Summer - American Radio History

Summer - American Radio History

SUMMER ISSUE

VOL.2

No.1

Published by

Milton

B.

Sleeper

Price $1.00

Magazine

for

Music

Lis ne'rs

www.americanradiohistory.com

m,...w

.d,..,

Columbia

Listening mean maximum

Pleasure

-

thanks to the finest in modern sound recording methods and equipment

Music lovers everywhere know more listening pleasure that

Columbia LP records mean

-not

in playing time alone, but in superb quality of reproduction.

Yet few listeners outside the professional circle realize the degree of perfection which this record quality requires in every step of manufacture and proc- essing. Take the original sound recordings and the processing masters, for example. Frequency response, signal

-to

-noise ratio, distortion and surface noise must measure up to standards which would have seemed entirely impractical a few years ago.

But Columbia has found that Audiotape and Audiodiscs are an ideal combination for meeting all of these exacting re- quirements

-

Audiotape for recording the original sound and

Audiodiscs for the masters from which stampers are made.

In fact this same record -making combination is now being used with outstanding success by

America's leading producers of fine phonograph records and broadcast transcriptions.

You can get this same sound perfection in your recording work, too

-

with Audiodiscs and Audiotape.

Their superior quality is the result of more than

12 years of specialized experi- ence by the only company in America devoted solely to the manufacture of fine sound recording media, both tape and discs.

GThe exclusive trade -mark of

Columbia Long Playing

Records- symbol of highest quality.

Trade -Marks

"Columbia, "`Masterworks,'

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Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. Marcas Registradas.

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Plan to attend the free "Jensen

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CORP.

AUTHORitatively Speaking

This month's cover portrays a television and radio -phonograph installation which would fit gracefully into almost any home.

It was designed and engineered by Lowe

Associates in Boston.

HigJt-Jidelitq

THE MAGAZINE FOR MUSIC LISTENERS

Four months ago, we unpacked a new FM tuner and, after a quick look at it, sat down to read the long and detailed instructions sent with it. We thought those instruc- tions were unusually well written. So we called the. manufacturer to find out could explain, equally clearly, a little who wrote them.

"Our chief engineer". We then asked the C.E. if he thought he about how FM tuners worked and a lot about what tuner specifications meant in terms of user satisfaction. "Well, I can always

He tried, and we think he succeeded

- with exceptional lucidity. Thus we have the article, beginning on page

17, by

Spindell of

Browning Labs.

Howard

In this issue, we inaugurate a new feature on page

37:

A

London Newsletter, by

Donald W. Aldous, who is in a position to know what is going on: he is executive secretary of the British Sound Recording

Association, member of many technical and non -technical committees, and a writer well

- known in the English periodicals.

Some men face a crisis and are overcome.

Others, more rare, overcome the crisis.

George

A.

Brewster is one of the rare variety.

His crisis was several cabinetsful of audio and radio equipment, a small living room, yet the only commercially available cabinets wasted space, as far as his equipment was concerned. Instead of giving up in despair, he designed his own cabinet and, on page

39, tells how he did it.

By a popular acclaim, we gladly present for repeat performance,

Edward

L.

Merritt,

Jr., who brings us up to date on The Music

Between, beginning on page

48.

Time was when corner enclosures for speak- ers were almost unknown and Paul Klipsch was considered a dangerous radical. Now they are so widely accepted that one manu- facturer will soon be able to advertise,

"Name the corner. and we can fill it!

".

That's why we asked chief engineer for Electro- Voice, to tell about the whys and wherefores closure. This he does

-

Howard of this type of en- on page

Souther,

65.

Branch Offices

(advertising only):

NEW

YORK,

Room 1209,

6

East 39th Street.

Phone: MUrray

Hill

5

-6332.

Fred

C.

Mich

- alove,

April, for

Eastern Manager. CHICAGO,

Washington Street.

Phone: CEntral

6

-0469.

Charles Kline, Western Manager.

Published by:

AUDIOCOM, INC.

Barrington, Mass. Tel.

Great Barrington

500.

HIGH -FIDELITY is issued quarterly in

September, November and February.

Single copies $1.00 three years,

-Subscription

$3.00 for one year in at the

176 rate:

W.

Great

$6.00

U.S.A.

-Canada, add

50e per year postage- foreign, add $1.00 per year postage.

Editorial contributions will be welcomed by the Editor. Payment for articles accepted will be arranged prior to publication. Contribu- tions will be neither acknowledged nor returned unless accompanied by adequate packing, and directions, nor will postage,

HIGH

-

FIDELITY Magazine be responsible for their safe handling in its office or in transit.

The cover design and contents of

HIGH

-

FIDELITY magazine are fully protected by

U. S. copyrights, and must not be reproduced in any manner or in any form without written permission.

Volume

2

Number

1

Summer

1952

CHARLES

FOWLER,

Editor

CONTENTS

As the Editor Sees It

Noted With Interest

Readers' Forum

How to Select an

FM

Tuner, by Freeman

A. Spindell

What makes a good

FM tuner? What do the manufacturers' specifi- cations mean in terms of listener satisfaction? These are the ques- tions answered in this article.

Four

LP

Commandments, by

William

S.

Bachman

If you want your LP records to live to a ripe (and quiet) old age, follow the simple rules prescribed by the author.

Music

for

the Group, by

William

D.

Diemer

Whether two or two hundred people assemble for a record concert, here are ideas for increasing their enjoyment.

Music in the Home

A portfolio of custom installations for home and office.

FM

Broadcasting, by

Milton

B.

Sleeper

What's wrong and right

--

about FM broadcasting today.

London Newsletter, by Donald

W.

Aldous

A comprehensive report of English and European activities in the field of records and recording.

Make

It

Compact, by George

A. Brewster

Design details of a cabinet which will house all your phono -radio equipment and still leave space for a few other pieces of furniture in your living room.

RECORDS

AND

MUSIC SECTION

Verdi on Records, by

C.

G.

Burke

The author continues his series on the recorded works of the great composers.

Hither and Yon:

Musically

The

A

Music Between, by Edward

L.

Merritt,

Jr. second report on semi -classical music.

Music on Tape

If you have been wondering about pre -recorded tapes, this candid report will be helpful.

Records in

Review

List of

LP

Record

Companies:

Addenda

Designs

for

Corner Enclosures, by

Howard

Souther

This authoritative article tells the whys and wherefores of this popu- lar type of loudspeaker enclosure.

Room

Acoustics, by

G.

A.

Briggs

The third in the series of articles on sound reproduction.

Air

Couplers and Such

Reports and photographs from readers.

New Books

Tested in the

Home:

The

Altec-

Lansing Hi -Fi System

The

Weathers One -Gram Pickup

Traders' Marketplace

Professional Directory

Advertiser's

Index

MILTON

Copyright

B.

SLEEPER,

1952 by

Publisher

Audiocom, Inc.

Entered as second -class matter April 27,

1951 at the

Post

Office, Great

Act of March 3, 1879. Additional entry at the

Barrington, Mass., rader the

Put

Office, Pittsfield, Mass. Printed in the U. S. A.

41-64

41

4

7

11

17

22

24

2$

34

37

39

46

4$

50

51

54

65

69

75

79

92

94

101

104

I

1 1

3 www.americanradiohistory.com

As

THE

EDITOR

SEES

IT

4

®F

THE many letters in the Readers' Forum issue, three of this point up different aspects of a similar problem: how high should high fidelity be?

John

Timm asks for an article on

DDT for the bugs of high fidelity. He mentions rumble, hum, and many an- other complaint familiar to owners of wide -range music listening systems. The hum may not be in the system; if the equipment is really good, it will reproduce the hum which broadcast station engineers overlook and the rumble which strays into records. It will also, of course, reproduce every musical whisper, every crashing crescendo.

The bad, yes; also

But, says another reader, there is not enough good on records, anyway.

- the good.

Too many records are

-

of

a quality inferior to the equipment on which they are played.

This is true, but the situation is improving, certainly insofar as producers of classical records are concerned.

The improvement achieved over the past three years can- not be denied, and more and more companies are releasing records of outstanding sound quality.

The Music

Be- tween is in a state some, very badly.

of

turmoil; some is recorded very well,

Popular and jazz items seem to be consistently poor.

Finally, H. M.

Evans joins an earlier correspondent in annoyance over having purchased what reviewers stated was an outstanding high fidelity recording, only to find that it had been played half a dozen times with the record shop's worn out needle, scratched by careless handling, and gene-rally reduced to a playable condition which made it un-

-

on hi

-fi equipment.

Mr. Evans advocates adoption of an

English custom: mint copies

- that records in factory

-sealed jackets, guaranteed perfect, is,

of

top quality all the way around.

We shall add to this our own story, presaged.. by the article in an earlier issue by Carl

Eton on his experiences vwith jazz its records.

A manufacturer, moderately well known popular records, sent us three 78's for review. Two w re identical with what one would buy in the record shop. Quality was poor: no highs, no lows.

The third record was a

"white

label"-

intended for disc jockeys and marked

Not

For Resale. Quality: excellent. In other words, this company can do it, but not for the public.

Another company, also best known for its popular 78's, lately entered the

LP classical and semi- classical field.

Some

of

its releases have been

of

outstanding recording quality. Recently some ten

-inch LP's came in for re- view.

They screeched so badly in the highs that nothing could be done to make them bearable.

The last records to be cited in our story are the

78 rpm. jazz pressings privately recorded by

E.

D. Nunn, whose activities were

HIGH

-FIDELITY. mentioned in the previous issue of

They are proof positive that it can be done. all

Logically, we come to the conclusion that high fidelity can be too high

- sometimes.

It can be too high nearly the time with pop records; frequently with semi -classical records; occasionally with classical releases.

It can also be too high within the music reproducing system itself. The system was discussed at must be balanced. This subject length in an article in

HIGH

-FIDELITY

No.

2, but it is too important not to be mentioned again, briefly. up

In essence, a wonderful loudspeaker will show the faults of an amplifier; a wonderful speaker and amplifier will bring out all the rumble in a turntable; and a superlative system will reproduce with unpleasant clarity the rumble and wow in a record.

However, there are occasions, more and more and more of them, when everything is just right

- from the micro- phone in the recording studio to the speaker in the living room. Then the original is indeed re- created in our homes.

Then

- and only then

- is high fidelity never too high.

FINALLY, a suggestion for record manufacturers

(es- pecially those in the pops and jazz field) to consider: if it is possible to produce "white labels ", why would it not be feasible to manufacture a few extra copies, wrap them up carefully, as Mr. Evans suggests, replace the

Not

For Resale notice with one which reads,

"For use only on high fidelity reproducing systems

"?

Granted, the market now is small

- certainly when compared to one which buys over i,000,000 copies each of top pop hits every year.

But the market is growing; may well encompass the entire home market. eventually it

The sooner it is cultivated, the sooner we shall be able to write another editorial, reversing our suggestion and recommending that the users be of old- fashioned equipment not forgotten

. .

. that special pressings (with black labels

?) be made available to them, bearing the state- ment, "For use only on low fidelity equipment." That will be the day! www.americanradiohistory.com

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5 www.americanradiohistory.com

Only

TWO reasons

why it

should be the new

tUeboor

Custom installation by

Voicz

&

Vision, hc.

I

/

/

Your hi- fidelity

installation

deserves

those components that provide

the

"ex- tras" which, when combined add up to

1 pride of ownership and

2 truly fine high fidelity reproduction. The new Webcor

106 -27

HF

Diskchanger gives you both. The features your

installation

must have to perform at its best are those that are found exclusively in a

Diskchanger made by

Webster- Chicago.

Plays all three speeds, all three sizes auto-

\ matically. Absolute minimum rumble.

\

Extra -balanced weight turntable for

"fly- wheel" action and speed constancy. Retractable

\

idler wheel eliminates flat spots on drive surfaces.

Plug

-in head takes popular magnetic cartridges.

Au- tomatic muting switch between records. flock

Super electrostatic turntable.

Easiest changer to install.

// If it's made by Webster

-

Chicago, it's ujebcor

...

and if it's

Webcor it is the finest

6

Mtsbcr is a registered

Made noms fer products manufactured by

WE

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CAC

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www.americanradiohistory.com

Noted with

Interest:

Standard of Comparison

Elsewhere in this issue, we a mention use of tape recorded at

15 ips. as a standard a- gainst which to compare a batch of pre

-re- corded tapes. The story behind this tape has given us a long chuckle of merriment which we shall not soon forget. The tape itself has been played and re- played until we wonder if it is really true that tape never wears out.

The story begins last Winter, when our publisher shoveled the snow out of his drive and betook himself to the land of the Brahmin. Perhaps the shoveling was too much for him, for no sooner had he arrived in

Boston than he was infected by a fever which was sweeping the area:

WBGH was on the air.

Enthusiasm and excitement had not run so high since the Tea Party. Needless to say, a story in full was the result. Please see HIGH

-FIDELITY

No.

4, page 6o ff.

Among our readers, reaction to the arti- cle was primarily a sustained, dreamy -eyed look. Others said, in effect,

"Hunh! ". At least one pair spell out

"Hunh!"

- of readers took the time to in one of by the best -humored, most enjoyable letters we've received in quite a while. To wit:

"Dear

Mr. Sleeper:

"We look askance at your remarks about the technical performance of non- commerci- al stations in the Spring issue of

HIGH-

FIDEL-

ITY.

We at

WUOM welcome comparison as to technical operation with any station, commercial or non- commercial, in opera- tion today.

"For some years now,

WUOM has been covering a large part of the state of

Michi- gan with non -commercial programs, largely musical, of highest quality. We average two or three live music remotes weekly, with many studio pickups of smaller in- strumental groups. All of our recording is done on tape at

15 or 3o ips., and we sup- ply many hours of recorded program mate- rial to stations in and out of Michigan.

"We are enclosing a few excerpts of tape from some of our typical pickups. If you have time, you might listen to them, and perhaps they might help you revise your ideas is about educational broadcasting. This

Step One in a carefully laid plot to move the High Fidelity Capital of the World from

Great Barrington to Ann Arbor.

Sincerely,

Dean

TV.

Colton,

Studio Supervisor

Robert

M. Burd, Recording Engineer

Station

With

WUOM, Univ. of Michigan" that as a good start, we ran through the tape. Now we are off our feet!

Every- thing was there

...

full frequency range

...

dynamics aplenty

. . clarity

.

.. and it all wound up with a combined chorus- orchestra- organ "explosion" which has not yet failed to bring listeners in our home right out of their chairs.

To Waldo Abbot, director of broadcasting at

WUOM, a low and reverential bow. An- other bow to the men responsible for catch- ing sound at its best. And to all concerned, a gentle prod in a lower left rib: how's for an article for the Fall issue of

HIGH-

FIDEL-

ITY?

Continued on page

9

Prerequisite to

ALL

TRIODE

HIGH QUALITY

AUDIO

AMPLIFIER

The

BROOK will play at extremely low volume, yet retain or, recreate

in

full naturalness of tone; your home the full volume of a symphony, or dance band, clear and clean. You will hear and

FEEL

live music and voices.

Write for technical data, booklet

.

..

TV

RECORDS

..

RADIO

7 www.americanradiohistory.com

PRESENTING

COLLINS

AM-FM "PRE -FAB

"

TUNERS

NOW you can build a Collins

AM

-FM tuner from the Pre -Fab units shown below

!

COMPLETE VERSATILITY is the byword in this new tuner design. Through the addition of the

AM circuit, the Collins tuner will meet all require- ments for home music systems and installations where a fine tuner is required.

ECONOMY:

The very finest in tuner design is you at exceptionally low prices. Collins quality offered is your assurance of a fine product that will work to your com- plete satisfaction.

You cannot duplicate this tuner in its completed form at twice the price

!

3

Ways to purchase

1

COLLINS Tuner

2

1.

As an AM tuner kit

2.

As an

FM

tuner

3.

As an

AM -FM kit tuner kit

FM

Tuning Unit

$15.25

The Collins

FM

-AM Pre -Fab Tuner

After

You Assemble It (Total Kit

Cost

Kit

As

It Looks

$69.00)

AM Tuning Unit

(Includes

IF and

Audio Amplifier)

$19.25

8

FM IF

Amplifier

$19.75

Tuning

Eye Kit

Available

At

ALL PRE -FAB UNITS

ARE ASSEMBLED, WIRED, TESTED,

AN

D

ALIGNED

AT

FACTORY. PRICES SHOWN INCLUDE TUBES.

The FM tuning unit employs a

6J6 dual triode

RF

6AG5 converter, and 6C4 oscillator. Permeability tuned, and drift

-free.

High sensitivity of between

6 and

Dimensions:

71/4"x411/2

".

The

IF

10 amplifie; stable, microvolts. amplifier for

FM uses

6 tubes!

6BA6,

(4)

6AU6, and

6AL5 discriminator.

High gain, wide band response for highest fidelity reception. Frequency response cf

FM section, plus or minus

2

DB,

20 to

20,000 cycles. Distortion less than /2 of

1%. Dimensions:

1

1 s

/b

°x2

1/2'.

Tie the use of new, high gain iron -core transformers. Careful align- ment

AM tuning unit utilizes a sensitivity and selectivity is accomplished through provides widest response super -het circuit employing three tubes:

6BE6 converter, 6BA6

IF amplifier, and 6AT6 detector.

E.stremely high available from this type of circuit.

If builder desires, triode amplifier section of 6AT6 tube may be used as first audio stage.

Chassis

Kit includes all necessary parts. Nothing else to buy

Instruction Manual included with detailed, step

-by -step procedure pictures and schematic diagrams.

Chassis

2

1/2 measures

8"x17

Overall, the tuner, when assembled, measures

8

°x17 °x6

"x

$2.85

UC

-2 Universal

Chassis Kit

$14.75

MAIL

ORDER COUPON

TODAY

!

r

TO:

COLLINS AUDIO

PRODUCTS

P.O. Box 368, Westfield,

N.J.

Enclosed Find

Li

Check

CO. INC.

Money

Order For

NAME

AM Tuning Unit

FM

Tuning Unit

FM

IF

Amplifier

UC

-2 Chassis

Kit

M

-1

Tuning

Eye

Kit

ADDRESS

1

CITY

STATE www.americanradiohistory.com

NOTED

WITH

INTEREST

Continued from page

7

WAJL to

WUOM

Speaking of FM station WUOM reminds us that we were somewhat startled by a report from them concerning the latest fashion in gifts for successful broadcasters: another radio station. Yes, that's right. We have just re -read the release, to be sure of our facts, and it says that FM

-

lock, stock, and sity

Michigan, has antenna station

WAJL of

- as a gift to the Univer- of Michigan, which plans to operate it point for WUOM programs. as a relay

Photographers: Proceed with Caution!

In this item, we bring to your attention that Peerless

Camera

Stores'

(italics ours) has started an audio department, well stocked with a variety of speakers, amplifiers, tuners, turntables, and whatnot. Camera stores have long dealt in tape recording

Peerless is one equipment, but of the first to go whole hog into audio. which is

It is an interesting move, but one fraught with danger for those who have hitherto followed the quiet and cellar

- bound hobby of photography.

They are likely to walk into the Peerless store on the purchase of an intent enlarger and walk out with an amplifier. Which will them into a noisy species, transmute habitat living room.

Chicago Residents: Note

Well

-known Voice and Vision has opened a new demonstration room at

54 E.

Walton

Street (90o

North), which is reliably re- ported to be one of the handsomest high fidelity in showrooms in the

U.

S.

Better stop for a look and listen.

Springfield (Mass.)

Residents: Note

A short while ago, we had an interesting discussion with George Karpovich of

Spring- field

Sound Co.

(772

Worthington

St.). His organization has been in the public address and intercommunication systems field for several years and is now in the process of expanding to include a demonstration room for high fidelity news for equipment. This is good anyone within driving distance of

Springfield; we need reliable sales and ser- vice hereabouts. Springfield Sound will be especially glad to have visitors at this time, for they want suggestions on how best to meet the needs of future customers.

Compliments on a

Complement

Vic

Brociner served has earned many compliment a well -de- for his preamplifier

- equalizer unit,2 and seems likely to earn more compliments for a complement to that unit: a control amplifier

"intended to pro- vide additional amplification and con- trols for selection of inputs, volume, bass and treble

". The preamp -equalizer works di-

1138

East 44th St., New York

17,

N.

Y.

2Described in

HIGH-

FIDELITY, No.

3.

Continued on page

82

magne order

Here's the ideal instrument to complete your modern home installation of high fidelity sound equipment. Magnecorder, first choice,

3 to

1, of America's radio engineers, gives you matchless sound reproduction

...

so true and life -like you can't tell it from the original music.

Magnecorder can be easily installed and integrated with your radio. TV, or present sound system assembly. And so simple to operate a child can learn to use it in a matter of minutes.

Now you can record, play back and preserve indefinitely, fine music, great speeches, important events, the voices of your family and friends. Or you can erase the tape and use it again and again. for complete information and demonstration write today

!

Maqoteeetfra

Inc.

PROFESSIONAL TAPE RECORDERS

360

N.

Michigan Avenue

Chicago

1,

III.

Dept.

H

F

-4

Name.

Address...

City Zone..

State

9 www.americanradiohistory.com

lyEET

... with no tone arm resonance

11114111

New

1ra9

108

-B

Arm for all records has new suspension principle

Perfect tracking

of

records and virtual elimina- tion of tone arm resonances are only two advantages

of

this arm versatile, specially -designed

-

the finest

yet developed! It satisfies every requirement

of I,P

reproduction, permits instant changing from

78

r.p.m.

to

LP (micro- groove) or

45 r.p.m. and assures correct stylus pressure automatically.

GE

or

Pickering magnetic pickup cartridges are interchangeable and slip

into

place quickly and easily.

Maintains perfect contact

with bad

records, accommodates records

up to

16"

in

diameter.

106

-SP

Transcription Arm

-

Assures fidelity of tone for every speed record.

Three cartridge slides furnished enable GE l

-mil,

21!. or

3

-mil, or Pickering cartridges to be slipped into position instantly, with no tools or solder.

Low vertical inertia, precisely adjustable stylus pressure.

Gray Equalizers

-

standard professional equipment by leading broadcast stations, these specially- designed equal- izers assure highest tonal quality reproduction from old records

...

new record

...

constant velocity frequency response for conventional or LP records.

Uses GE or Pickering cartridges.

Please write fo bulletins describing the above equipment.

RESEARCH

and

Development

Co.,

Inc.,

Hilliard

St., Manchester,

Conn.

Division of

The

GRAY MANUFACTURING COMPANY

-Originators of the

Gray Telephone Pay Station and the

Gray Audograph www.americanradiohistory.com

t

L

SIR:

I wish

I had the time to say all the nice issue about your maga- things

I would like to say zine.

I

- certainly have enjoyed reading every practically every article. The Maga- zine has proved to be more than

I expected. to

However,

I would be remiss if

I neglected mention the pleasure and information

I obtain from such scholarly articles as

"Ludwig van Beethoven on Records" by

C.

G. Burke. These are more than worth the price me of the Magazine alone for it saves time as well as expense in enlarging my record collection.

I know

I represent only one vote

-but

I'm for more articles like that.

While

I appreciate that most people like the non -technical articles, I believe every- one would be willing to see one article on circuits.

I know

I like to ponder over in- tricate schematic diagrams, as if

I under- stood everything about them. Perhaps because

I do like to tinker with circuits

- adding this or changing that. Perhaps there more people like me? are

Edwin Schwarz

Devon, Conn.

SIR:

Readers' Forum

I have just finished reading my latest

HIGH

-FIDELITY

Magazine. Although it is a very

I good magazine, and very interesting, find it a bit over my head

(I am a very green greenhorn).

I usually take it to a friend of mine, who runs a radio shop, and he explains things to me.

I am fascinated by the setup by

Albert

Kahn. Would it be possible to get the de- tails such as what is the make of tuner, tape recorder, transcription turntable, television set, tweeters and the horns and i8-in. speakers?

Is it possible to get a sketch, or a diagram of the construction and the hookup of all component parts?

I have been looking around for a long time for such an installation.

Paul

G.

Frenzelas

Roosevelt, N. Y.

Write to

Howard Souther, Electro- Voice,

Inc., Buchanan,

Mich.

SIR:

May

I say a word in defense of the maligned wives referred to in your Readers'

Forum column? Being myself one of these apparently heartless and unappreciative spouses,

I feel some affinity for the gals under fire, and would like to justification for our

To begin with attitude. point out some

- we are not all dolts with unmusical ears.

It should be understood that a goodly percentage of us enjoys music in many or all of its classifications, and ap- preciates high fidelity reproduction with the most avid in of the audiophiles. However, we, our admitted vanity, lose some of the

Continued on page

13

In the home that is wired for magic you'll

¡índ a

BROWNING

TUNER house,

if

you

Today, the ether

is

a treasur

e

have the key

to

unlock

it.

Great

music,

better than

fidelity of

microwave relay

from c

ever before, with all the oncert

of

-

ultra

-

stage

to

radio transmitter and an increasing wealth educational programs,

lec-

tures, forum discussions, and the finest performances

of

the legitimate stage.

In the

perfect

comfort

and convenience

of

your own

liv-

ing room,

this

-

you

with

can have all the complete sense

of

actual presence which

is the

foremost

re-

quirement

for the

feeling

of

true participation.

If

you have a Browning tuner. And an amplifier and speaker with the required extended frequency response.

MODEL

RJ

-20B FM

-AM

TUNER

Armstrong

FM circuit;

20 db quieting with

61/2 microvolts i.f. on both

Separate r.f. and bands

AFC on

FM with

ON

/OFF switch

AM bandwidth selec- tion,

9 kc. and

4 kc. Drift- compensated

FM

20 audio

15-

15,000 cycles

±11/2 db. db treble and bass boost self

- contained power supply.

MODEL

RJ

-12C FM

-AM

TUNER

Armstrong

FM circuit;

20 db quieting with less than

10 microvolts

Separate r.f. and i.f. on both bands

AFC on FM with

ON

/OFF switch

Drift

-compensated

FM audio

15-

15,000 cycles

±11/2 db

AM audio

20 -6600 cycles

±3 db

Triple -tuned f.f.

MODEL

RV

-10B FM

TUNER

Armstrong

FM circuit; less than

10 microvolts for complete limiting

AFC on FM with

ON

/OFF switch

2

-stage cascade limiter Tuned r.f. stage

Drift

- compensated High impedance output.

Learn the full high -fidelity

- specifications for

Browning write for complete per- formance curves and data on these models.

In Canada, address:

Measurements Engineering

Arnprior, Ontario.

Ltd.

ENGINEERED

FOR

ENGINEERS ri www.americanradiohistory.com

in photography, the lens controls the quality

!

.

Model 2122A-R with four -foot extension cables to permit more flexible installations.

12

...

in a sound system, its the amplifier!

CHOOSE

A

BELL

Fidelity

Custom High

Amplifier

a

As

a fine camera lens picks up every detail for the eye, a

Bell

Amplifier reproduces all the vivid sounds of the original voice or music

-

sounds normally lost by inferior equipment. That's why more and more discriminating listeners are choosing Bell's modestly -priced amplifiers as the heart of their custom -built home music systems.

The

Bell

Model

2122 -A is especially designed for those who want a quality amplifier at a medium price. It's a versatile unit with four separate inputs, including one for radio tuner, one for any crystal pickup, plus two special inputs for the newer magnetic type of pickup. Built

-in pre -amplifiers and individual equalization of each of these magnetic inputs assures proper match and response.

Bass to and treble boost with attenuation makes it possible for the operator adjust the tone to his most exacting taste.

Output impedance is adjust- able for proper matching to most speakers.

For a more flexible special installation, Model

2122A

-R comes equipped with a control panel and four -foot extension cables.

This remote -controlled unit has all the outstanding features of the

2122

Amplifier, and, in addi- tion, lends itself ideally to the modern, built

-in type of audio installation.

TUBES: 1-

5Y3GT,

2-

6V6GT,

2- 6S17GT,

1.12AX7.

SIZE:

OUTPUT:

10

HUM LEVEL: watts at less than

3

%. Peak:

15 watts.

FREQ.

RES.:

Plus or minus .75 db

30 to 15,000 cycles.

65 db below rated output.

'

INPUTS: '

OUTPUT radio,

1

IMP.:

3

-4, phono,

2

Magnetic.

6-8, and

15

-18 ohms.

I

f

71,4" deep, 6" high,

11

Y_" long.

Thinking of installing one of the modern, find a built new

-in thrill music systems? in hearing

You'll your favor- ite artists, your most -loved selections. reproduced as they should sound!

..

. all the original quality undistorted and life -like! And you'll hear them best if you build your system around a

Bell

High -Fidelity

Amplifier!

BELL

SOUND

SYSTEMS,

INC.

555

-57 Marion

Road Columbus

7,

Ohio

EXPORT

OFFICE

401

Broadway, New

York

13,

N.

Y. www.americanradiohistory.com

READERS' FORUM

Continued from page z z

PHONOGRAPH

ACCESSORIES

delight in a near -perfect hi -fi system if, rather than being attractively housed in a cabinet or wall installation, it is in myriad strung out components from one end of the living room to the other! It as pretty as it sounds. doesn't look half

One other complaint: admittedly, the most natural reproduction is obtained by playing recordings fairly loud, but

I for one, choose to become acclimated gradually to the grandiose passages in, say, Pictures at an

Exhibition; and I'm slightly more amenable to

I listening in the approved fashion when can sit down and pay full attention.

At the wrong times the din can be distracting.

In praise of your magazine, I've found it to be the first tific of its kind which an unscien- mind such as mine can digest and

I was very favorably impressed with our first copy.

How about some more articles and pic- tures on installations with a few suggestions on how to keep the price down, while still maintaining faithful reproduction?

Pamela

Wheeler

Norwich, Conn.

SIR:

I read with interest the report on the

Columbia AL series of records, and

I own a few of the discs. But it occurred to me that

Continued on page

'5

CITY

Photo courtesy

Tulsa Daily World

SIR:

Please note from the enclosed that

I am three times as confident of your efforts as

I was in my charter t

-year subscription.

As the

Fortune of audio, you have done a remark- able job.

At times the whole high fidelity effort has seemed, to my non -technical mind,to be a kind of fool's errand. It has seemed rather like using a too- octane fuel in a

Model

T.

LP pressings aside, the breach between today's fine components and the phono- graph records which line our shelves is great and very nearly intolerable.

May

I humbly suggest that when the matter is next .discussed forward my that someone put notion that the

"most impor- tant component" record which at of an audio system that moment is the resides on the turntable.

Do not let the audio engineer forget that a great cultural treasure lies yet en- graved on the millions of "shellac" press- ings which people have lovingly collected.

We do not intend to throw these records away

(as a matter of fact,

I just yesterday got from England a new English Columbia pressing of

Leon

Goosens playing a wonder- ful oboe concerto

- on shellac,

Perhaps someone will have the of course). good sense to design a

"collector's circuit" which will permit us to play our wealth and great performances of without fine music bracing for the surface grindings of an

"open" position on a compensator and the contained dull rumble of one of the muting position. rames T.

Maher

New York, N.

Y.

,

,

,

,

11 to

1

choice with

High

Fidelity Group

What phono accessories are best?

Take a curb- stone poll among the record enthusiasts you know.

Chances are the majority of them use G

-E cartridges and styli to extract a full measure of enjoyment from recorded music. The group in the picture, audiophiles of

Tulsa, Oklahoma, are a case in point. Of their mem- berss all but one have home music listening systems equipped with General Electric cartridges.

Be kind to your records

-and

be kind to your ear.

Whatever your preference, G

-E diamond or sapphire tips in single and triple -play cartridges deliver superb reproduction of tone.

A point to remember: the higher the quality of stylus, the easier it is on your records.

G

-E is accessories

are

easy to install. If your music dealer out of stock, write us for the name of the nearest supplier in your area.

Send for this

FREE catalog!

General Electric Company, Section 5492 -15

Electronics Park,

Syracuse,

New York

Please send me a copy of your latest Phono Accessories Catalog.

NAME

ADDRESS

Record to

Wear is hard detect except by comparison.

A wear-

(right) ing stylus shows tip gradual distor- tion. Diamond stylus

(left) runs hundreds of hours without and vis- ible wear. Easy to buy install, the dia- mond pays off in lis- tening pleasure and record protection.

GENERAL()

STAT

I

New

(RPJ

Reversible Stylus

-013) incorpo- rates sapphire* tip for standard play and dia- mond tip for LP and

45's. "Double twist" arm permits stylus to follow every tiny rec- ord groove. Ask your

G

-E dealer for a onstration today. dem-

''Natural and synthetic sapphires are used.

ELECTRIC

I;

www.americanradiohistory.com

PLUS PERFORMANCE

in

QUALITY

SOUNDCRAFT MAGNETIC

RECORDING

TAPE

New Reeves

Soundcraft Recording Tape outper-

forms all others. Experience will show you

that

Sound-

craft Tape

has

unique lasting qualities,

over

and

above

other magnetic recording tape.

Soundcraft Tape

is

the

only

tape manufactured

by specialists

with

20 years of

continuous experience in the

sound

recording

field

...

a

tape perfected after

years of

painstaking research

and

experimentation

to

produce

the

ultimate

in fidelity.

and

PACKAGING

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waiting for:

five reels of

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or

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-Chest at no

extra

cost!

Constructed

of

durable, lined boxboard, the handsome

pyroxylin- coated

Tape

-

Chest is a

permanent

filing

cabinet.

Stores

each reel horizontally in

an

individual drawer

to

protect it and lengthen

its life.

Soundcraft Tape

is easy to sell, because

it's

so

superior. The Tape

-Chest will make

it

easy to sell reels five

at

a

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REEVES

SOUNDCRAFT

TAPE

HAS ALL

THESE PLUS

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'4

Send for

FREE

Descriptive Literature

-Now

Reeves

Soundcraft

Corp.,

Magnetic Products Div.

10 East

52nd Street,

N. Y.

22.

N. Y.

Gentlemen: Please send me, without cost or obligation, your

Soundcraft Magnetic

Tape brochure showing how

I can get better recording results.

1

.

Pre-coated for greater adhesion.

2. Constant speed coating process for output uniformity.

3.

Each foot checked to guarantee absolute output uniformity.

4. Buffed for improved high frequency response.

5. Surface lubricated to insure quiet performance.

6. Six-spoke reels to prevent sagging when stored.

REEVES

NAME

ADDRESS

CITY STATE

SOUNDCRAFT

10

East 52nd Street,

N. Y.

22, N. Y.

THE ONLY RECORDING MATERIALS

PERFECTED AND MANUFACTURED

BY

RECORDING SPECIALISTS

Please write

Reeves

Soundcraft for additional information. www.americanradiohistory.com

READERS'

FORUM

Continued from page

i8

the ill

-fated

7

-in. discs are ideal for the purpose.

I believe Columbia stated a few years ago that there was a maximum of

8 mins. possible per side.

Almost all record changers will handle the size, and certainly there would be no prob- lem of storage.

The manufacturer would find such a size cheaper to manufacture and ship.

I believe the disadvantages of inconvenience and pinch effect are relatively minor.

I, for one, hope that some manufacturer will use the

7

-in. size for medium length works.

Ronald Pesha

Tulsa, Okla.

SIR:

Congratulations on your first year of publication. Enclosed find my renewal for a three -year subscription.

I agree that it would be greatly appreciated if advertisers would quote prices in their ads in your magazine.

I always feel that if an advertiser does not want to quote a price he is ashamed of it.

Can't send you flowers, so am sending this card of my wife's instead. lication certainly deserves it.

Your pub-

W.

J.

Hammond

Pharr, Texas

The above was written on a birthday card.

Thanks,

Mr.

Hammond.

Sm:

.

. .

You will observe that

I decline to use a hyphen in

HIGH

FIDELITY.

The reason appears in the letterhead. Sheer pedantry, natch.

Kalamazoo College

Kalamazoo, Mich.

W.

H. Burke

Department of English

Sm:

Reference is made to

C. A.

Anglemire's letter in the Readers' Forum concerning their

Masterworks Record Club.

Enjoyed Mr. Anglemire's account of their club. We have something similar here but it originated in a little different manner. In working for the U.

S.

Fish and Wildlife

Service, we more often than not find our- selves stationed in some of the more remote sections of the Country. Far removed from

FM, TV and, more especially, hundreds of miles away from live concerts, our only con- tact with the musical world is through the recording medium.

There are three of us, and our families, stationed at the Seney

National

Wildlife

Refuge who are intensely interested in classi- cal music. The Seney Refuge is located in the heart of the timber country of Michigan's

Upper Peninsula and a where.

Two long way from no- of us have hi

-fi installations.

Continued on page io6

AMPEX ELECTRIC COR COR

Redw NA City,

4TION

California

eAdvanced

Series

400

-A i

5 www.americanradiohistory.com

T H

E B

' S

.

..

B E E

T H O

V

E

N

,

B

R

A H

M S A N

D they're

better than

ever! t6

dynamic coupling assures

°---14es,

Bach, Beethoven and Brahms are now better than ever

r

we don't mean we've improved their music, but we do mean we've improved the reproduction of their recorded music.

It's the new, improved Pickering Cartridges that give credence to this claim. Yes. Pickering

Cartridges are different.

They're improved.

They're better than ever. Pickering patented Cart- ridges with Dynamic Coupling* are superior in every way, by providing

..

HIGHER FREQUENCY RESPONSE

NEGLIGIBLE INTERMODU-

LATION DISTORTION BETTER TRACKING CHARACTERISTICS

REMEMBER

Pickering engineers and designers have but one objective

. .

. to produce products that will please the music lovers' insatiable appetite for the flawless recreation of recorded music

...

for the utmost in quality insist upon Pickering Audio Components...

Pickering diamond stylus cartridges

...

not only wear longer but, more important, they preserve

. the musical quality and prolong the life of your record library. constant stylus contact with the record grooves over the entire audio spectrum (2o- 2o.000 cps) full frequency response full transient response

NO

RESONANCES

NO

MISTRACKING

NO

GRINDING

OF GROOVE WALLS

P

I

C K E

R

I

N G

and

company,

incorporated

Pickering High

Fidelity Components are available through leading Radio

Parts dis- tributors everywhere; detailed literature sent upon request. Address Department

H

Oceanside,

L.

I.,

New

York

011101!1111

www.americanradiohistory.com

how to select an

F v1

Tuner

By

FREEMAN

A.

SPINDELT,

M

ANY, many words have been the merits of various types written concerning

of

amplifiers, speaker systems, and phonograph pickups appropriate to high fidelity sound reproduction.

Because this informa- tion is available in such abundance, the non -technical buyer is able to make an intelligent selection

of

these items. Un- fortunately, this is not true of

FM tuners. Little compre- hensive material has been published to help the average audiophile interpret the technical specifications of these devices and to evaluate various features in terms sirability or convenience.

of

de-

It is the purpose of this article to provide a basis for understanding the factors which should be considered when selecting an FM tuner.

Fundamentally, the function of a tuner is to accept radio energy from the antenna lead

-in and to convert the modu- lation or variations of this energy into audio signals having a magnitude suitable for feeding an amplifier. The ideal tuner would perform this function without introducing any distortion or noise, and its audio output would be identical to the signals fed into the transmitter from the studio.

While these theoretical goals are never quite reached in practice, the approach can be amazingly close and, logically, the rating of a tuner's performance is established by how nearly perfection is achieved.

There are, of course, many factors which influence overall performance.

Some

of

these factors present no difficulty to the designer. Others are major problems. Solutions are limited by the technical state of the art, or must be the subject of compromise for economic reasons. The sensible selection

of

an FM tuner requires a knowledge

of

what these problems are, and a means

of

judging the de- gree to which the designer has met their challenge.

Sensitivity

This term requires definition before it becomes in meaningful connection with

FM tuners. Basically, sensitivity is determined by how weak the received radio signals can be and still provide listenable output.

Greater sensitivity per- mits reception of weaker signals.

One way of specifying sensitivity is characterized by the simple statement, "20 microvolts sensitivity ". The in- ference here is that when a broadcast signal

of

zo millionths of one volt is applied to the antenna terminals of the tuner, an audio signal of useable average amplitude, probably

'A to

I volt, will be delivered by the tuner to the audio ampli- fier.

This type of sensitivity specification, stated alone, is relatively meaningless because it says nothing at all about how much noise' will be mixed with the signal.

A considerably better idea gained from the qualified of useful sensitivity can be statement,

"io

microvolts re- quired for zo decibels quieting

". The decibels indicate, in this case, the loudness of the noise output in proportion to the loudness of the speech or music output.

Some idea of this relationship may be had by noting that the difference in loudness

of

average noise between an active office and a quiet residential interior is about

20 db; between an average residence and a quiet whisper

5 ft. away,

3o db. Ratings which specify sensitivity and quieting are a good indication

of

tuner performance on weak signals.

Fewer microvolts for more db

of

quieting indicate that quieter reception of weak signals may be expected.

'The noise referred to is that resulting from all sources, internal and external. which is signals. heard when tuning between stations and as background noise on weak

17 www.americanradiohistory.com

It might be inferred from the foregoing that high sensi- tivity is of value only in fringe areas where strong signals do not exist.

Certainly it is of primary importance under such conditions, but since higher sensitivity results in an improvement in quieting on strong signals as well as weak, this quality is valuable to urban listeners as well.

Improvement in the ratio of quieting to sensitivity of one type of tuner over another is generally attributable to increased overall amplification, improved limiter or ratio detector performance, and meticulous design in the early amplification stages for minimum internal noise generation.

Each of these factors represents added items of expense to the manufacturer in more components or higher engi- neering costs. As a result, FM tuners having high sensi- tivity are relatively more expensive than those which are mediocre in this respect.

Selectivity

An

FM tuner on which the dial is set, let us say, to loo megacycles, will receive not only a loo -mc. radio signal, but will respond as well to frequencies slightly higher and lower than this. Actually, not one single frequency, but a range or band of frequencies is received at any dial setting.

If this band of frequencies is narrow, the selectivity is said to be high; if broad, the selectivity is termed low or poor.

It would be well to point out here that in FM tuners, the best unit is not the one having the highest selectivity but, rather, the unit having a selectivity characteristic which is most nearly correct.

What is correct will be made plain a little later.

Radio signals carrying music and speech are not confined to a single transmitted frequency such as loo mc., but are spread out over a band centered about such a frequency.

Regulations of the

Federal

Communications Commission require that this band be no wider than 15o kilocycles; that is,

75 kc.2 above and below the station frequency. The

FCC also specifies that there be a 5o

-kc. idle space between the edges of these bands or channels. This condition is illustrated graphically in Fig.

1.

The ideal FM tuner would respond equally well to any frequency within the channel to which it was tuned, but would accept no energy at all from the channels immediately above or below it: the adjacent channels. This would require a selectivity char- acteristic best described by the drawing in Fig.

2.

The process of tuning would simply slide this curve along from channel to channel as desired.

In any practical tuner, the selectivity characteristic determined by is the intermediate frequency' amplifier, particularly by the design

The achievement of the

IF transformers employed. of a characteristic approximating that

Typical FM Tuners

Radio receivers capable

of

tuning the FM band

are legion. Among

the

commercial console

and table types, there

are dozens of makes and

hundreds

of models.

Most

include AM; many TV sets now

have

FM tuning

sections.

Then there

are a

group

of receivers designed

primarily

for

amateur and short

wave use; some of these

provide FM tuning. Finally, there

are

the FM tuners

used

principally

for

custom installations. Five typical units

are shown here

and

on page 20;

there

are many,

many

more.

For

a com- plete review,

manufacturers' and

mail

order cata-

logues should be consulted.

Altec -Lansing model 303 -A fier for

FM

-AM tuner. Includhs preampli- magnetic cartridges; separate bass and treble tone con- trols; input selector switch; record compensator. Power supply built in.

For complete report, see page

92.

,For

20 to

000 sake of

20,000 cycles; AM to comparison, the audible frequency range broadcasts

1,650,000 cycles (550

88,000,000 to are

1,650 transmitted on is approximately from frequencies from 550,- kc.); FM broadcasts to

108,000,000 cycles (88 to

108 roc. ) use the range of

,The

TRF); sequence of roughly as antenna,

2) at some more

4) amplify operations, follows: its shift the frequency to

-IF

1) amplify original frequency amplification; necessary so

3) to speak, in a tuner (either FM the radio frequency an

(tuned radio frequency amplification intermediate radio frequency and convert

-sufficiently signal picked frequencies from or

AM) is up by the radio to audio; and to drive the average amplifier. or amplify

Bogen model R604 tor.

FM

-AM tuner. Controls: tuning and selec-

Latter provides AM,

FM, power off, and two spares. Auto- matic frequency control incorporated; may be disabled by ex- ternal switch. Armstrong circuit. www.americanradiohistory.com

shown in Fig

2 would be enormously expensive and all out of proportion to the cost of the tuner. Indeed, this ideal curve is, at present, impossible practical design of realization. The of IF transformers yields characteristics which have various shapes, three representative types of which are shown in Fig.

3.

A study of these curves will reveal that a design difficulty lies in obtaining uniform response across the entire channel width and, at the same time, the minimizing the response to the channels adjacent to one desired.

If the response curve is narrow, as in the case of high selectivity shown in Fig.

3

-A, much of the en- ergy contained in the regions near the edges of the channel is rejected. This results in so much distortion that it is easily discernable by the ear.

If, as in Fig.

3

-B, the response is made wide enough to accept the entire channel with reasonable uniformity, the adjacent channels will also be partially accepted, resulting in interference.

Obviously, some kind of compromise must be made and, for the simple reason that

FM is a high fidelity medium, uniform- ity

of

response across the r

5o

-kc. channel is of first impor- tance, with adjacent channel rejection occupying second place on the list. This is further justified when it is re-

50

'KCB

CHANNEL 260

CARRIER

FREI].

_

75

KC

99.9 MC

50

'KC

CHANNEL

261

CARRIER

FREQ.

..75

KC

__

75

KC

-

100.1 MC

CHANNEL 262

CARRIER

FREQ.

".;765C

75

KC

100 3 MC

Fig. z.

Channels used by

FM broadcast stations are centered around a carrier frequency with a

75 kilocycle band on either side of the carrier. Ago

-kc. band separates channels.

Automatic Frequency

Automatic frequency control (AFC) is incorporated in the better FM tuners as an aid to correct tuning.

Accuracy in

FM tuning is essential. For the reception of any particular channel there is one precisely correct point of adjustment and even minor errors in setting the dial will result in dis- tortion, noise, or both. These defects are emphasized by

RELEVSPONSE

EL

100% oz f73

KC

CHANNEL 260

CARRIER

F REO.

f

75,E

KC

99.9

MC

Control

CHANNEL 261

CARRIER

FREQ

15

CHANNEL 202

CARRIER

FREQ

KC

KC

100.1

MC 100 3 MC

Fig.

2.

The frequency response characteristics of the ideal tuner wound exactly match those of the broadcast station, shown in Fig. r and indicated above by the heavy line. the high fidelity amplifiers and speaker systems normally used in conjunction with FM tuners. Tuning by ear alone is inadequate and, in tuners not having

AFC, a tuning in- dicator is indispensable.

While the theory and circuitry involved in AFC is com- plex, the advantages can be explained easily. In effect, the

AFC circuit is an electronic brain which recognizes the direction and amount of mistuning and acts upon this in- formation to restore correct tuning. This action is apparent when dialing an FM tuner having

AFC. As the dial is turned to the vicinity of a station, usually to the ragged edge of reception, the station will abruptly snap into proper tune.

It will remain so until the dial is turned almost completely past the station. Then the signal will be sudden- ly lost. With

AFC, the dial settings for correct tuning cease to be critical.

Additional benefit is gained by AFC in way.

Even the following though great care is exercised in tuning, there membered that adjacent channels are usually assigned by the

FCC to stations which are geographically far apart and unlikely to interfere with one another.

Actually, curves similiar to that of

Fig.

3

-C are obtainable and satisfy both requirements reasonably well.

At this point, it is interesting to note that the normal channel assignment for AM broadcasting is only io kc. wide. This seriously limits the audio range which can be transmitted by this medium. Comparing this io

-kc. chan- nel to the i 5o

-kc.

FM channel makes it rather apparent why so much better fidelity is possible through

FM trans- mission and reception.

Specifications for FM tuners frequently describe this selectivity characteristic as the "bandwidth" and may state,

"Bandwidth

of

150 kc. ". This is not very definitive.

Comparisons may be made more readily when the reduction in response at various bandwidths is stated in decibels.

The ideal method of analysis is the study of actual curves established by measurements made on the tuner.

-IDEAL

RESPONSE

ACTUAL RESPONSE

Fig.

3.

In actual practice, tuning characteristics shown in

A, B.

C above, are achieved.

Both A and

B are poor;

C balances wide frequency response against good sensitivity. are various forces at work within the tuner to cause the tuning to change, or drift, during the period of operation.

More important among them are physical expansion of components due to rising temperature, and changes in AC line voltage. Well- designed tuners are compensated for these changes as far as possible but they remain threats to

19 www.americanradiohistory.com

good performance. The

AFC circuit does not differentiate between manual mistuning and errors arising from within, and will continually correct any residual drift without re- quiring retuning.

There is a relatively minor ,drawback created by AFC.

In the case of a weak signal very close to a strong signal on the dial, the AFC circuit may exhibit an affinity for the stronger, and skip right over the weaker, signal. For those who enjoy logging weak signals, this may be annoy- ing at times and is the reason why the better -designed FM tuners are provided with a switch to disable the

AFC.

Audio Fidelity

Many FM broadcasts contain sound from zo or

3o up to

15,000 cycles.

To make use of this range, the FM tuner must be capable of flat frequency response between these limits with a minimum of distortion. That is to say, the strength of the signals picked up by the antenna must be amplified equally by the tuner, regardless of their audio frequency. Tuner specifications usually include figures to indicate how well the audio range is reproduced and, there- fore, they may be readily compared.

It is important to note that any response specified, unless otherwise noted, is that of the tuner alone and may be con- siderably altered by any equipment connected to the audio output. One must remember, for example, that shielded cable has a definite capacity per foot and the length of cable used between the tuner and the amplifier may cause considerable loss of high audio frequencies. It is good practice, therefore, to use cable having low capacity per foot and to make this connection as short as possible. De- tails of capacity -per

-foot may be obtained from manu- facturers or suppliers. Generally speaking, it is unwise to exceed a total capacitance of

5o to

75 micromicro- farads

(mmfd). Coaxial cables, such as

RG -59/u, have a capacitance of about

21 mmfd. per ft.

Garden -variety shield- ed wire generally runs higher than coaxial cable.

Low frequency response may be impaired if the amplifier input impedance is too low. For example, to maintain response within

3 db down to

3o cycles, where the output condenser in the tuner is .05 mfd., the amplifier input impedance must be greater than

175,000 ohms. Require- ments for minimum low frequency loss are usually fulfilled, but high frequency attenuation, caused by excessively long interconnecting cables, is a too -common fault in many installations.

These considerations will serve to and amplifier are point out that tuner not completely independent and thought should be given to the compatibility of these units when purchasing equipment or planning installations.

Tone Controls

Tone controls may be more accurately described as devices which alter the frequency response of the audio circuits in the hi

-fi system. They can be designed to boost or atten- uate independently either the high or low frequencies, and they may be associated (physically) with either the tuner or the amplifier, or they may be in a separate control unit.

20

Typical FM

Tuners

Browning model

RJ

-20A

FM-AM tuner. Controls: on -off; tuning, separate bass and treble tone controls; volume; AM frequency bandwidth; selector switch providing AM, FM, and three spare positions. Armstrong circuit. AFC.

Radio Craftsmen model

RC

-13.

Controls: separate bass and treble tone controls; on -off and volume; tuning; input selector which provides three spares. Built

-in phono preamplifier for magnetic cartridges. Armstrong circuit. AFC.

Sargent -Rayment model SR

-31

FM

-AM tuner. Controls: vol- ume; bass and treble tone controls; tuning; input selector which provides two spares. Ratio detector. www.americanradiohistory.com

The purpose of such controls is to permit the listener to alter the tonal balance to please his ears. While theory indicates that a flat, uniform response over the entire fre- quency range

of

hearing should sound best, tests have shown that individual preferences vary, due to conditioning and other factors such as room acoustics. It is also possible for the sound, as transmitted, to be improperly equalized by the broadcasting station.

Some improvement can be achieved in either case through the use

of

tone controls which are adjusted to the point where the results are most pleasing.

It is decidedly important, where tone controls are used, that there be well defined knob positions for flat response so restored. that a basic, normal condition can be easily

It is generally unwise to duplicate tone controls on both tuner and amplifier unless it is determined in ad- vance that one set will remain idle.

The use of both sets may produce excessive boost and thereby cause distortion.

Distortion

Strictly speaking, distortion in an FM tuner means that the audio signals have been altered in the receiving process and, therefore, are no longer exactly the same as those fed into the transmitter. Through common usage the term has come to apply only to alterations which are undesirable be- cause they are, or are likely to be, objectionable to the ear.

The effects of tone controls, for instance, is not considered distortion since they contribute to pleasant listening.

Distortion may arise from several sources, the more important of which are: improper

-generally

too high selectivity, and non

-linearity

- of

discriminator or ratio de- tector characteristic. These may be design weaknesses or may be due to maladjustment

of

otherwise adequate com- ponents. Distortion may also arise in poorly -designed audio stages through which the signal must pass on its journey to the audio output.

For purposes of comparison, the specifications indicating percent harmonic distortion are worthy of study. These are generally available from manufacturers

of

FM tuners and indicate the amount of distortion present when adjustments are correct.

Another source

of

distortion that should be pointed out lies, not in the tuner, but in the lack of compatibility

of

tuner and amplifier. Too large an audio signal fed into an amplifier may cause serious distortion by overdriving one or more of the amplifier tubes. This must be avoided. Un- fortunately, no general statement can be made, since output voltage will vary from tuner to tuner and the range of ac- ceptable audio voltage is not the same in all amplifiers.

