Participant Manual - Walk for Wellness Challanges

Participant Manual - Walk for Wellness Challanges
WALK FOR
WELLNESS
CHALLENGE
WORKPLACE PROGRAM
PARTICIPANT’S MANUAL
THE HOW-TO GUIDE FOR ORGANIZING
A WORKPLACE WALKING CHALLENGE FOR EMPLOYEES
SEPTEMBER 2011
WALK FOR WELLNESS CHALLENGE - Workplace Program Participant’s Manual
Adapted from in motion Winnipeg.
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WALK FOR WELLNESS CHALLENGE - Workplace Program Participant’s Manual
Acknowledgements
The Physical Activity Advisors program encourages Niagara residents of all ages, abilities
and incomes to make healthier lifestyle and active living choices by providing accurate
and consistent education about physical activity and its benefits through the use of a
trained and supported volunteer base.
Physical Activity Advisors provide accurate and consistent information about physical
activities and its benefits to communities through presentations and displays in a variety
of settings including workplaces, community centres and community organizations.
The Physical Activity Advisor program would like to provide a special thank you to
Winnipeg in motion for the ability to reference these materials. For additional
information on Winnipeg in motion, please visit www.winnipeginmotion.ca .
Manual Overview
We welcome suggestions on how to improve the challenge or its resources.
Please send your comments and suggestions to nrphvolunteers@niagararegion.ca .
The Participant’s Manual includes challenge information and tools that you will need to
participate in the Walk for Wellness Challenge. Also included in the manual are some
resources that will help you understand the importance of being physically active and
eating healthy and help participants to reach their weekly goals.
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Table of Contents
Acknowledgements............................................................................................................. 2
Manual Overview ................................................................................................................ 2
Participant Instructions ....................................................................................................... 6
Participant Steps for Success .............................................................................................. 7
Getting Points for Getting In-Step ...................................................................................... 8
Pedometers ....................................................................................................................... 11
Tips that Motivate ............................................................................................................. 12
Be Active at Work ............................................................................................................. 13
APPENDIX A - Ideas That Motivate (Physical Activity Tips) .............................................. 15
APPENDIX B - Ideas that Motivate (Nutrition Tips) .......................................................... 18
APPENDIX C - Suggestions for Increasing Vegetables and Fruits on a Budget ................. 20
APPENDIX D - Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire* .............................................. 21
APPENDIX F - Non-Step Conversion Tool .......................................................................... 26
APPENDIX G - Converting wheelchair odometer distance to steps ................................. 27
APPENDIX H - Walk for Wellness Tracking Sheet ............................................................. 28
APPENDIX I - PAR-Q & YOU ............................................................................................... 30
APPENDIX J - Web Resources to Support You during the Walk for Wellness Challenge.. 31
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Participant Instructions
The Walk for Wellness Challenge is a fun active living and healthy eating challenge
designed for a workplace setting. The goal of the Walk for Wellness Challenge is to
educate employees on the benefits of physical activity and healthy eating. This
Challenge has also been designed to equip you with some tools to become more
physically active and eat more vegetables and fruit on a daily basis.
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Participant Steps for Success
To take part in the challenge, we would like you to complete the following steps:
6
5
4
3
2
1
Stick with it &
have FUN!
Track activity/eating &
submit your weekly totals
Get “in motion” and make
positive lifestyle changes
Complete the pre-challenge survey and
goal setting worksheet
Complete the Physical Activity Readiness
Questionnaire (PAR-Q)
Recruit your co-workers (1 to 3), register a team with the
Challenge Coordinator and obtain a pedometer
By participating in this challenge, you are taking an active step toward improving your
own health and wellness. Healthy eating and physical activity has been known to
reduce the risk for several chronic conditions including diabetes, heart disease,
hypertension and some cancers. An active lifestyle has also been shown to help
improve mood, sleep patterns and increase productivity.
Points Tracking System has been developed to make the coordination of the challenge
and the tracking of team points easier. As a Challenge Participant it is important that
you keep track of your time spent on physical activity. This includes daily step counts
and other activity as found in the Other Activities sheet found in the back of this
manual. It is also important to track the servings of fruits and vegetables eaten daily. At
the end of each week (or when requested by your Team Captain or Challenge
Coordinator), it is up to each individual or team member to submit the tracking sheet so
that results can be recorded.
It is easy to reach success with the Challenge by following the above steps for success.
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Getting Points for Getting In-Step
The Walk for Wellness Challenge involve teams of one to four participants (one team
captain and up to three participants). Each day for the duration of the challenge, track
physical activity participation using a pedometer/odometer or the conversion chart
provided for non-step activities. In addition to logging steps, log the number of servings
of vegetables and fruit consumed daily. The Steps and Serving details can be logged on
the Personal Activity/Nutrition Tracking Sheet provided.
The challenge is designed to include people of all activity levels, whether currently
engaging in planned physical activity or not. All interested staff can participate, learn
new things and have fun!
There are two phases for the participants in this challenge:
1. Baseline – One week
Track your servings of fruit and vegetables and your daily activity using the
Conversion Tool for Non-Step Activities and a pedometer or odometer. Log
these details into the Personal Activity/Nutrition Tracking Sheet.
At the end of the baseline week, forward weekly total to your Team Captain
or Challenge Coordinator.
This will be your baseline activity level.
NO points will be awarded for the first week.
Points begin to accumulate at the beginning of the second week.
2. Challenge – Four to Eleven weeks
Continue to track daily activity and number of servings of vegetables and
fruit using the Personal Activity/Nutrition Tracking Sheet provided.
At the end of each week, forward weekly totals to Team Captain or Challenge
Coordinator.
Captains will forward their teammates’ average weekly activity totals to the
Challenge Coordinator or collate them for team points. Team point totals
will be tallied based on the sum of the contributions of each team member.
The point system has been developed to reward gradual and continual
progress, as well as the successful maintenance of a 10,000 + step per day
average throughout the challenge.
The nutrition portion has been set up to reward healthy eating behaviour
based on the 2007 edition of Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide.
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How to Track Points
Initially, the point system may seem a bit difficult at first, however it is necessary to
“level the playing field” for participants of all fitness levels.
The point system has been designed to reward you as the participants for making
consistent improvements by 10% or better in your physical activity level or for already
being active and remaining above 10,000 steps for the duration of the challenge.
The point system is designed to equally reward participants that are less active and
those that are more active at the start of the challenge.
“Step Points” - Physical Activity Points
Basic Step Points:
1 point for each 1000 steps per teammate for their weekly average of steps up to a max
of 10 points (10,000 steps).
Weekly Bonus Step Points:
Less Active Participants
For less active participants who have an average below the benchmark of
10,000 steps per day:
5 points for an improvement of 10% or more up to the weekly equivalent of
10,000 steps per day.
Example: Participant “Jane” averages 5,000 steps during the baseline week.
During week two, “Jane” averages 8,000 steps. “Jane” would then receive 8 step
points and 5 bonus step points for 13 combined points.
Active Participants
For active participants who have an average above the benchmark of 10,000 steps per
day:
3 points for an improvement of 10% or more beyond the weekly equivalent of
10,000 steps per day.
Example: Participant “Jack” achieves an average of 11,000 steps during the third
week of the challenge. Then during the fourth week, “Jack” increases his average
step total to 12,100 steps. “Jack” would then receive 10 basic step points for
staying above 10,000 steps and would also receive 3 bonus step points for
increasing his step total by 10%.
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End of Challenge Step Bonuses:
Bonus points are tallied at the end of the challenge and awards become greater
as the length of the challenge increases.
Challenge Length 5-7 weeks
8-10 weeks
11-12 weeks
Average Step
increase each
week by at
least 10% for
duration of
challenge
Average Step
totals > 10,000
steps for
duration of
challenge
10 Bonus Points
20 Bonus Points
30 Bonus Points
10 Bonus Points
20 Bonus Points
30 Bonus Points
“Healthy Eating Points”
Basic Healthy Eating Points
5 points will be awarded to each participant who achieves a weekly average of at
least 7 fruits and vegetables per day.
End of Challenge Healthy Eating Bonuses:
Bonus points tallied at end of challenge and awards are greater as the length of
challenge increases.
Challenge Length 5-7 weeks
8-10 weeks
11-12 weeks
Maintaining an
average of at
least 7 fruit and
vegetable
servings for the
duration of the
challenge
20 Bonus Points
30 Bonus Points
10 Bonus Points
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Pedometers
The Walk for Wellness Challenge is based on the use of a pedometer. A pedometer is a
very useful tool to help monitor progress and is also a powerful motivator to take more
daily steps. It is recommended that a safe progression is a weekly increase in daily steps
by 10% of your current level.
A pedometer is a simple device that is about the size of a pager and is generally worn on
the waistband of your clothing or belt. Pedometers work on a pendulum motion and
count the number of steps taken while being worn.
The basic pedometer, which simply measures the steps taken, is all that is required for
this challenge. More advanced pedometers can also measure distance traveled, calories
burned, and duration walked. A good quality pedometer usually has a cover flap to
protect the reset button. The more features your pedometer has, the more it will likely
cost.
