Avid|DS - Tutorial

Avid|DS - Tutorial
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TUTORIAL
© 1999–2001 Avid Technology, Inc. All rights reserved.
Avid, Media Composer, OMF, Open Media Framework,
and the Avid|DS logo are registered trademarks of Avid
Technology, Inc.
All other trademarks contained herein are the property
of their respective owners.
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The Avid|DS application uses JScript and Visual Basic
Scripting Edition from Microsoft Corporation.
This document is protected under copyright law.
The contents of this document may not be copied
or duplicated in any form, in whole or in part,
without the express written permission of Avid
Technology, Inc. This document is supplied as a
guide for the Avid|DS product.
Reasonable care has been taken in preparing the
information contained in this document. However,
this document may contain omissions, technical
inaccuracies, or typographical errors.
Avid Technology, Inc. does not accept responsibility
of any kind for customers' losses due to the use of
this document. Product specifications are subject to
change without notice.
Cast and Crew: Patrick Bayne, Mauricio Bussab,
James Duff, François Giard, Luc Langevin,
Tristan Le Rudulier, Frances McGill,
Marianne Rodrigues, Louis-Philippe Rondeau,
Athena Soupliotis, Liven Tam, and Gino Vincelli.
Document No. 0130-05128-01 1101
Printed in Canada.
Contents
Contents
Chapter 1
Where to Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Learning Roadmap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Using the Documentation Library. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Document Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Using the Mouse and Pen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Avid|DS Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Licensing Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Training Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Hotline Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Corporate Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Avid|DS Mailing List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Web Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Comments? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
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Chapter 2
Setting Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
The Digital Post-Production Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
The Windows Operating System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Logging on to your Workstation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Using the Windows Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Lesson 1: Installing the Media Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Chapter 3
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Starting Avid|DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Setting your Project Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Lesson 2: Creating a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Introducing the Avid|DS Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
An Avid|DS Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Chapter 4
Capturing Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Workflow: Capturing Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Capturing Source Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
What is Source Material?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
What are Master Clips? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Lesson 3: Capturing Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Tutorial • 3
Contents
The Browser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
The Transport Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Lesson 4: Organizing Your Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Chapter 5
Editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Workflow: Editing Audio and Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
The Editing Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
The Timeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Manipulating Objects on the Timeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Lesson 5: Creating a Rough Cut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Preparing Clips for Editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Lesson 6: Insert Editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Trimming Clips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Lesson 7: Fine-Tuning Your Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Lesson 8: Applying Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Editing on Multiple Tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Lesson 9: Multi-Camera Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
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Chapter 6
Managing Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
What is Media? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Capturing Media at Different Qualities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Storage Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lesson 10: Purging Unwanted Media. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lesson 11: Onlining Your Spot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lesson 12: Adding the Final Shots to Your Sequence . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 7
86
87
88
88
91
98
Applying Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
The Effects Library. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Applying Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
What’s the Difference between Clip and Track Effects?. . . . . . . 101
The Property Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Processing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Lesson 13: Defining the Look of Your Spot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
4 • Tutorial
Contents
Using the Effects Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Lesson 14: Applying Effects to an Effects Tree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Lesson 15: Using the Selective Color Correction Effect . . . . . . . . 114
Applying a Picture-in-Picture Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Lesson 16: Adding a Picture-in-Picture Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Chapter 8
Adding Graphics Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Workflow: Painting and Titling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
The Graphics Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Graphics Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Creating and Editing Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Lesson 17: Adding a Graphics Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Lesson 18: Adding Titles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
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Chapter 9
Adding Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Workflow: Mixing Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Mixing Your Audio Clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
The Audio Clips and Tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Working in Audio Container Clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Using the Mixer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Lesson 19: Mixing Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Lesson 20: Adding Sound Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
C ha p t e r 10
Compositing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
The Compositing Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Compositing Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Lesson 21: Choosing a Compositing Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Lesson 22: Using External Mattes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Lesson 23: Creating the Final Shot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
C ha p t e r 11
Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Introduction to Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Using the Trackers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Selecting a Suitable Reference Point for Tracking. . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Lesson 24: Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Tutorial • 5
Contents
C ha p t e r 12
Using 3D DVE/Titling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Workflow: 3D DVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Workflow: Titles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
The 3D DVE Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Working in the 3D World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Working with the Camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Viewing Through the Alternate Camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Adding Depth to an Image Using a Displacement Map . . . . . . . . . 213
Lesson 25: Using a 3D DVE Displacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Animating the Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Processing the Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
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C ha p t e r 13
Completing the Spot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Lesson 26: Finishing the Spot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
C ha p t e r 14
Outputting Your Spot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Outputting the Production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lesson 27: Outputting Your Project to Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Backup of Your Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lesson 28: Archiving and Restoring Your Project . . . . . . . . . . . .
228
229
231
233
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
6 • Tutorial
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Ch apter 1
Where to Begin
This book teaches you the basics of working with Avid|DS by creating a two-minute spot.
You’ll be working through this book from beginning to end. At any point, you can refer to
the FinalSpot movie to get an idea of the kind of result you’re looking for. But before you
can do that, you’ll need the Apple QuickTime player to see the previews.
This Tutorial includes one guide and two media CDs, and assumes that you’ve already
installed Avid|DS on your system.
To get the most out of Avid|DS, take a moment to review the learning roadmap on the next
page; it shows you the best way to learn all about Avid|DS!
Tutorial • 7
Chapter 1 • Where to Begin
Learning Roadmap
The Avid|DS package includes a comprehensive set of learning materials. With this
Roadmap, you’ll know where to find the information you need to get up and running
quickly and effectively.
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Start with the Workstation Setup Guide to prepare your site for Avid|DS and assemble your
workstation. Use the Installation & Administration Guide should you need to reinstall and
license any of the components, or for tips on the daily maintenance of your system.
Refer to the Release Notes for feature limitations and workarounds.
If you’re new to Avid|DS, work through the Tutorial to learn how to use the features in the context of a basic
production. This full-color tutorial gives you step-by-step instructions on how to create a two-minute spot.
Or, if you prefer, get hands-on training by taking the DS-101 course. This course is the classroom version of the
standalone Avid|DS Tutorial book.
For details, visit http://softimage.com/avidds.
If you’re already familiar with Avid|DS, follow the New Features Tour online. It briefly describes all the new
features in version 5.0 with a set of QuickTime clips that provides visual overviews of some of the features.
The tour is available from the Drivers CD or, if it was installed on your system, you can run it from the Help
menu in Avid|DS.
Avid|DS Discussion Group
You can join the worldwide network of Avid|DS users exchanging ideas and techniques by e-mail. To
subscribe, send an e-mail to [email protected] with the following text in the body of
your message: subscribe ds.
8 • Tutorial
Learning Roadmap
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The Drivers CD contains the New
Features Tour and all the Avid|DS
documentation in electronic form
(PDF format). See next page for how
to use the Documentation Library.
At Avid|DS Authorized Training Centers (ATCs) around the world, you can further your
Avid|DS education by attending the DS-201: Essentials and DS-301: Compositing &
Graphics courses. These multi-day courses teach you about the interface and workflow
while producing short projects. For details, visit http://avid.com/education.
®
The New Features Guide briefly
describes the many new features
you’ll encounter in version 5.
When you see this icon
, it means
there’s a corresponding multimedia
demo in the online version of the
New Features.
Comments?
We’d appreciate any comments or
suggestions you may have about this
book or any other piece of our
documentation. Just send them to:
[email protected]
The User’s Guide contains
comprehensive information on
how to perform basic and
advanced post-production tasks.
The Compositing & Effects
Guide contains information and
visual examples on how to use
effects in Avid|DS, and shows
you how to perform
compositing and tracking.
The online help contains on-screen reference information on interface
elements, commands, and parameters. There are two ways to access it:
• Click the ? icon or Help button in any property editor or dialog box.
• Choose Help > Contents and Index from the main menu bar in Avid|DS.
Shortcuts are available under the Help menu
in Avid|DS. Print out the Shortcut card and
the Quick Reference Card and you’ll
always have these editing tips handy.
Tutorial • 9
Chapter 1 • Where to Begin
Using the Documentation Library
You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader
installed to view the documentation online.
If you do not have it installed, you can
download it from http://apple.com/
quicktime/download/.
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The Documentation Library contains the New Features Tour, as well as all the Avid|DS
documentation in PDF format. If it was installed on your system, you can access it from the Help
menu in Avid|DS.
To access the Documentation Library
• In Avid|DS, select Help > Documentation Library.
or
1. Insert the Drivers CD in your CD-ROM drive.
2. From the main menu, select Avid|DS Documentation.
Document Conventions
This guide uses the following symbols and conventions:
Bold
Bold is used for menu commands, dialog box and property editor options, and file, folder,
and button names.
Italics
Italics place emphasis on certain words.
>
The greater than (>) sign indicates menu commands (and subcommands) in the order
that you choose them. For example, File > Import means to open the File menu and then
choose the Import command. This applies to menus from the menu bar and pop-up
menus that appear when you right-click on the interface.
View or listen to the FinalSpot movie (in the D:\DSTMedia\FinalSpot folder) to get an idea
of what the final video and audio should look and sound like.
Notes are reminders or contain important information.
Tips are useful bits of information, workarounds, and shortcuts that you may find helpful
in a particular situation.
Cross-references point you to other sources of information on a given topic.
10 • Tutorial
Learning Roadmap
Frequently asked questions are posed and answered.
These tips may be useful if you have an Avid Media Composer® background.
These notes contain information and steps specific for Avid|DS HD Editor. Since this book
was written for Avid|DS, it contains lessons for features that are not available in Avid|DS
HD Editor. These notes give you alternative steps or tell you which lessons to skip entirely.
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Mouse, Pen and Keyboard
For Avid|DS, you can use a two-button mouse (with wheel) or a pen and tablet. The left and right
mouse buttons perform different operations. Unless otherwise stated, use the left mouse button.
The mouse and pen operate slightly differently. All procedures in this guide are documented for the
mouse. You can, however, easily use a pen or the keyboard. The following table shows the terms
relating to the mouse, pen, and keyboard.
This term
Means this with a mouse
Means this with a pen
Click
Quickly press and release the left mouse
button. Always use the left mouse button
unless otherwise stated.
Tap the tablet once with the tip of the
pen, or touch the pen to the tablet
with enough pressure to click.
Double-click
Click the left mouse button twice rapidly.
Quickly tap the tablet twice in the
same screen pixel or press the F5 key
to go from single to double-click.
Right-click
Quickly press and release the right mouse
button.
Press the top portion of the switch on
the side of the pen or press the F6 key
to go from left to right-click.
Drag
Hold down the left mouse button or the
wheel while you move the mouse.
Press the pen to the tablet while
moving the pen.
Alt+key, Ctrl+key,
Shift+key, etc.
Hold down the first key while you press the second key. For example, “Press Alt+F1”
means to hold down the Alt key while you press the F1 key.
Customizing the Pen or Mouse
By customizing the pen, you can adjust the click pressure, switch functions, and other features. You
can also customize the mouse. For example, you can select left-handed configuration or change the
double-click speed.
Tutorial • 11
Chapter 1 • Where to Begin
Using the Mouse and Pen
Both the mouse and pen are input devices that let you select menu items and objects, and execute
commands from the interface.
Some mice have three buttons or a wheel
between the two buttons. The added
button can have additional functions.
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For details on customizing the mouse and
pen, refer to the online help in Windows
and the WACOM ArtZII documentation
provided with your Avid|DS system.
The mouse
The left mouse button lets you
place the pointer anywhere on
the screen or use it to select
an object or region.
The right mouse button displays certain
commands via pop-up menus. The commands
depend on where on the interface you click.
The pop-up menus let you access commands
quickly, which can save you a great deal of
time. Avid|DS makes use of the right mouse
button frequently.
The pen
The eraser works like the eraser on
a pencil. Press and drag the eraser
to select something. When you lift
the eraser, the text is erased.
The lower switch is set for a
right-click by default.
Use the pen tip to left-click,
position the pointer, and select
and move objects on the screen.
12 • Tutorial
The upper switch is set to left
double-click by default.
Avid|DS Support
Avid|DS Support
Technical support for Avid|DS is provided by your Avid reseller working together with Avid|DS
Customer Service. Immediate assistance for any technical issue is available through our hotline,
e-mail, and web support services.
Licensing Support
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You must contact your reseller to request a license for your Avid|DS system. You can do this through
your reseller or through the license request form under Licensing at http://softimage.com/avidds.
Training Support
If you’re interested in Avid|DS training, you’ll find a complete overview of courses, education
centers, and training programs under Education at http://softimage.com/avidds.
Hotline Support
Avid resellers provide first line support for Avid|DS according to their specific geographical area and
time zone. Working as an extension of Avid|DS Customer Service, these fully trained agents provide
the most efficient and effective support possible to all our customers.
Contact information for your Avid reseller is available through the Avid Reseller Locator at http://
avid.com/cgi/locator/index.asp.
You can reach Avid|DS Customer Service at the following:
Avid|DS Customer Service
North America
tel: 1 800 387-2559
fax: 1 514 845 8252
Worldwide
tel: 1 514 845-2199
fax: 1 514 845 8252
9:00 am to 9:00 pm (Eastern)
2:00 pm to 2:00 am (GMT)
Hotline assistance is also available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for an additional fee.
Tutorial • 13
Chapter 1 • Where to Begin
Europe
tel: 44 175 365 0670
fax: 44 175 365 8503
9:00 am to 6:00 pm (GMT)
4:00 am to 1:00 pm (Eastern)
E-mail & Web
e-mail: [email protected]
web: avid.com
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Corporate Addresses
You can reach Avid Technology, Inc. at the following addresses:
Corporate Headquarters
Avid Technology, Inc.
Avid Technology Park
One Park West
Tewksbury, MA 01876
tel: 800 949-AVID or 978 640-6789
fax: 978 640 1366
web: avid.com
European Headquarters
Avid Technology Europe Ltd.
Westside Complex
Pinewood Studios
Pinewood Road
Iver, Buckinghamshire SLO ONH
United Kingdom
tel: 44 175 365 5999
fax: 44 175 365 4999
Asian Headquarters
Avid Technology (S.E. Asia) Pte. Ltd.
315 Alexandra Road
#03-01 Performance Center
Singapore 159944
Republic of Singapore
tel: 65 476 7666
fax: 65 475 7666
14 • Tutorial
Avid|DS Support
Avid|DS Mailing List
If you have an e-mail account, you can join the worldwide network of Avid|DS users exchanging
ideas. The mailing list has proven to be quite useful for users, with a constant stream of new
subscribers.
To subscribe, send an e-mail to [email protected] with the following text in the body of
your message: subscribe ds. You can get further information on using the automated list server by
e-mailing [email protected] with “help” as your message.
?
Web Support
The Avid|DS Support and Download sections at http://softimage.com/avidds provide quick access
to a wide range of resources from the Avid|DS teams and user community. Downloads, including
presets, drivers, and Quick Fix Engineering (QFE), provide the latest solutions for your Avid|DS
system. Online documentation, tutorials, and Knowledge Base articles ensure you get the most out
of your work with Avid|DS. It's like having a dedicated Avid|DS Customer Service engineer sitting at
your desk!
Comments?
We’d appreciate any comments or suggestions you may have about this book or any other piece of
our documentation. Just send them to: [email protected]
Tutorial • 15
Chapter 1 • Where to Begin
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16 • Tutorial
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Ch apter 2
Setting Up
In Avid|DS, everything that you do to your clips is non-destructive, and can be edited and
reconstructed at any time. This is because of the way Avid|DS was designed; its integrated
environments allow a seamless workflow between editing, compositing, graphics design,
and audio.
This chapter shows you the overall workflow for constructing and outputting a twominute spot using the basic tools in Avid|DS. This way, you’ll begin to understand the
general concepts and workflows in Avid|DS. A deeper understanding will come as you
progress through this guide.
Tutorial • 17
Chapter 2 • Setting Up
The Digital Post-Production Process
Since Avid|DS is a digital, nonlinear, post-production environment, you no longer have to mount,
shuttle through, and cue your tapes every time you want to access parts of your footage.
Once you’ve converted your footage into a digital format and stored it on a disk array, Avid|DS gives
you complete, random access to the media with instantaneous retrieval of clips and sequences. You
also have quick, nonlinear access to any part of your sequence, and the ability to apply a wide variety
of digital effects at any stage of your production.
?
Each post-production facility has its own way of doing things, and every post-production job is
unique. You can use different tools and techniques to accomplish your jobs—import sequences
“offlined” on other systems and proceed with your finishing in Avid|DS; or, build a full editorial
from start to end directly in Avid|DS, using full resolution, uncompressed media!
After your job is complete, you can neatly package all of its media and files, making space for your
next job. If you need to, you can always restore the job at any time.
The following illustration shows you the complete Avid|DS production cycle, and how Avid|DS adds
flexibility and creative independence to the post-production process.
18 • Tutorial
The Digital Post-Production Process
2
“Offline” edit
Create a rough cut of key clips and
decide timing of cuts and
transitions.
Redigitize source
material in full,
uncompressed
resolution from
file or tape.
If offlined externally, load OMF®
(Open Media Framework®) file or
EDL (edit decision list) into Avid|DS
to digitize material from file, tape,
or audio.
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3
1
Fine-tune edit
Capture material
Digitize source material at
low resolution directly from
file or tape.
Fine-tune timing of cuts,
transitions, and other effects.
4
Apply effects
• Create composites.
• Add 2D and 3D effects.
7
Archive the project
• Mix and sweeten audio.
• Add titles and graphics.
• Archive project and/or media to tape.
Continuous process
• Project and media can be restored at
any time.
6
• Perform dust/scratch removal
and color correction.
5
Output media
Output sequence to tape or
file, such as .avi.
Process
Process all effects applied to
clips and create new media
files (source media remains
untouched).
Tutorial • 19
Chapter 2 • Setting Up
The Windows Operating System
Avid|DS is designed to run and make full use of the Windows 2000 and Windows NT
operating systems.
Logging on to your Workstation
Before you start Avid|DS, you must log on to your workstation with your user identification (ID)
and password. This provides security, as well as individual preference settings.
?
Since many users can work on the same workstation at different times, the Windows 2000 or
Windows NT user ID gives you a unique profile, so as not to conflict with the settings of other users.
When you run Avid|DS, you are accessing an environment that can be customized to your needs. If
you set any personal or project preferences while logged on, Avid|DS saves them to your user profile.
The next time you log on to that workstation, it recalls your previous settings.
• On your Avid|DS workstation, enter your user name and password.
The Windows 2000 or Windows NT desktop appears.
Using the Windows Explorer
The filing system in Windows 2000 or Windows NT is very much like a paper filing system. Your
workstation is like a big electronic filing cabinet. Each drive on your computer is like a drawer in that
filing cabinet. Each drive contains folders, which act the same way as folders in a filing cabinet
drawer—they hold documents and other information. In the folders on your computer, you can
store many items, including documents, media, and project files.
Windows 2000 and Windows NT let you
create new “drawers” by mapping
network drives or storage drives to
your computer.
20 • Tutorial
The Windows Explorer provides you with a hierarchical view of your computer’s and the network’s
file structure. It also lets you quickly access any folder or file on your workstation, or on any
workstation on the network.
The Windows Operating System
Lesson 1: Installing the Media Files
This lesson shows you how to use the Windows Explorer to access the various drives on your system,
locate Avid|DS-related files, install the media files from the Tutorial Media CDs, and preview the
two-minute spot you’ll be working on.
1. On the Windows desktop, right-click on the My Computer icon and choose Explore from
the menu.
The Windows Explorer window is displayed. Your disks are allocated as follows:
?
Windows 2000
Windows NT
A: 3.5" Floppy disk drive
A: 3.5" Floppy disk drive
C: Local hard drive partition
C: Local hard drive partition
D: External disk array for storing video media
D: External disk array for storing video media
F: Local hard disk drive partition for storing project files
and audio media
E: Local hard drive partition for storing audio media
Z: CD-ROM drive
G: CD-ROM drive
F: Local hard drive partition for storing project files
2. In the Windows Explorer, click the D: drive.
Tutorial • 21
Chapter 2 • Setting Up
3. From the File menu, choose New > Folder.
A new folder is created on the D: drive and added to the bottom of the list in the Contents view
of the Windows Explorer window. The name of the folder is highlighted.
4. Name the folder DSTMedia and press Enter.
5. Insert the Tutorial Media 1 CD in your system’s CD-ROM drive.
6. In Windows Explorer, click the CD-ROM icon to display the contents of the CD.
?
7. To select all the files, press Ctrl+A.
8. To copy the files you selected, right-click on one of the files in the Contents view and choose
Copy from the menu.
The folders you selected are copied to the Clipboard.
9. Open the DSTMedia folder you just created and press Ctrl+V to paste the contents of the
Clipboard in the folder.
10. Once the copying is completed, remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive and insert the Tutorial
Media 2 CD.
11. Repeat steps 6 to 9 to copy the contents of the second CD to the DSTMedia folder.
12. Verify that the files are in the right location by clicking the D: drive and opening the
DSTMedia folder.
The contents of the DSTMedia folder are displayed in the Contents view.
To view the .mov files, you’ll need Apple
QuickTime 4.1.2 or later. If you have not yet
installed QuickTime on your system, go to
the Apple website: www.apple.com.
22 • Tutorial
13. To view the two-minute spot that you’ll be working on throughout this guide, open the
FinalSpot folder and double-click on the FinalSpot.mov file.
The Windows Operating System
14. When the movie is over, close the QuickTime Player and Windows Explorer window by clicking
the close (X) icon in the upper-right corner.
Close window
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15. Remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive and keep them in a safe place.
Tutorial • 23
Chapter 2 • Setting Up
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24 • Tutorial
?
Ch apter 3
Getting Started
Now you’re ready to get started. In this chapter, you will create a project for your work,
take a tour of the Avid|DS interface, and find out about the different ways to get help.
Take your time going through the first few chapters to make sure you understand the
basics before moving on.
Tutorial • 25
Chapter 3 • Getting Started
Starting Avid|DS
Avid|DS is a project-based system. Projects are the all-encompassing structure for your work.
As soon as you start Avid|DS, you are prompted to open or create a working project and sequence.
?
Projects contain master clips,
sequences, and any special presets
and/or scripts you create
Master clips are representations of
the digitized media stored on your
disk array
Sequence files contain information
about your edit decisions,
composites, and any effects you’ve
applied to your clips
Where do I set my user profile?
These master clips can be shared
between sequences within the
same project
Setting your Project Preferences
Avid|DS does not have a separate user
profile. Each time a new user logs onto the
system, Windows 2000 or Windows NT
creates a user profile for that person.
Windows remembers the different settings
for each user.
Before you create a project in Avid|DS, there are three main questions you should ask yourself:
Can I have PAL and NTSC sequences in
the same project?
Your answer to these questions determine the project preferences that you set when you create the
project. Project preferences define the way your material is captured, processed, and output. Once
you set them, they’re applied to each sequence you create in the current project. You still, however,
have the option of changing these settings to create different versions of a sequence.
Yes. Even though the sequence
preferences are inherited from the project
by default, you can still customize the
preferences for each sequence.
26 • Tutorial
• What video and audio format am I going to work with?
• What resolution should I use for my media?
• Do I need to compress my media to save space on the disk array?
Starting Avid|DS
Lesson 2: Creating a Project
This lesson shows you how to start Avid|DS, create a project, and set the preferences for your project.
1. Double-click on the Avid|DS shortcut icon on your desktop.
The Project Browser dialog box is displayed.
?
2. Click New Project to open a new project.
The New Project dialog box is displayed.
Tutorial • 27
Chapter 3 • Getting Started
Project Name text box
?
3. In the Project Name text box, type: DSTutorial_YourName. Do not press the Enter key yet
because that will close the dialog box and you still have to set the project preferences.
4. Leave the Location at its default setting: F:\DSProjects. This is where your project will be saved.
5. Click the General tab to switch to the General property page, which lets you set the preferences
for your project.
General
property page
28 • Tutorial
Starting Avid|DS
Working in a lower resolution and/or
using compressed media lets you save
storage space on your disk array, and
therefore, is useful for rough cuts of
your sequence.
?
Before outputting your production,
however, you should recapture your
material in uncompressed format at a
higher resolution.
6. Select NTSC D1 > 4/3 as the format.
The frame size, field dominance, color space, and pixel ratio options are set automatically.
7. Select Non-Drop Frame as the default timecode format.
8. From the Resolution list, select Full.
9. Select the Uncompressed option since you’ll be working mainly with uncompressed media.
Remember that you can change the working video settings at any time.
10. Select the Use the closest media format available option to allow Avid|DS to display media even
if an exact resolution or compression match can’t be found.
11. From the Sample Rate list, select 48 kHz.
12. From the Mixer Configuration list, select Stereo.
13. Leave the SR Conversion Quality at its default setting.
14. Click OK to accept these settings.
Avid|DS opens a project called “DSTutorial_YourName” and automatically creates a new
untitled sequence.
Tutorial • 29
Chapter 3 • Getting Started
Introducing the Avid|DS Interface
Avid|DS HD Editor only has three layouts:
Editing, Graphics, and Media Input/Output.
?
For details on customizing your layouts,
refer to Editing Existing Layouts in the
online Help.
Editing
Graphics
Compositing
3D DVE
Media Input/Output
30 • Tutorial
The Avid|DS interface is divided into several layouts. Each layout contains the tools required to
perform specific tasks. Avid|DS has divided these tasks into five layouts: Editing, Graphics,
Compositing, 3D DVE, and Media Input/Output. Each layout is equipped with the appropriate tools
that you need to perform these tasks. Although the default layouts are provided for you, the interface
in Avid|DS is totally customizable, so you can create your own layouts with your favorite tools.
The first time you start Avid|DS, the Editing layout is automatically displayed. You can switch to a
different layout by selecting a layout icon from the taskbar on the left side of each layout. However,
don’t switch between layouts yet, because some layouts require that you have clips on the timeline.
Introducing the Avid|DS Interface
An Avid|DS Layout
The Avid|DS layouts contain common elements that you’ll be using frequently in the lessons. These
elements are described below:
?
Menu bar commands let you open
and save projects and sequences,
edit your layouts, and get help
Toolbars contain commonly used
tools grouped together to make
tasks quicker and easier. You can
customize toolbars to accommodate
your style of working
Viewer displays the output of your
sequence at the position of the play cursor
Taskbar lets you switch
between layouts
Browser lets you explore and
organize clips, sequences,
and custom effects within a
hierarchy of folders
View switcher lets you
access different views
Status bar displays the timecodes
of selected objects on the timeline
and provides warning, error, and
active command information
Timeline is where you place and edit clips to build a sequence. It graphically displays the
position of video and audio clips, container clips, transitions, and effects over time.
The Timeline Navigation bar at the bottom of the timeline lets you zoom and pan the
timeline, step in and out of containers, and switch between the Source and Record timelines
Transport controls let you
preview your media in the
viewer or play sequences
Pop-up menu commands relate
to a specific area or object on the
Avid|DS interface. They’re only
visible when you right-click on an
object or a sensitive screen area
Tutorial • 31
Chapter 3 • Getting Started
Getting Help
All of the task-based information in the
Avid|DS User’s Guide and Compositing &
Effects Guide is also available in PDF
format on the Avid|DS Drivers CD.
Avid|DS comes with a comprehensive help system that contains reference information on all the
interface elements. If you’re looking for information on a particular interface element or property
page parameter, you needn’t look any further than the online help.
There are three ways to access information:
Help menu
?
When you access Help from the main menu bar in Avid|DS, the entire help
system is displayed. You can search through the table of contents, index, or
use the Find utility to locate information.
Help icon or button
Every view, property page, dialog box, and pop-up menu contains a
Help icon or button. When you click the Help icon or button, detailed
information is displayed about the specific parameters or interface
elements in that view, property page, dialog box, or pop-up menu.
Tooltips
When a control has no text label, Avid|DS uses a small pop-up window
called a tooltip to display the name of a desktop element or its
keyboard shortcut.
Position the pointer over an interface element, such as an icon, and
pause for a second. A tooltip with the name of the element appears.
32 • Tutorial
Getting Help
There are three different ways to search for information in the help system:
Table of Contents
The table of contents lets you search by interface element.
The interface is broken down into six different categories:
Dialog Boxes, Menus, Toolbars, Layouts, Views, and
Property Editors.
?
Double-click on the book icon to view the topics contained
in that category. To view a topic, double-click on it.
Index
The online index is similar to the index that you would find
in the back of printed books. When you’re looking for
specific information, select the Index tab and type in the
word you want to find.