Recourse must be made to the tuner and amplifier manuals which usually point out these values. In all cases, the tuner output must not exceed allowable amplifier input unless a volume control is incorporated which is situated electri- cally between the two units.

Reference to the literature and instruction manual sup- plied with the tuner will indicate whether the output is directly from the discriminator or ratio detector, or whether the output is fed from a cathode follower. Too much emphasis cannot be placed on the importance

of

carefully reading all material supplied with the tuner, since the precautions to be observed for any particular type will ordinarily be found there. Adherence to these recommen- dations is mandatory for good results. Ideal conditions for one type of tuner may not even approach the proper conditions for another type and a little study of technical requirements will pay big dividends in good results.

Operational Convenience

Custom high fidelity installations offer a first -class tunity to go off the deep end oppor-

of

complexity. The wise prospective purchaser will examine point equipment from the

of

view of convenience and simplicity of operation.

Granted, there is a certain minimum of complication which must be expected due to the several pieces of equipment and operating functions involved. However, a little paper planning will permit a sensible control arrangement.

Access to the tuner panel knobs is essential since the tuning control must be adjusted when a different station is desired. This being the case, the tuner should logically be the main control center, and to this end it is wise to select a tuner which provides several input connections for phono,

TV, and other equipment.'

These should be selectable by means of a panel switch which will also select the tuner func- tion desired and pass the signals through the tuner volume control to the amplifier.

In this way, the one volume con- trol will govern the audio level from any of the available sources.

Selection

of

the desired source can be made at the tuner panel, resulting in a very convenient knob layout.

Mounting the Tuner

In general, FM tuners may be mounted in any position unless specifically ruled out by the manufacturer's directions.

All electronic equipment generates heat which must be dispelled, principally by convection.

For this reason, as great a circulation

of

air as possible should be allowed and cabinet openings placed so as to form a

"chimney" effect.

Hot air, being lighter, will rise and attempt to escape at the top of any enclosure.

If the tuner is mounted within the same enclosure as the speakers, there is always the danger of acoustical feed- back, which may make the entire system

"sing" at an audio frequency. When this decidedly condition must be endured, it is good practice to mount the tuner on sponge rubber, making sure that no part of the tuner, including dial parts or control shafts, touches the cabinet itself at any point.

Conclusion

It is hoped that the foregoing discussion will be of value to the prospective purchaser

of

an

FM tuner. It may also offer suggestions to the person who now has a tuner but feels he is not getting the most out of it.

Only one cardinal rule should be remembered: Read the manufacturer's in- structions carefully

-and

follow them!

4An alternative is to concentrate all control functions, except tuning,

"nerve center ", as it was called in the first issue of HIGH -FIDELITY. in one

-Ed

2 www.americanradiohistory.com

You be can bounce your

LP

records on the floor with almost complete certainty

that

they

will

not break. But, before you do any bouncing, the record must be

pulled

out of its

jacket

-

and

this must

and don't

touch the record surfaces with your fingertips! done with care. Buckle the jacket,

These instructions might well be issued with every

LP

record,

for

they serve to emphasize two contradictory characteristics of

LP's:

they break with difficulty, but damage easily. The

78- rpm. records, with which we have been

familiar for

so long, reverse

LP

characteristics: they crack

and

break easily, but

are

not so susceptible to dust

and

scratches.

However, if

LP's are

correctly

handled and cared

for, they

will

live to

a

ripe

-

and

quiet

-

LP

health

and

well -being should be

followed?

For an

authoritative

an- old age.

What rules of swer, we asked William

S.

Bachman,

Director

of

Engineering

and

Development

for

Columbia

Records, to

tell

us exactly

what

to do to prolong

LP record

life

and

to keep surface noise to

a

min

- imum.

"That's

easy," he said,

`Just..

.

Follow these

FOUR

11,

COMMANDMENTS

22

Ì.

Always handle the record by its edges, or by one edge and center

Unless you have washed your hands within the past two minutes, your fingertips are greasy.

If the grease is transferred to the record surface, dust and gritty particles will adhere to the spot and, within a short while, that area on the record will be noisy. The illustration for rule

No.

2 shows how the record can be held in one hand. www.americanradiohistory.com

2.

Buckle the record jacket when removing or replacing the record

LP records have delicate surfaces.

The vinylite is tough, but the grooves are not cut as deeply as on a

78 rpm., so the needle or stylus rides nearer to the surface, and a light scratch is more likely to be audible than one of similar depth inflicted on a 78.

Hold one edge against the body and squeeze

of

the jacket - the cardboard will pop open and only the edges of the record will touch. Buckling the jacket will allow you to handle the record by its edge and slide it easily into container.

3.

Before playing, wipe the record lightly with a soft, slightly damp cloth

Wiping with slightly damp, soft cloth picks up dust and reduces static electricity which would attract dust from the air while the record is being played. Also, wiping before each playing removes the very fine particles

For a more detailed discussion of needle tip which wear off the needle as the record is played. of this point, see the previous issue of

HIGH-

FIDELITY

401

Store albums store singles either on edge or flat, in stacks

Since the vinylite from which LP's are made is flexible, there is danger bowed

-or

warped of these discs becoming

-if

they are subjected to uneven pressure. Thus, if a stack

of

rz

-in. records are piled on top of a couple of to

-in. discs, the edges of the bottom tz

-in records may tend to bend down. Similarly, a group of albums piled on top

of

one another are likely to bend the records in the albums near the bottom of the pile.

Continued on page

i

05

23 www.americanradiohistory.com

for

the

Group

By

WILLIAM

D.

DI

EMER

THROUGHOUT

the Country, music -listening groups are springing up.

Many are small

-a

few neighbors and friends who get together from time to time for an evening of music. Others have grown until an audience of

5o to too is not unusual.

All such groups have one common problem: selection of material for balanced, interesting programs. The larger groups have another common problem: administrative organization.

International House, in

Chicago, has had an active and large it group for nearly

20 years.

This article is the story of that group

-

how it came to be, how it is organized, how selects its programs, the problems it has faced and the success it has had.

The article is presented with the thought that that which has been learned over the years by

Inter- national House, may be of help to small as well as large music -listening groups.

International House: the Audience

International House, graduate dormitory on the Univer- sity of Chicago campus, houses about

35o men and

18o women from countries all over the world, and from almost every state in the Union. It is designed to be more than a residence hall for the foreign and American students who live there: It attempts to provide a complete life, a home away from home. The detailed list of the activities spon- sored by the House and by its residents adds up to a picture of a full and varied social and intellectual life. For instance, each week there are four record concerts, three dances, a movie and a panel discussion group.

Thus, the Music

Committee, whose story this is, competes with many other activities for the students' limited recreational time. Never- theless, it is highly successful.

24

Activities of the Music

Committee

The single most important activity

of

the Committee is its presentation of four record concerts each week.

The best attended (about

8o) is the two -hour concert given every Sunday morning. There are two concerts during the week, on Tuesday and Thursday evenings, each r j hours long, which draw an attendance of twenty to thirty.

A

Saturday afternoon opera program, which is also a vehicle for presenting the longer choral and symphonic works, draws an attendance of about fifteen or twenty.

The Committee also operates a record library for those residents who own phonographs.

At present, the library includes

175 albums of standard

78

LP records.

Still in its first quarter rpm. records, and

35 of operation, the library serves about twenty residents.

The Committee also serves as an organizational focus for other musical activities of interest to the residents. During the Autumn Quarter,

1951, it sponsored a series of Music

Appreciation classes.

The topic, probably inadvisedly chosen, was analysis of the Beethoven quartets.

Atten- dance was about twenty

-five at the beginning, but fell off sharply later. The consensus of observers was that the topic, though profound, quickly exhausted the interest of the average non

-professional student of music.

Most re- cently, the Committee has sponsored the formation informal music -making group of

of

an residents who have some skill in performing or singing. Its character is perhaps best described by its title, "No

Audience Allowed

".

History: Before the Music Committee

The record concerts have been a feature

of

the

House's activities throughout its history. At the time it was corn- www.americanradiohistory.com

pleted in 1932, the Carnegie

Foundation donated an ex- cellent custom -built phonograph, and

5o albums of

78 rpm. records. These records were used to present the initial program of two i

-hour concerts each week.

The Sunday morning concert program was begun in the

Summer of

í95o. It quickly proved to be one of the most popular activities in the House, as evidenced by the attend- ance figures.

The Saturday afternoon opera programs were also begun in

í95o. At first they were broadcasts of the Metropolitan

Opera during its

16

-week season.

The recent flood of recorded opera on

LP has led to the development of this series as one

of

record concerts rather than

Undoubtedly, the continued competition of

of

broadcasts. the Met has reduced attendance at these programs.

History:

Since the Committee

Until very recently, the programming and presentation of these concerts was the work of a single interested resident, appointed by the House administration. The formation of a

Committee in September

1951 undoubtedly stimulated the development of the musical program. The most noticeable result has been an improvement in the quality

of

the music. When a number of persons combine their judgments on what is to be played, their greater common pool

of

musical experience and taste broadens the scope of the programs.

Another important result of the formation

of

the Com- mittee has been the modernization of the phonograph. It now features a two -way speaker system, an all- triode am- plifier, and a seperate control unit including the record player, volume, bass, and treble controls.

Membership

The Music Committee exists as an integral part of the In- ternational House Council, the general representative of the residents to the

House administration. Its membership is voluntary, its organization is loose and free. There is little in the way of rigidly described and assigned duties.

During its first year of operation, there has been a gradual change in the character of the membership. At first it in- cluded principally residents with a greater than average in- terest in music.

They tended to overweigh the programs in favor of works not on the standard concert repertoire, which led to a loss of interest on the part of the majority, and their gradual withdrawal from the work of the Committee. The trend is now towards active solicitation, by the

Chairman, of the cooperation of those residents who, by their con- versation and frequent attendance at the concerts, show the greatest interest, the widest knowledge, and the best taste in music. Thus, the membership of the Committee is evolv- ing from a voluntary basis to an invitation basis.

Organization

As a part of the International House Council, the Music

Committee has a specified range of activities.

The Council defines the area of concern for the Committee as the

"promotion of musical activities of interest to the residents ".

To carry out these and the other duties it has assumed, the

Committee has set up five Sub committees: Programming,

Record Concerts, Opera Concerts, Music Appreciation, and

Cataloging.

The Programming Subcommittee is responsible for se- lecting the works to be played at the concerts. The Record

Concerts Subcommittee, usually consisting of two persons, is in charge of collecting the records to be played, and presenting the program. The Opera Concerts Subcom- mittee, usually consisting of one person, is in charge of selecting the opera, obtaining the records, and presenting the program. The Music Appreciation Subcommittee was to be charged with the responsibility of presenting a series

International

1louse,

Chicago

of Music Appreciation classes

The experience of the first series of this class, however, has led to the dissolution of this Subcommittee. The Cataloging Subcommittee has charge of the comprehensive list of records available in the

House Collection and those available for borrowing from the private collections in the House. as

This organization works out almost as well in practice it looks on paper. The Programming Subcommittee has naturally excited the greatest interest

of

the members.

Outside of the necessary routine supervision and coordin- ation by the Chairman, it has functioned well.

The isola- tion of the Opera Concerts Subcommittee in the hands of one person has enabled it to continue functioning effec- tively as a separate body.

The time demands placed upon the Cataloging Subcommittee, and the exactitude it requires,

25 www.americanradiohistory.com

calling for a special sort of personal interest, have led to its function being completely assumed by the Chairman.

Source of Records

The Programming Subcommittee draws upon three sources for the records used at the concerts: The

House

Collection, several private collections within the House, and a neigh- borhood record shop.

The House's original collection of

5o albums of

78's has been expanded through donations or by purchases to its present size (175 albums of

78's,

35

LP's).

About a dozen residents of the House have offered the

Committee the use of their private collections. These total about

30o

LP's and a few albums of

78's.

About one -third of the records used are borrowed from

The Disc, an exceptionally well -supplied record shop.

A comprehensive card catalogue lists the records available both in the House Collection (except that most 78's are not bothered with) and in the private collections. In addition to the usual information (composer, title, artists, and orchestra), these cards include a more thorough analysis

Members of the successful

International

House Music Committee, whose activities are discussed in this article. of records listed as

"Miscellaneous Collections" in the

Schwann catalog, and also the name of the owner, and some- times the playing time of each selection.

The playing time is obtained in some cases from actual performance of the records, and in other cases from that given in

HIGH-

FIDELITY.

This timing is proving of increasing value in enabling the

Subcommittee to judge more accurately whether its pro- grams fit within the agreed -upon time limits. The cards also list the dates on which the record has been played.

Development of Committee

For the first quarter of its operation, the Programming

Subcommittee consisted of various interested members of the Music Committee, each of whom was in complete charge of programming a single week's concert. With the second quarter of operation, the Music Committee de- cided that this plan led to too fragmented a series.

Each

26 programmer, tended to operate in isolation, ence without refer- to what had been played before.

To correct this fault, subcommittees were composed of groups of three persons, each subcommittee being in charge of planning the programs for three consecutive weeks. Each

Subcommittee was to give consideration to the sequence of programs, and work more towards a balance of musical periods and forms.

The programs are being cast increasingly often into a mold whose principles have been evolved through experience.

One of the principles most frequently applied is that the concerts should not include a large number of short works.

As a general rule, the Sunday concerts include four or five selections, and the evening concerts, two to six selections.

Another principle is that a variety of music forms must be presented. The Sunday program, particularly, usually in- cludes one choral or vocal work, chamber music, often a work for solo piano, and ends with a symphony.

Some degree of temporal continuity is also required.

Acting upon the assumption that there is, at least within the minds of the listeners, a development of mood in music corresponding rather closely to the historical development of music, the works selected for a given program are presented in the order of their composition. This foreknowledge of tem- poral order is a factor which also preselects the works. This order is often altered to some extent by the principle that variety should be provided by alternating large -scale works with chamber music, or that various timbres should be al- ternated. That is, a work such as a piano sonata may be suitably followed by a chamber work such as a string quartet, thus achieving good program balance.

The majority of listeners appear to prefer programs with a heavy representation of works familiar to them. Their argument is based upon the view and enjoyment. Those in charge of of music as relaxation preparing the pro- grams view the programs as a means for widening the ac- quaintance of the members of the audience with the whole of the classic repertoire, with emphasis on those works which are judged by most critics as those of greatest merit.

Certainly both views are strongly defensible, and the Com- mittee does not pretend that it has the most satisfactory answer to this controversy.

Experience has shown one way flict. of lessening the con-

The smaller audience at the evening concerts is usually more receptive to the latter kind of thinking, where- as the audience at the Sunday morning concerts, perhaps by the mere fact of its being larger, is inclined to the former view. grams

Thus, the Subcommittee has gradually evolved pro- including the more familiar works for the Sunday morning concerts, with the introduction of one or two more esoteric works, and a greater emphasis on the of the repertoire, at the evening concerts. broadening

Special Events

Some variety in the record concerts is offered by special musical events.

During the first year of its operation, the

Committee planned two such events.

During the week of

March

23, it offered a week music of programs devoted to the of

Beethoven, in commemoration of the 125th anniversary of his death. Later in the year it will sponsor a www.americanradiohistory.com

piano recital by one of the music students living in the

House as a part of one of its Sunday morning programs.

Expansion of Record Collection

In making its most recent purchase of records, one member of the Committee sought to simplify the problem by draw- ing up a set of criteria to be used in making the selections.

To a large degree, these criteria were developed with specific respect to the total context

of

musical activities at Inter- national House. Stated in question

I) Will the record be played? form, they were:

2)

3)

Is it a selection not in the present House

Collection?

Is it a selection not in any of the private collections?

4) Is there a good recording available?

5) Is it a good bargain, i. e., more than one work on a re- cord, etc.?

6)

Does the selection add variety to our present collec- tion? Balance of forms, piano music, vocal music, cham- ber music, symphonies, etc.?

With these criteria, a tentative list of records was drawn up, including about three times as many titles as could be purchased. At the Committee meeting, further sugges- tions were requested. From this list, several selections were made by consensus, until the full sum available had been spent.

General Principles of Organization

From the foregoing account, it is apparent that the Music

Committee at

International House has developed a system intended to be highly responsive to the particular environ- ment within which it works, guided by the overall phi- losophy of music as a broadening aesthetic experience. Thus, the total pattern of the Committee's activities cannot be transferred to other groups working in different situations.

What are the unique characteristics of our situation?

Several important ones appear readily. On the advantage side are a very knowledgeable and appreciative group of students, both as audience and as programmers; a compact social community, making communication a relatively sim- ple process and a potent influence; and a virtually unlimited repertoire of records.

On the disadvantage side, the most serious difficulty is the limited time available to most graduate students here. Its primary effect has been the channeling

of

all responsible activity into a few hands.

Yet there are many characteristics of the situation which are common to all music programming groups. Everyone will be faced with the problem of reconciling the opposite views of music as relaxation and enjoyment, versus a means for aesthetic education. Everyone will be faced with the problem of maintaining an effective working organization.

From our experience, it appears that the

Chairman is the crucial focus of the activities

of

a

Music Committee. The ideal Chairman, it seems to us, is one who combines both a good organizing ability and a broad and discerning musi- cal taste. It may well be that these two characteristics are incompatible within a single person.

If this is actually the case, the die should be cast in favor of the organizer. To balance this one -sidedness, the Chairman should have ready access to the opinions

of

those who have musical taste, and be responsive to these opinions. It further appears that, if a balanced program is desired, there must be several of these "consultants ". Even the most knowledgeable per-

Two members of the audience portray a study in concentration. sons have a preference for a certain period or a certain type of form.

-

The music program is a reasonably successful activity; the concerts are always presented, almost always exactly as programmed; they provide a program varied and interest- ing enough to excite comment from many

of

the audience; and the audience continues to attend.

Complete comfort induces maximum enjoyment of the music.

From this discussion, other groups interested in pro- moting similar programs may be able to draw worthwhile ideas. The Music Committee cannot provide a blue- print for organization.

All the Committee can do is to in- dicate what has seemed to it to be the central problems, so that other groups can either forestall them, or at least be able to recognize them as problems rather than as human idiosyncracies. It hopes also that the account will give ideas for specific activities useful to other groups.

27 www.americanradiohistory.com

SIC at home and

Not many years ago, the only way one could hear good music was to attend a concert. still the best way

Without doubt, that is

...

but today, it is possible to bring into the home and the office an increasingly exact facsimile

of

"the real thing

". Furthermore, with the advent and popularization of custom installations, music has become a living and active part of our everyday environment.

As is demonstrated by the photographs on these pages, attractiveness and listenability can

- and should six be well one and the same thing. This portfolio

-

of

installa-

WEINGARTEN

-LOS

ANGELES tions includes the simple and the elab- orate, as well as designs for both home and office.

They have been se- lected from the work of the following custom installation engineers, to whom we are indebted for the loan of photo- graphs: Custom Television Co., 1947

Broadway, New

York

23, N. Y.; Cus- tomcraft, Inc., 1636

Connecticut

Ave- nue,

N.W., Washington

9,

D.C., Lowe

Associates,

169

Bay State

Road, Bos- ton

15,

Mass.;

Nathan Margolis Shop,

28

High

Street,

Hartford

3,

Conn.; and Weingarten Electronic

Labora- tories, 7556

Melrose Avenue, Los

Angeles 46, Calif.

The installation shown on this page includes FM -AM radio, extension speakers controlled from the receiver, a record changer (at left) and record storage compartment, located between the changer and the receiver.

On the facing page, the upper illus- tration shows an office

TV installa- tion.

An interesting feature is that special precautions were taken so that when the

TV set was in use in the executive offices, the employees be- hind the partition could sound from the speaker. not hear the

The installation shown at the right has a

20 -in.

TV unit which includes

FM radio. The speaker has an area surrounding it of about

15 cu. ft.

The chassis is, of course, serviced from the rear.

One of the sliding doors shown houses a movie projector and the other, a record cutting and playing unit.

2

R www.americanradiohistory.com

'

.

_.:: i''. www.americanradiohistory.com

A

..:>aa

A wall installatior which has every- thing: television,

FM

-AM tuner, and record changer

- as well as plenty of space for desk, bar, and book and record storage facilities.

CUSTOMCP.A=f' 1NaS-INGTON

Part of the fixtures

.

LO

W

E-

BOSTON

Here is a space saver for the modern home: a wall installa- tion designed to provide a corn- plete home entertainment cen- ter without using up any pre- cious floor space.

Ventilation is afforded by a cool air intake at the top rear of the record stor- age compartment allowing a flow up through the electronic equipment and emptying into the attic above.

The loudspeak- er, located behind vertical louvres, is an Altec Lansing

6o3

-B.

The television chassis is an RC- i ooA, the tuner is an

RC -co and the amplifier is an

RC -2.

The record changer is a

Webster

-

Chicago equipped with

Pickering cartridges. www.americanradiohistory.com

At the right is a straightforward design con- structed in an existing cabinet. First require- ment for the installation shown below, left, was to utilize an old family heirloom. The

TV front panel, the changer drawer, and speaker compartments had to be specially made.

Even the TV knobs were antiqued to conform to the style of the cabinet. The cabinet itself was made about

6 ins. deeper to accom- modate the depth of the TV chassis. Two

5

-in. speakers were used instead of trying to squeeze in a t

2

-in. unit.

CUSTOM TELEVISION

-NEW

YORK

Part of the furniture

C'ISTOM TELEVISION

-NEW

YORK

Bebw is a reproduction of an original piece. Equipment includes a

Hallicrafter tuner, Webster changer with

G

-E cartridges, and Jensen t

5

-in. coaxial speaker.

MARGJL

S-M.4RTFJRD www.americanradiohistory.com

WEI

IGARTEN-LOS ANLELES

The modern and

...

LOWE-BOSTON

the very, very old

NIARGOLIS-HARTFORD www.americanradiohistory.com

Facing page, upper left:

Radio and TV built into a former bar.

Upper right. Adding a

TV tuner to an existing bookcase required cutting a

3

-in. hole in the wall so the neck of the TV tube could be recessed,

but always

.

.

.

MARGOLIS-HARTFORD

Music

This page, above:

An antique pine washstand was converted to hold a

Meissner receiver, Webster changer, and i 2

-in.

Jensen speaker. Below: a compact, neat design houses TV,

FM, and AM

- as well as plenty

)f booki!

LO W

E-

BOSTON

Facing page, bottom: here is a custom installation to delight the antiquarian's heart. It was built in 1924!

Note the storage battery

...

the

B- eliminator

..

. bus bar wiring

. .

. ah me!

The good old days! www.americanradiohistory.com

33

PROGRAMS

ARE

GETTING

BETTER

ON

FM

IBROADCASTING

by

MILTON

B.

SLEEPER

Time has confirmed the statement made

by

Charles Denny in

1947,

when he was finest

Chairman

of

the

FCC,

that

"FM

is

the aural broadcast

system

obtainable in the present state

of

the radio art."

In many areas today, such as Washington,

D.

C.,

more programs many

of

the

best

are available

on

FM than

AM, with carried

only by

FM stations. Here are facts compiled recently

by

RTMA and

NARTB.

LETTERS from

HIGH-

FIDELITY readers indicate an that increasing number of people have practically stopped listening to radio programs, and now de- pend on records for musical entertainment.

Some say their reception on AM is spoiled by fading and interference from distant stations. Others complain that, even on local stations, there is too much static from electrical machinery, oil burners, refrigerators, or defective neon sigris.

If you belong to the

I- don't- use -my- radio- any -more fra- ternity, perhaps it's because you haven't become acquainted with the clean, clear reception that one of the new FM sets can give you.

Or perhaps you bought one of the early

FM models that had neither sensitivity nor noise -limiting, and so decided that FM reception was no better than what you had been getting.

In either case, you may be missing some ve-y fine enter

- tainment. At least, in many areas, FM -only stations, or FM

trap

mitters operated by

AM network stations, are pro- viding better program service than many listeners realize.

Eaily this year, the Radio

&

Television Manufacturers

Association and the National Association of Radio

&

Tele- vi-ion Broadcasters joined forces in a project to acquaint the public with the progress that FM has made in raising the standards of radio program service. In their preliminary investigation, they found a prevailing public opinion that

"FM is dead" in areas where FM is actually very much alive, to the point of giving more service, better programs, and far better reception than is obtainable on AM broadcast- ing. This was disclosed by comparative studies of AM and

FM program schedules.

For example, in the Washington, D.C. area, listeners have a choice free of

14

FM stations that provide reception, of noise and fading, within a radius of

5o miles or more. Some transmit on FM only. Others carry the same programs on both FM and AM, although certain of these close down their AM transmitters at sunset, and can be

34 heard only on FM at night.

An actual analysis of classical music, for example, showed that, of

22 outstanding programs,

16 are broadcast only on FM. These are:

CLASSICAL MUSIC IN WASHINGTON

National Gallery

Concerts

FM

ONLY

Sundays

FM

ONLY Su,

T, W,

8:oo

PM

WCFM

Symphony

Hall

Th

8:05

PM

WGM3

Complete

Operas FM

ONLY

M,T,W,Th,F,

8:05

PM

WCFM

Oklahoma City

Symphony

Library of Congress

Concerts

Symphonies

For

Youth

FM

ONLY

Sundays

FM

ONLY

Fridays

FM

ONLY

Saturdays

10:00

PM

8:15

PM

WGMS

1:30

PM

WASH

WASH

Music Till

Midnight

French Program

High Fidelity

Concert

FM

ONLY

S,T,W,Th,F,

11:05

PM

WGMS

FM

ONLY

Sundays

6:3o

PM

WCFM

FM

ONLY

Sundays

12:15

PM

WASH

Twentieth Century

Music

In Recital

Chi:ago Theater of the

Air

FM

ONLY

Saturdays

FM

ONLY

W,Th,F

Saturdays

10:05

PM

WGMS

7:05

PM

WGMS

10:00

PM

WASH

Organ Recital

RCA Victor

Showcase

Columbia

Masterworks

Sylvan Levin

Opera_

Concert

Philharmonic

Concert

The Telephone

Hour

New York

Philharmonic

Canadian

Symphony

NBC Symphony

Metropolitan Opera

Auditions

FM

ONLY

Sundays

FM

ONLY

FM

ONLY

M,T,W,Th

Mondays

FM

ONLY

Sundays

FM

ONLY

Saturdays

Mondays

Sundays

Sun.lays

Saturdays

Tuesdays

3:00

PM

WCFM

5:06

PM

WGMS

11:05

PM

WGMS

9:00

PM

WASH

8:05

PM

WGMS

9:00

PM

WRC

2:30

PM

W

I'OP

6:30

PM

WMAL

6:30

PM

WRC

8:3o

PM

WMAL www.americanradiohistory.com

Qq-Taa

WASHINGTON

DAa,r

SIMS, ISAIIeenAr. MARCH nl. 116r

FM

AM

: complete listening pleasure

The new FM -AM receivers bring you all, not just a portion, of the many fine radio programs broadcast in

Greater Washington. For instance, in the evening you can tune in

12 instead of

7 stations and choose from a wide variety of programs

-

many available only on FM

-with

an

FM -AM set.

Washington has four independent

FM stations whose programs cannot be heard without an

FM -AM receiver.

It has three additional stations whose programs are broadcast on FM only in the evening.

An FM -AM set provides dependable and continual

listening-

daytime or evening.

An FM -AM receiver will

bring

you COMPLETE

listening pleasure

including the following types of

programs:

CLASSICAL MUSIC

Some of the finest music on the symphonies, concerts air

..

, operas,

...

are broadcast only on

FM. Others are on both FM and AM stations but are heard best on an FM -AM receiver,

POPULAR MUSIC

Whether you want popular music for background or relaxation, or

"hot" numbers for dancing, an

FM -AM set gives you a wide range of choice, includ- ing many programs only on

FM stations.

NEWS

With an

FM -AM receiver, you can get all the news all the time or tune in your favorite commentators, whether on

FM or AM or both.

DRAMA and MYSTERY

Many of the most thrilling plays are broadcast regularly on FM only.

Others are carried on both

FM and AM simultaneously. With an FM

-AM set ypu can hear all of them.

NETWORK PROGRAMS

There are six networks with radio outlets in Wash- ington.

Most of the programs of the major net. works are broadcast simultaneously on

FM and

AM.

Some network programs can be heard only over

FM. With an FM

-AM set, you can get them all.

RELIGIOUS

Some local church services are broadcast only on

FM stations. All religious programs, whether local or on networks, can be tuned in on an FM -AM set.

AM plus

FM brings you DOUBLE pleasure

...

many more programs

...

better listening, free of static and interference.

See your dealer today and ask him to show you the new FM

-AM sets which will convince you that

. .

.

FM

Means

Far More

Listening Pleasure

1 he

Radio-

Television

Manufacturers Association

This is FM Month in

Washington and RTMA takes this opportunity to pay tribute to all radio stations in the National Capital and particularly to

FM for its added service.

This advertisement, reduced, in size, was one of ington paper, a series of

full

pages in a

Wash- planned to acquaint radio listeners with the superior quality of

FM reception, and the additional program service provided by the FM stations.

The campaign is now being extended to other cities,

35 www.americanradiohistory.com

There are

21 special interest programs, ranging from story -time music for children to Music from London and the Westminster Record Library, that are carried only on

FM.

Two stations, WWDC at

Ioi.r

mc. and WBUZ at

96.7 mc., transmit background music continuously. The former starts at 7:3o

AM, and the latter at 3:oo

PM.

As for the network shows, these are broadcast simultaneously on FM and AM.

With such superior service available on FM, it's surprising that anyone listens to AM. Nonetheless, while the percentage of FM set ownership growing steadily in the is

Washington area, it is still relatively low. principal reason is

The that most people have not heard FM from a good set, properly installed.

The mention of installation refers to the use of an antenna. While a good

FM set can generally pick up strong signals without benefit of an antenna, or with just a connection to the

AC cord, noise -free reception is seldom possible without a simple dipole, at least. In that respect, FM is like TV, since they both operate in the high

- frequency band.

People take it for granted that they must have an an- tenna with a television set, but some expect an FM receiver to give perfect results without one, presumably be- cause AM sets

don't

require them.

Actually, the circuits in an FM re- ceiver that eliminate static and fad- ing require incoming signals of a cer- tain minimum strength in order to function effectively.

The better the antenna, the stronger the signals fed to the FM set.

So the answer to im- proving reception on FM is to use a better antenna or to increase the height of an existing one. The matter of height is particularly important at locations in the shadow of higher ground, as it is in television. In fact, a

TV antenna designed for the lower

VHF channels is good for FM in lo- cations where the directional effect is advantageous, and particularly good

107.3

106.3

105.1

103.5

101.1

100.3

99.5

98.7

97.1

96.7

96.3

93.9

92.5 co

ó -.

ó-

m m- o m co m

V

-

---4

- teresting experiences with good

FM sets, properly installed.

A typical comment: "I didn't realize that there was such strong background noise on my AM reception until

I got an

FM set.

Now that I've become accustomed to the silence behind FM programs,

I don't listen to AM any more." Another frequent observation: "I quit listening to

AM network programs because they sounded so dull and lifeless when

I turned down the tone

---,

---1

WMAL

WFAN

WCFM

WRC

WRFL

FM

WUST -FM

WARL-FM

----4

WGMS-FM

WWDC-FM

-

WOL-

FM

AWASH-FM

WBUZ

WTOP-FM

-FM control in order to reduce the static.

With FM,

I don't have to use the tone control, because there isn't any inter- ference.

The network programs may be limited to

5,000 cycles, but by com- parison with what

I had on AM,

FM quality is the wonderful."

And on the subject of interstation interference and fading: "Since the war, my AM reception from stations ro miles or more away has become progressively worse at night. On some, there is a steady squeal that varies slightly pitch. Others come in clear in enough for a few minutes, then the program becomes garbled, and finally a differ- ent station comes in.

If

I happen to catch the call, it is usually a several station hundred miles away. Fortu- nately, the AM stations

I want to hear most have FM transmitters, too.

Now, with my

FM tuner,

I can enjoy the programs

I had given up on AM.

Reception is perfectly steady, and there is no interference from distant sta- tions."

Of course, there are complaints from some areas about FM programs.

They range from:

"I have checked the transmission from

, and find their signals are consistently distorted.

Doesn't the

FCC make any attempt to enforce their standards for FM sta- tions?" Another frequent cirticism:

"Are they trying to be funny at

- when they claim to be a high -fidelity sta- tion? and

They play records all the time,

I'm sure that most of them come second -hand from juke boxes. When

I phoned the station about it, the manager said they can't do any better when a rotator is employed.

Under ordinary circumstances a sensitive FM set, used with an efficient antenna, will bring in stations

5o to too miles away. Un- fortunately, dealers are generally reluctant to suggest the added cost of an antenna, for fear of discouraging the sale of a receiver!

The result is that many people who own FM sets are only able to get noise -free reception from nearby stations. Adding an antenna may extend the range to cover a dozen or more FM transmitters.

Reports from HIGH-

FIDELITY readers indicate some in- because the station is losing money as it is.

He also said that when they shut down the transmitter for five days, they didn't get a single telephone call or letter.

When

I asked him how he could expect people to listen to a station that runs all the time on worn out records, all he had to say was that they were planning to close down shortly."

As to the program content and quality, listeners must face the fact that all too many station managers and spon- sors do not have well -developed critical Continued on page r

12

36 www.americanradiohistory.com

L don

Newsletter

D.

W. ALDOUS

TELEVISION licenses numbered I,181,20o in Great

Britain and Northern Ireland at the end of

1951, and the opening of new TV transmitters by the

British

Broadcasting Corporation increases these figures every month, but the never -ending search for

"perfect" sound reproduction of radio and recordings continues to attract innumerable enthusiasts, both amateur and professional.

Yes, it can be said with confidence that the audiophile is very much with us in England.

Among gramophiles, the most widely discussed question for many months has been: When will the E.M.I. (Electric and Musical Industries Ltd.) group release slow -speed, long -playing discs? Let me give you the background to this story.

The Decca Record Company in this

Country issued

33

1/3 rpm. long- playing records in June

195o and, at the time of writing (February), over

35o Decca LP discs have been re- leased.

The Decca Record Company

Ltd. issues records under the following labels: Decca, Brunswick, Capitol,

Vocalion, Telefunken, and

Rex, although this last name is no longer used. English Decca records are sold in the

U.S.A. under the name London, because English Decca sold out its connection with the American Decca Record,

Inc.

The larger E.M.I. group produces H.M.V.

(His

Mas- ter's Voice), Columbia, Parlophone, Regal -Zonophone and

M.G.M. records but, to date, all these labels are on

78 rpm. discs only. In

November

195o, the

Chairman of the E.M.I. group announced that his organization would not issue any new type of record for the home market without giving the retail trade at least six months' notice.

No official announcement

of

E.M.I.'s intentions has yet been made but, from evidence collected from several sources, it would appear that eventually, probably this year, discs at both

331/3 and

45 rpm. will be available from this concern. One pointer is that E.M.I.

LP pressings are al- ready released on the Continent.

Although no

45 rpm. discs are available in

England, three -speed record players are on sale now.

The Decca, Brunswick and Capitol LP's are selling stead

- ily here.

Foreign sales are responsible for over half the invoice value

of

our record business, with particular atten- tion paid to exporting Deccas to the

U.S. and Canada.

Every record buyer, whilst appreciating the extension of the recorded repertoire with these new LP's, hopes that a full -scale Battle of the Speeds will not develop along the lines of the

American conflict in 1948-9.

IN

SPITE of marked improvement in recording tech- niques, better pressings, and increased cost of raw ma- terials and labor charges, it is interesting to note that record prices have risen only slightly since

1939. For example, in 1939 an H.M.V.

12

-in. Red

Label disc was

6s.

Today it is

6s.9d. But, the

66

2

/3%

Purchase Tax has to be added to the price, making the cost to the purchaser

9s-

91

/2d.'

This Purchase Tax, regarded in many quarters as an unfair tax on culture varied

-

books and periodicals bear no tax from

3311/3% in 1940

-

has through l00% in

1943 to the present -day

662/3%.

In the year ended March

195o, the tax yield on musical instruments and gramophone records was about

2.9 million pounds sterling. Once again, the heavily

- taxed British record buyer awaits with some trepidation the

March

11th

Budget!

IRECENTLY paid a visit to the B.B.C.'s main orchestral studio at Delaware

Road, Maida

Vale,

London, which has been considerably modified to improve its acoustic prop- erties. This studio, originally built in 1934 inside what was once a large

B.B.C. skating rink, is now the largest owned by the

Until after the war, it remained substantially in its original form, except for the installation of an electronic organ and a raised platform for the orchestra.

The acoustics, however, were inclined to produce a boom in qualities the bass response and be rather dead at the higher frequencies. As a result

of

an extensive study of the acoustic

of

a number of concert halls by B.B.C. research engineers, the studio was redesigned.

The modifications introduced included the provision of special roofing, felt membrane absorbers on the side walls to reduce the reverberation time in the extreme bass, composite absorbing units on the wall over the balcony, and flat rectangular plates on the ceiling. The tiers on the orchestra platform were mounted on solid concrete and the woodblock surface in front

of

the orchestra was extended by

15 ft. A dado of plywood backed by rockwool was fitted along the sides and below the balcony. The rever- beration time is now

1.75 seconds?

Following these and other changes, marked improve- ment in orchestral tone and definition has been observed by conductors, players and listeners. Listening over the mon-

'Approximately

$1.37.

37 www.americanradiohistory.com

itor loudspeaker in the adjacent control room to an or- chestral rehearsal conducted by Sir

Adrian Boult, with

Benno Moiseiwitsch as the solo pianist,

I was most im- pressed with the quality. the two companies will be issuing each

As far as other's repertoire.

Columbia is concerned,

I gather this applies solely to the territories of North and South America.

In all other countries, the Columbia catalogue will appear under the aegis of Philips.

FROM

a

Continental friend,

I learn that Philips Phono- graphic Industry, Baarn,

Holland, a subsidiary of the huge

Philips electrical organization, has announced a new

7

-in.

"Minigroove"

78 rpm. long- playing disc.

These are normal

- speed pressings in vinyl co- polymer resins with a micro- groove track requiring a o.cor in.- radius stylus. A playing time of up to

5 minutes is possible. The recording char- acteristic is substantially the same as that used for standard

78 rpm. discs.

The diameter of the inner groove is only

31

ins., but with the reduced stylus radius and the high groove speed, tracing distortion is as good as the best

78 rpm. discs.

The recorded level is about

3 to

6 db less than standard commercial records issued in this Country.

Al- though the vinyl raw material used is an expensive item, the small diameter of the record permits the final disc to be sold at a price no greater than the normal

12

-in. shellac pressing. Philips have issued a number of Dutch records of this type in

France, Austria, Belgium, Germany, Canada,

Sweden,

Denmark, Switzerland, and Spain, but arrange- ments for release in Great Britain have not yet been an- nounced.

The news was published a few weeks ago that a reciprocal agreement between American Columbia and

Dutch Philips has been signed, which means that from

January r, 1953,

,For a discussion of reverberation time, see

G. A. Briggs' article on Room

Acoustics in this issue.

ANOTHER approach to the extended playing -time problem at standard

78 rpm. is the variable -pitch record, in which the grooves are close together on quiet passages and wider apart on loud, heavy passages. Two

Continental series, Archiv and Deutsche Grammophon Gesellschaft, are now being recorded with variable groove -pitch and a playing time of

711 minutes is obtained with a 36 db. dynamic range on

12

-in. discs. Pressings seem to be on shellac (and not always of the best grade), which results in rather high background noise.

IN

VIEW of the interesting article on Public Library

Record Loan service in the first issue

(Summer

1951) of

HIGH-

FIDELITY,

I first

British think readers may like to know of the book to be published devoted to an examina- tion of the special problems connected with the formation and operation of gramophone record libraries as part of the British public library service.

This is a volume entitled

"The Gramophone

Record

Library ", by

C.

D. Overton, published at r

5s. by

Grafton and Company,

51

Great Russell Street,

London, W.C.1.

The author, who was largely responsible for the public record library at

Walthmastow, London, divides his book into two sections: the first 69 pages cover the history

(1914 -39) of the record depart- ment and ancillary services. The re- maining

54 pages of this work, com- prising five appendices, include a sug- gested basic list of records. The poten- tial reader must be warned that there are a number of errors and omissions in listing records, etc., which make the book less than authoritative, but a revised edition will make it a valuable pioneer effort. Any librarian in Ameri- ca concerned with this field should also consult the July

1949 issue of "The

Library

Association Record" (The

Li- brary

Association, Chaucer House,

Malet Place,

London,

W.C. r) which was devoted to recorded music collec- tions.

IN

THE next London Newsletter,

I shall have more news and information about recorded music and audio in

England but, if you have a particular topic you would like discussed in this feature, please do write to the Editor as early as possible.

The British Broadcasting

Company's

Maida

Vale Studio, showing acoustic

treatment

of walls

and

ceiling. www.americanradiohistory.com

let's make it

Compact

By

GEORGE

A.

BREWSTER

THE auspicious debut of

HIGH

-FIDELITY

Maga- zine is now a matter who once stared bug of history, and readers

-eyed at

Philip Kelsey's deluxe installations have long since had time to come back down to earth, consult their budgets, and look around the living room to see which large piece of furniture would have to be moved out.

On the chance that some readers have neither large living rooms nor large budgets,

I have put on paper my own experiences with the design of an assembly which, without sacrificing quality, achieves compact- ness.

About three years ago,

I decided to pension off the old family radio

-phonograph and acquire some of the high fidelity components which

I was begin- ning to read about. With an assemblage of these units,

I was told in the literature,

I could have a truly high quality music system that would play rings around the ordinary commercial job as far as authen- tic reproduction of sound was concerned. After sorting out a variety of recommendations,

I bought an fier

FM tuner

(size

9 by

13 by

8 ins.), a power ampli-

(io by

12 by

8 ins.), a preamplifier and control unit

(7 by

13 by

5 ins.), and a good quality loud- speaker.

I put them all together and they spelled, much to my gratification, better radio and record reproduction than

I had ever heard before.

So good it was (and still is, for that matter) that when

I went to the Audio Fair last Fall,

I felt not the slightest tinge of envy.

The only trouble was,

I had no place to put the components.

Not being blessed with an old wash-

Fig. r.

This cabinet design

features

compactness. www.americanradiohistory.com

39

TURNTABLE

PHONO

MOTOR:

VENTS would have to be mounted quite low, involving the stoop, squat, and squint that Philco was supposed to have eliminated back in the '3o's.

Also, having been long convinced that a record changer is an invention of the devil,

I had no use for most of the space provided for that mech- anism. When

I dreamed of convenience,

I pictured myself seated in a chair with a hand within easy reach of all controls and operations.

Maximum convenience is undoubtedly achieved by con- centrating all the components in a all chairside cabinet, so that operating motions are within the smallest possible

POWER

AMPUI',

T

area. True, certain amplifiers feature chairside controls, but since the important functions of playing records and tuning radio stations are ignored

- even placed of the room on the other side

- the conveni- ence is largely illusory. The

Fig.

2. ment

hand

These two

and

overlapping of components.

The left view is

a

drawings show exact place- cross -section as seen from front. stand or sideboard or

Murphy bed,

I could not indulge in any of those ingenious conversions invented by designers whose feet seldom leave the drawing board, nor could

I afford to invest in yards of fancy cabinetry of the Voice and

Vision variety.

I could use the box vacated by the old family set (indeed,

I did, for a short time), assorted sizes of the components, as well as but the the oddly miserable allowance in the old cabinet made many of

2 cu. ft. for the speaker, unfortunate compromises necessary. The first thing

I did, therefore, was to house the speaker in its own separate enclosure.

Casting about for a reasonably -priced commercial cabinet for the remaining units,

I finally found a shop that had a moderate -cost and attractive line of furniture for audio equipment. One model,

231/2 by was closest to my needs,

35112 by i8 ins., but in the matter of size and convenience, there were distinct drawbacks. The tuner

SELECTOR LOUDNESS BASS TREBLE ideal design would combine everything except the speaker in a single cabinet. Then, my problem was to discover how small this cabinet could

Almost at once,

I be made. found that the components could not only be placed next to each other, they could be overlapped.

The phonograph motor, which required very little space below the mounting board, could be interlocked like a jig- saw very puzzle with the tuner and preamplifier, which used little space above the mounting board.

I even found that, with a little ingenuity, the tuner's dial could be shifted so that it would occupy the

Continued on page zoo

Fig.

4. below. motor

1,./4K board soft rubber.

RUBBER is

Phonograph mounted on

CHASSIS

MOUNTING B!.\;^^

BRACKET

Fig.

5, above.

Tuner and preamplifier

chassis

are

hooked over brackets.

Fig.

3.

Commercial cabinet is twice the size of the one de- scribed in this article, as shown by the comparisons

at

left. www.americanradiohistory.com

the

1p

records of

"

Giuseppe

Verdi

c g

burke

HE

WHOSE music has dominated Italian opera for more than a hundred years was born in Lombardy in

181 3.

Richard Wagner was born in that year.

Two men never had less in common. It is interesting that the man whose career did most resemble Verdi's should have been another

German,

Franz

Josef Haydn, musically alien to Verdi as he was.

Both were born poor and both were largely self

- educated. Both acquired by very hard work a professional expertise in composition only matched by those few whose genius was affluent apparent almost from birth. Both became through music; both were absolutely preeminent in their day although

Verdi's domain was more restricted than

Haydn's; both were basically simple men equipped with peasant shrewdness; and if Haydn became a practiced courtier, and Verdi an associate of the great political figures of his country, both remained apparently unspoiled and decently human until the end. Where they differed, be- sides in their music, was in their acquiescence to the differ- ent spirits of their respective eras.

Haydn was too old to embrace the most sweeping of revolutions when it came, but Verdi's first sixty years were passed in a period of dis- content, unrest, spasmodic insurrection and finally, suc- cessful national asseveration. This is of great importance, because the Italian ferment dictated much of

Verdi's music, and the success of his insolent innuendos directed at the

Austrian hegemony encouraged him to continue the matter which had brought success to him personally and had maintained the turbulence that eventually was to make

Italy a united nation. At least twelve

of

his operas have subject matter which was repugnant to the

Austrian author- ities, and his difficulties with the censorship, which resulted in changes

of

locale and personages in certain operas

-

Un

Ballo in

Maschera and

Rigoletto

- were plaguing in their frequent occurrence, although amusing and informative to a later age. His very name,

VERDI, became a signifi- cant rallying an chant

of

nationalistic insurgence, for it was ominous acrostic of

Vittoria Emanuele

Re d' Italia, still an apocryphal monarch whose pretentions were ob- noxious to Austria.

We know Verdi as a composer of operas, and indeed almost all his work is in this form. He did write, while a very young man, many vocal and instrumental composi- tions which have largely disappeared.

He loved opera, and wrote according to his bent. He produced many masterpieces, of which too many are tainted with a pre- posterous and dated theatricalism, which caused Verdi's name to fall into considerable international disrepute for many years after he had attained the summit of his fame.

The contrast of

Wagner and his reforms was always present to make cultivated people sneer gently at Verdi's acqui- escence in fusty conventions of his contemporaneous stage.

There has been a good deal of discussion in recent years about the necessity of "revaluating"

Verdi, as the great composer he certainly was, and the recently celebrated half

- centennial of his death put forward this discussion with considerable force.

Actually, it does not seem that revaluation is necessary.

The opinion generally prevalent during the last two -score years

-that

Verdi wrote a wondrous music to contaminated fables which certainly diminish their acceptance as great entities of art, and which induce us to love the music with indulgence for the amiable composer who troubled so little with problems

- this opinion seems quite fair and exact once we have enlarged it by the inclusion of two superb exceptions, the musical dramas

Otello and Falstaff, which belong in the highest category of man's creation, and which generally attract a restricted and superior audience gags at

Trovatore, that

I

Lombardi and even Traviata, wherein the music, for all its simplicity, is so immensely superior to the texts which baffle both sense and a sense of form, that for many it is often impossible to have an unadul- terated enjoyment of the music while regarding the action.

It is too bad for us who enjoy the fruits of his genius, and tragic for him whose repute would have been nobler for it, that the association with the great Boito did not be- gin much earlier.

Boito gave him two marvelous librettos; we dare

Otello not think what Verdi might have done before had that scholar, philosopher, linguist, soldier and

41 www.americanradiohistory.com

composer supplied him with texts, even if they had been on the same subjects that

Verdi did use to someone else's libretto. Boito's tasteful theatrical sense was so complete that we can be confident he could even have contrived a rational and poetic

Trovatore.

As to the Wagner in the late Verdi, there can be no doubt of it:

Boito, Wagner's translator, put it there. Verdi, the composer who probed every text exhaustively, treated

Otello and Falstaff as the texts insistently dictated. The texts were so devised by the librettist that the sensitive composer had no other course than to treat them as music dramas as

Wagner would have done, except in

Verdi's own musical idiom which, where

Otello and Falstaff are concerned, we may not because less elaborate. call an idiom inferior to Wagner's

He was eighty when he wrote Falstaff to attain the pin- nacle of his country's musical craft in his last work.

He had steadily grown in power through the years. At four- score, from the heights of Falstaff, surveying the procession of his work, he could see that all led up to here. An artist can have no deeper satisfaction than the knowledge that his latest work is better than those before; and Verdi, eighty, contentedly let the latest be the last, and laid down his tools.

He lived in serene patriarchal seclusion for years. His life had nearly coincided with the eight more unfolding of the Nineteenth

Century, and when the old Century ex- pired the old composer desisted too.

Less than a month convinced him that the new Twentieth was unpromising; he died on January

27,

1901.

THE VERDI

RECORDS

More different recordings have been made bearing

Verdi's name than all those of any three other composers.

Five with hundred 78's must have come from

Rigoletto alone,

Donna

é mobile, Questa o quella and Caro

Nome serving as cards of admission to phonographic ranks for hundreds of tenors and sopranos. The stage was coy to

Otello, but the studios never lost enthusiasm for another

Ave

Maria therefrom; and millions of people who had never heard

Un ballo in maschera were familiar with

Eri tu. LP has diminished this flood of episodic offerings although there has been some diversion to 45 rpm's. The natural new tendency is to the complete operas, of which we now have thirteen, with two more announced. There are also a number of scenes, excerpts, collections and miscellanies designed to advance singers to celebrity in occupancy of the long microgrooves of 33's. This kind of hash is de- plored and has been ignored here

- although some of the isolated scenes have admitted value in their recordings

- because their admission would have called for entry of a

AIDA: Opera in Four Acts on a Libretto by

Antonio

Ghislanzoni.

1871

Caterina Mancini

(s),

Giulietta

Sim

- onato (ms),

Mario Filippeschi (t),

Rolando Panerai (bne), Giulio Neri

(bs), Antonio Massaria

(bs). Chorus and

Orchestra of Radio Italiana,

Vittorio

Gui, cond. Cetra -Soria three

12

-in.

1228.2 hr.

18 min.

817.85.

Maria Caniglia (s), Ebe

Stignani (ms),

Beniamino Gigli (t),

Gino

Bechi

(bne),

Tancredi Pasero (bs), Italo

Tajo

(bs);

Chorus and

Orchestra of the Rome

Opera, Tullio Serafin, cond. RCA Vic- tor four r 2

-in. r.cT

6400.

2 hr. 3o min.

$22.88.

Commissioned by the Khedive to cele- brate the opening of the Suez

Canal, Aida has jutting prominence as the most pompous pièce d'occasion ever written for the theatre; and a certain naive grandeur in the new big style devised by Verdi for the occasion is in constant and often successful battle with flood of

78's and 45's for which there is simply not room.

This Verdi survey is concerned only with complete works or works wherefrom excisions have been negligible or conventional, not injurious to the concept. It will be noticed that there are not yet many duplications, and we may expect the future to bring more, especially of the most famous operas, and

Urania, a that where duplications exist the su- periority

Special of one version is in each case easily manifest. attention is directed to the following:

Otello on stunning recording, and

Rigoletto on Victor, gleaming in warm polish, which have received the best engineering;

Un Giorno di

Regno, a highly proficient all

- around accomplishment on Cetra;

Falstaff, the supreme achievement of the Italian musical stage, also on Cetra;

Traviata on Victor, an invigorating fresh breeze blowing through the battered frame of a lovely edifice; and

Rig

- oletto on a

Remington despite its faults, for this album offers great deal of entertainment for $6.57.

All the recorded operas are furnished with albums and the texts in Italian and English except the Columbia Tra- viata, which offers no text. the tawdry expedience of the miserable con- fection which served as libretto. Elephants are a desirable stage property in this pag- eant, and the admissibility of these worthy animals on the scene tends to emphasize the mere dimensions of the production and, alas, the spurious nature employed to put the of the contrivances emotions into action.

Verdi's music is interesting throughout, combining brazen pomp, willowy lyricism and showy declamation with expert surety which can certainly entertain even if it can- not convince us here. There is no charac- terization because there are no characters, the participants being gaudy lay- figures.

It may be opera, remarked that people who hear but not many operas, speak of Aida with great respect.

The resurrected Victor version is not re- corded to enough advantage to challenge the new Cetra edition, although the Victor has some very good singing, particularly by

Caniglia. The Cetra then is the one to have.

It is pretty good and could have been better, had the singers been instructed to have more respect for the microphone.

A number of good voices are injured in fortes because of the odd ignorance of vocalists of the effect proximity to the microphone can have on overtones. The deleterious results are par- ticularly apparent when Mancini and the tenor Filippeschi crowd the instrument.

Otherwise the recording is steadily good.

Larger forces are employed than for most of the other Verdi works in the Cetra lists, and they have been registered with fine sonority and good detail on discs engineered to characteristics easily reproduced.

