75-50rD BMXdigital manual
digital
Broadcast
Console
99-1200-0 (14-input mainframe)
99-1200-1 (22-input mainframe)
99-1200-2 (30-input mainframe)
99-1200-3 (38-input mainframe)
99-1200-8 (8-input mainframe)
Operations
&
Technical
Manual
PRE75-50
Revision D.1 • 12/10
Broadcast Communications Division
www.broadcast.harris.com
ii
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D • 8/05
Contents
CE Declaration of Conformity ......................... iv
4 - BMXdigital SERVER SETUP
Safety Instructions .......................................... v
Hazard/Warning Label Identification .............. v
Manual Revisions ........................................... vi
RMXd File Structure .................................... 4-1
RMXd Server Configuration ......................... 4-5
Session Files ............................................... 4-14
Session & Macro Files ................................ 4-16
1 - GENERAL INFORMATION
Software Updates ....................................... 4-22
Product Overview ........................................ 1-1
Settings Recovery ....................................... 4-22
Specifications ............................................... 1-4
Warranty ...................................................... 1-6
5- SERVICE
2 - INSTALLATION
Parts and Repair Services ............................. 5-1
Spare and Replacement Parts ....................... 5-2
Console Installation ...................................... 2-2
Cabling and Wiring ...................................... 2-7
Tool and Installation Kits ............................. 5-3
Module Servicing ......................................... 5-3
Module Quick Guides
Mic Preamplifier ................................... 2-16
Universal Input ..................................... 2-18
6 - ACCESSORIES
Furniture and Cabinetry ............................... 6-1
Furniture Mounted Panels ............................ 6-1
Telco/Codec .......................................... 2-24
RLS ...................................................... 2-28
Session .................................................. 2-32
Peripheral Panels ......................................... 6-2
Headphone Distribution Amplifier ............... 6-2
Logic Wiring Diagrams & Cables .................. 6-2
Control Room ....................................... 2-34
Studio ................................................... 2-40
Outputs ................................................. 2-50
External Remote Line Selector (Ext. RLS) ... 6-4
Mic Remote Control Logic Example ........... 2-58
Basic Peripheral Logic Example ................. 2-60
Complex Peripheral Logic Example ........... 2-62
APPENDIX A: VMCC, SESSION &
MACRO FILES
Net Card .................................................... 2-64
Community Monitor ................................... A-1
VMCC File Maintenance ............................. A-1
VMCC Operations Errata ........................... A-3
3 - OPERATION
Setup, Config, General File Info .................. A-6
Module & Card Overview ............................. 3-1
Macro Files ................................................ A-7
Meter Panel Overview .................................. 3-1
Microphone Preamplifier Module ................. 3-2
Universal Input Module ................................ 3-3
INDEX
A - D ..................................................... Index-1
E - M .................................................... Index-2
Telco/Codec Module ..................................... 3-6
Telco/Codec Module Operation .................... 3-8
Remote Line Selector (RLS) Module .......... 3-11
M - S ..................................................... Index-3
S - W ..................................................... Index-4
Session Module .......................................... 3-12
Control Room Module ................................ 3-14
Studio Module ........................................... 3-16
Output Modules ......................................... 3-17
Meter Panel ................................................ 3-18
Net Cardl ................................................... 3-20
iii
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D • 8/05
Declaration of Conformity
Application of Council Directive: 89/336/EEC
Standards To Which
Conformity Is Declared:
EN55103-1:1997
Manufacturer's Name:
Harris Corporation BCD/Harris Pacific
Manufacturer's Shipping Address:
4240 Irwin Simpson Road
Mason, Ohio USA 45040
513-459-3400
Manufacturer's Mailing Address:
4393 Digital Way
Mason, Ohio USA 45040
513-459-3400
Equipment Description:
Digital Broadcast Console
Equipment Class:
Professional Audio / Visual
Model Numbers:
BMX Digital Broadcast Console, Inclusive of
Legacy Digital Product Line
EN55103-2:1997
I the undersigned, hereby declare that the equipment specified above,
conforms to the above Directive(s) and Standard(s).
Harris Corporation – Mason, Ohio USA
Place:
Signature:
Douglas A. Bevington
Full Name:
Manager – Product/Technical Services Consoles
and Studio Products
Position:
iv
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D • 8/05
Safety Instructions
uc
tions
1. R ead A
Allll Instr
Instruc
uctions
tions.. Read all safety and operating
instructions before operating the product.
uc
tions
2. R etain A
Allll Instr
Instruc
uctions
tions.. Retain all safety and operating
instructions for future reference.
nings
3. Heed A
Allll Wa rrnings
nings.. You must adhere to all warnings
on the product and those listed in the operating
instructions.
w A
ll Instr
ollow
All
Instruc
uctions
tions.. Follow all operating and
4. Follo
uc
tions
product usage instructions.
5. H ea
eatt . This product must be situated away from any
heat sources such as radiators, heat registers, stoves,
or other products (including power amplifiers) that
produce heat.
tila
tion. Slots and openings in the product are
6. V en
entila
tilation.
provided for ventilation.They ensure reliable operation
of the product and keep it from overheating. Do not
block or cover these openings during operation. Do
not place this product into a rack unless proper
ventilation is provided and the manufacturer’s
recommended installation procedures are followed.
oistur
oisture
7. Wa t er and M
Moistur
e. Do not use this product near
water such as a bathtub, wash bowl, kitchen sink, or
laundry tub, in a wet basement, or near a swimming
pool or the like.
8. A ttachmen
ttachmentt ss.. Do not use any attachments not
recommended by the product manufacturer as they
may cause hazards.
our
9. Power SSour
ourcces
es.. You must operate this product using
the type of power source indicated on the marking
label and in the installation instructions. If you are not
sure of the type of power supplied to your facility,
consult your local power company.
o l a rrii z aatttion.
10. G r ounding and PPo
i o n . This product is
equipped with a polarized AC plug with integral safety
ground pin. Do not defeat the safety ground in any
manner.
or
d PPrr ot
ec
tion. Power supply cords must be
11. Power C
Cor
ord
otec
ection.
routed so that they are not likely to be walked on nor
pinched by items placed upon or against them. Pay
particular attention to the cords at AC wall plugs and
convenience receptacles, and at the point where the
cord plugs into the product.
tning
12. Ligh
Lightning
tning.. For added protection for this product,
unplug it from the AC wall outlet during a lightning
storm or when it is left unattended and unused for
long periods of time. This will prevent damage to the
product due to lightning and power line surges.
loading
loading.. Do not overload AC wall outlets,
13. O v e rrloading
extension cords, or integral convenience outlets as this
can result in a fire or electric shock hazard.
n tr
tryy. Never push objects of any
14. Objec
bjectt and Liquid EEn
kind into this product through openings as they may
touch dangerous voltage points or short out parts,
which could result in a fire or electric shock. Never spill
liquid of any kind on the product.
essor
ies
15. A cc
ccessor
essories
ies.. Do not place this product on an unstable
cart, stand, tripod, bracket, or table. The product may
fall, causing serious injury to a child or adult and serious
damage to the product. Any mounting of the product
must follow manufacturer’s installation instructions.
ombina
tion. Move this product
16. P r oduc
ductt and C
Caa rrtt C
Combina
ombination.
with care. Quick stops, excessive force, and uneven
sur faces may cause the product and the cart
combination to overturn.
vicing
17. S e rrvicing
vicing.. Refer all servicing to qualified servicing
personnel.
equir
ing SSe
e rrvic
vic
18. D amage RRequir
equiring
vice
e . Unplug this product
from the wall AC outlet and refer servicing to qualified
service personnel under the following conditions:
a. When the AC cord or plug is damaged.
b. If liquid has been spilled or objects have fallen into
the product.
c. If the product has been exposed to rain or water.
d. If the product does not operate normally (following
operating instructions).
e. If the product has been dropped or damaged in any
way.
f. When the product exhibits a distinct change in
performance. This indicates a need for service.
emen
ts
19. R eplac
eplacemen
ementt PPaa rrts
ts.. When replacement parts are
required, be sure the service technician has used
replacement parts specified by the manufacturer or
that have the same characteristics as the original parts.
Unauthorized substitutions may result in fire, electric
shock, or other hazards.
et
heck. Upon completion of any repairs to this
20. S a ffet
etyy C
Check.
product, ask the service technician to perform safety
checks to determine that the product is in proper
operating condition.
21. C leaning
leaning.. Do not use liquid or aerosol cleaners. Use
only a damp cloth for cleaning.
Hazard/Warning Label Identification
tion PPoin
oin
ol
The E x clama
clamation
ointt symb
symbol
ol,
within an equilateral triangle, alerts the
user to the presence of important
operating and maintenance (servicing)
instructions in product literature and
instruction manuals.
C A U T I O N
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
WARNING: SHOCK HAZARD - DO NOT OPEN
AVIS: RISQUE DE CHOC ELECTRIQUE - NE PAS OUVRIR
CAUTION: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK DO NOT
REMOVE ANY COVER OR PANEL. NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS
INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED SERVICE PERSONNEL.
WARNING: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC
SHOCK, DO NOT EXPOSE THE POWER SUPPLY OR CONSOLE
TO RAIN OR MOISTURE.
tning FFlash
lash W ith
The Ligh
Lightning
A r r owhead symb
ol
symbol
ol, within an
equilateral triangle, alerts the user to
the presence of uninsulated
dangerous voltage within the
product’s enclosure that may be of
sufficient magnitude to constitute a
risk of electric shock.
WARNING
ARNING—This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy. If not installed and used in accordance with the instructions in this
manual it may cause interference to radio communications. It has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A computing device
(pursuant to Subpart J of Part 15 FCC Rules), which are designed to provide reasonable protection against such interference when operated in a commercial environment. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause interference, in which case the user, at his own expense, will be
required to take whatever measures may be required to correct the interference.
v
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D • 8/05
Manual Revisions
T
his page provides a quick reference of the
current document pages and their revision level. If
you receive a revision to this document from Harris,
replace the old manual pages with the new ones and
discard the old pages. Replace this page with the
new Manual Revisions page.
Revision Affected pages
A
Comments
All pages
10/01 First Release
A.1
Contents, Ch 1, Index
12/01 corrected info
in Specifications.
B
All pages
8/02 updated various
installation and
operation information.
Incorporated firmware
and hardware
updates.
Appendix B pages
3/03 add software
release 3.24 info.
C
All pages
1/04 Added info on the
BMXd-8 & BMXd-14
frame sizes and the
VistaMax audio
management system.
D
Contents,Ch. 4, 5,
Appendix A, index
Added information on
VMCC.
B.1
vi
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D • 8/05
digital
General
Information
T
1
truded aluminum chassis for strength and RFI immunity.The meter panel—hinged at the rear, closes
hanks for joining the growing ranks of
over the upper part of the modules, covering the
audio and logic connectors, the DIP switches and
broadcasters employing Harris Corporation prod-
DSP and Net Cards. Cable access to modules is
done from below the meter panel.
ucts designed by PR&E. Our mission: provide the
MODULE & CARD DESCRIPTIONS
finest quality products, systems, documentation and
Full-featured Input modules are described
after-sale support.
throughout this manual. Limited-function versions
The BMXdigital is a very sophisticated console
(minus the Send or Utility bus controls), Net-only
with an extensive range of features contained in a
versions (no connectors) and Limited-function
compact design. To obtain maximum benefit from
Net-only versions (no connectors nor Send and
the console’s capabilities, read the Installation and
Utility bus controls) are also available.
Operation sections prior to product installation.
Microphone Preamplifier Module
Five mic preamps, each with a trim pot under a
Product Overview
security cover, come standard on the BMXdigital8 and -14. Ten preamps come standard on the
Each BMXdigital console ships with the follow-
other frame sizes. A second five or ten input Mic
ing installed into the mainframe assembly:
Preamp Module can be field installed.
• Microphone Preamplifier Module
Mic preamps take balanced input signals (from
(1 Mic Preamp standard, 1 optional)
• Universal Input Modules (as ordered)
-65 dBu to -30 dBu) and output balanced +4 dBu
• Telco/Codec Modules (up to 6, as ordered)
outputs for direct connection to a Universal Input
• Remote Line Selector modules (as ordered)
module or to outboard processing equipment.
• Session Module (1 standard)
Universal Input Module
• Control Room Module (1 standard)
This module features two inputs (A and B), each
• Studio Module (1 optional)
• Output Modules (3 standard)
can come from an analog or a digital source
• DSP Cards (1 to 5, depending on frame size)
(source selection is set via a module DIP switch).
• Net Card (1 optional)
DIP switches also set the analog input level or the
• Blank Panels (as required)
digital attenuation. Each input has a fully independent parallel logic circuit for remote control
The BMXdigital’s motherboard and module/
of the module and/or module control of the source
card area is surrounded by a sheet metal and ex-
equipment. Each module has independent mic/
1-1
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 1/04
digital
1 General Information
line logic functions for both inputs, also set using
an analog input (active input set by module DIP
the module’s Setup DIP switches.
switch). Front panel controls are the same as the
Universal Input, minus the A/B selection. Instead,
The Universal Input module has controls for the
there is a Source Selector and Take button.
following functions: A/B input selection, input
mode selection, channel on/off, fader level, solo,
Session Module
cue, pan/balance, two Send selectors and level
controls, and ten output bus selectors (four pro-
This module provides session control, auxiliary
gram, four utility, and two off-line buses). A two-
meter source selection, and event timer controls.
line display shows the A and B input source names.
There are eleven Aux Meter selector buttons (for
Two 24-pin connectors connect logic wiring to/
viewing any External Input, Send, Utility bus, or
from external peripherals or control panels for the
Telco Record output) and two Main Meter selectors
A and B inputs. Two 14-pin connectors allow re-
(PGM 1-4 and UTL 1-4) for viewing the Program
mote talkback (active when microphone logic is
or the Utility buses on the four Main Meters (on
selected) for the A and B inputs. Four 8-position
the BMXdigital-8, the two buttons cycle through
DIP switches set logic and module function op-
the buses to show one at a time on the Main meter).
The session control section has a Session
tions independently for the A and B inputs.
Selector and two buttons: Take and Save. A two-
Telco/Codec Input Module
line display shows the session currently being used
An optional module that provides audio and
and either the next session to be loaded, or when
logic connections for a telephone hybrid or a codec
the Session Selector is being turned, the various
(satellite transceiver, ISDN interface, etc.). Up to
sessions available in alphanumeric order.
six Telco modules can be installed in the frame.
The Timer Control section has the event timer
Telco modules have digital and analog inputs
controls: Start, Stop, Hold, and Reset, as well as
(the active input is set via DIP switch) and the
the Auto Reset control, which adds automatic
same controls as a Universal Input—minus the
module on resetting of the event timer.
A/B input selector. Additional module controls in-
Control Room Module
clude: telco monitor bus and telco record output
assignment buttons, a Talk to Codec function, a
This module has the monitor selection and con-
Source Selector and a Take button (for source se-
trol facilities for the console operator. It has paral-
lection with a VistaMax, Ext. RLS or a router).
lel logic control for control room speaker dim and
mute, and to provide a control output for the Con-
Each Telco module has an associated mix-
trol Room warning lamp controller.
minus (Foldback) of any combination of the program, utility or send buses and two off-line mix
The Control Room module has independent
buses. An Auto-Foldback function can automate
monitor and headphone source selectors and moni-
switching Foldback between an off-line mix and
tor and headphone fader level controls. The mod-
the assigned bus with module off and on.
ule also has input mode controls, Cue and talkback level controls and a solo clear button. Addi-
Remote Line Selector Input Module
tional headphone controls include an Autocue se-
An optional module that offers source selection
lector and a button to force the headphones to
from a VistaMax system, an external remote line
follow the monitor source selection.
selector or a router. Each module has a digital and
1-2
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 1/04
digital
1 General Information
Studio Module
gram, Utility, and Send outputs. For digital out-
This optional module has the monitoring and
puts, sample rates of 48 kHz and 44.1 kHz are
talkback controls for two separate studios or voice
supported. These modules feature output sample
booths, plus talkback audio and control inputs
rate selectors for the Program auxiliary outputs
for a producer/call screener position and for an
and the Utility and Send outputs, as well as gain
external position.
trim controls for the Program, Utility, and Send
The Producer and External audio inputs are
analog outputs.
line level. The Mic Preamp module may be used
DSP Cards
as needed for these inputs. A Producer Talkback /
IFB Panel (PRE99-1188) is also available. It pro-
The number of standard DSP (Digital Signal
vides a mic and preamp for the Producer along
Processor) cards installed is frame-size dependent
with Talk buttons for thirteen locations.
(BMXd-8 has one DSP Card, BMXd-14 has two,
and so on up to the BMXd-38 with five cards).
The Studio module has two parallel logic con-
DSP cards plug into the motherboard behind
nectors for the Studio 1 and 2 dim, mute, and Stu-
the input modules, hidden below the meter panel
dio Warning Lamp interface controls.
The Studio module also has monitor and talk-
in normal use. Each card has a “heartbeat” LED
back selector controls, and monitor and talkback
to indicate operation. An optional External Input
level controls. All of the controls operate indepen-
DSP (99-1355-1) adds an external AES-3 refer-
dently for each studio.
ence input for the first DSP Card position.
Output Modules
Net Card
There are three Output modules. The Output 1
This optional card allows the BMXdigital to di-
module has the digital-to-analog converters and
rectly interface to a VistaMax Audio Management
mix matrices for creating mix-minus foldbacks to
System. It plugs into the motherboard behind the
support up to six Telco/Codec modules. It also con-
Output modules, hidden below the meter panel in
tains individually mixed outputs for Telco moni-
normal use. There are eight VistaMax inputs and
toring and recording. Two monaural mix-minus
outputs on the card for connecting intercom, ex-
outputs for each Telco/Codec module, one with
ternal monitors and other in-room equipment that
talkback (IFB) and one with a clean feed, are on
does not need to have local module control.
this module.
POWER SUPPLY
Digital and analog outputs are provided for the
mix-minus and recorder feed outputs. For digital
The separate rack-mount power supply (99-
outputs, sample rates of 48 kHz and 44.1 kHz
1205) supplies +48 VDC and a voltage monitor
are supported. The mix-minus analog outputs are
signal to the console. One supply comes standard.
fixed at +4 dBu. This module features output
An optional second 99-1205 supply and a +48
sample rate selectors for digital outputs and gain
VDC Coupler (99-1203) can be installed for re-
trim controls for the analog Telco record mix out-
dundant supply operation. Each power supply has
put and IFB level.
its own AC input, On/Off switch and LED power
The Output 2 and Output 3 modules contain
good indicator. Each power supply is fully regu-
the AES digital output drivers, digital-to-analog
lated and protected against excessive current by
converters, and analog line amplifiers for the Pro-
internal fuses and electronic safeguards.
1-3
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 1/04
digital
1 General Information
Specifications
Analog Main Outputs
Output Source Impedance: <3 ohms balanced
The specifications for the BMXdigital are sig-
Output Load Impedance: 1 k ohms minimum
nificantly more complete, and the related test con-
Nominal Output Levels: Program, Utility, Send,Telco/
ditions are more defined, than those usually shown
Codec Mix-Minus, Telco Record Mix Feed: +4
for consoles in this class. Be sure to follow the test
dBu, adjustable between +3 dBu and +9 dBu
conditions and measure in the units as stated.
Maximum Output Levels: Program, Utility, Send,
The specifications are for a fully loaded BMX-
Telco/Codec Mix-Minus,Telco Record Mix Feed:
digital 38-input mainframe.
+24 dBu; +28 dBu with nominal output level
adjusted to +8 dBu
Test Conditions:
Specifications are for the basic signal paths, per
Digital Inputs and Outputs
channel, with >1 k ohm loads connected to the
Reference Level: +4 dBu (-20 dB FSD)
analog main outputs.
Digital I/O: Thru digital input and digital Program,
0 dBu corresponds to an amplitude of 0.775
Utility, Send, Telco/Codec Mix-Minus outputs
volts RMS regardless of the circuit impedance.This
Signal Format: AES-3, S/PDIF (input only)
is equivalent to 0 dBm measured into a 600 ohm
AES-3 Input Compliance: 24-bit sample rate conver-
circuit for convenient level measurement with
sion available, individually switch selectable
meters calibrated for 600 ohm circuits. Noise speci-
AES-3 Output Compliance: 24-bit
fications are based upon a 22 kHz measurement
Digital Reference: Crystal (internal) or AES-3 (ex-
bandwidth. The use of a meter with 30 kHz band-
ternal) at 48 kHz ±100 ppm
width will result in a noise measurement increase
Internal Sample Rate: 48 kHz
of approximately 1.7 dB.
Output Sample Rates: Program Main outputs are
Total Harmonic Distortion (THD+N) is mea-
48 kHz; Program Aux, Utility, Mix-Minus and
sured at a +18 dBu output level using a swept
Telco Record Mix outputs, individually DIP
signal with a 22 kHz low pass filter.
switch set for 48 kHz or 44.1 kHz
FSD = Full Scale Digital, +24 dBu
Processing Resolution: 24-bit fixed with extended
precision accumulators
Conversions: A/D 24-bit, Delta-Sigma, 128x
Microphone Preamplifiers
Source Impedance: 150 ohms
oversampling on all digital inputs; D/A 24-bit,
Input Impedance: 5 k ohms minimum, balanced
Delta-Sigma, 128x oversampling
Input Level Range: Adjustable, -65 to -30 dBu
Latency: <1.6 ms, mic in to monitor out
Input Headroom: >20 dB above nominal input
Output Level: +4 dBu, nominal
Monitor Outputs
Output Source Impedance: <3 ohms, balanced
Output Load Impedance: 1 k ohms minimum
Analog Line Inputs
Input Impedance: >40 k ohms, balanced
Output Level: +4 dBu nominal, +24 dBu maximum
Input Level Range: Selectable, -10 dBv, +4 dBu,
+6 dBu, +8 dBu
Frequency Response
Input Headroom: 20 dB above nominal input
Microphone or Line Input to Program, Utility, or Send
Output: +0 dB/-0.5 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
1-4
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 1/04
digital
1 General Information
Dynamic Range
Console Power Requirements
Analog Input to Analog Output: 105 dB referenced to
Fully configured BMXdigital 22: 250 watts at 115/
FSD, 108 dB “A” weighted to FSD
230 VAC, ±12%, 50/60 Hz
Analog Input to Digital Output: 109 dB referenced to
Fully configured BMXdigital 30: 285 watts at 115/
FSD
230 VAC, ±12%, 50/60 Hz
Fully configured BMXdigital 38: 320 watts at 115/
Digital Input to Analog Output: 107 dB referenced to
230 VAC, ±12%, 50/60 Hz
FSD, 110 dB “A” weighted to FSD
Digital Input to Digital Output: 138 dB
Power Supply Voltage
Console power: +48 VDC at 6.25 Amps,
Equivalent Input Noise
Microphone Preamp: -127 dBu, 150 ohm source
optional redundant supply can be added with
48 volt coupler
Total Harmonic Distortion + Noise
Mic Pre Input to Mic Pre Output: <0.005%, 20 Hz to
Power Supply Ground
20 kHz, -38 dBu input, +18 dBu output
Rack mounted power supply: grounded thru AC cord
Analog Input to Analog Output: <0.005%, 20 Hz to
20 kHz, +18 dBu input, +18 dBu output
Power Supply Connection
Digital Input to Digital Output: <0.00016%, 20 Hz to
AC input: IEC power cord, one per plug-in power
20 kHz, -20 db FSD input, -20 db FSD output
supply
Digital Input to Analog Output: <0.005%, 20 Hz to
DC output: Keyed multi-pin connectors
20 kHz, -6 db FSD input, +18 dBu output
Dimensions
BMXd-8: 9.8" [249] x 29.2" [742] x 33.4" [848]
Crosstalk Isolation
Program-to-Program or to-Utility or to-Send: >95 dB,
BMXd-14: 9.8" [249] x 42.0" [1067] x 33.4" [848]
20 Hz to 20 kHz
BMXd-22: 9.8" [249] x 54.8" [1392] x 33.4" [848]
A Input to B Input, B Input to A Input: >110 dB, 20 Hz
BMXd-30: 9.8" [249] x 67.6" [1717] x 33.4" [848]
to 20 kHz
BMXd-38: 9.8" [249] x 80.4" [2042] x 33.4" [848]
48V Power Supply (Rack mount): 2 RU: 3.5" [89] x
19" [483] x 10" [254]
Stereo Separation
Analog Program Outputs: >86 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
48V Coupler (Rack mount): 1 RU: 1.75" [45] x 19"
[483] x 10" [254]
All dimensions are Height, Width, Depth.
Harris Corporation reserves the right to change
specifications without notice or obligation.
1-5
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 1/04
digital
1 General Information
WARRANTY
E) This Warranty is void for equipment which
The BMXdigital console and power supply carry
has been subject to abuse, improper installa-
a manufacturer’s warranty which is subject to the
tion, improper operation, improper or omit-
following guidelines and limitations:
ted maintenance, alteration, accident, negligence (in use, storage, transportation, or han-
A) Except as expressly excluded herein, Harris
dling), operation not in accordance with
Corporation (“Seller”) warrants equipment of
Seller’s operation and service instructions, or
its own manufacture against faulty workman-
operation outside of the environmental con-
ship or the use of defective materials for a pe-
ditions specified by Seller.
riod of one (1) year from date of shipment to
Buyer. The liability of the Seller under this War-
F) This Warranty is the only warranty made by
ranty is limited to replacing, repairing, or issu-
Seller, and is in lieu of all other warranties,
ing credit (at the Seller’s discretion) for any
including merchantability and fitness for a par-
equipment, provided that Seller is promptly
ticular purpose, whether expressed or implied,
notified in writing within five (5) days upon
except as to title and to the expressed specifi-
discovery of such defects by Buyer, and Seller’s
cations contained in this manual. Seller’s sole
examination of such equipment shall disclose
liability for any equipment failure or any
to its satisfaction that such defects existed at
breach of this Warranty is as set forth in sub-
the time shipment was originally made by
paragraph A) above; Seller shall not be liable
Seller, and Buyer returns the defective equip-
or responsible for any business loss or inter-
ment to Seller’s place of business in Mason,
ruption, or other consequential damages of any
Ohio, packaging and transportation prepaid,
nature whatsoever, resulting from any equip-
with return packaging and transport guaran-
ment failure or breach of this warranty.
teed.
B) Equipment furnished by Seller, but manufactured by another, shall be warranted only to
the extent provided by the other manufacturer.
C) Thermal filament devices, such as fuses, are
expressly excluded from this warranty.
D) The warranty period on equipment or parts
repaired or replaced under warranty shall expire upon the expiration date of the original
warranty.
1-6
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 1/04
digital
2
Installation
T
The BMXdigital console shipment consists of:
he BMXdigital mainframe “drops into”
• The 8, 14, 22, 30 or 38 input frame with the
standard modules (Mic Preamp, Session, Con-
a cutout (shown below) in the studio furniture
trol Room, three Outputs and DSP Cards) installed. Also installed are any optional items that
countertop. A minimum of 14 inches [356 mm] of
were also ordered (Universal Input, Telco/Codec and RLS modules, blank panels, Net Card).
vertical clearance above the countertop is required
• A 2RU rack-mount 48 volt power supply with
to fully open the meter panel. The rear 2.5 inches
interconnecting cable.
• A BMXdigital Tool kit (3 AA batteries, AMP
[63.5 mm] of the mainframe bottom is open so
MOD IV crimp tool and contact removal tool,
hex driver, and module removal tool).
wiring can be easily dressed up through the main-
• Audio and logic connector kit. The kit contains
all the AMP MOD IV connector housings and
frame to the module connectors, which are hid-
receptacle contacts typically needed for installation.
den below the meter panel in normal use.
33.4"
Console, back view
[848]
11.8"
[300]
COUNTERTOP
14.00"
[356]
5.75"
[146]
4.00"
4.00"
[102]
[102]
0.75"
[19]
2.50"
[63.5]
Dimension Table
A
B
2.50"
Console, side view, with dimensions
[63.5]
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
BMXdigital-14 42.0" [1067]
38.9" [988]
39.2" [996]
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
BMXdigital-22 54.8" [1392]
51.7" [1313]
52.0" [1321]
30.5" 123456789012345678901234567890121234567
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
FURNITURE CUTOUT
[775] 123456789012345678901234567890121234567
BMXdigital-30 67.6" [1717]
64.5" [1638]
64.8" [1646]
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
BMXdigital-38 80.4" [2042]
77.3" [1963]
77.6" [1971]
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
Millimeter dimensions in brackets. All dimensional tolerances are: +¼"
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
123456789012345678901234567890121234567
Mainframe
BMXdigital-8
29.2" [742]
26.1" [663]
C
26.4" [671]
[6.4], -0" [0.0]. Typical setback from countertop edge to the front of the
console is 12" [305]. There must be 14" [356] of clearance above the
countertop to open up the meter panel.
C
2-1
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 1/04
digital
2 Installation
MAINFRAME CONFIGURATION
Console Installation
The BMXdigital design positions the input modTo simplify console installation, logic cable wir-
ules in the physical center of the mainframe. This
ing diagrams for specific peripheral equipment are
gives the operator equal reach to peripheral equip-
available from Harris Technical Support. Refer to
ment located to either side of the console.
page 5-1 for contact information.
Module Placement
INSTALLATION NOTE: Do not locate the con-
The 8, 14, 22, 30 or 38 input module positions
sole near intense electromagnetic hum fields, such
can have any combination or order of the follow-
as those produced by large power transformers
ing modules installed: Universal Input, Telco/
and by audio amplifiers that use inexpensive power
Codec (six maximum), and Remote Line Selector
transformers operating in or near saturation.
(RLS). The remaining console positions are fixed.
Strong electromagnetic fields may impair the per-
The Microphone Preamp module(s), Session mod-
formance of the BMXdigital and neighboring
ule, Control Room module, optional Studio mod-
equipment. Route audio cables to achieve maxi-
ule, and Output modules must be positioned as
mum practical distance from all AC power mains
shown below.
wiring.
BMXdigital Mainframe, Module Configuration
Output 3 (standard)
12.25" Blank Panel (standard)
The input module positions are filled
with any combination or number of
Universal Input and Remote Line
Selector modules, and up to six Telco/
Codec modules. Unused positions are
covered with 25" Blank Panels.
Studio (optional) 25” blank panel (standard)
Input modules
Control Room (standard)
* The number of DSP Cards used is set by the frame size.
** The optional Net Card is used with the VistaMax Audio Management System.
*** These two slots are input module positions 1 and 2 on the BMXdigital-8 frame.
Output 2 (standard)
Net Card **
12.25" Blank Panel (standard)
DSP Card 5*
Output 1 (standard)
DSP Card 4*
12.25" Blank Panel (standard)
DSP Card 3*
Session (standard)
Reserved position (covered by a 25" Blank panel) ***
DSP Card 2*
Reserved position (covered by a 25" Blank panel) ***
Mic Preamp 2 (optional)
12.5” blank panel (standard)
12.25" Blank Panel (standard)
12.25" Blank Panel (standard)
Mic Preamp (standard)
DSP Card 1
NOTE: The number of input module positions matches the console model number (e.g., BMXdigital-22 has 22 input positions). There is
one DSP card in the BMXd-8, two DSP cards in the BMXd-14, three in the BMXd-22, four in the BMXd-30, and five in the BMXd-38.
The areas covered by the five 12.25" Blank Panels can be used for mounting Harris BMXdigital Accessory Panels or custom remote
control panels. Since the Harris BMXdigital Accessory Panels are 6" long, a PRE99-1100 Divider Kit (for mounting up to four Accessory
Panels in place of two 12.25" Blank Panels), or a PRE99-1101 Divider Kit (for mounting up to six Accessory Panels in place of three
12.25" Blank Panels) is required. Typically, the PRE99-1100 Divider Kit is installed in place of the Blank Panels on the left end of the
console and the PRE99-1101 is installed in place of the Blank Panels on the right end of the console. 6" Blank Panels (PRE99-1714-3)
cover unused Accessory Panel positions.
2-2
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 1/04
digital
2 Installation
BMXdigital Meter Panel
Clock
(not available on
the BMXdigital-14)
Main Meters
(BMXdigital-8 only has one meter)
Two Session module switches select
whether the Program or the Utility
Buses are displayed
Auxiliary Meter
Event
(Cue, Solo, or Session
Timer
module-switched source)
CONNECTOR ACCESS
Meter Panel
The meter panel has five horizontal Stereo Bar-
Module connectors are hidden below the meter
graph Meters, except for the BMXdigital-8, which
panel, which is hinged on the rear of the main-
has two meters. An alphanumeric display below
frame. To access the connectors, open up the meter
each meter identifies the current signal source
panel by lifting up on the middle of the meter panel
(PROGRAM 1, UTILITY 1, etc.).
while allowing it to pivot rearward to fully extend
the two gas springs.
Four of the meters provide simultaneous level
Caution: Make sure the panel is open all the
monitoring of the four Program or the four Utility
way so that it does not accidentally fall shut.
bus outputs, as selected by two Session module
buttons. On the BMXdigital-8, these two Session
To facilitate initial wiring, the meter panel can
module buttons cycle through the four Program
be entirely removed from the mainframe:
1 Open up the meter panel fully and unplug
and the four Utility buses to select which bus to
the meter power cable (attached to the rear
display on the single main meter.
panel) and the three signal cables plugged into
The right-hand meter (Auxiliary) shows the Cue
the Session module.
or Solo bus levels. When neither function is active, the meter shows a source selected on the Ses-
2 With another person assisting to hold the
sion module (from between the four external in-
meter panel, remove the screw and bushing
puts, the two Sends, the four Utility buses or the
that attach each gas spring to the meter panel.
Telco Record output).
Lay the gas springs on the mainframe while
working.
The meter display mode (peak hold or non-peak
hold) and the level where the peak indicators turn
3 Unlatch the hinges by moving the release pins
on are set for each meter via DIP switches on each
to their unlocked positions and lift the meter
meter display board.
panel up and off the mainframe.
On the left end of the meter panel is an ESEslaveable 12/24-hour digital clock (on all sizes
To reinstall the meter panel, align the two halves
except for the BMXdigital-14). On the right end
of the hinges, then release the pins out of their
there is an event timer that can be controlled
unlocked positions.
manually, through buttons on the Session mod-
Reattach each gas spring to the meter panel by
ule, or automatically, through module On reset
inserting a screw through the gas spring and the
commands.
bushing.
2-3
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 1/04
digital
2 Installation
POWER SUPPLY
GROUNDING AND SHIELDING
The 99-1205 power supply requires 2 RU of
The broadcast facility’s technical ground can be
rack space within the console cabinetry, below and
connected to the mainframe chassis using the
to the left or right of the supporting countertop.
threaded insert on the rear of the console (shown
The 48 Volt Power Supply must be installed so
in the Power Connections drawing on this page).
that the 30 foot power supply cable (90-1709) is
Use a 10-32 screw and crimp lug to terminate the
not under any tension when routed through the
facility’s technical ground wire.
cabinet and connected to the mainframe’s rear
Connect the cable shields at both the console
panel connectors.
and the peripheral end when all system components share a common ground potential and are
Connecting the Power Supply
using isolated ground AC outlets tied individually
The power supply cable has two connectors:
back to the main technical ground.
• A 5-pin connector to supply 48 volt DC
If isolated ground AC outlets are not available,
power to the console.
connect the cable shields at the console end only.
• A 4-pin connector to supply power status
The shields should be floated (left unconnected)
information (Imminent Power Loss) to the
at the peripheral device end. Ensure the periph-
console.
eral devices connect to a clean ground through
Both connectors must be attached to the back
their power cords, or through separate ground
of the BMXdigital and to the power supply.
wires to the facility’s technical ground.
Power Connections —
Console Mainframe, Rear Panel
POWER SUPPLY GROUNDING NOTE:
The Power Supply chassis connects to the
AC mains safety or “U” ground wire.
Meter Panel
Power
48 VDC
Power
Power Supply
Status
Threaded
Insert for
10-32 screw
AUDIO GROUND NOISES: Buzz pickup is generally electrostatic—such as capacitive coupling
between an audio line and a power line. To avoid
DC GROUNDING NOTE: Do not
audio ground noises, do not route audio lines in
connect the audio or logic supply
the same wireway as an AC power line.
ground wiring to the chassis of the
power supply.
INSTALLING BACKUP BATTERIES
AC GROUNDING NOTE: Do not
plied in the 76-2001 Tool Kit. They should NOT
defeat the safety ground in any way.
be installed until the console is completely installed
Doing so may provide a potentially
and is ready for everyday use.
Three AA rechargeable NiCad batteries are sup-
dangerous condition to the operator.
The batteries supply a “Keep Alive” voltage that
holds each module’s logic state during momen-
Redundant Power Supply
tary power outages. They mount in a battery clip
To provide redundant console power, two
located below the three 12.25" blank panels on
99-1205 power supplies can be connected to the
the right end of the console.
console through a 99-1203 48 Volt Coupler.
2-4
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D.1 • 12/10
digital
2 Installation
To install the backup batteries:
The operating mode (autonomous or ESE slave),
1 Remove the blank panels in front of the Out-
the type of ESE signal (TC89 or TC90), and the
put modules using the supplied hex driver.
type of clock time desired (12-hour or 24-hour
2 Install the batteries into the battery clip,
format) are set using DIP switch DS1 on the clock
observing the correct polarity as marked on
PCA. DS1 is on the right rear edge of the circuit
the battery clip and shown below.
board.
To access the clock PCA, open the meter panel.
Backup Battery Installation
Output 3
+
-
+
-
1 2
3
-
Clock Option Switches (DS1)
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
Clock PCA
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
SWITCH UP
SWITCH DOWN
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
24-hour
12-hour
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
TC90
TC89
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
ESE Enabled
ESE Disabled
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
(Slaved)
(Autonomous)
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
Unused
Unused
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
Unused
Unused
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
12345678901234567890123
4 5
Output 2
+
play on the meter panel.
12.25" Blank panel
12.25" Blank panel
Output 1
The clock PCA is mounted behind the clock dis-
Middle 12.25" Blank Panel removed
to show the battery clip
Note: Replace the batteries yearly to ensure continuous backup protection. Use only Panasonic P-
Clock circuit board DIP switch.
Factory default settings are DOWN.
50AAH or equivalent batteries designed for continuous slow charge operation. To prolong battery
With the clock set to autonomous mode, it must
life, remove the batteries when the console is pow-
be set after power-up. There are three clock set
ered down for an extended period.
buttons on the bottom left front of the clock PCA.
• Use the right button (Fast) to scroll by min-
SETTING THE CLOCK
utes at a time.
The digital time-of-day clock (not available on
• Use the middle button (Slow) to scroll by
the BMXdigital-14) can operate in autonomous
seconds at a time.
or slave modes.When used autonomously (the fac-
• Use the left button (Hold) to synchronize
tory preset), a temperature-controlled quartz crys-
the console clock to an external time refer-
tal oscillator controls the clock timing. In slave
ence by setting the clock ahead of the ex-
mode, clock timing comes from a TC89- or TC90-
ternal time reference, then press and hold
compatible ESE master clock reference signal.
Setting the Clock
Clock Circuit Board, lower left front edge
Master clocks are available from:
ESE
142 Sierra St.
El Segundo, CA 90245.
Telephone: 310.322.2136
www.ese-web.com
Hold
2-5
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D.1 • 12/10
Slow
Fast
digital
2 Installation
Event Timer Option Switches (DS1)
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
Timer PCA
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
SWITCH DOWN
SWITCH UP
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
Unused
12345678901234567890123456
Unused
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
Unused
Unused
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
Unused
Unused
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
Unused
Unused
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
.1 sec display OFF
.112345678901234567890123456
sec display ON
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
12345678901234567890123456
the HOLD button to freeze the time. When
the external time reference reaches the time
on the BMXdigital clock, release the HOLD
4 5
button to start the clock.
When an ESE time-code signal is connected to
the BNC connector on the clock circuit board, and
1 2 3
slave mode is selected (DS1-3 is set UP), the clock
does not require setting. If the ESE time-code signal fails, the clock automatically defaults to its internal crystal reference oscillator, flashing the display colons to indicate the loss of time-code.
EVENT TIMER
Timer circuit board DIP switch.
Factory default settings are DOWN.
The event timer displays time in minutes, seconds and tenths of seconds. The only timer option
METER SETUP
setting is whether to display the tenths of seconds
digit as the timer runs. DS1-1 (a DIP switch on
The level at which the blue peak indicators turn
the timer circuit board, located behind the timer
on, as well as the meter display mode (peak hold
display), sets whether the tenths are shown or not.
or non-peak hold), is set separately for each meter
In the UP position, the tenths of seconds are dis-
using DIP switches on the edge of each meter PCA.
played. In the DOWN position, the factory default,
To access the meter DIP switches, open the meter
the tenths do not display while the timer runs.
panel by lifting it up and rotating it toward the
Note that the tenths of seconds are always shown
rear of the console until it stops. Each meter’s DIP
when the timer is in the Stop or Hold mode.
switches are located on the underside of the meter
panel, directly below the right end of each meter.
Meter DIP Switch Definitions
#
Switch Name
UP Function (switch set up)
DOWN Function (switch set down)
1 Peak Indicator Level
See Switch 1 and 2 Table, below
2 Peak Indicator Level
See Switch 1 and 2 Table, below
3 Meter Display Mode *
Non-peak hold
Peak hold
4 Spare Switch
5 Termination Switch
Set UP for Meter 1
Set DOWN for Meters 2 - 5
* Active only when meters are set to display Average and Peak (Session module DIP switch 1 set to Off )
Meter Option Switches (DSW2)
Switch 1 and 2 Table
1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567
1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567
Peak Level
DOWN
UP
DOWN
UP
DOWN
DOWN
UP
UP
0 dB
-2 dB
-4 dB
-6 dB
5
#2
4
#1
1 2 3
Use these switches to set the level
where the Blue peak indicators light.
Switches 1, 2, 3 shown down,
switches 4 and 5 shown up.
2-6
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 1/04
Meter PCA
digital
2 Installation
WIRE PREPARATION
Cabling and Wiring
All BMXdigital audio and logic wiring termi-
Before installing the console, draw up a facility
nates in AMP MOD IV receptacle contacts at the
wiring plan that lists the console interconnections
console. Stranded wire of 22 to 26 AWG, with in-
with all peripheral devices. Identify and create tags
sulation diameters of .040 to .060 inch, can be
for all audio and logic cabling. List each connec-
used with the AMP MOD IV receptacle contacts.
tion in a master facility wiring logbook to facilitate wiring installation, future system wiring
Insulation Barrel
changes, equipment updates, and system troubleshooting.