Find Utility
The online search utility lets you search for specific words
and phrases contained in the Help topics that may not be in
the index. For example, if you want to locate all help topics
that contain the term “browser”, select the Find tab and
type browser in the Find property page.
Tutorial • 33
Chapter 3 • Getting Started
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34 • Tutorial
?
Ch apter 4
Capturing Media
Avid|DS can capture material from a variety of different sources, such as video tape, audio
tape, and file. Avid|DS also has sophisticated conforming capabilities, which let you finish
work offlined on another system.
This chapter introduces you to the Media Input/Output layout and browser, shows you
how to import your media files, recognize the different clip types, and organize your media.
Tutorial • 35
Chapter 4 • Capturing Media
Workflow: Capturing Material
Capturing media is the digital transfer of audio or video material from an external device, such as a
videotape recorder, to the video storage disk array on your workstation. You can capture material for
your project from different sources, such as tape or file. The following illustration shows you the
process of capturing material:
?
Source material
Clips refer to media
on disk array
Captured video and/or audio are
represented as master clips in the browser
36 • Tutorial
Actual digitized material (media) is
stored on the disk array
Capturing Source Material
Capturing Source Material
What is Source Material?
?
Source material is the original, unaltered material from videotapes or digital recordings. This source
material comes from a variety of sources, such as video, audio, animated sequences, graphics, and
still images. When you capture material with Avid|DS, you are digitally transferring audio or video
material from an external device to a disk array on your workstation. These media files can take up
large amounts of disk space.
What are Master Clips?
The captured material, or media, are displayed as master clips in the browser. These clips contain
information, such as the location of the media on your disk array, the source data’s tape name, and
original in/out timecodes. With this information, you can recapture the material at any time.
Tutorial • 37
Chapter 4 • Capturing Media
Lesson 3: Capturing Material
Does Avid|DS support capture from
an EDL or OMF file?
?
You can load both EDL and OMF files
into Avid|DS, making it easy to transfer
projects that were offlined on another
system. Using EDL or OMF files, you can
create log files, recreate the clips on the
timeline with supported effects, and
then recapture the necessary media.
This lesson shows you how to capture material from file. You will be capturing the first series of clips
to create a rough cut of your edit. For this purpose, you don’t need to capture the video material at a
high-quality resolution, so you will be capturing it at a compression ratio of 25:1. Since the audio
material doesn’t take up much space, you will be capturing it at the highest sample rate.
The material for all the lessons has been provided on the two Tutorial CDs (included with this
guide), so you’ll have to capture the material from file. You’ll need enough storage space for about 5
minutes of video and 5 minutes of audio, so make sure you have the necessary space available on
your drives before attempting to capture.
When you’re working on the effects, graphics, and compositing lessons later on in this guide, you’ll
be deleting the compressed media and recapturing at full uncompressed resolution.
1. From the taskbar, click the Media Input/Output icon.
The Media Input/Output layout is displayed.
2. In the Input panel, select the Compressed option and select a compression ratio of 25:1.
38 • Tutorial
Capturing Source Material
3. Set the audio Sample Rate to 48000 Hz and the Bit Depth to 24.
?
4. From the Capture Source list, select the File option.
5. Since the files originated from an NTSC 4/3 video source, make sure the following options are set:
• Media Conversion: Keep Original Size and Position
• Convert Video Frame Rate: Deselected
• File Pixel Ratio: Standard - NTSC (0.9)
• File Field Dominance: Auto
6. The files that you’re importing do not contain alpha channels, so make sure that the Keep Alpha
option is not selected.
Tutorial • 39
Chapter 4 • Capturing Media
7. Select the Log and Import option to import the media to your disk array and create master clips
in the browser.
8. Click Import.
The Import File dialog box is displayed.
Path text box
?
9. In the Path text box, type in the following: D:\DSTMedia\Editing.
Instead of typing a path directly in the
Path text box, you can use the browser
tools and the browser tree to navigate to
any folder on your system or anywhere on
the network.
To select files one at a time, hold down
the Ctrl key and click the files you want.
40 • Tutorial
The browser displays the D:\DSTMedia\Editing folder and its media files.
Capturing Source Material
10. Make sure the dialog box is in Details mode. Select all the files in this folder by clicking the first
clip and then holding down the Shift key and clicking the last clip.
All the files in the folder are highlighted.
?
Clips viewed in
Details mode
11. Click OK to begin capturing.
A progress bar appears, showing the media for each clip being logged and imported. It should
take between 10 and 15 minutes to capture the media.
Tutorial • 41
Chapter 4 • Capturing Media
Video media is stored on the external disk
array. Audio media is stored on a partition
of your local hard drive.
Once the media is digitized, master clips are created in the browser. These clips refer to the
captured media which is stored on your disk array.
Clips viewed in
Thumbnails mode
?
42 • Tutorial
The Browser
The Browser
Before organizing your project files, it’s time to have a look at the browser. The browser lets you
explore and organize clips, sequences, and effects within a hierarchy of folders. If you remember the
Windows Explorer from the second chapter, you’ll notice that the browser works in very much the
same way. It also facilitates tasks, such as moving, copying, renaming, purging and deleting clips.
?
Thumbnails mode displays a
pictorial representation of the files
Browser tools let you
create folders, set
favorites, browse the
network, choose display
options, obtain help,
and set project and
preset paths
Details mode displays
the files in a tabular
format with information
about the source material
Browser tree shows the
hierarchical arrangement of
folders and disks available.
A plus sign (+) indicates each
item that contains more
folders or files. After you
click the plus sign to expand
an item in the tree, it
changes to a minus sign (-),
indicating that the item can
be collapsed. Click the minus
sign to collapse the folder
and hide its contents
Contents view displays
the contents of the
current folder
Browser icon in the
view switcher
Tutorial • 43
Chapter 4 • Capturing Media
Recognizing Clip Types
Each clip in the browser is represented by an icon that indicates its type. These icons help you
distinguish between the different clip types. Here is the complete list of the icons that appear in your
browser and the clips that they represent:
You may notice that your browser doesn’t
contain the following icons:
Icon
• Audio container clip
?
Represents
Icon
Represents
Audio clips
Combined audio and video clips
Audio container clips
Still images
Video clips
Sequences
• Video or graphics container clip
• Sequence
This is because you haven’t created any of
these items yet. As you create them later on
in this book, they’ll appear in the browser.
Video or graphics container clips
The Transport Controls
The transport controls let you preview your media in the viewer or play sequences that have been
edited on the timeline. You can also remote-control external devices, such as VTRs, so that you can
play, capture, and record material.
Shuttle slider
Skipped Frame indicator
Frame Forward
Mark In/Out-points
Loop
Timecode locator
Time display
Go to
timecode
Source name
Frame Backward
Go to Head/Rewind
44 • Tutorial
Play/Stop
Go to In/Out-point
Go to Tail/Fast Forward
Go to Previous/Next Edit
The Browser
Lesson 4: Organizing Your Browser
This lesson shows you how to preview clips in the dual viewer and change the sequence preferences.
You will also create subclips and organize your clips in the browser so that they’re easily accessible.
Previewing Clips
?
To load a clip or sequence into the dual
viewer, you can double-click on it in
the browser.
1. In the browser, drag the 01-LakePan clip to the viewer.
The dual viewer is displayed with the Source and Record viewers.
Record viewer
Source viewer
Closes the
dual viewer
Create Subclip
Transport controls
A “Media Not Available” message appears in the Source viewer because the media format and
sequence preferences do not match.
2. From the File menu, choose Sequence Preferences.
You don’t actually need to specify the
exact compression ratio, since Avid|DS
uses a closest-matching formula.
The Sequence Preferences dialog box is displayed.
3. In the Working Video Settings box, select the Compressed option and select 25:1 as your
preferred ratio to match the compression ratio you used when capturing the media.
4. Click OK.
To play your sequence, press the L key.
To stop playback, press the Spacebar.
The working video settings now match the settings at which the media was captured, so the
01-LakePan clip can now be displayed in the Source viewer.
5. In the transport controls, click the Play button to preview the clip.
Tutorial • 45
Chapter 4 • Capturing Media
Creating Subclips
1. Double-click on the Inserts clip in the browser to load it into the Source viewer.
2. Click the Play button to preview the clip.
Notice that this clip contains two shots.
?
Shot 1
Shot 2
One is a close-up of a watch and the other is a man sitting in a canoe. You are going to split up
the clip into two separate subclips.
3. In the Position Indicator box, make sure the in marker is at the beginning of the clip.
In marker
Out marker
In button
Position bar
Out button
4. Drag the position bar to the frame (00:00:04:26) in which the shot changes from the close-up of
the watch to the man in the canoe.
5. Click Out to set an out-point.
The out marker moves to the location of the position bar.
6. Move the position bar somewhere between the in and out markers. Choose a representative
image because the frame where the bar is positioned will be used as the thumbnail
representation for this clip in the browser.
46 • Tutorial
The Browser
7. Click Create Subclip to create a subclip of the material between the in and out-points.
The Create Subclip dialog box is displayed.
8. Type in the name Watch and click OK.
A new clip called “Watch” is created in the browser.
?
Watch clip
9. Create the second subclip by setting the in marker at the first frame of the second shot and the
out-marker at the last frame of the clip.
10. Drag the position bar between the in and out markers to select an appropriate image to represent
your clip.
Position bar between in and out markers
11. Click Create Subclip and name the new clip BottleSide.
The BottleSide clip appears in the browser.
12. Click Done to return to the single main viewer.
Tutorial • 47
Chapter 4 • Capturing Media
Organizing Clips in the Browser
1. With the DSTutorial_YourName project folder selected in the browser, create a new folder by
clicking the New Folder icon.
The New Folder dialog box is displayed.
2. Name the folder Unused and click OK.
The Unused folder appears in the browser.
?
3. Create another folder and name it Audio.
4. Since you won’t be using the Inserts clip anymore, drag the clip to the Unused folder. Release the
mouse button as the pointer passes over the Unused folder to drop it into the folder.
5. Click the Unused folder to verify that the Inserts clip is in that folder.
6. Click the Up One Level icon to return to the DSTutorial_YourName folder.
48 • Tutorial
The Browser
7. Click the Details icon to view the clips as a list. The Details mode displays information on your
clips, including source name, in, out, channels, and comments, if any.
?
To create a copy of a clip in a different
folder, hold down the Ctrl key and drag
the clip to another folder.
You can create favorites of the folders you
use most often. Open the folder you want
to add to your favorites list, click the
Favorites icon and then choose Add to
Favorites from the menu.
You can add, delete, rearrange and sort
columns in the Details view. Refer to the
online help for details.
8. Click the Channels heading in the Contents view of the browser to sort the clips by channel.
All the audio clips should be grouped together.
9. Select the following audio clips by holding down the Shift key, clicking the first audio clip and
then the last one. Select the following audio clips:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Bells
FinalMix
Wind
Atmosphere
Mus-bass
Mus-main
Mus-perc
10. Drag the clips to the Audio folder.
Now that you’ve organized your clips in the browser, you can begin creating your first sequence.
Tutorial • 49
Chapter 4 • Capturing Media
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50 • Tutorial
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Ch apter 5
Editing
This chapter introduces the Editing layout, timeline, and transport controls, and shows
you how to perform basic editing tasks, such as arranging clips on the timeline and
performing simple transitions, like cuts, dissolves, and wipes. This chapter focuses on
video clips. You will work with the audio in Chapter 9: Adding Audio.
Tutorial • 51
Chapter 5 • Editing
Workflow: Editing Audio and Video
Editing involves previewing clips, building a sequence, and performing your edits quickly and easily.
The following illustration shows you the process of editing material:
1
Locate and prepare media for editing
Preview and trim source media in the viewer
2
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3
Place clips on the timeline
Create a rough cut of your sequence by
dragging clips to the timeline
4
Manipulate clips
Move, trim, slip, roll, and nest
clips on the timeline
5
Apply transitions
Create cuts, wipes, dissolves, crossfades, and
Picture-in-Picture or DVE-type transitions
52 • Tutorial
The Editing Layout
The Editing Layout
The Editing layout is where you create sequences by arranging audio and video clips on the timeline,
You can then refine your edits by moving and trimming clips, and adding transitions.
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Browser is a management tool that lets you
explore and organize clips, sequences, and
custom effects within a hierarchy of folders
View switcher is a set of
controls that lets you access
different toolsets or views
Toolbars contain commonly used
tools grouped together to make
certain tasks quicker and easier
Timeline is where you
place and edit clips to
build a sequence
Status bar displays the
timecodes of selected
objects on the timeline
Viewer displays the output
of your sequence at the
position of the play cursor
Transport controls let you preview your
media in the viewer or play sequences
that have been edited on the timeline
Tutorial • 53
Chapter 5 • Editing
The Timeline
The timeline is where you place and edit clips to build your sequence. The timeline displays all the
elements that make up your sequence, such as video and audio clips, transitions, and effects.
Overview area provides a view of all the clips and tracks on the
current timeline. The clip bars represent the clips on the audio, video,
overlay, or timeline effect tracks, and their relative positions in time
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Timeline controls let you
perform global operations
on the timeline
Timeline ruler displays the
time scale of your sequence
Marker ribbon displays
markers and indicates timeline
material that needs processing
Timeline effect track
contains effects that are
applied to all tracks on the
timeline
Overlay track contains video
clips which are composited
over clips on the video tracks
Track controls let you
mute, solo, or ripple
the clips on a selected
track. You can also
scroll and adjust the
height of tracks
Video tracks contain the
video clips in the sequence
Video clip
Audio clip
Audio track contains the
audio clips in a sequence
Timeline navigation bar lets you zoom and pan the
timeline, step into and out of container clips, and
switch between the source and record timelines
Play cursor indicates the current playback position
Placing Clips on the Timeline
The easiest way to build a rough cut of your sequence is to drag your clips from the browser directly
onto the timeline. As you place clips on the timeline, the tracks stretch to accommodate the clips.
You can only place video clips on video tracks, and audio clips on audio tracks. When media with
synchronized video and audio components is placed on the timeline, the video and audio are placed
as separate clips on the video and audio tracks.
54 • Tutorial
The Editing Layout
Ripple Mode
When the Ripple mode is on, the main
Ripple button turns blue, as are the Ripple
buttons of any tracks on which the Ripple
mode is activated.
The Ripple mode, when activated, lets you insert clips at the timecode at which you place them on
the timeline. Existing clips move down the timeline to accommodate the inserted clip, allowing you
to preserve the integrity of previous edits as you continue making other edits on the timeline.
Main Ripple button
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Ripple on
Ripple off
Track Ripple button
Ripple on
Ripple off
Inserting this clip when the
Ripple mode is on moves
the clips that follow it
further down the timeline
You can ripple all tracks (timeline effect, overlay, video, and audio) across the timeline or restrict the
rippling only to the video tracks or other selected tracks.
Tutorial • 55
Chapter 5 • Editing
Clip Activeness
Audio clips differ as you can have several
audio clips active at the same time to
create a mix.
Clips become “active” when you place them on the timeline. This is indicated by an activeness bar
below the active frames. Frames that overlap each other on the video tracks during the same
timeframe cannot both be active. Inactive frames will still appear on the timeline to let you view the
full clip, and trim it in or out as necessary. However, only the active sections of a clip are used in the
final production.
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Clip
Activeness bar
Only active frames are
used in the final
production
56 • Tutorial
Manipulating Objects on the Timeline
Manipulating Objects on the Timeline
Since all clips in Avid|DS are simply
references to the original media stored on a
media disk, any editing tasks performed on
the clips do not affect the original media.
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After placing all your clips on the timeline, you can rearrange them if necessary. You can also adjust
the edit points between clips, as well as move, copy, or delete them.
All editing tasks are based on what you select on the timeline. You can select a clip, track,
activeness bar, edit point, transition bar, effect bar, and/or any region on the timeline. Selecting
and manipulating any of these objects affects the position and appearance of the clip in the
final production.
Clip
Effect bar
Marker
Overview
area
Track
Selected
region
Activeness bar
Display master timecodes
of selected object
Start
For selected object
End
Duration
Play cursor
position
Transition
Edit point
For in/out markers
In
Out
Duration
Display source timecodes of selected clip
For details on using the timecode boxes,
refer to Timecode Boxes in the online help.
You can adjust the in, out, and duration timecodes of objects on the timeline by selecting the object
and entering values directly in the timecode boxes in the status bar at the bottom of your layout. This
lets you make quick, precise edits.
Tutorial • 57
Chapter 5 • Editing
Lesson 5: Creating a Rough Cut
This lesson shows you how to create a rough cut of your edit by dragging and dropping clips from
the browser to the timeline. A rough cut lets you establish the basic order of the clips in your
sequence, and see where you need to start making edits.
Dragging and Dropping Clips on the Timeline
1. From the taskbar, click the Editing layout icon.
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2. In the browser, make sure that the DSTutorial_YourName folder is selected.
To select clips sequentially in the Details
mode, click the first clip that you want to
select, hold the Shift key, and click the last
clip. The clips in between are
automatically selected.
To select a group of clips, drag the mouse
over the clips that you want to select.
Your timeline can have any start time you
want. To change the start time, choose
File > User Preferences, go to the
Editing property page, and then change
the Timeline Starts at option. For this
tutorial, make sure your timeline starts at
00:00:00:00.
3. Hold down the Ctrl key and select the following clips (in order):
•
•
•
•
•
01-LakePan
02-WakeUp
03-Basket
04-Smell
05-ManFront
4. Drag the selected clips from the browser to the beginning of video track V2 on the timeline.
As you drag the selected clips over the timeline, a shadow indicates the space that the clips
will occupy.
Shadow
58 • Tutorial
Manipulating Objects on the Timeline
Dragging a combined audio and video clip
to the timeline creates an audio clip and a
video clip locked together in a sync group.
The synchronized clips move together on
the timeline, and moving one clip moves
the other automatically.
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5. Release the clips.
The video clips are placed next to one another on video track V2, while the audio clip of
01-LakePan is placed on audio track A1.
For more information, refer to
Synchronizing Clips on page 268 of the
Avid|DS User’s Guide.
Replacing the Audio Clip
1. Make sure that the Ripple mode is off. To turn Ripple mode off, click the main Ripple button.
2. Since you won’t be using the audio portion of the 01-LakePan clip, select the audio clip on the
timeline, and press the Delete key to delete it.
Make sure you select the clip and
not the clip’s activeness bar.
Activeness bar
3. Open the Audio folder in the browser and drag the FinalMix audio clip to the beginning of
audio track A1 on the timeline.
Tutorial • 59
Chapter 5 • Editing
Adjusting the Visible Time Span
The timeline navigation bar at the bottom
of the timeline works the same in Avid|DS
as it does in Media Composer and
Symphony. Simply, drag the scroll bars to
zoom in and out or to pan the timeline.
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Drag the scroll bar to
the left to zoom out and
to the right to zoom in
1. In the overview area of the timeline, position the pointer on the right edge of the visible time span.
The pointer changes to an arrow pointing to the right.
Video clips
Drag the scroll bar to
the left to pan left and
to the right to pan right
You can adjust the visible time span by
zooming in and out of the timeline using
the zoom buttons in the timeline controls.
Audio clip
Pointer
Visible time span
2. Drag the pointer left to the end of the video clips in the overview area.
New visible time span
Drag pointer here
Zoom to Frame
Zoom In
Zoom Out
As you reduce the visible time span, you automatically zoom in on the selected region of the
timeline.
Playing Back Your Sequence
1. Click the Go to Head/Rewind button in the transport controls.
2. Click the Play button in the transport controls.
You can press the Spacebar to stop
playback at any time.
3. Click the Play button again to stop playback at any time.
Creating a New Folder
1. In the browser, select the DSTutorial_YourName folder.
2. Click the New Folder icon.
The New Folder dialog box is displayed.
3. Name the new folder Sequences and click OK.
The Sequences folder appears in the browser.
60 • Tutorial
Manipulating Objects on the Timeline
Saving Your Sequence
1. From the File menu, choose Save to save your sequence.
The Save Sequence dialog box is displayed.
2. In the browser tree, click the Sequences folder to designate it as the folder in which you save
your sequence.
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3. In the File Name text box, type Lesson5 and click OK to save the sequence.
The sequence is saved, and a new sequence file (Lesson5) appears in the Sequences folder in
the browser.
Tutorial • 61
Chapter 5 • Editing
Preparing Clips for Editing
Before you place a clip on the timeline, drag it from the browser to the viewer to set precise in and
out-points. This hides extra material in long clips. When you drag a clip to the viewer, the dual
viewer is displayed in place of the viewer. The dual viewer contains the Source and Record viewers.
Source viewer
Record viewer
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The source clip is displayed in
the Source viewer, and the
Record viewer displays the
clip (if any) at the current
position of the play cursor on
the timeline. This lets you
compare a source clip with
the clip on the timeline,
where it will be inserted
You can place master clips, container clips, or sequences in the Source viewer for previewing. This
lets you cue or mark new in and out-points on the source clip, and then insert, overwrite, replace, or
fit-to-fill clips on the timeline with it.
To set the Source/Record mode to Auto,
right-click on the Source/Record icon and
choose Auto.
62 • Tutorial
An alternative way to preview clips and sequences and set in and out-points is by using the Source
timeline. The Source timeline displays the clips and or sequences that have been loaded in the Source
viewer. You can work on the Source timeline as you normally would, and then insert or overwrite
those clips into your sequence. You can switch to Source timeline mode manually or set the mode to
Auto, so that the timeline automatically switches to the Source timeline when the Source viewer is
selected, and switches to the Record timeline when the Record viewer is selected.
Preparing Clips for Editing
Lesson 6: Insert Editing
This lesson shows you how to use the dual viewer to set new in and out-points on your clips, insert
the selected portions of those clips on the timeline, and overwrite existing material on the timeline.
Setting the Ripple Mode
1. Open Lesson5 if it is not already open.
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2. In the timeline controls, click the main Ripple button to set all of the tracks to Ripple mode.
3. On audio track A1, click the track Ripple button to turn off the Ripple mode on the audio track.
The video tracks are now in Ripple mode, while the audio track is not.
Main Ripple is activated
Ripple mode is activated
on the video tracks
Ripple mode is deactivated
on the audio track
Tutorial • 63
Chapter 5 • Editing
Inserting Clips
Mark in-point Timecode locator
1. In the transport controls, type 00:00:15:14 in the timecode locator box and press Enter.
The play cursor moves to the specified timecode.
2. On the transport controls, click In.
An in marker is placed on the timeline.
In marker
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3. From the browser, open the DS_Tutorial_YourName folder and double-click on the Watch clip.
The Watch clip is displayed in the source viewer of the dual viewer.
4. Click the Source viewer (left) to make sure that it’s selected.
A green box around the viewer indicates that it’s selected.
5. In the In timecode box, type 00:00:02:19 and press Enter.
The clip’s in marker is placed at position 00:00:02:19 in the position indicator box.
Out marker
Position bar
In marker
In timecode
Duration
Out timecode
64 • Tutorial
Preparing Clips for Editing
6. In the Duration timecode box, type 00:00:02:00 and press Enter.
The clip’s out marker is placed in the position indicator box at 00:00:04:19 timecode, and the
clip’s duration is shortened to 2 seconds.
7. Make sure that the track selector is set to track V2.
Track selector
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8. Click Insert.
The clip is inserted at the in-point that you set on the timeline.
In marker
Existing clips move forward to
accommodate the insertion
Inserted clip
9. Play the sequence to see how your edit looks.
10. If you’re satisfied with your edit, click Done to return to the main viewer. Otherwise, press
Ctrl+Z to undo it.
You can repeat the process using different in-points and durations to create your own edit.
Tutorial • 65
Chapter 5 • Editing
Overwriting Clips
1. On the timeline, move the play cursor to the point in the 05-ManFront clip where the man
finishes smelling the cheese.
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2. In the transport controls, click In.
An in marker is placed on the timeline.
In marker
3. Scrub through the next few seconds of the 05-ManFront clip to see what you’ll be overwriting
with new material.
4. From the browser, double-click the BottleSide clip.
The BottleSide clip is displayed in the Source viewer.
5. Click the Source viewer (left) to make sure that the source clip is selected.
66 • Tutorial
Preparing Clips for Editing
You can refer to the final spot at any time
to get an idea of where to set the new
edit points. The file is located in the
D:\DSTMedia\FinalSpot folder.
6. In the Position Indicator box, move the position bar to the point where the man finishes
smelling the cheese.
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7. Press the I key to set the clip’s in-point.
8. In the Position Indicator box, move the position bar to the point just before the man grabs the
bottle of wine.
9. Press the O key to set the clip’s out-point.
10. Make sure that the Track Selector is set to track V2.
Tutorial • 67
Chapter 5 • Editing
11. Click Overwrite.
The selected portion of the clip is inserted at the in-point that you set on the timeline, and
overwrites the existing material.
In marker
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Inserted clip
12. Play that portion of the sequence to see how your edit looks.
Notice that the sequence does not flow smoothly from the BottleSide clip to the 05-ManFront
clip. This edit is fixed later in this chapter.
13. Click Done to return to the main viewer.
14. From the File menu, choose Save As and save your sequence as Lesson6.
68 • Tutorial
Trimming Clips
Trimming Clips
In Avid|DS, there are several ways to fine-tune your edit. You can always use the trim handles to edit
the in and out-points of clips on the timeline as shown below:
Trim-out handle
changes the outgoing frame on Clip A
Trim-in handle
changes the incoming frame on Clip B
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Edit point
For more precise editing, you can use the Trim view to interactively edit the in and out-points of
clips, and immediately see how the edits affect the other clips in the sequence.
Outgoing frame
Incoming frame
Clip name
You can also make precise adjustments to the in and out-points of clips on the timeline by moving
the play cursor to a new in or out-point, and using the Snap In or Snap Out commands respectively.
Tutorial • 69
Chapter 5 • Editing
Lesson 7: Fine-Tuning Your Edit
This lesson shows you how to trim your clips using the Trim view, trim handles, and the Snap In and
Snap Out commands. Once you’ve completed the first three edits, use your favorite tool to fine-tune
the rest of the edits on the timeline.
Trimming Clips Using the Trim View
1. Open Lesson6 if it is not already open.
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2. In the timeline controls, make sure that the main Ripple button is still selected. Ripple mode
should still be on for the video tracks.
3. From the transport controls, click the Prev or Next buttons to move the play cursor to the edit
point between the BottleSide clip and the second part of the 05-ManFront clip.
Edit point
The red edit and trim handles are displayed
4. From the view switcher, click the Trim icon.
The Trim view displays the incoming and outgoing frames at the edit point.
Incoming frame
View switcher
70 • Tutorial
Outgoing frame
Trimming Clips
5. In the Trim view, click the Incoming frame (right) to make sure that only the incoming frame
is selected.
The selected frame is surrounded by a red border.
Forward 1 frame
6. Click the Forward 1 Frame or Forward 10 Frames button to trim the 05-ManFront clip.
You can watch the effects of your trimming in the main viewer.
Forward 10 frames
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7. Stop trimming when the man is about to catch the wine bottle (the offset is approximately
+60 frames).
8. Click Preview to preview the edit. You can watch the preview in the outgoing frame viewer.
Loop markers are automatically placed on the timeline marker ribbon, and the marked section
of the timeline is played continuously.
Play cursor
Loop markers
Edit point
9. Click Preview again to stop playback.
Tutorial • 71
Chapter 5 • Editing
You can refer to the final spot at any time
to get an idea of how to trim the clips.
The file is located in the
D:\DSTMedia\FinalSpot folder.
Trimming Clips in the Timeline
1. Click the edit point between the 04-Smell and 05-ManFront clips to select it.
The red edit and trim handles are displayed.
2. Drag the 04-Smell clip’s trim-out handle to the left.
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Select edit point
Zooming in on an edit point helps you
drag the trim handles more precisely.
To zoom in on a timeline region,
highlight the region in the overview
area of the timeline.
Drag trim handle left
Release trim handle
As you drag the trim-out handle, the play cursor follows it and the outgoing frame in the Trim view
is updated.
3. Release the trim handle at the frame in which the man is seen in profile, looking forward with his
eyes squinted, mouth closed, and his hand reaching down into the basket.
Before
After
The clip’s length on the timeline is updated, and since the Ripple mode is on, the 05-ManFront
clip moves to the left to adjust.
4. Drag the 05-ManFront clip’s trim-in handle to the right.
Select edit point
72 • Tutorial
Drag trim handle right
Release trim handle
Trimming Clips
5. Release the trim handle at the frame in which the man is seen from the front, looking forward
with his eyes squinted, mouth closed, and his hand reaching down into the basket.