Gui's direction seems entirely competent until after half an hour or so the listener realizes the conductor's indifference to dynamics.

Nothing seems much softer than mf, and although the fortes are robust, the lack of real contrast instills some sensation of monotony. In sum, the Cetra edition is a good deal less less than ideal, and something than we should have expected, but it offers an Aida of enough substantial value to satisfy until we shall have one insistently excellent.

42 www.americanradiohistory.com

(Un) BALLO

IN MASCHERA

An edition of this opera purportedly re- corded at Rome by a cast specified in detail, but in fact a cheeky pilferage from the air of a

Metropolitan broadcast, was issued by

Classic

Editions and hastily withdrawn after legal action. It is no longer obtainable except by accident, and is mentioned to keep the chronicle complete. here

(La)

BATTAGLIA DI LEGNANO (The

Battle of

Legnano). Opera in Four

Acts on a Libretto by

Salvatore

Cam

- marano. 1848

Caterina Mancini

(s), Edmea Limberti

(ms), Amedeo Berdini (t),

Rolando

Panerai (bne), and other vocal soloists.

Chorus and Orchestra of Radio Ital- iana,

Soria

Fernando Previtali, cond. Cetra- three

12- in. 1220.

I hr. 49 min.

$17.85.

The taunting provocation

- the defeat of dominion of such a subject in

1176

- by the Lombard League compels respect for Verdi's courage and illustrates the nationalistic fer- ment in

Italy in the year

1848. of revolutions,

That ferment, bursting into maddened enthusiasm at the opera's première in Rome early in 1849, produced a temporary illusion of success which calmer succeeding days did not ratify.

The historical verdict has been consignment to quiescence, and does not seem unjust. The libretto is a mere military pageant to which is precariously glued a dull love -story of unlikely motiva- tions; and while the music is not tiresome, it is largely undistinguished and routine, as if the composer was more hopeful of the

Magenta and Solferino to come than inter- ested in the Legnano of seven centuries ago.

The only recording is an adequate state- ment of a work whose appeal is principally historical.

As usual with Cetra, chorus and orchestra are well handled, with sound both full andclear in characteristics requiring only a conventional setting of the amplifier con- trols. Mancini, who can sing, disappoints with some disagreeable forcing in which she is joined by the tenor Berdini. Panerai's comfortable baritone cannot redeem the flabby part it has to serve.

The other roles are episodic.

ERNANI. Opera in Four Acts on a

Li- bretto by

Francesco

Maria Piave after

Victor Hugo's Play. 1843

Caterina Mancini (s),

Gino Penno

(t),

Giuseppe Taddei (bne), Giacomo

Vaghi (bs); Chorus and Orchestra of

Radio Italiana, Fernando Previtali, three

12

-in. 121o.

I hr.

58 min. $17.85.

With a libretto that does tolerant proprieties not violate the of romanticism, Verdi composed an entertaining and fiery opera whose characters have some memorable sub- stance.

Astonishingly, Piave permitted them to adhere consistently to type, and Verdi was resultantly able to create a score wherein episodic treatment is narration subordinated to a of the drama as a whole.

For Cetra, Mr. Previtali has contrived a spirited performance, and the singers, par- ticularly Mancini, seem in good form, but

Cetra has been evil to the singers.

The sound has been captured to a double stand- ard, one part for chorus and orchestra, the other for the soloists. The first is fairly accurate and roomy if not brilliant; the second damns all the soloists without ces- sation by the competition of a fierce micro

- phonic musical flutter. This enjoyment

- is gravely injurious to disqualifying, in this opinion. Discophiles who can stomach such wing- beating will find the other ele- ments of thfi recording in order.

FALSTAFF. Commedia

Lirica in Three

Acts on a

Libretto by

Arrigo Boito, after Shakespeare's

"Merry

Wives of

Windsor" and

"Henry

IV

". 1892

Lina

Pagliughi

(s),

Rosanna Carteri

(s), Anna Maria Canali (ms), Amalia

Pini (ms), Emilio Renzi (t),

Gino del

Signore (t),

Giuseppe Nessi (t), Giu- seppe Taddei (bne), Saturno Meletti

(bne), Cristiano dalla Mangas

(bs).

Chorus and Orchestra of Radio

Itali- ana, Mario Rossi, cond. Cetra

-Soria three

I2 -in.

1207.

I hr. 54 min.

$17.85.

Verdi was nearly eighty when he his composed masterpiece. There is no parallel to this in music, most have been of whose greatest creations wrought by men at less than half that age. est work,

Haydn's sixties produced his great- but the effort silenced him. The effort of Falstaff stilled Verdi.

No wonder. He embellished Boito's deft condensation with an elaborate and con- tinuous illustrative musical commentary.

Properly there are no arias, no duets, no set pieces of any kind. The composer is con- cerned with exposure of character, of the clash of characters; he is concerned less with the march the events of events than with the effects of upon his people. The broad and massive music, symbolizing Falstaff's paunch and greed, is nervous with subtleties, with allusions and innuendoes.

The orchestra mocks, cajoles, hints, and overwhelms in a parade of rich patterns in which coarse and fine are necessarily interwoven.

Few works of art have had such a succès d'estime.

Extravagantly admired, Falstaff is comparatively seldom played. Verdi's audi- ence is enormous, and has been trained to the tuneful euphony of Traviata, to the facile stream of easily- remembered music in

I rovatore and

Rigoletto.

Fifty thousand hurdy -gurdies were supported in the main by the music of Verdi.

Otello and Falstaff were in effect a deception practiced on the million devotees of the instrument.

Now we may hear them both, thanks to another mechanism. Falstaff is to be found in an excellent Cetra edition, one of the bright gems of the company's catalogue, although not one of the most recent. In- deed the heavy orchestral forces and com- plex vocal ensembles have been registered with a decisive clarity that belies the age of the recording. Strings and woods are parti- cularly incisive, and the violins present none of the difficulty from them which we always dread on records. The voices 'are so disposed that none ever wrongly dominates, and the adjustment of singers to orchestra is of an exactitude to make us wonder why it is a rarity in records.

A good Falstaff means a good conductor, particularly on discs.

The singers obtain success rather as actors than as practitioners of vocal display not in the score; beauty of voice is subordinate to direction and flexi- bility and sense. The conductor cannot create the first, but he can most strongly influence the other three. The stage is crowded with principals in Falstaff, and the task of mingling their song with the or- chestra's is singularly exacting. Mr. Rossi, in this his best recording achievement, has blended voices and instruments into an ob- jective cohesiveness clarity. It is his of compelling force and triumph; but his singers are able and intelligent, with Messrs. Taddei and Renzi and Miss Pagliughi managing the outstanding roles smoothly.

Several

Verdi albums surpass this in the re- creation of sound, and a few are more brilliant in more interpretation, but none offers a consummate musical experience.

(La)

FORZA

DEL

DESTINO

(The third edition on

Cetra 1201 omits about a of the score.

It's inclusion here would have argued for the inclusion of other frag- ments for which neither time nor space is available.)

(Un) of

GIORNO

DI REGNO

(One

Day

Reign).

"Melodramma

Giocosco" in Two Acts on a

Libretto by

Felice

Romani. 1840

Lina

Juan

Pagliughi (s), Laura Cozzi (ms),

Oncina

(t),

Renato Capecchi

(bne), Sesto

Bruscantini (bs), Cristi- ano dalla Mangas (bs). Chorus and

Orchestra of Radio Italiana, Alfredo

Simonetto, cond. Cetra 12- inch. 122

5.

I hr. 4o min. $11.90.

Verdi's second opera and first buffa was written at a time of terrible personal bereave- ment. He did not like the libretto, but characteristically blamed the complete failure of

Giorno di

Regno on his music. The libretto is better than a number he used later, and the music, influenced by Auber through

Donizetti but essentially Verdi in its broad swinging tunes, is vivid, lively and infectious, with an apter characterization than we should expect to find in the early operas.

The farce is taut and neat: once we understand the involved improbability of the basic situation we see it ripple cheerfully to an ordained nuptial conclusion. all

The Cetra recording did not need the stimulation of a competing edition to put participants on their mettle. No Verdi opera on discs offers consistently better singing than we have here, with Mmes.

Pagliughi and Cozzi in rare form and the tenor Oncina revealing a beautiful lyric voice in a delivery cushioned, admirable and rare.

The others, particularly Bruscan- tini, are more than competent, and Simonetto guides the well- trained chorus and orchestra with confident and sparkling reins.

The engineered sound is notably free of serious faults, and maintains the voices in nice pro- portion against the full

-blooded orchestra.

In sum, a very agreeable in a masterly light entertainment presentation, one of the best realizations in the Cetra catalogue.

(I) LOMBARDI ALLA

PRIMA

CRO-

CIATA (The Lombards at the

First

Crusade). Opera in Four Acts on a

Libretto by

Temistocle Solera. 1842

Maria Vitale (s), Renata Broilo

(s),

Miriam Pirazzini (ms),

Aldo Bertocci

(t), Gustavo

Gallo

(t),

Mario Petri

43 www.americanradiohistory.com

(bne). Chorus and

Orchestra of Radio

Italiana, Manno

Wolf- Ferrari, cond.

Cetra -Soria three

12

-in. 1217.

I hr

59 min. $17.85.

In Nabucco, Solera gave Verdi a libretto not without dramatic merit and some sense form.

Intoxicated by the success of of this, the librettist produced in the following year a piece of writing which in Verdi's treatment obtained a success equal to that of

Nabucco, and considerable distinction in being rec- ognizably one of the most outrageous librettos ever fabricated by anyone at any time. It is best to ignore it, and enjoy the music fine of I Lombardi which, by itself has a triumphant swing.

Like Nabucco, the choruses are distinguished and seductive, and several of the pieces allotted to the soloists are praiseworthy as indicative of moods yanked upon the scene by whims of the librettist.

I Lombardi is competently sung in the Cetra recording, with Gallo and

Petri particularly at home in the music; the conductor manages everyone smoothly, and the recorded sound has a close resem- blance to the good sound heard in the

Cetra

Nabucco.

MACBETH.

Urania has announced a recording of this opera, but it had not appeared by press -time.

MESSA DA

REQUIEM (Requiem Mass).

1873

Selma Kaye (s), Miriam Pirazzini (ms),

Gino Sinimberghi

(t), Augusto Beuf

Orchestra of the

(bs). Chorus and

Rome Opera,

Luigi Ricci, cond.

Urania two

12

-in.

URLP

213.

I hr. 20 min.

$1

1.90.

Maria Caniglia (s), Ebe

Stignani (ms),

Beniamino Gigli (t), Ezio

Pinza (bs).

Chorus and Orchestra of the (then)

Royal Opera, Rome, Tullio Serafin, cond. RCA

Victor two

12

-in.

LCT

6003.

I hr.

12 min. $11.44-

Herewith a problem to the discophile, seem- ingly insoluble. The two versions abovel are complementary. What Victor has Urania lacks and what Urania has, came too late for Victor. The latter has a superb perform- ance dynamically led by a conductor whose predilection for the score was matched by his understanding of it; four excellent soloists, amongst whom Messrs. Gigli and

Pinza enjoyed a day of wonderful form; and a well -trained chorus and orchestra.

Urania equals the chorus and orchestra, and offers intelligent from Ricci, but if less forceful leadership her solo sopranos are tor- mented by tremolo and her tenor, despite good moments, is no Gigli. Beuf is an im- pressive bass, but his voice has not the dis- tinctive beauty that Pinza's had then.

The Victor 78's, from which the present discs are transfers, date from about

1938 and were then first- class. The LP's provement, and would excite no are an im- discontent if there were no Urania made to a very high standard of modern engineering.

Against the full- bodied mass of this sound festooned with brass fanfares of brightest color and

'The

Concert Hall edition on

CHS

1131, wherein an organ undertakes the work of a hundred instru- mentalists, can hardly have more than parochial interest, and was not examined for this survey. punctuated by the wonderful Urania pian- issimi the Victor seems pallid and even puny.

As usual in this kind of confrontation, the writer finds that the grander recording makes the grander impact, vious superiority but in face of the ob- of the Victor performance as such, music -lovers may prefer the less exciting sound.

The

Requiem was written in deep affection for the death of Verdi's great friend Manzoni, whose novels were influential in the period.

It is a work of extraordinary dramatic fervor written from the ripeness experience and the of the composer's strength of his grief.

The formalized pattern of the service ham- pered not at all this man accustomed to the easy scope of operatic librettos: he wrote as he always had, illustrating the text with the direct honesty he used to write music de- scriptive of the embrace of lovers.

The re- sult is one of the few truly great universal requiems in music.

LUISA MILLER.

Opera in Three

Acts on a Libretto by

Salvatore Cammarano after

Schiller's

Play "Intrigue and

Love ". 1849

Lucy

Kelston (s), Miti Truccato

Pace

(ms), Giacomo Lauri -Volpi (t),

Scip- ione Colombo (bne), Giacomo Vaghi

(bs), Duilio Baronti (bs). Chorus and

Orchestra of Radio Italiana, Mario

Rossi, cond. Cetra -Soria three s2 -in.

1221.

I hr. 47 min. $17.85.

The tragedy of a country girl whose love above her station provokes disaster, be- lievable in the neat libretto once the glossy patness of the initial situation is accepted, provided Verdi with an outlet for his tenderer talents. Much of Luisa Miller is a pleasing rustic melodiousness, and in his choral writing the composer reveals a folk -quality not unworthy of comparison with Weber.

The only version on discs is engineered to the best standard we have had from Cetra.

There is more high- frequency detail amidst the orchestral mass, and the scope namics ceive

- for which the first credit has of dy- conductor must been increased re- by an uncommon sensitivity to the lighter passages.

Rossi's management would be commend- able indeed if he did not have to accept responsibility for the antics of two of his principal singers, who howl their way right out of the integrity of his concept and frus- trate the musical malleability singers of the other doing their duty. The malefactors are

Miss Kelston as

Luisa and Mr. Lauri

-

Volpi as her lover.

No philippic against the excesses been of the breed of tenors has ever pungent enough to characterize the revolting arrogant screams of this fellow; and when Miss Kelston, as the object of his ear -splitting desire, vies with him in loving concert, their ferocious battle for the micro- phone effects a sublimation of naked pierc- ing noise which is surely a major curiosity of recorded music. The tragedy of this

Luisa Miller is that

Luisa and her repellent boy- friend cannot be expunged from it.

NABUCODONOSOR.

(Nebuchadrez- zar). Opera in Four Acts on a

Li- bretto by

Temistocle Solera. 1842

Gabriella Gatti

(s), Caterina Mancini

(s), Mario Binci (t), Paolo Silveri

(bne), Antonio Cassinelli

(bs). Chorus and Orchestra of Radio Italiana,

Fernando Previtali, cond. Cetra-

Soria three

12

-in.

1

216.

I hr.

55 min.

$17.85.

Nabucco, the young Verdi's third opera, had an initial success which established his fame and prepared the way for greater successes.

Although some of its fortune must be attributed to the analogy Italians chose to find between the Hebrews' struggle against oppression and their own subjection to

Austria, Nabucco is a good and a rousing opera to a quasi -historical libretto of the kind for which Verdi always had a welcome.

The attached love -story is melodramatically forceful, and is fresher here than in its repe- tition after removal from Jerusalem to Mem- the great feature of

Nabucco

- not are only the famous

Va. pensiero, which served as of the Italian insurgents, an unofficial hymn but others of singularly expressive power for a is composer of such limited experience. It curious that the work is not accorded more contemporary performances, but the excellent Cetra recording goes far to com- pensate for this.

Singing is above average quality in this album, with Gatti very fine when she is not too near the microphone, Cassinelli con- sistently agreeable, Binci confident and sure,

Silvera very good except when he succumbs to tremolo and Mancini fluctuating between tion is absolutely direct and valiant

- de- cidedly appropriate for an assertive, warlike action wherein subtlety has little place. their best

- is typical which is to of say

Cetra -Soria at strong and corn- pact, with everything heard and everything in order, without and no faults of any sensational features importance.

OTELLO. Opera in Four

Acts on a Li- bretto by

Arrigo Boito after

Shakes- peare's Tragedy.

1886

Anna la Pollo

(s),

Ada Landi (ms),

Gino Sarri (t), Athos Cesarini (t),

Mino Russo (t), Antonio Manca Serra

(bne), Carlo Platani (bs), Virgilio

Stocco (bs), Chorus and Orchestra of the Rome Opera, Alberto Paoletti, cond. Urania three

12

-in.

URLP

2 r

6.

2 hr. so min. $17.85.

Here Boito takes charge, and for the first time in his seventy -three years the great composer saw a great libretto. Boito, an all- around man of genius, taste, cultivation and experience, an excellent composer of lively curiosity who translated Shakespeare and Wagner into Italian, served Verdi with- out disservice to Shakespeare, in a stun- ning demonstration of skill and good taste.

Within the much smaller frame of the opera, he has retained the Shakespearean essence.

Consciously or not (but hardly the latter)

Boito set his venerable colleague the task of making an opera along lines indicated by

Wagner's application of Gluck's ideas, of which by far the most important element was that dramatic action be not impeded by musical display. In

Otello and Falstaff, the music illumines and intensifies the dra- matic action. No more the comfortable but preposterous practice of allocating to the leading singers of a projected opera so many minutes each of recitative, cavatina and aria before the opera was written. Verdi had to

44 www.americanradiohistory.com

drop all his accustomed weapons, examine his inner resources and invent a kind of music he had never tried before.

So pro- found was his genius that the new work, in such contradiction with the principles of his great successes, is easily and obviously his greatest tragedy and probably the only one still moving after we have left the brief spell of the theatre. He gives us a new subtlety, particularly in the enriched orchestral com- ment, an entirely new and juster character- ization in the declamatory vocal line, a more complex chorus used as dramatic partici- pants rather than mere musical variants de- vised to hold attention; and he rejects scrupulously any extraneous interpolations.

Thanks to Boito, Shakespeare and Verdi have each found his man.

This Urania best recording is probably the of all the recorded Verdi in terms of sound itself.

Probably, because the Victor

Rigoletto, in its serene polish, its lack of obvious imperfections, presents a different kind of sonic value hard to compare. The

Urania

Otello is decidedly the most sensa- tional of Verdi editions, and one of the most sensational of all operatic recordings. We can say that as far as our reproducing appa- ratus are concerned the range of frequencies in this

Otello is complete; and the dynamic range, whose extensiveness is vital to dra- matic exposition, has seldom if ever been surpassed on discs. The whispered pianissimi, a great credit to conductor as well as engi- neers, are almost incredible in their distinct and entirely audible tininess. Also are notable the bite in the bass, the characteristic ringing overtones of the brass and the pun- gent traceries of the wood. Little correction is required in the amplifier. The one appar- ent defect, which is not pronounced, is a projection of the soloists somewhat larger than the rest of life as illustrated by chorus and orchestra.

The performance as a whole is very good, with chief honors to the beautifully phrased, finely work detailed and dramatically expressive of Mr. Paoletti with his huge forces.

The Otello has some tremolo and some coarseness when loud, but is gracious when lyrical. Miss la

Pollo, uncertain at first, acquires warmth as she proceeds. The Iago of

Mr. Serra is a concept and realization of high order, implacable and restrained, subtly conveying an impression of rueful irony at his own horror.

QUARTET IN

E

MINOR. 1873

New Italian Quartet. with Schumann:

Quartet in

F, Op. 41,

No.

2.

London

I2 -in.

LLP

323.

21 min. $5.95.

Paganini Quartet. RCA

Victor

LM

37. 22 min. $4.67. ro

-in.

A friendly and unassuming exercise, the single specimen of Verdi's chamber music resembles the quartets of the great German masters in that it was written for four stringed instruments. It is guileless but not naive.

It offers to the new

Italian Quartet (Nuovo

Quartetto Italiano) a perfect subject for their exquisite nuance, quivering subtlety and perfect discipline. The way of the

Pa- ganini Quartet is more direct, and in this

Quartet less rewarding. When the Nuovo

Quartetto can find a work susceptible to the precious details of their infinite scrutiny, they will not be outplayed. (There are many such works.) The engineering not of one equals that of the other, with Victor some- what bigger and crisper, resonant and coarser

London more

- results of room -tone.

QUATTRO PEZZI SACRI (Four Sacred

Pieces)

(The four short choral works of this pro- duction from the period of

Falstaff do not comprise an inviolable entity. They have violated the completeness of this survey by remaining coy in their recorded versions.

All four have been advertised for Concert

Hall

CHs

1136; but this has not yet appeared.

Nos. some i and

3 are on Allegro

ALG

3019 with

Monteverdi, but the copy for this survey was mislaid. No. 2, Stabat Mater, shares a ten -inch Mercury

(MG

15011) with four choral songs by

Brahms. This is a fairly effective, rather coarse -grained re- cording of a routine interpretation.)

RIGOLETTO. Opera in Three

(some- times Four) Acts on a Libretto by

Francesco

Maria

Piave, after

Victor

Hugo's

"Le

Roi s'amuse ". x85r

Erna Berger (s), Nan Merriman

(ms),

Jan Peerce

(t),

Leonard Warren (bne),

Italo Tajo (bs), and other vocal solo- ists.

Robert

Shaw

Chorale and

RCA

Victor Orchestra, Renato Cellini, cond. RCA

Victor three

12

-in.

LM

61or.

I hr. 45 min.

$17.16.

Orlandina Orlindini

(s), Lidia Melani

(ms), Gino Sarri (t), Ivan

Petroff

(bne), Mario Frosini

(bs), and other vocal soloists. Chorus of the Corn

- munale Theatre and

Orchestra of the

May lia,

Festival, Florence; Erasmo Ghig- cond.

Remington three s2 -in.

199- 58 -60.

I hr. 48 min.

$6.57.

Glib great though it be, the melodrama has a horror whose effect is more forceful on records than in the theatre, its action requiring expedients deterrent to credibility and productive of titters invidious to tragedy.

This is strong, energetic and inventive

Verdi, sharper at characterization than in any previous work, lyrical but grim, and expertly descriptive. The astonishing open- ing scene, with the corrupted splendor of the Renaissance indicated to perfection by the simplest means while the excitement an awful of foreboding grows, is one of the most vivid quarter -hours in theatrical music; and the last act, whose culminating staged horror is too pat and too contrived, is just the same convincing in the music which describes it.

Malignantly obfuscating the sober exer- cise of judgement is the small item of

$6.57.

This and the quality of the Remington

Rigoletto himself, Ivan Petroff, argue power- fully in

Remington's favor. Everything else is in

Victor's favor, despite some good singing by Orlandini and Sarri for Remington.

For this was the first of a

Victor series of major works whose recorded bent"

- sound justifies attribution of the rather special word "lam- a glowing, caressing brilliance free of roughness. This sound expresses a performance of remarkable competence, wherein everyone is pretty good and only

Tajo's Sparafucile is explicitly memorable.

The orchestra and Shaw -trained chorus are velvet.

On the sum of its values the Victor

Rigoletto will withstand competition for years.

The subsidiary singers for

Remington are less than impressive; the orchestra and less expert to a degree that is smaller permits pretty culpable vagaries from wind -players.

The direction is less symphonic; there are some background noises: there is micro- phone tumult now and then, particularly on

Side

5.

And yet the complete impression is of a lively projection of the music. The sound is clear and solid in a wide range of cycles and dynamics, and the even super- ficial hiss is easily overcome with very little musical loss by use of a noise suppressor.

This is certainly more admirable sound than that of the old Columbia Traviata described below, and Verdi's tragedy certainly emerges with its horrible vitality fairly intact, since the recorded crudities are only occasional.

If the Victor version did not exist we should be grateful for this one; and many people with $6.57 are going to be grateful anyway.

SIMON BOCCANEGRA

The opera has been advertised in a by Cetra- Soria, recording but had not been made avail- able by press

-time.

(La)

TRAVIATA (The Wayward),

Opera in Three Acts on

Francesco a

Libretto by

Maria Piave after the

Drama by

Alexandre Dumas II,

"La

Dame aux Camélias."

2853

Licia

Albanese

(s), Maxine Stellman

(ms), Jan Peerce (t),

John Garris

(t),

Robert Merrill (bne), George Cehan- ovsky

(bne). Chorus and NBC Orch- estra, Arturo Toscanini, cond.

RCA

Victor two r2 -in.

LM

6003.

I hr. 44 min.

$

1

5.44.

Adriana Guerrini (s),

Maria Huder

(ms), Luigi

Infantino (t), Blando

Giusto

(t),

Paolo

Silveri

(bne), Paolo

Rakowsky

(bne). Chorus and Orch- estra of the Rome

Opera, Vincenzo

Bellezza,

SL cond. Columbia three

12

-in.

Io3.

I hr. 49 min.

$16.35.

Rosetta Noli (s), Giulia Olini (ms),

Guiseppe Campora

(t), Carlo Taglia- bue

(bne), Ottavio Serpo (bne). Chorus and Orchestra, Umberto Berrettoni, cond. Remington three

12

-in. 199 -77.

$6.57.

Verdi was dictator of the operatic when Traviata was written, but world the first performance enjoyable of the most lyrical and easily of his operas was a fiasco.

It was a bad performance; but it is hard to under- stand how any audience could have resisted the surperb alternations ness of gayety and tender- that make a slick and unconvincing libretto into a convincing and touching drama, barely frayed after ninety -nine years, and stagewise more plausible as its epoch fades into the colored mists of a retrospec- tively romantic past.

After a nod to Columbia for her pioneer- ing effort on LP, and the observation the that

Remington price of $6.57 is of no signifi- cance here, we may dismiss with a few rather unkind words their editions in favor of the one that really counts. The Columbia is a dull recording of a so -so performance, with a heavy, tubby bass and lusterless treble.

What seems to be some pretty good singing on the discs

Remington is terribly burlesqued on of fantastically maimed sound which compose a curiosity such may be gleefully of recording and as sought by collectors.

45 www.americanradiohistory.com

Her

Rigoletto shows that Remington can produce satisfactory engineering, but the

Traviata hardly seems credible even while it is tin- canning forth its sorry message.

It is a pity that the Remington surfaces have been so much improved for these discs; a powerful surface noise would be welcome to cover the sound intentionally recorded.

The victorious Victor is outstanding in only one respect: the imperious control of her conductor who tolerates no ambiguity.

The recording, accomplished with remark- able skill in double transfer from broadcast

- transcription (1946) to tape to LP's has faults we should not expect today, parti- cularly clashes of concerted voices and severely diminished bass (which a good amplifier or compensator can restore).

Still, the high frequencies are clear if not notable, and little exception may be taken to balance or timbre. Merrill is excellent in a part which never fails, enjoys but neither Albanese not

Peerce continuous glory.

Their skill is there, but their best sound, only intermittently.

Remains Toscanini, with the chorus and the orchestra. This is enough to justify rec- ommendation of the album as a unique and precious edition. Probably no other opera

- certainly no other Italian opera essentially light texture

-

Italian has received of on discs such transparent, nervous, logical and dynamic leadership as this. The intention is to make the score heard; and here this means that the lightest interjection, the most trivial episode, is proportioned not to be lost; while the familiar musical rhetoric of certain cadences wherein we expect a tame orchestral response is given the same scru

;ny accorded the most original passages, producing a delighted sense of novelty.

The the unity of the chords

- these of sforzati, are familiar

Toscanini qualities present here, but more effective here, in an opera, than in symphonic music where there are other able practi- tioners.

There is no relaxation of utterance in this

Traviata.

A relaxation of musical or dramatic mood is indicated with the same clarity as a mood of exaltation, but it demands as much concentration and as much exact effort.

No

- doubt there will be Traviatas better -sung and better -recorded. It is unlikely that there will be another as electrifying.

(IL)

TROVATORE (The Troubadour).

Opera in Four Acts on a Libretto by

Salvatore Cammarano.

1852

Caterina Mancini

(s),

Miriam Pir- azzini (ms),

Carlo

Giacomo Lauri -Volpi

(t),

Tagliabue (bne), Alfredo Col

- ella (bs). Chorus and Orchestra of

Radio Italiana, Fernando Previtali, cond. Cetra -Soria three

12

-in. 1226.

2 hr.

5 min.

$

17.85.

We must dwell a painful text, moment on the occupying an unqualified eminence as the worst in repertory, beyond cavil.

This libretto is the one always mentioned as the supreme example of operatic absurdity.

Its grilled gypsies, mistaken identities, off- stage action and alterable motivations, the remarkable denseness of its puppets, the opportune arrivals and the convenient vacillation of the fortunes of war would require the winging words of a

Dante and a

Shakespeare to make so much pre- posterousness endurable. Poor Verdi had only pedestrian phrases of extended bom- bast or ludicrous laconicism to inspire his music. So magnificently did he garnish the tasteless brew that

Trovatore at formance was received with its first per- tumultuous acclaim. and it has been a necessary staple of every opera -house since. Verdi had poured out melodies in proportion to the deficien- cies of his text, and the procession of lively tunes is nowhere else in his work so nearly continuous.

Trovatore each of its requires muscular voices from singers in the Cetra

- for Colella in the are edition

- minor part least happy when most with excep- of Ferrando voluminous.

The hard assertiveness of

Mr. Lauri

-Volpi is a severe trial for us, and Mancini, bell -like at mezza voce, is discomfiting at full lungs.

Tagliabue's voice seems tired or eroded.

Furthermore, the Previtali direction, while nowhere specifically inefficient is not con- cerned with much more than the grand external line. chorus and the

Notably good work by the robust health of the recorded sound provide contrast for the mediocrity of the rest. The album can only be regarded as a stop -gap for those who cannot await the arrival of a better.

46

Hither and

Yon:

Musically

cal

WE and

STARTED to call this column

"Noted With Interest in the Musi-

Recording World" but decided that the title would have to be abbreviated some- how, and N.W.I.I.T.M.A.R.W. was too much initialese even for Washington, D.

C., let alone

Great Barrington, Mass. Further- more, readers title; and

- might confuse the column with our other columnar effort of similar this was the clincher

- our printer could never get all that title into one line of type.

So we shall try

"Hither and

Yon: Musically" until someone has a better idea.

What will appear here is a matter jecture. Suffice it to say that of con- the column is needed because we have collected a series of oddments which don't fit into the stand- ard plan for the Records and Music section of

HIGH -FIDELITY.

Yet they deserve atten- tion. They range from what we was thought record hiss, but turned out to be rain, to the off -key singing

(yes, it turned out to be on -key) of some inebriated Fanti villagers.

Africa

Undoubtedly many

HIGH-

FIDELITY readers are already familiar with Field

Recordings.'

Mention of them produced a slight, high frequency buzzing in our heads (how nice it

'475

Fifth Avenue, New York

17,

N. Y. is that, in this Magazine, we can avoid the hackneyed "ringing a bell ") but that was about all.

However, we explored and finally wound up with an album of twelve to

-in. 78 rpm. discs which have fascinated us ever since.

The story behind them is that Arthur

African

21- string harp- guitar

S.

Alberts, well

-known as a writer and mu- sicologist, spent several war years in

West

Africa as head of American war information activities in that area. He became keenly interested in the largely unknown and unre- corded music of the people of the Guinea

Coast, and went back in

1949 equipped with a jeep, a

Magnecorder PT6

-P, thousands of feet of tape, and all the other parapher- nalia required for a jaunt into the bush.

Over a period of six months, he secured the first high fidelity collection of traditional and contemporary music of the Gold Coast,

Ivory Coast, Soudan, Liberia, and other very much "hither and yon" places.

Since we have never had an opportunity to hear the original instruments and voices personally, we ity, cannot vouch for the fidel- but it can be judged to be exceptional.

The voices seem unusually real and presence is excellent. The frequency range of re- corded sound is very wide; there is an ex- traordinarily deep- throated war drum re- corded on band

2 ly of record

1

-3 which severe- taxes the bass response of the best re- producing systems and which is inaudible on standard, packaged phonographs.

The content of the albums2 ranges from recordings of

Gold Coast message drums, through demonstrations of the various types of instruments used for vocal accompani- ments, war chants, songs of work and play, to café calypso songs.

The albums are accompanied by a

24

-page booklet which provides commentaries on West African mu-

2The 12 records are packaged in

3 whole neatly boxed and bound in simulated leather.

Cost is $25.00 plus

88 cents Federal tax the unusual and rare is always costly. albums,

-

high, the but www.americanradiohistory.com

sic, notes on the construction and rhythm of the music and its relationship to the

American popular idiom, and descriptions of the circumstances under which each re- cording was made. Also included are ten

8 by so -in. photographs, two of which are reproduced hereabouts. a

To the uninitiate, the records will bring new world of sound

- it will music. To the initiate, to the not be called student, and to the musicologist, Tribal,

Folk and Café

Music of

West

Africa will be a valuable in- strument for further learning.

India

From Africa to India, via phonograph rec- ords, is but a flip of the wrist.

Traditional and

Classical

Music of India, an

LP recording issued by

Ethnic Folkways Library,' is on a par with the African music discussed above in that it enables us to hear, so easily, the rare and esoteric.

If we were in a philo- sophical mood, we believable might ponder the un- broadening of our cultural hori- zons during the past generation.

This disc is but one of a broad catalogue issued by Folkways and covering a wide field, from recordings

Summers to Folk

Music of Ethiopia.

Fidelity is good

- as far as of we can are quiet; -and the music

-

Andrew Rowan judge; surfaces certainly differ- ent and, after the first plunge, quite be- guiling.

Indian

(U.

S.)

One more item in this musical travelogue, and

From then we shall go on to other matters.

North America comes a group of sung and recorded by

Navajo Indian pieces

Edward Lee

Natay,4 life -long student of

Indian music.

Some of these are very haunting... the Sunrise Song on side 2, particularly. We would like to know how and where these recordings were made. Some the Sunrise Song ous effect, as if the placed at one end

-

- notably have an unusual, cavern- microphone of a large stone building such as a church, the singer and had been his instru- ments at the other.

For a bit more of the unusual, add this record to the special collection.

Hats

Off

To Mercury, for the statement on the liners of its new

Olympian series:

"For best re- sults, this record should be played at full room volume

...

Owners of wide -range re- producing equipment are advised to set their bass and treble controls so that playback characteristics will be in accordance with the response curve published by the Audio

Engineering Society" record purchasers

- and for warning that "sapphire or metal styli should be checked for replacement at least every six months

".

LP's

a la

Eskimo

Although we presume recordings have been made of whatever music Eskimos produce,

',Folkways Records and Service Corp.,

St., New York

City.

117

W.

46

+Arizona

Recording Productions,

Phoenix, Ariz.

834

No. 7th Ave.,

Two veterans of the Kissi army play ceremonial and dance music on blood- rin'ed flutes this item is not concerned with that, and we're sorry if we misled you.

It is con- cerned with the Eskimo habit of trans- porting the tinier members of their fami- lies to

- on the backs of the larger members.

The custom is spreading South and East believe it or not

- manufacturers of

LP records.

Thus to Circle Records, we award the cute -trick -of- the -year prize, for attaching a 7

-in. LP to the back of the liner of its 52-in. LP recording of composer

Henry Cowell's music. Cowell plays his own music and, on the 7

-in. LP, comments on his music. Neat, sensible, and far more in- teresting than the printed word.

Valuable Thumbnail

Someday, some great and omnipotent author- ity

(public opinion, if we wait long enough) will require that all record manufacturers put an identifying number and title in exactly the same spot on every record jacket.

As it is now, to find a particular record in an other- wise neat shelfful, records must be pulled almost all the way before out identification can be made.

Columbia has always been one of the most thoughtful in this respect, but an innova- tion noted on the latest batch of review records deserves a special pat on the back and a quiet prayer that it will be

ML

4503

continued.

Here it is, Beethoven: reduced exactly half-

Symphony No.

3

In size for reproduction

E

-flat Major,

Op. 55

(

"Eroica") in HIGH -FIDELITY.

It's located in the upper corners right and left of the jacket, as near the edge as possible.

Watchmakers Please Note

If a

Urania Records habit becomes universal, manufacturers of stop watches will lose a group of valuable customers: HIGH-

FIDELITY'S record critics. As readers know, we report the playing time in connection with our record reviews. Thus each record reviewer has had to scurry around and ac- quire a stop watch. Urania reports the play- ing time right on the label.

Since many readers have commented favorably on our playing time reports, Urania can expect similar approval.

Full

Dimensional

Sound

FDS is

Capitol's latest contribution to high fidelity recording. On purpose or by chance, they sent us for review two records in the same package: one old style and one new,

FDS style. The old was good

...

the new so much better, in brilliance and fullness, that the comparison was indeed startling.

Reviews of

Capitol discs appear in the cus- tomary place. We just wanted to note pub- licly that one more record manufacturer has taken a major step in the right direction.

Raining Hiss or Hissing Rain

We began this column with remarks about record hiss which was rain, and we almost forgot to explain what prompted the remark.

'Twas Emory

(Sound -of- our -Times)

Cook's Rail

Dynamics.

We have listened to that record many times. Once or twice, we tried the other side, always to be greeted with the worst record hiss we ever heard. Re- cently, we were called away to the phone be- fore we could get the pickup off

.

.. the hiss continued

...

then came the most fantastic roar and rumble imaginable.

Cook mate

-

- may his had soul rest in backed up Rail a warm

Dynamics cli- with a thunderstorm. After we had made certain all speaker cones were still intact, we decided time

- but was take wonderful. Try it easy at first. it some-

That rec- ord hiss (sorry; rain) is deceptively gentle.

-C.

F.

47 www.americanradiohistory.com

THE

MUSIC

BETWEEN

By

EDWARD

L.

MERRITT,

Jr.

SOME

time ago, we sent up a trial balloon in the form of a single article on The Music Between. Reader response to that article was far beyond expectations and confirmed the writer's belief that a huge listening audience exists for the music which is neither strictly pop- ular nor strictly classical: music which includes such di- vergent types as show scores from Broadway and Holly- wood, special arrangements of the so- called standards

(ever- green tunes from the popular lists of the past), ballet music, and incidental music

of

practically every sort.

Now that the vote is in, we are beginning a series of reg- ular reports on The Music Between.

As we proceed from issue to issue with the latest on music in this particular category, we hope to have the benefit of reader opinions.

There are certain facets of reporting on The Music Between which differ from the critical slant directed at other types of music. For one thing, it is extremely hard to evaluate interpretation. With classical music, the intentions of the composer are fairly well determined, and the success or failure of the musical group in the development

of

those ideas may be analyzed critically. However, when we leave this field and turn to The Music

Between, we have to deal with music which derives the greater part of its interest and attraction from the individual concept of the performer or arranger. Thus it follows that an examination

of

such music begins under the severe handicap of lacking, as a point of departure, the original concept of the composer.

This states a problem we feel should be solved in concert with all those who enjoy The Music Between. Thus we ask your response to two questions:

Shall we analyze the music itself, or shall we limit our examination to a report on physi- cal characteristics, such as the fidelity of the discs, and surface noise, plus a brief statement of our personal reactions to the music, with the reasons therefor?

One further word is in order before turning to a con- sideration of the records on our list. As time goes on, we will have more and more material to engage our attention but, since the present series of articles is the first compre- hensive attempt to review this type of music, it is proving a lengthy process to round up and obtain all of the various discs. Therefore, this report is a sampling

- not a study of all available discs in the field. Further, the records reported are the good ones; to conserve time and space, we have omitted the ones to which we reacted unfavorably.

Conversation Piece

(Complete Music Play)

Columbia two r2-in. sr.

-163

Lily Pons,

Noel Coward and others.

Child- ren's Chorus and

Orch.; Lehman Engel, cond.

Words and Music by

Mr.

Coward. Or- chestral arrangements by

Carol Huxley.

On the basis of this item and one immedi- ately following, one is tempted to award the

Music Between Palm to Goddard Leiber- son. This charming album is another in the wonderfully exciting series of revivals pro- duced by

Mr. Lieberson which draw into the spotlight of contemporary recording ex- cellence some of the very greatest successes of yesterday. This Noel Coward play, originally written for the beguiling Yvonne

Printemps, has been tastefully re- published for presentation as a completely aural pro- duction. The little verses, newly conceived, serve to set the scene and make a complete whole out of a play and its music, even though divorced from the theatre.

Some may question Miss Pons' accent, but the total result justifies the obvious care and effort put into this production. Particularly impressive is the work of

Cathleen Nesbitt.

Here is a wonderfully warm and human char- acter beautifully re- created member.

- through the spo- ken word alone! It is a performance to re-

The recording is in line with

Columbia's best.

Girl

Crazy

(Complete Musical Score)

Columbia rz

-in.

Mr.

4475. $5.45.

Mary Martin, with Louise

Carlyle, Eddie

Chappell.

Orchestra by and chorus conducted

Lehman

Engel. Lyrics by

Ira

Gershwin.

Music by George Gershwin. Miss orchestrations by

Martin's

Ted

Royal; other orches- trations by

Carol Huxley, with vocal ac- companiments by

Johnny

Lesko.

Overture, opening choruses, Bidin' My time, Could You Use Me

?,

Samson and

Delilah,

I

Got Rhythm, But Not

For Me,

Treat Me Rough, Boy!, What

Love Has

Done

To Me, Cactus Time, Finale.

In picking

Mary Martin to recreate the original Ethel Merman role in this Gershwin gem, Goddard

Lieberson has done it again.

Here is a fabulous score revealed in a lustrous recording which rates

A

-r. One or two little items deserve attention: the engaging

Ted Royal orchestration of

I

Got Rhythm, bringing back memories of

Cozy Cole in

Carmen Jones, and the fine sounding voice and style of young singer Eddie Chappell.

Mary Martin's handling of the favorites from this score rates with some best she has ever put on wax. of the very

And it cer- tainly sounds wonderful to hear verses from popular songs which actually make sense, as do these by Ira Gershwin.

A

Vienna State Operetta Concert

London ro

-in.

LPS

428. $4.95.

Karl

Friedrich, (t), Hilde Gueden, (s). The

Vienna State Opera Orch.; Wilhelm Liebner, cond.

Ginditta:

Schonste der Frauen (Lehar);

Tausend und Eine Nacht:

Nun Nachst du

Wieder (Strauss); Land Des Lachelens:

Wer hat die Liebe mus in Herz gesenkt

(Lehar); Ras Telbinder: Wenn Zwie sich lieben (Lehar);

Giuditta:

Freunde, das

Leben ist lebenswert (Lehar);

Nacht in

Venedig: Treusein, das liegt mir nacht

(Strauss); Giuditta: Schon wie die blaue

Sommernacht (Lehar); Gottergatte:

Was

Ich Langst ertraumte (Lehar).

Alone among the producers of long playing discs,

London continues to supply Ameri- can markets with some of the most beau- tiful Music Between in the world: the music of Europe's popular theatre. This record is an impressive showcase for the logical suc- cessor to one of the very greatest singers of our time. The tenor, Karl Friedrich, does more than remind one of the great Richard

Tauber as he revives this series era's Hilde Gueden. of Tauber successes, assisted by the Metropolitan Op-

If you are one of those who enjoys music with the Viennese touch, be sure to hear this package.

As usual, the

48 www.americanradiohistory.com

-b

London engineers have come up with another of their wonderful jobs. Unfortunately, our review copy raises the question of disc composition again.

Is the London mixture overly abrasive or are

American needles of a slightly different size?

Regardless of the answer, there seems to be an ever -present hiss, which fortunately seldom prevents the superior sounds produced by the recording engineer from rolling through.

Two on the Aisle

Decca

12

-in.

DL

8040. $4.85.

An original cast featuring members of the

New

York Production.

Bert Lahr,

Dolores Gray, with Kathryne Mylroie,

Fred Bryan.

Chorus and

Orchestra directed by

Herbert

Greene.

Music by

Jule

Styne.

Lyrics by

Betty Comden and

Adolph Green. Orchestra arrangements by

Philip Lang.

Another visit to Broadway, this time con- ducted by Decca with pleasing effect. somewhat less

The historic talents of Bert Lahr are present, than matched by his material.

The new talent of Dolores Gray is better dis- played in several pieces, particularly the song, There Never Was A

Baby Like My

Baby.

We'd like to go right out

on

the limb and reserve a star world spot of tomorrow. for Miss Gray in

So far as the the recording itself is concerned, there is a good deal less perspective than in this month's European entries, and somewhat less presence than we found in the Columbia discs.

Pineapple Poll: Ballet Suite

Decca

Io

-in.

DL

7521. $3.85.

Royal Opera

House Orch., Covent

A Sadler's Wells

Garden;

John Lanchbery, tond,.

Music by

Sir

Sullivan,

Arthur arranged by

Charles

Mackerras.

Ballet Presentation recorded in Europe by

Parlophone

Co.

Ltd.

Opening Dance, Poll's Solo and Pas de

Deux, Belaye's Solo, Pas de Trois,

Adagio,

Jasper's

Hornpipe and Reconciliation,

Finale.

Gilbert and Sullivan have been so for so popular long it certainly wasn't to be doubted that, once copyright restrictions were re- moved, their music would get around. This

Ballet Suite marked the first stop on this journey and serves to attractiveness point up the universal of

Sir

Arthur's music. There isn't a really well -known item in the lot, but the score fairly sparkles.

The record- ing, in the European style, with its more obvious room tone or perspective, serves the music well and brings up the same old question again: Which recording style actu- ally serves the music best? Should the at- tempt be to re- create the perspective of the theatre in the concert hall, or should the recorder's art bring the artists into the home with a closeup not possible in actual per- formance?

La Boutique Fantasque: Ballet Suite

Decca

Io

-in.

DL

7518. $3.85.

Royal Opera

House

Orch., Covent

Hugo Rignold, cond.

Garden;

Music by

Gioacchino

Rossini, arranged by

Ottorino Respighi.

A

Sadler's Wells

Ballet Presentation recorded in

Europe by

Parlophone

Co.

Ltd.

Just about everything said about the Sullivan goes for this recording, too, except that the various excerpts may prove a bit more famil- iar.

Particular attention is due one of the most abandoned performances of

La

Danza on record. It is impossible to imagine any tenor keeping up with such a tempo. No matter how one feels about ballet, all will probably agree that Respighi's handling of the original Rossini airs makes for fine listening.

Curtain Time

Columbia

12

-in. rtL

4451- $5.45.

Morton Gould at the piano his orchestra. and conducting

Bewitched, What Is

There To

Say,

Poor

Pierrot, Old Devil Moon, Mine, Septem- ber Song, Bad Timing,

So

In

Love.

This is another revival of yesterday's music.

In this instance, it is in the orchestral style of Morton Gould, a long -time producer of The Music Between. Musically, there are a couple of bright spots, particularly

Be- witched. But, generally speaking, most of these tunes seem a bit over -arranged to us.

Perhaps the very obvious facility of the ar- ranger gets in the way, but it does seem as though Gould sacrifices the melody for the effect more often than not in this recording.

THE

JAZZ

Echoes of

Decca

Harlem io-in.

DL

5369. $3.00.

Russ

David at the piano, with rhythm accom- paniment. Music of Duke Ellington.

Echoes of

Harlem,

Rockin' In Rhythm,

Sophisticated

Lady,

Don't

Get Around

Much

Any

More, Caravan, Prelude To

A

Kiss,

I

Got It Bad, It

Don't

Mean

A

Thing.

The piano enthusiast will find several things here worth cheering about. Russ David's run -through of these Ellington familiars is marked with a commendable restraint.

Personally, the slower numbers get the nod, but here again, the question of melody has a great deal to do with preference.

Of course, any trio is on the spot. In an orches- tra, the individual instrumentalist can hide in the ensemble, but the shadow of the mi- crophone is pitifully small when a group of three performs. The recording is very good, and the balance of the trio excellent.

Herman

Chittison

Trio

Columbia 50-in. cL

6582.

$

3.00.

Herman

Chittison, piano; Abie Baker, bass;

Everett Barksdale, guitar.

Serenade (Drigo), My Blue Heaven,

Just

A

Memory, I've Had My Moments, On

The Alamo, The Continental, behavin', Should

I.

Ain't Mis-

For piano fans who like theirs with a kick, Mr. little

Chittison may well help fill in a few odd minutes now and then. With so

The recording follows Columbia's high standards, and the surfaces to continue a joy hear... or rather, not to hear.

Ecstasy

Decca Io

-in.

DL

537o. $3.00.

Tommy Dorsey and

Victor Young. Trombone solos with the Singing Strings, Chorus and

Orch.

Ecstasy, Body and Soul,

You're

The One,

The Searching Wind, Flower

Of Dawn, My

Love,

Smoke Gets In Your

Eyes,

This

Nearly Was Mine.

For those who like music in the popular idiom, this looks like a good thing. The combined talents

Victor of Tommy Dorsey and

Young should add up to something special. In this case, that seems to be some- thing just a little out of order. Well, it's probably the inclusion of the chorus. The slick trombone of Mr. Dorsey, and the strings, are well caught by the engineers, but the constant reappearance of the human voices seems only to add sugar to the already sweet.

Of the whole package, we picked

This Nearly Was Mine, tromboned by Mr.

Dorsey with his own orchestra.

CORNER

many contemporary popular musicians get- ting their harmonies perilously close, it's always a pleasure to hear an inventive mind working over the old favorites without falling back into the bop idiom.

Jazz

Off

The Air: Volumes

I and

2

Esoteric 50-in.

ESJ 2 and

3

Roy ski,

Rich, ente

Eldridge, Flip Phillips, Eddie Safran

-

Al

Casey, Specs

Powell, Mike

Fats Navarro, Ralph Burns,

(Vol.

II), both with

Art

Ford.

Colicchio,

Mel

Torme (Vol.

Eager,

I);

Charlie Ventura, Allen

Bill

Davis, Chubby Jackson, Buddy

Al

Va.-

Lover,

Honeysuckle Rose, How High

The

Moon, Flip and Jazz, Buck

Still

Jumps

(Vol.

I);

Sweet

Georgia Brown and High

On An Open Mike (Vol. II).

To the jazz enthusiast, these two discs bring back some of the most exciting listen- ing current in the late '40's.

A series of radio sessions, presided over by the disc- jockey's favorite disc -jockey, Art Ford, brought New York listeners a roster of the biggest names in jazz.

Radio Station

WNEW, even back in

1947, led the pack with its pioneering ways, and these re- creations demonstrate some of the excitement one used to enjoy when the Saturday

Session hit the air. By night

Swing contemporary stand- ards, the recording may show up a bit less than high fidelity, but the contents makes these records worthy of the jazz beside such items as the Benny collection

Goodman

Carnegie Hall Concert, The Bessie Smith

Collection, and a few other specials.

49 www.americanradiohistory.com

50

Oscar Peterson at

Carnegie

Mercury

I o -in.

MG

C-107.

$

3.00.

Oscar Peterson, piano;

Ray Brown, bass.

Carnegie Blues,

I

Only Have Eyes For

You, Fine and Dandy.

Mr. Peterson pulls out all the stops in what is in billed as the first single -artist album

Norman Granz's "Jazz at the Philhar- monic" series.

The full frenzy, which seems to be required of jazz today, is present in this actual performance recording. The Peterson style calls up all of the performer's inven- tive talent, which is obviously considerable, but from a personal total disappearance hard to take. point of of view the almost the melodic line is

Recording -wise, neither hot nor cold.

Reinhold

Svensson:

Vol. II

Prestige Io -in.

PRLP

I29. $3.35.

Reinhold Svensson, companiment. piano, with rhythm ac-

Stars Fell

On

Alabama,

Just

A

Gigolo

Beat The Clock, Undecided, The Song

Is

Ended, Flying Home, Jeepers Creepers,

I

Wished

On The Moon.

On the basis this of the evidence contained in month's

Music Between chapter, a vote of thanks for pioneering goes to Prestige.

This is particularly true with regard to a pair of discs cut in

Sweden and presenting some of that Country's young jazz musicians.

Reinhold

Svensson plays in the general style of the fine George Shearing, and is a man with a notable talent and a set young of per- of his own. So far as their re- sonal ideas cording is concerned, it is average, and unfortunately, the Prestige discs seem af- fected with undue surface noise.

The New Sounds From Sweden,

Prestige Io -in.

PRLP

Vol. II

I2I.

$3.35.

Lars Gullin Quartet:

That's It, Gull In

Gulch, All

Yours, Deep Purple.

A

Bengt Halbbert Trio:

Lover Man, Indiana,

These Foolish Things, Cool Kid.

This record of the two Swedish imports brings us two small combinations: The

Lars

Gullin Quartet, starring the baritone sax

- ophoning of its leader, and the Bengt Hall- berg Piano Trio. The latter features the rather melodic talent of young Hallberg who does very nicely standards and a with three well

-known slightly boppish item titled,

Cool Kid. One would not claim any fabu- lous rating for this entry but, except for the unfortunate surfaces, this turns out as an interesting bit.

Red Rodney:

The New Sounds

Prestige

I O

-in.

PRLP 12 2.

$

3.3

5

Red Rodney, trumpet;

Phil Raphael, piano;

Jim

Ford, alto;

Phil

Leshin, bass;

Phil

Brown,

Chorus.

The Baron, This Time The Dream's On

Me, Mark, If You

Are

But

A

Dream, Red

Wig, Smoke Gets In

Your Eyes,

Coogan's

Bluff.

Back in the United States, Prestige here packages up seven by a highly considered assorted list young trumpet artist by the enthusiasts. the first time, Red Rodney plays through an of standards and specials.

For

If nothing else, the surfaces are uniform, for here again the noise level runs high.

music on

Tape

The pre- ahead

- recorded tape industry is moving slowly, falteringly, and beset by many obstacles, the largest of which is the problem of making duplicates. Five dupli- cates at one whack is standard practice; rumors have been a- flying that machines capable of delivering

25 to

5o duplicates are being perfected. Compare this with the fact that, nowadays, it is not uncommon for a popular hit tune to run to I,000,000 copies.

We will let you do the arithmetic

...

du- plicating remains the problem, and until the process can be speeded up, the cost of pre- recorded tape will remain high relative to

LP records.

A dozen I200

-ft. reels of raw tape can be purchased from most radio jobbers for less sec., than $3.50 per reel. At

71/2 ins. per recorded single track, half an hour of music can be recorded on a reel of that size. be

4o

With music on it, the same tape priced well over $6. to

6o minutes on it

-

LP record costs less

- than will with

$6.

To compete with LP records, music on tape must offer something more than records.

One advantage is familiar to all: there is no record scratch, hiss, or pop on tape.

That advantage may be worth the extra cost, but as

LP's improve, it is less and less of a sales argument.

The big advantage might be improved re- production of the music or sound.

It is possible to get better sound from tape than from records.

The big catch here is tape speed.

As those of our readers who followed the series of articles in HIGH- FIDELITY on tape recording will remember, frequency range and tape speed are closely tied to- gether. A rule of thumb (sometimes bet- tered, not always accomplished) is that the highest frequency which can be recorded is

I,000 times the tape speed.

Thus, at

7th ips., the frequency range is from about

7o to 7,500 cycles.

European tape masters are recorded gen- erally at 3o ips.; domestic ones at

15 ips.

Most of the pre- recorded tape compan- ies concentrate on

71/z ips.

On a high fidelity, wide -range reproduc- ing system with a good tweeter, the dif- ference is noticeable. For instance, if a good

LP record is recorded onto tape at

71/2 is ips., loss of brilliance on the highs apparent. At

15 ips., it is almost, if not entirely, impossible to distinguish the orig- inal record from the tape

To realize the value reproduction of it. of improved reproduc- tion of sound, a high tape speed is neces- sary.

Thus a second possible advantage of tape becomes questionable: Tape could pro- vide far longer periods of uninterrupted music than

LP records. For example, the longest LP side which we have come across ran

34 mins.

If we could disregard the tape speed and use

- or be satisfied with

- a tape speed of

33/4 ips., a semi- profes- sional tape recorder, capable rot of handling

/rin. reels, would provide

2 hours of uninterrupted music.

These two aspects of tape recording key- note current interest in pre- recorded tape.

Two fundamental groups are buying tape: those who want uninterrupted background music, and those who want fidelity superior to what is now available on

LP records.

The first group is not too hard to satisfy, and tapes available today seem to be filling the bill quite adequately. The second group, the hi

-fi fans, are tough customers! And rightly so; LP's are astonishingly good, tapes are expensive and must be markedly better to be worth the investment.

As of today, it would appear that hi -fi fans should buy with caution. We recently spent a long evening listening to a selec- tion of pre- recorded tapes. For moral sup- port and astute critical listening, we in- vited

C.

G. Burke to the session. We agreed in our opinions of the recordings, but the opinions are not likely to be helpful. Stated briefly, they were:

"Maybe yes, maybe no."

For instance,

A -V

Tape

Libraries1 has a relatively large group of tapes available.

Many of them duplicate Remington Records' classical releases.

Thus we were able to make a direct comparison of Mozart's Jupi- ter

Symphony on tape and on records. A similar comparison was made on

Sinfonia Concertante.

Mozart's

We compared

A -V tapes with some from Tape Industries.2 And both were checked against a standard: a live

FM broadcast taken down at

15 ips.

All pre- recorded tapes were single track, 7' ips. releases.

Equipment used was Concer-

tos,

McIntosh, Pickering, Brociner preamp, and a 3- speaker reproducing system.

As far as the Jupiter

Symphony is con- cerned, we'll take the tape. Even with the turnover up at 800 and the treble down

20 db, the record showed poor bass and shrill highs. There was more clarity to individual instruments on the record, but this did not compensate for the better lows and highs on tape. Re the tape, Burke

"good timbre and crispness pure

...

wood slightly dull ". Listening to the disc, he highs

...

noted: violins jotted down,

"Exaggerated

...

bass raspy

...

distortion of wind ".

However, the

Sinfonia Concertante was slightly better on record than on tape, although the difference between the two was not nearly as great as with the Jupi- ter.

Burke's notes for the tape:

"Timbre darkened; soloists not crisp. Violins pleas

-

Continued on page

61

1A-V

Tape Libraries, Inc., 730

Fifth Ave., New

York

19,

N. Y. has over a score of tapes in its catalogue.

Six are of classical music; the others are in popular able as single vein track at and include organ reveries, moments in music, and the like. Tapes are avail-

7% ips., for $8.95 reel; and as double track at

7% ips. for $9.95 hour

-long reel, or double track at

$7.95 per one -hour reel. per

34

%

-hour ips. per for

2Tape Recording Industries, 3335

E. Lansing Ave.,

Lansing, Michigan, is operating a

Tape- of -the-

Month

Club. Cost is $6.95 per 1200 -ft. reel either 7% or

15 ips.

Repertoire is expanding rapid- ly; at present it consists

Between. largely of at

The Music www.americanradiohistory.com

'

RECORPS in

REVIEW

C. G.

BURKE

ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN

JOHN

CONLY

J.

F.

INDCOX

KURT

LIST

NOTES ABOUT

RECORD

REVIEWS

To facilitate reference to this section, all classical LP releases are arranged alphabetically by composer.

Miscel- laneous collections, not normally identi- fied by composer, are collected at the end of the record review section.

Where two or more composers appear on one record, the reviews are cross

- referenced but not repeated.

Playing time is reported for each re- lease and, unless otherwise indicated, is the total for both sides of a single disc or, in the case of albums, is the total for all records in the set.

The Editor welcomes suggestions for improving the Records in Review sec- tion of

HIGH

-FIDELITY.

BACH, J.

S.:

Cantatas

No. 32

(Lieb- ster Jesu, Mein

Verlangen) and

140

(Wachet

Auf!)

Magda Laszlo (s), Waldemar Kmentt

(t), Alfred us;

Poell

(bs); Akademie Chor-

Vienna National Opera Orch.;

Hermann Scherchen, cond.

West- minster

12

-in.

WL

5122. 24 and

31 mins. $5.95.

Cantata

No. 8o

(Ein' Feste Burg): Maja

Weis-

Osborn

(s),

Hilde Rossl

-Majdan

(a),

Kurt

Equiluz (t),

Walter

Berry

(bs); Akademie Chorus; Vienna

Cham- ber Orch.;

Felix

Prohaska, cond.

Van- guard (Bach Guild)

12

-in.

BG

508.

39 mins.

$5.95

Not many people are familiar with many

Bach cantatas because there are too many of them to permit frequent performance of more than a few.

The phonograph has been making them available, and the three under consideration here will certainly tempt music -lovers to savor others.

There is no guaranty that others will be proclaimed with the mastery of these. The most widely known,

No. 8o, asserts its virile faith through

Prof. Prohaska's forthright wielding of the chorus; the others are notable for the beauty and devoted application of the solo voices, and Dr. Scherchen's loving delineation of a gemlike orchestral curtain. The

Bach Guild engineering is bright and big, the West- minster clear and undistorted, subtle in its values and exceptional, if not for this com- pany.-C.

G.

B.

BACH,

J.

S.:

Fugue in

A

Minor

Fugue in G

Minor (Great)

Ricercare in

Six

See

Parts (from The Musical

BEETHOVEN

Offering)

BACH, J.

S.:

Goldberg Variations

Rosalyn Tureck, piano. Allegro two

12

-in.

ALG

3033. 90 mins. $11.90.

Playing the repeats and so nearly its doubling length, the valiant (and conspicuously capable) pianist makes the endlessly in- ventive Variations the longest piano work ever less. recorded, and to many, perhaps end-

Exhaustive of the keyboard, it can be exhausting to hearers; and eight variations at a time (there are thirty) can suffice even for spellbound music -lovers, fascination it- self being fatiguing.

-

The recorded tone small, and requires careful manipulation is of bass results.

-

C.

G.

B.

BACH,

J.

S.:

Little

Notebook of Anna

Magdalena

Bach, Volume I

Kurt

Rapf, harpsichord;

Maja Weis

-

Osborn

(s).

Vanguard

12

-in.

(Bach

Guild)

BG

510. 30 mins.

$5.95.

Of the nineteen pieces in the initial record of the impressive potpourri of grand and little music written wife for the survivors out by

Bach's second instruction of herself and the of her depthless husband's twenty children, eight are man. The compositions of insinuating appeal of the great these inter- pretations comes from the performers' acceptation of the informality of the source.

There is no keyboard.

- tension, from soprano or

The latter has thirteen solos and accompanies the soprano in the remain- ing items, supported by viol. By our current cable.

-

C.

G.

B. is impec-

BACH, J.

S.: A Survey of his Organ Music,

Carl

13

Volume

I

Weinrich, organ of Princeton

University Chapel.

MGM

1 o -in.

E

98. and

12 mins. $3.00.

The Pauacaglia and

Fugue in

C

Minor and the

A

Minor (Vivaldi)

Concerto occupy the envelope, but a room can hardly con- tain them.

Really extraordinary organ sound, especially for discophiles using several speakers simultaneously,

-

C.

G.

B. of a dis- tinctive organ played by a man who loves

Bach.

BEETHOVEN:

Grosse Fuge,

Op. 133

-

BACH, J.

S.:

Fugue in A

Minor Fugue in G Minor (Great)

Ricercare in

Six

Parts

(from The Musical

Offering)

Stuttgart Chamber Orch.; chinger, cond. London t2

-in.

171/4,

31/2,

5,

Karl

Muen- and

81/2 mins.

LL

526.

$5.95.

Karl Muenchinger's exceptional string group is not quite in the earlier as successful here as it was Brandenburg Concertos.

In the Beethoven, the playing is clear warding feature but the intonation not always exact.

The re- plasticity and it is of this performance is the of the individual voices.

The

Grosse

Fuge is a highly complex work, questionable whether any perform. ance can represent exactly what Beethoven had in as a mind; the music appears here more vision than as a realized study in sound.

Of all the performances

I have heard, those by string orchestra have seemed more felici- tous than the quartet the duplication performances because of sound in the individual parts helps to clarify the vertical complexity.

This was so on

78 rpm., where the Busch

Chamber version sounded more convincing than that of the Budapest Quartet

(to name the two best performances in the respective categories), and it is so on

LP, where the

Muenchinger group has it all over the Pascal

Quartet.

Both

Bach fugues

-the

one in

A

Minor, a four -part composition supposedly from the early Weimar days, and the better -known

"Great" period

-

G

Minor fugue from the are

Koethen rendered in string orchestra transcriptions by

Mr. Muenchinger.

The transcriptions are straight and do not at- tempt to simulate any keyboard sonority.

The

A

Minor fugue is performed with a fast, motoric drive; rapidly, that in G but in a more delicate way. In both there is some fine linear

Minor also brings shading which out the inner coherence of the in- dividual parts.

The

Six

-part Ricercare from

The

Musical

Offering is rendered in a string orchestra version by

Edwin Fischer.

To my mind, it is questionable whether a string orchestra

5

1 www.americanradiohistory.com

is the best medium for presenting the deep involvement of the six voices.

It is helped in this case, however, by a performance which aims for a kind of organ registration and builds its climaxes with great care and a fine sensitivity for large, all

-enveloping sound.

The recording does not do full justice to the performance. It has a kind of muddy quality, especially on the Bach side, and the long chord in the opening of the Beethoven suffers from an unpleasant wow. Best equalization is at an

Boo turnover point, with a

12 db roll -off on the highs. A

2 db roll -off on the bass is matter of individual taste.

-

K.

L. a

BEETHOVEN: Symphonies No. z through

9

Felix

Weingartner conducting Vienna

Philharmonic Orch.

(Nos. z, 3, 7,

8 and

9); The London Symphony Orch.

(No.

2);

The London Philharmonic

Orch.

(Nos. 4 and

5);

The

Royal Phil- harmonic Orch.

(No.

6).

Columbia nine

12

-in.

ML

4501

-4507, final digit corresponding to the number of the

Symphony, with Symphonies No. 8 and

9 both in Album sL

165. 21, 30,

45,

30,

32, 36, 34, 23,

$5.45 each

62 record. mins. respectively.

This must have been a labor of love for

Columbia, whose most musical association

Weingartner was.

The painstaking re-cre- ations, from 78's fourteen or more years old, must be received with appropriate acknowledgment from discophiles who in a case like this have no to inadequacies the latest feats of sonic engineering. Wein- gartner is the only right of sound to take as exception compared to conductor to have made the nine

Symphonies on discs. His self

- effacement has created in every case a poetic and even projection less concept.

If of a pure and change- some of these concepts are not spectacular, all are indispensable as a guide to music- lovers wishing to how accuracy and know just imagination interact to take these scores from into music. print and put them

These records are over -heavy in the bass and insufficiently defined at the top. The monitoring practiced at their creation has restricted their dynamics.

They are not going to be purchased for the splendor of their sound, but the writer is pleased to repeat here what he has said elsewhere: that every record collector should have at least one example of Weingartner's

Bee- thoven, for his own delectation and in proper homage to the conductor who first took the phonograph seriously. The

Eighth and Fifth

Symphonies are recorded to best advantage; the Sixth is weakest. The Ninth

Fifth,

Seventh,

Eighth, Fourth and First are beautiful examples gartner could do.

- of the work

Felix Wein-

C.

G.

B.

The Corsair

-

Benvenuto

RAVEL:

Cellini

Bolero

Paris Conservatory Orch.; Charles

Munch, cond. London s2 -in.

LLP

466.

II,8

and r7mins.

$5.95.

This conductor is always pat with Berlioz: the frisky,

. swashbuckling overtures swirl in gallant orchestral foam. Ravel's fading tour de force receives an equally effective, if different, treatment, being properly held to a changeless slow pace throughout its rep- etitious course.

A little cavernous, the sound quality. is

- nevertheless

C. G.

B. of commendable

BERLIOZ:

Symphonie

Fantastique,

Op. r4

Concertgebouw Orch. of Amsterdam;

Eduard van Beinum, cond. London 12- in.

LLP

489. 45% mins. $5.95.

The Philadelphia Orch.; Eugene Or- mandy,_cond. Columbia I2

-in.

ML

4467.

47%4 mins. $5.45.

The music fied of

Berlioz has persistently de- classification.

Since even music his- torians have explained it best only ex post facto, by way of

Liszt and Strauss, one need not be astonished if less learned interpreters give it the most widely divergent perform- ances.

Both Messrs. van Beinum and

Ormandy concentrate on one specific aspect of the

Symphonie

Fantastique, though in each case the aspect is different.

One might say that van Beinum emphasizes the Symphonie and Ormandy the Fantastique.

Van

Beinum's is the more difficult task, for the numerous rhapsodic passages of the work do not lend themselves too well to a straightforward interpretation in which the tempos are metronomically equal.

That he manages to stick to his plan and reveal a certain structural unity, going beyond the programmatic idea, is perhaps to van

Beinum's credit but it is not neccessarily a service to the work. in,

Unfortunately, where van Beinum rushes

Ormandy fears to tread.

The latter's interpretation is given over to romantic effusion in which large variances of tempo, practically from passage to passage, are most characteristic.

Structurally he makes the work fall apart, emotional response but it cannot be denied that his performance evokes a much greater than van Beinum's. It is interesting to note that although Or- mandy's basic beat is somewhat slower, the impression created is that of a more nervous pulse and occasionally of greater hurry.

One finds this least disturbing in the fourth movement, but is quite put out by it in the third.

From the engineering point of view, the

Columbia version has several advantages over the London product. The extreme ends are reproduced with clarity, and they frame a clean, well- defined middle register which becomes blurred only on rare occasions when orchestral tutti passages tend to lose charac- teristic sound qualities in their mixture.

Columbia's music is also better distri- buted on the two sides, with Side A featur- ing the first two movements, Side

B the re- maining three. There is one disadvantage to this method, however: it leads to a crowd- ing of music on the B side and a slight distortion toward the end of the last move- ment. More disturbing is a loss of constant pitch throughout the symphony. The work begins almost half a pitch level of

A tone below the normal

=

440; gradually pitch comes up to normal and is sustained there in the fourth movement; but in the lento of the fifth, it drops again almost half a tone, only to be raised again to normal towards the end.

Also, in a very commendable desire to main- tain a clearly defined orchestral sound,

Col- umbia engineers have had to forfeit some of the dynamic differentiations which Berlioz demands between pianissimi and immediately following fortissimi.

London's sound suffers mainly from an imbalance between the various registers.

There is a strong boost in the bass and a great deal of stridency in the high end, es- pecially in the extreme register of the violins.

The strings lack definition in the middle; but strangely enough, the woodwinds seem exceedingly well recorded, especially in the third movement, where they play a pre- ponderant role.

Dynamic contrasts are pre- served in a truerway than on the Columbia recording.

Attention must be drawn to the fact that

London records according to no convention- al curve. After extensive experimentation, this writer has found that on the present recording a turnover point of

300 and a closing of the amplifier above 8,000 kcs. leads to the best results. This minimizes the unpleasantness of the highs and does not considerably add to the boom of the bass. is a

London's pitch is constant, but the music badly distributed on the two sides, with break occurring in the middle of the third movement at the end of

Side A.

(The label copy erroneously states ment begins on Side B.)

- the third move-

K.

L.

BORODIN, LIADOF, RIMSKY -KOR-

SAKOV et. al: chestrated by

Tati -Tati

$5.45

(Symphonic paraphrases on Chopsticks, or-

N. Tcherepnin and

Werner Janssen)

Columbia

Symphony Orch.; Werner

Janssen, cond. Columbia I2 -in.

ML

4480.

33 mins.

Musical history mentions no ration so other collabo- august in the perpetration of a joke.

If some of the point is lost in trans- ference from the piano, an equivalent pun- gency is added by the very showy orches- trations, engagingly appropriate.

The dozen jocularities, rousing or solemn, are declaimed with blithe skill by an expert band on a disc of complex and vivid sound, here and there startling in percussive os- tentation. In fact, the record will probably retain a joke has lost its freshness.

-

C.

G.

B.

BRAHMS: Double Concerto in

A

Minor,

Op. 102

Jean Fournier, violin; Antonio cello;

Janigro,

Vienna National Opera Orch.;

Hermann Scherchen, cond. Westmin- ster

12

-in.

WL

5117.

32 miss.

$5.95

It is too bad that this beautifully poetic performance, with both soloists preeminent in the production of a long even line and the conductor in equivalent support with a fine orchestra, should not have received engineering favors on

Westminster's high- est level. The orchestra seems unsolid, to retreat in perspective, and an unwanted shimmer violins.

-

C. the solo violin and the

G.

B. other

BRAHMS:

Piano Quintet in F Minor,

Op.

34

Chigi Quintet. London 52-in.

LL

505.

37% mins. $5.95.

The Chigi

Quintet tends to over- sentimen- talize the romanticism of this music. The dynamic contrasts appear exaggerated; when they are close together, this give one the impression quality tends to of sudden level drops.

52 www.americanradiohistory.com

The recording is good. It is spacious and multi -dimensional. Some may find the piano sound too mellow, although this is not disturbing to me. The mellowness can be remedied through a bass roll -off;

I would not recommend doing so because one can easily arrive at a dull, hammer -like in the middle range. The best sound equalization is at a

Soo the highs.

-

K.

L. a 12 db roll -off in

BRAHMS: Symphony No. 2 in D,

Op. 73

London Philharmonic Orch.; Wilhelm

Furtwängler, cond. London 12

-in.

LLP

28.41 mins. $5.95.

A stately ceremonial whose jubilation is massive and startling in the Furtwängler conception of a symphony we consider light in a more customary presentation.

Anything that challenges routine is interesting if not necessarily right, and the

Jochum and Mon- teux editions, on Decca and Victor respec- tively, have the vitality to resist a strong challenge.

Two years ago the bold, concentrated tiers of sound in the Furtwängler record would have awed us, but we are used to that now, and able to apprehend some ob- scuration of detail at low volume.

-

C.

G.

B.

BRAHMS: Symphony No. 3 in

F, Op.

90

Concertgebouw Orch., Amsterdam;

George Szell, cond. London 52-in.

LLP

487.

31 mins. $5.95.

The recorded work been of this conductor has of uniformly high worth, but there has been a tendency to restrict him to Bo- hemian music.

The present record is an acknowledgment that the restriction was warranted by nothing more than

Dr. Szell's birthplace: he is severe brought forth into very competition by this symphony, and the disc surpasses its rival in the richness of its orchestral mass and the nicety of its delineation one of timbre. The interpretation is of strong dramatic contrasts within a frame fine. of familiar phrasing, the whole very

-C

G.

B.

BRAHMS

(

?):

Trio in

A

Major for

Piano,

Violin, and

Cello (Op.

Posth.)

William Huebner, violin.

Richard

Harand, cello. Franz

Holletschek, piano. Westminster 12

-in.

WL

5o58.

43 mins.

The reason for the question mark after the composer's name, above, is gone into in detail in the liner notes.

Suffice it to say here that although the music is decidedly

Brahmsian, there is a degree of doubt about the actual composer.

Whoever composed it, it is a rich piece of music, richly interpreted and recorded. The piano in particular is soft, full, and mellow.

It makes a very interesting comparison with the Liszt Sonata in B

Minor recorded by London on

LPs

392.

In fact, some may feel that the piano on this Westminster is almost too heavy, even with control setting a turnover of

Soo.

It tends to override the other instruments and produce an effect of lack of clarity.

Both the violin and cello are clear and without rasp or edginess, although just a bit remote in comparison with the piano.

CHAUSSON:

Symphony in B flat,

Op.

20

San

Francisco Symphony Orch.; Pierre

Monteux, cond. RCA

Victor

12

-in.

LM

1181.

32 mins. $5.72.

The sunniest conductor eases the constric- tion of a talented man's only symphony, written under the influence of

César Franck.

That influence is perhaps limp, but in this a is case was is well not sterile: The Chausson

Symphony constructed and scored, and is not it shame -faced

- apology for living.

Neither let's not fool ourselves

- a vital

C. proclamation although of anything very striking, ing may make us temporarily think so.

-

G.

B.

CHOPIN:

Concerto No.

2 for

Piano wad

Orchestra in F Minor,

Op. 21

Guiomar Novaes, piano. Vienna

Sym- phony Orch.; Otto Klemperer, cond.

Vox I2 -in.

PL

7100.

31 mins.

We are hard put to it to review this record without bias. We like

Chopin; we like this

Concerto; we we particularly like Novaes; and think that the whole record, musically, is wonderful. Unfortunately, perhaps, we are even more critical of the sound than of the musicianship. No amount of control adjusting could bring the sound into reason- able shape. True, the balance between the orchestra and the piano is very good.

We have the feeling bility that there is a bare possi- that only one microphone was used.

At least, the piano is drowned orchestra at the

But right places! out by the

- we have no tone controls on our system. All we can do is to adjust for differ- ent turnover frequencies and for different degrees of preemphasis. Even with

20 db. droop at the high end, the violins shrieked.

Even with the turnover at 800, there wasn't the correct amount of bass. And through- out it all, both piano and orchestra sounded remote

. as if that single microphone were in the last row of the orchestra.

We shall play the record again from time to time, because we like the music and the musicians, and because the realism provided by the effect of a single microphone is a very real asset. We just wish had been better, or that the sound that we had more con- trols on our system.

We also hope, fervently, that the bugaboo of every reviewer hasn't befallen us: re- ceipt of a single otherwise good pressings.

-

D. a

A. batch of

COWELL, H.: Piano

Music

Played by

51

-101.

18 composer. Circle and

18 mins. $5.95.

12

-in. of the 192ós are nostal-

The great days gically recalled by this recording, which contains

20

Many of tone -clusters of Cowell's short piano pieces.

- groups of adjacent notes struck with the fist, the flat of the hand, or a ruler placed on the keyboard. In some, the keyboard is dispensed with and the strings are plucked or made to sound by rubbing. Cowell, in other words, treats the piano as an as a instrument of harp, and as a kind of percussion, violin. The pre- pared -piano boys have since performed more radical operations on Cristofori's long

-suffering invention, and consequently

Cowell's pieces now take on a kind of classic quality; besides, they are excellent works of music. Many of them deal with themes of

Irish legendary lore; a few reflect incidents of everyday American life; some are without programmatic connotations, but all reflect a bright, inventive, humorous, inquiring and eminently musical spirit. The recording is excellent, and is accompanied by a kind of pilot- record, a little disc, packed in an extra cusses his work.

- wherein Cowell dis-

A. F.

DEBUSSY: Sonata

Piano

3

-

No.

3 for

Violin and

Piano for

Violin and

VILLA -LOBOS: Sonata

No.

Ricardo Odnoposoff, violin;

Leonid

Hambro, piano. Allegro I2

-in.

ALG

3025. I2 and

14 mins. $5.95.

All the books tell us that Debussy's last sonatas are labored, mannered works with- out much life or fire. Strangely, however, they keep coming up on concert programs and in the recording lists, and it is now quite easy to perceive that the light texture, fantasticality, reserve and classicism of these sonatas reflect creative powers not a decline in Debussy's but a refusal to stand still and follow the grooves his critics had laid out for him. The

Violin Sonata is very well played by revelation

Odnoposoff and Hambro, but the of the set is not so much the

Debussy as the

Villa -Lobos on the other side. This work, composed in

1915, is in the Idiom of

Franck and d'Indy; it contains not a trace of the brilliant, brutal, folkloric idiom the Brazilian composer was shortly to make his own. And yet, as an early work of a very distinguished talent, it has a pro- file

- or perhaps one finds it there because recording.

- is

A. F.

Villa-

Lobos.

First -rate

DELLO

JOIO:

Psalm of

David

Crane Chorus and Orch., Crane

De- partment of

Music, State University

Teacher's College, Potsdam, New

York; Helen

M.

Hosmer, cond.

Con- cert Hall Society

I o -in. clls s s mins. $4.67. i8.

15

Based on a cantus firmus by

Pres,

Josquin des this work recalls the fervor and serenity of the r

5th century composer, to which a thoroughly modern sense of sonority and rhythmic impulse has been added.

On the whole, a highly convincing demonstration of the modern fusion of scholarship with creative ance.

- art.

Good recording and perform-

A. F.

DVORAK:

Symphony No.

4, in

G,

Op.

88

Concertgebouw Orch., Amsterdam;

George

Szell, cond. London

12

-in.

LLP

488.

34 mins. $5.95.

In the recording industry three years is an age. The Walter version of this airy, ten- der and lively symphony, chronologically the eighth, was excellent when issued in

1949 and is still imposing until the new

Szell edition is heard. Thereafter, no contest.

All the elements whose careful synthesis must cal be reproduction

- to obtain good clarity, timbre, mass, de- tail, dynamic and cyclic sweep

- musi- are in union supporting the excellent impressive

Concertgebouw Orchestra in lusty accord with the variable demands of a conductor

53 www.americanradiohistory.com

who obviously loves and understands the work. The disc any is as of a standard symphony.

-

C.

G.

B. as

ENESCO: Octet for

Strings in

C.

Major,

Op. 7

American Arts (Chamber) Orch.; Karl

Krueger, cond. New Records r 2

-in.

NRLP

I0I.

38 mins. $5.75.

Anyone who is inspired by a liking for

Enesco's best known works, the Roumanian

Rhapsodies, into buying this album is in for an awful shock. Enesco's more serious efforts were all directed toward innovation.

The flavor of this octet is vaguely akin to that of early Bartok, or perhaps Kodaly, but

Enesco's musical ideas are not good enough to support the long and elaborate treatment given them here. engineering so -so.

-

J.

C. is good, the

FALLA: Sombrero de Tres Picos (Three

-

Cornered Hat)

Amparito Péris de

Prulière

(s).

Orch. of the Opéra -Comique, Paris;

Jean

Martinon, cond. Urania

12

-in.

URLP

7034

37 mins. $5.95.

This is the only complete recording of the rich and rhythmic score. The interpretation is one of weighty alacrity. If the orchestra is not an instrument of the nicest precision, that is of minor importance on a disc whose outstanding feature is its opulent sound.

For, save for two or three minutes of dis- proportionately loud interjections from the soprano, this is a majestic recording.

Its washed and incised bass, tingling percussion and enveloping strings make place for this in the loftiest company, that of Columbia's

Rachmaninoff

Second Symphony,

Westmin- ster's Lieutenant

Kije,

Victor's

Rachmaninoff

Rhapsody and Mercury's

Pictures at an Ex- hibition.

Bass obtain the sharpest impact of organization reduction is necessary to a of splendid sound. galvanizing

-

C. G.

B.

FLOTOW:

Martha

(Complete Opera)

Erna Berger (s), Else Tegetthoff

(ms),

Peter Anders

(t),

Josef Greindl (bne),

Eugen Fuchs (bs), Franz Sauer (bs);

Chorus of Berlin Municipal Opera and

Symphony

Orch. of Radio Berlin;

Arthur Rother, cond. Urania three z2- in.

URLP

217.

I hr.

42 mins. $17.85.

This stimulating kind of fluff, bright in facile rhythm and fashioned melodiously with the clarity that

Auber bequeathed to his contemporaries and rivals to imprint tunes on the listening brain, receives a vivacious and very professional interpreta- tion from all participants, chief of whom are Mr.

Rother and

Mme. Berger. The super- ior Anders and Greindl voices are hurt by their ineptitude at the microphone, a per- sisting Urania fault fied that has adversely modi- the effectiveness of many otherwise excellent recordings. For this piece of engineering is basically cious of high order, spa-

(although a little too reverberant), very clear and crisp, with that bite to the lower strings which is an engaging feature of the best Uranias. Microphone bleat occurs periodically, notably on side

5 where the two leading men frustrate themselves and each other in contesting for the instru- ment. Some rumble obtrudes, especially on side

6.

There are moments of incipient distortion in the orchestra. Withal, not too bad an effect.

Disappointing, rather, since

Urania's own grand demonstration with

Otello

C.

(reviewed elsewhere in this issue) shows the faults to have been obviable

-

G.

B.

GLAZOUNOW:

Suite

French from The

Seasons

National

Symphony Orch.;

Roger Désormiére, cond. Capitol

12- in.

P

8157.

32 mins. $4.98.

A crisp sound, yet solid and embracive, well- balanced and true -timbred, character- izes one of the best Capitols issued, which would be better without metallic overtones to the violins. These cannot be expunged without harm to the brilliance of the rest.

Resourceful orchestration and some inter- mittent frisky inconsequentiality are the notable aspects of nounced abilities. a diversion distinction, played with free athleticism by conductor

-

C. of

G. proved and pro-

B. without real

GLINKA: Suite milla from

Ruslan and

Lud-

London Symphony Orch.; Anatole

Fistoulari, cond. MGM

26 mins. $3.00. ro

-in.

E

105.

A neat, small -scaled recording of excep- tional balance and differentiation which brings parts out of obscurity of timbres, other sprightly of this traditional opera than the fami- liar overture (which is included). Welcome and desirable, in the spirited and pliant per- formance on this disc.

-

C. G. B.

HANDEL: Passacaglia

See

TURINA

HANDEL: Utrecht Te Deum

Let

Thy

Hand

Be

Strengthened (Anthem)

Soloists, Chorus and Chamber

Orch. of the

Danish National Radio; Mogens

Wöldike, cond. Haydn

Society

12

-in.

HSL

2046.

29 and

9 mins.

$5.95.

This paean, trumpeting a sturdy devotion and invincible worldliness, established the mighty er young

Saxon as a successful courti- and the greatest of

English composers.

It has not the convincing forcefulness of the later

Dettingen Te Deum triumph is but its vigorous stunningly expressive of a

British nationalism which for the first time dominated continental politics.

The disc shows those virtues cording which we are learning to associate with records of of performance and re-

Danish origin: a cleanliness of delivery and of reproduction, a careful preparation ance

American of all participants and an avoid- of obvious exaggeration. The Wöldike conception is unhampered by the Anglo- tradition of Handel to discipline the high spirits of which tends his majestic confessions; and chorus (singing in English) and orchestra are completely under the con- ductor's control.

The

Coronation Anthem (for

George II) is a more polished expression of the same kind of pomp wherein British approval of

God is brightly panoplied but always stalwart.

Interesting, valuable and entertaining, in efficient engineering which allows full exposition of the dramatic mu- sic without nical prowess.

-

C.

G.

B.

HAYDN: Music estra: Aria for

Soprano and

Orch-

pro

Adventu,'Aria di

Lin- dora, Aria di Errisena,

Scena dl Bere- nice,

Le

Parole del gran Principe di

Russia

Gertraud Hopf; Vienna Symphony

Orch.; Meinhard von Zallinger, cond.

Haydn

Society

12

-in.

HSLP

2045.

4, 6,

15 and

8 mins.

$5.95.

I1,

A sic, pity this delectable injured a little by each anthology of mu- maiden to recording, should have been of its participants.

The voice is handsome, dark and unwieldy, the orchestra shallow in this recording, and the conductor casual.

Anticipatory echo and interpolated flutter are both audible.

The sum of faults would disqualify a record assured are version, the spell

- not likely to be reissued soon in

C. G. of duplication, but since these arias

B. another of the music may out- weigh the mediocrity of the presentation.

HAYDN: Nocturnes

No.

3, 5

Ferdinand IV of

Naples

Trio

Horn, Violin and and

6

Violoncello in for for

E

flat

Vienna Chamber Orch.;

Franz

Lits- chauer, cond. (Nocturnes).

Koch,

Schneiderhan and Huebner

(Trio).

Haydn Society r 2

-in.

HSLP

1044.

16,

Io,

7 and

9 mins. $5.95.

Nocturnes

1023 r,

2, 4 and

7 appeared on

HSLP more than a year ago.

All are diverting divertimentos exhibiting their grace boldly.

Written for the worth, they are forgotten and unlikely lyra but transcribed by

Haydn who knew their among the most engaging of his lighter works. Litschauer, who con- ducts for new one, was both discs, is a little offhand in the but the standard he fails to attain high indeed in the first set. The newer engineering is crisper better than that of but not necessarily the earlier disc which bore the cheerful tenderness and its of the music understanding direction so warmly.

The

Trio is a hurdle for the horn well cleared by Koch. It is not engrossing but is gently caressing and has been cleanly etched. It will be noted with approval by the discal public records a practice that current Haydn Society announce their duration in minutes, initiated and discontinued

London and resumed by Urania.

-

C. G. by

B.

HAYDN: Quartets

No.

44, in

Op. 42

D

Minor,

S

No.

82, in

G, Op. 77,

No. r

Schneider Quartet. Haydn

Society in.

HSQ

37.

15 and

21 mins. r

$5.95.

t-

Quartets

No.

83, in

F, Op. 77, No.

2

No. 84

(unfinished), in

B flat,

Op. ro3

Schneider Quartet. Haydn

Society

12- in.

HSQ

38. 22 and

12 mins.

$5.95

The two discs are available separately or in as album

HSQ -M as a unit not so arbitrary it may appear, since the higher opus numbers are the last works in the form from the master's hand, and

Op.

42 shares with

Op. 103 the distinction of including one work only, instead of the customary six, three or two. It is hard to offer a confident opinion on the records because a cruel edge to the violins disappears in emission from high fidelity apparatus only after a painstaking effort and not with all apparatus.

This difficulty is in the recording, strings not in the of

Messrs. Schneider and Cohen.

Music -lovers would be wise to assay the reproduction obtained from their own in- struments before committing themselves to

54 www.americanradiohistory.com

the purchase of what are admirably- played and satisfactorily recorded discs only with pity to forego No.

83

- a a grand work in astonishing anticipation of

Beethoven, and the only recording patability may of not be apparent.

- because

-

C.

G. of

B. an incom- record and reproducer which

HAYDN: Symphony No. 94, in G (Sur- prise)

Symphony No. 103, in E flat

(Drum

Roll)

Royal

Philharmonic Orch.; Sir

Thomas Beecham, cond. Columbia

I2 -ln.

ML

4453. 23 and

25 mins.

$5.45

Symphony No. 99,

No. in E flat

Symphony roi, in

D

(Clock):

Vienna National

Opera Orch.; Hermann Scherchen, cond. Westminster I2 -in.

WL

5102.

27 and

28 mins. $5.95.

Never has a conductor in direct recording competition been favored with such consist- ently superior in his series engineering as

Dr. Scherchen of ten Haydn symphonies, a notable memoir to his fame and an imposing earnest of phonographic art. Every one of these symphonies has better sound than the best of its rivals and that is true of

No. 103, wherein he is challenged for the first time by Sir

Thomas Beecham, once valorous champion on records.

A distinc- tive orchestral bloom sion of rotund sound

- a

Haydn's most mellow expan- procured either by engineering perception or contributed by hall acoustics, is

Scherchen's and not

Bee

- cham's. We a must call the Columbia disc good recording, and the Westminster con- sequently exceptional.

Interpretively,

Sir

Thomas seems to have it, with a franker approach and faster tempos more appropriate than the careful subtleties of Dr. Scher

- chen. The

Englishman's

Surprise, unrecorded by Scherchen, with a delicate exactitude of line obtained by what must have been very painstaking orchestral preparation, is the writer's favorite of all the inter- pretations of this that he has heard.

No. 99, on the new Scherchen disc, par- ticularly its immaculate, regretful adagio in lingering emanation, takes precedence other versions, and the

Clock, over the two in a gracious seven.

- projection supported by noble recording values, is the preference among

C.

G.

B.

HINDEMITH: Kammermusik No.

4, Op.

36, No.

3

Peter Rybar, violin;

Winterthur

Sym- phony Orch.; Henry Swoboda, cond.

The Four Temperaments: Franz

Hollet- schek, piano; Vienna Symphony Orch.;

Henry Swoboda, cond. Both on

West- minster

12

-in.

WL

5074.

20 and

22 mins. $5.95.

Kammermusik No. 4 is an absolutely colos- sal piece, a concerto for violin and cham- ber orchestra composed in 1925, at a time when

Hindemith's youthful enthusiasm was spurting its highest, his polyphonic tex- tures were at their most rugged. and his rhythmic vitality expressed itself on the grandest scale.

Even though this work is not too well recorded by Peter Rybar and the

Winterthur

Symphony Orchestra, it is authoritatively performed, and the value of the music itself quite overrides what reser- vations one might have about its regis- tration.

The

Four

Temperaments, on the other side, was composed in

1944.

It is a kind of con- certo for piano and strings in the form of a theme and four variations, each variation corresponding to one of medieval physiology of

-

"temperaments" the Melancholic, the Sanguine, the Phlegmatic and the Chol- eric.

Since the theme is involving three contrasted quite ideas, complex, its dis- tortion in the mirrors of the four tempera- ments leads to widespread involvements brilliantly and ingeniously solved, although the score lacks some of the fire and ur- gency

The of the earlier concerto for violin.

Four Temperaments is well played.-

A.F.

HINDEMITH:

Trauermusik

See

TURINA

HONEGGER: King

David

Janine Micheau (s), Janine Collard

(a),

Pierre Mullet (bne), Jean Hervé

(speaker), Maurice

Duruflé;

(organ)

Brasseur Chorus and French National

Radio Orch.; the

Composer, cond.

Westminster two r9 mins.

$11.90. la

-in.

WAL

204.

I hr.

The union of musical and electronic talents here permits the ascription of the imper- ial word

"definitive" to the edition. The conductor- composer is one able to master his own work, the intoning of the text

(French) by the chosen soloists is acrid and telling; the enunciation of the Narrator is precise, and chorus and orchestra have been trained to a unified galvanic vigor.

The billows of sound re- created by the en- gineers are oceanic the but do not suffocate boatswain's pipe in a stunning demon- stration of Westminster prowess in the analysis and conquest of aural difficulties.

The hall is again used as a creative factor in the registration of sound both massive and chiseled. Low -frequency background noise is an occasional fault and, at the very end, silence is too -abruptly imposed before the last chord has completed its proper re- verberation.

Called by the composer a

Symphonic

Psalm in Three Parts, the music is as conven- iently a cantata in its as phonograph version anything. The barbaric excitation of its alternate salutes to Stravinsky and obeisances to Bach is intensified for sound -enthusiasts by the quality of the sound they hear, which compels an increment of conscious ad- miration for its own sake.

The album is supplied with an introduc- and English translation.

-

C.

G.

B.

KODALY: Quartet

No.

2,

O.

ro

SZYMANOWSKI:

Quartet in

C,

- op. 37

Walden Quartet. Lyrichord z2 -in. 22.

15 and

13 mins. $5.95.

Two modern quartets of great melodious- ness, charm, refinement and ingenious recorded.

-

A.

F. well

MOZART and SHUBERT:

Songs

Erna

Berger

(s). RCA

Victor Io

-in.

LM

133. 16 mins. $4.67.

The five most familiar Mozart songs (Das

Veilchen,

Abendempfindung, etc.) and Schu- bert's Heindenröslein, wafted in Miss

Ber- get's ever

-young voice with a facile address a little tainted by a persisting aura of com- placency, largely redeemed by extreme clar- ity of enunciation. The needs generous bass fortification.- of

C. the piano

G.

B.

MOZART,

W. A.: Concerto for

Flute and

Harp, in

C

(K

299)

Concerto

1,inD(K412)

for

Horn

No.

Karl

Mess, flute;

Dora Wagner, harp;

Gerhard Görmer, horn; Stuttgart Ton

-

Studio Orch.; Gustav Lund, cond. Per- iod I2

-in.

SPLP 544. 28 and 9 mins.

$5.95.

The aerial beguilement of

K 299, here played with easygoing jubilation not comparable to the finished stylization of the LeRoy

-

Laskine- Beecham version on Victor 78's. has nevertheless the better exposition on the newer disc. This is the magic of good

LP's, that unremarkable performances can outshine remarkable ones in obsolescent recordings, through the living pulsations of almost touchable reproduction.

The fragmentary Horn

Concerto completes the

33 rpm. recording essays in that form of

(Nos. the four wonderful

2 and

4 on Colum- bia, No.

3 on WCFM). It is the smallest of the four wonders, well played and in- dued.

"touchabil- cisively engraved, with the

-

C. G. after treble has been sub-

B.

MOZART, W.

A.: Concerto i6, in D (K

Io

451)

I. 26 mins. for

Piano

$4.75.

No.

Jeanette Haien; National Gallery

Orch.; Richard

Bales, cond.

WCFM

Io

-in.

LP

In a concerto glistening with aggressive grace, Mr. Bales shows again his instinct for unearthing and projecting first -class, but usually snubbed, decorative works by

Mozart, and Miss Haien is pleasantly in accord with the bold esprit implicit in the score. Orchestral values are well presented in an objective recording which offers good piano bass used.

- a

C. but some bell at the top, the latter characteristic

G. B. of the instrument

MOZART, W.

A.:

Divertimentos

Oboes,

Bassoons for and

Horns in

Pairs:

No.

(K

8 in F (K213),

No.

12 in

E

252),

No. 13, flat

(K

270)

inF(K253),

flat

No.

14 in B

Karl Mayerhofer et al.

Westminster r

2- in.

WI.

5103. ro, 9,

12 and

14 mins.

$5.95.

Inventive and occasionally enticing, but essentially froth and so intended, the di- versions are stated with a cool elegance at piquant variance with their popular nature. is audible, but not excessively.

-

C.

G.

B.

MOZART, W.

A.:

Missa Brevis in F

(K 192) Dixit et Magnificat

(K 193)

Mozarteum Chorus and Orch.,

Salz- burg; Schmeidel, cond. Lyrichord

12- in.

LL

18.

$5.95

Both of these are early works, composed in

1774 for the services in the private chape of Mozart's inveterate enemy, Hieronymus

Colloredo, Archbishop- Elector of

Salzburg.

55 www.americanradiohistory.com

The Mass is in a relatively light, rococo style; even though it employs in its

Credo the famous four -note plainsong melody which

Mozart was later to make famous in the finale of the Jupiter, it belongs in spirit with the joyous, smallboned violin concertos rather than with such big religious works as the

Requiem or the Jupiter itself. The Dixit and Magnificat are considerably bigger in outline and conception; they are works for a festival occasion and involve the pomp of trumpets recording is good, recording fair.

-

A.

F.

MOZART: Quartet No. z8 in A

(KV

464)

Quartet

No. 25 in F (KV 59o)

Amadeus

Quartet. Westminster r2-in.

WL

5092.

33

(!) and 24 min.

These have the same spatially pervasive re- production as the Viola

Quintet mentioned elsewhere.

They have also some arrant violin bite which must be reduced if the essentially warm quality of these studied performances is to be appreciated. Number

18, running

33 minutes, is the longest side this writer has ever encountered. We have had several LP's of about eight minutes, and discophiles may well be puzzled as to what constitutes "Long Playing ".

-C.

G. B.

MOZART: Quintet (Viola) No.

5 in G

Minor (K. 516)

Amadeus String Quartet. Cecil

Witz,

2nd viola.

Westminster.

12

-in.

WL

5o86.

35 min.

Arono-

The most personal utterance from the most objective composer, four facets of a tor- mented grief, the most performed, the most admired of the composer's chamber works.

It is hard to see how the interpretation could be bettered, the Amadeus group bowing out the emotional intensity in tones of per- fect euphony, even when some roughness would be tolerable. They are abetted by a curiously satisfactory room -tone which, without undue resonance, seems to expand the sound gently upward and around, mak- ing it pervasive and not penetrating, and in a corners.

-

C.

G. B. all its

MOZART,

W.

A.:

Serenade

No. 9 in

D

Major

(Posthorn)

(K 32o)

L'Orchestre de la Suisse

Romande;

Peter Maag, cond.

London t

2

-in.

LLP

502.

39 mins. $5.95.

Here is an is outstanding performance.

It precise, clear, rhythmically very exact, emphasizing the dance beat, and highly dignified in its presentation. The work is quite properly conceived as an orchestral composition, yet it manages to maintain a chamber music transparency which allows an unusual and fortuitous glimpse into the inner architecture.

The recording is exceptionally good.

There is a fine, mellow bass, but a slight exaggeration on the high end. This can be compensated by a roll -off on the high db.

-

K.

L. of

16 db or, whenever available, as much as zo

MOZART,

W.

A.: Sinfonia Concertante for

Violin, Viola and

Orchestra, in

E flat

(K 364)

Walter Barylli, violin; Paul

Doktor, viola.

Felix

Vienna National Opera Orch.;

Prohaska, cond. Westminster r2

-in.

WL

5107.

31 mins. $5.95.

The gorgeous perfection elegance in this of exacerbated summit of double con- certos has been hitherto ignored in the lavish torrent of

LP

¡editions. Future issues will not proclaim its angry subtleties more eloquently than the interpreters here. En- gineers, however, will be able to improve on a recording ster good but not for Westmin-

-a

little shallow, a little shrill, short in orchestral; definition and lacking the solid

-

C.

G.

B.

MOZART, W.

A.:

Sonatas

Hands, in

F (K 497) for

Piano Four and in

C

(K 521)

Joerg Demus, Paul Badura -Skoda.

Westminster

12

-in.

WL

5082. 24 and

24 mins. $5.95.

SHUBERT:

Grand

Duo

Hands in

C,

Op.

14o for

Piano Four

Joerg Demus, Paul Badura -Skoda.

Westminster

12

-in.

WL 5093. 33 mins.

$5.95.

These two records by an exceptionally uni- fied team of musical intelligences are juxta- posed to vivify their extraordinary difference in style and texture. The good- tempered

Mozart

Sonatas are essentially and patently piano -music which would gain little by transcription.

Schubert s

Grand

Duo almost certainly was it insists not originally in this form: throughout on its own nakedness without an orchestral garb already written or planned for it.

There is a pleasant con- troversy about the work. Some musicolo- gists claim that this is the lost

"Gastein"

Symphony (provided only that Schubert wrote a symphony at

Gastein); and indeed it has been recorded in an orchestration under that perhaps apocryphal title by Vanguard and Colosseum. Westminster's issuance of the music as published is a valid service for students and music- lovers interested in making scholarly comparisons. an agreeably mellow piano sound.

-

C.G.B.

MOZART,

W.

A.: Symphony No. 24, in

B zo, flat

(K 182) in

F (K

247)

Divertimento

No.

Stuttgart Ton- Studio

Orch. Hans

Michael, cond for Symphony;

Gustav

Lund,

12 cond for

Divertimento.

-in.

SPLP

545.

9 and

34 mins.

Period

$5.95.

At seventeen, Mozart was already instinc- tive with the sophistication which embel- lishes the slight frame with inimitably facile grace.

The Diver- timento is of this little symphony bigger, its interest less concen- trated. The first is pleasantly played, the second rather prosaically, factory, both unstriking, recording.

- in

C. a

G. satis-

B.

OFFENBACH:

Orphée aux Enfers

Vocal soloists, chorus and Paris Phil- harmonic Orch.

;

René Leibowitz, cond.

Renaissance two

12

-in.

3t mins.

$11.90. sx

204.

I hr.

In perverting his own genius, in destroying gods for an endangered people who could not afford to dispense with them, Offen- bach cheerfully contributed to the downfall of a nation.

The musical vaudeville of

Orpheus in vice of

Hell depends on the vulgar de- startling vigor of rowdy in alternation

- ed the cheap cynicism

- lyrical with which he and adorn- of his subject, gave it an influence it is too bad it had, and main- tains a vehement interest even now, de- cidedly stimulated by the participants in this recording, done with traditional bump- tiousness and energy. Everyone is tho- roughly trained, and M. Leibowitz's break- neck drive is exhilarating. The clarity of the dialogue is notable and makes it very easy for those understanding French to follow it without the libretto furnished.

In general, the recorded sound is impres- sive, both expansive and vibrant, with un- forced high frequencies very pleasant to hear, far but in places the chorus is in the background and some weak or of too the solo voices are too near the microphone. C.

G.

B.

POULENC: Trio for

Trumpet, Trombone and

Horn

See

SAINT

-SAENS

PROKOFIEV:

Symphony No. 6 in E flat,

Op. rzr

L'Orchestre de la Suisse Romande;

Ernest Ansermet, cond. London r

2

-in.

LLP

527.

4o mins. $5.95.

Ernest Ansermet gives this work, which represents the first notable departure from

Prokofiev's usual symphonic style, an un- conventional and, in many respects, quite extraordinary reading. His approach is essentially a study in sound rather than in structure. Thus he achieves astonishing tonal effects; perhaps a somewhat mannered and stilted total impression; but because of the surprise element, a very stunning end result.

The recording is well realized. Both ends are slightly tipped up, with the result roll -off that the middle range sounds less forceful still quite clean.

A turnover of

500 but and a of r6 db in the high and

2 db in the bass will restore excellent equilibrium. K.

L.

PURCELL: Dido and

Aeneas

Eleanor Houston (s), Adele Leigh (s),

Henry Cummings (bne), and other solo voices; Stuart Chamber Orch. and

Chorus; Jackson Gregory, cond. Per- iod r2 -in.

SPLP 546.

54 mins. $5.95.

The absurdities of a wretched dramatic confection, jeweled with a compelling music, are not so detractive from musical enjoyment when the work issues from a phonograph and becomes a cantata. The record is seductive.

The young voices, little known here, are intelligently projected and generally warm in texture, and Miss

Houston is decidedly excellent as

Dido. The sound is clean and seems close. An un- usual sensation of intimate participation is possible for the hearer who reproduces this at less than come personal and animate.

-

C. G.

B. be-

RACHMANINOFF:

Concerto No.

3 in

D

Minor,

Op. 3o

Vladimir Horowitz, piano; RCA Vic- tor Orch.;

Fritz

Reiner, cond.

RCA

56 www.americanradiohistory.com

4

now available

at

over

3000 record store throughout

the

natio

\\

SCHW

LONG

PLAYING

RECORD CATALOG

THE

"BIBLE"

OF

RECORD BUYERS

Issued every month

Complete listing of every

L. P available

New releases prominently marked

Over 130 record companies represented

Sorry, Schwann Long

Playing Record Catalog is not available on a subscription basis.

Please ask your dealer for your monthly copy. www.americanradiohistory.com

One

If actual size)

Schwann

90

Mass.

Ave. Cambridge 39, Mass.,

57

Victor I2

-in.

LM

I178.

38 mins.

$ 5.72.

The logic of the collaboration is hearten- ing. The basis of choice is not mere avail- ability, but appropriateness. It is very hard to believe that any other pianist and con- ductor living can eclipse the appeal of the complementary coalescence of the recreative musical craft promulgated here with such smooth bounty in a slick, unshowy record- ing, masterly in ing proportion, and unadul- of piano resonance.

-

C. G. B.

RAVEL: Bolero

See

BERLIOZ

RAVEL: Daphnis et Chloé,

Suite

No.

2

La

Valse, poème choréographique

INR

Symphony

Orch., Brussels; Franz

André, cond.

Capitol 10-in.

L

8545.

22 mins. total.

Both sides of this Capitol -Telefunken record will be classed by the hi -fi enthuisiast as demonstration and test pieces. The record- ing is exceptionally good: a tremendous dynamic range, highs on the

La

Valse side in Daphnis et Chloé

- are sharp and clear they tend to shriek and there are some tremendous tympani thumps in

La

Valse.

The bass is almost too strong; there is a slight feeling by that the low frequency it has been achieved not microphone placement but by boosting tone control somewhere in the recording or transcribing process.

Except for this low frequency dominance, the balance throughout the orchestra is good and there is a realistic sense of sound perspective, particularly in Daphnis et Chloé.

The music itself is interesting and pic- torial; La

Valse brings to mind almost a parody on all

Viennese waltzes, played at times by a doubled Sousa band!

Which gives us also the feeling that André may almost too terrific.

-

D.

A.

...

it is

RAVEL:

Quartet in F

Sonata and

Cello for

Violin

Pascal

Concert Hall

Society

52

-in. cHS

22

Quartet, and members thereof. and

12 mins. $5.95. sI23.