9/64” [3.57 mm]
Refer to the module Quick Connection Guides,
on pages 2-16 to 2-57, for information on each
Wire Barrel
audio and logic connection (including block diagrams for each logic interface connector) and on
Properly
Crimped Contact
each module’s setup DIP switches.
REQUIRED CABLES AND WIRE
The BMXdigital uses the following types of
cables and wires:
AMP MOD IV Receptacle Contacts
• Analog audio connections require twoconductor, stranded, insulated, foil-shield
cable using a separate shield drain wire
Follow these steps for audio wire preparation:
(equivalent to Belden 8451, 9451 or 8761).
1 Strip the cable insulation jacket and foil shield
back 1½" [38.10 mm].
• AES/EBU connections require 110 ohm
2 Remove the foil shield and sleeve the drain
two-conductor, stranded, insulated, foil-
wire with 20 AWG Teflon sleeving. Leave
shield cable containing a separate shield
9/64" [3.57 mm] of the drain wire exposed.
3 Cover the cut end of the jacket with 3/4"
drain wire (equivalent to Belden 1800A).
[19.05 mm] of heat-shrink tubing. Shrink this
tubing, centered on the jacket cut end, to hold
• Logic control cables require stranded, 22
the drain wire sleeving in place.
AWG, multiple-conductor, non-shielded,
4 Strip the signal wire insulation back 9/64"
jacketed cable (equivalent to Belden 9423,
[3.57 mm].
8457 or 9421). The number of conductors
5 Crimp the receptacle contact onto the wire
used is determined by the application. Typi-
and insulation.
cally cables with five and eight wires are
most often used for constructing logic
Audio C
able S
hielding N
ot
e: To follow recomCable
Shielding
Not
ote:
cables. Even though there are eighteen dis-
mended grounding procedures, the drain wires
tinct signals on the Logic Interface connec-
must be sleeved with Teflon sleeving and heat
tor, only a handful are typically used for
shrink tubing must cover all cable jacket cut ends
any given application.
to insulate the shield wiring.
2-7
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 1/04
digital
2 Installation
AMP MOD IV
Receptacle Contacts
handles to crimp the contact onto the wire.
The tool handles automatically release and
3/4” [19.05 mm]
Shrink Tubing
spring open after the crimp cycle is complete.
Cable ID Tag
Teflon Sleeving
over drain wire
Printed
Side of
Crimp
Tool
Audio Wire, ready for insertion into an
AMP MOD IV connector housing
Die
Logic control cables are fabricated in a similar
Contact Holder,
snapped against
Crimp Tool
Wire
AMP MOD IV
Receptacle
Contact
manner to the audio wiring. Strip the jacket insulation back 1½" [38.10 mm], sleeve the cut end
with 3/4" [19.05 mm] of shrink tubing and strip
Insulation Stop
Anvils
the insulation from each wire 9/64" [3.57 mm].
Crimp Tool — Cutaway View
Once the contact has been crimped, insert and
AMP MOD IV
Contact
Crimp Tool
lock the contact receptacle into the appropriate
connector housing following the pinout diagrams
found in the Quick Connection Guides on pages
2-16 to 2-57.
A receptacle contact is inserted into the housing with its locking tab side toward the locking
tab slots on the side of the connector housing. A
CRIMP TOOL OPERATION
slight click can be heard when the contact’s lock-
A ratcheting AMP crimp tool with contact holder
ing tab springs up into the locking tab slot.
is included.The tool crimps both the insulation and
To remove a contact from a housing, the PRE70-
wire barrels on the AMP MOD IV receptacle con-
129 Contact Removal Tool (included in the
tact in one crimp. To use the ratcheting crimp tool:
PRE76-2001 tool kit) is required. Insert the tool's
1 Insert the contact into the contact holder with
tip into the locking tab slot and press the locking
the barrel openings up. Typically the middle
tab down while lightly pulling on the wire to re-
holder is used (for 20 - 24 AWG wire). Flip
move the contact from the housing.
the holder up so it magnetically latches against
the crimp tool. The end of the insulation bar-
Contact Removal Tool
rel will be about 2 mm from the end of the
Locking Tab Slots
die. Close the tool one click (only until the
anvil holds the contact in place, as shown in
Locking Tab
the cutaway view, above.)
2 Insert the prepped wire into the contact until
the insulation hits the tool’s wire stop. Hold
Receptacle Contact,
Insertion & Removal Detail
the wire in place while squeezing the tool
2-8
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 1/04
digital
2 Installation
AUDIO CONNECTIONS
Analog Connections
Audio connections take advantage of the three-
There are no analog interstage patch points
pins per row design of the three- and six-pin AMP
within the BMXdigital input or output modules.
MOD IV housings. Three-pin housings are used
To use the console with a patch bay, connect the
for balanced digital connections while six-pin
line level outputs from the peripheral devices di-
housings are used for balanced analog connections.
rectly to the patch bay. Normal these signals to
One important exception is the Mic Preamp mod-
the appropriate analog input modules.
Likewise, the BMXdigital’s analog outputs may
ule, which uses three-pin connectors for balanced
be routed through a patch bay normalled to stan-
analog microphone inputs.
dard peripherals such as analog on-air processing
Pin Numbers for Analog &
Digital Audio Connectors,
3
3
6
2
2
5
1
1
4
3-pin
connector
gear, recorders, telephone hybrids, etc.
The Mic Preamp module’s line-level outputs (+4
dBu, nominal, balanced, mono outputs) can also
be routed through a patch bay normalled to an
input module, or to external mic processing.
When a mic processor with only a microphone
6-pin
connector
level input is used, the microphone is connected
directly to the mic processor, with the processor’s
Pin numbering shown from the wire insertion end,
oriented from the board operator’s perspective.
line-level output either directly connected to an
input module (using the mono wiring pinout
All audio wiring, when plugged into a module
shown below) or through a patch bay normalled
connector, has this orientation:
to an input module.
• The audio shields are on pins 1 and 4 (the
Two-Channel (Stereo)
Line Input or Output — 6-Pin Housing
pins closest to the board operator).
• The audio low wires (typically the black
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
wires) are on pins 2 and 5 (the middle pins).
• The audio high wires (typically the red
wires) are on pins 3 and 6 (the back pins).
For stereo applications, the left channel wires
plug into the left column of pins and the right channel wires plug into the right column of pins (from
Signal Description
Shield for the left channel, or signal 1
Low (- input or output), left channel, or signal 1
High (+ input or output), left channel, or signal 1
Shield for the right channel, or signal 2
Low (- input or output), right channel, or signal 2
High (+ input or output), right channel, or signal 2
the board operator’s perspective).
When a six-pin input comes from a mono source
Single Channel (Mono)
Line Input — 6-Pin Connector
(such as an external microphone preamp output),
the left and right inputs should be paralleled to-
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
gether (pins 1 and 4 tied together, pins 2 and 5
tied together and pins 3 and 6 tied together). If
this is not done, then the module’s mode buttons
will have to be set for mono operation (see page 35 for L/R Mode information on the Universal Input Module).
Signal Description
Shield (connects directly to the chassis)
Low (- input) tied to pin 5
High (+ input) tied to pin 6
Shield (connects directly to the chassis)
Low (- input) from pin 2
High (+ input) from pin 3
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Microphone Input — 3-Pin Connector
Pin
1
2
3
If a match box is not available, connect an unbalanced device to a BMXdigital input using the
Signal Description
Shield (connects directly to the chassis)
Low (- input)
High (+ input)
following illustration.
Connecting an Unbalanced Device
to a BMXdigital Analog Input
Digital Connections
From the
Unbalanced
Device
Digital inputs and outputs are wired like the
Microphone Input shown above.
Console
Balanced
Input
R
The Universal Input, RLS and Telco/Codec mod-
L
ules have digital inputs. The three-pin digital inputs accept AES-3 (AES/EBU) compatible signals,
Shields
3 6
2 5
1 4
and as mentioned in the Unbalanced Connections
section
that
follows, can
also
accept
S/PDIF signals in most cases.
When an unbalanced device must be connected
Each Output module has multiple digital out-
to a BMXdigital balanced analog output, and an
puts. Each outputs an AES-3 compatible signal.
IHF-PRO match box is not available, do not tie
Note: The digital outputs cannot connect di-
the low (-) and shield pins together to “unbalance”
rectly to an S/PDIF input. A signal translation
the signal. The low output pin must always be left
interface is required.
“floating” when unbalancing a BMXdigital output, as shown in the following illustration.
AES/EBU Digital Inputs and
External Clock Reference Input
Pin
1
2
3
Connecting an Unbalanced Device
to a BMXdigital Analog Output
Signal Description
Shield (connects directly to the chassis)
Low (- input)
High (+ input)
(Nominal Output is -2 dBu)
Console
Balanced
Output
AES/EBU Digital Outputs
Pin
1
2
3
Signal Description
Shield for AES/EBU signal
Low (- output)
High (+ output)
3 6
2 5
1 4
To the
Unbalanced
Device
L
R
Shields
(Make no connections to pins 2 & 5)
UNBALANCED CONNECTIONS
S/PDIF Signals
Although all analog inputs and outputs are
Digital devices with only an S/PDIF digital out-
active and balanced, unbalanced consumer or
put can connect to a BMXdigital input, but only
“semipro” equipment can be connected to the con-
when a 249 ohm resistor is used to load the 75
sole. For best results, connect an unbalanced de-
ohm S/PDIF cable. Install the resistor at the AMP
vice through an IHF-PRO match box and keep
MOD IV housing per the illustration on the next
the unbalanced cable lengths as short as possible.
page.
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Connecting an S/PDIF Device to
a BMXdigital AES/EBU Input
LOGIC CONNECTIONS
BMXdigital modules have built-in logic I/O in-
Console
AES/EBU
Input
From
S/PDIF
Device
Signal
terfaces that can control, or be controlled by,
peripheral devices connected to the console. For
example, a CD player connected to a module can
3
Shield
2
be automatically started when the module is
1
turned on. Then, at the end of the cut, the CD
249 ohm resistor
Player logic can turn the module audio off and
control the off button illumination to indicate that
An unbalanced-to-balanced line transformer can
the cut has been played.
also be used to interface an S/PDIF signal.
Note 1: A signal conversion interface must be
When a mic remote control panel is connected,
used to connect an AES/EBU output to a S/PDIF
its On, Off, Cough and Talkback buttons control
input.
the module while tally outputs from the module
control the button tallies on the mic panel.
Note 2: Some S/PDIF signals may not work with
the BMXdigital’s inputs, even with the additional
BMXdigital modules have the following logic
load resistor or a transformer, because of nonstand-
connectors:
ard levels or protocols in the S/PDIF product.
• Universal Input modules have two MAIN
connectors for the devices connected to the
DIGITAL CLOCK REFERENCE
A and the B inputs and two T/B OPTION
The BMXdigital has an internal clock for sample
connectors for separate talkback control for
rate timing, with sample rate converters on each
the A and B mic inputs.
input to synchronize/convert external digital sig-
• Telco/Codec and RLS modules have a
nals to the console’s internal 48 kHz sample rate.
single LOGIC I/O connector for the device
The console can synchronize to an external AES-
connected to the module.
3 digital reference signal (of 48 kHz, ±100 ppm
• The Session module has three EXT TIMER
only) when using the optional Ext. Input DSP card
connectors for resetting studio or producer
(99-1356-1). A 3-pin connector on the card has a
timers, a DATA (RJ-45) connector for con-
green LED next to it to indicate whether the in-
necting the console to a local LAN and the
ternal or external reference is active.When a valid
connectors for the factory-installed wiring
external reference signal is present, the LED is
that ties the mainframe to the meter panel.
off. If the LED is still lit with an external signal
• The Control Room module has a LOGIC
connected, it indicates the reference signal is not
connector for the warning light, mute, dim,
present or is out of range.
and talkback. A CUE CNTL connector allows external cue input control.
DSP Card Features
Heartbeat LED —
Flashes to indicate the
DSP is good.
• The optional Studio module has two
External Input and LED —When
unlit, indicates the console is
using the External reference.
(optional connection)
LOGIC connectors for dim, mute, and warning indications and two talkback connectors (PRODUCER and EXTERNAL).
• The Output 1 module has a PRODUCER
IFB LOGIC connector.
Thumbscrews
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MODULE QUICK GUIDES
UNIVERSAL LOGIC INTERFACE
Pages 2-16 to 2-57 have Quick Guides to con-
A block diagram of the Universal Input module
figuring logic connections and DIP switch settings.
logic interface is shown on page 2-13. Logic out-
Each guide covers the audio and logic connector
puts (shown on the right side of the illustration)
pinouts and signal descriptions, DIP switch set-
are isolated from the peripheral device by six solid-
ting definitions, and, for some modules, logic block
state “relays.”The “relay contacts” can switch logic
diagrams. The Module Quick Guides:
voltages of up to 60 volts at 350 mA.
Pressing the On button generates a 220 ms con-
• Mic Preamp: pages 2-16 & 2-17
tact closure from pin 5 (Start Command Pulse). A
• Universal Input: pages 2-18 to 2-23
sustained contact closure while On is available on
• Telco/Codec: pages 2-24 to 2-27
pin 23 (Start Command Sustained). It stays closed
• RLS: pages 2-28 to 2-31
as long as the module is On. Pressing the Off but-
• Session: pages 2-32 & 2-33
ton generates a 220 ms closure from pin 4 (Stop
• Control Room: pages 2-34 to 2-38
Command Pulse). These three command outputs
are tied together at pin 13 (Command Common).
• Studio: pages 2-40 to 2-49
Module DIP switches DS2-2 (for the A input)
• Output 1: pages 2-50 to 2-53
and DS4-2 (for the B input) , set whether a single
• Output 2: pages 2-54 & 2-55
pulse is output when the module status changes
• Output 3: pages 2-56 & 2-57
(Off to On, or On to Off), or if each additional press
of the On or Off buttons produces another contact
Note: There are four versions of each Input mod-
closure. The default setting (switch 2 set to OFF)
ule: full-featured (shown in the Quick Guides); lim-
is a single contact closure. When DS2-2 or DS4-2
ited-function modules (without the Utility or Send
is set to ON, then each additional press of the On
bus controls); and full-featured or limited-featured
or Off button produces another 220 ms contact
Net-only modules (which have no input and logic
closure.
The remaining outputs; Logic Active/Cue Tally
connectors).
Pages 2-58 to 2-63 show examples of typical
[pin 15], On Tally [pin 17], and Off Tally [pin 16],
logic connections to the Universal Input module
are tied together at Tallies Common [pin 14]. They
from a mic remote control panel, a CD player and
present sustained logic outputs for each function.
a digital delivery system. Pages 2-64 thru 2-66
There are six logic inputs on the left side of the
illustration: Reset, Ready, On, Off, Cough and Talk
cover the Net Card and Net-Only modules.
to Control Room/Ext. Cue. These inputs are optoNote: For complete isolation of the console and
isolated and current limited so any logic voltage
a peripheral device, use only the opto-isolated con-
from +5 to +40 VDC can be used. Reset and Ready
trol connections. Both logic ground and +5 VDC
have both high (+) and low (-) input pins so that
are referenced to the console’s power supply and
either polarity logic can be used. The other inputs
ground and should only be connected to isolated
use active low logic (pull to ground) that typically
devices like mic control panels or other Harris Ac-
come from a mic control panel (although On and
cessory Panels. Connecting logic ground to a non-
Off could be triggered by a peripheral device). To
isolated device may result in a ground loop be-
use these inputs, pin 18 (Activate Logic Inputs)
tween the console and the peripheral device.
must be jumpered to the + logic voltage. Typically
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Block Diagram, Universal Input
Module Logic Interface
5 Start Command Pulse
22
Ready Input (+)
24
Ready Input (-)
21
Reset Input (-)
19
Activate Logic Inputs(+)
18
Internal Logic
4 Stop Command Pulse
Reset Input (+)
23 Start Command Sustained
13 Commands Common
15 MIC: Logic Active Tally LINE: Cue Tally
17 On Tally
On Input (-)
7
Off Input (-)
8
Cough Input (-)
9
16 Off Tally
14 Tallies Common
1 Logic Ground
MIC: Talk To C/R (-) LINE: Cue Input (-) 20
2 Logic Ground
3 Logic Ground
+5 volts
Notes:
Opto-Isolator inputs can handle +5 to +40 VDC logic
Opto-Isolator outputs can handle up to 60 volts or 350 mA
6 Logic Supply +5VDC
10 Logic Supply +5VDC
11 Logic Supply +5VDC
12 Logic Supply +5VDC
this is pin 6 (Logic Supply +5 VDC), but it can
are set to On), the module is set as a microphone
also be supplied by the peripheral device.
and the Logic Active Tally output (pin 15) is closed
The Audio Reset and Ready inputs can use ei-
when that input (input A for DS1 or input B for
ther active low logic (pull to ground) or active high
DS3) is active. When no mute is set, the module is
logic (pull to +VDC) from peripheral devices.With
set for line logic and pin 15 becomes a Cue Tally.
active high logic, Ready (-) and Audio Reset (-)
are tied to logic ground on the peripheral device.
Setting DIP Switches
Ready (+) and Audio Reset (+) then connect to
When referring to a module’s DIP switch set-
the appropriate logic outputs on the peripheral
ting, a switch is Set to Off when it is to the right
device.
and it is Set to On when it is to the left (orienta-
When active low logic is used by the peripheral
tion is from the board operator’s perspective). In
device, Ready (+) and Audio Reset (+) connect to
the illustration, all odd num-
the logic supply voltage on the peripheral device,
bered switches are shown set
and Ready (-) and Audio Reset (-) connect to the
to On and all even numbered
appropriate logic outputs.
switches are shown set to Off.
Pin 15’s signal (Logic Active Tally / CueTally)
changes depending upon whether the channel logic
On = set Left
Off = set Right
switches (DS1/DS3) are set to mute any location.
When any mute is set (DS1/DS3, switches 2 - 5
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logic are wired directly to an input module’s con-
Universal Input Module Logic and Mics
Microphone logic has three main functions: to
nectors. This is typically how mics are wired even
mute the monitor speakers in the room with a “hot”
when the console is connected to a VistaMax sys-
mic; to command a hot mic warning light; and to
tem since the active input mic audio can be made
activate logic functions like talkback and cough.
available as a VistaMax source—allowing the mic
The warning commands come from the Control
audio to be routed to another console or other destination in the VistaMax system.
Room or Studio modules, but it is the Universal
Input modules that tell the monitor modules that
VistaMax Mic Connections
the input is a mic and where that mic is located
When a studio, voice-over booth, or other ex-
(control room, a studio, or an external site).
Setting a Universal input module as a mic in-
ternal location will be shared by multiple control
put is done by either setting DIP switch 2, 3, 4 or
rooms, then the shared mics should be routed
5 to On on DS1 (A input) or DS3 (B input) or,
through the VistaMax system. This then allows
when a console is tied into a VistaMax system, by
each BMXdigital console to independently con-
assigning the input using its Room Code. The
trol the mics (just as if they were directly connected
Room Code is a VistaMax system function that
to the console) via the VistaMax system.
sets the room using a Session file setting that is
The shared mics and their mic panels are wired
typically used when the mic is routed through the
directly to an Analog I/O and a Logic I/O card in
VistaMax system.
a VistaMax frame. The logic signals for the mic
panel are “bound” to the mic audio during setup.
Thus, selecting a mic as a source by any console
Direct Mic Connections
Pages 2-58 and 2-59 summarize setting up a
automatically routes both the audio and logic to
Universal Input module as a direct microphone
that console through its Net Card.Tally commands
input, utilizing a PRE99-1198 Mic Panel (simpli-
from the console to the mic panel are routed
fied schematic shown below). This is typically how
through the Net Card and the Logic I/O Card.
For additional networked audio information re-
mics in the control room or in a dedicated studio
fer to the VistaMax manual (Harris # 75-52).
are connected. Both the mic audio and the mic
Mic Control Panel
(Simplified Schematic
for PRE99-1197 or PRE9-1198)
Mic Logic To/From a BMXdigital Module
A mic panel connects to a Universal Input module using the MAIN logic connector (a simplified
TALKBACK
schematic is on page 2-13). To enable the remote
S1
AMBER (TALKBACK)
CR3
AMBER (COUGH)
V+ SUPPLY
J1
8
CR6
7
CR5
J1
supply (pin 6, 10, 11, or 12). The On Tally output
COUGH
(pin 17) drives the LEDs in the On button and
S4
CR7
6
2
CR1
J1
ON
3
CR8
AMBER (OFF)
OFF TALLY
(Activate Logic Inputs) must jumper to the +5 VDC
S2
4
CR4
J1
control inputs (On, Off, Cough, Talkback), pin 18
TALK TO C/R
COUGH
RED (ON)
ON TALLY
J1
J1
the Off Tally (pin 16) drives the LEDs in the Off
ON
OFF
CR2
button. The other LEDs (Cough and Talkback)
S3
LOGIC GND
J1
5
1
J1
connect to +5 VDC. Switches and LEDs are
OFF
GNDD
commoned to Logic Ground.
To make a custom mic panel, use SPST (single
J1: TO/FROM CONSOLE CHANNEL LOGIC
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pole, single throw) momentary contact switches
Pages 2-62 and 2-63 show an example where
with LED or lamp indicators. Lamps must be 6.3
Reset (+) and Ready (+) connect to +5 VDC on
volt type with a current draw of under 50 mA.
the module. The Ready (-) command and the Re-
Tie one side of each switch and lamp to Logic
set (-) command are pulled low by the active low
Common (pin 1, 2 or 3 on the MAIN connector).
logic relay outputs on the peripheral device, which
The other side of the Cough and Talkback lamps
all tie to the module’s Logic Ground (pin 1).
are tied together to Logic Active Tally (pin 15).
For devices requiring a steady On signal, the
Each switch is tied to its logic counterpart (the
Start Command Sustained output can be used.
On switch goes to the On (-) input, pin 7, the Off
Additional Logic Connections
switch goes to Off (-) input, pin 8, etc.). The on/off
There are additional logic connections on the
lamps are tied to their Tally outputs (On lamp to
Session module, Control Room module, optional
On Tally, pin 17; Off lamp to Off Tally, pin 16).
Studio module, and Output 1 module.
Tallies Common (pin 16) is jumpered to +5 VDC
(pin 6, 10, 11 or 12). Pin 18, Activate Logic In-
Three 3-pin connectors on the Session module
puts (+), is also jumpered to +5 VDC (typically
interface remote timers so they can be reset by the
pin 6 is used).
console timer reset logic. The Session module also
has factory-installed cabling for the clock and
Input Module Logic (Universal Input,
Telco/Codec, RLS) and Peripheral Devices
timer, the talkback mic, the digital meters and the
meter legend display data. For more information
Peripheral devices are controlled through the
on the Session module’s logic connections and set-
Start and Stop Command Pulses, or through the
tings, see pages 2-32 and 2-33.
Start Command Sustained logic, and the Com-
A 14-pin connector on the Control Room mod-
mands Common connections.
ule carries the logic interface for the Control Room
In the basic logic connection example on pages
warning light, mute, dim and talkback. An 8-pin
2-60 and 2-61, active low logic is used, thus Com-
connector on the Control Room module controls
mands Common is connected to the logic ground
the External Cue input. For more information on
on the peripheral device (labeled Command Com-
the Control Room module’s logic connections and
mon on the Denon CD player in the example).
settings, see pages 2-34 to 2-38.
In the complex logic example shown on pages
The optional Studio module has two 14-pin con-
2-62 and 2-63, active high logic is used, thus
nectors to control the two studios’ logic (warning
Commands Common connects to +5 VDC.
lights, mutes, dims). The Studio module also has
Note: This voltage is more typically supplied
two 16-pin connectors: one for the talkback au-
directly by the peripheral device in order to
dio and logic for a producer, the other for talkback
prevent ground loops.
audio and logic from an external site. For more
Peripheral devices control the module through
information on the Studio module’s logic connec-
the Reset and Ready logic inputs. In the example
tions and settings, see pages 2-40 to 2-49.
on pages 2-60 and 2-61, only the Ready function
The Output 1 module includes an 8-pin con-
is used. The Ready function performs an audio
nector to control the producer’s talkback to each
Reset, which turns off the module without gener-
mix-minus output. For more information on the
ating a Stop Command Pulse. In addition, it also
Output 1 module’s logic connections and settings,
controls the Off lamp illumination.
see pages 2-50 to 2-53.
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QUICK GUIDE TO THE MICROPHONE PREAMPLIFIER MODULE
The BMXdigital mic preamp contains two separate PCAs with five mic preamps on each board. The
BMXdigital-8 and -14 come standard with five mic preamps, whereas the BMXdigital-22, -30 and -38
come standard with ten mic preamps. Each 3-pin input connects to a separate mic preamp driving its
own 6-pin line-level balanced analog output connector. The connectors are hidden by the meter panel in
normal operation.
INPUTS
Inputs— The 3-pin analog inputs accept mono microphone signals.
Connect only low impedance, balanced, dynamic or condenser
microphones, with nominal mic output levels of -65 to -30 dBu, to these
inputs.
Analog Mic Inputs
High (+)
3
Low (-)
2
Shield
1
(wire insertion end view)
OUTPUTS
Outputs — The 6-pin analog outputs are wired in parallel (mono)
using the standard pinout sequence. This allows these outputs to connect
directly to Universal Input modules without requiring any setting changes
to be made to the Input Mode from a standard stereo input. The preamp
output signal level is +4 dBu.
Analog Preamp Outputs
Left High (+)
3
6
Right High (+)
Left Low (-)
2
5
Right Low (-)
Shield
1
4
Shield
(wire insertion end view)
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MICROPHONE PREAMPLIFIER MODULE SWITCHES
PHANTOM
DS1/DS2 — These DIP switches set whether phantom power is applied to each mic input. The
factory default setting for all switches is OFF.
# Switch Name
ON Function (set to operator’s left)
OFF Function (set to operator's right)
DS1
1
2
3
4
5
Mic Input #1
Mic Input #2
Mic Input #3
Mic Input #4
Mic Input #5
Phantom power on
Phantom power on
Phantom power on
Phantom power on
Phantom power on
Phantom power off
Phantom power off
Phantom power off
Phantom power off
Phantom power off
DS2*
Microphone Preamplifier Module Switch Definitions
6
7
8
9
10
Mic Input #6
Mic Input #7
Mic Input #8
Mic Input #9
Mic Input #10
Phantom power on
Phantom power on
Phantom power on
Phantom power on
Phantom power on
Phantom power off
Phantom power off
Phantom power off
Phantom power off
Phantom power off
* Optional on the BMXdigital-8 and BMXdigital-14, standard on the other frame sizes.
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QUICK GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSAL INPUT MODULE
Eight connectors come standard on each Universal Input module: two 6-pin analog audio input
connectors, two 3-pin digital audio input connectors, two 14-pin logic connectors, and two 24-pin logic
connectors. The connectors are hidden by the meter panel in normal operation.
AUDIO INPUTS
ANAL
OG INPUT
S A & B — The 6-pin analog inputs accept stereo or
ANALOG
INPUTS
mono line level signals. Mono signals, like those from a preamplified
microphone, should be paralleled to the left and right inputs.
Analog Inputs - Stereo
Left High (+)
3
6
Right High (+)
Left Low (-)
2
5
Right Low (-)
Shield
1
4
Shield
(wire insertion end view)
Analog Inputs - Mono
High (+)
3
6
High (+)
Low (-)
2
5
Low (-)
Shield
1
4
Shield
(wire insertion end view)
DIGIT
AL INPUT
S A & B — The two 3-pin digital inputs accept AES-3
DIGITAL
INPUTS
(AES/EBU) or S/PDIF signals (when the circuit shown on page 2-11 is used).
Digital Inputs
High (+)
3
Low (-)
2
Shield
1
(wire insertion end view)
LOGIC I/O
T/B OPTION A & B — Two 14-pin Talkback connectors allow separate
A/B input control of talkback when microphone logic is active. Connects to
a PRE99-1199 Mic Remote Panel with five Talks, or a custom talkback
control panel. For additional information, see pages 2-22 and 2-23.
MAIN A & B — Two 24-pin logic connectors allow separate A/B input
control of the peripheral devices connected to the A and B inputs. For
additional information, see pages 2-20 and 2-21.
2-18
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UNIVERSAL INPUT MODULE SWITCHES
SETUP
DS1/DS2 — These 16 DIP switches affect the logic settings for the A input. Individual switch definitions are listed below.
DS3/DS4 — These 16 DIP switches affect the logic settings for the B input. Individual switch definitions are listed below.
DS1 / DS3
Universal Input Module Switch Definitions
# Switch Name
ON Function (set to operator’s left)
OFF Function (set to operator's right)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Digital
Mutes C/R speakers at module on 1
Mutes Studio 1 speakers at module on 1
Mutes Studio 2 speakers at module on 1
Mutes external site speakers at module on 1
Hold down On button as Cough button
Resets timer at module on
Local (Off lamp follows on/off status)
Analog
No monitor muting
No monitor muting
No monitor muting
No monitor muting
On button not used for Cough
No timer reset
Remote (Off lamp follows ready logic)
Moving Fader from/to full-off (bottom)
turns module On/Off
Multiple (each press of On/Off button
generates another pulse)
All (pulses are generated no matter
where On/Off control originates)
Disables the Dim function when
receiving talkback
Bypasses the internal SRC (use only
when the console and all the audio
sources are locked to an external reference) 2
Use local DIP switches to set Mute location
Fader movement does not affect
module On/Off
Single (pulse is only generated when
changing state, Off to On, or On to Off )
Local (pulses are only generated by
module On/Off buttons)
Enables the Dim function (the default
setting)
Uses internal SRC (normal setting)
See table below
See table below
See table below
See table below
Signal Source
CR Mute
Studio 1 Mute
Studio 2 Mute
External Site Mute
Local On Cough
Timer Reset
Off Lamp Control
1 Fader Start
2 Start/Stop Pulses
DS2 / DS4
3 Start/Stop Control
(no mute location set)
Dim Function Control
(mute location is set)
4 Sample Rate
Converter (SRC)
5
6
7
8
Mute Setting Control
Spare Switch
Input Level Set
Input Level Set
VistaMax Room Code sets Mute location
Switches 7 & 8 Table
These switches are used together to set the nominal reference levels for the A and B inputs. The factory
default settings are both OFF.
7
8
Analog 3
Digital 4
Off
Off
On
On
Off
On
Off
On
+4 dBu
+6 dBu
+8 dBu
-10 dBV
0 dB
-6 dB
-12 dB
-18 dB
1
The module logic is set as Microphone when any of these switches are set to On with a directly connected mic. When the
mic is a net source, then switch DS2/4-5 sets how the mute location is set (using a DIP switch or using Room Code).
2
Refer to page 2-11, Digital Clock Reference for details on an external reference.
3
The nominal input to achieve -20 FSD (equal to a +4 dBu output), with the fader set to the red reference line.
4
The amount of gain reduction applied to the digital input signal.
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UNIVERSAL INPUT MODULE — MAIN LOGIC
MAIN Connector
The left connector connects to the A Input device; the right connector connects to the B Input
Logic Supply +5 VDC
12 24
Ready (+)
Logic Supply +5 VDC
11 23
Start Command Sustained
the module set as a Mic Input (DS1 or DS3 switch
Logic Supply +5 VDC
10 22
Reset (+)
2, 3, 4, or 5 is set to ON) then pin 15 is a Logic
Cough (-)
9
21
Ready (-)
Active Tally and pin 20 is the Talk to Control Room
Off (-)
8
20
MIC: Talk to C/R (-) LINE: Ext Cue (-)
On (-)
7
19
Reset (-)
Logic Supply +5 VDC
6
18
Activate Logic Inputs (+)
Start Command Pulse
5
17
On Tally
Stop Command Pulse
4
16
Off Tally
Logic Ground
3
15
MIC: Logic Active Tally LINE: Cue Tally
Logic Ground
2
14
Tallies Common
Logic Ground
1
13
Commands Common
device.
Pins 15 and 20 have dual logic functions. With
logic input. However, when the module is used as a
Line Input (DS1 or DS3 switches 2, 3, 4, and 5 all
set to OFF), then pin 15 is a Cue Tally output and
pin 20 is an external Cue command.
See pages 2-58 to 2-63 for examples of typical
logic connections.
(wire insertion end view)
Universal Input Module, MAIN — Simplified Logic Diagram
5 Start Command Pulse
22
Ready Input (+)
24
Ready Input (-)
21
Reset Input (-)
19
Activate Logic Inputs(+)
18
Internal Logic
4 Stop Command Pulse
Reset Input (+)
23 Start Command Sustained
13 Commands Common
15 MIC: Logic Active Tally LINE: Cue Tally
17 On Tally
On Input (-)
7
Off Input (-)
8
Cough Input (-)
9
16 Off Tally
14 Tallies Common
1 Logic Ground
MIC: Talk To C/R (-) LINE: Cue Input (-) 20
2 Logic Ground
3 Logic Ground
Notes:
Opto-Isolator inputs can handle +5 to +40 VDC logic
Opto-Isolator outputs can handle up to 60 volts or 350 mA
+5 volts
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6 Logic Supply +5VDC
10 Logic Supply +5VDC
11 Logic Supply +5VDC
12 Logic Supply +5VDC
digital
2 Installation
Universal Input Module MAIN Logic Signal Definitions
PIN NAME/NUMBER
START COMMAND PULSE
(pin 5)
STOP COMMAND PULSE
(pin 4)
START COMMAND
SUSTAINED (pin 23)
COMMANDS COMMON
(pin 13)
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION OF CONNECTION
Equivalent to a Normally Open (N/O) relay contact. A momentary “contact closure” of 220 ms is generated when
the module On button is pressed. Typically connects to the Remote Start logic input on the peripheral device.
When DS2-2 or DS4-2 is set to On, each press of the On button generates another contact closure.
Same as the Start Command Pulse, except it is initiated by the module Off button. Typically connects to the
Remote Stop or Pause logic input on the peripheral device.
Same as Start Command Pulse, except it is a maintained contact closure for as long as the module is on. Typically
connects to the Remote Start logic input on a peripheral device that cannot use a start pulse.
The Common (C) relay contact output for the three Start and Stop Command outputs. Sets whether the Start
and Stop Commands are active high (connect this pin to the logic supply voltage on the peripheral device) or
active low (connect this pin to logic ground on the peripheral device).
ACTIVATE LOGIC INPUTS (+)
(pin 18)
To enable the control inputs: On, Off, Cough, Talk/Ext Cue, tie this pin to + logic voltage (+5 to +40). When tied to
an isolated device like a mic remote panel, use the Logic Supply +5 VDC (jumper pin 18 to pin 6, 10, 11 or 12).
ON (-)
(pin 7)
When pulled low, turns the module on from off, generating a Start Pulse if DS2-3 or DS4-3 is set to On. Input is
ignored if the module is already on, unless DS2-2 or DS4-2 is set On (each press generates a Start Pulse output).
OFF (-)
(pin 8)
When pulled low, turns the module off from on, generating a Stop Pulse if DS2-3 or DS4-3 is set to On. Input is
ignored if the module is already off, unless DS2-2 or DS4-2 is set On (each press generates a Stop Pulse output).
COUGH (-) (pin 9)
TALK TO C/R or CUE (-)
(pin 20)
TALLIES
OFF TALLY (pin 16)
ON TALLY (pin 17)
LOGIC ACTIVE TALLY or
CUE TALLY (pin 15)
TALLIES COMMON
(pin 14)
When pulled low, mutes the audio from all assigned buses for as long as the Cough button is pressed.
When pulled low, and the module is set as a Mic, the input audio is muted from all output buses and only routed
to the talkback bus. When set as a Line, routes the input audio to the Cue bus while the input is low.
All Tally outputs are N/O “dry contact” type outputs. Typically used to drive indicators, the outputs can sink or
source up to 60 volts at 350 mA. The “C” or common contact for all the tallies is Tallies Common (pin 14).
This output connects to Tallies Common while the module is off when DS1-8 or DS3-8 is set to On. When
DS1-8 or DS3-8 is set to Off, then this output is controlled by the Ready logic.
This output connects to Tallies Common while the module is on.
This output connects to Tallies Common when the module is set as a Mic and the matching A or B input is
selected. When set as a Line input, the output is connected to Tallies Common while Cue is active.
The “C” relay contact for the three Tallies, it must be tied high or low to provide the return path for the Tallies.
Typically, the tally lamps are all tied to ground and Tallies Common connects to the lamp supply voltage (+5 to
+60 VDC). If the Tallies are tied to +VDC, then this pin would tie to ground.
READY (+) & (-)
RESET (+) & (-)
These complementary logic inputs require +5 to +40 VDC between the (+) input and the (-) input for activation.
This can be done by connecting an active high logic to the (+) input and grounding the (-) input, or by
supplying +5 to +40 VDC to the (+) input and an active low logic to the (-) input.
READY (+) & (-)
(pins 24 & 21)
When activated while the module is on, turns the module off without generating a stop pulse. When activated
while the module is off, it controls the Off lamp to indicate device status. Typically, no lamp indicates the
peripheral is not ready to play, a steady lamp on indicates the device is ready, and a flashing lamp indicates the
device has already played or is not yet cued up.
RESET (+) & (-)
(pins 22 & 19)
When activated while the module is on, turns the module off without generating a stop pulse. Input is ignored if
the module is already off.
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
(pins 6, 10, 11, 12)
Module logic voltage output sources that can deliver up to 300 mA of current to isolated control panels. All pins
are simply paralleled for convenience.
LOGIC GROUND
(pins 1, 2, 3)
Module logic ground. Should be connected to isolated control panels only.
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UNIVERSAL INPUT MODULE — T/B OPTION LOGIC
T/B OPTION Connector
The left logic connector has the talkback features for the A input; the right logic connector
Logic Supply +5 VDC
7
14
Logic Supply +5 VDC
Logic Ground
6
13
Logic Ground
Privacy Tally Command
5
12
Privacy Tally Common
Privacy (-)
4
11
Talk to External (-)
Talk to Studio 1 Co-Host (-)
3
10
Talk to Studio 2 Co-Host (-)
Talk to Studio 1 Host (-)
2
9
Talk to Studio 2 Host (-)
Talk to Studio 1 (-)
1
8
Talk to Studio 2 (-)
has the talkback features for the B input. Talkback is only active when the module is set as a
Microphone (a mute location is set on switches
2 thru 5 on DS1 and/or DS3).
The control logic can come from a PRE991199 Mic Panel with Five Talks, or from a custom talkback panel. Each Talk command input
(Talk to Studio 1 (-), Talk to Studio 2 (-), etc.),
when held low, routes the pre-fader, pre-switch
(wire insertion end view)
module audio to the selected talk destination.
Privacy, when active, prevents anyone from
monitoring the pre-switch audio in the console.
While Privacy (-) is pulled low, Privacy Tally
Command (pin 5) is tied to Privacy Common
(pin 12), to provide a low output for activating
a lamp or LED Privacy Active indicator.
Universal Input Module, T/B OPTION — Simplified Logic Diagram
1
Talk to Studio 1 Host (-)
2
Talk to Studio 1 Co-Host (-)
3
Talk to Studio 2 (-)
8
Talk to Studio 2 Host (-)
9
5 Privacy Tally Command
Internal Logic
Talk to Studio 1 (-)
12 Privacy Tally Common
6 Logic Ground
13 Logic Ground
7 Logic Supply +5VDC
14 Logic Supply +5VDC
Talk to Studio 2 Co-Host (-) 10
Notes:
Opto-Isolated inputs are current limited and work
with +5 to +40 VDC logic.
Talk to External (-)
11
Privacy (-)
4
Opto-Isolated outputs can sink up to 60 volts or
350 mA max. current flow.
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Universal Input Module T/B OPTION Signal Definitions
PIN NAME/NUMBER
TALK TO STUDIO 1 (-) (pin 1)
TALK TO STUDIO 1 HOST (-) (pin 2)
TALK TO STUDIO 1 CO-HOST (-) (pin 3)
PRIVACY (-) (pin 4)
PRIVACY TALLY COMMAND (pin 5)
TALK TO STUDIO 2 (-) (pin 8)
TALK TO STUDIO 2 HOST (-) (pin 9)
TALK TO STUDIO 2 CO-HOST (-) (pin 10)
TALK TO EXTERNAL (-) (pin 11)
PRIVACY TALLY COMMON (pin 12)
LOGIC GROUND (pins 6 & 13)
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC (pins 7 & 14)
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION OF CONNECTION
When pulled low, routes the module audio to the Studio 1 outputs.
When pulled low, routes the module audio to the host’s headphones in Studio 1.
When pulled low, routes the module audio to the co-host’s headphones in Studio 1.
When pulled low, prohibits the console operator from hearing the talent mic unless the channel
is turned On. Privacy applies to solo, cue, and any pre-switch assignments.
Output that goes low when Privacy is active.
When pulled low, routes the module audio to the Studio 2 outputs.
When pulled low, routes the module audio to the host’s headphones in Studio 2.
When pulled low, routes the module audio to the co-host’s headphones in Studio 2.
When pulled low, routes the module audio to the external output.
Common connection to logic ground for the Privacy Tally Command.
Module logic ground. Connects to the Talkback control panel to provide switch returns.
Module logic voltage output source that can deliver up to 300 mA of current.
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QUICK GUIDE TO THE TELCO / CODEC MODULE
Three connectors come standard on the optional Telco module: one 6-pin analog audio input connector, one 3-pin digital audio input connector, and one 24-pin logic connector. The connectors are hidden
by the meter panel in normal operation.
AUDIO INPUTS
ANAL
OG INPUT — The 6-pin analog input accepts line level stereo or
ANALOG
mono signals. When a mono signal is connected, parallel the signal to the
left and right input pins.
Analog Inputs - Stereo
Left High (+)
3
6
Right High (+)
Left Low (-)
2
5
Right Low (-)
Shield
1
4
Shield
(wire insertion end view)
Analog Inputs - Mono
High (+)
3
6
High (+)
Low (-)
2
5
Low (-)
Shield
1
4
Shield
(wire insertion end view)
DIGIT
A L I N P U T — The 3-pin digital input accepts AES-3
TA
(AES/EBU) or S/PDIF signals (when the circuit shown on page 2-11 is used).
