null  null
The Authoritative -Nag
phono cartridge directory
recording in quadraphonics
OFF
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
AUTO
Hirsch -Houck Laboratories put the Scott 382-C 110 -Watt AM/
FM stereo receiver through its paces for a review in a recent issue
of ELECTRONICS WORLD. In Hirsch-Houck's own words, here's
how the Scott measured up:
" ... the Perfectune FM tuning indicator ... is far easier to use
and more accurate than a zero -center tuning meter."
"AM ... has a clean, undistorted sound ... easy to listen to."
"The unit proved to be very sensitive, to no one's surprise."
"The FM tuner has an IHF usable sensitivity of 1.8 microvolts,
one of the steepest limiting
with full limiting at 3 microvolts
curves we have measured to date."
listen to the modestly priced Scott
Make your own review
382-C at your dealer's. For complete information on Scott stereo
components, write:
-
...
COSCOTT
Scott, Inc., Dept.010-02, Maynard, Mass. 01754
Export: Scott International, Maynard, Mass. 01754
H. H.
1970, H. H. Scott, Inc.
Check No. 100 on Reader Service Card
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This is the tape deck nur components
have been saving themselves for.
Right off the top, our RS-733US
gives your components an
incredible head start. Because
its three heads are made of Hot
Pressed Ferrite. And Ferrite
( pioneered by Panasonic) improves
frequency response a fantastic
25%. All by itself!
It also lets us create the
world's narrowest, most precise
tape-head gap. Which is exactly
what makes the high fidelit-w so
high. And it stays high. Because
Ferrite heads live more than ten
times longer than non-Fen:1e ones.
As you might expect, our
RS-736US has a top speed cf 15 i.p.s.
Which is nothing less than broadcast quality. ( For flexibility, it also
has two other speeds: 33/4 and 71/2. )
And the ontrols are designed
to keep everything
under
control. Lou'll find a separate
switch for tape and speeLequalizatron. Two large VU meters to
let you slpervise separate sources
(live and electronic ). Slide controls.
And a m mitor switch (fc a each
channel) to let yoL compere
what's inside with.vhat'sautside.
To let you knav where you're
at, there's a cue lever Ana
for momentary stops, a pause
con_rol. A Noise-F:ee DeAce
takes care of unnatural tope hiss.
There's even an automat=
adjustment far thetape t_neion.
One sweet lever tocontrel fast
forward, rewind, s:op, play
and pause. And tirtel dLat Lsover.
-well
Just like thececks you find in
recording stidios, the RS-736US
lets you record sound on sound.
Or sound wilttl sound. Or mix music
in, up and out. And add echo.
And there's more.
200 kH,AC-bias. A signal-tonoise ratio ant's better than
53 db. And a frequency response
curve of 20 ==z to 30,000 Hz
at 15_.p.s. We even include a chart
that gives you the personal
frequency response of your
particular unit.
Co see the RS-736US at your
Panasonic cenponent hi-fi dealer.
And hear wiry this tape deck is
the one you s and your components )
have been waiting for.
Breathlessly
t
PANASONIC.
just slightly ahead of our time.
200
Part Avenue,
N. Y. 10017. For
Cieck
it,.
1
on Reader Service Card
our nearest Panasonic -li-Fi Beale', call 801 6:1-3293
li N. J.,
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
800 962-2803. We Fay for
tt8 call.
Ask about Model RS-736US.
SHARPE
announces
another first
AUDIO
Successor to
George W. Tillett
Jay Butler
Editor
Publisher
Edward Tatnall Canby
Sanford L. Cahn
Marketing Director
Associate Editor
Assistant Editor
Ruth E. Napp
Advertising Production
Marlyn Rentschler
Jean Davis
Designer
Subscription Manager
Eugene Pitts
the ultimate in listening
pleasure ... now
guaranteed for life
Superior craftsmanship and highest
standards of quality control. These
ingredients, built intoevery SHARPE
model 770 Stereophone are now
backed by a lifetime guarantee ... for
a lifetime of listening pleasure.
SCINTREX will repair or replace
any SHARPE model 770 Stereophone which develops a malfunction
due to defective workmanship or
materials, or from normal wear and
usage ... during the life of the
original owner.
SHARPE MODEL 770
STEREOPHONES
... designed for those who appre-
ciate the finest in sound.
outperform the most advanced
speaker systems in undistorted reproduction of the entire sound spectrum.
drivers are calibrated and matched
for identical audio characteristics ..
assure uniform reproduction in both
channels.
actual frequency response tracing
accompanies each unit.
individually fused channels with
independent volume control.
attractive styling in contemporary
walnut grain and 24K gold ... an
outstanding addition to the most
sophisticated sound system.
Hear for yourself the dramatic difference SHARPE brings to listening
enjoyment. Visit your authorized
SHARPE dealer fora demonstration
and all the facts on this unique lifetime
guarantee. Use the reader service card
for the name of your nearest dealer and
u free full -color brochure.
Say SHARPE for the sound of
satisfaction
Est. 1911
Vol. 55, No. 2
FEBRUARY 1971
STEREOPHONES
moo,
Contributing Editors
Herman Burstein
Leonard Feldman
Richard Freed
Joseph Giovanelli
C. G. McProud
Alexander Rosner
Bertram Stanleigh
S. L. Weingarten
Bert Whyte
FEATURE ARTICLES
20
26
28
30
36
Audio Transmission Line Equalization
Recording in Quadraphonics
How Many Channels? Part Il
Boris, Igor, and The Dutchman
Phono Cartridge Survey
Buck O. Kraft
Ronald M. Klein
Duane H. Cooper
Richard Freed
EQUIPMENT REVIEWS
44
46
50
V -M
Model 1555 Synchro-Matic
Model A -7030U
Model S-7100
Automatic Turntable
TEAC Tape Deck
Sherwood AM/FM Stereo Receiver
RECORD/TAPE REVIEWS
54
58
62
Classical
Canby's Capsules
Weingarten Looks At
.
Edward Tatnall Canby
Edward Tatnall Canby
Sherwood L. Weingarten
.
AUDIO IN GENERAL
4
6
8
12
Audioclinic
Joseph Giovanelli
What's New
Herman Burstein
Tape Guide
Behind the Scenes
16
18
64
66
Editor's Review
Donald Aldous
London Letter
Classified
Advertising Index
AUDIO (title registered U.S. Pat. Off.) is published by North American Publishing Co., I. J.
Borowsky, President; Frank Nemeyer and Roger Damio, Vice Presidents; R. Kenneth Baxter,
Production Director; Nate Rosenblatt, Promotion Director; Mary Claffey, Circulation Director.
Subscription rates-U.S. Possessions, Canada, and Mexico, $5.00 for one year; $9.00 for two
years; all other countries, $8.00 per year. Printed in U.S.A. at Philadelphia, Pa. All rights
reserved. Entire contents copyrighted 1971 by North American Publishing Co. Second class
postage paid at Columbus, Ohio.
REGIONAL SALES OFFICES: Jay L. Butler and Sanford L. Cahn, 41 East 42nd St., New York,
N.Y. 10017; Telephone (212) 687-8924.
Jay Martin, 15010 Ventura Blvd., Sherman Oaks, Calif. 91403; (213) 981-7852.
SHARPE
AUDIO
DIVISION
SCINTREX INC.
'0 Creeksrde Drive. Amher
nawanda N.Y. 14150
st
REPRESENTATIVES: United Kingdom: Overseas Newspapers (Agencies) Limited. Cromwell
House, Fulwood Place, London, W.C.1./Telephone: 01-242 0661/Cables: WESNEWS London
PS4. Continental Europe: John Ashcraft, 12 Bear St., Leicester Square, London W.C. 2. England. Tel. 930.0525. For Benelux & Germany: W. J. M. Sanders, Mgr. Herengracht 365, Amsterdam, Holland. Tel. 24 09.08. Japan: Japan Printing News Co., Ltd. No. 13, 2 Chome GinzaHigasi, Chuo-ku Tokyo, Japan. Phone 541-5795
Industrial Park
..v-t Age"rs
ELPA MARKETING INDUSTRIES INC.
..,w
Hyde Park. N.
Y
11040
ALSO AVAILABLE IN CANADA
Check No.
2
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Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to the above address
on Reader Service Card
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Front view
Rear view with decorative
panels removed.
The W80A
Va riti ex
is
different!
in a
Two W80As on
a
even together on an optional pedestal as a
single -cabinet consolette ... and still preserve stereo
perception and original tonal balance no matter
where in the room you are listening. Here's why:
single optional pedestal.
The exclusive variplanular
disc
inside the cabinet provides a
discreet amount of direct frontal
energy which is projected from
the top of the cabinet; omnidi-
rectional energy from the sides
and rear of the cabinet; and
reflected sound, mostly from
the rear and top of the enclosure. The
W80A is therefore not just an "omni"
Unlike any other speaker system available
today, two W80As can be placed anywhere
room, any distance apart or from a wall .. .
2
Furthermore, the W80A is
a
"VARIFLEX", because the
variplanular disc is also
adjustable. The disc is easily
set just once while the
system is being installed,
without tools or special instruments.
4ilti
There are numerous possibilities,
to meet virtually every decor or physical requirement.
or just a "reflecting" a forward projecting speaker ......IS all three.
But, unlike most other multi speaker systems, the bass reproducer does not splatter
its sound downward onto
the floor, and the mid and
treble speakers do not
project in other directions. In the W80A, the
fundamental tones and
related harmonics, which give
a musical instrument its identifying
timbre and natural, realistic qualities, are reconstituted
within a "mixing chamber" which contains the variplanular
disc, so that the sounds of musical instruments enter the
room as a whole, retaining tonal balance and further abetting stereo perception.
-he W80A VARIFLEX is a decorator's dream, and happily,
practical in cost. At $317.60 list each, it is more than a
match for old fashioned speakers that are a lot bigger
(the W80A is only 28" x 171/4" x 17" deep) and much more
For example, setting the discs outboard widens the stereo sound, if
you need to keep the two W80As
close together.
4
Setting the discs toe -in prevents
the hole -in -center problem, if the
room requires placing the two
W80As far apart.
startlingly effective is the combination of the mixing
chamber and its adjustable variplanular disc, that you
can freely walk about the room, even sit directly in
front of one speaker, and you'll always hear both stereo channels. The music, always stereo, will literally follow you!
So
t:Si'
For a complete catalog, write to Wharfedale Division,
British Industries Co., Dept. HA -21 Westbury, N.Y.11590.
expensive.
4
(; JL
VARIFLEX SPEAKER SYSTEM
Check No. 3 on Reader Service Card
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Coming in March
Audioclinic
Microphonic Cartridge
Special loudspeaker number-
Directory of
Loudspeaker
systems.
Loudspeaker Design-Victor
Brociner looks at some of the
problems.
Equipment Profiles include:
Tandberg Model 600 tape
recorder
Q. When my tonearm is in its rest
position, any time I tap the turntable
anywhere on its surface, my speakers
reproduce this tapping. What causes
this problem? John Hanley, Woodside,
New York.
A. The fact that you hear sound when
you tap your phonograph is perfectly
normal. Sound vibrations are transmitted from the arm to the cartridge.
Something in the cartridge, perhaps
the stylus assembly, is microphonic. In
other words, something in the cartridge
changes its physical shape or position
in such a way as to cause a slight voltage
to appear at the output of the cartridge,
and you hear this output as a "ping."
Some cartridges exhibit this tendency
more than others. Any cartridge, however, will produce this strange sound
if the volume control is turned up far
enough.
Wow and Flutter
Q. Il liar is "wow and flutter"? I understand that these are important factors in
selecting equipment. I gather that "wow"
Marantz Model 19 deluxe
receiver
About the cover: This shows a modern
record -changer as it would probably
look in a discotheque! First changer
came on the market in the late 1930's
and was extremely complicated weighing upwards of 70 pounds! Present-day
machines are not only streamlined in
design but have a performance close to
that of semi-professional turntables.
is a change in motor speed in both tape
decks and turntables but flutter? Sgt. Paul
Bonney, APO San Francisco, California.
A. "Wow and flutter" refer to speed
variations which occur in both turntables and tape recorders. Tape and
discs are intended to be driven at a
constant speed. It is very difficult to
make a piece of equipment drive these
media at a constant speed. To the extent
that the speed varies, there will be a
corresponding variation in musical
pitch. If the speed variation is slow,
we call it a "wow." If it is fast, we refer
to it as a "flutter." Wow and flutter
are measured as a percentage of the
speed of the equipment. A piece of
equipment is considered to have reasonably low wow and flutter if the speed
variations are below 0.2 per cent. Some
feel that 0.3 per cent is an acceptable
amount of wow and flutter. Other
experts will say that 0.1 per cent wow
and flutter must be attained for high
quality sound. When these speed variations are extreme, we have an audible
wavering of musical pitch. This is
especially noticeable when listening
to such instruments as the piano and
the clarinet because they produce long,
sustained tones. When musical tones
are produced in rapid succession, the
ear does not hear a particular tone long
enough to perceive speed variations,
JOSEPH GIOVANELLI
except in cases of severe wow and
flutter.
Wow and flutter are not necessarily
present at the same time or in the same
piece of equipment. Turntables will
have more wow than flutter, while the
reverse is true of tape machines.
Editor's Note
Most of you are supplying stamped,
self-addressed envelopes with your
requests for information. I very much
appreciate this. I handle a tremendous
number of letters, and do so without a
secretary. You can readily see that the
time required to make out return
envelopes would be better spent in
actually answering letters. Thus, it
would speed up my answers to your
questions.
Related to this same subject, I
realize that readers who reside in
countries other than the United States,
do not have access to American stamps,
and that it is impossible for them to
supply a stamped return envelope.
However, it would be of great help if
the envelope could be supplied, complete with the address to which the
letter is to be sent.
I gather that GI's often have a difficult time in obtaining envelopes,
expecially those in forward positions.
I certainly can understand the problem.
Don't worry about the envelopes under
these circumstances.
I would also appreciate it if you all
could put your return address in the
body of your letters. This would help
in cases where the outside and return
envelopes are lost. If any of you have
written and have never received an
answer, it is because there was no way
to forward your letter to you.
I answer every letter received, even
when the questions are not suitable
for inclusion in this column. However,
as some of you know, when a question
requires a great deal of study, it sometimes might take a while before it is
answered. I regret this very much, and
I thank those of you who are now awaiting such answers for your conJ.G.
siderable patience.
If you have a problem or question on
audio, write to Mr. Joseph Giovanelli
at AUDIO, 134 North Thirteenth
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19107. All
letters are answered. Please enclose
a stamped, self-addressed envelope.
AUDIO
4
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FEBRUARY 1971
". .. (The Dynaco A-25)
has established a
new standard of perfor mance
in uncolored, natural sound."
THE HI-FI NEWSLETTER (P.O. Box 539, Hialeah, Fla. 33011)
ee
...you'll
have a
hard time buying
more musical
naturalness
at any price."
THE STEREOPHILE (Box 49, Elwyn, Pa. 19063)
Dynacc A-25
$79 95
The critiques from these hobbyist magazines
have unusual merit as these publications
accept no advertising. Their comparative evaluations are funded solely by the subscriptions
of ardent audio* 'es.
The A -25's sounc quality is a direct consequence of its smooth frequency response,
outstanding transient characteristics, and very
low distortion. Its aperüodüc design (virtually
constant impedance over its range) provides
an ideal load so any amplifier can deliver more
undistorted power (and thus higher sound
levels) for
a
given speaker eff ciency.
Uniformity of impedance also makes the
A-25 the best choice for adding two new speakers to an existing stereo setup using the
Dynaco system" for four-dimensional reproduction. In this way, true "concert hall sound" can
be enjoyed with a standard stereo amplifier.
Many existing stereo discs, tapes and FM
broadcasts already contain this ambience information which, now revealed in the additional
loudspeakers, gives far greater realism to
your listening.
*Send for literature or picksome up at your dealer where you can see and hear Dynaco equipment.
/JyIeCit INC
3060 JEFFERSON ST., PHILA., PA.
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
19121
THE FIRST
CROWN
PREAMPLIFIER
What's New in Audio
Panasonic Digicorder
This compact -sized unit offers a cassette player/recorder, AM/FM radio
and a digital clock. The cassette recorder section has an automatic stop device and an automatic level control in-
What would happen to a preamplifier
design, if the design engineer could free
himself from stereotyped ideas and start
fresh with only a list of customers' requests? Well, at CROWN that has just happened, and the result is the IC150, an
exciting "new concept" control center with
simplified circuitry, controls that are easy
to understand and use, several exclusive
to top
features, unsurpassed quality, and
a lower price tag.
it all off
Crown Engineers discovered that pre that
amp switches don't need to pop
there is something better than the stereo
that the phono preamp
mode switch
and,
can be dramatically improved
that by using IC's, a versatile high -quality,
advanced -performance preamplifier
can be priced to beat inflation.
Of course, the true uniqueness of such
an innovative design cannot be appreciated
by reading about it. The only answer is
to experience the IC150 yourself. Let us
-
-
.
.
.
.
.
Check No. 123 on Reader Service Card
.
.
.
put circuit. Other features include a
tape monitor system, alarm and 24 hour timer on the radio, AFC on FM,
and illuminated clock face.
.
tell you where Crown's "new concept" is
being introduced in your area. Write today
for a list of locations.
Jensen loudspeakers
A completely redesigned line of Concert Series loudspeakers has been announced by Jensen. The line is keyed
to the needs of the distributor and
service technician and includes 167
speaker models, one or more of which
fits almost any application. Sizes range
from 3 in. to 15 in. in the round type
and from 2 -by -6 -in. to 6 -by -9 -in. in the
oval models.
Check No. 122 on Reader Service Card
World's quietest phono preamp
Infinitely variable stereo panorama control
Silent switching and automatic muting
at turn -on and turn-off
Integrated circuit modules
Industry's lowest distortion levels
Full range tone and loudness controls
Guaranteed phase response
3 -year parts and labor warranty
Will drive any amplifier
5239, walnut enclosure 533
Electro -Voice paging projectors
Sansui Model
a
.'
4
4.
8
receiver
a:
This AM/FM stereo receiver combines
features of Sansui's AU999 control
center/amplifier and the TU999 tuner.
The direct -coupled amplifier section
produces 180 watts (IHF) power into 4
ohms. Response is said to be 5 to 50,000
Hz + I dB with less than 0.3% total
harmonic and less than 0.4% inter modulation distortion. The FM tuner
has 1.7µV (IHF) sensitivity, 1.5 dB capture ratio, and a signal-to-noise ratio
of better than 65 dB. Featured are stepswitched, dB -calibrated tone controls
for bass, mid -range and treble. Price:
.
$499.95.
Check No. 120 on Reader Service Card
Harman-Kardon Festival compacts
This line of music systems is available
in eight models, each with amplifier,
AM/FM tuner, automatic turntable,
speakers, and magnetic cartridge. The
tuner section features automatic tuning
with center -channel locking, and tone
controls are provided for bass, midrange, and treble. The styling is a refreshing departure from conventional
presentations. Prices: from $329.95.
Check No. 119 on Reader Service Card
Standard SR-A1000S receiver
Ask your dealer also about Crown's new companion D150 power amplifier, which delivers 200
watts IHF output at 8 ohms or 350 watts at 4 ohms.
No amp in this power range - however expensive has better frequency response or lower hum,
noise or distortion. It offers performance equal
to the famous DC300, but at medium power and
price. It's worth listening into!
Exported as
AMCRON
®
BOX 1000,
ELKHART,
iil/ W / `/
INDIANA, 46514,
U.S.A.
The PA12 and PA12F paging projectors are designed for low cost and
high performance where reproduction
quality and high intelligibility are demanded in an outdoor speaker. Both
feature computer -calculated horn flare,
a new design for diaphragm and voice
coil assembly, plus an Alnico V magnet.
The PA -12 is shown. Prices: PA12,
$27; PA I2F, $33.
Check No. 121 on Reader Service Card
This solid-state AM/FM stereo receiver offers 20 watts rms per channel
with a IHF power bandwidth of 15 to
50k Hz. The FM tuner section is said to
have a sensitivity of 2.5 it.V and a frequency response of 20 to 20.000 Hz ±
dB. Loudness, low filter. muting. mode
and AFC are controlled by rocker -type
switches. Price $209.95.
1
Check No. 118 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
6
Check No. 6 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FEBRUARY 1971
black and omni-directional, the 53C3 v rtually eliminates tight polar patterns cn the
upper highs. Gives you deep, full timbered
bass on the ultra lows. Banishes that b)ihersome "hole in the middle." Ends nailing your
chair down to that one "best" spot common
with conventional speakers. Gives you the -reedom to roam around your own room, enveloped
in rich stereo sound.
The 5303 utilizes tour woofers and four horn
tweeters. Flawlessry reproduces the 20 to 20,000 Hz
Sleek,
range. -land es up to 80 watts input with ease.
Can be moor ted on stand (included), or hung
from cili-s to give you more living space..
If your tastes are more traditional, then
check out JVC's Model 5340. It handles up
to 80 watts. Integrates a cellular horn in its
powerful 4 -way speaker system. There are many
other fine speakers in the JVC line. See and hear
them at your nearest JVC dealer. He w II be proud
to demonstrate them, just as you wall be proud to
own them.
JVC
JVC America, Inc..
Check No.
7
Catching On Fast
5035, 55th Road, Maspeth. New VorK. N.\. 11379
on Reader Service Card
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Tape Guide
Condenser Microphones
Q. I plan to buy a Roberts 400X tape
machine, operating at 15 ips. 1 would
appreciate any comments on the quality
of this machine, and on its advantages
and disadvantages. If condenser microphones are the best, can you please tell
me the ones that would operate the best
with the above machine.-John Mastronaidi, Cortland, N.Y.
A. The policy of AUDIO prohibits
me from commenting on specific items
of audio equipment. Therefore I cannot
comment on the tape recorder you
mention nor suggest specific condenser
microphones.
However, I can offer the following
general comments. Condenser microphones are considered by many to be
the best type available. But also they
cost the most. Most audio stores are
willing to demonstrate their high -price
microphones, enabling you to choose by
ear.
If you plan to do live recording, it
is a good idea to have a tape recorder
that operates at 15 ips, because it will
provide a wider dynamic range than
one operating at 71/2 ips. The reason is
that more treble boost is supplied at
Th ips than at 15 ips; with more treble
boost there is more danger of running
into tape saturation. When recording
material with strong transients, for
example guitar music, you are apt to
run into the problem of insufficient
"headroom."
VU Meter Calibration
Q. I have just purchased a tape deck.
How do I know if its VU meters are
calibrated right? If they are not, what
can I do to correct them?-Leroy Mowatt,
Bronx, N.Y.
A. To check calibration of your VU
meters, you probably need the assistance of an authorized service agency.
The meter should read O VU when the
machine is fed a 400 Hz signal that
produces 1% harmonic distortion on
the tape.
Life of Acetate Tape
Q. I have heard of acetate tape lasting through 15 years of storage, and I
have read of a person who discards acetate
tape after three years of use. How long
does acetate tape last, and what factors
HERMAN BURSTEIN
combine Signal I obtained in
playback with the new Signal 2, and
feed the combined signal into the tape
machine for recording.
affect its life?-Leroy Mowatt, Bronx,
N.Y.
A. Life span of an acetate tape depends upon the quality of the tape and
conditions of storage. A good tape stored
is to
under conditions of moderate temperature and humidity can probably last 15
Recording -Only Problem
Q. Is it possible for a 4 -track record-
years or more. I have some acetate
tapes purposely stored under extremes
of heat and humidity (temperatures
from about freezing to over 100 degrees
and humidity from very damp to very
dry), and they still play well after more
than 10 years.
Speed of Head Wear
Q. I have an Akai M-8 which a friend
is letting me use. He purchased the unit
in Japan and used it for approximately
20 to 25 hours. No one else has used the
recorder. The heads are worn badly
enough to make 33/4 ips unacceptable;
7' ips is all right but could be better.
The unit has been used about 50 hours
total. What caused the heads to wear so
quickly?-George Harris, Chicago, Ill.
A. If the machine uses pressure pads,
the cause might be excessive pad pressure. If the machine relies on tape
tension, the cause could be excessive
tension. Also, the heads themselves
could be at fault. Good heads are
made with deep gaps so that they can
withstand considerable wear before
serious deterioration in performance
occurs, and they are made of materials
resistant to wear. Cheap heads are not.
Still another possibility is the absence of
tape lifters to space the tape away from
the heads during rapid wind and rewind.
playback head to be defective only during
recording and perfectly all right in playback? My problem is exactly that. Playback of 4 -track stereo prerecorded tapes
as well as my mono tapes (4 -track) previously recorded on my machine is all
right. But for stereo recording, while
the right channel is okay, the output from
the left channel is very, very weak. I have
tried checking the selector switch and
the tubes; thoroughly cleaning both the
erase and the record -playback heads,
as well as demagnetizing them-and
testing with used and virgin tapes of
reliable brands.-Rodolfo C. Penserga.
Ormoc City. Philippines.
A. While few things are absolutely
impossible. I am strongly disinclined
to think that a tape head which operates
satisfactorily in playback will not also
do so in recording. Your difficulty
seems to lie in a defective part in the
left recording channel, such as a resistor
or capacitor. Possibly this defect prevents bias current from reaching the
left channel, or it cuts down the audio
drive signal, or both. Low or missing
bias current would result in very weak,
and very distorted, sound. If the sound
is only weak but not distorted, then
the problem lies somewhere in the
audio portion of the recording circuit.
Signal tracing would be necessary to
establish in what part of the circuit
lies the fault.
Sound -on -Sound
Q. In reading about the Sony 255
tape deck, I noticed that you must purchase a mixer so that the deck can make
sound -on -sound recordings. This is a
two -head deck, and I thought that in
order to have sound -on -sound there must
be three heads. Could you explain how
the mixer can add sound-on-sound?Leroy Mowatt, Bronx, N.Y.
A. To make true sound -on -sound recordings does require three heads in
the case of a mono machine. However,
in the case of a stereo machine, one
channel of the record -playback head
can serve for playback, while the other
simultaneously serves for recording.
It would seem that the role of the mixer
Taping Discs
Q. 1 have had problems in taping
records, and I do not know what the cause
might be. I recently purchased an Angel
stereo recording of Don Giovanni and
have tried several times to make a tape
of this. However, the level of my tape
on playback is about half the level of
the recording when played through my
record player and amplifier. Also, the
sound quality of the tape is not nearly
equivalent to the records. The output of
my phono pickup is stated to be 7.5 mV,
and I have put the phono sensitivity switch
of my audio amplifier in the maximum
(Continued on page 10
AUDIO
8
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
)
FEBRUARY 1971
= TCA-40
TCA-40
4 -track, 4-
t
f
and 2-channel playback
TCA-40
RA -41
TCA-41
(record amplifier)
4 -track, 4- and 2-channel
2 -channel record
playback
= TCA-42
4 -track, 4-
and 2 -channel playback
4- and 2 -channel record
2 RA -41's
HIGHER MATH
Three decks, three capabilities: the Simul-tralC
TCA Series from TEAC.
Buy one, add onto it, and you're up to the next
model. Keep going till you reach the top.
Or start at the top, and get everything going
for you at once.
All three units feature 4- and 2-channel
playback the only brand with auto, reverse.
And Models 40 and 41 can be modified to the
full 4 -channel capability of Mode: 42 as
shown. Meanwhile, any one of these decks
is compatible with your present 2-channel
equipment without modification.
Other 4 -channel tape decks may look
like ours. But they either have only one
motor or they cost a king's ranscm.
(They don't sound as good, either.)
And any way you add them up,
the TCA Series can never be
obsolete. You don't even need
a slide rule to show you why.
Just a good pair of ears.
-
-
TEAC.
TEAC Corporation of America
2000 Colorado Avenue
Santa Monica, California 90404
Check No. 9 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
(Mounting cradle and dust cover optional)
Tape Guide
(Continued from page
THE
PHASE LINEAR
AMPLIFIER
700 WATTS R.M.S.
WHY 700 WATTS?
Among the most stubborn misconceptions common among hi-fi
enthusiasts is that forty or fifty watts is sufficient power to drive
most speaker systems to their maximum performance. Amplifier
manufacturers, however, have understood the advantages
of higher power, particularly in driving multiple systems with their
high power handling capabilities, or modern, high quality but inefficient air suspension system. Consequently, progress in amplifier design has gradually increased power ratings, but the considerable technical problems involved in producing a reliable and
reasonably priced amplifier of ample power have led many audiophiles to believe that what was available must be sufficient.
The benefit of en available 700 watts is not in producing music
several times louder than one is accustomed to hearing, rather it
is in the elimination of severe distortion caused by amplifier clipping (overload). A one hundred watt amplifier is not capable of
producing the sound pressure levels often demanded on any but
the most efficient speaker systems, with the result that
many audiophiles have confused amplifier clipping with
"speaker breakup".
The power output capabilities of previous power amplifiers have
been based, not on acoustic requirements, but on electro economic considerations. It turns out that with today's low effi-
ciency speaker systems, a power input of several thousand watts
would be required (dissipation allowing) to produce the sound
pressure peaks that occur in live musical performances. Clearly,
the larger the amplifier, other things being equal, the more faithful the sound. We find that even the Phase Linear is overloaded
from time to time when driving low efficiency speakers with, for
example, Stravinsky's Rite of Spring at realistic volume levels.
These demands led to the development of the Phase Linear
the most powerful, most advanced amplifier that today's silicon power transistor technology could reasonably produce.
..
SPECIFICATIONS:
POWER: Greater than 350 watts/channel R.M.S., both
channels driven into eight ohms.
DISTORTION: Distortion is typically less then .01%.
8
)
position. I have made the tape recording
at the highest level according to -my VU
meters. Am I doing something wrong? Or
is it normal to expect the taping of a
-record through a system such as mine
to be inferior to the recording itself?
My equipment consists of an Ampex
model 2160 tape recorder, a Scott 260B
amplifier, a Garrard record player, and
Pickering V-15/3 cartridge.-Charles
B. Baker, Brussels, Belgium.
A. It is quite possible and not unusual for the recording level on tape
playback to be less than on phono playback. The factors involved are the output of the particular tape machine used,
the output of the phono cartridge employed, and the gain of the phono pre amp in the amplifier employed. You
need not be overconcerned about the
differences in level, provided you get
as much level as you desire on tape
playback.
The deterioration in sound quality
when taping records may be due to
the following. First, you are using a
pickup with relatively high output. If
your amplifier's sensitivity switch is
in the position for maximum gain, you
may be overloading the phono preamp,
with consequent distortion. Second,
you state that you have made the
tape recordings at the highest level
according to the VU meters. Recording
at excessive level would have two deleterious results: It would result in
distortion, and it would saturate the tape
at high frequencies. causing treble loss.
Cross -Field Heads
Q. What is the function of the cross field head?-E. Richmond Bauer, APO
96308
A. Its purpose is to reduce the erasing
effect of bias current on high frequencies
when recording, thus leading to better
treble response. Bias current is necessary
in recording in order to reduce distortion
and increase the amount of signal recorded on the tape (i.e. to improve the
signal to noise ratio).
DAMPING: Greater than 1,000 at 20 hz.
FINISH: Light brushed gold and black anodize
PHASE LINEAR CO.
19555 23 Ave. N.W.
Seattle, Wn. 98177
Phone: (206) 542-6533
ONLY PHASE LINEAR CAN DELIVER THE
AMPLIFIER THAT CAN DELIVER THE POWER
Check No. 10 on Reader Service Card
Equalization at Different Speeds
Q. I would like to ask you a question
in reference to extra preamp gain. I
happen to own a Fisher X 101-C
amplifier. This is a tube amplifier. I also
own a Viking 88 stereo tape recorder,
and a Viking 807 stereo playback transport without preamps. I do a lot of recording with the Viking 88, off the air and
from records. The reason I bought a
separate playback deck was to save my
other recorder a lot of wear and tear on
the heads. The way I see it, wearing out
one head is a lot better than wearing out
three, and less costly. My Fisher amplifier
has a provision for TAPE HEAD and for
TAPE PLAY. After I finish making a recording on the Viking 88 and play it
back through the stereo system using the
TAPE PLAY switch on my amplifier, the
results sound great. But if I take that
same recording and play it back using
the Viking 807, and with the equalization
switch of my amplifier in the tape
position, I automatically get a bass
boost and treble cut. What I'd like to
know is what can I do to overcome this
problem? The technical specifications
of my Fisher state that the TAPE HEAD
input requirement is 2 mV at I kHz,
and the Viking 807 output is 2 mV at
1 kHz. Since these two units are matched
up sensitivity -wise, why am I getting
bass boost and treble cut? Is there anything I can do to correct this problem?Artis W. Evans, Jr., Brooklyn, N.Y.
A. So far as I can see, the input and
output sensitivities of your amplifier
and Viking 807 have nothing to do with
your problem of frequency balance.
Inasmuch as your playback deck has
no preamp, you are feeding the tape
playback head signal directly into your
Fisher TAPE HEAD input. Therefore
the only equalization supplied is by the
Fisher. And this equalization should
properly consist of a very substantial
amount of bass boost -36 dB in all at
71/2 ips. Inasmuch as ' the bass boost
begins at 3,180 Hz (3 dB up at this
point), it sounds like a combination of
bass boost and treble cut. However,
you complain that the net result is
too much bass boost and treble cut.
One reason for this excess could be
that you are operating at 33/4 ips, but
using equalization intended for 71/2 ips.
The required playback equalization for
33/4 ips involves less bass boost and
treble cut than at 71/2 ips. Another
possibility is that either the record head
of your Viking 88 or the playback head
of your Viking 807 (or both) is out of
azimuth alignment, resulting in treble
loss. Checking and correcting azimuth
alignment requires an azimuth test
tape. a VTVM, and the necessary knowhow: this is usually best left to a
competent technician.
If you have a problem or question on
tape recording, write to Mr. Herman
Burstein at AUDIO, 134 North Thirteenth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19107.
All letters are answered. Please
enclose a stamped, self-addressed
envelope.
AUDIO
10
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FEBRUARY 1971
The same precision that
guides the automatic pilot of a 747
tunes the Pioneer SX-2500.
Just press tie tuning bar anc the
sarvomecianism takes over. It 3tbps
the dial pointer Precisely at the zero
point of detect:r. The resu t is dead
center tiring which you can actially
the Local Station Sw tc h and decrease
the sensitivity be pick up the strongest
local stations only. Wien you're
looki^g for stereo programs, the
Ste-eo Selector Switch automatically
tunes in those stations broadcasting
in stereo only.
Whatever refinement you're
Icocing for it an AM -FM stereo
e
see when tf Tuning needle lights up.
And you car tine from twenty three
feet away with the convenient -err cte
control unit which also ad usts the
wlume.
Rated at 340 watts IHF (72.772
RMS at 8 ohms), Pioneer endowed the
SX-2500 wi-i extraordinary versat lity.
I: has fire ¡rpL.ts and seven outputs,
Eccomncdating two pairs of speaker
systems. TI a FM section alone
features f vE C's and two crystal ilters
far supera selectivity. Emaloying
tiree deal gat_ FET's, sersiti.itj is
matctless 1.6,uV, to pickup even
tie weakes`. stations. Or you can fl p
pIOtVCCn®
(V)
Íá
nUrO
4EA NClJF.
6:
90
92
receiver, Pioneer I'as designed into
the SX-2500. The -e are stepped tone
controls ... louiress contour control
adjustable muting ... center
channel output far Three dimensional
systems. Pre and nain amplifier may
be used indepencently with multi -amp
stereo systems
The SX-2510 offers
more meaningfu features
And in the SE me way that tie
747 offers more cznveniences, the
Pioneer SX-25C0 Dtfers more
meaningful features than any cDmparaaly priced stereo receiver.
See and hear the SX-2500 at
your local Pioneer dealer. Complete
with remote ccntrol unit, $549 95.
Pioneer Elec-ronics U.S.A. Corp.
178 Commerce Road, Carlstadt,
New Jersey 07072.
.
x
91
'
16
90
a
IOi
a
t5
]B
iWF34E
.A
.ES- COAST: 1335 WES1 134TH ST. GP.REE .A. CALIF. 90247
CA{IADA: S. H. PARKER CO., 67 LESNILL RD., DON MILLS, ONTARIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
BEHIND THE SCENES
AUDIO industry has always
seemed to be particularly plagued
by the "chicken and the egg" syndrome.
Many examples come to mind, and were
it not for the pioneering efforts of some
far-sighted individuals who were willing
to "go out on a limb," and introduce
new (and usually controversial) audio
products, we probably would still be
playing 78 rpm records with cactus
needles. A classic example of the syndrome is the pre-recorded cassette.
Even the most ardent advocate of
the cassette system will admit that the
major failing of music cassettes has
been the intolerably high level of tape
hiss. The cassette has other problems,
but this factor alone has kept the cassette out of consideration as a medium
for high quality recorded music. Tape
hiss in professional master recordings
had been successfully overcome by use
of the Dolby A301 Noise Reduction
System. While applicable to the cassette
hiss problem, at nearly $1500 the A301
was hardly a consumer product! Dr.
Dolby came to the rescue by introducing
the "B Type" noise reduction system, a
simplified single -band version of the
professional system. To make the Dolby
"B Type" system a practical reality in
terms of pre-recorded cassettes, one
would need a reasonably priced noise
reduction unit in the home, which would
be used to "expand" in a mirror image,
pre-recorded cassettes issued in "compressed" form by the various record
companies. In this manner the consumer would get the benefit of the IO
dB reduction of tape hiss afforded by
the "B Type" system. At this point we
reached the "chicken and egg" problem.
the noise
To wit: which comes first
reduction unit or the specially recorded
cassettes? Fortunately the problem was
eventually resolved. because the "B
Type" system was designed for recording as well as playback. thus allowing
a more "saleable" unit. With this as
a plus factor. the Advent Corp. made
the decision to manufacture a "B Type"
record/playback noise reduction unit.
which could be used with existing types
of consumer tape recorders. As you
know, this resulted in the marketing of
the Advent Model 100, and a simplified
less expensive unit, the Model 101.
Having done this, Advent felt there was
a market for a cassette recorder with
built-in Dolby "B Type" noise reduction system. Thus we have had for some
aEa.wH..E
THE
...
Advent Model 200
Harman-Kardon CAD5
Fisher RC 80
time the hardware for making Dolby
"B Type" recordings and for playback
of Dolbyized cassettes. The rub of
course was that no such cassettes existed.
From the record companies' viewpoint,
it was felt that they could not undertake
the manufacture of Dolbyized cassettes
on a low volume, "spècialized product"
basis. The alternative was to Dolbyize
practically all of their cassette output.
which on this mass basis would add
little cost in the manufacturing process.
The question here was whether such
"compressed" cassettes would play
satisfactorily on standard equipment
without the Dolby noise -reduction
circuitry.
After we all agonized about this for
some time, Ampex Stereo Tapes, by
far the largest manufacturer of prerecorded cassettes, conducted experiments which proved to their satisfaction
that not only could Dolbyized cassettes
playback on typical consumer equip -
ment, but that the slight added "brightness" often enhanced the sound. Those
who felt the sound was overbright could
always turn down their treble controls.
On the strength of their experiments,
Ampex announced they would be issuing
Dolbyized cassettes. Either on their
own volition, or spurred by the Ampex
announcement, several record companies indicated interest in releasing
Dolbyized cassettes. Finally, Vox and
London/ Decca announced their definite
plans to issue Dolbyized cassettes, and
other record companies are soon expected to follow suit.
After months of eager anticipation,
I now have before me Dolbyized cassettes from Ampex, Vox, and London/
Decca. There are only seven cassettes
but I know of at least
to be sure
15-20 more in the works in the immediate future, and I feel confident
that the dam will burst soon and we
...
(Continued on page 14)
AUDIO
12
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FEBRUARY 1971
1
Fisher has the world's first
4 -channel stereo receiver.
What do you have?
Let's compare what you have and what the Fisher 701 has.
It has 250 watts (621/2 per channel). Integrated Darlington output stages.
It has 1.7 microvolts FM sensitivity (IHF). All active elements in front end are IC's.
IF plus multiplex section contains 5 IC's comprising 14 amplifying stages.
It has 2 permanently tuned multipole filters, one with 5 high -Q toroidal resonators.
(Alternate channel selectivity is 65 dB!)
Besides flywheel -assisted tuning, it has pushbutton electronic tuning with
no moving parts (AutoScan'). And remote -control AutoScan is included in the $699.95 price.
The AM section has 2 permanently tuned multipole filters, one
with 5 high -Q toroidal resonators.
It has sliding volume controls that operate as smoothly as studio faders.
And it has a Wide Surround' switch that feeds ordinary stereo r
Only 250! $2 value!
signals at a reduced volume (after a slight delay) into the rear
Send for your copy of The Fisher
speakers, to create a 4 -channel effect from 2 -channel material.
Handbook, 1971 edition, a fact But, most important of all, the Fisher 701 has 4
filled 80 -page guide to high fidelity.
This full -color reference book also
independent channels.
includes complete information on
Now, how does that stack up against what you have?
all Fisher stereo components. En-
1
close 250 for handling and postage.
The Fisher
Fisher Radio, P.O. Box 1367
Long Island City, N.Y.11101
We invented high fidelity.
Name
Address
City
O'JEASEA': AND CANADIAN RLSIDLNIS PLEASE WRIT: Ti
ISHER RADIO INTERNATIONAL, LONG ISLAND CITI, N. T.1110
r
ltll f,,
.1,-1Li Alii-lLR-¡!T1,
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
State
Zip
0302711
IIL
j
here's what Hirsch Houck laboratories
discovered about the
model SP -12 cartridge
K
Flat, smooth and gently rising response to between 25,000 and 30,000
Hz, with
excellent stereo separation
maintained over the full range ...
The cartridge met or bettered every
published specification for which we
could test.
Stereo Review
December, 1970
ii
55
emphasizes its use of a diamond mounted directly on the cantilever without an intermediate cup or
bushing, which would add undesirable mass to the moving system. Its
B & O
success is obvious from the outstandingly wide range and flat response of this cartridge ...
When playing records with the cartridge it is difficult to assign any
special character to the sound. This
is a logical result of its smooth,
wide -range response, which gives it
a very neutral quality. This highly
desirable property means that the
cartridge will reproduce records
faithfully, without imposing any of its
own characteristics on the sound.
Electronics World
January, 1971
55
WHAT MORE CAN WE ADD?
ASK YOUR DEALER FOR A DEMONSTRATION!
Bang&Olufsen ofAnlerica,Inc.
525 EAST MONTROSE
WOOD DALE. ILLINOIS 60191
Check No. 14 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Behind The Scenes
(Continued from page 12)
will see Dolbyized cassettes from many
record companies. To playback these
Dolbyized cassettes, I used a Wollensak/3M cassette deck in conjunction
with the Advent Model 100 Dolby noise
reduction unit.
In order to have some sort of reference when evaluating these cassettes
relative to their noise content, I set up a
General Radio sound level meter 12
feet from my loudspeakers. I then adjusted my playback levels so that the
loudest peaks in the music on the cassettes registered 100dB on the meter.
At that level, I listened to the pianissimo
sections, and especially noted the hiss
background whenever there were rests
in the music and no sound at all was
being produced. Admittedly, this
assessment is partially subjective, but
I think it works well enough to provide
useful information. You may have raised
an eyebrow at the figure of 100 dB. _
Remember this is on peak passages and
is by no means average playback level.
I wanted to playback the cassettes at
what I would call a psychoacoustic
equivalent of concert hall level when
sitting no further back than about the
20th row of seats. The loudness perception you would get from this level
would depend on the size of your listening room. Obviously, if one sets the playback level in a room at an excessively
low point, the hiss level you perceive
will be lower. The problem with prerecorded cassettes up to now is that
even at comparatively low playback
levels, tape hiss was obtrusive.
The first Dolbyized cassettes from
Ampex were the operas "Tosca" and
"Norma," drawn from the London/
Decca catalog. I played "Tosca" first
and then "Norma," and in listening to
the quiet sections discovered I still could
hear some residual hiss. Upon investigating, I found that Ampex had
made a merchandising boo-boo. Instead
of putting their best foot forward in
this new enterprise and drawing from
the wealth of Dolby A301 masters in the
London catalog, they choose "Tosca"
and "Norma," which were made before
the Dolby System was in use. This
brings up an important point.
You must first understand that when
hiss from these
I say I heard some
operas, it was far below the level that
would have heard if these had been
standard non -Dolby cassettes. The
improvement was very audible and
definitely worthwhile. Now quite obviously, the vast majority of classical
recordings in the various catalogs were
made prior to the introduction of the
I
14
AUDIO
FEBRUARY 1971
Dolby System. The signal-to-noise ratio
of the recorders on which these productions were made, even going back as
far as 1958, was on the average about
60-62 dB. This is pretty quiet and would
satisfy a lot of people. If the actual
master and not a "sub" or "working"
master several generations removed
from the master is processed for Dolby
"B Type." the subsequent cassettes in
the majority of cases should be quiet
enough to warrant their release. Nonetheless, there is no question that the
optimum noise reduction in cassettes
is going to be those that are processed
from Dolby A301 masters.
The Ampex/London "Tosca" in this
Dolby cassette release is astonishing
for its big, full-bodied sound, generally
quite clean. The sound is definitely
wide range and of course the dynamic
range is quite wide due to the Dolby
processing. You won't believe the
solidity and weight of the cannon that
are so prominent in this opera. Ampex
scores high on the mechanical side ... the
cassette winds smoothly, and it is in
only two or three spots that a flute or
an oboe has a slightly "burbly" sound
due probably to irregularities in the
lining of the cassette. While it would
have been more desirable if Ampex had
released a production made from a
Dolby master, the present cassette is
very much worthwhile. "Norma" is
not nearly as good as "Tosca" in several
ways. Tape hiss is a shade more
prominent, there are more "burbly"
sounds in exposed woodwind sections
of the score. The orchestral sound is
impressively full. The most glaring
fault is a shrillness and stridency to the
voices that really grates on one's nerves.
It would appear that equalization is
off in some respect. It doesn't jibe that
the orchestral sound is fairly well
balanced, while at the same time the
voices appear to be loaded with, high
frequency distortion.
The London/Decca Dolbvized cassettes were sent to me from London
and represent somewhat of a departure
for this company. in that their cassettes
will be distributed through London
Records offices in this country. As you
are probably aware, all London tape
products have been made and distributed in this country by Ampex Stereo
Tapes for quite a few years. London/
Decca claims there is no conflict of
interest in their new distribution venture, that their contract with Ampex
will remain in force. Whatever the case.
I
have listened to Albèniz-Suite
Espanola. Vienna Imperial, and Serenade For Strings and Souvenir De
Florence by Tchaikovskv. all Dolbvized
QUAD
For 20 years and throughout the world the trade mark
QUAD has identified the high quality audio equipment
made by this Company.
Because others are now seeking to use the name in
other ways we have to make it clear that by itself
or combined with other words or numerals, QUAD
identifies only audio equipment, components and
related goods of our manufacture or sponsorship.
All other use of QUAD in connection with such goods
is either a misuse, abuse or
FEBRUARY 1971
15
infringement which must
and will be prosecuted.
ACOUSTICAL MANUFACTURING CO. LTD.,
Huntingdon, England.
Check No. 12 on Reader Service Card
IThifliosh
CATALOG
and FM DIRECTORY
Get all the newest and latest information on the new McIntosh Solid State equipment in the McIntosh catalog. In addition you will
receive an FM station directory that covers all of North America.
'il
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X 112
FM STEREO/AM TUNER PREAMPLIFIER
ALL SOLID STATE
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TODAY!
(Continued on page 60)
AUDIO
®
McIntosh Laboratory Inc.
2 Chambers St., Dept. AE11
Binghamton, N.Y. 13903
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE__
Check No. 15 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
ZIP
Editor's Review
cartridge directory on page 38 lists
some 46 units of which 13 have been selected
for capsule reviews which appear on pages 40
through 43. The modern light -weight cartridge is a far
cry from the early models used on the old 78 rpm
records. One I designed in the mid -thirties weighed
no less than 4 ounces and had an adapter for attachment to a tone -arm of an acoustic phonograph: (how
many readers remember those xxxx springs?)
Like loudspeakers, phono cartridges have improved enormously over the past few years and like
loudspeakers, the best ones tend to sound more and
more alike. Just six years ago, John Crabbe, Editor
of the British "Hi-Fi News" said "... there are really
no pick-ups at present available which will properly
track high frequencies on the most heavily modulated stereo discs at playing weights significantly
less than about 11 grams; in fact most require 2
grams or more on the occasional difficult passages.
In some cases it is claimed that cartridges will track
at 34 gm or less in high quality arms; it can be stated
categorically that this is untrue." Well, things have
improved since then and now there are several cartridges available which can track below 11 gms in a
suitable arm. It should be mentioned, however, that
too low a tracking weight can cause as much damage
to the fine grooves as a heavier weight than necessary, so great care must be taken when setting -up.
THE PHONO
with some pain, is a Latin -Greek hybrid. And so it
is-just like the word television which has been accepted by the pundits for many years! Tetraphonic is
a little clumsy and as for quadrasonic, it is not really
the logical equivalent of monophonic and stereophonic. Moreover, it conveys the impression of four
sounds instead of four sound sources-an important
difference. So, for the time being, we will stick with
quadraphonic.
PLL PLL PLL
Another acronym to plague us! PLL stands for
Phase -Locked -Loop and it refers to a new system. of
FM detection involving a voltage controlled oscillator which is kept in phase with the signal by a
phase comparator. The control voltage, or difference
signal, is the audio output. A simplified explanation
-but it will suffice for the moment.
What are the advantages of PLL? In theory, distortion should be low because it is relatively easy
to design an extremely linear oscillator. Secondly,
capture ratio could be significantly better because
of the locking-in effect. So far, tuners using this system have not come up to expectations but you will
hear more about PLL... .
Audio Shows
The Institute of High Fidelity announce a new
show to be held later this year in Palo Alto, CaliFrom the Land of the Cherry Blossom comes fornia. The place selected is the Cabana Hyatt
news that the Japanese Record Manufacturers As- House Motel and the dates are March 29 to April 5.
sociation have decided to adopt the JVC system Meanwhile, Teresa, Rogers has been very pleased
(described briefly in our November issue) .as stand- with the response to the forthcoming Washington
ard. If only U.S. record companies would get to- Show. Three floors were originally reserved but now
gether and evolve a standard too. At the moment, a fourth floor has been added. The dates are FebCBS have two viable systems but other companies ruary 12 to the 15th and it will be held in the Hotel
are experimenting with the Feldman-Fixler, Hafler, Washington at 15th and Pennsylvania Avenue-withand Scheiber methods. Perhaps they are wise in be- in a stone's throw of the White House.
ing a little cautious.... Meanwhile, my pile of quadraphonic discs gets bigger and bigger-but no de- Humor In Advertising
coders. Not even a prototype-infuriating!
"For Quadrasonic, you really need two heads
(or at least four ears) ... Two sounds coming from a
Greek Hybrids
proper stereo set-up is frightening enough to comSeveral erudite readers have suggested that Tetra - prehend, but four different directions is sure to send
phonic or Quadrasonic are more appropriate names you to the nearest analyst"-Skyline Electronics
G.W.T.
for four -channel than quadraphonic, which, they say (makers of headphones).
JVC Wins
AUDIO
16
FEBRUARY 1971
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y
Letfrír
Donald Aldous
of what has been called
an "audio explosion" in England, as
well as on the Continent, has been the
number of audio fairs, festivals, exhibitions. demonstrations, and company
presentations offered during 1970 to
the growing hi fi public. Mind you,
the technical standards achieved at
some of these shows have been amusingly described by one of my colleagues
as varying between "the real hi fi,
some commercial hi fi, some lo fi, and
quite a lot of no fi!" but sound entertainment in the home-in one form or
another-is certainly on the upgrade.
A straw in the wind, however, occurred
at the 19th International Tape Recording Contest (CIMES) staged in Geneva
last November. The committee and
judges were shown some winning video
entries in a Dutch contest, and the
results were so impressive that video is
now a new class in the 1971 CIMES.
The time limit will be 5 minutes, and
entries are not restricted to clubs so
that individuals can submit video tapes.
A pointer to the future, as use of VTR
equipment becomes more widespread
in schools and in the home, enthusiasts
using the medium must know what type
of videotape configuration is acceptable. Incidentally, without wishing to
wave the British flag too much, our
own Peter Bastin's tape "Not a Word"
won the Grand Prix and the special
prize for the tape most suitable for
broadcasting. Yet another British
entry, the documentary "Sunderland
Hospital Broadcasts" by Ken McKenzie
won the first prize in the reportage
class. This tape was earlier judged to
be the "Tape of the Year" in the
British Amateur Tape Recording Contest, of which I am one of the judges.
Thanks to these and other British tapes,
the UK scored the highest average
marks and so got the cup for "the best
INDICATIVE
Donald Aidous is a well-known British authority
on hi ti. He is Equipment Reviews Editor o! the
newly combined British magazine Hi-Fi News/
Record Review.
national selection." Switzerland came
next, followed by Norway, Holland,
Denmark. France, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Italy, and Belgium. Why were
there no American entrants? I must
discover if there are any restrictions
on USA tape, as surely some fine
examples could be submitted.
Many of you will have an untarnished
diary on hand, and so this would
seem to be a good moment to jot down
some dates for the English hi fi scene,
just in case you can get over to England
yourself and sample the 1971 vintage.
If you cannot. I'll report the highlights
in one of these letters. "Sonex '71."
the audio show sponsored by the Federation of British Audio's special company formed for such promotions, will
run from Wednesday. March 31 to
Sunday, April 4. with the first two days
as trade only. The 17th International
Audio Fair and Music Festival will
again be mounted in the Olympia
exhibition hall, London, during mid October, and the 1970 show features are
discussed below. Not strictly hi fi, but
worthy of attention by the professional
sound engineer is the "Sound '71"
exhibition organized by the Association
of Public Address Engineers (APAE)
from March 16-19, in London. My friend
Haydon Warren, APAE Technical
Officer, tells me that all stands have
been sold and the lecture theme for this
year is up-to-the-minute techniques for
the sound man!
I don't know whether there is a comparable public address engineering
organization in the USA, but the history
of the APAE really started with a group
of reputable P.A. contractors getting
together to form a trade association,
led by the late Alex J. Walker, in 1948,
when the association was born. Over
the years the APAE has expanded its
activities and, in addition to its important annual exhibition, publishes a
journal, along with other literature,
1971
and helps promote the exports of British
PA equipment. now amounting to
several million pounds.
The quality of sound (or rather the
lack of quality in many instances) in
public places, from theatres to open-air
entertainments) is a pet hobbyhorse of
mine, and I make my critical views
known whenever the reproduced sounds
fall below an acceptable level. There are
no technical reasons today why most satisfying sound fidelity cannot be
offered in any auditorium, but the usual
reason for very inferior results is unwillingness to pay for the best. An
example of how good such systems
can be, to which I can testify
personally, is the Shure Vocal Master
sound projection system, which offers
selective control of volume and vocal
effects over six microphone channels,
plus anti -feedback switching, and developing 100 watts rms continuous
power. It was used most effectively for
all of the 20 lecture/recitals presented
in the Hi Fi Theatre by John Borwick
at the 1970 Audio Fair at Olympia, and
a most pleasing reproduction in the
huge Royal Opera House auditorium to
reinforce the voices of Pierre Boulez
and CBS record producer Paul Myers
when introducing the first public playback of the CBS record set of Debussy's
Pelléas et Mélisande. This line -source
sound system demonstrated what can be
done to keep the "golden ears" happy
in such a place!
In the last year, a most -complex
sound system, traveling with a group of
American university students presenting
a show called "Up the People," greatly
impressed me when I heard it in two
locations in England. On one occasion
some 20 microphones were operative on
stage without feedback in a highly
reverberant enclosure, controlled by
a 24 -way mixer, I think, in the body of
the hall.
(Continued on page 52
AUDIO
18
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)
FEBRUARY 1971
Much has been said about the Heathkit®AR-29.
All good:
-
High Fidelity,
receiver. This is exactly what the
September 1970
Heath Company... has done with
"For its rated output of 35 watts
its Model AR -29 receiver. For
(sine -wave power) per channel,
features and styling, the AR -29
the set produced less than 0.1
is, in our opinion, a triumph of
per cent distortion across the normodern technology."
mal 20-20,000 Hz audio band."
niz 151
"The
assembly/operating man811810881188111181111118111811888
tlrllt®taaor7mp
"Frequency response, virtually a
ual that comes with the kits
H111111111
ruler -straight line from 10 Hz to
bears the usual Heath mark of
100,000 Hz, was the best we
excellence."
have ever measured in a receiver.
"You don't have to live with the
"On every count, the completed AR -29 either met or exceeded its
AR -29 to know you have a good receiver. Turn it on and tune
published performance specifications
and did so with only the
along the dial and listen to how stations drop in and stay solidly in
normal adjustments spelled out for the kit builder. No professional
place in both FM and AM."
alignment was needed."
"You will know right away that the Heathkit AR -29 is the best
Elementary Electronics, September-October 1970
medium power receiver you have ever heard or are likely to hear."
" .. it's quite likely that many, if not most, users will consider the
Stereo Review, April 1970
Julian Hirsch on the AR -29:
AR -29 the best buy in receivers. Even a nitpicker would have
"Its FM tuner had an IHF sensitivity of 1.75 microvolts, placing it
trouble finding fault with the AR -29."
among the finest in respect to sensitivity." "Stereo FM frequency
Stereo, Winter 1971
response was extremely flat, ±0.25 dB from 30 Hz to 15,000 Hz."
"An exceptionally good value for the kit builder; set meets or ex"We found the audio amplifiers to be considerably more powerful
ceeds specifications without need for professional alignment or
than their rated 35 watts (RMS) per channel. With both channels
adjustments; one of the best performing receivers available in any
driven at 1000 Hz into 8 -ohm loads, we measured about 50 watts
form."
(RMS) per channel just below the clipping level."
Audio, August 1970
C. G. McProud on the AR -29:
"Harmonic distortion was under 0.1 per cent from 0.15 to 50 watts,
"The Heathkit AR -29 is a worthy companion to the famous AR -15
and under 0.03 per cent over most of that range. IM distortion was
somewhat easier to build, somewhat lower in power, somewhat
about 0.1 per cent at any level up to 50 watts. At its rated output of
less expensive
35 watts per channel, or at any lower power, the distortion
but nevertheless a superb receiver in its own
of the
right."
AR -29 did not exceed 0.15 per cent between 20 and 20,000
Hz.
.. measured distortion of 0.15 per cent as typical over most of The distortion was typically 0.05 per cent over most of the audio
range, at any power level."
the audio range, even though the specifications rate the receiver at
"Hum and noise were extremely low: -90 dB at the high-level auxilia distortion of 0.25 per cent."
ary input and -71 dB on phono, both referenced to a 10 -watt output."
"We noted a power output of 36 watts per channel at a distortion
" .. the AR -29 construction made a positive impression". "... asof 0.15 per cent, with both channels driven, and at the rated dissembly has been markedly simplified."
tortion of 0.25 per cent, we measured an output of 42 watts per
channel. Power bandwidth also exceeded specifications, extendSays Mr. Hirsch about overall performance: "The test data speaks
ing from 7 Hz to 43 kHz at the half -power point. Frequency refor itself." "... no other receiver in its price class can compare
sponse at the -watt level was from 7 Hz to 62 kHz, ±1 dB, and
with it."
from 4 Hz to 110 kHz ±3 dB, also exceeding specifications. Full
Kit AR -29, 33 lbs.
$299.95*
limiting occurred at an input signal of 1.4 uV, while IHF sensitivity
Assembled AE -19, pecan cabinet, 10 lbs.
$ 19.95*
measured 1.8 uV."
See
these
and
300
other
Heathkit
products
at one
"After such an impressive set of measurements, we could only
of the following Heath Electronic Centers:
hope that listening tests would bear out what we had measured,
CALIFORNIA
Downers
Grove, 60515
New York, 10036
as indeed they did. We first found that we could pull in 26 stations
Anaheim, 92805
224 Ogden Ave.
35 W. 45th Street
with only our finger on one of the FM antenna terminals, which was
330 E. Ball Road
MARYLAND
OHIO
El Cerrito, 94530
impressive in itself. After we connected the antenna, we brought in
Rockville, 20852
Cleveland, 44129
6000 Potrero Avenue
5542 Nicholson Lane
43 stations, with 32 of them in stereo." "... to date we have never
5444 Pearl Rd.
La Mesa, 92041
MASSACHUSETTS
Woodlawn, 45215
pulled in over 41 stations heretofore with any receiver, and not all
8363 Center Drive
Wellesley, 02181
10133 Springfield Pike
Los Angeles, 90007
of them were listenable."
165 Worcester St.
PENNSYLVANIA
2309 S. Flower St.
MICHIGAN
"Even the AM reception was excellent ..."
Philadelphia,
phiv, 19149Blvd.
Redwood City, 94063
Detroit,
6318it urRogh,
Blvd.
2001 Middlefield Rd.
.. the construction and final testing is a short course in elec18645 W. Eightg9 Mile Rd.
Pittsburgh, 15235t
Woodland Hills, 91364
MINNESOTA
3482
tronics, well done as is usual with Heath instructions, and effective
Wm.
Penn
Hwy.
22504 Ventura Blvd.
Hopkins, 55343
TEXAS
enough that it is not necessary to give a final alignment with instruCOLORADO
101 Shady Oak Rd.
Dallas, 75201
ments to get the receiver operating in accordance with its specifiDenver, 80212
MISSOURI
2715 Ross Avenue
5940 W. 38th Ave.
cations."
St. Louis, 63123
Houston, 77027
Gravois
3705 Westheimer
Ave.
9296
"Its performance should satisfy the most critical audiophiles GEORGIA
NEW JERSEY
WASHINGTON
Atlanta,
30305
thoroughly."
Fair
Lawn,
07410
Seattle, 98121
5285 Roswell Road
35-07 Broadway (Rte. 4)
2221 Third Ave.
Popular Electronics, April 1970
ILLINOIS
NEW YORK
WISCONSIN
"How does a company that is reputed by the experts and hi-fi
Chicago, 60645
Jericho, L.I., 11753
Milwaukee, 53218
3462-66 W. Devon Ave.
purists to be the maker of the world's finest top -of -the -line stereo
15 Jericho Turnpike
5215 W. Fond du Lac
Retail Heathkit Electronic Center prices slightly higher to cover shipping, local
eceiver (AR -15) outdo itself? Simple (or so it seems)! It proceeds
stock,
consultation
and
demonstration
facilities.
Local service also available
to make the world's finest medium -power, medium -price stereo
whether you purchase locally or by factory mail order.
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
FREE
NEW 1971 CATALOG
Featuring these and dozens of
other exciting new kits for
home, hobby, test and service,
education and recreation
.
over 300 easy -to -build, fun -to use electronic kits in all. Get
your FREE copy now
use
coupon or write: Heath Company, Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022.
..
...
Dept. 41-2
Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022
HEATH COMPANY,
a
Enclosed is $
Schlumberger company
plus shipping.
Please send model (s)
Please send FREE Heathkit Catalog.
Name
o Please send Credit Application.
Address
City
*Mail order prices; F.O.B. factory. Prices
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State
&
Zip
specifications subject to change without notice.
HF -245
components present in the input.
Measurement of harmonic distortion
is one basic method of testing the
quality of a program circuit. Circuits
that have low harmonic distortion will
generally deliver program material of
good quality. At the present time, a
harmonic distortion figure of 0.4 percent is reasonable and within economic
limits when consideration is given to
all of the equipment involved.
Audio
Transmission
Line
Equalization
OUR PRESENT day society of
pushconveniences,
modern
button equipment and instant
everything, we take most things for
granted. We are conditioned to expect
the Sunday paper to be on the front
porch, the milk on our front doorstep in
time for breakfast, the garbage to be
removed twice a week, a flip of a switch
and light, a flip of a switch and music.
Behind most of the conveniences we
take for granted is a multitude of littleknown technical problems, sometimes
monumental in scope. In this article
a few of the problems and solutions
related to the transmission of high
quality stereo music on wire transmission lines will be considerèd.
The question of what is an adequate
frequency range to faithfully reproduce
sound with a high degree of realism
has been investigated by many researchers. The conclusions of Harvey Fletcher
of the Bell Telephone Laboratories
state that the range of frequencies which
can be perceived by the listener depends upon his innate hearing ability,
the average level of the sound, and upon
the characteristics of the background
noise. Statistically, the median frequency
range for the population is from 20
to 15,000 Hz at an intensity of 120 dB.
As the intensity of the sound is diminished, the response of the ear falls off
at the high and low ends of the audio
spectrum. Within the range of normal
listening levels, a frequency response of
dB is considered
50 to 15,000 Hz +
satisfactory for high quality sound reproduction. An increase in bandwidth
or a tighter tolerance could be achieved
but the economic penalty would not be
justified in that only an extremely small
percentage of the population could
detect the change. It must also be
understood the frequency response of
the transmission line extends above and
below the specified frequency range
before the half -power points are
reached.
IN
I
1
'Southern Bell Telephone Co., Charlotte, N.C.
Line Loss Characteristics
Buck O. Kraft*
Line Noise
Now that we are aware of the circuit requirements, let's look at a situation and one possible solution. The
problem is to install an audio transmission line between an FM studio and'
a transmitter some ten miles away.
indicates what we might do.
Figure
What we would have in this situation is,
essentially, a pair of wires ten miles
long. How would it work? Could all the
circuit requirements be met? The solid
line in Fig. 2 tells the story. Due to
line loss, our expected receive power
would be very low; therefore, the signalto-noise ratio would be unsatisfactory.
The frequency response would be ±26
dB with the high frequency range all
but lost in the line noise. Obviously
this method will not prove satisfactory
so other techniques must be used.
The present day technique of audio
transmission line conditioning, as shown
in Fig. 3, requires an amplifier and
equalizer at each telephone office.
This method breaks the line into
relatively short segments which can
meet the necessary requirements.
Let's take a closer look at one of
these line sections, including line loss
characteristics, equalizer characteristics and amplifier characteristics.
In the example, let the cable facility
be 22 gauge and the distance from the
studio to the first central office be four
miles. The dashed line in Fig. -2 indicates
the approximate bare loss (with no
equipment attached) of the cable pair.
It is clear from the figure that the difference in loss between the high and
low ends of the frequency band is
aboud 18 dB. The general contour and
the magnitude of the frequency -versus loss characteristic of the cable pair is
the result of the d.c. resistance and the
parallel distributed capacity of the
metallic conductors which make up
the pair. The d.c. loss of the pair
is constant at all frequencies under
consideration. The attenuation, which
is a result of the distributed capacity,
increases with an increase of frequency.
This results in an increase in loss with
increase in frequency. The method used
to negate this rising -frequency -versus loss characteristic is to insert a device
in the cable pair called an equalizer.
1
Although the frequency limit of
the transmission line is based on the
inherent physical capabilities of the
ear to perceive various frequencies,
the line noise limit is determined by
the construction of the line itself.
Multiple pair cable is generally used as
the transmission media. This means
many telephone and teletype circuits
are in the same cable and each causes
a small but perceptible amount of noise
to be induced into the audio transmission line. Some of the larger cables
contain as many as 2100 telephone
circuits. As might be expected, this
large number of interfering circuits
could cause a severe noise induction
problem. With the initial installation
of high quality cable and the application
of proper maintenance procedures, the
noise requirement of -57 dB can not
only be met, but exceeded by a number
of dB in many instances. In telephone
technology, the standard transmission
line impedance is 600 ohms and the
standard power reference level is
milliwatt. This combination of milli watt and 600 ohms is called 0 dB. Any
milliwatt is reprepower less than
sented by so many -dB; any power
greater than milliwatt is represented
by so many + dB. A noise requirement
of -57 dB, in essence, means the total
measured noise power is 57 dB below
milliwatt.
the reference power of
Mathematically, this equates to a peak
of 2,000 pica -watts.
Harmonic distortion occurs when a
device such as an amplifier or transformer has non-linear characteristics.
If a transistor amplifier is operated on
any non-linear portion of its characteristic, a change in input results in
a change in the output which is not
directly proportional. The resulting
distortion is harmonic or non-linear
distortion. Harmonic components are
generated by the device and appear in
the output, in addition to those frequency
1
1
1
1
1
AUDIO
20
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
*
FEBRUARY 1971
o
-lo
-20
]0 MILES
TELEPHONE
CENTRAL
OFFICE 21
FM
TUCIO
oio
o¡
ó -30
TELEPHONE
CENTRAL
OFFICE z2
J
-40
FM
TRANSMITTER
-50
TRANSMISSION LINE
-
-60
ONE PAIR INA MULTIPLE PAIR CABLE
50
Fig.
1-Showing
100
1K
a
straight-through audio transmission line
Fig. 2-Dashed line shows loss in 4 -mile section of 22-gauge
cable. Solid line shows loss in 10 -mile section of 22 -gauge
cable.
connection.
FROM FM
TO NEST
STUDIO
CENTRAL
OFFICE
AUDIO TRANSMISSION LINE
ó
kHz
4
JIG 3CT
3
kHz
15
T0.0075 0.0062T0.0051'f`C.
3-Audio transmission line with
equalizer and amplifier replacing the
straight-through connection in the telephone central office.
Fig.
The equalizer shown in Fig. 4 uses
a parallel resonant circuit. Below the
resonant frequency, the reactance is
inductive and, hence, according to the
formula for inductive reactance (XL =
27T FL) the equalized loss increases as
the frequency decreases. Since the
equalizer acts as a variable resistance
bridged across the cable pair, it introduces more loss at the low frequencies
than it does at the high frequencies.
Also, the lower series resistance introduced by R1, the greater the amount
of equalized loss provided. As the frequency increases, the inductive reactance increases. The resistance of RI
now has less equalizing effect as the
inductor and capacitor approach
resonance. Therefore, the equalizer
introduces less loss at the higher frequencies. The resultant frequency of
the equalizer is designed to be sufficiently above the highest equalized
frequency so as to provide the proper
slope as indicated by Fig. 5.
The amount of equalization that has
to be provided in the first section of
the circuit, according to Fig. 2, is 18dB.
At the studio, all frequencies from 50
Hz to 15,000 Hz, in 100 Hz steps, are
transmitted at 0 dB over the circuit
to the first central office. Here the
equalizer is adjusted by first selecting
the proper 15 kHz position. This is
done by experimenting to find out what
contour most closely fits the loss of the
cable pair. Now R1 is adjusted until
the loss of the equalizer is equal but
opposite to the loss of the circuit. Figure
6 indicates the result when this adjustment is properly completed. -The result of this equalizing process is not
I
3
2
ICI
AUDIO
10K
FREQUENCY-HE
a--5
6
kHz
kHz
r2,11
I
C5
SIB
15 kH
C6
0.09Ìs 0.12
}
INDUCTOR
Rl
15
mom n
16
Fig.
4-Showing
a
schematic of
a line
equalizer.
BM
.
BEß`
71-11
11I
BEB,_äI
J
ii 1MlNWi.
S
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Ill
MB
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1111!1111,1l
emm.iummue
las
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I75
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las
10
15
20
20.5
21
21.5
`
23.5
24
21.5
,H.
5-Equalizer slopes for 4 kHz switch positions.
only a flattening of the frequency
maximum gain of the amplifier is 42.5
response but also a drop in overall
+
dB, which indicates this is not a
level. This drop in level is the price
particularly high gain device. The reawhich must be paid to achieve a flat
son for this is the level of the input
frequency response.
signal is normally not lower than -20
or -25 dB. If the input signal was very
low-the order of -35 or -40 dB-the
Amplification
signal-to-noise ratio would be so low
The next process is to introduce
as to make the signal unusable. Addisufficient gain at this point to compentional gain in this case would serve no
sate for circuit and equalizer loss and
useful purpose. The maximum output
leave the first central office at a level
power is -22 dBm or 158 milliwatts.
of 0 dBm. (dBm indicates
This figure may seem unusual until
milliwatt
developed into 600 ohms.) Located in
certain considerations are reviewed.
telephone offices are amplifiers
The normal average power of the audio
associated with line equalizers. Figure
signal leaving the studio and all other
7 is a schematic of a solid state program
points which contain gain devices is
amplifier; Fig. 8 is a picture of the
0 dBm or
milliwatt. Higher output
current version. Table A lists some of
levels would cause interference to be
the amplifier specifications.
introduced into the other circuits in
A brief discussion of a few of the
the cable. Lower output power would
characteristics might be in order. The
cause the signal-to-noise ratio to be
Fig.
1
1
1
FEBRUARY 1971
21
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Characteristic
1,000 Hz
Frequency
Response
Output
Power
Noise
Gain
Controls
I
ni pedance
KS -16831, Amplifier
42.5
35
± dB
LINE LOSS AFTER EQUALIZATION
1
to 15,000: ±0.5 dB of
1,000 Hz value
+22 dBm with 0.5%
total harmonic distortion
(rms)
-60 dBm with dc -supply
noise not exceeding 64
drn and 15 kHz flat
weighting
Nineteen 2 ±0.25 dB
steps-total 38 dB and
OFF position, Vernier
control range 2 dB
150 or 600ohms in 25,
100, 150, 600ohms out
LINE LOSS
EQUALIZER LOSS
30
50
10K
1K
100
20K
FREQUENCY -Hz
Table A-Electrical characteristics of a
solid state program amplifier, which
compensates for circuit and line loss.
poor at the receiving end of the circuit,
as a result of low received power. A
0 dB transmission level is a compromise
which allows the best results to be
obtained, from both a signal-to-noise
ratio and an interference standpoint.
Fig
on total line loss.
It now becomes quite apparent what
has been accomplished in the first
section of the circuit. Transmitted from
the first central office is a bandwidth of
dB at a level of
50 to 15,000 Hz ±
0 dBm. The noise level will be below
-67 dB and the distortion will be below
0.4 percent. In effect, the studio has
been moved four miles closer to the
transmitter as far as the audio output
of the first central office is concerned.
The type of circuit that has been
described is known as a local program
circuit. These are relatively short in
The operating voltage for the
amplifier is 48 volts d.c., which is obtained from central office batteries.
In the event of a commercial power
failure, the equipment still operates
because the central office batteries are
charged independently of commercial
power. Jacks are associated with the
equipment so that, in case of a failure,
a spare amplifier can be patched (in-
Dependability is a prime requirement in telephone company equipment.
Program amplifiers are no exception.
As a rule, the equipment is turned on
when it is installed and tested and never
turned off except for maintenance.
Thousands of these amplifiers have
been performing successfully throughout the country for five or more years,
which is a credit to the design and
manufacture of this equipment.
TO
6-Equalizer effect
1
serted) into the circuit in a few seconds.
Monitor jacks are provided to check the
quality of the circuit if an abnormal
condition does exist.
T2
48V BATTERY
OR CONNECTING
T2'
3
4
CIRCUIT
AS REQUIRED
5
'6
7j
6
I I
OUTPUT
°/SI
BL¢
R3
RI
INPUT
C4
)
68
Ç3
2yy
R2
R
0
C
8
0
9
50
5W0
R2
>10
QI
2N553
E
MI
M2
CII
50'l'
Fig.
7-Showing
a
schematic of
a
-*-1J2
-1-C2
T
''-v
50
TO VU
METER
MONITOR
J3
program amplifier.
AUDIO
22
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FEBRUARY 1971
Miles Davis uses AR -3a speaker systems for
home listening. Their accuracy and lack of
coloration account for their choice by many
professional musicians.
One of America's most distinguished musicians, Miles Davis is enthusiastically heard by listeners in every
part of the world, live during his tours, and recorded on Columbia Records. His most recent recording is
"Miles Davis At Fillmore".
Free product catalog available on request from Acoustic Research, 24 Thorn dike Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02141.
Check No. 23 on Reader Service Card
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length, possibly up to about 30 to 40
miles. In this situation, there could be
a maximum of eight amplifiers in series
strung along the circuit. The limiting
factor as far as the number of amplifiers
in series is the distortion contributed
by each. With this many amplifiers in
series, a reasonable distortion factor
is 1.5 percent. Where very long program
circuits are involved, such as coast -to coast networks, this technique is not
used. Microwave radio or wire carrier
systems would be used in these cases.
Briefly, in these systems, the audio
band is translated to higher frequencies
and transmitted as sidebands in the
radio frequency spectrum.
The next section of the circuit shown
in Fig. 1 is from the first central office
to the second central office. The same
techniques are used to equalize the
second and the remaining sections of
the circuit. It is important to know,
however, that the audio oscillator remains at the studio and transmits the
test frequencies through each equalized
section to the next section. With this
arrangement, any residual discrepancies
in one section can be remedied in the
next section or sections. It is important,
however, that each section, as far as
practical, should be equalized to not
only meet but exceed the circuit requirements.
The last section of the circuit, which
is from central office number three to
the transmitter, is treated differently
than the previous sections. An equalizer
will be located at the transmitter but
an amplifier probably will not be, unless
this section is long and, consequently,
the received audio level low. The signalto-noise ratio at the transmitter determines the need for amplification at
that location. As an example, if the
equalized level is -18 dB, what could
the maximum signal-to-noise ratio be?
The normal sending level at the studio
for program material is +8 VU (volume
units) with a peak factor of + 10 VU.
(Peak factor indicates the maximum
amplitude the signal will momentarily
reach). This means the maximum level
is + 18 VU. Now if the equalized loss
in the last section is 18 dB, the peak
level would arrive at a level of 0 VU.
If the inherent circuit noise was -60 dB,
the signal-to-noise ratio would be 60 dB.
Of course, for signal levels less than the
peak value, the signal-to-noise ratio
would be less.
Stereo Considerations
When the program material is in
stereo form, two of the facilities previously described are required. This
type of transmission necessitates added
specifications comparing the two
transmission media. As indicated, the
frequency response in each channel
DIFFERENCE
ELECTRICAL
LENGTH
IN
IN
o
LEFT CHANNEL LINE
o
OUT
IN
o
Fig.
8-Showing
an audio
RIGHT CHANNEL LINE
amplifier and
jacks.
Fig. 9-Showing differential phase shift,
with the left-channel line shorter than
the right -channel line.
T
Fig.10-Arrangement for measurement
of differential phase shift in stereo channels.
(TMS is transmission measuring set.)
shall be ± 1 dB from 50 to 15,000 Hz.
The added specification requires the
transmission frequency characteristics
of the two channels be within 0.5 dB
of each other anywhere in the specified
audio range. If this requirement is met,
the monophonic listener will receive a
satisfactory signal. A difference in electrical length between two transmission
facilities results in differential phase
shift. If one path is slightly longer than
the other electrically, the two signals
will add vectorially at the receiving
end. Figure 9 represents an extreme
case of differential phase shift. The
signal which traverses the longer path
requires a greater time to reach the
end of the circuit. The worst possible
condition would result if the two paths
differed in electrical length by 180
degrees, which is a half-wave length
for a particular frequency. As would be
expected, this frequency would be
greatly attenuated. Differential phase
shift between two circuits increases
as the frequency is increased because
a slight difference in length can represent an appreciable part of a cycle. As
a rule, differential phase shift between
two circuits used for stereo transmission
is quite small and if the requirement can
be met at 15,000 Hz, it will be met in
the rest of the audio band.
In order to have negligible differential
phase -shift, the two circuits must be
completely identical in all respects.
Both circuits should be in the same
cable in all parts of the transmission
facility. Identical amplifiers must be
used and installed at the same locations.
Equalizers must be of the same type and
installed at identical locations.
The test arrangement used to check
for differential phase shift is indicated
in Fig. 10. At the transmitting end, the
oscillator is adjusted for an output of
kHz. The received level
10 dB at
should be equal to the normal received
level plus the loss of the resistance network which is 15.4 dB. If this requirement is not met, a frequency check is
made. When the differential phase
shift is negligible, the response characteristic of the combined circuits should
be ± dB from 50 to 15,000 Hz. If one of
the circuits is reversed, the two signals
will be 180 degrees out of phase and
the received level will usually be 20
to 30 dB lower than expected.
Minor discrepancies, where the
response at the high end is out of limit,
are due to slight accumulated differences in the make-up of the two circuits. This is generally quite easy to
remedy.
This is just a brief look into the current technology of audio transmission
lines. Many more engineering considerations are involved which we
haven't covered. The basic concepts
that were examined do give an accurate
picture and should give the reader a
good insight in this one small facet of
/E
audio techniques.
1
1
AUDIO
24
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FEBRUARY 1971
Extravagance
in the pursuit of
excellence is no vice.
At first blush, $225 for a record playing
instrument would appear to be rather
expensive. That is about $50 more
than today's acknowledged standard in
record playing instruments, our own
Miracord 50H.But, if you're one of those
people who derive great satisfaction
from an instrument that is precise in
every detail and offers meaningful features not available anywhere, then the
new Miracord 770H is designed for you.
The 770H takes for granted all features that exist in the finest of turntables
available today. It shares all of the im-
portant exclusive 50H features- Papst
hysteresis synchronous motor; external
stylus overhang adjustment with built-in
gauge; massive, dynamically balanced
turntable and cueing in both manual
and automatic modes. To these features,
the 770H has added several that are
new, that never existed before, and that
will contribute to
flawless play and
greater enjoyment
from your records.
Such features include TR U/TRACK,
an adjustable head
that can be set so
that the cartridge assumes the precise
15 degree vertical angle for any number
of records when used automatically, or
fora single record when used manually.
There's a variable speed control with
digital stroboscopic speed indicator.
Not only can you adjust the speed of
the 770H over a 6% range, but you can
restore it to the precise originally selected speed (33 or 45 rpm) with the help
of a built-in illuminated stroboscopic
speed indicator. Digital readouts of the
exact speed are always visible on the
rim of the turntable.
Another breakthrough is the built-in
ionic elapsed time stylus wear indicator
which keeps tabs, by the hour, of precisely how long your stylus has been in
use. It even reminds you to check your
stylus.
So, you see, the rewards of the 770H
for the music lover more than compensate for the enthusiasm of our engineers.See it at selected audio specialists
or write for full color brochure. Benjamin
Electronic Sound Corporation, Farmingdale, New York 11735/a division of
Instrument Systems Corp.
Miracord 770H
Check No. 25 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
FEBRUARY 1971
25
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Quadraphonic News
Recording In Quadraphonics
Ronald M. Klein*
ideally
stereo
ends itself to recording large
groups and intricate performances. The auditory impact of such a
recording is almost beyond description
and certainly represents a giant step
forward in the area of recording
techniques.
However, small groups will also
benefit by making use of this new
medium. One of our specialties is traditional music, including polka, old
time, and Dixieland music, which all
require a similiar recording technique.
When recording groups of this type,
the emphasis is on the most natural
sound possible. This can be achieved to
a great extent by recording in a hall
with good natural acoustics and retaining these acoustics through a quadraphonic recording. To take full advantage of this new sound, we are now
recording all LP master tapes in
quadraphonic under these conditions.
In our technique, the main stereo information is recorded on the normal
front channels. Pickup of ambient
acoustics from each back corner of
the hall becomes the rear channels.
There is a natural blend between all
channels, and the result is very realistic.
We have also tried the "surround"
type of quadraphonic technique, with
direct instrument pickup on each channel. The results are pleasant, but
decidedly artificial for this type of music.
This technique is very effective with
certain types of modern music however,
particularly when electronic instruments are included in the orchestration.
Effective location recording in
quadraphonic stereo would be very
cumbersome when using up to ten
microphones and conventional equipment. To solve this problem, we have
designed and built all the auxiliary
equipment we use in our laboratory.
Everything is transistorized and as
small as practical. This also allowed us
to customize the entire system for
maximum efficiency and lowest possible
RE-55
Electro -Voice
distortion.
microphones are used. They were
chosen for their very low distortion and
extremely smooth response. Taping is
done on a Sony TC -366-4 machine,
UADRAPHONIC
THIS IS STEREO
A
.1nn14U
1 ( I.inw,.i114..n .r.7 11.1d.
At the top of the page is a British record
which is mainly devoted to the normal
stereo setting -up procedures. However,
one band has been recorded for a
three -speaker arrangement. The Hafler
demonstration disc is shown in the
middle, and underneath is the KL record
mentioned in the article. Information
concerning it can be obtained direct
from KL Recording.
`KL Recording Service
P.O. Box 55
Hubertus, Wis. 53033
chosen for its small size and exceptional
quality. The entire recording system
can be set up on a two -by -four -foot
table and will handle up to 12 microphones or lines, complete with stereo
panning facilities. Master tapes produced
with this system have a usable frequency
response of 20 to 20,000 Hz at a maxiintermodulation
measured
mum
distortion of 0.8 percent. This is indeed
a tribute to the excellence of present
day electronic components and assemblies.
At the time of this writing, a system
for quadraphonic disc recording is still
under discussion. When this is finally
resolved, we will be issuing quadraphonic disc recordings from master
tapes now being recorded as previously
described.
One of the four-channel disc systems
now under discussion has a very interesting secondary use. Using part of
this system as described by David Hafler
(AUDIO, July 1970, page 24). a "tri phonic" recording can be made. As
suggested by Mr. Hafler, we have re-
cently released a record containing an
encoded third channel. (Sig Loomis
and the Tag -A -Longs, KLP-4) In this
recording, a single microphone was
placed in the back of the hall to pick
up ambient acoustics. This signal was
fed to both channels in equal amounts,
with one channel inverted to produce
the L-R component. On playback, this
signal will appear across the high sides
of each channel as an additive compònent, assuming the low or common
sides are tied together. This signal
can then be reproduced by connecting
(Continued on page 28 )
AUDIO
26
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FEBRUARY 1971
When the Citation Twelve
power amplifier was introduced,
it was immediately hailed by
HIGH FIDELITY magazine as
"
a virtually distortionless
device." STEREO REVIEW
said, "... the amplifier circuit..
is disarmingly simple, yet it
offers essentially state-of-the-art
performance." STEREO & HI -Fl
TIMES summed it up by saying,
"Harman-Kardon has produced
an amplifier that is so close to
theoretical perfection that it may
be said that the Citation Twelve
simply drops out of the
reproduction chain. It simply
produces no discernible sound
of its own."
Now Harman-Kardon presents
the Citation Eleven, a
superlative preamplifier worthy
of the Citation name.
.
The Citation Eleven
specifications are unmatched
by any preamplifier ever made.
But specifications alone do not
begin to convey the scope of
this remarkable instrument.
For one thing, instead of
conventional tone controls, the
Citation Eleven employs a series
of precision filters that permit
you to boost or attenuate the
signal at five critical points
within the audio spectrum. By
judicious use of the audio
equalizer you can correct
deficiencies in program material,
speakers and room acousticsliterally shaping your system's
frequency response. What
you actually hear is acoustically
balanced to the requirements
of your listening room.
But more. The Citation Eleven
Citation Eleven (wired) $295.00.
a full complement of
professional controls, and enough
inputs and outputs to satisfy
the requirements of the most
demanding audiophile. For
example: two tape monitor
switches; a front panel speaker
selector switch for two sets
of speakers; two low impedance
headphone receptacles; a special
defeat switch that removes the
audio equalizer from the circuit
for instant comparison of
equalized and flat response.
The extraordinary performance
and unparalleled flexibility of
the Citation Eleven are unrivalled
by any preamplifier on the
market today.
To fully appreciate the
Citation Eleven, you should
hear it in combination with the
Citation Twelve. But the
Citation Eleven, in combination
with any top flight amplifier,
will provide unexcelled
performance. Your HarmanKardon dealer will be happy to
provide a demonstration.
For complete specifications
and technical information, write
to Harman-Kardon, Inc., 55
Ames Court, Plainview, New
York 11803.
offers
harman kardon
A subsidiary ofJervis Corporation
Now...
The Citation Eleven
awaits the experts.
Check No. 27 on Reader Service Card
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of the encoded third channel is most
striking with earphones, as sound is
actually heard from slightly behind the
listener's head. Even the normal stereo
Recording in Quadraphonics
(Continued from page 26
)
these points. This
speaker should be placed in the rear
of the listening area, so as to simulate
the actual hall acoustics in proper
perspective. A diagram showing this
is on the record jacket for the benefit
of those who wish to try it. As Mr.
Hafler pointed out, this speaker will
reproduce any out of phase components
on a stereo record, and we have found
it does make an improvement in the
playback of other recordings. The effect
a speaker across
sound on speakers is somewhat enhanced by this additional acoustic information.
Another method of retaining acoustics
will be used in a forthcoming Dixieland LP release (Riverboat Rascals at the
Rangeline, KLP-5) The master tape is
in quadraphonic, but the first issue
of the record will be in normal stereo.
When the master is cut, a portion of the
right rear signal will be mixed in with
the right front, and a portion of the
left rear with the left front. This will
give an effect similiar to the encoded
Part lI
How Many Channels?
Duane H. Cooper*
THE
TRIPHONIC system,
which
I
described recently (AUDIO, p.
36, Nov., 1970), was one which
had been stripped to its psycho -acoustic
fundamentals. For the sake of clarity,
mention of possible refinements and
extensions had been omitted. However,
this system does share with other stereo
systems using widely -spaced speakers
a problem that may be designated as
old
sound -image polarization-the
problem. Here,
hole -in -the-middle
this problem is that of an instability,
against varying listening positions, of
images along the front -to -side axes.
A smoother frontal spread is obtained
if the front speaker by replaced by a
spaced pair of speakers, each carrying
the sum signal. For example, an existing
stereo pair, mono connected, may be
used with minimal modification of an
operating installation. Many experimenters will prefer this quadraphonic
array using what may be called "split"
front speakers. The reproduction should
still be regarded as triphonic, however.
since the two front speakers still care_
the same information.
With existing recordings, the smoothing benefits of split front speakers are
easy to demonstrate. Whether splitting
the side speakers will produce similar
benefits is a question not so easily
settled, since commercial recordings
designed to exploit triphonic reproduction for side and back localizations
are not, of course, available. Any such
*Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, III. 61801.
De oy
J
third channel, but will be more apparent
on speaker playback.
However, the best arrangement will
still be a true quadraphonic recording,
and we are hopefully awaiting a system
that will be fully compatible with
present stereo disc reproducing equipment. We are also hoping to see a truly
usable quadraphohic tape system made
available to the public at a reasonable
price. As one step in this direction,
quadraphonic reel-to-reel tapes will be
available from us on a limited basis in
the early part of 1971. We hope other
recording companies will also make
some quadraphonic material available.
so as to aquaint the consumer with this
exciting new method of recording.Æ
splitting should be designed, however,
to make the most effective use of the
greater psychoacoustic weight attaching
to the side locations.
For example, the left side speaker
could be moved forward somewhat to
take the 0 degree position (Fig. 1), and
a speaker in the extreme left -back
position could be added to carry an L -R
signal. The corresponding provisions
would be made on the right, but with
the extreme right -back speaker to carry
an R -L signal. Thus the off-center bias
in back localization which I earlier
noted as being a hazard for a single
back speaker
difference -connected
would be avoided. It is this use of such
that
difference -connected speakers
would merit further study in schemes
that are basically triphonic.
A matrix -like array may be used to
indicate the speaker locations and signal
combinations described above, as
follows:
F
Fig.
1-The triphonic
by Cooper in his
system explained
earlier article.
F
S5F
0
L
F
%F
0
L
L
L
-L
O
%a8
B
Fig.
2-One
R
R
0
R
-R
R
0
-S,8
-B
possible
quadraphonic
speaker arrangement.
L
B
in which F stands for L+R. and B
stands for L -R. Then, with R = O.
L = R, L = -R, and L = O. the arrays
obtained are shown in Fig. 2. In-between
combinations are clearly possible.
Microphone arrangements and their
matrix combinations to obtain specific
localizations other than these are not
obvious in every instance. Further
experimental data, whereby the psycho acoustic weight of the side -speaker
locations may be determined, are
needed. It will be recalled that it is
this weight that would make it possible
to obtain a subjective impression of excellent channel separation in the face
of rather little electrical separation.
Thus, automatic circuitry to detect level
balances and to steer these to effect an
enhancement of subjective separation
would not be needed.
AUDIO
28
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F
R
-B
FEBRUARY 1971
...value unsurpassed
for integrity of sound
for quality and elegance of cabinetwork
and above all,
for ability to meet your needs
of today and your greater need tomorrow.
Our Catalog tells the story of Bozak's two decades of
leadership in loudspeakers, and explains the dynamic
concept of Systematic Growth. Ask for your copy.
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U.S.A.
Richard Freed
ONDON HAS
reissued three more of
its mid -fifties opera sets on its
half-price Richmond label and.
while most such reissues from this
source have been welcomed as genuine
bargains and some even as treasures
beyond price, one must seek far for
justifications for these particular
revivals. One is a dismayingly unsatisfactory account of Wagner's Flying Dutchman, taped live at Bayreuth
in 1955 (SRS -63519, $8.94). The other
two are products of English Decca's
pilgrimage to Yugoslavia, a year or
so earlier, to record Russian opera:
Borodin's Prince Igor (SRS -64506,
$11.92) and Mussorgsky's Boris Godunov
(RS -63030, $8.94). This Dutchman was
not issued in stereo before, and neither
was this Boris; the latter, in fact, is still
offered in mono only.
While investment in any of these
three sets would seem to me the most
false kind of economy, a case of sorts
might be made for Prince Igor, since
there is not-and, for that matter, never
has been-any other really complete
recording of the opera. Oscar Danon
(who conducted the work in Chicago a
few seasons ago) is a superb musician
who made the most of the opportunity
he was given: an opportunity to record
a fascinating but relatively neglected
masterpiece in its entirety for a major
company, but with conspicuously inadequate personnel. From his shaping
of the Overture (a delicious confection
of Glazunov, based on his recollection
of Borodin's extemporization at the
piano), it is at once obvious that the
music is important to him, that he
understands and enjoys it thoroughly,
and that his enthusiasm and authority
are communicated easily. It is equally
the
that
unfortunately,
obvious,
orchestra of the Belgrade National
Opera is not a very distinguished
ensemble, with good enough strings
(rather good ones, in fact) but winds
that just won't do.
In the vocal complement, the mezzo
Melanie Bugarinovich is a very attractive
Konchakovna, and Biserka Cvejic
(who has become a star at the Mel since
making these recordings, but whose
name is still transliterated by London
as "Tzveych") makes an excellent impression in her two very minor roles
(a Polovetsi maiden and a nurse). From
there on. though, it's all downhill.
Zharko Cvejic (or Tzveych), in the
classic dual role of Khan Konchak and
Prince Galitsky, does nothing either to
honor or to efface the memory of
Chaliapin or any of his other distinguished predecessors; there is neither
subtlety nor style nor much of anything
especially musical about his singing, and
his notions of characterization are crude.
Dushan Popovich, in the title role, is
actually far from unappealing, but one
feels a little less "dignity" and a little
more vocal security would not be amiss.
Valerie Heybalova, as Yaroslavna,
seems to personify the character of
AUDIO
30
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FEBRUARY 1971
IECiCrI
r:r.rvbJ.i
R
r
ilI
ÏÌ
il
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1
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Spring -loaded connectors
eliminate the need for tools
when changing speaker or
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Unique FET demodulator in
AM section increases sensitivity
and reduces spurious response
and cross modulation
Muting circuit eliminates
between -station background
noise and hiss
4 FET's in FM front end
minimize spurious response
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am
Dual headphone outputs
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Black-out glass panels
light up as functions are selected
Separate AM and FM tuning
eliminates needless dial spinning
Nikko 1101 AM/FM
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Computer -type plug-in
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Separate stepped volume control
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If that handsome brute is a bit much, check these beauties:
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range, Hear them at your Nikko dealer's today.
Put an AKG
on the job.
Boris, Igor and The Dutchman
(Continued from page 30
)
undertaking: there can be no
questioning her sincerity or her feeling
for the music, but she simply lacks the
technical equipment to enable the
listener to stop fretting about which
note she may ultimately land on and
enjoy the performance.
So, why go on? The only reason for
"going on," or considering this set,
would be its uniqueness, but who really
wants a complete Igor of such poor
quality? Disregarding the cloudy old
Bolshoi recording on Period, the only
competing version, on Angel, omits
Act III and has numerous other cuts,
including a huge chunk of the Overture
itself-but it does have Boris Christoff
as Galitsky and the Khan, some other
very fine singers, and the superb conductor Jerzy Semkow, who has a far
better aggregation of instrumentalists
in the Sofia Opera orchestra than Oscar
Danon had in Belgrade. The sound,
too, of course, is more than a dozen
years newer. There will probably be a
complete Igor from Moscow sooner or
later on Melodiya/Angel (although the
omission of Act III is traditional there).
My advice for the present, to those who
want a really complete recording but do
not wish to be without this glorious
music altogether while waiting for it
would be to rest content with the single
disc of excerpts from the Christoff/
Semkow version on Angel S-36568,
which offers eminently satisfying
versions of most of the highlights
(omitting, sadly, Yaroslavna's aria).
Kreshimir Baranovich, on the evidence of his recordings, was much less
of a conductor than Danon, and there
is simply not much point getting into
a discussion of his surpassingly pedestrian treatment of Boris, which, as noted,
is in mono only, and has nothing special
in its favor, except perhaps an unusually
vigorous chorus and some real excitement in the Kromy Forest scene. The
Rimsky-Korsakov version is used, of
course, but with substantial cuts, including the scene with Marina and
Rangoni in its entirety. Miro Changalovich sings the title role and, while
he does nothing wrong, he does little
to bring it to life. The Columbia recording of a Bolshoi Theatre production
under Melik-Pashayev, with George
London in the title role, costs twice
as much but is worth it, and the Angel
conducted by the late André Cluytens,
with Christoff as Boris, though more
expensive still, makes price too trivial
a matter to consider. However, if
this
It will
sound better!
For complete information
on AKG performance at
prices ranging from
$40. to $75. net write to:
MICROPHONES HEADPHONES
DoSOKUUTEO NY
NORTH AMERICAN PHILIPS CORPORATION
100 EAST.Tnc STREET. NEW TOR, NEW YORK ,o O,
ARG CANADA
DIVISION
OF
DOUB.E DIAMOND ELECTRONICS
SCARBOROUGH. ONTARIO
Christoff s earlier (mono) recording,
conducted by the incomparable Issay
Dobrowen, were to reappear on Seraphim, we could then simply forget
about all the others. Whether officially
so designated or not, that was one of
the "great recordings of the century,"
and, though recorded two or three
years before the Belgrade Boris, it was
superior sonically as well as musically.
Even though the reissued Dutchman
bears the Bayreuth imprimatur, it is
really about in the same class as the
Belgrade Boris, which is to say "undistinguished" would be an understatement. The cast looks good on paper:
the late Hermann Uhde as the Dutchman, Astrid Varnay as Senta, Ludwig
Weber as Daland. But, while Uhde
and Varnay both gave us many great
performances, on records and in the
theatre, they were both off their form
when this one was taped, and so was
Ludwig Weber. Joseph Keilberth conducted with a heavy hand and a stunning
abstinence from imaginativeness, and
the orchestra and chorus go a long way
toward cementing the impression of a
thoroughly second-rate effort. This was
an early stereo recording, and at best
it is no improvement over the mono
offered earlier, in which the stage business sounds clumsy instead of vivifying, and balances and perspectives
are not at all comfortable. According
to the label, side one opens with the
fanfare that calls Bayreuth audiences
into the theatre, but it is not on the
disc, which actually begins, conventionally enough, with the familiar Overture. In the old mono edition we did
have the fanfare, the warning bell and
the orchestra tuning up-the whole
works in terms of atmosphere-but it
was still, after all, the same unsatisfactory performance. The Klemperer
version, on Angel at full price, is the
one to go for if you want a Dutchmanand if you think you don't, the
Klemperer could change your mind.
Since these three sets happened to be
among the very few disappointments in
London's exceptional catalogue, one can
only wonder why it was felt necessary
or desirable to reissue them. Perhaps,
now that Böhm's marvelous Frau ohne
Schatten has been restored in this series
(in stereo now, at one-third of its original price in mono) and such other gems
as the Clemens Krauss Salome, Ansermet's L'Enfant et les Sortilèges and
Flagstad's A lceste have also been revived, it has become a matter of scraping the bottom of the barrel. But the
indispensable Krauss Zigeunerbaron is
still in Limbo, and it is high time it
were made available again.
AUDIO
32
Check No. 32 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FEBRUARY 1971
Pure, clean tone ..simple
elegant styling. end the rost
meticulously Engineerec
stereo receivers, tape decks,
compac
tuners, amplifiers
and speaters you'\,e ever L. id
ears on It's all .aiting ficr
you atycirnearest KENWOOD
Dealer- :he best stereo crmpone:-its pure...and simpe!
Me sound approach to quality
KENWOOD
15711 S. Broadway,
Gardena Calif. 90247
72-02 Fifty-first Ave., Woodside, N.Y. 11377
Check No. 33 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
This is what you'll say when you hear the price of the Sony 6200
AUDIO
34
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FEBRUARY
1971
This is what you'll say when you hear the Sony 6200
The unusually high price of the new Sony 6200 receiver
is a come-on. For once you know it, you can hardly
resist the temptation to hear it perform and justify its
lofty price. And once you hear it perform, you'll have to
own this superb component.
The real joy of the 6200 lies in its performance. Balanced positive and negative power supplies permit
direct coupling all the way through to the speakers for
unusual clarity. There is power to spare by whatever
measure: 360 IHF watts into 4 ohms, 70+70 watts
continuous power into 8 ohms with both channels driven;
a minimum of 60+60 at all frequencies from 20 to
20,000 Hz.
FM performance is equally distinguished. The FET
front end raises the sensitivity to its theoretical limit
(1.2 uV for 20 dB quieting; 1.8 uV IHF), while retaining
the ability to handle strong local stations without overload and spurious response. Solid state i.f. filters ensure
that the same superb performance you hear today, you'll
enjoy many years later; the receiver never needs realignment.
Throughout, the accent is on pleasure: the silky feel of
the flywheel tuning action. The precision and stability of
the 6200's tuning: locate the frequency you want on the
long, linear dial with the power off, and the station comes
in clearly an instant after the power is turned on.
And the 6200 is always easily adaptable to your
desires: You can elect to hear only stereo broadcasts. Or
you can switch out the interstation muting to find the
weak and distant stations normally hidden in the inter station "hash" that muting eliminates (less than 3uV).
Even moderately noisy stereo signals can be heard in
stereo, thanks to a high -blend switch that reduces noise
without affecting separation.
We could document all this performance with a host of
specifications and graphs. But even these can merely
indicate performance, not reveal it. The true revelation
is your own listening experience, and the "ah" of your
reaction to it. For many, that "ah!" will prevail over the
"oh?" engendered by its price-converting that "oh?"
perhaps to a Hmmm... With which, of course, your Sony
dealer will be glad to harmonize. For if he, too, did not
take pleasure in good sound, he would not be a Sony
dealer. Sony Corporation of America, 47-47 Van Dam St.,
Long Island City, New York 11101.
New SONY 6200 Stereo Receiver
Check No. 35 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
35
FEBRUARY 1971
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Phono Cartridge Survey
A buyers'guide to the best
products is a fairly
massive procedure, and there are
certain to be omissions of individual reader's favorite products in the
category, when one considers that in the
directory 46 separate cartridges are
listed, and these do not begin to include
all the products of the several manufacturers. We estimate, for example,
that there must be at least 65 different
cartridges on the market from those
manufacturers who are in the high
fidelity industry. The only ones listed,
too, are magnetic cartridges, since they
have become the accepted standard for
high quality sound reproduction.
Any testing of cartridges involves
the use of phonograph records, and to
be fanatically accurate, one should use
a new record for each test-prohibitively
expensive, considering that a frequency
record, a square -wave record, and a
wide -range test record must be used to
provide a complete dossier on each
cartridge. For frequency runs, the usual
test record is the CBS STR-100. For
wide -range measurements, the STR-120
is required, since the STR-100 covers
the range only from 40 to 20,000 Hz.
The STR-120 extends the range to
50,000 Hz at the high end, and down
to 10 Hz at the low. Square -wave and
intermodulation distortion tests necessitate the use of the STR-1 I 1 disc, which
also has tracking information, although
we used the STR-100 for tracking.
Additionally required are a 'scope,
a graphic recorder, an a.f. voltmeter, an
IM distortion analyzer, and a camera.
The chart shows the "fixed" or static
information about the cartridges tested,
and will indicate that an ohmmeter and
an inductance bridge are also needed.
addition to the equipment listed before.
Our first test was that of frequency
NY ROUNDUP Of
cartridges now available.
response, using the STR-100 record.
Response was first recorded for the
left channel from 40 to 20,000 Hz, followed immediately by crosstalk response
of the left channel to a right -channel
modulation on the disc. Next we duplicated the measurement using the right
channel of the cartridge. We then put
on the STR-120 record and measured
response on the sweep from 500 to
50,000 Hz, also on both channels, and
followed this by running curves on
response from 500 down to 10 Hz. We
then measured the output from the
cartridge at a signal of 3.54 cm/sec,
1000 Hz, and divided the figure obtained by 3.54 to obtain the relative
output in mV for a stylus velocity of
cm/sec, which provides a comparative
figure.
We then connected the IM analyzer
to the output of the measuring preamp-which, by the way, is equalized
to provide a boost of 6 dB/octave
below 500 Hz, and to be flat above
that turnover frequency. The recording
characteristic of the STR-100 record
consists of a straight line at a slope of
6 dB/octave from 500 Hz down, and
flat above. A complementary equalization to this is not obtainable by a simple
RC network such as is used in ordinary
preamps, and if the usual RIAA equalization is used, the resulting curve will
have a 1.5 dB "bump" at 500 Hz, and
will roll off slightly below 50 Hz. This
latter we accept, but a resonant circuit
is necessary to flatten the "bump" at
500 Hz. All measurements are made
through this preamp except for the
square -wave photos, which require a
wide -band linear preamp.
The IM measurements are done at
two recorded levels-at +9 dB for the
lateral bands of different levels-starting
1
36
at +6 and increasing in 3 -dB steps. The
lateral bands of different levels-at +6
and increasing in 3 -dB steps. The
vertical portion has only three bands,
+6, +9, and + 12. These IM bands are
presented in duplicate with different
pairs of frequencies-one is with 400
to 4000 Hz, while the other is with 200
to 4000 Hz. We have selected only the
+9 lateral modulation at 200 and 4000
Hz, and for the vertical measurement,
we chose the +6 modulation at the
same pair of frequencies. Thus the
measurements should not be considered
"absolute," but only relative.
One series of bands on the STR-100
consists of a 100 -Hz signal recorded
at stylus velocities of 6, 12, 18, 24, and
30 cm/sec. To determine the tracking
force listed on the chart, we measured
the lowest force that would track the
30-cm/sec groove without breaking up.
All these measurements were then followed by changing the preamp and
projecting the square wave on the scope
and photographing it. The square wave
photos are unretouched and are simply
prints from the negatives made of the
patterns displayed on the scope. One
should always remember that the curves
and photos are those of a single cartridge (two at the most), and while they
are likely to be characteristic of the
entire run of the specified models, they
cannot necessarily be guaranteed as
such. This is a caution which should be
remembered with respect to reports on
any equipment. The only realistic
curves and data should be the average
of a large number of individual units,
which is, of course, impossible in a
limited compilation such as this.
(Continued on page
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
38
)
FEBRUARY 1971
If you haven't heard the only
Stereophone in the world that lets you
hear all ten audible octaves
you haven't heard a nything yet
The remarkable Koss ESP -9 Electrostatic
Stereophone brings you distortion -free
wide -range frequency response never
before possible in headphones ... flat
± 2 db monitoring over the entire
audible spectrum of ten octaves. What's
more, you get push-pull, balanced acoustical circuitry that cancels out all second
harmonic distortion. The ESP -9 surpasses
the range of even the finest loud speaker systems. Large, oversized coupling transformers in
the external energizer unit provide high -power
capability in the very low bass range ... produce
good wave form at 30 Hz with up to 10 volts
input. A simple selector switch on the energizer unit lets you quickly choose self bias, or ac line energizing for precision
level measurements. A soft, wide
headband and patented, fluid -filled ear
cushions provide for fatigue -free monitoring of the longest recording session.
There's more to hear about the Sound
of Koss. But until you try a set of Koss
Stereophones for yourself ... you haven't
heard anything yet. Send for our new,
free 16 page full -color catalog. Address your request c/o: Virginia
Lamm, Dept. 41.
H K O S S Stereophones
Koss Electronics S.r.l., Via Valtorta,
Koss Electronics, Inc., 4129 N. Port Washington Rd., Milwaukee, Wis. 53212
Card
Reader
Service
Check No. 37 on
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
21
20127, Milan, Italy
STEREO CARTRIDGES
Directory of Manufacturers
ADC (see Audio Dynamics Corp.)
Stylus type
indicates adv. page)
\d
43'
30
39
0.73
4-P,
47K
4714
E
±2
E
C
10-24K
2h
'
0
,
x
.i
4e
10-24K
et
e
0.3
a
0.7
0.3
x
0.7
e
Only 3 -stylus
100.00
0.3 00.7
User
65.00
47K
E
0.3x0.7
User
59,50
47K
E
0.3
User
44.95
30
30
0.73
14-14
47K
33
33
0.73
4-14
20
20
0.92
4.2
E
Check No. 135 on Reader Service Card
of America
525 E. Montrose
Wood Dale, III. 60191
Check No. 134 on Reader Service Card
E
14-11a
which allows custom
matching to each record.
75.00
0.73
dg.
0.6
x
User
30
Audio Dynamics Corp.
Pickett District Road
New Milford, Conn. 06776
B & O
e
.4'
User
SPECIAL
FEATURES
0.3x0.1
30
- Conical
E-Elllptical
é
8+
°ye
1
25
á
á
4..e
r` $
Y
.!v9¡I. `e$ Y
ICucled numen
ADC
`
es°
Y aNU FACNRER
C
As above, but with single stylus assembly.
±2
27
10-2214
Benjamin Electronic Sound Corp.
40 Smith St.
Farmingdale, N.Y. 11735
±2
IOE-
10-20K
MK
32
11
S50XE
10-20K
x
0.7
42
990XE
Top of new line of induced magnetic dg. All
styli
10-20K
20
20
0.92
1-2
47K
E
0.3x0.7
User
User
in
"X"
Decca (see Paoli High Fidelity Consultants)
29.95
±2
Imo
220
10-18K
20
SP -12
15-25K
>25
20
0.921
>20
1.0
2-5
47K
C
0.7
I2-1.5
47K
E
0.2
x
0.1
9.95
User
8.5
69.95
3
SECCA
4RC
30-16K
25
7.5
23
47K
3-31y
0.5
E
x
0.6
220XE, with
elliptical stylus, S22Á0.
EMPIRE
COLORING
444-E
10-24K
444.12
162414
26
344-17
20.2284
24
26
stylus.
Elpa Marketing Industries
New Hyde Park, N.Y. 11040
65.00
17
1.0
.075
47K
E
0.2 x0.9
User
6.5
69.50
17
1.0
.075
47K
C
0.5
User
6.5
59.50
47K
C
0.7
User
6.5
39.50
User
1.0
I
244-17
20.2284
22
L5
1.5
47K
C
0.7
6.5
24.95
1000ZE'X
4-40K
35
25
1.5
4-14
47K
E
11.2
x0,7
User
7
99.95
999VE'X
6-3K
35
25
1.7
155-14
47K
E
0.2x0.7
User
7
79.95
999TE
6-32K
35
25
L7
44-148
47K
E
0.2x0.7
User
7
64.95
999SE'X
8-32K
35
25
2.0
14-114
47K
E
0.3x0.7
User
7
49.95
999PE
8-320
35
25
2.0
4e-2
47K
E
0.3x0.7
User
1521K
30
20
47K
E
0.3 x0.8
User
X
X
B00Super
0.8
I
-P>
7
7
800E-
Check No. 131 on Reader Service Card
For "state-of'the-art" tone arms; response
20.20K
30
20
1.0
1.2
47K
E
0.3
x
0.8
User
7
39.95
For very good record players;
tracing at
F.1
7.40K
F-3
NORELeo
Empire Scientific Corp.
1055 Stewart Ave.
Garden City, N.Y. 11530
35
7-40K
33-MK
412
Goldring (see IMF Products)
curve furnished
Mk II
GRAoo
Check No. 132 on Reader Service Card
44.95
69.50
E
EMI (see Benjamin Electronic)
Response 561014 4LSd0 "Naked" diamond
+_3
ELAC
Check No. 133 on Reader Service Card
series are interchangeable.
30
0.8
0.7-2
Any
a
35
30
0.8
0.7-2
Any
C
33
20
LO
4.144
47K
E
1
gm or
slightly over.
User
5.5
75.00
'Patented twin-tip -2 separate 0.3 -mil conical
lips ground on one diamond "Fluxbridger generator,
0.6
User
5.5
49.50
"Fluxdidge"
0.3x0.7
User
7
67.50
Grado Laboratories, Inc.
4616 Seventh Ave.
Brooklyn, N.Y. 11220
Check No. 130 on Reader Service Card
generator.
Individually calib. chariot hey resp. supplied
with each cartridge.
ORTOPON
PICKERIRe
S -15M
'T
20-20K
30
25
0.6
1-2
47K
E
0.3
x
0.7
Factory
31
85.00
515'0
20.20K
30
25
0.6
1-2
47K
E
0.3
x
0.7
Factory
1814
80.00
SL-15/T
20-20K
30
25
0.6
47K
E
0.3
x
0.7
Factory
7
75.00
SL-15
20-20K
30
25
.02
4.114
2
E
0.3
x
0.7
Factory
7
60.00
XV -45/
50.25K
30
22
4.4
4.1
47K
E
0.200.9
User
5
65.00
10-25K
D
5.5
85-114
E
0.300.9
User
5
54.95
34.114
IMF Products
7616 City Line Ave.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19151
Pre -amp MP -235, 360.
Check No. 129 on Reader Service Card
750E
XV-151
22
47K
All XV -15 models include"X-GuarC' replaceable
stylus and "Dustomatic" brush hinged to stylus
assembly; exclusive snap-in cartridge mount.
400E
XV-15/
10-25K
30
22
6.0
1.3
47K
C
0.7
10-25K
30
22
8.0
2-4
47K
E
0.4
10-25K
30
22
5.5
47K
E
User
5
39.95
0.9
User
5
49.95
0.9
User
5
49.95
350
XV-15/
x
200E
0-I5/
Phase IV-
114-
0.3
x
±14
5.15'
'
10-236
25
20
6.5
1-3
47K
C
0.7
User
5
34.95
V-1543 series has
"Dustomatic" brush;
15 -degrees tkg. angle; snap -in
10.25K
25
20-25K
cartridge mount
0.3x0.9
User
5
0.7
User
6.8
67.50
Analog-computer -designed for finest-Quality TT's.
User
6.8
62.50
As above, except with conical stylus.
49.95
New series of high -tradability cartridges
for good turntables.
5.5
4-144
47K
E
25+
0.7
N14
41K
E
20-25K
25 v
0.7
34.14
47K
C
831E
20.20K
25+
1.0
4.144
47K
E
0.2
0.7
User
M93E
262014
25+
1.2
144-3
47K
E
0.4x0.7
User
5
39.95
MISE
20-31K
25+
1.2
4.154
47K
E
0.4
User
6
34.95
20
V-15
0.2
x
Type II
Improved
V-15
0.7
Type Il -7
Improved
x
x
0.7
5
As above.
Lowest cost high-trackability cartridge for
upgrading older turntables.
11-7530
smaalroN
68lÁ
681EE
3)-20K
10K -20K
10-10K
25+
1.2
114-3
35
LI
114-3
35
0.82
LI
47K
C
0.7
User
6
24.50
As above, conical stylus.
47K
C
0.7
User
5.5
66.00
All models with "Longhair" brushes.
Primary calib. std for icdg. sys checkout.
$174
47K
E
0.2 x0.9
User
5.5
72.00
For
2-4
47K
0.4 30.9
User
5.5
66.00
More rugged ctg el lip. stylus des. for med. force;
exa freq. resp. and linearity.
±44 dB
681SE
±45-
500A
critical listening; high compliance,
low mass, and low
20-10K
35
E
±2
dB
20-10K
kg
force assure min. wear
35
LO
2-5
47K
C
0.7
User
5
30.00
For heavy-duty on-the -air use
35
1.0
1-244
47K
C
0.5
User
5
35.00
For auditioning -room use
35
1.0
2.5
47K
E
0.4
User
5
35.00
Larger stylus radius, tougher armature cusp.
for longlife in broadcast applications.
±1dB
5009A
20-10K
±1d13
500E
33-10K
±148
_
x
0.9
Check No. 128 on Reader Service Card
Ortofon (see Elpa Marketing)
49.95
AME -3
SNURE
North American Philips Corp.
100 E. 42nd St.
New York, N.Y. 10017
"Dustomatic" brush.
AM.3
V-15.'
V-IS'Phase IV series has high profile;
Low mass stylus assembly includes
N4E
Norelco (see North American Philips Corp.)
38
Paoli High Fidelity Consultants
P.O. Box 876
Paoli, Pa. 19301
Check No. 127 on Reader Service Card
Pickering & Co., Inc.
Sunnyside Blvd.
Plainview, N.Y. 11803
Check No. 126 on Reader Service Card
Shure Brothers, Inc.
222 Hartley Ave.
Evanston, Ill. 60202
Check No. 125 on Reader Service Card
Stanton Magnetics
Terminal Drive
Plainview, N.Y. 11803
Check No. 124 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FEBRUARY 1971
THE
SANSUI QS-1
QUADPHONIC SYNTHESIZER
$
SANSUI QS -I
4 -CHANNEL SOUND FROM ANY 2 -CHANNEL SOURCE
Senses and recovers the ambient information
hidden in your stereo discs, tapes and broadcasts
After having discovered that the ambient components of the original total sound
field are already contained in hidden form, in conventional stereo records, tapes
and broadcasts, Sansui engineers developed a method for sensing and
zph input
sansei
recovering them. These subtle shifts and modulations, if re -introduced,
Tuadphonio
in
as
it
existed
the
original
sound
total
of
the
atria
breathtakingly recreate the
Phase -modulation
recording or broadcast studio.
The heart of the Sansui Quadphonic Synthesizer'` is a combination of a unique
reproducing matrix and a phase modulator. The matrix analyzes the 2 -channel
Phasemodulated signals
information to obtain separate direct and indirect components, then redistributes
these signals into a sound field consisting of four distinct sources.
This type of phase modulation of the indirect components, applied to the additional
speakers, adds another important element. It sets up a complex phase interference fringe in the
listening room that duplicates the multiple indirect -wave effects of the original field. The result is
parallel to what would be obtaind by using an infinite number of microphones in the studio (Ml through
Mn in the accompanying illustration) and reproducing them through a corresponding number
of channels and speakers.
IF L
R
L
F R
R. R
The startling, multidimensional effect goes beyond the four discrete sources used in conventional
4 -channel stereo, actually enhancing the sense of spatial distribution and dramatically expanding the
dynamic range. Also, the effect is evident anywhere in the listening room, not just in a limited area
at the center. And that is exactly the effect obtained with live music! This phenomenon is one
of the true tests of the Quadphonic system.
The Sansui Quadphonic Synthesizer QS -1 has been the talk of the recent high-fidelity shows at which
it has been demonstrated throughout the country. You have to hear it yourself to believe it. And you
can do that now at your Sansui dealer. Discover that you can hear four channels plus, today,
with your present records and present stereo broadcasts. $199.95.
`Patents Pending
SANSUI ELECTRONICS CORP.
Woodside, New York
Gardena, California
Frankfurt a M., West Germany
SANSUI ELECTRIC CO., LTD., Tokyo, Japan
Electronic Distributors (Canada), British Columbia
Check No. 39 on Reader Service Card
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Phono Cartridge Survey-Continued
ADC -25
This cartridge was profiled in the July, 1969
issue and is included in addition to the ADC 220 because we have long used it as a reference
standard. Our unit has a frequency response
which is within 1 dB up to 20,000 Hz! It uses
the induced -magnet principle whereby the
stylus does not move a heavy magnet; instead
the magnet is fixed and the stylus moves a tiny
magnetic collar which in turn moves between
the pole pieces. Three styli are provided-two
bi -radial or elliptical and one conical type.
Styli can be interchanged in a matter of
seconds and, in theory, the critical user can
get optimum results from his records. Available as ADC -26 with single elliptical stylus at
a reduced price.
IM dist.: 1.6 lat., 2.2 vert. Tracking: 0.75 g.
)18
t
T1G
"11111.111111
.1111
RESPONSE
F1
®1111
i
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1111
!MI 11111
'AMIN
CROSSTALK
111111
l.111111
100
' 11111!
IK
10K
FREQUENCY
-
20K
H.
ADC-220XE
FREQUENCY RESPONSE
0
This is a relatively inexpensive model, using
the same induced -magnet principle as the
ADC -25 described above. Response continues
to about 35,000 Hz preceded by a small peak
around 15,000 Hz. Separation is in the vicinity
of 25dB at 1000 Hz, falling to 20 dB at 10,000
Hz. It is an up -dated version of the older ADC 220, having the new snap -on stylus assembly.
IM dist.: 2.5 lat., 5.4 vert. Tracking: 0.75 g.
_10
<
-20
CROSSTALK
20
IK
700
10K
20K
50K
FREQUENCY Ha
Audio Technica
This unit may or may not be on the market
under this name, but the product is used by
a number of manufacturers in completed
modular systems. Performance is reasonably
comparable with other models-flat to about
5 kHz, then rising 4 dB at 9000 and remaining
there to 20,000, then rolling off to -5 dB at
30 kHz. Separation is 22 4B through most of
the range, rising to 26 at 3500 Hz, then gradually decreasing to 10 dB at 15 kHz.
IM dist.: 2.1 lat., 2.8 vert. Tracking: 0.75 g.
.i+4,4i,
Ifil
a
13
This model, AT -35X, is
used in the Electro Voice Landmark 100
compact system, which
was reviewed in the
November, 1970 issue.
1111.11111
2111111
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111111
111111
11
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11111
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IIIIIIIIII.IIIIII
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®.1111r1,97_7.,,._,,,; 1i1111mIlllll
20
100
1K
0OK
FREQUENCY
SOK
-Ha
Decca 4RC
This cartridge was reviewed in June, 1970
and it has several interesting features. No
cantilever is used between stylus and magnet
which, it is claimed, results in more accurate
tracing of the record grooves. Tracking weight
is higher than most other top -grade cartridges
but, according to the manufacturers, record
wear is less due to the lower effective tip mass
and use of a hand-polished diamond. The
reviewer stated "it measures better and sounds
better than any other pickup I have tested to
date." Note that this product is manufactured
by Decca Gramophone Ltd. of England,
which is in no way connected with Decca
Records, a division of MCA, Inc. of New York.
IM dist.: 2.1 lat., 2.5 vert. Tracking: 3 g.
40
RESPONSE
SEPARATION
-
-30
20
50
- - -R
L CHANNEL
100
500
1K
CHANNEL
5K
IOK
20K
FREQUENCY -Ha
-
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
AUDIO
FEBRUARY 1971
B&O SP -12
This unit was profiled in the October, 1970
issue with a complete description of its mechanism. The stylus arm terminates in a "micro cross" which relays the flux to the four pole
pieces. Response is smooth up to about 15 kHz,
then rises some 4 dB at 21 kHz, after which it
drops off to -10 dB at 30 kHz. Separation is
around 20 dB dropping to 12 dB at 20 kHz.
IM dist.: 3.2 lat., 4.0 vert. Tracking: 0.5 g.
RESPONSE
1
10
CROSSTALK
100
20
10K
IK
FREQUENCY -
50K
Hz
Elac STS -444E
The Elac cartridge employs the moving magnet principle, invented by Dr. Ahrens of
that company. The magnet-a tiny bit-is in
the end of the stylus arm opposite the stylus,
and its movements generate the flux changes
through the four coils. The method is simple,
effective, and relatively easy to manufacture.
The differences in performance of the various
models using this construction testify to the
ingenuity of the individual designers in adapting the method to their products. This cartridge is very flat up to 20,000 Hz, then drops
off to 10 dB down at 26,000. Separation is
better than 25 dB throughout most of the
range, dropping to 15 at 10 kHz, and 10 at
RESPONSE
CROSSTALK
20
100
IK
10K
`.0K
FREQUENCY -H.
20 kHz.
IM dist.: 3.0 lat., 4.0 vert. Tracking: 0.75 g.
Empire 1000ZE/X
The 1000 ZE was profiled in the November,
1970 issue, but the "X" model is still an
improvement. Response is smooth, being dB
down at 10 kHz, 3 dB at 20 kHz, and about
8 at 30 kHz. Separation is better than 25 dB to
above 10 kHz, and then drops to 15 at 20,000.
Flatness of response is attributed by the manufacturer to the use of laminated pole pieces.
The built-in stylus protector swings down to
RESPONSE
11
1
-20
CROSSTALK
keep the stylus from contact with undesirable
objects until you want to play a record. Then
you swing the protector up and away.
IM dist.: 2.2 lat., 3.0 vert. Tracking: 0.5 g.
Goldring 800 Super
20
1K
10K
50K
FREQUENCY -Hz
E
This British -made product is praised by
many users, and it is a pleasant sounding
unit, fairly flat to 20 kHz, with a little trough
at 5000 to 7000 Hz-about 3 dB. This is not an
uncommon condition with cartridges, and
probably results from damping to eliminate
the main resonant peak, which in this unit
is about 21 kHz. Separation is about 22 dB
throughout the spectrum up to about 15 kHz,
and then it decreases to about 15 dB at 20 kHz.
IM dist.: 2.1 Lat., 4.3 vert. Tracking: 0.75 g.
AUDIO
100
RESPONSE
<
CROSSTALK
-20
20
100
IK
FREQUENCY -Hz
FEBRUARY 1971
www.americanradiohistory.com
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10K
50K
Phono Cartridge Survey-Continued
Grado F-2
Another new principle-this time using a
"flux -bridging" generator. The generator
itself is a toroidal structure with four gaps.
The moving element is placed adjacent to the
gaps but affects only the fringe field and acts
much like a moving-coil pickup. Note the
low inductance of the coils which are so placed
as to neutralize hum pickup, thus eliminating
the need for a shield. Response is flat and
slightly rising to + dB at 20 kHz, then drops
to only 10 dB down at 50 kHz. Obviously this
cartridge should be a logical choice for playing the four-channel discs. Separation is better
than 25 dB over most of the spectrum, and is
still at least 15 dB at 45 kHz.
IM dist.: 2.5 lat., 6.0 vert. Tracking: 1.0 g.
RESPONSE
0
10
<
-20
CROSSTALK
20
10K
OC
1
FREQUENCY
SCK
-H:
Ortofon SL -15
The only moving-coil cartridge in this survey, the Ortofon has long been on the market
in two forms-with a transformer built into
the cartridge itself, and with a separate transformer to be connected between the cartridge
and the usual 47,000 -ohm-input preamp. Note
that in the chart, the inductance of the coil
itself is shown as 350 microhenries, rather
than in the usual millihenry range. Since the
cartridge output impedance is only 2 ohms
and its output is .04 mV/cm/sec, some additional step-up in voltage is required for the
average preamplifier. We had both the separate transformer, and a new pre-preamp which
is now available for use with the Ortofon,
and we made measurements with both.
Response was similar, essentially flat to 10
kHz on the high end, then rising to a peak of
about 15 dB at 23 kHz, then dropping back
to flat again at 50 kHz. This would result in
considerable "brightness," but with some
speakers it might be considered desirable.
And for four-channel records, it would be
ideal. The response peak, which is quite
Z.\
RESPONSE
CROSSTALK
20
1110
K
FREQUENCY
10K
SOK
- Nz
broad, actually, can be corrected readily by
most tone controls, and especially so with
some of the selective equalizers. Separation
with either amplifier or transformer was
about 22 dB throughout the entire range,
in consideration of the increased response
in the 20-30 kHz range.
The new pre-preamp consists of a single
grounded -base transistor in each channel
along with a very well filtered power supply
and input and output jacks. It represents a
desirable addition to the Ortofon, since it
eliminates the possibility of hum pickup by
the exposed-although well shielded-trans-
With amplifier.
With transformer.
former.
IM dist.: 2.2 lat., 3.8 vert. Tracking: 1.0 g.
with transformer: 2.6 lat., 4.0 vert.
42
AUDIO
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FEBRUARY 1971
Pickering XV15-750E
The top -of-the -line descendant of the first
magnetic cartridge to attain popularity in
the high fidelity field, the XV 15-750E has a
very flat response to 10 kHz, then rises about
3 dB at 19 kHz and drops off to -10 dB at
30 kHz. Separation is better than 25 dB, then
decreases smoothly to about 6 dB at 20 kHz.
The Pickerings employ the "Dustamatic"
brush which rides in the groove ahead of
the stylus and clears if from dust and lintno more "rugs" on your styli. The new plastic
fixtures for mounting simplify the entire
operation of putting a cartridge into the head,
since the fixture snaps into the head or
attaches by a single screw .and the cartridge
is simply snapped into the plastic fixture.
IM dist.: 2.6 lat., 2.8 vert. Tracking: 0.5 g.
RESPONSE
CROSSTALK
20
100
1K
50K
10K
FREQUENCY -Hz
Shure V15 -II, Improved
This cartridge is the top of a long line
of fine cartridges-individually tested before
RESPONSE
-10Mia
\
0
leaving the factory, and recognized as one
of the choices of many audiophiles. When
used with the recommended capacitance in
the connecting cables-450 pF-this cartridge
is flat within
dB to 20 kHz, then falls off
rapidly, being down 10 dB at 24 kHz. Separation is around 27 dB throughout, up to 15 kHz,
then decreasing to 15 dB at 20 kHz. The V15 II, Improved was profiled in the March, 1970
e
20
1
\
20
CROSSTALK
IK
100
10K
SOK
FREQUENCY -N.
issue.
1M dist.: 2.6 lat., 2.8 vert. Tracking: 0.5 g.
Stanton 681 EE
This cartridge is known as the "calibration
standard," and is used for this purpose in
many recording studios and record factories.
It is guaranteed flat within + 1.5 dB to 15 kHz,
and a calibration is provided with each one
as it leaves the factory. The one we measured
was right on the button with the specifications
on the calibration slip which accompanied it
(which serves as a justification of our own
equipment.) The separation is better than
25 dB from 60 to 2000 Hz, then decreases
gradually and smoothly to 8 dB at 10 kHz,
and remaining in that vicinity up to 20 kHz.
The unit is beautifully packaged (as a matter
of fact, packaging of cartridges is becoming
as important as the packaging of cosmetics has
been for years), with a gleaming metal case,
plus a smaller metal case in which you can
store your spare styli and also a small screwdriver. And with the exception of the Ortofons and Decca every cartridge in this survey
has a user-interchangeable stylus, so you can
go from conical 0.5 -mil to various tip radii
on elliptical or in some instances, to a 3.0 or
2.7 -mil stylus for playing your old 78's. If
you can remember that far back. The unit is
shown with its dust brush.
IM dist.: 2.3 lat., 2.3 vert. Tracking: 0.5 g.
AUDIO
R
ESPONSE
CROSSTALK
20
100
1K
10K
50K
FREQUENCY -N.
43
FEBRUARY 1971
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Equipment
Profiles
Synchro-Matic Turntable
TEAC A -7030U Stereo Tape Deck
Sherwood S-7100 AM/FM
Stereo Receiver
V -M
44
46
50
V-M "Synchro-Matic" Automatic
Turntable, Model 1555
MANUFACTURER'S SPECIFICATIONS:
Speeds: Two, 33'/3 and 45 rpm. Motors:
two, synchronous; one for turntable, one
for cycle change. Dimensions: 183/4"
wide, 143/4" deep, 61/2" high over dust
cover. Weight: 20 lbs. Price: $220, with
Shure M-71 cartridge, dust cover, and
base.
For some strange reason, there have
been no truly high fidelity record
changers made in the U.S.A. for almost
the history of the high fidelity industry.
There have been many excellent singleplay turntables made here, and very few
anywhere else in the world, but the
high quality changer has remained the
province of the Germans and the
British, with one recent importation
from Italy which looks good, but which
we have not tested to date.
'The new V -M "Synchro-Matic" does
qualify as a high fidelity changer, and
it offers a number of features not
exhibited heretofore in automatic turntables.
Audiophiles have often been worried
about the use of a single motor for both
record turning and the operation of the
changing mechanism, in spite of the
excellent performance that several
European manufacturers have gotten
out of single -motor automatics. The
audio buff who sticks with his single play turntable will argue"that the better
tape recorders have three motors, so
why can't a turntable have a motor for
each function-which would require but
two, while the professional tape recorders need three for the functions of
rewinding, take-up, and the constant speed capstan drive.
The V-M is the first automatic we
have seen that employs two motors.
Both are small "clock -type" synchronous
designs, with the turntable motor revolving at 300 rpm and the changer
motor turning at a geared -down 4 rpm,
but still completing its change cycle at
13 seconds at either turntable speed.
The operating procedure of the V -M
turntable is as follows: After actuating
the cycle-by depressing either the automatic or manual play keys or by the arm
on completion of a record-the turntable
motor stops, the arm rises and swings
to the right, the next record is lowered
half way to the platter, its diameter is
sensed by the arm, which then backs
off about '/8 in., the record is lowered
to the platter, the arm moves in to the
first -groove position, the turntable
starts rotating, and the arm lowers gently
to the record. That is quite a complicated procedure, but it is controlled by
a single cam driven directly by the
change -cycle motor, geared down to
4 rpm. During the cycle, a switch wafer
driven by the shaft of the change -cycle
motor shorts the pickup leads for
silence during the change. While the
record is playing, the arm has no mechanical connection with any of the
cams and levers of the changing mechanism. It has an extension of arcuate
form which obscures the light from a
small lamp, preventing it from shining
on a photo -sensitive cell. At the end of
the play, the end of the extension moves
past the light beam, which illuminates
the cell and inaugurates the change
cycle. The operating cam is a die-cast
disc with grooves and convolutions on
it which actuate the various levers that
perform the multitudinous movements
to cause the change. The center spindle,
with its three arms, is actuated by a flat
beryllium -copper spring strip which is
moved horizontally, parallel to the
chassis, then is guided around : curved
path to end up as a vertical motion in
the spindle.
44
The turntable proper-an aluminum
stamping with its rubber pad neatly
finished-rests on the "drive turntable,"
another stamping which is driven by
a flat rubber belt from the drive
motor turning at 300 rpm. Change of
speed is accomplished by a lever which
coaxes the belt from the smaller diameter of the motor shaft for the 331/3 speed
to the larger diameter for the 45, and
back again as directed by the control
just back of the operating keys. Raised
numbers are uncovered as the control
is moved from one position to the other
to indicate the turntable speed.
The arm is an aluminum tube with
a 28 -deg. bend near the head, which
plugs into a socket in the end of the
arm. The head-a plastic molding,
chrome "plated" by the usual evaporation process-is held in place by a collet like ring, and accommodates the cartridge in an adjustable position to
compensate for variations in overhang.
Balancing the arm is simplified by a
knob which actuates a roller that bears
on the underside of the arm extension
and moves the weight forward and
backward as the knob is turned. Auxiliary metal strips are provided to
increase the mass of the counter -weight
for cartridges heavier than normal.
After the arm and cartridge are
balanced, the stylus force is set by
another knob on the left side Of the
arm mounting, with the force being
AUDIO
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FEBRUARY 1971
indicated through a small hole in the
front of the housing. A height adjustment screw is accessible from the top of
the mount, while another adjustment
for stylus landing is accessible once
the platter is removed-a simple operation, since it is held onto the drive turntable by a "C" washer.
The mechanism is supported from
the chassis plate by rubber mounts
to reduce the effect of external bumps
or vibration on the unit. Cup washers
can be inverted over the rubber mounts
to lock the mechanism to the chassis
plate for transporting.
At the rear of the unit are three
openings-one for the power cord, one
for an accessory a.c. outlet, and one
for the signal output phono receptacles,
along with a ground screw. Four goodsized rubber feet serve to hold the
mechanism into the walnut -finished
holds auxiliary counterweight.
Moves co
forward
to oa
Fig.
1-Close-up of arm moulting and counterbalance.
case, which provides excellent protection
to the mechanism with its fiber -board
bottom plate. An attractive smoky plastic
dust cover fits onto grooves in the base.
Operation
Four operating keys are providedstop, automatic, manual, and cue. As
many as six records may be stacked on
the spindle, and automatic play is started
by depressing the auto key. For manual
playing, a single record is placed on
the spindle and the manual key is depressed, starting a change cycle, lowering the record to the platter, and bringing the arm over the starting groove.
where it can be lowered by depressing
the cue key. The arm may be lifted at
any place by again depressing the cue
key, and lowered again into the same
groove by another action of the key.
Belt
o
-5
- 10
-15
Performance
Before actually using the unit to play
records, we made all the usual tests
and measurements, using the Shure
M71MB cartridge with which the unit
is equipped. In the important range
6 to 250 hz-we found wow -and -flutter to
be a low .06%, which increased to only
0.1% in the range from 0.5 to 6 Hz. The
signal-to-noise ratio measured 34 dB,
unweighted, which would approximate
54 dB if we convert this to the "audible
rumble loudness level," which more
accurately describes the effect on the
ear with the average home system.
The 13 -second change cycle was
constant for either speed of the turntable, as would be expected since it is
the result of using a separate motor
for the chaning operation. Most changer
mechanisms are driven by the turntable
platter itself, and at different speeds
-
AUDIO
2-Close-up of turntable drive motor pulley and belt -shifting mechanism.
is in the 45 rpm position.
Fig.
- 20
-25
20
100
1
10K
K
20K
FREQUENCY Hz
Fig. 3-Frequency response curves of the V -M Synchro-Matic 1555 equipped with
a Shure M71MB cartridge.
the time of cycling varies.
In playing use, the unit performed as
its
measurements indicated, with
consistent operation over a number of
hours of listening. The V -M "SynchroMatic" is built economically, with the
use of plastics where they would suffice,
as is usual with modern designs. But we
could find no fault with their use in
the performance of the unit. We did
find one "problem" in its operationwith a single record on the platter, de -
pressing the manual key would cause a
change cycle, and then the turntable
drive motor would stop. A little study
taught us that the turntable motor could
be persuaded to continue if we stopped
the arm during the cycle at the time it
was "feeling" the diameter of the record.
That was the simple answer to the
puzzling behavior of the unit, and once
we learned that, the problem ceased to
C. G. McP.
exist,
Check No. 45 on Reader Service Card
45
FEBRUARY 1971
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TEAC A -7030U Stereo Tape
Deck
MANUFACTURER'S SPECIFICATIONS:
Speeds: Two, 15 and 71/2 ips. Heads:
Four; two -track erase, record, and playback, and four -track playback. Reel
Size: 101/2" max. Motors: Three; dual speed hysteresis synchronous for capstan drive, two eddy -current for reel
turntables. Wow and Flutter: 15 ips,
.05%; 71/2 ips, .08%. Signal -to -Noise
Ratio: 58 dB (2 -track); 55 dB (4 -track).
Crosstalk: 40 dB at 1000 Hz. Frequency
Response: 15 ips, 40 to 20,000 Hz ± 2
dB; 71/2 ips, 50 to 15,000 Hz ± 2 dB.
Inputs: Microphone, 10,000 ohms, 0.5
mV min.; line, 300,000 ohms, 0.1 V min.
Output: Approximately 1 V for a load
impedance of 100,000 ohms or more.
Fast Winding Time: Approximately 200
sec. for 2400 ft. of tape. Dimensions:
203/4" high, 17%" wide, 8-1/16" deep,
(10" over knobs). Weight: 62 lbs. Price:
$749.50.
2CCÿ00%cllu
This is the first tape deck with the
speed combination we have
been privileged to examine in a long
time, and it is a delightful machine to
operate. The control is by relays and
solenoids, which makes it possible to
add a remote -control accessory when desired, and for special applications such
laboratories, another
as language
15-71/2-ips
accessory-a remote pause control-is
available.
The A -7030U accommodates 10'
reels, as well as any smaller sizes one
wishes to use. It is basically a two -track
machine, but has the additional four track head for playing tapes recorded
with this configuration-which naturally
includes most pre-recorded tapes.
The unit has the usual arrangement
with the reels at the top, the operating
controls in the lower portion of the
transport section, the amplifier is in a
separate chassis mounted in the same
cabinet as the transport.
The operating controls along the
lower portion of the transport are: the
power switch, with a pilot light above
it, followed by the tape -speed switch,
the reel -size switch, the two track/four
track switch, all of which are push push buttons, and the CUE button, a
momentary switch. To the right are
three short bars controlling tape
motion-REWIND, FAST FORWARD, and
PLAY, with a long STOP bar underneath
them. At the right edge of the panel are
the RECORD button, with the RECORD
pilot light above it. The head assembly
is above the push -push switches, and
the counter, driven by a belt from the
supply reel, is to its left. Above the
counter is a stabilizer roller with a
compliance arm alongside, the latter
Fig.
1-Front
view of amplifier section.
with a sensing post over which the tape
is threaded. The stabilizer roller is fitted
with a l'/4 -lb. flywheel to iron out any
variations in tape feed from the supply
reel. The sensing post is designed to
work with a piece of aluminum foil on
the back of the tape, and as the foil
passes the post, the machine will either
do nothing, stop, or rewind the tape and
then stop, depending on the setting of
a switch on the rear panel of the deck.
To the right of the head assembly is
the capstan-of massive dimensions,
since it measures 0.475 in. in diameter.
Above it is the pinch roller, and to its
right is the automatic shut-off lever.
Holding the reels in place are two
large reel clamps which accommodate
NAB 101/2 -in. reels, and which lock in
place with a slight turn of the knob.
46
For 7 -in. and smaller reels, rubber
slip-on reel holders are provided. In
addition to the stabilizing roller, there
is also a scrape -flutter roller between
the record and play heads, as well as
tape -lifters which are retracted in the
fast -wind positions when the CUE button
is depressed.
The amplifier section, shown in
Fig. 1, has two phone jacks for left
and right microphone inputs under the
record -level controls-the left pair controlling microphone levels and the right
pair for the line inputs, which may be
mixed together for recording. The controls are dual -concentric types, with
the anodized aluminum front knobs
controlling the left channel, while
the larger black plastic knobs are for
the right channel. Next are the two 41/2AUDIO
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FEBRUARY 1971
Boom Boon.
We've taken our most versatile, best -performing unidirectional studio microphone, the Shure SM53, and made it even more versatile by developing a
complete boom accessory system that equips the SM53 for every conceivable boom and "fish -pole" application! Shure design engineers started with a
major breakthrough in design: a small, lightweight, extremely effective
isolation mount. They developed a super -flexible isolation cable, a pair
of highly -efficient front -and -rear windscreens, and a 20" boom extension
pipe. Finally, they developed a complete boom assembly that combines unusually small size with superb control and noise isolation.
Result: an accessory lineup that makes every Shure SM53 studio
microphone a complete microphone
gel
system! Write: Shure Brothers Inc.,
222Hartrey
Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 60204.
Check No. 47 on Reader Service Card
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SI--IVRE
in. VU meters, illuminated whenever
power is on. Between them are two
more push-push switches which control
which channel is recording. To the right
of the meters is another push -push
button which selects source or tape
monitoring, followed by the output
level control, also a dual -concentric
type. Below this is a stereo phone jack.
The amplifier and the transport assembly are connected electrically by
two cables, each with octal plugs, and
by two separate play -head cables
plugged into phone jacks on both amplifier and transport. The remote control
accessory requires a 11 -pin plug, while
the pause control uses a 6 -pin DIN
plug, with only three wires. Actuation
of the pause control in the accessory releases. the brake and capstan solenoids,
stopping the tape motion. In addition to
the interconnecting cables, there is a
ground strap between the two sections.
Amplifier Circuitry
The amplifiers are relatively straightforward in design, with conventional
solid-state circuitry. Each play amplifier
consists of a three -transistor preamplifier section, ending in an emitter
follower, with feedback from its emitter
to the emitter of the first transistor,
switched by a relay as the speed -change
button is actuated. The preamp is
followed by a twin -T filter, followed by
the TAPE -SOURCE switch and the output level control. This feeds a two -transistor
amplifier which provides the necessary
gain to supply the output signal and
also drives the meter amplifier-a single
transistor-which is also switched from
tape to source. Adjustable resistors serve
to balance the indications between the
two signals. In addition to feeding the
meter amplifier, the amplifier also feeds
another transistor which is a transformer
coupled to the phone jack to permit use
of conventional low -impedance headphones. A bias trap across the output
terminals eliminates any residual bias
from the amplifier.
The record amplifier consists of a
microphone preamp stage followed by
the mic volume control, which is paralleled by the line input volume control.
Both are adjusted to similar outputs by
variable resistors. The mixing controls
then feed a two -transistor feedback pair
with some high -frequency equalization,
and the output drives the recording
output stage, a single transistor with
resonant circuits across part of its emitter
resistor to provide the required high frequency peaking. The output from the
collector feeds the record head through
another bias trap. with bias being adjusted by a variable resistor. In the
Fig. 2-Showing transport section from rear. Note massive
flywheels on both capstan (left) and stabilizing roller (right).
2 -track
2 -track
erase
head
record
4 -track
2 -track
head
play head
play head
Scrape flutter
filter,xoller
erne Tape lifting
rods
Fig. 3-Close-up view of the head assembly. Note the additional head at right for playback of four -track tapes.
CO
PLAYBACK FROM STANDARD TAPE -15
,Ì;
IPS
7'2IPS
RECORD AND PLAYBACK -15
IPS
IPS
20
50
100
500
500
5K
10K
20K
FREQUENCY -Hz
Fig. 4-Response curves for playback of standard frequency
tapes and for recording and playback at both speeds.
AUDIO
48
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FEBRUARY 1971
play mode, the record heads are shorted
to ground.
The bias/erase oscillator, operating at
108 kHz, consists of a balanced pushpull circuit, with the output deriving
from a secondary winding on the oscillator coil. When recording on only one
channel, a simulated load impedance
absorbs the signal which would normally
be supplied to the head not in use.
The power supply utilizes a transformer with two secondaries-one for
the meter lamps and one for collector
supply for the amplifiers. This is rectified
by two diodes, and is well filtered. A
relay in the amplifier chassis performs
the equalization changes necessary for
the two speeds, and with six more relays in the transport, there is a complement of seven altogether, along with
24 transistors and 10 diodes.
Accompanying the A-7030 is an
attractive flexible plastic cover which
can be used to protect the machine from
dust and exposure. Also included are
the ubiquitous flannel polishing cloth,
two spare fuses, a small bottle of oil,
and two Allen wrenches for use in
ordinary maintenance operations. Also
included, of course, are the two NAB
reel holders, two rubber reel stops for
one
7 -in. and smaller reels, and
aluminum NAB empty reel. The
power cord, separable, and two phono tipped patch cords are provided for the
necessary connections.
Operation
As would be expected from a professional caliber unit, such as this one,
the machine performed flawlessly. One
of the usual tricks that reviewers are
wont to perform is trying to break the
tape. I can be done if you try real hard,
but it requires two fingers or two hands
to operate the controls fast enough and
if you do not follow the instructions
given. It is suggested that when fast
winding and a stop is desired that you
should first depress the fast -winding
lever for the other direction, then the
stop button. If you do this, you can't
break the tape. If, however, you go from
fast wind to stop and then immediately
to play, you are likely to break the tape,
but it requires some very fast finger
work. The first time we succeeded in
breaking the tape we thought we had
outwitted the machine, but it happened
at an old splice. We did succeed later
in breaking the tape itself, but only
by disregarding the directions.
There is understandable joy in using
a machine at 15 ips, even though it
uses tape up fast. But what can we use
for a source? We did have some 15-ips
tapes that have been on hand for some
AUDIO
time, and used this as an opportunity to
dub them to another machine at 71/2 so
we can play them at will. But the advantages of those tapes were only that
we had them-they were mono, and almost twenty years old.
The performance of the A -7030U is
so good at 71/2 that the only advantage
of the 15-ips speed would be for the
individual who does a lot of original
recordings-there is no need for 15 ips
if you are recording from the air or
for dubbing from phonograph records.
Thus the main advantage of this
machine is that of its finely finished
construction, its very low wow and
flutter, its excellent separation, and
its signal-to-noise ratio.
GREAT
STEREO
STARTS HERE!
Performance
The frequency response of the
A -7030U is shown in Fig. 4 from standard tapes, and from signals fed in at a
constant level. The slight rolloff at the
low end was not in evidence when we
adjusted the input signal to the VU
meters on the recorder, only from a
flat input signal.
Flutter and wow measured a very low
of .03% at 15 ips, and .06% at 71/2, both
of which are excellent. Signal-to-noise
ratio at 15 ips was measured at 58 dB
below the 3% distortion point, which
occurred at +9 dB above the indicated
0 dB of the VU meters. At 71/2 ips, S/N
was 56 dB. Harmonic distortion was
3% at +9 dB, 1.6% at +6 dB, and 0.5%
at 0 dB and at 10 dB below indicated 0.
These figures were for all frequencies
from 100 to 10,000 Hz, increasing to
1.2% at 50 Hz (which might be the fault
of the generator). Rewind time for
1800 feet of tape was clocked at 90
seconds, which is pretty fast. Channel
separation was measured at an even
50 dB, also excellent. Four -track performance was essentially identical,
with only 2 dB lower S/N.
Using a hysteresis motor for capstan
drive through a belt to a heavy flywheel, there was no change in speed as
frequency was varied. Nor was there
any change as voltage was lowered to
50. However, the machine would not
start at any voltage lower than 96, but
once playing it would continue down
to 50 volts. The brakes, employing 270 deg. felt -lined copper bands, were
extremely effective.
In conclusion, the A -7030U is a solid
machine, built on a 3/16" steel panel
as the main chassis, and it should last
forever. And it is also a "solid" performer which should require a minimum
of maintenance. It is a recorder of which
anyone could be justly proud.C.G. McP.
Check No. 48 on Reader Service Card
49
FEBRUARY 1971
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If you're becoming serious about listening
to stereo equipment, here's a cartridge
to get you started on the right track
the ADC 220XE. Like its more expensive
brothers, it is carefully crafted by hand
with our exclusive induced magnet
design. It tracks accurately and yields
faithful sound reproduction with
virtually any changer or tonearm. As you
can see, the 220XE is really a great first
cartridge. And even its low price of $22
will be music to your ears.
-
course, when you're ready to move up
to more sophisticated stereo equipment,
you can choose from ADC's complete
line of superior cartridges. Isn't it nice to
know we won't desert you on the way up?
Of
ADC 220XE SPECIFICATIONS
Output: 6 mV at 5.5 cms/sec.
recorded velocity.
Tracking Force:
1
to
21/2 grams.
Frequency Response: 10 Hz to 18 kHz
3 dB.
±
Channel Separation: 20 dB from 50 Hz
to 10 kHz.
Compliance: 20 x 10-6 cms/dyne.
Vertical Tracking Angle: 15°.
Rec. Load Impedance:
47,000 ohms
nominal.
Price: $22 Suggested Resale.
Write for detailed specifications on
other "X" series cartridges.
AUDIO
DYNAMICS
CORPORATION
PICKETT DISTRICT ROAD,
NEW MILFORD, CONNECTICUT
06776
AUDIO FOR
AUDIOPHILES
Check No. 51 on Reader Service Card
Sherwood Model S-7100 AM/FM Stereo Receiver
WI
MANUFACTURER'S SPECIFICATIONS:
FM TUNER SECTION: IHF Sensitivity: 1.9 µV. S/N: -65dB.
THD: 0.5%. Selectivity: 40 dB. Capture Ratio: 2.8 dB. Spurious
Response Rejection: 87 dB. Image Rejection: 78 dB. I.f. Rejection: 90 dB. Stereo Separation: 40 dB @ 1 kHz.
AM TUNER SECTION: Sensitivity: 5µV @ 60% Mod. for 6 dB
S/N. Selectivity: 7.5 kHz @ -6 dB. Frequency Response:
-6dB @ 4 kHz. Image Rejection: -50 dB @ 1 MHz. I.f. Rejection: -45 dB @ 1 MHz.
AMPLIFIER SECTION: IHF Power: 70 watts total, 8 ohm load.
RMS Power: 25 watts/channel. THD: 1.0% at rated output,
0.2% at 10 watts. IM Distortion: 1.0% at 8 ohms, rated output;
0.35% at 10 watts. Power Bandwith: 25-20kHz. Frequency Response: (Aux): 30-20 kHz ±2 dB. Damping Factor: 30 @ 8
ohms. Tone Control Range: Bass: ±13 dB @ 100 Hz; Treble:
±13 dB @ 10 kHz. Input Sensitivity: (For rated output): Phono:
1.5 mV; Aux: 3.8 V. Hum and Noise (IHF): Phono: -65 dB;
Aux: -75 dB.
GENERAL: Size: 171/2 in. W. x 55/e in. H. X 131/2 in. D. Price:
$199.95 (Walnut case included).
OM -1 OMNI SPEAKER SYSTEM. We've been in it from the
beginning
at point ALPHA in time. Our engineers took
...
audible sounds-electronically produced, and made them
clear, high fidelity tones. We participated in the design and
engineering of speakers to create the world's finest stereophonic sound reproduction. Now, we have reached OMNI ...
0M-1 OMNI SPEAKER SYSTEM produces sound uniformly
for any part of the room. It is "omni-directional," (radiates
360 degrees). This new concept radiates both direct and
reflected sound deftly, creating a real depth sensation. You
can place this OMNI speaker anywhere from the middle of
the room to a corner bookshelf. The UTAH Omni Speaker
is a wonderful new way to enjoy music.
sound all around
SPECIFICATIONS
Woofer; 8" diameter, cloth roll suspension, 13/4 pound magnet structure, 1" voice coil. Tweeter; 3"
diameter, co -axially mounted, Alnico
V magnet. Crossover frequency;
4,500 Hz. Cabinet; 93/4 x 93/4 x 141/2"
high, durable laminated walnut finish. Power; 30 -watts peak, (15 watts
program). Response, 35/18,500
Hz. Impedance, 8 ohms. Shipping
weight,
15
pounds.
HUNTINGTON, INDIANA
46750
We never cease to be amazed at just how much value can be
packed into a receiver chassis these days in the "just under
$200.00" price bracket. The latest receiver in this category to be
measured and evaluated was the new Sherwood S-7100 which
is obviously manufactured for that firm by an overseas factory.
If we had to summarize our findings in two sentences we would
say: The tuner section is outstanding for this price. The amplifier does not quite come up to its specs (at least the model we
tested didn't), but is, nevertheless a good performer-within this
price category.
The front panel layout (in anodized gold and black finish) is
shown in the opening photo. The upper section includes a peak reading tuning meter (active in both AM and FM tuning functions), a well -illuminated, if somewhat foreshortened dial scale,
flanked by the usual stereo indicator light, tuning knob coupled
to a smooth flywheel, and the loudness (or volume) control
which, in its counterclockwise position also turns off power to
the unit. The lower section of the panel includes a four -position
function -selector switch, a speaker selector for main, remote,
both or no speakers (when using phones), and bass, treble and
balance controls. Four two -position "key" switches provide
tape monitoring functions, stereo/mono mode, FM interstation
muting, and loudness compensation on/off. Finally, at center
panel, there are stereo phone and tape -dubbing jacks. The
latter jack duplicates the "tape monitor input" jacks located
at the rear of the chassis, enabling the user to record to or playback from a second tape recorder. This feature also permits
dubbing from one recorder to another.
The rear panel layout is quite conventional in features, including a switched convenience a.c. receptacle, line and speaker
fuses, well -spaced screw terminals for main and remote speaker
hook-up, input jacks for PHONO and Aux, record -out and tape monitor jacks, and a terminal strip for connection of FM and
AM antennas as well as a ground terminal screw for connection to the phono changer or turntable if required. A built-in
50
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AUDIO
FEBRUARY 1971
is also provided, and it is capable of being
swung away from the chassis for best AM reception.
Removing the walnut enclosure discloses the circuit board
layout of the chassis (See Fig. 1), since there is no inner metal
housing supplied. A fully -sealed front end drives separate AM
and FM i.f. circuit boards. The multiplex decoder circuitry
is located on another circuit board. Twin driver -amplifier circuit boards feed the power -output transistors located on the
heat sinks at the rear of the chassis. Preamplifier and tone control -stage circuit boards are located below chassis surface,
just visible in Fig. 1 adjacent to the front panel. Although output-transformerless, the audio amplifiers of the S-7100 do
utlize driver transformers in a conventional push-pull circuit
design. The only output -circuit protection afforded is in the
form of a fast -acting 2.5 -ampere speaker -line fuse in each
channel.
"Loopstick" antenna
Performance Measurements
II
sensitivity were the only criterion of FM tuner perform with sets costing two
y measured an IHF
1.9 µV claimed. This
ant FM performance
tte S/N ratio reached
never quite made the
o) was 0.65 percent on
as excellent, reaching
vity and capture ratio
therein lies the some:ction, in terms of its
eting units. A 40 -dB
minimal, particularly
of the tuner. That is,
:ions crowd each other
characteristic leads to
-and indeed, in one or
h effects were in evi-
1-Showing top view of Sherwood S-7100 receiver.
Fig.
1
dB LIMITING
2.0µV
@
o
-10
:
aration are plotted in
2losely with published
claimed). At extreme
Jecreased to about 20
1-
o
-20
-30
i
-40
-1
-50
ce
r
-60
-70
0.1
1.0
10.0
100.0
INPUT SIGNAL-µ V
Fig.
2-Sensitivity, THD, and S/N of the tuner section.
L
"L"
OUTPUT WITH
"L'' ONLY APPLIED
o
w
f, F -10
It
23 watts
output per
an be seen in Fig. 4.
rcent figure at an outs driven. If one measnnel driven, published
)erhaps this is the way
f, although IHF stand n to full output when
width measured from
±aracteristic is plotted
levels (around watt)
2.5 dB at 20 kHz with
tone controls set for mechanical center. By boosting the setting
slightly, flat response was attained within dB from 18 Hz to
23 kHz. This response, as well as tone control range and loudness compensation curves for -30 dB setting of' the volume
control, are shown in Fig. 6.
t
yjI--20
reo
"R"
OUTPUT WITH
"L" ONLY
-30
APPLIED
_43
100
10
10K
1K
FREQUENCY-Hz
Fig.
1
3-FM
Stereo separation.
1.4
s
1.2
Z
1.0
21
41
WATTS
23 WATTS
8 -OHM
0
0.8
IM
Ñ 0.6
E
0.4
./
LOAD,
BOTH CHANNELS
I
DRIVEN
!
THO
0.2
Listening Tests
0.1
The Sherwood S-7100 receiver was used with a pair of
medium -efficiency book -shelf loudspeaker systems for most of
our listening tests. It drove them nicely at all levels of volume
which we would normally want in a modest -size listening area.
In oversize listening areas, however, or with very low -efficiency
AUDIO
1
10
POWER OUTPUT
Fig.
4-THD
100
-WATTS :HANNEL
and IM characteristics of the amplifier section.
51
FEBRUARY 1971
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
speaker systems, the amplifier showed sigris of going into overload and distortion was apparent at high listening levels. If
o
two sets of speakers aré to be used with this receiver (main and
remote locations), it is recommended that only one pair be
-2
used at a time in view of these power limitations, unless
fairly high -efficiency systems are chosen.
-3
As for FM reception, a count of all stations received with a
100
1K
10K
100K
10
directional outdoor multi -element antenna came to 43, but
again, this must be tempered by the fact that some six of these
FREQUENCY -Hz
stations were heard with evidence of alternate channel interference to a greater or lesser degree. That still leaves 37 stations Fig. 5-Power bandwidth (at 8 ohms, both channels driven).
which were acceptable, devoid of any noticeable background
noise and low enough in distortion to be satisfactory. For all
but the ardent FM "DX -er" that's a lot of FM in a low-priced
+15
receiver!
+10
It is difficult to rate an under -$200.00 receiver, such as the
LOUD
55
Sherwood S-7100, in absolute terms. Obviously, the manu+s
@-30 dB
facturer has built in just about every feature and performance
o
spec that modern technology could come up with at this retail
-s
price. Is it the equal of $400.00 receivers? Of course not! Should
it be rated as a "high-fidelity" unit in the context in which
- 10
readers of this magazine recognize that term? Absolutely!
-15
Certainly, for the less-affluent devotees of good sound in the
would
make
a
great
"starter"
syshome, the Sherwood S-7100
100
10
1K
10K
100K
tem-far superior to any of the mass -advertised so-called
FREQUENCY -Hz
"cheapie" compacts which appear in newspaper advertising
around the country-and even more superior to any package or Fig. 6-Tone-control range, frequency response, and loudness console equipment which purports to be "high fidelity" and contour action.
offers inflated specifications that are all but meaningless. L.F.
1
s
Check No. 52 on Reader Service Card
London Letter
(Continued from page 18)
This is not the place for a discussion
of the politics of the British hi fi
industry, but to reflect the current British
scene we must say that with hi fi expanding into a bigger market (perhaps a
mass market) the traditional and truly
hi fi manufacturers have their problems. The big radio manufacturers are
casting eyes at this area, and Mr. John
Portlock, Managing Director of the UK
end of Bang & Olufsen, has offered his
view that rationalization must come,
"as the small British hi fi firms are too
fragmented to compete with the major
firms moving into audio. .
." He
appears to see the future of hi fi in the
UK as fewer and larger manufacturers,
on Continental lines with probably
Great Britain joining the Common
.
Market!
Yes, a dilemma certainly, but the
outlook is not so dismal for the genuine
hi fi firms as Mr. Portlock opines. The
best will always have their followers,
and the big boys have a long way to
go to bridge that mid fi/hi fi gap.
*
*
The space remaining will allow me
only to mention some of the products
that attracted attention at the IAMF
show, concentrating on British designs,
as most of you will be familiar with the
American and Japanese items. John
Bowers (of Bowers & Wilkins) provided
an impeccable demonstration from a
pre-recorded tape, using his latest
DM70 combined electrostatic and
dynamic loudspeaker, the DM3 model,
and the bookshelf design DM performing admirably with its improved
1
crossover network. Celestion introduced
their new Ditton 120 speaker, measuring
about 17 x 8 X 9 in. incorporating two
drive units, the familiar HF 1300 for
high -frequencies, and a long -throw
LF/MF unit of high -flux, aided by an
ABR (acoustic bass radiator) for the
extreme
bass.
Goodmans'
latest
"Minister" two -unit reflexed enclosure. fitted with an 8 -in. long throw bass unit with plastic coated
cone and a new type dome radiator
mid-range/treble unit, was heard to
advantage for the first time here.
One of the most satisfying sonic
demonstrations was staged by Rogers
Developments, using the latest Monitor
models fed from a Ravensbourne
amplifier. Full marks here. In the
modest -price category, the old electronics firm of Whiteley demonstrated
three loudspeaker systems. LC.93,
LC.94, and LC.95, and Tannöy's family
of loudspeakers put up a very good
overall show that attracted big audiences. Another manúfacturer who has
succeeded in obtaining a family resemblance in their range of speakers
is Mordaunt-Short. Sonic similarity
is a good sign that the designer knows
52
what he is aiming for, and the new
Mordaunt-Short MS077 has a similar
character to its brothers. The MS077
is a three -unit model and the essential
differences in the models relate to the
power handling and bass output only.
Turntables from JP, handled here
by Howland -West Ltd., especially the
belt-driven models TP.60I and T.500,
performed well, and Transcriptors
Ltd.. demonstrated a new turntable.
first seen at the Dusseldorf show last
August. This has a synchronous motor
driving a 6 -lb. non-ferrous platter via
a belt, resulting in rumble -free performance. The whole baseboard floats
at a resonance below 5 Hz and a fluid
dashpot can be used to damp this movement. The main bearing is PTFE. This
company also offered an exceptional
pickup arm (the fluid model) which
employs a ball -race to stabilize a uni pivot. Sinclair Radionics demonstrated
an early prototype turntable, with electronic control and the record bearers
and pickup arm made from glass tube!
Audix Ltd. demonstrated their new
Graphic Stereo pre -amp and Stereo
Power amplifier, equipment of professional caliber. The pre -amp has a low noise level, magnetic -input circuit,
five adjustable equalizers (covering
range 80 Hz to 8 kHz), comprehensive
mixing facilities, and output PPMs.
The power amplifiers are 160W and
70W types, which include "acoustic
environmental correction" (or shelf
AUDIO
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FEBRUARY 1971
controls) working over the ranges below
and above approximately 800 Hz.
A novelty item was an FM -crystal
locked radio -guitar, derived from work
on radio -microphones. This device frees
the electric guitarist from wire connections! Reslo is the company responsible for this innovation.
Two eminent personalities from
America came over specifically to
take part in the junketings at and
around Olympia-Dr. Robert Moog
demonstrated his synthesizer in conjunction with J. B. Lansing loudspeakers in a joint room and later presented a lecture on the instrument and
its electronic music to capacity audiences. As an extra -mural event, Dr.
Amar Bose, Professor of Electrical
Engineering at M.I.T., talked in an
easy, lucid style about his Bose 901
loudspeaker system. Dr. Bose's philosophy of loudspeaker design, based on
extensive research, is probably well
known to AUDIO readers, but the sound
was certainly impressive from these
comparatively small cabinets housing
nine 4 -in. units. An equalizer unit is
used, of course, and powerful amplifiers
are essential to drive the speakers,
hence their high price.
With a colleague, I was fortunate
enough to be given a special demonstration of the new Nivico JVC four discrete -channel disc system, a system
employing a pilot -tone, plus FM and
The
phase -modulation techniques.
bandwidth extends to 45 kHz, and the
record is fully compatible. The improved pickup available will play
ordinary two -channel stereo discs. The
directional information was well presented with good separation, and the
system has many features of technical
interest. I seem to recall that English
Decca engineers had patents on such a
system, when the 45-45 stereo system
was introduced.
As a collector of test and demonstration records I was intrigued to discover
three specimens demonstrated at the
Fair: John Borwick's excellent "Enjoyment of Stereo" (HMV .SEDM6), "This
is Stereo" by John Wright and Clement
Brown (EXP .70) marketed by Howland West Ltd., and a stereo test/demo disc
from Audix, Stansted, Essex. Next time
you read these notes, we shall have gone
over to decimal currency!
Thank you to my American friends
and readers, who have sent me some
encouraging messages about the first
of these Letters from London, which
appeared in the September 1970 issue.
It will appear more frequently than
quarterly, if the reactions continue
favorably and the Editor agrees. (I'll
think about it! Ed.)
AUDIO
FEBRUARY 1971
Anyone should
be able
to name
45,000 records
and tapes
No feat of memory. Just reach for SCHWANN-the complete catalog of information on thousands of currently
available phonograph records and tapes. Covers classical,
popular, jazz, rock and every other category. Tells who
recorded them, manufacturers record numbers, and gives
other facts you need to get the most pleasure from the
records you buy.
MONTHLY SCHWANN RECORD & TAPE GUIDE-contains
35,000 listings of Stereo L.P. records, 8 -track cartridge and
cassette tapes. Classical, popular, rock, jazz, folk, shows,
electronic music. Approx. 600 new listings each month. 75¢
SCHWANN SUPPLEMENT-contains older popular music,
imported, mono, spoken, and religious records. Issued
twice a year. 60¢.
SCHWANN COUNTRY & WESTERN TAPE & RECORD CATALOG-New 1970-71 edition lists available Country &
Western music on more than 60 labels. Includes titles of
selections on the recordings. Cassette tape and 8 -track
cartridge numbers as well as record numbers given. 75¢
SCHWANN ARTIST ISSUE-Currently available classical
records listed by performing artist: orchestras, quartets,
instrumental soloists, etc. Needed by music lovers and
record collectors. 1970 edition. $1.75
Schwann, though helpful to record dealers and their sales
persons, is for anyone who is serious about records. Get
a copy and browse through it at your leisure. Keep a
Schwann at home for reference and to help you decide on
additions to your record library.
Schwann Catalogs are available
from your Record Shop
If your dealer does not have SCHWANN CATALOGS, we
will help you to get acquainted with this valuable "bible"
of the record world. Send the coupon for the SCHWANN
SAMPLER, and/or individual Schwann publications.
Last Monthly SCHWANN RECORD & TAPE GUIDE
Postpaid $1.00
Latest semi-annual SCHWANN SUPPLEMENT
Postpaid 75¢
SCHWANN ARTIST ISSUE -1970 Edition
Postpaid $2.25
SCHWANN COUNTRY & WESTERN TAPE & RECORD
CATALOG -1970-71 Edition
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for items checked above.
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Address
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State
Zip
SCHWANN RECORD & TAPE GUIDE
137 Newbury Street, Boston, Mass. 02116
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AU
,
Classical
Record
of utterly diverse types are arbitrarily
coupled up on LP. )
One hundred records! Would that our
columns could have done justice to all of
them, over the years. Alas, they are
merely a ripple in the big LP flood that
still continues, and there are other contemporary series as prolific, notably that
from Composers Recordings and such
newcomers as the Acoustic Research offerings. But Louisville was the pioneer,
and as a self-help project, centered on
its own home activities, this has been
a remarkable enterprise. The prime
mover, Robert Whitney, no longer conducts but the new man, Jorge Mester,
carries on, mixing modern classics in with
new works.
Performances:
Louisville Orchestra 100th Golden Edition
1954-1970. (Strauss: Six Songs, Op. 68;
Rhodes: The Lament of Michal.) Rita
Shane, Phyllis Bryn-Julson, soprani; Louisville Orch., Mester. LS -704 stereo
(Mail order: Louisville Orchestra, 321
West Broadway, Louisville, Ky. 40202).
The Louisville people got so excited
about this, their one -hundredth release
on LP, that they forgot to put the content of the record on the cover, on either
back or front! It's OK-they stuck on a
gummed label and inserted a booklet.
Good cause for excitement. The disc
combines an unusual and beautifully done
set of orchestrated songs by Richard
Strauss, from the top of his late -period
vocal writing (1918) with a wellmatched serial -style work for soprano
and orchestra by Phillips Rhodes, also
beautifully performed by another soprano.
I found both sides quite absorbing, andfor once-not bad as a pair of back-toback offerings. (Too often, modern works
Sound: B
primavera-Florentine music of
the 14th century. Early Music Consort,
David Munrow. Argo ZRG 642 stereo
Ecco la
`F¿evie
Edward Tatnall Canby
A-
($5.95)
Want a super -hi-fi record of totally
new kind of music? ( Well, not exactlythere are numerous records of such music
if you keep up with them.) New, in any
case, for most listeners. The Italian title,
"Behold the Springtime" gives the cue to
the mood. Classical but not heavy! It's
music out of that lively Florentine period
when all the arts where blossoming, unbelievably and healthily. Music, too,
though we've been discovering it only
recently. This record combines a fine
group of instruments of the time-rebec,
mediaeval fiddle, lute, sackbut, crumhorns, shawms, recorders, harp, assorted
percussion instruments-with the new
kind of voice for such music, light, accurate, non -operatic, blending perfectly
with the instruments. Easy listening.
The sound on this record is unusually
fine-don't know what they've done.
Crisp, clear, the transient sounds beautifully tight, the colors splendidly natural
and alive, all against a supernaturally
quiet background, virtually soundless.
Shows what recording can do, state-ofthe-art.
Performances:
J.
A-
Sound: A
Chamber
Orchestra, Colin Davis; Hurwitz Ch.
Orch., Emanuel Hurwitz. L'Oiseau -Lyre
C. Bach Symphonies. English
SOL 317 stereo ($5.95)
These four short symphonies by the
youngest of the Bach sons, the one who
sounds like Mozart and was called the
"London Bach," will startle listeners
54
who know their Mozart symphonies. Perhaps it is intentional; in any case there
are so many Mozart -like ideas in these,
either suggestions or almost literal replications, that one might accuse J. C. of
plagiarism if he had not come first! in
addition, the sound of these orchestras,
notably the English Chamber Orchestra
with Davis ( Hurwitz takes care of the
first of the four works), is broad and
big enough to equate with the familiar
sound of Mozart symphonies as we usually hear them.
The coincidence of themes and style
is in part merely due to common usage
of the time, the musical formulas that
were put to work by every composer.
There are dozens of "Jupiter Symphony"
beginnings, by composers both big and
small, because this was an effective way
to start off and a very "in" sound for
any musician who knew what was right
for the moment.
But the peculiar relationship between
Bach and Mozart, Bach having been the
prime influence on the young Mozart
throughout Mozart's first brilliant years
of composing, surely accounts for some
of the "Mozart-like" ideas in these works.
More properly, they are Bach -like themes
when they appear, later on, in Mozart's
music.
The difference between the two are
significant too. What, indeed, makes
Mozart a genius and Bach merely a fine
composer? The evidence is right before
your ears here, in splendid detail.
Performances:
John Stanley: Concertos from Op. 2. Hur-
witz Chamber Orch., Hurwitz. L'Oiseau Lyre SOL 315 stereo ($5.95).
Don't quite place the name? Stanley
was one of the "minor" British composers who followed along in the wake
of the great Handel in London, overshadowed (so we always were told) into
total obscurity by the Great Man Himself.
Well, not quite. Stanley, though blind,
did very well for himself in England,
was much in demand in all musical respects and after Handel's death took over
some of the work of producing the
Handel oratorios. He wrote quantities of
his own music, very successfully.
Yes, it sounds very much like Handel.
You'd be fooled in an instant. But on
closer examination, over a longer span,
you find that this younger composer is
actually more modern (he was 28 years
younger than Handel) ; there are definite
signs here and there of the new galant
style of graceful ornament, pointing to (Continued on page 56
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Sound: B
B
)
FEBRUARY 1971
IF YOU DO ANYTHI G
WITH 1/4'TAPE YOU
CAN DO IT DETItR
Automa
cientific
n
REVOX
recorder that could match the performance of the Revox A77 in all respects,
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So much for critical opinion.
Of equal significance, is the fact that
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studios.
But what really fascinates us, is that
the A77 has been singled out
to,
operations
location mastering
ne or
And that's a simple statement of fact.
From the moment it was introduced,
the Revox A77 was hailed as a
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When they wanted a machine to standardize on, a machine that would lend
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www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
time
When was
oúhelast
piano?
Classical Record Reviews
(Continued from page 54)
wards Mozart and the like. Handel influenced, but did not quite obscure these
younger British composers, as we had
thought.
Not as strong music as Handel either
but it flows very easily and with much
polish. Excellent addition to your Handel
collection.
Performance: B+
Or a round violin or guitar?
You haven't. Because these instruments
with
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What started out as a
romance in Los Angeles...
A salesman in Los Angeles recommended a Concord receiver
to a couple from Phoenix,
the couple from Phoenix told their lawyer in Colorado Springs,
the lawyer from Colorado Springs told an oil man from Tulsa,
the oil man from Tulsa told his lodge brother from Peoria,
the lodge brother from Peoria told a druggist from Cleveland,
the druggist from Cleveland told a truck driver from Philadelphia,
the truck driver from Philadelphia told his stock broker from New York,
and the stock broker from New York loved the Concord stereo receiver.
...has ended up as a
love affair in Newyork!
And this is the reason for the love affair. The the audiophile controls-tape monitoring, speaker
Concord Mark 20, AM -FM stereo receiver is 300 selector switch, stereo headphone jack, loudness
watts* of beauty. It can deliver enough distortion - contour controls, calibrated slide pots for tone,
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records, tapes and broadunder $300 Other Mark
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
2t1R
Sound:
B
Aleksei Nasedkin Schubert Sonata in
D, Two Impromptus. Melodiya Angel
SR -40145 ($5.98).
Schubert: Sonatas in A Minor, A Major.
Lili Kraus. piano. Vanguard Cardinal
VCS 10074 stereo ($3.98).
As we all remember. Schubert, with
his famous little glasses, was a timid,
gentle soul. But inside, there was a real
demon in the man and it came out in
musical terms. His last works, especially
for piano. are tremendous big things,
straining even the modern grand in
their passionate force. Here are two
really top Schubert pianists, each one
doing one of those late monsters, each
of them beautifully recorded: Lili
Kraus. a veteran in Schubert. Mozart,
and such (her Mozart piano playing
was famous on records 'way back in
the middle '30's. as I can remember)
straight out of the central tradition,
and the young Russian Aleksei Nasedkin. from an alien land hut with an
astonishing understanding of the
Schubert sense and message.
Lili Kraus is almost unexceptionable,
even at a comfortable age and as a
woman! Her power is still big, she gets
that grand sound. she is the equal of
Schubert's pianistic demands. Nevertheless. I still sense, somehow, too
much preoccupation with close-up detail, a lack of the long-range drive in
spite of her plenty powerful fingers. She
is. in a well-bred musical way, a bit
too polite à la Viennoise. It is the way
Schubert is played in those parts, right
in the Viennese tradition. But Schubert
today needs a stronger. rawer approach.
Nasedkin has it. His huge piano, in
a golden liveness (Kraus' is characteristically miked in a dry acoustic), is
technically something out of Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky, quite strikingly
Russian. No matter! He won the famed
Tchaikovsky prize, but more importantly, he copped the International
Schubert Competition in Vienna. He
deserved it. He understands Schubert,
56
AUDIO
FEBRUARY 1971
projects Schubert, as very few pianists
have ever done on records. Beneath the
Russian -style exterior there is extraordinary drive, an amazing control of
rhythmic power (the very life of Schubert) and, even more important, a real
sense for those marvelous Schubert
changes of key, strange chords, unexpected shifts of harmony. Some of
our finest Western pianists flounder
only too audibly in this respect. And so,
with all this and a superb sense of the
grand shape and drama, this young
man plays Schubert as I have never
heard it before. He doesn't miss a
trick-and some of them have been
missing ever since Schubert's day, as
far as I can figure.
Vanguard's drier recording is at a
lower level on the disc and thus at first
seems less impressive than the glorious
big Melodiya-Angel sound with all its
liveness. Actually, the two recordings
are of equal merit, both offering big,
eloquent piano sound without distortion
or unevenness and minus a trace of
unpleasant percussion.
Performances: A, A-
Sound: B+,
B
+
Schubert: Sonata in D. Eugene Istomin.
piano. (Columbia MS 7443 stereo
($5.98)
How different! The same late -Schubert piano sonata that the young Russian
Aleksei Nasedkin plays on MelodiyaAngel and the two performances could
not be in greater contrast.
Istomin's Schubert is clear, precise,
economical and very much of the piano.
Whereas Nasedkin seems to play beyond the piano, into a universal realm
of musical expression-the piano is only
the vehicle; we forget it (when we aren't
concentrating upon the technique displayed) in favor of what it is saying.
Istomin's piano does not let you forget.
Nasedkinis all Russian, a big, passionate, heavy player, in the achieved
sound; Istomin, in spite of the background suggested by his non -Yankee
name, is all American (as Lili Kraus in
her Schubert is sheer central Europe),
American in the crisp, no-nonsense
efficiency, in the smooth technique
applied so precisely, in the warm but
not passionate involvement, in the professional attitude that, somehow, treats
the Schubert as a problem in piano performance.
Odd-in Columbia's Beethoven Trios
this same Istomin is the leading force,
the most dynamic of the three players,
the most lively and rhythmic. In the
Schubert he is cooler and more didactic,
though the music would seem to demand just the opposite.
Performance:
Rachmaninoff
1930). RCA
Sound:
B
plays
Chopin
Victrola VIC
1534
B
left
2.10?i4
mono
C+, C
l6:
-4se.
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NAME
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CITY
AUDIO
,1
(1920-
Here they come, more of the old
recordings of the grand old pianists
who dominated the recorded art between
the big wars. The supply is enormousRachmaninoff left 250 separate items,
a few of which (two on this disc) have
never been published.
Rachmaninoff-massive, potent, dark
and brooding, the man of steel whose
explosive fingers seemed too strong for
mere piano keys. Rachmaninoff the
austere; for in a Romantic way he was
austere, tailoring his performances to
an exact perfection. Was he really, as
they said, the first "modern" pianist?
He does sound so now. That is, he still
sounds normal, if such a powerhouse
could be called normal. His style,
clearly Russian -built and massive, is
not yet old fashioned as we listen. Side I
of this disc, including the four-movement Sonata in B Flat Minor, is mostly
electric with a massive bassy piano
sound. (Two items from 1927 are
evidently electric even that early.) Side
2 is acoustic, seven out of nine items
dating from 1920 through 1923. Surprisingly similar sound, if scratchier and
minus bass. They were splendid acoustic
recordings.
Alfred Cortot, whose recordings are
a decade younger, is old fashionedmarvelously so. Alongside Rachmaninoff his pianism is outwardly pale, with a
French pastel sound; but the impression is misleading-the fire is there, if
dampened by low-level recording (one
way to avoid percussion and buzz).
What counts is the marvelous subtlety
of piano color, the layers of forward and
background, each of incredible precision, as though played by several
people on different instruments. And
the old-fashioned impulsiveness, the
rubato, the surgings and hesitations!
Really beautiful and no pianist could
hope to do it today. Yes-there are mis(except
Everybody
flubs.
takes,
Rachmaninoff) flubbed a bit in those
pre -editing days but Cortot was well
known for it. Never bothered him, and
so it scarcely bothers us; he goes sailing right on.
Sounds:
J
+
($2.98).
The Art of Alfred Cortot (1930-1948).
Chopin, Schumann, Liszt, Albéniz,
Debussy, Ravel. Seraphim 60143
mono ($2.98).
Performances: A, A
j`
STATE
ZIP
57
FEBRUARY 1971
Check No. 57 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
n
TITLE
HANDEL
©apsules...
CONTENT
&
SOUND
Handel: The Complete Concerti Grossi,
Op. 3 (with oboes); Concerto in C from
Alexander's Feast. Collegium Aureum.
RCA Victrola VICS 6036 stereo ($2.98).
The Baroque music craze began with Handel-Ernest Ansermet recorded the complete concerti Op. 6 back around 1929 and Sir Hamilton Harty's "Water Music"
Suite was almost as early. Typically, these Op. 3 concerti, with oboes as well as
strings, sum up everything most people like about Baroque. Nice playing, authentic
old instruments'as a matter of course.
Handel: Messiah. Complete/Original
Instrumentation. Price, Minton, Young,
Diaz; Amor Artis Chorale, Engl. Ch.
Orch., Somary. Vanguard Cardinal VCS
10090/2 stereo ($11.94).
One step nearer to the ultimate "authentic" Messiah, but still not quite the whole
bit: the solo voices are unreconstructed modern, so is the chorus. A fine soprano, a
superb contralto, an old-fashioned bell-bottomed tenor and a booming bass. But
the instruments are near -Baroque, tempi properly brisk, the whole free of the cloying
ancient tradition of church and festival. Lots of added improvisation, correct but a
bit clumsy; the soprano does superb fast runs but her trills sound like a nanny goat.
Recommended as the best try yet.
Handel: Messiah. Morison, Thomas,
Lewis, Milligan; Huddersfield Choral
Society, Royal Liverpool Philh. Orch.,
Sargent. Seraphim SIC 6056 (3 discs)
stereo ($8.94).
The Huddersfield -Sargent Messiahs, over the years, summed up the old festival
tradition, straight down from Mendelssohn in the 1840s and a billion miles from
Baroque "authenticity." Huge choral masses, vast orchestra, the music re -scored to
Romantic proportions, ponderous tempi, and a stately impressiveness. Not at all
unmusical-just totally non -Baroque! There were two Huddersfield recordings; this
is the second, just into the stereo era. Grand spread of sound but a bit scratchy.
Chorlieder der Romantik (Romantic
Choral Songs). Bergedorfer Kammerchor, Wormsbächer. Telefunken SLT
43115-B stereo ($5.95).
Schumann, Mendelssohn, Schubert, Dvorak, Brahms, Tchaikovsky in wonderfully
heartfelt Romantic songs for chorus, with and without accompaniment, sung with
superb style and musicianship. One odd thing-why do Telefunken violins and
chorus voices sound so grainy in loud passages? Like a stylus beginning to wear.
Again and Again I notice it.
Bizet: Carmen (original 1875 opera comique version). Bumbry, Vickers,
Freni, Paskalis; Chorus, Orch. Paris
Opera, de Burgos. Angel SCL 3767
(3 discs) stereo ($17.96).
The opera -comique genre, like the German Singspiel, included spoken parts; Bizet,
like Mozart (and Beethoven) converted it for serious purposes. But Carmen was
quickly turned back into a standard -type non -speaking opera, the one we know.
Several scenes were cut, too. Here's the original work, first time since 1875-very
odd for Carmen lovers, no great change for those who are newish to it. A curiously
chaste performance, accurate but non-expanding-Burgos drives ahead fast. Principals' French is lousy-the spoken parts are done by French actors; I find the discontinuity unpleasant. Two added scenes, plus the dialogue. Interesting.
Buskers. RCA LSP 4426 stereo ($4.98)
Music of the Waits. Argo ZTG 646
stereo ($5.95).
Indian Street Music. The Bauls of
Bengal. Nonesuch H 72035 stereo
Street music! Buskers are current -day music makers in London, recorded outdoorsall sorts, slapstick to rock. The Waits, 16th C., hired by towns, were on call ("waited")
for municipal events: lots of crumhorns, recorders, etc., dances by well knowns. The
Bauls sing wailing semi -ragas with cryptic meanings, to strings, tabla, cymbals. All
these in excellent hi fi stereo.
($2.98).
Glenn Gould. Beethoven Variations
(32 Vars. in C Minor; Vars. in F on an
Original Theme; "Eroica" Variations.)
Columbia M 30080 stereo ($5.98).
Excellent Beethoven. Is it more straightforward, less individual and eccentric, because Gould is older now? Or (more likely) because the Beethoven playing tradition
is stronger, the music more recent, than that of Bach and Mozart, where past Gould
interpretations have taken on new and highly personal shapes? Gould plays no concerts now; he surely allows tape editing, for the best out of various takes. Makes
not the slightest difference! That is the way records must be made and are best made.
I do not see why we should care a fig if Gbuld were unable to play in "live" concerts
at all, for it is quite irrelevant. Here is he, and he is good to listen to. The two huge
variation sets, the 32 in C Minor and the Eroica Variations (precursors of the Eroica
Symphony's last movement) are, to be sure, somewhat gentle and less heroic than is
customary. I find the change refreshing. There is no lack of architecture, sweep.
eloquence; the music simply is played for itself, not for the big show.
58
AUDIO
FEBRUARY 1971
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i
Fairfax
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Originally the FAIRFAX FTA system was built to custom
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now permits the unconscious differentation between each of
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The next time you're auditioning speakers insist on comparing the FAIRFAX FTA to other speakers of its class or even
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GRAPHIC STEREO TONE CONTROL
program material, speakers, and individual
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In other words, it tailors sound to suit your
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HIRSCH-HOUCK LABORATORIES HAD THIS TO
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The Graphic Stereo Tone
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See your dealer or send a
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Check No. 58 on Reader Service Card
Behind The Scenes
(Continued from page 15)
stereo cassettes, and to put it mildly.
am absolutely amazed at the superb
quality. This is what the game is all
about. This represents a new ball
game .. . one can no longer dismiss the
cassette as a "toy." The best of the lot
is the "Suite Espanola," and this comes
so close to the quality of a good disc, it
is frightening. It doesn't have quite
the wide frequency response, low distortion, and transient response of the
disc, but it is very, very good. On the
plus side for the cassette, there is the
no audible
dead quiet background
tape hiss even though this too was
played back with peak levels of 100 dB.
Then too, there are no "ticks" or "pops"
or "scratches," which can be so distracting and annoying when listening to
a disc. The overall sound is beautifully
clean and has great sonority. Strings are
very smooth, showing exceptionally low
levels of high frequency distortion.
Percussion was sharply defined and
extended all the way to the lowest frequency. Brass was big and bright. In
all, there was no feeling of compression
so common with standard pre-recorded
cassettes. One friend for whom I played
this cassette just wouldn't believe he
was listening to a cassette and went
over and pressed the pause control on
the Wollensak to convince himself!
Mechanically the cassettes were good
too, with just one "burble" sound on a
solo flute, the only fall from grace.
Much the same praise can be lavished
on the Tchaikovsky pieces and the
Vienna Imperial, with just a shade less
stability and a bit of high frequency
distortion showing up occasionally. In
terms of dynamic range and tape hiss
they were on a par with the Suite
Espanola, which is accolade enough. It
goes without saying that all three Dolbyized cassettes were processed from
Dolby A301 masters
and it sure
makes a great difference!
There is no doubt that the use of
chromium dioxide tape would allow
more headroom and even lower values
of high frequency distortion, but
strictly from the viewpoint of signalto-noise ratio these London/Decca
Dolbvized cassettes leave scant room for
improvement.
The full report on the Vox Dolbyized
cassettes will have to wait until next
month, since I have discovered a slight
mechanical problem with them and
need new copies. As a preliminary observation they are of roughly the same
quality as the London/Decca cassettes,
although there seems to be a tiny wisp
of tape hiss still audible.
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introductory
copy
Joh.n M
JOHN MAYALL, who is virtually a
one-man history of British blues,
has crossed the Atlantic to form
as close an Anglo-American alliance as
existed before the Revolution.
For the first time, he has recorded
an LP with only U.S. musicians, as
good a combo as he has had-with the
possible exception of groups featuring sidekick John Allman's steel and
gut -reaction virtuosity.
The emphasis of the album, USA
UNION (Polydor 24-4022), is, naturally,
blues. But there are heavy overtones
of jazz-and some straight pop seeps
in now and then. It also is a message
LP, evidenced quickly by the lead piece,
"Nature's Disappearing," an unsubtle
appeal to save our environment.
Witness part of the lyrics:
"Man's a filthy creature
"Raping the land and water and
the air.
"Tomorrow may be too late"Now's the time that you must be
aware.
"Nature's disappearing
"Polluted death is coming
Do
..
.
you care?
"Garbage going nowhere
"Soon the dumps will spread to your
front door.
"Lakes and rivers stagnant
"Nothing lives or grows like years
before.
WRITE YOUR NAME & ADDRESS HERE,
CUT & POST THIS COUPON or write a
separate letter to RECORDS AND RECORDING,
75 Victoria St., London, SW 1, England.
name
address
city
state
"Nature's disappearing.
"The world you take for grantedsoon no
more...
.
Coupled with the tune are, on the
inside of the dustjacket, tips on fighting
pollution, including pleas against littering and for buying only deposit bottles.
The music itself, on all 10 tracks, is
fascinating. The combo, first of all,
is drummerless. Thus there is a combination of sounds from Don Harris'
62
violin, itself a rarity (but one may
wonder why after hearing "Deep Blue
Sea" and "Crying"); Larry Taylor's
bass guitar (hear, in particular, "My
Pretty Girl" and "Off the Road"), and
Harvey Mandel's lead guitar. Mayall,
himself, of course, is outstanding on
harmonica and guitar-and he tosses
in a bit of shuffle piano. The leader's
singing, gruff at best, would leave something to be desired in any other format,
but blues numbers are the perfect setting
for the coarseness.
All the tunes (ranging from the
shortest to "Crying," the longest at
6:25) were penned by Mayall, and all
prove that you don't have to be black to
have soul or to care about life on this
planet, or about loneliness or love.
A soft rock -pop sound, a la Harpers
Bizarre, emanates pleasantly from a disc
that carries the name of the group as
title, REDEYE (Pentagram, PE 10,003).
The 10 cuts, written wholly or in part
by Dave Hodgkins, who is the quartet's
acoustic rhythm guitarist, range from
entries in the softness sweepstakes to
bouncy novelty -flavored winners.
Best of the recording, distributed by
Viva -Bravo, are "Games," straight
pop -rock with a driving beat; "Empty
White Houses," with a gospel aura;
"Mississippi Stateline," a bluesy soft
rock success, and "Collection of Yesterday and Now," the longest piece (4:26).
Bob Bereman, who is outstanding on
drums and percussion, is the only
Redeye member who doesn't sing.
Vocals are, however, augmented by
Douglas "Red" Mark, the electric
guitarist, and Bill Kirkham, bassist.
A great waste of talent-specifically
that of Hugo Montenegro and Al Hirtis found on an RCA Victor recording,
VIVA MAX! (LSP-4275), with music
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FEBRUARY 1971
from the film of that name that dealt,
supposedly in a comedic vein, with an
attempt by latter-day Mexican patriots
to recapture the Alamo.
The movie missed the mark, and the
album suffers the same fate. Only a
couple of the 10 tracks, all arranged
and conducted by Montenegro, are
more than film background music and
have any meaning by themselves. The
lead piece, "Viva Max March," is one
of the few-it is bright and breezy, and
by far the best item on the LP. "Sentries
Charge" is interesting in its approach,
mainly through the use of heavy jazz
riffs (combinations of Hirt's magical
trumpet and flashing drums), and
"Paula's Theme," 3 a.m. music with
superlative horn work.
On the negative side, though, are
"Sneaky Lady," a conglomerate without definition; "Operation Morning
After," to which only "ditto" fits;
"Don't Turn Back," which features
good stereo separation but is otherwise unimaginative-despite the presence
of the Ron Hicklin Chorus; "Viva
Max Hat Dance," a slight update of
the traditional theme; "March to the
Alamo," a cacophony of traffic sounds,
loud music, and a disoriented choral
effect, and "After Mass on Sunday" and
"The Alamo Letter," both of which
intersperse dialogue and musical fragments.
As a whole: Ecchh!!
Roger Williams, a master at taking
pop tunes and adding classical flourishes, continues his best-selling ways
with
THEMES FROM GREAT
MOVIES (Kapp, KS 3629). Backed by
an orchestra conducted by Don Costa
(except for "Windmills of Your Mind"
and " `Airport' Love Theme," on which
Ralph Carmichael holds the baton),
Williams' piano shows an excellent
variety of moods and tempos, and does
its bit to bridge the generation gap.
On the first side, for instance, "On
a Clear Day You Can See Forever" is
a longish tune that ends with jazzy
passages. This contrasts with "Hello
Dolly!" traditionally a big, brassy, up tempo scorcher, and the stringed softness of "Midnight Cowboy." Other
differences can be seen on "Windmills
," with a heavy classical interlude, and "Song from `M*A*S*H'
(Suicide is Painless)," that showcases
a soft rock beat and chorus.
The flip side contains the pensive
Rod McKuen chartbuster "Jean,"
the whistling and march tempo of
" `Patton' Theme" (which also is jazzy
at its midsection), and "Come Saturday
Morning," with a pizzicato flavor that
leads to a smooth, Muzak -type arrangement.
The all new PE -2040
PErfection in PErformance
Your inevitable choice among automatic
turntables. Sooner or later other auomatic turntables
will incorporate the exclusive featu-es now available on the new
PE -2040: Dial-a-Matic vertical trackng angle adjustment for all records ..
Fail safe stylus proIndependent, ultra -gentle, fingertip cueing control
tector ... Automatic record scanner ... Single lever control for all modes of
repeat.
These
just
some
of the exclusive
operation ... Continuous record
are
features. Stop by at your PE dealer for the complete story and a demonstration of PErfection in PErformance. PE -2040-$155.00; other PE models from
$70.00. For further information on PE and name of your nearest dealer write:
Dept. A.2
Elpa Marketing Industries, Inc., New Hyde Park, N.Y. 11040
LAFAYETTE 1971
468
..
.
Catalog 710
Pages
Your 1st Guide To
Everything In Electronics
..
...
Tuners . - Receivers
Stereo Hi-Fi .
Turntables & Accessories
.
Speakers
Automatic Reversing Stereo Tape ReFM Radios
Color TV's
corders & Decks
Tubes & Parts
Intercoms & PA SysClosed Circuit TV Equipment
tems
Musical
Auto Tape Players
Cameras
Instruments
Serving The Public
Since 1921
Send For
FREE!
1971 Catalog Today!
LAFAYETTE Radio ELECTRONICS
Dept. 27021
P.O. Box 10
Syosset, L.1., N.Y. 11791
ore
Send me the FREE 1971 Catalog 710
Address
63
Check No. 53 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
27021
Name
City
FEBRUARY 1971
PErfection in PErformance
Golden Jubilee Edition
...
AUDIO
P
.
...
State
Yip -----.-------
Classified
FOR SALE
Rates:
25íE per
word per insertion for noncommercial advertisements; 50e per word for commercial advertisements. Frequency discounts as follows:
times, less 15%; 6 times, less 20%; 12 times,
less 30%. Closing date is the FIRST of the
second month preceding the date of issue.
Payment must accompany all orders under
2
$10.00.
SERVICES
SERVICES
HIGH FIDELITY SPEAKERS REPAIRED
AMPRITE SPEAKER SERVICE
655 Sixth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10010
CH 3-4812
RECORDS MADE FROM YOUR TAPES. Also,
editing and mastering. Send for free brochure. Nashville Record Productions, Inc.
Dept. AM, 204 19th Ave., So., Nashville,
Tennessee 37203.
RENT STEREO TAPES $1.25 week. Catalog
254. Tape Library, Box 8126, Washington,
D.C. 20024.
CUSTOM STYLUS and cartridge re -tipping,
Edison,
Ortofon,
repairing. (Weathers,
Shure, etc.) Box 322A. Tuckahoe, N.Y.
10707, 914 -SP 9-1297.
CUSTOM RECORDING SERVICE. Tape and
disc. Stereo and mono. Live and copies,
Editing. Masters and pressings. High quality at reasonable rates. Joseph Giovanelli,
Audio -Tech Laboratories, 2819 Newkirk
Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. IN 9-7134.
LEARN Electronic Organ Servicing at home.
All makes including transistors. Experimental
NHSC.
Accredited
kit-trouble -shooting.
Free Booklet. Niles Bryant School, 3631
Stockton, Dept. 1D, Sacramento, Calif.
95820.
MAKE FRIENDS WORLDWIDE through
in-
ternational correspondence. Illustrated brochure free. Hermes, Berlin 11, Germany.
PROTECT YOUR LP's. Poly sleeves for
Jackets 54. Inner sleeves 44. Poly lined
paper 104. White Jackets 254. Minimum
order $5.00. House of Records, Hlllburn,
N.Y. 10931.
TUBES,
Semiconductors,
ELECTRONIC
Equipment and Parts. Lab -matched tubes,
Finest quality. Serving T //Hi-Fi Servicemen, Engineers, and industry for 30 Years.
Advise your needs. Send 254 for Catalog.
A Barry Electronics, 512 Broadway, New
York, N.Y. 10012. (212) 925-7000.
AMPLIFIER REPAIR. Original
performance or improved specifications.
BKM Associates, Box 22, Wilmington, Mass.
ACOUSTECH
01887.
MIDWEST'S only AR/Dyna factory -authorized repair station. Large stock of parts
and factory -trained personnel. Haynes Microelectronics, 9 W. 14th St., P.O. Box 457,
Lawrence, Kansas 66044.
NEED SOMETHING "SPECIAL"? Four channel power amplifiers, electronic crossover
network, special mixers or filters? State of
the art technology now in any system or
component. Act as your own project engineer: Our staff and lab are available.
Development Engineering Services Co.,
P.O. Box 693, Pacoima, Calif. 91331.
PSYCHEDELIC LIGHTING MANUAL! Make
strobes, kaleidoscopes, color organs, etc.
Send $2.95. Lightrays, 1315-B Weaver, Philadelphia, Pa. 19150.
FOR SALE
GUARANTEED USED EQUIPMENT: Marantz
preamp $195.
Crown DC300 Amplifier
$485.
Marantz Electronic Crossover $40.
McIntosh C-22 preamp $195.
Thorens
TD124 w SME $150.
Teac 6010 $400.
JBL SE400 Amp $195.
Marantz 18 Receiver $395.
AR1W's $65 ea. Dual 1219 w carMarantz 15 amplifier $195.
tridge $135.
Tandberg 64X $250.
Marantz Mdl 1
audio console $50.
Leak Point 1 Stereo
preamp/amp $115.
Marantz 8 Amplifier
$100.
Audio Consultants, 517 Davis Street,
Evanston, Illinois 60201. (312) 864-9565.
7
SCOTCH MAGNETIC TAPE, discount, Box
167A, Orwigsburg, Pa.
NEW CM CC -2 Preamplifier, wood case.
$165. New SAE Mark IV Amplifier. $245.
(203) 661-1888. Reply to Box #AF1-1.
OLD TIME RADIO:
minute demonstration tape, catalog, 254. Double -R -Radio, 505
Seeley Road, New York 13224.
15
MARANTZ 8B AMP. $110, after 5 P.M. Dave
Scoville, 2312 Cassopolis St., Box 15, Elkhart, Indiana, 46514. (219) 264-7397.
KLIPSCH, S.A.E., REVOX, other quality components. Individually designed and installed
music reproduction systems. C. M. Sant mire, Audio Consultant (402) 477-8469, by
appointment. LINCOLN, NEBRASKA.
FISHER XP -18 speakers $400 pr. originally
excellent condition. MARANTZ 10B
tuner $425, 33 preamp $300, 16 poweramp
$350, less than 6 months old. McINTOSH
MC -30s, 3 at $100 each. KLH 27 receiver
$225. C. E. Fields, 1340 S. 20th St., Lincoln,
Nebraska (402) 489-8237.
$660,
THREE AMPEX PR -10-2 Stereo Recorders
(unmounted), two in good condition, $350.00
each. One needs work, but enough spare
parts are available from a fourth recorder.
Make offer for both of these, write: Howard
White, Director of Audio -Visual Services,
Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio 44074. Or
call (216) 774-1221, Ext. 3100.
SCHOBER Rv-3 Reverbatape, new, $125.
Brand new Crown 4 channel recorders,
ss844 two mix inputs per channel. $1900.
each. Used Ampex 602-02 full track, top
condition. $250. Call area (614) 252-2626.
NATIONALLY advertised Audio Equipment,
Cost Plus 10%. Stereo World, 3250 Duke
Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314.
64
INFINITY SERVO -STATIK I as tested in
High Fidelity magazine. Rosewood finish.
Private party needs cash. J. D. Griggs, 3515
Manhattan Ave., Manhattan Beach, Calif.
90266. Phone: (213) 545-2577.
GATES 52CS STUDIOETTE, Excellent. $500.
Stolz, (916) 489-8659.
E.
TEAC A-6010 Deck, excellent, best offer
over $350. Ed Daily, 2801 Neil Drive, Roanoke, Virginia 24019.
STUDIO CLEARANCE SALE: Crown 714CL.P./Z Quarter track stereo recorder with
adjustable heads for half track stereo playback, 2 V.U. meters, 4 mixed microphone
or line inputs, 3%, 71/2, & 15 ips speeds,
14" reel capacity, portable carrying case.
Excellent condition $455.00. Line output
transformers available at $25.00/pair. Ampex MX -10 four input mic./line stereo mixers. Three at $250.00 each. Fisher KX-10
reverbs at $30.00 ea. Pultec model EQP-1
Program equalizers. Two for $550.00, 285.00
ea. Altec 1566A line amplifier/preamp.
$40.00. Presto 92-B recording amplifier with
41/2" illuminated V.U. meter and Presto 1-D
cutterhead $210.00. Presto 6-N lathe, 45/33
speed, suction tube, lamp, floor cabinet,
and two leadscrews $270.00. Extra lead screws, hot stylus, and microscope available. Pickering model 410 mono. preamp.
on rack panel $180.00. 51/4" rack panel with
three Simpson 4Y2" rectangular V.U. meters
and three controls $53.00. E.V. 666 dynamic
microphone and cable $89.00. A.K.G:
Norelco D -200E two-way dynamic with new
cable $44.00. WIEGANd AUDIO LABS., 3402
Windsor Rd., Wall, N.J. 07719. Phone: (201)
681-6443.
STEREO TAPE TRANSPORT. Made for lead-
ing manufacturer, two -speed, pause control,
7" reel, 50-15000 Hz, 0.25% wow and
flutter, with record/play and erase heads.
Without case. Send money order or check
for $19.50 to Stereo Center, 218 Columbia
Street, Utica, New York 13502. Add $2.50
for prepaid shipping & insurance.
PROFESSIONAL STEREO TONEARM-similar to Shure M232 or Rek-O-Kut S520. Plugin shell, finger lift, adjustable counterweight, no springs, heavy connecting cables
with pin plugs, beautifully balanced. Oneyear warranty. Made by famous turntable arm manufacturer in Switzerland. Send
check or M.O. for $9.50 plus $1.50 for shipping and insurance. Stereo Center, 218
Columbia Street, Utica, N.Y. 13502.
OLD RADIO PROGRAMS. Large selection.
Lowest prices. Catalog 254. Roger Massel,
1533 50th S.W., Wyoming, Michigan 49509.
BRAUN, fabulous German stereo components, full catalog 504. ADS, P.O. Box 293,
Huntsville, Ala., 35801.
OLD RADIO programs catalogue 254. Steve
Monaco, 1306 Park Ave., Des Moines, Iowa
50315.
-
INFINITY SYSTEMS -The finest reproduction possible today. CROWN -so pure
DC -300 IC -150 tape. Phila. area (609) 8543448, Mid Penna. area (717) 273-6314.
CONSUMERS CASSETTES and Accessories,
Blank Cassettes as low as C-30-504, C-60
-544, C-90-994, C-120---$1.22. All Cassettes licensed quality control by North
American Philips. Lifetime guarantee. WRITE
FOR FREE CATALOG! CONSUMERS ELECTRONICS CO., -103 Park Avenue, Dept.
AM, New York, N.Y. 10017.
OLD RADIO PROGRAMS on tape for sale
or trade. Send 354 for current 1970 catalog. Bob Joseph, 1250 La Baron Circle,
Webster, N.Y. 14580.
AUDIO
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FEBRUARY 1971
FOR SALE
HARPSICHORD -Completely new design six
feet long with either one, two, or three sets
of strings. Kits from $1.75; also completed
instruments.
Clavichord kit from $100.
Write for free brochure. Zuckermann Harpsichords, Inc., Department R, 115 Christopher Street, New York, N.Y. 10014.
KLIPSCH, TANNOY, BOZAK, MARANTZ,
THORENS, RABCO-No Discounting -Superior Sound, 1801 Brewerton Rd. (Rt. 11)
Syracuse, N.Y. 13211.
NAB HUB ADAPTERS-Fit Revox, Crown,
TEAC, Roberts. $3/pair postpaid. No C.O.D.
Qty prices available. John Kountz, 1065 Van
Dyke Dr., Laguna Beach, Ca. 92651.
IMPROVE YOUR AR or KLH.
Microstatic, the first Total -Coverage high frequency speaker system, is designed to
improve the performance of AR and KLH
speakers. Write for detailed brochure. Micro -Acoustics Corp., Box 302, White Plains,
N.Y. 10602.
REK-O-KUT Turntables, Tonearms, and Replacement Parts are now available. Contact
our Main Plant at Rek-O-Kut, 1568 North
Sierra Vista, Fresno, Calif. 93703. Phone:
(209) 251-4213 or our Parent Company CCA
Electronics Corp., 716 Jersey Avenue, Gloucester City, N.J. 08030, Phone: (609) 4561716.
OLD Radio Programs on tape, 6 hours for
$8.00 Catalog 50e. Remember Radio Inc.,
1926 Cherokee, Norman, Okla. 73069.
SCULLY Professional Tape Recorders, from
1
to 24 tracks, complete recording studio
package designed to order featuring W.A.L.
console systems .and other leading professional audio products. Phone (201) 6816443, Weigrand Audio Laboratories, 3402
Windsor Road, Wall, N.J. 07719.
DISC RECORDING EQUIPMENT: Complete
mono and stereo cutting systems featuring
rebuilt Scully, Neumann, Van Eps, and Fairchild lathes and new W.A.L. amplifiers.
Priced from $2500.00 Wiegand Audio Laboratories 3402 Windsor Road, Wall, N.J.
07719.
RADIO YESTERYEAR! Biggest and best In
the Industry we created. Over 7000 of those
great old-time radio shows. ANY program
you remember, drama, bands, serials, comedy, etc. Highest fidelity possible with Ampex duplicators. Free catalog. Radio Yesteryear, Box H. Dept. A, Croton -On -Hudson,
New York 10520. Member Better Business
Bureau.
VINTAGE RADIO on LP records at last.
Highest Fidelity, most reasonable prices.
Free catalog. The Radiola Co., Box H,
Dept. A, Croton-On -Hudson, New York
10520.
CATALOGS Broadcasts, soundtracks, Personalities of Thirties, Forties, Box 225, New
York, N.Y. 10028.
REVOX, QUAD, Thorens, Stanton, Ortofon,
P. E., Sony, Dual, Marantz, Bozak, S.A.E.,
Rabco, KLH, Dynaco, Barzilay Cabinets. Interiors Plus Sound, 1322 E. Commercial
Boulevard, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, 33308.
(305) 771-4715.
BUY -SELL -TRADE: AR, Altec, Advent, Marantz, Sony, Dynaco. SHURE V15-11 Improved, $47 and old cartridge, shipped prepaid. STEREO Shop, 1201 Ellis, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52405.
tape recorder with extras.
$195: Berlant series 30 play preamp $35. KLH model 18 tuner $80. - Gerald Rucks,
P.O. Box 866, Oswego, Ill., 60543 (312)
UHER
400-S
554-8277.
AUDIO
FOR SALE
CUSTOM SPEAKER CABINETS to your
specs., and duplication of any discontinued
Price list available. Custom
sound systems installed in Wash. D.C. area.
Custom Audio Components, 3921 Lantern
Drive, Wheaton, Md. 20902. (301) 942-8540.
enclosure.
DIRECT FROM ENGLAND'S HI-FI
MAIL ORDER SPECIALISTS! Save money
on SME, Leak, Quad, Goldring, Decca,
Bowers & Wilkins, Thorens, Ferrograph.
Tandberg, Revox, Gold Speakers, Transmission Line, Garrard BSR, Dual, Lowther,
Wharfedale, KEF, Celestion, Transcriptors,
Radford etc. Insured shipping: quotes free,
or send $1.00 in include specified leaflets.
Goodwin Ltd., 7 Broadway, Wood Green,
London N. 22. 6 DU. Visitors welcome .to
showrooms.
BUY
COLOR CONVERTER for black and white
television. New patented color television
system. An electronic do-it-yourself kit for
hobbyists and experimenters. Plans, instructions and brochure only $2.50. Bele
Electronics Corp., 111 Northeast Second
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33132.
-
FOR SALE
-4
BASF
TRACK PRE-RECORDED STEREO
TAPES, Lowest Prices, Postpaid U.S.A. Free
brochures. Write STEREOTONE TAPES, Box
657, Sterling, Illinois 61081.
TAPES - Pre-recorded and blank. Reels,
Cartridges, Cassettes. Lowest Prices anywhere. Alan Enterprises, 5023 Lee St., Skokie, Illinois 60076.
DYNAMIC RANGE EXPANSION can restore
inert undulating sensitivities into spectacuThe HAR.
lar stereophonic realism
MONIC WAVE FORM PROCESSOR Is $119.
Postpaid, connects easily, and is completely guaranteed. Information free. AUDIO
ENGINEERING LABORATORIES, INC., King
Ferry, N.Y. 13081.
EQUIPMENT WANTED
CORPORATION of America Erath
models LWE-1 and LWE-VI speaker systems. Heathkit AJ-15 Deluxe stereo tuner
John Barrett, P.O. Box 207, Immokalee,
TEAC
Fla. 33934.
KARG LABS XT-1 TV Audio receiver. John
325 West 19th, New York, N.Y.
10011.
RIBBON,
CONDENSER,
MICROPHONES
dynamic, precision -built in West Germany,
top value, performance and appearance.
Write for distributor costs, catalog and FREE
booklet, "HOW TO CHOOSE AND USE MICROPHONES." Stanford International, San
Carlos, Ca. 94070.
Slagle,
SPECIALIZING taped radio mysteries. Reels
or cassettes. Catalog $1.00, refundable first
order. Detective House, 218 Orangeview
Lane, Lakeland, Fla. 33803.
Serious recordists to make records for five
companies. We train, equip and provide
protected franchised territories. Modest investment required. Send resume to Mr.
Bloch, 418 N. Main St., Englewood, Ohio
FM BACKGROUND MUSIC without commercials available on many FM stations! MUSICON Adapter plugs into your FM Tuner,
delivers continuous music through your
amplifier and speakers. Line-cord operated. No adjustments or tuning, ever. New
design breakthrough guarantees optimum
performance (15 -day refund for any reason).
Lowest price ever-$39 postpaid to K-LAB,
Box 572A, S. Norwalk, Conn. 06856.
PATENT RIGHT for sale-Tonearm, Servo-
controlled strait-line tracking. U.S. inquiries.
J. Jeles, Box 182, Chemainus, B.C. Canada.
INFINITY AND S. A. E. equipment -unquestionably the finest available. Send for brochures, other components. Paul Heath, 81
Big Tree St., Livonia, N.Y.
AMPEX 440-8-C Recorder. Mint condition $8950. Ampex 440-2-C with additional 1/4
track play head $2200. Ampex 300-2-C
$1750 all guaranteed. Joe Tarsia. 212 N.
12th St., Phila., Pa. 19107 (215) 561-3660.
FREE CATALOG offers high fidelity speaker
systems at manufacturer's prices. CTAL,
Box 543, Newark, Calif. 94560.
HI FI FURNITURE? See Toujay designs at
S.E.E. 70's High Fidelity exhibit, 443 Park
Ave. S., N.Y.C. 10016, Tues. to Fri. 10-6,
Sat. 10-4. Full line brochure 25e.
COMPLETE LINE of magnetic car & truck
signs, 36 std. sizes. 40% profit. Mobil Magnetics, Bx 283PI, Decatur, Ind.
INFINITY SYSTEMS, Quad, Stax, Crown
International, Citation, Decca, K. E. F., Thor ens, Transmission -Line speakers, anything
else exotic. Plus custom electronic crossovers and amps -Electrostatic Sound Systems Co., 1823 20th St., Sacramento Calif.
95814.
STEREO HEADPHONES -$20 -DISCOUNTS
AVAILABLE. WRITE H & M DEPT. A BOX
474, PT. HUENEME, CALIF. 93041.
FEBRUARY 1971
CASH FOR YOUR unwanted LP's and prerecorded tapes. Record House, Hillburn,
New York 10931.
HELP WANTED
45322.
RECORDS
"HARD TO GET" records -all speeds. Record Exchange, 842 Seventh Avenue, New
York, N.Y. 10019.
OLDIES -45 RPM. Original hits. Catalog 50e.
& S Record Sales, Box 197, Wamps-
C
ville, N.Y. 13163.
"HARD-TO -FIND", deleted LPs and 45s,
all types and categories, vast resources.
RECORDS, Dept A, Box 16115, San Francisco, CA USA 94116.
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
MAKE BIG MONEY raising chinchillas, rabbits, guinea pigs for us. Catalog 25e. Keeney Brothers Farms, Inc., New Freedom,
Pa. 17349 or Summerfield, Fla., 32691.
SITUATION WANTED
VIBRAHARPIST seeks alliance with recording studio equipped with electronic music
synthesizer to produce, record, and explore
the world of rhythm and tones. Reply to
Box A00-1.
Young Experienced Salesman seeking sales
position In Audio field. Will travel. Full
knowledge of merchandise. Charles Gulley,
2712 Bartlett B-2, Pascagoula, Miss. 39567.
HONEST MAN looking for an honest job.
Must be 100% on the up and up. No
phonies please. Very retentive memory.
Albert Francis Safran, Jr., 819 Pierson Run
Road, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15239.
IN OR AROUND BATON ROUGE, Louisiana.
Would like to work part time in the Audio
field, while attending junior college for
electronics. SP/4 John D. Davis E434-686984, Co. A, 523rd Sig. BN., Chu Lai Run,
APO S.F. 96374.
65
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Advertising
Index
P
E
STEREO
A
HI-FI
K
Direct
service
E
from the
R
factory
to you.
S
Y
S
T
E
M
S
Systems that feature handsome
walnut finished enclosures, surrounding perfectly coordinated
high compliance speakers, that
surround you with the full dynamic spectrum of sound.
very special
price.
A
feature is their
MODEL CMS 83, $40,
comparable to $69 value.
MODEL CMS 124, $90,
comparable to $160 value.
Money back
guarantee if not
satisfied.
CLARK MUSIC INDUSTRIES. INC. Send for
P. 0 BOX 888 Dept. 3
your Free
61 WALNUT AVENUE
Catalog
CLARK, NEW JERSEY 07066
today.
Check No. 101 on Reader Service Card
REAR HERE
FOR THE UTMOST IN
DISCOUNTS
ON NATIONALLY
ADVERTISED
Acoustical Manufacturing Co.
Acoustic Research, Inc.
AKG Div., Norelco
Audio Dynamics Corp
B & O of America
Benjamin Electronic Sound Corp.
Boston Audio Co.
Bozak Mfg. Co.
British Industries Corp
Clark Music Industries, Inc.
Concord Electronics Corp.
Crown of America
Downtown Audio
Dynaco, Inc.
electro-harmonix
Elpa Marketing Industries
Empire Scientific Corp.
Cover
Fairfax Industries, Inc
Finney Co.
Fisher Radio Corp.
Harman-Kardon, Inc.
Heath Co.
15
23
32
you're shopping
discounts
because you want
the most system
for your money.
49
14
25
66
29
3
K OS
/IlCO
66
56
/S/Vc7
6
Before you buy, be sure to
check our price list. You'll be
glad you did.
66
5
57
63
Write us for our price list, DEPT.A,
or check our number on the reader
service card.
IV
59
66
13
27
19
JVC America, Inc
7
Kenwood Electronics, Inc.
33
Koss Electronics, Inc
37
Lafayette Radio Corp
63
Marantz Co.
Cover III
Matsushita Electric Corp. of America
McIntosh Laboratory, Inc.
15
1
Metrotec Industries
60
Nikko
31
Norelco
32
Panasonic
10
Phase Linear Co.
17
Pickering & Co., Inc.
Pioneer Electronics (USA) Corp.
l
Records & Recording
62
ReVox Corp.
55
Sansui Electric Co., Inc.
39
53
Schwann, Inc.
Scott, H.H., Inc.
Cover II
2
Sharpe Audio Div., Sintrex, Inc.
47
Shure Brothers, Inc
34, 35
Sony Corp. of America
61
Soundcraftsmen
60
Superex Electronics Corp
TEAC Corp. of America
9
50
Utah Electronics
3
Wharfedale
Yamaha International Corp.
56
1
BOSt011
1
Check No. 103 on Reader Service Card
GET
MORE and BETTER
FM Stereo Multiplex
BROADCASTS
WITH
ì=nvc'a
Award Winning FM Components
vw
I
8u -FI STEREO
COMPONENTS
WRITE FOR OUR QUOTE
All Merchandise Shipped
Promptly Fully Insured
Our Warehouse.
From
DOWNTOWN
AUDIO, INC.
17 WARREN ST.
NEW YORK, N.Y.10007
267-3670-1-2
FM ANTENNA
Model FM -4G
$28.50 list
FM BAND
PASS FILTER
Model 3007
$7.30 list
Write Dept. AM-
FM INDOOR
AMPLIFIER
Model 65.7
$24.95
2- for Catalog 20-213
THE FINNEY COMPANY
DEPT. A
Check No. 102 on Reader Service Card
/COMPANY
Discount Drive, Randolph, Mass. 02368
( East Randolph Industrial Park, )
34 W. Interstate St., Bedford, Ohio 44146
66
AUDIO
FEBRUARY 1971
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Check No. 104 on Reader Service Card
Use this FREE Post Paid Card for more facts
on the products described and advertised in
this issue.
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ISSUE
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49
64
79
94
109
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20
35
50
65
80
95
110
125
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21
36
51
66
81
96
111
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22
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67
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97
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68
83
98
113
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24
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69
84
99
114
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55
70
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100
115
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71
86
101
116
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Permit No. 22,489
Philadelphia, Pa.
But not crazy. Because if you are a purist and
willing to pay for-perfec ion., he Marantz Model 19
will more than justify your investment.
The Maran
odel 19 is a magnificent new
Stereophonic FM rec% er. It s stiic
lovers whose demand f r.. ound deli#yi
pale of the average list. r.
the s perior
The Model 19 co b
Mara tz CG onents with
and features of indi
the ease of installa 'off nd si plicjt of a single
Bred r the sound of the
receiver. It also is t
el multiplex.
future -.- ready for 4
Visit; your Maranl dealer.
He'll let you personally handle the controls of the,
Vlodel 19 as if you owned. it. You can also compare
`t to other makes. Then let your ears make up your
mind.
By the wa
your budget has you in a bind, look
over our line of the other fine Maraptz receivers
.
.
s
-,....
="
starting as 101v as $219.
iirz+.we
ir..,
heck No. 43 on Reader Service dard
obsidian. of Sup. rscupr. Inc.. P.O. Jinx 99C, Sun Valley,
Marant, Co.. Inc..
California. 9135..... d for free catalog. Circle 43 onreader-service card.
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ed
Empireif model 598 TroubacJor turntable fyftem
end 1000 ZE/X long playing ftereo cartridge.
Here are two of the world's greatest
stereo components. Empire's model 598
turntable system exceeds every broadcast
specification for professional playback
equipment while the 1000 ZE/X cartridge
allows you to track any record at forces
so low you never get stylus or record
wear. Superb alone-they are spectacular
together. Ask your hi fi dealer for a
totally unfcrgettable demonstration.
Write for a free Guide to Sound Design
for 1971: Empire Scientific Corp.,
1055 Stewart Ave., Garden City, N.Y. 11530
EMPIRE
1
CIRCLE NO. 96 ON READER SERVICE CARD
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