JetControl 24x - User Manual

JetControl 24x - User Manual
JetControl 24x
JetWeb
Controller
User Manual
Article # 60863327 / Rev. 3.20.2
June 2007 / Printed in Germany
Introduction
JetWeb
Revision 3.20.2
Jetter AG reserves the right to make alterations to its products in the interest of
technical progress. These alterations need not be documented in every single case.
This manual and the information contained herein have been compiled with due
diligence. However, Jetter AG assume no liability for printing or other errors or
damages arising from such errors.
The brand names and product names used in this document are trademarks or
registered trademarks of the respective title owner.
2
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Introduction
How to Contact us:
Jetter AG
Gräterstrasse 2
D-71642 Ludwigsburg
Phone - Switchboard:
Phone - Sales:
Phone - Technical Hotline:
++49 7141 2550-0
++49 7141 2550-433
++49 7141 2550-444
Telefax:
E-Mail - Sales:
E-Mail - Technical Hotline:
Internet address:
++49 7141 2550-425
[email protected]
[email protected]
http://www.jetter.de
This Manual is an Integral Part of the
JetControl 24x Control System:
Type:
Serial #:
Year of construction:
Order #:
To be entered by the customer:
Inventory #:
Place of operation:
© Copyright 2007 by Jetter AG. All rights reserved.
Jetter AG
3
Introduction
JetWeb
Significance of this User Manual
This manual forms part of the JetControl 24x
•
•
and must be kept in a way that it is always at hand until the JetControl 24x will be
disposed.
If the JetControl 24x is sold, transferred or lent, this manual must be handed over.
In any case you encounter difficulties to clearly understand this user manual, please
contact the manufacturer.
We would appreciate any suggestions and contributions on your part and would ask
you to contact us. This will help us to produce manuals that are more user-friendly
and to address your wishes and requirements.
This manual contains important information on how to transport, erect, install,
operate, maintain and repair the JetControl 24x.
Therefore, the persons carrying out these jobs must carefully read, understand and
observe this manual, and especially the safety instructions.
Missing or inadequate knowledge of the manual results in the loss of any claim of
liability on part of Jetter AG. Therefore, the operating company is recommended to
have the instruction of the persons concerned confirmed in writing.
System Requirements
This user manual is giving a description of the controller JetControl 24x with
operating system revision V3.20.
For programming all the functions described in this manual, programming
environment JetSym revision V2.3.1 or higher is required.
Update Information
Compatibility with Previous Revisions
Operating systems starting from V3.14 can be used on JC-24x controllers starting
from serial number 20020523070000. If it is intended to upgrade an older controller
with OS revision V3.14 (or higher), please contact the technical hotline of Jetter AG.
System registers
When updating from an OS revision before V3.14, the battery-backed system
registers are set to their default values when the controller is switched on for the first
time.
4
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Introduction
Table 1: Default values
Register Number
Meaning
Factory setting
2023
JX2-I/O dummy modules; bit-coded
Bit = 1 : Module exists
-1
2024
JX2-Slave dummy modules; bitcoded
Bit = 1 : Module exists
255
2029
Baud rate on the system bus
7 = 1 MBaud
7
2032
Delay on system start before the
system bus is initialized
10
2077
System bus special functions
0
2909
Number of the first floating point
register
65024
2964
Sub-version number of JetIP protocol
(V1.1)
0
History
Jetter AG
Revision
Comment
3.11.1
Original issue
3.20.1
For information on operating system revisions from V3.12 to
V3.20 refer to Appendix A: "Recent Revisions", page 364.
3.20.2
Elimination of various typographical and formatting errors
5
Introduction
JetWeb
Description of Symbols
This sign is to indicate a possible impending danger of serious physical damage
or death.
Warning
This sign is to indicate a possible impending danger of light physical damage.
This sign is also to warn you of material damage.
Caution
This sign is to indicate a possible impending situation which might bring damage
to the product or to its surroundings.
It also identifies requirements necessary to ensure faultless operation.
Important
You will be informed of various possible applications and will receive further
useful suggestions.
It also gives you words of advice on how to efficiently use hardware and software
in order to avoid unnecessary efforts.
Note
·/-
Enumerations are marked by full stops, strokes or scores.
Operating instructions are marked by this arrow.
Automatically running processes or results to be achieved are marked by this
arrow.
PC and user interface keys.
This symbol informs you of additional references (data sheets, literature, etc.)
associated with the given subject, product, etc. It also helps you to find your way
around this manual.
6
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Jetter AG
1
Safety Instructions
15
1.1
Generally Valid Safety Instructions
15
1.1.1
1.1.2
1.1.3
1.1.4
1.1.5
1.1.6
Usage as Agreed Upon
Usage Other Than Agreed Upon
Who is Permitted to Operate the JetControl 24x?
Modifications and Alterations to the Module
Servicing and Maintaining the JetControl 24x
Shutting Down and Disposing of JetControl 24x
15
15
16
16
16
16
1.2
Ensure Your Own Safety
17
1.3
Instructions on EMI
18
2
Physical Dimensions
19
3
Operating Parameters
21
4
Technical Data
27
5
Installing the JetControl 24x
29
5.1
Important Notes
29
5.1.1
5.1.2
5.1.3
Notes on Safety as regards the Installation
Notes on Safety as regards Commissioning
Specifications of plug-in terminals
29
30
31
5.2
Mechanical Installation
31
5.3
Electrical Installation
32
5.4
Power Supply
33
5.4.1
5.4.2
Requirements
Description of Connections
33
34
5.5
Digital Inputs
36
5.5.1
5.5.2
5.5.3
5.5.4
Technical Data
Description of the LEDs
Description of Connections
Numbering System of Digital Inputs Located on
Expansion Modules
36
37
38
5.6
Digital Outputs
40
5.6.1
5.6.2
5.6.3
5.6.4
Technical Data
Description of the LEDs
Description of Connections
Numbering System of Digital Outputs Located on
Expansion Modules
40
41
42
5.7
Serial Interfaces
44
5.8
Ethernet Interface
45
5.8.1
Connecting to the RJ45 Jack
45
39
43
7
Table of Contents
8
JetWeb
5.8.2
5.8.3
5.8.4
Connection between JetControl 24x and PC
Connection between JetControl 24x, switch and PC
Connection via Several Switches
46
46
47
5.9
Status LEDs, Toggle Switch
49
5.9.1
5.9.2
LEDs
The Mode Selector
49
50
5.10
Setting the IP Address
52
5.10.1
5.10.2
5.10.3
5.10.4
Permanent IP address
IP address from the configuration memory
IP address based on the rotary switch position
IP Address via special function
52
52
54
56
5.11
Switch-on delay
57
5.12
Interface Cables
58
5.12.1
5.12.2
5.12.3
5.12.4
5.12.5
5.12.6
Overview of interface cables
Programming Cable JN-PK-5m
HMI Cable JN-DK-Xm
User Interface Cable KAY_0386-xxxx
User Interface Cable KAY_0533-0025
Jetter System Bus Cable
58
59
60
61
63
65
6
Software Programming
69
6.1
Addressing Digital Inputs and Outputs
69
6.1.1
6.1.2
6.1.3
6.1.4
Basic Controller
Expansion module JX2-I/O
I/O Access to Smart I/O Modules
Access to digital inputs/outputs using registers
69
69
71
72
6.2
Access to Flags
73
6.2.1
6.2.2
Overview of Flags
User Flags
73
73
6.3
Special Flags
77
6.4
Description of Registers/Variables
83
6.4.1
6.4.2
6.4.3
6.4.4
6.4.5
6.4.6
Overview of registers/variables
Coding of Register Numbers
User-specific variables/registers
Switching between integer/floating point registers
Programming by Means of Registers
Calculations by Means of Registers
83
84
86
86
88
92
6.5
Special Registers
100
6.6
Special/System Functions
129
6.6.1
6.6.2
6.6.3
6.6.4
6.6.5
Format Conversion
Arithmetic Functions
Modbus RTU CRC Checksum
Modbus/TCP
RemoteScan
130
131
133
135
137
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Jetter AG
Table of Contents
6.6.6
6.6.7
6.6.8
6.6.9
6.6.10
Data files
E-Mail
Network Interface
String instructions
Networking via JetIP
139
142
143
144
147
6.7
System command
149
6.7.1
6.7.2
6.7.3
Register(s)
Command: Resetting to factory setting
Command: Resetting to factory settings and clearing
the password of the application program
149
149
150
7
HMIs - Operator Guidance
151
7.1
Technical Data
151
7.2
Description of Connections
152
7.3
Multi-display mode
153
7.4
Programming HMIs
156
7.4.1
7.4.2
7.4.3
7.4.4
7.4.5
Displaying Texts:
Text Output Parameters
Control Characters for Text Output
Displaying Register Contents / Variables
Polling Register Values / Variables
156
156
158
160
161
7.5
Fixed-Point Numbers
163
7.5.1
7.5.2
Displaying Fixed-Point Numbers
Entering Fixed-Point Numbers
163
165
7.6
USER_INPUT: Suggested Value
167
7.7
Registers
168
7.8
Controlling HMI Keys and LEDs
186
8
Operator Interaction with User Interfaces
191
8.1
Output Instructions for JX2-PRN1 and JX2-SER1 Modules 191
8.1.1
8.1.2
Displaying Texts
Displaying Registers/Variables
192
193
8.2
Register Description for JX2-PRN1 and
JX2-SER1 Modules
195
9
User-Programmable Interface
197
9.1
Description of Connections
197
9.2
Description of Functions
198
9.3
Description of Registers
199
9.4
Output of texts and values
207
9.4.1
9.4.2
Displaying Texts
Displaying Registers/Variables
208
209
9
Table of Contents
10
JetWeb
9.5
Example of an Application
211
10
Real-Time Clock
217
10.1
Register(s)
217
10.2
Accuracy
218
10.3
Exemplary Program
218
11
Topology of the Jetter System Bus
221
11.1
Centralized Arrangement on the System Bus
223
11.2
Remote Arrangement on the System Bus
224
11.3
Connecting Smart I/O modules
225
11.4
Baud Rate
226
11.5
Jetter System Bus Cable
227
11.6
Configuring Dummy Modules
227
11.7
Codes of Supported Modules
230
11.8
Monitoring of I/O modules
232
12
Error Handling
235
12.1
Hardware errors
235
12.2
Application Program Errors
235
12.3
OS Error Messages
238
13
Introduction to Web Functions
241
13.1
Licensing
242
13.1.1 Description
13.1.2 License File
242
242
13.2
Availability of Web Functions
243
13.3
The FTP Server
244
13.3.1 Log-In
13.3.2 Key Commands
244
244
13.4
245
The HTTP Server
13.4.1 Supported File Types
13.4.2 Server Side Includes
245
245
13.5
The E-Mail Client
246
13.6
IP Addresses
247
13.6.1 The file "hosts"
13.6.2 Domain Name System
247
248
14
File System
249
14.1
Properties
249
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Table of Contents
14.2
User Administration
14.2.1 Flash Disk Lock File
14.2.2 Key Names File
14.2.3 User File
250
251
252
14.3
253
System directories / files
14.3.1
14.3.2
14.3.3
14.3.4
The file "/license/license.dat"
The directory "/System/OS" and the file "/System/system.ose"
The file "/System/cfgvar.ini"
The files "/System/flashdisklock.ini",
"/System/keys.ini", and "/System/users.ini"
14.3.5 The file "/System/flashdiskinfo.txt"
254
254
255
14.4
257
Formatting the Flash Disk
14.4.1 Formatting by means of the Format Register
14.4.2 Formatting by means of mode selector
256
256
257
257
15
FTP Server
259
15.1
Log-In
259
15.2
Supported Commands
260
15.3
Example: Windows FTP Client
261
16
E-Mail
263
16.1
Authentication
263
16.1.1 Background
16.1.2 Supported Authentication Methods
263
263
16.2
The E-Mail INI file
263
16.2.1 Section [SMTP]
16.2.2 Section [DEFAULT]
16.2.3 Section [POP3]
264
264
264
16.3
Structure of the E-Mail Template File
266
16.4
Name of the E-Mail Template File
267
16.5
Sending E-Mails
267
16.6
The E-Mail Default Template File
268
16.7
Transmission of Controller Values
269
16.7.1
16.7.2
16.7.3
16.7.4
16.7.5
16.7.6
Format Definition
Register - Text Variable
Flags
Inputs
Outputs
Indirect Access
269
270
271
272
273
274
16.8
Maximum Values
275
16.9
E-Mail Tracking Register
275
16.10 Sample E-Mail
Jetter AG
249
276
11
Table of Contents
JetWeb
17
HTTP Server
279
17.1
Supported File Types
279
17.2
Server Side Includes
279
17.2.1 Name Space Tag
17.2.2 Data Tag
17.2.3 Example Page
280
280
287
17.3
Visualization via Internet Browser
287
18
Networking via JetIP
289
18.1
N_COPY_TO/FROM2
289
18.2
NetCopyList
289
18.2.1 System/Special Functions
18.2.2 Example
290
293
18.3
JetIP V1.1
294
18.4
Registers
295
18.5
Special Flags
299
19
RemoteScan
301
19.1
Special/System Functions
301
19.1.1 Configuring RemoteScan
19.1.2 Starting RemoteScan
19.1.3 Stopping remote scan
301
304
304
19.2
Registers
305
20
Modbus/TCP
307
20.1
Licensing
307
20.1.1 License File
20.1.2 Availability of Web Functions
307
308
20.2
Modbus/TCP Server
309
20.2.1
20.2.2
20.2.3
20.2.4
Addressing
Supported Commands - Class 0
Supported Commands - Class 1
Supported Commands - Class 2
309
309
310
311
20.3
Modbus/TCP Client
313
20.3.1 Remote Scan
20.3.2 Special/System Functions
20.3.3 Example of an Application
21
EtherNet/IP
319
21.1
Licensing
319
21.1.1 License File
21.1.2 Availability of Web Functions
12
313
314
316
319
320
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Table of Contents
21.2
Configuration
320
21.2.1
21.2.2
21.2.3
21.2.4
Configuration File
Configuration Registers
Time Base
HostName / HostNameType
321
321
323
323
21.3
Register(s)
324
21.3.1 Communication Registers
21.3.2 Control Register
22
Data Files
327
22.1
Special/System Functions
327
22.1.1
22.1.2
22.1.3
22.1.4
22.1.5
22.1.6
Implementation
File Names
Saving values – Creating a file
Saving values – Appending to a file
Reading values from a file
Deleting a file
327
327
328
329
330
331
22.2
Registers
332
22.2.1 Availability of data files Functions
22.2.2 Status Registers
332
332
22.3
File Format
333
22.4
Example of an Application
334
23
String Functions
337
23.1
Comparing Strings
337
23.2
Searching a string within another string
339
23.3
Appending Strings
340
23.4
Converting register values into strings
341
23.5
Copying Strings
342
23.6
Format of a JetSym text variable
343
24
Interface Activity Monitoring
345
24.1
Description
345
24.2
Register(s)
346
24.3
Flags
347
25
User-programmable CAN Interface
349
25.1
Enable
350
25.2
Interface Registers
351
25.2.1 Global Registers
25.2.2 Box Registers
Jetter AG
324
324
351
356
13
Table of Contents
JetWeb
25.3
Flag
359
25.4
Assigned CAN IDs
359
25.5
Exemplary Program
360
List of Appendices
Appendix A:
Appendix B:
Appendix C:
Appendix D:
Appendix E:
Appendix F:
Appendix G:
Appendix H:
Appendix I:
14
Recent Revisions
Operating System Update
Application program
Multitasking Operating System
(Interpreter)
Tables for Designing a Control System
Equipped with JetControl 24x
List of Abbreviations
List of Illustrations
Index of Examples
Index
364
367
373
376
380
381
385
387
389
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
1.1 Generally Valid Safety Instructions
Table
Contents
of
1
1.1
Safety Instructions
Generally Valid Safety Instructions
The control system JetControl 24x complies with the valid safety regulations and
standards. Special emphasis was given to the safety of the users.
Of course, the user should adhere to the following regulations:
• relevant accident prevention regulations;
• accepted safety rules;
• EC guidelines and other country-specific regulations.
1.1.1
Usage as Agreed Upon
Usage as agreed upon includes operation in accordance with the operating
instructions.
The supply voltage of the JetControl 24x is DC 24V. This operating voltage is
classified as SELV (Safety Extra Low Voltage).
The JetControl 24x controller is therefore not subject to the EU Low Voltage
Directive.
The JetControl 24x controller must be operated within the limits of the specified data.
For more information refer to chapter 4 "Technical Data", page 27.
The JetControl 24x is used to control machinery, such as conveyors, production
machines, and handling machines.
1.1.2
Usage Other Than Agreed Upon
The JetControl 24x must not be used in technical systems which to a high
degree have to be fail-save, e.g. ropeways and aeroplanes.
If the JetControl 24x is to be run under surrounding conditions, which differ from the
conditions mentioned in chapter 3 "Operating Parameters", page 21, the
manufacturer is to be contacted beforehand.
Jetter AG
15
1 Safety Instructions
JetWeb
1.1.3
Who is Permitted to Operate the
JetControl 24x?
Only instructed, trained and authorized persons are permitted to operate the
JetControl 24x.
Transport:
Only by personnel with knowledge in handling
electrostatically sensitive components.
Installation:
Only by specialists with training in electrical
engineering.
Commissioning:
Only by specialists with extensive knowledge of, and
experience with, electrical engineering / drive
technology.
1.1.4
Modifications and Alterations to the
Module
For safety reasons, no modifications and changes to the JetControl 24x and its
functions are permitted.
Any modifications to the JetControl 24x not expressly authorized by the manufacturer
will result in a loss of any liability claims to Jetter AG.
The original parts are specially designed for the JetControl 24x. Parts and
equipment of other manufacturers are not tested on our part, and are,
therefore, not released by us.
The installation of such parts may impair the safety and the proper functioning of the
JetControl 24x.
Any liability on the part of Jetter AG for any damages resulting from the use of non
original parts and equipment is excluded.
1.1.5
Servicing and Maintaining the JetControl 24x
The control system JetControl 24x must not be repaired by the operator. The
JetControl 24x does not contain any parts that could be repaired by the operator.
The control system JetControl 24x must be sent to Jetter AG for repair.
The JetControl 24x is maintenance-free. Therefore, absolutely no inspection or
maintenance works are required for the operation of the module.
1.1.6
Shutting Down and Disposing of
JetControl 24x
The environmental regulations for the respective country apply to shutting down and
disposing of the JetControl 24x on the operating company’s premises.
16
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
1.2 Ensure Your Own Safety
1.2
Ensure Your Own Safety
Disconnect the JetControl 24x from the electricity mains to carry out
maintenance work. By doing so, you will prevent accidents resulting from
electric voltage and moving parts.
Safety and protective devices, e.g. the barrier and cover of the terminal
box must never be shunted or by-passed.
Dismantled protective equipment must be reattached prior to
commissioning and checked for proper functioning.
Prior to commissioning, the machine manufacturer shall conduct a hazard
analysis for the machine and take appropriate measures to prevent
personal injury and damage to property resulting from accidental
movements.
Malfunctions
In case of failures or damages, disconnect the control system JetControl
24x from the mains immediately.
Malfunctions or other damages are to be reported to an authorized person
at once.
The JetControl 24x must be protected from improper or inadvertent use.
Information Signs and Labels
Writings, information signs, and labels always have to be observed and
kept readable.
Damaged or unreadable information signs and labels are to be
exchanged.
Jetter AG
17
1 Safety Instructions
JetWeb
1.3
Instructions on EMI
The noise immunity of a system corresponds to the weakest component of the
system. For this reason, correct wiring and shielding of cables is of paramount
importance.
The JetControl 24x has to be attached to a DIN rail acc. to EN 50022-35 x
7.5.
Follow the instructions given in Application Note 016 "EMC-Compatible
Installation of the Electric Cabinet" published by Jetter AG.
The following instructions are excerpts from Application Note 016:
On principle, physical separation should be maintained between signal
and power lines. We recommend spacings greater than 20 cm. Cables and
lines should cross each other at an angle of 90°.
Shielded cables must be used for the following lines:
Analog lines, data lines, motor cables coming from inverter drives (servo
output stage, frequency converter), lines between components and
interference suppressor filter, if the suppressor filter has not been placed
at the component directly.
Shield cables at both ends.
Unshielded wire ends of shielded cables should be as short as possible.
The entire shield must, in its entire perimeter, be drawn behind the
isolation, and then be clamped under an earthed strain relief with the
greatest possible surface area.
When male connectors are used:
The shield (impedance shielding) must, in its entire perimeter, be drawn
behind the shielding clamp of the metallized connector housing,
respectively of the EMC gland bushing, its greatest possible surface area
being clamped under a strain relief.
Only use metallized connectors, e.g. SUB-D with metallized housing.
Please take care of direct connection here as well.
If the shield cannot be attached to the connector, for example, with a screw
type terminal:
It is important that shield and strain relief are highly conductive and directly
connected to a grounded surface with the greatest possible surface area.
When doing so, grounding must be implemented in a way that the
unshielded portion of the cable is as short as possible.
18
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
2
Physical Dimensions
Fig. 1: Front View of the JetControl 24x Controller
Fig. 2: Side View of the JetControl 24x Controller
Jetter AG
19
2 Physical Dimensions
JetWeb
Fig. 3: Top View of the JetControl 24x Controller
Design
20
Dimensions (H x W x D in mm)
115 x 156 x 58
Weight
670 g
Housing bottom
Aluminium, powder coated;
Color: blue
Housing cover
Steel sheet metal coated with AlZn
Installation on
DIN-rail to EN 50022-35 x 7.5
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
3
Operating Parameters
Operating Parameters: Power Rating
Parameter
Value(s)
Power Rating
•
•
•
DC 24 V (DC 20 V .. 30 V)
Residual ripple: ≤ 5 %
SELV power supply
Voltage dips
•
Duration of voltage dips ≤ 10
ms
Interval between two dips: ≥ 1
s
Severity level: PS2
•
•
Preferable
reference
standard(s)
DIN EN 61131-2
Environmental Operating Parameters
Jetter AG
Parameter
Value(s)
Preferable reference
standard(s)
Operating
temperature range
0° C up to 50° C
Storage temperature
range
-25° C up to +70° C
DIN EN 61131-2
DIN EN 60068-2-1
DIN EN 60068-2-2
Air Humidity /
Humidity Rating
10 % to 95 %
No condensing
DIN EN 61131-2
Pollution Degree
2
DIN EN 61131-2
Corrosion Immunity/
Chemical Resistance
No special protection against
corrosion. Ambient air must be
free from higher concentrations
of acids, alcaline solutions,
corrosive agents, salts, metal
vapors, or other corrosive or
electroconductive
contaminants.
Maximum operating
altitude (atmospheric
pressure)
2,000 m above sea level
DIN EN 61131-2
21
3 Operating Parameters
JetWeb
Mechanical Operating Parameters
Parameter
Value(s)
Preferable reference
standard(s)
Free Falls
Withstanding Test
Height of fall (units within
packing): 1 m
DIN EN 61131-2
DIN EN 60068-2-32
Vibration Resistance
•
DIN EN 61131-2
DIN EN 60068-2-6
•
•
10 Hz -57 Hz: with an
amplitude of 0.0375 mm for
continuous operation (peak
amplitude of 0.075 mm)
57 Hz -150 Hz: 0.5 constant
acceleration for continuous
operation (1 g constant
acceleration occasionally)
1 octave/minute, 10
frequency sweeps
(sinusoidal), all 3 spatial
axes
Shock Resistance
15 g occasionally, 11 ms,
sinusoidal half-wave, 2 shocks
in all three spatial axes
DIN EN 61131-2
DIN EN 60068-2-27
Class of Protection
IP20, rear: IP10
DIN EN 60529
Mounting Position
Any position, snapped on DIN
Rail
Operating Parameters - Electrical Safety
22
Parameter
Value(s)
Preferable reference
standard(s)
Class of Protection
III
DIN EN 61131-2
Dielectric Test
Voltage
Functional ground is connected
to chassis ground internally.
DIN EN 61131-2
Overvoltage category
II
DIN EN 61131-2
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Operating Parameters (EMC) - Emitted Interference
Parameter
Value(s)
Preferable reference
standard(s)
Rack
•
Frequency band:
30 to 230 MHz, limit 30 dB
(µV/m) at 10 m distance
Frequency band: 230 1,000 MHz, limit 37 dB (µV/
m) at 10 m distance (class
B)
DIN EN 61000-6-3
DIN EN 61000-6-4
DIN EN 55011
Frequency bands:
• 0.15 to 0.5 MHz, limit 40 to
30 dB (µV)*
• 0.5 to 30 MHz, limit 30 dB
(µV)*
* measured using a quasi peak
rectifier (class B)
DIN EN 61000-6-3
•
Signal and control
line connections, DC
voltage supply inputs
and outputs
Operating Parameters (EMC) - Immunity to
Interference of Housing
Parameter
Value(s)
Preferable reference
standard(s)
RF Field, amplitudemodulated
•
Frequency band:
27 - 1,000 MHz
Test field strength 10 V/m
AM 80 % with 1 kHz
Criterion A
DIN EN 61131-2
DIN EN 61000-6-2
DIN EN 61000-4-3
Discharge through air: Test
peak voltage 8 kV
Contact Discharge: Test
peak voltage 4 kV
Criterion A
DIN EN 61131-2
DIN EN 61000-6-2
DIN EN 61000-4-2
•
•
•
ESD
•
•
•
Jetter AG
23
3 Operating Parameters
JetWeb
Operating Parameters (EMC) - Immunity to
Interference of Signal Ports
Parameter
Value(s)
Preferable reference
standard(s)
Asymmetric RF,
amplitude-modulated
•
DIN EN 61000-6-2
DIN EN 61000-4-6
•
Frequency band:
0.15 - 80 MHz
Test voltage: 10 V
AM 80 % with 1 kHz
Source impedance 150
Ohm
Criterion A
Burst
•
•
•
•
Test voltage: 1 kV
tr/tn 5/50 ns
Repetition frequency: 5 kHz
Criterion A
DIN EN 61131-2
DIN EN 61000-6-2
DIN EN 61000-4-4
Test with damped
oscillations (digital
inputs and outputs
only)
Damped sinusoidal oscillation
• Frequency: 1 MHz
• Source impedance: 200
Ohms
• Repetition rate: 400 Hz
• Test voltage: 1 kV
DIN EN 61131-2
DIN EN 61000-4-12
Surge voltages,
asymmetrical (line to
earth)
tr/th 1.2/50 µs
No-load voltage: 1 kV
DIN EN 61000-6-2
DIN EN 61000-4-5
•
•
•
24
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Operating Parameters (EMC) - Immunity to
Interference of DC Power Supply Inputs and Outputs
Parameter
Value(s)
Preferable reference
standard(s)
RF, asymmetric
•
DIN EN 61000-6-2
DIN EN 61000-4-6
•
Frequency band:
0.15 - 80 MHz
Test voltage: 10 V
AM 80 % with 1 kHz
Source impedance: 150
Ohms
Criterion A
Burst
•
•
•
•
Test voltage: 2 kV
tr/tn 5/50 ns
Repetition frequency: 5 kHz
Criterion A
DIN EN 61131-2
DIN EN 61000-6-2
DIN EN 61000-4-4
Test with damped
oscillation
Damped sinusoidal oscillation
• Frequency: 1 MHz
• Source impedance: 200
Ohms
• Repetition rate: 400 Hz
• Test voltage: 1 kV
DIN EN 61131-2
DIN EN 61000-4-12
Surge voltages,
asymmetrical (line to
earth)
Symmetrical (line to
earth)
tr/th 1.2/50 µs
No-load voltage: 0.5 kV
DIN EN 61000-6-2
DIN EN 61000-4-5
•
•
•
Jetter AG
25
3 Operating Parameters
JetWeb
26
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
4
Technical Data
Electrical Data
Rated voltage of logic circuit and
outputs
DC 24 V, max. ripple 5%
Permissible range of operating voltage
DC 20 .. 30 V
Power consumption CPU, typical
200 mA at DC 24 V without extensions
400 mA with maximum number of I/Os
Functional Equipment
16 digital inputs
DC 24 V, PNP
8 digital outputs
DC 24 V, 0.5 A, PNP
2 serial interfaces
1 in case of JC -241
per RS-422 or RS-232 port
1 Ethernet interface
10/100 MBit/s, TX
Real-time clock
Hour, minute, second
Year, month, day, day of the week
System bus for expansion modules
System bus
Operating mode selector
RUN / STOP / LOAD
LED for status indication
RUN / ERR
Memory
Application registers
Integer
Integer or floating point
Floating Point Notation
0 .. 1999
20000 .. 49999
65024 .. 65279
User Flags
0 .. 255
Number of timers
32100
Flash Disk
JC-241
JC-243
JC-246
1 Mbyte
3 Mbyte
7 Mbyte
Application program
(The user program is a file on the flash
disk with the default name
userprog.ej2.)
Jetter AG
64 Kbyte
27
4 Technical Data
JetWeb
Do not delete the user program file userprog.ej2 on the flash disk.
Important!
Expansion options
Type
28
JC-241
JC-243
JC-246
Max. # of non-intelligent expansion
modules (JX2-I/O modules)
7
15
23
Maximum # of intelligent expansion
modules (JX2-Slave, JetMove 2xx,
JetMove 6xx modules)
1
3
6
Max. # of third-party peripheral modules,
such as JX-SIO modules
10
10
10
Max. I/O sum
136
264
392
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.1 Important Notes
5
Installing the JetControl 24x
5.1
Important Notes
5.1.1
Notes on Safety as regards the
Installation
HAZARD caused by high operating voltage!
CAUTION: Damage to property may result!
Warning
On devices, which are installed together with JetControl 24x in a machine,
hazardous voltages may occur!
Please observe the following precautions in order to avoid damages to property,
muscle cramps, burns, unconsciousness, respiratory standstill, etc., and possibly
death:
Have installation jobs carried out by qualified personnel only, see
chapter 1.1.3 "Who is Permitted to Operate the JetControl 24x?", page
16.
Do not plug or unplug plug-in connectors while they are energized.
Also, do not unscrew screwed connections of energized components.
Failure to comply with these rules may cause voltage peaks and, thus,
electromagnetic interferences which may result in damages to the
equipment, as well as in electrical hazards to persons.
Therefore, switch off the operating voltage of the machine before
carrying out any work on it.
Before carrying out installation and maintenance jobs, isolate the
JetControl 24x and all devices connected to it from the mains (pull out
the mains plug).
Avoid damages caused by electrostatic discharge by touching
grounded points before carrying out installation work.
Damages caused by ESD do not always become immediately
apparent!
Jetter AG
29
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
5.1.2
JetWeb
Notes on Safety as regards
Commissioning
HAZARD caused by high operating voltage!
CAUTION: Damage to property may result!
Warning
On devices, which are installed together with JetControl 24x in a machine,
hazardous voltages may occur!
Please observe the following precautions in order to avoid damages to property,
muscle cramps, burns, unconsciousness, respiratory standstill, etc., and possibly
death:
Have installation jobs carried out by qualified personnel only, see
chapter 1.1.3 "Who is Permitted to Operate the JetControl 24x?", page
16.
Prior to commissioning, please do the following:
Reattach dismantled protective equipment and check it for proper
functioning.
This way, protection from moving parts of the machine will be achieved.
Connect to the JetControl 24x only devices or electrical components,
e.g. JX2-I/O modules, servo amplifiers and motors, that have been
sufficiently separated from the connected electric circuits.
Protect the JetControl 24x controller and the equipment connected to it
against accidental contact with live parts and components;
Always carry out each commissioning, even a short functional test, with
correctly connected PE bus;
30
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.2 Mechanical Installation
5.1.3
Specifications of plug-in terminals
Important!
The following specifications apply to plug-in terminals for power supply and
digital inputs/outputs:
1. Core cross-section
0.25 - 2.5 mm2
2. Stud torque of terminal blocks:
0.5 Nm - 0.6 Nm
3. Size of screwdriver blade:
0.6 x 3.5 mm
4. Stripping length of cores:
8 mm
5.2
Mechanical Installation
Please check the shipment for completeness.
In your electric cabinet choose the place of the DIN rail for mounting the
JetControl 24x and other peripheral modules, such as Smart I/O
module and JX2-..., if any.
Attach the JetControl 24x and optional modules to the DIN rail EN
50022 - 35 x 7.5 in accordance with the applicable instructions.
Jetter AG
31
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
5.3
JetWeb
Electrical Installation
Important!
Make sure that the connection cables are correctly wired when
installing the JetControl 24x.
Incorrect polarity of input lines of the power supply, as well as of digital
input and output lines results in damages to the JC-24x controller.
You can use our prefabricated programming, HMI and connecting
cables for the Jetter system bus. For more information refer to chapter
5.12.1 "Overview of interface cables", page 58.
For installation according to EMC, the chapter 1.3 "Instructions on
EMI", page 18 must be read and observed.
Connect a HMI to your controller using the HMI cable JN-DK via SER1
or SER2.
Connect the JetControl 24x to your computer using the programming
cable JN-PK via SER1 or SER2 or using an Ethernet connection.
For the Ethernet connection, set the required IP address using the
rotary address switches.
Install JetSym on your computer.
Launch JetSym and set the communication parameters.
Energize the Jetcontrol 24x controller and download a JetSym program
from your computer to your controller.
Check the controller for proper functioning.
32
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.4 Power Supply
5.4
Power Supply
5.4.1
Requirements
Power Supply Unit Requirements
Voltage Range
DC 24 V (20 .. 30 V)
Residual ripple: <5 % filtered
SELV
Max. current consumption of terminal
X10:
Pin CPU DC 24V 1.5 A:
– CPU
– LCD
– System bus
0.4 A
0.75 A
0.4 A
Pin IO DC 24V 4A:
– Digital outputs
4A
Maximum Total Current
5.5 A
Important!
Caution
•
The maximum supply voltage must not exceed DC 30 V since a higher supply
voltage may cause damages to the JC-24x controller.
•
If the JC-24x controller is not supplied with sufficient power (under-voltage),
malfunctions may occur.
Note!
Protection against polarity reversal:
The JC-24x module is protected against polarity reversal. For testing the module,
a voltage of 24 volts with reversed polarity was applied for 10 s.
Jetter AG
33
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
5.4.2
JetWeb
Description of Connections
Terminal Specifications
•
•
•
•
•
•
3-pole terminal block COMBICON RM 5.08
(for printed-circuit boards)
Cable cross-sectional area: 0.25 - 2.5 mm2
Torque (for input plug screws): 0.5 .. 0.6 Nm
The maximum stripping length for input lines is 8 mm.
The accepted VDE guidelines have to be observed
Flat-bladed screwdriver: 0.6 x 3.5 x 100 mm
Connecting Cable Specifications
•
Not required
Cable Shielding
•
Not required
Fig. 4: JetControl 24x: Power supply connector
34
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.4 Power Supply
Pin Assignment of 3-pin Plug for Terminal Blocks
View
X 10
Jetter AG
Pin
Signal
Comment
IO
DC 24V 4A
DC 20 .. 30 V
Power supply for
digital outputs
CPU
DC 24V 1,5A
DC 20 .. 30 V
Power supply for
logic circuit
0V
GND
Impedance
grounding
connected to the
housing
35
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
JetWeb
5.5
Digital Inputs
5.5.1
Technical Data
Technical Data - Digital Inputs
16 digital inputs
DC 24 V -15 % .. +20 %
Type
pnp
Input terminals
Plug-in terminal blocks
LEDs, inputs 1-16
24 volt are applied to the input.
Pick-off method: Hardware-triggered signal
Heat loss of logic circuit
0.3 Watt
Rated input voltage
DC 24 V -15 % .. +20 %
Voltage Range
0 .. 30 V
Input current type
approx. 5mA
Input resistance
3.0 kΩ
Input delay time
approx. 3 ms (from 0 to 1, and from 1 to 0)
Signal voltage ON
min. 17 V
Signal voltage OFF
max. 5 V
Signal processing
dynamic
Electrical isolation
None
If a line with reverse polarity is connected to a digital input, the input will be
destroyed.
Caution
A digital output may directly (without additional load) be connected to a digital
input.
Note!
36
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.5 Digital Inputs
5.5.2
Description of the LEDs
Fig. 5: LEDs Representing the Digital Inputs of JetControl 24x
LEDs of Digital Inputs
Designation
INPUT 1 .. 16
Color
yellow
Function
Digital input 1 through 16
ON:
Signal voltage ON
OFF:
Signal voltage OFF
Jetter AG
37
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
5.5.3
JetWeb
Description of Connections
Terminal Specifications
•
•
•
•
•
•
8-pole terminal block COMBICON RM 5.08
(for printed-circuit boards)
Cable cross-sectional area: 0.25 - 2.5 mm2
Torque (for input plug screws): 0.5 .. 0.6 Nm
The maximum stripping length for input lines is 8 mm.
The accepted VDE guidelines have to be observed
Flat-bladed screwdriver: 0.6 x 3.5 x 100 mm
Connecting Cable Specifications
•
Not required
Cable Shielding
•
Not required
Pin Assignment of 8-pin Plug for Terminal Blocks
View
X21
X22
38
Pin
Signal
Number
1
Digital input # 1
101
2
Digital input # 2
102
3
Digital input # 3
103
4
Digital input # 4
104
5
Digital input # 5
105
6
Digital input # 6
106
7
Digital input # 7
107
8
Digital input # 8
108
9
Digital input # 9
109
10
Digital input # 10
110
11
Digital input # 11
111
12
Digital input # 12
112
13
Digital input # 13
113
14
Digital input # 14
114
15
Digital input # 15
115
16
Digital input # 16
116
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.5 Digital Inputs
The connection of the digital inputs of the JetControl 24x controller is shown in Fig.
6. Reference point is the 0 V terminal to which the 0 V signal is connected-up.
Fig. 6: External circuit of the digital inputs 4 and 13
5.5.4
Numbering System of Digital Inputs
Located on Expansion Modules
Numbering System of Digital Inputs
Digital Inputs of JX2-ID8
Module Position Number
Input # 1
Module position * 100 +1
Input # 2
Module position * 100 +2
...
...
Input # 8
Module position * 100 + 8
First non-intelligent expansion module Module slot = 2
Jetter AG
39
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
JetWeb
5.6
Digital Outputs
5.6.1
Technical Data
Technical Data - Digital Outputs
8 digital outputs
DC 24 V, 0.5 A, pnp
Output terminals
Plug-in terminal blocks
LEDs, outputs 1 - 8
24 V output, switched;
pick-off point: Hardware-triggered signal
Type of outputs
Transistor, pnp
Rated voltage
DC 24 V -15 % .. +20 %
Voltage Range
20 .. 30 V
Load current
max. 0.5 A / output
Output power of outputs
96 Watt
Electrical isolation
None
Protective circuit
Short circuit, overvoltage,
overtemperature, polarity reversal
Protection against inductive loads
Yes
Principle of Operation
Non-latching
Signal voltage ON
Typ. Vsupply - 1.5 V
A digital output may directly (without additional load) be connected to a digital
input.
Protection against polarity reversal:
The digital outputs are reverse polarity proof.
Note!
40
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.6 Digital Outputs
5.6.2
Description of the LEDs
Fig. 7: LEDs Representing the Digital Outputs of JetControl 24x
LEDs of digital outputs
Designation
OUTPUT 1 ... 8
Color
yellow
Function
Digital output 1 through 8
ON:
Signal voltage ON
OFF:
Signal voltage OFF
ERR
red
Collective error message
24 V
ON:
Overload, short circuit,
overtemperature of one or
more outputs.
Error states can be
queried in register 2008.
green
ON:
External voltage supply of
the digital outputs is
provided.
Jetter AG
41
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
5.6.3
JetWeb
Description of Connections
Terminal Specifications
•
•
•
•
•
•
8-pole terminal block COMBICON RM 5.08
(for printed-circuit boards)
Cable cross-sectional area: 0.25 - 2.5 mm2
Torque (for input plug screws): 0.5 .. 0.6 Nm
The maximum stripping length for input lines is 8 mm.
The accepted VDE guidelines have to be observed
Flat-bladed screwdriver: 0.6 x 3.5 x 100 mm
Connecting Cable Specifications
•
Not required
Cable Shielding
•
Not required
Pin Assignment of 8-pin Plug for Terminal Blocks
View
X31
42
Pin
Signal
Number
1
Digital Output # 1
101
2
Digital Output # 2
102
3
Digital Output # 3
103
4
Digital Output # 4
104
5
Digital Output # 5
105
6
Digital Output # 6
106
7
Digital Output # 7
107
8
Digital Output # 8
108
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.6 Digital Outputs
Connection details on the digital outputs of the JetControl 24x controller are shown
in Fig. 8.
The 0 V terminal strip to which the 0 V signal is applied is located in the switch
cabinet.
Fig. 8: External circuit of the digital outputs 3 and 5
5.6.4
Numbering System of Digital Outputs
Located on Expansion Modules
Numbering system of digital outputs
Digital Output JX2-OD8
Module Position Number
Output 1
Module position * 100 +1
Output 2
Module position * 100 +2
...
...
Output 8
Module position * 100 + 8
First non-intelligent expansion module Module slot = 2
Jetter AG
43
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
JetWeb
5.7
Serial Interfaces
The JetControl 24x controller is equipped with two serial interfaces (JC-241 only 1
interface), each providing either a RS-232 or a RS-422 interface. For each interface
(Ser1 or Ser2) either RS-422 or RS-232 can be used.
These interfaces serve for communication between JC-24x controller and PC on
which the JetSym programming tool is installed. But also for connecting controller
and HMI.
RS-422 Ser1 and Ser2 (8-pin miniature DIN jack)
Ser1 or Ser2 Jack
8
7
5
6
4
2
3
1
Pin
Signal
Comment
1
RDA
RS-422
2
GND
Ground
3
RDB
RS-422
4
-
RS-232
5
SDB
RS-422
6
DC 24 V
Power Supply for User
Interface
7
SDA
RS-422
8
-
RS-232
RS-232 Ser1 and Ser2 (8-pin miniature DIN jack)
Ser1 or Ser2 Jack
8
7
5
2
44
6
4
1
3
Pin
Signal
Comment
1
-
RS-422
2
GND
Ground
3
-
RS-422
4
RXD
RS-232
5
-
RS-422
6
DC 24 V
Power Supply for User
Interface
7
-
RS-422
8
TxD
RS-232
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.8 Ethernet Interface
5.8
Ethernet Interface
5.8.1
Connecting to the RJ45 Jack
The JetControl 24x is connected to the Ethernet through its RJ45 jack.
There are two types of interconnecting cables used for 10/100 MBit/s twisted pair
Ethernet.
•
•
Straight-through twisted pair cables
Crossover cables (transmitting and receiving lines are crossed)
LED
LED
LNK
ACT
X51
Fig. 9: Ethernet Connection
LEDs of RJ45 Ethernet Jack
Designation
Function
ACT
Activity: The JetControl 24x controller is
transmitting or receiving signals via
Ethernet
LNK
Linkage: The JetControl 24x controller
is linked with an Ethernet
Note!
LED "LNK" lits green:
The correct cable has been used as connection between Ethernet network and
JetControl 24x.
LED "ACT" lits yellow:
JetControl 24x is transmitting data via Ethernet.
Jetter AG
45
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
JetWeb
There are two types of interconnecting cables used for 10/100 MBit/s twisted pair
Ethernet.
•
•
Straight-through twisted pair cables
Crossover cables (transmitting and receiving lines are crossed)
5.8.2
Connection between JetControl 24x and
PC
Direct connection between a PC and a JetControl 24x is established by means of a
crossover cable.
Fig. 10: Ethernet Connection between PC and JetControl
5.8.3
Connection between JetControl 24x,
switch and PC
If connection between a PC and a JetControl 24x is established through a switch,
then straight-through cables have to be used.
Fig. 11: Ethernet Connection between JetControl and Switch
46
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.8 Ethernet Interface
5.8.4
Connection via Several Switches
The switches have to be interconnected by means of crossover cables. The
connections between JetControl and switch, as well as between PC and switch have
to be made through straight-through cables.
Fig. 12: Ethernet Connection Switch to switch
Terminals have to be interconnected by means of crossover cables:
•
•
•
•
Note!
PC to PC
JetControl to PC
JetControl to JetControl
etc.
Terminals with infrastructure components (e.g. switch) have to be
interconnected via straight-through cables:
•
•
•
PC to switch
JetControl to switch
etc.
Infrastructure components have to be interconnected by means of
crossover cables:
•
•
•
Jetter AG
Switch to switch
Switch to router
etc.
47
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
JetWeb
As in most cases connections are established between an infrastructural
component and a terminal, switches/hubs are provided with an uplink port. An
uplink port allows to connect two infrastructural components using a straightthrough cable. Thus, the uplink port eliminates the need for a special crossover
cable. On some switches/hubs a switch is used to toggle the uplink port between
straight-through and crossover cable.
Note!
If the proper cable is not available, the uplink port of a switch/hub can be used.
Some devices are provided with an automatic crossover function which ensures
automatic adjustment to the cable and distant station.
48
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.9 Status LEDs, Mode Selector
5.9
Status LEDs, Mode Selector
5.9.1
LEDs
Fig. 13: Status LEDs
Status LEDs
5 V (green)
Supply voltage for the logic circuit is OK
24 V (green)
Supply voltage for the digital output driver is OK
ERR (red)
Error - error description in register 2008 (chapter 12.3
"OS Error Messages", page 238).
RUN (green)
Operating system is running
LED - OS Boot Sequence
No
LED
ERR = red
RUN=
Meaning
green
Jetter AG
1
red
Boot loader is checking the validity of the initial program
loader
2
red, green
Program loader is copied from flash memory to RAM
3
both OFF
The program loader is launched in the RAM
4
red
Program loader is checking the validity of the OS
5
red, green
The OS is unzipped and copied to RAM
6
both OFF
The OS is launched in the RAM
7
red
Initialization of the OS is started
8a
green,
flashing
Switch set to STOP
OS is okay, but application program halted
8b
green,
flashing;
increased
blinking
rate
Switch set to RUN
OS is okay, startup delay (register 2032) is elapsing,
application program is being checked
49
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
JetWeb
LED - OS Boot Sequence
9b
green
Switch set to RUN
red is
flashing
brightly
OS is okay, but there is no valid application program to be
executed.
green, lit
OS is okay, application program is being executed
LED - Error Messages
Following power-up the red LED (ERR)
and the green LED (RUN) are flashing
The switch is in LOAD position
Boot loader is running
OS will not be checked and launched.
Following power-up the red LED (ERR)
flashes 3 times, then both LEDs (red =
ERR, green = RUN) are flashing.
The switch is in RUN or STOP position.
Boot loader is running
There is no valid OS.
The red LED (ERR) and the green LED
(RUN) are flashing alternately during
runtime
Serious OS error
The red LED (ERR) is lit during OS
runtime
Error. The error description is given in
register 2008 (chapter 12.3 "OS Error
Messages", page 238).
The current state of the LED can be queried in register 10182.
5.9.2
The Mode Selector
When the control system is powered-up the position of the mode selector is scanned.
Fig. 14: Positions of toggle switch S21 (mode selector)
This switch serves two purposes. The first is to set the start-up behavior of the
controller. The second is to format the flash disk.
50
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.9 Status LEDs, Mode Selector
Start-up Process
Mode Selector
Position
Meaning
LOAD
The boot process proceeds as far as to
the initial program loader
STOP
The application program is not started
RUN
The application program is started
After power-up the switch has no influence to the controller functions. The current
position of the switch can be scanned in register 10181.
Formatting the Flash Disk
Sometimes it might be necessary to reformat the flash disk. This process can be
initiated by entering value 29547 into register 2936 followed by switching off the
controller and switching it on again. Or by changing over the switch during the boot
process:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Switch the controller off.
Set switch to STOP position.
Switch the controller on.
As soon as the LED ERR (red) is lit, set switch to LOAD position.
Wait until LED RUN (green) is lit as well.
Wait until both of the LEDs go out.
Wait until both of the LEDs go on again.
Set switch to RUN position within 0.5 seconds.
If the switch is set to the RUN position within 0.5 seconds, the green LED (RUN) goes
off. The red LED (ERR) will be lit until the flash disk is cleared (time depends on how
full the disk is: approx. 2 to 10 s). Next, the LED RUN starts blinking and the LED
ERR is lit to indicate that no application program was found.
If the switch was set to the RUN position too late, the LED RUN will not go off. In this
case, please start from point 1 again.
Jetter AG
51
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
5.10
JetWeb
Setting the IP Address
There are 4 ways to assign an IP address to a JetControl 24x. The actually used IP
address can be read out of register 2931.
5.10.1 Permanent IP address
If all three address switches are set to "0" when the controller is switched on, IP
address 192.168.10.15 is assigned to the JetControl.
In case of any uncertainties with regard to the IP address used, you can use this
"loophole" to set the JetControl to a defined state.
5.10.2 IP address from the configuration
memory
If all three address switches are set to "F" when the controller is switched on, the IP
address stored in the configuration memory is assigned to the JetControl.
The configuration memory can be accessed via the configuration file "/System/
cfgvar.ini" or via registers 10131 through 10145 and 10200 through 10219.
Configuration File
To gain access to the configuration file "/System/cfgvar.ini" via FTP the user must
have administrator rights.
This file has the same structure as a Windows *.INI file:
[CFGVAR]
Version
IP_Address
IP_SubNetMask
IP_DefGateway
BasePort
IP_DNS
HostNameType
HostName
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
5
192.128. 10. 97
255.255.255. 0
192.128. 10. 1
50000
192.118.210.209
1
JetControl24x
In no case, do not change the version number.
Important!
52
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.10 Setting the IP Address
Register(s)
Registers 10131 through 10145 and 10200 through 10219 provide an alternative way
of accessing the configuration memory.
To gain access to the configuration file via registers, first of all, the password value
2002149714 (0x77566152) has to be loaded into password register 10159. Then,
registers 10132 through 10145 and 10200 through 10219 are modified. Finally, the
changes to the configuration memory have to be saved by entering an arbitrary value
into register 10100.
Register(s)
Value used in
the example
10100
Saving the configuration values
10131
Version number
5
10132
IP address, MSB
192
10133
IP address, 3SB
128
10134
IP address, 2SB
10
10135
IP address, LSB
97
10136
Subnet mask, MSB
255
10137
Subnet mask, 3SB
255
10138
Subnet mask, 2SB
255
10139
Subnet mask, LSB
0
10140
Default Gateway, MSB
192
10141
Default Gateway, 3SB
128
10142
Default Gateway, 2SB
10
10143
Default Gateway, LSB
1
10144
Port number of JetIP server
10145
IP address of DNS server
10159
Password
10200
HostNameType
10201 through
10219
Jetter AG
Meaning
HostName
(Format of a text variable)
50000
0xC076D2D1
(192.118.210.209)
2002149714
(0x77566152)
1
JetControl24x
53
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
JetWeb
Do not change the version number contained in register 10131.
Important!
5.10.3 IP address based on the rotary switch
position
With all other address switch positions differing from the above mentioned settings
the IP address is taken from the configuration memory to create the IP address. Then
the three least significant nibbles are replaced by the values resulting from the
positions of the rotary switches.
The IP address of a JetControl 24x is structured as follows:
Fig. 15: IP Address Pattern
•
•
•
•
54
The two first octets (192.168) and the high-order nibble of the third octet are taken
over from the configuration memory.
The low-order nibble of the third octet is set by means of the rotary switch "High"
(value range: 0 through 15).
The high-order nibble of the fourth octet is set by means of the rotary switch "Mid"
(value range: 0 through 15).
The low-order nibble of the fourth octet is set by means of the rotary switch "Low"
(value range: 0 through 15).
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.10 Setting the IP Address
Example 1: Determining the IP address resulting from the rotary
switch positions
Convert the value of the rotary switch "High" into a decimal value. Then multiply the
value of the rotary switch "Mid" by 16 and add it to the value of the rotary switch
"Low".
(The hexadecimal value A corresponds to the decimal value 10, B = 11, C = 12, D =
13, E = 14, and F = 15)
Fig. 16: Determining the IP address resulting from the rotary switch positions
Example 2: Setting a specific IP address
The two last octets of the IP address 192.168.10.78 are to be converted into a
hexadecimal value.
Decimal/Hexadecimal Conversion
Dec
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
0
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
4
1
5
Hex
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
W
C
D
E
F
Conversion of the 3rd octet is carried out using the above table:
10 dec -> A hex -> the rotary switch "High" has to be set to position "A"
Decimal numbers greater than 15 are converted according to the following example
for the 4th octet:
78 : 16 = 4,... -> Turn rotary switch "Mid" to position 4
78 - (4 x 16) = 14
Jetter AG
55
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
JetWeb
The decimal number 14 is converted according to the table above:
14 dec -> E hex -> The rotary switch "Low" has to be turned to position "E"
192 . 168 . 10 . 78
In decimal notation
octets 3 and 4 are:
78
10
10 dec is A hex
78 : 16 = 4,... -> Switch “Mid” in position 4
78 - (4 x 16) = 14 Switch “Low” in position E
High
192 . 168 . 0
Mid
=A
Switch position (hex):
1
0
1
High
0
Low
=4
.
0
1
0
0
Mid
=E
1
1 1
0
Low
Fig. 17: Setting a specific IP address
To create the IP address, the rotary switch positions are read in once during the boot
process.
The current rotary switch setting can be read from register 10180.
5.10.4 IP Address via special function
The IP address of the controller carrying out the function can be modified via special
function 122 with the controller running. When this function has been completed
without errors, the new IP address can be read out of register 2931.
However, the configuration file "/System/cfg_var.ini" or registers 10132 and 10135
are not affected by this function (the rotary switches for setting the address have not
been switched neither), so that after the next reboot the settings defined here will be
activated again.
SYSTEM FUNCTION 122
56
Declaration
SYSTEMFUNCTION (122, InReg, OutReg)
Parameter
InReg: Number of the register containing the new IP
address.
Return values
OutReg: Number of the register to which the result will be
stored.
= 0: No error
> 0: Error
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.11 Switch-on delay
Since this function directly accesses the interface on a low level, it should only be
activated during times when no network communication takes place. Failure to
do so may result in data loss.
Important!
5.11
Switch-on delay
Register 2032: ON Delay
Function
Description
Read
Actual ON delay, resolution 100 ms
Write
New ON delay value
Value range
10 .. 600
Value after reset
Latest set value
The ON delay function ensures that the JetControl 24x waits a defined time period
before it initializes the system bus, and starts the application program. This delay
time is set in steps of 100 ms in register 2032.
Example 3: On delay via register 2032
A value of 60 in register 2032 means that the JetControl 24x will wait 6 seconds
before initializing the system bus.
Note!
•
•
•
Jetter AG
If modules connected to the system bus require a certain time until they get
initialized, the ON delay via register 2032 provides the necessary delay time.
If JX-SIO modules are connected to the system bus, we recommend to set
register 2032 to the value of 60.
A flashing RUN LED indicates that the delay time caused by ON delay is
running. With advancing delay time the flashing intervals become shorter and
shorter.