The Quartet, composed in

1906, was

Ravel's first work of chamber music, and the Sonata, which dates from

1927, was his last. recording therefore provides an

This important contrast: the suave, polished, Fauré -like classicism caprice, the of the early piece versus the tough, open polyphony and the almost Bartokian rhythms of the late one.

The duo -sonata is very little known, is but it nevertheless a masterpiece, and it is mag- nificently played here by Oscar Shumsky and Bernard Greenhouse.

The

Quartet is

Excellent recording.

-

A. F.

Quartet.

RAWSTHORNE: Concerto No. 2

Piano and

Orchestra for

Clifford Curzon, piano.

London

Sym- phony Orch.;

Sir Malcolm Sargent, cond.

London

I o -in.

Ls

513.

263/4 mins. $4.95.

Because Alan Rawsthorne got his start as a is composer at a comparatively late age, one prone to think of him as belonging to the young generation of

British contem- porary composers. Actually he belongs to the generation of Constant

Lambert. As one who has lived through the major changes of style which twentieth- century music has undergone in its evolution, he has absorbed a great deal from the masters of this century.

Rawsthorné s

Second

Piano

Concerto, written in

5955 cil upon commission by the Arts Coun- of

Great Britian for the national Festival, demonstrates well what he has absorbed.

It shows him as at once an introspective composer and an

The musical outgoing personality. thinking is clearly symphonic, with each new thematic idea developed in a sort of variation from previously introduced material. This work is a concerto only in the same sense as a

Brahms piano concerto; perhaps it would be better described as a symphony with a piano solo obbligato.

Of the four movements, the short, slow third one

At any is rate, it is the most interesting part

- far more original and authentic than the partly Busoniesque first movement or the jazzy one last one, which only too often reminds of second -rate Gershwin.

As far as one can knowledge judge without thorough of the score, the performance seems to take into account the two basic strains of the music, which are lyrical rhythmical. Mr.

Curzon delivers and himself of an apparently difficult task with brilliance and assurance; the orchestra defines the thematic material with great plasticity.

The recording has an excellent and well

- defined middle, with a clear and true piano sound, bass but it suffers from a rumble in the and stridency in the high violins.

-K.L.

SAINT pet

-SAENS: Septet and

Piano

- for

Strings,

Trum-

POULENC: Trio for

Trumpet, Trombone and

Horn

Harry Glanz, trumpet;

Brooks

Smith, piano; Philip Sklar, bass;

Gordon

Pu- lis, trombone; Arthur Berv, horn;

Stradivari Records String Quartet.

Stradivari

12

-in.

STR

605. mins. $5.95. t8 and

15

These two pieces well of jolly French trivia mate across nearly a half- century, but are of interest mostly for their unusual instru- mentation.

Recording is rather distant, subdued.

J.C.

SCHUBERT:

Grand

Duo

Hands, in

C,

Op.

14o for

Piano Four

See

MOZART

SCHUBERT:

Quartet

No.

13, in

A

Minor,

Op.

29

Vienna Konzerthaus Quartet.

West- minster

I

2-in.

WL

5115. 37 mins.

$5.95.

Quartets

No.

8, in B

No 6 in D: flat,

Op.

168

Vienna Konzerthaus Quar- tet.

27

Westminster

12

-in.

WL

5I

IO. and

20 mins. $5.95.

We know that the Schneider

Quartet has been engaged by the

Haydn

Society for the huge project of a complete edition of

Haydn's quartets. The Vienna

Konzerthaus

Quartet in an unobtrusive way seems to be aiming at the realization of a less daring program of smaller scope: the recording of that much of

Schubert's chamber music sus- ceptible to a quartet's participation.

Al- ready the Vienna players have taken part in the two

Quintets and the

Octet, and the three

Quartets noticed here bring their total of

Schubert in this form to five. The three compose an illuminating presentation of a stunning surge of genius. No.

6 has a frail and rather conventional appeal suggesting a gifted student or genteel minor master.

No.

8, written a year later in the maturity of seventeen, sparkles with the bold inven- tions

A of an individual thinker. The famous

Minor Quartet, composed after ten more years (a third of this ship with the greatest pathetic cended by its dark pinions to life) has as- companion- of

Beethoven, Haydn and Mozart. The most familiar distinction of style of the Vienna Konzerthaus Quartet is the long pressure to extract the most and the most romantic juice.

It is decidedly effective in Schubert where it seems particu- larly appropriate, but some music -lovers re- ject it.

Indeed, there are two directly op- posite camps: those who the cannot stomach group and those who prefer its

Schubert to any other's. The writer is with the latter.

Recording characteristics are not quite the same for the two discs, but they are both generally well realized, with a good bloom to violins for the amplifier to unsharpen.

-

C.

G. B.

SCARLATTI,

D.: Sonatas chord, Vols.

I and

II for

Harpsi-

Fernando Valenti. Westminster s2 -in.

WL

5106. 46 mins. $5.95.

Westminster

52

-in.

WL

5116.

52 mins.

$5.95.

Nowhere may stunning keyboard virtuosity be more pertinently applied than to the infuriated sportiveness of Domenico

Scar

- latti's miniature

Sonatas. Mr. Valenti has the virtuosity required, and gusto in quan- tity, and the twenty -four he has chosen

CO record advance principally a tumultuous and tricky exuberance. Tonally, the discs are dazzlers, in accordance with the present fashion of re- creating the harpsichord larger than life.

No harm in that. if the reproduc- tive volume is lowered to unorchestral pro

- portion.The harpsichord used has an individ- uality of timbre very knowingly exploited. -

C.

G.

B.

SCHUBERT: Die Winterreise

Victor Carne, tenor; Gerald Moore, piano. Westminster two

52

-in.

WL

5087

-8.

I hr.

9 mins.

$11.90

Mr. Carne is an intelligent tenor of in- gratiating high baritone appeal. Mr.

Moore is an accompanist of exceptional ability and probity. Westminster bows to no one in the technical aspects of recording. Plainly, the prospects of producing the definitive version of the most heart -rendingly beauti- ful cantata in music are favored in advance by the quality of these participants.

Tenor and pianist have obviously studied, dis- cussed and analyzed their complex and subtle interrelationship, and it is arrogant to be- lieve that they are necessarily wrong on the occasions when one disagrees with their method. In truth, they have done a

Winter

- reise of beauty and understanding, but the records are not successful to the degree

58 www.americanradiohistory.com

on

Columbia

Records rich

repertoire for

audiophiles

Outstanding examples of brilliant wide -range recording to please

a

variety of musical tastes.

Hear them

!

You'll want to include your favorites in your own Hi

-Fi collection!

Columbia

Records

Symbol of the finest quality in

Long

Playing

Records

Trade

-Marks "Columbia," Masterworks," fan

Reg.

U. S.

Pat.

Off.

Marsas Registradas

Tati -Tati

(Symphonic Paraphrases on "Chopsticks" freely transcribed and orchestrated by

Nicolas Tcher- epnin and Werner Janssen). Werner Janssen conducting the Columbia Symphony Orchestra. ML 4480.

Tchaikovsky: The Months,

Op.

37a.

(Arranged by

Morton Gould). Morton Gould at the Piano and conducting his

Orchestra. ML 4487.

Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique,

Op.

14.

The Phil- adelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy, Conductor.

ML

4467.

Wagner: Siegfried's

Rhine Journey and

Siegfried's

Funeral Music (from "Die Gotterdämmerung

"). Leo- pold Stokowski phony Orchestra of New York. ML

4273.

Music of Victor Herbert.

Andre Kostelanetz and his

Orchestra. ML 4430.

Ravel: Daphnis

Schonberg: et

Chloé Suites

Nos.

1 and 2

Verklärte

Nacht (Transfigured Night).

The Philadelphia ductor. ML 4316.

Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy, Con-

Gershwin: Porgy and Bess. (Produced by

Goddard

Lieberson). Complete Opera with Lawrence Winters,

Camilla Williams, Inez Mathews, Avon Long and others. Set SL -162.

Twilight Concert

-Program

No.

I

I.

Artur Rodzin- ski conducting The Columbia Symphony Orchestra.

ML 4337.

Bowles: Concerto for

Two Pianos, Winds rnd

Per- cussion. Arthur Gold and Robert Fizdale, Duo- pianos, with Daniel Saidenberg conducting. ML 2128.

Hanson: Concerto in

G

Major for

Piano and

Or- chestra,

Op.

36. Rudolf Firkusny,

Piano, with the

Eastman -Rochester Symphony Orchestra, Howard

Hanson, Conductor Grieg: Holberg Suite,

Op.

40.

Eastman- Rochester Symphony Orchestra, Howard

Hanson, Conductor. ML

4403.

Bizet: Carmen.

Complete Opera with Solange Michel,

Raoul Jobin the

TF..éâtre and others with Chorus and Orchestra of

National de l'Opéra- Comique conducted by

André Cluytens. Set SL -109.

Rachmaninoff: Suites Nos.

1 and

2 for

Pianos, Op. 5 and

Op.

17.

Vitva

Vronsky

Victor Babin, Duo -pianists. ML 4379.

Two and

59 www.americanradiohistory.com

6o

94...106...113

139

This is not an

arithmetic

pro- gression, but an

indication

of the steady increase in the number of record companies issuing Long

Playing Records.

Many listeners have trouble in obtaining the

fine musical

performances available

on

the

following small labels:

Aca-

demy

. .

.

Bach Guild

.

.

.

Cetra

-Soria

...

Dial

...

EMS

FolkWays

...

Golden Leg- end

REB

...

New

...

Period

..

.

...

Tempo

...

Urania

...

Vanguard

...

WCFM.

* * *

To help solve

their problems, we

carry in stock, at

all

times, all the above, plus every label listed in

Schwann.

* * *

Every

record mentioned in

the Beethoven Discography

by

C. G.

Burke, last

issue of

High-

Fidelity

in our

stock,

* *

*

.

RECORDS

FREE,

MAILED, POST

ON

RECEIPT OF

YOUR

CHECK OR

MONEY ORDER

. .

OR SENT

C.O.D.

.

. .

IF

YOU PREFER.

SCHWANN

LP

CATALOG

MAILED

FREE

ON

REQUEST.

279

11.5OC

Main

Street

0

Great

Barrington,

Mass. they by and should be. softening

-

They have been victimized voice and

- warming instrument, has blunted the emotional and dramatic core.

It is impossible, hearing this overripe lus- ciousness reise.

- of mere sound, not to be conscious of it; and this is a pity, during Die Winter

-

C.

G.

B.

SCHUBERT: Quartets

No. z5, in

G, Op. r6r;

No.

12

(Quartetsatz), in

C

Minor

Fine Arts Quartet.

Mercury

12-in.

MG

101'04.

40 and

6 mins. $4.85.

This is a technically good performance, in many details admirable, but entirely unex- pressive of the profound inner emotion and beautiful horror of the supreme

G

Major

Quartet.

The fault seems to be mainly in the passive intonation, aggressive and febrile.

-

C. ought

G.

B. to be

SCHUBERT: Quintet in

C,

Op. 163

Benar Heifetz, znd violoncello, with

Budapest Quartet. Columbia 12-in.

ML

4437. 45 mins.

$5.45.

This is the fourth version, the third out- standing, of the longest and most ravishing music for a small ensemble. The technical values here are first -class and very similar in their bold proximity to those achieved by the engineers in the Vienna

Konzerthaus recording for

Westminster, without the soft bloom imposed on the latter by the room acoustics. The performance here is ortho- dox which the Vienna

Konzerthaus cer- tainly was not; the Budapesters bow a very rich sound directly, without to dwell on a phrase that the reluctance characterizes the

Konzerthaus effort. These two versions are not compatible, but it is likely that more people will prefer the less startling Buda- pest narration, which is not unlike the clean and gracious work by the

Hollywood

Quartet less for compelling acoustics.

-

C.

G. B.

SCHUBERT:

Eight Transcriptions by

Liszt

Egon and

Tausig

Petri, piano. Columbia

12

-in.

ML

4436.

37 mins. $5.45.

These things were once very familiar, and the generous Liszt did much to acquire posthumous recognition for

Schubert through the showy vehicle their musical magic. he used to

Most of them

- carry the

Trout, Der Lindenbaum, Der Erlkönig,

Liebesbotschaft, Gretchen am

Spinnrade

- have been recorded elsewhere as the songs they properly are; but for those who wish them pianistically bedizened, here they are in an ingly unenthusiastic. of a pianism surpris-

-

C.

G

.B.

SCHUBERT:

Songs

See

MOZART

SCHUMANN,

R.: Carnaval,

Op. 9

Gyorgy Sandor, piano.

Columbia

I2 -in.

ML

4452.

24 mins. $5.45.

There is little I find to recommend in this perfunctory performance by Sandor.

His hard -driven tone and unromantic approach make this the least satisfying of the five versions now available on

LP.

The recorded sound of the piano is atro- cious, clanging unmercifully in the treble, and sounding soggy and wooden in the bass.

My copy was also afflicted with some wavering.

With the memorable Rachmaninoff ver- sion scheduled for re- issue, it would seem advisable for lovers of to await its appearance.

-

J.

F. I.

SHOSTAKOVICH:

Song of the Forests,

Op.

8i

Petrov

(t),

Kilichevsky (bs); Corn

- bined orchestras and choruses of the

USSR State

Bolshoi

Philharmonic and the

Theatre; Eugene Mravinsky, cond. Vanguard I2

-in.

VRS

422.

$5.95

Colosseum I2 -in.

CRLP

33 mins. for both.

I18. $5.45.

These apparently are recordings of the same performance several of the work.

Colosseum has times managed to acquire and pro- cess

Iron Curtain tapes. Vanguard in this territory, yet has produced by is far new the better record. Its engineers claim to have repitched thirteen different portions of the erratic Russian tape. Such technical virtuos- ity is to be commended, but it seems wasted on music like this. Song of the Forests is an oratorio on the subject of conservation and is on an artistic par with the average recruit- ing billboard.

There is no trace here of the

Shostakovich who wrote the Fifth or Lady Macbeth of

Mzensk

- not

Symphony a single bourgeois -intellectual overtone, nor spark originality.

Its a little tragic.

-

J.

C. of

SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphony No. 7

(Leningrad)

Op.

6o

Buffalo

Philharmonic Orch.; William

Steinberg, cond. Allego two 12

-in.

ALG

3041.

69 mins.

$1

I.9o.

Shostakovich's

Seventh Symphony was writ- ten during the German siege of Leningrad, of which it is purportedly a musical de- piction. It is a large, unwieldy work in- corporating most of the composers bad features, such as bombast, lack of ability to handle large symphonic structures logi- cally, and rough orchestration. Mr. Stein- berg does as well with it as can possibly be expected, by giving it pace and emphasiz- ing dramatic climaxes.

The recording was orginally made late in 1945 and released on 78 rpm. Naturally, it lacks the latest advances in recording techniques

- especially since it was made, in part at least, from an actual performance with audience present. Beyond this, the LP transfer cannot be called wholly successful.

There are notable pitch changes, particu- larly in the last movement, which drops at times half a tone. There is also no di- ameter compensation.

Consequently, the outside of the record is bright and clear, although the tone is hard and brittle but, towards the middle, unpleasant distortion of the highs and lows sets in, and the picture becomes blurred.

This record is best played with an 800 eurnover and a 52 db roll -off on the highs.

But it might well be worth the trouble to change equalization during the playing.

When the tone arm moves towards the middle, less roll

-off on the highs would somewhat alleviate the lack of clarity near the center.

-

K.

L.

Continued on page 62 www.americanradiohistory.com

MUSIC

ON TAPE

Continued from page So ant. Overall

For the disc:

- soothing but not defined.

"Highs much cleaner, truer timbre. Violins shimmer more. Bass the same. Disc better, about but neither good."

We listened to Tchaikovsky's

1812 Over- ture on A -V

Tape and, at the beginning, were not at all pleased. Everything seemed weak and lost; a too much of thumping the rest of bass obscured the music. This is a dynamic piece, but the control engineer seemed to be afraid to let it out. We had more or less crossed off the tape when we noticed that the sound had improved con- siderably.

It was a slow change, but the last half was better than the first, and on a par with the

Sinfonia Concertante.

Dale Perry of Tape Industries' sent us a reel which included excerpts from several in his regular catalogue. Therefore, we have to judge the average for his product against the average for

A -V.

The joint

C.G.B.

-C.F.

verdict was: sound a bit bet- ter, music not as good. The orchestra under

Kurt

Woss, recorded by A -V and

Remington, was much larger than the one used by Perry for his releases, which made a fair compari- son difficult. But the cleaner, sound was a little better balanced, and more con- sistent in overall quality. is

Tapes have not yet become so numerous that they can be judged and compared in manner similiar to LP record releases. a

That one reason why, at the beginning of this piece, we said our opinion was, in essence, of the tapes

"Maybe yes, maybe no". lized

- nor is product is not yet stabi- the market. The hi

-fi fan's verdict is likely to be the seeker

"Maybe no ", whereas of background music will vote a strong yes.

Yet there is a market for hi

-fi tapes.

Interest in tapes is growing rapidly; more and more people have tape recorders capable of reproducing the best.

As proof of inter- est, here are highly abbreviated extracts from a few of the many letters received as a result of our request in a previous issue of

HIGH -FIDELITY for such comments.

"One -hour reels at

71/2 ips."

P. K.

-

"I'm interested in pre- recorded tape selections mostly in the classical field." J.

Y.

-

"71/2 home use. Would should be standard for like

W. H.

B.

-

"I as well as now have

711 classicals." equipment but as soon be 15." A. E. prefer as

W.

-

"Symphonic will and classic jazz at

712 ips. preferred." H.

L. B. to'/

-in. reels at

15 ips. for best fidelity."

W. P. B.

-

"I'd

-

"Tape

-of- the -month deal would be excellent provided the price of each recording comes out at least

20% cheaper than the cost in a in good either

711

A. F. L.

-

LP or

"I record. mind." J.

G.

A.

33/4 ips. of the same recording

-

I have the

"I am

711 speed interested in double track tapes." would be definitely interested if

I could get quality at

711 speed.

I often."

R.

C.

T.

- doubt that

I could afford a 15 ips. subject too

"I would welcome a tape

-of- the -month arrangement.

A suffi- cient number chaser to feel of pre -recorded tapes should be planned in advance to encourage the pur- that a repertoire can actually be compiled of unusually good orchestrations, novelty features and choral numbers."

F.J.L.

Ask to se¡

-

"I am mainly interested in high fidelity material of classical nature.

I intend to

M. G. W.

- reproduction."

"Preferred tape speed is 711 ips. single track. My choice is for particularly piano works."

A. outright pur- chases, rather than rental, of symphonies and

J.

C.

-

"I would be interested in

- light classical music.

Of course it would be high fidelity."

B.

V.

"Am interested in learning what musi- cal selections are available on tape at

15 ips."

B.

H.

-

"I am interested in high fidelity tapes; my interest would run more to classics, semi

-classics and

- production arrangements of standard pops.

Be

-bop, etc. no!!"

E. P.

M.

-

"I prefer a frequency re-

-

"Personally, strongly prefer spite loss

15,000 cycles."

15

J. J.

S. ips. de- of playing time to maintain great

t:iati'¡s:

..t

1 t

RU

SIAN ryrypp''

,

Berlin

Ev

RE, OP

Pfÿ'harmonic i

Orchestra

72

Hans Steinkopf, conductor

,

5005 1310" LP i fist price 84.75

URLP p

Janacek

SINFONIE'TA

Symphony Orchestra of Radio Leipzig',

Vaclav Neumann, conductor

URLP

7030

1

12" LP list price $5.95

:URLP

Dvorak

7-SYMPHONY-NO.

2,-TI I

IINOR,

OP.

Berlin

Philharmonic Orchestra

Ernst

Schrader, conductor

7015

1

12"

LP list price $5.95

70

THE THREE-

L'Orchestre; de l'Opera -Co lean' liete ique,

Martinon, condhctor

URLP

Falla

CORNEREDLAT(Complete)

Paris!

7034

+

1

12"

LP ligt price $5.95 i

J i i i

URLP

Smetana

=

THE BARTERED

=3RIDE

Richter,?

Hauser, Peters, '.Boehme i

Chorus and Orchestra of Berlin Civic Opera

Hans Lenzer, conductor

210

3

127 LP's

& libretto list price $18.50

LOVE j -

'ProkoJ ev+

FOR THREE

..

ORAN-GES:

SUITE

Symphony Orchestra of Radio Berlin

Ar hur Rother, conductor

URLP 5005#

1

10" LP list

{price

$4.75 our latest cataloig, now available

}sat your local record dealer.

UR

A

N

I

A

RECORDS, INC. advantage over LP's." H. H.

L.

-

"I have of someone who is read in your magazine placing on the market, high fidelity tape recordings for home use.

I have been hoping for just such development.

I want to encourage this as much as

I am able and

I hope the venture will be a financial as well as technical success."

F.

J.

F.

In conclusion: our feeling is that a good beginning has been made. There is still far to go. Companies now serving the market for pre- recorded tapes need and want suggestions from prospective and present users will of their product. We at

HIGH

-FIDELITY do all we can to keep readers posted, and we are anxious to be of whatever help we can to both users and manufacturers of tapes.

As worthwhile tapes become avail- able, we shall review them.

6i

www.americanradiohistory.com

RECORDS

IN REVIEW

Continued from page

Go

STRAUSS: Don

Juan

See

WAGNER

STRAUSS,

JOHANN: Music of (The

Bat and The

Gypsy

Baron overtures;

Artists' Life and

Voices of

Spring walt- zes)

Vienna Philharmonic Orch.; Clemens

Krauss, cond. London

I

2-in.

LLP 454.

8, 8, 8 and

6 mins. $5.95.

STRAUSS,

JOHANN

Year" Concert

(Nine waltzes) and JOSEF: "New polkas and

Vienna

Philharmonic Orch.;

Clemens

Krauss, cond. London

I

2-in.

LLP

484.

43 mins.

$5.95.

Krauss in Strauss is a sure and devoted hand, perhaps the ablest now recording. His easy but studied grace may be taken for granted: all we need to know is the quality of the engineering. In these two discs, the sound is of London's familiar Vienna excellence

- muscular, percussive and impressive, with a high- frequency metal rection. that needs stern cor-

Good records; and illustrative of the editorial eccentricity so puzzling to discophiles, not least in the case of London, which determines how many minutes music shall occupy how many feet of of groove.

Here we have identical genre. and two miscellanies, but one disc sounds through- out

43 mins. and the other for 3o mins. Is

-

C. G. excessive?

B.

Or is the other deficient?

STRAUSS,

JOHANN: One

Night in

Venice (Eine

Nacht in Venedig)

Vocal soloists from the Vienna Nat- ional Opera; Chorus of the

Bregenz

Festivals;

Vienna Symphony Orch.;

Anton Paulik, cond. Columbia two

12-in.

SL

119.

I hr.

16 mins.

$1

0.90.

Made

-in-

Vienna Strauss has responsibility hitherto been a of London, whose

Zigeuner- baron and Fledermaus are not likely to be challenged.

One

Night in

Venice is not musically equal to those works, nor does this Columbia album offer such imposing names for the principals. Nevertheless, this is a projection of experienced skills, wherein a tenor, Karl Friedrich, sounds like Tauber redivivus. The painstaking delineations of

Clemens Krauss, who conducts Strauss for

London, are not in Mr. but still his musicians

Paulik's competence, bubble along in easy and agreeable fashion. A year ago, we should have thought the sound remarkable. able, salient brilliance. but unremark-

Today it seems praiseworthy, without

-

C. G. B. without

STRAUSS, J.: plete)

Der Zigeunerbaron (Com-

Alfred Poell (bne), Karl Dönch (b),

Julius Patzak (t),

Kurt Preger

(t),

Emmy Loose (s),

Steffy

Leverenz (a),

August

Jaresch (t),

Rosette

Anday (a),

Hilde Zadek (s), Franz Bierbach (bne).

Chorus of the Vienna National Opera;

Vienna Philharmonic Orch.; Clemens

Krauss, cond. London two I2

-in.

LLP

418

-9.

I hr.

35 mins. $11.90.

Last year

Baron; the Bat and this year the

Gypsy both are from Vienna via

London

Records which, in view of the superlative results, is obviously the route to follow for the best recorded demonstrations of the exalted tuneful absurdities of the great light

Master. Strauss in Vienna is a vital ele- ment in the life of a now -emaciated city; he is a spiritual force whose frivolity dilutes the city's havoc. The entire cast present production exudes a of the carefree ease which is in reality the result of decades of polished stylizing. Dr. Krauss is a con- siderable man, not least imposing when guiding his people with sure and knowing finesse through the captivating intricacies of these operettas. The engineering

Gypsy of the

Baron excels the excellent work in the Bat, particularly in the choral fortissimos, handled without distortion, and in the un- broken masses of smooth, tapestried sound in the finales. Everything is luminous, and the balance so nice of voices to the instruments is that it definitive edition. is

- not

C. even noticed.

G. B.

A

STRAUSS, R.: Symphonia Domestica,

Op. 53

Vienna Philharmonic Orch.;

Clemens

Krauss, cond.

42 mins.

London 12-in.

LLP 483.

$5.95.

As a seasoned and expert interpreter of the music a of

Richard Strauss, Clemens Krauss convincing whole

- into partly because of careful attention to thematic phrasing, partly because Krauss understands how to combine symphonic clarity with true senti- ment.

The engineering side of the record is good.

There is fine balance all the way up from a sound and formidable bass to the gratify- ing highs. The combination of expert con- ducting and engineering has made the rather chick orchestration as transparent as possible, with the strings covering the rest orchestral material only of the upon rare occasions.

STRAUSS, R.:

Till

Eulenspiegel's Merry

Pranks, op. 28

Death and

Trans- figuration,

Op.

24

RCA

RCA

23

Victor Orch.;

Victor mins.

12

-in.

$5.72.

Fritz

LM

Reiner, cond.

1180.

14 and

From the has beginning of

LP this conductor been favored with engineering of the best current quality. The early Columbias were excellent when new and are not to be despised now; Reiner's recent crop of

Vic- tors emits a singular elegance of pure sound hard to define or to illustrate, except by negatives. We receive an impression that this sound contains nothing extraneous to the orchestra, that it is uncontaminated.

We hear nothing we identify as distortion; we find nothing requiring sharp discipline from a compensator. Everything seems rounded, and no matter what Dr. Reiner plays, the sound has a soft glossy finish, bespeaking his own skill, the suavity of the orchestra and the mastery of the

The two tone engineers.- have a new and persuasive allure.

-

C.

G.

B.

TCHAIKOVSKY:

Symphony No.

3 in

D

(Polish)

Op. 29

Homburg

Symphony

Orch.; Paul

Schubert, cond. Regent

52-in.

MG

5012. 45 mins.

$5.45.

Seeds are of the later Tchaikovsky symphonies strewn on every page of the diffuse but by no means dull score. The perform- ance here is above all careful: there is an obvious dynamic potential not evoked by the conductor. Instrumental differentiation has been neatly realized in a recording gen- erally well contrived, albeit tonally the acoustics of the hall or studio.

- dry from

C.G.B.

TCHAIKOVSKY:

The Tempest,

Sym- phonic Fantasia,

Op.

18 Hamlet,

Overture -Fantasia,

Op.

67a

Stockhold Radio Orch.; Jacques Rach- milovich, cond. Mercury

12

-in.

MG

10I12.

22 and

19 mins. $4.85.

Hamlet, the stronger work, has its first

LP while

The Tempest has previously received the deference of several recording corn- panics. Tchaikovsky's Shakespeare is unique in music. The translations he used must have excised everything but blood and lust from the English text. In these works he is, as

Tolstoi was in his Shakespearean re- flections, a thorough -going

Slay. Caliban,

Prospero and Miranda are in rather dull musical motion, but there is brassy Kremlin pomp illustrative of Hamlet's trials and a

Caucasian melancholy, descriptive lia, of Ophe- more interesting perhaps because of the incongruity. The recordings are splen- did, particularly of Hamlet wherein the drums and brass rock the loudspeaker. Mr.

Rachmilovich's direction seems vigorous never heard the music before.

-

C. G. B.

TURINA:

Scène

Andalouse

Passacaglia

- for

Violin and

Viola

-

-

HINDE-

HANDEL:

VILLA -LOBOS: Duet

Louis

Persinger, violin and piano;

Rolf Persinger, viola. Stradivari

Re- cords String Quartet and Chamber

Orch. Stradivari

12

-in.

ST&

608.

39 mins. $5.95

None of this music is of much consequence, but the Persinger father -son team give it all considerable life.

The print received was off -center and bubbly.

-J.

C.

Recording, so -so.

VILLA -LOBOS:

Viola

See

TURINA

Duet for

Violin and

VILLA -LOBOS: Sonata No

3 for

Violin and

Piano

See DEBUSSY

VITTORIA:

The Masses:

O

Magum

Mysterium and

O

Quam Gloriosum

Welch Chorale; James

B.

Welch, dir.

Allegro

12

-in.

ALG

2

Oh mins. $5.95.

3034. t

61/2 and

The two a cappella masses are similar in

62 www.americanradiohistory.com

construction, but not necessarily in mu- sical content. In the two corner movements, for example,

0

Magnum Mysterium has a

Kyrie

Dei that is clear and joyous, and an Angus that is touchingly mysterious; in the

0

Quam Gloriosum the procedure is reversed.

Performance is by and large clear, with occasional unsteadiness in the intonation, but not more than is usual with acappella groups. The best feature ance is of the perform- that it tries to offer the music in exact focus and as a living piece rather than a scholarly academic exercise.

The recording is somewhat fuzzy but quite acceptable when equalized according to the NAB curve. Close to the center in

0

Magnum

Mysterium.

-

K.

L. especially

WAGNER: Die Meistersinger von

Nürn- berg

(Complete Opera)

Hilde Gueden (s),Elsie Schurhoff (ms),

Gunther Treptow (t), Anton Dermota

(t), Paul Schoeffler (bs), Otto Edel- mann (bs), Karl Dönch (bs), Alfred

Poell (bne), and other vocal soloists;

Vienna National Opera Chorus and

Vienna Philharmonic Orch.;

Hans

Knappertsbusch, cond. London six

12

-in.

LLPA

9. 4 hrs.

23 mins. $35.70.

The third complete

Meistersinger to be re- corded is the best. All three have virtues, but the Urania edition was ill- balanced and the Columbia lacked orchestral detail while proffering an off -form Walther in a recording of a public performance which, like all public performances on records, produced special difficulties. The singing in the

London edition is consistently good, with the David of Dermota particularly superior.

Gueden has not the pure beauty of voice demonstrated by Schwarzkopf for

Columbia, but her characterization of

Eva is gracious and subtle.

As Sachs, Schoeffler is what we expect of him, and Dönch makes

Beckmesser nearly credible.

Knapperts- busch's direction is less eloquently lyrical than Karajan's for Columbia, but its meas- ured statement is effective and earnest. The outstanding superiority, however, is in the sound as such, which is don here, with no good striking average Lon- deficiencies, agreeable balance and fine orchestral deline- ation.

The second act was issued a year ago: the first and third acts, utilizing the same talents and very nearly the same recording characteristics, may be purchased separately as

LLP

478

-9

(Act

I) and

LLP

48o

-2

(Act III).

The original second act was stretched in the editing to cover four sides, which means that the compounded complete work oc- cupies fourteen sides instead of the twelve utilized for the new entirety, thus penalizing those music -lovers who originally had faith in

London, to the extent of and nearly six extra dollars.

-

C.

G.

B.

WAGNER:

Parsifal

(Complete

Opera)

Martha Modle

(ms), Wolfgang

Wind- gassen (t), wig

George London

(bs),

Lud-

Weber (bne), Hermann Uhde

(bs),

Chorus and Orch. of the

Bayreuth

Festival, 1951;

Hans Knappertsbusch, cond. London six

1

2

-in.

LLPA

1 o. 4 hrs. 29 mins.

$35.7o.

The culmination of

Wagner's enormous, fret- ful genius for music, applied in intense

edbanaeit

LONG

ONLY

WESTMINSTER HAS NATURAL BALANCE

How

in

FOR

AN

ENTIRELY NEW

EXPERIENCE IN LISTEN-

ING

TO RECORDED

MUSIC order these records from:

SOUNDS of our

TIMES

Route No

2

Stamford, Conn.

VII r,NG /WORDS

j. s. bath cantata

32

(

"liebster

Jesu, mein

Verlangen ") cantata

140

(

"wachet auf ") magda laszlo, soprano alfred poell, bass waldemar kmentt, tenor akademiechor hermann scherchen conducting the orchestra of the vienna state opera

WL5122

high

is

the HIGH

HIGH fidelity

1,

2.

3.

As high as the quality of the recording equipment.

As

As high as the standard high as the of operating technique. understanding of the engineers.

4. are

No higher than the fidelity played on today, but

.

.

. of the phonograph the records

Sounds of our

Times

LP Records will still be High Fidelity by for years to come. tomorrow's standards

. .

. and

Now, for the most critical listeners, there is available from

COOK

LABORATORIES, makers of fine recording equip- ment, an expanding catalog and sound stories. of the best in artists, repertoire,

The following are outstanding examples:

RAIL DYNAMICS No.

ro7o-

listed as one of the year by

Saturday Review of

Lit. of the best LP's

BAG PIPE PARADE No.

1025

N. Y. Times

XMAS MUSIC BOX No.

N. Y.

Times

"acoustical perspective ", roll

"astonishing fidelity,"

THE HARP (VITO) No.

1030. The N.

Y.

Times says this is

"how a harp really sounds."

Please send catalog of organ, piano, and other LP's.

LP

RECORDS ONLY: $4.00 each, plus

Soc postage

NAME

ADDRESS

63 www.americanradiohistory.com

concentration of all its seductive appa- ratus to a distressing, pompous melodrama, acquires a lurid, fascinating, unhealthy and rather obscene glow in its mock marriage to a devotion the composer never betrayed except under the spell of his own wondrous and repugnant music. The Bayreuth reali- zation makes the long- winded and pungent sacrilege an apprehensive but marvelous musico- dramatic experience.

In no other performance the that the writer can recall have presumptuous garrulities of

Gurnemanz,

Amfortas and Klingsor seemed so signifi- cant (temporarily) as in the beautiful ex- pression given to them by

Messrs. Weber,

London and Uhde. The choruses are ex- alted, and the

Knappertsbusch leadership extorts a deeply- glowing interweft of al- luringly insinuating, sensual and sensuous sounds. The Windgassen Parsifal is adequate and, if our Kundry experiences vocal diffi- culty in more than one place, she sounds fearsomely possessed in an unwholesomely convincing way. We are justified in saying that this is a rarely formidable perform- ance, and the unhappy pageantry is easily the most successful engineering of a

Bay- reuth effort that we have. The discs were made in public performance, and show some

- the usual disadvantages of the method coughs, falling objects and miscellane- ous unwanted sounds but these are less obtrusive here than often, while the other hazards confronting a difficult kind of recording have been rather remarkably cir- cumvented. Balance is very good, both of the interrelationship of orchestra, chorus and soloists, and in the proportions of the orchestra itself.

In the aromatic tum- bling surf of sound, detail is well if not surpassingly preserved, difficult muted strings are registered with smoothness, and timbre of the brass is more than satisfactory. Furth

- more, the curve used by the London engi- neers is controls. propitious for reproduction with a minimum of difficulty at the amplifer's

-

C.

G.

B.

WAGNER: Götterdämmerung; Siegfried's

Rhine Journey

STRAUSS: Don

NBC

I I

Juan

Orch.; Arturo Toscanini, cond.

Both on RCA

Victor i2-in.

LM

5

557. and

18 min.

The greatest Wagnerian verifies conductor living the distinction in a Rhine Journey in which the dark intensity of mood is borne by all the orchestral choirs with as- tounding and distinct precision. Toscanini seems to be the only man who can achieve both without reciprocal injury or injury to the whole. The Strauss, too, a vividly symmetrical is excellent in but unchastened out- pouring of rich sound which needs more bass reinforcement and less treble diminu- tion than most records.

-

C.

G.

B.

WAGNER: Lohengrin:

Love

Duet

Tannhäuser:

Introduction to

Act and Dich Teure Halle

II

Wesen

- donck Poems

Tiana Lemnitz, soprano, (and Franz

Völker in the Lohengrin).

Orch. of

Radio Berlin; Arthur Rother cond.,

(except in the Poems where Michael

Raucheisen is at

12

-in. the piano.) Urania

7059.

39 min. (all)

64

Here is evidence that the Lemnitz voice is recovering some of its glory. It shows a little strain at the top, but compelling beauty elsewhere.

The ageless Völker is still just we about as good a

German tenor as know and the Lohengrin

Duet here is superior to the Traubel- Baum -Rodzinsky version on Columbia

ML

4055 which is pretty good. The lVesendonck Poems in the rich Lemnitz delivery are not helped by the tired accompaniments provided by

Raucheisen; but Dich teure Halle, despite a little vocal unsteadiness, is electrifying. The is of the first order.

-

C. produced this disc

G.

B.

MISCELLANY

Songs of the Auvergne Songs at

School

Madeleine Grey, soprano. Orchestral accompaniment in the first; flute and piano in the second. Columbia 12-in.

ML

4459.

24 and

15 mins.

$5.45.

The

Songs of the

Auvergne, in

Madeleine

Grey's vital, ecstatic, unchallengeable il- lustration, were a

Columbia

78 rpm. classic.

In transfer to LP, improvement is to be no- ticed in every direction

- better bass, brighter treble, warmer tonality.

The charming folk songs assembled as

Songs at

School have eminence in affecting.

- not the same magisterial pre- interpretation, but are extremely

Owners of Miss Susan Reed's earnest struggle with the

Songs of the Auvergne, also on Columbia, may now melt

it.-

C.G.B.

FRENCH

ORGAN MUSIC

Catharine Crozier, Organ. Kendall

12

-in.

LP

2553.

59th and

17 mins.

An interesting group of modern organ corn

- positions excellently played by the Eastman

School ticularly of Music's Catharine Crozier. Par- notable is the variety of tonal effects required by the music and accom- plished by the musician.

Recording is outstanding; dynamic range exceptional.

Surfaces unusually quiet.

Compensation control settings of

300 and

-12 db should give good results.

Selections include:

Jean Langlais,

Hymne d'actions de graces

"Te

Deum

";

Marcel Dupré,

Variations sur un Noel;

Paul de Malein- greau,

Le

Tumulte au Prétoire; Olivier

Messiaen, Les Bergers

Jehan Alain, Litanies. and

-

Le

Banquet

C. F.

Céleste;

FUNT, ALLEN:

The

Candid

Mircophone,

Vols.

2

ML

4449 and and

3.

Columbia two

4450. $5.45 each.

12

-in.

Allen

Funt s brought many a laugh into millions of homes

Having some famous radio program has of the best of The Candid

Microphone series on records has the ad- vantage we of enabling us to repeat those which think are the funniest. We doubt that anyone will find all of these situations humorous.

That, as a matter of fact, is part a situations are funny to which people.

Recording is

- of the fun: play one or more sides to group

There two discs. of of the original AM broadcasts! are

- people; watch and good a total

C. F.

...

of considerably better

22 see

- selections on the

DON COSSACKS

ON PARADE

Serge Jaroff, cond. Columbia

12

-in.

ML

4473.

141/2 and

17 mins. $5.45.

An excellent recording

Cossacks of the likeable

Don

-a

group so widely traveled that almost everyone will have heard one or more of the selections on this record pre- sented in his local movie theater or high school auditorium. Columbia has done a commendable job in catching the spirit and the sound of the singers; as we listened to the record, we seemed to be right back in our Mahaiwe Theater, echo and all.

The record includes: Green Grass, Kalin- ka, In the

Don Valley, Dark Eyes, Two

Guitars, Along the

St.

Petersburg Road,

Old Waltz, Selection from

Songs, Scenes from "Life

Gretchaninov of the

Czar

".

CORRECTIONS TO LIST

OF RECORD COS.

In

HIGH

-FIDELITY

No.

3, we published a list of manufacturers of

LP records. Since then we have received a number of corrections and comments

. . .

American Music

Records,

5637

Ave., Chicago 22,

N. Ashland

Ill.-

Traditional jazz.

Arizona

Seventh Avenue, Phoenix, Ariz.

-

North

Produ- cers of Natay, Navajo

Singer, mentioned in column "Hither and Yon: this issue in the

Musically".

The company advises us:

"These same eight chants are available at

78 are rpm., all eight in one album. The records available in some music stores. Cost of the LP is bum, about $4.20; of the

78 rpm. al- about $5.75. As our distribution is not complete, records may be purchased direct from us where dealers do not have them in stock. We have to add postage charges."

A

Circle Records is listed for writes: jazz you would add

"We note that Circle

'and composers workshop'

- classical music with the accent on modern." recent Circle release, by Henry Cowell, is reviewed in this issue.

Dana

Music

Co. has a new address:

344

North

Ave.,

New Rochelle, N. Y.

Good

Time

Jazz

Record Co.,

Inc. has a new address: 8481

Melrose Place, Los

Angeles

46, Calif.

They write:

"We specialize in

New Orleans jazz, ragtime, Dixieland and blues.

The Firehouse Five Plus

Two are our leading artists.

We are not in the reissue field."

22,

Ill.

-

1637

N. Ashland Ave., Chicago

Jazz classics, original and reissued performance by principal jazzmen.

SPA

Records,

Inc., 422

Broadway, Saratoga

Springs, N. Y. is a new company in the

LP field. A few releases have been advertised but none has been received for review so far.

Further information in the next issue of

HIGH -FIDELITY.

Session at

Chicago 22,

Ill.

-

N. Ashland Ave.,

Selected performances from the annual Bix festival.

The Turntable, P.

28, curacy

- we

O. Box 622,

Hollywood

"In the interest of ac- would like to point out that we do not reissue swing records. Rather, we record our own material and release it for the benefit, mostly, of jazz collectors.

We feature Dixieland style but have recorded certain other things.

For example, four guitar solos by

George Van Eps, one of the great guitarists extant.

If we ever put this out on LP we would like to have your opinion." www.americanradiohistory.com

Designs for a

Corner

Enclosure

By

HOWARD

SOUTHER

AMAN once said about art "Away with your easels and chisels, your oils and chips, for these are hypo- critical rubbish! Show me only the finished pic- ture or the completed form."

True enough, perhaps

-

for indeed it is the finished picture which is important.

Nevertheless, without chisels and chips, there could be no completed form

...

no art.

So it is with the art of reproducing sound through loudspeaker systems. The genesis in this objective and over -simplified analysis. After all, we are dealing with that which is purely creative and subjective. But it follows that we cannot exclude a re- lationship, and therefore we may be permitted the prem- ises below:

RANGE: lus

The mind, through the ear, delights in the stimu- generated by frequencies which are mathematically of the art product is as important as the product itself. For it is only by understand- ing and using the processes of the art as tools that we can engage properly in syn-

Without a loudspeaker, we would have

no

sound. Given a good speaker, the difference between good and poor sound depends very largely

on

the cabinet or enclosure in which the speaker

thesizing the miracle

of

high fidelity sound.

We choose the word "synthesizing" pur- posely; it is not hard to achieve fidelity is

mounted.

One of

the most widely used enclosures in high fidelity

systems is

the

`

folded corner horn" design which

is over part synthesis

of

the audible spectrum, but the

of

all frequencies into high fidelity is another matter altogether.

Particularly, it is

discussed in

difficult to balance the low frequencies, the bass notes

of

an orchestra, with easy -to- reproduce middle and high frequen- cies. Since the purpose

of

this article is to delve into this problem and forced to offer practical solutions thereto, we are to concern ourselves in what follows with intri- cate and, at times, seemingly trivial techniques to achieve a basis of appreciation.

this article.

related, i.e., music as sound opposed to noise.

Noise is, in part,

of

random frequencies containing many odd

-order harmonics.

As the range

of

musical sounds increases, or covers a greater number

of

octaves, the sensations excited by the multiple combinations cause added pleasure.

It follows that the ultimate in range causes the largest mea- sure of auditory satisfaction.

It would seem first that we should justify the impor- tance of bass tones themselves.

By bass tones, we mean those frequencies comprising the first three octaves, from

16 to

13o cycles.

To bring out their importance, we must expand our field somewhat and consider the entire phenomenon

of

musical listening.

The Phenomenon of

Musical Listening

We shall brook no argument with the artist who disclaims the following dissection of musical composition, nor will we agree wholly with the engineer who may support us

The upper octaves are attained today in both commer- cial and custom built systems with relative ease.

The first three octaves up so easily to and including

13o cycles are not attained. These octaves have only recently be- come partially available in commercial sets; the very smoothest reproduction in these important octaves can be attained actually only by a custom built enclosure. It may be inferred from the foregoing that the conventional commercial speaker in most the usual enclosure with which

of

us are familiar, completely and totally misses all but the fringe

of

the lower octaves in the spectrum.

VOLUME

:

The wide range musical sensations to which we

65 www.americanradiohistory.com

have just referred gain in intensity and also in value as an emotional stimulus as the loudness is increased.

Be- cause these paragraphs deal with the importance of bass, it is proper that we over

40% should emphasize at this time that of the energy content in comprehensive orches- tral passages lies in the first three octaves. This fact may serve to explain why it is that the staccato impact of bass tones from drums and tom -toms serve to excite even savages into a state of emotion. This example points up the importance of the power and stimulus to be derived from the bass energy in the lower portion of the musical spectrum.

DYNAMICS:

Now let us consider the further effect of wide -range musical sounds, particularly the bass, whose loudness is increased through a succession of pre -climaxes, until a strong emotional impact is derived from crescendo with full bass complement followed by a sudden cessation to noiseless silence. This type of musical performance may be said to have a

"breathtaking" character, and is frequently found in music.

In cases such as these, the arrangement of the music has been carefully calculated by the composer to follow a pattern:

The gradual in- crease in physiological tension in ear, the brain through the the extreme frequency range which then permits the required variety, followed by the dynamic range which allows the buildup to crescendo, finally the sudden con- trasting relaxation and transition into absolute quiet

.

.

. it is not hard to appreciate that music reproduction with- out adequate range

- including bass response

- can be a totally unsatisfying thing and

of

very small value.

CONCLUSION: lusion

In achieving our goal of the complete il- of reality, range is of the utmost importance; it is required that we attempt to reproduce all the frequen- cies below

13o cycles.

A further requirement of para- mount importance is to reproduce this bass range with the original volume. A final necessity is to have the loud- speaker handle, in conjunction with the complementary equipment in the system, not only the soft passages with complete fidelity and clarity, sages.

This virtue we but also the fortissimo pas- might term the dynamic "range

- ability" of the speaker.

Until recently, sufficient attention has not been paid to these requirements

of

good listening; it is our purpose in the balance of this writing to disclose what can be done, and perhaps to point the way to the complete ac- complishment

of

adequate bass.

The Accomplishment of Better

Bass

If

we were simply to suspend a loudspeaker in the air and apply a series of low frequency tones to the diaphragm, we would find that a ig

-in. unit would begin to lose in volume level down from about

800 cycles (or the sixth octave) at a constantly accelerating rate.

Therefore, the operation of a speaker cannot be discussed without con- sideration of the enclosure in which it is to be placed.

This enclosure, whatever form it may take, acts as an acous- tic transformer; it couples the region of intense air pres- sure in the area of the cone to the very low

"impedance"

of

the surrounding air in the room in which the music

66 is being reproduced. The effectiveness with which this coupling is accomplished determines just how extended and how efficient the bass range of the speaker will be.

For instance, an

8 cu. ft. box with a r5 -in. speaker reproduces fairly evenly down to

120 cycles, where it falls off in its response to about

8o cycles, or just a little bit above the second octave. From then on, radiation prac- tically ceases.' The ear, however, is an unusually sensi- tive device and will disclose some signal below this second octave region, but of such low level, or attenuated to such a degree, as to be practically unusable. Another phenom- non which we observe is that, as the frequency continues to go down, instead of hearing a true low frequency fundamental tone, we hear only the second harmonic

of

the tone. This is a form of distortion which is to be avoided if at all possible.

Now, a wavelength tone in the middle of the second octave has a of about

320 ins.

In order to reproduce this tone properly, the low frequency speaker should be coupled to the air in the room through a horn whose mouth is one -quarter the size of this wavelength, or

8o inches!

Obviously, such dimensions preclude use horn in the living room; certainly a device of a straight

of

this size would have difficulty in finding a suitable the most spot in even sumptuous living quarters. But there are ways of circumventing this basic requirement

of

good bass reproduction. The corner of the room may be utilized

This is a midget

-size corner horn which utilizes speaker. an 8

-in.

It stands only 24 ins. high, has a sloping front panel, and requires about r% sq. ft. of floor space.

The walls of the room are used as an ex- tension of the speaker hoan

. as an extension of a horn whose mouth can be concealed in a small furniture cabinet of pleasing proportions. Four such cabinets are described in this article.

The ability to reproduce the extreme bass is approximately the same for each insofar as concerns range. A virtue of the larger units is the refinement possible in design discontinuities in the flare to effect fewer of the horn.

A concomitant advantage lies in the ability of the larger enclosure to house a larger low frequency speaker, thus permitting a more efficient, as well as a smoother, system. This effi- ciency improves reproduction of the dynamic range which

'For further material on this subject, see the article in this issue by G. A.

Briggs. www.americanradiohistory.com

we treated earlier, and the larger magnets used in bigger speakers make possible the increased volume which is is required for the more complete illusion.

For those music

-lovers and high fidelity enthusiasts who find it possible to engage in some construction and building in, an alternative method of designing the neces- sary horn for better reproduction is suggested in several illustrations. With the larger horn, it is possible to in- crease the bass range over the smaller corner horn en- closures. Through this means, an extension

of

range well into the first octave, down to i6 cycles, is possible.

These larger horns are patterned after the folded horns found behind theater screens and form an almost ideal enclosure.

So far, the theater horns deliver the smoothest, most distortion

-free response that the art has been able to

produce.

Considerations in

Reproducing

Complete Bass

We have previously stated reality requires that the complete illusion that the original level

of of

the music be re- produced.

For an 80-piece orchestra, this offers some complication in the smaller living room, and in particu- lar for those living rooms which are in apartment houses.'

The necessity for reducing the maximum level becomes apparent. This dictates, then, that we consider a biological requirement

of

the human ear. As the intensity

of

a wide range source of sound is decreased, we find that the sen- sitivity of the ear at the extremes of the spectrum begins to fall off quite rapidly. Consequently, if the intensity

2However, range or fidelity characteristics even of average LP records.

3The the sound fed into most theaters seldom approaches the frequency author's tendency to understatement is apparent here)

-

Editor.

-

Editor.

At the left is pictured a typical, medium size corner enclosure.

It is intended for use either with a single speaker, preferably of the coaxial type, or with two speakers, one of which is a tweeter. The sketch gives an idea of internal construction.

The cabinet above is with zz -in. speakers available commercially for use and stands

3o ins. high. An identical design stands

37 ins. high and is for use with z5 -in. speakers.

This is one of the largest corner de- signs.

It stands

5 ft. high and utilizes

5 speakers. Note that, unlike the other corner designs illustrated, the low frequencies do not radiate di- rectly into the room. Sound from it is forced through a long,

"horn" path. www.americanradiohistory.com

67.

level of a large orchestra is reduced to the point where it may be heard comfortably in a living room, we find that the music sounds rather thin and attains a pinched or squeezed effect.

This is occasioned by the apparent loss of the high end, and extreme attenuation

of

the bass register. To restore the semblance

of

reality lost by decreasing

This may be the volume, the bass must be reinforced. done to a degree in the amplifier which forms part of the reproducing system.

The amplifier, however, can do only part

of

the job.

It is necessary that the speaker be able to translate the additional elec- trical energy supplied by the amplifier into audible bass response.

In recognition of this characteristic of the ear,

Paul

Klipsch, the noted acoustics engineer, introduced a special cavity behind the driver cone.

In conjunction with the compliance of the cone material itself, this permits a decided reinforcement of the entire bass range, thus help- ing to restore the feeling of reality lost by the insensitivity of the ear at the lower levels of operation. This same principle plicable of enclosing the back of the driver cone is ap- to folded horn systems of the non

-corner type, provided that special drivers, or speakers, are employed.

These drivers are designated as

"Klipsch" type units, and two manufacturers produce such drivers.*

Through these means, a very practical horn -loaded bass reproducing system for the home can be designed.

Application

The vast majority reason or

of

individuals are not able, for one another, to alter the architectural design of their living room to accommodate a wide range, high fidel- ity loudspeaker system. In this case, their choice for the ultimate in bass reproduction is limited to corner designs.

The critical listener will observe the superiority in range and cleanliness over bass -reflex type the conventional and rather boomy of enclosure.

The complete absence of artificiality is

For apparent at the first listening. the discriminating listener who has the means to alter his listening room, di wings are available which show the design and construction type horn system

of

the ideal theater

- mentione.i here and elaborated upon in a previous issue of

HIGH-

FIDELITY.

EDITOR'S NOTE:

Complete working drawings for the de- signs shown on author these pages may be obtained by writing the at

Electro- Voice, Inc., Buchanan, Mich.

+Stephens and Electro-Voice.

At the right is a sketch of the internal construction of the theater -type horn illustrated below.

This loudspeaker system was described in detail in HIGH

-

FIDELITY No.

4.

It is shown again in this article because it represents close to if not the ultimate in sound reproduction, and because it utilizes the Klipsch principles normally applied to corner horns of the type illustrated on the preceding pages.

68 www.americanradiohistory.com

ROM

ACOUSTICS

By

G.

A.

BRIGGS

EDITOR'S PROLOGUE:

In this article of his series,

Mr. Briggs under- takes to discuss one of the most complex problems of sound repro- duction: room acoustics.