Before
After
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6. Play the cut to see how your edit looks.
Snapping In and Snapping Out
1. In the timeline controls, make sure that the main Ripple button is still selected.
2. Scrub through the clips on the timeline to see how your cuts look up to this point.
3. Move the play cursor to the point in the 03-Basket clip, where the man starts to reach for the
bread in the open basket.
4. Click the 03-Basket clip to make sure that it’s selected.
Tutorial • 73
Chapter 5 • Editing
5. From the NLE Tools toolbar, click Snap In.
The selected frame becomes the clip’s new in-point.
Snap In
6. Move the play cursor to the point in the 03-Basket clip where the man starts to pull the sausage
out of the basket.
Snap Out
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7. Make sure that the 03-Basket clip is still selected.
8. From the NLE Tools toolbar, click Snap Out.
The selected frame becomes the clip’s new out-point.
9. Play back the sequence to see how the cuts look with the new edit points.
Fine-Tuning the Rest of Your Edits
You can refer to the final spot at any time
to get an idea of how to fine-tune the rest
of the edits. The file is located in the
D:\DSTMedia\FinalSpot folder.
74 • Tutorial
1. Locate the edits that don’t transition well, and trim the clips to correct them.
2. When you’re satisfied with all of your edits, save the sequence as Lesson7.
Transitions
Transitions
Transitions are changes, like dissolves, wipes, Picture-in-Picture effects, fades, DVEs, or cuts, that
you can apply to or between clips on the timeline. You can apply transitions to the beginning or end
of a single clip, or between two clips.
For more information, refer to Image
Transition Effects on page 311 of the
Avid|DS Compositing & Effects Guide.
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The type of transition you apply depends on the media you’re working with. For instance, you can
apply a dissolve, wipe, Picture-in-Picture, or DVE to video clips, while you can apply a crossfade, or
a fade-in or fade-out to audio clips.
On the timeline, transitions are represented as color gradients in the activeness bars of the clips where
you’ve applied transitions. You can adjust the duration of transitions by dragging the edit points.
Transition duration
Real-time transition
Transition duration
Lesson 8: Applying Transitions
You can apply transitions between clips on
the same track or on different tracks.
However, you can only apply a transition
between clips if there is extra material
available on one of the clips.
This lesson shows you how to apply a transition between two clips. A transition is a change from one
clip to the next, such as a dissolve, wipe, or a simple cut to another clip. The type of transition you
apply depends on the media you’re working with.
Placing Your Clips
1. Open Lesson7 if it is not already open.
2. In the timeline controls, make sure that the main Ripple button is deselected.
3. Right-click on the overview area of the timeline and choose Display > Display Unused Material
from the menu.
Tutorial • 75
Chapter 5 • Editing
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4. Position the play cursor at the point in the 05-ManFront clip where the fisherman puts his hand
to his face.
5. From the browser, drag and drop the TableWide clip onto the empty video track after the
play cursor.
76 • Tutorial
Transitions
6. Right-click on the clip and choose Activate from the menu to activate the clip.
The TableWide clip becomes active and a portion of the 05-ManFront clip becomes inactive. The
TableWide clip is now part of the sequence, replacing the portion of the 05-ManFront clip that
covers the same time span.
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7. Select the activeness bar of the TableWide clip.
In-point
Out-point
8. Click in the D (duration) timecode box on the right side of the status bar.
Activeness bar
Duration timecode box
9. Type 400 and press Enter.
The length of the TableWide clip is now stretched to 4 seconds. Since this clip is a still image, the
same frame is repeated over the length of the entire clip.
Tutorial • 77
Chapter 5 • Editing
Applying the Transitions
1. Select the first edit point between the TableWide and 05-ManFront clips.
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2. On the NLE Tools toolbar, click Dissolve/Crossfade.
The Dissolve property editor is displayed and a dissolve transition is applied between the two
clips. For the purpose of this lesson, you do not need to make any changes to the default settings.
3. Select the second edit point between the TableWide and 05-ManFront clips and click Dissolve/
Crossfade again.
78 • Tutorial
Transitions
A dissolve transition is applied at the end of the TableWide clip.
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Click to close
property editor
4. Close the Dissolve property editor by clicking the small x in the top-right corner of the
property editor.
5. Play back your sequence to see how the transitions look.
If you’re running Avid|DS on a Zx10 or
GT1 workstation, you must process the
transitions before you can play them
back in real time because you’re using
compressed media.
6. Save your sequence as Lesson8.
To process the transitions, click the all..
button in the Dissolve property editor.
The Processing Options dialog box is
displayed. Select the following options:
• Current Timeline
• Minimal
• Fields
Click OK to begin processing.
Tutorial • 79
Chapter 5 • Editing
Editing on Multiple Tracks
You can create any number of audio and video tracks on the timeline. Although you can easily
place all of your video clips on a single track, working on multiple tracks gives you greater flexibility
when editing.
In Avid|DS, the video and audio tracks have no special order. The active frames determine the sequence
of events. For example, you can place shots taken with different cameras on separate tracks. You can
then easily switch the view from one camera to another by cutting from one clip to another.
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The following example shows how the same sequence is produced on one track and on multiple
tracks. The activeness bars in both scenarios indicate which frames are used in the sequence. In both
scenarios, the same frames on the clips are used.
Single-track editing
Before
After
Clip is added to the same track
Multi-track editing
Before
When you place clips on multiple tracks,
you can reveal extra frames while editing
by right-clicking in the overview area of the
timeline and choosing Display > Display
Unused Material from the menu.
This is especially useful when you want to
see how many frames are available for
trimming, slipping, or rolling.
After
Unused material
80 • Tutorial
Clip is added to a new track
Editing on Multiple Tracks
Lesson 9: Multi-Camera Techniques
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As you add tracks to the timeline, existing
tracks may get pushed out of the timeline
area. To reveal these tracks, move the
pointer to the left edge of the track
controls until the pointer changes to a
hand. Now drag up or down to reveal the
hidden tracks.
This lesson shows you how to create new tracks on the timeline, and how to cut between clips on
those tracks.
Creating New Video Tracks
1. Open Lesson8 if it is not already open.
2. Right-click on the timeline marker ribbon and choose Insert Video Track from the menu.
A new video track (V3) is added above the existing video tracks.
Marker ribbon
Pointer becomes
a hand
Drag to reveal
tracks
3. Repeat step 1 to create another video track (V4).
Tutorial • 81
Chapter 5 • Editing
Cutting between Clips
1. In the timeline controls, make sure that the main Ripple button is deselected.
2. In the transport controls, click the Prev or Next buttons to move the play cursor to the edit point
between the TableWide clip and the second part of the 05-ManFront clip at the end of the
second dissolve.
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3. From the browser, drag the TableCU clip to video track V3 on the timeline and align its in-point
with the play cursor.
Since the TableCU clip is a still image, it has a default duration of one second on the timeline.
4. From the browser, drag the BottleCU clip to video track V4 on the timeline and align its in-point
with the play cursor.
Make sure the BottleCU clip finishes
before the 05-ManFront clip.
82 • Tutorial
Notice that neither the TableCU nor BottleCU clip has an activeness bar. This is because multiple
video tracks cannot be active at the same time.
Editing on Multiple Tracks
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5. Click the TableCU clip to make sure that it’s selected.
The red edit and trim handles are displayed.
6. Drag the clip’s outgoing edit handle to the right until the TableCU clip has the same duration as
the BottleCU clip.
Outgoing
edit handle
You can refer to the final spot at any
time to get an idea of how your cuts
should look. The file is located in the
D:\DSTMedia\FinalSpot folder.
Scrub through the spot and locate the
cuts approximately 58 seconds into
the final spot.
7. Move the play cursor to the point where you want to cut from the 05-ManFront clip to the
BottleCU clip.
Tutorial • 83
Chapter 5 • Editing
8. Click the BottleCU clip to select it.
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9. From the NLE Tools toolbar, click Cut To.
The activeness is switched from the 05-ManFront clip to the BottleCU clip at the play
cursor position.
10. Now do a cut from the BottleCU clip back to the 05-ManFront clip using the technique you
just learned.
11. Cut from the 05-ManFront clip to the TableCU clip.
You can also cut to a selected clip by
pressing the C key.
12. Cut from the TableCU clip back to the 05-ManFront clip.
13. Play back your sequence to see how your series of cuts look.
14. You can adjust the length of each clip between cuts to change the overall effect.
15. When you’re satisfied with your cuts, save your sequence as Lesson9.
84 • Tutorial
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Ch apter 6
Managing Media
When working with several digitized video and audio files, it’s important to understand
how Avid|DS handles your data, so that you can work efficiently.
This chapter describes the different types of media, how to effectively manage your storage
space, and how to get rid of media that you no longer need.
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Chapter 6 • Managing Media
What is Media?
There are two types of media in Avid|DS. The first is digitized source material that you capture and
import from tape or file, as discussed in the Capturing Media chapter.
The second type of media, called cache, is created when an effect, transition, or composite in the
sequence, is applied to the originally captured media and then processed. When Avid|DS encounters
processed effects during playback, it uses the cache instead of the source media.
The following illustration shows the relationship between the source and cache media.
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Master clips in the browser
Effect applied to a clip in the timeline
Source media
Cache media
Cache media is created when effects and
transitions applied to your clips are processed.
It is also stored on the disk array. When
Avid|DS encounters processed effects during
playback, it uses the cache media instead of
the original source media.
Source media is the material
that you capture from tape
or file. It is stored on the
disk array and referenced by
master clips in the browser.
Disk array
86 • Tutorial
What is Media?
Capturing Media at Different Qualities
Not only do you have two different types of media, but you can have as many different qualities as
you like. This lets you work and process at a low quality and then easily switch to a higher quality
when needed.
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When working on the effects and compositing portions of your project, it’s a good idea to recapture
your media at a higher quality. Avid|DS creates a second version of the media on your disk array.
The master clip maintains the link to both versions, allowing you to easily switch between them
while you work.
Master clip in browser
Media on disk array
Current working
sequence preferences
Full resolution,
2:1 compression
Quarter resolution,
2:1 compression
Full resolution,
no compression
When you change the working sequence preferences, such as switching to full resolution, Avid|DS
automatically looks for media of that quality on your disk array for you to work with.
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Chapter 6 • Managing Media
Managing Storage Space
One problem with having so many different qualities of media on your disk array, is that the media
files are often large and can quickly use up space. Because of this, it’s good practice to delete any
unused media. Since a clip is a representation of the digitized media stored on disk, you can delete
your media without deleting the clip and sequence files. This is called purging your media.
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You may notice that when you apply
certain effects or transitions, some areas
on the timeline are highlighted in yellow.
This indicates that you can play the effect
or transition in real time; no processing is
required and no cache is created.
For details on real-time effects, refer to
Working with Real-time Effects on
page 79 of the Avid|DS Compositing &
Effects Guide.
You can purge your source and cache media without losing vital information about the edits you
made. You can later use the clip or sequence files to recapture the source material or reprocess the
effects to create caches.
When a clip’s source media is deleted, the clip icon in the browser turns red. When caches are
purged, the icon does not change color, but areas of the timeline that rely on this processed media
are highlighted in red.
Lesson 10: Purging Unwanted Media
Now that you’ve finished the offline edit and are ready to start the finishing aspects of the project,
you’ll need to recapture your material at uncompressed video quality. Before you do this, you’ll
purge the compressed media that’s no longer needed.
1. Open Lesson9 if it is not already open.
2. If you still have the dual viewer displayed, click Done to return to the main viewer.
3. Select all the clips in the browser.
4. Right-click on any of the selected clips and choose Purge Media from the menu.
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Managing Storage Space
The Purge dialog box is displayed.
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5. In the Display Associated Media For box, make sure that the Items Selected in the Browser
option is selected.
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Chapter 6 • Managing Media
6. Since you want to remove the compressed video files you originally captured, select the
Compressed Video option in the Consider Following Media Types box.
7. The 01-LakePan clip also contains audio, so select the Audio (all sampling rates) option as well.
8. In the Keep Media Used In box, deselect the Other Master Clips and Other Sequences options.
This purges the media even if it is being used by other sequences in the project.
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9. In the Optimize For box, make sure that Quick Storage Recovery is selected. This option
searches for complete media files that you’re no longer using. It doesn’t split up media files to get
rid of unused portions of clips, which can substantially reduce the time it takes to find and purge
the media.
10. Deselect the Also Keep 15 Frames Heads and Tails with Preserved Media option, since you want
to remove the media completely.
11. Click Refresh Purge List.
All the files that you captured at 25:1 compression are displayed in the purge list.
12. Click Purge.
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Managing Storage Space
Avid|DS uses color in the browser to
distinguish between clips that contain
media and those that don’t. A red icon
indicates that there is no media for this clip.
This happens if you log material without
capturing it, or if you purge or delete
media associated with a particular clip.
13. A warning message asks if you’re sure you want to purge these files. Click Yes.
The compressed video files are removed from your system.
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14. Close the Purge dialog box and play back your sequence. In place of the media, Avid|DS displays
a “Media Not Available” message. Notice also that the clip icons in the browser are now red,
which means that there is no longer any media associated with your clips.
Lesson 11: Onlining Your Spot
Now that you no longer have the compressed media, you need to recapture the media at
uncompressed quality. You’ll also capture the clips required for the compositing and effects section
of your project.
These clips are divided into two different groups: media with alpha and media with no alpha. Each
group will be imported separately because the capture settings will be different for each one. As you
have quite a lot of media to capture, you’re going to log the clips quickly and then recapture them
from the browser.
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Chapter 6 • Managing Media
Recapturing from the Browser
1. Switch to the Media Input/Output layout and select the Input tab.
2. In the Video box, select the Uncompressed option.
3. From the Capture Source list, select Browser.
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If you want to recapture the audio
portion of a clip, select the Audio button
and then specify which audio channels
you want to capture.
4. Make sure that only the Video button is selected.
5. Multi-select all the clips in the DSTutorial_YourName folder.
6. Click Capture.
The uncompressed media is captured and stored on your disk array. When the capture is
complete, the clip icons are no longer red, signifying that media now exists for the clips. The
capture takes about 10 minutes.
7. Switch back to the Editing layout.
The “Media Not Available” message is still displayed in the viewer because the sequence
preferences are still set to Compressed.
8. From the File menu, choose Sequence Preferences.
The Sequence Preferences dialog box is displayed.
9. Change the Working Video Settings back to Uncompressed and click OK.
The media is now displayed in the viewer.
10. Click Play to play back your sequence.
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Logging Clips with No Alpha
1. Switch back to the Media Input/Output layout and select the Input tab.
2. In the browser, make sure you’re in the DSTutorial_YourName folder.
3. From the Capture Source list, select File.
4. Set the other capture settings as follows:
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5. Click Log.
The Import File(s) dialog box is displayed.
Favorites icon
Path text box
Since you’ll want to jump to D:\DSTMedia
often, you can add it to your favorites list.
To do so, click the Favorites icon in the
browser and choose Add to Favorites
from the list.
When you want to quickly jump to that
location in the future, all you have to do is
click the Favorites icon and choose
D:\DSTMedia from your list of favorites.
6. In the Path text box, type in the following path D:\DSTMedia.
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Chapter 6 • Managing Media
The browser displays the media files of the D:\DSTMedia folder.
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7. Select all the .mov files in this folder and click OK to begin logging the clips.
The clips are logged in the browser in the DSTutorial_YourName folder.
If you switch to Thumbnails mode, you’ll notice that all the logged clips are displayed with the
Avid|DS clapboard. This indicates that these clips do not yet have any corresponding media on
the disk array.
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Managing Storage Space
Logging Clips with Alpha
When capturing material with an alpha
channel, you need to indicate whether it
is premultiplied or not. Since the source
material in this tutorial is premultiplied,
make sure that the Premultiplied Alpha
option is selected.
1. Since the next set of clips to log contain alpha channels, go to the Input panel and set the capture
settings as follows:
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2. Click Log.
The Import File(s) dialog box is displayed.
Instead of typing a path directly in the
Path text box, you can use the browser
tools and the browser tree to navigate to
any folder on your system.
3. In the Path text box, type in the following path: D:\DSTMedia\Alpha.
The browser displays the media files of the D:\DSTMedia\Alpha folder.
4. Select all of the folders by switching to Details view, and then holding down the Shift key and
clicking the first folder and then the last.
5. Click OK to begin logging the clips.
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Chapter 6 • Managing Media
Recapturing Logged Clips from the Browser
1. In the browser, select all the clips that have the Avid|DS clapboards as thumbnails by holding
down the Ctrl key and clicking each one.
2. From the Capture Source list, select Browser.
3. Make sure that only the Video button is selected.
4. Click Capture to begin capturing the media.
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A progress bar appears, showing the media being imported for each clip logged in the browser.
The recapture process takes between 10 and 15 minutes.
When the capture is complete, the clip thumbnails are updated to show the first frame of video,
and the clip icons are no longer red.
This part of the lesson is for Avid|DS HD
Editor users only. For all other users, go
directly to Lesson 12: Adding the Final
Shots to Your Sequence on page 98.
Capturing Completed Clips for Avid|DS HD Editor Only
Since Avid|DS HD Editor does not have certain compositing and effects features, you’ll have to skip
certain lessons in this book and replace some clips on the timeline with the completed composites
you’re going to capture here.
1. In the browser, click the DSTutorial_YourName folder to make sure that it’s selected.
2. Click the New Folder icon
The New Folder dialog box is displayed.
3. Name the new folder Completed_Composites and click OK.
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Managing Storage Space
The Completed_Composites folder appears in the browser.
4. Open the Completed_Composites folder so that the new clips you’re capturing will be created
in this folder.
5. On the Input panel of the Media Input/Output layout set the capture settings as follows:
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6. Click Import.
The Import File(s) dialog box is displayed.
7. In the Path text box, type in the following path: D:\DSTMedia\Completed_Composites.
The browser displays the media files of the D:\DSTMedia\Completed_Composites folder.
8. Select all four files and click OK to begin importing the clips.
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Chapter 6 • Managing Media
Lesson 12: Adding the Final Shots to Your Sequence
In this lesson, you will add the new shots you captured to the timeline to complete your sequence.
1. Switch back to the Editing layout.
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To sort the contents of your browser, click
on a column heading. You can also do
multi-level sorts, by Shift+clicking the
column headings in the order of sorting
importance. For more information on
multi-level sorting see, Sorting Clips in
Details View in the online help.
2. In the browser, multi-select clips 06-Glasses to 19-FinalBoat. Make sure the clips are in
sequential order, from 06-Glasses to 19-FinalBoat, before you select them.
3. Drag the clips to the timeline, so that the beginning of the clip shadow lines up with the end of
the last video clip on the timeline.
Align clip shadow with the end
of the 05-ManFront clip
The clips are created on the timeline.
4. Save your sequence as Lesson12.
98 • Tutorial
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Ch apter 7
Applying Effects
Now that you’re familiar with editing clips, it’s time to start applying effects to them.
In Avid|DS, you can apply effects to clips, tracks, layers, and Effects Trees. You can also
customize and save your favorite effect as a preset to use on other clips.
This chapter describes the different types of effects and how to apply them, as well as the
effects library, and how to process effects.
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Chapter 7 • Applying Effects
The Effects Library
One of the most powerful features of Avid|DS is the wide variety of effects that you can apply to your
media. The term effect refers to a range of filters, DVEs, keyers, and transitions. Each effect has
several properties that allow for unlimited variations. You can save custom property settings as
presets and use them on other projects.
The 3D DVE and Tree effects are not
available in Avid|DS HD Editor.
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100 • Tutorial
The effects are grouped into these categories:
Effect categories
Description
3D DVE
Effects that let you create 2D and 3D titles, as well as 3D DVEs. You can apply these
effects to clips, tracks, or trees.
Audio
Effects that let you adjust the output signal of your audio clip. You can apply these
effects to audio clips, tracks, or mixer strips.
DVE
Effects that are either a transition from one clip to another clip, or a 3D
transformation between layers in a composite. You can apply these effects to clips,
tracks, layers, or trees.
Image
Effects that encompass a wide variety of effects that you can apply to video clips,
tracks, layers, and trees. These include blur, fade-in, fade-out, and noise, to name a
few.
Keyer
Effects that let you create a matte based on a specific color range. You can apply
these effects to clips, tracks, layers, or trees.
Paint
Effects that you apply to the strokes in your graphics session. Paint effects respect the
direction and pressure of paint strokes. You can apply these effects through the
graphics property tree.
Source generator
Effects that let you create new clips based on the region or track you’ve selected. You
can also apply source generator effects to a tree. You can specify an effect for the
new clip, such as a solid color or wood grain, and then use this clip as the background
in your compositing session or create a fade-to-color transition.
Time
Effects that let you modify a clip’s playback rate. Once you apply a time effect to a
clip, Avid|DS creates a container clip to preserve the properties of the original clip.
Time effects include the 3:2 Contract, 3:2 Expand, Deinterlace, Interlace, and
Timewarp. You can apply these effects to clips only.
Transition
Effects that let you change from one clip to the next using a dissolve, wipe, fade, DVE,
Picture-in-Picture, or crossfade effect. You can apply these effects between two clips
or to trees.
Tree
Effects that you can apply to an Effects Tree, such as the Composite and Key
Combiner effects.
Applying Effects
Applying Effects
All effects applied on the timeline are based on what you’ve currently selected. You can apply video
and audio effects to individual clips or tracks. Effects applied to clips are called clip effects and effects
applied to a track are called track effects.
What’s the Difference between Clip and Track Effects?
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Clip effects are attached to individual clips; if you move the clip, the effect travels with it. You can
add an unlimited number of clip effects on top of other clip effects; this is called a stack of effects. Clip
effects are useful when you want to modify only one clip.
Track effects are attached to an individual track. You can apply effects to any type of track in Avid|DS—
timeline effect, overlay, video, and audio. Track effects are useful when you want to apply an effect to
several clips on the same track. You can also stack multiple track effects on top of each other.
Timeline effect
Video track
Audio track
Track effect
Clip effects
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Chapter 7 • Applying Effects
The Property Editors
Avid|DS uses property editors to let you adjust the properties of effects. Property editors are
displayed when you apply an effect or transition to a clip or series of clips. A property editor displays
the properties of a selected object, tool, or effect. You can adjust the values of a property using sliders
and text boxes.
Load and save effects/presets
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Global controls for animating
and processing effects
Property pages contain
additional properties
Highlighted buttons are
selected or active
Click to turn an option on. If the box is
already checked, click to turn it off
Dimmed option is currently unavailable
Click in the text box and drag
clockwise or counterclockwise
to increase or decrease the
values in a text box. You can
also use the [ (open bracket)
and ] (close bracket) keys while
pressing the Shift or Ctrl keys to
change the values by
increments of 0.1 or 10
102 • Tutorial
Drag the slider to increase or
decrease the property value
Applying Effects
Processing
Before you can play the results of effects applied to your media, you must process your clips. When
you do this, all the effects, transitions, composites, or container clips in your sequence are processed.
When you process your clips, a final image or sequence of images is generated and stored in a new
media file, called a cache, so that your source media remains unaltered. During playback, Avid|DS
uses this new cache file instead of the source media.
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Clips without cache files point
directly to source media
Source media
Clip with an effect that needs processing
After processing, the
generated cache file is used
instead of source media
For details on processing and caches, see
Processing on page 129 of this guide and
refer to Cache Management in Avid|DS on
page 152 of the Avid|DS Compositing &
Effects Guide.
You can process all or part of your sequence. You can even process your media at different
resolutions. A separate cache file is created for each resolution at which you process your clips.
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Chapter 7 • Applying Effects
When is Processing Needed?
For a list of all the real-time effects, refer
to Working with Real-time Effects on
page 79 in the Avid|DS Compositing &
Effects Guide.
Processing is usually needed for video images and graphics. Some video effects do not need
processing as Avid|DS can compute the effects during playback. These are known as real-time effects.
With the exception of the timewarp effects, all audio effects and transitions are real-time effects.
That is, you don’t need to process them before you can play them back.
When you apply an effect, the marker ribbon changes color to indicate whether or not it requires
processing. Also, when you play an unprocessed region in the sequence, the message “Processing
Needed” is displayed in the viewer.
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There are two possible colors on the marker ribbon—yellow or red.
Yellow indicates that the clip can be played in
real time and processing is not required
Red indicates that the
effect cannot be
played in real time
and needs to be
processed first
Marker ribbon
indicates sections
that may require
processing
This message appears
in the viewer when a
red highlighted area
is played
After an effect is processed, the marker ribbon becomes clear, and you can see the results in the
viewer when you play your sequence.
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Applying Effects
Lesson 13: Defining the Look of Your Spot
This lesson introduces you to some of the effects available in Avid|DS and how they’re applied to
clips. You will improve the overall look of your spot by applying a color correction and a crop effect
to your sequence. You will then save these effects as presets to a toolbar, so that they can be easily
reused in later lessons.
Adding a Color Correction Effect
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1. In the timeline, right-click on the first clip, 01-LakePan, and choose Add Clip Effect from the menu.
The Load Preset dialog box is displayed.
2. From the Image Effects folder, click the Color Correction effect to select it and click OK.
An effects bar appears above the clip on the timeline and the Color Correction property editor
is displayed.
Color Correction effect bar
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Chapter 7 • Applying Effects
3. On the Basic property page, set the following values:
• Saturation: 80
• Gain: 105
• Brightness: –5
4. On the Balance property page, select the Midtones range and drag the color selector to the yellow
part of the wheel. Set the following values:
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• Hue: 33
• Gain: 20
Note that the Hue and Gain values update as you move the color selector on the wheel.
106 • Tutorial
Applying Effects
5. Close the Color Correction property editor.
Notice how the coloring in the clip now has a more yellow hue.
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After
Before
Adding a Crop Effect
1. In the timeline, right-click on the 01-LakePan clip and choose Add Clip Effect from the menu.
The Load Preset dialog box is displayed.
2. From the Image Effects folder, select the Crop effect and click OK.
For more information on the special
conditions under which effects may cease
to be playable in real-time, refer to
Working with Real-time Effects on
page 79 of the Avid|DS Compositing &
Effects Guide.
An effects bar is placed on the clip and the Crop property editor is displayed. Note that the
portion of the marker ribbon is still yellow, indicating that the clip is still playable in real time.
Yellow area of marker ribbon
Effect bar
Color Correction effect bar
3. On the Crop property page, set the following values:
• Top: 50
• Bottom: 50
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Chapter 7 • Applying Effects
You now have black bands at the top and bottom of your image in the viewer.
Black bands at top
and bottom of clip
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4. Close the Crop property editor.
Saving the Presets to a Toolbar
1. On the 01-Lake Pan clip, double-click on the Color Correction effect bar to open its
property editor.
2. In the Color Correction property editor, drag the thumbnail to the User toolbar next to the viewer.
Thumbnail
The Save Preset As dialog box is displayed.
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Applying Effects
3. Name the preset LookCC and click OK.
An icon for the preset is created on the User toolbar.
4. Repeat steps 1 to 3 for the Crop effect and name the preset LookCrop.
User toolbar with LookCC and LookCrop presets
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5. Save the sequence as Lesson13.
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Chapter 7 • Applying Effects
Using the Effects Tree
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The use of Effects Trees is limited in
Avid|DS HD Editor. You can’t expand a
tree or open the Effects Tree view, which
means that you can’t create new trees or
modify the setup of existing trees. You
can, however, modify the properties of
each effect within an existing tree. You
have access to each of the effect’s
property editors from the Effects list.
The Effects Tree is a tool that lets you composite multiple clips, apply any number of effects, as well
as switch one input for another, delete effects, collapse nodes, copy trees, and save a tree as a preset.
You can apply Effects Trees to clips, tracks, or layers, or as a transition.
An Effects Tree is made of three different types of nodes:
• Input nodes represent the source image from a track in a compositing layer, a clip and its effects
on the timeline, or a source generator effect in an Effects Tree.
• Effects nodes represent each effect that you apply to an Effects Tree.
• Output nodes represent the output of an Effects Tree.
Although you can use the Effects Tree for
compositing, this section focuses mainly
on applying effects. For information on
using the Effects Tree for compositing, see
Chapter 10: Compositing on page 162.
Each node reads an input image, processes the image, and produces an output image as a result. In
turn, the output image is used as the input to another node, and so on. The result of all the nodes is
fed to the output node, and the result is displayed in the viewer.