57
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
5.12
JetWeb
Interface Cables
5.12.1 Overview of interface cables
•
Programming cable JN-PK-5m for JetControl:
Length 5 m:
•
•
•
58
Article # 60860013
HMI cable JN-DK-Xm between JetControl 24x and HMI models LCD 110, LCD
16, LCD 23, LCD 25, LCD 27, as well as LCD 34:
Length 2.5 m:
Cable assy # 192 2,5 m
Article # 60860011
Length 5 m:
Cable assy # 193 5 m
Article # 60860012
HMI cable KAY_0386-xxxx between JetControl 24x and HMI model LCD 60:
Length 2.5 m:
KAY_0386-0250
Article # 60864359
Length 5 m:
KAY_0386-0500
Article # 60864360
HMI cable adaptor KAY_0533-0025 for LCD 52, LCD 54 and LCD 54Z:
Length 25 cm:
•
Cable assy # 196 5M
KAY_0533-0025
Article # 60864897
Jetter system bus connecting cable:
Length 0.2
m:
Cable assy # 530 0.2 m
Article # 10309001
Length 0.5
m:
Cable assy # 530 0.5 m
Article # 10309002
Length 1.0
m:
Cable assy # 530 1.0 m
Article # 10309003
Length 1.5
m:
Cable assy # 530 1.5 m
Article # 10309004
Length 2.0
m:
Cable assy # 530 2.0 m
Article # 10309006
Length 2.5
m:
Cable assy # 530 2.5 m
Article # 10309016
Length 3.0
m:
Cable assy # 530 3.0 m
Article # 10309015
Length 4.0
m:
Cable assy # 530 4.0 m
Article # 10309007
Length 5.0
m:
Cable assy # 530 5.0 m
Article # 10309008
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.12 Interface Cables
5.12.2 Programming Cable JN-PK-5m
Specification of Connectors
On the controller side
• 8-pin miniature DIN connector (male), type: KMDLA - 8P by KYCON
• Allowed conductor size: 0.128 - 0.051 mm2
On the PC side
• 9-pin female SUB-D connector in metallized housing (quality grade 3).
• Allowed conductor size: 0.25 - 0.128 mm2
Connecting Cable Specifications
•
•
•
•
Number of cores: 3
Core cross-sectional area: 0.14 mm2
Cable length: 5 m
Max. cable length: 15 m
Cable Shielding
•
•
Complete shielding, no paired shielding
The shield must be connected to the connector housings on both ends of the
cable with the greatest possible surface area (shield twisted, clamped under the
strain relief clamps, and wrapped with copper foil).
Programming Cable JN-PK-5m
Controller
Shield
PC
SER1, SER2
COM 1, COM 2
Connect shield with the greatest
possible surface area!
Use metallized housing only!
Pin
Signal
Pin
8
TxD
RXD
2
4
RXD
TxD
3
2
GND
5
On the PC side (COM1, COM2), pins 7 and 8, as well as pins 1, 4 and 6 must be
short-circuited.
Jetter AG
59
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
JetWeb
5.12.3 HMI Cable JN-DK-Xm
Specification of Connectors
On the controller side
• 8-pin miniature DIN connector (male)
Type: KMDLA - 8P
By: KYCON
• Allowed conductor size: 0.128 - 0.051 mm2
On the user interface side
• 15-pin male SUB-D connector in metallized housing (quality grade 3).
• Allowed conductor size: 0.25 - 0.128 mm2
Connecting Cable Specifications
•
•
•
•
Number of cores: 6
Core cross-sectional area: 0.14 mm2
Cable length: X m
Max. cable length: 400 m
Cable Shielding
•
•
60
Complete shielding, no paired shielding
The shield must be connected to the connector housings on both ends of the
cable with the greatest possible surface area (shield twisted, clamped under the
strain relief clamps, and wrapped with copper foil).
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.12 Interface Cables
User Interface Cable JN-DK-Xm
Controller
Shield
User Interface
SER1, SER2
Connect shield with the greatest
possible surface area!
Use metallized housing only!
Pin
Signal
Pin
6
DC +24 V
15
2
GND
12
5
SDB
RDB
6
7
SDA
RDA
7
3
RDB
SDB
4
1
RDA
SDA
5
Note!
It is recommended to buy the cables from Jetter AG.
5.12.4 User Interface Cable KAY_0386-xxxx
Specification of Connector/Socket
On the controller side
• 8-pin miniature DIN connector (male)
Type: KMDLA - 8P
By: KYCON
• Allowed conductor size: 0.128 - 0.051 mm2
Jetter AG
61
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
JetWeb
On the user interface side
• 15-pin female SUB-D connector in metallized housing (quality grade 3).
• Allowed conductor size: 0.25 - 0.128 mm2
Connecting Cable Specifications
•
•
•
•
Number of cores: 5
Core cross-sectional area: 0.14 mm2
Cable length: xxxx cm
Max. cable length: 400 m
Cable Shielding
•
•
Complete shielding, no paired shielding
The shield must be connected to the connector housings on both ends of the
cable with the greatest possible surface area (shield twisted, clamped under the
strain relief clamps, and wrapped with copper foil).
HMI Cable KAY_0386-xxxx
Controller
Shield
LCD 60
SER1, SER2
COM 2
Connect shield with the greatest
possible surface area!
Use metallized housing only!
Pin
Signal
Pin
1
RDA
SDA
14
2
GND
GND
5
3
RDB
SDB
15
5
SDB
RDB
13
7
SDA
RDA
12
short-circuited
62
[
11
10
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.12 Interface Cables
5.12.5 User Interface Cable KAY_0533-0025
The user interfaces LCD 52, LCD 54, and LCD 54Z are equipped with a nondetachable cable connecting the LCD with the controller. On the controller side, this
cable has a 15-pin male SUB-D connector. For connecting the user interface to the
8-pin Mini-DIN socket of the JC-24x (SER1 port) a cable adapter is required.
Specification of Connector/Socket
On the controller side
• 8-pin miniature DIN connector (male)
Type: KMDLA - 8P
By: KYCON
• Allowed conductor size: 0.128 - 0.051 mm2
On the user interface side
• 15-pin female SUB-D connector in metallized housing (quality grade 3).
• Allowed conductor size: 0.25 - 0.128 mm2
Connecting Cable Specifications
•
•
•
Number of cores: 6
Core cross-sectional area: 0.14 mm2
Cable length: 25 cm
Cable Shielding
•
•
Jetter AG
Complete shielding, no paired shielding
The shield must be connected to the connector housings on both ends of the
cable with the greatest possible surface area (shield twisted, clamped under the
strain relief clamps, and wrapped with copper foil).
63
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
JetWeb
Cable adapter for connecting a LCD 52, LCD 54, and
LCD 54Z
Controller
Shield
LCD Cable
Connect shield with the greatest
possible surface area!
Use metallized housing only!
Pin
Signal
Pin
6
DC +24 V
4
2
GND
7
5
SDB
RDB
10
7
SDA
RDA
11
3
RDB
SDB
12
1
RDA
SDA
13
Note!
It is recommended to buy the cable adapter from Jetter AG.
64
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.12 Interface Cables
5.12.6 Jetter System Bus Cable
Specification of Connectors
On the controller side
• 9-pin male SUB-D connector in metallized housing (quality grade 3).
• Diameter of the cable apt for connecting: 0.25 - 0.60 mm2
On the opposite side of the cable
• 9-pin female SUB-D connector in metallized housing (quality grade 3).
• Diameter of the cable apt for connecting: 0.25 - 0.60 mm2
System Bus Cable Specification
The following minimum requirements apply to the manufacture of the system bus
cable:
System Bus Cable - Technical Data
Function
Core cross-sectional
area
Jetter AG
Description
1 MBaud:
0.25 - 0.34 mm2
500 kBaud:
0.34 - 0.50 mm2
250 kBaud:
0.34 - 0.60 mm2
125 kBaud:
0.50 - 0.60 mm2
Cable capacitance
maximum 60 pF/m
Resistivity
1 MBaud:
maximum 70 Ω /km
500 kBaud:
maximum 60 Ω /km
250 kBaud:
maximum 60 Ω /km
125 kBaud:
maximum 60 Ω /km
Number of cores
5
Shield
Complete shielding, no paired shielding
Twisting
Core pair CL and CH twisted.
65
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
JetWeb
Allowed cable lengths
Baud Rate
Max. cable
length
Max. tap line
length
Max. overall tap
line length
1 MBaud
30 m
0.3 m
3m
500 kBaud
100 m
1m
39 m
250 kBaud
200 m
3m
78 m
125 kBaud
200 m
-
-
Note!
•
•
66
The maximum cable length depends on the baud rate used and the number of
modules connected to the bus.
When calculating the maximum line length, please take into account that each
module connected to the bus reduces the cable length by approx. 1 m.
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
5.12 Interface Cables
System bus cable of cable confection # 530
Shield
Jetter AG
BUS-OUT
Connect shield with the greatest
possible surface area!
Use metallized housing only!
BUS-IN
Pin
Signal
Pin
1
CMODE0
1
2
CL
2
3
GND
3
4
CMODE1
4
5
TERM (not connected)
5
6
Unassigned
6
7
CH
7
8
Unassigned
8
9
Do not connect
9
67
5 Installing the JetControl 24x
JetWeb
68
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.1 Addressing Digital Inputs and Outputs
6
Software Programming
For a more detailed description of the programming language, including sample
programs, refer to JetSym online help.
6.1
Addressing Digital Inputs and
Outputs
6.1.1
Basic Controller
Numbering of the Inputs on the Basic Controller
Input
Number
Input # 1
101
Input # 2
102
...
...
Input # 16
116
Numbering of the Outputs on the Basic Controller
6.1.2
Output
Number
Output 1
101
Output 2
102
...
...
Output 8
108
Expansion module JX2-I/O
The address is made up of the module number and the number of the respective
input or output.
Jetter AG
69
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Coding of the Input / Output Number:
Fig. 18: Coding of Inputs and Outputs of JX2-I/O modules
Note!
For determination of the module number, the digital input or output modules are
being counted. Intelligent modules, such as JX2-SV1, JX2-SM2, JX2-PID1
modules, etc., located among the digital input and output modules, are not being
taken into consideration.
Module no. 1 is assigned to the basic controller. Starting from there, the module
numbers are being counted left to right.
Basically, the granularity is 16. That means, for example, that a JX2-OD8 module
occupies 16 logical outputs, despite it provides only 8 physical ones.
Example 4: Configuration consisting of digital input and output
modules only
The table below shows the input/output numbering for a basic controller with two
JX2-ID 8 modules and one JX2-OD 8 output module, arranged as follows:
JetControl
24x Basic
Controller
Output
module
JX2-OD8
Input
module
JX2-ID8
Input
module
JX2-ID8
Module # 1
Module # 2
Module # 3
Module # 4
Input 101 ... 116
Outputs 101 .. 108
Output
201 .. 208
Input
301 .. 308
Input
401 .. 408
Example 5: Configuration consisting of one JX2-SV1
Basic controller with one intelligent expansion module JX2-SV1, one digital input
module JX2-ID8, and one digital output module JX2-OD8.
70
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.1 Addressing Digital Inputs and Outputs
JetControl
24x Basic
Controller
Output
module
JX2-OD8
Servo
module
JX2-SV1
Input
module
JX2-ID8
Module # 1
Module # 2
Module # 3
Module # 4
Output
201 .. 208
SV Module
! ! !
Input
301 .. 308
Input 101 .. 116
Outputs 101 .. 108
Note!
From Example 5: "Configuration consisting of one JX2-SV1", page 70 can be seen
that, for module numbering of the digital inputs and outputs, the module JX2-SV1
is not being taken into account.
6.1.3
I/O Access to Smart I/O Modules
The address is made up of the module number and the number of the respective
input or output. The module numbers 70 to 79 are assigned to the Smart IO modules.
These module numbers are set by DIP switches. Thereby the I/O numbers 7001 to
7964 result by following pattern:
Coding of the input or output numbers:
Fig. 19: Coding of Inputs and Outputs of Smart I/O modules
Important!
The same coding system applies to all third-party peripheral modules connected
to the Jetter system bus.
The allowed models of third-party peripheral modules are listed in chapter 11
"Topology of the Jetter System Bus", page 221.
Jetter AG
71
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Example 6: Configuration with one Smart I/O Module
X10
S41
X2
0 V +24 V
POWER
24 V 1 2
OUTPUT
X21
X22
X23
X24
X51
X31
UM
US
Jetter
RUN
CAN
MD
4
3 4 24 V
OUTPUT
3
2
2
X1
1
1
X1
5
6
A-OUT
5V
5
5
OUTPUT
6 7 8 0V
X2
10
8
JX2-SV1
9
6
7
4
1
8
2
3
Li+
LiPos
X
K1
K2
K0
24 V
JX-SIO
7
ENC
JX2-OD 8
JX2
X19
INPUT
Li+ Li- REF
X18
CH
CL
GND
120 Ω
X3
Fig. 20: Controller JC-24x with JX2 modules and one Smart I/O module
Basic controller with one intelligent expansion module JX2-SV1, one Smart I/O
module and one digital output module JX2-OD8.
Basic
Controller
Output
module
JX2-OD8
Servomodule
JX2-SV1
Smart I/O
Module
JX-SIO
Module # 1
Module # 2
Module # 3
Module # 70
Inputs and outputs
101 .. 108
Output
201 .. 208
SV Module
! ! !
Inputs and outputs
7001 .. 7064
6.1.4
Access to digital inputs/outputs using
registers
Digital inputs and outputs of JC-24x controller and of JX2-I/O
modules connected to the bus.
Fig. 21: Coding in case of I/O register mapping with JX2-I/O modules
72
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.2 Access to Flags
Digital inputs with Smart I/O modules and other third party
peripheral modules
Fig. 22: Coding in case of input register mapping with Smart I/O modules
Digital outputs with Smart I/O modules and other third party
peripheral modules
Fig. 23: Coding in case of output register mapping with Smart I/O modules
6.2
Access to Flags
6.2.1
Overview of Flags
Flags
Flag numbers
Meaning
Register
Mapping
Remanent?
0 .. 255
User Flags
2600 .. 2610
yes
256 .. 2047
User Flags
0 .. 74
yes
2048 .. 2303
Special Flags
2611 .. 2621
no
6.2.2
Jetter AG
User Flags
73
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Flags 0 through 255 are freely available to the user. These flags are mapped to
registers 2600 through 2610 such that whole flag ranges can be accessed through
registers. Logic operations with flag ranges are carried out using the wordprocessing instructions WAND, WOR, and WXOR.
Mapping of Flags
to Registers
*)
Register(s)
Flags
2600
0 - 23
2601
24 - 47
2602
48 - 71
2603
72 - 95
2604
96 - 119
2605
120 - 143
2606
144 - 167
2607
168 - 191
2608
192 - 215
2609
216 - 239
2610
240 - 255*)
Note!
Bits 16 through 23 of register 2610 are 0.
Example 7: Mapping of flags to registers
Mapping of flags to registers by the example of
register 2609
Bit #
0
1
2
3
4
...
21
22
23
Reg. 2609
1
0
0
0
1
...
0
1
0
216
217
218
219
220
...
237
238
239
Flags
74
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Programming by
Means of Flags
6.2 Access to Flags
Example 8: Programming by Means of Flags
A program is to start execution of a process when the start button is pressed and
automatic mode is enabled through the corresponding flag being set, e.g. in
another task.
JetSym
WHEN IN iStartButton AND Flag fAutomaticMode THEN
...
JetSym ST
WHEN biStartButton AND bfAutomaticMode CONTINUE;
...
Example 9: Programming by Means of Flags
Execution of a second task -- the automatic task -- is to be started in the main task
using a flag.
JetSym
TASK tMainTask
LABEL lMainTask
...
IF IN iStartButton THEN
Flag fAutomaticMode
...
THEN
GOTO lMainTask
TASK tAutomaticMode
LABEL lAutomaticMode
WHEN Flag fAutomaticMode THEN
...
THEN
GOTO lAutomaticMode
Jetter AG
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6 Software Programming
JetWeb
JetSym ST
TASK tMainTask
...
WHILE TRUE DO
...
IF biStartButton THEN
bfAutomaticMode := TRUE;
END_IF;
...
END_WHILE;
END_TASK;
TASK tAutomaticMode
...
LABEL lAutomaticMode
WHEN bfAutomaticMode CONTINUE;
...
GOTO lAutomaticMode
...
END_TASK;
76
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.3 Special Flags
6.3
Special Flags
The operating system of the JetControl 24x makes various special flags available
which can be used to control and modify functions.
The functions of these special flags are listed in the following table.
Note!
As a rule, setting a flag means enabling the corresponding function.
Exceptions are referred to separately.
Functions of Special Flags
Control of User Interface LEDs
2224
LED of
2230
LED of
2225
LED of
2231
LED of
2226
LED of
2232
LED of
2227
LED of
2233
LED of
2228
LED of
2234
LED of
2229
LED of
2235
LED of
Scanning User Interface Keys
(with the exception of LCD 27)
Jetter AG
2181
2201
2182
2202
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6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Functions of Special Flags
78
2183
2203
2184
2204
2185
2205
2186
2206
2187
2207
2188
2208
2189
2209
2190
2210
2191
2211
2192
2212
2193
2214
2194
2213
2195
2215
2196
2216
2197
2217
2198
2218
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.3 Special Flags
Functions of Special Flags
2199
2219
2221
2220
2223
2222
2170
2160
2171
2161
2172
2162
2173
2163
2174
2164
2175
2165
2176
2166
2177
2167
2178
2168
2179
2169
2200
LCD 27
2209
Jetter AG
2210
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6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Functions of Special Flags
2211
2212
LCD 16 - NUM 25
80
2186
2206
2187
2207
2188
2208
2189
2209
2190
2210
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.3 Special Flags
Functions of Special Flags
Display Format
2060
DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE hexadecimal
Special flags associated to the system bus
2048
Time-out of JX2-I/O or JX-SIO module
2049
Time-out of JX2-Slave Module
2050
Time-out with register access to a JX2-I/O Module
2059
Reading JX2-I/O input data after each task
2061
Reading out output states (not from RAM, but from the module).
2065
Output driver error signalling in register 2008 ON/OFF
2067
Fatal system bus error
2068
Accumulation of errors on the system bus
2270
Access to inactive JX-SIO module
2272
Access to an unknown JX-SIO register
2273
Access to a not supported JX-SIO register
2274
Time-out when monitoring a JX-SIO module
2275
JX-SIO has carried out an internal reset
2077
Prioritized CAN-PRIM reception
OS Special flags
2058
2072
JetIP communication prioritization
0=
JetIP instructions are processed on switching from the last
task to task 0.
1=
JetIP instructions are processed on each task switch
Stop in case of user program error
0=
The whole application program will be stopped
1=
Only the task in which the error occurred will be stopped
Value following reset: 0
2073
Stop in case of arithmetic error
0=
No stop in case of error
1=
Stop in case of error
Value following reset: 0
Jetter AG
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6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Functions of Special Flags
2074
Error in arithmetic
0=
No arithmetic error
1=
Arithmetic error, e.g. overflow, division by zero, etc.
Value following reset: 0
2075
Error in case of network access
0=
No network error
1=
Network error (see registers 2710/2711 or 2750/2751)
Value following reset: 0
2076
Carry bit with shift instructions
State of the register bit which has been shifted out last
Interface special flags
82
2088
Activity monitoring: OS flag - Ethernet
Value following reset: 0
2089
Activity monitoring: User flag - Ethernet
Value following reset: 0
2090
Activity monitoring: OS flag - SER1
Value following reset: 0
2091
Activity monitoring: User flag - SER1
Value following reset: 0
2092
Activity monitoring: OS flag - SER2
Value following reset: 0
2093
Activity monitoring: User flag - SER2
Value following reset: 0
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.4 Description of Registers/Variables
6.4
Description of Registers/Variables
6.4.1
Overview of registers/variables
Variables / Registers
Address / Register
number
Jetter AG
Meaning
Remanent?
0 .. 1999
Integer user register/
variable
yes
2000 .. 2999
Special Register
No (yes)
3000 .. 3249
Registers on nonintelligent modules
no
4000 .. 4367
I/O mapping
no
5000 .. 5999
JX-SIO input registers
no
6000 .. 6999
JX-SIO output registers
no
7000 .. 7999
JX-SIO special registers
no
8000 .. 8999
I/O mapping with remote
scan
no
10000 .. 10099
Serial Interfaces
no
10100 .. 10299
Configuration Registers
No (yes)
10300 .. 10499
I/O mapping with
EtherNet/IP
no
10500 .. 10599
User-programmable
CAN Interface
no
12100 .. 17499
Registers of intelligent
modules
no
20000 .. 49999
User registers/variables
(integer or floating point)
yes
65024 .. 65279
Floating point user
register/variable
yes
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6 Software Programming
6.4.2
JetWeb
Coding of Register Numbers
In this chapter coding of register numbers for modules connected to the Jetter
system bus is shown.
JX2-I/O modules
Fig. 24: Coding of register numbers for JX2-I/O modules
Smart I/O module
Fig. 25: Coding of register numbers of the Smart I/O module
To the following third-party peripheral modules the coding pattern given in Fig. 25
applies:
– Smart I/O Module
– Festo CPX Terminals
– WAGO I/O-System 750
– Lenze Frequency Inverter 8200 vector
– Milan Drives by Werner Riester GmbH
– Vacon NX Frequency converter
– Ecostep Drives 100-..., 200-... and 216-...
84
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.4 Description of Registers/Variables
Lumberg LJX7-CSL-... modules
Fig. 26: Coding of register numbers for LJX7-CSL-... modules
To the following third-party peripheral modules the coding pattern given in Fig. 26
applies:
– Lumberg LJX7-CSL-... modules
– SI Unit EX120 and EX250 by SMC Pneumatik GmbH
– Festo CPV-Direct
– Buerkert valve terminal type 8640
– maxon position controller EPOS 24/1
JX2-Slave module
Fig. 27: Coding of register numbers for JX2-Slave modules
JetMove 2xx
Fig. 28: Coding of JetMove 2xx register numbers
For more information refer to the manual coming with the JX2-... and Smart I/O
module, as well as to the user information on JetMove products and third-party
peripheral modules.
Jetter AG
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6 Software Programming
JetWeb
6.4.3
User-specific variables/registers
In the address range from 0 through 1999 remanent integer variables/registers are
available to the user as memory for storing comparative, measuring or set values.
For storing floating point numbers remanent variables/registers ranging from 65024
through 65279 can be used. The variables ranging from 20000 through 49999, which
are also remanent, can be used to store integers or floating point numbers. To switch
between these two function the remanent special register 2909 is used.
•
•
•
Integer variables/registers are 32 bits wide and have got a value range from
+2,147,483,647 through -2,147,483,648.
Floating point or integer variables/registers are also 32 bits wide and have got a
value range from ±(1.2x10-38 through 3.4x1038).
In JetSym ST, a value is assigned to a variable using the operator ":=". Using the
instruction REGISTER_LOAD a value is assigned to a register.
Note!
The contents of the 32256 integer/floating point user registers/variables are
maintained when the JetControl 24x is switched off.
6.4.4
Switching between integer/floating point
registers
The remanent variables/registers in the address range from 20000 through 49999
can be used as integer variables/registers, or as floating point variables/registers. In
the remanent special register 2909 the user can set the variable's address/register's
number starting from which variable/register contents are regarded as floating point
numbers.
Example 10: Setting the floating point register range
User variables/registers starting from number 35000 are to be treated as floating
point variables/registers.
86
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.4 Description of Registers/Variables
0
1999
Integer
20000
Integer
2909
35000
34999
35000
Floating Point
49999
65024
65279
Floating Point
Fig. 29: Partitioning integer/floating point user variables/registers
Note!
When "switching" between integer/floating point variables/registers, or vice
versa, the contents of the memory cells remain unchanged. Merely the kind how
they are interpreted changes.
Register 2909: First floating point register / variable
Function
Read
Description
Number of the first floating point register / address of the first
floating point variable
Value following reset: Address / register number set last
Write
Defining the beginning of the floating point register range:
•
•
Value range
Jetter AG
With a value less than 20000 the value 20000 is entered
into the register
With a value greater than 49999 the value 65024 is entered
into the register
20000 .. 65024
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6 Software Programming
6.4.5
JetWeb
Programming by Means of Registers
JetSym
The instruction:
REGISTER_LOAD (x, a)
is for loading numeric values or contents of other registers into a register.
In the instruction above, "x" represents the number of the register, into which the
value "a" is to be written by analogy with Fig. 30 and Fig. 31.
Fig. 30: REGISTER_LOAD with
numeric parameters
Fig. 31: REGISTER_LOAD with
symbolic parameters
JetSym ST
Using the assignment operator ":=" the numerical value is stored to the specified
register.
Fig. 32: Assigning a constant to a variable (JetSym ST)
88
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.4 Description of Registers/Variables
The numerical value "123456789" is loaded into the variable located at 100
("Register 100"). Then, the numerical value "9.8765 10-7" is loaded into the floating
point variable located at 65024 ("Register 65024"). Then, value "-12345" is assigned
to "register 100".
Indirect and Double Indirect Addressing
JetSym
Not only a number can be written for the "x" and the "a" in the above instruction above
but a register can be specified as well. To do so, prefix an “@“ to the register number
by pressing the space key.
If “@(y)“ is written instead of "x", then value "a" is written into the register the number
of which is contained in register "y".
If “@(b)“ is written instead of "a", then, not the value itself but the content of the
specified register is loaded into register "x" (or @(y)).
If “@@(b)“ is written instead of "a", the result is as follows: First, the value of the
register with number b is read.
REGISTER_LOAD (x, @@b)
This value then serves as register number. This means, a new value is read in the
register with the specified number, and then stored to register "x".
Fig. 33: Indirect and Double Indirect Addressing (JetSym)
JetSym ST
With JetSym ST, for this purpose the address operator "&" and the pointer operator
"@" are used.
Fig. 34: Indirect and Double Indirect Addressing (JetSym ST)
Jetter AG
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6 Software Programming
JetWeb
First, the address of the variable "IVarInt2" (here: 20010) is assigned to the variable
"IVarInt1". Then, the content of "IVarInt2" is copied to "IVarInt1". Then, the content
of the "register", to which "IVarInt2" is pointing (the number of which is contained in
"IVarInt2"), is copied to "IVarInt1". Finally, the content of the "register", to which
"IVarInt2" is pointing is copied to register, to which "IVarInt1" is pointing.
Example 11: Loading a number into a register
JetSym
REGISTER_LOAD (rNewPosition, 1280)
JetSym ST
rNewPosition := 1280;
Value 1280 is loaded into the register rNewPosition.
Example 12: Copying one register into another register
JetSym
REGISTER_LOAD (rVoltage, @rVoltage1)
JetSym ST
rVoltage := rVoltage1;
The value which is contained in the register rVoltage1 will be
loaded into register rVoltage. In other words, the contents of
register rVoltage1 is copied into register rVoltage.
Example 13: Loading by means of double indirect addressing
JetSym
REGISTER_LOAD (rVoltage, @@rVPointer)
JetSym ST
rVoltage := @@rVPointer;
The value of the register, the number of which is specified in the
register rVPointer, is loaded into register rVoltage.
90
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.4 Description of Registers/Variables
Example 14: Double Indirect Addressing Numerical example
Register Number
Value
REG 64
111
REG 111
70035
REG 150
11
REG 11
Any value
This example will be carried out using the following instruction:
JetSym
REGISTER_LOAD (@150, @@64)
JetSym ST
VAR
pDestination: INT AT %VL 150;
pSource: INT AT %VL 64;
END_VAR;
@pDestination := @pSource;
This instruction results in the following register values and the
graphic representation shown in Fig. 35:
Register 64 = 111
remains unchanged
Register 111 = 70035
remains unchanged
Register 150 = 11
remains unchanged
Register 11 = @150
@150
REG 150
11
REG
11
= @@64 =
@111 = 70035
@@64
REG
64
111
REG 111
Arbitrary
70035
Value
70035
will be
copied to
register 11
Fig. 35: Example for Double Indirect Addressing with JetSym
Jetter AG
91
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
6.4.6
Calculations by Means of Registers
For forming expressions, in JetSym and JetSym ST the arithmetical operators for the
4 basic arithmetical operations (+, -, *, /), and the operators for bit-wise
interconnection of registers (WAND, WOR, WXOR) are available.
Processing expressions
JetSym
Expressions are strictly processed from left to right (no "order of operation rule"). If a
specific order of operations is to be ensured, brackets have to be inserted manually.
JetSym ST
Here, multiplication, division and bit-wise AND relation are given priority over
addition, subtraction and bit-wise OR, and XOR relations. If there is no priority, the
expression is processed from left to right.
Note!
An operation is given priority by means of brackets which are automatically
inserted. This fact has to be taken into account when processing expressions
where floating point and integer values are mixed (for more information refer to
the next section).
Calculations of Floating Point / Integer Values
Basically, floating point and integer values and constants can be mixed within an
arithmetical expression. However, especially with value overruns or underruns the
principle of operation of the OS has to be taken into account:
•
Processing of an expression is always started as integer calculation. This means
that intermediate results of divisions are stored without decimal places.
•
When the first floating point register or floating point constant is encountered,
processing switches over to floating point operation. The remaining expression is
calculated using floating point values (integer values will also be converted).
•
With an opening bracket and a function call, the existing intermediate result, as
well as the calculation type are internally buffered, and the operating system
switches over to integer calculation.
•
With a closing bracket and when returning from a function, the OS resumes the
buffered calculation type.
When comparing arithmetical expressions, the calculation of the expression "on
the right side of the equals sign" is started as integer calculation, irrespective of
how the calculation of the expression "on the left side of the equals sign" has been
carried out.
•
92
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.4 Description of Registers/Variables
•
With an assignment, the calculation of the expression "on the right side of the
assignment operator" starts with the type of register (variable) to which the result
is to be assigned, provided the register (variable) is a local JetControl 24x register
(variable). Otherwise, an integer calculation starts.
•
When a floating point value is assigned to an integer register (integer variable),
the value is rounded to the next integer.
•
Operators for bit-wise relations may be used for integer calculations only.
Example 15: Value assignment with operations
JetSym
REG rResult = 12 / 5 * 2
JetSym ST
•
•
JetSym
rResult := 12 / 5 * 2;
If "rResult" is an integer register or a register located on an
expansion module, value 4 is assigned to it, since decimal places
are not taken into account with integer divisions.
If "rResult" is a local floating point register, calculations are
carried out using floating point values. Thus, the result, which is
assigned to the register, is 4.8.
REG rResult = 12.0 / 5 * 2
JetSym ST
•
•
rResult := 12.0 / 5 * 2;
If "rResult" is an integer register, the value 5 is assigned to it,
since the floating point constant causes a switchover to floating
point calculations. Then, the result of the calculation (4.8) is
rounded up as it is assigned to an integer register.
If "rResult" is a floating point register (local or located on an
expansion module), the value 4.8 is assigned.
JetSym
In JetSym the following instructions are used for calculations:
Jetter AG
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6 Software Programming
JetWeb
• REG <RegNo>
•
REGZERO <RegNo>
• REGDEC <RegNo>
• REGINC <RegNo>
• SHIFT_LEFT (<RegNo>, <BitNo>)
• SHIFT_RIGHT (<RegNo>, <BitNo>)
For all these instructions it is possible to indirectly specify the register number.
Fig. 36: Example of Register Arithmetic (JetSym)
Programming
Instruction REG
This instruction obtains direct access to the value of a register and can be dealt
with like a variable. In an output instruction, a certain value is assigned to the
register left to the equals sign. In an input condition, the content of a register is
read. In both cases, the register accesses right to the equals sign result in reading
the register content.
Example 16: Two examples for REG instruction
1. THEN
REG 1 = REG 105 * 25
In this example an assignment (output instruction) is shown, which is initiated by
THEN. Register 105 is read and its contents is multiplied by 25. The result of this
calculation is stored to register 1. The contents of register 105 will remain
unchanged.
2. IF REG 1 = REG 105 * 25 THEN
...
In this case, the expression REG 1 = REG 105 * 25 is not part of an output
instruction, but of an input condition. In this part of the program the value of register
1 remains unchanged. It will only be compared with the product REG 105 * 25.
ProgrammingInstr
uction REGZERO
94
This instruction obtains direct access to the value of a register and can be dealt
with like a variable. In an output instruction, value 0 is assigned to the register. In
an input condition, the content of the register is read and compared with 0.
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.4 Description of Registers/Variables
By using the instruction REGZERO a register value is set to 0, or a register is sensed
whether its value is 0:
REGZERO <RegNo>
Following IF or WHEN, this instruction, as an input condition, has the meaning being
explained in the example below:
Example: REGZERO compared with REG
IF REGZERO 49 THEN
...
IF REG 49 = 0 THEN
...
These two program parts have got the same function.
On the right-hand side of the example the comparison is carried out
as general arithmetic comparison. On the left-hand side of the
example the special instruction REGZERO is used.
The benefit of using REGZERO is that it speeds up program
execution.
Programming
Instructions
REGDEC and
REGINC
These two instructions serve for decreasing (decrementing) or increasing
(incrementing) a register value by 1. Such functions are frequently used in loops
to increase or decrease counters and pointers.
Example: REGDEC compared with REG
THEN
REGDEC 100
THEN
REG 100 = REG 100 - 1
These two program parts have got the same function. With both of
them, the value of register 100 is decremented by 1.
Example: REGINC compared with REG
THEN
REGINC 88
THEN
REG 88 = REG 88 + 1
These two program parts have got the same function. With both of
them, the value of register 88 is incremented by 1.
Example: REGDEC and REGZERO
REGISTER_LOAD (1, 10)
Jetter AG
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6 Software Programming
JetWeb
LABEL 55
...
REGDEC 1
IF REGZERO 1 THEN
...
ELSE
GOTO 55
THEN
This way, a loop can be realized which executes a certain number of
iterations. During each run of the loop, the value of the "counting
register" is decremented by one and is being checked whether it is 0
(REGZERO 1). If the register is 0, the instruction is carried out in the
THEN branch. The the program will exit the loop. If the value of
register 1 is not ZERO, the program will go back to the starting point
of the loop.
The instructions REGDEC and REGINC have the advantage of being more compact and
of significantly speeding up processing.
Programminginstr
uctions
SHIFT_LEFT and
SHIFT_RIGHT
These to instructions are used to shift all bits of a register by a user-definable
number of places to the right or left. Shifting a bit by one position corresponds to
a multiplication (_LEFT) or a division (_RIGHT) by 2.
These instructions are, for example, used to assign information to a part when
transporting it through a plant.
The bit shifted out of the register last can be read out of flag 2076.
Example 17: SHIFT_LEFT Instruction
THEN
SHIFT_LEFT (100, 3)
This example shows a way how to multiply the contents of register 100 by 8. This
approach has the advantage over an arithmetic expression of speeding up
processing.
Example 18: SHIFT_RIGHT Instruction
SHIFT_RIGHT (200, 1)
IF FLAG 2076 THEN
...
If these instructions are used in a loop, it is very easy to make execution of a
processing step conditional on the state of individual bits of register 200.
96
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.4 Description of Registers/Variables
JetSym ST
With JetSym ST the following instructions are available:
• DEC (<RegNo>)
• INC (<RegNo>)
• SHIFT_LEFT (<RegNo, BitNo>)
• SHIFT_RIGHT (<RegNo>, <BitNo>)
Fig. 37: Example of Register Arithmetic (JetSym ST)
Programming
Instruction DEC
and INC
These two instructions serve for decreasing (decrementing) or increasing
(incrementing) a register value by 1. Such functions are frequently used in loops
to increase or decrease counters and pointers.
Example 19: Examples of DEC and INC Instructions
Example: Comparison between DEC and arithmetic
expression
THEN
DEC (lCounter)
THEN
lCounter := lCounter - 1
These two program parts have got the same function. With both of
them, the content of variable 1Counter is decremented by 1.
Example: Comparison between INC and arithmetic
expression
Jetter AG
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6 Software Programming
JetWeb
THEN
INC (lCounter)
THEN
lCounter := lCounter + 1
These two program parts have got the same function. With both of
them, the content of variable 1Counter is incremented by 1.
Example: DEC
lCounter := 10;
WHILE lCounter DO
...
DEC (lCounter);
...
END_WHILE;
This way, a loop can be realized which executes a certain number of
iterations. At the beginning of the loop, a check is made whether the
"counting register" is unequal to "0". If this is the case, the
instructions within the loop are executed, the counter is decremented
by one and a jump to the beginning of the loop is made. Once the
counter is "0", the program starts to execute the instruction behind
"END_WHILE".
Note!
A loop with a certain number of cycles could also be programmed using the
instruction FOR.
98
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Programminginstr
uctions
SHIFT_LEFT and
SHIFT_RIGHT
6.4 Description of Registers/Variables
These to instructions are used to shift all bits of a register by a user-definable
number of places to the right or left. Shifting a bit by one position corresponds to
a multiplication (_LEFT) or a division (_RIGHT) by 2.
These instructions are, for example, used to assign information to a part when
transporting it through a plant.
The bit shifted out of the register last can be read out of flag 2076.
Example 20: SHIFT_LEFT Instruction
THEN
SHIFT_LEFT (lVar1, 3)
This example shows a way how to multiply the contents of "IVar1" by 8. This
approach has the advantage over an arithmetic expression of speeding up
processing.
Example 21: SHIFT_RIGHT Instruction
SHIFT_RIGHT (lDrill, 1)
IF bfCarry THEN
...
// flag 2076
If these instructions are used in a loop, it is very easy to make execution of a
processing step conditional on the state of individual bits of the variable "IDrill".
Jetter AG
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6 Software Programming
6.5
JetWeb
Special Registers
Special
registers
Function
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
Operating System and Error Messages
100
2000
Software version
1)
2)
0 .. 65.535
Version
2001
Status register
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
8
Page 236
2002
Run-time register: Runtime since
reset in units specified in register
2003.
1)
2)
-2.147.483.648 ..
+2.147.483.647
0
2003
Time base for DELAY, as well as
START-TIMER and TIMER-END? in
multiples of 10 ms.
1)
2)
0 .. 255
10 (100 ms)
2006
Cycle time of all tasks in ms
1)
2)
0 .. 255
Not defined
2008
Operating system error
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65.535
0
Page 238
2009
Number of erroneous task
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
255
Page 237
2010
Program address of the error for
internal use
1)
2)
0 .. 65535
65535
2032
ON delay in multiples of 100 ms
1)
2)
3)
10 .. 600
Last setting
chapter 5.11 "Switch-on
delay", page 57
2037
Run-time register: Runtime since
reset in milliseconds
1)
2)
-2.147.483.648 ..
+2.147.483.647
0
2909
Number of the first floating point
register
1)
2)
3)
20000 .. 65024
Last setting
Page 87
2960
Password for system commands:
1112502132 (0x424f6f74)
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 0xffffffff
0
Page 149
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.5 Special Registers
Special
registers
2961
Function
System command
104 =
Resetting the
remanent
settings to
factory setting
204 =
same as 104
plus deleting
the application
program and its
password
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 0xffffffff
0
Page 149
2962
Stored password for application
program
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 0xffffffff
0
Page 374
2963
Entered password for application
program
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 0xffffffff
0
Page 374
Application program
2022
Version number of the application
program in the RAM
2035
Size of the application program in
the RAM
1)
0 .. 65.535
2970
Application program creation date
- minute
1)
0 .. 59
2971
Application program creation date
- minute
1)
0 .. 23
2972
Application program creation date
- day
1)
1 .. 31
2973
Application program creation date
- month
1)
1 .. 12
2974
Application program creation date
- year
Interface Monitoring
Jetter AG
2955
Ethernet monitoring interval in
milliseconds
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65,535 (0 = OFF)
0
Page 346
2956
Monitoring Time SER1 in
milliseconds
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65,535 (0 = OFF)
0
Page 346
101
6 Software Programming
Special
registers
JetWeb
Function
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
2957
Monitoring Time SER2 in
milliseconds
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65,535 (0 = OFF)
0
Page 347
2710
Total number of errors on the
Ethernet interface
1)
2)
0 .. 2.147.483.647
0
2750
Task-specific number of errors on
the Ethernet interface
1)
2)
0 .. 2.147.483.647
0
10019
Number of errors on SER1
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 2.147.483.647
0
Page 207
10039
Number of errors on SER2
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 2.147.483.647
0
Page 207
System bus
102
2011
Time-out of JX2-I/O or JX-SIO
module
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
chapter 12.1 "Hardware
errors", page 235
2012
Time-out of JX2-Slave Module
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
chapter 12.1 "Hardware
errors", page 235
2013
Amount of installed JX2-I/O or JXSIO Modules
1)
2)
0 .. 255
Quantity
2014
Amount of JX2-Slave Modules
1)
2)
0 .. 255
Quantity
2015
Pointer to module array
1)
2)
0 .. 255
0
2016
Module array:
2015 means pointer
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
Qty. of modules
chapter 11.7 "Codes of
Supported Modules",
page 230
2015 =
2016 =
0 ->
Qty. of modules
2015 =
2016 =
1 ->
Code of the first
module
2023
Bit-coded dummy list of JX2-I/O
modules; 1 = module exists
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 0xFFFFFFFF
Last setting
Page 227
2024
Bit-coded dummy list of JX2-Slave
modules; 1 = module exists
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
Last setting
Page 228
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.5 Special Registers
Special
registers
Function
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
2027
Output driver error of JX2-I/O
module
1)
One bit per module
2028
Monitoring Interval
for JX2-I/O and JX-SIO modules
1)
2)
0 .. 255
20 (200 ms)
2029
System Bus Baud Rate
1)
2)
4 .. 7
Last setting
3)
Page 226
4=
5=
6=
7=
125 kBaud
250 kBaud
500 kBaud
1,000 kBaud
2032
ON delay in multiples of 100 ms
1)
2)
3)
10 .. 600
Last setting
chapter 5.11 "Switch-on
delay", page 57
2070
Amount of JX-SIO modules
1)
0 .. 10
2071
Present amount of I/Os
1)
24 ..136 (JC-241)
24 .. 264 (JC-243)
24 .. 392 (JC-246)
2073
JX-SIO - Time-out in ms
1)
2)
0 .. 255
50
2074
Sync interval (in ms) for third-party
modules
1)
2)
0 .. 255
0 (= OFF)
2077
Enabling system bus special
functions
1)
2)
0 .. 65.535
Value written last
Page 350
3)
Jetter AG
2760
JX2-I/O time-out configuration
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
5
Page 232
2761
Index in I/O time-out monitoring
array
1)
2)
3)
2 .. 32, 70 .. 79
2
Page 232
2762
I/O time-out monitoring array
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65.535
0
Page 233
2763
I/O monitoring time-out
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
10 [ms]
Page 233
2764
Time-out with register access to a
JX2-I/O module
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
10 [ms]
Page 234
103
6 Software Programming
Special
registers
2765
JetWeb
Function
Time-out when accessing
registers on a JX2-Slave module
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
20 [ms]
Page 234
Task control
104
2004
Task switch conditions
Taskswitch always if
• DELAY
• USER_INPUT
• WHEN (not fulfilled), and also if
• Bit 0 = 1 AND Task switch
time-out (2005)
• Bit 1 = 1 AND GOTO
• Bit 2 = 1 AND IF (not fulfilled)
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
3
Appendix D:
"Multitasking Operating
System (Interpreter)",
page 376; section:
"Task switch conditions"
2005
Task time-out:
Period after which a task is exited
at the latest, see register 2004
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
20 (20 ms)
Appendix D:
"Multitasking Operating
System (Interpreter)",
page 376; section:
"Task switch conditions"
2006
Cycle time of all tasks in ms
1)
2)
0 .. 255
Not defined
2007
Number of the highest user task
1)
2)
0 .. 99
Number
2025
Present task
2026
Prioritized task
1)
2)
0 .. 99, 255
255 (no priorities
assigned)
2091
Reserve capacity of the stack in
which the query is carried out.
2100 .. 2199
Task status:
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
Status
JetSym Setup Content
0=
Task not
existing
1=
Task has been
stopped
2=
Waiting for
network
3=
Stopped at
breakpoint
250 =
WHEN_MAX
253 =
USER_INPUT
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.5 Special Registers
Special
registers
Function
254 =
DELAY
255 =
Task is being
processed
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
2200 .. 2299
Task Program Index
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65535
TASK Start
JetSym Setup Content
2300 .. 2399
Task time register for DELAY
1)
2)
0 .. +2.147.483.647
0
Control of HMIs (LCD Display)
2804
Total number of characters
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
48
Page 168
2805
Number of Characters per Line
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
24
Page 168
2806
Text choice for DISPLAY_TEXT_2
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 169
0 = Text 1
1 = Text 2
Jetter AG
2807
Divisor (USER_INPUT)
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65.535
1
Page 165
2808
Number of decimal places
(USER_INPUT)
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 165
2809
Divisor (DISPLAY_REG/_VALUE)
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65.535
1
Page 163
2810
Number of decimal places
(for DISPLAY_REG/_VALUE)
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 171
2811
Maximum number of decimal
positions for USER_INPUT
1)
2)
0 .. 4
4
2812
Field width for integer display
registers
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
11
Page 172
2813
Field length USER_INPUT
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
11
Page 173
105
6 Software Programming
Special
registers
JetWeb
Function
2814
Indirect cursor position
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 127
0
Page 173
2815
Default value for USER_INPUT
1)
2)
3)
-2.147.483.648 ..
+2.147.483.647
0
Page 173
2816
Sign suppression
1 = No sign
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 174
2817
Status USER_INPUT
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
Status
Page 175
2818
Enable/disable monitor function
0 = OFF
1 = ON
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
255
Page 175
2819
Switch-over time between text
display and monitoring functions
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65.535
35 (350 ms)
Page 177
2820
Switch-over to Monitor Display
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 177
2821
Dialog language:
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
Depending on the
application program
Page 178
0 = German
1 = English
106
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
2824
Indirect buffer number with
device #0
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 11
2
Page 178
2825
Multi-Display Mode: Text buffer
number for HMI # 1
1)
2)
3)
1 .. 4
1
Page 179
2826
Multi-Display Mode: Text buffer
number for HMI # 2
1)
2)
3)
1 .. 4
2
Page 179
2827
Multi-Display Mode: Text buffer
number for HMI # 3
1)
2)
3)
1 .. 4
3
Page 179
2828
Multi-Display Mode: Text buffer
number for HMI # 4
1)
2)
3)
1 .. 4
4
Page 180
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.5 Special Registers
Special
registers
Function
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
2829
Multi-Display Mode: Base flag
number for HMI # 1
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 2000
2000
Page 180
2830
Multi-Display Mode: Base flag
number for HMI # 2
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 2000
2000
Page 180
2831
Multi-Display Mode: Base flag
number for HMI # 3
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 2000
2000
Page 181
2832
Multi-Display Mode: Base flag
number for HMI # 4
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 2000
2000
Page 181
2833
Multi-Display Mode: LED register
number for HMI #1
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65535
2649
Page 182
2834
Multi-Display Mode: LED register
number for HMI #2
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65535
2649
Page 182
2835
Multi-Display Mode: LED register
number for HMI #3
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65535
2649
Page 182
2836
Multi-Display Mode: LED register
number for HMI #4
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65535
2649
Page 183
2837
JX2-PRN1 module number for
outputting DISPLAY instructions
on device # 8
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 24
0
Page 183
2838
JX2-SER1 module number for
outputting DISPLAY instructions
on device # 11
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 24
0
Page 183
2839
Character code for "Delete
display"
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
95 (’_’)
Page 158, Page 184
2840
Character code for "Delete to end
of line"
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
36 (’$’)
Page 158, Page 184
2841
String variable address for
outputting DISPLAY instructions
on device # 7
1)
0 .. 1999; 20000 ..
49999
0
Page 185
2)
3)
Network Control
Jetter AG
107
6 Software Programming
Special
registers
JetWeb
Function
2702
Register offset
1)
2)
0 .. 65535
0
2703
Flag offset
1)
2)
0 .. 65535
0
2704
Input offset
1)
2)
0 .. 65535
100
2705
Output offset
1)
2)
0 .. 65535
100
2707
Indirect network number for
1)
2)
1 .. 254
0
N_SEND_REGISTER (_VALUE) and
N_GET_REGISTER (_VALUE)
108
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
2708
Network time-out in milliseconds
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65,535 ms
250 ms
Page 295
2709
Network response time in ms
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65,535 ms
0
Page 296
2710
Total number of network errors
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 2.147.483.647
0
Page 296
2711
Error code of last network access
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 296
0=
No error
1=
Time-out
3=
Error message
from the
remote station
5=
Invalid network
address
6=
Illegal number
of registers
7=
Invalid
interface
number
2717
Number of retries in case of a
network error
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 297
2718
Total number of retries
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 2.147.483.647
0
Page 297
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.5 Special Registers
Special
registers
Function
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
2750
Task-specific amount of network
errors
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 2.147.483.647
0
Page 297
2751
Error code of the last network
access in the task in which the
query is carried out
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 298
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 2.147.483.647
0
Page 298
2752
0=
No error
1=
Time-out
3=
Error message
from the
remote station
5=
Invalid network
address
6=
Illegal number
of registers
7=
Invalid
interface
number
Task-specific number of
repetitions
Time registers
2002
Run-time register: Operating time
since reset in 0.1 s. The unit is
dependent on register 2003.
1)
2)
0 .. +2.147.483.647
0
2003
Time base for DELAY, as well as
START-TIMER and TIMER-END? in
1)
2)
0 .. 255
10 (100ms)
multiples of 10 ms.
2006
Cycle time of all tasks in ms
1)
2)
0 .. 255
Not defined
2037
Run-time register: Runtime since
reset in milliseconds
1)
2)
-2.147.483.648 ..
+2.147.483.647
0
1)
2)
0 .. +2.147.483.647
0
3)
chapter 10 "Real-Time
Clock", page 217
2300 .. 2399
Task time register for DELAY
RTC Registers
2911/2921
Jetter AG
Seconds
109
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Special
registers
Function
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
2912/2922
Minutes
3)
chapter 10 "Real-Time
Clock", page 217
2913/2923
Hours
3)
chapter 10 "Real-Time
Clock", page 217
2914/2924
Day of the week 0 .. 6
0 = Sunday
3)
chapter 10 "Real-Time
Clock", page 217
2915/2925
Day
3)
chapter 10 "Real-Time
Clock", page 217
2916/2926
Month
3)
chapter 10 "Real-Time
Clock", page 217
2917/2927
Year 0 .. 99
3)
chapter 10 "Real-Time
Clock", page 217
2928
RTC Access
3)
chapter 10 "Real-Time
Clock", page 217
Web Function Registers
2930
110
State of Web function initialization
Bit 0 = 1:
FTP server
available
Bit 1 = 1:
HTTP server
available
Bit 2 = 1:
E-mail client
available
Bit 3 = 1:
Data file
feature
available
Bit 4 = 1:
Modbus/TCP
has been
licensed
Bit 5 = 1:
Modbus/TCP
server OK
Bit 6 = 1:
EtherNet/IP
available
1)
2)
0 .. 255
Depending on
initialization
2931
Own IP address
1)
2)
0x00000000 .. 0xffffffff
IP address
2932
SMTP server IP address
Only valid if reg 2930, bit 2 = 1
1)
2)
0x00000000 .. 0xffffffff
IP address
2933
POP3 server IP address
Only valid if reg 2930, bit 2 = 1
1)
2)
0x00000000 .. 0xffffffff
IP address
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.5 Special Registers
Special
registers
Function
2934
SMTP server port number
Only valid if reg 2930, bit 2 = 1
1)
2)
0 .. 65535
Port number
2935
POP3 server port number
Only valid if reg 2930, bit 2 = 1
1)
2)
0 .. 65535
Port number
2936
Formatting the Flash Disk
Write access with 29547 - then
switch off - then switch on
Result: Disk has been formatted all data are lost with exception of
the directories "/System" and "/
licenses".
1)
2)
0 .. 65535
0
2937
Status of e-mail processing
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 275
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
255
Page 275
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 332
2938
0:
No e-mail is
being
processed
1:
Hand over
execution to EMail module
2:
E-Mail is being
compiled
3:
E-mail has
been sent to
the server.
Number of E-Mail task
0 .. 99:
255:
2977
Jetter AG
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
Number of the
task sending an
e-mail
No task is
sending an email
Status of the data file operation
0:
No file
operation in
progress
1:
Hand over
execution to
the file module
2:
Data is being
read/written
3:
File operation
completed
111
6 Software Programming
Special
registers
2978
JetWeb
Function
Number of the task performing a
data file operation
0 .. 99:
255:
Number of the
task which is
processing a
file
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
255
Page 333
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 305
No task is
processing a
file
Remote Scan
2965
Communications protocol
1=
3=
5=
JetWay
JetIP
Modbus/TCP
2966
Amount of configuration blocks
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 10
0
Page 305
2967
Scan status
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 1
0
Page 306
First 16-bit I/O register; mapped
by I/O 20001 .. 20016
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65535
0
Last 16-bit I/O register; mapped
by I/O 35985 .. 36000
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65535
0
3)
“32 Combined Inputs"
on page 403
0=
1=
8000
Remote scan is
not active
Remote scan is
running
...
8999
32 Combined Inputs
4000
101 .. 108, 109 .. 116,
201 .. 208, 209 .. 216
4001
109 .. 116, 201.. 208,
209 .. 216, 301 .. 308
...
4044
2301 .. 2308, 2309 .. 2316,
2401 .. 2408, 2409 .. 2416
16 Combined Inputs
112
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.5 Special Registers
Special
registers
Function
4060
101..108, 109 .. 116
4061
109 .. 116, 201 .. 208
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
3)
“16 Combined Inputs"
on page 403
3)
“8 Combined Inputs" on
page 403
...
4106
2401 .. 2408, 2409 .. 2416
8 Combined Inputs
4120
101 .. 108
4121
109 .. 116
4122
201 .. 208
...
4167
2409 .. 2416
32 Combined Outputs
4200
101 .. 108, 109 .. 116,
201 .. 208, 209 .. 216
4201
109 .. 116, 201.. 208,
209 .. 216, 301 .. 308
3)
“" on page 404
...
4244
Jetter AG
2301 .. 2308, 2309 .. 2316,
2401 .. 2408, 2409 .. 2416
113
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Special
registers
Function
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
16 Combined Outputs
4260
101..108, 109 .. 116
4261
109 .. 116, 201 .. 208
3)
“16 Combined Outputs"
on page 404
3)
“8 Combined Outputs"
on page 404
...
4306
2401 .. 2408, 2409 .. 2416
8 Combined Outputs
4320
101 .. 108
4321
109 .. 116
4322
201 .. 208
...
4367
2409 .. 2416
Mapping of Flags to Registers
0
256 .. 279
1
280 .. 303
3)
“Mapped User registers/
Flags" on page 405
3)
“24 Combined Flags" on
page 405
3)
“24 Combined Special
Flags" on page 405
...
74
2032 .. 2047
2600
0 .. 23
2601
24 .. 47
...
2610
240 .. 255
2611
2048 .. 2071
2612
2072 .. 2095
...
114
2620
2264 .. 2287
2621
2288 .. 2303
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.5 Special Registers
Special
registers
Function
2622
0 .. 15
2623
16 .. 31
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
3)
“16 Combined Flags" on
page 405
3)
“16 Combined Special
flags" on page 406
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65535
0
Page 199
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
3
Page 200
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 2.147.483.647
9.600
Page 200
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 8
8
Page 201
...
2637
240 .. 255
2638
2048 .. 2063
2639
2064 .. 2079
...
2655
2320 .. 2335
Serial Interfaces
Jetter AG
10000
(SER1)
10020
(SER2)
Error state
10001
(SER1)
10021
(SER2)
Configuration
10002
(SER1)
10022
(SER2)
Bit/s - valid values are
10003
(SER1)
10023
(SER2)
Bits/character - valid values are
Bit 15 = 1 -> BREAK received
Bit 14 = 1 -> Frame error
Bit 13 = 1 -> Parity error
Bit 12 = 1 -> Reception overflow
0 -> OFF
1 -> reserved
2 -> PRIM protocol
3 ->pcom7 Protocol
1.200, 2.400, 4.800, 9.600,
19.200, 38.400, 57.600, 115.200
5, 6, 7, 8
115
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Special
registers
10004
(SER1)
10024
(SER2)
10005
(SER1)
10025
(SER2)
10006
(SER1)
10026
(SER2)
116
Function
Number of stop bits
1 ->
1 stop bit
2 ->
1.5 stop bits
with 5 bits/
character
2 ->
2 stop bits with
6, 7, 8 bits/char
Parity
0 ->
No parity
1 ->
Uneven parity
2 ->
Even parity
3 ->
MARK
- parity 1
4 ->
SPACE
- parity 0
Interface driver
0 ->
RS-232
1 ->
RS-422
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
1
Page 201
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
2
Page 202
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
Register 10006: 1
Register 10026: 1
Page 202
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 203
10010
(SER1)
10030
(SER2)
Transmit Buffer
10011
(SER1)
10031
(SER2)
Transmit buffer filling level
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65535
0
Page 203
10012
(SER1)
10032
(SER2)
Receive buffer
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 203
10013
(SER1)
10033
(SER2)
Receive buffer
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 204
Size: 512 characters
FIFO
Access does not remove
character
Size: 512 characters
FIFO
Access removes character
Size: 512 characters
FIFO
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.5 Special Registers
Special
registers
Function
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
10014
(SER1)
10034
(SER2)
Receive buffer filling level
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65.535
0
Page 204
10015
(SER1)
10035
(SER2)
Receive buffer 16 bit little endian
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65.535
0
Page 205
10016
(SER1)
10036
(SER2)
Reception buffer 16 bit big endian
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 65.535
0
Page 205
10017
(SER1)
10037
(SER2)
Receive buffer 32 bit little endian
1)
Access removes 4 characters.
Four received characters are
combined. The first received
character is the LSB.
2)
3)
-2.147.483.648 ..
2.147.483.647
0
Page 206
10018
(SER1)
10038
(SER2)
Receive buffer 32 bit big endian
1)
Access removes 4 characters.
Four received characters are
combined. The first received
character is the MSB.
2)
3)
-2.147.483.648 ..
2.147.483.647
0
Page 206
Access removes 2 characters
Two received characters are
combined. The first received
character is the LSB.
Access removes 2 characters
Two received characters are
combined. The first received
character is the MSB.
Configuration
Jetter AG
10100
Storing the configuration to the
configuration file.
1)
2)
0
10132
IP address, MSB
1)
2)
1 .. 254
Depending on
configuration
10133
IP address, 3SB
1)
2)
1 .. 254
Depending on
configuration
10134
IP address, 2SB
1)
2)
1 .. 254
Depending on
configuration
117
6 Software Programming
Special
registers
118
JetWeb
Function
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
10135
IP address, LSB
1)
2)
1 .. 254
Depending on
configuration
10136
Subnet mask MSB
1)
2)
1 .. 254
Depending on
configuration
10137
Subnet mask 3SB
1)
2)
1 .. 254
Depending on
configuration
10138
Subnet mask 2SB
1)
2)
1 .. 254
Depending on
configuration
10139
Subnet mask LSB
1)
2)
1 .. 254
Depending on
configuration
10140
Gateway MSB
1)
2)
1 .. 254
Depending on
configuration
10141
Gateway 3SB
1)
2)
1 .. 254
Depending on
configuration
10142
Gateway 2SB
1)
2)
1 .. 254
Depending on
configuration
10143
Gateway LSB
1)
2)
1 .. 254
Depending on
configuration
10144
Port number of the JetIP Server
1)
2)
0 .. 65535
Depending on
configuration
10145
IP address of DNS server
1)
2)
32 bits
Depending on
configuration
10159
Password for write access to
registers 10132 .. 10145 and
10200 .. 10219:
0x77566152
1)
2)
0 .. 0xffffffff
0
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.5 Special Registers
Special
registers
10200
Function
Type of host name
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
1)
2)
3)
10201 ..
10219
Host name
2)
3)
0 .. 4
Depending on
configuration
chapter 21.2.4
"HostName /
HostNameType", page
323
Depending on
configuration
chapter 21.2.4
"HostName /
HostNameType", page
323
Static Info Registers
10160
Operating system version
320 -> V3.20
1)
2)
0 .. 65.535
Depending on OS
10161
Operating system build version
1)
2)
0 .. 65.535
Depending on OS
10162
PCB type
Internal use only
1)
2)
0 .. 255
Depending on type
10163
PCB Revision
Internal use only
1)
2)
0 .. 255
Depending on version
10164
Assembly options
Internal use only
1)
2)
0 .. 255
Depending on options
10165
Processor revision
Internal use only
1)
2)
0 .. 255
Depending on
processor
10166
DRAM size in bytes
1)
2)
0 .. 16.777.216
Depending on DRAM
10167
SRAM size in bytes (non volatile)
1)
2)
0 .. 524.288
Depending on SRAM
10170
Type of node
241: JetControl 241
243: JetControl 243
246: JetControl 246
1)
2)
0 .. 65.535
Depending on node type
10171
Ethernet MAC Address;
Manufacturer section
1)
2)
0 .. 16.777.215
20.683
10172
Ethernet MAC Address;
Device section
1)
2)
0 .. 1.6777.215
Depending on device
Dynamic info registers
Jetter AG
119
6 Software Programming
Special
registers
Function
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
10180
Address switch positions
1)
2)
0 .. 0xFFF
Depending on switch
position
10181
Switch Position
1)
2)
0 .. 3
Depending on switch
position
1)
2)
0 .. 3
Depending on LED state
1)
2)
0 .. 1
Depending on battery
10182
10183
120
JetWeb
1 ->
LOAD
2 ->
RUN
3 ->
STOP
LED status
Bit 0 = 1 ->
LED "RUN" is
lit
Bit 1 = 1 ->
LED "ERR" is lit
Battery state
0 ->
SRAM and
RTC power
supply faulty.
SRAM data are
not valid
1 ->
Power supply is
OK
10184
Battery voltage in steps of 100 mV
27 = 2.7 V
1)
2)
0 .. 255
Depending on battery
10185
Logic circuit voltage in steps of
100 mV
50 = 5.0 V
1)
2)
0 .. 255
Depending on logic
voltage
10186
Ethernet state
1)
2)
0 .. 15
Depending on
connection condition
Bit 0 = 1 ->
Ethernet
interface
available
Bit 1 = 1 ->
connected
Bit 2 = 1 ->
10 MBit/s
Bit 2 = 0 ->
100 MBit/s
Bit 3 = 0 ->
Half duplex
Bit 3 = 1 ->
Full duplex
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.5 Special Registers
Special
registers
10187
Function
Number of receiving errors on
Ethernet interface
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
1)
2)
10188
Number of sending errors on
Ethernet interface
-2.147.483.648 ..
2.147.483.647
0
1)
-2.147.483.648 ..
2.147.483.647
EtherNet/IP
2910
Time Base
1)
2)
3)
0, 2 .. 50 [ms]
As previously set
Page 323
10200
Type of host name
1)
2)
0 .. 4
Depending on
configuration
2)
Depending on
configuration
chapter 21.2.4
"HostName /
HostNameType", page
323
0=
10201 ..
10219
No attachment
1/3
decimal
2/4
hexadecimal
Host name
3)
10300 ..
10331
Outputs (direct)
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 0xffffffff
0
chapter 21.3.1
"Communication
Registers", page 324
10332 ..
10363
Inputs (direct)
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 0xffffffff
0
chapter 21.3.1
"Communication
Registers", page 324
10390
Status (bit-coded)
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 3
0
Page 324
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 2
0
Page 325
10391
Jetter AG
Bit 0:
Copy inputs
Bit 1:
Copy outputs
Command
1=
Copy inputs
2=
Copy outputs
121
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Special
registers
10392
Function
Error
0=
No error
1=
Inputs are
being copied
2=
Outputs are
being copied
3=
Unknown
command
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 3
0
Page 326
10400 ..
10431
Outputs (buffer)
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 0xffffffff
0
chapter 21.3.1
"Communication
Registers", page 324
10432 ..
10463
Inputs (buffer)
1)
2)
0 .. 0xffffffff
0
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 7
0
Page 351
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 9
0
Page 352
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 31
0
Page 353
CAN-PRIM
10500
Status (bit-coded)
Bit 1:
Bit 2:
10501
10502
122
NEW-DAT
ID length
Command
Box number
1=
Box ON
2=
Box OFF
3=
Send message
4=
Clear NEWDAT
5=
Clear receive
buffer overflow
6=
Clear sending
error(s)
7=
Clear FIFO
8=
ID length 11
bits
9=
ID length 29
bits
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.5 Special Registers
Special
registers
Function
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
10503
NEW-DAT FIFO occupancy
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 32
0
Page 353
10504
NEW-DAT FIFO data
1)
2)
3)
-1 .. 31
-1
Page 354
10506
Global receiving mask
1)
0 .. 0x7ff (11-bit ID)
0 .. 0x1fffffff (29-bit ID)
0
Page 354
2)
3)
10507
10510
Global receiving ID
Box status (bit-coded)
Bit 0:
Bit 1:
Bit 2:
Bit 3:
10511
10512
Valid
NEW-DAT
Overrun
Sending error
Box configuration (bit-coded)
Bit 0:
2)
3)
0 .. 0x7ff (11-bit ID)
0 .. 0x1fffffff (29-bit ID)
0
Page 355
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 15
0
Page 356
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 1
0
Page 356
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 0x7ff (11-bit ID)
0 .. 0x1fffffff (29-bit ID)
0
Page 357
1)
1=
Transmission
box
CAN-ID
10513
Number of data bytes
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 8
0
Page 358
10514 ..
10521
Data bytes
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
Page 358
JX-SIO
Diagnostics and Administration Registers
Jetter AG
2011
Module number of a nonintelligent JX2 module or JX-SIO
module with time-out
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
0
chapter 12.1 "Hardware
errors", page 235
2013
Amount of installed non-intelligent
JX2 or JX-SIO modules
1)
2)
0 .. 255
Quantity
123
6 Software Programming
Special
registers
JetWeb
Function
2015
Pointer to module array
1)
2)
0 .. 255
0
2016
Module array
1)
2)
3)
0 .. 255
Qty. of modules
chapter 11.7 "Codes of
Supported Modules",
page 230
2028
Monitoring Interval for JX2-I/O
and JX-SIO modules
1)
2)
0 .. 255
20 (200 ms)
2029
System Bus Baud Rate
1)
2)
4 .. 7
Last setting
3)
Page 226
4=
5=
6=
7=
124
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
125 kBaud
250 kBaud
500 kBaud
1,000 kBaud
2070
Amount of JX-SIO modules
1)
0 .. 10
2071
Present amount of I/Os
1)
24 ..136 (JC-241)
24 .. 264 (JC-243)
24 .. 392 (JC-246)
2072
Version number of system bus
driver
2073
JX-SIO - Time-out in ms
1)
2)
0 .. 255
50
7x02
Pointer to terminal array of the
Smart I/O module
7x03
Terminal array of the Smart I/O
module
7x04
Index to function terminals
7x05
Status of function terminal
7x06
Input data of function terminal
7x07
Output data of function terminal
7x90
Error register of the Smart I/O
module
7x91
Status register of the Smart I/O
module
7x92
Pointer to error array of the Smart
I/O module
7x93
Error array of the Smart I/O
module
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.5 Special Registers
Special
registers
Function
7x97
Serial number of the JX-SIO
Module
7x98
Monitoring Interval of JX-SIO
modules
I/O module
7x99
Version of the JX-SIO operating
system
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
JX-SIO 32 Combined Inputs
5x00
7x01 .. 7x32
5x01
7x09 .. 7x40
5x02
7x17 .. 7x48
5x03
7x25 .. 7x56
5x04
7x33 .. 7x64
JX-SIO 16 Combined Inputs
5x10
7x01 .. 7x16
5x11
7x09 .. 7x24
5x12
7x17 .. 7x32
5x13
7x25 .. 7x40
5x14
7x33 .. 7x48
5x15
7x41 .. 7x56
5x16
7x49 .. 7x64
JX-SIO 8 Combined Inputs
5x20
7x01 .. 7x08
5x21
7x09 .. 7x16
5x22
7x17 .. 7x24
5x23
7x25 .. 7x32
5x24
7x33 .. 7x40
5x25
7x41 .. 7x48
5x26
7x49 .. 7x56
5x27
7x57 .. 7x64
JX-SIO 32 Combined Outputs
6x00
Jetter AG
7x01 .. 7x32
125
6 Software Programming
Special
registers
JetWeb
Function
6x01
7x09 .. 7x40
6x02
7x17 .. 7x48
6x03
7x25 .. 7x56
6x04
7x33 .. 7x64
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
JX-SIO 16 Combined Outputs
6x10
7x01 .. 7x16
6x11
7x09 .. 7x24
6x12
7x17 .. 7x32
6x13
7x25 .. 7x40
6x14
7x33 .. 7x48
6x15
7x41 .. 7x56
6x16
7x49 .. 7x64
JX-SIO 8 Combined Outputs
6x20
7x01 .. 7x08
6x21
7x09 .. 7x16
6x22
7x17 .. 7x24
6x23
7x25 .. 7x32
6x24
7x33 .. 7x40
6x25
7x41 .. 7x48
6x26
7x49 .. 7x56
6x27
7x57 .. 7x64
JX-SIO Analog Inputs
126
5x60
Analog input # 1
5x61
Analog input # 2
5x62
Analog input # 3
5x63
Analog input # 4
5x64
Analog input # 5
5x65
Analog input # 6
5x66
Analog input # 7
5x67
Analog input # 8
5x68
Analog input # 9
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.5 Special Registers
Special
registers
Function
5x69
Analog input # 10
5x70
Analog input # 11
5x71
Analog input # 12
7x09
Value range analog inputs
7x10
Configuration analog input 1
7x11
Configuration analog input 2
7x12
Configuration analog input 3
7x13
Configuration analog input 4
7x14
Configuration analog input 5
7x15
Configuration analog input 6
7x16
Configuration analog input 7
7x17
Configuration analog input 8
7x18
Configuration analog input 9
7x19
Configuration analog input 10
7x20
Configuration analog input 11
7x21
Configuration analog input 12
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
JX-SIO Analog Outputs
Jetter AG
6x60
Analog output # 1
6x61
Analog output # 2
6x62
Analog output # 3
6x63
Analog output # 4
6x64
Analog output # 5
6x65
Analog output # 6
6x66
Analog output # 7
6x67
Analog output # 8
6x68
Analog output # 9
6x69
Analog output # 10
6x70
Analog output # 11
6x71
Analog output # 12
7x29
Value range analog outputs
7x30
Configuration analog input 1
127
6 Software Programming
Special
registers
128
JetWeb
Function
7x31
Configuration analog input 2
7x32
Configuration analog input 3
7x33
Configuration analog input 4
7x34
Configuration analog input 5
7x35
Configuration analog input 6
7x36
Configuration analog input 7
7x37
Configuration analog input 8
7x38
Configuration analog input 9
7x39
Configuration analog input 10
7x40
Configuration analog input 11
7x41
Configuration analog input 12
7x75
Index for analog outputs
7x78
Error mode of analog outputs
7x79
Error condition of analog outputs
7x85
Index for analog outputs
7x88
Error mode analog outputs
7x89
Error status analog outputs
1) Value Range
2) Reset Value
3) Cross Reference
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.6 Special/System Functions
6.6
Special/System Functions
JetSym
The special functions always are called using two parameters. The first parameter is
the number of the first register of a register array which contains the operands (this
array may, of course, consist of one register only). The second parameter is the
number of the register into which the results of the function have to be written.
The register numbers can be specified directly or indirectly.
This calling convention applies to all system functions except for system functions
60, and 61.
Example:
SPECIALFUNCTION (21, 65024, 65025)
This function calculates the sine for the number contained in register 65024 and
stores the result to register 65025.
JetSym ST
These system functions are always called using two parameters. The first parameter
is the address of a variable array which contains the operands (this "array" may, of
course, consist of a single variable only). The second parameter is the address of the
variable into which the results of the function have to be written.
These addresses can be specified directly or indirectly.
This calling convention applies to all system functions except for system functions
60, and 61.
Example:
SYSTEMFUNCTION (21, &fSource, &fDestination)
This function calculates the sine based on the content of the variable 'fSource', and
stores the result in 'fDestination'.
Jetter AG
129
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
6.6.1
Format Conversion
Function 4: BCD to Binary (no sign)
Value range of argument:
register with 8 BCD digits
Value range of the result:
positive value
Potential errors:
Result in case of error:
Computing time:
Not yet defined
This function can be used, for example, to convert multi-digit BCD switches, which
are connected to digital inputs, into internal (binary) notation.
Example 22: BCD to binary conversion
Fig. 38: SF 4: BCD to binary conversion
•
•
•
A four-digit BCD switch is to be connected to the local inputs 101 through 116
(unit's place to E101 through E104, ten's place to E105 through E108 etc.).
Access to the switch is made via register 4060 which is mapped to inputs (variable
nsBCDswitch).
The converted value is stored to the variable "nSwitchValue".
Value set on the
BCD switch:
130
"5432"
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.6 Special/System Functions
nsBCDswitch:
21554dec
00005432hex
nSwitchValue:
5432dec
00001538hex
Function 5: Binary to BCD
Value range of argument:
Binary value
Value range of the result:
8 BCD digits
Potential errors:
Overflow, most significant nibbles (beyond
8) will be truncated
Result in case of error:
Computing time:
Not yet defined
This function can be used, for example, to convert a numeric value to be output on a
BCD display which is connected via digital outputs.
6.6.2
Arithmetic Functions
On principle, it is permitted to specify integer registers for parameter transfer or for
the result. In most cases, this makes no sense due to the value range.
Note!
The values for computing time are only approximate values and depend mostly on
the parameter value.
Function 20: Square Root
Value range of argument:
0 and positive numbers
Value range of the result:
0 and positive numbers
Potential errors:
Negative number as argument
Result in case of error:
0
Computing time:
120 µs
Function 21: Sine (sin)
Jetter AG
Value range of argument:
-1000 to +1000 in radian measure!
Value range of the result:
-1.00 through +1.00
131
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Potential errors:
None
Computing time:
300 µs
Example 23: Sine Calculation
Fig. 39: SF 21: Sine Calculation
This program section shows how to use function 21 to calculate the sine of an angle.
The user is prompted via HMI to enter an angle (in degrees). Then, the entered value
is converted into a radian measure. The calculated sine is displayed on the display
in the second line.
Function 22: Cosine (cos)
Value range of argument:
-1000 to +1000 in radian measure!
Value range of the result:
-1.00 through +1.00
Potential errors:
None
Computing time:
350 µs
Function 23: Tangent (tan)
Value range of argument:
-1000 to +1000 in radian measure!
Value range of the result:
-1013 through +1013
Potential errors:
None
Computing time:
320 µs
Function 24: Arc Sine (arc sin)
Value range of argument:
132
-1.00 through +1.00
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.6 Special/System Functions
Value range of the result:
-π/2 through +π/2
Potential errors:
Argument outside -1..+1
Result in case of error:
0
Computing time:
380 µs
Function 25: Arc Cosine (arc cos)
Value range of argument:
-1.00 through +1.00
Value range of the result:
0 through +π
Potential errors:
Argument outside -1..+1
Result in case of error:
0
Computing time:
360 µs
Function 26: Arc Tangent (arc tan)
Value range of argument:
-1013 through +1013
Value range of the result:
-π/2 through +π/2
Computing time:
340 µs
Function 27: Exponential Function (ex)
Value range of argument:
-86.63 through +86.63
Value range of the result:
0 through 4.237
Computing time:
330 µs
Function 28: Natural Logarithm (ln)
Value range of argument:
0 through 4.237
Value range of the result:
-86.63 through +86.63
Computing time:
390 µs
6.6.3
Modbus RTU CRC Checksum
Special/system functions 60 and 61 are for calculating and checking CRC
checksums with a Modbus communication in RTU mode.
Jetter AG
133
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Function 60: Calculating the CRC Checksum
Operating principle
This function calculates a two-byte checksum from the
transferred frame and adds the two bytes to the end of
the frame.
Parameter 1:
Number of the register with the first datum of the
MODBUS protocol.
Parameter 2:
Number of the register with the last data of the
MODBUS protocol without the two bytes for the CRCchecksum.
Potential errors:
The number of the last register is smaller than the
number of the first register.
The number of the last register increased by two is
higher than 2000, or higher than 49999.
Each register may contain useful data in the lowest 8
bits only.
Result in case of error
Undefined
Computing time
< 2 ms
Function 61: Checking the CRC Checksum
Operating principle
This function checks the checksum of a frame and adds
the result to the end of this frame.
Parameter 1:
Number of the register with the first datum of the
MODBUS protocol.
Parameter 2:
Number of the register with the last datum of the
MODBUS protocol with the two bytes for the CRCchecksum.
Potential errors:
The number of the last register is smaller than the
number of the first register.
The number of the last register increased by two is
higher than 2000, or higher than 49999.
Each register may contain useful data in the lowest 8
bits only.
Result in case of error
Undefined
Computing time
< 2 ms
JetSym sample program for checking a Modbus CRC checksum
In the following example, a Modbus CRC-checksum is checked using special
function 61. If the checksum is correct, a 1 is returned. Else, a 0 is returned.
134
REGISTER_LOAD (100, 0x02)
// Slave Address
REGISTER_LOAD (101, 0x03)
// Function code
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.6 Special/System Functions
REGISTER_LOAD (102, 0x00)
// Starting number
REGISTER_LOAD (103, 0x20)
// Starting number
REGISTER_LOAD (104, 0x00)
// Quantity
REGISTER_LOAD (105, 0x04)
// Quantity
REGISTER_LOAD (106, 0x45)
// CRC checksum
REGISTER_LOAD (107, 0xF0)
// CRC checksum
SPECIALFUNCTION (61, 100, 107)
// Checking CRC checksum
IF
// the result is contained in register
108
Reg. 108 = 1
THEN ...
// CRC checksum correct
ELSE ...
// CRC checksum incorrect
6.6.4
Modbus/TCP
The special/system functions 65 (reading registers) and 66 (writing registers) can be
used as acyclic transmission channel to a Modbus/TCP server.
These functions establish a connection to the specified server, transmit the desired
data and clear down the connection.
Note!
It is not advisable to issue TaskBreak or TaskRestart instructions for this task or
to restart the program through JetSym while one of these functions is carried out
since in such a case the connection remains established which may block
additional transmissions.
For more information on Modbus/TCP (client and server) refer to chapter 20
"Modbus/TCP", page 307.
Function 65: Reading registers
Operating principle
Using this function, a register block from a Modbus/TCP
server is copied to the registers/variables of the local
memory.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
Jetter AG
Meaning
0
IP address
1
Port number
502
2
Time-out
in ms
135
6 Software Programming
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
JetWeb
3
Number of the source
register
remote
4
Number of the designation
register
local
5
Quantity of Registers
1 .. 125
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
-1 or -2
Error during connection set-up
-4
Error during data transfer
-5
Error message from server
-8
Time-out
-10
No Modbus/TCP license
Function 66: Writing to Registers
Operating principle
Using this function, the content of registers/variables of
the local memory is copied to a register block a Modbus/
TCP server.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
0
IP address
1
Port number
502
2
Time-out
in ms
3
Number of the source
register
local
4
Number of the designation
register
remote
5
Quantity of Registers
1 .. 125
Parameter 2:
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Potential errors:
Error code
0
-1 or -2
136
Meaning
Meaning
No error
Error during connection set-up
-3
Error during data transfer
-5
Error message from server
-8
Time-out
-10
No Modbus/TCP license
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.6 Special/System Functions
6.6.5
RemoteScan
The configurable RemoteScan function is used to cyclically copy register/variable
contents from the JetControl to registers/variables of network nodes. On the other
hand, they can be read by the nodes and copied into JetControl registers/variables.
The RemoteScan function can be accessed by using special/system functions 80,
81, and 82.
At the moment, RemoteScan via Modbus/TCP is supported only.
For more information on RemoteScan, please refer to chapter 19 "RemoteScan",
page 301.
Function 80: Configuring RemoteScan
Operating principle
To configure RemoteScan special/system function 80 is
used. However, this function does not initiate
communication.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
Meaning
0
Protocol
5=
Modbus/
TCP
1
Quantity of following
communication units
1 .. 10
Communication unit 1
Jetter AG
2
Address
Modbus/
TCP: IP
address
3
Port number
Modbus/
TCP: 502
4
Update rate
10 ..
65535 ms
5
Quantity of output
registers
0 .. 125
6
Output source register
number
local
7
Output destination register
number
remote
8
Quantity of input registers
0 .. 125
9
Input source register
number
remote
10
Input destination register
number
local
137
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
11
Number of the first register
of the status register block
12
Time-out
in ms
Communication unit 2
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
13
Address
..
..
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
-1
Protocol not supported
-2
Set quantity of communication units >
10
-3
Invalid address or port number
-4
Invalid register number
-10
RemoteScan is already running
Note!
With modules without input or output registers the corresponding quantity has to
be set to 0.
If the configuration comprises inputs and outputs, the outputs are sent first, then
the inputs are read.
Function 81: Starting RemoteScan
Operating principle
Function 81 is used to start a RemoteScan that has
been configured using function 80.
Parameter 1:
No parameters are transferred to this function. Thus,
the content of parameter 1 is of no significance.
Parameter 2:
This function always returns the value 0 as result.
Potential errors:
None
Result in case of error
Computing time
Not yet defined
Function 82: Stopping RemoteScan
Operating principle
138
Function 82 is used to stop a running RemoteScan.
When doing so, all possibly existing communication
connections are closed.
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.6 Special/System Functions
Parameter 1:
No parameters are transferred to this function. Thus,
the content of parameter 1 is of no significance.
Parameter 2:
This function always returns the value 0 as result.
Potential errors:
None
Result in case of error
Computing time
Not yet defined
Note!
Execution of this function may take a relatively long time, depending on the
configuration, since it waits until all currently running transfers will be terminated.
6.6.6
Data files
For more information on data files, please refer to chapter 22 "Data Files", page 327.
Function 90: Saving values – Creating a file
Operating principle
Function 90 is for creating a new data file and inserting
a selectable register or flag block into this file.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
Jetter AG
Meaning
0
File Name
1
Variable type
1 = Register
3 = Flag
2
Number of the first register or flag
3
Number of the last register or flag
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
-1
Error when creating file (e.g. disk full)
-2
Error when writing data
-4
Error when closing file
-6
Invalid register/flag number
-10
Data file feature not available
-20
Internal OS error
139
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Function 91: Saving values – Appending to a file
Operating principle
Function 91 is for appending a selectable register or flag
block to an existing file. In case this file does not exist,
a new file will be created.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
Meaning
0
File Name
1
Variable type
1 = Register
3 = Flag
2
Number of the first register or flag
3
Number of the last register or flag
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
-1
Error when opening or creating file
-2
Error when writing data
-4
Error when closing file
-6
Invalid register/flag number
-10
Data file feature not available
-20
Internal OS error
Function 92: Reading values from a file
Operating principle
Special function 92 is for reading register values and
flag states out of a data file and entering them into the
corresponding registers or flags. The information is
processed in the order specified by the content of the
file.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
0
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
140
Meaning
File Name
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
-1
Error when opening the file
-3
Error when reading data
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.6 Special/System Functions
-4
Error when closing file
-10
Data file feature not available
-20
Internal OS error
Function 96: Deleting a file
Operating principle
Function 96 is for deleting a data file from the flash disk.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
0
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
Jetter AG
Meaning
File Name
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
-5
Error when deleting the file
-10
Data file feature not available
-20
Internal OS error
141
6 Software Programming
6.6.7
JetWeb
E-Mail
For more information on sending e-mails, please refer to chapter 16 "E-Mail", page
263.
Function 110: Sending e-mails
Operating principle
This function is used to initiate the sending of an e-mail.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
0
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
142
Meaning
E-mail file name
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
-1
Insufficient memory
-2
FROM not defined
-3
TO not defined
-4
No connection to the e-mail server or
error during data transfer to the e-mail
server.
-10
E-Mail function not available.
-12
Internal error
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.6 Special/System Functions
6.6.8
Network Interface
Remarks!
These functions are for modifying network interface settings. Since these
functions directly access the interface on a low level, they should only be activated
during times when no network communication takes place. Failure to do so may
result in data loss.
IP and MAC addresses have to be specified as 32 bit values.
Function 120: Permanent entry into the ARP table
Operating principle
At the moment, the ARP table may hold a maximum of
20 entries. If this table is completely filled, one of the
existing entries will be deleted when communication
with a new partner starts. This function is for entering
addresses that will not be deleted automatically.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
Meaning
0
IP Address
1
MAC Address: Manufacturer section
2
MAC Address: Device section
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
>0
Error
Function 121: Deleting an entry from the ARP table
Operating principle
This function is required, for example, to replace a
network node during operation, thus, addressing a new
node with the same IP address but with a different MAC
address.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
0
Jetter AG
Meaning
IP Address
143
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
>0
Error
Function 122: Modifying own IP address
Operating principle
This function is for modifying the IP address of the
controller carrying out the function. When this function
has been completed without errors, the new IP address
can be read out of register 2931.
However, the configuration file "/System/cfg_var.ini" or
registers 10132 and 10135 are not affected by this
function (the rotary switches for setting the address
have not been switched neither), so that after the next
reboot the settings defined here will be activated again.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
0
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
IP Address
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
>0
6.6.9
Meaning
Error
String instructions
Function 140: Comparing strings
Operating principle
Function 140 is for comparing the contents of two string
variables.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
Parameter 2:
Possible results:
144
Meaning
0
Number of the first register of the first
string variable
1
Number of the first register of the
second string variable
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Result
Meaning
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.6 Special/System Functions
=0
Strings are identical
<0
String 1 is smaller than string 2
>0
String 1 is larger than string 2
Function 141: Searching a string in another string
Operating principle
Function 141 is for checking whether string 2 is
contained in string 1.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
Parameter 2:
Possible results:
Meaning
0
Number of the first register of the first
string variable
1
Number of the first register of the
second string variable which is being
searched within string 1.
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Result
Meaning
0
String 2 cannot be found in string 1
1
String 2 has been found in string 1
Function 142: Appending strings
Operating principle
Function 142 is for appending the contents of string
variable 2 to string variable 1. String variable 2 remains
unchanged.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
Jetter AG
Meaning
0
Number of the first register of the first
string variable
1
Number of the first register of the
second string variable
2
Maximum register numbers for string 1
Parameter 2:
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Result of this function:
Number of registers occupied by the new string 1.
145
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
Function 143: Converting register values into strings
Operating principle
Function 143 is for converting the contents of a register
into a string and storing it to a string variable. The
register contents remain unchanged.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
Meaning
0
Number of the register the contents of
which are to be converted.
1
Number of the first register of the string
variable to which the string is to be
stored.
Parameter 2:
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Result of this function:
Number of registers occupied by the string variable.
Function 144: Copying strings
Operating principle
Function 144 is for copying the contents of string
variable 1 to string variable 2. String variable 1 remains
unchanged.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
146
Meaning
0
Number of the first register of the string
variable the content of which is to be
stored.
1
Number of the first register of the
second string variable into which the
content of string 1 is to be copied.
Parameter 2:
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Result of this function:
Number of registers occupied by the string variable.
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.6 Special/System Functions
6.6.10 Networking via JetIP
Function 150: Configuring NetCopyList
Operating principle
This function is for configuring a list of JetIP instructions
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a description block.
Offset
Meaning
0
IP address of the remote PLC
1
Port number
Communication unit 1
2
Command:
1 = Read access
2 = Write access
3
Mode:
1 = Autoincrement the source address
2 = Autoincrement the destination
address
4
Number of variables
5
Local variable number
6
Remote variable number
...
Communication unit n
(n-1) x 5 + 2
Command:
1 = Read access
2 = Write access
(n-1) x 5 + 3
Mode:
1 = Autoincrement the source address
2 = Autoincrement the destination
address
(n-1) x 5 + 4
Number of variables
(n-1) x 5 + 5
Local variable number
(n-1) x 5 + 6
Remote variable number
nx5+2
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
A positive digit is the reference to this list. This value has
to be stored since it will be needed as parameter for
functions 151, and 152.
A negative number is an error code.
Error code
-1
Jetter AG
Terminator = 0
Meaning
All lists are already being used; no
available list has been found
147
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
-2
All communication units are already
being used; no available
communication units have been found
-3
Empty list
-4
Invalid list
-5
Invalid IP address
-6
Invalid instruction
-8
Invalid mode
-9
Maximum number of registers
exceeded
-10
Maximum size of requested transmit
buffer exceeded
-11
Maximum size of requested receive
buffer exceeded
-20
No JetIP V1.1 available
Function 151: Deleting NetCopyList
Operating principle
A NetCopyList, which has been created using function
150, is deleted using special/system function 151.
Parameter 1:
Reference to the list. (result if function 150 has been
successful)
Parameter 2:
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Potential errors:
Error code
Meaning
-7
Invalid reference
-20
No JetIP V1.1 available
Function 152: Sending NetCopyList
Operating principle
A NetCopyList, which has been created using function
150, is sent using special/system function 152. This
function joins communication units of a NetCopyList into
a JetIP V1.1 frame.
Parameter 1:
Reference to the list. (result if function 150 has been
successful)
Parameter 2:
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Potential errors:
148
Error code
Meaning
-7
Invalid reference
-12
The response contains at least one
negative acknowledgement
-20
No JetIP V1.1 available
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
6.7 System command
6.7
System command
System commands can be executed via system command register.
First of all, the password register has to be set properly in order to protect against
accidental activation of system commands.
• If a value is entered into the command register while the password register
contains the wrong value, value "-1" is read back from the command register.
• If the password register contains the correct value and a wrong command is
issued, the value contained in the command register will not be altered and the
password register is set to "0".
• If the correct values are entered into both registers, both contain value "0" once
the command has been executed.
6.7.1
Register(s)
Register 2960: Password for system commands
Function
Description
Read
0 or value which has been entered last
Write
Enter password:
1112502132 (0x424f6f74)
Value range
32 bits
Value after reset
0
Register 2961: System command
Function
Read
-1, 0 or value which has been entered
last
Write
Issue command
104: Resetting the remanent settings to
factory setting
204: Same as 104 plus deleting the
application program and its password
Value range
32 bits
Value after reset
0
6.7.2
Jetter AG
Description
Command: Resetting to factory setting
149
6 Software Programming
JetWeb
When the controller is switched on, most of the special registers are initialized using
the factory settings. Some of the special registers are located in the battery-backed
memory and are initialized by the manufacturer before the device is shipped. Using
command 104 these remanent special registers can be reset to their as-delivered
condition.
Register
Number
Meaning
Factory
setting
2023
JX2-E/A dummy module; bit-coded
Bit = 1 : Module exists
2024
JX2-Slave dummy modules; bit-coded
Bit = 1 : Module exists
2029
Baud rate on the system bus
7 = 1 MBaud
7
2032
Delay on system start before the system bus
is initialized
10
2077
System bus special functions
0
2909
Number of the first floating point register
2964
Sub-version number of JetIP protocol (V1.1)
6.7.3
-1
255
65024
0
Command: Resetting to factory settings
and clearing the password of the
application program
First, command 204 resets the remanent registers to the factory settings (refer to
command 104). Then, the application program is deleted from the flash disk and the
controller memory. Finally the password of the application program is set to "0"
(chapter "Application program password", page 374).
150
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
7.1 Technical Data
7
HMIs - Operator Guidance
7.1
Technical Data
Overview: HMIs
Type
Jetter AG
Type of
Display
Keys
Comment
Interface
Cable
LCD 110
4 lines of 20
characters
each
12 F keys (with
LED)
Special function
keys
Numerical
keypad
Backlit
chapter 5.12.3
"HMI Cable JNDK-Xm", page
60
LCD 16
4 lines of 20
characters
each
5 F keys
(with LED)
can be
expanded by a
keyboard
module
(NUM25)
chapter 5.12.3
"HMI Cable JNDK-Xm", page
60
LCD 23
2 lines of 24
characters
each
Cursor left
Cursor right
ENTER
5 mm
character
height
chapter 5.12.3
"HMI Cable JNDK-Xm", page
60
LCD 25
2 lines of 24
characters
each
5 F keys
(with LED)
5 mm
character
height
backlit
chapter 5.12.3
"HMI Cable JNDK-Xm", page
60
LCD 27
2 lines of 24
characters
each
5 F keys
Cursor keypad
Clear
ENTER
LCD 34
2 lines of 24
characters
each
5 F keys
Special function
keys
Numeric keypad
LCD52
4 lines of 16
characters
each
6 F keys
Numeric keypad
LCD54
4 lines of 16
characters
each
8 F keys
Numeric keypad
chapter 5.12.3
"HMI Cable JNDK-Xm", page
60
Backlit
chapter 5.12.3
"HMI Cable JNDK-Xm", page
60
chapter 5.12.5
"User Interface
Cable
KAY_05330025", page 63
Backlit
Emergency
Stop
chapter 5.12.5
"User Interface
Cable
KAY_05330025", page 63
151
7 HMIs - Operator Guidance
JetWeb
Overview: HMIs
Type
Type of
Display
Keys
Comment
Interface
Cable
LCD54Z
4 lines of 16
characters
each
8 F keys
Numeric keypad
Backlit
Emergency
Stop
"Dead man's"
Key
chapter 5.12.5
"User Interface
Cable
KAY_05330025", page 63
LCD60
2 lines of 40
characters
each
8 F keys (with
LED)
Numeric keypad
Backlit
chapter 5.12.4
"User Interface
Cable
KAY_0386xxxx", page 61
7.2
Description of Connections
For connecting HMIs via RS-422 to the SER1 or SER2 input of the JetControl 24x
the cables listed in the table in chapter 7.1 "Technical Data", page 151 have to be
used.
152
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
7.3 Multi-display mode
7.3
Multi-display mode
Multi-display mode allows a JC-24x controller to be operated with up to four LCD
HMIs connected to one of the serial interfaces. When doing so, the same or different
texts and/or register contents can be displayed on the various HMIs.
Specific parameters for the LCD HMI used are described in the
corresponding User Manual.
An individual number must be assigned to each LCD HMI.
If only one LCD HMI is used, value 0 is always assigned.
This number can be assigned in the configuration menu of the
corresponding HMI.
If more than one LCD HMI is used, a value between 1 and 4 is
assigned to each LCD HMI starting with 1. In this case, a display with #
1 must exist.
If HMIs are used which differ in size (i.e. number of characters per line x
number of lines), # 1 must be assigned to the HMI with the greatest
number of characters.
The HMI with number 1 is the master LCD. After power-up only the first LCD HMI is
synchronized with the JC-24x controller. The other LCDs remain inactive until they
receive command signals.
Note!
User input and monitor mode (which is invoked by pressing the key "R" or "I/O")
can be activated at the same time only for one display.
Jetter AG
153
7 HMIs - Operator Guidance
JetWeb
Note!
•
•
The controller is not designed to provide power supply for several LCD HMIs.
Therefore, the LCD HMIs need to be supplied by a separate power supply with
a DC voltage of 15 V to 30 V.
Power consumption of individual LCD HMIs (approx. 300 mA) has to be taken
into account when designing a system and when using it.
For connecting several user interfaces to the LCD port of the controller you
need an adaptor or modified connecting cables.
Different from the standard design, the connection cables must be modified,
see Fig. 40.
Only HMIs with RS-422 interface can be used in multi-display mode.
Examples and hints on multidisplay mode are given in Application Note 002.
•
•
•
•
•
Cable connection
LCD HMI # 1
15-pin SUB-D plug
Pin
Signal
6
RDB
7
RDA
4
SDB
5
SDA
15
DC 24 V
12
GND
Cable connection
LCD HMI # 2
15-pin SUB-D plug
Pin
Controller connection
8-pin Mini DIN plug
Pin
3
1
4
2
5
6
7
8
Signal
6
RDB
7
RDA
4
SDB
5
SDA
Signal
15
DC 24 V
3
RDB
12
GND
1
RDA
5
SDB
7
SDA
Cable connection
LCD HMI # 3
15-pin SUB-D plug
Pin
Signal
5
SDA
4
SDB
7
RDA
6
RDB
15
DC 24 V
12
GND
Cable connection
LCD HMI # 4
15-pin SUB-D plug
Pin
DC 24 V
- +
Power
supply
unit
Signal
5
SDA
4
SDB
7
RDA
6
RDB
15
DC 24 V
12
GND
Fig. 40: Pin Assignment of the Connecting Cable for Several LCD HMIs
154
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
7.3 Multi-display mode
Important!
•
1.
Number of cores:
6
2.
Core cross-sectional area:
0.14 mm2
3.
Connector (male):
Sub-D, 15 pins, metallized housing
Mini-DIN, 8 pins
4.
Maximum cable length:
100 m
5.
Shield:
Complete shielding, no paired
shielding
•
Jetter AG
When fabricating the connection cables, the following minimum requirements
apply also with a view to EMC:
The shield must be connected to the metallized connector housings on both
ends of the cable with the greatest possible surface area.
155
7 HMIs - Operator Guidance
7.4
JetWeb
Programming HMIs
This chapter gives a description of such instructions necessary for programming
display and keyboard modules. For programming, the following instructions will be
used:
• DISPLAY_TEXT
• DISPLAY_TEXT_2
• DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE
• USER_INPUT
The following examples refer to an user interface with 2 lines 24 characters each.
7.4.1
Displaying Texts:
The following instructions are used to display text on the user interface:
JetSym
DISPLAY_TEXT (<DeviceNo>, <Cursorpos>, "<Text>“)
DISPLAY_TEXT_2 (<DeviceNo>, <Cursorpos>, "<Text1>", "<Text2>")
DISPLAY_TEXT (<DeviceNo>, <Cursorpos>, @<RegNr>)
JetSym ST
DISPLAY_TEXT (<DeviceNo>, <Cursorpos>, "<Text>")
DISPLAY_TEXT_2 (<DeviceNo>, <Cursorpos>, "<Text1>", "<Text2>")
DISPLAY_TEXT (<DeviceNo>, <Cursorpos>, <StringVar>)
7.4.2
Device Number
156
Text Output Parameters
The parameter "Device Number" is specified by entering a value from 0 through
11.
#0
Indirect input via register 2824
#1 through #4
Selection of an HMI.
#5 through #6
Not assigned
#7
Output into string variables or text registers. Address in
register 2841
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Cursor Position
7.4 Programming HMIs
#8
JX2-PRN1 printer output; the module number is contained
in register 2837 (refer to chapter 8 "Operator Interaction
with User Interfaces", page 191)
#9
Selection of the user-programmable interface PRIM at
SER1 (refer to chapter 9.4 "Output of texts and values",
page 207)
#10
Selection of the user-programmable interface PRIM at
SER2 (refer to chapter 9.4 "Output of texts and values",
page 207)
#11
Selection of the user-programmable interface PRIM at
JX2-SER1; the module number is contained in register
2838 (refer to chapter 8 "Operator Interaction with User
Interfaces", page 191).
This parameter is used to define the cursor position where the first character of the
text is to appear. This is true only for device #0 to #4. Not for PRIM, SER, PRN.
Cursor Positions of various HMIs
Type
Cursor Position
Position 0,
Register 2814
Jetter AG
Cursor Positions
LCD 16,
LCD 110
Line # 1:
Line # 2:
Line # 3:
Line # 4:
1 through 20
21 through 40
41 through 60
61 through 80
LCD 23
Line # 1:
Line # 2:
1 through 24
25 through 48
LCD 25
Line # 1:
Line # 2:
1 through 24
25 through 48
LCD 27
Line # 1:
Line # 2:
1 through 24
25 through 48
LCD 34
Line # 1:
Line # 2:
1 through 24
25 through 48
LCD 52,
LCD 54(Z)
Line # 1:
Line # 2:
Line # 3:
Line # 4:
1 through 16
17 through 32
33 through 48
49 through 64
LCD 60
Line # 1:
Line # 2:
1 through 40
41 through 80
The cursor position 0 has a special meaning: First, register 2814 is polled. If the
value in register 2814 is not 0, the value specified in register 2814 represents the
cursor position. If the value in register 2814 is 0, the new text will be attached to the
text displayed last. The cursor is located at exactly the same position where it had
been positioned after execution of the last instruction DISPLAY_TEXT or
DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE.
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7.4.3
JetWeb
Control Characters for Text Output
The two characters "_" and "$" serve as control characters for text output.
When text is output via PRIM, SER and PRN (#8 through #11), the control characters
remain in their original form. When text is output on device #7, the control characters
are removed from the string.
DELSCR
"_“: When this character is used, first, the displayed text is deleted and then,
irrespective of the specified parameter, the given text is displayed starting from
cursor position 1. This character does only make sense, when it is placed at the
beginning of the text, as otherwise the first part of the text would be displayed first,
and then would be deleted immediately. This character has got the meaning DELSCR
(Delete Screen).
DELEOL
"$": This character deletes the rest of a line starting from the present cursor position.
It is also referred to as DELEOL (Delete End Of Line).
If the characters "_" and/or "$" are to be displayed in a text, the control characters
can be redefined using the registers 2839 and 2840.
Register 2839: Clear display
Function
Read
Description
ASCII code of the character for the control function "clear
display".
Value after reset: 95 ("_")
Write
Defining a new character
Value range
0 .. 255
Register 2840: Delete text up to end of line
Function
Read
Description
ASCII code of the character for the control function "delete text
up to end of line".
Value after reset: 36 ("$")
Write
Defining a new character
Value range
0 .. 255
Example 24: Text output on an HMI
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7.4 Programming HMIs
JetSym
DISPLAY_TEXT (0, 1, "_Actualposition:")
JetSym ST
DISPLAY_TEXT (0, 1, "_Actualposition:")
By using this instruction the entire LCD display is deleted first, and "Actual position:"
is then displayed on the upper line of the display (cursor position = 1). Any previously
displayed text will be ignored following DELSCR. The following display will appear:
JetSym
DISPLAY_TEXT (0, 25, "Set position:$")
JetSym ST
DISPLAY_TEXT (0, 25, "Set position:$")
After issuing this instruction, the text "Set Position:" is written at the given cursor
position 25, i.e. at the beginning of the second line of the display. Then, the rest of
this line is deleted.
JetSym
DISPLAY_TEXT (0, 0, "ERROR")
JetSym ST
DISPLAY_TEXT (0, 0, "ERROR");
After issuing this instruction, the text ERROR is written, starting from the present
cursor position.
By doing so, this text is simply attached to any already existing text. This is true if
register 2814 contains 0, too.
Register 2814
Jetter AG
The cursor position is indirectly specified by register 2814 if cursor position 0 has
been programmed in the instruction.
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Note!
If register2814 is containing a value other than zero, this value is interpreted as
cursor position and the text "ERROR" is written at the given position, e.g. with the
following instruction:
DISPLAY_TEXT (0, 0, "ERROR")
7.4.4
Displaying Register Contents / Variables
A register or variable value can be output on an HMI using the following instruction:
JetSym
JetSym ST
DISPLAY_REG (<DeviceNo>, <Cursorpos> <RegNo>)
DISPLAY_Value(<DeviceNo>, <Cursorpos>, <VarName>);
The parameters "Device No." and "Cursor Position" have exactly the same function
as described for the DISPLAY_TEXT instruction; refer to chapter 7.4.2 "Text Output
Parameters", page 156.
JetSym
In addition, the number of an integer or floating point register is to be specified. Of
course, this is the number of the register, the contents of which are to be displayed.
For this purpose, indirect addressing can be applied as well.
JetSym ST
Here, the name of an integer or floating point variable is to be specified as third
parameter. The content of this variable is displayed. Here, indirect addressing using
the pointer operator "@" is also possible.
Note!
Numerals are usually displayed with a field length of 10 digits plus one sign (thus,
a total of 11 characters). The output format can be adjusted through registers
2809, 2810, 2812, and 2816.
With help of flag 2060 the values can be displayed in hexadecimal (flag 2060 = 1)
or decimal notation (flag 2060 = 0).
Example 25: Output of register values on an HMI
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7.4 Programming HMIs
JetSym
JetSym ST
DISPLAY_REG (0, 14, 100)
DISPLAY_VALUE (0, 14, myVar);
Using this instruction, the content of register 100, or of variable "myVar" is displayed
on the LCD display. If register 2812 (field length) has not been changed since reset,
the register value appears at the end of the first display line as shown below (e.g.
register 100 / myVar = -3567):
The dots are to represent the positions which have still got the "previous“ contents
after executing the instruction.
JetSym
DISPLAY_TEXT (0, 25, "ActualPos.:$")
DISPLAY_REG (0, 38, 12109)
JetSym ST
DISPLAY_TEXT (0, 25, "ActualPos.:$")
DISPLAY_VALUE (0, 38, MEM[12109]);
In the following example, a useful combination of the two DISPLAY instructions is
illustrated.
First, the text "Actual Position:" is written into the second line (to the left), while the
rest of the second line is deleted (dollar sign "$"). The second instruction is used to
display the contents of register 12109 on the bottom right of the display. With a servo
controller module to which module # 2 is assigned the actual position is stored to this
register.
Example: The actual position of axis 21 has got the value 5400.
The dots are to represent the positions which have still got the "previous“ contents
after executing the instruction.
7.4.5
Polling Register Values / Variables
The USER_INPUT instruction is for reading register or variable values which have
been entered via HMI.
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JetSym
JetSym ST
JetWeb
USER_INPUT [<DeviceNo>, <CursorPos>, <RegNo>]
USER_INPUT (<DeviceNo>, <CursorPos>, <VarName>);
The same, which applies to the DISPLAY_TEXT instruction, is true for the two
parameters "Device Number" and "Cursor Position". If cursor position 0 is entered,
the value contained in register 2814 is taken as cursor position for user input. If this
value is 0, which is the value of the register after a reset, then the present cursor
position is used for user input.
JetSym
The register number is the number of the register to which the value, that has been
entered, is to be assigned. Here, simple indirect register addressing is possible as well.
JetSym ST
Here, the name of the integer or floating point variable is specified to which the
entered value is to be assigned. Here, simple indirect addressing is possible as well.
Note!
As a rule, for USER_INPUT 11 characters are allowed. The field length can be
adjusted in register 2813. The maximum number of decimal positions can be set
in register 2811. In register 2815 a default value can be specified (chapter 7.6
"USER_INPUT: Suggested Value", page 167).
Once the instruction has been invoked, a blinking cursor appears in the input
field.
Example 26: User input via HMI
JetSym
DISPLAY_TEXT (0, 1, "_New Position ?")
USER_INPUT (0, 25, 100)
JetSym ST
DISPLAY_TEXT (0, 1, "_New Position ?")
USER_INPUT (0, 25, rNewPos);
To provide meaningful user guidance, the USER_INPUT instruction is often combined
with the DISPLAY_TEXT instruction. The effect of these two instructions is that the text
"New Position?" is displayed on the top left of the display. Then, the controller is
waiting for a numeral to be entered.
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7.5 Fixed-Point Numbers
7.5
Fixed-Point Numbers
Fixed-point numbers can be displayed and entered with the help of the user
interface. While doing so, the functions of register 2812: "Field length for
DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE" and register 2813:"Field length for USER_INPUT"
remain unchanged. These registers are specified as mentioned above.
7.5.1
Displaying Fixed-Point Numbers
For this purpose, two additional special registers are available, namely the registers
2809 and 2810.
Register 2809: Divisor for displaying the value
DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE
Register Value
Decimal Positions
1
0
10
1
100
2
1000
3
10000
4
The number of decimal positions is defined through the value of this register. As an
alternative, instead of register 2809, register 2810 can also be used. A maximum of
four decimal positions is possible.
Register 2810: Decimal positions for DISPLAY_REG /
DISPLAY_VALUE
Jetter AG
Register Value
Decimal Positions
0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
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JetWeb
The number of decimal positions is defined through the value of this register. As an
alternative, instead of register 2810, register 2809 can also be used. A maximum of
four decimal positions is possible.
Once values are entered into register 2809, register 2810 is modified automatically.
The same applies vice versa.
Example 27: Output of decimal positions on an HMI
The following instruction is used to display the contents of register 200 on the HMI.
JetSym
JetSym ST
DISPLAY_REG (0, 1, 200)
DISPLAY_VALUE (0, 1, MEM[200]);
The number -20.00, for example, is displayed by the following register definitions:
Register 200 = -2000
Register 2809 = 100
[as an alternative to Register 2810]
Register 2810 = 2
[as an alternative to Register 2809]
Note!
The numeric value of register 200 remains unchanged. For representation
purposes on the display, a decimal point is added only.
Note!
When specifying the field length in register 2812, the decimal point has to be taken
into account. Using the default value "11", a ten digit number plus a sign can be
displayed. If an additional decimal point is used, the value in this register has to
be set to "12".
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7.5 Fixed-Point Numbers
7.5.2
Entering Fixed-Point Numbers
For this purpose, two additional special registers are available, namely the registers
2807 and 2808. Once the input is completed, the number of decimal places resp. the
corresponding divisor, which have been input by the user, can be seen from these
registers.
Register 2807: Divisor for value input USER_INPUT
Register Value
Decimal Positions
1
0
10
1
100
2
1000
3
10000
4
The number of decimal positions for data input is defined through the value of this
register.
As an alternative, instead of register 2807, register 2808 can also be used. A
maximum of four decimal positions is possible.
Register 2808: Decimal positions for USER_INPUT
Register Value
Decimal Positions
0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
The number of decimal positions for data input is defined through the value of this
register.
As an alternative, instead of register 2808, register 2807 can also be used. A
maximum of four decimal positions is possible.
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Example 28: Entering decimal positions via HMI
Integer register:
Data are downloaded from the user interface to register 200 using the following
instruction:
JetSym
JetSym ST
USER_INPUT (0, 1, 200)
USER_INPUT (0, 1, MEM[200]);
Once value 20.01 is entered by the operator, the following values appear in the
relevant registers:
Register 200 = 2001
Register 2807 = 100
Register 2808 = 2
Note!
The numerical value of register 200 is 2001. When this value is displayed on the
HMI, a decimal point is added. The operator has to enter the value for register 200
only, together with the desired number of decimal places. From this input the
values of register 2807 and register 2808 will result.
Floating Point Registers:
Data are downloaded from the user interface to register 65100 using the following
instruction:
JetSym
JetSym ST
USER_INPUT (0, 1, 65100)
USER_INPUT (0, 1, MEM[65100]);
Once value 20.01 is entered by the operator, the following values appear in the
relevant registers:
Register 65100 = 20.0100
Register 2807 = 100
Register 2808 = 2
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7.6 USER_INPUT: Suggested Value
Note!
When assigning a fixed-point value, that has been input, to a floating point
register, the values contained in registers 2807 / 2808 are taken into account, and
the value, that has actually been entered, is stored to the destination register.
7.6
Default Value in
Register 2815
USER_INPUT: Suggested Value
An additional special register, namely register 2815, has been provided to suggest
a value (default value) to the user when issuing the USER_INPUT instruction.
The value contained in register 2815 will be shown on the display followed by the
cursor, instead of 0. The operator may either confirm this value (default) by pressing
ENTER, or alter it. The altered value is accepted by pressing ENTER.
By pressing C ("clear“), the input is deleted; then the suggested value contained in
register 2815 will appear again.
Example 29: Output of a suggested value on the display
JetSym
USER_INPUT (0, 1, 100)
JetSym ST
USER_INPUT (0, 1, MEM[100]);
HMI display:
The displayed value 0 is the default value of register 2815.
JetSym
JetSym ST
Jetter AG
REGISTER_LOAD (2815, 88)
USER_INPUT (0, 1, 100)
MEM[2815] := 88;
USER_INPUT (0, 1, MEM[100]);
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HMI display:
The displayed value 88 is the defined value contained in register 2815.
Note!
For displaying the suggested value the same formatting registers (2809, 2810,
2812, and 2816) do apply as for the instructions DISPLAY_REG or
DISPLAY_VALUE.
7.7
Registers
Register 2804: Number of characters per line of HMI
Function
Read
Description
Present value of the number of HMI characters
Value after reset: 48
Write
New value specifying the number of characters for the
connected HMI
Value range
1 .. 127
This register gets initialized by the connected HMI
Register 2805: Number of characters per line
Function
Read
Description
Present value: Number of characters per line
Value after reset: 24
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7.7 Registers
Write
New value specifying the number of characters for the
connected HMI
Value range
1 .. 127
This register gets initialized by the connected HMI
Register 2806: Text selection for DISPLAY_TEXT_2
Function
Read
Description
Present value for the text to be displayed in connection with
the DISPLAY_TEXT_2 instruction.
Value 0: Text 1
Value 1: Text 2
Value after reset: 0
Bilingual Text
Output
Write
New value for text selection:
Value 0: Text 1
Value 1: Text 2
Value range
0 .. 1
Using the DISPLAY_TEXT_2 instruction a selection can be made between two texts
to be displayed, e.g. for bilingual operator guidance.
Example:
Text 1 for the customer, text 2 for the service staff.
In this register, choice is made which one of the two texts is to be displayed.
Register 2807: Divisor for USER_INPUT of fixed-point
numbers
Function
Read
Description
Present value for the divisor to define the number of decimal
positions for user inputs:
Value 1: No decimal position
Value 10: One decimal position
...
Value 10,000: Four decimal positions
Value after reset: 1
Write
Illegal
Value range
1 .. 10.000
When numbers with decimal positions are input by the user, these data are read out
through register 2807 or 2808.
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Register 2807 represents a divisor determining the number of decimal positions. For
example, if the divisor value is 10, the resulting number will have one decimal
position. 1/10 = 0,1 corresponds to 1 decimal position.
Register 2808: Number of Decimal Positions for
USER_INPUT of Fixed-point Numbers
Function
Read
Description
Present value of the number of decimal positions for user
inputs:
Value 0: No decimal position
Value 1: One decimal position
...
Value 4: Four decimal positions
Value after reset: 0
Write
-
Value range
0 .. 4
Unlike register 2807, where the number of decimal positions is represented by a
divisor, register 2808 is for directly specifying the number of decimal positions. Write
access to register 2807 automatically changes register 2808 and vice versa.
Register 2809: Divisor for representation of fixedpoint numbers for DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE
Function
Read
Description
Present value for the divisor to define the number of decimal
positions for DISPLAY_REG:
Value 1: No decimal position
Value 10: One decimal position
...
Value 10,000: Four decimal positions
Value after reset: 1
Write
New value for the divisor to define the number of decimal
positions for DISPLAY_REG.
Value range
1 .. 10.000
If values are to be displayed with decimal positions on the HMI using the
DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE instruction, this can be achieved by using either
register 2809 or 2810.
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7.7 Registers
Register 2809 represents a divisor determining the number of decimal positions. For
example, if the divisor value is 10, the resulting number of decimal positions will be
1. 1/10 = 0,1 corresponds to 1 decimal position.
Register 2810: Number of Decimal Positions for
Displaying Fixed-Point Numbers when using the
DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE Instruction
Function
Read
Description
Present value of the number of decimal positions for
DISPLAY_REG:
Value 0: No decimal position
Value 1: One decimal position
...
Value 4: Four decimal positions
Value after reset: 0
Write
Present value of the number of decimal positions for
DISPLAY_REG.
Value range
0 .. 4
Unlike register 2809, where the number of decimal positions is defined by a divisor,
register 2810 is for directly specifying the number of decimal positions.
If, for example, 3 decimal positions are to be displayed, the value 3 can directly be
input into register 2810. In register 2809, though, the divisor to be input would be
1,000. Write access to register 2809 automatically changes register 2810 and vice
versa.
Register 2811: Maximum Number of Decimal
positions for USER_INPUT
Function
Read
Description
Present number of decimal positions
Value after reset: 4
Jetter AG
Write
New number of decimal positions
Value range
0 .. 4
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Register 2812: Field length for the DISPLAY_REG /
DISPLAY_VALUE instruction
Function
Read
Description
Present field length for the DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE
instruction
Value after reset: 11
Write
New field length for the DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE
instruction
Value range
2 .. 12
A maximum of 12 positions can be assigned to a register display.
If values of two or three characters are to be entered only, the actually required
number of positions can be assigned to the display by using register 2812. This is of
special importance if a great number of texts and values are to be displayed on an
HMI.
The following rule applies:
Content of register 2812 = Number of positions to be displayed + sign + decimal point
Example: Register 2812 = 4 corresponds to 3 positions +1 sign or 2 positions + 1 sign
+ 1 decimal point
Example: - 1 2 3
Note!
Please take into account that one position each is occupied by the sign and the
decimal point. If a 6-digit value is to be displayed, the value 7, resp. 8 has to be
entered into register 2812, even if displaying the sign has been suppressed
through register 2816.
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7.7 Registers
Register 2813: Field length for the USER_INPUT
instruction
Function
Read
Description
Present field length for the USER_INPUT instruction
Value after reset: 11
Write
Present field length for the USER_INPUT instruction
Value range
2 .. 12
Definition of the number of positions to be assigned to the USER_INPUT instruction.
A maximum of 12 positions can be assigned to a user input.
If values of two or three characters are to be entered only, the actually required
number of positions can be assigned to the display by using register 2813. This is of
special importance if a great number of texts and values are to be displayed on an
HMI.
Note!
Please take into account that one position each is occupied by the sign and the
decimal point. If a 6-digit value has to be input, the value 7 or 8 has to be entered
into register 2813.
Register 2814: Indirect cursor position for
DISPLAY_TEXT, DISPLAY_REG/_VALUE and
USER_INPUT instructions
Function
Read
Description
Present value for indirect cursor position.
Value after reset: 0
Write
New value for indirect cursor position.
Value range
0 .. 127
If cursor position 0 is specified for the instructions DISPLAY_TEXT, DISPLAY_REG/
_VALUE, and USER_INPUT, the cursor position will be selected which is defined in
register 2814. If the value in this register is 0 as well, the text or value to be displayed
will be attached to the texts or values that have already been displayed.
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Register 2815: Default Value for the USER_INPUT
Instruction
Function
Read
Description
Present default value at the cursor position defined by the
USER_INPUT instruction.
Value after reset: 0
Write
New default value for the USER_INPUT instruction.
Value range
- 2.147.483.648 .. + 2.147.483.648
Once a USER_INPUT instruction is activated, a default value will appear at the
defined cursor position. This value is 0 by default. If another value is to be displayed
at this position, the position is to be specified in 2815.
Register 2816: Sign suppression with the
DISPLAY_REG instruction
Function
Read
Description
Present value for sign suppression.
Value after reset: 0
Write
New value for sign suppression.
Value 0: Sign will be displayed
Value 1: Sign will not be displayed
Value range
0 .. 1
Register values can be displayed either with or without sign. Values are displayed
with sign by default. By using register 2816 it is possible to suppress the display of
signs.
Note!
When setting the field length, the sign has to be taken into account (Reg 2812 /
Reg 2813), even if the sign is not displayed.
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7.7 Registers
Register 2817: User Input Status
Function
Read
Description
Present user input status:
Value 0: User input has not been activated
Value 1: User input has been activated
Value after reset: 0
Write
New user input status:
Value 0: Termination without transfer of value
Value 2: Termination with transfer of value
Value range
0 .. 2
From this register can be seen whether a user input is activated at the moment. This
way, the time of the user input can, for example, be monitored from another task.
Once a defined period is expired, the user input can be terminated and the value
shown on the display can be accepted by writing value 2 into register 2817.
If value 0 has been written into register 2817, the user input is terminated without
accepting the displayed value.
Register 2818: Restrictions of monitor functions
Function
Read
Description
Status of monitor functions
Value after reset: 255
Write
Disabling/enabling monitor functions
Value range
0 .. 255 (bit-coded)
To allow the user to access defined operating functions, certain keyboard areas can
be enabled, or disabled, using this register.
Disabled keyboard functions can be re-enabled for service staff through this register
as well.
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Bit-Specific Functions of Register 2818
Bit
176
Function
Bit 0 = 1
Key "Display of register contents"
Bit 0 = 0
Key "Display of register contents"
disabled, but bits are set.
Bit 1 = 1
Key "Entry of flags"
Bit 1 = 0
Key "Entry of flags" disabled
Bit 2 = 1
Key "Access to outputs"
Bit 2 = 0
Key "Access to outputs" disabled
Bit 3 = 1
Key "Access to inputs"
Bit 3 = 0
Key "Access to inputs" disabled
Bit 4 = 1
Key "Change of register contents"
Bit 4 = 0
Key "Change of register contents" disabled
Bit 5 = 1
Key "Change of flags"
Bit 5 = 0
Key "Change of flags" disabled.
Flag "Change of state" is disabled.
Bit 6 = 1
Key "Change of outputs"
Bit 6 = 0
Key "Change of outputs" disabled
Bit 7 = 1
Key "Display of inputs"
Bit 7 = 0
Key "Display of inputs" disabled
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
7.7 Registers
Register 2819: Switch-Over Time between Monitor
Screen and Normal Display
Function
Read
Description
Present value for switch-over time between monitor screen
and normal display:
A multiple of the time base specified in register 2003.
Value after reset: 35
Write
New value for switch-over time between monitor screen and
normal display.
Value range
0 .. 65.536
If the monitoring functions for registers, flags, display or change of outputs and inputs
have been activated, the display of the user interface will be in monitor screen mode.
In register 2819 the switch-over time between monitor screen and normal display is
specified. Switching-over is carried out upon completion of inputs in monitor mode of
the user interface.
Example 30: Switch-over time between monitor screen and
normal display
A value of 35 in this register stands for a switch-over time of 3.5 seconds.
Register 2820: Switch-over to Monitor Display
Function
Read
Description
Present mode: Switchover to monitor screen by pressing the
ENTER key:
Value 0: Switchover by pressing ENTER enabled
Value 1: Switchover by pressing ENTER disabled
Value after reset: 0
Write
New mode for switchover to monitor screen mode:
Value 0: Switching over by pressing ENTER enabled
Value 1: Switching over by pressing ENTER disabled
Value range
0 .. 1
Direct switchover to the monitor screen can be carried out by pressing the ENTER
key. This function can be enabled or disabled by using register 2820.
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Register 2821: Dialog language
Function
Read
Description
Present setting for the language of integrated HMI functions:
Value 0: German
Value 1: English
Value after reset: Depending on the user program
Write
New setting for the language of integrated HMI functions:
Value 0: German
Value 1: English
Value range
0 .. 1
By using this register, the language for communication functions between HMI and
operator is set. The language setting refers to operating system functions of the HMI,
but not to texts output by the user. Such operating system functions are, for example,
the monitor functions for registers, flags, inputs and outputs.
Register 2824: Indirect Buffer Number for Device 0
Function
Read
Description
Setting the indirect buffer number
Value after reset: 2
Write
New value for the indirect buffer number
Value range
0 .. 11
The control system provides four text buffers for multi-display mode. Using the
DISPLAY_TEXT or DISPLAY_REG/_VALUE instructions data can be written into
this buffer.
When using these instructions, the device number defines the buffer which is
activated by the corresponding instruction. If a device number between 1 and 4 is
used, the buffer is addressed directly. If device number 0 is used, then that buffer is
addressed to which register 2824 points. This way, it is possible to divert a text, for
which device number 0 was specified, to several HMIs.
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7.7 Registers
Note!
If only one HMI is connected and if it is configured to run in single mode, this HMI
cyclically polls buffer 2 (reset value).
A buffer can be assigned to each display with the help of registers 2825 through
2828.
Register 2825: Text buffer for HMI # 1
Function
Read
Description
Set number of text buffer
Value after reset: 1
Write
A new text buffer is assigned to HMI # 1
Value range
1 .. 4
Register 2826: Text buffer for HMI # 2
Function
Read
Description
Set number of text buffer
Value after reset: 2
Write
A new text buffer is assigned to HMI # 2
Value range
1 .. 4
Register 2827: Text buffer for HMI # 3
Function
Read
Description
Set number of text buffer
Value after reset: 3
Jetter AG
Write
A new text buffer is assigned to HMI # 3
Value range
1 .. 4
179
7 HMIs - Operator Guidance
JetWeb
Register 2828: Text buffer for HMI # 4
Function
Read
Description
Set number of text buffer
Value after reset: 4
Write
A new text buffer is assigned to HMI # 4
Value range
1 .. 4
Register 2829: Basic key flag number for HMI # 1
Function
Read
Description
Set basic number
Value after reset: 2000
Write
Basic number of flags which are used for HMI # 1 to recognize
keystrokes.
Value range
0 .. 2000
Register 2830: Basic key flag number for HMI # 2
Function
Read
Description
Set basic number
Value after reset: 2000
180
Write
Basic number of flags which are used for HMI # 2 to recognize
keystrokes.
Value range
0 .. 2000
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
7.7 Registers
Register 2831: Basic key flag number for HMI # 3
Function
Read
Description
Set basic number
Value after reset: 2000
Write
Basic number of flags which are used for HMI # 3 to recognize
keystrokes.
Value range
0 .. 2000
Register 2832: Basic key flag number for HMI # 4
Function
Read
Description
Set basic number
Value after reset: 2000
Write
Basic number of flags which are used for HMI # 4 to recognize
keystrokes.
Value range
0 .. 2000
Registers 2829 through 2832 allow to shift the flag area that reflects the key status of
the HMIs within the whole flag range of the controller.
Note!
The value following a reset maps the keys of all HMIs into the standard flag area
for single-display mode, i.e. from flag 2160 through 2223.
The flag area for keys is calculated by the following formula:
Flag area for keys = basic number + (160 .. 223)
If, for example, the basic number is set to -161, then the F1 key is mapped to flag 40.
Example 31: Mapping the F1 key
Following a reset, the F1 key is mapped to flag 2201 since the basic number is 2000.
Jetter AG
181
7 HMIs - Operator Guidance
JetWeb
Register 2833: Register number for controlling LEDs
of HMI # 1
Function
Read
Description
Set register number for controlling LEDs of HMI # 1
Value after reset: 2649
Write
Register number for controlling LEDs of HMI # 1
Value range
0 .. 65335
Register 2834: Register number for controlling LEDs
of HMI # 2
Function
Read
Description
Set register number for controlling LEDs of HMI # 2
Value after reset: 2649
Write
Register number for controlling LEDs of HMI # 2
Value range
0 .. 65335
Register 2835: Register number for controlling LEDs
of HMI # 3
Function
Read
Description
Set register number for controlling LEDs of HMI # 3
Value after reset: 2649
182
Write
Register number for controlling LEDs of HMI # 3
Value range
0 .. 65335
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
7.7 Registers
Register 2836: Register number for controlling LEDs
of HMI # 4
Function
Read
Description
Set register number for controlling LEDs of HMI # 4
Value after reset: 2649
Write
Register number for controlling LEDs of HMI # 4
Value range
0 .. 65335
These registers are for assigning flags, which control LEDs of HMIs, to several
address areas. Then, LEDs can then be addressed in a different way using the same
key on several HMIs.
Following a reset the LEDs of all HMIs are assigned to those flags to which they are
assigned in single-display mode, i.e. to the flags 2224 through 2235.
With the help of registers 2833 through 2836, a register can now be assigned to each
HMI. The lower 12 bits of these registers, then, control the LEDs.
If a given register is mapped by flags, LEDs can also be addressed via these flags
and not only via register bits.
Example: Flags 2224 through 2239 are mapped to register 2649.
Register 2837: JX2-PRN1 module number for
outputting texts and values on device # 8
Function
Read
Description
Present module number
Value after reset: 0
Write
New module number
Value range
0 .. 255
Register 2838: JX2-SER1 module number for
outputting texts and values on device # 11
Function
Read
Description
Present module number
Value after reset: 0
Jetter AG
Write
New module number
Value range
0 .. 255
183
7 HMIs - Operator Guidance
JetWeb
Note!
When redirecting display instructions to a printer or serial interface module, the
control characters for "Delete display" and "Delete to end of line" will not be
interpreted, but just output.
chapter 8 "Operator Interaction with User Interfaces", page 191
Register 2839: Character code for "Delete display"
Function
Read
Description
Current ASCII character for "Delete display"
Value after reset: 95 (’_’)
Write
Defining a new character
Value range
0 .. 255
Register 2840: Character code for "Delete to end of
line"
Function
Read
Description
Current ASCII character for "Delete to end of line"
Value after reset: 36 (’$’)
Write
Defining a new character
Value range
0 .. 255
If the characters "_" and "$" are to be displayed in a text on the HMI, the control
characters for "Delete display" and "Delete to end of line" have to be reassigned to
other codes.
Example 32: Reassigning the ASCII character for "Delete display"
JetSym:
REGISTER_LOAD (2839, 0)
DISPLAY_TEXT (0, 10, “Jet_Control“)
REGISTER_LOAD (2839, 95)
184
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
7.7 Registers
Register 2841: String variable address when
redirecting an output to device # 7
Function
Description
Read
Address of the variable
Write
Defining the new address
Value range
0 .. 1999 and 20000 .. 49999
The output of DISPLAY-TEXT and DISPLAY_REGISTER instructions can be
redirected to string variables or text registers. To do so, device number 7 has to be
specified in the instruction. If device number 0 is used (indirect device number), the
value 7 has to be entered into register 2824.
The number of the first register of the text register or, correspondingly, the address
of the string variable have to be set in register 2841 beforehand.
Control characters for deleting the display (register 2839; "_") and for deleting a line
to its end (register 2840; "$") will be removed from the string.
Registers for formatting the output (field length, number of decimal places, etc.) will
be taken into account.
For more information on string variable formats refer to chapter 23.6 "Format of a
JetSym text variable", page 343.
Jetter AG
185
7 HMIs - Operator Guidance
7.8
JetWeb
Controlling HMI Keys and LEDs
Note!
All keys and LEDs mentioned below in the table "Control of User Interfaces", or
"Scanning of User Interface Keys" apply to user interfaces according to table
chapter 7.1 "Technical Data", page 151 in "single display mode" and in the
default setting of "multi-display mode". In "multi-display mode" the assignment of
LEDs and keys can separately be set for each HMI via registers 2829 through
2836 (see chapter 7.3 "Multi-display mode", page 153).
Controlling HMIs, Keys, and LEDs
Special Flag
186
LED, Key
Special Flag
LED, Key
2224
LED of
2230
LED of
2225
LED of
2231
LED of
2226
LED of
2232
LED of
2227
LED of
2233
LED of
2228
LED of
2234
LED of
2229
LED of
2235
LED of
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
7.8 Controlling HMI Keys and LEDs
Scanning User Interface Keys
Special Flag
LED, Key
Special Flag
LED, Key
Function Keys
2201
2181
2202
2182
2203
2183
2204
2184
2205
2185
2206
2186
2207
2187
2208
2188
2209
2189
2210
2190
2211
2191
2212
2192
Special function keys (does not apply to LCD 27)
Jetter AG
2214
2193
2213
2194
187
7 HMIs - Operator Guidance
JetWeb
Scanning User Interface Keys
Special Flag
LED, Key
Special Flag
2215
2195
2216
2196
2217
2197
2218
2198
2219
2199
2220
2221
2222
2223
LED, Key
2200
Numerical Keys
188
2160
2170
2161
2171
2162
2172
2163
2173
2164
2174
2165
2175
2166
2176
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
7.8 Controlling HMI Keys and LEDs
Scanning User Interface Keys
Special Flag
LED, Key
Special Flag
2167
2177
2168
2178
2169
2179
LED, Key
LCD 27
2209
2210
2211
2212
LCD 16 - NUM 25
Jetter AG
2206
2186
2207
2187
2208
2188
2209
2189
2210
2190
189
7 HMIs - Operator Guidance
JetWeb
190
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
8.1 Output Instructions for JX2-PRN1 and JX2-SER1
8
Operator Interaction with User
Interfaces
For more information on DISPLAY instructions for displaying texts and register/
variable contents on HMIs, as well as their corresponding control registers refer to
chapter 7 "HMIs - Operator Guidance", page 151.
Note!
•
•
•
The instructions to display texts or registers/variables on HMIs also apply to
printers connected to JX2-PRN1 and JX2-SER1 modules.
In order to output texts and registers/variables via a JX2-PRN1 or JX2-SER1
module, you have to specify one of the following parameters: device number 8
for JX2-PRN1 or device number 11 for JX2-SER1. For more information refer
to chapter 7.4.2 "Text Output Parameters", page 156.
If during communication via Jetter system bus an error occurs because the
modules JX2-PRN1, or JX2-SER1 do not answer in general, special flag 2048
"Time-out of a non-intelligent JX2-I/O module with IO or register access" will be
set.
If the modules don't answer with a register access, special flag 2050 will
additionally be set.
8.1
Output Instructions for JX2-PRN1
and JX2-SER1 Modules
Output of texts and registers/variables on a JX2-SER1/JX2-PRN1 module is
supported by the following instructions:
•
•
DISPLAY_TEXT
DISPLAY_TEXT_2
• DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE
Note!
When information is output on a JX2-PRN1 or JX2-SER1 module, the cursor
position is not evaluated.
Example 33: Output on a JX2-PRN1 or JX2-SER1 module
JetSym
Output on JX2-PRN1:
Jetter AG
Output on JX2-SER1:
191
8 Operator Interaction with User Interfaces
JetWeb
DISPLAY_TEXT (8, 1, "Hello")
DISPLAY_TEXT (11, 1, "Hello")
DISPLAY_TEXT_2 (8, 1, "Hello",
"Hello")
DISPLAY_TEXT_2 (11, 1, "Hello",
"Hello")
DISPLAY_TEXT (8, 1, @1400)
DISPLAY_TEXT (11, 1, @1400)
DISPLAY_TEXT (8, 1, @@1400)
DISPLAY_TEXT (11, 1, @@1400)
DISPLAY_REG (8, 1, 1400)
DISPLAY_REG (11, 1, 1400)
DISPLAY_REG (8, 1, @1400)
DISPLAY_REG (11, 1, @1400)
JetSym ST
Output on JX2-PRN1:
Output on JX2-SER1:
DISPLAY_TEXT (8, 1, ’Hello’)
DISPLAY_TEXT (11, 1, ’Hello’)
DISPLAY_TEXT_2 (8, 1, ’Hello’,
’Hello’)
DISPLAY_TEXT_2 (11, 1, ’Hello’,
’Hello’)
DISPLAY_TEXT (8, 1, myText)
DISPLAY_TEXT (11, 1, myText)
DISPLAY_TEXT (8, 1, @pMyText)
DISPLAY_TEXT (11, 1, @pMyText)
DISPLAY_VALUE (8, 1, myVar)
DISPLAY_VALUE (11, 1, myVar)
DISPLAY_VALUE (8, 1, @pMyVar)
DISPLAY_VALUE (11, 1, @pMyVar)
8.1.1
Displaying Texts
The following instruction is used to display a text on the output device:
JetSym
DISPLAY_TEXT (<DeviceNo>, <Cursorpos>, "<Text>“)
JetSym ST
DISPLAY_TEXT (<DeviceNo>, <CursorPos>, ’<Text>’);
In the following example, the module name is to be output on an output device via
JX2-SER1 and JX-PRN1 modules with the device numbers 11 and 8. For this
purpose, the following entries have to be made:
192
JetSym
DISPLAY_TEXT (8, 1, "JX2-PRN1")
DISPLAY_TEXT (11, 1, "JX2-SER1")
JetSym ST
DISPLAY_TEXT (8, 1, ’JX2-PRN1’);
DISPLAY_TEXT (11, 1, ’JX2-SER1’);
•
In order to output text on an output device via a JX2-PRN1 module, the module
number has to be set in register 2837. Characters will be output as long as the
connected printer is ready. If the printer is not ready, output will be interrupted and
a task switch is carried out.
•
In order to output text on an output device via a JX2-SER1 module, the module
number has to be set in register 2838. First, the DISPLAY_Text instruction
checks the transmit buffer of the JX2-SER1 module. If the buffer is not empty, a
task switch is carried out. However, if the transmit buffer is empty, the text or
register/variable content is written into the transmit buffer one by one.
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
8.1 Output Instructions for JX2-PRN1 and JX2-SER1
Example 34: Text output using the DISPLAY_TEXT instruction
In the following example, the text "Hello" will be output via a JX2-SER1 and a JX2PRN1 module. The following characters are consecutively sent to the JX2-PRN1
module , as well as to the JX2-SER1 module:
48hex
ASCII-Code for "H"
61hex
ASCII-Code for "e"
6Chex
ASCII-Code for "l"
6Chex
ASCII-Code for "l"
6Fhex
ASCII-Code for "o"
Program instructions for the JX2-SER1 module:
JetSym
REGISTER_LOAD (2838, 2)
// Module # of JX2-SER1
DISPLAY_TEXT (11, 1, "Hello")
// Text output via JX2-SER1 Module
JetSym ST
MEM[2838] := 2;
// Module # of JX2-SER1
DISPLAY_TEXT (11, 1, ’Hello’)
// Text output via JX2-SER1 Module
Program instructions for the JX2-PRN1 module:
JetSym
REGISTER_LOAD (2837, 2)
// Module # of JX2-PRN1
DISPLAY_TEXT (8, 1, "Hello")
// Text output via JX2-PRN1 module
JetSym ST
MEM[2837] := 2;
// Module # of JX2-PRN1
DISPLAY_TEXT (8, 1, ’Hello’)
// Text output via JX2-PRN1 module
8.1.2
Displaying Registers/Variables
The following instruction is used to display a register/variable value on the output
device:
JetSym
Jetter AG
DISPLAY_REG (<DeviceNo>, <Cursorpos> <RegNo>)
193
8 Operator Interaction with User Interfaces
JetSym ST
JetWeb
DISPLAY_Value(<DeviceNo>, <Cursorpos>, <VarName>);
In the following example, the content of register 1400, or of the variable myVar is to
be output on an output device via JX2-SER1 and JX-PRN1 modules with the device
numbers 11 and 8. For this purpose, the following entries have to be made:
JetSym
DISPLAY_REG (8, 1, 1400)
DISPLAY_REG (11, 1, 1400)
JetSym ST
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
DISPLAY_VALUE (8, 1, myVar);
DISPLAY_VALUE (11, 1, myVar);
The parameter "Device No." has exactly the same function as described for the
DISPLAY_TEXT instruction.
The known registers 2809, 2810, 2812, and 2816 are used to format the output.
The DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE instruction will output a register/variable
value in ASCII format on an output device via the JX2-SER1 module, if device #
11 has been selected. The number of the module connected to the system bus
must be specified in register 2838.
The DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE instruction will output a register/variable
value in ASCII format on an output device via the JX2-PRN1 module, if device #
8 has been selected. The number of the module connected to the system bus
must be specified in register 2837.
The first character to be sent is the left-most character (e.g. sign) of the string (see
example).
JetSym: The DISPLAY_REG instruction for a JX2-SER1 or JX2-PRN1 module
works with direct and indirect register addressing. Double indirect register
addressing is not possible. The indirect register address is entered by pressing
the blank key in the DISPLAY_TEXT menu.
JetSym ST: The DISPLAY_VALUE instruction for a JX2-SER1 or JX2-PRN1
module works with direct addressing of the variable or using a pointer variable.
Example 35: Output using the DISLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE
instruction
In the following example, value 7623 is loaded into the register/the variable "myVar".
Next, the register is output via a JX2-SER1 module with a field width of 8 characters
and without decimal positions. The following characters are sent one after the other
by the JX2-SER1 module:
194
20hex
Space character
20hex
Space character
20hex
Space character
20hex
Space character
37hex
ASCII-Code for "7"
36hex
ASCII-Code for "6"
32hex
ASCII-Code for "2"
33hex
ASCII-Code for "3"
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
8.2 Register Description for JX2-PRN1 and JX2-
Program instructions for the JX2-SER1 module:
JetSym
REGISTER_LOAD (2810, 0)
// No decimal position
REGISTER_LOAD (2812, 8)
// Setting the field width to 8
REGISTER_LOAD (2838, 2)
// Module # of JX2-SER1
REGISTER_LOAD (myVar, 7623)
// Output register
DISPLAY_REG (11, 1, myVar)
// Text output via JX2-SER1 Module
JetSym ST
MEM[2810] := 0;
// No decimal position
MEM[2812] := 8;
// Setting the field width to 8
MEM[2838] := 2;
// Module # of JX2-SER1
myVar := 7623;
// Output register
DISPLAY_VALUE (11, 1, myVar)
// Text output via JX2-SER1 Module
8.2
Register Description for JX2-PRN1
and JX2-SER1 Modules
Register 2837: Module number of JX2-PRN1
Function
Jetter AG
Description
Read
Present module number value
Write
New module number value
Value range
JC-241:
JC-243:
JC-246:
Value after reset
2
2-8
2 - 16
2 - 24
195
8 Operator Interaction with User Interfaces
JetWeb
Register 2838: Module number of JX2-SER1
Function
196
Description
Read
Present module number value
Write
New module number value
Value range
JC-241:
JC-243:
JC-246:
Value after reset
2
2-8
2 - 16
2 - 24
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
9.1 Description of Connections
9
User-Programmable Interface
9.1
Description of Connections
Cable for User-Programmable Interface
RS-232 Connectors SER1 or SER2
JetControl
Shield
Specs
max Length: 15 m
SER1, SER2
8 pin male Mini
DIN connectors
Connect shield with the greatest
possible surface area!
Jetter AG
Pin
Signal
2
GND
4
RxD (Receive Data)
8
TxD (transmit Data)
197
9 User-Programmable Interface
JetWeb
Cable for User-Programmable Interface
RS-422 Connectors SER1 or SER2
JetControl
Shield
Specs
max Length:
400 m
SER1, SER2
8 pin male Mini
DIN connectors
Connect shield with the greatest
possible surface area!
Use metallized housing only!
Pin
9.2
Signal
1
RDA (Receive Data Channel A)
inverted channel
2
GND
3
RDB (Receive Data Channel B)
non-inverted channel
5
SDB (Send Data Channel B)
non-inverted channel
6
DC 24 V (HMI Power Supply)
7
SDA (Send Data Channel A) inverted
channel
Description of Functions
The serial interfaces of the JetControl 24x (1 for JC-241; 2 for JC-243 and JC-246)
are set to pcom-7 communication by default. To be able to us an interface as userprogrammable interface it must be set to "PRIM" via its configuration register.
Registers 10000ff are available for programming the interface.
Each interface has its own register set, so they can be parameterized independent
of each other.
Texts and register contents can easily be output by re-directing display instructions
to the serial interfaces (chapter 7.4.2 "Text Output Parameters", page 156). To do so,
the involved interface has to be set to the PRIM protocol.
198
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
9.3 Description of Registers
Note!
Here, the control characters for "Delete display" and "Delete to end of line" will not
be interpreted, but just output as is the case when redirecting display instructions
to a printer or serial interface module.
9.3
Description of Registers
Note!
The register set for the interface SER1 starts with number 10000.
The register set for the interface SER2 starts with number 10020.
Registers 10000 / 10020: Error state
Function
Read
Description
Bit-coded
Bit 15 = 1 ->
BREAK received
Bit 14 = 1 ->
Frame error when receiving characters
Bit 13 = 1 ->
Parity error when receiving characters
Bit 12 = 1 ->
Overflow on recipient side
Value after reset: 0
Write
Write access with any value clears the error
Value range
0 .. 65535
Note!
Write access of registers 10001 to 10006 and 10021 to 10026 initializes the
interface. Transmission and reception buffers are cleared. Characters will be lost
if the interface is active during initialization.
Jetter AG
199
9 User-Programmable Interface
JetWeb
Registers 10001 / 10021: Configuration
Function
Read
Description
Actual mode
Value after reset: 3
Write
Value range
Setting a new mode
0 ->
OFF
1 ->
Reserved
2 ->
PRIM: User-Programmable Interface
3 ->
pcom7: OS executes the pcom7 protocol
0 .. 255
Registers 10002 / 10022: Baud Rate
Function
Read
Description
Actual baud rate value
Value after reset: 9.600
Write
Setting a new baud rate (in bit/s)
Allowed values:
1.200, 2.400, 4.800, 9.600, 19.200, 38.400, 57.600, 115.200
Value range
200
0 .. 2.147.483.647
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
9.3 Description of Registers
Registers 10003 / 10023: Character Length
Function
Read
Description
Actual character length
Value after reset: 8
Write
Setting a new character length (in bit/character)
Allowed values: 5, 6, 7, 8
Value range
0 .. 8
Registers 10004 / 10024: Number of stop bits
Function
Read
Description
Actual number of stop bits
Value after reset: 1
Write
Setting a new number of stop bits
Allowed values:
1 ->
1 stop bit
2 ->
1.5 stop bits if character length is 5
2 stop bits if character length is 6, 7 or 8
Value range
Jetter AG
0 .. 255
201
9 User-Programmable Interface
JetWeb
Registers 10005 / 10025: Parity
Function
Read
Description
Actual parity
Value after reset: 2
Write
Setting a new parity
Allowed values:
Value range
0: NO ->
no parity
1: ODD ->
odd parity
2: EVEN ->
even parity
3: MARK ->
Parity 1
4: SPACE ->
Parity 0
0 .. 255
Registers 10006 / 10026: Hardware
Function
Read
Description
Actual interface hardware
Value after reset:
Register 10006: 1
Register 10026: 1
Write
Setting the new interface driver
Allowed values:
0 -> RS-232
1 -> RS-422
Value range
202
0 .. 255
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
9.3 Description of Registers
Registers 10010 / 10030: Transmit Buffer
Function
Read
Description
Last character
Value after reset: 0
Write
Send character
Value range
0 .. 255
Remarks!
The transmit buffer size is 512 characters.
The transmit buffer is a FIFO buffer. The character written last can be read.
If values are entered into a full buffer, the characters written last will be lost.
Registers 10011 / 10031: Transmit Buffer Occupancy
Function
Read
Description
Actual filling level
Value after reset: 0
Write
Illegal
Value range
0 .. 65.535
Registers 10012 / 10032: Receive buffer; characters
are not cleared on access
Function
Read
Description
Last character (only valid if registers 10014 / 10034 are greater
than 0).
Value after reset: 0
Jetter AG
Write
Illegal
Value range
0 .. 255
203
9 User-Programmable Interface
JetWeb
Remarks!
The size of the receive buffer is 512 characters.
The receive buffer is a FIFO buffer. The first character can be read and will not be
deleted by the read access. The following characters can not be accessed.
If the buffer is full and additional characters are received, these characters will be
lost.
Registers 10013 / 10033: Receive buffer; characters
are cleared on access
Function
Read
Description
Last character (only valid if registers 10014 / 10034 are greater
than 0).
Value after reset: 0
Write
Illegal
Value range
0 .. 255
Remarks!
The size of the receive buffer is 512 characters.
The receive buffer is a FIFO buffer. The first character can be read and is deleted
by the read access. The following characters can be accessed.
If the buffer is full and additional characters are received, these characters will be
lost.
Registers 10014 / 10034: Receive Buffer Occupancy
Function
Read
Description
Actual filling level
Value after reset: 0
204
Write
Illegal
Value range
0 .. 65.535
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
9.3 Description of Registers
Registers 10015 / 10035: Receive buffer 16-bit,
little-endian
Access removes 2 characters
Function
Read
Description
2 received characters are combined. The first received
character is the LSB.
Value after reset: 0
Write
Illegal
Value range
0 .. 65.535
The register contains 0 if no character is in the receive buffer (filling level = 0). The
MSB contains 0 if only 1 character is in the receive buffer.
The configuration register has to be set to mode 2 (PRIM) to use the receive buffer.
Registers 10016 / 10036: Receive buffer 16-bit,
big-endian
Access removes 2 characters
Function
Read
Description
2 received characters are combined. The first received
character is the MSB.
Value after reset: 0
Write
Illegal
Value range
0 .. 65.535
The register contains 0 if no character is in the receive buffer (filling level = 0). The
LSB contains 0 if only 1 character is in the receive buffer.
The configuration register has to be set to mode 2 (PRIM) to use the receive buffer.
Jetter AG
205
9 User-Programmable Interface
JetWeb
Registers 10017 / 10037: Receive buffer 32-bit,
little-endian
Access removes 4 characters
Function
Read
Description
4 received characters are combined. The first received
character is the LSB.
Value after reset: 0
Write
Illegal
Value range
-2.147.483.648 .. 2.147.483.647
The configuration register has to be set to mode 2 (PRIM) to use the receive buffer.
Registers 10018 / 10038: Receive buffer 32-bit,
big-endian
Access removes 4 characters
Function
Read
Description
4 received characters are combined. The first received
character is the MSB.
Value after reset: 0
Write
Illegal
Value range
-2.147.483.648 .. 2.147.483.647
The configuration register has to be set to mode 2 (PRIM) to use the receive buffer.
Note!
Registers which remove characters from the receive buffer should not be
displayed in the JetSym setup or a visualization mask (or the like), since theses
characters are no longer available to the application program and, thus, seem to
be lost.
206
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
9.4 Output of texts and values
Registers 10019 / 10039: Error counter
Function
Read
Description
Amount of receive and send errors of the serial interface
Value after reset: 0
Write
Only clearing makes sense
Value range
-2.147.483.648 .. 2.147.483.647
9.4
Output of texts and values
For more information on DISPLAY instructions for displaying texts and register/
variable contents on HMIs, as well as their corresponding control registers refer to
chapter 7 "HMIs - Operator Guidance", page 151.
Note!
•
•
The instructions for displaying texts or registers/variables on HMIs also apply
to devices connected to the local serial interfaces of the JC-24x.
In order to output texts and registers/variables you have to specify one of the
following parameters: device number 9 for the first serial interface (SER1), and
device number 10 for the second serial interface (SER2). For more information
refer to chapter 7.4.2 "Text Output Parameters", page 156.
Output of texts and registers/variables on a user-programmable interface is
supported by the following instructions:
•
•
DISPLAY_TEXT
DISPLAY_TEXT_2
• DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE
Note!
When information is output on a user-programmable interface, the cursor position
is not evaluated.
Jetter AG
207
9 User-Programmable Interface
JetWeb
Example 36: Output on a user-programmable interface
JetSym
Output on SER1:
Output on SER2:
DISPLAY_TEXT (9, 1, "Hello")
DISPLAY_TEXT (10, 1, "Hello")
DISPLAY_TEXT_2 (9, 1, "Hello",
"Hello")
DISPLAY_TEXT_2 (10, 1, "Hello",
"Hello")
DISPLAY_TEXT (9, 1, @1400)
DISPLAY_TEXT (10, 1, @1400)
DISPLAY_TEXT (9, 1, @@1400)
DISPLAY_TEXT (10, 1, @@1400)
DISPLAY_REG (9, 1, 1400)
DISPLAY_REG (10, 1, 1400)
DISPLAY_REG (9, 1, @1400)
DISPLAY_REG (10, 1, @1400)
JetSym ST
Output on SER1:
Output on SER2:
DISPLAY_TEXT (9, 1, ’Hello’)
DISPLAY_TEXT (10, 1, ’Hello’)
DISPLAY_TEXT_2 (9, 1, ’Hello’,
’Hello’)
DISPLAY_TEXT_2 (10, 1, ’Hello’,
’Hello’)
DISPLAY_TEXT (9, 1, myText)
DISPLAY_TEXT (10, 1, myText)
DISPLAY_TEXT (9, 1, @pMyText)
DISPLAY_TEXT (10, 1, @pMyText)
DISPLAY_VALUE (9, 1, myVar)
DISPLAY_VALUE (10, 1, myVar)
DISPLAY_VALUE (9, 1, @pMyVar)
DISPLAY_VALUE (10, 1, @pMyVar)
9.4.1
Displaying Texts
The following instruction is used to display a text on the output device:
JetSym
DISPLAY_TEXT (<DeviceNo>, <Cursorpos>, "<Text>“)
JetSym ST
DISPLAY_TEXT (<DeviceNo>, <CursorPos>, ’<Text>’);
In this example, the module name is to be output on a user-programmable interface.
For this purpose, the following entries have to be made:
JetSym
DISPLAY_TEXT (9, 1, "JetControl 241")
DISPLAY_TEXT (10, 1, "JetControl 246")
JetSym ST
DISPLAY_TEXT (9, 1, ’JetControl 241’);
DISPLAY_TEXT (10, 1, ’JetControl 246’);
Example 37: Text output using the DISPLAY_TEXT instruction
In the following example, the text "Hello" is output on a user-programmable interface.
The following characters are consecutively sent over the interface:
208
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
9.4 Output of texts and values
48hex
ASCII-Code for "H"
61hex
ASCII-Code for "e"
6Chex
ASCII-Code for "l"
6Chex
ASCII-Code for "l"
6Fhex
ASCII-Code for "o"
Programming instructions for the first interface - SER1:
JetSym
REGISTER_LOAD (10001, 2)
// Switching to PRIM
DISPLAY_TEXT (9, 1, "Hello")
// Displaying the text
JetSym ST
MEM[10001] := 2;
// Switching to PRIM
DISPLAY_TEXT (9, 1, ’Hello’)
// Displaying the text
Programming instructions for the second interface - SER2:
JetSym
REGISTER_LOAD (10021, 2)
// Switching to PRIM
DISPLAY_TEXT (10, 1, "Hello")
// Displaying the text
JetSym ST
MEM[10021] := 2;
// Switching to PRIM
DISPLAY_TEXT (10, 1, ’Hello’)
// Displaying the text
9.4.2
Displaying Registers/Variables
The following instruction is used to display a register/variable value on a userprogrammable interface:
JetSym
JetSym ST
DISPLAY_REG (<DeviceNo>, <Cursorpos> <RegNo>)
DISPLAY_Value(<DeviceNo>, <Cursorpos>, <VarName>);
In this example, the content of register 1400, or the content of the variable myVar is
to be output on a user-programmable interface. For this purpose, the following
entries have to be made:
Jetter AG
209
9 User-Programmable Interface
JetWeb
JetSym
DISPLAY_REG (9, 1, 1400)
DISPLAY_REG (10, 1, 1400)
JetSym ST
•
•
•
•
•
•
DISPLAY_VALUE (9, 1, myVar);
DISPLAY_VALUE (10, 1, myVar);
The parameter "Device No." has exactly the same function as described for the
DISPLAY_TEXT instruction.
The known registers 2809, 2810, 2812, and 2816 are used to format the output.
The DISPLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE instruction will output a register/variable
value in ASCII format on a user-programmable interface, if device # 9 or 10 has
been selected, and the corresponding interface has been set to PRIM mode.
The first character to be sent is the left-most character (e.g. sign) of the string (see
example).
JetSym: The DISPLAY_REG instruction for a user-programmable interface
works with direct and indirect register addressing. Double indirect register
addressing is not possible. The indirect register address is entered by pressing
the blank key in the DISPLAY_TEXT menu.
JetSym ST: The DISPLAY_VALUE instruction for a user-programmable interface
works with indirect addressing of the variable or using a pointer variable.
Example 38: Output using the DISLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE
instruction
In the following example, value 7623 is loaded into the register/the variable "myVar".
Next, the register is output on a user-programmable interface with a field width of 8
characters and without decimal positions. The following characters are sent one after
the other on the interface:
20hex
Space character
20hex
Space character
20hex
Space character
20hex
Space character
37hex
ASCII-Code for "7"
36hex
ASCII-Code for "6"
32hex
ASCII-Code for "2"
33hex
ASCII-Code for "3"
Programming instructions for the first interface - SER1:
JetSym
210
REGISTER_LOAD (2810, 0)
// No decimal position
REGISTER_LOAD (2812, 8)
// Setting the field width to 8
REGISTER_LOAD (10001, 2)
// Switching to PRIM
REGISTER_LOAD (myVar, 7623)
// Output register
DISPLAY_REG (9, 1, myVar)
// Displaying the text
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
9.5 Example of an Application
JetSym ST
MEM[2810] := 0;
// No decimal position
MEM[2812] := 8;
// Setting the field width to 8
MEM[10021] := 2;
// Switching to PRIM
myVar := 7623;
// Output register
DISPLAY_VALUE (9, 1, myVar)
// Displaying the text
9.5
Example of an Application
In the following example a program is shown which demonstrates communication
with a weighing machine via user-programmable serial interface.
In the course of this communication the PLC sends a request to the weighing
machine, and the weighing machine returns the measured value. All information is
transferred in the form of alphanumeric characters (ASCII). The special characters
STX (ASCII 2), and ETX (ASCII 3) allow the user to recognize the beginning and the
end of a communication frame.
Representation of numbers is without sign with leading blank.
Requesting frame:
Start Character
STX (2)
Command
Here: "READ"
Measuring point
#
3 digits
End Character
ETX (3)
Example: Measuring point # 259
Jetter AG
Character #
decimal
ASCII
1
2
STX
2
82
"R"
3
69
"E"
4
65
"A"
5
68
"D"
6
50
"2"
7
53
"5"
8
57
"9"
9
3
ETX
211
9 User-Programmable Interface
JetWeb
Responding frame:
Start Character
STX (2)
Measured value
5 digits
End Character
EXT (3)
Example: Measured value = 4567
Character #
decimal
ASCII
1
2
STX
2
32
""
3
52
"4"
4
53
"5"
5
54
"6"
6
55
"7"
9
3
ETX
Fig. 41: PRIM: Declaration of variables and constants
The two included files contain the definitions of the special register structure for the
serial interfaces (JC2X_SER) and HMIs (LCD_SPEC_VAR). The variable
"nsAddress" contains the number of the measuring point to be read. In "nsWeight"
the measured value can be read. If the value is positive, the measurement is valid. If
the value is negative, a reception error has occurred.
212
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
9.5 Example of an Application
Fig. 42: PRIM: Application Task
In the application task, the SER1 interface is initialized first, and the output box for
the value to be sent is set. Then, the value is measured in a loop. Between individual
measurements is an interval of 1 second.
Fig. 43: PRIM: Sending Function
Jetter AG
213
9 User-Programmable Interface
JetWeb
The control characters STX and ETX are directly entered into the transmit buffer of
the serial interface. The command ("READ") and the number of the measuring point
are output using the display instructions and redirected to SER1 (device # 9). Then,
it is checked whether the whole frame has completely been sent within a certain time.
Fig. 44: PRIM: Receiving function
In this mode, the system waits for an STX character, and, then, for the remaining 6
characters (5 numeric characters + ETX). The ASCII numerals are converted into a
number and the last character is checked for ETX.
214
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
9.5 Example of an Application
Fig. 45: ASCII/numeral conversion
This simplified routine is used to convert received ASCII numerals into numeric
values.
Jetter AG
215
9 User-Programmable Interface
JetWeb
216
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
10.1 Register(s)
10
Real-Time Clock
10.1
Register(s)
With the help of a battery buffered register set access to the functions of the real-time
clock is made.
Real-time clock registers for accessing individual
registers
Register Number
Function
2911
Seconds
2912
Minutes
2913
Hours
2914
Day of the week 0 .. 6
0 = Sunday
2915
Day
2916
Month
2917
Year 0 .. 99
Note!
With each read access to one of the registers 2911 through 2917 the current time
and date is loaded into the registers 2921 through 2927.
Real-Time Clock Registers for Register Block Access
Jetter AG
Register Number
Function
2921
Seconds
2922
Minutes
2923
Hours
2924
Day of the week 0 .. 6
0 = Sunday
2925
Day
2926
Month
2927
Year 0 .. 99
217
10 Real-Time Clock
JetWeb
•
•
•
Dummy write access to register 2928 writes the contents of register 2921
to register 2927 into the registers 2911 to 2917 at the same time.
Dummy read access to register 2928 transfers the contents of register
2911 to register 2917 into the registers 2921 to 2927.
Advantage: data consistency since all register contents are transferred
at the same time.
10.2
Accuracy
Real-time clock accuracy depends on the frequency accuracy of the quartz oscillator
generating the base frequency for the clock module. The frequency, which is
generated by the oscillation of the quartz, is highly dependent on the ambient
temperature. Therefore, over the whole temperature range of the controller a
frequency tolerance of 1 minute per month can be expected in the worst case.
10.3
Exemplary Program
The following sample program shows the present real-time clock data on the display
of an HMI.
The following approach is used to display minutes and seconds with a leading zero:
For right justified display of numbers it is possible to specify the
number of digits to be displayed by using register 2812. If less digits
are allowed than there are significant digits in the number, then
leading digits are suppressed.
The program realizes this approach by adding the value 100 to the
seconds and minutes. Then, the leading "1" will not be displayed.
218
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
10.3 Exemplary Program
JetSym
TASK tRTC
; Setting the display format: no sign, 2-digit numbers
REGISTER_LOAD (2816, 1)
REGISTER_LOAD (2812, 3)
DISPLAY_TEXT [0, 1, "_The present time is:“]
LABEL RTCloop
CALL DisplayTime
DELAY 5
GOTO RTCloop
LABEL DisplayTime
REGISTER_LOAD (rI, @2928)
DISPLAY_TEXT (0, 27, ". .20
; Displaying the date
DISPLAY_REG (0, 25, 2925)
REG rI = REG 2926 + 100
DISPLAY_REG (0, 28, rI)
REG rI = REG 2927 + 100
DISPLAY_REG (0, 33, rI)
; Displaying the time
DISPLAY_REG (0, 37, 2923)
REG rI = REG 2922 + 100
DISPLAY_REG (0, 40, rI)
REG rI = REG 2921 + 100
DISPLAY_REG (0, 43, rI)
RETURN
Jetter AG
,
:
; Dummy read access
:")
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
Day
Adding leading zeros
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
Hour
Adding leading zeros
Month
Adding leading zeros
Year
Minute
Adding leading zeros
Second
219
10 Real-Time Clock
JetWeb
JetSym ST
220
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
11
Centralized and
Remote
Arrangement of
Expansion
Modules
Topology of the Jetter System
Bus
The JetControl 24x control system can be expanded using various expansion
modules of the JX2-... and JX-SIO series. The system bus port is located on the
right side of the basic controller. The expansion modules can either directly be
attached to the basic module, or connected to it from a remote location. By using a
baud rate of 125 kBaud an overall distance of up to 200 meters from the basic
module is possible.
A JetControl 241 can be expanded to a maximum of:
•
136 digital inputs/outputs (including CPU I/O)
->
non-intelligent modules
•
56 analog inputs
->
non-intelligent modules
•
56 analog outputs
->
non-intelligent modules
•
14 hardware counters
->
non-intelligent modules
•
8 serial interfaces
->
non-intelligent modules
•
7 printer interfaces
->
non-intelligent modules
•
1 servo axes
->
intelligent modules
•
2 stepper motor axes
->
intelligent modules
•
4 PID controllers
->
intelligent modules
1 intelligent module can be added.
7 non-intelligent modules can be added.
A JetControl 243 can be expanded to a maximum of:
•
264 digital inputs/outputs (including CPU I/O)
->
non-intelligent modules
•
170 analog inputs
->
non-intelligent modules
•
170 analog outputs
->
non-intelligent modules
•
30 hardware counters
->
non-intelligent modules
•
17 serial interfaces
->
non-intelligent modules
•
15 printer interfaces
->
non-intelligent modules
•
3 servo axes
->
intelligent modules
•
6 stepper motor axes
->
intelligent modules
•
12 PID controllers
->
intelligent modules
3 intelligent modules can be expanded.
15 non-intelligent modules can be added.
Jetter AG
221
11 Topology of the Jetter System Bus
JetWeb
A JetControl 246 can be expanded to a maximum of:
•
392 digital inputs/outputs (including CPU I/O)
->
non-intelligent modules
•
184 analog inputs
->
non-intelligent modules
•
184 analog outputs
->
non-intelligent modules
•
46 hardware counters
->
non-intelligent modules
•
25 serial interfaces
->
non-intelligent modules
•
23 printer interfaces
->
non-intelligent modules
•
6 servo axes
->
intelligent modules
•
12 stepper motor axes
->
intelligent modules
•
24 PID controllers
->
intelligent modules
6 intelligent modules can be expanded.
23 non-intelligent modules can be added.
Expendability using third-party peripheral modules
Furthermore, up to 10 third-party peripheral modules can be added to all three
controller models via Jetter system bus. These modules are connected the same
way as a Smart I/O module. For more information refer to chapter 11.3 "Connecting
Smart I/O modules", page 225.
The following modules fall in this category:
– Smart I/O Module
– Lumberg LJX7-CSL-... modules
– Festo CPV-Direct valve terminals and CPX terminals
– Buerkert valve terminal type 8640
– SI Unit EX120 and EX250 by SMC Pneumatik GmbH
– Lenze Frequency Inverter 8200 vector
– maxon position controller EPOS 24/1
– WAGO I/O-System 750
The following third-party peripheral modules fall in the category "intelligent modules".
For these modules the above mention restrictions in relation to the controller are true:
– Milan Drives by Werner Riester GmbH
– Vacon NX Frequency converter
– Ecostep Drives 100-..., 200-... and 216-...
Important!
For more information refer to the manual coming with the JX2-... and Smart I/O
module, as well as to the user information on JetMove products and third-party
peripheral modules to ensure proper functioning of your control system.
222
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
11.1 Centralized Arrangement on the System Bus
Note!
•
If you are not sure which expansion module is required or which cable length
is allowed, please contact Jetter AG.
Important!
In order to ensure flawless functioning of the centralized or remote module
arrangement, the boundary conditions as regards configuration mentioned in
chapter 11.1 "Centralized Arrangement on the System Bus", page 223, or chapter
11.2 "Remote Arrangement on the System Bus", page 224 must be met. Failure
to meet these conditions will result in malfunctions of individual modules or a
breakdown of the entire system configuration.
11.1
Centralized Arrangement on the
System Bus
– The centralized arrangement allows up to 5 non-intelligent expansion modules to
be directly connected to the JC-24x controller. Power supply of these 5 expansion
modules is ensured by the JC-24x controller.
– In addition, 1/3/6 intelligent expansion modules can directly be connected to the
controller.
– Electrical and mechanical connection is realized via a SUB-D connector. These
connectors excel by their reliable mechanical and electrical connections, as well
as good EMI characteristics.
JC-24x equipped with a maximum of 5 non-intelligent
modules
STOP
LOAD
A
BCDE
JetWeb
JC-246
F 01 2
HIGH
BC DE
A
7 8 9
A
BCDE
MID
F 01 2
34 56
S33
INPUT
F 01 2
3 4 56
S32
SER2
Jetter
ADRESS
S31
34 56
SER1
7 8 9
RUN
LOW
INPUT
1
2
9
10
1
2
3
4
11
12
3
4
5
6
13
14
5
6
7
8
15
16
7
8
X1
X1
X1
1
OUTPUT
2 3 4 24 V
OUTPUT
0V 1 2 3
INPUT
Jetter
0V 1 2 3
INPUT
4
JX2-OD8
4
1 0 V 2 0 V 24 V
ANALOG OUTPUT
Jetter
JX2-PRN1
Jetter
Jetter
JX2-ID8
JX2-ID8
1
14
7 8 9
24 V
5V
24V
1
5
1
5
1
5
ERR
RUN
2
6
2
6
2
6
3
7
3
7
3
7
4
8
4
8
4
8
5
X2
OUTPUT
6 7 8 0V
5
X2
INPUT
6 7 8 0V
5
X2
25
ANALOG OUTPUT
3 0V 4 0V 0V
INPUT
6 7 8 0V
X2
13
X1
Fig. 46: Centralized arrangement on the Jetter System Bus
Jetter AG
223
11 Topology of the Jetter System Bus
11.2
JetWeb
Remote Arrangement on the System
Bus
– Using the Jetter system bus as internal system bus allows that one or several
modules can be located at a maximum distance of 500 meters from the basic
controller.
– The remote modules are controlled by the application program as if they were
directly connected to the controller.
– A maximum of 7/15/23 non-intelligent and 1/3/6 intelligent expansion modules
can be connected to a controller with the power supply modules JX2-PS1 not
being taken into account.
– Each remote module set must be connected to a power supply unit JX2-PS1. One
power supply unit JX2-PS1 is designed for supplying 5 non-intelligent expansion
modules (for more information refer to Fig. 47).
– The JX2-PS1 modules must be located at the beginning of the remote module set,
so as to meet EMC requirements. This is also true for module sets consisting only
of intelligent expansion modules.
– Intelligent expansion modules are supplied with DC 24 V by a PSU of their own.
Therefore, they do not require a JX2-PS1 module.
– For a remote module set consisting of intelligent and non-intelligent expansion
modules a JX2-PS1 is required, since intelligent modules are not able to supply
non-intelligent modules with current and voltage.
Fig. 47: Remote Arrangement on the Jetter System Bus
224
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
11.3 Connecting Smart I/O modules
11.3
Connecting Smart I/O modules
– Smart I/O modules can directly be connected to the JetControl 24x controller.
– Connection is carried out in the same way as for remote arrangement of digital
and analog modules. For more information refer to the following illustration.
– If a JX-SIO module is the last module on the Jetter system bus, a terminating
resistor of 120 Ω must be attached to the bus.
– JX-SIO modules are supplied with DC 24 V by a PSU of their own. Therefore, they
do not require a JX2-PS1 module.
– For more information on how to connect JX-SIO modules, please refer to the
corresponding manual.
X10
S41
2 3 4 24 V
OUTPUT
X2
0 V +24 V
POWER
24 V 1 2
OUTPUT
RUN
IN
X23
X24
X51
X31
X41
X42
MD
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
OUT
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
B
8
8
COUNTER
A B 0V
X62
X41
0V
IN
1
ENC
A-OUT
3
7
Li+
LiPos
X
K1
K2
K0
4
8
5V
NANO-D
JX2-OD 8
24 V
ANALOG
2
3 4
OUT
0V OUT 0V
5
X51
X2
1
5
2
6
OUTPUT
6 7 8 0V
JX2-SV1
JX-SIO
10
8
X22
RUN
CAN
9
24 V
5V
RUN
ERR
DIR
STEP
A
S11
7
X21
UM
US
Jetter
8
INPUT
4 5 6
X1
1
DIR STEP 0 V
SM
7
3
8
6
2
PC
7
5
1
X21
X11
4
5 6
OUTPUT
4
LCD
3
3
2
2
DC 24 V 1
4A
STOP
X12
X1
X61
X31
0 V DC 24 V
1A
POWER
1
X10
JX2
X19
X18
CH
120 Ω
CL
GND
INPUT
Li+ Li- REF
X3
Cabling for connecting
Jx2 expansion modules with
JX-SIO expansion modules
JX2
X19
X18
1
5
6
9
CH
CL
GND
120 Ω
Fig. 48: Connecting a JX-SIO module to the JetControl 24x
Jetter AG
225
11 Topology of the Jetter System Bus
11.4
JetWeb
Baud Rate
The Jetter system bus can be operated at baud rates ranging from 125 to 1,000
kBaud.
Factors influencing the baud rate:
•
•
•
The maximum permissible line length of the system bus becomes shorter with
increasing baud rate.
The data transmission speed on the system bus increases with increasing baud
rate.
The permissible baud rates of the Jetter system bus also depend on the modules
connected to it; see the following table:
Permissible Baud Rates
kBaud
125
250
500
1.000
Non-intelligent and intelligent JX2
modules
x
x
x
x
JX-SIO modules and FESTO CPVDirect valve terminals
x
x
x
x
Non-intelligent and intelligent JX2
modules, JX-SIO modules and
FESTO CPV-Direct valve terminals
x
Modules
x
Registers for Setting the Baud Rate:
Register 2029: Baud Rates of the JETTER System
Bus
Function
226
Description
Read
Present value of the set baud rate
Write
New baud rate value
4
125 kBaud
5
250 kBaud
6
500 kBaud
7
1,000 kBaud
Value range
4-7
Value after reset
Baud rate set last
Default
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
11.5 Jetter System Bus Cable
Note!
The new baud rate only becomes effective when all expansion modules are
restarted completely.
11.5
Jetter System Bus Cable
See “Jetter System Bus Cable” on page 65.
11.6
Configuring Dummy Modules
Dummy modules are used to configure modules on the system bus which actually do
not exist. When assigning system bus module numbers, register and I/O numbers,
the JetControl 24x treats dummy modules as if they were existing modules.
Dummy modules are of great advantage, for example, with series machines which
are produced in several versions and configurations with a varying number of
expansion modules connected to the system bus. By installing dummy modules, I/O
and register numbers in the application program may remain the same.
Register 2023: JX2-I/O Dummy Modules
Function
Description
Read
Bit-coded list of configured JX2-I/O dummy modules # 2
through 24
Write
Configuring JX2-I/O dummy modules
Bit 0:
Bit 1:
Bit 2
1=
JX2-I/O module # 2 exists
0=
JX2-I/O module # 2 is a dummy module
1=
JX2-I/O module # 3 exists
0=
JX2-I/O module # 3 is a dummy module
1=
JX2-I/O module # 4 exists
0=
JX2-I/O module # 4 is a dummy module
etc.
Jetter AG
Value range
0 .. 0xFFFFFFFF
Value after reset
As set last (remanent)
227
11 Topology of the Jetter System Bus
JetWeb
Register 2023 is used for configuring JX2-I/O dummy modules. When doing so, each
bit represents one module. Changes apply only after the system bus has been reinitialized.
Register 2024: JX2-Slave Dummy Modules
Function
Description
Read
Bit-coded list of configured JX2-Slave dummy modules
# 2 through 7
Write
Configuring JX2-Slave dummy modules
Bit 0:
Bit 1:
Bit 2:
1=
JX2-Slave module # 2 exists
0=
JX2-Slave module # 2 is a dummy
module
1=
JX2-Slave module # 3 exists
0=
JX2-Slave module # 3 is a dummy
module
1=
JX2-Slave module # 4 exists
0=
JX2-Slave module # 4 is a dummy
module
etc.
Value range
0 .. 255
Value after reset
As set last (remanent)
Register 2024 is used to configure JX2-Slave dummy modules. When doing so, each
bit represents one module. Changes apply only after the system bus has been reinitialized.
Example 39: Machine manufactured in two models
A machine is produced in two different models. The simple version does not require
analog inputs and one stepper motor less than the fully equipped version.
Due to the installation of dummy modules, all I/O and register numbers can be kept.
The application program needs not be adjusted.
For the simple version, the JX2-Slave with the slave module number 2 and the JX2I/O module with the I/O module number 3 have to be configured as dummy modules.
This is achieved by setting bit 0 in register 2024 and bit 1 in register 2023 to zero.
The JX2-ID8 module keeps its I/O numbers IN 401 ... IN 408, and the JX2-SM2
module its register numbers ranging from 13100 through 13299.
For the simple model, the JetControl 24x controller also reports that it has found
three JX2-I/O and two JX2-Slave modules. However, the module code for dummy
modules is entered into registers 2015 and 2016 in the module array.
228
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
11.6 Configuring Dummy Modules
JC-24x
JX2-OD8
JX2-SM1D
JX2-IA4
JX2-SM2
JX2-ID8
STOP
LOAD
Jetter
HIGH
A
BCDE
INPUT
F 01 2
3 4 5 6
S32
MID
F 01 2
A
BC DE
789
S33
3 4 5 6
SER2
JetWeb
JC-246
F 01 2
A
BCDE
ADRESS
S31
3 4 5 6
SER1
789
RUN
LOW
INPUT
1
2
3
4
24V
OUTPUT
1
2
9
10
1
2
3
4
11
12
3
4
5
6
13
14
5
6
7
8
15
16
7
8
0V 24V
POWER
LOGIC
OUTPUT
0V
A
A
B
B
0V 70V
MOTOR
0V
DC-POWER
Jetter
U1
I1
Jetter
I2
0V
1
2
3
4
0V 24V
INPUT
Jetter
JX2-SM1D
JX2-OD8
U2
ANALOG INPUT
POWER
Jetter
JX2-ID8
JX2-IA4
Jetter
DRV1
JX2-SM2
DRV2
Li+
Li+1
789
LiPos
24V
Li+2
Li-1
Li-2
Pos1
Pos2
X2
5V
24V
1
5
5V
1
5
X1
ERR
RUN
2
6
i>
2
6
Y1
Y2
3
7
T>
3
7
STEP1
STEP2
4
8
U<
4
8
DIR1
DIR2
MC
OUTPUT
5
6
7
8
0V
Li+ Li- REF
INPUT
INPUT
ANALOG INPUT
U3
I3
U4
I4
0V
5
6
7
INPUT
8
0V
5V
Li+ Li- REF Li+ Li- REF
Fig. 49: Implementation of two different models using dummy modules
Jetter AG
229
11 Topology of the Jetter System Bus
11.7
JetWeb
Codes of Supported Modules
The codes of modules, which have been recognized by the controller and
automatically been commissioned by it, can be read out from module array registers
2015 and 2016.
Module
Code
Designation
Comment
JX2-I/O Modules
0
JX2-OD8
8 digital outputs
1
JX2-ID8
8 digital inputs
2
JX2-IO16
8 digital inputs and 8 digital
outputs
3
JX2-IA4
4 analog inputs
4
JX2-OA4
4 analog outputs
5
JX2-CNT1
Counter Input
6
JX2-PRN1
Module with Centronics
interface
7
JX2-SER1
Module with serial interface
9
JX-TP20-R
Module with 20 keys and HMI
functionality
10
LJX7-CSL-108-ID16
16 digital inputs, IP67
11
LJX7-CSL-109-ID16-NPN
16 digital inputs (n), IP67
12
LJX7-CSL-107-OD8-2A
8 digital outputs, IP67
13
LJX7-CSL-114-OD16
16 digital outputs, IP67
14
LJX7-CSL-113-ID8-OD8
8 digital inputs and 8 digital
outputs, IP67
JX-SIO and Third-party Modules
230
64
JX-SIO
System bus coupler for Smart
I/O
65
CPV-Direct Valve Terminal
Festo AG & Co.
66
CPX-Terminal
Festo AG & Co.
67
Valve terminal type 8640
Bürkert GmbH & Co. KG
68
I/O-SYSTEM 750
WAGO Kontakttechnik GmbH
69
SI-Unit EX120
SMC Pneumatik GmbH
70
Frequency inverter 8200 vector
Lenze Drives Systems GmbH
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
11.7 Codes of Supported Modules
Module
Code
Designation
Comment
71
SI-Unit EX250
SMC Pneumatik GmbH
75
Position controller EPOS 24/1
maxon motor ag
103
Milan Drive 1)
Werner Riester GmbH & Co.
KG (auma)
104
Ecostep Drives 1)
Jenaer Antriebstechnik
105
NX frequency inverter 1)
Vacon GmbH
JX2-Slave and JetMove modules
128
JX2-SV1
Position feedback controller,
frequency inverter ...
129
CAN-DIMA
Position feedback controller
with integrated servo amplifier
130
JX2-SM2
Module for controlling 2
stepper motor amplifiers
131
JX2-SM1D
Module with integrated power
unit for controlling a stepper
motor
132
JX2-PID1
Module with 4 PID controllers
133
JX2-PROFI1
Slave for Profibus-DP
135
JetMove 200 Series
Position feedback controller
with integrated servo amplifier
136
JX2-ProfiM
Master for Profibus-DP
146
JetMove 600 Series
Position feedback controller
with integrated servo amplifier
Dummy Modules
252
JX-SIO dummy-module
253
JX2-Slave dummy module
254
JX2-I/O Dummy Module
255
Not identified
1)
: With respect to register numbers, these modules are treated as third-party
peripheral modules. In regard to expandability of controllers, these modules are
treated as JX2-Slave modules.
Jetter AG
231
11 Topology of the Jetter System Bus
11.8
JetWeb
Monitoring of I/O modules
Monitoring of JX2-I/O modules can be configured by the user and adapted to suit the
needs of the corresponding controller.
Register 2760: JX2-I/O time-out configuration
Function
Description
Read
Actual JX2-I/O time-out configuration
Write
New JX2-I/O time-out configuration
Value range
0 .. 255
Value after reset
5
The JX2-I/O time-out configuration is for setting the maximum allowed number of
retries when updating I/Os on JX2-I/O modules. In this context, updating I/Os means
refreshing the input and output values.
The JetControl 24x controller signals a time-out error in error register 2008 when the
number of retries has reached the specified value.
Register 2761: Index to I/O time-out monitoring array
Function
Read
Description
Actual index
Index corresponds to I/O module
number
232
Write
New index
Value range
2 .. 32, 70 .. 79
Value after reset
2
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
11.8 Monitoring of I/O modules
Register 2762: I/O time-out monitoring array
Function
Read
Description
Actual value of JX2-I/O monitoring
array
Reg. 2761 = 2
-> Reg. 2762: Entry for I/O module # 2
Reg. 2761 = 3
-> Reg. 2762: Entry for I/O module # 3
Reg. 2761 = 70
-> Reg. 2762: Entry for I/O module # 70
Write
When entering the value "0", the entry
for the currently selected I/O module is
set to zero.
Value range
0 .. 65.535
Value after reset
0
If the JetControl 24x does not receive an answer from a JX2-I/O or JX-SIO module
within the time-out specified in register 2763, the entry in the I/O time-out monitoring
array assigned to the given module is incremented by one.
The I/O time-out monitoring array allows to evaluate the quality of the connection
between JetControl 24x and individual expansion modules.
Register 2763: I/O monitoring time-out
Function
Description
Read
Actual JX2-I/O monitoring time-out
Write
New JX2-I/O monitoring time-out
Value range
2 .. 255 [ms]
Value after reset
10 [ms]
Register 2763 can be used to configure the maximum allowed time the JetControl
24x will wait for a response from the expansion module when updating I/Os. The
entry in the I/O time-out array, which is assigned to the corresponding expansion
module, will be incremented by one not until this time-out has elapsed.
Jetter AG
233
11 Topology of the Jetter System Bus
JetWeb
Register 2764: Time-out with register access to a
JX2-I/O module
Function
Description
Read
Actual time-out
Write
New time-out
Value range
2 .. 255 [ms]
Value after reset
10 [ms]
Register 2764 can be used to configure the maximum allowed time the JetControl
24x will wait for a response when accessing JX2-I/O registers (register 3xxz). Not
until this time has elapsed, a time-out error is indicated in register 2008.
Register 2765: Time-out when accessing registers on
a JX2-Slave module
Function
Description
Read
Actual time-out
Write
New time-out
Value range
2 .. 255 [ms]
Value after reset
20 [ms]
Register 2765 can be used to configure the maximum allowed time the JetControl
24x will wait for a response when accessing JX2-Slave registers (register 1xzzz). Not
until this time has elapsed, a time-out error is indicated in register 2008.
234
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
12.1 Hardware errors
12
Error Handling
When dealing with errors, the following distinction has to be made:
•
•
•
Hardware Errors
Application Program Errors
Operating system errors
12.1
Hardware errors
If communication via system bus with a module connected to a JetControl 24x is not
possible, this error is signalled by the following messages:
•
The number of the module where a communication time-out has occurred is
indicated in register 2011 resp. 2012;
•
The red LED ERR on the JetControl 24x basic controller is lit when register 2008
is not equal to zero.
To check whether the application program will access to registers which cause
errors, the JetControl 24x must be powered on while the program is stopped (toggle
switch in "STOP" position). If register 2008 continues to display "0", the error is
caused by the application program. If a value other than "0" is displayed, proceed
according to chapter 12.3 "OS Error Messages", page 238.
12.2
Syntax Check
Application Program Errors
The programming interface JetSym includes a syntax check function which
"intercepts" errors in the application program. When compiling the source
program, syntax check can either be enabled or disabled. While working with
JetSym, it is advisable to leave the syntax check enabled since it spots
fundamental errors (cf. Fig. 50).
If syntax checking is disabled, it may happen that faulty programs are downloaded to
the JetControl 24x controller. In this case, errors will be reported in register 2008.
Register 2001 signals whether the application program is running properly or has
been stopped.
Jetter AG
235
12 Error Handling
JetWeb
Fig. 50: Activating syntax check in JetSym
Note!
Even with the syntax check activated, a program cannot completely be checked
during the compilation process. For example, errors with indirect addressing or
overflow of numbers within an arithmetic calculation can be detected only during
runtime of the application program.
Register 2001: Status register
Function
Read
Write
Value range
Description
State:
Bit 0 = 0:
Program has been
stopped
Bit 0 = 1:
Program is running
Bit 3 = 1
always
Bit 0 = 0:
Stop program
Bit 0 = 1:
Start program
0 .. 255
The status register signals whether the program in the controller is currently running
or has been stopped.
236
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
12.2 Application Program Errors
A program can be stopped under the following conditions:
• If a syntax error in the application program has been spotted. The type of error is
displayed in register 2008 and LED ERR is lit.
• If the program has been stopped through the setup screen of JetSym by pressing
Ctrl+Shift+P or by writing into register 2001;
• If the "STOP-RUN" switch is in "STOP" position when the controller is powered
up.
Note!
The LED RUN signals whether the program is running properly or has been
stopped.
LED RUN lit:
Program is running
LED RUN is flashing:
Program has been stopped
Register 2009: Number of the erroneous task
Function
Read
Description
Number of the task in which an error
has occurred.
Value after reset: 255
Error code:
255:
No error!
254:
The program code cannot be
related to a task following
program start or reset.
Write
Error message is deleted
Value range
0 .. 99
If in the application program an error has been spotted, the number of the task, in
which the error has occurred, can be read from this register.
Jetter AG
237
12 Error Handling
JetWeb
Note!
When a newly created application program is transferred, it is at first stored only
to the RAM. To store the application program permanently to the flash
memory, it has to be copied from RAM to flash memory. If the function
Autoflash has been activated (cf. Fig. 74), JetSym will automatically copy the
program to the flash memory each time the program is transferred.
If the program is not copied to the flash memory, the "old" program will again be
activated on restarting the controller.
12.3
OS Error Messages
Register 2008: Operating System Error Messages
Error
number
Type of Error
Bit 2 = 1
No valid application
program
•
Application program
not found or invalid,
e.g. damaged
– Download valid application
program
Bit 3 = 1
Time-out of JX2-I/O or JXSIO module: Module does
not respond
•
Intermittent electrical
contact or break of
Jetter system bus
cable
– Check Jetter system bus
cable for continuity and short
circuit. For doing so, shake
the cable.
Bit 4 = 1
Time-out of JX2-Slave
module: Module does not
respond
•
Access to intelligent
modules which have
not been inserted or
detected.
Reg. 12100 .. 17499
– Check power supply of the
intelligent module.
– Do not power up intelligent
modules following power-up
of the CPU, i.e. intelligent
modules have to be powered
up at the same time as the rest
of the system.
– If the 5 V LED of the relevant
module is not illuminated,
return the module for repair.
– Check the addressing of
registers for the module in the
JetSym program and correct
it, if necessary. The module
must be detected in the
module array with registers
2015 and 2016.
238
Error Cause
Troubleshooting
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
12.3 OS Error Messages
Register 2008: Operating System Error Messages
Error
number
Type of Error
Error Cause
Troubleshooting
•
Access to nonintelligent modules
which have not been
inserted or detected.
Reg. 3000 .. 3149
– Calculation of register
address is wrong
– Module defective
– Too many modules are
connected to the Jetter
system bus cable without
power supply module PS1.
•
Intermittent electrical
contact or break of
Jetter system bus
cable
– Check Jetter system bus
cable for continuity and short
circuit. For doing so, shake
the cable.
Bit 5 = 1
Illegal op-code in the RAM
•
Erroneous application
program
– Reload application program
Bit 6 = 1
Wrong programming of an
arithmetic calculation
•
Faulty programming
– Activate syntax check. Then,
reload revised program.
Bit 7 = 1
Multiple entry of a label
number
•
Faulty programming
– Activate syntax check. Then,
reload revised program.
Bit 8 = 1
General syntax error
•
Faulty programming
– Activate syntax check. Then,
reload revised program.
Bit 9 = 1
Flag 2065 is set: Overload
of one or several output
drivers on the basic
device.
•
Overload or short
circuit of a set output
– Eliminate short circuit
Bit 10 = 1
Jump to a non-existing
label or subprogram
•
No jump label defined
in the application
program
– Activate syntax checking,
check program and revise it.
Bit 12 = 1
Task stack overflow or
underflow
•
Too many subprogram
levels.
Too many nesting
levels for function calls.
Missing RETURN at
the end of subroutines/
functions
– Activate syntax checking,
check program fund revise it.
•
•
Jetter AG
239
12 Error Handling
JetWeb
Error messages of special flags
Flag number
240
Type of Error
2048
I/O-Module time-out: corresponds to register 2008, bit 3
2049
Slave module time-out: corresponds to register 2008, bit 4
2050
Time-out during register access to a JX2-I/O Module
2074
Error in arithmetic calculation
2075
Network error
2065
Enable error message of output drivers. For more information see register 2008, bit 9
2067
Fatal system bus error
2068
Accumulation of errors on the system bus
2270
Access to inactive JX-SIO module
2272
Access to an unknown JX-SIO register
2273
Access to a not supported JX-SIO register
2274
Time-out when monitoring a JX-SIO module
2275
JX-SIO has carried out an internal reset
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
13
Introduction to Web Functions
The JetControl system provides following Web functions:
•
•
•
FTP Server: Access to directories and files of the file system on the built-in flash
disk.
HTTP Server: Homepages can be downloaded into the controller via FTP and
accessed with any standard internet browser. Access to variables of the controller
runtime system.
SMTP Client: E-Mails can be sent by the controller. E-mail header parameters
and message contents with variables of the controller runtime system.
All these services are based on the JetControl file system.
FTP-Server
Standard
User: admin
Password: admin
4 connections
max.
E-Mail
Standard Page
index.htm(l)
SSI
SOAP
Runtime of
the Controller
16 connections
max.
User
program
Data files
File System
7 directory levels + 1 file level
Names of directories or files: 63 characters max.
8 files max. may be opended at the same time
Case sensitivity
All characters except for / . .. are permitted
Date, time, size
User- / Access administration
Fig. 51: File system, servers and services
Do not delete the user program file userprog.ej2 in the file system (flash disk).
Important!
Jetter AG
241
13 Introduction to Web Functions
13.1
JetWeb
Licensing
For the FTP server no licensing is required.
13.1.1 Description
To be able to use the Web functions "e-mail" and "HTTP Server" a valid license file
is required when JetControl is booting. This license is an individual license, i.e. for
each JetControl an individual license file is required.
If e-mail and HTTP functions are ordered together with the controller (JetControl 24x
- W), a valid license file is included in the delivery. This file must not be deleted.
For reorders the serial number on the nameplate of the JetControl has to be
indicated.
13.1.2 License File
The license file is named "license.dat" and is located in the subdirectory "/licenses".
This file is a pure text file.
The file is divided into different sections: The section "SMTPHTTP" includes the key
which unlocks the web functions.
Note!
The same file also contains license information on web functions and the Modbus/
TCP protocol. If various functions are purchased at different points in time, the
contents of the various license files have to be copied together to create a
common "license.dat" file.
Example 40: Structure of a license file for web functions
[SMTPHTTP]
CONTROLLER=JetControl24x
SERIALNUMBER=20030825070353
LICENSE=bb40478bf99d5383cb8ad911879852330080f9296542bf55
[MODBUS_TCP]
CONTROLLER=JetControl24x
SERIALNUMBER=20030825070353
LICENSE=171a1dd0a3c7cfd99121834ba2c208d65adad1733f51e50f
[ETHERNET_IP]
CONTROLLER=JetControl24x
SERIALNUMBER=20030825070353
LICENSE=fc071dccbeda14c48ccd9e56c0df157447c7be6e2205f812
242
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
13.2 Availability of Web Functions
Note!
The subdirectory "/licenses" and the file "license.dat" exist in any configuration
and can not be deleted even if the flash disk is formatted. If you did not buy a
license, this file exists, but it is empty.
The license file has a constant date and the file size is always "0".
13.2
Availability of Web Functions
After power-on of the controller the Web functions are initialized. Bit 0 to 2 of register
2930 indicate the state of the Web function initialization, respectively their availability.
Register 2930 - Bit No
Jetter AG
Availability
0
0 = FTP server not available
1 = FTP server available
1
0 = HTTP server not available
1 = HTTP server available
2
0 = E-Mail client not available
1 = E-Mail client available
3
0 = Data file function not available
1 = Data file function available
4
0 = No Modbus/TCP
1 = Modbus/TCP has been licensed
5
0 = Modbus/TCP server not available
1 = Modbus/TCP server available
6
0 = No EtherNet/IP
1 = EtherNet/IP available
243
13 Introduction to Web Functions
13.3
JetWeb
The FTP Server
The FTP server allows access to directories and files of the flash disk integrated into
the JetControl 24x using an FTP client. Apart from the command line FTP client,
which comes with many PC operating systems, graphic FTP tools can be used, as
well.
13.3.1 Log-In
To have access to the file system via FTP the FTP client must log in and enter the
user name and password. In its original configuration the controller is provided with
a user account with administrators rights:
User:
admin
Password:
admin
Via user administration of the file system, this password can be modified and new
users can be added (cf. chapter 14.2 "User Administration", page 249).
13.3.2 Key Commands
Overview of the most important commands supported by the FTP server:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
244
File transfer to and from the controller: Commands: RETR and STOR.
Deleting files. Command: DELE.
Create and delete directories. Commands: MKD and RMD.
Change the current directory. Command: CWD, for example, CWD EMAIL or CWD /
(back to the root directory).
Displaying files and subdirectories of the current directory. Command: LIST.
Directory names are separated by a slash / not by a backslash \.
Case sensitivity: EMAIL is not Email !
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
13.4 The HTTP Server
13.4
The HTTP Server
The HTTP server can be accessed via standard browser. To do so, it may also be
necessary (depending on the file system configuration) to enter the user name and
password to have access to certain files.
The default file names are index.htm and index.html.
13.4.1 Supported File Types
The following file types are supported:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
*.htm, *.html, *.shtml
*.txt, *.ini
*.gif, *.tif, *.tiff, *.bmp, *.wbmp
*.jpg, *.jpe, *.jpeg, *.png
*.xml
*.js, *.jar, *.java, *.class, *.cab
*.ocx
*.pdf, *.zip, *.doc, *.rtf
*.css
*.wml, *.wmlc, *.wmls, *.wmlsc
13.4.2 Server Side Includes
This function allows to display actual values of controller variables (inputs, outputs,
flags, registers) in an HTML page.
Refer to chapter 17.2 "Server Side Includes", page 279.
Jetter AG
245
13 Introduction to Web Functions
13.5
JetWeb
The E-Mail Client
Up to 256 various E-mails can be sent from the controller via e-mail client. The e-mail
templates have to be stored in the directory /EMAIL.
Note!
The path /EMAIL has to be written in capital letters since the controller file system
is case sensitive.
An e-mail is sent using the following command:
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (110, x, y)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (110, x, y);
x specifies the number of the register that contains the number of the e-mail that is
to be sent. The number of the e-mail is part of the e-mail file name: email_0.cfg to
email_255.cfg.
y stands for the register number that contains the function result, e.g. error codes.
Each e-mail consists of different sections:
[FROM]
[TO]
[CC]
[SUBJECT]
[ATTACHMENT]
[MESSAGE]
Note!
The complete path to the attached file is specified in the [ATTACHMENT]
section. The attached file must be an ASCII file (pure text file).
The e-mail file itself is an ASCII file that can be created with any ASCII editor, for
example the Windows Editor.
246
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
13.6 IP Addresses
Actual controller values can be integrated into the e-mail text via tag functions. Realtime states of the automation process can be transmitted via e-mail by this tag
functions.
See chapter 16 "E-Mail", page 263.
13.6
IP Addresses
Now, names can be specified as IP addresses (e.g. when configuring the e-mail
client). To this end, the host name is assigned to the IP address in the file "hosts" in
the directory "/etc".
If the name cannot be found in the file "hosts", the operating system tries to achieve
name resolution through a DNS server. For this purpose, the IP address of the DNS
server is to be specified in the configuration file "cfgvar.ini" in the directory "/System"
or in register 10145.
Note!
Due to runtime reasons, addressing through names in the realtime section of the
controller (e.g. with the instructions N_COPY_TO/FROM) is not possible. Direct
information on the IP address have to be given there.
13.6.1 The file "hosts"
This file must be stored in the directory "/etc". It is read out once when the controller
is booting. This file has to be created in the same format as the corresponding
Windows file. This file is a pure text file.
Example 41: Possible contents of the file "hosts"
# Sample HOSTS file for JC-24x
192.168.33.209 jetter_mail
192.168.33.208 jetter_demo
192.168.10.211 JC211
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13 Introduction to Web Functions
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13.6.2 Domain Name System
If a host name cannot be found in the file "hosts", the controller tries to resolve the IP
address by obtaining the corresponding IP address from a DNS server. During the
booting process of the controller the IP address of the DNS server is read out of the
configuration memory.
Configuration File
The configuration memory can be accessed via the configuration file "/System/
cfgvar.ini" by means of an FTP connection with administrator rights.
Example 42: Possible contents of the configuration file "/System/
cfgvar.ini"
[CFGVAR]
Version
IP_Address
IP_SubNetMask
IP_DefGateway
BasePort
IP_DNS
HostNameType
HostName
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
5
192.128. 10. 97
255.255.255. 0
192.128. 10. 1
50000
192.118.210.209
1
JetControl24x
Configuration Registers
An alternative method to using the configuration file, is accessing the configuration
memory through special registers. The IP address of the DNS server can be read out
of register 10145.
To modify this address, proceed as follows:
1. Enter value 0x77566152 into the password register 10159
2. Enter the IP address of the DNS server into register 10145
3. Save the configuration by entering any value into register 10100 (the value is of
no significance)
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14.1 Properties
14
File System
14.1
Properties
The file system of the JetControl 24x is for managing the built-in flash disk. This file
system consists of system directories which cannot be deleted by the user and an
area which is available to the user. The size of this area is:
JetControl 241
1 MBytes
JetControl 243
3 MBytes
JetControl 246
7 MBytes
Properties:
• 7 directory levels and 1 file level
• Directory or file names with a maximum length of 63 characters
• Maximum number of simultaneously opened files: 8
• Case sensitivity
• Directory names are separated by a slash "/" not by a backslash "\".
• For directory and file names all characters are allowed, excluding "/" and "..".
• Date, time, file size (apart from system files)
• User/access administration for a maximum number of 31 locks and 32 users.
14.2
User Administration
The JetControl file system offers the possibility to define authorization for access
(locks) to flash disk directories, as well as to set up users with specific permissions
(keys).
Such settings can be made in various configuration files located in the directory "/
System". Since these files are stored outside the normal flash disk, they will not be
deleted when formatting the flash disk.
Only users with administrator rights are authorized to read and modify these files.
Note!
Administrator rights are assigned by the key "1". This assignment is permanently
defined in the file system and cannot be influenced by the user.
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Basically, the following rule applies: The contents of a user administration file can
be read immediately after the file has been transferred. However, it will be
applicable only after the next reboot of the control system.
Important!
Note!
Directories and files, for which the user does not have the required key, will not be
displayed by the FTP command LIST (for displaying directory contents).
14.2.1 Flash Disk Lock File
In this file, locks can be assigned to subdirectories located on the flash disk. Only
users with the corresponding key are allowed to read or write (delete) files and
subdirectories located in these directories.
File
The file "flashdisklock.ini" is a configuration file and has only one section, namely
"[LOCKS]". Each subdirectory on the flash disk is specified with its lock number in an
individual line. Lock numbers from 0 to 31 can be assigned. "0" means that the given
subdirectory is not locked, i.e. it can be accessed without particular authorization.
It is also possible to assign a name instead of a number. The name has first to be
defined in the file "keys.ini".
Example 43: Possible contents of the file "flashdisklock.ini"
[LOCKS]
test1=0
test1/sub1=0
test1/sub2=5
test2=user1
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14.2 User Administration
14.2.2 Key Names File
The file system supports up to 31 different user locks/keys which are consecutively
numbered from 1 to 31. To provide ease of handling, a name can be assigned to
each lock/key combination in this file. The names have to be unambiguously and
may comprise of a maximum of 15 alphanumeric characters.
To access a subdirectory protected by a lock, users have to use the matching key.
Lock and key have the same name.
File
The lock and key names are entered into the section "[KEYS]" of the file "keys.ini".
The names defined here can be used for creating locks and users once the file has
been transferred and the controller has been rebooted.
Example 44: Possible contents of the file "keys.ini"
[KEYS]
KEY01=admin
KEY02=os
KEY03=
KEY04=
KEY05=
KEY06=
KEY07=
KEY08=
KEY09=
KEY10=user1
KEY11=user2
KEY12=
KEY13=
KEY14=user5
KEY15=
KEY16=
KEY17=
KEY18=
KEY19=
KEY20=
KEY21=
KEY22=
KEY23=
KEY24=
KEY25=
KEY26=
KEY27=
KEY28=
KEY29=
KEY30=
KEY31=
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14.2.3 User File
The file system supports up to 32 users. Each user is provided with:
• an unambiguous name with up to 31 alphanumeric characters
• a password with up to 31 alphanumeric characters
• a set of up to 31 read access keys
• a set of up to 31 write access keys
The FTP and HTTP servers use the user database to control access to the file
system.
File
The file "users.ini" is a configuration file comprising of up to 32 sections with user
names ranging from "[USER1]" to "[USER32]". The entry “NAME” is mandatory. The
entries password "PW", read access keys "READKEYS" and write access keys
"WRITEKEYS" are optional. The entry "SYSKEYS" is intended for future expansions
and has no function at the moment.
The read and write keys are displayed as a comma separated list. They have to be
entered into the list in the same format. Keys, to which names have been assigned
(chapter 14.2.2 "Key Names File", page 251), are displayed with their names. When
creating the file, both names and numbers of the keys can be used.
Any user with administrator rights is allowed to modify the user file.
Note!
[USER1] must always have the name "admin".
It is not possible to delete the user "admin" ([USER1]) nor to modify his write or
read key. Only his password can be set.
Example 45: Possible contents of the file "users.ini"
[USER1]
NAME=admin
PW=admin
READKEYS=1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,
21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31
WRITEKEYS=1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,
21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31
[USER2]
NAME=OS_update
PW=jetterOS
READKEYS=1
WRITEKEYS=1
[USER3]
NAME=jetter
PW=test
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14.3 System directories / files
14.3
System directories / files
On the flash disk of the JetControl 24x directories and files are located which are
required for system configuration or from which system information can be read. As
these directories and files are located in a memory area which is not available to the
user, they cannot be deleted, but only overwritten. Even formatting the flash disk has
no impact on these files.
Without administrator rights, only access to the file "/System/flashdiskinfo.txt" is
granted. For access to all other directories and files administrator rights are required.
Note!
The creation date of system files is a constant date. It is the date when the disk
has been formatted.
Fig. 52: System directories / files
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14.3.1 The file "/license/license.dat"
For more information refer to chapter 13.1.1 "Description", page 242.
The key for Modbus/TCP communication is located in the section "MODBUS_TCP",
the key for EtherNet/IP in the section "ETHERNET_IP".
If various functions are purchased at different points in time, the contents of the
various license files have to be copied together to create a common "license.dat" file.
Example 46: The three possible sections of the license file
[SMTPHTTP]
CONTROLLER=JetControl24x
SERIALNUMBER=20011023150021
LICENSE=f4d0cf3d577c823f1a45d6119595387000802d2965e3bf55
[MODBUS_TCP]
CONTROLLER=JetControl24x
SERIALNUMBER=20011023150021
LICENSE=20ca3ec94895de551afd8d4bf7cc629a5ada0f733fb3e50f
[ETHERNET_IP]
CONTROLLER=JetControl24x
SERIALNUMBER=20010619070027
LICENSE=9a0e3453c9d8ec0fa62bb77ffbf63e1e6eee43470b8dd13b
14.3.2 The directory "/System/OS" and the file "/
System/system.ose"
The directory "/System/OS" serves as target directory when updating the OS via FTP
connection. For this purpose, the OS file (e.g. "JC240_V320.ose") is copied into this
directory.
As an alternative, the OS file can directly be copied into the directory "/System". In
this case the file must be named "system.ose".
The OS located in the flash memory of the JetControl can be read-out by reading the
file "/System/system.ose".
For more information refer to chapter Appendix B: "Operating System Update", page
367.
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14.3 System directories / files
14.3.3 The file "/System/cfgvar.ini"
Several settings of the network interface are stored to the configuration memory of
the JetControl 24x. These settings will be read during the boot process and the
interface will be initialized correspondingly. The configuration memory can be
accessed via the configuration file "/System/cfgvar.ini" or via registers 10131 through
10145, and 10200 through 10219.
This file has the same structure as a Windows *.INI file.
Example 47: Possible contents of the configuration file "/System/
cfgvar.ini"
[CFGVAR]
Version
IP_Address
IP_SubNetMask
IP_DefGateway
BasePort
IP_DNS
HostNameType
HostName
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
5
192.128. 10. 97
255.255.255. 0
192.128. 10. 1
50000
192.118.210.209
1
JetControl24x
In no case, do not change the version number.
Important!
Jetter AG
IP_Address:
(Part of) IP address of the JetControl 24x, see chapter 5.10
"Setting the IP Address", page 52.
IP_SubNetMask:
Defines a mask for comparing addresses when sending and
receiving IP frames.
IP_DefGateway:
Specifies a gateway address for devices which are located
outside the own subnet.
BasePort:
Base port number for communication via JetIP
IP_DNS:
IP address of DNS server
HostNameType
Specifies how a an unambiguous name is generated from
the HostName.
HostName
Is used for EtherNet/IP; refer to chapter 21.2.4 "HostName /
HostNameType", page 323
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14 File System
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14.3.4 The files "/System/flashdisklock.ini", "/
System/keys.ini", and "/System/
users.ini"
For detailed information on these files refer to chapter 14.2 "User Administration",
page 249.
14.3.5 The file "/System/flashdiskinfo.txt"
This file - the only file which can be accessed without administrator rights - provides
information on the flash disk's user area.
Example 48: Possible contents of the file "flashdiskinfo.txt"
Name :
Date :
Time :
Tracks:
Track
Track
Track
Track
Track
Track
Track
Track
Track
Track
Track
Track
Track
Track
Track
Track
flash disk
10.12.2002
13:07
16
0:
1:
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
7:
8:
9:
10:
11:
12:
13:
14:
15:
Total:
sectors:
sectors:
sectors:
sectors:
sectors:
sectors:
sectors:
sectors:
sectors:
sectors:
sectors:
sectors:
sectors:
sectors:
sectors:
sectors:
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
Used
:
Blocked:
Free
:
Total :
sectors: 2048
543560
161544
335280
1040384
(used:
(used:
(used:
(used:
(used:
(used:
(used:
(used:
(used:
(used:
(used:
(used:
(used:
(used:
(used:
(used:
1
0
107
128
128
128
123
0
84
94
70
126
69
12
0
0
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
blocked:
blocked:
blocked:
blocked:
blocked:
blocked:
blocked:
blocked:
blocked:
blocked:
blocked:
blocked:
blocked:
blocked:
blocked:
blocked:
38
0
21
0
0
0
5
0
25
34
58
2
59
76
0
0
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
free:
free:
free:
free:
free:
free:
free:
free:
free:
free:
free:
free:
free:
free:
free:
free:
89)
128)
0)
0)
0)
0)
0)
128)
19)
0)
0)
0)
0)
40)
128)
128)
(used: 1070 / blocked: 318 / free: 660)
byte
byte
byte
byte
In this example, the file of a JetControl 241 (1 MB) is shown.
"Date" and "Time" indicate the time when the flash disk has been formatted.
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14.4 Formatting the Flash Disk
Sector States
used
The sector is occupied with files
blocked
free
The sector is no longer occupied, but can not yet be used due
to administrative reasons
The sector is not occupied and can be used
At the end of the file statistical data are displayed.
14.4
Formatting the Flash Disk
Sometimes it might be necessary to reformat the flash disk. This can be the case if
an OS release has been transferred which has a different flash disk format (e.g.
when updating from OS release 2.xx to 3.xx). Or when information for flash disk
administration has been destroyed (e.g. due to a voltage drop during a file operation).
14.4.1 Formatting by means of the Format
Register
When the controller is powered-up the content of register 2936 is checked during the
initialization phase. If, at that moment, this register contains the value 29547, the
flash disk will be formatted and value "0" will be assigned to the register. Thus, to
format the flash disk using this register proceed as follows:
1. Switch the controller on.
2. Enter the value 29547 into register 2936 (using JetSym, LCD HMI, ...).
3. Switch the controller off.
4. Switch the controller on.
→ The flash disk formatting process starts
14.4.2 Formatting by means of mode selector
When the controller is powered up and the OS is initialized, the formatting process
can be activated by setting the mode selector in the following way:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Jetter AG
Switch the controller off.
Set selector to STOP position.
Switch the controller on.
As soon as the LED ERR (red) is lit, set selector to LOAD position.
Wait until LED RUN (green) is lit as well.
Wait until both of the LEDs go off.
Wait until both of the LEDs go on again, and
set switch to RUN position within 0.5 seconds
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14 File System
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If the switch is set to the RUN position within 0.5 seconds, the green LED (RUN) goes
off. The red LED (ERR) will be lit until the flash disk is cleared (time depends on how
full the disk is: approx. 2 to 10 s). Next, the LED RUN starts blinking and the LED
ERR is lit to indicate that no application program was found.
If the switch was set to the RUN position too late, the LED RUN will not go off. In this
case, please start from point 1 again.
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15.1 Log-In
15
FTP Server
The FTP server allows access to directories and files of the flash disk integrated into
the JetControl 24x using an FTP client program. Apart from the command line FTP
client, which comes with many PC operating systems, graphic FTP tools can be
used, as well.
The FTP server on the JetControl 24x is able to manage 4 FTP connections
simultaneously. That is, up to 4 FTP client programs can be connected with the
JetControl 24x at the same time. Any additional client, which tries to connect with the
FTP server, will get no response to its request for establishing a connection.
15.1
Log-In
To have access to the file system via FTP, the FTP client must log in and provide its
user name and password when starting the communication. In its original
configuration the controller is provided with a user account with administrators rights:
User:
admin
Password:
admin
Via user administration of the file system, this password can be modified and new
users can be added (cf. chapter 14.2 "User Administration", page 249).
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15.2
Supported Commands
Command
Meaning
USER
Sends the user name; is used at the beginning of the login process
PASS
Sends the password; is sent after USER to complete the
log-in process
QUIT
Terminates the connection
PORT
Specifies the IP address and port number to which the FTP
server is to connect for the next file transfer.
TYPE
Sets the transfer type; the following types are possible:
• Type A with interpretation N
• Type I
• Type L with 8 bits per character
MODE
Sets the transfer mode; here, only "S" (stream) is possible
STRU
Sets the file structure when transferring data; here, only "F"
(file) is possible
NLST
Returns a list containing the file names of a directory
LIST
Returns a list containing the file names and file information
of a directory
PWD
Returns the name of the current directory
CWD
Switches to another directory
CDUP
260
Moves up by one directory level
MKD
Creates a new directory
RMD
Removes a directory
STOR
Stores a file
RETR
Reads a file
DELE
Deletes a file
RNFR
Indicates the file name to be changed; must be followed by
"RNTO"
RNTO
Indicates the new name of the file which has been specified
by "RNFR" before.
PASV
The FTP server changes into "passive mode"
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
15.3 Example: Windows FTP Client
15.3
Example: Windows FTP Client
Below is a description of a session using the Windows NT 4.0 FTP Client:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Invoking the client program and opening the connection
Log in as user "admin" with password
Displaying the content of the current directory using "dir"
Transferring the file "jetter1.jpg" to the JetControl using the command "put"
Re-displaying the content of the current directory using "dir"
Terminating the session and the FTP client program using "bye"
Fig. 53: Session using the Windows NT 4.0 FTP Client
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16.1 Authentication
16
E-Mail
E-mails can be sent from the JetControl 24x if both a valid license exists (refer to
chapter 13.1 "Licensing", page 242), and this function has successfully been
initialized on the controller (refer to chapter 16.2 "The E-Mail INI file", page 263).
E-Mails are defined by means of templates which are stored to the controller in the
directory"/EMAIL". The "/EMAIL" directory has to be written in capital letters since
the controller's file system is case sensitive. Up to 256 different e-mail templates can
be created and selected for sending. E-mail transmission is triggered by
SPECIALFUNCTION / SYSTEMFUNCTION 110.
16.1
Authentication
16.1.1 Background
By default, no authentication is required for the SMTP protocol which is used for
sending e-mails. When this protocol was developed in the early 80-s, authentication
was not considered necessary. The today's measures of the Internet were not
foreseeable then.
From the today's point of view this fact represents an intolerable security hole. First
of all, the annoyance caused by spam e-mail is increasing from day-to-day.
Therefore, authentication has been added to the old SMTP protocol. To be able to
send e-mails via SMTP server a user name and a password have to be entered now.
This information is transmitted in encrypted form. This way, nobody is able to misuse
a mail server for sending illegal e-mails.
16.1.2 Supported Authentication Methods
POP3-before-SMTP
This is a method where the JetControl first has to establish a connection to the POP3
server. To do so, a user name and password are required. Thereupon, the JetControl
is allowed to send e-mails for a given period of time (mostly 10 to 30 minutes). The
settings (USER and PASSWORD) for this method are made in section POP3 of the
file "/EMAIL/email.ini". This file is described in the following.
SMTP-AUTH
The original SMTP protocol has been modified in a way where user login is now also
allowed. With this method only a user and the relating password for the SMTP server
have to be entered.
JetControl supports the following SMTP-AUTH actions: LOGIN, PLAIN and CRAMMD5. The settings (USER and PASSWORD) for this method are made in section
SMTP of the file "/EMAIL/email.ini". This file is described in the following.
16.2
Jetter AG
The E-Mail INI file
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16 E-Mail
JetWeb
The e-mail function is initialized during boot-up of the controller based on the
contents of the file "/EMAIL/email.ini". This file is a pure text file which is compatible
with Windows INI files.
The email.ini file is divided into different sections:
16.2.1 Section [SMTP]
In section [SMTP] the IP address and port number of the SMTP server are specified
and the parameter of the HELO command is defined.
The entries for PORT and HELO are optional. The standard port number 25 is used
if no port has been specified. The HELO name has a maximum length of 63
characters.
The IP address can be specified by entering a name which is, then, resolved by
means of the file "/etc/hosts" or a DNS server (for more information refer to chapter
13.6 "IP Addresses", page 247).
If there is no entry for "USER" in this section, log-on to the SMTP server is carried
out by the "HELO" command with the entry "HELO" as parameter. If "USER" has
been defined, the corresponding "PASSWORD" must be defined, too. In this case,
the log-on is carried out using the "EHLO" command and encrypted SMTP
authentication.
Example 49: Possible content of section [SMTP]
[SMTP]
IP=192.169.40.1
PORT=25
HELO=JetControl1
USER=JetControl0815
PASSWORD=MyPassWord
16.2.2 Section [DEFAULT]
In the section [DEFAULT] the name of an e-mail template file is specified which
contains default settings for e-mails. The settings made here will be used when
sending an e-mail if the corresponding section in an e-mail template has not been
defined.
Example 50: Possible content of section [DEFAULT]
[DEFAULT]
MAILCFG=email_default.cfg
16.2.3 Section [POP3]
Some e-mail servers require the e-mail client to log on via POP3 service before emails can be sent to the server.
The port number can be specified as an option. If no port number has been specified,
port number 110 is used.
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16.2 The E-Mail INI file
Here, the IP address can also be specified by entering a name which is, then,
resolved by means of the file "/etc/hosts" or a DNS server (for more information refer
to chapter 13.6 "IP Addresses", page 247).
Example 51: Possible content of section [POP3]
[POP3]
IP=192.169.40.1
Port=110
BENUTZER=testuser
PASSWORT=test
•
Bit 2=1 of register 2930 indicates proper initialization of the e-mail client.
Following section entries are obligatory. The other definitions are optional. If no
entries are made, the controller automatically uses the default values (e.g.
PORT=25). In this case no entries are needed. If no log-on is required, only the
IP address of the server has to be specified:
Note
[SMTP]
IP=192.169.40.1
For SMTP authentication the user name and the password have to be specified
additionally:
[SMTP]
IP=192.169.40.1
USER=JetControl0815
PASSWORD=MyPassWord
If the server requires a POP3 log-on, the following section is obligatory:
[POP3]
IP=192.169.40.1
BENUTZER=testuser
PASSWORT=test
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16.3
Structure of the E-Mail Template File
The e-mail template is an ASCII file which can be created by means of any ASCII
editor, for example the Windows Editor. The e-mail template consists of different
sections.
These sections are:
[FROM]
E-Mail sender
[TO]
E-mail addressee
[CC]
Additional e-mail addressee(s)
[SUBJECT]
E-Mail Reference
[ATTACHMENT]
Complete path and file name
[MESSAGE]
E-Mail text
Remarks:
•
•
•
Several addressees are separated by ";".
The complete path to the attached file is specified in the [ATTACHMENT] section.
The attached file must be an ASCII file. The file extension is of no significance.
All particulars can be tagged with real-time controller values that are integrated
into the e-mail text (refer to chapter 16.7 "Transmission of Controller Values",
page 269).
The content of the [FROM] section depends on the e-mail server. Some servers
accept no domain name, others append the domain name automatically. For
some servers the domain name must be specified. Other servers are able to
handle both options.
Note
Please check with your IT administrator which function is supported by your
server.
If your server does not accept a domain name, just omit the domain name. In this
case, the server inserts the domain name automatically. Only insert the name into
the [FROM] section.
[email protected]
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16.4 Name of the E-Mail Template File
16.4
Name of the E-Mail Template File
The e-mail template file is an ASCII file. It is stored in the "/EMAIL" directory. The
pattern of the E-Mail file name is:
email_xyz.cfg
xyz represents the number of the e-mail template. This number can be a value
between 0 and 255. Thus, a maximum number of 256 e-mail templates is possible.
Examples:
email_0.cfg
etc.
email_255.cfg
16.5
Sending E-Mails
An e-mail is sent using the following command:
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (110, x, y)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (110, x, y);
x specifies the number of the register that contains the number of the E-mail to be
sent. The number of the e-mail is part of the e-mail file name: email_0.cfg to
email_255.cfg.
y stands for the register number that contains the function result. Following results
are possible:
Error
code
Jetter AG
Meaning
Possible error cause
0
No error
-1
Insufficient memory
Operating system error
-2
FROM not defined
The file email_<No>.cfg file faulty or not
found.
-3
TO not defined
The file email_<No>.cfg is corrupt.
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Error
code
Meaning
Possible error cause
-4
No connection to the
e-mail server or error
during data transfer
to the e-mail server.
No E-Mail server available or wrong
configuration of the email.ini file. Data
transfer error.
-10
E-Mail function not
available. Bit 2 of
register 2930 is not
set.
Initialization error during operating system
start. For example email.ini corrupt or
missing.
-12
Internal error
Operating system error
Sending of an e-mail may take considerable time. Therefore, other application
tasks are carried out during sending of an e-mail. However, only one function call
can be carried out at a time. Tasks, which invoke this function while another task
is sending an e-mail, are therefore blocked until this operation is completed.
The state of the currently running operation can be polled through the registers
specified below.
Note
16.6
The E-Mail Default Template File
The e-mail default template file contains sections that are used if this section is not
specified in the corresponding e-mail. The e-mail default template file is placed in the
"/EMAIL" directory. The name of the default e-mail template file is defined in the
[DEFAULT] section of the e-mail initialization file "email.ini". The default setting for
the default e-mail template file name is "email_default.cfg".
The following default sections can be preset:
[FROM]
E-Mail sender
[TO]
E-mail addressee
[CC]
Additional e-mail addressee(s)
[SUBJECT]
E-Mail Reference
[ATTACHMENT]
Complete path and file name
[MESSAGE]
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16.7 Transmission of Controller Values
E-Mail text
16.7
Transmission of Controller Values
Actual controller values can be integrated into the parameters of the sections via tag
functions. Thus, the contents respectively states of registers and text variables,
inputs, outputs and flags can be transmitted via e-mail.
All tags start with following characters
<JW:DTAG
and are closed by the following character:
/>
Between these tag delimiters variables can be defined.
16.7.1 Format Definition
The appearance of the different variables, or the number of places, can be influenced
by means of the variable format.
•
When specifying the format, the number of digits / characters representing a
variable can be defined by the character "#".
•
Prefixing a zero "0" enables the output of leading zeroes (applies to the register
types INT, INTX and REAL).
•
Prefixing a plus sign "+" enables the output of a sign (applies to the register types
INT, and REAL).
•
Prefixing a space character enables the output of a space character for positive
values (applies to the register types INT and REAL).
Furthermore, values can be modified by a factor and an offset. If these variables
have been defined, the value is multiplied by the factor first, then, the offset is
added.
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16.7.2 Register - Text Variable
The variable name begins with a capital R followed by the register number.
Examples:
<JW:DTAG name="R100" type="INT" />
Result: The content of register 100 is inserted into the e-mail as integer number.
<JW:DTAG name="R65028" type="REAL" format="+0####.### factor="1.5"
offset="500" />
Result:
The content of register 65028 is multiplied by 1.5, then, 500 is added to the product,
and the result is displayed with sign and at least five integer positions (if necessary
with leading zeroes). Furthermore, three decimal positions are inserted.
The following types are possible:
Type
Meaning
INT
Integer decimal
INTX
Integer hexadecimal
INTB
Integer binary
BOOL
Register content = 0 -> Result: 0
Register content != 0 -> Result: 1
REAL
Floating point decimal
STRING
Text variable
Note!
INT is the default type if no type is defined.
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16.7 Transmission of Controller Values
16.7.3 Flags
The variable name begins with a capital F followed by the flag number.
Examples:
<JW:DTAG name="F100" type="STRING" />
Result: The state of flag 100 is inserted into the e-mail as TRUE or FALSE string.
<JW:DTAG name="F100" type="STRING" format="#" />
Result:
The state of flag 100 is inserted into the e-mail as T or F string.
The following types are possible:
Type
Meaning
BOOL
Flag = 0 -> Result: 0
Flag = 1 -> Result: 1
STRING
Flag = 0 -> Result: FALSE
Flag = 1 -> Result: TRUE
Note!
BOOL is the default type if no type is defined.
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16.7.4 Inputs
The variable name begins with a capital I followed by the input number.
Example:
<JW:DTAG name="I105" type="STRING" />
Result:
The state of input 105 is inserted into the e-mail as ON or OFF string.
The following types are possible:
Type
Meaning
BOOL
Input = 0 -> Result: 0
Input = 1 -> Result: 1
STRING
Input = 0 -> Result: OFF
Input = 1 -> Result: ON
Note!
BOOL is the default type if no type is defined.
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16.7 Transmission of Controller Values
16.7.5 Outputs
The variable name begins with a capital O followed by the output number.
Examples:
<JW:DTAG name="O105" type="BOOL" />
Result: The state of output 105 is inserted into the E-Mail as 1 or 0.
<JW:DTAG name="O105" type="STRING" format="##" />
Result:
The state of output 105 is inserted into the e-mail as ON or OFF.
The following types are possible:
Type
Meaning
BOOL
Output = 0 -> Result: 0
Output = 1 -> Result: 1
STRING
Output = 0 -> Result: OFF
Output = 1 -> Result: ON
Note!
BOOL is the default type if no type is defined.
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16.7.6 Indirect Access
Indirect access is realized by inserting the capital letter P in front of the variable
name. P stands for Pointer. Access is now realized indirectly by the content of the
register that is specified in the variable name.
Examples:
<JW:DTAG name="PR100" type="INT" />
The content of the register is transferred whose number was specified in register
100.
<JW:DTAG name="PF100" type="BOOL" />
The state of the flag is transferred whose number was specified in register 100.
<JW:DTAG name="PI100" type="BOOL" />
The state of the input is transferred which number is specified in register 100.
<JW:DTAG name="PO100" type="BOOL" />
The state of the output is transferred which number is specified in Register 100.
In addition, an offset can be defined to the value in the pointer register. This value is
for defining the register, flag, input or output number.
Examples:
<JW:DTAG name="PR100 + 75" type="INT" />
Result:
The content of the register is transferred whose number results from the addition of
the content of register 100 and the value 75.
<JW:DTAG name="PR100 + R75" type="INT" />
Result:
The content of the register is transferred whose number results from the addition of
the content of register 100 and the content of register 75.
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16.8 Maximum Values
16.8
Maximum Values
For the individual e-mail sections the following number of characters is allowed:
[FROM]
63
[TO]
127
[CC]
127
[SUBJECT]
127
[MESSAGE]
8191
16.9
E-Mail Tracking Register
With the help of two registers the user can track whether an e-mail has been sent.
Register 2937: Status of e-mail processing
Function
Read
Description
0: No e-mail is being processed
1: Transfer to e-mail module
2: E-Mail is being compiled
3: E-mail has been sent to the server.
Value after reset: 0
Write
Illegal
Value range
0 .. 255
Register 2938: Task number of e-mail task
Function
Read
Description
Number of task that is just sending an e-mail:
0 .. 99:
Task number
255:
No task is sending an e-mail
Value after reset: 255
Jetter AG
Write
Illegal
Value range
0 .. 255
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Evaluating register 2938 makes sense only if the value in register 2937 is not 0.
Note
16.10 Sample E-Mail
Example 52: E-mail template file
Fig. 54: E-mail template file
The following register contents
Register 100
= 1234
; will not completely be displayed with (bin)
Register 65028
= 20.5
; rounding to 2 decimal positions
result in the following e-mail:
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16.10 Sample E-Mail
Fig. 55: Received e-mail
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17.1 Supported File Types
17
HTTP Server
The availability of the HTTP server depends on whether there is a valid license file
when the controller is booting (refer to chapter 13.1 "Licensing", page 242).
The HTTP server can be accessed via standard browser. The browser is for reading
and displaying files which have been downloaded to the controller via FTP. To do so,
it may also be necessary (depending on the file system configuration) to enter the
user name and password to have access to certain files.
The default file names are index.htm and index.html.
17.1
Supported File Types
The following file types are supported:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
*.htm, *.html, *.shtml
*.txt, *.ini
*.gif, *.tif, *.tiff, *.bmp, *.wbmp
*.jpg, *.jpe, *.jpeg, *.png
*.xml
*.js, *.jar, *.java, *.class, *.cab
*.ocx
*.pdf, *.zip, *.doc, *.rtf
*.css
*.wml, *.wmlc, *.wmls, *.wmlsc
17.2
Server Side Includes
•
Current controller values can be displayed in an HTML page using the "Server
Side Includes" (SSI) function in the HTTP server.
•
To do so, a "Name Space Tag" has to be defined at the beginning of the HTML
page that is to contain the controller values. This name space tag defines the
"Name Space" used in the page.
•
When the page is loaded into the browser, the HTTP server replaces the "Data
Tags" in the "Body" section of the page once by current controller values.
Note!
To refresh the values, the page must be reloaded.
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17.2.1 Name Space Tag
The "Name Space Tag" must be the first entry in the HTML file. Its structure is as
follows:
<NS:DTAG xmlns:NS=http://jetter.de/ssi/jetcontrol/
with "NS" representing the "name space". A character string with a maximum length
of 63 characters can be chosen for the name space. The "Name Space" introduced
here will be used again for the subsequent "Data Tags".
The remaining parts of the line are fixed and have to be specified in exactly the same
manner.
In the following examples, JC is used for "Name Space".
17.2.2 Data Tag
All "data tags" begin with the following string:
<NS:DTAG
They are completed by the character:
/>
Between these tag delimiters the following variables can be defined:
Format Definition
The appearance of the different variables, or the number of places, can be influenced
by means of the variable Format.
•
When specifying the format, the number of digits / characters representing a
variable can be defined by the character "#".
•
Prefixing a zero "0" enables the output of leading zeroes (applies to the register
types INT, INTX and REAL).
•
Prefixing a plus sign "+" enables the output of a sign (applies to the register types
INT, and REAL).
•
Prefixing a space character enables the output of a space character for positive
values (applies to the register types INT and REAL).
Furthermore, values can be modified by a factor and an offset. If these variables
have been defined, the value is multiplied by the factor first, then, the offset is
added.
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17.2 Server Side Includes
Register - Text Variable
The variable name begins with a capital R followed by the register number.
Examples:
<JC:DTAG name="R100" type="INT" />
Result:
The content of register 100 is inserted into the e-mail as integer number.
<JC:DTAG name="R65028" type="REAL" format="+0####.### factor="1.5"
offset="500" />
Result:
The content of register 65028 is multiplied by 1.5, then, 500 is added to the product,
and the result is displayed with sign and at least five integer positions (if necessary
with leading zeroes). Furthermore, three decimal positions are inserted into the text.
The following types are possible:
Type
Meaning
INT
Integer decimal
INTX
Integer hexadecimal
INTB
Integer binary
BOOL
Register content = 0 -> Result: 0
Register content != 0 -> Result: 1
REAL
Floating point decimal
STRING
Text variable
Note!
INT is the default type if no type is defined.
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Register - Bit Variable
The variable name begins with a capital B followed by the register number. The
number of the bit is indicated by a preceding period.
Examples:
<JC:DTAG name="B100.2" type="STRING" />
Result:
The state of bit 2 of register 100 is represented as TRUE or FALSE.
<JC:DTAG name="B100.0" type="STRING" format="#" />
Result:
The state of bit 0 of register 100 is represented as TRUE or FALSE.
The following types are possible:
Bool is the default type if no type is defined.
Type
BOOL
STRING
282
Meaning
Bit reset
-> Display: 0
Bit set
-> Display: 1
Bit reset
-> Display: FALSE
Bit set
-> Display: TRUE
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
17.2 Server Side Includes
Flags
The variable name begins with a capital F followed by the flag number.
Examples:
<JC:DTAG name="F100" type="STRING" />
Result:
The state of flag 100 is inserted into the page as TRUE or FALSE string.
<JC:DTAG name="F100" type="STRING" format="#" />
Result:
The state of flag 100 is inserted into the page as T or F string.
The following types are possible:
Type
Meaning
BOOL
Flag = 0 -> Result: 0
Flag = 1 -> Result: 1
STRING
Flag = 0 -> Result: FALSE
Flag = 1 -> Result: TRUE
Note!
BOOL is the default type if no type is defined.
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Inputs
The variable name begins with a capital I followed by the input number.
Example:
<JC:DTAG name="I105" type="STRING" />
Result:
The state of input 105 is inserted into the page as ON or OFF string.
The following types are possible:
Type
Meaning
BOOL
Input = 0 -> Result: 0
Input = 1 -> Result: 1
STRING
Input = 0 -> Result: OFF
Input = 1 -> Result: ON
Note!
BOOL is the default type if no type is defined.
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17.2 Server Side Includes
Outputs
The variable name begins with a capital O followed by the output number.
Examples:
<JC:DTAG name="O105" type="BOOL" />
Result:
The state of output 105 is inserted into the page as 1 or 0.
<JC:DTAG name="O105" type="STRING" format="##" />
Result:
The state of output 105 is inserted into the page as ON or OFF.
The following types are possible:
Type
Meaning
BOOL
Output = 0 -> Result: 0
Output = 1 -> Result: 1
STRING
Output = 0 -> Result: OFF
Output = 1 -> Result: ON
Note!
BOOL is the default type if no type is defined.
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Indirect Access
Indirect access is realized by inserting the capital letter P in front of the variable
name. P stands for Pointer. Access is now realized indirectly by the content of the
register that is specified in the variable name.
Examples:
<JC:DTAG name="PR100" type="INT" />
The content of the register is transferred whose number was specified in register
100.
<JC:DTAG name="PF100" type="BOOL" />
The state of the flag is transferred whose number was specified in register 100.
<JC:DTAG name="PI100" type="BOOL" />
The state of the input is transferred which number is specified in register 100.
<JC:DTAG name="PO100" type="BOOL" />
The state of the output is transferred which number is specified in Register 100.
In addition, an offset can be defined to the value in the pointer register. This value is
for defining the register, flag, input or output number.
Examples:
<JC:DTAG name="PR100 + 75" type="INT" />
Result:
The content of the register is transferred whose number results from the addition of
the content of register 100 and the value 75.
<JC:DTAG name="PR100 + R75" type="INT" />
Result:
The content of the register is transferred whose number results from the addition of
the content of register 100 and the content of register 75.
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17.3 Visualization via Internet Browser
17.2.3 Example Page
<JC:DTAG xmlns:JC="http://jetter.de/ssi/jetcontrol" />
<html>
<Header>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=windows1252">
<meta name="GENERATOR" content="Microsoft FrontPage 4.0">
<meta name="ProgId" content="FrontPage.Editor.Document">
<title>Index</title>
</head>
<body>
Hello world,&nexample;
<p>Actual controller values can be inserted into an html page like
this:&nexample;</p>
<p>Register 100 = <JC:DTAG name= 'R100' type = INT format="+####" />,
or Hex: 0x<JC:DTAG name="PR100+10" type = INTX format="0###" />,
or better like this <JC:DTAG name="R100" type = "INTX" />h,
this value corresponds to <JC:DTAG name="R100" type = "BOOL" /> if
only Boolean is queried.
But binary is also possible: <JC:DTAG name="R100" type = "INTB"
format=######## />b.&nexample;</p>
<p>Strings can also be defined "<JC:DTAG name="R1000" type = "STRING"
/>".&nexample;</p>
<p>A real number looks as follows: <JC:DTAG name="R65028" type =
"REAL" /> or like this: <JC:DTAG name="R65028" type = "REAL" factor=
"1.3" format="###.##" />.&nexample;</p>
<p>The value of a flag is represented as follows: <JC:DTAG name="F10"
/> or <JC:DTAG name="PF10" type = "STRING" />.&nexample;</p>
<p>For inputs and outputs by analogy: <JC:DTAG name="PI13" type =
"BOOL" /> or <JC:DTAG name="O13" type = "STRING" />.&nexample;</p>
<p>R100 =
<JC:DTAG name="R100" type="INT" format="+0##########"/
>&nexample;</p>
<p>Regards&nexample;</p>
<p>Your JetControl</p>
</body>
</html>
17.3
Visualization via Internet Browser
To allow browser-based visualization a Java applet and an ActiveX are available as
communication component for transferring controller data.
For more information please contact a Jetter AG sales representative.
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18.1 N_COPY_TO/FROM2
18
Networking via JetIP
Exchange of variables or register contents with other Jetter controllers via Ethernet
is supported in the application program through JetSym instructions and special
functions.
18.1
N_COPY_TO/FROM2
The following two instructions have been integrated into the programming languages
JetSym and JetSym ST:
N_COPY_TO2
N_COPY_FROM2
These instructions provide a means for copying contiguous variable blocks to a
network node and from it.
Reference:
For more detailed information on network instructions refer to the chapter on
programming language of the JetSym online help.
18.2
NetCopyList
The NetCopyList function can be used to combine several read/write accesses to
registers located on another controller in one Ethernet telegram which results in a
significant performance increase in the following cases:
– If several registers are to be transmitted which are distributed across the memory;
– if registers are to be read and written in one go.
If read or write access to contiguous register blocks is to be made, it makes more
sense to use the instructions N_COPY_TO2, and N_COPY_FROM2 (refer to
chapter 18.1 "N_COPY_TO/FROM2", page 289).
The NetCopyList function can be accessed by using special/system functions 150,
151, and 152.
It is possible to create up to 10 lists of different length. The total amount of
communication units must not exceed 500.
One telegram can contain a maximum of 64 register values.
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These functions can only be used for communication partners who support
version 1.1 of JetIP protocol.
JetControl 800 with V1.00 or higher
JetControl 647 with V3.51 or higher
JetControl 24x with V3.14 or higher
Note!
18.2.1 System/Special Functions
Function 150: Configuring NetCopyList
Operating principle
This function is for configuring a list of JetIP instructions.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register / address of the first variable
of a descriptive block.
Offset
Meaning
0
IP address of the remote PLC
1
Port number
Communication unit 1
2
Command:
1 = Read access
2 = Write access
3
Mode:
1 = Autoincrement the source address
2 = Autoincrement the destination
address
4
Number of variables
5
Local variable number
6
Remote variable number
...
Communication unit n
290
(n-1) x 5 + 2
Command:
1 = Read access
2 = Write access
(n-1) x 5 + 3
Mode:
1 = Autoincrement the source address
2 = Autoincrement the destination
address
(n-1) x 5 + 4
Number of variables
(n-1) x 5 + 5
Local variable number
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18.2 NetCopyList
(n-1) x 5 + 6
nx5+2
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
Remote variable number
Terminator = 0
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
A positive digit is the reference to this list. This value has
to be stored since it will be needed as parameter for
functions 151, and 152.
A negative number is an error code.
Error code
Meaning
-1
All lists are already being used; no
available list has been found
-2
All communication units are already
being used; no available
communication units have been found
-3
Empty list
-4
Invalid list
-5
Invalid IP address
-6
Invalid instruction
-8
Invalid mode
-9
Maximum number of registers
exceeded
-10
Maximum size of requested transmit
buffer exceeded
-11
Maximum size of requested receive
buffer exceeded
-20
No JetIP V1.1 available
Function 151: Deleting NetCopyList
Operating principle
A NetCopyList, which has been created using function
150, is deleted using special/system function 151.
Parameter 1:
Reference to the list (result if function 150 has been
successful)
Parameter 2:
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Potential errors:
Jetter AG
Error code
Meaning
-7
Invalid reference
-20
No JetIP V1.1 available
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Function 152: Sending NetCopyList
Operating principle
A NetCopyList, which has been created using function
150, is sent using special/system function 152. This
function joins communication units of a NetCopyList into
a JetIP V1.1 frame
Parameter 1:
Reference to the list (result if function 150 has been
successful)
Parameter 2:
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Potential errors:
292
Error code
Meaning
-7
Invalid reference
-12
The response contains at least one
negative acknowledgement
-20
No JetIP V1.1 available
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18.2 NetCopyList
18.2.2 Example
The following screenshots show simple examples of how these functions can be
used in JetSym ST
Fig. 56: NetCopyList: Declaration of Variables
In this example, a memory for 3 (cNoOfLists) with 2 elements is created.
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Fig. 57: NetCopyList: Program
In the user task, the first list is configured and set up using system function 150. The
result of this function is stored ("nHandle") to allow its use as reference to the list in
the sending function. In the following loop, this list is sent cyclically (break in variable
"nDelay").
18.3
JetIP V1.1
Starting from OS release V3.14 version 1.1 of the network protocol JetIP is
supported. As a result, several instructions can be combined into one request
telegram. The controller also returns the answers in only one reply message. This
way, the duration of update processes, for example with visualization masks, can be
reduced.
This approach will not adversely affect communication in systems equipped with JC24x and JC-800 controllers and PC software (e.g. JetSym, JetViewSoft etc.) using
different protocol versions.
A software bug in the operating system of JetControl 647 (up to and including version
3.50) prevents this controller from communicating with controllers using protocol
version 1.1.
If it is intended to use a JC-24x with V3.14 or higher together with a JetControl 647,
the JC-647 OS version should be 3.51 or higher. If it is not possible to update the JC647, the protocol version in JC-24x can be set to 1.0.
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18.4 Registers
Register 2964: JetIP protocol version
Function
Description
Read
JetIP protocol version
0 = V1.1
1 = V1.0
Write
Setting the protocol version. This
setting will become effective only after
the next reboot of the controller.
Value range
0 through 1
Value after reset
0 (V1.1)
This register is battery-backed. That is, its content remains stored when the controller
is de-energized. System commands 104 and 204 will restore this register to its
factory settings.
18.4
Registers
The following registers are for setting some of the network parameters or will return
status information.
Register 2708: Time-out value
Function
Description
Read
Set time-out value
Write
Setting a new time-out value
Value range
0 through 65,535 in milliseconds
Value after reset
250
When another controller is accessed, the response must be received within the set
time-out value. If the response fails to appear, the request is re-sent (if this feature
has been set). Otherwise the instruction is cancelled and a time-out message is
issued.
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Register 2709: Response time
Function
Description
Read
Response time of the last network
instruction
Write
-
Value range
0 through 65,535 in milliseconds
Value after reset
0
The response time comprises of the data transmission time, the response time of the
communication partner and the local processing time.
Register 2710: Total number of network errors
Function
Description
Read
Total number of all network errors
Write
Only clearing makes sense
Value range
32 bits
Value after reset
0
When a network error occurs, this register is incremented.
Register 2711: Error code of network error
Function
Description
Read
Error code of the last network access
Write
Only clearing makes sense
Value range
0 through 255
Value after reset
0
Network Error Codes:
296
0=
No error
1=
Time-out
3=
Error message from remote station
5=
Illegal network address
6=
Illegal number of registers
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18.4 Registers
Network Error Codes:
7=
Illegal interface number
Register 2717: Max. number of retries
Function
Description
Read
Set number of retries
Write
New number of retries
Value range
0 through 255
Value after reset
0
This register is for setting the number of retries, that is, how often the network
instruction is sent in case of an error, before execution of this instruction is cancelled
and an error message is sent to the application program.
Register 2718: Total number of retries
Function
Description
Read
Number of retries that have been
performed for network instructions
Write
Only clearing makes sense
Value range
32 bits
Value after reset
0
Each retry of a network instruction will cause this register to be incremented.
Register 2750: Task-specific amount of network
errors
Function
Jetter AG
Description
Read
Number of network errors in the task
where this register is being read.
Write
Only clearing makes sense
Value range
32 bits
Value after reset
0
297
18 Networking via JetIP
JetWeb
Register 2751: Task-specific error code of network
error
Function
Description
Read
Error code of the last network error
which occurred in the task where this
register is being read.
Write
Only clearing makes sense
Value range
0 through 255
Value after reset
0
Network Error Codes:
0=
No error
1=
Time-out
3=
Error message from remote station
5=
Illegal network address
6=
Illegal number of registers
7=
Illegal interface number
Register 2752: Task-specific number of retries
Function
298
Description
Read
Number of network instruction retries
which occurred in the task where this
register is being read.
Write
Only clearing makes sense
Value range
32 bits
Value after reset
0
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
18.5 Special Flags
18.5
Special Flags
When a network error occurs which is reported to the application program, registers
2710 and 2750 are incremented and flag 2075 is set, as well. This flag is not reset
by the operating system
Jetter AG
299
18 Networking via JetIP
JetWeb
300
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
19.1 Special/System Functions
19
RemoteScan
The configurable RemoteScan function is used to cyclically copy register/variable
contents from the JetControl to registers/variables of network nodes. On the other
hand, they can be read by the nodes and copied into JetControl registers/variables.
The RemoteScan function can be accessed by using special/system functions 80,
81, and 82.
At the moment, RemoteScan via Modbus/TCP is supported only. However, this
function is limited to the usage of 16-bit registers ranging from 8000 through 8999 as
local registers. Only one connection is established to each server (IP address and
port) irrespective of the number of communication units which have been configured
on the servers.
If several communication units are configured on one server, accesses are serialized
since servers often do not support "command pipelining". If several servers have
been configured, communication is carried out in parallel.
19.1
Special/System Functions
19.1.1 Configuring RemoteScan
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (80, Parameter1, Parameter2)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (80, Parameter1, Parameter2);
Operating
principle
To configure RemoteScan special/system function 80 is
used. However, this function does not initiate communication.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register/address of the first variable of a
descriptive block.
Offset
Meaning
0
Protocol
5 = Modbus/TCP
1
Quantity of following
communication units
1 .. 10
Communication unit 1
Jetter AG
2
Address
Modbus/TCP:
IP address
3
Port number
Modbus/TCP: 502
4
Update rate
10 .. 65535 ms
5
Quantity of output
registers
0 .. 125
6
Output source register
number
local
301
19 RemoteScan
JetWeb
7
Output destination
register number
remote
8
Quantity of input
registers
0 .. 125
9
Input source register
number
remote
10
Input destination
register number
local
11
Number of the first
register of the status
register block
12
Time-out
in ms
Communication unit 2
13
Address
..
..
Modbus/TCP:
IP address
Parameter 2:
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting from
the function.
Potential errors:
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
-1
Protocol not supported
-2
Set quantity of communication units > 10
-3
Invalid address or port number
-4
Invalid register number
-10
RemoteScan is already running
Note!
•
•
•
With modules without input or output registers the corresponding quantity has
to be set to 0.
If the configuration comprises inputs and outputs, the outputs are sent first,
then the inputs are read.
The address (always the first entry of a communication unit) has to be specified
directly. It cannot be specified using names.
Status register block
The number of the first register of the status register block, consisting of 3
consecutive registers, has to be specified in the description block of each
communication unit (Offset 11, 24). Error messages of this communication unit are
stored to this block when RemoteScan is running.
302
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
19.1 Special/System Functions
The status register block has the following structure:
Reg.
Offset
0
1
Meaning
Status (bitcoded)
Error code
Bit #
Meaning
0
Scan is
running
Is set after each update
cycle
1
An error has
occurred
Is set each time an error
has occurred
The code of the last error is displayed.
Value
Meaning
0
No error
<0
Application-specific error
Modbus/TCP:
Value
2
Jetter AG
Number of
errors
Meaning
-1
Error in the network driver
-2
Error in the connection
management
-3
Error when sending output
registers
-4
Error when reading input
registers
-5
Exception response
-6
Error when receiving the
response
-7
Wrong transaction ID
-8
Time-out
101
Time-out
102
Error when reading/writing local registers
103/
104
Error in the lower-level communication
layer
The number is incremented each time an error
occurs.
303
19 RemoteScan
JetWeb
Note!
It is useful to initialize the contents of the status register blocks with 0 before
starting the RemoteScan.
19.1.2 Starting RemoteScan
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (81, Parameter1, Parameter2)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (81, Parameter1, Parameter2);
Operating principle
Function 81 is used to start a RemoteScan that has
been configured using function 80.
Parameter 1:
No parameters are transferred to this function. Thus,
the content of parameter 1 is of no significance.
Parameter 2:
This function always returns the value 0 as result.
Potential errors:
None
19.1.3 Stopping remote scan
304
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (82, Parameter1, Parameter2)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (82, Parameter1, Parameter2);
Operating principle
Function 82 is used to stop a running RemoteScan.
When doing so, all possibly existing communication
connections are closed.
Parameter 1:
No parameters are transferred to this function. Thus,
the content of parameter 1 is of no significance.
Parameter 2:
This function always returns the value 0 as result.
Potential errors:
None
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
19.2 Registers
Note!
Execution of this function may take a relatively long time, depending on the
configuration, since it waits until all currently running transfers will be terminated.
A programming example on how these functions can be used is given in chapter
20.3.3 "Example of an Application", page 316.
19.2
Registers
The following registers provide an overview of the set RemoteScan mode.
Register 2965: Protocol
Function
Read
Description
Protocol
5=
Modbus/TCP
Value after reset: 0
Write
Disabled
Value range
32 bits
Register 2966: Number of communication units
Function
Read
Description
Number of communication units
Value after reset: 0
Jetter AG
Write
Disabled
Value range
32 bits
305
19 RemoteScan
JetWeb
Register 2967: Activity state
Function
Read
Description
0=
Not active, stopped
1=
Active, running
Value after reset: 0
306
Write
Disabled
Value range
32 bits
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
20.1 Licensing
20
Modbus/TCP
20.1
Licensing
To be able to use the Modbus/TCP communication protocol a valid license file must
exist when JetControl is booting. This license is an individual license, i.e. for each
JetControl an individual license file is required.
If the Modbus/TCP communication protocol is ordered within the scope of a package,
a valid license file is included in the delivery. This file must not be deleted.
For reorders, the serial number on the nameplate of the JetControl has to be
indicated.
20.1.1 License File
The license file is named "license.dat" and is located in the subdirectory "/licenses".
This file is a pure text file.
The file is divided into different sections: The section "MODBUS_TCP" includes the
key which unlocks the Modbus/TCP functions.
Note!
The same file also contains license information on web functions and the Modbus/
TCP protocol. If various functions are purchased at different points in time, the
contents of the various license files have to be copied together to create a
common "license.dat" file.
Example 53: Possible content of the file "license.dat"
[SMTPHTTP]
CONTROLLER=JetControl24x
SERIALNUMBER=20030825070353
LICENSE=bb40478bf99d5383cb8ad911879852330080f9296542bf55
[MODBUS_TCP]
CONTROLLER=JetControl24x
SERIALNUMBER=20030825070353
LICENSE=171a1dd0a3c7cfd99121834ba2c208d65adad1733f51e50f
[ETHERNET_IP]
CONTROLLER=JetControl24x
SERIALNUMBER=20030825070353
LICENSE=fc071dccbeda14c48ccd9e56c0df157447c7be6e2205f812
Jetter AG
307
20 Modbus/TCP
JetWeb
Note!
The subdirectory "/licenses" and the file "license.dat" exist in any configuration
and can not be deleted even if the flash disk is formatted. If you did not buy a
license, this file exists, but it is empty.
The license file has a constant date and the file size is always "0".
20.1.2 Availability of Web Functions
After power-on of the controller the Web functions are initialized. Bit 4 to 5 of register
2930 report of the initialization state of the Modbus/TCP protocol, respectively its
availability.
Register 2930 - Bit No
308
Availability
0
0 = FTP server not available
1 = FTP server available
1
0 = HTTP server not available
1 = HTTP server available
2
0 = E-Mail client not available
1 = E-Mail client available
3
0 = Data file function not available
1 = Data file function available
4
0 = No Modbus/TCP
1 = Modbus/TCP has been licensed
5
0 = Modbus/TCP server not available
1 = Modbus/TCP server available
6
0 = No EtherNet/IP
1 = EtherNet/IP available
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
20.2 Modbus/TCP Server
20.2
Modbus/TCP Server
With a valid license and after a successful start of the Modbus/TCP server, an
external client can access registers, inputs and outputs. In doing so, 4 connections
may be opened at the same time.
Note!
Since only registers with a width of 16 bits can be transferred via Modbus/TCP,
access to the high-order 16 bits of JetControl registers is not possible. When
receiving register values, sign extension to 32 bits will not be carried out.
20.2.1 Addressing
The addresses which have been received via Modbus can be modified locally in the
server. For this purpose, three registers have been provided. The respective basic
address for accessing registers, inputs and outputs can to be entered into these
registers. Then, the number contained in the Modbus/TCP frame specifies the
address with reference to the basic address.
Basic Address Registers
Register #
Function
2702
Register(s)
2704
Inputs
2705
Outputs
Following reset, the value contained in these three registers is 0. This way, the
addresses in the Modbus/TCP frame indicate the addresses actually used in JC-24x.
Example:
•
•
•
Modbus instruction "read multiple registers"; starting register number 1000; quantity: 5.
The basic address register for register accesses 2702 contains the value 800.
It serves for reading registers 1800 through 1804.
20.2.2 Supported Commands - Class 0
read multiple registers (fc 3)
Reading register blocks.
The starting register number within JC-24x is calculated as follows: Register number
specified in the instruction plus the content of basic address register 2702.
Jetter AG
309
20 Modbus/TCP
JetWeb
write multiple registers (fc 16)
Writing register sets.
The starting register number within JC-24x is calculated as follows: Register number
specified in the instruction plus the content of basic address register 2702.
20.2.3 Supported Commands - Class 1
read coils (fc 1)
Reading outputs.
The starting output number within JC-24x is calculated as follows: Output number
specified in the instruction plus the content of basic address register 2705.
The output number has to be transferred in the internal format of the JC-24x control.
JetSym – Application-specific
numbering format
JC-24x – Internal numbering format
101 .. 116
0 .. 15
201 .. 216
16 .. 31
etc.
etc.
read input discretes (fc 2)
Reading inputs.
The starting input number within JC-24x is calculated as follows: Input number
specified in the instruction plus the content of basic address register 2704.
The input number has to be transferred in the internal format of the JC-24x control.
JetSym – Application-specific
numbering format
JC-24x – Internal numbering format
101 .. 116
0 .. 15
201 .. 216
16 .. 31
etc.
etc.
read input registers (fc 4)
Reading inputs blockwise in 16-bit words.
The starting register number within JC-24x is calculated as follows: Register number
specified in the instruction plus the content of basic address register 2702.
310
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
20.2 Modbus/TCP Server
Inputs
Register Number
101 .. 116
0
201 .. 216
2
301 .. 316
4
etc.
etc.
write coil (fc 5)
Activating/deactivating an individual output.
The output number within JC-24x is calculated as follows: Output number specified
in the instruction plus the content of basic address register 2705.
The output number has to be transferred in the internal format of the JC-24x control.
JetSym – Application-specific
numbering format
JC-24x – Internal numbering format
101 .. 116
0 .. 15
201 .. 216
16 .. 31
etc.
etc.
write single register (fc 6)
Entering values into the low-order 16 bits of a JC-24x register.
The register number within JC-24x is calculated as follows: Register number
specified in the instruction plus the content of basic address register 2702.
20.2.4 Supported Commands - Class 2
force multiple coils (fc 15)
Activating/deactivating several outputs.
The starting output number within JC-24x is calculated as follows: Output number
specified in the instruction plus the content of basic address register 2705.
The output number has to be transferred in the internal format of the JC-24x control.
Jetter AG
JetSym – Application-specific
numbering format
JC-24x – Internal numbering format
101 .. 116
0 .. 15
201 .. 216
16 .. 31
etc.
etc.
311
20 Modbus/TCP
JetWeb
read / write registers
Writing and simultaneously reading registers.
The starting register number within JC-24x is calculated as follows: Register number
specified in the instruction plus the content of basic address register 2702.
First, the registers polled by the client are read and, then, the registers transferred
from the client are stored.
312
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
20.3 Modbus/TCP Client
20.3
Modbus/TCP Client
The Modbus/TCP client in JetControl 24x controllers supports Class 0 Conformance
(see chapter 20.2.2 "Supported Commands - Class 0", page 309). This means that
commands for reading and writing multiple registers are used. Up to 125 registers
with a width of 16 bits can be transmitted in one frame. When sending 32-bit registers
only the lower-order 16 bits are transmitted. When assigning incoming register
values to the JetControl-internal 32-bit registers sign extension to 32 bits will not be
carried out.
As protocol ID "0" is used, as unit ID "1". Assignment of sent and received frames is
carried out using the transaction ID.
Connections to 11 different servers may be opened at the same time.
20.3.1 Remote Scan
This function is for cyclically transferring the inputs and outputs 20001 through 36000
that are combined in the 16-bit registers 8000 through 8999 from and to the
configured servers. Only one connection is established to each server (IP address
and port) irrespective of the number of communication units which have been
configured on the servers.
If several communication units are configured on one server, accesses are serialized
since servers often do not support "command pipelining". If several servers have
been configured, communication is carried out in parallel (refer to chapter 19
"RemoteScan", page 301).
Mapping of inputs/outputs to registers
Register(s)
Inputs / outputs
8000
20001 - 20016
8001
20017 - 20032
8002
20033 - 20047
etc.
etc.
Note!
Since the registers and the inputs/outputs mapped to them merely are memory
cells located in the RAM, and no direct mapping to hardware takes place, it is not
determined whether a register contains inputs or outputs. Assignment is made not
until configuration in the communication units takes place.
Jetter AG
313
20 Modbus/TCP
JetWeb
20.3.2 Special/System Functions
As acyclic transmission channel to a Modbus/TCP server the special functions 65
(reading registers) and 66 (writing registers) can be used (the functions are available
independent of RemoteScan).
While one of these two special functions is being carried out simultaneous calls of
this functions in other tasks are blocked until this function will be terminated.
These functions establish a connection to the specified server, transmit the desired
data and clear down the connection. If a connection exists that has been established
by RemoteScan, this connection will be used. Setting-up and clearing-down the
connection is not required.
The IP address is always to be specified directly. It cannot be specified using names.
Important!
It is not advisable to issue TaskBreak or TaskRestart instructions for this task or
to restart the program through JetSym while one of these functions is carried out
since in such a case the connection remains established which may block
additional transmissions.
Function 65: Reading registers
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (65, Parameter1, Parameter2)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (65, Parameter1, Parameter2);
Operating principle
Using this function, a register block from a Modbus/TCP
server is copied to the registers/variables of the local
memory.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register/address of the first variable
of a descriptive block.
Offset
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
314
Meaning
0
IP Address
1
Port number
502
2
Time-out
in ms
3
Number of the source
register
remote
4
Number of the designation
register
local
5
Quantity of Registers
1 .. 125
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
20.3 Modbus/TCP Client
0
-1 or -2
No error
Error during connection set-up
-4
Error during data transfer
-5
Error message from server
-8
Time-out
-10
No Modbus/TCP license
Function 66: Writing to Registers
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (66, Parameter1, Parameter2)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (66, Parameter1, Parameter2);
Operating principle
By using this function, the content of registers/variables
of the local memory is copied to a register block a
Modbus/TCP server.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register/address of the first variable
of a descriptive block.
Offset
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
0
IP Address
1
Port number
502
2
Time-out
in ms
3
Number of the source
register
local
4
Number of the designation
register
remote
5
Quantity of Registers
1 .. 125
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
-1 or -2
Jetter AG
Meaning
Error during connection set-up
-3
Error during data transfer
-5
Error message from server
-8
Time-out
-10
No Modbus/TCP license
315
20 Modbus/TCP
JetWeb
20.3.3 Example of an Application
JetControl is to cyclically exchange I/O data with 2 Modbus/TCP servers on the
network. RemoteScan is used for this function.
On external request, a single variable is to be sent to one of the two communication
partner.
Fig. 58: Modbus/TCP: Type declaration
Here, the type declarations are shown which are required for initialization
(t_RscanHeader, t_RscanElement) and displaying the status (t_RscanStatus) of
RemoteScan. An additional structure (t_ModbusTCP) is used for acyclic
communication.
Fig. 59: Modbus/TCP: Constants and Variables
316
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
20.3 Modbus/TCP Client
Fig. 60: Modbus/TCP: User task
First, the configuration data are entered into the structures required for initializing the
RemoteScan function. The starting address of these structures is transferred along
with other data when system function 80 (cLinitRscan) is invoked. If initialization was
successful, RemoteScan function is started via system function 81 (cStartRscan)
and cyclic communication sets in.
Then, the parameter structure for acyclic data transmission is prepared. Setting flag
"bSend" triggers a register block to be sent to a second communication partner one
time.
Jetter AG
317
20 Modbus/TCP
JetWeb
318
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
21.1 Licensing
21
EtherNet/IP
JetControl 24x is equipped with an EtherNet/IP network interface card which
provides two connections with EtherNet/IP controllers. This network interface
supports the device profile "Generic Device".
An EDS file (Electronic Data Sheet) on JetControl 24x is available on request.
21.1
Licensing
To be able to use the EtherNet/IP communication protocol a valid license file must
exist when JetControl is booting. This license is an individual license, i.e. for each
JetControl an individual license file is required.
If the EtherNet/IP communication protocol is ordered within the scope of a package,
a valid license file is included in the delivery. This file must not be deleted.
For reorders, the serial number on the nameplate of the JetControl has to be
indicated.
21.1.1 License File
The license file is named "license.dat" and is located in the subdirectory "/licenses".
This file is a pure text file.
The file is divided into different sections: The section "ETHERNET_IP" includes the
key which unlocks the EtherNet/IP functions.
Note!
The same file also contains license information on web functions and the Modbus/
TCP protocol. If various functions are purchased at different points in time, the
contents of the various license files have to be copied together to create a
common "license.dat" file.
Example 54: Possible content of the file "license.dat"
[SMTPHTTP]
CONTROLLER=JetControl24x
SERIALNUMBER=20030825070353
LICENSE=bb40478bf99d5383cb8ad911879852330080f9296542bf55
[MODBUS_TCP]
CONTROLLER=JetControl24x
SERIALNUMBER=20030825070353
LICENSE=171a1dd0a3c7cfd99121834ba2c208d65adad1733f51e50f
Jetter AG
319
21 EtherNet/IP
JetWeb
[ETHERNET_IP]
CONTROLLER=JetControl24x
SERIALNUMBER=20030825070353
LICENSE=fc071dccbeda14c48ccd9e56c0df157447c7be6e2205f812
Note!
The subdirectory "/licenses" and the file "license.dat" exist in any configuration
and can not be deleted even if the flash disk is formatted. If you did not buy a
license, this file exists, but it is empty.
The license file has a constant date and the file size is always "0".
21.1.2 Availability of Web Functions
After power-on of the controller the Web functions are initialized. Bit 6 of register 2930
reports of the initialization state of the EtherNet/IP protocol, respectively its
availability.
If bit 6 is not set, either there is no valid license, or the EtherNet/IP function has been
disabled in register 2910 (chapter 21.2.3 "Time Base", page 323).
Register 2930 - Bit No
21.2
Availability
0
0 = FTP server not available
1 = FTP server available
1
0 = HTTP server not available
1 = HTTP server available
2
0 = E-Mail client not available
1 = E-Mail client available
3
0 = Data file function not available
1 = Data file function available
4
0 = No Modbus/TCP
1 = Modbus/TCP has been licensed
5
0 = Modbus/TCP server not available
1 = Modbus/TCP server available
6
0 = No EtherNet/IP
1 = EtherNet/IP available
Configuration
The "HostName" of the controller, which is required for EtherNet/IP, is set in the
configuration memory.
320
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
21.2 Configuration
The configuration memory can be accessed via the configuration file "/System/
cfgvar.ini" or via registers 10131 through 10145, and 10200 through 10219. The
configuration memory is read out once when the controller is booting. That is, when
changes have been made to the configuration memory, JetControl must be restarted
for the changes to become effective.
21.2.1 Configuration File
To gain access to the configuration file "/System/cfgvar.ini" via FTP the user must
have administrator rights.
This file has the same structure as a Windows *.INI file:
[CFGVAR]
Version
IP_Address
IP_SubNetMask
IP_DefGateway
BasePort
IP_DNS
HostNameType
HostName
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
5
192.128. 10. 97
255.255.255. 0
192.128. 10. 1
50000
192.118.210.209
1
JetControl24x
In no case, do not change the version number.
Important!
21.2.2 Configuration Registers
Registers 10131 through 10145 and 10200 through 10219 provide an alternative way
of accessing the configuration memory.
To gain access to the configuration file via registers, first of all, the password value
2002149714 (0x77566152) has to be loaded into password register 10159. Then,
registers 10132 through 10145 and 10200 through 10219 are modified. Finally, the
changes to the configuration memory have to be saved by entering an arbitrary value
into register 10100.
Jetter AG
321
21 EtherNet/IP
JetWeb
Register(s
)
Meaning
Value used in
the example
10100
Saving the configuration values
10131
Version number
5
10132
IP address MSB
192
10133
IP address, 3SB
128
10134
IP address, 2SB
10
10135
IP address LSB
97
10136
Subnet mask, MSB
255
10137
Subnet mask, 3SB
255
10138
Subnet mask, 2SB
255
10139
Subnet mask, LSB
0
10140
Default Gateway, MSB
192
10141
Default Gateway, 3SB
128
10142
Default Gateway, 2SB
10
10143
Default Gateway, LSB
1
10144
Port number of JetIP server
10145
IP address of DNS server
10159
Password
10200
HostNameType
10201 through
10219
HostName
(Format of a text variable)
50000
0xC076D2D1
(192.118.210.209)
2002149714
(0x77566152)
1
JetControl24x
Do not change the version number contained in register 10131.
Important!
322
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
21.2 Configuration
21.2.3 Time Base
The time base for processing the EtherNet/IP protocol can be set in the remanent
register 2910.
The value set here is used during the boot process to initialize the EtherNet/IP
function. Consequently, the controller has to be restarted for changes to become
effective.
Register 2910:Time Base EtherNet/IP
Function
Description
Read
Time base in milliseconds
Write
Setting the new time base (this setting
will become effective only after the next
reboot)
Value range
0, 2 .. 50 [ms]
Value after reset
As previously set
If the value is "0", the EtherNet/IP interface card will not be activated.
21.2.4 HostName / HostNameType
The feature "HostNameType" is for setting the actually used "HostName". With a
"HostNameType" 1 or 2, the position of the 3 IP address switches (S31 through S33)
is appended to the "HostName" in the configuration memory. With a
"HostNameType" 3 or 4, the last 3 nibbles of the controller IP address is appended.
This approach offers the possibility the create automatically generated unique host
names.
HostNameType
0
Jetter AG
Appendix
Example
none
JetControl24x
1/3
decimal
JetControl24x-10-97
2/4
hexadecimal
JetControl24x-a61
323
21 EtherNet/IP
JetWeb
21.3
Register(s)
21.3.1 Communication Registers
For communication with the Ethernet/IP controller several registers with a width of 32
bits are available to the user. The controller writes output information into these
registers and reads input information out of them.
These communication registers are designed in 2 blocks each:
– The first block is for direct access to values transferred via EtherNet/IP.
– The second block is for buffering theses values. Thus, data consistency is
ensured across the whole block.
Transfer of values to and from buffer registers is controlled by the user using an
instruction.
Register(s)
JetControl
EtherNet/IP Controller
10300 .. 10331
Outputs (direct)
Inputs
10332 .. 10363
Inputs (direct)
Outputs
10400 .. 10431
Outputs (buffer)
Inputs
10432 .. 10463
Inputs (buffer)
Outputs
21.3.2 Control Register
Register 10390: Status
Function
Description
Read
Status of a copying action
Write
-
Value range
0 .. 3 (bit-coded)
Value after reset
0
Meaning of the individual status register bits:
Bit 0:
Copying EtherNet/IP inputs
1 = Copying process is running
324
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JetControl 24x
21.3 Register(s)
Meaning of the individual status register bits:
The contents of buffer registers 10400 through 10431 are copied into
registers 10300 through 10331 and are made available to EtherNet/IP.
0 = No copying process running
Data contained in buffer registers 10400 through 10431 can be changed
consistently.
Bit 1:
Copying EtherNet/IP outputs
1 = Copying process is running
The contents of registers 10332 through 10363 are transferred to buffer
registers 10432 through 10463.
0 = No copying process running
Consistent access to data contained in buffer registers 10432 through
10463 is possible.
The copying process to and from the buffer registers is executed asynchronously
with respect to the application program, and depends, among other things, from the
EtherNet/IP cycle. So, if a copying process has been triggered via instruction
register, the program must wait until the corresponding bit in the status register is
reset. Only when the status register has been reset, a new instruction may be issued
or access to data registers is possible.
Register 10391: Instruction
Function
Description
Read
Last instruction
Write
New instruction
Value range
0 .. 2
Value after reset
0
The following instructions are available to the controller:
1
Copy EtherNet/IP inputs:
The contents of buffer registers 10400 through 10431 are copied into
registers 10300 through 10331 and are made available to EtherNet/IP.
2
Copy EtherNet/IP outputs:
The contents of registers 10332 through 10363 are transferred to buffer
registers 10432 through 10463.
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21 EtherNet/IP
JetWeb
Register 10392: Error
Function
Description
Read
Last error
Write
Erasing the register value
Value range
0 .. 3
Value after reset
0
Potential errors:
0
No error
1
Inputs are already being copied:
If following instruction 1, while bit 0 in the status register is still set,
instruction 1 is re-issued, the new instruction is ignored and the error
register is set to 1.
2
Outputs are already being copied:
If following instruction 2, while bit 1 in the status register is still set,
instruction 2 is re-issued, the new instruction is ignored and the error
register is set to 2.
3
326
Unknown instruction
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
22.1 Special/System Functions
22
Data Files
The latest register values and flag states can be written into a file or read-out of a file
with the help of some special functions. This read/write process is controlled by the
application program.
The file format is identical to the format of the "data dump" files created by JetSym
(see chapter 22.3 "File Format", page 333).
The file names consist of two constant parts and a register content. So, files can be
selected by different register values (see chapter 22.1.2 "File Names", page 327).
Written files are stored to the root directory (highest directory level) of the flash disk.
Files to be loaded must also be located in the root directory. Access to data files is
carried out with administrator rights and cannot be restricted.
22.1
Special/System Functions
22.1.1 Implementation
Since file operations may take considerable long time, especially with large files,
other application tasks are processed while one of the file operations is running.
However, only one function can be processed at a time. Tasks which invoke one of
these functions while a file operation of another task is running are therefore blocked
until this operation is completed.
That implies that data consistency of value blocks to be written or read is not
ensured. Data consistency has to be ensured by accordingly programming the
application program.
The state of the currently running operation can be polled through the registers
specified below.
22.1.2 File Names
File names always start with "Data_" followed by a numerical value and the extension
"da". The numerical value for drawing a distinction between various files is acquired
from the parameter register of the special functions.
Example 55: Names of Data Files
Data_123456789.da
Data_0.da
Note!
Observe capitalization. The file system is case sensitive.
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22 Data Files
JetWeb
22.1.3 Saving values – Creating a file
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (90, Parameter1, Parameter2)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (90, Parameter1, Parameter2);
Operating principle
Function 90 is for creating a new data file and inserting
a selectable register or flag block into this file.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register/address of the first variable
of a descriptive block.
Offset
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
328
Meaning
0
File Name
1
Variable type
1 = Register
3 = Flag
2
Number of the first register or flag
3
Number of the last register or flag
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
-1
Error when creating file (e.g. disk full)
-2
Error when writing data
-4
Error when closing file
-6
Invalid register/flag number
-10
Data file feature not available
-20
Internal OS error
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
22.1 Special/System Functions
22.1.4 Saving values – Appending to a file
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (91, Parameter1, Parameter2)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (91, Parameter1, Parameter2);
Operating principle
Function 91 is for appending a selectable register or flag
block to an existing file. In case this file does not exist,
a new file will be created.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register/address of the first variable
of a descriptive block.
Offset
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
Jetter AG
Meaning
0
File Name
1
Variable type
1 = Register
3 = Flag
2
Number of the first register or flag
3
Number of the last register or flag
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
-1
Error when opening or creating file
-2
Error when writing data
-4
Error when closing file
-6
Invalid register/flag number
-10
Data file feature not available
-20
Internal OS error
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JetWeb
22.1.5 Reading values from a file
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (92, Parameter1, Parameter2)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (92, Parameter1, Parameter2);
Operating principle
Special function 92 is for reading register values and
flag states out of a data file and entering them into the
corresponding registers or flags. The information is
processed in the order specified by the content of the
file.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register/address of the first variable
of a descriptive block.
Offset
0
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
330
Meaning
File Name
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
-1
Error when opening the file
-3
Error when reading data
-4
Error when closing file
-10
Data file feature not available
-20
Internal OS error
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
22.1 Special/System Functions
22.1.6 Deleting a file
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (96, Parameter1, Parameter2)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (96, Parameter1, Parameter2);
Operating principle
Function 96 is for deleting a data file from the flash disk.
Parameter 1:
Number of the first register/address of the first variable
of a descriptive block.
Offset
0
Parameter 2:
Potential errors:
Jetter AG
Meaning
File Name
Number of the register / address of the variable resulting
from the function.
Error code
Meaning
0
No error
-5
Error when deleting the file
-10
Data file feature not available
-20
Internal OS error
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22 Data Files
JetWeb
22.2
Registers
22.2.1 Availability of data files Functions
After power-on of the controller the data file functions are initialized. Bit 3 of register
2930 reports the state of data file initialization, respectively, its availability.
Register 2930 - Bit No
Availability
0
0 = FTP server not available
1 = FTP server available
1
0 = HTTP server not available
1 = HTTP server available
2
0 = E-Mail client not available
1 = E-Mail client available
3
0 = Data file function not available
1 = Data file function available
4
0 = No Modbus/TCP
1 = Modbus/TCP has been licensed
5
0 = Modbus/TCP server not available
1 = Modbus/TCP server available
6
0 = No EtherNet/IP
1 = EtherNet/IP available
22.2.2 Status Registers
The processing state of a file operation and the number of the task carrying out the
operation can be read from two registers.
Register 2977: Processing State
Function
Read
Description
0: No file operation in progress
1: Processing transferred to file module
2: Data is being read/written
3: File operation completed
Value after reset: 0
332
Write
Illegal
Value range
0 .. 255
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
22.3 File Format
Register 2978: Task number
Function
Read
Description
Number of the task performing a file operation
0 .. 99:
Task number
255:
No Task
Value after reset: 255
Write
Illegal
Value range
0 .. 255
22.3
File Format
These files are pure text files with one line for each entry. The entries are to be
terminated with "carriage return / line feed". Comment lines are allowed.
A data file is to start with the file identifier "SD1001".
Data lines start with an identifier for the variable. Now follows the number of the
variable also separated by a blank or tab. Now follows the value of the variable also
separated by a blank or tab.
The IDs at the beginning of a line must not be indented.
Variable ID
Variable type
FS
Flags
QS
Floating point numeral register
RS
Integer register
All lines that do not start with such a variable ID are regarded as comment lines with
the exception of the first line containing the file ID.
Example 56: Possible contents of a data file
SD1001
; JC-24x DATA FILE - Jetter AG
FS 111 1
This is a comment
RS 20112 110
FS 113 1
QS 65024 -3.141593
QS 65025 6.789e-05
The third line from below is also a comment line since the variable's ID ("FS") does
not stand at the beginning of the line.
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22 Data Files
JetWeb
22.4
Example of an Application
Once per hour JetControl 24x is to read an analog value which is generated by a
thermal sensor. During the course of the day the corresponding readings are to be
stored to a file. This file will be deleted at the end of each day once the average
temperature, minimum and maximum temperatures have been calculated and stored
to a file which is named after the day of the week.
Fig. 61: Data file: Type declarations
Here, the declarations for access to real-time clock registers (t_TimeDate), the
parameters of file functions (t_DataFile) and the created data (t_Temp) are specified.
Fig. 62: Data Files: Constants and Variables
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22.4 Example of an Application
This screenshot shows the constants and variables used in the program. For access
to the real-time clock, the variables required for direct register access, as well as for
the buffer have been created. The signal resulting from the temperature
measurement is connected to channel # 1 of the first JX2-IA4 module. The
conversion factor from analog value to temperature is assigned to a floating point
variable.
Fig. 63: Data Files: Program
At the beginning of the program, a parameter file is loaded, which, for example, has
been transferred via FTP connection. Then, the used variables are initialized.
The infinite loop is for transferring the RTC registers into the buffer by means of a
dummy read access. This allows the system to operate on the basis of consistent
data. The temperature measurement is triggered once the register "Hour" advances.
First, the required temperature values are calculated. Then, the actual temperature
value is appended to the file containing the hourly values. Once per day (in our
example: 11 p.m.) the four temperature values (average, minimum and maximum
value, as well as last actual value) along with date and time are stored to a file the
name of which results from the day of the week. Then, the file containing the hourly
values is deleted.
For the sake of clarity, a troubleshooting function (e.g. by evaluating the variable
"nResult") has been renounced.
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22 Data Files
JetWeb
336
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JetControl 24x
23.1 Comparing Strings
23
String Functions
Using the special/system functions described below, strings can be processed in text
variable format. A description of this format is given in the JetSym online help or in
chapter 23.6 "Format of a JetSym text variable", page 343.
Note!
The maximum string length must not exceed 255 characters!
Please make sure that the strings do not overlap! Failure to do so will yield
undetermined results.
23.1
Comparing Strings
Special function 140 is for comparing the contents of two string variables.
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (140, Parameter1, Parameter2)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (140, Parameter1, Parameter2);
Parameter1
Specifies the number of the first register of the
parameter block.
Parameter2
Specifies the number of the register where the result of
this function is stored.
Parameter block
The function parameters are specified starting from register Parameter1.
Register offset
Meaning
0
Address of string
1
Number of the first register of the first
string variable
1
Address of string
2
Number of the first register of the second
string variable
Result of the function
The result of the function can be read out of register Parameter2.
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23 String Functions
JetWeb
Register
contents
Meaning
=0
Strings are identical
<0
String 1 is smaller than string 2
>0
String 1 is larger than string 2
The two strings are compared with each other character by character. When the first
difference is detected, the ASCII code difference of these two characters is returned
as result of the function.
Fig. 64: Strings: Test program
This simple test program shows how the system function for comparing two strings
can be used. Before the start flag is set, the two strings are entered into the setup
screen of JetSym.
Example 57: String 1 is smaller than string 2
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JetControl 24x
23.2 Searching a string within another string
These two strings differ in the second character. The ASCII code for "a" is 97; the
ASCII code for "e" is 101. The difference of these two codes (97 - 101) is returned as
result in variable "nResult" (-4).
Example 58: String 1 is larger than string 2
The ASCII code for "o" is 111. Since the second string is only 4 characters long, and
the fifth character is missing, the difference of these two strings and, thus, the
resulting value is 111.
23.2
Searching a string within another
string
Special function 141 is for checking whether string 2 is contained in string 1.
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (141, Parameter1, Parameter2)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (141, Parameter1, Parameter2);
Parameter1
Specifies the number of the first register of the
parameter block.
Parameter2
Specifies the number of the register where the result of
this function is stored.
Parameter block
The function parameters are specified starting from register Parameter1.
Register offset
Jetter AG
Meaning
0
Address of string
1
Number of the first register of the first
string variable
1
Address of string
2
Number of the first register of the second
string variable which is being searched
within string 1.
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23 String Functions
JetWeb
Result of the function
The result of the function can be read out of register Parameter2.
Register
contents
Meaning
0
String 2 cannot be found in string 1
1
String 2 has been found in string 1
Example 59: Finding a string
The string "Con" has been found within the string "JetControl". As a result, the value
"1" is shown in the variable "nResult".
23.3
Appending Strings
Special function 142 is for appending the contents of string variable 2 to string
variable 1. String variable 2 remains unchanged.
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (142, Parameter1, Parameter2)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (142, Parameter1, Parameter2);
Parameter1
Specifies the number of the first register of the
parameter block.
Parameter2
Specifies the number of the register where the result of
this function is stored.
Parameter block
The function parameters are specified starting from register Parameter1.
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23.4 Converting register values into strings
Register offset
Meaning
0
Address of string
1
Number of the first register of the first
string variable
1
Address of string
2
Number of the first register of the second
string variable
2
maximum register
number
Maximum number of registers for string 1
Result of the function
The result of the function can be read out of register Parameter2. The result register
contains the number of registers occupied by the new string 1.
Example 60: Appending Strings
Before this function is invoked, string variable 1 contains "Jet", and string variable 2
contains "Control". The maximum number of registers, which string 1 may have after
string 2 is appended, is set to 3. Once this function is processed, the following
variable contents result:
The whole new string 1 ("JetControl") would occupy 4 registers. Because a maximum
number of 3 registers has been set, the string had to be truncated.
23.4
Converting register values into
strings
Special function 143 is for converting the contents of a register into a string and
storing it to a string variable. For this purpose, decimal ASCII coding is used.
Contents of integer or floating point registers can be converted into strings.
The register contents remain unchanged.
Jetter AG
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (143, Parameter1, Parameter2)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (143, Parameter1, Parameter2);
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23 String Functions
JetWeb
Parameter1
Specifies the number of the first register of the
parameter block.
Parameter2
Specifies the number of the register where the result of
this function is stored.
Parameter block
The function parameters are specified starting from register Parameter1.
Register offset
Meaning
0
Register Number
Number of the register the contents of
which are to be converted.
1
String address
Number of the first register of the string
variable to which the string is to be
stored.
Result of the function
The result of the function can be read out of register Parameter2. The result register
contains the number of registers occupied by the string variable.
Example 61: Converting a register into a string
The content of floating point register 65024 has been converted into a string which
occupies 5 registers.
23.5
Copying Strings
Special function 144 is for copying the contents of string variable 1 to string variable
2. String variable 1 remains unchanged.
342
JetSym
SPECIALFUNCTION (144, Parameter1, Parameter2)
JetSym ST
SYSTEMFUNCTION (144, Parameter1, Parameter2);
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
23.6 Format of a JetSym text variable
Parameter1
Specifies the number of the first register of the
parameter block.
Parameter2
Specifies the number of the register where the result of
this function is stored.
Parameter block
The function parameters are specified starting from register Parameter1.
Register offset
Meaning
0
Address of string
1
Number of the first register of the string
variable the content of which is to be
stored.
1
Address of string
2
Number of the first register of the second
string variable into which the content of
string 1 is to be copied.
Result of the function
The result of the function can be read out of register Parameter2. The result register
contains the number of registers occupied by the string variable.
23.6
Format of a JetSym text variable
JetControl 24x allows to store ASCII texts to registers. This feature is very useful if
you have to manage several languages for the instruction "DISPLAY_TEXT ", or if
data have to be transferred to or from data bases using JetWeb services.
JetControl 24x registers have a width of 32 bits. However, for storing text variables
only the lower 24 bits are used. Since each ASCII character requires 1 Byte (8 bits),
3 ASCII characters can be stored per register.
The least significant byte of the register containing the text is reserved for the length.
The second byte contains the display mode and is of interest only in connection with
JETTER HMIs. Therefore, a detailed description will not be given here. The third byte
is the first character of the text. The remaining characters of the string are stored to
bytes 0, 1 and 2 of the following registers.
Example 62: Text Registers
If, for example, register 100 and the following registers contain the text "Hello", the
contents of these registers will look as follows:
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23 String Functions
JetWeb
Fig. 65: Text Registers / Text Variables
– The first byte of register 100 contains 05 (hex). This value indicates the number
of characters the text comprises of. The third byte is 48 (hex). This is the ASCII
code for "H".
– Register 101 contains the 3 bytes 65 (hex), 6c (hex) and again 6c (hex), whereas
65 (hex) is the ASCII code for "e", and 6c (hex) for "l".
– Register 102 contains the next text byte 6f (hex). This is the ASCII code for "o".
– The contents of the other bytes in these registers are of no significance since they
are not used for storing the text.
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JetControl 24x
24.1 Description
24
Interface Activity Monitoring
24.1
Description
The activity of a connected communications partner, communicating via serial
interfaces (SER1, SER2) or via Ethernet interface with JetControl, can be monitored
from the application program by means of two special flags per interface. This allows
to determine, for instance, whether a connection to an operator or display module still
exists.
Note!
Only communication via pcom-7 and JetIP protocols is monitored. If the serial
interface has been set to PRIM or if other protocols and services are used on the
Ethernet interface, none of the monitoring functions described here is carried out.
Upon receipt of a valid frame the respective first special flag is set by the operating
system. At the same time, a monitoring interval, the duration of which can be set in
a register, is triggered. Each new frame will restart the monitoring interval.
The user can set a second special flag. If valid frames do not arrive anymore, both
special flags are reset upon expiry of the monitoring interval. Since the second
special flag is not set by the OS, the user is able to determine that the connection
was temporarily disconnected. Even if the first special flag was reset for a short time
following an interruption and set again shortly afterwards.
The monitoring interval can be defined by the user through a register for each
interface. The activity monitoring can be switched off by setting the monitoring
interval to "0" (default setting).
Activity monitoring requires cyclic data exchange to take place over the interface.
For HMIs (e.g. LCD 25, LCD 34, etc.) the monitoring interval should not be set to a
value less than 200 ms. Otherwise it may happen that in multi-display mode or with
extensive messages errors will be reported, although communication is still active.
With visualization systems (e.g. JetLink, JetView Soft, browsers with Java applets)
or the programming system JetSym, the scan time can be set or communication can
be stopped completely. This fact has to be taken into account when using activity
monitoring.
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24 Interface Activity Monitoring
JetWeb
Fig. 66: Monitoring of the SER2 Interface
24.2
Register(s)
Register 2955: Ethernet Monitoring Interval (JetIP)
Function
Read
Description
Actual monitoring interval in milliseconds
Value after reset: 0 (no monitoring)
Write
New monitoring interval in milliseconds
Value range
0 .. 65.535
Register 2956: Monitoring interval SER1 (pcom7)
Function
Read
Description
Actual monitoring interval in milliseconds
Value after reset: 0 (no monitoring)
346
Write
New monitoring interval in milliseconds
Value range
0 .. 65.535
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
24.3 Flags
Register 2957: Monitoring interval SER2 (pcom7)
Function
Read
Description
Actual monitoring interval in milliseconds
Value after reset: 0 (no monitoring)
Write
New monitoring interval in milliseconds
Value range
0 .. 65.535
24.3
Flags
2088
Flags
Interface
Ethernet
2089
2090
2093
Jetter AG
OS flag
0 = no JetIP activity
1 = JetIP activity
User flags
0 = no JetIP activity
to be set by user
SER1
2091
2092
Meaning
OS flag
0 = no pcom7 activity
1 = pcom7 activity
User flags
0 = no pcom7 activity
to be set by user
SER2
OS flag
0 = no pcom7 activity
1 = pcom7 activity
User flags
0 = no pcom7 activity
to be set by user
347
24 Interface Activity Monitoring
JetWeb
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JetControl 24x
25
User-programmable CAN
Interface
Note!
The functions provided by JetControl 24x and the following description of these
functions require working knowledge of the Controller Area Network (CAN).
With activated user-programmable CAN interface (CAN-PRIM) 32 virtual message
boxes are available to the user. Each of these boxes can be configured as sending
or receiving box each of them with a specific CAN ID. For this purpose, the ID length
(11 bits or 29 bits) can be set globally for all boxes. Mixed operation is not possible.
Note!
If the user-programmable CAN interface is used, the maximum number of nonintelligent I/O modules which can be connected to the controller is reduced to 9.
If, in addition, CANopen devices are used, the number of non-intelligent modules
is reduced to 7.
When using CAN identifiers with a length of 29 bits, only non-intelligent I/O
modules must be connected which have a "2" as the first cipher of their serial
number. If older I/O modules (with a serial number starting with "1") are to be
connected, only IDs with a length of 11 bits must be used.
Devices connected to the controller which are to be controlled via CAN-PRIM
must not send messages while the controller is booting.
Important!
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25 User-programmable CAN Interface
25.1
JetWeb
Enable
This function is enabled through the register which is assigned to the special
functions of the system bus driver.
Register 2077: System bus special functions
Function
Description
Read
Actual value
Write
Enabling/disabling special functions of
the system bus driver
Value range
0 to 65,535 (bit-coded)
Value after reset
Value written last
Meaning of the individual control bits:
Bit 0:
Reserved
Bit 1:
Reserved
Bit 2:
CAN-PRIM
0=
The user-programmable CAN interface is not active
1=
The user-programmable CAN interface is available
Note!
The content of this register is remanent. That is, the content remains stored when
the controller is switched off.
The settings contained in this register are evaluated only on a restart of the
controller.
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25.2 Interface Registers
25.2
Interface Registers
The following registers are used to access the user-programmable CAN interface.
The contents of a message box are shown. An index register (10502) is used to
select the corresponding box.
25.2.1 Global Registers
Register 10500: Status Register
Function
Description
Read
Actual status
Write
-
Value range
0 .. 7 (bit-coded)
Value after reset
0
Meaning of the individual status register bits:
Bit 0:
Reserved
Bit 1:
NEW-DAT
1=
Bit 2:
Jetter AG
The global NEW-DAT bit is set if the NEW-DAT FIFO buffer
contains at least one value (register 10503 > 0).
ID length
0=
CAN IDs with a length of 11 bits are sent/received
1=
CAN IDs with a length of 29 bits are sent/received
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25 User-programmable CAN Interface
JetWeb
Register 10501: Instruction Register
Function
Description
Read
Last instruction
Write
New instruction
Value range
0 .. 9
Value after reset
0
The application program waits at the assignment to the instruction register until the
instruction is completely processed.
The following instructions are available to CAN-PRIM:
1
Activating the box:
This option is for checking the ID of the message box. If the ID is valid
(for CAN-PRIM only CAN IDs can be used which are not occupied by
the system bus; for more information refer to chapter 25.4 "Assigned
CAN IDs", page 359), the box is activating by setting the valid bit in the
status register of the box (register 10510).
2
Deactivating the box:
The status register of the selected box is set to "0" and a possibly
existing entry is removed from the receiving FIFO.
3
Sending a message:
The message in the selected box is sent if the box has been configured
as sending box and has been activated.
The CAN controller is granted 5 milliseconds for sending the message.
If the message could not be sent, error bit in the status register of the
box is set.
4
Clearing the NEW DAT bit:
The NEW-DAT bit (bit 1) in the status register of the box is cleared.
This way, the box is again ready to receive.
5
Clearing the buffer overflow bit:
The overflow bit in the status register of the box is cleared.
6
Clearing the transmission error bit:
The transmission error bit in the status register of the box is cleared.
7
Clearing the NEW-DAT FIFO buffer:
The FIFO buffer, where the box numbers of the received messages
are displayed, is cleared.
8
352
Setting the default ID length (11 bits):
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
25.2 Interface Registers
The following instructions are available to CAN-PRIM:
The ID length for all receiving and sending boxes is globally set to 11
bits.
The receiving FIFO buffer is cleared and the status register of all boxes
is set to "0".
9
Setting the extended ID length (29 bits):
The ID length for all receiving and sending boxes is globally set to 29
bits.
The receiving FIFO buffer is cleared and the status register of all boxes
is set to "0".
Register 10502: Box number
Function
Description
Read
Number of the selected box
Write
Selecting a new box
Value range
0 .. 31
Value after reset
0
The contents of the boxes selected here are displayed in register 10510 and the
following registers. In addition, the instructions contained in the instruction register
apply to the box the number of which has been set here.
Register 10503: NEW-DAT FIFO occupancy
Function
Description
Read
Number of received messages
Write
-
Value range
0 through 32
Value after reset
0
When a message is received, it is stored to the corresponding receiving box and the
number of this box is stored to a FIFO buffer. This way, it can easily be determined
which box has received a new message. The occupancy register shows how many
messages have been received.
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JetWeb
Register 10504: NEW-DAT FIFO data
Function
Description
Read
Number of the box to which a message
has been stored.
Write
-
Value range
-1 through 31
Value after reset
-1
When reading this register, the number, which is just read, is removed from the FIFO
(and the buffer occupancy is decremented). Value "-1" is read once the FIFO buffer
is empty (buffer occupancy = 0).
Messages for the CAN-PRIM function are received by the CAN controller of
JetControl 24x through a dedicated message box. When a message is received via
CAN bus, the controller first checks whether it can be assigned to a receiving box of
the system bus driver.
If this is not the case, the CAN controller checks whether there is a correlation with
the global receiving ID in register 10507. In register 10506 a mask can be defined
specifying the bits which are used for comparing the received ID and the global
receiving ID. If a correlation is found, the message is stored to one of the 32 virtual
message boxes. The ID configured in this box must exactly match the received ID.
Register 10506: Global receiving mask
Function
Description
Read
Set mask (bit-coded)
Write
Setting a new mask
Value range
0 through 0x7ff (11-bit ID)
0 through 0x1fffffff (29-bit ID)
Value after reset
0
If the bit in the receiving mask is set (1), the corresponding bit of the received ID is
compared with the global receiving ID.
If the bit is set to zero (0), the corresponding ID bits are not compared.
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25.2 Interface Registers
Register 10507: Global receiving ID
Function
Description
Read
Set ID
Write
Setting a new ID
Value range
0 through 0x7ff (11-bit ID)
0 through 0x1fffffff (29-bit ID)
Value after reset
0
Registers 10506 and 10507 can be used to specify a range of IDs to be transmitted
to the CAN-PRIM interface.
By default (register 10506 = 0) all messages, which are not "intercepted" by the
system bus driver, are forwarded to the CAN-PRIM interface.
Note!
When changing the ID length using command 8 or 9, both registers (10506 and
10507) are set to zero.
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25.2.2 Box Registers
The contents of a box can be accessed using the following registers. When doing so,
the number of the box must be contained in register 10502.
Register 10510: Box Status
Function
Description
Read
Status of the selected box
Write
-
Value range
0 .. 15 (bit-coded)
Value after reset
0
Meaning of the individual status register bits:
Bit 0:
Bit 1:
Bit 2:
Bit 3:
Valid
0=
Box is disabled. Sending or receiving is not possible.
1=
Box is enabled. Sending or receiving is possible.
NEW-DAT
0=
No new messages received; one receiving box is ready to receive
1=
New message received; reception of further messages blocked
Overrun
0=
No buffer overrun
1=
one or more message for the given box have arrived while the box
was not ready to receive additional messages (NEW-DAT set);
the new messages are lost.
Sending error
0=
No sending error
1=
When sending a message using command 3 an error has
occurred; this may happen if no node is connected to the JC-24x
system bus or if the baud rates do not correspond to each other.
Register 10511: Box Configuration
Function
Read
356
Description
Present configuration
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
25.2 Interface Registers
Write
Setting a new configuration;
a new configuration can be set if the
box is not valid (register 10510: Bit 0 =
0).
Value range
0 .. 1 (bit-coded)
Value after reset
0
Meaning of the individual configuration register bits:
Bit 0:
Sending box
1=
Sending box
CAN frames can be sent via sending box.
0=
Receiving box
CAN frames can be received in this box.
Register 10512: CAN ID
Function
Description
Read
Actual CAN ID
Write
Setting a new CAN ID;
a new configuration can be set if the
box is not valid (register 10510: Bit 0 =
0).
Value range
11 or 29 bits (depending on
configuration)
Value after reset
0
This register is for setting the CAN ID to which a receiving box "listens". This CAN ID
will be transmitted when a message is sent via sending box.
When a box is activated, the ID is checked for overlapping with IDs which have been
allocated by the operating system. If an illegal ID has been set, the corresponding
box will not be set as "active".
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25 User-programmable CAN Interface
JetWeb
Register 10513: Number of Data Bytes
Function
Description
Read
Number of Data Bytes
Write
Number of data bytes to be sent
(sending box)
Value range
0 through 8
Value after reset
0
When a frame has been received, the number of received data bytes can be read
from a receiving box.
For a sending box, the number of data bytes to be sent must be set here.
Registers 10514 through 10521: Data byte 0 through 7
Function
Description
Read
Data byte 0 through 7
Write
Data byte 0 through 7
Value range
0 through 255
Value after reset
0
Only the number of data bytes specified in register 10513 is valid.
When a message with less than 8 bytes is received, the data bytes following the last
received byte up to data byte 7 will not be overwritten, but keep their previous value.
When sending a message with less than 8 bytes in length, the data bytes up to data
byte 7 need not be filled.
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25.3 Flag
25.3
Flag
In receiving mode, the operating system of the controller periodically checks for
incoming frames and copies the received data to the corresponding receiving box.
By default, this check is performed once per task cycle. A higher priority can be
assigned by setting this flag. In doing so, the check is performed with each user task
switch.
Flag 2077: Prioritized CAN-PRIM reception
Function
Description
Read
Priority of CAN-PRIM reception
Delete
Receiving check with task switch from
last task to task 0
Set
Receiving check with each user task
switch
Value after reset
0
25.4
Assigned CAN IDs
The operating system of the JC-24x and the modules connected to it use a number
of CAN IDs for communication purposes. Therefore, these IDs are not available to
the user-programmable CAN interface. Some IDs are not available at all. Other IDs
are not available if specific modules are connected to the controller.
As can be seen from the following table, the Jetter system bus only uses IDs with a
length of 11 bits. Thus, 29-bit identifiers can be used for CAN-PRIM without any
restrictions.
Note!
When a box is activated using command 1, the ID of the selected box is checked.
If the ID is valid, the box is activated by setting the "valid" bit in the status register
of the box (register 10510). If the ID is already in use, the valid bit is deleted.
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25 User-programmable CAN Interface
Modules
connected to the
bus
JetWeb
Unavailable IDs
Independent of the
connected modules
0x100, 0x701 - 0x70A, 0x732 - 0x73B, 0x746 0x74F
JX2-I/O Modules
0x180 - 0x19E, 0x1A0 - 0x1BF, 0x380 - 0x39F,
0x3A0 - 0x3BF
JX2-Slave Modules
0x09F - 0x0AF, 0x161 - 0x16F, 0x1D1 - 0x1DF
JX-SIO and Third-party
Modules
0x1C6 - 0x1CF, 0x246 - 0x24F, 0x2C6 - 0x2CF,
0x346 - 0x34F, 0x3C6 - 0x3CF,
0x446 - 0x44F, 0x4C6 - 0x4CF
0x581 - 0x58A, 0x5B2 - 0x5BB, 0x5C6 - 0x5CF,
0x601 - 0x60A, 0x632 - 0x63B, 0x646 - 0x64F
Festo-CP Module
0x010, 0x110, 0x120, 0x130, 0x140, 0x150,
0x1E0, 0x1F0, 0x250, 0x260, 0x270, 0x350,
0x360, 0x370, 0x3B0
25.5
Exemplary Program
The following segments of a JetSym ST program exemplify how the CAN-PRIM
function can be initialized in the JC-24x controller and used to send and receive CAN
messages.
An executable JetSym ST application is available from the technical hotline of Jetter
AG.
360
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JetControl 24x
25.5 Exemplary Program
Fig. 67: Type and variable definition for CAN-PRIM
Fig. 68: Initializing CAN-PRIM
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25 User-programmable CAN Interface
JetWeb
Fig. 69: Receiving a message (CAN-PRIM)
Fig. 70: Sending a message (CAN-PRIM)
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Appendix
Appendices
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363
Appendices
JetWeb
Appendices
of
List
Appendix A:Recent Revisions
Latest changes in revision 3.20.1:
Chapter
Comment
General
Information
Latest templates have
been used
Introduction
Update information
Added
Deleted
3
3
Phone number,
Significance of this User
Manual
3
1
Safety Instructions
3
2
Design
3
Operating Parameters
3
5
Installation Guide
3
5.1
Important Notes
3
5.10.2
Configuration data Host
Name (type)
3
6
Software Programming
6.1.4
Access to digital inputs/
outputs using registers
6.3
Special Flags
Now headline 2
6.3
FLAG 2058
6.4.2
Coding of Register
Numbers
3
6.5
Special Register
Now headline 2
3
6.5
New special registers
Value range for several
registers has been revised
364
Revised
3
3
3
3
3
6.6
New system functions
Program examples
3
3
6.7
System command
3
7
User Interface
7.3
Multi-display mode
3
7.4
New device # 7
3
8
Operator Interaction with
User Interfaces
3
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Appendix
Chapter
Jetter AG
Comment
Revised
Added
9
User-Programmable
Interface
9.1
Description of
Connections
Male instead of female
connector
3
9.3
Reg. 10015 and 10016
MSB and LSB were mixed
up
3
9.4
Display of values and
texts
3
9.5
Program example
3
11
System bus topology
11.1
Centralized arrangement
3
11.2
Decentralized
arrangement
3
11.4
Baud Rate
3
11.5
System Bus Cable
3
11.7
Codes of supported
modules
3
11.8
Monitoring of I/O modules
12.2
Current screenshot
13.4.1 and
17.1
File type bmp
3
14.3.3
Configuration file has
been extended
3
16
SMTP authentication
3
17.2.2
HTTP Server
Data tag bit variable
3
18
Networking via JetIP
3
20.3.3
Program example
3
21
EtherNet/IP
3
22.4
Program example
3
23
String functions
3
25
User-programmable CAN
Interface
3
Appendix A
Recent Revisions
3
Deleted
3
3
3
365
Appendices
JetWeb
Chapter
Comment
Revised
Added
Appendix B
Updating the OS of a
slave module
3
Appendix C
Application program
password
3
Current screenshot
3
Appendix D
Multitasking Operating
System
3
Appendix E
Tables have been deleted
Deleted
3
3
Reference to Excel sheet
3
Glossary
Appendix H
Index
3
Quick
Reference
New flags / registers /
functions
3
3
In general, all chapters of this revision have been checked for errors and reusability.
366
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JetControl 24x
Appendix
Appendix B: Operating System Update
Updating the Operating System of the Controller
From JetSym
In the menu item "Build“ of the JetSym programming interface the operating system
can be updated.
For this purpose, operating system files (*.OS) are made available on the Internet
(http://www.jetter.de) by JETTER AG.
JetSym stops the execution of the application program before the OS will be
updated.
Important!
Fig. 71: Operating System Update via JetSym
For transferring an OS update, time-out must be set to 4,000 ms on
the tab "Controller" in the JetSym menu "Project / Settings...". This is
the default setting.
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Appendices
JetWeb
•
During an OS update via Ethernet interface, the controller continues to work
maintaining its full range of functions (system bus, web functions etc.).
At the beginning of the OS update process via one of the serial ports, a special
loader program is transferred to the controller and started there. This loader
program is for receiving and storing an OS file sent by JetSym. It has no additional
functions.
•
Note!
JetSym checks whether the selected OS file is compatible with the module to
which the file is to be transferred.
Via FTP
The directory "/System/OS" serves as target directory when updating the OS via FTP
connection. For this purpose, the OS file (e.g. "JC240_V320.ose") is copied into this
directory.
As an alternative, the OS file can directly be copied into the directory "/System". In
this case the file must be named "system.ose".
The OS located in the flash memory of the JetControl can be read-out by reading the
file "/System/system.ose".
To gain access to the directory "/System/OS" and/or the file "system.ose" in the
directory "/System", the FTP connection has to be established with administrator
rights.
Remarks!
•
•
368
When updating via FTP no check will be carried out whether the selected OS
file is compatible with the module to which the file is to be transferred.
Unfortunately the OS of intelligent slave modules cannot be updated via FTP
at the moment.
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Appendix
Example of an OS update via FTP using the Microsoft Windows NT command
line FTP client:
A text file (e.g. "JC24xUpdate.txt") is to be created containing
consecutively processed FTP commands.
open 192.168.110.2
user admin admin
hash
cd "System"
cd "OS"
put JC240_V320.ose
bye
The Windows FTP client is then called within a batch file or at the
Windows prompt with the file name as parameter:
C:\>ftp -s:JC24xUpdate.txt -n
Note:
For this example, the executable file and the OS file must be located
in the root directory of drive C:.
In both cases (i.e. transfer via JetSym or via FTP) JetControl receives and buffers
the whole OS file. Then, the checksum is checked (CRC). If the file has been
received correctly, the existing OS is deleted and the new OS is stored.
During an operating system update, the power supply of the controller must not be
interrupted.
Important!
Note!
The new operating system is active after the next booting in both cases.
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Appendices
JetWeb
OS files for update via JetSym and FTP differ with respect to file format. It is not
possible to rename a file with the extension "*.ose" into a file with the extension
"*.os" in order to allow transfer via JetSym, and vice versa.
Important!
OS update of a module connected to the system bus
Since some slave modules do not correctly respond to access to their registers
during the OS update process, setup mode of JetSym or a visualization directly
accessing slave registers should be disabled.
Important!
A smart module connected to the system bus can be updated by selecting the option
"Update OS..." in the JetSym menu "Build". For more information refer to Fig. 72.
JetSym stops the execution of the application program before the OS will be
updated.
Important!
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Appendix
Fig. 72: Operating System Update via JetSym
For transferring an OS update, time-out must be set to 4,000 ms on
the tab "Controller" in the JetSym menu "Project / Settings...". This is
the default setting.
•
During an OS update via Ethernet interface, the controller continues to work
maintaining its full range of functions (system bus, web functions etc.).
Note!
JetSym checks whether the selected OS file is compatible with the module to
which the file is to be transferred.
Once the corresponding OS file with the extension "os" has been selected, the
number of the module connected to the system bus and the OS of which has to be
updated must be specified.
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Appendices
JetWeb
Fig. 73: Updating the OS of a smart slave module
Note!
Once the OS has been updated successfully, the system bus should be initialized.
For this purpose, the JC-24x is restarted.
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Appendix
Appendix C: Application program
The application program is run from the dynamic RAM. The flash disk is used to store
the application program permanently. The application program is saved to it as a file.
When the application program is downloaded from JetSym it is stored to the DRAM
for the time being. Thus, it will get lost when the controller is switched off. To store
the program permanently it has to be copied from the RAM to the flash memory. To
do so, you have the option to select the JetSym menu item "RAM -> Flash" in the
menu "Build" or to tick the checkbox "Autoflash" under "Project/Settings" on the tab
"Controller".
Fig. 74: Autoflash Settings in JetSym
If this checkbox is ticked, on loading the application program it is automatically
copied to the flash disk.
Within JetSym, application programs are transferred by pressing, for example,
.
If not otherwise configured, the application program is stored to the main directory of
the flashdisk as file with the name "userprog.ej2". Once the controller is switched on,
it is loaded from the flashdisk. In the configuration file "userprog.ini" another program
name can be set.
Due to this approach, it is possible to load several programs into the controller, e.g.
via FTP, and to activate one of them.
Configuration File
The configuration file must have the name "userprog.ini" and be stored to the root
directory of the flashdisk. This file is a pure text file. The file consists of the following
elements:
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Appendices
JetWeb
[USERPROGRAM]
PROGRAM=path/filename.ext
Path, filename and extension are subject to file system restrictions only. Each time
the application program is loaded or saved, the configuration file is read. Thus, it can
be modified during runtime of the controller (it is not required to restart the controller).
When a program is stored, the subdirectories must already exist (provided that a path
has been specified). Otherwise it is not possible to save the program.
Application program password
To protect the intellectual property of the application programmer it is possible to
protect the application program by a password before it is read-out using the pcom7
or JetIP protocol. However, the password will not protect the application program
against access via FTP. To achieve FTP access protection the user administration
of the file system can be used.
Registers
Register 2962: Stored password
Function
Description
Read
0 = No password protection
-1 = Program is protected
Write
Entering the same value twice will set a
new password
Value range
32 bits
Value after reset
0
Register 2963: Entered password
Function
374
Description
Read
Value written last
Write
Entering password
Value range
32 bits
Value after reset
0
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Appendix
Function
•
•
•
•
In delivered condition and following system command 204 the stored and entered
password equals to 0. As an indication that the program is password protected,
register 2962 contains the value "-1". Register 2963 contains the correct
password 0. This way, the application program can be read-out (e.g. when
comparing programs in JetSym).
To enter a new password the same value has to be entered twice into register
2962. After the first write access, value 0 is displayed in register 2962 because no
password protection exists. Only if the new password is confirmed by a second
write access with the same value, the password is accepted and the read
protection is activated.
To allow the application program to be read out or the password to be changed
the new password has to be entered into register 2963.
In the case of a protected application program, the OS can only be updated if
register 2963 contains the correct password.
Changing the Password
– Enter the present password into register 2963
– Enter the new password into register 2962
– Confirm the new password by re-entering it into register 2962
Example:
Present password: 1234
New password: 5678
mem[2963] := 1234;
mem[2962] := 5678;
mem[2962] := 5678;
JetSym
If you try via JetSym to read-out a password protected program with a wrong
password, the following error message is displayed in the output window:
fatal error 4202: Communication error: IP = Invalid parameter
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Appendices
JetWeb
Appendix D: Multitasking Operating
System (Interpreter)
This chapter is directed at users who in greater detail want to know how the
multitasking operating system of the JetControl 24x basically works.
Basic Information on Multitasking
A great number of control systems are operated with a program which is cyclically
processed. Cyclic processing is required if processing of several parallel programs
is not feasible, thus multitasking cannot be used.
Every system, however small it may be, includes parallel functions and processes.
Even if only one automatic process is required, there are parallel functions or
operator guidance functions to be monitored.
Execution of Parallel Functions by Multitasking
The most practical approach to parallel processing is multitasking since it is the most
distinct and, in logical terms, the simplest way of implementing parallel processing.
The reasons, why this kind of technology has not yet been applied in control systems
on a broad basis, are as follows:
•
PLC automation technology, to a high degree, is committed to its traditional
concept using PLC languages, such as ladder diagram, function plan and
statement list, and, as a result, to the cyclic processing of programs.
•
The known realtime-capable multitasking operating systems are very complex.
This requires powerful, and therefore expensive, hardware. Also, specialists are
needed for their handling.
•
The realtime capability of multitasking operating systems known from the office
realm is limited since numerous system functions, such as access to hard disks,
mouse handling, etc., get access to program flow via interrupts.
•
Due to the complexity of the known multitasking operating systems, their
application in the area of small and mid-sized control systems has not been
possible so far.
Reproduction of the Real Process Flow
Thanks to multitasking, there is no need to convert the process into a cyclic program
flow which does not reflect the real process flow. Multitasking enables the program
to be executed in a way that corresponds to the real process flow.
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Appendix
JetControl with Multitasking OS for Industrial
Automation
To realize an OS with multitasking and a descriptive, process-oriented execution for
the whole range of industrial automation, Jetter AG has developed an easy-to-use
multitasking OS.
This OS was designed for meeting the demands of automation technology and can
even be implemented into the micro-controller JetControl 24x.
Principle of Operation
First of all, distinction must be made between single-processor and multiprocessor
systems. For processing applications with great volumes of data, e.g. complex
graphics, multiprocessor systems are used in the EDP realm. In such systems, data
are processed in parallel by several processors.
Multitasking for Single-Processor Systems
In most cases, parallel data processing using several processors is not being
employed, neither in known multitasking operating systems of the office realm nor in
most other systems. Multiprocessor systems are not universally applicable to the
wide range of control applications due to the required hardware and software, thus,
the high price. An exception are some special applications. Therefore, in control
systems a single processor is used managing parallel processing of all programs.
This also applies to a JetControl system.
There are several basic approaches to multitasking operating systems. One of them
is the time-sharing method.
Time-sharing runs several tasks by interleaving portions of processing time allotted
to each task. Each task is executed until its portion of time is elapsed. Then, control
of the system is passed to the next task. This process is continued until the initial task
gets its turn, then it starts once again.
Time-Slice Multitasking
With JetControl systems, an optimized time-sharing multitasking is used. It is
possible to write up to 100 parallel programs, so-called tasks.
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Appendices
JetWeb
Note!
A program always starts with TASK 0. Thus, TASK 0 is the only task, the
existence of which is mandatory. The order, in which additional tasks are
programmed, is irrelevant. For reasons of clarity, a systematic and logical order
of tasks is advisable.
Note!
The duration of program execution primarily depends on the number of tasks
being used. The program length is only of secondary importance to the
processing time. Clever programming, that is a limited number of tasks, is crucial
to a fast processing of a program.
Permanently Defined and User-Defined Task Switching
Conditions
A task does not always make the most of the available processing time. If, for
example, the next instruction of a task is a delay which has not elapsed yet, an
immediate task switch takes place. Such a task switch cannot be controlled by the
program. After the following instructions a task switch is inevitably carried out:
•
•
•
DELAY process has not been completed yet
WHEN condition has not been fulfilled yet
USER_INPUT program waits until the operator enters a value
Additionally, further task switching conditions can be defined in register 2004:
•
•
•
378
if the time specified in register 2005 has elapsed
when the task encounters a GOTO instruction
when the condition of an IF instruction has not been fulfilled.
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Appendix
Note!
Task switching is forced by using the instruction DELAY 0 with parameter 0. If,
during processing, a task encounters DELAY 0, it switches immediately to the
next task.
By using the instruction DELAY 0, low priority can be assigned to tasks or program
parts. For example, a task which is controlling the displays needs not have the same
response time as a task in automatic mode. Inserting one or more DELAY 0
instructions into user interface tasks results in time saving which is made available
to other tasks.
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Appendices
JetWeb
Appendix E: Tables for Designing a
Control System Equipped with
JetControl 24x
From the technical hotline of Jetter AG an Excel spreadsheet is available which
allows convenient compilation of expansion modules required for an application.
File name: SysBus_Configuration_xxxa_e.xls
a.xxx: Present version number (at the moment 115)
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Appendix
Appendix F: List of Abbreviations
Jetter AG
A/D
Analog/Digital
AC
Alternating Current
ADC
Analog-to-Digital Converter
AM
Amplitude Modulation
ARP
Address Resolution Protocol: A TCP/IP protocol for
determining the hardware address (or physical address) of a
node on a local area network connected to the Internet, when
only the IP address (or logical address) is known.
ASCII
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
CAT 5
CATegory 5: Cable category 5 for Fast Ethernet (100BaseTX)
via twisted pair lines
COM
Device name for a serial port in Wintel systems. The first serial
port is identified as COM1, the second as COM2, etc.
CPU
Central Processing Unit
CRC
Cyclic Redundancy Check: A procedure used in checking for
errors in data transmission.
D/A
Digital/Analog
DAC
Digital-to-Analog Converter
DIN
Deutsches Institut für Normung = German Industry Standard
DIR
Direction
DNS
Domain Name System: The system by which hosts on the
Internet have both domain name addresses (such as
bluestem.prairienet.org) and IP addresses (such as
192.17.3.4). The domain name address is used by human
users and is automatically translated into the numerical IP
address, which is used by the packet-routing software.
I/O
Input/Output
EMC
Electro-Magnetic Compatibility
ENC
Encoder: A feedback element that converts linear or rotary
position (absolute or incremental) into a digital signal.
ERR
Error
ESD
Electro Statical Discharge
FIFO
First In First Out
FP
Floating Point: Floating point notation
FTP
File Transfer Protocol: Protocol used for copying files to and
from remote computer systems on a network using TCP/IP,
such as the Internet.
381
Appendices
382
JetWeb
FX
Fast Ethernet (100BaseX) via fibre optic cables
GND (Ground)
Ground
HTML
HyperText Markup Language: The markup language that uses
tags to mark elements, such as text and graphics, in a
document to indicate how Web browsers should display these
elements to the user and should respond to user actions such
as activation of a link by means of a key press or mouse click.
HTTP
HyperText Transfer Protocol: The client/server protocol used
to access information on the World Wide Web.
IEC
International Electrotechnical Commission
INT
INTeger: A data type representing whole numbers.
IP
Internet Protocol
JC
JetControl
JetIP
A protocol for communications of Jetter AG brand controllers
via Ethernet.
LAN
Local Area Network: Local network, for example, an Ethernet
network within a building.
LCD
Liquid Crystal Display
LED
Light Emitting Diode
LSB
Least Significant Bit: least significant bit, for example, of a
word; or Least Significant Byte
MAC
Media Access Control: Access control to the network.
HMI
Human Machine Interface
ms
Millisecond
MSB
Most Significant Bit: most significant bit, for example, of a
word; or Most Significant Byte
NUM 25
Keyboard module for LCD 16 user interface
pcom7
A protocol for communications of Jetter AG brand controllers
via serial port.
PID
Proportional-Integral-Differential (Controller)
pnp
A type of bipolar transistor in which a base of N-type material
is sandwiched between an emitter and a collector of P-type
material.
Output: in active state ("1") the output is energized.
Input: to achieve active state ("1"), the input is to be energized.
POP3
Post Office Protocol version 3: This is the current version of
the Post Office Protocol standard in common use on TCP/IP
networks.
PPR
Pulses Per Revolution
PRIM
User-Programmable Interface
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Jetter AG
Appendix
PRN
The logical device name for printer. A name reserved by the
MS-DOS operating system for the standard print device, PRN
usually refers to a system's first parallel port, also known as
LPT1 (PRiNter).
PWM
Pulse Width Modulation
RDA
Receive Data A: The first differential channel of the RS-422
interface. Inverted signal.
RDB
Receive Data B: Second differential channel of the RS-422
interface. Non-inverted signal.
RS-232
An accepted industry standard for serial communications
connections.
RS: Recommended Standard
For transmission distances of up to 15 m. No differential
evaluation. Transmitting and sending on different lines.
RS-422
For transmission distances over 15 m. Two lines with
differential evaluation. Transmitting and sending on different
lines.
RS-485
For transmission distances over 15 m. Two lines with
differential evaluation. Transmitting and sending on the same
line.
RTC
Real Time Clock
RTU
Remote Terminal Unit: Communication mode in Modbus
networks via serial interfaces
RXD
Receive (RX) Data
A line used to carry received serial data from one device to
another.
SDA
Send Data A: The first differential channel of the RS-422
interface. Inverted signal.
SDB
Send Data B: Second differential channel of the RS-422
interface. Non-inverted signal.
SELV
Safe Extremely Low Voltage: Voltage up to 60 V, galvanically
separated from the network.
SM
Stepper Motor
SMTP
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol: A TCP/IP protocol for sending
messages from one computer to another on a network. This
protocol is used on the Internet to route e-mail.
PLC
Programmable Logic Controller
SSI
ServerSide Includes: A function provided by the HTTP server
to include values from the controller in HTML pages.
SSI
Synchronous Serial Interface
STEP
Step: "Step“
SUB-D
Type name of a plug-in connector
383
Appendices
384
JetWeb
SV
Servo Motor
TCP
Transmission Control Protocol: The protocol within TCP/IP
that governs the breakup of data messages into packets to be
sent via IP, and the reassembly and verification of the
complete messages from packets received by IP.
TCP/IP
Acronym for Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol.
A protocol for communications between computers which has
become the de facto standard for data transmission over
networks, including the Internet.
tr/tn
time rise/time normal:"rise time of a pulse/total duration of a
pulse" "rise time of a pulse/total duration of a pulse"
TX
Fast Ethernet (100BaseX) via twisted pair cables.
TXD
Transmit (TX) Data: "Transmit Data"
A line used to transmit received serial data from one device to
another; e.g. from a computer to a modem.
UDP
User Datagram Protocol: The connectionless protocol within
TCP/IP that corresponds to the transport layer in the ISO/OSI
model. UDP converts data messages generated by an
application into packets to be sent via IP but does not verify
that messages have been delivered correctly. Therefore, UDP
is more efficient than TCP, so it is used for various purposes,
including SNMP; the reliability depends on the application that
generates the message.
UTP
Unshielded Twisted Pair: A cable containing one or more
twisted pairs of wires without additional shielding. UTP is more
flexible and takes up less space than shielded twisted-pair
(STP) cable but has less bandwidth.
VDC
Voltage Direct Current
WAN
Wide Area Network: A communications network that connects
geographically separated areas. Example: Internet
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Appendix
Appendix G: List of Illustrations
Fig. 1:
Fig. 2:
Fig. 3:
Fig. 4:
Fig. 5:
Fig. 6:
Fig. 7:
Fig. 8:
Fig. 9:
Fig. 10:
Fig. 11:
Fig. 12:
Fig. 13:
Fig. 14:
Fig. 15:
Fig. 16:
Fig. 17:
Fig. 18:
Fig. 19:
Fig. 20:
Fig. 21:
Fig. 22:
Fig. 23:
Fig. 24:
Fig. 25:
Fig. 26:
Fig. 27:
Fig. 28:
Fig. 29:
Fig. 30:
Fig. 31:
Fig. 32:
Fig. 33:
Fig. 34:
Fig. 35:
Fig. 36:
Fig. 37:
Fig. 38:
Fig. 39:
Fig. 40:
Fig. 41:
Fig. 42:
Fig. 43:
Fig. 44:
Fig. 45:
Fig. 46:
Fig. 47:
Fig. 48:
Fig. 49:
Fig. 50:
Fig. 51:
Fig. 52:
Fig. 53:
Jetter AG
Front View of the JetControl 24x Controller
Side View of the JetControl 24x Controller
Top View of the JetControl 24x Controller
JetControl 24x: Power supply connector
LEDs Representing the Digital Inputs of JetControl 24x
External circuit of the digital inputs 4 and 13
LEDs Representing the Digital Outputs of JetControl 24x
External circuit of the digital outputs 3 and 5
Ethernet Connection
Ethernet Connection between PC and JetControl
Ethernet Connection between JetControl and Switch
Ethernet Connection Switch to switch
Status LEDs
Positions of toggle switch S21 (mode selector)
IP Address Pattern
Determining the IP address resulting from the rotary switch positions
Setting a specific IP address
Coding of Inputs and Outputs of JX2-I/O modules
Coding of Inputs and Outputs of Smart I/O modules
Controller JC-24x with JX2 modules and one Smart I/O module
Coding in case of I/O register mapping with JX2-I/O modules
Coding in case of input register mapping with Smart I/O modules
Coding in case of output register mapping with Smart I/O modules
Coding of register numbers for JX2-I/O modules
Coding of register numbers of the Smart I/O module
Coding of register numbers for LJX7-CSL-... modules
Coding of register numbers for JX2-Slave modules
Coding of JetMove 2xx register numbers
Partitioning integer/floating point user variables/registers
REGISTER_LOAD with numeric parameters
REGISTER_LOAD with symbolic parameters
Assigning a constant to a variable (JetSym ST)
Indirect and Double Indirect Addressing (JetSym)
Indirect and Double Indirect Addressing (JetSym ST)
Example for Double Indirect Addressing with JetSym
Example of Register Arithmetic (JetSym)
Example of Register Arithmetic (JetSym ST)
SF 4: BCD to binary conversion
SF 21: Sine Calculation
Pin Assignment of the Connecting Cable for Several LCD HMIs
PRIM: Declaration of variables and constants
PRIM: Application Task
PRIM: Sending Function
PRIM: Receiving function
ASCII/numeral conversion
Centralized arrangement on the Jetter System Bus
Remote Arrangement on the Jetter System Bus
Connecting a JX-SIO module to the JetControl 24x
Implementation of two different models using dummy modules
Activating syntax check in JetSym
File system, servers and services
System directories / files
Session using the Windows NT 4.0 FTP Client
19
19
20
34
37
39
41
43
45
46
46
47
49
50
54
55
56
70
71
72
72
73
73
84
84
85
85
85
87
88
88
88
89
89
91
94
97
130
132
154
212
213
213
214
215
223
224
225
229
236
241
253
261
385
Appendices
JetWeb
Fig. 54:
Fig. 55:
Fig. 56:
Fig. 57:
Fig. 58:
Fig. 59:
Fig. 60:
Fig. 61:
Fig. 62:
Fig. 63:
Fig. 64:
Fig. 65:
Fig. 66:
Fig. 67:
Fig. 68:
Fig. 69:
Fig. 70:
Fig. 71:
Fig. 72:
Fig. 73:
Fig. 74:
386
E-mail template file
Received e-mail
NetCopyList: Declaration of Variables
NetCopyList: Program
Modbus/TCP: Type declaration
Modbus/TCP: Constants and Variables
Modbus/TCP: User task
Data file: Type declarations
Data Files: Constants and Variables
Data Files: Program
Strings: Test program
Text Registers / Text Variables
Monitoring of the SER2 Interface
Type and variable definition for CAN-PRIM
Initializing CAN-PRIM
Receiving a message (CAN-PRIM)
Sending a message (CAN-PRIM)
Operating System Update via JetSym
Operating System Update via JetSym
Updating the OS of a smart slave module
Autoflash Settings in JetSym
276
277
293
294
316
316
317
334
334
335
338
344
346
361
361
362
362
367
371
372
373
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Appendix
Appendix H: Index of Examples
Example1: Determining the IP address resulting from the rotary switch
positions
Example2: Setting a specific IP address
Example3: On delay via register 2032
Example4: Configuration consisting of digital input and output modules only
Example5: Configuration consisting of one JX2-SV1
Example6: Configuration with one Smart I/O Module
Example7: Mapping of flags to registers
Example8: Programming by Means of Flags
Example9: Programming by Means of Flags
Example10: Setting the floating point register range
Example11: Loading a number into a register
Example12: Copying one register into another register
Example13: Loading by means of double indirect addressing
Example14: Double Indirect Addressing Numerical example
Example15: Value assignment with operations
Example16: Two examples for REG instruction
Example17: SHIFT_LEFT Instruction
Example18: SHIFT_RIGHT Instruction
Example19: Examples of DEC and INC Instructions
Example20: SHIFT_LEFT Instruction
Example21: SHIFT_RIGHT Instruction
Example22: BCD to binary conversion
Example23: Sine Calculation
Example24: Text output on an HMI
Example25: Output of register values on an HMI
Example26: User input via HMI
Example27: Output of decimal positions on an HMI
Example28: Entering decimal positions via HMI
Example29: Output of a suggested value on the display
Example30: Switch-over time between monitor screen and normal display
Example31: Mapping the F1 key
Example32: Reassigning the ASCII character for "Delete display"
Example33: Output on a JX2-PRN1 or JX2-SER1 module
Example34: Text output using the DISPLAY_TEXT instruction
Example35: Output using the DISLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE instruction
Example36: Output on a user-programmable interface
Example37: Text output using the DISPLAY_TEXT instruction
Example38: Output using the DISLAY_REG / DISPLAY_VALUE instruction
Example39: Machine manufactured in two models
Example40: Structure of a license file for web functions
Example41: Possible contents of the file "hosts"
Example42: Possible contents of the configuration file "/System/cfgvar.ini"
Example43: Possible contents of the file "flashdisklock.ini"
Example44: Possible contents of the file "keys.ini"
Example45: Possible contents of the file "users.ini"
Example46: The three possible sections of the license file
Example47: Possible contents of the configuration file "/System/cfgvar.ini"
Example48: Possible contents of the file "flashdiskinfo.txt"
Example49: Possible content of section [SMTP]
Example50: Possible content of section [DEFAULT]
Example51: Possible content of section [POP3]
Example52: E-mail template file
Jetter AG
55
55
57
70
70
72
74
75
75
86
90
90
90
91
93
94
96
96
97
99
99
130
132
158
160
162
164
166
167
177
181
184
191
193
194
208
208
210
228
242
247
248
250
251
252
254
255
256
264
264
265
276
387
Appendices
JetWeb
Example53:
Example54:
Example55:
Example56:
Example57:
Example58:
Example59:
Example60:
Example61:
Example62:
388
Possible content of the file "license.dat"
Possible content of the file "license.dat"
Names of Data Files
Possible contents of a data file
String 1 is smaller than string 2
String 1 is larger than string 2
Finding a string
Appending Strings
Converting a register into a string
Text Registers
307
319
327
333
338
339
340
341
342
343
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Appendix
Appendix I: Index
A
DELSCR
ActiveX
287
Addressing
Digital I/Os
Digital I/Os of Smart I/O Module
Digital I/Os per register
Register(s)
JetMove 2xx
JX2-I/O module
JX2-Slave Module
LJX7-CSL-... module
Smart I/O Module
Administrator
Applet
Application registers
69
71
72
85
84
85
85
84
249, 252, 259
287
86
Arc Cosin
133
Arc Sin
132
Arc Tangent
133
Attachment
266
Authentification
263
Autoflash
238, 373
C
Cable
58
Calculations
92
Client
Modbus/TCP
313
Communication unit
NetCopyList
RemoteScan
290
301
Configuration Memory
Conformance
Connection
Digital Inputs
Digital Outputs
Ethernet
Power Supply
Serial Interface
52, 255
313
38
42
45
34
44
Cosine
132
Cursor Position
157
D
Jetter AG
Default Value
167
DELEOL
158
Description of Symbols
Design
Device Number
158
6
20
156
Digital Inputs
36
Digital Outputs
40
E
EDS
319
Electrical Data
27
E-Mail Server
263
Erroneous task
237
Error flags
240
Error Register
238
Errors signalled by LEDs
EtherNet/IP
Expansion options
Exponential Function
50
319
28
133
F
Factory settings
149
Field length
172
File Names
Application program
Data files
E-Mail
373
327
267
Fixed-Point Numbers - Display
163
Fixed-Point Numbers - Input
165
Flash disk
256
Formatting the Flash Disk
FTP Server
Functional Equipment
51, 257
259
27
H
HMIs
Control character
Cursor Position
Device Number
Multi-display mode
Overview
Text output
158
157
156
153
151
159
Host Name
323
389
Appendices
JetWeb
hosts
247
HTTP Server
279
I
ID
355
Information Signs
17
Installation Guide
29
Interface Activity
345
K
Keys
252
L
LCD Flags
186
ON delay
57
Operating Conditions
21
Operating Parameters
Electrical Safety
22
EMC - Emitted Interference
23
EMC - Immunity to Interference
DC Power Supply Inputs and
Outputs
25
Rack
23
Signal Ports
24
Environment
21
Mechanical parameters
22
Power Rating
21
Operating System Update
Controller
JX2-Slave
254
367
370
LEDs
Digital Inputs
Digital Outputs
RJ45 Ethernet jack
Status
37
41
45
49
Overview of Flags
73
Overview of Registers
83
LEDs indicating booting sequence
49
Password
Application program
Configuration Memory
Flash disk
FTP Server
System command
Licensing
Data file
EtherNet/IP
Modbus/TCP
Web Functions
254
319
307
242
Locks
250
M
Maintenance
16
Malfunctions
17
Memory overview
27
P
Power Supply
133
Networking
289
Protocol ID
NEW-DAT
351
279
Modbus CRC
133
Modbus/TCP
307
Monitor functions
176
Multitasking
376
Numbering
Digital Inputs
Digital Outputs
39
43
33
349
197
Programming Cable JN-PK-5m
Natural logarithm
MIME Types
374
53, 248
257
244
149
PRIM
CAN
Serial Interface
Programming Instruction
DISPLAY_REG
DISPLAY_TEXT
DISPLAY_TEXT_2
REG
REGDEC
REGINC
REGISTER_LOAD
REGZERO
SHIFT_LEFT
SHIFT_RIGHT
USER_INPUT
N
390
O
59
156
156
156
94
94
94
88
94
94
94
167
313
R
RemoteScan
Repair
137
16
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Appendix
S
Safety Instructions
Sending e-mails
Server
Modbus/TCP
Setting the IP address
15
267
309
52
Shielding in conformity with the EMC
standards
18
Sign suppression
174
Sine
131
Special Flags
Jetter AG
77
Special Register
100
Special/System Function
129
Square Root
131
ST Programming Instruction
DEC
DISPLAY_TEXT
DISPLAY_TEXT_2
DISPLAY_VALUE
INC
SHIFT_LEFT
SHIFT_RIGHT
USER_INPUT
97
156
156
156
97
97
97
167
String Functions
337
Syntax Check
235
System bus
Baud Rate
Centralized arrangement
Dummy modules
Expansion options
Remote arrangement
Supported Modules
226
223
227
221
224
230
System Bus Cable
Cable confection # 530
Specs
67
65
System command
149
System Registers
4
System Requirements
4
T
Tag
E-Mail
HTTP
269
279
Tangent
132
Template file
266
Text variables
343
Time Base
323
Toggle switch
50
Transaction ID
313
U
Unit ID
313
Update Information
4
Usage as agreed upon
15
Usage Other Than Agreed Upon
15
User Administration
249
User Flags
73
User Interface Cable JN-DK-Xm
61
User Interface Cable KAY_0386-xxxx
62
User Interface Cable KAY_0533-0025
64
391
Appendices
JetWeb
392
Jetter AG
General Overview: Registers
JetControl 24x
Quick Reference
Rev 3.20
Technical Data
JC-241
JC-243
JC-246
Integer registers, remanent
2000
2000
2000
Floating point registers, rem.
256
256
256
30000
30000
30000
Integer/floating point
registers, rem.
Flags, remanent
256
256
256
Mapped flags, remanent
1792
1792
1792
Program memory
64 KB
64 KB
64 KB
Digital inputs, local
16
16
16
Digital outputs, local
8
8
8
Max. # of JX2-I/O modules
7
15
23
Max. # of JX2-Slave modules
1
3
6
Max. # of JX-SIO Modules
10
10
10
Max. I/O sum
136
264
392
Serial port(s)
1
2
2
Ethernet interface
1
1
1
1 MB
3 MB
7 MB
yes
yes
yes
Flash disk
Real-time clock
0 .. 1999
2000 .. 2999
3000 .. 3309
4000 .. 4999
5000 .. 6999
7000 .. 7999
8000 .. 8999
General integer registers
Special Register
Registers of JX2-IO modules
I/O mapping
Mapping of analog JX-SIO values
JX-SIO configuration registers
Mapping of RemoteScan I/Os
10000 .. 10099
10100 .. 10299
10300 .. 10499
10500 .. 10599
12100 .. 19999
Serial Interfaces
JetControl configuration registers
Mapping of EtherNet/IP I/Os
User-programmable CAN Interface
Registers of JX2-Slave Modules
20000 .. 49999
65024 .. 65279
General integer/floating point registers
Floating point registers
2000
2001
Operating system: software version
Status registers, bit-coded
Bit 0:
1 = User program is running
2002
2006
2008
Runtime registers in time base units
Cycle time of all tasks
Error messages, bit-coded
Bit 2:
1 = no valid application program
Bit 3:
1 = Time-out of JX2-I/O or JX-SIO module
Bit 4:
1 = Time-out of JX2-Slave module
Bit 5:
1 = Illegal op-code in the application
program
Bit 6:
1 = Wrong programming of an arithmetic
calculation
Bit 7:
1 = Multiple mentioning of a label
Bit 8:
1 = General syntax error
Bit 9:
1 = Overload of local outputs
Bit 10: 1 = Jump to a non-existing label or
subprogram
Bit 11: 1 = FESTO CP-FB module signals error
Bit 12: 1 = Task stack over-/underflow
2009
2010
2032
2037
2909
2960
2961
2962
2963
Number of erroneous task
Program address of error
Input delay time in steps of 100 ms
Runtime registers in milliseconds
Number of the first floating point register
Password for system commands
System command
Stored password for application program
Entered password for application program
General Overview: Flags
FLAG 0 .. 255
FLAG 256 .. 2047
FLAG 2048 .. 2303
General user flags
By register 0 .. 74 mapped flags
Special Flags
General Overview: IOs
I/O 101 .. 116
I/O 201 .. 2416
I/O 7001 .. 7964
I/O 20001 .. 36000
Local inputs/outputs on JC-24x
Inputs/outputs on JX2-I/O modules
Inputs/outputs on JX-SIO modules
Virtual inputs/outputs for RemoteScan
mapped by registers 8000 .. 8999
Available User Registers
0 .. 74
0 .. 1999
20000 .. 49999
65024 .. 65279
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
Special OS Registers
General integer registers with mapped flags
General integer registers, 32 bits
General integer or floating point registers,
32 bits
Floating point registers
393 / 407
December 2005 / Printed in Germany
Information on Application Program
2022
2035
2970
2971
2972
Version of application program in the RAM
Size of the application program in the RAM
Application program creation date - minute
Application program creation date - hour
Application program creation date - day
Article # 60865170
Quick Reference / Rev. 3.20.1
JetControl 24x
Appendix
Interface Monitoring
2070
2071
2072
2073
2074
2077
2955
2956
2957
2710
2750
10019
10039
Ethernet Monitoring Time in milliseconds
Monitoring Time SER1 in milliseconds
Monitoring Time SER2 in milliseconds
Total number of errors on the Ethernet interface
Task-specific number or errors, Ethernet
Number of errors on SER1
Number of errors on SER2
2760
2761
2762
2763
2764
2765
Flag 2088
Flag 2089
Flag 2090
Flag 2091
Flag 2092
Flag 2093
OS flag, Ethernet interface
User flag, Ethernet interface
OS flag, SER1
User flag, SER1
OS flag, SER2
User flag, SER2
2973
2974
Application program creation date - month
Application program creation date - year
System Bus Special Registers
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2023
2024
2027
2028
2029
Module # Time-out of JX2-I/O or JX-SIO module
Module # Time-out of JX2-Slave module
Number of JX2-I/O or JX-SIO Modules
Amount of JX2-Slave Modules
Pointer to module array
Module array
JX2-I/O dummy modules, bit-coded, bit = 1 :
Module exists
JX2 slave dummy modules, bit-coded, bit = 1 :
Module exists
Output driver error of JX2-I/O module
Monitoring Interval for JX2-I/O and JX-SIO
modules
System Bus Baud Rate
7=
1 MBaud
6=
500 kBaud
5=
250 kBaud
4=
125 kBaud
Number of JX-SIO modules
Present I/Os sum
Version number of system bus driver
Time-out time in milliseconds for JX-SIO
Sync interval in milliseconds; 0 = OFF
Enabling system bus special functions
Bit 2:
1 = user-programmable CAN interface is
available
JX2-I/O time-out configuration
Index in I/O time-out monitoring array
I/O time-out monitoring array
I/O monitoring time-out
Time-out of JX2 I/O registers
Time-out of JX2-Slave registers
Task Control
2004
2005
2006
2007
2025
2026
2091
2100 .. 2199
2200 .. 2299
2300 .. 2399
Task switch conditions, bit-coded
Bit 0:
1 = Task switch when task time-out will be
reached
Bit 1:
1 = Task switch in case of GOTO
Bit 2:
1 = Task switch in case of a not fulfilled IF
Task time-out time in milliseconds
Cycle time of all tasks in milliseconds
Number of the highest user task
Present task number
Priority task; 255 = no priorities assigned
Reserve stack capacity of the task in which the
register is read
Task status, task 0 .. 99
0
Task not existing
1
Task has been stopped
2
Waiting for response from network
3
Stopped at breakpoint
250
WHEN_MAX
253
USER_INPUT
254
DELAY
255
Task is being processed
Task program index, task 0 .. 99
Task time register for DELAY, task 0 .. 99
Control of HMIs
2804
2805
2806
Total number of display characters
Number of Characters per Line
Text selection for DISPLAY_TEXT_2
0=
Text 1
1=
Text 2
2807
2808
2809
2810
2811
2812
2813
2814
2815
2816
2817
2818
2819
Divisor (USER_INPUT)
Number of decimal positions (USER_INPUT)
Divisor (DISPLAY_VALUE)
Number of decimal positions (DISPLAY_VALUE)
Max. number of decimal positions (USER_INPUT)
Field width for displaying integer registers
Field width for USER_INPUT
Indirect cursor position
Default value (USER_INPUT)
Sign suppression; 1 = No sign
Status USER_INPUT
Enable/disable monitor function
Switch-over time between text display and
monitoring function
Switch-over to Monitor Display
Dialog language
0 = German
1 = English
2820
2821
2824
2825
2826
2827
2828
2829
2830
2831
2832
2833
2834
2835
2836
Indirect buffer number with device # 0
Multi-display mode
Text buffer number for HMI # 1
Text buffer number for HMI # 2
Text buffer number for HMI # 3
Text buffer number for HMI # 4
Base flag number for HMI # 1
Base flag number for HMI # 2
Base flag number for HMI # 3
Base flag number for HMI # 4
Register number of LEDs on HMI # 1
Register number of LEDs on HMI # 2
Register number of LEDs on HMI # 3
Register number of LEDs on HMI # 4
2837
2838
2839
Module number of JX2-PRN1 (display redirection)
Module number of JX2-SER1 (display redirection)
Character code for "Delete display"
2840
2841
Character code for "Delete to end of line"
String variable address (display redirection)
Network Control
2702
2703
2704
2705
2707
2708
2709
2710
2711
2717
2718
2750
2751
2752
Register offset
Flag offset
Input offset
Output offset
Indirect network number
Time-out time in milliseconds
Response time in milliseconds
Total number of network errors
Error code of last network access
0 = No error
1 = Time-out
3 = Error message from remote station
5 = Illegal network address
6 = Illegal number of registers
7 = Illegal interface number
Number of retries in case of a network error
Total number of retries
Number of network errors in the task in which the
register is read
Error code of last network access in the task in
which the register is read
Number of retries in the task in which the register is
read
Real-time Clock
2911
2912
2913
2914
2915
2916
2917
2921
2922
2923
2924
2925
2926
2927
2928
2006
2037
2300 .. 2399
Runtime register in register 2003 - time units
Time base in multiples of 10 milliseconds;
Time base for DELAY, START_TIMER,
TIMER_END
Cycle time of all tasks in milliseconds
Runtime registers in milliseconds
Task time register for DELAY, task 0 .. 99
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
2965
2966
2967
8000 .. 8999
Communications protocol
Amount of configuration blocks
Scan status
16-bit I/O registers
mapped by I/Os 20001 .. 36000
Registers of JX2-I/O Modules
Coding of digital inputs/outputs
xxzz
xx:
Module number (2 .. 24)
zz:
I/O number (1 .. 16)
Coding of Register Numbers
3xxz
xx:
Module number (2 .. 24) - 2
z:
Register number (0.. 9)
The function of individual registers on JX2-I/O modules is specific to
the given module. For more information refer to the corresponding
user's manual.
Web Functions
Registers of JX2-Slave Modules
2930
Coding of Register Numbers
1xyzz
x:
Module number (2 .. 7)
y:
Axis number
zz:
Register number (0.. 99)
Time Registers
2002
2003
Direct access to RTC
Seconds
Minutes
Hours
Weekday; 0 = Sunday
Day
Month
Year
Access via buffer
Seconds
Minutes
Hours
Weekday; 0 = Sunday
Day
Month
Year
Transmission of buffer values from/to real-time
clock
Remote Scan
2931
2932
2933
2934
2935
2936
2937
2938
2977
2978
Availability (bit-coded)
Bit 0:
1 = FTP server available
Bit 1:
1 = HTTP server available
Bit 2:
1 = E-mail function available
Bit 3:
1 = Data file function available
Bit 4:
1 = Modbus/TCP has been licensed
Bit 5:
1 = Modbus/TCP server has been started
Bit 6:
1 = Ethernet/IP available
Own IP address
IP address of SMTP server
IP address of POP3 server
Port number of SMTP server
Port number of POP3 server
Password for formatting the flash disk
Status of e-mail processing
Number of the task sending an e-mail
Status of the data file operation
Number of the task performing a data file operation
395 / 407
December 2005 / Printed in Germany
The function of individual registers on JX2-Slave modules is specific
to the given module. For more information refer to the corresponding
user's manual.
JX-SIO Registers
Coding of digital inputs/outputs
7xzz
x:
Module number -70 (0 .. 9)
zz:
I/O number (1 .. 64)
Coding of inputs / registers
5xzz
x:
Module number -70 (0 .. 9)
zz:
Register number (0.. 99)
Article # 60865170
Quick Reference / Rev. 3.20.1
JetControl 24x
Coding of outputs / registers
6xzz
x:
Module number -70 (0 .. 9
zz:
Register number (0.. 99)
Coding of configuration registers
7xzz
x:
Module number -70 (0 .. 9
zz:
Register number (0.. 99)
5x10 .. 5x16
5x20 .. 5x27
5x60 .. 5x71
16 combined digital inputs
8 combined digital inputs
Analog inputs
6x10 .. 6x16
6x20 .. 6x27
6x60 .. 6x71
16 combined digital outputs
8 combined digital outputs
Analog Outputs
7x09
7x10 .. 7x21
7x29
7x30 .. 7x41
Value range for analog inputs
Configuration of analog inputs
Value range for analog outputs
Configuration of analog outputs
7x75
7x78
7x79
Index for a group of 8 digital outputs
Error mode of digital outputs
Error condition of digital outputs
7x85
7x88
7x89
Index for analog outputs
Error mode of analog outputs
Error condition of analog outputs
7x02
7x03
Index to JX-SIO terminal array
JX-SIO terminal array
7x04
7x05
7x06
7x07
Index to function terminals
Status of function terminal
Input data of function terminal
Output data of function terminal
7x90
7x91
7x92
7x93
7x97
7x98
7x99
The following registers can be read even in case of
a JX-SIO time-out
Error Register
Status Registers
Index to Error Array
Error Array
Serial number
Monitoring Interval
Software version
Appendix
Serial Interfaces
JC-24x Configuration
The first register number applies to the SER1 interface
The second register number applies to the SER2 interface
10000/10020 Error state
Bit 15
= 1: BREAK received
Bit 14
= 1: Frame error at reception
Bit 13
= 1: Parity error at reception
Bit 12
= 1: Overflow on recipient side
10001/10021 Configuration
0 = off
1 = Reserved
2 = PRIM: user programmable user interface
3 = pcom7 protocol by operating system
10002/10022 Baud Rate
1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600,
115200
10003/10023 Character Length
5, 6, 7, 8
10004/10024 Number of stop bits
1 = 1 stop bit
2 = 1.5 stop bits if character length is 5;
2 stop bits if character length is 6, 7 or 8
10005/10025 Parity
0 = NO: no parity
1 = ODD: odd parity
2 = EVEN: even parity
3 = MARK: Parity 1
4 = SPACE: Parity 0
10006/10026 Hardware
0 = RS-232
1 = RS-422
10010/10030 Transmit buffer; size: 512 characters
10011/10031 Transmit buffer occupancy
10012/10032 Receiving buffer; without immediate clearing of the
character that has been read
10013/10033 Receiving buffer; with immediate clearing of the
character that has been read
10014/10034 Receive buffer occupancy
10015/10035 Receiving buffer; 16-bit; little endian
10016/10036 Receiving buffer; 16-bit; big endian
10017/10037 Receiving buffer; 32-bit; little endian
10018/10038 Receiving buffer; 32-bit; big endian
10019/10039 Error counter
Mapped by file "/System/cfgvar.ini"
10100
Saving the configuration
10132
IP-address; MSB
10133
IP address; 3SB
10134
IP address; 2SB
10135
IP-address; LSB
10136
Subnet mask; MSB
10137
Subnet mask; 3SB
10138
Subnet mask; 2SB
10139
Subnet mask; LSB
10140
Default Gateway; MSB
10141
Default Gateway; 3SB
10142
Default Gateway; 2SB
10143
Default Gateway; LSB
10144
Port number of JetIP server
10145
IP address of DNS server
10159
Password for register 10132 through 10219
10200
Type of host name
10201 .. 10219 Host name (text variable format)
Static Info Registers
10160
10161
10162
10163
10164
10165
10166
10167
10170
10171
10172
OS Version (same as register 2000)
OS Build Version
PCB type
PCB Revision
Assembly options
Processor revision
DRAM size in bytes
SRAM size in bytes
Type of node
MAC address; manufacturer 20683
section
MAC address; device section
Dynamic Info registers
10180
10181
10182
10183
10184
10185
10186
10187
10188
Address switch positions
RUN-STOP-LOAD Switch
1 = LOAD
2 = RUN
3 = STOPP
LED status
Bit 0
= 1: RUN lit
Bit 1
= 1: ERR lit
Battery state
0 = SRAM and RTC power supply faulty
1 = SRAM and RTC power supply OK
Battery voltage in steps of 100 mV
Logic circuit voltage in steps of 100 mV
Ethernet state
Bit 0
= 1: Ethernet available
Bit 1
= 1: connected (Link)
Bit 2
= 0: 10 MBit/s
Bit 2
= 1: 100 MBit/s
Bit 3
= 0: Half duplex
Bit 3
= 1: Full duplex
Number of reception errors on Ethernet interface
Number of transmission errors on Ethernet
interface
EtherNet/IP
2910
2964
10300 .. 10331
10332 .. 10363
10390
10391
10392
Time base in ms (0 = OFF)
JetIP protocol version
Outputs (direct)
Inputs (direct)
Status
Bit 0:
1 = Inputs are being copied
Bit 1:
1 = Outputs are being copied
Instruction
1 = Copy inputs
2 = Copy outputs
Last error
0 = No error
1 = Inputs are already being copied
2 = Outputs are already being copied
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
3 = Unknown command
10400 .. 10431 Outputs (buffer)
10432 .. 10463 Inputs (buffer)
CAN-PRIM
10500
Status
Bit 1:
Bit 2:
New message has arrived
1 = ID length 29 bits
0 = ID length 11 bits
10501
Instruction
1 = Energize box
2 = De-energize box
3 = Send message
4 = Clear NEW DAT bit
5 = Clear overrun bit
6 = Clear transmission error bit
7 = Clear NEW DAT FIFO
8 = Setting ID length to 11 bits
9 = Setting ID length to 29 bits
10502
Box number
10503
NEW DAT FIFO occupancy
10504
NEW DAT FIFO data
10506
Global reception mask
10507
Global reception ID
10510
Box status
Bit 0:
1 = Box ON
Bit 1:
1 = Message received, further reception
blocked
Bit 2:
1 = Reception overflow
Bit 3:
1 = Transmission error
10511
Box configuration
Bit 0:
0 = Receiving box
1 = Transmission box
10512
CAN ID
10513
Number of Data Bytes
10514 .. 10521 Data byte D0 .. D7
397 / 407
December 2005 / Printed in Germany
Article # 60865170
Quick Reference / Rev. 3.20.1
JetControl 24x
Appendix
2035
Special Registers in Numerical Sequence
Number
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
2028
2029
2032
Meaning
Operating system: software
version
Status registers, bit-coded
Runtime registers in time
base units
Time base in multiples of 10
milliseconds
Task switch conditions, bitcoded
Task time-out time in
milliseconds
Cycle time of all tasks in
milliseconds
Number of the highest user
task
Error messages, bit-coded
Number of erroneous task
Program address of error
Module # Time-out of JX2-I/O
module
Module # Time-out of JX2Slave module
Amount of JX2-I/O modules
Amount of JX2-Slave
Modules
Pointer to module array
Module array
Version of application
program in the RAM
JX2-I/O dummy modules
JX2-Slave dummy modules
Present task number
Prioritized task
Error in the output driver
JX2-I/O Module
Monitoring Interval
for JX2-I/O and JX-SIO
modules
System Bus Baud Rate
Input delay time in steps of
100 ms
Group
Operating System
Operating System
OS, time register
Time registers
Task control
2037
2070
2071
2072
2073
2074
2077
2091
Task control
Operating system,
time registers
Task control
Task control
Operating System
Operating System
Operating System
System bus
System bus
System bus
System bus
System bus
System bus
Application program
System bus
System bus
Task control
Task control
System bus
System bus
System bus
Operating System
2100 .. 2199
2200 .. 2299
2300 .. 2399
2600 .. 2610
2611 .. 2621
2622 .. 2637
2638 .. 2653
2702
2703
2704
2705
2707
2708
2709
2710
2711
2717
2718
2750
2751
2752
2760
Size of application program
located in RAM
Runtime registers in
milliseconds
Number of JX-SIO modules
Present I/O sum
Version number of system
bus driver
JX-SIO - Time-out in ms
Sync interval in milliseconds;
0 = OFF
Enabling special functions
Reserve stack capacity of the
task in which the register is
read
Task status, task 0 .. 99
Task Program Index
Task 0 .. 99
Task time register for DELAY,
task 0 .. 99
Flag 0 .. 255
Flag 2048 .. 2303
Flag 0 .. 255
Flag 2048 .. 2303
Register offset
Flag offset
Input offset
Output offset
Indirect network number
Time-out time in milliseconds
Response time in
milliseconds
Total number of network
errors
Error code of last network
access
Number of retries in case of a
network error
Total number of retries
Task-specific amount of
network errors
Error code of last network
access in the task in which the
register is read
Task-specific number of
retries
JX2-I/O time-out configuration
Application program
2761
Operating system,
Time registers
System bus
System bus
System bus
2762
2763
2764
2765
2804
System bus
System bus
System bus
Task control
2805
2806
2807
2808
Task control
Task control
Task Control,
Time registers
24 flags
24 Special flags
16 flags
16 Special flags
Network
Network
Network
Network
Network
Network
Network
Network
Network
Network
Network
Network
Network
Network
System bus
2809
2810
2811
2812
2813
2814
2815
2816
2817
2818
2819
2820
2821
2824
2825
2826
2827
2828
2829
2830
Index in I/O time-out
monitoring array
I/O time-out monitoring array
I/O monitoring time-out
Time-out of JX2 I/O registers
Time-out of JX2-Slave
registers
Total number of display
characters
Number of Characters per
Line
Text selection for
DISPLAY_TEXT_2
Divisor (USER_INPUT)
Number of decimal positions
(USER_INPUT)
Divisor (DISPLAY_VALUE)
Number of decimal positions
(DISPLAY_VALUE)
Max. number of decimal
positions (USER_INPUT)
Field width for displaying
integer registers
Field width for USER_INPUT
Indirect cursor position
Default value (USER_INPUT)
Sign suppression
Status USER_INPUT
Enable/disable monitor
function
Switch-over time between text
display and monitoring
functions
Switch-over to Monitor
Display
Dialog language
Indirect buffer number with
device # 0
Text buffer # HMI # 1
Text buffer # HMI # 2
Text buffer # HMI # 3
Text buffer # HMI # 4
Basic key flag number for HMI
#1
Basic key flag number for HMI
#2
System bus
System bus
System bus
System bus
System bus
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
2831
2910
2911
Basic key flag number for HMI
#3
Basic key flag number for HMI
#4
Register number of LEDs on
HMI # 1
Register number of LEDs on
HMI # 2
Register number of LEDs on
HMI # 3
Register number of LEDs on
HMI # 4
Module number of JX2-PRN1
(display redirection)
Module number of JX2-SER1
(display redirection)
Character code for "Delete
display"
Character code for "Delete to
end of line"
String variable address
(display redirection)
Number of the first floating
point register
Time base in ms (0 = OFF)
Seconds
2912
Minutes
2913
Hours
2914
Weekday; 0 = Sunday
2915
Day
2916
Month
2917
Year
2921
Seconds
2922
Minutes
2923
Hours
2924
Weekday; 0 = Sunday
2832
2833
2834
2835
2836
2837
2838
2839
2840
2841
2909
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
HMIs
2925
HMIs
2926
HMIs
2927
HMIs
2928
HMIs
2930
2931
2932
2933
2934
2935
2936
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
HMIs
Operating System
EtherNet/IP
Real-time clock
(direct)
Real-time clock
(direct)
Real-time clock
(direct)
Real-time clock
(direct)
Real-time clock
(direct)
Real-time clock
(direct)
Real-time clock
(direct)
Real-time clock
(buffer)
Real-time clock
(buffer)
Real-time clock
(buffer)
Real-time clock
(buffer)
2937
2938
2955
2956
2957
2960
2961
2962
2963
2964
2965
2966
2967
2970
2971
2972
2973
2974
2977
Day
Real-time clock
(buffer)
Month
Real-time clock
(buffer)
Year
Real-time clock
(buffer)
Transmission of buffer values Real-time clock
from/to real-time clock
Availability (bit-coded)
Web functions
Own IP address
Web functions
IP address of SMTP server
Web functions
IP address of POP3 server
Web functions
Port number of SMTP server Web functions
Port number of POP3 server Web functions
Password for formatting the Web functions
flash disk
Status of e-mail processing
Web functions
Number of the task sending Web functions
an e-mail
Ethernet Monitoring Time
Interface Monitoring
SER1 monitoring time
Interface Monitoring
SER2 monitoring time
Interface Monitoring
Password for system
Operating System
commands
System command
Operating System
Stored password for
Operating System
application program
Entered password for
Operating System
application program
JetIP protocol version
EtherNet/IP
Communications protocol
Remote Scan
Amount of configuration
Remote Scan
blocks
Scan status
Remote Scan
Application program creation Application program
date - minute
Application program creation Application program
date - hour
Application program creation Application program
date - day
Application program creation Application program
date - month
Application program creation Application program
date - year
Status of the data file
Web functions
operation
399 / 407
December 2005 / Printed in Germany
2978
3000 .. 3229
4000 .. 4044
4060 .. 4106
4120 .. 4167
4200 .. 4244
4260 .. 4306
4320 .. 4367
5000 .. 5999
6000 .. 6999
7000 .. 7999
8000 .. 8999
10000/10020
10001/10021
10002/10022
10003/10023
10004/10024
10005/10025
10006/10026
10010/10030
10011/10031
10012/10032
10013/10033
10014/10034
10015/10035
10016/10036
10017/10037
10018/10038
10019/10039
10100
10132
10133
10134
10135
10136
10137
10138
Number of the task
performing a data file
operation
Registers on JX2-I/O modules
Input 101 .. 2416
Input 101 .. 2416
Input 101 .. 2416
Output 101 .. 2416
Output 101 .. 2416
Output 101 .. 2416
Mapping of inputs
Mapping of outputs
Register(s)
I/O mapping
Error state
Configuration
Baud Rate
Character Length
Number of stop bits
Parity
Hardware
Transmit Buffer
Transmit buffer occupancy
Receiving buffer; without
immediate clearing of the
character that has been read
Receiving buffer; with
immediate clearing of the
character that has been read
Receive buffer occupancy
Receiving buffer; 16-bit; little
endian
Receiving buffer; 16-bit; big
endian
Receiving buffer; 32-bit; little
endian
Receiving buffer; 32-bit; big
endian
Error counter
Saving the configuration
IP-address; MSB
IP address; 3SB
IP address; 2SB
IP-address; LSB
Subnet mask; MSB
Subnet mask; 3SB
Subnet mask; 2SB
Web functions
32 inputs
16 inputs
8 inputs
32 outputs
16 outputs
8 outputs
JX-SIO
JX-SIO
JX-SIO
Remote Scan
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Serial interface
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Article # 60865170
Quick Reference / Rev. 3.20.1
JetControl 24x
10139
10140
10141
10142
10143
10144
10145
10159
10160
10161
10162
10163
10164
10165
10166
10167
10170
10171
10172
10180
Subnet mask; LSB
Default Gateway; MSB
Default Gateway; 3SB
Default Gateway; 2SB
Default Gateway; LSB
Port number of JetIP server
IP address of DNS server
Password
OS Rev. #
OS Build Version
PCB type
PCB Revision
Assembly options
Processor revision
DRAM size in bytes
SRAM size in bytes
Type of node
MAC address; manufacturer
section
MAC address; device section
Address switch positions
Appendix
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Static Information
Static Information
Static Information
Static Information
Static Information
Static Information
Static Information
Static Information
Static Information
Static Information
Static Information
Dynamic
information
10181
RUN-STOP-LOAD Switch
Dynamic
information
10182
LED status
Dynamic
information
10183
Battery state
Dynamic
information
10184
Battery voltage in steps of 100 Dynamic
mV
information
10185
Logic circuit voltage in steps Dynamic
of 100 mV
information
10186
Ethernet state
Dynamic
information
10187
Number of reception errors on Dynamic
Ethernet interface
information
10188
Number of transmission
Dynamic
errors on Ethernet interface information
10200
Type of host name
Configuration
10201
Host name
Configuration
10300 .. 10331 Outputs (direct)
EtherNet/IP
10332 .. 10363 Inputs (direct)
EtherNet/IP
10390
Status
EtherNet/IP
10391
Instruction
EtherNet/IP
10392
Last error
EtherNet/IP
10400 .. 10431 Outputs (buffer)
EtherNet/IP
10432 .. 10463 Inputs (buffer)
EtherNet/IP
10500
10501
10502
10503
10504
10506
10507
10510
10511
10512
10513
10514 .. 10521
Status
Instruction
Box number
NEW DAT FIFO occupancy
NEW DAT FIFO data
Global receiving mask
Global receiving ID
Box status
Box configuration
CAN ID
Number of Data Bytes
Data byte D0 .. D7
CAN-PRIM
CAN-PRIM
CAN-PRIM
CAN-PRIM
CAN-PRIM
CAN-PRIM
CAN-PRIM
CAN-PRIM
CAN-PRIM
CAN-PRIM
CAN-PRIM
CAN-PRIM
Special OS Flags
FLAG 2058
FLAG 2060
FLAG 2072
FLAG 2073
FLAG 2074
FLAG 2075
FLAG 2076
FLAG 2077
JetIP communication prioritization
Display_Reg/Value decimal/hexadecimal
Stop on program errors; task/program
Stop on arithmetic errors
Arithmetic error
Network error
Carry on shift instructions
CAN-PRIM reception with each task switch
Special Flags Associated to the System
Bus
FLAG 2048
FLAG 2049
FLAG 2050
FLAG 2059
FLAG 2061
FLAG 2065
FLAG 2067
FLAG 2068
FLAG 2270
FLAG 2272
FLAG 2273
FLAG 2274
FLAG 2275
Time-out of JX2-I/O or JX-SIO module
Time-out of JX2-Slave Module
Time-out with register access to a JX2-I/O Module
Reading JX2-I/O input data after each task
Reading output data from JX2-I/O module
Output driver error signaling ON/OFF
Fatal system bus error
Accumulation of errors on the system bus
Access to inactive JX-SIO module
Access to an unknown JX-SIO register
Access to a not supported JX-SIO register
Time-out when monitoring a JX-SIO module
JX-SIO has carried out an internal reset
Special Interface Flags
FLAG 2088
FLAG 2089
FLAG 2090
FLAG 2091
FLAG 2092
FLAG 2093
OS flag - Ethernet
User flag - Ethernet
OS flag - SER1
User flag - SER1
OS flag - SER2
User flag - SER2
Special Flags - HMIs
These flags do not apply to LCD17, LCD19, and LCD27
FLAG 2224
LED of key "F1"
FLAG 2225
LED of key "F2"
FLAG 2226
LED of key "F3"
FLAG 2227
LED of key "F4"
FLAG 2228
LED of key "F5"
FLAG 2229
LED of key "F6"
FLAG 2230
LED of key "F7"
FLAG 2231
LED of key "F8"
FLAG 2232
LED of key "F9"
FLAG 2233
LED of key "F10"
FLAG 2234
LED of key "F11"
FLAG 2235
LED of key "F12"
FLAG 2201
FLAG 2202
FLAG 2203
FLAG 2204
FLAG 2205
FLAG 2206
FLAG 2207
FLAG 2208
FLAG 2209
FLAG 2210
FLAG 2211
FLAG 2212
Key "F1"
Key "F2"
Key "F3"
Key "F4"
Key "F5"
Key "F6"
Key "F7"
Key "F8"
Key "F9"
Key "F10"
Key "F11"
Key "F12"
FLAG 2181
FLAG 2182
FLAG 2183
FLAG 2184
FLAG 2185
FLAG 2186
FLAG 2187
FLAG 2188
FLAG 2189
FLAG 2190
FLAG 2191
FLAG 2192
Key "Shift + F1"
Key "Shift + F2"
Key "Shift + F3"
Key "Shift + F4"
Key "Shift + F5"
Key "Shift + F6"
Key "Shift + F7"
Key "Shift + F8"
Key "Shift + F9"
Key "Shift + F10"
Key "Shift + F11"
Key "Shift + F12"
FLAG 2213
FLAG 2214
FLAG 2215
Key “→“
Key “←“
Key “R“
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
FLAG 2216
FLAG 2217
FLAG 2218
FLAG 2219
FLAG 2220
FLAG 2222
Key “I/O“
Key “=“
Key “C“
Key “ENTER“
Key “-“
Key “.“
FLAG 2193
FLAG 2194
FLAG 2195
FLAG 2196
FLAG 2197
FLAG 2198
FLAG 2199
FLAG 2221
FLAG 2223
Key “Shift + ←“
Key “Shift + →“
Key "Shift + R"
Key “Shift + I/O“
Key “Shift + =“
Key “Shift + C“
Key “Shift + ENTER“
Key “Shift + -“
Key "Shift + ."
FLAG 2160
FLAG 2161
FLAG 2162
FLAG 2163
FLAG 2164
FLAG 2165
FLAG 2166
FLAG 2167
FLAG 2168
FLAG 2169
Key “0“
Key “1“
Key “2“
Key “3“
Key “4“
Key “5“
Key “6“
Key “7“
Key “8“
Key “9“
FLAG 2170
FLAG 2171
FLAG 2172
FLAG 2173
FLAG 2174
FLAG 2175
FLAG 2176
FLAG 2177
FLAG 2178
FLAG 2179
Key “Shift + 0“
Key “Shift + 1“
Key “Shift + 2“
Key “Shift + 3“
Key “Shift + 4“
Key “Shift + 5“
Key “Shift + 6“
Key “Shift + 7“
Key “Shift + 8“
Key “Shift + 9“
FLAG 2200
Key "Shift"
401 / 407
December 2005 / Printed in Germany
Article # 60865170
Quick Reference / Rev. 3.20.1
JetControl 24x
Special HMI flags - LCD 17 / 19
FLAG 201
FLAG 202
FLAG 203
FLAG 204
FLAG 205
FLAG 206
FLAG 221
FLAG 222
FLAG 223
FLAG 224
FLAG 230
FLAG 231
FLAG 232
FLAG 233
FLAG 234
FLAG 235
FLAG 236
FLAG 237
FLAG 238
FLAG 239
FLAG 240
FLAG 241
FLAG 242
FLAG 243
FLAG 244
FLAG 245
FLAG 246
FLAG 248
FLAG 249
Key "F1"
Key "F2"
Key "F3"
Key "F4"
Key "F5"
Key "F6"
Key “↑“
Key “↓“
Key “←“
Key “→“
Key "Shift"
Key “R“
Key “I/O“
Key “C“
Key “ENTER“
Key “0“
Key “1“
Key “2“
Key “3“
Key “4“
Key “5“
Key “6“
Key “7“
Key “8“
Key “9“
Key “.“
Key “-“
Key “=“
Key "⇓" (only LCD 19)
Special HMI flags - LCD 27
FLAG 2209
FLAG 2210
FLAG 2211
FLAG 2212
Key “↑“
Key “↓“
Key “C“
Key “ENTER“
Appendix
Special HMI Flags - NUM 25
FLAG 2206
FLAG 2207
FLAG 2208
FLAG 2209
FLAG 2210
FLAG 2186
FLAG 2187
FLAG 2188
FLAG 2189
FLAG 2190
Key “S1“
Key “S2“
Key “S3“
Key “S4“
Key “S5“
Key “Shift + S1“
Key “Shift + S2“
Key “Shift + S3“
Key “Shift + S4“
Key “Shift + S5“
32 Combined Inputs
4000
4001
4002
4003
4004
4005
4006
4007
4008
4009
4010
4011
4012
4013
4014
4015
4016
4017
4018
4019
4020
4021
4022
4023
4024
4025
4026
4027
4028
4029
4030
4031
4032
4033
4034
4035
4036
4037
4038
4039
4040
4041
4042
4043
4044
101 .. 108
109 .. 116
201 .. 208
209 .. 216
301 .. 308
309 .. 316
401 .. 408
409 .. 416
501 .. 508
509 .. 516
601 .. 608
609 .. 616
701 .. 708
709 .. 716
801 .. 808
809 .. 816
901 .. 908
909 .. 916
1001 .. 1008
1009 .. 1016
1101 .. 1108
1109 .. 1116
1201 .. 1208
1209 .. 1216
1301 .. 1308
1309 .. 1316
1401 .. 1408
1409 .. 1416
1501 .. 1508
1509 .. 1516
1601 .. 1608
1609 .. 1616
1701 .. 1708
1709 .. 1716
1801 .. 1808
1809 .. 1816
1901 .. 1908
1909 .. 1916
2001 .. 2008
2009 .. 2016
2101 .. 2108
2109 .. 2116
2201 .. 2208
2209 .. 2216
2301 .. 2308
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
109 .. 116
201 .. 208
209 .. 216
301 .. 308
309 .. 316
401 .. 408
409 .. 416
501 .. 508
509 .. 516
601 .. 608
609 .. 616
701 .. 708
709 .. 716
801 .. 808
809 .. 816
901 .. 908
909 .. 916
1001 .. 1008
1009 .. 1016
1101 .. 1108
1109 .. 1116
1201 .. 1208
1209 .. 1216
1301 .. 1308
1309 .. 1316
1401 .. 1408
1409 .. 1416
1501 .. 1508
1509 .. 1516
1601 .. 1608
1609 .. 1616
1701 .. 1708
1709 .. 1716
1801 .. 1808
1809 .. 1816
1901 .. 1908
1909 .. 1916
2001 .. 2008
2009 .. 2016
2101 .. 2108
2109 .. 2116
2201 .. 2208
2209 .. 2216
2301 .. 2308
2309 .. 2316
201 .. 208
209 .. 216
301 .. 308
309 .. 316
401 .. 408
409 .. 416
501 .. 508
509 .. 516
601 .. 608
609 .. 616
701 .. 708
709 .. 716
801 .. 808
809 .. 816
901 .. 908
909 .. 916
1001 .. 1008
1009 .. 1016
1101 .. 1108
1109 .. 1116
1201 .. 1208
1209 .. 1216
1301 .. 1308
1309 .. 1316
1401 .. 1408
1409 .. 1416
1501 .. 1508
1509 .. 1516
1601 .. 1608
1609 .. 1616
1701 .. 1708
1709 .. 1716
1801 .. 1808
1809 .. 1816
1901 .. 1908
1909 .. 1916
2001 .. 2008
2009 .. 2016
2101 .. 2108
2109 .. 2116
2201 .. 2208
2209 .. 2216
2301 .. 2308
2309 .. 2316
2401 .. 2408
209 .. 216
301 .. 308
309 .. 316
401 .. 408
409 .. 416
501 .. 508
509 .. 516
601 .. 608
609 .. 616
701 .. 708
709 .. 716
801 .. 808
809 .. 816
901 .. 908
909 .. 916
1001 .. 1008
1009 .. 1016
1101 .. 1108
1109 .. 1116
1201 .. 1208
1209 .. 1216
1301 .. 1308
1309 .. 1316
1401 .. 1408
1409 .. 1416
1501 .. 1508
1509 .. 1516
1601 .. 1608
1609 .. 1616
1701 .. 1708
1709 .. 1716
1801 .. 1808
1809 .. 1816
1901 .. 1908
1909 .. 1916
2001 .. 2008
2009 .. 2016
2101 .. 2108
2109 .. 2116
2201 .. 2208
2209 .. 2216
2301 .. 2308
2309 .. 2316
2401 .. 2408
2409 .. 2416
16 Combined Inputs
8 Combined Inputs
4060
4061
4062
4063
4064
4065
4066
4067
4068
4069
4070
4071
4072
4073
4074
4075
4076
4077
4078
4079
4080
4081
4082
4083
4084
4085
4086
4087
4088
4089
4090
4091
4092
4093
4094
4095
4096
4097
4098
4099
4100
4101
4102
4103
4104
4105
4106
4120
4121
4122
4123
4124
4125
4126
4127
4128
4129
4130
4131
4132
4133
4134
4135
4136
4137
4138
4139
4140
4141
4142
4143
4144
4145
4146
4147
4148
4149
4150
4151
4152
4153
4154
4155
4156
4157
4158
4159
4160
4161
4162
4163
4164
4165
4166
101 .. 108
109 .. 116
201 .. 208
209 .. 216
301 .. 308
309 .. 316
401 .. 408
409 .. 416
501 .. 508
509 .. 516
601 .. 608
609 .. 616
701 .. 708
709 .. 716
801 .. 808
809 .. 816
901 .. 908
909 .. 916
1001 .. 1008
1009 .. 1016
1101 .. 1108
1109 .. 1116
1201 .. 1208
1209 .. 1216
1301 .. 1308
1309 .. 1316
1401 .. 1408
1409 .. 1416
1501 .. 1508
1509 .. 1516
1601 .. 1608
1609 .. 1616
1701 .. 1708
1709 .. 1716
1801 .. 1808
1809 .. 1816
1901 .. 1908
1909 .. 1916
2001 .. 2008
2009 .. 2016
2101 .. 2108
2109 .. 2116
2201 .. 2208
2209 .. 2216
2301 .. 2308
2309 .. 2316
2401 .. 2408
109 .. 116
201 .. 208
209 .. 216
301 .. 308
309 .. 316
401 .. 408
409 .. 416
501 .. 508
509 .. 516
601 .. 608
609 .. 616
701 .. 708
709 .. 716
801 .. 808
809 .. 816
901 .. 908
909 .. 916
1001 .. 1008
1009 .. 1016
1101 .. 1108
1109 .. 1116
1201 .. 1208
1209 .. 1216
1301 .. 1308
1309 .. 1316
1401 .. 1408
1409 .. 1416
1501 .. 1508
1509 .. 1516
1601 .. 1608
1609 .. 1616
1701 .. 1708
1709 .. 1716
1801 .. 1808
1809 .. 1816
1901 .. 1908
1909 .. 1916
2001 .. 2008
2009 .. 2016
2101 .. 2108
2109 .. 2116
2201 .. 2208
2209 .. 2216
2301 .. 2308
2309 .. 2316
2401 .. 2408
2409 .. 2416
403 / 407
December 2005 / Printed in Germany
101 .. 108
109 .. 116
201 .. 208
209 .. 216
301 .. 308
309 .. 316
401 .. 408
409 .. 416
501 .. 508
509 .. 516
601 .. 608
609 .. 616
701 .. 708
709 .. 716
801 .. 808
809 .. 816
901 .. 908
909 .. 916
1001 .. 1008
1009 .. 1016
1101 .. 1108
1109 .. 1116
1201 .. 1208
1209 .. 1216
1301 .. 1308
1309 .. 1316
1401 .. 1408
1409 .. 1416
1501 .. 1508
1509 .. 1516
1601 .. 1608
1609 .. 1616
1701 .. 1708
1709 .. 1716
1801 .. 1808
1809 .. 1816
1901 .. 1908
1909 .. 1916
2001 .. 2008
2009 .. 2016
2101 .. 2108
2109 .. 2116
2201 .. 2208
2209 .. 2216
2301 .. 2308
2309 .. 2316
2401 .. 2408
4167
2409 .. 2416
Article # 60865170
Quick Reference / Rev. 3.20.1
JetControl 24x
Appendix
32 Combined Outputs
4200
4201
4202
4203
4204
4205
4206
4207
4208
4209
4210
4211
4212
4213
4214
4215
4216
4217
4218
4219
4220
4221
4222
4223
4224
4225
4226
4227
4228
4229
4230
4231
4232
4233
4234
4235
4236
4237
4238
4239
4240
4241
4242
4243
4244
101 .. 108
109 .. 116
201 .. 208
209 .. 216
301 .. 308
309 .. 316
401 .. 408
409 .. 416
501 .. 508
509 .. 516
601 .. 608
609 .. 616
701 .. 708
709 .. 716
801 .. 808
809 .. 816
901 .. 908
909 .. 916
1001 .. 1008
1009 .. 1016
1101 .. 1108
1109 .. 1116
1201 .. 1208
1209 .. 1216
1301 .. 1308
1309 .. 1316
1401 .. 1408
1409 .. 1416
1501 .. 1508
1509 .. 1516
1601 .. 1608
1609 .. 1616
1701 .. 1708
1709 .. 1716
1801 .. 1808
1809 .. 1816
1901 .. 1908
1909 .. 1916
2001 .. 2008
2009 .. 2016
2101 .. 2108
2109 .. 2116
2201 .. 2208
2209 .. 2216
2301 .. 2308
109 .. 116
201 .. 208
209 .. 216
301 .. 308
309 .. 316
401 .. 408
409 .. 416
501 .. 508
509 .. 516
601 .. 608
609 .. 616
701 .. 708
709 .. 716
801 .. 808
809 .. 816
901 .. 908
909 .. 916
1001 .. 1008
1009 .. 1016
1101 .. 1108
1109 .. 1116
1201 .. 1208
1209 .. 1216
1301 .. 1308
1309 .. 1316
1401 .. 1408
1409 .. 1416
1501 .. 1508
1509 .. 1516
1601 .. 1608
1609 .. 1616
1701 .. 1708
1709 .. 1716
1801 .. 1808
1809 .. 1816
1901 .. 1908
1909 .. 1916
2001 .. 2008
2009 .. 2016
2101 .. 2108
2109 .. 2116
2201 .. 2208
2209 .. 2216
2301 .. 2308
2309 .. 2316
201 .. 208
209 .. 216
301 .. 308
309 .. 316
401 .. 408
409 .. 416
501 .. 508
509 .. 516
601 .. 608
609 .. 616
701 .. 708
709 .. 716
801 .. 808
809 .. 816
901 .. 908
909 .. 916
1001 .. 1008
1009 .. 1016
1101 .. 1108
1109 .. 1116
1201 .. 1208
1209 .. 1216
1301 .. 1308
1309 .. 1316
1401 .. 1408
1409 .. 1416
1501 .. 1508
1509 .. 1516
1601 .. 1608
1609 .. 1616
1701 .. 1708
1709 .. 1716
1801 .. 1808
1809 .. 1816
1901 .. 1908
1909 .. 1916
2001 .. 2008
2009 .. 2016
2101 .. 2108
2109 .. 2116
2201 .. 2208
2209 .. 2216
2301 .. 2308
2309 .. 2316
2401 .. 2408
209 .. 216
301 .. 308
309 .. 316
401 .. 408
409 .. 416
501 .. 508
509 .. 516
601 .. 608
609 .. 616
701 .. 708
709 .. 716
801 .. 808
809 .. 816
901 .. 908
909 .. 916
1001 .. 1008
1009 .. 1016
1101 .. 1108
1109 .. 1116
1201 .. 1208
1209 .. 1216
1301 .. 1308
1309 .. 1316
1401 .. 1408
1409 .. 1416
1501 .. 1508
1509 .. 1516
1601 .. 1608
1609 .. 1616
1701 .. 1708
1709 .. 1716
1801 .. 1808
1809 .. 1816
1901 .. 1908
1909 .. 1916
2001 .. 2008
2009 .. 2016
2101 .. 2108
2109 .. 2116
2201 .. 2208
2209 .. 2216
2301 .. 2308
2309 .. 2316
2401 .. 2408
2409 .. 2416
16 Combined Outputs
8 Combined Outputs
4260
4261
4262
4263
4264
4265
4266
4267
4268
4269
4270
4271
4272
4273
4274
4275
4276
4277
4278
4279
4280
4281
4282
4283
4284
4285
4286
4287
4288
4289
4290
4291
4292
4293
4294
4295
4296
4297
4298
4299
4300
4301
4302
4303
4304
4305
4306
4320
4321
4322
4323
4324
4325
4326
4327
4328
4329
4330
4331
4332
4333
4334
4335
4336
4337
4338
4339
4340
4341
4342
4343
4344
4345
4346
4347
4348
4349
4350
4351
4352
4353
4354
4355
4356
4357
4358
4359
4360
4361
4362
4363
4364
4365
4366
101 .. 108
109 .. 116
201 .. 208
209 .. 216
301 .. 308
309 .. 316
401 .. 408
409 .. 416
501 .. 508
509 .. 516
601 .. 608
609 .. 616
701 .. 708
709 .. 716
801 .. 808
809 .. 816
901 .. 908
909 .. 916
1001 .. 1008
1009 .. 1016
1101 .. 1108
1109 .. 1116
1201 .. 1208
1209 .. 1216
1301 .. 1308
1309 .. 1316
1401 .. 1408
1409 .. 1416
1501 .. 1508
1509 .. 1516
1601 .. 1608
1609 .. 1616
1701 .. 1708
1709 .. 1716
1801 .. 1808
1809 .. 1816
1901 .. 1908
1909 .. 1916
2001 .. 2008
2009 .. 2016
2101 .. 2108
2109 .. 2116
2201 .. 2208
2209 .. 2216
2301 .. 2308
2309 .. 2316
2401 .. 2408
109 .. 116
201 .. 208
209 .. 216
301 .. 308
309 .. 316
401 .. 408
409 .. 416
501 .. 508
509 .. 516
601 .. 608
609 .. 616
701 .. 708
709 .. 716
801 .. 808
809 .. 816
901 .. 908
909 .. 916
1001 .. 1008
1009 .. 1016
1101 .. 1108
1109 .. 1116
1201 .. 1208
1209 .. 1216
1301 .. 1308
1309 .. 1316
1401 .. 1408
1409 .. 1416
1501 .. 1508
1509 .. 1516
1601 .. 1608
1609 .. 1616
1701 .. 1708
1709 .. 1716
1801 .. 1808
1809 .. 1816
1901 .. 1908
1909 .. 1916
2001 .. 2008
2009 .. 2016
2101 .. 2108
2109 .. 2116
2201 .. 2208
2209 .. 2216
2301 .. 2308
2309 .. 2316
2401 .. 2408
2409 .. 2416
101 .. 108
109 .. 116
201 .. 208
209 .. 216
301 .. 308
309 .. 316
401 .. 408
409 .. 416
501 .. 508
509 .. 516
601 .. 608
609 .. 616
701 .. 708
709 .. 716
801 .. 808
809 .. 816
901 .. 908
909 .. 916
1001 .. 1008
1009 .. 1016
1101 .. 1108
1109 .. 1116
1201 .. 1208
1209 .. 1216
1301 .. 1308
1309 .. 1316
1401 .. 1408
1409 .. 1416
1501 .. 1508
1509 .. 1516
1601 .. 1608
1609 .. 1616
1701 .. 1708
1709 .. 1716
1801 .. 1808
1809 .. 1816
1901 .. 1908
1909 .. 1916
2001 .. 2008
2009 .. 2016
2101 .. 2108
2109 .. 2116
2201 .. 2208
2209 .. 2216
2301 .. 2308
2309 .. 2316
2401 .. 2408
4367
2409 .. 2416
Mapped User registers/Flags
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
FLAG 256 ... 279
FLAG 280 ... 303
FLAG 304 ... 327
FLAG 328 ... 351
FLAG 352 ... 375
FLAG 376 ... 399
FLAG 400 ... 423
FLAG 424 ... 447
FLAG 448 ... 471
FLAG 472 ... 495
FLAG 496 ... 519
FLAG 520 ... 543
FLAG 544 ... 567
FLAG 568 ... 591
FLAG 592 ... 615
FLAG 616 ... 639
FLAG 640 ... 663
FLAG 664 ... 687
FLAG 688 ... 711
FLAG 712 ... 735
FLAG 736 ... 759
FLAG 760 ... 783
FLAG 784 ... 807
FLAG 808 ... 831
FLAG 832 ... 855
FLAG 856 ... 879
FLAG 880 ... 903
FLAG 904 ... 927
FLAG 928 ... 951
FLAG 952 ... 975
FLAG 976 ... 999
FLAG 1000 ... 1023
FLAG 1024 ... 1047
FLAG 1048 ... 1071
FLAG 1072 ... 1095
FLAG 1096 ... 1119
FLAG 1120 ... 1144
FLAG 1144 ... 1167
FLAG 1168 ... 1191
FLAG 1192 ... 1215
FLAG 1216 ... 1239
FLAG 1240 ... 1263
FLAG 1264 ... 1287
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
FLAG 1288 ... 1311
FLAG 1312 ... 1335
FLAG 1336 ... 1359
FLAG 1360 ... 1383
FLAG 1384 ... 1407
FLAG 1408 ... 1431
FLAG 1432 ... 1455
FLAG 1456 ... 1479
FLAG 1480 ... 1503
FLAG 1504 ... 1527
FLAG 1528 ... 1551
FLAG 1552 ... 1575
FLAG 1576 ... 1659
FLAG 1600 ... 1623
FLAG 1624 ... 1647
FLAG 1648 ... 1671
FLAG 1672 ... 1695
FLAG 1696 ... 1719
FLAG 1720 ... 1743
FLAG 1744 ... 1767
FLAG 1768 ... 1791
FLAG 1792 ... 1815
FLAG 1816 ... 1839
FLAG 1840 ... 1863
FLAG 1864 ... 1887
FLAG 1888 ... 1911
FLAG 1912 ... 1935
FLAG 1936 ... 1959
FLAG 1960 ... 1983
FLAG 1984 ... 2007
FLAG 2008 ... 2031
FLAG 2032 ... 2047
24 Combined Flags
2600
2601
2602
2603
2604
2605
2606
2607
2608
FLAG 0 ... 23
FLAG 24 ... 47
FLAG 48 ... 71
FLAG 72 ... 95
FLAG 96 ... 119
FLAG 120 ... 143
FLAG 144 ... 167
FLAG 168 ... 191
FLAG 192 ... 215
405 / 407
December 2005 / Printed in Germany
2609
2610
FLAG 216 ... 239
FLAG 240 ... 255
16 Combined Flags
2622
2623
2624
2625
2626
2627
2628
2629
2630
2631
2632
2633
2634
2635
2636
2637
FLAG 0 ... 15
FLAG 16 ... 31
FLAG 32 ... 47
FLAG 48 ... 63
FLAG 64 ... 79
FLAG 80 ... 95
FLAG 96 ... 111
FLAG 112 ... 127
FLAG 128 ... 143
FLAG 144 ... 159
FLAG 160 ... 175
FLAG 176 ... 191
FLAG 192 ... 207
FLAG 208 ... 223
FLAG 224 ... 239
FLAG 240 ... 255
24 Combined Special Flags
2611
2612
2613
2614
2615
2616
2617
2618
2619
2620
2621
FLAG 2048 ... 2071
FLAG 2072 ... 2095
FLAG 2096 ... 2119
FLAG 2120 ... 2143
FLAG 2144 ... 2167
FLAG 2168 ... 2191
FLAG 2192 ... 2215
FLAG 2216 ... 2239
FLAG 2240 ... 2263
FLAG 2264 ... 2287
FLAG 2288 ... 2303
Article # 60865170
Quick Reference / Rev. 3.20.1
JetControl 24x
Appendix
Pin assignment of female Mini-DIN
connectors SER1 and SER2
16 Combined Special flags
Special Functions
2638
2639
2640
2641
2642
2643
2644
2645
2646
2647
2648
2649
2650
2651
2652
2653
4
5
BCD to HEX conversion of a register
HEX to BCD conversion of a register
Pin
1
Signal
RDA
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
Square Root
Sine
Cosine
Tangent
Arc Sin
Arc Cosine
Arc Tangent
Exponential Function
Natural logarithm
2
3
GND
RDB
4
5
RXD
SDB
6
DC 24 V
7
SDA
60
61
65
66
CRC generation for Modbus RTU
CRC of Modbus RTU
Reading registers via Modbus/TCP
Writing registers via Modbus/TCP
8
TxD
80
81
82
Initializing remote scan
Starting remote scan
Stopping remote scan
90
91
92
96
Writing data file
Appending data file
Reading data file
Deleting data file
110
Sending an e-mail
120
121
122
Storing entry to ARP table
Deleting an entry from the ARP table
Modifying own IP address
140
141
142
143
144
Comparing 2 strings
Searching a string within another string
Appending 2 strings
Converting a variable value into a string
Copying Strings
150
151
152
Configuring NetCopyList
Deleting NetCopyList
Sending NetCopyList
FLAG 2048 ... 2063
FLAG 2064 ... 2079
FLAG 2080 ... 2095
FLAG 2096 ... 2111
FLAG 2112 ... 2127
FLAG 2128 ... 2143
FLAG 2144 ... 2159
FLAG 2160 ... 2175
FLAG 2176 ... 2191
FLAG 2192 ... 2207
FLAG 2208 ... 2223
FLAG 2224 ... 2239
FLAG 2240 ... 2255
FLAG 2256 ... 2271
FLAG 2272 ... 2287
FLAG 2288 ... 2303
8
7
5
2
6
4
1
3
Meaning
RS422; receive data
inverted
Common ground
RS422; receive data not
inverted
RS232; receive data
RS422; transmit data not
inverted
Power Supply for User
Interface
RS422; transmit data
inverted
RS232; transmit data
Pin assignment of female SUB-D
connector for system bus
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Signal
CMODE0
CL
GND
CMODE1
TERM
Unassigne
d
CH
Unassigne
d
Reserved
Meaning
Control signal 0
CAN low input/output
Common ground
Control signal 1
Automatic termination
CAN high input/output
Do not connect
Jetter AG
JetControl 24x
407 / 407
December 2005 / Printed in Germany
Article # 60865170
Quick Reference / Rev. 3.20.1
Jetter AG
Gräterstraße 2
D-71642 Ludwigsburg
Germany
Phone:
Phone Sales:
Telefax
Sales:
Hotline:
Internet:
E-Mail:
+49 7141 2550-0
+49 7141 2550-433
+49 7141 2550-484
+49 7141 2550-444
http://www.jetter.de
[email protected]
Jetter Subsidiaries
Jetter Asia Pte. Ltd.
Jetter (Schweiz) AG
Jetter USA Inc.
32 Ang Mo Kio Industrial Park 2
#05-02 Sing Industrial Complex
Singapore 569510
Münchwilerstraße 19
CH-9554 Tägerschen
165 Ken Mar Industrial Parkway
Broadview Heights
OH 44147-2950
Singapore
Switzerland
U.S.A.
Phone:
Fax:
E-Mail:
Internet:
Phone:
Fax:
E-Mail:
Internet:
Phone:
Fax:
E-Mail:
Internet:
408
+65 6483 8200
+65 6483 3881
[email protected]
http://www.jetter.com.sg
+41 719 1879-50
+41 719 1879-69
[email protected]
http://www.jetterag.ch
+1 440 8380860
+1 440 8380861
[email protected]
http://www.jetterus.com
Jetter AG
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