What features are you looking for in a pedometer? Things to consider before you
purchase a pedometer:
Basic step counting (all that is required for this challenge)
Distance travelled in miles/kilometres
Time of walk/run
Steps per minute
Speed
Functionality: are the buttons easy to use? Is the display panel easy to read?
Clip to keep pedometer firmly in place on waistband.
How to use a pedometer:
Put your pedometer on as soon as possible each day as every step counts
towards your daily total.
Reset your pedometer each morning.
The pedometer can be attached to your belt, skirt or jogging clothes, and should
be lined up above your knee.
The pedometer should be parallel to the ground (not tilted).
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Tips that Motivate
Walking Tips to Keep You Going
Add variety by changing your route
Take an iPod or mp3 player to listen to music
Dress in layers so that you can adjust for weather conditions
Wear a hat and sunscreen and be sure to keep hydrated
Join a walking club in your community
Walk inside when the weather doesn’t cooperate (too hot, too cold, too wet, too
icy)
Suggestions for increasing difficulty
Add timed intervals of moderate to vigorous pace
Take fewer breaks
Increase time of the walking briskly
Find a route that varies in terrain
Comfort and Safety tips
If previously inactive, be sure to complete the PAR-Q and You checklist and/or
check with your doctor before beginning any exercise
If you become breathless while walking, slow down
Listen to your body. Walking should not cause pain, dizziness or nausea
Start walking with a proper warm up and cool down
Drink small amounts of water before, during and after your walk
Walk with a friend for pleasure and safety whenever possible
When walking alone, provide details of route and expected time of return
Staying Motivated
The first two to four weeks is the critical point for a new activity. Plan to
maintain your walking program at least a month to give yourself a fair chance of
it becoming routine
Make specific plans to walk and write them down. Include when, where, with
whom, how long, how hard and how often.
Walk during coffee breaks. Park further from the entrance whenever possible
Encourage family members to walk with you or walk with a dog
Try a daily positive walking affirmation to repeat to yourself such as "Walking
makes me look great and feel great"
Keep an exercise log and plot your progress
Reward yourself. Each month, particularly for the first 6 months, reward yourself
for sticking with your walking program goals
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Be Active at Work
Congratulations again for agreeing to participate in this challenge. You may already
know that being physically active regularly will help you sleep better, give you more
energy, enhance your self esteem and improve your overall quality of life. Research
supports that regular physical activity reduces the risk of numerous chronic conditions
such as heart disease, high blood pressure, osteoporosis, Type 2 diabetes and several
cancers.
Other benefits of physical activity participation include:
Increased energy and decreased fatigue
Weight management
Improved health and fitness
Improved sleep patterns
Improved self-image
Continued independent living
Improved productivity and mood
Reduced stress
Reduced risk of back injuries
Improved job satisfaction and team spirit
Active living refers to valuing and including physical activity into your daily routine. It
includes a wide variety of activities, from walking for leisure or transportation to
gardening as well as participating in recreational sport. Embrace and participate in any
type of physical activity that you enjoy - That is active living!
Canada’s Physical Activity Guidelines recommends that adults (aged 18-64 years)
accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous-intensity aerobic physical
activity per week to achieve health benefits.
Moderate intensity activities make you breathe harder and heart beat faster. You can
probably have a conversation but would not be able to sing.
Vigorous intensity activities make you breathe fast and hard and your heart beats much
faster. As a general rule, it will be difficult to carry on a conversation.
Being Physically Active At Work… Every Little Bit Counts
Taking “active breaks” during work hours is easy to do, and it’s good for you.
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Suggestions for Increasing Daily Steps to the Workday
Getting to and from work
Use a mode of active transportation to get to and from work
Park at the far end of the parking lot.
If taking the bus, get off a stop or two early and walk the rest of the way.
At the Office:
Stand up while you are talking on the telephone. Use of a headset or cordless
phone offers the ability to move freely about the office.
Take the stairs at work.
Use a printer that is further from your office or even one floor up.
Get up and talk to people instead of calling or sending an email.
Active Breaks and Lunch Hours:
Invite co-workers to walk around the block with you during your coffee break.
Suggest a break during work meetings and encourage your colleagues to stretch,
walk the halls, or climb the stairs with you.
Organize group activities or classes during lunch hours
Organize a walking club:
Have different routes and distances mapped out around your neighbourhood for
employees to access – variety can help keep people motivated.