Input node
Effects nodes
Output node
An Effects Tree with clip/track effects lets you add an
unlimited number of effects to a clip or track
An Effects Tree with a transition effect between two clips.
You can add additional effects to each input or both
110 • Tutorial
Using the Effects Tree
Lesson 14: Applying Effects to an Effects Tree
For Avid|DS HD Editor users only.
Since Effects Trees are not available in this
version, complete the following:
• Apply the LookCC and LookCrop
preset effects to the 02-WakeUp clip.
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• Jump to Lesson 15: Using the
Selective Color Correction Effect on
page 114.
This lesson shows you how to create the same effects as the previous lesson using an Effects Tree.
Then you’ll save the Effects Tree as a preset in a folder and on a toolbar. This lets you reuse the tree
without having to recreate it.
Applying Effects to an Effects Tree
1. Right-click on the 02-WakeUp clip and choose Add Clip Effect from the menu.
The Load Preset dialog box is displayed.
2. From the Image Effects folder, select the Effects Tree effect.
An effects bar appears above the clip and the Effects Tree property editor is displayed.
When you first position the pointer over a
preset, a tooltip displays its name.
3. In the Effects Tree property editor, click Expand to open the Effects Tree view.
The Effects Tree view is displayed and Input 1 is connected to the output node.
4. From the User toolbar, drag the LookCC preset to the Effects Tree view, positioning it between
the input and output nodes. Release the mouse button when the connector becomes highlighted.
The effect is automatically connected between the nodes and the viewer updates accordingly.
Connector
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Chapter 7 • Applying Effects
To add an effect to an Effects Tree, rightclick on an empty area of the view and
choose Add Effect from the menu.
5. Drag the LookCrop preset to the Effects Tree and place it after LookCC.
The effect is added to the Effects Tree and the viewer updates to show the new effect.
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Saving the Preset to a Folder
1. Right-click on an empty area of the Effects Tree view and choose Properties from the menu.
The Effects Tree property editor is displayed.
2. Click the Save Preset icon.
The Save Effects Tree Preset dialog box is displayed.
3. Navigate to a folder in which you want to save the preset, name it: FinalLook and click OK.
The Effects Tree preset is saved in the folder you selected.
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Using the Effects Tree
Saving the Preset to a Toolbar
1. In the Effects Tree property editor, drag the Effects Tree thumbnail to the User toolbar.
The Save Preset As dialog box is displayed.
2. Name the Effects Tree preset FinalLook and click OK.
An icon for the preset is created on the User toolbar.
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FinalLook tree preset
in User toolbar
3. Close the Effects Tree property editor.
4. Save the sequence as Lesson14.
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Chapter 7 • Applying Effects
Lesson 15: Using the Selective Color Correction Effect
In this lesson, you’ll use the Selective Color Correction tree preset to match the color of the water in
the 14-Splash clip with the water’s color in the clips before and after it without changing the color of
the lure.
Comparing the Water Color to the Adjacent Clips
Using the comparison buffer, you will compare two frames from different clips. This is useful when a
color in one clip must match the color in another clip.
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1. Move the play cursor to the middle of the 13-Cast clip.
2. Right-click on the viewer and choose Comparison Buffer > Use Compare Buffer from the menu
to turn on the comparison buffer.
3. Right-click on the viewer again and choose Comparison Buffer > Grab.
The current frame is stored in the comparison buffer. When you move the pointer to the viewer,
you’ll see a white box around it.
4. Position the pointer on the right edge of the white box and drag to the middle of the viewer.
114 • Tutorial
Using the Effects Tree
5. Move the play cursor to the middle of the 14-Splash clip and observe the difference in colors
between the two clips.
13-Cast clip
14-Splash clip
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Creating a Matte for the Water
1. Select the 14-Spash clip.
2. Add the Selective Color Correction to the clip by clicking Apply Effect > Selective Color
Correction from the Image Tools toolbar.
The Selective Color Correction property editor is displayed.
Apply Effect
3. From the Effects list, select Pick Color.
Effects list
4. On the Key property page, click Pick Key Color.
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Chapter 7 • Applying Effects
5. Click on the right side of the viewer to select a shade of blue from the water.
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Changing the Color of the Water
1. From the Effects list, select Selective Color Correction.
The Selective Color Correction property editor is displayed.
2. On the Basic property page, set the following values:
• Hue: Approximately 195
• Saturation: Approximately 80
• Gain: 120
116 • Tutorial
Using the Effects Tree
The color and saturation of the water in the 14-Splash clip should resemble the water in the
previous and next clips, but the color of the lure remains unchanged.
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Before
After
3. Close the property editor.
4. Right-click on the viewer and choose Comparison Buffer > Use Compare Buffer from the menu
to turn off the comparison buffer.
Processing the Effects Tree
1. In the timeline controls, click the Process indicator.
Process
indicator
The Processing Options dialog box is displayed.
2. From the Process box, select the Selected Object option.
3. From the Granularity box, select the Frames option.
4. Select the Update Viewer While Processing option.
5. Leave all other options at their default settings and click OK to begin processing.
A cache file is created for the Splash-14 clip with the Selective Color Correction effect applied to
it. When you play your sequence, Avid|DS uses the cache media instead of the source media.
6. Save the sequence as Lesson15.
Tutorial • 117
Chapter 7 • Applying Effects
Applying a Picture-in-Picture Effect
If you want to rotate the image, you’ll
have to use the DVE effect, which requires
processing before you can play it back.
The Picture-in-Picture effect lets you scale, translate, crop, and transform the size and position of an
image in real time.
Image
bounding box
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Handles
You can use the Picture-in-Picture effect to reposition or resize an image, create a transition between
two clips, create effects, such as “push-wipes” and “fly-bys”, or for single-sided transitions at the
beginning or end of a clip.
118 • Tutorial
Applying a Picture-in-Picture Effect
Lesson 16: Adding a Picture-in-Picture Effect
You can refer to the final spot at any time
to get an idea of how the Picture-inPicture should look. The file is located in
the D:\DSTMedia\FinalSpot folder.
This lesson shows you how to apply a Picture-in-Picture effect to the TableWide clip, which
gradually enlarges and repositions the image over the duration of the clip.
Applying a Picture-in-Picture Effect
1. On the timeline, move the play cursor to the first frame of the TableWide clip.
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2. From the timeline controls, click the Solo icon of the video track on which the TableWide
clip is located.
Now only material from that track is displayed in the viewer.
Solo
3. Click the TableWide clip to make sure that it’s selected.
4. From the Image Tools toolbar, click Apply Effect > Picture-in-Picture.
The Picture-in-Picture property editor is displayed, and a yellow bounding box appears around
the image in the viewer.
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Chapter 7 • Applying Effects
Animation Key
5. From the Picture-in-Picture property editor, click the Animation Key icon.
A keyframe is set at the first frame of the clip and the Animation Key icon turns red at that frame.
Autokey
6. Click the Next Key button.
Previous Key
Next Key
The play cursor moves to the last frame of the effect.
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7. On the DVE property page, make sure that the Lock XY option is selected.
The image’s width to height ratio is now locked. Changing one causes a corresponding change in
the other.
You can adjust the image’s position and
dimensions interactively by dragging the
handles on the bounding box. As you
drag the handles, the image dimensions
are automatically updated in the viewer.
8. In the Scale % box, enter 140 in the X text box, and press Enter.
The image’s Y value is set to 140 automatically and the image appears in the viewer at 140% of
its original size.
9. In the Translate box, enter 25 in the X text box, and –25 in the Y text box, and press Enter.
The images moves slightly downward and to the right.
To zoom out the viewer, right-click in the
viewer and choose Zoom > 50% from
the menu. To reset the viewer, right-click
in the viewer and choose Reset Pan and
Zoom.
120 • Tutorial
TableWide clip modified by Picture-inPicture effect. The viewer was zoomed
in by 50% so that you could see the
DVE handles.
Applying a Picture-in-Picture Effect
You can view a graphical representation
of the keyframes you set in the
animation editor. To do so, right-click
on the Animation Key icon in the
property editor and choose Animation
Editor from the menu.
10. From the Picture-in-Picture property editor, click the Animation Key icon.
A keyframe is set at the last frame of the clip.
Property values for the frames between the first and last keyframes are automatically calculated.
11. On the Options property page, select Frame as the Source Material.
Since the underlying material is a still, you should tag it as frame-based material. This affects
how the Picture-in-Picture effect is applied to the material.
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12. Close the Picture-in-Picture property editor.
13. From the timeline controls, deselect the Solo icon for video track V1.
Material from all video tracks are now displayed in the viewer. Since the Picture-in-Picture effect
is processed in real time, you can play back this portion of the timeline to view the result.
14. Save the sequence as Lesson16.
Tutorial • 121
Chapter 7 • Applying Effects
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122 • Tutorial
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Ch apter 8
Adding Graphics Effects
Avid|DS provides you with a set of graphics tools and effects that lets you create original
images or touch up existing clips without losing the original content. Using these tools,
you can create graphics objects, such as paint strokes and titles.
This chapter introduces you to the Graphics layout and views, and shows you how to
define the properties of your drawing tools. It also shows you how to create a graphics
effect and titles, as well as animate graphics objects and their properties.
Tutorial • 123
Chapter 8 • Adding Graphics Effects
Workflow: Painting and Titling
All graphics creation is done in the Graphics layout. Avid|DS has two toolsets for creating graphics:
Paint and Titling. They share the same animatable edit tools, color browsers, and paint effects’
editors. These toolsets let you touch up and add graphics elements to layers, as well as create mattes.
All strokes and their properties are vector-based and fully editable, except for when you’re working
in the raster paint mode.
Graphics effects can only be applied as
clip effects. Graphics effects applied to
layers or trees are not available in Avid|DS
HD Editor.
1
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Choose a method to apply graphics
Apply the Graphics effect to a clip
or
Create a graphics container clip and apply graphics to a layer
or
2
Choose a drawing tool
Choose a
drawing tool
124 • Tutorial
Apply graphics
as a node in the
Effects Tree
Drawing tool is
displayed in the graphics
property tree
Define each tool’s properties
Workflow: Painting and Titling
3
Create graphics object
Draw a stroke or
add a title
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4
Edit individual graphics objects
5
Process the graphics objects
Select object and
edit its properties
Process the frames on
which the graphics
objects were created
Tutorial • 125
Chapter 8 • Adding Graphics Effects
The Graphics Layout
The Graphics layout is where you perform painting and titling tasks. You can create and edit
graphics objects, touch up your clips using the graphics tools and the paint raster mode, as well as
create mattes.
Graphics Object view (GOV) displays graphics objects and their
time spans in the current graphics session. You can also select,
trim, move, rename, and delete any of your graphics objects
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View switchers let
you access different
toolsets or views
126 • Tutorial
Graphics property tree
displays the properties of a
selected tool or graphics object
Viewer displays the output of your sequence at the position of the
play cursor. During a graphics session, it also serves as an area to
create and arrange titles and graphics objects
Property editors let you set and modify
various graphics properties, such as brush
options, paint style, color, and titling style
Toolbars contain all the graphics tools
necessary for paint and titling creation
The Graphics Layout
Graphics Views
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The lessons in this chapter were created
using the Graphics view of the Graphics
layout, since it contains tools for both
paint and titling tasks. As you become
more familiar with painting and titling in
Avid|DS, you may choose alternate
methods of working and accessing tools.
The Graphics layout contains five different views: Paint, Titling, Transformations, Graphics, and the
Timeline view. The first four of these views contains tools which are optimized for certain types of
work. You may want to choose one of these views, modify an existing one, or create your own
custom view of the Graphics layout.
View switcher
Paint view for paint tasks
Each view contains tools,
toolbars, and other views
Titling view for titling tasks
Transformations view for transformation tasks and shape editing
Graphics view for paint and titling tasks
Timeline view for placing and editing clips in your sequence
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Chapter 8 • Adding Graphics Effects
Creating and Editing Graphics
Before you create graphics or titles, you must define how the brush strokes or titles will appear. Each
time you select a drawing tool, the editable properties of that tool are displayed in the graphics
property tree. When you click any of the property icons in the graphics property tree, its
corresponding property editor is displayed. You can set individual brush or text properties using
these property editors. Property editors let you define parameters, such as the brush, fill, edge, face,
and shadow.
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Drawing tools
When a drawing tool is
selected, the graphics
property tree displays all
of its properties. The
words “Current Tool”
appear above the tree
When a property icon
is selected, its property
editor is displayed,
allowing you to change
the settings
You can set the default properties of the drawing tool before creating an object. Then, when you
create a new object, the properties you set are applied to the strokes you create. These properties will
remain in effect until you change the properties of any of the drawing tools.
To override the default properties that you set, simply select one or more objects, and change the
properties in the graphics property tree. This only changes the properties of the selected objects.
After creating a graphics object, you can edit any of its properties. Before you can do that, however,
you must select an object. Only then can you move it, edit its properties, or change its shape.
128 • Tutorial
Creating and Editing Graphics
Lesson 17: Adding a Graphics Effect
This lesson shows you how to apply a blur effect to distort the area around the corkscrew. This
makes all the objects around the corkscrew appear out of focus, and draws the eye to the corkscrew.
Applying a Blur effect
1. Open Lesson16 if it is not already open.
2. Scrub through the TableWide clip on the timeline and position the play cursor in the middle of
the clip.
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3. Right-click on the Picture-in-Picture effects bar and choose Bypass from the menu.
The Picture-in-Picture effect bar turns orange, indicating that the effect is bypassed. This lets
you see the original source image, which makes it easier to paint on, because it is static.
4. Switch to the Graphics layout.
The Graphics effect is automatically applied to your clip and the Graphics layout is displayed.
5. From the view switcher on the left, click the Graphics view icon. This view contains both titling
and graphics tools.
Graphics view
6. From the GFX Creation Tools toolbar, click Freehand.
7. In the graphics property tree, click Paint Style to display the Paint Style property editor. Set the
following parameters:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Brush: Deselected
Fill: Selected
Invert: Selected
Fill Opacity: 100
Feathering Use: Selected
Feathering Crop: Deselected
Feathering Type: Blur
Blur X Radius: 50
Blur Y Radius: 50
By selecting the Invert option, you are applying the Blur effect everywhere, except inside the
stroke itself. This will create a blurred image outside the stroke, which focuses your attention to
the corkscrew.
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Chapter 8 • Adding Graphics Effects
8. In the graphics property tree, right-click on Fill Fx and choose Blur from the menu.
9. In the graphics property tree, click Fill Fx (Blur) to display the Blur property editor. Set the
following parameters:
• X and Y Radius: to 8
• Uniform: Selected
10. In the graphics property tree, click Masks to display the Masks property editor.
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11. Select the R, G, and B options, so that the effect is applied to these channels only.
12. In the graphics property tree, click Time Span.
13. In the Time Span property editor, click Start to End to apply the effect to the entire clip.
14. Draw a stroke around the corkscrew.
Stroke drawn around corkscrew
15. Switch to the Editing layout.
16. To reapply the Picture-in-Picture effect, right-click on the Picture-in-Picture effects bar and
choose Bypass from the menu.
The Picture-in-Picture is reapplied to the image.
130 • Tutorial
Creating and Editing Graphics
17. On the timeline, right-click on the Graphics effect bar and choose Lower from the menu.
The Graphics effect moves down one position in the stack of the effects and is now “under” the
Picture-in-Picture effect you applied in Lesson 16. Therefore, the Picture-in-Picture effect is
applied to the Blur effect as well.
Picture-in-Picture
effect
Graphics effect
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Processing the Effect
1. In the timeline controls, click the Process indicator.
The Processing Options dialog box is displayed.
2. From the Granularity box, select the Fields option and turn on the Update Viewer While
Processing option. Leave all the other options at their default settings.
3. Click OK to begin processing.
4. When the processing is complete, save the sequence as Lesson17.
You can refer to the final spot at any time
to see how the effect should look. The file
is located in D:\DSTMedia\Final Spot.
OPTIONAL: Repeat Lesson 17 and apply a similar graphics-based blur effect to the TableCU clip.
Tutorial • 131
Chapter 8 • Adding Graphics Effects
Lesson 18: Adding Titles
This lesson shows you how to generate a black background and then create a blur in/blur out titling
sequence by adding text and animating its properties over time. You may want to scrub through the
Final Spot movie to preview what you’ll be doing.
Generating a Clip
1. Open Lesson17 if it is not already open.
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2. In the timeline, select the 06-Glasses clip.
3. Make sure that Ripple is still on.
4. In the status bar, type 400+ in the S (start) timecode box and press Enter.
Start timecode
The clip is moved forward, creating a 4-second gap before it.
4-second gap before 06-Glasses clip
5. Click anywhere between the two clips.
The play cursor moves to the point where you clicked.
132 • Tutorial
Creating and Editing Graphics
6. Click the Frame Selection icon.
In and out markers are displayed on the marker ribbon at the beginning and end of the gap.
Frame Selection
Out marker
In marker
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7. Click the In/Out to Selection button.
The 4-second region you marked off is highlighted on the track.
In/Out to Selection button
4-second gap highlighted
8. From the Image Tools toolbar, click Black.
A black clip is created in the four-second gap.
9. Close the property editor.
10. Switch to the Graphics layout.
The Graphics effect is applied to the clip and the Graphics layout is displayed.
Tutorial • 133
Chapter 8 • Adding Graphics Effects
Creating a Title
1. Right-click on the viewer and choose Safe Action/Title from the menu.
Safe action guide
Safe title guide
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The safe action/title guides appear in the viewer.
2. From the view switcher, click the Graphics view icon.
3. From the GFX Creation toolbar, click Text.
You are now in Edit Text mode.
4. In the graphics property tree, click Titling Style.
5. In the Titling Style property editor, set the following parameters to define the look of the titles:
•
•
•
•
Face Use: Selected
Face Opacity: 100
Face Softness: 0
Deselect all other options
6. In the graphics property tree, right-click on Face Fx and choose Color Blend from the menu.
7. In the graphics property tree, click Font to open the Font property editor. Set the following
parameters:
• Font: Book Antiqua
• Style: Regular
• Size: 42
8. In the graphics property tree, click Masks and select the R, G, and B options in the Masks
property editor.
134 • Tutorial
Creating and Editing Graphics
9. In the graphics property tree, click Time Span, and click Start to End in the Time Span
property editor.
10. In the viewer, create a text box within the safe action/titling area by clicking and dragging.
11. Click in the text box, and type the following: Do you know that feeling?
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12. While still in Edit Text mode, right-click on the left margin of the text box and choose Center
from the menu.
The text is centered.
13. From the GFX Creation toolbar, click Text.
14. In the viewer, create another text box within the safe action/titling area as shown below.
15. Type the following: Been there before?
16. Right-click on the left margin of the text box and choose Center from the menu.
The second text body is centered.
Tutorial • 135
Chapter 8 • Adding Graphics Effects
Select
Animating the Titles
1. From the General toolbar, click Select and select the first text body you created.
2. From the General 2 toolbar, click <<Edited Frame.
The play cursor moves back to the first frame.
3. In the graphics property tree, click Titling Style.
4. In the Titling Style property editor, set the following values:
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• Face Opacity: 0
• Face Softness: 60
5. In the Titling Style property editor, click the Animation Key icon.
A keyframe is set at the first frame.
6. In the status bar, type 100+ in the P (play cursor position) timecode box and press Enter.
Play cursor position timecode
The position of the play cursor jumps forward one second.
7. In the Titling Style property editor, set the following values:
• Face Opacity: 100
• Face Softness: 0
8. In the Titling Style property editor, click the Animation Key icon.
The key icon turns red and another keyframe is set one second after the first keyframe.
9. In the status bar, type 200+ in the P (play cursor position) timecode box and press Enter.
The play cursor jumps two seconds forward.
10. In the Titling Style property editor, make sure the Face Opacity is set to 100 and the Face
Softness is set to 0.
This ensures that the title is at 100% opacity from the first to the third second of the 4-second
black clip.
11. In the Titling Style property editor, click the Animation Key icon.
You need a keyframe at this point to set the effect properties before you begin the final fade out.
136 • Tutorial
Creating and Editing Graphics
To zoom in the GOV, press the Z key and
drag left or right in the GOV. To reset
the zoom, press the Z key and click
anywhere in the GOV.
12. In the Graphics Object View (GOV), move the play cursor to the last frame containing text.
Last frame containing text
13. In the Titling Style property editor, set the following values:
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• Face Opacity: 0
• Face Softness: 60
14. In the Titling Style property editor, click the Animation Key icon.
Another keyframe is set one frame before the end of the titling sequence, where the title fades
to 0% opacity.
15. Select the other text body.
16. In the Face box, continue adding keyframes at the following timecodes.
To view the keyframes you set in the
animation editor, right-click on the
Animation Key icon in the property
editor and choose Animation Editor
from the menu.
• At the 30th frame (1 second), set the Opacity to 0 and the Softness to 60, and set a keyframe.
• 30 frames later (2 seconds), set the Opacity to 100 and the Softness to 0, and set a keyframe.
• Another 30 frames later (3 seconds), with the Opacity at 100 and the Softness at 0, and set a
keyframe.
• At the last frame containing text, set the Opacity to 0 and the Softness to 60, and set a keyframe.
The timing of the second title is staggered and introduced one second after the first title appears.
Then they both blur out to 0% opacity at the same time.
17. Switch to the Editing layout.
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Chapter 8 • Adding Graphics Effects
Processing the Effect
1. In the timeline controls, click the Process indicator.
The Processing Options dialog box is displayed.
2. From the Granularity box, select the Fields option and turn on the Update Viewer While
Processing option. Leave all other options at their default settings.
3. Click OK to begin processing.
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4. When the processing is complete, save the sequence as Lesson18.
You can refer to the final spot at any time
to get an idea of how the other two titles
should look. The file is located in
D:\DSTMedia\Final Spot. Scrub through
the spot and locate the following titles:
“When you get the right tool” and “...you
get what you need.”
138 • Tutorial
OPTIONAL: Repeat Lesson 18 to create two other titling sequences. Using what you’ve just learned
in this chapter, you should be able to recreate the titling sequences as they appear in the final spot.
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Ch apter 9
Adding Audio
Avid|DS has a full range of audio tools to edit, mix, and animate audio. This chapter
introduces you to the different audio formats in Avid|DS, and the different ways of creating
audio mixes. It also shows you how to apply effects to and mix your audio clips, and how
to automate your mixes.
Tutorial • 139
Chapter 9 • Adding Audio
Workflow: Mixing Audio
In Avid|DS, you’ll be doing most of your audio mixing using the mixer. The following illustration
shows how the audio tracks are created and fed into the mixer for further tuning.
1
Create an audio container clip
Create an audio container clip to hold
all the clips that will be mixed
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2
Apply audio effects
Apply effects on
the timeline tracks
Apply effects on the
mixer input strips
3
Fine-tune the mix
Adjust the volume and balance
of the audio streams
Mixer
4
Process the mix
Close the audio container clip to
automatically process the mix
140 • Tutorial
Mixing Your Audio Clips
Mixing Your Audio Clips
There are two ways to mix audio on the timeline. You can:
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Create a mix on the top
timeline. Place audio clips on
different tracks on the
timeline, and within the same
region. Unlike video clips,
audio clips do not lose their
activeness when placed at the
same timecodes as other audio
clips. This allows you to play
several clips simultaneously
Both clips
are active
or
Create a submix in an audio
container clip. Place multiple
audio clips in a container clip,
and mix them down to a single
clip on the top timeline
Audio
container clip
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Chapter 9 • Adding Audio
The Audio Clips and Tracks
Audio clips and tracks in Avid|DS can have up to eight channels of audio in any of the
following formats:
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In Avid|DS, you can manipulate audio clips
in much the same way as video clips. You
can play them in the viewer, drag and
drop them from the browser to the
timeline, trim, copy, and delete clips, and
of course, add effects to them.
Format
Description
Mono
Single channel of audio
Stereo
Two audio channels: Left and right
Quadraphonic
Four audio channels: Left, right, left rear, right rear
LCRS
Four audio channels: Left, center, right, surround
4 Stream
Four audio channels: Output 1 to 4
5.1
Six audio channels: Left, right, center, Low Frequency Emitter (LFE),
left surround, right surround
6.1
Seven audio channels: Left, right, center, Low Frequency Emitter (LFE),
surround center, side left, side right
7.1
Eight audio channels: Left, right, center, Low Frequency Emitter (LFE),
left surround, right surround, left center, right center
8 Stream
Eight audio channels: Output 1 to 8
Since the clip and track formats are independent of each other, you can place any kind of audio clip
on any audio track. You can also place different format clips on the same track. For example, you can
place a mono and a stereo clip on the same stereo track.
Stereo clip with two
channels of audio
Mono clip with one
channel of audio
When you place an audio clip on a track with a different format, it turns orange. This does not
prevent you from playing it back.
142 • Tutorial
Mixing Your Audio Clips
Working in Audio Container Clips
Audio container clips let you compress multiple audio tracks with up to 64 streams of audio down to
a single audio clip on one track, leaving you with more audio streams and tracks to work with. You
can have any combination of audio clips and tracks in an audio container clip. The format of the
container clip itself, however, depends on the mixer configuration specified inside the container clip.
The following illustration shows a group of audio clips that have been mixed down to a single clip on
the timeline.
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A closed audio container
clip is represented as a
single clip on the timeline
An open audio
container clip
Here are a couple of other reasons for using audio container clips:
• Animating (automating) your mix: If you need to boost or lower the signal at different points in
time, it’s more efficient to animate the mix in a container clip. This way, if you move the
container clip, its animation moves with it.
• Submixing: You can edit specific sounds more efficiently by creating submixes of common track
types. For example, mix hard sound effects like creaking floors and footsteps in one container
clip, vocal tracks in another, and instrumentals in yet another container clip. Then, premix all of
these clips in their respective container clips and play them simultaneously on the
parent timeline.
• Sample Accurate Editing: Within an audio container clip, you can do your editing in terms of
audio samples as opposed to the video frames used on the top timeline.
• Processing: When you close an audio container clip, the tracks and any effects are automatically
processed and represented as a single clip on the parent timeline.
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Chapter 9 • Adding Audio
Using the Mixer
You can assign the channels of an audio
track to a specific output strip. Depending
on your audio hardware configuration,
you may have up to eight audio output
channels available.
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For details on output routing, refer to
Assigning a Mixer Strip to an Output
Channel in the online help.
In Avid|DS, most of your audio mixing will be done using the mixer. Although you can perform
some mixing by applying effects to the audio clips on the timeline, the mixer gives you greater
flexibility and control over your overall audio mix.
Mixer input strips let you add effects
and adjust the overall volume and
balance of each track. They correspond
to the audio tracks on the timeline
Mixer output strips let you adjust the
overall volume of the output signal. The
number of output strips depends on
your current configuration
Strip controls let
you mute, solo,
animate, and adjust
the balance of an
audio track
Effects box lets you
apply effects to an
audio track
Volume fader lets you
control the level of the
audio signal
Strip name indicates the
name of the mixer strip. It
corresponds to the track
name on the timeline
144 • Tutorial
Mixer controls let
you control the look
and operation of
the mixer
Level meters
indicate the level of
the audio signal
Animation controls let you
control the mixer animation
Mixing Your Audio Clips
Lesson 19: Mixing Audio
This lesson shows you how to create an audio mix using several different audio clips. You will create
an audio container clip and use the mixer to create your mix.
Adding Audio to Your Spot
1. Open Lesson18 if it is not already open.
2. In the timeline controls, make sure the main Ripple button is deselected.
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3. Select the FinalMix audio clip and press Delete.
The FinalMix audio clip is removed from the timeline.
4. In the browser, select the Audio folder.
5. Drag the mus-main clip to the audio track. Place it in line with the first cut, between the
01-PanLake and 02-WakeUp clips.
The orange appearance of the clip
indicates a difference between the track
format and the clip format. In this case,
the clip is mono and the track is stereo.
6. Right-click on the mus-main clip and choose Create Audio Container from the menu.
A new timeline appears with only one audio track (A1), which contains the mus-main clip.
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Chapter 9 • Adding Audio
7. Right-click on the overview area and choose Insert Audio Track > Mono.
?
A mono audio track is added to the timeline.
How do I view the waveforms on
the timeline?
Click the track resize button once or
twice depending on how large you want
the track.
8. Repeat step 7 to create a third audio track.
9. Drag the mus-bass and mus-perc audio clips onto these new audio tracks. Place them at the
beginning of the timeline.
Track resize button
146 • Tutorial
Mixing Your Audio Clips
Mixing the Audio Clips
1. In the view switcher, click the Mixer icon.
The Mixer view is displayed.
