is %11v ECLECTIC ENGINEERING - page 30

is %11v ECLECTIC ENGINEERING - page 30

$4.00

August

1985

Volume

16

-

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VIDEO BROADCAST

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ECLECTIC ENGINEERING

-

page

30

FROM

THE

SPEED_

OF

W

BEEN

'p

2

August

1985

For years, sloppy tape transportation and handling have made the audio engineer's day much harder than it had to be.

This tormenting state has come to an end with the introduction of

Sony's

APR-5000

2

-track analog re- corder, available in a center -track time code version.

The APR- 5000's precise handling and numerous advanced features make the audio engineer's day run

APR- 5000's

16

-bit much smoother. For example, the microprocessor manages audio cision that's

8 alignment with a pre- humanly impossible.

And the additional

-bit microprocessor opens the way for extremely sophisticated serial communications. In tandem, they reach a truly unique level of intelligence.

Not only does the

APR -5000 do its job well; it does it consistently. The die -cast deck plate and

Sony's long- standing commitment to quality control maintain that the

APR-5000 will hardly need time off.

All of which results In a consistent sonic perform- ance that'll stand even the most critical audio profes- sionals on their ears.

For a demonstration of the re- corder that transports to a new fidelity analog audio high, contact your nearest Sony office:

Eastern Region (201) 368

-5000;

40.

Southern Region

(615)

366 -0333;

Central Region

(312) 773

-6000;

Western Region

(2l3)

537

-4300;

Headquarters

(201)

930

-6145.

SONY

Professional Audio

(.

1485

Som Corp. of America. Sony is a registered trademark of Sony Corp.

For additional information circle

#1

1

THE SP11

C M

11

N N

I

O

N E r,vo wry pleasant things happen vvhe^

SP/I p; olector

I

I. You hear uns, vocals

- instruments ónn.n frequency ri.lyP

2 Hearing fatigue lax) distortion cadse d by a+rd excessive high

-eni fD is practica4

The technical term for die

DOD

SPII

'-ence is

"psyrhoacoL- tic audio orocessor.

'

Yes, the SPII is a very sophistcated

; ricce of electronic hanehwork

It is net a

Triter, egralizer er : mrnpressor. The SPtI s unique ore-Herr is designed to

NODI

_

C N /1 N N

NII

IN

I l

I

W

O

I

C O SOLO

O11I1

PtOC1II

LIYiI

EXR SPII PNOIIC

ION

R660

'though the

SPII is the perfect compliment for just about mixing or recording application it is also ideal fo; live

Used on solo instruments or vocals it wiil rA von the subtlest passage or whí_pe

'per reaches of the human cessity of increasing t.

It

Ls staf

For add tional

DOD

Bet-oohs

Corporation. 563.9 South

Vey

Lane

SO

Lake

C re Uran

81107.410 circle o3

The AMEK

M -2500

can be video configured for applications in stereo teleproduction and music recording.

All AMEK consoles are built with the finest components and are entirely hard- wired- even the patch bay. By avoiding high- speed manufacturing techniques and other short cuts, you're assured of superior performance and that consistently unbeatable AMEK transparent sound.

36 to

56

VCA

Inputs

36 to

56 In

-line Monitors

24 to

48

Outputs

4

Band Variable

Q

Parametric

EQ

Variable

Hi Pass

/Low

Pass

Filtering

ß

EFX

Sends

VU or40 segment

PPM

/VU

LED

Metering

Patching

10

VCA to over

1000 points

Subgroups

Solo in place

Two Line

Inputs per channel

Differential or

Transformer Balancing

Full

Master Status Switching

Automation compatible with

MasterMix,

Massenburg, Arms, and Optimix

AMEK M -2500

SVT

56

\

48

Paramount Pictures

Hollywood, California

Call or write for more

AMEK's complete line information about of consoles.

In the

US:

AMEK CONSOLES, INC.

10815

Burbank Boulevard, North Hollywood, California

91601

Phone (818) 508 -9788 Telex 662526

In

Canada: AUDIO

CONCEPT

3400 Losch Blvd.,

Unit

14, St-

Hubert,

Québec, Canada

J3Y 5T6

Phone (514) 445 -2662 Telex 05- 268728

In the UK: AMEK

SYSTEMS & CONTROLS, LTD.

Islington Mill,

James

Street, Salford M3 5HW,

England

Phone (061) 834 -6747 Telex 668127

For additional information circle .116

PRODUCING AUDIO FOR TAPE RECORDS FILM LIVE

PERFORMANCE VIDEO

& BROADCAST

-

August

1985

Contents

-

Volume

16

-

Number

4

-

Production

Viewpoint

-

Making the transition from musician to second engineer, to receiving the big break

...

Daniel

Lazerus...

sliding into the "hot seat" for The

Nightfly project with producer

Gary Katz, and subsequent sessions with and the original cast album of The Gospel at Colonus.

Interviewed by Ralph Jones

John

Denver, Diana

Ross, Eddie Murphy, page

30

-

Live- Performance Sound

-

TOTO WORLD TOUR: SOUND

SYSTEM

DESIGN

BY

SCHUBERT

SYSTEMS GROUP

A

Virtual "Recording Studio on by

David Scheirman on the Road," with two

-stage keyboard mixers and myriad signal processing page

16

-

Visual Music Scene

-

The on by

Growing Influence of

Music

Video Production

Today's Recording Studio Industry

Adrian Zarin

-

Digital Production

- page

62

Digital an

SYNCHRONIZING DIGITAL

MASTERING AND

MULTITRACK SYSTEMS

WITH ANALOG

FILM AND VIDEO TRANSPORTS

TAPE,

Transports:

Why are they

SO

Different from Analog Machines? introduction by Rodney Pearson page

70

Synchronization and Editing Functions of the Studer

D820X

-2

Digital

Recorder by David t4'alstra page

73

Synchronizing

3M

Digital Multitrucks with Film and Video

Transports by Frank

R.

Dickinson page

76

Synchronizing Sony

PCM- 1610, P('M-

3120/3202 and

PCM -3324

Digital

Systems by

Curtis ('hair page

78

Synchronization of Mitsubishi

X-

800/850 and

X -811

Digital

Transports by Cary Fischer page

83

The EIAJ-

Format

Digital

Processor

Comes of Age:

A

Review of Available

Hardware, Transfer and Editing Systems by

David Smith page 86

Digital

Re-

Recording and Remix of Vintage Jimi Hendrix Tapes

Using

3M

DMS and JVC

DAS -900 by Joe

Gastwirt page

87

-

Musical

Creativity

-

SYNTHESIZERS

IN

THE STUDIO:

New

Technology and a New by

Quint

B.

Randle

Production Philosophy

MIDI

Update Report from Summer

NAMM by Bobby

Nathan

Exhibition page

92 page

101

-

The

Directory

-

Time -Domain Processors

Lines, and Special Effects Units, including Reverb

Systems,

Delay

Phasers, Flangers and Pitch Shifters page

116

-

Equipment Assessment

-

SONY APR -5002 ANALOG

TWO

-TRACK RECORDER

Reviewed by

Peter Butt

-

Departments

-

Letters to the Editor

News and

Studio Update

New

Industry

Products

-

page page

Advertiser's

Index

-

-

page

/04

144

O page

6

Exposing Audio Mythology, by

John

H.

Roberts

Developments

158

-

page

Final Stage

Classified

-

-

23 page page

-

154 page

110

/.5 page

132

ENGINEER PRODUCER'

-

the magazine to exclusively serve the

RECORDING STUDIO and CONCERT SOUND industries

...

those whose work involves the engineering and production of commercially marketable product for:

-

Records and Tape

Film

Live

Performance -

Video and Broadcast

-

the magazine produced to relate recording

ART

... to recording

SCIENCE

... to recording

EQUIPMENT.

ZZEZ o

Illa

Publisher

Editor

MARTIN GALLAY

MEL LAMBERT

-

Consulting Editors

-

ROMAN OLEARCZUK

DOUGLAS HOWLAND

LARRY

BLAKE

DAVID SCHEIRMAN

...

Technical Operations

...

Broadcast

...

Film

..

Live Performance

Art Director

Production Editor

Advertising Manager

Advertising /Sales

Business Manager

Circulation /Subscription

Manager

HOLLY FERGUSON

ROB

TUFFLY

LAUREL CASH

RHONDA KOHLER

V L.

GAFFNEY

BONI WISH

"RECORDING -Engineer. Producer (ISSN 0034-

1673) is published bimonthly for yearly subscription rates detailed below by Gallay

Communications,

Inc., 1850 Whitley Suite

220,

Hollywood,

CA 90028. Second -class postage paid at Los

Angeles, CA and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER: Send address changes to RECORDING- Engineer /Producer

P.O. Box

2449,

Hollywood,

CA 90078."

United

States

(Surface Mail)

$24.00

United States (First Class)

$30.00

Canada

$24.00

Foreign

545.00

(Foreign subscriptions payable in

U.S. funds only by bank check or money order.) amt:

0

B

RECORDING Engineer Producer is not responsible for any claim by any person based on the publication by RECORDING Engineer/

Producer of material submitted for publication.

Material appearing in

RECORDING Engineer,

Producer may not be reproduced without written consent of the publisher. the a.

i

To contact RECORDING- Engineer /Producer

Write:

P.O Box

2449,

Hollywood,

CA 90078,

Telephone: (213) 467 -1111,

FAX: (213) 469 -0513

IMC EMail: REP

-US

August

1985

0

R -e

/p

5

Dews

Letters

Views

R

-e/ p 6

DOLBY STEREO

ENCODING TECHNOLOGY from:

Gary Reber, VP

Tate

Audio

Los Angeles,

CA

This letter is to call attention to an omission referenced to the

June

1985 article by

Larry Blake, entitled "Mixing

Techniques for Dolby

Stereo Film and

Video Releases." 'l'he Dolby

Stereo matrix decoding circuitry utilized in the

Dolby Cat.150 card that two :35mm optical film speaker channels. thus completing the encode decode

4

-2

-4 process, is

System. 'l'ate

Audio, converts the tracks into four the'l'ate the technology company who developed the full -logic directional enhancement matrix decod- ing circuitry, licensed its proprietary surround stereo technology to

Dolby

Laboratories in 1977 for exclusive pro- fessional motion picture soundtrack production and theatre exhibition.

The Tate System, as configured in the

Dolby Cat.150 the card is presently in use in vast majority of the current 6,20( theatres worldwide equipped with

Dolby

Cinema Processors. It is the Tate

Sys- tem tchnology which has provided the excellent separation and other perfor-

ï

4e7X,f

NEW

4877 mance attributes of matrix decoding in the

Dolby

Stereo cinema system.

As of last year, Tate

Audio modified its position with respect to

Dolby Labora- tories and, as such. Dolby

Laboratories no longer has an exclusive license with

Tate

Audio.

Larry

Blake replies:

I tion take issue with

Mr.

Reber's implica- that logic

Tate

Audio

"developed the full surround sound techniques used since

- directional enhancement matrix decoding circuitry" used in Dolby SVA

1977.

11=9111111M d

:

t!

N i t'r

C.t

..

i"

í-/-

!¡.: r

-

- a

+ tif id

¡::

WORLD

AUDIO

Mercury

Street

San Diego, CA 92111

11111111111 w"Ma

AIWA

1111MA understanding, no theater decoder prior to that time contained Tate

Therefore,

I do not

Mr. Reber could

"Dolby Stereo

ICs. understand how possibly state that the matrix decoding circuitry

...

I is

I

...

the Tate System,- since Dolby had licensed stereo motion pictures for over two years prior to their involve- ment with

My

1981

Tate

Audio. article had already outlined the history of the Dolby Stereo, and

I thought it more important in to concentrate on the practical aspects of mixing for Dolby

Stereo release. The only news the new article is

Reber's

Dolby undergo tionship last sentence, Tate Audio and

Laboratories a change

- that

I in

Tate components in

June possibly omitted that, as stated did indeed their business

Dolby is no

1985 from in Mr. recently rela- longer using their theater

As stated in my

February

19211

R

-e p article titled Mixing Dolby

Stereo

Film

Sound, the first:35mm Dolby

Stereo film with surround decoding was

A

Star

Is

Born, released in late

1976.

All of the

Dolby

Stereo films released in 1977 and

19723

Encounters of the Third Kind.

Saturday

Night Feuer. Grease and Superman were

- including

Star

Wars. Close

116A

B cinema

Sansui

QS matrix decoding.

- exhibited with the original Cat. decoder card employing

The Cat.150 cinema decoder card using Tate

ICs was not in theaters until

Spring

1979; again, this was already stated in my 1981 article. As is my

UNDfq

Over

100 lines

Professional

.c>

OM low alb

NW

Ino

Audio

Sales

1-

800

-854 -2005 except California (619) 569 -1944 equipment.

CARE AND

REPAIR OF THE

STUDIO PATCH BAY from:

Ian Eales, chief

engineer,

Garden Rake

Music, mx

Audio

One of the most some items in potentially trouble- the studio is the patch bay, but it really needn't be if a little lied. and Phil Mendelson,

Services

maintenance and common sense is app-

Before we blame the patch bay totally, we should point out the problems we see that most of can be attributed instead to the patch cords themselves.

The air of our cities is not the best, to say the least; a multitude of pollutants are present in the air from automobiles and industrial sources. These react with the metal on the patch cords and jacks to form a tough oxide, which the degrades quality of the signal passing through them. What is required is a method to remove the oxide that metal. Any cleaner which does this without leaving behind any waxy residue can be used to clean patch cords. than

-new connector. has built up on the

A metal polish such as Mother's Mag

Polish does a great job.

Take a clean, lint

-free cloth, put some cleaner on it, and rub the connector tip. With another clean, lint

-free cloth, rub the cleaner off and, presto, you have a shiny, better

-

Another quick way to clean patch cords is possible more expensive, but takes much less time and may be more economical if you have a great many to clean. Find a machine shop with a buf- fing wheel, and ask if you can use it or rent time on it for about a hour.

Either use a cleaner like

Mother's, or a com- mercial buffing compound that they probably have at the machine shop.

Apply a small amount of compound to the buffing wheel, and then buff the tip of the patch cord.

A little practice will

August

1985

An age old question that can now be answered in are literal terms; the people

Showco, the answer is

Crown.

Consider the major tour.

Each move a major task.

Truckload after truckload of sound and lighting equipment must be put up and torn down, more often than not, overnight.

In most cases the awesome responsibility for a successful technical performance rests squarely on the shoulders of Showco.

A tour company with a client list that reads like Billboard's Top

100,

Showco has been at the forefront of this highly specialized field for years.

Their reputation stems from a finely tuned marriage of technology and sweat. We are proud of the many years we have been involved in

Showco's efforts and our new

Micro-

Tech'"

1000 power amplifier dramatically illustrates the value of this relationship.

Innovative Crown technology shaped by advice from Showco has produced a more powerful, lighter and smaller amplifier ideal for the touring professional. Higher power, less weight and less rack space translate into critically needed efficiency on the road.

Currently on arenas, and

28 new tour with system ever designed

Showco once the largest for indoor again relies on the power and dependability of the

Crown product.

134

Crown

PSA

-2s the power

--

Micro-Tech

1000s supply in excess loudspeakers. of

200,000 watts to drive over

16 tons of

The performance of the new

MT

-1000 further strengthens the dependability of Crown amplifiers. The only reason

Showco has had amps is to touch their new to move them. And move they have,

78 shows in

52 cities without a failure of any kind. Not surprising for a

Crown product but unheard of in any product fresh from the assembly line.

Months of

Showco's heavy duty field testing has established the MT-

1000's reliability even before it hit the market.

At your next concert take a look beyond the performers; chances are you will find Showco and the driving force of Crown.

Crown International, Inc.,

1718

West

Mishawaka Road.,

Elkhart,

Indiana

46517. (219) 294 -8000

crown®

August

1985

R

-e

/p

7

For additional information circle

#5

64

See

the first console specifically built for track at digital recording

the

Newyork

AE

S

Designed for the world's largest and most sophisticated recording studios, the

SUPERSTAR analog console with the is a

20

-bit performance, specifications, and functions necessary for digital recording. The

SUPERSTAR is totally modular and totally expand- able, and features

64 mixing busses for recording to two

32

-track tape recorders.

DESIGNED FOR

DIGITAL

Through critical analysis of design, and testing and re- testing of compo- nents, the signal path and sound qual- ity of this console is optimized for digi- tal recording.

Quad

Eight, as a part of the Mitsubishi Pro Audio Group, developed this console as the perfect companion to digital as multitracks such

Mitsubishi's new

X -850 32- channel recorder.

64 MIXING

BUSSES

The

SUPERSTAR has

64 mixing busses controlled from a central assign panel and readout. The

72 by 64 output matrix uses logic- controlled summing bus switching, providing 64 instantly selectable output busses.

Using its own memory for five complete presets, it also allows automation con- trol via a serial communication port.

COMPUMIX IV

AUTOMATION

A 32

-bit master processing com- puter records data on an

80 megabyte

Winchester hard disk in real time for unprecedented accuracy in an automa- tion system. This fourth

-generation design stores four instantly accessible real time mixes plus eight compressed mixes on the hard disk simultaneously, and transfers compressed mixes to and from floppy disk.

A distributed multi- processing system, Compumix IV has

Mitsubishi

X -850

32-

Channel Digital Audio

Recorders individual computers handling dedi- cated functions at different levels of the system architecture.

INTELLIGENT DIGITAL FADER

With its own microprocessor, the

IDF can operate standing alone or coupled to the automation system.

Using a monolithic encoder direct digital

8

-bit

/fader and a membrane touch panel inputing the

10

-bit internal pro- cessor, exact dB values are calculated using

14

-bit arithmetic, displayed, and converted to DC using a

12

-bit

D /A. All functions are at

10 times scanning rate for

Vio frame mute accuracy, and fader smoothing algorithm. There are

16 nested groups, and any module can b assigned master without changing i individual function.

The

VCA circuitry is on a sep e

PC card ule PC that plugs onto the mai board. Different VCAs be easily substituted.

PLUG -IN EQUALIZER

Finally, there's a choice!

The

SUPERSTAR in on each input module. Normally delivered with a four -band parametric equalizer with variable frequency dwidth, and peak/dip level; o are available.

Each module as a variable concentric high pass, low pass filter with individual in/out buttons.

AUTOMATED EQUALIZER

Each channel module has been designed to accept an izer, making the automated

SUPERSTAR equal- the most advanced console available.

PLUG

-IN PREAMPLIFIER

Each module's microphone pream- plifier is also of top panel plug -in design.

Transformers

-or

trans- formerless differential, the choice is yours. And new technology can be in- stantly added to your console.

AES

Booths

717 -724

SMPTE, Los

Angeles

Booth 1320

FOR

WORLD -CLASS STUDIOS

The

Super

by

Quad e.qh[

be connected to the indicator with only the peak signal shown, without addition from the other samples.

MODULE FEATURES

Each module is a dual in

-line design with separate channels for recording and monitor /mixdown. Main fader (or

VCA), equalizer, filter, auxiliary sends, and line trim can be switched to either channel. Each input module has eight auxiliary sends configured as four mon- aural and two stereo sends, with pan- ning.

They are switchable as pairs to either recording channel or monitor.

Monitor /mixdown channel is selectable to two stereo outputs for simulta- neously making two different mixes.

All output busses are differential bal- anced with optional transformers. For added overall control, each module has a switch

(AGM) which allows it to become an audio sub

-master for a group of input modules. A signal presence/ peak dual

LED circuit on each module indicates peak overload at microphone preamplifier out, or equalizer out, or fader out. Unique circuitry allows all to

BAR GRAPH METER

Above each module is a 60- segment

LED vertical bar level meter. The metering system is switchable to VU or peak ballistics with changeable electro- luminescent scales for each, VCA level indication, or two sets of spectrum ana- lyzers in

VI octave increments.

TOTALLY MODULAR FRAME

The SUPERSTAR console is con- structed of individual housing sections of eight modules each. The console is not limited to just a few standard frame sizes, but may be ordered with any number of inputs.

Interwiring of con- sole sections and input /output connec- tions is all with shielded plug

-in ribbon cable. High quality bantam jacks are on

PC boards, arranged module by mod- ule, and plug into the mother boards by shielded ribbon cable. This feature, along with the modular frame, makes this the only truly field- expandable console.

OPTIONAL OVERBRIDGE

An overbridge is available for mounting above the primary meter bridge to house additional accessories.

LIMITER/COMPRESSOR/GATE

This is a plug

-in option for the meter overbridge.

It is wired directly in

-line with each channel, or as a peripheral patchable processor. More than just an accessory to the module, it is a full

- function studio -quality leveling amplifier.

AFFORDABLE DIGITAL

The

SUPERSTAR costs less than other world -class consoles. And a digital package with a

Mitsubishi multitrack can save you even more.

SSL. SUPERSTAR. at

MITSUBISHI PRO

AUDIO GROUP

DIGITAL

ENTERTAINMENT

CORPORATION

Headquarters:

225

Parkside Drive, San Fernando, CA 91340

Phone

(818) 898 -2341

Telex 311786

New York:

Suite

1530, 555 W.

57th

Street,

New York, NY 10019

Phone

(212) 713 -1600

Nashville:

2200

Hillsboro Road, Nashville, TN 37212

Phone

(615) 298 -6613

Telex 703547

Canada:

363

Adelaide Street

E.,

Toronto, ONT. M5A 1N3

Phone

(416) 865 -1899

United Kingdom:

1

Fairway Drive, Greenford, MIDDX UB6 8PW Phone (01) 578 -0957

Telex 923003

NEVE.

See them all before you decide.

August

1985

El

R

-e

/p

9

For additional information circle

#6

The greatest

innovation

in

audio

mixing has just gotten better:

Necam

96.

Picture courtesy

Atlantic

Studios, N.Y.

The challenge:

Take a technological triumph.

Necam II, a computer- assisted audio by

tni:in,

loaded with exciting features. system, and

nuke

it better making it faster. more infor

-native, more intelligent and

The result:

Necam

-96

Incredible speed:

Feather-

tolh

sensitive faders eliminate hundreds of intermediate steps

5 r lightning -fast operation.

'total Information

ColorII'idc

)

Display: Our high

-resolution display tells where von glance, including time code

nlc

ire names. at a event times, scene changes and more: all labels. mutes. stores and events can he

ra1idl

changed.

I

Unique Intel

The faders move to

Ilback:

With or without updates.

whek

they need to be automatically

-

no PEC/Direct comparison needed. Sophisticated effects build up a snap.

Smart

Keys:

Our human- engineered software is the fastest ever developed to eliminate repetitive keystrokes.

Technological Sophistication:

Necam

96 will interface with any synchronizer as master or slave; read

SMIYTE time code, foot tacho pulses.

/frame counts, or even r

1

-I

7àke the next step. For further information call

Neve at

(203) 744 -6230 or write:

RI 'PERT

NEVI: INCORPORATED: IlLrlshire

(213) 874-8124 RUPERT NEVE OF CPS

IDA. racy

055

-62171 NINE. itdustrial

'ark.

Bethel.

('l'

06801(203)744-6B°

Telex

969638.7533

Sunset

Blvd.. Hollywood. ('A

90046

Ill).

repn-aettled by: Sonotechnique.

2585 Bates. Suite 304. Montreal.

P.Q.

H35

1A9

Canada

(514) 739 -3368

ELEctiu:NIC$

INTFRT4

I

ION.l.. I:rI).

Cambridge

House.

Mebourn.

Royston.

Hertfordshire. S686AU England

Phone

(1)763)

60776 RU 'I:1 -U NEVE

! imhI1:

6100

Darmstadt Bismarckstrasse

114.

West

German

Phone (06151) 81764.

tell how much

When it compound to apply. starts taking too long to clean a connector, apply more compound. With this method you can clean about

WO patch cords in an hour. When done, check to make sure there isn't any excess cleaner on any of the connectors that could recontaminate the patch hay.

Once these steps have been taken, it is likely that most of the patch bay prob- lems will already have disappeared. If problems are still being encountered, then the patch jacks themselves need attention. The environment in a record- ing studio is very dry, due to heat pro- duced by the equipment and air condi- tioning. This makes for an environment prone to generating high static particles which, in turn, attracts small airborne particles of dust into the studio. Invari- ably, some of this dust settles into the patch hay causing the familiar crac- kling when a patch is made.

Particles of dust in the patch hay can best be removed with high- pressure compressed air. The patch bay should be

If removed from its freely blasted phantom with mounting and be the compressed air. powering is employed on the microphone hay, the voltage supply should be turned off to avoid any danger of shorting the supply to ground while removing the hay. After the dust has been removed, a very small amount of contact cleaner, such as Cramolin

R2, may be applied and the bay then blasted again to remove any excess

Cramolin.

If the bay is particulary dirty, it may be necessary to insert patch cards to open the normals to remove the contami- nants caught between the points. It must be stressed that only small amounts of Cramolin should be used, and infrequently.

Because it is imprac- tical to use

Cramolin in bottled form on patch jacks, great care should he taken with the over

-use; spray, as this often leads to the use of the

R2

(diluted) for- mulation is acceptable.

One common misconception is that an abrasive is required to remove oxide and contact: the action of inserting the plug wipes action of contaminants when, in contact area. Experience shows fact, the patch jack with its mating plug is designed as a self -cleaning contact: the inserting the plug wipes the that burnishing with an abrasive might show an immediate improvement in performance, but only insofar as it has removed the contaminants. Burnishing can compromise the original com- patibility of the mating surfaces. Furth- ermore, continued burnishing eventu- ally removes enough metal contact loading is no longer possible; this is especially true with relay con- tacts with small contact areas. In the case of contacts that have that been proper plated or flashed with a conductive surface, the consequences of burnishing are obvious.

One further consequence of burnishing

(or using any foreign metal in a jack), is the depositing of a dissimilar metal onto the original contact surface. This is a potentially serious hindrance to the

Editor's

Note:

R

-e' p welcomes short

"Hits and Tips" itenis such as this

Technical note from Ian Eales and Phil

Mendelson. Send them c/o The Editor to the address given on the Contents page. d

`

t

passage of audio signals, due to the pos- sible creation of a metal

-oxide diode.

It should be noted ces.

° um. that most t

rg

tz

o<t

`Nher ``°ate dup a

``V

S ory

patch bay problems are a result of foreign substan-

If steps are taken to prevent these contaminants from entering the bay, problems will be kept to a minimum. For example, a simple plexiglass cover over a horizontal patch bay can make a big difference. especially if smokers put their ash trays nearby.

Again, it must he stated that the patch cord is responsible for the vast majority of problems.

If the cleaning process is repeated every three months or so, you will have better sound for years. and the patch bay will last a very long time.

When you work hard to make the very best very best duplicate. The original tape possible you deserve the trouble with most duplicators is that the copies are never as good as the tually indistinguishable from the original

- whether your masters are mono or stereo. open reel or cassette.

Only Sony Duplicators offer the unique ferrite and ferrite heads. These remarkable heads not only produce crisper, cleaner. more precise sound, but are guaranteed against wear for two years. Equally unique. only Sony Duplicators are expandable to

43 positions.

But then, with Sony's years of experience in the field of audio, these features are hardly surprising. Contact us for the name of your local authorized dealer.

COMMUNICATION WITH

R

-E

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-e

/p offices can now use

FAX transmissions, as well as

Telex via our

IMC EMailbox.

The

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Group

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August

1985

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EXPOSING

AUDIO

MYTHOLOGY

Laying to Rest Some of the Pro

-Audio

Industry's

More Obvious "Old Wives'

Tales"

by

John

H.

Roberts

This month we audible of power supply parameters. In part two,

I move on to will look significance of subjective listening tests. into the will

- consider some more aspects kHz, and found PSR

Rs in the 30 to 60 (IR range.

I t is also worth noting that op- amps v"ill often have a at their rails: pius and different

PSRR minus ore amplifier that power-

I supply measured

...

('an

You?

October

1983 naire felt that power supplies could aud- ibly affect the sound quality of signal processing gear. Some others have gone as

.lust Listen to

Supply

'l'he

Will

You!

That Power majority of respondents to our

"(olden far as to claim the

Ears" question- ability to hear different decoupling capacitors in equip- ment power supplies.

'I'he supply guess principle specification used to describe a given circuit's sensitivity to interaction

(and from the word this

"vocabulary word is

PSRR, or Power

Supply Rejection Ratio.

As you

"ratio," month's might

PSRR is usually specified in decibels; popular op- amps range can he typically specify

PSRR in the of

90 to

1(10

(IB.

Discrete circuits much better, or much worse. the simple one- gain stage with transistor

(or one -tube) having zero dB, or no rejec- tion at all of power- supply interference.

As with other specifications we've discussed in this series, there are subtle- ties to

PSRR. the correct

To keep interpretation of this discussion manage- able,

I would like to performance audio limit it to high

- circuits using op -amps.

The first subtlety to proper interpreta- tion of PSRR is understanding that number commonly quoted the only repres- of ents performance at a spot frequency say

60 or

120

Hz. As is true amp by negative feedback, the of most op- characteristics that are improved loop gain required for cause a falling open

- stability will commensurate performance degradation with increasing frequency.

I measured a few popular op

-amps at

20

PROFESSIONAL MUSIC ANALYSIS

Readers interested in taking advantage of the services of Professional Music Analysis, a company offering evaluation programs for engineers, producers and musicians intending to break into the music business

(see: Jim

Riordan's article on PMA published on page

32 of the February issue) can reach

PMA at the following address:

Professional

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Katella

Avenue, Anaheim, CA

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We did not include address details in the

February article because, at the time of its preparation, PMA was planning to relocate to new offices in

Anaheim

-

Editor. the

TRI

..

8

4,

SERIES

or

16

Bus

8

routing

or

16

- exhibited a

20

-dB difference.

Another subtlety to using

PSRR is understanding that the specified rejec- tion is referenced to the input.

There- fore, he the op

-amp's closed -loop gain must subtracted from the PSRR to refer- ence it to the an op

-amp output signal. Forexample, with

30 dB of

PSRR operat- ing at a closed -loop gain of

40 dB final rail

Ill dB! piece will actually boost any signal present on the power supply

The of information that is important for putting a consideration of

PSRR signal into perspective is:

What kind of will be present on the power

- supply rails under normal operation?

I will further break down this power

- supply signal down to two types: power- supply induced: and signal induced.

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Power -supply induced noise would be the ripple in a typical unregulated supply, or the hiss and much lower

-level ripple present in a typical regulated supply. The signal

-induced component of power -supply noise would be duct of power the pro- supply impedance, and changing load current being drawn.

Today, very few high -performance audio circuits use unregulated power supplies, since three -terminal regula- tors are not very expensive

Iless than

$1.

However, the fact the open

-loop gain and thus PSRR is maximum near ripple frequency closed -loop squeak by ing to note dB gain circuit without one. It is disappoint- that pre -amps with their of closed -loop means some gain that could possibly consumer

RIAA at

60

Hz a low phono

-dictated

60 still use unregulated supplies.

No matter how well they are shielded, ripple will power- appear in the output. supply

Inexpensive three -terminal regulators attenuate the ripple an additional

70 dB, making it a non -issue for most op -amp circuits. Since on low such regulators are based

-performance op -amp technology, their outputs contain notable wideband noise.

This noise present, ripple and reduced, but still discrete or can be audible hybrid circuits in that simple exhibit poor PSRR.

Signal- induced power supply noises are a bit more complex to analyze; they are typically induced by the amplifier delivering current to a load. In some cases driving feedback networks can draw significant current.

I have seen several analyses incorrectly blame capa- citors used in equalizer or frequency

- shaping feedback networks for drawing unlimited charging currents under transient conditions. In all cases the maximum current will be defined and limited by a

As can current bee that resistance. seen from must be

Figure supplied by

1A, the the op- amp output is a simple function of the input voltage divided by

R2.

In Figure

1B, the output current will be equal to the input current, which will also equal the input voltage divided by

R2.

In both cases the current will be completely independent of the value of

Cl. Where some designers have gotten into trouble

c

á

FREQUENCY

-y

Figure

2:

Output impedance of unregulated power supply. is making

R2 too small for drive to appropriate levels. the op -amp to

A case where capacitance can and has caused problems is when it is connected the new

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between

No an op

-amp's output and ground. designer would (should

?) ever do this on purpose, but connecting even several feet of trusty old shielded wire (at

30 pF per foot) has much the same effect.

For this reason it is a good practice to use build -out resistors

(50 to 500 series with cables to decouple ohms) in this cap- acitance from the op -amp.

For the sake of perspective,

I should note not the dominant consequence of not cable that power -supply ance, which will form interaction is decoupling your cables.

All op

-amps have some internal series -output resist- an

RC with the capacitance, delaying (phase shifting) the feedback signal. This phase shift eats up valuable stability phase margin

(see my April

1984 column), often causing spurious oscilla- tion.

(

"Gee Beaver, how come it doesn't oscillate on the bench

?

")

In fact, it is not that uncommon to encounter marginal circuits with that rising called on to break into oscillation

We amps have a PSRR frequency. Since an when the capacitance of a 'scope probe is con- nected to the output. have already determined that that op op- deteriorates

-amp be quency, drive cable capacitance will pulling more current with rising fre- power let's take a look at how the supply will perform.

The simple unregulated power supply will have a predominantly capacitive output impedance, falling with increas- ing frequency until reaching resonance and then rising again. Resonance (this month's second "vocabulary word

")

1

000 Micro Farad

35 Volt

E

Aluminum letirolybc

Capacitor

THREE TERMINAL

REGULATOR

AT30mp

THREE

TERMINAL

REGULATOR

AT

IS mA

\

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I

IApArm

2 ohmt

1 ohm

0.1 ohm

SUPER REGULATED

IAPproa

003 ohml

Ir

1

000 MPd AND 30

THREE mA

TERMINAL REGULATOR

IN

PARALLEL

I

I

0.01 ohm

Nt

100 H7

I kHz 10 kHz 30 kHz

Figure

3:

Power supply output impedance variations for single capacitor and three

- terminal regulators, separately and in parallel combination. occurs when the non -ideal resistance and inductance terms

(see my

February

1984 minimum impedance. Beyond reson- ance, the an frequency,

Many large electrolytic capacitors will inductance increasing impedance with rising as shown in

Figure

2. reach resonance kHz, but still have acceptably low impedance over the audio band.

(Note: newer capacitors designed for use in

HF to 200 tors column) of a kHz

-

DC-DC capacitor will dominate before switching have higher resonance

20 limit its

- for

20 regula- frequencies, and lower ESRs).

The output of a regulated supply will have much lower impedance than an unregulated circuit at low frequencies.

However, the popular three- terminal regulators rely upon negative feedback to keep of low- their output impedance low.

Use performance op -amp technology within causes output impedance to rise at higher frequency, as shown in Figure

3. of

It appears that tive load such we have a convergence several unfavorable trends.

A capaci- as shielded wire will draw increasing current just as the power supply is less willing to supply it.

To make matters worse, op

-amp PSRR is also falling. Which explains one of the more common causes of interchannel crosstalk, and explains why it is usually

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18

August

1985

For additional information circle 014

I much worse at higher frequencies.

A secondary problem caused by rising power- supply impedance is its effect on signal purity (distortion).

I had diffi- culty in reliably measuring distortion caused by inserting even

10

-ohm resis- tors in series with the power leads of a few different tried, op

-amps.

On the tests

I distortion was dominated by the op -amp output stages trying to drive the lower load resistances needed to gener- ate significant voltages at the power rails.

An even more premise subtle mechanism test bench only measures distortion products down to

-90 dB or so) is the that impedances or, for not he non

-linear that power -supply matter. particularily linear. non-

While the whole concept of PSRR predicts that didn't even try to measure

( my trusty old linear loads into linear power -supply impedances will generate non- linear signals on the power -supply rails. This is worth considering, since simple Zener shunt

-type power supplies or even three

- terminal regulators at low current drain will that these non- linearities will find their way back into the signal. ence between power- impedance ensures the relative differ- supply and load that they will he very small.

Conclusion:

It is my opinion that power -supply design typically will not affect sound quality. However. often the case, poor as is design practices can always prove the exception. Also, sim- ple be topologies, such as tube much more supply designs. can susceptible irregularities. to power

Recommendations:

Use high -performance op -amps and, whenever possible. operate them at low

(20 dB or less) closed -loop

Use gains. adequate capacitance in parallel with three -terminal regulators.

A 1,000 microFarad capacitor will usually he enough to ensure less than

0.1 ohm impedance across the audio hand.

If you on. It can, band is easier

-limit to the signal early roll -off out -of

-hand- transients. than brute force them out of your power there.

It supply should be noted once that regulators exhibit a lower output impe- dance as they deliver more current is a good idea to pull from them. For power

- any reader interested it supply designed around high performance op

-amps they three -terminal at least

25 or30 mA in brute

-force solutions, see Reference

=1 for a that get in delivers less than

0.04 ohms across the audio hand with very low noise.

In ious

Hear

What

I

Hear? circuit designer

I learned long ago things can sound good or bad for all the such

Do You past columns

I have offered var- cautions and criticisms tive or wrong

Our uncontrolled listening tests.

As a reasons. The unreliability of listening tests was recently driven home to be by an experience

I had while wearing my other hat as a designer of audio products. brand

-new of subjec- phono pre -amp was reviewed by two different. that low

- circulation Iunderground?) audio jour- nals.

To quote reviewer

=1:

"Exciting dynamics soundstage widened and deepened, and a wealth emerged. ness of string instruments sound somewhat wiry

...

of musical detail and energy

Particularly remarkable was

The

..."

However, the second reviewer had a slightly different ambience opinion:

...

. distorted on the test unit, suggesting indistinctness rather than depth flute sounded hooded sed

...The

...

suddenly returned. the high end sounds dryness

Of

...

The the clarity of the midrange and sweet-

The were muddled and the rather than reces- the sound made voices sounded shallow, without body or support. the ability to handle without mushing them together into a composite sound ... r complex and

I

Itl also lacked was sounds unable to follow a second or third voice or instru- ment with fidelity." And so on.

I unit funny how that works.) the factory yet

I do not have e good

( printable) explanation for how two presumably actually believe those reviews'

I have presented it is personally bench tested the review that funny if it dramatic. ness are was the object scorn. and found it subject of the fay irable review found its way hack to skilled listeners can listen cal units, and draw such opposed conclusions. to two identi- diametrically

This would be wasn't people out there working fur of so to the fact read much spec. hasn't that

The some and this example because

MmKt of us in this busi- routinely i

;filled upon to mnk- c e.

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August

19ä5

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tearooni

EMOTE

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We'd like to the incredible open your eyes to

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And something verb:

"look" well at the that has never been seen in any type of re- the capability to sound as as hear it.

The remote unit that controls the nine- teen

-inch rack

-mountable unit has a lighted high

-

resolution

LCD display that graphically depicts

And the sound itself is far su- to any other digital reverb. uses specially developed

Yamaha

LSIs to create up to

40 early reflections and up to

99.9 seconds of subsequent reverberation.

EARL

Y

REF'LECTION "displav male sh,aeing n.rom size and malie( let el and time d discrete r jleetnn.

'RE l "ERU

DENSITY- and an,de showing 4.14 relatai time njsnhn optent rererMeroli nz.

So the effect can be as natural

(or unnatural) as you want it to be.

We could go on about the REV

-l.

Tell you about its

44.1 kHz sampling rate that provides a full

18 kHz bandwidth to prevent the natural frequency content the results of the adjust- ments you make.

So getting just the right reverb sound is no

`REl-ERB

T/.11li

"display

MI

41 showing di%(rnwre wIr ,hlun, ur li ht. t:nu fit gut an-hands.

of the input signal from being degraded.

How it has a dynamic range of more than

90 dB longer a question of trial and error.

'111.11(

Ill'

ì roil,

1111

I

,,,,d

R,

,11 di,

The logical grouping of the para- meter controls on the remote also makes it easy to create any effect you like.

Then store it in any of 60 memories for instant recall.

The remcte also contains

9 addi- tional RAMs so you can store programs and carry them with you to use any- where there's an

REV-1.

;a

And there are 30 additional ROMs with factory preset sounds. Many of for the delay circuitry

,,,: !h,

',u,

and more than

85 dB for the reverb circuitry.

But why not take a closer look at the

REV-1 at your authorized Yamaha

Professional Audio Products dealer. Or for a complete brochure, write: Yamaha

International

Corporation, Professional

Products

Division,

P.O.

Box

6600,

Buena

Park,

CA

90622.

In

Canada,

Yamaha Canada

Music

Ltd., 135 Mil- ner

Ave.,

Scarborough,

Ont. M1S

3R1. which can be completely edited (as can the user

-programmed sounds) by us- ing the LEDs to tell you the ue or indicate in set val- whch direction to move the control so you can easily and precisely match the value of the originally programmed sound.

YAMAHA

1,!I

For additional information circle

#16

.\

U.;I1,1

I

If you're reaching for Gold

or

Platinum,first

reach

. f.

AT

R-e/p

22

Because there's never been a mastering tape like it.

Agfa

PEM 469 captures your sound perfectly in its complete dynamic range.

It's everything you've always wanted. Reach...and you'll succeed...with

Agfa PEM 469.

The only thing standard is the bias.

275

AGFA

AUDIO

NORTH STREET, TETERBORO,

N.J. 07608 (201) 288 -4100

AGFA- GEVAERT

August

1985

For additional information circle e17

-

continued from page 19..

Important decisions based upon what we hear.

How confident are you in your chops? When was the last time you had your hearing checked?

Avoid ble with one sound one is the trap of getting listening to comforta- flatter system than yours may sound wrong to you. tion. If their room sounds different yours. check it out wrong room. or one system. The brain has a funny way of compensating for a system's deficiencies and, before you know it. a

('heck out the competi- and find our which assume that theirs is wrong.

I som expect my reviewer of

- don't than automatically friends have what different sounding reference systems, and very likely different ideas what a good sound is.

If they were both record producers. one of them would he in trouble (maybe both).

The

Reading for

Audio

Extra

Credit

As my usual. i have referenced a few of earlier columns for more details on capacitor non -ideal performance, and op

-amp feedback circuit's non -ideal para- meters.

Reference

#1: is

The power- supply design actually part of a phono pre -amp design article entitled "Pre-eminent l're- amp, published in the

=:3

-$5 issue of

Amateur magazine.

OM

News

state

-of- the -art analog and digital con- sole

At systems." the end of

July, The National

Sound Archive, London, was scheduled to take delivery of a

Digital

Signal

Pro- cessor)

I

)SP) console that will he used to process catalog recordings prior to direct digital re- recording. Future plans call for the addition

Sound of a custom designed

Restoration System to the I)Sl', which will be used to remove surface noise from recordings.

Meanwhile, work is progressing on the construction of a full -size

I)SI' con- sole vintage vinyl and cylinder next scheduled for installation early year by West Deutsche Rund l'un k, the West

Gentian state broadcasting organization, at the new Mozart Center in its

Cologne. paid a visit to the Cambridge, England, factory in mid -.July to view the DSP

5(r,

Representatives from WDR build- point, and were reported at to be extremely impressed with the digital consoles topography and operational flexibility. in addition,

Neve recently played host to two separate technical delegations from a leading North Amer

- ican broadcast

Network. Visits to don, were also with the network, and The facility's

18

-input

Turner

('TS Studios.

Lon- arranged, to allow the delegations to gain hands

-on experience

32

-group

I)S1' console.

Besides success in the digital- console market. sales of Neve analog consoles

"Gauss.

The

Best

Unknown

Speakers in

The World'

These comments were unsdicittd and made by Mr.

Skitindale who pun'lxrscd the

Gauss speakers he uses in an elaborate sound system which supports Cincmascopc monies.

%ES Ili -Fi video, compact discs, stereo

TV and

"normal" stereo.

There's a

Gauss loudspeaker to fit even' pro- fessional need from

1(1" to an 18" that handles

400 watts and a range of high power compres- sion drivers with response to

20 kHz.

For intimation on the entire Gauss line. see your authorized Gauss dealer or write

Cetec Gauss, 9130 Glenoaks Boulevard,

Sun Valley.

CA

91352. (213)

8'5

-1910,

Telex:

194

989

CFTEC.

Choice of lite Pros

NEVE'S FUTURE LOOKING

POSITIVE

FOLLOWING

RECENT TAKE -OVER OF

PARENT

COMPANY

In late -June Neve's parent company,

Energy Services

&

Electronics

PLC

(ESE) was by purchased by the Brammer

Group, a diverse various reports multinational pany with numerous around the world. However, as predicted that com- subsidiaries have appeared in the finacial press during the last sev- eral months, Brammer subsequently an- nounced that it plans to sell off Neve

Electronic Holdings,

Ltd., the group of companies that includes Neve Electron- ics

International,

Ltd., Rupert Neve,

Inc., Rupert Neve of

Rupert

Neve, GmbH.

Canada,

Inc., and

Earlier this year,

ESE was the subject of an unsuccessful takeover hid by Peek

Holdings, which failed to secure the necessary majority of approval from

ESE stockholders. Peek also intended to sell control of the Neve Group following purchase of its parent company. of

According to

Barry

Roche, president

Rupert Neve, inc., "Now that

Brammer has confirmed its intention to sell the Neve Group

- and the number of companies interested in buying us is substantial, including many that are highly visible in the pro -audio industry

- our intention following the sale of the

Group will be to secure Neve's leading position within the recording and pro- duction studio market. The purchase will further assist Neve in continuing its extensive devlopment plans, and sup- porting the pro -audio industry with

..Most people don't teen know Gauss speak- ers exist

:' says Jim

Martilkde,

Engineering

Manager of Aphex Systems

Ltd.

"I live with soul at work anti at home.

Al

Aphev, we specialize in products that make sound heuer.

So.

I'm really critical of sound qualitm and demand dependability. That's w1i

I like and use Gauss speakers:

"With Gauss, you always know you're getting a professional loudspeaker:. Martindale con- tinued, "with

XXX

(the three letter company). you never know whether the speaker was de- veloped for hi

-fi or pro use. The quality just varies all over the place. For n» nmoney.

Gauss speakers are by far the

Ix-st speakers

I can use..

August

1985

O R -e

/p

2:3

News

and automation systems are reported to be very healthy. in excess of

$1.4 million worth of NECAM

9ti servo -controlled fader automation systems have been sold in the first six months of this year,

Roche says.

"The future of the company's activi- ties in

North America is extremely buo- yant."

Roche added. "Merging with a company in t he see in its that but help to has our type of products mainstream of business cannot increase Neve's presence in pro -audio marketplace.

We expect to continuing and the future. substantial growth on

At press time there was no final word the purchaser of the Neve Group.

SOUND('RAF

"l'

WINS SEVF :RAL

CONTRACTS

FROM

BB('

Sounduraft Electronics

Limited has sectored three separate orders from the

British Broadcasting Corporation. including a contract to supply the

III1(' with four consoles television that will be used for applications during the

ISti(i

Commonwealth Games, to he held in

Edinburgh. Scotland. next

-July.

The four customized be

Series

7)00 c msides will installed at the purpose

-built Broad- cast Centre in

Edinburgh under construction

BB('.

- for use

- currently by both the as host broadcaster. and Ali('

Australia.

In work addition. the BBC's Bristol Net-

Production

('entre has ordered a customized Series

511(1 that will be installed at St.

George's Church,

Bristol for both work. live broadcasts and recording

Finally. the company recently sup- plied eight.

Iti- channel

Series 200 porta- ble consoles

- including flight cases

- for use by

I11í('

Radio outside broadcast units in

London and throughout

F

:ngl:uul.

SOLID STATE

JACK'

OPENS

FAR EAST

OFFICE

According to

Stil, founder and man- aging director, Colin

Sanders, "Our studio and broadcast systems have become very world, popular in this part of the and ive forecast considerable additional growth throughout the region. SS!.

Far East will provide these clients with the kind of technical sup- port by and information exchange enjoyed

SSi, owners and users in the world's major production centers."

The new Hong Kong office will serve

551, clients in

China. Singapore. the

Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia and

Thailand. Currently six are based at the new location whom staff members

- all of under the direction of Solid

State

Logic

Fe- are multi-lingual

East's managing

- operating director. Bingo

'l'so.

Tso, a former

'long

Kong-based record producer for Polydor,

EMI and

WEA, and who has served as an SSi, consul- tant in the region for the last two years, explains hou and that a primary reason for open- ing the office is the emerging Chinese recording industry. Three SSI,

SL411(11)

E-

Series Master Studio

Systems were installed at the China Record Company recording studios in

Beijing. Guangz-

Shanghai last year, and a fourth

Si.4111)(I console is order by CRC.

Solid currently on

State

Logic

Far East is head- quartered at Austin

Tower,

Suite

:iO1, 22

Austin Avenue,

Tsimshatsui,

Kowloon,

Hong

Kong.

Telephone:

0452.31

î21-

2162: FAX: (852

-3l 72

:1

-546:

Telex:

4

580

(SSI.FE).

CIRCUIT

RESEARCH LABS

ACQUIRES ASSETS OF MI('MIX t

Circuit Research Labs.

Inc. has pur- chased certain assets of Michlix Audio

Products. Inc.

These assets consist of inventory, patents, licenses, contract rights and business naine.

Bernard

M.

Van

Ben-

According to

Item, president of

('R l.1.

"'Phis acquisi- tion marks our entry into the profes- sional recording marketplace. an im- portant new market for the Company.

Furthermore. we are confident we

%vill be able to develop tional new products based upon Mic-

Mix's and market addi- patented audio devices, thus plac- ing us in a much position overall." stronger competitive

:

t

's

it

j

ri

1(

tlftrrjj

r yrt'({{ç11`S.

?

'{{{

+

yii¡i

'*ìt+ÿlj

0

,

'++:

t,

.t(h

.,....s.-

C

CQ

.

1

f

1

is yours with price and performance unequaled

$21,500 including pedestal

24

26

8

2

buss

I/O

/24 track modules monitor dedicated sends and returns programmable muting groups

Selective

VU

8 or

Peak metering groups usable as mono

/line gain

/stereo sub controls groups

Separate mike

4

-band semi -parametric

EQ

Optional

TT handwired

192 pt patch bay

CATCH SIGHT OF

A

MATCHLESS

FROM YOUR

AMEK DEALER

AT

OUR

NEW

LOCATION

619

S.

Glenwood Place Burbank,

CA 91506 818- 843 -6320

The company that grows with you

R

-e' p 24

August

19$

For additional information circle

#20

Circuit Research markets elect

t

onjc manufactures and audio -processing and signal -generating equipment used tu enhance the quality and range olbroad- cast signals transmitted by radio and television stations in the

U.S. and abroad.

GOTHAM AUDIO CORPORATION

PURCHASED

BY

GROUP

HEADED

BY

RUSSELL

O. HAMM

Stephen

F.'l'enumer, company founder and president has announced the sale of

Gothant's business and name to a group of investors hearted

Hamm. long-time

\'P. by

The

Russell

O. transaction. which involved an undisclosed amount of stoney, was effective April

1,

1983.

'remitter will retain ownership of the

Gotham Building in New York: Quan- substantial tum Audio I.:tbs. Inc.: a interest in

Gotham

A.G., of Regensdurt,

Switzerland: and'I'horens- Franz

A(: of

\\'ettingen, Switzerland. manufacturers

Ill l'horens turntables.

Russell

O.

II

:mint. new president of the company. which retains the

Gotham name. has announced several immediate changes to holster the com- pany's relationship with customers and suppliers.

While product

Tines from

Neumann.

EMT, N'I'P and

Klein

&

Hummel will continue to he the founda- tion ofGothant's business. Hamm states that he will step up sales and promo- tional activities in an effort to reach a

Iwoucier customer base.

'\\'e

plan to maintain a higher profile in the future. not only the high making more people aware of quality products coating out of

L

?erupt. but particularly to make them aware that these products are at- fordable..' as

Jerry

(wham

has returned to

Gotham eastern sales manager alter

%vnrking with an absence of several years. and has been

Ilantm on a new EMT

dealer program. Juergen

Wahl. t

;otham's newly appointed west coast sales manager. has just returned from an intensive training seminar with

Neumann engineers in

Berlin.

Juergen has also re- opened the

I

Ms

Angeles office, which was closed when Hugh

Allen..lr. retired more than a year ago.

-

NEWS

NOTES

-

Nine pro -audio manufacturers have donated the use of nearly

$200,(100 in equipment to the

ASSOCIATION FOR

MULTI -IMAGE

INTERNATIONAL

(AMI) to provide sound for its festival to be held in

17, 1983.

Dallas. Texas, August

12 thru

The contributing companies include OTARI

QSC

AUDIO

CORPORATION,

PRODUCTS, APHEX,

COMMUNITY LIGHT

&

SOUND,

PRO

CO,

SOUNDCRAFT ELEC-

TRONICS,WHITE INSTRUMENTS,

AUDIO -TECHNICA U.S.

and

TECHNICAL PROJECTS.

This year's festival marks the fifth year of an on -going effort to raise the audio sights of multi -image producers and staging companies. In addition to the equip-

KWrththe

6120

I have control over

1l1

quality'

Dameon Higgins founded Delta Sounds and

Video in

1976 after

10 years in broadcasting.

This radio experience and his uncompromising audio standards quickly established Delta as a very successful recording studio and entertain- ment sound service in the area.

Orange County /LA

Although the company specialized in sup- plying complete custom sound programs and systems for school dance DJs and Discos, it wasn't long before Dameon found himself turn- ing down a lot of tape duplicating requests. The high quantities were not practical for "real time" duplicating, and the jobs that he

"farmed out" to high speed duplicating companies often came back to hurt his image.

Eventually, because of missed profit oppor- tunities and a frustrating lack of control over

Control module and a cassette master /slave module quality, Dameon decided to install his own high speed duplicating equipment.

He looked care- fully at every product on the market and finally selected the Telex 6120, seven slave, 1/2 track cassette -to-cassette model.

He knows that he can add on to his system as his business grows, but for now his 6120 can copy up to 280

C

-30s in one hour, ani is easily operated by one non- technical employee because of its compact size, single bLtton operation, jammed or a short tape warninç lights and automatic master rewind. Dameon hasn't regretted his decision for one moment because he now has thriving additional business of duplicating voice and DJ audition tapes, seminars and syn- dicated radio programs.

Now he reports a zero reject rate and his quality image is under his control where it belongs.

For over twenty years row, Telex has been the choice of those who, litre

Dameon Higgins, are fussy about the quality of their duplicate tapes.

To learn more about wiat the 6120 can do for you, write to

Telex Communications,

Inc.,

9600

Aldrich Avenue South, Minneapolis,

MN 55420.

Well send you complete specifications and pro- duction capabilities.

For quick information, call Toll

Free

800-828-6107

or in

Minnesota call (672) 887.5531.

Control module wat cassette master, eleven slaves and reel master

TELEX.

August

I

R-e p

25

News

ment donations. the

SOCIETY

OF'

PROFESSIONAL

RECORDING

STUDIOS (SPARS) will conduct two seminars concerning planning. bud- geting and producing original music tracks for multi -image shows. According to

Emory

Straus of White

Instruments. great improvements have been made in the production of and reproduction quality multi -image audio since the project began four years ago.

KBA

ENTERPRISES

FLANNERS PRO AUDIO has an- nounced the

1965

and

CHICAGO MUSIC

EXPO. to he held at the Hotel Contin- ental.

Chicago. September 20 thru

22.

Planned as the largest consumer music show in the Midwest. Expo

'S5 will fea- ture exhibits. talent showcases. semin- ars and an industry awards banquet.

The will exhibits. sponsored by

Planners. feature the latest in pro

-audio equipment and musical instruments, all of which will be available to the pulic for sale at the show. Expo organizers say that currently there is no other show that allows manufacturers to

"come into such direct. positive their customers. comprises panels of regional and national experts

The that contact with seminar program will address such subjects as Producing Music Videos.

Direct

Marketing Techniques for Inde- pendent Records. Music forJingles, and

Recording Studio Management.

Further details of

Expo

'65 are available from

KBA

Enterprises.

Inc.

110

Schiller

Street. Elmhurst.

IL 60126. (312)

979-839:1.

AUDIO INTERVISU

AL

DESIGN, the

LA

-based pro -audio equipment systems company. has been appointed

Southern California dealer for the new

Model

S:1:1 from

Studio

Reference Monitor

MEYER SOUND LABORA-

ATC to

STOP PRESS:

Distribute Telefunken

Products in

North America

Ranier Zopfy, sales manager of AEG Tele- funken Corporation, has announced that

ATC will import and distribute the Telefunken line of tape machines and products through- out North America.

"AEG has made a long -term commitment to this market," Zopfy says.

"We have developed audio recorders designed specifically to meet the needs of the market and have maintained our own personal commitment to manufactur- ing only the finest equipment that German engineering can design. We have already committed to the large inventory and techni- cians necessary to support a market as large as the United States. We will be naming our

East and

West Coast representatives shortly. and establishing regional inventories and ser- vice. By importing and distributing our own equipment. we are now very competitively priced."

The new company address is:

AEG Tele- funken Corporation, Route

22-

Oor Drive,

Sommerville, NJ

08876; (201) 722 -9800.

TORIES.

According to AID president,

Rick is

Plushner. "The design

I of the

8:13I perfect for professional studios, cially in close

-field espe- monitoring applica- tions. which also makes it the ideal speaker in the smaller. privately

-owned studio. The

Meyer speaker produces maximum linearity at both high and low levels, and has a degree of accuracy and realism that is phenomenal."

In addition to the t; :13.

AID is marketing the Meyer

Model

63-I subwoofer and

CP-

10

Complementary Phase stereo

10- band parametric system equalizer.

To expand system production to meet

increased demand. EASTERN

ACOUSTIC WORKS has added

2,500 square feet of assembly space at its

Framingham.

llA.

location.

Along with the increase in space.

EÁ11' has remo- delled all assembly facilities to create separate production areas for small sys- tems

-

MS:10 thru

FR

-15:1

-

and larger

systems-

FR22 thru

KF:;..50.

In

August. the company's Customer Service will become a personnel to improve turn -around time on separate department with new repairs.

THE

WESTWOOD ONE RADIO

NETWORKS has acquired STAR

-

FLEET COMMUNICATIONS. one of the nation's leading producers of live radio concert programming. Following the acquisition. Sam Kooper, founder and president of

Starfleet. and now serving as 11'estwood

One's director of

. continued on page

Iii

-

IS YOUR EDUCATION COMPLETE?

C

-duce

(c- diüts). r. To lead sound engineers astray from habitual use of microphones, stands and isolation booths. To include commitment to studio quality sound with maximum separation at a cost effective price. To persuade abandonment of setting -up problems and clutter in the studio or on stage. by attractive thing or quality.

C-duceable

Congas. Bongos. a.

Drums.

Timbales etc.. Acoustic

Guitar,

Mandolin. Lute. Balalaika.

Violin. 'Cello.

Double

Bass,

Harp, Banjo.

Piano.

Harpsichord,

Celeste,

Dulcimer. Zither.

Speaker Enclosures. Solid

Electric Guitars et cetera.

C-ducees

(c difisi s), n.

Many prominent musicians in all aspects

of

the music industry (i.e. jazz, folk, country, classical or rock). As in

Chick Corea, The Gatlin Brothers, Chrystal

Gayle, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Toto,

Mobile

Studio, Abbey Road Studio, Sidney Opera

House, Resorts International, Texas Hall Of

Fame, Oberlin College of

Music, English, Dutch,

German,

Swiss and Danish Radio, B.B.C. T.V., et al.

C-

'

-ducer

(c diit sip). n.

Studio quality contact microphones.

(-

(=1ucr

C -TAPE

P.O.

Box 1069, Palatine, IL 60078

DEVELOPMENTS

LIMITED

(800)

562 -5872 or (312)

359 -9240 Telex:

280502

R-e p

26

-

August l9s-

For additional information circle

=21

THE NEW

252:

Introducing the

Affordable

Reverb

Unit with

EMT performance.

It's

no

secret that the

"EMT

sound"

is a key

ords. It's been years. ingredient

of

many

hit rec-

that

way for

over

25

Our very first unit, the

140, is still used by major studios. And the sound of our big digital legendary. units, the

250 and 251, is

Now EMT introduces their new concept of digital reverb

-the

EMT

252. It offers more programs and features than the

250 and

251.

Here's what we mean...

(E M

T)

EMT -FRANZ

Postfach

1520,

D

-7630 Lahr

Telex 754319

.

Functionally clear, easy to operate control panel..

Ii

Non volatile storage for

128 groups of parameter settings.

Noiseless recall and sequencing of settings during audio programs.

40nS digital processor speed coupled with

16 bit A/D converters bandwidth and full dynamic yields range.

15kHz

The original

EMT 250 reverb program for superb sound at short decay settings.

The EMT

252 linear reverb program for perfectly natural sound at longer decays.

Chorusing, delay, echo loops. doppler reverb, and non- linear reverb programs.

For additional information circle

#69

The affordable

252:

The superb EMT sound will not surprise

you...

the price will!

Call today for a complete information package. 1(800)437- 8272.

GOTHAM

AUDIO

CORPORATION

741

Washington

Street

New

York, NY 10014

Telephone

212 741-7411 Telex 236779

West

Coast

Office 818 785 -2211

:IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII '"IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII11":III

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII'

-

.a-w-a-,r,.

.

°'Iiineno'lent1e'at'nent"11"14'It

i

"1i f°1e

`°1i

O1 !In

nent'le'fi

``1e

"9t

4""Ub9e°1eni

4=1t

...and

some

people

start

a session without

a

Klark

Teknik

Reverb.

To

discover

the

heights you

can reach

with

a

DN780

Digital Reverberator /Processor contact your local dealer or

Keith

Worsley

at

Klark Teknik

Electronics

Inc., 262a Eastern Parkway,

Farmingdale,

N.Y.

11735, USA.

Telephone

East

Coast

(516) 249 3660.

West Coast (415) 482 1800.

9

._

"t

al,

",i

9P1A3.

(514).

Ç71.

111111

II

M

1111111111111W.:1111111Mil

11111111111

Armlicniania,11

1

-11*-11

=I,

I

r

PRODUCTION VIEWPOINT

Few

engineer producers are fortunate enough

to

experience the kind

of

meteoric rise career

of

that has marked the

Daniel Lazerus.

Originally

a

drummer and keyboard player

for a

number

of

small bands, the native Californian drifted

to

the other

side of

the glass

in 1977.

During

five

years as

a

second engineer at the

Wally

Heider Hollywood facility, then at The Village Recorder

-

Lazerus got his training

on

- first album projects

for

Stevie Wonder tional

Rescue),

stepped

in to

and

(

soundtrack albums

(

The

Wiz

and

Grease).

The

big

break came, however, when Lazerus was seconding

for Roger

Nichols

on

the

Eye to Eye

album

project

with producer Gary

Katz:

when Nichols' schedule

forced him to

leave

in mid- project,

Lazerus take over as

Fagen's

The .'s'ight

f

Fleetwood

/y.

(Ilutiiquarium. Part

I),

Tom

Waits (Foreign Affair), the Rolling Stones

(Emo-

Mac

principal

Fleetwood

Mae

Lire), as

well

as

two

recordist,

Lazerus promptly and complete earned himself

a

the album. Subsequently

1983

hired

Grammy nomination as

to

record Donald

Best

Engineer

for his work on

the Fagen

project.

As one

might expect, the succeeding three years have

been very

busy

for

Daniel Lazerus.

His

engineering credits

now

include projects

for

(Ross).

Jean-

Michel

John

Denver (Seasons of the

Heart and Dreamland Express), Diana

Ross

Jarre

(Zoolook),

Eddie Murphy's debut musical album

(How Could It

Be

?),

and "'l'he

Finer Things"

from

the King of Comedy soundtrack album.

His

production credits span

work

with Joe

Cocker

(

Ciei /iced Man), the original cast album

of The Gospel At

('olonus, and

"5

Minutes

/ Bonzo Goes to

Washington"

1 a

rap street dance single with

Jerry

Harrison

of

the Talking

Heads).

When

we

caught

up

with the busy young engineer,

he

was tracking basics with producer Gary Katz at i.A's The Village

Recorder for

an album

project

with

Rosie Vela.

R

-e p (Ralph Jones): In looking at your biography. I'm struck by the variety of artists you've worked with

Cocker to

;irtist

I'm

- they really desire. Take, for did with which really is interesting sounds: some strong and unusual drums, and interesting guitar parts.

It's about balance.

You can only go so far to be new

John

[Dreamland helps me to achieve that

-

from and strong.

One thing balance is

Joe

Donald Paget'.

I assume that such a broad range of music would implya sim- ilarly broad range of engineering and production styles.

How do you accom- modate such differences?

Daniel Lazerus:

Basically, it just comes down to relating to the individual artist like

John

Denver: he could be recorded and produced with drum machines,

MiDI- interfaced keyboards, and so on, but it wouldn't be what he's about.

By the same token, you cannot record him in the way recorded before, because that he's been that's not what people are listening to these days.

So, what's needed is a creative and sensi- tive balance, and it often comes from an engineering standpoint: how you can

"stretch" the sounds. The album that

I

- genuinely you

Diana

Ross, can't marvellous, has a lot of be

John

Denver to understanding what instance, an

Express], obvious, but you need that that extremely inquisitive and experi- mental.

When I'm handling tracking date,

I'll try and use a different miking configuration than a

I've basic used before

- if only myself and be sure ing on something before. Both with to that continue

I'm not that has to just test other producers, and ultimate aspect of any production. rely- worked when I'm working in a production capacity myself, I've been able to exper- iment and yet maintain artist's integrity

- a sense of course, of that's the the

R

-e

/p

/Ralph Jones): There must be a set of basic principles that guide your

R -e p

:31)

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For additional information circle

24

Daniel

Lazerus

experiments. besides your own desire to try out something new.

After all. the technique has to he appropriate to the material that you're recording. Are you guided in any sense by the artist's past work?

Daniel Lazerus:

For me, it's an extremely

I'm instinctive process: although certainly aware of the we're working.

I'd like to try: basically, things set up beforehand.

I artist's recording history,

I don't actually think about it a lot, because is what's important not the past, but the moment in which

Usually,

I'll spend time listening to demos before we begin tracking basics, and really get a sense of the project. Then,

I spend a lot of time diagramming the miking concepts that have those

R

-e p

(Ralph Jones

):

Do you tend to he influenced by the sonics of the demo. or do you listen more for song values. and then try to create new sonies to enhance those values?

Daniel Lazerus:

I definitely would like to create new sonies. But, these days, demos are so sophisticated often can serve as an incredibly accu- rate guideline to the way that that a they song is to be recorded. I'm even impressed by the quality of

Portastudio song demos that i hear these days serious

- really, I'm

- recorded, for example, by someone who lives in a one

-room ment in apart-

Manhattan, plays all the parts, and also sings.

One musician like a very that is

Joy

Askew, different and talented keyboard player who works with Laurie Ander- son..Joy gave me some amazing demos, made when she was living in a very small space. She had a mike mounted in a bookcase, and she would walk back into the kitchen to this kind of "echo

-y" kitchen sound.

In general, there sing, so hasn't been that she got a lot of re- arranging involved when we work from demos, but certainly

I work to make the sonics much more sophisticated.

Even if it's a very live, raw sound after,

I try to stretch that to that make it we're more live, more raw. After all, the artist put that demo together to represent what they heard. It's their song

- it's what they want. If you can expand on then that's a good thing to try for. that,

K e p:

Giren your emphasis on experi- mentation.

I

would bet that you some- times are itations. frustrated by budgetary lim-

After all. recording time in the studios that you're been working in isn't all that cheap!

DL: Sometimes it's ally, you a bit of a fight: usu- can only get so experimental in the time you're given. Even so,

I try to experiment as much as

I can.

Jean

Jarre's new album, Zoo look. was just because of the nature of his

I

Michel a great opportunity to be experimental, used on artistry. things like

[Crown'

PZM mikes glass baffles that were about eight feet high and four feet wide. Laurie

Anderson performed on the album, and

I recorded her inbetween three baffles with PZMs on each baffle

- it really worked out great.

I used the same tech- nique to record Yogi

Horton, who played drums, and was able to capture some very "microscopic" drumming sounds.

The toms, particularly, worked out very well them with these glass baffles around holding PZMs.

R

-e p:

Your biography says that you

"designed" the Neu' York sessions

Jean-

Michel Jarre's

Zoolook album.

That terns for intrigues me.

What does it mean?

I)i.:

It is a very juicy term, isn't it?

"Designed" musicians:

- it sounds like inventing tofutti or something!

Well,

Jean-

Michel had never done a studio album with he's primarily an instru- mentalist.

He has had huge, wonderful

- sounding albums with widespread suc- cess in

Europe and elsewhere, but everything has been keyboardoriented.

He won was a fan of The

Nightfly, which the Grand Prix du

Disque in

France

- the top album award

- for that year.

So he looked me up when i was in New

York, and we met and talked about the project, which was going to utilize real

- not just his machines. It musicians was quite a risk for him. simply means

France who had some ideas;

I was in the

U.S., that

"Designed" here was someone in and

I helped him realize them. But

I also had some ideas of my own:

I thought of using Adrian

Belew and

Yogi

Horton.

I put the session together he was in while

France, and it really fell together beautifully.

R

-e p: You're worked in a number of studios. both here in L.A. and in Neu'

York. ferent

Presumably. each characteristics

-

a has dif- different room. console. monitors, tape machines.

Note do you cope among some with the differences facilities. and still maintain kind of continuity in your work?

DL:

'l'hat's a difficulty that every inde- pendent engineer faces.

It's a matter of knowing what you want, and being able to understand a room quickly. Most engineers grew up seconding, and get- ting to know certain rooms.

It's a big step when you begin engineering on your own and different studios, yet still want to have a central kind of sound

I think start working

-a

in a lot of

"heartbeat." that

I've been able to keep a

"center" about most of the records

I've done, even while different studios. it working in that very isn't always easy. and sometimes I'm not so sure that there hasn't been something lost in trying to keep that center. Maybe

I didn't know how to simply cut loose, because

I was driving towards a sound that

I wanted, and didn't always understand what the room was offering. to

It's certainly much more comfortable have a room

But if you that are you've agreed to work on a particular project in a particular studio, there's really no excuse for complaining: it's a matter of seeing what the room is and dealing with it, even if it's just a shoe

- would be a room consistent: one you in a situation where box. for

Obviously, the optimum situation any engineer or engineer- producer that that know they they and love. know to can be experi- ment with and stretch themselves a lit- tle further. It's difficult to go into radi- cally different rooms, but it's also a real test of your capabilities, and

I enjoy the challenge.

And there's a way to have continuity, also.

Re p: What do you look for when you first go into a new studio?

DL:

Initially.

I think about how the drums will sound. Drums are your foun- dation: that's really the basis on which everything's going to be structured. If a room seems inappropriate won't cut them there. for drums,

I

R

-e, p: What do you look for to get a good drum sound?

DL: An ability to have a strong, close.

If it's a very live, raw sound to make it more live, to that we're after, more raw. After all, the represent what they heard.

It's

If you can expand on that, then their that's

I try to stretch artists put that demo together song

-

a good it's what thing to they want. try that for.

August

1985

R

-e' p

33

ANNOTATED DISCOGRAPHY

A

An Inside

View to Track Production:

Conversation with

Engineer

Daniel Lazerus

By way of an introduction, Daniel Lazerus played for

R -e

/p a variety of recordings, drawn from past and recent projects, that he considered representative of his best mixing and engineering techniques. During the listening session, Lazerus offered comments on aspects of each selection:

John

Denver

-

title track from Dreamland Express album.

"This may give you an idea of the change that we perpetrated, compared to John's previous recordings.

We did this album in a very short period of time: we cut

16 tracks in three days, and mixed very quickly.

Even so, we spent some time dealing with the kick drum and snare on this cut, because they were somewhat difficult to record. The drums were played with brushes, and the kick drum was played very lightly to draw out a semi -contemporary sound.

"I miked the kick with a

Sennheiser

MD

-421 placed about midway inside the body of the drum, and added some damping on the head.

Then

I processed it through a couple of stages of API EQ, and

1 used a dbx limiter to keep it consistent

-

because it was just being tapped. Quite honestly, it was a real obstacle, because it was being hit so lightly:

I had to work to get it to be linear, and balanced in the track.

"The compression helped to draw it into the line.

Then, using a couple stages of good quality, older EQ,

I lost quite a lot in the region around

350

Hz; that makes an interesting kind of

'black hole' in the kick sound, though it's still got the lower

-end. l also like to add two to four dB at 50 or 60

Hz:

I like to have that

'ultra

-low -end' cranked a bit, since

I know that they're going to roll off some in the mastering, anyway. Of course,

EQ won't do much if you don't have the proper drum set or a good mike position. So, during the recording session, l was constantly running out and adjusting the mike an inch to the right or left from where it was, tweaking the positioning to get the best sound.

"The snare was played with couple of different

EQ stages a

-

brush, and miked an

API and a with

Pultec

- a

Shure SM57 going through which

1 used a to draw out the qualities that seemed best for the track. What I'll say about the snare here is that it lacks as much of the hi

-hat as possible, while still retaining a good snare sound.

I really count on proper miking technique to isolate the snare:

I detest gating tracks, because

I hate to commit to gating in the tracking stage, and then have to deal with it in the final mix."

John Denver:

"Gimme Your Love Forever" from

Dreamland

Express

"This album was an interesting challenge for me, because we were working on an old console, and had no computer assistance; all these mixes were entirely manual. This song, in particular, was challenging because it is a fairly complex arrangement: the band was supplemented with a full horn section, with Paulinho da

Costa on percussion. Initially,

Paulinho played only the conga track; then

I thought that it might be great to have timbales and a whistle

-

because the song has a

Brazilian feel to overdub stage." it

-

so he added those parts in the

We were particularly struck by a background vocal breakdown that occurs at the end of the tune. How did that come about, we queried?

"That was actually my idea. It seemed that, at that point in the song, there was an awkward feel to the timing and phrasing of the track.

So

1 decided that, in order to improve

Daniel

Lazerus at the

SSL 4000 console, Amigo Studios, North Hollywood.

No

111111111N

IllIllIllIllIllI

t

IIII

Daniel

Lazerus

tight drum sound, and a live sound as well.

R

-e

/p:

Hou' do you tell whether a room is capable of delivering that kind of live sound?

DL:

It usually seems to depend on the size of the room, although I've been sur- prised

-

I've been in situations where

I've been able to get strong drum sounds from pretty small, boxey rooms.

But

I tend to like a larger room.

In the

Village

Recorder

[Los Angeles], for example,

Studio I) has a walk

-in echo chamber.

It's a great room that was developed during the recording of the Fleetwood

Mac Tusk album. To be honest,

I'm not certain why it works or what the design is, but it's an incredible live chamber that you can set drums in front of, and do some opportunity to do a lot with basic drum tracks. interesting kinds of miking.

A very large room like

It allows that allows the you to cut the basic drums strong pure

- but

-

I mean, those have to be also to live -sounding tracks. think of recording

R

-e

/p:

Another thing that must be a concern when mooing from one studio to another is ferent monitoring systems and

"house curves

": the the whole question of interaction dif- between the monitors and the control room. Hou. do you maintain any degree of trust in the result, when these aspects can vary so widely?

DL: When

I did The

Donald Fagen,

I became

Nightfly with familiar with

David

Visonik

9000 speakers. Donald,

Walter[

Becker] and

Gary Katz had been mixing on the

9000s, and

I really fell in love with the speakers. For every single album, and every studio in worked, I've which I've taken those speakers with me.

They're marvellous monitors: they're what Aja,

Gaucho, and

The

Nightfly were mixed on.

The

9000s have a hump around

60 cycles but, once you under- stand that, they're "home

"; you're tak- ing "home" with you wherever you go, and

I think that's really important.

I think the

Visoniks are a fabulous

"heartbeat"

- a great center monitor- ing system.

R

-e

/p:

This "bump

" at

60

- do you find yourself tending to compensate in some way for that, or do you just take them as being representative of an average

"real- world" consumer speaker?

DL:

That's a good question [pauses reflectively]. The bump at

60 is just something that

I understand.

I deal with it by knowing the speakers; they're just very familiar to me.

It's not about compensating: it's just about good recording. What we're talking about is a

"masking" kind of effect: you don't hear the bass in the area around

60 to

100

R

-e

/p

34

August

1985

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August

1985

D

R-e/p

35

For additional information cycle

#25

ANNOTATED DISCOGRAPHY

-

continued

..

. might try to do an odd vocal breakdown with percussion. it, we

"First,

I set up a tape slap that was musically timed with the meter of the hi -hat.

I panned the background vocals left and right with an echo that made them three -dimensional, put the tape slap down the center, and also sent the tape slap return to echo. At the breakdown,

I dropped most of the tracks with a manual mute; the effect serves to smooth it out so that it's not so extreme.

It seemed to jazz up the track and, in the vein that we're talking about, it's something appropriately new for John. A breakdown in a

John Denver song is an unusual idea, and doing it with the background vocals seemed like an interesting way to go about it!"

Rosie Vela: "Zazu" from untitled debut album, projected for release in late

1985.

"Rosie is a model, probably one of the top ten on the Planet Earth. She has written a lot of marvellous songs that are sort of eccentric

-a

little like a

Kate Bush or a

Peter Gabriel. really believe this is going to be a strong record; certainly

I can suggest that she's written some very interesting songs.

I think she'll have a real strong possibility as an arriving new artist.

"I'm particularly proud of the drum sound on this cut. The kick is very strong and deep, and it hits you, but it's not boomy. It's a matter of using enough of the actual kick sound

--which was a strong, bottomy, straight

-ahead kick drum

-

and mixing it into a live acoustic chamber [at the Village Recorder, Los Angeles]. To get the chamber sound,

I was rolling mikes around the whole time, to everybody's chagrin!

"I used Neumann U87 mikes in the chamber, and they were highly compressed, so they're 'sucking' in that room

-- which also helps to 'snap up' the delay time that can occur.

The return from the chamber was then gated.

When

I got the sound that

I wanted,

I put it into an

AMS DMX

15.80, which then was triggered by a

Linn drum machine.

I treated the snare in a similar fashion.

"Setting close -down the gate

-

for a sound like this is a difficult thing. The point is committing to the really listening to the drum -machine sound, and making sure that the gate is closing musically. Once you put it on tape, you're committed: if the sound is great and huge but the gate is a little off, it can ruin the track.

I prepare for that by sampling sounds and putting them away, in case

I've missed it."

-

. continued

ROOM AND MICROPHONE LAYOUT

TO ACHIEVE

AMBIENT DRUM SOUNDS DURING BASIC TRACKING.

Studio: The Village Recorder Studio

D, Los Angeles

Engineer: Daniel Lazerus

Note the use of an echo chamber for mikina of live room ambience.

SEMIISOCATEO

AREA

KEYBOARDS

MAIN ROOM

DRUM MIKING: kick:

MD421 snare: SM57 cymbal:

C4I4

Hi Hal: C451 w /pad

Toms: C414 and C451 w /pad

'Door open around two

LIVE

CHAMBER

IIO

6

10 leed

U47

U47

C414

U87

C414

GUITAR

AMP

C451

SM57

ISO

ROOM

NEVE CONSOLE

SEMI ISOLATED

AREA

I

ISO

BOOTH

VOCALS

CONTROL

ROOM

I

Lazerus says that the room diagrammed above was used during the recording of basics for the forthcoming

Rosie Vela album Zazu, produced by Gary Katz. Two

Neumann

U87s and a single

AKG

C414 were mounted inside the live chamber, about two feet. The

87s were with the door open positioned two and five feet from the floor of the chamber near the door, while the

C414 was located eight feet inside the room and eight feet off the floor. He also points out that because of low -end build

-up, a little compression of the chamber mikes may be necessary, or the outputs from a few distant mikes mounted in the tracking room blended in with the chamber sound.

For guitar

-amp miking, Lazerus uses a

SM57 two inches from the speaker at a slight angle to the cone; an

AKG

C451 mounted two feet away at the same height; a

C414 mounted three feet away, and a foot or so higher; plus a

U87 mounted five feet away.

R

-e p:t6 August

1985

Daniel

Lazerus

cycles.

Sr, it can seem that you have a lot of hass, and then you realize that you may have more than you thought. But it's an instinctive thing, too.

I engineer, really, from the heart

- as silly as that sounds

I myself on the edge with each new pro- ject;

I laughter'. I'm always putting don't want to stop learning.

R -e p: Do you have a preference in mix- ing console's?

I)L: Very much.

I love the older

Neve consoles

-

pre -Eighties, early

Seven- ties.

They have incredibly musical

EQ: in the earlier

Neves, the engineers just seem to tions

- have chosen very musical posi- it's step, not sweep, EQ. When I work on other boards, and maybe have the opportunity to have access to an outboard rack drum sounds and through it. with

Neve EQ,

I'll

run things like that

R

-e p:

I'm also interested in your thoughts on digital audio.

Do you have a preference in digital multitrack and mastering machines?

DL:

To be honest,

I'm not all iar with the currently available digital recorders. that famil-

I've spent a year working on the

:3M

]

MS]

32

-track machine and, probably because it's the machine that

I'm most familiar with, that's the one that I've worked on most.

Soundworks

New

York] has that machine, and I've done several albums there. I can like how I punch -in, roll back, record, overdub, and bounce tracks on the 3M.

I have done a entirely lot of work in the domain, however

-

The digital

Nightfly is digital

[3M multitrack; mix to

Sony PCM

-1610]

-

and I've found that there's something missing in recording purely digital. It's almost like you can have something too pure, too clean. You listen to

Sergeant were done on

Pepper, eration" by The Who

- or

"My

Gen- those sessions analog two -tracks, or four

- tracks, or coupled four- tracks. And there's something wonderful about the

"analog sound" of those records.

You see, there's a way that

I like to record,

if

I can.

What

I like to do is use an older

Neve console, record on an

A

-800

Studer, use

[Scotch]

226 tape at

+6 ele- vated level, hit the tape very hard, and cut my basic chance

I can get,

I that approach. There's pression effect that larly with drums erly, tracks that way. Any

- try and steer happens and, a

-

toward

-corn- particu- recorded prop- it's so clean and strong. Then,

I immediately transfer those tracks to digital.

For me, the digital domain works ter in the overdub and mix stage.

I bet- still prefer using analog to but -

I like which to do is a track the basics, all the overdubs on great way bouncing, vocal to do digital all that combinations, and so

Mg.

r m!lll t

+Y

To stay

namber

one,

you've got

`o

make

the

best

even better.

Which is

why for

ten

years

Ampex

has

:ontinued advancing

the

performance of

masterThg tape.

Through

a

456

~

'rams

he tape

behind

the

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i

August

1985

0

R

-e

/p

39

-- continued from page 36

...

Daniel

Lazerus

on.

You end up with basic tracks which, when you solo them, you hear a kick drum recorded hot and strong analog sense, and transferred out generation loss

- onto

- in an with- digital.

The sound is never unbelievably tell that clean: you could it wasn't just recorded on the digital machine, but it has the qual- ity of the things i love about analog.

I mean, when

I mix, six, two -track slap machines

-

using because

I digital delays or digital slap just love

I'll even that rent

- up to rather sound: there's just something great about genuine was one of the purest that has ever been done. the analog world

- digital recordings

It the was never in album was purely

And digital, and painstakingly so. it sounds good:

if

you go to any

HiFi store, with. that's what they usually demo it's almost a joke! Yet, with all that in mind, we've cut a few

Donald's new album, and done analog- tracking

-to- reason rather than purely digital

Donald is recording digital

- tracks for it mode. that

- is because

Nightfly; he heard the difference. in the

The way of things that i've done since

The analog tape slap.

R

-e

/p:

So you're using each technology

- analog and digital

- for the best of what it can do for you.

DL: Very much so. See, in working with

...

[Pauses, then smiles wryly'

Okay,

Donald

I

Fagen

I, here

I go.

The Night fly

R -e p:

Donald

Pagers

:s work is notor- iously a ell- engineered and well -produced

- eery snappy. eery clean. It seems to me

Ihat this level of quality has to he the result of an attitude that runs through the whole recording process: miking, pre

-amps. the type of console used, cho- ice of

How outboard equipment, did you achieve that purity on The

Nightfly? and so on. level of sonic

ANNOTATED DISCOGRAPHY

-

concluded

..

.

Various Artists:

The Gospel at Colonus.

"This is a gospel show, composed by a guy named Bob Tilson. It's certainly experimental theatre; a sort of Oedipus set to gospel.

Donald

Fagen gave me tickets to a performance of the show at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and

I was so struck by it that

I sought out the composer and talked to him afterwards.

It turned out that nobody had made plans to record it.

I approached Donald about the idea, and we took it to Warner Brothers.

"It's not necessarily the kind of music that's 'hit- bound,' but it is amazing.

I mean, the crowd at

BAM went nuts! There's this group, the Five Blind Boys From Alabama, and their lead singer,

Clarence Fountain, who's blind, plays Oedipus in the show.

Oedipus, as you know, blinded himself. Clarence can turn on the stage like nobody's business, and he sings his ass off!

"The music involves a soloist, a band, and a huge choir. Miking the choir was an intriguing situation. When we came to doing the choir overdubs, which involved about

45 people, we were working in a studio in

New York [Soundworks) that was extremely dead: low ceilings, and kind of crowded. But this music was about the church!

So, we had the full choir in a semi -circle in this space, and

I miked them in three sections from in front and from behind with overhead mikes: Neumann

U87s behind, and

AKG

414s in front.

I set up an

EQ that seemed to work, blended the mikes, and recorded them in stereo. in the mix, concert hall effect from an Eventide

SP2016 digital echo system.

I added a

Lazerus and

Harrison:

"5 Minutes

Goes To Washington."

"This is a thing

I did with Jerry Harrison of the Talking Heads, recorded in a basement in

Milwaukee about a half a year ago.

It's like a street kind of dance thing. i play drums and keyboards, Jerry plays keyboards, and Bootsie Collins plays bass.

Ronald

Reagan does the rest: it's based on his famous

'blooper' speech in which he announced that he was

'outlawing

Russia forever', and that 'we begin bombing in five minutes.'

"Reagan's voice, taken directly from a recording that we got from the Mondale cam- paign, was sampled into an

E

-Mu Systems Emulator iI. The keyboard was split so that different portions of the sample were in different registers of the keyboard, and

Jerry played it. made it

This recording was done extremely quickly, and put out before the election.

It to number

38 on the dance charts here, and was very successful in Europe."

John Denver. "African

Sunrise," from

Dreamland

Express.

"This is

John Denver at his sincerest; as we all know him. i love this track: it's very much a'John Denver' song. John has been involved with the

World Hunger Project for about

12 years, and

I can people.

I did attest that it's a very real thing with him. He wrote this song in

Africa

-about a year before USA For Africa

-

when he was in Ethiopia and living with cricket overdubs on this track, and Roger

Nichols does bird calls. those

"This whole album was done with one band: two guitarists, an acoustic piano player, a sax player, and a drummer in a small booth. I'd generally been working in large rooms, with areas to displace everything, and this was a small room. Nonetheless,

I live attempted to get a drum sound by putting two Neumann

U87s in the booth, facing the glass.

This was the only track on the whole album in which

I could use those 'ambient' mikes. In the beginning of the song, the toms, played with brushes, are from the stereo room mikes."

DOD

DL: is a

With an artist matter of

-

like Donald, every single it really day

-a

meticulous concern sound.

If

something for how things wasn't sounding right, there could be several days spent on continually trying to achieve a par- ticular sound. The

Nightfly represents a very strong, perfect recording:

if

you were able to solo the tracks, you'd find that they're very clean, and very pure:

And having an objective mixer just helped the whole process: was mixed by involved.

Elliot

The

Nightfly

Scheiner, and the mixing process was unbelievably

I recorded the hulk of the album and, throughout the entire recording process, it was all about subtleties, like removing an

"s" from the end of a word.

Or literally, this is the truth

-

-

punching in on one syllable and getting out before the next one!

Of course, the great about digital is that it allows that thing degree of precision in punches.

So, for someone like Donald, who would want,

"Uh, can you get the in before the 'er' and out before

'th'.

.

.

" or whatever, digital is perfect.

Donald is and my just a purist beyond your imagining.

Which works for him, certainly, hut in some ways

I'm sure it also works against him. it's really just i)onald: that's how he hears it, and he cannot do it any other way.

Certainly, I've worked on records that have cost much less and sounded very good. And i also like things that are raw and recorded very live. But this is the way he works, and he's

And he's paying the bill. right: you cannot listen to his records and not hear brilliance, and groove. great music, and

I'm very proud of having worked on that album.

I sang on it; i did a lot of experimental stretched quite a rewarding. i could it more

if

it miking ideas; and i hit. wasn't

It so was good. difficult, but probably talk about

R

-e

/p:

How did you come to he involved with sessions for

The

Nightfly?

Was it through your work with producer Gary

Katz?

DL:

I was working at the

Village

Recorder, and had already worked at several other studios:

I started at Wally

Heider

I

Hollywood). When

I began at the

Village

I was a second and, within a year,

I was put on a project

Katz and Roger

Nichols debut album

- with it

Gary was the of a group called

Eye to

Eye. Roger ments, and said, "You should just use this guy.

I can't do it." had a lot of prior commit- after about two weeks he

He pointed to me, and

I took over the helm.

I finished the album, and was asked to work on The

Nightfly, which was kind of a coup: nobody else had penetrated that world before, and

I wound up being the basic recordist.

So, it came about from Roger

Nichols' insight about me, his generosity, and his lack of insecurity about involving someone new.

... continued overleaf

-

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it.

Daniel

Lazerus

I was born

California

- and raised in

Orange County in Southern the city of Orange,

- and all of a sudden

I in not only found myself doing a

Steely

Dan album as my first album, but also found a myself in

Manhattan. whole new world

-a

It was just lonely proposi- tion in a lot of ways, but it was reward- ing, and

I got a

Grammy nomination for

R -e, p:

Can you describe that technique for us?

DL: The way

I like to do it is to use two mikes in the vents on top.

I use two dif- ferent mikes, instead of the same kind, because it gives a different coloration and sonic quality.

I use a

Shure

SM56 or

57, and an

AKG C451 or

452 with a

10- dB pad. On the bottom,

I use a [Neu- mann]

U47 or an [Electro

-Voice] RE

-20 - or even a [Sennheiser]

MD

-421 would do.

I pan the top mikes left and right, and blend the bottom mike into both channels. It's a great sound.

R

-e

/p:

Let's talk about tracking.

Do you tend to go for a specific sound want to hear in the you may refine and so on? final mix, that or do try simply to record strong tracks you you that later with EQ, effects,

DL: When I'm to make sure solid, cutting basic tracks, that what's on tape and has all the qualities instrument

I try is rock that are necessary. And

I drive myself crazy about that:

I change instruments and amps around a lot, or rent other kinds of drums, because if the sound with the drums or the isn't there amp, you can't fix

But

I definitely go for a very specific sound. And it with radical

EQ. it's difficult sometimes, because performance is so important as well.

Nonetheless,

I have a very strong, innate sense of what I'm going for, and

I do have a style: there are some strong similarities that

I drive towards from record to record, dio. Yet,

I of performance. and from studio to stu- want to understand the sense

So, what I'm going great in phases,

I try to set myself up so

- so the tracking and overdub that to be that mixing sounds it's right there at the end of the fader, and I'm not going to have to fool with it too much. The worry about

...

times, when

I hear albums ished, it's excruciatingly painful something doesn't seem too loud, then there's a shaker

[shakes his things head] that that

Some-

I've fin-

-

I if in a too, that wasn't loud enough certain section!

I have to fight that, because these days cutting basic tracks is practically getting to be like mixing: you almost want to be able to cut your basic tracks and hear them like a final mix. achieve.

That is quite difficult to

R

-e

/p:

Especially since, at the outset, you of don't the really know what the texture final mix is going to be, since the whole sonic reality is unfolding before your ears as you work.

DL: Right.

It's just the business way. But in you put up that the has caused the projects the basic sophistication

They had been so well that it to

I've tracks, what hear will sound like final

-mix sounds.

At times, I've almost degenerated my basic track sounds by re-

EQ'ing things. thought be that done, if you'll out of to start with, that they didn't really need that!

R

-e

/p:

Do you tracking?

DL: No, live drum tracking, and maybe a bass effect.

I hopefully none comes from kick with no having

- except for want to have the control a good- that sounding snare drum coming through it, a snare track where hear the hi -hat you can barely good drums. cut

- many effects during that's miking technique

- all a matter and then of two faders with live, huge, stereo panned

R

-e

/p: you use

DL:

What live echo miking configuration for the ambient tracks?

In the case of the worked on, it was room mikes, some mikes chamber, and last nine different

that

do project

I mikes: were in a some of the direct mikes as well.

A live drum sound

that

you can put on two tracks needs to sound good: it

"spikey," or have too much cymbals. can't be off balance,

That takes technique. or snare too or

R

-e

/p:

Do you normally mix the basics that you track?

DL:

Yes.

R -e

/p: If you were not to be involved in the mixing, would you still provide a stereo

DL: ambience track like that?

If it would be an added bonus for the person who was mixing,

I suppose so.

It's rare that

I know beforehand that someone else is going to mix a project that

I've tracked. And even if

I was sure that was to be the case,

I wouldn't be able to pre -guess their style. How could you know you what they might want, unless had spent years seconding for them?

I just and, really need to go

-

I have with to my instincts say this again

-a

lot of what

I do is instinctive.

R

-e

/p:

Yet someone else mixed

The

Nightfly. How did you deal with situation?

DL:

I that just tried to do my own quality recording. There's ity in that things a lot of my album, just that in personal- the basics

-

I'm sure Elliot [Scheiner] wouldn't necessarily do.

Recording the

Hammond organ in stereo, for example, so that you can actually feel the Leslie speakers going around.

R -e

/p:

Let's turn to the mixdown pro- cess.

Do you conceive of the final mix in visual terms?

DL: Very much so.

I like paintings framed really see mixes speakers. What

I try to do is get the left

- to -right panorama of between that the two painting, but also create a three -dimensional feeling

- as though you could almost walk into the mix, and grasp a specific sound.

It's a matter of utilizing a lot of properly

- controlled echo and delay: those are the that allow a lot of dimension- elements ality, like a guitar that's echo over here [begins ious echo here, plus a over here, be and spiralling even shaker pointing in var- directions].

A vocal delay another delay heard. Or a saxophone echo and a delay way; a that has that its that's sitting may further away, barely that here, with its that's got an are going this echo like

that's that's

off here, but has an sending it off here. Things that make the mix

"breathe."

R

-e

/p:

At what point in the remix do you start to bring in these various echo and delay elements?

DL: Well,

I build all of elements first. The kinds of have spins and spirals are built on after the foreground parts, and they shouldn't be washed out or lost ily be lost

- particular, is something the foreground as the mix builds. things that bass guitar, that can in read-

R

-e

/p: ing of this when you first hear a demo, during tracking, or when you really become

DL:

I

When do you concentrate first

"painting" on begin conceiv- of a involved with the mix phase? mix? Is the basic it tracks when I'm doing those, and take time to think about mixing before mix time. As far as the recording process goes,

I do try to think about mixing in the sense of bouncing tracks properly; opening up tracks; keeping certain things open for mixing

I

- things like that. don't always have the opportunity to hear a demo. When

I do, an idea might spring to mind. But the concept of a mix really comes to me after sessions, when

I spend time before the actual mixing begins, the tracking thinking about what

I want to achieve.

I make pages and pages of drawings of experiments

that

I want to try in order to make a

...

continued overleaf

-

R

-e/ p 42

August

1985

We

the undersigned ask only one thing of

a

piano.

L.,,4LÌ2,

Leonard Bernstein

André Previn

762e-g

I.nllanw l'av;imtli

Aaron Copland

John uill' un>

Mickey

Gille

That it

be a

Baldwin.

Baldwin'

Without equal.

For additional information circle e29

Augu,t

I p

I,i

Daniel

Lazerus

drum go this way. or make a voice go that way: or make it bigger or smaller.

- mm mm

That's important.

I can't tell you all the great "mistakes" that mistakes! Even on my have records I've worked on. part been

Just wonderful

- on the by mis- punching, or something like that.

R

-e/ p:

You mix. you said that, when you build a start with the foreground ele- ments. Can you more detail?

DL: To be strong plates beat.

I describe the process in honest,

I really paring all of the effects use. i generally use a like to use

I'm going snare check my effects, because

- left, that start it's a regular, three right, and center drum

- by pre-

EMT and to to

I make sure that they are balanced, decaying in the same time, and sound similar. sends, going for my drums dry in i forget solo mode;

And check all then same decays, to me the centers of my effects

-

EQ'ing them and keyboards. Then I'll put up a mix with about drums and bass, and the echo.

Drums and bass are the foun- dation;

I build from there, adding key- boards, guitar, and so on.

Even the effects, drums might have certain but

I add those before

I continue. as far as setting delays and echo that with the bass, all all that. start depends

I guitar to on start add the drum sound.

I'll solo whatever is the smallest increment of time on the track

- usually, it's the hi

-hat rhythm

- and use that in setting delays. I'll listen to the return of the delay of the lead vocal, and make sure that it's just disappear- ing perfectly with that hi

-hat.

I love using tape

-slap machines with VSOs so that you can hear a beautiful delay, but it just melts and disappears into the track. On a lot of my mixes, there are as many as seven or eight very different delays.

R

-e

/p:

Have you had occasion to use sampling and replacement techniques?

DL: Oh, sure. While

I was doing

The

Nightfly,

I became familiar with Roger

Nichols' computer,

Wendell, which is the most sophisticated computerized sampling device that exists on the planet! Donald utilized Wendell to replace sounds on The

Nightfly, and it was fascinating.

Most of the time we were was miles working on designing that album, that

Roger

Wendell II, which was ahead as far as increased sam- pling rate, no loss of high

-end, and so on.

Then,

Roger produced the

Denver album [Dreamland

John

Express[ that

I just recorded and mixed, and we used Wendell a few times on replacing the snare.

Now, on the album that working on

[June

1985] that

I'm album, currently artist

Vela

- on

A &M

Gary

- which is an records named Rosie

Katz, who is producing, hired a guy named

Jim

Bralower. He's been doing Nile Rogers' drum machine programming, as well as for Hall and

Oates and Cindy Lauper; he's just an

.

.

` ' i

.

`

/

%,'

1III"'

r ace at programming drum machines.

Jim studied all the demos, set up all his drum machine programs for each song, and we laid down the drum machine parts first. Then

I worked with Jim

Keltner album

- who on played live things drums like on the kick -drum sounds, using the live chamber at the

Village Studio

D.

With

Jimmy Bralower and an

AMS

[

I)M

X -1

580S

J, we were able to sample those live sounds and trigger them from the drum machine.

That sort of thing is almost becoming the norm. And i thought it was funny, because there was all this talk about, "Is

SteveGadd in

Wendell? Is Jim Keltner's kick in Wendell ?" Well, these days Jim

Keltner will come to a date, and he's got all these weird drum sounds, noises, his

Simmons toms, his Linn chips, the whole thing. He's beyond

Wendell now!

It's ironic.

R -e

/p:

You had a background as a musi- cian before you began engineering, and on a lot as arranger. background singer, the percussion parts, and on

Diana

Ross' album [Ross[

I parts that sort of thing.

How do you think your music-al during your engineering and producing?

DL: If wrong, hear something that i'll point it out. Or

I might sug- gest a harmony part.

On the last Joe

Cocker album

[

Civilized

Ma n

[

I

-

I of your projects you're credited background by which

I comes arranged arranged the vocal mean that into play

I sounds worked them out with the

I don't know musicians. that there are any rules about those things, but

I don't want there to be any misunderstanding about terms:

I wasn't the "music

Any musician is usually free to develop his own gle or quite parts, unless you're doing something like that; it's rarely that strict. arranger." a jin-

Even with someone like

Donald Fagen, who knows very specifi- cally what he wants, there's still room.

R

-e - p:

I've always felt that the engineer be it in the studio or in concert

- formed an your work, integral the sanie way.

You part of the musical ensemble.

From what you say about i suspect that you appear to may feel have an intuitive approach to the recording pro- cess; you think musical terms. of what you're doing in

DL: Well, which

I the musician's approach has been a useful tool for me in never really doing.

I was of how my engineering, thought

I would be drawn into it.

One example musical background helps is that

I can read charts. The artist or pro- ducer can say, "Go back to bar #34," and

I can roll the machine back to that point.

Certainly, some very technical people are good engineers, but

I think it proba- bly works better if they have a musical background.

R

-e/ p: crafting the sound of a track, you also are greatly influencing the emotional impact of the song.

DL: Well,

I feel particular.

As a rule, when

I mix,

I'm left alone

-

But in and that that's about mixing, when

I need to in have

I the overview. And

I feel that it is an incredibly important role: you really affect the musical result, unless you have a producer who says, "I want this, want this, and

I want this!" It's a diffi- cult position, because you're coming up, and you also have working relation- ships with various producers to consider. brilliant engineer can add so

Yet a much to a a11d1 by track.

I believe in the engineer /producer

-to- artist relationship, that

I mean in the sense of how

Hugh Padgham or Bob

Clearmountain are working.

As a rule, an what they want, and sometimes produc- tion seems to be a which you can vision.

I believe matter get out of artist of the the knows extent way of to their desire a working relationship with someone who bridges the creative gap in the studio: a person sound that the that a lot of artists that artist can capture the can only describe. in

If

I were to be producing exclusively,

I would you still want to handle the engineer- ing side, because of the sense of control have, plus the cation with the the records immediate artist communi- working toward. i feel it's a valuable function, and

I think of engineers who are very much involved that and what they're that we there are hear, a lot yet they don't receive any credit or reciprocation.

It's kind of like being a taxi driver: you're serving as the link between the passengers and their destination.

I believe the that artist the relationship between and the engineer /producer, a co- production situation, is healthy for record -making.

It's desire for my career. certainly what

I

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-e' p 44

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1985

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1

LIVE -PERFORMANCE SOUND

AClockwise from above: David Bowers. Dirk Schubert. and Ed

Simeone

TOTO

World

Tour

SOUND

SYSTEM DESIGN

BY

SCHUBERT

SYSTEMS GROUP

by

David Scheirman

Take one of the music world's best -known, Grammy Award

- winning pop rock groups, a custom -tailored concert sound sys- tem,

136 controlled stage inputs, computer

- stage instrumentation, a new concept in monitoring, six

(6!!) veteran live soundmixers, and several months' worth of ing

...

and the

international

recipe exists tour- for one of the most complex concert sound pro- jects to be out on the road this year.

Starting

in

February of this year,

The Toto Entourage kicked off its

1985

World

Tour in

Japan.

A complete stage

-monitoring system, and a house

- mixing package equipped with a regu- lated power distribution system, were shipped to all international dates.

For the

Japanese

portion of the tour, a house reinforcement system was con- tracted through

Hibino Sound.

All

North American dates were handled by

Schubert Systems

Group, of Gar- dens,

CA.

On March

19, 1985,

Toto's U.S. tour began

at

the Arizona

State

Univer- sity Activity Center in Tempe, Ariz- ona.

This writer journeyed to the site for a first -hand look at the group's ad- vanced audio system, which features multiple mixing consoles with six operators.

The Band

Toto is a of some of notable group, comprised

America's busiest working studio session musicians. The group's albums have often featured innova- tive recording techniques and instrumen- tation.

Collectively, members of Toto

-

David

Paich,

Steve

Jeff, Steve and

Mike

Porcaro

- have

arranging

and recording of more re- cent,

American popular rock music

than

any other similar group of musician

/technicians.

Lukather, plus probably participated in the playing,

Several of the band members oper- ate personal

-use re-

cording studios,

which are of gear stripped when the group does one of its infrequent tours.

Shep Lonsdale, a re- re v

cording engineer

and audio mixer who has collabo- rated with the goup on such recent ven- tures as the film soundtrack for Dune, is involved in all aspects of

Toto's sound.

"Having

been involved with the actual recording to

Toto's music in the studio gives me a much different perspective on doing the live shows

than

many concert mixers might have," explains Lonsdale (pictured left).

"Traditionally, a gap has existed between live and recorded sound.

R -e

/p

46

0

August

1985

OUR

NEW

BABY

Announcing the arrival of the MTR -90's li tie brother:

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A multitrack mas- tering recorder that lets you do virtually any- thing you want to do in audio. affordably.

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SMPTE time code -based video editing sys- tems. machine controllers, and synchroni- zers. Its "3 -way" design

(1 inch

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And as your needs change. this machine will stay with you all the way up to

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1984

TOTO

WORLD

TOUR Figure

1:

Stage Diagram of

Toto

1985

World Tour.

113

That

gap is

starting

to narrow, as the technology becomes available to re- create the sound of an album in a live

- performance setting. Stage technol- ogy is the fidelity the past. The sound of the recorded music improving, and concert systems are now beginning to offer

and that

has the sound been of the

-sound lacking live in show are important to the members of

Toto."

GEODE

[STAGE POWERI

STEREO KEYBOARD MONITORS

VOCAL MIKE

COMPUTER

VOCAL

MONITOR

BAND MIX MONITOR

AUDIO CONSOLE

ELECTRONIC KEYBOARDS

OVERHEAD SIDEFILL MONITOR CABINET

The Live Concept

Dirk Schubert, of

Schubert Systems

Group, was actively involved in assem- bling

Toto' s cus- tom studio moni- toring system and performance hard- ware. When

the

band chose SSG to provide full sound reinforcement ser- vices as well for the group's live tour,

Schubert went along as a monitor mix engineer. to

"One of the most important things understand here is know way of

that

these guys what they want," states bert (pictured above right). "They craft their musical packages in the studio, and they are used to a hearing everything

...

Schu- certain stereo keyboard monitors, special vocal monitors, and instrument submixers.

It was up to us to figure out how to take the whole thing on the road in an easily -transportable package.

"Our touring accounts get some- thing

To

136

that

other sound companies are not often able to address: if the gear doesn't exist to give them the sound or the operational functions want, we build it for them."

that

make Toto's live show they happen, stage inputs were funneled down to house and stage monitor mixing positions, each with two

Gamble con- soles (and two board operators) by using separate, manned stereo key- board submix positions (Figure

1).

Hidden offstage, these two consoles gave both keyboardists David Paich and

Steve

Porcaro an individual audio mixer for ple submixing the multi- stage rigs (with banks of MIDI

- connected keyboards), as well as a

"private" stage monitor man for each musician's own musical program mater- ial.

Personal computers assisted in the MIDI -switching of the two rigs.

KEYBOARD MIXER

[OFFSTAGE RIGHT[

VOCAL, DRUM

MONITOR MIX

POSITION

YIP

SUBWOOFERS

,,

CENIERFILL

PA

SAX

ISTI

%e e

PIANO

®

DRUMS

437*

PERCUSSION

4

1

BASS

°i

his several years of touring with

Elec- tric on a

24-II

Light Orches- tra. Simeone mixed

Gamble

SC24- board.

De- signed and built by

Jim

Gamble

Asso- ciates, the features

24

trans

- formerless console inputs and

24 outputs, and seemed to be ideally suited for use as a stage instrument mixer (Figure

2).

"Basically, what we are doing here is giving the musician access to a

[WIRELESS]

'AUDIENCE!

[I

GUITAR

PROCESSING

EQUIPMENT

CENTERFILL

P

A.

KEYBOARD MIXER

[OFFSTAGE LEFTI

SUBWOOFERS wide variety of electronic instrument voicings, and using

MIDI

-switching technology to keep stage clutter

at

a minimum," Simeone explains

(pic- tured left).

Several primary keyboards are lo- cated on stage at Steve

Porcaro's posi- tion, including a

Yamaha

DX

-7.

In- terface cabling connects the stage area with Simeoné s setup, and those performance keyboards can access the additional instruments, including a pair of E -mu

Systems Emulator and an Oberheim

X-

Pander.

Its

"Some of the latest electronic key- board gear now available is being

Figure

2:

Stage -left keyboard mix position manned by Ed

Simeone.

-

Gamble SC-

24 -24

-11 console,

Keyboards; Stage

Left

The instrument submix for Steve

Porcaro was handled by Ed

Simeone, who gained a great deal of experience with complex keyboard setups during

R -e

/p

48

August

1985

VERSATILE.

V-43

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design, the

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a variety of applications.

A high

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where you need more

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means musicians can use the

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,

Figure

3

(left):

A Compaq personal computer located at the stage left submix position.

Each song in the show has a

"menu" showing which instruments are in use, as well as

MIDI patches. Figure

4

(right):

The Compaq display screen, showing an informational display designed by keyboard expert

Ralph

Dyck.

TOTO

WORLD

TOUR used with this show, and the factory support from companies such as

Yamaha, Oberheim and Emulator has been tremendous," Simeone con- fides.

"Things could get pretty com- plicated with this many keyboard units." Having the auxiliary key- board racks off

-stage gave the stage a much cleaner appearance, he offers.

To help the complex setup work smoothly, Simeone uses a Compaq personal computer placed next to his mixing desk (Figure

3).

The screen editor displays musical a

"menu" switch for for each each arrangement, showing what keyboard device is which MIDI tune

(Figure

4).

In addition, the computer program patched through

(arranged

by keyboard expert Ralph

Dyck) sends a pulse to a

JL

Cooper MS -II

MIDI match

-box device, when neer. authorized by the engi-

Yamaha

MIDI rack panel modules are hooked up to the various keyboard devices.

A customized voltage

-controlled attenuator module was designed by

Jonathon

Little of

Village Recorder, Los Angeles, to provide a direct interface for lever

- changing of the keyboard instru- ments.

"This is a very high -quality way to control levels," noted Simeone.

"It

would be very clean sole to counterproductive to put a signal from a $50,000 con- through

Porcaro uses a $1.50 volume whole rig, while David pot!

Steve the

VCA to control his

Paich uses his fade different out of synthesizers in and the piano mix."

Effects devices available to

Simeone included a unit, a

Yamaha REV

-1 digital reverberator, a DL -1500 digital delay

Lexicon

Roland Super

Jupiter, and a

Prime Time II digital delay.

In addition, a Dynacord

CLS -222 was available for an electronically- created

R p 50

0

August

1985

Leslie rotor effect.

The entire keyboard mixing rig was streamlined, and seemingly well

- designed inputs and outputs to and from the

VCAs as a synergistic package.

All are patched, and multicable connects the up." a can take over in case of MIDI

42

-pair synth rack and console. For fail -safe operation, a

16- channel manual switching panel

"hang

-

Additionally, a MIDI

"Panic

But- ton" is supplied just in case a glitch in the complex control -signal path line causes the system to disregard a com- puter instruction to change over to the next song's settings.

"On this side of the stage, Steve likes to wait until

I do the changes, and then he kicks it over himself with

an

on

-stage switch," explains

Simeone. "On stage right,

I think they did have a hangup once or twice dur- ing the shows in

Japan,

but a quick

tap

of the panic button sent out a burst of signal pulses in about

30 mil- liseconds,

that

cleared it up.

The button interrupts the signal bus, and gives and the circuits a chance to clear."

Keyboards; Stage Right

David Bowers, who has worked with the

Doobie

Brothers and Kenny

Loggins, among others, mixed David

Paich's

stage -right keyboard rig.

Bowers also commanded a Gamble

SC24

-24

-II desk

that

was located off- stage right (Figure

5).

Here, a bank of

MIDI -connected keyboards was dir- ectly controlled with an IBM personal computer (Figures

6 and

7).

An

Oberheim

DSX synthesizer with

Digital Polyphonic Sequencer, Ober-

Figure

5

:

Stage

-right keyboard mix position stereo manned by

David Bowers.)

-

Gamble SC-

24 -24

-1I console, monitor loudspeakers, and an

IBM personal computer. (This position

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51

For additional information circle

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Figure

6:

Stage

-right auxiliary keyboard rack, where MIDI- connected instruments for

David Paich include an Oberheim

DSX, Oberheim X- Pander, and an

E

-mu

Systems

Emulator

II. heim

013

-8,

Oberheim

X-

Pander and

Emulator

II were all controlled by either a

Yamaha

DX

-7 or

Paich's con- cert grand piano.

A cut was made into the piano frame, and the

DX

-7 nested snugly on top

(Figure

8).

"The computer, the keyboard audio mixer, and MIDI technology make things a lot easier on stage used to be,"

Bowers right).

than

they states

(pictured

"Instead of

,ye mountains of key- board instruments and miles of spa- ghetti -like cables, you up

just

there see a

-with

man his piano. But, you are hearing many of the exact voicings and synth parts

that

appeared on such classic tunes as

`Africa' and

`Hold

The Line'. The grand piano keyboard can trigger sounds from

that

have been stored in the album masters." the

Emulator, which were taken directly

Bowers used a Lexicon PCM60,

Roland

MKS

-80

Super Jupiter, two

Yamaha

D1500 digital delays, two

Roland

SRE

-555

Chorus

Echos, and a

Lexicon

224 digital reverb for special

- effects processing.

In addition, an

Aphex Compellor compressor- limiter and an Eventide

H949

Harmonizer were available in the equipment racks.

As on stage

-left, a

JL

Cooper MIDI

Match

-Box and a custom VCA panel formed part of the setup, along with a

Yamaha MIDI Rack.

Keyboard Monitors

"An important part of assembling

R

-e

/p

52

August

19H:,

Figure

7:

David Bowers' IBM computer handles MIDI switching for each tune during the show. this stage- monitoring system was the concept

that

the performers wanted small, bright- sounding boxes placed up at ear level," explains designer

Dirk Schubert. "Also, nobody in this band wants to hear much of

anything

below 150 Hz on from these boxes. It is like a 'close

- field' mini -monitor we speaker concept the approach.

What basically had to come up with was the Yamaha

NS

-10 or

that

vocals coming

JBI.

could concert sound pressure levels, able to hold up on the road."

4401 put out and be

Sets of compact, custom -built stereo keyboard monitors and interface elec- tronics were designed and assembled by

Schubert Systems

Group to pres- ent the complex mixes to the per-

Figure

8:

A Yamaha DX

-7 synthesizer has been

Yamaha neatly fit into the top of a concert grand piano. The DX

-7 and piano each access the off -stage key- board rack. formers. For console monitoring, both

David Bowers (stage- right) and Ed

Simeone (stage

-left) used a pair of cabinets

that

were placed on stage.

The identical to those miniature loudspeaker columns each house two

JBI.

Model 2118H eight

-inch speakers with a passive contour network on each, and a

2404-

11 tweeter. The eight frequency response is

-inch speaker's from

150

Hz to

4 kHz, essentially flat at which point the tweeter is brought in with a pas- sive crossover network. The boxes are trapezoidal in shape, and fitted into the stage set with small metal support

stands

(Figure

10).

Yamaha

PC

-2002

Figure

9:

David Paich's stage monitors: the small enclosure next to the piano keyboard carries a vocal mix only.

A stereo keyboard mix is also available from the mini -columns.

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August

1985

0

R

-e

/p

53

STEREO KEYBOARDS

150Hz AND UP

KEYBOARD SUBWOOFERS

PLUS FULL -RANGE MONITOR

MIX: DRUMS.PERCUSSION.

BASS.ETC.

JBL

E140

HP

150Hz

MUTE SWITCH

(SPEAKERSI

LEFT

Figure

10:

Small loudspeaker columns, each housing two JBL Model 2118 -H eight -inch monitors for Steve Porcaro on stage -left.

KEYBOARD

FEED

y

MUTE SWITCH

(MONITOR)

X

1

I i

1

r

V

LEFT SPEAKER

AMPLIFIER

HP

150Hz

M

TOTO

WORLD TOUR

amplifiers power the keyboard while Metron

A -400 rigs, amps drive the vocal monitors.

The small keyboard columns proved so popular during rehearsals

that

other performance areas also were supplied with them, sax including the

/background vocal riser.

"The concept really makes sense," ex- plained sideman Scott Page. "The lit- tle boxes give us bright reference in- formation to sing with, right there in front of us.

The kick and bass sound, the main rhythm section mix, comes from a little farther away in the bigger slant, instead of blasting me in the face like a lot of stage speaker sys- tems do.

It works great."

Critical keyboard, vocal and solo

- instrument program information is fed through the compact speakers.

Additional rhythm section material requiring better low- frequency pre- sentation is fed to the various per- formers through separate larger floor

-

slant

monitors

that

house JBL

K -140

15

-inch

2445 speakers,

2441 drivers with diaphragms, and

2405 tweeters.

Where floor for vocals, monitors are required and Mike Porcaro, SSG's low- profile vocal

slant

including monitors

Steve

Lukather were used (Fig- ure

11). of

These tiny boxes pack a pair

JBL

2118 -J eight -inch speakers and a 2425 one -inch compression driver

JBL

2344

Bi- mounted on a modified

Radial horn. Actively crossed over at

1.5 kHz, the cabinets sit hardly 12 inches high, and offer an extremely smooth, yet mix; bright, vocal reference they also have a power contour network on the horn.

A protective

R

-e

/p

54

August

1985

RIGHT

MONITOR

FEED

LP 100Hz

HP

1500Hz

MI

LP 1500Hz

-

PHASE

REVERSE

HORN

PHASE

M

V

(l

RIGHT SPEAKER

AMPLIFIER

SUM

HORN

AMPLIFIER

WOOFERS

AMPLIFIER

Top: Schubert Systems

Group Stereo keyboard Monitor Rig.

Above: Block Diagram of Keyboard

Monitor

Signal Flow. cover latches into place for travel, and wheels make moving the package very easy (Figure

12).

Monitor Mixers

The main monitor mixing

(down

-stage right) was

Dirk

Schubert and Alan area handled by

Bonomo(Fig- ure

13). A

Gamble SC40

-16 served the as primary board, while an

SC32

-16 was used as a drum and percussion submixer. (The latter also served the opening act).

What started as

136 dis- crete stage inputs ended up as 58 combined channels at the house and stage monitor positions, plus various effects returns.

Yamaha

Q -1027 third

-octave gra- phic equalizers were available for some of the

16 monitor mixes, although the Gamble boards feature on

-board parametric equalizers across each output mix.

A

Lexicon 224X reverb with LARC remote,

Yamaha

REV

-1

Time, digital reverb, Lexicon Prime

Eventide

H949

Harmonizer, and a

Roland SDE

-2000 digital delay unit were available for processing use on vocals, drums, keyboards and sax- ophone. dbx Model

160 and

160X compressor -limiters were chan nel- inserted for lead vocals, background vocal mix, piano and kick drum.

Flying overhead stereo, tri -amped sidefill cabinets flanked both sides of the downstage area.

Lead singer

"Fergie" Fredricson, using a

Nady

701 wireless microphone, does not rely on any floor slants. The cluttered look of a half dozen slants along the front of the stage is changed here to a completely wide -open performance area.

"We have been using one of our PA cabinets as a side

-fill box on each side,

hanging

from the lighting truss," notes Schubert. level on

"The stage

-sound this tour is much lower than it

1

1

1

%-

r

..tf--'

5555

A

15

Spacious,

Sparkling,

Expansive,

Effervescent, and yes,

Beautiful.

The new

XT digital reverb from

Alesis.

With features usually found only in units bearing sky

-high price tags. Like 14Khz frequency response.

And extended delay options like

Pre

-Delay and

Slap -Back.

Wide range decay time control. Diffusion, Damping, and filters.

With the

XT you can fatter drums, fill in dry strings or simply set vocals back into the deepest, smoothest acoustic cushion imaginable. All in full stereo.

The XT mixes reverb into a signal directly from the front panel or connects to any board with echo sends.

Digital reverb technology finally comes down to Earth.

See the Alesis model XT at better music stores and studio supply centers everywhere.

Made

In USA, suggested retail price

S

795

Fui additional intormation cacle

=35

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omio

0! ^FCr'FR

,P r

(7F511 t

70%

OF?

70% of Studio applications, for automation, are for pre -programmed muting, the remaining 30% utilising the more powerful memory of fader level.

Now the CM4400 can be linked to a

Commodore 64

PC with a suitable communications port via a

SMPTE

/EBU reader writer. With software loaded onto the

'

64

, by floppy disc,) there is now available:

1.

Automated muting of over

1000 mutes against

SMPTE or EBU time code.

2.

Automated trip of the 30 internal memories against

SMPTE or

EBU time code.

3.

4.

Video syncronisation using

SMPTE or

EBU to open or shut channels automatically

-a

later update will be an events controller linked to this.

Full operation of the

CM4400 muting or routing from the

REMOTE 64

PC keyboard.

70% of all automation applications conventional costs! available for only

70% of

CM4400

DIGITAL

ROUTING

SYSTEM

affordable quality

Dealer list and brochure from:

In Canada:

Soundtracs

Inc. 745 One Hundred and

Ninth

Street,

Arlington,

Texas,

76011.

Tel:

(817)

469 1600

MCI Music Inc. 745

One Hundred and

Ninth

Street,

Arlington,

Texas,

76011.

Tel:

(817( 469 1600

Omni Media Corporation Ltd

9653 Côte de Liesse,

Dorval, Québec H9P 1A3 (514(

636

9971

For additional information circle

#36

R -e p

56

D

August

1985

Figure

11

(left): SSG

°s cus-om low- a profile vocal monitors each house two JBL

2118 -J eight -inch speakers,

2425 one -inch compression onto the mini -monitors for travel protection. and driver on a modified

Bi- Radial horn. Figure

12

(right): A protective cover latches has ever been: it is about

6 to

10 dB used down from when we used a loud monitor system. up here on everyone traditional

With less sound stage, we are finding

that

Of hears more clearly."

Schubert's

16 monitor mixes, two went to the tiny floor mixes fed the slants; three miniature keyboard speakers; and five went to full-sized

15

-inch es. slant monitors as rhythm mix-

Additionally, three mixes were as effects sends for the vocals and drums, while a headphone mix was sent to the piano area, and stereo sidefïlls completed the monitor

"Toto hoard's output assignments. has been using the Gamble boards in the re- cording studio,.. notes Alan Bottom°

(pictured left). plex setup

"Since this has been whole com- created around the keyboard submixers and the dif- ferent types of are duplicating monitor cabinets,

that

on the road so we the performers have the same system

that

has worked well for recording."

"It is important to note

that

a moni- tor system designed around the needs

...

continued overleaf

-

0

It's

a jungle out there!

On stage you've got to sound better than good, so you need the best

'

sounding loudspeakers in the business.

You get just that with the

Wildcats live performance loudspeaker system from

Tannoy, the makers of the recording studio monitors. world renowned

Dual Concentric

A truly modular system,

Wildcats offer the flexibility to cater for every artistes individual requirements. One

Lynx may provide all the musical power needed by a single performer, while a complete multi- enclosure, high power rig can be easily assemolec from the

Wildcats range to give really high

' sounc levels wh le still retaining the

Tanncy character of smooth, natural sound.

The

Wildcats system is so flexible that whatever your act, and wherever you aopear...

1 f8_9

'er

...dare you turn your back on a

Wildcat?

LIVE

PERFORMANCE

LOUDSPEAKERS FROM

-

TANNIOy

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America Inc.,

97

Victoria

Street

North,

Kitchener, Ontario, Canada, N2H 5C1. Telephone:

(519) 745 1158

August

1985

R -e

/p57

For additional information circle

#37

I p

Figure

13:

The monitor mixing area, downstage right: Gamble

SC40 -16 and

Gamble SC32

-16, handled by

Dirk

Schu- bert and

Alan Bonomo.

TOTO

WORLD TOUR

of a recording studio working well in a live seems to be performance situation," Schubert explains. "The rolled

-off low -end, the smaller cabi- nets, the lack of floor front singer down the

Vocal

...

it has

slants

for the all helped to

Things sound very clean up here." cut stage noise tremendously.

microphones comprised

Shure

SM78,

Beyer

M88 and a

Nady

701

(fitted with an

SM87 capsule). The drum kit featured a host of

Sennheiser

MD -421s, while

II

Countryman Isomax miniature condenser mikes picked up

A the congas, bongos and timbales. hybrid Fender

/Yamaha

wireless body pack unit was installed on the saxophone to allow freedom of movement.

International Tour Package

The North American concert dates posed no particular logistical prob- lems for since the firm tionwide

Schubert Systems Group, regularly handles na- touring assignments for a variety of clients, including the Tubes,

Willie Nelson, Michael McDonald and Jefferson Starship. However, much thought was given to the many concert dates to be performed in Eur- ope and

Asia.

"Toto wanted the entire stage in- strument package and monitor sys- tem to be self -contained and consis- tent," recalls SSG's David Morgan.

"Due to the great number of signal processors, crossovers and amplifi- ers, it was important

that

all of the

!!

¡

Soúñd you don't think you can afford

Meyer sound?

YOUR

COMPETITION

CAN.

TOURING REINFORCEMENT

STUDIO MONITORS

STAGE,

DISCO,

RELIGIOUS

Call Mike

Harris or

Barry Ober

at

HARRIS AUDIO SYSTEMS. Inc.

1962

N.E. 149

St.,

N.

Miami, Florida 33181

Figure

14:

A regulated power distribu- tion system offers each mix and stage equipment area two

20

-amp legs of AC power. racks be standardized, while travel- ling as compactly as possible."

The standard

-sized electronics racks were fabricated by

Flag Systems of thick birch plywood, and covered with a tough charcoal -gray exterior nylon carpet material.

An inner, foam

- surrounded birch frame protects the delicate electronic equipment. The racks measure

30 by

24 inches, and fit either three across in a

90

-inch truck, or four trucks. across in the new

99

-inch

Due to the microprocessor -based functions of many electronics devices, a clean, consistent source of

AC power essential.

A compact was considered regulated power supply was designed and fabricated by SSG

(Figure

14).

"This distro serves the stage area, the monitor system and the house mix area," explains Schubert. "Each per- former and console area has two

20- amp legs of clean, regulated electrical power.

Every man is on breakers. If the

AC surge,

starts

the regulators his own to drop or automatically compensate, and can be set to allow

Figure

15:

House mix engineer Clive

Franks at the Gamble HC40

-24 console.

A

Yamaha

M1516 -A submixer handled

I drum and percussion inputs.

':

Jti tt:.'.':..

e

r

1

_

4

°

a.

(305) 944 -4448

August

1985

Figure

16: A

400 separate Soundcraft Series desk was provided for use by open- ing acts. up to a

12 percent `window' for the optimum voltage lever."

A custom -designed stage input pan

-

el/splitter

system was assembled for the group, with separate record

/broad- cast capabilities for taking

96 lines on

-stage into two

48

-pair snakes.

A variety of unexpected difficulties can arise when taking such a complex live show to other countries.

"We got to

Japan,

and were not even able to use our new Nady

701 wireless system because it turned out to be middle of a

Japanese right

in the television sta- tion frequency," Schubert recalls

"Over there, however, products are available for use which cannot be purchased here in the States." designer

[Dirk

House Mixing

Shep Lonsdale and

Clive

Franks share mixing duties for Toto. The primary mixing console was a

Gam- ble HC40

-24, and a

Yamaha

M1516

-A submixer was set up to receive drum and percussion inputs (Figure

15). A separate Soundcraft

Series

400 desk was provided for use by the opening act (Figure

16). a

Effects processing devices included

Lexicon Prime Time II, AMS

15

-80S and

RMX

-16 delay units,

Yamaha

REV

-1,

Lexicon

224X digital reverb, and an Eventide

H949

Harmonizer.

Ten Valley People Kepex

II noise gates were channel- inserted for drum and percussion inputs.

Channel

-in- serted compressor -limiting for vocal microphones was assigned to dbx model

160 and

165 devices. Four

Yamaha

C200 stereo cassete decks also were supplied for taping the sh

(Figure

17).

"This is my first time using this particular sound system," explains mixer

Clive

Franks, known for many years of touring with Elton John. pretty exciting. One can get better live sound results from a custom -tailored and correctly- engineered system such as this one. out

It's

here with

Schubert]

- good to

that

us, have the though makes

"It's

..

. things go more smoothly, since devices such as off

-the- shelf, some of the the crossovers are not familiar products."

Like Shep Lonsdale, Franks felt

that

sound systems for live- concert use have been improving over the years.

"We seem to be getting more sound from a fewer number of cabinets

than

what you would have seen sev- eral years ago," he notes. "Improved array design and increased amplifier performance are all part of it."

Lonsdale concurs:

"Years ago, we made the best out of

If you were good whatever we had. at what you did, you learned how to get the best sound out of anything, because so many of the available systems were poor in qual- ity. tems

It's pretty easy to find good sys- these days, as we all keep learn- ing about what it takes to do the job right." speaker

House System

Schubert Systems Group's loud-

arrays

comprise multiples of a three

-way rectangular "column" cabinet, each of which houses two

JBL

Model 2220

15

-inch speakers, a

Bi-

Radial horn with a two -inch com- pression driver, and four JBL

2402 tweeters. The sembled into cabinets are easily as- hanging arrays (Figure

18).

Large subwoofer cabinets, each housing four

JBL

Model 2245

18

-inch loudspeakers in a ported rectangular

PE

15 PARAMETRIC

EQUALIZER

AND

NOTCH

FILTER

The

PE

15 brings an unprecedented degree of performan

::e single-space parametric equalizer format cipabili-yto the

-Five complete bands with four- octave frequency sweeps

-

Bandwidth

-Bands

1 range from

1.5 down to

0.03

(1/30) octave

-+15dB boost and

-20dB cut for notch filter and

5 switchable to shelving mode capability

-1/4" and three -pin /unbalanced inputs and outputs

-Up to

20dB input gain for low level

E61 such as electric guiar or bass

Backed with low- noise

/low distortion circuitry and rehab a

Pane con- struction, the

PE

15

'mast have at any reasonable pr ce. With a suggested

Its- price of only

$389, however

I

See, would be a studio, sound reinforcement or broadcast hear and cove- a

PE

15 for yourself at your nearest Rane dealer.

ANSI6510

216th

SW.

Mountlake

Terrace, WA98043

(206) 774 -7309

C O R P O

R A T

I

O N

CANADA

Head -water

Ind., 635 Caron

Ave., Windsor,

ONT.

(519) 256 -5665

August

1985

0

R-e/p

59

Figure

17 (left):

House equipment racks held a

15

-80s and variety of signal processing devices, including a

Lexicon Prime Time Il, AMS

RMX

-16 delay units, and dbx compressor -limiters. Four Yamaha

C200 stereo cassette decks were available for making reference recordings of each concert. Figure

18

(right): A total of

36 three

-way loudspeaker enclosures, each housing two JBL

2220 loudspeakers, a

Bi- Radial horn with

2441 driver, and four

2402 compression tweeters, were supplied to the tour.

TOTO

WORLD

TOUR

box, provide low- frequency reinforce- ment below

100

Hz.

Stacked on the floor next to the stage, ramps allowed these boxes to serve also as an additional performance area for the acrobatic lead

Amplifier singer (Figure

19). racks house five stereo

HUSH!

®rwua7,Qn

IN

©

OOf

- units each.

Three

1,200

-watt, one

800

- watt and one 400

-watt specially

- modified Cerwin -Vega amps are cur- rently employed, a combination

that

yields

300

-watts to each

18- and

15- inch speaker,

150 watts to each

2441 driver, and

25 watts to each 2402 tweeter (Figure

20).

"Having enough amplifier head- room to adequately drive the loud- speaker system and the reserve to respond to

transient

peaks is very important to us," observes SSG tech- nician Mike

Ferrara.

A 200

-amp, three -phase power dis- tribution system drove the C/M Lode-

star

hoists used to

"hang"

the sound system, and supplied the main ampli- fier racks.

A neat, modular

I

-beam system with heavy nylon straps sus- pended the speaker arrays; one rig- ging point with a one -ton motor sus- pended a single beam and four speaker cabinets. For venues averaging 10,000 seats, SSG supplied Toto with

36 three

-way cabinets and eight sub

- woofers, giving a total of

32 18

-inch

Figure

19:

Large subwoofer cabinets, each containing four JBL 2245

18

-inch speakers, provide low- frequency re- inforcement below

100

Hz.

Stacked next to the stage, the top surface of the cabinets offered an additional perfor- mance area for the acrobatic lead singer.

There is only one

HUSH. But there are three models. and all three come from Rocktron. We call them the

HUSH

II

Series.

If you aren't using a

HUSH

II, you aren't getting peace and

QUIET!

Ask their the pros. They're already using

HUSH Its to quiet their guitars, and guitar effects, and keyboards, and keyboard effects, and amplifier pre -amps, and p.a. systems, and monitors, and studio tracks, and tapes, and records, and single -coil pickups, and to eliminate unwanted feed- back, and to quiet mixdowns, recording systems, compressors, digital delays and anywhere else they have a noise problem.

With nothing an effective single

-ended noise reduction of greater than

30dB, can compare to a

HUSH II, or a

HUSH IIB, or a

HUSH

IIC.

2146 Mien industrial Drive Auburn HeigMS,

All

See Your

Rocktron Dealer.

RocxrRon ocxrron

c-crRP.

Mlchgon

48057 (313)

853-3055 products patent pending ft-e

PRO D

August

I

9S5

Figure

20:

SSG amplifier racks housed three

1,200

-watt, one

800 -watt one

400

- watt specially- modified Cerwin

-Vega power amps;

300 watts of power is available to each

18- and

15

-inch speaker. speakers,

72

15-inch speakers,

36 two- inch drivers and

144 compression tweeters.

With

Conclusions

Performance

Sound

enough conso:es and digital signal processing gear in this one touring system to fill a couple of audio rental supply houses, one begins to wonder where the trend towards ex- tensive use will stop.

A concert sound setup such as hardware this one for live is

-performance extremely costly, and is far beyond the average system on the road today in terms of its complexity.

However, the extra care taken to assemble the audio tools required to achieve live duplication of recorded music deserves more pliments. The concert attended at the Arizona sity Activity

than that

a few com- this writer

State

Univer-

Center featured an ex- tremely well -crafted mix, with subtle nuances and effects not often heard in live rock concert of the one settings, particularly

-nighter variety.

The stage

-area submixers were per- haps instrumental in achieving the excellent end resu

".t.

The

SSG system presented the detailed mix to a lively college -age crowd

Full- with power to spare. frequency coverage was well

- distributed throughout the listening area. Twenty years ago, a "rock and roll" show had one soundman, per- haps

12 stage microphone inputs, and whatever house -sound cluster was available

that

night.

As

I

sat

and lis- tened to six experienced board opera- tors mixing down

136 inputs on

$300,000 worth of consoles and effects into high

-fidelity hanging speaker arrays, the distance

that

the concert sound industry has traveled in those two decades was remarkable to behold. Now, if we can only

"fix" those sporting -arena acoustics!

ONO

.

1`

The task of sound reinforce- men: is never simple- -the choice of equipment complex.

AKG has taken the guess- work out of microphone selection with low noise, reliable condenser microphones for distinct applications:

The

C

-535 is both durable

iTtio

M

and dependable.

Practical features such as output and response attenuation make it

+ of

_ ideal for both stage and pulpit, and chorus.

-567 lavalier which is a music or with fullness and clarity. small reproduces

The

C

-568 short shot

-gun microphone is

O+

`

only 10 ruches long, yet has extended area ose dif tc difficult

**1"""\\\\\

A<G

C1CCUBCiICiS

77 Select(

Stan-

..

Street

CT

06

203/

'

:

2121

1934

®

Akustische

(Íd

Karo

-Gean

C-rt

VISUAL

The

MUSIC

SCENE

Growing Impact of the New

Medium on

Recording and

Production Studio Industry

Today's nt Audio- for -Video Developments

Adrian Zarin revi

V

john

Wa'té

ReStless

Heart..

Vacs' "Rum

Turn

Tugger"V

Lcoking back over recent Music grown

Video effects, approach developments, it's hard to avoid several areas this tremendously.

On the artistic front, we've witnessed Music Video's evolution as a narrative genre through the incorporation of dialog, sound and an overall directorial

that

the conclusion is

infant

much

that

industry has indebted in to feature films.

Aesthetically, it's clear

that

video clips still have a long way to go.

In particular, directors need to solve the problems of distinct

art integrating

forms: music and two story- telling. But, by incorporating basic narrative structures into their clips, directors have brought Visual Music into a new era of sophistication. For confirmation of this new era's arrival, one need only such consider the impact of productions as David

Bowie's

Jazzin'

for

Blue

Jean;

20- minute video as an especially effective blend of music and narrative,

Blue

Jean

stands as a promise of good things to come.

In many respects, however, Music

Video's dramatic growth on the busi- ness front has all but overshadowed the artistic strides made during the

last year

or so. In broadcast, the

past

year brought many new Music Video outlets to both cable and the net- works. We even saw several contend- ers rise up and challenge MTV's autonomy as our only

24

-hour source of Music Video. While the most for- midable of the challengers

Broadcasting's

projected cable Music Video network

-

Turner

24

-

-hour never made it past the first round, it still seems

that

MTV's title as video's sole tastemaker has passed into history.

I)avia Bowie's `-plue

Jean

A.4

MUSIC

TELEVISION' a

And while all this was taking place,

Visual

Music was becoming more and more of a big seller on the home video- cassette market, via concert tapes, clips collections from leading

artists,

and rock

-related feature

-film releases.

So while directors and their creative teams pushed

Music Video forward as a valid entertainment form (with value outside the promotional realm), business forces in the industry were hard at work creating more and better ways to bring Music Video to the pub- lic.

Interestingly, both of these devel- opments posed new challenges for the audio side of Music Video production,

that

oft -neglected dimension

that

has been the special concern of R

-e

/p's regular "Visual

Music

Scene"

columns.

The

narrative

effects posed new use of dialog and problems for audio engineers in terms of synchronizing sound and picture, while incorporat- ing these extra aural elements into the on soundtrack without encroaching the music. And in both the broad-

cast

and home markets, audio quality became a hot issue.

Complaints were heard from programmers and viewers alike regarding the poor audio quality of the video clips broadcast on net- work

TV for and, occasionally, those home use.

The sold advent of Stereo

Television high- has made the need for quality broadcast audio all the more dramatic.

Meanwhile, one of the newer

24- hour music channels, the Discovery

Network, which broadcasting

June

planned to begin

1, will utilize audio as a leading selling point.

Its organiz- ers are eagerly publicizing plans to

transmit

the three -dimensional effect of

H olophonic sound on

UHF. (See the

December

1984

"Visual Music Scene. ")

MTV, for its part, began distributing digital stereo audio to affiliates on

January

1, via Dolby's new

Adaptive

Delta Modulation system. And on the home front, LaserDisc players, Beta

Hi

-Fi, and the new VHS Hi -Fi format have created a demand for home cassettes with audio quality compar- able to, if not better than, records and audio tapes.

As a result of all these develop- ments, audio in the professionals working

Music Video field have seen a gradual, but undeniable, increase in audio on awareness and sophistication the part of their colleagues. The audio concerns of

Visual Music scene the contemporary have affected eve- ryone from record company executives to producers, video directors and costume designers.

At the same time,

Studer

Audio:

Production

Versatility

MÁSTER

Bi

-Phase

Alternate reference and pilot signals

Pilot

Frequency

20- 20.000

Hz

VIDEO

COMPOSITE

(all standards/

MOVE

SENSOR

e

';20.,A

G

STUDER

TLS

4000

SWIC14000112114

Ai

AL

SMPTE'

EBU

BUS

Farallel

Control signals for host systems

CAPSTAN control serial control

Control signals

for

SLAVE

Studer's flexible in approach to synchronization audio, video and

film

production.

The new Studer

TLS 4000 syn-

chronizer

system

offers

ex- traordinary

flexibility

across a broad range of audio /audio, au- dio /video and audio

/film

syn- chronizing applications.

And, thanks to its modular design, the

TLS 4000 system can expand along with your growing facility.

Lock in a

Box. The

TLS 4000

"black box" unit functions as an extremely accurate chase lock synchronizer for one tape trans- port.

It resolves two

SMPTE time codes of any standard, and it will also accept

pilot

frequencies, video frame pulses, film bi -phase pulses, and move

RS232/422 pulses. The serial port links the

TLS

4000 synchronizer (in single or multiple units) to centralized controlling and editing systems.

Local separate

Control Unit (LCU).

A

Local Control Unit for the TLS 4000 is available in two different versions: the basic ver- sion (type

B) for many common applications, and the extended version

(type A) which offers en- hanced display capabilities as well as

WAIT LOCK, SLEW MODE,

LOOP, and

CUE

+

GO -TO op- erating features. The

Local Control Units fit compact in stan- dard

19" racks as well as in the extended console overbridge on

Studer

A810 recorders.

'c

1E18 1

NM

D=-

STUDEA to bottom:

Type B LCII.

Tpe

A

L<ti. "black box."

Suit Yourself.

Modular design lets you tailor a

TLS 4000 system to fit your particular needs

-

pres- ent and future. For more infor- mation on

Studer synchronizing systems, please

write

or

call:

Studer Revox

America,

1425

Elm

Hill

Pike,

Nashville,

TN 37210:

(615) 254 -5651.

STUDER

August

1985

O R -e

/p

63

For additional information circle

#42

careful and thorough audio prepara- tions have become essential in every phase of producing

Music Videos from

- the delivery of the master audio tape to the final

At every it is the production company, to phases of post

-production. step along the way, however, still common for audio problems to arise. While awareness of the audio engineer's requirements has grown, it is clear the further education is still in order.

Audio

Masters for

Music

Video

Among the discussions held at last

Fall's Billboard

Video Music Confer- ence year every

- perhaps the

-end gathering professionals voted to

Behind-

- industry's largest of Music Video was one various activities panel of de-

"The the

-Scenes

Team." The panel included representatives of virtually technical craft involved in production of music videos

- the includ- ing audio engineering. Representing the audio perspective was Gordon

Skene, a veteran film and television sound engineer whose Music Video credits include Michael lie

Jackson's

Bil-

Jean,

plus clips by Toto, Fleetwood

Mac,

Pat

Benatar and countless others.

"Sound appears to be the thing commented in

"But the quality of the sound

that

most people take for granted as just

'being there' in a

Music Video," Skene his opening remarks.

that

ends up on a video clip pretty much depends on the record company and the master tape of the song provides."

that

it

Elaborating on his remarks after the conference, Skene explained

"the problem with a lot of record com- panies is

that

the people in the

that

video departments, who make a lot of important decisions on a production, are not first- always aware of how crucial a generation sound source is. We've gotten master tapes you nuts

-

7'/2

that

would drive ips quarter- highly questionable stock,

that

track, sort of thing.

"The other problem

I have is with different versions of the song. Say there's a four

-minute version and a five- minute version. Maybe the

New

York office only five- has a master of the minute version, and we're shoot- ing to the four -minute version.

We sometimes get stuck with a situation where somebody makes quick dub of something, and our audio

Bronson video for CBS where the New

York office wrong tape. The was master.

I did a

Tyrone accidentally sent us the freaking

that's

what

artist's

we use as management out. The only available recording of the piece was on disc. So we ended up

having

to

transfer

from the record!"

No matter where or how it origi-

11111171

CM:=11

nates, a low- quality master can com- promise the effectiveness of a clip before the first day ins. The less-

than

of

-ideal shooting scenario beg-

that

Skene lays out is confirmed by audio another engineer in the music video field, George

EFX

Systems

Johnsen, proprietor of in

Burbank.

Johnsen

first appeared in

"Visual

Music

Scene" in connection with his re- sourceful sound effects work on

Michael Sembello's

(see

April

1984

"Automatic Man" issue of

R

-e

/p).

Over

past

year,

Johnsen has

had the the chance to witness his share of prob- lems with audio come masters through

EFX.

that

have

"We sometimes have a problem with the label sending out a third- or fourth -generation copy of the song," he relates. "In post production, we have to go down at least two more generations to get the music back to the video master, so the audio quality gets pretty poor.

There are now a number of video production houses though,

that

are requesting either the original master of the song or a safety copy of the make master from which to their transfers.

"So, in many respects, things are getting better; in other respects they're getting a little worse. The labels are

starting

to be aware of the fact times get

half

-inch copies

that that,

a sync tone and timecode are needed on the master, but they're not always putting them on correctly.

We some- sup- posedly, have sync and timecode on them, but, unfortunately, the sync

[timebase] is not always referenced to the timecode."

Which brings us to the topic of dig- ital music masters for Music Video projects. As the practice of mixing to digital two -track grows, the record labels are beginning to furnish digital masters to video production compan- ies.

In addition to improving audio quality,

PCM masters recorded on videotape help out with some common sync problems as well.

This aspect was pointed out in a follow

-up inter- view with

Tom Davis, whose contri- bution to

Philip Bailey's

I

Know (one of the first Music Videos to incorpo- rate dialog and sound effects) and

Van Halen's Jump, a video on which he tackled the problems of a final music mix

that

differed from the mix used in shooting the in the April

1984 clip, were detailed

"Visual

Music

Scene."

"You problems with explains, "because they have their own control

Also, report don't run into as many sync digital masters," Davis track and sync track. because of the very nature of digital audio, you tape off reference. reference frequency

Hz

[the NTSC video field rate]

that's that."

Davis, Skene,

that

projects in recent months for which sounded better

can't

they've and

than

It

- play only worked ital master, commenting a on

that

digital takes which is

Johnsen

projects based one

59.94 - and all several the record company furnished a dig- those projects went more smoothly and on analog masters.

As the popularity of

digital

recording and

mastering

spreads, audio engineers specializing in Music Video will no doubt be work- ing with more and more digital mas- ter material. For the time being, they are doing the best they can with what they are given. .. continued overleaf

-

Location production of a video for "No Way Out," from Jefferson Starship's recent album,

Nuclear Furniture, directed by Iry

Goodnov. Pictured: David Freiberg and Paul

Kantner.

R

-eip

64

O

August

1985

CREATIVE

CONCEPTS

PRODUCES CATS MUSIC VIDEO

Creative Concepts, a new

Music Video production company, earlier this year pleted a five- con minute video of "Rum Turn Tugger" from the

Broadway production of

Andrew Lloyd Weber's musical Cats. Principals in the production company are

Lou and Richie

Vetter, co- owners of New

York's

Blank Tapes Studios, who have joined forces with Jeff Lee, production stage manager, and T.

Michael Reed,

Cats' dance supervisor.

Featuring actor /singer Terrence

V. Mann, who performed the song in the original

Broadway cast, and just finished filming a lead roll in the film version of A Chorus Line, the

$250,000 Cats Music Video is described as the first to be produced for a

Broadway musical.

"Music Videos of feature film and recording artists have already proved their worth as promotional tools, but this is the first time a theatrical production has tapped the medium," says Richie

Vetter. Cats recently launched a national touring company, and a third production played in

Los Angeles earlier this year.

The Shubert Organization expects our

Music Video to become a powerful asset in spreading awareness for the show."

In addition to its distinction as the first Broadway musical Music Video, "Rum Tug

Tugger" is also said to be one of the first videos recorded digitally. Blank Tapes Studios owns a

Sony PCM -3324 multitrack, and

Vetter considers that digital recording was crucial to maintain the integrity of the original music.

"The original cast recording features a large orchestra of more than

20 pieces," he explains.

"We felt that a cleaner, more open sound would work better for the video, and incorporated synthesizers and a drum machine when we re-recorded the song at our studio with Terry Mann. We then added guitar and horn tracks. With our digital recorder we were able to eliminate loss of quality due to multiple transfers, and we came out with a sound that was far superior to traditional analog technology."

"As

Stereo

TV becomes more widely entrenched in the marketplace, the recording techniques for Music Videos are going to have to become far more sophisticated," offers company principal Richie Vetter.

"If

Broadway musicals and touring shows find that our

Cats video is having a positive effect on the box office, we expect to see a real flow of production work from that quarter. With our combination of recording expertise and

Broadway musical background, we hope to carve a solid nitch for Creative Concepts in this newly emerging area."

The Cats video was filmed over a six -day shooting schedule, with three days on stage at

New York's Longacre Theatre where a special set was constructed.

"It was impossible to shoot at the Winter Garden Theatre where the show was based,"

Vetter recalls, "because our lighting, sound, and time requirements would have played havoc with the show's performance schedule."

Director of photography was

Michael Negrin, cameraman for many Billy Joel videos.

David Seeger of Today Video served as editor, cutting feature film -style to pre- recorded music tracks. Co- producer Lou Vetter credits Willie Austin of

Glen Glenn Sound, L.A.,

David Smith of Editel, NY, and Sid Zimet of Audio Force, NY, with providing solid advice on digital recording aspects for the video.

"The technology is still quite new," Vetter explains. "Sid Zimet was particularly helpful in synching the digital audio track to the rough cut picture for the final underscore and mix.

There weren't many of these Sony digital recorders in the field at the time, and it was very helpful to have experts like these available to answer questions based on their hands-on experience.

"We came to terms with the evolution of the recording industry," he continues, "and decided that if we are going to continue to maintain an active part in the business we have to change with it.

Our purchase of the Sony PCM

-3324 digital recorder, our new Studio D, which was especially designed for audio

- for -film and -video, and our entrance into Music

Video production with Creative Concepts are all major steps designed to place us in the front ranks of the music and Music

Video production scene."

OOO

Remix of digital

Cats' "Rum Turn

Studios. New and Richie multitrack tapes of the

Tugger" at

Blank Tapes

York.

L

-to

-R:

Jeff Lee,

Lou

Vetter, of

Creative Concepts.

After some bad experiences, Skene reports,

"the work with production companies

I have adopted a more

-or- less audio hopefully but

standard

masters. Whatever we get

that's

[MOE

policy for working with it's the best possible master, not always the case

-

- goes over to Glen Glenn Sound [Holly- wood], where it is transferred to a

15 ips

half

-inch tape.

Channels one and two have stereo audio; channels three and four, respectively, have SMPTE timecode need. form, and

60 Hz sync tone. tape then becomes the master tape for the project, from which they they strike a

Nagra copy for playback in the field and all other copies

that

That

they

This helps to keep things uni- but by the time you lay your final audio back to your video master, you're ostensibly three down, no generations matter which way you look at it."

4

Cast of Andrew Lloyd

Weber's Cats during production of a five

- minute video for

"Rum

Turn Tugger," which is probably the first

Music Video to be recorded digitally using a

Sony PCM

-

3324 multitrack.

A special stage set was constructed for the shoot at

New York's

Longacre Theatre.

As a

Audio on specialist

Gordon Skene in

the Set

on- location audio, has seen his responsi- bilities increase over the past year from simply playing back the music track on the set to recording dialog and effects and, on occasion, juggling the problems of recording audio dur- ing playback. Although it is a fairly straightforward operation, playback of a track on the set can entail a few difficulties. Because of budgetary considerations, or simple misunder-

standing

of what is required, Skene explains, the production company will often request a playback PA sys-

August

1985

R -e p (i5

tern

that

is woefully inadequate for the task at hand. Although the play- back sound does not turn up on the final videotape, it can, says Skene, be crucial to an effective performance on a music video.

"Musicians are often incredibly apprehensive about performing in a video, especially if like to

They in hide behind want a ance

-level doing a

substantial

their playback. American bands, in particular, like to work with perform- playback and will play live at a level to match performance clip. The on this film.'

If the producer ling to give the it's their first; they their music a bit.

that

volume level

- if they're

artist's

attitude often is:

'I want to be able to really feel the track so

I can give out the kind of intense emotion you want

isn't

wil- band this, chances are he is going to get a lousy performance.

"What

I generally use in a situation like amp. I'll also use a on

that

is a

standard

BGW 750 power graphic equalizer occasion.

A lot of people think

that

is going too far for just a playback system, but it enables me to get differ- ent settings for the two output chan- nels of the

BGW. On one channel, for example,

I can emphasize high

-end for the drummer, and then equalize the second channel to suit the other members of the band.

I will some- times go through a small

Yamaha

r

mixing board as well,

just

to have a little more control over the playback.

What

I use for monitors depends on the band and the situation

- it can be

anything

from two small stage moni- tors to four large cabinets like the

Klipsch La

Scala."

Most dialog recording for Music

Videos takes place on the set; looping is generally reserved for big- budget productions. Also, when the lines are to be spoken by the musical artist(i.e., not by professional actors who are familiar with looping procedures), many directors feel they can capture a better performance on the set. The fact

that

there are usually only a few lines involved makes practical one. this approach a

"The techniques used to record dia- log for a Music Video are no different

than

what they would be for a film,"

Skene offers,

"as

far as microphones, mike placement and the aural per- spectives involved. Engineers coming from a video or recording studio background might think about it dif- ferently, but

I just draw on my film background. Generally,

I will use a

Sennheiser

815 or 816 on a boom, and hire a boom operator. I've also been

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'U.S Suggested Retail using some Schoeps microphones lately, and find they have a very nat- ural sound work."

that

is good for this kind of

As in film -sound recording, radio mikes are planted on actors and musicians

that

have lines to speak, and are used in long shots where it would be difficult to keep a micro- phone boom out of the frame.

Although this approach works well in most cases, as Skene relates, minor difficulties sometimes arise.

"This is an area where the ward- robe department gets involved. For example,

I recently did a video with

Apollonia [Prince's sultry musical cohort] where we decided to use radio mikes.

We found, though,

that

it was physically impossible to use a radio mike on this girl because she wasn't wearing enough clothes to conceal one!

We were shooting exteriors in a park and had to do the best we could with a up shotgun mike. working out fine."

Luckily, it ended

In the majority of cases, there is no need to have the music track playing back while dialog or effects are being recorded on the hear the track set. while

Once in a recording while though, it becomes necessary for some or all of the people on the set to ing place

- in order to mime move in time to is tak- instru- mental or vocal parts, for example, the music, show a reaction to the music, etc.

In such cases, the people who need to hear the track are outfitted with earpieces con-

taining

miniature receivers. For per- formance videos, audience reaction scenes

that

require audio recording on the set are often handled with the aid of a

"boom box."

"It's

a low- frequency tone generator

that

functions as a metronome,"

Skene explains. "We tempo of the song, figure out the and the tone gen- erator will put out regular pulses at about

30 or 35 Hz.

It's

barely audible.

During the mix, we can out."

just

EQ it

Post -Production

Audio

The problems of incorporating dia- log and effects into Music Videos also extend to post production. Facilities like George

Johnsen's

EFX, which combine record experience with post

- production work for film and TV, have emerged as problem solvers for directors working in this new genre.

Over the

past

year, EFX has provided

transfer

and sweetening services

(including dialog and effects work) for video clips by Molly

Hatchett, Earth,

Wind and Fire,

Los Lobos,

Ratt,

Chaka Khan, and Diana Ross, among others. According to

Johnsen, the ability to integrate record

-quality audio technology with film

/TV tech- niques is what has made EFX a popu- p

66 D

August

1985

lar post -production house for music videos.

"What you need is a facility with

TV

/film experience, but which is geared to music," he comments.

"Obviously, you

Video with countered

can't

dialog have a Music

that

sounds like

standard

television fare; it wouldn't go over on a

You high -fidelity music clip. have to match up your music, dia- log and effects, making sure dialog is clean and

that that

you have nasal- sounding dialog tracks encroaching on lead vocals. The tricky part of it was making sure the dialog

that

tion] in matches the environment ,seated the visual part of the program."

But by audio far the most frequently cited

/video integration problem en-

- was recorded [on and one

that

has the don't

that

loca- cropped many times in these pages

- is the problem of effectively syn- chronizing sound with picture. In most cases, origin in the difficulties have their the more

-or -less

standard

practice of shooting music clips on film (be it 35mm or 16mm) and then transferring to videotape either for editing or audio layback. Problems arise from the fact ment runs

at

a

that

film equip- speed which is refer- enced to a resolve frequency of

60 Hz, while video equipment is referenced to

59.94.

Johnsen

explains how problems of this nature can arise, and details

EFX's procedure for making the necessary speed conversions:

"We four

-track is provided by

The four -track has timecode and a

60

Hz

start

by making a

half

-inch,

transfer

the record company. reference tone vide us with a of the song, which printed on it to pro-

constant

sync reference

- the original audio master goes back to the record company and is never used again.

"We then make

Nagra field copies from our which is

half

-inch four -track. The

Nagra has a feature called `pilot tone,'

- or the

60 Hz crystal

-generated crystal injected

- pilot fre- quency same speed at which it was operating when

Hz, or a

that

allows you to have

that

machine resolve in playback. In other words, it plays back at exactly the it recorded

[the guide music track]. The film cameras are also crystal controlled to a reference of

60 subdivision of

60 Hz, so

that

they are running at exactly

24 fps or

30 fps.

"When you go to post," he con- tinues,

"99 times out of

100 you're transferring

[film to videotape] on a

Rank

Cintel [telecinel, which is refer- enced to 59.94

Hz.

Since your reference was the equivalent shooting

[which corresponds to a film of

60 rate

Hz of either

24 or

30 fps] there is a speed shift from

60

Hz to

59.94 Hz. We there- fore have to speed correct our inch, four -track audio master so

half

-

that

its

60 Hz reference conforms with the

59.94 Hz reference of the Rank

Cintel. on

"We our

start

with the

60

Hz

that

was

half

-inch and reference

that

to

59.94 Hz, so

that

the audio is slowed down [by a corresonding amount].

Then we lock up our

half

-inch machine to a one -inch,

C- format

VTR and

transfer

the audio tracks over to videotape. master

This means match the Rank

Cintel master." now have a one -inch,

C- format editing

that

is

that

we speed corrected to be

The speed- conversion problem can worked out in a number of ways,

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August

1985

0

R

-e.'p 67

according to Tom

Davis, who also reports seeing film

/tape

problems plague a good

60 Hz on it.

It can many Music Video pro- jects. "An audio tape can have either or

59.94 Hz

[sync have timecode plus one of frequencies. The

just

main

/resolve tone] timecode, or the two reference

thing

is to be consistent in what you do throughout the project. recommend

That

is why

I strongly

that

a qualified audio supervisor should be hired the record company or the video pro- duction company

- to

- either oversee by the project.

I've seen too many producers and production companies try to handle it themselves. They will have a rental company supply the audio equipment, a different company do the

transfers

...

too many unrelated people get involved.

No one knows what the others did, so you end up with a tangle of different formats in post production."

According to

George

Johnsen, film/ tape speed conversion problems have also served in the past year to inhibit the practice of remixing the music to suit the visual perspectives of the fin- ished picture.

"Only a couple of clips have been remixed

that

way this year," he reports. "Artistically, remixing for the video is definitely the way to go, but if you remix the song to match the

Faster,

video,

that

means you have to speed

- correct the

24

-track you master. Usually, don't find a

24

-track master with enough open timecode." tracks to accommodate the necessary reference code and

Digital Technology

The video practice of digitizing the final audio mix

that

is master is one laid back

that

to the has gained popularity during post production on

Music Videos.

"I'm seeing a lot more digital audio going on," Tom

Davis observes. "I won't say it's being used on every clip, but it is happening on a regular basis.

On a number

that

were specifically designed for home video of projects I've done distribution on

LaserDisc or

Beta

Hi -Fi, we delivered audio on either a one -inch or

3/4-inch videotape master

that

had a soundtrack dig- itally encoded with a

Sony PCM

-1610.

There are still high -quality audio pro- jects where we course. don't use digital, of

What we often do in those cases is lay back the audio to the one

- inch videotape master with

Dolby

A noise reduction, decode it in the and then they will mastering process.

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"A lot of times we'll deliver a four

- track audio tape master with

Dolby

- encoded stereo tracks and the same timecode as the video master.

A four

- track audio tape machine will give you one you won't suffer generation loss."

Davis feels

- inch video machine. But delivering digital audio is better still. even were much better quality if all prior stages of the project analog. If you digitize the final audio mixdown, the resulting audio tracks will be extremely quiet, and

that than

a

That's

true the popularity of digitizing the final audio for Music

Videos will continue to grow.

Many engineers, he explains, are still a little unsure of the correct procedures for digitizing audio tracks, but these doubts are likely to diminish with time.

"A lot of people are the fact

that

there's getting no hip big trick to to doing a digital master," says

Davis,

"as

long as your engineering staff is used to it.

The

1610 ple] will work on format

[for exam- any helical video- tape machine. Typically, we use the

:%a

-inch Sony

BVU

-800 U

-Matic Series at Pacific

Video [the facility

Davis is based],

at

which but you can even go to the one -inch format.

You basically just lock up two machines and decode the audio from the playback machine, through the

1610, onto the record machine."

The process does demand careful attention to a few details, however.

For one thing, Davis stresses, it is

important

to remember to reference the digital sampling rate of the

1610 to 59.94 Hz.

"Plus," the engineer adds,

"you have to remember for ing, which

that

the

[video] machine means the tially becomes the timebase corrector

that

1610

that

you essen- is record- have to disconnect the

[VCR's] timebase cor- rector, if it has one.

Typically, if you rent a 1610 from a

rental

house, they send you the

1610 with a

:'/

-inch video- tape machine.

You plug them together and it all works. In an editing house you have to be careful though, since all the machines are usually set up for editing, and have their own timebase correctors, which are the interfaced into facility's computer system.

So you basically have to strip down the time

- base corrector on whatever machine you are using, and let the the timebase corrector."

1610 become ing the

Looking Ahead

Digital audio, as Tom Davis points out, no lems doubt two

that

will most play glaring audio still face a role in solv- prob-

Music Video

- those of overall audio quality, and synchronization between the various visual and aural elements of a pro- gram. But the real key to solving both

N -e p 68 D

August

1985

problems lies with the people involved in Music Video as much as the tech- nology.

Improved lines of communi- cation between those responsible for every is phase of a Music Video project the only real means of achieving the type of consistency high

-quality audio and freedom from sync problems.

At the present

that

insures time, Music Video provduction is still very much a

haphazard

business. The popularity of the genre has exploded much too rapidly and unpredictably, it can be argued, for the industry to form a detailed and uniform approach to creating visual music.

This facet, however, is the very thing made Music Video so

that

has fascinating to watch in the the screen

- both on shares this quality with all the

Big

Moments in pop music: the rock in sion of

Wave the Sixties; the Punk /New onslaught of the Seventies they've all been enfants terribles, whose

past

few years and behind the alarming rate of scenes. It outstripped parental control. birth of the

Fifties; the

British Inva-

- growth far

But,

having

made it out of infancy,

Music Video must necessarily face the organizational strictures of adult life.

Last year the first steps were made toward unionizing the Music Video industry.

It's

unionization too early would affect the audio aspects of the genre

- to or, say for how

that

matter, its overall artistic content and quality.

Meanwhile, audio engineers themselves have felt a need for better organization of their craft within the

Music Video up with industry, and have come several suggestions of their own.

"Maybe there needs to be an

RIAA- type of organization for Music Video,"

Gordon Skene offers.

"An organiza- tion which insures given a certain

that

set of everyone guidelines is for tape formats, procedures, and things

that

nature. Or maybe it could take of the form of an

AES pamphlet

(or ser- ies of pamphlets) explaining the technology, such as

Nagra sync and

other

film procedures, to

AES members. Sound for films is definitely an area for which audio engineering schools should offer a few

A central organizing body respon- sible for idea technical classes."

standards

is an

that

holds a lot of appeal for many audio engineers working in the

Music Video field.

Visual music, though, may be still too much of a maverick industry to accept this type of organization.

"You have a lot of real individuals who are doing Music Video," com- ments

George

Johnsen, "and they're coming to it from all different kinds of backgrounds. In putting together any kind of central organization, the first problem you would of have is an attitude

'This is my magic way of doing it, and I'm not going to change it for you.' Secondly, a lot of people involved in the industry are far too busy to par- ticipate in this kind of organization.

Thirdly,

Music Video is just not an organizable type of industry right now, because of the type of creative people who are involved in it."

On a more facilities, grass roots level, several including

EFX, have begun holding informal, free seminars for

Music Video to learn more about the audio aspects of the craft. professionals

that

want

"Our seminars are usually about

20 people strong," says Johnsen, "so we're able to deal with specific exam- ples and do the sort of things

that

would be impractical at a larger industry gathering.

We're dealing with a new medium, and we think we can help people get a what's involved." little hipper to

Education is also

Music Scene" what the "Visual has been all about.

Throughout recent columns, I've attempted to focus on the most signif-

icant

aspects of Audio- for -Music

Video, and will continue to do so in the future. The coming year promises to be a pivotal,

"stand

-or- fall" period for visual music

- aesthetically, mercially, and technologically. com-

Stay tuned.

SIMPLY

THE BEST!

Simon Systems is in setting a new standard of excellence professional audio signal processing equipment.

It began and with the

DB

-1

A

Active Direct

Box.

Boldly designed independently powered

*, the

DB

-1A delivers performance that blows every other

DI away. The unique design of the

DB

-1A is based on totally active

(transformerless) circuit with no insertion loss. And with features like line level output, rechargable battery capability, and automatic power system check circuitry, it's easy to understand why so many professionals refer to it as simply the best direct box money can buy!

Then came the

CB

-4

Headphone Cue Box.

With four outputs independently controlled by conductive plastic stereo power controls, the

CB -4 allows up to four headphones to be driven from the same three amplifier.

A position switch selects left mono, right mono, or stereo mix, and XLR input /output connectors are provided for paralleling additional cue boxes. It's no wonder why the

CB

-4 has become a standard in the industry.

And the tradition of excellence continues with the

RDB

-400

Integrated Direct Box.

Based on the same design technique which made the

DB

-1A the premier direct box of the industry, the

AC powered

RDB

-400 is four direct boxes in one. It can be rack or floor mounted and has countless uses. It features a totally transformerless audio circuit design, line level output mode connectors, ground with infinitely variable trim, attenuation mode pad, with stepped variable trim, input overload

LED, speaker level input balanced and unbalanced buffered outputs with front and rear

XLR isolation switch, and a toroidal power transformer

The

RDB

-400 is a dream in the control room as well as on stage. Its versatility makes it useful as a pre

-amp. buffer, line driver, level converter, distribution amp, and many other applications.

So the next time you think signal processing equipment,

Simon Systems

-

Simply the Best! think like a pro:

Thanks for setting the trend:

PAUL ANKA

SNOWGLENN CAMPBELLFLEETW00D MAC.KENNY LOGGINSJEAN -LUC PONTY

JEFF PORCAROREO SPEEDWAGONUNIVERSAL STUDIOSTITO JACKSON

SSIMON

SYSTEMS

14201

Foothill

#29,

Sylmar, CA 91342. (818) 362 -4000.

An;:ii.1

I!1,ti:i

;

; fi-r p

69

: ii

I

1.

I

.

DIGITAL PRODt1CTION

1`

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SYNCHRONIZING DIGITAL

MASTERING

AND

MULTITRACK

SYSTEMS

WITH

ANALOG

TAPE,

FILM AND

VIDEO

TRANSPORTS

Sony,

An

Overview of

Mitsubishi,

the

Interface

Capabilities of

Studer,

3M,

JVC and

EIAJ- Format

Systems

DIGITAL TRANSPORTS:

Why

are they

so

Different

from Analog

Machines?

an introductory article by

Rodney Pearson, service coordinator, Solid

State

Logic, Inc.

learnt all there was to know about synchronizers,

SMPTE time

- code, ust when you thought it was

Fife to go into the studio, hav- ing and even the dreaded

Drop

Frame, along came digital tape ma- chines with new buzz words such as

Sampling Frequencies, Error

Correc- tion and

Word Clocks. will

This article present an overview of the methods of synchronizing digital audio recorders to video recorders analog recorders, with particular niques for film and film transports, reference and video to new tech- production.

Now

that

the major audible advan-

( tages of digital recording have been more or less) accepted, some of the secondary advantages can dressed. The be ad- manner in which digital audio is recorded requires the

16

-bit

K

-c p

70

August

1985

data

stream be timed by a system clock to such as which all analog

-to- digital processors, digital

(A

/D) con- verters, must by synchronized. This system clock offers several advan- tages: it allows, for example, absolute synchronization of audio tracks with other audio or video transports, while simultaneously eliminating speed variations and wow and flutter.

Digital audio is similar in many respects to video; in fact, several sys- tems on actually record the digital

SMPTE timecode, a the Sampling Frequency the

Word Clock from the master machine, only will the

- tapes must run be in

- known as transferred so

data

conventional video recorders. Even when synchronizing machines with timing signal at

that

not sync, but all the processors will be synchronized to tine another.

If digital data is to be transferred between course, machines it is essential, of

that

all tapes are recorded in

data

and track format, and the same at the same sampling frequency.

There are several important differ- ences in synchronizing digital record- ers, compared to analog machines.

For example, the system clock runs at a frequency of

4 or

5

MHz, lies and supp- timing information not only to the digital processors, but also to the

transport capstan

and reel motors (or drum servo in the case of VTR -based machines).

So, it is not sufficient to simply the input a 9,600 Hz waveform to capstan motor and thus control its speed until sync is achieved. Several synchronizers actually replace the system clock with a voltage -controlled oscillator

(VCO), and thus vary both the processor maintain sync. Because of the preci- sion of and

capstan

speeds to these timing circuits, analog recorders should always be

"resolved" if they are to be used as a master

transport

for slaving to digital or video means recorders.

(

that

a

"Resolving" machine's simply timecode is itself locked to a stable time base before additional machines are slaved to it.)

...

continued overleaf

-

The

JVC

Digital artist's editing system.

Digi-al audio edit nc takes on new speed, simplicity, and flexi- bility vvth JVC's 90C Mastering System. Anyone with a trained ea- can learn to cperate it in minutes and be assured of pro- fessional results of outstanding fidelity, accuracy, and clarity.

And w nile sonic excellence is surely the 900's most pe-sua- sive feature.f exibility runs a c ose second; for rot only will the

900 operate with but wish

VHS cassettes, too, with total sitety a

-ic conficencc, making it ideal for maste-ing digi- tal audio

disc

and the increasingly popular ni

-ï video discs.

The DPS

-00

cons sts et four pri ncipa com

:onents.

VP -900

Digital Audio Processor.

Two

-channel oulse count mode processcr. Several 16 -bit micro

- processcrs make it compatible with other prcfessional produtctron equ pment such as cutting lathes, synchorizers, and encoders

Dynamic range of more than 90 dB.

Frequency response from

1 to 20.0JC Hz

I '

0.5 dB), and bw recc rd ng bit rate of 3.087 Mb ts's at 44.1 kHz. Transformer -less ana- bg

FOcircuits further improve sound acality and the analoc

-to- digital,di.]ital

-to- analog converter reduces distcrtion to less than

0.02 per cent. while an emphas s circuit irrtoroves signal -to -noise ratic. Logic circuit uses CMOS

LSI chips for high reliability, compact- ness,

Igtt weight (48.6lbs) and low power consumption.

MS=

-

._-...

If

Audio Edi:or Control

Unit.

Electronic governo-'or rout ng coord natirg, and euecutinc al edit functions, ooth aJtoma-ic anc manual. Al tal ccmmarxis, from cigi- dutbIng of original to master for cortinucus procrams, tc repeti=ve poix

-to -pcint manual cueinç are regulated here.

TC

-901y

T me Code

Unit.

Actuaiytwo tore code units in one,

SMP tris un t reads and gererates

-E standard tine code and synch-onizes the

JvC exclusive

BP (b

-party) time code. Thus the

DAS -500 will

3perat' effec-ive ly with both ti-te codes: a necessity when-he Sistem is to be syn- chronized with videc equipment

.

AE -900V Digital Audio

Editor. Simplicity itself to operate, this little nume- puts editing r ght in the hands of the artist, if need be.

Precise to within microsecond accuracy, edit out searchcan be carried

:y nanual cue ng automatic scan, or direct actiress.

It wil confirm cut

-in, cut -pu- paints independently by recaling signals stored i n memory. Digital face control for adjJsting relative levels between crici.ial and master-ape.

Shirt function forchanging edi pointsbacicwward or forward ment. Anc

it

2

-ms steps for super-1 ne varable-gracient :ross

-faing function

f

x acjust- smooth continatyat

-he edit point. variable in

C.

10, 20, and 43 mic-oseconc steps.

AJt) tape locate Unction enables the user tobcatethe desired address on the original tape, automatically.

. .

1

.

®

ïïúu

For a demonstration of the

DAS -900 Digital Audio

System, a

Spec Sheet. or

JVC s complete catalogue. call. toll

-free

1-

800 -JVC -5825

JVC COMPANY OF AMERICA.

ProfeEs onal Video

Communicaticns Division.

41

Slater Drive,

Elmwood Park.

N.J.

07407 c

For

1985.

VC

Company of

Amenca

..

n

Ri

+

.,i

cücre -cT

JVC

CCMFANY OF AJERICA

Pro}ession314de- ComT.1nicatiois

Div ston

DIGITAL

INPUT

ANALOG

I

I

INf

AMP

PRE

E

MPHASIS

LOW PASS

FILTER

A/0

CONVERTER

SERIAL TO

PARALLEL

COVERTER

-'--p

ENCODER

--

RECORD

HEAD

HINPUT /RE

L

AY

SWITCH

HSYNC

SEPARATOR

1

_Ij

I

T

A

P

E

CROSS

IAUE

DECODER

TIME

BASE

CORRECTOR

ED PRE

AMP t

PLAYBACK

HEAD

HPARALLEL 10

SERIAL CONVERTER CONVERTER

H

LOW PASS

FILTER

DE

EMPHASIS

UNE

AMP

ANALOG

OUTPUT

DIGITAL

OUTPUT

FIGURE

1:

SIMPLIFIED

BLOCK DIAGRAM OF

A

"TYPICAL"

DIGITAL RECORDER

D

IGITAL PRODUCTION

The nature of digital audio, with this precise timing and lack of gener- ation loss, means

that

a great deal of manipulation of tracks is possible for example, there are systems which it is possible to synchronize

- in up to

15 digital multitracks through their respective remote control units. Since this adds up to a total of

:360 digital audio tracks, any number of which may be tape to another, the pos- sibilities for those who are consider- ing transferred without degrada- tion from one joining the Procrastinator's

As- sociation

(I know several producers who are seriously thinking about be- coming members!) are literally end- less. (Assuming, of course,

that

you have a console with

360 inputs and the budget for almost

$2 million worth of tape machines!)

But seriously, this ability to

"bounce" tracks without degradation is one of the major reasons for using digital audio instead of analog in film or video recording.

One of the film -sound reasons often cited by engineers for continuing to use large numbers of mag film machines, instead tracks, for dubbing is the simplicity with which

"slipped"

- individual tracks may be

that

is of analog advanced multi or

- re- tarded to maintain sync with the vis- ual action. Working with mag, may he slipped by as little tracks as one sprocket hole (a quarter of a

24 fps frame, or about

10 milliseconds).

Using digital multitrack recorders, however, two tracks are available. Individual tracks may be methods of slipping retarded with millisecond resolution by simply inserting a dig- ital delay line in the audio path.

Another method, if time permits, is to copy the required track or another machine

that

is tracks to synchron- ized to the master via timecode. Then, by manipulating timecode offsets, tracks may be advanced or retarded.

If tracks are transferred digitally, there will be no audible degradation or generation loss.

The recent unveil- ing of digital effects processors and

Winchester

- or

Hard

Disk -based edit-

SYNCHRONIZATION

AND EDITING FUNCTIONS

OF THE STUDER

D820X

-2

DIGITAL RECORDER

bE

Datvid Walstra, product specialist,

PCM

Systems, Studer International

The extensive synchronizing and editing capabilities of the D820X

-2

Twin-DASH- format digital two -track are made possible in large part by an advanced transport- control system. The transport's spooling and

DC cap- stan motors are all under software control, allowing microprocessors to calculate and control tape movement in the fastest and most efficient manner. Spooling speeds as high as

15 meters per second

(590 ips) permit very rapid access to cue points. Acceleration and deceleration is smooth and positive, even with

14

-inch tape reels. (The

14

-inch reel capacity allows the D820X

-2 to record over two hours at

15 ips.)

The D820X

-2 has extensive locate control facilities for fast access to the audio program.

Locate keys are also under software control, thus allowing individual units to be pro- grammed for specific customer requirements.

The transport may be locked to external time references, such as word clock, sector clock, or composite video sync signals.

The varispeed control allows for a deviation of ±12.5

%.

Of course, the digital output signals will vary accordingly, but a

Studer SFC

-16 sampling rate converter can be utilized to pro- vide automatic correction during transfer to another digital recorder.

Remote Control and Synchronizing

Following the

DASH format, the D820X

-2 provides a separate timecode channel; all ver- sions of the machine will have a timecode reader located in the deck with meter bridge display. The deck provides both serial and parallel remote control facilities. Parallel remotes allow for simple remote connections, and also provide required signals from the tape deck to the remote, while the serial

(RS232, RS422) bus allows for easy interfacing to synchronizers, such as the Studer TLS4000.

(Both the D820X

-2 and TLS4000 will be com- patible with the forthcoming

SMPTE

/EBU serial bus format.)

Editing

Capabilities

The

D820X

-2 is designed to facilitate both tape -cut and electronic editing. Tape -cut edit- ing is possible with complete confidence because of the DASH -Twin implementation, which offers data redundancy and

"smart" data protection. Electronic digital audio edit- ing will be accommodated with a system to be introduced by

Studer following final market introduction of the recorder.

Even without an electronic system, the

D820X

-2 permits compilation of master tapes by digital

-to- digital transfer. Levels can be

VSTUDER

D820X-2

.11.6-31

,yy,

»

adjusted in the digital domain during copying, and the timecode channel ensures accurate starting and stopping times.

Cue channels are provided for monitoring in the spooling and cueing modes.

R-e p

72

August

1985

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For additional information circle a48

Sell perf

°rm an

August 1985 R-e p

7:1

LOS

ANGELES

TOKYO

tuLi BdB

.J

:

BEI

R®M

11®

The ability to synchronise video and audio recorders is an increasingly vital facility required in studios

3

I tuer the world.

As much as three- quarters of taca4's audio recordings involve a visual aspect and recording is more international than eye- befo-e.

Basic tracks in

New

York, string and brass overdubs in

London, dubbing in Los Angelle

... modern international productions need an international standard for machine synchronisation, and there's really only one: Q -Lock by

Audio

Kinetics.

It's the same all over the world. The simple, uncluttered controls. The custom interfaces that suit your machines. The remarkable software capability. The integrated system with built

-in expansion possibilities.

It all adds up to accuracy and ease of use, and that means speed and creative flexibility. It means Q-

Lock. If you're looking for an international standard, you've found it.

Now, more than ever, you need to keep in sync with the times. Lock around the clock

-

with

Q -Lock.

Audio

Kinetics

Inc.,

4721

Laurel Canyon Boulevard,

Suite 209,

North Hollywood,

California

91607, USA

Tel:

(818) 980 5717

Telex

230 194 781. AUDIO

KINETICS

-

continued from page

7:0

.

. .

DIGITAL PRODUCTION

ing systems, such as the Compuson- ics DSP -20(0 and

AMS

Audio File

- both of which direct digital are expected to offer inputs and outputs com- patible with current recording for- mats

- will allow such devices to be used without any quality. loss of signal

Digital Multitrack

Operation

At this point, a brief description of how a typical digital fears you may have about this new technology. So, if you pay we'll learn about multitrack corder works might help to dispel re- any attention, sampling frequen- cies, bit rates and error correction, but

I promise we won

't get involved in

Nyquist Theorems or

Sampling

Algo- rithms, or any such advanced theory.

As shown in

Figure

1, the analog input signal is fed to the line amp and level control, after which optional pre

- emphasis may be added to optimize the signal

-to

-noise ratio. The

20 kHz lowpass filter prevents half the

Sampling

Frequency. The analog signal is converted to digital, and the

Aliasing by eliminating frequencies greater than resultant Serial Data stream converted to

Parallel Data. encoded

(in which

It is then data is

Interleaved and Parity

Bits added) and recorded by the record head.

(See the accom- panying Glossary for a detailed defi- nition of these concepts.)

On fied playback, the signal is ampli- and equalized before the sync passing to separator, which performs

data

extraction, demodulation and

Cyclic ing

Redundancy Checking, mark- any errors with

"flags.-

The serial data is then converted to parallel data, and any jitter in the playback signal absorbed by the Time Base

Corrector, before the

Word

Data and

Error

Correction flags pass from the

'l'BC to the leaves word

Decoder, which De-Inter- data and performs error correction. 'l'he Cross

Fader is used during Punch

-In and Punch

-Out se- quences, crossfading between input and playback signals. Following the

I is n put Playback switch.

Parallel converted to

Serial

data data

which, in turn, is then converted from digital to analog, lowpass filtered, de- empha- sized

(if required) and passed to the output amplifier.

As can be seen from explanation,

data

is the above being moved and processed our at extremely high speed; present sampling frequencies of

14.1 or

48 point. kHz are only the

Thus it is imperative

starting that

all processors are locked to a- common clock.

To see a amount of practical example of the

data

required to accurately reproduce a piece of music, consider the following example: a

Compact

Disc has a capacity of

70 minutes of music, yet if the same disc is used to store computer data, its capacity is a staggering

(i00 megabytes than

:1,500 times

that

of a

- more floppy disk used on a Commodore64!

A single Cl)

ROM, as they will be called, would be capable of storing the entire Encyclo- pedia

Britannica or over

1,000 hooks, each with 300 pages containing

300 words; and still have space for available graphics to be displayed on a TV screen.

Towards the Future

The long process of and often complicated transferring sound from location recording to lease may involve at generations, and

:?í mm least five or six

including'

i theatrical re-

-inch analog formats. The resulting loss of

transient

response and degrada- tion of signal

-to

-noise ratio has been endured by anyone

that

has paid good money to enjoy superb visual images accompanied by dubious audio repro- duction.

The

transfer

of audio to videodisc,

Beta or VHS

Hi -Fi for replay in a high -quality home video

/audio sys- tem may involve two more genera- tions of one -inch Type

-C video before reproduction on a system with audio specifications superior to those of any single link in the transfer process. In

transfer

stages

( other every one of the than copying to

Beta or

VHS

Hi -Fi), the audio quality suffers much more than that of the picture.

Since it is now possible to record digital audio on location using porta

SYNCHRONIZING

3M

DIGITAL MULTITRACKS

WITH FILM AND VIDEO TRANSPORTS by

Frank

R.

Dickinson, president, Digital by

Dickinson

interest slowly grew, this writer began conversations with several of the con- troller and synchronizer manufacturers in the hope a one

During the locking of past few years, there has been considerable interest in the digital audio transports with video and film chains.

As this complete system. Since we could not find that

We could felt do the job. such a that we system, would we be able to buy set out to develop that for frame- accurate editing, there were two basic considerations: one, to find a controller and a system configuration devise a means of interfacing the

3M

Digital Mastering System with each other, to allow the

And it transfer of that would allow the most flexibility, ease of operation, that digital would data be friendly under control was only after considerable investigation developed.

I felt to of a operate; and, secondly, to

SMPTE timecode editor. that this design philosophy was that the controller should synchronize the two machines, lock them together and points, thereby transfer the data digitally. The controller would be used to coordinate the master and slave machines and find the correct in creating the ability to generate a

/out record digitally transferred tape equivalent to the Edit

Decision

List

(EDL) supplied by a video editor.

The controller selected to handle this task was the

Audio Kinetics Q.Lock, since

A -K was the first company to develop an interface for

3M

DMS digital system.

At this point, with sketch pad and trusty wire -wrap tool in hand, an interface was constructed into that allowed the

Q.Lock to bring the two machines synchronization at the correct SMPTE timecode location, and then to transfer the data digitally from the slave machine to the master machine ac- cording to the EDI, supplied. Since the

3M machine is presently configured to allow the transfer of just one or all of the

32 available tracks, this same control capability is passed on to the timecode editing system. Such a fine degree of

A

A pair of 3M DMS

32

-track machines aboard the Record Plant Mobile audio during an

/video shoot for the

Stevie Wonder

Comes Home

Showtime special. r

0

4

&

G

..t...

,

..1ii.,

_

- t.. rimmiessNo

mi

sp os omti

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No

ti

-

fiti.

To provide a more accurate indication of recording levels during the

Stevie

Wonder

Comes Home shoot, the DMS remote con- trol and level- display unit was mounted on top of the Record Plant's API console meter bridge, in view of the engineer.

R-e p 76

August

1985

A

recording studio's reputation

rests

on two qualities. each artist deliver the performance of

a

lifetime.

The

The

first

second

is is

its the ability to help ability to help each producer capture those performances in exact detail, and to share them

at will.

The truly great studios

are

distinguished

by

their uncanny knack for making this kind of magic happen time and again. They

are staffed by

people who have mastered their art and know how to bring out the best. Because of their creativity, each of these top studios

is successful

in

its

own unique

way.

Which makes it

all

the more remarkable that out of

all

the possible choices, the

world's

leading studios have independently selected

a

common standard of excellence

for

their mixing consoles and computers

-the

Solid

State

Logic SL

4000

E

Series.

If

you're searching :or

a first class

studio anywhere in the world, we'd like

you

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721

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5'

,

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DIGITAL

PRODUCTION

hle processors then to transfer and video recorders, and edit this the digital domain without audio in any gen- eration loss, the inherent advantages of digital over traditional techniques are obvious.

For those wishing to take advan- tage of digital recording without dis- rupting established post- production routines, digital audio may be recorded on location and transferred

35mm mag film for to analog conventional edit- ing by film editors.

If this film is encoded with SMPTE timecode, an

Edit

Decision List (EDL) can then he generated, allowing the original dig- ital audio material to be

"conformed" by an editing system to duplicate the

35mm edits.

As the techniques used in recording studios merge with film those of video and

Post -Production, new capabili- ties will be developed. As each of these disciplines learns from the others, the full potential of digital audio synchro- nized to other media will be realized.

SYNCHRONIZING

SONY PCM

-

1610,

PCM

PMC

-3102/3202

-3324 DIGITAL

AND

SYSTEMS

by

Curtis Chan, senior engineering manager,

Sony Corporation of America

The increasing prevalence of digital equipment in recording makes it critical for to and post production studios possess a today's engineers thorough understanding of new tion interfacing and synchroniza- techniques available today. And there can be little doubt technology is

Glen

Glenn Sound minute, has demonstration

that

film digital having a growing impact on production techniques. Recently,

Neil Young completed a

Music Video using two

24

-track digital recorders. produced

that

a

30- fea- tures a six

-channel, digitally mas tered

Fritz soundtrack.

And Metropolis been

Lang's

1926 classic film, has enhanced by a new digital sound- track produced by

Giorgio Moroder.

While digital technology formed common bond for the these diverse pro- jects, the was as subject actual recording procedure different as their respective matter.

Synchronized Recording

The basic analog recording config- uration includes a master recording

SYNCHRONIZING

3M

SYSTEMS

- continued

..

. control at times provides the ability to carry notes or small sections of material across edit points, allowing smoother edit conventional butt editing. transitions than are possible by

The first major use of this in -house system came during the postproduction editing of

"Stevie

Wonder Comes Home" special for Showtime.

[See feature article in

October

1984 issue of

R

-e

/p

for further details

-Editor.]

By the time the show was aired via satellite, the audio tracks had been assembled using the

3M digital editing system, mixed via analog that was transfer to another recorded in London.) two -track digital system, sweetened using audience tracks from a second digital machine, and then transferred to a video -based PCM digital system for broadcast. (This same system is currently being used to assemble the audio for a soon to be released

Ricky

Scaggs' live show

The

3M digital

32

-track is also presently in use in

Nashville with a

JVC

VP

-900 two -track PCM processor to strip and replace the audio for a video promo. In this particular application, the only requirements are halted through the use of digital recording to remove and process the audio. Such an approach would prevent further loss of audio quality while the video is being edited into the format required by the video clip service. The introduction of digital processing has greatly increased the quality of the video's audio, and has become can take quite useful in the light of the fact that that the loss of audio quality an increasing number be of videos are actually being released in VHS and Betamax HiFi formats, both of which

During the time it has taken to develop our system, the increased need for automation has made it necessary to design interfaces for both Solid

State

Logic and Neve consoles. In the case of SSL, interface design was relatively simple, requiring some minor buffering of the equipped with

NECAM fader automation, the problems became more interest- ing, however. The solution was to use an Adams Smith timecode reader and linear advantage of high quality audio masters. translator. This approach thetically from tach pulses derived from the

3M

NECAM system with continuous timecode positions ing its data to that of the tape. data lines. In allowed the system the case of Neve consoles to generate timecode syn- transport, thereby providing the that it requires for match-

R

-e, p 78

D

August

1985 unit linked to one, two or more slaves via a timecode synchronizer.

When using a

Sony

PCM

-3324 digital multi- track as the master recording unit, and a

Sony

PCM-

3102/3202 digital two -track for the slave, the slave recorders are phased locked by using external word -clock connections.

Also, the sampling rate of the slave recorder should he set to the same frequency as the master zation unit. The same synchroni- technique applies on occasions for which PCM

-3324 is set

-up as the slave unit; refer to

Figures lA and

1

B for additional details. to

The

PCM

-3324 can also be expanded synchronize with video recorders.

An optional accessory board, the

DABK -3000, enables the recorder to lock to an NTSC monochrome signal at

:30

Hz,

NTSC color at

29.97 Hz, and even PAL

50 at

25 Hz.

Additionally,

-and

60 -Hz reference signals can

24- be selected. Use of

Clock the DABK

-3000

Video

Board allows audio and video editing to be synchronized through the use of a common sync source

(composite video).

The versatility of using a videotape recorder as the master can also be realized, composite sync being fed to the synchronizer as well as to the

VTR, PCM

-3324 multi- track and

PCM -3102/3202 digital two

-tracks. (The configuration shown in

Figures

2A

The use of several and

2B.) is multitracks in sync makes it mandatory to incorpo- rate a master remote control unit. The

Sony

RM -3310

Remote Controller enables up to three

PCM -3324s to be operated in perfect synchronization.

The controller also features an

instant

and precise autolocator with offset capability, plus simple, single

-cable connections to the recorders.

In order to set up a

72- channel system, three

RM -3310 with controllers must be used three

PCM

-3324 24- tracks.

When dem, hooking up recorders in tan- synchronization accuracy is always a prime concern. The use of one IF

-3310

3310

3310, and two interface with the

RM-

IF

-3311 guarantees mixing console interfaces with their respective

RM-

that

the three ma- chines will lock -up to within a one

-bit synchronization accuracy.

Up to

72 channels of console

Rec

/Ready con- trol will also be possible, as shown in

Figure

3.

The SRIF

-1 is a parallel

Figure lA:

Sony PCM33

-24 and

PCM- 3102/3202 slaved to 3324 master. (VCIock boards not installed in transports.)

44.1/48 kHz

WORD CLOCK

OUT

PCM 3324

MASTER

WORD CLOCK

IN

PCM

3324

SLAVE

TIMECOOE

CONTROLt #TIMECOOE

TIME

SYNCHRONIZER

4

CONTROL

(WORD CLOCK

{

IN

I PCM 3102 320?

SLAVE

1

CONTROL

ISE ECT EXTERNAL

SYNCI

COMPOSITE

VIDEO SYNC

TIMECODE

CONTROL

PCM

3324

SLAVE

î

1

TIMECODE

PCM

TIMECOOE'

3102'3202

SLAV:

CONTROL

SYNCHRONIZER

4

CONTROL

Figure

1B:

As

Figure lA, but with VClock

3324 multitrack transports. boards fitted to

PCM

-

COMPOSITE VIDEO SYNC

PCM

3324

MASTER

TIMECOOE

CONTROL

CONTROL

PCM 33 ?4

SLAVE

ITIMECODE

SYNCHR011ZER

Figure 2A (above):

Conventional

Digital Audio 'Video synchroni- zation setup.

Figure

2B (below)

Digital Audio /Video

PCM -1610 to provide sync synchronization using reference for PCM -3324.

RIDEO

MASTER

COMPOSITE SYNC

PCM 1610

144.056 kHz1

WORD CLOCK

PCM 3324

[EXTERNAL SYNCI

COMPOSITE SYNC

IWITH DARK -30001

TIMECOOE TIMECOOE

CONTROL

1

SYNCHRONIZER

CONTR3L interface with channel of a multi- channel recorder performed by a mix- ing console, and includes tallies for

Rec

/Ready

Rec

Off

Status.

standard

command/ tallies common to all synchronizers.

The SRIF

-4 applies to the

Rec control on each

/Safe status

and

/Ready

Rec

On/

Under certain circumstances fast lock -up time must be achieved and, as shown in Figure

4, the analog source is the master. The resolver is fed com- posite video code sync and receives time

- reference from the

PCM

-3324.

During play modes, the resolver locks to incoming sync and outputs a cor- responding reference signal to the phase input of the multitrack. The

advantage

of utilizing a resolver in this set up is

that

lock -up time is min- imized, so almost

that

sound

instantly.

output occurs

In addition, an analog recorder can be used as a mas- ter, which is quite useful during sweetening sessions.

Digital Production for

Film and Video

Today, many projects are being shot on film, edited on video, and then finally assembled on film, a method

that

offers the improved speed and ease of video editing. During post production of Kenny Loggins Alive, a cable television project videodisk release, a PCM

-3324 powerful effect with nick, issue of

R

-e

that

could be and

PCM

-1610 were used for optimum sound recording, ing.

So successful was the sound of the final videotape, the production has been used to demonstrate the by using a digital dub made from an analog master.

[See feature interview engineer /producer

Bruce

Bot- published in the February

1983

/p

editing and for and later master- obtained further details

-Editor.]

Produced before the introduction of the digital PCM

-3324 recorder, the

Loggins project made use of video master striped an edited with timecode, which served as a visual post

- production reference while the

24- track analog master was mixed down to two

-track digital via a

PCM

-1610 processor. Crossfade audio editing was accomplished with the

Sony

DAE

-1100 technique audio

Digital Audio Editor, a

that

allowed imperceptible transitions between sections, even when the production called for songs to be added from different performances.

First -generation audio for video and videodisc masters was accom- plished by synchronizing the two channel digital mix with the video

-

Digital

2

Services

to

48 track

Sony

Digital Recording

Complete Remote

Services

John Moran

Houston,

Texas

(713)

520

-0201

Post

Production

David Hewitt

New

York

City

(914) 425

-8569

August

1985

0

R -e p 79

DIGITAL PRODUCTION

MIXING

CONSOLE

AUX SYNCHRONIZER

SECTOR

ADDRESS

MIXING

CONSOLE

AUX master. and dubbing both audio and video simultaneously.

Kenny

LdggJins

Alive was shown at a recent

NAB

Convention by using a

21- track digital dub made from the analog master.

To provide a quality comparison between analog and dig- ital sweetening, for the the one -inch video presentation master was locked

Sony to a

PCM-

3:324, a analog

24- track, a PCM

-1610 and a

Sony two

- channel video playback recorder, via an Audio Kinetics

Q.Lock synchroni- zation system, as shown in

'l'he

Figure

4B. transfer of images from film to videotape can be done in locked to the film

5 a and

6 for further details. converter, such flying -spot chain either

When of two ways: using Telecine or a pre -striped dummy timecode reel

- is see sprocket

Figures using as a

Rank

-Cintel scanner Telecine and an external timecode generator, both the converter and the V'I'R are locked to the same composite videosync refer- ence being fed to the timecode genera- tor. For the second method, the time- code dummy reel must have its mark matched to print, and

that

of

start

the optical started simultaneously to achieve sprocket interlock. While video and audio are dubbed over by the converter, timecode is recorded on

TACH

I

IF

3310

RM

-3310

CONTROLLER

PCM -3324

MASTER

1

SYNCHRONIZER

EXTERNAL

SERVO

REFERENCE

IISRIF

11

111--- t,

ANALOG IN

-24

ANALOG

OUT

24

SRIF

41

I

IF 3311

AUX

MIXING

CONSOLE

ISRIF

-41

I

AUDIO PURPOSE INTERFACE BUS:IEEE 488 -1978

ANALOG IN

-24

ANALOG OUT

24

SECTOR

ADDRESS

RM

-3310

CONTROLLER

ANALOG

IN

24

ANALOG OUT

-24

Figure

3:

Synchronizing three PCM

-3324 multitracks to provide

72

-track capability. either the digital multitrack's time- code or one of its analog tracks. When scenes are edited, the

24

-track tape can be offset the required amount, and then the timecode resynchronized

GLOSSARY OF

DIGITAL AUDIO TERMS

Sampling

Frequency is the rate at which the Analog Voltage produced by audio is

Sampled for conversion to Digital bits or numbers. Common frequencies are:

48 kHz for professional multitracks;

44.1 kHz for Compact Disc and video -based systems; and 44.056 for video referenced to a

59.95 -Hz timebase.

This sampling frequency must be at least double the highest audio frequency to be recorded; otherwise Aliasing will occur.

(In other words, any waveform must be sampled at least twice per cycle; otherwise it cannot be accurately re- constructed upon playback.)

Anti

-Aliasing Filters are very steep Iowpass filters operating above

20 kHz that elimi- nate any frequencies within the input signal that could cause

Aliasing problems, as described above.

Serial

Data is a method of transferring data in which digital bits

"march in single file," as opposed to Parallel Data in which they "march" side by side eight or

16 bits at a time. (Note that parallel data requires a separate address line for each of the eight or

16 bits, hence we get

8- or

16

-bit microprocessors at the heart of most computer systems.)

Word

Clock is the timing reference for recording data.

Digital bits are grouped to form digital words, which in turn are synchronized by the word clock running at the sampling frequency.

*Interleaving is a method by which adjacent digital words are shuffled before recording so that, should any drop -outs occur or data be lost, the

Error

Correction circuiting will be able to reconstruct the missing data and De- Interleave it.

(A modern

-day example of not putting all your eggs in one basket!)

Parity

Bits are added to the data so that the total number of bits in a particular group or

Digital Word always add up to either an odd or even number

-

determined by whether

Odd or

Even

Parity is being used.

CRC or

Cyclic Redundancy Checking is the most powerful form of

Error Correction, and is performed by adding extra bits to the data following certain rules. If these same rules are observed and checked on playback, any errors caused by dropouts and other system nasties can be detected and corrected. probability using

CRC is 99.9985%.)

(In a 16

-bit system,

p

August

1985 R-ei p 80

IF-3311 before re- dubbing.

Synchronizing a film projector to a separate digital multitrack recorder for playback in a theatre, or for final dubbing on the re- recording stage, can be readily accomplished, as de- picted in

PCM-

Figures

7 and

8.

Since the

3324's

DARK-3000 board can lock to 60 Hz reference, both the pro- jector and the multitrack can receive the same reference frequency. The film

3324 projector is interlocked with the dummy timecode reel, and the PCM

- will have the same reference time

Tech 9F, a unit footage and frames into used. be as

If

that

timecode of the dummy.

that

A

Magna converts

- film

standard

information, can also be the digital locked to an multitrack cannot external sync then a

PCM

-1610 can be source, used, the

Sony PCM -3324 digital

24

-track

I l l

ltli

laiiI

I

III;i ltl-I

I

II:'

I:

CONTROL

C0+

NTROI

SYNCHRONIZER

1

VIDEO

SLAVE

COMPOSITE

VIDEO SYNC

EXTERNAL

SPEED

REFERENCE

PCM 3324

MASTER

RES3LVER

TIMECOOE

TIMECODE

ADVANTAGE: FAST LOCK UP TIME

SO

SOUND OUTPUT OCCURS

INSTANTLY.

ANO

PCM

3324

CAN ACT AS MASTER.

PROJECTOR

OPTICAL TO

VIDEO CONVERTER

IRANK CINTELI

VIDEO

MASTER

1

Figure 4A

(above):

Digital Audio /Video synchronization configuration utiliz- ing a resolver to provide improved system lock

-up times.

Figure

4B (below):

Audio/ Video layback and sweetening configuration, with video master slaving an analog video -layback transport, a

PCM

-1610 proces- sor, and a

PCM

-3324 digital multitrack.

COMPOSITE SYNC

PCM 3324

VIDEO

MASTER

_y

VIDEO

MONITOR

TIMECOOE TIME

CODE

-

N---

SYNCHRONIZEF

I

TIMECODI

24 CHANNEL OUT

LAYRACK ATR

COMPOSITE

VIDEO SYNC

1

TIMECODE

GENERATOR

Figure

5

(above): System configuration for film -to- video transfer, with timecode generation.

Figure 6(below): Alternate system configuration for film -to -video transfer, using a sprocket- interlocked

35mm dummy loaded with pre- recorded timecode.

PROJECTOR

¡MATCH START MARKSI

TELECINE

VIDEO

MASTER

L 4

TIMECODE

DUMMY

CONSOLE

Oti

PCM 1610

144.056 kHzl

BVU-80006

AFTER EDITED VIDEO MASTER AND

24 -TRACK ARE LOCKED VIA TIMECOOE.

THE

MIX

OR

SWEETENED OUTPUT CAN

BE LAID BACK TO THE SONY PCM

1610

TWO -TRACK SYSTEM.OR LAYBACK ATR.

HIGH

FIDELITY AUDIO

IS THEN POSSIBLE

FOR MUSIC VIDEOS.OR PLAYBACK

FOR STEREO TELEVISION BROADCAST. tracks being routed via a console for the final mixdown to a

Dolby

Stereo matrixed,

Lt -Rt mix.

Last year, Glen Glenn Sound drama- tically benefits for demonstrated

that

the film the numerous digital recording holds industry. Digital

Dream proved master, when transferred to analog for

that

even a digitally

-recorded distribution, provides superior sound quality.

A digital six

-channel soundtrack was prepared during re- recording of the

30- minute film, and then mixed to Lt

-Rt for

35mm Dolby Stereo transfer to prints. During music scoring, two

Sony

PCM

-3324 digital multitracks were synchron- ized with a

BTX

(now

Cipher

Digital) unit to provide

48

-track capability at

Glen Glenn /Record

Dialog

Plant Studio

M. and sound effects from the field were recorded on a

Sony

PCM

-F1 system and laid back to digital multi- track in the studio. Sony

PCM -3324s were then interlocked to picture via the

Glen Glenn PAP

(Post

Audio Pro- cessing) system of computerized syn- chronization.

In this way, pre -mixes of hundreds of recorded on the separate tracks were preventing generation loss during the multiple digital multitracks, transfer stages. Later, pre

- dubs were combined for the final six

- track digital mix, and then dubbed directly to the 70mm print for distri- bution.

...

continued overleaf-

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COMPOSITE SYNC

Our remarkable MD

431 lets performers work with amplification as loud as they wish

6 dB over other microphones

-up

to

-without feedback. And without sacrificing the clarity of full, rich response.

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August

1985 R

-e, p 81

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For a catalogue of standard test tapes or further information contact:

RCA TEST TAPES

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PROJECTOR

TIMECODE

GUMMY

PROJECTOR

-+

SYNCHRONIZER

CONTROL

PCM

33'24

ANALOG

OUT

24

CONSOLE OOIRYENCOOE

60Hz

TIMECOOE

t t2

Figure

7

(above):

Film interlock using DABK

-3000 video clock board and ence during re- recording of Dolby Stereo Lt

-Rt mix to PCM

-3324.

60

Hz refer-

MAGN TECH

9f

TIMECOOE

COMPOSITE SYNC

PCM

1610

COMPOSITE

SYNC

OR

WORD CLOCK

PCM 3324

ANALOG OUT

24

t

CONSOLE

SYNCHRONIZOR

TIMECOOE

CONTROL

4_- oOLDYENCODE

Figure

8:

Film interlock system using the PCM

-1610 processor to provide composite sync signal and word clock for PCM

-3324.

The visual future, marriage of digital audio and programming has a great

thanks

to the dual -impact of

Music Video productions and the introduction of Stereo Television.

Dramatic improvements in sound reproduction were recently brought to life by several Music Videos. The final

Dolby Stereo two

-track master of

The

Talking Heads'

Stop Making Sense was transferred directly to the optical negative from a final

Lt -Rt mix re- corded on a PCM -3324 digital multi- track.

A pristine signal quality was

maintained throughout

the re- recording and mixing of the program by the use of digital equipment.

Stevie Wonder Cones

Home was a recent Showtime television special

that

used two -track digital audio from a PCM

-1610. tion was

The simulcast produc- synchronized and uplinked via a

Scientific Atlanta converter sys- tem, and transmitted to

Showtime affiliates in digital form via the

Sat

- com

1R satellite.

I

See the October

1984 issue of

R -e

/p

for full details of audio post production of the Stop Making

Sense and Stevie Wonder Comes

Home

Still presentations

-

Editor.] another post -production method was used for Neil Young's Music

Video, directed by Hal Ashby, with

Elliot Mazer producing audio. The original multitrack masters were mixed in using two PCM -3324s running sync with the picture, and a PCM

-

1610 to two

-channel system the video master. used to receive the mix prior to final layback

Movie audiences as sion viewers are now well as televi- enjoying dig- itally recorded sound. Giorgio Morod- er's remake of

Fritz

Lang's

1926 classic film,

Metropolis, was one of the first major motion picture released to rely on digital technology for the soundtrack.

'l'hree

PCM-3324s were cascaded, and the

1.1

-track music masters mixed over to four tracks of

alternate

PCM- 3324s.

'l'hese mixes were work then ruin in sync with a video print of the film until the music exactly fitted the film's newly edited version.

A

PCM -1610 provided word sync to the digital multitrack, plus video video sync to the

BVU

-800 used for playback.

An Audio

Kinetics

(.Lock

synchronizer was locked to the video

I610, sync output of the

PCM

- with timecode running at the video rate.

For theatrical distribution, music was crossfaded from the dual multitracks and recorded directly to the four -track Dolby

Stereo film master.

The re- premiere of .'Metropolis was shown to

Motion audiences

Picture Arts at the Academy of and Sciences,

Los

Angeles, with audio being replayed from twin PCM -3324s interlocked via

SMPTE timecode to the film.

From this first project, audio fessionals quickly recognized pro-

that

digital is now quickly replacing the traditional methods of 35mm film recording; for example, it is very easy to synchronize two PCM sors to replace the

-1610 proces- familiar four -track mag

-film recording methods. 'l'he music scores of E.T.,

Poltergeist.

Indiana Jones and the Temple of

Doom.

Bruce Botnick, were all tered plus

Explorers, recorded by using digitally mas- this method, with the soundtrack albums being tnastered from a four

-channel mix.

'l'he use of digital is not limited to studio use either.

Frank Zappa re- cently videotaped sync. and digitally re- corded a live concert in New York

City with his personal chronized to

VTRs via composite

Tracks were

-use PCM then

-3324 mixed syn- directly h

1)

8:2

\ugust

ISh:,

onto the

P('M

-3324 by combining and bouncing the composites onto two free tracks for the stereo mix.

Final mixes for

Zappers

Does

humor

Belong in

Music were t hen t insferred the P('M

-1610 t11.(66 through kHz sampling frequency) at I';i ci tir Video, Holly- wood.

The young world of ing is quickly uniting digital record- with and film worlds to provide the video dramatic sensatii ins never before possible.

.M1Mel- ro

Ind is more ress; an than typifies this prog- innovative movie in 1926, the film i again a unique production rim years later than ks iii the use of digital technology.

Unlimited possibilities exist because of the flexibility digital technology possesses. And recording profession- als will ways to continue to find innovative increase the pleasure we re- ed

Ve from sound produced digitally.

SYNCHRONIZATION

MITSUBISHI

X

-80

X- shi synchronization of the

Mitsubi- digital

:32-Track and

X

-80 digital two -track machines is both

standard

and common, as corn- pared with the interface of the analog tape machines presently in use in stu- dios today. Both with a control of all units are supplied parallel interface for external transport and electronic functions. The

(RS -232C) is splice

"universal"

RS -422 differential serial port also provided on the new

X

-850 cut -and- digital

32- track; this additional interface will accommodate the re- quirements of video editing suites, television studios, and any other operations

that

serial interface. base their tape machine control protocol through

Other features able on the new

X

-850 include the addition of improved

- avail- external clock interface capabilities, which can be set to either

9.6 or

8 kHz.

The user can lock to external reference, such as

50

Mitsubishi

X -80 digital two -track, with optional VCO

-80 synchronizer interface, and DDl

-

-1 disk -mastering delay unit.

800/850

OF

AND

DIGITAL TRANSPORTS

by

Cary

B.

Fischer, operations manager,

Mitsubishi Pro

-Audio Group

or

60)

Hz,

59.94, or composite video the

X

-850 will

- automatically sense the external reference, and then lock to it.

T.) design and build an interface synchronizer cable, computer inter- face for console automation, or film chain interface, you need to under- stand what the two prospective pieces of hardware will supply in the way of control outputs and inputs, tally com- mands, servo information, power, ground configuration, tach informa- tion, and direction. (Again, this is

standard

interface information sim- ilar to tape machine.)

One user

that

found on any professional large advantage

that

the tional tracks for the purpose of end gains from utilizing Mitsubishi digital machines is the supply of addi-

data

storage.

Both the

32

-track and two

- track are provided with an additional

SMPTE timecode track, which alle- viates the problem of using up a valu- able tape track for code. In addition to the timecode track, the

32

-track has an additional two tracks for analog recording, the encoding of tion, or for and two digital tracks for automation informa- any other overlooked function

data that

you might need to store in real time. The two

-track has an additional analog track, as well as the SMPTE code track, the former being used to cue the tape prior to razor -blade editing.

Setting the damping factor is one

that's

usually an r\\

api

5

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1985

0

R -e

1)

83

option provided for you by various synchronizer manufacturers. The term

"damping," in this context, refers to the use of a synchronizer's capabili- ties to control match the transport, via synchronizer control, by the speed, direction, and acceleration of a

What this means is

internal

tape

that

transport. you control of can the adjusting the rate at which the synchronizer changes states to ensure proper tape handling. If proper con- trol of the tape

transport

is over- looked, you could

The

X

-800 has a damage the tape. software program stored in ROM

(read -only memory)

that

ensures proper tape handling, and which will prevent the tape from being by thrashed around the transport external control of the unit's servo

The

X

-80 two -track also features a

standard

interface to the outside world for master control. If the

X

-80 needs to be slaved to a second machine, the

DEC -VCO

(voltage

- controlled oscillator) interface will be required. The

VCO is control unit

that

an interactive allows for various synchronizers to control the

X -80 servo -control circuitry, and allows for three modes: a)

Internal Calibration; b) synchronizer control; and c)

Varis- peed

Operation. The unit's readout displays varispeed information (in percentage),

Shown in and sampling frequency.

Figure

1 are the pin outs for the

X

-80's remote control interface.

Interfacing the Mitsubishi line of digital recorders currently in use at various types of facilities around the world was accomplished with great ease. As special

Figure

1 shows, there are no considerations to the interface or synchronizing the machines.

Outside of the familiar use of tape machines interlocked for video scor- ing, dual -machine operation, and auto- mation machine control, there is an

SIIí'aAL

PIAh1E

PINIiUTS

SIGN AL l'lAME

FINíiUTS SIGNAL NAME

INPUT

Ext. Sig

_;L''r

Wind

STP

FT

REV'

C-REC

BACK

F'-ED IT

T

.ST ART

SPEED

SPEED

1

1/4

/8

)

í'1

P0637

(Sharp)

1

Receive

X-801:ti-80

A

34

35

21

22

39

23

19

36

20

37

40

24

EDIT

EXT

CNT F.3T

PL AY

REC

F''D

ERASE

SPEED

1/2

OUTPUT

C:NT-INH

UP

/DWN

FI=

637

1

38

3

4

5

6

7

43

27

Ratinq_

:

IF =

1

On-1A

VF =

1

.6V

02

C.-REO

FF

GND

(+30Y)

+3C

IV

CI

47''

F'INOUTs

Drive

X-80

/X-80

A

1

0

1 1

12

17

33

50

Figure

1:

Pinouts for Mitsubishi

X -80 digital two -track's remote control interface.

Key: CNT

=

Counter

Reste; C REC

=

Code Record

Control; BACK

=

Set back-speed mode for reverese spooling; P-EDIT

=

Output dubbing data to lineout;

02

=

Counter roller output for play mode. i7

(

T

1

)

Figure

2:

Schematic of film -to- digital -audio synchronization for scoring sessions.

The restyled

Mitsubishi

X -850 digital

32- track now provides cut -and -spice editing and improved external clock interface.

Dubbing Console

Dialog

Music

A

Effects.

AUDIO

1"1aCfilne RIJOni

35rrlrn

Dubber.

35rnrn

Recorders

-,:+ítíl

7,2

Track:

Master Film

Control Hrd ,.rr

Slancronizer

R

-e

/p

84

0 August

1985

interesting application now in pro- gress utilizing the

32

-track recorder.

TIMECODE: THE

KEY

TO

AUDIO /VIDEO

AND FILM

SYNCHRONIZATION

The key ingredients to successful inter- facing and synchronization in video, film or record projects is timecode, which provides a common "language" that ena- bles various recording equipment to com- municate with one another, and gives audio professionals more freedom to create even the most complex recordings. The SMPTE/

EBU timecode format adopted in the late

Sixties serves as the basis for today's sophisticated video and audio editing and synchronization systems. Two versions of the code currently exist; of thé pair

-

Lon- gitudinal Time Code (LTC) and Vertical

Interval Time Code (VITC)

-

we are con- cerned with the former. With Longitudinal

Time Code, the following relationships apply:

NTSC

2,400 bits per second:

30 frames per second

=

80 bits per frame.

PAL and

SECAM

2,000 bits per second:

25 frames per second

=

80 bits per frame.

While each bit has a specific value, of special interest here are the 10th and 11th bits. The 10th bit is the drop -frame bit, and indicates a drop or non -drop frame time- code condition. The reason for this indica- tor bit being necessary is that NTSC color signals have an actual frequency of approx- imately

29.97 frames per second, which means that a generator counting at the

30- frame rate would produce an increasing error of

3.6 seconds per hour. To compen- sate for this error,

108 frames are elimi- nated from the timecode each hour, or two frames each minute with the exception of the

10th minute. Bit

11 is the color -frame bit, and only applies to color recordings.

In

NTSC video, the color frame is divided into four fields, each being

1

/15th of a second in duration.

Fields

1 and

3 are defined as color frame A, while fields

2 and

4 are defined as color frame

B.

Color

-frame identification indicates that even -frame numbers coin- cide with color frame A, while odd frame numbers coincide with color frame

B, an identification that assists video -editing sys- tems in maintaining the correct video signal color -burst phase relationship across the edit points.

000

18

-BIT

PCM

TECHNOLOGY

BEING DEVELOPED BY dbx

While the main emphasis of these articles is on synchronizing PCM

(pulse-code modulation) trans ports, it should not be overlooked that dbx has avail able the Model 700 two channel digital processor based on Companded Predictive Delta Modulation

(CPDM)technolgy, for use with

'_ and',inchVCRs.

While the company has yet to release a purpose -built editor, existing timecode based video editors can be used for frame-accurate digital edits.

Also under development is a series of

18 bit PCM

ICs that the company plans to offer on an

OEM basis to manufacturers of tape transports and digital pro- cessors.

According to Bob Adams, dbx director of research, the new chips make use of a hybrid front

- end topography that samples at 6

MHz, followed by a switchable

16,

18-bit stage clocked at 48 kHz. The

ICs should be available next year.

OO

The Burbank Studios,

Los Angeles, has interfaced an

X

-800 in one of its dubbing rooms, where the unit is being used as a

X

-800

(now is dubbing machine.

The synchronized using a BTX

Cipher Digital) Shadow

Soft

- information touch to follow film pulse supplied from a troller. The

X

-800 film master chase film con- locks to the transport operation, and acts as though it were a conventional

35mm film dubber

- the only difference being the supply tracks! The TBS of

32 digital audio technical depart- ment has manufactured its own ver- sion of the autolocator, which is being integrated into the console for ease of machine control.

TBS is also its using another

X

-800 in scoring stage. Apart from scoring music tracks directly to this machine,

TBS is also adding additional mation to the tracks infor- pre -dubs

- for use

- in when the form of the tape is brought across to the dubbing stage.

This mode of operation using the

X-

800 is now

starting

to take hold.

Fan- tasy Studios, San Francisco, also is using the

X

-800 for film scoring, and a project is

Figure

2. underway

that

will give them the same type of flexibility achieved by

TBS, and diagrammed in

It must be kept in mind, however,

that

slaving a digital recorder to analog, video and film transports, is

From initial tracking

...

WNW to the finished

... or any step between.

CD

THE CHOICE

IS YOURS,

PICK

SIX

FROM

CMS DIGITAL RENTALS

Whether it's

JVC,

Sony,

3M, dbx,

Audio +Design

701's, or Soundstream,

CMS is the

ONLY rental source not all to

-

give you

CMS all these choices. And that's can also convert from any one format to another!

3M 32

-track

Sony

24

-track

NC

DAS VP 900

Sony

1610

Audio

+Design 701ES with interf ace tray

Lr

^

-

201 o dbx

700

Soundstream

JVC VP 101

Format conversions

Electronic Editing

(word accurate)

Digital Layback onto

Video

Masters

Compact Disc

Preparation

CD

CD reference disc manufacturing and much, much more!

So, whatever your needs,

CMS DIGITAL

IS

THE RIGHT CHOICE

DIGITAL

(818)

797

-3046

August

1985 R-e p t;L

A3_ n]n

SIGNAL NAHE

HOT

ü4[

+24'r'

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SPEED

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12

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(corn) dir

(

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(no) stop tally rew tally lifter

(no) stop (no) rev

(no) control sply stop (corn) tach (+) tach

(-) ff switch fwd

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+5 grd tach

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Mitsubishi x

-800

4 e

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330 ohm

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INTERCONNECTS BETWEEN MITSUBISHI

X

-800 AND

CIPHER BTX SHADOW

13

10

36

33 the ble the pite

data

has to be decoded sampling frequency

at that

a varia- matches external sync perturbations. Des- these admittedly minor limita- tions, there is little doubt

that

digital interlock is becoming an increasingly important technique in audio production. not the easiest task to accomplish from the manufacturer's point of view.

Because the PCM code is time based, it takes quite a lot of number crunching in order to reproduce a

PCM signal while the

transport

is responding to external sync control.

With the sync signal (located on each track of the tape) comparing its tim- ing to the machine's internal clock, and then being buffered to eliminate wow and flutter, a perfect recorded at a pling frequency an imperfect you crystal are really taking environment

-

- digital

-controlled sam- and turning it

data

into environment, in which

A

THE

EIAJ-

FORMAT

In early

1983, the

Sony EIAJ-

Format

PCM

-F1 was digital audio processor introduced to the world via a ser- ies of black and white advertisements

that

centered around a photograph of a in man recording a baby grand piano his home with a pair of micro- phones plugged into a small grey box.

With a domestic videocassette re- corder, of the ad explained, the promise high -quality digital audio in the home could become a indeed it did, reality. And although the popularity of such digital processors quickly

R -e

/p

86

August

1985

DIGITAL

PROCESSOR

COMES

OF AGE

Review of

Available

Hardware,

Transfer and Editing

Systems

by

David Smith, Editel /New York

developed well beyond recording your home baby

During grand piano. the last three years much water has flowed beneath the digital bridge regarding the eventual fate of

- in addi- EIAJ- Format processors tion to the introduction of a virtual plethora of accessories, a disussion of which will form the basis for this arti- refrain from cle. (However,

I will commenting on the future availabil- ity of any of these units, since it would tend only to do a further disservice to an information -hungry recording in- dustry. Except,

that

is, to comment

that

a recently divulged "legend" has it seriously considered as a viable pro

- audio product; merely a demonstra- tion of

Sony's technological prowess.

The

that

the

PCM the implications of

-F1

that

was never unit's commercial success and success so surprised its creators, the legend goes,

that

Sony's response has been mired by intercorporate strife and a long history of confusing disinformation.

Not to mention the fact

that

the com- pany also markets a fully -professional

16

-bit audio processor, the PCM -1610,

and

DAE -1100

editing system.)

To ers, date, several major manufactur- including Sony,

Nakamichi, San

- sui,

JVC, and Technics, have mar- keted

EIAJ- Format digital audio processors.

All these units are basi- cally similar, in ing made on one will definitely play back on

that

a digital record- another; trivial differences

between processors from different companies simply reflect the varied approaches quirements.

that

each manufacturer takes toward the marketplace re-

Sony,

due in no small part to its reputation as a high

-end audio com- ponent manufacturer, currently has three processors in its collection

PCM -F1, PCM

-501 and

PCM

-701 all of which are the only devices cap- able of

16

-bit quantization, a factor

that

endows them, many users con- sider, with superior audio capability.

(It should be remembered

that

the

EIAJ -Format only defines a stereo processor design for

14

-bit tion quantiza-

at

a sampling freqency of

44.1 kHz, and the data format used to record the signal on videotape; the

Sony processors feature both

14

-bit sampling, and a switchable

16

-bit mode ooh

- the

gm,tP

Sony

also manufactures the

Nakamichi

DMP

-100 processor, which essentially is a carbon copy of the

F1.

The primary differences include polypropylene audio input and output coupling capacitors cost several times those of the

F1

's mylar capacitors, and sound notica- bly sweeter.

The

Sansui

X

-1

that

Tricode processor has been in existence almost as long

-

that

"steals" two bits from the error- detection

data

analog converter stream.)

The

PCM

-F1 is a portable unit the minor exception of some version circuitry. Both the

F1

701 make use of two analog

-to-

that

can be operated either from

AC power or batteries, and contains integral mike pre -amps; it was originally introduced with a companion porta- ble VCR, the SL

-2000.

The PCM

-701 is a non -portable version of without mike pre

-amps, and is designed to blend in with a compo- nent hi

-fi system. The unit is very sim- ilar to the

F1 in most respects, with subtle changes in the digital

-to- analog con- converters, and a single digital

-to-

that

is the

PCM -F1, and the digital time -shared between the left and right channels.

Sony's most recent introduction, the

PCM

-501, incorporates new, dedi- cated hi her integrated circuits quality while t e vi eo

'the

501 circuitry is capable

that

of have substantially reduced the electronic complexity. The

501 uses one new high

-speed

A -to

-D converter and a new high

-speed

D

-to

-A converter, both of which are time -shared between channels. The analog circuitry uses different reconstruction filters and audio components,

incorporates

an "optimum video condition" control to optimize the unit for poor video recordings, as well as those made at slow

SLP). tape

.--p speeds (Beta III or VHS e&LE

J

Will

causean

playing nr711

DIGITAL

RE-

RECORDING

AND

REMIX OF

VINTAGE

HENDRIX

by

TAPES USING

3M

DMS AND

Joe

JVC

Gastwirt, JVC Cutting

Center, Hollywood

DAS

-900

According to Alan Douglas, founder of Are You Experienced Productions, and

Hendrix' last producer, our goal in the

Monterey Pop Festival reconstruction of

Jimi

Hendrix

Live At The soundtrack was to produce a master tape to be used for a new film soundtrack, plus video, LP and Compact

Disc release. Douglas, who has been working to keep Hendrix' music alive since his death, stated that his philosophy on this project was to recreate the live, raw, imperfect original sound of this concert. There were to be no overdubbed instruments or drum machines; we were simply to work with what we had.

We decided to mix down to a digital two

-track tape machine, since it was agreed that if any advantages existed to analog they had already been embossed on the original multi- track tapes.

We also did not want to compound any noise problems with additional analog tape hiss.

Our overall goal was to use

1985 digital technology to

1967 live rented from CMS

Digital,

Altadena,

CA. restore and preserve the sound. The two -track digital format we chose was a

JVC

DAS

-900 processor,

Upon inspecting the original

1967 eight -track tapes, falling

I knew we ran the risk of the tape apart after one or two good passes. Parts of the tape were already shredding, and the oxide was missing in a number of spots.

In order to eliminate any further deterioration,

I decided to transfer the original multitrack tape to one of

Frank Dickinson's modified

3M

DMS

32

-track digital recorders.

I chose this machine because of its superior sonic qualities, and Dickinson agreed to help with the different sync situations necessary to effect the audio transfers.

Mark Linett, who had already worked on the overall preparation of the

Kiss The Sky album, and had mixed two of the songs, was asked to mix the Monterey Pop project at

Sunset Sound's Studio,

Hollywood. Sunset has a more than adequate monitoring system, as well as a custom control board equipped with Neve NECAM console automation, which quickly interfaced with the

3M digital multitrack. The studio was conveniently stocked with plenty of outboard gear, including GML parametric equalizers, several types of digital delay lines, a and a live echo chamber. The relaxed good work atmosphere. feeling and the extremely helpful staff made for

Analog -to- Digital Transfer

After spending about four hours hooking up resolvers, timecode generators, aligning the digital

32- track, and adjusting the eight

-track head assembly to match the alignment of the

by

MIDCOM

known

in

the Southwest the companies we keep

And by the companies who keep us.

Only by grown as meeting a wide range of equipment the pre- eminent supplier needs has Midcom, Inc. of prestige audio equipment in the

Southwest. Exclusive dealer for prestige lines like the Otari

MTR 90

24 -track recorder and

NEVE consoles. Studios and broadcasters all over the southwest depend on Midcom for

expert consulting,

engineering and installation. Midcom's inventory features Otari,

Soundcraft, JBL, Lexicon, Neumann, Auditronics and Sound

Workshop. in

The wide variety of high quality audio equipment is why, the Southwest, demanding audio professionals depend on Midcom.

Mi

PRODUCTION AUDIO EQUIPMENT

AND

FACILITIES

FOR

THE SOUTHWEST

Midcom, Inc.

(214) 869 -2144

Three

Dallas

Communications Complex

Suite

108

/LB 50/631

I

N.

O'Connor /Irving, TX 75039 -3510

August

1985 O

R-e/p

87

HENDRIX DIGITAL RE-

RECORDING

-contined...

original multitrack tape, we were ready to start the transfer.

Because many extra tracks were available on the

DMS, we bounced each of the original eight analog tracks to two digital tracks. The breakdown was as follows: two tracks each of audience, guitar,

Jimi's vocal, bassist Noel Redding's background vocal, bass, drum, overhead drum, and 60 -Hz sync tone, for a total of

16 digital tracks, plus one for SMPTE timecode (to provide for future synchronization with video, as well as for interfacing the

3M digital multitrack to the

NECAM automation).

The

60 -Hz sync tone from the original recording was put through a resolver, and used to ensure accurate speed matching during subsequent playback. This same 60 -Hz sync tone was also recorded on the five- camera live film shoot from the concert, and is necessary for synchronizing the audio tracks to film.

Since the 3M DMS only holds

30 minutes of tape, and we were working with

45 minutes of original taped music, we had to divide the transfer into two parts. Convenient edit point with plenty of overlap time had to be found, in order to reconstruct the transfer into one continuous performance with consistent timecode throughout.

During the transfer stage, l was not surprised to find that, in spite of distortion, the vocals fading in and out, a drum mike disappearing and then breaking up while the sounds of the audience faded up and down, the tapes represented a truly remarkable performance, and one that also was a piece of history!

Remix Sessions

After taking several notes during this first listening, we were ready to set up the

JVC

DAS

-900 two -track digital processor for mixing. The DAS

-900 is a video -based system that works off either a preset internal sync, or a composite -video sync (sampling rate 44.056 kHz). Composite sync was taken from the 3M multitrack and plugged into the composite

- sync input of the digital processor. At the same time, we routed the

60

-Hz sync tone and

SMPTE timecode to analog tracks one and two of the video recorder being used to record the digital information.

It was now time to begin the mix of the concert intro and the first song,

"Killing Floor."

We spent a lot of time on each track, trying different types of EQ, limiting, compression, digital delay and echo.

After many painful hours, we finally came up with a mix that we all agreed upon.

Linett and

I took home cassette copies to listen to the mixes under familiar conditions.

After listening again the next morning, we both decided that the first mix was a good try, but sounded a little "overdone." This opinion also made us aware that the first song was not a good place to start the mixing, since the sound was still changing on stage, and the flow of the concert had not yet been established.

We moved on to the second song,

"Foxy Lady," to try a different technique. First we attempted to figure out the layout of the stage which, of course, was a very important consideration in terms of the placement of instruments relating to the film, and in keeping the audio as visual as possible. On this mix we used minimal EQ to keep the sound natural; the signal processing, digital delay and echo were used more to enhance the original sound

SCHEMATIC OF

32

-TRACK TO TWO -TRACK DIGITAL

REMIX

TRCCKS

1

31

LINE OUT

IIIIIIlI1l111I111111111I11ItIW

UNE

IN

3M

32

TRACK

DIGITAL

RECORDER

T

OUT IN

STEREO

BUSS

SIMPTE TIME

CODE READER

SUNSET SOUND CUSTOM

MIXING CONSOLE m.-TRACK

32

SIMPTE

TIME CODE

L5(

'HZ SYN( TCN

TRACK2

ANALOG

TRACK

I

DIG.

OUT

DIG IN

JVC

DAS

900

DI.,ITAL

2 TRACK

RECORDER

DIGITAL PRODUCTION

as the

Sony units.

A dedicated

14

-bit processor, the

X

-1 is the first device to deal with the slowest VHS and Beta videotape speeds. The Tricode circui- try utilized in the

X

-1 effortlessly handles the poor video replay quality of slow -speed of formats, and is the basis the optimum video condition circui- try found in the PCM

-501.

To date,

I have seen only two of these units, and am by surprised

Sansui.

that

a more agressive marketing stance has not been taken deal of response to market input, and its VP

-100 and VP

-101 processors trends discussed reflect the growing later in this article, as well as poten- tial applications beyond the original intended scope of the EIAJ- Format.

A more model,

14 designed

-

JVC

has always shown a great rugged and the

-bit processor, nor is

VP

-101 for used is but at

"professional"

also a dedicated has slow VCR the unit designed not been speeds to be used with less expensive

VCRs. JVC also manufactures a professional digital mastering system, the DAS

-900.

With the addition of a

JVC interface, it is possible to digitally introduced

transfer

from the

EIAJ-

Format

VP

-101 to the VP

-900

16

-bit processor, a offered by no other feature currently

Japanese

facturer of professional digital mas- tering systems. The VP

-101 has swit- chable pre- emphasis and a sync output jack to control the speed of the

VCR during playback. However, this jack does not accept external sync for video shoots, of VCRs to and limits the selection higher quality units capa- ble of

For accepting external sync. those of us wishing to enter the fray at minimum cost, the recently

Technics

SV -100 manu-

EIAJ-

Format processor presents us with a

14

-bit unit similar to the Sony

F1, but without the

16

-bit resolution. The unit has microphone pre -amps and can be used with a battery pack. Although theSV

-100 is small and lightweight, a recent product review faulted the device for tion. Even its lack of robust construc- one, price though

I have yet to see the combination of features and makes this a most attractive unit.

Editing EIAJ- Format Material

One of the great bones of contention with respect to the potential use of

EIAJ- Format processors in film

- sound, audio -for -video

Disc and production, is the fact

Compact

that

all of

that

recordings be edited them require and transferred to professional dig- ital formats, such as the

Sony PCM-

1610 or

JVC VP

-900.

At present, two commercially available products exist

R-e/p88

August

1985

to facilitate the video editing of

EIAJ-

Format digital audio without the need to convert it to a more expensive for- mat for editing.

As many

R

-e/ p readers may already be cal aware, the electrical and mechani- limitations of consumer

VCRs necessitated the development of a more robust error deal with

-correction format to errors. The encoded format speads blocks of increased random and burst

data

over more

than

one video field with the fields of video are result that, when edited, dissimilar data blocks are joined to each other, causing data discontinuities and resultant glitches.

Electric Valve Communications,

New York, manufactures an Editing

Co-

Processor

(ECOP)

that

senses the

data

discontinuity, and removes it by digitally crossfading the incoming and outgoing audio material for a smooth transition.

The device is a sin- gle circuit board

that

can be added to any EIAJ- Format processor via dealer modification.

By correcting glitches in the digital domain, ECOP enables edited tapes to be copied using the processor's digital copy fea- ture; duped ble tapes glitches and will be free

data

The device is video editor, which

data

of audi- discontinuities.

"transparent"

to any might range in complexity from a simple control-

HENDRIX DIGITAL

RE-

RECORDING

--

confined...

of the tape, rather than to hide, mask or alter the sound.

Next we used the NECAM automation to mute any electrical clicks and pops, stage noises, intermittent buzzes and any other disturbing noises inherent in the live recording.

Our next task was to recreate the audience track between songs.

Unfortunately, the original audience track had been faded up and down at the wrong times. and the applause cut off too quickly. We searched through other concert tapes to find applause that could used to blend with the original applause track. We ended up with eight to be

10 tracks of extra applause, mixed these together and melded them with the song. On each mix we allowed the applause to fade out and continue to the first few notes of the next tune, thereby providing plenty of overlap time to ensure smooth, easy transitions for the editing process.

We completed "Like

A Rolling Stone," "Rock

Me Baby" and, my favorite, "Hey Joe," using the same method.

On the third morning we mixed "Can You

See

Me," "The Wind Cries Mary," and

"Purple Haze"; in the afternoon we went on to

"Wild Thing," and the burning -guitar segment. As many of you may remember, there was a massive amount of distortion on this last tune, which Linett and

I were determined to eliminate.

After some extensive detective work, we discovered that most of the distortion was caused by a tube drum mike that had crapped out in the middle of the show, but which nobody noticed. (Or, if they did, they did nothing to repair or change it!) After muting the bad track, we were left with only one usable drum track. The next few hours were spent trying such tricks as sending the sound back into a speaker in the studio, miking the speaker, and then mixing this with the existing drum to create additional ambiance.

After we felt secure that the drums sounded as good as possible, we fixed a few more noise problems and finished "Wild Thing."

We then went back to the opening tune, "Killing

Floor" and, following the same format and energy level as

"Foxy Lady," ended up with a sparkling

-hot mix. The session was complete.

Digital Editing

After a good night's sleep,

I spent the rest of the day listening to the digital tape of each song, realizing

1 would not be able to rest until

I heard the complete performance edited together as one,

45- minute show.

Arriving at the CMS digital editing suite in Altadena at

11:00 that night, the first step was to hook up the DAS

-900 digital editor so that it would retain the identical SMPTE timecode used in the original session. CMS matched the

JVC

The unequalled equalizer.

Not all equalizers are created equal. You know that from experience.

So do we.

Our years of parametric design experience let us build so much performance and versatility into our 672A (mono) and 674A

(stereo) graphic /parametric equalizers that Modern

Recording

&

Music

(October,

1981) described the

674A as

"...the

most powerful equalizing tool for pro audio work that

I have yet to come across

".

They clearly appreciated the versatility and func- tionality of eight bands of

EQ with fully adjustable center frequency and crossover. bandwidth, plus the availability of 12dB /octave highpass and lowpass signal bandwidth or to serve as a filters to full electronic limit

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CA 94107

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TLX:

17

-1480

For additional information circle a58 August

1985

O

Ri.' p

89

HENDRIX DIGITAL

RE-

DIGITAL PRODUCTION

track model to a fully equipped

CMX system, and has an editing accuracy of

16 or33 milliseconds, depending on your ized choice of recording VCR.

HHB

Hire and Sales,

based pro -audio supply the

London

- and rental company, has developed a

Computer-

Logging Unit and Editor.

Cur-

RECORDING

--

contined... timecode to the original timecode, by using the

JVC TC

-900 interlocking unit. Next,

I had to be sure that the original 60

-Hz sync tone was being transferred correctly to the new

U

-Matic master tape that would be the final production master. The actual editing process went very smoothly, because of the precautions and care taken during mixdown. The level of the introduction needed to be raised, in order to match the level of the first tune; the fader provided on the DAS

-900 editing system made this a simple task to rehearse and execute.

Most of the other edits used to join the show together were made during silence, crowd noise or Hendrix speaking.

Unlike most other music editing sessions,

I had to concern myself with keeping the timecode consistent, rather than concentrating solely upon the music.

For example, if the applause from "Killing Floor" ended at exactly 06:07;29,

I had to find that exact timecode on the applause before

"Foxy Lady" started, and match the two together perfectly. After spending some time level matching between applause tracks, making sure that each tune came in loud enough, and checking to see that all sync information was transferred correctly,

I ended up with a tape that was ready to be mastered for LP, CD and to be synchronized with the film and video.

I do believe that there is an integral part of the human spirit that always strives for something good to be even better

-

not just for one's own satisfaction, but for everyone else as well. It was this desire that enabled Douglas, Linett and myself to find the energy and resources to keep the sounds of the great

"Jimi Hendrix Experience" alive and audibly up to date.

ODD rently, CLUE is the only dedicated

EIAJ-

Format editing system, and is based on the use of

half

-inch

Betamax

VCRs controlled by a microcomputer running custom software.

A full key- board and

VDU comprise the opera- tor interface, with a PCM

-701 replay- ing audio in real time.

Edit points to a resolution of

33 milliseconds can be captured on the "fly," entered from the keyboard, or determined manu- ally by humping the tape forwards and backwards one frame at a time.

Then the

resultant

edit point can he previewed before to it.

While actually committing editing EIAJ-

Format material, the to

data

glitches are tion of a lowpass filter removed in analog domain through the inser- at the edit point smooth over the anomaly. (For improved deglitching at the edit points, the Electric Valve

ECOP is available as an option for CLUE.)

Tape locations can be determined from the VCR's control track, or via an optional timecode reader board, and the edit decision lists stored to

51.1

-inch floppy disk.

CLUE is arranging EIAJ-

Format material the user edit in 1610- before particularly plans to the audio useful

that

can greatly reduce the amount of

(expensive) time for transfer and then format, for example. By working out the relevant edit points is transferred, you spent editing in the latter format.

EIA.1

-to -1610

Format

Conversions

In the event

that

greater edit resolu- tion is necessary, or for

Compact Disc mastering, a conversion from EIAJ- to -1610 format must be executed in the digital domain. Utilizing the Sony

DAE -1100 digital editing system,

ICOLOR SYNC

GENERATOR

^-

VP

OA

900

ITOA

PROCESSOR

AI

II

Ill

Ili

m

!

11

SYNC

II

E

PO

IC 900V

TIME

COGE

UNIT

IP CM AUDIO

ORIGINALI rr

imommilsor

CR

8250U or

BR

8600

VCR

-f-

PB

AE 900V

DIGITAL AUDIO

E

DITOR

IPCM AUDIO

MASTERI

AEC

s-

PB

CA or BR

8250V

VCR

8600V

L

,-VW-.1

Clockwise from above:

VP -900 processor and

TC -900V timecode unit; AE -900V editor; and editing controller. li

L./L.1

L'L-a

=

1111LLLLLLJ

VIDEO

ISYNCHRONIZER

POST -PRODUCTION

SMPTE TIME CODE

CR

SMPTE or BR

8250V

TIME C00E t

MONITOR

86000

VCR

AUDIO MASTERING SYSTEM

SIAVEI

The JVC Digital Audio

Mastering System

(DAMS) pulse -code modulation (PCM) digital audio comprises two main components: the VP -900

16

-bit, two

-channel processor, and the

AE -900V digital audio editor. Because the processor incorporates a unique bi- parity

(BP) recording format, and new error detection circuits, less expensive half -inch, VHS video recorders can be used to provide a two

-hour recording capability, in addition to conventional

áá -inch

U

-Matic

VCRs. Sampling frequency can be switched between

44.1 and 44.056 kHz. The

AE -900V electronic audio editor has a quoted accuracy within

180 microseconds, and searching for an exact edit point can be achieved in one of three ways: manual cuing, automatic scanning, or direct signals address input. The unit confirms cut

-in and -out points by recalling the stored in memory; a variable -gradient, crossfading function permits smooth continuity of program at the edit point.

Other components to the digital audio system include the

RM

-900 remote control, which operates both the audio processor and the companion VCRs; and the TC

-900V timecode unit, which reads and generates

SMPTE timecode and synchronizes it to JVC's own bi- parity timecode recorded digitally

-a

process essential for proper synchronization between the audio system and video equipment. The

Digital Audio

Mastering System is fully compatible with earlier

JVC audio systems.

August

1985

R

-e, p

90

1610- format material can be edited down to a is the

data

conversion, a

-block level video field, or

4.5 milliseconds), market and the accepted format for Compact

Disc master tapes received by the majority of CD manufacturing plants.

Currently, three manufacturers are supplying devices for

EIAJ

-to -1610

that

(1

/7th

of was created originally by RTW, whose products are distributed in the

U.S. by

Audi

-

tronics,

of Memphis,

Tennessee.

RTW

1983 began format conversions in with the introduction of its orig- inal

Studio Processor Set. As well as providing format transfer from

Fl to

1610, the unit also featurés line

-level analog interfacing, calibrated input attenuators, control of pre- emphasis and copy prohibition, and an ex- panded display showing the opera- tion of the error

-correction cealment circuitry. and con-

Recently, the

PCM Set

2 and

Set

3 have appeared, replacing the original

standard

bearer with new improved models offering expanded capability.

PCM Set

2 allows format conversion from

F1 to 1610, including all the aforementioned options featured on the original Studio Processor

Set, plus switchable

NTSC

/PAL

video stand- ard, and

RTW peak program meters.

PCM

Set

3 bidirectional format conversions:

Fl

- to-1610 adds the capability for and

1610- to

-Fl.

Audio +Design

erton,

701 processors

/Calrec,

Washington,

that

offers can be of Brem- a very clever modification package for PCM as add -ons, or contained within a modified processor. basic

701, package is added, along with new metalwork for the front and back panels

that

an

Starting

internal contain with the electronics precision input attenuators, analog line

-level inter- facing, a choice of PAL or NTSC video

standards,

pre- emphasis and copy

- prohibition control, full bidirectional format conversion, expanded error

- correction indication, and (something lacking in the

RTW units) Coincident

Time Correction

(CTC). When ferring material from

Fl- to 1610

that

microsecond delay be

F1.

This delay should built into the be corrected during digital

-to- digital transfers to preserve monaural compatibility.

(Since it utilizes for each no separate converters channel, the built

-in time delay.)

PCM

-1610 has

that

a single

that

an trans-

D

-to

11.34

/C

allows the user

-A

- to

- format, the fact converter is time

-shared (switched back and forth) between both left and right channels requires

Future developments by

A +D include

ADD -MIX, a digital fader and mixing system digitally mix two

Fl sources, and also vary their levels during mastering, with a remote -controlled fader unit

- purchased installed at the mastering console.

The most recent, and impressive, accessory for

Format material to

1610- and the

AES

converting

/EBU- format is the fessional Digital Audio

EIAJ-

BW -102

Interface

Pro- from

Harmonia

Mundi, of West Germany, and currently distributed in the

U.S. by

Audiotechniques,

New York, and

Angeles. Developed by Daniel

Weiss,

SFC

Audio

possible

Intervisual

the gentleman the

BW -102

that

interface

Design,

Los designed the hardware contained within the Studer

Sampling

Frequency Converter, covers every

combination

of

format transfers

conceivable, in addition to a host of corrective measures. Based on a

Eurocard mainframe construction, the unit allows the user to select input and output formats by installing appropriate modules in the cardframe.

Modules

1610

-, are available for

EIAJ

-, and

AES

/EBU- format input and output signals, as well as correc- tive modules input and output modules to provide the capability of changing levels with a fader, right interchannel phase reverse,

/left that

connect between the reverse, digital removal of pre- emphasis, or

11.34- microsecond interchannel delay. Also, and possi- bly the most useful feature of all, a digital highpass filter module is available for eliminating the distor-

A

4eeoro

V1onl ni ¡run

11171-11I1í

11i11

1I1-1=1í

1

1

11_111

I

I I

I

/

I\

1/

I

_ll

/1

11_ l ll

_111 "ll

ll

I

PRESENTS

LYNX

THIRD

JEFF

tion tapes tion.

No

BY

(213) 653

and poor edits

that

TIMELINE

EVANS

are

-0240 out of sor exists and, one for

-

Up

to

32 machine capability

No internal adjustments necessary

Built

-in software

for

most transports

Chase

Lock to play in seconds

Built

-in time code generator, reader, resolver

Reads code from

I

/20 to

60x speed

And much

more....

contact if not more so

GENERATION SYNCHRONIZER

8456 WEST THIRD

STREET LOS

ANGELES, CA 90048

- several years; several EIAJ-

Format units are fully portable, how- cessor becomes

at

development, we the

that

are unlikely to see available. result format from the presence of excessive

DC levels in

A -to -D or converters during recording, generally improper recording tech- niques. Future modules include a dig- ital equalizer, a digital limiter /com- pressor, and a limited sampling frequency kHz, converter

(44.1 kHz to

48 and back).

My personal interest in and expe- rience with EIAJ- is which have

Format digital audio based on two factors, been neither addressed by of the

Japanese

manufacturers: cost and portability.

While

EIAJ -Format pro- cessors are not built to professional

standards,

a factor

that

accounts for their low cost, with a little extra care and precaution they have turned out to be as reliable than professional processors, espe- cially in their ability to play back specifica- portable professional proces- present rate of ever, and the only way to record dig- itally in the field. of which

All argues strongly for the continued existence of the EIAJ

For- mat, at least until some form of small, reasonably priced professional pro-

000

August

1985

0

R

-e

/p

91

MUSICAL

CREATIVITY

SYNTHESIZERS

IN

THE STUDIO

NEW

TECHNOLOGY

AND

A NEW

PRODUCTION

PHILOSOPHY

by Quint

B.

Randle

/rzi,'

In the last year or two, a number of advancements have drastically changed the way in which engi- neers, producers, and players perceive synthesizers and keyboard instru- ments in general. It was just a short time ago

that

session players and studios alike were ordered waiting for back-

Yamaha

DX7s; and we now approach the subject of keyboards

- synthesizers, and hopefully clear up some of lems some of the new, as well as old, prob- and myths terminology,

that

and define and examine the new variables deeper, more complex lems one faces when have

Part

one will re- define some of the old the engineer /producer

that

/player

affect multikeyboard situation. The second installment will delve into some of the hands as many as eight keyboards are connected via

MIDI, or synchronized to tape providing some solutions.

- developed. in a

-on prob- hopefully sometimes wonder how we ever got along without them.

Another exam- ple of just how quickly this new synthesizer technology has been creeping upon the studio world is Chi- cago's

17 album. Most might consider

that

this

1985

Grammy- award

-winner utilized MIDI to while the extreme. But, discussing the project with ses- sion engineer Humberto Gatica, we discovered

that

producer David Fos- ter recorded several keyboard

-bass

parts

in two or more passes. "At the time we started

[May

1983] we could not

MIDI the

DX7 and Minimoog; we didn't have the software to do it," the engineer confides.

Realizing

that

the dawning of a new been era in keyboard technology has somewhat overwhelming to the recording industry, it may be useful to step back, take a deep breath, and approach the subject anew

- erase the blackboard, in a sense, and pull out a new piece of chalk. In this two

- part series, with the help of engineers, technicians and session players,

I will

Types of

Keyboard Synthesizers

Ask sizer any session player or synthe- programmer what it takes, equip- ment

-wise, to survive in today's mar-

-

Player

/programmer

Marcus Ryle

-

August

1985 R-e, p 92 ket, and he or she will probably say

that

you need at least one keyboard from the following three categories: analog

-based (or subtractive syn- thesis); digital

FM

-based (or additive synthesis); and sample

-based

(digital

PCM sampling).

Analog

synthesizer has been

The around the longest, but is well worth re- defining for our purposes.

Marcus

Ryle,

a session player

/programmer and former technician describes basic

at

Oberheim, analog synthesis as

"circuitry

that

oscillates at a parti- cular pitch.

A voltage

-controlled oscil- lator

[VCO] is usually employed to allow varying voltages to change the pitch of the produced sound. Before reaching our ears, the signal passes through a [voltage -controlled] analog and an analog amplifier." filter,

Generally, this mode of operation is referred to as subtractive synthesis: a sawtooth wave passes through an analog filter, and whatever the pro- grammer doesn't want included in the finished audio is subtracted from the initial waveform to produce the required timbre.

The rest of the circuitry in an analog keyboard, Ryle continues, depends of at what point in the history analog synthesis the unit was deve-

"Basically, all analog synthes- loped. izers on the market nowadays are controlled digitally. For example, in the case of the Oberheim

Xpander or

Matrix

12, the audio section is all

that's

analog; everything else is dig- ital

- original analog

-produced wave are

The all the factors which modify controlled via a microprocessor." fact

Also, cated the

that

these variable depending on how digital controls are on the com- mands are encoded digitally means they can be memorized and stored by the synthesizer's microprocessor. sophisti- an analog synthesizer, it could mean

that

all of the circuitry can be automatically calibrated by the built

- in microprocessor; you worry don't have to about the keyboard going out of tune in the middle of a take, for exam- ple, or waiting for it to tune up.

In addition to this, and again depending upon sophistication, Ryle continues,

"Digital technology allows a great deal of flexibility in terms of modula- tion ble

that

might not have been possi- previously. Modulation can be created through software control,

rather than

hardware itself.

"On the Xpander and the Matrix

12, there are five envelope generators and five LFOs [low- frequency oscillators] per voice

that

don't really exist in the hardware; they've been created in the software by the computor."

Ryle also points out

that

there are a number of synthesizers employing digital oscillators, which create the

The Linn 9000 is every con:eived for every artist, songwriter

.vhose creati.ity demands tk_ finest in

techrclan.

Designed for musicians by mu ;icians,

Linn the

9000 incorporates the world's most sophisticated touch sensitive digital drum machine with the most advanced

32 track

MIDI sequencer. There is v:rtn-ally no scengwriting fa -mance style tha: it cannot accommo- date, instantly. There is no mariner of per- or personal expression that it

ennot

precisely cuplicate.

..

...

.

....

,.....

.im..........

, ..

...

..c

o t'

-No

...

..

.

A glance at t_ a control panel tells you tha wren ins

)

ira -ion arrives, the effortless t

)

9000 makes it capture, arrange and edit your mt sic.

Vk hat you can't see are its user sound sampling capabilities and the extensive Linn lib -ary of professional quality sounds.

Isn't it about

tine

you visited your

Li dealer and experienced the Linn 9000 yourself?

The inventors of the digital drum machine now offer you the most sophisticated compositional tool ever created. The

Linn

9000.

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Linn Electronics, Inc.

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#298949 LINN UR

Atgust

1985

0

R -e, p 93

For additional information circle

#60

PPG WAVE

2.2

SEQUENTIAL

PROHET 600

NED SYNCLAVIER

II E

-MU

SYSTEMS

EMULATOR

II

SYNTHESIZERS

IN

THE STUDIO

initial audio signal, but the signal is then sent through analog filters and analog amplifiers. For instance, al- though the Roland JX

-3P and the

JX-

8P utilize such digital oscillators, the finished audio is created by passing the initial wave through subtractive analog filters. The main difference is

that

the device creating the initial waveform log; digital as opposed to ana- subtractive synthesis is still the modus operandi.

"Whether a subtractive synthesizer uses analog or digital sound -pro- ducing capabilities is really just going to give you different types of sounds," the consultant concludes.

Digital

FM:

Stated simply, a purely

digital synthesizer generates

a

"sound" with numbers, so to speak, by adding different sinewave values together to obtain desired sonic char- acteristics. Towards the end of the creation process, these numbers are fed into a digital

-to- analog converter

(DAC) so audio

that,

when amplified, our sensors can make some sense out of it.

Yamaha's series of digital

FM syn- thesizers, including the DX1, DX7 and

DX9, probably represents the most widespread implementation additive synthesis in use today.

Kevin Bierl,

a

Yamaha technician, explains how the

DX7 works:

"The digital sound source, or oper- ator, is itself a sinewave," he says,

"but

there are six of them on the

DX7

(four on the

DX9).

At this point, de- pending on what kind of sound the programmer is trying to six med to affect one

attain,

operators are digitally the program- another via the unit's

32 algorithms [software

-con- trolled processing steps] how they will be

- in essence, added together.

"Depending on the algorithm,"

R

-e

/p

94

August 1985

Bier! continues, ter which of these six operators are

'Modulators,' and which are 'Carri- ers': a

Carrier is what you hear, a

Modulator is you can only

"that

tells the compu- what you don't hear

- hear the Carrier, and the imprint the Modulator(s) add to the

Carrier."

Using such algorithms, the pro- grammer sets the parameters, and thereby develops waveform istics: character- different ratios between Modu- lators and Carriers; frequency of mod- ulation; how powerful an operator will be; envelope variables; in what order the operators will be used; etc.

"For example, we use a ratio of two to one

- quency of the Carrier is twice the Modulator

- the fre- to come up with what is a basic square wave- form, which is good for a reed -like sound."

But all the while, Bierl explains,

"it's

still numbers to the computer.

Finally, at the very end of the process, the numbers are fed into a DAC and the new analog sound is amplified."

Digital Sampling:

The basic tech- nical distinction between synthesis and sampling is

that

the former tech- nique creates a sound from scratch, as it were, using the methods. previously described

Sampling, on the other hand, uses a computer to digitize and store a sound introduced to it from an external source; and then, in its simplest form, plays the recording back at various pitches.

"As far as the development of samp- ling is concerned," says

Marco

Alpert

of

E

-mu

Systems,

"it

really began to become known about five or six years ago, with the first Fairlight

CMI, more

than anything

else. And then we [E -mu

Systems] like to think

that

the original Emulator

I was the first instrument designed to provide

[cost- effective]

On user sampling." the market today are a range of sampling synthesizers, including the

MIRAGE

ENSONIQ

Fairlight

CMI,

Emulator

II, New

England Digital

Synclavier,

Kurz- weil 250,

PPG Wave, and Ensoniq

Although each of the manu-

Mirage. facturers varies somewhat in its method, Alpert provides a flow

-chart explanation of user sampling:

"The sound enters the device in analog form from a microphone or line -lever source, or directly from an- other instrument. It is then fed through an analog

-to- digital conver- ter

(ADC), which measures the incom- ing voltage a prescribed number of

'times a second; for example, the

Emu- lator

II samples 27,500 times a second.

"Each time the

ADC measures the voltage, it checks to see at what level the voltage is, gives puter has a

string

initial incoming voltage taken at 36- microseconds intervals

(in the case of the Emulator II),

that

ber value, and stores it away in mem- ory.

It then repeats the process, stores the level numerically, and so on.

It does

that

for as long of

12 as the sound lasts, or until the available memory is depleted."

At this point, the keyboard /com-

-,

14- or

16

-bit numbers representing levels of the

that

level a num- can also be stored on cassette tape or floppy disk.

To play back the original sample, the

synthesizer's

microprocessor

transfers

a

12-, 14-,

16-bit number into a DAC which, after filtering, returns

We did

it

right.

It's no surprise that when engineers of our

tie

key

PZN' microphone technology set their sights on com- bining the effect with benefits o' the boundary unidirectioiality the fruits of their efforts would

D9 nothing less than superior.

After all, Crown has been leading the way in boundary technology longer than anyone

it

:he industry.

And, like the PZM project, our com- mitment to developing the

"premiere" unidirect onal, surface

- mounted microphone rings true.

Introducing the PCC -160 Phase

Coherent

Cardioid1M from Crown.

Designed for easy mounting on a boundary surface, the PCC

--

60 utilizes a mic subminiature supercardioid capsule to create a directional pattern which improves gain- before- feedback, reduces uni,antec room noise and rejects sou ids from the rear.

For stage reinforcement, podiums, news desks, or for hiding in sets, the PCC -160 performance. offers superior

And because the microphone is mounted on a boundary, direct and reflected sounds arrive at the diaphragm in- phase. The result...wide, smooth frequency response free of tonal coloration or unnatural sound which can occur with conventional microphones.

Self- contained electronics eliminate the need for a sometimes awkward in

-line preamp box. The

PCC -160 can be powered directly from the console or other remote power source.

Or if battery power is convenient, a battery supply unit can be inserted anywhere in the mike line...right up to the console or mixer.

For maximum flexibility, the

crown®

PCC -160 features three

-way

"bass an tilt" exclusive switch which allows you to tai'or, up or down, the low -end response for special ap- plications or unusual boundary sizes.

Due to its low profile and

"go away gray" finish, the

PCC -160 microphone becomes nearly invisible in use, making it ideal for the stage, newsroom or

But lectern beneath its top. cloak of dark gray, the PCC -160 is protected by heavy -gauge, all

-steel body, a tough enough to stand up to even the most severe abuse.

The PCC -160.

A microphone meeting the needs of today's sound professional with tocay's most ad- vanced technology.

We did it right.

Call or write for more and information complete specifications.

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46517 (219) 294 -8000

For additional information circle

#61

August

19M5 U i e, p

95

SYNTHESIZERS

IN THE STUDIO

it to an original voltage wave.

When sound at it comes to reproducing a a pitch other

than

nal, there are several methods avail- able. The most common

Alpert, is the origi- according to

that

of speeding up or slow- ing down the clock rate.

"If

you want the pitch to be higher, instead of read- ing the stored numbers

27,500 times a second during playback, the compu- ter reads at a rate of, perhaps,

30,000 per second. Or, if an octave higher is desired, the reading rate is then dou- bled to 55,000 times a second. The fas- ter the numbers are spit out of memory, slower the higher the pitch; a rate of reading the memory produces a lower pitch."

Technicalities aside, Alpert says

that

an important consideration with any sampling keyboard is its sam- pling rate

- how many times a second the device measures incoming voltage.

"Sampling rate defines the fre- quency response of highest frequency duced accurately is one sampling -rate frequency. In other words, if a system has a

30 kHz sam- pling rate, then the highest frequency you

While some allow the user the system; the

that

can be can reproduce is

15 kHz." repro-

half

the sampling keyboards to increase pling time (length) by the sam- reducing the sampling rate, this causes a reduction in frequency response, he concludes.

FAIRLIGHT

CMI

SERIES

III

KURZWEIL 250 now of a has an almost unlimited number variables available particular sound. while

Instead creating of dealing with only one synthesizer at a time, the player can now mix and match

different keyboards, using the strengths

of each to invent his or her own unique sound. And, as stated in its proper name, MIDI is not just intended for keyboards only, but for virtually all electronic musical instru- ments. Non -keyboard devices, such as sequencers, drum machines and, most recently, reverb units, can now be interfaced with a keyboard(s) in real time to create a multidimensional, multifunctional musical incarnation.

The unique audio combination of several synthesizers is, of course, the most common end result to all this, but

MIDI is the all- important means to be

that

end.

Part

two of this article, to published in a subsequent issue of

R

-e

/p,

will examine operational imperfections, but for now a brief description of this com- munications

standard

bilities as related to synthesizers

(or those purported to be offered by manufacturers) is in order.

Bob Moore, president of

Hybrid

Arts, a company among other musical software, a definning

MIDI:

that

of MIDI's produces,

MIDI sequencer for use on personal computers, draws this analogy when

"In

a few and its capa- computers there

-

Hybrid

Arts'

Bob

Moore

-

MIDI

While a

Takes Control

continual perfection of these three synthesizer types during the past decade has had a tremendous effect on the new keyboard philo- sophy, we ical nothing has changed the view synthesizers more

than

way

Mus-

Instrument

Digital Interface.

With MIDI, a synthesizer programmer

R -e

/p

96

August

1985 are interface common of

RS232.

standards

these

MIDI is

that standards

allow systems to communicate [with them- selves and external devices] virtually anywhere in the world, the most being basically the same thing, but for musical instruments; it allows electronic music to synthesizers communicate with one another.

"It's

essentially just four wires: two in each direction serial communication of MIDI

In and

MIDI Out words, a

- a bi- directional, information. In other keyboard can receive infor- mation and, at the same time, it can put out

[eight

-bit digital] information

[at a

transfer rate

of

31.25 kbits per second]."

MIDI can

transmit

all kinds of

data

between synthesizers and other MIDI

- equipped devices, including corn

- mands for selecting a new voice, pitch change, modulation change, breath control, sustain control, after

-touch, clocking information, various sequen- cer commands, plus a variety of system -exclusive commands up to

that

are

By the manufacturer to define. far the most common command sent from a master keyboard to slaved units is Note On and Note

Off.

"Be- cause of the MIDI offers, bytes of

standard,"

information

- stroke of the keyboard

Moore are different, and the way another keyboard might generate its sound,

Note On

standard

communication commands.

For the most

"even though the oscillators and Note Off are part, Note On and Off are three and- Note -Off event

that

- is, a

-On- single is a six -byte event. "Note On is three bytes long; the first byte communicates the

[MIDI] is channel code; the second byte the key value of the note; and the third byte is its velocity." [For a com- plete description of the various hex- adecimal codes for MIDI commands, refer to page

125 of the

December 1983 issue of

R

-e

/p-

Editor.]

hit

CLIEli

to

the

F3EFiT

DIN

The original Doctor

Click has been used to create countless innovative price of the original. Twice the machine at half the price! sync formats, and

MIDI.

Click and trigger

outputs

also. records,

TV and film scores, and special effects, and has spawned a whole new generation of imitators

MASTER BEAT

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Interface.

-

The

A

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(the sincerest form of flattery, you knows. sync to click tracks, live tracks,

MIDI, total and all tape sync codes for compatability.

High resolution programmable

Now, you can get more of the good

At the request of many studios and top musicians,

Garfield Electronics

Doctor's medicine for a lot less.

"timing map" allowing any beat interval sequence to be stored,

MOM

7

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BEA;

1M 1M (qryf

M

'pq

SSW

IMP,

ON11i

01.1111

AMP. /W r.

W9

WOW.

MY, i.,.

It

1

<

ä

6

2

3 o

SMPTE SYNCHRONIZER.

...I:M0AAN r1110 Uvll

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IM,

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DOCTOR

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DOCTOR CLICK

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Best of all, DOCTOR CLICK

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DOCTOR CLICK

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Inc. has developed the only true open

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imagination. This features list gives a glimpse of the performance con- trol horizons possiblewith

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ALL

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EBU formats:

24 and

25 frame,

30DF and

NDF.

Produces all

4 codes as well.

Simultaneous production of all sync formats:

6 fixed clocks,

1 vari- able arpeggiator

/step

sequencer clock the

5 sync

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-tape codes,

2 edited, arul offset

under

SMPTE control for complete of rhythmic

"feel."

adjustment

Six multi -programmable

SMPTE controlled event gates, each with

5

-volt and contact closure

outputs

for synchronized sound effects and control triggering!

Live from tracking mode creates sync pulse information in real time for live performance!

Advanced production features include:

RS

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computer

interface, code regenerate and conversion, jam sync, SMPTE from neopilot, remote control inputs, non- volatile memory,

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Is

Getting YourAct Together.

additional information circle

#62

August

1985

R

-1. p 9

ROLAND JUPITER -6

MOOG

MEMORY

MOOG

SYNTHESIZERS

IN

THE STUDIO

The MIDI

standard

provides

16 in- dependent channels over which to accomplish the transmission of data.

Each

MIDI synthesizer only recog- nizes which MIDI it channel

(1 thru

16) has been assigned to recognize, or to receive on.

"For instance,"

Moore explains,

"when a sequencing computer puts out

16 channels of MIDI information, a keyboard will only pay attention to whatever information is communi- cated over the particular channel it is assigned to; it won't do anything until it sees something within the byte stream it is

'told' to recognize."

When sequencing from an external computer, the master keyboard on a certain channel is patched to the com- puter's

MIDI

In and

MIDI Out.

Then the computer, in effect, disperses

that

information to other keyboards on varying channels.

Some sequencing systems can be connected via MIDI Clock to, in a sense, sequence one another, thereby increasing the number of available tracks by multiples of

16 or

32.

And

Hybrid Arts, for example, now has a

YAMAHA

DX7 FM

/DIGITAL

SYNTHESIZER system on -line mission of musical

"We're also

that

trying to allows

parts

the trans- as

MIDI information via telephone modem. help Motown put together a network of computers so

that

their publishing group can com- municate throughout the city with all of their musicians and composers,"

Moore explains. and one

Sync Codes

Another important advancement,

that

has more recently had a direct effect on keyboards, is the abil- ity to synchronize different devices in real -time, or to a timecode track on tape. Some synthesizers provide on- board sequencers, while others allow sequencing and triggering externally via MIDI or

CV trigger inputs. The use of sync codes is to generally referred as "clocking

": a master clock on one device is used to drive the clock(s) on another device(s) to communicate tempo,

start

points, etc.

In approach- ing the more complicated

MIDI and

J

What

y

Wwhat

The

MRL Calibration Graph is your proof of the quality control that goes into every

MRL

Reproducer Calibration Tape. We guarantee each one to exceed the performance requirements of IEC, NAB,

AES, and

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Standards. e

MRL Calibration Tapes are designed and supported by experts in magnetic recording and audio standardization

... we helped write the standards. Each tape comes with detailed instructions and application notes.

ytu

The MRL catalog includes tapes for all studio applications. In addition to the usual spot

- frequency tapes, we make single

-tone tapes, rapid -swept frequency tapes, wideband or

1

/3rd octave-band pink earldom noise tapes and difference -method azimuth

-setup tapes.

Most are available from stock.

Foi a catalog and

J fist of over 60 dealers in the USA and Canada, contact

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Exclusive

Export Agent: Gotham Export Corp, o

New

York, NY t

For additional information circle .63

R-e/p9t4August

;

RHODES

CHROMA sync problems to be described in part two of use reliable this article, it is understand the various sync codes in today, and

than

why some are more others.

important

to

"This whole business of syncing started with the film industry," says

Jim Mothersbaugh,

technical ad- ministrator at

Roland, "While record- ing a film soundtrack, a conductor needed some way to keep track of, and remain in time with, the film. At first, a simple metronomic beat was used; and, after some time, a visual cue for the conductor was developed called a

'streamer.'

"Today, after three decades of elec- tronic improvements, the music in- dustry has adopted, in one way or another, most of the timing codes way by

/sync that

were developed along the the film and

TV industries."

Pulses-

Per

-Quarter

-Note.

The most common forms of clocks found on son keyboard sequencers and related devices

Mothersbaugh explains off

-again voltage

-spike pulses are sent every quarter

-note [or beat] from the master clock to the slave. This, in turn, allows the devices to be syn- chronized together, the slave follow- ing the master.

Logically, a

48

PPQN clock is send- ing or receiving

48 pulses,

24, each are

24, 48, and

96

PPQN. quarter note, and so on.

While the higher pulse rates provide a slightly tighter resolution, Mothers

- baugh claims

that that

there

rather than

is on- ference in overall reliability;

again/

little dif- the rea- various manufacturers (mainly

Roland, Oberheim, and

Linn) used different clock rates was to create sys- tem exclusivity.

Frequency Shift

Key.

After the development of PPQN clocking, a technology called Frequency Shifted

Key for

(FSK) was devised specifically tape synchronization.

"FSK is very similar to

PPQN clock pulses," offers Mothersbaugh," in

that

there's a rapid succession of pulses. But, in this case,

using

on- again

/off rather than

-again voltage spikes, two frequencies modulated recorded tape, to at

against

a adjacent tracks one fluctuating signal reducing the chance on are being another at lower volume of on

1.2 and

2.1 kHz.

The result is a smoother, less

that

can be audio crosstalk the machine."

Although not as widespread on elec- tronic instruments as PPQN clocks,

FSK is still used on some devices today.

MIDI Clocking.

This form of clocking is thod

- on similar to the PPQN me-

/off

pulses

- but operates using MIDI specifications and

MIDI

- controlled hardware. The main draw- back with MIDI clocking, to

Mothersbaugh, is

that

according

"MIDI oper- ates at a frequency of

31.5 kHz, which is obviously too high for a tape ma- chine to handle."

As a result, MIDI clock commands real time. need to be effected in

PASSPORT SOUNDCHASER in

The problem with [PPQN, FSK,

MIDI] clocks can do further, and be able to sync and punch the middle of a song. With the dumb

-clock methods, you have no re- liable way at this level, is are a

"dumb" tempo indicator; they nothing more tempo. For example, they devices when or where to

that that

stop again; they

can't start

tell specify

can't

tell up and they and what beat and what measure they are at, etc.

The key is the ability to go one step

- other

than starting

at the beginning of a song [and have the

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August

I'6,._

R-e p99

- continued from page

55

..

SYNTHESIZERS

IN THE STUDIO

slaved device downbeat] count pulses from the

- to have everything link up.

SMPTE Code:

The first

"smart"

code was devised by

Motion neers in

Picture and Television Engi-

standard

of synchronization for the film and video the

Society of the Sixties as a industry; timecode is now a

standard

within the recording indus- try as well.

In essence, SMPTE time

- code is just a linear number sequence opposed to baugh,

/off

ing SMPTE code to tape, the slaved device is counting out, in a very fast and fine revolution, minutes, seconds, frames, and bits (1/80 of a frame). the advent of SMPTE timecode With synchronization, start, stop, punch

- in, punch

-out points, etc., can be refer- enced anywhere in a tune, not just relative to the beginning.

The problem is musical devices most electronic tional synthesizers) do not provide on- board

SMPTE timecode- reading cap- abilities.

To alleviate this problem, a number of companies are manufac- turing dumb clock /SMPTE interface units

that translate

into PPQN codes, etc.

"In a musical setting," says

Mothers

-

"it

an on

that

code.

When

(virtually all conven-

SMPTE timecode takes an interface lay- box like the Roland

SBX

-80,

Friend

Chip SRC and Garfield Electronics Master

Beat, to do this advanced type of synchron- ization. These devices read timecode off tape, and mathematically convert

that

to clock

/tempo information in- struments can read."

(For a detailed explanation of the timecode to MIDI and sync clock process, see Bob

Kin

- kel's article on issue of

R

-e

/p.) the Roland

SBX-80 and Friend Chip

SRC in the

April

MIDI Song

Pointer:

Another

MIDI specification on the horizon, deserves a mention. The Song

Pointer function provides many of the lux- uries previously

available

only through

SMPTE timecode. "With

Song clock

MIDI,

Pointer, we can send not only and tempo information through but it can say,

`Okay, you sequencers and drum machines, you're two,

starting

baugh reveals. up at measure

32, beat at

120 beats- per -minute'," Mothers

-

-

Player /programmer

Paul

Fox

-

with the Pointer Sisters,

Commo- dores,

Natalie

Cole,

Thelma Houston and

Cock

Robin. "Before, you were dealing with each individual axe as its own sound, and

Combining the sounds [on tape].

Nowadays,

I seldom put my system together without first figuring out the best way to create total sound."

A he synthesizers at the most. "You used to come few would bring along in years back, Fox maybe three, and put your Prophet up on the producer's desk, and was that; you basically fed the engineer your audio signal,

that's

cally where you lost control you developed a two, and says,

that

- basi- unless rapport with the engineer." of

That's

ancient history now. For

90% the time on sessions these days,

Fox uses more

than

one synthesizer to create a sound before going to tape.

"It's

like `MIDI- mania.'

You have to be open to saying to yourself, `Okay, is this too much

?' With just about every- thing,

I use component synthesizers.

Recently,

I did a horn sound with seven or eight different synthesizers:

I had two horn samples;

I had six

DX7 patches [from the new TX

-816] of tuned a bit."

-some

them were duplicates, but were de-

From a sonic perspective, MIDI

- mania has presented two obvious pro- blems: How many tracks are there available on the tape? And should the balance betweeen the different com- ponents of the finished sound be com- mitted to tape? Some in studios are deal- ing with these questions by providing the control room sub -mixer espec- ially for keyboards. This additional mixer provides a stereo feed to console exclusively for the synthesizers, and gives the engineer and producer more control, tape. as well as confidence, in committing a particular balance to

"A lot of guys, film players,"

Fox especially

TV and adds,

"are bring- ing along their own mixers to ses- sions.

So what he or she is sending to the board is basically a left and a

See

440 and

Evaluate the Valley

People Model

Limiter /Compressor

/Dynamic Sibilance

Processor at the following locations:

Allied

Broadcast Equipment

Richmond,

IN

3I7-

962 -8596

Alex Musical Instruments

New York, NY

212

-819 -0070

Eastcoast Sound

Danbury, CT

203 -748 -2799

Everything Audio

Encino,

CA

818 -995 -4175

Audio

Engineering Associates

Pasadena,

CA

818- 798 -9127

Harris Audio

Systems

Miami, FL

305- 944 -4448

Audio

Industries

Hollywood, CA

213 -851 -4111

Boynton Studios

Morris, NY

607 -263 -5695

IRC

Audio

Indianapolis, IN

317- 849 -6887

J

-Mar Electronics

Toronto, Ontario, Cananda

416 -421 -9080

Southwest Pro

Austin,

TX

512- 443 -4567

Audio

Studio Supply Company

Nashville, TN

615

-366 -1890

Tekcom Corporation

Philadelphia, PA

215- 627 -6700

Valley Audio

Nashville, TN

615- 383 -4732

Victors

House of

Music

Ridgewood, NJ

201- 652 -5802 on be,"

The

Audio says player

Signals

The net result of these new technol- ogies is generally the engineer deal- ing with multiple audio signals from a

"Keyboard System," one

rather than

synthesizer at a time.

/programmer

from

"It

almost changes your philosophy what you consider a synthesizer to

Paul

Fox, whose credits include projects

R

-e

/p

100

0

August

1985

Coast Recording Supply

Hollywood, CA

213

-462 -6058

DJ's Pro

Berwyn,

Audio

IL

312- 795 -4050

Martin Audio

New

York, NY

212 -541

-5900

Washington Music Center

Wheaton,

MD

301

-946 -8808

Professional

Audio

Services and

Supply

Burbank,

CA

818- 843 -6320

Westlake Audio

Los Angeles, CA

213 -851 -9800

right output. And, depending on how much include his own effects rack.

A like

MIDI

UPDATE

Sequencers

NAMM

to really go for the sound he or she hears in his or her head; they can

treat

entire setup as one synthesizer

`studio within a studio'."

Another simple problem occur in a multiple- synthesizer setup is the noise factor. Some models put out a ridiculous noise when

Over amount of ground surrounded by other units. and above any serious in-

F

gear the guy has, this may setup this enables the synthesist

that

the

- a can

MIDI-

Equipped

recent Summer

NAMM

Exhibition, held in or me, one of the more

MIDI striking innovations on show at the early June at

Midi Delay

- the

New

Orleans vention Center, was the Music not the time delay

Con-

Data's

inher- ent to most MIDI -equipped sequencers and synthesizers, but one that can be programmed!

Midi Delay is a software package created by Lance Ono for the building ground problems, Fox says the best way to combat this is by using a ground lifter

(three- prong

-to- twoprong adaptors). "I would suggest every synthesist always carry five or ten with them, because you're losing them."

In a always sies subsequent issue of

R

-e

/p,

I'll move on to examine the idiosyncra- and set

-up problem encountered by in several studios and session players creating and maintaining their own unique multiple- component syn- thesizer system.

ONE

Synthesizers, and Software at the Summer

Exhibition,

New

by Bobby Nathan

Orleans.

Apple Ile.

A total of

16 programmable presets are featured for delay parame- ters, including feedback (which is really the number of repetitions); amplitude

(the actual level in amplitude of each repetition in relation to the previous one measured in a plus and minus range); pitch change (the interval of pitch between each repetition);

Channel that the and the

MIDI repetitions will be triggering. Unlike analog and digital delays utilizing

A

/I)

converters, the bandwidth of the Midi Delay is the same as the MIDI device being triggered by the unit. The plus and minus amplitude programming makes for repetitions of the same amplitude, ascending ampli- tude, or the tude standard descending ampli- that we know so well from standard analog and digital delays.

Another innovative first was

DW -8000 eight

-voice velocity sensitive keyboard with built

-in digital delay. The provision of a unit might very well start

Korg's

/pressure built

-in delay a new stand- ard in including outboard gear into syn- thesizers. The need to add delay, reverb and ambience to synthesized sounds is already a well

-known practice in studio synthesis. The

DW -8000 keyboard also features

64 presets, each having its own' individual programmable delay settings.

Parameters include delay amount, feed- back, delay level,

LFO section with form. and an independent rate depth and wave-

There are also two digitally

- controlled oscillators

(DCOs) produce

16 the digital waveforms, including standard sine, waves. For live that can square and sawtooth performance and studio sessions, the self -contained dig- ital delay adds all the right

/or

dimensions to complement each of the contained presets. In the near future, Korg will also release the

EX -8000, a rack

-mounted version that encompasses all cf the same features as the

DW -8000, except

Compression with the

Model 440 is as easy as

1,

2,

3.

1.

Turn the unit on.

2.

Select

Auto mode.

3.

Adjust the compressor threshold control for the sound you want.

Valley

People

International

GO

Gotham AG,

Regendorf

Switzerland

Telex 59222 gothm ch, Tele 0041

-1

-840 -0144

That's all there is to it.

If this process appears to be oversimplified, it's only because during the design of the Model

440 Limiter /Compressor /Dynamic

Sibilance Processor great pains were taken to ensure that we delivered a highly sophisticated signal pro- cessor, capable of unsurpassed performance while remaining very straightforward and easy to use.

Prove to yourself how easy it is to operate a Valley

People

Model 440. You'll find them in stock at one of the locations listed on the adjacent page.

VALLEY

P.O.

PEOPLE,

INC.

Box

40306.2817

Erica

Place,

Nashville, TN 37204

(615) 383 -4737 TELEX

3785899

NASH AUDIO

For additional information circle

065

August

1985

0

R -e/ p

101

NAMM MIDI

UPDATE

for the keyboard.

Also in the keyboard corner, added

Yamaha

the

I)X

-5 synthesizer to its

FM

Series of keyboards. The

DX-5 is, in actuality, two DX-7s in one convenient package. The keyboard features the same action as found on the

DX -7; two cartridge slots and the ability to pro- gram function controls has been added.

Balanced line outputs for left, right and mix are available on both

XLR and

'

C- inch phone cally all

DX

-1, jacks. The

DX

-5 has basi- the features of

Yamaha's super but for a much more affordable price. The company also

KX -88 introduced the

Master

MIDI

Controller

Key- board, which features programmable splits with separate

MIDI channels.

There are also four programmable slid- ers that can be set to your favorite per- formance parameters of any of the

DX and

TX

Series synthesizers. The

KX -88 has a

88

-note, wooden -key velocity key- board, and could very well be perfect for the player who wants true piano touch and response. The synth is the perfect complement to playing and program- ming the

TX

-816 rack, which houses eight

DX

-7 modules in rackmount unit with programmable function controls.

A new entry into the MIDI scene was

Roland's

GR77B MIDI Bass Guitar

Controller and Synthesizer. The

GR77B resembles the already standardized

AD_

YSTEM

GR700

Guitar Synth in appearance, but has improved tracking. Unlike the

GR700, the GR77B features a separate microprocessor for each string, making for of the much improved tracking.

Because the lower frequency range of a bass guitar, the triggering should in reality be slower. The unit includes a synthes- izer section based on a

JX

-8P with

64 presets, a cartridge slot and MIDI Out and In.

On the

MIDI guitar scene,

Octave

Plateau

unveiled its long awaited gui- tar controller, which features a fret

- board wired for fast and accurate response. The guitar itself features a

Voyetra

-style keypad (telephone type) to call up program and parameter changes for whatever synthesizer is being controlled. The guitar comes with a phanthom -powered box life for its active electronics and

Out jack. There grammable levers are also three pro- that that can provides be

MIDI set

- to favorite performance parameters.

I

V

L

Technology

introduced its

Pitchrider

7000, a MIDI guitar inter- face, which comprises a hex pickup that can be mounted on almost any guitar, and an electronic

"brain" housing six individual Pitchriders. Each string has its own accurate triggering.

In converter,making for quite the electronic drum department,

Simmons introduced the analog /digi- tal SI)S

-9 drum set, a five

-piece kit feat- uring digital samples for the snare,

1

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VS4 raam.., analog kick, and three analog toms. The snare channel actually has three differ- ent digital samples

- one for the center of the head, and two for the rimshot thus making for a dynamic, real sound- ing snare.

Different tunings, release times programmed into

20 memories. The

SDS

-9 and noise balances can

- be pre- also featured a first in electronic drums: MIDI

-In and

-Out jacks that enable the device to trigger and be trig- gered thru

MIDI, various sequencers, synthesizers, and other MIDI drum machines.

Speaking of drum machines, E -Mu

Systems

introduced the SP

-12 sam- pling percussion, a

12

-bit sampling velocity MIDI is 99- drum machine. The SP

-12 segment /99

-song machine with

24 internal sounds stored on

EPROM chips, and which can also store eight sampled sounds in non-volatile memory.

Two different models are planned for market release: the basic unit with

1.2 seconds of sampling time divided among your eight samples; or the Turbo ver- sion, which five has its memory beefed up to seconds of sampling time, and the segment/ song memory expanded from

16 to

64

Kbytes. In many ways the SP

-12 has incorporated many of the Emulator

II's features into its front

-control panel; there are eight velocity tap pads with up to

32 levels of velocity assigned to any of the that can internal be or sampled sounds. Any sound can also be assigned to all eight pads, as in the case of a tom sample. MIDI In bility will allow the SP

-12 and Out capa- to control and be controlled by many various

MIDI

- equipped devices. The unit stores sequences and sampled drive. data via its cassette or optional Commodore disk

-

Having trouble learning

FM technol- ogy to

Well, program your Yamaha

DX -7?

Jellinghous

Music

Systems just might have an answer for you.

JMS has taken every parameter of the

DX

-7 and represented it by either a switch or knob on a cleverly laid out

Even analog

-style panel.

I)X

-7 if you've already learned to master editing, theJMS

DX

-7 programmer can probably spawn new and interest- ing

In patches. the corner,

MIDI -equipped

Yamaha

outboard gear introduced the REV

-7 digital reverb, which has stereo inputs and outputs, a three -band, non

- programmable, quasi -parametric EQ section,

30 rooms, presets

(including halls, flanging, chorusing, reverse effects, and a number of presets designed for specific tions), musical instrument applica- and

60 user -defined variations of the30 original presets. Program changes can be controlled via MIDI; there is also a hand

-held remote of the more important programming controls. The REV

-7 has basically all the same features of the REV

-1 played with both units in the Yamaha booth at

NAMM, that and includes found that

I some

-

I could basically duplicate reverb patches from the REV

-1 on the REV

-7.

Europa Technology

introduced the

R -e

/p

102

0 August

1985

Window Recorder, a

16

-bit

MIDI sampler with triggering capabilities, available in three

-, six

-,

12- and

24- second sam- pling time versions. After a sample has been recorded into it can then be truncated correct for slow the Window Recorder, attack and

- that

/or is the front and rear of the sample removed to unwanted parts of the sample. The

WR also has the ability to play a sample backwards.

Another innovative feature is the unit's overdub mode

(The only that enables infinite overdub on top of the original sample. catch is that if you're not happy with the final balance you're stuck.) The overdub feature can be most useful in produce a ples stacking really fat can also be up snare drums snare tuned which they were to sound. Sam- from the pitch at sampled; a loop func- tion will ously play back the sample continu-

-a

feature useful with percussion riffs, etc.

J.L.Cooper

introduced an interface for the Quantec

Room

Simulators that adds

MIDI program -change capabili- ties, etc. useful

The new interface is a most feature for live applications, and in the studio, with a MIDI sequencer, can add automated reverb capability to your mix.

In the software corner, the Apple

Macintosh finally has received some of the software development it deserves.

Of all the Mac programs at

NAMM,

Southworth

Music Total Music by

Systems

, a

99- track,

16

-MIDI channel per track MIDI recorder, was the most complete integrated package available.

Total Music allows the individual edit- ing of each

MIDI channel, either with graphics

(a graphic representation of a track's note durations, velocity, and etc.), or as notes on staves.

Music can be recorded via a

MIDI keyboard, or by placing notes on staves Macpaint- style.

After notes have been written on the staves, they can be instantly played back on recorder your MIDI keyboard. The features many different quan- tization values, and can also be pro- grammed to record in step mode.

The software includes a score -printing driver routine that can accommodate Apple's

Imagewriter or

Epson printers with the

Mac -Epson connection; many other printers can be interfaced as well. All the menus are self explanatory, making the need for a manual almost non exist- ent.

Southworth has also developed its own

Macintosh MIDI interface, which includes two MIDI

Ins. With the two

MIDI

Ins, a drum machine's

MIDI clock can simultaneously control Total Music, while MIDI data is recorded from a

MIDI -equipped keyboard.

Opcode introduced the

Midi Mac ser- ies of software for the Macintosh. The company's sequencer software includes

26 sequences of

10 tracks each; features such as loop, transpose and track mute are included.

Tracks can be edited sim- ilar to autolocating on a conventional multitrack, and songs are created by joining sequences together to form new sequences.

A separate Patch Librarian program can store any MIDI system's

Exclusive data onto one disk.

Synthes- izers supported by the Midi Mac soft- ware include the Yamaha

DX-7,

Ober

- heim OB

-8,

Casio

CZ -101, CZ 1000,

CZ -5000. plus the Roland

Juno

106 and

JX

-8P.

Opcode custom- has also introduced a designed MIDI interface that can be used for both the

Midi

Mac

Sequencer and Patch Librarian.

Digidesign's

Sound Designer soft- ware for the

E

-mu

Systems Emulator

11 digital keyboard provides gives the

EMU

II with capabilities beyond many of the higher priced computer systems.

Complex looping and truncation start and end points can be displayed, greatly simplifying editing on the Emulator

II.

What you need to "Get

On

Board" with

KEY

CUOUEI:

The Floppy DOS is a voice library

Atan, for the DX -7. You'll need a

DX -7!

The Floppy DOS is available for Apple,

Commodore, IBM,

Macintosh, Yamaha

OX

-1 and CX -5 (Cassette). You'll need one of those!

If your computer isn't already MIDIED. you'll need the KEY CLIQUE MIDI Interface Card (or another manufactura's card designed for your specific computer).

Finally, you'll need software to enter the

KEY CLIQUE library into your synthesizer.

KEY CLIQUE is

--

compatible with the following software:

KEY CLIQUE's SYS/EX, DX -Pro, DX- Heaven,

Mimetics, Hybrid

Arts MIDI Patch, Personal Composer and Music Works

-(-

-

-

--

-

-

- -

-

--

1

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ITY/STAIE

The Sound Designer menus resemble

Macpaint, and all editing is controlled via a mouse. allow

Cut and Paste features the attack of a trumpet to be pasted onto the envelope of a piano, for example. Via function of various menus, every the Emulator

I

I's front panel is displayed graphically and numeri- cally, for a quick status of where the filter, AI)SR, and all the other parame- ters are set. When editing a waveform. you ing. lopes can make good use of the zoom magnification functions for precise edit-

Waveforms, filter curves, mouse can also be hand drawn via a

- a feature that and enve- can virtually eliminate glitches caused during looping.

Bo

Tomlyn's

KEY

CLIQUE

Announces

The

ADVANCED DX.1 UBRARY

Bo

Tomlyn, well known for synthesizer programming in studio and in -store clinics, now offers his NEW ADVANCED DX -7 LIBRARY to you! The highest quality sounds at a price everyone can afford!

Bo

Tomlyn has programmed for: Toto. The

Jacksons, Bruce Springsteen, Lionel Richie. and others.

The

KEY CLIQUE

Floppy DOS" (Disk of

Sounds) contains

128 new sounds for your

DX -7 every month. New banks of orchestral, analog, piano, strings, lead line, split keyboard foot- controlled programs, and more expand your DX -7 capabilities to levels never before experienced. Each month's

DOS

Directory features valuable playing and programming hints.

KEY CLIQUE's Newsletter and Question

Ear' will allow you to share your ideas with members worldwide and participate in the development of future

KEY CLIQUE products. (ä50.00 per month or $240.00 for

6 -month subscription.)

SYS

I

EX

":

The first software which allows you to store synth and drum programs on one floppy disk. SYS /EX eliminates the need for separate software programs for each piece of equipment you own. SYS /EX is excellent for saving and loading your

KEY CLIQUE library. (Note: SYS/EX only compatible with

MIDI systems -exclusive equipped gear.)

Priced al $85.00

(Non

-members $125.00) aIOPE MIXER

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KEY CUQUE, INC.

3960 Laurel

Canyon Blvd Suite 374

Studw

City

Calaorma 91604

,

,

,

1

3960 Laurel Canyon Blvd Suite 3/4

Studio City California 91604

PIS)

$45.7116

,

,

KEY CLIQUE dedicated to musicians at a time when equipment is becoming hank, to understarr.

,

August

1985

R

-e/ p 103

-.

;,

P

ikCtU

T

UIPMENT

Northeast:

NO

II

,!;

1

"

-t

t_Di a

TROD NOSSEL RECORDING STUDIOS

(W- has installed an

Aphex Compellor compressor limiter, a

Loft

Model

410 compressor, API 554 parametric equalizers. a

Pearl electronic drum set, plus

Yamaha NS

-10s monitor speakers and

DX

-7 FM synthesizer. Available for rental is a

Yamaha QX

-1 with TX

-816 system.

P.O Box

57.

Wallingford, CT06492.

(203)

269

-4465.

BROCCOLI

RABE

RECORDING COMPLEX

(Fairfield, NJ) has installed a new

Time Line Lynx timecode synchronization system to its

48

-track facility.

In addition, two staff engineers have been added to the studio's staff

Dougerty.

15

Gloria Avenue, Fairfield, NJ

07006. (201) 575 -7460.

-

Bill Berends and Ed

DREAMLAND

RECORDING

(Kingston, NY) is a new

24

-track complex built by

Acoustic

Spaces and

Bija

Productions.

Constructed in a

"historic- church. the

800

-square -foot control room studio incorporates lead shielding in all walls, an

"acoustically coherent" isolation booth. and video and telecommunication capabilities via computer control, plus a

40- by 45

-foot ambient room with a

34-foot high ceiling. The control room features an automated

40 -input

API console with patchbay. mixdown computer (containing

36

Fadex modules). Sony

/MCI

24

-track and

Studer

Valley

People 65k

A800 multitracks linked to a

Cipher

Digital BTX Shadow synchronizing system. The following monitors are supplied within the facility's control room: UREI, Ed

Long TA

-3,

Yamaha

NS

-10,

Auratone, and

JBL models. Outboard gear comprises

Lexicon

224 and

PCM

-60 digital reverbs. dbx noise reduction, spokesman

Phil

Tektronix and

Pultec tube equipment, and

Studio Technologies

Echo Plate III reverb. Company

Miller says that the new complex offers audio video duplication services, rehearsal space, indoor outdoor lounges. and video production capabilities. Road

=3,

Box

288,

Route

28A,

Kingston.

NY

12401. (914) 338 -7151.

COUNTERPOINT

RECORDING STUDIOS

(New York City) has completed a major upgrade with the acquisition of two

Solid State Logic

6000E consoles. each with

Total

Recall automation, a pair of

Otari

MTR

-90

Mk II

24- tracks, four Otari

MTR

12 two- tracks. and an assortment of signal processing gear from

AMS. Eventide, Lexicon, and

Marshall Electronic.

Aside from the SSL boards. all equipment was supplied by

Martin

Audio.

In addition, Studio

B has been enlarged. and a variety of cosmetic and acoustical improvements have been built into both studios, says the facilty's owner

Jerry

Ragovoy.

723 7th

Avenue, New York,

NY

10019 (212) 398-9550.

SYNTONE

(Boston) expanded its synthesizer capabilities with the acquisition of a 32- voice, stereo New England Digital

Synclavier Digital Music System with guitar and sampling options. a

Fostex

B

-16D with autolocator, an

Allen and

Heath CMC

-24 semi- automated conole, and an

Otari two -track machine. Outboard gear includes a

Yamaha digital reverb, and a

Lexicon PCM

-42 digital delay line.

In addition. the facility has also built an isolation booth.

1108

Boylston Street. f302. Boston, MA

02115. (617) 267-4137.

MIXMASTERS

(San Diego) is a 24

-track facility geared for film scoring. video post

-

New production. and album sessions.

According to owner comprises: a

Charles Defazio, studio equipment

Neotek

Series Mc

36 -in 32

-out console; various

Otari tape machines, includ-

SYNTONE mastering machines: and outboard gear that includes

95

NEO

Synclavier

System ing an

MTR

-90

16 24- track. Mk

ILIA half -inch eight -track, MTR

-12 and

MTR

-10 two -track

Lexicon Model

224 and

Model

200 reverbs, plus Prime Time and

Model

Prime Time

II effects processors.

Eventide Harmonizer, and

Aphex Aural Exciter.

In addition. Louie Stevens and

Alan

Harper have been appointed as general manager chief engineer and studio manager engineer. respectively. 4877 Mercury Street,

San Diego. CA 92I1I.

(619) 569 -7367.

ESPN (Bristol. CT) has acquired a second

24- channel

Neve 5114 with

12 stereo and

12 mono busses.

Mike Negri, director of engineering and maintenance. reports that the desk was purchased primarily for use on the network's Sportscenter program, which profiles highlights from professional and college sports.

In addition, a

Sony

5000 video editor was added to the newly completed timecode editing suite. ESPN Plaza.

936

Middle Street. Bristol. CT

06010.

(203) 584-8477.

Midwest.

JOR

-DAN STUDIO

(Wheaton. IL) has added a complete

AMS RMX

-16 reverberation system. and microphones from

Neumann. AKG, and

Beyer. Also completed is a 600

-foot musician's lounge with monitoring facilities. The facility was originally designed by John Edward and

George Augspurger.

100

Wheaton Oaks Court. Wheaton.

IL

60187-3043. (3121 653 -1919.

--wwwwww--

CHARLES BROWN MUSIC

I

Cincinatti has opened two new studios. The Palm Room is a

SMPTE interlock facility that features an

Allen and Heath Syncon

B console.

Otari

MX

-5050 eight

-track. MTR

-12 two -track (with SMPTE timecode center -track). and a spe- cially modified MTR

-12 four -track for audio -visual work.

The second studio, a

MIDI

- controlled Synth Room. boasts a

Yamaha DX7, QX1, and

TX816 system with a

Roland

SBX

-80 Sync Box for SMPTE timecode interlock. Other equipment includes two

Oberheim

Xpanders, LinnDrum, Chroma Polaris synthesizer. and

J.L. Cooper

MIDI patch bay.

Recently added to the

24

-track Crimson Room and to both new rooms was a video -switching network linking the entire complex to an in -house one-inch video editing suite.

1349

East

McMillan

Avenue. Cincinnati. OH

45206. (513) 281-5212.

JOR -DAN

-

AMS reverb acquisition

POGO RECORDS RECORDING STUDIO,

IChampaigne.

IL) is a new

16

-track recording facility featuring a

Studiomaster

24-by -eight mixing console. a

UREI tube console. a

3M

16-track. a designed by

Lexicon digital reverb, and

Altec

604E monitors. The studio.

Combo Audio. measures

500 square feet, with a

270 square -foot control room. The facility is an independent recording studio. and was designed by

Mark

Rubel (pictured here) within

75- year -old brick building.

37

East

Taylor Street.

Champaiane.

IL

61820. (217) 351-8155.

Southeast:

AIRSHOW, INC.,

(Arlington. VA) has added the following equipment to enhance its new production studio and on- location remote recording capabilities: an

Ampex ATR

-102 two- track; a

Bryston

2B -LP amplifier; Yamaha NS -10 close -field speakers; two

Lang PEQ equalizers:

Trompeter

WE- style coaxial patchbays for digital audio and video signal routing; and a

Panasonic video monitor with pulse cross and underscan display.

5727 25th Road

North, Arlington,

VA

22207. (703) 237

-8312.

Re p lot

-

August

EASTERN

ACOUSTIC

WORKS!

FIRST

PRIZE

OF

THE

WINNER

JAPAN

AUDIO

CONSULTANT SOCIETY

COMPETITION

IT

REALLY

REALLY it works in the industrial

WORKS! installation in

Tokyo

-where the testing took place that resulted in

Nippon Onkyoka Kyokai naming the

EAW

-based

Unicus System the best- performing high -level sound system in the world.

And it works in EAW's new

FR

Series, shown above:

R222, FR102,

FR253,

FR122, FR153.

The

FR

Series is our third

- generation professional full

-range loudspeaker system.

It shares in the same advanced technology that helped win the international prize.

And it now brings that technology

EASTERN

ACOUSTIC

WORKS

59 Fountain Street /Box

111

Framingham, Massachusetts

07101

(617)

620

-1478 within everybody's reach.

There are important reasons for the extraordinary quality of the

FR

Series.

There's the crossover, for example

-the most sophisticated you can get in a compact system. comes as close as you can get to

It absolutely flat power response.

It all began with Kenton Forsythe calculating the design parameters with mathematical precision -and then adjusting them flawlessly in extensive and painstaking listening evaluations.

Exact acoustic measurement followed -based on a third order

(18dB per octave) filter that achieves precise phase and response coherence.

Then, special response

- compensation equalizes the drivers.

There's the testing:

A random sample of every driver run is production tested for a full hundred hours.

Further, each completed system is tested individually, as well.

So, no chances are taken with anything going out that isn't up to

EAW's full quality standards.

And along with everything else, there are the real wood enclosures of cabinet -maker quality. We use cross -grain,18 -plies

-to- the

-inch, laminated

European birch plywood that doesn't flex

-and stands up even under the most rigorous travel conditions.

But the real prize

-the one that counts most to us

-is knowing that we've built into our product the kind of science integrity and craftsmanship and that makes our sound as close to perfect cs it can sound.

And at prices that don't come close to the quality they buy.

August l'.is.

->

-R

-e p lil.;

For additional information circle #68

WE LEA

VE

OUT

YOU

DON'TNEED:

What makes our digital delay systems sound so clean?

ADM: Adaptive

Delta

Modulation.

When

PCM -based delay systems hit their cut

-off

frequencies, they unfortunately hit an electronic

"brick

wall."

Frequency response

falls

INPUT MODULATOR oEa,ub)

'

'

I

I

,

I-

10 -M{

FEEDBACK(

4,000

11

II

DIGITAL DELAY ImA/

4

-1E

DELAY

LWIOTH

-.uT

SPEED

LEVEL.

The

ADM 1020 gives you all the popular special effects at an affordable price.

Over one second maximum delay time. Perfect for the first time user or for the multiple effects user who needs a second unit. Bolt this one into your rack and flex your creative muscles.

OUTPUT ew.L i

\

I

-

WAKE

-'

-EwWI

MIX

ADM

1020

,Pt el

MODULATOR

E\\ 11/

I I

DIGITAL DELAY

Inn)

1

V e

L_

/1

MK."'

J

D(NIALE

LEC!lDJ... IO2E1l

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J

DELAY FACTOR

WIDTH

Go beyond the standard effects with the

ADM

1024. Comb filtering, tuned resonance, vocorder effects and much more. With a little experimentation you can create effects we've never heard of. This is the unit that built the DeltaLab reputation for quality and reliability.

'

SELLD d.r

I

=lECT-RON

malt

17 e

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I

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_

I

.;

URI

..

RIMED

NEM NMI(

EOM wr

01.1,

0I'9

ADM

1030.

The performance tool.

User programmable version of the

ADM 1024. Up to four effects addressable on command. Programs the complete effect

-not an approximation like some other units.

Use it with the optional ADM

-STL footswitch.

It's like a ton of stomp boxes in one little rack mount.

DELAY MIX

ADM

10

24

01985 ANALOG & 0101IAL SYSTEMS INC.

THE ONEEFFECT

"BRICK

WALL"

flat on

its back.

Phase distortion goes

wild.

Natu-

rally,

the sound suffers.

DeltaLab delays are more sensitive to the dynamic characteristics

of

musical sound. Our patented

ADM circuitry eliminates the

"brick

wall."

The result?

Clean, sharp effects: flanges that really rip; slapback that knocks

you

silly; doubling, chorusing and thickening that never slide into the mud.

Audition one today at your DeltaLab dealer.

Listen and compare.

DeltaLab delays really cut.

DeltaLab

August

1985 k-e p

107

_._

_l'

NM

I

V r

`

`

tltl

1

1

1

1

111 ti11

.01

'

l

1

E_-

^^

N

-. n

. n..

-.

.--.

.-.

.-

C

SOUNDSCAPE STUDIOS

(

Atlanta) is a new

24track facility comprising a custom

Neotek Series

Ilk

_'S

, .

; with stereo submasters and group muting; various Studer tape machines, including an

A80 quarter inch and A710 cassette deck:

FM

Acoustics

800A and

300A. and

Haller

500

MkIII monitors

24-track. A80 amps: plus

`..:.i

Tannez

::.

A810 speakers.

1)1)1..

Outboard gear includes a

Lexicon

224X digital reverb with

LARC. Super Prime Time digital delay, and a

PC M -4I

Eventide

H910 and H949

Harmonizers, dbx Model

165A limiters:

Valley People Kepex

II noise gates; and ail

Audio

Arts

1100 equa.irer.

677

Antone Street NW. Atlanta, GA

30318. (4041 351.1003.

Southern Cuiiiurniu:

C KDISC tHuliy.wood) has purc hased a pn wessur. DDI.J -120 digital delay. a pair of

Sony digital editing and disk -mastering audio system consisting of a

PCM -1610

BVU

-800 db recorders, and a

DAE

-1100 editing system. Pictured here at

Ken

Perry, iett1 and

John Golden with the new system.

Currently, the facility claims to offer a full range of in

-house analog and d!gual disk-mastering services to analog disk, digital and or analog tape, music editing and assembly tor Compact

Disc release. The Sony system augments Studio

As exisittng tandem Neumann

VMS

80 analog disk-cutting lathes. and

Zuma computer equipped

Neumann VMS

70 lathe with Technics quartz drive motor located in

Studio

B. 6550

Sunset. Hollywood,

CA 90028.

(213) 466.1323.

O

TIM JORDAN RENTALS

(Los Angeles) has purchased six

Timeline Lynx nmecode modules, and says it is the first company to be offering the synchronization units for rent on the

West Coast. The Lynx modules consist of individual timecode generator reader resolver units easily connected to virtually all digital and analog video, audio, and film transports.

In at

G

-

Sony digital editing system addition. the modules can be linked together for up to a

32- machine synchronization. Accord- ing to facility owner

Tim Jordan:

"I no longer have to stock a variety of interface circuit boards

KDISC and EPROM sets for the many different recorders, and t here is no prior set up time necessary

:in.

,`

,;

I..,!i-:. ier.,:!.y the

LynxJ."

8474

West Third Street, Los Angeles. CA

90048 (213) 653

-0240.

OCLAN1d

Al

RECORDERS

(Hollywood) has installed a second

GML

Moving Fader Automation System onto a custom

32

-input

B.

Delcorl console, which is linked to a portable

16

-input API board, resulting in a total of

48 channels of automation for Studio

The dual console system, which tailors mainly to album projects and film scores, was designed by Jay

Kaufman of Oceanway.

The facility's first GML system was installed a year ago onto an

API desk. A 40 -input

Joe's. in

North Hollywood. and installed onto a

Trident

Series

80 board.

With these

GML system was also delivered to Mama two systems, there now are reported to have been six GML systems installed this year. 6050 Sunset,

Hollywood, CA

90028.

1213)

467 -9375.

Why do Jensen

Transformers have

Clearer Midrange and

Top End?

The high frequency rolloff of a

Jensen

Transformer is optimized, by computer analysis, to fit the Bessel Low

Pass Filter response. This means minimum overshoot and ringing and flat group delay for best time alignment of all spectral components of the musical waveform.

In other words, the harmonics arrive at the same time as the fundamental frequency.

The result is a clear midrange and top end without the harsh, edgy sound which has been one of the most objectionable sonic complaints about transformers.

There's no

"midrange smear."

Only Jensen has this benefit of hi

-tech computer optimization.

F

OTHER

f-

JE-11P-1

STEP WAVEFORM

/-

1E -11 P -1

it

OTHER

GROUP DELAY

Visitors by appointment only

Closed Fridays.

10735 BURBANK BOULEVARD NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CA 91601

(213) 876 -0059

jensen transformers

INCORPORATED

For additional information circle a71

Ii

r(

I!,`

.\ugii,i

THE TASCAM

MS

-16:

FOR

THOSE WHO'VE

HEARD IT

ALL BEFORE.

We for designed our new

1"

16

-track especially the skeptics. Those who have heard all the other

16 get exceptional distortion. all the other claims. Hearing is believing, and the

MS

-16 delivers enough audio quality to convince the most critical ears. But that's just part of the story.

The fact is, the closer you look into the

MS

-16, the better it gets.

The

MS -16's superlative performance begins with our new micro -radii heads.

They tracks...and virtually eliminate

"head bumps" and ensure flat frequency response. Put this together with direct- coupled amplifiers throughout, plus ultra -quiet

FETs, transient and low and fre- quency response with extremely low you

Unlike most tape machines, the record/ sync and playback heads on the

MS

-16 are identical in performance, so you can make critical

EQ and processing decisions en overdubs or punch -ins without having to go back and listen a second time.

You get what you want sooner and with fewer headaches.

Record

/Function switches for each track allow effortless, one -button punch

-ins.

Input

Enable allows ing to concentrate rather on instant talkback dur- rewinds. With the

MS -16, you're free the project at hand... than on your tape machine.

The

MS

-16 takes the grief out of locking up with other audio and video machines as well. The

38

-pin standard

SMPTE

/EBU interface affords speedy, single

-cable con- nection with most popular synchronizers and editing systems. And the

MS -16's new

Omega Drive transport stands up to con- tinual shuttling while handling tape with kid

-glove kindness.

Take a closer look at

TASCAM more information at

7733

Telegraph Road,

Montebello,

CA 90640. the

MS

-16.

See your dealer for a demo, or write us for

THE TASCAM

MS -I6 SIXTEEN TRACK

TASCAM

THE SCIENCE

OF

BRINGING

ART TO

LIFE.

©

Copyright

1985

TEAC Corporation Of America

For additional information circle

#72

August

1985 R-e/p

109

Northeast:

AAA

RECORDING STUDIO

130W 42nd

St.Rm

552

New York.

NY 10036

12121

221

-6626

DM. PL. PR. PK

ANGEL SOUND

1576

Broadway

New

York.

NY 10036

1212) 765

-7460 TD

APON RECORD

CO

.

INC

P

0 Box 3082

Long

Steinway Station

Island City,

NY 11103

1718) 721

-5599 DM. TD. PL.

PR, PK

ASR RECORDING SERVICES

21

Harristown

Rd Glen

Rock.

NJ 07452

1201) 652 -5600

TD. PI<

AUDIO DIGITAL INC

12

Long Island Ave.

Holtsville,

NY 11742

1516)

289-3033

TD

AUDIO

435

VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS

Crooked Lane

King of Prussia,

PA 19406

12151272 -8500 TD

BEE -VEE

SOUND. INC

211

East 43rd

St

.

#603

New

York.

NY 10017

12121949 -9170 TD

BESTWAY PRODUCTS. INC

1105

Globe Ave

Mountainside.

1201)

232-8383

NJ 07092

PR. PK

BURLINGTON AUDIO TAPES. INC

106

Mott

St

Oceanside. NY 11572

1516) 678 -4414

TD

DICK CHARLES RECORDING

130

W

42nd St #1106

New York,

NY 10036

1212) 819 -0920

DM.

TD

COOK

LABORATORIES. INC.

375 Ely

Ave

Norwalk.

CT

06854

1203) 853 -3641

DM. TD. PL. PR, PK

CREST RECORDS. INC.

220

Broadway

Huntington Station.

NY 11747

1800) 645 -5318

DM. TD. PL. PR. PK

CRYSTAL CITY TAPE DUPLICATORS, INC.

48

Stewart Ave

Huntington.

NY 11743

15161421 -0222

TD

CUE RECORDINGS. INC

1156 Ave. of

Americas

New

York.

NY

10036

12121921 -9221

TO

THE CUTTING EDGE

P.O

Box

217

Ferndale,

NY 12734

1914) 292 -5965

DM. TD, PL. PR. PK

DIGITAL

BY

DICKINSON

Box 547.

9

Westinghouse Plaza

Bloomfield.

NJ 07003

12011429 -8996 CD

DISKMAKERS

925

N

3rd St.

Philedelphia.

PA 19123

1800) 468-9353 TD.

PR

DYNAMIC RECORDING

2846

Dewey

St.

Rochester.

NY

14616

17161621 -6270

TD.

PR

EXECUTIVE RECORDING. LTD

300 W

55th

St

New

York.

NY 10019

12121247 -7434

DM

1

_FvA\a_

The

R

-e

/p

Buyer's

Guide of

Cutting

and

Mechanical Services

FORGE RECORDING STUDIOS. INC.

P.0

Box

861

Valley Forge.

PA 19481

1215) 644-

3266.935

-1422 TD

MASTERING

PRESSING

TAPE DUPLICATION

PACKAGING

R

-e

/p's

Unique Directory Listing of

Disk Cutting and Tape

Duplicating

Services

-

the kind of services all recording and production facilities require as the "Final Stage" in the preparation of marketable audio product.

GEORGE NEID

PRODUCTIONS

14121 561

-3399

Otan

Mastering and Bin

Loop duplication.

AGFA 611, 612.

Magnetite and

627

BASF

True Chrome Pro

II

Were dedicated to the finest stereo duplication at truly competitive prices

Key to

Services:

DM

=

Disk Mastering

TD

=

Tape Duplication

PL

=

Plating

PR

=

Pressing

PK

=

Packaging

CD

=

CD

Preparation

To be included in the next edition of

The Final Stage" send details to

Rhonda

Kohler. RECORDING

Engineer/

Producer,

P.O. Box

2449, Hollywood,

CA

90078. (213) 467 -1111.

ABSOLUTELY the

BEST

QUALITY and

SERVICE at

ABSOLUTELY the

BEST PRICES

FREE BOXES with arty order

Real

Time Cassette Duplication

Printing and

Packaging

26

Baxter Street

Buffalo,

NY 14207 (716)876 -1454

EURÖPÄDISK;L°TD:;

Ewopaarik

LIa

'S

VarKR Street New

VOIR

Nt í00U

Audiophile pressing

Exclusively on imported

TELDEC vinyl

Licensed for

DMM

Central

Plating and

Pressing

HUB

-SERVALL

RECORD MFG

Cranbury

Rd.

Cranbury.

NJ 08512

16091655 -2166 PL.

PR

IAN COMMUNICATIONS

GROUP. INC.

10

Upton Drive

Wilmington.

MA 01887

16171658 -3700 TD

MARK CUSTOM

RECORDING SERVICE

10815 Bodine

Rd

Clarence,

NY 14031

1716) 659 -2600

DM.

TO PR. PL. PK

MASTER CUTTING ROOM

321 W

44th

St.

New York,

NY 10036

12121581 -6505 DM

MASTERDISK CORPORATION

16

West 61st

St

New

York.

NY 10023

1212) 541 -5022

DM

PRC

RECORDING COMPANY

422

Madison Ave

New

York.

NY 10017

12121

308 -2300 DM. PL. PR. PK

PETER PAN

145

INDUSTRIES

Kormorn

St

Newark.

NJ 07105

12011

344 -4214

DM.

PR. PL

OUIK

CASSETTE CORP

250

W

57th

St

.

Rm 1400

New

York.

NY 10019

12121977 -4411 TD

1

Mill

SL

-

The Chace

Burlington.

VT 05401

Mill

TD. PK

1802) 862 -8881

SOUND TECHNIQUE. INC

130 W

42nd

St

New York. NY 10036

1212) 869 -1323

DM

SOUNDTEK INC

1780

Broadway

New York.

NY 10019

12121489 -0806

DM. TD. PL.

PR. PK. CO

SOUNDWAVE RECORDING STUDIOS. INC

2

West 45th St #903

New

York.

NY

10036

12121730 -7360

PHILADELPHIA

MUA

FRANKFORD/

WAYNE

NEW YORK

MASTERING LABS

Computerized

Disc

Mastering

(215)561

-1794 (212)582

-5473

SPECTRUM MAGNETICS, INC.

1770 Lincoln Highway,

East

P.O.

Box 218

Lancaster.

PA

17603

(717) 296 -9275

TD. PK

Toll -Free

800 -441

-8854

BASF CHROME a specialty

Your audio cassette company!

N

-e p

110

August

1985

Steve

Tasco

Gilbard /Conee-t Sound

Sound Ltd.

Credits: Madonna

Engineer

At every

concert

Tasco does,

why

do 20,000

screaming fans experience the same sound and light

spectacle? Steve

Gilbard.

He

strips sound light down

to

the

basics,

then puts

it back

together again in just the and right measure.

No

matter whose sound.

No

matter what sight.

No

matter where. That's Gilbard's talent,

for 50 years.

We were

first and the innovative

use of technology.

Nikko Audio has

been

making substantive contributions

to

technology with

MOS FETs,

first with circuit breaker

pro-

tection. And

now, for

the

first

time, Nikko's

LABO Series of

commercial audio components.

Like

all Nikko components, they're built

to last.

As a

primary manufacturer with demanding double

QC aerospace

tolerances,

it's no

wonder Nikko Audio

offers a

fully transferable, conditional

3 year warranty.

un-

Nikko Audio

to every seat

and

Steve

Gilbard. Stretching the

power of

technology in the house

... and

beyond.

NIKKO

11=r1=11

Mr

1M ar.

_

The

_

_ _

ttr

_.1M power

of

technology.

5830 South Triangle Drive, Commerce, CA

90040

Nikko Audio systems and components are available exclusively through Authorized Nikko Audio

Dealers.

For additional information circle

#74 a

1

-2-7

+imp_

=

':,

August

1985 R -e p

111

1H111

IHNh/',`L1F/',

SUNSHINE SOUND. INC.

1650

Broadway

L

New York, NY 10019

(2121 582 -6227

TRACY

-VAL

CORPORATION

201

Linden Ave.

DM. PL

Somerdale.

NJ 08083

(609) 627 -3000

PL

IZ-e p 112

PRECISION

MAGNETIC

TRUTONE

RECORDS

163

Terrace

St.

Haworth,

NJ 07641

1201)

385 -0940

TEST TAPES

State of the art Neumann or Wes

- trex disk mastering labs, featuring creative engineering, outstanding service, competitive pricing. Top qual- ity record production available. packages also

Introducing two NEW SERIES of test tapes manufactured to

IEC and NAB equalization standards with extended frequency range and using international test frequencies.

VARIETY RECORDING STUDIO

130 W.

42nd St.,

Rm.

551

New York, NY 10036

(212) 221

-6625 DM, PL. PR,

PK

Hz

1/4"

SEC.

1

/2"

1"

&

2"

1000

30

40

4000

10 12

8000

15

20

16000 20 25

1000 10

12

31.5 10 12

40 10 12

63 10 12

60

20

30

40

20

20

20

20

VIRTUE RECORDING STUDIOS

1618 N.

Broad

St.

Philadelphia,

PA 9121

(215) 763 -2825

DM. TD. PL,

PR

East

/Southeast:

ALPHA RECORDS

1400 N.W. 65th Ave.,

Fort Lauderdale.

FL

305 -587 -6011

Plantation

PL. PR, PK

20

AMERICAN MULTIMEDIA

Route

8.

Box 215 -A

Burlington,

NC 27215

(919) 229 -5559 TD

100 10 12

125

10 12

20

20

20

PAT APPLESON STUDIOS INC.

1000 N.W.

159th Drive.

Miami.

FL 33169

(305) 625-4435 DM. TD. PL, PR. PK

250

10 12

500

10 12

1000

10

12

2000

10 12

4000

10 12

8000

10 12

10000

10 12

12500

12 15

20

20

20

20

20

25

COMMERCIAL

AUDIO

77 S.

Witchduck

Rd.

Virginia Beach. VA 23462

(8041

497-6506

TD

CUSTOM RECORDING AND SOUND. INC

1225

Pendleton

St.

P.O.

Box 7647

Greenville.

SC 29610

(3021 269-5018

TO

25 16000

12 15

20000

12

15 25

25

ourmi

4üí

'rent!

1000 12 15

I lC

10rí

t

\ible

Soundsheets

g

.-freak.

\tIi,re hard

Program used on new series of records can't. In n1a ^_alines. in the test tapes at

71/2,

15

&

30

IPS. mail. Great for promu samplers:

AUDIO CASSETTE

DUPLICATION

Send for free catalog.

STANDARD

TAPE

LABORATORY, INC.

26120

Eden

Landing

Road

Hayward,

#5,

California

94545

U.S.A.

786-3546 i

(415)

Send for our tree

"Cassette newsletter with details

Talk- and prices.

TOLL

FREE 1.800.EVA.TONE

EVA-TONE INCORPORATED

P.O. Box

7020 /Clearwater, FL 33518

GEORGIA RECORD PRESSING

262 Rio

Circle

Decatur.

GA 30030

(404) 373-2673 PR. PK

MAGNETIX

CORPORATION

770

Winter Garden.

FL 32787

1305) 656 -4494

West Bay St.

TD, PK

August

1985

r

MIAMI TAPE. INC.

8180 N.W. 103 St.

Hialeah

Gardens, FL 33016

(305) 558

-9211 TD, DM, PR, PL, PK

MUSIC

PEOPLE STUDIOS

932

Woodlawn

Rd.

Charlotte,

NC 28209

(704) 527 -7359 Td,

PK

NATIONAL CASSETTE SERVICES

613 N.

Commerce Ave. /P.O. Box

99

Front Royal,

VA 22630

(703) 635 -4181 TD. PK

PROGRESSIVE MUSIC STUDIOS

2116

Southview Ave.

Tampa,

FL 33606

(813) 251

-8093 TD,

PK

SMITH 8 SMITH SOUND STUDIOS

214

Doverwood

Rd.

Fern Park, FL 32730

(305) 331-6380 Td.

PK

South Central:

A8R

RECORD

8 TAPE MANUFACTURING

902 N.

Industrial

Dallas,

TX

75207

Blvd.

(214) 741

-2027 DM, TD, PL. PR, PK

ARDENT MASTERING. INC.

2000

Madison

Ave.

Memphis,

TN 38104

(901) 725 -0855

DM

CASSETTE CONNECTION

41

Music Square East

Nashville.

TN 37203

TD

CREATIVE SOUND PRODUCTIONS

9000

Southwest Freeway. Suite

Houston,

TX

77074

320

(713) 777 -9975 TO

DISC

MASTERING. INC.

30

Music Square West

Nashville,

TN 37203

(615)

254 -8825 DM

DUPLI- TAPES. INC.

4545 Bissonnet. Suite 104

Bellaire,

TX 77401

(713) 432 -0435

TD

HIX RECORDING CO.. INC.

1611

Herring Ave.

Waco,

TX

76708

(817) 756 -5303

MASTERCRAFT RECORDING CORP.

437

N.

Cleveland

Memphis,

TN

38104

(901) 274 -2100 DM

MASTERFONICS

28

Music Square

East

Nashville,

TN

37203

(615) 327 -4533

DM,

CD

MUSIC SQUARE MFG.

CO.

50

Music Square West. Suite 205

Nashville.

TN 37203

(6151

242-1427 CD.

DM. TD. PR, PL, PK

NASHVILLE

RECORD PRODUCTIONS

469

Chestnut St

Nashville, TN 37203

(615) 259-4200 TD.

DM. PK. PL,

PR

TRUSTY TUNESHOP RECORDING STUDIO

Rt.

1.

Box 100

Nebo.

KY

42441

(502) 249 -3194 TD

Midwest:

A&F MUSIC

SERVICES

2834

Otego

Pontiac.

MI 48054

(313) 682

-9025

TD

AARD -VARK

RECORDING. INC.

335

S.

Jefferson

Springfield.

MO 65806

(417) 866 -4104 TD.

PK

ACME RECORDING STUDIOS

3821

N

Southport

Chicago.

IL

60613

(3121477 -7333 TD.

PK

ARC ELECTRONIC SERVICES

2557

Knapp

N

E

Grand Rapids.

MI 49505

(616) 364 -0022 TD

AUDIO ACCESSORIES

CO

38W515 Deerpath

Rd

Batavia.

IL 60510

1312) 879 -5998 TD. PK

AUDIO GRAPHICS

13801

E

35th St

Independence,

MO 64055

18161254 -0400 TD, PK

BODDIE RECORD MFG 8 RECORDING

12202 Union Ave

Cleveland

OH

44105

(216) 752

-3440 DM.

TO. PL.

PR

DIGITAL AUDIO

DISC

1800

N.

Fruitridge

Terre Haute.

IN

47804

(812) 466-6821

CD

ELEPHANT RECORDING STUDIOS

21206 Gratiot Ave

East Detroit.

MI 48021

1313)

773-9386

TD

HANF

RECORDING STUDIOS. INC

1825

Sylvania Ave

Toledo.

OH

43613

(419) 474-5793 TD

INDUSTRIAL

AUDIO. INC

6228 Oakton

Morton Grove.

IL 60053

1312) 965 -8400 TD

JRC

1594

ALBUM PRODUCTIONS

Kinney Ave

Cincinnati,

OH 45231

1513) 522-9336 DM.

PR. PK

KIDERIAN RECORDS

PROD

4926 W.

Gunnison

Chicago.

IL 60630

(312) 399 -5535

DM. TD. PL.

PR. PK

MAGNETIC STUDIOS.

INC

4784

N

High

St

Columbus.

OH

43214

1614)

262 -8607

TD

MEDIA INTERNATIONAL. INC

247

E

Ontario

Chicago.

IL

60611

1312)

467-5430

TD. PK

MIDWEST CUSTOM

RECORD PRESSING

CO

P

0

Box

92

Arnold.

MO 63010

1314) 464 -3013

TD. PL. PR.

PK

MOSES SOUND ENTERPRISES

270 S.

Highway

Dr,

Valley Park.

MO

63088

(314) 225 -5778

TD

MUSICOL. INC

780

Oakland Park Ave

Columbus.

OH

43224

(614) 267 -3133 DM.

TO, PR. PK

NORWEST

123

COMMUNICATIONS

South Hough

St

Barrington.

IL

60010

(312)

381

-3271 TD

PRECISION RECORD

932

West

38

Place

Chicago.

IL 60609

LABS. LTD

312) 247 -3033 DM.

TD. PR. PL. Ph

0

C

A

CUSTOM PRESSING

2832

Spring Grove Ave

Cincinnati.

OH

45225

5131 681

-8400

DM. TD PL. PR, PK

1

Hh1E-frINN/',`LAC t_

RITE RECORD

PRODUCTIONS. INC.

9745

Mangham Drive

Cincinnati.

OH

45215

(513) 733 -5533 DM. TD. PL. PR. PK

RON ROSE

PRODUCTIONS

29277

Southfield

Rd.

Southfield.

MI 48076

1313)

424-8400

TD

SOLID SOUND. INC.

PO Box7611

Ann Arbor,

MI

48107

(313) 662 -0669 TD

SONIC SCULPTURES

636

Northland

Blvd

Cincinatti.

OH

45240

15131851 -0055

PM

STANG RECORDS MANAGEMENT

P

0 Box 256577

Chicago. IL 60625

(312) 399 -5535 CD. TD. DM. PL. PR. PK

STORER PROMOTIONS

P.O Box 1511

Cincinnati.

OH

45202

(513)

621

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CHRISTIAN AUDIO TAPES

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Southern California:

ABBEY TAPE DUPLICATORS. INC

9525

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Chatsworth,

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CMS DIGITAL

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CAPITOL RECORDS STUDIOS

1750

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Vine

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Hollywood.

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CASSETTE PRODUCTIONS UNLIMITED

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FILAM NATIONAL PLASTICS

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BERNIE GRUNDMAN MASTERING

6054

Sunset Blvd

Hollywood.

CA

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(213) 465 -6264 CD.

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7317

Romaine

St

Los Angeles. CA 90046

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OPHARION RECORDINGS

P

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Long Beach.

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WORLD RECORDS

P

0.

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#5

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Foreign:

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BRITAIN'S LEADING

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Neve DSP

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Tel -441 580 0444. TLX 298531.

The

Affordable

Way to

Eliminate

Audio

System and Room

Drift

The GOLDLINE Model

30

Digital,

Real

-Time, Spectrum

Analyzer is the affordable and easy

- to

-use instrument that takes the guesswork out of audio system calibration including frequency response measurement of consoles and tape machines, as well as monitor system calibration

TRAC MARKETINC

2015

BRUNDAGE

BAKERSFIELD.

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(805) 323

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We duplicate the spoken

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Music Duplicating

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Duplicating

VIRCO RECORDING. INC.

700

S.

Date Ave.

Alhambra,

CA 91803

(2131

283-1888 DM.

TO, PL. PR

Northern California:

ARCAL

2732 Bay Road

Redwood City.

CA 94063

(4151

369-7348

TD

Affordable at just:

81895.00.

Now available with the

Option

020

Printer Interface Board to provide hard copy of all test parameters used during RTA measurements.

The Model

30 is the ultimate studio and audio system "tweaking machine"

Full 30

Bands Six Memories Quartz Controlled Switched Capacitive Filtering to Eliminate

Drift

Ruggedized for Road Use

Microprocessor Controlled Built

-in

Pink Noise Source

"Flat." "A." or "User Defined"

Weighted Curves may be employed ROM User Curves Avai able

Learn how easy the Model 30 is to use. Return the number to receive the Goldline catalog of products. coupon below, or circle the reader service

P.O.

GOLD

LINE

Box

115

West

Redding,

CT

06896

(203) 938 -2588

NAME

COMPANY

STREET

CITY

STATE

ZIP

August

1985

R-r p

I

IA

The

Directory

TIME

R

-e

/p's

Product Listing of

DOMAIN

PROCESSORS and

SPECIAL

EFFECTS

Coming in the next issue: Frequency and Dynamics Processors.

UNITS

ACOUSTICLOG, INC.

19

Mercer

Street

New York,

NY 10013

Phone:

(212) 925 -1365

Phase 5A

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

Orte.

Effects Type(s): Phase shitting.

Delay Ranges:

N

Reverb

'A.

/Echo

Parameters:

N'A.

Operational Controls: Manual sweep: sweep speed: intensity: regeneration,: and envelope follower level.

Selected Standard Features: Built -it, regen- eration ar:d envelope envelope other devices. follower.

LA input and follower output fur conceruon to

Frequency

Response

(input

Distortion:

N

/A.

/output): N/

A.

S/N Ratio (input

/output):

N A.

Pro -User Price Range:

For additional

N/A information circle e170

ADVANCED MUSIC

SYSTEMS

U.S.

Distributor:

Harris Sound, Inc.

6640 Sunset

Blvd. Suite

#110

Hollywood,

CA 90028

Phone:

(213) 469 -3500

AMS DMX

15-80S

Inputs: Two.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects

Type(s): Delay. sampling. pitch -charge.

Delay Ranges:

0 to

13 seconds (full

Reverb

/Echo

Parameters:

N

/A. bandwidth).

Operational Controls:

Two

-channel input

- output; regeneration: VCO

(speed and depth): nudge buttons: and keypad for adding delay.

Selected Standard Features: seconds with pitch -change and sampling: chan- nel

B has 1.6 seconds ar;d

Frequency

Response

Channel

A has 3.2 pitch

-c hange.

(input/output):

20

Hz to

18 kHz,

-3/

+0 dB.

Distortion:

THD less than

0.03

".. at

1 kHz full output.

S/N Ratio (input

/output):

90 dB dynamic r.1;11,

Pro -User Price Range:

$8.995

AMS RMX

-16

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s): effects.

Digital reverb with special

Delay Ranges: Delay

Reverb program:

0 to

1.2 second,

/Echo Parameters: Pre

-delay: decay time decay filters (low and high).

Operational Controls: Nudge buttons and key pad for changing reverb parameters and pro grams; store stores; arid control input

(save

/output and recall): pots. nits

Selected Standard Features:

12 grams: factory pro- three programs erasable and repro

- grammable via optional remote with barcode reader.

Frequency Response (input kHz,

-3/

+0 dB.

/output):

20 Hz to

18

Distortion: THD less than output.

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

0.03'

90 dB at

1 kHz dynamic full range.

Pro

-User Price Range: $7,450

For additional information circle

#171

Inputs: Four.

Outputs:

Four (standard model).

Effects Type(s):

Digital delay.

Delay Ranges:

0 to

299 ms, extendable in

800 ms per module.

Reverb

/Echo Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational Controls: Adjustable inputoutput levels: and delay

Selected Standard Features: modules configurable and expandable: optional effects module. thumbwheels.

Input arid output frequency

Response

(input /output):

20

Hz to

16 kHz.

Distortion:

Less than

0.2 for

20

Hz to

6 kHz.

S/N Ratio weighted.

(input /output): Better than -93 dB,

A

Pro

-User Price Range:

For standard ur;it:

$15,000

Model

BX25E

Inputs: Two.

Outputs: Two (standard model).

Effects Type(s): Spring

Delay Ranges:

N

/A. reverb.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

1.5 to

3.5 seconds.

Operational Controls: Remote echo and control mix of

Selected Standard Features: levels at 60 ms reverb. as well as reverb types. selectable

Input and output adjustable. with optional

M250 echo unit

;two per channel).

Frequency

Response

(input

/output):

50

Hz to

8 kHz.

Distortion:

N

/A.

S/N Ratio (input

/output):

Better that: -76 dB.

A eighted.

Pro -User Price Range: For standard

For additional unit:

$5.500 information circle

#172

ALESIS

CORP.

P.O. Box 3908

Los

Angeles, CA 90078

Phone:

(213) 467 -8000

Model

XT

Inputs: One.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s):

Delay Ranges:

..er Wads.

Digital reverberation.

Dents time range is

0.15 to

10

Reverb

/Echo

Parameters: Pre

-delay: slap back: diffusion; size; decay time; arid filters.

Operational Controls: Input defeat: external defeat.

/output level; mix:

Selected Standard Features:

16

-bit audio.

Frequency

Response

(input dry:

14 kHz reverb.

/output):

20 kHz

Distortion:

Less than 0.1'...

S/N Ratio (input

/output):

Dynamic range is less than or equal to -85 dB: typical is less than or equal to -92 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$795 and up

For additional information circle

#173

AKG ACOUSTICS, INC.

77

Selleck Street

Stamford,

CT 06902

Phone:

(203) 348 -2121

Model

TDU7000

APPLIED RESEARCH

AND TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

215

Tremont

Street

Rochester,

NY 14608

Phone:

(216) 436 -2220

Model

DR1 -240

Inputs: Two.

Outputs:

I vs u.

Effects Type(s):

Digital reverb system.

Delay Ranges:

N

/A.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

Sever:.

Operational Controls: Room type: pre -delay:

HF damping: blend: decay time: and diffusion.

Selected Standard Features: Remote control.

MIDI: stereo it

;: stereo out: and 100 presets.

Frequency

Response

(input /output):

10

Hz to

1 a kHz.

Distortion:

Less that

0.1 "...

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

Better than -84 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$1.695

Model

01A -191

Inputs: One.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s):

Delay Ranges:

Digital reverb system.

N/A.

Reverb/Echo

Parameters: Seven.

Operational Controls:

Room type: pre-delay

HI' damping: blend; decay time: arid diffusion.

Selected Standard Features:

49 presets: nine room types: balanced mono in: atid stereo out

Frequency Response

(input/output):

20

Hz to

10

Distortion:

Less that

0.025"4..

S/N Ratio

(input/output):

Better than -72 dB.

Pro-User Price Range:

$1,395

Model

DR2-230

Inputs: One.

Outputs: Three.

Effects Type(s):

Digital reverb system.

Delay Ranges: N

/A.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

Six.

Operational Controls: Room type; pre -delay.

HF damping; blend: decay time: arid diffusion.

Selected Standard Features:

Nine room types, three presets; bypass; balanced mono in

/stereo or mixed mono out: and Hi

/Lo level.

Frequency Response

(input /output):

20 Hz to

10 kHz.

Distortion:

Less that

0.025%.

S/N Ratio

(input /output): Better

Pro

-User Price Range:

$995 than;

-72 dB.

Model

1500

Inputs: One.

Outputs: One.

Effects Type(s):

Digital delay.

Delay Ranges:

0.15 ms to

1.5 seconds in four ranges.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational Controls: Manual; width; speed. mix; and regeneration..

Selected Standard Features: Repeat hold; irn and

Hi

/Lo level.

/out.

Frequency Response (input kHz.

/output):

20 Hz to

70

Distortion:

Less that

0.2

., ,,.

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

Better than -90 dB.

Pro -User Price Range:

$500

Models 129/130/131

Inputs: One.

Outputs: One.

Effects Type(s): Pitch transpose, display. and foot pedal in, one unit.

Delay Ranges: N

/A.

Reverb

/Echo

Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational

Controls: Pitch shift: octave up. octave down: remote foot control; pitch display readout; arid bypass.

Selected Standard Features: Four presets: mix: regeneration: instrument

/line inputs; and auxil- iary loops.

Frequency

Response

(input

/output):

15

Hz to

11 kHz.

Distortion:

0.25'tß.

S/N Ratio

For

(input

/output): additional

Better than -80 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$1,200 information circle

#174

R

-e, p

116

August

1985

HARRY,

THERE HAS

TO

BE

AN EASIER

WAY.

MEMO:

Listen,

Harry,

I

know you keep saying we need "creative sound processing" to stay competitive.

I

loved the way you hung the mikes inside a

24-

gallon aquarium

for

the

Fred's

Fish

Food

jingle

(too

bad Fred's sing- ing goldfish dropped dead, though). And your reverse hyperspatial time

-delay effects

for

the

"H.G. Wells

Concerto" were incred- ibly brilliant.

Real award -winning

stuff.

But

I

gotta

tell you:

these complicated set- ups

of

yours are driving me crazy.

First

I

spend all day rigging equipment. Then

I

go all night de- bugging the effects so they sound right.

Harry, there just way to produce has to be an easier interesting acoustic envi- ronments.

And

I

think

I

found

it:

Ursa Major's new

StarGate

626.

The

626 effect we special need

-

puts just about every digital reverb, delays, and effects- inside one box with one set

of

controls. The reverb programs

all

sound absolutely professional

(this

is

an Ursa Ma-

jor

unit, after

all)

yond

-but the

626 goes way be- straight reverb. There's mono and stereo delay lines,

for

example, an effect called "reverse reverb," a stereoized dual echo, and the brightest plate simulation

I've ever heard. Plus a

lot

more

-16 pre -tuned

"rooms"

in all,

with

256 possible variations on each effect.

Anyway,

Harry,

I

want you to cancel

ev-

erything on your calendar tomorrow morn-

ing.

I'm taking you to hear a live demo

of

the

626.

Don't forget the checkbook, either.

We

need this thing

-and the sooner the better.

Regards,

THE

STARGATE

626

URSA

MAJOR, Inc.

Box 28, Boston,

MA

02258

USA

Telephone

Thlex:

921405 URSAMAJORBELM

(617)

924 -7697

August

1985

R

-e

/p

117

For additional information circle #79

The

L)irec tort'

AUDIO

+DESIGN CALREC,

INC.

P.O. Box 786

Bremerton, WA

98310

Phone:

(206) 275 -5009

Panscan

Inputs: Three. r

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s):

Auto panning and beat counter.

Delay Ranges:

N

/A.

Reverb /Echo

Parameters: N

Operational Controls:

/A. speed; oust threshold. s:

P t; trigger; depth. image; manual trigger: beat count; and beat e

-

4

I

I._ side( ted Standard Features: Beat counter from

1 to

10 beats; and rapid

Frequency Response vibrato for soft shift.

(input /output):

20 Hz to

20 kHz. +0/ -1 dB.

S/N Ratio

(input/output): reference

+8 dBm.

Better than -88 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$890

SCAMP

S23

Inputs: Two.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s):

Auto panning.

Delay Ranges:

N

/A.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

N

Operational

Controls:

Par: speed; par, pattern: rate of

/A. hold off (delay) between pans.

Selected Standard Features: External trigger ikevl input, triggered or continuous pan: and r.orm.tl revere indicators.

Frequency

Response

(input kHz.

±0.05 dB.

Distortion:

Less that;

0.05",..

S/N Ratio

(input

/output): reference

+8 ciBm.

/output):

20

Better than

Hz to

20

-103 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$450

SCAMP

524

Inputs: Two.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s): ADT

/flange.

Delay Ranges: Two ranges:

1.2 to

11 ms:

11 to

45 ms.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational Controls: Positive

/negative flang- ing: envelope follower: oscillator frequencyand modulation; and spin

(feedback).

Selected Standard Features:

Front

-end limiting allows controlled

"100

".,.. feedback: stereo reverb by cross coupling two units: and alai- tional delay with two or more units.

Frequency Response

(input /output):

20

Hz to

17 kHz,

±0.05 dB.

Distortion:

Less than

0.03 "...

S/N Ratio

(input /output): reference

+8 dBm.

Better than -80 dB,

Pro

-User Price Range: $650

For additional information circle

#175 r ontrolled: easily programmed: saves several delay configurations in memory: and security

Io,ck

-out.

Frequency Response

(input /output):

20

Hz to

20

.kHz.

"

THD plus noise at

1 kHz. Distortion:

0.05

S/N Ratio

(input

/output):

Better than -105 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range: For model:

$3.500 one -in

/four

-out

For additional information circle

#176

ADA SIGNAL

PROCESSORS

7303D Edgewater Drive

Oakland, CA

94621

-3095

Phone:

(415) 632 -1323

Digitizer

4

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s):

Programmable

Delay Ranges:

1 to

1.024 seconds. digital delay.

,. m,.,,,,..

n

-

AUDIO /DIGITAL,

INC.

1000

S.

Bertelsen Road, Suite

#4

Eugene, OR 97402

Phone:

(503) 687 -8412

ADX

2000

Inputs:

Six.

Outputs:

64.

Effects Type(s):

Cluster alignment: speaker alignment: theme parks: and touring sound.

Delay Ranges:

10 microseconds to

1.048seconds.

Reverb /Echo Parameters: Delay: gain;: and on

/off control.

Operational Controls:

RS232 port: user memory; and front

-panel keypad.

Selected Standard Features:

Microprocessor

T r li

i

/A.

J

Reverb

/Echo Parameters:

N

Operational Controls:

Full programming of all decay functions.

Selected Standard Features: 16 user

-programs: stereo outputs:

16 factory shadow programs;

.01f-diagnostics: and

LED readout.

Frequency Response

(input

/output):

Decay:

20

Iii to

16 kHz.

Distortion:

0.02";, maximum at 0 dBv. wet.

S/N Ratio

(input

/output):

Better than -90 dB.

Pro -User Price Range:

$699.95

2FX

Digital

Multi-

Effects

Inputs: One.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s): Delay

/effects.

Delay Ranges: N

'4.

e

ontrol at its best.

Symetrix

109 Bell Street

Seattle, Washington

98121, USA

Telephone (206) 624 -5012

Telex

703282

R-e p 118

August

1985

525 Dual Gated Compressor

/Limit

Simultaneous compress /limit and expand /gate.

CL150 Fast

RMST9

A

Compressor

/Limiter highly cost -effective single channel automatic gain controller.

501

/Limiter

Simultaneous peak and RMS detection. An indispensable tool for

PA.

522 Compressor

Versatile multi-

/Limiter /Expander /Gate /Ducker function processing for studio, stage, or production.

511

Noise Reduction System

Removes noise from any source, pre- recorded or live, mono or stereo.

Symetrix products are sold and supported world -wide. When you specify Symetrix you specify quality, performance, and reliability.

For additional information circle e80

MANNY'S

PROFESSIONAL

AUDIO

DIVISION

NEW

YORK

CITY'S LARGEST MUSIC

DEALER HAS

EXPANDED

TO INCLUDE

A

FULLY OPERATIONAL

PRO

AUDIO

DIVISION. COMPLETE

WITH DEMONSTRATION

FACILITIES

CAN

AND

OUR SPECIALIZED SALES STAFF,

WE

ASSIST

YOU

IN

SELECTING

ANYTHING

FROM

MICROPHONES

TO

A

COMPLETE MULTI -TRACK

RECORDING

STUDIO. WE

SHIP

WORLDWIDE.

WE'RE

JUST A

PHONE

CALL AWAY.

MANNY'S

MUSIC

156

WEST

48th

STREET

NYC, NY

10036

212

819

-0576

August

1985

C R -e

/p

119

For additional information circle

#81

The

Directory

Reverb

/Echo Parameters:

10 to

1 modulation: depth.

Operational Controls: Separate controls tor flange, chorus and echo.

Selected Standard Features: User car; run two delays at once: patch reverse switch: delay rate

LED: and

Frequency Response

(input to

17 kHz. optional foot controller.

/output): Wet:

20

Hz

Distortion:

0.5 ".. maximum at 0 dBv, wet.

S/N Ratio (input

/output): Better than -90 dB.

Pro -User Price Range: $599.95

64i/1.28i/2.56i Digital Delay

Inputs: One.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s): Full

-function digital delay.

Delay Ranges: 0.31 to

640 ms; 0.15 to 1.280

.econds:

0.31 to

2.560 seconds, respectively.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

8

-to

-1 modulation depth.

Operational Controls: Input and delay

/dry mix: invert; and repeat hold. output full modulation section: levels; phase

Selected Standard Features: Variable hi -cut for regeneration: modulation waveform control; delay rate LED. modulation .peed four

-step

LED headroom indicator.

LEDs; and

Frequency Response

(input to

17 kHz.

/output): Wet:

20 Hz

Distortion:

0.5% maximum at 0 dBv, wet.

S/N Ratio

(input

/output):

Better than -90 dB.

Pro -User Price Range: 64i: $499.95: 1.28i:

$699.95: 2.56i: $799.95

Model

STD

-1

Inputs: Orte.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s):

Multi

-tap delay line.

Delay Ranges: 1.3 to

55.5 ms.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

Six, non-harmonically related delay taps for stereo and psycho- acoustic processing.

Operational Controls:

N

/A.

Selected Standard Features: True stereo puts; six assignable delay taps; and tion section for multi -voice chorus.

Frequency

Response

(input to

20 kHz; delay:

20

Hz to

13.5 kHz. full

/output): out- modula-

Dry:

Distortion:

0.55'7, maximum at 0 dBv, wet.

10

Hz

S/N Ratio

(input unweighted.

/output):

Better than;

-93 dB

Pro -User Price Range:

$799.95

Model

S1000

Digital

Delay

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s): Full- function digital delay.

Delay Ranges:

N

/A.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational Controls:

Input

/output levels; delay

/dry mix: full modulation section; invert; and repeat hold. phase

Selected Standard Features: Four -step LED headroom indicator; and

8

-to

-1 modulation depth.

Frequency

Response

(input

/output):

Delay:

20

Hz to

10 kHz.

Distortion:

0.5 maximum at 0 dBv, wet.

S/N Ratio

(input

/output):

Better than -90 dB.

Pro -User Price Range: $299.95

For additional information circle x+177

BARCUS -BERRY ELECTRONICS

5381

Production Drive

Huntington

Beach. CA 92649

Phone:

(714) 898 -9211

Model

BBE 202

Inputs: Otte.

Outputs: One.

Effects Type(s): Phase and eliminator.

/A. amplitude distortion

Delay Ranges:

N

Reverb /Echo

Parameters:

N bypass;

/A.

Operational Controls: Stereo

/mono; process

- amplitude /gain;

50

Hz adjustable; ar

;d level.

Selected Standard Features:

XLR output.

Frequency Response

(input /output): input and

5

Hz to

20 kHz, t0.1 dB.

Distortion:

Less than

0.1'7, at

1 kHz.

S/N Ratio

(input

Pro

-User Price Range:

$1,495

For

/output):

N

/A. additional information circle

#178

BEL

ELECTRONICS

UK

Distribution: Studio

Equipment

Distributors

29

Guilford

Street, 29th Floor

Luton,

LU1

Bedfordshire

2NQ, England

Phone:

(0582) 452495

Models BD80/240/320

Inputs: Orte.

Outputs:

Three.

Digital delay processors.

Effects

Type(s):

Delay Ranges:

80:

Four seconds maximum delay:

240:

12 seconds maximum delay;

320: 16

. econds maximum delay.

Reverb /Echo Parameters: N

Operational Controls:

Feedback phase invert switch and ating modes: manual (via up witches) and oscillator (via speed controls). output mix control with switch; audio trigger; repeat hold; truncation; and two oper-

/down

Selected Standard Features: LED indicator;

LED indicated control; puts on jacks;

XLR

/A. filter infinite stereo input headroom repeat and keypad

/depth switch; mono out- connectors optional.

Frequency Response ual

(input /output):

(For man- mode)

80: 20

Hz to

15 kHz;

240:

20

Hz to

18 kHz;

320: 20

Hz to

15 kHz.

Distortion:

0.2% maximum at

1 kHz.

S/N Ratio typical.

(input /output): Dynamic range:

85 dB

Pro -User Price Range:

For

N/A additional information circle #179

GET

CARRIED

AWAY

-

WITH

SECK

PORTABILITY

-

4

3

- on

2

band

EQ with

sweep midrange

each

balanced

monitor mic /line input.

and

2 effects

sends sends

on

each

input.

Full throw

faders

for

complete

control.

Insert points on all inputs - for extra control of your music.

Rugged wire -less

design

for

road dependability.

Solos on all inputs and auxiliary returns.

Powerful

headphone

monitor amplifier.

All metal construction - and quiet.

Ask for it at your local

rugged dealer

- or call

(203) 324 -2889 for further information.

Then, let the music

carry

you away!

COnnQCfronÍCS

652

CONNECTRONICS CORPORATION

Glenbrook Road Stamford

Telephone (203)324 2889

CT.

06906 U.S.A.

Telex 643678

BIAMP

SYSTEMS

P.O Box 2160

Portland, OR

97208

Phone:

(503) 641

-6767

MR140 /SR340

Inputs: One.

Outputs: Orte.

Effects

Type(s): Spring

Delay Ranges: N

Reverb wet

/Echo

/A. reverb system.

Parameters: N

/A.

Operational Controls: Input and output levels, dry, and four bands of

EQ.

Selected Standard Features: Footswitch jack; plus two pre

-spring limiters.

Frequency Response

(input

/output):

Distortion:

THD less than 0.01%

N

/A.

5/N Ratio (input

/output): Better than -80 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range: MR140:

$349; SR340: $495

For additional information circle

#180

BOSS

U.S.

Distributor: Roland Corp.

7200

Dominion Circle

Los

Angeles, CA 90040

Phone:

(213) 685 -5141

RDD

-10 DDL

Inputs: Two.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s): Digital delay.

R -e

/p

120

August

1985

Delay Ranges:

0 to

400 ms.

Reverb /Echo

Parameters: N/A.

Operational Controls:

Delay range; fine rate/

- depth modulation

(±0.5 to

1.5); feedback: and delay tone

/level.

Selected Standard Features: RCA puts: stereo frequency

Response (input kHz. inputs modulation capabilites.

/A.

/out-

/output):

40 Hz to

16

Distortion:

N

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

Better that; -85 dB.

Pro -User Price Range:

$275

Inputs: One.

CE

-300 Super

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s): Stereo

Delay Ranges:

N

/A.

Chorus chorus.

Reverb /Echo

Parameters:

N

Irate and depth): tone; direct mute.

/A.

Operational

Controls: Input gain; modulation; output: bypass; and

Selected Standard Features:

+12 dB and two separate stereo choruses. input level;

Frequency Response

Distortion:

N

/A.

(input /output):

N

/A.

S/N Ratio (input

/output):

Better that; -85 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$299

Inputs: Three.

Outputs:

Four.

RX

-100 Reverb

Box

Effects Type(s): Reverb unit.

Delay Ranges:

20 to

400 ms.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational Controls: Input gain switch; chan- nel

A and

B volume: reverb volume; panpot; and mode switch.

Selected Standard Features: Stereo capability; mode one allows phase cance latiot, of

180 degrees.

Frequency Response

Distortion:

N

/A.

(input

/output):

N

/A.

S/N Ratio

Pro

(input

/output):

N

-User Price Range:

$230

/A.

RBF -10

Flanger

Inputs:

Two.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s): Flanger.

Delay Ranges:

1 to

13 ms.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

100 ms to

16 secoi.d.

LFO.

Operational Controls: Manual: rate: depth: level; balance; and effect on

/A.

/output):

N

/off.

Selected Standard Features: RCA or jack nection; stereo capability.

Frequency

Response

(input

Distortion:

N

S/N Ratio

(input

Pro

-User Price Range:

$160

/output):

N

/A.

/A. con

-

RPH -10 Phaser

Inputs:

Two.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s):

Phase shifter.

Delay Ranges:

LFO rate.

100 ms

Reverb

/Echo

Parameters:

N to

14 secur,ri

/A.

Operational

Controls: Mode

I.

II.

Ill; manual. rate; depth; and resonance.

Selected Standard Features: Two -stage hasing;

RCA or jack connection; stereo capable.

Frequency Response

Distortion:

N

S/N Ratio

/A.

(input

(input

/output):

N

/A.

/output):

Better that; -80 dB.

Pro -User Price Range:

$160

For additional information circle

#181

BRICK

AUDIO

102

South Porter

Elgin,

IL

60120

Phone:

(312) 742

-7425

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

Two.

Plate

Effects Type(s):

Plate

Delay Ranges:

N

/A.

Controller reverb.

Reverb /Echo

Parameters:

0.5 to

7 seconds, depending on size ordered.

Operational Controls: N/A.

Selected Standard Features: send;

"Brilliance" on three -band

EQ on each return; plate co' troller is a rack mounting, plate chamber is it inches deep.

Frequency Response

20 kHz, t4 dB.

(input output):

100

It/ to Accessit and

GBS

Reverbs

Inputs: One and two respectively.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s): Spring Reverb.

Delay Ranges:

N, A.

Reverb /Echo

Parameters:

2.5 seconds.

Operational Controls:

Accessit: mat< h: and sweep

EQ: GBS:

Mix: input match. input

Selected Standard Features: Accessit: spring tank.

Outboard

Frequency Response

Distortion:

N

/A.

(input /output):

N.

A.

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

N

/A.

Pro -User Price Range:

For

A(cesit:

$349: GBS: $715 additional information circle

#183

Distortion:

N

/A.

S/N Ratio

(input/output):

Better than -80 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$995 and up

For additional information circle

#182

CONNECTRONICS CORP.

652

Glenbrook

Road

Stamford,

CT 06906

Phone:

(203)

324

-2889

DELTA LAB

/ADS

One

Progress Way

Wilmington, MA

01887

Phone:

(617) 658 -5100

CE 1700

Inputs:

One.

Outputs:

One.

Effects Type(s):

NVM Compu Effectron

Programmable digital delay

"PART

OF

THE OVERALL

DIMENSION

OF

MY

COMPACT

DISC PROJECTS

HAS

BEEN

THE

RESULT OF THE

AN

-2"

Tom Jung,

President

Digital Music Products,

Inc.

"Recently,

I did a project,

Music for Christmas by Keith

Foley, with

9 synthesizers all

MIDI -interfaced together and fed into the console.

The

AN -2 really opened up the sound and spread it out

...

it sounded three dimensional and very interesting. Anybody that should have an AN -2.

I has have also used the AN -2 on a lot of guitars

-makes them sound great! useful as reverb itself!"

For the name of your local dealer call Studio Technolo- gies, Inc. at 312/676

-9177.

STUDIO a synthesizer

TECHNOLOGIES

INC.

rack

It's as

7250 NORTH CICERO AVENUE LINCOLNWOOD. ILLINOIS 60646

August

1985 R

-e'p

121

The

Direc tory

processor.

Delay Ranges:

0 to

1.724 se( ands

Reverb /Echo Parameters: delay: sweep: ratio: mis: setup: repeat:

;et end: plie

:

N 4.

Operational Controls:

Phase: by input: tedhac output: pass: k: store: recall: and numeric k 's pad.

Selected Standard Features: Built n; libran of effect, sample and trigger mode: "glitz h

-tree opera!, to trom one eftec

I to the nest

": real time

Insu r

..Ir.t;;

219 user locations: remote c,rpahili-

it..

\111)I interface: and touch control tror;t panel.

Frequency

Response

(input kHz. all delay settings.

/output):

2011/ to 20

Distortion:

0.2 "... maximum at

1 kHz.

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

Dynamic range 90 dB.

Pro -User Price Range: $999

Effectron

Ill ADM

1030/

Effectron

II

ADM

1024/

Effectron

I

ADM

1020

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

One.

I ffects Type(s): Programmable digital delay processor.

Delay Ranges: 1030: 0.25 to

1.024 seconds:

1024:

0.22 to 1.024 sec onds:

1020:

4 to

1.024 seconds.

Reeerh /Echo Parameters:

N

Controls: Units include: input. positiye'i egause leedhack.delay range. modu- lator. width. speed:

1030 includes: envelope. postie. negative mix, and write hanks

A

/D.

Selected Standard Features: kHz

Programmable:

17 bandwidth on all settings: all steel chassis: mutated stereo: optional footswit( h for

1030 and

1024.

Frequency Response

(input /output):

20 Hz to

17 kHz:

1020:

20 to

15 kHz.

Distortion:

0.2 maximum.

S'

N

Ratio

(input output):

Ds r.amit r,n:eo

90 tlf3

Model

The SCV

PC

80

-the

PC audio tool for the

80's.

80

Two small battery- powered units test phase integrity in any portion of an audio chain.

The transmitter unit generates a special "wide- band"

1

Hz tone. This signal is available at the

XLR output as an electrical signal, controllable from infinity to one volt. This allows testing of any system or unit, anywhere from the mic to the speaker. The signal also drives a built -in speaker for simple testing via the acoustical path.

The discriminator unit has both a built -in microphone and an input connector; phase integrity is indicated as either "In Phase" or "Reverse" on two LED's.

Simple, reliable and inexpensive, for the audio engineer. the

S.V.C. has become the true time saver

SCV

Inc.

414 North

Sparks Street

Pro

-User Price Range:

1030: $699: 1024: $499:

1020: $329

For additional information circle

#184

DOD

ELECTRONICS.

INC.

5639

Riley Lane

Salt

Lake City, UT 84107

Phone:

(801) 268

-8400

Model

R

-848

Inputs:

Ore.

Outputs: One.

Effects Type(s):

Res erberation.

Delay Ranges:

Pr

-delay:

20 to

60 ms.

Reverb /Echo Parameters: Resell) time:

2 seconds.

Operational Controls:

Pre

-delis:

(drive level: reverb time: tour contour presets: two -band quasi- parametric EQ: ar,d nuv ou1pu1 Ieyel.

Selected Standard Features:

Va iiable pre frequency contour presets: footsw itch lable: and reverb kill swill h.

Frequency Response

(input

/output):

-delay: control-

Wet:

5.6 kHz: dry:

20 kHz.

Distortion:

N A.

S/N Ratio

(input

/output):

Better that; -72 dli.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$399.95

Model

RDS-

900/1900

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

Three.

Effects Type(s):

Digital tlanging. chorus: dou- bling: and oc ho.

Delay Ranges:

1.5 to

14 ms:

6 ms: and

100 to

900 ros.

Reverb /Echo Parameters: N

/A.

Operational Controls: Speed: time: repeat: hold: feedback: mix: output level: input

Icy el: and efte( t ott

Selected Standard Features: f label delay: kill and repeat to ootswitch c hold control input: and dry output.

Frequency

Response

(input kHz; dry:

20 kHz.

Distortion:

N

1.

55 ms: width: functions:

/output):

50 to

(delay outrol-

VCO

Wet:

470

5.6

Burbank,

CA

91506

818

-843 -7567

S/N

(input

-90 dB (Irv.

/output):

Better than.

-85 d8 wet. and

Pro

-User Price Range: 900:

5295.95:

1900:

$299.95

Model

RDS -3600

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

Three.

Effects Type(s): bling. and e( ho.

Digital flanging. chorus. dou-

Delay Ranges: 1.5 ms:

200 to

14 ms:

6 to

55 ms:

50 to

450 nn to

1.800 seconds. 400 ms to

3.600 seconds: and

800 ms to

7.200 seconds.

Reverb /Echo Parameters: N- A.

Operational Controls:

Speed: time: repeat: hold: feedback: mis: output level: input level: and effect or, label delan

:

/oft. width:

Selected Standard Features: Footswitc h c kill ar;d repeat hold tune Lions: delay or;rrol-

\

CO control input: and do output.

Frequency Response

(input

/output):

40 to

15 kHz. at

1.800 sot onds:

40 Hz to

7.5 k

I

Iz and 40 Hz to

3.7 kHz at extended delay ranges.

Distortion:

N A.

5

N

Ratio

(input/output):

Better that; -85 dB

,.set: and -90 dn.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$399.95

For additional information circle

#185

U.S.

EMT -FRANZ

Distributor: Gotham Audio Corp.

741

Washington Street

New York. NY 10014

Phone:

(212) 741 -7511

EMT 251/252

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s): Reverb: echo: chorus: and deLrg

Delay Ranges: 0 to

440 ms.

Reverb /Echo

Parameters: Variable. 0.4 to

18 onds.

Operational Controls:

Reeerh time: reflectim; amplitude and time delay: and high. mid. and low reverb contour.

Selected Standard Features:

251: floor standing vital reverb with LCD parameter display:

252: kniount processor with remote control panel

.u.d

128

I memories. requency

Response

(input kllz.

/output):

30

Hz to

15

Distortion:

N

A.

S

N

Ratio

(input

/output):

252: heuer that; -75:

21 better than -73 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range: 251'252: 516.5000: 252:

$16.5000

EMT 245

Inputs: One.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s):

Digital reverb.

Delay Ranges:

0 to

84 ms.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

Variable.

0.4 to

4. r owls. operational

Controls: Deals

: reflection ampli- tude: reverb time:

El

'HF reverb optional

10

-memos remote control.

Selected Standard Features: contour: art)

Rackmow;t edigit.il res erh.

Frequency Response

(input

/output):

30

Hz to tr kHz.

Distortion:

N A.

S

N ratio (input

/output):

Better than -68

(113

Pro -User Price Range: $10.145

EMT 240

Inputs: Two.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s):

Gold foil reverb unit.

Delay Ranges: N

/A.

Reverb

/Echo Parameters:

Variable,

0.8 to

5 seconds.

Operational Controls: Reverb time and lo- treduenry roll -off.

Selected Standard Features:

Gold foil driver. with two (Iris ers and two pick -ups. frequency

Response

(input /output):

50

Hz to

15 kHz.

Distortion:

N

/A.

S/N ratio (input

/output):

Better that; -65 dB

Pro -User Price Range: $8.815

For additional information circle #186

E{ r p

122 O

August

1985

EVENTIDE. INC.

One

Alsan Way

Little

Ferry.

NJ 07643

Phone:

(201) 641 -1200

Model

SP2016

Inputs:

Two.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s):

Digital signal processor/ reverb.

Delay Ranges:

0 to

3.2 seconds to

1.6 seconds at toll handwidthl.

Reverb /Echo

Parametr decay time room simulated plate and room reverbs adjustable parameters: alphanumeric display and self test.

,:

posit.,,;:

Lero to wall

"hr,, texture: ir,om size; hi and low feedback all are

EQ controls: pre -delay: and program dependent).

Operational Controls:

Dual input dry /effect mix faders: status

/output and mode indicators: ontrol modes: select /adjust sliders: optional user- development system (SPUD) allows user to rlesign custom programs with external compu-

'er; optional hand

-held remote control.

Selected Standard Features:

65 presets for cus- utm setting: loop edit:

Hanger; multitap delay:

- all of with

Frequency

Response

(input kHz.

/output):

20

Hz to

10(

Distortion:

THD at

1 kHz, less than

0.1

",.;

0 s s.

Ratio

(input /output):

Dynamic range is rte

8.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$6.895

Model

H949

Harmonizer

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s): h. cr

; deli'. and flange c

Delay Ranges:

0 to .393.75 ms in

6.25

-ms step.

Reverb /Echo ontrol.

Parameters: Feedback and delay

Operational Controls: Input level repeat and hold button; control: feedback control for both main and delay outputs only; and pitch ontrol.

Selected Standard Features: Pitch change of one ctave up. or two octaves down; frequency out- puts for controlir;g tape machine motors; and lime compression.

I h requency

Response

(input

Hz. t1 dB.

/output):

Distortion:

Less than

0.15 at

S/N Ratio (input

Pro

-User Price Range:

$3.500

1 kHz.

20

Hz to

15

/output):

96 dB dynamic range.

I

Model

H910

Harmonizer

Inputs:

Or;e.

Outputs:

Two. ffects Type(s): Pitch

Delay Ranges:

0 to 112.5 ms it;

7.5 -ms steps.

Reverb /Echo n;trol. change; delay; and echo.

Parameters: feedback and delay

Operational Controls: Input. feedback. anti- feedback ,and pitch change controls: delay; line

/out.

I

Selected Standard Features: Second delay

-only nrtput to

82.5 ms). requency

Response

(input /output):

20

Hz to

12

Hz,

11 dB.

Distortion:

Less than

0.2

".. at

1 kHz.

S/N Ratio

(input

/output):

90

Pro

-User Price Range:

$1.500 dB dynamic range.

Model

FL201

Instant Hanger

Inputs:

Or;e.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s): Hanger.

Delay Ranges:

200 try sell. microseconds to

10 ms

/Echo

Parameters: N/

A.

(f,+

in the last year

I've

done projects

in LA.

and

Detroit. Currently,

I'm working

in

the

CBS

bay area for

Records"Yemans."

On

every occasion,

I've

needed to

rent

gear from Digital Dispatch and the equipment arrived on time... and

in

working order...A

very

professional

service..:'

Chris

Minto /Recording Engineer

Credits Pat Benotar Santana

Currently wnrkrn9 on Lemons for

CBS

Re,-:

. the

Bay area

JOHN

"We

can help you

Service

your Accounts"

MOLINO

-

General Manager

MICHAEL

MAY

-

Operations Manager

(213) 664

-FAST

(818) 952

-FAST

(714) 662

-FAST

OUTSIDE

CALIFORNIA

(800) 446

-FAST

DIGITAL DISPATCH 3917 Riverside Drive, Suite

101,

Burbank, CA91505

August

1985

R -e

/p

123

The Direc tory

Operational Controls:

Line in/out switch: depth: oscillator; phase shill and envelope follower.

Selected Standard Features: Remote capabilits

: and effect. control dual outputs for pseudo stereo

Frequency Response

(input

/output):

50

Hz to

15 kHz. t1 dB.

Distortion: Direct channel: less than

0.05 %, delayed channel: less than

1

"...

S/N Ratio

(input

/output):

85 dB dynamic range.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$700

Models 11193/CD254

Inputs:

Me.

Outputs:

Two and four. respectively.

Lffects Type(s): Delay lines.

Delay Ranges:

11193:

510 ms standard. optional one- or two -second versions:

CD254:

254 ms.

(Both units

Reverb adjustable in

2

-ms steps.)

/Echo Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational Controls:

11193 has front -panel

DIP switches: CD254 has internal switch selector.

Selected Standard Features: N A.

Frequency Response

(input

/output):

50

Hz to

11 kHz.

+0.5 dB.

Distortion:

Less that:

0.15"...

S/N Ratio

(input

/output):

90 dB dynamic range.

Pro -User Price Range:

1(193: $1.195 to

$1.495:

CD254:

$895

For additional information circle

#187

FOSTEX

RECORDING CORP.

15431

Blackburn Avenue

Norwalk, CA

90650

Phone:

(213)

921

-1112

Model

3180

Inputs:

Two.

Outputs:

Four.

Effects Type(s): Two -channel reverb.

Delay Ranges:

24 ms pre -delay.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

RT of three seconds referenced at

1 kHz.

Operational Controls: Separate it

;put, dry and reverb for each channel: input mix switch.

Selected Standard

Features: Two channels with stereo out for each channel: input limiters: over- load indicators: delay matrix provides pre -delay for six

-sprit

;g system.

Frequency

Response

(input /output):

20 Hz to

20 kHz.

Distortion:

N

/A.

5/N

Ratio

(input /output):

Dry: better than -80 dB ut ur:weighted: reverb: better than -58 dB

;weighted

.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$400

Model

3050

Inputs: One.

Outputs: One.

Effects Type(s):

Digital delay.

Delay Ranges: 0.13 to

270 ms.

Reverb

/Echo Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational Controls: Input level: delay range multiplier

(10 steps); speed arid depth modula- tion controls; separate dry and reverb send; output control; delay phase reverse switch.

Selected Standard Features: Eight

-bit encode

- decode with compander circuitry to minimize flange sweep noise; parallel foldback and auxil- iary output connections; for

VC delay; voltage limit/normal

Frequency Response

(input control input

/present indicator.

/output):

20 Hz to

20 kHz.

Distortion:

Delay THD 0.5 "...

S/N Ratio

(input

/output):

Better than -80 dB.

Pro -User Price Range: $400

For additional information circle #188

FURMAN SOUND,

INC.

30

Rich Street

Greenbrea, CA 94904

Phone:

(415) 927 -1225

Model

RV -1

Inputs: One.

Outputs: One.

Effects Type(s): Spring reverb.

Delay Ranges:

N

/A.

Reverb

/Echo Parameters:

Pre

-delay ranges of

33. 37. and

41 ms.

Operational Controls:

Semi

-parametric

11,

1,

EQ: shelving treble EQ: two output level cut. trots (wet

/dry): ground lift: and input level control.

Selected Standard Features: and

Input limiter: high -level inputs; and footswitch jack.

Frequency Response

(input

/output): loss

Direct:

21)

-0.5/

+O dB: reverb:

45

Hz to7 kH/

-

Hz to

20 kHz, with closely spaced peaks and dips.

Distortion: Direct: less than 0.01'...

S/N Ratio

-109 dB;

(input

/output): reverb:

-85 dB.

Direct: better that.

Pro

-User Price Range:

For

Mono:

$321:

Stereo:

$53', additional information circle

#189

IBANEZ

U.S.

Distributors: Hoshino

USA and Chesebro Music Co.

1716

Winchester Road

Bensalem, PA 19020

Phone:

(215) 638 -8670

DM1100 Digital Delay

Inputs: Two.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s): Time delay and unmodulated). effects (modulated

Y

N

E

W

AvHORIZ

Ep

ICE

NEK

ES

RENIAIS

FAGR

D

y

I

HNEINA

EGA

ACCESSORIES

TECH

IIBAI1ERIES1

SoNy i pRA110N

PE1E

CA

cow

GOAS

WAv

1N

TER

CHIN

ANDY ST

JOE2121516-1662

GALL

CELLULAR

1Fo3M

10 Mae.

.y.tereeesa-us 1841

BROADWAY

7

?7

1'1'x,

Delay Ranges:

7 ms to 3.600 seconds.

Reverb

/Echo Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational Controls:

Input level; delay- tone. delay time; modulation width and speed: feed- back; dry and delay levels.

Selected Standard Features:

Mike switching: normal and inserted outputs; and repeat -hold capabilities.

/line level frequency

Response

(input

/output):

Delay:

30

Hz to

8 kHz, - 3/

+0.5 dB.

Distortion: THD less than

1% on all ranges.

S/N Ratio

(input

/output):

EIN: -95 dB (IHF -A).

Pro -User Price Range:

$329

DM2000

Digital

Delay

Inputs: Two.

Outputs: Four.

Effects Type(s): Time delay and unmodulated). effects (modulated

Delay Ranges:

0.1 ms to 2.047 seconds.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational Controls: Input level; delay EQ: delay time; modulation speed and width: feed- back; dry and delay levels; and preset select.

Selected Standard Features: Eight presets; remote switching; normal arid inverted outputs; repeat -hold capabilities.

Frequency Response

(input

Hz to

20 kHz,

- 3/ +0.5 dB.

/output): Delay:

Distortion: THD less than 0.2 on all ranges.

10

S/N Ratio

(input /output): EIN: -95 dBv (IHF -A).

Pro -User Price Range: $449

HD1500

Inputs: Two.

Harmonics

/Delay

Outputs: Three.

Effects Type(s): Pitch shift arid

Delay Ranges:

0 time delay. to

504 ms; shift range: +1300 to

-1300 cents.

R

-e

/p

124

D

August

1985

I requenc+ Resprmse

(inputs output):

20 Hz to

12

Reverb /Echo

Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational Controls: Input level; delay

EQ; delay, time; modulation speed and back; dry and delay levels. width; feed- unweighted.

Pro -User Price Range:

$1.500 to

$3.000

For additional information circle

#191

Distortion: u

O i

S/N Ratio

For

(input /output):

Better than

-85 dB.

Pro -User Price Range:

$5.500 additional information circle

#192

e

ty

e e e e e

r,

KLARK -TEKNIK,

262a Eastern

INC.

Parkway

Farmingdale,

NY

11735

Phone:

(516) 249 -3660

LEXICON, INC

60

Turner

Street

Models

DN700/701

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

Three.

Effects Type(s):

N

/A.

Delay Ranges:

0 respectively. to

434 ms: and

0 to

1.7 seconds,

Waltham,

Inputs: One

Outputs:

One.

MA

02154

Phone:

(617)

891

-6790

Model

PCM

-41

Selected Standard Features: switching; dry and mix outputs; three preset shifts; with optional remote (ootswitch.

Frequency

Response

(input

Hz to

8 kHz. referenced at

Mike

/line

/output): level

Delay:

30 land

4 kHz; harmon- ics:

30

Hz to

8 kHz.

Distortion:

THD less than

1'X, on all ranges.

S/N Ratio (input

/output):

EQ input noise: -93 dBv (IHF -A).

Pro

-User Price Range:

For additional

$559 information circle

#190

Reverb /Echo

Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational Controls: Input level; indepertdern delay control per channel.

Selected Standard

Features: Electronic safe switch;

LED readout; and headroom indicator. frequency

Response (input

/output):

20

Hz to

15 kHz.

Effects Type(s): to

200 ms at f ull

Digital delay.

Delay Ranges: Delay

#1

,tt range: normal delay bandwidth, double delay, 400

6kHz: delay, #2 range: normal delay o of re

400 in lull bands

+ulth. double delay

800 ms at

6 kHi.

INDUSTRIAL

RESEARCH

_

C

_..

_.

CO

s

3

PRODUCTS, INC.

Distortion:

0.01",,.

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

Better than -85 dB.

Pro -User Price Range:

700: $1.295; 701: $1.795

321

Bond Street _TT?7T a#

Elk Grove Village,

IL

60007

Models

DN780

."

P

Outputs: Up to four.

Delay Ranges: increments.

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s): Digital reverb -hall: plate: chamber: room; and gated.

Phone:

(312) 439 -3600

Effects Type(s):

Model

DF -4015

Digital decay.

Zero to

192 ms. in

3

-ms

Delay Ranges:

Pre

-delay

0 to

99 ms;

RT zero to

99 seconds.

Reverb /Echo Parameters: Pre-delay; early reflections- pattern: and level.

Operational Controls:

HF and

LF equalization:

Operational Controls: Input: feedback: output nix; delay multiply;

VCO depth. waveform. and rate; delay select and range; feedback filters and invert: infinite repeat.

Frequency Response

(input /output): kHz.

+0

-1 dB in

#1 delay mode.

20

Hz to

15

Distortion:

0.17.. typical over bandpass

20 Hz to

15 kHz.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

N wheel switches.

/A.

Operational

Controls: Input level; and thumb-

Selected Standard Features: Red and green clip- ping

LEDs; transformer balanced in and out; security panel.

1

e

_

S/N Ratio

(input than, 90

/output):

Dynamic range better dB,

20

Hz to

20 kHz.

Price Range: $715 vss.3 a

..

"

..

ss

r

MI

MD

MAW

LnJ

Frequency kHz,

±2 dB.

Response

(input/output):

12

Hz to

15

Distortion:

Less that

0.012

"s.

S/N Ratio (input at

1 kHz,

+4 dBm.

/output):

Better than -90 dB

THE y' room size; input; and reverb time.

Selected Standard Features: Remote control;

16 program sequencing;

50 user memories; and five special effects.

Model

PCM

-42

Inputs:

One.

Outputs:

One. tffects

Type(s):

Digital delay line.

Delay Ranges: Standard memory

16 kHz mode: ti

5 is

400 ms

0.5 is

800 and

1.5 is 1.2 seconds:

6 kHz m. and

1.5 is 2.4 seconds. mode:

EDGE

3-

In

pro-

audio, the edge is a

combination of

talent and technology.

Dql

DIGITAL

REVERB SYSTEM

FULL 16.811

TECHNOLOGY /1410íz

BANDWIDTH

FULL

R NCTION

REMOTE CONTROL INCLUDED

OVER 100

PRESETS/USER

PROGRAMMABLE

FULL

MIDI

CAPABILITY

STEREO IN

/OUT MIX CONTROL

SOFTWARE BASED /UPDATEABLE

Full

Function

Remote Control

01A DIGITAL

REVERE

0R2

DIGITAL

REVERE

Our brand new software based

DR1

Digital

Reverb has 16-bit technology and

14KHz bandwidth, giving you wide dynamic range and frequency response.

This range and response result in high definition performance.

Couple this technology with the convenience of full function remote control, over 100 user presets and full MIDI capability.

Add your talent and you've got the edge in high definition.

And that's not all. We've several steps gone beyond by providing stereo in and out with full mix control and our famous

FIR programs so that all the sound you're looking for can be realized.

There's one more thing. Our powerful software is

That updateable. means when you buy a

DR1 today, you won't lose your edge tomorrow.

/RE

Applied Research

&

Technology Inc.

215

Tremont

Street

Rochester, New

York

14608

(716) 436 -2720

2/3

OCTAVE EQUALIZER

PITCH TRANSPOSER PACKAGE

1500 DIGITAL DELAY 1/3

OCTAVE EOUAUZER

DR1 DIGITAL

REVERE

August

1985

R.e'p

125

For additional information circle

#87

The Directory

Reverb

/Echo Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational Controls: Input: feedback; high cut: output mix: modulation;; VCO sweep, depth. waveform. and rate: clock indicator;

6 kHz bandwidth indicator: and

Selected Standard Features: Slap echo: long echo: doubling; infinite repeat. echo: ambient flanging: reson- ance: vibrato: pitch shifting: and clock output.

Frequency

Response

(input

/output):

20

Hz to

16 k

Hz.

+0.5

-3 dB in: first delay mode.

Distortion: 0.2.. typical over

Bandpass

20 Hz to

15 kHz.

N

I.

Ratio

90

(input

/output):

Dynamic dB.

20 Hz to

20 kHz. range better

Pro

-User Price Range:

2.4 second delay:

$1.000:

4.8 second delay:

$1.235

Model

95

Prime Time

I1

Inputs: One

(plus one auxiliary).

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s): Digital delay processor.

Delay Ranges: Standard

1.92 seconds: memory

960 ms; double full memory option in: normal mode

3.8 seconds; in double mode

7.68 seconds.

Reverb

/Echo

Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational Controls:

Two separate dry con- trols: delay modulation depth. shape. and rate: infinite repeat; dynamic recirculation: input level;

A and

B feedback; feedback mix: master output. filter output

Selected Standard Features: tion: doubling: resonance: clock

Dynamic recircula- tripling: chorus; flanging: output; slap echo: long echo.

Frequency

Response

(input kHz. +0.5/ -2 dB.

/output):

20

Hz to

16

Distortion:

0.1'2, maximum,

20 Hz to

10 kHz.

S/N Ratio al.

20

Hz

(input

/output): to

20 kHz.

Better than -90 typi-

Pro -User Price Range: $1.980

Model

97

Super Prime Time

Inputs: One

(plus one auxiliary).

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s):

Digital delay processor.

Delay Ranges: Standard memory:

0.2 to

640 ms.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

N 4

Inputs: Two.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s):

Digital reverb.

Delay Ranges:

0.1 to

99 seconds. plus reverb. infinite

Reverb /Echo Parameters: Room size: reverb time: pre delay: and frequency contour.

Operational Controls: Input levels; output mix: input and output mute.

Selected Standard Features:

Six standard pro- grams with registers.

54 variations. plus

10 user storage

Frequency Response (input kHz. i1 dB.

Distortion:

0.07".,. maximum at

1 kHz.

S/N Ratio

(input

/output):

/output):

20

Hz to

Better than -84 dB.

10

20

Hz to

20 kHz.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$4.800

Model

224X1

Inputs: Two.

Outputs: Four.

Effects Type(s):

Digital reverb /effects processor.

Delay Ranges:

0.1 ms to

1.96 seconds effects pro- gram;

0.1 to

70 seconds plus infinite reverb on reverb programs.

Reverb /Echo Parameters: Three tape speeds with

VSO: internal adjustment of

HF

EQ curve and bias; choice (blend) of even or odd har- monic dominance at tape saturation for each tape speed.

Operational Controls: Tape speed and

VSO.

Selected Standard Features: Tape slap for

"golden ears" effect.

Frequency

Response

(input kHz.

/output):

15

Hz to

15

Distortion:

As per over -bias and flux settings.

S/N Ratio (input

/output):

Better than -102

Pro

-User Price Range:

$1,295 dB.

5402 Time

Modulator

Inputs: One.

Outputs: One

One.

Effects Type(s): Positive

/negative flange; ADT: vibrato: pitch detune: echo; delay: vocoder effects: resonant drum tuning: plus combina- tions of above.

Delay Ranges:

150

Reverb microseconds to

400 ms.

/Echo

Parameters:

Six delay ranges in combination with mix -sweepable time, with no quantization steps.

Operational Controls:

Dry feed: three positive and negative output taps; level control: feed- back: time, depth, and speed modulation: waveform.

Selected Standard Features:

Modulation input: full multi

-tap output mixing;

2000 to

1 delay range sweep continue: total analog signal path for no digital distortion.

Frequency Response (input

20

Hz to

15 kHz.

/output): Bandwidth

Distortion:

N

S/N Ratio

/A.

(input

/output):

Better than -90 dB.

Pro -User Price Range: $1,995

For additional information circle

#194

Reverb /Echo Parameters: Over

32 user adjusta- ble parameters.

Operational Controls:

LARC

(Lexicon Alpha- numeric Remote Control). fully programmable.

Selected Standard Features: ing

Alphanumeric list- more than

60 reverb and effects variations.

Frequency Response (input kHz. t1.5 dB.

/output):

20 Hz to

15

Distortion:

0.07 ".., maximum for all reverb times between

0 and

35 seconds.

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

Better than -84 dB.

20

Hz

10 to

20 kHz for all reverb times between

0 and seconds.

Pro -User Price Range:

$12.500

For additional information circle

#193

Operational Controls:

Delay modulation depth. shape, and rate; main and auxiliary levels; delay output mix: recirculation controls with filter.

Selected Standard Features: Flanging: resonant

Clanging; doubling: tripling; chorus; slap echo: short echo; long echo; and

32 user registers.

Frequency

Response

(input

S/N Ratio (input

Hz to

20 kHz.

/output): kHz. +1/ -2 dB.

Distortion:

0.05'%. maximum at

1 kHz.

20

Hz to

20

/output):

Better than -85 dB,

20

Pro -User Price Range: $3.170

Model

PCM

-60

Inputs: One.

Outputs: Tyo

Effects Type(s): Digital reverb.

Delay Ranges: Room plate program

0.3 to

3.8 seconds: program

0.2 to

4.5 seconds.

Reverb /Echo Parameters: Two programs: four sizes: four reverb times; and frequency contours.

Operational Controls: Input level: mix control; output control; input and output level range select; and bypass.

Selected Standard Features: Plate

/room pro- grams with various sizes and reverb times.

Frequency Response kHz,

±1 dB.

(input /output):

20

Hz to

10

Distortion:

Better than or equal to

0.05'2,, maxi- mum at

1 kHz.

S/N Ratio (input

/output):

Better than -80 dB,

Hz to

20 kHz.

Pro-User Price Range:

$1.500

20

Model

200

MARSHALL ELECTRONIC

P.O. Box 438

Brooklandville, MD

21022

Phone: (301) 484 -2220

Model

AES -357

Inputs: Two.

Outputs:

Four.

Effects Type(s):

Ambience effects system: room simulation. stereo synthesis. and reverb pro- cessing.

Delay Ranges:

35 seconds." microseconds to "several

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

3.000 program loca- tions;

132 reflections. output taps:

Operational Controls: Room size; room shape: ambience; stereo spread: density; "image type." up to

1,200 width: depth: initial echo

Selected Standard Features: 100 types image of stereo generation with

1,000 programs:

100 room -shape size combinations of room simula- tion and ambience generation;

100 post- reverb processor images;

RS232 interface.

Frequency Response

(input kHz.

/output):

20

Hz to

20

Distortion:

N

S/N Ratio

/A.

(input /output):

Better than -95 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$2.995

AR -300 Tape

Eliminator

Inputs: One.

Outputs: One.

Effects Type(s): tape recorder

"Replicates the without the sound of noise." a quaity

Delay Ranges: ips:

40

Interhead delay

20 to

75 ms at 30 to

150 at 15 ips; and

80 to 300msat 7.5 ips.

NEPTUNE ELECTRONICS,

934 N.E.

25th Street

Portland, OR

97232

Phone:

(503) 232 -4445

INC.

Model

351

Inputs: One.

Outputs: One.

Effects Type(s): Spring reverb.

Delay Ranges: Variable.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational

Controls: Input gain; output level; five -band graphic

EQ: in

/out switching: mute: ar:d signal activated reverb.

Selected Standard Features: Signal activated reverb helps eliminate howling and spring slap due to external vibrations.

Frequency

Response

(input

/output):

Direct:

20

Hz to

14 kHz.

S/N Ratio

Pro

-User Price Range:

$375

For

(input

/output): additional

Better than -80 dB. information circle

#195

ORBAN

ASSOCIATES,

INC.

San

645

Bryant Street

Francisco, CA

94107

Phone:

(415) 957 -1067

Model

1118

Inputs:

Two.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s): Spring revert).

Delay Ranges:

N

Reverb

/A.

/Echo

Parameters: N

/A.

Operational Controls: Input bass and midrange;

EQ

/output controls; fixed threshold peak limiter. attenuators; and floating/

-

Selected Standard Features: Two independent channels; peak limiter to protect springs from transients;

EQ controls to tailor frequency response.

Frequency Response

(input

/output):

25

Hz to

16 kHz.

Distortion:

N

S/N Ratio

/A.

(input

/output):

Better than -76 dB.

Pro -User Price Range:

$899

For additional information circle

#196

H

-e p 126

August

1985

PHOENIX

AUDIO

LAB,

91 Elm

Street

ANC.

Manchester,

CT 06040

Phone:

(203) 649

-1199

Loft Model

450

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s): Delay

/flanker.

Delay Ranges:

160 to

360 ms.

Reverb

/Echo

Parameters:

N

/A.

Operational Controls:

Reverb indicators. iclnti. output: regeneration

(EQ shift l: ar id

LID

Selected Standard Features: Muscial instrument pre -amp: fear -panel

XLR foot pedal lack: lark and connectors or: inputs and outputs: rack mountable.

Frequency Response (input /output):

Distortion:

Flange is

0.2'..: delay

0.8

"...

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

N

/A.

Better than -80 dB.

4- weighted.

Pro -User Price Range:

$399 to

$549.

For additional information circle

#198

PUBLISON

AMERICA, INC.

6464 Sunset Blvd. Suite #980

Hollywood,

CA

90028

Phone:

(213) 460 -6355

Infernal Machine

90

Inputs:

Two

Outputs:

Four.

Effects Type(s): Reverberation.:

.i pitch change: rd time compression on two separate channels.

Delay Ranges:

0.04 ms to

200 seconds.

Reverb

/Echo

Parameters:

Volume: bass; dual treble coefficients: three primary reflections it; delay and gain,.

Operational Controls: Controlled by digital keyboard.

Selected Standard Features: Two entirely inde- pendent stereo reserber charn.eis: two pit( h changes: two

20- second memory for parameters:

MIDI interface.

:

200 memories

Frequency

Response

(input kHz.

/output):

20

Hz to

20

Distortion:

THD less that: 0.03 "...

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

Dvr:amic range:

96 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$10.900

For additional information circle

#199

QUANTEC

U.S.

U.S.

Distributor:

Europa

1638

Technologies

West

Washington

Blvd.

Venice, CA

90291

Phone:

(213) 392 -4985

Models

QRS & QRS

/L

Inputs: Two and one. respectively.

Outputs:

Four and two. respectisely.

Effects Type(s): Digital Room Simulator.

Delay Ranges:

0.1 to

100 seconds at 40

Hz

I. second' (up to

400

Reverb /Echo Parameters: Room site:

1 separate

HF and

LE

RT 60 times: to one million cubic meters.

Operational Controls:

Room size: level and delay for first reflection.: and enhance and freeze program (loop).

Selected Standard Features:

LED bargraph:

XLR connectors: grammable memories: optional infrared remote controller infinite and

Frequency

Response

(input kHz. +1/ -3 dB.

IL rotary

Cooper control pot:

MIDI interface.

/output):

20

64

Hz pro- to

8

Distortion:

N

S/N Ratio

/A.

(input /output):

Better than -88 dB.

CetelmatiOh*

-

gam mm, mow

moliw}___

2àcIiet

I

n1984 AMS

was honoured to receive England's highest award to industry

-

Her Majesty the

Queen's Award

for

Export Achievement.

To

be one of the handful of companies to win this award

is a

great honour.

To

win the

Award again in

1985 is

exceptional.

To

celebrate this

fact

,

each of the next

100 AMS

digital audio processors shipped to

America (serial numbers

3500 to

3600)

will come complete with

a

celebration

"Leading the

World" quilted satin tour jacket bearing both

AMS

and the dual Queen's Award

logos.

Check with your local dealer now.

cftt the

'Jacket!

ADVANCED MUSIC

SYSTEMS

(A division of

AMS

Industries plc)

Wallstreams

Lane.

Worsthorne. Burnley.

Lancs.

BB103PP

England

Tel: (0282) 57011

Telex: 63108 AMSG

1984

...

DEALER

INFORMATION

HARRIS SOUND

SERVICES

6640 Sunset Blvd..

Seite

110.

Hollywood.

1985

CA 90028 U.S.A.

Tek (800) 233 1580 or

Tel (213)469 -3500

Jackets offered on a first come, first served basis and subject to availability.

August

198

R -e p 127

The Directory

Pro

-User Price Range: QRS: $7.995:

QRS

$4.495

For additional information circle

#200

I

RANE CORP.

6510 216th 5W Street

Mountlake

Terrace, WA

98043

Phone:

(206) 774 -7309

Model

CD 48

Inputs:

Iuur.

Outputs:

Four.

Effects Type(s): Analog delay.

Delay Ranges:

0 to

8 ms. continuously sariable.

a

`

_

'

ROLAND

CORP.

7200

Dominion Circle

Los

Angeles, CA 90040

Phone:

(213) 685 -5141

SDE2500

..

Reverb

/Echo

Parameters:

N/A.

Operational Controls:

Each channel has a

0 to

2

Ins control and three pushbuttons for

+2 ms each

Selected Standard Features:

For phase of multissay speaker

,,stem.

Frequency Response

(input /output): aIiginierrt

20

Hz to

20 kHz,

±1 dB.

Distortion:

Less that,

0.09

S/N Ratio

Pro

For

(input additional

",

/output):

-User Price Range:

$349 at

106

+4 dB information dßm. at +20 circle

((Bill.

#201

Inputs:

Three.

Outputs:

I fight.

I fleets Type(s):

MIDI programmable digital

.telay.

Delay Ranges:

0 to

750 ms.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

15 hit

A. seater.

D/A cor.-

Operational Controls: Input gain: delay: modo-

Iation irate 'depth): memory; delay time write- copy: program char:tWI.

Selected Standard Features: 64

MIDI positions.

Frequency Response (input kHz programs:

128

/output):

10 Hz to

17

Distortion: Direct:

0.008

",

: delay:

0.05

"..

S,'N Ratio

(input/output):

Better than -96 dB.

Pro -User Price Range:

$795

SRV2000

Inputs:

Two.

Outputs:

Three.

Effects Type(s): resell).

MIDI programmable digital

Delay Ranges: Reverb pre-delay

0 to

300 ms. tinte:

0.1 to

99.9 seconds:

Reverb /Echo Parameters: First initial response

IFIRI: pre -delay.

Operational Controls: Input gain:

MIDI: memory cumber.

EQ: manual

[Q: pre-delay revert) time:

HF damp: copy ss r iu: room size.

-

Selected Standard Features:

MIDI bar

Frequency

Response

(

Distortion: N'A.

S/N Ratio (input

:.rr.dMIDIir

/output): that.

Better than -80 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$1.495

I

IR:

32 programs:

:relselectable input/output):

N. A.

SDE3000

Inputs: Four.

Outputs:

I ight.

Effects Type(s): delay.

MIDI programmable digital

Delay Ranges:

0 ins to

4.5 seconds.

Reverb /Echo Parameters: All front -panel c01:- trots programmable.

Operational Controls: Input gain: MIDI: memory x8: filter: x2: phase: modulation: feed- kit

Is phase: delay output: rate: depth: time.

Selected Standard Features: Feedback effect loop: "playmate

": modulation

CV it.: remote delay swltt hir:g.

Frequency Response

(input

/output):

10

Hz to

17 kHz.

Distortion:

0.008

S/N Ratio

(input

".

/output):

Better than:

-88 dB.

Pro -User Price Range:

$1.095

SDE1000

Inputs: Two.

Outputs:

Sis.

Effects Type(s):

Digital delas.

Delay Ranges:

0 ms to

1.125 seconds.

Reverb /Echo Parameters: Four programs.

Operational Controls: Input gain: teedback: delay out: modulation: time

( lelas phase: memory.

Selected Standard Features:

User program

- citable: riot; tes t

" playmate- and hold features: modula

- input.

Frequency Response

(input /output):

10 Hz to

17 kHz.

Distortion:

0.08

".,

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

Better than -80 dB.

Pro -User Price Range:

$499

SPE1000

Inputs: Three.

Outputs:

Se ua.

Effects Type(s):

Digital delay.

Delay Ranges:

0 to

640 ms.

Reverb

/Echo

Parameters:

0 to

10 ms in

0.10 -ms teps: abose

10 ms ira

1 ms steps.

Operational Controls: kaput gain: feedback: single repeat switch: delay delay x2: and modulation. out: phase invert:

Selected Standard Features: Rack input gain: features for mour :t: +12dB doubling delay time.

Frequency Response (input

/output):

10

Hz to

16 kHz.

Distortion:

0.05

S/N Ratio

(input

"

/output):

Better than:

-112 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$1.295

For additional information circle

#202

The

Aphex Compellor:

Invisible

Compression in

Stereo or

Mono.

The Aphex Compellor is the most

acclaimed compressor

/leveler

/peak

limiter ever made. With

good reason...

you

add

simply can't hear it work.

It

doesn't any color

or other sonic effects. Best of all, the

Compellor

is easy to use. Set it

once

and it

goes

to work

automatically..

inaudibly controlling your dynamics.

Ask your professional sound dealer for a

demonstration

of the remarkable

Aphex

Compellor. Available in monaural and stereo versions. Or write us for the name of your nearest

dealer

and more infor- mation on the full line of innovative

Aphex products.

Aphex Systems

Ltd.

ice

13340 Saticoy

St., N.

Hollywood, California 91605

(818) 765 -2212 TWX: 910

-321

-5762

Compellor is a trademark of Aphex Systems

Ltd.

R-e p

12r+

August

1985

For additional information circle

#89 c

1985 Aphex Systems Ltd

414

SCV,

INC.

No

SC Sparks Street

Burbank, CA

91506

Phone:

(818) 843 -7567

Model

RBS2

Inputs: l yvrr.

Outputs:

I\\u

Effects Type(s): Spring

Delay Ranges:

Ni

A. rover:.

Reverb /Echo Parameters: Delay time

3.5 seconds; first reflection:

30 ms.

L

7

-

']

'17

:

.

77.

`

R, dr'ri

Iy," rir'l''

Delay Ranges:

Mode

1:

(

Ii ii

'I ore and two has

0 to

999 has

0 to

999 nn it

1 ms steps:

499 Ins nt. n;

I

-nts steps: mode

2: channel one it;

1

-ms steps. channel two has

° to

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

REVERB: 0 to

9.9 seconds. in

O.1- second steps: earl reflection; level of

0.1 to 0.9 in 0.1- steps: pre -delay

0 to

255 ms in

1

-ms steps; sub- reverb level

0.1 to

0.9 in; a

0.1- steps. delay

0 to

255 ms it;

1

-ms steps: ECHO: e( ho

-1 teedbac k factor

0 to

1.9 it 0.1

-steps for hannels land

2: echo -20 to

999 ms it;

1

-ms steps for channel one. and

0 to

499 ms to

1

-ms steps for channel two.

Operational Controls: Touch keys: direct access with numeric al keypad:

LED displays: and head- room indicator.

Selected Standard Features: Non -volatile user memory tor

10 programs: one parameter memory, tor each master program: and eight lac tun presets.

Frequency

Response (input kHz. -3 +1 d6.

Distortion:

Less than

0.3

/output):

30

Hz to

13

S/N Ratio (input

"/

THD at

1 kHz.

/output):

Better than -78 dB or. reverb and echo:

-81 dB for delay.

Pro -User Price Range:

$9.500

For additional information circle

+x204

Operational Controls:

Reverb input. amount output; spin (regeneration:: low filter: bass. treble: and single

/stereo input switch.

Selected Standard Features:

Six sprit:g left and right drive level VU

LEDs: two -pie( r package

)electronics.

S/N Ratio (input plus

/output): sprit:g reverbi.

Frequency

Response

(input chait:tk

/output):

20

Hi to

20 kHz

Distortion: THD less than

0.1

",.:

IMD

0.01 "...

Better t-tar. -70 d8.

Pro -User Price Range: $925

For additional information circle

+x203

SONY CORP.

One

Sony

Drive

Park Ridge,

NJ

07656

Phone:

(201) 930 -1000

DRE2000A Digital Reverb

Inputs: Two.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s):

Modes: four revel b: two echo:

STUDIO TECHNOLOGIES

7250 N.

Cicero Avenue

Lincolnwood,

IL 60646

Phone:

(312) 676 -9177

Ecoplate

Ill

Inputs:

Ti., o.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s): Plate

Delay Ranges:

N

/A. reverb.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

RT

60 seconds. troni

0.5

Operational Controls:

High and low

EQ. to

5

Selected Standard Features:

N

A.

Frequency

Response

(input kHz.

/output):

80

Hi to

20

Distortion:

N A. r

N

Ratio

(input

/output):

Better that; -65 dB.

Pro-User Price Range:

$1.695

AN-2 StereoSimulator

Inputs: Two.

Outputs:

Two. f ffocts Type(s): Stereo synthesizer.

Delay Ranges:

N, A.

Reverb

/Echo Parameters:

N.

A.

Operational Controls: Stereo width and depth: t.;,111:: and modulation.

I

Selected Standard Features:

N A. requency

Response

(input

/output):

20

Fit to

1'; klli. t2 dB.

Distortion:

0.2'. THD.

S

N

Ratio

(input

For

/output):

Better than -70 dB.

Pro -User Price Range:

$650 additional information circle p205

SYCHRONOUS TECHNOLOGIES

1020 West

Wilshire

Blvd.

Oklahoma

City, OK 73116

Phone:

(405) 843 -9626

Hot Springs

Inputs:

Ore.

Outputs: One.

Effects Type(s): Springs myrrh with equalizer.

Delay Ranges: N/

A

-

..

O

-

-- o

,E

11-

4

-

_,

-

Reverb /Echo Parameters: Frequency select. resonance: and boost

/( ut.

Operational Controls:

N.

A. r

Selected Standard Features: Paraunteric EQ and ry erload

I

Q.

I requency

Response

(input /output):

20

Hi to

8 kHz.

LESS

THAN

ONE PERCENT

FAILURE!

Meyer

UPA

-1

Loudspeaker

System,

U.S.

Patent

271967

We were pleased, but not surprised, when our distributors and dealers told us that buyers of

Meyer Sound one percent equipment reported less than a failure rate in the new gear they purchased.*

At Meyer Sound we take extraordinary pre- cautions to ensure that all the components used in our systems are of the highest quality obtainable.

All the parts in each piece of

Meyer equipment are

100 percent tested to guarantee reliability and consistent perfor- mance.

Each assembled unit is thoroughly tested again before leaving our factory.

At Meyer Sound reliability isn't just a word to sell loudspeakers

-it's

the philosophy on which our reputation is built.

If you've heard about

Meyer, but you haven't or

heard

Meyer, call write us.

We'll give you the name of a dealer who can arrange a demonstration.

'Figure includes warranty and non -warranty repairs on an annual basis.

Meyer Sound

Laboratories

2832 San

Pablo Avenue

Meyer

Berkeley,

CA 94702

2

Sound

(415)

486-1166

For additional information circle #90

\ul;u.t

1985

O

R-e

'p

129

The Directory

Distortion:

N 1.

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

Better that: -66 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$499

For additional information circle x206

UNICORD

89

Frost Street

Westbury.

NY 11590

Phone:

(516) 333

Korg SDD1000

Inputs:

Orne.

Outputs:

Three.

Effects Type(s):

Digital delay.

Delay Ranges:

1 nn to

2.048 seconds.

Reverb /Echo Parameters: Delay time: frequency and intensity modulation: effet t level: feedback: high

-c ut fecdbac k filters.

Operational Controls: Input les el: direct output

I,,yel: hi effect ley el: delay time: factor: feed bac k:

-cut: and trequer.cs input attenuator with lIr:ity gai;: control.

Selected Standard Features: Sampling up to

2.048 seconds: infinite hold: external setting of lelas time.

Frequency

Response

(input /output):

30

Hi to

10

Hz at 1.024 seconds:

30

Hi to

5 kHz at

2.048

,econds.

Distortion:

0.05 dire( t:

0.1 ",. effect.

S/N Ratio (input /output):

Better than -80 dB.

Pro -User Price Range:

$395

Korg

GR1

Inputs: Two.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s): Spring reverb.

Delay Ranges:

N'A.

Reverb /Echo Parameters: Gate threshold and decay time: three -hand

EQ.

Operational Controls: Input level: direct output lrsel: gate on

'off sw itch: threshold: decay time:

LI. MI

.11F

FQ: direct output level: reverb level: incremental control for all delay parameters: input attenuator with unity gait; control.

Selected Standard Features:

Integral gate section allows setting of dents time: EQ section.

/output):

200 Hz to

Frequency Response

(input

4.5 kHz.

Distortion:

N

/A.

S/N Ratio

(input

/output): effect:

-8 for direr

I.

Better than

-60dB, for

Pro

-User Price Range:

$295

Korg SDD2000

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

Three.

Effects Type(s): delay.

MIDI programmable digital

Delay Ranges:

0 me to

4.368 seconds.

Reverb

/Echo

Parameters: Delay time: frequency and intensity modulation.: effect level: feedback.

Operational Controls: Input level: direct output level: ira( rernentaI

( ontrol for all delay parame- ters: input attenuator with unit gain control.

Selected Standard Features: Sampling up to

4.368 seconds:

MIDI program change:

64 pro- grammable settings: MIDI play hack of sample.

Frequency Response

(input

/output):

30

Hz to

18 kHz at 1.092 seconds:

30

Hz to 4.5 kHz at 4.368 seconds.

Distortion:

0.05

''.. dire( t: 0.1".. effect.

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

Better that; -80 dB.

Pro -User Price Range: $695

For additional information circle x+208

URSA

MAJOR, INC.

P.O. Box 28

Boston.

MA

02258

Phone: (617) 924 -7697

Space

Station

SST

-282

Inputs: One.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s):

Delay Ranges:

Reverb

Digital reverb /effects. h ho delay time:

0 to

256 ms.

/Echo

Parameters:

0 to

3.5 seconds of delay time.

Operational Controls: Knobs and push butto; controls taps

1 throughout: audition thru

8: pushbutton control for room selci lion one thru four: delay mixer comb filters: pre fo

-se; programs.

Selected Standard Features:

N s.

Frequency Response

(input /output):

20

I

1,, kHz.

Distortion: Total distortion ai;d noise 0.1 ",.. typical.

S/N Ratio (input

/output):

Better that; -80 dB.

Pro -User Price Range:

$2.195

Stargate 626/323

Inputs: Two.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s):

Digital reverb/effects

Delay Ranges: Pre-delas

:

0 to

320 ms.

.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

323: 0 to

10 second decay time in eight room programs: 626:

0 to

21i second decay in eight effects programs.

Operational Controls:

LF decal.

HE d. direct and reverb mix controls: room selcc pre -delay control: input mode: dry only: rest.; t lear.

Selected Standard Features: LED numeric displays.

Frequency Response

(input all rooms at all decay

/output): level and

15 kti. times: sampling rate

., kHz.

Distortion: Total distortion and noise

11 is pical.

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

80 dB do namic range

Pro -User Price Range: 626: $2.500: 623: $2.000

Model

MSP -126

Inputs: Two.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s): comb-stereo processing: room early reflections: delay

( lusters: pat;

Multi

-tap stereo processor: mode: digital delay: repeats: and musical scale in steps.

Delay Ranges:

100 to

360 ms.

Reverb

/Echo Parameters: N. A.

Operational Controls:

16

-c haracter alphat;u-

Old faithful.

In a time of changing technology,

"newest" often seems

"best

". While fancy, expensive digital reverbs are popping up right and left,

"old faithful"

-the

Orban

111B

Dual Spring Reverb unexpected advantages.

-still

offers some

The first is cleanliness. The

111B offers a decay which is smooth and clean, without buildup of irri- tating noise and

"granular" distortion found in many low -cost digital reverbs.

The second is vastly simplicity.

The 111B's circuitry is simpler than the circuitry used in the digitals.

This can be failure can important in any application where a cost you money or downtime.

Most importantly, the 1116 offers the best price/ performance value in the industry. Where else can you get quasi -parametric SO and a protection limiter in a two -channel unit for $899? So, if you don't want to spend four figures for a mono digital reverb, check out "old faithful ": a proven performer with the right sound at the right price. peak

urban

Ofltian

San

Associates

Inc.1,

645

Bryant St.

Francisco, CA

(415)

957 -1067

9407

Telex:

17

-1480

For additional information circle .91

Re p 1:10

August

1985

merit display shows knobbed control of parameter one:

16 delay variations of each mode parameter two:

16 amplitude variations.

Selected Standard Features: I.ED level display and bypass control.

Frequency Response (input

20 kHz, 44.1 kHz sampling

/output): rate.

Bandwidth

Distortion:

Total distortion: ar:d noise

0.1 ''.., tspica

.

S/N Ratio (input

/output):

80 dB dynamic range.

Pro -User Price Range: $2.000

For additional information circle

=209

YAMAHA

INTERNATIONAL CORP.

6600

Orangethorpe

Buena Park. CA 90620

Phone:

(714) 522 -9011

Model

D1500

Inputs: Orte.

Outputs: Two.

Effects Type(s):

Delay Ranges:

0

Digital delay. to

1.023 seconds.

Reverb

/Echo

Parameters: Delay time and LFO recall of presets:

10 presets:

60 user amd remote control.

Frequency

Response (input

Hz to

20 kHz. memories:

/output): Input:

20

Distortion:

Less that:

0.03

''...

S/N Ratio (input /output): Better than -66 dBm.

Pro -User Price Range:

N

A

Model

R1000

Inputs: One.

Outputs:

Ore.

Effects Type(s):

Delay Ranges: sec onds.

Digital reserherator.

Resell) tinte:

1.5. 1.6, 2.3, ara

;d 2.4

Reverb /Echo

Parameters:

N.

\.

Operational Controls: Input: trots; and bypass. output: mix cor,

Selected Standard Features:

Semi

-parameteric

EQ with bypass.

-20 or

+4 dB output quercy

Response

(input

'output

1:

Input:

20

Hz to

20 kHz.

Distortion: N'A. econds/N Ratio (input dB.

'output

I:

Better than -60

Pro -User Price

Range:

$795

Inputs: Four.

Outputs:

Eight.

Model

YDD -2600

Effects Type(s):

Digital delay.

Delay Ranges:

0 to

2.660 seconds (one to 1.333 seconds input):

0

Itwo inputs): and 0 to

655 ms

14 inputs).

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

N A.

Operational Controls:

Les el: memory: delay time entered it: ms or distance.

Standard Features: Various in tions available: remote out configura- control:

12 memories:

LCD display.

Frequency Response (input kHz.

/output):

20 Hz to

20

Distortion:

Less than

0.03

"...

S/N Ratio

(input

Pro

-User Price Range:

$7.700 f or

/output):

Better that; -90 dB. additional information circle

#207

Operational Controls:

Delay time lowpass ter:

Ir vel: signal invert:

LFO rat': fil- wave and depth mix: recall memorized for each preset.

Selected Standard Features:

1;., memories: MIDI recall of presets: bypass and repeat panel input and output levels. hold by front or footswitch: jack and

XLR connection:

Frequency

Response

(input

Hz

/outpc t): to

20 kHz: delay:

20

Hz to

18 kHz.

Input:

20

Distorion: Input:

0.008 ").: delay

0.08".,.

S/N Ratio

(input /output):

Better )Fart -90 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range:

$895

Inputs: Otte.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s):

Model

REV

-1

Digital reverb

Delay

Ranges: Early reflection;:

O tc

255 ms: sub

Sequent reverb:

0 to

600 ms.

INTRODUCING

MARSHALLS

NEW

357.

Reverb

/Echo Parameters: Up to

4C early reflec

- tions, and up to

99.9 seconds of re

-erb.

Operational Controls:

Low and high pass filters: early reflection (mode, nu -fiber of early reflec- tions.and room liver;ess): r

=verb

(mode, level in four frequency ranges).

Selected Standard Features:

99 with

30 pre

-programmed,

50 mable,artd mine in remote controller; edit- recall function:

RCR -1 remote control with

LCD rea- dout arid eight screen menus.

Frequency Response

(input

/ total memories. uer- outpct): program-

Input:

20

Hz to

18 kHz.

Distortion:

Less than

0.3

",,.

S/N Ratio

(input

/output):

Better tF art

-85 dB.

Pro

-User Price Range:

511.900

Model

REV -7

Inputs: Two.

Outputs:

Two.

Effects Type(s):

Digital reverb.

Delay Ranges: Up to

100 ms: up to

10 seconds of reverberation.

Reverb /Echo Parameters:

Ear y reflections: sub- sequent reverberation: pre -early reflection: and pre- reverb delays.

Operational Controls:

N

/A.

Selected Standard

Features: modes;

Mono /stereo three -band semi

-parameteric

EQ;

MIDI

'+

+

It will blow away the myth that high quality ambience generation and room simulation have to be expensive ani complicated.

See

Marshall's new Ambience

Effects

System 357

Well make your day.

Marshall

Electronic /Box 438

/Brooklandville,

MD

21022/301 184.2220

EQUIPMENT ASSESSMENT

SONY

APR

-5002

ANALOG

TWO

-TRACK

RECORDER

Frhe

APR -5002 is the first new product to emerge from the former

MCI Fort- facility since

Sony more

that

Lauderdale firm was sold to than two years ago. At only

91 pounds, the APR

-5002 is smaller and lighter than other profes- sional quality mastering recorders have ever been. The machine accom- modates reels of up to 12'2 inches diameter. and quarter- or half -inch tape widths. The APR

-500(1 is supp- lied in a from number of configurations, monophonic, full

-track

'

-inch, to two

-track

NAB -or DIN

-track

Figure

1:

Input impedance magnitude versus frequency for input port

1, typical.

I

I

Ret'iewed by

Peter

But

SONY RPR

-5002

LUC IrF

1?

PQT IIMCdbCC

CWNCI l

TYPICIL

1

PM

I

N1

11IIII1aüiiii

geometry. to two in two speed the is the one

III

IRE

Ì

1

I

-track'

-inch configurations, format covering range from

:3.75 to 30 ips.

Equali- zation characteristics are IEC, NAB, and

AES selectable. The model tested common featuring the higher three analog tape speeds:

7.5, and

30 ips with NAB geometry.

15

The used machine is small enough to be as a table

-top unit or as console mounted in the optional SU

-14 stand, allowing deck orientation to be horiz- ontal or

15- degree tilt.

A

tertiary central tape track

intended for timecode purposes is to be available on APR

-5003 two

-track models within a few exact obscure, months. The nature of this feature remains although it is to include an internal SMPTE generator and the capability for

"chase'' mode opera- tion. No mention is made of timecode offset accommodation capability, an important feature for real

-life syn- chronization applications. The preli- minary service manual accompany- ing the machine refers to a

"special- ti mecode track equalization used with record play fourth head functions provided by a situated between the erase and record heads.

No further description of the timecode recording process is given, although one would infer

that

it is based on linear analog recording reproduction. a modulated rather than carrier to permit

data scanning

at high tape shuttle speeds.

'l'he machine is configured to facili- tate synchronized applications with all deck and audio. tus control data channel sta-

functions accessible

through parallel and

RS

-422 serial ports at the rear of the deck assembly.

Flux- frequency references for time- code track alignment have not been indicated thus far.

The APR

-500( is microprocessor controlled: evidently, the CPU is time- shared between deck -control duties and signal- channel functions.

All

signal

-channel functions, except manually uncalibrated input and output gain adjustments, are con- trolled by the CPU.

All audio control settings are indicated in a two

-digit hexadecimal code, giving

256 discrete values for input- monitor level, record level, record -HF boost, record -bias drive, reproduce and sync gain, LF

Figure

2:

Input port common

-mode response. Top trace is the normal -mode response of channels

1 and

2 overlaid; top graticule reference is

+4 dBv.

Common mode responses for channels

1 and

2 are shown as the center and bottom traces, respectively.

Scale factors are

10 dB

/divi- sion, vertical, and log frequency, horizontal, as graduated ri

..

it-

p

1

:3 r]

August

ISttt5

first

the bad news

Your present

24

-track console is obsolete.

It was designed for music recording, but today that's only the beginning. Now you've got synthesizer dates needing MIDI interface, audio for video with computer editor control, and a forest of external processors. Throw in a mix minus requirement and a few stereo lines that need EQ: now the producer wants to compress the vocal subgroup.

If you're running out of patience it's because you're running out of console. What you need is something completely different.

and now the good news

The new Elite consoles were designed specifically for contemporary multipurpose studios. They are a major step ahead of split monitoring and inline monitoring consoles, no matter how many contrivances or computers have been tacked on.

The Elite I/O strip has two signal paths with linear faders. Each path has independent input selection and peak output assignment and its own solo, mute, phase reverse, and indication. The patch point, highpass filter, equalizer, and each auxiliary send can be assigned to either path: each path can become the input to the other. Signal paths can be

Y

-ed at five points, allowing simultaneous control of different mixes on two main stereo buses as well as the

24 multitrack outputs. Full- featured I/O modules with stereo sends, filters, patch, and four -band stereo EQ are available for stereo line inputs and subgroup masters.

The result is the most flexible operating system offered in a multitrack console. There are over

75 simultaneously useable line inputs and

72 effects sends on a typical

Elite, yet intelligent layout, clearly labeled switches, and calibrated controls keep this power smoothly under control and make the console quick to reset.

The Elite logic mute system offers and direct digital interface to video editors, MIDI controllers, computer data lines. An Elite with full- featured

Audio Kinetics automation offers an incredibly powerful disk -based SMPTE

- locked system. With factory installed Massenberg Labs moving fader auto- mation the Elite delivers power and flexibility second to none, but without the sonic shortcomings of comparable computer controlled consoles.

Elite consoles meet the challenges of contemporary studios. They will change the way you think about multitrack recording.

Join the

Elite.

Let others compromise.

NEOTEKg(0

;..°LXCU

°,

A

OnM

Illinois 60657

U.S.A. 312

-929 -6699

1154

West Belmont Avenue Chicago,

SONY RPR

TRRTfER

FUNCTIONS

TEST PORT ORS LIN( INPUT MONITOR

2

3 a 5 100

2

3.

5

I4 2

FREQUENCY (Hz)

3 4

5 2 3

S

1004

Figure

3: for

Output impedance magnitude versus frequency output port

1, typical. and

HI: equalization.

(Oddly, the hex code for maximum setting values is

"00," while minimum values are indi- cated by of the to the

"FF." variable.)

The

The numerical weight indication is inversely related magnitude of the indicated unit's service manual gives the use of each of the control and align- ment functions in a step

-by

-step sequence, where proper CPU responses are indicated, as well as the precise stimulus sequences required. The sequential and conditional precision demanded by semi -smart devices is difficult to convey by general discus- sion. The hand

-holding instructional approach taken by the writers of the

APR

5000 manual is appreciated, and should be emulated by other manu- facturers as well. All visual annun- ciators or indicators are either LEDs or electroluminescent devices need no

that

external lighting for func-

Figure

4:

Input monitor transfer functions for main audio channels and Calibration Input

/Output ports.

Main audio channels phase contours are rotated

-180 degrees for clarity. tional visibility, and can therefore be clearly seen in low ambient lighting.

I.CDs don't serve well in the dark.

Provision is made for the retention of data for up to three audio electron- ics alignment settings, for each of the three tape speeds.

The alignment

-

data

memory is kept alive during power interruptions by an internal battery: tape counter and the

30-

data

are address program cue point not ily retained during power interrup- tions, however. This oversight would seem to be minor, as all sections random- access memory could be eas- serviced by the same

stand

of

-by power source.

The mechanics of the APR

.5000 show vestiges of the

MCI heritage.

The

MVC control is still a deck fea- ture, although it mechanically re- sembles the Sony videodeck counter- part, relying on body capacitance sensing for activation in shuttle modes only. Head tially identical to machines, with ISO metric hardware.

The head suspension is substan-

that

of the JH

-110 imately

45 degrees counter- clockwise from assembly is rotated approx- the customary parallel

-front position. Mercifully, the sheet of

(

/,- inch deck aluminum chassis for

that

MCI served as the tape machines has been replaced with a true alumi- num at casting. Although still in use by least one tape- machine manufac- turer, the single -slab approach to deck design has been proven inadequate, and should have been universally abandoned by the industry years ago.

A spooling function is provided through use of the

MVC control in shuttle mode. Winds are smooth and clean, although they do tend toward the uneven at the higher of the speed range. Spooling does not

MVC engage the capstan.

Head -shield activation and tape-

Figure

5:

Input monitor high- frequency group delay response. Curves are derived from the phase curves of

Figure

4.

SONT 5002

NON1T0R

I

IN,: IN,,,

NIGH-.REOULNCI GROUP oE'_+T

Figure

6:

Input monitor low- frequency group delay response. Calibration

Input

/Output curve deleted. Curves are derived from

Figure

4.

SONY RPR

LINE

LO-

I

-5002

MONITOR

R-e p

13.1

1

766

I4

FREQUENCY

(Hz) i tit

6

7

6 S 164

August

19s5

In the early evening of

Sept.

17,

1973, Jay

Barth was at the wheel of a 22

ft.

utility truck that was loaded with sound equip- ment. Just south of

Benton Harbor,

MI an oncoming car crossed the center

-line; fortunately

Jay steered clear of the impending head

-on collision. Unfortu- nately, a soft shoulder caused the truck to roll two and one half times. Exit several

Crown

DC- 300A's through the metal roof of the truck's cargo area.

The airborne

300A's finally came to rest

- scattered about in a muddy field, where they remained partially submerged for four and a half hours.

Jay miraculously escaped injury; the amplifiers apparently had not.

Unbelievably, after a short time under a blow -dryer all the amps worked perfectly and are still going strong.

The rest

- and the truck, is history.

For additional information circle

#94

crown

1718

W.

Mishawaka

Road, Elkhart, IN

46517

(219) 294-5571

August

1985 R-e p

135

.

MR9

[

Oui1i

1

[MT l

O.

/

á

He

SONY RPR

-5002

15 IPS 0CCORO/REPRODIICC RESPONSE

ArCOAO EQUALIZATION IIMITO SMONM

NMS EQUALIZATION

-50 pCí

10 2 3

4

5

1 i i

100

2

FREQUENCY i

111-

(Hz)

. 345

14 2

I 1

3 4 5

111

104 2

3 l

1 I

504

Figure

7:

Record /reproduce transfer functions at 7.5 ips.

Tracks

#1 and

#2 magnitudes are shown separated by

1 dB for clarity.

The effects of maximum and minimum record

HF boost are shown for track

#1.

Note that phase advan- ces with frequency. lifter functions can be defeated with toggling deck buttons. Changing the head -shield

"thump" in the main audio channels, and should be avoided operation of of

status

does introduce during a play the machine. Command the machine can be transferred to an external controller and back by use of Network tons. One should be able to safely pre- sume

that

and Local command but- there is no interferance with Local deck from when the trol, and vious to manual operation of the any external controller machine

that

the is external controller sheltered from deck set information for Local con- status signals, which should be when ignoring anyway the

APR

-5000 is being manu- ally controlled.

Inasmuch as some machine controllers are not imper-

that

may is be ience

It is mode. sense be and stated deck is

data that

dictates

that

able to override

Figure

8:

Record

/reproduce transfer functions at

15 ips.

The effects of maximum and minimum record HF boost are shown for track

#1.

Note that phase advances with frequency. none of their business, this is a detail

that

can make a difference in conven- and efficiency of operations. local impossible in control of the the

Network

If this is absolutely true it could prove inconvenient, should

Stop command be a manual necessary during external

-control operations.

Good the Stop machine function, and

that

timing schemes are com- mand, from whatever source, should any other tape the user must never be denied his option. manual

Stop

The

RS -422 control port protocols not given in the manual. Attention is drawn to the possibility of the Sony

Sync Master and

BVE

-5000 as serving machine controllers, but no prom- ises are being made at this time; the relevant SMPTE documents govern- ing the protocols are referenced, and

that

is all.

The reluctance of most

synchronizer

and editing- system manufacturers to offer usable inter- facing and control software for non

- video devices is disheartening.

It refreshing to encounter use would be of a standard data transfer and con- trol system, such as the IEEE

-488 standard, that would serve everyone's needs even though the overkill in using it would be extensive. It would seem

that

the tendency for equipment manufacturers to strive for new, uni- que and unfamiliar control interfaces, compatible only with a specific con- troller, is not in the long -term interest of anyone.

I think it is time for the audio video hardware industry to

Figure

9:

Record /reproduce transfer functions at 30 ips.

The effects of maximum and minimum shown record HF boost are for track

#1.

Note that phase advances with frequency.

Figure

10:

Time domain response at 7.5, 15, and

30 ips. The traces are clarity. displaced vertically and shifted in time for

TIME INTERVAL- 5.00 u

TIME WINDOW-

0 TO

5.12 pose

1

125 257

TIME DOMAIN WRVEPORM

305

ORTO POINT

513

641

IMAX1

VRLUE

3.30

769

697 1024

SONY RPR

-5002

155.3125 Mx SO. WOVE

7.5,

15,

30 IPS

RECORD.REPRODUCE

.S

5

:zS

W

]

Z

`

á

'.5

IPS

30

:es

2

â

R

0 z u

1.20 m

1.52

.

2.5ì o

IIME

(fe:

R

-e- p

136 D

August

1985

stop

reinventing

technology the wheel, and use that has served the rest of the electronics industry for over

111 years, and which has the capability of meeting its every possible need.

Spot both erasure capability for either or ol'the audio tracks. and perhaps for the timecode included as track, has been

standard

deck function. n of this mode only the selected sections the erase head manually- swept are driven. so erasures can be ac- complished without

that

interference from any bias chive to the record head.

I f the timecode option does include should he used with great discretion since discontinuities in this capability for the timecode channel. it the timecode channel can render an otherwise per- fect

!mister unusable in synchronized applications.

The audio channels may be option- ally muted during

lifter

Defeat or other non -play operation by trans- mission of a Fl /It

Start Enable com- mand via the parallel control port or, presumably. the

RS -422 port as well.

Triggering

of

external

noise

- reduction devices is possible by use of optically-coupled conductances be- tween pins of a provided for rear -panel connector this purpose.

These con- ductances are rated at

24 V

I

)(' in their

"off" condition. and

100 n;A in their

"on" state.

Cue monitoring nels is provided of the audio chan- through a small speaker located to the right of'the

VU-

' meter panel. Acoustic level should be adequate for most applications. and a

1

-inch stereo headphone jack is avail- able.

Rear -panel IiNC coaxial connectors provide access to the audio for a test channels generator and measuring instrument. Activation of the audio

- channel alignment function connects the signal tion appearing at the Calibra-

Input

RNC, so

that

it is added to the normal audio provide channel inputs to calibration drive to the record electronics. The output signal of the channel selected to

1w controlled by the computer is routed to the Calibra- tion Output

I3NC for not great value for a one

-, two

- or four

- channel tape machine, although such a entirely sure feature can output is be

that

observation. this feature extremely observable at a time

I'm is of helpful in multitrack checks and alignments.

Phase

( not polarity) relationships between channel outputs cannot be observed directly through the Cali

- bration facilities, because only one

- although the vector sum of the two channel outputs should be available if

"All" channel adjustment mode is selected while in

Sync or

Reproduce mode.

Optimal azimuth alignment could then be determined by adjust- ing for a maximum magnitude indi- cation at the Calibration Output port

In code the case of inclusion of a time option, it is not clew-

that

a squared timecode signal would not be present also in the reproduce vector sum. Nor is it clear how the timecode bias, level, and equaliza :ion adjust- ments could be done without use of the extender card. Timecode and output will evidently be available as a retrig- gered, squared binary

-level signal as seen at the timecode output connector.

Performance Assessment

The machine provided for testing featured transformerless audiusignaI paths.

Audio -port inputs are of the single op

-amp, differential amplifier

- type. while the audio output ports are dual up -amp, pull quasi- balanced push

- drive. Single -ended nections may cause output con- significant, non- destructive ground currents in the grounded audio lead. difficulties in some and may cause applications; tion is. advised. Inclusion of' cau-

trans

- formers in the audio input and or output ports is optional.

The main audio input ports look into a single op

-amp differential input. Impedance versus frequency characteristics between audio con- nector pins

1 and

2,1 and:

3, and

2 and are shown in

3

Figure

1.

The differen- tial load measured

22.:3 kuhms at

2110

Hz,

The greater than the

10 kohms claimed. impedances the audio between each side of input pair and ground were

Ls

41.

RJAll'of.'..

RADIO

A/C AD-

r

/BLACK('-'("

SPANI`r

BAND

CHR

IENTE

BEA,,

A/C

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URBAN /BLACK

TRY

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SP.

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COUNTRY

URBAN

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CI- i<

COUNTRY BIG BAND

,

)SPEL

AiOR ALBUM ORIENTED FA

_

,

EASY

LIS-ENING URBAMI

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QOUNTRY BIG 3A

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FUL M,.SIC

EASY LISTENIN

'

'-

'DNTEMPORARYC

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ANISH ACR ifTh

UT FUL

MUSIC

-

F-om AOR to

CHR,

Country to

Jazz-

Vnatev

r the format,

-his cart's

for

yDJ.

For outstanding high frequency sensi-ivity and headroom, com-

-- patibility witF all cari machines, the multi- format AA

-4 deli,rers the sourd that audiences turn on.

AUDIOPAK

AA

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CAPITOL MAGNETICS PRODUCTS

6932

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)451

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SONA HPR-

5002

'.5

:PS

ACCORO. S NC

RESPONSE

RRN COURT

IZAUIOR

:OP

Figure

11:

Record

/reproduce relative group delay response. are shown

Group delays derived form Figures

7, 8, and 9 overlaid. measured at

12.5 and

9.17 kohms. an imbalance of about

4:3.

R

-C lowpass acitance is filtering

Inclusion of and cable cap- likely responsible for the drop in impedance magnitude at fre- quencies above about

2 kHz.

Normal mode to impedance magnitude declines about

10 kohms at about

60 kHz, while the imbalance side impedances bottom out at about

3.8 kohms at the

It

Figure

12:

Record

/sync transfer functions at 7.5 ips.

Tracks tt1 and tr2 magnitudes are shown separated by

1 dB for clarity.

The gap -loss null is readily observable in the magnitude null and phase reversal circa

15 kHz. Note that phase advances with frequency. same frequency.

Input port common -mode perfor- mance is shown in the photograph of

Figure

2 as observed at the respective main audio channel top trace is the output ports. The normal mode response at

+4 dBv, channels

1 and

2 overlaid.

The center trace is channel

1 common

- mode response, is the and the bottom trace channel

2 common

-mode

A

SIGHT

FOR SORE

EARS.

they'd scream for

SONEX. ears could talk,

The only patented acoustic foam with a specially sculptured anechoic design can replace traditional studio materials for a fraction of the cost.

SONEX absorbs sound, controls revert, eliminates stray reflections, and kills standing waves.

What's left is true sound.

Your ears know.

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SONEX blends with almost any decor and looks clean, sharp, profession;tl. facts and prices.

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Call or write us for all the

.

Olph a

OV

d

10

2049 West Broad Street exclu.ively to the pro sound industry by

Alpha Audio.

Richmond. Virginia 23220 (804) 358 -3852

:

:

.

Acoustic Products for the

Audio Industry

-

response. seen to be

Channel

1 and

2

CMRR is about

45 and

62 dB, respec- tively. Input port interfacing should present no problems.

Figure

3 shows the output

-port impedance magnitudes for channel

1 output typical. Normal mode source impedance measured

128 ohms at

200

Hz, remaining constant to about

90 kHz.

Line imbalance is about 3.62/3.23 or

9:8 for a perfectly floating load.

I would like to see an output balance ratio closer to

1:1 for balanced out- puts, although this condition seems to serve well enough.

In situations where an an active

-balanced output is imbalanced driving differential input

(the most common condition), the result- ing degree of line balance is deter- mined by the parallel combination of side impedances port has a of each port from signal pair to ground.

If

the output fairly low impedance mag- nitude of side impedance, and is closely balanced, the entire circuit condition of the will tend to be in bal- ance, even though the differential input load is imbalanced when observed by itself.

This can be a sig- nificant matter in the case of high

- intensity

RF and magnetic fields where transmission line imbalance is most apparent. A common -mode re- jection ratio of about

18 dB could be expected for a line imbalance of this magnitude.

Input -monitor transfer functions for the APR

-5002, surprisingly, were found to be inverting for the normal audio channels. The

Calibration Input proved to be the exception, having an erect polarity

( not phase) response as observed at the

Calibration Output port and at the main audio channel output connectors, pin

:3 taken as

"HI."

Audio -connector pin

3 was taken as the

"HI"

signal terminal for

R-e p

138

0

August

1985

5.1.

Specification

Power

Require- ments:

Power

Consump- tion:

Fuse

Rating:

Reel Size:

Tape Format:

Tape Speed:

Quoted

102 120

1:38;

204

'240 276

VA(';

48 to 60 Hz.

300W max.

5A(102V),4A(120V)

2A (240V); normal or fast blow.

3 to 12.5 inches;

NAB or EIA hubs;

DIN hubs optional.

0.25

-inch, two -track

NAB

0.25 track -standard: inch, two -track

DIN

0.25 track standard; inch,

3

-track center -track timecode.

(0.5 inch, optional.) two -track timecode feature

Standard

(high- speed)

7.5.

15

30 ips; and optional speed) 3.75, 7.5

15 ips:

±50%

(low and variable.

Better than

0.02

%.

Speed

Stability:

Start

-Up

'l'ime

Fast

-Wind

Time:

Spool

-Wind

Time:

MVC

Velocity:

Wow and

Flutter:

Frequency

Response:

Record

Play

Frequency

Response:

Record Sync

Recorded

(S +N)

/N

Record/

Ratio:

Reproduce

:30

15 ips 900 mS; ips 500 mS;

7.5 ips: 500 mS.

2,400

4,800 feet

110 sec; feet

170 sec;

2,400 feet 370 sec;

30 ips:

40 Hz to 28 kHz:

+0.75/ -2 dB.

15 ips:

30 Hz to

24 kHz;

+0.75/-2 dB.

7.5 ips:

:30

Hz to 20 kHz;

+0.75/ -1.5 dB.

SUMMARY OF SONY APR -5002

SPECIFICATIONS

Yes

Observed

Not checked.

Yes

Yes

As tested.

As tested.

±0.017% head to tail;

2,490 feet.

Not checked.

2,490 feet

114 sec;

Not checked.

2,490 feet

:387 sec.

0 to 1.9 per sec. meters

:30

(

15

7.5 ips less ips less ips less

3.75 than than than ips less

0.025%

0.035%

0.055' than i

0.10%

±peak, DIN -weighted).

Not checked.

30 ips:

±0.017'.q.

15 ips: ±0.027%

7.5 ips: ±0.037%

3.75 ips:

W

+F,

Not

Tested peak, DIN

- weighted.

30 ips:

50 Hz to

16 kHz:

+0.75/-2 dB.

15 ips:

:30Hzto10kHz;

+0.75/-2 dB.

7.5 ips:

30 Hz to

4 kHz;

+0.75/-2 dB.

:30

15

7.5 ips

66 dB. ips

64 dB. ips

63 dB.

30 ips:

53 Hz to 20.9 kHz;

+0.8/

-2 dB.

15

29 Hz to 30.0 kHz;

+0.1 ips:

-2 dB.

7.5 ips:

14

Hz

+1.3r' to5.27

-1.5 dB. kHz;

30 ips:

42 Hz to 25.6 kHz;

+1.4;'

-2 dB.

15 ips:

27 Hz to 21.3

+0/-2 dB. kHz;

7.5 ips:

15

Hz to 6.8 kHz;

+0: -1.5 dB.

30 ips 66.5 dB.

15

7.5 ips

62 dB. ips 57.5 dB.

20 Hz to 20 kHz

UNWTI);

Ref:

51(1 nW m.

Recorded

Distortion:

(1 kHz: 510 nW m)

:3rd

Harmonic

30 ips less l5 ips

7.5 less ips less than

0.:35

" ;.; than

0.52%; than

1.6'':..

2nd Harmonic

:3";

3rd

Harmonic

Fluxivity

Level:

Bias

Frequency:

Erase

Frequency:

Depth of

Erasure:

Input

Impedance

Output

Impedance

Maximum

Audio

Output level

Weight

Table

Top

Stand type

Polarity

Response:

Record

Record play

Sync

Line In Out

Generator

In

.(Meter Out

Generator

In

Line Out

Line

In

Meter Out

Repro'

Meter Out

Sync

.steter Out

Hardware:

Testing tape stock:

Flux

-

Frequency

References:

3(1

15

7.5 ips less ips less ips less than

0.10

"6; than

0.1(r.: than

0.11r';,.

30 ips:

1.0111 n11'

15 m. ips:

1.020 nW. m;

7.5 ips: 1.000 nW m.

400 kHz.

100 kHz.

Not quoted.

30

15

7.5 ips0.16 ips ips

0.5(r.

:30

7.5 ips: ips:

Unreadable at

I:5 ips: 30 Hz; analyzer resolution.

Not measured.

Not measured.

Not measured.

Greater than dB below

I

76 kHz at

250 nW m: all speeds and track formats.

Erasure below

I kHz at52(1nW-'m:

:30ips78:82 dB; Tk

I

'.

15ips80:84dB;TkI

2.

7.T)

Ck ips

83,'8:3 dB;

1'2.

Audio

Amplifier Electronics:

1(1 kohms, balanced.

22.3 kohms, imbalanced differential input.

12(1 ohms, balanced.

128 ohms, imbalanced active differential.

+22.4 l

H

F' dliv

(600 ohms): load.

91 pounds;

46.26 kg.

110

Not measured. pounds;

49.89 kg. Not measured.

ADDITIONAL OBSERVED:

Audio port pin

#3 taken as "HI

":

Negative

Negative

Inverting

Non

-inverting

Inverting

Non

-inverting

Inverting

Inverting

ISO Metric: Hex socket

- head; Totsu head

("slot 'n' clot ")

:3M

MRI.211.221, 21J205,

21T204.

Suggested End

5003

-User Price:

APR

-5001

(Mono) $6,800; 5002 (DIN

/NAB ste

(DIN

stereo plus IEC timecode)

$9,000;

SU

-14

stand

$500.

Manufacturer:

Sony

Corporation of America, Sony Drive,

reo) $7,500;

Park

Ridge,

NJ

07656.

(201)

930 -6137.

August

1985

R -e p

1:33

e.

15

Sor.,

:+s +lcOrtt, S.!.0

R[S.Y.NS.

...B

!Lk.:

ItwtION

'flf

:BB

SONY RPR

-5002

34 (PS

RECORD'SVDC RESPONSE

RCS

E0EALIUP1

ION

I

Ì

IB iB I

0

Ill

DE

2 3

4

00

2 3 4 5

FREQUENCY

I

(Hz)

2 3

1Bk

3

4

50k

Ill

2

24

5

100 2

3

1 5 lk

2

3

FREOUENCY

(Hz)

Figure

13:

Record /sync transfer functions at

15 ips.

Tracks

#1 and

#2 magnitudes are shown separated by

1 dB for clarity. The gap loss null is readily observable in the magni- tude null and phase reversal circa

33 kHz. Note that phase advances with frequency.

Figure

14:

Record sync transfer functions at 30 ips.

Tracks

#1 and

#2 magnitudes are shown separated by

1 dB for clarity. Note that phase advances with frequency. all measurements given here, which conforms with the conventions fol- lowed by both Sony and

MCI in the past.

The input -monitor transfer func- tions are shown in

Figure

4.

Phase

(not polarity) curves for main audio channels

1 and

2 are displaced -180 degrees so

that

they will tend to rotate about the central abscissa of the graph. The line -input magnitude functions are remarkably flat at low frequencies, showing only about

10 degrees of lead at

6

Hz. By contrast,

the

Calibration Input

Output

response is down about

3.5 dB at

6 Hz with a phase lead of around

53 degrees, and down

Hz. about

0.5 dB at

20

It should be possible to improve this performance to match the main audio channel response.

At the high

- end of the band, the main audio channel

1 magnitude tends to roll off a bit faster than the channel

2 or Cal- ibration Input Output does. All three channels were found to exhibit very linear lagging phase response with increasing frequency.

Group -delay

5002

Input /Output response for the

APR

- main audio and Calibration channels is shown in

Figures

5 and

6.

Figure

5 shows that, in all cases, the curves flatten out and are approximately horizontal to

50 kHz, delay indicating equal propagation at all frequencies in

that

range.

The notable exception is the delay curve labeled

"Test" which rises steeply below frequencies below about

800 Hz

- is a consequence of the low frequency magnitude rolloff in the

Calibration channel noted above.

Low

-frequency group delay is shown in

Figure6 with the Calibration delay curve deleted, most of as it is off -scale through this region. The main audio

R -e p

1.11)

0

August

1985 channels' group delay becomes fairly flat above about

60 Hz, and oscillates about the zero -second abscissa above

that

frequency

-a

remarkably good performance for any

AC- coupled audio signal device.

The APR

-5002 attends to its prime task of recording and reproduction very well indeed, as witnessed by the curves of

Figures

7, 8 and

9.

The low

- frequency contour irregularities are restricted to a band

+1.5 -1 dB about the magnitude reference.

Record'rep- roduce

magnitude

response was adjusted to be flat at

1 and

1(1 kHz

against

the calibrated reproducer using the

CW sinewave signal. Flat- ness was observed to be within

-1 dB of

that

reference line between the two frequencies. The

data

shown is the result of a deconvoluted Fourier trans- form of a 195.3125 -Hz squarewave, and therefore represents a more dense signal spectrum

than

would a sine

- wave sweep. The magnitude response limits given in the

Summary of observed performance were deter- mined from these curves.

A seasoned reader of these equip- ment assessments will note the unus- ual signal phase -function behavior shown in all of these record

/repro- duce increasing frequency often nal graphs. In this case, the signal phase leads encountered for electronic sig-

paths

in general

-

- lags with as is due more to the inclusion of a variable, single

-pole allpass filter network in the record electronics signal path. The frequency of the allpass pole is adjusted by the computer to track the phase response of the record pre -emphasis filter.

This can be done with reliability, because there is no phase contribution to the analog record

/reproduce processes, leaving only the electrical responses of the various electronic stages involved to be contended with. The reproducer phase response is largely dictated by the time

constants

of the reproducing characteristic to be used, leaving only the record phase response as the major

Time- variable in the system. domain plots of track #1's

195.3125 -Hz shown in placed pre quite large form shows a post implying squarewave response are

Figure

that

tude response at

10. squarewave traces shows a

-transition spike, which is fairly small at the

7.5 ips speed, growing somewhat at

15 ips and becoming at

30 ips.

The

7.5 ips wave-

-transition spike, as great as the induced corrective phase lead may be at that speed, it is still not imize the overshoot adequate to min- due to the phase rotation caused by the radical HF boost required to overcome the tape

- wavelength response for flat magni-

that

Each of the speed. At

15 dis- ips, the phase correction would appear to be about the correct value for minimal overshoot, while the phase correction for the

:30 ips case appears to be more

than

required. The absence of any ringing in the region of the square- wave transitions of Figure

10 indi- cates very accurate reproducer head termination.

The

APR

-5002 record

/reproduce, relative group -delay curves for tracks

#1 and

#2 are shown in Figure

11.

The conclusions drawn from of examination the character of the time -domain traces of Figure

10 are confirmed for the cases of the

7.5 and

15 ips speeds.

The slight drop in the

7.5 ips delay in the region

6 to 30 kHz does look like the delay compensation could profit- ably be increased in this region. The

30 ips curve is close to optimal, with a

slight droop above about

10 kHz.

The choice of delay compensation as shown here is very close to optimal. and likely could not be improved very much to yield truly flat group

-delay response.

The flux -loop sweeps of Figure l:) show the linearity of the pre

-equalized reproduce head response versus fre- quency, while Figure

16 shows the same kind of

data

for the sync head.

The lack of any deviation from linear- ity about the peak due to undamped head resonance is clearly indicated. showing careful attention to critical termination of the respective track cores. The two channels are very closely matched in all cases.

The flatness of the APR-

:)002 meter- ing is quite good;

Table

1 gives the observed meter response for a con-

stant

main audio input level.

Exami- nation of the magnitude curve for track

41 given in

Figure

4 shows the meter follows the tude channel

that

magni- response closely over the range measured.

Analysis Summary

'l'he APR-5002 is easily the hest analog tape machine to emerge from any manufacturer over the past sev- eral years. The quality of perfor- mance exhibited in these tests indi- cate

that

there may

1w hope for high qualit y audio recording in the absence of any more Ampex A'I'R -100s, the benchmark

against

tended to judge

,:l

which

I have other analog machines. The wow and flutter per- formance is very good, although there is a to tendency for the flutter readings rise above their lowest values at the extreme head and tail of the reel.

The service manual is very com- plete, and offers step

-by

-step proce- dures for most significant repair and maintenance actions.

The schematics

Frequency

5 lo

20

50

100

250

500

1k

2k

4k

6k

8k

10 k

12.5 k

16 k

20 k

25 k

30 k

40 k

TABLE

1:

VU

METER INDICA-

TION VERSUS FREQUENCY.

(Constant

line input.)

Meter Indication

0.0 (dB)

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

-0.05

-0.15

-0.25

-0.35

-0.60

-0.80

-1.65 and parts lists show the same com- pleteness

that

Sony has given to its video equipment. Once one is intro- duced to the documentation philo- sophy and the nomenclature, it is fairly easy to find the relevant section of the manual situation.

that

applies to a given

'l'he Totsu (slot

'n' dot) hardware may present problems in tooling for the technician accustomed to dealing with slot, hex -socket. Phillips and

Posidrive hardware. Yielding to the temptation to make do with careful application of a common slot -blade screwdriver rather than the proper

Totsu tools will mayhem. 'l'he result in unnecessary investment in proper quality tooling is always a rewarding, if intangible, one.

The machine is small, light and eas- ily moved. All major electronic as- semblies are accessible from the front, or by removal of the rear panels. The audio mother board is more a carrier of interconnects and hoard receptacles; it

than

just contains a couple of

data

demultiplexers, LED drivers and the cue

-speaker drive amplifiers. The placement of significant active com- ponents on relatively inaccessible mother boards is,

I think, a poor cho- ice of configuration from a tech sup- port viewpoint. The obvious difficulty in observing a circuit contained on a mother board assembly can be frus- tratingly since installation of the daughter boards is often required to

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August

1985 It-i.

1,

I

I I

Figure

15:

Reproduce head flux -loop response. The upper trace is track

#1 response, track

#2 is the lower trace.

Scale factors are

10 dB,

/division, vertical, and log frequency, horizontal, as graduated. place the system in a configuration permitting intelligent fault isolation and observation of dynamic signals.

The mechanical design is rugged, and the many exploded assembly drawings clear and uncluttered.

Printed

-circuit assemblies show the

Sony influence, and bear white silk

- screened component designations over a solder -resist coating. (There are a couple of "Oh

R-e p 142 yeahs" evident as

August

1985 com- ponents tacked onto foil runs in pla- ces they were obviously not intended

- originally these problems will un- doubtedly be corrected as serial numbers advance.)

The polarity -inversion problem is just one of those things that some- times slip through the engineering design review process and, though mundane, needs to be corrected im- mediately. The most solution to be advantageous this problem would seem to reversal of the audio pairs at the main audio -input connectors, which would bring all signal ports into polarity agreement and result in erect recording and reproduction in both sync and play modes.

The cimal matter of the inverse hexade- parameter indications is more a matter of preference on my part than a deficiency. The hex values are uni- que to serve

The any parameter magnitude, and their intended purpose. phase

( not polarity) correction network seems to be designed very close to optimum for the speeds and equalizations observed. The ability of the microprocessor to track the record equalization delay as closely as it does is a compliment to its designers.

Removing responsibility for proper delay compensation from the back of the maintenance technician is a defi- nite technical step forward.

In closing,

I should deck think that a having

14

-inch reel capacity and

Figure

16:

Sync head flux -loop response. The upper trace is track

#1 response, track

#2 is the lower trace.

Scale factors are

10 dB

/division, vertical, and log frequency, horizontal, as graduated. four -track a worthy channel capacity would be entry for the pro audio vi- deo convention is not yet widespread, and new market. Four -track is still widely used, since the central timecode track equipment capable compatibility with existing program libraries is still needed. of format

MANUFACTURER'S REPLY

Hiro Konno of the Product and 'Takeshi Yazawa,

Management depart- ment, Professional Audio Division,

Sony Corporation as follows: of America, reply

We appreciate the author's thorough evaluation and his report on our new product, the APR

-5002. We it to be quite detailed, consensus is excellent job.

that

the have found and author did our an

However, there are some discrep- ancies in his findings, some mis- interpretations of design goals, and general differences of opinion.

We gratefully acknowledge the author's pointing out the polarity reversal in the audio path in production units.

This problem has since been resolved by

Engineering.

The areas requiring clarification are as follows:

1.

Published versus

Measured

Specifications Discrepancies:

In this particular area, it appears as though the author's measured speci- fications were based on criteria other

than

those used by

Sony engineering.

Therefore his data is slightly different.

Some of our specifications have recently been ammended

(S

/N ratio,

30 ips

65 dB;

15 ips

62 dB; 7.5 ips

62 dB), actually eliminating crepancies. some dis- in

We do find a large variance, however, his measured

7.5 ips frequency response and

S

'N and our factory measurement.

We are not in a position to comment further without consulting the author on his test procedure and problems encountered. provide frequency

I

We response ments, which are

2.

Timecode

-

Editor.]

Processing:

under- stand that

Peter Butt used a 195

-Hz squarewave excitation signal to measure-

available

by examining the time -domain traces thus produced

As this evaluation was intended to be on an

APR

:5002, we chose to provide no description of our timecode processing methods, or any actual operational specifications.

The APR

-

5003 is

APR uniquely different from the

5002, and trying to lump them together in an evaluation based on the APR

-5002 alone would not be appropriate in our opinion.

We are very pleased to supply an APR

-5003 at a later date for a complete evaluation on its own.

Mapping and Data

3.

Memory

Back -Up:

The

APR

-5000

Series retains all

Audio

Alignment, Search and Timecode

status

Cue points information in a battery backed

-up memory system.

Each specific type of into its own unique locations, only and is written over by an operator performing a detailed alignment procedure. call

-up

This

data

is mapped

data

back assemblies to have its own

-up allows for each of the

12 possible head

data

also for at any time in the future. This

data

is also supported in the case of the power supply being reviewed for service.

We do not this area. understand why the author may have had a problem in

4.

Serial Control Protocols:

This is an area of conjecture by almost everybody today.

We have chosen to support two protocols in the

APR

-5000

Series, both of which only be can practically realized in the

APR

-5003,

RS -422A using a

Time Referencing

System

( i.e.

Timecode

SM

PTE

They are

'EBU). the Sync Master specific, and specific sub -set of the

Sony

BV

-type, for emulating a

BVU

-800

Transport

Motion Control

Com- mands.

We refer to the work of

SMPTE

EBU and the published doc- uments to date in the manual. This is meant to give the readers some insight as to the work going on for the future implementation. In respect to protocol to qualified users, but not them

T.

Line listings, outright.

Input

Sony

pling Imbalance:

has a policy of supplying them on a controlled basis publishing

Differential

Cou-

We do not agree with the author in his evaluation of this section at all.

We tion use a hybrid

Diff Amp for this sec- and, upon examination actual circuit, one can see of

that

results are not possible.

We feel the his

that

he may have incorrectly connected his test equipment to the Input Amp and unbalanced it improperly, result- ing in the results mentioned.

6.

Author's

Comments

on

Signal

Processing Performance:

We on a feel

that

these are based upon personal opinion and, although valid strictly theoretical basis, are not achievable with the technology

that

is available today.

As always, we will continue to endeavor in achieving absolutely

"perfect" audio performance, as tech- nology allows.

7.

Audio Mother Board Servicing:

serviceability of this particular

PCB.

In

The author comments on the lack of actuality, this

Mother Board, but the Audio Control

Mother Board, located in housing. This PCB is is not the Audio the

Meter easily accessed and serviced by anyone.

In addition, the real Audio Mother Board is a pas- sive backplane, which can be removed and repaired with the same relative ease.

8.

Polarity Reversal:

The description of the reversal in polarity of the Audio

Signal Path is correct and incorrect.

He assumes

that

we use pin

#3 as "HI," and pro- ceeds to describe the reversal in of terms input coupling problem. In actual- ity, we conform to

I

EC

XLR

Standard which calls for pin

#2 to be

the"

#286,

HI" connectors. The conclusion in we came to is lem is actually

(where it was corrected).

that

in the coupling the output

that

prob- path later actually found and

As time does not permit consulta- tion with the author tion, we are confident prior

that

to

R publica-

-e p will afford us the opportunity to reply in greater depth following our dialog.

000

Is the really

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CU -41 worth the price?

The

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But specs alone aren't reason enough to invest in the CU -41.

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Phone 03

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August

1985

R-e/p

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Any of the six mixer channels may be recorded by any or all of the four tracks of the recorder at any time, via a combination of bus.

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D SYSTEMS,

INC.

467

W

38TH HOUSTON, TEXAS 77018 (713) 695 -9400 audio and lighting sales, service and rentals

Lexicon

Micmix

MXR

Orban

Olen

DSC

Rem sa

Scotch

Shure

Soandcratt

Tescam

Turbosound urgi

Ursa

Adams -Smith

Agfa

AKO

Amek

Ampex

Ashiv

Audio -Technica

Community

Crest

Crown dbx

Deltalab

Electrevoice

Eventide

EXR

HME

Interlace

Ivie

Jal

Klark- Teknik

AURATONE MODEL 5MC

RACK MOUNTABLE THREE

-

CHANNEL MONITORS

Designed specifically as an ultra- compact, three

-channel monitor for the video

/broad- cast industry, the Model 5MC is equivalent to three, side -by

-side

5C Super -Sound -Cubes contained in a single enclosure measuring only

51.2 by

1612 by

81/1 inches. The unit will provide separate audio feeds for functions such as cue, program, emergency channel, talkback, news, sports, etc., and can be used for

A -B comparisons of stereo -mono quality for both broadcast program material, and in recording production.

In this latter applica- tion, the two outside channels are used for stereo. with the center for mono.

Quoted frequency response for the full

- range close -field monitors is ±3.5 dB on -axis,

(anechoic from

150

Hz to

12.5 kHz). Each five -inch round driver has a specially shielded magnet structure for preventing distortion of the TV image on adjacent

CRTs due to flux leakage. Impedance is 8 ohms, and power handling

30 watts per channel. in

Optional metal rack ears simplify mounting standard

19

-inch relay racks.

Protective plastic bumpers are provided for use on con- sole meter bridges or desk tops and nylon hangers are included for wall mounting.

Suggested pro

-net price for the

Model

5MC Multi -Channel

Monitor is

$150; an optional

19

-inch rack -mounting kit is $10.

AURATONE CORPORATION

For additional information circle

#101

GARFIELD

ELECTRONICS

BEAT FOR

TIMECODE

MASTER

/MIDI

SYNCHRONIZATION

The new unit provides sync generation in beats per minute,

24, 25, or

30 fps film

/video calibrated tempos from all

SMPTE /EBU formats:

24- and

25- frame,

30

DF and NDF, and simultaneous production of

16 musical

- instrument sync formats. In addition, a

"Doc- tor

Click" facility enables syric to click tracks, live tracks, MIDI, and all tape sync codes.

A high -resolution, programmable

"timing map" allows any beat -interval sequence to be stored, edited, and offset under SMPTE con- trol, for adjustment of rhythmic "feel." Also available are six multi -programmable SMPTE controlled

-event gates, each with five -volt and contact -closure outputs for synchron- ized sound effects and control triggering.

August

1985 R -l' p

114

Your

Recordings

Can Only Sound as

Good as the

Cables Used to Record Them

Other production features include RS -232 serial interface; code regenerate and conver- sion; jam sync; SMPTE from Neopilot; remote control- inputs; and non- volatile memory.

Recommended list price of the Master

Beat is $1,995.

GARFIELD

ELECTRONICS

For additional information circle

#102

HOQUE ELECTRONICS

UNVEILS MATRIX

M

-250

POWER AMP

The Matrix

M

-250 stereo power amplifier will provide

100 watts rms into

8 ohms and

180

Watts rms into

4 ohms, with less than

0.05',. distortion, and features extensive amplifier and load protection plus has preci- sion peak -power indicators.

LED meters with clip

A highspeed, non -switching design is said to provide an accurate wide -band response of

5

Hz to

100 kHz, with less than

120 dB signal -to -noise ratio.

Two toroidally -wound transformers permit the amplifier to be housed in a

312-inch rack mounting steel cabinet, and be powered by

115 or

230 line voltage.

Suggested pro

-user price for the

Matrix

M -250 amp is $458.

HOQUE ELECTRONICS

For additional information circle

#103

Introducing Prolink

High

Performance

Studio Cables by

Monster Cable:

Many people in the record- ing business used to think that cables were just cables.

And in fact, many of us still do. of transients, and the "nat- uralness" and "presence" of voices and are all lost instruments, through conven- tional cables. prise the most critical and skeptical of engineers, sim- ply by switching from your current connecting cables to Prolink by

Monster

Cable.

A

Sound of their

Own.

Many engineers have found that the opposite is true.

They are discovering that ordinary cables have "a sound of their own" and distort music recording and reproduction in ways that we were never even aware of.

Critical areas such as clarity, depth of bass response, quickness

A

Monster

New Tech- nology in

Cable Design.

Monster Cable has shown music listeners worldwide that the sound of their play- back systems could be sig- nificantly improved simply by changing their cables to the Monster.

Now you can obtain an improvement in the sound of both and playback recording that will sur-

Come Hear the Monster.

We invite you to hear our entire line of microphone, speaker, and studio hookup cables. Put them through your most critical listening and durability testing.

You'll discover just how good your recordings can really sound.

2se¡,..E

For your free brochure please call or write

Paul

Stubblehine, Professional

Products Division

Manager.

Monster Cable' Products. Inc.

101

Townsend.

San Francisco CA 94107

415 777-13.55

Telex:

470584

M('SY tJ

I

SHURE ANNOUNCES TWO

NEW BOUNDARY- EFFECT

CONDENSER MICROPHONES

The two new additions to the company's line of boundary -effect (surface) microphones are the Model

819

Unidirectional and the

Model

809

Omnidirectional condenser mod- els.

Both mikes, according to Sandy

Schroeder, Shure's marketing manager /pro- fessional entertainment and general audio products, "These two new microphones will offer sound contractors and music dealers improved performance, durability, and flexi- bility in those applications where a boundary

- effect microphone is required, but where budget is limited.

*

Both microphones are priced below that of the professional Shure SM90 /SM91 models and should prove to be very attractive to the general sound and semi

- professional markets, because of their superior reproduction qual- ity and long -term reliability."

Both the 819

Unidirectional and the 809

Omnidirectional Condenser Surface Micro- phones have a user net price of

$200.

SHURE BROTHERS,

INC.

For additional information circle

#104

When Your

Reputation

Depends On It,

There's Only

One Choice

...

.

IAN COMMUNICATIONS

GROUP, INC.

Cassette, Open

Reel, &

Video

Tape

Duplications

Otari

MTR-

I

0

Mastering, Dolby

HX

-Pro,

Digital Mastering!

Otari

DP -7000 Duplication

In

-House Printing

& Packaging

Full

Line of

Studio

Supplies

Agfa

& 3M

Audio /Video

Tapes

Call

us. You

should hear what you're missing!

ion

Communications Group,

Inc.

10

Upton Dove

Wlrnington

MA 01887

16171

6583700

August

141íi5

.

]

R -e p

1

1a

New

Products

SCIENTIFIC DESIGN

ANNOUNCES

NEW

COMPUTER

-

AIDED SPEAKER

The

DESIGN SOFTWARE

Computer -Aided Speaker Design, for use on an

Apple

II computer, was developed for contractors, sound companies, consul- tants and manufacturers. This package allows complete modelling of loudspeaker systems, and accurately predicts system response before any prototypes are built.

Version

2.0 now comes as a two

-disk set.

Besides the main program disk. a file disk allows data storage on up to 800 speaker drivers, and is shipped loaded with data on over 120 drivers from various manufacturers.

The program calculates and graphically plots the response and displacement limited func- tions for both sealed and vented systems.

The inclusion of an electronic filter can also be incorporated in the design chain. The user has full control over graph scales and resolution.

A complete crossover design program allows

6, 12, 18 and

24 dB per octave cross- overs to he designed complete with impe- dance correction circuits. Nine utility pro- grams calculate various often

-used functions, including reference efficiency from Thiele

Small parameters, vent tunings, passive radiator mass, etc.

Computer requirements are an

Apple

II computer with 64K memory; Applesoft ROM and two disk drives. The Grappler parallel printer interface is supported for graphic screen print

-outs.

An IBM version is pres- ently in development.

Computer -Aided Speaker Design has a suggested retail price of $99.95.

SCIENTIFIC DESIGN SOFTWARE

For additional information circle #109

SOUNDMASTER AUDIO EDITING

SYSTEM FROM AMTEL

SYSTEMS

SoundMaster is a

SMPTE timecode- based, computer- assisted editing control sys- tem. designed for audio -for -video and audio

- for -film post production, and is described as offering the speed, ease of operation and flex- ibility previously available only in videotape editing systems.

IIMtT

1

III

l

1M

111 tr

-14 PL Sr

REC

Emr

WM

MI/

MO= me

WIN

The system can simultaneously control up to four tape machines

(typically three audio and one video transport), using tape syn- chronizers as intelligent interfaces to the transports. An IBM microcomputer acts as a host for SoundMaster's custom hardware and software.

The system can store and execute over

2,500 editing events. Three different video display screens are generated that furnish the user with: real -time transport status display, an edit decision list with list management functions; and a system parameter set -up screen. [See a feature article in the June issue of

R -e p for a full description of operational features in -use at

The

Master's Workshop

-

Editor.

[

List price of the Sound

Master system is which includes the IBM computer.

$9,995,

Users who already own the necessary com- puter hardware may purchase the system for

$8,195.

AMTEL SYSTEMS, INC.

For additional information circle

#110

E

-MU

SYSTEMS ANNOUNCE

EMULATOR

SP

-12

SAMPLING

PERCUSSION SYSTEM

The new unit uses

12

-hit data sampling, and comes pre

- programmed with a full corn

- plement of acoustic and electronic drum and percussion sounds.

Additional sounds can be loaded from cassette, an optional disk drive, or custom sounds recorded with the

SP -12's built -in user sampling facility. Because the

SP -12 samples into battery- backed memory. sounds are always available instantly the

SP-

12 is turned on.

Tuning, decay, mix level and tempo

(including gradual accelerados and de- accelerados) are totally programmable, while touch

-sensitive play buttons provide control over dynamics and expression. And with the

SP -12's multiparameter modes. any sound can be assigned to all eight play buttons

LaSalle stocks over 250 product lines, giving you the widest choice.

LaSalle's prices are the lowest, offering you the best values.

Their product knowledge and service are expert, supporting you both before and after your purchase.

:

Il,,

L,>.:

R-e p l-16

August

1985

Call:

inside MA

(617) 924-7767

Nationwide (800) 533 -3388

or

Visit:

75

North

Beacon

Street

Watertown, MA 02172

1116

Boylston

Street

Boston, MA

02115

22 LaSalle Road

West

Hartford, CT 06107

For additional information circle #108

alle

Professional Audio

&

Musical Instruments

simultaneously with a different tuning or level setting for each button.

Flexible repeat and subsong functions greatly simplify the creation of complex sound structures.

A step programming mode lets the user create intricate rhythm patterns, as well as examine and edit patterns originally programmed in real time.

°

1

L

For use in professional film, video, and recording applications the SP.

12 includes a built

-in

SMPTE code reader generator, as well as a standard

24 pulse

- per -quarter clock.

A full MIDI implementation allows control from MIDI keyboards, sequencers, and computers.

Suggested list price for the Emulator

SP

-12 is $2.745.

E

-MU SYSTEMS. INC.

For additional information circle

#111

SENNHEISER ELECTRONIC

INTRODUCES

EM 2103

-9

NARROWBAND VHF

RECEIVER

Utilizing true diversity circuitry, the new receiver is said to offer consistent, noise -free performance. Available for use with carrier frequencies ranging from

150 to

216

MHz, the

EM

2003

-9 offers uninterrupted, broadcast

- quality audio, and employs the same front

- end helical filters as the company's larger multi -channel diversity receivers, which result in extremely high selectivity of

RF, and the elimination of intermodulation from other stray carriers.

Bryston's 2B -LP

Bryston has been known and respected for years as the manufacturer of a line of amplifiers which combine the transparency and near -perfect musical accuracy of the finest audiophile equipment, with the ruggedness, reliability and useful features of the best professional gear. Thus, Bryston amplifiers land preamplifiers) can be considered a statement of purpose to represent the best of both worlds

- musical accuracy and professional reliability to the absolute best of our more than 20 years' experience in the manufacture of high-quality electronics.

The

2B -LP is the newest model in

Bryston's line. and delivers 50 watts of continuous power per channel from a package designed to save space in such applications as broadcast monitor. mobile sound trucks, headphone feed, cue. and any installation where quality must not be limited by size constraints. As with all Bryston amplifiers. heatsinkiag is substantial, eliminating the requirement for forced -air cooling in the great majority of installations. This is backec up by very high peak current capability (24 amperes per channel) and low distortion without limiting, regardless of type and phase angle of load.

In short, the 28-LP is more than the functional equivalent of our original 28 in spite of the fact that it occupies only half the volume, and will fit into a single 1.75" rack -space.

The usefulness of the 2B -LP is extended by a long list of standard features. including: Balanced inputs: female XLR input jacks: dual level- controls: isolated headphone jack; and individual two-colour pilot -light /clipping indicator LEDs for each channel. In addition. the channels maybe withdrawn from the front of the amplifier while it is in the rack. vastly facilitating any requirement for field- service. including fuse -replacement.

Of course, in keeping with Bryston's tradition of providing for special requirements, the 2B-LP can be modified or adapted to your wishes on reasonably short notice, and at nomiral cost.

Best of all, however, the 2B-LP is a

Bryston. Thus the sonic quality is unsurpassed. The difference is immediately obvious. even to the uninitiated.

Other amplifiers in

Brystons line include the model

3B. at 100 watts per channel, and

The model 4B. at 200 watts per channel All ratings continuous power at 8 ohms at leCs than 01% IM or

THD

IN

THE

UNITED STATES

[__i

RFD °4, fIVERMONT

F.,

1.

Montpelier, Vermont 06602

IN

CANADA

S/

Vsk

,e

It t

MARKETING

LTD

<

1». R,adale Ontor o,

Canodn M9V

31'6

1.,

The unit may be rack -mounted or stacked, and has an integral antenna splitter for effi- cient use of antennas and installation simplic- ity. LED instrumentation displays both audio modulation and RF strength, as well as the selection of the strongest

RF signal at the two antennas. Adjustable squelch guarantees positive muting of unwanted signal. Two dis- crete outputs

-

balanced and unbalanced

--are available, each with a separate level control for applications requiring both moni- tor mix and live mix without the use of line splitters.

SENNHEISER

ELECTRONIC

CORPORATION

For additional information circle

11112

MODE

THRESHOLD trt

Gale

Ell,

E rl!

By

Popular

Demand...

Now, there's a

Gatex module for your dbx

F

-900 frame. And, as you would expect, the unit incor- porates all of the the important features that made four -channel version an overwhelming success.

In its noise gating mode, Gatex employs gram Dependent

Pro-

Attack to eliminate turn -on

"pop

", while maintaining attack times sufficiently short to accommodate all percussion instru- ments.

Program Controlled Sustain automati- cally lengthens the release time as dictated by program content. This means freedom from dis- tortion when using shorter release times.

As an added bonus, Gatex offers two expan- sion modes. Users of the original Gatex have found them unsurpassed for reducing noise on instruments, vocals, and mixed program material.

The Gatex

904, just what you'd expect from...

_Audio

USAudio Inc.

P.O. Box

40878 /NASHVILLE,

TN 37204

(615)

297 -1098

August

1985

0

R -e p 147

THE

BEST SPECS

COST

LESS.

Frequency response:

20 Hr. to 20 kHz

±.5dB

.5m'. to

6 volt

R\lS capacity without clipping or distortion

.05%

THD

Whirlwind "l'RSP

-1 transformer for signal isolation and splitting with uniform response

(single secondary). isolation and splitting with uniform response

(dual secondary).

Whirlwind

TRHL -M transformer for Hi to

Lo signal conversions and signal isolation.

The best specs in the business... for half the price. From The Interface Specialists

whirlwind

THE INTERFACE SPECIALISTS

Whirlwind

Music, Inc.,

P.O. Box 1075

Rochester, New York 14603

(716)663

-8820

New

Products

RLA

INTERNATIONAL INTRODUCES

X3000A

ELECTRONIC CROSSOVER

The two

-channel, three -way unit provides a variety of outputs: a sub -bass output with a bandwidth of

30 to

100

Hz; a full output with a bandwidth of

30

Hz to

65 kHz; and a tweeter output with a bandwidth of

7 to

65 kHz. The sub -bass and tweeter outputs have front

- panel level controls allowing

16 dB of boost or cut, while the full output has a level control allowing

6 dB of boost or 40 dB of cut. The input signal is thus divided into a buffered and subsonic -filtered, full- spectrum output that is available to feed the main system crossover, as well as two special purpose low- and high

- end drive signals that can be used to feed additional power amplifiers connected to sub

-bass bins and tweeter arrays. tion of an outboard equalizer (such as the future RLA Q5000 rotary program equalizer) or any special effects equipment.

The X3000A has a suggested retail price of

$550.

RLA

INTERNATIONAL, LTD.

For additional information circle

#117

TANNOY

SR840 POWER

AMPLIFIER

The SR840 is a

250W per channel stereo amplifier designed for use in high -level studio monitoring, professional sound reinforce- ment systems and high quality public address work. The new amp is described to be the

The sub -bass and tweeter filters are 24 dB per octave, Linkwitz

-Riley slopes, and the subsonic filter is 24 dB per octave Butter- worth at 30

Hz. All outputs are balanced line drivers with a maximum output level of

+26 dB into

600 ohms; input is active differential, transformerless -balanced.

In addition, an EQ loop in the sub -bass circuitry enables inser- result of "no- compromise" design and manu- facturing standards: before dispatch each completed unit receives a full test on every specified parameter.

Quoted technical specifications include max RMS output power at clip point

(

+0, -0.5 dB) with both channels driven into

8 ohms of

250W, 440W into

4 ohms, 645W into

20 ohms, and 860W bridged mono into

8 ohms;

THD and noise of less than

0.05 at any power over band

20

Hz to

20 kHz (typically

0.01% at 200W into

8 ohms); intermodulation distortion less than

0.03% (50 Hz and

7 kHz,

CHICAGO

MUSIC EXPO

Presented by

CHICAGO

HOTEL

CONTINENTAL

SEPT.

20

21

22 g(Eaq

EntEZa:ises,

Jrnc.

Sponsored

by

FLANNER'S

PROAUDIO,INC.

Se...ng tre

B,oaaroo

Call or write:

CHICAGO MUSIC EXPO

110

Schiller, Suite

205

Elmhurst,

IL

60126

312- 279 -8323

Seminars

'by

n a ra s

and

CENTER

FOR

MUSIC

BUSINESS

STUDIES

"Finding your place in the music business."

279-8323

R

-e

/p

148

August

1985

4:1

8

-12 dB); Unweighted noise ref 250W into ohms -105 dB (A-weighted

116 dB); full power bandwidth

+0,

-0.5 dB

15

Hz to 40 kHz; and crosstalk at reference rated output at

1 kHz better than -75 dB.

Output indica- tors have a rise time of

10 milliseconds, a fall time of

1 second- and }2 of indicated level.

TANNOY

NORTH AMERICA, INC.

For additional information circle

#118

FAIRLIGHT

UNVEILS CMI

SERIES III

DIGITAL

SYNTHESIZER

Technical features of the new Series Ill include:

Digital sound quality using

16

-bit, random

- access waveform storage and converters;

A

total

16 audio output channels, each with their own

16

-bit

DAC, VCF, VCA and output connector;

Ability to route any of

16 voices to any of the

16 output channels;

Massive common Waveform RAM to allow multiple samples across the keyboard, differ- ent waveform samples per keyboard section selectable or blended from performance dynamics;

Several methods of off

-line synthesis, includ- ing full and

Fourier analysis and resynthesis, FM comprehensive sound manipulation and sustain techniques;

Up

to seven Megawords of Waveform RAM may be installed, providing

140 seconds of

16

-bit sound when sampled at 50 kHz. (This

:ime can be split as needed between instru- ments.) The sample time is more than doubled if

WRAM is used in 8

-bit mode

(at

44.1 kHz sample rate: 5.2 minutes) Sixteen and

8

-bit waveform modes can be inter- mixed. and up to

120 independent sounds accessed for each

"Voice"

(e.g. multisam- pling over split keyboard);

*Stereo sampling to WRAM at 50 kHz, mono sampling to

100 kHz;

*Playback sample rate to

200 kHz;

*External control via

MIDIíSMPTE and click- track;

Control of external equipment via MIDI,

SMPTE in out and

TTL clock signals;

A

Real

-time Composer sequencer can con- trol up to 80 instruments simultaneously

16 internally, and up to

64 via

Fairlight's

16

-voice slave racks or the four MIDI output sockets; and

"Mega- sampling" capability to and from

60

Mbyte hard disk.

The main physical changes from

Series IIX are an expanded motherboard, to hold the extra waveform memories, a

500

-watt, switch

- mode power supply and a

150

-watt analog supply. A small high -resolution

X -Y graphics tahltet has also been introduced, in place of the previous lightpen, providing greater accuracy, ability to draw on black areas of the screen, and elimination of operator fatigue.

FAIRLIGHT

INSTRUMENTS

For additional information circle

#119

TASCAM

SERIES

200

SOUND

REINFORCEMENT AND

RECORDING MIXERS

The M

-208 (eight Inputs) and M

-216 (16 inputs) rack- mountable mixers feature four program busses, each with its own pan and fader, and a stereo bus also with separate faders. The program bus faders allow multi- ple input-channel signals to be grouped on a single fader for quick and accurate control during live performances, or recording.

The Series

200 also provides eight tape inputs with corresponding switches in the channel strips, so that an eight

-track recorder can be left connected and brought into the mixer for playback monitoring.

Each channel strip provides: pad, trim, channel insert, overload indicator, two tape

- selector switches, three

-band shelving and sweep -type parametric EQ, effect and fold-

Bruce Swedien -1984

Grammy Award winning engineer of Michael Jackson's "Thriller" album; and engineer for Quincy Jones, James Ingram, Sergio Mendez, Missing Persons...on the

DI

-100 Direct Box:

"The DI -100 has a very warm sound... very rich. It sounds just great to me!" is

"I like to use it with synthesizers.

What

I do is take an output from the synthesizer, and because the DI

-100 capable of Line

Level, I run it right into the tape machine... straight through... by -pass the console totally!

It works great!

Oh... and you know what else

I really like about it

?... that little gain control...that's handy!"

The DI- 100...

"it stays right with me,

I won't give it up!!!"

We appreciate the support of our users...thanks again to:

BRUCE SWEDIEN

DAN WALLIN

GLEN GLEN SOUND,

-LOS

ANGELES

DISNEY STUDIOS

-LOS

ANGELES

EFX

STUDIOS

-LOS

ANGELES

WONDERLAND STUDIOS -LOS

ANGELES

-LOS

ANGELES

ABC -TV

CLAIRE BROS.- MANHEIM,

PA

ALASKA

Anchorage

ARIZONA

Phoenix

CALIFORNIA

Burbank

San Francisco

Whittier

CONNECTICUT

New Haven

Stamford

W

Hartford

FLORIDA

Jacksonville

Miami

Tampa

GEORGIA

Smyrna

INDIANA

Evansville

Indianapolis

.

Alaska Stage Craft

Studiobudders

Sound Genesis

Whittier Music

Goldie Libro Music

Audiotechniques

La Salle Music

New Hope Sound

Harris Audio

Paragon Music

The

Ear Audio

Music Mart

Dallas Music Pro Shop

Indy Pro-Audio

MASSACHUSETTS

Boston

Brockton

Dalton

E.0

WUlhtzer, Inc.

Scorpio Sound

Berkshire Pro-Audio

Watertown

MICHIGAN

La Salle Music

Saginaw Watermelon Sugar

MINNESOTA

Savage LaVonne Wegener Music

NEVADA

Las Vegas Celestial Sound /Light

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Hempstead

NEAT

NEW YORK

New

York

New

York

New York

Audiofechni ues

Martin Audio Video

Night Owl Music Supply

NORTH CAROLINA

Grant

Falls

OHIO

Cleveland

Dayton

Fantasy Music

Central Music Exchange

Hauer Music

SWEDISH RADIO 8 TELEVISION

CENTRE CULTURAL

-MANITOBA. CANADA

ANN

-

MARGRET SHOW

SHIRLEY MacLAINE SHOW

WAYNE NEWTON SHOW

ENGELBERT HUMPERDINK SHOW

CAESAR'S PALACE

-LAS

VEGAS

HARRAH'S-

ATLANTIC CITY NJ

CALL

US

AND ASK ABOUT

OUR NEW RACKMOUNT DIRECT

BOXES'!

OREGON

Portland

Portland

PENNSYLVANIA

Philadelphia

SOUTH CAROLINA

Charleston

TENNESSEE

Nashville

TEXAS

Austin

Dallas

Dallas

WASHINGTON

Bellevue

Seattle

WEST VIRGINIA

Charleston

WISCONSIN

Waukesha

Portland Music

RMS Sound

Tekcom

Xeno

Fox

Valley

Corp

Music

Sound.

Inc.

Avrom

Gemini Sound

Guitars

RMS

Etc

Sound

Appalachian Sound

Flanners

Pro

Audio

-Audio

T h1

ARTISTS

X-

PONENT ENGINEERING

BOX

2331

RP MENLO PARK CA

94025

(415) 365 -5243

©1984 AXE

August

15785

R-e/p

149

For additional information circle

#120

In

Al tests, this tiny condenser microphone equals any world

-class professional microphone.

Any size, any price.

Actual Size

Compare the

Isomax

II to any other microphone. Even though it mea- sures only

5/15"

X

5

/e" and costs just

$189.95,* it equals any world -class microphone in signal purity.

And Isomax goes where other micro- phones cannot: Under guitar strings near the bridge, inside drums, inside pianos, clipped to horns and woodwinds, taped to amplifiers

(up to 150 dB sound level!).

Isomax opens up a whole new world of miking techniques far too many to men- tion here. We've prepared information sheets on this subject which we will be happy to send to you free upon request.

We'll also send an

Isomax brochure with complete specifications.

Call or write today.

*

Pro net price for Omnidirectional, Cardioid,

Hypercardioid, and Bidirectional models.

COUNTRYMAN ASSOCIATES INC.

417 Stanford Ave., Redwood

City, CA

94063 (415) 364 -9988

New

Products

back level controls. bus design switches, and pre -fader listen (solo) switch. Balanced and unbalanced inputs are available for all input channels, as are balanced and unbalanced outputs for the program busses and stereo bus. Sub -buss inputs allow the

Mixer to accept signals from another mixer, to increase the available signal sources.

The Master Section includes, in addition to the program faders, pan controls and the stereo faders; effect return level and pan con- trols; master level controls for effect and foldback mixes; solo master level; and switch- ing matrixes for the monitor and meters.

The M-208 carries a suggested retail price of

$995, while the M -216 is priced at `51,495.

TASCAM

For additional information circle s123

IMAGESCOPE

STEREO PHASE

DISPLAY

UNIT

FROM

B

&B

SYSTEMS

The new unit displays the complex stereo audio signal graphically showing the actual dispersion pattern of the sound energy as it will appear in a typical listening environnent.

The Imagescope provides a true visual real

- time representation of the balance, separa- tion and level of the stereo signal, and is intended for use in recording studio and audio production post- production facilities, in addition to the

TV and

AM broadcaster looking to stereo.

990

Discrete

Op

-Amp

k

In recording and production, Imagescope is used to position exactly any track or tracks in the stereo image, in real -time, thus avoid- ing stereo phase errors. The unit is also used at transmission sites to verify separation and or mono compatihilitç

B

&B SYSTEMS, INC.

For additional information circle 5124

SENNHEISER MKH- 40 -P48

STUDIO CONDENSER

MICROPHONE

The combination of symmetrical capsule with optimal resistive loading is said to result in a highly linear frequency response, and in inherent noise level that is virtually imper-

Electronic Design by Deane Jensen

Packaging

&

Production Design by John Hardy

Fast:

18V

/µS

@

150 Ohms,

16V

/µS

@

75 Ohms

Quiet: -133.7

dBv E.I.N.

(20-

20kHz, shorted input, unweighted)

Powerful:

+24 dBv

@

75 Ohms (Ref:

OdBv

=

.775 V)

AND IT

SOUNDS GREAT

!

THESE USERS AGREE:

Sunset Sound,

JVC

Cutting center, Mobile Fidelity,

K

-Disc Mastering,

Sony (Digital Audio

Div.), Capitol Records, Inc., WFMT Chicago, Jensen

Transformers, Bonneville Productions, DeMedio

Engineering,

ABC -TV,

20th

Century Fox,

Armin Steiner, and many more

!

THE HARDY CO. Box AA631, Evanston, IL

60204

(312) 864

-8060

R -e- p 150

August

19s:> ceiveable by modern digital recording equip- ment. The MKH

-40 is described as handling both high and low sound -pressure levels with ease and accuracy, and is capable of record- ing the most subtle sonic nuance to the loud-

est boom without coloration, noise, or inter

- modulation distortion.

Featuring a cardiod directional pat tern. the

MKH

-40 has a quoted frequency response of

40 Hz to

20 kHz, and a sensitivity of

25 mV

Pa (8 mV

Pa),

±1 dB. Nominal source impedance is 150 ohms, balanced, and min- imum load impedance

1 kohm. Equivalent

RMS SPL (DIN

45500) is 12 dBa (16 dBa), and equivalent peak SPL dBa).

(CCIR

468)

21 dBa (26

Maximum

SPL for less than

0.5

"

THD at

1kHz is quoted

134 dB (142 dB).

SENNHEISER ELECTRONIC

CORPORATION

For additional information circle

#125

CS -1200 POWER AMPLIFIER

FROM PEAVEY

Peavey begins shipment of a new

"power house" amp, the CST"-1200.

This unit is larger than their extremely popular

CS.400TM and

CS.800TM models that have been ac- claimed as the industry standard in power amplification.

The new CS

-1200 is described as a

"brute" of an amplifier, built for ruggedness, reliability and superior performance.

Large continuous duty power transformers are of a new semitoroidal

-type, and the entire unit is designed to meet rigid European electronic and heat dissipation specifications.

The power amp has two separate chan- nels, and its two massive power supplies are complemented by a large number of rugged silicon output transistors in a unique "tunnel- like" dissipation tube that maximizes heat dissipation: it is rated

600 watts RMS contin- uous per channel

8 into

4 ohms, and

1,200 into ohms in bridge mode.

As well as Peavey's patented DDT com- pression. the CS

-1200 features the com- pany's new

"back porch" accessory plug

-in patch panel for balanced input transformers, and crossover special function modules.

Suggested retail price of the CS

-1200 is

$1,199.50.

PEAVEY ELECTRONICS

For additional information circle

#126

LED matrix to locate room acoustic anomo- lies.

Through the use of an internal pink

-noise generator and sensing microphone, the

DAX

2800 will perform computer -controlled automatic equalization and quickly

EQ a sys- tem to any memory setting.

The unit also provides instantaneous, automatic

EQ and RTA curve averaging of up to eight curves, and can be weighted as much as 7:1. be

Sensitivity of EQ or RTA settings can changed from

3 dB to

1 dB.

NEI

LAUNCHES

DAX

2800 THIRD- OCTAVE

ANALYZER /EQUALIZER

The DAX

2800 combines the functions of a third

-octave, real -time analyzer with a dig- itally controlled third-octave graphic equal- izer, and adds a computer for measurement and control functions. Under the control of the on -board computer, gain settings on each of 28 ISO -centered filtering bands can be stored and instantly recalled from

16 memory locations: specific requirements for

EQ can be recalled on demand by the push of a button.

Additionally, the unit incorporates a dig- itally controlled RTA that can display the spectrum of an audit) source on the

28

-band

For the sound contractor, the

DAX

2800 acts as the

"master" computer to download into the DAX

EQ POD any prescribed room equalization curve, the latter unit is a blank

- panelled, third

-octave equalizer for perman- ent sound system installations, and cannot be adjusted by unauthorized personnel without the

DAX

2800.

NEPTUNE ELECTRONICS,

INC.

For additional information circle #'27

NEW UREI MODEL 809

TIME ALIGN MONITOR FOR

SMALLER CONTROL ROOMS

The

809

Studio Monitor features an all -new

12

-inch coaxial driver that is said to deliver a true, one -point sound source, tight bass and superior stereo imaging. The new coaxial driver incorporates a titanium diaphragm compression driver in the HF section that

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AMEK 3000.

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Auto_

36/32/36. Automated

Auditranics

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90k

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INTERNATIONAL,

INC.

TELEX (316706)

IMC (OCEANAUDIO -US) additional information circle

#128

August

1985

O

Reip

151

2k

170

170 r

650

I.6k

I.2k

200

600

I.6k

Ik

2k

2.2k

450

750

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18k

800

2k

500

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48k

2k

8

5k

We have the necessary quality hardware: top

Corners, handles, catches, aluminum, extrusions, cables, connectors, vinyl and speakers.

Write for free 60 page brochure and price -list.

Please send

2

$ for postage.

rcc

FCC

-Fittings

Hawthorne, NJ

07506

Postbox 356 e

Phone: 201

423 4405 extends response envelope to beyond 17.5 kHz.

When high- and low

-frequency portions of sound do not reach the ear at the same time, the result is

"time smear" which, UREI explains, can be fatiguing after hours of criti- cal listening. The Time

Align" technique util ized by the

809 solves

"time smear" by con- sidering driver placement and adjusting crossover group delay parameters to achieve simultaneous arrival of sound from the voice coils of the two transducers.

STEWART ELECTRONICS

EXPANDABLE PHANTOM

POWER SUPPLY SYSTEM be

The new expandable system is designed to used with most microphones and acces- sories requiring

48

VDC.

Starting with the basic single -channel supply, the system is expandable to a full

12 channels, features full

48

Because of

VDC supply. individual channel regulation, each channel is said to feature very low cross- talk, hum and noise.

Low hum, coupled with isolation from input to output, permits the option of unbalanced operation, as well as providing protection for the inputs of equip- ment that does not have its own isolation.

The system also features short -circuit pro- tection, which allows adjacent channels to remain unaffected in the event of a short.

STEWART ELECTRONICS

For additional information circle

#132

The unit utilizes the patented UREI HF horn with its diffraction buffer for correct acoustic impedance matching and smooth out -of -band response. nate the midrange

Shadow slots elimi- shadowing common to conventional coaxial loudspeaker horns, while ceramic magnet structures are said to ensure that the system's sensitivity will not degrade with time or continual use.

JBL PROFESSIONAL

For additional information circle #131

-

ADVERTISEMENT

-

SIMON SYSTEMS RDB -400

FOUR

-WAY DI

BOX

The new unit is a four- channel version of the

DB

-1A DI with added features and capa- bility. The AC- powered RDB -400 is based on a totally active circuit design there are no transformers in the audio path.

A three -position output level switch pro- vides a

"normal" output which, unlike other

LAKE EXPANDS

CAPABILITIES

What's new at LAKE? Besides the of new people influx

...

A host of new computer systems. sign,

Computers that assist in the de- engineering, drafting, and service of audio /video systems.

One of the most excit- ing new computer systems is the audio de- partments Tecron TEF System

10.

A port- able audio spectrum analyzer that can be used in the field and the data brought back to the office for further analysis.

LAKE is involved in the design and building of television stations, recording studios, post production editing systems, and sound reinforcement systems worldwide. A com- puter system that could quickly analyze the acoustic parameters of any space was very important to the engineering department.

They are currently using the TEF 10 to help expedite the engineering requirements of an expanding customer base.

An example of its value was recently dis- cussed at a meeting

I attended. It seems that microphones placed at a specific area on stage were experiencing excessive feed- back.

The client had tried a number of cor- rective measures to no avail.

LAKE's en- gineers, using the TEF

10 were able to pin- point the problem, something that at first

LAKE'S audio systems engineers Dennis Smyers (foreground) and Steve Blake analyze data

glance seemed insignificant, a steam pipe located near the speaker cluster was causing a strong reflection into the problem area.

Covering the pipe with absorbent material, eliminated the problem.

on the

TEF

System

10

Without a doubt, this type of commit- ment on the part of LAKE in R

&

D, positions them as the systems company of choice in the audio field. Contact them at

(617)

244 -6881.

For additional information circle #130

Dls, has no insertion loss;

"attenuation" mode with variable attenuation trim; and

"line level" output mode with line trim for direct connection to a line input or tape deck, bypassing the console completely.

Because the unit is independently powered, design techniques are said to have been util- ized that are not possible with a phantom

- powered

DI.

The RDB

-400 can be floor-or rack -mounted, and has front and rear XLR, balanced out- puts, and front

-panel unbalanced buffered outputs.

Suggested retail price of the RDB-

400 is

8895.

SIMON SYSTEMS

For additional information circle

4133

RANE MODEL

GE

-30

THIRD -OCTAVE GRAPHIC

EQUALIZER

Every aspect of the GE

-30's design is said to have been analysis for fully optimized by computer maximum accuracy, minimum phase shift, minimum noise contribution, the greatest flexibility, and total freedom from imprecise filter bandwidth vatiations com- mon to other brands of graphic equalizers.

Having been subjected to a thorough series of worst

-case calculations by computer automation, the GE

-30 is described as provid- ing the highest levels of reliability and free- dom from environmental stresses associated with the sometimes abusive requirements of commercial

-audio installations.

Features include

30 -band second

-gen- eration, state -variable constant -bandwidth filters; boost /cut

(

+12 dB boost and -15 dB cut) or cut -only

(

-18 dB) capability with LED indicator; switchable, active

-balanced or transformer

-balanced output; sweepable ultrasonic and sweepable subsonic filters; plus overload indicator and automatic "fail

- safe" hard wire bypass with LED indicator.

RANE

CORPORATION

For additional information circle 134

MODEL

310

COMPRESSOR

LIMITER, LEVELER

FROM

ROCKTRON

The Model

310 is a fully automatic compressor leveler that offers program

- dependent ratio, attack and release with selectable compression or leveling modes.

The unit employs Rocktron's unique log- arithmic compression for smooth com- pression, the company says.

The input gain switch allows the musician to plug his instrument directly into the

Model

310 for use in live applications; when used in this mode, the musician may also use the

310 as a pre -amp.

The compression control simultaneously adjusts the threshold of compression and the input level to the compression circuit.

Compression ratio automatically changes from

1:1 to de program. Output level is adju over a

25 dB range.

Two different modes of operation are selectable via the front panel: compression and leveling.

In leveling mode, attack and release times are slow enough to have a minimal effect on program transients and short -term changes in dynamics.

The Model

310 also features a 10- segment gain reduction meter for monitoring the amount of gain reduction taking place.

ROCKTRON

CORP.

For additional information circle

135

TANNOY

FSM "TWIN

15

-INCH

STUDIO MONITOR

The new FSM is an addition to the com- pany's dual- concentric

SRM Series of moni- tors. Improvements in specifications are said to have resulted in a high power, high sensitiv- ity, studio monitor capable of resolving fine detail at extremely high SPL.

The cabinet constructed of

1.25

-inch medite

(a very dense. hard, manufactured timber product) is divided into two totally separate internal chambers. The bass reflex system employs one

15

-inch dual -concentric for mid high frequencies, and one

15

-inch transducer for bass.

The system also utilizes an all -new

Low

Frequency Window for bass equalization and

Hard Wire crossover technology.

Suggested Retail of the FSM is

$4,:98.

TANNOY

NORTH AMERICA, INC.

For additional information circle

4136

QUIET...

PROGRAM EQUALIZATION

2

L

-C

ACTIVE

Channel Octave

Band

Graphic Equalizer

4100A

The model 4100A features Active.

(L -C) Tuned

Fi to -s.

Inductor -Capacitor

Tie resonant frequency of each filter is derived PASSIVELY by a

Tuned

L

-C Pair.

This drastically reduces the number of active devices nec- essary to build a

Ten Band Graphic Equalizer. Only seven operational amp ifiers are in each channel's sig- nal path: THREE in the differential amplifier input:

TWO

ONE for filter summat on:

ONE for input level control: for the output buter.

The result

...

the LOWEST

"Worst

Case"

NOISE Jf any graphic equalizer in the industry

...

-90dBv or better.

,

t:srtm

-----

222222

^...-

....T,.T.,T..;..;.

;

;...;..

THE WHITE INSTRUMENTS

ADVANTAGE

-

CRAFTSMANSHIP

Hand Tuned Filters

Brushed, Painted

Alurrinum

Chassis

Captive, Threaded Fasteners

-No

Sheet Metal

Screws

Integrated Circuits in Sockets

Glass Epoxy Circuit Boards

-Well

Supported

High

Grade

Components

Highest degree of Calibration in the ndustry

100

°%o

Quality Control

Throughout th3

Manufactur- ing Process

Instant

Above and Beyond the

Call of Duty

Re- sponse to

Field

Problems.

For additional information circle x+137

instruments, inc.

P.O. Box 698 Austin,

Texas

78767

512/892

-0752

TELEX

776 409 WHITE INST AUS

:\u,ust

I li e p l.i:i

LL

Pir

YRE

NOT

- -

SELL IT

!

THE

ORGANIZATION

YOUR

NATIONAL

CLEARINGHOUSE

FOR

FINE

USED

AUDIO

&

VIDEO

.

.

Our mailers reach

'

als every

- month. We'll list your us

-

equipment free of charge- help you find that rare i e n

e

Or.

Ye.

THE

BERTECH ORGANIZATION

Distributors, brokers and custom fabricators of quality audio and video equipment.

6804

FOOTHILL BLVD.

TUJUNGA, CA 91042

(818) 352

-3181

THINK

BERTECH FIRST

!

Classifies

-

RATES

$82 Per

Column Inch

(21h"

x

11

One

-inch minimum, payable

in advance. Four inches

-

maximum.

Space over

four

inches for at

regular display will

be charged

advertising

rates.

FREE

32pq Catalog 8

50 Audio Video Appiic.

EQUIPMENT for SALE

,, iM( s

OSC

,0 si,.o

Yono

EQUIPMENT

FOR SALE

Used

&

New

Mics., Etc.

Mixers. Amps, Effects.

YAMAHA, JBL.

BGW, SHURE,

ETC.

Low Prices. eg: BGW 750B's, $700.

Lexicon

224,

$4.950 Quantity discounts.

A -1

AUDIO,

6322

DeLongpre

Ave..

Hol- lywood, Calif.

90028.

(213) 465 -1101.

AUTOLOCATORS

CM50full function microprocessor based autolocator and SMPTE reader available for

20 different multitracks, typically:

M79,

MM1100, A80.

You've seen it on the 616 and X80!

Call us now if your multitrack needs a little help finding its way around. Prices around

$1100.

Applied Microsystems Ltd.,

(213) 854 -5098. a

Aga,. D,ri Ample eOPAMP LABS INC

TV

Audio

8

(213) 934

Rcd

Prod

Contain

-3566

1033

N

Sycamore Av LOS ANGELES CA,

90038

For additional information circle #141

MCI JH -532C

FOR

SALE

Console. Plasma Meters,

Automation, Producers Desk, Center

Grouping Masters. Reverb

Returns with

EO.

Excellent condition. asking $53.5K.

Call Alan (312)

822

-9127.

MCI

FOR SALE

JH542B console with 28

I/O modules. Automated Plasma Meters

SACRAFICE

$25,000.00 or

B

O call

Bobby

(212) 921

-1711.

of

Sound

Arts

Offering

5 wk

Hollywood

University

I

/

10 wk

/

6 month

RECORDING

ENGINEERING

WORKSHOPS

University of Sound Arts r. Ueeri producing tomorrow s recording

For the last nine ye. engineers and vide(

The

We use the finest and the most modern state of ihr art equipment engineers that are most effe(tivf' and current in their approach in the world. thus producing

Also available:

1 yr. program

In

Audlo-Video Technology

CALL COLLECT in

California

213-

467 -5256 or

1-

800

-228-2095 or write to

University of Sound Arts. 6363 Sunset

Bi.,

RCA Bldg.,

Hollywood,

CA 90028

AM

PEX

REPLACEMENT

HEADS

RECORDER PARTS

REFURBISHMENT

BASE PLATE

REPAIRS

800

-553 -8712

800 -325 -4243

N

CA

SPRAGUE

íííÁ1:N1:

I II,S

IN1:.

IN

STOCK

IMMEDIATE

SHIPMENT

818 -994 -6602

15759 STRATHERN STREET

VAN NUYS, CA

91406

TELEX 754239

MICS

-

FOR SALE

(4)Countryman

DI:

(4)Shure

57;

(1)AKG D124: (2)EV shotguns: (1)PZM supply; (2)Pzm mies; (1)AKG

451: (2)

Shure

53:

(1)Senn. 421;

(4)Shure

58; (1)

Beyer

500: (4)EV DS35: (2)EVCS15 sup- plies: (2)Sony

ECM377; (2)Sony ECM50:

(2)Shure

59. (1)Senn. TM2002. (6)U87 mies:

Package:

S5000

CONSOLE

-

(1)MCI

24.24

JI-1416

Package:

S6000

OUTBOARD

-

(1)UREI

527:

(4)gain- brains, (4)kepex's

1

)Allison main:

(1)Ashley

66

Param: (2)UREI LA3A

(2)UREI

1176:

(1

)Eventide

1745m:

(1)AKG

BX2O echo:

1

1)

EMT

162 echo

Package $9000

-

Call

-

Dale at Dale

Ashby

201

-658 -3026.

&

Father

"TVU"

PUTS STEREO LEVEL

BARRAPH

ON VIDEO MONITOR

Accurate ni -res drS01ah iS

V6

PPM

Swachable

Scale naS fu annotation peak flasher

005, tlOnable on screen

Tvt.' accepts balanced Imes ano

Semedr0 inputs

Available NOw 5500."

Inovonics

14081458 0552

TPA

325,

NEOTEK CONSOLES

Mint Series

II.

20.16. 40 -TT patch cords. spare module. pedestal.

$10.5K. Series

I.

16.4.2, rec module. flight case.

S5

2K

Call days

802

-658 -6475

30

-day warranty by seller.

Amek

2500 console

36 input.

24 plus

6 out. near mint condition. full parametric

EO continuously variable w 3 dB detents. extra patch points:

6 aux sends and returns: automation ready;

10 grouping busses:

XLR snakes available. (213)

462 -0000.

Sphere Eclipse

B

Console

20 channel.

8 with graphic

EQ in good shape. 360

System

Digital Sample keyboard

- excellent condition and priced to sell.

Allen

&

Heath System

8 console

16 n

8.

Call Jim

R at 614 -663 -2544.

Six new

FAIRLIGHT

CMI

FOR

SALE used by

ATA

R

I

audio lab

408/747

-2870

things

from

NEI:

CLEAN

PATCH

BAYS

NO DOWN

TIME

VERTIGO BURNISHER AND VERTIGO

INJECTOR RESTORE ORIGINAL

PERFORMANCE

TO

YOUR PATCH BAYS

VERTIGO 1.4 TRS AND 77 BURNISHERS:

Each eliminates na al

VERTIGO

14

TRS

AND TT INJECTORS:

Lid) .rgct,r tIwnuly ìuivenl l einttk?le rnlemiillents in breaking contacts (normals) when patch cord has been removed

ONLY uld!hnn:,l

$29.95

EA.

Please write mh,nrld!r r'

-'''d ,r,iPr rim, for

VERTIGO RECORDING SERVICES

12115

Magnolia Blvd.

#116

North Hollywood.

CA

9160/

The

DAX

2800.

A digitally controlled

28

-band third

- octave graphic equalizer.

The

DAX

2800.

A digitally controlled

28

-band third- octave real time analyzer.

The DAX

2800.

Storage and immediate recall of

16 digital

EQ or

RTA memory settings.

The DAX

2800.

Instantaneous automatic

EQ and

RTA averaging! A real time

-saver when equalizing acoustically complex rooms.

The

DAX2800.

Automatic equalization to any

RTA memory setting!

The

DAX 2800 will actually measure the room and quickly

EQ your system to any desired memory setting!

The DAX

2800.

The master programmer for NEI's new

DAX

EQ POD, a blank -panelled, dedicated third

- octave equalizer for permanent sound system installations.

The DAX

2800.

Truly a remarkable integration of high

- quality audio engineering and digital technology.

See our complete line of professional audio equipment.

934 N

E

25th

Avenue Portland. Oregon 97232

Telephone

1503)

232 -4445 Telex 364412 INTR

August 19,5

It

-t p 15.ì

r

Public Auction Sale

Thurs.. Sept.

12 at

11

A.M.

BALOWIN

Well at

220 Broadway

Huntington Station.

Long

Island, New York maintained. top of the line equipment of complete

mastering

&

recording studio

(equipped for cassette tapes

& record discs(

and mobile recording equipmen

.

Studio Equipment:

Tape recorders by:

Ampex. Nakamichi.

Stellavox.

Telefunken.

TEAC.

Kenwood.

Microphones:

Over 400 Neumann

Mikes incl:

U47 tube. KM87. &

KM89.

& many others by: RCA. EV.

Shure. Capps Crown

PZM. Beyer.

Mike

Stands by: Neumann.

Atlas. Keith Monk: Mike Accessories such as:

Holders. Cables.

Wind Screens: Speaker

Monitors by: UREI.

Altec.

EV:

Amps Tubes

&

Components by:

Fairchild.

UREI.

Macintosh

RCA:

Headphones by: Koss. Beyer: Yamaha

Mixers:

Scotch

206&

207

Blank

Tape: Noise

Reduction Equip. by: dbx. Dolby

A

& B.

Telecom. Advent. and many other items too numerous to mention.

Mastering

Equip:

Neumann Lathe. Westrex Heads.

Pultec

Stereo Panner. UREI

Equalizer. Gotham

Delay

Units. Scamp DeEssers. EMT

Limiters.

UREI

Notch-Peak Filters. EMT Reverbs.

Westrex Amps.

Tape Duplicating Systems by Ampex &

E lectrosound.

Digital

Equip:

Sony

PCM1.

Recorders

& BTX

Digital Encoders.

Sony

Editors.

Mobile

Equip:

Telefunken

&

Nakamichi

Tape Recorders.

Yamaha PM

700

& PM

100

Mixing

Boards.

Klein

&

Hammel

Monitor

Speakers.

Stellavox Bile Special Effects Recorder. All of the preceding are equipped w

/Anvil

Cases.

Misc.

Equip:

Quadrophonic by: Sony.

CVS &

Neumann:

Sylvania

& Sanyo: Sony PVM

VCRS by:

Monitor

& VCR.

CALL

OR

WRITE

FOR

FREE

BROCHURE

By BALDWIN

INDUSTRIAL

LIQUIDATORS INC.

AUCTIONEERS AS AGENTS

PO

Box 920 Wantagh L.I.. N.Y.

11793

Auctioneers

Telephone: (516] 826 -4700

IZ-e p

1+16

August

I'I,ti:,

For additional information circle .145

1

I- oaQUALlTY9

TAC

KAVA

1.000 pure vinyl records in paper sleeves

One color printed labels

All metal parts and processing

Mastering with

Neumann VMS70 lathe

&

SX14 cutter

4S RPM

RI'c.,ru Parkdy.,

12

Album Package

Records and Printed Givors

$399.

I

$1372.

(FOB Dallas)

I

To mere this special price.

This ad ansi accompany order

)

12"

33

-1/3 Album Package Includes full color stock jackets or custom black and white jackets.

Package includes full processing

Re- orders available at reduced cost.

We make full

4

-color Custom Albums, too'

For full ordering Information call

DICK McGREW at 1- 800 -527 -3472 c1+p record manufacturing corp.

902

Industnal Boulevard, Dallas Texas 75201

12141

741 -2027

EQUIPMENT for

SALE

IBM

PC

/XT COMPATIBLE

AVATAR

SYSTEMS offers a

PC /XT compatible that is better than IBM's and costs less too. 640K Ram. dual drives.

50

°%o faster

Ser

Par Ports.

Battery -Time- clock. w

/Amber monitor

=

S1400.

Color

=

S1625.

Add:

20 meg Hard Disk $700.

Other systems

& software available. (AV related products coming). (IBM is a reg

TM of IBM).

AVATAR SYSTEMS

1-

213 -559 -5350

FOR

SALE

Soundcraft

MCI

3B

Console 32x24c24 -$22K:

JH114 -24 w

Locate

III

-

$19.5K:

Lexicon Prime Time

93

Digital Metronome

2

-

Kepex II's w

4 card rack

-

-

$.5K: UREI

2

Valley

$.8K: Even- tide Harmonizer 949 w/ ALG

-3

-

$2.8K:

UREI 1176

Limiters

$.2k ea.:

Aphex

Compellor Limiter

Gates heads

-

-

S1.4K:

S150:

$2.7K:

-

S850:

Scamp Noise

Ampex AG440 -4tk

Ampex AG440

Lexicon

224 S5K: w/ 2tk

2tk Deck

Eventide

Flanger

-

$450:

-

Klark Teknik

AKG

C

-24

$.5K: Orban 6228 stereo

Tube

Mic

Stereo

EQ

-

EQ

S.4k:

-S1.8K:

Neumann

KM54 Tube Mic speakers

$450:

JBL 4313

-

S.4K:calf 818-

763 -0130.

FOR SALE

Sound Workshop Series 30:

ARMS auto- mation with Super- Group. Full

336 pt. TT patch bay. 28

Main Frame,

25

I

/Os.

IMMACULATE CONDITION!

Must sell.

514K.

Contact: Michael Creamer (305)

298 -3917.

EQUIPMENT for

RENT e

C

-Zeros

You Can Trust!

Our shells are engineered to give you:

*

Perfect azimuth control

*

Smooth and uniform loading at ultra high speeds

*

Easy, direct on- cassette printing or labelling

*

The most competitive pricing

Also available are pancake and bulk loaded premium cassettes

Call

Us

For

Free

Samples!

Jordax California

Inc.

1513

Sixth

St.,

Suite 204

Santa Monica, CA

90401

Phone: (213) 393 -1572

NEW YORK

NASHVILLE scrtEts-ff

"The Audio Rental People"

DIGITAL RECORDERS CONSOLES

TIMECODE WIRELESS MIKES

SYNTHESIZERS EFFECTS

1619

Broadway,

NY NY

(212) 582 -7360

MISCELLANEOUS

5 album. of

IRO cnm stereo sound el

Iccts grouped hg

Under

50 catcgor). cent. a cui.

(;er your free demo of' e

\\

Hie

I

f\.

2125

Guard

S.

IIIIIIC,IIry,ll,

\I\

llUlr/

M

.

PRODUCTION ERE

LIBRARY

For additional information circle n149 please mention

YOU

...

SAW IT

IN

R

-E

/P

For additional information circle .146

News

-

continued from page

. .

. special projects, will handle the produc- tion of live concerts on the East Coast. utilizing his own custom- designed mobile recording mobile studios based in Los Angeles and Cleve- land. Most recently, a worldwide radio broadcast of the

Aid concerts from

Stadium. facility. Startleet's will join

Westwood One mobile

Starfleet produced

Lire

Philadelphia's.1.F.K.

PEAVEY ELECTRONICS COR-

PORATION recently was presented with the Presidential "E Star" Award for continued excellence in export achievements. In accepting the award at a special ceremony ir. dent

Meridian,

Mis- sissippi, company founder and presi-

Hartley

Peavey said:

"1 want to personally tributors in the

92 countries around the world for thank all of our loyal dis- making this possible.

Without their support, we would not be able to accomplish

Presidential this major goal." for the award in exporting a company be selected previously for the

"E''

Eligibility requires

Award, which that the company received in

1978.

EMI

MUSIC build a

Compact

Disc mastering and manufacturing has announced plans facility in the U.K., to to lw located at

Swindon,

Wiltshire.'I'he new plant is scheduled to begin initial pro- duction early next year, with annual capacity gradually increasing to between million

CI)s. The new eight and

10 capability will significantly increase the company's Compact Disc supplies. by which currently are being met manufacturing services in Europe and Japan. At present. Nimbus

Records is reported to be the only company to be manufacturing

Compact Discs in the

U.K.

According to vice

GOTHAM laboratory manager,

Joe

Leung, parts for restoring

AUDIO

NEUMANN ser-

tí47

and

U48 microphones are now availa- ble from the company. Metal parts for

U47

48 mikes have since the been unavailable early Seventies. Leung explains, but now Neumann has begun re- manufacture of a limited supply of housing tubes, head grilles, output transformers and other items. Further details of restoration service costs are available from Leung at:

1!1'2'1 741 -7411.

THE PLANT STUDIOS, Sausalito.

('A, has introduced a mobile mainte- nance service for the San Francisco

Hay

Area. Complete with mobile van, radio dispatch, and utilizing a

Sound'l'echn- nology Model

1510

Tape Recorder Au- dio test System, The Plant's maintenace team will be on

-call

24 hours a day to service recording and production stu- dios. As part of the new service, the facility also is offering a

Preventative

Maintenance Program that checkups will provide of studio equipment on a regu- lar basis.

"Maintenance is a mutual

...

continued overleaf

-

Do you have

any...

equipment for sale?

... employment opportunities?

... studios for sale?

... services to render?

If so, then place your

R

CLASSIFIED

AD

Dollar for dollar

R

-e

/p classifieds reach more people

PROFESSIONALLY employed in

Audio

Production

It's

$82.00 an inch

-

one inch minimum

Type or print your ad clearly

There are

8 lines to

35 an inch and characters to a line

Send check or money order with copy to:

R -e

/p

Classifieds

P.O. Box

2449, Hollywood,

CA 90078

(213) 467

-1111

August 19r

R

-e" p 157

VVs

problem that all recording studios share in this industry." says

Plant owner Stan

Jacox.

"Now it's time, in the Bay

Area. to make it a mutual asset." More details of the new service are available from

The Plant Services:

1415)

332- 6101.

PROFESSIONAL AUDIO SER-

'ICES

h as relocated to larger premises in

Burbank.

Bob

('A.

According to owner

Ila'ken, the company is now based in the former site of

Kendun Recorders, whose

5,000-squire-f()ot facility features an

"acoustically- correct" demonstration room measuring in excess of

5011 square feet.

(i19

The address of the new location is

South Glenwood Place.

Burbank.

CA

915O6: the company's telephone number rentalnsi 4lß:813- tí321).

WOLFF ASSOCIATES has pur- chased the entire

API product line of recording and production consoles, plus modular signal processors.

The final transfer of ownership, which took place in late June, means that the company will now be manufacturing the

API con- sole line once again, as well as develop- ing a new range of products expected to consoles and a date, one include retrofits for older moving that is

-fader system. To authorized dealer for the new product line has been appointed:

Studio

Consultants.

New York; a network of

A &R

Record

Manufacturing

Co

Advanced Music Systems

Agfa Gevaert

AKG

Acoustics

Alesis

Allen

&

Heath Brennel

156

127

22

61

55

141

Alpha Audio

AMEK

138

4

Ampex Corporation

Amtet Systems

Analog

&

Digital

Systems

Aphex Systems, Ltd

Applied Research and

Technólogy

Audio Intervisual Design

Audio Kinetics

37

68

106

-107

128

125

91

74

-75

152 Audio Productive, Inc

Audio -Technica

US

Auratone Corp

18

41

149 AXE

B

&B

Systems

Baldwin Piano Co

Baldwin Liquidators

Bertech Organization

Bryston

35

43

156

154

147

Capitol Magnetics

Cerwin Vega

Cetec Gauss

Chicago Music Expo

Cipher Digital

CMS Digital

Connectronics

Countryman Associates

Crown International

C

-Tape Development dbx, Inc

Delta

Lab

137

49

23

148

67

85

120

150

7,95,135

26

51

Digital Dispatch

Digital Entertainment Corp

Digital

Services

DOD

Electronics

Eastern

Acoustic Works

Educational Electronics

Everything Audio

FCC

Fittings

Fostex

Garfield Electronics

Goldline

Gotham Audio Corp.

Hardy Company

Harris Audio Systems

HRC

IAN

Magnetics

Communications Group, Inc.

Innovation Specialties

JBL, Inc.

Jensen

Tranformers

Jordax

Inc

JVC

Key

Company

Clique, Inc of

America

Klark

-Teknik

Lake Systems

106

-107

123

8

-9

79

3

105

11

32

152

14

97

115

27

150

58

99

145

102

53

108

156

71

103

28

-29

152

THIS ISSUE

OF

R

-E /P

IS

SPONSORED

BY

THE FOLLOWING LIST

OF

ADVERTISERS

La

Salle

Music

LD Systems

Lexicon, Inc

Linn Electronics

Magnetic Reference Labs

Manny's Music

Marshall Electronic

Meyer Sound Labs

Midcom

Mitsubishi Pro

-Audio Group

Monster Cable

NEI

NEOTEK

Rupert Neve, Inc

New World Audio

Nikko Audio

Ocean

Audio

Omni Craft,

Inc

Orban Associates

Otari Corporation

Peavey

Electronics

Polyline Corp

Pro

Audio Services

Rane

Corporation

RCA Records

Rocktron Corp

Samson

Sanken

Microphones

SCV

Audio

Sennheiser Electronics

Shure

Brothers, Inc

Simon Systems

Solid State

Logic

Sony

Soundcraft

Soundtracs, Inc

Sprague Magnetics, Inc

Standard

Tape Labs

Storer Promotions

Studer Revox

/America

Studio Technologies

Summit Audio

Symetrix

Tannoy

TASCAM Division /TEAC Corp

Telex Communications

3

-M

Companies

Trident

U.S A

University of Sound Arts

URSA MAJOR

U.S.

Audio

Valley People

Vertigo Recording Services

Westec

Audio /Video

Westlake

Audio

Whirlwind Audio

White Instruments

Wolff Associates

World Records

Yamaha

2

38

-39

56

154

112

113

63,161

121

157

118

114

24

59

82

60

66

143

122

81

162

69

77

57

109

25

12

-13

15,17,19

154

117

147

100 -101

155

73,124

16

148

153

83

114

20 -21

6

111

151

82

89,130

47

31

146

144

45

93

98

119

131

129

87

8

-9

145

155

133

10 distributors will be chosen within the next few months. the company says.

OCEAN AUDIO, the Los

Angeles

- based used pro

-audio equipment dealer, has rented a

Solid State Logic SL4000E

AMIGO STUDIOS,

North console to

Hollywood. The SSI, board previously was in service at Ridge

Farm Studios,

England, and features a 40

-input main

- frame with full automation capabilities.

According to Ocean

Audio president

David Radler, sole on a at a rate

Amigo is renting the con- three -month renewable lease, of

6% of the SL4000's resale value per month; the studio also has the option end of purchasing the board at the of each lease period. The

Amigo lease is Ocean sole

Audio's first in the con- rental market, and may indeed represent the first such rental deal of a

Solid State Logic board in the U.S.

"There's a substantial number of stu- dios that would like to seriously work with the SSI, consoles,"

Radler offers,

"but not all can afford the luxury of placing an order for a six- figure piece of hardware. We've put together a very reasonable and chase affordable rental /pur- program for high

-end consoles that puts them within easy grasp of just about anyone who's serious about the kind of business boards like these could generate for their studios." The com- pany also is reported to be arranging for the delivery of several

Series consoles market. More from

!)avid for information is available

Hadler additional

SL6000 on the U.S.

121:3) rental

454.6043.

STOP PRESS:

Mitsubishi

Pro Audio Group

Established in UK

Digital Entertainment

Corporation, a subsi- diary of Mitsubishi Electric Sales

America,

Inc., has announced the start of full sales and service operations in the

United Kingdom, under its recently acquired subsidiary, Quad

-

Eight

/Westrex, Ltd. Formation of Digital

Entertainment Corporation, Ltd., is in currently process, which company will act as the overall

UK subsidiary headquarters. The primary trading name to be used in the

UK is

Mitsubishi Pro Audio Group, which means that both the North American and the UK operations will be integrated under one com- mon control.

Peter Sidey has been appointed special executive consultant with full responsibilities for Mitsubishi Pro

Audio Group UK opera- tions; he previously served as managing direc- tor with Neve during the Seventies.

Adrian Bailey has been appointed man- ager and of Pro Audio Marketing, Manufacturing

Technical Services at the UK headquar- ters; he joins the company with 15 years exper- ience at

Neve Electronics. as

Barry Motton will continue in his position managing director of

Quad Eight

/

Westrex,

Ltd.

"We have been working a long time to get to this president Tore Nordahl. of ent point," says

Mitsubishi Pro Audio

Group company,

"With the resources our

$8 billion -strong Mitsubishi Electric par- our commitments to the UK market are substantial and long term. We are putting our energies into key pro -audio pro- ducts in the major markets around the world.

Our three

-year plan is to be the leader in digital recording, film recording, and in digital /analog consoles."

I)

15tí

August

1985

Studer

Audio:

Advanced

Recording;

The

The hardware is typically Studer. software is simply astounding.

ransport mechanics in our new

Analog

Master Recorder are stable, and precision- crafted

Swiss tradition. That's all typ-

'

Studer. What's new is an in-

ous

networ_c of

software

- oiled operating sys:ems. uture Perfect. The

A820 is de- d to meet the demands of to- m's computer -controlled audio fiction facilities. Multiple on-

1 microprocessors control all

Sting sub -systems, including an drive, spooling motors, and parameter settings. Most op- ig features are user program-

, allowing you to tailor an A820 ur exact needs in a matter of tes. If your needs change, you ly re- program your features. virtually every operating fea- ture of the A820 may be accessed and controlled through an optional

RS232/RS422 serial data port.

Gentle on the

Wind. The A820 handles your valuable tapes with kid gloves. The

DC

capstan

motor starts, following a defined ramp, only after the pinch roller is engaged.

A closed loop servo system monitors tape tension and reel inertia to provide optimum acceleration and braking.

Both tape tension and tape winding speeds are user programmable. dual

The Wheel Thing. The A820's thumbwheel shuttle /edit con- trol makes tape -cut editing a breeze.

One wheel fast winds tape in either direction at increasing speeds while the other precisely positions tape for the edit.

Also

Noteworthy. The

A820 in- corporates Studer's new generation of phase compensated audio elec- tronics, available with either trans- former or active balanced inputs and outputs.

In sound quality, the A820 takes a quantum leap ahead of re- corders made just a few years ago.

Options for the A820 include a cen- ter -track SMPTE time code channel and test generator.

The Payback. The

"hardware" in the

Studer

A820 is made to give you

dependable service

for

years

to come. That's the Studer tradition.

Plus, with its advanced software, the

A820 also does more different jobs, gets more jobs cone in less time, and produces sonically super:or re- sults. That's

tie

bottom line in any upgrading programs.

Fc

r

more information on the new

A820

Analog Master Recorder, please contact: Studer

Revox

Arrerica,

1425

Elm

I- ill

Pike.

NLshville,

TN

37210;

(615) 254 -5651.

STUDER

August

1985

R -e

/p

161

For additional information circle #150

MIN

Great performers have one thing in common.

Mick

Jagger, Pete Townshend,

Randy

Owen

Tina

Turner, Ronnie

Milsap, Eddie Rabbitt,

-great performers know their legendary stature depends on the quality of their voices.

That makes the purity of vocal reproduction critical.

That makes rugged, reliable

Shure mics essential.

Shure mics have been the number one choice of top professionals for many years from the legendary

SM58 dynamic to Shure's newest trailblazer, the

SM87 condenser.

Whether you're on your way up, or you've already made it, don't trust your great performances to anything less than the best

-

Shure mics.

SHUE

BREAKING

SOUND

BARRIERS

®

For additional information circle

#152

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