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APPENDIX A - Ideas That Motivate (Physical Activity Tips)
Walking Road Trip- Based on the average stride length being .8 metres - 10,000 steps
will equal 8 kilometres (5 miles). One kilometre equals 1250 steps. Using this formula,
you can determine where you have traveled. Below are just some of the destinations
you and/or your team may reach during the challenge.
From St. Catharines to the following town or destination…
Town or destination
Distance in
Kilometres
Equivalent # in steps
Niagara Falls
Welland
Toronto
Hamilton
Burlington
Mississauga
Calgary, AB
Vancouver, BC
Saint John, NB
Yellowknife, NWT
Miami, Florida
Acapulco, Mexico
Los Angeles, California
Honolulu, Hawaii
12
13
56
50
48
64
2,754
3,401
1.079
3,134
1,930
3,513
3,517
7,514
15,000
16,250
70,000
62,500
60,000
80,000
3,442,500
4,251,250
1,348,750
3,917,500
2,412,500
4,391,250
4,396,250
9,392,500
Plan a celebration after achieving a certain distance or location – you may select a
tropical destination in the winter and have a tropical themed celebration. (i.e., Hawaiian
luau when you reach Hawaii).
For estimating distances to various destinations by air, visit:
www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/distance.html
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APPENDIX A - Seasonal Ideas for the Walk for Wellness Challenge
Autumn Ideas:
Fall brings many unique opportunities to be active. The beauty of the changing leaves
and lingering sunshine of still-long days set the stage for afternoon hikes and evening
walks.
Comfortable temperatures tempt us to head outside and enjoy fall festivals and an array
of fundraising walks and runs. Spend time with family and friends outdoors and enjoy
the many social benefits of physical activity.
Take in the fall festivals, craft shows and themed events that many communities
offer.
Support a worthwhile cause; participate in an active fundraising event for charity
while improving health.
Enjoy a scenic bike ride, walk or hike in or around your community or along the
Niagara River Parkway.
Visit a pick-your-own farm for apples and seasonal vegetables.
Visit local farms to pick your own pumpkins, tackle a corn maze or build a
scarecrow.
Rake the leaves instead of using a lawnmower or leaf blower.
Winter Ideas:
Winter provides a wonderful opportunity to get active and discover the great
outdoors…or the great indoors if the cold isn’t your cup of hot apple cider! These
suggestions can extend beyond the Challenge and can be shared with your family and
friends.
Taking it Outside
Say hello to snow!
Create a 3-D portrait. Build a snowperson look-alike for each participant or get
family members involved. Make a family of snow angels.
Build snow castles, mazes, or snow sculptures.
Consider shoveling instead of using the snow blower
Go tobogganing or skating outdoors. Remember the helmets!
Plan a team game of snow pitch (slow pitch in the snow) or neighbourhood game
of Capture the Snowball.
Use food colouring in a spray bottle to create a hopscotch game on the snow.
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Enjoy the winter wonderland along the Niagara River Parkway or one of the
many trails that Niagara has to offer.
Indoor fun
Winters may be short on snow, but tall on cold temperatures! Don’t forget to be active
on these cold days, instead try some of these practical ideas:
Organize a workplace fitness circuit session that includes jumping jacks in the
outside of the lunch room, wall push-ups in or other stations based on the
suggestions of the participants.
Help with housework and tidy up or vacuum with vigor.
Play active games during break with a quick game of Twister or Simon Says.
Try a new activity or an older favourite! Try indoor skating, bowling or an indoor
playground.
Take in a museum or walk through the mall or an indoor attraction.
Jumping Into Spring:
Spring is a great time to add activity into your daily routine at work and at home. The
days are getting longer and warmer, and it feels great to be outside. There are many
activities that can assist you to increase your step count and beautify living spaces at the
same time. Consider grabbing family and friends to:
Give the yard an overhaul. Instead of using a lawnmower to pick up old leaves
and dead grass, participants can use a rake instead.
Plant a garden or consider helping out in a community garden.
Trim the trees or shrubs. Plant flowers. Overturn the soil.
Organize a neighbourhood clean-up day within the workplace. Consider having
staff members donate lunch hour to clean up a local park or green space.
Walk outdoors during coffee breaks, lunch breaks or whenever possible.
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APPENDIX B - Ideas that Motivate (Nutrition Tips)
Tips on Vegetable and Fruits to the Daily Menu
Vegetables and fruit are loaded with vitamins, minerals, fiber and disease fighting
phytochemicals. Research has shown that getting the recommended servings of
vegetables and fruit each day can help reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2
diabetes and some types of cancer.
Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide recommends the following number of servings of
fruit and vegetables:
Males (age 19 – 50)
Females (age 19 – 50)
Males and Females (50 +)
8-10 servings/day
7-8 servings/day
7 servings/day
What is a Serving?
1 Serving of Vegetables or Fruit is…
This looks like…
1 medium sized vegetable or fruit
1 cup (250 ml) green salad
½ cup (125 ml) unsweetened juice
½ cup (125 ml) raw, cooked, frozen or
canned vegetable or fruit
¼ cup (60 ml) dried fruit
A banana, apple or carrot
A small side salad about the size of your fist
A small glass of orange juice or ½ juice box
A scoop of peas or a small bowl of sliced
peaches or grapes
A small box of raisins
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Adding Vegetables and Fruits to your Day
Remind Challenge participants that adding vegetables and fruits can be easy with a little
planning during the grocery store visit.
Sprinkle berries or sliced bananas over favourite breakfast cereal.
Grab a piece of fruit, a wedge of low-fat cheese and a handful of wholegrain
crackers for a fast and nutritious breakfast.
Fill your desk drawer with healthy grab & go snacks such as fruit cups (packed in
juice not syrup), fruit leathers, dried fruit and unsweetened applesauce cups.
Wash and pre-bag baby carrots, celery sticks and peppers to add to lunch bag.
At the sub, pita or sandwich shop, pile sandwich high with the variety of
vegetables available.
Eat at least one vegetable or fruit with every meal and at snack times.
Become famous for the wonderful vegetable and dip trays you bring to work
parties.
Buy fresh fruits and veggies in season when they may be less expensive and at
their peak flavor.
Shred carrots or zucchini into casseroles, quick breads, and muffins or cakes. Use
applesauce instead of oil when baking.
For dessert, have baked apples, pears, or try frozen juice bars (100% juice),
sorbet, sherbet, or frozen yogurt topping with fruit.
Vegetables and fruit are loaded with vitamins, minerals, fiber and disease fighting
phytochemicals. Research has shown that getting the recommended servings of
vegetables and fruit each day can help reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2
diabetes and some types of cancer.
Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide recommends the following number of servings of
fruit and vegetables:
Males (age 19 – 50)
Females (age 19 – 50)
Males and Females (50 +)
8-10 servings/day
7-8 servings/day
7 servings/day
What is a Serving?
1 Serving of Vegetables or Fruit is…
1 medium sized vegetable or fruit
1 cup (250 ml) green salad
½ cup (125 ml) unsweetened juice
½ cup (125 ml) raw, cooked, frozen or
canned vegetable or fruit
¼ cup (60 ml) dried fruit
This looks like…
A banana, apple or carrot
A small side salad about the size of your fist
A small glass of orange juice or ½ juice box
A scoop of peas or a small bowl of sliced
peaches or grapes
A small box of raisins
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APPENDIX C - Suggestions for Increasing Vegetables and Fruits on a
Budget
Eating healthy does not need to break the bank. Try these suggestions on how to
increase fruit and vegetable intake on a budget:
Cook enough for several meals and freeze leftovers. Place enough food for 1-2
meals in each container.
Create a meal plan for the week that uses similar fruits and vegetables, prepared
in different ways. Make the most out of the produce that you buy.
Buy fruits and vegetables in season at farmers’ markets or at your local grocery
store.
Grow your own vegetables. Invest a little in seeds, and get a lot of vegetables in
return. Try indoor pots or greenhouse growing for the cooler months.
Mix it yourself as 100% juice from frozen concentrate is often less expensive per
serving than pre-bottled juice.
Minimize waste, by buying only the amounts your family will eat.
Enjoy the comforts of home more often. Eating at restaurants can increase the
amount you spend on food.
Be creative! To get the most out of your purchase, enjoy your fruits and
vegetables in different ways. For example, you can use fruits for dessert. Try
baking apples or poaching pears with some cinnamon.
Homemade soup is a healthy and tasty way to use vegetables. Make a big batch
and freeze leftovers in small lunch-size containers.
Look for sales and deals on fruits & vegetables at the grocery store or through
coupons.
Cut your fruits and vegetables at home. Pre-cut produce can cost much more
than whole fruits and vegetables.
Canned fruits and vegetables will last longer and can be a healthy addition to a
variety of meals. Choose canned vegetables that have no added salt and fruit
that is canned in 100% fruit juice.
Frozen fruit and vegetables store well in the freezer until you’re ready to add
them to a meal.
Pick your own at local farms. Late summer and early fall is a great time to pick
your own fruits and vegetables. This can be a fun and less expensive way to buy
in bulk and freeze, can, or dry for later.
Store-brands can be a great budget choice for many forms of fruits and
vegetables.
Buy frozen fruits and vegetables in large bags to stretch your budget (e.g., green
beans and blueberries). Avoid those with added sugar, salt, or sauce.
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APPENDIX D - Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire*
For each of the following questions, please circle Yes or No. Be sure to follow the
instructions carefully.
Physical activity or exercise includes activities such as walking briskly, jogging, bicycling,
swimming, or any other activity in which the exertion is at least as intense as these
activities.
1.
2.
No
I am currently physically active.
0
I intend to become more physically active in the next six months. 0
Yes
1
1
For activity to be regular, it must add up to a total of 150 minutes or more per week and
should be moderate or vigorous intensity. The 150 minutes can be accumulated
throughout the week in bouts of 10 minutes or more.
1.
2.
I currently engage in regular physical activity.
I have been regularly physically active for the past six months.
No
0
0
Yes
1
1
__________
SCORING
If question 1 = 0 and question 2 = 0, then you are at stage 1 (Pre-contemplation).
If question 1 = 0 and question 2 = 1, then you are at stage 2 (Contemplation).
If question 1 = 1 and question 3 = 0, then you are at stage 3 (Preparation).
If question 1 = 1, question 3 = 1, and question 4 = 0, then you are at stage 4 (Decision/action).
If question 1 = 1, question 3 = 1, and question 4 = 1, then you are at stage 5 (Maintenance).
* Source: Adapted from B. H. Marcus and L. H. Forsyth, 2003, Motivating People to Be Physically Active,
(Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics).
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What Stage are you in?
Stage 1: Not thinking About Change (Precontemplation)
Stage 2: Thinking About Change (Contemplation)
Stage 3: Doing Some Physical Activity (Preparation)
Stage 4: Doing Enough Physical Activity (Action)
Stage 5: Making Physical Activity a Habit (Maintenance)
Stage 1: Not Thinking about Change
1. Talk with your health care provider about how you might personally benefit from
exercise.
2. Think about the additional benefits from physical activity including better weight
control, increased energy, decreased depression and/or anxiety.
3. Think about the barriers preventing you from becoming more active (i.e., no
time, no one to be active with, no place to be active)
4. Think of ways that your inactivity is affecting people important to you. Discuss
this with these individuals.
5. Think about what physical activities you would be most likely to do and where
you might do them.
6. Think of a small gift you can buy for yourself as a reward for following these
strategies.
7. Be aware of the importance of using these strategies as beginning steps for
becoming physically active.
8. After using these strategies for a couple of weeks, think again about your stage
of change.
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Stage 2: Thinking About Change
1. Do some research and identify opportunities for physical activity participation.
2. Write down some of the barriers that prevent you from being physically active
(i.e., no time, no one to be active with, no place to be active). Identify some
solutions to a few of these barriers.
3. Ask some people you know to help you with solutions for overcoming barriers to
physical activity.
4. Commit yourself to a brief period of physical activity, such as a ten-minute walk,
at least once over the next week.
5. For one week keep track of how much time you spend participating in physical
activity and how much time you spend sitting or being inactive in other ways
(i.e., watching TV, driving, sleeping).
6. Think of a small gift you can buy for yourself as a reward for following these
strategies.
7. After using these strategies for a few weeks, think again about your stage of
change.
Stage 3: Doing Some Physical Activity
1. For one week keep track of how much time you spend participating in physical
activity and how much time you spend sitting or being inactive in other ways
(i.e., watching TV, driving, sleeping).
2. Look at your record of activity and plan to replace 15 minutes of inactive time
during the week with a physical activity.
3. Think of ways to remind yourself to be more active during the week, such as
scheduling physical activity appointments, post-it notes with reminders to do
activities around the home, office and/or car.
4. Commit yourself to increasing your daily activity at least 5 minutes each day for
the next week.
5. Allow yourself to do something inactive (watch TV, read) as a reward for being
physically active.
6. Discuss with someone important in your life how he/she can reward you for
following these strategies.
7. After using these strategies for a few weeks, think again about your stage of
change.
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WALK FOR WELLNESS CHALLENGE - Workplace Program Participant’s Manual
Stage 4: Doing Enough Physical Activity
1. Write down ways to be physically active each day.
2. Commit yourself to doing at least 30 minutes of activity each day or 150 minutes
of physical activity per week.