?
Faders
Strip names
2. In the mixer, do the following:
• Highlight the Strip Name box of the A1 input strip and type: Main.
• Highlight the Strip Name box of the A2 input strip and type: Bass.
• Highlight the Strip Name box of the A3 input strip and type: Perc.
The track names on the timeline change to match the corresponding input strip name.
Track names
3. Using the Play button on the transport controls and the Faders on the mixer input strips, adjust
the levels of the separate tracks as necessary.
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Chapter 9 • Adding Audio
4. At the bottom of the taskbar, click the Go to the Top Timeline icon.
The audio container is closed, mixed down, and displayed as a clip on the top timeline.
5. Right-click on the audio container clip and choose Properties from the menu.
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The Clip property editor is displayed.
6. On the General property page, type: Music in the Name text box and close the property editor.
The name of the audio container clip changes to “Music”.
You can edit your layout to make the
timeline area bigger, so you can see all the
tracks. You have the choice of either
copying your layout and then modifying it
or just editing the existing layout. For more
information, refer to Editing Existing
Layouts in the online help.
148 • Tutorial
7. Right-click on the overview area and choose Insert Audio Track > Stereo from the menu.
A stereo audio track is added to the timeline.
8. Drag the Atmosphere audio clip from the browser to the new track. Place it at the beginning of
the timeline.
Mixing Your Audio Clips
9. Using the mixer, adjust the levels of the Atmosphere audio clip in relation to the Music
audio clip.
For the FinalSpot.mov, –5dB was used for
the “Atmosphere”.
10. When you’re satisfied with the mix, save your sequence as Lesson19.
Lesson 20: Adding Sound Effects
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You can apply audio effects to an audio clip, track, or mixer strip. Clip and track effects can be applied
to selected areas of the timeline. Mixer strips, however, let you apply an effect to the entire signal
coming from a track.
This lesson shows you how to add an audio effect to a clip. You will also use the mixer to animate the
effects parameters and record them over time.
Fading in to the Audio
1. Open Lesson19 if it is not already open.
2. Drag the Bells audio clip from the browser to the marker ribbon. Place it at the beginning of
the timeline.
Drag Bells clip to the
marker ribbon
A new audio track containing the Bells audio clip is automatically created. Since the Bells audio
clip is stereo, a stereo track is created.
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3. Select the in-point of the Bells audio clip.
In-point of Bells clip
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4. Click the Audio Tools icon to open the Audio Tools toolbar.
5. On the Audio Tools toolbar, click Audio Fade In.
A default fade-in is created.
Audio Fade In
6. Repeat steps 2 and 3 using the Atmosphere audio clip.
Adding a Reverb Effect to the Bells Clip
1. Right-click on the Bells audio clip and choose Add Clip Effect from the menu.
The Load Preset dialog box is displayed.
2. In the Audio Effects folder, select the Reverb effect and click OK.
The Reverb effect is added to the Bells clip and the Reverb property editor is displayed.
Click the Help icon to get detailed
information on each of the parameters in
the Reverb property editor.
Click the Preview button to play back the
effect in loop mode, while adjusting the
effect’s properties.
3. Adjust the Reverb settings until you get the right “distance” with the bells.
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Mixing Your Audio Clips
4. Using the mixer, adjust the levels of the Bells audio clip in relation to the Atmosphere and Music
audio clips.
Recording Fader Animation
1. Position the play cursor at the last edit point between the TableCU and the 05-ManFront clips.
2. From the browser, drag the Wind audio clip to the new audio track, and place it at the play
cursor position.
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Start of the wind clip placed at the
position of the play cursor
In this position, the Wind clip overlaps with the “Do you know this feeling?” title that’s between
the 05-ManFront and 06-Glasses clips.
3. Make sure the play cursor is positioned at the beginning of the Wind audio clip.
4. In the mixer, click the animation button on the input strip for the track on which the Wind clip
was placed.
The animation button turns red.
You can listen to the final spot at any time
to get an idea of what the final audio
should sound like. The file is located in the
D:\DSTMedia\FinalSpot folder.
5. Right-click on the animation button and make sure Record Fader Animation is selected.
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6. Move the fader to the very bottom of that mixer input strip.
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Fader
7. Press the L key to begin playback, and drag the fader up and down over the duration of the clip
to fade the wind in and out. When the Wind clip is finished, stop the playback by pressing the
Spacebar.
The animation button turns green to indicate that some animation was recorded.
8. When you’re finished, play back the sequence to see the animation.
9. If you’re not satisfied with the animation right-click on the animation button and choose Delete
Fader Animation then try to record the animation again from step 3.
10. If you’re satisfied with the results, save your sequence as Lesson20.
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Chapter 10
The Compositing layout is not available
in Avid|DS HD Editor, but you can create
simple composites using overlay tracks.
Compositing
Compositing is the layering of two or more images together to create a new image.
Avid|DS provides several ways in which you can composite images.
This chapter introduces you to the Compositing layout and describes the three methods in
which you can composite images. You’ll also learn how to use external mattes in layers and
Effects Trees, and how to work with media larger than D1 size.
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The Compositing Layout
The Compositing layout is where you organize multiple layers of video clips and images. You can
apply standard layer effects or create an Effects Tree in which you can add multiple clips for
compositing and multi-input effects. When you switch to the Compositing layout, a graphics
container clip is automatically created, allowing you to focus on just the clips you want to composite.
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Layers view is where you set the
order of clips that are placed on the
graphics container clip timeline
Effects Tree is where you can
apply multiple effects and
composite clips
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Viewer displays the output of your
sequence at the position of the play cursor
Graphics container timeline is
where you place clips to be added to
layers in the Layers view
The Compositing Layout
Compositing Methods
Compositing is limited to the first method
(simple compositing) in Avid|DS HD Editor.
In Avid|DS, there are several ways to perform compositing. The method you choose depends on how
you prefer to work and the complexity of your composite. The three methods of compositing are:
Simple compositing on the overlay track(s)
lets you add titles or graphics on the track,
and composite images over clips on the
video tracks.
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Layers in a graphics container clip let
you create multiple layers and composites
that require tracking, external mattes, or
animation. You can also apply effects,
such as color correction, DVEs, graphics,
keyers, and Effects Trees to each layer and
perform Boolean operations between
layers and mattes.
Effects Trees are useful when you want to
reuse the treatment of an element
repeatedly within a composite. In an Effects
Tree, you can apply any combination of
image effects. This lets you combine
multiple images on one layer, which serves
as the input to the layer above it.
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For Avid|DS HD Editor users only.
Since this version only lets you create
composites using the overlay tracks,
complete the following:
• Do the first part of this lesson:
Simple Overlay Compositing.
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• Jump to Lesson 22: Using External
Mattes on page 166.
Lesson 21: Choosing a Compositing Method
This lesson shows you how to composite images using overlay tracks, layers, and an Effects Tree.
Since the clips you’ll use already have mattes in their alpha channels, they will be immediately
composited. These are the clips you’ll be using for each example:
• CatchWater: The background for the composite.
• 16-CatchMan_1: The man composited over the water.
• CatchFish1: A series of computer-generated images. After you import the images, they’re
displayed as a single clip in the browser.
• CatchFingers_1: The man’s fingers, which are composited on top of the fish.
Simple Overlay Compositing
1. Open Lesson20 if it is not already open.
2. In the timeline controls, make sure that the main Ripple button is deselected.
3. Select the 16-CatchMan_1 clip on the timeline and press the Delete key.
The clip is removed from the timeline leaving a space between the 15-ReelIn and
17-BottleTop clips.
4. Drag the CatchWater clip to the timeline, placing it in the area previously occupied by the 16CatchMan_1 clip.
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This lets you start the composite again, with the CatchWater clip as the bottommost layer in
the composite.
Resize
5. Click the Resize icon on each video track to set the tracks to the smallest size.
Since you need to add overlay tracks, this will save you from having to scroll the timeline to
see the tracks.
6. Right-click on the marker ribbon and choose Insert Overlay Track from the menu.
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Marker ribbon
An overlay track is added to the timeline.
Overlay track
7. Add two more overlay tracks to the timeline and resize them to the smallest size.
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8. On the left side of the track controls, position the pointer over the scroll bar, and drag it up or
down so you can see the video clips and the bottommost overlay track. The pointer changes to a
hand when you pause over the scroll bar.
Scroll bar
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This will help you position the first clip on the overlay track in relation to the other video clips.
9. From the browser, drag the 16-CatchMan_1 clip to the bottommost overlay track and position it
above the CatchWater clip on the video track below. Notice that “magnetism” helps you position
the clip correctly.
Since the 16-CatchMan_1 clip already has a matte in its alpha channel, the man is automatically
composited over the background clip.
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You can solo any overlay track and click
the Alpha button on the Viewer toolbar
to see the alpha of each clip. This will
show you how each clip contributes to
the final composite.
10. Scroll the timeline until you can see all the overlay tracks.
11. Drag the rest of the clips, CatchFish1 and CatchFingers_1, to each overlay track, making sure
that the CatchFingers_1 clip is on the topmost overlay track. Since the CatchFingers_1 and
CatchFish1 clips are only required for part of the sequence, place them so their last frames align
with the last frame of the rest of the clips.
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Last frames match up
As you can see, using overlay tracks is a quick way to create a composite. However, when you
have many clips you want to composite, overlay tracks may not be the most efficient way as they
can add many more tracks to your timeline, requiring you to scroll the timeline up and down to
see them.
Compositing with Layers
Since this example shows you how to composite clips using layers, you won’t need the overlay
tracks anymore.
1. Right-click on an empty area in the overlay track that contains the CatchFingers_1 clip and
choose Delete Track from the menu.
A dialog box is displayed asking if you’re sure you want to delete the track.
2. Click Yes.
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3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 to delete the other two overlay tracks.
4. On the timeline, position the play cursor over the CatchWater clip.
5. Switch to the Compositing layout.
The Compositing layout is displayed and the CatchWater clip is in the first layer in the
composite.
6. Drag the 16-CatchMan_1 clip from the browser to an empty area in the Layers view.
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A layer is created in the Layers view, as well as a track in the timeline.
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7. From the browser, drag the CatchFish1 clip to the marker ribbon. Position the shadow at the end
of the rest of the clips.
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A layer is created in the Layers view, as well as a track in the timeline. This forms the last layer
in the composite.
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8. Repeat step 4 with the CatchFingers_1 clip.
Since all the clips have mattes in their alpha channels, they’re immediately composited on top
of one another.
Compositing in an Effects Tree
Since you’ll be recreating the composite using an Effects Tree, you only need one layer on which to
apply the Effects Tree.
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1. In the Layers view, right-click on the CatchFingers_1 layer and choose Remove Layer from
the menu.
The layer is removed, but the clip remains on the timeline.
2. Remove the rest of the layers except the CatchWater layer.
3. In the Layers view, click the CatchWater layer to select it.
The Effects Tree for that layer is displayed. The input node (CatchWater) is connected to the
output node and displayed in the viewer.
4. Right-click on an empty area of the Effects Tree and choose Add Effect from the menu.
The Load Preset dialog box is displayed.
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5. From the Tree Effects folder, select the Composite effect and click OK.
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The Composite effect node is added to the tree.
6. In the timeline, drag the track icons of the following clips to the Effects Tree:
Track icon
• CatchFingers_1
• CatchFish1
• 16-CatchMan_1
Nodes are created for each clip.
If you click and release on an output port,
the connector becomes “stuck” to the
pointer. When you click on an input port,
the connection is made. For more
information, refer to Connecting and
Disconnecting Nodes on page 49 of the
Avid|DS Compositing & Effects Guide.
7. Connect the Composite effect to the tree in the following order:
•
•
•
•
CatchWater to Input 1 (this node is also connected to the output node, but you’ll change it later)
16-CatchMan_1 to Input 2
CatchFish1 to Input 3
CatchFingers_1 to Input 4
Output port
Input port
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8. Connect the output port of the Composite node to the output node.
The connection from the CatchWater clip is broken, and the Composite node is connected to the
output node.
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Since all the clips have mattes in their alpha channels, they are immediately composited on top of
one another.
You can slightly defocus the background
by adding the Blur effect to the tree
between the Input 1 and Composite
nodes. Increase the blur size slightly.
9. On the taskbar, click the Go to Top Timeline icon.
The graphics container clip is closed and the Editing layout is displayed.
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The Compositing Layout
Processing the Clip
1. In the timeline controls, click the Process indicator.
The Processing Options dialog box is displayed.
2. Process the clip using these options:
• Duration of Selection
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• Minimal
• Fields
• Update Viewer While Processing
3. Click OK to begin processing.
4. When the processing is complete, save the sequence as Lesson21.
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Chapter 10 • Compositing
Lesson 22: Using External Mattes
For Avid|DS HD Editor users only.
Since there is no Compositing layout in
Avid|DS HD Editor, complete the
following:
• Open the Completed_Composites
folder in the browser.
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• Replace the 18-BottleFront clip on the
timeline with the 18-BottleFront_Final
clip.
• Jump to Lesson 23: Creating the Final
Shot on page 170.
In some cases, you’ll be supplied with two RGB clips that you need to combine: one for the RGB
channels and one for the same clip as its matte. The RGB clips that you want to use as a matte are
referred to as external mattes. You can add an external matte to a clip in either the Layers view or in an
Effects Tree; this lesson shows you both methods. You’ll be adding an external matte to the BottleFish1
clip, so that the man’s hand is composited on top of the fish. These are the clips you’ll be using:
• BottleFish1: The top layer. After you import this series of .pic images, they’re displayed as a
single clip in the browser.
• 18-BottleFront: The bottom layer.
• BottleExtMatte: The external matte for the BottleFish1 clip.
Adding External Mattes to Layers
1. Position the play cursor over the 18-BottleFront clip and switch to the Compositing layout.
The Compositing layout is displayed and the 18-BottleFront clip becomes the first layer in
the composite.
2. From the browser, drag the BottleFish1 clip to the Layers view.
A new track is added to the timeline, and the clip becomes the top layer in the Layers view.
3. Add the BottleExtMatte clip as a new track, but not as a layer by right-clicking on the clip while
you drag it to the marker ribbon on the timeline. Since this clip will be used as an external matte,
it doesn’t require a layer.
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4. Drag the icon of the track that contains the BottleExtMatte clip to the Layer Alpha thumbnail of
the BottleFish1 clip.
Result area
Layer controls
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Layer RGB thumbnail
Layer Alpha thumbnail
The external matte is added to the clip, compositing the hand over the fish.
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Adding External Mattes in Effects Trees
1. Right click on the BottleFish1 clip and choose Remove Layer from the menu. Since you’re going
to recreate the same composite in an Effects Tree, you no longer need the layer.
Each layer has its own Effects Tree. To
display the Effects Tree of a layer, click on
the layer.
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2. Click the BottleFront layer to display its Effects Tree.
3. From the timeline, drag the track icons of the BottleExtMatte and BottleFish1 clips to the
Effects Tree.
The clips are added as nodes.
4. In the Effects Tree, right-click on the connector and choose Add Effect from the menu.
The Load Preset dialog box is displayed.
You can zoom the Effects Tree in or out by
pressing the Z key, and then right-clicking
and dragging in the Effects Tree.
5. From the Tree Effects folder, add the Composite effect to the tree.
The composite effect is automatically connected to the nodes.
6. Add the Matte Composite effect to the tree as well.
7. Connect the nodes as shown below:
The clips are composited with the hand over the fish.
8. On the taskbar, click the Go To Top Timeline icon.
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Processing the Composite
1. In the timeline controls, click the Process indicator.
The Processing Options dialog box is displayed.
2. Process the clip using these options:
?
•
•
•
•
Duration of Selection
Minimal
Fields
Update Viewer While Processing
3. Click OK to begin processing.
4. When the processing is complete, save the sequence as Lesson22.
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Chapter 10 • Compositing
Lesson 23: Creating the Final Shot
For Avid|DS HD Editor users only.
Since the Compositing layout and Effects
Trees are not available in this version,
complete the following:
• Open the Completed_Composites
folder in the browser.
?
• Replace the 19-FinalBoat clip on the
timeline with the 19-FinalBoat_Final
clip.
• Jump to Chapter 11: Tracking on
page 187.
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The final shot is comprised of several effects and techniques that will help you become familiar with
mixing and matching clips of various resolutions, keying, using DVEs, stabilizing clips, and using a
drop shadow effect. The following clips are used in this lesson:
• 19-FinalBoat: This is a blue screen shot of the man in the boat (shot from above). You’ll need to
stabilize the shot to remove any camera shake, key out the blue screen, resize and rotate the shot
using a DVE, apply a drop shadow to create a more realistic composite, and apply a DVE to
zoom the shot out at the end.
• WaterTop: This is the background for the 19-FinalBoat clip; a shot of the water from above.
Since it’s larger than D1 resolution, you’ll need to link to the media instead of importing it, using
a technique called mix & match. When you create a link to the file, you are not restricted to the
sequence’s frame size. Clips that are linked to external material are known as linked clips. Before
you output the sequence, you’ll have to process this material according to the sequence’s frame
size. When you do this, Avid|DS simply crops the portions of the image that lie outside the
viewer area.
The Compositing Layout
Stabilizing the Boat
1. Open Lesson22 if it is not already open.
2. On the timeline, scrub through the 19-FinalBoat clip.
Notice that there’s camera shake in the shot. You can eliminate the shake using the Stabilizer effect.
This effect uses a DVE transformation to move each frame in the opposite direction of the
unwanted movement, creating a motion path in the viewer that represents the jittering motion in
the sequence.
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3. Right-click on the 19-FinalBoat clip and choose Create Graphics Container from the menu.
You can also use the browser to add
effects by setting the path to Factory,
navigating to the Image Effects folder, and
dragging the effect to the tree.
If you position the trackers while the play
cursor is in the middle of the clip, a
keyframe will be set because the Autokey
mode is on by default. To fix this, position
the play cursor on the first frame, right-click
on the Animation Key icon and choose
Remove Animation from the menu.
The Compositing layout is displayed, a container clip is created, and the clip becomes the first
layer in the composite.
4. Add the Stabilizer effect (Image Effects folder) to the tree and connect it to 19-FinalBoat clip.
5. Move the play cursor to the beginning of the clip.
6. Double-click on the Stabilizer node to display the property editor, and then choose Stabilizer
from the Effects List.
Effects list
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The Stabilizer property editor is displayed.
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7. From the Edit list, select In 2 - ref to select the reference layer on Input 2.
8. Select the Update option, so that you can see the result as the tracker tracks.
Mode list
Edit list
When stabilizing clips, both the reference and layer clips are the same. However, stabilizing and
tracking are usually performed on the reference layer (Input 2).
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The Compositing Layout
9. Hold down the Ctrl key and drag the reference tracker in the viewer (currently at the bottomleft) to the point at which you want to remain stable.
Tracker
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For more information, refer to Positioning
the Reference Tracker on page 464 of the
Avid|DS Compositing & Effects Guide.
Be sure to position the tracker over an area that contains high contrast. When you use the Ctrl
key to move a tracker, both the reference and layer trackers are positioned at the same point.
10. On the property editor, click the Track Forwards button.
Track
Forwards
The motion path of the clip is recorded. A DVE transformation is applied to the image to
compensate for the motion path and to stabilize the image.
11. From the Edit list, select Output.
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The results of the tracking are displayed in the viewer.
12. Scrub through the clip to examine the results of the tracking.
13. Close the Stabilizer property editor.
Creating a Link to the Background WaterTop clip
1. Switch to the Media Input/Output layout.
From this layout you can link to the WaterTop clip. The clip is larger than D1 resolution, so to
maintain its size, you must link to it rather than import it.
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2. In the browser, select the DSTutorial_YourName folder, click the New Folder icon, and name the
new folder WaterTop.
To help you determine where the linked clip is, you’ll put it in this folder.
3. Open the new folder.
4. Set the capture settings as follows:
5. Click Link.
The Import File dialog box is displayed.
6. Navigate to the D:\DSTMedia\Link folder, select the WaterTop.mov file and click OK.
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Avid|DS creates a link to the file and a master clip is created in the browser. A red line is displayed
under the clip’s icon to indicate that it’s a linked clip.
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Line indicates clip is linked
You’ll use this clip later on as the background for the composited shot.
7. Switch to the Compositing layout.
8. Add the WaterTop clip to the Effects Tree by dragging it from the browser to the tree.
The clip is added to the Effects Tree and a new track is created in the timeline. The clip’s name is
appended with the term “(Linked)”.
9. On the timeline, right-click on the WaterTop clip and choose Properties from the menu.
10. In the clip property editor, make sure Center, Keep Original Size is selected from the Conversion
Mode list.
This ensures that the image keeps its original format and is centered in the viewer.
11. If the safe action and safe title guides are not displayed in the viewer, right-click on the viewer
and choose Safe/Action Title from the menu.
The safe action and safe title guides let you see how clips that are larger than D1 resolution are
displayed in the viewer.
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12. On the timeline, click the S (solo) button on the track that contains the WaterTop clip.
Solo button
The WaterTop clip is displayed in the viewer, so you can see how the D1 image looks.
?
13. To view the entire clip, zoom out the viewer interactively by holding down the Z key, rightclicking and dragging in the viewer.
14. Right-click on the viewer and choose Reset Pan and Zoom from the menu.
The viewer returns to its original size and position.
15. Deselect the Solo button on the WaterTop composite track.
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Compositing the Clips
1. Add the Composite effect (Tree Effects folder) to the tree.
2. Connect the clips to the Composite node as follows:
• WaterTop to Input 1
• Output of the Stabilizer effect to Input 2
• Output of Composite effect to the Output node
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The clips are composited. However, you won’t see the composited result because you need to
create a matte for the boat.
Creating a Matte for the Boat
You can drag the Blue-Green Keyer effect
until its input port touches the
connection. The connectors will snap to
the new node. For more information, refer
to Connecting and Disconnecting Nodes
on page 49 of the Avid|DS Compositing &
Effects Guide.
1. Add the Blue-Green Keyer (Image Effects folder) to the tree between the 19-FinalBoat node and
the Stabilizer node. Applying a keyer effect before any other effects in an Effects Tree will create
the cleanest key possible.
2. Double-click on the Blue-Green Keyer node.
The Blue-Green Keyer property editor is displayed.
3. Make sure the play cursor is at the beginning of the timeline.
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4. Expand the Blue-Green Keyer property editor to the left so that you can easily view the name of
each property page.
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5. On the Shapes property page, select the Polyline tool from the Shape Creation box. Draw a
reasonably-tight stroke around the boat. Press the Ctrl key and click the viewer to close the stroke.
By creating a shape first, you can eliminate all areas except for the blue screen. Currently, the water
is displayed inside the shape, but you can change the fill, so that it is displayed outside the shape.
6. From the Shape Transformation box, click the Select Shape icon.
A yellow box is displayed around the shape to indicate that it’s selected.
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7. Set the following parameters:
• Fill Inside: Deselected
• Fill Outside: Selected. Set value to 0.
The water is displayed outside the shape, and the boat, with the blue screen, is displayed inside.
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8. On the Key property page, click Pick Key Color and select the blue background around the boat
in the viewer.
An initial matte is created.
9. Select the Output Matte option.
The matte is displayed in the viewer. As you can see, the matte is not yet complete. You need to
make the background fully transparent and the foreground fully opaque.
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10. On the Matte property page, click Pick BG, and select the semitransparent area around the boat.
Repeat until all the semitransparent areas around the boat disappear.
To zoom interactively in the viewer, hold
down the Z key, and then right-click and
drag in the viewer. To pan the viewer hold
down the X key and drag in the viewer.
The semitransparent areas are forced to become transparent. Later you’ll add a shadow to the
boat, so you can key out the shadow area as well. If there are still stray pixels around the boat that
are not black, zoom in and select them too.
11. Click Pick FG, and select the gray pixels inside the boat.
The pixels are forced to become opaque.
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12. On the Matte property page, deselect the Output Matte option to see the composited result.
Since the image isn’t correctly positioned yet, the next step is to rotate and scale it using a DVE.
13. Close the Blue-Green Keyer property editor.
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Rotating and Scaling the Boat Using a DVE
1. Add the DVE effect to the tree between the Stabilizer and Composite nodes.
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2. Open the DVE property editor.
A bounding box is displayed around the image.
You can also enter values directly in
the Scale X and Y boxes, and then
press Enter.
3. Click Scale and drag the DVE handles in the viewer to scale the boat down to about 80% of its
original size.
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4. Click Rotate, select a DVE handle in the viewer, and rotate the boat until it’s horizontal. Move
the image up slightly. The goal is to line up the fisherman’s left hand with the position of the CG
fish he just threw away.
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DVE handle
You can refer to the final spot at any time
to get an idea of how the boat should
look. The file is located in the
D:\DSTMedia\FinalSpot folder.
5. Close the DVE property editor.
Adding a Shadow to the Boat
Next you’ll create a more realistic composite by adding a shadow to the boat.
1. Add the Drop Shadow effect to the tree between the DVE and Composite nodes.
2. Open the Drop Shadow property editor.
3. On the DVE property page, change the value of X or Y in the Scale box to 105%, and press Enter.
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Since the Lock XY option is selected in the
Scale box, changing one value also
changes the other.
The shadow protrudes from around the edges of the boat.
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4. Drag the shadow in the viewer down and to the bottom-left until it looks correct.
5. On the General property page, set the Softness to about 12%.
The shadow becomes more transparent and looks more natural.
6. Close the Drop Shadow property editor.
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Zooming Out Using a DVE
The last thing to do is zoom the shot out using a DVE to create a sense of closure.
1. Make sure the play cursor is at the beginning of the shot.
2. On the layer, click the DVE button.
?
The DVE property editor is displayed and a DVE is applied to the entire tree.
3. Click the Animation Key icon on the DVE property editor to set a keyframe on the first frame.
4. Move the play cursor to the last frame of the composite.
5. Hold down the Z key, and right-click and drag the viewer to zoom it out until you can see the
entire wireframe of the WaterTop clip.
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If you click somewhere else and the DVE
property editor disappears, simply click
the DVE button again.
6. Drag the DVE handles to scale the composite down until the DVE wireframe is the same size as
the D1 borders.
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DVE wireframe is the same
size as the D1 image
If you’ve been panning or zooming the
viewer, you can reset the viewer. Simply
press the Z and X keys simultaneously on
your keyboard and click the viewer.
7. Set a keyframe and close the DVE property editor.
8. On the taskbar, click the Go to Top Timeline icon.
9. Right-click on the graphics container clip and choose Properties from the menu.
The Clip Properties property editor is displayed.
You can rename the other graphics
container clips as well, so that you can
easily identify them.
10. Change the name of the graphics container clip to 19-FinalBoat-GC.
11. Close the Clip Properties property editor.
Processing the Effect
1. On the timeline, select the graphics container clip.
2. In the timeline controls, click the Process indicator.
The Processing Options dialog box is displayed.
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3. Process the clip using these options:
• Duration of Selection
• Frames
• Update Viewer While Processing
4. Click OK to begin processing.
5. When the processing is complete, save the sequence as Lesson23.
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Chapter 11
For Avid|DS HD Editor users only.
Since tracking is not available in Avid|DS
HD Editor, complete the following:
• Open the Completed_Composites
folder in the browser.
Tracking
Motion tracking lets you follow the motion of up to four points in an image sequence and
apply the resulting motion path to another image. Most of the time, when you composite
images together, you need one image to follow the motion in another image.
• Replace the 08-EBookCU clip on the
timeline with the 08-EBookCU_Final
clip.
• Jump to Chapter 12: Using 3D DVE/
Titling on page 207.
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Introduction to Tracking
For more information, refer to Choosing a
Tracking Method on page 454 of the
Avid|DS Compositing & Effects Guide.
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The reference does not necessarily have to
be the background. You can composite
the layer with any other clip.
There are two ways that you can apply motion tracking to composited clips: using a DVE tracker or
using a tracker in the Effects Tree. The method you choose depends on the complexity of your
composite and how you prefer to work.
Before you can do any motion tracking, you’ll need to understand the following terms:
Reference is the clip that you track to construct a motion path. In the example below, four-point
tracking is applied to the bus in order to paste a banner onto its side.
Layer is the clip that follows the motion path extracted from the reference clip. In this example, it’s
the banner that will be pasted onto the bus.
Result is the composite of the moving layer over a background. Once a motion path is constructed, it
is applied as a DVE to the layer. In the example below, the result is the banner pasted onto the side of
the bus.