Digital Inputs
High (+)
3
Low (-)
2
Shield
1
(wire insertion end view)
LOGIC
LOGIC I/O — The 24-pin logic connector allows control of the connected
device by the module, or external control of the module by the device. When
the device connects to the module through a switcher (router or External
RLS), source selection addressing is output from this connector. The source
(analog or digital input), whether a switcher is used and other logic selections
are configured by the SETUP DIP switches (see Switch Definitions, page 225). For additional module information, see pages 2-26 and 2-27.
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TELCO / CODEC MODULE SWITCHES
SETUP
DS1 / DS2 — These 16 DIP switches set logic functionality for the module, per the Telco/Codec
Module Switch Definitions table below.
DS1
Telco / Codec Module Switch Definitions
#
Switch Name
ON Function (set to the operator’s left)
OFF Function (set to the operator's right)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Set Telco ID
Set Telco ID
Set Telco ID
Set Telco ID
Set Telco ID
Set Telco ID
Signal Source
Timer Reset
On (sets the module as Telco / Codec #1) 1
On (sets the module as Telco / Codec #2) 1
On (sets the module as Telco / Codec #3) 1
On (sets the module as Telco / Codec #4) 1
On (sets the module as Telco / Codec #5) 1
On (sets the module as Telco / Codec #6) 1
Digital Input
Resets timer at module on
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Analog Input
No timer reset
Local (Off lamp follows module on/off status)
Fader movement, from full off, turns
module on; to full off, turns module off.
Bypasses the internal SRC (use only
when the console and all the audio
sources are locked to an external reference) 2
Switcher (VistaMax or External RLS is used)
VistaMax (see Appdx. A about other routers)
Pre-fader with module off (only when
Session module switch 6 is set for Pre-Fader)
See DS2 table below
See DS2 table below
Ready (External device controls lamp)
Fader movement does not affect
module on/off
Uses internal SRC (normal setting)
1 Off Lamp Control
2 Fader Start/Stop
DS2
3 Sample Rate
Converter (SRC)
4 Source Type
5 Switcher Type
6 O/L & Record Source
7 Input Level
8 Input Level
Direct (device plugs into module)
External RLS (PRE99-947)
Post-fader regardless of module on/off
See DS2 table below
See DS2 table below
DS2 — Switches 7 and 8
These switches are used together to set the nominal input level. The factory default is both OFF.
7
Off
Off
On
On
8
Off
On
Off
On
Analog 3
+4 dBu
+6 dBu
+8 dBu
-10 dBV
Digital 4
0 dB
-6 dB
-12 dB
-18 dB
1
Caution: Set only one of these six DIP switches to ON. This setting identifies the module, affecting signal routing and
module controls. Each Telco module in the console MUST have a unique ID setting.
2
Refer to page 2-11, Digital Clock Reference for details.
3
The nominal analog input to achieve -20 FSD (equal to a +4 dBu output), with the fader set to the red reference line.
4
The amount of gain reduction applied to the digital input.
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TELCO / CODEC MODULE — LOGIC I/O
LOGIC I/O Connector
The 24-pin LOGIC I/O connector allows the
module to control, or be controlled by, the device
attached to the module.
Logic Supply +5 VDC
12 24
Ready (+)
Logic Supply +5 VDC
11 23
Start Command Sustained / RLS-3
Logic Supply +5 VDC
10 22
Reset (+)
A device can connect directly to the module or it
can connect through a switcher. Two types of switchers are supported: VistaMax and the PRE99-947
no connection
9
21
Ready (-)
External Remote Line Selector (Ext. RLS). The
Off (-)
8
20
no connection
source (switcher or direct) and the switcher type
On (-)
7
19
Reset (-)
Logic Supply +5 VDC
6
18
Activate Logic Inputs (+)
When the module connects to an Ext. RLS, sev-
Start Command Pulse
5
17
On Tally / RLS-2
eral logic connections (pins 15, 16, 17 and 23) be-
Stop Command Pulse
4
16
Off Tally / RLS-1
come RLS address outputs. This change occurs only
Logic Ground
3
15
Logic Active Tally / RLS-0
Logic Ground
2
14
Tallies/ RLS-0, -1, -2 Common
Logic Ground
1
13
Commands/ RLS-3 Common
(VistaMax or Ext. RLS) are set via DIP switches
DS2-4 and DS2-5.
when DS2-4 is set ON and DS2-5 is set to OFF.
When a VistaMax or other router is used (DS2-5 is
set ON), these pins do not change function since
addressing is done through the Session module.
(wire insertion end view)
Telco / Codec Module, Logic I/O — Simplified Logic Diagram
Reset (+)
22
Ready (+)
24
Ready (-)
21
Reset (-)
19
5 Start Command Pulse
4 Stop Command Pulse
23
Activate Logic Inputs (+) 18
Direct / Router: Start Command Sustained
Ext. RLS Switcher: RLS-3
On (-)
7
Off (-)
8
Logic Ground
Logic Ground
Logic Ground
Logic Supply +5VDC
Logic Supply +5VDC
Logic Supply +5VDC
Logic Supply +5VDC
Internal Logic
13 Commands Common / RLS-3 Common
1
2
3
6
10
11
12
15
Direct / Router: Logic Active Tally
Ext. RLS Switcher: RLS-0
17
Direct / Router: On Tally
Ext. RLS Switcher: RLS-2
16
Direct / Router: Off Tally
Ext. RLS Switcher: RLS-1
14 Tallies Common / RLS-0, -1, -2 Common
Notes:
Opto-Isolated inputs are current limited and work with +5 to +40 VDC logic.
Opto-Isolated outputs can sink up to 60 volts or 350 mA max. current flow.
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Telco / Codec Module LOGIC I/O Logic Signal Definitions
PIN NAME/NUMBER
START COMMAND PULSE
(pin 5)
STOP COMMAND PULSE
(pin 4)
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION OF CONNECTION
Equivalent to a Normally Open (N/O) relay contact. A momentary “contact closure” of 220 ms is generated each
time the module turns on from off. Typically connects to the Remote On logic input on the peripheral device.
Same as the Start Command Pulse, except it is initiated by the module Off button. Typically connects to the
Remote Stop or Off logic input on the peripheral device.
START COMMAND
SUSTAINED / RLS-3
(pin 23)
Direct: Same as Start Command Pulse, except it is a maintained contact closure for as long as the module is on.
Typically connects to the Remote On logic input on a peripheral device that cannot use a start pulse.
Ext. RLS: Outputs addressing bit 3.
COMMANDS / RLS-3
COMMON
(pin 13)
The Common (C) relay contact output for the three Start and Stop Command outputs. Sets whether the Start
and Stop Commands are active high (connect this pin to the logic supply voltage on the peripheral device) or
active low (connect this pin to logic ground on the peripheral device).
ACTIVATE LOGIC INPUTS (+)
(pin 18)
To enable the control inputs: On, Off, tie this pin to + logic voltage (+5 to +40). When tied to an isolated device
like a remote panel, use the Logic Supply +5 VDC (jumper pin 18 to pin 6, 10, 11 or 12).
ON (-) (pin 7)
When pulled low, turns the module on. Input is ignored if the module is already on.
OFF (-) (pin 8)
When pulled low, turns the module off. Input is ignored if the module is already off.
TALLIES
OFF TALLY / RLS-1
(pin 16)
ON TALLY / RLS-2 (pin 17)
LOGIC ACTIVE TALLY / RLS-0
(pin 15)
TALLIES / RLS-0, -1, -2
COMMON
(pin 14)
All Tally outputs are N/O “dry contact” type outputs. Typically used to drive indicators, the outputs can sink or
source up to 60 volts at 350 mA. The “C” or common contact for all the tallies is Tallies Common (pin 14).
Direct: This output connects to Tallies Common while the module is off. When DS2-1 is set OFF, then this output
is controlled by the Ready logic. Ext. RLS: Outputs addressing bit 1.
Direct: This output connects to Tallies Common while the module is on. Ext. RLS: Outputs addressing bit 2.
Direct: This output connects to Tallies Common when module is powered up.
Ext. RLS: Outputs addressing bit 0.
The “C” relay contact for the three Tallies, it must be tied high or low to provide the return path for the Tallies.
Typically, the tally lamps are all tied to ground and Tallies Common connects to the lamp supply voltage (+5 to
+60 VDC). If the Tallies are tied to +VDC, then this pin would tie to ground.
READY (+) & (-)
RESET (+) & (-)
These complementary logic inputs require +5 to +40 VDC between the (+) input and the (-) input for activation.
This can be done by connecting an active high logic to the (+) input and grounding the (-) input, or by
supplying +5 to +40 VDC to the (+) input and an active low logic to the (-) input.
READY (+) & (-)
(pins 24 & 21)
When activated while the module is on, turns the module off without generating a stop pulse. When activated
while the module is off, it controls the Off lamp to indicate device status. Typically, no lamp indicates the
peripheral is not ready to play, a steady lamp on indicates the device is ready, and a flashing lamp indicates the
device has already played or is not yet cued up.
RESET (+) & (-)
(pins 22 & 19)
When activated while the module is on, turns the module off without generating a stop pulse. Input is ignored if
the module is already off.
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
(pins 6, 10, 11, 12)
Module logic voltage output sources that can deliver up to 300 mA of current to isolated control panels. All pins
are simply paralleled for convenience.
LOGIC GROUND
(pins 1, 2, 3)
Module logic ground. Should be connected to isolated control panels only.
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QUICK GUIDE TO THE REMOTE LINE SELECTOR (RLS) MODULE
Three connectors come standard on the optional Remote Line Selector (RLS) module: one 6-pin
analog audio input connector, one 3-pin digital audio input connector, and one 24-pin logic connector.
The connectors are hidden by the meter panel in normal operation.
AUDIO INPUTS
ANAL
OG INPUT — The 6-pin analog input accepts stereo signals or
ANALOG
mono signals. When a mono input is used, parallel the signal to the left
and right inputs.
Analog Inputs - Stereo
Left High (+)
3
6
Right High (+)
Left Low (-)
2
5
Right Low (-)
Shield
1
4
Shield
(wire insertion end view)
Analog Inputs - Mono
High (+)
3
6
High (+)
Low (-)
2
5
Low (-)
Shield
1
4
Shield
(wire insertion end view)
DIGIT
A L I N P U T — The 3-pin digital input accepts AES-3
TA
(AES/EBU) or S/PDIF signals (when the circuit shown on page 2-11 is used).
Digital Inputs
High (+)
3
Low (-)
2
Shield
1
(wire insertion end view)
LOGIC
LOGIC I/O — The 24-pin logic connector controls the device connected
to the module. Devices typically connect through a switcher (an External
RLS under module control or a router), although a device can connect
directly to the module as well. The source type and switcher type are
configured via the module’s SETUP DIP switches (settings listed on page 229). Logic connections vary depending on the type of device connection.
For more information, see pages 2-30 and 2-31.
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REMOTE LINE SELECTOR (RLS) MODULE SWITCHES
SETUP
S etup — These eight DIP switches set logic functionality for the module per the Switch
Definitions table below.
Remote Line Selector (RLS) Module Switch Definitions
#
Switch Name
1 Signal Source
2 Timer Reset
3 Bypass Sample Rate
Converter (SRC)
4
5
6
7
8
Source Type
Switcher Type
Spare Switch
Input Level Set
Input Level Set
ON Function (set to operator’s left)
OFF Function (set to operator's right)
Digital
Resets timer at module on
Bypasses internal SRC (use only when
the console and all the audio sources
are locked to an external reference) 1
Switcher (VistaMax or External RLS)
VistaMax (see Appdx. A about other routers)
Analog
No timer reset
Uses internal SRC (normal setting)
See table below
See table below
See table below
See table below
Direct
External RLS (PRE99-947)
SETUP — Switches 7 and 8
These switches are used together to set the nominal reference level for the inputs. The factory default
settings are both OFF.
1
2
3
7
8
Analog 2
Digital 3
Off
Off
On
On
Off
On
Off
On
+4 dBu
+6 dBu
+8 dBu
-10 dBV
0 dB
-6 dB
-12 dB
-18 dB
Refer to page 2-11, Digital Clock Reference for details.
The nominal analog input to achieve -20 FSD (equal to a +4 dBu output), with the fader set to the red reference line.
The amount of gain reduction applied to the digital input.
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REMOTE LINE SELECTOR MODULE — LOGIC I/O
LOGIC I/O Connector
The 24-pin LOGIC I/O connector allows the RLS
module to control, or to be controlled by, the device
connected to the module. A device can connect di-
Logic Supply +5 VDC
12 24
Ready (+)
Logic Supply +5 VDC
11 23
Start Command Sustained / RLS-3
Logic Supply +5 VDC
10 22
Reset (+)
rectly to the module, but more commonly input selection would be done through a switcher. Two types
of switchers are supported:VistaMax (or other rout-
no connection
9
21
Ready (-)
ers) and the PRE99-947 External Remote Line Se-
Off (-)
8
20
no connection
lector (Ext. RLS).
On (-)
7
19
Reset (-)
Logic Supply +5 VDC
6
18
Activate Logic Inputs (+)
the module’s SETUP DIP switches (see page 2-29).
Start Command Pulse
5
17
On Tally / RLS-2
When the module connects to an Ext. RLS, sev-
Stop Command Pulse
4
16
Off Tally / RLS-1
eral logic connections (pins 15, 16, 17 and 23) be-
Logic Ground
3
15
Logic Active Tally / RLS-0
Logic Ground
2
14
Tallies / RLS-0, RLS-1, RLS-2 Common
Logic Ground
1
13
Commands / RLS-3 Common
The source type (switcher or direct) and the
switcher type (VistaMax or Ext. RLS) are set via
come RLS address outputs. This change occurs only
when DS2-4 is set ON and DS2-5 is set to OFF.
When a VistaMax or other router is used (DS2-5 is
set ON), these pins do not change function since
(wire insertion end view)
addressing is done through the Session module.
Remote Line Selector (RLS) Module, LOGIC I/O — Simplified Logic Diagram
Reset (+)
22
Ready (+)
24
5 Start Command Pulse
4 Stop Command Pulse
Ready (-)
21
Reset (-)
19
23
Activate Logic Inputs (+) 18
Direct / Router: Start Command Sustained
Ext. RLS Switcher: RLS-3
On (-)
7
Off (-)
8
Logic Ground
Logic Ground
Logic Ground
1
2
3
Logic Supply +5VDC
Logic Supply +5VDC
Logic Supply +5VDC
Logic Supply +5VDC
Internal Logic
13 Commands Common / RLS-3 Common
6
10
11
12
15
Direct / Router: Logic Active Tally
Ext. RLS Switcher: RLS-0
17
Direct / Router: On Tally
Ext. RLS Switcher: RLS-2
16
Direct / Router: Off Tally
Ext. RLS Switcher: RLS-1
14 Tallies Common / RLS-0, -1, -2 Common
Notes:
Opto-Isolated inputs are current limited and work with +5 to +40 VDC logic.
Opto-Isolated outputs can sink up to 60 volts or 350 mA max. current flow.
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RLS Module LOGIC I/O Logic Signal Definitions
PIN NAME/NUMBER
START COMMAND PULSE
(pin 5)
STOP COMMAND PULSE
(pin 4)
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION OF CONNECTION
Equivalent to a Normally Open (N/O) relay contact. A momentary “contact closure” of 220 ms is generated each
time the module turns on from off. Typically connects to the Remote On logic input on the peripheral device.
Same as the Start Command Pulse, except it is initiated by the module Off button. Typically connects to the
Remote Stop or Off logic input on the peripheral device.
START COMMAND
SUSTAINED / RLS-3
(pin 23)
Direct: Same as Start Command Pulse, except it is a maintained contact closure for as long as the module is on.
Typically connects to the Remote On logic input on a peripheral device that cannot use a start pulse.
Ext. RLS: Outputs addressing bit 3.
COMMANDS / RLS-3
COMMON
(pin 13)
The Common (C) relay contact output for the three Start and Stop Command outputs. Sets whether the Start
and Stop Commands are active high (connect this pin to the logic supply voltage on the peripheral device) or
active low (connect this pin to logic ground on the peripheral device).
ACTIVATE LOGIC INPUTS (+)
(pin 18)
To enable the control inputs: On, Off, Cough, Talk to C/R, tie this pin to + logic voltage (+5 to +40). When tied to
an isolated device like a remote panel, use the Logic Supply +5 VDC (jumper pin 18 to pin 6, 10, 11 or 12).
ON (-) (pin 7)
When pulled low, turns the module on, generating a Start Pulse. Input is ignored if the module is already on.
OFF (-) (pin 8)
When pulled low, turns the module off, generating a Stop Pulse. Input is ignored if the module is already off.
TALLIES
All Tally outputs are N/O “dry contact” type outputs. Typically used to drive indicators, the outputs can sink or
source up to 60 volts at 350 mA. The “C” or common contact for all the tallies is Tallies Common (pin 14).
OFF TALLY / RLS-1
(pin 16)
ON TALLY / RLS-2 (pin 17)
LOGIC ACTIVE TALLY / RLS-0
(pin 15)
TALLIES / RLS-0, -1, -2
COMMON
(pin 14)
Direct: This output connects to Tallies Common while the module is off. When DS2-1 is set OFF, then this output
is controlled by the Ready logic. Ext. RLS: Outputs addressing bit 1.
Direct: This output connects to Tallies Common while the module is on. Ext. RLS: Outputs addressing bit 2.
Direct: This output connects to Tallies Common when module is powered up.
Ext. RLS: Outputs addressing bit 0.
The “C” relay contact for the three Tallies, it must be tied high or low to provide the return path for the Tallies.
Typically, the tally lamps are all tied to ground and Tallies Common connects to the lamp supply voltage (+5 to
+60 VDC). If the Tallies are tied to +VDC, then this pin would tie to ground.
READY (+) & (-)
RESET (+) & (-)
These complementary logic inputs require +5 to +40 VDC between the (+) input and the (-) input for activation.
This can be done by connecting an active high logic to the (+) input and grounding the (-) input, or by
supplying +5 to +40 VDC to the (+) input and an active low logic to the (-) input.
READY (+) & (-)
(pins 24 & 21)
When activated while the module is on, turns the module off without generating a stop pulse. When activated
while the module is off, it controls the Off lamp to indicate device status. Typically, no lamp indicates the
peripheral is not ready to play, a steady lamp on indicates the device is ready, and a flashing lamp indicates the
device has already played or is not yet cued up.
RESET (+) & (-)
(pins 22 & 19)
When activated while the module is on, turns the module off without generating a stop pulse. Input is ignored if
the module is already off.
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
(pins 6, 10, 11, 12)
Module logic voltage output sources that can deliver up to 300 mA of current to isolated control panels. All pins
are simply paralleled for convenience.
LOGIC GROUND
(pins 1, 2, 3)
Module logic ground. Should be connected to isolated control panels only.
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QUICK GUIDE TO THE SESSION MODULE
Four user connectors come standard on the Session module: one 10base-T connector (DATA) and
three 3-pin EXT. TIMER connectors. There are also three meter panel connectors, which are factory
connected. All connectors are hidden by the meter panel in normal operation.
INPUTS/OUTPUTS
DA
TA — Connect a standard CAT-5 cable to this 10base-T connector to
DAT
tie the BMXdigital Server into a Local Area Network (LAN). See Chapter 4 for
more information on configuring and using the BMXdigital Server.
LOGIC OUTPUTS
EX
T TIMER — Three 3-pin External Timer connectors are available to
EXT
reset external event timers. For more information, see page 2-33.
TO METER PANEL
LEGENDS — Factory harnessed connector that outputs the alphanumeric
meter names.
METERS — Factory harnessed connector that outputs the meter level
data.
TIMER / TB MIC — Factory harnessed connector that has the audio
from the meter panel-mounted talkback microphone and the timer control
signals from the Session module Start, Stop, Reset, and Hold buttons.
RESET (SEE MANUAL)
RESET — This switch resets all operational parameters on all modules.
Typically, this switch is only used for test or servicing purposes and has
no normal operational use since this switch does not reset the DSP cards nor
the BMXdigital Server–it only resets the input module operational
parameters.
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SESSION MODULE SWITCHES
SETUP
SETUP — These eight DIP switches affect logic settings for the meters and for the entire console per
the Session Module Switch Definitions table below.
Session Module Switch Definitions
Console-wide Settings Meters
#
Switch Name
ON Function (set to operator’s left)
1 Meter Display Mode
2 Auxiliary Meter
Display Priority
3 Channel On Cancels
Cue or Solo
4 Cue Lamp Control
5 Solo function latch
6 Off-Line buses
signal source
7 PGM/UTL 1- 4 function
8 Spare Switch
OFF Function (set to operator’s right)
Average only
Average and peak
Cue is displayed (when both Cue
Solo is displayed (when both Cue
and Solo are selected)
and Solo are selected)
Cue and Solo are canceled when
Cue and Solo are not affected by
channel is turned on
channel on
Cue indicators blink when Cue is on
Cue indicators are solid when Cue is on
Solo buttons are latched (alternate action)
Solo buttons are momentary
All modules Post-fader, but Pre-Switch
Universal/RLS, Pre-fader and Pre-Switch *
* See page 2-25 about an additional Telco module switch that affects their Off-Line source.
BMXd-8 sequential meter source selection
Meter switching for all other frame sizes
SESSION MODULE — EXTERNAL TIMER
These connectors reset up to three external timers (like the timer
in the PRE99-1211 Turret Clock & Timer). They operate indepen-
Session Module, External Timer Reset —
Simplified Logic Diagram
dently of the Session module timer buttons. The two active pins
+3.3VDC
2 Auto Reset Command
(pins 2 and 3) momentarily short together when a reset command
EXT TIMER 1
3 Auto Reset Common
Internal Logic
is issued by turning on a module that is set to reset the timer.
EXT TIMER 1, 2, 3 Connectors
3
Auto Reset Common
2
Auto Reset Command
1
no connection
EXT TIMER 2
3 Auto Reset Common
2 Auto Reset Command
EXT TIMER 3
3 Auto Reset Common
(wire insertion end view)
Notes:
There are no connections to pin 1.
Opto-Isolated outputs can sink up to 60 volts or
350 mA max. current flow.
Session Module EXT TIMER Logic Signal Definitions
PIN NAME/NUMBER
2 Auto Reset Command
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION OF CONNECTION
AUTO RESET COMMAND
(pin 2)
Equivalent to a Normally Open (N/O) relay contact. A momentary “contact closure” of 220 ms (to the Auto Reset
Common pin) is generated each time a module is turned on that has the Timer Reset Command active (DS1-7 or
DS3-7 is set ON). Connect this pin to J4-4 on the PRE99-1211 timer.
AUTO RESET COMMON
(pin 3)
The Common (C) relay contact for the Auto Reset Command. Tie this pin to the Timer’s logic ground pin when an
active low logic is required or tie it to the Timer’s Logic Voltage when an active high logic is required. Connect
this pin to J4-3 on the PRE99-1211 timer.
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CONTROL ROOM MODULE CONNECTORS
Thirteen connectors come standard on each Control Room module: five 6-pin analog audio input
connectors, six 6-pin analog audio output connectors, one 14-pin logic connector, and one 8-pin logic
connector. The connectors are hidden by the meter panel in normal operation.
AUDIO INPUTS
EX
T-1, EX
T-2, EX
T-3, EX
T-4, CUE IN — These 6-pin analog inputs
EXT-1,
EXT-2,
EXT-3,
EXT-4,
accept stereo or mono signals from external monitor sources such as offair tuners, a synthetic air monitor, VistaMax monitor output, etc. When a
mono source is connected, parallel the signal to the left and right inputs.
Analog Inputs / Outputs - Stereo
Left High (+)
3
6
Right High (+)
Left Low (-)
2
5
Right Low (-)
Shield
1
4
Shield
(wire insertion end view)
Analog Inputs - Mono
High (+)
3
6
High (+)
Low (-)
2
5
Low (-)
Shield
1
4
Shield
(wire insertion end view)
AUDIO OUTPUTS
MONIT
OR, OPER
AT OR, CO-HOST
AC K
MONITOR,
OPERA
CO-HOST,, GUEST
GUEST,, CUE
CUE,, TALKB
TALKBA
— The 6-pin analog outputs for the control room monitor speaker amplifier
(Monitor); three outputs for the headphone amplifiers for the board operator
(Operator), co-host or host (Co-host) and for one or more guests (Guest); a
Cue amplifier feed (Cue); and a separate Talk to Control Room output
(Talkback) for a powered Talkback monitor speaker or amplifier.
LOGIC I/O
LOGIC — This 14-pin connector has four “relay” outputs (Control Room
warning, mute, dim, and talkback) and two remote inputs (Dim and
Mute). See pages 2-36 and 2-37 for details on these signals.
CUE CNTL — This 8-pin connector has an external cue control input
See page 2-38 for details on this signal.
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CONTROL ROOM MODULE SWITCHES
SETUP
SETUP — These eight DIP switches affect logic functionality for the module per the Control Room
Module Switch Definitions below.
Control Room Module Switch Definitions
#
Switch Name
1 Headphone AutoCue
functions (when active)
2 Talkback to Co-Host
Headphones
3 Talkback to Cue
4 Dim Monitors when
Receiving Talkback
5 Auto-switch External
Inputs 1 & 2 1
6 Auto-switch External
Inputs 3 & 4 2
ON Function (set to operator’s left)
OFF Function (set to operator's right)
Cue is summed to the left channel, monitor
is summed to the right channel
Adds talkback to the co-host’s headphones
Cue feeds both headphone channels
(Cue in stereo), monitor is muted
Does not add talkback to the co-host’s
headphones
Talkback audio does not go to Cue
Monitors do not dim when receiving
talkback
No automatic monitor source switching
with a hot mic in the Control Room
Adds talkback audio to the Cue output
Monitors dim by 12 dB when receiving
talkback
Automatic switching from External
Input 1 to Input 2 while there is a hot mic
in the Control Room
Automatic switching from External
Input 3 to Input 4 while there is a hot mic
in the Control Room
No automatic monitor source switching
with a hot mic in the Control Room
7 Spare Switch
8 Spare Switch
1
When set to ON, the monitor source automatically switches between External Input 1 (which typically has the
off-air monitor, with delay) and External Input 2 (which has a synthetic air signal with little or no delay). When
External 1 is selected as the monitor source, and a Control Room mic module is turned on, the monitor source
automatically changes to External Input 2. When all Control Room mic modules are off, then External Input 1 is
automatically selected.
2
When set to ON, the monitor source automatically switches between External Input 3 (which would be the off-air
monitor, with delay), and External Input 4 (which has a synthetic air signal with little or no delay). When External 3
is selected as the monitor source, and a Control Room mic module is turned on, the monitor source automatically
changes to External Input 4. When all Control Room mic modules are off, then External Input 3 is automatically
selected.
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CONTROL ROOM MODULE — LOGIC
LOGIC Connector
The 14-pin LOGIC connector has the hot mic
warning output (Warning Relay) for a control
Logic Supply +5 VDC
7 14
Activate Logic Inputs (+)
Logic Supply +5 VDC
6 13
Talkback Tally
Warning Relay
5 12
Dim Tally
The two Warning Relay outputs short to-
Warning Relay
4 11
Mute Tally
gether when a control room mic is on. They can
Logic Ground
3 10
Tallies Common
Logic Ground
2
9
Dim (-)
Logic Ground
1
8
Mute (-)
room warning lamp interface, two remote inputs; Mute (-) and Dim (-), and various tally
outputs (Mute, Dim and Talkback Tally).
be used as two “dry contacts” or one can be jumpered to + voltage to present a high logic, or to
ground to present a low logic (on isolated
(wire insertion end view)
ground devices, these can come from the Logic
Supply +5 VDC or Logic Ground on the connector).
Note: The warning relay and control room
mute functions are only activated by modules
set as control room microphones (DS1/DS3,
switch 2 is On) and that are assigned to at least
one PGM or UTL bus.
Control Room Module, LOGIC — Simplified Logic Diagram
4 Warning Relay
5 Warning Relay
12 Dim Tally
Activate Logic Inputs (+) 14
Mute Input (-)
8
Dim Input (-)
9
Internal Logic
11 Mute Tally
13 Talkback Tally
10 Tallies Common
Notes:
Opto-Isolated inputs are current limited and work
with +5 to +40 VDC logic.
1 Logic Ground
2 Logic Ground
3 Logic Ground
Opto-Isolated outputs can sink up to 60 volts or
350 mA max. current flow.
7 Logic Supply +5VDC
6 Logic Supply +5VDC
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Control Room Module, LOGIC, Logic Signal Definitions
PIN NAME/NUMBER
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION OF CONNECTION
WARNING RELAY
(pins 4 and 5)
A pair of Normally Open (N/O) relay contacts. The two contacts maintain a “contact closure” while a Control
Room mic module (with DS1-2 or DS3-2 set to ON) is turned on. The two pins can be used as a “dry contact”
output, or one can be connected to the Warning Lamp control input while the other is tied to ground (to
generate an active low logic output) or to + logic voltage (to generate an active high logic output).
MUTE TALLY (pin 11)
This Normally Open (N/O) contact connects to Tallies Common while the control room speakers are muted.
DIM TALLY (pin 12)
TALKBACK TALLY (pin 13)
TALLIES COMMON (pin 10)
ACTIVATE LOGIC INPUTS (+)
(pin 14)
MUTE (-) (pin 8)
DIM (-) (pin 9)
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
(pins 6 and 7)
LOGIC GROUND
(pins 1, 2, 3)
This Normally Open (N/O) contact connects to Tallies Common while the control room speakers are
dimmed.
This Normally Open (N/O) contact connects to Tallies Common while Talkback is received by the Control
Room.
This pin must be tied high or low to provide the return path for the various Tally outputs. Typically, the tally
lamps (or external relays) are all tied to ground and Tallies Common is the source for the lamp / relay supply
voltage (+5 to +60 VDC). If the Tallies / relays are tied to +VDC, then this pin ties to ground.
To enable the control inputs: Mute and Dim, tie this pin to + logic voltage (+5 to +40). When tied to an
isolated device like a remote panel, use the Logic Supply +5 VDC (jumper pin 14 to pin 6 or 7).
When pulled low, mutes the Control Room monitors.
When pulled low, dims the Control Room monitors by 12 dB.
Module logic voltage output sources that can deliver up to 300 mA of current to isolated control panels.
The pins are simply paralleled for convenience.
Module logic ground. Should be connected to isolated control panels only.
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CONTROL ROOM MODULE — CUE CONTROL LOGIC
CUE CNTRL Connector
The 8-pin CUE CNTRL connector has the External Cue on/off logic. Only four pins (1 - 4)
Logic Supply +5 VDC
4
8
no connection
Cue (+)
3
7
no connection
Supply +5 VDC and the Cue (-) and Logic
Cue (-)
2
6
no connection
Ground go to an External Cue switch (main-
Logic Ground
1
5
no connection
are used on this connector.
Typically the Cue (+) pin is jumpered to Logic
tained SPST). The logic connector is hidden by
(wire insertion end view)
the meter panel in normal operation.
Control Room Module, CUE CNTRL — Simplified Logic Diagram
Cue Input (-)
3
2
Notes:
Opto-Isolated inputs are current
limited and work with +5 to +40 VDC
logic.
Internal Logic
Cue Input (+)
4 +5 VDC Supply
1 Logic Ground
Control Room Module, CUE CNTRL , Logic Signal Definitions
PIN NAME/NUMBER
CUE (+)
(pin 3)
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION OF CONNECTION
Tie this input to +5 to +40 VDC to use the Cue (-) input as the External Cue trigger. Conversely, when the Cue
(-) input is tied to ground, then this input requires a high logic voltage (+5 to +40 VDC) to add the External
Cue audio to the Cue bus.
CUE (-)
(pin 2)
When this input is tied to ground, then the Cue (+) input requires +5 to +40 VDC to activate External Cue.
Conversely, when Cue (+) is tied to +V (+5 to +40 VDC), then a low logic input to this pin adds the External
Cue audio to the Cue bus.
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
(pin 4)
Module logic voltage output source that can deliver up to 300 mA of current to an isolated control panel.
LOGIC GROUND
(pin 1)
Module logic ground. Should be connected to an isolated panel only.
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QUICK GUIDE TO THE STUDIO MODULE
Twelve connectors come standard on the Studio module: eight 6-pin analog audio output connectors
(four for each studio), two 14-pin main logic connectors (one for each studio), and two 16-pin logic
connectors (one for a Producer’s talkback and one for an External location talkback). The connectors
are hidden by the meter panel in normal operation.
AUDIO OUTPUTS
MONIT
OR — The 6-pin analog outputs for the monitor speaker
MONITOR
amplifiers in Studio 1 and Studio 2. The outputs are wired using the standard
pinout sequence.
O-HOST
CO-HOST
O-HOST,, GUEST — The 6-pin analog outputs for the
HOST,, C
HOST
headphone amplifiers for a host, co-host, and the guests in Studio 1 and
Studio 2. The outputs are wired using the standard pinout sequence.
Analog Outputs
Left High (+)
3
6
Right High (+)
Left Low (-)
2
5
Right Low (-)
Shield
1
4
Shield
(wire insertion end view)
LOGIC I/O
LOGIC 1, LLOGIC
OGIC 2 — The two 14-pin Main logic connectors have
dimming, muting, and warning light commands for the two studios. For
more information, see pages 2-42 and 2-43.
PR
ODUCER — The 16-pin Producer connector has the producer’s
RODUCER
talkback audio and logic inputs and Tally outputs. For additional
information, see pages 2-44 and 2-45.
EX
TERNAL — The 16-pin External connector has the external location’s
EXTERNAL
talkback audio and logic inputs and Tally outputs. For additional
information, see pages 2-46 to 2-49.
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STUDIO MODULE SWITCHES AND MIC TRIMS
SETUP
SETUP — These eight DIP switches set logic functionality for Studio outputs per the Studio Module
Switch Definitions table below.
MIC TRIM
CONSOLE
ODUCER, EX
TERNAL — These three trimpots set the talkback levels for the
ONSOLE,, PR
PRODUCER,
EXTERNAL
console mic, the producer’s mic, and the external location’s mic.
Studio Module Switch Definitions
#
Switch Name
1 Studio 1: Auto-switch
External Inputs 1 & 2 1
2 Studio 1: Auto-switch
External Inputs 3 & 4 2
3 Studio 2: Auto-switch
External Inputs 1 & 2 1
4 Studio 2: Auto-switch
External Inputs 3 & 4 2
5 Studio 1: Co-host
receives talkback
only
6 Studio 2: Co-host
receives talkback
only
7 External mute/dim
output enable
ON Function (set to operator’s left)
OFF Function (set to operator's right)
Automatic switching from External
Input 1 to Input 2 while there is a hot mic
in Studio 1
Automatic switching from External
Input 3 to Input 4 while there is a hot mic
in Studio 1
Automatic switching from External
Input 1 to Input 2 while there is a hot mic
in Studio 2
Automatic switching from External
Input 3 to Input 4 while there is a hot mic
in Studio 1
Allows co-host in Studio 1 to receive
talkback only and disables selector
audio
Allows co-host in Studio 2 to receive
talkback only and disables selector
audio
Pins 4 and 5 are logic outputs: pin 4
is an External Mute Command and
pin 5 is External Dim Command.
No automatic monitor source switching
with a hot mic in Studio 1
No automatic monitor source switching
with a hot mic in Studio 1
No automatic monitor source switching
with a hot mic in Studio 2
No automatic monitor source switching
with a hot mic in Studio 2
Selector audio is enabled
Selector audio is enabled
Pins 4 and 5 are logic inputs: pin 4 is Talk to
Studio 1 (-) and pin 5 is Talk to Studio 1
Host (-)
8 Spare Switch
1
When set to ON, the monitor source automatically switches between External Input 1 (which typically has the
off-air monitor, with delay) and External Input 2 (which has a synthetic air signal with little or no delay). When
External 1 is selected as the monitor source, and a Control Room mic module is turned on, the monitor source
automatically changes to External Input 2. When all Control Room mic modules are off, then External Input 1 is
automatically selected.
2
When set to ON, the monitor source automatically switches between External Input 3 (which would be the off-air
monitor, with delay), and External Input 4 (which has a synthetic air signal with little or no delay). When External 3
is selected as the monitor source, and a Control Room mic module is turned on, the monitor source automatically
changes to External Input 4. When all Control Room mic modules are off, then External Input 3 is automatically
selected.
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STUDIO MODULE — STUDIO 1 & 2 LOGIC SCHEMATIC AND DESCRIPTION
The two 14-pin Logic connectors (one for
LOGIC Connectors
each Studio) control the warning, mute, and dim
functions of the module. The logic connectors
are hidden under the meter panel in normal
Logic Supply +5 VDC
7
14
Activate Logic Inputs (+)
Logic Supply +5 VDC
6
13
Talk to Co-Host Tally
Warning Relay
5
12
Dim Tally
Warning Relay
4
11
Mute Tally
Logic Ground
3
10
Tallies Common
Logic Ground
2
9
Dim Studio (-)
Logic Ground
1
8
Mute Studio (-)
operation.
(wire insertion end view)
Studio Module, Studio 1 & 2 — Simplified Logic Schematic
4 Warning Relay
5 Warning Relay
12 Dim Studio Tally
Activate Logic Inputs (+) 14
8
Dim Studio (-)
9
Internal Logic
Mute Studio (-)
11 Mute Studio Tally
13 Talk to Co-Host Tally
10 Tallies Common
Notes:
Opto-Isolated inputs are current limited and work
with +5 to +40 VDC logic.
1 Logic Ground
2 Logic Ground
3 Logic Ground
Opto-Isolated outputs can sink up to 60 volts or
350 mA max. current flow.
6 Logic Supply +5VDC
7 Logic Supply +5VDC
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Studio Module, Studio 1 & 2 LOGIC — Logic Signal Definitions
PIN NAME/NUMBER
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION OF CONNECTION
WARNING RELAY
(pins 4 and 5)
A pair of Normally Open (N/O) relay contacts. A “dry contact closure” between the pins is generated each time
the studio has a live mic.
ACTIVATE LOGIC INPUTS (+)
(pin 14)
Connect +V logic to this input to enable the active low inputs: Mute and Dim Studio. If the inputs are isolated
from other devices (e.g., on a remote control panel), the +VDC can come from Logic Supply +5 Logic.
MUTE STUDIO (-) (pin 8)
DIM STUDIO (-) (pin 9)
When pulled low, mutes the studio MONITOR output.
When pulled low, dims the studio MONITOR output by 12 dB.
TALK TO CO-HOST TALLY
(pin 13)
Normally Open (N/O) contact output. A “contact closure” to Tallies Common (pin 10) is generated while any
location talks to the Co-Host.
MUTE TALLY (pin 11)
Normally Open (N/O) contact output. A “contact closure” to Tallies Common (pin 10) is generated when the
studio MONITOR output is muted.
DIM TALLY (pin 12)
Normally Open (N/O) contact output. A “contact closure” to Tallies Common (pin 10) is generated when the
studio MONITOR output is dimmed.
TALLIES COMMON (pin 10)
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
(pins 6 and 7)
LOGIC GROUND
(pins 1, 2, 3)
The Common (C) contact output for the Mute, Dim, and Talk to Co-Host Tally outputs.
Module logic voltage output source that can deliver up to 300 mA of current to an isolated control panel.
Outputs are paralleled for convenience.
Module logic ground for isolated control panels only.
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2 Installation
STUDIO MODULE — PRODUCER AUDIO & LOGIC
PRODUCER Connector
The 16-pin PRODUCER connector has the
producer’s talkback switch inputs and talkback
Logic Supply +5 VDC
8
16
Logic Ground
Logic Supply +5 VDC
7
15
Talk to External (-)
PRE99-1188 Producer Talkback/IFB panel or
Talk to Studio 1 Co-Host (-)
6
14
Talk to Studio 2 Co-Host (-)
from a custom panel. The switch inputs (Talk
Talk to Studio 1 Host (-)
5
13
Talk to Studio 2 Host (-)
to Studio 1 (-), Talk to Studio 2 (-), etc.) are
Talk to Studio 1 (-)
4
12
Talk to Studio 2 (-)
no connection
3
11
no connection
Talkback Audio Shield
2
10
Control Room Dim (-)
Talkback Audio (-)
1
9
Talkback Audio (+)
audio input (+4 dBu, balanced).
The PRODUCER signals come from a
activated by a logic low. This is done through
SPST momentary switches commoned to Logic
Ground (pin 16).
When the Producer is in the control room,
the Control Room Dim (-) input (pin 10) can
Audio Connection
be used to dim the C/R MONITOR output. Use
(pins 1, 2, 9)
DPST talkback switches to connect separately
(wire insertion end view)
to the switches and to pin 10; or use signal diodes to sum SPST talkback switches.
Studio Module, PRODUCER — Simplified Logic & Audio Diagram
Talk to Studio 1 (-)
4
Talk to Studio 1 Host (-)
5
Talk to Studio 1 Co-Host (-)
6
Talk to Studio 2 (-)
12
Talk to Studio 2 Host (-)
13
Talkback audio (+)
9
+
Talkback audio (-)
1
_
Talkback audio shield
2
Internal Logic
CHASSIS
7 Logic Supply +5VDC
Talk to Studio 2 Co-Host (-) 14
8 Logic Supply +5VDC
16 Logic Ground
Talk to External (-)
15
Control Room Dim (-)
10
Notes:
Opto-Isolated inputs are current limited
and work with +5 to +40 VDC logic.
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PRODUCER
TALKBACK
BUS
digital
2 Installation
Studio Module, PRODUCER — Logic & Audio Signal Definitions
PIN NAME/NUMBER
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION OF CONNECTION
TALK TO STUDIO 1 (-) (pin 4)
When pulled low, routes the Producer talkback audio to Studio 1 MONITOR and HOST outputs.
TALK TO STUDIO 1
HOST (-) (pin 5)
When pulled low, routes the Producer talkback audio to the Studio 1 HOST output only.
TALK TO STUDIO 1
CO-HOST (-) (pin 6)
When pulled low, routes the Producer talkback audio to the Studio 1 CO-HOST output only.
TALK TO STUDIO 2 (-) (pin 12)
When pulled low, routes the Producer talkback audio to Studio 2 MONITOR and HOST outputs..
TALK TO STUDIO 2
HOST (-) (pin 13)
When pulled low, routes the Producer talkback audio to the Studio 2 HOST output only.