3. Try a new activity that you think might be enjoyable.
4. Set up a plan for rewarding yourself for physical activity on a regular basis.
5. Think of ways to remind yourself to be more active during the week (i.e., put
reminders in your calendar, put post-it notes with reminders to exercise around
your home, office, and/or car).
6. Make a physical activity goal for the next three months. The goal should be
specific and realistic. .
7. Think about some of the benefits you have already received from being
physically active and those benefits you will reach if you remain physically active.
8. After using these strategies for a few weeks, think again about your stage of
change.
Stage 5: Making Physical Activity a Habit
1. Meet with your physician to discuss long-term health goals for physical activity,
such as decreased blood-pressure and/or cholesterol.
2. Think about the additional benefits offered from living a physically active lifestyle
including better weight control, increased energy, improved stress management,
better sleep.
3. Write down the strategies that have helped you so far and think about ways to
make these strategies part of your daily routine.
4. Continue to set both short and long-term goals for physical activity.
5. Plan for how to stay physically active on vacations or holidays.
6. Think about how to restart your physical activity if you’ve missed a few days.
7. Talk with people important to you about how they can help you to stay
motivated.
8. If you are having trouble staying motivated, go back to some of the earlier
strategies, such as thinking about the benefits of physical activity.
9. Find ways to make physical activity fun!
This handout adapted from Motivating People to be Physically Active, Marcus & Forsyth, 2003
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WALK FOR WELLNESS CHALLENGE - Workplace Program Participant’s Manual
APPENDIX - E Challenge Goal Setting Worksheet
Before starting the challenge, identify at least 2 personal reasons for wanting to become
more physically active. Examples may include being a healthy role model for your
family, achieving a healthier body weight, making new friends or relieving stress.
S.M.A.R.T. Goal Setting – Get to where you want to be
Setting goals is an effective way to change your current behaviours and habits. In order
to be effective, goals should be SMART..
S – specific
M – measurable
A – attainable
R – realistic
T – time oriented
Here are some examples showing how to use the SMART approach:
To reach a healthy weight
Specific: Lose 10 pounds.
Measurable: Weigh myself once a week.
Attainable: Change the amount and type of foods I eat so that foods include more fruits
and vegetables. Complete a minimum of 30 minutes of physical activity each day or 150
minutes per week.
Realistic: Lose 1-2lbs each week.
Time oriented: Lose 10 pounds over the course of the challenge in the next 8-10 weeks.
Become more active
Specific: Walk 30 minutes, 7 days a week.
Measurable: Time myself when I go walking and keep a daily log.
Attainable: Call a friend to walk with me.
Realistic: Walk each day beginning with 10-15 minutes and include walking on breaks
while at work. I will do my walks first thing in the morning so that my day does not get
too busy.
Time oriented: Reach 30 minutes of walking at one time by week four of the Walk for
Wellness Challenge and then walk every day after week 8.
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WALK FOR WELLNESS CHALLENGE - Workplace Program Participant’s Manual
APPENDIX F - Non-Step Conversion Tool
The pedometer is a great motivational tool for tracking activities that involve stepping
(e.g. walking, stair-climbing, jogging, etc.) or all the extra steps you take throughout the
day. There may be times that a pedometer cannot measure the activity accurately (e.g.
rowing, yoga, stretching, etc.).
In these situations, keep track of the duration (in minutes) of the activity. Using the
chart below for your activity (or one similar to it), multiply the number of minutes of
activity by the number of steps per minute (e.g., 30 minutes of ping pong equals 3,480
steps).
Steps
Activity
Steps
Activity
145
246
131
174
116
203
87
87
232
232
125
131
174
203
145
260
116
174
131
101
67
348
172
116
260
101
203
290
290
160
260
131
Aerobics (low impact)
Aerobics (step)
Badminton
Basketball
Bicycling, leisurely
Bicycling, moderate
Bowling
Canoeing, light
Circuit Training
Cross-country skiing
Curling (sweeping)
Dancing
Downhill skiing
Elliptical trainer
Firewood, carrying/stacking
Football
Gardening (light)
Gardening (heavy)
Golfing, without a cart
Golfing, with a cart
Grocery Shopping
Handball
Hiking, general
Horseback riding
Hockey
Housework, general
Ice skating
Jumping rope
Martial Arts
Mowing the lawn
Orienteering
Painting walls
101
116
203
125
203
101
203
463
391
290
232
203
174
182
203
145
348
180
260
72
203
116
232
101
87
87
116
174
87
174
145
72
Pilates
Ping pong
Racquet Sports
Raking leaves
Rollerblading
Rowing, light
Rowing, moderate
Running, 10 mph (6 min/mile)
Running, 8 mph (7.5 min mile)
Running, 6 mph (10 min mile)
Running, 5 mph (12 min/mile)
Scuba diving
Snow shovelling
Snowboarding
Soccer
Softball
Squash
Stair climbing (light)
Stair climbing (moderate)
Stretching
Swimming
Tai Chi
Tennis
Trampoline
Volleyball
Wash the car
Water aerobics
Water skiing
Weight lifting, moderate
Weight lifting, vigorous
Yard Work
Yoga
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WALK FOR WELLNESS CHALLENGE - Workplace Program Participant’s Manual
APPENDIX G - Converting wheelchair odometer distance to steps
Use the following chart to convert your wheelchair odometer reading into steps. The
chart is based on the premise that the average distance covered by walking 10,000 steps
with an average stride length of .8 meters is 8 kilometres (5 miles).