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There are several scenarios in which you can use motion tracking:
• Compositing: Movement in one image is tracked and applied to another. A point (or set of
points) in one layer follows the motion of a point (or set of points) in a reference layer.
• Stabilizing: A single clip is stabilized to remove unwanted movement. A point in a reference clip
tracks an arbitrary static point within the same clip.
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• Creating motion paths: A path is created by tracking a reference point (or set of points), then
saved and applied later as a preset to other layers or clips.
• Shape tracking: A garbage matte is created and the tracker is used to track motion in the
sequence and apply it to the garbage matte. You could also draw a shape and use the tracker to
apply motion from one image to the shape.
Using the Trackers
Before you start tracking or stabilizing anything, keep in mind that the reference point you choose
for tracking and the way you position the trackers affects the overall success of your tracking.
With every tracking scenario, there are trackers on both the reference and the layer. The tracker(s)
on the reference must be positioned on the point(s) that will create the motion path. The tracker(s)
on the layer should be positioned on the point(s) that will follow the motion path.
Reference trackers
Layer trackers
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A tracker is composed of two concentric squares, representing the target area and search region. The
target area is the pixel pattern that the tracker looks for in each frame, and the search region is the
vicinity in which the tracker looks for its target.
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Center of
target
Target area
Search region
Tracker number
Selecting a Suitable Reference Point for Tracking
The key to successful tracking is selecting a good reference point. When you start tracking, the
individual trackers sample a target area of the reference clip at the target frame. In each subsequent
frame, the motion tracker searches for the target image within the tracker's search region. When the
target is found, a keyframe is set. The resulting motion path controls the tracker DVE, and the layer
image moves accordingly.
In order for the search region of the tracker to recognize the target area and its motion against its
surroundings, choose a region with good contrast and detail.
When placing the reference tracker, choose an area that:
• Has a clear pattern with high contrast. You can also change the color space to select a channel
with the most contrast.
For more information, refer to Offsetting
the Tracker on page 491 of the Avid|DS
Compositing & Effects Guide.
• Appears in all frames of the sequence being tracked. That is, make sure it does not disappear
or fall outside the viewer area. If either of these occur, you can still offset the trackers.
• Has a pattern that remains constant in all frames. Make sure, if possible, that what you track is
not constantly changing.
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Setting the Search Region
The search region determines how much of the image will be analyzed when searching for the target
area. Here are some points to remember when setting the search region:
• The time required to analyze the search region is proportional to the size of the search region.
Avoid unnecessarily large search regions.
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• A very large area also increases the chance of a false match with some completely different part of
the image.
Lesson 24: Tracking
In this lesson, you will composite a computer-generated image of a screen depicting lure types on top
of the hand-held computer, and make the CG image follow four points on the computer. The motion
of the CG layer needs to follow the motion of the computer reference layer, so you can “pin” the CG
image to the computer. You’ll perform the tracking in an Effects Tree and use the following clips:
• 08-EBookCU: The hand-held computer to which you’ll pin the CG image. You also need to key
out the green color, so that the CG image is composited behind it, and remove the tracking dots.
• BaitslideA1 to BaitslideD1: Four CG images that are composited over the computer.
Setting Up the Tracking
1. Open Lesson23 if it is not already open.
2. Right-click on the 08-EBookCU clip and choose Create Graphics Container from the menu.
Since tracking requires multiple inputs, you need to perform the tracking in the
Compositing layout.
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3. On the timeline, right-click on the marker ribbon and choose Insert Video Track from the menu.
A new track is added to the timeline.
4. Hold down the Ctrl key and click the four Baitslide clips (BaitslideA1 to BaitslideD1) in the
browser to select them. Release the Ctrl key and drag the clips to the new track.
All four clips are placed on the new track one after the other.
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5. Add the BaitSlidesA1 track to the Effects Tree by dragging the track icon to the Effects Tree view.
6. In the Effects Tree, add the Composite effect (Tree Effects folder).
7. Composite the clips as follows:
• Connect 08-EbookCU to Input 1 of the Composite node.
This is the background clip.
• Connect BaitSlidesA1 to Input 2 of the Composite node.
• Connect the output of the Composite node to the input of the Output node.
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8. Add a Tracker effect (located in the Tree Effects folder) to the tree between the BaitSlidesA1 node
and the Composite node.
9. Connect the clips to the Tracker effect by doing the following:
• Connect 08-EbookCU (reference image) to Input 2.
• Connect BaitSlidesA1 (the layer image) to Input 1.
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Tracking the Computer
1. Make sure the play cursor is at the beginning of the timeline.
2. Double-click on the Tracker node to open its property editor.
3. From the Tracker property editor, select In 2 - ref from the Edit list.
Mode box
Edit list
The clip of the hand-held computer is displayed in the viewer. All tracking takes place on the
reference image.
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4. Move the trackers in the viewer, so they’re just outside the green area of the computer screen.
Trackers placed outside
of green screen
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This will help place the CG image correctly on top of the green screen.
5. From the Tracker property editor, select In 1 - layer from the Edit list.
The computer-generated image is displayed in the viewer.
6. Position the trackers on each corner of the image.
Trackers placed on
corners of image
7. From the Edit list, select Output.
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The composited result is displayed in the viewer.
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8. From the Edit list, select In 2 - ref.
Since the trackers need to track the dots, you can offset them.
9. Hold down the Shift key, and then right-click and drag each tracker, so they are positioned
over the dots.
Trackers are offset over dots
As you drag the trackers, the reference points remain in the original position, but the trackers
become offset.
10. On each tracker property page (R1-R4), do the following:
• Select B (blue) as the color space.
This will provide a better contrast between the dots and the green screen, as the screen contains
very little blue.
• Set the Threshold to 70.
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This lowers the acceptable level of match between the target and the comparable area found in
the next frame. If the confidence level goes below 70, then tracking will stop.
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Color space
Threshold
To zoom interactively in the viewer, hold
down the Z key, and then right-click and
drag in the viewer. To pan in the viewer
hold down the X key and drag in the
viewer.
11. Shrink each tracker’s target area, so that they are just a little bigger than each white dot. In the
viewer, zoom in on the trackers to see them better.
Original
Target resized
This reduces the amount of green displayed in the target area, so that a more accurate track
is produced.
12. On each tracker property page (R1-R4), set the following in the Confidence box:
• Threshold: 70
This lowers the acceptable level of match between the target and the comparable area found in
the next frame. If the confidence level goes below 70, then tracking will stop.
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13. On the Advanced property page, select the Track in Fields option.
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Track in Fields option
This is essential as the source material is field-based and each field needs to be tracked separately.
14. Click the Track Forwards button.
Track Forwards
The tracking starts. If you want to get a visual update of the tracking as it is performed, you can
select the Update option from the Tracker property page.
15. Once the tracking is complete, select Output from the Edit list.
The tracked results are displayed in the viewer. If you don’t see the composited result, deselect
View in the Tracker property editor.
16. Close the Tracker property editor.
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Create a Matte for the Computer Screen
1. Add a Blue-Green Keyer effect (located in the Image Effects folder) to the Effects Tree.
2. Connect the effect as follows:
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The hand-held computer is displayed, as it is composited over the CG image. Once you create
the matte, you’ll see the result.
3. Open the Blue-Green Keyer property editor.
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4. Expand the Blue-Green Keyer property editor to the left so that you can easily view the name of
each property page.
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5. On the Key property page, click Pick Key Color, and click the green area of the hand-held
computer’s screen.
An initial matte is created and the CG image is displayed on top of the hand-held computer.
6. Click Output Matte.
The matte is displayed in the viewer.
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7. In the Pre-blur box, select the Apply option.
A blur is applied to the RGB to make the green paper appear less grainy. Only the alpha channel
is affected by this operation.
8. On the Matte property page, click Pick BG and click the gray areas of the hand-held
computer’s screen.
This forces semitransparent areas to become fully transparent.
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9. Click Pick FG, and select the gray areas outside the computer’s screen.
This forces semitransparent areas to become fully opaque.
Don’t worry if there is still garbage outside of the screen area, as this doesn’t affect the composited result. The next step is to remove the dots that you used for motion tracking on the screen.
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Removing the Dots from the CG Image
1. Position the play cursor at the beginning of the clip.
2. In the Blue-Green Keyer property editor, click the Shapes property page.
3. In the Shape Creation box, click the Ellipse tool and draw an ellipse around each dot.
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The dots are removed. However, since the image moves, you need to track the dots.
4. In the Blue-Green Keyer property editor, select the Bypass option.
This lets you see the dots, so you can resize the trackers to them.
5. On the Shapes property page, click the Select Shape tool in the Shape Transformation box, and
select all the shapes in the viewer by holding down the Shift key and clicking each shape or by
drawing a lasso around the shapes.
6. On the Tracker property page, click Show. Now, click on each shape’s tracker in the viewer.
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All the trackers are displayed on all the shapes. Tracking only takes place on trackers that are
displayed in the viewer.
7. Zoom in the viewer, so you can see the target boxes better.
8. Resize each target box, so it’s just slightly bigger than the dot.
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Original
Target resized
A smaller target provides better tracking, the same way you initially tracked the dots.
9. Reposition the box, so it’s centered as well.
10. From the Color Space list, select B (blue) for each target and select Track in Fields.
Track in Fields option
Color space
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11. Click the Track Forwards button.
Track Forwards
The tracking starts. If the tracker fails, you can reset the target and/or lower the Confidence level.
12. When the tracking is finished, deselect the Bypass option.
The matte is displayed in the viewer.
13. On the Key property page, deselect the Output Matte option.
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The composited result is displayed in the viewer.
14. Close the Blue-Green Keyer property editor.
Finish the Shot with a Noise Effect
The shot is pretty much complete now, but it still doesn’t look completely realistic. To make it look
more realistic, you can apply a noise effect.
1. On the timeline, drag above the Baitslides clips to select a region on the track.
Selected
track region
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2. Right-click on the selected track and choose Add Track Effect from the menu.
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The Load Preset dialog box is displayed.
3. Select the Noise effect from the Image Effects folder.
The Noise effect is applied to the selected track region and its property editor is displayed.
Noise effect
applied to track
4. On the General property page of the Noise effect, set the following parameters:
• Distribution: Uniform
• Monochromatic: Selected
• Amount: 5
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The CG image now matches the computer better.
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Go to Top
Timeline icon
Go to Video
Container 1 icon
5. Close the Noise property editor.
6. On the taskbar, click the Go To Top Timeline icon.
The graphics container clip is closed, and the Editing layout is displayed. The Graphics
Container 1 clip is displayed on the timeline.
Processing the Clip
1. Click the Process indicator in the timeline controls.
The Processing Options dialog box is displayed.
2. Process the clip using these options:
• Minimal
• Fields
• Update Viewer While Processing
3. Click OK to begin processing.
4. When the processing is complete, save the sequence as Lesson24.
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206 • Tutorial
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Chapter 12
For Avid|DS HD Editor users only.
Since the 3D DVE and 3D Titling are not
available in Avid|DS HD Editor, complete
the following:
• Open the Completed_Composites
folder in the browser.
Using 3D DVE/Titling
The 3D DVE layout provides you with a set of tools and effects that lets you create and edit
3D DVEs and titles. You can rotate and extrude 3D DVE objects, add textures and lighting to
your session, as well as animate most parameters interactively.
This chapter introduces you to the 3D DVE layout, shows you how to use a texture to
define areas of an object, and transform and rotate it in 3D.
• Replace the 19-FinalBoat clip on the
timeline with the 19-FinalBoat_Final
clip.
• Jump to Chapter 13: Completing the
Spot on page 219.
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Workflow: 3D DVE
You can create and manipulate 3D DVEs in the 3D DVE layout. The following illustration shows the
typical workflow of a 3D DVE session.
1
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Select a clip to use as the DVE
Apply 3D DVE
effect to clip on
timeline
Clip used as 3D DVE
A 3D layer is automatically created
in the 3D DVE Layers view.
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2
Decide whether you want to work in Direct View mode
3
Manipulate the 3D DVE in
the viewer
4
Add effects to the 3D DVE
Workflow: Titles
Workflow: Titles
You can create and manipulate 2D and 3D titles in the 3D DVE layout. The following illustration
shows the typical workflow of a titling session.
1
Decide whether you want to create a 2D or 3D title.
Apply the 2D Titling or 3D Titling effect to your clip
Clip is used as background for titles.
Depending on the effect you selected, either a 2D layer or
3D layer is automatically created in the 3D DVE Layers view
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Decide whether you want to work in Direct View mode
2
3
Select the Text tool and set its properties
Text tool
4
Create a title in the viewer
5
Select the title and edit its properties
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The 3D DVE Layout
The 3D DVE layout is where you create 3D DVEs and titles. By default, the 3D DVE layout consists
of the transport controls, viewer, timeline, browser, 3D DVE Layers view, 3D DVE Object view, and
a series of toolbars and property editors you’ll need for working with 3D DVEs and titles.
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3D DVE Property Editors toolbar
contains property editors that let
you adjust the properties of all
objects in the 3D DVE layout
3D DVE Object view (3D OV)
displays 3D DVE objects and their
time spans in the current session
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3D DVE Tools toolbar lets you select and
create objects, as well as light and rotate
them in three-dimensional space
3D DVE Layers view shows you a
hierarchical view of the layers in a project
and provides commands to select, create,
delete, and modify layers
Viewer displays the output of your sequence at the position
of the play cursor. In the 3D DVE layout, it also serves as an
area to create and arrange titles and 3D DVEs
3D DVE Viewer toolbar lets you work in
Direct View mode, suspend output to the
external monitor, manipulated the camera, as
well as align the edges or centers of multiple
objects relative to each other, position
objects, and determine how objects are
displayed in the viewer
Working in the 3D World
Working in the 3D World
Before you create any 3D DVEs or titles in the 3D DVE layout, you should be aware of some basic 3D
concepts, such as three-dimensional space, materials, and lights.
Three-Dimensional Space
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When working with 3D DVEs and titles, it’s essential to understand the notion of working within a
virtual three-dimensional space using a two-dimensional user interface. To represent the geometry
of an object, Avid|DS uses the classical Euclidean/Cartesian mathematical representation of space. It
is based on three perpendicular axes X, Y, and Z, intersecting at one point called the origin.
Materials
Once you’ve created an object, you can apply materials to define its surfaces’ appearance. A surface is
an area of an object. You can control the visibility and appearance of each surface by applying a set of
properties called a material.
You can modify the appearance of the various surfaces of an object. For example, you can apply a
brick texture to a rectangle to give the appearance of a brick wall, a gradient to a wavy shape that
runs along the left edge of the view to enhance a scene, or a reflective texture to the edges of the
characters in a word to simulate a chrome outline.
Lights
Another basic element you will work with is light. Light sources are points in three-dimensional
space that emit light, causing objects (with materials that can be affected by light) to appear
illuminated. There are three kinds of light sources: infinite, local, and spot.
You specify the location of light sources relative to objects in the scene by using light source objects,
which exist above all other objects in the scene.
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Working with the Camera
The camera in Avid|DS is similar to a real camera, letting you view objects in the scene from
different angles and perspectives. You can create interesting effects, such as camera fly throughs, by
animating the camera’s parameters. The camera shows you what the scene will look like when you
render it.
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You can only see the camera icon while
you’re viewing through the alternate
camera.
The main camera icon in the viewer has two arrows. The blue arrow indicates where the camera is
“looking”, that is, the direction the lens is facing. This is called the interest. The camera is always
constrained to the interest. The green arrow indicates the camera’s up direction. You can change the
camera’s direction by rolling the camera.
Green arrow shows up direction
Blue arrow points towards interest
Viewing Through the Alternate
Camera
In addition to the main camera, there’s also an alternate camera. In many ways, the main and
alternate cameras are similar, except that the alternate camera is not an actual object. It’s only a tool
for viewing and navigating through your scene; it is not displayed in the viewer and does not have
any properties for you to edit.
When viewing through the alternate camera, you can see the main camera and the background (if
any) is not visible. You cannot select or animate the alternate camera.
Viewing through the main camera, which is
not visible as you are looking through it.
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Viewing through the alternate camera. The
main camera is visible.
Zoomed out view through the
alternate camera.
Adding Depth to an Image Using a Displacement Map
Adding Depth to an Image Using a Displacement Map
In addition to deforming an object produced by a DVE, you can use a texture to define the convex
and concave areas on the surface of the object. The luminance values of the color in the texture
(alpha channel ignored) define the convex (raised) and concave (lowered) areas on the surface.
Lesson 25: Using a 3D DVE Displacement
In this lesson, you will animate the canoe in the composite you previously created with the 3D DVE.
Then you’ll make it appear as if it were rocking gently in 3D.
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1. Open Lesson24 if it is not already open.
2. Double-click on the 19-FinalBoat-CG container clip to open it.
Load Preset
3. To make the boat rock in 3D, you’ll replace the DVE with a 3D DVE effect. In the Effects Tree,
double-click on the DVE node. In the DVE property editor, click the Load Preset icon and select
the 3D DVE effect from the Image Effects folder.
4. In the 3D DVE property editor, switch to the Masking property page. Select the Alpha option
from the Process box and close the property editor.
Alpha option
5. Close the 3D DVE property editor.
6. Drag the ZDepthMatte clip from the browser to the Effects Tree.
A new track is automatically created in the graphics container timeline and a node appears
in the tree.
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7. Connect it to Input 2 of the 3D DVE node.
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8. Double-click on the 3D DVE node to switch to the 3D DVE layout.
9. In the 3D DVE Layers view, expand Layer 1 and select the DVE layer.
Expand
10. From the 3D DVE Property Editors toolbar, click the Transform icon to open the Transform
property editor.
To get better interaction in the 3D DVE,
select the Direct View mode.
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11. On the Transform property editor, set the Scale in X, Y, and Z to 80 to make the model
appear proportional.
Adding Depth to an Image Using a Displacement Map
12. Now you’ll rotate the boat in the Z axis to make it horizontal and move the boat slightly, so that
the hand of the fisherman is properly positioned with the fish he’s about to throw. Set the
following properties:
• Rotation (Z): 34
• Position (Y): 5
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13. Open the DVE property editor, and set the Displacement Texture to Input 2 (the
ZDepthMatte clip). The texture is the source that is used to create the displacement, which
is based on the grayscale.
To see how the model looks, you can
toggle the alternate camera. First make
sure you’re in Direct View mode.
Select the Toggle Camera icon and then
use the Tumble tool to orbit the model.
Use the Reset Current Camera icon to
reset the viewer.
14. To give your model depth, set the following parameters:
• Scale: 18 to give magnitude to the displacement.
• Offset: 50 to set the grayscale level in the texture that represents no displacement of the surface.
• Softness: 10 to adjust the smoothness of the surface. You can soften a displacement map to hide
irregularities in grayscale levels in the texture.
• Detail in X and Y: 3 to adjust the detail of the DVE’s appearance.
Toggle Camera
Tumble
Reset Current Camera
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Animating the Layer
1. From the 3D DVE Layer toolbar (next to the 3D DVE Layers view), click the Group icon to
create a parent relationship with the DVE node (it has the coordinates you want to animate).
2. Open the Transform property editor.
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You can interactively rotate the
layer by dragging the handles in
the viewer.
3. Go to the first frame, set the Rotation (X) to 6, and set a keyframe.
If you want, you can also animate
the rotation in the Y and Z axes.
Suggested settings are between 4
and -4 in Y and 1 and -1 in Z.
5. Go to 02:00, set the Rotation (X) to 6, and set a keyframe.
4. Go to 1:00, set to the Rotation (X) to -6, and set a keyframe.
6. Right-click on the Animation Key icon and choose Animation Editor from the menu.
7. From the animation tree, click Rotate X to select its function curve.
8. From the Curves menu and choose Cycle.
The Rotate X function curve is cycled, making the boat rock gently back and forth.
Cycled function curve
9. Go to the top timeline.
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Adding Depth to an Image Using a Displacement Map
Processing the Effect
1. In the timeline controls, click the Process indicator.
The Processing Options dialog box is displayed.
2. Select the following options:
• Selected Object
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• Minimal
• Frames
• Update Viewer While Processing
3. Click OK to begin processing.
4. When the processing is complete, save the sequence as Lesson25.
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Chapter 13
Completing the Spot
In this chapter, you’ll import an HTML titling body that contains the closing credits of the
final sequence. After editing the titling body, you will build an animated roll. As a final
touch, you’ll add the FinalLook preset to the rest of the spot.
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Lesson 26: Finishing the Spot
This lesson shows you how to import HTML-based text onto a black background and build a
credit roll. Then you’ll use the FinalLook preset you saved earlier to create a consistent look for
the entire sequence.
Setting up the Closing Credits
1. Move the play cursor to the last frame by clicking the Go to Tail/Fast Forward button in the
transport controls.
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Go to Tail/Fast Forward
2. Click the Prev button twice to bring the play cursor to the end of the 19-FinalBoat-GC clip.
The last edit point of the 19-FinalBoat-GC clip is selected.
3. From the Image Tools toolbar, click Apply Effect > Fade Out.
The last shot fades out to black.
4. Move the play cursor to the end of the 19-FinalBoat-GC clip.
5. In the transport controls, click the In button.
The in marker is displayed on the marker ribbon.
6. Press the End key on your keyboard to move the play cursor to the end of your sequence.
7. In the transport controls, click the Out button.
The out marker is displayed in the marker ribbon at the end of your sequence.
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8. Click the track icon to highlight the track.
9. In the timeline controls, click the In/Out to Selection button.
The region is highlighted on the track.
In/Out to Selection
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10. From the Image Tools toolbar, click Black.
A generated black clip is created between the in and out-points.
11. Right-click on the generated clip and choose Add Clip Effect.
12. From the Load Preset dialog box, select the Graphics effect (Image Effects folder).
A graphics effect is applied to the clip and the Graphics layout is displayed.
13. In the Graphics view of the Graphics layout, click Import HTML from the GFX Creation toolbar.
The Open dialog box is displayed.
14. Navigate to the D:\DSTMedia\Credits folder, select the Credits.html file and click Open.
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The text is imported as a text body and displayed in the viewer.
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15. With the Select button activated in the General toolbar, click the text object in the viewer to
select it.
16. In the graphics property tree, click Titling Style.
17. In the Titling Style property editor, define the style of the titles by setting the following
parameters:
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•
•
•
•
Face (Use): Selected
Face (Opacity): 100
Face (Softness): 0
Edge (Use): Deselected
Shadow (Use): Deselected
18. In the graphics property tree, right-click on Face Fx and choose Color Blend from the menu.
19. In the Face Fx (Color Blend) property editor, select a white color for the title color.
20. Right-click on the viewer and choose Safe Action/Title from the menu.
The safe action/title grid is displayed.
21. Switch to the Transformations view.
22. With the Select button activated in the General toolbar, click the text box in the viewer to
select it.
23. From the Absolute Align toolbar, click the Absolute Align Horizontal Center icon.
222 • Tutorial
The text is centered in the viewer.
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24. Switch back to the Graphics view.
The font properties for the credits are as
follows:
25. From the General toolbar, click Edit Text.
26. In the text body, type your name next to the Editing/Compositing credit.
• Times New Roman
• Regular
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Enter your name here
27. Select the text body.
28. From the General 2 toolbar, click Graphics Properties.
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29. In the Graphics Properties property editor, set the following parameters:
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•
•
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Roll/Crawl Motion: Roll
Roll/Crawl Start Position: Offscreen
Roll/Crawl End Position: Offscreen
Roll/Crawl Standard Speed: Deselected
30. Click Build.
The offscreen to offscreen roll is built automatically.
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31. Switch to the Editing layout.
Processing the Credits
1. Select the generated clip on the timeline and click the Process indicator.
The Processing Options dialog box is displayed.
2. Process the clip using these options:
• Selected Object (make sure the Include Real-Time Effects option is selected as well)
• Minimal
• Fields
3. Click OK to begin processing.
Applying the Overall, Final Effect
1. On the timeline effect track, drag a region covering the complete spot, except for the 01-LakePan
clip and the first 02-WakeUp clip.
For Avid|DS HD Editor users only.
Since you did not create the FinalLook
preset, complete the following:
• Add both the LookCC and LookCrop
presets to the selected area.
224 • Tutorial
Selected area
2. From the User toolbar, click the FinalLook preset that you saved to the User toolbar in
Lesson 14.
The FinalLook effect is applied to your spot.
FinalLook preset
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Process the Entire Sequence
1. Click the Process indicator in the timeline controls.
The Processing Options dialog box is displayed.
2. Process the clip using these options:
• Current Timeline (make sure the Include Real-Time Effects option is selected as well)
• Minimal
• Fields
3. Click OK to begin processing.
4. When the processing is complete, play back your sequence to view what you created.
5. Save your sequence as Lesson26.
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Chapter 13 • Completing the Spot
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Chapter 14
Outputting Your Spot
At this point, you’ve got a finished sequence that you want to output. Outputting is quick
and easy in Avid|DS. You have all the tools you need to prepare your output for the various
formats available.
This chapter shows you how to output your sequence, and archive and restore your
project files.
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Chapter 14 • Outputting Your Spot
Outputting the Production
When you’ve put the finishing touches on your sequence and have processed any effects that you
applied to it, you can:
Only the audio portion of a sequence
can be exported to an OMF file.
• Output the sequence directly to tape.
• Output a digital file for the Internet, or for CD or DVD applications.
• Generate an EDL or OMF for use outside the Avid|DS environment.
The final output is based on the edit information in the sequence. During recording, Avid|DS uses
this information to locate media on the disk array and transfer it to tape or file.
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Media
Sequence
Generate EDL/OMF
Record media
Before outputting your sequence to tape, you can specify its output quality. Avid|DS uses the video
and audio quality settings that you specified in your sequence preferences. If you want to output at a
resolution for which there is no media on the disk array, you have to capture and process at that
resolution before outputting the sequence to tape.
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Outputting the Production
If you’ve been working with lower quality
media, you may want to recapture the
material at a higher quality before
outputting your production. If you applied
effects to your sequence, they’ll have to
be processed again.
Outputting your program involves selecting the media you want to output, specifying the output
quality, and selecting the tracks and device to which you want to export your program. Only the
active portions of clips on the timeline are output.
You can also choose to output your sequence to tape or file. You can output part of a sequence by
selecting the area you want to output, and setting in and out-point markers on the top timeline.
Lesson 27: Outputting Your Project to Tape
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For details on configuring the external
device, refer to Configuring the External
Device on page 74 of the Avid|DS
User’s Guide.
This lesson shows you how to output your sequence to tape. Before continuing with this lesson and
the next, however, make sure that you have a striped tape inserted in the deck, and that the deck is
connected and configured to your Avid|DS workstation.
1. Switch to the Media Input/Output layout and select the Output tab.
2. From the view switcher, click the Timeline icon.
The timeline is displayed.
3. Move the play cursor to the beginning of the sequence, and click In on the transport controls to
set an in-point.
4. Press the End key on the keyboard to move the play cursor to the end of the sequence.
5. On the transport controls, click Out to set an out-point.
6. Switch back to the Media Input/Output panels and select ToTape as the output device.
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Chapter 14 • Outputting Your Spot
7. Set an in-point on the tape where you want to begin recording by entering a number, such as
10:00:00:00, in the Timecode locator box.
Timecode locator
8. Select the Sequence In/Out option to limit the output to the in and out-points you set.
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Notice that the Out and Duration timecode boxes update to reflect the length of the sequence
you’re outputting.
9. To output the video and audio channels of your sequence, select V, A1, and A2. Both A1 and A2
are selected because you want to output both audio channels.
10. Click Output Now to begin recording your sequence to tape.
11. When the recording is finished, rewind the tape using the transport controls in Avid|DS and play
back your sequence.
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Creating a Backup of Your Project
Creating a Backup of Your Project
Archiving is a way to create backups of your project, move a project to another workstation, or free
up space on your disk drives. You can seamlessly restore archived projects at any time.
If you choose to archive only the project
data, the media can easily be recaptured
once the project is restored.
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All clips, sequences, and custom presets that you create during the course of your project are stored
in a project folder. When you archive your project, all the files in the project are copied to another
location. Any media associated with the project can also be archived to tape. When you need to
reopen the project, its contents can be reconstructed from the archived files and your source tapes.
Media on disk array
Caches
Source media
Project files on local disk
Archive
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Chapter 14 • Outputting Your Spot
For details on restoring projects, refer to
Restoring Projects on page 40 of the
Avid|DS User’s Guide.
When you’ve finished working on a project, you can remove it from your workstation to free up disk
space. It’s also a good idea to archive your files during the course of your project, so that you have a
backup of your work. You can safely move a project from one workstation to another by archiving it,
and then restoring it on the new workstation.
The Project Manager handles the archiving and restoring of project files and media.
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The Project Manager dialog box displays all projects
on your workstation, and lets you archive, restore,
or delete these project files and their media
232 • Tutorial
You can recover the project files of an archived
project by restoring it through the Project Manager.
You have the choice of restoring the whole project
or only portions of it
Creating a Backup of Your Project
Lesson 28: Archiving and Restoring Your Project
This lesson shows you how to back up your project, delete it, and restore it. When you delete the
project, you will delete the media as well. So, when you restore the project, you will have to recapture
the media.
Archiving Your Project
1. In the Media Input/Output layout, click the Project Manager icon in the view switcher.
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You can also access the Project
Manager from any layout by choosing
View > Views > Project Manager.
The Project Manager is displayed.
2. From the Choose a project to archive list, select the DSTutorial_YourName project.
3. Select the Archive video media files to tape option.
4. Select the type of video media you want to archive from the lists. For this lesson, choose
Uncompressed only and 720×486 only.
5. Select Archive video cache files to tape.
6. Select the type of cache media you want to archive from the lists. For this lesson, choose
Uncompressed only and 720×486 only.
7. Select the Archive audio media files to disk option and select All Sample Rates from the list.
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8. Select the Archive audio cache files to disk option and select All Sample Rates from the list.
9. Leave the project archive destination at its default location.
The archive is named automatically using the project name and date.
10. Click Archive.
The project files are archived to disk. When Avid|DS is finished archiving the project files, it
displays the following message:
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The dialog box warns you that the linked clip in your project cannot be archived, and that you
should back it up separately. Usually, you would back up the linked clips after the archive was
complete, but for this lesson, it is not necessary.
11. Click OK.
The Create Media Archive dialog box is displayed.
12. Make sure that the correct VTR or external device preset is selected in the Device list.
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Creating a Backup of Your Project
13. Set an in-point, where you want the archive to start on the tape.
14. Click Continue.
The source media and cache files are archived to tape.
Deleting Your Project
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1. You can’t delete a project that you currently have open, so from the File menu, choose New >
Project to create a new project.
2. In the New Project dialog box, name your project DSTutorial_temp and click OK.
The DSTutorial_temp project is opened.
3. In the Media Input/Output layout, click the Project Manager icon in the view switcher.
The Project Manager is displayed.
4. On the Delete property page, select the DSTutorial_YourName project from the list and
click Delete.
5. A message is displayed asking you to confirm your decision to delete the project and all its
associated media. Click Yes.
The DSTutorial_YourName project and all its media is deleted from your system.
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Chapter 14 • Outputting Your Spot
Restoring Your Project
You can restore a project on any Avid|DS
workstation as long as it is running the
same version.
1. In the Project Manager, select the Restore tab.
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2. Click Browse to navigate to the folder where your archive resides.
3. Navigate to F://DS Archives/DSTutorial_YourName, select the archive, and click OK.
4. Leave the project name destination at its default setting.
5. Click Select media to restore to choose the media you want to restore.
The Media Options (1/2) dialog box is displayed.
6. To restore everything, click OK.
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Creating a Backup of Your Project
The Media Options (2/2) dialog box is displayed.
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7. To restore the video source media, select the Restore video media files from tape option and
choose the following options from the lists:
• Uncompressed
• 720×486 Only
8. To restore the video cache media, select the Restore video cache files from tape option and
choose the following options from the lists:
• Uncompressed
• 720×486 Only
9. To restore the audio source media, select the Restore audio media files from disk option and
select All Sample Rates from the list.
10. To restore the audio cache media, select the Restore audio cache files from disk option and select
All Sample Rates from the list.
11. Click OK to close the dialog box.
12. Click Restore to begin restoring your project and media.
13. When the project files are restored, a message box is displayed, asking you to insert the tape on
which the media was archived. If the tape is already in the deck, click OK to restore the media.
14. When Avid|DS is finished restoring your project and media, open the DSTutorial_YourName
project to verify that everything has been restored.
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Chapter 14 • Outputting Your Spot
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238 • Tutorial
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Glossary
2D layer—A 3D DVE layer in which objects are
stacked on top each other. Objects cannot
intersect in this type of layer.
3:2 Pulldown—See Pulldown.
3D layer—A 3D DVE layer in which objects are
positioned based on their locations in threedimensional space. Objects can intersect in this
type of layer.
4:2:2 digital video (D1 video)—A digital video
system defined by the ITU-R-601 (CCIR-601)
technical documentation. 4:2:2 refers to the
comparative ratio of sampling of the three
components of the video signal: luminance and
two color channels.
Activeness—The sections of a clip that will be
used in the final output. These frames are
indicated by the activeness bar below a clip.
ADAT—A proprietary audio standard for a
multichannel optical digital interface, which is
used in the family of Alesis ADAT digital
multitrack recorders. The standard ADAT data
stream contains eight channels of digital
audio data.
AES/EBU—Audio Engineering Society/
European Broadcasting Union. A digital signal
format for professional audio input, which
permits a variety of sampling frequencies and
channel configurations.
AIFF (Audio Interchange File Format)—A file
format used for storing high-quality sampled
sound, musical instrument data, and
compressed/uncompressed audio data.
ALE (Avid Log Exchange)—A file format
specifically designed to hold information about
log files generated by the Avid Media
Composer. An ALE file contains information
about the source material. It does not import
sequences, effects, or other higher level
information.
Tutorial • 239
Glossary
Alignment—The position of text within a
column of a text object.
Alpha channel—One of the four channels (or
components) of information that is contained
in each pixel of an image. This channel specifies
the transparency of each pixel, allowing
portions of the foreground image to reveal or
block out the background image when two
images are composited. The grayscale image
represented by the alpha channel is often
referred to as the matte. See also Mask, Matte,
Opacity, and Transparency.
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Anchor point—The location about which a
rotation or scaling operation of an object
occurs.
Animation—The change of an object and/or its
properties over time. See also Keyframe.
Annotation—A description of your material,
including the name of the author, the category,
and any other information that you may want
to save. Annotations allow you to quickly locate
files and information about them.
Antialiasing—A method of smoothing the
jagged edges along the lines and curves of text
or graphics. This is done by a mathematical
process that subsamples pixels.
Archive—To back up your project files or move
closed projects to an external medium.
Artifacts—The undesired, visible effects in an
image due to technical limitations. Some
artifacts are caused by inherent limits in the
video electronics process, and some are the
result of compression techniques.
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Aspect ratio—The numerical ratio of pixel
height to width. The standard aspect ratio for
D1 NTSC is 0.9 and PAL is 1.07.
Assemble edit—An edit where all tracks,
including the video, audio, timecode, and
control tracks are erased and then
recorded over.
Autokey—A mode that, when activated, sets a
keyframe whenever you change the selected
object's properties.
Autosave—A function that automatically saves
your work to a specific location at
predetermined intervals.
AVI (Audio Video Interleaved)—A file format
used for synchronizing video and audio
without the use of hardware.
Background—The material used for the
background or fill area of objects. Using a
background material is a simple way of having a
material appear behind text, without using
another object.
Backtiming—Trimming a clip’s out-point
without changing its activeness, duration, or
position. The clip is slipped along its unused
material. See also Slip.
Batch Capturing—An automated process
whereby a bunch of clips from the browser or
timeline are captured in one pass.
Bézier—A type of curve that always passes
through control points. See also Linear
and Spline.
Bit depth—1. The number of bits used to
represent the color of a pixel. Black and white
images use a bit depth of 1, 16-color images use
a bit depth of 4, 256-color images use 8, and so
Glossary
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on. 2. The number of bits used to represent an
audio sample. The more bits there are, the
more accurately you can represent the
amplitude at that point in time.
Capture—To digitally transfer audio or video
material from an external device, such as a
videotape recorder, to the local disk storage on
your workstation.
Bit rate—The transfer speed of data within a
computer or between a computer and
a peripheral.
Capture resolution—The size and quality of
the media file created when you capture source
material. See also Resolution and
Working resolution.
Blue Screen—A procedure in which a subject is
photographed in front of a uniformly lit blue
background. You can substitute the blue
background in Avid|DS by keying out the blue
color. See also Keying.
Boolean—A system of logic that allows you to
combine objects using logical operators, such
as And, Or, Xor, Min, and Max. In Avid|DS,
Boolean operators are used for combining
several mattes in a single layer.
Border—The outer edge of an object. See also
Construction lines.
Bounding box—The extent or rectangular
enclosure of an object.
Brightness—See Luminance.
Bypass—1. To mute an audio effect in order to
listen to the original audio signal. Bypassing an
effect lets you compare your audio signal with
and without the effect. See also Mute. 2. To
mute a video effect in order to view the results
without the effect(s) that you bypassed.
Cache—A media file that stores information
and is generated when you process an effect,
transition, composite, or container clip created
in your sequence. During playback, Avid|DS
uses this cache file instead of the source media.
See also Interactive cache.
Channel—The color or transparency
information in an image, such as R, G, B, or
alpha. In audio, a channel can be the input
or output.
Character—A letter, digit, or special symbol
you type on a keyboard.
Character spacing—See Kerning.
Character style—The visual enhancement,
such as superscript or subscript, to the normal
style of a character.
Chroma keying—The process of creating a
matte based on a foreground image’s color.
Using this matte, you can composite the image
over another image.
Chrominance—The portion of a video signal
that contains color information.
Client—A workstation that has the Avid|DS
application installed.
Clip—A representation of the digitized
material stored on the disk array. A clip can
represent a stream of audio, a series of video or
animation frames, or a still image.
Clip effect—An effect that is attached to a clip
and moves with it on the timeline. See also
Track effect.
Tutorial • 241
Glossary
Clipboard—A portion of memory used to store
temporary objects during copy and
paste operations.
Corner pinning—A technique used to pin the
four corners of one static image (usually) onto
another static image.
Codec—Short for compressor/decompressor, a
codec is any technology for compressing and
decompressing data.
Corner point—A type of control point whose
tangent handles do not point in opposite
directions, producing an angle or corner at the
control point. See also Cusp point and
Smooth point.
Comparison buffer—A portion of the system
memory used to store a snapshot of a frame in
the viewer.
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Composite—Two or more layered images that
create a single new image. Using mattes and
DVEs, you can define how the images are
layered in the resulting composite image.
Compound shape—A single shape consisting
of separate curves.
Compression—A technique used to reduce the
amount of space necessary to store video
information.
Construction lines—The dashed lines that
outline objects, such as the scene, text objects,
and imported decks.
Container clip—A type of clip that combines
multiple audio or video clips to create a
mixdown, composite, or special effect. When
you close a container clip, it appears as a single
clip on the timeline. You can reopen a container
clip at any time to add, modify, or delete
its components.
Control points—The points that define curves
drawn in the viewer using tools in the
Compositing, Graphics, or 3D DVE layout.
Each control point has two tangent handles that
can extend from it. See also Corner point,
Cusp point, and Smooth point.
242 • Tutorial
Crossfade—An audio transition between two
clips over a specified number of frames. The
sound of the outgoing clip gradually becomes
less audible as the sound of the incoming clip
increases to the desired volume.
Cusp point—A type of control point whose
tangent handles are of zero length, producing
an angle at the control point. A cusp point is a
variation of a corner point. See also
Corner point and Smooth point.
Cut—A jump or instant transition from one
clip to the next.
Cycling—Repeating a function curve for all or
part of the duration of an animation. See also
Function curve.
D1—A format for digital video tape recording
that conforms to the CCIR 601, 4:2:2 standard,
and uses 19 millimeter wide tape.
Deck—A sequence of pages. A deck defines the
location and size of the pages within it.
Deinterlace—The process of separating the
odd and even fields in a clip. When you
deinterlace a clip in Avid|DS, each field
becomes a frame and the clip’s duration
is doubled.
Glossary
Details—A mode in the browser where all the
details pertaining to a clip are displayed, such as
the date the clip was created.
See also Thumbnails.
Digital Video Effect (DVE)—A type of effect
used to transform the size, position, and shape
of images in three-dimensional space.
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Dither—A method of filtering an image to
reduce banding due to low color resolution.
Directional light—See Infinite light.
Disk array—Multiple SCSI drives combined to
deliver fast data transfer rates, great storage
capacity, and reliable data.
Disk drive—The storage area on your
workstation where Avid|DS stores project files.
These project files refer to media on external
media disks. See also Project files.
Displacement map—A representation of a
nonsmooth surface described by the alpha
channel of an image. Lighter shades produce
bumps or convex regions, whereas darker
shades produce valleys or concave regions.
Dissolve—A type of transition between video
clips in which the image from one clip
gradually becomes less distinct as the image
from the other clip replaces it.
Drop frame timecode—A type of timecode in
which two frames in every minute (except on
the tenth minute) is eliminated in SMPTE
timecode. See also Non-drop frame timecode.
Drop shadow—A shadow that appears in the
same form, at the same size, and on a surface
parallel to the object creating it, but usually
offset from the object. See also Local shadow
and Projected shadow.
DSU—DS Unit. DSUs are the standard units
used in Avid|DS. They are independent of the
working resolution and express absolute
position or distance in a common way in all
the effects.
DVE—See Digital Video Effect (DVE).
Edit—1. A transition point (cut, wipe, or
dissolve) between two video or audio
sequences. 2. A numbered event in an EDL. An
edit consists of source entry/exit timecodes, a
transition type (cut, wipe dissolve), the edit
mode (video/audio), annotations, and record
entry/exit timecodes.
Edit point—1. A moment in time at which a cut
occurs or where a transition starts or ends. 2. An
indicator of the in and out-points of clips and
transitions that appear in the clip’s activeness bar.
EDL (Edit Decision List)—A list of edits made
during an editing session and used to direct the
output of the final production.
Effects—A method of changing audio or video
clips or tracks using filters, DVEs, keyers and
transitions. Effects are grouped into categories
including: 2D DVE, 3D DVE, audio, image,
keyer, paint, source generators, time,
transitions, and tree. In some cases, you must
process an effect to play it in real time. See also
Clip effect and Track effect.
Effects Tree—A tool that lets you composite
multiple clips and apply any number of effects.
An Effects Tree is made of nodes which
represent the inputs, effects, and the output, as
well as node connectors. See also Node.
Emissive color—The color of a surface when
light is not shining on the surface. See also
Shininess and Specular color.
Tutorial • 243
Glossary
Environment map—A texture that is reflected
from an existing surface material. The surface
has its own material (solid color, gradient, or
another texture) that reflects the texture. See
also Local map and Reflection map.
External matte—A matte taken from another
clip. See also Matte.
Extrude—The extension of a two-dimensional
object into three dimensions by extending the
edges of the object along the Z axis. For
example, a circle becomes a cylinder, or a
square becomes a cube or block.
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Face—1. For fonts, a variation in a font family.
For example, Helvetica Bold is a face of the
Helvetica font family. 2. For objects, an
abbreviated name for surface. For example, the
front or back face (surface) of an object.
Fade—1. A dissolve from full video to black
video. 2. A gradual increase or decrease in the
sound of an audio clip to the desired
volume level.
Favorite—A shortcut used for focusing the
browser tree on a specific set of files
and folders.
Field—One half of a frame that consists of odd
or even lines of video information. When a clip
is interlaced, each frame is separated into two
fields. See also Frame.
Field dominance—The order in which odd and
even fields occur in time.
Field of view—The total area (in degrees) to
the left and right of the line of sight to an object
in the scene.
Folder—A directory in which you organize
clips, sequences, and presets into smaller more
manageable groups. A folder points to the
location of your media files. It can be an area on
a media disk, a network drive, or a hard drive
on your workstation. When you select a folder,
the browser tree updates to show your project
folders, sequences, clips, or media.
Fps (frames per second)—A measure of the
film or video display rates. (NTSC = 30 fps,
PAL = 25 fps, SECAM = 25 fps, Film = 24 fps).
Frame—A single still image that is the basic
unit of a video sequence. A frame is a
combination of interleaved even and odd fields.
Different video formats display frames at
different rates. See also Field.
Frame size—The dimensions of a digital image
in Avid|DS. These measurements are based on
DSUs (Avid|DS units) so that they provide a
common unit of measure between video images
and computer-generated graphics.
Freeze Frame—A time effect that stops the
action in a clip by repeating a specific frame for
a specific duration.
Function curve—A graphical representation of
an object’s property changes over a period of
time. All function curves can be edited.
Gain—1. A measurement of the amount of
luminance in a video image. 2. In audio, gain is
a measurement of the change between two
audio levels.
Garbage matte—A matte that you create in an
image’s alpha channel to remove unwanted
objects.
Graphics objects—Any object that you create
in the Graphics layout, such as strokes or titles.
244 • Tutorial
Glossary
Graphics session—The time span over which
graphics objects appear. You can create a
graphics session by applying the Graphics effect
to a clip or track, or by applying graphics on a
layer inside a graphics container clip.
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Green screen—A procedure in which a subject
is photographed in front of a uniformly lighted
green background. You can substitute the green
background in Avid|DS by keying out the green
color. See also Keying.
Grid—A visual representation of equally
spaced horizontal and vertical intervals, along
which objects can be aligned. A grid appears as
dots at these intervals.
HDTV (High Definition Television)—A video
format characterized by a wide aspect ratio and
a high-resolution picture quality.
Head—The first frame in a video sequence.
Heads—The extra frames of video or audio
digitized before the in-point of a clip. Heads
give room for edits to be adjusted without
needing to rerecord or recapture the clip.
See also Tails.
HLS (Hue, Luminance, and Saturation)—A
model for representing color using these three
elements. See also Hue, Luminance,
and Saturation.
Hue—The tone or tint of a color. Hue is
expressed as a degree from 0 to 360 on a
standard color wheel. For example, a value of 0
represents red, a value of 180 represents cyan,
and a value of 300 represents magenta. See also
Luminance and Saturation.
Images—Graphics or single-frame clips that
are either imported or created in Avid|DS.
Input icon—A graphical representation of the
input to a node. You can make a connection to
this icon from the output icon of another node.
See also Output icon, Node, and Effects Tree.
In-point—1. The place where an edit, clip, or
effect starts. 2. A point in the timeline,
represented by a marker, where material is
inserted. See also Out-point.
Infinite light—A light source that is very far
away, so that the light rays are essentially
parallel to each other, such as the sun. See also
Local light and Spot light.
Insert editing—Placing new material in an
existing video sequence by moving the existing
material to accommodate the new, or
overwriting the existing material.
Interactive cache—A cache that is created each
time you view an image with an effect applied
to it. Avid|DS automatically processes the
effects on the frame on which the play cursor is
currently positioned and saves it to disk, so that
you can improve your interaction time when
viewing the results of effects on a frame-byframe basis.
Interlace—To combine the odd and even fields
in a clip. When you interlace a clip in Avid|DS,
each frame becomes a field and the clip’s
duration is halved.
Interpolate—To estimate and synthesize
information between keyframes. This
information defines the shape of a
function curve.
ITU-R 601—The world standard which defines
the parameters for digital video.
Tutorial • 245
Glossary
Jog—To move through a clip or sequence,
frame by frame, forward and backward.
See also Scrub.
Kerning—To adjust the horizontal space
between pairs of characters in a text object.
See also Leading.
Key color—The color used in the keying
process. See also Keying.
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Keyboard shortcuts—The keys or key
combinations that, when pressed or held down,
provide quick access to frequently performed
commands or operations. A keyboard shortcut
is the keyboard equivalent of a command, tool,
or operation that is also available elsewhere in
Avid|DS. In some cases, an object, such as a clip
on the timeline, must be selected first.
Keyframe—The value of an animated parameter
that you set at a given point in time. Parameter
values between keyframes are obtained by
interpolating between keyframe values.
Keying—The process of creating a matte from a
foreground clip to composite it over a
background clip. You can create a key based on
HLS, YUV, or RGB color values. See also Matte.
Kissing—A method in which you can connect
nodes in an Effects Tree. You can drag a node’s
input icon over the output icon of another
node, so that it “kisses” the edge of the second
node. A connector joins the two nodes. See also
Ripping, Sticky connections, and Twanging.
Layer—1. An object in the Layers view that you
can composite over another layer using a matte.
2. An object in the 3D DVE Layers view that
defines how its contents are drawn. Layers are
the size of and the same duration as the scene.
3. An object in the Effects Tree that you can
246 • Tutorial
composite over another input using a matte. 4.
The clip that follows the motion path extracted
from the reference clip in a Tracker effect. See
also 2D layer and 3D layer.
Layer effects—Effects that you apply to layers
in the Layers view, including Color Correction,
DVE, Graphics, and Blue-Green Keyer.
Leading—The vertical distance between lines
of word-wrapped text in a single paragraph.
Linear—A type of curve that consists of
straight line segments between control points.
See also Bézier and Spline.
Linked clip—A representation of a media file
located outside your disk array. As the media
associated with a linked clip does not reside
within the current project, you must process it
before you can play it back in real time.
Local light—A light source whose light rays
extend from a single point evenly in all
directions, such as a candle. See also
Infinite light and Spot light.
Local map—A texture image that is applied
across the surface of an object. As the object is
moved, scaled, or rotated, so is the texture. See
also Reflection map.
Local shadow—A shadow that is attached to a
side of an object, and moves in relation to the
object. See also Drop shadow and
Projected shadow.
Logging—To place information about source
material on a clip, so that you can perform a
batch capture later on.
Loop—To repeatedly play back a section of the
timeline or a clip.
Glossary
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LTC—Longitudinal timecode. A type of
timecode recorded on the audio track of a tape.
LTC can be easily read when the tape is moving
forwards or backwards but not at freeze frame.
Material—The appearance of a surface of an
object. A material can be a solid color, a
gradient, or a texture. In addition, gradients
and textures can have an optional tint.
Luminance—The relative lightness or darkness
of a color. The values range from 0 (darkest/
black result) to 1 (lightest/white result). See also
Hue and Saturation.
Matte—A grayscale image that defines the
transparency of an image when it is composited
over another. A matte can be part of the image
itself (alpha channel) or derived from another
image (external matte). See also External matte.
Magnetism—An object’s ability to “snap” or
align to other objects on the timeline when they
are in close proximity of each other. As you
drag an object on the timeline, it snaps to any
of these elements: markers, clip in/out-points,
cuts and transitions, and the play cursor.
Marker—A marker that is used to set reference
points or areas of interest on the clips or the
timeline. All markers have “magnetism” which
lets you easily synchronize clips together.
Marking—To set a clip’s in and out-points on
the timeline.
Mask—An image, portion, or component of an
image that defines which pixels, paint strokes,
and titling characters affect the image.
See also Matte.
Master clip—1. The unedited representation of
the media stored on the disk array. Master clips
are created in the browser when you capture
video and/or audio material. 2. The first clip
selected in a sync group. Clips selected or added
subsequently are slave clips. See also Sync-lock.
Master/slave—A relationship between
synchronized clips in which the position of the
slave clips is calculated relative to the
master clip.
Media—The digitized form of source material
after it has been captured and imported from
tape or file into Avid|DS.
Media disk—The physical device where you
store media, such as a disk array.
Mono—A single channel of audio data.
Morph—A technique that lets you transform
one image or a sequence of images into another
over a sequence of frames. See also Warp.
Motion path—1. The path that is drawn when
a tracker tracks the movement of an object in a
reference image. The path is comprised of a
series of control points or keyframes,
representing the position of a tracker on each
frame. This path is then used to move the image
of another layer. 2. The path that is drawn when
a DVE is translated and animated.
See also DVE.
Motion tracking—A technique for making an
image in one clip follow the movement of an
object in another clip. Motion tracking also lets
you stabilize an image by compensating for
unwanted camera movement. See also Stabilize.
Multi-camera editing—Creating a video
sequence of a single scene using material
recorded with multiple cameras.
Tutorial • 247
Glossary
Multi-track editing—Placing clips on different
tracks and creating cuts between them.
Mute—To turn off the sound on an audio track
or the visibility of a layer when compositing.
See also Bypass.
Neighborhood effect—See Spatial
filtering effect.
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Node—The graphical representation of the
inputs, effects, and output in an Effects Tree.
See also Effects Tree.
Non-destructive editing—A method of editing
whereby the digitized source material is always
left unchanged.
Non-drop frame timecode—A SMPTE
timecode format that continuously tracks
NTSC video at a rate of 30 fps without
dropping frame counts to compensate for the
actual 29.97 fps rate of NTSC video. As a result,
non-drop-frame timecode does not coincide
with real time. See also Drop frame timecode.
Nonlinear—An editing system that allows
random access to any part of a project. Edits
and changes can be made to any part of the
project at any time.
NTSC (National Television Standards
Committee)—The color broadcasting standard
used in North America, Japan, and parts of
South America. The NTSC standard uses 525
horizontal lines per frame with two fields per
frame of 262.5 lines. Each field refreshes at
59.94 Hz.
Offline edit—A rough cut or preliminary edit
usually performed using low-cost equipment,
which can then be conformed on a high quality
online system.
248 • Tutorial
OMF (Open Media Framework)—An
advanced form of an edit decision list. In
addition to the instructions for transitions and
timewarps, it also preserves layering
information in a sequence.
One-sided Transition—A transition or other
effect applied to a clip’s in or out-point.
See also Transition.
Onion skinning—Blending the current frame
with preceding and/or successive frames at a
specified percentage.
Online edit—The final edit and effects are
performed at full programme quality.
Opacity—A property of an image or object that
controls how much objects behind them are
obscured. For images, it can be controlled by
the alpha channel or by an external opacity
control. See also Transparency.
Orientation grid—The visual representation of
the frame size, location, and orientation in
three-dimensional space. The orientation grid
appears as equally spaced horizontal and
vertical lines, with X, Y, and Z axis arrows
extending from the center of the frame.
Orthographic projection—A type of
projection whereby objects are not distorted to
make depth more realistic. With orthographic
projection, it is as if the object is very far away
from the viewer, and distortion is not apparent.
Although this type of projection is not realistic,
you may find it useful to have an undistorted
texture on an object rotating around the X or Y
axis. See also Perspective projection.
Orphan file—See Unreferenced media file.
Out-point—The place where an edit, clip,
effect, or transition ends. See also In-point.
Glossary
Output—1. The composite of a moving layer
above a background. 2. The result of all inputs
and effects in an Effects Tree.
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Output icon—A graphical representation of
the output of a node. You can make a
connection to this icon from multiple input
icons of other nodes. See also Input icon, Node,
and Effects Tree.
Overlay track—A type of track whose contents
appear on top of the contents of the tracks
below it. Overlay tracks can be used to create
simple composites.
Overwrite—To place new clips over existing
clips in a timeline region. Subsequent clips on
the timeline do not ripple.
Page—An object that contains other objects.
PAL (Phase Alternate Line)—The color
broadcasting standard used in Europe, China,
Australia, New Zealand, the Middle East, and
parts of Africa. The PAL standard uses a total of
625 lines per frame, with two fields per frame of
312.5 lines each. Each field refreshes at 50 Hz.
Parent timeline—Any level of the timeline
containing subordinate levels. For example,
container clips are placed on the parent
timelines of their contents.
See also Top timeline.
Path—A user-defined curve onto which you
can fit text or along which you can scroll text.
Paths can be linear or nonlinear. You create
paths by using the shape drawing and
editing tools.
Path text—Text that fits on or moves along a
user-defined path.
Perspective projection—A type of projection
whereby objects are distorted to simulate depth.
The farther an object, the smaller it looks.
Conversely, the closer an object, the larger it
looks. You can see the effect of perspective
projection on objects rotated around the X or Y
axis. See also Orthographic projection.
Pinning—To mark the function curves of
different objects, so that they can all be viewed
simultaneously in the animation editor.
Play cursor—A vertical red line on the timeline
that indicates the position of the frame
currently displayed in the viewer.
Post-roll—The default number of post-roll
frames during a preview. When you preview
processed frames, the post-roll frames are
added to the end of the selection.
Preference Set—A file containing customized
layouts, toolbars, command maps and script
commands. You can create new preference sets,
as well as importing and exporting
existing ones.
Premultiplied image—An image in which the
RGB values of pixels have been multiplied by
their corresponding alpha channel values.
Pre-roll—The default number of pre-roll
frames during a preview. When you preview
processed frames, the pre-roll frames are added
to the beginning of the selection.
Preset—A customized set of properties for an
effect, Effects Tree, transition, graphics tool, or
attribute. Using the object’s property editor,
you can modify any of these properties, and
save them as a new preset.
Preview—To rehearse an edit or effect in order
to verify if it’s the desired result.
Tutorial • 249
Glossary
Process—To create a final image or sequence of
images. Most of the effects, transitions,
composites, or container clips in your sequence
must be processed before they can be viewed
during playback. Avid|DS can play some effects
in real time if you have the real-time, multistream workstation. The results are stored in a
new media file (cache), so that your source
media remains unaltered.
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Profile—The appearance of an object at its
edges. For example, beveled, tubed, and
rounded edges.
Profile material—The material used for the
profile surface of an object.
Project—A structure that contains all the clips
and sequences required for your work. In the
browser, it is represented as a folder that can
contain as many subfolders as you need to
organize files related to your work.
Project files—Files that are created by Avid|DS
when you capture or import material, save
custom effects, and build sequences. Project
files include clips, container clips, presets, and
sequences. They contain information about
your digitized media on disk and any edits that
you’ve made to that media.
Projected shadow—A shadow that is produced
by a light source shining on the object and
projecting the obscured region onto a shadow
plane. See also Drop shadow and Local shadow.
Projection—The method of representing threedimensional objects on a two-dimensional
surface, such as a computer display. See also
Orthographic projection and Perspective
projection.
250 • Tutorial
Property—An object’s value. Properties are
adjusted in property editors.
Pulldown—A process used to perform a filmto-tape transfer whereby 24 fps (frames per
second) film material is adapted to the 30 fps
NTSC videotape format. A special method is
required to create the additional video frames
from the film frames.
PsF (progressive segmented frames)—A
progressive format where the frames are
displayed one after the other, but are
transported as two separate fields.
Purge—To delete source or cached media.
Source media is associated with master clips,
while cached media is generated from
processed effects, graphics and composites in
a sequence.
Quadraphonic—A surround sound
configuration that uses four channels of
audio data.
Razor—To cut a clip in two, resulting in
independent clips with no relation to
each other.
Real time—During play back, events occur at
their planned time, without a delay from
previous events.
Reference—The clip that is tracked to
construct a motion path. See also Search region,
Target area, and Tracker.
Reference background—An image or
animation file used to help position objects in a
scene. The reference background appears
behind all objects.
Glossary
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Reference clips—A clip that points to another
sequence within the current project. Because
reference clips only point to a sequence, they
consume less memory and load faster than
container clips. This improves performance on
complex timelines. Using a reference clip also
allows you to work on that portion of your
sequence separately. Once updated, the changes
are automatically reflected in sequences that
contain this reference clip.
Ripping—A method in which you can
disconnect nodes in an Effects Tree. You can
click on a node and “shake” or “rip” it away
from the other nodes. See also Kissing,
Twanging, and Sticky connections.
Ripple—A mode that propagates the changes
that you make to the edit points of clips to all
successive clips. You can ripple clips on the
entire timeline or just clips on specific tracks.
Reflection map—A texturing method in which
the surface of the object is a reflective texture.
See also Local map and Environment map.
RGB (Red, Green, Blue)—A color standard
that describes color components or color space
using these three elements. Most computer
monitors use this format. See also YUV.
Remote processing station—A workstation that
has only the Avid|DS RP software installed on it. It
handles processing requests from the client
workstation.
Roll—To change a clip’s location on the
timeline, while retaining its duration and
active frames.
Rendering—The process of creating a final
image or sequence of images from a scene. The
process of taking a geometric model, a lighting
model, a camera view, and other image
generation parameters, such as maps.
Rendering techniques such as shading, light
source, or depth cueing are sometimes used to
make the image look realistic.
Resolution—The amount and degree of detail
in a video image. See also Capture resolution
and Working resolution.
Resolution independence—The ability to
capture, work with, and output the same
material at various predetermined resolutions.
The working resolution, capture resolution,
and output resolution can be totally
independent from one another in Avid|DS. See
also Working resolution and Capture resolution.
Safe action area—The central area of the
viewer where action can occur without having
any edges of the clip cut off. This area delineates
where action should occur to be fully visible on
a television set.
Safe title area—The central area of the viewer
where you can safely place graphics and titles
without having any of its edges cut off. This
area delineates where titles should occur to be
fully visible on a television set.
Sample rate—The frequency at which an
analog signal is digitized during recording. The
higher the sampling rate, the more accurate the
digital representation of the signal becomes.
Saturation—The degree of mixture between a
pure hue and neutral gray. Lower values
produce the least saturated color while higher
values produce the most saturated color. See
also HLS (Hue, Luminance, and Saturation),
Hue, and Luminance.
Tutorial • 251
Glossary
Scrub—To interactively move through audio or
video at various speeds. See also Jog.
Search region—The vicinity in which the
tracker looks for its target. See also Tracker and
Target area.
SECAM (Sequential Color and Memory)—A
broadcast standard used in Eastern Europe and
France. The SECAM standard uses 625 lines
per frame.
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Sequence—An arrangement of clips on the
timeline that contains information about edit
decisions, applied graphics and effects,
animation settings, and working preferences.
Shadow—The projection of an object onto a
surface. A shadow is created by the object
obscuring rays of light shining on it.
Shape tracking—A technique that lets you
create shapes in a garbage matte for areas that
are difficult to key out, and then track them to
match the moving image.
Shininess—The visual glossiness or dullness of
a material. See also Emissive color and
Specular color.
Shuttle—To view a sequence at greater than
normal speed.
Slip—To move the contents of a clip while its
edit points remain fixed. Slipping a clip does not
change the position or duration of the active area
of a clip.
Smooth point—A type of control point whose
tangent handles point in opposite directions,
producing a smooth curve through the control
point. See also Control points and Corner point.
252 • Tutorial
SMPTE (Society of Motion Pictures and
Television Engineers)—A frame numbering
system used for electronic editing and timing of
video productions. Each frame of video is
assigned a number. Timecode denotes the
hours: minutes: seconds: frames (00:00:00:00)
elapsed on videotape. There are two types of
timecode: drop frame and non-drop frame.
Snapshot Curves—Temporary backup copies
of function curves. Snapshot curves allow you
to edit a function curve and then revert to the
snapshot function curve if you’re not satisfied
with the change.
Solo—1. To single out the sound on an audio
strip. 2. To single out the visibility of a layer
when compositing. 3. To single out the image
on a video track. See also Mute.
Source generator—A type of effect that lets you
create new clips based on the region or track
you’ve selected. You can specify an effect for the
new clip, such as a solid color or wood grain,
and then use the clip as the background in your
compositing session.
Source material—The original unaltered
material in the form of videotapes, film reels,
digital recordings, etc. used for editing.
Spatial filtering effect—A type of effect that
modifies every pixel in an image based on a
calculation that involves adjacent pixels.
S/PDIF (Sony/Phillips Digital Interface
Format)—A consumer variation of the AES/
EBU digital audio interconnection standard.
The standard S/PDIF data stream contains a
stereo pair (two channels) of digital audio.
Glossary
Specular color—The color that appears at or
near the area of a lit surface closest to a light
source. By default, the specular color is white.
See also Emissive color and Shininess.
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Spill correction—A method of correcting a
keyed image’s foreground color where the
background color has not been fully removed
through the keying process.
Spline—A curve that is defined by control
points, but does not pass through them. With
function curves, a spline indicates a fluctuating
value between two points in time. See also
Linear and Bézier.
Spot falloff—The decrease in intensity for a
spot light from the center of the light source to
the edges of the area defined by the spot size.
See also spot size.
Spot light—A light source whose light rays
extend from a single point in a cone shape,
casting light on a specific oval or circular area
of a scene. See also Infinite light, Local light,
Spot falloff, and Spot size.
Spot size—The circular area, expressed as an
angle, covered by a spot light. A small angle
produces a small, focused spot size. A large
angle produces a large, wide spot light, similar
to a local light. See also Spot falloff.
Stabilize—A technique that lets you
compensate for camera instability or other
unwanted camera movement in an image. See
also Motion tracking.
Sticky connections—A method in which you
can connect nodes in an Effects Tree. You can
click on an node’s output incon and release the
mouse button. The connector becomes “stuck”
to the pointer. You can then move the pointer
over another node’s input icon and click on it to
make the connection. See also Kissing,
Twanging, and Ripping.
Stroke—A single drawing gesture made in the
viewer to create a graphics object, such as titles,
freehand strokes, and geometric shapes.
Sync group—Two or more clips sync-locked
together.
Sync-lock—To lock two or more clips together
after they have been synchronized, so that when
one clip is moved, all connected clips move
with it.
Sync master—The first clip selected when
creating a sync-group.
Sync offset—The number of frames difference
between the original position of a slave clip
relative to the master clip, and its new position
once you move it independently of its sync peers.
Sync peer—Any clip in the same sync-group as
another clip.
Sync slave—Clips selected after the master clip
when creating a sync group, or added to an
existing sync group.
Synchronize (or syncing)—To make clips move
or occur simultaneously, and to
coincide perfectly.
Tail—The last frame in a video sequence.
Tails—The extra frames of video and audio
after the out-point of a clip. Tails give room for
edits to be adjusted without the need to rerecord or recapture the clip. See also Heads.
Tutorial • 253
Glossary
Tangent—A line that extends from a control
point that controls the direction of a Bézier
curve. Tangent handles also control key points
on function curves when the curve point’s type
is set to Bézier.
Target area—The pixel pattern that the tracker
looks for in each frame. See also Tracker and
Search region.
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Text body—A group of words, lines, and
paragraphs that together constitute a single
graphics object. You can select, edit, and add
text within a text body.
Texture—An image that you can map onto an
object to change its appearance.
Three-point editing—Creating an edit by
setting the in and out-points on the source
material while only setting the in-point on the
destination timeline.
Thumbnails—1. A mode in the browser where
clips are graphically displayed. 2. A thumbnail
is also a graphical representation of a clip or a
preset. See also Details.
TIFF (Tag Image File Format)—A format used
for storing and interchanging bitmap
(raster) images.
Timecode—A digitally-encoded signal that is
recorded on videotape in the format of hours:
minutes: seconds: frames. The purpose of
timecode is to label each frame of video for
identification and editing.
Timeline—A graphical representation of all of
the clips in your sequence, transitions between
them, and effects applied to them.
254 • Tutorial
Timeline effect track—A type of track that is
used to apply effects on top of all other effects
on the video and overlay tracks.
Timewarp—An effect that is used to change the
duration of a clip. The action in the clip is
speeded up or slowed down by decreasing or
increasing the number of frames.
Top timeline—The topmost level of the
timeline; this is where you can see all the clips
that comprise your sequence. See also
Parent timeline.
Tracker—An object that is composed of two
concentric rectangles representing the target
area and the search region used in the tracking
process. There are trackers for both the
reference and layer images. You can use up to
four trackers. See also Target area and
Search region.
Track effect—An effect that is attached to a
track. See also Clip effect.
Transition—A change from one clip to the
next., such as a dissolve, wipe, fade, DVE, or
simply a cut to another clip.
Transparency—A property of an image or
object that controls how much objects behind
them are displayed. For images, it can be
controlled by the alpha channel or by an
external opacity control. See also Opacity.
Tree Effect—An effect that is applied in an
Effects Tree.
Trim—To modify the edit points of a clip. You
can trim a clip in or out to show or hide extra
frames in the clip.
Glossary
Twanging—A method in which you can
connect nodes in an Effects Tree. You can drag a
node over an existing connector and the
connector snaps or “twangs” to the input and
output icons of the node. See also Kissing,
Ripping, and Sticky connections.
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Uncompressed video—A video stream whose
data content has not been modified by a data
compression scheme. The video signal remains
uncompressed during input, storage, and
output. Uncompressed video conforms to the
ITU-R 601 standard.
Warp—A technique that lets you transform an
image or part of an image from one shape to
another over time. See also Morph.
WAV (Waveform Audio)—A file format used
for audio data.
Waveform—A visual display that shows the
electronic pattern of an audio clip.
Windows Explorer—An application that lets
you view and manage the files and folders on
your workstation, and make network
connections to shared resources.
Undertessellation—A bright or focused spot
light shining on a material that produces
distinct triangular patterns on the surface
of objects.
Wipe—A transition between video clips where
the outgoing clip is wiped out and replaced by
the image from the incoming clip, according to
a specific pattern.
Unreferenced media file—Media files on the
media disk that are not referenced by any clip
or sequence.
Wireframe—A mode in which an object
appears to be made of wire. This lets you easily
see the outline of objects.
User profile—A file which contains your user
preferences, such as screen layout, save, user, and
backup preferences. Each user has a separate
profile that is associated with their user name
and recalled each time you log on to the system.
Working resolution—The resolution that
defines the quality at which media is displayed
in the viewer and processed by Avid|DS. See
also Resolution and Capture resolution.
View—An area on the Avid|DS desktop that
contains groups of tools that you can use to edit
your media.
Viewer—Part of the Avid|DS interface that
displays the output of your sequence at the
position of the play cursor.
VITC—Vertical Interval Timecode. A type of
timecode added to the vertical blanking of a TV
signal. It can be read during jogging and
freezing, but not during spooling.
YUV—A color standard that describes color
space in Y (luminance) and UV (chrominance)
in which the luminance and chrominance are
separate. The Y component specifies the
brightness of each pixel, while the U and V, or
chrominance, components specify the color of
pixels. YUV is a commonly accepted term for
YCrCb, where Y represents luminance and Cr
and Cb represent chrominance. See also RGB
(Red, Green, Blue).
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Glossary
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256 • Tutorial
1 A B C D E
F G H
Index
Numerics
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2D DVE 100
2D layer 239
3D DVE
displacement map 213
effect 100
interest 212
3D DVE Layers view 210
3D DVE layout 210
3D DVE Object View (3D OV) 210
3D DVE Property Editors
toolbar 210
3D DVE Tools toolbar 210
3D DVE Viewer toolbar 210
3D layer 239
4:2:2 digital video 239
A
activeness 56, 239
bars 56, 57
ADAT 239
AES/EBU 239
AIFF 239
ALE 239
alignment 240
alpha channel 240
anchor point 240
animating
audio 143
animation 240
keyframes 246
annotation 240
antialiasing 240
applying effects
transitions 75
I
J
K L M N O P Q R S
archiving 240
linked clips 234
media 232
project files 231
project manager 232
projects 232
area, target 190
array, disk 243
artifacts 240
aspect ratio 240
assemble editing 240
audio
animating 143
animation controls 144
clips 54, 142
container clips 143
crossfade 75, 242
effects 100
effects box 144
formats 26, 142
gain 244
input strips 144
level meters 144
mixer controls 144
mixing 140, 144
output strips 144
processing 143
samples 143
strip controls 144
strip name 144
submix 143
tracks 142
volume fader 144
workflow 140
Audio Interchange File Format
(AIFF) 239
Audio Video Interleaved (AVI) 240
T U V W X Y Z
Autokey mode 240
autosave 240
AVI 240
Avid|DS
discussion group 8
getting started 20
logging on 20
starting 26
B
background 240
effects See source generator
effects
reference 250
backing up projects 232
batch capturing 240
Bézier function curve 240
bit depth 240
bit rate 241
blue screen 241
Boolean operators 241
border 241
bounding box 241
brightness 245
broadcasting standards
HDTV 245
NTSC 248
PAL 249
SECAM 252
browser 31, 43
clip icons 44
Contents view 43
copying clips 43
creating folders 48
deleting clips 43
Details mode 43
master clips 37
Index
moving clips 43
organizing clips 43
renaming clips 43
setting favorites 93
sorting columns 49
Thumbnails mode 43, 254
tools 43
tree 43
viewing details 243
bypassing 241
C
caches 86, 103, 241
interactive 245
capture resolution 241
capturing 241
batch 240
from EDL/OMF 38
logging clips 91
material 36, 37
media 37
recapturing from browser 91
workflow 36
Cartesian space 211
channels
color 241
character 241
style 241
chroma keying 241
chrominance 241
client station 241
clip 241
effects 101, 241
icons, color 91
Clipboard 242
Tutorial • 257
Index
?
1 A B C D E
F G H
clips
audio 54, 142
combined audio and video 59
copying 57
creating copies 49
deleting 57
icons 44
layer, motion tracking 188
linked 246
logging 91
manipulating 57
master 247
mixing audio 141
moving 57
placing on timeline 54
preparing 62
reference 251
reference, motion tracking 188
selecting sequentially 58
setting in and out-points 62
synchronized 59
syncing 253
trimming 69 to 74
types 44
video 54
codec 242
color
channels 241
clip icons 91
specular 253
color models
HLS 245
RGB 251
YUV 255
color standards
HLS 245
RGB 251
YUV 255
258 • Tutorial
I
J
K L M N O P Q R S
comparison buffer 114, 242
composite 242
compositing 153
choosing a method 155
layout 154
linking media 170
methods 155
mix & match 170
Compositing layout 154
Refer also to online help
compound shape 242
compression 242
ratio 26
construction lines 242
container clips 242
audio 141, 143
Contents view
browser 43
Refer also to online help
control points 242
conventions 11
keyboard, mouse, and pen 11
copying
clips 57
corner pinning 242
corner point 242
crossfade 75, 242
curves
Bézier 240
control points 242
linear 246
spline 253
cusp point 242
customer service 13
cut 242
cycling 242
T U V W X Y Z
D
E
D1 242
deck 242
deinterlacing 242
deleting
clips 57
media 88, 232
projects 232, 235
Details mode 43, 243
digital post-production 18
applying effects 19
archiving projects 19, 231
capturing material 19, 37
fine-tune editing 19
offline editing 19
outputting media 19
outputting production 228
processing 19, 103
discussion group, Avid|DS 8
disk
array 243
drive 243
displacement map 213, 243
dissolve 243
dither 243
document conventions 10
Documentation Library 9, 10
drive, disk 243
drives
mapping 20
drop shadow 243
drop-frame timecode 243
DSU 243
dual viewer 62
DVE 100, 243
3D 208
DVE effect 118
edit 243
edit points 57, 69, 243
editing 51
graphics properties 128
layout 53
multi-track 80, 81
non-destructive 248
offline 19
workflow 52
Editing layout 53
Refer also to online help
EDL 243
effect bars 57
effect node 110
effects 243
2D DVE 100
3D DVE 100
applying 101
audio 100
background 100, 252
clip 101
DVE 100, 118
Effects Tree 111
image 100
keyer 100
layer 246
library 100
paint 100
real-time 88, 104
source generator 100, 252
time 100
timewarp 254
track 101, 254
transition 100
tree 100
types 100
1 A B C D E
?
F G H
Effects Tree 110, 243
effect nodes 110
input nodes 110
nodes 110
output nodes 110
transitions 110
emissive color 243
environment map 244
Explorer, Windows NT 20
external mattes 166, 244
extrude 244
F
face 244
fades 244
fade-in 75
fade-out 75
falloff, spot 253
favorites 244
adding 93
field dominance 244
field of view 244
fields 244
file formats
AIFF 239
AVI 240
TIFF 254
WAV 255
files
orphan See unreferenced media
file
project 250
Find utility, online help 33
folders 244
creating favorites 49
I
J
K L M N O P Q R S
formats
audio 26, 142
video 26
forum, Avid|DS 15
fps 244
frame size 244
frames 244
frames per second 244
freeze frame 244
function curves 244
Bézier 240
linear 246
pinning 249
G
gain 244
garbage matte 244
ghosting 252
graphic tablet 11
graphics
creating 128
editing 128
editing properties 128
layout 126
objects 244
paint 124
property tree 126
session 245
titling 124
workflow 124
Graphics Object view 126
green screen 245
grid 245
orientation 248
T U V W X Y Z
Index
H
K
HDTV 245
heads 245
Help menu 32
help, online 32
Documentation Library 10
Find utility 33
Help button 32
index 33
searching 33
table of contents 33
tooltips 32
HLS 245
hotline support 13
HTML files
importing 221
hue 245
kerning 246
key color 246
keyboard conventions 11
keyboard shortcuts 9, 246
keyer effects 100
keyframes 246
keying 246
kissing nodes 246
I
image effects 100
images 245
importing
HTML files 221
in and out-points 69
index, online help 33
infinite light 245
in-points 245
input nodes 110
input strips 144
insert editing 245
interactive caches 245
interest, 3D DVE 212
interlacing 245
interpolate 245
ITU-R 601 245
J
jog 246
L
layer effects 246
layer, motion tracking 188
layers 246
2D 239
3D 239
layouts 30
3D DVE 210
Compositing 154
customizing 30
Editing 53
Graphics 126
menu bar 31
pop-up menus 31
status bar 31
taskbar 31
timeline 31
view switcher 31
leading 246
licensing support 13
light sources 211
lightness 245
lights
infinite 245
local 246
spot 253
linear function curve 246
Tutorial • 259
Index
?
1 A B C D E
linked clips 246
archiving 234
linking 170
list, mailing 15
local
light 246
mapping 246
shadow 246
locking
clips 253
logging
clips 91, 246
logging on to workstation 20
looping 246
LTC 247
luminance 245, 247
M
magnetism 247
mailing list 15
managing
media 88
storage space 88
manipulating clips 57
maps
displacement 243
environment 244
reflection 251
markers 247
marking, in/out points 247
masks 247
master clips 26, 37, 247
subclips 46
master/slave 247
material 211, 247
capturing 37
digitized See media
source 37, 252
260 • Tutorial
F G H
I
J
K L M N O P Q R S
mattes 247
external 244
garbage 244
media 247
caches 86
deleting 88
managing 88
processed 86
purging 88
quality 87
recapturing 37
source material 86
See also caches
media disks 247
media files
cache 103
installing 21
unreferenced 255
menu bar 31
menu, Help 32
messages
Processing Needed 104
mix & match 170
mixing 140, 141, 144
animating 143
audio container clips 141
sub-mixing 143
workflow 140
modes
Details 43
Ripple 251
Thumbnails 43, 254
wireframe 255
mono
audio tracks 247
morphing 247
motion path 247
T U V W X Y Z
motion tracking 187, 247
layer clip 188
reference clip 188
reference point, selecting 190
search region 190, 191
target area 190
trackers 190
mouse
conventions 11
using 12
moving
clips 57
multi-camera editing 247
multi-track editing 80, 81, 248
muting 248
N
National Television Standards
Committee (NTSC) 248
neighborhood effects 248
New Features Guide 9
nodes 248
effect 110
input 110
kissing 246
output 110
non-destructive editing 248
non-drop frame
timecode 248
nonlinear 248
NTSC 248
O
offline editing 19, 248
OMF 248
one-sided transitions 248
onion skinning 248
online editing 248
online help 9, 32
Find utility 33
Help button 32
Help icon 32
Help menu 32
index 33
searching 33
table of contents 33
tooltips 32
opacity 248
operating system
Windows 2000 20
Windows NT 20
organizing clips, browser 43
orientation
grid 248
origin 211
orphan media files See unreferenced
media
orthographic projection 248
out-points 248
output 249
EDL 228
OMF 228
quality 228
sections of timeline 229
to file 228
to tape 228
output icon 249
output node 110
output strips 144
overlay tracks 249
overwrite 249
1 A B C D E
F G H
P
?
page 249
paint 124
paint effects 100
PAL 249
parent timeline 249
password 20
path
text 249
paths 249
pen 12
conventions 11
perspective projection 249
Phase Alternate Line (PAL) 249
phone support 13
pinning
corner 242
play cursor 249
pop-up menus 31
post-production 18
applying effects 19
archiving 231
archiving projects 19
capturing material 19, 37
fine-tune editing 19
offline editing 19
outputting media 19
outputting production 228
processing 19, 103
post-roll 249
preference sets 249
preferences 20
premultiplication 249
pre-roll 249
presets 249
previewing 249
processed media 86
I
J
K L M N O P Q R S
processing 103, 250
audio 143
colors on marker ribbon 104
Processing Needed message 104
profile 250
material 250
Program viewer 62
project files 250
master clips 26
sequences 26
Project Manager
archiving 232
restoring 232
project preferences
audio format 26
compression ratio 26
resolution 26
video format 26
projected shadow 250
projection 250
orthographic 248
perspective 249
projects 26, 250
archiving 231, 232
creating 27
creating backups 232
deleting 232, 235
moving 232
restoring 231, 236
setting preferences 26
versions 26
properties 250
property editors 102, 126
Refer also to online help
pulldown 250
purging 250
caches 88
source media 88
T U V W X Y Z
Index
Q
S
quadraphonic 250
quality
output 228
Quick Reference card 9
QuickTime 7
S/PDIF 252
safe action area 251
safe title area 251
sample rate 251
saturation 251
scrubbing 252
search region 190, 252
setting 191
SECAM 252
sequence preferences 87
sequences 26, 252
Sequential Color Memory
(SECAM) 252
session, graphics 245
shadows 252
drop 243
local 246
shape tracker 252
shapes
compound 242
shininess 252
Shortcut card 9
shortcut keys 246
shortcuts
keyboard 9
shuttle 252
size, spot 253
slipping clips 252
smooth point 252
SMPTE 252
snapping
in 73
out 73
Society of Motion Pictures and
Television Engineers
(SMPTE) 252
soloing 252
R
razor 250
real time 250
real-time effects 88, 104
recapturing
media 37, 91
reference 250
background 250
clips 251
image, for tracking 250
motion tracking 188
reflection map 251
region
search 190
remote processing
station 251
render 251
resolution 26, 251
capture 241
independence 251
working 255
restoring
media 232
project manager 232
projects 231, 236
RGB 251
ripping 251
Ripple mode 55, 251
track 55
roll
clips 251
Tutorial • 261
Index
?
1 A B C D E
source generator
effects 100, 252
source material 37, 252
source media 86
Source viewer 62
spatial filtering effects 252
specular color 253
spill correction 253
spline
function curves 253
spot
falloff 253
light 253
size 253
stabilizing 253
starting Avid|DS 26
status bar 31
timecode boxes 57
sticky connections 253
storage space 88
strokes 253
subclips 46
support 13
hotline 13
licensing 13
training 13
web 15
surface 211
sync
groups 253
master 253
offset 253
peer 253
slave 253
synchronizing clips 59, 253
sync-lock 253
262 • Tutorial
F G H
I
J
K L M N O P Q R S
T
table of contents, online help 33
Tag Image File Format (TIFF) 254
tails 253
tangents 254
target area 254
target area, motion tracking 190
taskbar 31
technical support 13
telephone support 13
text
3D 209
text body 254
texture 254
three-dimensional space 211
three-point editing 254
Thumbnails mode 254
TIFF 254
time effects 100
timecode 254
drop-frame 243
non-drop frame 248
timeline 31, 54, 254
displaying unused material 80
placing clips on 54
revealing extra frames 80
scrolling 81
top 254
zooming 60, 72
timeline effect track 254
timewarp 254
titling 124
toolbars 31
tooltips 32
top timeline 254
track effects 101, 254
tracker 189, 190, 254
T U V W X Y Z
trackers
reference point, selecting 190
tracking 189
methods 188
types 188
tracking, motion 187
reference point, selecting 190
search region 190, 191
target area 190
trackers 190
tracks 57
audio 142
creating new 81
Ripple mode 55
timeline effect 254
training support 13
transformation 118
transition bars 57
transitions 100, 254
applying 75
Crossfade 75, 242
cut 242
Dissolve 243
Fade-in 75
Fade-out 75
one-sided 248
Wipe 255
transparency 254
transport controls 31, 44
tree
browser 43
effects 100, 110, 254
trim handles 69
Trim view 69
trimming 254
clips 69 to 74
snapping in/out 69
twanging 255
U
uncompressed video 255
undertessellation 255
unreferenced media
file 255
user
name 20
profile 20, 26, 255
settings 20
V
video
clips 54
format 26
view switcher 31
viewer 31, 62, 255
dual 62
Program 62
Source 62
views 255
browser 31
Graphics 127
Graphics Object 126
Paint 127
Timeline 127
Titling 127
Transformations 127
Trim 69
VITC 255
W
WACOM tablet, pen 12
warp 255
WAV 255
waveforms 255
web support 15
1 A B C D E
?
F G H
I
J
K L M N O P Q R S
T U V W X Y Z
Index
Windows 2000
Explorer 20
mapping network drives 20
operating system 20
user settings 20
Windows Explorer 255
Windows NT
Explorer 20
mapping network drives 20
operating system 20
user settings 20
wipe 255
wireframe mode 255
workflows
3D DVE 208
audio 140
capturing material 36
editing 52
graphics 124
titles 209
working resolution 255
workstation
logging on 20
Y
YUV 255
Tutorial • 263
Index
1 A B C D E
?
264 • Tutorial
F G H
I
J
K L M N O P Q R S
T U V W X Y Z
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