TALK TO STUDIO 2
CO-HOST (-) (pin 14)
When pulled low, routes the Producer talkback audio to the Studio 2 CO-HOST output only.
TALK EXTERNAL (-) (pin 15)
When pulled low, routes the Producer talkback audio to the EXTERNAL connector, Talkback audio output.
CONTROL ROOM DIM (-)
(pin 10)
When pulled low, dims the Control Room MONITOR output by 12 dB. Only used when the Producer is
located in the control room.
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
(pins 7 & 8)
Module logic voltage output source that can deliver up to 300 mA of current to an isolated control panel.
The two outputs are paralleled for convenience.
LOGIC GROUND (pin 16)
Module logic ground that can connect to an isolated control panel.
AUDIO CONNECTION:
AUDIO SHIELD (pin 2)
Tied to chassis ground.
TALKBACK AUDIO (+) & (-)
(pin 9 & 1)
Producer’s talkback microphone input. The input is line-level (+4 dBu), differential. If not using a Producer
Panel, route the producer’s talkback mic through a Mic Preamp module preamp to boost it to line level.
PRE99-1188 Producer Panel connection to the BMXdigital console
To PRODUCER LOGIC on the
Studio Monitor Module
99-791-CU cable
J1
To PRODUCER IFB LOGIC on
the Output 1Module
EXT
STU 1
C-HST
TELCO
1
STU 1
HOST
TELCO
2
STU
1
TELCO
3
STU 2
C-HST
TELCO
4
STU 2
HOST
TELCO
5
STU
2
TELCO
6
J11
(optional)
PRE50-23
Power Supply
PRE99-1188
BMXdigital
Producer
Talkback/IFB
Panel
J8
PRE99-785 cable
Clock/Timer
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Revision C • 1/04
digital
2 Installation
STUDIO MODULE — EXTERNAL AUDIO & LOGIC, WITH SETUP DIP SWITCH 7 OFF
The 16-pin EXTERNAL connector has the
EXTERNAL Connector, with DIP Switch 7 set Off
external site’s talkback logic inputs and com-
Logic Supply +5 VDC
8
16
Logic Ground
Logic Supply +5 VDC
7
15
Activate Logic Inputs (+)
Both audio in and out are balanced +4 dBu
Talk to External Tally
6
14
Talk to Control Room (-)
analog connections. A mic preamp is required
Talk to Studio 1 Host (-)
5
13
Talk to Studio 2 Host (-)
for the External site’s talkback microphone.
Talk to Studio 1 (-)
4
12
Talk to Studio 2 (-)
Talkback Audio Out (-)
3
11
Talkback Audio Out (+)
A Talk to External Tally (that pulls low) is
Talkback Audio In Shield
2
10
Talkback Audio Out Shield
available to command a lamp or LED indica-
Talkback Audio In (-)
1
9
Talkback Audio In (+)
mand output as well as the External site’s talkback audio in and out.
One of the Mic Preamp module’s ten mic
preamps could be used for this function.
tor that talk to external is being received.
(wire insertion end view)
Pins 4 and 5 change their functions depend-
Talkback Audio Pins
ing upon whether SETUP DIP switch 7 is set
Audio Out (pins 3,10,11)
Audio In (pins 1, 2, 9)
On or Off. When DIP switch 7 is off (the default setting, as shown on this page), pins 4
and 5 are the logic inputs Talk to Studio 1 and
Talk to Studio 1 Host.
When DIP switch 7 is on (see pages 2-50
and 2-51), pins 4 and 5 become the command
outputs External Mute and External Dim.
Studio Module, EXTERNAL (DIP switch 7 Off ) — Simplified Logic Diagram
Activate Logic Inputs (+)
15
4
Talk to Studio 1 Host (-)
5
6 Talk To External Tally
Internal Logic
Talk to Studio 1 (-)
Talk to Studio 2 (-)
12
Talk to Studio 2 Host (-)
13
16 Logic Ground
7 Logic Supply +5VDC
8 Logic Supply +5VDC
Notes:
Opto-Isolated inputs are current limited and work
with +5 to +40 VDC logic.
Talk to Control Room (-)
Opto-Isolated outputs can sink up to 60 volts or
350 mA max. current flow.
14
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digital
2 Installation
Studio Module, EXTERNAL (DIP switch 7 Off) Audio & Logic Signal Definitions
PIN NAME / NUMBER
TALK TO STUDIO 1 (-)
(pin 4)
TALK TO STUDIO 1
HOST (-) (pin 5)
TALK TO STUDIO 2 (-)
(pin 12)
TALK TO STUDIO 2
HOST (-) (pin 13)
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION OF CONNECTION
When pulled low, routes the External Talkback Audio Input to Studio 1 MONITOR and HOST outputs.
NOTE: When DIP switch 7 is on, Talk to Studio 1 is disabled (see page 2-51).
When pulled low, routes the External Talkback Audio Input to the Studio 1 HOST output.
NOTE: When DIP switch 7 is on, Talk to Studio 1 Host is disabled (see page 2-51).
When pulled low, routes the External Talkback Audio Input to Studio 2 MONITOR and HOST outputs.
When pulled low, routes the External Talkback Audio Input to the Studio 2 HOST output.
TALK TO CONTROL ROOM (-)
(pin 14)
When pulled low, routes the External Talkback Audio Input to the control room TALKBACK and OPERATOR
outputs.
ACTIVATE LOGIC INPUTS (+)
(pin 15)
Connect this pin to Logic Supply +5 VDC (pin 7 or 8) to enable the active low logic inputs (Talk to C/R, and
the four Talk to Studios) when they come from an isolated control panel.
EXTERNAL TALK TALLY (-)
(pin 6)
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
(pins 7 & 8)
LOGIC GROUND (pin 16)
Normally Open (N/O) contact. A “contact closure” to ground is generated whenever Talk to External is
activated from the Control Room, the Producer, or a microphone module.
Logic voltage source that can deliver up to 300 mA of current to isolated remote panels. Pins 7 and 8 are
simply paralleled for convenience.
Logic ground. Connect only to isolated remote panels only.
AUDIO CONNECTIONS:
TALKBACK AUDIO OUTPUT
(-) & (+) (pins 3 & 11)
TALKBACK AUDIO INPUT
(-) & (+) (pins 1 & 9)
TALKBACK IN & OUT SHIELDS
(pins 2 & 10)
The balanced line-level Talk To External audio output. This can drive a powered talkback speaker, or, if the
External location goes on-air, it can be summed into the External location’s headphone feed.
The balanced line-level Talkback From External audio input. One of the Mic Preamp module’s preamplifiers
can be used to boost the External location’s talkback microphone to line-level to feed this input.
Shields for the balanced Talkback Audio Input and Output. Connects to the chassis.
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Revision C • 1/04
digital
2 Installation
STUDIO MODULE — EXTERNAL AUDIO & LOGIC, WITH SETUP DIP SWITCH 7 ON
EXTERNAL Connector, with DIP Switch 7 set ON
The 16-pin EXTERNAL connector has the
external site’s talkback logic inputs and com-
Logic Supply +5 VDC
8
16
Logic Ground
Logic Supply +5 VDC
7
15
Activate Logic Inputs (+)
Both audio in and out are balanced +4 dBu
Talk to External Tally
6
14
Talk to Control Room (-)
analog connections. A mic preamp is required
Dim External Command
5
13
Talk to Studio 2 Host (-)
for the External site’s talkback microphone.
Mute External Command
4
12
Talk to Studio 2 (-)
Talkback Audio Out (-)
3
11
Talkback Audio Out (+)
A Talk to External Tally (that pulls low) is
Talkback Audio In Shield
2
10
Talkback Audio Out Shield
available to command a lamp or LED indica-
Talkback Audio In (-)
1
9
Talkback Audio In (+)
mand outputs as well as the External site’s talkback audio in and out.
One of the Mic Preamp module’s ten mic
preamps could be used for this function.
tor that talk to external is being received.
(wire insertion end view)
Pins 4 and 5 change their functions depend-
Talkback Audio Pins
ing upon whether SETUP DIP switch 7 is set
Audio Out (pins 3,10,11)
Audio In (pins 1, 2, 9)
On or Off. When DIP switch 7 is on (as shown
on this page), pins 4 and 5 are the command
outputs Mute External and Dim External.
These are used to control the monitor speakers at the external location.
When DIP switch 7 is off (the default setting as shown on pages 2-48 and 2-49), pins 4
and 5 are the logic inputs Talk to Studio 1 and
Talk to Studio 1 Host.
Studio Module, EXTERNAL (DIP switch 7 On) — Simplified Logic Diagram
4 External Mute Command
Activate Logic Inputs (+) 15
Talk to Studio 2 (-)
5 External Dim Command
12
Internal Logic
Talk to Studio 2 Host (-) 13
6 Talk To External Tally
Talk to Control Room (-) 14
16 Logic Ground
Notes:
Opto-Isolated inputs are current limited and work
with +5 to +40 VDC logic.
7 Logic Supply +5VDC
8 Logic Supply +5VDC
Opto-Isolated outputs can sink up to 60 volts or
350 mA max. current flow.
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digital
2 Installation
Studio Module, EXTERNAL (DIP switch 7 On) Audio & Logic Signal Definitions
PIN NAME/NUMBER
TALK TO STUDIO 2 (-) (pin 12)
TALK TO STUDIO 2 HOST (-)
(pin 13)
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION OF CONNECTION
When pulled low, routes the External Talkback Audio Input to Studio 2 MONITOR and HOST outputs.
When pulled low, routes the External Talkback Audio Input to the Studio 2 HOST output.
TALK TO CONTROL ROOM (-)
(pin 14)
When pulled low, routes the External Talkback Audio Input to the control room TALKBACK and OPERATOR
outputs.
ACTIVATE LOGIC INPUTS (+)
(pin 15)
Connect this pin to Logic Supply +5 VDC (pin 7 or 8) to enable the active low logic inputs (Talk to C/R, and
the four Talk to Studios).
MUTE EXTERNAL
COMMAND (-) (pin 4)
Normally Open (N/O) contact. A “contact closure” to logic ground (pin 16) is generated whenever a
Universal Input module, that is set to Mute External (DS1-5 or DS3-5 is set to On), is on. Consult Harris Radio
Systems Engineering for design information on using this logic output.
DIM EXTERNAL
COMMAND (-) (pin 5)
Normally Open (N/O) contact. A “contact closure” to logic ground (pin 16) is generated whenever another
location is talking to External. Consult Harris Radio Systems Engineering for design information on using
this logic output.
TALK TO EXTERNAL
TALLY (-) (pin 6)
Normally Open (N/O) contact. A “contact closure” to logic ground (pin 16) is generated whenever Talk to
External is activated from the control room, the producer, or a microphone module.
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
(pins 7 & 8)
Logic voltage source that can deliver up to 300 mA of current to isolated remote panels. Pins 7 and 8 are
simply paralleled for convenience.
LOGIC GROUND (pin 16)
Logic ground. Connect only to isolated remote panels only.
AUDIO CONNECTIONS:
TALKBACK AUDIO OUTPUT
(-) & (+) (pins 3 & 11)
TALKBACK AUDIO INPUT
(-) & (+) (pins 1 & 9)
TALKBACK IN & OUT SHIELDS
(pins 2 & 10)
The balanced line-level Talk To External audio output. This can drive a powered talkback speaker, or, if the
External location goes on-air, it can be summed into the External location’s headphone feed.
The balanced line-level Talkback From External audio input. One of the Mic Preamp module’s preamplifiers
can be used to boost the External location’s talkback microphone to line-level to feed this input.
Shields for the balanced Talkback Audio Input and Output. Connects to the chassis.
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Revision C • 1/04
digital
2 Installation
QUICK GUIDE TO THE OUTPUT 1 MODULE
Fifteen connectors come standard on the Output 1 module: seven 6-pin analog audio output connectors, seven 3-pin digital audio output connectors, and one 8-pin logic connector. The connectors are
hidden by the meter panel in normal operation.
MIX-MINUS AUDIO OUTPUTS
ANAL
OG — The 6-pin analog outputs are wired using the standard
ANALOG
pinout sequence. All mix-minus analog outputs are MONO audio outputs
with a fixed level of +4 dBu. The left output includes talkback; the right
output is a “clean mono feed” that does not have talkback. For more
information on the composition of this signal pair, see page 3-8 and 3-9.
DIGIT
AL — The 3-pin digital outputs send AES-3 (AES/EBU) compatible
DIGITAL
signals. The left channel contains the mono mix-minus audio plus talkback;
the right channel is a “clean mono feed” that does not have talkback. The
sample rate (48 kHz or 44.1 kHz) for each output is set independently by
the SAMPLE RATE DIP switches.
TELCO RECORD MIX
A nalo
g Output — The 6-pin analog output is wired using the standard
nalog
pinout sequence. The left channel has those Telco/Codec modules that have
TO REC active; the right channel has the base record mix. For more
information on the composition of this signal pair, see pages 3-8 and 3-9.
Digital Output — The 3-pin digital output is an AES-3 (AES/EBU)
compatible signal. The left channel has those Telco/Codec modules that have
TO REC active; the right channel has the base record mix. The sample rate
(48 kHz or 44.1 kHz) is set using SAMPLE RATE DIP switch 7.
PRODUCER IFB LOGIC
P r o duc
er IFB LLo
o gic — The 8-pin Producer IFB logic connector controls
ducer
talkback from the Producer to the Mix-Minus outputs. For more information,
see pages 2-52 and 2-53.
Digital Outputs
High (+)
3
Left High (+)
3
6
Right High (+)
Low (-)
2
Left Low (-)
2
5
Right Low (-)
Shield
1
Shield
1
4
Shield
(wire insertion end view)
2-50
H A R R I S
Analog Outputs
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 1/04
(wire insertion end view)
digital
2 Installation
OUTPUT 1 MODULE SWITCHES
SAMPLE RATE 44.1
S ample R
a t e 44.1 — These eight DIP switches set the sample rate for each digital output per the
Ra
Output 1 Module Switch Definitions table below.
Output 1 Module Switch Definitions
#
Switch Name
ON Function (set to operator’s left)
OFF Function (set to operator's right)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Mix-minus Output 1
Mix-minus Output 2
Mix-minus Output 3
Mix-minus Output 4
Mix-minus Output 5
Mix-minus Output 6
Telco Record Mix
Spare Switch
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
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Revision C • 1/04
digital
2 Installation
OUTPUT 1 MODULE — PRODUCER IFB LOGIC
The 8-pin PRODUCER IFB LOGIC connector
PRODUCER IFB LOGIC Connector
has the talkback commands to add Producer talkback to the various Mix-Minus outputs.
The Talk to Mix-Minus 1 to 6 logic inputs come
from the Producer Talkback IFB Panel (PRE99-
Logic Supply +5 VDC
4
8
Talk to Mix-Minus 6
Talk to Mix-Minus 2
3
7
Talk to Mix-Minus 5
Talk to Mix-Minus 1
2
6
Talk to Mix-Minus 4
Logic Ground
1
5
Talk to Mix-Minus 3
1189), or from a custom talkback panel. Use cable
PRE99-791-CU to connect the Producer Panel
(wire insertion end view)
to this connector and to the PRODUCER logic
connector on the Studio module.
Talk to Mix-Minus-1 (-)
2
Talk to Mix-Minus-2 (-)
3
Talk to Mix-Minus-3 (-)
5
Talk to Mix-Minus-4 (-)
6
Talk to Mix-Minus-5 (-)
7
Talk to Mix-Minus-6 (-)
8
Internal Logic
Output 1 Module, PRODUCER IFB LOGIC — Simplified Logic Diagram
4 Logic Supply +5VDC
1 Logic Ground
Notes:
Opto-Isolated inputs are current limited
and work with +5 to +40 VDC logic.
Output 1 Module, PRODUCER IFB LOGIC Signal Definitions
PIN NAME / NUMBER
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION OF CONNECTION
TALK TO MIX-MINUS-1 (pin 2)
When pulled low, Producer talkback audio is added to the left channel of the Mix-Minus 1 outputs.
TALK TO MIX-MINUS-2 (pin 3)
When pulled low, Producer talkback audio is added to the left channel of the Mix-Minus 2 outputs.
TALK TO MIX-MINUS-3 (pin 5)
When pulled low, Producer talkback audio is added to the left channel of the Mix-Minus 3 outputs.
TALK TO MIX-MINUS-4 (pin 6)
When pulled low, Producer talkback audio is added to the left channel of the Mix-Minus 4 outputs.
TALK TO MIX-MINUS-5 (pin 7)
When pulled low, Producer talkback audio is added to the left channel of the Mix-Minus 5 outputs.
TALK TO MIX-MINUS-6 (pin 8)
When pulled low, Producer talkback audio is added to the left channel of the Mix-Minus 6 outputs.
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC (pin 4)
Module logic voltage output source that can deliver up to 300 mA of current to an isolated control panel.
LOGIC GROUND (pin 1)
Module logic ground. Should connect to isolated control panels only.
2-52
H A R R I S
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Revision C • 1/04
digital
2 Installation
PRE99-1188 Producer Panel connections to the console
(Studio module PRODUCER LOGIC, and Output 1 Module PRODUCER IFB LOGIC)
To PRODUCER LOGIC on the
Studio Monitor Module
99-791-CU cable
J1
To PRODUCER IFB LOGIC on
the Output 1Module
EXT
STU 1
C-HST
TELCO
1
STU 1
HOST
TELCO
2
STU
1
TELCO
3
STU 2
C-HST
TELCO
4
STU 2
HOST
TELCO
5
STU
2
TELCO
6
J11
PRE99-1188
BMXdigital
Producer
Talkback/IFB
Panel
J8
PRE99-785 cable
(optional)
PRE50-23
Power Supply
Clock/Timer
PRE99-791-CU Producer Panel Interface Cable, connector pin outs
J1 on Producer Talkback / IFB Panel
P1
Signal
Output 1 Module, Producer IFB Logic
Pin
Pin
Telco 1 switch
1
Telco 2 Switch
2
Telco 3 Switch
3
Telco 4 Switch
4
Telco 5 Switch
5
Telco 6 Switch
6
Talk Audio (-)
8
Talk Audio (+)
9
Talk to Studio 2 Switch
10
Talk to St 2 Host Sw
11
BLK
WHT
RED
GRN
ORG
BLU
Signal
2
Talk to Mix-Minus 1
3
Talk to mix-Minus 2
5
Talk to mix-Minus 3
6
Talk to mix-Minus 4
7
Talk to mix-Minus 5
8
Talk to mix-Minus 6
Pin
Talk to St 2 Co-Host Sw
12
Talk to Studio 1 Switch
13
Talk to St 1 Host Sw
14
Talk to St 1 Co-Host Sw
15
Talk to External Switch
16
Dim Monitors
17
Ground
18
RED / BLK
GRN / BLK
ORG / BLK
BLU / BLK
BLK / WHT
RED / WHT
GRN / WHT
BLU / WHT
BLK / RED
WHT / RED
ORG / RED
Signal
1
Talkback Audio (-)
9
Talkback Audio (+)
12
Talk to Studio 2 (-)
13
Talk to St 2 Host (-)
14
Talk to St 2 Co-Host (-)
4
Talk to Studio 1 (-)
5
Talk to St 1 Host (-)
6
Talk to St 1 Co-Host (-)
15
Talk to External (-)
10
C/R Dim (-) ***
16
Logic Ground
P2
P3
Studio Module,
Producer Logic
*** C/R Dim is only connected when the Producer Panel is
located in the control room. Each time the producer talks to any
location the C/R monitors are dimmed by 12 dB.
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H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 1/04
digital
2 Installation
QUICK GUIDE TO THE OUTPUT 2 MODULE
Fourteen connectors come standard on the Output 2 module: seven 6-pin analog audio output connectors and seven 3-pin digital audio output connectors. The connectors are hidden by the meter panel
in normal operation.
ANALOG OUTPUTS
PGM-1, PGM-2 — The 6-pin analog outputs for the Program 1 and
Program 2 buses are wired using the standard pinout sequence shown
below. The MAIN and AUX connectors are isolated outputs that carry the
same signals (the Program 1 bus or the Program 2 bus).
UTL-1, UTL-2 — The 6-pin analog outputs for the Utility 1 and 2 buses
are wired using the standard pinout sequence shown below.
SEND-1 — The 6-pin analog output for the Send 1 bus is wired using the
standard pinout sequence shown below.
Analog Outputs
Left High (+)
3
6
Right High (+)
Left Low (-)
2
5
Right Low (-)
Shield
1
4
Shield
(wire insertion end view)
DIGITAL OUTPUTS
PGM-1, PGM-2 — The 3-pin AES-3 (AES/EBU-compatible) digital
outputs of the Program 1 and Program 2 buses. The MAIN and AUX
connectors are isolated outputs that carry the same signals (the Program 1
bus or the Program 2 bus), but the AUX output can be set to either 48 kHz
or 44.1 kHz sampling by SAMPLE RATE DIP switches. The MAIN output is
fixed at 48 kHz sampling.
UTL-1, UTL-2 — The 3-pin AES-3 (AES/EBU-compatible) digital outputs
of the Utility 1 and Utility 2 buses. The outputs can be set to either 48 kHz or
44.1 kHz sampling by SAMPLE RATE DIP switches.
SEND-1 — The 3-pin AES-3 (AES/EBU-compatible) digital outputs the
Send 1 bus. The output can be set to either 48 kHz or 44.1 kHz sampling by
a SAMPLE RATE DIP switch.
Digital Outputs
High (+)
3
Low (-)
2
Shield
1
(wire insertion end view)
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OUTPUT 2 MODULE SWITCHES
SAMPLE RATE 44.1
S ample R
a t e 44.1 — These five DIP switches set the sample rate for the Output 2 module’s
Ra
digital outputs per the Output 2 Module Switch Definitions table below.
Output 2 Module Switch Definitions
#
Switch Name
ON Function (set to operator’s left)
OFF Function (set to operator's right)
1
2
3
4
5
PGM-1 Aux Out
PGM-2 Aux Out
UTL-1 (Utility 1 bus)
UTL-2 (Utility 2 bus)
SEND-1
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
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QUICK GUIDE TO THE OUTPUT 3 MODULE
Fourteen connectors come standard on the Output 3 module: seven 6-pin analog audio output connectors and seven 3-pin digital audio output connectors. The connectors are hidden by the meter panel
in normal operation.
ANALOG OUTPUTS
PGM-3, PGM-4 — The 6-pin analog outputs for the Program 3 and
Program 4 buses are wired using the standard pinout sequence shown
below. The MAIN and AUX connectors are isolated outputs that carry the
same signals (the Program 3 bus or the Program 4 bus).
UTL-3, UTL-4 — The 6-pin analog outputs for the Utility 3 and 4 buses
are wired using the standard pinout sequence shown below.
SEND-2 — The 6-pin analog output for the Send 2 bus is wired using the
standard pinout sequence shown below.
Analog Outputs
Left High (+)
3
6
Right High (+)
Left Low (-)
2
5
Right Low (-)
Shield
1
4
Shield
(wire insertion end view)
DIGITAL OUTPUTS
PGM-3, PGM-4 — The 3-pin AES-3 (AES/EBU-compatible) digital
outputs of the Program 3 and Program 4 buses. The MAIN and AUX
connectors are isolated outputs that carry the same signals (the Program 3
bus or the Program 4 bus), but the AUX output can be set to either 48 kHz
or 44.1 kHz sampling by SAMPLE RATE DIP switches. The MAIN output is
fixed at 48 kHz sampling.
UTL-3, UTL-4 — The 3-pin AES-3 (AES/EBU-compatible) digital outputs
of the Utility 3 and Utility 4 buses. The outputs can be set to either 48 kHz or
44.1 kHz sampling by SAMPLE RATE DIP switches.
SEND-2 — The 3-pin AES-3 (AES/EBU-compatible) digital outputs the
Send 2 bus. The output can be set to either 48 kHz or 44.1 kHz sampling
by a SAMPLE RATE DIP switch.
Digital Outputs
High (+)
3
Low (-)
2
Shield
1
(wire insertion end view)
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OUTPUT 3 MODULE SWITCHES
SAMPLE RATE 44.1
S ample R
a t e 44.1 — These five DIP switches set the sample rate for the Output 3 module’s
Ra
digital outputs per the Output 3 Module Switch Definitions table below.
Output 3 Module Switch Definitions
#
Switch Name
ON Function (set to operator’s left)
OFF Function (set to operator's right)
1
2
3
4
5
PGM-3 Aux Out
PGM-4 Aux Out
UTL-3 (Utility 3 bus)
UTL-4 (Utility 4 bus)
SEND-2
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 44.1 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
Sets the digital sample rate to 48 kHz
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2 Installation
Mic Remote Control Connection Example
This example shows setting up a Universal Input module as a control room mic using the A input,
with a mic remote control panel connected to the module. Additional information on logic connections and DIP switch settings for the Universal Input module are on pages 2-18 through 2-23.
UNIVERSAL INPUT MODULE MAIN LOGIC CONNECTOR SIGNAL TABLE
12 24
11 23
10 22
9
21
8
20
7
19
6
18
5
17
4
16
3
15
2
14
1
13
(wire insertion
end view)
PIN # SIGNAL
FUNCTION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Module logic ground.
Module logic ground.
Module logic ground.
Stop command output. N/O contact.
Start command output. N/O contact.
5 volt source.
Remote On switch input (active low).
Remote Off switch input (active low).
Remote Cough switch input (active low).
5 volt source.
5 volt source.
5 volt source.
Start/Stop Pulse, Start Sustained common. C contact.
Tally relays common connection. C contact.
Logic active tally output. N/O contact.
Off tally output. N/O contact.
On tally output. N/O contact.
+VDC to enable external inputs On, Off, Cough, Talkback.
Remote Audio Off input (active low).
Remote Talkback input (active low).
Remote Ready input (active low).
+VDC to enable Audio Reset function (audio off control).
Start sustained command output. N/O relay contact.
+VDC to enable the Ready function (Off lamp control).
LOGIC GROUND
LOGIC GROUND
LOGIC GROUND
STOP COMMAND PULSE
START COMMAND PULSE
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
ON INPUT (-)
OFF INPUT (-)
COUGH INPUT (-)
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
COMMANDS COMMON
TALLIES COMMON
LOGIC ACTIVE TALLY
OFF TALLY
ON TALLY
ACTIVATE LOGIC INS (+)
RESET (-)
TALK TO C/R INPUT (-)
READY (-)
RESET (+)
START SUSTAINED
READY (+)
Notes:
+VDC is between +5 and +40 VDC.
Output tallies/relays can switch voltages up to +60 VDC
Bold indicates connections used in this example.
UNIVERSAL INPUT MODULE SWITCH SETTINGS
DS1
DS2
#
Switch Name
Setting
#
Switch Name
Setting
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Signal Source
CR Mute
Studio 1 Mute
Studio 2 Mute
External Site Mute
Local On, Cough
Timer Reset
Off Lamp Status
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Fader Start
Start Pulse
Dim Control
Bypass SRC Converter
Mute Setting Control
Spare Switch
Input Level Set
Input Level Set
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
Note: ON settings are to the operator’s left. OFF settings are to the operator’s right.
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SIMPLIFIED DIAGRAM FOR INTERFACING A MIC REMOTE CONTROL PANEL
Logic Outputs
Opto-Isolated Relay
Start Command Pulse
5
Stop Command Pulse
4
Start Command Sustained 23
Opto-Isolated
Relay
Commands Common
13
Mic: Logic Active Tally
Line: Cue Tally
15
Off Tally
16
Opto-Isolated
Relay
Universal Input Module, Internal Logic
Opto-Isolated
Relay
PRE99-1197 / PRE99-1198 Mic Panels
Opto-Isolated
Relay
TALKBACK *
4 +5 V
Opto-Isolated
Relay
+5V
On Tally
17
Tallies Common
14
*
+5 Logic
6
COUGH
+5 Logic
10
+5 Logic
11
+5 Logic
12
8 Talkback Switch *
*
7 Cough Switch
ON
Logic Ground
1
Logic Ground
2
Logic Ground
3
6 On Switch
3 On Tally
OFF
Logic Inputs
18
5 Off Switch
On (-)
7
2 Off Tally
Off (-)
8
1 Logic Ground
Cough (-)
9
Activate Logic Ins (+)
OptoIsolator
OptoIsolator
OptoIsolator
OptoIsolator
OptoIsolator
Mic: Talk to C/R (-)
Line: Ext Cue (-)
20
Reset (+)
22
Reset (-)
Ready (+)
19
24
Ready (-)
21
* Not used on the PRE99-1197 panel
Remote Microphone
Control Panel
Universal Input Module
Jumper pin 10 to 18
(activates the Logic Inputs)
Wiring diagram for a PRE99-1198
Mic Remote Control Panel with Talkback
This diagram shows the wiring for the PRE99-787-CU
cable. It connects either the PRE99-1197 Mic Panel
(with On/Off/Cough buttons) or the PRE99-1198 Mic
Panel (with On/Off/Cough/Talkback buttons) to a
Universal Input module..
Pin 20
Pin 15
Pin 14
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Mic Control Panel
Switch Common
Off Tally
On Tally
+5 V
Off Switch
On Switch
Cough Switch
Talkback Switch
Pin 1
Jumper pin 6 to 14
(Tallies Common to +5 Volts)
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Basic Peripheral Device Logic Connection Example
This example shows a Universal Input module set up as a line, using the A analog input, to
interface a CD player (Denon DN-951/961 shown in the example). For more information on logic
connections and DIP switch settings for the Universal Input module, see pages 2-18 through 2-23.
UNIVERSAL INPUT MODULE MAIN LOGIC CONNECTOR SIGNAL TABLE
12 24
11 23
10 22
9
21
8
20
7
19
6
18
5
17
4
16
3
15
2
14
1
13
(wire insertion
end view)
PIN # SIGNAL
FUNCTION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Module logic ground.
Module logic ground.
Module logic ground.
Stop command output. N/O contact.
Start command output. N/O contact.
5 volt source.
Remote On switch input (active low).
Remote Off switch input (active low).
Remote Cue switch input (active low).
5 volt source.
5 volt source.
5 volt source.
Start/Stop Pulse, Start Sustained common. C contact.
Tally relays common connection. C contact.
Cue tally output. N/O contact.
Off tally output. N/O contact.
On tally output. N/O contact.
+VDC to enable external inputs On, Off, Cough, Talkback.
Remote Audio Off input (active low).
Activates Cue function (active low).
Remote Ready input (active low).
+VDC to enable Audio Reset function (audio off control).
Start sustained command output. N/O relay contact.
+VDC to enable the Ready function (Off lamp control).
LOGIC GROUND
LOGIC GROUND
LOGIC GROUND
STOP COMMAND PULSE
START COMMAND PULSE
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
ON INPUT (-)
OFF INPUT (-)
CUE INPUT (-)
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
COMMANDS COMMON
TALLIES COMMON
CUE TALLY
OFF TALLY
ON TALLY
ACTIVATE LOGIC INS (+)
RESET (-)
REMOTE CUE (-)
READY (-)
RESET (+)
START SUSTAINED
READY (+)
Notes:
+VDC is between +5 and +40 VDC.
Output tallies/relays can switch voltages up to +60 VDC
Bold indicates connections used in this example.
UNIVERSAL INPUT MODULE SWITCH SETTINGS
DS1
DS2
# Switch Name
Setting
#
Switch Name
Setting
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Fader Start
Start Pulse
Start/Stop Pulse
Bypass SRC Converter
Spare Switch
Spare Switch
Input Level Set
Input Level Set
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
Signal Source
CR Mute
Studio 1 Mute
Studio 2 Mute
External Site Mute
Local On, Cough
Timer Reset
Off Lamp Status
Note: ON settings are to the operator’s left. OFF settings are to the operator’s right.
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SIMPLIFIED DIAGRAM FOR INTERFACING A DENON DN-951/961 CD PLAYER
Logic Outputs
Opto-Isolated Relay
Start Pulse
Stop Pulse
5
Opto-Isolated
Solid State
Relay
Start Sustained
23
Opto-Isolated
Solid State
Relay
Commands Common 13
Univeral Input Module Internal Logic
Opto-Isolated
Solid State
Relay
Opto-Isolated
Solid State
Relay
Opto-Isolated
Solid State
Relay
+5V
4
Cue Tally
15
Off Tally
16
On Tally
17
Tallies Common
14
3 Pause Command
+5 Logic
+5 Logic
+5 Logic
+5 Logic
6
10
11
12
10 Command Common
Logic Ground
Logic Ground
Logic Ground
1
2
3
Denon 951/961 Remote Logic
2 Play Command
15 Pause Tally
16 Standby/Cue Tally
22 Tally Common
+5 VDC
Peripheral Device
Logic Inputs
Activate Logic Ins (+) 18
OptoIsolator
OptoIsolator
OptoIsolator
OptoIsolator
OptoIsolator
On (-)
7
Off (-)
8
Cough (-)
9
Remote Cue (-)
Reset (+)
20
22
Reset (-)
Ready (+)
19
24
Ready (-)
21
Universal Input Module
Pin 24
Ready (+)
Wiring diagram for a Denon DN-951/962
CD Player
Pin 21
This diagram shows the wiring between a typical CD
player and a Universal Input module set as a line
input.
Pin 5
Pin 4
Ready (-)
Command Common
Stop Pulse
Start Pulse
Pin
22
15
16
10
3
2
DENON Connector Signal
Tally Common (+5 VDC)
Pause Tally
Standby/Cue Tally
Command Common
Pause Command
Play Command
Isolation Diodes
(1N4001 or similar)
Pin 13
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Complex Logic Connection Example
This example shows setting up a Universal Input module (A input, analog) to interface with a
remote logic device, such as an ENCO DADpro. For more information on logic connections and DIP
switch settings for the Universal Input module, see pages 2-18 through 2-23.
UNIVERSAL INPUT MODULE MAIN LOGIC CONNECTOR SIGNAL TABLE
12 24
11 23
10 22
9
21
8
20
7
19
6
18
5
17
4
16
3
15
2
14
1
13
(wire insertion
end view)
PIN # SIGNAL
FUNCTION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Console logic ground.
Console logic ground.
Console logic ground.
Stop command output. N/O relay contact.
Start command output. N/O relay contact.
5 volt source.
Remote On switch input (active low).
Remote Off switch input (active low).
Remote Cough switch input (active low).
5 volt source.
5 volt source.
5 volt source.
Start/Stop Pulse, Start Sustained common. C relay contact.
Tally relays common connection. C relay contact.
Cue tally output. N/O relay contact.
Off tally output. N/O relay contact.
On tally output. N/O relay contact.
+VDC to enable external inputs On, Off, Cough, Talkback.
Remote Audio Off input (active low).
Activates the Cue function (active low).
Remote Ready input (active low).
+VDC to enable Audio Reset function (audio off control).
Start sustained command output. N/O relay contact.
+VDC to enable the Ready function (Off lamp control) .
LOGIC GROUND
LOGIC GROUND
LOGIC GROUND
STOP COMMAND PULSE
START COMMAND PULSE
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
ON INPUT (-)
OFF INPUT (-)
COUGH INPUT (-)
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
LOGIC SUPPLY +5 VDC
COMMANDS COMMON
TALLIES COMMON
CUE TALLY
OFF TALLY
ON TALLY
ACTIVATE LOGIC INS (+)
RESET (-)
REMOTE CUE (-)
READY (-)
RESET (+)
START SUSTAINED
READY (+)
Notes:
+VDC is between +5 and +40 VDC.
Output relays can switch voltages up to +60 VDC
Bold indicates connections used in this example.
UNIVERSAL INPUT MODULE SWITCH SETTINGS
DS1
DS2
#
Switch Name
Setting
# Switch Name
Setting
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Signal Source
CR Mute
Studio 1 Mute
Studio 2 Mute
External Site Mute
Local ON Cough
Timer Reset
Ready Lamp Status
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
Fader Start
Start Pulse
Start/Stop Pulse
Bypass SRC Converter
Spare Switch
Spare Switch
Input Level Set
Input Level Set
Note: ON settings are to the operator’s left. OFF settings are to the operator’s right.
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SIMPLIFIED DIAGRAM FOR INTERFACING AN ENCO DADPRO
Logic Outputs
Opto-Isolated Relay
5
Start Pulse
Opto-Isolated
Relay
4
Start Sustained
23
Commands Common 13
Opto-Isolated
Relay
Universal Input Module Internal Logic
Stop Pulse
Opto-Isolated
Relay
Opto-Isolated
Relay
Opto-Isolated
Relay
+5V
Cue Tally
15
Off Tally
16
Enco DADPro Remote Logic
On Tally
17
8 Input 0
Tallies Common
14
27 Input 0
+5 Logic
+5 Logic
+5 Logic
+5 Logic
6
10
11
12
26 Input 1
Logic Ground
Logic Ground
Logic Ground
1
2
3
Input 0
+
7 Input 1
+
Input 1
-
37 Relay 0 Common
17 Relay 1 Common
OptoIsolator
OptoIsolator
OptoIsolator
OptoIsolator
Relay 1
19 Relay 0 N/O
36 Relay 1 N/O
Logic Inputs
OptoIsolator
Relay 0
34 Relay 2 Common
Activate Logic Ins (+)
18
On (-)
7
Off (-)
8
Cough (-)
9
Remote Cue (-)
Reset (+)
20
22
Reset (-)
Ready (+)
19
24
Ready (-)
21
16 Relay 2 N/O
Relay 2
Peripheral Device
Universal Input Module
Wiring diagram for an ENCO DADpro Digital Delivery System
This diagram shows the wiring between a typical Digital Delivery System and a Universal Input
module, set as a line input.
Jumper pin 12
to 24 (enables
READY)
Jumper pin 10
to 22 (enables
RESET)
Jumper pin 6
to 18 (enables
remote ON)
Pin 11
Pin 7
Pin 21
Stop Pulse
Start Pulse
Reset (-)
Pin 19
On (-)
Pin 5
Pin 4
Ready (-)
Pin 1
Logic
Ground
Pin 13
Pin
7
8
16
17
19
26
27
34
36
37
ENCO 37-Pin Connector
Input 1
Input 0
Relay 2 (N/O)
Relay 1 (C)
Relay 0 (N/O)
Input 1 (C)
Input 0 (C)
Relay 2 (C)
Relay 1 (N/O)
Relay 0 (C)
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NET CARD
Some typical uses of the Net Card outputs in-
Only BMXdigital consoles with the optional Net
clude routing analog audio to the External Moni-
Card installed can directly communicate with and
tor inputs on the control room module, VistaMax
control a VistaMax system. The Net Card (shown
intercom talk into the External Talk input, and
below) plugs into the motherboard at the right
for in-room recording equipment.
rear corner of the mainframe, behind the output
The Net Card inputs can connect Talk from Ex-
modules. It is hidden by the meter panel in nor-
ternal audio into the VistaMax system along with
mal use. There are two talkback level trim con-
outputs of in-room equipment that do not require
trols on the card to set control room and producer
an input channel on the console yet still need to
talkback levels at installation. A blank panel cov-
be made available throughout the facility through
ers the Net Card slot when the card is not present.
the VistaMax system.
BMXdigital Net Card Front Panel Features
Local Analog & Digital Sources
Local Analog & Digital Destinations
Signals to/from VistaMax frame(s)
Without the Net Card, a BMXdigital console is
The two Facet connections (CAT-5e, as shown
treated like any other console connected to a Vis-
above, or alternately Optical connections, not
taMax system: input channel sources and console
shown) each simultaneously send 64 signals to the
outputs must connect to VistaMax frame I/O in-
VistaMax frame with 64 return signals coming
puts while I/O card outputs connect to the con-
from the VistaMax frame. Each signal may con-
sole inputs. Any in-room devices connected directly
sist of: one channel of audio; any number of com-
to the console would only be available through a
mon logic commands; or it can be an audio signal
bus output connection. VistaMax selector panels
with logic “bound” to the audio.
would then be used to select the input sources for
Although only one facet cable is required to tie
the BMXdigital into the VistaMax system, both
the console inputs tied to the VistaMax.
With the addition of the Net Card, the BMX-
facet connections can be used to double the signal
digital console is integrated into the VistaMax sys-
carrying capability (128 signals coming from the
tem. A Net Card functions as the audio, logic and
console with another 128 signals returning to the
control interface between the entire console and
console) or for connection redundancy.
the VistaMax system through the two Facet con-
Refer to the VistaMax manual (75-52) for addi-
nectors. It automatically makes available to the
tional connection and applications information.
VistaMax system any, or all, of the console input
NET-ONLY MODULES
sources and console bus outputs.
The Net Card also provides eight local audio
These are input modules that do not have any
sources (four analog and four digital inputs) and
of the external audio or logic connections found
eight local destinations (four analog and four digi-
on the full-featured and limited-feature input mod-
tal outputs) for the VistaMax system.
ules. They are designed to directly interface with a
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VistaMax system. To use Net-Only modules, the
BMXdigital console must have the optional Net
Card installed, and it must be connected to a VistaMax system.
Although the same type of VistaMax direct routing can be done using standard input modules, if
no in-room audio connection is required on a module, then a less-expensive Net-Only input module
can be used in lieu of any standard module.
There are two types of Net-Only modules: fullfeatured and limited feature (without Send and
Utility bus controls) available for each type of input module (Universal Input, Telco, and RLS).
Net-Only Module Operation
Net-Only modules look identical to, and function the same as, standard modules—at least as
far as the operator is concerned. They have the
Universal
Input
same controls as the standard modules. It is only
when the meter panel is opened up that any dif-
Telco
RLS
Net-Only Module DIP Switches
ferences can be seen.
Net-Only modules do not have audio or logic
module is made by a Session file setting. The Net-
connections and only have one set of DIP switches
Only Telco and RLS modules also have Session-
on them (as shown to the right). Their inputs can
specific settings (the destination they are assigned
only be a VistaMax source. But, that input can be
to, a source include list, a source exclude list, etc.).
controlled by the console logic, if set to do so in
Refer to Chapter 4: Server or to the VistaMax
the Session file. Likewise, the logic from the source
manual (Harris # 75-52) for additional informa-
signal can be set to control the module (e.g., con-
tion on VistaMax source selection.
The eight DIP switches on Net-Only modules
trol the Off lamp and turn the module on or off).
have different settings than on standard modules.
Net-Only Module Installation
Net-Only Module Switch Definition tables are on
Net-Only modules can be placed into any input
page 2-66. On Net-Only Universal Input modules,
module position. The only limitation is on Telco
mute locations can be automatically set following
modules: there can only be six Telco modules in a
the VistaMax Room Code. If Room Code is not
frame (regardless of what type of Telco module—
used, then the mute location is set using the mute
standard or Net-Only, full-featured or limited fea-
location DIP switches. On the Net-Only RLS mod-
ture set, is installed).
ules the switches are not active. On the Net-Only
Both the Telco and RLS Net-Only modules are
Telco the switches set the Telco ID number and
automatically setup as “switchers”—controlling a
set whether the Off-line and Record source is pre
single destination on the VistaMax system. Input
or post fader.
source selection for the Net-Only Universal Input
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NET-ONLY MODULE DIP SWITCH SETTINGS
Net-Only Universal Input Module: DS1 Switch Definitions
#
Switch Name
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Spare Switch
CR Mute
Studio 1 Mute
Studio 2 Mute
External Site Mute
Spare Switch
Spare Switch
Spare Switch
ON Function (set to operator’s left)
OFF Function (set to operator's right)
Mutes C/R speakers at module on 1
Mutes Studio 1 speakers at module on 1
Mutes Studio 2 speakers at module on 1
Mutes external site speakers at module on 1
No monitor muting
No monitor muting
No monitor muting
No monitor muting
1
These switches are only active if the VistaMax Room Code function is not being used. Set only one switch to On
to activate mic logic functions (trigger room warning command and mute monitor speakers at channel on).
Net-Only Telco / Codec Module: DS1Switch Definitions
#
Switch Name
ON Function (set to the operator’s left)
OFF Function (set to the operator's right)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Set Telco ID
Set Telco ID
Set Telco ID
Set Telco ID
Set Telco ID
Set Telco ID
O/L & Record Source
Sets the module as Telco / Codec #1 1
Sets the module as Telco / Codec #2 1
Sets the module as Telco / Codec #3 1
Sets the module as Telco / Codec #4 1
Sets the module as Telco / Codec #5 1
Sets the module as Telco / Codec #6 1
Pre-fader when module is off (only when
Session module switch 6 is set for Pre-Fader)
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Post-fader regardless of module on/off
8 Spare Switch
1
Caution: Set only one of these six DIP switches to ON. This setting identifies the module, affecting signal routing and
module controls. Each Telco module in the console MUST have a unique ID setting.
Net-Only Remote Line Selector (RLS) Module: DS1 Switch Definitions
#
Switch Name
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Spare Switch
Spare Switch
Spare Switch
Spare Switch
Spare Switch
Spare Switch
Spare Switch
Spare Switch
ON Function (set to operator’s left)
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OFF Function (set to operator's right)
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3
Operation
T
MONITOR MODULES
his chapter covers module and meter panel
BMXdigital has two types of monitor modules:
• Control Room
component operation for the BMXdigital console.
• Studio
The Control Room module is standard,
Refer back to the illustration on page 2-2 for the
installed next to the Session module. The optional
Studio module is installed next to the Control
module and card placement within the mainframe.
Room module. Refer to these Quick Guide pages
on using the monitor modules:
Module & Card Overview
• Control Room module, pages 3-14 & 3-15
• Studio module, page 3-16
INPUT MODULES
BMXdigital has four types of input modules:
OUTPUT MODULES
• Microphone Preamplifier
BMXdigital has three standard output modules
• Universal Input
installed in dedicated positions at the right end of
• Telco/Codec Input (limited to six)
the mainframe. The Quick Guides to using the
• Remote Line Selector Input (RLS)
output modules are on pages 3-17 and 3-18.
One Mic Preamp module comes standard. A
DSP AND NET CARDS
second Mic Preamp module can be installed next
One or more DSP cards and the optional Net
to the standard Mic Preamp. Any combination, or
Card are installed behind the modules, below the
order, of Universal Input, Telco/Codec (up to six),
meter panel. There are no user controls on these
and RLS modules may be installed into the input
cards.
module positions.
• DSP Card, page 3-20
Refer to these Quick Guide pages on using the
• Net Card, page 3-20
various input modules:
• Mic Preamp module, page 3-2
Meter Panel Overview
• Universal Input module, pages 3-3 to 3-5
• Telco/Codec module, pages 3-6 to 3-10
The BMXdigital meter panel attaches at the rear
• RLS module, page 3-11
of the mainframe and closes down over the upper
part of the modules, hiding all of the module con-
SESSION MODULE
nectors from the board operator’s view. It has the
The Session module is standard, installed im-
meters, a clock (except on the BMXdigital-14) and
mediately to the right of the input module
an event timer. A Quick Guide to the meter panel
positions. A Quick Guide to using the Session
components is on pages 3-18 and 3-19.
module is on pages 3-12 and 3-13.
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MICROPHONE PREAMPLIFIER MODULE QUICK GUIDE
This module amplifies five or ten low-level (-65 to -30 dBu) microphone signals up
to line-level (+4 dBu). The BMXdigital-8 and BMXdigital-14 come standard with five
mic preamps, the other frame sizes come standard with ten mic preamps.
The line-level balanced mono output from each preamplifier can jumper directly to
a Universal Input module; be routed through a patch bay; or connect to an external
line-level mic processor. The trim controls set the gain as required for each microphone preamp. These are normally set during installation and should NOT be adjusted by the board operator.
Two Microphone Preamplifier modules may be installed in a BMXdigital frame to
yield twenty microphone preamplifiers.
MIC PREAMPS
Remove the security cover to access the individual preamp gain trim pots. These adjust
the preamp gain to yield a nominal +4 dBu output for microphone input levels between
-65 dBu and -30 dBu.
PREAMP GAIN — Separate trim controls for each microphone preamp.
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UNIVERSAL INPUT MODULE QUICK GUIDE
This module has two inputs (A and B). The Input Source Display shows the active input in
bold in the top line (the alternate input source is shown in the bottom line). With a Net Card
installed, the module’s input can be a VistaMax source, which is set via the Session file. A
VistaMax source is identified by a blinking dot in the display’s left character. A full-featured
module is shown. A limited-feature version (no Utility bus or Send controls) is also available.
FADER SECTION
This section has the Input Source Display, the buttons for input source selection, Solo, Cue,
On and Off, and the module fader.
Input S
our
ispla
y — A two-line ten-character display that shows the current
Sour
ourcce D
Displa
isplay
selected input in bold in the top line with the alternate input name in the bottom line.
A in — When lit, indicates the A input is selected, and its name is in the top line of the
display. To change the input, the FCN button must be lit (see below).
FCN — Function button. Press for a full second (until it lights), then press the A in or B
in button to change the input source. The A in and B in buttons can only be selected
while the FCN button is lit. It automatically turns off after about three seconds.
B in — When lit, indicates the B input is selected, and its name is in the top line of the
display. To change the input the FCN button must be lit (see above).
F ader — A 100mm module level control with dB indications along the left side to show
the relative attenuation. Setting the fader to the red reference line (-12 dB) sets the module
for unity gain. This means a nominal +4 dBu analog input signal will appear as a -20
indication on the meters. This is equivalent to a 0 VU indication on a mechanical meter.
SOL
O — When lit, adds the module’s post-fader, post-switch audio to the Solo bus and
SOLO
interrupts the monitor and operator headphone outputs, but does not affect the on-line
signal, the co-host, or guest outputs. Solo can be a momentary or a latched function. See
page 2-33 (Session module DIP switch settings) for details.
CUE — When lit, routes the module’s pre-fader, pre-switch audio to the Control Room
module’s cue output. This does not affect the on-line signal. When the module is set as a
mic input, the Cue button is momentary. When the module is a line input, the Cue button
is latched, toggling the cue feed on and off.
ON — When pressed, turns the module on, lighting the button and routing the module
audio to the selected buses. Logic control commands (timer reset, start pulse, Cue reset,
etc.), may be initiated, depending upon the SETUP DIP switch settings.
OFF — When pressed, turns the module off, removing the module audio from all selected
buses (except for those set for pre-switch operation). Logic control commands (Stop Pulse,
Off Tally, etc.) may be initiated, depending upon the SETUP DIP switch settings. This button
can also be set to indicate peripheral device status, thus it may not light up when pressed.
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Universal Input, Telco/Codec & RLS Modules
SEND 1 and SEND 2
(not present on limited-feature modules)
This section has the on/off control, level, and signal routing controls
to feed the module’s audio to the Send 1 and Send 2 buses. The
controls are identical for each Send bus.
PRE FFADER
ADER — When lit, the send audio feed is taken before the
module’s fader (thus adjusting the fader level does not affect the
send output level). When unlit, the send level is affected by the
module’s fader setting.
PRE SWIT
CH — When lit, the send audio is always available
SWITCH
(it is not affected by the module On/Off buttons). When unlit, the
send output follows the module’s on/off status.
R otar
y V olume C
on
tr
ol — Sets the level of the module audio
otary
Con
ontr
trol
feeding that send bus.
ON/OFF — When lit, connects the module to that send bus. If the
module is on (or if the PRE SWITCH button is lit) and the volume
control is turned up (and the module fader is up, if PRE FADER is
not lit), then audio is applied to the bus. When unlit, no audio
from this module is applied to that send bus.
UTILITY BUSES
(not present on limited-feature modules)
This section has the module controls for the four Utility buses:
UTL 1, UTL 2, UTL 3, and UTL 4.
UTL 1, UTL 2, UTL 3, UTL 4 — When lit, routes the module
audio to Utility bus 1, 2, 3, or 4. The module can be assigned to
any combination of buses. When the button is unlit, no audio is
fed to that Utility bus.
PRE FFADER
ADER — When lit, the audio feed to that Utility bus is
taken before the module’s fader (thus adjusting the fader level does
not affect the level to the bus). When unlit, the feed level to the
Utility bus is controlled by the module’s fader setting.
PRE SWIT
CH — When lit, the audio feed to that Utility bus is
SWITCH
always active (it is not affected by the module On/Off buttons).
When unlit, the feed to the Utility bus follows the module’s on/off
status.
Both the Pre Fader and the Pre Switch buttons can be selected on
any Utility or Send Bus.
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Universal Input, Telco/Codec & RLS Modules
PROGRAM BUSES
This section has the selectors for the four Program buses and
the two off-line buses.
P RO G RA M 1 , P RO G RA M 2 , P RO G RA M 3 ,
PR
OGR
AM 4 — When lit, routes the module audio to any
ROGR
OGRAM
combination of the Program 1, Program 2, Program 3, and
Program 4 buses. When unlit, the module audio does not
feed that bus. These outputs are always post-switch and postfader.
O/L 1, O/L 2 (O
ff-Line 1, O
ff-Line 2) — When lit,
(Off-Line
Off-Line
routes the module audio to any combination of the Off-Line
1 and Off-Line 2 buses (which are used for building up offair mix-minuses). The Off-Line feeds are always pre-switch,
but whether they are pre-fader or post-fader is set for all Input
and RLS modules through a DIP switch on the Session module.
For details on setting this option, see page 2-33 (Session Module
DIP switch settings).
MODE/PAN/BAL
This section has the controls for setting the module’s mode
(stereo or three mono modes) and the pan or balance of the
module’s bus outputs.
L and R — These buttons set the mode (stereo or mono).
When both buttons are unlit, the module is stereo. When the L
(left) button is lit, the left input feeds both the left and right
outputs. When the R (right) button is lit, the right input feeds
both the left and right outputs. When both L and R buttons
are lit, the left and right inputs are summed into a mono
mix, which then feeds both the left and right outputs.
R otar
yP
an/B
alanc
eC
on
ol — Controls where the
otary
Pan/B
an/Balanc
alance
Con
ontt rrol
input is placed in stereo aural space when the PAN/BAL button
is lit. On a stereo signal, it functions as a balance control.
On a mono signal (either L or R, or both, are lit), it functions
as a pan pot.
PAN/B
AL — When lit, the pan/balance control is active.
AN/BAL
When unlit, the pan/balance control does not affect the audio.
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TELCO/CODEC MODULE QUICK GUIDE
Up to six Telco/Codec modules may be installed in the console. Most controls are
the same as a Universal Input module (On/Off, Fader, mode selection, and bus selection), but since the module may be connected to an External RLS or router, or may
come from a VistaMax System, there is a Source Selector and Take button on this
module (taking the place of the A/B selectors). There is also a Talkback button for
talking to the caller or remote in addition to Telco record enable and monitor select
buttons. Additional operational details on special Telco functions are presented on
pages 3-8 to 3-10. A limited-feature version module is also available, which does not
have the Send and Utility bus controls.
SEND & UTILITY BUSES
This section has the selectors for the four Utility outputs and the two Send.
Refer to page 3-4 for their functions.
PROGRAM BUSES
This section has the selectors for the four Program outputs and the two offline buses. The AUTO F/B button sets up how the Foldback (the return feed to
the caller) is selected.
PR
OGR
AM 1, PR
OGR
AM 2, PR
PROGR
OGRAM
PROGR
OGRAM
PROGR
OGRAM
ROGR
OGRAM
OGR
AM 3, PR
OGR
AM 4 —
When lit, routes the module to any combination of the Program 1, Program
2, Program 3, and Program 4 buses. The “winking” button indicates the
bus that is being used as the Foldback Mix source (see pages 3-8 and 3-9 for
foldback details). When unlit, the module audio does not feed that bus. These
outputs are always post-switch and post-fader.
O/L 1, O/L 2 (O
ff-Line 1, O
ff-Line 2) — When lit, routes the module
(Off-Line
Off-Line
audio to any combination of the Off-Line 1 and Off-Line 2 buses (which are
used for building up off-air mix-minuses). A “winking” button indicates the
bus that is being used as the Foldback Mix source (see pages 3-8 and 3-9).
The Telco Off-Line feeds are always pre-switch and pre-fader.
A ut
o F/B — Automatic Foldback. When lit, automatically switches the
uto
Foldback Mix source between the “winking” off-line bus (when the module is
off) and the “winking” program bus (when the module is on). For details on
this function, see pages 3-8 and 3-9.
MODE/PAN/BAL
This section has the controls for setting the module’s mode (stereo or mono)
and the pan or balance of the module’s bus outputs. Refer to page 3-5 for
their functions.
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Telco/Codec Module
FADER SECTION
This section has the Input Source Display; input Source Selector and Take controls;
Telco Monitor and Record Feed assignment buttons; the Talkback, Solo, Cue, On,
and Off buttons; and the signal level fader.
Input S
our
Sour
ourcce D
Displa
isplay
ispla
y — A two-line ten-character display that shows the
module’s name in the top line (TELCO 1). When the input is a Switcher, as shown in
the full module illustration, the top line shows the current source (SAT_FEED) and
the bottom line shows the selected source (NEWS_1).
S our
elec
ourcce S
Selec
electt or — A rotary encoder to scroll through the available VistaMax,
router or Ext. RLS sources (shown in the Display’s bottom line). Only active when
the module is set as a Switcher (see page 2-25 for DIP switch settings).
TAKE — When pressed, “takes” the selected source shown in the display’s bottom
line. This makes it the current source, thus its name will be shown in both the top
and bottom lines. The Take button and Source Selector are only active when the
module is set as a Switcher (see page 2-25 for DIP switch settings).
T O REC — When lit solid, adds the module’s audio to the Telco record output.
When flashing, indicates the module is not feeding the record output (see pages 39 and 3-10 for additional information on this function). To select or deselect this
button, the FCN button must be lit (see below).
FCN — Function button. Press for a full second to light, then press the To Rec or To Mon button to
change the setting. The To Rec and To Mon buttons can only be changed while the FCN button is lit.
T O MON — When lit, adds the module to the Telco monitor mix that is available on the Control Room
and Studio modules. To select or deselect, the FCN button must be lit (see above).
ALKBA
A CK — A momentary press to talk button so the board operator can to talk to the caller or
TALKB
remote on the left output of that Telco Input’s mix-minus output.
SOL
O — When lit, adds the module’s post-fader audio to the Solo bus and interrupts the monitor and
SOLO
operator headphone outputs, but does not affect the on-line signal, the co-host or guest outputs. Solo can
be a momentary or a latched function, following a Session module DIP switch setting (page 2-33).
CUE — When lit, routes the module’s pre-fader, pre-switch audio to the Control Room module’s cue
output. This does not affect the on-line signal.
Fader — A 100mm module level control with dB indications along the left side to show relative
attenuation. Set the fader to the red reference line (-12 dB) for module unity gain. This means a nominal
+4 dBu analog input will show a -20 indication on the meters (equivalent to 0 VU).
ON — When pressed, turns the module on, lighting the button and routing the module audio to the
selected buses. Logic control commands (timer reset, start pulse, Cue reset, etc.), may be initiated,
depending upon the SETUP DIP switch settings.
OFF — When pressed, turns the module off, removing the module audio from all selected buses (except
those that are set for pre-switch operation). Logic control commands (Stop Pulse, Off Tally, etc.) may be
initiated, depending upon the SETUP DIP switch settings.
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TELCO FOLDBACK MIX
TELCO/CODEC MODULE OPERATION
Up to six “callers” (any remote send and receive
The Telco Foldback mix source, indicated by its
device like a telephone hybrid, satellite transceiver,
“winking” assignment button on each Telco mod-
ISDN interface, etc.) can connect to six Telco/
ule, is derived from a program or off-line bus. The
Codec modules (Telco), as illustrated below.
bus used is determined by which buses are as-
Each Telco is set to a unique Telco ID number
signed and by whether an Auto-Foldback button
(see page 2-25) and has two mono mix-minus
is on. If it is, then the Telco’s state (module On or
outputs on the Output 1 module. The mono mix-
Off) also affects which bus is the Foldback source.
minus outputs, also called Foldback mixes, send
The program bus Foldback feeds are derived
a sum of one of the program or off-line buses back
post-switch and post-fader, but the off-line bus
to the caller—but always minus the caller’s audio.
feeds are pre-switch and either pre-fader or post-
Hence the mix-minus nomenclature, and why
fader (determined by Session module DIP switch
there are six separate Foldback outputs.
6, see page 2-33). The Telco modules have a separate DIP switch (see page 2-25) active when pre-
Typical Telco/Codec
Input
(Send to network)
fader is selected on the Session module. This al-
Output
(Receive from network)
lows the Telco modules to be post-fader even when
Universal and RLS modules are pre-fader.
Note: When a Telco is set for pre-fader O/L feed,
this setting forces the active Send and Utility buses
to also be pre-fader, when the module is off.
Telos Zephyr
Auto-Foldback On
Telco/Codec Module
(set as Telco #1)
When the AUTO F/B button is lit, as shown
below, that Telco’s Foldback mix automatically
switches between the assigned program bus when
Output 1 Module
the module is On, and the assigned off-line bus
when the module is Off, using this bus priority:
Foldback Sources
Each mix-minus connector has two
outputs. The left output is meant for the
caller, remote talent, or a remote producer
FOLDBACK SOURCE
since it has talkback superimposed over
FOLDBACK SOURCE
since AUTO F/B is lit
the mono mix-minus. The right output is
since AUTO F/B is lit
a mono “clean feed” (it has no talkback).
& module is On
It is used for guests or a remote site program feed. The board operator talks to
any caller by pressing the Talkback button on that Telco module. A local Producer can talk to any caller using a custom switch panel or a Producer Talkback/IFB panel (PRE99-1188).
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digital
3 Operation
While the Module is On: Program 1 is the Fold-
when the remote talent goes on-air, the mix-mi-
back mix source. If it’s not assigned, then the
nus should not change, thus only Program 1 can
source is selected in this order; Program 2, Pro-
be selected on the Telco and the Program 1 mix-
gram 3, Program 4, Off-Line 1, Off-Line 2.
minus will always be sent back to the remote, re-
While the Module is Off: Off-Line 1 is the pri-
gardless of whether the module is On or Off. If a
mary Foldback mix. If it’s not assigned, then Off-
special remote broadcast mix is required, assign
Line 2 is the source. If neither Off-Line is assigned,
Off-Line 1 or Off-Line 2 as well, and it will be the
there will be no mix-minus audio (except for any
return feed, regardless of the Program bus assign-
talkback on the left output).
ments and whether the module is On or Off.
Auto-Foldback On is the most common setting
TELCO RECORD MIX
for call-in contests or interviews where the caller
A two-channel Telco Record Mix output is avail-
will go live on-air. Typically, only the talent’s mic
able on the Output 1 module.
input and the caller’s Telco are assigned to O/L 1.
With the Telco module Off, the caller can hear the
The left channel has
talent thru the O/L 1 bus and the talent can hear
only the callers from
the caller through either the Telco Monitor output
those Telco modules that
or Cue. When the Telco module is turned on, the
have their TO REC but-
mix-minus switches to Program 1 (assuming the
tons lit solid (see page 3-
air feed is Program 1), so the caller can hear ev-
7 for more info on this
erything going to air—minus their voice.
button).
Typical Record
Enabled Telco
Button Settings
Base Mix Source
(feeds the right
channel of the
Telco Record
Outputs)
The right channel has
a base mix from one of
Auto-Foldback Of f
When Auto-Foldback is off (the AUTO F/B but-
the program or off-line
ton is not lit), the module uses a different bus pri-
buses. The source for the
ority order.
base mix is determined
While the Module is On
or Off: The primary Foldback source is Off-Line 1.
through a bus priority
Foldback Source
when AUTO F/B
is not lit
order, similar to how the
Foldback Mix source is
If it is not assigned, then
Off-Line 2 is the source.
If it is not assigned then
the program buses are selected in this order; Program 1, Program 2, Pro-
est priority bus assigned on any TO REC Telco
Foldback
Source
when
Auto F/B
is not
becomes the source for the base mix—even if more
lower priority buses are assigned on more TO REC
Telco modules.
Typically, only one caller is recorded at a time,
but, because there can be up to six Telcos, and
Auto-Foldback Off is
for recording callers for
later broadcast and for
Module On/Off
status does not
affect the Telco
Record Outputs
selected. Again, the high-
gram 3, Program 4.
the most common setting
TO REC buttonslit
solid: both are
feeding the left
channel of the
Telco Record
Outputs.
each module can have completely different assignments, the TO REC buttons not only record en-
Module On/Off
status does not
change the
foldback source.
able a module, they also indicate whether or not
that Telco is actually being recorded.
doing a live remote where a “broadcast” feed to
When the TO REC buttons are lit solid, as shown
the remote site is required. In a remote broadcast,
above, those callers are feeding the left channel of
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Recording Functions with Auto
Foldback Active on one or more
Record Enabled Telcos
the record output. When the TO REC button is
“winking,” (as shown to the right) it indicates that
caller is NOT being recorded.
As with creating the Foldback Mix, the bus pri-
Base Mix Source
when this module
is On since AUTO F/B
is active.
ority order changes when a TO REC Telco has
Auto-Foldback enabled. But, there is added complexity since multiple modules can have AUTO
Base Mix Source
when this module
is Off since AUTO F/B
is active.
F/B turned On! Thus, the easiest way to record a
caller is to keep AUTO F/B turned off and only
Since Auto F/B is un-lit,
this module does not affect
the Base Mix source.
have one Telco module with TO REC active.
Here are the two Telco Recording priority orders and what happens in each condition:
TO REC buttonlit
solid: Telco 1 feeds
the left channel
of the Telco Record
Outputs, regardless of
module On/Off status.
AUTO F/B is off on all TO REC Telcos: The Base
Mix source is Off-Line 1. If it is not assigned, then
Off-Line 2 is the source.When either of these buses
are selected, the TO REC Telco module On/Off set-
Module On/Off status
changes the Base Mix
source
tings do not affect the record output as shown on
the previous page. It is the easiest method to record
TO REC button flashes to indicate
Telco 2 is NOT being recorded.
WHY? Because this module is On,
which assigns it to the Program 1
Base Mix, but with Telco 1 Off, the
Base Mix is Off-Line 1. If Telco 1 is
turned On, and Telco 2 is still On,
then the Base Mix is Program 1
and the TO REC button will be lit
solid and this module will feed
the left channel of the Telco
Record Outputs.
callers.
When neither Off-Line bus is assigned, then the
Here is a summary table of what is, or is not,
Program buses are used in this order; Program 1,
Program 2, Program 3, Program 4. In this case
recorded:
the TO REC Telco module must be turned On in
TELCO RECORD MIX, CHANNEL ASSIGNMENT SUMMARY
order to record the caller. If the TO REC module
LEFT CHANNEL Those Telco modules with their TO REC
buttons lit solid
is Off, then TO REC will wink, indicating that caller
RIGHT All modules assigned to the Base Mix
CHANNEL bus, including those Telco modules that
are not record enabled (TO REC button
is not lit)
is NOT being recorded.
AUTO F/B is lit on at least one TO REC Telco: In
this case, the source is controlled by the On/Off
NOT Any module NOT assigned to the Base
RECORDED Mix bus, which includes any Telcos with
a winking TO REC button
state of any TO REC Telco with its AUTO F/B
button lit. When all of the Telcos with AUTO F/B
lit are On, then Program 1 is the primary base
Note: Off-line feeds from Universal Input and
mix (followed by Program 2, Program 3, Program
RLS modules are always pre-switch and are set
4, Off-Line 1, Off-Line 2).
for either Pre- or Post-Fader by a Session module
When any of these modules are Off, then Off-
global DIP switch (see page 2-33 about this set-
Line 1 becomes the base mix. If it’s not assigned,
ting). The Telco modules’ Off-Line bus feeds are
then Off-Line 2 is the base mix. If neither Off-
also pre-switch, but each has a separate Post-/Pre-
Line is assigned, there will be no callers recorded
Fader DIP switch (see page 2-25 about this set-
and all the TO REC buttons will be winking. This
ting) when the Session module switch is set for
is summarized in the illustration on this page.
Pre-fader.
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REMOTE LINE SELECTOR (RLS) MODULE QUICK GUIDE
This module has one input from a Switcher (VistaMax System, External RLS or Router).
It has the same features as the Universal Input module, except that a Source Selector
and Take button replace the A/B Input selector buttons. A limited-feature version is also
available, which does not have the Send and Utility bus controls.
SEND & UTILITY BUSES
This section has the selectors for the four Utility outputs and the two Send. Refer to page
3-4 for their functions.
PROGRAM BUSES
This section has the selectors for the four Program outputs and the two off-line buses.
Refer to page 3-5 for their functions.
MODE/PAN/BAL
This section has the controls for setting the module’s mode (stereo or mono) and the
pan or balance of the module’s bus outputs. Refer to page 3-5 for their functions.
FADER SECTION
This section has the Input Source Display, the controls for input Source Selection, the
Solo, Cue, On and Off buttons, and the module fader.
Input S
our
ispla
y — A two-line ten-character display that shows the current
Sour
ourcce D
Displa
isplay
source (SAT_FEED) in the top line. The bottom line shows the selected source (NEWS_1).
The brackets on the current name indicate that the router source change is still pending.
See Appendix B for details on router control functions.
S our
elec
ourcce S
Selec
electt or — A rotary encoder that scrolls through the available sources
(shown in the Display’s bottom line) when the module is set as a switcher. Used with the
Take button (see below).
TAKE — Press to take the selected source shown in the display’s bottom line. It then
becomes the current source, and is thus shown in both lines. The Take button and
Source Selector are only active with a Switcher input. For details, see page 2-25.
SOL
O — When lit, adds the module’s post-fader audio to the Solo bus and interrupts
SOLO
the monitor and operator headphone outputs, but does not affect the on-line signal, the
co-host or guest outputs. Solo can be a momentary or a latched function. See page
2-33 for details.
CUE — When lit, routes the module’s pre fader, pre switch audio to the Control Room
module’s cue output. This does not affect the on-line signal.
ON — When pressed, turns the module on, lighting the button and routing the module
audio to the selected buses. Logic control commands (timer reset, start pulse, Cue reset,
etc.), may be initiated, depending upon the SETUP DIP switch settings.
OFF — When pressed, turns the module off, removing the module audio from all
selected buses (except those that are set for pre-switch operation). Logic control
commands (Stop Pulse, Off Tally, etc.) may be initiated, depending upon the SETUP
DIP switch settings.
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SESSION MODULE QUICK GUIDE
This module has the controls for the timer, and for saving and recalling Sessions (server
files holding different console setups), and the Main and Auxiliary Meter source selectors.
AUX METER
This section allows one source to be selected for the Auxiliary meter. The selection is overridden by
Cue or Solo, which display on the Auxiliary meter while active.
EX
T 1, EX
T 2, EX
T 3, EX
T 4 — When lit, assigns an External input to the Auxiliary meter.
EXT
EXT
EXT
EXT
SND 1, SND 2 — When lit, assigns a Send bus to the Auxiliary meter.
UTL 1, UTL 2, UTL 3, UTL 4 — When lit, assigns a Utility Bus to the Auxiliary meter.
TEL
CO REC — When lit, assigns the Telco Record output to the Auxiliary meter. See pages
TELC
3-9 and 3-10 for more information about this mix.
MAIN METERS
This section has the source selectors for the Main meters.
PGM 1-4 — When lit, assigns the four Program buses to the main meters on all size frames
except for the BMXd-8. On the BMXd-8, each press displays the next PGM bus (the first press shows
PGM 1, the next press shows PGM 2, then PGM 3, then PGM 4, etc.).
UTL 1-4 — When lit, assigns the four Utility buses to the main meters on all size frames except
for the BMXd-8. On the BMXd-8, each press shows the next UTL bus (the first press shows UTL 1, the
next press shows UTL 2, then UTL 3, then UTL 4, etc.). Each Utility bus signal can also be sent
individually to the Auxiliary meter.
SESSION
This section allows the console operator to recall or save Sessions. Sessions hold the console setup
parameters (settings such as which Input module buttons are lit and the module input source
names). Sessions are stored on the BMXdigital Server, which is on the Session module. Chapter 4
covers the BMXdigital Server in detail.
S ession D
ispla
y — The top line shows the current Session name (the file that is currently
Displa
isplay
loaded into the console). The bottom line shows the selected or “on deck” Session name, as dialed
up by the Session Selector. This selected Session is loaded into the console by pressing the TAKE
button.
S ession S
elec
Selec
electt or — A rotary encoder to alphanumerically show previously saved Session
file names in the bottom line of the Session Display.
TAKE — Loads the Session file shown in the bottom line of the Session Display into the console.
The current and selected names will then be the same, until the Session Selector is rotated.
SA
VE — Saves all of the Input modules’ button settings, input source names and button lockout
AVE
information as a new Session on the BMXdigital Server using the current session name with a
new numerical suffix added (operators cannot overwrite existing sessions).
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Session Module
TIMER CONTROL
This section has the controls for the event timer, located
at the right end of the meter panel.
AU T
O RESET — When lit, allows the timer to be
TO
automatically reset whenever an input module, with its
timer reset function enabled, is turned on. When a reset
command is detected, the timer resets to 00:00.0 and
immediately starts counting upward. When inactive (not
lit), the timer ignores module timer reset commands.
RESET — Manually resets the timer to 00:00.0. If the
timer was already counting, the timer will continue to
count up from 00:00.0.
HOLD — When pressed and held, stops the timer’s
display to show the elapsed time (the timer itself continues
to run). Releasing HOLD returns the timer display to the
current run time.
ST
AR
T — Immediately starts the timer from the
TA
RT
displayed time.
ST
OP — Immediately stops the timer. The elapsed time
TOP
remains on the timer display until cleared by the RESET
button, or START is pressed to start the timer counting
up from the displayed time.
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CONTROL ROOM MODULE QUICK GUIDE
This module has the monitor source selection and control facilities for the console operator’s
headphones and the control room monitor speakers.
CONTROL ROOM
This section controls the audio source(s) for the various Control Room outputs. The left column
buttons select the audio for the monitor speakers, the co-host, and guest headphones; the right
column buttons select the audio for the operator’s headphones. Multiple buttons can be selected
(hold down one button and press additional buttons), however, only two digital sources (the
Send, Program, and Utility buses are all digital) can be selected simultaneously.
T 2, EX
T 3, EX
T 4 — Routes an External Input to the Control Room outputs.
EX
T 1, EX
EXT
EXT
EXT
EXT
SND 1, SND 2 — Routes a Send bus to the Control Room outputs.
UTL 1, UTL 2, UTL 3, UTL 4 — Routes a Utility bus to the Control Room outputs.
TEL
CO REC — Routes the Telco Record Base Mix to the Control Room outputs.
TELC
TEL
CO MON — Routes the Telco Monitor Mix to the Control Room outputs.
TELC
PGM 1, PGM 2, PGM 3, PGM 4 — Routes a Program Bus to the Control Room outputs.
SOL
O CLEAR — Flashes to indicate a module has Solo active. Press to clear the Solo function.
SOLO
FOLL
O W MONIT
OR — When lit forces the right column selector buttons (HEADPHONE) to
FOLLO
MONITOR
follow the left column buttons (MONITOR). When unlit, the Headphone selector buttons function
independently of the Monitor select buttons.
A UT
O CUE — When lit, allows cue to interrupt the operator headphone output. When unlit,
UTO
cue does not affect the operator headphone output.
CUE V olume P
ot — Controls the level of the dedicated Cue output.
Pot
TALKB
A CK V olume P
ot — Controls the level of the dedicated Talkback output.
ALKBA
Pot
L & R MODE — These buttons set the monitor mode (stereo or mono) for both the monitor
speakers and headphones. When both buttons are unlit, the outputs are stereo. When the L (left)
button is lit, the left input feeds both the left and right outputs. When the R (right) button is lit, the
right input feeds both the left and right outputs. When both L and R buttons are lit, the left and
right inputs are summed into a mono mix to feed both the left and right outputs.
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Control Room Module
FADER
This section has the two faders to control the levels of the Monitor
speakers and Operator headphones. The Co-Host and Guest
headphone outputs are fixed-level outputs that are typically
controlled by a headphone jack panel with volume control like the
PRE99-103-2.
MONIT
OR FFader
ader — 100mm fader to adjust the level of the
MONITOR
Control Room monitor speakers. It controls the MONITOR output
level.
HEADPHONE FFader
ader — 100mm fader to adjust the level of
the console operator’s headphones. It controls the OPERATOR output
level.
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STUDIO MODULE QUICK GUIDE
This optional module has the monitor source and talkback controls for two studio locations.
STUDIO
This section has the source selector buttons for all the outputs (monitor and headphone) for two
air studios, voice booths, or other locations. The left column buttons control the source(s) for the
Studio 1 outputs; the right column buttons control the source(s) for the Studio 2 outputs. Multiple
sources can be selected simultaneously by holding down one source button while pressing
additional buttons.
T 2, EX
T 3, EX
T 4 — Selects an External input for the Studio outputs.
EX
T 1, EX
EXT
EXT
EXT
EXT
SND 1, SND 2 — Selects a Send bus for the Studio outputs.
UTL 1, UTL 2, UTL 3, UTL 4 — Selects a Utility Bus for the Studio outputs.
TEL
CO REC — Selects the Telco Record Base Mix for the Studio outputs.
TELC
TEL
CO MON — Selects the Telco monitor mix for the Studio outputs.
TELC
PGM 1, PGM 2, PGM 3, PGM 4 — Selects a Program Bus for the Studio outputs.
TALKBACK LEVEL
This section has the talkback level controls for the two studios. The left control is the talkback level
for Studio 1; the right control is the talkback level for Studio 2.
TALKB
A CK V olume P
ots — Each pot sets the level for the associated studio’s talkback.
ALKBA
Pots
MONITOR LEVEL
This section has the controls for the monitor levels for the studios. The left control is for Studio 1;
the right control is for Studio 2. The control is not active when a Studio Selector panel (PRE991189) with a Volume Control panel (PRE99-1192) is connected to the console.
MONIT
OR V olume P
ots — Each pot sets the level for the associated studio’s Monitor output.
Pots
MONITOR
STUDIO 1 & 2 TALKB
AC K
ALKBA
This section has the controls for talking to the two studios.
TALK O
VER MUTE — A latching button that, when lit, permits talkback audio to the studio’s
OVER
monitor output even when it is muted. When unlit, talkback is muted with the studio monitors.
CO-HOST — While pressed, routes the console talkback audio to the Co-Host output.
HOST — While pressed, routes the console talkback audio to the Host output.
STUDIO — While pressed, routes the console talkback audio to the studio’s Monitor output.
TALK T O EX
TERNAL — While pressed, routes the console talkback audio to the External
EXTERNAL
audio output.
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OUTPUT 1 MODULE QUICK GUIDE
This module has the mix-minus outputs for up to six Telco modules and a telco
record output. Separate trim controls set the analog record output level and the talkback levels for the producer and console mics. These controls are normally set once
during installation so should NOT require adjustment by the board operator.
OUTPUT 1
Normally protected by a security cover. It has the separate trimpots for setting the Telco
Record Mix outputs and the talkback levels for the console and producer.
ORD MIX, LEFT & RIGHT — Sets the analog output levels for the Telco
TEL
CO REC
TELC
RECORD
Record Mix output.
CONSOLE MIC LE
VEL SET — Sets the talkback level to the mix-minus outputs
LEVEL
when the TALK BACK buttons are pressed on the Telco modules.
PR
ODUCER MIC LE
VEL SET — Sets the talkback level of the producer’s microphone
RODUCER
LEVEL
on the Producer Talkback/IFB Panel (PRE99-1188) going to the mix-minus outputs.
OUTPUT 2 MODULE QUICK GUIDE
This module has the outputs for Program 1, Program 2, Utility 1, Utility 2, and
Send 1. Trim controls, for the analog outputs, set the left and right channels separately.
These controls are normally set once during installation so should NOT require adjustment by the board operator.
OUTPUT 2
Normally protected by a security cover. Separate multi-turn trimpots set the left and right
analog output levels for each bus.
PGM-1L/-1R — Sets the left/right output levels for the Program 1 analog outputs. Both
the Main and Aux output are affected equally.
PGM-2L/-2R — Sets the left/right output levels for the Program 2 analog outputs. Both
the Main and Aux outputs are affected equally.
UTL-1L/-1R — Sets the left/right channel output levels for the Utility 1 analog output.
UTL-2L/-2R — Sets the left/right channel output levels for the Utility 2 analog output.
SEND-1L/-1R — Sets the left/right channel output levels for the Send 1 analog output.
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OUTPUT 3 MODULE QUICK GUIDE
This module has the outputs for Program 3, Program 4, Utility 3, Utility 4, and
Send 2. Trim controls, for the analog outputs, set the left and right channels separately.
These controls are normally set once during installation so should NOT require adjustment by the board operator.
OUTPUT 3
Normally protected by a security cover. Separate multi-turn trimpots set the left and right
analog output levels for each bus.
PGM-3L/-3R — Sets the left/right output levels for the Program 3 analog outputs. Both
the Main and Aux outputs are affected equally.
PGM-4L/-4R — Sets the left/right output levels for the Program 4 analog outputs. Both
the Main and Aux outputs are affected equally.
UTL-3L/-3R — Sets the left/right channel output levels for the Utility 3 analog output.
UTL-4L/-4R — Sets the left/right channel output levels for the Utility 4 analog output.
SEND-2L/-2R — Sets the left/right channel output levels for the Send 2 analog output.
METER PANEL QUICK GUIDE
Each meter panel has a clock (except for the BMXdigital-14), an event timer, and five stereo bargraph meters
(except for the BMXdigital-8, which has two meters).
BMXdigital Meter Panel
Clock
(not available on
the BMXdigital-14)
Main Meters
(Program or Utility Buses)
BMXd-8 has only one meter.
Event Timer
Auxiliary Meter
(Cue, Solo, Session module
selected source)
CLOCK
The clock displays time in hours:minutes:seconds in either 12- or 24-hour time. See page 2-5 for information
on setting the clock and for the clock board’s DIP switch functions.
EVENT TIMER
The event timer displays time in minutes:seconds:tenths of seconds. See page 2-6 for information on setting the
timer board’s DIP switches and page 3-13 for descriptions of the timer controls on the Session module.
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BARGRAPH METERS
Horizontal bargraph meters display stereo outputs as detailed below. The name of the signal being metered is
shown below each meter.
The first four meters from the left, except for the BMXdigital-8, provide separate level monitoring for the four
Program or four Utility buses (toggled by the PGM 1-4 and UTL 1-4 buttons on the Session module, see page 312). On the BMXdigital-8, the left hand meter shows one Program or Utility bus. Repeatedly press the PGM 14 or UTL 1-4 buttons to display each bus in numeric order on the left hand meter.
The fifth meter, Auxiliary (the right hand meter on the BMXdigital-8), shows the cue or solo bus level, or a
source (an external input, a Send bus, a Utility bus, or the Telco Record Base Mix) set by the Source Selector
buttons in the Aux Meter section of the Session module (see page 3-12). The meter’s alphanumeric display
identifies the name of the selected source (e.g., CUE, SOLO, SEND-2, EXTERNAL-1, etc.).
BMXdigital Bargraph Meter
Left Channel Level
Separate Blue Peak
Indicators for the
Left and Right
Channels
dB below FSD*
Right Channel Level
Signal name
* FSD = Full Scale Digital, or 0 on the meters—the maximum console output level
Each bar segment, from 0 down to -30 represents, a 1 dB level change between bars. From -30 to -57, each bar
represents a 3 dB difference in level. The bars are green from -57 up to -20. The -20 level is equivalent to a 0 VU
setting on a mechanical meter. With a properly set up console this results in a +4 dBu analog output (analog
outputs can be level trimmed, however). From -20 up to -3 the LEDs are yellow. Levels should always peak in this
area. The 0, -1, and -2 bars are red to indicate the signal is dangerously close to clipping. To prevent digital
distortion on the outputs, the red bars should rarely, if ever, light up—especially the 0 bar since this indicates the
signal is at, or attempting to go beyond, Full Scale Digital (the digital clipping point).
A Session module DIP switch (see page 2-33) sets the meter displays for average only (a solid moving bargraph
indicates the average signal level) or for average and peak (a solid bargraph represents the average level with a
single bar, typically 6 to 10 dB higher than the average bargraph, representing the peak level).
The two blue peak indicators may light up in either mode to indicate the signal is too hot. The level at which
the blue peak indicators turn on (0, -2, -4, or -6), and the meter display mode (peak hold, where the highest peak
bar stays lit for about 3 seconds, or non-peak hold, where the peak more accurately follows the signal), is set
separately for each meter using DIP switches on the edge of each meter PCA (see page 2-6).
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DSP CARDS
The Net Card has eight local inputs and eight
The DSP Cards (one in the BMXdigital-8, two
local outputs from the VistaMax Audio Manage-
in the BMXdigital-14, three in the BMXdigital-
ment System. These travel to/from the console to
22, four in the BMXdigital-30 and five in the
the VistaMax frame with the other console signals
BMXdigital-38) mount into the console perpen-
through the two Facet connectors on the Net Card.
dicularly behind the input modules. They are hid-
The Net Card’s inputs are used as sources in
den by the meter panel in normal use since there
the VistaMax system. They are made available to
are no operator controls on the cards.
one or more VistaMax destinations depending
upon how each input is published in the VistaMax
Each card has a “heartbeat” LED to indicate the
system.
card’s status. One DSP, typically the left hand card,
is the master DSP, as evidenced by its heartbeat
The eight Net Card outputs show up asVistaMax
LED blinking at twice the rate of the remaining
destinations. The source for each destination is se-
DSP Cards.
lected via a Session file setting or are manually
selected using a VistaMax hardware Selector Panel
NET CARD
or an on-screen software panel, to select the source.
The optional Net Card (shown below) mounts
Refer to the VistaMax manual (Harris # 74-52)
in line with the DSP cards at the right rear corner
for additional information on VistaMax sources
of the frame, behind the output modules. It is hid-
and destinations.
den by the meter panel in normal use since there
are no operator controls on the card.
BMXdigital Net Card
Local Analog & Digital Inputs
Local Analog & Digital Outputs
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digital
BMXdigital
Server Setup
4
T
BMXd File Structure
a single-board computer (SBC) with an integral
ers to ensure proper operation. The following
The BMXdigital console’s setup and configura-
he BMXdigital Server physically consists of
tion files must be properly saved into specific foldscreen shot shows the folders and files in the useraccessible area of the flash disk. Except for
Flash Disk to store the operating system, configura-
Release.txt, all BMXd server files are located
within the Storage Card folder.
tion files, setup files and user-created session files.
The SBC is part of the Session module.
The BMXdigital Server stores these file types:
• Sessions (.ses suffix)
• Macros (.mac suffix)
Files and Folders on the BMXdigital Server
• Console setup (.ini suffix)
• Console configuration (.cfg suffix)
An FTP program is used to access the console’s
The BMXdigital Server also functions as an FTP
flash disk. Internet Explorer can be used, but FTP
(File Transfer Protocol) server. This allows files to
Voyager, a dedicated FTP file management pro-
be easily transferred between a networked Win-
gram (a demo version is included on the 99-5000
dows® computer and the console using an FTP
CD-ROM), is recommended. The default factory
program. A computer networked with the console
IP address assigned to each BMXdigital console
is generically referred to as the “setup computer,”
is 192.168.100.22. Enter this IP address into the
which serves as the editing interface for the
FTP Site address field in FTP Voyager in order to
BMXdigital Server files.
view the console files on a new console.
All .ini and .cfg files on the BMXd Server
Inside the Storage Card folder is a Data folder,
are maintained using VistaMax Control Center
an nqx.ini file, and three other system files that
(VMCC)—an editor program included on the 99-
should not be changed. Inside the Data folder are
5000 CD-ROM. It is installed and runs on the setup
the SesFiles, SysFiles and Ref folders. The Ref
computer. Using the program is covered later in
folder is never changed.
this chapter and in Appendix A.
Because BMXdigital uses the same operating
system as RMXdigital consoles and VistaMax
frames, only one setup computer running VMCC
is required to maintain all of the files on all of the
VistaMax devices that are networked together in
Storage Card and Data folder contents
the VistaMax LAN.
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SESFILES FOLDER
The SesFiles folder holds session and macro files.
The SysFiles folder holds these console config and
The SesFiles folder holds all of the user-created
setup files: ROUTERS.INI, INVENTORY.TXT,
session and macro files, and the init.mac file,
LOCAL_PUBLISH.CFG, EDGEDEVICE.INI,
which is a special macro file created and main-
SERVERID.TXT and, when the console is net-
tained using VMCC.
worked in a VistaMax System, a device publish
A session file is used to instantly change con-
file (Dx_PUBLISH.CFG) for other devices (con-
sole channel settings for particular dayparts or for
soles and racks) in the VistaMax community.
specific applications like voice tracking, production, newsroom use or on-air use. A session is cre-
BMXDIGITAL SERVER FILES OVERVIEW
ated by first selecting the channel sources and setting the channel button assignments as required
for a particular daypart or application. Pressing
RELEASE.TXT
This text file—stored at the top level of the flash
Save on the Monitor Control panel saves these con-
drive, lists the operating system version, build
sole settings as a new session file into the SesFiles
number and build date. This can be compared to
folder.
the current operating system build on the Harris
A session file is loaded into the console by first
FTP site (see page 5-1 for access details). The
using the Monitor Control panel’s rotary Session
release.txt file looks like this:
Selector to alphanumerically list the .ses files in
the SesFiles folder. With the desired session file
VistaMax Platform Version 4.20 [SJP]
CE.NET 4.2 + 2004 Q1 and Q2 QFEs applied
name displayed, press Take to load that session
#build 441 - built 08:09:2005 @ 16:46.08
into the console. This reconfigures the channel set-
Technology of Pacific Research & Engineering
Copyright 2003 - 2005 Harris Corp.
tings—except for those channels that are On, they
do not change to the new session settings until
they are turned Off to prevent any on-air signal
NQX.INI
This essential setup file is in the Storage Card
interruption.
folder. It is read as the SBC starts after power up,
Macro files are text files like sessions, but they
when the SBC Reset button is pressed or when
are not selected using the Session Selector. If a
the SBC is reset via an FTP command.
board operator would need to load a macro they
The file stores the console’s IP address, server
can be assigned to a router channel, otherwise they
name, device number and several other start-up
are loaded using FTP commands (either manu-
parameters. The file is maintained using VMCC.
ally using FTP Voyager or automatically by using
The most commonly edited file entries are cov-
the Task Scheduler program included on the 99-
ered in on page 4-5, BMXd Server Configuration.
5000 CD-ROM). Macro files have a .mac suffix.
A special macro file maintained by VMCC, called
init.mac, loads automatically each time the SBC
PROVISIONED.HASH
This file is also in the Storage Card folder. It is
starts up to set the sample rates on the two ad-
created by VMCC, which uses it to determine which
justable rate outputs on the Net Card.
files are to be replaced when Distributing files.
Deleting this file will cause the next Distribute files
Editing session files as well as creating and ed-
action to replace all files. This is equivalent to se-
iting macro files are covered in later sections of
lecting the Force Download option.
this chapter and in Appendix A.
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4 BMXdigital Server
SYSFILES FOLDER
ROUTERS.INI
The SysFiles folder holds the remaining con-
This file, also maintained using VMCC, sets
sole configuration and initialization files. It also
which sources and destinations are available for
has a number of files automatically maintained
routing on a console. There are three sections to
by the BMXdigital server. These include route per-
the file: router definitions; source include list; des-
sistence files (PF_xx.bin) that allow audio routes
tination include list, as shown below:
to be automatically reestablished if power is lost
[Routers]
; Router types supported: VistaMax
Type_1=VistaMax
;
[SrcInclude]
Include_1_1=D3.225-231
Include_1_2=D11.173-233,257-291
;
[DstInclude]
Include_1_1=D11.129-159,209-215
to the console.
The following descriptions cover user files in the
SysFiles folder:
SERVERID.TXT
This text file lists the ID number of the KSU
Headers ([Routers], [SrcInclude],
card’s Single Board Computer (SBC). It consists
[DstInclude]) define the sections. [Routers]
of a single line of text:
sets whether a VistaMax or another type of router
Server ID is 123-456-789.
is networked with the console. [SrcInclude]
The number (e.g., 123-456-789) is the Server
(Source Include) lists all of the input signals that
ID for that particular SBC. This number can be
could be shown on the router or telco modules’
given to a Harris tech support representative in
source selectors. In the example above, only sig-
order to receive a License Code (entered into
nals 225-231 on device 3 and signals 173-233
VMCC) to unlock optional extended features on a
and 257-291 on device 11 would be shown in the
specific console.
source selectors.
DstInclude (Destination Include) lists the
destinations that are available to Edge Devices
INVENTORY.TXT
This text file lists the modules plugged into the
served by the console. In the example, the only
console and how many DSP cards are in the frame.
destinations that would be shown on a VM-SDS
This information is updated whenever the con-
(source/destination selector) would be those on
sole is restarted or a module is removed or
device 11, destinations 129-159 and 209-215.
Each include statement line lists sources from a
changed. The inventory is also saved in the Map-
single VistaMax device. However, when there are
ping section of each session file.
Modules are listed by hex numbers. The num-
a lot of sources from one device, there could be
bers are the hex equivalent of session file channel
multiple Include_x= statement lines for that
ID numbers.
one device.
EDGEDEVICE.INI
Map_0_to_7=ff ff ff 01 02 03 04 05
Map_8_to_15=06 ff ff ff ff ff ff ff
Map_16_to_23=ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff
Map_24_to_31=ff 07 08 09 0a 0b 0c 0d
Map_32_to_39=0e 0f 10 11 12 13 14 15
Map_40_to_47=16 17 18 19 1a 1b 1c 1d
Map_48_to_55=1e 1f 20 21 22 91 92 61
Map_56_to_63=61 b1 b2 ff ff ff ff ff
DSP=4
This file, maintained using VMCC, configures
edge devices (console or rack-mount source or
source/destination selector panels) that receive
their information from the BMXdigital Server. An
edgedevice.ini file example, for a single VM-
Typical BMXd-38 INVENTORY.TXT file contents
SSD selector panel, is shown on the next page.
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4 BMXdigital Server
[System]
;===========================================================================
;TimeServerIP=192.168.100.11:123;
;LogServerIP=192.168.100.11:514; ;
;VMCommunityIP=234.5.6.7:5100;default value
;
;===========================================================================
[EdgeDeviceIndex]
;===========================================================================
EdgeDevice_1=00-60-35-01-e8-ff
; SS_1_6_Dst
;
;===========================================================================
[00-60-35-01-e8-ff]
; SS_1_6_Dst
;===========================================================================
EXEFile=rced/rced.tini
;Location of tini
FTPServerIP=192.168.100.22 ;server IP address
DeviceIP=192.168.100.201
;edge IP address
DeviceMask=255.255.255.0
;Device mask
GatewayIP=0.0.0.0
;Gateway
LogServerEnable=1
;ServerName=BMXd_1;
DeviceName=SS_1_6_Dst
;Edge device name
VMServerIP=192.168.100.22:4001 ;IP add:port#
;
Destination_1=D1.243
;
Include_1_1_1=D2.225-231
Include_1_1_2=D3.71,77,129,131
Include_1_1_3=D1.173,175,225,227,257-291
;
Include_2_1_1=D1.257-271
Include_2_2_1=D2.225
Include_2_2_2=D3.71,77,129,131
Include_2_2_3=D1.225
Include_2_3_1=D1.273-287
Include_2_4_1=D2.225-231
Include_2_4_2=D1.225,227,233,289,291
Include_2_5_1=D1.273-287,337,339
Include_2_6_1=D1.257-271
;
;Button Assignments =============
Button_1_1=D3.71
Button_1_2=D3.129
Button_1_3=D3.131
Button_1_4=D1.225
Button_1_5=D1.273
Button_1_6=D1.275
;
Button_2_1=D1.245
Button_2_2=D1.247
Button_2_3=D1.249
Button_2_4=D1.251
Button_2_5=D1.253
Button_2_6=D1.255
and the Include_2 entries). Again, all of these en-
Although edge devices are typically served by a
characteristics: whether the signal is hidden and
VistaMax frame, they can be served by a console,
whether it is mono or stereo. For example, the first
as shown above. This is typically only done when
source shown: src=241,NET A1, identifies sig-
the controlled destinations are the console’s Net
nal 241 as the left output of Net Card connector
Card outputs. As shown, a dual selector panel (VM-
A1. It is a mono signal since the next entry
SSD) is configured so that the left buttons (identi-
(src=241,NET A1R) is not linked to the previ-
fied as Button_1_1 thru 6) are hot source keys to
ous entry by a ,242 at the end of the entry. Both
control the source for destination 1 (signal 243:
signal 241 and 242 are available and are not hid-
the Net A2 analog output). The right hand but-
den (an open bracket, {, placed in front of the
tons are conversely set as six destination selectors
name hides that signal from being selected or seen
(Button_2_1 thru 6) for signals 245 - 255: the net
by the other VistaMax community devices).
tries are set using the VMCC program, covered later
in this chapter and in Appendix A.
LOCAL_PUBLISH.CFG
This file, again created by VMCC following the
parameter entries entered into the program, lists
all of the sources and destinations on the console
by their In Room Names. It further identifies
whether the signal is hidden or not and whether it
is stereo linked. The following example of a
local_publish.cfg file shows just a portion
of the KSU card audio signals:
;AudioSrc Card#: 63
src=241,NET A1
src=242,NET A1R
src=243,NET A2,244
src=244,{NA2R
src=245,NET A3,246
src=246,{NA3R
src=247,NET A4,248
src=248,{NA4R
;
;AudioDst Card#: 63
dst=241,A1 ALG,242
dst=242,{NA1R
dst=243,A2 ALG,244
dst=244,{NA2R
dst=245,A3 ALG,246
dst=246,{NA3R
dst=247,A4 ALG,248
dst=248,{NA4R
Each line identifies one signal as either a source
(src=) or a destination (dst=), along with two
The first destination signal that is shown
Card A3 and A4 analog outputs and the four digi-
(dst=241,A1 ALG,242) identifies the signal as
tal outputs, D1 thru D4).
Each destination covered by the edge device has
the A1 analog output of the net Card (signal 241);
an included signal list (identified by the Include_1
that its displayed name is A1 ALG; and that the
signal is stereo linked to the next signal (by the
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4 BMXdigital Server
BMXd Server Configuration
,242 at the end of the entry). The “right channel”
of the A1 analog output (dst=242,{NA1R) is hidden because of the { (open bracket) in front of the
Several software programs must be installed on
signal name. On stereo signals the right channel
the setup computer in order to configure the
is always hidden by default.
BMXdigital server files. These programs are supplied on the 99-5000 CD-ROM. They can also be
downloaded from the Harris FTP site (see page
Dx_PUBLISH.CFG
5-1 in Maintenance for FTP access details).
As part of a VistaMax system, each console and
frame has a unique device number assigned in its
COMMUNITY MONITOR
nqx.ini file. In order for a device to know what
sources are available from other devices, a Device
Community Monitor (CM) runs as a process on
Publish file is created by VMCC in the form of
the setup computer (it initially appears as only a
Dx_publish.cfg where x is the console’s de-
tray icon:
vice number. The example below shows the same
Show Monitor Display).
. Right-click on the icon and select
The Community Monitor listens to communi-
section as the local_publish file shown previously:
cations on the VistaMax LAN from all VistaMax
;AudioSrc Card#: 46
src=161,11.MM1
src=162,11.MM1R
src=163,11.MM2
src=164,11.MM2R
src=165,{11.MM3,166
src=166,{11.MM3R
src=167,{11.MM4,168
src=168,{11.MM4R
;
;AudioDst Card#: 46
dst=241,11.NA1,242
dst=242,{11.NA1R
dst=243,11.NA2,244
dst=244,{11.NA2R
dst=245,11.NA3,246
dst=246,{11.NA3R
dst=247,11.NA4,248
dst=248,{11.NA4R
community members. It obtains such parameters
as IP address, device name and MAC address for
each community member. It also writes a text file
on
the
setup
computer,
Community
Monitor.txt, that identifies each community
member. This file is updated with each community member change. Thus, CM should always be
run prior to inspecting a community in VMCC.
VISTAMAX CONTROL CENTER
VMCC distributes a device publish file to every
The VistaMax Control Center (VMCC) is the user
other device in the community. The file is like the
interface for editing and maintaining the settings
local_publish.cfg file except that the names
of the various BMXd server setup files (nqx.ini,
consist of: the Call Group entry (11 in the example
init.mac, edgedevice.ini, routers.ini,
above), the community Name Radix entry (a pe-
local_publish.cfg and dx_publish.cfg)
riod in the example above) and the four-character
so the console fits into a particular VistaMax com-
Community Name (as defined in the VMCC Sig-
munity. This is covered in more detail throughout
nal Summary).
the remainder of this chapter.
The VMCC program (icon:
) not only sets
up and maintains files for any BMXdigital console—it also does the same thing for all VistaMax
community members (any RMXdigital or BMX-
digital console, VistaMax rack or VistaMax edge
device connected to the LAN). It also automatically updates each interdependent file when any
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CONFIGURATION PREREQUISITES
change is made, automatically deciding how each
community member reacts to the new download
The following items are required before the
files—when the nqx.ini file is changed, the con-
BMXdigital Server can be configured for a spe-
sole must be restarted; when a publish file or the
cific VistaMax system:
routers.ini file is changed, an Init Router pro-
• A setup computer running Windows® 98/
cedure must be run to read the new files; and an
NT/2000/Me/XP with one 10Base-T or
Init RCED must be run to restart edge devices
100Base-T Ethernet port assigned to a fixed
IP address of 192.168.100.11.
when the edgedevice.ini file changes. VMCC
allows for staggered file distribution, so that on-
• A crossover or a straight-thru CAT-5 cable
air consoles can be updated in non-drive time, even
(depends upon the type of connection be-
if a production room has already been updated.
tween the setup computer and the console).
• A fixed IP address that can be assigned to
FTP VOYAGER
the BMXdigital Server for use within the
A program demo is included on the CD-ROM.
VistaMax local area network.
• An installed and working BMXd console.
This is the best FTP file transfer program to use
If unsure of network configuration procedures,
on a VistaMax system. The program transfers ses-
check with a network administrator.
sion and macro files between a console and the
There are the two methods of connecting the
setup computer, where they can be manually ed-
setup computer to the BMXd Server:
ited using Notepad, and then can upload them
back to the console or frame. The program is also
useful for downloading files from the Harris FTP
Direct Connection
site.
1 Connect a crossover CAT-5 cable between the
KSU card’s Ethernet connector and the
3CDAEMON
Ethernet port assigned to IP 192.168.100.11
This program has a syslogger to monitor the
on the setup computer.
VistaMax network operations. Another main function is to serve as a TFTP server so that new oper-
Connecting Thru a Network Switch*
ating system code can be easily uploaded to a Vis-
1 Connect a straight-thru CAT-5 cable from the
KSU card’s Ethernet connector to an open port
taMax device during start-up.
on the network switch.
Each of these programs has a readme.txt file on
2 Connect a straight-thru CAT-5 cable from the
the 99-5000 CD-ROM (and the FTP site) with full
Ethernet port on the setup computer to another
installation and setup information.
open port on the network switch.
* A network hub could be used during installation, but it is not recommended for normal use.
Only a network switch should be used. Before
making this connection make sure that the
console’s IP address (the default address assigned at the factory is 192.168.100.22) does
not conflict with an existing network address.
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INITIAL CONFIGURATION PROCEDURE
To change which port CM uses, click Options,
This procedure requires that both CM and
then select Setup. If 192.168.100.11 is not
VMCC be installed on the setup computer; that
shown in the Community Local IP address win-
the BMXdigital console is installed and powered
dow, click the window’s down arrow, select that
up using the factory IP setting of 192.168.100.22;
address, then close and restart CM.
and that the setup computer and the BMXdigital
Once the new BMXdigital console is shown
are networked together.
in the CM display, the setup computer is properly communicating with the new console.
1 Start Community Monitor
Click the desktop icon (
) on the setup com)
2 Start VMCC (desktop icon:
puter to start Community Monitor. This adds a
miniature icon to the taskbar tray. Right-click
The first time VMCC starts up, no community
on the tray icon to select Show Monitor Dis-
is displayed. Click the Tools menu and select
play. An example is shown below:
New Community to start setting up a new community. Use the illustration below to identify
the VMCC user interface features.
The Editing pane, in the middle of the program window, allows global parameters for the
Community Monitor display
VistaMax community to be set when the comThe new console should be shown in the dis-
munity name is highlighted in the Community
play with an IP address of 192.168.100. 22. If
Explorer pane along the left side. These param-
the console is not shown, then CM may be lis-
eters include naming the new community and
tening to the wrong Ethernet port on the setup
changing the administrator address (which uses
computer.
the setup computer’s IP address: 192.168.
Editing Pane
Community Explorer Pane
Menu items
(File, Edit, Tools)
Community Summary Pane
Hide Summary
Pane button
Community Name
To Reorder Summary List,
click #, Address, or Name
Community Devices
R = RMXdigital
B=BMXdigital
E= Edge device
Active Device
(parameters shown in
the editing pane)
Left Pane Activity
Selection Tabs
Saved Status Flag
Saving Database Icon
VMCC, graphical interface features
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4 BMXdigital Server
100.11). The other settings can be left at their
box to add the check mark). Click the Inspect
default settings at this time.
button to inspect the console’s information. The
The Editing pane is also where configuration
information line shows “done” when the inspec-
parameters for the consoles, racks, panels, cards
tion is completed. Click Continue to move to
and signals are shown and edited. Which set of
the window showing the inspection results.With
parameters are currently shown is set by high-
a new console there will be no slot conflicts or
lighting the item in the Community Explorer
critical issues, so click the Accept button.
pane. The Explorer pane uses a tree structure
After a few seconds the console shows up as a
to expand and collapse items as required. Click
new community member in the Community
the + button next to a console name expands
Explorer pane along the left side of the win-
its tree to show individual panels and cards and
dow. This pane shows each device in the Vis-
a Signal Summary. Clicking the - button col-
taMax community.
lapses the tree, hiding the items.
Along the right side of the VMCC screen is a
4 Edit Console Settings
Community Summary pop-open window that
Click once on the console’s name in the Com-
lists the IP address, device number and name
munity Explorer pane to highlight the name.
for each community member. It is most often
This switches the editing pane to show Device
used when creating a community or when add-
parameters where a unique device name, unique
ing new community members. The Community
device number and a unique IP address for the
Summary can be hidden by clicking on the
BMXd console are set.
upper right push-pin icon. The summary win-
Additional parameters, which affect how this
dow can also be dragged to another location
device interacts with the other consoles and
within the main program window.
racks in the VistaMax community, are also set
in the Device pane. Setting the device parameters are covered in the Configuration Notes and
3 Inspect the VistaMax Community
Click the VMCC File menu item, then select
Tips later in this chapter.
Inspect Community. A community inspection
window opens to show all the VistaMax devices
5 Provision Files
detected—which in this case should be only one,
Once the console parameters are edited as re-
the new BMXdigital console.
quired, the new settings must be used to create
If the console is not found, then the VMCC
new console configuration files. Creating the
VistaMax Network Interface setting may need
configuration files is called Provisioning. Click
to be changed under the Tools menu. Click Tools,
the Provisioning tab at the bottom of the Com-
then select Options. In the Option window, click
munity Explorer pane to switch the display to
the Administration tab. In the VistaMax Net-
show the provisioning panes.
work Interface list box, click the down arrow
The provisioning panes have only two but-
to list the NIC cards on the setup computer.
tons at the top: Provision and Distribute... Click-
Select the 192.168.100.11 card, click OK, and
ing the Provision button creates the setup and
reinspect the community.
configuration files from the parameters entered
Verify there’s a check mark under the Inspect
in the editing pane, as required for the console.
heading for the BMXd console (doubleclick the
The provisioned files can be double checked in
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4 BMXdigital Server
the middle pane by clicking the + button next
to the My Documents folder. If necessary, change
to the console name to drop down a list of the
folders, then click Save. When Normal or Force
setup files VMCC created.
Download was selected, VMCC opens a Device
Specific Distribution window, while checking
that it can communicate with the various community devices. This window also lists the action that will be taken after the files are distributed. To send the files the device must be enabled (doubleclick on the Enable boxes to add
a check mark).
Provisioned File List
for BMXdigital
Clicking on a filename displays the file contents in the provision editor pane. Even though
files can be manually edited in the provision
editor pane, this should NOT be done on a normal basis as the edits will be overwritten the
Device-Specific Distribution List Window
next time the Provision button is clicked.
Click Distribute to download the provisioned
files to the enabled devices. If nqx.ini has
6 File Distribution
After double-checking the provisioned files,
changed (as shown above for BMXd_3), the
the final step is to distribute the provisioned
console will be reset. If Force Download was
files to the console. Clicking the Distribute...
selected in the previous screen, then every de-
button opens a dialog box with the three dis-
vice will “Reestablish Device Identity (RESET).”
tribution options: perform a normal console
When the publish files have changed, then an
download (where only changed files are re-
initialize router will be performed (as shown
placed on the console); perform a force down-
above on VMaxRack9 and RMXd_11). If the
load (where all console files are replaced by the
edgedevice.ini file has changed the an initialize
files provisioned by VMCC); or save the provi-
RCED (Remote Control Edge Devices) will be
sioned files to the setup computer’s hard drive.
performed so that the edge devices will read
the updated information.
Now that a community has been created, adding new community members is a matter of opening up the community and, following steps 3 thru
6, add each new console or frame following the
recommendations and tips presented in the fol-
File Distribtuion Selection window in VMCC
lowing sections. For additional information on
Click a radio button to select the distribution
VMCC refer to Appendix A.
method, then click the Next button. If Local
Download is selected, a save dialog box opens
4-9
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CONFIGURATION NOTES AND TIPS
work. Always confirm all IP addressing choices
with a knowledgable network administrator.
If a console is not networked with a VistaMax
system, it could continue to use the factory de-
Before the setup computer can access the BMXd
fault IP address (192.168.100.22). In such a case,
Server, its IP address must be changed so it is in-
a network switch is not required since the setup
side the local subnet mask assigned to the BMXd
computer could be directly connected to the con-
Server. The default IP address for the console, as
sole, using a crossover CAT-5 cable, whenever any
shipped from the factory, is 192.168.100.22 with
files require editing.
a default subnet mask of 255.255.255.0.
With multiple BMXdigital consoles, RMXdigital
Note: If the IP address has been changed and is
consoles, VistaMax racks and VistaMax Edge De-
not known, it can be recovered using a serial port
vices networked together, it is essential that a list
connection. See Settings Recovery on page 4-27.
of all devices on the VistaMax LAN be kept so
Contact a network administrator if additional
that nonconflicting IP addresses can be assigned
information is required to change the setup
and set on each device before connecting them to
computer’s IP address.
the network switch. Sequentially list network de-
NQX.INI FILE SETTINGS
vices (consoles, racks, edge devices, switches and
computers), assigning a unique IP address and,
These are the nqx.ini file settings that are set
for the consoles and VistaMax racks, assigning
using the VMCC program (highlight the console
unique device names and numbers (from 1 to 63).
name in the Explorer pane to show these settings).
Device Name
Here is a suggested network addressing scheme,
Enter a unique Device Name to
using the default 192.168.100.xxx addresses, for
identify the console. It can have a maximum of
assigning devices in easy-to-remember blocks of
ten alphanumeric characters, but it cannot con-
IP addresses:
tain spaces or any special characters. This en-
Suggested IP Addressing for a VistaMax LAN
file.
try sets the NAME= parameter in the nqx.ini
Networked Device
Network switches, local computers
IP Address
192.168.100.1 up to .10
Device Number Enter a unique number, from 1
to 63, to identify the console as a VistaMax de-
default TFTP server (setup computer)
computer)192.168.100.11
vice. The number used is typically related to
spare addresses
192.168.100.12 up to .21
default console IP address
192.168.100.22 *
spare addresses
192.168.100.23 up to .32
default VVistaMax
istaMax frame IP address
192.168.100.33 *
spare addresses
192.168.100.34 up to .40
Device_number= parameter in the nqx.ini
VistaMax frames
192.168.100.41 up to .49
file.
VistaMax Intercoms
192.168.100.50 up to .100
Consoles (BMXd or RMXd)
192.168.100.101 up to .199
have a unique fixed IP address. The first three
VistaMax Edge Devices
192.168.100.200 up to .299
octets (e.g. 192.168.100.xxx) are identical for
* to avoid conflicts when adding a new console or frame,
do not assign these addresses to any LAN device.
all devices in the system. The last octet identi-
the console IP address (e.g., if the console IP is
set as 192.168.100.122, the device number
would be set to 22). This entry sets the
Device Address Each console and frame must
fies the device. See the suggested IP Address-
Note: Major network communications problems
ing Table adjacent for suggested addresses. This
will occur if two devices are assigned the same IP
entry sets the NET_IP= parameter in the
address and are plugged in together on the net-
nqx.ini file.
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CONSOLE SIGNAL SETUP
Subnet Mask Typically, the default subnet mask
(255.255.255.0) is left as is. Check with a
Having configured the nqx.ini file means the
network administrator before making any
BMXdigital console can safely be networked with
changes to the subnet mask.
other VistaMax devices in the community—but it
This is normally left at the
doesn’t mean the console is “ready for air” yet.
default setting (0.0.0.0) to prevent external
There are a number of source and destination
access to the VistaMax LAN. Again, check with
parameters that need to be set properly to inte-
a network administrator before making any
grate a console into a VistaMax community:
Gateway Address
changes to the gateway address.
1. In Room names, Community Names and signal descriptions can be edited to specifically iden-
These are all of the entries that must be changed
tify the signals.
by VMCC in order to add a new BMXdigital con-
2. The signal mode (stereo or mono) needs to be
sole into an existing VistaMax community.
set. All user inputs and outputs defaults are ste-
An additional entry (Licenses) may be required
reo (odd number signals are Linked to the Next
if customized features must be unlocked. The Li-
even numbered signal), but any could be changed
cense Code is entered into the Licenses dialog box
to mono.
located near the bottom of the console editing pane.
3. Set whether a signal is Hidden (cannot be
seen by other community members). Hidden signals cannot be a routed source or destination.
4. Set whether the signal is added on various
Include Lists.
5. Set whether a Universal Input module is as-
Device License Entry Box
signed as a router on either the A or B input source.
There are two parts to a License Code: the fea-
Most of these settings are done in the Signal
ture name and the code number. The feature name
Summary pane (shown above). To open it, click
is the name of the License (automation, router,
the console name + button to open its tree, click
control extension, etc.). The code number is a nine-
the Signal Summary + button and then highlight
digit number (e.g., 123-456-789).
either Sources or Destinations. This pane is where
To obtain a License, the Server ID number for
signal names are assigned, mono/stereo selection
the console (listed in the serverid.txt file) must
is set and setting whether a signal is hidden or
be given to a Harris Technical Services or Sales
available is made.
Representative so that they can generate a License
Code for that specific BMXdigital console.
When the nqx.ini file is provisioned and distributed, the console automatically restarts so that
the file changes can take effect. Use Community
Monitor to verify the new console was setup cor-
Signal Summary Pane in VMCC
rectly. CM will list the console name, device num-
Additional signal settings are done in the mod-
ber and its IP address.
ule detail pane. This pane is opened by selecting a
specific source or destination signal. In the example
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below, a Universal input module is shown, which
error warning box will be shown so the error
is the only module that has anything set in this
can be corrected.
pane. To view this pane, click on the module name.
Checkmark either the A Input is routed box or
Signal Format (Stereo or Mono)
the B Input is routed box to set that input as a
All AMP MOD IV audio connectors on the
routed source. The opposite input should be left
BMXd carry two signals. By default, each is set
unchecked to allow the local source to be selected.
as a stereo connection, with the left signal be-
Selecting both inputs as routed does no harm, but
ing assigned an odd signal number and the right
since there is only one signal that can be routed to
signal being assigned the next even signal num-
a Universal input module, it is not useful.
ber. This ensures the two signals are treated as
one source or destination for proper phase, timing and routing of the two signals.
This stereo relationship is set by a check mark
in the column Link w/Next. The check mark
sets the signal as stereo linked with the next
Module Detail Pane in VMCC
signal. Typically this is only done on the oddThe following parameters are edited in
numbered signals so that a stereo signal is on
the Signal Summary pane:
one connector.
To change a stereo signal into a pair of mono
signals, remove the check mark in the Link w/
In Room and Community Names, Description
The In Room Name identifies the signal in
Next column by double-clicking on it. The two
the module source selectors using up to nine
signals will now be treated as two separate
alphanumeric characters.
mono signals. When a mono signal is routed to
a module, it automatically appears on both the
The Community Name is a four-character
left and right outputs of the module.
name to identify the signal on other community members’ console or edge device source
selectors. It follows the Call Group prefix (which
Hidden Signals
is set in the console pane) and the Name Radix
Each console has many signals that are set
(set in the community pane).
as Hidden. These include each stereo signal’s
right channel (which is hidden so that only the
The description helps to identify the signal to
left channel name shows up in source selectors)
other VMCC users.
To enter the signal names and definitions,
and all of the internal console-only signals (sev-
click on the In Room Name, Community Name
eral mix-minus primitive and talkback signals).
or Description and edit them as required. If too
A Hidden signal has a check mark in the Hid-
many characters are entered or if an illegal char-
den column to indicate it is not available to add
acter is entered, a red exclamation point and
to any signal include list. For most installations,
the default settings for Hidden will work fine.
To change the Hidden status, doubleclick on
the check mark to remove it, or doubleclick in
the empty box to add a check mark.
Name Length Error in VMCC
A quick way to set the check marks for an en4-12
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tire console is to click once to highlight any col-
Net Card Sample Rate Selection
umn entry and then use the keyboard space bar
There are two output sample rate selection
to check or uncheck that check box. Use the up
boxes for the first two digital Net Card outputs
and down arrow keys to quickly move through
(Output A is D1 and Output B is D2). Each
the list, pressing the spacebar as required to change
can be set for either 48 kHz or 44.1 kHz. The
check mark status.
remaining Net Card digital outputs have a fixed
48 kHz sample rate output.
Remaining entries are set in the Console pane.
Highlight the console name to see these items.
Create Console Include Lists
Only those signals without checkmarks in the
Net Card Sample Rate, License
and Chain Files Entry Box
Hidden column can be added to an include list.
An Include List is the master signal source or
destination list for a console.The source include
Chain to a Session File
list sets which signals are available for routing
After the operating system completes loading
(e.g. which ones are shown in the source selec-
at console start up, the init.mac file is loaded.
tor displays). The destination include list sets
In the init.mac file, there’s a Chain Files section
which destinations can have signals routed to
where one or more session files can be listed to
them. This typically only affects edge devices
automatically load after init.mac. Typically,
(e.g. Source Selector panels or Source/Desti-
this is for a setup file to load that configures
nation selector panels) since the console does
the console for its standard function (air, pro-
not have any destination selection device.
duction, voice tracking, etc.). In some applications, a session file on another device will also
need to be loaded, so it is also entered here.
In the example, mix-minus.ses is a setup
file on device 3. It will be loaded after the
daypart_0.ses file loads on the local console (the Device # 0 entry indicates the file is
Setting Signal Include Lists
on the local device).
To create the signal lists, first highlight a De-
ADDITIONAL VMCC INFORMATION
vices name. All of the unhidden sources or destinations on that device are shown in the Avail-
Appendix A has additional details on usingVMCC
able Signals box. Using standard Windows se-
to accomplish various system setup tasks. Examples
lection techniques, select the desired signals,
of system design and console setup commands are
then click the double right arrow key (>>) to
also presented with additional session file and macro
add these signals to the Include Signals list. Re-
file information beyond that covered in the remain-
peat for the other devices.
ing section of this chapter.
To remove any sources from the Include List,
highlight the signals then click the double left
arrow key (<<).
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Session Files
or update any session settings (e.g., adding labels,
changing the channel source, adding button lock-
Session files are text files with the suffix .ses.
out information, etc.). This same computer could
Pressing Save on the Monitor Control panel saves
also be used to perform other session management
the current console settings and source selections
duties like renaming or deleting session files.
as a new session file in the SesFiles folder on the
MAKING A TEMPLATE SESSION
BMXdigital Server (storage card/DATA/
To simplify creating new sessions, it’s recom-
SesFiles).
There is no limit to the number of session files
mended that a session file be created with the most
saved, however, since every session saved to the
common settings used on the console including
SesFiles folder is listed in alphanumeric order on
channel source selections, labels and button lock-
the Session Selector, only active session files should
outs. This session file, placed in the SesFiles folder,
be keep in this folder. Periodically use the setup
is then selected and taken on the console as the
computer to delete old or unused session files from
basis for creating new sessions by adjusting the
the folder using FTP Voyager. Old sessions and
channel settings and then pressing Save to create
engineering test sessions could be kept in a folder
a new session file. Rename the session file, using
created inside the SesFiles folder since session files
the setup computer, as required.
in this folder are not seen by the operator.
LOADING A SESSION FILE
To create a new session, set the console’s assignment buttons to reflect a particular console
Use the Session Selector on the Session module
function (e.g., a morning show, a midday program,
to list the session files in the SesFiles folder. Files
an interview show, etc.). The button settings and
are listed in alphanumeric order in the bottom line
source selections are then saved into a new ses-
of the session display. Turn the selector clockwise
sion by pressing Save on the Session module.
(CW) to move up through the list or counterclock-
Each time Save is pressed, all of the current in-
wise (CCW) to move down through the list. Once
put module button settings and source names are
the desired session name is in the bottom line of the
saved to a new session file. If no session was loaded,
Session display, press Take to load the session.
the new session has the default filename:
undefined.ses with a numeric suffix (e.g.,
Session Currently loaded
undefine01.ses, undefine02.ses, etc.).
Selected Session
If a session was previously loaded, then the name
Session Selector
used is the current session name with a numbered
suffix. Since session names are limited to 10 alpha-
Take button
numeric characters, the original session name will
Save button
be truncated as required (as in undefine01.ses)
to add the numbered suffix.
Monitor Control panel,
Session File Controls
EDITING SESSION FILES
Once a session is saved, any LAN-connected com-
For example, to recall and load the “undefined”
puter can retrieve and edit the .ses file as required.
session file, which is a session file that ships with
Use a text-only editor (Windows® Notepad) to add
the BMXdigital:
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1 Use the Session Selector to find and display
Note: Folder shortcuts can be created in FTP
UNDEFINED in the bottom line of the ses-
Voyager to go directly to the SesFiles folder in
sion display.
any console. Click Tools, then Folder Shortcuts.
2 With UNDEFINED in the bottom line, press
Click Add and then type in the SesFiles folder
Take to immediately load the session.
path name into the Path entry box:
Note: When a session is loaded, any mod-
Storage Card/Data/SesFiles. Click OK
ules that are On do not immediately update
twice (to close the entry box and to accept the
to the new session information. Instead, those
new shortcut). A green SesFiles folder is now
channels’ On buttons flash to indicate there
shown in the file tree. Clicking once on this
are pending changes to that module. When a
folder opens the SesFiles folder.
4 Drag the desired session file from the SesFiles
pending module is turned off, the new ses-
folder to the Session Files folder created on the
sion file settings take effect.
setup computer.
DOWNLOADING SESSION FILES
Editing and Renaming Session Files
Before downloading any session files to the setup
computer, create a Session Files folder to save the
After downloading the session file, use Notepad®
files while editing and uploading them back to the
to open the session file and add any channel la-
BMXdigital Server.
bels, button lockouts or other changes required.
To download a session from the BMXdigital
After editing the file, use Save As. . . to give it a
Server to a setup computer:
more descriptive name like template.ses.
1 Start FTP Voyager.
Note: Session files can also be renamed using
2 In the connection window, select the console,
standard Windows® functions (e.g., right-click the
file name and choose Rename) or click, pause, click
then click Connect.
If the setup computer has never connected to
on the name to highlight it. This can be done us-
the console, click New Site, then enter the
ing Windows® Explorer on the setup computer or
console’s name and IP address in the entry
while viewing the BMXdigital Server’s FTP site
boxes, as shown below:
using FTP Voyager.
Click Connect to connect and display the
console’s file tree, as shown below:
BMXd Server Files using FTP Voyager
Note: Session names can be up to ten alphanumeric characters plus the .ses suffix. Spe-
FTP Voyager Connection Dialog Box
cial characters are not allowed but spaces and
3 Open the Storage Card folder, then the Data
underlines are OK. File names appear in up-
folder, then the SesFiles folder. The folder’s con-
per case letters in the session display even
tents were shown on page 4-1.
when named using upper and lower case.
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Uploading Sessions
Channel ID Numbers
To use an edited session file, it must be uploaded
BMXdigital components (input modules, moni-
to the BMXdigital Server’s FTP site. If a template
tor modules, Net Card connections) are assigned
file (template.ses) was created, it can be up-
unique ID numbers based upon their position in
loaded and then used as the basis for creating new
the mainframe and by their DIP switch assign-
session files. The template session file must have
ment settings to specifically identify local signals.
the file extension .ses.
Universal Input modules are numbered from the
To upload the template session file to the BMX-
left end of the frame (number 1) sequentially to
digital Server:
the right.
1 Open the BMXdigital Server’s FTP site, if it is
Telco and RLS modules are numbered sepa-
not already open, and navigate to the SesFiles
rately because each type has three modes of op-
folder.
eration (assigned through module DIP switches)
2 Drag the template.ses file from the local
although typically only two (Direct and Router)
computer to the SesFiles folder on the BMX-
are used in a VistaMax system. Telco modules are
digital Server’s FTP site.
further identified by a Telco number, from 1 thru
3 Dial up and then take the TEMPLATE ses-
6, that associates a dedicated mix-minus output
sion to load it into the BMXdigital console. Con-
with each Telco module.
firm that all of the settings and input sources
Channel ID numbers are used in both section
are set correctly before using it as a template to
headings for signal assignment, and in the chan-
create standard sessions.
nel assignment settings within these sections, in
both session and macro files. An ID summary follows:
Channel ID Numbers
Session and Macro Files
Type
Channel #
Universal Input
1 - 63
Telco 1 - 6 (Direct)
65 - 70
Telco 1 -6 (Router)
81 - 86
Telco 1 - 6 (Ext. RLS) 97 - 102
RLS (Direct)
113 - 127
RLS (Router)
129 - 143
RLS (Ext. RLS)
145 - 159
Session and macro files can have these sections:
• General File Information
• Universal Input Module Source Labels
• Routed Channel Source Selections
• Channel-Specific Include Lists
Assignment Method
As installed, left to right
As configured by DIP switches
As configured by DIP switches
As configured by DIP switches
As installed, left to right
As installed, left to right
As installed, left to right
• Channel-Specific Button Settings
Here’s an example of how channel ID numbers
• Channel-Specific Button Lockouts
are used on a networked BMXdigital console:
• Channel Mapping
Channel IDs identify each module or channel
[Router_81]
Include_1=D1,65-96
Include_2=D2,241-256
by frame position, module type (Universal Input,
Telco or RLS) and whether the module is set for a
routed input. Signal IDs uniquely identify each
In the section of a session file shown above, the
source and destination in a VistaMax system. These
two Include lines set which sources are shown on
different numbering systems are covered in the fol-
the source selector for Router 81 (e.g., Telco 1 set
lowing sections.
as a router input). Include_1=D1, sets which
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sources on device 1 are shown (which in the ex-
Global ID numbers precisely identify the origi-
ample are the 32 inputs on the I/O card in slot 1
nation or destination of each signal since the
of a VistaMax frame, set as device 1).
console’s or rack’s device number is implied by
Include_2=D2, sets which sources are shown
the global ID number. Thus every audio and logic
on device 2, which in this case is the BMXdigital
signal on a console, as well as every console bus
console. 241-256 are the analog and digital in-
signal has a unique global ID number.
puts on the Net Card.
A Signal ID Calculator is included on the 995000 CD-ROM and is also available from the Har-
Signal ID Numbers
ris FTP site (see page 5-1 for access) in the
Each signal in a VistaMax system can be
customer_support/99-5000_CD-ROM folder. The
uniquely identified by using either a Global ID
calculator is an Excel file to list local number ver-
number—a five to seven digit number that
sus Global number for every signal on a console
uniquely identifies every possible signal in a Vis-
by entering the console’s device number.
taMax system; or by using a universal number,
Whenever a signal ID is required in a session
which consists of a device number shortcut (D plus
file to identify a signal, either the universal or the
the community member’s device number) followed
global ID can be used. If the entry refers to a local
by a local number.
signal then only the local signal number is re-
Universal numbering was shown in the previ-
quired, as in assigning local Net Card inputs to a
ous example where D1,65-96 uniquely identi-
channel-specific include list, only the local num-
fied signals 65 to 96 on device 1.
ber is required although using the universal num-
When referring to signals within one console or
ber or the global ID number will also work.
a rack, a local number can be used. But local numbers are repeated on all devices of the same type,
SESSION FILE SECTIONS
for example, all consoles use local number 225
Session files consist of sections. Each section
for the PGM 1 bus signal. Needless to say, this
begins with a section header followed by one or
means that a local number is only usable on a
more entries. The following sections highlight the
local console or rack to refer to signals on that
typical sections found in session files.
console or rack.
To turn the local number into a unique univer-
Information Section
sal number simply add the device number (e.g.,
The information section header [Informa-
D1, D2, and so on, up to D63) before the local
tion] is used to provide a brief description of
number to refer to a specific signal on a specific
the file. The default description must be manually
console or rack in the system.
edited to add information on how or why the ses-
The operating system does the same thing but
sion file was created (e.g., sets the console
it uses global ID numbers, which are not very in-
to prerecord network feeds).
tuitive for end users to easily use. In the previous
To change the file description, scroll down to
example, the Global numbers for signals 65 to 96
the line that begins with Description=. Edit
on device 1 are 65601 to 65632. On device 2, the
the existing description. If required, additional
signals 65 to 96 are expressed as D2, 65-96 in
comments can be placed anywhere in the session
universal numbering, but in global ID numbering
file when proceeded by a ; (semicolon). Comments
they are 131137 to 131168.
help clarify session file settings to other users.
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BUTTON SETTING SECTIONS
Labels Section
Each Universal Input module has two labels to
Each assignment button on an input module
identify the module’s A and B input sources. These
has its own section in the session file where the
labels are what are shown in the two lines in the
button state for each module can be set when the
input source display when the Session is loaded.
session file loads. The default settings in the
Telco and RLS modules that are set as direct
undefined.ses file is for all buttons as =0, which
have only one input so, typically, the source name
sets the button state to Off. Settings that require
is listed in the top row (the A label) with a couple
other types of entries are typically also undefined.
dashes in the bottom row (the B label) although
Although the on/off settings could be manually
both lines could be used to further identify the
edited—by changing each =0 setting to =1, it’s
source. On Telco and RLS modules that are set as
generally far easier to simply set the buttons to
routed inputs the label is controlled by the routed
their desired states (on or off) on the input mod-
signal name and the Labels entries are ignored.
ules and then press Save on the Session module to
save all the button states at one time into a new
There are two Labels sections—one for the A
session file. This session file can then be edited as
input names and one for the B input names.
required to add labels, etc.
The A input labels section begins with:
[Labels_A]
[On]
The B input labels section begins with:
Normally, there are no entries listed in this sec-
[Labels_B]
Labels (e.g., Label_1=1 A, Label_145=RLS
tion since this section affects what happens when
1, etc.) use the Channel Number Assignments
a session file loads. With no entries, all channels
(shown on page 4-16) to specifically identify each
that are Off immediately load the settings from
module.
the new session file. All channels that are On go
into pending and do not load their new settings
Labels can be up to ten alphanumeric charac-
until the channel is manually turned Off.
ters long—including standard punctuation and
spaces and, even though labels can be entered us-
However, entries in this section override this
ing upper and lower case letters, the labels are
default method of changing sessions—forcing
always are shown in upper case, centered in the
listed channels On or Off automatically when the
module’s display.
session is taken.
For instance, if the On section looks like this,
Adding Channel Labels
1
[On]
Channel_1=1
Channel_2=0
Scroll through the session file to the Labels
section for the input to edit (A or B).
2
when the session file is taken, channel 1 is imme-
Highlight and replace the default or existing
diately turned On with the new session settings,
labels (e.g., Label_1=1 A, Label_2=2 A)
while channel 2 is immediately turned Off—even
with more descriptive labels for the inputs. For
if either channel is on-air.
example, if the input to the first Universal In-
Typically, there are no entries under the [On]
put module (the left most module in the con-
heading unless the console is being setup for non-
sole) is the output of Mic Preamp 1, then the
new
label
could
be
entered
attended operation (e.g. slaved to a digital deliv-
as:
ery system).
Label_1=MIC PRE 1.
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SESSION FILE SECTION SUMMARY
• [TelcoRecord] Sets whether the Telco
Within each of these sections, each channel but-
to Record feature is on or off for the Telco
ton can be set either On (=1) or Off (=0) when the
modules.
session file loads:
• [TelcoMonitor] Sets whether the Telco
• [On] Sets whether any module is forced
to Monitor feature is on or off for the Telco
On or Off when the session file loads.
modules.
• [Source] Sets whether the A or the B in-
CHANNEL LOCKOUT SECTION
put is the selected source for the module.
This section sets whether any channel buttons
• [Mode] Sets each module’s default mode
are locked out, preventing changes to the session
(Stereo, Left, Right, or Mono Sum).
file settings by the board operator. Channel lock-
• [Cue] Sets whether cue is on or off for each
outs are typically set for unattended console op-
module.
eration or when a special console setup must be
• [Send_1, Send_2] Sets whether the
maintained.
module is assigned to one or both send
The channel lockout template section begins
buses.
with [ChannelLockout_0].
• [Utl_1, Utl_2, Utl_3, Utl_4] Sets
whether the module is assigned to any of
Setting Channel Lockouts
the Utility buses.
• [Prog_1, Prog_2, Prog_3, Prog_4]
1
Copy the entire channel lockout section of the
Sets whether the module is assigned to any
session file. It begins with ChannelLockout_0
of the Program buses.
and ends with PanBalance=0.
• [Offline_1, Offline_2] Sets whether
2
Paste the copied channel lockout section back
the module is assigned to either Off-line bus.
into the session file. Although it can be pasted
• [Send_1_PF, Send_2_PF] Sets whether
anywhere in the file, it is recommended that all
the module’s send is pre-fader or post-fader.
of the channel lockout sections be kept together
in one area of the session file.
• [Send_1_PS, Send_2_PS] Seta whether
the module’s send is pre-switch or post-
3
Change the heading (ChannelLockout_0)
of the pasted section to the channel number to
switch.
• [UTL_1_PF, UTL_2_PF, UTL_3_PF,
which the lockout information is being added.
UTL_4_PF] Sets whether the module’s Util-
Refer to the ID Number Assignments table on
ity bus feed is pre-fader or post-fader.
page 4-12 for what number to use for each channel.
• [UTL_1_PS, UTL_2_PS, UTL_3_PS,
For example, to add lockout information for
UTL_4_PS] Sets whether the module’s Utility bus feed is pre-switch or post-switch.
the left most Universal Dual Fader channel,
• [PanBalance] Sets whether the module’s
change the header Channel Lockout_0 to
ChannelLockout_1. To add button lockout
pan/balance control is on or off.
information for the Telco 2 channel, change
• [Solo] Sets whether solo is on or off for
Channel Lockout_0 to Channel Lock-
each module.
• [TelcoAuto] Sets whether the Auto
out_82.
Foldback feature is on or off on the Telco
4
Edit the channel lockout section as needed.
Each button is locked separately. To allow the
modules.
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RouterCommand
button to be changed by the operator, leave the
setting for the button as 0. To lockout that par-
Either Global or Local signal ID numbers can
ticular button, change the setting to 1.
5
be used in the ‘Take commands’ section of the ses-
Repeat steps 1 - 4 for each channel that re-
sion or macro file to identify sources and destina-
quires any buttons to be locked out.
tions. The section header [RouterCommand_1],
is used to set up the default routing for each routed
MAPPING SECTION
module by ‘taking’ or routing a source to a Uni-
The mapping section [Mapping] lists the
versal module with a routed input.
BMXdigital channels, as detected at the time the
A typical [RouterCommand_1] section on a
session was saved, into a table that is identical to
BMXdigital is shown below:
the inventory.txt file (see page 4-3). The section is
[RouterCommand_1]
take_1=65777,65665
take_2=65779,65667
take_3=65781,65669
take_4=65783,65671
automatically rewritten by the BMXdigital Server
at each save so it should not be edited.
;
;
;
;
Net
Net
Net
Net
Card
Card
Card
Card
A1
A2
A3
A4
to
to
to
to
channel
channel
channel
channel
1
2
3
4
The table entries are in hex, with Map_0 being
a reserved position listed as ff for no channel de-
Each Take command (take_x=source,
tected. Map_9 up to Map_24 are reserved for the
destination) must be on a separate line and
Net Card facet connections and are never popu-
be listed in numerical order. Both source and des-
lated. Each installed Universal module is num-
tination can be identified using their Global sig-
bered sequentially left to right in the frame from
nal IDs, as shown above. 65777 identifies this sig-
01 to 3f. Telco channels are numbered 41 to 66.
nal as the left channel of the A1 analog input on
RLS modules are numbered from 71 to 9f .Which
the Net Card in the console assigned as device
numbers are used is set by the type of RLS and
number 1. The 65665 identifies that it goes to
Telco input (direct, router or RLS), the Telco num-
module 1 which is in the first slot at the left end of
ber and the RLS position.
the console.
Up to sixty-four of these Take commands can
Map_57 and Map_58 identify the CR Monitor
be listed in numeric order in any one session file
and Studio Monitor modules as b1 and b2.
The channel map ends with DSP=x. which iden-
to route sources to destinations. This routing oc-
tifies how many DSP cards are installed in the
curs when the session file is loaded (unless a mod-
frame.
ule is On, in which case it is pending until the
module is turned off).
ROUTER ASSIGNMENT SECTIONS
Routes assigned by a session file are continu-
Each console is assigned a unique device num-
ously maintained until another session file is
ber by the nqx.ini file during start-up. Though
loaded that changes the routing or until a new
typically left at device=1 for non-networked con-
source is selected on a module, by using a FTP
soles, when multiple BMXdigital consoles and Vis-
command or by using an Edge Device. All routes
taMax frames are networked together, each must
are held, even if the console is turned off or loses
have a unique device number assigned (from 1 to
power, by a “persistence file” that gets updated af-
63) to distinctly identify its signals to the other
ter every route is taken.
networked devices. The device number is used to
In previous examples, one source has been
create the Global Signal ID number that uniquely
shown being routed to one destination, but any
identifies every signal in a networked system.
one source can be routed to any number of desti4-20
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
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4 BMXdigital Server
[Router_82]
Include_1=D1,65,67,69,71,73
Include_2=D2,257-272
Take=macro_2
nations by adding separate Take command lines
from that source to the other destinations.
[Router_83]
Take=0
Include Lists
[Router_84]
Take=0
Sources can only be routed on an RLS module’s
source selector if the source is listed on the
console’s Source Include List. This list is stored in
The Take= line sets the source for the module
the console’s routers.ini file. The Source In-
when the session file loads, with Take=0 or
clude list (its header is [srcinclude], is cre-
Take=-1 routing silence. The Take command can
ated and maintained using VMCC. It must list ev-
also call a macro file, as shown in Router_82. A
ery signal that may be required to be routed on a
macro is a mini-session file, with a .mac suffix,
console.
that is called from within a session file or via FTP
Since this list could include every signal from
commands. In this case, the file macro_2.mac is
every device in the VistaMax community, the in-
called up in order to set up a special mix-minus
clude list could have several hundred sources. This
feed for Telco 2.
would make finding the desired source very diffi-
The channel-specific include statements
cult for the board operator.
(Include_x=Dy, channel number range)
To limit the total number of sources shown on a
set a range of sources, or individual sources sepa-
module’s source selector, each module can have a
rated by commas, that can be selected by the mod-
channel-specific source list assigned by the ses-
ule listed in the section heading (e.g.,
sion file. It should include only those sources re-
[Router_81]). Each include line must be listed
quired for a particular daypart or application. In
in sequential numeric order, where x equals 1 in
most applications, some modules will keep all
the first line, then 2, 3 and so on. Typically, all the
sources available while others will have specific
sources for one device are listed on a single line,
subsets with only the required signals listed.
but they could be divided into separate entry lines
It should be noted that once a channel-specific
to make it more legible for someone editing the
include list has been assigned in a session file, that
session file contents.
list will be used for subsequent sessions, unless a
The y entry (as in =D1) is the device number. In
different channel-specific include list is specified
the example, there are two devices in the system
for that module. To return the list to the master
that the Telco 1 and Telco 2 channels can select
include list, the channel-specific include list would
sources from: D1 (device 1) and D2 (device 2).
have this command: include_1=all.
Channel ID numbers identify the available
The following is an example of the channel-
sources just like they identify the section head-
specific include lists for four channels set as Telcos.
ings. A table listing of the Channel Number As-
In this example Telco 1 (channel ID 81) and Telco
signments is on page 4-17.
2 (channel ID 82) are active, while the Telco 3
INIT.MAC FILE
(channel ID 83) and 4 (channel ID 84) entries are
The init.mac file is very important in the
file placeholders since they are not assigned:
RMXdigital, but in the BMXdigital it is only used
[Router_81]
Include_1=D1,65-96,161-192
Include_2=D2,257-272,337-352,
Take=65873
to assign the sample rates on the Net Card D1
and D2 outputs and chain a session file.
4-21
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4 BMXdigital Server
UPDATING THE SOFTWARE
The init.mac file is maintained and edited
Once the TFTP Server is installed on the setup
using VMCC.
computer, and configured to point to the folder
Refer to Appendix A for additional command
holding the new system software, the update is
entry information for session and macro files.
performed automatically after the BMXdigital console is power cycled. The BMXdigital must be
taken off-air during this procedure.
Software Updates
To update the BMXdigital software:
1 Configure the TFTP Server to point to the folder
Harris Corporation may periodically issue soft-
on the CD-ROM that contains the updated sys-
ware revisions for the BMXdigital Server at no
tem software following the instructions in the
charge. New feature enhancements may also be
previous procedure.
offered at a nominal fee. In either case, updating
2 Make sure the TFTP Server computer is prop-
the operating system software on the BMXdigital
erly communicating with the BMX digital
Server is quick and easy since a TFTP Server pro-
Server.
gram is included with each software release. It is
3 Turn off the BMXdigital console power supply.
also available from the 99-5000 CD-ROM and
Wait at least 10 seconds, then turn it back on.
from the Harris FTP site: ftp://ftp.pre.com.
The TFTP Server will automatically begin to
See page 5-1 Service for access information.
download and update the BMXdigital Server
software after the SBC boots up (this typically
TFTP SERVER
takes between 30 and 60 seconds).
TFTP stands for Trivial File Transfer Protocol.
4 Once the update has finished loading, quit the
TFTP Servers transfer and update software for
TFTP Server.
routers, switchers, hubs and other networked de-
5 To use the new software, power cycle the BMX-
vices like the BMXdigital Server.
digital console. Again, wait at least 10 seconds
The following steps describe how to install and
before turning it back on.
configure the 3CDaemon TFTP Server—which is
Settings Recovery
included on the CD-ROM along with the new files,
although any TFTP Server can be used to update
the BMXdigital Server software.
A quick method to try to recover a forgotten or
To install and configure the TFTP Server:
inadvertently changed IP address is to use Com-
1 Install the TFTP Server on the setup computer
munity Monitor’s Status display. It shows every
following the instructions included with the soft-
VistaMax device connected to the VistaMax LAN,
ware update.
even those devices that have an IP address out-
2 From the TFTP Server’s File menu, choose Con-
side of the system’s subnet mask, so the unknown
IP address can easily be noted.
figure Selected Service.
3 On the TFTP Upload/Download Directory tab,
Once the IP address is noted, the setup
select the folder on the CD-ROM that contains
computer’s fixed IP address can be reassigned to
the new BMXdigital files.
fall into the subnet mask of that console’s IP so
4 Click OK.
the nqx.ini file can be edited, which is covered
later in this section.
4-22
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Revision D • 8/05
digital
4 BMXdigital Server
ACCESSING A LOST USERNAME OR
PASSWORD
To recover the username or password on a
BMXdigital Server requires using a 2x5 Port to
9-pin DB9 adapter along with a Null Modem Cable
to connect the Single Board Computer (SBC) on
the Session module to a Windows computer running HyperTerminal.
DB9 Male to 2x5 - Port Connection Cable
(available from Cables N Mor,
http://www.cablesnmor.com/f27200.html)
Follow these steps to recover a lost username or
password:
1
Remove the Session Module from the console.
The console may remain turned on, as hot
swapping of modules is permitted.
2
Connect the 2x5 header on the adapter to the
HDR4 COM1 header on the SBC. The SBC is
the PCA toward the board operator end of the
module that does not have a motherboard con-
DB-9 female to female null modem cable
(available from Cables N Mor,
http://www.cablesnmor.com/null-modem-cable.html)
nector. The HDR4 header is right below the
Timer Control label on the Session module
faceplate. Orient the flat-cable so that its red
stripe is toward pin 1 on the header (which is
5
toward the board operator end of the mod-
with the flat cable feeding up between the Ses-
ule).
3
sion module and the Control room module.
Connect a DB9 female to female null modem
6
cable to the 2x5 Port adapter and to a DB9
As the BMXdigital Server starts up, the terminal will show multiple screens of informa-
serial port on a Windows computer.
4
Reinstall the Session module into the console
tion. Within the NQXcompare section will be
Start HyperTerminal (a Windows Communi-
the entry: USER = username,password. Use the
cations Accessories program) and establish a
HyperTerminal scroll feature to re-display this
new connection using these Port Settings:
information if required.
7 Run FTP Voyager on the setup computer and
enter the username and password as required
to view the Storage Card folder contents.
HyperTerminal Port Settings for communicating
with the RMXdigital Server
4-23
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digital
4 BMXdigital Server
4-24
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D • 8/05
digital
5
Service
T
parts are ordered, have the Harris part numbers
available when ordering. For a list of parts, see
he BMXdigital console is designed to give
page 5-2. Modules and other assemblies may have
lead times exceeding two weeks, so order accord-
many years of trouble-free operation. If it does re-
ingly.
Assemblies returned to Harris for service, ex-
quire service, please read through this section. It
change, or credit must have an RA (Return
Authorization) tracking number. This number is
provides information on maintenance and service
assigned by the Technical Services Department. Assemblies received without an RA number written
for the BMXdigital console, including the spare or
on the shipping label side of the packaging may
be returned or subject to an additional
replacement parts that are available.
handling fee.
To order assemblies or to request an RA, con-
Parts and Repair Services
tact Harris by mail, phone, fax, e-mail, or visit the
Harris Website:
The only parts that are field replaceable are fad-
Harris Corporation
Attention: Technical Services Department
4240 Irwin Simpson Road
Mason, OH 45040 USA
ers, fader knobs, and rotary knobs (see page 5-2
for part numbers). Assemblies may be replaced in
the field, but are generally not field-serviceable.
Phone: 513.459.3503, 8:00 to 5:00 EST
Fax: 513.701.5309
E-mail: [email protected]
For servicing, assemblies should be returned to
Harris Technical Services Department.
www.broadcast.harris.com
BMXdigital technical information (this manual,
schematics, software, SPROM revision informa-
All U.S. orders and serviced assemblies are
tion, etc.) are available at this Internet support site:
shipped FOB Mason, Ohio using UPS Groundtrak,
ftp://ftp.pre.com. Log in as: customer (the
unless otherwise specified. Federal Express or UPS
username). The password is: pacific. All docu-
two-day, overnight and next morning delivery is
ments and schematics are published in PDF for-
also available for most items. For next day deliv-
mat, so Acrobat Reader 4.0 or later is required.
ery, orders must be placed before 2 p.m. Eastern
Time, and the shipping method must be specified
PARTS ORDERING AND REPAIR
INFORMATION
at the time of order.
Assembly orders or repair services can be
Spare modules and assemblies can be pur-
charged to American Express, VISA, or
chased through a sales representative or through
Mastercard. Orders may also be shipped COD, if
the Harris Technical Services Department. To ex-
not on account with Harris. Contact a sales repre-
pedite the ordering process and ensure the correct
sentative for account information.
5-1
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D.1 • 12/10
digital
5 Service
Harris #
99-1151-1
95-1151-1
95-1151-2
99-1152-1
90-1714-1
95-1152-1
95-1162-1
99-1152-3
90-1714-3
95-1152-1
99-1153-1
90-1715-1
95-1152-2
99-1153-3
90-1715-3
95-1152-2
99-1155
95-1155-1
95-1165-1
99-1156-1
95-1156
95-1176
99-1156-2
95-1156
95-1176
99-1157
90-1719
95-1157
95-1167
99-1158
90-1718
95-1158-1
95-1168-1
99-1159
90-1717
95-1159-1
95-1170
99-1160-1
95-1160-1
99-1160-2
95-1160-2
99-1163-1
90-1716-1
95-1152-3
99-1163-3
90-1716-3
95-1152-3
99-1177
99-1201
99-1205
99-1800
SPARE AND REPLACEMENT PARTS
These tables list the replaceable or serviceable
assemblies and parts for the BMXdigital.
Replaceable Parts
The following are field-replaceable parts:
Harris #
12-93
19-327
21-227-1
21-227-2
21-227-3
21-227-4
21-227-5
21-228-1
21-332-1
21-332-2
32-725
32-726
32-727
32-728
32-729
32-730
33-27-2
80-1752
80-1753
80-1754
90-1709
90-1713-1
90-1713-2
99-1100
99-1101
99-1714-1
99-1714-2
99-1714-3
99-1714-4
Description or Use
10-character Display
Flex cable, 30 conductor
Universal Input module SPROM
Telco/Codec module SPROM
Remote Line Selector module SPROM
Session module SPROM
Control Room module SPROM
DSP module SPROM
Output 1 module SPROM
Two-Studio Monitor module SPROM
Rotary Knob
Fader Knob (silver)
Fader Knob (red)
Fader Knob (green)
Fader Knob (blue)
Fader Knob (yellow)
Gas Spring
Display cover lens, Inputs & Session modules
Trimpot Cover Lens, Outputs & Mic Pre modules
Label Cover Lens, Session module
30' Power cable (power supply to console)
Fader Assembly, Input modules
Fader Assembly, Control Room module
Divider kit for two 12.25" blank panels
Divider kit for three 12.25" blank panels
Blank panel, 12.5" long (2nd mic preamp cover)
Blank panel, 25" long (module cover)
Blank panel, 6" long (accessory panel blank)
Blank panel, 12.25" long (standard covers)
Serviceable Assemblies
The following table lists the serviceable or replaceable modules and assemblies:
Harris #
90-1704
95-1180-1
95-1180-2
95-1180-3
95-1181
95-1178
95-1179
Description or Use
Power Stick Assembly (w/regulator PCAs)
3.3 V Power Converter, PCA
5 V Power Converter, PCA
19 V Power Converter, PCA
Power Entry Converter
Clock PCA (not used on BMXdigital-14)
Timer PCA
5-2
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D.1 • 12/10
Description or Use
Microphone Preamp module, 10 Input
Left PCA (Mics 1 - 5)
Right PCA (Mics 6 - 10)
Universal Input module
Faceplate switchboard assembly
Main PCA
Input PCA
Universal Input module w/o Sends & Utilities
Faceplate switchboard assembly
Main PCA
Telco/Codec module
Faceplate switchboard assembly
Main PCA
Telco/Codec module w/o Sends & Utilities
Faceplate switchboard assembly
Main PCA
Output 1 module
Main PCA
Connector PCA
Output 2 module
Main PCA
Connector PCA
Output 3 module
Main PCA
Connector PCA
Control Room module
Faceplate switchboard assembly
Main PCA
Connector PCA
Studio module
Faceplate switchboard assembly
Main PCA
Connector PCA
Session Module
Faceplate switchboard assembly
Main PCA
Connector PCA
Master DSP module
Main PCA
Slave DSP module
Main PCA
RLS Module
Faceplate switchboard assembly
Main PCA
RLS module w/o Sends & Utilities
Faceplate switchboard assembly
Main PCA
Digital meter assembly
1RU 48 Volt Power Coupler
2RU 48 Volt Power Supply
Single-board computer module
(mounts on Session module)
digital
5 Service
TOOL AND INSTALLATION KITS
Module Servicing
A tool kit and an installation kit are shipped
Most modules consist of two assemblies: a face-
with each new console.
plate/switchboard assembly and a Main PCA. A
Tool Kit
Connector PCA may also be used for additional
input or logic connectors. Assemblies are field-
The contents and quantities of the 76-2001 Tool
replaceable, but they are not field-serviceable. Do
Kit are listed below:
Harris #
38-88
50-7
70-126
70-129
70-43
70-90
Description or Use
Spare Button Head Screws
AA NiCad Batteries
AMP Crimp Tool
Extraction Tool
Module Pull Tool
Allen driver Hex Tool
not disassemble the faceplate/switchboard assem-
Qty.
12
3
1
1
1
1
bly, as these are assembled using a fixture.
Any module not currently in the console’s onair signal path can be removed or installed with
the console powered, and on-air, without causing
any audio interruption or noises in the program
audio.
NOTE: Prior to removing any module from the
Installation Kit
mainframe, turn off all its bus assignments and
The installation kit shipped depends on the
unplug all input, output, and logic cables.
mainframe size ordered:
• BMXdigital-8: 76-2000-8
• BMXdigital-14: 76-2000-0
REMOVING MODULES
• BMXdigital-22: 76-2000-1
To remove a module from the mainframe:
• BMXdigital-30: 76-2000-2
1 Open the meter panel.
• BMXdigital-38: 76-2000-3
2 Use the included hex tool (PRE70-90) to remove the two screws located at the top and
The contents and quantities of the installation
bottom of the module, and the grounding
kits are listed below:
screw located directly below the dip switches.
3 Screw the module pull tool (PRE70-43) into
Quantities for each BMXdigital framesize
P/N
Description
-8 -14 -22 -30 -38
14-482 1x3 Housing
40 54
70
86 102
14-484 2x3 Housing
57 80
86 102 118
14-486 2x4 Housing
1
1
1
1
1
14-492 2x7 Housing
7
15
15
19
19
14-494 2x8 Housing
2
2
2
2
2
14-513 2x12 Housing
12 20
36
55
71
15-938-1 Receptacle Contact 900 1250 1534 1966 2366
the grounding screw hole and use the tool to
carefully lift the module out of the mainframe.
grounding
screw
NOTE: If you need to replace one of the assemblies, please contact Harris Technical Services
Department for further instructions.
5-3
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D.1 • 12/10
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5 Service
INSTALLING INPUT MODULES
Both models are specifically setup for the main-
To install a module into the mainframe:
frame size the card is installed into through rotary
1 Open the meter panel.
switches DS1 and DS2. The following table lists
2 Lower the module into its slot. Be sure to align
the rotary switch settings by frame size.
the pins on the PCA with the motherboard
NET CARD ROTARY SWITCH SETTINGS
connector in the mainframe.
Framesize DS1
8
6
14
7
22
8
30
A
38
B
3 When the pins are aligned, press straight down
to seat the module. Do not force the module,
and do not press on buttons or connectors
while seating the module.
4 Fasten the module to the mainframe using two
DS2
1
1
1
2
2
38-88 screws and install the module grounding screw.
NOTE: If the module does not work after instal-
FADER SERVICING
lation, remove the module and visually check to
There are no replaceable nor rebuildable parts
make sure no connector pins are bent.
on the BMXdigital fader assembly. Fader service
is comprised of cleaning and lubricating.
DSP AND NET CARD SERVICE INFO
Unlike the input, control room, studio or ses-
Faders are conductive plastic, single-element fad-
sion modules, DSP and Net cards cannot be re-
ers. If the fader movement is rough, either the lu-
moved or plugged in with the console power on.
bricant on the glide rails has evaporated or foreign material has gotten into the fader. Dow Corning 510 is the preferred glide rail lubricant as it
DSP Cards
will not migrate to the contact fingers like other
There are two versions of DSP cards in use—
lubricating oils.
the original design (identified by a solid green LED
on each card, with one master DSP with 3-pin
Fader Disassembly and Cleaning
MOD IV connector) and the current VistaMaxcompatible cards (identified by a flashing yellow
To disassemble and clean the faders:
LED on each card with the left-most card auto-
1 Remove the module from the mainframe.
matically set as the master—with an LED flash
2 Remove the fader knob and the two fader
rate that is twice as fast as the other DSP cards).
mounting screws, then remove the fader from
the switch assembly.
The two DSP card versions cannot be inter-
3 Remove the snap-on fader assembly cover. It
mixed, they must be replaced as a set. When a Net
is held in place by plastic tabs.
card is installed, the current version (with the flash-
4 Clean the fader using either a dry cotton swab
ing yellow LED) must be installed.
or a cotton swab dampened with distilled
DSP cards of either version do not have any user
water.
settings or adjustments.
NOTE: The use of chemical cleaners on the conductive plastic will substantially shorten fader life.
Net Card
Never touch the fader slider contact fingers while
There are two Net card models available: with
cleaning the fader parts.
optical and without optical VistaMax connctors.
5-4
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D • 8/05
digital
5 Service
Use only a dry cotton swab, or a cotton swab
the timer circuit board. For more information about
dampened with distilled water, to clean the fader
the timer circuit board, see page 2-6.
parts. If coffee, a soft drink, or other sugared liq-
If the timer is not Auto resetting as expected,
uid has been spilled into the fader, remove it from
check the various input module DIP switch set-
the module as soon as possible and remove the
tings. On the Universal input modules, DS1-7 sets
top cover of the fader. Hold the fader under hot
timer reset for the A input and DS3-7 sets it for
running water and move the fader slider back and
the B input. On the RLS modules, switch 2 sets
forth to dissolve the sugars and other chemicals.
timer reset. On the Telco modules, switch DS1-8
Thoroughly dry the rails and conductive plas-
sets timer reset. For more information about set-
tic using dry cotton swabs and then lubricate the
ting the module DIP switches, see the Installation
top fader rail using the following procedure.
chapter sections for each module.
Lubricating the Glide Rail
METER ASSEMBLY
Move the fader slider to the middle of its travel
The meter assemblies are field-replaceable only.
and place one drop of Dow Corning 510 lubricant
There are no user-serviceable parts on the meter
(or equivalent) on the top rail on either side of the
assembly.
fader slider bushings. Move the slider through its
Meter Troubleshooting
full travel to distribute the lubricant. Wipe off excess lubricant. Normally only the top rail that the
Each meter has three connections: 5 VDC power
fader slider bushings glide on requires lubricant.
via a six wire cable that jumpers the meters, clock,
and event timer to the rear chassis power connec-
CLOCK AND TIMER ASSEMBLY
tor; a ribbon cable that carries the serial data sig-
The clock and timer assemblies are located in
nal for the meter name display; and an AES/EBU
the meter panel. Note that the BMXdigital-14 does
digital audio cable.
not have a clock assembly.
If a meter is not working properly, check that
the three cables are installed correctly. Also check
Clock Troubleshooting
that the two DIP switches, located on the meter
If the clock is not working properly, check to be
circuit board, are set correctly. DSW2 is the DIP
sure that the cable leading to the assembly is in-
switch at the front edge of the board. Its settings
stalled correctly. Also check the DIP switch set-
are covered on page 2-6.
tings that control the clock’s operating mode. The
The other DIP switch (DSW1) sets the meter
clock’s DIP switches are located on the clock cir-
number (Meters 1 - 5, as viewed from left to right).
cuit board. For more information about the clock
This switch must be set properly when replacing
circuit board, see page 2-5.
a meter since each meter position has a specific
setting, as shown on the next page.
Timer Troubleshooting
If the timer is not working properly, check to
be sure that the cable leading to the assembly from
the Session module is installed correctly.
If the tenths of seconds display is not functioning as expected, check the DIP switch setting on
5-5
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D • 8/05
digital
5 Service
Meter Number Table for DSW1
POWER SUPPLY
5
Auxiliary Meter
4
PGM / UTL Meter 4 / BMXd-8 Meter
3
PGM / UTL Meter 3
2
PGM / UTL Meter 2
1
SWITCH ON (set to the left)
PGM / UTL Meter 1
Periodically check that the vent openings are
not blocked and there is no dust buildup on the
vent openings.
CAUTION: To reduce the risk of
electric shock, do not disassemble the power supply. Refer servicing to qualified service
personnel.
Power Supply Connections
METER
PCA
Both connectors must be attached to the back
of the BMXdigital mainframe and the power supply. See page 2-4 for additional details.
5 4 3 2 1
DSW1 is next to the ribbon cable connector (J3).Set only
one DSW1 switch to On,per the above table.Move switch
away from the J3 connector to set to On.
5-pin Connector
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
Signal
+48 V
+48 V
Shield
+48 V Return
+48 V Return
Wire Color
Red
Yellow
Clear cover
Black
Blue with Black Stripe
4 3 2 1
4-pin Connector
Pin
1
2
3
4
Signal
Power Supply 1 Collector
Power Supply 1 Emitter
Power Supply 2 Collector
Power Supply 2 Emitter
Wire Color
Orange
Brown
Blue
Red with Black Stripe
BACKUP BATTERIES
A “Keep Alive” voltage is generated by three AA
nickel cadmium (NiCad) batteries (supplied in the
tool kit). These batteries supply a voltage, to hold
each module’s logic state during power outages,
so the console powers back up in the same state it
was in when power was lost. For information on
installing these batteries, see pages 2-4 and 2-5.
5-6
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D.1 • 12/10
digital
6
Accessories
H
FURNITURE MOUNTED PANELS
Furniture-mounted accessory panels maintain
arris offers a number of accessories and
the console’s look and feel while providing remote
control for important studio functions. All
services to complement your BMXdigital console.
BMXdigital accessory panels are 6" long by
either 1.6" or 3.2" wide. Single width panels (1.6"
Available products range from the VistaMax Audio
x 6" panels) include various mic control panels,
studio and headphone level panels, and periph-
Management System to integrate multiple BMX-
eral control panels. Cabinet skirt-mounted panels
include two headphone panels (jack-only and jack
digital consoles into a facility-wide network, to an
with level control). Custom-designed switch and
indicator panels are also available.
External RLS for multiple-source selection, to host
The PRE99-1788-1 Single Cabinet Plate allows
any single 1.6" x 6" panel to mount into a coun-
and guest panels, monitor control panels, headphone
tertop. The PRE99-1788-2 Dual Cabinet Plate
allows two 1.6" panels or a 3.2" double-width
panels, console drop-in peripheral control panels, a
panel to mount into a countertop.
The PRE99-1213 Studio Turret (shown on the
host turret with clock and timer and space for eight
next page) is a countertop turret that comes with
a PRE99-1211 Clock and Timer. It has space for
control panels, and a 3 x 6 headphone distribution
eight single-width 1.6" panels.
amp with digital level control panels. Harris serCABINET PLATE APPLICATION EXAMPLES
vices range from supplying logic wiring for common peripheral devices to complete system wiring
design and installation packages.
FURNITURE AND CABINETRY
Harris offers a full line of standard and custom
furniture and cabinetry, to house the BMXdigital
console and studio peripheral equipment, as well
as complete turnkey studio design and implementation services. Contact your Harris sales repre-
PRE99-1788-1 SINGLE
POSITION CABINET PLATE
(SHOWN WITH A PRE99-1198)
sentative for details.
6-1
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 10/03
PRE99-1788-2 DUAL
POSITION CABINET PLATE
(SHOWN WITH A PRE99-1199
& A PRE99-1191)
digital
6 Accessories
PERIPHERAL PANELS
PRE99-1213 TURRET APPLICATION EXAMPLE
These panels allow the console operator to use other equipment without turning away from the console.
Available drop-in panels include the
Telos Desktop Director and Switch
Console, several digital delivery sys-
PRE99-1211 Turret Clock and Event Timer
tem controllers, a delay unit control-
PRE99-1189
PRE99-1192
PRE99-1198
Dual Fader
Mic Remote
PRE99-1714-3 PRE99-1210
PRE99-1188
ler, and a tape remote. Some of these
require Divider Kits (see page 2-2)
when mounting into the blank panel
areas at either end of the mainframe.
MIC REMOTE PANELS
Four mic remote control panels are
available for the BMXdigital. The basic panel is the PRE99-1197, with On,
Studio Monitor Selector
Blank
Group Mic Control
Producer Talkback/IFB
Off, and Cough buttons. The PRE991198 (shown in the turret example)
adds a Talkback button to the three basic panel
the Host, Co-Host, and Guest outputs (from ei-
buttons. A simplified schematic, and connection
ther the Control Room or Studio modules).
information, for these panels is shown on page 6-
Headphone level control is done digitally
3.
through the PRE99-1214-series headphone panThe PRE99-1199 Mic Control panel (shown in
els. Headphone panels are available with and with-
the dual cabinet plate example on the previous
out a volume control pot. Those without a pot are
page) is designed for a host or co-host. It has the
designed to work with the Headphone fader con-
standard On, Off, Cough, and Talk to Control Room
troller (shown in the dual cabinet plate example
buttons, but also adds four additional Talk but-
on the previous page).
tons that can be configured for talking to two stu-
Existing headphone panels, which use a pot to
dios, directly to a host or a co-host, or with an
directly control the amplified level, can also be used
external location.
with the PRE99-1215 amplifier.
The PRE99-1210 Group Mic Controller (shown
LOGIC WIRING DIAGRAMS & CABLES
in the turret example) is used in a studio where
separate guest mic control panels are not installed.
To assist in logic cable design and construction,
The panel gives a host On/Off control for up to
Harris’ Technical Services Department can
six microphones from a single 1.6" panel.
supply logic wiring diagrams for many popular
peripheral devices.
HEADPHONE DISTRIBUTION AMP
To assist in installation, Harris also offers pre-
The PRE99-1215 Headphone amp has six out-
made peripheral logic cables for many popular
puts for one Host and up to five Co-Hosts or
devices. For availability and pricing, contact a sales
Guests. The three inputs to the amp come from
representative.
6-2
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 10/03
digital
6 Accessories
MIC REMOTE CONTROL PANEL INFORMATION (FOR PRE99-1197 AND PRE99-1198)
AMBER (TALKBACK)
CR3** CR6**
V+ SUPPLY (5 TO 30)
J1
4
ON TALLY
J1
3
RED (ON)
CR8
OFF TALLY
J1
2
LOGIC GROUND
J1
1
TALKBACK **
J5
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
AMBER (COUGH)
CR4
CR5
CR7 YELLOW (OFF)
CR1
CR2
J1: TO CONSOLE CHANNEL LOGIC
R1 *
S1 **
J1
TALK TO C/R **
7
J1
COUGH
6
J1
ON
5
J1
OFF
S2
ON
S4
GNDD
* Resistor Pack R1 limits the LED current. Its value is determined
by the voltage supplied by the console. Panels ship from the
factory with the 5 Volt resistor pack installed.
GNDD
8
COUGH
OFF
S3
Console Resistor
Logic Pack Value Harris P/N
Mic Remote
Control Panel
Schematic
5 Volts 47 ohms
12 Volts 390 ohms
6-786
6-787
Digikey P/N
4608X-1-470-ND
4608X-1-391-ND
GNDD
1 2 3
4 5 6
J2: TO GROUP MIC CONTROLLER
(use cable PRE99-790-CU)
** These items are not populated
on the PRE99-1197 Panel.
Application Examples
Mic Remote Control
Panel Connections
CURRENT LIMITING
RESISTOR PACK
(symetrical
orientation)
J2: TO/FROM GROUP
MIC CONTROLLER *
J1: TO/FROM
CONSOLE CHANNEL
LOGIC *
TALK
BACK
* For most
applications only
J1 will be used.
6
5
4
3
2
1
COUGH
COUGH
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
J2
J1
PRE99-1788-1
SINGLE CABINET
PLATE with a
PRE99-1197
GUEST MIC PANEL
(ON/OFF/COUGH)
PRE99-1788-2 DUAL CABINET
PLATE with a PRE99-1198
GUEST MIC PANEL
(ON/OFF/COUGH/TALKBACK)
& PRE99-1191HEADPHONE
FADER PANEL
PRE99-787-CU, 1.6" Mic Remote Panel Cable (for PRE99-1197 and PRE99-1198)
Mic Remote Panel
P1
Signal
Console MAIN Logic Connector
Pin
Logic Ground
1
Off Tally
2
On Tally
3
V+ Supply
4
Off Switch
5
On Switch
6
Cough Switch
7
Talkback Switch
8
Pin
BLK
WHT
RED
GRN
BRN
BLU
ORG
YEL
Signal
1
Logic Ground
16
Off Tally Output
17
On Tally Output
12
+5 Volt Supply
8
Remote Off Switch
7
Remote On Switch
9
Remote Cough Switch
20
Remote Talk C/R Switch
14 Tally Common
PARTS LIST
P1: Housing, 8-pin AMP MOD IV (PRE14-486)
P2: Housing, 24-pin AMP MOD IV (PRE14-513)
Contacts, AMP MOD IV (PRE15-938-1)
Cable: 8-conductor Belden # 9421 or equivalent
Jumper Wire: 26 AWG white hookup, UL1429 or equivalent
6
+5 Volt Supply
18
Opto Source Voltage
10 +5 Volt Supply
6-3
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 10/03
P2
digital
6 Accessories
EXTERNAL REMOTE LINE SELECTOR
(EXT. RLS)
External RLS and BMXdigital Modules
RLS or Telco modules can be set as a control
The Ext. RLS (PRE99-947) is a rack-mount ste-
module for an External RLS. Once a module is
reo source selector with 16 balanced inputs and a
configured to control an Ext. RLS (see below), the
single balanced output that connects to any Telco
source can be dialed up and taken using the
or RLS module. It works with both balanced ana-
module’s Source Selector and Take button.
log and AES/EBU digital signals, however, each
To configure an RLS or Telco module for use
Ext. RLS can only route analog or digital audio,
with an External RLS, set their DIP switches as
not both. To route both analog and digital audio,
follows:
two External RLSes are required to provide up to
Remote Line Selector Module
32 source selection—sixteen analog and sixteen
digital, to a single module.
The External RLS’s rear view, connector pinout
and typical wiring diagrams are shown below.
DIP Switch
#
Setting
DS1
4
On
DS1
5
Off
EXTERNAL REMOTE LINE SELECTOR (PRE99-947), REAR VIEW
NOTE: The RLS Control Panel and Aux Pwr connections are not used when the Ext. RLS connects to a BMXdigital module.
EXT. RLS CONNECTOR PINOUTS
12 11 10 9 8 7
6 5 4 3 2 1
8 7 6 5
4 3 2 1
P39
CONTROL IN
(WIRE ENTRY END)
P35
CONTROL THRU
(WIRE ENTRY END)
P39
P35
CONTROL IN
PIN
1
WIRING DIAGRAM, EXTERNAL RLS
CONTROL CABLE, TO RLS OR TELCO
MODULE
BMXdigital RLS or
Telco/Codec Module
LOGIC I/O Connector
CONTROL THRU
PIN SIGNAL
1
RLS-0
FUNCTION
RLS RELAY CONTROL 0
2
RLS-1
RLS RELAY CONTROL 1
2
RLS-1
RLS RELAY CONTROL 1
3
RLS-2
RLS RELAY CONTROL 2
3
RLS-2
RLS RELAY CONTROL 2
4
RLS-3
RLS RELAY CONTROL 3
4
RLS-3
RLS RELAY CONTROL 3
5
unused
none
5
V+5D
+5 VOLTS (FOR DIGITAL)
6
unused
none
6
GNDD
DIGITAL GROUND
7
RLS-0 DSP
RLS SELECTION TO I/F 0
7
V+5D
+5 VOLTS (FOR DIGITAL)
8
RLS-1 DSP
RLS SELECTION TO I/F 1
8
GNDD
DIGITAL GROUND
9
RLS-2 DSP
RLS SELECTION TO I/F 2
10
RLS-3 DSP
RLS SELECTION TO I/F 3
11
GNDD
DIGITAL GROUND
12
V+5D
+5 VOLTS (FOR DIGITAL)
P1 - P16
RLS RELAY CONTROL 0
P1
SIGNAL
PIN
LOGIC GROUND
LOGIC +5VDC
RLS-0
RLS-1
RLS-2
RLS-3
LOGIC GROUND
COMMAND COMM.
LOGIC GROUND
TALLY COMMON
3
10
15
16
17
23
1
13
2
14
AUDIO INPUTS (1 - 16)
PIN SIGNAL
ANALOG FUNCTION DIGITAL FUNCTION
1
Left Shield
Audio Left Shield
AES/EBU Shield
2
Left Low
Audio Left Low
AES/EBU Low
3
Left High
Audio Left High
AES/EBU High
4
Right Shield
Audio Right Shield
unused
5
Right Low
Audio Right Low
unused
6
Right High
Audio Right High
unused
P17 - P32
unused
2
Left Low
Audio Left Low
unused
3
Left High
Audio Left High
unused
4
Right Shield
Audio Right Shield
unused
5
Right Low
Audio Right Low
unused
6
Right High
Audio Right High
unused
P33
AUDIO OUTPUT
PIN
SIGNAL
ANALOG FUNCTION DIGITAL FUNCTION
1
Left Shield
Left Shield
AES/EBU Shield
2
Left Low
Left Low
AES/EBU Low
3
Left High
Left High
AES/EBU High
4
Right Shield
Right Shield
unused
5
Right Low
Right Low
unused
6
Right High
Right High
unused
11
12
1
2
3
4
SIGNAL
RLS CONTROL 1
RLS CONTROL 2
RLS CONTROL 3
PARTS LIST
P1: Housing, 24-pin AMP MOD IV (PRE14-513)
P2: Housing, 12-pin AMP MOD IV (PRE14-490)
Contacts: AMP MOD IV (PRE15-938-1)
Cable: 7-conductor Belden # 9430 or equivalent
Jumper Wire: 26 AWG white hookup, UL1429 or equiv.
1st RLS Chassis
(Control THRU)
P1
PARTS LIST
P1 - P33: Housing, 6-pin, MOD IV
AMP 87631-2 (PRE14-484)
P35: Housing, 8-pin, MOD IV
AMP 87631-4 (PRE14-486)
P38: Housing, 24-pin, MOD IV
AMP 2-87631-0 (PRE14-513)
P39: Housing, 12-pin, MOD IV
AMP 87922-2 (PRE14-490)
All contacts: Crimp, Gold, MOD IV
AMP 102128-1 (PRE15-938-1)
SIGNAL
RLS-0
RLS-1
RLS-2
RLS-3
V+5D
GNDD
6-4
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 10/03
PIN
1
2
3
4
5
6
P2
COMMON
+5VDC
RLS CONTROL 0
WIRING DIAGRAM, FOR RLS THRU
P1 - P33
IN / THRU / OUT
(WIRE ENTRY END)
ANALOG FUNCTION DIGITAL FUNCTION
Audio Left Shield
PIN
WHT
BLK
RED
GRN
BRN
BLU
6 5 4
3 2 1
AUDIO THRU (1 - 16)
PIN SIGNAL
1
Left Shield
RLS CONTROL IN
Connector
FUNCTION
SIGNAL
RLS-0
2nd RLS Chassis
(Control IN)
BLK
WHT
RED
GRN
BRN
BLU
PIN
1
2
3
4
12
11
SIGNAL
RLS-0
RLS-1
RLS-2
RLS-3
V+5D
GNDD
PARTS LIST
P1: Housing, 8-pin AMP 87631-4 (PRE14-486)
P2: Housing, 12-pin AMP 87922-2 (PRE14-490)
Contacts: Crimp, Gold, AMP 102128-1 (PRE15-938-1)
Cable: 7 Cond. Belden #9430 or equivalent.
Length is 12.0" for stacked configuration.
P2
digital
6 Accessories
Telco/Codec Module
display (e.g. Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta). The
DIP Switch
#
Setting
source type (analog or digital) is transparent to
DS2
4
On
the board operator. Missing or empty entries are
DS2
5
Off
not displayed on the module.
When the Ext. RLS is used with digital sources,
Refer to pages 2-28 to 2-31 for more informa-
physical input 1 on the External RLS uses La-
tion on configuring the RLS module. Refer to pages
bel_17, input 2 uses Label_18, and so up to input
2-24 to 2-27 for more information about config-
16 which uses Label_32. An analog device can
uring the Telco/Codec module.
also be connected to the analog input on the module, and it can be selected like the RLS sources by
External RLS and the BMXdigital Server
simply adding an entry line for Label_1 (when
Connecting an External RLS, and properly set-
Label_1 is selected the module automatically
ting up the controlling module, results in a mod-
switches to the analog input).
ule display that simply lists the sources as: Input
Conversely, when an Ext. RLS is used with ana-
01, Input 02, Input 03, etc., as the Source Selector
log sources, the input entries match the inputs on
is rotated. These new settings must be saved to a
the External RLS (e.g., input 1 uses Label_1, in-
session file in order to change these default names
put 2 uses Label_2 and so on up to input 16 which
(see Chapter 4 for details), to more accurately re-
uses Label_16). A digital device can also be di-
flect the RLS input sources.
rectly connected to the digital input and selected
In the session file, a typical External RLS entry
using the Source Selector by adding an entry line
looks like this:
for Label_17, which, when taken, switches the
[RLS_145]
module to use the digital input.
<The range for RLS modules is 145 (for the
For more information on the BMXdigital Server
first RLS module from the left end) to 159. The
and session files, see Chapter 4.
range for Telco modules is 97 (for Telco 1) to 102
Typical External RLS Applications
(for Telco 6). Each Telco or RLS module has one
of these unique numbers (see page 4-7).>
Two typical applications for the External RLS
Selection=4
and the BMXdigital are shown page 6-6.
<This is the current selection from the last time
In Application 1, one or two External RLSes
the session file was saved. It can be any number
are connected to a single controlling module. The
from 1 to 32.>
first External RLS is used for either analog or digi-
Label_1=Delta
tal signals; the second External RLS is used for
Label_2=Foxtrot
the other type of signal. For example, if the first
Label_3=Hotel
External RLS is used for analog signals, the sec-
<Label_1 through Label_16 are reserved for the
ond is used for digital signals.
sixteen possible analog sources.>
In Application 2, multiple External RLSes are
Label_17=Golf
used for analog sources. In this example, some or
Label_18=Echo
all of the analog sources are made available to
<Label_17 through Label_32 are reserved for
multiple BMXdigital modules. Each analog input
the sixteen possible digital sources.>
can cascade, using the THRU output, to additional
Labels appear alphabetically in the module’s
External RLSes. In this way, the same analog
6-5
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 10/03
digital
6 Accessories
TYPICAL EXTERNAL RLS APPLICATIONS
Application 1: One External Remote Line Selector (PRE99-947) can connect to the ANALOG INPUT,
for selecting analog sources, or it can connect to the DIGITAL INPUT, for selecting digitial
sources. A second RLS can connect to the remaining audio input to provide 32-source selection
(16 analog and 16 digital) on a single RLS or Telco/Codec input channel.
BMXdigital RLS or
Telco/Codec Module
LOGIC I/O connector
From Analog Sources 1 - 16
PRE99-947
)
External RLS or Telco/Codec module, ANALOG INPUT
To additional RLS INs.
(as in Application 2)
PRE99-695-0 cable
From Digital Sources 1 - 16
PRE99-947
)
External RLS or Telco/Codec module, DIGITAL INPUT
Application 2: Up to 16 analog sources need to be simultaneously available on multiple channels. Connect External
RLSes to several RLS or Telco/Codec modules. The inputs to each External RLS are daisy-chained
together to allow independent selection of the same 16 analog sources by each destination channel.
BMXdigital RLS or
Telco/Codec Module
LOGIC I/O connector
From Analog Sources 1 - 16
PRE99-947
)
To RLS or Telco/Codec “X” ANALOG INPUT
BMXdigital RLS or
Telco/Codec Module
LOGIC I/O connector
PRE99-967-0 cable (1 - 16 places depending upon installation needs)
PRE99-947
)
To RLS or Telco/Codec “Y” ANALOG INPUT
To additional RLS INs.
sources are made available to multiple RLS or
Note: Cascading, as shown in Application 2, can-
Telco/Codec modules at the console.
not be done with digital signals. AES/EBU sig-
Other installations are possible by combining
nals need to have one terminated destination. A
the techniques of Application 1 and Application
digital distribution amplifier (Digital DA) must be
2. The External RLS can also be used with an ex-
used to provide similar functionality.
ternal controller (PRE99-953) to feed recording
devices or other line-level devices needing multiple analog or digital source selection.
6-6
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision C • 10/03
digital
VMCC, Session
and Macro Files
T
VMCC FILE MAINTENANCE
he VistaMax Control Center (VMCC) is
A
The VMCC application (icon:
) not only
simplifies rack configuration, it also allows onethe software program station engineers use to cre-
stop file maintenance for every VistaMax community member—any RMXdigital or BMXdigital
ate and maintain the configuration files needed
console, VistaMax rack or VistaMax edge device.
After VMCC distributes the setup and config files
by all VistaMax community devices—including
to each community device, a PROVISIONED.HASH
file is written into the storage card folder. The next
the BMXdigital console.
time Normal Download is selected to distribute
Chapter 4 covers console configuration, basic
updated files,VMCC reads the hash file to identify
VMCC operations and standard commands for
which files match the newly provisioned files so
session and macro files. This appendix presents
they are not re-downloaded and so only those files
addition details on using VMCC and using
with changes are downloaded.
Notepad® to edit session and macro files. An er-
If the hash file is not found (as in the first time
rata section on VMCC covers program use notes
VMCC downloads files), then VMCC will down-
and an application section presents information
load all files, which is equivalent to selecting Force
on setting up command entries for specific tasks
Download. This always causes consoles or racks
in session and macro files.
to restart since the nqx.ini file is replaced.
The revision D release of the BMXdigital CD-
COMMUNITY MONITOR (CM)
ROM (Harris # 99-5000) introduced two major
CM (tray icon:
changes to the console’s operating system.The first
) is not only a valuable tool
is that all VistaMax devices now run release 4.2 of
for setting up a VistaMax system, it’s also helpful
the BMXdigital Server operating system. The sec-
for troubleshooting and analyzing a VistaMax sys-
ond is that two Harris-proprietary software pro-
tem since it sees all VistaMax devices connected
grams: VistaMax Community Monitor (CM) and
to the network—even those with IP addresses out-
VistaMax Control Center (VMCC) are now used
side the network’s assigned subnet.
to create, maintain and properly distribute con-
IP addressing problems can occur if a new con-
figuration files for allVistaMax community devices.
sole is added to a system that’s not using the de-
Previously, configuration files were created manu-
fault IP addressing scheme (as presented on page
ally using a text-only editor and were distributed
4-10). A factory-fresh console has an IP address
to all the community members by hand. See chap-
of 192.168.100.22 but, if the system is set for IP
ter 4 for details on installing these files. It should
addresses using another subnet (say 137.237.
be noted that session and macro files must still be
207.xxx) then the new console will not be seen by
edited using Notepad®.
the setup computer. Another way this might happen is if the IP address entered into VMCC had a
A-1
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T
Revision D • 8/05
I
O
N
digital
Appendix A VMCC
typo which was not caught and the file was dis-
Use Notepad to open each nqx.ini template
tributed to the console. When the Controller Card
file: BMX_Nqx.ini, RMX_Nqx.ini, and
restarts after file distribution, FTP Voyager would
Rack_Nqx.ini, as required to add in the entry
no longer be able to see it, nor would any other
line. Enter it just after the Jones period entry, as
community devices. But, since every community
shown in the following example:
device reports its IP address to CM, it will be shown
; Set the Jones period (default is 500)
jones_period = 500
;
VMCS_Port = 2006,T ;TCP/IP protocol
;----------------------------------------
in the CM status window.
To access such a “missing” device, change the
setup computer’s fixed IP address so it falls within
After saving the modified template files, use
the missing device’s subnet, as listed in the CM
VMCC to reprovision files so the modified
status display. Once that is done, use FTP Voy-
nqx.ini templates are used, then force distrib-
ager to view the device’s storage card and open
ute the changed files to the consoles and racks.
up the nqx.ini file and correct the IP address
After the console or rack restarts, start Com-
manually so that the device again is within the
mand Client. Click Options then select Setup to
community’s subnet. Return the setup computer
configure the Command Client.
back to its previous fixed IP address.
Restart the device (reset the rack’s Controller
Card, the Session module on a BMXdigital console or the KSU on a RMXdigital console) to now
use the corrected IP address. If the problem was
caused by a typo, correct the IP address in VMCC
and then redistribute the corrected files to the device to update the hash table.
Command Client
Command Client Setup Windows
CM includes an application called Command
Client. It is accessed from the Start menu (under
In the pop-up window, shown above, enter the
Programs/Harris Corp/VistaMax on the setup
IP address for the console or rack that will be re-
computer). The application allows a session or
motely controlled. The group port is always 2006
macro file to be loaded onto a VistaMax device
for TCP/IP communications. Make sure the TCP
from the setup computer. It can alternately be set
box is checked, then click OK to close the win-
to take one or more routes on a console or rack.
dow. Click Connect to connect to the device.
To use the application, the following entry line
Once connected, the lower half of the window is
must be added to the nqx.ini file on each de-
activated and a session or macro file name can be
vice that will be controlled in this manner:
entered in the text box when the Session radio
VMCS_Port = 2006,T ;TCP/IP protocol
button is filled. To enter a session or macro, type
It is best to add this command to the VMCC
the full name and suffix, then press Send to load
nqx.ini template files. There is one for each type
the session or macro.
of VistaMax device in the VMCC templates folder
Click the Take radio button in order to route
(C:\Program Files\Harris Corp\Vista
one or more signals. To enter routes, each route is
Max Control Center\Templates).
A-2
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T
Revision D • 8/05
I
O
N
digital
Appendix A VMCC
VMCC OPERATIONS ERRATA
in the form of: [source, destination]. Multiple routes
can be entered when they are separated by com-
The VMCC program released with the rev D ver-
mas, as in the following:
sion of the 99-5000 CD-ROM is build 2044. The
[161,241],[163,243],[165,245]
following operational tips and function warnings
apply to this build. Each build of the VMCC soft-
Pressing Send takes the routes to the selected
ware includes a ReleaseNotes.txt file in the VMCC
console.
folder (C : \ P r o g r a m
The entry example above routes the first three
Files\Harris
mix-minus signals to the first three analog out-
Corp\VistaMax Control Center is the de-
puts on an RMXdigital console’s KSU card. If
fault path to the folder). The latest release build is
routes are made between devices, then either the
available for downloading from the Harris con-
universal signal ID form (e.g., D10.225) or the
sole FTP site (see page 5-1 for access details).
global number form must be used (e.g., 65585).
Duplic
ate C
ommunit
yN
ames
uplica
Communit
ommunity
Names
Both of these refer to the PGM 1 bus signals from
VMCC currently allows multiple files to be saved
a console set as device 10.
with the same name. To avoid confusion, assign a
unique name for each new community.
UDP Commands
There is an alternate function to the Command
Editing Card Complement on a Device
Client that allows UDP commands from peripherals like digital delivery systems or programming
When editing the card complement on a device,
automation systems to function like the Command
wait for the processing to complete or errors may
Client to remotely load session or macro files and
be introduced. Processing is complete once the
to take routes.
community text blinks.
To command a VistaMax device using UDP com-
BMXd & Telc
os
elcos
mands, the following line is entered into the
nqx.ini file—in lieu of the previous command
VMCC does not limit the number of Telco chan-
line that allowed manual takes and file loading
nels that can be assigned. Do not set more than
from the Command Client:
six channels as Telco channels.
VMCS_Port = 2002,U ;UDP protocol
Signal Naming Conventions
The commanding device would then use stan-
VistaMax devices, like the BMXd console, can
dard UPD command protocol to load a session
show a 10-character source name or session file
file (again using the session or macro name with
name in their displays.The displayed source names
suffix) and, by using the source and destination
may be either the In Room Name or the Commu-
structure that was shown above, be able to take
nity Name plus other identifiers. The type of name
routes on any device that has the UDP entry line
used is determined by which Tier Naming Con-
in their nqx.ini file.
vention is set on each device in the community.
The Tier Naming Convention is set in the device edit pane, just above the Source Include List.
The default setting is Convention 1, which uses
the In Room names in all local and device publish
files. This is mainly used in smaller installations
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where all of the community members are associ-
When multiple stations are in one facility, then
ated with a single station or a common purpose.
Tier 3 naming can be used. This differentiates be-
For example: a single station facility where three
tween fellow group members (those with the same
consoles (one air studio, an image studio and a
Call Group name) and everyone else in the com-
production/backup air studio) are networked with
munity by showing names on the other group de-
one rack; or a network origination facility where
vices using the Call Group (XYZ in the example),
two racks are networked with six studio consoles.
the Discipline Sort Character and the Discipline
Prefix.
When a single community has devices associated with multiple stations—where each station
On devices with different Call Group names, the
group has dedicated Air, Production and Image
System Name is used. It consists of the Call Group
studios, then Tier Convention 2 or 3 can be used
name plus the first character of the Discipline Pre-
to identify where each source is from by including
fix. The Call Group name then identifies the sta-
a Call Group name or Discipline Prefix along with
tion—narrowing the possible source locations to
the signal’s Community name.
a few rooms. The Discipline Prefix name is typi-
Here’s a summary of how the three levels of
cally the room function, e.g. Air, Production, Im-
naming are used to create local and device pub-
age, Rack, thus by combining the call letters with
lish files:
the first letter of the room function one can easily
TIER NAMING
CONVENTION
DISPLAYED SOURCE NAMES BY DEVICE:
LOCAL
GROUP
SYSTEM
TIER 1 (LOCAL)
MINIDISK1
MINIDISK1
MINIDISK1
TIER 2 (GROUP) MINIDISK1
XYZ.MD1
XYZ.MD1
TIER 3 (SYSTEM) MINIDISK1
-PROD.MD1 XYZP.MD1
identify where the signal originates.
Setting Signal Include Lists
VMCC SETTINGS THAT GENERATED THE ABOVE NAMES:
In Room Name1 = MINIDISK1
Community Name1 = MD1
Call Group2 = XYZ
Discipline Prefix2 = PROD
Name Radix3 = . (PERIOD)
Discipline Sort Character3 = - (DASH)
In Room Prefix3 = (BLANK)
The Source Include list, set in the console edit
pane, is the master list of sources that will be available for selection on router modules and source
selector panels. The routers.ini file is where
1 - Entry set in the Signal Summary edit pane
2 - Entry set in the Device edit pane
3 - Entry set in the Community edit pane
this list gets used to create the [SrcInclude] sec-
Tier Naming Convention Summary
tion list.
When Tier 1 naming is used, local names are
The Destination Include list set sets those des-
displayed on all devices. This is fine for small fa-
tinations (Netcard outputs) that are available to
cilities, but when multiple consoles have output
be controlled by destination panels. The
signals being routed which have identical names
[DstInclude] list in routers.ini is equal to the
(like PGM 1, for instance), it will be difficult to
Destination Include list entries.
know where those signals are from if each signal
Edge Device Parent Reassignment
is not given a unique name. To get around this
limitation, Tier 2 naming can be used.
Each edge device has an assigned “parent” which
Tier 2 names use the In Room Prefix followed
is that community member with that edge device’s
by the first nine characters of the In Room name
setup information in its edgedevice.ini file.
to identify signals on the local device. The other
If an existing edge device is assigned a new par-
members of the community will not see the In
ent in VMCC, new edgedevice.ini files will
Room name, but will see the Tier 2 name in the
have to be provisioned and distributed to all of
example above (e.g., Call Group Name, Name Ra-
the affected consoles and racks to effect the par-
dix, Community Name).
ent change on the edge device.
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When there are dozens of edge devices in a com-
There is no distinction, however, in this pane
munity, the affected edge device may not “hear”
between devices that match completely and de-
the Init RCED command issued by VMCC after
vices that need to have their MAC address popu-
new parent files are distributed. To ensure the edge
lated. Click Accept to populate the MAC addresses
device grabs the correct files, power cycle the edge
in the community members. Even though it may
device to force it to retrieve its setup information
appear that no action is required, if Cancel is
from the new parent.
clicked, the MAC addresses will not be populated.
Nesting E
dge D
evic
es
Edge
De
vices
Merging a Physical Device into a VMCC-Entered Device
When Nest edge devices is checked under
Inspecting a community, with the intent to merge
Tools\Options\General tab, adding a new edge
an inspected device with a VMCC-entered device,
device or changing the parent on an existing edge
will only work if the inspected device and the
device does not automatically update the edge de-
VMCC device match exactly in regards to frame-
vice location in the Explorer pane.
size, card type installed and their slot locations.
Edge device positions get updated when: a new
If the two devices do not match exactly, VMCC
device is added to the community; when the com-
only allows the inspected device to be added as a
munity is reopened (File, Open Community); when
new community member.
the Nest edge devices selection is cycled (To cycle
The differences between the VMCC device and
the Nest selection, open the Options window,
the inspected device will be shown in the Inspect
uncheck Nest edge devices, then click OK to close
window. Make note of the differences and update
the options window. Reopen the Options window
the VMCC device accordingly. Again inspect the
and recheck Nest edge devices and click OK to
community. Once the inspected device matches the
close the options window.). The edge devices will
VMCC device, VMCC will allow the inspected de-
now be properly nested under the correct parent.
vice to be merged into the existing VMCC device.
Un-Installing C
ar
ds fr
om D
evic
es
Car
ards
from
De
vices
Merge Devices List
Use caution when uninstalling cards from the
If there is a changed device near the bottom of a
community devices. There is no warning issued
long device list in the “Merge Devices” pane, there
for the removal of cards which have signals as-
is no immediate indicator that decisions may be
signed to include lists or as button assignments.
required. Be sure to scroll down through the device list looking for devices with changes.
Inspection and Merge Devices Issues
Matching a Physical Community with an Existing
Merge Devices, Multiple Changes
If there are multiple devices with changes in the
VMCC-created Community
Inspecting a physical community, with the in-
“Merge Devices” pane, contiguous selections of
tent to populate the null MAC addresses of a
changed devices will display only the list of “Criti-
VMCC-created matching community, brings up a
cal Issues” specific to the first changed device se-
Merge Devices pane. This pane shows a list of all
lected. Selection of a device with no changes causes
devices which match in both IP address and physi-
the next changed device selected to display cor-
cal configuration to those in the VMCC commu-
rectly.
nity.
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SETUP, CONFIG, SESSION, MACRO—
GENERAL FILE INFO
When an EntryValue refers to a specific signal
in the VistaMax system it can be identified in three
All VistaMax device setup and configuration files
ways: by its global number (65697); by its local
are text-only files that share common formatting
number (161); or, when the signal is on another
rules like: each section begins with a [Section
device, by its universal number (d1.161). Each of
Name] header, which is limited to 32 characters;
these numbers reference the Mix-Minus 1 signal
that each entry line has an absolute maximum
on the console set as device 1.
The following command shows the use of local
length of 1,000 characters (the line length may be
further limited by other constraints imposed by
numbering,
the section); and that all text proceeded by a semi-
[RouterCommand_1]
take_1=161,241; MM-1 > KSU A1
take_2=163,243; MM-2 > KSU A2
colon (;) is a comment line, which is limited to 80
characters.
The following command shows the use of uni-
Config (.cfg) and setup (.ini) files are cre-
versal numbering,
ated and maintained using VMCC so this infor-
[RouterCommand_1]
take_1=d1.161,d1.241; MM-1 > KSU A1
take_2=d1.163,d1.243; MM-2 > KSU A2
mation is more applicable to session and macro
files, which are created and/or edited manually
using Notepad.
The following command shows the use of glo-
Here’s how each section and its entries appears
bal numbering,
in each VistaMax file:
[RouterCommand_1]
take_1=65697,65777; MM-1 > KSU A1
take_2=65699,65779; MM-2 > KSU A2
[Section Name]
;Section Comment Line
KeyValue=EntryValue ;Comment
There are three Excel spreadsheets included on
The [Section Name] defines what the sec-
the 99-5000 CD-ROM that can be used to deter-
tion entry values set up. The name is specific and
mine the local and global numbers for each signal
must be entered using exact characters. Following
in any console or rack. The universal number is
each [Section Name] heading is space avail-
simply the device indicator (d) and the device num-
able for one or more comment lines. Up to 32 com-
ber (1 up to 63) followed by a period and the local
ment lines could be added. Each comment line
number, as shown in the above examples.
There are also PDF files for each spreadsheet
begins with a semicolon (;).
that show the local and global numbers for device
Each section is limited to 64 data entry lines.
1 of each console type and rack.
Each data entry line is composed of a KeyValue
followed by = (equals) and then the EntryValue.
Section Headings
The KeyValue may be up to 32 characters in
length. The EntryValue may be up to 80 charac-
In session files most section headings define the
ters in length, plus each entry can be followed by
button states of each channel strip on the control
an optional comment—which can also be up to
surface when the session loads. Thus there are sec-
80 characters in length (after the ;).
tion headings for PGM 1, PGM 2, Mode, Cue, etc.
The format of the Entry Value is Section Name
and under each heading is an entry for each chan-
specific, and it may have multiple components,
nel strip in the console. These types of headings
each separated by a comma.
were covered in chapter 4.
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macro to return the consoles back to standard day-
[chain]
time operations.
This section allows one or more session files to
be automatically loaded on other consoles or racks
Macros are loaded into a console or VistaMax
when the session is loaded. It is more often used
rack just like a session file: they can be run manu-
in macro files than in session files, but it works
ally through using a file load FTP command; they
equally well in either. The chain command entry
can be added to the Task Scheduler so they are
looks like this:
run at specified times; or they can be added to a
[chain]
call_1=remote_1.ses,9
router channel for board operator selection and
loading.
This is most often used to route a return signal
Macro files are stored in the SesFiles folder. Since
(mix-minus, IFB) for a remote or for a shared two-
they do not have a .ses suffix they do not show
way device like an ISDN interface that connects
up in the Session selector. If a board operator needs
to another device. In the example, the KeyValue is
to load a macro, the macro can be assigned as a
call_1= and the Entry Value is remote_1.ses
“source” on a router channel. The macro is ex-
which is loaded on device 9.
ecuted when the operator selects the macro and
presses Take on the router channel.The only down-
[RouterCommand_1]
side: adding a macro to a router channel means
This section allows one or more routes to be set
that channel is exclusively set aside for macros—
when the session loads. Typical usage was shown
no normal audio sources are displayed.
in the examples on signal numbering on the pre-
Here is part of an RMXd session file showing a
vious page.
standard router definition and one set for loading
Each take_x KeyValue, numbered sequentially
macros:
from 1, defines one route. Each EntryValue de-
[Router_4]
include_1=257-287,321-335
Take=259
fines the source and the destination for that route.
In take_1=161,241 signal 161 is the source and
signal 241 is the destination.
[Router_5]
macro_1=dallas
macro_2=chicago
macro_3=tucson
macro_4=bayonne,6
MACRO FILES
Macro files are text-only command files that
have a .mac suffix. They are created using a text-
Router 4 is a typical router section with a chan-
only editor like Notepad®. Macro files contain ses-
nel-specific include list (to limit the sources dis-
sion file-type commands to perform one or more
played), and a take command that routes a signal
tasks. A simple macro might consist of a couple
on the channel when the session file is taken.
commands to route signals for setting up a live
Router 5 is set to display four macros in its
remote.
source list. Macros 1, 2 and 3 are on the local
A more complex macro could not only route
device. Macro 4 (bayonne) is run on device 6. The
bidirectional signals, but could also command ses-
session file command syntax for assigning mac-
sion files to load on several community devices.
ros to a router channel is as follows:
One use for this would be to setup a facility for
[Router_x]
Macro_n=Filename,d
unattended overnight operation. When the morning show staff comes in, they would run another
x is the channel ID of the router channel.
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n sequentially numbers the macro entries, starting from 1. Up to 64 macros could be assigned to
any one router channel.
Filename is the macro’s file name minus the
.mac file extension.
,d is an optional entry to specify a device number. The device number identifies which device has
the macro file. The macro is loaded on that device. No entry says the macro is on the local device.
Channel Displays
When a session file that has macros assigned
on a router channel is taken, the console automation checks the SesFiles folder, on the local device
only, to verify the macro files listed in the session
file are present. If a macro file is not found, the
name is displayed with arrows,
> Macro name <
when it is dialed up on the router channel. If a
macro with the arrows is taken, the macro does
not load and the name is displayed with brackets,
[ Macro name ]
indicating the macro did not run. Since this function only checks the local device, macro files called
on other devices are assumed to execute as requested and there is no indication that the macro
file did not load as requested.
Router channels with macros should be left
turned Off since there is no audio on the channel
and taking a macro in this state causes it to execute immediately. While the router channel with
macros is On, taking any macro—local or remote,
will also show brackets around the name, but in
this case it is because the macro is pending. It will
not be executed until the channel is turned Off.
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I
Index
Index
Page numbers listed as chapter-page.
A
Channel ID Numbers ................................ 4-16
Accessories
Cabinet Plates ...................................... 6-1
External Remote Line Selector ............. 6-4
Furniture Mounted Panels .................... 6-1
Headphone Distribution Amplifier ....... 6-2
Mic Remote & Peripheral Panels .......... 6-2
AMP MOD IV Receptacle Contacts
Crimp Procedure .................................. 2-7
Crimp Tool ........................................... 2-8
Housings, Audio ................................... 2-9
Insertion & Removal ............................. 2-8
Audio
Analog Connections .............................. 2-9
Digital Clock Reference ...................... 2-11
Digital Connections ............................ 2-10
S/PDIF Connections ........................... 2-10
Unbalanced Connections .................... 2-10
Clock
DIP Switch settings .............................. 2-5
On Meter Panel .................................. 3-18
Servicing .............................................. 5-5
Setting the Time ................................... 2-5
Community Monitor .................................... 4-5
Connection Examples
Basic Logic Example .......................... 2-60
Complex Logic Example .................... 2-62
Mic Remote Control Example ............. 2-58
Connections
Audio ................................................... 2-9
Logic .................................................. 2-11
Unbalanced ........................................ 2-10
Connector Access ........................................ 2-3
Console Installation ..................................... 2-2
B
Control Room Module
Cue Control Logic ............................... 2-38
Backup Batteries
Installing .............................................. 2-4
Description ........................................... 1-2
Service Information .............................. 5-6
DIP Switch Settings ........................... 2-35
Install Quick Guide ............................ 2-34
Bargraph Meters
Description ......................................... 3-19
Logic .................................................. 2-36
DIP Switch Settings ............................. 2-6
Operation Quick Guide ...................... 3-14
Crimp Tool Operation .................................. 2-8
BMXdigital Server
File Structure ....................................... 4-1
D
Initial Configuration ............................. 4-7
Denon CD Player Connection Example ..... 2-61
C
Dx_publish.cfg (Device Publish) File ........... 4-5
Cabinet Plates ............................................. 6-1
Digital Clock Reference ............................. 2-11
Cabling and Wiring
DIP switches, how to set ............................ 2-13
Cabling Access into Mainframe ............. 2-1
DSP Card
Crimp Tool Operation ........................... 2-8
Description ........................................... 1-3
Required Cables and Wire .................... 2-7
Operation ........................................... 3-20
Wire Preparation ................................. 2-7
Service Info .......................................... 5-4
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E
edgedevice.ini File ...................................... 4-3
L
ENCO DADPro Connection Example ....... 2-63
Logic
local_publish.cfg File .................................. 4-4
Event Timer
Block Diagram, Universal Logic ......... 2-13
DIP switch Settings ............................. 2-6
Cable, Mic Remote Panel ...................... 6-3
On Meter Panel ................................. 3-18
Connections ........................................ 2-11
Servicing ............................................. 5-5
Dim & Mute Logic .............................. 2-15
Troubleshooting .................................. 5-5
Interface, Universal Logic ................... 2-12
External Remote Line Selector (RLS) ......... 6-4
Mic & Peripheral Remote Logic .......... 2-14
Setting DIP Switches .......................... 2-13
F
Warning Lamp Logic ......................... 2-15
Fader Servicing ........................................... 5-4
Wiring Diagram Info ............................ 6-2
File Structure ............................................. 4-1
Furniture Cutout ........................................ 2-1
FTP Site Information ................................. 5-1
M
Macro Files (see Session and Macro Files)
FTP Voyager Program ................................ 4-6
Mainframe
Configuration ....................................... 2-2
G
Connector Access .................................. 2-3
General Information .................................... 1-1
Description ........................................... 1-1
General Troubleshooting ............................. 5-6
Dimensions .......................................... 2-1
Global Signal ID Number ......................... 4-17
Furniture Cutout .................................. 2-1
Grounding and Shielding ............................ 2-4
Manual Revisions .......................................... vi
Guest Panels (Mic Remote Panels) .............. 6-3
Mapping Section, Session File .................. 4-20
Meter Panel
H
Bargraph Meters ................................ 3-19
Harris Contact Information ......................... 5-1
Clock .................................................. 3-18
Hazard/Warning Label Identification ............. v
Description ........................................... 2-3
I
Event Timer ....................................... 3-18
init.mac File
File Information .................................. 4-2
File Sections ...................................... 4-25
File Settings ....................................... 4-20
Operation Quick Guide ...................... 3-18
Overview .............................................. 3-1
Meters
DIP Switch Setting ............................... 2-6
Input Module (see Universal Input Module)
Setting Display Options ........................ 2-6
Installation .................................................. 2-1
Troubleshooting ................................... 5-5
Installation Parts Kit ................................... 5-3
Mic Preamplifier Module
Installing Backup Batteries ......................... 2-4
inventory.txt File ........................................ 4-3
Description ........................................... 1-1
IP Addressing, Suggested ......................... 4-10
Install Quick Guide ........................... 2-16
DIP Switch Settings ........................... 2-17
Operation Quick Guide ....................... 3-2
Mic Remote Panel .............................. 2-14, 6-3
Mic Remote Panel Connection Example .... 2-58
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M (CONTINUED)
Peripheral Devices
Modules and Cards
Basic Peripheral Device Example ....... 2-60
Overview ............................................. 3-1
Complex Peripheral Device Example . 2-62
Placement ............................................ 2-2
Peripheral Device Logic ...................... 2-14
Quick Guide Page Listing ................... 2-12
Power Supply
Servicing .............................................. 5-3
Connecting ........................................... 2-4
Description ........................................... 1-3
N
Grounding Notes .................................. 2-4
Net Card
Maintenance ......................................... 5-5
Description ........................................... 1-3
Producer Talkback/IFB Panel ................... 2-53
Functions & Connections .................... 2-64
Provisioned.hash File ................................. 4-2
Operation ........................................... 3-20
R
Service Info .......................................... 5-4
release.txt File ............................................ 4-2
Net-only Module Information .................... 2-64
nqx.ini File ................................................. 4-2
nqx.ini Settings ........................................ 4-10
Remote Line Selector Module (RLS)
Description ........................................... 1-2
DIP Switch Settings ........................... 2-29
O
Install Quick Guide ............................ 2-28
Operation .................................................... 3-1
Logic I/O ........................................... 2-30
Output 1 Module
Operation Quick Guide ...................... 3-11
Description ........................................... 1-3
Repairs
DIP Switch Settings ........................... 2-51
Information .......................................... 5-1
Install Quick Guide ............................ 2-50
Services ................................................ 5-1
Operation Quick Guide ...................... 3-17
RLS Module (see Remote Line Selector Module)
Producer IFB Logic ............................ 2-52
Router Assignments .................................. 4-20
Output 2 Module
RouterCommand Section ........................... 4-20
Description ........................................... 1-3
routers.ini File ............................................ 4-3
DIP Switch Settings ........................... 2-55
Install Quick Guide ............................ 2-54
S
Operation Quick Guide ...................... 3-17
Safety Instructions ......................................... v
Output 3 Module
serverid.txt File ........................................... 4-3
Description ........................................... 1-3
Servicing
DIP Switch Settings ........................... 2-57
Clock Assembly .................................... 5-5
Install Quick Guide ............................ 2-56
Faders .................................................. 5-4
Operation Quick Guide ...................... 3-18
Meters ................................................. 5-5
Modules ............................................... 5-3
P
Power Supply ....................................... 5-6
Parts
Timer Assembly ................................... 5-5
SesFiles Folder ........................................... 4-2
Ordering ............................................... 5-1
Replacement Parts ............................... 5-2
Spare Parts ........................................... 5-2
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S (CONTINUED)
Telco/Codec Module (cont.)
Session and Macro Files
Logic I/O ........................................... 2-26
Channel Labels ................................... 4-18
Operation Quick Guide ........................ 3-6
Channel Button Settings ..................... 4-18
Telco Record Mix ................................. 3-9
Channel ID Numbers .......................... 4-16
Template Session ......................................... 4-5
Channel Lockout Section .................... 4-19
Timer (see Event Timer)
Downloading Session Files ................. 4-15
Tool Kit ....................................................... 5-3
Editing Session Files ........................... 4-14
Loading a Session File ........................ 4-14
U
Mapping Section ................................ 4-20
Unbalanced Connections ........................... 2-10
Session File Sections ........................... 4-17
Universal Input Module
Signal ID Numbers ............................. 4-17
Description ........................................... 1-1
Template Files .................................... 4-14
DIP Switch Settings ........................... 2-19
Install Quick Guide ............................ 2-18
Session Module
Description ........................................... 1-2
Logic Interface ................................... 2-12
DIP Switch Settings ........................... 2-33
Main Logic ......................................... 2-20
External Timer ................................... 2-33
Main Logic Schematic ........................ 2-20
Install Quick Guide ............................ 2-32
Operation ............................................. 3-3
Operation Quick Guide ...................... 3-12
T/B Option Logic .............................. 2-22
Setting the Clock ........................................ 2-5
Updating Software .................................... 4-22
Setting Module DIP Switches ................... 2-13
Software Updates ...................................... 4-22
V
Specifications .............................................. 1-4
VistaMax
Integrating BMXdigital with, .............. 3-28
Studio Module
Description ........................................... 1-3
Mic Connections thru, ........................ 2-14
DIP Switch Settings ........................... 2-41
Net Card Connections ......................... 2-64
External Talkback .............................. 2-46
Studio Turret (console accessory) ................. 6-1
Setting Room Code ............................. 2-19
VistaMax Control Center (VMCC)
File Maintenance ................................ A-2
General Program Info .......................... 1-2
Graphical User Interface ...................... 4-7
Operations Errata ............................... A-3
Signal Setup ...................................... 4-11
SysFiles Folder ........................................... 4-3
Using the Program .............................. 4-5
Install Quick Guide ............................ 2-40
Operation Quick Guide ...................... 3-16
Producer Talkback ............................. 2-44
Studio 1 and 2 Logic .......................... 2-42
T
W
TFTP Server ............................................. 4-22
Warranty ..................................................... 1-6
Telco/Codec Module
Wiring and Cabling
Description ........................................... 1-2
Crimp Tool Operation ........................... 2-8
DIP Switch Settings ........................... 2-25
Required Cables and Wire .................... 2-7
Foldback Mix ....................................... 3-8
Wire Preparation ................................. 2-7
Install Quick Guide ............................ 2-24
INDEX-4
H A R R I S
C O R P O R A T I O N
Revision D • 8/05
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