Distance (reported in metres)
Equivalent # of Steps
100 m
200 m
300 m
400 m
500 m
600 m
700 m
800 m
900 m
1000 metres (1 kilometre)
1100 m
1200 m
1300 m
1400 m
1500 m
1600 m
1700 m
1800 m
1900 m
2000 m (2 kilometres)
2100 m
2200 m
2300 m
2400 m
2500 m
2600 m
2700 m
2800 m
2900 m
3000 m (3 kilometres)
4000 m (4 kilometres)
5000 m (5 kilometres)
125
250
375
500
625
750
875
1000
1125
1250
1375
1500
1625
1750
1875
2000
2125
2250
2375
2500
2625
2750
2875
3000
3125
3250
3375
3500
3625
3750
5000
6250
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WALK FOR WELLNESS CHALLENGE - Workplace Program Participant’s Manual
APPENDIX H - Walk for Wellness Tracking Sheet
A great goal is to try and increase the distance walked or your time spent walking by
10% each week (i.e. 1 minute for every 10 minutes walked).
Remember to reset your pedometer each day. Be sure to put it on as soon as
possible each morning. Use the Non-Step Conversion Tool for non-step activities
and/or for when you are not wearing a pedometer.
Each week, forward your weekly totals to your Team Captain. Try to increase
your total steps and fruit and vegetables by 10% each week.
Week
Week 1
Baseline
Week 2
Week 3
Week 4
Week 5
Week 6
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
Weekly
Total
Weekly
Average
Pedometer
Reading
Step
Equivalents
Servings of
Fruits & Veg
Pedometer
Reading
Step
Equivalents
Servings of
Fruits & Veg
Pedometer
Reading
Step
Equivalents
Servings of
Fruits & Veg
Pedometer
Reading
Step
Equivalents
Servings of
Fruits & Veg
Pedometer
Reading
Step
Equivalents
Servings of
Fruits & Veg
Pedometer
Reading
Step
Equivalents
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WALK FOR WELLNESS CHALLENGE - Workplace Program Participant’s Manual
Week
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
Weekly
Total
Weekly
Average
Servings of
Fruits & Veg
Week 7
Week 8
Week 9
Week 10
Week 11
Week 12
Week 13
Pedometer
Reading
Step
Equivalents
Servings of
Fruits & Veg
Pedometer
Reading
Step
Equivalents
Servings of
Fruits & Veg
Pedometer
Reading
Step
Equivalents
Servings of
Fruits & Veg
Pedometer
Reading
Step
Equivalents
Servings of
Fruits & Veg
Pedometer
Reading
Step
Equivalents
Servings of
Fruits & Veg
Pedometer
Reading
Step
Equivalents
Servings of
Fruits & Veg
Pedometer
Reading
Step
Equivalents
Servings of
Fruits & Veg
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WALK FOR WELLNESS CHALLENGE - Workplace Program Participant’s Manual
APPENDIX I - PAR-Q & YOU
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WALK FOR WELLNESS CHALLENGE - Workplace Program Participant’s Manual
APPENDIX J - Web Resources to Support You during the Walk for Wellness
Challenge
The following are excellent web based resources that can help you safely get active eat
better for good health and earn more challenge points.
Niagara Region Public Health search physical activity
www.niagararegion.ca
Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q) (included in participants manual):
http://www.csep.ca/english/view.asp?x=698
Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-guide-aliment/myguide-monguide/index_e.html
Canada’s Physical Activity Guide
www.csep.ca
Dietitians of Canada: Eat Well Live Well
www.dietitians.ca
Assess Your Health: EATracker
http://www.dietitians.ca/Your-Health.aspx
EatRight Ontario
http://www.eatrightontario.ca
Page 31
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