te`(g - Okanagan Basin Water Board
#te'(g
Water Supply and Hydrology Study
For the
MCCULLOCH RESERVOIR \ryATER SUPPLY AREA
(Yeør1-2003Report)
Prepared for the
SOUTH EAST KELOWNA IRRIGATION DISTRICT
Kelowna, BC
by
DOBSON ENGINEERING LTD.
#4, 1960 Springfield Road
Kelowna, BC
vlY 5v7
Januaryr 2004
rü/ater Supply and Hydrology Study
-
2003
Report
I
Table of Contents
1.0
TNTRODUCTION
2.0 PROJECT
DESCRIPTION
Pno.rBcrAcrIVIrIES................
2.2 Eeulpt'¡eNrDpslcN
2.3 Quelrrv AssuneNcE AND Quallrv Cournol..
2.1
3.0
RESULTS.........
........................ I
........ I
......................2
....................3
............ 3
.......... 3
3.1 Poor-pv Cnner....
3.2 Srnr.rNo
4.0
Cnser.
coNcLUsIoNs
5.0 RECOMMENDATIONS........
File: 209-001 Project: 2301'l Date: January 2004
....... 5
........6
....................... 7
DOBSON ENGINEERING LTD.
Water SupBly and Hydrolory Study
-
2003 Report
Table I
Projeet Aetivities
Table 2
Siæs and Equipment
Table 3
Stage and Diseharge Measurements
Tablo 4
lvfean Monthly Discharge (WSC Data vs 2003 Data)
File: 209-001 Project 23017 Date: January2004
DOBSON ENGINEERTNG LTD.
ru
Water Supply and Hvdrolosy Studv-2003 Report
APPENDIXA
2A03Datø
APPENDIX B
Equipment Specifications
File: 209-001 Project 23017 Date:January 2004
DOBSON ENGINEERING LTD.
SOUTH EAST KELOWNA IRRIGATION DISTRICT
Kelowna. BC
Water Supply and Hydrology Study
for the
McCULLOCH RESERVOIR WATER SUPPLY AREA
(Yearl-2003Report)
1.0 INTRODUCTION
.
.
ln t979 the Ministry of Environment completed a report titled Ñport on South East
Kelowna lrrigation Distríct llater Supply Hydrologt and in 1984 a letter update to the 1979
report was completed. A key recommendation from this report was that hydrometric data
collection should continue for the SEKID system and that the annual supply capabilities of
the system should be re-evaluated in 7 - l0 years.
It has been 19 years since that comprehensive water supply study was completed, so it is
timely to confirm what the hydrologic characteristics of the supply area are today based on
actual flow data and to compare this information to the hydrolo gy thatwas reporte d,1n 1979.
With increasing demands for water and the potential that climate change and land use
change (changes in vegetative cover due to forestry activities) may be affecting runoff it is
important that the District has a clear understanding of the current water supplyiituation.
At the request of the South
East Kelowna Inigation District, Dobson Engineering Ltd.
initiated a water supply study for the McCulloch Reservoir water supply area.
2.0 PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Water Survey of Canada (WSC) operated hydrometric stations at several locations in the
water supply area over the period 1973 to 1984 including station 08NM210 - Pooley Creek
Above Pooley Ditch, and station 08NM2l2 - Stírling Creek Diversion to McCulloch
Reservoír. Unfortunately the Pooley Creek station was discontinued in 1979 and the Stirling
Creek station in 1984. Based on the 1979 Ministry of Environment report, Pooley CreeÈ
contributes the largest proportion of run-off to the McCulloch reservoir, and nearly 40% of
the mean annua] runoff for the Hydraulic drainage area was derived from the areal draining
to both the Pooley Creek and Stirling Creek diversions. Eased on this info¡¡q!üþt Jhg fiJsi
two hydrometric stationi]ãilitiõñal hydrometric stations
_priority was to re-establish these
proposeilîo'qUánntflîhê -wäiêi yield fròm both Cañyon Creek and upper Hydraulic
Creek supply areas.
iie
File: 209-001 Project:23017 Date: lanuary2004
DOBSON ENGINEERING LTD.
Water Supplv and Hydroloc,y Study
-
2003 Report
The purpose of re-establishing the hydrometric gauging stations is to provide the District
with current data on the spring, summer and fall runoff that is the source of supply to the
storage reservoirs. This data will be used to compute unit area runoff values that will be
compared to those values computed in the previous reports. It is important for the District to
know if these unit runoff values have changed. If they have changed then they may impact
the ability of the District to meet its supply obligations in the future. Accurate estimates of
unit runoff values will require several years of data. Because of the importance of this data,
one of the objectives of the project is identify which stations are of greatest value and what
are the best locations for the stations to meet the District's needs.
2.1 Project Activities
The completion dates for the various project activities are outlined in Table 1 below.
Table I
Dates
Mav 16.2003
Iulv 28-29.2003
Aue. 19.2003
Sept. 30,2003
Oct. 14. 2003.
Oct.20.2003
Oct.28.2003
Nov. 10.2003
-
Project Activities
Activitv
Field review to determine stream gauging locations
Install Poolev Creek stillins well
Install steel shelter at Poolev Creek and calculate stream flow
Install instrumentation at Poolev Creek and calculate stream flow
Install instrumentation on Stirlins Creek and calculate stream flow
Calculate stream flows and ensure site operation
Survev channels and calculate stream flow
Remove instrumentation from service for winter
The stilling well at the Pooley Creek site had been damaged and past flood events
washed the structure downstream from its original location. In late July, the structure
was salvaged, repaired and re-installed near the original location, upstream from the
diversion.
Installation of the level sensors and data loggers was planned for early summer 2003,
however equipment delivery delays, the back country travel ban .imposed by the
Ministry of Forests and frre fighting activities all combined to delay the installations.
Permanent survey benchmarks were established to enable elevation references for water
levels.
Four discharge and stage measurements were completed for each station. This data was
used to develop an initial stage discharge curve for each site. (Refer to Appendix A for
detailed stage and discharge data). The equipment was removed from service on
November 10, 2003 to prevent damage from freezing conditions.
File: 209-001 Project:23017 Date: January2004
DOBSON ENGINEERING LTD.
2,2 Equiprment Design
The stations are designed to record water levels, which is converted to discharge data
using the stage discharge curve. The stage discharge curve for each site must be
established
measuring the discharge over a range of water levels. Discharge
[e]
-by
(m'ls) is calculated
by measuring water velocity IV] (n/Ð multiplied by channel crosi
sectional area [A] (m'). The discharge and corresponding water levels are graphed to
determine the relationship between stage and discharge. From this graph, water levels
can be converted to discharge values. A minimum of three points is requìred to establish
this relationship, however better accuracy is obtained with more points to plot the curve.
The equipment used at each site is listed in Table 2 and the technical specifications for
this equipment is found in Appendix B.
Table 2 - Sites and Equipment
Site
Pooley Creek
Water Level Sensor
Water Level Data Loeeer
OTT Thalimedes float operated OTT Thalimedes float operated
Stirling Ditch
shaft encoder and data logger
Stevens Pressure Transducer
shaft encoder and data losser
Campbell Scientific CR5t0 Data
Logger
The velocity measurements (used to calculate discharge) were made using a Marsh
McBirney Flow Mate Model 2000 flowmeter (refer to Appendix B for ãquipment
specifications). The equipment at the Pooley station is owned by SEKID, the rémàining
equipment is on loan.
2.3 Quality Assurance and Qualify Control
This project follows standards outlined by the Resource Inventory Standards Committee
(RISC) in the Manual of Standard Operating Procedures for Hydrometric Surveys in
British Columbia. The accuracy of the flow meter was confirmed by taking velocity
measurements in a uniform open concrete channel and comparing them with the values
obtained using the floating object method of estimating stream velocity, as well as the
Manning Equation for that channel.
3.0 RESULTS
Continuous water level data was collected from September 30,2003 to November 10, 2003
Creek.
Observations made during site visits in July and August determined that although thãre were
minor flows at the diversions, the flows were lost to evaporation (and minor infiltration/ditch
losses) and were not supplying any water to the Mcculloch Reservoir.
at Pooley Creek and from October 14, 2003 to November 10, 2003 at Stirling
During the summer of 2003, the Okanagan experienced a drought period and there was no
appreciable precipitation from mid July through September. Environment Canada data
indicates that in 2003,the Southern BC Mountains Region experienced the 4th driest summer
File: 209-001 Project:23017 Date: January2004
DOBSON ENGINEERING LTD.
Water Suoolv and Hvdrologv Studv
-
4
2003 Report
since 1948. Continuous water level data was not collected at Pooley Creek or Stirling Creek
during the summer months, however because of the drought conditions it is likely that the
two basins provided no water to the McCulloch Reservoir from mid July through September.
There were several significant rainstorms during October, which resulted in increased stream
flows. The data from Environment Canada indicates that in 2003, the Southern BC
Mountains Region experienced the I lth wettest autumn since 1948.
The dates on which discharge measurements were completed are listed in Table 3 and a
comparison of the historic WSC data with the 2003 data is in Table 4.
Table 3 - Stage and Disch¿rge Measurements
Date
Aus. 9.2003
Seot. 30.2003
Oct. 14.2003
Oct.20.2003
Oct.28.2003
Poolev Creek
Discharge (m'/s)
Staee (m)
0.0038
0.000
0.0044
0.001
N/A
N/A
0.137
0.104
0.0874
0.0431
Stirline Crcck
Stase (m)
N/A
N/A
Discharse (m'/s)
0.0006
N/A
0.0026
0.263
0.309
0.0281
0.0115
0.286
Table 4 - Mean Monthly Discharge (\ilSC Data vs 2003 Data)
Data
2003 Poolev
WSC Poolev
2003 Stirline
WSC Stirline
Aor.
Mav
Mean Monthly Discharge (mr/s)
Aug.
Julv
June
0.957
0.868
0.123
0.016
Sept.
Oct.
0.02s
0.063
0.018
*0.021
0.041
*This value is bæed on data collected
0.356
0.148
0.012
0.003
0
0
and may be an overestimate ofthe true average monthly discharge.
l4 to Oct 31., ano
3.1 Pooley Creek
Very low flow was observed in Pooley Creek during the site installation in July and
during subsequerit visits in August and September. During these periods the diverted
flow from Pooley Creek was lost along the diversion ditch, primarily due to
evaporation. Although there are likely minor infiltration losses along the ditch, these are
considered negligible, as the ditch is constructed in areas with relatively impervious
soil.
Flows less than approximately 0.0044
14.41/s, or 0.31 ac. fi/day) did not reach the
^3ls
McCulloch Reservoir during the hot summer months. Flows exceeding this value likely
reach the reservoir, however it is not known what proportion of these flows are lost to
evaporation. Because the air temperature is much lower in October than during the
summer months the evaporation losses are assumed to be negligible and the discharge
File: 209-001 Project:23017 Date: January2004
DOBSON ENGINEERING LTD.
Water Supply and Hydrology Study
-
2003 Report
recorded at the station during the cooler fall period is assumed to reach the McCulloch
Reservoir.
The October 2003 mean monthly discharge for Pooley Creek is 0.025 m3/s compared to
the WSC mean monthly discharge of 0.018 m'ls (based on data collected in
1973,1974,1976-1979). The total monthly discharge from Pooley Creek for October
2003 is approximately 65 742 m'or 53.3 ac ft (based on mean daily discharges summed
for the month, assuming no losses). At this time this data is only relevant for the period
that it was collected. It will form part of the archived data that will be used in the future
to define the current trends in runoff. However, this data is very valuable since 2003
was a record year from a hydrologic perspective due to extremely low precipitation.
Refer to Appendix A for additional details.
3.2 Stirling Creek
Similar to Pooley Creek, very low flows were also observed in Stirling Creek during the
summer months, and it is likely that flows from mid July through September did not
reach the McCulloch Reservoir. Flows less than 0.0026 m'ls (2.6Ils, or 0.18 ac ft/day)
are lost to evaporation during the hot summer months. During October, it is assumed
that evaporation losses are negligible, and the October flows reached the McCulloch
Reservoir.
The mean discharge for Stirling Creek (based on data collected from October 14-31) is
0.021 mils compared to the WSC mean monthly discharge of 0 m3ls (based on data
collected in 1977-1979 and 1984). The total discharge from Stirling Creek during the
period October 14-31,2003 is approximately 31 952m'or25.9 ac ft (based on mean
daily discharges summed for the month, assuming no losses). As with the Pooley Creek
data, this data is only relevant for the period that it was collected, but will from part of
the data archive to be used in the future to define the current runoff trends. Please refer
to Appendix A for additional details.
File: 209-001 Project: 23017 Date: January2004
DOBSON ENGINEERING LTD.
Water Supply and Hydrology Study -2003 Repoft
4.0 CONCLUSIONS
Prior to the undertaking of this project, the last hydrology and water supply study for the
McCulloch Reservoir water supply area was completed in 1979. The runoff conditions
of the water supply area may have changed since 1979 due to climate change and
changes in forest cover in the upper watershed.
The previous hydrology study suggests that the Pooley and Stirling diversions supply
of the mean annual run-off to the McCulloch Reservoir. The 'WSC
hydrometric stations on Pooley Creek and the Stirling Ditch (lower Stirling Creek) were
re-established and water level and stream discharge data were collected during the fall of
2003. No additional stations wcrc cstablished in 2003.
nearly 40%
The Okanagan experienced drought conditions during the summer of 2003. Because
precipitation was negligible and air temperatures were very high from mid-July through
September 2003, stream flows in Pooley Creek and Stirling Creek were negligible
during this time. However, there were signifrcant rainstorms and cooler air temperatures
in October, which resulted in increased stream flows. Environment Canada reports that
the 2003 summer was the 4th driest and the 2003 autumn was the I lth wettest on record
for the Southern BC Mountains region.
During the hot summer months (mid-July through September 2003), neither.the Pooley
diversion nor the Stirling diversion were supplying water to the McCulloch Reservoir.
For the Pooley diversion, summer flows less than 0.0044 m3/s 10.3 ! ac ftlday) did not
reach the McCulloch Reservoir. For the Stirling diversion, summer flows less than
0.0026 m3/s 10.18 ac ftlday) did not reach the reservoir (most likely due to evaporation
losses along the diversion ditches).
The rains in October, combined with reduced evaporation losses resulted in increased
stream flow at both diversions and water was supplied to the reservoir from early
October through early November. Because of the reduced evaporation rates during the
cooler months, it is assumed that the discharge recorded at the diversions reached the
reservoir with negligible losses.
The water yield from the Pooley diversion to the McCulloch Reservoir (October 1-31,
2003) was approximately 62 910 m' (51 ac ft), and-the yield from the Stirling diversion
(October 14-31,2003) was approximately 32 070 m" (26 ac ft).
File: 209-001 Project 23017 Date: January2004
DOBSON ENGINEERING LTD.
Water Supply and Hydrology Study
-
2003 Report
5.0 RECOMMENDATIONS
Continue to collect and analyze hydrometric data at the Pooley Creek and Stirling ditch
diversions to develop a current database that can be used to define the hydrology ofthese
areas.
Install a staff gauge at the Stirling Ditch station to confirm datalogger readings during
routine site visits.
Conduct flow measurements on the ditches downstream from the points of diversion, in
addition to those at the gauging stations, to determine the extent of the water losses in
the ditches during the summer period. Compare daily reservoir level data and reservoir
outflow data with the inflow data from the stations to better understand the current water
supply conditions.
Sites for new hydrometric stations should be located in2004 in Canyon Creek and upper
Hydraulic Creek and stations should be established to determine the water yields for
these two supply areas.
Dedicate specific staff to be trained to take over the routine operations of the gauging
station network or arrange to have the network managed under contract. The success of
this project depends upon the commitment of the staff time or resources to maintain the
stations and collect the additional field data.
Purchase additional equipment to replace that on loan and that required for any new
stations.
¡ject Hydrologist
Tllt;tj
File: 209-001 Project:23017 Date: January2004
DOBSON ENGINEERING LTD.
APPENDIX A
2003 Data
Pooley Creek Discharge Estimate (Sept. 30. 2003)
Su rface Velocity measurement fl ow calcu lations
Stream/Flume width - 20 cm
Stream/Flume depth - 4 cm deep
Length - 95 cm
Surface Velocity of floating object over 95 cm length
Run
run 1
Time
run2
run 3
run 4
run 5
run 6
runT
run 8
run 9
run 10
Average
(s) Velocity (m/s) Area (m2) Discharge (m3/s)
1.6
0.594 0.008
0.0048
1.9
0.500 0.008
0.0040
1.64
0.579 0.008
0.0046
1.75
0.543 0.008
0.0043
1.64
0.579 0.008
0.0046
1.8
0.528 0.008
0.0042
r.83
0.519 0.008
0.0042
1.63
0.583 0.008
0.0047
1.6
0.594 0.008
0.0048
1.7
0.559 0.008
0.0045
1.709
0.558
0.008
0.0045
Stirling Creek Discharge Estimate (Oct. 14, 2003)
rface Velocity measu rement fl ow calcu lations
Stream/Flume width -21.5 cm
Stream/Flume depth - 4.2 cm deep
Length - 50 cm
Surface Velocity of floating object over 50 cm length
Su
Run
1
Time
run
run2
run 3
run 4
run 5
run 6
run 7
run 8
run 9
run 10
Average
(s) Velocity (m/s) Area (m2) Discharge (m3/s)
1.48
0.338 0.00903
0.0031
1.5
1.43
1.27
1.37
1.42
1.35
1.45
1.37
1.41
1.405
0.333 0.00903
0.350 0.00903
0.394 0.00903
0.365 0.00903
0.352 0.00903
0.370 0.00903
0.345 0.00903
0.365 0.00903
0.355 0.00903
0.357 0.009
0.0030
0.0032
0.0036
0.0033
0.0032
0.0033
0.0031
0.0033
0.0032
0.0026
The stream flow on these dates was too low to use the flowmeter.
Rocks were placed to confine flow to a small regular shaped flume.
Surface velocity was measured using a stopwatch and small pieces
of styrofoam.
Pooley Creek Discharge Meas u rements/Galcu lations Oct. 20, 2003
Oct 20 2003 at approximately 4:30 DST at Pooley Creek.
Used 0.6 depth for flow meter. Used cross section at gabion walldownstream from stilling well.
Stilling Well = 0.136-0.137 m deep at 4:30 DST
Staff Gauge = .138+/- m at 4:30 DST
well.
Creek Diversion at Gabion Basket downstream from
(m3/s)
(m/s)
(m2)
(m)
o
velocity
width at depth Flow Area
Water Depth
Station
0.14 0.00168
0.0'12
0.05
0.24
0.1
0.32 0.00832
0.1
0.026
0.26
0.2
0.0084
0.024
0.1
0.24
0.3
0.32 0.00608
0.019
0.1
0.19
0.4
0.0077
0.022
0.1
0.22
0.5
0.0069
0.023
0.1
0.23
0.6
0.31
0.00682
0.022
0.1
0.22
0.7
0.0066
0.022
0.1
0.22
0.8
0.18
0.00378
0.021
0.1
0.21
0.9
0.22 0.00484
0.022
0.1
0.22
1
0.0034
0.02
0.1
0.2
1.1
0.24 0.00432
0.018
0.1
0.18
1.2
0.31 0.00434
0.014
0.1
1.3
0.14
0.32 0.00448
0.014
0;1
0.14
1.4
0.24 0.00264
0.011
0.1
0.11
1.5
0.11 0.00143
0.013
0.1
0.13
1.6
0.12 0.00204
0.017
0.1
0.17
1.7
0.16 0.00288
0.018
0.1
0.18
1.8
0.08 0.00072
0.009
0.05
0.18
1.85
(m)
0.35
0.35
0.3
0.3
0.17
Total
Liters/second
US Gal/second
US Gal/minute
ft3/second
ft3/day
Acre FeeVday
Average Depth
87.4
23.08
1384.85
3.09
266577.19
6.12
0.194
0.0874
Stirling Creek Discharge Meas u rements/Calculations Oct. 20, 2003
Oct 20 2003 at approximately 5:30 DST at Stirling Creek.
Used 0.6 depth for flow meter. Used cross section at 3 m downstream from stilling well.
Stilling Well = refer to data logger at 5:30 DST
No Staff Gauge in place = at 5:30 DST
Station
(m)
(m)
(m2) (m/s)
Water Depth width at depth Flow Area
0.09
0.6
0.7
0.1
0.1
0.8
0.12
0.12
0.14
0.12
0.r 1
0.14
0.13
0.9
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
2
2.1
2.2
0.11
0.1
0.1
0.07
0,06
0.07
0.06
0.06
.
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
velocity
0.008
0.009
0.01
0.01
0.012
0.012
0.014
0.012
0.011
0.014
0.013
0,011
0.01
0.01
0.007
0.006
0.007
0.006
0.006
ft3/day
Acre FeeUday
Average Depth
28.1
7.42
445.40
0.99
85736.74
1.97
0.099
O
0.08
0.02
0.13
0.12
0.18
0.23
0.27
0.00064
0.00018
0.0013
0.0012
0.00216
0.00276
0.25
0.00378
0.003
0.23
0.11
0.00322
0.1
0.17
0j2
o.12
0.08
0.02
00
00
Total Discharge
Liters/second
US Gal/second
US Gal/minute
ft3/second
(m3/s)
0.08
0.00143
0.0011
0.0017
0.0012
0.00084
0.00048
0.00014
Pooley
C
reek
D
ischarge Measu rements/Calcu lations Oct. 28, 2003
Oct 28 2003 at approximately 2:30 PST at Pooley Creek.
Used 0.6 depth for flow meter. Used cross section at gabion wall downstream from stilling well.
Stilling Well = 0.104 m deep at 2:30 PST
Staff Gauge = .106 m at 2:30 PST
Creek Diversion at Gabion Basket downstream from stil
(m3/s)
(m2)
(m)
o
width at depth Flow Area
Water
0.14 0.0014
0.0105
0.05
0.021
0.1
0.21
0.2
0.19 0.
0.021
0.1
0.21
0.3
0.14 0.
0.018
0.1
0.4
0.18
0.21 0.00
0.018
0.1
0.18
0.5
0.19 0.00
0.018
0.1
0.18
0.6
0.1
0.018
0.18
0.7
0.016
0.1
0.16
0.8
0.18 0.00252
0.1
0.014
0.14
0.9
0.013
0.1
0.13
1
(m)
1.1
0.11
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.85
0.16
0.13
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.14
0.14
0.14
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.05
0.16
0.011
0.016
0.013
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.14
0.04
0.02
0.02
0.014
0.014
0.007
Total Discharge
Liters/second
US Gallsecond
US Gal/minute
ft3/second
ft3/day
Acre FeeUday
Average Depth
43.1
11.3779225
682.6753498
1.52097398
131412.1519
3.016602217
0.153
0.001
0.114444
0.001
0.
0.
0.00014
stirlin g creek Discha rge Measu rements/calculations oct. zg, 2oo3
Oct 28 2003 at approximately 12:30 DST at Stirling Creek.
Used 0.6 depth for flow meter. Used cross section at 3 m downstream from stilling well.
Stilling Well= 0.286 m at 12:30 DST
No Staff Gauge in place
Creek Ditch.
Station
(m)
(m)
Water Depth
width at depth Flow Area velocity
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.08
0.07
0.07
0.09
0.9
0.08
1
1.1
0.1
0.1
1.2
0.08
1.3
1.4
0.1
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
2
2.1
2.2
0.1
0.08
0.07
0.08
0.075
0,04
0.04
0.05
0.02
0.02
(m2)
0.m
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.007
0.007
0.009
0.01
0.008
0.01
0.01
0.008
0.01
0.008
0.007
0.008
0.0075
0.004
0.004
0.005
0.002
0.002
Total
Liters/second
US Gal/second
US Gal/minute
ft3/second
ft3/day
Acre FeeVday
Average Depth
11.5
3.0379872
182.279232
0.406111
35087.9904
0.805454504
0.071
(m/s)
(m3/s)
o
0.01 0.00007
0.08 0.00056
0.05 0.00045
0.13
0.13
0.0013
0.00104
0.002
0.0016
0.2
0.16
0.14 0.00112
0j2 0.0012
0.1 0.0008
0.06 0.00042
0.06 0.00048
0.04
0.0003
0.03 0.00012
0.01 0.000041
Discharge
0.033333
0t
0.0115
Mean Daily Water Yield - Pooley and Stirling Creeks (ac ft/day)
-l
7.O
6.0
Pooley Creek Water Yield (Oct. 1-31, 2003) = 53.3
acft
5.0
Pooley data suspect
beyond October 31,
due to ice formation.
(g
!t
o
(ú
4.0
lE Pooley Data
lr öünrng uata
E'
o
t
o
3.0
(g
=
2.0
Stirling data not available
untilOctober 14,2003
1.0
0.0
.{.-i."{".þî""{*þi""{".{".þî..î"..t"".Ë".î"{*d
I
i
Pooley Creek Stage Discharge Curue (2003)
0.16
0.14
o.12
0.1
-
E
I
o.oe
(U
U'
Best Fit Curved Line Equatiori
0.06
! = 0.0454Ln(x) + 0.2473
*=l
0.04
0.02
0
0.0400 0.0500
Discharge (mtls)
0.0600
0.0900
0.1000
Pooley Creek - Mean Daily Level and Discharge (Oct. l-31, 2003)
0.0900
0.160
0.0800
0.140
0.0700
0.120
0.100
E
-¡+
0.0600
Mean Daily Level (m)
Discharge (m3/s)
(l,
o
J
o
\(v)o
o.osoo
0.080
ED
L
(lt
0.0400
(!
€o
€
,9
c¡
0.060
0.0300
0.040
0.020
0.0200
0.0100
0.0000
*eis"*sie;f*fififis"is'is"is"is"isois"islislislislislirlislislislislislþslirlislþslis"
"ro-e"o-s.ç{"r"{.ç{...t-e"+tt".
I
Stirling Creek Stage Discharge Gurve (2003)
0.320
0.310
0.300
^E
0.290
o
Best Fit Curved Line Equation: y=0.0189Ln(x)+0.3743
= 0.9797
ED
(E
Ø
*
o.zgo
o.270
0.260
0.250
0.005
0.01
0.015
Discharge 1m3/s¡
o.o2
0.025
0.03
Stirling Creek - Mean Daily Level and Discharge (Oct.14-31, 2003)
0.350
0.0800
0.300
0.250
E
o
o
J
/t
-!-
0.200
0.150
=
0.100
0.050
-f
0.0700
Tr
¡
Â
¡-Mean
q,
(E
*r'
/.ar Y- -rA-- \./ l\
\tV
0.0500
Daily Level(m)
+Discharge
0.0600
(m3/s)
o.o40o Ë'
(!
(,
.!2
0.0300
\
I
0.0200
0.0100
\
0.000
o
(Ð
g
0.0000
0
APPENDIX B
Equipment Specifications
Equipment Specifications
-
Marsh McBirney Flow Mate Model 2000 Flow
Meter
Velocity Measurement
Method (Electromagnetic)
Zero Stability (+l- 0.05 fl/sec)
Accuracy (+L2% of reading * zero
stability)
Outputs
3.5 Digit
Signal Output Connector (Optional)
Analog O.lV = I ff/sec or I m/s
2V: Full Scale
Range (-0.5 to +19.99 ft./sec, -0.15 to +6
mis)
Requirements
D-Cells)
Power
Batteries (2
hours
Battery Life Continuous ON
Alkaline (25-30
NiCad ( I 0- 1 5
Extemal Power Supply (Optional)
l20V,lV/ or 220V,lW
Water Resistant Electronic
Submersible one Foot for 30
hours)
hours/charge)
Case
Seconds
Materials
Sensor (Polyurethane)
Cable (Polyurethane Jacket)
Electronic Case (High Impact Molded Plastic)
Weight
3 lb 9 oz with case and 20 ft of cable
2 lb l0 oz without sensor and cable
Temperature
Open-Channel-Velocity-Sensor (0'C - 72'C)
Full Pipe Sensor (0"C - 72"C at250 psi)
Electronics (0"C - 50"C)
OTT Thalimedes Float Operated Shaft Encoder - TechnicalData
Measurement range
Resolution
switch-selectable
Maximum measuring
error
m
m
m
r l digit
+19.999
0.001
10.002
m +199.99ft
0.01 ft
0.01 m
10.002 m t0.0066 ft
1l digit rl digit
tI99.99
Data Logger Unit
Display
Measured value
memory
LCD I single-line,4.5 places, characters
l2 mm high
approximately 30 000 measured values
(EEPROM)
Sampleinterval/Storageinterval
1,2,3,4,5,6,10,12,75,20,30min
1,2,3,4,6,8,12,24h
Interfaces
Power Supply
RS 232 C
0=Off
*
infrared (IrDa)
I x 1.5 V C-cells (LR 14 C AM
diameter
battery
Dimensions L x
Weight including
Casing
Degree of protection
Temperature range
Encoder Unit
Circumference of pulley
Standard float cable
DimensionsLxWxH
Weight
Casing
Degree of protection
Temperature range
2)
alkaline type (exclusively battery powered)
244mmx47 mm
0.320 kg
Plastic
IP 68
-20oC to +70oC
200.0 mm
I mmØ
other diameters can be graduated; e.g.
0.6 mm float cable Ø - set float pulley
circumference to 198.7 mm
82mmx82mmx34mm
0.140 kg
Plastic
lP 54
-20"C to +70oC
Transducer cable
Length
Im
EMC limit values
-Resistance to electrostatic
(ESD)
discharge
-Resistance to electromagnetic
flrelds
-Resistance to transient fields (burst)
-Resistance to
surge
-Line-borne and radiated
interference
complies with EN 61000-4-2 degree of severity
2 (4kV contact discharge)
complies with EN 61000-4-3 degree of severity
3 (10 V/m)
complies with EN 61000-4-4 special degree of
severity (4 kV)
complies with EN 61000-4-5 degree of severity
2 (l kv)
complies with EN 55022 Class B
Campbell Scientific Model CR 510 Data Logger - Technical Specifications
Electrical specifications are valid over a -25o to +50'C range unless otherwise specified; non-condensing environment
required. To maintain electrical specifications, Campbell Scientific recommends recalibrating dataloggers every two years.
PROGRAMEXECUT¡ONRATE PERIODAVERAGINGMEASUREMENTS SDI-I2INTERFACE
System tasks ¡nitiated in sync w¡th
real-time
UD
to 64 Hz. One measurement w¡th data
lransfer
¡s
is
DEFINITION: The average per¡od for a single cycle
determined by measuring the durat¡on of a
number of cycles. Any of the 4 single-ended.analog.
input channels can be used. Signal attentuation and
coupling ¡s typ¡cally
INPUT FREQUENCY
S¡gnal peak-to-peakl Min. Max
Frcq.2
Max.
Pulse
25
200 kHz
?90
l'0
l0
50 kHz
2.0
10
62
8 kHz
5
5 kHz
100
..-.^.? 0
-2-TY.
RESOLUTION: 35 ns div¡ded by the number of
cycles measured
ACCURACY: t0.03% of read¡ng
TIME REQUIRED FOR MEASUREMENT: Signal
per¡od multiplied by the number of cycles measured
plus 1.5 cycles + 2 ms.
spec¡f¡ed
requ¡red.
RANGE:
ANALOG INPUTS
NUMBER OF CHANNELS: 2 different¡al or
w.
Min.
4
ps
V
single-ended, ind¡v¡dually configured.
Ty
ps
mV
V
RAñGE AND RESOLUTTON:
ps
mV 2'0V
Full Scale Resolut¡on (pV)
ps
V
lnput Range 1mV) oittèrentiat single-Ended
' 666
r25OO 333
33.3
66.6
!250
6.66
t25
3.33
2.oo
1.00
!7.5
possible at this rate without interrupt¡on.
0.33
t2.5
0.66
INPUT SAMPLE RATES: lncludes the
measurement t¡me and convers¡on to
eng¡neer¡ng un¡ts. The fast and slow
measurements integrate the s¡gnal for 0.25
and 2.72 ms, respect¡vely. Differential
measurements ¡ncorporate two integrations
with reversed input polar¡t¡es to reduce
thermal otfset and common mode errors.
Fast d¡fferent¡al voltage: 4.2 ms
Slow differential voltage: 9.2 ms
D¡fferential w¡th 60 Hz rejection: 25.9 ms
ACCURACY: r0.1% of FSR G25" to 50'C);
10.05% of FSR (0'to 40'C);
e.9., t0. l % FSR = *5.0 mV for t2500
mV range
INPUT NOISE VOLTAGE (for t2.5 mV
range):
Fast different¡al: 0.82 pV rms
Slow differential: 0.25 pV rms
Different¡al w¡th
60 Hz rejection: 0.18 pV rms
COMMON MODE RANGE: T2.5 V
DC COMMON MODE REJECTION: > 140
dB
NORMAL MODE REJECTION: 70 dB (60
Hz w¡lh slow different¡al measurement)
INPUT CURRENT: tg nA maximum
INPUT RESISTANCE: 20 Gohms typical
ANALOG OUTPUTS
DESCRIPTION: 2 switched exc¡tations.
active only during measurement, one at a
l¡me.
RANGE: +2.5 V
RESOLUTION: 0.67 MV
ACCURACY: i2.5 mV (0" to 40"C);
tS mV G25" to 50'C)
CURRENT SOURCING:25 mA
CURRENT SINKING: 25 MA
FREQUENCY SWEÉP FUNCTION: The
switched outputs provide a programmable
swept frequency, 0 to 2.5 V square wave for
excit¡ng vibrating w¡re transducers.
RESISTANCE
MEASUREMENTS
MEASUREMENT TYPES: ThE CR51O
provides
rat¡ometric bridge measurements of 4- and
6-w¡re full br¡dge, and 2-, 3-, and 4-w¡re half
br¡dges. Precise dual polarity excitation
us¡ng any of the sw¡tched outputs
el¡m¡nates dc errors. Conductivity
measurements use a dual polar¡ty 0.75 ms
excitation to min¡m¡ze polarization errors.
ACCURACY: !0.02% of FSR plus br¡dge
errors.
ac
PULSE COUNTERS
NUMBER OF CHANNELS: 2 eight-b¡t or 1 s¡xteenb¡t;
softwaÍe selectable as switch closure, high frequency
pulse, or lowjevel ac modes. An add¡t¡onal channel
(C2lP3) can be software conf¡gured to read switch
closures at rates up to 40 Hz.
MAXIMUM COUNT RATE: '16 kHz, e¡ght-bit counter;
400 kHz. si)deen-b¡t counter. Channels are scanned at
I or 64 Hz (software selectable).
SWITCH CLOSURE MODE:
Minimum Switch Closed Time: 5 ms
Minimum Sw¡tch Open Time: 6 ms
Maximum Bounce T¡me: 1 ms open
w¡thout being counted
HIGH FREQUENCY PULSE MODE:
Min¡mum Pulse Width: 1.2 ps
Maximum lnput Frequency: 400 kHz
Max¡mum lnput Voltage: t20 V
Voltage Thresholds: Count upon trans¡t¡on from below
1.5 V to above 3.5 V at low frequencies. Larger ¡nput
transit¡ons are requ¡red at high frequencies because of
input f¡lter w¡th 1.2 Us time constant. S¡gnals up to 400
kHz will be counted if centered around +2.5 V with
deviat¡ons = 2.5 V for= 1.2 us.
LOW LEVEL AC MODE:
Oypical of magnetic pulse flow transducers or olher low
voltage, sine wave outputs,)
lnput Hysteres¡s: 14 mV
Maximum ac lnput Voltage: t20 V
Min¡mum ac lnput Voltage:
(Sine wave mV
Range (Hz)
1 to 1000
0.5 to 10,000
0.3 to 16,000
'16-b¡t conl¡g. or 6¡l Hz scan req'd for freq. >.2048 Hz
i
20
200
1000
rms)*
DIGITAL I/O PORTS
DESCRIPTION: Port C1 is software selectable as a
binary ¡nput, control output, or as an SDI-12 port.
Port C2lP3 is input only and can be software conligured
as an SDI-12 port, a binary input, or as a
sw¡tch closure counter (40 Hz max).
OUTPUT VOLTAGES (no load): high 5.0 V 10.1 V;
low < 0.1 V
STANDARD
DESCR¡pT¡ON: D¡gitat t/O ports C1-C2
support SDI-12 asy-nchronous
communicationt uó to ten SDI-12 sensors
can be connected to each port. Meets
SDt-12 standard Version t.2 for
datalogger and sensor modes.
EMland ESD PROTECTION
The CR510 ¡s encâsed ¡n metal and
incorporates EMI f¡ltering on all inputs and
outputs. Gas discharge tubes prov¡de
robust ESD protection on all terminal
block ¡nputs and outputs. The following
European standards apply.
EMC tested and conforms to BS
EN61 326: I 998.
Deta¡ls of performance cr¡teria applied are
available upon request.
CPU AND INTERFACE
PROCESSOR: Hitachi 6303.
PROGRAM STORAGE: Up to 16 kbytes
for active program; additional 16 kbytes
for alternate programs. Operat¡ng syslem
stored ¡n 128 kbytes Flash memory.
DATA STORAGE: 128 kbytes SRAM
standard (approximately 62,000 values).
Add¡t¡onal 2 Mbytes Flash available as an
opl¡on.
OPTIONAL KEYBOARD DISPLAY: I digit
LCD (0.5" digits).
PERIPHERAL INTERFACE: 9 pin D-type
connector for keyboard display, storage
module, modem, pr¡nter, card storage
module, and RS-232 adapter.
BAUD RATES: Selectable at 300, 1200,
and 9600, 76,800 for certa¡n synchronous
devices. ASCII commun¡cation protocol ¡s
one start b¡t, one stop bit, eight data bits
(no paritÐ.
CLOCKACCURACY: t1 m¡nute per
month
SYSTEM POWER
REQUIREMENTS
VOLTAGE: 9.6 to 16 Vdc
TYPICAL CURRENT DRAIN: 1.3 mA
quiescent, 13 mA during processing, and
46 mA during analog measurement.
BATTERIES: Any 12 V battery can be
connected as a pr¡mary power source.
Several power supply opt¡ons are
ava¡lable from Campbell Scientific.
The model CR2430 l¡thium battery for
clock and SRAM backup has a capac¡ty of
270 mAhr.
PHYSICAL SPECIFICATIONS
OUTPUT RESISTANCE: 5OO ohms
SIZE: 8.4" x I .5" x 3.9" (21.3 cm x 3.8 cm
x 9.9 cm). Addit¡onal clearance required
for ser¡al cable and sensor leads.
WEIGHT: 15 oz. (425 g)
INPUT STATE: high 3.0 to 5.5 V; low -0.5 to 0.8 V
WARRANTY
INPUT RESISTANCE: 100 kohms
Three years against defects in materials
and workmansh¡p.
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising