Introduction to C-Bus Trainee Notes

Introduction to C-Bus Trainee Notes
 C-Bus training Course
Introduction to C-Bus
Trainee Notes
Revision Number: V1.3 © Copyright Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd 2006. All rights Reserved. Clipsal Integrated Systems is a division
of Clipsal Australia Pty Ltd ABN 27 007 873 529. This material is copyright under Australian and international
laws. Except as permitted under the relevant law, no part of this work may be reproduced by any process without
prior written permission of and acknowledgement to Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd.
Clipsal is a registered trademark of Clipsal Australia Pty Ltd.
The information in this manual is provided in good faith. Whilst Clipsal Integrated Systems (CIS) has endeavoured
to ensure the relevance and accuracy of the information, it assumes no responsibility for any loss incurred as a
result of its use. CIS does not warrant that the information is fit for any particular purpose, nor does it endorse its
use in applications which are critical to the health or life of any human being. CIS reserves the right to update the
information at any time without notice.
V1.3 April 2006
2
Day1
Set up and check training boards. Load software if not already loaded on computers. Check USB adaptor / serial comms to boards. Introduction Web Site: www.clipsal.com.cis
Technical Support Phone: 1300 722 247 Housekeeping Mobile phone issues. Please put mobile phones on silent and take the call outside the training room if you are unable to turn it off. Any training missed due to taking phone calls will have to be picked up in your own time. The training course is not specific to a particular installation. Hence we are not programming one trainee’s current or future installation. Introduction to CIS and Products. 1994 was the first job in C‐bus at the ETSA building No1 Anzac Hwy Adelaide (still working) 1995 C‐bus officially released. C‐bus programming has evolved through three software packages. We now use a program called ‘C‐Bus Toolkit’ to program C‐Bus. This is a ‘windows’ based package, making navigation of the software familiar to many users. The largest Job to date is the Telecom Towers in Malaysia 60 Networks. Intro and concepts (Introduction to C-Bus P2)
Units
System Units (System Support Devices) (P5 Introduction to C‐Bus Manual) (C‐Bus Hardware Manual) Power Supplies
((PP1155 IInnttrroodduuccttiioonn ttoo CC--BBuuss M
Maannuuaall))
Power Supplies do not show on network. What is the C‐Bus voltage, how many power supplies can be used? (36V up to 2A Max.) (Recommended Min 20V). Output units & current requirements for input units (see table & calculation sheet in manual). PCI & CNI Bridges (P4 C‐Bus Hardware Manual) 90% of networks are single networks so bridges are usually not needed. Bridges can be set up to allow networks to talk to each other No power or Clock across bridges Input Units (P5 Introduction to C‐Bus Manual) (C‐Bus Hardware Manual) Output Units (P5 Introduction to C‐Bus Manual) (C‐Bus Hardware Manual) 1
Basic Network (P5 Introduction to C-Bus Manual)
Basic Network showing separate Power Supplies. Units Per Network (P18 Introduction to C-Bus Manual)
100 Units per Network average unit draws 18mA (22mA for Neo).(Max current 2A) Use C‐Bus calculator C-Bus Operating Parameters Max total cable length 1000 meters (1km) per network. Max 255 networks 1 Burden per network At least 1 clock (max 3) per network. (Only 1 clock is Active, the others are Enabled, ready to Activate if needed). Cable
(P9 Introduction to C‐Bus Manual, P2 C‐Bus Concepts)
Cat5 cable (Electrical Characteristics, Impedance) (90 Ohms / 1Km return) Why UTP? (Noise reduction) Colour code on the Cable, why two cores instead of one? (Current Rating 2A) Why Pink? Only one brave enough to use pink (can tell that it is used for C‐Bus) also Sheath is 240V Mains Rated. (Still allow separation & segregation) Cable segregation
The C‐Bus Pink Cat 5 UTP, has a mains rated outer sheath. When running the C‐Bus cable in parallel with mains, maintain 150mm segregation between the two cables at all times. Where C‐Bus needs to cross mains cable at least 60mm separation, and C‐Bus cable crosses at a 90 degrees. Check local Electrical Wiring Standards for compliance. Orange and Blue – Positive Supply Orange/White and Blue/White – Negative Supply Remote Override – Green & Green/White ON, Brown & Brown/White OFF (Switched to Negative Supply). Cable Terminations
Twist the pair together or use a bootlace crimp. Do not solder to join the cables when secured in a screw terminal. This may cause cold creep. When twisting the pair together, avoid frayed terminations.
Network Burden (P17 Introduction to C‐Bus Manual, P8 C‐Bus Concepts Manual) Why do you need a Network Burden? Is it important? The Network Burden provides a standard impedance to a C‐Bus Network, and will ensure correct and reliable communications. What is a Network Burden? 1Kohm resistor in series with 10μF – 22uF/50v capacitor. Different types of Network burden RJ45 Version comes with a PC Interface Leaded version similar to RJ45 version Software selectable Burden 2
C-Bus System Clock (P7 C‐Bus Concepts Manual) What is a system clock and why do we need it? (Bipolar 2.5v pulse of 296μS every 2mS. Synchronises data transmission after pulse) Addressing Structure (P21 Introduction to C‐Bus Manual, P9 C‐Bus Concepts Manual) Why we use Hex (difference between hex and decimal & Hex used in the program but converted to decimal / tags by the computer). Network Address
Unit Addressing Unique addressing of units. Group Addressing (P23 Introduction to C‐Bus Manual, P11 C‐Bus Concepts Manual) Input and output units communicate with each other. Each group address can have a unique description (Tag). Multi way switching. Switches do not have to correspond to lights in the room. Area Addressing (P24 Introduction to C‐Bus Manual, P11 C‐Bus Concepts Manual) How it works Why we use it Application Addresses (P21 Introduction to C‐Bus Manual, P10 C‐Bus Concepts Manual) As with unit addresses we have 255 Application addresses. Currently we use application 56 for lighting and 136 For Heating. We also use 202 for Trigger Control application (For Scenes in C‐touch etc) and 203 for Enable (for Schedules in C‐touch) Network Variable
C-Bus Indicators (P13 C‐Bus Hardware Manual) All C‐Bus Output Units (excluding the IR Transmitter) have three types of indicators. UNIT LED: Indicates the status of the individual unit. Local or Remote Overrides have been toggled.
Indicates if mains power is present to the unit. C-BUS LED: Indicates presence of a C‐Bus Clock. Indicates an acceptable C‐Bus Voltage. LOCAL TOGGLE INDICATOR: Shows the status of each channel on the particular output unit. Manually overrides each channel. Used in Learn Mode programming. 3
Tools & Functions
TAGS All C‐Bus Addresses are given names, known as Tags. All Tags may be user defined to meaningful names. Tags are only stored in the C‐Bus Software on the PC. No tags at all reside in any C‐Bus Units. Part Name & Project name stored in units. ‘Set Project to All’ function of Toolkit. C-Bus Toolkit - Software Navigation (C‐Bus Toolkit Software Manual) ‘Toolkit’ and the commonly used buttons (icons). Project Manager. Add a new project. Navigate around project Manager. (Project, Network, Units) Scan the network and display GUI of Dimmer and Relay and Key input. (Brief, details covered later). Difference between Units in Database and Units on Network. If you edit units on the Database and do not ‘save to physical unit’ it does not reflect the real network. Exercise 1. (Assistance from trainer)
Toggle / Retrig Timer, Memory / Toggle Dimmer and passing on of timers. Exercise 2.
• Do exercise 2 with less assistance. • Problem with this method of Master Control, is excessive current switching. • Turn on loads before continuing. •• Is this a better method of control? Yes, loads ramp off.
Short Press / Long press
Short press, long press and use of for programming / operation of units. Key Functions (Short Press / Long press etc) Short Press (SP) – Always sent. Short release (SR) – Sent if Key releases before 400mS (or whatever time is set for LP) Long Press (LP) – Sent after 400mS (or whatever time is set for LP) Long Release (LR) – Sent when key releases after LP. Debounce. purpose of. (48mS default). Micro functions.
4
Logic
There are two types of Logic ʺANDʺ & ʺORʺ (Min and Max on the Dimmer) Programming exercise 3
Dimmer Loads
Load types. (Fluorescent, Compact Fluorescent, Incandescent, Electronic Transformers, Iron Core Transformers.) Electronic transformer compatibility. (Refer to table & calculation sheet in manual). Dimmer types ‐ Leading Edge, Trailing Edge. Iron Core transformers, use Lamp Load + 20% to allow for losses. (Iron loss, Eddy Current, Copper Loss). Use Leading Edge with Electronic Transformers 300nF or 1000nF Pro Series. 240V on Dimmer Outputs
TThhee ddiim
%,, tthheerree iiss ssttiilll vvoollttaaggee pprreesseenntt.. N
Neeeedd ttoo iissoollaattee ssuuppppllyy ttoo
mm
meerr oouuttppuuttss ddoo nnoott ssw
wiittcchh ooffff aatt 00%
m
e
r
b
e
f
o
r
e
w
o
r
k
i
n
g
o
n
c
i
r
c
u
i
t
s
.
ddiim
mmer before working on circuits. 5
Fan Speed Control (depending on State & Trainee requirements, how much detail is covered here) Here are a number of workable solutions. 2 sections. A. Where the fan is suitable to be used on a dimmer channel i.e. where a little bit of fan noise is RJ45 Connections on C-Bus Units
not a problem. C-Bus
Discuss 4 options here‐ RS232
Use a single button set as a dimmer ‐ set min turn‐on to 35% ‐ extend the ramp1 time to 8 or 12 Programming exercise 4
secs to roughly match the fans ability to alter its speed. Use a single button to give 2 speed operation, say 90% and 50% ‐ set the max turn‐on to 90% ‐
short press will then toggle between 90% and Off ‐ use long press, Recall1 to obtain 50%. Use 2 keys to give High, Med and Low ‐ button 1 will toggle between High and Off ‐ button 2
will use Recall1 on Short Press, and Recall2 on Long Press, to give Med and Low. Use 4 keys, High‐Upkey, Med‐ Recall1, Low‐Recall2, Off –Offkey. B. Where fans must be almost silent, therefore using capacitor control. 4 options‐ Use 2 keys ‐ one for Med and one for Low (each switch in a certain value of capacitance) ‐ both keys are pressed for High (this switches in both capacitors and gives a speed close to high) this
uses 2 relay channels. As above but using 4 keys ‐ button 3 will have the block allocation to turn on both Med and Low to give the high speed. Using 3 relay channels is possibly the best option but quite expensive ‐ use scenes to give a 4 button operation ‐ High, Med, Low, Off. (or 3 different turn on levels of the same GA. problem is
that the indicator does not indicate the fan speed. As above, but by having a Scene Trigger Group and Action Selectors can give the same operation
on 2 keys, (Requires a device capable of storing scenes eg C‐touch, PAC. etc). A regular method used in Queensland of using two relays where by the fast speed is attained by
having both capacitors in circuit together. There is a possibility of the voltage across the
capacitors or the fan exceeding that of line voltage. It has been suggested that if this method of
control is employed that the voltage across the capacitors and the fan motor are checked to
confirm that there is not an excessive p.d.
As xl approaches xc the voltages will rise and could exceed line voltage across both elements
This problem can be somewhat dangerous giving the fact that the inductive reactance of the
motor is of an unknown value to most electricians, and hence they cannot calculate when
resonance would occur, as they only have the capacitors value, which they could calculate the
capacitive reactance from.
This problem could case failure of the capacitors or fan motor.
6
RJ45 Connections on C-Bus Units
C‐Bus RS232 Warn ing ‐‐ DO NOT connect computer to the C‐Bus RJ45 on the PCI. Exercise 4.
The idea of the Theatre exercise with the Corporate Boxes is not to impact on the theatre performance. Min Logic similar to “and” and is used to prevent the above. Exercise 5.
PE Cell (Light Level Sensor) (P6 Basic Programming Manual) Show the PE Cell GUI. Level Control will try to achieve the level set by the PE cell it will do this by dimming the lighting set in the Level Control. On/Off will switch off a Group Address when the PE cell reaches a certain level. Enable is the group address that switches the PE Cell on. Exercise 6.
PIR (P8 Basic Programming Manual) 3 Models available 5750L WP outdoor Infrascan 18m SENPIROA SENPIRSS (old units) 5751L indoor Infrascan 8m 90° SENPIRIA SENPIRSS (old units) 5753L 360° indoor Infrascan SENPIRIB PIR GUI Trim Pot fully anti – clockwise Sunset turn pot clockwise and back off ¼ turn. (LED may prevent light level working). 7
Learn Mode
Demonstration of Learn Mode and showing that a clock can be switched on when entering learn mode. Also use of Advance learn mode (Super Learn Mode) ability to turn on burden which will alter the output unit address to 01 and blank (unused) the channels unless you turn off the indicators. Analogue Dimming See for Page 12 for details. DSI Ballast
See Page 13 for details. END DAY 1
8
Revision & Case Study Day
2
Assessment. Complete theory questions before tomorrow. Installing New Units
All new C‐Bus units have a default Unit Address of 255. Many different ways to implement. 1. Create your database and program all units. (Set unit addresses, group addresses, networks etc) Install units on site and note serial numbers against unit locations. (Either on plan or fix serial numbers from boxes to units. Scan the network in and resolve any conflicts (Unravel etc). Use ‘Set address to database’ to readdress units on network to match your database. (you can either transfer unit programming at this time, or leave until all units matched, then transfer database to units on network). (If you transfer data as you readdress units, you may miss those units which do not need to be readdressed, so latter method is preferrable). 2. Before delivery of C‐Bus product to site, the units may be pre‐programmed. Using a C‐Bus Power Supply and a PC Interface, program the unit to a new unique Unit Address. Program C‐Bus unit with all other relevant addresses. Take C‐Bus products to site and install. Barcode Scanning is an alternative. Unit Types (as used on Training Board) Unit Type Description Part No. PCINT4 DIN Rail PC Interface RELDN12 DIN Rail 12 Channel Voltage Free Relay 10A per L5512RVF Channel DIMDN8 DIN Rail 8 Channel Dimmer, 1A per Channel L5508D1A KEY1 1 Gang Key Input Unit 5031NL KEY2 2 Gang Key Input Unit 5032NL KEY4 4 Gang Key Input Unit 5034NL KEYM4 4 Gang NEO Key Input Unit 5054NL KEYM8 8 Gang NEO Key Input Unit 5058NL SENLL Light Level Sensor 5031PE SENPIRIA Passive Infra‐Red Motion Detector, Indoor, Corner 5751L Mount (SENPIRSS) old units 5500PC 9
Project Manager & Planning
Scope of works. Define the Project. Plan – Product / Hardware. Power supply calculation.
Program units with Unit Addresses, save to Database and clearly label C‐Bus unit and box with mounting location, and unit address. Ensure means of knowing physical location of units. ie Use meaningful labels in database. Send units to site with the plan to provide correct installation position. Edit project Database and assign group addresses. Visit the site and download data to network. Test and commission system and if needed, alter programming. Backup project and document. Leave a copy on site. Follow up visit to site at later date to fine tune to customer’s satisfaction. Update backups & documentation. Leave a copy on site. Creating / Restoring backups. (.cb3 files) Adding Units to DataBase
Exercise 7
Scenes
What is a scene? A Scene is a combination of outputs coming on, going off or dimming to a particular level. Scenes are used to create a ‘mood’ in a room or an area. As an example of a scene, imagine the following scenario: You have asked your guests to come to the dinner table and the lights in the dining room are fully on so everyone can see their way to their places. Now that they are seated you, press a scene button. The lights over the table dim gradually to a level appropriate to light the dinner party and the downlights over the serving area turn up so that you can uncork the first bottle of wine for the night… Programming scenes may be done in the Saturn, Neo and Reflections Input Units as well as the MultiSensor. These units have an area of memory for storing Scene information. The number of possible Group Addresses in the NEO is constant but can be divided up differently according to your needs. If you want lots of Group Addresses included in your Scenes then you can’t have as many scenes. Conversely, if you only want a small number of Group Addresses in a Scene you can have lots of Scenes. You can think of this memory area as a “bucket of Group Addresses” that you can draw from, and once you have used them all up then that is all the scenes you can have. The exact number is forty Group Addresses over a maximum of 8 scenes, with no scene containing more than 10 Group Addresses. You can have four Scenes, each with ten Group Addresses (which will use up 100% of the Scene Bucket) or you can have eight Scenes each with five Group Addresses. Methods for selecting Group Addresses for scene (Double click, multiple selection etc.) Exercise 8
Exercise 9 (C-Bus House Exercise)
Load (restore) faulty project to PC. (Faulty1.cb3)
END DAY 2
10
DAY 3
Bridges (P4 C‐Bus Hardware Manual) Configuration of Bridges, topology Map You can control the same group addresses across the networks, also the group addresses might be the same but the descriptions can be different. Also the descriptions may be the same, but different group addresses. Fault Finding
Fault finding procedures / tools. Principles of fault finding using a multimeter. Measure C‐Bus voltages + to – and also + & ‐ to earth should be equal (approx ½ C‐Bus Voltage). Resistance measurement to locate shorts or opens. (90 ohms / 1KM). Use C‐Bus LEDS. Use Application log to see what unit issued a command. Fault finding chart. A typical example. Output Units Key Units
A network with units connected in a combination Daisy chain / Star topology has failed. The key input units are not functioning. The C‐Bus status LED is OFF. The installation has ample power supplies and has been functioning correctly since installation. Exercise 10
Load faulty1.cb3 to training board if not already done. Find, fix & document faults. This exercise, when working correctly, should have the 4 Key Unit buttons 1 to 4, switching Lamps 1 to 4 ON & OFF. The 8 Key NEO should be operating as toggle dimmers on Lamps 1 to 8 respectively. 12 Channel Relay Unused 1 Key Unit Unused 2 Key Unit Unused 4 Key NEO Unused. Light level sensor & PIR Unused. 11
Diagnostic kit
What it does. Does not show tags and it can operate in either Hex or Decimal. Wireless
Demo of wireless products. Analogue Dimming (0 – 10V)(if not covered on Day 1) To dim fluorescent lights the Fluorescent ballast needs to be dimmable. The dimming control is usually 0‐10v. To be able to achieve dimming with C‐Bus, the Fluorescent ballasts need to be wired into 5104AM or a 5504AM. (General guide 10 ballasts/channel of analogue output. Check ballast specification) With 0 – 10V ballasts, a relay must be fitted, because the lamps do not turn off at 0%. 0 – 10V
AnalogueOutput Unit
L5504AMP
Use same GA
C-Bus Relay
1A 1B 2A 2B
A
+
+
-
0 – 10v
Ballast
N
A
N
A
0 – 10V
Ballast
N
NOTE: Polarity is important. The control lines should be wired with a mains voltage rated cable. 12
DSI Gateway (if not covered on Day 1)
An easy way to dim Fluorescent is to use a DSI Controller. The Ballast needs to be a DSI Ballast. (Usually about 100 Ballast /channel. Check ballast specification)
If you have a large number of DSI ballasts, consider fitting a relay as shown (This will save energy
in the off state), for a small number of ballasts, the relay can be omitted.
The DSI system will however turn the lamp off at 0%, unlike 0 – 10V ballast.
Use same GA
DSI
Gateway
0
1
0
2
C-Bus Relay
0 3
D1
A
DSI Ballast
D2
N
A
N
A
D1
DSI Ballast
D2
N
NOTE: Polarity is important. The control lines should be wired with a mains voltage rated cable. DALI Gateway
Finish
13
C-Bus training Course
Introduction to C-Bus
Exercises
Name: Trainer: Revision Number: V1.2 Date: © Copyright Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd 2004. All rights Reserved. This material is copyright under Australian and
international laws. Except as permitted under the relevant law, no part of this work may be reproduced by any process without
prior written permission of and acknowledgement to Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd.
Clipsal is a registered trademark of Clipsal Australia Pty Ltd.
The information in this manual is provided in good faith. Whilst Clipsal Integrated Systems (CIS) has endeavoured to ensure the
relevance and accuracy of the information, it assumes no responsibility for any loss incurred as a result of its use. CIS does not
warrant that the information is fit for any particular purpose, nor does it endorse its use in applications which are critical to the
health or life of any human being. CIS reserves the right to update the information at any time without notice.
V1.2 February 2006
Introduction to C-Bus Exercises
Exercise 1 – Basic
•
Program 8 Channel Dimmer
Ch1 = BoardRoom Lights.
Ch2 to Ch8 = Unused.
•
Program 12 Channel Relay
Ch1 = Office Lights
Ch2 = Store Lights
Ch3 = Accounts Office
•
Program 4 Key Switch
K1 = Office Lights, on/off.
K2 = Store Lights, 5 sec timer (Toggle
Timer)
K3 = Accounts Office, on/off.
K4 = Board Room Lights, Dimmer
(Toggle)
Program 2 Key Switch
K1 = Office Lights, on/off.
K2 = Board Room Lights, preset 30%
Exercise 2 - Area Addressing
•
Program the 1 Key Input to Master, with an on/off function.
•
Apply Master to the Area Address of the relay & dimmer.
•
Test to see what happens.
•
Are there any problems with using this feature as a Master Control?
•
Apply custom ramp off commands and adjust ramp times on the 1 Key Unit.
•
Short Press:
Idle
•
Short Release:
Idle
•
Long Press:
Ramp Off
•
Long Release:
Idle
•
Ramp 2:
12 Seconds (Ramp 2, global tab)
•
Is this a better means of control? Exercise 3 - Logic
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Remove the ‘Master’ area address and replace with Unused in all C-Bus units.
Program the 1 Key Input to Master, with an On/Off function.
Program the 12 Channel Relay, go to the Logic tab and apply Master to the logic group.
Select AND logic.
Tick Channels 1,2 &3.
Program the 8 Channel Dimmer, go to the Logic tab and apply Master to the logic group.
Select Min Logic and tick Channel 1.
Using this method it is a true master control, as nothing will operate until the master is on.
C‐Bus training Course 1
Introduction to C-Bus Exercises
Exercise 4 - Logic
Create a new Project called Theatre
•
Program 12 Channel Relay
•
Program 4 Key Unit •
K1 = Box 1, Toggle Dimmer K2 = Box 2, Toggle Dimmer K3 = Box 3, Toggle Dimmer K4 = Box 4, Toggle Dimmer Program 4 Key NEO Unit Ch1 to Ch6 = House Lights, with staggered
turn on.
•
Program 8 Channel Dimmer
Ch1 = Box 1, Ch2 = Box 2
Ch3 = Box 3, Ch4 = Box 4
Ch5 = Box 5, Ch6 = Box 6
Ch7 = Box 7, Ch8 = Box 8
Tick all logic channels and assign
House lights to Logic Group.
MIN logic for all channels.
•
K1 = Box 5, Toggle Dimmer K2 = Box 6, Toggle Dimmer K3 = Box 7, Toggle Dimmer K4 = Box 8, Toggle Dimmer Program 1 Key Unit
K1 = House Lights, toggle dimmer.
Exercise 5 - Light Level Sensor
1. Set Groups / Light Level = Box 8 (Ch8 of 8ch Dimmer Output Unit from prev. Ex.)
Tick Refresh for Ambient Light if not already ticked.
Read Lux measurement value with ‘Box 8’ light OFF, then read Lux with Box 8 ON, and
set Target Lux to about ‘OFF’ level measured plus half of the difference of the two values.
Set Margin to 10 Lux (+ or – 5Lux).
Leave all other settings as is.
2. Set Groups / Light Level = Unused
Set Groups / Light On/Off = Box 8
Leave all other settings as is.
* Note when using Light Level GA, never goes to 0% (OFF)
C‐Bus training Course 2
Introduction to C-Bus Exercises
Exercise 6 - PIR
Set Daytime Movement (LI) Group = Porch Light (Ch7 of 12ch Relay Output Unit from prev.
Ex.)
Tick Use same response settings as ‘Day-Time Movement’
Under the ‘Blocks’ tab, set Timer 1 to 5 Seconds.
Leave all other settings as is.
C‐Bus training Course 3
Introduction to C-Bus Exercises
Exercise 7 – Downloading
•
To successfully download a database to a C-Bus network two factors must be met: -
•
- Units types on the database and units types on the network must match.
- Unit addresses in the database and unit addresses on the network must match.
Programming live on the network, address the following units to the Unit Addresses
shown:- •
•
•
•
•
00 = PC Interface
01 = 12 Channel Relay
02 = 8 Channel Dimmer
50 = 1 Key Input
51 = 2 Key Input
•
•
Disconnect from the Network, create new project called MYHOME. •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
52 = 4 Key Input
53 = 4 Key NEO
54 = 8 Key NEO
150 = Light Level Sensor
151 = PIR
In ‘MYHOME’ Database, add units with correct address and unit type to match units on the training board. Program 12 Channel Relay
Ch1 = Outside Lights Ch7 = Porch Light Ch2 = Garden Lights Ch8 = Garage Light Ch3 = Kitchen Lights Ch9 = Toilet Light Ch4 = Bathroom Lights Ch10 = Stairs Light Ch5 = Hall Lights Ch11 = Balcony Light Ch6 = Laundry Light Ch12 = Front Door Program 8 Channel Dimmer
Ch1 = Lounge Lights Ch5 = Dining Room Ch2 = Wall Lights Ch6 = Up Lights Ch3 = Rumpus Room Ch7 = Down lights Ch4 = TV Light Ch8 = Spot Lights Program 4 Key Input
• Program 1 Key Input
Key 1 = Outside Lights, 10 Second Retrig Key 1 = Going Out. Timer. (Custom) Key 2 = Garden Lights, on/off. Short Press = Idle. Key 3 = Kitchen Lights, on/off. Short Release = Ramp off. Key 4 = Bathroom Lights, on/off. Long Press = Idle. Program 4 Key NEO
Long Release = Idle. Ramp2 = 30 sec. Key 1 = Lounge Lights, Memory Dimmer, turn on maximum 80%. Key 2 = Wall Lights, Memory Dimmer, turn on minimum 30%. Key 3 = Rumpus Room, Preset 60 %. Key 4 = TV Light, Toggle Dimmer. C‐Bus training Course •
Program Dimmer and Relay
‘Area Address’ = Going Out continued next page 4
Introduction to C-Bus Exercises
Exercise 7 continued
•
Program 2 Key Input
Key 1 = Dining Room, On/Off. Key 2 = Up Lights, Toggle Dimmer. •
Reconnect to network and
download database to network Exercise 8 - Scenes
8 Key NEO •
•
(Program the Trigger group to ‘Training’) Program Key 1 Scene, 8 sec ramp time Action Selector to ‘All On’. Lounge Light to 100%. Wall Lights to 100%. Rumpus Room to 100%. TV Lights to 100%. Dining Room to 100% Program Key 2 Scene, 12 sec ramp time Action Selector to ‘Mix Up’. Lounge Light to 20%. Wall Light to 40%. Rumpus Room to 60%. TV Lights to 80%. Dining Room to 100% •
•
Program Key 3 Scene, 4 sec ramp time Action Selector to ‘Mix Down’. Lounge Light to 100%. Wall Lights to 80%. Spot Lights to 60%. TV Lights to 40%. Dining Room to 20%. Program Key 4 Scene, 12 sec ramp time Action Selector to ‘All Off’. Lounge Light to 0%. Wall Lights to 0%. Rumpus Room to 0%. TV Lights to 0%. Dining Room to 0% C‐Bus training Course 5
Introduction to C-Bus Exercises
Exercise 9 C-Bus House Design
•
•
•
•
This exercise makes use of all the units on the C-Bus Training Board to simulate a real
world installation. The customer has provided the following information, including
suggested scenes. You are required to implement the customer’s requirements and find
solutions for any areas not specified.
The following is the house layout plan showing loads & switch positions.
Program the Key Input Units & Output Units to implement this design.
Three scenes are required for the open area Dining/Kitchen/Lounge area as well as an all off
key function.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Scene 1: Cooking
Kitchen Down Lights 100%
Fluoro 100%
Dining Down Lights 50%
Lounge Centre Lights 30%
Lounge Wall Lights Off
•
•
•
•
•
•
Scene 3: TV
Kitchen Down Lights 30%
Fluoro Off
Dining Down Lights Off
Lounge Centre Lights Off
Lounge Wall Lights 20%
•
•
•
•
•
•
Scene 2: Dining
Kitchen Down Lights 20%
Fluoro Off
Dining Down Lights 70%
Lounge Centre Lights Off
Lounge Wall Lights 15%
continued next page
C‐Bus training Course 6
Introduction to C-Bus Exercises
continued from previous page
• The Light Level Sensor is to control the external 100W Incandescent Light.
• The PIR is to be set to activate the Hall light.
• The external 150W Floodlight can only be turned on if it is dark.
• The Bathroom Exhaust Fan is to come on when the Bathroom Light is switched on, but
should remain on for 10 minutes after the Bathroom Light is switched off.
• Bedroom 2 to have a “Night Light” (30%) setting.
• Bedroom 1 to have an all off switch (except for Bedroom 2 and this bedroom).
Use the separate supplied sheets to design & document the installation.
Exercise 10 – Fault Finding
This exercise, when working correctly, should have the 4 Key Unit buttons 1 to 4, switching
Lamps 1 to 4 ON & OFF.
The 8 Key NEO should be operating as toggle dimmers on Lamps 1 to 8 respectively.
Find, fix & document faults.
Fault
Fix
Optional Exercises
Exercise 11
•
Program 12 Channel Relay
Ch1to Ch4 = Warehouse. Ch1 set to turn on at 20%. Ch2 set to turn on at 40%. Ch3 set to turn on at 60%. Ch4 set to turn on at 80%. Ch5 = Store. Ch6 = Stairwell. •
Program 8 Channel Dimmer
Ch1 = Board Room. Ch2 = Stage Lights. Ch3 = Wall Lights C‐Bus training Course •
Program 4 Key Input
Key 1 = Warehouse, Toggle Dimmer. Key 2 = Store, 5 sec timer. Toggle Timer Key 3 = Stairwell, 10 sec Retrig. Timer. Key 4 = Wall Lights, 40% preset. •
Program 8 Key NEO
Key 1 = Board Room, Memory Dimmer. Key 2 = Stage lights, Memory Dimmer. Key 3 = Wall Lights, Memory Dimmer. Key 4 = Warehouse, Memory Dimmer. Key 5 = Stairwell, 10 sec Retrig Timer. 7
Introduction to C-Bus Exercises
Exercise 12 – Timer Challenge 1
•
Program the 8 Channel Dimmer Ch1 = Light 1 Ch2 = Light 2 Ch3 = Light 3 Ch4 = Light 4 •
Program so the four lights will all switch ON at the same time. After the time periods the lights should switch OFF. Once you have done this, reverse it so the lights start in the OFF position and come ON after their time periods.
•
•
Set the 1 Key Unit as a timer Light 1 = 5 Seconds Light 2 = 10 Seconds Light 3 = 15 Seconds Light 4 = 20 Seconds Exercise 13 - Timer Challenge 2
•
•
Program the 8 Channel Dimmer Ch1 = Bathroom Light Ch2 = Bathroom Fan Configure the 1 Key Unit so that: On the first press the Bathroom Light and the Bathroom Fan switch on. On the second press the Bathroom Light switches off, but the fan stays on for 10 seconds.
Exercise 14 – PIR Disable
Program the 8 Channel Dimmer Channel 1 to Light 1 and use this for your Output. PIR Disable 1 Customer wants to disable the PIR so that the Light will stay on. • Configure the 2 Key Unit so that Key 1 disables the PIR and Key 2 toggles the Light. PIR Disable 2
• Configure the 1 Key Unit so that the light comes on and the PIR is disabled. PIR Disable 3
Customer wants to disable the PIR so that the light will stay off. • Configure the 1 Key Unit so that when the switch is turned off, the PIR is disabled and the light stays off. PIR Disable 4
Set up the PIR so the Bathroom light comes on when it is dark, but the fan always comes on. C‐Bus training Course 8
C-Bus Unit Allocation Table
Unit Description
Current
(mA)
Location
Unit
Address
Ref:
Network: Local
Part Name:
Notes:
Unit Type: PC Interface
Clock:
Tag Name:
Unit Address:
Burden:
Ref:
Network: Local
Location:
Unit Type: RELDN12
Application:
Area:
Unit Address:
Part Name:
Channel
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Notes:
Group
Notes
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
Channels
1
And
Or
2
3
4
5
6
7
Logic Groups
8
9
10
11
12
Unit Type: DIMDN8
Application:
Area:
Ref:
Network: Local
Location:
Channel
Group
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Unit Address:
Part Name:
Notes
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
Notes:
Channels
1
2
3
4
5
Logic Groups
6
7
8
And
Or
Ref:
Network: Local
Location:
Key
1
Notes:
Group
_____________
Ref:
Network: Local
Location:
Key
1
2
Notes:
Group
_____________
_____________
Unit Type: Key1
Application:
Area:
Function
____________
Unit Type: Key2
Application:
Area:
Function
____________
____________
Unit Address:
Part Name:
Notes
_____________________
Unit Address:
Part Name:
Notes
_____________________
_____________________
Ref:
Network: Local
Location:
Key
1
2
3
4
Notes:
Group
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
Ref:
Network: Local
Location:
Key
1
2
3
4
Notes:
Group
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
Ref:
Network: Local
Location:
Key
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Notes:
Group
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
Unit Type: Key4
Application:
Area:
Function
____________
____________
____________
____________
Unit Type: KEYM4
Application:
Area:
Function
____________
____________
____________
____________
Unit Type: KEYM8
Application:
Area:
Function
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
Unit Address:
Part Name:
Notes
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
Unit Address:
Part Name:
Notes
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
Unit Address:
Part Name:
Notes
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
Unit Type: SENLL
Application:
Area:
Ref:
Network: Local
Location:
Group
Light Level
Light On/Off
Enable Group
Target Lux:
Notes:
Indicator
____________
____________
____________
______
Unit Address:
Part Name:
Notes
_____________________
_____________________
_____________________
Margin: ______
Unit Type: SENPIR(IA)(SS)
Application:
Area:
Group Function Expiry Time
Day-time Movement (LI)
_____ _______
_______
Night-time Movement (DA)
_____ _______
_______
Use Same Response as Daytime Ref:
Network: Local
Location:
Unit Address:
Part Name:
Expiry Function
____________
____________
Sunset to Sunrise (SS)
_____
_______
_______
____________
Security (SE)
_____
_______
_______
____________
Sensor Enable/Disable
Enables Disables _____
Notes:
Unit Type: KEYM4
Unit Address:
Location:
Trigger Group:
Scene 1:
Key:
Ramp Rate:
Action Selector:
Scene 2:
Key:
Ramp Rate:
Action Selector:
Scene 3:
Key:
Ramp Rate:
Action Selector:
Scene 4:
Key:
Ramp Rate:
Action Selector:
Group
%
Group
%
Group
%
Group
%
Unit Type: KEYM8
Unit Address:
Location:
Trigger Group:
Scene 1:
Key:
Ramp Rate:
Action Selector:
Scene 2:
Key:
Ramp Rate:
Action Selector:
Scene 3:
Key:
Ramp Rate:
Action Selector:
Scene 4:
Key:
Ramp Rate:
Action Selector:
Group
%
Scene 5:
Key:
Ramp Rate:
Action Selector:
Group
Group
%
Scene 6:
Key:
Ramp Rate:
Action Selector:
%
Group
Group
%
Scene 7:
Key:
Ramp Rate:
Action Selector:
%
Group
Group
%
Scene 8:
Key:
Ramp Rate:
Action Selector:
%
Group
%
C-Bus Reserved Application Addresses
As you may know C-Bus Toolkit allows you to create new Applications each of
which can have up to 255 Group Addresses. But its important to note that some
Application Addresses are Reserved... for backward compatibility however Toolkit
allows you to create Applications at almost any Address.
Future releases of Toolkit will nag you if you use a reserved application, so get into
the habit now of using the right ones.
So what can you use safely? Here's a list of what Clipsal currently uses or has planned
for Application Addresses:
25 Temperature Broadcast
38 Room Control System (Clipsal 5 Star)
48 - 94 Lighting
95 Dali Gateway Interface Default Application
112 Ventilation (dampers and fans)
113 Irrigation Control
114 Pool, spa, pond and fountain control
136 Heating (Clipsal 5 Star)
202 Trigger Control (Clipsal SceneMaster, IR Output)
203 Enable Control
205 Audio/Visual
208 Security
209 Metering (gas, water, electricity, oil, etc)
223 Clock and Timekeeping
224 Telephony Status & Control
228 Measurement (light, liquid, temperature, etc)
255 C-Bus Network Management and Control
As you can see, there's 46 Application Addresses that are designated as "Lighting"
between 48 and 94 (inclusive). You can safely use ANY of these addresses without
fear that Clipsal will later allocate one of these to some form of specialised role on the
Network. Stick to these Addresses.
The default lighting application is 56. If you need a few more, start from 57 and work
up from there – it’s simple and easily recognisable.
The list above is not complete, we have roughly another 20 that we will reserve
shortly for other functions that will be supported by future hardware. Once again, they
will NOT be in the range 48-94.
NOTE #: 05-032-1
DATE: 6 December 2005
APPLICATION NOTE
KEY WORDS:
SHARING INTELLIGENT SOLUTIONS
Title:
Decimal, Hexadecimal and Percentage conversions
Products Applicable:
Any products that support remote triggering
This document displays the equivalent conversions between Decimal, Hexadecimal
and Percentages for C-Bus Addressing and Remote Triggering.
Decimal
Hexadecimal
Percentage
(d)
(h)
(%)
000
00
0
001
01
002
02
003
03
004
04
005
05
006
06
007
07
008
08
009
09
010
0A
011
0B
012
0C
013
0D
014
0E
015
0F
016
10
017
11
018
12
019
13
020
14
© Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd 2005. All rights reserved
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1 of 9
Decimal, Hexadecimal and Percentage conversions
021
15
022
16
023
17
024
18
025
19
026
1A
027
1B
028
1C
029
1D
030
1E
031
1F
032
20
033
21
034
22
035
23
036
24
037
25
038
26
039
27
040
28
041
29
042
2A
043
2B
044
2C
045
2D
046
2E
047
2F
048
30
049
31
050
32
051
33
052
34
053
35
054
36
© Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd 2005. All rights reserved
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
2 of 9
Decimal, Hexadecimal and Percentage conversions
055
37
056
38
057
39
058
3A
059
3B
060
3C
061
3E
062
3D
063
3F
064
40
065
41
066
42
067
43
068
44
069
45
070
46
071
47
072
48
073
49
074
4A
075
4B
076
4C
077
4D
078
4E
079
4F
080
50
081
51
082
52
083
53
084
54
085
55
086
56
087
57
088
58
© Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd 2005. All rights reserved
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
3 of 9
Decimal, Hexadecimal and Percentage conversions
089
59
090
5A
091
5B
092
5C
093
5D
094
5E
095
5F
096
60
097
61
098
62
099
63
100
64
101
65
102
66
103
67
104
68
105
69
106
6A
107
6B
108
6C
109
6D
110
6E
111
6F
112
70
113
71
114
72
115
73
116
74
117
75
118
76
119
77
120
78
121
79
122
7A
© Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd 2005. All rights reserved
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
4 of 9
Decimal, Hexadecimal and Percentage conversions
123
7B
124
7C
125
7D
126
7E
127
7F
128
80
129
81
130
82
131
83
132
84
133
85
134
86
135
87
136
88
137
89
138
8A
139
8B
140
8C
141
8D
142
8E
143
8F
144
90
145
91
146
92
147
93
148
94
149
95
150
96
151
97
152
98
153
99
154
9A
155
9B
156
9C
© Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd 2005. All rights reserved
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
5 of 9
Decimal, Hexadecimal and Percentage conversions
157
9D
158
9E
159
9F
160
A0
161
A1
162
A2
163
A3
164
A4
165
A5
166
A6
167
A7
168
A8
169
A9
170
AA
171
AB
172
AC
173
AD
174
AE
175
AF
176
B0
177
B1
178
B2
179
B3
180
B4
181
B5
182
B6
183
B7
184
B8
185
B9
186
BA
187
BB
188
BC
189
BD
190
BE
© Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd 2005. All rights reserved
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
6 of 9
Decimal, Hexadecimal and Percentage conversions
191
BF
192
C0
193
C1
194
C2
195
C3
196
C4
197
C5
198
C6
199
C7
200
C8
201
C9
202
CA
203
CB
204
CC
205
CD
206
CE
207
CF
208
D0
209
D1
210
D2
211
D3
212
D4
213
D5
214
D6
215
D7
216
D8
217
D9
218
DA
219
DB
220
DC
221
DD
222
DE
223
DF
224
E0
© Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd 2005. All rights reserved
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
7 of 9
Decimal, Hexadecimal and Percentage conversions
225
E1
226
E2
227
E3
228
E4
229
E5
230
E6
231
E7
232
E8
233
E9
234
EA
235
EB
236
EC
237
ED
238
EE
239
EF
240
F0
241
F1
242
F2
243
F3
244
F4
245
F5
246
F6
247
F7
248
F8
249
F9
250
FA
251
FB
252
FC
253
FD
254
FE
255
FF
© Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd 2005. All rights reserved
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
8 of 9
Decimal, Hexadecimal and Percentage conversions
Technical Support and Troubleshooting
For technical assistance call: 1300 722 247 (Australia)
0800 888 219 (New Zealand)
CIS web site:
http://www.clipsal.com/cis/
© Copyright Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd 2005. All rights Reserved. This material is copyright
under Australian and international laws. Except as permitted under the relevant law, no part of this
work may be reproduced by any process without prior written permission of and acknowledgement to
Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd.
Clipsal and C-Bus are registered trademarks of Clipsal Australia Pty Ltd.
The information in this document is provided in good faith. Whilst Clipsal Integrated Systems (CIS) has
endeavoured to ensure the relevance and accuracy of the information, it assumes no responsibility for
any loss incurred as a result of its use. CIS does not warrant that the information is fit for any
particular purpose, nor does it endorse its use in applications which are critical to the health or life of
any human being. CIS reserves the right to update the information at any time without notice.
CISF072/1
9 of 9
Memo
To
:
Subject :
TECH SUPPORT EMAIL:
All CIS customers within Australia & NZ
Date:
tech.training@cispl.com.au
07-06-2004
“Table: Recommended Maximum Quantities of electronic transformers on
specific Clipsal dimmers.”
If you are not aware of the table, its purpose is “to list various Clipsal Integrated Systems Leading
Edge type Dimmers and the recommended maximum quantities of electronic transformers that can
be connected to them.” The table is not applicable to the dimmers, 32E450TM, 32E500FM,
31E800T.
Listed Transformers:
The transformers listed on the table have previously been submitted by either the manufacturer or
in most cases by the contractors / installers who are using that particular transformer.
Based upon the capacitance loading and the V.A. rating of the transformer we have then
calculated the recommended maximum quantity of transformers that should be connected to our
dimmers. We have in the past, inspected transformers, to determine the capacitance (nF) loading
of the transformers. We wish to advise that we no longer provide this inspection service.
Supply of Formulas:
To give an installer the ability to work out how many electronic transformers can be fitted to a
Clipsal dimmer, we have documented the process / formulas that we use for the dimmer
calculations.
With the correct use of the supplied formulas, an installer will then be able to perform the
calculations based upon your preferred transformer.
The two required values from the transformer are:
¾ V.A rating
¾ Capacitance loading
V.A. Rating:
The Maximum V.A rating of the transformer is typically printed on the casing of the transformer
itself, so obtaining this should pose no problem. Note that we are referring to the maximum V.A of
the transformer itself, not the V.A. rating of any lamp or lamps attached to the transformer.
Capacitance Loading Value:
A higher value of capacitance ( typically > 100nF ) on a transformer will present a higher loading to
any “Leading Edge” dimmer controlling it, hence, the lower the capacitance, the better. Not all
transformers exhibit a capacitance loading effect. In most cases a capacitor is used to ensure
compliance with EMC standards. This in itself causes much of the capacitive loading effect.
“Trailing Edge” design dimmers do not suffer from capacitance loading.
The capacitance value will rarely be listed on the unit itself but may possibly be documented in its
instructions. If the capacitance value is not displayed, the installer will then be required to source
this value from where they purchased the transformer.
-2-
FORMULAS
1/ Standard Series, Leading Edge, High Power Dimmers, 32/1000 & 32/2400
STEP 1:
A
=
( Transformer ) V.A
( Transformer ) nF
If this value is less than “0.85”, then the transformer is deemed as not recommended, ( N R ) due
to its high capacitive loading in comparison to its V.A. output.
If this value is greater than “0.85”, then the transformer is deemed to have an acceptable
Capacitance to V.A ratio.
Based upon an acceptable result in “Step 1”, the following formula would then be used:
STEP 2:
“X” (Rounded Down) = ( Dimmer Channel ) Maximum V.A.
( Transformer ) V.A.
X = “the recommended maximum quantity of electronic transformers to be
connected to that dimmer channel.”
Note:
Whilst an electronic transformer may be listed as “not recommended” on the CIS Table;
“Recommended Maximum Quantities of electronic transformers on specific dimmers”, there is a
possibility that it may still be used, however, there is a limitation.
The limitation is that the dimmed circuit will need to be divided into parallel sub-circuits of 400 V.A.
or less. Each of these sub-circuits would then require 1 of the 32EIND inductors connected into it.
The 32EIND is a Clipsal product and can be ordered from normal distribution channels such as
Electrical Wholesalers.
-3-
2/ C-Bus Leading Edge dimmer formula for number of electronic transformers
The appropriate maximum “Capacitance and V.A” loadings for C-Bus Dimmers are listed in a table
on the last page of this document.
Note:
All 3 of the following steps must be completed in order to obtain the correct
recommended quantity of electronic transformers.
STEP 1:
“Value A” - the “maximum quantity of transformers based upon the transformers
individual nF loading on the dimmer channel”.
“Value A” (Rounded down) =
STEP 2:
“Value B”
Dimmer Channel Maximum Capacitance “nF”
Individual Transformer “nF”
- the “max quantity of transformers based upon the transformers
individual V.A Loading on the dimmer channel”.
“Value B” (Rounded Down)
=
Dimmer Channel Maximum “V.A.”
Individual Transformer “V.A.”
STEP 3:
Values “A” & “B” are then compared, the lesser value is then used as “X”.
Where
X = “the recommended maximum quantity of electronic transformers to be connected to
that dimmer channel.”
Example:
Step 1 -
Step 2 -
Din Dimmer (300nf)
transformer ( 100nf )
= 3
Din Dimmer ( 240VA )
transformer ( 60VA )
Step 3 -
Result:
= 4
Compare
“Step 1 Value = 3”
“Step 2 Value = 4”.
The lower value of “3” is used for how many transformers are “recommended”.
The maximum “Capacitance and V.A” loadings for C-Bus Dimmers are listed in a table on the last
page of this document or alternatively available from the Clipsal Integrated systems Website.
www.clipsal.com/cis
-4-
Relevant details of C-Bus Leading Edge dimmers.
PRO
OLD
DIN
C-Bus Leading Edge Dimmers
Part
Number
Number of
channels
Maximum nF
per channel
Maximum V.A.
per channel
L5508D1A
8
300
240
L5504D2A
4
300
480
5104D750
4
300
750
L5104D5
4
1000
1200
L5102D10
2
1000
2400
L5101D20
1
1000
4800
Note relating to the previously mentioned document
Document titled “Table: Recommended Maximum Quantities of Electronic transformers on specific
Clipsal dimmers”.
High Power Dimmers & C-Bus Dimmers
Various transformers on the table may be listed as “N C” or “not compatible” in some of the
columns. This is typically due to the manufacturer stating that the transformer is only suitable for
“TRAILING EDGE” type dimmers.
Any detail on this trailing edge dimming control requirement has either been printed on the product
itself or written in the manufacturers instructions supplied with the product.
High Power Dimmers only
Various transformers on the table may be listed as “N.R” or “not recommended”, this is due to the
ratio of transformer V.A. to the transformers capacitance. For further detail please refer back to
page 2 of this document.
Technical Support & Training Department
Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd,
tech.training@cispl.com.au
Ph: 1300 722 247 (within Australia)
C-Bus Unit Current Requirements
Part
Number
503X
R506X
5084, 5085,
5054, 5055
5082, 5084,
5086
5052, 5054,
5058
5104AM
5102RVF
5512, 550x
5112D….,510X
D…
L5504AMP
5034NIRT
5800WGA
5504GI
5104BCL
5031PE
5035NIRS
5000CT
5000CTC
5050CTC
5080CTC
5753
E5751
5100PC
5500NB
5100NA
5502DAL
5500NMA
5500PACA
5100T
560110, 560125
560884
L5508DSI
5500CN
5031V2TC7,
5031H2TC7
5750WP
Description
C-Bus
Current
(mA)
Key Input Unit Standard
Key Input Unit Reflection,
Key Input Unit DLT
18
18
22
Key Input Unit Saturn
22
Key Input Unit NEO
22
Analogue Output Unit
2 Channel Relay (36mA for programming only)
Relays, Dimmers
PRO Dimmer (60mA Internal Power Supply)
18
0
0
0
Analogue Output
C-Bus Infrared Transmitter (NIRT)
Wireless Gateway
General Input Unit
Bus Coupler
C-Bus Light Level Sensor
Scene Master
C-Bus Touch Screen B & W
C-Bus Touch Screen Colour
18
32
32
18
18
18
36
40
22
C-Bus Multi-Sensor
PIR Occupancy Sensor
PC Interface
Network Bridge
C-Bus Network Analyser
DALI Gateway
Network Monitor
Pascal Automation Controller
C-Bus Telephone Interface
Multi Room Audio Amplifier
Multi Room Audio Matrix Switcher (Internal 330mA supply).
DSI Gateway. (If no mains power connected 18mA for programming).
CNI (Separate 9 – 12v supply)
Digital Clock
18
18
32
18
20
32
18
32
18
22
0
0
0
18
Infrascan
18
C-Bus Installation Fault Finding Chart
The intention of this fault finding chart is to guide the user into deducing possible installation faults.
It is not exhaustive and with experience you may be able to short cut certain areas.
Start
Programming
or
communications problem.
Go to page 2
What is wrong?
Physical problem
No
Have you checked the
Output Unit?
Yes
Yes
Unit LED ON
or
Flashing
on
Output Unit
Does the Key
Input LED operate
when the
key is pressed
Flashing
Press Local Toggle button
for two seconds.
If still flashing,
check C-Bus wiring
for short circuit. *1
No
No Mains
Power Supply
Flashing
No
C-Bus LED ON?
No
Yes
Check wiring
No C-Bus power.
Check Power Supplies. *2
No Clock. *3
Check for short circuit
between C-Bus +ve & -ve
*1
Yes
C-Bus power is low.
Either remove some
input units, or
add power supplies.
This part of the physical check appears to be correct,
provided you have checked both inputs & outputs.
1
C-Bus Installation Fault Finding Chart
It is very important that the physical side of the installation is correct before continuing with this section.
Start
No or don’t know
Go back to page 1
Is the Physical
side working?
Yes
C-Bus to PC
Comms OK?
Yes
No
Yes
Is the correct comms
port selected
No
Select the correct
comms port
Don’t know
Use search for network
button to find correct
comms port, then select it.
No
Is the Unit/Comms
LED flashing
(even a small amount)?
Yes
C-Bus to PC
Comms OK?
Yes
Can the network be
No/ poor opened & scanned?
or intermittent
Yes
Check the status
of your burden. *4
No
There appears to be no
communications coming out
of your PC. *5
No
Check that the loads are
connected to the correct
outputs.
Are the correct
loads working?
Yes
It looks
like it’s all working
Using Toolkit on the application / group
node, highlight the relevant Group
Address and check the dependencies.
Edit units as required.
Using the application log on the relevant
application, press the key input and see if the
correct Group Address is being transmitted
on to the network. Edit units as required.
2
2
C-Bus Installation Fault Finding Chart
Note *1 Checking the Pink cat 5 between C‐Bus positive (Blue and Orange) and Negative (Blue/white and Orange/white). Use a multimeter start on the DC voltage range to confirm there is no voltage . Then change to the ohms range, and break the circuit down in to segments until the short can be identified. If the Unit LED is flashing, check for short circuit between C‐Bus negative and Brown/Brown‐White and C‐Bus negative and Green/Green‐White. Note *2 Power supply units check that there are sufficient Power supplies to power the system. Din rail output unit with power provide 200 mA Din rail stand alone PSU provides 350 mA Pro series dimmers provide 60 mA Typical current demands are PCI =32 mA PIR’s =18 mA Neo type Key Input =22 mA Standard Key input = 18 mA Mono touch screen = 40 mA Colour touch screen = 22 mA Note *3 If there is no clock present on a C‐Bus2 system, and you do not have an alternative device capable of generating a clock (with its clock enabled) that may be connected to the system then, use learn mode to enable the clock. Enter learn mode and wait until the unit light and C‐Bus light flash alternatively. This may take a while if after one minute the lights are not flashing alternatively then come out of learn mode and try again. For more info please see the training manual C‐Bus2 Learn Mode Operation and Programming, Part A Getting Started pages 6 –8. Note *4 Confirm you have one burden if suggested by toolkit, (as a general guide if you have less than 70 units you will need one burden). If you do not have a hardware burden on the network and appear to have comms problems adding a burden may help. If possible add a hardware burden, if not software one may be enabled using learn mode. See the training manual C‐Bus2 Learn Mode Operation and Programming, Part B Advance programming guide page 12. 3
C-Bus Installation Fault Finding Chart
Note*5 There appears to be no communications coming out of your computer. • Check the RS 232 cable possibly the easiest way would be to try another one • Are you using an USB to RS232 converter if so check that it is present on the device manager list and what comms port is it assigned to. Using the Help feature window provides type in device manager. Also have the drivers that come with the converter been installed see the manufacturer’s info. Intermittent Faults Intermittent faults are somewhat harder to diagnose. Check the following, which have proven to be some of the more common issues: C‐Bus cables all correctly terminated and dry. Check C‐Bus voltage is in the correct range. Add one extra unit at the far end of the C‐Bus network to see if the network fails. If either of the above, add an additional power supply. Check voltage as below: +
Each reading should be similar, if not, look for one of the C‐Bus lines gone down to earth. Possibly twisted around front plate screw of key input unit.
C‐Bus _
V
V
Earth
4
C-Bus training Course
Introduction to C-Bus
Assessment
Name: Date: Trainer: RESULTS Description Competency Achieved C-Bus terminology C‐Bus issues & problems Programming / Toolkit Fault Finding Revision Number: V1.2 © Copyright Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd 2006. All rights Reserved. Clipsal Integrated Systems is a division of Clipsal
Australia Pty Ltd ABN 27 007 873 529. This material is copyright under Australian and international laws. Except as permitted
under the relevant law, no part of this work may be reproduced by any process without prior written permission of and
acknowledgement to Clipsal Integrated Systems Pty Ltd.
Clipsal is a registered trademark of Clipsal Australia Pty Ltd.
The information in this manual is provided in good faith. Whilst Clipsal Integrated Systems (CIS) has endeavoured to ensure the
relevance and accuracy of the information, it assumes no responsibility for any loss incurred as a result of its use. CIS does not
warrant that the information is fit for any particular purpose, nor does it endorse its use in applications which are critical to the
health or life of any human being. CIS reserves the right to update the information at any time without notice.
V1.2 April 2006
Introduction to C-Bus Assessment
C-Bus terminology
1. What is the maximum current allowed on a C‐Bus network? 2. What is the maximum total cable length allowed on a C‐Bus network? 3. What cable core colours are used for the C‐Bus? 4. Name the five different address types used in C‐Bus programming. 5. Name three different categories of C‐Bus Unit. 6. What is the recommended maximum number of Units you can have on a single C‐Bus network? 7. A Network Bridge is a C‐Bus unit that passes C‐Bus commands between two networks while: •
Maintaining the same C‐Bus Clock on both networks. •
Maintaining electrical isolation between C‐Bus networks. •
Maintaining electrical isolation between C‐Bus and Ethernet networks. •
Maintaining electrical isolation between the PC’s Serial Port and C‐Bus.
8. What is the purpose of the Clock in a C‐Bus installation? •
To keep time •
To synchronise communications •
To operate timers •
To measure how long the C‐Bus has been operating C‐Bus training Course 1
Introduction to C-Bus Assessment
9. What is the purpose of the Burden in a C‐Bus installation? •
To correct network voltage •
To allow correct communications •
To load the network •
To allow the clock to operate 10. What is meant by the term “Tag” as used in C‐Bus programming? •
A “Tag” is used to label the project. •
A “Tag” is a meaningful name for a C‐Bus Group Address. •
A “Tag” is used to attach a C‐Bus unit to the bus. •
A “Tag” is used to terminate the C‐Bus. C-Bus issues & problems 1. What topologies can be used when connecting C‐Bus units on a single network? (Circle all that apply) •
Daisy Chain •
Star •
Combination Daisy Chain and Star •
Closed Ring 2. What is the maximum number of networks that can be connected in a ‘Daisy Chain” or series connection? 3. If the Unit LED & C‐Bus LED on a C‐Bus Output Unit are lit, does this indicate the status of the Network Burden? 4. What is the recommended minimum separation between a C‐Bus cable and a mains cable when run in parallel? 5. Can a DIN Rail Dimmer unit have its 240v inputs (control stage and switching stage) connected to different phases? C‐Bus training Course 2
Introduction to C-Bus Assessment
6. When Mains power is connected to a dimmer unit, and the local toggle indicator is OFF, what voltage can be measured at the load terminals with no load connected? 7. What is the recommended minimum C‐Bus voltage? 8. What methods may be used to connect C‐Bus cables together in a key input unit? (Circle correct answers). •
Screw terminals •
Soldering •
Crimping 9. When a C‐Bus cable must cross a mains cable, C‐Bus must have adequate segregation as well as crossing at an angle of: •
25 Degrees •
75 Degrees •
45 Degrees •
90 Degrees 10. Power supplies What is the minimum number of dimmer units with power supplies would you need to order to implement this installation correctly? Unit mA per unit Qty Total Current 6 Gang Saturn Key Input Unit 4 4 Gang Key Input Unit 1 DIN Rail PC Interface Unit 1 5 Gang DLT Input Unit (Neo) 3 Passive Infra‐Red Motion Detector 1 DIN Rail 8 Channel Dimmer, 1A per channel 3 Total Current
C‐Bus training Course 3
Introduction to C-Bus Assessment
Programming / Toolkit
Mark off the exercises in the following table as you complete them.
Essential Exercises
Optional Exercises
Exercise No.
Completed
Exercise No.
Completed
1
11
2
12
3
13
4
14
5
15
6
7
8
9
10
Fault finding
The Training Board has been programmed with some deliberate faults.
Using Toolkit, find and fix these faults. Document what you do in the following table.
Fault Description
C‐Bus training Course Solution
4
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising