‣
Ask for speaker/venue suggestions (if not already confirmed).
‣
Announce speakers/venues as you confirm them.
‣
Post whatever photos you have—venue, speakers, etc.
‣
Post information about the Organizer (you!) and the host (if someone other than you).
‣
Highlight other TEDx events in your region that are happening on specific days.
‣
Post the daily TED Talks/TEDx Talks to your fan page.
‣
Share a TED.com or TEDx Blog post.
‣
Ask your audience their favorite TED Talk—and why.
‣
Share what you’re doing with the larger TED community by posting on the TED.com and TEDx
fan pages. These pages have hundreds of thousands of fans who not only are interested in
what you are doing, but also may want to help you with your event.
Create a Twitter account
Twitter has become one of the Internet's most powerful promotional tools. Use it to keep your
attendees in the loop — and find new fans — with short, timely updates. This is also your
opportunity to curate your tweets. For example, before the event you might build up excitement by
tweeting blog posts and encouraging people to sign up. During the event, you might tweet behind
the scenes images and speaker quotes. And after the event, you might tweet when you post
videos and photos.
‣
Tweet everything: planning meetings, speaker announcements, logistics notes
‣
Start conversations with other Twitterers (e.g. @TEDChris)
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Additional Considerations
‣
Webcasts
If you're planning on providing a webcast of your event, it's important to let the TEDx community
know. (Other organizers may want to organize events that feature your event's webcast.) Fill in the
"Webcast URL" field as soon as you know the URL. If you know you'll have a webcast but don't have
the URL yet, enter your website's URL -- or a placeholder page on your website that contains
information you do have about your webcast.
‣
Links
Only add links to your TEDx event's websites. Do not upload personal links, links to corporate
websites, etc.
‣
After your event
After your event, remember to add highlights to your Event Page. (Adding highlights is a prerequisite
for renewing your license.)
✓
✓
✓
✓
Add a Flickr tag
Add the URL of your YouTube playlist of videos
Make sure your speaker list is up to date
Upload a new photo from your event
Templates and Samples
‣
Sample website design
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Chapter 7
Audience
‣ Inviting your guests
Difficulty Time
Costs
Rules
•••••
•••••
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TED Spirit
TEDx is more than a set of events—it is a global community that
comprises individuals from diverse nations, cultures and
backgrounds. So who you invite is as important as what you
program: your guests will be charged with carrying your TEDx
event’s “ideas worth spreading” into the world. Organizers should
select their audience carefully, choosing participants from a wide
variety of backgrounds who can contribute to the conversation.
Rules
1.
Enforce attendance limits. Only allow as many audience members as your
license allows.
2.
Use the feedback form. Immediately following your event send all of your
attendees a link to the official TEDx Attendee Feedback Form. Feedback from
your event will be used in evaluating and renewing licenses.
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Inviting your guests
Guiding Principles
1 Send out an application
To simplify the selection process, ask potential guests to fill out an application form. Their effort to do
so will show their commitment to participating in your event.
2 Tell attendees what to expect
Let prospective attendees know its size, location, theme and whether you will feature original speakers
or pre-recorded TED Talks (or both).
Best Practices
Your application form for prospective attendees should include this basic information:
✓ A clear description of TED, TEDx and your TEDx event
✓ Your TEDx event date
✓ First name
✓ Last name
✓ Company/organization name
✓ Job title/description/role
✓ Email address
✓ Street address
✓ Phone number(s)
✓ Skype ID
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TED also recommends including fields for long-form answers, such as:
✓ Tell us about yourself
✓ List up to three Web links that will help us better understand you
✓ What do you hope to get out of this TEDx event?
Additional Considerations
‣
Provide name tags
Helping attendees remember names makes them feel more comfortable speaking with one another.
‣
Reserve a certain number of passes for other TED community members
This can include other TEDx organizers, TED volunteer translators, TED Fellows or other TEDsters.
‣
Audience limits
Due to space constraints or audience limits, not everyone who applies to attend your TEDx event will
get a ticket. As the event Organizer, it is your responsibility to address any issues that arise in your
community around not everyone being able to attend. If people express displeasure on social media or
other platforms, please address these issues in a polite and inclusive manner. Consider offering a livestreaming event at a separate location to handle overflow, or ask others to host a viewing party
organized around your event.
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Chapter 7: Audience
Chapter 8
Photo and Video
‣ Recording your event
‣ Sharing your event
Difficulty Time
Costs
Rules
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TED Spirit
Video will not only open your talks to a world-wide audience but
will give your event a permanent life online. The better your
production quality, the better the chances that your speaker’s
ideas have of succeeding.
Read through our production guide for breakdown of the
standard set-up we recommend. Curating and preparing good
speakers should, far and away, be your top priority and you don’t
need to do everything listed in the guide to get your talks onto
TED.com -- but it certainly helps.
If you are not experienced in video production, recruit team
members who do. If you hire professionals (and we strongly
recommend that you do), make sure that they read through our
production guide -- shooting talks has unique requirements.
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Rules
1.
Any webcast must be free and may not include advertising.
2.
All webcast events must be hosted in non-commercial spaces, and free
of charge to participants.
3.
Your live event, talks and other content recorded at your event may not
be distributed on broadcast television, cable television, satellite
television or on-demand TV.
4.
Webcast archives of TEDx events are not permitted.
5.
TEDx event teams must upload videos of every talk from their event to
the TEDx Talks YouTube channel (and only the TEDx Talks YouTube
channel) unless the talk is in violation of the speaker rules.
6.
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Recording your event
Guiding Principles
1 Stage and light for video
Design an focussed, interesting and dynamic stage. Use three-point lighting on your speakers and
keep your entire stage well lit, too.
2 Know the total running time
Audio might be the most important thing. If your video turns our badly for any reason, it’s probably
salvageable. If your audio is bad, it isn’t. We urge you to record a direct feed from quality
microphones.
3 Be familiar with the speaker’s visual aids
Every space is different and will require unique camera placement. But there are a few essential shots
you should attempt to execute. Check our production guide for details.
4 Edit well
Shooting your talks is only the beginning. It is only in the editing room that all of your footage comes to
life. If you’ve recorded a live mix, don’t rely on it -- pace your cutting, use the best camera angles and
cut to the slides as soon as they’re referenced.
Best Practices
Working on a budget
‣
Make your stage look professional
You don’t need anything fancy. Just get your branding in there and make sure the speaker and the
screen screen will be visible in the videos.
‣
Light your speakers well
If you can’t get the standard three-point lighting set-up, make your stage evenly lit where your
speaker will be standing and darker in the background. Avoid fluorescent lighting and spotlights.
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Capture a live feed from your speakers’ mics
This one is a firm requirement. You must capture audio that will be pleasant to listen to on
headphones.
‣
Shoot from at least two cameras
Prioritize your camera angles in the order we’ve listed in the production guide. Camera’s 1 and 2
are essential.
‣
Edit your talks
Cut to the slides as soon as they are referenced and for as long as your viewers need to look at
them. Start each video with the beginning of the talk (not with lengthy introductions). And cut out
any major gaffes.
‣
Shoot from at least two cameras
Prioritize your camera angles in the order we’ve listed in the production guide. Camera’s 1 and 2
are essential.
‣
Capture slides on video
If possible, capture a direct video feed of the slides and presentation materials as they appear on
the screen. If this cannot be done, keep at least a corner of the screen in your wide shot, so that
you will know when to advance the slides in post-production.
The full package
‣
Consult our production guide your shot
Check our production guide for a full list of best practices.
Inspiration
Videos
‣
“How to Shoot a TED Talk”
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Sharing your event
Guiding Principles
1 The TEDx physical audience is only the tip of the iceberg
One of the distinguishing characteristics of a TEDx event is the ability to not only generate and share
ideas but to spread them further through technology and video. Think of your audience as broader
than the people sitting in the room.
2 Live webcasts can be tricky, plan ahead
Live webcasts are great. They enable more people to see your event as it unfolds in multiple locations.
But setting this up can be tricky and fraught with technical difficulties. If you plan to use a webcast,
test the system and plan ahead.
Best Practices
Webcast If you're planning on providing a webcast of your event, it's important to let the TEDx community
know. (Other organizers may want to organize events that feature your event's webcast.) Fill in the
"Webcast URL" field as soon as you know the URL. If you know you'll have a webcast but don't have
the URL yet, enter your website's URL -- or a placeholder page on your website that contains
information you do have about your webcast.
Filming a documentary of your event
If you or someone you know would like to shoot a short or full-length documentary on your TEDx
event, they must follow the following guidelines:
✓ You can shoot a documentary specific to your TEDx event, but not a general TEDx documentary.
✓ No use of the TED and/or plain TEDx logos.
✓ No filming inside the theatre while your event is taking place; only the designated film crew who is
filming the TEDx talks is allowed into the theatre to film during talks and breaks.
✓ You can shoot b-roll in break areas, but not inside the theatre.
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✓ TEDx talks cannot be re-edited or remixed; a maximum of 30 seconds of any TEDx Talk may be
featured.
Additional Considerations
If you plan to incorporate TED Talks shown at the event in your documentary, please read and follow
these rules:
✓ Documentary filmmakers can use excerpts of TED Talks within their films, provided the speaker agrees.
TED must secure permission from each individual speaker for any use not produced by TED.
✓ In order for TED to approach the speaker with the request, you must provide TED with a brief from the
filmmaker on the intended use of the footage, the film's perspective/point of view and distribution plan.
We also like to see brief bios on the creative team (producer, director, etc).
✓ If the speaker agrees, we will provide the filmmaker with footage on a data DVD in one of our standard
formats (any needed conversion will be the filmmakers' responsibility). Depending on the particular
conference, footage will be delivered in one of the following formats: DVCPro NTSC, DVCPro PAL,
DVCPro NTSC Anamorphic or DVCPro HD 1080i60. We do not deliver footage on tape.
No licensing fees are charged, but the footage must be accompanied by an on-screen credit (generally
a lower-third) referencing TED.com.
Inspiration
Multilingual live stream for TEDxMonterey: As TEDxMonterey was streamed live in
English, viewers worldwide had the option of listening to interpretation by grad students at the
Monterey Institute of International Studies in Chinese, Russian, Spanish, Korean and Japanese.
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Chapter 8: Photo and Video
Chapter 9
Post Event
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‣ Sharing your TEDx experience
‣ Feedback and Renewal
‣ Taking action with TED as an Organizer
Difficulty Time
Costs
Rules
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Chapter 9: Postscript
TED Spirit
So, you’ve just finished this big-deal amazing TEDx event, you’re
elated, but also a little tired—and we want more? Conclusions
are important, and as the TEDx program grows, it’s imperative
that you talk about the conversations and multimedia generated
by your TEDx event. The success of the TEDx program depends on Organizers’
reports and feedback. What you are creating is important, and it
should be shared!
Rules
1.
Share your feedback. After your event is finished, you'll need to fill out and
submit the official TEDx Organizer Close Out form. The success of the TEDx
program depends on your input!
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Chapter 8: Photo and Video
Putting your videos online
Guiding Principles
1 Edit well
We can’t emphasize this enough: Create coherent and compelling videos for every talk.
2 Write captivating headlines and descriptions
Write headlines for each talk that would inspire you to click on that video. And write appealing
descriptions that will excite viewers and keep them watching to the end.
3 Tag thoroughly
Good meta-data can determine the success of failure of any video. When you upload to YouTube, add
our required tags -- but don’t stop there. Include every relevant tag you can think of. Don’t include
irrelevant tags.
Upload your Videos
You must upload Talk videos to the official TEDx channel on YouTube using the TED Media Uploader
within one month of your TEDx event. Do not upload your videos anywhere other than the official TEDx
YouTube channel. Having trouble, learn more about using the TED Media Uploader to upload your
talks.
We will put your videos onto the TEDx Talks website on the work-day after your videos have been
uploaded to YouTube. As such, videos MUST be properly named and tagged as soon as you upload.
‣ Opening and closing graphics
You must open each video with your officially licensed event logo. Closing reels are welcome, but
not required. We encourage you to create intro and closing reels that are unique to your event,
providing that they follow all of our branding guidelines. You may never use the TED logo or the
TEDx logo without your unique name or the “x=independently organized TED event” text. Your
logo must be clearly separated from any other text or graphics used. We will take down videos
that break these rules and require that they be fixed and re-uploaded. If you are unsure about your
intro or closing reels, feel free to send them to me for approval
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Copyrighted content
Before you upload any video, you must confirm that all the images, music and video clips used in
your speakers' presentations are cleared for re-distribution on YouTube. Securing rights to any
copyrighted materials is entirely the responsibility of the TEDx organizer.
‣
Adhere to YouTube's Terms of Service
Adhere to YouTube's Terms of Service and Community Guidelines with ever video uploaded to the
TEDx Talks YouTube channel. Before you upload any video, you must confirm that all the images,
music and video clips used in your speakers' presentations are cleared for distribution on YouTube.
Securing rights to any copyrighted materials is entirely the responsibility of the TEDx organizer.
‣
Sponsor logos on your videos
Sponsor logos may only be shown on one slide at the beginning and end of each video. This slide
must be 3 seconds long at maximum and adhere to our official sponsorship slide template.
There may only be a single slide in your video to feature all of your sponsor logos. Sponsor logos
may not appear anywhere else in the video. If you have multiple sponsors you must feature all of
your sponsor logos on the one slide. Never superimpose your event logo or a sponsor logo over
the speaker's talk or slides. Never feature rolling credits.
‣
Slides related to sponsors must appear in the following sequence:
1. General event intro graphics
2. Your TEDx event logo
3. Sponsor pre-roll card
4. Talk
5. Sponsor post-roll card
6. General event post-roll card
The pre- and post-roll sponsor logo slides you display in your videos should use the layout of
these templates (versions for 4:3 and 16:9 provided). If you are unable to edit these image files,
recreate the layout in your image/slide editor of choice.
If you are featuring multiple sponsor logos, send a still image of your slide to
tedxpostevent@ted.com for approval. Sponsor logos must appear smaller than your TEDx event's
logo.
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Chapter 8: Photo and Video
Best Practices
‣
Double-check that your videos follow our rules
Sponsor slides can’t exceed three seconds. Use only your official logo, with your official name, and
separated from other text and graphics. Don’t burn in any logo through the presentation. If you
break these rules or any other rules listed in our guidelines, we will pull them from the internet and
request that they be edited again.
‣
Upload high quality video files
YouTube accepts a wide variety of video formats, but we recommend following Google’s own
guidelines.
‣
Write creative headlines
Every talk needs a title. Make it something you would click on, but descriptive enough that your
viewers know what to expect going in. Cleverness is welcome -- when appropriate.
‣
Write engaging descriptions
In the description field, begin with 2-3 sentences that detail the content of the talk. Don’t give
everything away though. Take a look at the way we write copy on every one of our own talk
viewing pages for inspiration.
‣
Write nice bios
Below the description, include a short 6-7 sentence biography of the speaker. Answer the viewer’s
question: Why should I trust this person?
‣
Translate your talks
Consider translating your talks or linking up to the open source translation program to dub your
videos before they are uploaded.
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Chapter 9: Postscript
Sharing your TEDx experience
Guiding Principles
1 Continue to tell the world about TEDx!
Update your personal blog, website and social media accounts to share links to your TEDx event site.
Quote or tweet about—Organizers, volunteers, audience members or speakers. Remember to keep it
short and sweet, with an inspiring saying about TEDx or your individual event.
Best Practices
People love reliving amazing moments and events they’ve attended. Allow them to do that by writing a
blog post, creating a mini documentary video, or posting a selection of great pictures from your event.
Maybe even write to tell us (tedxstories@ted.com) about how you feel the day went—we love those
kinds of emails.
Storytelling ideas and examples
‣
Showcase your TEDx-related design projects—anything from a jaw-dropping stage setup to an
amazing event poster.
‣
Tell us about a personal experience, such as this personal diary by Kaila Colbin of TEDxChCh,
which talks about going to TEDActive.
‣
Record a personal interview with one of your event’s featured speakers or fellow TEDx Organizers,
such as this conversation between Kelo Kubu, Organizer of TEDxSoweto, and the TEDxCapetown
Organizers. ‣
Share the great promotional video you created for your event, a behind-the-scenes video you
created, or explain a video of a speaker who made an impact. TEDxThessaloniki had a very
mysterious video trailer, and TEDxIstanbul created this video for TEDxAthens to show at its event.
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Chapter 9: Postscript
Feedback and Renewal
Guiding Principles
1 Talk back to us
After your event is finished, you'll need to fill out and submit the official TEDx Organizer Close Out
form. The success of the TEDx program depends on your input!
2 Re-apply!
Re-apply for your event license by logging into your TED profile and going to “TEDx Events” in your
profile and clicking “Apply for a new license.” If you do not plan to renew your license, please tell us as
soon as possible. Other Organizers may want to use your event name.
Best Practices
‣
Schedule a postmortem
In addition to providing your feedback to TEDx, it might be helpful for you to get feedback from
your team about how the event went.
‣
Look for a successor if you’re not renewing
Consider grooming someone on your team to continue to grow your community, and your event.
This new license would have to apply for this license, you cannot simply transfer your license over
to them.
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Chapter 9: Postscript
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If someone you know wants to take over your TEDx license
✓ Email TEDxApplications@ted.com and ask to have your license expired.
✓ Let us know who will be taking over your license.
✓ The individual taking over your license should formally apply for the TEDx event name, and
include in their application their relationship to the original licensee.
Note: The under 100 person rule applies to the current licensee of any TEDx event. If a previous
licensee has attended TED and hosted over 100 attendees, that rule does not carry over to a new
licensee that has not attended a TED Conference.
‣
Looking for more to do?
Here are some additional ways to continue your involvement with TEDx—until you start planning
your next event:
‣
Place highlights from your event on your website, or create a new site to feature them.
‣
Subtitle your videos to reach a wider audience! TEDx talks can be transcribed and translated
through TED's Open Translation Project. Follow these five steps to get started.
Templates and Samples
‣
Post event checklist
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Chapter 9: Postscript
Taking action with TED as an Organizer
Guiding Principles
1 Share with the community
As a TEDx licensee, and a member of the TEDx community, it is your responsibility to welcome new
licensees into the community, and to pass on your knowledge. Reach out to new members of the
community and welcome them.Your experiences can make another Organizer’s job easier!
2 Join other TED initiatives
Great things are happening at TED! Check in with us to see what’s happening.
3 Get more involved with TEDx
Now that you’re a veteran TEDx Organizer, you have so much to contribute. Be on the lookout for
what’s happening within your global TEDx community.
Best Practices
Take Action with TED
‣
TEDx in a Box
For members of undeveloped and under served communities, TEDx events can be a catalyst
for learning and inspiration. Through our "TEDx in a Box" initiative, people in these
communities are given access to all they need to organize a TEDx event in a small, portable
suitcase.
How to get involved:
✓ Purchase a TEDx in a Box for an event in a underserved or developing world community.
(Cost of the box is $2,000, plus shipping and handling)
✓ Encourage people you know living and working in developing world communities to host a
TEDx in a Box type event.
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Chapter 9: Postscript
✓ Host a TEDx event in a developing or under privileged community -- Suraj Sudhaker is the
organizer of TEDxKibera, a TEDx event in a slum in Nairobi, Kenya. He began his TEDx
journey with one event, and educated the Kibera community on TED and TEDx, and
empowered them to host their own TEDx events.
✓ Translate the Developing World Toolkit document. (If you or someone from your TEDx
community are interested in translating this document, email tedx@ted.com.)
‣
The TED Prize
The TED Prize is awarded annually to an exceptional individual who receives $100,000 and, more
importantly, “One Wish to Change the World.” As a TEDx Organizer, you can support the TED Prize
winners by engaging your local community in the execution of their wishes. Some ways previous
TEDx Organizers have gotten involved include:
‣
Inside Out Project
At TED2011, TED Prize recipient JR, a street artist, wished to “use art to turn the world inside
out.” You can support JR’s wish by organizing a group action—five or more people creating
and coordinating an exhibit together—at your TEDx event.
How to get involved:
✓ Download and review the guidelines for group actions.
✓ Through your website, blog, Twitter feed, etc., announce your plan to coordinate a group
action at your TEDx event.
✓ Choose someone to lead the conversation at your event.
✓ Set a specific time for those interested to get together.
✓ Once your group action has been decided upon, email the TED Prize team; they will help
guide the execution and documentation of your action.
‣
The Charter for Compassion
Charter for Compassion is the result of Karen Armstrong’s 2008 TED Prize wish. The Charter,
by people all over the world and drafted by a multi faith, multinational council of thinkers and
leaders, seeks to change the conversation so that “compassion” becomes a key word in public
and private discourse.
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Chapter 9: Postscript
✓ Incorporate the Charter for Compassion into your TEDx event by asking attendees to sign
the charter.
✓ Provide a space where attendees can get information about the charter.
✓ Ask someone involved with a local branch of the charter to speak at your event.
Inspiration
Inside Out Project: TEDxKarachi participated in ‘Inside Out,’ a global art project initiated by French
street artist and 2011 TEDPrize winner, JR. The photographs bring to light the mistreatment of
minority communities in Pakistan. The Charter for Compassion at TEDxAmsterdam and TEDxKids@TheHill: At
TEDxYouth@Amsterdam, performers at the event worked elements of the Charter into a song.
At TEDxKids@TheHill, Erin Henry spoke about her work as the founder of the Children’s Charter for
Compassion, an approved project of the Charter.
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Chapter 9: Postscript
Additional
Support
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‣ Other Organizer resources
‣ Get inspired by your fellow TEDx-ers
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Additional Support
We always welcome your queries and suggestions. Before you
contact us, please check to see whether we’ve already
answered your question(s) in our Organizer Guide.
We also recommend you solicit support from the TEDx
community. More often than not, other event Organizers can
answer your questions—and offer helpful tips. Post your queries
to TEDx Hub.
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Additional Resources
Other Organizer Resources
TEDx Organizers have a wealth of resources at their disposal, from TED staff at the main office to
TEDx mentors and ambassadors in the field. We also welcome suggestions about what else might
make your role as an Organizer easier. Please email them to tedx@ted.com. Keep in mind that other
TEDx Organizers are your greatest resource.
TEDx Ambassadors
One of the main objectives of the TEDx program is to strengthen regional collaboration among TEDx
Organizers in existing TEDx communities worldwide. TED has appointed people to help oversee and
grow regional connections within their communities. You can find the current Ambassadors on
TED.com.
TEDx Organizers may ask these ambassadors for advice and assistance.
TEDx Hub
The TEDx Hub is an online knowledge-sharing platform designed specially for the TEDx community.
It’s THE place for TEDx’ers to talk; share files, photos and videos with each other; and event host
online meetings with 100+ people. If you’re a TEDx organizer, please join the TEDx Hub!
TEDx Organizer Workshops
TEDx Organizer Workshops, hosted and attended by TEDx Organizers, provide an opportunity for
people who have already organized or who plan to organize a TEDx event to come together to discuss
best practices and strategies for the TEDx program in their region. The first-ever such workshop, the
TEDx Asia Organizers Workshop, drew 20 Organizers from various countries in Asia to the Great Wall
of China. That event kick-started numerous TEDx collaborations on the continent and sparked new
conversations around the community members’ shared goals. Email Salome Heusel if you are
interested in hosting an organizer workshop.
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Thanks and
good luck!
Additional Resources
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