In the pages alloted to him, it is impossible to do more than to cover a few basic principles general suggestions. and to make a few

Readers should remember that, in the home, once the sound leaves the loudspeaker, it is diffused throughout the room.

It is then reflected by some surfaces, such as plaster and wood, and absorbed by others, such as rugs everything is different and drapes. To make matters complicated, all at once!

The degree of absorption, for instance, depends not only on the material but also on the frequency or pitch of the sound. Thus, an

Axminster rug absorbs six times as much of the loudness of the highest note on the piano as it does of middle

C.

Similarly, low frequency sounds spread out from the loudspeaker in all directions, whereas the high frequencies travel almost in a straight line.

This is the reason, by the way, for the flared horns on tweeters

(to spread out the sound as much as pos- sible), and for the requirement that tweeters be aimed at the listening area.

We might be able to paint a word picture of the relative hash of sound which arrives loudspeaker, at our ears after it has been emitted by the then bounced back and forth from wall to ceiling to floor and back to wall, meanwhile amounts by drapes, chairs, being and the like

- absorbed in varying but Mr. Briggs does it more clearly with a few well- chosen oscillograms. Suffice it to that the sound eventually gets tired of bouncing around say here and

We

6o is attenuated until mention this specific reduction to z

/z,000th decibels

- because it has but z

/z,000th acousticians have of its decided

- or that a loudness. drop of the length of time it takes for a given sound to die away to that extent in a room is the reverberation time of the room for a specified frequency.

Reverberation time varies

(of course!) with frequency, as shown in some of Mr. Briggs' charts. Incidentally

-if

frequency is not specified in connection with reverberation time, the frequency is assumed to be 512 cycles per second

(C above middle

C).

Ideal reverberation time depends on several factors, including type of sound and, most important, the size of the room. Knudsen and Harris' show that optimum reverberation time, in a room of zo,000 cu. ft.

(for example,

3o by 42 ft., with an

8-ft. ceiling), ranges from

0.7 sec. for speech to

1.35 secs. for organ music.

For average music, the secs. range is from

1.2 secs. in a room of zo,000 cu. ft. to

1.7 for an auditorium with a size of i,000,000 cu. ft.

Too long a reverberation time causes sound blur, way, because if we may express it that a second sound will reach the listener before the first has had a chance to die away.

Too short a time results in a dead sounding room.

Generally speaking, a reverberation time of

I. o sec. or slightly less is a good figure for the average living room.

We have discussed reverberation time it is a prime concept in acoustics at some length, because and is referred to repeatedly by

Mr.

Briggs.

If readers would like to delve deeper into the subject, we can recommend the Knudsen and

Harris book mentioned above.

Although tecture, the

Further, it is concerned fundamentally with non- domestic archi- principles apply equally to the home listening room. it keeps the technicalities to a minimum. technical textbook is:

Lawrence

E.

Kinsler and

A standard,

Austin

R.

Frey,

"Fundamentals of Acoustics" (John

Wiley, 1950).

MANY of us have only recently begun to realise the importance of the part played by room, studio and concert hall acoustic conditions in providing us with enjoyable sound. It is true that we are mainly concerned here with the reproduction

of

music in the home, but a gen- eral survey of the whole field should help in the understand- ing of any particular problem.

Conditions at

Source

The

Royal Festival Hall, London, completed in 1951, pro- vides us with the latest and largest experiment in acoustics.

The work done here seems to prove that once echo and re- verberation characteristics have been controlled, and good diffusion achieved, a large enclosed space can give satis- factory production

of

speech, song, solo instrument, chorus and orchestra not only for the audience in the hall but for radio listeners as well. The response characteristics

of

the hall are shown in Fig.

1.

Listening experience. to music in the Festival Hall is a refreshing

It will be noted that the reverberation time averages close on

2 secs. and only falls off by about o.5 sec. at 1o,000 cycles. This, coupled with good diffusion, accounts for the remarkable brilliance and clarity achieved.

It would be in-

3

82

HALL EMPTY

HALL teresting to lis-

FULL`` ten to a play in the Hall; the

8

1 brilliance o

f

No

30 100

CYCLES

1000

5000

PER SECOND

10K the "response" would surely

Fig. z.

Reverberation time curves

Royal Festival

Hall in London.' for the add life to the performance.

The average theatre is heavily damped, with quency response and a poor high fre- short reverberation period. The result is that all voices sound rather dull.

I think that the improved acoustics associated with studio performances broadcast plays have contributed largely to their

of

popularity.

It is interesting to compare

Fig. r with the graph,

Fig.

2, which shows reverberation time against volume for the pre- ferred studios at the B.B.C.

Two large concert halls with good acoustics are included,

'Vern

O. Knudsen and Cyril M. Harris: "Acoustical

Designing in Architec- ture". Wiley

1950.

'Reproduced from

Nature,

Hall, by P. H. Parkin.

18

Aug.

1951:

Acoustics of the Royal Festival

69. www.americanradiohistory.com

to indicate that large orchestral studios are equivalent to concert halls with audience.

In a paper to the Building Research Congress 1951, it was pointed out by Mr. T. Somerville of the B.B.C. that a concert hall which has good acoustics for the audience is

O.

I i i

Ó

OT

OO

O o nf

O

Q

N

Ó

N

O

N

O

VOLUME. CUBIC

FEET

8

N u q

ó

N o o r- o

ó

Fig.

2.

M

Reverberation time plotted against volume, B.B.C. studios.'

-Music

studios

G--

General purpose studios

T

-Talks

C-

studios

Concert halls always for good for broadcasting, as the conditions necessary broadcasting are exactly those required for good listen- ing conditions in the hall.

The effect paper

- is of studio treatment clearly shown in Fig.

3.

- described in the same

The original construc- tion consisted of building board on walls and ceiling, the

The reverberation curve floor being concrete and carpet. was as shown at

A.

The treatment was on the following lines.

A woodblock floor was laid. Reverberation time at low frequencies was reduced by fitting membrane absorbers. These are shallow

20

1.B

1.6

14

1.2

1.0

1.8

0.60

'11

\

N

0

\;

\\

\_i

i'\

\

\

:

\-:s`

i

..

C

.

\

\ \

\

\

\

ó

N

Lc) o

O

FREQUENCY

IN

CYCLES

PER SECOND

Fig.

3.

Effect of acoustic before treatment. B: treatment on reverberation time. Curve A: after treatment, no carpet.

C: carpet added. box structures covered with linoleum or bituminous paper roofing material which resonate at frequencies up to

500 cycles and so absorb the sound waves.

(Thin plywood panels may be similarly used.)

High frequency response was improved by painting the walls and ceiling, and scatter- ing of sound was achieved by fitting rectangular diffusers, which are preferred by the

B.B.C. to the cylindrical or spher- ical forms of irregularity widely adopted in American studios. sFigs.

2 and

3 from

Somerville. All

228.6d. from

Report papers of Building Research Congress, given at this

1951.

Paper by

Congress are available in book form

T. at the Secretary, Building Research Station, Watford, Herta., Eng.

70

Listening Conditions

I suspect that the reader will already have begun to wonder why this article is headed Room Acoustics instead of

Studio Design. It seems to me that it is necessary to learn something about acoustic treatment in general before we can begin to understand the domestic problem. Further- more, there is always the possibility of taking a leaf out of the professional's book and applying modifications in the home, although it will not be easy to pass off three or four rectangular diffusers as beauty treatment, and membrane absorbers would be even worse!

For domestic listening, a reverberation period of just below one second is usually considered right.

I asked

Dr.

L.

E. C.

Hughes of London to calculate the period for the conditions of my own music room. He found it came out on the dead side and suggested we should increase the height.

(By comparison, fitting rectangular diffusers would be chicken feed.)

It should be remembered that ideal reverberation time without good diffusion' is unsatisfactory, but the calcu- lations by

Dr.

Hughes are given here, as they may form a guide to readers who would like to assess and

/or

improve their own listening conditions.

CALCULATION

OF

REVERBERATION

Room

15 by 34 by

Formula:

T

=

V io ft.

/2oaS

PERIOD where: T is reverberation time in seconds

V a s

=

volume of room in cubic feet

=

absorption coefficient of each area

=

square feet of each area

Absorption

Material

Carpet

Panelling

Ceiling

&

Walls

Curtains

Settee, estimated

2

Easy

Chairs, estimated

3

Cushions, estimated

Bookcase, estimated

Piano, estimated

4

Humans

Coefficient

O. I

0.05

0.075

0.2

Sabinsb

20

38

35

16

3o

16

6

2

2 r6

161

T

=

v

/2oas

=

2240/2o x 161

=

0.7o seconds

Removing the carpet would increase

T to o.8o sec.

Dispensing with the settee and the easy chairs would bring the reverberation time up to about

1 sec.

This would be ideal for piano playing in the room, but its advantages for reproduced music are less certain. In an effort to compensate for average home listening conditions, a dis-

4Diffusion is the scattering of the sound throughout the room.

OA all their absorption coefficients such as music room has an area of which means

200 sabin is

1 sq. materials at

Knudsen and Harris, sq. ft. as

20 sq. chairs, various frequencies; any standard gives about them. For

200 sq. ft. example,

Its absorption coefficient is

0.10, that it absorbs

10% of the sound. 10% of

200 is 20 humans, and bookcases, which cannot be sorption coefficients, sound of of Mr. Briggs' ft. of a of sabins is ft. of surface which is 100% sound absorptive. Practically construction and furnishing have

10% efficient rug

100% efficient sound demonstrated the must be converted to the equivalent absorptivity of in room the table, and contents absorbs can be been tested to determine reference work, rug in Mr. Briggs'

-which brings us to the figure of

20 sabins. "20 sabins" is a quick way of saying that the same amount of sound absorber. The usefulness of the concept where masses (instead easily rated of computed. of areas) such in terms of areas so as ab- the total www.americanradiohistory.com

tant microphone technique is now usually adopted as giving a realistic reproduction

of

the acoustics of the studio.

This perspective, as it were, is brought into the listening room, and calls for comparatively dead conditions for best results.

Ambience or

Room Tone

Recordings made under large hall or open air conditions reproduce very well in small rooms. On the other hand, recorded ambiences of small rooms gives most unsatis- factory results when reproduced in larger rooms or halls.

This fact is forcibly demonstrated by a few special re- cordings made by

C. E.

Watts in his lounge at Sunbury on Thames. Recordings

of

his piano reproduced along side the actual instrument are quite indistinguishable from the original, yet the same recordings played in a larger hall produce effects of wow. On the other hand, a recording

of tug

-boat noises made on the Thames from room effects

-

- obviously free reproduces with startling reality in lecture hall seating

30o a people or in the music room

(mine) condemned by Dr.

Hughes because the ceiling is too near the floor.

Eigentones

There is, in the simplest case, resonance between parallel walls when the distance between the walls is an integral number of half wavelengths. Thus, in the room under discussion, there will be resonances or eigentones7 as follows:

Distance be-

Wave

- tween walls length r

6 ft.

14 ft.

I o ft.

32 ft.

28 ft.

2

0 ft.

Resonant Frequencies

L/2

2L /2

34.5

39.5

55

69

79

to

3L/2

94

I28

164

The main resonances therefore extend from about

34 cycles to

164 cycles.

The effect recording of such eigentones is clearly heard in any

of

speech made in a small, untreated room.

Diffusion

Scattering is the use of irregular surfaces in the distribution of sound to produce diffusion. Adequate diffusion re- sults in uniform distribution

of

sound energy in the en- closed space. Theatres and concert halls used to be with ornate interiors which greatly improved built the acoustics by ville dispersing sound. It is pointed out by Mr. Somer- that rectangular diffusers are effective down to fre- quencies where the dimensions are only

1/7 of a wave-

lengths

Thus a raised surface

3 ft. long would be ef- fective down to about

5o cycles.

"Ambience is the general tonal characteristic of a room.

A recording made in the open air includes no recorded ambience.

Microphone placement in a room, distance from sound source, and type of microphone (cardioid, etc.) all deter- mine the extent, nature, and modification of the reproduced ambience.

A small room can produce most objectionable results.

7Eigentones are condition all the resonances produced would be a cube, as directions. The the by parallel walls resonance frequencies would be the lowest resonance occurs at half a in a room. The worst sane in wavelength. For instance, at

40 cycles, the wavelength is about

28 ft. Thus a room

14 by

14 by

14 ft. would have a pronounced resonance or eigentone at

40 cycles, the harmonics of

80 and

120 cycles. plus diagonal resonances at and others

57, 70 at cycles, etc.

As the size of an enclosed space is increased. the resonant frequencies are owered and take longer to build up; they are, therefore, less objectionable. a

Room resonances and standing waves are intensified by rectangularly shaped room.

As nearly all rooms are square or oblong, it is good to learn that acoustic treat- ment as already outlined overcomes these defects.

Oscillograms

It is one thing to read about eigentones, standing waves, diffusion, etc., but it is quite another problem to under- stand exactly what they mean and how they affect our own conditions of listening.

Without some such interpreta- tion, the questions are only

of

academic interest to the average listener.

In my last article in this journal,

I demonstrated how the performance

of

a loudspeaker can be recorded by passing a slowly moving film in front of an oscilloscope and photo- graphing the result.

I think the system is even more effective in recording the effects

of

room conditions, to give a picture of the behaviour of sound waves in a given room, and also to observe how the performance

of

a loud- speaker is affected by such conditions.

Before going any further,

I should like to make it quite clear that

I am not suggesting that listening rooms should be converted into studios; we are accustomed to listening in ordinary rooms and excessive acoustic treatment might produce "unnatural" results. (We must preserve some of our illusions!)

Standing

Waves

The following tests were made in a room approximately

16 by

15 by

91/2 ft. high. Walls and ceiling were covered in beaver board and painted; the wooden floor was covered by linoleum. Contents were mainly office furniture and test equipment. The room is very much "livelier" than the normal living room, with very good high frequency re- sponse.

The sound source was an audio frequency oscillator with flat output from

20 to 16,000 cycles.

For the first set of tests a corner speaker system was used: a

15

-in. bass unit in a

9 cu. ft. ble brick -built reflex enclosure with an

8

-in. tre- unit and crossover at

1,000 cycles. (Flat response over

8 or

10 octaves is was t8 not claimed here.)

Power input volts at

15 ohms, equal to about

4 watts.

The microphone was moved across the room in three directions

A, B and

C as indicated in Fig.

4 at a height

of

3 ft., and the sound level was photographed on the mov- ing film.

14

Various frequencies were used. A selection of the most significant results is reproduced in

Figs.

5, 6, 7, and

8.

The frequency is marked on each oscillogram. The distance covered was to ft. across the room in two directions, and ft. diagonally.

The following observations can be made:

1.

There is a position near the centre of the room where

5o

-cycle sounds is almost inaudible, in spite

of

the fact that human beings have two ears and only one microphone bWavelength in feet equals 1,129 divided by the frequency.

90ver here, we shall have to find the

60 -cycle dead spot. Ed.

71 www.americanradiohistory.com

was used. choice

Hum nuisance can often be reduced by suitable of listening position.

2.

The difference in sound level at maximum and

5o cycles between minimum is 25 db. At 4o cycles, there is a peak mation of

35 db in one location, which suggests the of an eigentone. for-

3.

Dead spots occur at other frequencies in different positions. The distance be- tween these nodes is halv- ed, in theory, as frequency is raised an octave. The

16

FEET

9PEAKER

A condition here is, of course, affected by reflections from different surfaces.

4.

The nodes of mini- mum sound are caused by out

-of -phase effects from reflected waves of sound.

C

I5

FEET

5.

As a rule, the max- imum amplitudes at low frequency are near a wall.

Fig.

4.

Plan of test room, with direction of microphone travel.

It will be appreciated by the reader that the effects pictured are produced by the specified location of the loudspeakers. Moving the sound source will result in different pheno- mena.

So far as maximum amplitude at low frequencies is concerned, say from

3o to

5o cycles, tests seem to indicate that the corner position is the best, but as our brick reflex is a fixture, we cannot be dogmatic here. Mr.

C.

E.

Watts

(I do not mind bringing him in be- cause he has nothing to sell!) certainly attains realistic reproduction of piano, harpsichord, cello, and music box by speaker in standing his loud- the position originally occupied by

Fig.

6. the instrument, but this is a counsel of perfection which is beyond the reach of most of us.

Incidentally, the speaker system in question has become known as the

"Watts

Folly" and consists of two i

5

-in. cloth- surround units mounted in back -to -back reflex cabinets with sand

-filled panels, crossover at i,000 cycles with

8 and

5 in. units con- nected in parallel on small baffles facing downwards at a distance of about

8 ins. above the reflex enclosure. The whole structure is in any mounted on runners and can be placed position for exciting eigentones at unusual points, often with startling results.

Fig.

5.

40

CYCLES

40

CYCLES

50

CYCLES

Sound level as microphone traveled in Direction

A.

50

CYCLES

Sound level as microphone traveled diagonally, Direction

B.

50

CYCLES

60

CYCLES

120

CYCLES

Fig.

7.

Sound level, at three low frequencies, as microphone was moved across room in

Direction

C,

Fig.

4.

Di,c.ence of travel: about so ft.

72

600

CYCLES

1000

CYCLES

5000

CYCLES

Fig.

8.

For these oscillograms, the microphone was moved as in

Fig.

7, but the sound level was analyzed for much higher frequencies. www.americanradiohistory.com

Room

Effects on Loudspeaker Performance

The next batch of oscillograms, Figs.

9 through

15, is re- lated to one

8

-in. speaker. This unit was mounted in different ways and placed in different positions in the test room already described. Oscillograms of response up to

50o cycles were reaching effects taken. If any reader still doubts the far

- of mounting and of location on the low frequency performance of any loudspeaker, these pictures should help to dispel the illusion once and for all.

It is quite impossible in the space

of

an article to interpret or explain all the effects produced.

We must content ourselves with brief comments, leaving the reader to draw his own conclusions.

One high frequency response curve is included as a matter of general interest.

The oscillograms show the behaviour of a typical

8

-in. speaker.

Corrugated cone suspension; main resonance

75 cycles.

Microphone was kept

12 ins. on axis in all cases.

Input was 3.5 volts at

12 ohms, equal to about r watt.

Impedance source

8 ohms (triodes in push -pull); flux density

13,000 lines.

The main points of interest are embraced in the comments under the oscillograms.

At high frequencies, room reflections are rapid and fre- quent. It would be necessary to take a large number curves to establish a criterion

of

performance and

of

assess- ment. In this case, reflection at high frequency had been intensified by painting the walls and ceiling. Small holes

3/32

I or in. diameter drilled in the beaver board at distances of

i'h

ins. would absorb sound at frequencies above

500 cycles and would reduce reflection.

It is, of course, well known that carpets and soft furnishings have a similar effect.

The behaviour of sound in an enclosed space is a vast subject.

These investigations do no more than touch the fringe of it.

If they also touch the imagination of the reader and help him to understand some of the problems associated with his own sound reproducing conditions, they serve their purpose.

30 50

100

200

500

Fig.

9.

Speakers mounted on 2

Note the severe loss of bass result of ft. baffle, which starts placed in centre of room. around

200 cycles as a small baffle area, incidentally cancelling cone resonance and removing frequency doubling. Suitable mounting for clean reproduction of speech.

30 50 100 200

500

Fig. ro. conditions. up to 75 cycles. high flux

Speaker mounted in window,

There density facing outside

The bass resonance is almost of are traces of frequency doubling the magnet-

1.3,00o lines. for free and

-field trebling damped out by the

EDITOR'S

EPILOGUE:

We have Mr. Briggs at a definite disadvantage. Because he has been doing a very con- siderable amount of research in preparation for each manu- script, he is forced to mail off his articles too close to editorial deadline for us to submit our comments for his approval. Hence, we are able to write prologues and epi- logues to our heart's content.

Thus we come to the end of this article with the feeling of "Where now, little man

?" We have been presented with a comprehensive outline

of

major acoustic considerations.

We have been shown the effect from one of moving our armchair position to another

(Figs.

5 through

8) and of moving the speaker cabinet (Figs.

9 through

15.)

It is all the too obvious that such operations will drastically alter sound we hear, although we must remember that

Mr.

Briggs' oscillograms make variations in apparent than they would be to sound any except far more the most critical ear.

30

50

100

200

500

Fig. rr.

Speaker mounted in matched reflex cabinet, placed in corner of room. room reflections

The corner position helps to produce a rise in reflex output below

5o cycles.

The severe dips

26o cycles are probably phase cancellation at

220 cycles. at effects. about

Note rio and start of

30 50 100 200 500

Fig.

12.

Same more central as

Fig.

II, but cabinet position shows room reflections

The go-cycle hump of Fig.

ri

placed

4 ft. from corner. The at about roo cycles. has disappeared.

73 www.americanradiohistory.com

So where do we go from here? First, let's stand around in various spots with our heads cocked learnedly to one side and listen.

Pick a phonograph record which has as many separate sounds as possible.

Ideally, the record should be a frequency test record such as

Cook Labora- tories Io

-LP.10

(Warning: repeated use of this record is guaranteed to drive all members of the family out to the movies!) sary, try

If something more musical is deemed neces-

Britten's

Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra on

Columbia LP

ML

4197. Careful listening tests of this sort may indicate a better spot for that favorite armchair.

Second, if the sound seems to be really bad, try moving

10Cook

Laboratories, R

-2,

Stamford, Conn.

30

50 100

200

500

Fig.

13.

Same as Fig. xx,

Room effects swamp the representation of what we but cabinet picture here. placed normally hear. in centre

Probably a of room. fairly true

30 50 100

200

500

Fig. x4.

Speaker mounted as for

Fig. ix but taken outside for free field response.

There is obviously a complete absence of room effects.

Some

The main cone

-cabinet resonance occurs at

75 cycles. frequency doubling, but less than shown in Fig. to. the speaker cabinet

- into a corner if it's not already there.

(Cooperation of the distaff side can be secured by sug- gesting that the sofa would look better if moved

6 ins. nearer the fireplace.

Such a shift will require complete rearrangement of all other furniture in the room including, incidentally, the speaker cabinet.)

Third, get out paper and pencil and figure reverbera- tion time.

If it's long, how's about some new drapes?

Or some bookshelves along that blank wall?

Or a new and larger rug, with a pad under it? So you will know what to buy (or to take out, if the reverberation time is short), here is a list of absorption coefficients, copied from

Knudsen and Harris:

Material

Carpets, lined

Carpets, unlined

Carpet, rubber, on concrete

Cotton fabric,

14 oz. per sq. yd., draped to half its area

Cotton fabric, as above, draped. to

%

Draperies, velours.

18 oz. per sq. yd. its area

Draperies, as above, draped to half their area

Linoleum, on concrete floor

Oregon

Pine Flooring

Ozite 0.39 lb. per sq. ft.

Absorption

Coefficient

.25

.15

.o8

.49

.15

.35

55

.03

.o8

.20

Brick wall, unpainted

Glass

Interior stucco, smooth finish, on tile

Plaster, lime, sand finish, on metal lath

Poured concrete, unpainted

Wood sheathing, pine

Wood veneer, on

2

X

3 wood studs,

16 ins. o.c.

Description

Chair, American loge, fully upholstered in mohair

Chair, plywood seat, plywood back; seats up

Person, adult

Person, child, high school

Person, child, grammar school

Total

Sound

Absorption in sabins

4.5 o.24

4.2

3.8

2.8

.03

.03

.04

.o6

.02

.I0

.I2

30

50

100 200

500

500 1000 2000

5000 10.000

15.000

Fig. i y.

Speaker mounted in

9 cu. ft. brick corner reflex.

The benefits are clearly shown, and can indeed be heard in a normal listening test.

74 www.americanradiohistory.com

Ar-CoupIers.

. .

and such

is

CORRESPONDENCE about

Air Couplers continues to be heavy. Two questions predominate: what to do with the

Coupler, when floor or wall mounting impossible, and, since when were rulers marked in thirds

of

an inch?

The last question refers to the drawing in

HIGH -FIDELITY

No

3.

Design

of

the

Air Coupler called for dividing

13 inches into three equal spaces.

According to our calcula- tions, we that resulted in a figure of

4 calculated, and published,

1/3 ins. without first

Unfortunately, consulting with the manufacturers

They are of rulers, measuring sticks, and tapes. uncooperative in the matter of thirds.

To answer the last group of questions first, Fig.

I gives dimensions, in orthodox measures, of all parts of the

Air

Coupler. Note that the dimensions are based on use of

4

I..-- e3 floor space saved. But what can be

Coupler when such done with the Air

"structural" mounting is impossible?

Bookcases seem to be a popular answer, judging from what readers tell us. For instance,

John

Gaylor of

South

Bend sent us a photograph of his solution to the problem,

Fig.

2.

He writes, "My equipment consists of an RC

-io

AM -FM tuner, a

Webster- Chicago record player using

Pickering pickups, and a

Williamson amplifier which

I built. The amplifier and separate power unit are mounted

I

141

FRONT PANELS

72

22 V e

S

1/8

4 3/8 tttttt

'4

1/4

3/31/8

43

1/4

4

3/B

INTERNAL CONSTRUCTION. ALL PIECES 41/2

INS. WIDE h1O v2-.I a

3/e

.1.-4.

,O

A aó

7-

14 v2

J e

10

3/4--1

72

BACK PANEL WITH

HOLE FOR

12

-IN.

SPEAKER

NOTE: 1.MATERIAL OF CONSTRUCTION.

PLYWOOD

3/4 -IN.

THICK

2. ALL DIMENSIONS

IN

INCHES

Fig z.

Revised drawing of dual

Air

Coupler shows all dimensions.

3A

-in. plywood throughout. If wood

of

a different thick- ness is used, the dimensions will change; similarly, if the

Air

Coupler is installed in which requires the floor or in any other location changing the overall width

of

16 ins., the internal sizes will also change.

oNE

OF the big advantages of the

Air

Coupler is that it can be mounted in the floor, wall, or ceiling.

In this way, the large speaker cabinets required for correct repro- duction of low frequencies can be eliminated and valuable

Fig.

z

Attractive and practical bookcase houses an Air

Coupler. behind the lower bookshelf on the opposite end from the tuner.

All components are mounted on

'/-in.

thick sponge rubber. The speaker in the

Air Coupler is a

GE

Si 201 and the other speaker is an Electro -Voice i2 -in. radax.

The knick- knacks and the clock on top are on felt pads. It is seldom that

I notice any rattle from them."

Edward

Johnston, of

Rochester, Minn., sent us photo- graphs of an unusually interesting installation which em- ploys two Air Couplers.

Figs.

3 and

4 should make the arrangement

of

the units clear.

Dr.

Johnston writes,

"Many an eager hi

-fi enthusiast has run headlong into the battle of the sexes on attempting to smuggle an adequate speaker cabinet into the living room. My wife is a lovely lady who admits to

27 years of determined living: determined not to have a speaker cabinet in her living room. There was no change in her determination when

I added a tweeter to my dual- speaker,

18 watt Magnavox.

A magnetic pickup seemed a complete waste

of

money to her more -than- slightly tone -deaf ears.

But oh!

What a change when

I purchased two Western Electric i2

-in. speakers and in- stalled them in a separate

7 cu. ft. bass reflex cabinet!

"Soon after receiving the ultimatum that either the speaker cabinet or my own, comfortable, easy chair had go,

I received the Winter issue to

of

HIGH-

FIDELITY.

With feverish excitement (over 98.6

F. to you)

I scanned the

75 www.americanradiohistory.com

Fig.

3.

Front of double Air Coupler bookcase before covering the mid

-range speaker and tweeter compartment with grille cloth. article and plans for the duplex

Air Coupler. As

I glanced about the room from where

I was sitting on the floor,

I noted with new interest the large homemade bookcase left by the previous owners of the house. After a thorough discussion

I of the project between the two of us

(to which listened attentively),

I undertook the construction of two

Air Couplers.

"Breaking several established rules of basic sound repro- duction as prescribed in the

Air Coupler article,

I placed the openings of the two cabinets, one at either end of the

"Arrival of the bookcase in the living room was an event

I shall never forget. First,

I had to dismantle the top shelf to get it up the basement stairs.

The look of horror on my loving wife's face as she saw its size was somewhat softened when

I carried the old speaker cabinet to the base- ment. Her only comment was,

'Don't

you think it looks better in here with that chair in the corner where the speaker cabinet used to be

?'

She also told me that if the marked vibration of the walls, set up by the organ pedal tones on the record

I was using to test the bass response, were to knock one of her scenic Wedgewood plates from the wall, there would be no reason to keep an incomplete set.

The remaining plates would be broken over a convenient block of solid ivory.

"The placement of the speakers has worked out very well.

Without any noticeable separation of the various ranges carried by the different speakers, there still remains a quality of naturalness and breadth that is lacking in single- source or tightly clustered multiple- speaker arrangements.

"The ending of this story is a happy one. Marital bliss is again established and high fidelity reigns, if not supreme, at least in a position of importance (still in the living room, too!).

A loudness control has reduced the volume to a sensible level with continued full range reproduction and aural balance. Local hi

-fi enthusiasts

(a rapidly enlarging group) marvel at the quality of reproduction and take a second look at their expensive amplifiers and speakers, the latter in compromised and inadequate cabinets for the most part."

FINALLY, here is a sketch arrangement used by O.

C. of the folded

Air

Coupler

Hoggren in

Chicago, Fig.

4.

He reports that it works very well, and it certainly saves space.

We hope readers will to the problems mounting.

-C.F.

continue to send us their solutions of equipment

(as well as

Air Coupler)

PORT

CONE

FOR PEAR

RADIATION

B"

Fig. q.

View of the edged with felt radiations out rear of double

Air

Coupler. Note the partitions which fit tightly against the wall, leading the back around the middle range horn type speaker. bookcase.

I also arranged one cabinet behind the other, staggering them only enough to leave room for the speaker on the rear exactly of the front cabinet. The two cabinets the same with the exception of were the internal parti-

tims.

These were modified in one cabinet to produce air columns of six and nine feet, thereby flattening frequency response even further. The two Air Couplers were then fastened together securely with straight irons, and a liberal dose of furniture glue applied to the opposing surfaces.

University Cobra -t2 speaker was placed in the center

A of the first shelf for a middle -range speaker. The small tweeter was mounted directly above this,

Fig.

3.

76

PORT FOR

FRONT

CONE RADIATION

S-

Fig. g. to

1/2'

SIDE VIEW WITH SIDE PANEL

REMOVED

Folded Air Coupler designed by O.

C.

Hoggren. www.americanradiohistory.com

ae"

.

P mootb eoou& s

I

mas tecetse

AT%G a4 as a bitlbóaY gleá%e oe

O4 tant a

1ò must.

suet" t

a the cal. at e gp'dllty mow

4 e tec'

AsaPbotog aeligbt' otas stag

4ew iapbet' that tb e be of leo s makes

3ust so, the tote the t

ò

Cet maltes

<f o a lettes

-1 o'us't

The lens makes or mars the picture, the reproducer makes or mars the music.

The revolutionary

new

records

are so

true to the original that almost

any

pickup

is

bound

to give some

results

...

but

-it takes

a

reproducer of the highest order, one sensitized

to

the

Nth degree

to

...

a

Chromatic Polyphase

-

bring out

every

subtle shading,

every

nuance

so essen-

tial to the real music of which these discs are capable.

One single magnetic unit plays all home records

Sapphire

- replaceable or Diamond styli

Special models for radio stations, includ- ing Vertical -Lateral units

POLYPHASE HEAD lot any arm turn

RIGHT for 77í!t and

I urn

LEFT lot

78 rpm so smple with the new

Compass pivoted Audax arms and for

Record Changers.

Never before

such EAR

-QUALITY,

such

FAITHFUL after all cycles

the reams are and

REPRODUCTION, but

. .

.

written about kilo- other laboratory

the chips are

down

-YOU

-

YOU data-

be the judge. for editorial reprint

when and only YOU

can

decide what sounds best and most pleasing. Therefore

.

. .

SEE

and

HEAR

POLYPHASE and

Write

POLYPHASE Principles on

Be sure to obtain a copy of PHONO FACTS from your distributor

AUDAK COMPANY

"Cr, ator of

500

Fifth

Avenue New

York

36

Fine

Eleclro-Acoustical

.4 pparnlus for

Over 25

Years"

"Tite

Siam.aQanci wiiieii Otiteu

44e

/uc4ed

aid

7/aliueci"

www.americanradiohistory.com

AUTHORIZED DEALERS for

Klipsch and

Associates

VLIpSCF-ICCN

Klipschorn

is one of

the

few

products developed and manufac- tured under the perfectionistic

gui-

dance

of

its inventor. In the art

of

high quality

sound

reproduction,

10

years

is a

venerable

age: Klips-

chorn began to earn its reputation

in

1940.

Only in

the authentic Klipschorn

does one find

the fundamentally correct and time -tested

engineer- ing combined

with

new

advances proved

in

the light

of experience.

Like

the functional structure,

Klipschorn's

designing

and styling result

from

application

of

many

skills

and surpassing craftsmanship.

Utility, furniture, and

deluxe fin- ishes are

part

of

the products, and have contributed to the acceptance

of

"King Klipschorn

".

Models from $516

to

$711.

We suggest Klipschorn as

the ultimate

goal in

your

long

range planning.

CALIFORNIA

Berkeley Custom

Elec- tronics, 2302 Roosevelt

Ave., Berkeley 4 Tel:

THornwall 3-4180

Joseph B.

1220

N.

Craig

Valley

St.,

Burbank Tel: Charle- ston

8

-7856

Western Research As- sociates,

P.

O. Box

1591, Sacramento

Tel: Gilbert

3

-6382

Van Sickle Radio Co.

1113 Pine St., St. Louis

1,

Tel: Chestnut 1814

NEW YORK

Klipsch Eastern, Inc.

420 Madison Ave.,

New York 17

Tel: PLaza 9 -1700

Craig

Audio Labora- tories,

12

Vine

St.,

Rochester

Tel: Baker 1345

COLORADO

R. C.

E.

Matthews, 6100

Severn St.,

Denver

7

NORTH

DAKOTA

G. People, 609 Black

Building, Fargo

D.C.

Customcraft Radio

&

Television, 1636 Con- necticut Ave.,

Washington

9

COlumbia 5930

N.W.,

Tel:

OKLAHOMA

R. F.

South

Sutherlin,

1217

Zunis, Tulsa

Tel: 9-4104

ILLINOIS

Chas. C.

Henry, 6705

Caldwell, Chicago 30

Tel: Rodney

3

-8707

KENTUCKY

Electronics

&

Sound

231

-33 Fairfield Ave.,

Bellevue, Tel: Colonial

6212

PENNSYLVANIA

S.

J.

Pensock, 138 N.

Wyoming

St., Hazelton

University

Radio

Co.

4524 Forbes St., Pitts- burgh

13

Tel: SChenley

1

-1876

Continental Sound Con- sultants, P.O. Box 172,

Warrington

Tel: Doylestown 5929

LOUISIANA

Custom Electronics, 813

Chartres St., New Or- leans 16

Tel: Canal 4120

Audio Engineering As- sociates,

P. O. Box

6274, Shreveport

TENNESSEE

Electra

Distributing

Co.

1914 West End

Nashville

4

Ave.,

MASSACHUSETTS

Paul W.

St.

George

368 Congress St., Bos- ton

10

Tel:

Liberty

2

-8385

MICHIGAN

K -L

-A Laboratories,

Inc., 7422 Woodward

Ave., Detroit

2

Tel: TRinity 4 -1100

G. M. Schiedel, 4250

Textile Rd.,

Ypsilanti

TEXAS

Richard McGrew, 5810

Llano, Dallas

6

Tel:

TE

9662

N. J.

Dicken-

Deebee

Assoc., 4600 Byron

St.,

El

Paso Tel: 6 -2611

Gulf

Coast Electronics

1110

Winbern

Street,

Houston 4

Tel: Justin 1551

Sound

Haven

P.O. Box 668, Wharton

MINNESOTA

W.

Lee

Torgeson, 2323

Pierce St., N.E.,

Min- neapolis

Tel: Sterling 2917

WASHINGTON

Hallgren Associates

1502

Seattle

Fortieth

Tel: Prospect

Ave.,

2085

Rebel is a

horn

-housing for

direct radiator drive

systems,

and,

like

Klipschorn, utilizes the

walls

at

a room corner as

part

of

the

loud-

speaker horn. The resulting exten-

sion in bass range is

at least an octave better than

offered

by

con-

ventional

"baffles ",

and the

load- ing reduces

distortion to vanishing-

ly low levels even

at high input.

Rebel is

priced from

$87

to

$156,

and

is designed for

application of

12 inch

and

15 inch single

and

co- axial speakers.

Whether

Rebel is used as

an "ul- timate" speaker

or

an

"interim" unit within the structure

of a longer

range plan to culminate

in a Klips- chorn,

the Rebel assures

a

high intrinsic quality and

good per- formance per dollar.

MISSOURI

Richard

White, 4800

Jefferson St., Kansas

City

2

Tel: Logan 1575

IIKIll1)SCI1. LY

Associates

For complete data, see your nearest dealer or write

Hope,

Arkansas

Telephones:

7

-6795 and

7

-4538

78 www.americanradiohistory.com

IMPORTANT

WOKS

Musical

379

Engineering, by

Harry

F.

Olson. pages,

61/2 by

91/2,

314 illustrations.

McGraw -Hill Book

Co.,

New York.

1952.

$6.50.

HIGH

-FIDELITY

Book

De- partment No. 95.

The subtitle of "Musical Engineering" is: an engineering treatment of the interre- lated subjects of speech, music, musical instruments, acoustics, sound reproduction, and hearing. That so wide a range of sub- jects can be covered in a volume this size is possible because the author writes with an extreme economy of words. Every sen- tence explains an is important fact; discussion held to a minimum. And the author is in a better position to state the facts tics of acous- than probably any other person in this

Country: he is

Director of

RCA's Acous- tical Laboratory in Princeton, and President- elect of the Acoustical Society of America.

Thus, this is an authoritative, factual book. For the engineer, it is a valuable it contains much of interest

- since there is a great deal to be read and learned from

"Musical Engineering" which is non- technical. The layman will smile from time to time as he observes the antics of the engineer when the latter translates a familiar physical phenomenon into terms of elec- tricity and acoustics. For instance, on page

168 is a

"schematic view" of the larynx.

The illustration of the physical construction of the larynx might have come from a book on anatomy, but the

"electrical analogy" looks like a wiring diagram for a new am- plifier circuit. ics

The engineering drawings of the mechan- of practically every strument are fascinating

- musical in- to layman and scientist.

So, too, are the descriptions of the instruments. For instance, the bassoon

"consists of a double mechanical reed cou- pled to a conical tube.

It covers a lower frequency range than the oboe. In order to operate in this lower frequency range and still retain a portable and easily handled instrument, the tube is doubled back on it- self.

The effective length of the resonating air column is determined by the holes in the side which may be opened or closed by the fingers either directly or by keys.

A change in the effective length of the resonant air column produces a change in the resonant frequency. In this manner a series of reson- ant frequencies corresponding to the musical scale can be obtained

.

The tube in the bas- soon is conical, with no appreciable flare at the mouth. The fundamental frequency range taves, of the basson covers about three oc- from

B

-flat' to

E

-flats.

The doubled conical air column is about

93 inches in length. The overall length of the instru- ment is 481/2 inches."

Some of the most interesting paragraphs for high fidelity enthusiasts have to do with tests of how much distortion people can hear, in the chapter on sound repro- ducing systems.

Chapter headings in "Musical

Engineer- ing" give a further idea of its content:

Continued on page

8o

Years

ahead

in listening

pleasure

When you own a

Newcomb amplifier you own more than just a carefully built piece of electronic equipment that measures up to the most exacting mechanical requirements. You also own

...

what you really want

...

the phonograph amplifier that's designed to give you the most in listening quality.

Model HIP -14,

14

Phonograph watt

Amplifier

THE

Let your own ears be the judge.

When you listen to a

Newcomb you hear your favorite recordings or radio and television shows come gloriously to life. These superb amplifiers are subjected to rig- orous testing procedures throughout their produc- tion to insure mechanical and electrical perfection.

BUT

.

.. more than that

...

they must meet the most critical listening quality tests.

Newcomb Model KXLP -30 is a 20-

20,000 cycle, low distortion, 30 watt phonograph amplifier pro- viding the reserve power to make full use of its special tone control circuits. Superbly balanced elec- trical design, the result of many years experience, gives you remarkable listening quality.

The

Magic Red Knob four stage record condition com- pensator frees tone controls from the function of controlling surface noise.

Thus any desired tonal balance may be obtained under any condition of operation at any volume level. Adaptable for use with AM -FM radio tuners, TV, wide range loud- speakers and magnetic or crystal pickups, it is engineered for your listening pleasure.

Write for

complete descriptive

literature

SOUND

///

THAT

QUALITY

BUILT

Model

P

-10A,

10

Phonograph watt

Amplifier

Mode

R

-12, Three Speed

Portable Phonograph

Model

RC

-12, three Speed

Porttoble Phonograph

Model B-100

Radio

NEWCOMB AUDIO

PRODUCTS CO.,

DEPT.

W, 6824 LEXINGTON AVENUE, HOLLYWOOD

38,

CALIFORNIA

MANUFACTURERS OF P.A.,

PORTABLIE SYSTEMS,

PHONOGRAPH, MOBILE, INSTRUMENT AND WIRED MUSIC

AMPLIFIERS

PHONOGRAPHS, RADIOS, TRANSCRIPTION PLAYERS

AND RACK

EQUIPMENT

79 www.americanradiohistory.com

eactc cC to-

Co'ah now even `naze

at...

the new

JIM

/A1vs1/M; acoustical lens gives the highs a smoothness your ear appreciates instantly

The magnificent Jim Lansing enclosures are a perfect complement to the matchless tone reproductions made possible by the new

Jim Lansing full acoustical lens.

The new lens, a natural development brought about by the inadequacies of the multicellular horn, distributes sound constantly and uniformly over the entire audio spectrum.

This gives the highs a smoothness impossible to match by any other method.

The band width of the lens, being broader than the entire audio spectrum with which it is used, distributes sound to all points in the listening area without variation of intensity regardless of the frequency.

175

Drop into your high fidelity dealer and ask

DLH, for the full driver story on the Jim Lansing

-horn -lens

assembly, today.

Multicellular

HORNI

5,000

Cycles

Acoustic

LENS,

5,000

Cycles

ta

Gceat

IMPORTANT

BOOKS

Continued from page

79

Sound Waves, Musical Terminology,

Musi- cal Scales,

Resonators and Radiators, Musi- cal

Instruments,

Characteristics of

Musical

Instruments,

Properties of Music, Theater,

Studio, and

Room Acoustics, Sound- repro- ducing Systems.

"Musical Engineering" is a must for en- gineers and technicians concerned with the science of sound reproduction, for it ex- plains the science of the original sound.

For the non -technical man who wants to increase his background of factual infor- mation,

"Musical Engineering" is a pri- mary source of complete information and sustained interest.

The Recording and

Reproduction of

Sound, Second Edition, by

805

Oliver Read. pages,

61/2 by

91/4, over 700 illus- strations. Howard

W. Sams

&

Co.,

Inc.,

Indianapolis.

1952. $7.95. HIGH

-FI-

DELITY

Book Department No. 46.

It is quite impossible to review this book?

It is a reference work which, in the hi -fi library, has no equal and no peer. It would be much better if readers of

HIGH -FIDELITY who want something to turn to for more information on almost any topic related to sound recording and reproduction would just scrape to our Book together the $7.95 and send it

Department.

The first edition of "Recording and Re- production of Sound" was the best of its kind, even though it had only

375 pages.

The new edition is double the size and four times the value. Practically every as- pect of the subject matter indicated by the title is covered.

The approach is semi

- technical. There is much for the layman, who will be enticed into a perusal of the schematics and formulae. The engineer will find basic technical data supplemented with a wealth of practical information.

There are a few very minor flaws: not every question is answered; it could not be so in less than ro volumes, considering the scope of the book. On the other hand, there is so much material crammed into the

800

-odd up in several places

- brought depending on the point of view from which it is being exam- ined. However, there is no duplication.

A valuable feature is that, in the course of discussing principles, a great many typi- cal pieces of equipment are described in detail. Everything that was in the first edition is here in the second, revised, brought up -to -date if need be, and supplemented by 43o new pages.

About the best we can do toward giving an idea of the scope of this compendium is to list chapter headings: Behavior of

Sound

Waves, History

Basic of Acoustical Recording,

Recording Methods,

Lateral

Disc Re- cording, Disc Recorders, Microgroove Re- cording, Recording Styli,

The Decibel,

Phono Reproducers, Tone Arms and Re- producing

Styli,

Magnetic (Tape and Wire)

Recording, Magnetic Tape Recorders, Mag- netic

Film

Recorders, Microphones, Loud- speakers and Enclosures,

Dividing Networks and Filters, Tone Control (Equalizers),

Continued on page

82

James

B.

Lansing Sound,

Inc.

8o

74

first in fine sound

2439

Fletcher

Drive.,

Los

Angeles 39, Calif. www.americanradiohistory.com

METERS

ARE

ACCURATE...

TALK

IS

NOT...!

W hen an important conclu- sion

is

to

be

reached

... when a dependable comparison

is

to be made

... among several sup- posedly similar products

... we do not rely upon conversation, claims and mere words! W

WANT

FACTS

...

!

So,

when it comes to comparing

Magnetic

Sound Recording Tape

...words don't mean

a

thing, unless supported by laboratory experience. And, in view of the ease with which accurate meas- urements can be obtained, it seems even entirely unnecessary and hazardous to make

a

choice based upon the uncer- tainty of the spoken word or written claim.

MAKE

THIS ABSOLUTELY FOOL -PROOF

TEST

BY

ACTUAL

METER

READINGS:

Splice end -to -end,

ORRADIO

IRISH

BRAND

211

RPA with any conventional tape you may be now using.

o

Record a

6000 cps audio signal through the splice from ORRADIO

21

1

RPA to the

"comparison" tape.

O

Rewind and play back with your

VU meter across the output.

THE

DIFFERENCE

WILL

BE

STARTLING!

SIGNAL

OUTPUT

80

AMPLITUDE

VARIATION

SIGNAL -TO -NOISE

RATIO

IRISH

TAPE

60

1/2 db

50 db

TAPE

YOU

ARE

NOW

USING

J

NOTE: The greater Volume Output

of

ORRADIO

IRISH TAPE.

NOTE: The greater

Amplitude

Constancy of ORRADIO

IRISH TAPE.

NOTE: The greater Signal -to -Noise

Ratio of ORRADIO

IRISH TAPE.

The performance results will be comparable at other frequencies, as well.

This is metered proof of the superior quality of ORRADIO IRISH Magnetic

Tapes.

The Reason?

There are differences in

Magnetic Oxides.

ORRADIO molecular lubricated oxides are more stable to coating conditions and turn out more uniform dispersions...that is one of the reasons for the growing acceptance of ORRADIO Tape.

Be sure your next

Tape has molecular lubri- cated oxide.

You can be sure of the finest recordings possible with

ORRADIO

21IRPA

Plastic

Base Professional Tape.

Available at your local Radio

Parts

Distributor or at your favorite

Photo Supply Store.

Manufactured

In U.S.A.

OPELIKA, ALABAMA utarturer

82

Ewing

Galloway

tc4

Whether you prefer disk or magnetic recordings for your high fidelity system, your choice of phonograph needles, recording tape, or recording wire, is important

...

As important to you as the essential components in your system fidelity fans prefer

...

That's why so many high

Fidelitone- products manufactured to precise standards of performance as well as design.

Fidelitone Phonograph Needles and Styli are available at your record shop, in diamond, jewel and osmium alloy tips. Also Fidelitone Recording

Tape and Wire, with ultra

-low surface noise factors, in

Standard Time Lengths.

PERMO,

Incorporated, Chicago 26.

Fidelitone

NEEDLES

TAPE

WIRE

IMPORTANT

BOOKS

Continued from page

8o

Attenuators and Mixers, Amplification,

Pre

- amp- Equalizers, Music Systems,

PA

Sound

Systems,

Acoustics, Tuners

(AM -FM),

Speech

Input

Systems, Complete Recording

Systems,

Record Manufacture (Pressings),

Audio Measurements, Recording and Repro- ducing Standards, and

last

but not least, an

Appendix.

NOTED WITH INTEREST

Continued from page

9 rectly with the new unit. To date, we have examined the control amplifier only on paper, but it looks good.

Vic is getting the unit into production as we go to press.

He has promised us one of the first ones and, if we get it soon enough, a report on it in the next issue well have of

HIGH

-

FIDELITY.

Described briefly, the control amplifier incorporates a bass control giv- ing

5 steps of boost, flat, and

2 steps of cut. By means of clever design, the bass control is interlocked electrically with the volume control, so that bass is boosted more at low volumes than at high, thus recogniz- ing the idiosyncrasies of human reported by

Messrs. Fletcher and hearing as

Munson.

For example, maximum bass boost of

3o db at

3o cycles is attainable only when the vol- ume control is down 4o db. With the volume wide open, boost is zo db. Maximum bass cut is

-zo db at zo cycles. The treble range is from a boost of about

7 db at ro,000 cycles to a cut of zo db at the same frequency, accomplished by a step control which pro- vides two boost positions and five of attenu- ation.

An input selector switch controls four input connections. There are two output connections: one "normal" and one, not af- fected by the volume control, for connec- tion direct to a tape recorder so that the program can be recorded and listened to, simultaneously. Neat, that!

More we hope. about this unit in the next issue,

Why We Like Records it.

We live in television

- a benighted area for one station, take it or leave

We find that we leave it a great deal more than we take it, and our hopes for the future were not raised by a flyer which came to our desk from an organization which provides films for TV. The front page blazoned forth the exciting news that

"This collection of top quality, high budget- ed feature films insures the most sales

- conscious sponsor of highest audience ratings as well as the prestige that goes with superior television

The rest entertainment

". of the flyer was devoted to details of the films, which included: The Count of

Monte

Cristo,

Kit

Carson, Shirley Temple in Miss Annie Rooney, The Last hicans of the Mo-

...

er

...

excuse us a minute while we crank up the Edison. Dan

Quin has just released a new cylinder.

Continued on page

84 www.americanradiohistory.com

GET

THIS

ALLIED

o

Best

,Buy in

Hi -Fi

New

Pilot

AF

-605

Hi -Fi

AM -FM Tuner at a sensationally low price only

$4295

Lowest

Cost

High

-Quality

Tuner

Ideal for

Custom

Installations

The

new

Pilot

AF

-605

Tuner provides splendid

re-

ception of

me

standard

from

20- 15,000 cps, signal- impedance to minimize high frequency

in

AM

FM band. Features handling ability. Has relatively output with

low

distortion and

high controlled by band switch. ing condensers for AM

AM cable.

and FM

Includes antennas; broadcasts and the

flat response within

inputs

for low

output attenuation

phono and TV,

and FM; provision

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88 -108

With

slide -rule dial (each

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3

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tun- outside

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FM

Features:

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RF stage

for maximum sensi-

tivity and selectivity; built

-in line;

antenna temper- ature- compensated

oscillator;

ratio detector with

225 kc wide

linear response; IF at

6

db points;

300 ohm

balanced input to antenna

coil

with

electro-

static

shield.

response

200 kc wide

AM

Features: ciency new

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-in high effi-

"ceramic

loop

stick" iron

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antenna;

IF

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trap; IF response

7.5 kc wide

separate

diode for

AVC voltage.

at

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Pilot

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NOTED

WITH

INTEREST

Continued from page

82

PERMOFLUX

ROYAL EIGHT" WITH

THE

FAMOUS

BLUE

CONE

r

1.1

C

tone

...from

the flashing sunlight

of Mozart

to the storm

of

Shostakovich

ROYAL

EIGHT"

84

P144AUDIOPHILES musical the country over acclaim the clean, brilliant, life

-iik

reproduction of the Permoflux. Royal Eight

"...the

8r'

Speaker comparable to any

12

"!

Combined with the new Permoflux

Carnes-

Baffle, Model

CB

-8 -M, the Royal Eight" re- creates original programs with even superior sensitivity and fidelity

-every

instrument in full-- range tonal balance. Here's

Big

Speaker Performance in a smal

, easy -to- install frame at a sensible price.

($22.50

List, less

Baffle

.

See your Radio

Parts Distributor or write to Permoflux full information about the complete Royal

Blue Line today of 6" to far

15'

Speakers and

Baffle Combinations.

Ask for

Permoflux Catalog

1

-207.

"Sound in

Design!

. .

,Sound in

Price!"

PERMOFLUX CORPORATION

4916

-A

W.

GRAND

AVE., CHICAGO 39,

ILL.

1

236

S.

VERDUGO RD.. GLENDALE 5,

CALIF.

.n

lec, nsee

--Campbell

Mfq.

CumpOn y. ro ron lo, Canada

Ray of Sunshine

Like

Pollyanna, we must have our ray of sunshine ever breaking through the clouds.

In this case, the clouds (largely engen- dered by the preceding item) are television programming, the ray of sun an announce- ment from WOI -TV that they began, on

March loth, a six

"Background Europe

- lecture series on

Versailles to Yalta ".

This is one of the experimental programs to be produced by the Fund for Adult Educa- tion, an independent organization established by the Ford Foundation in cooperation with

WOI

-TV.

We certainly do not advocate that TV should become an unending series of lec- tures and other good- for -the -soul programs, but an occasional interruption from the antics of the burlesquedians should be welcome.

Tape Playback

Only

Those interested not in recording in

- tape playback only

- should investigate the two low -cost Pentron models, PB-a, which is player and preamp only, and PB -A2, which includes an amplifier and speaker.

Both operate at

33/4 and

71/2 ips.

Write the manufacturer for complete details: Pentron

Corp.,

221 E.

Cullerton

St.,

Chicago

16.

I.R.E. Show

Early in March, the

Institute of

Radio En- gineers held a week

-long pow -wow at the

Grand Central Palace in New York. More than anything else, the combined impact of

357 exhibits and 30,000 visitors made that audio is but a mote in the us feel electronic eye of an enormous industry. Millions of dollars' worth of equipment were assembled for display; only a tiny fragment, con- fined to a short corridor close to the at- tic, could be considered remotely connected with the recording and reproduction of au- dible sound. (Supersonics and subsonics re- ceived due attention.)

Every facet of a microwave's life could be examined and thrown open for intimate study on the os- cilloscopic face of any one of a dozen won- derful test instruments.

Only one instru- wise glance at audio

- and it a didn't side- do a very good job, at that. shall go out to Chicago soon,

Ah well, we to the Audio

Fair, and then we shall be able to puff out our chest and feel big and im- portant, once again.

There was little at the

I. R.

E. show of special interest to the audio fraternity.

Magnecord introduced its

"Magne-

Cordette", essentially a

PT6 -AH plus a preamp -equalizer unit so that, at last, Magne- cord equipment can be used in a high fidelity installation without requiring the purchase of a

Magnecord record -playback power amplifier and speaker. The unit comes in an attractive cabinet; takes

71/2 or to-in. reels; operates either at

15 and

71/2 or

71/2 and

33/4

Continued on page

86 www.americanradiohistory.com

AUDIO_

PHILE'S

BOOKSHELF

ELEMENTS OF SOUND RECORDING:

John

G.

Frayne and Halley

Wolfe,

686 pages,

483 illustrations,

6 x

94,

cloth.

Two experts in the field of sound record- ing present a technical discussion of the basic problems in tion of sound.

A recording and reproduc- standard reference text for the designer, engineer, technician and student.

No. 53

$9.50

WILLIAMSON AMPLIFIER BOOKLET:

D.

T. N.

Williamson,

36 pages,

31 illustrations, new edition, paper.

This booklet contains complete design data for constructing this famous high

- fidelity amplifier. In this new edition, the author has added a considerable amount of information on tone controls, low pass filters and record compensating circuits.

No. 94 $1.00

G.

A.

BRIGGS

Noted British Authority

We now have available in good supply these two important books:

PIANOS, PIANISTS AND

SONICS: 190 pages,

102 illustrations,

51 x cloth.

Written in non

-technical terms, this book is intended for all music lovers and sound enthusiasts. The complete story of the piano, including history, construction, aids in selection and care, and the relationship between the in- strument and sound- recording, repro- duction, and room acoustics.

No. 55 $2.50

LOUDSPEAKERS: 88 pages,

44 illustra- tions.

Much material has been added in the third edition of this book to provide complete answers to questions on speakers and enclosure designs.

It is a thorough treatise, written in non- technical terms.

No. 56

$1.25

A list

of

books which will be of

interest and value to

you, carefully selected from

the many publications related to

music, records,

and

sound. Using our Book Service, you can

have your

choice

by return

mail.

Just

send

the

coupon with

your remittance.

ACOUSTIC

DESIGN IN ARCHITECTURE: sen and

Harris,

457 pages,

51,2 x cloth.

Knud-

84,

Although this book is primarily intended for architects and designers, laymen in- terested in correct acoustic design of home listening rooms will find this an excellent and helpful reference book. Principles, procedures and specific applications are discussed in detail.

No. 62 $7.50

MAKE MUSIC

LIVE:

Greene, Radcliffe and

Scharff,

256 pages, illustrated,

61/ x

104, cloth.

A bling practical guide for planning, assem- and installing high -fidelity home music systems. This book includes de- tailed explanations on how to buy and select components, complete installation instructions for equipment, data on types of woods, woodworking joints, hardware specifications, finishes and methods of concealing elements in existing furniture.

No. 70 $4.50

MICROPHONES: compiled by The British

Broadcasting Corporation;

111 pages,

62 illustrations, 5% x

8% cloth.

This book, originally written as a text- book for use in training BBC engineers, has now been made available for general publication. It will prove to be of great interest and value to all concerned with microphones in sound engineering.

A few of the topics discussed are: re- quirements for microphones in a broad- casting studio; laws relating to sound waves and their behaviour; design and characteristics of various types of micro- phones and details of the ribbon, moving

- coil, crystal and condenser instruments.

No. 73

$3.25

SELECTIVE RECORD GUIDE:

Moses Smith,

5% x

81,,, cloth.

This book is a truly selective and prac- tical record guide, emphasizing economy and quality of performance and recording.

The author supplies a running commentary on the music and on composers and their place in the historical scene.

No. 85 $4.50

LISTENING TO MUSIC CREATIVELY:

Edwin

J.

Stringham,

479 pages, illustrated, cloth.

This book presents in an absorbing and ingenious way not only the history of music but a method by which the un- trained listener can find pleasure and meaning in music. Dr. Stringham covers all the forms of music, analyzing simply and clearly a specific example of each type.

In so doing, he furnishes an excellent guide for building a well- integrated record collection.

No. 89

$6.00

ACOUSTICS

OF

MUSIC:

Wilmer T. Barthol- omew,

242 pages, illustrated, cloth.

This book fills the need for clarifying the fundamentals of acoustics, and gives to music lovers, in readable form, the materials for understanding acoustical problems of composition, performance, teaching and appreciation. The various types of sound

- percussive, vibratory, etc., and the technicalities of sound orig- ination, are also discussed in detail.

No. 90

$5.00

MUSICAL

ENGINEERING:

Harry

F.

Olson,

357 pages, well illustrated with

303 figures and

28 tables,

6 x

94,

cloth.

Musical Engineering will serve as an excellent reference book for those inter- ested in every aspect of music, whether student, teacher, musician, engineer or layman. Acoustics, sound reproduction and musical instruments, with facts on their construction, range and characteris- tics, are some of the many phases of musical engineering now clearly explained and interrelated in this book.

No. 95 $6.50

WHAT

TO LISTEN FOR IN MUSIC:

Copland,

281 pages,

51/2 x 8.

The art of listening

Aaron to music discussed by one of our best known contemporary

American composers.

This work pre- sents a fresh conception of what we hear, and should hear, when listening to any piece of music. a

It is an invaluable aid to more complete enjoyment of music.

No. 76 $4.00

THE

RECORDING AND REPRODUCTION OF

SOUND:

Oliver Read, Second Edition,

805 pages, over

700 illustrations,

61,, x

94,

cloth.

A complete and authoritative treat- ment of the entire subject of sound, this book covers all aspects of recording in- cluding a complete analysis of recorders, as well as full data on reproduction equip- ment such as amplifiers, speakers, micro- phones and phonograph equipment.

Everything that was in the first edition is here in the second, revised, brought up to date, and supplemented by 430 new pages.

It is a reference work which is a

MUST in the Hi

-Fi library.

No. 46 $7.95

Book

Department

HIGH -FIDELITY

Magazine

Great Barrington, Mass.

I enclose

$ circled for which please send me, postpaid, the books indicated by the numbers below. (No C.O.D.'s, please.)

NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

46 53 55 56 62 70 73

76 85 89 90

94 95

ZONE _STATE

85 www.americanradiohistory.com

86

THERE

IS

A

For the musical connois- seur, a 210-B DYNAURAL

Amplifier offers the ultimate in high -fidelity music per- formance. Extreme power and range, uniquely versa- tile controls and compensat- ing Features

. . . in all respects the

Finest amplifier obtainable

.

..

with a

Full

- year warranty.

While not incorporating all compensating features of the 210

-13, the

214 -A Remote -control

Amplifier offers the same extraordinary control and amplification.

The

214 -A, however, is unequalled for its ease of installation and operation: and its exceptional 120

Preamplifier is readily used with other power amplifiers.

-A Equalizer

-

Just why are the 210

-B and 2I4 -A amplifiers recognized as standards for comparison in the field? Simply because H. H.

SCOTT amplifiers give you the best music under all conditions. not just ideal ones. In bringing you musical enjoyment. your music -playing system must contend with a variety of record conditions and characteristics, speaker responses, listener preferences. and so on.

Adjusting for room these acoustics. is simple with the unique control and compensating features found only in H. H.

SCOTT amplifiers.

Write us today for

FREE booklet

HF452, com- plete specifications, and the name of your nearest distributor.

HOSMER

S

C

O

T

T,

INC.

385 PUTNAM AVE. CAMBRIDGE

39,

MASS.

NOTED

WITH INTEREST

Continued from page

84 ips.; permits earphone input to tape; all in all monitoring of the

- a good move by

Magnecord.

Two miniscule tape recorders were seen:

Amplifier Corp. of battery operated job

America displayed

- and

Al

Travis a

(of

Broadcast Engineer's Specialty Co.) showed off his very neat, well- designed portable.

Neat Trick of the

Month

Permo

-

Fidelitone of Chicago has brought out a cute gadget: a little record brush mounted on a narrow strip of Mystik ad- hesive tape.

Stick the tape to the car- tridge (or arm) and the brush sweeps up the dust just ahead of the stylus.

It's a wise investment and costs only 5o cents at most record shops.

Worn

Styli

The damage done to records by worn styli was brought out forcefully in Gerald Shir- ley's article in the previous issue of

HIGH

-

FIDELITY.

The problem is being attacked from many angles; various organizations have ordered thousands of reprints of the article and, approaching the matter from another angle, Walco is making available to dealers a high -powered microscope with which customers' needles can be inspected.

Good idea, Walco!

Stick to the Alarm Clock

We have distinct memories of having dis- mantled several $1.98 alarm clocks, back many years ago. We do not recall ever hav- ing counted the parts, nor do we recall any great moments of jubilation, so we as- sume that they never ticked again.

Even haps though we are now older and per- more learned, we are most certainly never going to take a television set apart.

That resolve has always been firm in our minds, but should it ever waver, we will glance quickly at a photograph sent us by Admiral showing the innards of a table model TV set spread neatly on a large table.

There are, says

Admiral, over 1,600 parts

...

and it takes 2,000 soldered connections to put them all together.

By the way, Admiral, if you are going to all this trouble to lay things out and photo- graph them, couldn't you give us an exact count? Or will we have to take one of your sets apart to find out, precisely?

Oh, No! What are we saying! Let's see that photo again!!

New Record Changers

At the Audio Fair in

Chicago, we shall ex- amine with interest several additions to the

V

-M line of record changers.

Most note- worthy, we believe, will be the Model 956

-

GE, which uses a four -pole motor, muting switch, and GE variable reluctance car- tridge. It plays all speeds, all sizes, and shuts off automatically and completely af- ter the last record.

Continued on page 87 www.americanradiohistory.com

NOTED WITH

INTEREST

Continued from page 86

More

Carpenters

Here are additions to lists of carpenters and cabinetmakers already published in

HIGH

-

FIDELITY.

Clearwater,

Fla.: In answer to your plea for names of superior cabinetmakers,

I sub- mit the following: G.

B. Snyder, 312

Jef- ferson

Ave.

Mr. Snyder is an excellent, ex- perienced cabinetmaker, and has an under- standing of audio systems as well.

I have found his prices to be quite fair.

Having recently placed a superb installation

(a recommendation.

- highest

Don Johnson,

116o

Drew

St.,

Clearwater,

Fla.

New

Rochelle,

N. Y.: We note that in your Readers' Forum in the Winter issue, you have a request for the name of a repu- table cabinetmaker who can make cabinets to house the FM, TV and phono equipment.

We have made cabinets for several New

York custom installation organizations and would appreciate it if name on file for your subscribers.

- our

Real

Art Furniture Corp.,

335

North

Ave.

Jacksonville,

Fla.: In response to your note in the Winter issue of

HIGH

-

FIDELITY, requesting names of cabinetmakers with ex- perience in audio cabinet work,

I should like to submit my name.

I have a power workshop and have had considerable experi- ence in audio work.

I have constructed several radio

-phono combinations, speaker enclosures (bass reflex and folded horn), portables, and a a local with junior permanent installation for college.

I custom television and recorders.

-

G.

Franklin McClure,

1242

Belvedere Ave.

Danville, III.: I understand you are look- ing for names of people who do cabinet- work. We build Pipe organs from the raw material to the finished job.

Organ Builder, Danville.

-

Cozatt

San Francisco,

Calif:

For your file on cabinetmakers in the

San

Francisco

Bay area, I would like to recommend the Perma- style

Furniture Co., 95o

Columbus

Ave. I have seen several excellent examples of their cabinetwork, closures, radio including speaker en-

-phono cabinets, and other furniture. One of their best features is the ability to follow drawings submitted by the customer, and have the final prod- uct come out with correct dimensions as planned.

I had them build a cabinet for me to house an amplifier and controls, tuner, record changer, transcription turntable, and tape recorder. Since our living room must also have room for a few people after all the above equipment is installed, it necessary to design the cabinet was without too much space to spare.

I am pleased to report that everything fits! All sliding units, doors, and the lid of the transcription com- partment are carefully fitted, and all ex- posed edges are nicely veneered (no painted raw edges).

Cabinet construction is very sturdy.

Walnut, natural finish, was used throughout, including sub -bases for turn- table, changer and recorder. Finish is dull varnish, very beautifully done, and the

Continued on page 88

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TO

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NEEDLE

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Write for

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87 www.americanradiohistory.com

88.

E23A-

CORNER SPEAKER

\;

/'t&at/LG freatietyi

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to delight the audio connoisseur...

In the motion picture industry where professional audio

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Altec speaker systems are accepted as

the "quality standard!'

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utilize

these finest of sound systems.

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is a reality! These same professional components have been

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Utilizing

two bass speakers in an Altec exclusive

direct radiating horn

cabinet, there is no mid -range hole at crossover and the smooth,

natural

bass

will delight the audio

connoisseur.

Frequencies from the crossover at 800 cycles

up

to

the limit

of

audibility

above

16,000 cycles are reproduced and

distributed

smoothly by a

high

frequency

unit operating with

a

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...

no

third tweeter unit with

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required.

9356

Santa Monica Blvd., Beverly

Hills, Calif.

161

Sixth Avenue, New York 13, New

York

NOTED WITH INTEREST

Continued from page

87 entire job is very satisfactory.

-

W. D.

Rambo, 256! Poppy Dr., Burlingame,

Calif.

Toronto, Canada: I will build speaker may write in to you.

-

Harold

A. Miller,

65

Southvale Dr., Toronto

17.

Danville, Ill.: In response to your in- quiry concerning carpenters who do careful work,

I believe

I can highly recommend Mr.

Perry Cozatt, RR No.

2,

Danville. Mr.'

Cozatt is a skilled cabinetmaker. His spe- cialty is manufacturing

Pipe organs and chimes. While he hasn't been handling cus- tom radio work,

I believe his skill as a ify him in that line.

- well qual-

Ransom Beers,

Sidell,

Ill.

Cabinets: to order and Ready Made

The list of carpenters and cabinetmakers who will build to your specifications keeps growing steadily; we'll publish a revised and complete list in the next issue

FIDELITY.

Meantime, we of

HIGH- continue to ask your help in sending us names of organi- zations which you have found to be capable.

If a ready -made cabinet will do the job, we

H suggest you write for literature to G

&

Wood Products

Co.,

75

North r rth

St.,

Brooklyn r r, N. Y. They have available a variety of equipment and speaker cabinets, some in kit form, all at reasonable prices.

FM

Stations

We are always anxious to know music activities of the good

- of

FM stations. From

S.

J. Greear, of Denver, Colo., we have re- ceived the following report on bad -music stations:

"The three Denver stations in your FM listing have no right to appear in a hi -fi magazine. Their music is

AM network, with an occasional local sports program. Denver listeners should not waste money on FM receivers."

On the sunnier side is a long report from

John

Meeker of

Berkeley, Calif. on the fine -music activities of KPFA. Excerpts:

"I have just finished reading with in- terest your article on radio station WGBH.

It represents the type of station that

I am highly interested in and hope to see more of throughout the Country. It is not, how- ever, the first radio station to start opera- tions on the basic premise programs will be that thoroughly high quality appreciated by a mature and discriminating audience.

That distinction goes to my favorite station,

KPFA of

Berkeley, Calif. which was and is the only listener- sponsored station in the

Country. It first went on the air in the Spring of

5949 and since its inception has shown that the idea of listener- sponsorship is practical and workable. The station is now operating with an ERP of about

16 kw., and is in the process of revamping the transmit- ter building to make room for a new trans- mitter which will provide an effective radi- ated power of

52 kw. The new signal will make the station the third most powerful station in the

San

Francisco

Bay area and will

Continued on page

89 www.americanradiohistory.com

NOTED WITH

INTEREST

Continued from page

88 eecadotbied

Seeeswee reach out to a substantial portion of

Central

California.

"The program quality of the station's broadcasts are percentage consistently high.

A large of the programs are live with the recorded ones being of varying degrees of quality technically due to the variation in the sources of recorded material.

"Twice a week the station broadcasts stu- dio recitals by Bay Area musicians. On

Monday nights, the student musicians and those just starting their careers present a half -hour program; on Friday nights the professionals, both well -known and not so well- known, present a program of about an hour's duration. These are live broad- casts and really give FM a chance to show its worth.

"There are some good things available on the FM band here in addition to KPFA but they have to be looked deserves credit for its for. good

Station KRON music program- ming on weekdays. It operates Monday through

Friday from

3 to so p.m. with music and news and most of the time has fairly good music (from my point of view). The music is from the classics and light classics generally and usually is from fairly good recordings.

"KNBC deserves credit for bringing the

FM audience live concerts of the

San Fran- cisco Symphony

Orchestra. The Standard

Oil Company has presented the Standard

Hour for about

25 years over the NBC net- work and since the advent of

FM, the net- work outlet in

San

Francisco has put up a good quality FM transmitter which gives excellent coverage to the metropolitan area.

The program features the various symphony orchestras of the

Pacific Coast and when the program originates from the

San

Francisco

Opera

House or from the new Berkeley High

School Community Theatre, the technical quality is superb.

"One other station deserves mention here for its work. KRE in Berkeley has the dis- tinction of having produced a high quality program time of serious music for the longest of any station in the Western

U.

S.

This program, Music of the Masters, is pre- sented each weeknight from

7 to

8 and has been the best program of recorded music available in this area for years. KPFA has caused a change in the situation so that

KRE's program now shares the spotlight for quality. KRE is now operating on

FM as well as AM and the music program can be heard on FM. It is mostly from LP record- ings provided and selected by the manager of one of the local record stores with a quality of announcing and advertising that equals the quality of the music.

"The other FM stations in this area are not very exciting to me.

KALW is the station operated by the

San Francisco Public

Schools and is primarily a laboratory for the students in radio -engineering and announcing.

They produce, plan, and announce the programs while the technical students operate the controls of the console and transmitter. The programs are more or less average. It gives fairly good signal qual- ity to my locality in Berkeley. KCBS -FM is the

CBS network station and duplicates

Continued on page 90

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4,7

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Constant

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1

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Check or Money Order. No. C.O.D.'s Please

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WEATHERS

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89 www.americanradiohistory.com

90

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Stephens is

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In fine sound systems the trend is away from use of transformers. The Stephens

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500

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You get 20 watts of audio plus the elimination of all distortion introduced by transformers. There is less phase shift than ever experienced with a

To transformer- especially on the low end. What This Means

You...clarity of tone never before experienced in sound reproduction. Full rich tones without hum and noise. When used with matching Stephens speakers having

500 ohm voice coil impedance, you experience the ultimate in fine listening. These speakers which are specially wound for use with the

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NOTED

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Continued from page 89 the AM schedule.

I have trouble picking it up for some reason.

KGO

-FM is the ABC network station here and duplicates the

AM schedule; KJBS -FM is defunct after having tried to put on program schedule of good music during the broadcast day.

KNBC -FM duplicates the AM schedule but, as noted above, is to be commended for its work with the local symphony orchestra broadcasts.

KRON has been mentioned above. It is operated by the San Francisco

Chronicle and is an adjunct of the paper's

TV station. KSFH is now defunct and its transmitter site has been purchased by

KPFA.

KDFC originally put out good music, well programmed, but fluences have changed it into a monetary in-

"Musicast" station with second rate programming."

Here are more reports on activities of concert stations:

"FM station WRSW, Warsaw, Ind., pre- worthwhile and enjoyable."

-

B. are

Brennan,

Columbia City, Ind.

"In response to your request for reader reports on FM stations programming good music hours,

I would like to direct your attention to station WBIB -FM, New Haven, affiliated with

WQXR -FM, New York, and serving as a relay station for most, if not all of the latter's programs.

According to your list, WBIB -FM operates at zo kw. I

I think this is incorrect; i. e., believe the station is at present oper- ating below this licensed power level.

As a matter of fact, it is difficult to receive the signal clearly here in Hartford, since station

WCOP -FM, Boston, interferes

(WCOP -FM is a frequency, 100.7 zo kw. station on the same mc.)."

-

Theodore

A.

Guest,

W.

Hartford

7,

Conn.

"In response to your request for inform- ation on programs over FM as per HIGH

-

FIDELITY, I

Seattle is must say this: KISW -FM here in about the only station over which you can enjoy high fidelity reception. They play all

LP's whereas the other stations play the same transcriptions as they do on

AM. The network programs on

KOMO-

FM and AM are poor, except those from

California, like the Standard

Hour (usually good).

KOMO

-FM has the equipment to put out the programs, but the cross

- country telephone lines limit response.

Guess we'll have to sit back and enjoy our own records and KISW -FM until such time as lines!"

-

R.

E.

Greenwood, Seattle, Wash.

"Here's some data on Chicago area

FM stations:

WAAF -FM duplicates sister AM schedule between station

1

noon and AM's sign

- off.

WBBM -FM and WENR -FM duplicate

AM schedule between

3 and

9 p.m.

WBIK, an FM -only station, broadcasts recorded and transcribed music six hours a day without any commercials.

Continued on page

91 www.americanradiohistory.com

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Irving Kolodin, music editor of the Sat.

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NOTED WITH INTEREST

Continued from page 90

WEFM, Zenith's FM station, broadcasts

141/2 hours of fine music on recordings.

WEHS is temporarily off the air due to changes in existing station.

WFJI is

Chicago's only radio station that offers complete variety out paid commercials. of programs with-

WFMF is a functional music and storecast station, thus broadcasting

18 hours of music.

WGNB usually duplicates AM schedule between

3 and to p.m.

WMBI -FM duplicates AM schedule while it is on the air.

WMOR is temporarily off the air.

WXRT and WIFA are permanently off the air.

WEXI,

Sr.

Charles, is off the air tempo- rarily due to fire.

WOPA -FM is now operating.

WOAK is now WFMT and broadcasts all classical music.

There are over 600,000 FM homes in the

Chicago area and approximately

8o% of these are faithful listeners.

This proves there is a definite future in FM ".

-

Howard

Schock, Morris, Ill.

"FM broadcasting in the Pittsburgh area has reached that sales of a low ebb.

It is to be hoped

FM -TV receivers plus an in- creasing awareness of the thrill of high fidelity will turn the tide.

WPIT -FM and

KQV -FM were no longer on the air when your list appeared. The former had fine evening music and good transmission, while it lasted; the latter fea- tured storecasts superior to those which remain on WKJF (see below).

Two stations, WWSW and WKJF, form- erly had live broadcasts

Symphony, at least one

My opinions on of of the Pittsburgh which was superb. the remaining stations:

Educational WDUQ, with fine recorded and occasional live music is the best station for programming, but its flea -power trans- mitter can't be heard.

KDKA once had separate FM, now merely relays network shows, as do two other stations. On my receiver, always too much hiss from KDKA.

Announcers superior. WKJF, independent, transit and storecast, has library of inces- santly- played

"music between" records that all sound alike, plus poor announcers and awful modulation.

WWSW, independent, sports and music,

Transmission good grams, shouldn't but try weak. to do both.

Daytime pro- popular

( ?) records; night music programs too short, too briefly annotated.

Announcers average. FM sportcasts make music highly uncertain. Station will inter- rupt anything to present news. WCAE and

WJAS, network programs only, good power and unimpeachable transmission.

WJAC, mission

Johnstown, has strong trans- of network programs into this area, duplicating KDKA. WJPA,

Washington, has at times had excellent live program material.

If just one local station had the courage and imagination to good FM programs

- re- establish separate, with announcers who have completed high school English would be a vast blessing to this

City."

Harry

L.

Wynn, Pittsburgh,

Pa.

- it

-

216fR/f/C

OWL exclusive at

.

HUDSON

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The finest quality incorporated into and workmanship have been this fine

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Low impedance audio output,

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20 microvolts sensitivity for

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IF response is 200 kc wide at

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Complete set of cables $7.50 extra

VISIT OUR SOUND STUDIOS

We stock and demonstrate all standard makes of high

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Write for literature on all makes.

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--a complete tape trans- with matching preamplifier and supersonic and erase are push -pull bias oscillator. Units completely wired and

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Same professional quality features as above-

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NET PRICE

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Write for Bulletin

102

As far as we know, there is no exact equiva- lent to the Altec- Lansing high fidelity sys- tem. We believe we are correct in saying that it is the only complete and integrated system available today.

That statement may raise a few eyebrows, so we hasten to explain exactly what we mean by

"complete and integrated".

By integrated, we mean that the compon- ents be matched one to the other, that the interconnections be so simple that anyone

(literally) can make them without danger of mistake, and that there be no duplica- tion of controls.

By complete, we refer principally to in- clusion of essential controls: volume, bass, treble, record compensation, and in- put selection.

The importance of completeness need not be pointed out to the high fidelity enthu- siast. Even manufacturers are beginning to realize the need; record compensators as well as tone controls are now generally available.

And for the thousands of people who have struggled to connect an ABC tuner to a

DEF amplifier with

GHI preamplifier in the middle and a

JKL compensator some- where in the lineup, integration is a topic which might best not be

Altec was brought up at all! one of the first, if not the first,

Fig. r. FM -AM tuner, preamplifier, all controls are housed in one cabinet. and manufacturer to recognize the need. Others are beginning to follow suit.

It is very much to Altec's credit that they have produced a system which is com- plete, flexible, and integrated.

Three fundamental units are available: first, a power amplifier. Second, an FM -AM tuner which incorporates volume, bass, treble, input selector, and record compen- sating controls. Third, for those who do not need FM -AM trol section tuning facilities, the con- of the tuner is available sepa- rately as a chairside unit. Figs. r,

2, and

3 illustrate the units.

THIS TRIO

ASSURES

OF

GREAT

NAMES

YOUR

LISTENING PLEASURE

ARROW

NI

G

StEPos

Arrow, Browning and Stephens are a great trio to give you the finest in high fidelity equipment. ARROW -home of all the great names in you your want

Audio for years in

-has audio, from stylus to complete audio systems.

To assure listening pleasure, you, every timel a its everything replacement

ARROW for

BROWNING

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FM

For

11 tubes, plus

Less

H, power supply. No tone controls. 73/s"

131/2"

W,

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Net

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TUNER tuner covers both bands, provides

15- 15,000 cycles flat within

11/2 db

Armstrong circuit;

2

-stage cascade

AFC the discriminating music lover.

This fine response, and drift compensation. High imped- ance output for any fine

"eye" and on FM. limiter; audio amplifier. crystal detector.

$131.50

R1

-20B, similar to above, but supply and tone controls with power

$178.75

STEPHENS a

112 -A

12" Cospiral Speaker

Features new sonic lens on highs. Gives top for quality

90° dispersion performance at real budget price.

60

-8,000 cps range within

5 db;

25 watt output. voice coil. Heavy

11/2 lb.

8

-16 ohm

Alnico

Ideal where space must be conserved.

121/4" 51/2"

D.

List $42.00.

V

2" magnet.

Net.... $30.87

You'll want Arrow new High Fidelity Bulletin

HF

-4 for information on all our fine audio equipment.

Whether you have an is at your disposal. No audio problem, or just a question our expert

Hi -Fi

Advisory

Service obligation, of course.

Visit our

Audio

Studios.

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92 www.americanradiohistory.com

Fig.

2.

Power amplifier is separate chassis.

The power amplifier is a straightforward design having a stated frequency response of r r db from

20 to 20,000 cycles. It is rated at

27 watts output with less than

5% total harmonic less distortion,

15 watts with than

0.5

%.

Intermodulation distortion at 4o and 2,000 cycles, is

8% at

16 watts.

The preamplifier -control unit, either a- lone as a chairside unit, or incorporated into the FM -AM tuner, provides a range bass and treble control indicated of in Figs.

4 through

7.

Fig.

4 shows the effect of the tone controls alone;

Figs.

5,

6, and

7 show the control possible when the input selector is set to

PHONOGRAPH and one of the three record compensation positions are used in conjunction with the tone con- trols. The three record tions provide: t) compensation turnover posi-

250 cycles, treble flat;

2) turnover

800 cycles, treble flat; and

3) turnover

450 cycles, treble attenuated r t db at ro,000 cycles. Posi- tion

3 matches the

AES curve.

The output of the preamp- control unit is of cathode follower design, so either the chairside unit or the tuner may be located up to

5o ft. away from the power amplifier.

(Note, however, that the connection from phonograph cartridge to control unit should be kept short.)

The tuner section is more or less stand- ard.

Antenna connections are interesting: lead

-in from the FM antenna can be used as an AM antenna, or a separate AM line may be used. Further, by disconnecting a small resistor under the chassis, AM sen- sitivity can be increased for long- distance operation. Keeping sensitivity low tends

Fig.

3.

Chairside control cathode follower circuit so unit employs it can be placed up to 5o ft. away from power amplifier. to improve reception in signal areas. congested, strong

-

In testing the

Altec FM section, we found that, on most semi -strong signals, no diff-

Continued on page

102

WE HAVE

A

STEPHENS FULL

AT

IT!

-RANGE

12

-INCH

SPEAKER

A

BUDGET PRICE

Net price:

Model

112FR

$30.87

Here's a fine

Stephens speaker of top quality offered within budget require- ments of average high fidelity fans. The

Model 112FR 12" full range speaker in- corporates an aluminum die cast frame, a heavy steel pot -structure, and a

1% -lb.

Alnico V magnet. co-

It's an entirely new spiral speaker with sonic lens for better sound distribution (90° high fre- quency dispersion). The deep voice coil assures outstanding low frequency per- formance.

Net Prices:

Model

C622

Model W620

$76.44

_

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MATCHING CABINETS

Stephens C622

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tifiottg it"--

04:0-iotitéroto

Tested

in the Home

At the Audio

Fair in

New York last Fall,

Paul

Weathers' exhibited his

I

-gram pickup.

Most pickups for

LP records operate with a stylus pressure tion of of at least pressure to

I

6 grams. Reduc- gram would mean a corresponding reduction in record and sty- lus wear.

A sapphire stylus, good for per- haps

3o hours last for zoo of

LP record playing, would hours; if a diamond stylus were used, the new pickup could be labeled

"lifetime" without danger of the manuac- turer being called up by the FTC for mis- representation in advertising.

The sound which the new pickup pro- duced was exceedingly fine, and it was achieved by a method not currently used by any other manufacturer. Instead of relying on the principles of magnetism, or the energy

- producing characteristics of crystals, Weath- ers employed what amounts to a minia- ture FM transmitter. Variation in capaci- tance, caused by the stylus shank moving in close proximity to a small plate on the cartridge, modulated a radio signal gener- ated by an oscillator.

The Weathers pickup caused a furore at the Audio

Fair. We have since received many reports from readers: all have been favor- able.

A.

One of the most glowing was from

C.

Anglemire (whose music listening group was described in the previous issue of

HIGH

-

FIDELITY.)

Mr. Anglemire wrote, in

'Weathers Electronic Iduatries West Collingwood

N.J.

Fig. r.

The Weathers pickup rides on the record with a stylus pressure of one gram. part, We wish to report that some time ago, we had an opportunity to try out the

Weathers pickup and found it out of this world!" Engineers with whom we have talk- ed have been highly enthusiastic.

We have been working with a

Weathers unit for the past several weeks and can corroborate the opinion of others: it is exceptionally good. The experimentally

- inclined audiophile is likely to achieve results considerably above average.

And, every user of a

Weathers is at least quad: rupling the life of his records.

The cartridge is illustrated in Fig. r. The loop of metal, running from just under the prongs at the lus end of right the unit and around to the sty- is a protective guard and part of the assembly which holds the stylus. The guard and stylus slide off the cartridge body. Behind the guard is the

f craftsmen io

High

FM

Fidelity

-AM

Tuner

Maybe you had a hand in design- ing this magnificent tuner.

A lot of our friends did. Their questions and suggestions mode sense because they came from people who knew what they needed. The superior flex- ibility and performance of the C

-10 proves it.

And we think it will an- swer your rigid requirements, too. furnish both

Two cathode followers audio output and detector out- put for remote installations. compen-

Built -in pre

-amplifier, sated for variable reluctance pick-ups.

Automatic

Frequency tirely eliminates

Control en- drift, simplifies tuning.

5 microvolts sensitivity

FM and

AM.

10 kc filter on on both

AM eliminates inter

- station squeal.

Boss and treble tone boost, cut, or controls for

20-

20,000 cycle flat response.

Write for

50c information

-or send for instructions and schematics

THE

RAD

eraftsmen

INC.

N. Ravenswood pelt.

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Fig.

2.

The oscillator is shown right; accessory power supply at the at the left. stylus shank and tip.

Between the stylus and the brush is the plate which forms one half of the capacitor (the other half is the stylus shank), which is part of the car- tridge assembly. The variation in capac- ity, which modulates the oscillator, is produced by the motion of the stylus in re- lation to this fixed plate. Normal spacing is to to

20 thousandths of an inch.

Beyond the plate is the brush which is an integral and important part of the Weath- ers unit. For one thing, the brush cleans the record. For another, it absorbs

4 grams of the total cartridge pressure of

5 grams, leaving t gram for the stylus tip to carry.

We asked Paul Weathers how brush would last. long the

None has worn out to date. After

6 months of almost continual use, the bristles tended to set and the pres- sure on the stylus tip increased to

i'

grams. Beyond this time limit, no change has been noted.

A shielded wire, cut to specific length and furnished by the manufacturer, attaches to the two prongs at the right in Fig. r.

Continued on page 96

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Continued from page 95

It is very is part important to note that this wire of the electrical circuit.

If its length is changed, it will be necessary to adjust the tiny

"trimmer" capacitor in the os- cillator unit,

Fig.

3.

Similarly, the spacing of the two prongs, to which the wire is attached, is critical.

If the cartridge is used in a holder which requires spread- ing of the prongs, as in Webster- Chicago plug

-in heads, the trimmer capacitor be must adjusted to counterbalance the change in capacitance between the two prongs.

The shielded wire from the pickup car- tridge is connected to the RMA plug up)

(Roc- on the oscillator, shown at the right in

Fig.

2.

Power requirements for the oscil- lator are 25o volts of thoroughly filtered

DC at

2 milliamperes and

6.3 volts AC at

0.3 amps. This power may be drawn from the power amplifier or other associated equip- ment, or it may be obtained from the

Weathers power supply, shown at the left in

Fig. 2.

A short, shielded lead is connected from the oscillator to the power amplifier (not to a preamplifier).

If the amplifier has

Fig.

3. chassis.

View of underside of oscillator

Tube at left is

6AT6. Almost

Trimmer capacitor is just above coil. in center is oscillator coil, which is slug tuned. an input connection which is compensated for crystal pickups, the coM

(common or ground) and

CONS

AMPLI

(constant ampli- tude) connections on the terminal board of the oscillator are used. If the amplifier has only a flat input connection, the connec- tion is made to

COM and

AES terminals. In either case, the shield is connected to the

COM terminal.

The volume control normally used with the amplifier serves to control the output of the Weathers unit.

Readers who saw the Weathers unit dem- onstrated at the Audio

Fair will wonder why we have not mentioned the slim, attractive arm which Paul Weathers was using. The reason is that, by improving his design,

Weathers has been able to avoid the neces- sity of using a special arm. As described in the November

1951 issue of

Radio and

Television

News, the arm was an integral part of the electrical circuit, the oscillator used two 6AT6 tubes, and the price was stated to be around

$200. Since then, the

Continued on page 97 www.americanradiohistory.com

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PHONO PICKUP

Continued from page 96

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arm inated

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$40.

Three types of styli are available: stand- ard

.003 -in. radius, .00r radius, and a trun- cated tip, designed to play either

78 rpm. or

LP records. Attempts by other manu- facturers to develop a universal stylus, using the truncated principle, have not been entirely successful. What the result will be with a truncated tip in a

I

-gram pick- up remains to be seen.

So much for a description of the unit.

How does it work? We said several things at the beginning of this

Report which in- dicated our general reaction. tic"

-

"engineers are highly enthusias- and that is true. The theory behind the pickup is excellent. The design is clean, simple, and not likely to get out of adjustment. The fulfillment of this de- sign is

- and this is why we mentioned "experimentally- inclined audio- philes" good. But

- fitting the unit into an exist- ing system may take experimenting. The man who merely wants to plug a new head into his Garrard changer should proceed with caution.

Four characteristics of the Weathers should be considered in relation to the rest of the system: first, the stylus pres- sure is so low that some changers will not trip; second, some plug

-in heads require spreading of the connecting pins on the cartridge, necessitating adjustment of the oscillator; third, the ers is very output of the Weath- low, and will not be sufficient to drive all makes since the pickup is of amplifiers; and fourth, plugged directly into the power amplifier, benefit of record compen- sators may be lost. Let's examine these points separately.

Use with

Record Changers

The question here is the amount of stylus pressure required to hold the stylus in the groove so arm motion will trip the changer mechanism at the end

Weathers' pressure of a record.

The of

I

-gram is sufficient for a

Webster- Chicago or an RCA

45 rpm. unit, insufficient for the time being for a

Garrard. It is understood that adjustments can be made on the Garrard; owners of these units should write the

U.

S. distributor for instruction.

Adapting to Pickup Arms

The Weathers cartridge can be used with almost any standard arm. It can be screwed into the RCA

45 rpm. changer arm without difficulty. It can be screwed to the plug -in head arrangement on the Gray ro8 -B.

The regular terminals on this arm should be re- moved; weight should be added until the stylus just barely drifts down onto the record surface. Pickering arms will require some modification. There is a small lug which interferes with the terminals on the

Weathers cartridge. The lug can be removed or bent out of the way, or long screws and shims used to build up under the cartridge

Continued on page 98

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Continued from page 97 until the terminals clear the lug. With either Gray or the Pickering, the connecting wires supplied with the arms should be re- moved and the special Weathers wire sub- stituted.

Arms which have plug -in heads, such as the Webster- Chicago, can be used easily insofar as mechanics are concerned. The cartridge will fit in the head; the termi- nals on the cartridge can be spread and soldered to the standard plug -in head termi- nals.

However, as mentioned earlier, this upsets the capacitance of the circuit.

The screwhead on the trimmer capacitor, located on the underside of the oscillator,

Fig.

3, will have to be turned counter- clockwise (as seen in the illustration) about one -quarter turn. Then the oscillator itself will have to be retuned. This is accom- plished by turning the long threaded screw on top of the oscillator. In Fig.

2, this is directly behind the

Corot terminal. Instruc- tions supplied with the Weathers explain exactly how this should be done; it is easy.

Required Gain of Amplifier

The main problem

Weathers is that its we ran output is low

- rela- tively, lower than any of the standard mag- netic or crystal units. Magnetic units have an actual output far lower than crystals or the Weathers, but they are always used in conjunction with preamplifiers. The latter raise the output until it is sufficient to drive an average power amplifier. Now, since the gain of power amplifiers depends on design and hence, on make, the Weathers will work with some but not with others. We tried the

Weathers with the Altec tuner and amplifier which we were testing for the report on page

92.

Results were perfect. We simply con- nected the

AES output of the Weathers os- cillator to the

SPARE terminals of the Altec tuner; both ful. sound and volume were wonder-

However, when the Weathers was used with a

McIntosh

5o -W -2, or the Sarser-

Sprinkle version of the Williamson, we did not get anything like enough volume.

Therefore, if the Weathers is to be con- nected direct to the power amplifier, it is important that the amplifier have suffi- cient gain. Gain, expressed in decibels, is usually stated by the amplifier manu- facturer. For instance, the Williamson -type which we mentioned has a gain of about

7o db; the Altec is stated to have a gain between

- of

82 db. The difference of

52 db is the difference with the

Weathers

- satis- faction and dissatisfaction.

If the amplifier to be used with the

Weathers does not have sufficient gain, it is possible to use the pickup with a stand- ard preamplifier provided the bass boost characteristics of the preamp are counter- balanced. This can be done either by modi- fying the circuit of the preamp, or by us- ing a compensating network between the

Weathers oscillator and the preamp input.

Design of such a network is going to require experimentation. For our test, we used a

Brociner preamplifier -compensator.

Victor

Brociner has worked with the Weathers and

Continued on page

99 www.americanradiohistory.com

á r

PHONO PICKUP

Continued from page 98 had designed a compensating network to match it to his unit. Because we use a corner reflex Air Coupler, our extreme low fre- quency response is probably better than average. Anyway, we feel that we got too much very -low bass. With a different speak- er system, this might not be an objection.

Paul Weathers suggested that we use a

500 mmfd. capacitor in series with the

AES output terminal.

The effect seemed to be about needed here

- or a

"de- bassed" preamp. is

Use of Record Compensators

The fact ted to that the Weathers unit is connec- the tuner or crystal input connec- tion on the power amplifier (through a vol- ume control, of course) and not through the customary preamplifier means used to compensate for that controls recording character- istics will be inactivated in nearly all cases.

Actually, inability to compensate for recording characteristics is not as impor- tant with the Weathers as with magnetic units. The reasons are complicated: mag- netic cartridges are constant velocity devices.

Records are cut with a constant amplitude characteristic up to their turnover point, then with a constant velocity character- istic. Therefore, magnetic cartridges re- quire bass boost below the turnover point, and the user should be able to vary the point where the boost begins so that it will match the point on the frequency scale where the record manufacturer changed from constant amplitude to characteristics. constant velocity

On the other hand, the

Weathers unit is a constant amplitude device. Hence, it fol- lows the recording characteristic up to the turnover point (without compensation), but would droop thereafter. To compensate the droop at high frequencies, Weathers incorporates a circuit. This network into the oscillator network is in the circuit when the

ABS connections are used; it is out of the circuit when the

CONS AMPLT terminals are wired to the crystal input connection of an amplifier.

The effect is that turnover compensation is not necessary, and that treble compensa- tion is good enough for most records.

Conclusion

This report has been unusually long but, as we gram said much earlier, the Weathers

1- tialities and will be a delight to many ears

- but it cannot be plugged nonchalantly into just any sound reproducing system or any arm.

We confess, we worked with the

Weathers for some time and were discouraged

- until we thoroughly tried it with the

Altec amplifier which we were also testing.

The discussion of this pickup has been long because we want readers to share our en- joyment, not our original trials and tribu- lations.

Soundwise, the Weathers ranks close to or at the top.

It's the old story, given correct associated equipment, it is hard to distinguish by ear one top pickup from

Continued on page zoo

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Washington St., Boston 8, Mass.

PHONOLPICKUP

Continued from page

99 another. Extreme low frequency response on the Weathers is above average, by ear and by at meter; the overall curve is smooth.

The ear reports clean, brilliant but not harsh highs. minimum

-

Surface noise seems held to a below average. We also noted that the Weathers seemed particularly good low volume levels.

Sound had a trans- lucent quality; dynamics were well pre- served.

Perhaps the biggest feature is the reduc- tion in record wear.

The

1

-gram weight is really something!

COMPACT CABINET

Continued from page 40 most advantageous spot in the layout. The power amplifier, of course, could be put almost anywhere.

By using a 10

-in. turn- table, the control knobs of the preamplifier could be moved close to the record -playing unit, since the turntable was high enough for a 12

-in. record to ride clear

In this way, the inside width of the knobs. of the cabinet would have to be made only inch wider than the diameter about one -half of the record itself.

By making every possible change and improvement effect an of this kind,

I was able to astonishing decrease in the size of the cabinets. Instead of the 8.7 cu. ft. of the commercial cabinet, my requirements came to about

3.2 cu. ft.

To a person whose living quarters, while not cramped, forbid anything quite as elaborate as has been seen up to now in HIGH-

FIDELITY, such space- saving is invaluable. Instead bulky piece of a of furniture

23' by 35' by

18 ins.,

I needed a box only

141/2 by

173,4 by

211/2 ins.

The final design is shown in

Fig.

I.

The plan and elevation, showing positions of the units, is sketched in Fig.

2.

Fig.

3 shows front and side views of my arrange- ment in comparison with the smallest com- mercial cabinet available.

As finally constructed, the cabinet,

Fig.

1, has some unusual features. The power amplifier is set on a platform very close to the floor, within a four -sided shallow base.

Ventilation is achieved by having the cab- inet proper rest on two grooves cut in the front and back sides of the base. But, it overhangs the base at each end, as shown in Fig.

3.

13 by

11/2

This leaves an open space ins. on each end, through about which cool air may circulate. The air heated by the power amplifier and other equipment, escapes in two directions: through the

1/4-in. space between cabinet sides and the phono- graph motor mounting board, and through five

I

-in. holes cut into the back wall of the cabinet just above the power amplifier.

The mounting board, on which the phonograph motor is mounted, is suspended on brackets, cushioned with rubber and screwed to the sides, as indicated in Fig.

4.

This facilitates removal of the board when replacement of tubes or repairs are needed.

Continued on page

lot

www.americanradiohistory.com

COMPACT CABINET

Continuer/ from page zoo

i

The tuner and preamplifier are suspended on brackets attached to the sides of the cabinet proper,

Fig.

5.

Controls have been simplified for maxi- mum convenience: The main power switch, formerly on the tuner, has been incorporated into the selector switch on the preamplifier, as has the phonograph motor switch. Thus the selector has the following positions:

I) power off;

2) tuner, amplifier, preamplifier on; and

3) pickup, amplifier, preamplifier, and phonograph motor on. The only other controls are the speed changer for the phonograph motor, and the treble, bass, and gain controls.

I do not seem to require an adjustable turnover switch, either be- cause

I can obtain satisfactory balance with the treble and bass controls, or because

I'm just not fussy. Such extreme simplification of controls is not essential in making the installation compact, but it does to overall convenience.

A total contribute of six knobs certainly contrasts with the baker's dozen

I

I have seen pictured in some installations.

Although the amplifier and control unit am using are not standard models, there is no reason why the ideas outlined here cannot be used with any of the equipment now on the marker.

I found that even the bulkier units, such as the more elaborate

FM -AM tuners, adapt themselves unex- pectedly well to such concentration and in overlapping as

I have outlined.

Perhaps the most important factor in high fidelity installation is careful planning

- the selection of the components, and then in their installation into a well

-designed, carefully thought

-out cabinet. Only through plenty of forethought can the ultimate goal of visual, as well as aural, attractiveness be achieved.

BROOK

A

D tV

THE

ULTIMATE finest possible

...

truly the reproduction of orchestral music requires a high

-fidelity system planned for the unique acoustical demands of your home or apartment.

BROWNING McINTOSH

ENJOY TRUE

-

FIDELITY

WITH

A

BROOK HIGH

QUALITY AUDIO AMPLIFIER

Serving New York

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CREATIVE

AUDIO

ASSOCIATES

150

S.

East

Harrison

Street

Orange, N.

J.

ORange

6

-5229

CREATIVE AUDIO ASSOCIATES

Representing the leaders in sound en- gineering

.

.

. exclusively feature a personalized service of demonstration in your home of high -fidelity concert sys- tems.

Components of true -fidelity, blended to satisfy your most rigid requirements, are assembled with skill and craftsman- ship, by trained and experienced audio experts. A d;rect comparison between custom

BROCK components amplifier

. . . such as the

...

and your present set can now be made within the acous- tics of your living room.

CRAFTSMEN

JIM LANSING

ALTEC CRA

THIS

IS NOT AN EXPENSIVE SERVICE

Advice on cabinet design, cumulative additions to your present sound system, care and maintenance of components, and other important factors are corn

- bined in this economical service designed to show you the limitless perfection of personalized audio reception.

There is no charge for home demonstration or in- stallation. Write

Dept. Hl for descriptive literature.

MAGNETIC TAPE

RECORDERS...

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Here's the place to buy, swap, or sell audio equipment. Rates are only 20c a word (including address) or $20 an inch, and your advertisement will reach

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/ea/wee/hi

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FOR SALE:

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Record player outlet.

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F

I.enard

HIGH

FIDELITY

SOUND EQUIPMENT

AT

ITS FINEST

erence could be detected aurally between the

Altec, which uses a ratio detector, and a top quality, Armstrong -type tuner. On weak signals, cars passing near the listening post were more noticeable with the

Altec, and over

-all

Input background noise was a little heavier. and

SPARE

- in are PHONO addition, of course, to FM or AM. The

SPARE feeds through the tone controls; the

PHONO is for magnetic or

A section of the world's largest

Sound

Equipment Studios

-

at LEONARD'S.

HI

-FI

SYSTEM

Continued from page

93

IO2

The

LEONARD

RP

5

The

Perfect

Hi

-Fi

Radio -Phono

System

Here's true VALUE. Components will delight special afford. the most discriminating

LEONARD price that all that at a can

RADIO

CRAFTSMEN FM

Model

C10

-AM

TUNER

Just arrived, this latest improved model with built

-in pre

-amp for use with all magnetic type cartridges. Has separate equalization for GE, Audak, and Picker- ing units features.

-and many other desirable

RADIO

CRAFTSMEN AMPLIFIER

-Model

C2

The ideal companion for the C10.

10 watts of undistorted output. Inverse feedback. cycles.

Frequency range of

20- 20,000

UNIVERSITY

SPEAKER

12" COAXIAL

-Model

Includes high frequency

Response, 45- 15,000 cycles.

8 ohms.

Power

25 watts.

6201 attenuator.

Impedance,

WEBSTER- CHICAGO

RECORD CHANGER

-Model

106 -27

This is the latest improved hi

-fi model.

Plays

3 speeds automatically. ped with

2

Cartridges.

It is equip-

GE Variable Reluctance

C10

C2

All yours to enjoy for only

...

.

261

A

Thing of Beauty

...

And Forever a Joy!

The Choice corner type cabinet. in a over reflex rating cabinet.

A combination

-30

ALTEC SPEAKER SYSTEM

-Model

820A of Connoisseurs watts.

...

A two -way system

%"

High built into

Consists of a newly- designed

Overall Dim. complete specifications on that direct radiating horn guarantees unsurpassed quality the entire audio range. Dividing Network Crossover

Required Amplifier

Output Impedance

47 request

-6

to

12 x an attractive ohms. Audio power

424"

-800

Wide.

NET cycles.

Exact

$525.00

6201

106 -27

56

ASK ABOUT OUR

OTHER

PACKAGE

SPECIALS,

PENTRON TAPE RECORDER

-Model

9T -3C

Operates on dual track and dual speeds of

34" speed has

2

,ew6,d and fast

f

rwa,d.

Homes, Churches, Business.

7y"

Woighs speed has only

34" or

7

" per second,

27

1 lbs.

Write for circular. hr. recording.

Idol fo,

Fast

Scl.ols

H. H.

SCOTT-

REMOTE CONTROL AMPLIFIER

-Model

214A

A really superb amplifier that gives extra

-high undistorted power and extreme range to bring the world's greatest orchestras into your home. Unique treble and bass controls allow continuous adjustment to any listening preference on any record.

Preamplifier:

4 channels

-3

high level, sator; Loudness Control, etc.

I low level; Record Compen-

Amplifier: Less rated

20 watt output; Hum Level below full cycles. than

.5% harmonic distortion

-minus at

90 full db output; Frequency range -flat from

12- 55,000

NET

$189.87

Leonard's Has Everything in Audio

Equipment

Q

GROMMES, Amp. Model PG50

Net

$49.75

WESTERN ELECTRIC Speaker- Model728B

Net

$35.70

PICKERING

AUDAK L6

Equalizer

Cartridge

-Model 132E

(less adapter)

Net

$12.00

Net

$20.28

Mail orders filled

Write

Dept. H4 for immediate, courteous service. promptly.

Thank you.

N

4

Send now

for

our FREE 48 p. CATALOG of the latest and

finest in

Sound

Equipment.

the house built on

SERVICE

konardi.

COrtlandt 7-0315

69

CORTLANDT ST.,

NEW YORK 7, N. Y.

50

100

500

1000

5000

1Q0000

FREQUENCY -CYCLES PER SECOND

Fig.

4.

Basic bass possible for

FM, AM, and treble control range and

SPARE inputs. variable reluctance cartridges and operates through both record compensating and tone controls. Three input connections are pro- vided on the chairside preamplifier unit: a PHONO, which is identical with the one on the tuner, and two

SPARES which can be used, for instance, for radio and television.

8,

Output from the amplifier is tapped for

4, and

16 ohm speaker systems.

440

10

ZO d m

2o

30 m

10

N``

20 50 100

-

500 1000.

5

®

_e,

5000

10A00

FREQUENCY

-CYCLES

PER

SECOND

Fig.

5.

Control range for

AES

PHONO input.

The fidelity of the system is excellent.

The Altec engineers speak of their system as the Cadillac in the field, and that is just about it.

Good, conservative design produces good, clean sound. It is not a sports car, nor a hot rod jalopy.

Note that from the

SPARE connection on the tuner to the loudspeaker, the Altec has more gain than most amplifiers.

See the discussion of this feature in connec- tion with the report on the Weathers pick- up on page 94.

We liked the simplicity of the Altec con- trols. Once in a great while we might wish

Continued on page

103 www.americanradiohistory.com

HI

-FI

SYSTEM

Continued from page roz that we had a bit more control. In

98% of the cases, there is enough, but when a really poor record must be played, more would be nice.

That's a minor point does not begin to outweigh the many which good points of this equipment, nor the one out- standing feature: convenience and simplic- ity of installation.

It is a little hard to describe on paper the hitching together process, but here is an attempt. When the tuner is used, the

+40

30 ro to

20

20

50 100

500,000

FREQUENCY-CYCLES PER

500010000

*WAND

Fig.

6.

Control sator in No. range with record compen- r position; turnover

250 cycles.

50

.

100

500

1000

5000

FREQUENCY- CYCLES

PER.

SECOND

10000.,.

Fig.

7.

Compensator at

No. 2; turnover

Boo. tuner, phono motor, or whatever, can be tied in with the amplifier.

If the preamp is used, it gets its power via a four -prong socket on the amplifier chassis. The tuner develops its own power, so when it is used instead a of the preamp, dummy four -prong plug is inserted into the socket

The of the amplifier to output of the tuner or short of it out. the chair

- side preamp a unit is connected by means of three

-prong plug to the power amplifier.

Even our grandmother couldn't get these con- nections mixed up, especially since each is polarized so it can be inserted only one way!

Continued on page

104

Now you, too, can own the in ultimate high

-fidelity.

The world's finest component parts, combined with

Voice and Vision's

"exact cubic -con- tent" loud speaker chamber, provides incomparable re- production.

Birch, ebony, bleached oak, bleached walnut, or mahog- any.

Write for brochure or order direct.

the award- winning PROFESSIONAL

SERIES by the nation's most acclaimed cusiom- builder

PROFESSIONAL

SERIES

COMBINATIONS

Laboratory assembled and tested

PROFESSIONAL

SERIES

COMPONENTS

KIT

Assemble it yourself including cabinet

$556.00 to

$1000.00

$468.71 to

$784.28

Voice and Vision, inc.

316

N.

MICHIGAN

AVE. CHICAGO I, ILL.

An

3

-3891 amplifier gets its AC power from an outlet on the tuner chassis, which is controlled by a switch associated with the volume control on the tuner. When used with the preamp unit, the amplifier is plugged into a wall outlet but it is still controlled from the panel of the chairside preamp unit. Then there is a spare

AC fier chassis so outlet on the ampli- that operation of a television

A.

Leonard ctw.'

The

Sensational New

WEATHERS

One

-Gram

Capacitance Pick

-Up

(Cartridge

Form)

AT LONG LAST!

-

REALISM without vif

#!í/ noise;

,

One

Two

20

TO

20,000

CYCLES

Will Improve and

Replace

Any Modern

Phonograph

Pickup

gram

stylus

pressure

with ideal tone arm

grams pressure

on modern Webster changers

Adjudged

Sen- sation at

No- vember

New

York

Audio

Show.

Ar

Very low pressures

with

other players, including

RCA 45 changer

Will operate properly with

most good

quality

tone arms

Oscillator requires 6.3 volts ac at 0.3 amp, and 250 volts dc at 2ma.

Available from most amplifiers.

WEATHERS power supply, complete with power cord, for

117 volts, 60 cps net

$14.50

Complete cable, with ultra- flexible oscillator unit, tube, installation instructions hardware and net

s37.50

Send now

for

our FREE

48 p.

CATALOG of

the latest and finest in

Sound

Equipment,

COrtlandt

7

-0315 the house.' built on

SERVICE

Leonard

103 www.americanradiohistory.com

104

«gESupN1ANr

Custom

Matched

HIGH

FIDELITY

SOUND

SYSTEM

Come in to hear the our modern sound department and sensational amazed at born cost so be little.

II

"Ii

ESCONIAN." well a system can sound distance prevents carefully- parked and prompt a

lv

You'll trip studio yon can order this system by mail. to

-

shipped. he yet our

It will

WEBSTER- CHICAGO

RECORD PLAYER

Model

101

-270

GENERAL ELECTRIC

MAGNETIC

CARTRIDGE

Model

RPX

-050

GROMMES

AMPLIFIER

Model 50PG

HI

-FI

SYSTEM

Continued from page 103

STOR TION

0.10 n l

Conclusion

"POINT ONE"

Highly recommended, most particularly for the person who knows little about the in- tricacies of audio and who wants to plug possible

- and as then simply and quickly sit back for as continued enjoyment.

We wish the Altec system had been avail- able when a friend came in, a year or so ago, to ask our recommendations for a sys- tem to be installed in his parents' home.

Complete

$19200 net preamplifier which has with new compensated settings for all records.

He followed our advice, had the installation made, and everyone was delighted. The ents think the music is beautiful

- par- but they hardly touch the equipment when their son is away. knobs to cope with

- there including are ten two volume controls, two on -off switches, and two input selectors!

This is a serious dilemma for many peo- ple; it is a real and important obstacle in the

In and the

TL

/12 amplifier, hum and noise levels fall within

-80 db

-72 db relative to

10 watts and are entirely inaudible. Feed

- back is taken from low side of output transformer and due to the magnitude of feedback, there can be no rise of voltage. The repro- duction of transients, especially of low frequency, is astonishingly clarified. path of enjoyment of high fidelity repro-

Altec provides the answer. duction of sound. It is to this dilemma that

Leak

"Point

One" provides the ultimate in clarity and frequency response. Certified tests by

British

Nat'l

Physical Lab. (equiv.

U.

S.

Bureau of Standards) prove this triple loop power amplifier and pre

-amplifier exceed manufac- turer's performance claims.

\\

At your dealer or write for

FREE FACT

SHEET to Dept.

2

LF

BRITISH INDUSTRIES CORP.

164

Duane St., New York 13, N. Y.

Professional

Directory

MEISSNER

TUNER

Model

8C

High

Quality

Custom

Installations

Featuring the Famous

"CHILDS" CUSTOM

-

BUILT AMPLIFIER

As described in the July issue of

RADIO

& TV

NEWS

1601

ULRIC J. CHILDS

Audio Engineer

First Avenue, New York

28,

N. Y.

TR

9

-1290

Wharfedale

Built by

Wharfedale

Wireless Works under the direction of

G.

A.

Briggs, world renowned sound engineer!

$6195 net

UNIVERSITY

COAXIAL

SPEAKER

Model

6201

I

SERVICE CO. OF

PENNA., INC.

7TH

& ARCH

STREETS

PHILA. 6, PA.

LOmbard

3

-5840

3412

BRANCHES

Germantown Ave.

1042

Hamilton

St.

Philadelphia, Pa.

Allentown, Po.

5930

Market Street

Philadelphia, Pa.

916

Northampton

St.

Easton, Po.

3rd

IL

Tatnall

Sts.

Wilmington, Del.

( )

( )

Please send latest catalogue supplement.

Check or

Money Order enclosed for

"Resconian"

High

Fidelity

Sound System illustrated above.

O 10% (minimum) enclosed.

Balance

C.

O.

D.

NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

ZONE STATE.

CUSTOM INSTALLATIONS

Radio

-

Phonograph

-

Television

The best in fine cabinetry and electronic engineering

LOWE ASSOCIATES

167

Bay State

Road

Boston, Massachusetts

COpley

7

-6644

DOUBLE your listening pleasure with the composer's ORIGINAL

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Bargains at 98c ea.:

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Sta.,

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$

A

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TI

THAT

SPEAKER fefnasing and p

CE listening

Wharfedale speakers are cloth suspended to improve transient response and to reduce bass res- onances.

This results in a more level the transient or decay element.

The exclusive special cone with bakelized apex achieves amazingly clear highs.

At your dealer or

FREE FACT SHEET write for to Dept.

2

W

F

BRITISH INDUSTRIES

CORP.

164 Duane St., New York 13, N. Y. www.americanradiohistory.com

FOUR COMMANDMENTS

Continued from page 23

FAS

Air -Coupler for

Those are the four basic rules which Mr.

Bachman gave us.

Here are some general comments and suggestions from him:

"Record collectors are sometimes con- cerned gloss about variations in the color and of long playing disc surfaces.

Some

33

`1/3 rpm. records appear to be dull and grey, while others are shiny and black. The fact is simply that the gloss or shine of a record is the reflection from flat surfaces or

'land' between the grooves. The duller, greyer surface means that there is less

'land' because the record actually contains more grooves. More 'land' appears as the number of grooves decreases. Grey or dull records are not defective by virtue of the apparent lack of gloss.

They simply contain more grooves and hence more music. In fact, it will be seen if discs which appear dull are slanted so that light is reflected from the groove walls, that their surfaces are black and glossy. a

"Some Columbia records are produced by process of variable pitch which uses up practically all of the 'land'. In this process the space between adjacent grooves is gov- erned by the loudness of the music, allowing the greatest possible playing time without sacrificing any recording quality or volume.

"Heat and dust are the two greatest dangers to records. Long playing records should never be stored near radiators or other scources of hear. High temperatures will aggravate the tendency to warp if records are not held flat. Proper storage is the most important preventative for record warpage.

"Flattening warped records is a slow pro- cess. In many cases months are required.

Records should be placed in their jackets on a flat surface, like a glass table top, and weighted down with more records or some other large, flat object that will cover the entire surface.

"Records should be stored absolutely flat, stacked either vertically or horizontally, but flat.

Multiple -disc sets in albums or boxes should not be mixed in horizontal stacks with single records, since the variation in thickness will cause warpage.

Such sets should always be stored vertically.

"Careless dropping of the needle on a record surface should be avoided. But once the record is scratched, the audible effects can be minimized somewhat by turning down the phonograph treble tone control.

"Records should always be put back into their jackets immediately after each playing.

Long playing discs should not be left to lie around unprotected. And be sure to buckle the jackets in order to slide the record easily into its container and to permit one to hold the record lightly at the edge while re- inserting.

"A dusty record should be cleaned with a slightly dampened cloth. This will remove lint and grit from the surfaces, although the lint alone is not particularly harmful.

"Grease marks from fingerprints should be removed because they will retain par- ticles of grit and dust.

Rub them off with a dry cloth.

Any lint which remains can then be removed with a damp cloth.

Continued on page io6

Crossover

Networks

Any

Bass

Good News

. . .

The Dual ready for delivery.

This is

Air

-Coupler for bass reinforcement is in stock, the improved model described cation last October, and in the in Radio Communi-

Winter Edition of

High

Fidelity.

As more and more extended -range systems, reports in. One of of the most critical audio experts install

Air

-Couplers in the most of remarkable performance continue to pour enthusiastic owners is

Paul deMars, former chief engineer of the Yankee Network, avid a pioneer in high -quality reproduction.

He said: talent

FM as

I am getting from my Air

-Coupler in combination with a dual speaker

"I have never heard such magnificent tone from records and for intermediate and treble frequencies." live

-

For your convenience

.

.

. the

Air

-Coupler is available in both knock -down form, so that you can assemble it with a screwdriver, or completely assembled, ready to mount the speaker. Made plywood, with each piece cut to precision fit. entirely of first

-quality

3/4

-in.

DUAL

AIR-

COUPLER,

IN KNOCK -DOWN

FORM

Every part is bled Air furnished, including

-Coupler, before front the screws. panel is

Illustration mounted. any

12

-in. speaker, the recommended size. now only

$34.50 shows

Opening is assem- cut for

DUAL AIR

-COUPLER, COMPLETELY ASSEMBLED now only

$47.50

If you haven't the time or the inclination to put the parts together yourself, then here is the

Air

-Coupler completely assembled and finished in a truly professional manner. Supplied as illustrated, with front panel in place, ready for the speaker.

MISCELLANY: we carry in stock

.

Alter

600

-B 12

-in. speaker for the

Air

-Coupler, $46.50; Peerless

S

-230Q output transformer,

$26.00; Peerless

R-560A power transformer, $16.00; Peerless C-455A power choke, $10.00;

English KT-66 output tube, $4.95; Raton CHU2 tweeter, $23.10.

for

System of

Two or

More

Loudspeakers

By a judicious selection of associated components, the three coil sizes on which G.A. enable our customers to secure networks which will operate at has low

-cost crossover

14 standardized different cross- over frequencies!

For the experimenter, that means a wide range of choice without having to break the bank to buy dozens means making

Mh)

-

only and it of three coil passes on coils. For sizes (10.2, the wants to install his system once and those savings

5.1, man and direct who for all, it money saved, because G.A. saves money by to

1.6 its customers.

If you want to use three speakers with crossover points at 350 and 1,100 cycles, for example, just order two of the networks listed above (for an with rapid crossover attenuation, it

8-ohm system, would be

No.

6 and No.

8).

As most everyone has found out by now, G.A. is headquarters for know, we're the crossover networks. only organization

As far as we stocking networks specifically designed for use with Air

-Couplers.

If you are in doubt about the selection of a network for your particular speakers, send

10c for the G.A. Network

Data Sheet, from which you can determine your requirements exactly.

12

RAPID ATTENUATION NETWORKS db droop per octave.

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700

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10

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$11.50

12.00

16.00

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24.00

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13.00

17.50

24.00

26.50

4 ohms 550

275

175

85

11

12

13

14

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26.50

Complete networks include necessary capacitors and level controls.

Be sure to indicate you whether want just the coils or the complete network.

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General

Reinforcement

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South Egremont, Massachusetts

Co. tos www.americanradiohistory.com

Zeed

Pickering

410

Control Unit

A self -powered preamplifier

- control unit far use with basic power amplifiers, such as the Musicians Amplifier and the Williamson type, as others of well as the new

Stephens 500D.

FEATURES:

Accurately equalized for

ALL magnetic cartridges.

A

3- position compensator for matching the characteristics of pop- ular types of records; response curves are unaffected by make of pickup used.

Separate bass and treble controls, flat position of controls indicated by a round dot. Controls are step type.

Cathode follower tion from power of frequency permits remote loca- amplifier without loss response.

Three

AC outlets on rear of chassis per- mits master control of power for other components of a music system with the

AC switch on the panel.

Amplifier and tube sockets shock mount- ed to minimize microphonics.

Tubes:

1

- 6AU6;

3

- 6AB4;

1

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Built in power supply, specially designed for minimum hum level, removes the problem of properly decoupling when tapping a power filament voltages. Plugs into

117 volts,

50/60 cycles

AC. amplifier for

B+ and

Dimensions: 3"

H; 6

3/4"

D; 13

1/2"

W.

NET PRICE $99.00

They're

New;

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Pickering mag- netic cartridges with Dynamic Coupling provides: better tracking, better frequency response and less intermodulation distor- tion. The appearance is the same, but the entire inner mechanism has been rede- signed to provide cleaner and more real- istic quality than ever before.

New

Stylus Mounting Assembly reduces

"needle talk" to a minimum. Provides greatest possible compliancewith mini- mum mass.

Constant stylus contact with the groove over the

(20- 20,000 c.p.s.). record entire audio spectrum

Full frequency response; full transient response; no resonances; no mistrack- ing; no grinding of the groove wall.

DIAMOND CARTRIDGES:

For microgroove records,

Model D140S

$

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For standard

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Model D120M

$

24.90

SAPPHIRE CARTRIDGES

For microgroove

For standard

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$15.00 records,

Model S120M

$9.90

Price Reduced

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The

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Radio's

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Two models engineered by us from a design published by CONSUMERS' RESEARCH,

INC., Washington, N.

J. (Special Bulletin

#31). PEERLESS TRANSFORMERS used

Clear, rich, throughout on both models. full, brilliant price.

High

Fidelity at a low, low

Output for this a transformers especially designed transformer.

CR

-10 uses a standard quality "husky" transformer, response from

30

- 15,000 cps; CR -10Q uses the famous line and

20 transformer; vacuum impregnated moisture to 20,000

Peerless

S240Q,

20 -20 resistant, c.p.s. response from

All triodes in this unique circuit em- ploying self bias.

Seven tubes including rectifier.

Harmonic distortion less than

2

%; hum level

60 to 70db below rated output.

Built in preamplifier for magnetic tridges, input for radio tuner, car- crystal microphone or other signal source.

Se- lector switch, volume control, bass and treble controls and power switch are the controls on the front panel.

Kits supplied with punched chassis, fin- ished in bronze hammertone, with con- trol designations silk screened on the front panel; all necessary components; transformers and choke; tubes. Easy to follow by instruction book containing step

-

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NEW LOW

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Model

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Model CR -10W wired

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& ELECTRONICS CO.

INC.

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F

DUANE ST. NEW YORK

7, N.

Y.

BARCLAY

7

-1840

New and Improved

Pickering Cartridges

FOUR COMMANDMENTS

Continued from page

105

"The record cleaning cloth should not be too moist. If too damp, it may leave drop- lets of water on the record which harmful in themselves, but which are not will give a spotty appearance to the disc when the moisture dries.

"Many record collectors are concerned bout static. Actually this condition does not in itself interfere in the least with the sound of the record.

Discs accumulate electricity because they are good insula- tors, and the electrical charge attracts dust particles. The charge is developed thr- ough friction, even by rubbing a dry cloth across the record surface. For this reason, cleaning should be done with a damp cloth."

READERS' FORUM

Continued from page

15

Some time ago, we established a bi- weekly habit that is now becoming tradition and a very enjoyable one.

On

Friday nights, for two hours, we project ourselves into a make

- believe world and have symphony concerts of our own. The concert starts at 8:oo p.m., programs that have been typed up are passed out, the lights are dimmed and by the light of a warm fire and in comfortable chairs, we can easily imagine ourselves at a live concert.

The program usually follows the set con- cert pattern: two or three shorter selections, an intermission and then the major work of the evening. Some nights are devoted to chamber music, piano recitals or a complete opera. Until one has tried it, it is truly amazing how much "alive" a good high fidelity system can sound in semi -darkness.

Later, over coffee cups, a hot discussion on the relative merits of composers, con- ductors, orchestras, recordings, hi

-fi equip- ment and audio in general take place.

John H. Nowak

Germfask, Mich.

SIR:

In the last issue of

HIGH

-FIDELITY, there is an article in Readers' Forum that interested me very much,

"Group

Listening ".

Every

Friday night in my home is

Concert night.

My friends enjoy the recordings very much, and they are all sad good listeners. The only part is none of them has a high fidelity setup.

My installation is a

Scott

800 -B tuner with separate amplifier, Rek -O

-Kut

T12 -H transcription turntable, Gray io8-B arm using G

-E magnetic pickups with diamond styli.

Equalizer is the Radio Shack HL t

-6 with six positions.

I use an Altec Lansing

6o4

-B in a corner cabinet. The next thing

I am planning to buy is a tape recorder;

I like the

Concertone very much.

I have been collecting records for ten years and am proud very well of my collection. It is rounded out: symphonies, con- certos, three complete operas, and chamber music. On chamber music, above all, with

Continued on page 107

lob

www.americanradiohistory.com

READERS'

FORUM

Continued from page rob a good high fidelity system, the enjoyment is endless.

For the last three years,

I have been switching my library to long playing records which is well over two

I hundred now. wish HIGH-

FIDELITY

Magazine complete success.

I am sure we will years look back a few from now, when everyone who loves good music and knows what high fidelity means, will know

HIGH

-FIDELITY

Magazine is a must for the layman.

Les

J.

Sampson

New York, N. Y.

SIR:

It seems as though pre- recorded music on tape is getting to be a big thing of late. The

A -V Library is probably the biggest venture, and it's been preceded and followed by possibly half a dozen smaller outfits. And, that's where Nocturne comes into the picture.

Nocturne turned exclusively tape several years ago, and furnishes

"mood music" in any degree desired to wired music outlets,

FM stations employing continuous musical segments, private collectors who desire com- plete symphonies cut for them on tape, etc.

Our latest esting

-

- and probably the most inter- venture is that of furnishing adaptable to collectors tapes of color slides and color movies. We prepare mentary, complete with running corn

- appropriate back- ground music, that can make

"talkies" out of amateur film work.

We're not a very large outfit, but we've got ideas.

And, application is background moving very music for every fast of late. We don't have catalogues as yet, but can supply listings to fit every need.

Just thought that our activities might interest you and your readers a bit.

Jack

Hartley

Nocturne Productions

88

Diamond

Bridge Avenue

Hawthorne, N. J.

SIR:

I most heartily agree with your decision to use smaller type for the Record Reviews, run -over material, etc.

We're more inter- ested in content than pages, and anyway,

I would expect that one whose auditory per- ception warranted high fidelity audio would not be too deficient in the visual acuity de- partment!

My opinion of your magazine is probably best expressed by the

3

-year renewal sub- scription which

I sent the day after your expiration notice arrived.

I especially like the Record Reviews and think it a good on the eyes too that idea to have them on yellow paper so they're easy

- for the fine is print!) easier

Paul

Vance,

Jr.

Urbana,

Ill.

We think the ivory color in this issue is real purty

...

do readers agree?

Continued on page ro8

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20" high x 213/4" wide x

15í4" deep.

Bass reflex cabinet volume:

6 cu. ft.

ASSEMBLED CABINETS

(Sanded smooth, ready for finishing)

MODEL 70

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AM. FM section has temperature compensated lator for minimum drift;

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TAPEMASTER

PT -121

TAPE RECORDER. cost basic recorder for use with or radio. Dual track. Records at

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Fast forward speed,

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Companion unit for

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PFANSTIEL "PFAN- WOOD"

TONE ARM.

New func- tionally designed high -fidelity tone arm with no interfering resonances. Features knuckle -type ing for both lateral and vertical motions. bear-

Tracking angle is adjustable for any record diameter. Pres- sure

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ILLINOIS

READERS' FORUM

Continued from page

roi

SIR:

I was much interested in letter partially quoted in

Mr. Burnside's

"Noted With

In- terest" in the Spring issue of

HIGH -FIDELITY.

My experience matches his, only

I do not hesitate to return records which

I find have been damaged way. Perhaps many or which are

I am more faulty in any fortunate than in that

I deal with a shop where this is possible.

I was much interested, while

I was in

London last Fall, to find that some record shops advertised

"mint copies" which is equivalent to Mr. Burnside's sealed carton.

The problem posed by

Mr.

Burnside will require the cooperation and unders-.tnding of the manufacturer, the merchant and the consumer.

The consumer contribution ro this problem is not well enough understood.

It seems to me that there should be less and less need for the buyer to want to play a record at the shop before buying. This is due

-

to the great increase in the number and quality of record reviews in many magazines

HIGH

-FIDELITY, for example.

Ordinary shopping habits and attitudes do not function effectively when one buys records. The purchase of a recorded sym- phony, for example, should be a matter some study and thought, regardless of of the status of one's economic health.

Such study and thought is now possible without ac- tually playing the record once, twice or more times at the possible expense vide means of the merchant or another buyer.

If

the merchant finds it necessary to pro- for the prospective buyer to re- view a record at first hand, he should see to it that the best possible equipment is avail- able and that the salesman supervises the playback session.

I have in mind only serious music, ex- pertly performed and recorded on LP rec- ords. The answer to

Mr.

Burnside's com- plaint is the

"mint copy

".

This will require some re- education of the record buyer and a willingness on the part of the merchant and manufacturer to take back records which can be perfect. demonstrated to be technically im-

H.

M.

Evans

New

York,

N. Y.

SIR:

It has just occurred to me that FM broad- casting might get a lift

if

you can get all your readers to write something similar to the following to the advertisers.

We lost an

FM broadcaster in this town because he couldn't get enough advertising to pay him to run an

AM and an FM station simulta- neously. Worse yet, he owns the local daily and through said sheet, he gave the im- pression that his

FM station was being dis- continued because and

I meet many

FM was on the way out, lifted eyebrows that in- dicate that I am out of date because I just fresh bought a fancy new

FM outfit.

Would it be ethical for you to give me the names of any other subscribers in

Kan

-

Continued on page

109 www.americanradiohistory.com

"Designed

for

Discriminating Users"

READERS' FORUM

Continued from page io8

"SO

VN

DC

RA FT

ERS"

F.M.-A.M.

13

Tube

Chassis

HIGH FIDELITY

Complete, ready to plug in

-including amplifier with all tubes and

10" or

12"

P.M. Speaker.

$6950

list

$139.50 kakee to your magazine? The local record stores tell me that they have a limited stock of classical records because no one ever asks for them.

I am ordering mine from New

York and Chicago, and am wondering if others here are doing the same. As a gang, we might convince the shops here that classical music does have an audience.

Will readers write direct to Mr.

Hoskin

- son? His mail address is given below along with excerpts from his letter to a broadcast advertiser.

NEW!

2ND

EDITION of the only complete reference on

AUDIO!

`The

Recording&

Reproduction of

SOUND" by

OLIVER

READ

FM tuning range 88 Megacycles -108 Megacycles.

AM tuning range 535 Kilocycles -1650 Kilocycles.

Individual circuit de- coupling insures minimum cir- cuit drift.

Dial large, easy -to -read multi -color slide rule type.

Tone range covers cycles. all tones from

30 cycles to 15000

Brand new, pre -amp high. original factory sealed for reluctance pickup and

Pull audio output approx.

14 watts. Volume tone and bass controls. Antenna, folded FM aerial, knobs, plugs, etc.

Instructions incl.

Will accommodate

2 carton.

NTAL

12%" speakers. x input.

Built -in

10tjy" x

Push -

7%"

Webster Changers

Cartridge with

GE

$29.95

VM No. 950 WITH GE

CARTRIDGE

Console Cabinet

Changer. avialable to fit

Chassis &

28.95

Record

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY

-FULLY

GUARANTEED

"Reynolds

Metal Co.

Louisville, Kentucky

Att: Sales

Department

"Gentlemen:

"I wish to thank you for your sponsoring of the FM broadcasts of the symphony or- chestra programs at 5:3o p.m. CST on Satur- day evenings. This is a musical treat that is priceless and enjoyed by our entire family, and also by some of our neighbors who are not fortunate enough to have

FM receivers.

"Transmission quality on amplitude

- modulated broadcasts is so bad that we lis- tened to AM programs only long enough to get the weather forecasts, until we got our new FM receiver lately. The tone quality of your symphony, broadcast by WMAQ-

FM, is so realistic and so easy to listen to that you will find us in your audience every

Saturday evening."

WEBSTER- CHICAGO

c c

WEBCOR"

RECORD CHANGERS

Model No. 100,

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Model No. 110 with automatic shut-off after last Record. SAME AS

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Web. 100 w

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Web. 110 w

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VM 950 w

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REPLACE

YOUR OLD CHANGER

NOW

$22.95

$15.95

$29.95

$33.95

$28.95

$3.50

95c

R.C.A.

-VICTOR

2

-SPEED RECORD

CHANGER

Plays 10" and 12" records automatically and shuts off after last record. Flipover. Crystal cartridge

&

2 needles

(mfr. by

Measures 12" x 13 or Radio set.

VM

"-

exclusively for

Fully guaranteed.

Original Factory Cartons. METAL

BASE $3.50 extra. easily attaches to

$

r

R.C.A.). your

T.V.

895

Send for descriptive literature

Order direct from this ad $10 on C.O.D. orders.

Address mail and C.O.D. orders to Dept. H.F.

AN

222

SOUND

EQUIPMENT

CO.

Fulton St.,

New

York

7,

N. Y.

Phone

WOrth

0632

Rt.

2

Kankakee,

Ill.

SIR:

Martinsville,

Va.

E.

M.

Hoskinson list

I would appreciate your sending to me a of home recordists who would be in- terested in corresponding with others with a similar hobby.

I happen to be a disc record- ing enthusiast who gets as much enjoyment from recording classical music from the radio as from any commercial record yet to be issued.

There is just something about an actual Met broadcast or a

Toscanini concert that doesn't get into the grooves of corn

- mercial records.

Along this line, there may be a collector or two who would be interested in trading copies of their best attempts, or of some program that they didn't get.

Many thanks, and wish you would hurry that next issue of

HIGH-

FIDELITY on as

I have just about finished memorizing the last three.

Robert

M.

Gravely

SIR:

I have one fault to find with a record extolled in your

54.

I

"The Hat Trick" on page bought Tchaikovsky's

Fourth on West- minster

WL

5096 and settled back for the miracle to happen. It did! The music was

Continued on page

rio

Completely revised and vastly en- larged new edition

OVER

800

PAGES largest selling book in its field us or

Sound Enginee

Fi

Enthusiasts,

P.

A.

Men, Broadcasting

Stations, Recording

Studios, Students

CONTENTS:

A Partial List of

Authoritative

Chapters:

Behavior of Sound Waves;

Basic

Recording

Methods; Lateral Disc

Recording; Microgroove

Recording;

The

Decibel; Phono Reproducers;

Styli

;

Microphones; Loudspeakers and

En- closures;

Dividing Networks and Filters;

At- tenuators and Mixers; Home Music Systems;

P.A. Systems;

Amplifiers; AM and

FM

Tun- ers

-PLUS

HUNDREDS OF OTHER SUBJECTS

Now you any can have all the right answers to subject in the field of Audio.

Learn how to select and get the most out of recording equipment. Tells you how to select the proper amplifier for given applications, how to test amplifier performance, how to elimi- nate hum. Explains microphone, speaker and pickup principles and selection factors.

Shows how to utilize inverse feed -back, ex- panders and compressors. Covers hundreds of subjects

-a

vast wealth of reliable infor- mation found in no other single volume.

If you work in the field of Audio, this book be- longs in your library.

Order your copy today!

6

"'x

9"

Hard Covers

800 pages 700

ONLY

$795

illustrations

ORDER

TODAY

Order from your Parts

Jobber, or write direct to

HOWARD

W.

SAMS &

CO., INC.

2201

E.

46th

St.,

Indianapolis 5, Ind.

My

(check)

(money order) is enclosed. for

$

Send

Reproduction copy(ies) of The

Recording

& of Sound(.

R

-2).

$7.95 per copy.

Name

Address

L

City

State

109 www.americanradiohistory.com

READERS' FORUM

Continued from page

109

IT'S

A

SHAME

throw away that beautiful to old Console...replace the obsolete radio with a modern, easily

-installed

1

10

ESPEY

AM

/FM

CHASSIS and your console is right

- up

- to

- date

It is not necessary to spend a large sum of money to modernize your old radio or to become a "High

Fidelity" enthusiast. ESPEY chassis provide the

Highest Quality at moderate prices.

Fully licensed under RCA and Hazeltine patents.

The photo shows the Espey Model

511

-C, sup- plied ready to play. Equipped with tubes, an- tenna, speaker, and all necessary hardware for mounting. NEW

FEATURES

-Improved

Frequency ulation circuit, drift compensated rectifier,

-

12 tubes and preamplifier pick -up tubes purpose tubes

-

High quality

Push-pull beam power audio

Switch for easy changing reluctance pickups former supplying

4

-

Multi -tap

-8

-MF output to crystal

-500

AM audio ohms.

10 or

-4

mod- plus dual reception watts

-

- variable output trans-

Write Dept.

HF for literature and complete specifications on Model

511

-C and others.

Makers of line radios since 1928.

MANUFACTURING

COMPANY,

INC.

528 EAST 72nd STREET. NEW YORK 21, N.

Y. e with

Uses

I%

+I

'\\\\\

AMPLIFIER

First Williamson matching

Altec Lansing Peerless

Practically distortionless at s watts output. db

Type

761

Amplifier

-

both less from 10 cycles to 100 te. ie4 supplied output transformer.

Harmonie and than

1/2 i of splitter of 807 tubes. The a voltage

SSN7, output transformer tured by the Peerless and Is may

Type really discerning listener. difference and measurements superb rately)

Amplifier (which consists of using

BSN7, and a a a push-pull output

-the

+ choice actually bear out the performance. Frequency response highs and lows

Harmonic and to

Output impedance 4,

8, or 18 ohms.

The new

Heathkit Williamson the best obtainable in of the from

The

10 cycles with amplifiers he allow be

Division

Amplifier today

You you equal crispness stage can purchased amplifier to stage is rear and intermodulatlon distortion than

1/a of

1

7o at

5 watts output harsh and unpleasant listening fatigue.

Audio Engineering Magazlne.for November, 1949. and is is to the one considered by engineers using using a kit hear the clarity. both less eliminate published In throughout

1 db the the the audio field as one of the best ever developed. The

Main built to qualities which contribute their highest of Altec Lansing standards. sepa- and phase a manufac-

Output impedances of 4. 8, and 18 ohms are available. The power supply uses a separate chassis

The main chassis with husky Chicago Transformer power transformer and choke, and

700V Mallory filters for long hum -free operation. A 5V4G amplifier and high rectifier power supply by

5y211

Is used. are each on ide by

111 a long.

qeatede

AMPLIFIER

KIT

The dividual bass and treble tone- selected.

12AX7 (or 12AY7) dual turn amplifier controls which up to 15db of boost or attenuation. A lects preamplifier triode or

PREAMPLIFIER AND TONE

CONTROL with a a

78 record types, and a

12A177 installations notched shafts of the controls and switches

UNIT KIT either also is

In

á" well kit first amplifier magnetic, crystal, or suited to custom either vertical of shaft lengths to

1 consists of: stage or be stage switch

-

each on allow provide panel it will and a for

LP in- se operate special variety

Dimensions: 21/2" high by

WRITE

WA

-Al Amplifier

(Main Amplifier kit and

-

Combination

Power Supply) plete with

WA -P1

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1

-

com-

$69.50

4

-

(Main ipped kit

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Less WA-P1

Wgt., only and

29 lbs.

Express only)

-

Combination

Power Supply).

$49.75

FOR

9e

CATALOG

7

WA -P1 Preamplifier

Kit only. (less power supply) (Tubes included). To- tal Ship.

7 lbs. (Shipped

Express or Parcel

Post)

$19.75

\`\ reproduced with the help of Messrs. Rek -O-

Kut, Pickering, Williamson, and Altec-

Lansing. After control so turning down the volume that the lows were just audible, a crashing crescendo knocked a pewter teapot off the fireplace mantle. Since my living room is approximately

14 by 3o ft.,

I would warn anyone not to buy this record unless they have at least a small auditorium handy.

I have one suggestion. Every improve- ment we try to make in our means of repro- duction brings with it at least several minor irritants the cure for which most of us find by the good old trial and error method. Such things as a buzzing tone arm, a

6o -cycle hum, etc., present problems that are easily solved if you know how. Why not an article on DDT for the bugs of high fidelity?

John

A. Timm

Boston, Mass.

SIR:

After reading the cordial and enthusiastic letters in Readers' Forum,

I am tempted to invite some kindred spirit to try to ease the intra- family tension which was raised when

I suggested placing a r 5

-in. loudspeaker in the plaster wall of our living room. The good wife is resigned to the idea if the eye- sore can be camouflaged.

I have thought of concealing it behind a framed watercolor which can be hinged so as to swing back against the wall when the loudspeaker is being used, but

I whether it is a good idea. don't know

Hit is placed where planned, there will not be adequate space for it, suitably -sized pictures on either side of if it is merely covered by fabric and frame painted to match the wall.

Any suggestions by readers who can solve the delicate domestic impasse will be grate- fully received.

New Wilmington, Pa.

Hugh M. Hart, M.D.

SIR:

As devoted audiophiles

(my husband on the technical end and

I on the listening end) may we add our praise, commendation and appreciation of the job you are doing with

HIGH- FIDELITY.

My request concerns an article in the near future on the care and storage of records, both LP's and 78's.

Mrs.

C. IV.

Watson

Chicago, Ill.

See page 22, this issue.

SIR:

To be more specific as to why

I find

HIGH -FIDELITY

SO enjoyable,

I think you have produced just what you apparently set out to do; namely, a collection of timely and informative articles and departments earmarked for those who are primarily in- terested in faithful reproduction per re rather than in the complexities that create it.

James

Cause)

Portland, Ore. www.americanradiohistory.com

THE

AUDIO

EXCHANGE

Have you any high fidelity audio equipment which you wish to trade for something better?

We will accept your present equip- ment in trade for any

NEW equipment on the market.

Currently we are featuring Williamson

- circuit amplifiers, built exclusively for

The Audio Exchange to our stringent

specifica- tions.

The exceptional freedom from

distortion,

wide and

fre-

quency range

"pres-

ence" of the

William's on circuit is well known. You can depend

upon the

finest mater-

ials and workman-

ship in our models.

Oil

-filled condensers and the best over

-rated components are used through- out.

807 able at output

$5.00 tubes. KT additional.

-66 tubes avail-

Available with the following transformers: output

AE -100PC

AE

-100PW with

Partridge

CFB with Partridge

WWFB

AE

-100AT with

Acrosound

TO

-290

AE

-100A with Acrosound

TO

-300

$145.00

$131.00

$120.00

$130.00

Other on output transformers are available request.

Send coupon for complete data

-sheet.

THE

AUDIO EXCHANGE offers these complete services:

1.

We sell all

NEW equipment.

2. We accept used equipment for trade

-in.

3. We sell GUARANTEED used equipment.

4. We manufacture equipment.

AVAIL

YOURSELF OF THE NEWEST

IDEA

IN

THE

AUDIO

BUSINESS. WRITE

TODAY.

PHONE

Olympia

8

-0445.

E

THE

AUDIO EXCHANGE, INC.,

DEPT. HF.

-1

159 -19 Hillside Avenue

Jamaica 32, New York

Enclosed is

$

, for which send me amplifier model No.

Send data sheet.

Send catalogue of used equipment.

NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

L

ZONE. .STATE

ADVERTISING

INDEX

Allied

Radio Corp.

Altec Lansing Corp...

Ampex

Electric Corp.

Arrow

Electronics, Inc..

Audak

Co.

Audio

Devices,

Inc

Audio

Exchange, Inc.

83

88

15

92

77

Inside Front Cover

111

Bell Sound Systems, Inc.

Berlant Associates

Bonafide

Radio

&

Electronics Co.

Book

Department

British Industries,

Inc.

Brociner Electronic Lab.

Brook Electronics, Inc..

Browning Laboratories,

Inc.

Capitol

Records, Inc.

Childs, Ulric

J.

Collins Audio

Products Co.

Columbia Records

Creative Audio Associates

Custom Electronics

Back Cover

104

.

8

.59

101

87

.93

12

101

107

85

104

112

7

11

Duotone, Inc.

Electronic Workshop

Electro- Voice, Inc.

Espey

Mfg.

Co., Inc.

G.

&

H.

Wood Products

Co.

Garrard Sales Corp.

General Apparatus Co..

General Electric

Co.

Gray

Mfg.

Co.

Harvey

Radio

Co.....

The

Heath

Co.

High

-Fidelity Magazine

Hudson Radio

&

TV

Corp.

99

5

110

107

2

105

13

10

96

110

97

91

JAN Electronics

Jensen

Jensen

Industries, Inc.

Mfg.

Co.

109

87

1,

97

Klipsch

&

Associates

Lansing Sound Corp..

Lea Pocket Scoros, Inc.

Leonard Radio, Inc..

Lowe Associates, Inc.

78

80

104

102, 103

104

Magnecord, Inc.

McIntosh Engineering Lab.

The

Music Box

Newark

Electric Co.

Newcomb

Audio

Pdts. Co.

Orradio Industries, Inc.

Oxford

Electric Corp.

Permo, Inc.

Permoflux

Corp...

Pickering

&

Co., Inc.

Precision Electronics, Inc.

Presto Recording

Co.

RYB, Inc.

Radio Craftsmen, Inc.

Radio Electric Service Co..

Radio Shack Corp.

Reeves

Soundcraft Corp.

Rek

-O

-Kut

Co.

Russellcraft

Co., Inc.

9

112

60

108

79

81

98

82

84

16

99

95

93

94, 95

..

104

100

14

91

89

Sams,

Howard W., Co., Inc..

Schwann, W.

Scott,

Sun

Hermon Hosmer,

Radio

&

Electronics

Inc...

Sounds of our Times

Stephens

Mfg.

Co.

Stromberg- Carlson

Sound

Div.

Co...

109

57

86

63

90

1 1

1

106

Tape Master, Inc.

Terminal

Radio Corp..

Traders

Marketplace

..Inside

University

Loudspeakers, Inc.

Urania

Records, Inc.

Back

92

Cover

101

94

61

Voice and Vision,

Inc.

Weathers Industries.

Webster- Chicago

Corp......

Westminster Records

103

89

6

63

STROMBERG -CARLSON SOUND DIVISION

ROCHESTER 21, N.

Y.

Ask about the new

STROMBE

RG-

CARLSON matched line of

"Custom

Four

Hundred"

High- Fidelity

Equipment

TUNER

AMPLIFIER

SPEAKER

CHANGER

AND

CABINET

First shown at the

ELECTRON

ICS

PARTS

SHOW

Chicago

III

www.americanradiohistory.com

A NEW

CORNER SPEAKER

FM BROADCASTING

Continued from page 36

The

IIIC,«T too

WORLD'S

FINEST..

AMPLIFIER

I

=

h

MODEL

4

HORN

t.IN-rnture available upon request.

BROCINER

ELECTRONICS LABORATORY

1546

Second Ave., New York 28,

N. Y.

MANUFACTURERS

OF

PHONOGRM:PH PREAMPLIFIER-EQUALIZERS

HORN-LOADED CORNER REPRODUCER

THE

ULTRA -LINEAR

POWER AMPLIFIERS

DUAL -HORN

CORNER REPRODUCER COMPLETE

THE TRANSCENDENT

CUSTOM INSTALLATIONS

Comparison

Performance of unrivalled purity and smooth- ness over the entire audible range! Powered by u remarkable twin -cone driver unit* designed ex- pressly for horn loading. this dual born achieves naturalness that simply cannot be pad into words or expressed in terms of specifications.

MODER-

ATE

IN SIZE AS WELL AS PRICE. it lends itself to graceful. attractive, decorative treatment that renders it a complement to the finest decor.

Available in traditional as well as modern design.

Hear the Brociner Model

4

Horn.

You will agree that its unobtrusive naturalness places it in a class by itself.

The middle range :.nd high Petrie tones arc d

.ne,,

I

uniformly by o rear, tor horn of unique design

In the

I.:...

Inge. the driver nit is efficiently coupled to the air means of folded horn utilizing the corner of the room

Io prolongation of the horn strur tore

"N1Ode by LU,

Wei of England for

Brutiner

NEW!

CONTROL

AMPLIFIER

The

MODEL CA -2 ideal

"front end" for bask power amplifiers.

proves-

50W

-2 Amplifier

50 Watts (Peak: 1001°

Less than 1% monic or

lar- inter

modulation distòr- tion even at peak

power-

reproduc- ing the

entire

audible range from

20- 20,000 cps

Compare McIntosh with any amp iffier

50W

-2

-at

any price.

For it is only by such comparison that you can fully appreciate the truly superior qualities of this unique, patented instrument reached the that has theoretical limit of quality and efficiency! No other amplifier can give you so much power wit}) so little distortion, at s.ich low cost.

OSS

..

SINGLE FREQUENCY HARMONIC DISTORTION

..,,EEO

Max

_i

,o.cr pa:-

,.0-oaa

PHAS SHIFT VS. FREQUENCY CHARACTERISTIC

10

0 50

AOO.00,

Write today for a technical information and name of nearest dealer.

AE

-2A Amplifier

Equalizer

MC

INTOSH

LABORATORY,

INC.

320

Water

St.,

Binghamton, N.

Y. faculties. In general, they seem to take the attitude: "I

Or: don't care how the station, or program, sounds as long as you tune it in."

"It must be good enough, because we don't get any complaints."

That is the situation at many stations. To most station managers, it seems, the name of the program or the performer is of para- mount importance. If it's a good name, it must be a good show. Some of the poorest

"reception"

I have ever heard has been at the annual conventions of the National

Association of

Radio

&

Television Broad- casters. Each year, there is a final at which some banquet of the big -name talent pro- vides what is described as

"entertainment

".

You would expect such performers to be really experts at microphone technique.

But no! Practically without exception, they drape themselves on the microphone stand, and sing or shout at the top of their lungs so close to the mike that they seem to be chewing off the paint. The sound system of the ballroom at the

Hilton Hotel in

Chicago is really very good, but what comes out of the loudspeakers when the talent mugs the mike is simply awful to hear!

To anyone of even moderately critical taste, ten minutes of that kind of audio re- production is too much. Yet most of the men who run the broadcast stations in this

Country listen to those performances every year and, apparently, think they are wonder- ful. At

For my least, part, that's the way they applaud.

I'd like to see them put a fence around the mikestand so that no one could get nearer to it than ten feet.

Then,

I think, the sound from the speakers would seem to come from human beings and musical in- struments, and not from Tin Pan alley.

Of course, that is a general criticism, al- beit well deserved. Nevertheless, there are important exceptions, and there are signs of continuing improvement among the FM stations. Listening to radio is definitely a habit, and broadcasters have come to take that habit for granted, forgetting that is is possible for people to become discouraged by the inferior programs and poor reception to point where they get into the habit of

NOT listening.

Audio broadcasting no longer has the advantage of novelty which television enjoys. Hence listener interest can be held only by good reception of good programs.

And since station managers only judge their programs by the letters of comment from listeners, programs will be improved only to the extent to which we make our opinions known by writing the stations about what we don't like, and what we do like, too.

Subscriptions to

HIGH -FIDELITY make wonderful gifts for friends, customers, and associates. For special group rates on

3 or more subscriptions entered write the Circulation at one time,

Department, HIGH

-

FIDELITY,

P.O. Box 600, Great Barring- ton, Mass. www.americanradiohistory.com

NEW

GARRARD

Manual

3

-Speed

Model

M

Record

Player

Perfect a

Assembly for

LP libraries

- really fine player at low cost! Identical to

RC80 3

-speed changer, ex- cept for manual changing.

Has 4

-pole, heavy duty, silent motor; weighted turntable for flywheel action; perfectly mounted parallel lift tone arm and interchangeable plug -in heads.

2533

With two pick -up shells, less cartridge.

Model

MC, dual stylus crystal turnover cartridge,

30.58

AUDAX

R

-2

-G

CARTRIDGE

Plug -in

Uses magnetic head for Garrard record changer.

Audax polyphase principal. A simple twist brings either the standard or microgroove stylus into play. Sapphire stylii. Fine reproduction. Only

6 -8 grams stylus point pressure.

17's

PICKERING MAGNETIC

Marvelous high level, output. Delivers

70 volts from

40 to 10,000 cps.

Stylus guard protects jewel tip. High imped- ance.

Simple mounting in transcription arms most and Webster and Garrard changers. For matched pair for Webster changer add

"W" number, fidelity with distortion -free milli- to Pickering for Garrard add

S

CARTRIDGES

-1405

Pickering magnetic cart- ridge with sapphire stylus for microgroove records.

15.00

S-120M

Pickering magnetic cart- ridge with sapphire stylus for standard groove rec- ords.

9.90

RADIO

CRAFTSMEN C

-10

Wide -Range

AM -FM

TUNER

Improved model

-

brilliant performance on both bands!

Built -in preamplifier

G.E., Pickering and for similar wide -range cartridges.

Automatic frequency con- trol circuit simplifies tun- ing, eliminates station drift.

Flat response less than 1% distortion treble controls,

FM

-AM chrome chassis. and antenna.. 11 from 20-

20,000 full output. Cascade inputs far phono and TV tubes plus

15" W, at rectifier. Polished

9"

D,

7"

H. cps,

S microvolts sensitivity, limiter.

Bass audio. Supplied

A

1

3

and with

S

RADIO CRAFTSMEN

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A new

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1

± than

0.1 db. Total har-

0.01% at average watt.

9950

F

NOTE: This combination phono amplifiers the necessary we have provides one of tested. TERMINAL interconnecting cable and plug the finest will set make for you. a

APPROVED

I

A

-800

PREAMP

Ideal for use with Williamson circuits. compact unit, a 4

-stage preamplifier with

In one inputs radio tuner and for magnetic pickup cartridges, crystal cartridge.

Separate bass power amplifiers such as and treble con- trols (boost & attenuation).

7- position compensator network. Designed as front end for high quality the

Williamson.

Uses 2-

7F7 dual triodes, rubber mounted to prevent microphonics. Pilot light.

12

"W,

4

"D,

2

"H.

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-for

high

-fidelity sound equipment!

SPECIAL SALE! and now

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TERMINAL new, will give you a liberal trade -in allowance on any standard brand amplifier; loudspeaker; tape, wire or disc recorder; two or three -speed record player; micro- phone or radio tuner.

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WEBSTER

#100-4

Record changer,

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Double needle cartridge.

Guaranteed new, in sealed facturers close -out. Only cartons.

Set manu-

Sorry, no mail or phone orders on this item.

BOGEN

R

-604

AM -FM

Corner enclosures for 12" and

15

" speakers using famous

Klipsch folded horn principle.

Extends speakers bass range to

35 cps! No Roominess. Increases power handling capacity of any speaker. veneers.

Beautiful hand -finished

291/x

"ARISTOCRAT" for 12"

Speakers

H,

19"

W,

161/2

"

D.

Mahogany

Blonde

58.51

62.23

"ROYAL" for 15"

Speakers

37"

H, 231/e" W, 241/2

"

D.

Mahogany

Blonde

105.84

111.72

ELECTROVOICE

TUNER

New

AM

FM tuner

& FM with

10 offering bands. magnificent reception over

20 db noise reduction on full

AM

&

Control and temperature stabilized contained

105 -125V, consuming 50 watts. off, b) Phono, c) FM, approved. 10" W,

60 cycle AC

5- d) position selector:

AM,

111/2'°

D, e) TV.

7"

H. oscillator. Self power supply,

UL a) Power

9735

-

New!

8HD

HORN

Diffraction horn with new distributed source principle offers and superior dispersion increased efficiency.

Molded fibreglass.

12W

L.F. DRIVER

Resonance 57 cps,

3

Ib.

Alnico

V magnet.

15 -20 watts.

16 ohms im- pedance.

121/4

" diem., 11" max. baffle opening, 7" depth behind mounting panel.

15W 15" L.F.

Driver

5295

70.56

882

BOGEN

HO10

All

Triode

Power

Amplifier

(en be mounted in console or custom installation.

A truly high -fidelity amplifier providing: minimum distortion (less than .3 at

10 watts), maximum frequency response

(flat from mum damping factor

(exceeds 20) and dynamic range (over 70 db).

10 to 50,000 cycles). tremendous

Opti-

9770

BOGEN RXPX

Remote

Controller

T

-25

H

-F DRIVER

Watts.

Response

±

5 db

500-

10 -25

13,000 cps. Impedance 16 ohms.

13/4

V magnet.

5" diem.,

6" deep. Throat lb. Alnico diam.

1".

92

X

-8

CROSSOVER

Full

1/2 section,

M- derived.

3 db loss point,

800 cps.

Impedance:

16 ohms. 8"x51/2"x41/2

".

2940

With single cable to combine remote with

H010 for complete, convenient control operation of power, function selection, bass

(over

39 db control), treble

(over 33 db control), volume and turnover frequency. Furniture finish.

5445

V

-M

955GE

-4

3

-SPEED CHANGER

WITH

GE

TRIPLE

-PLAY CARTRIDGE and

HEAVY DUTY

4 -POLE

MOTOR

NOW

...

better tape recordings at

LOW COST!

Model

PT

-121 TAPEMASTER

Plays through your own

Hi

Fi

Amplifier,

Radio or

Radio -Phono

System

Base and

Cables

Mixer -changer with one simple control knob.

Mounted in metal base. Fully jamproof. Auto- matically plays

7, 10 or

12 -inch records at

331/2,

45 or

78 rpm. Pickup arm returns to rest and motor shuts off after last record! 1314"

W, 12"

D,

8"

H.

With cables and plugs,

RTMA standard

71/2

" per sec. tape speed, fast forward and rewind.

Full monitoring and self -powered (105.125 V., 60 cycle AC).

Inputs for

Radio- Phonos and mike, outputs to

Amplifier and

8995

Headphones. Complete instructions furnished.

as

i4

Distributors of Radio and Electronic Equipment

CORTLANDT STREET

NEW YORK

7, N.

Y.

Phone:

WOrth

4 -3311

Cable Address: TERMRADIO www.americanradiohistory.com

/

f/

Z

/4

//7't

//(//l,frede>Zt)

THE

Pittsburgh

Symphony

Orchestra

CONDUCTED

BY

William

Steinberg

Hear these superb Capitol FDS Classics

BEETHOVEN:

Symphon y

No.

6 in F

Major (Pastorale)

SCHUBERT:

Symphony

No.

8 in

B

Minor (Unfinished)

Symphony

No.

2 in B

Flat

Major

The

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra conducted by William Steinberg

RAVEL:

Introduction et Allegro

DEBUSSY:

Danses Sacrée et

Ann Mason Stockton,

GLAZOUNOV:

Profane

Harpist

The

Seasons

-

Ballet Suite

Roger Dcsormiere conducting the

French National Symphony Orchestra

on Full Dimensional Sound

In selecting the Capitol label for his recording debut with the Pittsburgh

Symphony

Orchestra, William Steinberg joins the other noted artists who consider Capitol's

FULL

DIMENSIONAL

SOUND the foremost expression of the recording art today.

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symphony no.

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69

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WHAT

IS

FULL DIMENSIONAL

SOUND?

For music connoisseurs, Capitol's Full Dimensional

Sound is a development of supreme importance.

FDS is more than high fidelity, more than full range.

In addition to these qualities you will find in

FDS recordings balance and depth, usually sacrificed for the sake of range alone.

There is no "magic" to FDS. It results from the use of the most modern studio and recording equipment

...

painstaking care

...

plus a unique recording technique that permits maximum collaboration between artist, producer and engineer.

As you will bear, this technique makes possible the reproduction of all tonal characteristics in the natural color and true perspective of the original live performance.

Hear Capitol's current classical releases

-

identified by the FDS symbol

-

for recordings of great music, reproduced to the highest degree of dynamic fidelity made possible by the present state of the art.

A completely rewarding musical experience awaits you.

Send for free

'Playback

Characteristics Chart" of

Capitol FDS

Records and F

&

O

Frequency

Musical Scale

-Write:

Capitol Records Inc.,

Dept.

H

Sunset and Vine

Hollywood 28, California

TRADEMARK

FULL DIMENSIONAL

SOUND www.americanradiohistory.com

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