Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual, Release 9.0

Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual, Release 9.0
Preface
Note
The terms "Unidirectional Path Switched Ring" and "UPSR" may appear in Cisco literature. These terms
do not refer to using Cisco ONS 15xxx products in a unidirectional path switched ring configuration.
Rather, these terms, as well as "Path Protected Mesh Network" and "PPMN," refer generally to Cisco's
path protection feature, which may be used in any topological network configuration. Cisco does not
recommend using its path protection feature in any particular topological network configuration.
This section explains the objectives, intended audience, and organization of this publication and
describes the conventions that convey instructions and other information.
This section provides the following information:
•
Revision History
•
Document Objectives
•
Audience
•
Document Organization
•
Related Documentation
•
Document Conventions
•
Obtaining Optical Networking Information
•
Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request
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Revision History
Date
Notes
October 2008
Added a reference to “CTC Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section of TL1 Command
Guide, in the Power Monitoring sections.
November 2008 Updated the section “Compatibility by Card” in the chapter, “Transponder and
Muxponder Cards”.
December 2008
February 2009
March 2009
•
Added new section on DCN Extension in Chapter 16, Management Network
Connectivity.
•
Added a note in the “Y-Cable and Splitter Protection” section of Chapter 9,
Transponder and Muxponder Cards.
•
Updated the section “System Environmental Specifications” in Appendix-A,
“Hardware Specifications”.
•
Added a note in the section “Y-Cable Protection” of chapter “Transponder and
Muxponder Cards”.
•
Added a note in the “SFP Specifications” section of Appendix A, “Hardware
specifications”.
•
Added the optical module functional block diagram for the OPT-AMP-C card in
the chapter, Optical Amplifier Cards.
•
Added a note to the section "GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE
Cards" in the chapter, “Transponder and Muxponder Cards”
•
Updated details of ONS-SE-ZE-EL SFP in Chapter 9, Transponder and
Muxponder Cards and Appendix A, Hardware specifications.
April 2009
Added a note in the section “Automatic Power Reduction” of chapter 11, “Network
Reference”.
June 2009
Updated the section, Supported Node Configurations for OPT-RAMP-C Card in the
chapter, Node Reference.
July 2009
August 2009
September
2009
October 2009
•
Updated the minimum output power (with one channel) value in the “A.5 Optical
Amplifier Cards” section of Appendix A, Hardware specifications.
•
Updated the table “XFP Specifications” and added the table “Multimode Fiber
XFP Port Cabling Specifications” in “XFP Specifications” section of Appendix
A, Hardware specifications.
Added details on how the throughput of the MXP_MR_10DME_C and
MXP_MR_10DME_L cards is affected in Chapter 8, Transponder and Muxponder
Cards.
•
Added a new section titled “Management of Non-LAN Connected Multishelf
Node” in Chapter 16, Management Network Connectivity.
•
Added a note to the section, “Span Loss Verification” in the chapter, Network
Reference.
•
Added values for power requirements for OPT-RAMP-C card in Appendix A,
Hardware Specifications.
•
Updated the section, IGMP Snooping in the chapter, Transponder and
Muxponder cards.
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November 2009
•
Updated the section “32WSS Block Diagram” in the chapter “Reconfigurable
Optical Add/Drop Cards”.
•
Added a note in “GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE Cards” section
of chapter, Transponder and Muxponder Cards.
•
Updated the table "2R and 3R Mode and ITU-T G.709 Compliance by Client
Interface" in chapter, Transponder and Muxponder Cards.
•
Updated the table “Card View Tabs and Subtabs” in Chapter, Cisco Transport
Controller Operation.
•
Updated the section “Layer 2 Over DWDM Protection” in the chapter
“Transponder and Muxponder Cards”.
•
Changed the BIEC parameter to BIT-EC in Chapter, “Performance Monitoring”.
•
Updated the SFP/XFP Card Compatibility table for ADM-10G card in chapter
Transponder and Muxponder Cards.
•
Updated the section “Client Interface” under the section “GE_XP, 10GE_XP,
GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE Cards” in the chapter “Transponder and Muxponder
Cards”.
•
Added the section, “Mesh Patch Panel Specifications” in the appendix, Hardware
Specifications.
•
Updated the table “Multimode Fiber SFP Port Cabling Specifications” in the
appendix “Hardware Specifications”.
•
Updated the section “SNMP Overview” in the chapter “SNMP”.
•
Created a section “Fan Tray Units for ONS 15454 Cards” in the chapter “Shelf
Assembly Hardware”.
•
Added footnote and note for ONS-SC-2G-28.7 SFP in the chapter “Transponder
and Muxponder Cards” and appendix “Hardware Specifications”.
June 2010
•
Updated the table “ONS 15454 Security Levels—Node View” in the chapter
“Security Reference”.
July 2010
•
Updated the table “SFP/XFP Card Compatibility” in the chapter “Transponder
and Muxponder Cards”.
•
Updated the section “GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE Card
Specifications” in the appendix, “Hardware Specifications.”
•
Updated the following sections:
February 2010
March 2010
April 2010
– Updated the key features for the MXP_MR_10DME card in the chapter,
Transponder and Muxponder Cards.
– Updated the section, Y-cable protection in the chapter, Transponder and
Muxponder Cards.
August 2010
•
Updated the table “Node View (Single-Shelf Mode) or Shelf View (Multishelf
Mode) Tabs and Subtab” in the chapter, “Cisco Transport Controller Operation”.
September
2010
•
Added the FAPS switching criteria in the section, “Layer 2 Over DWDM
Protection” in the chapter, “Transponder and Muxponder Cards”.
October 2010
Updated the "Class 1M Laser Product Statement" section in the chapters “Optical
Amplifier Cards”, “Multiplexer and Demultiplexer Cards”, “Optical Add/Drop
Cards”, “Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop Cards”, and “Transponder and
Muxponder Cards”.
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November 2010
•
Updated the section, “SNMP in Multishelf Management” in the chapter, SNMP.
•
Updated the width of the single slot cards for Control cards and Transponder and
Muxponder Cards in the appendix, "Hardware Specifications".
•
Updated the table “SFP/XFP Card Compatibility” in the chapter “Transponder
and Muxponder Cards”.
•
Updated the tables “SFP Specifications” and “Single-Mode Fiber SFP Port
Cabling Specifications” in the appendix, “Hardware Specifications”.
January 2011
•
Updated the width of all the cards in the appendix, "Hardware Specifications".
April 2011
•
Updated the section “Interllink Interfaces” and the table “SFP/XFP Card
Compatibility” in the chapter “Transponder and Muxponder Cards”.
•
Updated the section “Safety Labels” in the following chapters:
– Optical Service Channel Cards
– Optical Amplifier Cards
– Multiplexer and Demultiplexer Cards
– Optical Add/Drop Cards
– Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop Cards
– Transponder and Muxponder Cards
•
Updated the power values in the “Individual Card Power Requirements” table in
the appendix, “Hardware Specifications”.
•
Updated the section “SFP and XFP Modules” in the chapter “Transponder and
Muxponder Cards”.
•
Removed the sections “SFP Specifications” and “XFP Specifications” and added
the section “SFP and XFP Specifications” in the appendix “Hardware
Specifications”.
•
Updated the section “AIC-I Card” in the chapter “Common Control Cards”.
•
Updated the section “Y-Cable Protection” in the chapter “Transponder and
Muxponder Cards”.
July 2011
•
Added a note in the “PC and UNIX Workstation Requirements” section of
Chapter, “Cisco Transport Controller Operation”.
August 2011
•
Updated the sub-section “Configuration Management” under the section
“OTU2_XP Card” in the chapter “Transponder and Muxponder Cards”.
September
2011
•
Updated the key features section of TXP_MR_10G, TXP_MR_10E,
TXP_MR_10E_C, TXP_MR_10E_L, and OTU2_XP cards in the chapter
“Transponder and Muxponder Cards”.
•
Added a note to SONET PM Parameters table in “SONET PM Parameter
Definitions” section.
•
Replaced G.975.1 with G.975.1 I.7 and added a note in the chapter, "Transponder
and Muxponder Cards".
•
Created a “Summary Pane” section in the chapter, “Cisco Transport Controller
Operation”.
May 2011
June 2011
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October 2011
December 2011
February 2012
April 2012
•
Removed the Temperature table and updated the Temperature section with
standard operating temperature values and removed the Environmental section
from all the 15454 card specifications in the appendix "Hardware
Specifications."
•
Updated the figure “Scenario 3: Using Proxy ARP with Static Routing (ANSI
and ETSI)” in the chapter “Management Network Connectivity”.
•
Updated the power values in the table “Individual Card Power Requirements” in
the appendix “Hardware Specifications”.
•
Updated the section “Termination Modes” in the chapter “Transponder and
Muxponder Cards”.
Removed the autonegotiation support statement for ADM-10G card from the “Key
Features” section in the chapter “Transponder and Muxponder Cards”.
•
Updated the "Faceplate and Block Diagram" section of "GE_XP, 10GE_XP,
GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE Cards" in the chapter, “Transponder and Muxponder
Cards”.
•
Upadted the section “SNMP in Multishelf Management” in the chapter “SNMP”.
May 2012
Updated the section “Optical Channel Circuits” in the chapter “Optical Channel
Circuits and Virtual Patchcords Reference”.
June 2012
Updated the section “Generic Threshold and Performance Monitoring MIBs” in the
chapter “SNMP”.
July 2012
Document Part Number revisioned to 78-18377-02 and a full length book-PDF was
generated.
August 2012
Updated the power values in the table “Individual Card Power Requirements” in the
appendix “Hardware Specifications”.
October 2012
•
Updated the “Circuit Provisioning” section of ADM-10G card in the chapter
“Transponder and Muxponder Cards”.
•
Added a caution to the section, “IP Addressing with Secure Mode Enabled” in
the chapter, “Management Network Connectivity”.
December 2012 Renamed chapter "Management Network Connectivity" to "Manage Network
Connectivity".
April 2013
Updated the section “External Firewalls” in the chapter “Manage Network
Connectivity”.
June 2013
Updated the section “Administrative States” in the chapter “Administrative and
Service States”.
November 2013 Updated the section “Trunk Interface” of OTU2_XP card in the chapter “Transponder
and Muxponder Cards”.
Document Objectives
This document provides background and reference material for Cisco ONS 15454 dense wavelength
division (DWDM) systems.
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Audience
To use this publication, you should be familiar with Cisco or equivalent optical transmission hardware
and cabling, telecommunications hardware and cabling, electronic circuitry and wiring practices, and
preferably have experience as a telecommunications technician.
Document Organization
Table 1
Cisco ONS 15454 Reference Manual Chapters
Title
Summary
Chapter 1, “Shelf Assembly Hardware”
Provides a description of Cisco ONS 15454
hardware for the ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Chapter 2, “Common Control Cards”
Includes descriptions of the TCC2, TCC2P, AIC-I,
and MS-ISC-100T cards.
Chapter 3, “Optical Service Channel Cards”
Includes descriptions of OSCM and OSC-CSM
cards.
Chapter 4, “Optical Amplifier Cards”
Includes descriptions of the OPT-PRE, OPT-BST,
OPT-BST-E, OP-BST-L, OPT-AMP-L,
OPT-AMP-C, and OPT-AMP-17-C cards, as well
as card temperature ranges and card compatibility.
Chapter 5, “Multiplexer and Demultiplexer
Cards”
Includes descriptions of the Protection Switching
Module (PSM) card used in Cisco ONS 15454
dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM)
networks.
Chapter 6, “PSM Card”
Includes descriptions of the 32-MUX-O,
32DMX-O, and 4MD-xx.x cards.
Chapter 7, “Optical Add/Drop Cards”
Includes descriptions of the AD-1C-xx.x,
AD-2C-xx.x, AD-4C-xx.x, AD-1B-xx.x, and
AD-4B-xx.x cards, card temperature ranges,
compatibility, and applications.
Chapter 8, “Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop
Cards”
Includes descriptions of the 32WSS, 32WSS-L,
32DMX, 32DMX-L, 40-DMX-C, 40-DMX-CE,
40-MUX-C, 40-WSS-C, 40-WSS-CE, 40-WXC-C,
and MMUC cards, card temperature ranges,
compatibility, and applications.
Chapter 9, “Transponder and Muxponder Cards”
Includes information about ransponder (TXP),
muxponder (MXP), GE_XP, 10GE_XP, and
ADM-10G cards, as well as their associated
plug-in modules (Small Form-factor Pluggables
[SFPs or XFPs]).
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Table 1
Cisco ONS 15454 Reference Manual Chapters (continued)
Title
Summary
Chapter 10, “Node Reference”
Explains the DWDM node types t available for the
ONS 15454. The DWDM node type is determined
by the type of amplifier and filter cards that are
installed in an ONS 15454. Also explains the
DWDM automatic power control (APC),
reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexing
(ROADM) power equalization, span loss
verification, and automatic node setup (ANS)
functions.
Chapter 11, “Network Reference”
Explains the DWDM network applications and
topologies. Also provides network-level optical
performance references.
Chapter 12, “Optical Channel Circuits and Virtual Explains the DWDM optical channel (OCH)
Patchcords Reference”
circuit types and virtual patchcords that can be
provisioned. Circuit types include the OCH client
connection (OCHCC), the OCH trail, and the OCH
network connection (OCHNC).
Chapter 13, “Cisco Transport Controller
Operation”
Describes Cisco Transport Controller (CTC), the
software interface for the Cisco ONS 15454.
Chapter 14, “Security Reference”
Provides information about Cisco ONS 15454
users and security.
Chapter 15, “Timing Reference”
Provides information about Cisco ONS 15454
users and node timing.
Chapter 16, “Manage Network Connectivity”
Provides an overview of ONS 15454 data
communications network (DCN) connectivity.
Cisco Optical Networking System (ONS) network
communication is based on IP, including
communication between Cisco Transport
Controller (CTC) computers and ONS 15454
nodes, and communication among networked
ONS 15454 nodes. The chapter shows common
Cisco ONS 15454 IP network configurations and
includes detailed data communications network
(DCN) case studies.
Chapter 17, “Alarm and TCA Monitoring and
Management”
Describes Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) alarm
and threshold crossing alert (TCA) monitoring and
management.
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Table 1
Cisco ONS 15454 Reference Manual Chapters (continued)
Title
Summary
Chapter 18, “Performance Monitoring”
Performance monitoring (PM) parameters are used
by service providers to gather, store, set thresholds
for, and report performance data for early detection
of problems. In this chapter, PM parameters and
concepts are defined for transponder, muxponder,
and dense wavelength division multiplexing
(DWDM) cards in the Cisco ONS 15454 including
optical amplifier, multiplexer, demutiplexer,
optical add/drop multiplexer (OADM), and optical
service channel (OSC) cards.
Chapter 19, “SNMP”
Explains Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP) as implemented by the Cisco ONS 15454.
Appendix A, “Hardware Specifications”
Contains hardware and software specifications for
the ONS 15454 ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies
and cards.
Appendix B, “Administrative and Service States” Describes the administrative and service states for
Cisco ONS 15454 dense wavelength division
multiplexing (DWDM) cards, optical payload
ports, out-of-band optical service channel (OSC)
ports, optical channel network connections
(OCHNCs), and transponder/muxponder cards and
ports.
Appendix C, “Pseudo Command Line Interface
Reference”
Describes Pseudo-IOS command line interface
(PCLI) for GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and
10GE_XPE cards.
Appendix D, “Connector Losses in Raman Link
Configuration”
Describes guidelines to be followed when
configuring a Raman link.
Related Documentation
Use the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual in conjunction with the following referenced
publications:
•
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide, Release 9.0
•
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide, Release 9.0
•
Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0
•
Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Reference Guide, Release 9.0
•
Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Quick Reference Guide, 9.0
•
Cisco ONS 15454 SDH TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0
•
Cisco ONS 15454 SDH TL1 Reference Guide, Release 9.0
•
Cisco ONS 15454 SDH TL1 Command Quick Reference Guide, 9.0
•
Release Notes for Cisco ONS 15454 Release 9.0
•
Release Notes for Cisco ONS 15454 SDH Release 9.0
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•
Cisco TransportPlanner DWDM Operations Guide, Release 9.0
For an update on End-of-Life and End-of-Sale notices, refer to
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/optical/ps2006/prod_eol_notices_list.html
Document Conventions
This publication uses the following conventions:
Convention
Application
boldface
Commands and keywords in body text.
italic
Command input that is supplied by the user.
[
Keywords or arguments that appear within square brackets are optional.
]
{x|x|x}
A choice of keywords (represented by x) appears in braces separated by
vertical bars. The user must select one.
Ctrl
The control key. For example, where Ctrl + D is written, hold down the
Control key while pressing the D key.
screen font
Examples of information displayed on the screen.
boldface screen font
Examples of information that the user must enter.
<
Command parameters that must be replaced by module-specific codes.
>
Note
Means reader take note. Notes contain helpful suggestions or references to material not covered in the
document.
Caution
Means reader be careful. In this situation, the user might do something that could result in equipment
damage or loss of data.
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Warning
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
This warning symbol means danger. You are in a situation that could cause bodily injury. Before you
work on any equipment, be aware of the hazards involved with electrical circuitry and be familiar
with standard practices for preventing accidents. Use the statement number provided at the end of
each warning to locate its translation in the translated safety warnings that accompanied this
device. Statement 1071
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
Waarschuwing
BELANGRIJKE VEILIGHEIDSINSTRUCTIES
Dit waarschuwingssymbool betekent gevaar. U verkeert in een situatie die lichamelijk letsel kan
veroorzaken. Voordat u aan enige apparatuur gaat werken, dient u zich bewust te zijn van de bij
elektrische schakelingen betrokken risico's en dient u op de hoogte te zijn van de standaard
praktijken om ongelukken te voorkomen. Gebruik het nummer van de verklaring onderaan de
waarschuwing als u een vertaling van de waarschuwing die bij het apparaat wordt geleverd, wilt
raadplegen.
BEWAAR DEZE INSTRUCTIES
Varoitus
TÄRKEITÄ TURVALLISUUSOHJEITA
Tämä varoitusmerkki merkitsee vaaraa. Tilanne voi aiheuttaa ruumiillisia vammoja. Ennen kuin
käsittelet laitteistoa, huomioi sähköpiirien käsittelemiseen liittyvät riskit ja tutustu
onnettomuuksien yleisiin ehkäisytapoihin. Turvallisuusvaroitusten käännökset löytyvät laitteen
mukana toimitettujen käännettyjen turvallisuusvaroitusten joukosta varoitusten lopussa näkyvien
lausuntonumeroiden avulla.
SÄILYTÄ NÄMÄ OHJEET
Attention
IMPORTANTES INFORMATIONS DE SÉCURITÉ
Ce symbole d'avertissement indique un danger. Vous vous trouvez dans une situation pouvant
entraîner des blessures ou des dommages corporels. Avant de travailler sur un équipement, soyez
conscient des dangers liés aux circuits électriques et familiarisez-vous avec les procédures
couramment utilisées pour éviter les accidents. Pour prendre connaissance des traductions des
avertissements figurant dans les consignes de sécurité traduites qui accompagnent cet appareil,
référez-vous au numéro de l'instruction situé à la fin de chaque avertissement.
CONSERVEZ CES INFORMATIONS
Warnung
WICHTIGE SICHERHEITSHINWEISE
Dieses Warnsymbol bedeutet Gefahr. Sie befinden sich in einer Situation, die zu Verletzungen führen
kann. Machen Sie sich vor der Arbeit mit Geräten mit den Gefahren elektrischer Schaltungen und
den üblichen Verfahren zur Vorbeugung vor Unfällen vertraut. Suchen Sie mit der am Ende jeder
Warnung angegebenen Anweisungsnummer nach der jeweiligen Übersetzung in den übersetzten
Sicherheitshinweisen, die zusammen mit diesem Gerät ausgeliefert wurden.
BEWAHREN SIE DIESE HINWEISE GUT AUF.
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Avvertenza
IMPORTANTI ISTRUZIONI SULLA SICUREZZA
Questo simbolo di avvertenza indica un pericolo. La situazione potrebbe causare infortuni alle
persone. Prima di intervenire su qualsiasi apparecchiatura, occorre essere al corrente dei pericoli
relativi ai circuiti elettrici e conoscere le procedure standard per la prevenzione di incidenti.
Utilizzare il numero di istruzione presente alla fine di ciascuna avvertenza per individuare le
traduzioni delle avvertenze riportate in questo documento.
CONSERVARE QUESTE ISTRUZIONI
Advarsel
VIKTIGE SIKKERHETSINSTRUKSJONER
Dette advarselssymbolet betyr fare. Du er i en situasjon som kan føre til skade på person. Før du
begynner å arbeide med noe av utstyret, må du være oppmerksom på farene forbundet med
elektriske kretser, og kjenne til standardprosedyrer for å forhindre ulykker. Bruk nummeret i slutten
av hver advarsel for å finne oversettelsen i de oversatte sikkerhetsadvarslene som fulgte med denne
enheten.
TA VARE PÅ DISSE INSTRUKSJONENE
Aviso
INSTRUÇÕES IMPORTANTES DE SEGURANÇA
Este símbolo de aviso significa perigo. Você está em uma situação que poderá ser causadora de
lesões corporais. Antes de iniciar a utilização de qualquer equipamento, tenha conhecimento dos
perigos envolvidos no manuseio de circuitos elétricos e familiarize-se com as práticas habituais de
prevenção de acidentes. Utilize o número da instrução fornecido ao final de cada aviso para
localizar sua tradução nos avisos de segurança traduzidos que acompanham este dispositivo.
GUARDE ESTAS INSTRUÇÕES
¡Advertencia!
INSTRUCCIONES IMPORTANTES DE SEGURIDAD
Este símbolo de aviso indica peligro. Existe riesgo para su integridad física. Antes de manipular
cualquier equipo, considere los riesgos de la corriente eléctrica y familiarícese con los
procedimientos estándar de prevención de accidentes. Al final de cada advertencia encontrará el
número que le ayudará a encontrar el texto traducido en el apartado de traducciones que acompaña
a este dispositivo.
GUARDE ESTAS INSTRUCCIONES
Varning!
VIKTIGA SÄKERHETSANVISNINGAR
Denna varningssignal signalerar fara. Du befinner dig i en situation som kan leda till personskada.
Innan du utför arbete på någon utrustning måste du vara medveten om farorna med elkretsar och
känna till vanliga förfaranden för att förebygga olyckor. Använd det nummer som finns i slutet av
varje varning för att hitta dess översättning i de översatta säkerhetsvarningar som medföljer denna
anordning.
SPARA DESSA ANVISNINGAR
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Aviso
INSTRUÇÕES IMPORTANTES DE SEGURANÇA
Este símbolo de aviso significa perigo. Você se encontra em uma situação em que há risco de lesões
corporais. Antes de trabalhar com qualquer equipamento, esteja ciente dos riscos que envolvem os
circuitos elétricos e familiarize-se com as práticas padrão de prevenção de acidentes. Use o
número da declaração fornecido ao final de cada aviso para localizar sua tradução nos avisos de
segurança traduzidos que acompanham o dispositivo.
GUARDE ESTAS INSTRUÇÕES
Advarsel
VIGTIGE SIKKERHEDSANVISNINGER
Dette advarselssymbol betyder fare. Du befinder dig i en situation med risiko for
legemesbeskadigelse. Før du begynder arbejde på udstyr, skal du være opmærksom på de
involverede risici, der er ved elektriske kredsløb, og du skal sætte dig ind i standardprocedurer til
undgåelse af ulykker. Brug erklæringsnummeret efter hver advarsel for at finde oversættelsen i de
oversatte advarsler, der fulgte med denne enhed.
GEM DISSE ANVISNINGER
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Obtaining Optical Networking Information
This section contains information that is specific to optical networking products. For information that
pertains to all of Cisco, refer to the Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request section.
Where to Find Safety and Warning Information
For safety and warning information, refer to the Cisco Optical Transport Products Safety and
Compliance Information document that accompanied the product. This publication describes the
international agency compliance and safety information for the Cisco ONS 15454 system. It also
includes translations of the safety warnings that appear in the ONS 15454 system documentation.
Cisco Optical Networking Product Documentation CD-ROM
Optical networking-related documentation, including Cisco ONS 15xxx product documentation, is
available in a CD-ROM package that ships with your product. The Optical Networking Product
Documentation CD-ROM is updated periodically and may be more current than printed documentation.
Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request
For information on obtaining documentation, submitting a service request, and gathering additional
information, see the monthly What’s New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and
revised Cisco technical documentation, at:
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Preface
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Shelf Assembly Hardware
This chapter provides a description of Cisco ONS 15454 hardware for the ANSI and ETSI shelf
assemblies. For card descriptions, see Chapter 2, “Common Control Cards,” Chapter 3, “Optical Service
Channel Cards,” Chapter 4, “Optical Amplifier Cards,” Chapter 5, “Multiplexer and Demultiplexer
Cards,” Chapter 7, “Optical Add/Drop Cards,” or Chapter 9, “Transponder and Muxponder Cards.” To
install equipment, refer to the “Install the Shelf and Common Control Cards” chapter in the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Chapter topics include:
Note
•
1.1 Overview, page 1-2
•
1.2 ONS 15454 ANSI Rack Installation, page 1-3
•
1.3 ONS 15454 ETSI Rack Installation, page 1-6
•
1.4 FlexLayer and Y-Cable Protection, page 1-9
•
1.5 Typical DWDM Rack Layouts, page 1-19
•
1.6 Front Door, page 1-21
•
1.7 ONS 15454 ANSI Backplane Covers, page 1-28
•
1.8 ONS 15454 ETSI Front Mount Electrical Connection, page 1-32
•
1.9 ONS 15454 ANSI Alarm Expansion Panel, page 1-32
•
1.10 Ethernet Adapter Panel, page 1-37
•
1.11 Filler Card, page 1-39
•
1.12 Cable Routing and Management, page 1-40
•
1.13 Fan-Tray Assembly, page 1-50
•
1.14 Power and Ground Description, page 1-54
•
1.15 ONS 15454 ANSI Alarm, Timing, LAN, and Craft Pin Connections, page 1-55
•
1.16 Cards and Slots, page 1-59
The Cisco ONS 15454 shelf assemblies are intended for use with telecommunications equipment only.
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1.1 Overview
Caution
Unused card slots should be filled with a blank faceplate (Cisco P/N 15454-BLANK for ANSI shelves
and 15454E-BLANK for ETSI shelves). The blank faceplate ensures proper airflow when operating the
ONS 15454 without the front door attached, although Cisco recommends that the front door remain
attached.
1.1 Overview
This section provides an introduction to the Cisco ONS 15454 ANSI and the Cisco ONS 15454 ETSI.
Install the ONS 15454 in compliance with your local and national electrical codes:
•
United States: National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70; United States National Electrical
Code.
•
Canada: Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, CSA C22.1.
•
Other countries: If local and national electrical codes, are not available, refer to IEC 364, Part 1
through Part 7.
1.1.1 Cisco ONS 15454 ANSI
When installed in an equipment rack, the ONS 15454 ANSI assembly is typically connected to a fuse
and alarm panel to provide centralized alarm connection points and distributed power for the
ONS 15454 ANSI. Fuse and alarm panels are third-party equipment and are not described in this
documentation. If you are unsure about the requirements or specifications for a fuse and alarm panel,
consult the user documentation for the related equipment. The front door of the ONS 15454 ANSI allows
access to the shelf assembly, fan-tray assembly, and fiber-storage area. The backplanes provide access
to alarm contacts, external interface contacts, power terminals, and BNC/SMB connectors.
You can mount the ONS 15454 ANSI in a 19- or 23-inch rack (482.6 or 584.2 mm). The shelf assembly
weighs approximately 55 pounds (24.94 kg) with no cards installed.
The ONS 15454 ETSI is powered using -48 VDC power. Negative and return power terminals are
connected via the MIC-A/P and the MIC-C/T/P FMECs. The ground terminal is connected via the 2-hole
grounding lug.
Note
The ONS 15454 ANSI is designed to comply with Telcordia GR-1089-CORE Type 2 and Type 4. Install
and operate the ONS 15454 ANSI only in environments that do not expose wiring or cabling to the
outside plant. Acceptable applications include Central Office Environments (COEs), Electronic
Equipment Enclosures (EEEs), Controlled Environment Vaults (CEVs), huts, and Customer Premise
Environments (CPEs).
1.1.2 Cisco ONS 15454 ETSI
When installed in an equipment rack, the ONS 15454 ETSI assembly is typically connected to a fuse and
alarm panel to provide centralized alarm connection points and distributed power for the
ONS 15454 ETSI. Fuse and alarm panels are third-party equipment and are not described in this
documentation. If you are unsure about the requirements or specifications for a fuse and alarm panel,
consult the user documentation for the related equipment. The front door of the ONS 15454 ETSI allows
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1.2 ONS 15454 ANSI Rack Installation
access to the shelf assembly, fan-tray assembly, and fiber-storage area. The FMEC cover at the top of the
shelf allows access to power connectors, external alarms and controls, timing input and output, and craft
interface terminals.
You can mount the ONS 15454 ETSI in an ETSI rack. The shelf assembly weighs approximately 26 kg
(57 pounds) with no cards installed. The shelf assembly includes a front door and a Front Mount
Electrical Connection (FMEC) cover for added security, a fan tray module for cooling, and extensive
fiber-storage space.
The ONS 15454 ETSI is powered using –48 VDC power. Negative, return, and ground power terminals
are connected via the MIC-A/P and the MIC-C/T/P FMECs.
1.2 ONS 15454 ANSI Rack Installation
The ONS 15454 ANSI shelf is mounted in a 19- or 23-in. (482.6- or 584.2-mm) equipment rack. The
shelf assembly projects five inches (127 mm) from the front of the rack. It mounts in both Electronic
Industries Alliance (EIA) standard and Telcordia-standard racks. The shelf assembly is a total of 17
inches (431.8 mm) wide with no mounting ears attached. Ring runs are not provided by Cisco and might
hinder side-by-side installation of shelves where space is limited.
The ONS 15454 ANSI assembly measures 18.5 inches (469.9 mm) high, 19 or 23 inches (482.6 or 584.2
mm) wide (depending on which way the mounting ears are attached), and 12 inches (304.8 mm) deep.
You can install up to four ONS 15454 ANSIs in a seven-foot (2133.6 mm) equipment rack. The
ONS 15454 ANSI must have one inch (25.4 mm) of airspace below the installed shelf assembly
to allow air flow to the fan intake. If a second ONS 15454 ANSI is installed underneath the shelf
assembly, the air ramp on top of the lower shelf assembly provides the air spacing needed and
should not be modified in any way. Figure 1-1 shows the dimensions of the ONS 15454 ANSI.
Note
A 10-Gbps-compatible shelf assembly (15454-SA-ANSI or 15454-SA-HD) and fan-tray assembly
(15454-FTA3, 15454-FTA3-T, or 15454-CC-FTA) are required if ONS 15454 ANSI 10-Gbps
Cross-Connect (XC10G) cards are installed in the shelf.
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1.2.1 Reversible Mounting Bracket
Figure 1-1
Cisco ONS 15454 ANSI Shelf Dimensions
Top View
22 in. (55.88 cm) total width
12 in.
(30.48 cm)
19 in. (48.26 cm) or 23 in. (58.42 cm)
between mounting screw holes
Side View
5 in.(12.7 cm)
Front View
22 in. (55.88 cm) total width
32099
18.5 in.
(46.99 cm)
12 in. (30.48 cm)
19 in. (48.26 cm) or 23 in. (58.42 cm)
between mounting screw holes
1.2.1 Reversible Mounting Bracket
Caution
Use only the fastening hardware provided with the ONS 15454 ANSI shelf to prevent loosening,
deterioration, and electromechanical corrosion of the hardware and joined material.
Caution
When mounting the ONS 15454 ANSI shelf in a frame with a nonconductive coating (such as paint,
lacquer, or enamel) either use the thread-forming screws provided with the ONS 15454 ANSI shipping
kit, or remove the coating from the threads to ensure electrical continuity.
The shelf assembly comes preset for installation in a 23-inch (584.2 mm) rack, but you can reverse the
mounting bracket to fit the smaller 19-inch (482.6 mm) rack.
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1.2.2 Mounting a Single Node
1.2.2 Mounting a Single Node
Mounting the ONS 15454 ANSI shelf in a rack requires a minimum of 18.5 inches (469.9 mm) of
vertical rack space and one additional inch (25.4 mm) for air flow. To ensure the mounting is secure, use
two to four #12-24 mounting screws for each side of the shelf assembly. Figure 1-2 shows the rack
mounting position for the ONS 15454 ANSI shelf.
Figure 1-2
Mounting an ONS 15454 ANSI Shelf in a Rack
FAN
39392
Equipment rack
FAIL
CR
IT
MA
J
MIN
Universal
ear mounts
(reversible)
Two people should install the shelf assembly; however, one person can install it using the temporary set
screws included. The shelf assembly should be empty for easier lifting. The front door can also be
removed to lighten the shelf assembly.
1.2.3 Mounting Multiple Nodes
Most standard (Telcordia GR-63-CORE, 19-inch [482.6-mm] or 23-inch [584.2-mm]) seven-foot
(2.133-m) racks can hold four ONS 15454 ANSI shelves and a fuse and alarm panel. However, unequal
flange racks are limited to three ONS 15454 ANSI shelves and a fuse and alarm panel, or four
ONS 15454 ANSI shelves using a fuse and alarm panel from an adjacent rack.
If you are using the external (bottom) brackets to install the fan-tray air filter, you can install three shelf
assemblies in a standard seven-foot (2.133-m) rack. If you are not using the external (bottom) brackets,
you can install four shelf assemblies in a rack. The advantage of using the bottom brackets is that you
can replace the filter without removing the fan tray.
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1.2.4 ONS 15454 ANSI Bay Assembly
1.2.4 ONS 15454 ANSI Bay Assembly
The Cisco ONS 15454 ANSI bay assembly simplifies ordering and installing the ONS 15454 ANSI
shelf because it allows you to order shelf assemblies preinstalled in a seven-foot (2,133 mm) rack. The
bay assembly is available in a three- or four-shelf configuration. The three-shelf configuration includes
three ONS 15454 ANSI shelf assemblies, a prewired fuse and alarm panel, and two fiber-storage trays.
The four-shelf configuration includes four ONS 15454 ANSI shelf assemblies and a prewired fuse and
alarm panel. You can order optional fiber channels with either configuration. Installation procedures are
included in the Unpacking and Installing the Cisco ONS 15454 Four-Shelf and Zero-Shelf Bay Assembly
document that ships with the bay assembly.
1.3 ONS 15454 ETSI Rack Installation
The ONS 15454 ETSI shelf assembly (15454-SA-ETSI) is mounted in a 600 x 600-mm (23-inch) or 600
x 300-mm (11.8-inch) equipment cabinet/rack. The shelf assembly projects 240 mm (9.45 inches) from
the front of the rack. It mounts in ETSI-standard racks. The shelf assembly is a total of 435 mm (17.35
inches) wide with no mounting ears attached. Ring runs are not provided by Cisco and might hinder
side-by-side installation of shelves where space is limited.
The ONS 15454 ETSI shelf assembly measures 616.5 mm (24.27 inches) high, 535 mm (21.06 inches)
wide, and 280 mm (11.02 inches) deep. You can install up to three ONS 15454 ETSI shelves in a
seven-foot (2133.6 mm) equipment rack. The ONS 15454 ETSI must have one inch (25.4 mm) of
airspace below the installed shelf assembly to allow air flow to the fan intake. If a second
ONS 15454 ETSI is installed below the first shelf assembly, an ETSI air ramp unit must be assembled
between the two shelves to ensure adequate air flow.
Figure 1-3 provides the dimensions of the ONS 15454 ETSI shelf assembly.
Caution
The standard ETSI racks can hold three ONS 15454 ETSI shelf assemblies and two air ramps. When
mounting a shelf assembly in a partially filled rack, load the rack from the bottom to the top with the
heaviest component at the bottom of the rack. If the rack is provided with stabilizing devices, install the
stabilizers before mounting or servicing the unit in the rack.
Caution
The ONS 15454 ETSI must have 1 inch (25.4 mm) of airspace below the installed shelf assembly to
allow air flow to the fan intake. The air ramp (the angled piece of sheet metal on top of the shelf
assembly) provides this spacing and should not be modified in any way.
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1.3.1 Mounting a Single Node
Figure 1-3
ONS 15454 ETSI Shelf Assembly Dimensions
Top View
535 mm (21.06 in.) total width
280 mm
(11.02 in.)
Side View
40 mm (1.57 in.)
Front View
280 mm (11.02 in.)
535 mm (21.06 in.) total width
61213
616.5 mm
(24.27 in.)
1.3.1 Mounting a Single Node
The ONS 15454 ETSI requires 616.5 mm (24.24 inch) minimum of vertical rack space and 25 mm
(1 inch) below the installed shelf assembly to allow air flow to the fan intake. If a second
ONS 15454 ETSI is installed above a shelf assembly, the air ramp between the shelves provides space
for air flow. To ensure the mounting is secure, use two to four M6 mounting screws for each side of the
shelf assembly. A shelf assembly should be mounted at the bottom of the rack if it is the only unit in the
rack.
Figure 1-4 shows the rack mounting position for the ONS 15454 ETSI shelf.
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1.3.2 Mounting Multiple Nodes
Figure 1-4
Mounting an ONS 15454 ETSI Shelf in a Rack
FAN
FAIL
CR
IT
MAJ
MIN
61240
Equipment rack
Two people should install the shelf assembly; however, one person can install it using the temporary set
screws included. The shelf assembly should be empty for easier lifting. The front door can also be
removed to lighten the shelf assembly.
1.3.2 Mounting Multiple Nodes
Most standard (Telcordia GR-63-CORE, 23-inch [584.2 mm]) seven-foot (2,133 mm) racks can hold
three ONS 15454 ETSI shelves, two air ramps, and a fuse and alarm panel. Figure 1-5 shows a
three-shelf ONS 15454 ETSI bay assembly.
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1.4 FlexLayer and Y-Cable Protection
Figure 1-5
Three-Shelf ONS 15454 ETSI Bay Assembly
Fuse and Alarm Panel,
mountable in the rack
if the rack is 2200 mm
(86.6 in.) high or higher
Air Ramp
ETSIs (SDH)
61583
Air Ramp
1.4 FlexLayer and Y-Cable Protection
The Cisco ONS 15454 FlexLayer DWDM system includes the following components:
•
Two-channel add or drop flex module
•
FlexLayer shelf assembly
•
Y-cable FlexLayer module
•
Y-cable module tray
The FlexLayer shelf assembly is 1 rack unit (RU) high and can be mounted in a 19-inch (482.6-mm) or
23-inch (584.2-mm) rack (two-way mounting brackets). The FlexLayer shelf assembly is used to house
the FlexLayer and Y-cable modules.
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1.4.1 FlexLayer Modules
1.4.1 FlexLayer Modules
The two-channel add/drop FlexLayer module is a completely passive unidirectional component that
allows the insertion or the extraction of two channels within the ONS 15454 channel plan. This module
is used only in point-to-point, one-channel, amplified system configurations.
Sixteen specific modules are available to cover the whole 32-channel bandwidth. Table 1-1 shows how
the FlexLayer add/drop modules are grouped in relation to the supported channels.
Table 1-1
ITU
ONS 15454 100-GHz Channel Plan
Channel ID
Frequency (THz)
Wavelength (nm)
59
30.3
195.9
1530.33
58
31.1
195.8
1531.12
57
31.9
195.7
1531.90
56
32.6
195.6
1532.68
54
34.2
195.4
1534.25
53
35.0
195.3
1535.04
52
35.8
195.2
1535.82
51
36.6
195.1
1536.61
49
38.1
194.9
1538.19
48
38.9
194.8
1538.98
47
39.7
194.7
1539.77
46
40.5
194.6
1540.56
44
42.1
194.4
1542.14
43
42.9
194.3
1542.94
42
43.7
194.2
1543.73
41
44.5
194.1
1544.53
39
46.1
193.9
1546.12
38
46.9
193.8
1546.92
37
47.7
193.7
1547.72
36
48.5
193.6
1548.51
34
50.1
193.4
1550.12
33
50.9
193.3
1550.92
32
51.7
193.2
1551.72
31
52.5
193.1
1552.52
29
54.1
192.9
1554.13
28
54.9
192.8
1554.94
27
55.7
192.7
1555.75
26
56.5
192.6
1556.55
Two-Channel A/D
Flex Module
15216-FLB-2-31.1=
15216-FLB-2-32.6=
15216-FLB-2-35.0=
15216-FLB-2-36.6=
15216-FLB-2-38.9=
15216-FLB-2-40.5=
15216-FLB-2-42.9=
15216-FLB-2-44.5=
15216-FLB-2-46.9=
15216-FLB-2-48.5=
15216-FLB-2-50.9=
15216-FLB-2-52.5=
15216-FLB-2-54.9=
15216-FLB-2-56.5=
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1.4.1 FlexLayer Modules
Table 1-1
ITU
ONS 15454 100-GHz Channel Plan (continued)
Channel ID
Frequency (THz)
Wavelength (nm)
24
58.1
192.4
1558.17
23
58.9
192.3
1558.98
22
59.7
192.2
1559.79
21
60.6
192.1
1560.61
Two-Channel A/D
Flex Module
15216-FLB-2-58.9=
15216-FLB-2-60.6=
Figure 1-6 shows the module functional block diagram. In Figure 1-6, the signal flows from left to right
when the card is used as a drop component and from right to left when the module is used as an add
component.
Figure 1-6
Two-Channel Add/Drop FlexLayer Module Block Diagram
DROP
ADD
DROP-MON
DROP-COM-RX
ADD-COM-TX
DROP-COM-TX
ADD-COM-RX
ADD CH-RX
DROP CH-TX
Connector
Channel Filter
90947
ADD-MON
When the module is used as a drop component, the wave-division multiplexing (WDM) composite signal
coming from the DROP-COM-RX port is filtered sequentially by two filters and the filtered channels are
dropped at the two DROP-CH-TX ports. The rest of the WDM composite signal is sent to the
DROP-COM-TX port. A two-percent tap coupler, DROP-MON, is used to monitor the input WDM
composite signal.
When the module is used as an add component, the added channels coming from the two ADD-CH-RX
ports are combined with the WDM composite signal coming from the ADD-COM-RX port. The
multiplexed WDM composite signal is sent to the ADD-COM-TX port. A two-percent tap coupler,
ADD-MON, is used to monitor the multiplexed WDM composite signal.
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1.4.1 FlexLayer Modules
Figure 1-7 shows the physical appearance of the ONS 15454 two-channel add/drop FlexLayer module.
Figure 1-7
ONS 15454 Two-Channel Optical Add/Drop FlexLayer Module
90948
Front Panel
Labels are provided to show how the module ports are mapped. It is the end user’s responsibility to label
the module for its intended use (drop or add component).
Figure 1-8 shows how the connectors are mapped and labeled on the front panel when the component is
used as a drop component. The COM-RX is mapped to Port 1, the COM-TX is mapped to Port 12, and
the two dropped channel TX ports are mapped to Ports 9 and 10. The two-percent tap MON port is
mapped to Port 6. Port 7 is not active.
Figure 1-8
Two-Channel Drop Component Connector Mapping and Labeling
2 Channel Drop Module 15216-FLB-2-XX.X
COM-TX
2% TAP
1
6
MON
12
9
10
15XX.XX 15XX.XX
TX
TX
90949
COM-RX
Figure 1-9 shows how the connectors are mapped and labeled in the front panel when the component is
used as an add component. The COM-TX is mapped to Port 1, the COM-RX is mapped to Port 12, and
the added channels are mapped to the two RX Ports 9 and 10. The two-percent tap MON port is mapped
to Port 7. Port 6 is not active.
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1.4.2 Single Y-Cable Protection Module
Figure 1-9
Two-Channel Add Component Connector Mapping and Labeling
2 Channel Add Module 15216-FLB-2-XX.X
COM-TX
COM-RX
2% TAP
12
1
9
10
MON 15XX.XX 15XX.XX
RX
RX
90950
7
1.4.2 Single Y-Cable Protection Module
The Y-cable protection module is a bidirectional module. It is equipped with two passive star couplers:
one that is used as a splitter and one that is used as a coupler.
Note
None of the modules in this equipment release can be used for video on demand (VoD) applications.
Note
The ADM-10G card, which can be provisioned as either a transponder or muxponder, does not support
Y-cable protection.
The purpose of this module is to provide Y-cable protection on the CLIENT side of transponder (TXP)
cards such as the TXP_MR_10G, TXP_MR_10E, or TXP_MR_2.5G (Figure 1-10). There are two
versions of this module, one for multimode applications (CS-MM-Y) and one for single-mode
applications (CS-SM-Y).
Using one Y-cable protection module, you can protect one client signal with two TXP cards, and two
client signals with four TXP cards.
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1.4.2 Single Y-Cable Protection Module
Figure 1-10
Typical Y-Cable Protection Module Configuration
TX
Client
Protecting
Card
Line
RX
Y_Cable
Protection
Module
TX
Client
Working
Card
RX
90938
Line
When the module is used in the coupler direction, the individual signals enter the module from the
CPL-RXn ports and pass through a passive star coupler to the CPL-TX port. The coupler is not meant to
combine both the protect and working client card signals. The module allows a path for the working
client transmit interface to connect to the network in the event the opposite interface in the protection
pair should fail (the protect interface switches to the working interface).
When the module is used in the splitter direction, the signal enters the module from the SPL-RX port
and is split through a passive star coupler to the SPL-TXn ports. This module, although designed to pass
wavelengths associated with the ONS 15454 32-channel plan, is not selective to specific wavelengths
(modules do not filter wavelengths).
Figure 1-11 shows the block diagram of the Y-cable protection module.
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1.4.2 Single Y-Cable Protection Module
Figure 1-11
1:2 Splitter and 2:1 Coupler (Y-Cable Protection) Module Block Diagram
SPLa-RX
CPLa-TX
SPLb-RX
90939
CPLb-TX
SPLa
-TX1
SPLa
-TX2
CPLa
-RX1
CPLa
-RX2
SPLb
-TX1
SPLb
-TX2
CPLb
-RX1
CPLb
-RX2
Figure 1-12 and Figure 1-13 show the physical appearance of the ONS 15454 Y-Cable Protection
FlexLayer Module. This module has two versions, one for single-mode applications and the other for
multimode applications.
Figure 1-12
ONS 15454 Y-Cable Protection FlexLayer Module (Single-Mode)
Front Panel
90952
CS-SM-Y
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1.4.2 Single Y-Cable Protection Module
Figure 1-13
ONS 15454 Y-Cable Protection FlexLayer Module (Multimode)
Front Panel
90940
CS-MM-Y
Figure 1-14 shows how the module front panel ports are mapped and labeled. The multimode module is
mapped and labeled the same as the single-mode module.
Figure 1-14
Y-Cable Protection Component Connector Mapping and Labeling
1:2 Splitter and 2:1 Combiner 15216-CS-MM/SM-Y
RXb1 TXb1
TXa
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
RXa
TXb
RXb
RXa2 TXa2
RXb2 TXb2
90941
RXa1 TXa1
Table 1-2 details the single-mode and multimode front panel Protection A mapping. It shows how two
DWDM receive inputs (client working and protect) provide one output signal to the customer client
equipment, using the module combiner function.
Table 1-2
Protection A (TXP Cards 1 and 2) Port Mapping: Combiner from DWDM
Receive Port on the Y-Cable Module
Signal Sources
1 (RXa1)
Client TX port on the TXP 1 card
6 (RXa2)
Client TX port on the TXP 2 card
Transmit Port on the Y-Cable Module
Signal Destination
5 (TXa)
RX port on customer client equipment A
Table 1-3 details the single-mode and multimode front panel Protection A mapping. It shows how the
module splits a single receive input from the equipment into two DWDM output signals (working and
protect) to the TXP client port.
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1.4.2 Single Y-Cable Protection Module
Table 1-3
Protection A (TXP Cards 1 and 2) Port Mapping: Splitter to DWDM
Receive Port
Signal Source
10 (RXa)
TX port on customer client equipment A
Transmit Port
Signal Destinations
2 (TXa1)
Client RX port on the TXP 1 card
7 (TXa2)
Client RX on the TXP 2 card
Table 1-4 details the single-mode and multimode front panel Protection B mapping. It shows how two
DWDM receive inputs (client working and protect) provide one output signal to the equipment, using
the module combiner function.
Table 1-4
Protection B (TXP Cards 3 and 4) Port Mapping: Combiner from DWDM
Receive Port
Signal Sources
3 (RXb1)
Client TX port on the TXP 3 card
8 (RXb2)
Client TX port on the TXP 4 card
Transmit Port
Signal Destination
11 (TXb)
RX port on customer client equipment B
Table 1-5 details the single-mode and multimode front panel Protection B mapping. It shows how the
module splits a single receive input from the equipment into two DWDM output signals (working and
protect) to the client.
Table 1-5
Protection B (TXP Cards 3 and 4) Port Mapping: Splitter to DWDM
Receive Port Number
Signal Source
12 (RXb)
TX port on customer client equipment B
Transmit Port Number
Signal Destinations
4 (TXb1)
Client RX on the TXP 3 port
9 (TXb2)
Client RX on the TXP 4 port
The following muxponder (MXP) and transponder (TXP) cards can use Y-cable protection:
•
MXP_2.5_10G
•
MXP_2.5_10E
•
MXP_MR_2.5G
•
TXP_MR_10G
•
TXP_MR_10E
•
TXP_MR_2.5G
•
MXP_MR_10DME_C
•
MXP_MR_10DME_L
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1.4.3 Multiple Y-Cable Module Tray
Note
The MXP_MR_10DME_C card is labeled 10DME-C on the card faceplate. The MXP_MR_10DME_L
card is labeled 10DME-L on the card faceplate.
1.4.3 Multiple Y-Cable Module Tray
Another option for Y-cable protection is the Y-cable module tray. Each tray holds up to 8 individual
Y-cable modules (Figure 1-15).
Figure 1-15
Y-Cable Protection Module Tray
144678
Y cable modules
LC-LC cables
The ports on these Y-cable modules are labelled according to their intended signal type (Client TX/RX,
TXP Working TX/RX, TXP Protect TX/RX). You can use the port label on the front of the tray to identify
the ports on each module (Figure 1-16).
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1.5 Typical DWDM Rack Layouts
Figure 1-16
Client TX
Y-Cable Protection Port Label
Client TX Client TX
Client TX Client TX
Client TX Client TX
Client TX
Client RX Client RX Client RX Client RX Client RX Client RX Client RX Client RX
TXP W TX TXP W TX TXP W TX TXP W TX TXP W TX TXP W TX TXP W TX TXP W TX
TXP W RX TXP W RX TXP W RX TXP W RXTXP W RX TXP W RX TXP W RX TXP W RX
TXP P RX TXP P RX TXP P RX TXP P RX TXP P RX TXP P RX TXP P RX TXP P RX
#1
#2
#3
#4
#5
#6
#7
144677
TXP P TX TXP P TX TXP P TX TXP P TX TXP P TX TXP P TX TXP P TX TXP P TX
#8
1.5 Typical DWDM Rack Layouts
Typical dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) applications might include:
•
3 ONS 15454 shelves
•
1 Dispersion Compensating Unit (DCU)
•
7 patch panels (or fiber-storage trays), in either 1rack unit (RU)or 2 RU sizes
– 1RU: Fiber-storage tray and 64-channel patch panel
– 2 RU: Y-cable patch panel, 64-channel patch panel, 80-channel patch panel, and mesh patch
panel (4 or 8 degree)
Or, alternatively:
•
3 ONS 15454 shelves
•
2 DCUs
•
6 standard patch-panel trays (or fiber-storage trays), or 3 deep patch-panel trays, in either 1 RU or
2 RU sizes
– 1RU: Fiber-storage tray and 64-channel patch panel
– 2 RU: Y-cable patch panel, 64-channel patch panel, 80-channel patch panel, and mesh patch
panel (4 or 8 degree)
See Figure 1-17 for a typical rack layout.
Note
Use the rack layout generated by Cisco TransportPlanner to determine your exact shelf layout.
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Chapter 1
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1.5 Typical DWDM Rack Layouts
Figure 1-17
Typical DWDM Equipment Layout in an ONS 15454 ANSI Rack
FUSE & ALARM PANEL
FIBER STORAGE
FIBER STORAGE
FIBER STORAGE
DCU
DCU
PATCH PANEL
ANSI
SHELF
By default,
2 RU patch panels
are used for
64 and 80-channels
ANSI
SHELF
240766
ANSI
SHELF
2000 mm (78.74 in.) internal clearance
AIR RAMP
FIBER STORAGE
PATCH PANEL
ANSI 23 in. (584.2 mm) or 19 in. (482.6 mm)
If you are installing a patch-panel or fiber-storage tray below the ONS 15454 shelf, you must install the
air ramp between the shelf and patch-panel tray/fiber-management tray, or leave one rack unit (RU)
space open.
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1.6 Front Door
1.6 Front Door
The Critical, Major, and Minor alarm LEDs visible through the front door indicate whether a critical,
major, or minor alarm is present anywhere on the ONS 15454 shelf. These LEDs must be visible so that
technicians can quickly determine if any alarms are present on the ONS 15454 shelf or the network. You
can use the LCD to further isolate alarms. The front door (Figure 1-18) provides access to the shelf
assembly, fiber-storage tray, fan-tray assembly, and LCD screen.
Figure 1-18
The ONS 15454 Front Door
CISCO ONS 15454
Optical Network System
Door lock
Door button
33923
Viewholes for Critical, Major and Minor alarm LEDs
The ONS 15454 ANSI ships with a standard door but can also accommodate a deep door and extended
fiber clips (15454-DOOR-KIT) to provide additional room for cabling (Figure 1-19). The ONS 15454 ETSI
does not support the deep door.
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1.6 Front Door
Cisco ONS 15454 ANSI Deep Door
115011
Figure 1-19
The ONS 15454 door locks with a pinned hex key that ships with the shelf assembly. A button on the
right side of the shelf assembly releases the door. You can remove the front door to provide unrestricted
access to the front of the shelf assembly.
Note
To mount the air ramp on an ONS 15454 ANSI with a deep door, mounting brackets (Cisco P/N
700-25319-01 for 19" deep door, and 700-25287-01 for 23" deep door) are provided. Refer to the “Install
the Shelf and Common Control Cards” chapter in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide for
instructions on how to install the air ramp for standard and deep door chassis.
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1.6 Front Door
Before you remove the ONS 15454 front door, you must remove the ground strap of the front door
(Figure 1-20).
ONS 15454 ANSI Front Door Ground Strap
71048
Figure 1-20
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Chapter 1
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1.6 Front Door
Figure 1-21 shows how to remove the ONS 15454 ANSI front door.
Removing the ONS 15454 ANSI Front Door
FAN
38831
Figure 1-21
FAIL
CR
IT
MA
J
MIN
Translucent
circles
for LED
viewing
Door hinge
Assembly hinge pin
Assembly hinge
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1.6 Front Door
Figure 1-22 shows how to remove the ONS 15454 ETSI front door.
Removing the ONS 15454 ETSI Front Door
FAN
61237
Figure 1-22
FAIL
CR
IT
MAJ
MIN
Translucent
circles
for LED
viewing
Door hinge
Assembly hinge pin
Assembly hinge
An erasable label is pasted on the inside of the front door. You can use the label to record slot
assignments, port assignments, card types, node ID, rack ID, and serial number for the ONS 15454.
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1.6 Front Door
Figure 1-23 shows the erasable label on the ONS 15454 ANSI shelf.
ONS 15454 ANSI Front-Door Erasable Label
61840
Figure 1-23
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1.6 Front Door
Figure 1-24 shows the erasable label on the ONS 15454 ETSI shelf.
ONS 15454 ETSI Front-Door Erasable Label
P/N 47-12460-01
78098
Figure 1-24
The front door label also includes the Class I and Class 1M laser warning. Figure 1-25 shows the
ONS 15454 ANSI laser warning.
Laser Warning on the ONS 15454 ANSI Front-Door Label
67575
Figure 1-25
Figure 1-26 shows the ONS 15454 ETSI laser warning.
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1.7 ONS 15454 ANSI Backplane Covers
Laser Warning on the ONS 15454 ETSI Front-Door Label
78099
Figure 1-26
1.7 ONS 15454 ANSI Backplane Covers
If a backplane does not have an electrical interface assembly (EIA) panel installed, it should have two
sheet metal backplane covers (one on each side of the backplane). See Figure 1-27. Each cover is held
in place with nine 6-32 x 3/8 inch Phillips screws.
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1.7.1 Lower Backplane Cover
Figure 1-27
Backplane Covers
B
A
Backplane Sheet Metal
Covers
32074
Lower Backplane
Cover
1.7.1 Lower Backplane Cover
The lower section of the ONS 15454 ANSI backplane is covered by either a clear plastic protector
(15454-SA-ANSI) or a sheet metal cover (15454-SA-HD), which is held in place by five 6-32 x 1/2 inch
screws. Remove the lower backplane cover to access the alarm interface panel (AIP), alarm pin fields,
frame ground, and power terminals (Figure 1-28).
Removing the Lower Backplane Cover
32069
Figure 1-28
Retaining
screws
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1.7.2 Rear Cover
1.7.2 Rear Cover
The ONS 15454 ANSI has an optional clear plastic rear cover. This clear plastic cover provides
additional protection for the cables and connectors on the backplane. Figure 1-29 shows the rear cover
screw locations.
Figure 1-29
Backplane Attachment for Cover
32073
Screw locations
for attaching the
rear cover
You can also install the optional spacers if more space is needed between the cables and rear cover
(Figure 1-30).
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1.7.3 Alarm Interface Panel
55374
S
A UIT
P N A
-4
IN LE O B
65 2
N
S A -C LE
0 TO
TR S
E O FO
W
-5
U R M
at 7
C E B R
ts V
TI FE U M
M dc
S O
O
ax
N R TI U
S TO B N
im
.
LE TI
um
IN
N
S
S U G
TA R O
LL FA N
A C
TI E
O .
N
Installing the Plastic Rear Cover with Spacers
R
E
T
C
th AU
1
pr e TI
io B O
B
r AT1 N
A
to
:
T
se an R
em
1
rv d
ic te ov
R
in rm e
E
g
T
in po
al w
2
bl er
B
oc fro
A
ks m
T
bo
2
th
Figure 1-30
1.7.3 Alarm Interface Panel
The AIP is located above the alarm contacts on the lower section of the backplane. The AIP provides
surge protection for the ONS 15454 ANSI. It also provides an interface from the backplane to the
fan-tray assembly and LCD. The AIP plugs into the backplane using a 96-pin DIN connector and is held
in place with two retaining screws. The panel has a nonvolatile memory chip that stores the unique node
address (MAC address). The MAC address identifies the nodes that support circuits. It allows
Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) to determine circuit sources, destinations, and spans. The
TCC2/TCC2P cards in the ONS 15454 ANSI also use the MAC address to store the node database.
Note
The 5-A AIP (73-7665-XX) is required when installing fan-tray assembly 15454-FTA3 or
15454-CC-FTA, which comes preinstalled on the shelf assembly (15454-SA-ANSI or 15454-SA-HD).
Note
A blown fuse on the AIP board can cause the LCD display to go blank.
1.7.4 Alarm Interface Panel Replacement
If the AIP fails, a MAC Fail alarm appears on the CTC Alarms menu and/or the LCD display on the
fan-tray assembly goes blank. To perform an in-service replacement of the AIP, you must contact the
Cisco Technical Assistance Center (Cisco TAC). For contact information, see the “Obtaining
Documentation and Submitting a Service Request” section on page -lxv.
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1.8 ONS 15454 ETSI Front Mount Electrical Connection
You can replace the AIP on an in-service system without affecting traffic (except Ethernet traffic on
nodes running a release earlier than Software Release 4.0). The circuit repair feature allows you to repair
circuits affected by MAC address changes on one node at a time. Circuit repair works when all nodes
are running the same software version. Each individual AIP upgrade requires an individual circuit repair;
if AIPs are replaced on two nodes, the circuit repair must be performed twice. Always replace an AIP
during a maintenance window.
Caution
Note
Do not use a 2-A AIP with a 5-A fan-tray assembly; doing so causes a blown fuse on the AIP.
Ensure that all nodes in the affected network are running the same software version before replacing the
AIP and repairing circuits. If you need to upgrade nodes to the same software version, no hardware
should be changed or circuit repair performed until after the software upgrade is complete.
1.8 ONS 15454 ETSI Front Mount Electrical Connection
The ONS 15454 ETSI positive and negative power terminals are located on FMEC cards in the Electrical
Facility Connection Assembly (EFCA). The ground connection is the grounding receptacle on the side
panel of the shelf.
The ONS 15454 ETSI EFCA at the top of the shelf has 12 FMEC slots numbered sequentially from left
to right (18 to 29). Slots 18 to 22 and 25 to 29 provide electrical connections. Slots 23 and 24 host the
MIC-A/P and MIC-C/T/P cards, respectively. The MIC-A/P and the MIC-C/T/P cards also connect
alarm, timing, LAN, and craft connections to the ONS 15454 ETSI.
For more information about the MIC-A/P and MIC-C/T/P cards, see Chapter 2, “Common Control
Cards.”
1.9 ONS 15454 ANSI Alarm Expansion Panel
The optional ONS 15454 ANSI alarm expansion panel (AEP) can be used with the AIC-I card to provide
an additional 48 dry alarm contacts for the ONS 15454 ANSI: 32 inputs and 16 outputs. The AEP is a
printed circuit board assembly that is installed on the backplane. Figure 1-31 shows the AEP board; the
left connector is the input connector and the right connector is the output connector.
The AIC-I without an AEP already contains direct alarm contacts. These direct AIC-I alarm contacts are
routed through the backplane to wire-wrap pins accessible from the back of the shelf. If you install an
AEP, you cannot use the alarm contacts on the wire-wrap pins. For more information about the AIC-I,
see Chapter 2, “Common Control Cards.”
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1.9 ONS 15454 ANSI Alarm Expansion Panel
Figure 1-31
AEP Printed Circuit Board Assembly
Output Connector
78471
Input Connector
Figure 1-32 shows the AEP block diagram.
Figure 1-32
AEP Block Diagram
AIC-I Interface
(wire wrapping)
TIA/EIA 485
In Alarm Relays
Out Alarm Relays
78406
Inventory data
(EEPROM)
AEP/AIE
CPLD
Power Supply
Each AEP alarm input port has a provisionable label and severity. The alarm inputs have optocoupler
isolation. They have one common 32-VDC output and a maximum of 2 mA per input. Each opto-metal
oxide semiconductor (MOS) alarm output can operate by definable alarm condition, a maximum open
circuit voltage of 60 VDC, and a maximum current of 100 mA. See the “17.6 External Alarms and
Controls” section on page 17-13 for further information.
Figure 1-33 shows the wire-wrapping connections on the shelf backplane used to connect to the AEP.
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1.9 ONS 15454 ANSI Alarm Expansion Panel
Figure 1-33
AEP Wire-Wrap Connections to Backplane Pins
Orange
Yellow
White
Black
A
B
A
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
BITS
B
B
A
1
A
B
2
2
3
A
9
6
4
LAN
B
8
5
3
4
A
7
ACO
10
FG3
IN
IN/OUT
FG4
FG5
A
A
A
B
A
1
1
11
2
2
2
2
12
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
MODEM
CRAFT
FG7
FG8
FG9
B
IN
LOCAL ALARMS
VIS
IN
FG6
B
1
AUD
FG10
FG11
FG12
96618
FG2
B
1
ENVIRONMENTAL ALARMS
IN
FG1
B
A
1
Violet
Slate
Green Brown
Blue
Red
Table 1-6 shows the backplane pin assignments and corresponding signals on the AIC-I and AEP.
Table 1-6
Pin Assignments for the AEP
AEP Cable Wire
Backplane Pin
AIC-I Signal
AEP Signal
Black
A1
GND
AEP_GND
White
A2
AE_+5
AEP_+5
Slate
A3
VBAT–
VBAT–
Violet
A4
VB+
VB+
Blue
A5
AE_CLK_P
AE_CLK_P
Green
A6
AE_CLK_N
AE_CLK_N
Yellow
A7
AE_DIN_P
AE_DOUT_P
Orange
A8
AE_DIN_N
AE_DOUT_N
Red
A9
AE_DOUT_P
AE_DIN_P
Brown
A10
AE_DOUT_N
AE_DIN_N
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1.9 ONS 15454 ANSI Alarm Expansion Panel
Figure 1-34 is a circuit diagram of the alarm inputs. (Inputs 1 and 48 are shown in the example.)
Figure 1-34
Alarm Input Circuit Diagram
AEP/AIE
Station
48 V
GND
max. 2 mA
Input 1
VBAT–
Input 48
78473
VBAT–
Table 1-7 lists the connections to the external alarm sources.
Table 1-7
Alarm Input Pin Association
AMP Champ
Pin Number Signal Name
AMP Champ
Pin Number Signal Name
1
ALARM_IN_1–
27
GND
2
GND
28
ALARM_IN_2–
3
ALARM_IN_3–
29
ALARM_IN_4–
4
ALARM_IN_5–
30
GND
5
GND
31
ALARM_IN_6–
6
ALARM_IN_7–
32
ALARM_IN_8–
7
ALARM_IN_9–
33
GND
8
GND
34
ALARM_IN_10–
9
ALARM_IN_11–
35
ALARM_IN_12–
10
ALARM_IN_13–
36
GND
11
GND
37
ALARM_IN_14–
12
ALARM_IN_15–
38
ALARM_IN_16–
13
ALARM_IN_17–
39
GND
14
GND
40
ALARM_IN_18–
15
ALARM_IN_19–
41
ALARM_IN_20–
16
ALARM_IN_21–
42
GND
17
GND
43
ALARM_IN_22–
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1.9 ONS 15454 ANSI Alarm Expansion Panel
Table 1-7
Alarm Input Pin Association (continued)
AMP Champ
Pin Number Signal Name
AMP Champ
Pin Number Signal Name
18
ALARM_IN_23–
44
ALARM_IN_24–
19
ALARM_IN_25–
45
GND
20
GND
46
ALARM_IN_26–
21
ALARM_IN_27–
47
ALARM_IN_28–
22
ALARM_IN_29–
48
GND
23
GND
49
ALARM_IN_30–
24
ALARM_IN_31–
50
—
25
ALARM_IN_+
51
GND1
26
ALARM_IN_0–
52
GND2
Figure 1-35 is a circuit diagram of the alarm outputs. (Outputs 1 and 16 are shown in the example.)
Figure 1-35
Alarm Output Circuit Diagram
Station
AEP/AIE
Output 1
max. 60 V/100 mA
78474
Output 16
Use the pin numbers in Table 1-8 to connect to the external elements being switched by external controls.
Table 1-8
Pin Association for Alarm Output Pins
AMP Champ
Pin Number Signal Name
AMP Champ
Pin Number Signal Name
1
—
27
COM_0
2
COM_1
28
—
3
NO_1
29
NO_2
4
—
30
COM_2
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1.10 Ethernet Adapter Panel
Table 1-8
Pin Association for Alarm Output Pins (continued)
AMP Champ
Pin Number Signal Name
AMP Champ
Pin Number Signal Name
5
COM_3
31
—
6
NO_3
32
NO_4
7
—
33
COM_4
8
COM_5
34
—
9
NO_5
35
NO_6
10
—
36
COM_6
11
COM_7
37
—
12
NO_7
38
NO_8
13
—
39
COM_8
14
COM_9
40
—
15
NO_9
41
NO_10
16
—
42
COM_10
17
COM_11
43
—
18
NO_11
44
NO_12
19
—
45
COM_12
20
COM_13
46
—
21
NO_13
47
NO_14
22
—
48
COM_14
23
COM_15
49
—
24
NO_15
50
—
25
—
51
GND1
26
NO_0
52
GND2
1.10 Ethernet Adapter Panel
An ethernet adapter panel (EAP) is required in an ANSI or ETSI equipment rack for multishelf
configurations. Two EAPs are required in a multishelf configuration, one for each MS-ISC-100T card.
Figure 1-36 shows an example of two installed EAPs and the connection between each EAP and a node
controller shelf and a subtending shelf.
An EAP cable is used to connect the MS-ISC-100T card ports to the EAP (Figure 1-37). The nine
connector ends plug into Ports 0 through 8 of the MS-ISC-100T card, and the multiport connector plugs
into the EAP. Ports 0 and 1 on the MS-ISC-100T card are the DCN ports; Ports 2 through 7 are the SSC
ports. A cross-over (CAT-5) LAN cable is used to connect the DCN port on the EAP to the front panel
of the TCC2/TCC2P cards in the subtending shelves.
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1.10 Ethernet Adapter Panel
Figure 1-36
Connecting the EAP to the Node Controller and Subtending Shelf
EAP
EAP
Subtended Shelf
RJ-45
RJ-45
TCC2/
TCC2P
Slot 7
TCC2/
TCC2P
Slot 11
Node Controller Shelf
DCN1
DCN1
DCN2
DCN2
SSC1
SSC1
SSC2
SSC2
SSC3
SSC3
SSC4
SSC4
SSC5
SSC5
SSC6
SSC6
SSC7
SSC7
RJ-45
RJ-45
PRT
PRT
UA
TCC2/
MS-ISC TCC2P
Slot 6
Slot 7
NC
UA
TCC2/
TCC2P MS-ISC
Slot 11 Slot 12
585
NC
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1.11 Filler Card
Figure 1-37
EAP Cable
DCN 1
DCN 2
SSCI 1
SSCI 2
SSCI 3
SSCI 4
SSCI 7
151586
SSCI 5
SSCI 6
1.11 Filler Card
The filler card is designed to occupy empty multiservice and AIC-I slots in the Cisco ONS 15454
(Slots 1 to 6, 9, and 12 to17). The filler card cannot operate in the cross-connect (XC) slots (Slots 8
and 10) or TCC2/TCC2P slots (Slots 7 and 11). The filler card is detected by CTC.
When installed, the filler card aids in maintaining proper air flow and EMI requirements.
Figure 1-38 shows the card faceplate. The filler card has no card-level LED indicators.
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Chapter 1
Shelf Assembly Hardware
1.12 Cable Routing and Management
Figure 1-38
Filler Card Faceplate
124234
FILLER
1.12 Cable Routing and Management
The ONS 15454 cable management facilities include the following:
•
Fiber patch panels
•
A cable-routing channel (behind the fold-down door) that runs the width of the shelf assembly
(Figure 1-39 on page 1-41)
•
Plastic horseshoe-shaped fiber guides at each side opening of the cable-routing channel that ensure
that the proper bend radius is maintained in the fibers (Figure 1-40 on page 1-42)
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1.12.1 Fiber Management
Note
You can remove the fiber guide, if necessary, to create a larger opening (if you need to route
CAT-5 Ethernet cables out the side, for example). To remove the fiber guide, take out the
three screws that anchor it to the side of the shelf assembly.
•
Cable tie-wrap facilities on EIAs that secure cables to the cover panel (ANSI only)
•
Reversible jumper routing fins that enable you to route cables out either side by positioning the fins
as desired
•
Jumper slack storage reels (2) on each side panel that reduce the amount of slack in cables that are
connected to other devices
Note
To remove the jumper slack storage reels, take out the screw in the center of each reel.
•
Optional fiber-storage tray (recommended for DWDM nodes)
•
Optional tie-down bar (ANSI only)
Figure 1-39 shows the cable management facilities that you can access through the fold-down front door,
including the cable-routing channel and the jumper routing fins.
Figure 1-39
Managing Cables on the Front Panel
FAN
FAIL
CR
IT
MA
J
MIN
34238
Reversible jumper
routing fins
Fold down
front door
1.12.1 Fiber Management
The jumper routing fins are designed to route fiber jumpers out of both sides of the shelf. Slots 1 to 6
exit to the left, and Slots 12 to 17 exit to the right. Figure 1-40 shows fibers routed from cards in the left
slots, down through the fins, then exiting out the fiber channel to the left. The maximum capacity of the
fiber routing channel depends on the size of the fiber jumpers.
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Chapter 1
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1.12.1 Fiber Management
Fiber Capacity
96518
Figure 1-40
Fiber guides
Table 1-9 provides the maximum capacity of the fiber channel for one side of an ANSI shelf, depending
on fiber size and number of Ethernet cables running through that fiber channel.
Table 1-9
ANSI Fiber Channel Capacity (One Side of the Shelf)
Maximum Number of Fibers Exiting Each Side
Fiber Diameter
No Ethernet Cables
One Ethernet Cable
Two Ethernet Cables
0.6 inch (1.6 mm)
144
127
110
0.7 inch (2 mm)
90
80
70
0.11 inch (3 mm)
40
36
32
Table 1-10 provides the maximum capacity of the fiber channel for one side of an ETSI shelf, depending
on fiber size and number of Ethernet cables running through that fiber channel.
Table 1-10
ETSI Fiber Channel Capacity (One Side of the Shelf)
Maximum Number of Fibers Exiting Each Side
Fiber Diameter
No Ethernet Cables
One Ethernet Cable
Two Ethernet Cables
0.6 inch (1.6 mm)
126
110
94
0.7 inch (2 mm)
80
70
60
0.11 inch (3 mm)
36
31
26
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1.12.2 Fiber Management Using the Patch-Panel Trays
Determine your fiber size according to the number of cards/ports installed in each side of the shelf. For
example, if your port combination requires 36 fibers, 3-mm (0.11-inch) fiber is adequate. If your port
combination requires 68 fibers, you must use 2-mm (0.7-inch) or smaller fibers.
1.12.2 Fiber Management Using the Patch-Panel Trays
The optional patch-panel trays manage the connections between multiplexer/demultiplexer and TXP
cards by splitting multiple fiber push-on (MPO) cables into single fiber connections (LC cables). The
patch-panel tray consists of a metal shelf, a pull-out drawer, a drop-in patch-panel module, and various
cable routing mechanisms.
1.12.2.1 Standard and Deep Patch-Panel Trays (32-Channel)
There are two patch-panel trays intended for use with 32-channel cards, the standard tray (1 RU deep)
and the deep tray (2 RUs deep). Both the standard patch-panel tray can host up to eight ribbon cables
(with eight fibers each) entering the drawer, or 64 cables (with a maximum outer diameter of 2 mm
[0.079 in.]). The deep patch-panel has the bulkheads organized in 8 packs, each housing 8 LC adapters,
which allows for more room for internal fiber routing as well as more clearance for ingress and egress
of the cables. The deep patch-panel comes with the MPO-LC cables preinstalled.
Because the standard and deep patch-panel tray can each host 64 connections, hub and ROADM nodes
will typically require two standard patch-panel modules each, and other DWDM nodes might require
one. (Only one standard or deep patch-panel tray is necessary for terminal nodes.) The module fits
19- and 23-inch (482.6-mm and 584.2-mm) ANSI racks and 600 mm (23.6 inch) x 300 mm (11.8 inch)
ETSI racks, using reversible brackets.
Figure 1-41 shows a partially fibered standard patch-panel tray.
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Chapter 1
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1.12.2 Fiber Management Using the Patch-Panel Trays
Standard Patch-Panel Tray
124007
Figure 1-41
Figure 1-42 shows a partially fibered deep patch-panel tray.
Figure 1-42
Deep Patch-Panel Tray
MPO-LC Cables
144679
LC-LC cables
Figure 1-43 shows the label on the patch panel that identifies the wavelength for each port.
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1.12.2 Fiber Management Using the Patch-Panel Trays
3
4
5
6
7
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
1560.6nm 1559.7nm 1558.9nm 1558.1nm
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
1556.5nm 1555.7nm 1554.9nm 1554.1nm
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
1552.5nm 1551.7nm 1550.9nm 1550.1nm
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
1548.5nm 1547.7nm 1546.9nm 1546.1nm
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
1544.5nm 1543.7nm 1542.9nm 1542.1nm
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
1540.5nm 1539.7nm 1538.9nm 1538.1nm
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
2
8
144676
1
Patch-Panel Port Wavelengths
1536.6nm 1535.8nm 1535.0nm 1534.2nm
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
1532.6nm 1531.8nm 1531.1nm 1530.3nm
Figure 1-43
1.12.2.2 40-Channel Patch-Panel Tray
The 40-channel patch panel tray is 2 RUs deep and comes preinstalled with MPO-LC cables. The
40-channel patch-panel tray can host up to 10 ribbon cables (with eight fibers each), for a total of 80
connections, and is used with expanded ROADM, terminal, hub, and mesh nodes. Expanded hub and
ROADM nodes will typically require two 40-channel patch-panel modules each; terminal nodes require
one 40-channel patch-panel tray; and one 40-channel patch-panel tray is needed for mesh nodes for each
direction.
The module fits 19- and 23-inch (482.6-mm and 584.2-mm) ANSI racks and 600 mm (23.6 inch) x
300 mm (11.8 inch) ETSI racks, using reversible brackets.
Figure 1-44 shows a 40-channel patch-panel tray.
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Chapter 1
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1.12.2 Fiber Management Using the Patch-Panel Trays
40-Channel Patch-Panel Tray, Side View
159817
Figure 1-44
Figure 1-45 shows the 40-channel patch-panel ports and corresponding wavelengths.
TX
TX
TX
TX
159712
RX
RX
RX
RX
1558.9nm
1559.7nm
1560.6nm
RX
RX
RX
1561.4nm
TX
TX
TX
TX
RX
1555.7nm
1556.5nm
1557.3nm
RX
RX
RX
1558.1nm
TX
TX
TX
TX
RX
1552.5nm
1553.3nm
1554.1nm
RX
RX
RX
1554.9nm
TX
TX
TX
TX
RX
1549.3nm
1550.1nm
1550.9nm
RX
RX
RX
1551.7nm
TX
TX
TX
TX
RX
1546.1nm
1546.9nm
1547.7nm
RX
RX
RX
1548.5nm
TX
TX
TX
TX
RX
1542.9nm
1543.7nm
1544.5nm
RX
RX
RX
1545.3nm
TX
TX
TX
TX
RX
1539.7nm
1540.5nm
1541.3nm
RX
RX
RX
1542.1nm
TX
TX
TX
TX
RX
1536.6nm
1537.4nm
1538.1nm
RX
RX
RX
1538.9nm
TX
TX
TX
TX
RX
1533.4nm
1534.2nm
1535.0nm
RX
RX
RX
40-Channel (15454-PP-80) Patch-Panel Port Wavelengths
1535.8nm
TX
TX
TX
TX
RX
1530.3nm
1531.1nm
1531.8nm
1532.6nm
Figure 1-45
1.12.2.3 Mesh Patch-Panel Tray
There are two mesh patch-panel trays, four-degree (PP-MESH-4) and eight-degree (PP-MESH-8), which
are intended for use with mesh nodes. Both trays are 2 RUs deep. The four-degree patch panel allows up
to 4 sides to be used per mesh node, while the eight-degree patch panel allows up to 8 sides to be used
per mesh node. The 4-degree patch-panel tray can host up to 4 MPO-MPO and 4 LC-LC cables, and the
8-degree patch-panel tray can host up to 8 MPO-MPO and 8 LC-LC cables. The module fits 19- and
23-inch (482.6-mm and 584.2-mm) ANSI racks and 600 mm (23.6 inch) x 300 mm (11.8 inch) ETSI
racks, using reversible brackets.
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1.12.3 Fiber Management Using the Y-Cable Module Tray
Figure 1-46 shows a four-degree patch-panel tray.
Four-Degree Patch-Panel Tray
159721
Figure 1-46
Figure 1-47 shows an eight-degree patch-panel tray.
Eight-Degree Patch-Panel Tray
159716
Figure 1-47
1.12.3 Fiber Management Using the Y-Cable Module Tray
The optional Y-cable module tray manages the connections between TXP cards by splitting patchcords
into single connections. The patch-panel tray consists of a metal shelf, a pull-out drawer, and up to eight
Y-cable modules.
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1.12.4 Fiber Management Using the Fiber-Storage Tray
Figure 1-48 shows a fibered Y-cable module tray.
3
4
5
6
7
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
1560.6nm 1559.7nm 1558.9nm 1558.1nm
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
1556.5nm 1555.7nm 1554.9nm 1554.1nm
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
1552.5nm 1551.7nm 1550.9nm 1550.1nm
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
1548.5nm 1547.7nm 1546.9nm 1546.1nm
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
1544.5nm 1543.7nm 1542.9nm 1542.1nm
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
2
8
144676
1
1540.5nm 1539.7nm 1538.9nm 1538.1nm
Y-Cable Module Tray
1536.6nm 1535.8nm 1535.0nm 1534.2nm
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
1532.6nm 1531.8nm 1531.1nm 1530.3nm
Figure 1-48
To ensure diversity of the fiber coming from different cards in the Y-cable scheme, one pair of fibers
(e.g. from the active transponder) should come out on the opposite side from the second pair of fibers
(e.g. standby transponder), according to local site practice.
1.12.4 Fiber Management Using the Fiber-Storage Tray
Cisco recommends installing at least one fiber-storage tray in multinode racks to facilitate fiber-optic
cable management for DWDM applications. This tray is usually used to store slack cable from cables
installed between cards within a single node. Refer to Figure 1-17 on page 1-20 for typical mounting
locations.
Table 1-11 provides the fiber capacity for each tray.
Table 1-11
Fiber-Storage Tray Capacity
Fiber Diameter
Maximum Number of Fibers Exiting Each Side
0.6 inch (1.6 mm)
62
0.7 inch (2 mm)
48
0.11 inch (3 mm)
32
Figure 1-49 shows an example of a fiber-management tray with fiber-optic cables routed through it. You
can route cables around the cable rounders, entering and exiting from either side, as necessary. Route
fibers as necessary for your site configuration.
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1.12.5 Fiber Management Using the Optional ANSI Tie-Down Bar
Figure 1-49
Fiber-Storage Tray
East
entry/exit
134609
West
entry/exit
1.12.5 Fiber Management Using the Optional ANSI Tie-Down Bar
You can install a 5-inch (127-mm) tie-down bar on the rear of the ANSI chassis. You can use tie-wraps
or other site-specific material to bundle the cabling and attach it to the bar so that you can more easily
route the cable away from the rack.
Figure 1-50 shows the tie-down bar, the ONS 15454 ANSI, and the rack.
Figure 1-50
Tie-Down Bar on the Cisco ONS 15454 ANSI Shelf Assembly
105012
Tie-down bar
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1.13 Fan-Tray Assembly
1.13 Fan-Tray Assembly
The fan-tray assembly is located at the bottom of the ONS 15454 shelf assembly. The fan tray is a
removable drawer that holds fans and fan-control circuitry for the ONS 15454. The front door can be left
in place or removed before installing the fan-tray assembly. After you install the fan tray, you should
only need to access it if a fan failure occurs or if you need to replace or clean the fan-tray air filter. Refer
to the “Maintain the Node” chapter in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide to clean and
replace the fan-tray assembly.
The front of the fan-tray assembly has an LCD screen that provides slot- and port-level information for
all card slots, including the number of Critical, Major, and Minor alarms.
The fan-tray assembly features an air filter at the bottom of the tray that you can install and remove by
hand. Remove and visually inspect this filter every 30 days and keep spare filters in stock. Refer to the
“Maintain the Node” chapter in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide for information about
cleaning and maintaining the fan-tray air filter. Figure 1-51 shows the position of the ONS 15454 ETSI
fan-tray assembly. (The fan-tray assembly on the ONS 15454 ANSI is located in a similar position.)
Caution
Do not operate an ONS 15454 without the mandatory fan-tray air filter.
Caution
Fan-tray assembly 15454E-CC-FTA (ETSI shelf)/15454-CC-FTA (ANSI shelf) is required when any of
the following cards are used in an ONS 15454 DWDM application: ADM-10G, GE_XP, 10GE_XP,
GE_XPE, 10GE_XPE, ML-MR-10, and CE-MR-10.
Caution
The 15454-FTA3-T fan-tray assembly can only be installed in ONS 15454 Release 3.1 and later shelf
assemblies (15454-SA-ANSI, P/N: 800-19857; 15454-SA-HD, P/N: 800-24848). The fan-tray assembly
includes a pin that prevents it from being installed in ONS 15454 shelf assemblies released before
ONS 15454 Release 3.1 (15454-SA-NEBS3E, 15454-SA-NEBS3, and 15454-SA-R1). Equipment
damage can result from attempting to install the 15454-FTA3 in an incompatible shelf assembly.
Note
15454-CC-FTA is compatible with Software Release 2.2.2 and greater and shelf assemblies
15454-SA-HD and 15454-SA-ANSI. 15454E-CC-FTA is compatible with Software Release 4.0 and
greater and shelf assembly 15454-SA-ETSI.
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1.13.1 Fan Tray Units for ONS 15454 Cards
Position of the ONS 15454 ETSI Fan-Tray Assembly
61236
Figure 1-51
FAN
FAIL
CR
IT
MAJ
MIN
LCD
Fan tray
assembly
1.13.1 Fan Tray Units for ONS 15454 Cards
Table 1-12 lists the applicable fan tray units supported for ONS 15454 cards in Release 9.0
Table 1-12
Fan Tray Units for ONS 15454 Cards
ONS 15454 Cards
15454E-FTA-48V (ETSI shelf)
/15454-FTA3-T(ANSI shelf)
15454E-CC-FTA (ETSI shelf)/
15454-CC-FTA (ANSI shelf)
TCC2/TCC2P
Yes
Yes
AIC-I
Yes
Yes
MS-ISC-100T
Yes
Yes
AEP
Yes
Yes
MIC-A/P
Yes
Yes
MIC-C/T/P
Yes
Yes
OSCM
Yes
Yes
OSC-CSM
Yes
Yes
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1.13.1 Fan Tray Units for ONS 15454 Cards
Table 1-12
Fan Tray Units for ONS 15454 Cards
ONS 15454 Cards
15454E-FTA-48V (ETSI shelf)
/15454-FTA3-T(ANSI shelf)
15454E-CC-FTA (ETSI shelf)/
15454-CC-FTA (ANSI shelf)
OPT-PRE
Yes
Yes
OPT-BST
Yes
Yes
OPT-BST-E
Yes
Yes
OPT-BST-L
Yes
Yes
OPT-AMP-L
Yes
Yes
OPT-AMP-17-C
Yes
Yes
OPT-AMP-C
Yes
Yes
OPT-RAMP-C
Yes
Yes
32MUX-O
Yes
Yes
32DMX-O
Yes
Yes
4MD-xx.x
Yes
Yes
PSM
Yes
Yes
AD-1C-xx.x
Yes
Yes
AD-2C-xx.x
Yes
Yes
AD-4C-xx.x
Yes
Yes
AD-1B-xx.x
Yes
Yes
AD-4B-xx.x
Yes
Yes
32-WSS
Yes
Yes
32-DMX
Yes
Yes
32-WSS-L
Yes
Yes
32-DMX-L
Yes
Yes
MMU
Yes
Yes
40-DMX-C
Yes
Yes
40-DMX-CE
Yes
Yes
40-MUX-C
Yes
Yes
40-WSS-C
Yes
Yes
40-WSS-CE
Yes
Yes
40-WXC-C
Yes
Yes
TXP_MR_10G
Yes
Yes
TXP_MR_2.5G
Yes
Yes
TXPP_MR_2.5G
Yes
Yes
MXP_2.5G_10G
Yes
Yes
TXP_MR_10E
Yes
Yes
MXP_2.5G_10E
Yes
Yes
MXP_MR_2.5G
Yes
Yes
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1.13.2 Fan Speed
Table 1-12
Fan Tray Units for ONS 15454 Cards
ONS 15454 Cards
15454E-FTA-48V (ETSI shelf)
/15454-FTA3-T(ANSI shelf)
15454E-CC-FTA (ETSI shelf)/
15454-CC-FTA (ANSI shelf)
MXPP_MR_2.5G
Yes
Yes
TXP_MR_10E_C
Yes
Yes
TXP_MR_10E_L
Yes
Yes
MXP_2.5G_10E_C
Yes
Yes
MXP_2.5G_10E_L
Yes
Yes
MXP_MR_10DME_C
Yes
Yes
MXP_MR_10DME_L
Yes
Yes
GE_XP/10GE_XP
No
Yes
ADM-10G
No
Yes
GE_XPE/10GE_XPE
No
Yes
OTU2_XP
No
Yes
1.13.2 Fan Speed
Fan speed is controlled by the TCC2/TCC2P card’s temperature sensors. The sensors measure the input
air temperature at the fan-tray assembly. Fan speed options are low, medium, and high. If the
TCC2/TCC2P card fails, the fans automatically shift to high speed. The temperature measured by the
TCC2/TCC2P sensors appears on the LCD screen.
1.13.3 Fan Failure
If one or more fans fail on the fan-tray assembly, replace the entire assembly. You cannot replace
individual fans. The red Fan Fail LED on the front of the fan tray illuminates when one or more fans fail.
The red Fan Fail LED clears after you install a working fan tray.
Caution
As with the FTA3, the 15454E-CC-FTA (for ETSI) and 15454-CC-FTA (for ANSI) Fan Fail LED on the
front of the fan-tray assembly illuminates when one or more fans fail to indicate that a fan-tray assembly
or AIP replacement is required. But the Fan Fail LED on the 15454E-CC-FTA and 15454-CC-FTA will
also illuminate when only one power source is connected to the chassis, and or any fuse blows. In such
conditions, the Fan Alarm is triggered and the fans run at maximum speed.
1.13.4 Air Filter
The ONS 15454 contains a reusable air filter (for ANSI: 15454-FTF2; for ETSI: 15454E-ETSI-FTF) that
is installed either below the fan-tray assembly or, for the ONS 15454 ANSI, in the optional external filter
brackets.
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1.14 Power and Ground Description
The reusable filter is made of a gray, open-cell, polyurethane foam that is specially coated to provide fire
and fungi resistance. All versions of the ONS 15454 can use the reusable air filter. Spare filters should
be kept in stock. Inspect the air filter every 30 days, and clean the filter every three to six months.
Replace the air filter every two to three years. Avoid cleaning the air filter with harsh cleaning agents or
solvents.
Earlier versions of the ONS 15454 ANSI shelf used a disposable air filter that is installed beneath the
fan-tray assembly only. However, the reusable air filter is backward compatible.
1.14 Power and Ground Description
Ground the equipment according to Telcordia standards or local practices. The following sections
describe power and ground for the ONS 15454 shelves.
1.14.1 ONS 15454 ANSI Power and Ground
Cisco recommends the following wiring conventions, but customer conventions prevail:
•
Red wire for battery connections (–48 VDC).
•
Black wire for battery return connections (0 VDC).
•
The battery return connection is treated as DC-I, as defined in Telcordia GR-1089-CORE, Issue 3.
The ONS 15454 ANSI has redundant –48 VDC #8 power terminals on the shelf-assembly backplane.
The terminals are labeled BAT1, RET1, BAT2, and RET2 and are located on the lower section of the
backplane behind a clear plastic cover.
To install redundant power feeds, use four power cables and one ground cable. For a single power feed,
only two power cables (#10 AWG, copper conductor, 194 degrees F [90 degrees C]) and one ground
cable (#6 AWG) are required. Use a conductor with low impedance to ensure circuit overcurrent
protection. However, the conductor must have the capability to safely conduct any faulty current that
might be imposed.
The existing ground post is a #10-32 bolt. The nut provided for a field connection is also a #10 AWG,
with an integral lock washer. The lug must be a dual-hole type and rated to accept the #6 AWG cable.
Two posts are provided on the ONS 15454 ANSI to accommodate the dual-hole lug. Figure 1-52 shows
the location of the ground posts.
Figure 1-52
Ground Posts on the ONS 15454 ANSI Backplane
FRAME GROUND
61852
Attach #6 AWG
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1.14.2 ONS 15454 ETSI Power and Ground
1.14.2 ONS 15454 ETSI Power and Ground
The ONS 15454 ETSI has redundant –48 VDC power connectors on the MIC-A/P and MIC-C/T/P
faceplates. To install redundant power feeds, use the two power cables shipped with the
ONS 15454 ETSI and one ground cable. For details, see the “2.6.1 MIC-A/P FMEC” section on
page 2-18 and the “2.6.2 MIC-C/T/P FMEC” section on page 2-21.
Caution
Only use the power cables shipped with the ONS 15454 ETSI.
1.15 ONS 15454 ANSI Alarm, Timing, LAN, and Craft Pin
Connections
Pin connections are provided on the ONS 15454 ANSI backplane. For information about
ONS 15454 ETSI connections, see the “1.8 ONS 15454 ETSI Front Mount Electrical Connection”
section on page 1-32.
The ONS 15454 ANSI has a backplane pin field located at the bottom of the backplane. The backplane
pin field provides 0.045 inch2 (29 mm2) wire-wrap pins for enabling external alarms, timing input and
output, and craft interface terminals. This section describes the backplane pin field and the pin
assignments for the field. Figure 1-54 on page 1-57 shows the wire-wrap pins on the backplane pin field.
Beneath each wire-wrap pin is a frame ground pin. Frame ground pins are labeled FG1, FG2, FG3, etc.
Install the ground shield of the cables connected to the backplane to the ground pin that corresponds to
the pin field used.
Note
The AIC-I requires a shelf assembly running Software R3.4.0 or later. The backplane of the ANSI shelf
contains a wire-wrap field with pin assignment according to the layout in Figure 1-53 on page 1-56. The
shelf assembly might be an existing shelf that has been upgraded to Software R3.4 or later. In this case,
the backplane pin labeling appears as indicated in Figure 1-54 on page 1-57, but you must use the pin
assignments provided by the AIC-I card as shown in Figure 1-53 on page 1-56.
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1.15 ONS 15454 ANSI Alarm, Timing, LAN, and Craft Pin Connections
A
Cisco ONS 15454 Backplane Pinouts (Release 3.4 or Later)
B
A
B
A
B
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
5
4
4
4
4
6
BITS
LAN
FG2
Pin
A1
B
ACO
A
B
A
FG3
Function
BITS Output 2 negative (–)
B1
BITS Output 2 positive (+)
A2
BITS Input 2 negative (–)
FG5
B
A
1
11
8
2
2
2
2
12
9
3
3
3
3
10
4
4
4
4
MODEM
CRAFT
Pin
FG8
FG7
LOCAL ALARMS
FG9
AUD
FG10
A3/A15 Normally open output pair number 3
B3/B15
N/O
B2/B14
B3
BITS Output 1 positive (+)
A4
BITS Input 1 negative (–)
A4/A16 Normally open output pair number 4
B4
BITS Input 1 positive (+)
B4/B16
ACO
RJ-45 pin 6 RX–
B1
RJ-45 pin 3 RX+
RJ-45 pin 2 TX–
CRAFT
RJ-45 pin 1 TX+
Connecting to a PC/Workstation or router
RJ-45 pin 2 RX–
B1
RJ-45 pin 1 RX+
A2
RJ-45 pin 6 TX–
B2
A1
RJ-45 pin 3 TX+
ENVIR
ALARMS B1
IN
A2
B2
A3
B3
A4
B4
A5
B5
A6
B6
A7
B7
A8
B8
A9
B9
A10
B10
A11
B11
A12
B12
Alarm input pair number 1: Reports
closure on connected wires.
Alarm input pair number 4: Reports
closure on connected wires.
Alarm input pair number 5: Reports
closure on connected wires.
A1
Transmit (PC pin #3)
Ground (PC pin #5)
A4
B3
A4
B4
LOCAL A1
ALARMS B1
VIS
(Visual) A2
B2
N/O
Alarm input pair number 7: Reports
closure on connected wires.
Receive (PC pin #2)
A3
A3
B3
Alarm input pair number 6: Reports
closure on connected wires.
Normally open ACO pair
A2
LOCAL A1
ALARMS B1
AUD
A2
(Audible)
B2
N/O
A3
Alarm input pair number 2: Reports
closure on connected wires.
Alarm input pair number 3: Reports
closure on connected wires.
A1
If you are using an
AIC-I card, contacts
provisioned as OUT
are 1-4. Contacts
provisioned as IN
are 13-16.
B1
B2
A1
FG12
Function
BITS Input 2 positive (+)
A2
FG11
A1/A13 Normally open output pair number 1
ENVIR
ALARMS B1/B13
IN/OUT
A2/A14 Normally open output pair number 2
BITS Output 1 negative (–)
Connecting to a hub, or switch
B
IN
VIS
IN
A3
A1
A
1
B2
LAN
B
1
FG6
Field
A
A
1
IN
IN/OUT
FG4
B
7
ENVIRONMENTAL ALARMS
IN
BITS
A
1
FG1
Field
B
A
1
A4
B4
DTR (PC pin #4)
Alarm output pair number 1: Remote
audible alarm.
Alarm output pair number 2: Critical
audible alarm.
Alarm output pair number 3: Major
audible alarm.
Alarm output pair number 4: Minor
audible alarm.
Alarm output pair number 1: Remote
visual alarm.
Alarm output pair number 2: Critical
visual alarm.
Alarm output pair number 3: Major
visual alarm.
Alarm output pair number 4: Minor
visual alarm.
83020
Figure 1-53
Alarm input pair number 8: Reports
closure on connected wires.
Alarm input pair number 9: Reports
closure on connected wires.
Alarm input pair number 10: Reports
closure on connected wires.
Alarm input pair number 11: Reports
closure on connected wires.
Alarm input pair number 12: Reports
closure on connected wires.
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1.15.1 Alarm Contact Connections
A
ONS 15454 ANSI Backplane Pinouts
B
A
B
A
B
A
B
A
B
A
B
A
B
A
A
B
A
B
A
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
BITS
4
4
LAN
ENVIR
4
ALARMS
IN
FG1
FG2
Field
BITS
FG3
Pin
A1
4
4
ACO
X . 25
Function
BITS Output 2 negative (-)
BITS Output 2 positive (+)
BITS Input 2 negative (-)
B2
BITS Input 2 positive (+)
FG6
FG7
Field
Pin
A1
ENVIR
ALARMS B1
OUT
A2
N/O
A3
BITS Output 1 negative (-)
A3
BITS Output 1 positive (+)
B3
A4
BITS Input 1 negative (-)
A4
B4
BITS Input 1 positive (+)
B4
Connecting to a hub, or switch
RJ-45 pin 6 RX-
B1
RJ-45 pin 3 RX+
A2
RJ-45 pin 2 TX-
ACO
CRAFT
RJ-45 pin 1 TX+
Connecting to a PC/Workstation or router
RJ-45 pin 2 RX-
B1
RJ-45 pin 1 RX+
A2
RJ-45 pin 6 TX-
B2
A1
RJ-45 pin 3 TX+
B2
A3
B3
A4
B4
Alarm input pair number 1: Reports
closure on connected wires.
Alarm input pair number 4: Reports
closure on connected wires.
A1
A1
AUD
FG10
FG11
FG12
Function
Normally open output pair number 1
Normally open output pair number 2
Normally open output pair number 3
Normally open output pair number 4
Normally open ACO pair
Transmit (PC pin #3)
A3
Ground (PC pin #5)
A4
B3
A4
B4
LOCAL A1
ALARMS B1
VIS
(Visual) A2
B2
N/O
Receive (PC pin #2)
A2
LOCAL A1
ALARMS B1
AUD
A2
(Audible)
B2
N/O
A3
Alarm input pair number 2: Reports
closure on connected wires.
Alarm input pair number 3: Reports
closure on connected wires.
4
B1
B2
A1
FG9
2
TBOS
B2
B3
A1
FG8
1
ALARMS
VIS
FG5
B1
ENVIR
ALARMS B1
IN
A2
CRAFT LOCAL
OUT
FG4
A2
LAN
4
MODEM
B
A3
B3
A4
B4
DTR (PC pin #4)
Alarm output pair number 1: Remote
audible alarm.
Alarm output pair number 2: Critical
audible alarm.
Alarm output pair number 3: Major
audible alarm.
Alarm output pair number 4: Minor
audible alarm.
Alarm output pair number 1: Remote
visual alarm.
Alarm output pair number 2: Critical
visual alarm.
Alarm output pair number 3: Major
visual alarm.
Alarm output pair number 4: Minor
visual alarm.
38533
Figure 1-54
1.15.1 Alarm Contact Connections
The alarm pin field supports up to 17 alarm contacts, including four audible alarms, four visual alarms,
one alarm cutoff (ACO), and four user-definable alarm input and output contacts.
Audible alarm contacts are in the LOCAL ALARM AUD pin field and visual contacts are in the LOCAL
ALARM VIS pin field. Both of these alarms are in the LOCAL ALARMS category. User-definable
contacts are in the ENVIR ALARM IN (external alarm) and ENVIR ALARM OUT (external control)
pin fields. These alarms are in the ENVIR ALARMS category; you must have the AIC-I card installed
to use the ENVIR ALARMS. Alarm contacts are Normally Open (N/O), meaning that the system closes
the alarm contacts when the corresponding alarm conditions are present. Each alarm contact consists of
two wire-wrap pins on the shelf assembly backplane. Visual and audible alarm contacts are classified as
Critical, Major, Minor, and Remote. Figure 1-53 on page 1-56 and Figure 1-54 on page 1-57 show alarm
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1.15.2 Timing Connections
pin assignments.
Visual and audible alarms are typically wired to trigger an alarm light or bell at a central alarm collection
point when the corresponding contacts are closed. You can use the ACO pins to activate a remote ACO
for audible alarms. You can also activate the ACO function by pressing the ACO button on the
TCC2/TCC2P card faceplate. The ACO function clears all audible alarm indications. After clearing the
audible alarm indication, the alarm is still present and viewable in the Alarms tab in CTC.
1.15.2 Timing Connections
The ONS 15454 ANSI backplane supports two building integrated timing supply (BITS) clock pin
fields. The first four BITS pins, rows 3 and 4, support output and input from the first external timing
device. The last four BITS pins, rows 1 and 2, perform the identical functions for the second external
timing device. Table 1-13 lists the pin assignments for the BITS timing pin fields.
Note
For timing connection, use 100-ohm shielded BITS clock cable pair #22 or #24 AWG (0.51 mm²
[0.020 inch] or 0.64 mm² [0.0252 inch]), twisted-pair T1-type.
Table 1-13
BITS External Timing Pin Assignments
External Device
Contact
Tip and Ring
Function
First external device
A3 (BITS 1 Out)
Primary ring (–)
Output to external device
B3 (BITS 1 Out)
Primary tip (+)
Output to external device
A4 (BITS 1 In)
Secondary ring (–)
Input from external device
B4 (BITS 1 In)
Secondary tip (+)
Input from external device
A1 (BITS 2 Out)
Primary ring (–)
Output to external device
B1 (BITS 2 Out)
Primary tip (+)
Output to external device
A2 (BITS 2 In)
Secondary ring (–)
Input from external device
B2 (BITS 2 In)
Secondary tip (+)
Input from external device
Second external device
Note
Refer to Telcordia SR-NWT-002224 for rules about provisioning timing references.
1.15.3 LAN Connections
Use the LAN pins on the ONS 15454 ANSI backplane to connect the ONS 15454 ANSI to a workstation
or Ethernet LAN, or to a LAN modem for remote access to the node. You can also use the LAN port on
the TCC2/TCC2P faceplate to connect a workstation or to connect the ONS 15454 ANSI to the network.
Table 1-14 shows the LAN pin assignments.
Before you can connect an ONS 15454 ANSI to other ONS 15454 ANSI shelves or to a LAN, you must
change the default IP address that is shipped with each ONS 15454 ANSI (192.1.0.2).
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1.15.4 TL1 Craft Interface Installation
Table 1-14
LAN Pin Assignments
Pin Field
Backplane Pins
RJ-45 Pins
LAN 1
Connecting to data circuit-terminating
equipment (DCE1, a hub or switch)
B2
1
A2
2
B1
3
A1
6
B1
1
A1
2
B2
3
A2
6
LAN 1
Connecting to data terminal equipment
(DTE) (a PC/workstation or router)
1. The Cisco ONS 15454 ANSI is DCE.
1.15.4 TL1 Craft Interface Installation
You can use the craft pins on the ONS 15454 ANSI backplane or the EIA/TIA-232 port on the
TCC2/TCC2P faceplate to create a VT100 emulation window to serve as a TL1 craft interface to the
ONS 15454 ANSI. Use a straight-through cable to connect to the EIA/TIA-232 port. Table 1-15 shows
the pin assignments for the CRAFT pin field.
Note
You cannot use the craft backplane pins and the EIA/TIA-232 port on the TCC2/TCC2P card
simultaneously.
Note
To use the serial port craft interface wire-wrap pins on the backplane, the DTR signal line on the
backplane port wire-wrap pin must be connected and active.
Table 1-15
Craft Interface Pin Assignments
Pin Field
Contact
Function
Craft
A1
Receive
A2
Transmit
A3
Ground
A4
DTR
1.16 Cards and Slots
ONS 15454 cards have electrical plugs at the back that plug into electrical connectors on the shelf
assembly backplane. When the ejectors are fully closed, the card plugs into the assembly backplane.
Figure 1-55 shows card installation for an ONS 15454 ANSI shelf.
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1.16 Cards and Slots
Installing Cards in the ONS 15454 ANSI
39391
Figure 1-55
FAN
FAIL
CR
IT
MAJ
MIN
Ejector
Guide rail
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1.16.1 Card Slot Requirements
Figure 1-56 shows card installation in the ONS 15454 ETSI shelf.
Installing Cards in the ONS 15454 ETSI Shelf
FAN
61239
Figure 1-56
FAIL
CR
IT
MAJ
MIN
Ejector
Guide rail
1.16.1 Card Slot Requirements
The ONS 15454 shelf assemblies have 17 card slots numbered sequentially from left to right. Slots 7 and
11 are dedicated to TCC2/TCC2P cards. Slot 9 is reserved for the optional AIC-I card.
Caution
Do not operate the ONS 15454 with a single TCC2/TCC2P card. Always operate the shelf assembly with
one working and one protect card of the same type.
Shelf assembly slots have symbols indicating the type of cards that you can install in them. Each
ONS 15454 card has a corresponding symbol. The symbol on the card must match the symbol on the slot.
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1.16.2 Card Replacement
Table 1-16 shows the slot and card symbol definitions.
Table 1-16
Slot and Card Symbols
Symbol Color/Shape Definition
Orange/Circle
Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17. Only install cards with a circle symbol on the faceplate.
Blue/Triangle
Slots 5, 6, 12, and 13. Only install cards with circle or a triangle symbol on the
faceplate.
Purple/Square
TCC2/TCC2P slot, Slots 7 and 11. Only install cards with a square symbol on
the faceplate.
Green/Cross
Cross-connect (XC/XCVT/XC10G) slot, Slots 8 and 10. Only install
ONS 15454 cards with a cross symbol on the faceplate.
Note
Cross-connect cards are not required in DWDM applications. Install a
FILLER card or blank card if not using Slots 8 and 10.
Red/P
Protection slot in 1:N protection schemes.
Red/Diamond
AIC/AIC-I slot, Slot 9. Only install cards with a diamond symbol on the
faceplate.
Gold/Star
Slots 1 to 4 and 14 to 17. Only install cards with a star symbol on the faceplate.
Blue/Hexagon
(Only used with the 15454-SA-HD shelf assembly.) Slots 3 and 15. Only install
ONS 15454 ANSI cards with a blue hexagon symbol on the faceplate.
1.16.2 Card Replacement
To replace an ONS 15454 card with another card of the same type, you do not need to make any changes
to the database; remove the old card and replace it with a new card. To replace a card with a card of a
different type, physically remove the card and replace it with the new card, then delete the original card
from CTC. For specifics, refer to the “Maintain the Node” chapter in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Procedure Guide.
Caution
Note
Removing any active card from the ONS 15454 can result in traffic interruption. Use caution when
replacing cards and verify that only inactive or standby cards are being replaced. If the active card needs
to be replaced, switch it to standby prior to removing the card from the node. For traffic switching
procedures, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
An improper removal (IMPROPRMVL) alarm is raised whenever a card pull (reseat) is performed,
unless the card is deleted in CTC first. The alarm clears after the card replacement is complete.
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Common Control Cards
Note
The terms "Unidirectional Path Switched Ring" and "UPSR" may appear in Cisco literature. These terms
do not refer to using Cisco ONS 15xxx products in a unidirectional path switched ring configuration.
Rather, these terms, as well as "Path Protected Mesh Network" and "PPMN," refer generally to Cisco's
path protection feature, which may be used in any topological network configuration. Cisco does not
recommend using its path protection feature in any particular topological network configuration.
This chapter describes the Cisco ONS 15454 common-control cards. For installation and card turn-up
procedures, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. For card safety and compliance
information, refer to the Cisco Optical Transport Products Safety and Compliance Information
document.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Chapter topics include:
•
2.1 Card Overview, page 2-1
•
2.2 TCC2 Card, page 2-2
•
2.3 TCC2P Card, page 2-6
•
2.4 AIC-I Card, page 2-10
•
2.5 MS-ISC-100T Card, page 2-15
•
2.6 Front Mount Electrical Connections, page 2-18
2.1 Card Overview
The card overview section lists the cards described in this chapter.
Each card is marked with a symbol that corresponds to a slot (or slots) on the ONS 15454 shelf assembly.
The cards are then installed into slots displaying the same symbols. See the “1.16.1 Card Slot
Requirements” section on page 1-61 for a list of slots and symbols.
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2.1.1 Common Control Cards
2.1.1 Common Control Cards
The following common control cards are needed to support the functions of the DWDM, transponder,
and muxponder cards:
•
TCC2 or TCC2P
•
AIC-I (optional)
•
MS-ISC-100T (multishelf configurations only)
2.1.2 Front Mount Electrical Connections (ETSI only)
The following Front Mount Electrical Connections (FMECs) are needed to support the functions of the
DWDM, transponder, and muxponder cards:
•
MIC-A/P
•
MIC-C/T/P
2.2 TCC2 Card
Note
For TCC2 card specifications, see the “A.3.1 TCC2 Card Specifications” section on page A-8.
The Advanced Timing, Communications, and Control (TCC2) card performs system initialization,
provisioning, alarm reporting, maintenance, diagnostics, IP address detection/resolution, SONET
section overhead (SOH) data communications channel/generic communications channel (DCC/GCC)
termination, optical service channel (OSC) DWDM data communications network (DCN) termination,
and system fault detection for the ONS 15454. The TCC2 also ensures that the system maintains
Stratum 3 (Telcordia GR-253-CORE) timing requirements. It monitors the supply voltage of the system.
Note
The LAN interface of the TCC2 card meets the standard Ethernet specifications by supporting a cable
length of 328 ft (100 m) at temperatures from 32 to 149 degrees Fahrenheit (0 to 65 degrees Celsius).
Figure 2-1 shows the faceplate and block diagram for the TCC2.
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2.2.1 TCC2 Functionality
Figure 2-1
TCC2 Faceplate and Block Diagram
BACKPLANE
Ref Clocks
(all I/O Slots)
TCC2
-48V PWR
Monitors
System
Timing
BITS Input/
Output
FPGA
Real Time
Clock
FAIL
PWR
A
B
TCCA ASIC
SCL Processor
DCC
Processor
SCL Links to
All Cards
ACT/STBY
MCC1
MCC2
CRIT
Serial
Debug
MAJ
MIN
SCC1
SCC2
HDLC
Message
Bus
REM
SYNC
SCC3
ACO
400MHz
Processor
ACO
Modem
Interface
FCC1
LAMP
SDRAM Memory
& Compact Flash
Modem
Interface
(Not Used)
Mate TCC2
HDLC Link
Communications
Processor
SCC4
FCC2
Mate TCC2
Ethernet Port
RS-232
TCP/IP
Faceplate
Ethernet Port
Ethernet
Repeater
Backplane
Ethernet Port
(Shared with
Mate TCC2)
RS-232 Craft
Interface
Note: Only 1 RS-232 Port Can Be Active Backplane Port Will Supercede Faceplate Port
137639
Faceplate
RS-232 Port
Backplane
RS-232 Port
(Shared with
Mate TCC2)
2.2.1 TCC2 Functionality
The TCC2 card terminates up to 32 DCCs. The TCC2 hardware is prepared for up to 84 DCCs, which
will be available in a future software release.
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2.2.2 Redundant TCC2 Card Installation
The node database, IP address, and system software are stored in TCC2 nonvolatile memory, which
allows quick recovery in the event of a power or card failure.
The TCC2 performs all system-timing functions for each ONS 15454. The TCC2 monitors the recovered
clocks from each traffic card and two building integrated timing supply (BITS) ports for frequency
accuracy. The TCC2 selects a recovered clock, a BITS, or an internal Stratum 3 reference as the
system-timing reference. You can provision any of the clock inputs as primary or secondary timing
sources. A slow-reference tracking loop allows the TCC2 to synchronize with the recovered clock, which
provides holdover if the reference is lost.
The TCC2 monitors both supply voltage inputs on the shelf. An alarm is generated if one of the supply
voltage inputs has a voltage out of the specified range.
Install TCC2 cards in Slots 7 and 11 for redundancy. If the active TCC2 fails, traffic switches to the
protect TCC2.
The TCC2 card has two built-in interface ports for accessing the system: an RJ-45 10BaseT LAN
interface and an EIA/TIA-232 ASCII interface for local craft access. It also has a 10BaseT LAN port for
user interfaces via the backplane.
2.2.2 Redundant TCC2 Card Installation
Cisco does not support operation of the ONS 15454 with only one TCC2 card. For full functionality and
to safeguard your system, always operate with two TCC2 cards.
When a second TCC2 card is inserted into a node, it synchronizes its software, its backup software, and
its database with the active TCC2. If the software version of the new TCC2 does not match the version
on the active TCC2, the newly inserted TCC2 copies from the active TCC2, taking about 15 to 20
minutes to complete. If the backup software version on the new TCC2 does not match the version on the
active TCC2, the newly inserted TCC2 copies the backup software from the active TCC2 again, taking
about 15 to 20 minutes. Copying the database from the active TCC2 takes about 3 minutes. Depending
on the software version and backup version the new TCC2 started with, the entire process can take
between 3 and 40 minutes.
2.2.3 TCC2 Card-Level Indicators
The TCC2 faceplate has ten LEDs. Table 2-1 describes the two card-level LEDs on the TCC2 faceplate.
Table 2-1
TCC2 Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LEDs
Definition
Red FAIL LED
This LED is on during reset. The FAIL LED flashes during the boot and
write process. Replace the card if the FAIL LED persists.
ACT/STBY LED
Indicates the TCC2 is active (green) or in standby (yellow) mode. The
ACT/STBY LED also provides the timing reference and shelf control. When
the active TCC2 is writing to its database or to the standby TCC2 database,
the card LEDs blink. To avoid memory corruption, do not remove the TCC2
when the active or standby LED is blinking.
Green (Active)
Yellow (Standby)
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2.2.4 Network-Level Indicators
2.2.4 Network-Level Indicators
Table 2-2 describes the six network-level LEDs on the TCC2 faceplate.
Table 2-2
TCC2 Network-Level Indicators
System-Level LEDs
Definition
Red CRIT LED
Indicates critical alarms in the network at the local terminal.
Red MAJ LED
Indicates major alarms in the network at the local terminal.
Yellow MIN LED
Indicates minor alarms in the network at the local terminal.
Red REM LED
Provides first-level alarm isolation. The remote (REM) LED turns red when
an alarm is present in one or more of the remote terminals.
Green SYNC LED
Indicates that node timing is synchronized to an external reference.
Green ACO LED
After pressing the alarm cutoff (ACO) button, the ACO LED turns green.
The ACO button opens the audible alarm closure on the backplane. ACO is
stopped if a new alarm occurs. After the originating alarm is cleared, the
ACO LED and audible alarm control are reset.
2.2.5 Power-Level Indicators
Table 2-3 describes the two power-level LEDs on the TCC2 faceplate.
Table 2-3
Note
TCC2 Power-Level Indicators
Power-Level LEDs
Definition
Green/Amber/Red
PWR A LED
The PWR A LED is green when the voltage on supply input A is between the
low battery voltage (LWBATVG) and high battery voltage (HIBATVG)
thresholds. The LED is amber when the voltage on supply input A is between
the high battery voltage and extremely high battery voltage (EHIBATVG)
thresholds or between the low battery voltage and extremely low battery
voltage (ELWBATVG) thresholds. The LED is red when the voltage on
supply input A is above extremely high battery voltage or below extremely
low battery voltage thresholds.
Green/Amber/Red
PWR B LED
The PWR B LED is green when the voltage on supply input B is between the
low battery voltage and high battery voltage thresholds. The LED is amber
when the voltage on supply input B is between the high battery voltage and
extremely high battery voltage thresholds or between the low battery voltage
and extremely low battery voltage thresholds. The LED is red when the
voltage on supply input B is above extremely high battery voltage or below
extremely low battery voltage thresholds.
For ONS 15454 ETSI shelf, the power-level LEDs are either green or red. The LED is green when the
voltage on supply inputs is between the extremely low battery voltage and extremely high battery voltage
thresholds. The LED is red when the voltage on supply inputs is above extremely high battery voltage
or below extremely low battery voltage thresholds.
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2.3 TCC2P Card
2.3 TCC2P Card
Note
For TCC2P card specifications, see the “A.3.2 TCC2P Card Specifications” section on page A-8.
The Advanced Timing, Communications, and Control Plus (TCC2P) card is an enhanced version of the
TCC2 card. The primary enhancements are Ethernet security features and 64K composite clock BITS
timing.
The TCC2P card performs system initialization, provisioning, alarm reporting, maintenance,
diagnostics, IP address detection/resolution, SONET SOH DCC/GCC termination, and system fault
detection for the ONS 15454. The TCC2P also ensures that the system maintains Stratum 3
(Telcordia GR-253-CORE) timing requirements. It monitors the supply voltage of the system.
Note
The LAN interface of the TCC2P card meets the standard Ethernet specifications by supporting a cable
length of 328 ft (100 m) at temperatures from 32 to 149 degrees Fahrenheit (0 to 65 degrees Celsius).
The interfaces can operate with a cable length of 32.8 ft (10 m) maximum at temperatures from –40 to
32 degrees Fahrenheit (–40 to 0 degrees Celsius).
Figure 2-2 shows the faceplate and block diagram for the TCC2P card.
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2.3 TCC2P Card
Figure 2-2
TCC2P Faceplate and Block Diagram
BACKPLANE
TCC2P
-48V PWR
Monitors
Ref Clocks
(all I/O Slots)
System
Timing
BITS Input/
Output
FPGA
Real Time
Clock
FAIL
PWR
A
B
DCC
Processor
TCCA ASIC
SCL Processor
SCL Links to
All Cards
ACT/STBY
MCC1
CRIT
MAJ
MIN
Serial
Debug
MCC2
SMC1
SCC2
HDLC
Message
Bus
REM
SYNC
SCC3
ACO
ACO
400MHz
Processor
Modem
Interface
(Not Used)
Modem
Interface
Mate TCC2
HDLC Link
FCC1
LAMP
Communications
Processor
SDRAM Memory
& Compact Flash
SCC1
SCC4
Ethernet
Phy
FCC2
RS-232
TCP/IP
Faceplate
Ethernet Port
Ethernet Switch
EIA/TIA 232
Craft Interface
Faceplate
EIA/TIA 232 Port
Note: Only 1 EIA/TIA 232 Port Can Be Active Backplane Port Will Supercede Faceplate Port
Backplane
Ethernet Port
(Shared with
Mate TCC2)
Mate TCC2
Ethernet Port
Backplane
EIA/TIA 232 Port
(Shared with
Mate TCC2)
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2.3.1 TCC2P Functionality
2.3.1 TCC2P Functionality
The TCC2P card supports multichannel, high-level data link control (HDLC) processing for the DCC.
Up to 84 DCCs can be routed over the TCC2P card and up to 84 section DCCs can be terminated at the
TCC2P card (subject to the available optical digital communication channels). The TCC2P selects and
processes 84 DCCs to facilitate remote system management interfaces.
The TCC2P card also originates and terminates a cell bus carried over the module. The cell bus supports
links between any two cards in the node, which is essential for peer-to-peer communication. Peer-to-peer
communication accelerates protection switching for redundant cards.
The node database, IP address, and system software are stored in TCC2P card nonvolatile memory,
which allows quick recovery in the event of a power or card failure.
The TCC2P card performs all system-timing functions for each ONS 15454. The TCC2P card monitors
the recovered clocks from each traffic card and two BITS ports for frequency accuracy. The TCC2P card
selects a recovered clock, a BITS, or an internal Stratum 3 reference as the system-timing reference. You
can provision any of the clock inputs as primary or secondary timing sources. A slow-reference tracking
loop allows the TCC2P card to synchronize with the recovered clock, which provides holdover if the
reference is lost.
The TCC2P card supports 64/8K composite clock and 6.312 MHz timing output.
The TCC2P card monitors both supply voltage inputs on the shelf. An alarm is generated if one of the
supply voltage inputs has a voltage out of the specified range.
Install TCC2P cards in Slots 7 and 11 for redundancy. If the active TCC2P card fails, traffic switches to
the protect TCC2P card. All TCC2P card protection switches conform to protection switching standards
when the bit error rate (BER) counts are not in excess of 1 * 10 exp – 3 and completion time is less than
50 ms.
The TCC2P card has two built-in Ethernet interface ports for accessing the system: one built-in RJ-45
port on the front faceplate for on-site craft access and a second port on the backplane. The rear Ethernet
interface is for permanent LAN access and all remote access via TCP/IP as well as for Operations
Support System (OSS) access. The front and rear Ethernet interfaces can be provisioned with different
IP addresses using CTC.
Two EIA/TIA-232 serial ports, one on the faceplate and a second on the backplane, allow for craft
interface in TL1 mode.
Note
To use the serial port craft interface wire-wrap pins on the backplane, the DTR signal line on the
backplane port wire-wrap pin must be connected and active.
2.3.2 Redundant TCC2P Card Installation
Cisco does not support operation of the ONS 15454 with only one TCC2P card. For full functionality
and to safeguard your system, always operate with two TCC2P cards.
When a second TCC2P card is inserted into a node, it synchronizes its software, its backup software, and
its database with the active TCC2P card. If the software version of the new TCC2P card does not match
the version on the active TCC2P card, the newly inserted TCC2P card copies from the active TCC2P
card, taking about 15 to 20 minutes to complete. If the backup software version on the new TCC2P card
does not match the version on the active TCC2P card, the newly inserted TCC2P card copies the backup
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2.3.3 TCC2P Card-Level Indicators
software from the active TCC2P card again, taking about 15 to 20 minutes. Copying the database from
the active TCC2P card takes about 3 minutes. Depending on the software version and backup version the
new TCC2P card started with, the entire process can take between 3 and 40 minutes.
2.3.3 TCC2P Card-Level Indicators
The TCC2P faceplate has ten LEDs. Table 2-4 describes the two card-level LEDs on the TCC2P
faceplate.
Table 2-4
TCC2P Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LEDs
Definition
Red FAIL LED
This LED is on during reset. The FAIL LED flashes during the boot and
write process. Replace the card if the FAIL LED persists.
ACT/STBY LED
Indicates the TCC2P is active (green) or in standby (amber) mode. The
ACT/STBY LED also provides the timing reference and shelf control. When
the active TCC2P is writing to its database or to the standby TCC2P
database, the card LEDs blink. To avoid memory corruption, do not remove
the TCC2P when the active or standby LED is blinking.
Green (Active)
Amber (Standby)
2.3.4 Network-Level Indicators
Table 2-5 describes the six network-level LEDs on the TCC2P faceplate.
Table 2-5
TCC2P Network-Level Indicators
System-Level LEDs
Definition
Red CRIT LED
Indicates critical alarms in the network at the local terminal.
Red MAJ LED
Indicates major alarms in the network at the local terminal.
Amber MIN LED
Indicates minor alarms in the network at the local terminal.
Red REM LED
Provides first-level alarm isolation. The remote (REM) LED turns red when
an alarm is present in one or more of the remote terminals.
Green SYNC LED
Indicates that node timing is synchronized to an external reference.
Green ACO LED
After pressing the ACO button, the ACO LED turns green. The ACO button
opens the audible alarm closure on the backplane. ACO is stopped if a new
alarm occurs. After the originating alarm is cleared, the ACO LED and
audible alarm control are reset.
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2.3.5 Power-Level Indicators
2.3.5 Power-Level Indicators
Table 2-6 describes the two power-level LEDs on the TCC2P faceplate.
Table 2-6
Note
TCC2P Power-Level Indicators
Power-Level LEDs
Definition
Green/Amber/Red
PWR A LED
The PWR A LED is green when the voltage on supply input A is between the
low battery voltage (LWBATVG) and high battery voltage (HIBATVG)
thresholds. The LED is amber when the voltage on supply input A is between
the high battery voltage and extremely high battery voltage (EHIBATVG)
thresholds or between the low battery voltage and extremely low battery
voltage (ELWBATVG) thresholds. The LED is red when the voltage on
supply input A is above extremely high battery voltage or below extremely
low battery voltage thresholds.
Green/Amber/Red
PWR B LED
The PWR B LED is green when the voltage on supply input B is between the
low battery voltage and high battery voltage thresholds. The LED is amber
when the voltage on supply input B is between the high battery voltage and
extremely high battery voltage thresholds or between the low battery voltage
and extremely low battery voltage thresholds. The LED is red when the
voltage on supply input B is above extremely high battery voltage or below
extremely low battery voltage thresholds.
For ONS 15454 ETSI shelf, the power-level LEDs are either green or red. The LED is green when the
voltage on supply inputs is between the extremely low battery voltage and extremely high battery voltage
thresholds. The LED is red when the voltage on supply inputs is above extremely high battery voltage
or below extremely low battery voltage thresholds.
2.4 AIC-I Card
Note
For hardware specifications, see the “A.3.3 AIC-I Card Specifications” section on page A-9.
The optional Alarm Interface Controller–International (AIC-I) card provides customer-defined
(environmental) alarms and controls and supports local and express orderwire. It provides
12 customer-defined input and 4 customer-defined input/output contacts. The physical connections are
via the backplane wire-wrap pin terminals. If you use the additional alarm expansion panel (AEP), the
AIC-I card can support up to 32 inputs and 16 outputs, which are connected on the AEP connectors. The
AEP is compatible with ANSI shelves only. A power monitoring function monitors the supply voltage
(–48 VDC). Figure 2-3 shows the AIC-I faceplate and a block diagram of the card.
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2.4.1 AIC-I Card-Level Indicators
Figure 2-3
AIC-I Faceplate and Block Diagram
AIC-1
FAIL
Fail
PWR
A
B
AIC-I
Act
ACT
UDC-A
UDC-B
ACC
INPUT/OUTPUT
DCC-A
DCC-B
Express orderwire
ACC
(DTMF)
Ring
Local orderwire
12/16 x IN
(DTMF)
UDC-A
Ring
4x
IN/OUT
UDC-B
Ringer
DCC-A
Power
Monitoring
DCC-B
RING
Input
LOW
LED x2
AIC-I FPGA
Output
EOW
RING
EEPROM
78828
SCL links
2.4.1 AIC-I Card-Level Indicators
Table 2-7 describes the eight card-level LEDs on the AIC-I card faceplate.
Table 2-7
AIC-I Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LEDs
Description
Red FAIL LED
Indicates that the card’s processor is not ready. The FAIL LED is on during
reset and flashes during the boot process. Replace the card if the red FAIL
LED persists.
Green ACT LED
Indicates the AIC-I card is provisioned for operation.
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2.4.2 External Alarms and Controls
Table 2-7
AIC-I Card-Level Indicators (continued)
Card-Level LEDs
Description
Green/Red PWR A LED The PWR A LED is green when a supply voltage within a specified range
has been sensed on supply input A. It is red when the input voltage on supply
input A is out of range.
Green/Red PWR B LED The PWR B LED is green when a supply voltage within a specified range has
been sensed on supply input B. It is red when the input voltage on supply
input B is out of range.
Yellow INPUT LED
The INPUT LED is yellow when there is an alarm condition on at least one
of the alarm inputs.
Yellow OUTPUT LED
The OUTPUT LED is yellow when there is an alarm condition on at least one
of the alarm outputs.
Green RING LED
The RING LED on the local orderwire (LOW) side is flashing green when a
call is received on the LOW.
Green RING LED
The RING LED on the express orderwire (EOW) side is flashing green when
a call is received on the EOW.
2.4.2 External Alarms and Controls
The AIC-I card provides input/output alarm contact closures. You can define up to 12 external alarm
inputs and 4 external alarm inputs/outputs (user configurable). The physical connections are made using
the backplane wire-wrap pins or FMEC connections. See the “1.9 ONS 15454 ANSI Alarm Expansion
Panel” section on page 1-32 for information about increasing the number of input/output contacts.
LEDs on the front panel of the AIC-I indicate the status of the alarm lines, one LED representing all of
the inputs and one LED representing all of the outputs. External alarms (input contacts) are typically
used for external sensors such as open doors, temperature sensors, flood sensors, and other
environmental conditions. External controls (output contacts) are typically used to drive visual or
audible devices such as bells and lights, but they can control other devices such as generators, heaters,
and fans.
You can program each of the twelve input alarm contacts separately. You can program each of the sixteen
input alarm contacts separately. Choices include:
•
Alarm on Closure or Alarm on Open
•
Alarm severity of any level (Critical, Major, Minor, Not Alarmed, Not Reported)
•
Service Affecting or Non-Service Affecting alarm-service level
•
63-character alarm description for CTC display in the alarm log
You cannot assign the fan-tray abbreviation for the alarm; the abbreviation reflects the generic name of
the input contacts. The alarm condition remains raised until the external input stops driving the contact
or you provision the alarm input.
The output contacts can be provisioned to close on a trigger or to close manually. The trigger can be a
local alarm severity threshold, a remote alarm severity, or a virtual wire:
•
Local NE alarm severity: A hierarchy of Not Reported, Not Alarmed, Minor, Major, or Critical
alarm severities that you set to cause output closure. For example, if the trigger is set to Minor, a
Minor alarm or above is the trigger.
•
Remote NE alarm severity: Same as the local NE alarm severity but applies to remote alarms only.
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2.4.3 Orderwire
•
Virtual wire entities: You can provision any environmental alarm input to raise a signal on any
virtual wire on external outputs 1 through 4 when the alarm input is an event. You can provision a
signal on any virtual wire as a trigger for an external control output.
You can also program the output alarm contacts (external controls) separately. In addition to
provisionable triggers, you can manually force each external output contact to open or close. Manual
operation takes precedence over any provisioned triggers that might be present.
Note
For ANSI shelves, the number of inputs and outputs can be increased using the AEP. The AEP is
connected to the shelf backplane and requires an external wire-wrap panel.
2.4.3 Orderwire
Orderwire allows a craftsperson to plug a phoneset into an ONS 15454 and communicate with
craftspeople working at other ONS 15454s or other facility equipment. The orderwire is a pulse code
modulation (PCM) encoded voice channel that uses E1 or E2 bytes in section/line overhead.
The AIC-I allows simultaneous use of both local (section overhead signal) and express (line overhead
channel) orderwire channels on a SONET/SDH ring or particular optics facility. Express orderwire also
allows communication via regeneration sites when the regenerator is not a Cisco device.
You can provision orderwire functions with CTC similar to the current provisioning model for
DCC/GCC channels. In CTC, you provision the orderwire communications network during ring turn-up
so that all NEs on the ring can reach one another. Orderwire terminations (that is, the optics facilities
that receive and process the orderwire channels) are provisionable. Both express and local orderwire can
be configured as on or off on a particular SONET/SDH facility. The ONS 15454 supports up to four
orderwire channel terminations per shelf. This allows linear, single ring, dual ring, and small
hub-and-spoke configurations. Orderwire is not protected in ring topologies such as bidirectional line
switched ring (BLSR), multiplex section-shared protection ring (MS-SPRing), path protection, or
subnetwork connection protection (SNCP) ring.
Caution
Do not configure orderwire loops. Orderwire loops cause feedback that disables the orderwire channel.
The ONS 15454 implementation of both local and express orderwire is broadcast in nature. The line acts
as a party line. Anyone who picks up the orderwire channel can communicate with all other participants
on the connected orderwire subnetwork. The local orderwire party line is separate from the express
orderwire party line. Up to four OC-N/STM-N facilities for each local and express orderwire are
provisionable as orderwire paths.
The AIC-I supports selective dual tone multifrequency (DTMF) dialing for telephony connectivity,
which causes one AIC-I card or all ONS 15454 AIC-I cards on the orderwire subnetwork to “ring.” The
ringer/buzzer resides on the AIC-I. There is also a “ring” LED that mimics the AIC-I ringer. It flashes
when a call is received on the orderwire subnetwork. A party line call is initiated by pressing *0000 on
the DTMF pad. Individual dialing is initiated by pressing * and the individual four-digit number on the
DTMF pad.
Table 2-8 shows the pins on the orderwire connector that correspond to the tip and ring orderwire
assignments.
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2.4.4 Power Monitoring
Table 2-8
Orderwire Pin Assignments
RJ-11 Pin Number
Description
1
Four-wire receive ring
2
Four-wire transmit tip
3
Two-wire ring
4
Two-wire tip
5
Four-wire transmit ring
6
Four-wire receive tip
When provisioning the orderwire subnetwork, make sure that an orderwire loop does not exist. Loops
cause oscillation and an unusable orderwire channel.
Figure 2-4 shows the standard RJ-11 connectors used for orderwire ports.
Figure 2-4
RJ-11 Connector
61077
RJ-11
Pin 1
Pin 6
2.4.4 Power Monitoring
The AIC-I card provides a power monitoring circuit that monitors the supply voltage of –48 VDC for
presence, undervoltage, and overvoltage.
2.4.5 User Data Channel
The user data channel (UDC) features a dedicated data channel of 64 kbps (F1 byte) between two nodes
in an ONS 15454 network. Each AIC-I card provides two user data channels, UDC-A and UDC-B,
through separate RJ-11 connectors on the front of the AIC-I card. Each UDC can be routed to an
individual optical interface in the ONS 15454. For instructions, see the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Procedure Guide.
The UDC ports are standard RJ-11 receptacles. Table 2-9 lists the UDC pin assignments.
Table 2-9
UDC Pin Assignments
RJ-11 Pin Number
Description
1
For future use
2
TXN
3
RXN
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2.4.6 Data Communications Channel
Table 2-9
UDC Pin Assignments (continued)
RJ-11 Pin Number
Description
4
RXP
5
TXP
6
For future use
2.4.6 Data Communications Channel
The DCC features a dedicated data channel of 576 kbps (D4 to D12 bytes) between two nodes in an
ONS 15454 network. Each AIC-I card provides two data communications channels, DCC-A and
DCC-B, through separate RJ-45 connectors on the front of the AIC-I card. Each DCC can be routed to
an individual optical interface in the ONS 15454. For instructions, see the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Procedure Guide.
The DCC ports are synchronous serial interfaces. The DCC ports are standard RJ-45 receptacles.
Table 2-10 lists the DCC pin assignments.
Table 2-10
DCC Pin Assignments
RJ-45 Pin Number
Description
1
TCLKP
2
TCLKN
3
TXP
4
TXN
5
RCLKP
6
RCLKN
7
RXP
8
RXN
2.5 MS-ISC-100T Card
Note
For hardware specifications, see the “A.3.7 MS-ISC-100T Card Specifications” section on page A-12.
The Multishelf Internal Switch Card (MS-ISC-100T) is an Ethernet switch used to implement the
multishelf LAN. It connects the node controller shelf to the network and to subtending shelves. The
MS-ISC-100T must always be equipped on the node controller shelf; it cannot be provisioned on a
subtending controller shelf.
The recommended configuration is to implement LAN redundancy using two MS-ISC-100T cards: one
switch is connected to the Ethernet front panel port of the TCC2/TCC2P card in Slot 7, and the other
switch is connected to the Ethernet front panel port of the TCC2/TCC2P card in Slot 11. The Ethernet
configuration of the MS-ISC-100T card is part of the software package and is automatically loaded. The
MS-ISC-100T card operates in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17 on the node controller shelf; the recommended
slots are Slot 6 and Slot 12.
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2.5 MS-ISC-100T Card
Table 2-11 lists the MS-ISC-100T port assignments.
Table 2-11
MS-ISC-100T Card Port Assignments
Port
Description
DCN 1and DCN 2
Connection to the network
SSC1 to SSC7
Connection to subtending shelves
NC
Connection to TCC2/TCC2P using a cross-over cable
PRT
Connection to the PRT port of the redundant MS-ISC-100T
Figure 2-5 shows the card faceplate.
Caution
Shielded twisted-pair cabling should be used for interbuilding applications.
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2.5.1 MS-ISC-100T Card-Level Indicators
Figure 2-5
MS-ISC-100T Faceplate
MS ISC
100T
FAIL
PRT
NC
SSC7
SSC6
SSC5
SSC4
SSC3
SSC2
SSC1
DC2
DCN1
ACT
145274
CONSOLE
2.5.1 MS-ISC-100T Card-Level Indicators
The MS-ISC-100T card supports two card-level LED indicators. The card-level indicators are described
in Table 2-12.
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2.6 Front Mount Electrical Connections
Table 2-12
MS-ISC-100T Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LEDs
Description
FAIL LED (Red)
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card processor is not ready or that a
catastrophic software failure occurred on the card. As part of the boot
sequence, the FAIL LED is turned on until the software deems the card
operational.
ACT LED (Green)
The green ACT LED provides the operational status of the card. If the ACT
LED is green, it indicates that the card is active and the software is
operational.
2.6 Front Mount Electrical Connections
This section describes the MIC-A/P and MIC-C/T/P FMECs, which provide power, external alarm, and
timing connections for the ONS 15454 ETSI shelf.
2.6.1 MIC-A/P FMEC
Note
For hardware specifications, see the “A.3.5 MIC-A/P FMEC Specifications (ETSI only)” section on
page A-11.
The MIC-A/P FMEC provides connection for the BATTERY B input, one of the two possible redundant
power supply inputs. It also provides connection for eight alarm outputs (coming from the TCC2/TCC2P
card), sixteen alarm inputs, and four configurable alarm inputs/outputs. Its position is in Slot 23 in the
center of the subrack Electrical Facility Connection Assembly (EFCA) area.
The MIC-A/P FMEC has the following features:
•
Connection for one of the two possible redundant power supply inputs
•
Connection for eight alarm outputs (coming from the TCC2/TCC2P card)
•
Connection for four configurable alarm inputs/outputs
•
Connection for sixteen alarm inputs
•
Storage of manufacturing and inventory data
For proper system operation, both the MIC-A/P and MIC-C/T/P FMECs must be installed in the
ONS 15454 ETSI shelf. Figure 2-6 shows the MIC-A/P faceplate.
271305
BATTERY B
BARCODE
GND
CLEI CODE
ALARM
IN/OUT
CAUTION
MIC-A/P Faceplate
TIGHTEN THE FACEPLATE
SCREWS WITH 1.0 NM TORQUE
MIC-A/P
Figure 2-6
POWER RATING
Figure 2-7 shows a block diagram of the MIC-A/P.
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2.6.1 MIC-A/P FMEC
MIC-A/P Block Diagram
3W3
Connector
Power
16 Alarm inputs
Alarms
DB62
Connector
4 Alarm in/outputs
Inventory Data
(EEPROM)
B
a
c
k
p
l
a
n
e
61332
Figure 2-7
Table 2-13 shows the alarm interface pinouts on the MIC-A/P DB-62 connector.
Table 2-13
Alarm Interface Pinouts on the MIC-A/P DB-62 Connector
Pin No.
Signal Name
Signal Description
1
ALMCUTOFF N
Alarm cutoff, normally open ACO pair
2
ALMCUTOFF P
Alarm cutoff, normally open ACO pair
3
ALMINP0 N
Alarm input pair 1, reports closure on connected wires
4
ALMINP0 P
Alarm input pair 1, reports closure on connected wires
5
ALMINP1 N
Alarm input pair 2, reports closure on connected wires
6
ALMINP1 P
Alarm input pair 2, reports closure on connected wires
7
ALMINP2 N
Alarm input pair 3, reports closure on connected wires
8
ALMINP2 P
Alarm input pair 3, reports closure on connected wires
9
ALMINP3 N
Alarm input pair 4, reports closure on connected wires
10
ALMINP3 P
Alarm input pair 4, reports closure on connected wires
11
EXALM0 N
External customer alarm 1
12
EXALM0 P
External customer alarm 1
13
GND
Ground
14
EXALM1 N
External customer alarm 2
15
EXALM1 P
External customer alarm 2
16
EXALM2 N
External customer alarm 3
17
EXALM2 P
External customer alarm 3
18
EXALM3 N
External customer alarm 4
19
EXALM3 P
External customer alarm 4
20
EXALM4 N
External customer alarm 5
21
EXALM4 P
External customer alarm 5
22
EXALM5 N
External customer alarm 6
23
EXALM5 P
External customer alarm 6
24
EXALM6 N
External customer alarm 7
25
EXALM6 P
External customer alarm 7
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2.6.1 MIC-A/P FMEC
Table 2-13
Alarm Interface Pinouts on the MIC-A/P DB-62 Connector (continued)
Pin No.
Signal Name
Signal Description
26
GND
Ground
27
EXALM7 N
External customer alarm 8
28
EXALM7 P
External customer alarm 8
29
EXALM8 N
External customer alarm 9
30
EXALM8 P
External customer alarm 9
31
EXALM9 N
External customer alarm 10
32
EXALM9 P
External customer alarm 10
33
EXALM10 N
External customer alarm 11
34
EXALM10 P
External customer alarm 11
35
EXALM11 N
External customer alarm 12
36
EXALM11 P
External customer alarm 12
37
ALMOUP0 N
Normally open output pair 1
38
ALMOUP0 P
Normally open output pair 1
39
GND
Ground
40
ALMOUP1 N
Normally open output pair 2
41
ALMOUP1 P
Normally open output pair 2
42
ALMOUP2 N
Normally open output pair 3
43
ALMOUP2 P
Normally open output pair 3
44
ALMOUP3 N
Normally open output pair 4
45
ALMOUP3 P
Normally open output pair 4
46
AUDALM0 N
Normally open Minor audible alarm
47
AUDALM0 P
Normally open Minor audible alarm
48
AUDALM1 N
Normally open Major audible alarm
49
AUDALM1 P
Normally open Major audible alarm
50
AUDALM2 N
Normally open Critical audible alarm
51
AUDALM2 P
Normally open Critical audible alarm
52
GND
Ground
53
AUDALM3 N
Normally open Remote audible alarm
54
AUDALM3 P
Normally open Remote audible alarm
55
VISALM0 N
Normally open Minor visual alarm
56
VISALM0 P
Normally open Minor visual alarm
57
VISALM1 N
Normally open Major visual alarm
58
VISALM1 P
Normally open Major visual alarm
59
VISALM2 N
Normally open Critical visual alarm
60
VISALM2 P
Normally open Critical visual alarm
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Common Control Cards
2.6.2 MIC-C/T/P FMEC
Table 2-13
Alarm Interface Pinouts on the MIC-A/P DB-62 Connector (continued)
Pin No.
Signal Name
Signal Description
61
VISALM3 N
Normally open Remote visual alarm
62
VISALM3 P
Normally open Remote visual alarm
2.6.2 MIC-C/T/P FMEC
Note
For hardware specifications, see the “A.3.6 MIC-C/T/P FMEC Specifications (ETSI only)” section on
page A-12.
The MIC-C/T/P FMEC provides connection for the BATTERY A input, one of the two possible
redundant power supply inputs. It also provides connection for system management serial port, system
management LAN port, modem port (for future use), and system timing inputs and outputs. Install the
MIC-C/T/P in Slot 24.
The MIC-C/T/P FMEC has the following features:
•
Connection for one of the two possible redundant power supply inputs
•
Connection for two serial ports for local craft/modem (for future use)
•
Connection for one LAN port
•
Connection for two system timing inputs
•
Connection for two system timing outputs
•
Storage of manufacturing and inventory data
For proper system operation, both the MIC-A/P and MIC-C/T/P FMECs must be installed in the shelf.
Figure 2-8 shows the MIC-C/T/P FMEC faceplate.
271306
BATTERY A
GND
TIGHTEN THE FACEPLATE
SCREWS WITH 1.0 NM TORQUE
ACT
LINK
LAN
CAUTION
BARCODE
TERM
CLEI CODE
AUX
TIMING B OUT
MIC-C/T/P Faceplate
IN
TIMING A
MIC-C/T/P
Figure 2-8
POWER RATING
Figure 2-9 shows a block diagram of the MIC-C/T/P.
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Common Control Cards
2.6.2 MIC-C/T/P FMEC
MIC-C/T/P Block Diagram
3W3
connector
Power
RJ-45
connectors
System management serial ports
System management LAN
RJ-45
connectors
4 coaxial
connectors
Inventory Data
(EEPROM)
Timing 2 x in / 2 x out
B
a
c
k
p
l
a
n
e
61334
Figure 2-9
The MIC-C/T/P FMEC has one pair of LEDs located on the RJ45 LAN connector. The green LED is on
when a link is present, and the amber LED is on when data is being transferred.
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3
Optical Service Channel Cards
This chapter describes the optical service channel (OSC) cards for Cisco ONS 15454 dense wavelength
division multiplexing (DWDM) networks. For installation and card turn-up procedures, refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. For card safety and compliance information, refer to the
Cisco Optical Transport Products Safety and Compliance Information document.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Chapter topics include:
•
3.1 Card Overview, page 3-1
•
3.2 Class 1 Laser Safety Labels, page 3-2
•
3.3 OSCM Card, page 3-5
•
3.4 OSC-CSM Card, page 3-8
3.1 Card Overview
This section provides card summary and compatibility information.
Note
Each card is marked with a symbol that corresponds to a slot (or slots) on the ONS 15454 shelf assembly.
The cards are then installed into slots displaying the same symbols. See the “1.16.1 Card Slot
Requirements” section on page 1-61 for a list of slots and symbols.
An optical service channel (OSC) is a bidirectional channel connecting two adjacent nodes in a DWDM
ring. For every DWDM node (except terminal nodes), two different OSC terminations are present, one
for the west side and another for the east side. The channel transports OSC overhead that is used to
manage ONS 15454 DWDM networks. An OSC signal uses the 1510-nm wavelength and does not affect
client traffic. The primary purpose of this channel is to carry clock synchronization and orderwire
channel communications for the DWDM network. It also provides transparent links between each node
in the network. The OSC is an OC-3/STM-1 formatted signal.
There are two versions of the OSC modules: the OSCM, and the OSC-CSM, which contains the OSC
wavelength combiner and separator component in addition to the OSC module.
The Mesh/Multiring Upgrade (MMU) card is used to optically bypass a given wavelength from one
section of the network or ring to another one without requiring 3R regeneration.
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3.1.1 Card Summary
3.1.1 Card Summary
Table 3-1 lists and summarizes the functions of each card.
Table 3-1
OSCM, OSC-CSM, and MMU Card Summary
Card
Port Description
For Additional Information
OSCM
The OSCM has one set of optical ports and See the “3.3 OSCM Card”
one Ethernet port located on the faceplate. It section on page 3-5.
operates in Slots 8 and 10.
OSC-CSM
The OSC-CSM has three sets of optical
ports and one Ethernet port located on the
faceplate. It operates in Slots 1 to 6 and 12
to 17.
See the “3.4 OSC-CSM Card”
section on page 3-8.
3.1.2 Card Compatibility
Table 3-2 lists the CTC software compatibility for the OSC and OSCM cards.
Table 3-2
Software Release Compatibility for Optical Service Channel Cards
Card Name
R4.5
R4.6
R4.7
R5.0
R6.0
R7.0
R7.2
R8.0
R8.5
R9.0
OSCM
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
OSC-CSM
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
3.2 Class 1 Laser Safety Labels
This section explains the significance of the safety labels attached to the OSCM and OSC-CSM cards.
The faceplates of the cards are clearly labeled with warnings about the laser radiation levels. You must
understand all warning labels before working on these cards.
3.2.1 Class 1 Laser Product Label
The Class 1 Laser Product label is shown in Figure 3-1.
Class 1 Laser Product Label
CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT
145952
Figure 3-1
Class 1 lasers are products whose irradiance does not exceed the Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE)
value. Therefore, for Class 1 laser products the output power is below the level at which it is believed
eye damage will occur. Exposure to the beam of a Class 1 laser will not result in eye injury and may
therefore be considered safe. However, some Class 1 laser products may contain laser systems of a higher
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3.2.2 Hazard Level 1 Label
Class but there are adequate engineering control measures to ensure that access to the beam is not
reasonably likely. Anyone who dismantles a Class 1 laser product that contains a higher Class laser
system is potentially at risk of exposure to a hazardous laser beam
3.2.2 Hazard Level 1 Label
The Hazard Level 1 label is shown in Figure 3-2. This label is displayed on the faceplate of the cards.
Figure 3-2
Hazard Level Label
65542
HAZARD
LEVEL 1
The Hazard Level label warns users against exposure to laser radiation of Class 1 limits calculated in
accordance with IEC60825-1 Ed.1.2.
3.2.3 Laser Source Connector Label
The Laser Source Connector label is shown in Figure 3-3.
Laser Source Connector Label
96635
Figure 3-3
This label indicates that a laser source is present at the optical connector where the label has been placed.
3.2.4 FDA Statement Label
The FDA Statement labels are shown in Figure 3-4 and Figure 3-5. These labels show compliance to
FDA standards and that the hazard level classification is in accordance with IEC60825-1 Am.2 or Ed.1.2.
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3.2.5 Shock Hazard Label
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JULY 26, 2001
Figure 3-5
96634
FDA Statement Label
FDA Statement Label
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JUNE 24, 2007
282324
Figure 3-4
3.2.5 Shock Hazard Label
The Shock Hazard label is shown in Figure 3-6.
Shock Hazard Label
65541
Figure 3-6
This label alerts personnel to electrical hazard within the card. The potential of shock hazard exists when
removing adjacent cards during maintenance, and touching exposed electrical circuitry on the card itself.
This section describes the optical service channel cards. An optical service channel (OSC) is a
bidirectional channel connecting two adjacent nodes in a DWDM ring. For every DWDM node (except
terminal nodes), two different OSC terminations are present, one for the west side and another for the
east side. The channel transports OSC overhead that is used to manage ONS 15454 DWDM networks.
An OSC signal uses the 1510-nm wavelength and does not affect client traffic. The primary purpose of
this channel is to carry clock synchronization and orderwire channel communications for the DWDM
network. It also provides transparent links between each node in the network. The OSC is an
OC-3/STM-1 formatted signal.
There are two versions of the OSC modules: the OSCM, and the OSC-CSM, which contains the OSC
wavelength combiner and separator component in addition to the OSC module.
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3.3 OSCM Card
3.3 OSCM Card
Note
For OSCM card specifications, see the “A.4.1 OSCM Card Specifications” section on page A-13.
The OSCM card is used in amplified nodes that include the OPT-BST, OPT-BST-E, or OPT-BST-L
booster amplifier. The OPT-BST, OPT-BST-E, and OPT-BST-L cards include the required OSC
wavelength combiner and separator component. The OSCM cannot be used in nodes where you use
OC-N/STM-N cards, electrical cards, or cross-connect cards. The OSCM uses Slots 8 and 10, which are
also cross-connect card slots.
The OSCM supports the following features:
•
OC-3/STM-1 formatted OSC
•
Supervisory data channel (SDC) forwarded to the TCC2/TCC2P cards for processing
•
Distribution of the synchronous clock to all nodes in the ring
•
100BaseT far-end (FE) User Channel (UC)
•
Monitoring functions such as orderwire support and optical safety
The OC-3/STM-1 section data communications channel (SDCC or RS-DCC) overhead bytes are used
for network communications. An optical transceiver terminates the OC-3/STM-1, then it is regenerated
and converted into an electrical signal. The SDCC or RS-DCC bytes are forwarded to the active and
standby TCC2/TCC2P cards for processing through the system communication link (SCL) bus on the
backplane. Orderwire bytes (E1, E2, F1) are also forwarded via the SCL bus to the TCC2/TCC2P for
forwarding to the AIC-I card.
The payload portion of the OC-3/STM-1 is used to carry the fast Ethernet UC. The frame is sent to a
packet-over-SONET/SDH (POS) processing block that extracts the Ethernet packets and makes them
available at the RJ-45 connector.
The OSCM distributes the reference clock information by removing it from the incoming OC-3/STM-1
signal and then sending it to the DWDM cards. The DWDM cards then forward the clock information to
the active and standby TCC2/TCC2P cards.
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3.3 OSCM Card
Figure 3-7 shows the OSCM card faceplate and block diagram.
Figure 3-7
OSCM Card Faceplate
OSCM
FAIL
ACT
OSC
Line
UC
SF
OC-3
VOA
OC-12
OC3-ULR
Optical
transceiver
ASIC
OC-3
FPGA
POS
MII
Processor
Physical
Interface
FE
FE User
Channel
TX
DC/DC
TOH &
Cell Bus
6
MT CLKt MT CLKt
0 Slot
0 Slot
1-6
12-17
BAT A&B
96464
M P
SCL Bus
to TCCs
6
Power supply
Input filters
145944
RX
19.44 MHz
Line Ref clock
For information on safety labels for the card, see the “3.2 Class 1 Laser Safety Labels” section on
page 3-2.
Figure 3-8 shows the block diagram of the variable optical attenuator (VOA) within the OSCM.
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3.3.1 Power Monitoring
Figure 3-8
OSCM VOA Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
P1
OSC RX
OSC TX
Control
Interface
Control
Module
124968
P1 Physical photodiode
OSC Variable optical attenuator
3.3.1 Power Monitoring
Physical photodiode P1 monitors the power for the OSCM card. The returned power level value is
calibrated to the OSC TX port (Table 3-3).
Table 3-3
OSCM VOA Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1
Output OSC
OSC TX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
3.3.2 OSCM Card-Level Indicators
The OSCM card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 3-4.
Table 3-4
OSCM Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that
there is an internal hardware failure. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
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3.3.3 OSCM Port-Level Indicators
Table 3-4
OSCM Card-Level Indicators (continued)
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the OSCM is carrying traffic or is
traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as loss of
signal (LOS), loss of frame alignment (LOF), line alarm indication signal
(AIS-L), or high BER on one or more of the card’s ports. The amber signal
fail (SF) LED also illuminates when the transmit and receive fibers are
incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the light
turns off.
3.3.3 OSCM Port-Level Indicators
You can find the status of the card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray assembly. Use
the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and severity of alarms
for a given port or slot. The OSCM has one OC-3/STM-1 optical port located on the faceplate. One
long-reach OSC transmits and receives the OSC to and from another DWDM node. Both DCN data and
FE payload are carried on this link.
3.4 OSC-CSM Card
Note
For OSC-CSM card specifications, see the “A.4.2 OSC-CSM Card Specifications” section on
page A-13.
The OSC-CSM card is used in unamplified nodes. This means that the booster amplifier with the OSC
wavelength combiner and separator is not required for OSC-CSM operation. The OSC-CSM can be
installed in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17. To operate in hybrid mode, the OSC-CSM cards must be
accompanied by cross-connect cards. The cross-connect cards enable functionality on the OC-N/STM-N
cards and electrical cards.
The OSC-CSM supports the following features:
•
Optical combiner and separator module for multiplexing and demultiplexing the optical service
channel to or from the wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) signal
•
OC-3/STM-1 formatted OSC
•
SDC forwarded to the TCC2/TCC2P cards for processing
•
Distribution of the synchronous clock to all nodes in the ring
•
100BaseT FE UC
•
Monitoring functions such as orderwire support
•
Optical safety: Signal loss detection and alarming, fast transmitted power shut down by means of an
optical 1x1 switch
•
Optical safety remote interlock (OSRI), a feature capable of shutting down the optical output power
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3.4 OSC-CSM Card
•
Automatic laser shutdown (ALS), a safety mechanism used in the event of a fiber cut. For details on
ALS provisioning for the card, see the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. For information
on using the card to implement ALS in a network, see the “11.9 Network Optical Safety” section
on page 11-19.
The WDM signal coming from the line is passed through the OSC combiner and separator, where the
OSC signal is extracted from the WDM signal. The WDM signal is sent along with the remaining
channels to the COM port (label on the front panel) for routing to the OADM or amplifier units, while
the OSC signal is sent to an optical transceiver.
The OSC is an OC-3/STM-1 formatted signal. The OC-3/STM-1 SDCC or RS-DCC overhead bytes are
used for network communications. An optical transceiver terminates the OC-3/STM-1, and then it is
regenerated and converted into an electrical signal. The SDCC or RS-DCC bytes are forwarded to the
active and standby TCC2/TCC2P cards for processing via the SCL bus on the backplane. Orderwire
bytes (E1, E2, F1) are also forwarded via the SCL bus to the TCC2/TCC2P for forwarding to the AIC-I
card.
The payload portion of the OC-3/STM-1 is used to carry the fast Ethernet UC. The frame is sent to a
POS processing block that extracts the Ethernet packets and makes them available at the RJ-45 front
panel connector.
The OSC-CSM distributes the reference clock information by removing it from the incoming
OC-3/STM-1 signal and then sending it to the active and standby TCC2/TCC2P cards. The clock
distribution is different from the OSCM card because the OSC-CSM does not use Slot 8 or 10
(cross-connect card slots).
Note
S1 and S2 (Figure 3-11 on page 3-12) are optical splitters with a splitter ratio of 2:98. The result is that
the power at the MON TX port is about 17 dB lower than the relevant power at the COM RX port, and
the power at the MON RX port is about 20 dB lower than the power at the COM TX port. The difference
is due to the presence of a tap coupler for the P1 photodiode.
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3.4 OSC-CSM Card
Figure 3-9 shows the OSC-CSM faceplate.
Figure 3-9
OSC-CSM Faceplate
OSC
CSM
FAIL
ACT
SF
Line
OSC
combiner
separator
UC
OC-12
OC-3
OC3-ULR
Optical
transceiver
ASIC
OC-3
FPGA
POS
MII
OSC
COM
RX
TX
TX
Physical
Interface
FE User
Channel
TX
DC/DC
Power supply
Input filters
LINE
RX
COM
MON
RX
Processor
BAT A&B
96465
MPMP
SCL Bus RxClkRef
to TCCs
145943
TOH &
Cell Bus
For information on safety labels for the card, see the “3.2 Class 1 Laser Safety Labels” section on
page 3-2.
Figure 3-10 shows a block diagram of the OSC-CSM card.
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3.4 OSC-CSM Card
Figure 3-10
OSC-CSM Block Diagram
Line
OC-3
OSC
combiner
separator
OC3-ULR
Optical
transceiver
OC-12
ASIC
OC-3
FPGA
POS
MII
OSC
COM
DC/DC
Power supply
Input filters
96477
TOH &
Cell Bus
MPMP
SCL Bus RxClkRef
to TCCs
FE User
Data
Channel
Physical
Interface
Processor
BAT A&B
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3.4.1 Power Monitoring
Figure 3-11 shows the OSC-CSM optical module functional block diagram.
Figure 3-11
OSC-CSM Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
MON RX
DROP
section
P
P1
PV1
V
COM TX
S1
LINE RX
OSC RX
Filter
Control
Interface
P P2
Control
HW Switch
Control
P5
P
OSC TX
PV2
V
LINE TX
COM RX
P
P4
Opt. Switch
P
P3
124897
Filter
ADD
section
V
Virtual photodiode
P
Physical photodiode
S2
MON TX
Variable optical attenuator
Optical splitter
3.4.1 Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1, P2, P3, and P5 monitor the power for the OSC-CSM card. Their function is as
follows:
•
P1 and P2: The returned power value is calibrated to the LINE RX port, including the insertion loss
of the previous filter (the reading of this power dynamic range has been brought backward towards
the LINE RX output).
•
P3: The returned value is calibrated to the COM RX port.
•
P5: The returned value is calibrated to the LINE TX port, including the insertion loss of the
subsequent filter.
The returned power level values are calibrated to the ports as shown in Table 3-5.
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3.4.2 OSC-CSM Card-Level Indicators
Table 3-5
OSC-CSM Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1
Out Com
LINE RX
P2
Input OSC
LINE RX
P3
In Com
COM RX
P5
Output Osc
LINE TX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
3.4.2 OSC-CSM Card-Level Indicators
The OSC-CSM card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 3-6.
Table 3-6
OSC-CSM Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that
there is an internal hardware failure. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the OSC-CSM is carrying traffic or is
traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS, LOF,
AIS-L, or high BER on one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED
also illuminates when the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly
connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the light turns off.
3.4.3 OSC-CSM Port-Level Indicators
You can find the status of the card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray assembly. Use
the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and severity of alarms
for a given port or slot. The OSC-CSM has a OC3 port and three other sets of ports located on the
faceplate.
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3.4.3 OSC-CSM Port-Level Indicators
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4
Optical Amplifier Cards
This chapter describes the optical amplifier cards used in Cisco ONS 15454 dense wavelength division
multiplexing (DWDM) networks. For installation and card turn-up procedures, refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. For card safety and compliance information, refer to the
Cisco Optical Transport Products Safety and Compliance Information document.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Chapter topics include:
•
4.1 Card Overview, page 4-1
•
4.2 Class 1M Laser Safety Labels, page 4-4
•
4.3 OPT-PRE Amplifier Card, page 4-6
•
4.4 OPT-BST Amplifier Card, page 4-10
•
4.5 OPT-BST-E Amplifier Card, page 4-14
•
4.6 OPT-BST-L Amplifier Card, page 4-18
•
4.7 OPT-AMP-L Card, page 4-22
•
4.8 OPT-AMP-17-C Card, page 4-27
•
4.9 OPT-AMP-C Card, page 4-31
•
4.10 OPT-RAMP-C Card, page 4-35
4.1 Card Overview
This section provides summary and compatibility information for the optical amplifier cards.
Note
Each card is marked with a symbol that corresponds to a slot (or slots) on the ONS 15454 shelf assembly.
Cards should be installed in slots that have the same symbols. See the “1.16.1 Card Slot Requirements”
section on page 1-61 for a list of slots and symbols.
Optical amplifiers are used in amplified nodes (such as hub nodes), amplified OADM nodes, and line
amplifier nodes. The seven types of ONS 15454 DWDM amplifiers are:
•
Optical Preamplifier (OPT-PRE)
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4.1.1 Applications
Note
•
Optical Booster amplifier (OPT-BST)
•
Optical Booster Enhanced amplifier (OPT-BST-E)
•
Optical Booster L-Band amplifier (OPT-BST-L)
•
Optical L-Band preamplifier (OPT-AMP-L)
•
Optical C-Band amplifier (OPT-AMP-17-C).
•
Optical C-band high-gain high-power amplifier (OPT-AMP-C)
•
Optical C-band long-haul span loss reduction (in unregenerated sections) amplifier (OPT-RAMP-C)
The OPT-AMP-L preamplifier, OPT-AMP-C, and OPT-AMP-17-C amplifiers are software-configurable
as a preamplifier or as a booster amplifier.
Optical amplifier card architecture includes an optical plug-in module with a controller that manages
optical power, laser current, and temperature control loops. An amplifier also manages communication
with the TCC2/TCC2P card and operation, administration, maintenance, and provisioning (OAM&P)
functions such as provisioning, controls, and alarms.
4.1.1 Applications
Using CTC (CTC > Card > Provisioning), the following amplifiers can be configured as booster or
preamplifiers:
•
OPT-AMP-C
•
OPT-AMP-17C
•
OPT-AMP-L
•
OPT-BST-E
•
OPT-BST
The amplifier functions as a booster amplifier when equipped in slots 1, 3, 5, 13, 15, 17 and as a
preamplifiers when equipped in Slots 2, 4, 6, 12, 14, 16. If the node is installed using the CTP NE update
configuration file, the amplifier role is automatically implemented by CTP and hence, no manual
configuration is necessary.
Note
The OPT-BST and OPT-BST-E amplifiers are supported as preamplifiers in sites that are equipped with
the OPT-RAMP-C card. In any other configuration, the OPT-BST and OPT-BST-E cards must be
configured as a booster amplifier.
For more information about the supported configurations and network topologies, see Chapter 10, “Node
Reference” and Chapter 11, “Network Reference.”
4.1.2 Card Summary
Table 4-1 lists and summarizes the functions of each optical amplifier card.
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4.1.3 Card Compatibility
Table 4-1
Optical Amplifier Cards for the ONS 15454
Card
Port Description
For Additional Information
OPT-PRE
The OPT-PRE amplifier has five optical
See the “4.3 OPT-PRE
ports (three sets) located on the faceplate. It Amplifier Card” section on
operates in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
page 4-6.
OPT-BST
The OPT-BST amplifier has four sets of
optical ports located on the faceplate. It
operates in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
See the “4.4 OPT-BST
Amplifier Card” section on
page 4-10.
OPT-BST-E
The OPT-BST-E amplifier has four sets of
optical ports located on the faceplate. It
operates in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
See the “4.5 OPT-BST-E
Amplifier Card” section on
page 4-14.
OPT-BST-L
The OPT-BST-L L-band amplifier has four See the “4.6 OPT-BST-L
sets of optical ports located on the faceplate. Amplifier Card” section on
It operates in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
page 4-18.
OPT-AMP-L
The OPT-AMP-L L-band preamplifier have See the “4.7 OPT-AMP-L Card”
section on page 4-22.
five sets of optical ports located on the
faceplate. It is a two-slot card that operates
in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
OPT-AMP-17-C
See the “4.8 OPT-AMP-17-C
The OPT-AMP-17-C C-band low-gain
preamplifier/booster amplifier has four sets Card” section on page 4-27.
of optical ports located on the faceplate. It
operates in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
OPT-AMP-C
See the “4.9 OPT-AMP-C Card”
The OPT-AMP-C C-band high-gain,
high-power preamplifier/booster amplifier section on page 4-31.
has five sets of optical ports located on the
faceplate. It operates as a preamplifier when
equipped and provisioned in Slots 2 to 6 and
11 to 16 or as a booster amplifier when
equipped and provisioned in Slot 1 and 17.
OPT-RAMP-C
See the “4.10 OPT-RAMP-C
The OPT-RAMP-C C-band amplifier is a
Card” section on page 4-35.
two-slot card and uses the span fiber to
amplify the optical signal. It has five sets of
optical ports located on the faceplate and
operates in Slots 1 to 5 and 12 to 16.
4.1.3 Card Compatibility
Table 4-2 lists the Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) software compatibility for each optical amplifier
card.
Table 4-2
Software Release Compatibility for Optical Amplifier Cards
Card Type
R4.5
R4.6
R4.7
R5.0
R6.0
R7.0
R7.2
R8.0
R8.5 R9.0
OPT-PRE
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
OPT-BST
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
OPT-BST-E
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
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4.2 Class 1M Laser Safety Labels
Table 4-2
Software Release Compatibility for Optical Amplifier Cards (continued)
Card Type
R4.5
R4.6
R4.7
R5.0
R6.0
R7.0
R7.2
R8.0
R8.5 R9.0
OPT-BST-L
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
OPT-AMP-L
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
OPT-AMP-17-C
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
OPT-AMP-C
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
OPT-RAMP-C
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
4.2 Class 1M Laser Safety Labels
This section explains the significance of the safety labels attached to the optical amplifier cards. The
faceplates of the cards are clearly labeled with warnings about the laser radiation levels. You must
understand all warning labels before working on these cards.
4.2.1 Class 1M Laser Product Statement
Figure 4-1 shows the Class 1M Laser Product statement. Class 1M lasers are products that produce either
a highly divergent beam or a large diameter beam. Therefore, only a small part of the whole laser beam
can enter the eye. However, these laser products can be harmful to the eye if the beam is viewed using
magnifying optical instruments.
Figure 4-1
Class 1M Laser Product Statement
145953
CAUTION
HAZARD LEVEL 1M INVISIBLE
LASER RADIATION
DO NOT VIEW DIRECTLY WITH
NON-ATTENUATING OPTICAL
INSTRUMENTS λ = 1400nm TO 1610nm
4.2.2 Hazard Level 1M Label
Figure 4-2 shows the Hazard Level 1M label. This label is displayed on the faceplate of the cards. The
Hazard Level label warns users against exposure to laser radiation calculated in accordance with
IEC60825-1 Ed.1.2.
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4.2.3 Laser Source Connector Label
Figure 4-2
Hazard Level Label
145990
HAZARD
LEVEL 1M
4.2.3 Laser Source Connector Label
Figure 4-3 shows the Laser Source Connector label. This label indicates that a laser source is present at
the optical connector where the label appears.
Laser Source Connector Label
96635
Figure 4-3
4.2.4 FDA Statement Label
The FDA Statement labels are shown in Figure 4-4 and Figure 4-5. These labels show compliance to
FDA standards and that the hazard level classification is in accordance with IEC60825-1 Am.2 or Ed.1.2.
FDA Statement Label
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JULY 26, 2001
96634
Figure 4-4
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4.2.5 Shock Hazard Label
FDA Statement Label
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JUNE 24, 2007
282324
Figure 4-5
4.2.5 Shock Hazard Label
Figure 4-6 shows the Shock Hazard label. This label alerts you to an electrical hazard within the card.
The potential for shock exists when you remove adjacent cards during maintenance or touch exposed
electrical circuity on the card.
Shock Hazard Label
65541
Figure 4-6
4.3 OPT-PRE Amplifier Card
Note
For hardware specifications, see the “A.5.1 OPT-PRE Amplifier Card Specifications” section on
page A-14.
Note
For OPT-PRE card safety labels, see the “4.2 Class 1M Laser Safety Labels” section on page 4-4.
The OPT-PRE is a C-band, DWDM, two-stage erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) with midamplifier
loss (MAL) that can be connected to a dispersion compensating unit (DCU). The OPT-PRE is equipped
with a built-in variable optical attenuator (VOA) that controls the gain tilt and can also be used to pad
the DCU to a reference value. You can install the OPT-PRE in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17. The card is
designed to support up to 80 channels at 50-GHz channel spacing. The OPT-PRE features include:
•
Fixed gain mode with programmable tilt
•
True variable gain
•
Fast transient suppression
•
Nondistorting low-frequency transfer function
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4.3.1 OPT-PRE Faceplate Ports
Note
•
Settable maximum output power
•
Fixed output power mode (mode used during provisioning)
•
MAL for fiber-based DCU
•
Amplified spontaneous emissions (ASE) compensation in fixed gain mode
•
Full monitoring and alarm handling with settable thresholds
•
Four signal photodiodes to monitor the input and output optical power of the two amplifier stages
through CTC
•
An optical output port for external monitoring
The optical splitter has a ratio of 1:99, resulting in about 20 dB-lower power at the MON port than at the
COM TX port.
4.3.1 OPT-PRE Faceplate Ports
The OPT-PRE amplifier has five optical ports located on the faceplate:
•
MON is the output monitor port
•
COM RX (receive) is the input signal port
•
COM TX (transmit) is the output signal port
•
DC RX is the MAL input signal port
•
DC TX is the MAL output signal port
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4.3.2 OPT-PRE Block Diagrams
Figure 4-7 shows the OPT-PRE amplifier card faceplate.
Figure 4-7
OPT-PRE Faceplate
OPT
PRE
FAIL
ACT
RX
TX
TX
96466
DC
COM
RX
MON
SF
4.3.2 OPT-PRE Block Diagrams
Figure 4-8 shows a simplified block diagram of the OPT-PRE card’s features.
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4.3.3 OPT-PRE Power Monitoring
Figure 4-8
OPT-PRE Block Diagram
COM RX
COM TX
Optical
module
DC RX
MON
DC TX
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
Power supply
Input filters
DC/DC
96478
Processor
SCL Bus SCL Bus
TCCi M
TCCi P
BAT A&B
Figure 4-9 shows the a block diagram of how the OPT-PRE optical module functions.
Figure 4-9
OPT-PRE Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
COM RX
COM TX
P1
P2
P3
P4
MON
Variable optical attenuator
DC RX
98298
P Physical photodiode
DC TX
DCU
4.3.3 OPT-PRE Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1, P2, P3, and P4 monitor the power for the OPT-PRE card. Table 4-3 shows the
returned power level values calibrated to each port.
Table 4-3
OPT-PRE Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1
Input Com
COM RX
P2
Output DC
DC TX
P3
Input DC
DC RX
P4
Output COM (Total Output)
COM TX
Output COM (Signal Output)
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4.3.4 OPT-PRE Amplifier Card-Level Indicators
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
4.3.4 OPT-PRE Amplifier Card-Level Indicators
Table 4-4 shows the three card-level LED indicators on the OPT-PRE amplifier card.
Table 4-4
OPT-PRE Amplifier Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the OPT-PRE is carrying traffic or is
traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS on
one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the
transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are
properly connected, the light turns off.
4.3.5 OPT-PRE Ampifier Port-Level Indicators
You can determine the status of the card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray
assembly. Use the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and
severity of alarms for a given port or slot.
4.4 OPT-BST Amplifier Card
Note
For hardware specifications, see the “A.5.2 OPT-BST Amplifier Card Specifications” section on
page A-15.
Note
For OPT-BST card safety labels, see the “4.2 Class 1M Laser Safety Labels” section on page 4-4.
The OPT-BST is designed to ultimately support up to 80 channels at 50-GHz channel spacing. The
OPT-BST is a C-band, DWDM EDFA with optical service channel (OSC) add-and-drop capability.
When an OPT-BST installed in the an ONS 15454, an OSCM card is also needed to process the OSC.
You can install the OPT-BST in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17. The card’s features include:
•
Fixed gain mode (with programmable tilt)
•
Gain range of 5 to 20 dB in constant gain mode and output power mode
•
True variable gain
•
Built-in VOA to control gain tilt
•
Fast transient suppression
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4.4.1 OPT-BST Faceplate Ports
Note
•
Nondistorting low-frequency transfer function
•
Settable maximum output power
•
Fixed output power mode (mode used during provisioning)
•
ASE compensation in fixed gain mode
•
Full monitoring and alarm handling with settable thresholds
•
Optical Safety Remote Interlock (OSRI), a CTC software feature capable of shutting down optical
output power or reducing the power to a safe level (automatic power reduction)
•
Automatic laser shutdown (ALS), a safety mechanism used in the event of a fiber cut. For details on
ALS provisioning for the card, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. For
information about using the card to implement ALS in a network, see the “11.9 Network Optical
Safety” section on page 11-19.
The optical splitters each have a ratio of 1:99. The result is that MON TX and MON RX port power is
about 20 dB lower than COM TX and COM RX port power.
4.4.1 OPT-BST Faceplate Ports
The OPT-BST amplifier has eight optical ports located on the faceplate:
•
MON RX is the output monitor port (receive section).
•
MON TX is the output monitor port.
•
COM RX is the input signal port.
•
LINE TX is the output signal port.
•
LINE RX is the input signal port (receive section).
•
COM TX is the output signal port (receive section).
•
OSC RX is the OSC add input port.
•
OSC TX is the OSC drop output port.
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4.4.2 OPT-BST Block Diagrams
Figure 4-10 shows the OPT-BST amplifier card faceplate.
Figure 4-10
OPT-BST Faceplate
OPT
BST
FAIL
ACT
TX
TX
RX
TX
TX
96467
LINE
OSC
RX
COM
RX
MON
RX
SF
4.4.2 OPT-BST Block Diagrams
Figure 4-11 shows a simplified block diagram of the OPT-BST card’s features.
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4.4.3 OPT-BST Power Monitoring
Figure 4-11
OPT-BST Block Diagram
COM TX
Line RX
Monitor Line RX
Com RX
Optical
module
Line TX
OSC TX
Monitor Line TX
OSC RX
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
Power supply
Input filters
DC/DC
96479
Processor
SCL Bus SCL Bus
TCCi M
TCCi P
BAT A&B
Figure 4-12 shows a block diagram of how the OPT-BST optical module functions.
Figure 4-12
OPT-BST Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
MON TX
P1
COM RX
OSC RX
P2
LINE TX
APR
signal
COM TX
LINE RX
P4 OSC
P3 in RX
OSC TX
98300
MON RX
P Physical photodiode
4.4.3 OPT-BST Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1, P2, P3, and P4 monitor the power for the OPT-BST card. Table 4-5 shows the
returned power level values calibrated to each port.
Table 4-5
OPT-BST Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1
Input Com
COM RX
P2
Output Line (Total Output)
LINE TX
Output Line (Signal Output)
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4.4.4 OPT-BST Card-Level Indicators
Table 4-5
OPT-BST Port Calibration (continued)
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P3
Output COM
LINE RX
P4
Output OSC
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
4.4.4 OPT-BST Card-Level Indicators
Table 4-6 describes the three card-level LED indicators on the OPT-BST card.
Table 4-6
OPT-BST Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the OPT-BST is carrying traffic or is
traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS on
one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the
transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are
properly connected, the light turns off.
4.4.5 OPT-BST Port-Level Indicators
You can determine the status of the card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray
assembly. Use the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and
severity of alarms for a given port or slot.
4.5 OPT-BST-E Amplifier Card
Note
For hardware specifications, see the “A.5.3 OPT-BST-E Amplifier Card Specifications” section on
page A-15.
Note
For OPT-BST-E safety labels, see the “4.2 Class 1M Laser Safety Labels” section on page 4-4.
The OPT-BST-E amplifier card is a gain-enhanced version of the OPT-BST card. It is designed to support
up to 80 channels at 50-GHz channel spacing. The OPT-BST-E is a C-band, DWDM EDFA with OSC
add-and-drop capability. When an OPT-BST-E installed, an OSCM card is needed to process the OSC.
You can install the OPT-BST-E in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17. The card’s features include:
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4.5.1 OPT-BST-E Faceplate Ports
Note
•
Fixed gain mode (with programmable tilt)
•
True variable gain
•
Gain range of 8 to 23 dBm with the tilt managed at 0 dBm in constant gain mode and output power
mode
•
Enhanced gain range of 23 to 26 dBm with unmanaged tilt
•
Built-in VOA to control the gain tilt
•
Fast transient suppression
•
Nondistorting low-frequency transfer function
•
Settable maximum output power
•
Fixed output power mode (mode used during provisioning)
•
ASE compensation in fixed gain mode
•
Full monitoring and alarm handling with settable thresholds
•
OSRI
•
ALS
The optical splitters each have a ratio of 1:99. The result is that MON TX and MON RX port power is
about 20 dB lower than COM TX and COM RX port power.
4.5.1 OPT-BST-E Faceplate Ports
The OPT-BST-E amplifier card has eight optical ports located on the faceplate:
•
MON RX is the output monitor port (receive section).
•
MON TX is the output monitor port.
•
COM RX is the input signal port.
•
LINE TX is the output signal port.
•
LINE RX is the input signal port (receive section).
•
COM TX is the output signal port (receive section).
•
OSC RX is the OSC add input port.
•
OSC TX is the OSC drop output port.
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4.5.2 OPT-BST-E Block Diagrams
Figure 4-13 shows the OPT-BST-E amplifier card faceplate.
Figure 4-13
OPT-BST-E Faceplate
OPT
BST-E
FAIL
ACT
TX
TX
RX
TX
TX
145939
LINE
OSC
RX
COM
RX
MON
RX
SF
4.5.2 OPT-BST-E Block Diagrams
Figure 4-14 shows a simplified block diagram of the OPT-BST-E card’s features.
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4.5.3 OPT-BST-E Power Monitoring
Figure 4-14
OPT-BST-E Block Diagram
Line RX
COM TX
Monitor Line RX
Com RX
Optical
module
Line TX
OSC TX
Monitor Line TX
OSC RX
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
DC/DC
Power supply
Input filters
96479
Processor
SCL Bus SCL Bus
TCCi M
TCCi P
BAT A&B
Figure 4-15 shows a block diagram of how the OPT-BST-E optical module functions.
Figure 4-15
OPT-BST-E Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
MON TX
P1
COM RX
OSC RX
P2
LINE TX
APR
signal
COM TX
LINE RX
P4 OSC
P3 in RX
OSC TX
98300
MON RX
P Physical photodiode
4.5.3 OPT-BST-E Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1, P2, P3, and P4 monitor the power for the OPT-BST-E card. Table 4-7 shows
the returned power level values calibrated to each port.
Table 4-7
OPT-BST-E Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1
Input Com
COM RX
P2
Output Line (Total Output)
LINE TX
Output Line (Signal Output)
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4.5.4 OPT-BST-E Card-Level Indicators
Table 4-7
OPT-BST-E Port Calibration (continued)
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P3
Output COM
LINE RX
P4
Output OSC
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
4.5.4 OPT-BST-E Card-Level Indicators
Table 4-8 describes the three card-level LED indicators on the OPT-BST-E amplifier card.
Table 4-8
OPT-BST-E Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the OPT-BST-E is carrying traffic or is
traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS on
one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the
transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are
properly connected, the light turns off.
4.5.5 OPT-BST-E Port-Level Indicators
You can determine the status of the card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray
assembly. Use the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and
severity of alarms for a given port or slot.
4.6 OPT-BST-L Amplifier Card
Note
For hardware specifications, see the “A.5.4 OPT-BST-L Amplifier Card Specifications” section on
page A-16.
Note
For OPT-BST-L safety labels, see the “4.2 Class 1M Laser Safety Labels” section on page 4-4.
The OPT-BST-L is an L-band, DWDM EDFA with OSC add-and-drop capability. The card is well suited
for use in networks that employ dispersion shifted (DS) fiber or SMF-28 single-mode fiber. The
OPT-BST-L is designed to ultimately support 64 channels at 50-GHz channel spacing, but in
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4.6.1 OPT-BST-L Faceplate Ports
Software R9.0 and earlier it is limited to 32 channels at 100-GHz spacing.When an ONS 15454 has an
OPT-BST-L installed, an OSCM card is needed to process the OSC. You can install the OPT-BST-L in
Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17. The card’s features include:
Note
•
Fixed gain mode (with programmable tilt)
•
Standard gain range of 8 to 20 dB in the programmable gain tilt mode
•
True variable gain
•
20 to 27 dB gain range in the uncontrolled gain tilt mode
•
Built-in VOA to control gain tilt
•
Fast transient suppression
•
Nondistorting low-frequency transfer function
•
Settable maximum output power
•
Fixed output power mode (mode used during provisioning)
•
ASE compensation in fixed gain mode
•
Full monitoring and alarm handling with settable thresholds
•
OSRI
•
ALS
The optical splitters each have a ratio of 1:99. The result is that MON TX and MON RX port power is
about 20 dB lower than COM TX and COM RX port power.
4.6.1 OPT-BST-L Faceplate Ports
The OPT-BST-L amplifier has eight optical ports located on the faceplate:
•
MON RX is the output monitor port (receive section).
•
MON TX is the output monitor port.
•
COM RX is the input signal port.
•
LINE TX is the output signal port.
•
LINE RX is the input signal port (receive section).
•
COM TX is the output signal port (receive section).
•
OSC RX is the OSC add input port.
•
OSC TX is the OSC drop output port.
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4.6.2 OPT-BST-L Block Diagrams
Figure 4-16 shows the OPT-BST-L card faceplate.
Figure 4-16
OPT-BST-L Faceplate
OPT
BST-L
FAIL
ACT
TX
TX
RX
TX
TX
180929
LINE
OSC
RX
COM
RX
MON
RX
SF
4.6.2 OPT-BST-L Block Diagrams
Figure 4-17 shows a simplified block diagram of the OPT-BST-L card’s features.
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4.6.3 OPT-BST-L Power Monitoring
Figure 4-17
OPT-BST-L Block Diagram
COM TX
Line RX
Monitor Line RX
COM RX
Optical
module
Line TX
OSC TX
Monitor Line TX
OSC RX
FPGA
For SCL Bu s
management
SCL Bus
TCCi M
Power supply
Input filters
DC/DC
180930
Processor
SCL Bus
TCCi P
BAT A&B
Figure 4-18 shows a block diagram of how the OPT-BST-L optical module functions.
Figure 4-18
OPT-BST-L Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
MON TX
OSC RX
P3
P1
COM RX
P2
LINE TX
APR
signal
COM TX
LINE RX
P5 OSC
P4 in RX
OSC TX
134976
MON RX
P Physical photodiode
4.6.3 OPT-BST-L Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1, P2, P3, P4, and P5 monitor the power for the OPT-BST-L card. Table 4-9
shows the returned power level values calibrated to each port.
Table 4-9
OPT-BST-L Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1
Input COM
COM RX
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Optical Amplifier Cards
4.6.4 OPT-BST-L Card-Level Indicators
Table 4-9
OPT-BST-L Port Calibration (continued)
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P2
Output Line (Total Output)
LINE TX
Output Line (Signal Output)
P3
Output OSC-RX
OSC-RX
P4
Output COM
LINE RX
P5
Output OSC-TX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
4.6.4 OPT-BST-L Card-Level Indicators
Table 4-10 shows the three card-level LEDs on the OPT-BST-L card.
Table 4-10
OPT-BST-L Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the OPT-BST-L is carrying traffic or is
traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS on
one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the
transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are
properly connected, the light turns off.
4.6.5 OPT-BST-L Port-Level Indicators
You can determine the status of the card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray
assembly. Use the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and
severity of alarms for a given port or slot.
4.7 OPT-AMP-L Card
Note
For hardware specifications, see the “A.5.5 OPT-AMP-L Preamplifier Card Specifications” section on
page A-17.
Note
For OPT-AMP-L card safety labels, see the “4.2 Class 1M Laser Safety Labels” section on page 4-4.
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4.7.1 OPT-AMP-L Faceplate Ports
The OPT-AMP-L is an L-band, DWDM optical amplifier card consisting of a two-stage EDFA with
midstage access loss (MSL) for an external DCU and OSC add-and-drop capability. Using CTC, the card
is provisionable as a preamplifier (OPT-PRE) or booster amplifier (OPT-BST), and is well suited for use
in networks that employ DS or SMF-28 fiber. The amplifier can operate up to 64 optical transmission
channels at 50-GHz channel spacing in the 1570 nm to 1605 nm wavelength range.
When an OPT-AMP-L installed, an OSCM card is needed to process the OSC. You can install the
two-slot OPT-AMP-L in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
The card has the following features:
Note
•
Maximum power output of 20 dBm
•
True variable gain amplifier with settable range from 12 to 24 dBm in the standard gain range and
24 dBm to 35 dbM with uncontrolled gain tilt
•
Built-in VOA to control gain tilt
•
Up to 12 dBm MSL for an external DCU
•
Fast transient suppression; able to adjust power levels in hundreds of microseconds to avoid bit
errors in failure or capacity growth situations
•
Nondistorting low frequency transfer function
•
Midstage access loss for dispersion compensation unit
•
Constant pump current mode (test mode)
•
Constant output power mode (used during optical node setup)
•
Constant gain mode
•
Internal ASE compensation in constant gain mode and in constant output power mode
•
Full monitoring and alarm handling capability
•
Optical safety support through signal loss detection and alarm at any input port, fast power down
control (less than one second), and reduced maximum output power in safe power mode. For details
on ALS provisioning for the card, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. For
information on using the card to implement ALS in a network, see the “11.9 Network Optical
Safety” section on page 11-19.
Before disconnecting any OPT AMP-L fiber for troubleshooting, first make sure the OPT AMP-L card
is unplugged.
4.7.1 OPT-AMP-L Faceplate Ports
The OPT-AMP-L amplifier card has ten optical ports located on the faceplate:
•
MON RX is the output monitor port (receive section).
•
MON TX is the output monitor port.
•
COM RX is the input signal port.
•
LINE TX is the output signal port.
•
LINE RX is the input signal port (receive section).
•
COM TX is the output signal port (receive section).
•
OSC RX is the OSC add input port.
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4.7.2 OPT-AMP-L Block Diagrams
•
OSC TX is the OSC drop output port.
•
DC TX is the output signal to the DCU.
•
DC RX is the input signal from the DCU.
Figure 4-19 shows the OPT-AMP-L card faceplate.
Figure 4-19
OPT-AMP-L Faceplate
OPT-AMP-L
FAIL
ACT
TX
TX
TX
RX
TX
TX
180931
LINE
OSC
RX
DC
RX
COM
RX
MON
RX
SF
4.7.2 OPT-AMP-L Block Diagrams
Figure 4-20 shows a simplified block diagram of the OPT-AMP-L card’s features.
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Optical Amplifier Cards
4.7.2 OPT-AMP-L Block Diagrams
Figure 4-20
OPT-AMP-L Block Diagram
Line RX
COM TX
Monitor Line RX
COM RX
Optical
module
Line TX
OSC TX
Monitor Line TX
OSC RX
DC RX
DC TX
Processor
DC/DC
Power supply
Input filters
180932
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
SCL Bus SCL Bus
TCCi M
TCCi P
BAT A&B
Figure 4-21 shows a block diagram of how the OPT-AMP-L optical module functions.
Figure 4-21
OPT-AMP-L Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
DC TX
DC RX
External Mid-Stage
Loss
OSC RX
P7
P2 P3
COM RX
P1
P4
OSC
Add
LINE TX
MON TX
Transmit Section
Receive Section
OSC
Drop
MON RX
P5
P Physical photodiode
P6
LINE RX
145256
COM TX
OSC TX
Variable optical attenuator
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4.7.3 OPT-AMP-L Power Monitoring
4.7.3 OPT-AMP-L Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P7 monitor the power for the OPT-AMP-L card. Table 4-11 shows the
returned power level values calibrated to each port.
Table 4-11
OPT-AMP-L Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1
Input COM Power
COM RX
P2
Output DC (total power)
DC TX
Output DC (signal power)
P3
Input DC (input power)
DC RX
P4
Output Line Transmit (total power)
LINE TX
Output Line Transmit (signal power)
P5
Input Line Receive Power
LINE RX
P6
Output OSC Receive Power
OSC RX
P7
Input OSC Transmit Power
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
4.7.4 OPT-AMP-L Card-Level Indicators
Table 4-12 shows the three card-level LEDs on the OPT-AMP-L card.
Table 4-12
OPT-AMP-L Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the OPT-AMP-L is carrying traffic or is
traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS on
one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the
transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are
properly connected, the light turns off.
4.7.5 OPT-AMP-L Port-Level Indicators
You can determine the status of the card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray
assembly. Use the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and
severity of alarms for a given port or slot.
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4.8 OPT-AMP-17-C Card
4.8 OPT-AMP-17-C Card
Note
For hardware specifications, see the “A.5.6 OPT-AMP-17-C Amplifier Card Specifications” section on
page A-17.
Note
For OPT-AMP-17-C safety labels, see the “4.2 Class 1M Laser Safety Labels” section on page 4-4.
The OPT-AMP-17-C is a 17-dB gain, C-band, DWDM EDFA amplifier/preamplifier with OSC
add-and-drop capability. It supports 80 channels at 50-GHz channel spacing in the C-band (that is, the
1529 nm to 1562.5 nm wavelength range). When an ONS 15454 has an OPT-AMP-17-C installed, an
OSCM card is needed to process the OSC. You can install the OPT-AMP-17-C in Slots 1 to 6 and
12 to 17.
The card’s features include:
•
Fixed gain mode (no programmable tilt)
•
Standard gain range of 14 to 20 dB at startup when configured as a preamplifier
•
Standard gain range of 20 to 23 dB in the transient mode when configured as a preamplifier
•
Gain range of 14 to 23 dB (with no transient gain range) when configured as a booster amplifier
•
True variable gain
•
Fast transient suppression
•
Nondistorting low-frequency transfer function
•
Settable maximum output power
•
Fixed output power mode (mode used during provisioning)
•
ASE compensation in fixed gain mode
•
Full monitoring and alarm handling with settable thresholds
•
OSRI
•
ALS
4.8.1 OPT-AMP-17-C Faceplate Ports
The OPT-AMP-17-C amplifier card has eight optical ports located on the faceplate:
•
MON RX is the output monitor port (receive section).
•
MON TX is the output monitor port.
•
COM RX is the input signal port.
•
LINE TX is the output signal port.
•
LINE RX is the input signal port (receive section).
•
COM TX is the output signal port (receive section).
•
OSC RX is the OSC add input port.
•
OSC TX is the OSC drop output port.
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4.8.2 OPT-AMP-17-C Block Diagrams
Figure 4-22 shows the OPT-AMP-17-C amplifier card faceplate.
Figure 4-22
OPT-AMP-17-C Faceplate
OPT
-AMP
17-C
FAIL
ACT
TX
TX
RX
TX
TX
159520
LINE
OSC
RX
COM
RX
MON
RX
SF
4.8.2 OPT-AMP-17-C Block Diagrams
Figure 4-23 shows a simplified block diagram of the OPT-AMP-17C card’s features.
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4.8.3 OPT-AMP-17-C Automatic Power Control
Figure 4-23
OPT-AMP17-C Block Diagram
COM TX
Line RX
Monitor Line RX
COM RX
Optical
module
Line TX
OSC TX
Monitor Line TX
OSC RX
FPGA
For SCL Bu s
management
Power supply
Input filters
DC/DC
180928
Processor
SCL Bus
TCCi M
SCL Bus
TCCi P
BAT A&B
Figure 4-24 shows how the OPT-AMP-17-C optical module functions.
Figure 4-24
OPT-AMP-17-C Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
MON TX
OSC RX
P2
P5
OSC
add
COM RX
P1
LINE TX
APR
signal
OSC
drop
P3 in RX
MON RX
LINE RX
P4 OSC
OSC TX
159519
COM TX
P Physical photodiode
4.8.3 OPT-AMP-17-C Automatic Power Control
A transient gain range of 20 to 23 dB is available to APC in order to permit other amplifiers to reach
their expected set points. However, operation in this range is not continuous. At startup, the
OPT-AMP-17-C card caps the gain at a maximum of 20 dB.
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4.8.4 OPT-AMP-17-C Power Monitoring
Note
When the OPT-AMP-17-C operates as a booster amplifier, APC does not control its gain.
4.8.4 OPT-AMP-17-C Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1, P2, P3, P4, and P5 monitor power for the OPT-AMP-17-C card. Table 4-13
shows the returned power level values calibrated to each port.
Table 4-13
OPT-AMP-17-C Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1
Input COM
COM RX
P2
Output Line (Total Output)
LINE TX
Output Line (Signal Output)
P5
Output OSC-RX
OSC-RX
P3
Output COM
LINE RX
P4
Output OSC-TX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
4.8.5 OPT-AMP-17-C Card-Level Indicators
Table 4-14 shows the three card-level LEDs on the OPT-AMP-17-C card.
Table 4-14
OPT-AMP-17-C Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the OPT-AMP-17-C is carrying traffic or
is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS on
one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the
transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are
properly connected, the light turns off.
4.8.6 OPT-AMP-17-C Port-Level Indicators
You can determine the status of the card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray
assembly. Use the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and
severity of alarms for a given port or slot.
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4.9 OPT-AMP-C Card
4.9 OPT-AMP-C Card
Note
For hardware specifications, see the “A.5.7 OPT-AMP-C Amplifier Card Specifications” section on
page A-18.
Note
For OPT-AMP-C card safety labels, see the “4.2 Class 1M Laser Safety Labels” section on page 4-4.
The OPT-AMP-C card is a 20-dB output power, C-band, DWDM EDFA amplifier/preamplifier. It
contains mid-stage access loss for a Dispersion Compensation Unit (DCU). To control gain tilt, a VOA
is used. The VOA can also be used to attenuate the signal to the DCU to a reference value. The amplifier
module also includes the OSC add (TX direction) and drop (RX direction) optical filters.
The OPT-AMP-C card supports 80 channels at 50-GHz channel spacing in the C-band (that is, the 1529
nm to 1562.5 nm wavelength range). When an ONS 15454 has an OPT-AMP-C card installed, an OSCM
card is needed to process the OSC. You can install the OPT-AMP-C card in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
Slots 2 to 6 and Slots 12 to 16 are the default slots for provisioning the OPT-AMP-C card as a
preamplifier, and slots 1 and 17 are the default slots for provisioning the OPT-AMP-C card as a booster
amplifier.
The card’s features include:
•
Fast transient suppression
•
Nondistorting low-frequency transfer function
•
Mid-stage access for DCU
•
Constant pump current mode (test mode)
•
Fixed output power mode (mode used during provisioning)
•
Constant gain mode
•
ASE compensation in Constant Gain and Constant Output Power modes
•
Programmable tilt
•
Full monitoring and alarm handling capability
•
Gain range with gain tilt control of 12 to 24 dB
•
Extended gain range (with uncontrolled tilt) of 24 to 35 dB
•
Full monitoring and alarm handling with settable thresholds
•
OSRI
•
ALS
4.9.1 OPT-AMP-C Card Faceplate Ports
The OPT-AMP-C amplifier card has 10 optical ports located on the faceplate:
•
MON RX is the output monitor port (receive section).
•
MON TX is the output monitor port.
•
COM RX is the input signal port.
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4.9.1 OPT-AMP-C Card Faceplate Ports
•
COM TX is the output signal port (receive section).
•
DC RX is the input DCU port.
•
DC TX is the output DCU port.
•
OSC RX is the OSC add input port.
•
OSC TX is the OSC drop output port.
•
LINE RX is the input signal port (receive section).
•
LINE TX is the output signal port.
Figure 4-25 shows the OPT-AMP-C amplifier card faceplate.
Figure 4-25
OPT-AMP-C Card Faceplate
OPT
-AMP
-C
FAIL
ACT
TX
TX
TX
RX
TX
TX
274510
LINE
OSC
RX
DC
RX
COM
RX
MON
RX
SF
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4.9.2 OPT-AMP-C Card Block Diagrams
4.9.2 OPT-AMP-C Card Block Diagrams
Figure 4-26 shows a simplified block diagram of the OPT-AMP-17C card features.
Figure 4-26
OPT-AMP-C Block Diagram
COM TX
Line RX
Monitor Line RX
COM RX
Optical
module
Line TX
OSC TX
Monitor Line TX
OSC RX
DCU TX
DCU RX
FPGA
For SCL Bu s
management
SCL Bus
TCCi M
DC/DC
Power supply
Input filters
240356
Processor
SCL Bus
TCCi P
BAT A&B
Figure 4-27 shows how the OPT-AMP-C optical module functions.
Figure 4-27
OPT-AMP-C Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
External Mid Stage Loss
DC-TX
OSC-RX
DC-RX
PD6 PD7
Transmitting
section
COM-TX
PD5
PD1
PD2
OSC
add
LINE-TX
MON-TX
OSC
drop
COM-TX
LINE-RX
PD3
MON-RX
PD4
OSC-TX
274506
Receiving
section
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4.9.3 OPT-AMP-C Card Power Monitoring
4.9.3 OPT-AMP-C Card Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P7 monitor the power for the OPT-AMP-C card (see Table 4-15).
Table 4-15
OPT-AMP-C Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1
Input COM Power
COM RX
P2
Output Line Transmit (total power)
Line TX
Output Line Transmit (signal power)
P3
Input Line Receive Power
Line RX
P4
Input OSC Receive Power
P5
Output OSC Transmit Power
OSC-RX
P6
Output DC Transmit (total power)
DC-TX
Output DC Transmit (signal power)
P7
Input DC Receive Power
DC-RX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
4.9.4 OPT-AMP-C Card-Level Indicators
Table 4-16 shows the three card-level LEDs on the OPT-AMP-C card.
Table 4-16
OPT-AMP-C Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the OPT-AMP-C card is carrying traffic
or is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS on
one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the
transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are
properly connected, the light turns off.
4.9.5 OPT-AMP-C Card Port-Level Indicators
You can determine the status of the card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray
assembly. Use the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and
severity of alarms for a given port or slot.
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4.10 OPT-RAMP-C Card
4.10 OPT-RAMP-C Card
Note
For hardware specifications, see the “A.5.8 OPT-RAMP-C Amplifier Card Specifications” section on
page A-19.
Note
For OPT-RAMP-C card safety labels, see the “4.2 Class 1M Laser Safety Labels” section on page 4-4.
The OPT-RAMP-C is a double-slot unit and improves unregenerated sections in long spans using the
span fiber to amplify the optical signal. To achieve Raman amplification, two Raman signals (that do not
carry any payload or overhead) are transmitted on the optical fiber because the gain generated by one
signal is not flat (different wavelengths in C-band receive different gain values). The energy of these
Raman signals transfer to the higher region of the spectrum thereby amplifying the signals transmitted
at higher wavelengths. The Raman effect reduces span loss but does not compensate it completely.
The card operates up to 80 optical transmission channels at 50-GHz channel spacing over the C-band of
the optical spectrum (wavelengths from 1529 nm to 1562.5 nm). To provide a counter-propagating
Raman pump into the transmission fiber, the Raman amplifier provides up to 500 mW at the LINE-RX
connector. The OPT-RAMP-C card can be installed in Slots 1 to 5 and 12 to 16, and the card supports
all network configurations. However, it can be equipped only on both endpoints of a span.
When the Raman optical powers are set correctly, a gain profile with limited ripple is achieved. The
wavelengths of the Raman signals are not in the C-band of the spectrum (used by MSTP for payload
signals). The two Raman wavelengths are fixed and always the same. Due to a limited Raman gain, an
EDFA amplifier is embedded into the card to generate a higher total gain. An embedded EDFA gain
block provides a first amplification stage, while the mid stage access (MSA) is used for DCU loss
compensation.
The Raman total power and Raman ratio can be configured using CTC. For information on how to
configure the Raman parameters, refer the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. The Raman
configuration can be viewed on the Maintenance > Installation tab.
The card’s features include:
•
Raman pump with embedded EDFA gain block
•
Raman section: 500 mW total pump power for two pump wavelengths
•
EDFA section: 16 dB gain and 17 dB output power
•
Gain Flattening Filter (GFF) for Raman plus EDFA ripple compensation
•
Mid stage access for DC units
•
VOA for DC input power control
•
Full monitoring of pump, OSC, and signal power
•
Fast gain control for transient suppression
•
Low-FIT (hardware managed) optical laser safety
•
Hardware output signals for LOS monitoring at input photodiodes
•
Optical service channel add/drop filters
•
Raman pump back-reflection detector
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4.10.1 OPT-RAMP-C Card Faceplate Ports
4.10.1 OPT-RAMP-C Card Faceplate Ports
The OPT-RAMP-C card has ten optical ports located on the faceplate:
•
MON RX is the output monitor port (receive section).
•
MON TX is the output monitor port.
•
COM RX is the input signal port (receive section).
•
COM TX is the output signal port.
•
DC RX is the input DCU port.
•
DC TX is the output DCU port.
•
OSC RX is the OSC add input port.
•
OSC TX is the OSC drop output port.
•
LINE RX is the input signal port (receive section).
•
LINE TX is the output signal port.
Figure 4-28 shows the OPT-RAMP-C card faceplate.
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4.10.2 OPT-RAMP-C Card Block Diagram
Figure 4-28
OPT-RAMP-C Faceplate
270710
OPT-RAMP-C
FAIL
ACT
TX
TX
TX
RX
TX
TX
LINE
OSC
RX
DC
RX
COM
RX
MOM
RX
DF
4.10.2 OPT-RAMP-C Card Block Diagram
Figure 4-29 shows a block diagram of how the OPT-RAMP-C card functions.
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Optical Amplifier Cards
4.10.3 OPT-RAMP-C Card Power Monitoring
Figure 4-29
OPT-RAMP-C Card Functional Block Diagram
PD
6
W to E
section
Line-RX
Pump
Add
PD
1
PD
2
PD
3
PD
4
OSC
Add
COM-TX
Pump 1
PD
8
PD
10
PD
11
Pump 2
PD
9
E to W
section
Pump
Drop
Line-TX
OSC
Drop
COM-RX
PD
12
PD
Physical photodiode
PD
7
270709
PD
5
OSC-TX
Variable optical attenuator
Two Raman pump lasers are combined internally and launched in-fiber at the LINE-RX port, thereby
counter-propagating with the DWDM signal. An EDFA gain block provides further amplification of the
DWDM signal, which allows regulated output power entry in the mid stage access and acts upon the
VOA attenuation. While the optical filters are present for the OSC add and drop functions, the OSC
signal counter-propagates with the DWDM signal. Two monitor ports, MON-RX and MON-TX, are
provided at the EDFA input and output stages and are used to evaluate the total gain ripple. A total of 12
photodiodes (PDs) are provided, allowing full monitoring of RP power, DWDM power, and OSC power
in each section of the device. In particular, PD12 allows the detection of the remnant Raman pump power
at the end of the counter-pumped span, while PD11 detects the amount of Raman pump power
back-scattered by the LINE-RX connector and by the transmission fiber.
The EDFA section calculates the signal power, considering the expected ASE power contribution to the
total output power. The signal output power or the signal gain can be used as feedback signals for the
EDFA pump power control loop. The ASE power is derived according to the working EDFA gain. PD2,
PD3, and PD4 provide the total power measured by the photodiode and the signal power is derived by
calculating the total power value.
4.10.3 OPT-RAMP-C Card Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes PD1 through PD12 monitor the power for the OPT-RAMP-C card (see Table 4-17).
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4.10.4 OPT-RAMP-C Card Level Indicators
Table 4-17
OPT-RAMP-C Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
PD1
EDFA DWDM Input Power
LINE-RX
PD2
EDFA Output Power (pre-VOA
attenuation)
DC-TX (port with 0 dB VOA attenuation)
PD3
DCU Input Power
DC-TX
PD4
DCU Output Power
DC-RX
PD5
DWDM Input Power
COM-RX
PD6
OSC ADD Input Power
OSC-RX
PD7
OSC DROP Output Power
OSC-TX
PD8
Pump 1 in-fiber Output Power
LINE-RX
PD9
Pump 2 in-fiber Output Power
LINE-RX
PD10
Total Pump in-fiber Output Power
LINE-RX
PD11
Back-Reflected Pump Power
LINE-RX
PD12
Remnant Pump Power
LINE-TX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
4.10.4 OPT-RAMP-C Card Level Indicators
Table 4-18 shows the three card-level LEDs on the OPT-RAMP-C card.
Table 4-18
OPT-RAMP-C Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the OPT-RAMP-C card is carrying traffic
or is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS on one
or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the transmit
and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly
connected, the light turns off.
4.10.5 OPT-RAMP-C Card Port-Level Indicators
You can determine the status of the card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray
assembly. Use the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and
severity of alarms for a given port or slot.
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4.10.5 OPT-RAMP-C Card Port-Level Indicators
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5
Multiplexer and Demultiplexer Cards
This chapter describes legacy multiplexer and demultiplexer cards used in Cisco ONS 15454 dense
wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) networks. For installation and card turn-up procedures, refer
to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. For card safety and compliance information, refer to
the Cisco Optical Transport Products Safety and Compliance Information document.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Chapter topics include:
Note
•
5.1 Card Overview, page 5-1
•
5.2 Safety Labels, page 5-7
•
5.3 32MUX-O Card, page 5-11
•
5.4 32DMX-O Card, page 5-16
•
5.5 4MD-xx.x Card, page 5-20
For a description of the 32DMX, 32DMX-L, 40-DMX-C, 40-DMX-CE, 40-MUX-C, 40-WSS-C,
40-WSS-CE, and 40-WXC-C cards, refer to Chapter 8, “Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop Cards.”
5.1 Card Overview
The card overview section contains card summary, compatibility, interface class, and channel allocation
plan information for legacy multiplexer and demultiplexer cards.
Note
Each card is marked with a symbol that corresponds to a slot (or slots) on the ONS 15454 shelf assembly.
The cards are then installed into slots displaying the same symbols. See the “1.16.1 Card Slot
Requirements” section on page 1-61 for a list of slots and symbols.
5.1.1 Card Summary
Table 5-1 lists and summarizes the functions of the 32MUX-O, 32DMX-O, and 4MD-xx.x cards.
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5.1.2 Card Compatibility
Table 5-1
Multiplexer and Demultiplexer Cards
Card
Port Description
For Additional Information
32MUX-O
The 32MUX-O has five sets of ports located See the “5.3 32MUX-O Card”
on the faceplate. It operates in Slots 1 to 5 section on page 5-11.
and 12 to 16.
32DMX-O
The 32DMX-O has five sets of ports located “5.4 32DMX-O Card” section
on the faceplate. It operates in Slots 1 to 5 on page 5-16
and 12 to 16.
4MD-xx.x
The 4MD-xx.x card has five sets of ports
See the “5.5 4MD-xx.x Card”
located on the faceplate. It operates in Slots section on page 5-20.
1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
5.1.2 Card Compatibility
Table 5-2 lists the CTC software compatibility for each card.
Table 5-2
Software Release Compatibility for Legacy Multiplexer and Demultiplexer Cards
Card Name
R4.5
R4.6
R4.7
R5.0
R6.0
R7.0
R7.2
R8.0
R8.5
R9.0
32MUX-O
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
32DMX-O
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
4MD-xx.x
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
5.1.3 Interface Classes
The 32MUX-O, 32DMX-O, and 4MD-xx.x cards have different input and output optical channel signals
depending on the interface card where the input signal originates. The input interface cards have been
grouped in classes listed in Table 5-3. The subsequent tables list the optical performance and output
power of each interface class.
Table 5-3
ONS 15454 Card Interfaces Assigned to Input Power Classes
Input Power Class
Card
A
10-Gbps multirate transponder cards (TXP_MR_10G, TXP_MR_10E,
TXP_MR_10E_C, and TXP_MR_10E_L) with forward error correction (FEC)
enabled and 10-Gbps muxponder cards (MXP_2.5G_10G, MXP_2.5G_10E,
MXP_MR_10DME_C, MXP_MR_10DME_L, MXP_2.5G_10E_C, and
MXP_2.5G_10E_L) with FEC enabled
B
10-Gbps multirate transponder card (TXP_MR_10G) without FEC and 10-Gbps
muxponder cards (MXP_2.5G_10G, MXP_MR_10DME_C,
MXP_MR_10DME_L), and ADM-10G cards with FEC disabled
C
OC-192 LR ITU cards (TXP_MR_10E, TXP_MR_10E_C, and TXP_MR_10E_L)
without FEC
D
2.5-Gbps multirate transponder card (TXP_MR_2.5G), both protected and
unprotected, with FEC enabled
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5.1.3 Interface Classes
Table 5-3
ONS 15454 Card Interfaces Assigned to Input Power Classes (continued)
Input Power Class
Card
E
OC-48 100-GHz DWDM muxponder card (MXP_MR_2.5G) and 2.5-Gbps
multirate transponder card (TXP_MR_2.5G), protected or unprotected, with FEC
disabled and retime, reshape, and regenerate (3R) mode enabled
F
2.5-Gbps multirate transponder card (TXP_MR_2.5G), protected or unprotected,
in regenerate and reshape (2R) mode
G
OC-48 ELR 100 GHz card
H
2/4 port GbE transponder (GBIC WDM 100GHz)
I
TXP_MR_10E, TXP_MR_10E_C, and TXP_MR_10E_L cards with enhanced
FEC (E-FEC) and the MXP_2.5G_10E, MXP_2.5G_10E_C, MXP_2.5G_10E_L,
MXP_MR_10DME_C, and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards with E-FEC enabled
Table 5-4 lists the optical performance parameters for 10-Gbps cards that provide signal input to
multiplexer and demultiplexer cards.
Table 5-4
10-Gbps Interface Optical Performance
Parameter
Class A
Class B
1
Class I
OSNR
Limited
Power
Limited
Type
Power
Limited
Maximum bit rate
10 Gbps
10 Gbps
10 Gbps
10 Gbps
Regeneration
3R
3R
3R
3R
FEC
Yes
No
No
Yes (E-FEC)
Optimum
Average
Average
Optimum
–12
–12
Threshold
Maximum BER
2
10
OSNR
Limited
Class C
–15
Power
Limited
10
OSNR
Limited
10
OSNR
Limited
10–15
OSNR1 sensitivity
23 dB
Power sensitivity
–24 dBm –18 dBm –21 dBm –20 dBm –22 dBm
–26 dBm –18 dBm
Power overload
–8 dBm
Transmitted Power Range
9 dB
23 dB
19 dB
19 dB
20 dB
–8 dBm
–9 dBm
–8 dBm
8 dB
3
10-Gbps multirate
transponder/10-Gbps
FEC transponder
(TXP_MR_10G)
+2.5 to 3.5 dBm
+2.5 to 3.5 dBm
—
—
OC-192 LR ITU
—
—
+3.0 to 6.0
dBm
—
10-Gbps multirate
transponder/10-Gbps
FEC transponder
(TXP_MR_10E)
+3.0 to 6.0 dBm
+3.0 to 6.0 dBm
—
+3.0 to 6.0 dBm
Dispersion
compensation
tolerance
+/–800 ps/nm
+/–1,000 ps/nm
+/–1,000
ps/nm
+/–800 ps/nm
1. OSNR = optical signal-to-noise ratio
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2. BER = bit error rate
3. These values, decreased by patchcord and connector losses, are also the input power values for the OADM cards.
Table 5-5 lists the optical interface performance parameters for 2.5-Gbps cards that provide signal input
to multiplexer and demultiplexer cards.
Table 5-5
2.5-Gbps Interface Optical Performance
Parameter
Class D
Type
Power
Limited
Maximum bit rate
Class E
Class F
Class G
Power OSNR
OSNR
Limited Limited Limited
Power
Limited
2.5 Gbps
2.5 Gbps
2.5 Gbps
2.5 Gbps
1.25 Gbps
2.5 Gbps
Regeneration
3R
3R
2R
3R
3R
3R
FEC
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
Threshold
Average
Average
Average
Average
Average
Average
–15
–12
–12
–12
–12
OSNR
Limited
Class H
OSNR
Limited
Power
Limited
Class J
OSNR
Limited
Power
Limited
10–12
Maximum BER
10
OSNR sensitivity
14 dB
6 dB
14 dB
10 dB
15 dB
14 dB
11 dB
13 dB
Power sensitivity
–31
dBm
–25
dBm
–30
dBm
–23
dBm
–24 dBm
–27
dBm
–33
dBm
–28 dBm –18 dBm –26 dBm
Power overload
–9 dBm
–9 dBm
–9 dBm
–9 dBm
–1.0 to 1.0 dBm
–1.0 to
1.0 dBm
–2.0 to 0 dBm
Transmitted Power Range
10
10
10
10
12 dB
–7 dBm
–17dBm
+2.5 to3.5 dBm
—
1
TXP_MR_2.5G
–1.0 to1.0 dBm
TXPP_MR_2.5G
–4.5 to –2.5 dBm
–4.5 to –2.5 dBm –4.5 to
–2.5 dBm
MXP_MR_2.5G
—
+2.0 to +4.0 dBm —
MXPP_MR_2.5G
—
–1.5 to +0.5 dBm —
2/4 port GbE
Transponder (GBIC
WDM 100GHz)
Dispersion
compensation
tolerance
8 dB
–1200 to
+5400 ps/nm
–1200 to
+5400 ps/nm
–1200 to –1200 to
+3300
+3300 ps/nm
ps/nm
–1000 to +3600
ps/nm
–1000 to
+3200
ps/nm
1. These values, decreased by patchcord and connector losses, are also the input power values for the OADM cards.
5.1.4 Channel Allocation Plan
ONS 15454 DWDM multiplexer and demultiplexer cards are designed for use with specific channels in
the C band and L band. In most cases, the channels for these cards are either numbered (for example, 1
to 32 or 1 to 40) or delimited (odd or even). Client interfaces must comply with these channel
assignments to be compatible with the ONS 15454 system.
Table 5-6 lists the channel IDs and wavelengths assigned to the C-band DWDM channels.
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5.1.4 Channel Allocation Plan
Note
In some cases, a card uses only one of the bands (C band or L band) and some or all of the channels listed
in a band. Also, some cards use channels on the 100-GHz ITU grid while others use channels on the
50-GHz ITU grid. See the specific card description or Appendix A, “Hardware Specifications” for more
details.
Table 5-6
DWDM Channel Allocation Plan (C Band)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
1
196.00
1529.55
42
193.95
1545.72
2
195.95
1529.94
43
193.90
1546.119
3
195.90
1530.334
44
193.85
1546.518
4
195.85
1530.725
45
193.80
1546.917
5
195.80
1531.116
46
193.75
1547.316
6
195.75
1531.507
47
193.70
1547.715
7
195.70
1531.898
48
193.65
1548.115
8
195.65
1532.290
49
193.60
1548.515
9
195.60
1532.681
50
193.55
1548.915
10
195.55
1533.073
51
193.50
1549.32
11
195.50
1533.47
52
193.45
1549.71
12
195.45
1533.86
53
193.40
1550.116
13
195.40
1534.250
54
193.35
1550.517
14
195.35
1534.643
55
193.30
1550.918
15
195.30
1535.036
56
193.25
1551.319
16
195.25
1535.429
57
193.20
1551.721
17
195.20
1535.822
58
193.15
1552.122
18
195.15
1536.216
59
193.10
1552.524
19
195.10
1536.609
60
193.05
1552.926
20
195.05
1537.003
61
193.00
1553.33
21
195.00
1537.40
62
192.95
1553.73
22
194.95
1537.79
63
192.90
1554.134
23
194.90
1538.186
64
192.85
1554.537
24
194.85
1538.581
65
192.80
1554.940
25
194.80
1538.976
66
192.75
1555.343
26
194.75
1539.371
67
192.70
1555.747
27
194.70
1539.766
68
192.65
1556.151
28
194.65
1540.162
69
192.60
1556.555
29
194.60
1540.557
70
192.55
1556.959
30
194.55
1540.953
71
192.50
1557.36
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5.1.4 Channel Allocation Plan
Table 5-6
DWDM Channel Allocation Plan (C Band) (continued)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
31
194.50
1541.35
72
192.45
1557.77
32
194.45
1541.75
73
192.40
1558.173
33
194.40
1542.142
74
192.35
1558.578
34
194.35
1542.539
75
192.30
1558.983
35
194.30
1542.936
76
192.25
1559.389
36
194.25
1543.333
77
192.20
1559.794
37
194.20
1543.730
78
192.15
1560.200
38
194.15
1544.128
79
192.10
1560.606
39
194.10
1544.526
80
192.05
1561.013
40
194.05
1544.924
81
192.00
1561.42
41
194.00
1545.32
82
191.95
1561.83
Table 5-7 lists the channel IDs and wavelengths assigned to the L-band channels.
Table 5-7
DWDM Channel Allocation Plan (L Band)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
1
190.85
1570.83
41
188.85
1587.46
2
190.8
1571.24
42
188.8
1587.88
3
190.75
1571.65
43
188.75
1588.30
4
190.7
1572.06
44
188.7
1588.73
5
190.65
1572.48
45
188.65
1589.15
6
190.6
1572.89
46
188.6
1589.57
7
190.55
1573.30
47
188.55
1589.99
8
190.5
1573.71
48
188.5
1590.41
9
190.45
1574.13
49
188.45
1590.83
10
190.4
1574.54
50
188.4
1591.26
11
190.35
1574.95
51
188.35
1591.68
12
190.3
1575.37
52
188.3
1592.10
13
190.25
1575.78
53
188.25
1592.52
14
190.2
1576.20
54
188.2
1592.95
15
190.15
1576.61
55
188.15
1593.37
16
190.1
1577.03
56
188.1
1593.79
17
190.05
1577.44
57
188.05
1594.22
18
190
1577.86
58
188
1594.64
19
189.95
1578.27
59
187.95
1595.06
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Table 5-7
DWDM Channel Allocation Plan (L Band) (continued)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
20
189.9
1578.69
60
187.9
1595.49
21
189.85
1579.10
61
187.85
1595.91
22
189.8
1579.52
62
187.8
1596.34
23
189.75
1579.93
63
187.75
1596.76
24
189.7
1580.35
64
187.7
1597.19
25
189.65
1580.77
65
187.65
1597.62
26
189.6
1581.18
66
187.6
1598.04
27
189.55
1581.60
67
187.55
1598.47
28
189.5
1582.02
68
187.5
1598.89
29
189.45
1582.44
69
187.45
1599.32
30
189.4
1582.85
70
187.4
1599.75
31
189.35
1583.27
71
187.35
1600.17
32
189.3
1583.69
72
187.3
1600.60
33
189.25
1584.11
73
187.25
1601.03
34
189.2
1584.53
74
187.2
1601.46
35
189.15
1584.95
75
187.15
1601.88
36
189.1
1585.36
76
187.1
1602.31
37
189.05
1585.78
77
187.05
1602.74
38
189
1586.20
78
187
1603.17
39
188.95
1586.62
79
186.95
1603.60
40
188.9
1587.04
80
186.9
1604.03
5.2 Safety Labels
This section explains the significance of the safety labels attached to some of the cards. The faceplates
of the cards are clearly labeled with warnings about the laser radiation levels. You must understand all
warning labels before working on these cards.
5.2.1 Class 1 Laser Product Labels
The 32MUX-O card has a Class 1 laser. The labels that appear on the card are described in the following
sections.
5.2.1.1 Class 1 Laser Product Label
The Class 1 Laser Product label is shown in Figure 5-1.
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5.2.1 Class 1 Laser Product Labels
Figure 5-1
Class 1 Laser Product Label
145952
CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT
Class 1 lasers are products whose irradiance does not exceed the Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE)
value. Therefore, for Class 1 laser products the output power is below the level at which it is believed
eye damage will occur. Exposure to the beam of a Class 1 laser will not result in eye injury and may
therefore be considered safe. However, some Class 1 laser products may contain laser systems of a higher
class but there are adequate engineering control measures to ensure that access to the beam is not
reasonably likely. Anyone who dismantles a Class 1 laser product that contains a higher Class laser
system is potentially at risk of exposure to a hazardous laser beam
5.2.1.2 Hazard Level 1 Label
The Hazard Level 1 label is shown in Figure 5-2. This label is displayed on the faceplate of the cards.
Figure 5-2
Hazard Level Label
65542
HAZARD
LEVEL 1
The Hazard Level label warns users against exposure to laser radiation of Class 1 limits calculated in
accordance with IEC60825-1 Ed.1.2.
5.2.1.3 Laser Source Connector Label
The Laser Source Connector label is shown in Figure 5-3.
Laser Source Connector Label
96635
Figure 5-3
This label indicates that a laser source is present at the optical connector where the label has been placed.
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5.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards
5.2.1.4 FDA Statement Label
The FDA Statement labels are shown in Figure 5-4 and Figure 5-5. These labels show compliance to
FDA standards and that the hazard level classification is in accordance with IEC60825-1 Am.2 or Ed.1.2.
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JULY 26, 2001
Figure 5-5
96634
FDA Statement Label
FDA Statement Label
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JUNE 24, 2007
282324
Figure 5-4
5.2.1.5 Shock Hazard Label
The Shock Hazard label is shown in Figure 5-6.
Shock Hazard Label
65541
Figure 5-6
This label alerts personnel to electrical hazard within the card. The potential of shock hazard exists when
removing adjacent cards during maintenance, and touching exposed electrical circuitry on the card itself.
5.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards
The 32DMX-O and 4MD-xx.x cards have Class IM lasers. The labels that appear on these cards are
described in the following subsections.
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5.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards
5.2.2.1 Class 1M Laser Product Statement
The Class 1M Laser Product statement is shown in Figure 5-7.
Figure 5-7
Class 1M Laser Product Statement
145953
CAUTION
HAZARD LEVEL 1M INVISIBLE
LASER RADIATION
DO NOT VIEW DIRECTLY WITH
NON-ATTENUATING OPTICAL
INSTRUMENTS λ = 1400nm TO 1610nm
Class 1M lasers are products that produce either a highly divergent beam or a large diameter beam.
Therefore, only a small part of the whole laser beam can enter the eye. However, these laser products
can be harmful to the eye if the beam is viewed using magnifying optical instruments.
5.2.2.2 Hazard Level 1M Label
The Hazard Level 1M label is shown in Figure 5-8. This label is displayed on the faceplate of the cards.
Figure 5-8
Hazard Level Label
145990
HAZARD
LEVEL 1M
The Hazard Level label warns users against exposure to laser radiation of Class 1 limits calculated in
accordance with IEC60825-1 Ed.1.2.
5.2.2.3 Laser Source Connector Label
The Laser Source Connector label is shown in Figure 5-9.
Laser Source Connector Label
96635
Figure 5-9
This label indicates that a laser source is present at the optical connector where the label has been placed.
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5.3 32MUX-O Card
5.2.2.4 FDA Statement Label
The FDA Statement labels are shown in Figure 5-10 and Figure 5-11. These labels show compliance to
FDA standards and that the hazard level classification is in accordance with IEC60825-1 Am.2 or Ed.1.2.
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JULY 26, 2001
Figure 5-11
96634
FDA Statement Label
FDA Statement Label
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JUNE 24, 2007
282324
Figure 5-10
5.2.2.5 Shock Hazard Label
The Shock Hazard label is shown in Figure 5-6.
Shock Hazard Label
65541
Figure 5-12
This label alerts personnel to electrical hazard within the card. The potential of shock hazard exists when
removing adjacent cards during maintenance, and touching exposed electrical circuitry on the card itself.
5.3 32MUX-O Card
Note
See the “A.7.1 32MUX-O Card Specifications” section on page A-20 for hardware specifications.
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5.3 32MUX-O Card
The 32-Channel Multiplexer (32MUX-O) card multiplexes 32 100-GHz-spaced channels identified in
the channel plan. The 32MUX-O card takes up two slots in an ONS 15454 and can be installed in
Slots 1 to 5 and 12 to 16.
The 32MUX-O features include:
•
Arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) device that enables full multiplexing functions for the channels.
•
Each single-channel port is equipped with VOAs for automatic optical power regulation prior to
multiplexing. In the case of electrical power failure, the VOA is set to its maximum attenuation for
safety purposes. A manual VOA setting is also available.
•
Each single-channel port is monitored using a photodiode to enable automatic power regulation.
An additional optical monitoring port with 1:99 splitting ratio is available.
Figure 5-13 shows the 32MUX-O faceplate.
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5.3 32MUX-O Card
Figure 5-13
32MUX-O Faceplate
32MUX-0
FAIL
ACT
MON
96468
COM
TX
54.1 - 60.6
46.1 - 52.5
RX
38.1 - 44.5
30.3 - 36.6
SF
For information on safety labels for the card, see the “5.2.1 Class 1 Laser Product Labels” section on
page 5-7.
Figure 5-14 shows a block diagram of the 32MUX-O card.
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5.3.1 Channel Plan
Figure 5-14
32MUX-O Block Diagram
30.3 to 36.6
8 CHS RX
38.1 to 44.5
8 CHS RX
46.1 to 52.5
8 CHS RX
54.1 to 60.6
8 CHS RX
MON
Optical
module
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
DC/DC
Power supply
Input filters
134413
Processor
COM TX
SCL Bus SCL Bus
TCCi M
TCCi P
BAT A&B
The 32MUX-O card has four receive connectors that accept multifiber push-on (MPO) cables on its front
panel for the client input interfaces. MPO cables break out into eight separate cables. The 32MUX-O
card also has two LC-PC-II optical connectors, one for the main output and the other for the monitor port.
Figure 5-15 shows the 32MUX-O optical module functional block diagram.
Figure 5-15
32MUX-O Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
1
P1
P2
P3
P4
MON
Inputs
COM TX
P29
P30
P31
P
Physical photodiode
Variable optical attenuator
P32
Control
Control
interface
98301
32
5.3.1 Channel Plan
The 32MUX-O is typically used in hub nodes and provides the multiplexing of 32 channels, spaced at
100 GHz, into one fiber before their amplification and transmission along the line. The channel plan is
shown in Table 5-8.
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5.3.1 Channel Plan
Table 5-8
32MUX-O Channel Plan
Channel Number1 Channel ID
Frequency (GHz)
Wavelength (nm)
1
30.3
195.9
1530.33
2
31.2
195.8
1531.12
3
31.9
195.7
1531.90
4
32.6
195.6
1532.68
5
34.2
195.4
1534.25
6
35.0
195.3
1535.04
7
35.8
195.2
1535.82
8
36.6
195.1
1536.61
9
38.1
194.9
1538.19
10
38.9
194.8
1538.98
11
39.7
194.7
1539.77
12
40.5
194.6
1540.56
13
42.1
194.4
1542.14
14
42.9
194.3
1542.94
15
43.7
194.2
1543.73
16
44.5
194.1
1544.53
17
46.1
193.9
1546.12
18
46.9
193.8
1546.92
19
47.7
193.7
1547.72
20
48.5
193.6
1548.51
21
50.1
193.4
1550.12
22
50.9
193.3
1550.92
23
51.7
193.2
1551.72
24
52.5
193.1
1552.52
25
54.1
192.9
1554.13
26
54.9
192.8
1554.94
27
55.7
192.7
1555.75
28
56.5
192.6
1556.55
29
58.1
192.4
1558.17
30
58.9
192.3
1558.98
31
59.7
192.2
1559.79
32
60.6
192.1
1560.61
1. The Channel Number column is only for reference purposes. The channel ID is consistent with
the ONS 15454 and is used in card identification.
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5.3.2 Power Monitoring
5.3.2 Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P32 monitor the power for the 32MUX-O card. The returned power
level values are calibrated to the ports as shown in Table 5-9.
Table 5-9
32MUX-O Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1–P32
ADD
COM TX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
5.3.3 32MUX-O Card-Level Indicators
The 32MUX-O card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 5-10.
Table 5-10
32MUX-O Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that
there is an internal hardware failure. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the 32MUX-O is carrying traffic or is
traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure on one or more of the card’s
ports. The amber SF LED also illuminates when the transmit and receive
fibers are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the
light turns off.
5.3.4 32MUX-O Port-Level Indicators
You can find the status of the card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray assembly. Use
the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and severity of alarms
for a given port or slot. The 32MUX-O card has five sets of ports located on the faceplate.
COM TX is the line output. COM MON is the optical monitoring port. The xx.x to yy.y RX ports
represent the four groups of eight channels ranging from wavelength xx.x to wavelength yy.y, according
to the channel plan.
5.4 32DMX-O Card
Note
See the “A.7.2 32DMX-O Card Specifications” section on page A-21 for hardware specifications.
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5.4 32DMX-O Card
The 32-Channel Demultiplexer (32DMX-O) card demultiplexes 32 100-GHz-spaced channels identified
in the channel plan. The 32DMX-O takes up two slots in an ONS 15454 and can be installed in
Slots 1 to 5 and 12 to 16.
The 32DMX-O features include:
•
AWG that enables channel demultiplexing functions.
•
Each single-channel port is equipped with VOAs for automatic optical power regulation after
demultiplexing. In the case of electrical power failure, the VOA is set to its maximum attenuation
for safety purposes. A manual VOA setting is also available.
•
The 32DXM-O has four physical receive connectors that accept MPO cables on its front panel for
the client input interfaces. MPO cables break out into eight separate cables.
Note
•
In contrast, the single-slot 32DMX card does not have VOAs on each drop port for optical power
regulation. The 32DMX optical demultiplexer module is used in conjunction with the 32WSS
card in ONS 15454 Multiservice Transport Platform (MSTP) nodes.
Each single-channel port is monitored using a photodiode to enable automatic power regulation.
Figure 5-16 shows the 32DMX-O card faceplate.
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5.4 32DMX-O Card
Figure 5-16
32DMX-O Faceplate
32DMX-0
FAIL
ACT
54.1 - 60.6
46.1 - 52.5
TX
38.1 - 44.5
30.3 - 36.6
SF
145935
COM
RX
MON
For information on safety labels for the card, see the “5.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards” section on
page 5-9.
Figure 5-17 shows a block diagram of the 32DMX-O card.
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5.4.1 Power Monitoring
Figure 5-17
32DMX-O Block Diagram
30.3 to 36.6
8 CHS TX
38.1 to 44.5
8 CHS TX
46.1 to 52.5
8 CHS TX
54.1 to 60.6
8 CHS TX
MON
Optical
module
Processor
DC/DC
Power supply
Input filters
96480
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
COM RX
SCL Bus SCL Bus
TCCi M
TCCi P
BAT A&B
Figure 5-18 shows the 32DMX-O optical module functional block diagram.
Figure 5-18
32DMX-O Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
P1
1
P2
P3
P4
COM RX
DROP TX
P33
P29
P30
P31
Variable optical attenuator
P
32
Control
interface
Control
Physical photodiode
98302
P32
5.4.1 Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P33 monitor the power for the 32DMX-O card. The returned power
level values are calibrated to the ports as shown in Table 5-11.
Table 5-11
32DMX-O Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1–P32
DROP
DROP TX
P33
INPUT COM
COM RX
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5.4.2 32DMX-O Card-Level Indicators
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
5.4.2 32DMX-O Card-Level Indicators
The 32DMX-O card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 5-12.
Table 5-12
32DMX-O Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that
there is an internal hardware failure. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the 32DMX-O is carrying traffic or is
traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure on one or more of the card’s
ports. The amber SF LED also illuminates when the transmit and receive
fibers are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the
light turns off.
5.4.3 32DMX-O Port-Level Indicators
You can find the status of the card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray assembly. Use
the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and severity of alarms
for a given port or slot. The 32DMX-O card has five sets of ports located on the faceplate. MON is the
output monitor port. COM RX is the line input. The xx.x to yy.y TX ports represent the four groups of
eight channels ranging from wavelength xx.x to wavelength yy.y according to the channel plan.
5.5 4MD-xx.x Card
Note
See the “A.7.3 4MD-xx.x Card Specifications” section on page A-22 for hardware specifications.
The 4-Channel Multiplexer/Demultiplexer (4MD-xx.x) card multiplexes and demultiplexes four
100-GHz-spaced channels identified in the channel plan. The 4MD-xx.x card is designed to be used with
band OADMs (both AD-1B-xx.x and AD-4B-xx.x).
The card is bidirectional. The demultiplexer and multiplexer functions are implemented in two different
sections of the same card. In this way, the same card can manage signals flowing in opposite directions.
There are eight versions of this card that correspond with the eight sub-bands specified in Table 5-13 on
page 5-23. The 4MD-xx.x can be installed in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
The 4MD-xx.x has the following features implemented inside a plug-in optical module:
•
Passive cascade of interferential filters perform the channel multiplex/demultiplex function.
•
Software-controlled VOAs at every port of the multiplex section regulate the optical power of each
multiplexed channel.
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5.5 4MD-xx.x Card
•
Software-monitored photodiodes at the input and output multiplexer and demultiplexer ports for
power control and safety purposes.
•
Software-monitored virtual photodiodes at the common DWDM output and input ports. A virtual
photodiode is a firmware calculation of the optical power at that port. This calculation is based on
the single channel photodiode reading and insertion losses of the appropriated paths.
Figure 5-19 shows the 4MD-xx.x faceplate.
Figure 5-19
4MD-xx.x Faceplate
4MD
-X.XX
FAIL
ACT
TX
TX
TX
RX
TX
TX
96470
COM
15xx.xx
RX
15xx.xx
RX
15xx.xx
RX
15xx.xx
RX
SF
For information on safety labels for the card, see the “5.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards” section on
page 5-9.
Figure 5-20 shows a block diagram of the 4MD-xx.x card.
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5.5 4MD-xx.x Card
Figure 5-20
4MD-xx.x Block Diagram
Channel
Outputs
COM RX
Optical
Module
COM TX
Channel
Inputs
DC/DC
converter
Processor
Power supply
input filters
96482
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
SCL Bus SCL Bus
TCC M
TCC P
BAT
A&B
Figure 5-21 shows the 4MD-xx.x optical module functional block diagram.
Figure 5-21
4MD-xx.x Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
COM TX
COM RX
Control
interface
Control
Demux
Mux
V1
P1
P2
V2
P3
P3
P6
P7
P8
98303
P5
RX channels
TX channels
V Virtual photodiode
P Physical photodiode
Variable optical attenuator
The optical module shown in Figure 5-21 is optically passive and consists of a cascade of interferential
filters that perform the channel multiplexing and demultiplexing functions.
VOAs are present in every input path of the multiplex section in order to regulate the optical power of
each multiplexed channel. Some optical input and output ports are monitored by means of photodiodes
implemented both for power control and for safety purposes. An internal control manages VOA settings
and functionality as well as photodiode detection and alarm thresholds. The power at the main output
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5.5.1 Wavelength Pairs
and input ports is monitored through the use of virtual photodiodes. A virtual photodiode is implemented
in the firmware of the plug-in module. This firmware calculates the power on a port, summing the
measured values from all single channel ports (and applying the proper path insertion loss) and then
providing the TCC2/TCC2P card with the obtained value.
5.5.1 Wavelength Pairs
Table 5-13 shows the band IDs and the add/drop channel IDs for the 4MD-xx.x card.
Table 5-13
4MD-xx.x Channel Sets
Band ID
Add/Drop Channel IDs
Band 30.3 (A)
30.3, 31.2, 31.9, 32.6
Band 34.2 (B)
34.2, 35.0, 35.8, 36.6
Band 38.1 (C)
38.1, 38.9, 39.7, 40.5
Band 42.1 (D)
42.1, 42.9, 43.7, 44.5
Band 46.1 (E)
46.1, 46.9, 47.7, 48.5
Band 50.1 (F)
50.1, 50.9, 51.7, 52.5
Band 54.1 (G)
54.1, 54.9, 55.7, 56.5
Band 58.1 (H)
58.1, 58.9, 59.7, 60.6
5.5.2 Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P8 and virtual photodiodes V1 and V2 monitor the power for the
4MD-xx.x card. The returned power level values are calibrated to the ports as shown in Table 5-14.
Table 5-14
4MD-xx.x Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1–P4
ADD
COM TX
P5–P8
DROP
DROP TX
V1
OUT COM
COM TX
V2
IN COM
COM RX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
5.5.3 4MD-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
The 4MD-xx.x card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 5-15.
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5.5.4 4MD-xx.x Port-Level Indicators
Table 5-15
4MD-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that
there is an internal hardware failure. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the 4MD-xx.x card is carrying traffic or
is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure on one or more of the card’s
ports. The amber SF LED also illuminates when the transmit and receive
fibers are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the
light turns off.
5.5.4 4MD-xx.x Port-Level Indicators
You can find the status of the card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray assembly. Use
the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and severity of alarms
for a given port or slot. The 4MD-xx.x card has five sets of ports located on the faceplate. COM RX is
the line input. COM TX is the line output. The 15xx.x TX ports represent demultiplexed channel
outputs 1 to 4. The 15xx.x RX ports represent multiplexed channel inputs 1 to 4.
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6
PSM Card
This chapter describes the Protection Switching Module (PSM) card used in Cisco ONS 15454 dense
wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) networks. For installation and card turn-up procedures, refer
to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. For card safety and compliance information, refer to
the Cisco Optical Transport Products Safety and Compliance Information document.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Chapter topics include:
•
6.1 PSM Card Overview
•
6.2 Key Features
•
6.3 PSM Block Diagram
•
6.4 PSM Faceplate Ports
•
6.5 PSM Card-Level Indicators
•
6.6 PSM Bidirectional Switching
6.1 PSM Card Overview
The PSM card performs splitter protection functions. In the transmit (TX) section of the PSM card (see
Figure 6-1), the signal received on the common receive port is duplicated by a hardware splitter to both
the working and protect transmit ports. In the receive (RX) section of the PSM card (Figure 6-1), a
switch is provided to select one of the two input signals (on working and protect receive ports) to be
transmitted through the common transmit port.
The PSM card supports multiple protection configurations:
•
Channel protection—The PSM COM ports are connected to the TXP/MXP trunk ports.
•
Line (or path) protection—The PSM W and P ports are connected directly to the external line.
•
Multiplex section protection—The PSM is equipped between the MUX/DMX stage and the
amplification stage.
For more information on the network configurations supported for the PSM card, see the
“10.2 Supported Node Configurations for OPT-RAMP-C Card” section on page 10-19.
For more information on the network topologies supported for the PSM card, see the “11.4 Network
Topologies for the PSM Card” section on page 11-9.
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6.2 Key Features
6.2 Key Features
The PSM card provides the following features:
•
Operates over the C-band (wavelengths from 1529 nm to 1562.5 nm) and L-band (wavelengths from
1570.5 nm to 1604 nm) of the optical spectrum.
•
Implements bidirectional nonrevertive protection scheme. For more details on bidirectional
switching, see the “6.6 PSM Bidirectional Switching” section on page 6-5.
•
Single slot card with three LEDs on the front panel.
•
Six LC-PC-II optical connectors on the front panel.
•
Can be equipped in any node from Slot 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
•
Can be equipped in a different shelf from its peer TXP/MXP card in channel protection
configuration.
Note
It is strongly recommended that you use the default layouts designed by Cisco Transport Planner,
which place the PSM card and its peer TXP/MXP card as close as possible to simplify cable
management.
•
Automatic creation of splitter protection group when the PSM card is provisioned.
•
Switching priorities are based on ITU-T G.873.1.
•
Performance monitoring and alarm handling with settable thresholds.
•
Automatic laser shutdown (ALS), a safety mechanism used in the event of a fiber cut. ALS is
applicable only in line protection configuration. For details on ALS provisioning for the card, refer
to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. For information about using the card to
implement ALS in a network, see the “11.9 Network Optical Safety” section on page 11-19.
6.3 PSM Block Diagram
Figure 6-1 shows a simplified block diagram of the PSM card.
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6.4 PSM Faceplate Ports
Figure 6-1
PSM Block Diagram
TX Section
VOA1
Virtual
PD
PD1
W-TX
50/50
Splitter
COM-RX
P-TX
PD2
VOA2
PD3
PD5
VOA3
W-RX
1x2
Switch
COM-TX
P-RX
270910
PD4
RX Section
6.4 PSM Faceplate Ports
The PSM card has six optical ports located on the faceplate:
•
COM-RX (receive) is the input signal port.
•
COM-TX (transmit) is the output signal port.
•
W-TX is the working output signal port (transmit section).
•
W-RX is the working input signal port (receive section).
•
P-TX is the protect output signal port (transmit section).
•
P-RX is the protect input signal port (receive section).
All ports are equipped with photodiodes to monitor optical power and other related thresholds. The
W-RX, P-RX, W-TX, and P-TX ports have optical power regulation provided by variable optical
attenuators (VOA). All VOAs equipped within the PSM card work in control attenuation mode.
Figure 6-2 shows the PSM card faceplate.
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Chapter 6
PSM Card
6.5 PSM Card-Level Indicators
Figure 6-2
PSM Card Faceplate
PSM
TX
RX
TX
TX
1345567
Any of the 12
general purpose slots
270911
COM
P
RX
W
RX
FAIL
ACT
SF
6.5 PSM Card-Level Indicators
Table 6-1 shows the three card-level indicators on the PSM card.
Table 6-1
PSM Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is
not ready or that an internal hardware failure occurred.
Replace the card if the red FAIL LED persists.
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PSM Card
6.6 PSM Bidirectional Switching
Table 6-1
PSM Card-Level Indicators (continued)
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the PSM is carrying
traffic or is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition
such as LOS on one or more of the card’s ports. The
amber SF LED also turns on when the transmit and
receive fibers are incorrectly connected. When the fibers
are properly connected, the light turns off.
6.6 PSM Bidirectional Switching
A VOA is equipped after the hardware splitter within the PSM card. The VOA implements bidirectional
switching when there is a single fiber cut in a protection configuration involving two peer PSM cards.
Figure 6-3 shows a sample configuration that explains the bidirectional switching capability of the PSM
card.
Figure 6-3
PSM Bidirectional Switching
TX Section
RX Section
PD1
W-TX
W-RX
PD3
COM-TX
COM-RX
PD2
P-TX
P-RX
PD5
PD1
PD3
PD5
PD4
W-RX
W-TX
COM-RX
COM-TX
PD4
P-TX
PD2
RX Section
TX Section
A
270915
P-RX
B
In this example, there is a fiber cut in the working path from Station A to Station B as shown in
Figure 6-3. As a result of the fiber cut, an LOS alarm is raised on the W-RX port of Station B and it
immediately switches traffic on to its P-RX port. Station B simultaneously also stops transmission (for
approximately 25 milliseconds) on its W-TX port, which raises an LOS alarm on the W-RX port of
Station A. This causes Station A to also switch traffic to its P-RX port. In this way, PSM implements
bidirectional switching without any data exchange between the two stations.
Since the two stations do not communicate using signaling protocols (overhead bytes), a Manual or
Force protection switch on the PSM card is implemented by creating a traffic hit. For example, consider
that you perform a Manual or Force protection switch on Station A. The TX VOA on the active path is
set to automatic VOA shutdown (AVS) state for 25 milliseconds. This causes Station B to switch traffic
to the other path because it cannot differentiate between a maintenance operation and a real fail. After
25 milliseconds, the VOA in Station A is automatically reset. However, Station B will not revert back by
itself because of nonrevertive switching protection scheme used in the PSM card.
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6.6 PSM Bidirectional Switching
To effectively implement switching, the Lockout and Force commands must be performed on both the
stations. If these commands are not performed on both the stations, the far-end and near-end PSMs can
be misaligned. In case of misalignment, when a path recovers, traffic might not recover automatically.
You might have to perform a Force protection switch to recover traffic.
Note
The order in which you repair the paths is important in the event of a double failure (both the working
and protect paths are down due to a fiber cut) on the PSM card in line protection configuration when the
active path is the working path. If you repair the working path first, traffic is automatically restored.
However, if you repair the protect path first, traffic is not automatically restored. You must perform a
Force protection switch to restore traffic on the protect path.
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CH APT ER
7
Optical Add/Drop Cards
This chapter describes optical add/drop cards used in Cisco ONS 15454 dense wavelength division
multiplexing (DWDM) networks. For installation and card turn-up procedures, refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. For card safety and compliance information, refer to the
Cisco Optical Transport Products Safety and Compliance Information document.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Chapter topics include:
•
7.1 Card Overview, page 7-1
•
7.2 Class 1M Laser Product Safety Lasers, page 7-7
•
7.3 AD-1C-xx.x Card, page 7-9
•
7.4 AD-2C-xx.x Card, page 7-12
•
7.5 AD-4C-xx.x Card, page 7-16
•
7.6 AD-1B-xx.x Card, page 7-20
•
7.7 AD-4B-xx.x Card, page 7-23
7.1 Card Overview
The card overview section contains card overview, software compatibility, interface class, and channel
allocation information for optical add/drop cards.
Note
Each card is marked with a symbol that corresponds to a slot (or slots) on the ONS 15454 shelf assembly.
The cards are then installed into slots displaying the same symbols. See the “1.16.1 Card Slot
Requirements” section on page 1-61 for a list of slots and symbols.
Optical add/drop cards are divided into two groups: band optical add/drop multiplexer (OADM) cards
and channel OADM cards. Band OADM cards add and drop one or four bands of adjacent channels. The
cards in this chapter, including the 4-Band OADM (AD-4B-xx.x) and the 1-Band OADM (AD-1B-xx.x)
are utilized only in the C band. Channel OADM cards add and drop one, two, or four adjacent channels;
they include the 4-Channel OADM (AD-4C-xx.x), the 2-Channel OADM (AD-2C-xx.x), and the
1-Channel OADM (AD-1C-xx.x).
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Chapter 7
Optical Add/Drop Cards
7.1.1 Card Summary
Note
For information about L band add and drop capability, see Chapter 8, “Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop
Cards.”
7.1.1 Card Summary
Table 7-1 lists and summarizes the functions of the optical add/drop cards.
Table 7-1
Optical Add/Drop Cards
Card
Port Description
For Additional Information
AD-1C-xx.x
The AD-1C-xx.x card has three sets of ports See the “7.3 AD-1C-xx.x Card”
located on the faceplate. It operates in Slots section on page 7-9.
1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
AD-2C-xx.x
The AD-2C-xx.x card has four sets of ports See the “7.4 AD-2C-xx.x Card”
located on the faceplate. It operates in Slots section on page 7-12.
1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
AD-4C-xx.x
The AD-4C-xx.x card has six sets of ports See the “7.5 AD-4C-xx.x Card”
located on the faceplate. It operates in Slots section on page 7-16.
1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
AD-1B-xx.x
The AD-1B-xx.x card has three sets of ports See the “7.6 AD-1B-xx.x Card”
located on the faceplate. It operates in Slots section on page 7-20.
1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
AD-4B-xx.x
The AD-4B-xx.x card has six sets of ports See the “7.7 AD-4B-xx.x Card”
located on the faceplate. It operates in Slots section on page 7-23.
1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
7.1.2 Card Compatibility
Table 7-2 lists the CTC software compatibility for each optical add/drop card.
Table 7-2
Software Release Compatibility for Optical Add/Drop Cards
Card Name
R4.5
R4.6
R4.7
R5.0
R6.0
R7.0
R7.2
R8.0
R8.5
R9.0
AD-1C-xx.x
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
AD-2C-xx.x
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
AD-4C-xx.x
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
AD-1B-xx.x
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
AD-4B-xx.x
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
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Optical Add/Drop Cards
7.1.3 Interface Classes
7.1.3 Interface Classes
The AD-1C-xx.x, AD-2C-xx.x, AD-4C-xx.x, AD-1B-xx.x, and AD-4B-xx.x cards have different input
and output optical channel signals depending on the interface card where the input signal originates. The
input interface cards have been grouped in classes listed in Table 7-3. The subsequent tables list the
optical performances and output power of each interface class.
Table 7-3
ONS 15454 Card Interfaces Assigned to Input Power Classes
Input Power Class
Card
A
10-Gbps multirate transponder cards (TXP_MR_10G, TXP_MR_10E,
TXP_MR_10E_C, and TXP_MR_10E_L) with forward error correction (FEC)
enabled and 10-Gbps muxponder cards (MXP_2.5G_10G, MXP_2.5G_10E,
MXP_MR_10DME_C, MXP_MR_10DME_L, MXP_2.5G_10E_C, and
MXP_2.5G_10E_L) with FEC enabled
B
10-Gbps multirate transponder card (TXP_MR_10G) without FEC and the
10-Gbps muxponder card (MXP_2.5G_10G, MXP_MR_10DME_C,
MXP_MR_10DME_L) and ADM-10G cards with FEC disabled
C
OC-192 LR ITU cards (TXP_MR_10E, TXP_MR_10E_C, and TXP_MR_10E_L)
without FEC
D
2.5-Gbps multirate transponder card (TXP_MR_2.5G), both protected and
unprotected, with FEC enabled
E
OC-48 100-GHz DWDM muxponder card (MXP_MR_2.5G) and 2.5-Gbps
multirate transponder card (TXP_MR_2.5G), both protected and unprotected,
with FEC disabled and retime, reshape, and regenerate (3R) mode enabled
F
2.5-Gbps multirate transponder card (TXP_MR_2.5G), both protected and
unprotected, in regenerate and reshape (2R) mode
G
OC-48 ELR 100 GHz card
H
2/4 port GbE transponder (GBIC WDM 100GHz)
I
TXP_MR_10E, TXP_MR_10E_C, and TXP_MR_10E_L cards with enhanced
FEC (E-FEC) and the MXP_2.5G_10E, MXP_2.5G_10E_C, MXP_2.5G_10E_L,
MXP_MR_10DME_C, and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards with E-FEC enabled
10-Gbps cards that provide signal input to the optical add/drop cards have the optical performance
parameters listed in Table 7-4.
Table 7-4
10-Gbps Interface Optical Performance
Parameter
Class A
Class B
1
OSNR
Limited
(if appl.)
Power
Limited
OSNR
Limited
(if appl.)
Class C
Class I
OSNR
Limited
Power
Limited
OSNR
Limited
(if appl.)
Type
Power
Limited
Maximum bit rate
10 Gbps
10 Gbps
10 Gbps
10 Gbps
Regeneration
3R
3R
3R
3R
FEC
Yes
No
No
Yes (E-FEC)
Threshold
Optimum
Average
Average
Optimum
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7.1.3 Interface Classes
Table 7-4
10-Gbps Interface Optical Performance (continued)
Parameter
Class A
Class B
1
OSNR
Limited
(if appl.)
OSNR
Limited
(if appl.)
Power
Limited
Class C
Class I
OSNR
Limited
Power
Limited
10–12
10–15
19 dB
20 dB
OSNR
Limited
(if appl.)
Type
Power
Limited
Maximum BER2
10–15
OSNR1 sensitivity
23 dB
Power sensitivity
–24 dBm –18 dBm –21 dBm –20 dBm –22 dBm
–26 dBm –18 dBm
Power overload
–8 dBm
Transmitted Power Range
10–12
9 dB
23 dB
19 dB
–8 dBm
–9 dBm
–8 dBm
8 dB
3
10-Gbps multirate
transponder/10-Gbps
FEC transponder
(TXP_MR_10G)
+2.5 to 3.5 dBm
+2.5 to 3.5 dBm
—
—
OC-192 LR ITU
—
—
+3.0 to 6.0
dBm
—
10-Gbps multirate
transponder/10-Gbps
FEC transponder
(TXP_MR_10E)
+3.0 to 6.0 dBm
+3.0 to 6.0 dBm
—
+3.0 to 6.0 dBm
Dispersion
compensation
tolerance
+/–800 ps/nm
+/–1,000 ps/nm
+/–1,000
ps/nm
+/–800 ps/nm
1. OSNR = optical signal-to-noise ratio
2. BER = bit error rate
3. These values, decreased by patchcord and connector losses, are also the input power values for the OADM cards.
2.5-Gbps cards that provide signal input to the optical add/drop cards have the interface performance
parameters listed in Table 7-5.
Table 7-5
2.5-Gbps Interface Optical Performance
Parameter
Class D
Class E
Class F
Class G
Class H
OSNR
Limited
OSNR
OSNR
Limited Power (if
Limited
(if appl.) Limited appl.)
Power
Limited
OSNR
Limited Power
(if appl.) Limited
Class J
OSNR
Limited
(if appl.)
Power
Limited
Type
Power
Limited
Maximum bit rate
2.5 Gbps
2.5 Gbps
2.5 Gbps
2.5 Gbps
1.25 Gbps
2.5 Gbps
Regeneration
3R
3R
2R
3R
3R
3R
FEC
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
Threshold
Average
Average
Average
Average
Average
Average
–15
–12
–12
–12
–12
Maximum BER
10
OSNR sensitivity
14 dB
10
6 dB
14 dB
10
10 dB
15 dB
10
14 dB
10
11 dB
13 dB
10–12
8 dB
12 dB
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7.1.4 DWDM Card Channel Allocation Plan
Table 7-5
2.5-Gbps Interface Optical Performance (continued)
Parameter
Class D
Class F
Class G
Class H
Power
Limited
OSNR
Limited
OSNR
OSNR
Limited Power (if
Limited
(if appl.) Limited appl.)
Power
Limited
OSNR
Limited Power
(if appl.) Limited
Power sensitivity
–31
dBm
–25
dBm
–24 dBm
–27
dBm
–33
dBm
Power overload
–9 dBm
–9 dBm
–9 dBm
–9 dBm
–7 dBm
–17dBm
–1.0 to 1.0 dBm
–1.0 to
1.0 dBm
–2.0 to 0 dBm
—
—
—
+2.5 to3.5 dBm
—
Type
Transmitted Power Range
Class E
–30
dBm
–23
dBm
Class J
OSNR
Limited
(if appl.)
Power
Limited
–28 dBm –18 dBm –26 dBm
1
TXP_MR_2.5G
–1.0 to1.0 dBm
TXPP_MR_2.5G
–4.5 to –2.5 dBm
–4.5 to –2.5 dBm –4.5 to
–2.5 dBm
MXP_MR_2.5G
—
+2.0 to +4.0 dBm —
MXPP_MR_2.5G
—
–1.5 to +0.5 dBm —
2/4 port GbE
—
Transponder (GBIC
WDM 100GHz)
—
—
Dispersion
compensation
tolerance
–1200 to
+5400 ps/nm
–1200 to –1200 to
+3300
+3300 ps/nm
ps/nm
–1200 to
+5400 ps/nm
–1000 to +3600
ps/nm
–1000 to
+3200
ps/nm
1. These values, decreased by patchcord and connector losses, are also the input power values for the OADM cards.
7.1.4 DWDM Card Channel Allocation Plan
ONS 15454 DWDM channel OADM and band OADM cards are designed for use with specific channels
in the C band. In most cases, the channels for these cards are either numbered (for example, 1 to 32) or
delimited (odd or even). Client interfaces must comply with these channel assignments to be compatible
with the ONS 15454 system.
Table 7-6 lists the channel IDs and wavelengths assigned to the C-band DWDM channels.
Note
In some cases, a card uses only some or all of the channels listed in a band. Also, some cards use channels
on the 100-GHz ITU-T grid while others use channels on the 50-GHz ITU-T grid. See specific card
descriptions in Appendix A, “Hardware Specifications,” for more details.
Table 7-6
DWDM Channel Allocation Plan (C Band)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
1
196.00
1529.55
42
193.95
1545.72
2
195.95
1529.94
43
193.90
1546.119
3
195.90
1530.334
44
193.85
1546.518
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7.1.4 DWDM Card Channel Allocation Plan
Table 7-6
DWDM Channel Allocation Plan (C Band) (continued)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
4
195.85
1530.725
45
193.80
1546.917
5
195.80
1531.116
46
193.75
1547.316
6
195.75
1531.507
47
193.70
1547.715
7
195.70
1531.898
48
193.65
1548.115
8
195.65
1532.290
49
193.60
1548.515
9
195.60
1532.681
50
193.55
1548.915
10
195.55
1533.073
51
193.50
1549.32
11
195.50
1533.47
52
193.45
1549.71
12
195.45
1533.86
53
193.40
1550.116
13
195.40
1534.250
54
193.35
1550.517
14
195.35
1534.643
55
193.30
1550.918
15
195.30
1535.036
56
193.25
1551.319
16
195.25
1535.429
57
193.20
1551.721
17
195.20
1535.822
58
193.15
1552.122
18
195.15
1536.216
59
193.10
1552.524
19
195.10
1536.609
60
193.05
1552.926
20
195.05
1537.003
61
193.00
1553.33
21
195.00
1537.40
62
192.95
1553.73
22
194.95
1537.79
63
192.90
1554.134
23
194.90
1538.186
64
192.85
1554.537
24
194.85
1538.581
65
192.80
1554.940
25
194.80
1538.976
66
192.75
1555.343
26
194.75
1539.371
67
192.70
1555.747
27
194.70
1539.766
68
192.65
1556.151
28
194.65
1540.162
69
192.60
1556.555
29
194.60
1540.557
70
192.55
1556.959
30
194.55
1540.953
71
192.50
1557.36
31
194.50
1541.35
72
192.45
1557.77
32
194.45
1541.75
73
192.40
1558.173
33
194.40
1542.142
74
192.35
1558.578
34
194.35
1542.539
75
192.30
1558.983
35
194.30
1542.936
76
192.25
1559.389
36
194.25
1543.333
77
192.20
1559.794
37
194.20
1543.730
78
192.15
1560.200
38
194.15
1544.128
79
192.10
1560.606
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7.2 Class 1M Laser Product Safety Lasers
Table 7-6
DWDM Channel Allocation Plan (C Band) (continued)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
39
194.10
1544.526
80
192.05
1561.013
40
194.05
1544.924
81
192.00
1561.42
41
194.00
1545.32
82
191.95
1561.83
7.2 Class 1M Laser Product Safety Lasers
This section lists the safety labels attached to the AD-1C-xx.x, AD-2C-xx.x, AD-4c-xx.x, AD-1B-xx.x,
and AD-4B-xx.xx cards.
7.2.1 Class 1M Laser Product Statement
The Class 1M Laser Product statement is shown in Figure 7-1.
Figure 7-1
Class 1M Laser Product Statement
145953
CAUTION
HAZARD LEVEL 1M INVISIBLE
LASER RADIATION
DO NOT VIEW DIRECTLY WITH
NON-ATTENUATING OPTICAL
INSTRUMENTS λ = 1400nm TO 1610nm
Class 1M lasers are products that produce either a highly divergent beam or a large diameter beam.
Therefore, only a small part of the whole laser beam can enter the eye. However, these laser products
can be harmful to the eye if the beam is viewed using magnifying optical instruments.
7.2.2 Hazard Level 1M Label
The Hazard Level 1M label is shown in Figure 7-2. This label is displayed on the faceplate of the cards.
Figure 7-2
Hazard Level Label
145990
HAZARD
LEVEL 1M
The Hazard Level label warns users against exposure to laser radiation of Class 1 limits calculated in
accordance with IEC60825-1 Ed.1.2.
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7.2.3 Laser Source Connector Label
7.2.3 Laser Source Connector Label
The Laser Source Connector label is shown in Figure 7-3.
Laser Source Connector Label
96635
Figure 7-3
This label indicates that a laser source is present at the optical connector where the label has been placed.
7.2.4 FDA Statement Label
The FDA Statement labels are shown in Figure 7-4 and Figure 7-5. These labels show compliance to
FDA standards and that the hazard level classification is in accordance with IEC60825-1 Am.2 or Ed.1.2.
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JULY 26, 2001
Figure 7-5
96634
FDA Statement Label
FDA Statement Label
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JUNE 24, 2007
282324
Figure 7-4
7.2.5 Shock Hazard Label
The Shock Hazard label is shown in Figure 7-6.
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7.3 AD-1C-xx.x Card
Shock Hazard Label
65541
Figure 7-6
This label alerts personnel to electrical hazard within the card. The potential of shock hazard exists when
removing adjacent cards during maintenance, and touching exposed electrical circuitry on the card itself.
7.3 AD-1C-xx.x Card
Note
See the “A.9.1 AD-1C-xx.x Card Specifications” section on page A-40 for hardware specifications.
The 1-Channel OADM (AD-1C-xx.x) card passively adds or drops one of the 32 channels utilized within
the 100-GHz-spacing of the DWDM card system. Thirty-two versions of this card—each designed only
for use with one wavelength—are used in the ONS 15454 DWDM system. Each wavelength version of
the card has a different part number. The AD-1C-xx.x can be installed in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
The AD-1C-xx.x has the following internal features:
•
Two cascaded passive optical interferential filters perform the channel add and drop functions.
•
One software-controlled variable optical attenuator (VOA) regulates the optical power of the
inserted channel.
•
Software-controlled VOA regulates the insertion loss of the express optical path.
•
VOA settings and functions, photodiode detection, and alarm thresholds, are internally controlled.
•
Virtual photodiodes (firmware calculations of port optical power) at the common DWDM output and
input ports are monitored within the software.
Figure 7-7 shows the AD-1C-xx.x faceplate.
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Chapter 7
Optical Add/Drop Cards
7.3 AD-1C-xx.x Card
Figure 7-7
AD-1C-xx.x Faceplate
AD-1C
-X.XX
FAIL
ACT
TX
RX
TX
TX
96473
COM
EXP
RX
15xx.xx
RX
SF
For information on safety labels for the card, see the “7.2 Class 1M Laser Product Safety Lasers”
section on page 7-7.
Figure 7-8 shows a block diagram of the AD-1C-xx.x card.
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7.3.1 Power Monitoring
Figure 7-8
AD-1C-xx.x Block Diagram
Add Rx Drop Tx
COM RX
EXP TX
Optical
Module
COM TX
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
EXP RX
DC/DC
converter
Power supply
Input filters
124074
uP8260
processor
SCL Bus SCL Bus
TCC M
TCC P
BAT A&B
Figure 7-9 shows the AD-1C-xx.x optical module functional block diagram.
Figure 7-9
AD-1C-xx.x Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
Control
interface
Control
COM
RX
V1
COM
TX
V2 P2
P5
P4
EXP
TX
P3
EXP
RX
98304
P1
V Virtual photodiode
P Physical photodiode
Variable optical attenuator
TX
RX
Channel 15xx.xx
7.3.1 Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P4 and virtual photodiodes V1 and V2 monitor the power for the
AD-1C-xx.x card. The returned power level values are calibrated to the ports as shown in Table 7-7.
Table 7-7
AD-1C-xx.x Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1
ADD
DROP RX
P2
DROP
DROP TX
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7.3.2 AD-1C-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
Table 7-7
AD-1C-xx.x Port Calibration (continued)
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P3
IN EXP
EXP RX
P4
OUT EXP
EXP TX
V1
IN COM
COM RX
V2
OUT COM
COM TX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
7.3.2 AD-1C-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
The AD-1C-xx.x card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 7-8.
Table 7-8
AD-1C-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that
there is an internal hardware failure. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the AD-1C-xx.x card is carrying traffic
or is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure. The SF LED also illuminates
when the transmitting and receiving fibers are incorrectly connected. When
the fibers are properly connected, the LED turns off.
7.3.3 AD-1C-xx.x Port-Level Indicators
You can find the status of the card port using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray assembly. Use
the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and severity of alarms
for a given port or slot. The AD-1C-xx.x has six LC-PC-II optical ports: two for add/drop channel client
input and output, two for express channel input and output, and two for communication.
7.4 AD-2C-xx.x Card
Note
See the “A.9.2 AD-2C-xx.x Card Specifications” section on page A-41 for hardware specifications.
The 2-Channel OADM (AD-2C-xx.x) card passively adds or drops two adjacent 100-GHz channels
within the same band. Sixteen versions of this card—each designed for use with one pair of
wavelengths—are used in the ONS 15454 DWDM system. The card bidirectionally adds and drops in
two different sections on the same card to manage signal flow in both directions. Each version of the
card has a different part number.
The AD-2C-xx.x has the following features:
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Optical Add/Drop Cards
7.4 AD-2C-xx.x Card
•
Passive cascade of interferential filters perform the channel add and drop functions.
•
Two software-controlled VOAs in the add section, one for each add port, regulate the optical power
of inserted channels.
•
Software-controlled VOAs regulate insertion loss on express channels.
•
VOA settings and functions, photodiode detection, and alarm thresholds are internally controlled.
•
Virtual photodiodes (firmware calculation of port optical power) at the common DWDM output and
input ports are monitored within the software.
Figure 7-10 shows the AD-2C-xx.x faceplate.
Figure 7-10
AD-2C-xx.x Faceplate
AD-2C
-X.XX
FAIL
ACT
TX
TX
RX
TX
TX
96474
COM
EXP
RX
15xx.xx
RX
15xx.xx
RX
SF
For information on safety labels for the card, see the “7.2 Class 1M Laser Product Safety Lasers”
section on page 7-7.
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7.4.1 Wavelength Pairs
Figure 7-11 shows a block diagram of the AD-2C-xx.x card.
Figure 7-11
AD-2C-xx.x Block Diagram
CH 1
Add RX Drop TX
COM RX
CH 2
Add RX Drop TX
EXP TX
Optical
Module
COM TX
uP8260
processor
Power supply
input filters
DC/DC
converter
98305
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
EXP RX
SCL Bus
TCC M
SCL Bus
TCC P
BAT A&B
Figure 7-12 shows the AD-2C-xx.x optical module functional block diagram.
Figure 7-12
AD-2C-xx.x Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
Control
interface
Control
COM
RX
V1
COM
TX
V2 P3
P7
P1
Variable optical attenuator
EXP
TX
P5
EXP
RX
P2
P4
98306
V Virtual photodiode
P Physical photodiode
P6
TX
RX
First
channel
RX
TX
Second
channel
7.4.1 Wavelength Pairs
The AD-2C-xx.x cards are provisioned for the wavelength pairs listed in Table 7-9. In this table, channel
IDs are given rather than wavelengths. To compare channel IDs with the actual wavelengths they
represent, see wavelengths in Table 7-6 on page 7-5.
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7.4.2 Power Monitoring
Table 7-9
AD-2C-xx.x Channel Pairs
Band ID
Add/Drop Channel ID
Band 30.3 (A)
30.3, 31.2
31.9, 32.6
Band 34.2 (B)
34.2, 35.0
35.8, 36.6
Band 38.1 (C)
38.1, 38.9
39.7, 40.5
Band 42.1 (D)
42.1, 42.9
43.7, 44.5
Band 46.1 (E)
46.1, 46.9
47.7, 48.5
Band 50.1 (F)
50.1, 50.9
51.7, 52.5
Band 54.1 (G)
54.1, 54.9
55.7, 56.5
Band 58.1 (H)
58.1, 58.9
59.7, 60.6
7.4.2 Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P10 and virtual photodiodes V1 and V2 monitor the power for the
AD-2C-xx.x card. The returned power level values are calibrated to the ports as shown in Table 7-10.
Table 7-10
AD-2C-xx.x Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1–P2
ADD
COM TX
P3–P4
DROP
DROP TX
P5
IN EXP
EXP RX
P6
OUT EXP
EXP TX
V1
IN COM
COM RX
V2
OUT COM
COM TX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
7.4.3 AD-2C-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
The AD-2C-xx.x card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 7-11.
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7.4.4 AD-2C-xx.x Port-Level Indicators
Table 7-11
AD-2C-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that
there is an internal hardware failure. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the AD-2C-xx.x card is carrying traffic
or is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure. The amber SF LED also
illuminates when the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected.
When the fibers are properly connected, the light turns off.
7.4.4 AD-2C-xx.x Port-Level Indicators
You can find the status of the card port using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray assembly. Use
the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and severity of alarms
for a given port or slot. The AD-2C-xx.x card has eight LC-PC-II optical ports: four for add/drop channel
client input and output, two for express channel input and output, and two for communication.
7.5 AD-4C-xx.x Card
Note
See the “A.9.3 AD-4C-xx.x Card Specifications” section on page A-42 for hardware specifications.
The 4-Channel OADM (AD-4C-xx.x) card passively adds or drops all four 100-GHz-spaced channels
within the same band. Eight versions of this card—each designed for use with one band of
wavelengths—are used in the ONS 15454 DWDM system. The card bidirectionally adds and drops in
two different sections on the same card to manage signal flow in both directions. There are eight versions
of this card with eight part numbers.
The AD-4C-xx.x has the following features:
•
Passive cascade of interferential filters perform the channel add and drop functions.
•
Four software-controlled VOAs in the add section, one for each add port, regulate the optical power
of inserted channels.
•
Two software-controlled VOAs regulate insertion loss on express and drop path, respectively.
•
Internal control of the VOA settings and functions, photodiode detection, and alarm thresholds.
•
Software-monitored virtual photodiodes (firmware calculation of port optical power) at the common
DWDM output and input ports.
Figure 7-13 shows the AD-4C-xx.x faceplate.
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7.5 AD-4C-xx.x Card
Figure 7-13
AD-4C-xx.x Faceplate
AD-4C
-X.XX
FAIL
ACT
TX
TX
TX
TX
RX
TX
TX
96475
COM
EXP
RX
15xx.xx
RX
15xx.xx
RX
15xx.xx
RX
15xx.xx
RX
SF
For information on safety labels for the card, see the “7.2 Class 1M Laser Product Safety Lasers”
section on page 7-7.
Figure 7-14 shows a block diagram of the AD-4C-xx.x card.
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7.5.1 Wavelength Sets
Figure 7-14
AD-4C-xx.x Block Diagram
Channel 1
Add Drop
Rx Tx
COM RX
Channel 2
Add Drop
Rx Tx
Channel 3
Add Drop
Rx Tx
Channel 4
Add Drop
Rx Tx
EXP TX
Optical
Module
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
SCL Bus
TCC M
uP8260
processor
EXP RX
DC/DC
converter
Power supply
Input filters
124075
COM TX
SCL Bus
TCC P
BAT A&B
Figure 7-15 shows the AD-4C-xx.x optical module functional block diagram.
Figure 7-15
AD-4C-xx.x Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
4Ch OADM module
COM
RX
P11
V1
Control
interface
Control
P10
EXP TX
P9
EXP RX
P12
COM
TX
V2
P1 P2 P3 P4
P5 P6 P7 P8
98299
V Virtual photodiode
P Physical photodiode
Variable optical attenuator
TX Channels
RX Channels
7.5.1 Wavelength Sets
The AD-4C-xx.x cards are provisioned for the sets of four 100-GHz-spaced wavelengths shown
Table 7-12 on page 7-19.
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7.5.2 Power Monitoring
Table 7-12
AD-4C-xx.x Channel Sets
Band ID
Add/Drop Wavelengths
Band 30.3 (A)
1530.3, 1531.2, 1531.9, 1532.6
Band 34.2 (B)
1534.2, 1535.0, 1535.8, 1536.6
Band 38.1 (C)
1538.1, 1538.9, 1539.7, 1540.5
Band 42.1 (D)
1542.1, 1542.9, 1543.7, 1544.5
Band 46.1 (E)
1546.1, 1546.9, 1547.7, 1548.5
Band 50.1 (F)
1550.1, 1550.9, 1551.7, 1552.5
Band 54.1 (G)
1554.1, 1554.9, 1555.7, 1556.5
Band 58.1 (H)
1558.1, 1558.9, 1559.7, 1560.6
7.5.2 Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P10 and virtual photodiodes V1 and V2 monitor the power for the
AD-4C-xx.x card. The returned power level values are calibrated to the ports as shown in Table 7-13.
Table 7-13
AD-4C-xx.x Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1–P4
ADD
COM TX
P5–P8
DROP
DROP TX
P9
IN EXP
EXP RX
P10
OUT EXP
EXP TX
V1
IN COM
COM RX
V2
OUT COM
COM TX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
7.5.3 AD-4C-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
The AD-4C-xx.x card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 7-14.
Table 7-14
AD-4C-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that
there is an internal hardware failure. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
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7.5.4 AD-4C-xx.x Port-Level Indicators
Table 7-14
AD-4C-xx.x Card-Level Indicators (continued)
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the AD-4C-xx.x card is carrying traffic
or is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition. The amber SF
LED also illuminates when the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly
connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the light turns off.
7.5.4 AD-4C-xx.x Port-Level Indicators
You can find the status of the card port using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray assembly. Use
the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and severity of alarms
for a given port or slot. The AD-4C-xx.x card has 12 LC-PC-II optical ports: eight for add/drop channel
client input and output, two for express channel input and output, and two for communication.
7.6 AD-1B-xx.x Card
Note
See the “A.9.4 AD-1B-xx.x Card Specifications” section on page A-43 for hardware specifications.
The 1-Band OADM (AD-1B-xx.x) card passively adds or drops a single band of four adjacent
100-GHz-spaced channels. Eight versions of this card with eight different part numbers—each version
designed for use with one band of wavelengths—are used in the ONS 15454 DWDM system. The card
bidirectionally adds and drops in two different sections on the same card to manage signal flow in both
directions. This card can be used when there is asymmetric adding and dropping on each side (east or
west) of the node; a band can be added or dropped on one side but not on the other.
The AD-1B xx.x can be installed in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to17 and has the following features:
•
Passive cascaded interferential filters perform the channel add and drop functions.
•
Two software-controlled VOAs regulate the optical power flowing in the express and drop OADM
paths (drop section).
•
Output power of the dropped band is set by changing the attenuation of the VOA drop.
•
The VOA express is used to regulate the insertion loss of the express path.
•
VOA settings and functions, photodiode detection, and alarm thresholds are internally controlled.
•
Virtual photodiode (firmware calculation of port optical power) at the common DWDM output are
monitored within the software.
Figure 7-16 shows the AD-1B-xx.x faceplate.
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7.6 AD-1B-xx.x Card
Figure 7-16
AD-1B-xx.x Faceplate
AD-1B
-X.XX
FAIL
ACT
TX
RX
TX
TX
96471
COM
EXP
RX
XX.X
RX
SF
For information on safety labels for the card, see the “7.2 Class 1M Laser Product Safety Lasers”
section on page 7-7.
Figure 7-17 shows a block diagram of the AD-1B-xx.x card.
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7.6.1 Power Monitoring
Figure 7-17
AD-1B-xx.x Block Diagram
Band xx.x
Rx
COM RX
Band xx.x
Tx
EXP TX
Optical
Module
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
EXP RX
uP8260
processor
DC/DC
converter
Power supply
Input filters
124073
COM TX
SCL Bus SCL Bus
TCC M
TCC P
BAT A&B
Figure 7-18 shows the AD-1B-xx.x optical module functional block diagram.
Figure 7-18
AD-1B-xx.x Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
Control
interface
Control
COM
RX
V1
COM
TX
V2 P2
Physical photodiode
P1
P4
EXP
TX
P3
EXP
RX
98307
V Virtual photodiode
P Physical photodiode
P5
TX
RX
Band xx.x
7.6.1 Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P4 and virtual photodiodes V1 and V2 monitor the power for the
AD-1B-xx.x card. The returned power level values are calibrated to the ports as shown in Table 7-15.
Table 7-15
AD-1B-xx.x Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1
ADD
BAND RX
P2
DROP
BAND TX
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7.6.2 AD-1B-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
Table 7-15
AD-1B-xx.x Port Calibration (continued)
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P3
IN EXP
EXP RX
P4
OUT EXP
EXP TX
V1
IN COM
COM RX
V2
OUT COM
COM TX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
7.6.2 AD-1B-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
The AD-1B-xx.x card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 7-16.
Table 7-16
AD-1B-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that
there is an internal hardware failure. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the AD-1B-xx.x card is carrying traffic
or is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure. The amber SF LED also
illuminates when the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected.
When the fibers are properly connected, the light turns off.
7.6.3 AD-1B-xx.x Port-Level Indicators
You can find the status of the card port using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray assembly. Use
the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and severity of alarms
for a given port or slot. The AD-1B-xx.x has six LC-PC-II optical ports: two for add/drop channel client
input and output, two for express channel input and output, and two for communication.
7.7 AD-4B-xx.x Card
The 4-Band OADM (AD-4B-xx.x) card passively adds or drops four bands of four adjacent
100-GHz-spaced channels. Two versions of this card with different part numbers—each version
designed for use with one set of bands—are used in the ONS 15454 DWDM system. The card
bidirectionally adds and drops in two different sections on the same card to manage signal flow in both
directions. This card can be used when there is asymmetric adding and dropping on each side (east or
west) of the node; a band can be added or dropped on one side but not on the other.
The AD1B-xx.x can be installed in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17 and has the following features:
•
Five software-controlled VOAs regulate the optical power flowing in the OADM paths.
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7.7 AD-4B-xx.x Card
•
Output power of each dropped band is set by changing the attenuation of each VOA drop.
•
The VOA express is used to regulate the insertion loss of the express path.
•
VOA settings and functions, photodiode detection, and alarm thresholds are internally controlled.
•
Virtual photodiode (firmware calculation of port optical power) at the common DWDM output port
are monitored within the software.
Figure 7-19 shows the AD-4B-xx.x faceplate.
Figure 7-19
AD-4B-xx.x Faceplate
AD-4B
-X.XX
FAIL
ACT
TX
TX
TX
TX
RX
TX
TX
96472
COM
EXP
RX
XX.X
RX
XX.X
RX
XX.X
RX
XX.X
RX
SF
For information on safety labels for the card, see the “7.2 Class 1M Laser Product Safety Lasers”
section on page 7-7.
Figure 7-20 shows a block diagram of the AD-4B-xx.x card.
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Optical Add/Drop Cards
7.7.1 Power Monitoring
Figure 7-20
AD-4B-xx.x Block Diagram
Channel 1
Add Drop
Rx Tx
COM RX
Channel 2
Add Drop
Rx Tx
Channel 3
Add Drop
Rx Tx
Channel 4
Add Drop
Rx Tx
EXP TX
Optical
Module
COM TX
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
SCL Bus
TCC M
EXP RX
DC/DC
converter
Power supply
Input filters
124075
uP8260
processor
SCL Bus
TCC P
BAT A&B
Figure 7-21 shows the AD-4B-xx.x optical module functional block diagram.
Figure 7-21
AD-4B-xx.x Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
Control
interface
Control
COM
RX
P12
V1 P5
P1
P6
P2
P7
P3
P8
P4
P10
EXP
TX
P9
EXP
RX
98308
COM
TX
P11
TX
RX
B30.3 or B46.1
V
P
TX
RX
B34.2 or B50.1
TX
RX
B38.1 or B54.1
TX
RX
B42.1 or B58.1
Virtual photodiode
Physical photodiode
Variable optical attenuator
7.7.1 Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P11 and virtual photodiode V1 monitor the power for the AD-4B-xx.x
card. The returned power level values are calibrated to the ports as shown in Table 7-17.
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7.7.2 AD-4B-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
Table 7-17
AD-4B-xx.x Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1–P4
ADD
COM TX
P5–P8
DROP
DROP TX
P9
IN EXP
EXP RX
P10
OUT EXP
EXP TX
P11
IN COM
COM RX
V1
OUT COM
COM TX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
7.7.2 AD-4B-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
The AD-4B-xx.x card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 7-18.
Table 7-18
AD-4B-xx.x Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that
there is an internal hardware failure. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the AD-4B-xx.x card is carrying traffic
or is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure. The amber SF LED also
illuminates when the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected.
When the fibers are properly connected, the light turns off.
7.7.3 AD-4B-xx.x Port-Level Indicators
You can find the status of the card port using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray assembly. Use
the LCD to view the status of any port or card slot; the screen displays the number and severity of alarms
for a given port or slot. The AD-4B-xx.x has 12 LC-PC-II optical ports: eight for add/drop band client
input and output, two for express channel input and output, and two for communication.
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CH APT ER
8
Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop Cards
This chapter describes the Cisco ONS 15454 cards deployed in reconfigurable optical add/drop
(ROADM) networks. For installation and card turn-up procedures, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Procedure Guide. For card safety and compliance information, refer to the Cisco Optical Transport
Products Safety and Compliance Information document.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Chapter topics include:
Note
•
8.1 Card Overview, page 8-2
•
8.2 Safety Labels for Class 1M Laser Product Cards, page 8-9
•
8.3 32WSS Card, page 8-12
•
8.4 32WSS-L Card, page 8-18
•
8.5 32DMX Card, page 8-25
•
8.6 32DMX-L Card, page 8-30
•
8.7 40-DMX-C Card, page 8-35
•
8.8 40-DMX-CE Card, page 8-40
•
8.9 40-MUX-C Card, page 8-45
•
8.10 40-WSS-C Card, page 8-50
•
8.11 40-WSS-CE Card, page 8-56
•
8.12 40-WXC-C Card, page 8-63
•
8.13 MMU Card, page 8-70
This chapter contains information about cards that perform mesh topology functions. Multiplexer and
demultiplexer cards that do not perform these functions are described in Chapter 5, “Multiplexer and
Demultiplexer Cards.”
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Chapter 8
Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop Cards
8.1 Card Overview
8.1 Card Overview
The ROADM cards include six add drop cards utilized in the C band (32WSS, 32DMX, 32DMX-C,
40-MUX-C, 40-WXC-C, and MMU) and two add drop cards utilized for the L band (32WSS-L, and
32DMX-L).
This section provides card summary, compatibility, channel allocation, and safety information.
Note
Each card is marked with a symbol that corresponds to a slot (or slots) on the ONS 15454 shelf assembly.
The cards are then installed into slots that have the same symbols. See the “1.16.1 Card Slot
Requirements” section on page 1-61 for a list of slots and symbols.
8.1.1 Card Summary
Table 8-1 lists and summarizes information about each ROADM card.
Table 8-1
ROADM Card Summary
Card
Port Description
For Additional Information
32WSS
The 32WSS card has seven sets of ports
located on the faceplate. It operates in
Slots 1 to 5 and 12 to 16.
See the “8.3 32WSS Card”
section on page 8-12
32WSS-L
The 32WSS-L card has seven sets of ports
located on the faceplate. It operates in
Slots 1 to 5 and 12 to 16.
See the “8.4 32WSS-L Card”
section on page 8-18
32DMX
The 32DMX has five sets of ports located on See the “8.5 32DMX Card”
the faceplate. It operates in Slots 1 to 6 and section on page 8-25
12 to 17.
32DMX-L
The 32DMX-L has five sets of ports located See the “8.6 32DMX-L Card”
on the faceplate. It operates in Slots 1 to 6 section on page 8-30
and 12 to 17.
40-DMX-C
The 40-DMX-C has six sets of ports located See the “8.7 40-DMX-C Card”
on the faceplate. It operates in Slots 1 to 6 section on page 8-35
and 12 to 17.
40-DMX-CE
The 40-DMX-CE has six sets of ports
located on the faceplate. It operates in
Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
40-MUX-C
The 40-MUX-C has six sets of ports located See the “8.9 40-MUX-C Card”
on the faceplate. It operates in Slots 1 to 6 section on page 8-45.
and 12 to 17.
40-WSS-C
The 40-WSS-C card has eight sets of ports
located on the faceplate. It operates in
Slots 1 to 5 and 12 to 16.
40-WSS-CE
The 40-WSS-CE card has eight sets of ports See the “8.11 40-WSS-CE
located on the faceplate. It operates in
Card” section on page 8-56
Slots 1 to 5 and 12 to 16.
See the “8.8 40-DMX-CE Card”
section on page 8-40
See the “8.10 40-WSS-C Card”
section on page 8-50
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8.1.2 Card Compatibility
Table 8-1
ROADM Card Summary (continued)
Card
Port Description
For Additional Information
40-WXC-C
The 40-WXC-C card has five sets of ports
located on the faceplate. It operates in
Slots 1 to 5 and 12 to 16.
See the “8.12 40-WXC-C Card”
section on page 8-63
MMU
The MMU card has six sets of ports located See the “8.13 MMU Card”
on the faceplate, It operates in Slots 1 to 6 section on page 8-70
and 12 to 17.
8.1.2 Card Compatibility
Table 8-2 lists the Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) software compatibility for the ROADM cards.
Table 8-2
Software Release Compatibility for ROADM Cards
Card Name
R4.5
R4.6
R4.7
R5.0
R6.0
R7.0
R7.2
R8.0
R8.5
R9.0
32WSS
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
32WSS-L
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
40-WSS-C
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
40-WSS-CE
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
32DMX
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
32DMX-L
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
40-DMX-C
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
40-DMX-CE
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
40-MUX-C
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
40-WXC-C
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
MMU
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
8.1.3 Interface Classes
The 40-MUX-C, 32DMX, 32DMX-L, 40-DMX-C, 40-DMX-CE, 32WSS, and 32WSS-L cards have
different input and output optical channel signals depending on the interface card originating the input
signal. The input interface cards have been grouped in classes listed in Table 8-3. The subsequent tables
list the optical performance and output power of each interface class.
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Chapter 8
Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop Cards
8.1.3 Interface Classes
Table 8-3
Cisco ONS 15454 Card Interfaces Assigned to Input Power Classes
Input Power Class
Card
A
10-Gbps multirate transponder cards (TXP_MR_10G, TXP_MR_10E,
TXP_MR_10E_C, and TXP_MR_10E_L) with forward error correction (FEC)
enabled and 10-Gbps muxponder cards (MXP_2.5G_10G, MXP_2.5G_10E,
MXP_MR_10DME_C, MXP_MR_10DME_L, MXP_2.5G_10E_C, and
MXP_2.5G_10E_L) with FEC enabled
B
10-Gbps multirate transponder card (TXP_MR_10G) without FEC, 10-Gbps
muxponder cards (MXP_2.5G_10G, MXP_MR_10DME_C, and
MXP_MR_10DME_L), and ADM-10G cards with FEC disabled
C
OC-192 LR ITU cards (TXP_MR_10E, TXP_MR_10E_C, and TXP_MR_10E_L)
without FEC
D
2.5-Gbps multirate transponder card (TXP_MR_2.5G), both protected and
unprotected, with FEC enabled
E
OC-48 100-GHz dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) muxponder
card (MXP_MR_2.5G) and 2.5-Gbps multirate transponder card
(TXP_MR_2.5G), protected or unprotected; FEC disabled; and retime, reshape,
and regenerate (3R) mode enabled
F
2.5-Gbps multirate transponder card (TXP_MR_2.5G), protected or unprotected,
in regenerate and reshape (2R) mode
G
OC-48 ELR 100 GHz card
H
2/4 port GbE transponder (GBIC WDM 100GHz)
I
TXP_MR_10E, TXP_MR_10E_C, and TXP_MR_10E_L cards with enhanced
FEC (E-FEC) and the MXP_2.5G_10E, MXP_2.5G_10E_C, MXP_2.5G_10E_L,
MXP_MR_10DME_C, and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards with E-FEC enabled
Table 8-4 lists the optical performance parameters for 10-Gbps cards that provide signal input to the
following multiplexer cards and demultiplexer cards:
•
32DMX
•
32DMX-L
•
32DMX-O
•
32MUX-O1
•
40-DMX-C
•
40-DMX-CE
•
40-MUX-C
•
40-WSS-C
•
40-WSS-CE
•
40-WXC-C
•
4MD-xx.x
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8.1.3 Interface Classes
Table 8-4
10-Gbps Interface Optical Performance
Parameter
Class A
Class B
1
Class I
OSNR
Limited
Power
Limited
Type
Power
Limited
Maximum bit rate
10 Gbps
10 Gbps
10 Gbps
10 Gbps
Regeneration
3R
3R
3R
3R
FEC
Yes
No
No
Yes (E-FEC)
Optimum
Average
Average
Optimum
–12
–12
Threshold
Maximum BER
2
10
OSNR
Limited
Class C
–15
Power
Limited
10
OSNR
Limited
10
OSNR
Limited
10–15
OSNR1 sensitivity
23 dB
Power sensitivity
–24 dBm –18 dBm –21 dBm –20 dBm –22 dBm
–26 dBm –18 dBm
Power overload
–8 dBm
Transmitted Power Range
9 dB
23 dB
19 dB
19 dB
20 dB
–8 dBm
–9 dBm
–8 dBm
8 dB
3
10-Gbps multirate
transponder/10-Gbps
FEC transponder
(TXP_MR_10G)
+2.5 to 3.5 dBm
+2.5 to 3.5 dBm
—
—
OC-192 LR ITU
—
—
+3.0 to 6.0
dBm
—
10-Gbps multirate
transponder/10-Gbps
FEC transponder
(TXP_MR_10E)
+3.0 to 6.0 dBm
+3.0 to 6.0 dBm
—
+3.0 to 6.0 dBm
Dispersion
compensation
tolerance
+/–800 ps/nm
+/–1,000 ps/nm
+/–1,000
ps/nm
+/–800 ps/nm
1. OSNR = optical signal-to-noise ratio
2. BER = bit error rate
3. These values, decreased by patchcord and connector losses, are also the input power values for the optical add drop
multiplexer (OADM) cards.
•
Table 8-5 lists the optical interface performance parameters for 2.5-Gbps cards that provide signal
input to the following multiplexer and demultiplexer cards:
•
32DMX
•
32DMX-L
•
32DMX-O
•
32MUX-O1
•
40-DMX-C
•
40-DMX-CE
•
40-MUX-C
•
40-WSS-C
•
40-WSS-CE
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8.1.4 Channel Allocation Plans
Table 8-5
•
40-WXC-C
•
4MD-xx.x
2.5-Gbps Interface Optical Performance
Parameter
Class D
Type
Power
Limited
Maximum bit rate
Class E
Class F
Class G
Power OSNR
OSNR
Limited Limited Limited
Power
Limited
2.5 Gbps
2.5 Gbps
2.5 Gbps
2.5 Gbps
1.25 Gbps
2.5 Gbps
Regeneration
3R
3R
2R
3R
3R
3R
FEC
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
Threshold
Average
Average
Average
Average
Average
Average
–15
–12
–12
–12
–12
OSNR
Limited
Class H
OSNR
Limited
Power
Limited
Class J
OSNR
Limited
Power
Limited
10–12
Maximum BER
10
OSNR sensitivity
14 dB
6 dB
14 dB
10 dB
15 dB
14 dB
11 dB
13 dB
Power sensitivity
–31
dBm
–25
dBm
–30
dBm
–23
dBm
–24 dBm
–27
dBm
–33
dBm
–28 dBm –18 dBm –26 dBm
Power overload
–9 dBm
–9 dBm
–9 dBm
–9 dBm
–7 dBm
–17dBm
–1.0 to 1.0 dBm
–1.0 to
1.0 dBm
–2.0 to 0 dBm
—
—
—
+2.5 to3.5 dBm
—
Transmitted Power Range
10
10
10
10
8 dB
12 dB
1
TXP_MR_2.5G
–1.0 to1.0 dBm
TXPP_MR_2.5G
–4.5 to –2.5 dBm
–4.5 to –2.5 dBm –4.5 to
–2.5 dBm
MXP_MR_2.5G
—
+2.0 to +4.0 dBm —
MXPP_MR_2.5G
—
–1.5 to +0.5 dBm —
2/4 port GbE
—
Transponder (GBIC
WDM 100GHz)
—
—
Dispersion
compensation
tolerance
–1200 to
+5400 ps/nm
–1200 to –1200 to
+3300
+3300 ps/nm
ps/nm
–1200 to
+5400 ps/nm
–1000 to +3600
ps/nm
–1000 to
+3200
ps/nm
1. These values, decreased by patchcord and connector losses, are also the input power values for the OADM cards.
8.1.4 Channel Allocation Plans
ONS 15454 DWDM ROADM cards are designed for use with specific channels in the C band and
L band. In most cases, the channels for these cards are either numbered (for example, 1 to 32 or 1 to 40)
or delimited (odd or even). Client interfaces must comply with these channel assignments to be
compatible with the ONS 15454 system.
. The following cards operate in the C band:
•
32WSS
•
32DMX
•
32DMX-C
•
40-MUX-C
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8.1.4 Channel Allocation Plans
•
40-WXC-C
•
MMU
Table 8-6 lists the C band channel IDs and wavelengths at ITU-T 50-GHz intervals. This is a
comprehensive C band channel table that encompasses future card capability as well as present
capabilities.
.
Table 8-6
DWDM C1 Band Channel Allocation Plan with 50-GHz Spacing
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength (nm)
1
196.00
1529.55
42
193.95
1545.72
2
195.95
1529.94
43
193.90
1546.119
3
195.90
1530.334
44
193.85
1546.518
4
195.85
1530.725
45
193.80
1546.917
5
195.80
1531.116
46
193.75
1547.316
6
195.75
1531.507
47
193.70
1547.715
7
195.70
1531.898
48
193.65
1548.115
8
195.65
1532.290
49
193.60
1548.515
9
195.60
1532.681
50
193.55
1548.915
10
195.55
1533.073
51
193.50
1549.32
11
195.50
1533.47
52
193.45
1549.71
12
195.45
1533.86
53
193.40
1550.116
13
195.40
1534.250
54
193.35
1550.517
14
195.35
1534.643
55
193.30
1550.918
15
195.30
1535.036
56
193.25
1551.319
16
195.25
1535.429
57
193.20
1551.721
17
195.20
1535.822
58
193.15
1552.122
18
195.15
1536.216
59
193.10
1552.524
19
195.10
1536.609
60
193.05
1552.926
20
195.05
1537.003
61
193.00
1553.33
21
195.00
1537.40
62
192.95
1553.73
22
194.95
1537.79
63
192.90
1554.134
23
194.90
1538.186
64
192.85
1554.537
24
194.85
1538.581
65
192.80
1554.940
25
194.80
1538.976
66
192.75
1555.343
26
194.75
1539.371
67
192.70
1555.747
27
194.70
1539.766
68
192.65
1556.151
28
194.65
1540.162
69
192.60
1556.555
29
194.60
1540.557
70
192.55
1556.959
30
194.55
1540.953
71
192.50
1557.36
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8.1.4 Channel Allocation Plans
Table 8-6
DWDM C1 Band Channel Allocation Plan with 50-GHz Spacing (continued)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength (nm)
31
194.50
1541.35
72
192.45
1557.77
32
194.45
1541.75
73
192.40
1558.173
33
194.40
1542.142
74
192.35
1558.578
34
194.35
1542.539
75
192.30
1558.983
35
194.30
1542.936
76
192.25
1559.389
36
194.25
1543.333
77
192.20
1559.794
37
194.20
1543.730
78
192.15
1560.200
38
194.15
1544.128
79
192.10
1560.606
39
194.10
1544.526
80
192.05
1561.013
40
194.05
1544.924
81
192.00
1561.42
41
194.00
1545.32
82
191.95
1561.83
1. Channels on the C band are 4-skip-1, starting at 1530.33 nm.
The following add drop cards utilize the L band DWDM channels:
•
32WSS-L
•
32DMX-L
Table 8-7 lists the L band channel IDs and wavelengths at ITU-T 50-GHz intervals. This is a
comprehensive L band channel table that encompasses future card capability as well as present
capabilities.
Table 8-7
DWDM L Band1 Channel Allocation Plan at 50 GHz Spacing
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength (nm)
1
190.85
1570.83
41
188.85
1587.46
2
190.8
1571.24
42
188.8
1587.88
3
190.75
1571.65
43
188.75
1588.30
4
190.7
1572.06
44
188.7
1588.73
5
190.65
1572.48
45
188.65
1589.15
6
190.6
1572.89
46
188.6
1589.57
7
190.55
1573.30
47
188.55
1589.99
8
190.5
1573.71
48
188.5
1590.41
9
190.45
1574.13
49
188.45
1590.83
10
190.4
1574.54
50
188.4
1591.26
11
190.35
1574.95
51
188.35
1591.68
12
190.3
1575.37
52
188.3
1592.10
13
190.25
1575.78
53
188.25
1592.52
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8.2 Safety Labels for Class 1M Laser Product Cards
Table 8-7
DWDM L Band1 Channel Allocation Plan at 50 GHz Spacing (continued)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength (nm)
14
190.2
1576.20
54
188.2
1592.95
15
190.15
1576.61
55
188.15
1593.37
16
190.1
1577.03
56
188.1
1593.79
17
190.05
1577.44
57
188.05
1594.22
18
190
1577.86
58
188
1594.64
19
189.95
1578.27
59
187.95
1595.06
20
189.9
1578.69
60
187.9
1595.49
21
189.85
1579.10
61
187.85
1595.91
22
189.8
1579.52
62
187.8
1596.34
23
189.75
1579.93
63
187.75
1596.76
24
189.7
1580.35
64
187.7
1597.19
25
189.65
1580.77
65
187.65
1597.62
26
189.6
1581.18
66
187.6
1598.04
27
189.55
1581.60
67
187.55
1598.47
28
189.5
1582.02
68
187.5
1598.89
29
189.45
1582.44
69
187.45
1599.32
30
189.4
1582.85
70
187.4
1599.75
31
189.35
1583.27
71
187.35
1600.17
32
189.3
1583.69
72
187.3
1600.60
33
189.25
1584.11
73
187.25
1601.03
34
189.2
1584.53
74
187.2
1601.46
35
189.15
1584.95
75
187.15
1601.88
36
189.1
1585.36
76
187.1
1602.31
37
189.05
1585.78
77
187.05
1602.74
38
189
1586.20
78
187
1603.17
39
188.95
1586.62
79
186.95
1603.60
40
188.9
1587.04
80
186.9
1604.03
1. Channels on the L band are contiguous, starting at 1577.86 nm. The channels listed in this table begin with 1570.83 nm
for backward compatibility with other ONS products.
8.2 Safety Labels for Class 1M Laser Product Cards
This section explains the significance of the safety labels attached to some of the cards. The card
faceplates are clearly labeled with warnings about the laser radiation levels. You must understand all
warning labels before working on these cards.
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8.2.1 Class 1M Laser Product Statement
The 32DMX, 32DMX-L, 40-MUX-C, 40-DMX-C, 40-DMX-CE, 32WSS, 32WSS-L, 40-WSS-C,
40-WSS-CE, and 40-WXC-C cards have Class IM lasers. The labels that appear on these cards are
described in the following subsections.
8.2.1 Class 1M Laser Product Statement
Figure 8-1 shows the Class 1M Laser Product statement.
Figure 8-1
Class 1M Laser Product Statement
145953
CAUTION
HAZARD LEVEL 1M INVISIBLE
LASER RADIATION
DO NOT VIEW DIRECTLY WITH
NON-ATTENUATING OPTICAL
INSTRUMENTS λ = 1400nm TO 1610nm
Class 1M lasers are products that produce either a highly divergent beam or a large diameter beam.
Therefore, only a small part of the whole laser beam can enter the eye. However, these laser products
can be harmful to the eye if the beam is viewed using magnifying optical instruments.
8.2.2 Hazard Level 1M Label
Figure 8-2 shows the Hazard Level 1M label. This label is displayed on the faceplate of the cards. The
Hazard Level label warns users against exposure to laser radiation by Class 1 limits calculated in
accordance with IEC60825-1 Ed.1.2.
Figure 8-2
Hazard Level Label
145990
HAZARD
LEVEL 1M
8.2.3 Laser Source Connector Label
Figure 8-3 shows the Laser Source Connector label. This label indicates that a laser source is present at
the optical connector where the label is located.
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8.2.4 FDA Statement Label
Laser Source Connector Label
96635
Figure 8-3
8.2.4 FDA Statement Label
The FDA Statement labels are shown in Figure 8-4 and Figure 8-5. These labels show compliance to
FDA standards and that the hazard level classification is in accordance with IEC60825-1 Am.2 or Ed.1.2.
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JULY 26, 2001
Figure 8-5
96634
FDA Statement Label
FDA Statement Label
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JUNE 24, 2007
282324
Figure 8-4
8.2.5 Shock Hazard Label
Figure 8-6 shows the Shock Hazard label. This label alerts you to electrical hazards within a card. A
shock hazard exists when you remove adjacent cards during maintenance, or when you touch exposed
electrical circuitry on the card itself.
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8.3 32WSS Card
Shock Hazard Label
65541
Figure 8-6
8.3 32WSS Card
Note
See the “A.8.3 32WSS Card Specifications” section on page A-26 for hardware specifications.
Note
For information 32WSS card safety labels, see the “8.2 Safety Labels for Class 1M Laser Product
Cards” section on page 8-9.
The two-slot 32-Channel Wavelength Selective Switch (32WSS) card performs channel add/drop
processing within the ONS 15454 DWDM node. The 32WSS card can be installed in the following pairs
of slots:
•
Slots 1 and 2
•
Slots 3 and 4
•
Slots 5 and 6
•
Slots 12 and 13
•
Slots 14 and 15
•
Slots 16 and 17
8.3.1 32WSS Faceplate Ports
The 32WSS has six types of ports:
•
ADD RX ports (1 to 32): These ports are used for adding channels (listed in Table 8-9 on page 8-17).
Each add channel is associated with an individual switch element that selects whether that channel
is added. Each add port has optical power regulation provided by a variable optical attenuator
(VOA). The 32WSS has four physical receive connectors that accept multifiber push-on (MPO)
cables on its front panel for the client input interfaces.Each MPO cable breaks out into eight separate
cables.
•
EXP RX port: The EXP RX port receives an optical signal from another 32WSS card in the same
network element (NE).
•
EXP TX port: The EXP TX port sends an optical signal to the other 32WSS card within the NE.
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8.3.1 32WSS Faceplate Ports
•
COM TX port: The COM TX (line input) port sends an aggregate optical signal to a booster
amplifier card (for example, OPT-BST) for transmission outside of the NE.
•
COM RX port: The COM RX port receives the optical signal from a preamplifier (such as the
OPT-PRE) and sends it to the optical splitter.
•
DROP TX port: The DROP TX port sends the split-off optical signal containing drop channels to
the 32DMX card, where the channels are further processed and dropped.
Figure 8-7 shows the 32WSS card front panel and identifies the traffic flow through the ports.
Figure 8-7
32WSS Faceplate and Ports
32WSS
FAIL
ACT
SF
30.3-36.6
Add 9-16
46.1-52.5
54.1-60.6
TX TX
RX RX
115291
COM TX
Add 25-32
TX
COM RX
EXP
EXP TX
RX
EXP RX
Add 17-24
COM
DROP TX
DROP
TX
ADD RX
Add 1-8
38.1-44.5
32 Add Ports
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8.3.2 32WSS Block Diagram
8.3.2 32WSS Block Diagram
Figure 8-8 provides a high-level functional block diagram of the 32WSS card and Figure 8-9 on
page 8-15 shows how optical signals are processed on the EXP RX and COM RX ports.
Figure 8-8
32WSS Block Diagram
32 add ports
Add 1 Add 2
Add 32
Wavelength
selective switch
EXP RX port
(In from other 32WSS
within the network element)
Add channel
or pass-through
Optical
splitter
DROP TX port
dropped channels
COM RX port
(In from preamplifier,
OPT-PRE, or OSC-CSM)
115293
EXP TX port
(To the other 32WSS
within the network element)
COM TX port
(To OPT-BST or
OSC-CSM)
(To COM RX port
of 32DMX)
Aggregate optical signals that enter the EXP RX and COM RX port are processed in two ways: Add
channel/pass-through and optical splitter processing. The optical processing stages are shown in
Figure 8-9, which provides a detailed optical functional diagram of the 32WSS card.
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8.3.2 32WSS Block Diagram
Figure 8-9
32WSS Optical Block Diagram
Optical switch
(Add channel or
pass-through)
1
1 pass-through
Optical
DMUX
(AWG)
EXP RX port
(In from 32WSS)
2
1
Add 1
P1
2
2 pass-through
P33
Optical
MUX
(AWG)
COM TX port
(To OPT-BST
or OSC-CSM)
2
P66
Add 2
P2
32
EXP TX port
(To 32WSS)
Dropped
channels
32
P68 Add 32
Optical
splitter
P32
P64
P67
COM RX port
(In from OPT-PRE
preamplifier or
OSC-CSM)
115292
DROP TX port
(To 32DMX)
P69
32 pass-through
P34
P65
VOA
Photodiode
The EXP RX PORT and COM RX PORT operate as follows:
•
EXP RX Port Add Channel/Pass-through Processing
The incoming optical signal is received at the EXP RX port from the other 32WSS card within the
NE. The incoming aggregate optical signal is demultiplexed into 32 individual wavelengths, or
channels. Each channel is then individually processed by the optical switch, which performs
add/pass-through processing. By using software controls, the switch either selects the optical
channel coming in from the demultiplexer (that is, the pass-through channel) or it selects the
external ADD channel. If the ADD port channel is selected this channel is transmitted and the
optical signal coming from the demultiplexer is blocked.
After the optical switch stage, all of the channels are multiplexed into an aggregate optical signal,
which is sent out on the COM TX port. The output is typically connected to an OPT-BST or
OPT-BST-E card (in the event a booster amplifier is needed) or to an OSC-CSM card (if no
amplification is needed).
•
COM RX Port Optical Splitter Processing
The COM RX port receives the incoming optical signal and directs it to the 32WSS card’s optical
splitter. The splitter optically diverts channels that are designated to be dropped to the DROP TX
port. The DROP TX port is typically connected to the COM RX port of the 32DMX where the drop
channels are being dropped. Channels that are not dropped pass through the optical splitter and flow
out of the 32WSS card EXP TX port. Typically, this optical signal is connected to the other 32WSS
module within the NE.
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8.3.3 32WSS ROADM Functionality
•
COM TX Port Monitoring
The COM-TX Value can be measured by either a physical or a virtual photodiode of the
15454-32WSS card. If the vendor ID of the 15454-32WSS card is between 1024 (0x400) and 2047
(0x800) the COM-TX value is measured by physical photodiode. If the vendor ID of the
15454-32WSS card is greater than 2048 (0x800), the COM-TX value is measured by the virtual
photodiode.
For COM-TX values measured by virtual photodiode, check the values at the RX port in the
downstream of the COM-TX port (COM-RX port on OPT-BST or OSC-CSM card).
8.3.3 32WSS ROADM Functionality
The 32WSS card works in combination with the 32DMX card to implement ROADM functionality. As
a ROADM node, the ONS 15454 can be configured to add or drop individual optical channels using
CTC, Cisco TransportPlanner, and Cisco Transport Manager (CTM). ROADM functionality using the
32WSS card requires two 32DMX single-slot cards and two 32WSS double-slot cards (totalling six slots
needed in the ONS 15454 chassis).
For other cards’ ROADM functionality, see that card’s description in this chapter. For a diagram of a
typical ROADM configuration, see the “10.1.4 ROADM Node” section on page 10-12.
Note
A terminal site can be configured using only a 32WSS card and a 32DMX card plugged into the east or
west side of the shelf.
8.3.4 32WSS Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P69 monitor the power for the 32WSS card. Table 8-8 shows how the
returned power level values are calibrated to each port.
Table 8-8
32WSS Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1–P32
ADD (Power ADD)
ADD RX
PASS THROUGH
COM TX
ADD (Power)
COM TX
P65
OUT EXP
EXP TX
P66
IN EXP
EXP RX
P67
OUT COM
COM TX
P68
IN COM
COM RX
P69
DROP
DROP TX
P33–P64
1
1. P33–P64 monitor either ADD or PASSTHROUGH power, depending on the state
of the optical switch
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
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8.3.5 32WSS Channel Allocation Plan
8.3.5 32WSS Channel Allocation Plan
The 32WSS Card’s channel labels, frequencies, and wavelengths are listed in Table 8-9.
Table 8-9
32WSS Channel Allocation Plan
Band ID
Channel Label
Frequency (THz)
Wavelength (nm)
B30.3
30.3
195.9
1530.33
31.1
195.8
1531.12
31.9
195.7
1531.90
32.6
195.6
1532.68
34.2
195.4
1534.25
35.0
195.3
1535.04
35.8
195.2
1535.82
36.1
195.1
1536.61
38.1
194.9
1538.19
38.9
194.8
1538.87
39.7
194.7
1539.77
40.5
194.6
1540.46
42.1
194.4
1542.14
42.9
194.3
1542.94
43.7
194.2
1543.73
44.5
194.1
1544.53
46.1
193.9
1546.12
46.9
193.8
1546.92
47.7
193.7
1547.72
48.5
193.6
1548.51
50.1
193.4
1550.12
50.9
193.3
1550.92
51.7
193.2
1551.72
52.5
193.1
1552.52
54.1
192.9
1554.13
54.9
192.8
1554.94
55.7
192.7
1555.75
56.5
192.6
1556.55
58.1
192.4
1558.17
58.9
192.3
1558.98
59.7
192.2
1559.79
60.6
192.1
1560.61
B34.2
B38.1
B42.1
B46.1
B50.1
B54.1
B58.1
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8.3.6 32WSS Card-Level Indicators
8.3.6 32WSS Card-Level Indicators
Table 8-10 describes the three card-level LED indicators on the 32WSS card.
Table 8-10
32WSS Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that
there is an internal hardware failure. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the 32WSS card is carrying traffic or is
traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure on one or more of the card’s
ports. The amber SF LED also illuminates when the transmit and receive
fibers are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the
light turns off.
8.3.7 32WSS Port-Level Indicators
You can find the alarm status of the 32WSS card’s ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454
fan-tray assembly. The screen displays the number and severity of alarms on a given port or slot. For the
procedure to view these counts, refer to “Manage Alarms” in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure
Guide.
8.4 32WSS-L Card
Note
See the “A.8.4 32WSS-L Card Specifications” section on page A-28 for hardware specifications.
Note
For 32WSS-L safety label information, see the “8.2 Safety Labels for Class 1M Laser Product Cards”
section on page 8-9.
The two-slot 32-Channel Wavelength Selective Switch L-Band (32WSS-L) card performs channel
add/drop processing within the ONS 15454 DWDM node. The 32WSS-L card is particularly well suited
for use in networks that employ DS fiber or SMF-28 single-mode fiber.The 32WSS-L card can be
installed in the following pairs of slots:
•
Slots 1 and 2
•
Slots 3 and 4
•
Slots 5 and 6
•
Slots 12 and 13
•
Slots 14 and 15
•
Slots16 and 17
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8.4.1 32WSS-L Faceplate Ports
8.4.1 32WSS-L Faceplate Ports
The 32WSS-L card faceplate has six types of ports:
•
ADD RX ports (1 to 32): These ports are used for adding channels (which are listed in Table 8-12
on page 8-24). Each add channel is associated with an individual switch element that selects whether
the channel is added. Each add port has optical power regulation provided by a VOA.
•
EXP RX port: The EXP RX port receives an optical signal from another 32WSS-L card in the same
NE.
•
EXP TX port: The EXP TX port sends an optical signal to the other 32WSS-L card within the NE.
•
COM TX port: The COM TX port sends an aggregate optical signal to a booster amplifier card (for
example, the OPT-BST card) for transmission outside of the NE.
•
COM RX port: The COM RX port receives the optical signal from a preamplifier (such as the
OPT-PRE) and sends it to the optical splitter.
•
DROP TX port: The DROP TX port sends the split-off optical signal with drop channels to the
32DMX-L card, where the channels are further processed and dropped.
Figure 8-10 shows the 32WSS-L module front panel and identifies the traffic flow through the ports.
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8.4.2 32WSS-L Block Diagram
Figure 8-10
32WSS-L Faceplate and Ports
32WSS-L
FAIL
ACT
SF
77.8-83.6
Add 9-16
91.2-97.1
98.0-04.0
TX TX
RX RX
134973
COM TX
Add 25-32
TX
COM RX
EXP
EXP TX
RX
EXP RX
Add 17-24
COM
DROP TX
DROP
TX
ADD RX
Add 1-8
84.5-90.4
32 Add Ports
8.4.2 32WSS-L Block Diagram
Figure 8-11 provides a high-level functional block diagram of the 32WSS-L card and Figure 8-12 on
page 8-22 shows how optical signals are processed on the EXP RX and COM RX ports.
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8.4.2 32WSS-L Block Diagram
Figure 8-11
32WSS-L Block Diagram
32 add ports
Add 1 Add 2
Add 32
Wavelength
selective switch
EXP RX port
(In from other 32WSS-L
within the network element)
Add channel
or pass-through
Optical
splitter
DROP TX port
dropped channels
COM RX port
(In from OPT-AMP-L preamplifier
or OSC-CSM)
134971
EXP TX port
(To the other 32WSS-L
within the network element)
COM TX port
(To
o OPT-AMP-L booster
or OSC-CSM)
(To COM RX port
of 32DMX)
Aggregate optical signals that enter the EXP RX and COM RX ports are processed in two ways: add
channel/pass-through and optical splitter processing. The optical processing stages are shown in
Figure 8-12, which provides a detailed optical functional diagram of the 32WSS-L card.
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8.4.2 32WSS-L Block Diagram
Figure 8-12
32WSS-L Optical Block Diagram
Optical switch
(Add channel or
pass-through)
1
1 pass-through
Optical
DMUX
(AWG)
EXP RX port
(In from 32WSS-L)
2
1
Add 1
P1
2
P33
2 pass-through
Optical
MUX
(AWG)
COM TX port
(To OPT-AMP-L
booster
or OSC-CSM)
2
P66
Add 2
P2
32
EXP TX port
(To 32WSS-L)
32 pass-through
32
P68 Add 32
Optical
splitter
P32
P64
P67
COM RX port
(In from OPT-AMP-L
preamplifier
or OSC-CSM)
134972
DROP TX port P69 Dropped
(To 32DMX-L)
channels
P34
P65
VOA
Photodiode
The EXP RX PORT and COM RX PORT operate as follows:
•
EXP RX Port Add Channel/Pass-through Processing
The incoming optical signal is received at the EXP RX port from the other 32WSS-L card within
the NE. The incoming aggregate optical signal is demultiplexed into 32 individual wavelengths, or
channels. Each channel is then individually processed by the optical switch, which performs
add/pass-through processing. By using software controls, the switch either selects the optical
channel coming in from the demultiplexer (that is, the pass-through channel) or it selects the
external ADD channel. If the ADD port channel is selected this channel is transmitted and the
optical signal coming from the demultiplexer is blocked.
After the optical switch stage, all of the channels are multiplexed into an aggregate optical signal,
which is sent out on the COM TX port. The output is typically connected to an OPT-AMP-L or
OPT-BST-E card (in the event a booster amplifier is needed) or to an OSC-CSM card (if no
amplification is needed).
•
COM RX Port Optical Splitter Processing
The COM RX port receives the incoming optical signal and directs it to the 32WSS-L card’s optical
splitter. The splitter optically diverts channels that are designated to be dropped to the DROP TX
port. The DROP TX port is typically connected to the COM RX port of the 32DMX-L where the
drop channels are being dropped. Channels that are not dropped pass through the optical splitter and
flow out of the 32WSS-L card EXP TX port. Typically, this optical signal is connected to the other
32WS-L module within the NE.
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8.4.3 32WSS-L ROADM Functionality
8.4.3 32WSS-L ROADM Functionality
The 32WSS-L works in combination with the 32DMX-L to implement L band (1570 to 1620 nm)
functionality. As a ROADM node, the ONS 15454 can be configured to add or drop individual optical
channels using CTC, Cisco TransportPlanner, and CTM. ROADM functionality using the 32WSS-L card
requires two 32DMX-L single-slot cards and two 32WSS-L double-slot cards (totalling six slots needed
in the ONS 15454 chassis).
For other cards’ ROADM functionality, see that card’s description in this chapter. For a diagram of a
typical ROADM configuration, see the “10.1.4 ROADM Node” section on page 10-12.
Note
A terminal site can be configured using a 32WSS-L card and a 32DMX-L card plugged into the east or
west side of the shelf.
8.4.4 32WSS-L Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P69 monitor the power for the 32WSS-L card. Table 8-11 shows the
returned power level values calibrated to each port.
Table 8-11
32WSS-L Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1–P32
ADD (Power ADD)
ADD RX
PASS THROUGH
COM TX
ADD (Power)
COM TX
P65
OUT EXP
EXP TX
P66
IN EXP
EXP RX
P67
OUT COM
COM TX
P68
IN COM
COM RX
P69
DROP
DROP TX
P33–P64
1
1. P33–P64 monitor either ADD or PASSTHROUGH power, depending on the state
of the optical switch
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
8.4.5 32WSS-L Channel Plan
The 32WSS-L card uses 32 banded channels on the ITU-T 100-GHz grid, as shown in Table 8-12.
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8.4.5 32WSS-L Channel Plan
Table 8-12
32WSS-L Channel Plan
Band ID
Channel Label
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
B77.8
77.8
190
1577.86
78.6
189.9
1578.69
79.5
189.8
1579.52
80.3
189.7
1580.35
81.1
189.6
1581.18
82.0
189.5
1582.02
82.8
189.4
1582.85
83.6
189.3
1583.69
84.5
189.2
1584.53
85.3
189.1
1585.36
86.2
189
1586.20
87.0
188.9
1587.04
87.8
188.8
1587.88
88.7
188.7
1588.73
89.5
188.6
1589.57
90.4
188.5
1590.41
91.2
188.4
591.26
92.1
188.3
1592.10
92.9
188.2
1592.95
93.7
188.1
1593.79
94.6
188
1594.64
95.4
187.9
1595.49
96.3
187.8
1596.34
97.1
187.7
1597.19
98.0
187.6
1598.04
98.8
187.5
1598.89
99.7
187.4
1599.75
00.6
187.3
1600.60
01.4
187.2
1601.46
02.3
187.1
1602.31
03.1
187
1603.17
04.0
186.9
1604.03
B81.1
B84.5
B87.8
B91.2
B94.6
B98.0
B01.4
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8.4.6 32WSS-L Card-Level Indicators
8.4.6 32WSS-L Card-Level Indicators
Table 8-13 describes the three card-level LED indicators on the 32WSS-L card.
Table 8-13
32WSS-L Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the 32WSS-L card is carrying traffic or
is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure on one or more of the card’s
ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the transmit and receive fibers
are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the light
turns off.
8.5 32DMX Card
Note
See the “A.8.1 32DMX Card Specifications” section on page A-23 for hardware specifications.
Note
For 32DMX card safety label information, see the “8.2 Safety Labels for Class 1M Laser Product
Cards” section on page 8-9.
The single-slot 32-Channel Demultiplexer (32DMX) card is an optical demultiplexer. The card receives
an aggregate optical signal on its COM RX port and demultiplexes it into to (32) ITU-T 100-GHz-spaced
channels. The 32DMX card can be installed in Slots 1 to 6 and in Slots 12 to 17.
8.5.1 32DMX Faceplate Ports
The 32DMX card has two types of ports:
•
COM RX port: COM RX is the input port for the aggregate optical signal being demultiplexed. This
port is supported by a VOA for optical power regulation and a photodiode for optical power
monitoring.
•
DROP TX ports (1 to 32): On its output, the 32DMX provides 32 drop ports (listed in Table 8-15 on
page 8-28) that are typically used for dropping channels within the ROADM node. These ports are
connected using four 8-fiber MPO ribbon connectors. The incoming optical signal to the
demultiplexer comes into the COM RX port. This input port is connected using a single LC duplex
optical connector.Each drop port has a photodiode for optical power monitoring. Unlike the two-slot
32DMX-O demultiplexer, the drop ports on the 32DMX do not have a VOA per channel for optical
power regulation. For a description of the 32DMX-O card, see the “5.4 32DMX-O Card” section
on page 5-16.
Figure 8-13 shows the 32DMX card front panel and the basic traffic flow through the ports.
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8.5.2 32DMX Block Diagram
Figure 8-13
32DMX Faceplate and Ports
32DMX
FAIL
ACT
SF
Logical View
Drop 9-16
Drop 17-24
Drop 25-32
TX
COM-RX
30.3-36.6
Drop-2
Drop 1-8
38.1-44.5
Drop-1
46.1-52.5
32 Drop Ports
54.1-60.6
32 Drop Port Outputs
MON
145936
COM RX
(Receives Drop-TX from
32WSS on COM RX)
COM
RX
Drop-32
8.5.2 32DMX Block Diagram
A block diagram of the 32DMX card is shown in Figure 8-14.
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8.5.3 32DMX ROADM Functionality
Figure 8-14
32DMX Block Diagram
30.3 to 36.6
8 CHS TX
38.1 to 44.5
8 CHS TX
46.1 to 52.5
8 CHS TX
54.1 to 60.6
8 CHS TX
MON
Optical
module
Processor
DC/DC
Power supply
Input filters
96480
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
COM RX
SCL Bus SCL Bus
TCCi M
TCCi P
BAT A&B
Figure 8-15 shows the 32DMX optical module functional block diagram.
Figure 8-15
32DMX Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
P1
1
P2
P3
20 dB max
attenuation
COM RX
P4
P33
DROP TX
P34
P29
P30
P31
P32
P
Physical photodiode
124967
32
Variable optical attenuator
8.5.3 32DMX ROADM Functionality
The 32DMX card works in combination with the 32WSS card to implement ROADM functionality. As
a ROADM node, the ONS 15454 can be configured to add or drop individual optical channels using
CTC, Cisco TransportPlanner, and CTM. ROADM functionality using the 32DMX card requires two
32DMX single-slot cards and two 32WSS double-slot cards (for six slots total in the ONS 15454
chassis).
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8.5.4 32DMX Power Monitoring
For information about the ROADM functionality for other cards, see that card’s description in this
chapter. For a diagram of a typical ROADM configuration, see the “10.1.4 ROADM Node” section on
page 10-12.
Note
A terminal site can be configured using only a 32WSS card and a 32DMX card plugged into the east or
west side of the shelf.
8.5.4 32DMX Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P33 monitor the power for the 32DMX card. The returned power level
values are calibrated to the ports as shown in Table 8-14.
Table 8-14
32DMX Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1–P32
DROP
DROP TX
P33
INPUT COM
COM RX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
8.5.5 32DMX Channel Allocation Plan
The 32DMX card’s channel labels, frequencies, and wavelengths are listed in Table 8-15.
Table 8-15
32DMX Channel Allocation Plan
Band ID
Channel Label
Frequency (THz)
Wavelength (nm)
B30.3
30.3
195.9
1530.33
31.1
195.8
1531.12
31.9
195.7
1531.90
32.6
195.6
1532.68
34.2
195.4
1534.25
35.0
195.3
1535.04
35.8
195.2
1535.82
36.1
195.1
1536.61
38.1
194.9
1538.19
38.9
194.8
1538.87
39.7
194.7
1539.77
40.5
194.6
1540.46
B34.2
B38.1
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8.5.6 32DMX Card-Level Indicators
Table 8-15
32DMX Channel Allocation Plan (continued)
Band ID
Channel Label
Frequency (THz)
Wavelength (nm)
B42.1
42.1
194.4
1542.14
42.9
194.3
1542.94
43.7
194.2
1543.73
44.5
194.1
1544.53
46.1
193.9
1546.12
46.9
193.8
1546.92
47.7
193.7
1547.72
48.5
193.6
1548.51
50.1
193.4
1550.12
50.9
193.3
1550.92
51.7
193.2
1551.72
52.5
193.1
1552.52
54.1
192.9
1554.13
54.9
192.8
1554.94
55.7
192.7
1555.75
56.5
192.6
1556.55
58.1
192.4
1558.17
58.9
192.3
1558.98
59.7
192.2
1559.79
60.6
192.1
1560.61
B46.1
B50.1
B54.1
B58.1
8.5.6 32DMX Card-Level Indicators
Table 8-16 describes the three card-level LED indicators on the 32DMX card.
Table 8-16
32DMX Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the 32DMX card is carrying traffic or is
traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure on one or more of the card’s
ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the transmit and receive fibers
are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the light
turns off.
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8.5.7 32DMX Port-Level Indicators
8.5.7 32DMX Port-Level Indicators
You can find the alarm status of the 32DMX card’s ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454
fan-tray assembly. The screen displays the number and severity of alarms on a given port or slot. For the
procedure to view these counts, refer to “Manage Alarms” in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure
Guide.
8.6 32DMX-L Card
Note
See the “A.8.2 32DMX-L Card Specifications” section on page A-24 for hardware specifications.
Note
For 32DMX-L safety label information, see the “8.2 Safety Labels for Class 1M Laser Product Cards”
section on page 8-9.
The single-slot 32-Channel Demultiplexer L-Band card (32DMX-L) is an L band optical demultiplexer.
The card receives an aggregate optical signal on its COM RX port and demultiplexes it into to (32)
100-GHz-spaced channels. The 32DMX-L card is particularly well suited for use in networks that
employ DS fiber or SMF-28 single-mode fiber. The 32DMX-L card can be installed in Slots 1 to 6 and
in Slots 12 to 17.
8.6.1 32DMX-L Faceplate Ports
The 32DMX-L card has two types of ports:
•
COM RX port: COM RX is the input port for the aggregate optical signal being demultiplexed. This
port is supported by both a VOA for optical power regulation and a photodiode for optical power
monitoring.
•
DROP TX ports (1 to 32): On its output, the 32DMX-L card provides 32 drop ports (listed in
Table 8-21 on page 8-38) that are typically used for dropping channels within the ROADM node.
These ports are connected using four 8-fiber MPO ribbon connectors. Each drop port has a
photodiode for optical power monitoring. Unlike the two-slot 32DMX-O demultiplexer, the drop
ports on the 32DMX-L do not have a VOA per channel for optical power regulation. For a
description of the 32DMX-O card, see the “5.4 32DMX-O Card” section on page 5-16.
Figure 8-16 shows the 32DMX-L card front panel and the basic traffic flow through the ports.
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8.6.2 32DMX-L Block Diagram
Figure 8-16
32DMX-L Faceplate and Ports
32DMX
FAIL
ACT
SF
Logical View
Drop 9-16
Drop 17-24
Drop 25-32
TX
COM-RX
77.8-83.6
Drop-2
Drop 1-8
84.5-90.4
Drop-1
91.2-97.1
32 Drop Ports
98.0-04.0
32 Drop Port Outputs
MON
145940
COM RX
(Receives Drop-TX from
32WSS-L on COM RX)
COM
RX
Drop-32
8.6.2 32DMX-L Block Diagram
Figure 8-17 shows a block diagram of the 32DMX-L card.
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8.6.3 32DMX-L ROADM Functionality
Figure 8-17
32DMX-L Block Diagram
77.8 to 83.6
8 CHS TX
84.5 to 90.4
8 CHS TX
91.2 to 97.1
8 CHS TX
98.0 to 04.0
8 CHS TX
MON
Optical
module
Processor
DC/DC
Power supply
Input filters
134969
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
COM RX
SCL Bus SCL Bus
TCCi M
TCCi P
BAT A&B
Figure 8-18 shows the 32DMX-L optical module functional block diagram.
Figure 8-18
32DMX-L Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
P1
1
P2
P3
20 dB max
attenuation
COM RX
P4
P33
DROP TX
P34
P29
P30
P31
P32
P
Physical photodiode
124967
32
Variable optical attenuator
8.6.3 32DMX-L ROADM Functionality
The 32DMX-L card works in combination with the 32WSS-L card to implement ROADM functionality.
AS a ROADM node, the ONS 15454 can be configured to add or drop individual optical channels using
CTC, Cisco TransportPlanner, and CTM. ROADM functionality using the 32DMX-L card requires two
32DMX-L single-slot cards and two 32WSS-L double-slot cards (for a total of six slots in the
ONS 15454 chassis).
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8.6.4 32DMX-L Power Monitoring
For information about ROADM functionality for other cards, see that card’s description in this chapter.
For a diagram of a typical ROADM configuration, see the “10.1.4 ROADM Node” section on
page 10-12.
Note
A terminal site can be configured using only a 32WSS-L card and a 32DMX-L card plugged into the east
or west side of the shelf.
8.6.4 32DMX-L Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P33 monitor the power for the 32DMX-L card. The returned power
level values are calibrated to the ports as shown in Table 8-17.
Table 8-17
32DMX-L Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1–P32
DROP
DROP TX
P33
INPUT COM
COM RX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
8.6.5 32DMX-L Channel Plan
The 32DMX-L card uses 32 banded channels on the ITU-T 100-GHz grid, as shown in Table 8-18.
Table 8-18
32DMX-L Channel Plan
Band ID
Channel Label
Frequency (THz)
Wavelength (nm)
B77.8
77.8
190
1577.86
78.6
189.9
1578.69
79.5
189.8
1579.52
80.3
189.7
1580.35
81.1
189.6
1581.18
82.0
189.5
1582.02
82.8
189.4
1582.85
83.6
189.3
1583.69
84.5
189.2
1584.53
85.3
189.1
1585.36
86.2
189
1586.20
87.0
188.9
1587.04
B81.1
B84.5
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8.6.6 32DMX-L Card-Level Indicators
Table 8-18
32DMX-L Channel Plan (continued)
Band ID
Channel Label
Frequency (THz)
Wavelength (nm)
B87.8
87.8
188.8
1587.88
88.7
188.7
1588.73
89.5
188.6
1589.57
90.4
188.5
1590.41
91.2
188.4
1591.26
92.1
188.3
1592.10
92.9
188.2
1592.95
93.7
188.1
1593.79
94.6
188
1594.64
95.4
187.9
1595.49
96.3
187.8
1596.34
97.1
187.7
1597.19
98.0
187.6
1598.04
98.8
187.5
1598.89
99.7
187.4
1599.75
00.6
187.3
1600.60
01.4
187.2
1601.46
02.3
187.1
1602.31
03.1
187
1603.17
04.0
186.9
1604.03
B91.2
B94.6
B98.0
B01.4
8.6.6 32DMX-L Card-Level Indicators
Table 8-19 describes the three card-level LED indicators on the 32DMX-L card.
Table 8-19
32DMX-L Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the 32DMX-L card is carrying traffic or
is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure on one or more of the card’s
ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the transmit and receive fibers
are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the light
turns off.
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8.6.7 32DMX-L Port-Level Indicators
8.6.7 32DMX-L Port-Level Indicators
You can find the alarm status of the 32DMX-L card’s ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454
fan-tray assembly. The screen displays the number and severity of alarms on a given port or slot. For the
procedure to view these counts, refer to “Manage Alarms” in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure
Guide.
8.7 40-DMX-C Card
Note
See the “A.8.6 40-DMX-C Card Specifications” section on page A-31 for hardware specifications.
Note
For 40-DMX-C safety label information, see the “8.2 Safety Labels for Class 1M Laser Product Cards”
section on page 8-9.
The single-slot 40-Channel Demultiplexer C-band (40-DMX-C) card demultiplexes 40 100-GHz-spaced
channels identified in the channel plan (Table 8-21 on page 8-38), and sends them to dedicated output
ports. The overall optical power can be adjusted using a single VOA that is common to all channels. The
40-DMX-C card is unidirectional, optically passive, and can be installed in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
8.7.1 40-DMX-C Faceplate Ports
The 40-DMX-C has two types of ports:
•
COM RX port: COM RX is the line input port for the aggregate optical signal being demultiplexed.
This port is supported by a VOA for optical power regulation and a photodiode for per-channel
optical power monitoring.
Note
•
By default, the VOA is set to its maximum attenuation for safety purposes (for example,
electrical power failure). A manual VOA setting is also available.
DROP TX ports (1 to 40): On its output, the 40-DMX-C card provides 40 drop ports that are
typically used for dropping channels within the ROADM node. These ports are connected using five
physical connectors on the front panel that accept MPO client input cables. (MPO cables break out
into eight separate cables.) The 40-DMX-C card also has one LC-PC-II optical connector for the
main input.
Figure 8-19 shows the 40-DMX-C card faceplate.
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8.7.2 40-DMX-C Block Diagram
Figure 8-19
40-DMX-C Faceplate
40-DMX-C
FAIL
ACT
SF
Logical View
40 Drop Port Outputs
30.3 - 35.8
40 Drop Ports
Drop-1
Drop 1-8
36.6 - 42.1
Drop-2
42.9 - 48.5
Drop 25-32
Drop 33-40
159554
COM RX
(Receives Drop-TX from
40-WSS-C on COM RX)
COM
RX
Drop-40
Drop 17-24
49.3 - 54.9
COM-RX
55.7 - 61.4
TX
Drop 9-16
8.7.2 40-DMX-C Block Diagram
Figure 8-20 shows a block diagram of the 40-DMX-C card.
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8.7.3 40-DMX-C ROADM Functionality
Figure 8-20
40-DMX-C Block Diagram
30.3 to 35.8
8 CHS RX
36.6 to 42.1
8 CHS RX
42.9 to 48.5
8 CHS RX
49.3 to 54.9
8 CHS RX
55.7 to 61.4
8 CHS RX
Optical
module
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
DC/DC
Power supply
Input filters
151971
Processor
COM RX
SCL Bus SCL Bus
TCCi M
TCCi P
BAT A&B
Figure 8-21 shows the 40-DMX-C optical module functional block diagram.
Figure 8-21
40-DMX-C Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
P1
1
P2
P3
P4
COM RX
DROP TX
P41
P37
P38
P39
Variable optical attenuator
P
Physical photodiode
Control
40
Control
interface
151972
P40
8.7.3 40-DMX-C ROADM Functionality
The 40-DMX-C card works in combination with the 40-WSS-C card to implement ROADM
functionality. As a ROADM node, the ONS 15454 can be configured at the optical channel level using
CTC, Cisco TransportPlanner, and CTM. ROADM functionality using the 40-DMX-C card requires two
single-slot 40-DMX-C cards and two 40-WSS-C double-slot cards (for a total of six slots in the
ONS 15454 chassis).
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8.7.4 40-DMX-C Power Monitoring
For other cards’ ROADM functionality, see that card’s description in this chapter. For a diagram of a
typical ROADM configuration, see the “10.1.4 ROADM Node” section on page 10-12.
8.7.4 40-DMX-C Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P40 monitor the power at the outputs of the 40-DMX-C card. P41
monitors the total multiplexed power at the input, calibrated to the COM-RX port. Table 8-20 shows the
returned power level values calibrated to each port.
Table 8-20
40-DMX-C Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1–P40
DROP
DROP TX
P41
INPUT COM
COM RX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
8.7.5 40-DMX-C Channel Plan
Table 8-21 shows the 40 ITU-T 100-GHz-spaced, C band channels (wavelengths) that are demultiplexed
by the 40-DMX-C card.
Table 8-21
40-DMX-C Channel Plan
Band ID
Channel Label Frequency (GHz)
Wavelength
(nm)
B30.3
30.3
195.9
1530.33
31.1
195.8
1531.12
31.9
195.7
1531.90
32.6
195.6
1532.68
33.4
195.5
1533.47
34.2
195.4
1534.25
35.0
195.3
1535.04
35.8
195.2
1535.82
36.6
195.1
1536.61
37.4
195
1537.40
38.1
194.9
1538.19
38.9
194.8
1538.98
39.7
194.7
1539.77
40.5
194.6
1540.56
41.3
194.5
1541.35
B34.2
B38.1
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8.7.6 40-DMX-C Card-Level Indicators
Table 8-21
40-DMX-C Channel Plan (continued)
Band ID
Channel Label Frequency (GHz)
Wavelength
(nm)
B42.1
42.1
194.4
1542.14
42.9
194.3
1542.94
43.7
194.2
1543.73
44.5
194.1
1544.53
45.3
194
1545.32
46.1
193.9
1546.12
46.9
193.8
1546.92
47.7
193.7
1547.72
48.5
193.6
1548.51
49.3
193.5
1549.32
50.1
193.4
1550.12
50.9
193.3
1550.92
51.7
193.2
1551.72
52.5
193.1
1552.52
53.3
193
1553.33
54.1
192.9
1554.13
54.9
192.8
1554.94
55.7
192.7
1555.75
56.5
192.6
1556.55
57.3
192.5
1557.36
58.1
192.4
1558.17
58.9
192.3
1558.98
59.7
192.2
1559.79
60.6
192.1
1560.61
61.4
192
1561.42
B46.1
B50.1
B54.1
B58.1
8.7.6 40-DMX-C Card-Level Indicators
The 40-DMX-C card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 8-22.
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8.7.7 40-DMX-C Port-Level Indicators
Table 8-22
40-DMX-C Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the 40-DMX-C card is carrying traffic or
is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure on one or more of the card’s
ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the transmit and receive fibers
are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the light
turns off.
8.7.7 40-DMX-C Port-Level Indicators
You can find the alarm status of the 40-DMX-C card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454
fan-tray assembly. The screen displays the number and severity of alarms on a given port or slot. For the
procedure to view these counts, refer to “Manage Alarms” in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure
Guide.
8.8 40-DMX-CE Card
Note
See the “A.8.7 40-DMX-CE Card Specifications” section on page A-32 for hardware specifications.
Note
For 40-DMX-CE card safety label information, see the “8.2 Safety Labels for Class 1M Laser Product
Cards” section on page 8-9.
The single-slot 40-Channel Demultiplexer C-band, even channels (40-DMX-CE) card demultiplexes 40
100-GHz-spaced even-numbered channels identified in the channel plan (Table 8-24 on page 8-43), and
sends them to dedicated output ports. The overall optical power can be adjusted using a single VOA that
is common to all channels. The 40-DMX-CE card is unidirectional, optically passive, and can be
installed in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
8.8.1 40-DMX-CE Card Faceplate Ports
The 40-DMX-CE card has two types of ports:
•
COM RX port: COM RX is the line input port for the aggregate optical signal being demultiplexed.
This port is supported by a VOA for optical power regulation and a photodiode for per-channel
optical power monitoring.
Note
By default, the VOA is set to its maximum attenuation for safety purposes (for example,
electrical power failure). A manual VOA setting is also available.
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8.8.2 40-DMX-CE Card Block Diagram
•
DROP TX ports (1 to 40): On its output, the 40-DMX-CE card provides 40 drop ports that are
typically used for dropping channels within the ROADM node. These ports are connected using five
physical connectors on the front panel that accept MPO client input cables. (MPO cables break out
into eight separate cables.) The 40-DMX-CE card also has one LC-PC-II optical connector for the
main input.
Figure 8-22 shows the 40-DMX-CE card faceplate.
Figure 8-22
40-DMX-CE Card Faceplate
40-DMX-C
FAIL
ACT
SF
Logical View
40 Drop Port Outputs
30.7 - 36.2
40 Drop Ports
Drop-1
37.0 - 42.5
Drop-2
Drop 1-8
43.3 - 48.9
Drop 25-32
Drop 33-40
240642
COM RX
(Receives Drop-TX from
40-WSS-CE on COM RX)
COM
RX
Drop-40
Drop 17-24
49.7 - 55.3
COM-RX
56.2 - 61.8
TX
Drop 9-16
8.8.2 40-DMX-CE Card Block Diagram
Figure 8-23 shows a block diagram of the 40-DMX-CE card.
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8.8.3 40-DMX-CE Card ROADM Functionality
Figure 8-23
40-DMX-CE Card Block Diagram
30.7 to 36.2
8 CHS RX
37.0 to 42.5
8 CHS RX
43.3 to 48.9
8 CHS RX
49.7 to 55.3
8 CHS RX
56.1 to 61.8
8 CHS RX
Optical
module
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
DC/DC
Power supply
Input filters
240641
Processor
COM RX
SCL Bus SCL Bus
TCCi M
TCCi P
BAT A&B
Figure 8-24 shows the 40-DMX-CE card optical module functional block diagram.
Figure 8-24
40-DMX-CE Card Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
P1
1
P2
P3
P4
COM RX
DROP TX
P41
P37
P38
P39
Variable optical attenuator
P
Control
Physical photodiode
40
Control
interface
151972
P40
8.8.3 40-DMX-CE Card ROADM Functionality
The 40-DMX-CE card works in combination with the 40-WSS-CE card to implement ROADM
functionality. As a ROADM node, the ONS 15454 can be configured at the optical channel level using
CTC, Cisco TransportPlanner, and CTM. ROADM functionality using the 40-DMX-CE card requires
two single-slot 40-DMX-CE cards and two 40-WSS-CE double-slot cards (for a total of six slots in the
ONS 15454 chassis).
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8.8.4 40-DMX-CE Card Power Monitoring
For the ROADM functionality of other cards, see the description of that card in this chapter. For a
diagram of a typical ROADM configuration, see the “10.1.4 ROADM Node” section on page 10-12.
8.8.4 40-DMX-CE Card Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P40 monitor the power at the outputs of the 40-DMX-CE card. P41
monitors the total multiplexed power at the input, calibrated to the COM-RX port. Table 8-23 shows the
returned power level values calibrated to each port.
Table 8-23
40-DMX-CE Card Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1–P40
DROP
DROP TX
P41
INPUT COM
COM RX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
8.8.5 40-DMX-CE Card Channel Plan
Table 8-24 shows the 40 ITU-T 100-GHz-spaced, C band channels (wavelengths) that are demultiplexed
by the 40-DMX-CE card.
Table 8-24
40-DMX-CE Card Channel Plan
Band ID
Channel Label Frequency (GHz)
Wavelength (nm)
B30.7
30.7
195.85
1530.72
31.5
195.75
1531.51
32.3
195.65
1532.29
33.1
195.55
1533.07
33.9
195.45
1533.86
34.6
195.35
1534.64
35.4
195.25
1535.43
36.2
195.15
1536.22
37.0
195.05
1537.00
37.8
194.95
1537.79
38.6
194.85
1538.58
39.4
194.75
1539.37
40.1
194.65
1540.16
40.9
194.55
1540.95
41.8
194.45
1541.75
B34.6
B38.6
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8.8.6 40-DMX-CE Card-Level Indicators
Table 8-24
40-DMX-CE Card Channel Plan (continued)
Band ID
Channel Label Frequency (GHz)
Wavelength (nm)
B42.5
42.5
194.35
1542.54
43.3
194.25
1543.33
44.1
194.15
1544.13
44.9
194.05
1544.92
45.7
193.95
1545.72
46.5
193.85
1546.52
47.3
193.75
1547.32
48.1
193.65
1548.11
48.9
193.55
1548.91
49.7
193.45
1549.72
50.5
193.35
1550.52
51.3
193.25
1551.32
52.1
193.15
1552.12
52.9
193.05
1552.93
53.7
192.95
1553.73
54.4
192.85
1554.54
55.3
192.75
1555.34
56.1
192.65
1556.15
56.9
192.55
1556.96
57.8
192.45
1557.77
58.6
192.35
1558.58
59.4
192.25
1559.39
60.2
192.15
1560.20
61.0
192.05
1561.01
61.8
191.95
1561.83
B46.5
B50.5
B54.4
B58.6
8.8.6 40-DMX-CE Card-Level Indicators
The 40-DMX-CE card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 8-25.
Table 8-25
40-DMX-CE Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
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8.8.7 40-DMX-CE Card Port-Level Indicators
Table 8-25
40-DMX-CE Card-Level Indicators (continued)
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the 40-DMX-CE card is carrying traffic
or is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure on one or more of the card’s
ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the transmit and receive fibers
are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the light
turns off.
8.8.7 40-DMX-CE Card Port-Level Indicators
You can find the alarm status of the 40-DMX-CE card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454
fan-tray assembly. The screen displays the number and severity of alarms on a given port or slot. For the
procedure to view these counts, refer to the “Manage Alarms” chapter in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Procedure Guide.
8.9 40-MUX-C Card
Note
See the “A.8.5 40-MUX-C Card Specifications” section on page A-31 for hardware specifications.
Note
For 40-MUX-C card safety label information, see the “8.2 Safety Labels for Class 1M Laser Product
Cards” section on page 8-9.
The single-slot 40-Channel Multiplexer C-band (40-MUX-C) card multiplexes forty ITU-T
100-GHz-spaced channels identified in the channel plan in Table 8-21 on page 8-38. The 40-MUX-C
card can be installed in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17. The 40-MUX-C card is typically used in hub nodes.
8.9.1 40-MUX-C Card Faceplate Ports
The 40-MUX-C card has two types of ports:
•
COM TX port: COM TX is the line output port for the aggregate optical signal being multiplexed.
This port is supported by both a VOA for optical power regulation and a photodiode for per-channel
optical power monitoring.
Note
•
By default, the VOA is set to its maximum attenuation for safety purposes (for example,
electrical power failure). A manual VOA setting is also available.
DROP RX ports (1 to 40): The 40-MUX-C card provides 40 input optical channels. These ports are
connected using five physical receive connectors on the card’s front panel that accept MPO cables
for the client input interfaces. MPO cables break out into eight separate cables. The 40-DMX-C card
also has one LC-PC-II optical connector for the main output. For the wavelength range, see
Table 8-21 on page 8-38.
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8.9.2 40-MUX-C Card Block Diagram
Figure 8-25 shows the 40-MUX-C card faceplate.
Figure 8-25
40-MUX-C Card Faceplate
40-MUX-C
FAIL
ACT
SF
Logical View
40 Client Channel Inputs
30.3 - 35.8
40 Client Ports
Client-1
Client ports 1-8
36.6 - 42.1
Client-2
42.9 - 48.5
RX
Client ports 9-16
Client ports 25-32
Client ports 33-40
159555
COM TX
Sends combined signal
to OPT- BST
COM
TX
49.3 - 54.9
Client ports 17-24
55.7 - 61.4
Client-40
COM TX
8.9.2 40-MUX-C Card Block Diagram
Figure 8-26 shows a block diagram of the 40-MUX-C card.
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8.9.3 40-MUX-C Card Power Monitoring
Figure 8-26
40-MUX-C Card Block Diagram
30.3 to 35.8
8 CHS RX
36.6 to 42.1
8 CHS RX
42.9 to 48.5
8 CHS RX
49.3 to 54.9
8 CHS RX
55.7 to 61.4
8 CHS RX
Optical
module
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
DC/DC
Power supply
Input filters
151974
Processor
COM TX
SCL Bus SCL Bus
TCCi M
TCCi P
BAT A&B
Figure 8-27 shows the 40-MUX-C optical module functional block diagram.
Figure 8-27
40-MUX-C Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
1
P1
P2
P3
P4
COM TX
Inputs
P37
P38
P39
P
P40
Physical photodiode
Variable optical attenuator
Control
Control
interface
151975
40
8.9.3 40-MUX-C Card Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P40 monitor the power of the individual input ports to the 40-MUX-C
card. P41 monitors the total multiplexed output power, calibrated to the COM-TX port. Table 8-26 shows
the returned power level values calibrated to each port.
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8.9.4 40-MUX-C Card Channel Plan
Table 8-26
40-MUX-C Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1–P40
ADD
ADD RX
P41
OUTPUT COM
COM-TX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
8.9.4 40-MUX-C Card Channel Plan
Table 8-27 shows the 40 ITU-T 100-GHz-spaced, C band channels (wavelengths) that are multiplexed
by the 40-MUX-C card.
Table 8-27
40-MUX-C Channel Plan
Band ID
Channel Label Frequency (GHz)
Wavelength
(nm)
B30.3
30.3
195.9
1530.33
31.1
195.8
1531.12
31.9
195.7
1531.90
32.6
195.6
1532.68
33.4
195.5
1533.47
34.2
195.4
1534.25
35.0
195.3
1535.04
35.8
195.2
1535.82
36.6
195.1
1536.61
37.4
195
1537.40
38.1
194.9
1538.19
38.9
194.8
1538.98
39.7
194.7
1539.77
40.5
194.6
1540.56
41.3
194.5
1541.35
42.1
194.4
1542.14
42.9
194.3
1542.94
43.7
194.2
1543.73
44.5
194.1
1544.53
45.3
194
1545.32
B34.2
B38.1
B42.1
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8.9.5 40-MUX-C Card-Level Indicators
Table 8-27
40-MUX-C Channel Plan (continued)
Band ID
Channel Label Frequency (GHz)
Wavelength
(nm)
B46.1
46.1
193.9
1546.12
46.9
193.8
1546.92
47.7
193.7
1547.72
48.5
193.6
1548.51
49.3
193.5
1549.32
50.1
193.4
1550.12
50.9
193.3
1550.92
51.7
193.2
1551.72
52.5
193.1
1552.52
53.3
193
1553.33
54.1
192.9
1554.13
54.9
192.8
1554.94
55.7
192.7
1555.75
56.5
192.6
1556.55
57.3
192.5
1557.36
58.1
192.4
1558.17
58.9
192.3
1558.98
59.7
192.2
1559.79
60.6
192.1
1560.61
61.4
192
1561.42
B50.1
B54.1
B58.1
8.9.5 40-MUX-C Card-Level Indicators
The 40-MUX-C card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 8-28.
Table 8-28
40-MUX-C Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the 40-MUX-C card is carrying traffic or
is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure on one or more of the card’s
ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the transmit and receive fibers
are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the light
turns off.
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8.9.6 40-MUX-C Port-Level Indicators
8.9.6 40-MUX-C Port-Level Indicators
You can find the alarm status of the 40-MUX-C card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454
fan-tray assembly. The screen displays the number and severity of alarms on a given port or slot. For the
procedure to view these counts, refer to “Manage Alarms” in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure
Guide.
8.10 40-WSS-C Card
Note
See the “A.8.8 40-WSS-C Card Specifications” section on page A-33 for hardware specifications.
Note
For 40-WSS-C safety label information, see the “8.2 Safety Labels for Class 1M Laser Product Cards”
section on page 8-9.
The double-slot 40-channel Wavelength Selective Switch C-Band (40-WSS-C) card switches 40 ITU-T
100-GHz-spaced channels identified in the channel plan (Table 8-21 on page 8-38) and sends them to
dedicated output ports. The 40-WSS-C card is bidirectional and optically passive. The card can be
installed in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17
The 40-WSS-C features include:
•
Receipt of an aggregate DWDM signal into 40 output optical channels from the Line receive port
(EXP RX) in one direction and from the COM-RX port in the other direction.
•
Per-channel optical power monitoring using photodiodes.
•
Signal splitting in a 70%-to-30% ratio, sent to the 40-DMX-C for dropping signals, then to the other
40-WSS-C card.
•
Aggregate DWDM signal monitoring and control through a variable optical attenuator (VOA). In
the case of electrical power failure, the VOA is set to its maximum attenuation for safety purposes.
A manual VOA setting is also available.
Within the 40-WSS-C card, the first AWG opens the spectrum and each wavelength is directed to one of
the ports of a 1x2 optical switch. The same wavelength can be passed through or stopped. If the
pass-through wavelength is stopped, a new channel can be added at the ADD port. The card’s second
AWG multiplexes all of the wavelengths, and the aggregate signal is output through the COM-TX port.
8.10.1 40-WSS-C Faceplate Ports
The 40-WSS-C has eight types of ports:
•
ADD RX ports (1 to 40): These ports are used for adding channels. Each add channel is associated
with an individual switch element that selects whether an individual channel is added. Each add port
has optical power regulation provided by a VOA. The five connectors on the card faceplate accept
MPO cables for the client input interfaces. MPO cables break out into eight separate cables. The
40-WSS-C card also has one LC-PC-II optical connector for the main input.
•
COM RX: The COM RX port receives the optical signal from a preamplifier (such as the OPT-PRE)
and sends it to the optical splitter.
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8.10.1 40-WSS-C Faceplate Ports
•
COM TX: The COM TX port sends an aggregate optical signal to a booster amplifier card (for
example, the OPT-BST card) for transmission outside of the NE.
•
EXP RX port: The EXP RX port receives an optical signal from another 40-WSS-C card in the same
NE.
•
EXP TX: The EXP TX port sends an optical signal to the other 40-WSS-C card within the NE.
•
DROP TX port: The DROP TX port sends the split off optical signal that contains drop channels to
the 40-DMX-C card, where the channels are further processed and dropped.
Figure 8-28 shows the 40-WSS-C card faceplate.
Figure 8-28
40-WSS-C Faceplate
40-WSS-C
FAIL
ACT
ADD RX
42.9 - 48.5
49.3 - 54.9
TX
TX
55.7 - 61.4
RX
159394
COM
EXP
RX
DROP
TX
36.6 - 42.1
30.3 - 35.8
SF
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8.10.2 40-WSS-C Block Diagram
8.10.2 40-WSS-C Block Diagram
Figure 8-29 shows a block diagram of the 40-WSS-C card.
Figure 8-29
40-WSS-C Block Diagram
1
1 Pas Through
1
CONTROL
Control
Interface
1 ADD
2
EXPRESS
RX
2 Pas Through
2
Comon
TX
2 ADD
40
Virtual
photodiode
40
40 ADD
Comon
RX
70/30
ADD RX
159393
EXPRESS
TX
DROP
TX
2 Pas Through
Figure 8-30 shows the 40-WSS-C optical module functional block diagram.
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8.10.3 40-WSS-C ROADM Functionality
Figure 8-30
40-WSS-C Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
ADD RX
EXP RX
Optical
module
EXP TX
COM RX
COM TX
DROP TX
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
Power supply
Input filters
DC/DC
159392
uP8260
2xSCL Buses
BAT A&B
LC connector
MPO connector
8.10.3 40-WSS-C ROADM Functionality
The 40-WSS-C card works in combination with the 40-DMX-C card to implement ROADM
functionality. As a ROADM node, the ONS 15454 can be configured at the optical channel level using
CTC, Cisco TransportPlanner, and CTM. ROADM functionality using the 40-WSS-C card requires two
40-WSS-C double-slot cards and two 40-DMX-C single-slot cards (for a total of six slots in the
ONS 15454 chassis).
For information about ROADM functionality for other cards, see that card’s description in this chapter.
For a diagram of a typical ROADM configuration, see the “10.1.4 ROADM Node” section on
page 10-12.
8.10.4 40-WSS-C Power Monitoring
The 40-WSS-C has physical diodes that monitor power at various locations on the card. Table 8-29 lists
the physical diode descriptions.
Table 8-29
40-WSS-C Physical Photodiode Port Calibration
Physical Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port(s)
P1
DROP
DROP TX
P2
EXP
EXP RX
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8.10.5 40-WSS-C Channel Plan
Table 8-29
40-WSS-C Physical Photodiode Port Calibration (continued)
Physical Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port(s)
1
RX
Add i RX ports (that is, channel input Add i RX
power), up to 40 ports and therefore 40 PDs1
PDi41
TX
COM TX port (that is, per-channel output COM TX
power) up to 40 channels and therefore 40 PDs
PD5
COM
COM TX port (that is, total output COM TX power)
PDi3
1. i indicates any channel from 01 through 40.
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
Additionally, the 40-WSS-C has two virtual diodes. Virtual diodes are monitor points for each physical
photodiode; they are identified with a physical diode relative to the way that the physical diode is
identified with one of the two interlink (ILK) ports. Table 8-30 lists the virtual diodes.
Table 8-30
40-WSS-C Virtual Photodiode Port Calibration
Virtual Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port(s)
VPD1
COM
COM RX port (total input COM RX power)
VPD2
EXP
EXP TX port (total output EXP TX power)
8.10.5 40-WSS-C Channel Plan
Table 8-31 shows the 40 ITU-T 100-GHz-spaced, C band channels (wavelengths) that are switched by
the 40-WSS-C card.
Table 8-31
40-WSS-C Channel Plan
Band ID
Channel Label Frequency (GHz)
Wavelength (nm)
B30.3
30.3
195.9
1530.33
31.1
195.8
1531.12
31.9
195.7
1531.90
32.6
195.6
1532.68
33.4
195.5
1533.47
34.2
195.4
1534.25
35.0
195.3
1535.04
35.8
195.2
1535.82
36.6
195.1
1536.61
37.4
195
1537.40
B34.2
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8.10.6 40-WSS-C Card-Level Indicators
Table 8-31
40-WSS-C Channel Plan (continued)
Band ID
Channel Label Frequency (GHz)
Wavelength (nm)
B38.1
38.1
194.9
1538.19
38.9
194.8
1538.98
39.7
194.7
1539.77
40.5
194.6
1540.56
41.3
194.5
1541.35
42.1
194.4
1542.14
42.9
194.3
1542.94
43.7
194.2
1543.73
44.5
194.1
1544.53
45.3
194
1545.32
46.1
193.9
1546.12
46.9
193.8
1546.92
47.7
193.7
1547.72
48.5
193.6
1548.51
49.3
193.5
1549.32
50.1
193.4
1550.12
50.9
193.3
1550.92
51.7
193.2
1551.72
52.5
193.1
1552.52
53.3
193
1553.33
54.1
192.9
1554.13
54.9
192.8
1554.94
55.7
192.7
1555.75
56.5
192.6
1556.55
57.3
192.5
1557.36
58.1
192.4
1558.17
58.9
192.3
1558.98
59.7
192.2
1559.79
60.6
192.1
1560.61
61.4
192
1561.42
B42.1
B46.1
B50.1
B54.1
B58.1
8.10.6 40-WSS-C Card-Level Indicators
The 40-WSS-C card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 8-32.
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8.10.7 40-WSS-C Port-Level Indicators
Table 8-32
40-WSS-C Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the 40-WSS-C is carrying traffic or is
traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure on one or more of the card’s
ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the transmit and receive fibers
are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the light
turns off.
8.10.7 40-WSS-C Port-Level Indicators
You can find the alarm status of the 40-WSS-C card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454
fan-tray assembly. The screen displays the number and severity of alarms on a given port or slot. For the
procedure to view these counts, refer to the “Manage Alarms” chapter in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Procedure Guide.
8.11 40-WSS-CE Card
Note
See the “A.8.9 40-WSS-CE Card Specifications” section on page A-35 for hardware specifications.
Note
For 40-WSS-CE card afety label information, see the “8.2 Safety Labels for Class 1M Laser Product
Cards” section on page 8-9.
The double-slot 40-channel Wavelength Selective Switch Even-Channel C-Band (40-WSS-CE) card
switches 40 ITU-T 100-GHz-spaced channels identified in the channel plan (Table 8-35 on page 8-61)
and sends them to dedicated output ports. The 40-WSS-CE card is bidirectional and optically passive.
The card can be installed in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
The 40-WSS-CE features include:
•
Receipt of an aggregate DWDM signal into 40 output optical channels from the Line receive port
(EXP RX) in one direction and from the COM-RX port in the other direction.
•
Per-channel optical power monitoring using photodiodes.
•
Signal splitting in a 70-to-30 percent ratio, sent to the 40-DMX-CE card for dropping signals, then
to the other 40-WSS-CE card.
•
Aggregate DWDM signal monitoring and control through a VOA. In the case of electrical power
failure, the VOA is set to its maximum attenuation for safety purposes. A manual VOA setting is
also available.
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8.11.1 40-WSS-CE Faceplate Ports
Within the 40-WSS-CE card, the first AWG opens the spectrum and each wavelength is directed to one
of the ports of a 1x2 optical switch. The same wavelength can be passed through or stopped. If the
pass-through wavelength is stopped, a new channel can be added at the ADD port. The card’s second
AWG multiplexes all of the wavelengths, and the aggregate signal is output through the COM-TX port.
8.11.1 40-WSS-CE Faceplate Ports
The 40-WSS-CE card has eight types of ports:
•
ADD RX ports (1 to 40): These ports are used for adding channels. Each add channel is associated
with an individual switch element that selects whether an individual channel is added. Each add port
has optical power regulation provided by a VOA. The five connectors on the card faceplate accept
MPO cables for the client input interfaces. MPO cables break out into eight separate cables. The
40-WSS-CE card also has one LC-PC-II optical connector for the main input.
•
COM RX: The COM RX port receives the optical signal from a preamplifier (such as the OPT-PRE)
and sends it to the optical splitter.
•
COM TX: The COM TX port sends an aggregate optical signal to a booster amplifier card (for
example, the OPT-BST card) for transmission outside of the NE.
•
EXP RX port: The EXP RX port receives an optical signal from another 40-WSS-CE card in the
same NE.
•
EXP TX: The EXP TX port sends an optical signal to the other 40-WSS-CE card within the NE.
•
DROP TX port: The DROP TX port sends the split off optical signal that contains drop channels to
the 40-DMX-C card, where the channels are further processed and dropped.
Figure 8-31 shows the 40-WSS-CE card faceplate.
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8.11.2 40-WSS-CE Card Block Diagram
Figure 8-31
40-WSS-CE Faceplate
40-WSS-C
FAIL
ACT
ADD RX
43.3 - 48.9
49.7 - 55.3
TX
TX
56.2 - 61.8
RX
240643
COM
EXP
RX
DROP
TX
37.0 - 42.5
30.7 - 36.2
SF
8.11.2 40-WSS-CE Card Block Diagram
Figure 8-32 shows a block diagram of the 40-WSS-CE card.
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8.11.2 40-WSS-CE Card Block Diagram
Figure 8-32
40-WSS-CE Block Diagram
1
1 Pas Through
1
CONTROL
Control
Interface
1 ADD
2
EXPRESS
RX
2 Pas Through
2
Comon
TX
2 ADD
40
Virtual
photodiode
40
40 ADD
EXPRESS
TX
Comon
RX
70/30
159393
DROP
TX
2 Pas Through
ADD RX
Figure 8-33 shows the 40-WSS-CE optical module functional block diagram.
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8.11.3 40-WSS-CE Card ROADM Functionality
Figure 8-33
40-WSS-CE Card Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
ADD RX
EXP RX
Optical
module
EXP TX
COM RX
COM TX
DROP TX
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
DC/DC
Power supply
Input filters
159392
uP8260
2xSCL Buses
BAT A&B
LC connector
MPO connector
8.11.3 40-WSS-CE Card ROADM Functionality
The 40-WSS-CE card works in combination with the 40-DMX-CE card to implement ROADM
functionality. As a ROADM node, the ONS 15454 can be configured at the optical channel level using
CTC, Cisco TransportPlanner, and CTM. ROADM functionality using the 40-WSS-CE card requires two
40-WSS-CE double-slot cards and two 40-DMX-CE single-slot cards (for a total of six slots in the
ONS 15454 chassis).
For information about ROADM functionality for another cards, see the description of that card in this
chapter. For a diagram of a typical ROADM configuration, see the “10.1.4 ROADM Node” section on
page 10-12.
8.11.4 40-WSS-CE Card Power Monitoring
The 40-WSS-CE card has physical diodes that monitor power at various locations on the card. Table 8-33
lists the physical diode descriptions.
Table 8-33
40-WSS-CE Physical Photodiode Port Calibration
Physical Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port(s)
P1
DROP
DROP TX
P2
EXP
EXP RX
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8.11.5 40-WSS-CE Card Channel Plan
Table 8-33
40-WSS-CE Physical Photodiode Port Calibration (continued)
Physical Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port(s)
1
RX
Add i RX ports (that is, channel input Add i RX
power), up to 40 ports and therefore 40 PDs1
PDi41
TX
COM TX port (that is, per-channel output COM TX
power) up to 40 channels and therefore 40 PDs
PD5
COM
COM TX port (that is, total output COM TX power)
PDi3
1. i indicates any channel from 01 through 40.
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
Additionally, the 40-WSS-CE card has two virtual diodes. Virtual diodes are monitor points for each
physical photodiode; they are identified with a physical diode relative to the way that the physical diode
is identified with one of the two interlink (ILK) ports. Table 8-34 lists the virtual diodes.
Table 8-34
40-WSS-CE Virtual Photodiode Port Calibration
Virtual Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port(s)
VPD1
COM
COM RX port (total input COM RX power)
VPD2
EXP
EXP TX port (total output EXP TX power)
8.11.5 40-WSS-CE Card Channel Plan
Table 8-35 shows the 40 ITU-T 100-GHz-spaced, C-band channels (wavelengths) that are switched by
the 40-WSS-CE card.
Table 8-35
40-WSS-CE Channel Plan
Band ID
Channel Label Frequency (GHz)
Wavelength (nm)
B30.7
30.7
195.85
1530.72
31.5
195.75
1531.51
32.3
195.65
1532.29
33.1
195.55
1533.07
33.9
195.45
1533.86
34.6
195.35
1534.64
35.4
195.25
1535.43
36.2
195.15
1536.22
37.0
195.05
1537.00
37.8
194.95
1537.79
B34.6
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8.11.6 40-WSS-CE Card-Level Indicators
Table 8-35
40-WSS-CE Channel Plan (continued)
Band ID
Channel Label Frequency (GHz)
Wavelength (nm)
B38.6
38.6
194.85
1538.58
39.4
194.75
1539.37
40.1
194.65
1540.16
40.9
194.55
1540.95
41.8
194.45
1541.75
42.5
194.35
1542.54
43.3
194.25
1543.33
44.1
194.15
1544.13
44.9
194.05
1544.92
45.7
193.95
1545.72
46.5
193.85
1546.52
47.3
193.75
1547.32
48.1
193.65
1548.11
48.9
193.55
1548.91
49.7
193.45
1549.72
50.5
193.35
1550.52
51.3
193.25
1551.32
52.1
193.15
1552.12
52.9
193.05
1552.93
53.7
192.95
1553.73
54.4
192.85
1554.54
55.3
192.75
1555.34
56.1
192.65
1556.15
56.9
192.55
1556.96
57.8
192.45
1557.77
58.6
192.35
1558.58
59.4
192.25
1559.39
60.2
192.15
1560.20
61.0
192.05
1561.01
61.8
191.95
1561.83
B42.5
B46.5
B50.5
B54.4
B58.6
8.11.6 40-WSS-CE Card-Level Indicators
The 40-WSS-CE card has three card-level LED indicators, described in Table 8-36.
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8.11.7 40-WSS-CE Card Port-Level Indicators
Table 8-36
40-WSS-CE Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the 40-WSS-CE card is carrying traffic
or is traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure on one or more of the card’s
ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the transmit and receive fibers
are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the light
turns off.
8.11.7 40-WSS-CE Card Port-Level Indicators
You can find the alarm status of the 40-WSS-CE card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454
fan-tray assembly. The screen displays the number and severity of alarms on a given port or slot. For the
procedure to view these counts, refer to the “Manage Alarms” chapter in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Procedure Guide.
8.12 40-WXC-C Card
Note
See the “A.8.10 40-WXC-C Card Specifications” section on page A-37 or hardware specifications.
Note
For 40-WXC-C safety label information, see the “8.2 Safety Labels for Class 1M Laser Product Cards”
section on page 8-9.
The double-slot 40-channel Wavelength Cross-Connect C Band (40-WXC-C) card selectively sends any
wavelength combination coming from nine input ports to a common output port. The device can manage
up to 41 channels spaced at 100GHz on each port according to the channel grid in Table 8-6 on page 8-7.
Each channel can be selected from any input. The card is optically passive and provides bidirectional
capability. It can be installed in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
.The 40-WXC-C card provides the following features:
•
Demultiplexing, selection, and multiplexing of DWDM aggregate signal from input ports to
common output port.
•
Aggregate DWDM signal monitoring and control through a VOA.
•
VOAs are deployed in every channel path in order to regulate the channel’s optical power. In the case
of an electrical power failure, VOAs are set to their maximum attenuation value, or to a fixed and
configurable one. The VOA can also be set manually.
•
Per-channel optical power monitoring using photodiodes.
The 40-WXC-C card acts as a selector element with the following characteristics:
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8.12.1 40-WXC-C Faceplate Ports
•
It is able to select a wavelength from one input port and pass the wavelength through to the common
out port. Simultaneously, the card can block the same wavelength coming from the other eight input
ports.
•
It is able to stop wavelengths from all nine inputs.
•
It is able to monitor optical power and control path attenuation using per-channel VOA
independently of the wavelength input-to-out port connection.
8.12.1 40-WXC-C Faceplate Ports
The 40-WXC-C card has six types of ports:
•
COM RX: The COM RX port receives the optical signal from a preamplifier (such as the OPT-PRE)
and sends it to the optical splitter.
•
COM TX: The COM TX port sends an aggregate optical signal to a booster amplifier card (for
example, the OPT-BST card) for transmission outside of the NE.
•
EXP TX: The EXP TX port sends an optical signal to the other 40-WXC-C card within the NE.
•
MON TX: The optical service channel (OSC) monitor.
•
ADD/DROP RX: The 40-WXC-C card provides 40 input optical channels. For the wavelength
range, see Table 8-39 on page 8-68.
•
ADD/DROP TX: The DROP TX port sends the split off optical signal that contains drop channels
to the 40-WXC-C card, where the channels are further processed and dropped.
Figure 8-34 shows the 40-WXC-C card faceplate.
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8.12.2 40-WXC-C Block Diagram
Figure 8-34
40-WXC-C Faceplate
40-WXC
FAIL
ACT
RX
SF
TX
EXP
EXP RX Ports (from 1 to 8): fibres
come FROM Mesh PP
TX
DROP TX: fibre connected to 40-DMX for
local chs drop
ADD RX: fibre connected to 40MUX or xx-WSS for local chs Add
TX
ADD DROP
RX
MON
Monitor Port: monitors the traffic
transmitted on COM TX Port
TX
COM TX: line TX interface
TO Booster Amplifier
COM
RX
EXP
EXP TX: internal
connection TO Mesh PP
159396
COM RX: line RX interface
FROM Pre-Amplifier
8.12.2 40-WXC-C Block Diagram
Figure 8-35 shows the 40-WXC-C optical module functional block diagram.
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8.12.3 40-WXC-C Power Monitoring
Figure 8-35
40-WXC-C Optical Module Functional Block Diagram
ADD RX
PDi3
EXPRESS
RX
COM
TX
WXC optical module
Virtual
photodiode
PDi4
P5
P...P
OPM
VPD2
EXPRESS
TX
DROP TX
Virtual photodiode
VPD1
70/30
COM
RX
P1
DC/DC
uP8260
FPGA
For SCL Bus
management
159395
Power supply
Input filters
2xSCL Buses
BAT A&B
LC connector
MPO connector
8.12.3 40-WXC-C Power Monitoring
The 40-WXC-C has 83 physical diodes (P1 through P40) that monitor power at the outputs of the card.
Table 8-37 describes the physical diodes.
Table 8-37
40-WXC-C Physical Photodiode Port Calibration
Physical
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port(s)
P1
DROP
DROP TX
P2
EXP
EXP RX
1
RX
Add i RX ports (that is,
channel input Add i RX
power), up to 40 ports and
therefore 40 PDs1
PDi41
TX
COM TX port (that is,
per-channel output COM TX
power) up to 40 channels and
therefore 40 PDs
PD5
COM
COM TX port (that is, total
output COM TX power)
PDi3
1. i indicates any channel from 01 through 40.
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8.12.4 40-WXC-C Channel Plan
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
Additionally, the 40-WXC-C has two virtual diodes. Virtual diodes are monitor points for each physical
photodiode; they are identified with a physical diode relative to the way that the physical diode is
identified with one of the two interlink (ILK) ports. Table 8-38 lists the virtual diodes.
Table 8-38
40-WXC-C Virtual Photodiode Port Calibration
Virtual
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port(s)
VPD1
COM
COM RX port (total input
COM RX power)
VPD2
EXP
EXP TX port (total output
EXP TX power)
The usage of WXC and mesh PP power readings to troubleshoot a LOS-P in WXC COM TX port in Side
A is described in the following example. The example is explained assuming a single wavelength
1558.17 in the setup that comes from Side H to Side A. If there is more than one wavelength, then there
is a risk of dropping traffic when pulling common fibers. The example is explained below:
When the wavelength from side H is 1558.17, you can check the power reading at WXC EXP TX port
of the WXC card and verify the consistency with side H pre output power and WXC COMRX-EXPTX
port loss. You can also check with a power meter connected to the 8th fiber (since it is from side H) of
an MPO-FC (or LC) cable connected to the TAP-TX port of the MESH-PP. This value should be
consistent with the previous reading, less than the insertion loss of the installed PP-MESH. If it is
consistent, the issue is with the MPO between side A WXC and PP-MESH. If it is not consistent, the
issue is with the PP-MESH or the LC-LC from side H. With only the PP-MESH already tested during
installation, the only issue can be with the patch cord b.
You can check if the 1558.17 wavelength from side H is unequalized (that is, if the channel is not aligned
with the linear fit of the power values of the other channels) by keeping the DMX COM-RX port of side
H in maintenance, and checking both the signal and ASE levels of CHAN-TX ports of the DMX card. If
the channel is equalized (that is, if the channel is aligned with the linear fit of the power values of the
other channels), then the issue is in the WXC side A that cannot properly regulate the VOA for such
channel. If the channel is unequalized, then the issue is on a remote node.
Note
With an OSA or a spare 40 DMX, you can see the light coming from all the sides from TAP-TX of the
PP-MESH.
8.12.4 40-WXC-C Channel Plan
Table 8-39 shows the 40 ITU-T 100-GHz-spaced, C band channels (wavelengths) that are cross
connected by the 40-WXC-C card.
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8.12.4 40-WXC-C Channel Plan
Table 8-39
40-WXC-C Channel Plan
Band ID
Channel Label Frequency (GHz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Ch. 01
29.5
196
1529.55
B30.3
30.3
195.9
1530.33
31.1
195.8
1531.12
31.9
195.7
1531.90
32.6
195.6
1532.68
33.4
195.5
1533.47
34.2
195.4
1534.25
35.0
195.3
1535.04
35.8
195.2
1535.82
36.6
195.1
1536.61
37.4
195
1537.40
38.1
194.9
1538.19
38.9
194.8
1538.98
39.7
194.7
1539.77
40.5
194.6
1540.56
41.3
194.5
1541.35
42.1
194.4
1542.14
42.9
194.3
1542.94
43.7
194.2
1543.73
44.5
194.1
1544.53
45.3
194
1545.32
46.1
193.9
1546.12
46.9
193.8
1546.92
47.7
193.7
1547.72
48.5
193.6
1548.51
49.3
193.5
1549.32
50.1
193.4
1550.12
50.9
193.3
1550.92
51.7
193.2
1551.72
52.5
193.1
1552.52
53.3
193
1553.33
B34.2
B38.1
B42.1
B46.1
B50.1
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8.12.5 40-WXC-C Card-Level Indicators
Table 8-39
40-WXC-C Channel Plan (continued)
Band ID
Channel Label Frequency (GHz)
Wavelength
(nm)
B54.1
54.1
192.9
1554.13
54.9
192.8
1554.94
55.7
192.7
1555.75
56.5
192.6
1556.55
57.3
192.5
1557.36
58.1
192.4
1558.17
58.9
192.3
1558.98
59.7
192.2
1559.79
60.6
192.1
1560.61
61.4
192
1561.42
B58.1
1. This channel is unused by the 40-WXC-C
8.12.5 40-WXC-C Card-Level Indicators
The 40-WXC-C card has three card-level LED indicators described in Table 8-40.
Table 8-40
40-WXC-C Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that an
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the 40-WXC-C is carrying traffic or is
traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure on one or more of the card’s
ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the transmit and receive fibers
are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the light
turns off.
8.12.6 40-WXC-C Port-Level Indicators
You can find the alarm status of the 40-WXC-C card ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454
fan-tray assembly. The screen displays the number and severity of alarms on a given port or slot. For the
procedure to view these counts, refer to “Manage Alarms” in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure
Guide.
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8.13 MMU Card
8.13 MMU Card
The single-slot Mesh Multi-Ring Upgrade Module (MMU) card supports multiring and mesh upgrades
for ROADM nodes in both the C band and the L band. Mesh/multiring upgrade is the capability to
optically bypass a given wavelength from one section of the network or ring to another one without
requiring 3R regeneration. In each node, you need to install one east MMU and one west MMU. The
card can be installed in Slots 1 through 6 and 12 through 17.
8.13.1 MMU Faceplate Ports
The MMU has six types of ports:
•
EXP RX port: The EXP RX port receives the optical signal from the ROADM section available on
the NE.
•
EXP TX port: The EXP TX port sends the optical signal to the ROADM section available on the NE.
•
EXP-A RX port: The EXP-A RX port receives the optical signal from the ROADM section available
on other NEs or rings.
•
EXP-A TX port: The EXP-A TX port sends the optical signal to the ROADM section available on
other NEs or rings.
•
COM TX port: The COM TX port sends the optical signal to the fiber stage section.
•
COM RX port: The COM RX port receives the optical signal from the fiber stage section.
Figure 8-36 shows the MMU card faceplate.
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8.13.2 MMU Block Diagram
Figure 8-36
MMU Faceplate and Ports
MMU
ACT
FAIL
TX
RX
TX
TX
145190
COM
EXP
RX
EXP A
RX
SF
8.13.2 MMU Block Diagram
Figure 8-37 provides a high-level functional block diagram of the MMU card.
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8.13.3 MMU Power Monitoring
Figure 8-37
MMU Block Diagram
VPD2
75/25
PD1
COM TX
EXP RX
PD2
Legend
EXP A RX
LC PC II Connector
95/5
95/5
VPD1
COM RX
EXP TX
Optical splitter/coupler
Real photodiode
PD3
EXP A TX
Virtual photodiode
145191
VPD3
8.13.3 MMU Power Monitoring
Physical photodiodes P1 through P3 monitor the power for the MMU card. The returned power level
values are calibrated to the ports as shown in Table 8-41. VP1 to VP3 are virtual photodiodes that have
been created by adding (by software computation) the relevant path insertion losses of the optical
splitters (stored in the module) to the real photodiode (P1 to P3) measurement.
Table 8-41
MMU Port Calibration
Photodiode
CTC Type Name
Calibrated to Port
P1
1 (EXP-RX)
EXP RX
P2
5 (EXP A-RX)
EXP A RX
P3
6 (EXP A-TX)
EXP A TX
VP1
2 (EXP-TX)
EXP TX
VP2
4 (COM-TX)
COM TX
VP3
3 (COM-RX)
COM RX
For information on the associated TL1 AIDs for the optical power monitoring points, refer the “CTC
Port Numbers and TL1 Aids” section in Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide, Release 9.0.
8.13.4 MMU Card-Level Indicators
Table 8-42 describes the three card-level LED indicators on the MMU card.
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8.13.5 MMU Port-Level Indicators
Table 8-42
MMU Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level Indicators
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or that n
internal hardware failure occurred. Replace the card if the red FAIL LED
persists.
Green ACT LED
The green ACT LED indicates that the MMU card is carrying traffic or is
traffic-ready.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure on one or more of the card’s
ports. The amber SF LED also turns on when the transmit and receive fibers
are incorrectly connected. When the fibers are properly connected, the light
turns off.
8.13.5 MMU Port-Level Indicators
You can find the alarm status of the MMU card’s ports using the LCD screen on the ONS 15454 fan-tray
assembly. The screen displays the number and severity of alarms on a given port or slot. For the
procedure to view these counts, refer to “Manage Alarms” in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure
Guide.
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8.13.5 MMU Port-Level Indicators
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9
Transponder and Muxponder Cards
Note
The terms "Unidirectional Path Switched Ring" and "UPSR" may appear in Cisco literature. These terms
do not refer to using Cisco ONS 15xxx products in a unidirectional path switched ring configuration.
Rather, these terms, as well as "Path Protected Mesh Network" and "PPMN," refer generally to Cisco's
path protection feature, which may be used in any topological network configuration. Cisco does not
recommend using its path protection feature in any particular topological network configuration.
This chapter describes Cisco ONS 15454 transponder (TXP), muxponder (MXP), GE_XP, 10GE_XP,
GE_XPE, 10GE_XPE, ADM-10G, and OTU2_XP cards, as well as their associated plug-in modules
(Small Form-factor Pluggables [SFPs or XFPs]). For installation and card turn-up procedures, refer to
the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. For card safety and compliance information, refer to the
Cisco Optical Transport Products Safety and Compliance Information document.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Chapter topics include:
•
9.1 Card Overview, page 9-2
•
9.2 Safety Labels, page 9-4
•
9.3 TXP_MR_10G Card, page 9-8
•
9.4 TXP_MR_10E Card, page 9-11
•
9.5 TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L Cards, page 9-16
•
9.6 TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G Cards, page 9-20
•
9.7 MXP_2.5G_10G Card, page 9-24
•
9.8 MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L Cards, page 9-35
•
9.9 MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G Cards, page 9-44
•
9.10 MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L Cards, page 9-51
•
9.11 GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE Cards, page 9-59
•
9.12 ADM-10G Card, page 9-72
•
9.13 OTU2_XP Card, page 9-81
•
9.14 Y-Cable and Splitter Protection, page 9-89
•
9.15 Far-End Laser Control, page 9-92
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9.1 Card Overview
•
9.16 Jitter Considerations, page 9-93
•
9.17 Termination Modes, page 9-93
•
9.18 SFP and XFP Modules, page 9-94
9.1 Card Overview
The card overview section lists the cards described in this chapter and provides compatibility
information.
Note
Each card is marked with a symbol that corresponds to a slot (or slots) on the ONS 15454 shelf assembly.
The cards are then installed into slots displaying the same symbols. See the “1.16.1 Card Slot
Requirements” section on page 1-61 for a list of slots and symbols.
The purpose of a TXP, MXP, GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, 10GE_XPE, ADM-10G, or OTU2_XP card
is to convert the “gray” optical client interface signals into trunk signals that operate in the “colored”
dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) wavelength range. Client-facing gray optical signals
generally operate at shorter wavelengths, whereas DWDM colored optical signals are in the longer
wavelength range (for example, 1490 nm = violet; 1510 nm = blue; 1530 nm = green; 1550 nm = yellow;
1570 nm = orange; 1590 nm = red; 1610 nm = brown). Some of the newer client-facing SFPs, however,
operate in the colored region. Transponding or muxponding is the process of converting the signals
between the client and trunk wavelengths.
An MXP generally handles several client signals. It aggregates, or multiplexes, lower rate client signals
together and sends them out over a higher rate trunk port. Likewise, it demultiplexes optical signals
coming in on a trunk and sends them out to individual client ports. A TXP converts a single client signal
to a single trunk signal and converts a single incoming trunk signal to a single client signal. GE_XP,
10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards can be provisioned as TXPs, as MXPs, or as Layer 2
switches.
All of the TXP and MXP cards perform optical to electrical to optical (OEO) conversion. As a result,
they are not optically transparent cards. The reason for this is that the cards must operate on the signals
passing through them, so it is necessary to do an OEO conversion.
On the other hand, the termination mode for all of the TXPs and MXPs, which is done at the electrical
level, can be configured to be transparent. In this case, neither the Line nor the Section overhead is
terminated. The cards can also be configured so that either Line or Section overhead can be terminated,
or both can be terminated.
Note
The MXP_2.5G_10G card, by design, when configured in the transparent termination mode, actually
does terminate some of the bytes. See Table 9-43 on page 9-93 for details.
9.1.1 Card Summary
Table 9-1 lists and summarizes the functions of each TXP, TXPP, MXP, MXPP, GE_XP, 10GE_XP,
GE_XPE, 10GE_XPE, ADM-10G, and OTU2_XP card.
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9.1.1 Card Summary
Table 9-1
Cisco ONS 15454 Transponder and Muxponder Cards
Card
Port Description
For Additional Information
TXP_MR_10G
The TXP_MR_10G card has two sets of
ports located on the faceplate.
See the “9.3 TXP_MR_10G
Card” section on page 9-8.
TXP_MR_10E
The TXP_MR_10E card has two sets of
ports located on the faceplate.
See the “9.4 TXP_MR_10E
Card” section on page 9-11.
TXP_MR_10E_C and
TXP_MR_10E_L
The TXP_MR_10E_C and
TXP_MR_10E_L cards have two sets of
ports located on the faceplate.
See the “9.5 TXP_MR_10E_C
and TXP_MR_10E_L Cards”
section on page 9-16.
TXP_MR_2.5G
The TXP_MR_2.5G card has two sets of
ports located on the faceplate.
See the “9.6 TXP_MR_2.5G
and TXPP_MR_2.5G Cards”
section on page 9-20.
TXPP_MR_2.5G
The TXPP_MR_2.5G card has three sets of See the “9.6 TXP_MR_2.5G
ports located on the faceplate.
and TXPP_MR_2.5G Cards”
section on page 9-20.
MXP_2.5G_10G
The MXP_2.5G_10G card has nine sets of
ports located on the faceplate.
See the “9.7 MXP_2.5G_10G
Card” section on page 9-24.
MXP_2.5G_10E
The MXP_2.5G_10E card has nine sets of
ports located on the faceplate.
See the “9.7.4 MXP_2.5G_10E
Card” section on page 9-28.
MXP_2.5G_10E_C and
MXP_2.5G_10E_L
The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and
MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards have nine sets of
ports located on the faceplate.
See the “9.8 MXP_2.5G_10E_C
and MXP_2.5G_10E_L Cards”
section on page 9-35.
MXP_MR_2.5G
The MXP_MR_2.5G card has nine sets of
ports located on the faceplate.
See the “9.9 MXP_MR_2.5G
and MXPP_MR_2.5G Cards”
section on page 9-44.
MXPP_MR_2.5G
The MXPP_MR_2.5G card has ten sets of
ports located on the faceplate.
See the “9.9 MXP_MR_2.5G
and MXPP_MR_2.5G Cards”
section on page 9-44.
MXP_MR_10DME_C
and
MXP_MR_10DME_L
The MXP_MR_10DME_C and
See the
MXP_MR_10DME_L cards have eight sets “9.10 MXP_MR_10DME_C
of ports located on the faceplate.
and MXP_MR_10DME_L
Cards” section on page 9-51.
GE_XP and GE_XPE
The GE_XP and GE_XPE cards have twenty See the “9.11 GE_XP,
Gigabit Ethernet client ports and two
10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and
10 Gigabit Ethernet trunk ports.
10GE_XPE Cards” section on
page 9-59.
10GE_XP and
10GE_XPE
The 10GE_XP and 10GE_XPE cards have See the “9.11 GE_XP,
two 10 Gigabit Ethernet client ports and two 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and
10 Gigabit Ethernet trunk ports.
10GE_XPE Cards” section on
page 9-59.
ADM-10G
The ADM-10G card has 19 sets of ports
located on the faceplate.
See the “9.12 ADM-10G Card”
section on page 9-72.
OTU2_XP
The OTU2_XP card has four ports located
on the faceplate.
See the “9.13 OTU2_XP Card”
section on page 9-81.
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9.1.2 Card Compatibility
9.1.2 Card Compatibility
Table 9-2 lists the Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) software compatibility for each TXP, TXPP, MXP,
MXPP, GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, 10GE_XPE, ADM-10G, and OTU2_XP card.
Table 9-2
Software Release Compatibility for Transponder and Muxponder Cards
Card Name
R4.5
R4.6
R4.7
R5.0
R6.0
R7.0
R7.2
R8.0
R8.5
R9.0
TXP_MR_10G
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
TXP_MR_10E
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
TXP_MR_10E_C
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
TXP_MR_10E_L
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
TXP_MR_2.5G
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
TXPP_MR_2.5G
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
MXP_2.5G_10G
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
MXP_2.5G_10E
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
MXP_2.5G_10E_C
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
MXP_2.5G_10E_L
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
MXP_MR_2.5G
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
MXPP_MR_2.5G
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
MXP_MR_10DME_C
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
MXP_MR_10DME_L
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
GE_XP
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
10GE_XP
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
GE_XPE
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
10GE_XPE
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
ADM-10G
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
OTU2_XP
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
9.2 Safety Labels
This section explains the significance of the safety labels attached to some of the cards. The faceplates
of the cards are clearly labeled with warnings about the laser radiation levels. You must understand all
warning labels before working on these cards.
9.2.1 Class 1 Laser Product Cards
The MXP_2.5G_10G, MXP_2.5G_10E, MXP_2.5G_10E_C, MXP_2.5G_10E_L, ADM-10G, GE_XP,
10GE_XP, GE_XPE, 10GE_XPE, and OTU2_XP cards have Class 1 lasers. The labels that appear on
these cards are described in the following sections.
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9.2.1 Class 1 Laser Product Cards
9.2.1.1 Class 1 Laser Product Label
The Class 1 Laser Product label is shown in Figure 9-1.
Figure 9-1
Class 1 Laser Product Label
145952
CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT
Class 1 lasers are products whose irradiance does not exceed the Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE)
value. Therefore, for Class 1 laser products the output power is below the level at which it is believed
eye damage will occur. Exposure to the beam of a Class 1 laser will not result in eye injury and can
therefore be considered safe. However, some Class 1 laser products might contain laser systems of a
higher Class but there are adequate engineering control measures to ensure that access to the beam is not
reasonably likely. Anyone who dismantles a Class 1 laser product that contains a higher Class laser
system is potentially at risk of exposure to a hazardous laser beam
9.2.1.2 Hazard Level 1 Label
The Hazard Level 1 label is shown in Figure 9-2. This label is displayed on the faceplate of the cards.
Figure 9-2
Hazard Level Label
65542
HAZARD
LEVEL 1
The Hazard Level label warns users against exposure to laser radiation of Class 1 limits calculated in
accordance with IEC60825-1 Ed.1.2.
9.2.1.3 Laser Source Connector Label
The Laser Source Connector label is shown in Figure 9-3.
Laser Source Connector Label
96635
Figure 9-3
This label indicates that a laser source is present at the optical connector where the label has been placed.
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9.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards
9.2.1.4 FDA Statement Label
The FDA Statement labels are shown in Figure 9-4 and Figure 9-5. These labels show compliance to
FDA standards and that the hazard level classification is in accordance with IEC60825-1 Am.2 or Ed.1.2.
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JULY 26, 2001
Figure 9-5
96634
FDA Statement Label
FDA Statement Label
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JUNE 24, 2007
282324
Figure 9-4
9.2.1.5 Shock Hazard Label
The Shock Hazard label is shown in Figure 9-6.
Shock Hazard Label
65541
Figure 9-6
This label alerts personnel to electrical hazard within the card. The potential of shock hazard exists when
removing adjacent cards during maintenance, and touching exposed electrical circuitry on the card itself.
9.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards
The TXP_MR_10G, TXP_MR_10E, TXP_MR_10E_C, TXP_MR_10E_L, TXP_MR_2.5G,
TXPP_MR_2.5G, MXP_MR_2.5G, MXPP_MR_2.5G, MXP_MR_10DME_C, and
MXP_MR_10DME_L cards have Class 1M lasers.
The labels that appear on these cards are described in the following subsections.
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9.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards
9.2.2.1 Class 1M Laser Product Statement
The Class 1M Laser Product statement is shown in Figure 9-7.
Figure 9-7
Class 1M Laser Product Statement
145953
CAUTION
HAZARD LEVEL 1M INVISIBLE
LASER RADIATION
DO NOT VIEW DIRECTLY WITH
NON-ATTENUATING OPTICAL
INSTRUMENTS λ = 1400nm TO 1610nm
Class 1M lasers are products that produce either a highly divergent beam or a large diameter beam.
Therefore, only a small part of the whole laser beam can enter the eye. However, these laser products
can be harmful to the eye if the beam is viewed using magnifying optical instruments.
9.2.2.2 Hazard Level 1M Label
The Hazard Level 1M label is shown in Figure 9-8. This label is displayed on the faceplate of the cards.
Figure 9-8
Hazard Level Label
145990
HAZARD
LEVEL 1M
The Hazard Level label warns users against exposure to laser radiation of Class 1 limits calculated in
accordance with IEC60825-1 Ed.1.2.
9.2.2.3 Laser Source Connector Label
The Laser Source Connector label is shown in Figure 9-9.
Laser Source Connector Label
96635
Figure 9-9
This label indicates that a laser source is present at the optical connector where the label has been placed.
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9.3 TXP_MR_10G Card
9.2.2.4 FDA Statement Label
The FDA Statement labels are shown in Figure 9-10 and Figure 9-11. These labels show compliance to
FDA standards and that the hazard level classification is in accordance with IEC60825-1 Am.2 or Ed.1.2.
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JULY 26, 2001
Figure 9-11
96634
FDA Statement Label
FDA Statement Label
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE NO.50,
DATED JUNE 24, 2007
282324
Figure 9-10
9.2.2.5 Shock Hazard Label
The Shock Hazard label is shown in Figure 9-12.
Shock Hazard Label
65541
Figure 9-12
This label alerts personnel to electrical hazard within the card. The potential of shock hazard exists when
removing adjacent cards during maintenance, and touching exposed electrical circuitry on the card itself.
9.3 TXP_MR_10G Card
The TXP_MR_10G processes one 10-Gbps signal (client side) into one 10-Gbps, 100-GHz DWDM
signal (trunk side). It provides one 10-Gbps port per card that can be provisioned for an STM-64/OC-192
short reach (1310-nm) signal, compliant with ITU-T G.707, ITU-T G.709, ITU-T G.691, and
Telcordia GR-253-CORE, or a 10GBASE-LR signal compliant with IEEE 802.3.
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9.3 TXP_MR_10G Card
The TXP_MR_10G card is tunable over two neighboring wavelengths in the 1550-nm, ITU 100-GHz
range. It is available in 16 different versions, each of which covers two wavelengths, for a total coverage
of 32 different wavelengths in the 1550-nm range.
Note
ITU-T G.709 specifies a form of forward error correction (FEC) that uses a “wrapper” approach. The
digital wrapper lets you transparently take in a signal on the client side, wrap a frame around it and
restore it to its original form. FEC enables longer fiber links because errors caused by the optical signal
degrading with distance are corrected.
The trunk port operates at 9.95328 Gbps (or 10.70923 Gbps with ITU-T G.709 Digital Wrapper/FEC)
and at 10.3125 Gbps (or 11.095 Gbps with ITU-T G.709 Digital Wrapper/FEC) over unamplified
distances up to 80 km (50 miles) with different types of fiber such as C-SMF or dispersion compensated
fiber limited by loss and/or dispersion.
Caution
Because the transponder has no capability to look into the payload and detect circuits, a TXP_MR_10G
card does not display circuits under card view.
Caution
You must use a 15-dB fiber attenuator (10 to 20 dB) when working with the TXP_MR_10G card in a
loopback on the trunk port. Do not use direct fiber loopbacks with the TXP_MR_10G card. Using direct
fiber loopbacks causes irreparable damage to the TXP_MR_10G card.
You can install TXP_MR_10G cards in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17 and provision this card in a linear
configuration. TXP_MR_10G cards cannot be provisioned as a bidirectional line switched ring
(BLSR)/Multiplex Section - Shared Protection Ring (MS-SPRing), a path protection/single node control
point (SNCP), or a regenerator. They can only be used in the middle of BLSR/MS-SPRing and 1+1 spans
when the card is configured for transparent termination mode.
The TXP_MR_10G port features a 1550-nm laser for the trunk port and a 1310-nm laser for the for the
client port and contains two transmit and receive connector pairs (labeled) on the card faceplate.
The MTU setting is used to display the OverSizePkts counters on the receiving trunk and client port
interfaces. Traffic of frame sizes up to 65535 bytes pass without any packet drops, from the client port
to the trunk port and vice versa irrespective of the MTU setting.
Figure 9-13 shows the TXP_MR_10G faceplate and block diagram.
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9.3.1 Automatic Laser Shutdown
Figure 9-13
TXP_MR_10G Faceplate and Block Diagram
10G MR
TXP
1530.33 1531.12
FAIL
ACT/STBY
SF
TX
RX
CLIENT
Client interface
STM-64/OC-192
SR-1 optics modules
or 10GBASE-LR
DWDM
DWDM trunk
STM-64/OC-192
TX
RX
1530.33
1531.12
!
MAX INPUT
POWER LEVEL
- 8 dBm
Client
interface
Optical
transceiver
Framer/FEC/DWDM
processor
DWDM
trunk
(long range)
Serial bus
Optical
transceiver
uP bus
B
a
c
k
p
l
a
n
e
RAM
145948
uP
Flash
For information on safety labels for the card, see the “9.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards” section on
page 9-6.
9.3.1 Automatic Laser Shutdown
The Automatic Laser Shutdown (ALS) procedure is supported on both client and trunk interfaces. On
the client interface, ALS is compliant with ITU-T G.664 (6/99). On the data application and trunk
interface, the switch on and off pulse duration is greater than 60 seconds and is user-configurable. For
details on ALS provisioning for the card, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
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9.3.2 TXP_MR_10G Card-Level Indicators
9.3.2 TXP_MR_10G Card-Level Indicators
Table 9-3 lists the three card-level LEDs on the TXP_MR_10G card.
Table 9-3
TXP_MR_10G Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LED
Description
FAIL LED (Red)
Red indicates that the card’s processor is not ready. This LED is on during
reset. The FAIL LED flashes during the boot process. Replace the card if the
red FAIL LED persists.
ACT/STBY LED
Green indicates that the card is operational (one or both ports active) and
ready to carry traffic.
Green (Active)
Amber (Standby)
SF LED (Amber)
Amber indicates that the card is operational and in standby (protect) mode.
Amber indicates a signal failure or condition such as loss of signal (LOS),
loss of frame (LOF), or high bit error rates (BERs) on one or more of the
card’s ports. The amber SF LED is also illuminated if the transmit and
receive fibers are incorrectly connected. If the fibers are properly connected
and the link is working, the LED turns off.
9.3.3 TXP_MR_10G Port-Level Indicators
Table 9-4 lists the four port-level LEDs in the TXP_MR_10G card.
Table 9-4
TXP_MR_10G Port-Level Indicators
Port-Level LED
Description
Green Client LED
The green Client LED indicates that the client port is in service and that it is
receiving a recognized signal.
Green DWDM LED
The green DWDM LED indicates that the DWDM port is in service and that
it is receiving a recognized signal.
Green Wavelength 1
LED
Each port supports two wavelengths on the DWDM side. Each wavelength
LED matches one of the wavelengths. This LED indicates that the card is
configured for Wavelength 1.
Green Wavelength 2
LED
Each port supports two wavelengths on the DWDM side. Each wavelength
LED matches one of the wavelengths. This LED indicates that the card is
configured for Wavelength 2.
9.4 TXP_MR_10E Card
The TXP_MR_10E card is a multirate transponder for the ONS 15454 platform. The card is fully
backward compatible with the TXP_MR_10G card. It processes one 10-Gbps signal (client side) into
one 10-Gbps, 100-GHz DWDM signal (trunk side) that is tunable over four wavelength channels (spaced
at 100 GHz on the ITU grid) in the C band and tunable over eight wavelength channels (spaced at 50 GHz
on the ITU grid) in the L band. There are eight versions of the C-band card, with each version covering
four wavelengths, for a total coverage of 32 wavelengths. There are five versions of the L-band card,
with each version covering eight wavelengths, for a total coverage of 40 wavelengths.
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9.4.1 Key Features
You can install TXP_MR_10E cards in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17 and provision the cards in a linear
configuration, BLSR/MS-SPRing, path protection/SNCP, or a regenerator. The card can be used in the
middle of BLSR/MS-SPRing or 1+1 spans when the card is configured for transparent termination mode.
The TXP_MR_10E card features a 1550-nm tunable laser (C band) or a 1580-nm tunable laser (L band)
for the trunk port and a separately orderable ONS-XC-10G-S1 1310-nm or ONS-XC-10G-L2 1550-nm
laser XFP module for the client port.
Note
When the ONS-XC-10G-L2 XFP is installed, the TXP_MR_10E card must be installed in Slots 6, 7, 12
or 13)
On its faceplate, the TXP_MR_10E card contains two transmit and receive connector pairs, one for the
trunk port and one for the client port. Each connector pair is labeled.
9.4.1 Key Features
The key features of the TXP_MR_10E card are:
•
A tri-rate client interface (available through the ONS-XC-10G-S1 XFP, ordered separately)
– OC-192 (SR1)
– 10GE (10GBASE-LR)
– 10G-FC (1200-SM-LL-L)
•
OC-192 to ITU-T G.709 OTU2 provisionable synchronous and asynchronous mapping
•
The MTU setting is used to display the OverSizePkts counters on the receiving trunk and client port
interfaces. Traffic of frame sizes up to 65535 bytes pass without any packet drops, from the client
port to the trunk port and vice versa irrespective of the MTU setting.
9.4.2 Faceplate and Block Diagram
Figure 9-14 shows the TXP_MR_10E faceplate and block diagram.
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9.4.3 Client Interface
Figure 9-14
TXP_MR_10E Faceplate and Block Diagram
10 Gb/s
TP
1538.19
1538.98
FAIL
ACT/STBY
TX
RX
SF
Client interface
STM-64/OC-192
or 10GE (10GBASE-LR)
or 10G-FC (1200-SM-LL-L)
Client
interface
Optical
transceiver
Framer/FEC/DWDM
processor
Optical
transceiver
uP bus
B
a
c
k
p
l
a
n
e
TX
DWDM trunk
STM-64/OC-192
4 tunable channels (C-band) or
8 tunable channels (L-band) on
the 100-GHz ITU grid
uP
Flash
RAM
131186
RX
DWDM
trunk
(long range)
Serial bus
For information on safety labels for the card, see the “9.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards” section on
page 9-6.
Caution
You must use a 15-dB fiber attenuator (10 to 20 dB) when working with the TXP_MR_10E card in a
loopback on the trunk port. Do not use direct fiber loopbacks with the TXP_MR_10E card. Using direct
fiber loopbacks causes irreparable damage to the TXP_MR_10E card.
9.4.3 Client Interface
The client interface is implemented with a separately orderable XFP module. The module is a tri-rate
transceiver, providing a single port that can be configured in the field to support an OC-192 SR-1
(Telcordia GR-253-CORE) or STM-64 I-64.1 (ITU-T G.691) optical interface, as well as 10GE LAN
PHY (10GBASE-LR), 10GE WAN PHY (10GBASE-LW), or 10G FC signals.
The client side XFP pluggable module supports LC connectors and is equipped with a 1310-nm laser.
9.4.4 DWDM Trunk Interface
On the trunk side, the TXP_MR_10E card provides a 10-Gbps STM-64/OC-192 interface. There are four
tunable channels available in the 1550-nm band or eight tunable channels available in the 1580-nm band
on the 50-GHz ITU grid for the DWDM interface. The TXP_MR_10E card provides 3R (retime, reshape,
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9.4.5 Enhanced FEC (E-FEC) Feature
and regenerate) transponder functionality for this 10-Gbps trunk interface. Therefore, the card is suited
for use in long-range amplified systems. The DWDM interface is complaint with ITU-T G.707, ITU-T
G.709, and Telcordia GR-253-CORE standards.
The DWDM trunk port operates at a rate that is dependent on the input signal and the presence or absence
of the ITU-T G.709 Digital Wrapper/FEC. The possible trunk rates are:
•
OC192 (9.95328 Gbps)
•
OTU2 (10.70923 Gbps)
•
10GE (10.3125 Gbps) or 10GE into OTU2 (ITU G.sup43 11.0957 Gbps)
•
10G FC (10.51875 Gbps) or 10G FC into OTU2 (nonstandard 11.31764 Gbps)
The maximum system reach in filterless applications without the use of optical amplification or
regenerators is nominally rated at 23 dB over C-SMF fiber. This rating is not a product specification, but
is given for informational purposes. It is subject to change.
9.4.5 Enhanced FEC (E-FEC) Feature
A key feature of the TXP_MR_10E is the availability to configure the forward error correction in three
modes: NO FEC, FEC, and E-FEC. The output bit rate is always 10.7092 Gbps as defined in
ITU-T G.709, but the error coding performance can be provisioned as follows:
Note
•
NO FEC—No forward error correction
•
FEC—Standard ITU-T G.975 Reed-Solomon algorithm
•
E-FEC—Standard ITU-T G.975.1 I.7 algorithm, which is a super FEC code
The E-FEC of the ONS 15454 and Cisco ASR 9000 are not compatible.
9.4.6 FEC and E-FEC Modes
As client side traffic passes through the TXP_MR_10E card, it can be digitally wrapped using FEC
mode, E-FEC mode, or no error correction at all. The FEC mode setting provides a lower level of error
detection and correction than the E-FEC mode setting of the card. As a result, using E-FEC mode allows
higher sensitivity (lower optical signal-to-noise ratio [OSNR]) with a lower bit error rate than FEC
mode. E-FEC enables longer distance trunk-side transmission than with FEC.
The E-FEC feature is one of three basic modes of FEC operation. FEC can be turned off, FEC can be
turned on, or E-FEC can be turned on to provide greater range and lower BER. The default mode is FEC
on and E-FEC off. E-FEC is provisioned using CTC.
Caution
Because the transponder has no visibility into the data payload and detect circuits, the TXP_MR_10E
card does not display circuits under the card view.
9.4.7 Client-to-Trunk Mapping
The TXP_MR_10E card can perform ODU2-to-OCh mapping, which allows operators to provision data
payloads in a standard way across 10-Gbps optical links.
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9.4.8 Automatic Laser Shutdown
Digital wrappers that define client side interfaces are called Optical Data Channel Unit 2 (ODU2)
entities in ITU-T G.709. Digital wrappers that define trunk side interfaces are called Optical Channels
(OCh) in ITU-T G.709. ODU2 digital wrappers can include Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching
(G-MPLS) signaling extensions to ITU-T G.709 (such as Least Significant Part [LSP] and Generalized
Payload Identifier [G-PID] values) to define client interfaces and payload protocols.
9.4.8 Automatic Laser Shutdown
The ALS procedure is supported on both client and trunk interfaces. On the client interface, ALS is
compliant with ITU-T G.664 (6/99). On the data application and trunk interface, the switch on and off
pulse duration is greater than 60 seconds. The on and off pulse duration is user-configurable. For details
on ALS provisioning for the card, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
9.4.9 TXP_MR_10E Card-Level Indicators
Table 9-5 lists the three card-level LEDs on the TXP_MR_10E card.
Table 9-5
TXP_MR_10E Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LED
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready. This LED
is on during reset. The FAIL LED flashes during the boot process. Replace
the card if the red FAIL LED persists.
ACT/STBY LED
If the ACT/STBY LED is green, the card is operational (one or both ports
active) and ready to carry traffic. If the ACT/STBY LED is amber, the card
is operational and in standby (protect) mode.
Green (Active)
Amber (Standby)
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS, LOF,
or high BERs on one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED is also
on if the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. If the fibers
are properly connected and the link is working, the light turns off.
9.4.10 TXP_MR_10E Port-Level Indicators
Table 9-6 lists the two port-level LEDs in the TXP_MR_10E card.
Table 9-6
TXP_MR_10E Port-Level Indicators
Port-Level LED
Description
Green Client LED
The green Client LED indicates that the client port is in service and that it is
receiving a recognized signal.
Green DWDM LED
The green DWDM LED indicates that the DWDM port is in service and that
it is receiving a recognized signal.
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9.5 TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L Cards
9.5 TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L Cards
The TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L cards are multirate transponders for the ONS 15454
platform. The cards are fully backward compatible with the TXP_MR_10G and TXP_MR_10E cards.
They processes one 10-Gbps signal (client side) into one 10-Gbps, 100-GHz DWDM signal (trunk side).
The TXP_MR_10E_C is tunable over the entire set of C-band wavelength channels (82 channels spaced
at 50 GHz on the ITU grid). The TXP_MR_10E_L is tunable over the entire set of L-band wavelength
channels (80 channels spaced at 50 GHz on the ITU grid) and is particularly well suited for use in
networks that employ DS fiber or SMF-28 single-mode fiber.
The advantage of these cards over previous versions (TXP_MR_10G and TXP_MR_10E) is that there is
only one version of each card (one C-band version and one L-band version) instead of several versions
needed to cover each band.
You can install TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L cards in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17 and provision
the cards in a linear configuration, BLSR/MS-SPRing, path protection/SNCP, or a regenerator. The cards
can be used in the middle of BLSR/MS-SPRing or 1+1 spans when the cards are configured for
transparent termination mode.
The TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L cards feature a universal transponder 2 (UT2) 1550-nm
tunable laser (C band) or a UT2 1580-nm tunable laser (L band) for the trunk port and a separately
orderable ONS-XC-10G-S1 1310-nm or ONS-XC-10G-L2 1550-nm laser XFP module for the client
port.
Note
When the ONS-XC-10G-L2 XFP is installed, the TXP_MR_10E_C or TXP_MR_10E-L card is required
to be installed in a high-speed slot (slot 6, 7, 12, or 13)
On its faceplate, the TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L cards contain two transmit and receive
connector pairs, one for the trunk port and one for the client port. Each connector pair is labeled.
9.5.1 Key Features
The key features of the TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L cards are:
•
A tri-rate client interface (available through the ONS-XC-10G-S1 XFP, ordered separately):
– OC-192 (SR1)
– 10GE (10GBASE-LR)
– 10G-FC (1200-SM-LL-L)
•
A UT2 module tunable through the entire C band (TXP_MR_10E_C card) or L band
(TXP_MR_10E_L card). The channels are spaced at 50 GHz on the ITU grid.
•
OC-192 to ITU-T G.709 OTU2 provisionable synchronous and asynchronous mapping.
•
The MTU setting is used to display the OverSizePkts counters on the receiving trunk and client port
interfaces. Traffic of frame sizes up to 65535 bytes pass without any packet drops, from the client
port to the trunk port and vice versa irrespective of the MTU setting.
9.5.2 Faceplates and Block Diagram
Figure 9-15 shows the TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L faceplates and block diagram.
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9.5.3 Client Interface
Figure 9-15
10E MR
TXP C
TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L Faceplates and Block Diagram
10E MR
TXP L
ACT/STBY
SF
SF
Client interface
STM-64/OC-192
or 10GE (10GBASE-LR)
or 10G-FC (1200-SM-LL-L)
Client
interface
Optical
transceiver
Framer/FEC/DWDM
processor
Optical
transceiver
uP bus
TX
RX
TX
RX
DWDM
trunk
(long range)
Serial bus
DWDM trunk
STM-64/OC-192
82 tunable channels (C-band) or
80 tunable channels (L-band) on
the 50-GHz ITU grid
B
a
c
k
p
l
a
n
e
uP
Flash
RAM
134975
TX
TX
RX
FAIL
ACT/STBY
RX
FAIL
For information on safety labels for the cards, see the “9.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards” section on
page 9-6.
Caution
You must use a 15-dB fiber attenuator (10 to 20 dB) when working with the TXP_MR_10E_C or
TXP_MR_10E_L card in a loopback on the trunk port. Do not use direct fiber loopbacks with the cards.
Using direct fiber loopbacks causes irreparable damage to the cards.
9.5.3 Client Interface
The client interface is implemented with a separately orderable XFP module. The module is a tri-rate
transceiver, providing a single port that can be configured in the field to support an OC-192 SR-1
(Telcordia GR-253-CORE) or STM-64 I-64.1 (ITU-T G.691) optical interface, as well as 10GE LAN
PHY (10GBASE-LR), 10GE WAN PHY (10GBASE-LW), or 10G-FC signals.
The client side XFP pluggable module supports LC connectors and is equipped with a 1310-nm laser.
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9.5.4 DWDM Trunk Interface
9.5.4 DWDM Trunk Interface
On the trunk side, the TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L cards provide a 10-Gbps
STM-64/OC-192 interface. There are 80 tunable channels available in the 1550-nm C band or 82 tunable
channels available in the 1580-nm L band on the 50-GHz ITU grid for the DWDM interface. The
TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_C cards provide 3R transponder functionality for this 10-Gbps
trunk interface. Therefore, the card is suited for use in long-range amplified systems. The DWDM
interface is compliant with ITU-T G.707, ITU-T G.709, and Telcordia GR-253-CORE standards.
The DWDM trunk port operates at a rate that is dependent on the input signal and the presence or absence
of the ITU-T G.709 Digital Wrapper/FEC. The possible trunk rates are:
•
OC192 (9.95328 Gbps)
•
OTU2 (10.70923 Gbps)
•
10GE (10.3125 Gbps) or 10GE into OTU2 (ITU G.sup43 11.0957 Gbps)
•
10G-FC (10.51875 Gbps) or 10G-FC into OTU2 (nonstandard 11.31764 Gbps)
The maximum system reach in filterless applications without the use of optical amplification or
regenerators is nominally rated at 23 dB over C-SMF fiber. This rating is not a product specification, but
is given for informational purposes. It is subject to change.
9.5.5 Enhanced FEC (E-FEC) Feature
A key feature of the TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L cards is the availability to configure the
forward error correction in three modes: NO FEC, FEC, and E-FEC. The output bit rate is always
10.7092 Gbps as defined in ITU-T G.709, but the error coding performance can be provisioned as
follows:
•
NO FEC—No forward error correction
•
FEC—Standard ITU-T G.975 Reed-Solomon algorithm
•
E-FEC—Standard ITU-T G.975.1 I.7 algorithm, which is a super FEC code
9.5.6 FEC and E-FEC Modes
As client side traffic passes through the TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L cards, it can be digitally
wrapped using FEC mode, E-FEC mode, or no error correction at all. The FEC mode setting provides a
lower level of error detection and correction than the E-FEC mode setting of the card. As a result, using
E-FEC mode allows higher sensitivity (lower OSNR) with a lower bit error rate than FEC mode. E-FEC
enables longer distance trunk-side transmission than with FEC.
The E-FEC feature is one of three basic modes of FEC operation. FEC can be turned off, FEC can be
turned on, or E-FEC can be turned on to provide greater range and lower BER. The default mode is FEC
on and E-FEC off. E-FEC is provisioned using CTC.
Caution
Because the transponder has no visibility into the data payload and detect circuits, the TXP_MR_10E_C
and TXP_MR_10E_L cards do not display circuits under the card view.
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9.5.7 Client-to-Trunk Mapping
9.5.7 Client-to-Trunk Mapping
The TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L cards can perform ODU2-to-OCh mapping, which allows
operators to provision data payloads in a standard way across 10-Gbps optical links.
Digital wrappers that define client side interfaces are called ODU2 entities in ITU-T G.709. Digital
wrappers that define trunk side interfaces are called OCh in ITU-T G.709. ODU2 digital wrappers can
include G-MPLS signaling extensions to ITU-T G.709 (such as LSP and G-PID values) to define client
interfaces and payload protocols.
9.5.8 Automatic Laser Shutdown
The ALS procedure is supported on both client and trunk interfaces. On the client interface, ALS is
compliant with ITU-T G.664 (6/99). On the data application and trunk interface, the switch on and off
pulse duration is greater than 60 seconds. The on and off pulse duration is user-configurable. For details
regarding ALS provisioning for the TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L cards, refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
9.5.9 TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L Card-Level Indicators
Table 9-7 lists the three card-level LEDs on the TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L cards.
Table 9-7
TXP_MR_10E _C and TXP_MR_10E_L Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LED
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready. This LED
is on during reset. The FAIL LED flashes during the boot process. Replace
the card if the red FAIL LED persists.
ACT/STBY LED
If the ACT/STBY LED is green, the card is operational (one or both ports
active) and ready to carry traffic. If the ACT/STBY LED is amber, the card
is operational and in standby (protect) mode.
Green (Active)
Amber (Standby)
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS, LOF,
or high BERs on one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED is also
on if the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. If the fibers
are properly connected and the link is working, the light turns off.
9.5.10 TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L Port-Level Indicators
Table 9-8 lists the two port-level LEDs in the TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L cards.
Table 9-8
TXP_MR_10E_C and TXP_MR_10E_L Port-Level Indicators
Port-Level LED
Description
Green Client LED
The green Client LED indicates that the client port is in service and that it is
receiving a recognized signal.
Green DWDM LED
The green DWDM LED indicates that the DWDM port is in service and that
it is receiving a recognized signal.
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9.6 TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G Cards
9.6 TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G Cards
The TXP_MR_2.5G card processes one 8-Mbps to 2.488-Gbps signal (client side) into one 8-Mbps to
2.5-Gbps, 100-GHz DWDM signal (trunk side). It provides one long-reach STM-16/OC-48 port per
card, compliant with ITU-T G.707, ITU-T G.709, ITU-T G.957, and Telcordia GR-253-CORE.
The TXPP_MR_2.5G card processes one 8-Mbps to 2.488-Gbps signal (client side) into two 8-Mbps to
2.5-Gbps, 100-GHz DWDM signals (trunk side). It provides two long-reach STM-16/OC-48 ports per
card, compliant with ITU-T G.707, ITU-T G.957, and Telcordia GR-253-CORE.
The TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G cards are tunable over four wavelengths in the 1550-nm,
ITU 100-GHz range. They are available in eight versions, each of which covers four wavelengths, for a
total coverage of 32 different wavelengths in the 1550-nm range.
Note
ITU-T G.709 specifies a form of FEC that uses a “wrapper” approach. The digital wrapper lets you
transparently take in a signal on the client side, wrap a frame around it, and restore it to its original form.
FEC enables longer fiber links because errors caused by the optical signal degrading with distance are
corrected.
The trunk/line port operates at up to 2.488 Gbps (or up to 2.66 Gbps with ITU-T G.709 Digital
Wrapper/FEC) over unamplified distances up to 360 km (223.7 miles) with different types of fiber such
as C-SMF or higher if dispersion compensation is used.
Caution
Because the transponder has no capability to look into the payload and detect circuits, a TXP_MR_2.5G
or TXPP_MR_2.5G card does not display circuits under card view.
The TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G cards support 2R (retime, regenerate) and 3R (retime,
reshape, and regenerate) modes of operation where the client signal is mapped into a ITU-T G.709 frame.
The mapping function is simply done by placing a digital wrapper around the client signal. Only
OC-48/STM-16 client signals are fully ITU-T G.709 compliant, and the output bit rate depends on the
input client signal. Table 9-9 shows the possible combinations of client interfaces, input bit rates, 2R and
3R modes, and ITU-T G.709 monitoring.
Table 9-9
2R and 3R Mode and ITU-T G.709 Compliance by Client Interface
Client Interface
Input Bit Rate
3R vs. 2R
ITU-T G.709
OC-48/STM-16
2.488 Gbps
3R
On or Off
DV-6000
2.38 Gbps
2R
—
1
2 Gigabit Fibre Channel (2G-FC)/fiber
connectivity (FICON)
2.125 Gbps
3R
High-Definition Television (HDTV)
1.48 Gbps
2R
—
Gigabit Ethernet (GE)
1.25 Gbps
3R
On or Off
1 Gigabit Fibre Channel (1G-FC)/FICON
1.06 Gbps
3R
On or Off
OC-12/STM-4
622 Mbps
3R
On or Off
OC-3/STM-1
155 Mbps
3R
On or Off
Enterprise System Connection (ESCON)
200 Mbps
2R
—
SDI/D1 video
270 Mbps
2R
—
On or Off
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9.6.1 Faceplate
Table 9-9
2R and 3R Mode and ITU-T G.709 Compliance by Client Interface (continued)
Client Interface
Input Bit Rate
3R vs. 2R
ITU-T G.709
ISC-1 Compat
1.06 Gbps
3R
Off
ISC-3
1.06 or
2.125 Gbps
2R
—
ETR_CLO
16 Mbps
2R
—
1. No monitoring
The output bit rate is calculated for the trunk bit rate by using the 255/238 ratio as specified in
ITU-T G.709 for OTU1. Table 9-10 lists the calculated trunk bit rates for the client interfaces with
ITU-T G.709 enabled.
Table 9-10
Trunk Bit Rates With ITU-T G.709 Enabled
Client Interface
ITU-T G.709 Disabled ITU-T G.709 Enabled
OC-48/STM-16
2.488 Gbps
2.66 Gbps
2G-FC
2.125 Gbps
2.27 Gbps
GE
1.25 Gbps
1.34 Gbps
1G-FC
1.06 Gbps
1.14 Gbps
OC-12/STM-3
622 Mbps
666.43 Mbps
OC-3/STM-1
155 Mbps
166.07 Mbps
For 2R operation mode, the TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G cards have the ability to pass data
through transparently from client side interfaces to a trunk side interface, which resides on an ITU grid.
The data might vary at any bit rate from 200-Mbps up to 2.38-Gbps, including ESCON and video signals.
In this pass-through mode, no performance monitoring (PM) or digital wrapping of the incoming signal
is provided, except for the usual PM outputs from the SFPs. Similarly, this card has the ability to pass
data through transparently from the trunk side interfaces to the client side interfaces with bit rates
varying from 200-Mbps up to 2.38-Gbps. Again, no PM or digital wrapping of received signals is
available in this pass-through mode.
For 3R operation mode, the TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G cards apply a digital wrapper to the
incoming client interface signals (OC-N/STM-N, 1G-FC, 2G-FC, GE). PM is available on all of these
signals except for 2G-FC, and varies depending upon the type of signal. For client inputs other than
OC-48/STM-16, a digital wrapper might be applied but the resulting signal is not ITU-T G.709
compliant. The card applies a digital wrapper that is scaled to the frequency of the input signal.
The TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G cards have the ability to take digitally wrapped signals in
from the trunk interface, remove the digital wrapper, and send the unwrapped data through to the client
interface. PM of the ITU-T G.709 OH and SONET/SDH OH is implemented.
9.6.1 Faceplate
Figure 9-16 shows the TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G faceplates.
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Transponder and Muxponder Cards
9.6.2 Block Diagram
Figure 9-16
TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G Faceplates
2.5G MR
TXP
1530.33 1532.68
2.5G MR
TXP-P
1530.33 1532.68
FAIL
FAIL
ACT/STBY
ACT/STBY
SF
SF
HAZARD
LEVEL 1M
RX
TX
RX
TX
CLIENT
DWDM A
DWDM B
TX
CLIENT
RX
DWDM
RX
RX
TX
TX
HAZARD
LEVEL 1M
!
MAX INPUT
POWER LEVEL
- 8 dBm
145946
!
MAX INPUT
POWER LEVEL
- 8 dBm
For information on safety labels for the cards, see the “9.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards” section on
page 9-6.
9.6.2 Block Diagram
Figure 9-17 shows a block diagram of the TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G cards.
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Transponder and Muxponder Cards
9.6.3 Automatic Laser Shutdown
Figure 9-17
TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G Block Diagram
2R Tx path
Mux
Demux
CPU to
GCC
CPU
CPU
I/F
FPGA
CELL
BUS
SCL BUS
CELL BUS
Caution
Main
ASIC
Switch
Driver
Switch
Cross
Switch
Tunable
Laser
Trunk
Out
Mux
Demux
Limiting
Amp
Main
APD+TA
Limiting
Amp
Protect
APD+TA
Protect
ASIC
Mux
Demux
DCC
96636
SFP Client
2R Rx path
Switch
SCL
FPGA
You must use a 20-dB fiber attenuator (15 to 25 dB) when working with the TXP_MR_2.5G and
TXPP_MR_2.5G cards in a loopback on the trunk port. Do not use direct fiber loopbacks with the
TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G cards. Using direct fiber loopbacks causes irreparable damage to
the TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G cards.
You can install TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G cards in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17. You can
provision this card in a linear configuration. TXP_MR_10G and TXPP_MR_2.5G cards cannot be
provisioned as a BLSR/MS-SPRing, a path protection/SNCP, or a regenerator. They can be used in the
middle of BLSR/MS-SPRing or 1+1 spans only when the card is configured for transparent termination
mode.
The TXP_MR_2.5G card features a 1550-nm laser for the trunk/line port and a 1310-nm laser for the
client port. It contains two transmit and receive connector pairs (labeled) on the card faceplate. The card
uses dual LC connectors for optical cable termination.
The TXPP_MR_2.5G card features a 1550-nm laser for the trunk/line port and a 1310-nm or 850-nm
laser (depending on the SFP) for the client port and contains three transmit and receive connector pairs
(labeled) on the card faceplate. The card uses dual LC connectors for optical cable termination.
9.6.3 Automatic Laser Shutdown
The ALS procedure is supported on both client and trunk interfaces. On the client interface, ALS is
compliant with ITU-T G.664 (6/99). On the data application and trunk interface, the switch on and off
pulse duration is greater than 60 seconds. The on and off pulse duration is user-configurable. For details
regarding ALS provisioning for the TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G cards, refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
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9.6.4 TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G Card-Level Indicators
9.6.4 TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G Card-Level Indicators
Table 9-11 lists the three card-level LEDs on the TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G cards.
Table 9-11
TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LED
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready. This LED
is on during reset. The FAIL LED flashes during the boot process. Replace
the card if the red FAIL LED persists.
ACT/STBY LED
If the ACT/STBY LED is green, the card is operational (one or both ports
active) and ready to carry traffic. If the ACT/STBY LED is amber, the card
is operational and in standby (protect) mode.
Green (Active)
Amber (Standby)
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS, LOF,
or high BERs on one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED is also
on if the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. If the fibers
are properly connected and the link is working, the light turns off.
9.6.5 TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G Port-Level Indicators
Table 9-12 lists the four port-level LEDs on the TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G cards.
Table 9-12
TXP_MR_2.5G and TXPP_MR_2.5G Port-Level Indicators
Port-Level LED
Description
Green Client LED
The green Client LED indicates that the client port is in service and that it is
receiving a recognized signal.
Green DWDM LED
(TXP_MR_2.5G only)
The green DWDM LED indicates that the DWDM port is in service and that
it is receiving a recognized signal.
Green DWDM A LED The green DWDM A LED indicates that the DWDM A port is in service and
(TXPP_MR_2.5G only) that it is receiving a recognized signal.
Green DWDM B LED The green DWDM B LED indicates that the DWDM B port is in service and
(TXPP_MR_2.5G only) that it is receiving a recognized signal.
9.7 MXP_2.5G_10G Card
The MXP_2.5G_10G card multiplexes/demultiplexes four 2.5-Gbps signals (client side) into one
10-Gbps, 100-GHz DWDM signal (trunk side). It provides one extended long-range STM-64/OC-192
port per card on the trunk side (compliant with ITU-T G.707, ITU-T G.709, ITU-T G.957, and Telcordia
GR-253-CORE) and four intermediate- or short-range OC-48/STM-16 ports per card on the client side.
The port operates at 9.95328 Gbps over unamplified distances up to 80 km (50 miles) with different types
of fiber such as C-SMF or dispersion compensated fiber limited by loss and/or dispersion.
Client ports on the MXP_2.5G_10G card are also interoperable with SONET OC-1 (STS-1) fiber optic
signals defined in Telcordia GR-253-CORE. An OC-1 signal is the equivalent of one DS-3 channel
transmitted across optical fiber. OC-1 is primarily used for trunk interfaces to phone switches in the
United States. There is no SDH equivalent for SONET OC-1.
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9.7 MXP_2.5G_10G Card
The MXP_2.5G_10G card is tunable over two neighboring wavelengths in the 1550-nm, ITU 100-GHz
range. It is available in 16 different versions, each of which covers two wavelengths, for a total coverage
of 32 different wavelengths in the 1550-nm range.
Note
ITU-T G.709 specifies a form of FEC that uses a “wrapper” approach. The digital wrapper lets you
transparently take in a signal on the client side, wrap a frame around it and restore it to its original form.
FEC enables longer fiber links because errors caused by the optical signal degrading with distance are
corrected.
The port can also operate at 10.70923 Gbps in ITU-T G.709 Digital Wrapper/FEC mode.
Caution
Because the transponder has no capability to look into the payload and detect circuits, an
MXP_2.5G_10G card does not display circuits under card view.
Caution
You must use a 20-dB fiber attenuator (15 to 25 dB) when working with the MXP_2.5G_10G card in a
loopback on the trunk port. Do not use direct fiber loopbacks with the MXP_2.5G_10G card. Using
direct fiber loopbacks causes irreparable damage to the MXP_2.5G_10G card.
You can install MXP_2.5G_10G cards in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
Caution
Do not install an MXP_2.5G_10G card in Slot 3 if you have installed a DS3/EC1-48 card in Slots 1or 2.
Likewise, do not install an MXP_2.5G_10G card in Slot 17 if you have installed a DS3/EC1-48 card in
Slots 15 or 16. If you do, the cards will interact and cause DS-3 bit errors.
You can provision this card in a linear configuration. MXP_2.5G_10G cards cannot be provisioned as a
BLSR/MS-SPRing, a path protection/SNCP, or a regenerator. They can be used in the middle of
BLSR/MS-SPRing or 1+1 spans only when the card is configured for transparent termination mode.
The MXP_2.5G_10G port features a 1550-nm laser on the trunk port and four 1310-nm lasers on the
client ports and contains five transmit and receive connector pairs (labeled) on the card faceplate. The
card uses a dual LC connector on the trunk side and SFP connectors on the client side for optical cable
termination.
Note
When you create a 4xOC-48 OCHCC circuit, you need to select the G.709 and Synchronous options. A
4xOC-48 OCHCC circuit is supported by G.709 and synchronous mode. This is necessary to provision
a 4xOC-48 OCHCC circuit.
Figure 9-18 shows the MXP_2.5G_10G faceplate.
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Transponder and Muxponder Cards
9.7 MXP_2.5G_10G Card
Figure 9-18
MXP_2.5G_10G Faceplate
4x 2.5G
10G MXP
1530.33 1531.12
FAIL
ACT/STBY
SF
TX
1
RX
TX
2
RX
TX
3
RX
TX
4
RX
CLIENT
!
MAX INPUT
POWER LEVEL
- 8 dBm
DWDM
TX
RX
1530.33
145945
1531.12
For information on safety labels for the card, see the “9.2.1 Class 1 Laser Product Cards” section on
page 9-4.
Figure 9-19 shows a block diagram of the MXP_2.5G_10G card.
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9.7.1 Timing Synchronization
Figure 9-19
MXP_2.5G_10G Card Block Diagram
DWDM (Trunk)
STM-64 / OC-192
9.953,
10.3125,
10.709, or
11.095 Gbps
Client
STM-64 / OC-192
9.95328 or
10.70923 Gbps
Optical
Transceiver
Framer/FEC/DWDM
Processor
ASIC
Optical
Transceiver
uP bus
SCI
B
a
c
k
p
l
a
n
e
uP
RAM
83659
Flash
9.7.1 Timing Synchronization
The MXP_2.5G_10G card is synchronized to the TCC2/TCC2P clock during normal conditions and
transmits the ITU-T G.709 frame using this clock. The TCC2/TCC2P card can operate from an external
building integrated timing supply (BITS) clock, an internal Stratum 3 clock, or from clock recovered
from one of the four valid client clocks. If clocks from both TCC2/TCC2P cards are not available, the
MXP_2.5G_10G card switches automatically (with errors, not hitless) to an internal 19.44 MHz clock
that does not meet SONET clock requirements. This will result in a clock alarm.
9.7.2 Automatic Laser Shutdown
The ALS procedure is supported on both client and trunk interfaces. On the client interface, ALS is
compliant with ITU-T G.664 (6/99). On the data application and trunk interface, the switch on and off
pulse duration is greater than 60 seconds. The on and off pulse duration is user-configurable. For details
regarding ALS provisioning for the MXP_2.5G_10G card, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Procedure Guide.
9.7.3 MXP_2.5G_10G Card-Level Indicators
Table 9-13 describes the three card-level LEDs on the MXP_2.5G_10G card.
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9.7.4 MXP_2.5G_10E Card
Table 9-13
MXP_2.5G_10G Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LED
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready. This LED
is on during reset. The FAIL LED flashes during the boot process. Replace
the card if the red FAIL LED persists.
ACT/STBY LED
If the ACT/STBY LED is green, the card is operational (one or more ports
active) and ready to carry traffic. If the ACT/STBY LED is amber, the card
is operational and in standby (protect) mode.
Green (Active)
Amber (Standby)
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS, LOF,
or high BERs on one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED is also
on if the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. If the fibers
are properly connected and the link is working, the light turns off.
9.7.3.1 MXP_2.5G_10G Port-Level Indicators
Table 9-14 describes the four port-level LEDs on the MXP_2.5G_10G card.
Table 9-14
MXP_2.5G_10G Port-Level Indicators
Port-Level LED
Description
Green Client LED
(four LEDs)
The green Client LED indicates that the client port is in service and that it is
receiving a recognized signal. The card has four client ports, and so has four
Client LEDs.
Green DWDM LED
The green DWDM LED indicates that the DWDM port is in service and that
it is receiving a recognized signal.
Green Wavelength 1
LED
Each port supports two wavelengths on the DWDM side. Each wavelength
LED matches one of the wavelengths. This LED indicates that the card is
configured for Wavelength 1.
Green Wavelength 2
LED
Each port supports two wavelengths on the DWDM side. Each wavelength
LED matches one of the wavelengths. This LED indicates that the card is
configured for Wavelength 2.
9.7.4 MXP_2.5G_10E Card
The faceplate designation of the card is “4x2.5G 10E MXP.” The MXP_2.5G_10E card is a DWDM
muxponder for the ONS 15454 platform that supports full transparent termination the client side. The
card multiplexes four 2.5 Gbps client signals (4 x OC48/STM-16 SFP) into a single 10-Gbps DWDM
optical signal on the trunk side. The MXP_2.5G_10E provides wavelength transmission service for the
four incoming 2.5 Gbps client interfaces. The MXP_2.5G_10E muxponder passes all SONET/SDH
overhead bytes transparently.
The digital wrapper function (ITU-T G.709 compliant) formats the DWDM wavelength so that it can be
used to set up generic communications channels (GCCs) for data communications, enable FEC, or
facilitate performance monitoring.
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9.7.4 MXP_2.5G_10E Card
The MXP_2.5G_10E works with optical transport network (OTN) devices defined in ITU-T G.709. The
card supports ODU1 to OTU2 multiplexing, an industry standard method for asynchronously mapping
a SONET/SDH payload into a digitally wrapped envelope. See the “9.7.7 Multiplexing Function”
section on page 9-31.
The MXP_2.5G_10E card is not compatible with the MXP_2.5G_10G card, which does not support full
transparent termination. You can install MXP_2.5G_10E cards in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17. You can
provision this card in a linear configuration, as a BLSR/MS-SPRing, a path protection/SNCP, or a
regenerator. The card can be used in the middle of BLSR/MS-SPRing or 1+1 spans when the card is
configured for transparent termination mode.
The MXP_2.5G_10E features a 1550-nm laser on the trunk port and four 1310-nm lasers on the client
ports and contains five transmit and receive connector pairs (labeled) on the card faceplate. The card uses
a dual LC connector on the trunk side and uses SFP modules on the client side for optical cable
termination. The SFP pluggable modules are short reach (SR) or intermediate reach (IR) and support an
LC fiber connector.
Note
When you create a 4xOC-48 OCHCC circuit, you need to select the G.709 and Synchronous options. A
4xOC-48 OCHCC circuit is supported by G.709 and synchronous mode. This is necessary to provision
a 4xOC-48 OCHCC circuit.
9.7.4.1 Key Features
The MXP_2.5G_10E card has the following high level features:
•
Four 2.5 Gbps client interfaces (OC-48/STM-16) and one 10 Gbps trunk. The four OC-48 signals
are mapped into a ITU-T G.709 OTU2 signal using standard ITU-T G.709 multiplexing.
•
Onboard E-FEC processor: The processor supports both standard Reed-Solomon (RS, specified in
ITU-T G.709) and E-FEC, which allows an improved gain on trunk interfaces with a resultant
extension of the transmission range on these interfaces. The E-FEC functionality increases the
correction capability of the transponder to improve performance, allowing operation at a lower
OSNR compared to the standard RS (237,255) correction algorithm. A new block code (BCH)
algorithm implemented in E-FEC allows recovery of an input BER up to 1E-3.
•
Pluggable client interface optic modules: The MXP_2.5G_10E card has modular interfaces. Two
types of optics modules can be plugged into the card. These include an OC-48/STM 16 SR-1
interface with a 7-km (4.3-mile) nominal range (for short range and intra-office applications) and an
IR-1 interface with a range up to 40 km (24.9 miles). SR-1 is defined in Telcordia GR-253-CORE
and in I-16 (ITU-T G.957). IR-1 is defined in Telcordia GR-253-CORE and in S-16-1
(ITU-T G.957).
•
High level provisioning support: The MXP_2.5G_10E card is initially provisioned using
Cisco TransportPlanner software. Subsequently, the card can be monitored and provisioned using
CTC software.
•
Link monitoring and management: The MXP_2.5G_10E card uses standard OC-48 OH (overhead)
bytes to monitor and manage incoming interfaces. The card passes the incoming SDH/SONET data
stream and its overhead bytes transparently.
•
Control of layered SONET/SDH transport overhead: The card is provisionable to terminate
regenerator section overhead. This is used to eliminate forwarding of unneeded layer overhead. It
can help reduce the number of alarms and help isolate faults in the network.
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9.7.5 Faceplate
•
Automatic timing source synchronization: The MXP_2.5G_10E normally synchronizes from the
TCC2/TCC2P card. If for some reason, such as maintenance or upgrade activity, the TCC2/TCC2P
is not available, the MXP_2.5G_10E automatically synchronizes to one of the input client interface
clocks.
•
Configurable squelching policy: The card can be configured to squelch the client interface output if
there is LOS at the DWDM receiver or if there is a remote fault. In the event of a remote fault, the
card manages multiplex section alarm indication signal (MS-AIS) insertion.
9.7.5 Faceplate
Figure 9-20 shows the MXP_2.5G_10E faceplate.
Figure 9-20
MXP_2.5G_10E Faceplate
4x2.5
10 E
MxP
530.331550.12
FAIL
ACT/STBY
TX
RX TX
RX
SF
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
Client LEDs
145937
DWDM LED
For information on safety labels for the card, see the “9.2.1 Class 1 Laser Product Cards” section on
page 9-4.
Figure 9-21 shows a block diagram of the MXP_2.5G_10E card.
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9.7.6 Client Interfaces
Figure 9-21
MXP_2.5G_10E Block Diagram
DWDM
(trunk)
10GE
(10GBASE-LR)
FEC/
Wrapper
Optical
transceiver
SR-1
(short reach/intra-office)
or
IR-1
(intermediate range)
SFP client
optics modules
Optical
transceiver
E-FEC
Processor
(G.709 FEC)
Optical
transceiver
Serial bus
Optical
transceiver
Optical
transceiver
B
a
c
k
p
l
a
n
e
uP bus
RAM
Processor
115357
Onboard
Flash
memory
9.7.6 Client Interfaces
The MXP_2.5G_10E provides four intermediate- or short-range OC-48/STM-16 ports per card on the
client side. Both SR-1 or IR-1 optics can be supported and the ports use SFP connectors. The client
interfaces use four wavelengths in the 1310-nm, ITU 100-MHz-spaced, channel grid.
9.7.6.1 DWDM Interface
The MXP_2.5G_10E serves as an OTN multiplexer, transparently mapping four OC-48 channels
asynchronously to ODU1 into one 10-Gbps trunk. The DWDM trunk is tunable for transmission over
four wavelengths in the 1550-nm, ITU 100-GHz spaced channel grid.
Caution
You must use a 20-dB fiber attenuator (15 to 25 dB) when working with the MXP_2.5G_10E card in a
loopback on the trunk port. Do not use direct fiber loopbacks with the MXP_2.5G_10E card. Using
direct fiber loopbacks causes irreparable damage to the MXP_2.5G_10E card.
9.7.7 Multiplexing Function
The muxponder is an integral part of the reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexer (ROADM)
network. The key function of MXP_2.5G_10E is to multiplex 4 OC-48/STM16 signals onto one ITU-T
G.709 OTU2 optical signal (DWDM transmission). The multiplexing mechanism allows the signal to be
terminated at a far-end node by another MXP_2.5G_10E card.
Termination mode transparency on the muxponder is configured using OTUx and ODUx OH bytes. The
ITU-T G.709 specification defines OH byte formats that are used to configure, set, and monitor frame
alignment, FEC mode, section monitoring, tandem connection monitoring, and termination mode
transparency.
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9.7.8 Timing Synchronization
The MXP_2.5G_10E card performs ODU to OTU multiplexing as defined in ITU-T G.709. The ODU is
the framing structure and byte definition (ITU-T G.709 digital wrapper) used to define the data payload
coming into one of the SONET/SDH client interfaces on MXP_2.5G_10E. The term ODU1 refers to an
ODU that operates at 2.5-Gbps line rate. On the MXP_2.5G_10E, there are four client interfaces that can
be defined using ODU1 framing structure and format by asserting a ITU-T G.709 digital wrapper.
The output of the muxponder is a single 10-Gbps DWDM trunk interface defined using OTU2. It is
within the OTU2 framing structure that FEC or E-FEC information is appended to enable error checking
and correction.
9.7.8 Timing Synchronization
The MXP_2.5G_10E card is synchronized to the TCC2/TCC2P clock during normal conditions and
transmits the ITU-T G.709 frame using this clock. No holdover function is implemented. If neither
TCC2/TCC2P clock is available, the MXP_2.5G_10E switches automatically (hitless) to the first of the
four valid client clocks with no time restriction as to how long it can run on this clock. The
MXP_2.5G_10E continues to monitor the TCC2/TCC2P card. If a TCC2/TCC2P card is restored to
working order, the MXP_2.5G_10E reverts to the normal working mode of running from the
TCC2/TCC2P clock. If there is no valid TCC2/TCC2P clock and all of the client channels become
invalid, the card waits (no valid frames processed) until one of the TCC2/TCC2P cards supplies a valid
clock. In addition, the card is allowed to select the recovered clock from one active and valid client
channel and supply that clock to the TCC2/TCC2P card.
9.7.9 Enhanced FEC (E-FEC) Capability
The MXP_2.5G_10E can configure the FEC in three modes: NO FEC, FEC, and E-FEC. The output bit
rate is always 10.7092 Gbps as defined in ITU-T G.709, but the error coding performance can be
provisioned as follows:
•
NO FEC—No FEC
•
FEC—Standard ITU-T G.975 Reed-Solomon algorithm
•
E-FEC—Standard ITU-T G.975.1 I.7, two orthogonally concatenated BCH super FEC code. This
FEC scheme contains three parameterizations of the same scheme of two orthogonally interleaved
BCH. The constructed code is decoded iteratively to achieve the expected performance.
9.7.10 FEC and E-FEC Modes
As client side traffic passes through the MXP_2.5G_10E card, it can be digitally wrapped using FEC
mode error correction or E-FEC mode error correction (or no error correction at all). The FEC mode
setting provides a lower level of error detection and correction than the E-FEC mode setting of the card.
As a result, using E-FEC mode allows higher sensitivity (lower OSNR) with a lower BER than FEC
mode. E-FEC enables longer distance trunk-side transmission than with FEC.
The E-FEC feature is one of three basic modes of FEC operation. FEC can be turned off, FEC can be
turned on, or E-FEC can be turned on to provide greater range and lower BER. The default mode is FEC
on and E-FEC off. E-FEC is provisioned using CTC.
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9.7.11 SONET/SDH Overhead Byte Processing
9.7.11 SONET/SDH Overhead Byte Processing
The card passes the incoming SONET/SDH data stream and its overhead bytes for the client signal
transparently. The card can be provisioned to terminate regenerator section overhead. This is used to
eliminate forwarding of unneeded layer overhead. It can help reduce the number of alarms and help
isolate faults in the network.
9.7.12 Client Interface Monitoring
The following parameters are monitored on the MXP_2.5G_10E card:
•
Laser bias current is measured as a PM parameter
•
LOS is detected and signaled
•
Transmit (TX) and receive (RX) power are monitored
The following parameters are monitored in real time mode (one second):
•
Optical power transmitted (client)
•
Optical power received (client)
In case of loss of communication (LOC) at the DWDM receiver or far-end LOS, the client interface
behavior is configurable. AIS can be invoked or the client signal can be squelched.
9.7.13 Wavelength Identification
The card uses trunk lasers that are wave-locked, which allows the trunk transmitter to operate on the ITU
grid effectively. Table 9-15 describes the required trunk transmit laser wavelengths. The laser is tunable
over eight wavelengths at 50-GHz spacing or four at 100-GHz spacing.
Table 9-15
MXP_2.5G_10E Trunk Wavelengths
Band
Wavelength (nm)
30.3
1530.33
30.3
1531.12
30.3
1531.90
30.3
1532.68
34.2
1534.25
34.2
1535.04
34.2
1535.82
34.2
1536.61
38.1
1538.19
38.1
1538.98
38.1
1539.77
38.1
1540.56
42.1
1542.14
42.1
1542.94
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9.7.14 Automatic Laser Shutdown
Table 9-15
MXP_2.5G_10E Trunk Wavelengths (continued)
Band
Wavelength (nm)
42.1
1543.73
42.1
1544.53
46.1
1546.12
46.1
1546.92
46.1
1547.72
46.1
1548.51
50.1
1550.12
50.1
1550.92
50.1
1551.72
50.1
1552.52
54.1
1554.13
54.1
1554.94
54.1
1555.75
54.1
1556.55
58.1
1558.17
58.1
1558.98
58.1
1559.79
58.1
1560.61
9.7.14 Automatic Laser Shutdown
The ALS procedure is supported on both client and trunk interfaces. On the client interface, ALS is
compliant with ITU-T G.664 (6/99). On the data application and trunk interface, the switch on and off
pulse duration is greater than 60 seconds. The on and off pulse duration is user-configurable. For details
regarding ALS provisioning for the MXP_2.5G_10E card, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Procedure Guide.
9.7.15 Jitter
For SONET and SDH signals, the MXP_2.5G_10E card complies with Telcordia GR-253-CORE,
ITU-T G.825, and ITU-T G.873 for jitter generation, jitter tolerance, and jitter transfer. See the
“9.16 Jitter Considerations” section on page 9-93 for more information.
9.7.16 Lamp Test
The MXP_2.5G_10E card supports a lamp test function that is activated from the ONS 15454 front panel
or through CTC to ensure that all LEDs are functional.
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9.7.17 Onboard Traffic Generation
9.7.17 Onboard Traffic Generation
The MXP_2.5G_10E card provides internal traffic generation for testing purposes according to
pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS), SONET/SDH, or ITU-T G.709.
9.7.18 MXP_2.5G_10E Card-Level Indicators
Table 9-16 describes the three card-level LEDs on the MXP_2.5G_10E card.
Table 9-16
MXP_2.5G_10E Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LED
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready. This LED
is on during reset. The FAIL LED flashes during the boot process. Replace
the card if the red FAIL LED persists.
ACT/STBY LED
If the ACT/STBY LED is green, the card is operational (one or more ports
active) and ready to carry traffic. If the ACT/STBY LED is amber, the card
is operational and in standby (protect) mode.
Green (Active)
Amber (Standby)
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS, LOF,
or high BERs on one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED is also
on if the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. If the fibers
are properly connected and the link is working, the light turns off.
9.7.19 MXP_2.5G_10E Port-Level Indicators
Table 9-17 describes the port-level LEDs on the MXP_2.5G_10E card.
Table 9-17
MXP_2.5G_10E Port-Level Indicators
Port-Level LED
Description
Green Client LED
(four LEDs)
A green Client LED indicates that the client port is in service and that it is
receiving a recognized signal. The card has four client ports, and so has four
Client LEDs.
Green DWDM LED
The green DWDM LED indicates that the DWDM port is in service and that
it is receiving a recognized signal.
9.8 MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L Cards
The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards are DWDM muxponders for the ONS 15454
platform that support transparent termination mode on the client side. The faceplate designation of the
cards is “4x2.5G 10E MXP C” for the MXP_2.5G_10E_C card and “4x2.5G 10E MXP L” for the
MXP_2.5G_10E_L card. The cards multiplex four 2.5-Gbps client signals (4 x OC48/STM-16 SFP) into
a single 10-Gbps DWDM optical signal on the trunk side. The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and
MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards provide wavelength transmission service for the four incoming 2.5 Gbps client
interfaces. The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L muxponders pass all SONET/SDH overhead
bytes transparently.
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9.8.1 Key Features
The digital wrapper function (ITU-T G.709 compliant) formats the DWDM wavelength so that it can be
used to set up GCCs for data communications, enable FEC, or facilitate PM.
The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards work with OTN devices defined in ITU-T G.709.
The cards support ODU1 to OTU2 multiplexing, an industry standard method for asynchronously
mapping a SONET/SDH payload into a digitally wrapped envelope. See the “9.8.5 Multiplexing
Function” section on page 9-39.
The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards are not compatible with the MXP_2.5G_10G
card, which does not support transparent termination mode.
You can install MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17. You can
provision a card in a linear configuration, as a BLSR/MS-SPRing, a path protection/SNCP, or a
regenerator. The cards can be used in the middle of BLSR/MS-SPRing or 1+1 spans when the cards are
configured for transparent termination mode.
The MXP_2.5G_10E_C card features a tunable 1550-nm C-band laser on the trunk port. The laser is
tunable across 82 wavelengths on the ITU grid with 50-GHz spacing between wavelengths. The
MXP_2.5G_10E_L features a tunable 1580-nm L-band laser on the trunk port. The laser is tunable
across 80 wavelengths on the ITU grid, also with 50-GHz spacing. Each card features four 1310-nm
lasers on the client ports and contains five transmit and receive connector pairs (labeled) on the card
faceplate. The cards uses dual LC connectors on the trunk side and use SFP modules on the client side
for optical cable termination. The SFP pluggable modules are SR or IR and support an LC fiber
connector.
Note
When you create a 4xOC-48 OCHCC circuit, you need to select the G.709 and Synchronous options. A
4xOC-48 OCHCC circuit is supported by G.709 and synchronous mode. This is necessary to provision
a 4xOC-48 OCHCC circuit.
9.8.1 Key Features
The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards have the following high level features:
•
Four 2.5 Gbps client interfaces (OC-48/STM-16) and one 10 Gbps trunk. The four OC-48 signals
are mapped into a ITU-T G.709 OTU2 signal using standard ITU-T G.709 multiplexing.
•
Onboard E-FEC processor: The processor supports both standard RS (specified in ITU-T G.709) and
E-FEC, which allows an improved gain on trunk interfaces with a resultant extension of the
transmission range on these interfaces. The E-FEC functionality increases the correction capability
of the transponder to improve performance, allowing operation at a lower OSNR compared to the
standard RS (237,255) correction algorithm. A new BCH algorithm implemented in E-FEC allows
recovery of an input BER up to 1E-3.
•
Pluggable client interface optic modules: The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards
have modular interfaces. Two types of optics modules can be plugged into the card. These include
an OC-48/STM 16 SR-1 interface with a 7-km (4.3-mile) nominal range (for short range and
intra-office applications) and an IR-1 interface with a range up to 40 km (24.9 miles). SR-1 is
defined in Telcordia GR-253-CORE and in I-16 (ITU-T G.957). IR-1 is defined in Telcordia
GR-253-CORE and in S-16-1 (ITU-T G.957).
•
High level provisioning support: The cards are initially provisioned using Cisco TransportPlanner
software. Subsequently, the card can be monitored and provisioned using CTC software.
•
Link monitoring and management: The cards use standard OC-48 OH (overhead) bytes to monitor
and manage incoming interfaces. The cards pass the incoming SDH/SONET data stream and its
overhead bytes transparently.
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9.8.2 Faceplate
•
Control of layered SONET/SDH transport overhead: The cards are provisionable to terminate
regenerator section overhead. This is used to eliminate forwarding of unneeded layer overhead. It
can help reduce the number of alarms and help isolate faults in the network.
•
Automatic timing source synchronization: The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards
normally synchronize from the TCC2/TCC2P card. If for some reason, such as maintenance or
upgrade activity, the TCC2/TCC2P is not available, the cards automatically synchronize to one of
the input client interface clocks.
•
Configurable squelching policy: The cards can be configured to squelch the client interface output
if there is LOS at the DWDM receiver or if there is a remote fault. In the event of a remote fault, the
card manages MS-AIS insertion.
•
The cards are tunable across the full C band (MXP_2.5G_10E_C) or full L band
(MXP_2.5G_10E_L), thus eliminating the need to use different versions of each card to provide
tunability across specific wavelengths in a band.
9.8.2 Faceplate
Figure 9-22 shows the MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L faceplates and block diagram.
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Transponder and Muxponder Cards
9.8.3 Client Interfaces
Figure 9-22
MXP_2.5G_10E _C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L Faceplates and Block Diagram
4x2.5
10 E
MXP L
RX
RX
TX
RX
SR-1
(short reach/intra-office)
or IR-1
(intermediate range)
SFP client
optics modules
Optical
transceiver
FEC/
Wrapper
Optical
transceiver
E-FEC
Processor
(G.709 FEC)
Optical
transceiver
Serial bus
Optical
transceiver
Optical
transceiver
B
a
c
k
p
l
a
n
e
uP bus
Client LEDs
Onboard
Flash
memory
TX
RX
TX
TX
RX
RX TX
SF
TX
SF
RX
ACT/STBY
RX TX
FAIL
ACT/STBY
TX
FAIL
DWDM
(trunk)
10GE
(10GBASE-LR)
RAM
Processor
145941
4x2.5
10 E
MXP C
TX
RX
TX
RX
DWDM LED
For information on safety labels for the cards, see the “9.2.1 Class 1 Laser Product Cards” section on
page 9-4.
9.8.3 Client Interfaces
The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards provide four intermediate- or short-range
OC-48/STM-16 ports per card on the client side. Both SR-1 and IR-1 optics can be supported and the
ports use SFP connectors. The client interfaces use four wavelengths in the 1310-nm,
ITU 100-GHz-spaced, channel grid.
9.8.4 DWDM Interface
The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards serve as OTN multiplexers, transparently
mapping four OC-48 channels asynchronously to ODU1 into one 10-Gbps trunk. For the
MXP_2.5G_10E_C card, the DWDM trunk is tunable for transmission over the entire C band and for the
MXP_2.5G_10E_L card, the DWDM trunk is tunable for transmission over the entire L band. Channels
are spaced at 50-GHz on the ITU grid.
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9.8.5 Multiplexing Function
Caution
You must use a 20-dB fiber attenuator (15 to 25 dB) when working with the cards in a loopback on the
trunk port. Do not use direct fiber loopbacks with the cards. Using direct fiber loopbacks causes
irreparable damage to the MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards.
9.8.5 Multiplexing Function
The muxponder is an integral part of the ROADM network. The key function of the MXP_2.5G_10E_C
and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards is to multiplex four OC-48/STM16 signals onto one ITU-T G.709 OTU2
optical signal (DWDM transmission). The multiplexing mechanism allows the signal to be terminated at
a far-end node by another similar card.
Transparent termination on the muxponder is configured using OTUx and ODUx OH bytes. The
ITU-T G.709 specification defines OH byte formats that are used to configure, set, and monitor frame
alignment, FEC mode, section monitoring, tandem connection monitoring, and transparent termination
mode.
The MXP_2.5G_10E and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards perform ODU to OTU multiplexing as defined in
ITU-T G.709. The ODU is the framing structure and byte definition (ITU-T G.709 digital wrapper) used
to define the data payload coming into one of the SONET/SDH client interfaces on the cards. The term
ODU1 refers to an ODU that operates at 2.5-Gbps line rate. On the cards, there are four client interfaces
that can be defined using ODU1 framing structure and format by asserting a ITU-T G.709 digital
wrapper.
The output of the muxponder is a single 10-Gbps DWDM trunk interface defined using OTU2. It is
within the OTU2 framing structure that FEC or E-FEC information is appended to enable error checking
and correction.
9.8.6 Timing Synchronization
The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards are synchronized to the TCC2/TCC2P clock
during normal conditions and transmit the ITU-T G.709 frame using this clock. No holdover function is
implemented. If neither TCC2/TCC2P clock is available, the card switches automatically (hitless) to the
first of the four valid client clocks with no time restriction as to how long it can run on this clock. The
card continues to monitor the TCC2/TCC2P card. If a TCC2/TCC2P card is restored to working order,
the card reverts to the normal working mode of running from the TCC2/TCC2P clock. If there is no valid
TCC2/TCC2P clock and all of the client channels become invalid, the card waits (no valid frames
processed) until one of the TCC2/TCC2P cards supplies a valid clock. In addition, the card is allowed
to select the recovered clock from one active and valid client channel and supply that clock to the
TCC2/TCC2P card.
9.8.7 Enhanced FEC (E-FEC) Capability
The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards can configure the FEC in three modes: NO FEC,
FEC, and E-FEC. The output bit rate is always 10.7092 Gbps as defined in ITU-T G.709, but the error
coding performance can be provisioned as follows:
•
NO FEC—No FEC
•
FEC—Standard ITU-T G.975 Reed-Solomon algorithm
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9.8.8 FEC and E-FEC Modes
•
E-FEC—Standard ITU-T G.975.1 I.7, two orthogonally concatenated BCH super FEC code. This
FEC scheme contains three parameterizations of the same scheme of two orthogonally interleaved
block codes (BCH). The constructed code is decoded iteratively to achieve the expected
performance.
9.8.8 FEC and E-FEC Modes
As client side traffic passes through the card, it can be digitally wrapped using FEC mode error
correction or E-FEC mode error correction (or no error correction at all). The FEC mode setting provides
a lower level of error detection and correction than the E-FEC mode setting of the card. As a result, using
E-FEC mode allows higher sensitivity (lower OSNR) with a lower BER than FEC mode. E-FEC enables
longer distance trunk-side transmission than with FEC.
The E-FEC feature is one of three basic modes of FEC operation. FEC can be turned off, FEC can be
turned on, or E-FEC can be turned on to provide greater range and lower BER. The default mode is FEC
on and E-FEC off. E-FEC is provisioned using CTC.
9.8.9 SONET/SDH Overhead Byte Processing
The card passes the incoming SONET/SDH data stream and its overhead bytes for the client signal
transparently. The card can be provisioned to terminate regenerator section overhead. This is used to
eliminate forwarding of unneeded layer overhead. It can help reduce the number of alarms and help
isolate faults in the network.
9.8.10 Client Interface Monitoring
The following parameters are monitored on the MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards:
•
Laser bias current is measured as a PM parameter.
•
LOS is detected and signaled.
•
Rx and Tx power are monitored.
The following parameters are monitored in real time mode (one second):
•
Optical power transmitted (client)
•
Optical power received (client)
In case of LOC at the DWDM receiver or far-end LOS, the client interface behavior is configurable. AIS
can be invoked or the client signal can be squelched.
9.8.11 Wavelength Identification
The card uses trunk lasers that are wavelocked, which allows the trunk transmitter to operate on the ITU
grid effectively. Both the MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards implement the UT2 module.
The MXP_2.5G_10E_C card uses a C-band version of the UT2 and the MXP_2.5G_10E_L card uses an
L-band version.
Table 9-18 describes the required trunk transmit laser wavelengths for the MXP_2.5G_10E_C card. The
laser is tunable over 82 wavelengths in the C band at 50-GHz spacing on the ITU grid.
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9.8.11 Wavelength Identification
Table 9-18
MXP_2.5G_10E_C Trunk Wavelengths
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
1
196.00
1529.55
42
193.95
1545.72
2
195.95
1529.94
43
193.90
1546.119
3
195.90
1530.334
44
193.85
1546.518
4
195.85
1530.725
45
193.80
1546.917
5
195.80
1531.116
46
193.75
1547.316
6
195.75
1531.507
47
193.70
1547.715
7
195.70
1531.898
48
193.65
1548.115
8
195.65
1532.290
49
193.60
1548.515
9
195.60
1532.681
50
193.55
1548.915
10
195.55
1533.073
51
193.50
1549.32
11
195.50
1533.47
52
193.45
1549.71
12
195.45
1533.86
53
193.40
1550.116
13
195.40
1534.250
54
193.35
1550.517
14
195.35
1534.643
55
193.30
1550.918
15
195.30
1535.036
56
193.25
1551.319
16
195.25
1535.429
57
193.20
1551.721
17
195.20
1535.822
58
193.15
1552.122
18
195.15
1536.216
59
193.10
1552.524
19
195.10
1536.609
60
193.05
1552.926
20
195.05
1537.003
61
193.00
1553.33
21
195.00
1537.40
62
192.95
1553.73
22
194.95
1537.79
63
192.90
1554.134
23
194.90
1538.186
64
192.85
1554.537
24
194.85
1538.581
65
192.80
1554.940
25
194.80
1538.976
66
192.75
1555.343
26
194.75
1539.371
67
192.70
1555.747
27
194.70
1539.766
68
192.65
1556.151
28
194.65
1540.162
69
192.60
1556.555
29
194.60
1540.557
70
192.55
1556.959
30
194.55
1540.953
71
192.50
1557.36
31
194.50
1541.35
72
192.45
1557.77
32
194.45
1541.75
73
192.40
1558.173
33
194.40
1542.142
74
192.35
1558.578
34
194.35
1542.539
75
192.30
1558.983
35
194.30
1542.936
76
192.25
1559.389
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9.8.11 Wavelength Identification
Table 9-18
MXP_2.5G_10E_C Trunk Wavelengths (continued)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
36
194.25
1543.333
77
192.20
1559.794
37
194.20
1543.730
78
192.15
1560.200
38
194.15
1544.128
79
192.10
1560.606
39
194.10
1544.526
80
192.05
1561.013
40
194.05
1544.924
81
192.00
1561.42
41
194.00
1545.32
82
191.95
1561.83
Table 9-19 describes the required trunk transmit laser wavelengths for the MXP_2.5G_10E_L card. The
laser is fully tunable over 80 wavelengths in the L band at 50-GHz spacing on the ITU grid.
Table 9-19
MXP_2.5G_10E_L Trunk Wavelengths
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
1
190.85
1570.83
41
188.85
1587.46
2
190.8
1571.24
42
188.8
1587.88
3
190.75
1571.65
43
188.75
1588.30
4
190.7
1572.06
44
188.7
1588.73
5
190.65
1572.48
45
188.65
1589.15
6
190.6
1572.89
46
188.6
1589.57
7
190.55
1573.30
47
188.55
1589.99
8
190.5
1573.71
48
188.5
1590.41
9
190.45
1574.13
49
188.45
1590.83
10
190.4
1574.54
50
188.4
1591.26
11
190.35
1574.95
51
188.35
1591.68
12
190.3
1575.37
52
188.3
1592.10
13
190.25
1575.78
53
188.25
1592.52
14
190.2
1576.20
54
188.2
1592.95
15
190.15
1576.61
55
188.15
1593.37
16
190.1
1577.03
56
188.1
1593.79
17
190.05
1577.44
57
188.05
1594.22
18
190
1577.86
58
188
1594.64
19
189.95
1578.27
59
187.95
1595.06
20
189.9
1578.69
60
187.9
1595.49
21
189.85
1579.10
61
187.85
1595.91
22
189.8
1579.52
62
187.8
1596.34
23
189.75
1579.93
63
187.75
1596.76
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9.8.12 Automatic Laser Shutdown
Table 9-19
MXP_2.5G_10E_L Trunk Wavelengths (continued)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
24
189.7
1580.35
64
187.7
1597.19
25
189.65
1580.77
65
187.65
1597.62
26
189.6
1581.18
66
187.6
1598.04
27
189.55
1581.60
67
187.55
1598.47
28
189.5
1582.02
68
187.5
1598.89
29
189.45
1582.44
69
187.45
1599.32
30
189.4
1582.85
70
187.4
1599.75
31
189.35
1583.27
71
187.35
1600.17
32
189.3
1583.69
72
187.3
1600.60
33
189.25
1584.11
73
187.25
1601.03
34
189.2
1584.53
74
187.2
1601.46
35
189.15
1584.95
75
187.15
1601.88
36
189.1
1585.36
76
187.1
1602.31
37
189.05
1585.78
77
187.05
1602.74
38
189
1586.20
78
187
1603.17
39
188.95
1586.62
79
186.95
1603.60
40
188.9
1587.04
80
186.9
1604.03
9.8.12 Automatic Laser Shutdown
The ALS procedure is supported on both client and trunk interfaces. On the client interface, ALS is
compliant with ITU-T G.664 (6/99). On the data application and trunk interface, the switch on and off
pulse duration is greater than 60 seconds. The on and off pulse duration is user-configurable. For details
regarding ALS provisioning for the MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards, see the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
9.8.13 Jitter
For SONET and SDH signals, the MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards comply with
Telcordia GR-253-CORE, ITU-T G.825, and ITU-T G.873 for jitter generation, jitter tolerance, and
jitter transfer. See the “9.16 Jitter Considerations” section on page 9-93 for more information.
9.8.14 Lamp Test
The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards support a lamp test function that is activated from
the ONS 15454 front panel or through CTC to ensure that all LEDs are functional.
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9.8.15 Onboard Traffic Generation
9.8.15 Onboard Traffic Generation
The MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards provide internal traffic generation for testing
purposes according to PRBS, SONET/SDH, or ITU-T G.709.
9.8.16 MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L Card-Level Indicators
Table 9-20 describes the three card-level LEDs on the MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards.
Table 9-20
MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LED
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready. This LED
is on during reset. The FAIL LED flashes during the boot process. Replace
the card if the red FAIL LED persists.
ACT/STBY LED
If the ACT/STBY LED is green, the card is operational (one or more ports
active) and ready to carry traffic. If the ACT/STBY LED is amber, the card
is operational and in standby (protect) mode.
Green (Active)
Amber (Standby)
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS, LOF,
or high BERs on one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED is also
on if the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. If the fibers
are properly connected and the link is working, the light turns off.
9.8.17 MXP_2.5G_10E and MXP_2.5G_10E_L Port-Level Indicators
Table 9-21 describes the port-level LEDs on the MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L cards.
Table 9-21
MXP_2.5G_10E_C and MXP_2.5G_10E_L Port-Level Indicators
Port-Level LED
Description
Green Client LED
(four LEDs)
A green Client LED indicates that the client port is in service and that it is
receiving a recognized signal. The card has four client ports, and so has four
Client LEDs.
Green DWDM LED
The green DWDM LED indicates that the DWDM port is in service and that
it is receiving a recognized signal.
9.9 MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G Cards
The MXP_MR_2.5G card aggregates a mix and match of client Storage Area Network (SAN) service
client inputs (GE, FICON, Fibre Channel, and ESCON) into one 2.5 Gbps STM-16/OC-48 DWDM
signal on the trunk side. It provides one long-reach STM-16/OC-48 port per card and is compliant with
Telcordia GR-253-CORE.
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9.9 MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G Cards
Note
In Software Release 7.0 and later, two additional operating modes have been made available to the user:
pure ESCON (all 8 ports running ESCON), and mixed mode (Port 1 running FC/GE/FICON, and Ports
5 through 8 running ESCON). When the card is part of a system running Software Release 6.0 or below,
only one operating mode, (FC/GE) is available for use.
The 2.5-Gbps Multirate Muxponder–Protected–100 GHz–Tunable 15xx.xx-15yy.yy (MXPP_MR_2.5G)
card aggregates various client SAN service client inputs (GE, FICON, Fibre Channel, and ESCON) into
one 2.5 Gbps STM-16/OC-48 DWDM signal on the trunk side. It provides two long-reach
STM-16/OC-48 ports per card and is compliant with ITU-T G.957 and Telcordia GR-253-CORE.
Because the cards are tunable to one of four adjacent grid channels on a 100-GHz spacing, each card is
available in eight versions, with 15xx.xx representing the first wavelength and 15yy.yy representing the
last wavelength of the four available on the card. In total, 32 DWDM wavelengths are covered in
accordance with the ITU-T 100-GHz grid standard, G.692, and Telcordia GR-2918-CORE, Issue 2. The
card versions along with their corresponding wavelengths are shown in Table 9-22.
Table 9-22
Card Versions
Card Version
Frequency Channels at 100 GHz (0.8 nm) Spacing
1530.33–1532.68
1530.33 nm
1531.12 nm
1531.90 nm
1532.68 nm
1534.25–1536.61
1534.25 nm
1535.04 nm
1535.82 nm
1536.61 nm
1538.19–1540.56
1538.19 nm
1538.98 nm
1539.77 nm
1540.56 nm
1542.14–1544.53
1542.14 nm
1542.94 nm
1543.73 nm
1544.53 nm
1546.12–1548.51
1546.12 nm
1546.92 nm
1547.72 nm
1548.51 nm
1550.12–1552.52
1550.12 nm
1550.92 nm
1551.72 nm
1552.52 nm
1554.13–1556.55
1554.13 nm
1554.94 nm
1555.75 nm
1556.55 nm
1558.17–1560.61
1558.17 nm
1558.98 nm
1559.79 nm
1560.61 nm
The muxponders are intended to be used in applications with long DWDM metro or regional
unregenerated spans. Long transmission distances are achieved through the use of flat gain optical
amplifiers.
The client interface supports the following payload types:
Note
•
2G FC
•
1G FC
•
2G FICON
•
1G FICON
•
GE
•
ESCON
Because the client payload cannot oversubscribe the trunk, a mix of client signals can be accepted, up to
a maximum limit of 2.5 Gbps.
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9.9 MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G Cards
Table 9-23 shows the input data rate for each client interface, and the encapsulation method. The current
version of the ITU-T Transparent Generic Framing Procedure (GFP-T) G.7041 supports transparent
mapping of 8B/10B block-coded protocols, including Gigabit Ethernet, Fibre Channel, and FICON.
In addition to the GFP mapping, 1-Gbps traffic on Port 1 or 2 of the high-speed serializer/deserializer
(SERDES) is mapped to an STS-24c channel. If two 1-Gbps client signals are present at Port 1 and Port 2
of the SERDES, the Port 1 signal is mapped into the first STS-24c channel and the Port 2 signal into the
second STS-24c channel. The two channels are then mapped into an OC-48 trunk channel.
Table 9-23
MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G Client Interface Data Rates and Encapsulation
Client Interface
Input Data Rate
ITU-T GFP-T G.7041 Encapsulation
2G FC
2.125 Gbps
Yes
1G FC
1.06 Gbps
Yes
2G FICON
2.125 Gbps
Yes
1G FICON
1.06 Gbps
Yes
GE
1.25 Gbps
Yes
ESCON
0.2 Gbps
Yes
Table 9-24 shows some of the mix and match possibilities on the various client ports. The table is
intended to show the full client payload configurations for the card.
Table 9-24
Client Data Rates and Ports
Mode
Port(s)
Aggregate Data Rate
2G FC
1
2.125 Gbps
1G FC
1, 2
2.125 Gbps
2G FICON
1
2.125 Gbps
1G FICON
1, 2
2.125 Gbps
GE
1, 2
2.5 Gbps
1G FC
ESCON
(mixed mode)
1
5, 6, 7, 8
1.06 Gbps
0.8 Gbps
1G FICON
ESCON
(mixed mode)
1
5, 6, 7, 8
GE
ESCON
(mixed mode)
1
5, 6, 7, 8
ESCON
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
1.86 Gbps total
1.06 Gbps
0.8 Gbps
1.86 Gbps total
1.25 Gbps
0.8 Gbps
Total 2.05 Gbps
1.6 Gbps
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9.9.1 Performance Monitoring
9.9.1 Performance Monitoring
GFP-T performance monitoring (GFP-T PM) is available via remote monitoring (RMON), and trunk PM
is managed according to Telcordia GR-253-CORE and ITU G.783/826. Client PM is achieved through
RMON for FC and GE.
9.9.2 Distance Extension
A buffer-to-buffer credit management scheme provides FC flow control. With this feature enabled, a port
indicates the number of frames that can be sent to it (its buffer credit), before the sender is required to
stop transmitting and wait for the receipt of a “ready” indication The MXP_MR_2.5G and
MXPP_MR_2.5 cards support FC credit-based flow control with a buffer-to-buffer credit extension of
up to 1600 km (994.2 miles) for 1G FC and up to 800 km (497.1 miles) for 2G FC. The feature can be
enabled or disabled.
9.9.3 Slot Compatibility
You can install MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G cards in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17. The
TCC2/TCC2P card is the only other card required to be used with these muxponder cards. Cross-connect
cards do not affect the operation of the muxponder cards.
9.9.4 Interoperability with Cisco MDS Switches
You can provision a string (port name) for each fiber channel/FICON interface on the MXP_MR_2.5G
and MXPP_MR_2.5G cards, which allows the MDS Fabric Manager to create a link association between
that SAN port and a SAN port on a Cisco MDS 9000 switch.
9.9.5 Client and Trunk Ports
The MXP_MR_2.5G card features a 1550-nm laser for the trunk/line port and a 1310-nm or 850-nm laser
(depending on the SFP) for the client ports. The card contains eight 12.5 degree downward tilt SFP
modules for the client interfaces. For optical termination, each SFP uses two LC connectors, which are
labeled TX and RX on the faceplate. The trunk port is a dual-LC connector with a 45 degree downward
angle.
The MXPP_MR_2.5G card features a 1550-nm laser for the trunk/line port and a 1310-nm or 850-nm
laser (depending on the SFP) for the client port. The card contains eight 12.5 degree downward tilt SFP
modules for the client interfaces. For optical termination, each SFP uses two LC connectors, which are
labeled TX and RX on the faceplate. There are two trunk port connectors (one for working and one for
protect). Each is a dual-LC connector with a 45-degree downward angle.
9.9.6 Faceplates
Figure 9-23 shows the MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G faceplates.
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9.9.7 Block Diagram
Figure 9-23
MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G Faceplates
MXP
MR
2.5G
MXPP
MR
2.5G
15xx.xx
15xx.xx
15xx.xx
15xx.xx
FAIL
ACT/STBY
ACT/STBY
SF
SF
DWDMA
RX TX
MXP_MR_2.5G
MXPP_MR_2.5G
124077
DWDMB
RX TX
DWDM
RX TX
RX TX RX TX RX TX RX TX RX TX RX TX RX TX RX TX
RX TX RX TX RX TX RX TX RX TX RX TX RX TX RX TX
FAIL
For information on safety labels for the cards, see the “9.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards” section on
page 9-6.
9.9.7 Block Diagram
Figure 9-24 shows a block diagram of the MXP_MR_2.5G card. The card has eight SFP client interfaces.
Ports 1 and 2 can be used for GE, FC, FICON, or ESCON. Ports 3 through 8 are used for ESCON client
interfaces. There are two SERDES blocks dedicated to the high-speed interfaces (GE, FC, FICON, and
ESCON) and two SERDES blocks for the ESCON interfaces. A FPGA is provided to support different
configurations for different modes of operation. This FPGA has a Universal Test and Operations
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9.9.8 Automatic Laser Shutdown
Physical Interface for ATM (UTOPIA) interface. A transceiver add/drop multiplexer (TADM) chip
supports framing. Finally, the output signal is serialized and connected to the trunk front end with a
direct modulation laser. The trunk receive signal is converted into an electrical signal with an avalanche
photodiode (APD), is deserialized, and is then sent to the TADM framer and FPGA.
The MXPP_MR_2.5G is the same, except a 50/50 splitter divides the power at the trunk interface. In the
receive direction, there are two APDs, two SERDES blocks, and two TADM framers. This is necessary
to monitor both the working and protect paths. A switch selects one of the two paths to connect to the
client interface.
Figure 9-24
MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G Block Diagram
QDR
SRAM
GE, FC,
FICON,
ESCON
GE, FC,
FICON,
ESCON
SFP 1
SFP 2
ESCON
SFP 3
ESCON
SFP 4
High-speed
SERDES
SERDES
FPGA
(for
FC,
GE,
FICON,
ESCON,
PCS,
B2B,
GFP-T)
Laser
Serializer
TADM
framer
Trunk
interface
Deserializer
APD
SFP 5
ESCON
SFP 6
ESCON
SFP 7
ESCON
SFP 8
Caution
SERDES
134986
ESCON
You must use a 20-dB fiber attenuator (15 to 25 dB) when working with the MXP_MR_2.5G and
MXPP_MR_2.5G cards in a loopback configuration on the trunk port. Do not use direct fiber loopbacks
with the MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G cards. Using direct fiber loopbacks causes irreparable
damage to the MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G cards.
9.9.8 Automatic Laser Shutdown
The ALS procedure is supported on both client and trunk interfaces. On the client interface, ALS is
compliant with ITU-T G.664 (6/99). On the data application and trunk interface, the switch on and off
pulse duration is greater than 60 seconds. The on and off pulse duration is user-configurable. For details
regarding ALS provisioning for the MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G cards, refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
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9.9.9 MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G Card-Level Indicators
9.9.9 MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G Card-Level Indicators
Table 9-25 lists the card-level LEDs on the MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G cards.
Table 9-25
MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LED
Description
FAIL LED (Red)
Red indicates that the card’s processor is not ready. This LED is on during
reset. The FAIL LED flashes during the boot process. Replace the card if the
red FAIL LED persists.
ACT/STBY LED
Green indicates that the card is operational (one or both ports active) and
ready to carry traffic.
Green (Active)
Amber (Standby)
SF LED (Amber)
Amber indicates that the card is operational and in standby (protect) mode.
Amber indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS, LOF, or high
BERs on one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED is also
illuminated if the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. If the
fibers are properly connected and the link is working, the LED turns off.
9.9.10 MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G Port-Level Indicators
Table 9-26 lists the port-level LEDs on the MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G cards.
Table 9-26
MXP_MR_2.5G and MXPP_MR_2.5G Port-Level Indicators
Port-Level LED
Description
Client LEDs
(eight LEDs)
Green indicates that the port is carrying traffic (active) on the interface.
Amber indicates that the port is carrying protect traffic (MXPP_MR_2.5G).
Red indicates that the port has detected a loss of signal.
DWDM LED
(MXP_MR_2.5G)
Green (Active)
Green indicates that the card is carrying traffic (active) on the interface.
Red (LOS)
A red LED indicates that the interface has detected an LOS or LOC.
DWDMA and DWDMB
LEDs
(MXPP_MR_2.5G)
Green (Active)
Green indicates that the card is carrying traffic (active) on the interface.
Amber (Protect Traffic) When the LED is amber, it indicates that the interface is carrying protect
traffic in a splitter protection card (MXPP_MR_2.5G).
Red (LOS)
A red LED indicates that the interface has detected an LOS or LOC.
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9.10 MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L Cards
9.10 MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L Cards
The MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards aggregate a mix of client SAN service client
inputs (GE, FICON, and Fibre Channel) into one 10.0 Gbps STM-64/OC-192 DWDM signal on the trunk
side. It provides one long-reach STM-64/OC-192 port per card and is compliant with Telcordia
GR-253-CORE and ITU-T G.957.
The cards support aggregation of the following signal types:
Note
Caution
•
1-Gigabit Fibre Channel
•
2-Gigabit Fibre Channel
•
4-Gigabit Fibre Channel
•
1-Gigabit Ethernet
•
1-Gigabit ISC-Compatible (ISC-1)
•
2-Gigabit ISC-Peer (ISC-3)
On the card faceplates, the MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards are displayed as
10DME_C and 10DME_L, respectively.
The card can be damaged by dropping it. Handle it safely.
The MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L muxponders pass all SONET/SDH overhead
bytes transparently.
The digital wrapper function (ITU-T G.709 compliant) formats the DWDM wavelength so that it can be
used to set up GCCs for data communications, enable FEC, or facilitate PM. The MXP_MR_10DME_C
and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards work with the OTN devices defined in ITU-T G.709. The cards support
ODU1 to OTU2 multiplexing, an industry standard method for asynchronously mapping a SONET/SDH
payload into a digitally wrapped envelope. See the “9.7.7 Multiplexing Function” section on page 9-31.
Note
Because the client payload cannot oversubscribe the trunk, a mix of client signals can be accepted, up to
a maximum limit of 10 Gbps.
You can install MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17.
Note
The MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards are not compatible with the
MXP_2.5G_10G card, which does not support transparent termination mode.
The MXP_MR_10DME_C card features a tunable 1550-nm C-band laser on the trunk port. The laser is
tunable across 82 wavelengths on the ITU grid with 50-GHz spacing between wavelengths. The
MXP_MR_10DME_L features a tunable 1580-nm L-band laser on the trunk port. The laser is tunable
across 80 wavelengths on the ITU grid, also with 50-GHz spacing. Each card features four 1310-nm
lasers on the client ports and contains five transmit and receive connector pairs (labeled) on the card
faceplate. The cards uses dual LC connectors on the trunk side and use SFP modules on the client side
for optical cable termination. The SFP pluggable modules are SR or IR and support an LC fiber
connector.
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9.10 MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L Cards
Table 9-27 shows the input data rate for each client interface, and the encapsulation method. The current
version of the GFP-T G.7041 supports transparent mapping of 8B/10B block-coded protocols, including
Gigabit Ethernet, Fibre Channel, ISC, and FICON.
In addition to the GFP mapping, 1-Gbps traffic on Port 1 or 2 of the high-speed SERDES is mapped to
an STS-24c channel. If two 1-Gbps client signals are present at Port 1 and Port 2 of the high-speed
SERDES, the Port 1 signal is mapped into the first STS-24c channel and the Port 2 signal into the second
STS-24c channel. The two channels are then mapped into an OC-48 trunk channel.
Table 9-27
MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L Client Interface Data Rates and
Encapsulation
Client Interface
Input Data Rate
GFP-T G.7041 Encapsulation
2G FC
2.125 Gbps
Yes
1G FC
1.06 Gbps
Yes
2G FICON/2G ISC-Compatible (ISC-1)/ 2.125 Gbps
2G ISC-Peer (ISC-3)
Yes
1G FICON/1G ISC-Compatible (ISC-1)/ 1.06 Gbps
1G ISC-Peer (ISC-3)
Yes
Gigabit Ethernet
Yes
1.25 Gbps
There are two FPGAs on each MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L, and a group of four
ports is mapped to each FPGA. Group 1 consists of Ports 1 through 4, and Group 2 consists of Ports 5
through 8. Table 9-28 shows some of the mix and match possibilities on the various client data rates for
Ports 1 through 4, and Ports 5 through 8. An X indicates that the data rate is supported in that port.
Table 9-28
Supported Client Data Rates for Ports 1 through 4 and Ports 5 through 8
Port (Group 1)
Port (Group 2)
Gigabit Ethernet
1G FC
2G FC
4G FC
1
5
X
X
X
X
2
6
X
X
—
—
3
7
X
X
X
—
4
8
X
X
—
—
GFP-T PM is available through RMON and trunk PM is managed according to Telcordia GR-253-CORE
and ITU G.783/826. Client PM is achieved through RMON for FC and GE.
A buffer-to-buffer credit management scheme provides FC flow control. With this feature enabled, a port
indicates the number of frames that can be sent to it (its buffer credit), before the sender is required to
stop transmitting and wait for the receipt of a “ready” indication The MXP_MR_10DME_C and
MXP_MR_10DME_L cards support FC credit-based flow control with a buffer-to-buffer credit
extension of up to 1600 km (994.1 miles) for 1G FC, up to 800 km (497.1 miles) for 2G FC, or up to
400 km (248.5 miles) for 4G FC. The feature can be enabled or disabled.
The MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards feature a 1550-nm laser for the trunk/line
port and a 1310-nm or 850-nm laser (depending on the SFP) for the client ports. The cards contains eight
12.5 degree downward tilt SFP modules for the client interfaces. For optical termination, each SFP uses
two LC connectors, which are labeled TX and RX on the faceplate. The trunk port is a dual-LC connector
with a 45 degree downward angle.
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9.10.1 Key Features
The throughput of the MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards is affected by the
following parameters:
•
Distance extension—If distance extension is enabled on the card, it provides more throughput but
more latency. If distance extension is disabled on the card, the buffer to buffer credits on the storage
switch affects the throughput; higher the buffer to buffer credits higher is the throughput.
Note
•
Forward Error Correction (FEC)—If Enhanced FEC (E-FEC) is enabled on the trunk port of the
card, the throughout is significantly reduced in comparison to standard FEC being set on the trunk
port.
Note
•
For each link to operate at the maximum throughput, it requires a minimum number of buffer
credits to be available on the devices which the link connects to. The number of buffer
credits required is a function of the distance between the storage switch extension ports and
the link bandwidth, that is, 1G, 2G, or 4G. These buffer credits are provided by either the
storage switch (if distance extension is disabled) or by both the storage switch and the card
(if distance extension is enabled).
If distance extension is enabled on the card, the FEC status does not usually affect the
throughput of the card.
Payload size—The throughput of the card decreases with decrease in payload size.
The resultant throughput of the card is usually the combined effect of the above parameters.
9.10.1 Key Features
The MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards have the following high-level features:
•
Onboard E-FEC processor: The processor supports both standard RS (specified in ITU-T G.709) and
E-FEC, which allows an improved gain on trunk interfaces with a resultant extension of the
transmission range on these interfaces. The E-FEC functionality increases the correction capability
of the transponder to improve performance, allowing operation at a lower OSNR compared to the
standard RS (237,255) correction algorithm. A new BCH algorithm implemented in E-FEC allows
recovery of an input BER up to 1E-3.
•
Pluggable client interface optic modules: The MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L
cards have modular interfaces. Two types of optics modules can be plugged into the card. These
include an OC-48/STM 16 SR-1 interface with a 7-km (4.3-mile) nominal range (for short range and
intra-office applications) and an IR-1 interface with a range up to 40 km (24.9 miles). SR-1 is
defined in Telcordia GR-253-CORE and in I-16 (ITU-T G.957). IR-1 is defined in Telcordia
GR-253-CORE and in S-16-1 (ITU-T G.957).
•
Y-cable protection: Supports Y-cable protection between the same card type only, on ports with the
same port number and signal rate. See the “9.14.1 Y-Cable Protection” section on page 9-90 for
more detailed information.
•
High level provisioning support: The cards are initially provisioned using Cisco TransportPlanner
software. Subsequently, the card can be monitored and provisioned using CTC software.
•
ALS: A safety mechanism used in the event of a fiber cut. For details regarding ALS provisioning
for the MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454
DWDM Procedure Guide.
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9.10.2 Faceplate
•
Link monitoring and management: The cards use standard OC-48 OH bytes to monitor and manage
incoming interfaces. The cards pass the incoming SDH/SONET data stream and its OH bytes
transparently.
•
Control of layered SONET/SDH transport overhead: The cards are provisionable to terminate
regenerator section overhead. This is used to eliminate forwarding of unneeded layer overhead. It
can help reduce the number of alarms and help isolate faults in the network.
•
Automatic timing source synchronization: The MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L
cards normally synchronize from the TCC2/TCC2P card. If for some reason, such as maintenance
or upgrade activity, the TCC2/TCC2P is not available, the cards automatically synchronize to one
of the input client interface clocks.
Note
MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards cannot be used for line timing.
•
Configurable squelching policy: The cards can be configured to squelch the client interface output
if there is LOS at the DWDM receiver or if there is a remote fault. In the event of a remote fault, the
card manages MS-AIS insertion.
•
The cards are tunable across the full C band (MXP_MR_10DME_C) or full L band
(MXP_MR_10DME_L), thus eliminating the need to use different versions of each card to provide
tunability across specific wavelengths in a band.
•
You can provision a string (port name) for each fiber channel/FICON interface on the
MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards, which allows the MDS Fabric Manager to
create a link association between that SAN port and a SAN port on a Cisco MDS 9000 switch.
•
From Software Release 9.0, the fast switch feature of MXP_MR_10DME_C and
MXP_MR_10DME_L cards along with the buffer-to-buffer credit recovery feature of MDS
switches, prevents reinitialization of ISL links during Y-cable switchovers.
9.10.2 Faceplate
Figure 9-25 shows the MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L faceplates and block diagram.
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9.10.3 Wavelength Identification
Figure 9-25
MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L Faceplates and Block Diagram
10DME-C
10DME-L
4G FC
SerDes
FAIL
FAIL
ACT/STBY
ACT/STBY
SF
SF
SPF 4/1
5x I/O
Framer
G.709/FEC
OTN MXP
CPU
Core
FPGA
UT2
TX
RX
3
TX
RX
SPF 3/1
1/2/4G-FC
B2B
Credit
Mgt
FPGA
RX
4
RX
4
TX
RX
3
TX
Group 1
SPF 2/1
5x I/O
TX
TX
RX
1
2
RX
2
TX
RX
1
TX
SPF 1/1
1 x QDR
2M x 36bit Burst4
TX
1
TX
RX
4G FC
SerDes
SPF 9/1
Power supply
Data path
DCC/GCC
CPUC bus
145767
DWDM
RX
TX
DWDM
RX
TX
SPF 8/1
1/2/4G-FC
B2B
Credit
Mgt
FPGA
5x I/O
RX
TX
SPF 7/1
RX
4
SPF 6/1
5x I/O
RX
TX
2
3
RX
RX
RX
4
TX
3
Group 2
TX
2
TX
RX
1
TX
Client
ports
For information on safety labels for the cards, see the “9.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards” section on
page 9-6.
Caution
You must use a 20-dB fiber attenuator (15 to 25 dB) when working with the cards in a loopback on the
trunk port. Do not use direct fiber loopbacks with the cards. Using direct fiber loopbacks causes
irreparable damage to the MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards.
9.10.3 Wavelength Identification
The card uses trunk lasers that are wavelocked, which allows the trunk transmitter to operate on the ITU
grid effectively. Both the MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards implement the UT2
module. The MXP_MR_10DME_C card uses a C-band version of the UT2 and the
MXP_MR_10DME_L card uses an L-band version.
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9.10.3 Wavelength Identification
Table 9-29 describes the required trunk transmit laser wavelengths for the MXP_MR_10DME_C card.
The laser is tunable over 82 wavelengths in the C band at 50-GHz spacing on the ITU grid.
Table 9-29
MXP_MR_10DME_C Trunk Wavelengths
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
1
196.00
1529.55
42
193.95
1545.72
2
195.95
1529.94
43
193.90
1546.119
3
195.90
1530.334
44
193.85
1546.518
4
195.85
1530.725
45
193.80
1546.917
5
195.80
1531.116
46
193.75
1547.316
6
195.75
1531.507
47
193.70
1547.715
7
195.70
1531.898
48
193.65
1548.115
8
195.65
1532.290
49
193.60
1548.515
9
195.60
1532.681
50
193.55
1548.915
10
195.55
1533.073
51
193.50
1549.32
11
195.50
1533.47
52
193.45
1549.71
12
195.45
1533.86
53
193.40
1550.116
13
195.40
1534.250
54
193.35
1550.517
14
195.35
1534.643
55
193.30
1550.918
15
195.30
1535.036
56
193.25
1551.319
16
195.25
1535.429
57
193.20
1551.721
17
195.20
1535.822
58
193.15
1552.122
18
195.15
1536.216
59
193.10
1552.524
19
195.10
1536.609
60
193.05
1552.926
20
195.05
1537.003
61
193.00
1553.33
21
195.00
1537.40
62
192.95
1553.73
22
194.95
1537.79
63
192.90
1554.134
23
194.90
1538.186
64
192.85
1554.537
24
194.85
1538.581
65
192.80
1554.940
25
194.80
1538.976
66
192.75
1555.343
26
194.75
1539.371
67
192.70
1555.747
27
194.70
1539.766
68
192.65
1556.151
28
194.65
1540.162
69
192.60
1556.555
29
194.60
1540.557
70
192.55
1556.959
30
194.55
1540.953
71
192.50
1557.36
31
194.50
1541.35
72
192.45
1557.77
32
194.45
1541.75
73
192.40
1558.173
33
194.40
1542.142
74
192.35
1558.578
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9.10.3 Wavelength Identification
Table 9-29
MXP_MR_10DME_C Trunk Wavelengths (continued)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
34
194.35
1542.539
75
192.30
1558.983
35
194.30
1542.936
76
192.25
1559.389
36
194.25
1543.333
77
192.20
1559.794
37
194.20
1543.730
78
192.15
1560.200
38
194.15
1544.128
79
192.10
1560.606
39
194.10
1544.526
80
192.05
1561.013
40
194.05
1544.924
81
192.00
1561.42
41
194.00
1545.32
82
191.95
1561.83
Table 9-30 describes the required trunk transmit laser wavelengths for the MXP_MR_10DME_L card.
The laser is fully tunable over 80 wavelengths in the L band at 50-GHz spacing on the ITU grid.
Table 9-30
MXP_MR_10DME_L Trunk Wavelengths
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
1
190.85
1570.83
41
188.85
1587.46
2
190.8
1571.24
42
188.8
1587.88
3
190.75
1571.65
43
188.75
1588.30
4
190.7
1572.06
44
188.7
1588.73
5
190.65
1572.48
45
188.65
1589.15
6
190.6
1572.89
46
188.6
1589.57
7
190.55
1573.30
47
188.55
1589.99
8
190.5
1573.71
48
188.5
1590.41
9
190.45
1574.13
49
188.45
1590.83
10
190.4
1574.54
50
188.4
1591.26
11
190.35
1574.95
51
188.35
1591.68
12
190.3
1575.37
52
188.3
1592.10
13
190.25
1575.78
53
188.25
1592.52
14
190.2
1576.20
54
188.2
1592.95
15
190.15
1576.61
55
188.15
1593.37
16
190.1
1577.03
56
188.1
1593.79
17
190.05
1577.44
57
188.05
1594.22
18
190
1577.86
58
188
1594.64
19
189.95
1578.27
59
187.95
1595.06
20
189.9
1578.69
60
187.9
1595.49
21
189.85
1579.10
61
187.85
1595.91
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9.10.4 MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L Card-Level Indicators
Table 9-30
MXP_MR_10DME_L Trunk Wavelengths (continued)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
Channel
Number
Frequency
(THz)
Wavelength
(nm)
22
189.8
1579.52
62
187.8
1596.34
23
189.75
1579.93
63
187.75
1596.76
24
189.7
1580.35
64
187.7
1597.19
25
189.65
1580.77
65
187.65
1597.62
26
189.6
1581.18
66
187.6
1598.04
27
189.55
1581.60
67
187.55
1598.47
28
189.5
1582.02
68
187.5
1598.89
29
189.45
1582.44
69
187.45
1599.32
30
189.4
1582.85
70
187.4
1599.75
31
189.35
1583.27
71
187.35
1600.17
32
189.3
1583.69
72
187.3
1600.60
33
189.25
1584.11
73
187.25
1601.03
34
189.2
1584.53
74
187.2
1601.46
35
189.15
1584.95
75
187.15
1601.88
36
189.1
1585.36
76
187.1
1602.31
37
189.05
1585.78
77
187.05
1602.74
38
189
1586.20
78
187
1603.17
39
188.95
1586.62
79
186.95
1603.60
40
188.9
1587.04
80
186.9
1604.03
9.10.4 MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L Card-Level Indicators
Table 9-31 describes the three card-level LEDs on the MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L
cards.
Table 9-31
MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LED
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready. This LED
is on during reset. The FAIL LED flashes during the boot process. Replace
the card if the red FAIL LED persists.
ACT/STBY LED
If the ACT/STBY LED is green, the card is operational (one or more ports
active) and ready to carry traffic. If the ACT/STBY LED is amber, the card
is operational and in standby (protect) mode.
Green (Active)
Amber (Standby)
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS, LOF,
or high BERs on one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED is also
on if the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. If the fibers
are properly connected and the link is working, the light turns off.
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9.10.5 MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L Port-Level Indicators
9.10.5 MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L Port-Level Indicators
Table 9-32 describes the port-level LEDs on the MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L cards.
Table 9-32
MXP_MR_10DME_C and MXP_MR_10DME_L Port-Level Indicators
Port-Level LED
Description
Port LED
(eight LEDs, four for
each group, one for each
SFP)
When green, the port LED indicates that the client port is either in service
and receiving a recognized signal (that is, no signal fail), or Out of Service
and Maintenance (OOS,MT or locked, maintenance) and the signal fail and
alarms are being ignored.
Green/Red/Amber/Off
When red, the port LED indicates that the client port is in service but is
receiving a signal fail (LOS).
When amber, the port LED indicates that the port is provisioned and in a
standby state.
When off, the port LED indicates that the SFP is either not provisioned, out
of service, not properly inserted, or the SFP hardware has failed.
Green DWDM LED
The green DWDM LED indicates that the DWDM port is in service and that
it is receiving a recognized signal.
9.11 GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE Cards
GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards are Gigabit Ethernet Xponders for the ONS 15454
ANSI and ETSI platforms.
Note
GE_XPE card is enhanced version of the GE_XP card and 10GE_XPE card is enhanced version of the
10GE_XP card.
The cards aggregate Ethernet packets received on the client ports for transport on C-band trunk ports that
operate on a 100-GHz grid. The trunk ports operate with ITU-T G.709 framing and either FEC or E-FEC.
The GE_XP and 10GE_XP cards are designed for bulk point-to-point transport over 10GE LAN PHY
wavelengths for Video-on-Demand (VOD), or broadcast video across protected 10GE LAN PHY
wavelengths. The GE_XPE and 10GE_XPE cards are designed for bulk GE_XPE or 10GE_XPE
point-to-point, point-to-multipoint, multipoint-to-multipoint transport over 10GE LAN PHY
wavelengths for Video-on-Demand (VOD), or broadcast video across protected 10GE LAN PHY
wavelengths.
The GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards can be installed in Slots 1 through 6 or 12
through 17. The GE_XP and GE_XPE are double-slot cards with twenty Gigabit Ethernet client ports
and two 10 Gigabit Ethernet trunk ports. The 10GE_XP and 10GE_XPE are single-slot cards with two
10 Gigabit Ethernet client ports and two 10 Gigabit Ethernet trunk ports. The client ports support SX,
LX, and ZX SFPs and SR and 10GBASE-LR XFPs. (LR2 XFPs are not supported.) The trunk ports
support a DWDM XFP.
Caution
A fan-tray assembly (15454E-CC-FTA for the ETSI shelf, or 15454-CC-FTA for the ANSI shelf) must
be installed in a shelf where a GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, or 10GE_XPE card is installed.
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9.11.1 Key Features
GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards can be provisioned to perform different Gigabit
Ethernet transport roles. All the cards can work as Layer 2 switches. However, the 10GE_XP and
10GE_XPE cards can also perform as a 10 Gigabit Ethernet transponders (10GE TXP mode), and the
GE_XP and GE_XPE can perform as a 10 Gigabit Ethernet or 20 Gigabit Ethernet muxponders (10GE
MXP or 20GE MXP mode). Table 9-33 shows the card modes supported by each card.
Note
Changing the GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, or 10GE_XPE card mode requires the ports to be in a
OOS-DSBL (ANSI) or Locked, disabled (ETSI) service state. In addition, no circuits can be provisioned
on the cards when the mode is being changed.
Table 9-33
GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE Card Modes
Card Mode
Cards
Description
Layer 2
Ethernet
switch
GE_XP
Provides capability to switch between any two ports irrespective of
client or trunk port. Supported Ethernet protocols and services include
1+1 protection, QoS (Quality of Service), CoS (Class of Service),
QinQ, MAC learning, service provider VLANs (SVLANs), IGMP
snooping and Multicast VLAN Registration (MVR), link integrity,
and other Ethernet switch services.
10GE_XP
GE_XPE
10GE_XPE
10GE TXP
10GE_XP
10GE_XPE
10GE MXP
GE_XP
20GE MXP
GE_XPE
Provides a point-to-point application in which each 10 Gigabit
Ethernet client port is mapped to a 10 Gigabit Ethernet trunk port.
Provides the ability to multiplex the twenty Gigabit Ethernet client
ports on the card to one or both of its 10 Gigabit Ethernet trunk ports.
The card can be provisioned as a single MXP with twenty Gigabit
Ethernet client ports mapped to one trunk port (Port 21) or as two
MXPs with ten Gigabit Ethernet client ports mapped to a trunk port
(Ports 1 to 10 mapped to Port 21, and Ports 11-20 mapped to Port 22).
9.11.1 Key Features
The GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards have the following high-level features:
Note
•
Gigabit Ethernet MXP, TXP, and Layer 2 switch capability over the ONS 15454 DWDM platform.
•
Interoperable with TXP_MR_10E and TXP_MR_10E_C cards. Also interoperable with
Cisco Catalyst 6500 and Cisco 7600 series Gigabit Ethernet and 10 Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.
The GE_XPE and 10GE_XPE cards are interoperable with TXP_MR_10E and TXP_MR_10E_C cards.
Also interoperable with Cisco Catalyst 6500 and Cisco 7600 series GE, 10GE interfaces and CRS-1
10GE Interfaces.
•
Compatible with the ONS 15454 ANSI high-density shelf assembly, the ONS 15454 ETSI shelf
assembly, and the ONS 15454 ETSI high-density shelf assembly. Compatible with TCC2 and
TCC2P cards.
•
Far-End Laser Control (FELC)—FELC is supported on copper SFP from Release 8.52 and later. For
more information on FELC, see the “9.15 Far-End Laser Control” section on page 9-92.
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9.11.1 Key Features
•
Ports: The GE_XP and GE_XPE cards have twenty Gigabit Ethernet client ports and two 10 Gigabit
Ethernet trunk ports. The 10GE_XP and 10GE_XPE cards have two 10 Gigabit Ethernet client ports
and two 10 Gigabit Ethernet trunk ports. The client Gigabit Ethernet signals are mapped into an
ITU-T G.709 OTU2 signal using standard ITU-T G.709 multiplexing when configured in one of the
MXP modes (10GE MXP or 20GE MXP).
•
FEC and E-FEC: ITU-T G.709 framing with standard Reed-Soloman (RS) (255,237) FEC.
Performance monitoring and ITU-T G.709 Optical Data Unit (ODU) synchronous and asynchronous
mapping. E-FEC with ITU-T G.709 ODU and 2.7 Gbps with greater than 8 dB coding gain.
•
Broadcast drop-and-continue capability for VOD and broadcast video applications.
•
Layer 2 switch mode provides VLAN translation, QinQ, ingress CoS, egress QoS, Fast Ethernet
protection switching, and other Layer 2 Ethernet services.
•
IEEE 802.3 frame format supported for 10 Gigabit Ethernet interfaces. The minimum frame size is
64 bytes. The maximum frame size is user-provisionable.
•
MAC learning capability in Layer 2 switch mode.
•
Configurable service provider VLANs (SVLANs) and customer VLANs (CVLANs).
•
In Layer 2 switch mode, ports can be provisioned as network-to-network interfaces (NNIs) or
user-network interfaces (UNIs) to facilitate service provider to customer traffic management.
•
When a port is in UNI mode, tagging can be configured as transparent or selective. In transparent
mode, only SVLANs in the node’s VLAN database can be configured. In selective mode, a CVLANto-SVLAN relationship can be defined.
•
Layer 2 VLAN port mapping allows the cards to be configured as multiple Gigabit Ethernet TXPs
and MXPs.
•
Y-cable protection is configurable in TXP and MXP modes.
•
Two protection schemes are available in Layer 2 mode. They are:
– 1+1 protection—Protection scheme to address card, port, or shelf failures for client ports.
– Fast Automatic Protection—Protection scheme to address card, port, or shelf failures for trunk
ports.
•
End-to-end Ethernet link integrity.
•
Pluggable client interface optic modules (SFPs and XFPs): Client ports support tri-rate SX, LX, and
ZX SFPs, and 10-Gbps SR1 XFPs.
•
Pluggable trunk interface optic modules; trunk ports support the DWDM XFP.
•
Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) snooping to restrict the flooding of multicast traffic
by forwarding multicast traffic to those interfaces where a multicast device is present.
•
Multicast VLAN Registration (MVR) for applications using wide-scale deployment of multicast
traffic across an Ethernet ring-based service provider network.
•
Ingress CoS—Assigns a CoS value to the port from 0 (highest) to 7 (lowest) and accepts CoS of
incoming frames.
•
Egress QoS—Defines the QoS capabilities for the egress port.
•
MAC Learning—MAC address learning to facilitate switch processing.
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9.11.2 Faceplate and Block Diagram
9.11.2 Faceplate and Block Diagram
Figure 9-26 shows the GE_XP faceplate and block diagram. The GE_XPE faceplate and block diagram
looks the same.
Figure 9-26
GE_XP and GE_XPE Faceplates and Block Diagram
MPC8270 core
GE-XP
Power supply
Clocking
BCM 5650x with
Ethernet ASIC
FAIL
12GE
Client
ports
HAZARD
LEVEL 1
ACT
XAUI
to
SF14
FEC
SERDES
XFP WDM
TX
TX
RX
TX
BCM
5650x
FEC
SERDES
XFP WDM
TX
XAUI
to
SF14
SCL FPGA
159052
RX
TX
TX
TX
RX
RX
TX
16
RX
RX
TX
RX
17
RX
TX
18
Client
Ports 15-20
GE
RX
TX
19
RX
TX
2
TRUNK
1
TX
20
RX
RX
T2
Client
Ports 9-14
GE
RX
TX
RX
14
TX
TX
15
RX
6
7
8
Trunk
Ports 1-2
10GE
8GE
Client
ports
RX
TX
RX
RX
12
TX
13
RX
4
5
Client
Ports 1-8
GE
CONN
TX
RX
9
10
TX
RX
TX
11
2
3
RX
1
TX
SF
T1
CONSOLE
MAX INPUT
POWER LEVE
L
CLIENT: +3dBm
TRUNK: +1dBm
!
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE No.50,
DATED JULY 26, 2001
The GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards have two trunk ports. The GE_XP and GE_XPE
trunk ports are displayed as follows:
•
Trunk 1 and Trunk 2 on the faceplate
•
21-1 and 22-1 on CTC
•
21 (Trunk) and 22 (Trunk) on the Optics Thresholds table
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9.11.2 Faceplate and Block Diagram
Figure 9-27 shows the 10GE_XP faceplate and block diagram. The 10 GE_XPE faceplate and block
diagram looks the same.
Figure 9-27
10GE_XP and 10GE_XPE Faceplates and Block Diagram
10GE
XP
FAIL
ACT
SF
Power supply
Clocking
RX
1
TX
MPC8270 core
XAUI
to
SF14
RX
2
TX
CLIENT
Client
Ports 1-2
10GE
HAZARD
LEVEL 1
XFP
COMPLIES WITH
21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11
EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS
PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE
No.50, DATED
JULY 26, 2001
BCM 5650x
with
Ethernet ASIC
SERDES
XFP WDM
SCL FPGA
XAUI
SERDES
TX
XFP
XAUI
SERDES
FEC
RX
1
XAUI
to
SF14
SERDES
XFP WDM
159053
FEC
RX
2
TX
T RUNK
Trunk
Ports 1-2
10GE
CONSOLE
MAX INPUT
POWER LEVEL
CLIENT: +3dBm
TRUNK: +1dBm
159053
!
The 10GE_XP and 10GE_XPE card trunk ports are displayed as follows:
•
Trunk 1 and Trunk 2 on the faceplate
•
3-1 and 4-1 on CTC
•
3 (Trunk) and 4 (Trunk) on the Optics Thresholds table
For information on safety labels for the cards, see the “9.2.2 Class 1M Laser Product Cards” section on
page 9-6.
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9.11.3 Client Interface
Caution
You must use a 20-dB fiber attenuator (15 to 25 dB) when working with the cards in a loopback on the
trunk port. Do not use direct fiber loopbacks with the cards. Using direct fiber loopbacks causes
irreparable damage to the GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards.
9.11.3 Client Interface
The client interface is implemented with separately orderable SFP or XFP modules. The client interfaces
support the following tri-rate SFPs and XFPs using dual LC connectors and multimode fiber:
•
SFP- GE/1G-FC/2G-FC - 850 nm - MM - LC (PID ONS-SE-G2F-SX)
•
SFP - GE/1G-FC/2G-FC 1300 nm - SM - LC (PID ONS-SE-G2F-LX)
•
SFP - GE/1G-FC/2G-FC 1300 nm - SM - LC (PID ONS-SE-G2F-ZX)
•
SFP - 10/100/1000Base-T - Copper (PID ONS-SE-ZE-EL) Intra office up to 100;
Cable: RJ45 STP CAT5, CAT5E, and CAT6
The client interfaces support the following dual-rate XFP using dual LC connectors and single-mode
fiber:
•
XFP - OC-192/STM-64/10GE/10-FC/OTU2 - 1310 SR - SM LC (PID: ONS-XC-10G-S1)
The client interfaces support the following multimode XFP using dual LC connectors and multi-mode
fiber:
•
Note
XFP - OC-192/10GFC/10GE - 850 nm MM LC (PID ONS-XC-10G-SR-MM)
On GE_XP card, the copper Pluggable Port Module (PPM) interface can auto-negotiate and carry traffic
even when the peer interface operates at rates other than 1000 Mbps.
9.11.4 GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE Card-Level Indicators
Table 9-34 describes the three card-level LEDs on the GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE
cards.
Table 9-34
GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LED
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready. This LED
is on during reset. The FAIL LED flashes during the boot process. Replace the
card if the red FAIL LED persists.
ACT LED
If the ACT LED is green, the card is operational (one or more ports active) and
ready to carry traffic.
Green (Active)
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates that a signal failure or condition such as LOS,
LOF, or high BERs is present one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF
LED is also on if the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. If
the fibers are properly connected and the link is working, the light turns off.
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9.11.5 GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE Port-Level Indicators
9.11.5 GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE Port-Level Indicators
Table 9-35 describes the port-level LEDs on the GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards.
Table 9-35
GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE Port-Level Indicators
Port-Level LED
Description
Port LEDs
Green—The client port is either in service and receiving a recognized signal
(that is, no signal fail), or Out of Service and Maintenance (OOS,MT or
locked, maintenance) in which case the signal fail and alarms will be ignored.
Green/Red/Amber/Off
Red—The client port is in service but is receiving a signal fail (LOS).
Amber—The port is provisioned and in a standby state.
Off—The SFP is either not provisioned, out of service, not properly inserted,
or the SFP hardware has failed.
Green DWDM LED
Green—The green DWDM LED indicates that the DWDM port is in service
and receiving a recognized signal (that is, no signal fail), or Out of Service and
Maintenance (OOS,MT or locked, maintenance) in which case the signal fail
and alarms will be ignored.
Red—The client port is in service but is receiving a signal fail (LOS).
Amber—The port is provisioned and in a standby state.
Off—The SFP is either not provisioned, out of service, not properly inserted,
or the SFP hardware has failed.
9.11.6 DWDM Trunk Interface
The GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards have two 10 Gigabit Ethernet trunk ports
operating at 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10.3125 Gbps) or 10 Gigabit Ethernet into OTU2 (nonstandard
11.0957 Gbps). The ports are compliant with ITU-T G.707, ITU-T G.709, and Telcordia GR-253-CORE
standards. The ports are capable of carrying C-band and L-band wavelengths through insertion of
DWDM XFPs. Forty channels are available in the 1550-nm C band 100-GHz ITU grid, and forty
channels are available in the L band.
The maximum system reach in filterless applications without the use of optical amplification or
regenerators is nominally rated at 23 dB over C-SMF fiber. This rating is not a product specification, but
is given for informational purposes. It is subject to change.
9.11.7 Configuration Management
The GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards support the following configuration
management parameters:
•
Port name—User-assigned text string.
•
Admin State/Service State—Administrative and service states to manage and view port status.
•
MTU—Provisionable maximum transfer unit (MTU) to set the maximum number of bytes per
frames accepted on the port.
•
Mode—Provisional port mode, either Autonegotiation or the port speed.
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9.11.8 Security
Note
•
Flow Control—Flow control according to IEEE 802.1x pause frame specification can be enabled or
disabled for TX and RX ports.
•
Bandwidth—Provisionable maximum bandwidth allowed for the port.
•
Ingress CoS—Assigns a CoS value to the port from 0 (highest) to 7 (lowest) and accepts CoS of
incoming frames.
•
Egress QoS—Defines the QoS capabilities at the egress port.
•
NIM—Defines the port network interface management type based on Metro Ethernet Forum
specifications. Ports can be defined as UNI or NNI.
•
MAC Learning—MAC address learning to facilitate switch processing.
•
VLAN tagging provided according to the IEEE 802.1Q standard.
When the GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards are provisioned in a MXP or TXP mode,
only the following parameters are available: Port Name, State, MTU, Mode, Flow control, and
Bandwidth.
9.11.8 Security
GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE card ports can be provisioned to block traffic from a
user-defined set of MAC addresses. The remaining traffic is normally switched. You can manually
specify the set of blocked MAC addresses for each port. Each port of the card can receive traffic from a
limited predefined set of MAC addresses. The remaining traffic will be dropped. This capability is a
subset of the Cisco IOS “Port Security” feature.
9.11.9 Card Protection
The following section describes various card protection schemes available for the GE_XP, 10GE_XP,
GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards.
9.11.9.1 1+1 Protection
1+1 protection of GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards is provided in the Layer 2 (L2)
card mode to protect against client port and card failure.
1+1 protection is supported in both single shelf and multishelf setup. This means that the working card
can be in one shelf and the protect card can be in another shelf of a multishelf setup. Communication
between the two cards is across 10 Gigabit Ethernet interconnection interface using Ethernet packets.
The Inter link (ILK) trunk or internal pathcord must be provisioned on both the cards. This link is used
to transmit protection switching messages and data. For information on how to provision ILK or internal
patchcords, refer Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
Note
With 1+1 protection mechanisms, the switch time of a copper SFP is 1 second.
With 1+1 protection, ports on the protect card can be assigned to protect the corresponding ports on the
working card. A working card must be paired with a protect card of the same type and number of ports.
The protection takes place on the port level, and any number of ports on the protect card can be assigned
to protect the corresponding ports on the working card.
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9.11.9 Card Protection
To make the 1+1 protection scheme fully redundant, enable L2 protection for the entire VLAN ring. This
enables Fast Automatic Protection Switch (FAPS). The VLAN configured on the 1+1 port must be
configured as protected SVLAN. For information on how to enable FAPS, see Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Procedure Guide.
1+1 protection can be either revertive or nonrevertive. With nonrevertive 1+1 protection, when a failure
occurs and the signal switches from the working card to the protect card, the signal remains on the
protect card until it is manually changed. Revertive 1+1 protection automatically switches the signal
back to the working card when the working card comes back online. 1+1 protection uses trunk ports to
send control traffic between working and protect cards. This trunk port connection is known as ILK trunk
ports and can be provisioned via CTC. For information on how to provision an ILK link, see “DLP-G460
Provision an ILK Link” in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
The standby port can be configured to turn ON or OFF but the traffic coming to and from the standby
port will be down. If the laser is ON at the standby port, the other end port (where traffic originates) will
not be down in a parallel connection. Traffic is blocked on the standby port.
1+1 protection is bidirectional and nonrevertive by default; revertive switching can be provisioned using
CTC. For information on how to provision the cards, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure
Guide.
9.11.9.2 Y-Cable Protection
The GE_XP and GE_XPE cards support Y-cable protection when they are provisioned in 10 Gigabit
Ethernet or 20 Gigabit Ethernet MXP card mode. The 10GE_XP and 10GE_XPE cards support Y-cable
protection when they are provisioned in 10GE TXP card mode. Two cards can be joined in a Y-cable
protection group with one card assigned as the working card and the other defined as the protection card.
This protection mechanism provides redundant bidirectional paths. See the “9.14.1 Y-Cable Protection”
section on page 9-90 for more detailed information. The Y-cable protection mechanism is provisionable
and can be set ON or OFF (OFF is the default mode). When a signal fault is detected (LOS, LOF, SD,
or SF on the DWDM receiver port in the case of ITU-T G.709 mode) the protection mechanism software
automatically switches between paths. Y-cable protection also supports revertive and nonrevertive mode.
9.11.9.3 Layer 2 Over DWDM Protection
When the GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, or 10GE_XPE cards are in L2 over DWDM card mode,
protection is handled by the hardware at the Layer 1 and Layer 2 levels. Fault detection and failure
propagation is communicated through the ITU-T G.709 frame overhead bytes. For protected VLANs,
traffic is flooded around the 10 Gigabit Ethernet DWDM ring. To set up the Layer 2 protection, you
identify a node and the GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, or 10GE_XPE port that is to serve as the master
node and port for the VLAN ring on the card view Provisioning > Protection tab (Figure 9-28). If a
failure occurs, the node and port are responsible for opening and closing VLAN loops.
Note
The Forced option in the Protection drop-down list converts all the SVLANs to protected SVLANs
irrespective of the SVLAN protection configuration in the SVLAN database. This is applicable to a
point-to-point linear topology. The SVLAN protection must be forced to move all SVLANs, including
protected and unprotected SVLANs, to the protect path irrespective of provisioned SVLAN attributes.
A FAPS switchover happens in the following failure scenarios:
•
DWDM line failures caused by a fiber cut
•
Unidirectional failure in the DWDM network caused by a fiber cut
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9.11.10 IGMP Snooping
•
Fiber pull on the master card trunk port followed by a hard reset on the master card
•
Hard reset on the master card
•
Hard reset on the slave card
•
An OTN failure is detected (LOS, OTUK-LOF, OTUK-LOM, or OTUK-LOM on the DWDM
receiver port in the case of ITU-T G.709 mode)
•
Trunk ports are moved to OOS,DSBLD (Locked,disabled) state
•
Improper removal of XFPs
A FAPS switchover does not happen in the following scenarios:
•
Slave card trunk port in OOS,DSBLD (Locked,disabled) state followed by a hard reset of the slave
card
•
OTN alarms raised on the slave card trunk port followed by a hard reset of the slave card
Figure 9-28
Provisioning L2 Over DWDM on GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, or 10GE_XPE Cards
9.11.10 IGMP Snooping
As networks increase in size, multicast routing becomes critically important as a means to determine
which segments require multicast traffic and which do not. IP multicasting allows IP traffic to be
propagated from one source to a number of destinations, or from many sources to many destinations.
Rather than sending one packet to each destination, one packet is sent to the multicast group identified
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9.11.10 IGMP Snooping
by a single IP destination group address. GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards can learn
upto a maximum of 1024 multicast groups. This includes groups on all the VLANs.
Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) snooping restricts the flooding of multicast traffic by
forwarding multicast traffic to those interfaces where a multicast device is present.
When the GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, or 10GE_XPE card receives an IGMP leave group message from
a host, it removes the host port from the multicast forwarding table after generating group specific
queries to ensure that no other hosts interested in traffic for the particular group are present on that port.
Even in the absence of any “leave” message, the cards have a timeout mechanism to update the group
table with the latest information. After a card relays IGMP queries from the multicast router, it deletes
entries periodically if it does not receive any IGMP membership reports from the multicast clients.
In a multicast router, general queries are sent on a VLAN when Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM)
is enabled on the VLAN. The GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, or 10GE_XPE card forwards queries to all
ports belonging to the VLAN. All hosts interested in this multicast traffic send Join requests and are
added to the forwarding table entry. The Join requests are forwarded only to router ports. By default,
these router ports are learned dynamically. However, they can also be statically configured at the port
level in which case the static configuration overrides dynamic learning.
The GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards support IGMP snooping V2 as specified in
RFC 4541.
Note
The GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards can interoperate with V1 hosts. IGMPV3
snooping is not supported and the packets are flooded in the SVLAN. Layer 2 multicast groups learned
through IGMP snooping are dynamic.
GE_XP and 10GE_XP cards can support IGMP snooping on 128 stacked VLANs and GE_XPE and
10GE_XPE cards can support up to 256 stacked VLANs that are enabled. IGMP snooping can be
configured on a per SVLAN basis. By default, the feature is disabled on all SVLANs.
Note
When IGMP snooping is enabled on double-tagged packets, CVLAN has to be the same on all ports
attached to the same SVLAN.
Note
When IGMP snooping is working with Fast Automatic Protection Switch (FAPS) in a ring based setup,
it is advisable to configure all NNI ports as static router ports. This minimizes the multicast traffic hit
when a FAPS switchover occurs.
The following conditions are raised from IGMP snooping at the card:
•
MCAST-MAC-TABLE-FULL—This condition is raised when the multicast table is full and a new
join request is received. This table is cleared when at least one entry gets cleared from the multicast
table after the alarm is raised.
•
MCAST-MAC-ALIASING—This condition is raised when there are multiple L3 addresses that map
to the same L2 address in a VLAN. This is a transient condition.
For more information on severity level of these conditions and procedure to clear these alarms, refer to
the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting Guide.
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9.11.10 IGMP Snooping
9.11.10.1 Fast-Leave Processing
Note
Fast-Leave processing is also known as Immediate-Leave.
IGMP snooping Fast-Leave processing allows the GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, or 10GE_XPE to
remove an interface that sends a leave message from the forwarding table without first sending group
specific queries to the interface. When you enable IGMP Fast-Leave processing, the card immediately
removes a port from the IP multicast group when it detects an IGMP, version 2 (IGMPv2) leave message
on that port.
9.11.10.2 Static Router Port Configuration
Multicast-capable ports are added to the forwarding table for every IP multicast entry. The card learns
of such ports through the PIM method.
9.11.10.3 Report Suppression
Report suppression is used to avoid a storm of responses to an IGMP query. When this feature is enabled,
a single IGMP report is sent to each multicast group in response to a single query. Whenever an IGMP
snooping report is received, report suppression happens if the report suppression timer is running. The
Report suppression timer is started when the first report is received for a general query. Then this time
is set to the response time specified in general query.
9.11.10.4 IGMP Statistics and Counters
An entry in a counter contains multicasting statistical information for the IGMP snooping capable
GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, or 10GE_XPE card. It provides statistical information about IGMP
messages that have been transmitted and received. IGMP statistics and counters can be viewed via CTC
from the Performance > Ether Ports > Statistics tab.
This information can be stored in the following counters:
•
cisTxGeneralQueries—Number of general queries transmitted through an interface.
•
cisTxGroupSpecificQueries—Total group specific queries transmitted through an interface.
•
cisTxReports—Total membership reports transmitted through an interface.
•
cisTxLeaves—Total Leave messages transmitted through an interface.
•
cisRxGeneralQueries—Total general queries received at an interface.
•
cisRxGroupSpecificQueries—Total Group Specific Queries received at an interface.
•
cisRxReports—Total Membership Reports received at an interface.
•
cisRxLeaves—Total Leave messages received at an interface.
•
cisRxValidPackets—Total valid IGMP packets received at an interface.
•
cisRxInvalidPackets—Total number of packets that are not valid IGMP messages received at an
interface.
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9.11.11 Multicast VLAN Registration
9.11.11 Multicast VLAN Registration
Multicast VLAN Registration (MVR) is designed for applications using wide-scale deployment of
multicast traffic across an Ethernet-ring-based service provider network (for example, the broadcast of
multiple television channels over a service-provider network). MVR allows a subscriber on a port to
subscribe and unsubscribe to a multicast stream on the network-wide multicast VLAN. It allows the
single multicast VLAN to be shared in the network while subscribers remain in separate VLANs. MVR
provides the ability to continuously send multicast streams in the multicast VLAN, but to isolate the
streams from the subscriber VLANs for bandwidth and security reasons.
MVR assumes that subscriber ports subscribe and unsubscribe (“Join” and “Leave”) these multicast
streams by sending out IGMP Join and Leave messages. These messages can originate from an IGMP
version-2-compatible host with an Ethernet connection. MVR operates on the underlying mechanism of
IGMP snooping. MVR works only when IGMP snooping is enabled.
The card identifies the MVR IP multicast streams and their associated MAC addresses in the card
forwarding table, intercepts the IGMP messages, and modifies the forwarding table to include or remove
the subscriber as a receiver of the multicast stream, even though the receivers is in a different VLAN
than the source. This forwarding behavior selectively allows traffic to cross between different VLANs.
Note
When MVR is configured, the port facing the router must be configured as NNI in order to allow the
router to generate or send multicast stream to the host with the SVLAN. If router port is configured as
UNI, the MVR will not work properly.
9.11.12 MAC Address Learning
The GE_XPE and 10 GE_XPE cards support 32K MAC addresses. MAC address learning can be enabled
or disabled per SVLAN on GE_XPE and 10 GE_XPE cards. The cards learn the MAC address of packets
they receive on each port and adds the MAC address and its associated port number to the MAC address
learning table. As stations are added or removed from the network, the GE_XPE and 10 GE_XPE cards
update the MAC address learning table, adding new dynamic addresses and aging out those that are
currently not in use.
MAC address learning can be enabled or disabled per SVLAN. When the configuration is changed from
enable to disable, all the related MAC addresses are cleared. The following conditions apply:
•
If MAC address learning is enabled on per-port basis, the MAC address learning is not enabled on
all VLANs, but only on VLANs that have MAC address learning enabled.
•
If per-port MAC address learning is disabled then the MAC address learning is disabled on all
VLANs, even if it is enabled on some of the VLAN supported by the port.
•
If the per port MAC address learning is configured on GE-XP and 10 GE-XP cards, before upgrading
to GE-XPE or 10 GE-XPE cards, enable MAC address learning per SVLAN. Not doing so disables
MAC address learning.
9.11.13 Link Integrity
The GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE card support end-to-end Ethernet link integrity. This
capability is integral to providing an Ethernet private line service and correct operation of Layer 2 and
Layer 3 protocols on the attached Ethernet devices.
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9.11.14 Ingress CoS
The link integrity feature propagates a trunk fault on all the affected SVLAN circuits in order to squelch
the far end client interface. Ethernet-Advanced IP Services (E-AIS) packets are generated on a
per-port/SVLAN basis. An E-AIS format is compliant with ITU Y.1731.
Note
E-AIS packets are marked with a CoS value of 7 (also called .1p bits). Ensure that the network is not
overloaded and there is sufficient bandwidth for this queue in order to avoid packet drops.
When link integrity is enabled on a per-port SVLAN basis, E-AIS packets are generated when the
following alarms are raised;
•
LOS-P
•
OTUKLOF/LOM
•
SIGLOSS
•
SYNCHLOSS
•
OOS
•
PPM not present
When link integrity is enabled, GE_XP and 10 GE_XP card supports up to128 SVLANs and GE_XPE,
10 GE_XPE can support up to 256 SVLANs.
9.11.14 Ingress CoS
Ingress CoS functionality enables differentiated services across the GE_XPE and 10GE_XPE cards. A
wide range of networking requirements can be provisioned by specifying the class of service applicable
to each transmitted traffic.
When a CVLAN is configured as ingress CoS, the per-sport settings are not considered. A maximum of
128 CVLAN and CoS relationships can be configured.
9.12 ADM-10G Card
The ADM-10G card operates on ONS 15454 SONET, ONS 15454 SDH, and DWDM networks to carry
optical signals and Gigabit Ethernet signals over DWDM wavelengths for transport. The card aggregates
lower bit-rate client SONET or SDH signals (OC-3/STM-1, OC-12/STM-4, OC-48/STM-16, or Gigabit
Ethernet) onto a C-band tunable DWDM trunk operating at a higher OC-192/STM-64 rate. In a DWDM
network, the ADM-10G card transports traffic over DWDM by mapping Gigabit Ethernet and SONET
or SDH circuits onto the same wavelength with multiple protection options.
The ADM-10G card is a double-slot card that can be installed in Slots 1 through 5 or 12 through 16 in
standard and high-density ONS 15454 ANSI shelves (15454-SA-ANSI or 15454-SA-HD), the ETSI
ONS 15454 standard shelf assembly, or the ONS 15454 ETSI high-density shelf assembly. Installation
is supported in any of these slots.
Note
The recommended slots are 1, 3, 5 and 12, 14, 16.
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9.12.1 Key Features
Caution
Fan-tray assembly 15454E-CC-FTA (ETSI shelf)/15454-CC-FTA (ANSI shelf) must be installed in a
shelf where the ADM-10G card is installed.
The card is compliant with ITU-T G.825 and ITU-T G.783 for SDH signals. It supports concatenated
and nonconcatenated AU-4 mapped STM-1, STM-4, and STM-16 signals as specified in ITU-T G.707.
The card also complies with Section 5.6 of Telcordia GR-253-CORE and supports synchronous
transport signal (STS) mapped OC-3, OC-12, and OC-48 signals as specified in the standard.
The client SFP and trunk XFP are compliant with interface requirements in Telcordia GR-253-CORE,
ITU-T G.957 and/or ITU-T G.959.1, and IEEE 802.3.
9.12.1 Key Features
The ADM-10G card has the following high-level features:
•
Operates with the TCC2 or TCC2P.
•
Interoperable with TXP_MR_10E and TXP_MR_10E_C cards.
•
Has built-in OC-192/STM-64 add/drop multiplexing function including client, trunk, and STS
cross-connect.
•
Supports both single-card and double-card (ADM-10G peer group) configuration.
•
Supports path protection/SNCP on client and trunk ports for both single-card and double-card
configuration. The card does not support path protection/SNCP between a client port and a trunk
port. Path protection/SNCP is supported only between two client ports or two trunk ports.
•
Supports 1+1 protection on client ports for double-card configuration only.
•
Supports SONET, SDH, and Gigabit Ethernet protocols on client SFPs.
•
Supports XFP DWDM trunk interface single wavelengths.
•
Returns zero bit errors when a TCC2 or TCC2P card switches from active to standby or when manual
or forced protection switches occur.
•
Has 16 SFP-based client interfaces (gray, colored, and coarse wavelength division multiplexing
(CWDM) optics available).
•
Supports STM1, STM4, STM16, and Gigabit Ethernet client signals (8 Gigabit Ethernet maximum).
•
Has one XFP-based trunk interface supporting E-FEC/FEC and ITU-T G.709 for double-card
configuration.
•
Has two SR XFP interlink interfaces supporting redundancy connection with protection board and
pass-through traffic for double-card configuration.
•
Supports frame-mapped generic framing procedure (GFP-F) mapping for Ethernet over SONET or
SDH.
•
Can be installed or pulled from operation, in any slot, without impacting other service cards in the
shelf.
•
Supports client to client hairpinning, that is, creation of circuits between two client ports for both
single-card and double-card configuration. See the “9.12.11 Circuit Provisioning” section on
page 9-79 for more detailed information.
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9.12.2 GFP Interoperability
9.12.2 GFP Interoperability
The ADM-10G card defaults to GFP-F encapsulation that is compliant with ITU-T G.7041. This mode
allows the card to operate with ONS 15310-CL, ONS 15310-MA, ONS 15310-MA SDH, or ONS 15454
data cards (for example, ONS 15454 CE100T-8 or ML1000-2 cards). GFP encapsulation also allows the
ADM-10G card to interoperate with other vendors’ Gigabit Ethernet interfaces that adhere to the
ITU-T G.7041 standard.
9.12.3 Faceplate
Figure 9-29 shows the ADM-10G card faceplate.
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9.12.4 Port Configuration Rules
Figure 9-29
ADM-10G Card Faceplate and Block Diagram
ADM-10G
FAIL
HAZARD
LEVEL 1
ACT
SFP
TX
14
SFP
15
SFP
16
SFP
12
SFP
11
SFP
RX
10
SFP
TX
9
SFP
8
SFP
7
SFP
6
SFP
5
SFP
RX
4
SFP
3
SFP
2
SFP
1
SFP
13
TX
TX
TX
RX
TX
TX
15
16
TX
TX
RX
TX
TX
XFP
DWDM
TRUNK
12 x OC3/OC12
or 12 x STM1/STM4
10xGE MAC
10G GFP-over
SONET/SDH
framer
19
CPU -Core
STS-1
cross-connect
10G SONET/SDH
framer-pointer
processor 2
G.709 -FEC
framer 1
10G SONET/SDH
framer-pointer
processor 4
10G SONET/SDH
framer-pointer
processor 3
G.709 -FEC
framer 2
TX
VCAT
RLDR
RX
alarm
cpld
alarm
cpld
Main board
Daughter card
ILK
XFP
ILK
XFP
17
18
250482
COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10
AND 1040.11 EXCEPT FOR
DEVIATIONS PURSUANT TO
LASER NOTICE No.50,
DATED JULY 26, 2001
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
RX
8
9
10
11
TRK1
SCL
FPGA
switch
12
4 x OC48/STM16
10G SONET/SDH
4 x OC3/OC12 or
framer-pointer
4 x STM1/STM4
processor
TRK2/ILK2
RX
7
RX
6
RX
5
RX
RX
RX
TX
14
3
4
RX
RX
RX
13
TX
TX
TX
ILK1
switch
2
1
SF
9.12.4 Port Configuration Rules
ADM-10G card client and trunk port capacities are shown in Figure 9-30.
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9.12.5 Client Interfaces
ADM-10G Card Port Capacities
STM4/STM1
STM4/STM1
STM4/STM1
STM4/STM1
STM4/STM1
STM4/STM1
Gray SFP
Gray SFP
Gray SFP
Gray SFP
Gray SFP
Gray SFP
1
2
3
4
5
6
GE or OC12/OC3 or STM4/STM1
GE or OC12/OC3 or STM4/STM1
STM4/STM1
OC12/OC3
STM4/STM1
OC12/OC3
STM4/STM1
OC12/OC3
STM4/STM1
OC12/OC3
Gray SFP
Gray SFP
Gray SFP
Gray SFP
Gray SFP
Gray SFP
7
ILK2/
*Gray/
*OTU2/OC192/STM64
8 TRK2(18) DWDM XFP
9
10
11
TRK1
DWDM XFP OTU2/OC192/STM64
(19)
12
GE
GE
GE
GE
GE
GE
or
or
or
or
or
or
OC12/OC3
OC12/OC3
OC12/OC3
OC12/OC3
OC12/OC3
OC12/OC3
or
or
or
or
or
or
ILK1
(17)
Gray XFP
OC192/STM64
13
14
15
16
Gray SFP
Gray SFP
Gray SFP
Gray SFP
OC48/OC12/OC3
OC48/OC12/OC3
OC48/OC12/OC3
OC48/OC12/OC3
or
or
or
or
STM16/STM4/STM1
STM16/STM4/STM1
STM16/STM4/STM1
STM16/STM4/STM1
250481
Figure 9-30
*DWDM XFP and OTU2 is supported only when
Port 18 is configured as a trunk interface.
9.12.5 Client Interfaces
The ADM-10G card uses LC optical port connectors and, as shown in Figure 9-30, supports up to
16 SFPs that can be utilized for OC-N/STM-N traffic. Eight of the SFPs can be used for Gigabit Ethernet.
The interfaces can support any mix of OC-3/STM-1, OC-12/STM-4, OC-48/STM-16, or Gigabit
Ethernet of any reach, such as SX, LX, ZX, SR, IR, or LR. The interfaces support a capacity of:
•
4 x OC-48/STM-16
•
16 x OC-12/STM-4
•
16 x OC-3/STM-1
•
8 x GE
The supported client SFPs are:
•
Gray SFPs
– 1000Base-SX SFP 850 nm (ONS-SE-G2F-SX=)
– 1000Base-LX SFP 1310 nm (ONS-SE-G2F-LX=)
– OC48/STM16 IR1, OC12/STM4 SR1, OC3/STM1 SR1, GE-LX multirate SFP 1310 nm
(ONS-SE-Z1=)
– OC3/STM1 IR1, OC12/STM4 IR1 multirate SFP 1310 nm (ONS-SI-622-I1=)
– OC48/STM16 SR1 SFP 1310 nm (ONS-SI-2G-S1=)
– OC48/STM16 IR1 SFP 1310 nm (ONS-SI-2G-I1=)
– OC48/STM16, 1550 LR2, SM LC (ONS-SE-2G-L2=)
•
Colored DWDM SFPs
– 1000Base-ZX SFP 1550 nm (ONS-SI-GE-ZX=)
– OC3/STM1 LR2 SFP 1550 nm (ONS-SI-155-L2=)
– OC48/STM16 LR2 SFP 1550 nm (ONS-SI-2G-L2=)
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9.12.6 Interlink Interfaces
– OC48/STM16 SFP (ONS-SC-2G-xx.x)
Note
•
xx.x = 28.7 to 60.6. ONS-SC-2G-28.7, ONS-SC-2G-33.4, ONS-SC-2G-41.3,
ONS-SC-2G-49.3, and ONS-SC-2G-57.3 are supported from Release 8.5 and later.
CWDM SFPs
– OC48/STM16/GE CWDM SFP (ONS-SC-Z3-xxxx)
9.12.6 Interlink Interfaces
Two 2R interlink interfaces, called ILK1 (Port 17) and ILK2 (Port 18), are provided for creation of
ADM-10G peer groups in double-card configuration. In a single-card configuration, Port 18 must be
configured as a trunk interface (OC-192/STM-64 or OTU2 payload) and in a double-card configuration
(ADM-10G peer group), Port 18 must be configured as an ILK2 interface. Physically cabling these ports
between two ADM-10G cards, located on the same shelf, allows you to configure them as an ADM-10G
peer group.The ILK ports carry 10G of traffic each.
The interlink interfaces support STM64 SR1 (ONS-XC-10G-S1=) XFP and 10GE BASE SR
(ONS-XC-10G-SR-MM=) XFPs.
9.12.7 DWDM Trunk Interface
The ADM-10G card supports OC-192/STM-64 signal transport and ITU-T G.709 digital wrapper
according to the ITU-T G.709 standard. It supports two DWDM trunk XFPs in a single-card
configuration and one DWDM trunk XFP in a double-card configuration.
The supported DWDM trunk XFPs are:
•
10G DWDM (ONS-XC-10G-xx.x=) (colored XFP)
•
STM64 SR1 (ONS-XC-10G-S1=) (gray XFP)
9.12.8 Configuration Management
When using OC-48/STM-16 traffic, some contiguous port configurations, listed in Table 9-36, are
unavailable due to hardware limitations. This limitation does not impact the Gigabit Ethernet payload.
Note
The ADM-10G card cannot be used in the same shelf with SONET or SDH cross-connect cards.
Table 9-36
OC-48/STM-16 Configuration Limitations
OC-48/STM-16 Port Number
Ports Restricted from Optical Traffic
OC-48/STM-16 on Port 13
No OC-N/STM-N on Port 1 through Port 3
OC-48/STM-16 on Port 14
No OC-N/STM-N on Port 4 through Port 6
OC-48/STM-16 on Port 15
No OC-N/STM-N on Port 7 through Port 9
OC-48/STM-16 on Port 16
No OC-N/STM-N on Port 10 through Port 12
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9.12.9 Security
Note
The total traffic rate for each trunk cannot exceed OC-192/STM-64 on each ADM-10G card, or for each
ADM-10G peer group.
Note
Gigabit Ethernet is supported on Ports 1 through 8. Port 11 and Port 12 support only OC-3/STM-1 or
OC-12/STM-4.
Additionally, the following guidelines apply to the ADM-10G card:
Note
•
The trunk port supports OC-192/STM-64 and OTU2.
•
The interlink port supports OC-192/STM-64.
•
Up to six ADM-10G cards can be installed in one shelf.
•
Up to 24 ADM-10G cards can be installed per network element (NE) irrespective of whether the
card is installed in one shelf or multiple shelves.
•
The card can be used in all 15454-SA-ANSI and 15454-SA-HD shelves as well as ETSI ONS 15454
standard and high-density shelves.
•
A lamp test function can be activated from CTC to ensure that all LEDs are functional.
•
The card can operate as a working protected or working nonprotected card.
•
In a redundant configuration, an active card hardware or software failure triggers a switch to the
standby card. This switch is detected within 10 ms and is completed within 50 ms.
•
ADM-10G cards support jumbo frames with MTU sizes of 64 to 10,000 bytes; the maximum is
9,216.
•
After receiving a link or path failure, the ADM-10G card can shut down only the downstream
Gigabit Ethernet port.
In ADM-10G cards, the Gigabit Ethernet port does not support flow control.
9.12.9 Security
The ADM-10G card that an SFP or XFP is plugged into implements the Cisco Standard Security Code
Check Algorithm that keys on vendor ID and serial number.
If a pluggable port module (PPM) is plugged into a port on the card but fails the security code check
because it is not a Cisco PPM, a minor NON-CISCO-PPM alarm is raised.
If a PPM with a nonqualified product ID is plugged into a port on this card—that is, the PPM passes the
security code as a Cisco PPM but it has not been qualified for use on the ADM-10G card, a minor
UNQUAL-PPM alarm is raised.
9.12.10 Protection
The ADM-10G card supports 1+1 and SONET path protection and SDH SNCP protection architectures
in compliance with Telcordia GR-253-CORE, Telcordia GR-1400-CORE, and ITU-T G.841
specifications.
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9.12.11 Circuit Provisioning
9.12.10.1 Circuit Protection Schemes
The ADM-10G card supports path protection/SNCP circuits at the STS/VC4 (high order) level and can
be configured to switch based on signal degrade calculations. The card supports path protection/SNCP
on client and trunk ports for both single-card and double-card configuration. The card does not support
path protection/SNCP between a client port and a trunk port. Path protection/SNCP is supported only
between two client ports or two trunk ports.
The card allows open-ended path protection/SNCP configurations incorporating other vendor
equipment. In an open-ended path protection/SNCP, you can specify one source point and two possible
endpoints (or two possible source points and one endpoint) and the legs can include other vendor
equipment. The source and endpoints are part of the network discovered by CTC.
For detailed information about path protection configurations and SNCPs, refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 Reference Manual.
9.12.10.2 Port Protection Schemes
The ADM-10G card supports 1+1 protection on client ports for double-card configuration (ADM-10G
peer group) only. The card does not support 1+1 protection in single-card configuration. For 1+1 optical
client port protection, you can configure the system to use any pair of like facility interfaces that are on
different cards of the ADM-10G peer group. The 1+1 protection scheme can also work in a
unidirectional (unprotected) way or a bidirectional (protected) way. For information on optical port
protection, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 Reference Manual.
9.12.11 Circuit Provisioning
The ADM-10G card supports STS circuit provisioning both in single-card and double-card (ADM-10G
peer group) configuration. The card allows you to create STS circuits between:
•
Client and trunk ports
•
Two trunk ports
•
Two client ports (client-to-client hairpinning)
Note
Circuits between two trunk ports are called pass-through circuits.
For an ADM-10G card in single-card configuration, if you are creating STS circuits between two client
ports, following limitation must be considered:
•
Gigabit Ethernet to Gigabit Ethernet connections are not supported.
For an ADM-10G card that is part of an ADM-10G peer group, if you are creating STS circuits between
two client ports or between client and trunk ports, the following limitations must be considered:
•
Gigabit Ethernet to Gigabit Ethernet connections are not supported.
•
Optical channel (OC) to OC, OC to Gigabit Ethernet, and Gigabit Ethernet to OC connections
between two peer group cards are supported. Peer group connections use interlink port bandwidth,
hence, depending on the availability/fragmentation of the interlink port bandwidth, it may not be
possible to create an STS circuit from the Gigabit Ethernet/OC client port to the peer card trunk port.
This is because, contiguous STSs (that is, STS-3c, STS-12c, STS-24c, and so on) must be available
on the interlink port for circuit creation.
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9.12.12 Automatic Laser Shutdown
Note
There are no limitations to create an STS circuit between two trunk ports.
The two ADM-10G cards used in a paired mode use interlink ports ILK1 (Port 17) and ILK2 (Port 18).
A CCAT or VCAT circuit created between the peer ADM-10G cards uses the ILK1 port if the source or
destination is Port 19. The circuits created with a single ADM-10G card uses the ILK2 port.
If the circuit is of type STS-nc (where n is an integer and can take values 3,6,9,12,18,24,36,48,96) and
uses the ILK2 port, then the starting timeslot needs to use specific timeslots for traffic to flow. The
timeslots can be 12m+1 for STS-12c circuits and 48m+1 (where m is an integer and can take values
0,1,2,3...) for STS-48c circuits. The timeslots can be 3m+1 for the other STS-nc circuits.
The following example illustrates how to use the correct timeslot for an ILK2 port:
If there is no circuit on the ILK2 port and a STS-3c circuit is created, the circuit uses timeslots 1 to 3.
An STS-12c circuit must be created on the ILK2 port later. The STS-12c circuit must have used timeslots
4 to 15. However, the STS-12c circuit uses timeslots starting from 12m+1 (1, 13, 25, and so on) as
defined in the above rule. Therefore, before creating the STS-12c circuit, dummy circuits must be
created in CTC that consumes STS-9 bandwidth.
9.12.12 Automatic Laser Shutdown
The ALS procedure is supported on both client and trunk interfaces. On the client interface, ALS is
compliant with ITU-T G.664 (6/99). On the data application and trunk interface, the switch on and off
pulse duration is greater than 60 seconds. The on and off pulse duration is user-configurable. For details
on ALS provisioning for the card, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
9.12.13 ADM-10G Card-Level Indicators
Table 9-37 describes the card-level LEDs on the ADM-10G card.
Table 9-37
ADM-10G Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LED
Description
ACT LED
Green indicates that the card is operational (one or both ports active) and
ready to carry traffic.
Green (Active)
Amber (Standby)
Amber indicates that the card is operational and in standby (protect) mode.
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready. This LED
is on during reset. The FAIL LED flashes during the boot process. It the card
is inserted in a slot that is preprovisioned for a different card, this LED
flashes until a Missing Equipment Attribute (MEA) condition is raised. You
might also need to replace the card if the red FAIL LED persists.
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS, LOF,
or high BER errors on one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED is
also on if the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. If the
fibers are properly connected and the link is working, the light turns off.
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9.12.14 ADM-10G Card Port-Level Indicators
9.12.14 ADM-10G Card Port-Level Indicators
Table 9-38 describes the port-level LEDs on the ADM-10G card.
Note
Client or trunk ports can each be in active or standby mode as defined in the related section for each
specific protection type. For example, fiber-switched protection has active or standby trunk ports; 1+1
APS protection has active or standby client ports, and client 1+1 protection does not utilize active or
standby ports.
Table 9-38
ADM-10G Card Port-Level LED Indications
Port-Level Status
The port-level LED is
active and unprotected.
The port-level LED is in
standby.
Tri-color LED Description
•
If a port is in OOS/locked state for any reason, the LED is turned off.
•
If a port is in IS/unlocked state and the PPM is preprovisioned or is
physically equipped with no alarms, the LED is green.
•
If a port is in IS state and the PPM is physically equipped but does have
alarms, the LED is red.
•
If a port is in OOS/locked state for any reason, the LED is turned off.
•
If a port is in the IS/unlocked state and the PPM is preprovisioned or is
physically equipped with no alarms, the LED is amber.
•
If a port is in IS state and physically equipped but does have alarms, the
LED is red.
9.13 OTU2_XP Card
The OTU2_XP card is a four-port, XFP-based multirate (OC-192/STM-64, 10GE, 10G FC) Xponder for
the ONS 15454 ANSI and ETSI platforms. The OTU2_XP card supports multiple configurations.
Table 9-39 describes the different configurations supported by the OTU2_XP card and the ports that
must be used for these configurations.
Table 9-39
OTU2_XP Card Configurations and Ports
Configuration
Port 1
Port 2
Port 3
Port 4
2 x 10G transponder
Client port 1
Client port 2
Trunk port 1
Trunk port 2
2 x 10G standard regenerator
(with enhanced FEC (E-FEC)
only on one port)
Trunk port 1
Trunk port 2
Trunk port 1
Trunk port 2
1 x 10G E-FEC regenerator
(with E-FEC on two ports)
Not used
Not used
Trunk port
Trunk port
1 x 10G splitter protected
transponder
Client port
Not used
Trunk port
(working)
Trunk port
(protect)
All the four ports are ITU-T G.709 compliant and support 40 channels (wavelengths) at 100-GHz
channel spacing in the C-band (that is, the 1530.33 nm to 1561.42 nm wavelength range).
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9.13 OTU2_XP Card
The OTU2_XP card can be installed in Slots 1 through 6 or 12 through 17. The OTU2_XP card is a
single-slot card with four ports. The ports support SONET SR1, IR2, and LR2 XFPs, 10GE BASE SR,
SW, LR, LW, ER, EW, and ZR XFPs, and 10G FC MX-SN-I and SM-LL-L XFPs.
Caution
Fan-tray assembly 15454E-CC-FTA (ETSI shelf)/15454-CC-FTA (ANSI shelf) must be installed in a
shelf where the OTU2_XP card is installed.
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9.13.1 Key Features
9.13.1 Key Features
The OTU2_XP card has the following high-level features:
•
10G transponder, regenerator, and splitter protection capability on the ONS 15454 DWDM
platform.
•
Compatible with the ONS 15454 ANSI high-density shelf assembly, the ETSI ONS 15454 shelf
assembly, and the ETSI ONS 15454 high-density shelf assembly. Compatible with TCC2 and
TCC2P cards.
•
Interoperable with TXP_MR_10E and TXP_MR_10E_C cards.
•
Four port, multirate (OC-192/STM-64, 10G Ethernet WAN Phy, 10G Ethernet LAN Phy, 10G Fibre
Channel) client interface. The client signals are mapped into an ITU-T G.709 OTU2 signal using
standard ITU-T G.709 multiplexing.
•
ITU-T G.709 framing with standard Reed-Soloman (RS) (255,237) FEC. Performance monitoring
and ITU-T G.709 Optical Data Unit (ODU) synchronous mapping. Enhanced FEC (E-FEC) with
ITU-T G.709 ODU with greater than 8 dB coding gain.
•
IEEE 802.3 frame format supported for 10 Gigabit Ethernet interfaces. The minimum frame size is
64 bytes. The maximum frame size is user-provisionable.
•
Supports fixed/no fixed stuff mapping (insertion of stuffing bytes) for 10G Ethernet LAN Phy
signals (only in transponder configuration).
•
Default configuration is transponder, with trunk ports configured as ITU-T G.709 standard FEC.
•
In transponder or regenerator configuration, if one of the ports is configured the corresponding port
is automatically created.
•
In regenerator configuration, only Ports 3 and 4 can be configured as E-FEC. Ports 1 and 2 can be
configured only with standard FEC.
•
When port pair 1-3 or 2-4 is configured as regenerator (that is, card mode is standard regenerator),
the default configuration on Ports 3 and 4 is automatically set to standard FEC.
•
When Ports 3 and 4 are configured as regenerator (that is, card mode is E-FEC regenerator), the
default configuration on both these ports is automatically set to E-FEC.
•
In splitter protected transponder configuration, the trunk ports (Ports 3 and 4) are configured as
ITU-T G.709 standard FEC.
•
Supports protection through Y-cable protection scheme.
•
Client ports support SONET SR1, IR2, and LR2 XFPs, 10GE BASE SR, SW, LR, LW, ER, EW, and
ZR XFPs, and 10G FC MX-SN-I and SM-LL-L XFPs.
•
The MTU setting is used to display the ifInerrors and OverSizePkts counters on the receiving trunk
and client port interfaces. Traffic of frame sizes up to 65535 bytes pass without any packet drops,
from the client port to the trunk port and vice versa irrespective of the MTU setting.
9.13.2 Faceplate and Block Diagram
Figure 9-31 shows the OTU2_XP card faceplate and block diagram.
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9.13.2 Faceplate and Block Diagram
Figure 9-31
OTU2_XP Card Faceplate and Block Diagram
XFP 1
SERDES
SWAN
FPGA
G.709-FEC framer
SERDES
XFP 3
SCL
FPGA
Barile
FPGA
XFP 2
SERDES
G.709-FEC framer
Power supply
XFP 4
Clocking
241984
MPC8360 core
SERDES
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9.13.3 OTU2_XP Card-Level Indicators
9.13.3 OTU2_XP Card-Level Indicators
Table 9-40 describes the card-level LEDs on the OTU2_XP card.
Table 9-40
OTU2_XP Card-Level Indicators
Card-Level LED
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready. This LED
is on during reset. The FAIL LED flashes during the boot process. If the card
is inserted in a slot that is preprovisioned for a different card, this LED
flashes until a Missing Equipment Attribute (MEA) condition is raised. You
might also need to replace the card if the red FAIL LED persists.
ACT LED
If the ACT LED is green, the card is operational (one or more ports active)
and ready to carry traffic.
Green (Active)
Amber SF LED
The amber SF LED indicates a signal failure or condition such as LOS, LOF,
or high BER errors on one or more of the card’s ports. The amber SF LED is
also on if the transmit and receive fibers are incorrectly connected. If the
fibers are properly connected and the link is working, the light turns off.
9.13.4 OTU2_XP Port-Level Indicators
Table 9-41 describes the PPM port-level LEDs on the OTU2_XP card for both client and trunk ports.
Note
Client or trunk ports can each be in active or standby mode as defined in the related section for each
specific protection type. For example, fiber-switched protection has active or standby trunk ports; 1+1
APS protection has active or standby client ports, and client 1+1 protection does not utilize active or
standby ports.
Table 9-41
OTU2_XP PPM Port-Level Indicators
Port-Level Status
The port-level LED is
active and unprotected.
The port-level LED is in
standby.
Tri-color LED Description
•
If a port is in OOS/locked state for any reason, the LED is turned off.
•
If a port is in IS/unlocked state and the PPM is preprovisioned or is
physically equipped with no alarms, the LED is green.
•
If a port is in IS state and the PPM is physically equipped but does have
alarms, the LED is red.
•
If a port is in OOS/locked state for any reason, the LED is turned off.
•
If a port is in the IS/unlocked state and the PPM is preprovisioned or is
physically equipped with no alarms, the LED is amber.
•
If a port is in IS state and physically equipped but does have alarms, the
LED is red.
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9.13.5 OTU2_XP Card Interface
9.13.5 OTU2_XP Card Interface
The OTU2_XP card is a multi-functional card that operates in different configurations, such as
transponder, standard regenerator, E-FEC regenerator, and splitter protected transponder. Depending on
the configuration of the OTU2_XP card, the ports act as client or trunk ports (see Table 9-39). This
section describes the client and trunk rates supported on the OTU2_XP card for different card
configurations.
9.13.5.1 Client Interface
In transponder card configuration, Ports 1 and 2 act as client ports and in splitter protected transponder
configuration, Port 1 acts as a client port. For these card configurations, the client rates supported are:
•
OC-192/STM-64
•
10G Ethernet WAN Phy
•
10G Ethernet LAN Phy
•
10G Fibre Channel
9.13.5.2 Trunk Interface
In transponder and in splitter protected transponder card configuration, Ports 3 and 4 act as trunk ports.
For these card configurations, the trunk rates supported are:
•
OC-192/STM-64
•
10G Ethernet WAN Phy
•
10G Ethernet LAN Phy
•
10G Fibre Channel
•
OTU2 with ITU-T G.709 for OC-192 client interface
•
OTU2e with ITU-T G.709 for 10G Ethernet LAN Phy client interface
In standard regenerator card configuration, all four ports act as trunk ports and in E-FEC regenerator
configuration, Ports 3 and 4 act as the trunk ports. For these card configurations, the trunk rate supported
is:
•
Note
OTU2 G.709
The above mentioned OTU2 signal must be an OC-192/STM-64, 10G Ethernet WAN Phy, 10G Ethernet
LAN Phy, or 10G Fibre Channel signal packaged into an OTU2 G.709 frame. Additionally, the standard
regenerator and E-FEC regenerator configuration supports an OTU2 signal in which the OPU2 has been
generated by multiplexing four ODU1 signals.
9.13.6 Configuration Management
The OTU2_XP card supports the following configuration management parameters:
•
Card Configuration—Provisionable card configuration: Transponder, Standard Regen, Enhanced
FEC, or Mixed.
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9.13.7 OTU2_XP Card Configuration Rules
•
Port Mode—Provisionable port mode when the card configuration is set as Mixed. The port mode
can be chosen as either Transponder or Standard Regen for each port pair (1-3 and 2-4). For card
configurations other than Mixed, CTC automatically sets the port mode depending on the selected
card configuration.
•
Termination Mode—Provisionable termination mode when the card configuration is set as either
Transponder or Mixed. The termination mode can be chosen as Transparent, Section, or Line. For
Standard Regen and Enhanced FEC card configurations, CTC automatically sets the termination
mode as Transparent.
•
AIS/Squelch—Provisionable AIS/Squelch mode configuration when the card configuration is set as
either Transponder or Mixed. The termination mode configuration can be chosen as AIS or Squelch.
For Standard Regen and Enhanced FEC card configurations, CTC automatically sets the termination
mode configuration as AIS.
•
Regen Line Name—User-assigned text string for regeneration line name.
•
ODU Transparency—Provisionable ODU overhead byte configuration, either Transparent Standard
Use or Cisco Extended Use. See the “9.13.10 ODU Transparency” section on page 9-88 for more
detailed information.
•
Port name—User-assigned text string.
•
Admin State/Service State—Administrative and service states to manage and view port status.
•
ALS Mode—Provisionable ALS function.
•
Reach—Provisionable optical reach distance of the port.
•
Wavelength—Provisionable wavelength of the port.
•
AINS Soak—Provisionable automatic in-service soak period.
9.13.7 OTU2_XP Card Configuration Rules
The following rules apply to OTU2_XP card configurations:
•
When you preprovision the card, port pairs 1-3 and 2-4 come up in the default Transponder
configuration.
•
The port pairs 1-3 and 2-4 can be configured in different modes only when the card configuration is
Mixed. If the card configuration is Mixed, you must choose different modes on port pairs 1-3 and
2-4 (that is, one port pair in Transponder mode and the other port pair in Standard Regen mode).
•
If the card is in Transponder configuration, you can change the configuration to Standard Regen or
Enhanced FEC.
•
If the card is in Standard Regen configuration and you have configured only one port pair, then
configuring payload rates for the other port pair will automatically change the card configuration to
Mixed, with the new port pair in Transponder mode.
•
If the card is in Standard Regen configuration, you cannot directly change the configuration to
Enhanced FEC. You have to change to Transponder configuration and then configure the card as
Enhanced FEC.
•
If the card is in Enhanced FEC configuration, Ports 1 and 2 are disabled. Hence, you cannot directly
change the configuration to Standard Regen or Mixed. You must remove the Enhanced FEC group
by moving the card to Transponder configuration, provision PPM on Ports 1 and 2, and then change
the card configuration to Standard Regen or Mixed.
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9.13.8 Security
•
If the card is in Standard Regen or Enhanced FEC configuration, you cannot change the payload rate
of the port pairs. You have to change the configuration to Transponder, change the payload rate, and
then move the card configuration back to Standard Regen or Enhanced FEC.
•
You cannot change the card configuration when any of the affected ports are in IS (ANSI) or
Unlocked-enabled (ETSI) state. The ports must be in OOS,DSBLD (ANSI) or Locked,disabled
(ETSI) service state.
Table 9-42 provides a summary of allowed transitions for the OTU2_XP card configurations.
Table 9-42
Card Configuration Summary
Card
Configuration
Transition To
Transponder
Standard Regen
Enhanced FEC
Mixed
Transponder
—
Yes
Yes
Yes
Standard Regen
Yes
—
No
Yes
Enhanced FEC
Yes
No
—
No
Mixed
Yes
Yes
No
—
9.13.8 Security
The OTU2_XP card, when an XFP is plugged into it, implements the Cisco Standard Security Code
Check Algorithm that keys on vendor ID and serial number.
If a PPM is plugged into a port on the card but fails the security code check because it is not a Cisco
PPM, a NON-CISCO-PPM Not Reported (NR) condition occurs.
If a PPM with a nonqualified product ID is plugged into a port on this card, that is, the PPM passes the
security code as a Cisco PPM but it has not been qualified for use on the OTU2_XP card, a
UNQUAL-PPM NR condition occurs.
9.13.9 Automatic Laser Shutdown
The ALS procedure is supported on both client and trunk interfaces. On the client interface, ALS is
compliant with ITU-T G.664 (6/99). On the data application and trunk interface, the switch on and off
pulse duration is greater than 60 seconds. The on and off pulse duration is user-configurable. For details
on ALS provisioning for the card, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
9.13.10 ODU Transparency
A key feature of the OTU2_XP card is the ability to configure the ODU overhead bytes (EXP bytes and
RES bytes 1 and 2) using the ODU Transparency parameter. The two options available for this parameter
are:
•
Transparent Standard Use—ODU overhead bytes are transparently passed through the card. This
option allows the OTU2_XP card to act transparently between two trunk ports (when the card is
configured in Standard Regen or Enhanced FEC).
•
Cisco Extended Use—ODU overhead bytes are terminated and regenerated on both ports of the
regenerator group.
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9.13.11 Protection
The ODU Transparency parameter is configurable only for Standard Regen and Enhanced FEC card
configuration. For Transponder card configuration, this parameter defaults to Cisco Extended Use and
cannot be changed.
Note
The Forward Error Correction (FEC) Mismatch (FEC-MISM) alarm will not be raised on OTU2_XP card
when you choose Transparent Standard Use.
9.13.11 Protection
The OTU2_XP card supports Y-cable and splitter protection. Y-cable protection is provided at the client
port level. Splitter protection is provided at the trunk port level.
9.13.11.1 Y-Cable Protection
The OTU2_XP card supports Y-cable protection on client ports when it is provisioned in the transponder
card configuration. Two cards can be joined in a Y-cable protection group with one card assigned as the
working card and the other defined as the protection card. This protection mechanism provides
redundant bidirectional paths. See the “9.14.1 Y-Cable Protection” section on page 9-90 for more
detailed information. When a signal fault is detected (LOS, LOF, SD, or SF on the DWDM receiver port
in the case of ITU-T G.709 mode) the protection mechanism software automatically switches between
paths.
9.13.11.2 Splitter Protection
The OTU2_XP card supports splitter protection on trunk ports that are not part of a regenerator group
(see Table 9-39 for port details). You can create and delete splitter protection groups in OTU2_XP card.
In splitter protection method, a client injects a single signal into the client RX port. An optical splitter
internal to the card then splits the signal into two separate signals and routes them to the two trunk TX
ports. See the “9.14.2 Splitter Protection” section on page 9-92 for more detailed information.
9.14 Y-Cable and Splitter Protection
Y-cable and splitter protection are two main forms of card protection that are available for TXP, MXP,
and Xponder (GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, 10GE_XPE, and OTU2_XP) cards when they are
provisioned in TXP or MXP mode. Y-cable protection is provided at the client port level. Splitter
protection is provided at the trunk port level.
Note
GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards use VLAN protection when they are provisioned in
L2-over-DWDM mode. For information, see the “9.11.9.3 Layer 2 Over DWDM Protection” section on
page 9-67. The ADM-10G card uses path protection and 1+1 protection. For more information, see the
“9.12.10 Protection” section on page 9-78.
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9.14.1 Y-Cable Protection
9.14.1 Y-Cable Protection
Y-cable protection is available for the following ONS 15454 TXP, MXP, and Xponder cards:
•
TXP_MR_10G
•
TXP_MR_10E
•
TXP_MR_2.5G
•
MXP_2.5G_10G
•
MXP_2.5G_10E
•
MXP_2.5G_10E_C
•
MXP_2.5G_10E_L
•
MXP_MR_2.5G
•
MXP_MR_10DME_C
•
MXP_MR_10DME_L
•
GE_XP and GE_XPE (when in 10GE or 20GE MXP card mode)
•
10GE_XP and 10GE_XPE (when in 10GE TXP card mode)
•
OTU2_XP (when in Transponder card configuration)
To create Y-cable protection, you create a Y-cable protection group for two TXP, MXP, or Xponder cards
using the CTC software, then connect the client ports of the two cards physically with a Y-cable. The
single client signal is sent into the RX Y-cable and is split between the two TXP, MXP, or Xponder cards.
The two TX signals from the client side of the TXP, MXP, or Xponder cards are combined in the TX
Y-cable into a single client signal. Only the active card signal passes through as the single TX client
signal. The other card must have its laser turned off to avoid signal degradation where the Y-cable joins.
When an MXP_MR_2.5G, MXP_MR_10DME_C, or MXP_MR_10DME_L card that is provisioned
with Y-cable protection is used on a storage ISL link (FC1G, FC2G, FC4G, FICON1G, FICON2G, or
FICON4G), a protection switchover resets the standby port to active. This reset reinitialises the
end-to-end link to avoid any link degradation caused due to loss of buffer credits during switchover and
results in an end-to-end traffic hit of 15 to 20 seconds.
When using the MXP_MR_10DME_C or MXP_MR_10DME_L card, enable the fast switch feature and
use it with a Cisco MDS storage switch to avoid this 15 to 20 second traffic hit. When enabling fast
switch on the MXP_MR_10DME_C or MXP_MR_10DME_L card, ensure that the attached MDS
switches have the buffer-to-buffer credit recovery feature enabled.
You can also use the TXP_MR_2.5G card to avoid this 15 to 20 second traffic hit. When a Y-cable
protection switchover occurs, the storage ISL link does not reinitialize and results in an end-to-end
traffic hit of less than 50ms.
Note
Y-cable connectors will not work with copper SFPs because Y-cables are made up of optical connectors
and there is no way to physically connect them to a copper SFP.
Note
There is a traffic hit of upto a couple hundred milliseconds on the MXP_MR_2.5G and
MXP_MR_10DME cards in Y-cable configuration when a fiber cut or SFP failure occurs on one of the
client ports.
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9.14.1 Y-Cable Protection
Note
The OTU2-XP and 40E-MXP-C card cannot implement Y-cable protection for the client ports in 10 GE
LAN PHY mode. Hence, a pair of OTU2_XP cards is used at each end in pass-through mode
(Transponder mode with G.709 disabled) to implement Y-cable protection. The 40E-MXP-CE card can
implement Y-cable protection without the OTU2-XP card for the client ports in LAN PHY GFP mode.
However, the 40E-MXP-CE card cannot implement Y-cable protection without the OTU2-XP card for
the client ports in LAN PHY WIS mode.
Note
If you create a GCC on either card of the protect group, the trunk port stays permanently active,
regardless of the switch state. When you provision a GCC, you are provisioning unprotected overhead
bytes. The GCC is not protected by the protect group.
Figure 9-32 on page 9-91 shows the Y-cable signal flow.
Note
Loss of Signal–Payload (LOS-P) alarms, also called Incoming Payload Signal Absent alarms, can occur
on a split signal if the ports are not in a Y-cable protection group.
Note
Removing an SFP from the client ports of a card in a Y-cable protection group card causes an
IMPROPRMVL (PPM) alarm. The working port raises the IMPROPRMVL alarm and the protected port
raises the IMPROPRMVL alarm. The severity on the client ports is changed according to the protection
switch state.
Figure 9-32
Y-Cable Protection
Client
Port
"Working" card
(TXP or MXP)
Y cables
Trunk
Port
TX
Working
Client
RX
"Protection" card
(TXP or MXP)
Trunk
Port
Protect
124080
Client
Port
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9.14.2 Splitter Protection
9.14.2 Splitter Protection
Splitter protection, shown in Figure 9-33, is provided with TXPP cards, MXPP cards., and OTU2_XP
cards (on trunk ports that are not part of a regenerator group). You can create and delete splitter
protection groups in OTU2_XP card.
To implement splitter protection, a client injects a single signal into the client RX port. An optical splitter
internal to the card then splits the signal into two separate signals and routes them to the two trunk TX
ports. The two signals are transmitted over diverse optical paths. The far-end MXPP or TXPP card uses
an optical switch to choose one of the two trunk RX port signals and injects it into the TX client port.
When using splitter protection with two MXPP or TXPP cards, there are two different optical signals
that flow over diverse paths in each direction. In case of failure, the far-end switch must choose the
appropriate signal using its built-in optical switch. The triggers for a protection switch are LOS, LOF,
SF, or SD.
Figure 9-33
Splitter Protection
Protected Card
Client
Port
Splitter
Trunk
Port
Working
Client
RX
TX
Switch
Trunk
Port
124079
Protect
9.15 Far-End Laser Control
The 15454 DWDM cards provide a transparent mode that accurately conveys the client input signal to
the far-end client output signal. The client signal is normally carried as payload over the DWDM signals.
Certain client signals, however, cannot be conveyed as payload. In particular, client LOS or LOF cannot
be carried. Far-end laser control (FELC) is the ability to convey an LOS or LOF from the near-end client
input to the far-end client output.
If an LOS is detected on the near-end client input, the near-end trunk sets the appropriate bytes in the
OTN overhead of the DWDM line. These bytes are received by the far-end trunk, and cause the far-end
client laser to be turned off. When the laser is turned off, it is said to be squelched. If the near-end LOS
clears, the near-end trunk clears the appropriate bytes in the OTN overhead, the far-end detects the
changed bytes, and the far-end client squelch is removed.
FELC also covers the situation in which the trunk port detects that it has an invalid signal; the client is
squelched so as not to propagate the invalid signal.
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9.16 Jitter Considerations
Payload types with the 2R mode preclude the use of OTN overhead bytes. In 2R mode, an LOS on the
client port causes the trunk laser to turn off. The far end detects the LOS on its trunk receiver and
squelches the client.
FELC is not provisionable. It is always enabled when the DWDM card is in transparent termination
mode. However, FELC signaling to the far-end is only possible when ITU-T G.709 is enabled on both
ends of the trunk span.
9.16 Jitter Considerations
Jitter introduced by the SFPs used in the transponders and muxponders must be considered when
cascading several cards. With TXP_MR_2.5G, TXPP_MR_2.5G, MXP_MR_2.5G, MXPP_MR_2.5G,
and TXP_MR_10E cards, several transponders can be cascaded before the cumulative jitter violates the
jitter specification. The recommended limit is 20 cards. With TXP_MR_10G cards, you can also cascade
several cards, although the recommended limit is 12 cards. With MXP_2.5G_10G and MXP_2.5G_10E
cards, any number of cards can be cascaded as long as the maximum reach between any two is not
exceeded. This is because any time the signal is demultiplexed, the jitter is eliminated as a limiting
factor.
The maximum reach between one transponder and the other must be halved if a Y cable is used. For more
information on Y-cable operation, see the “9.14.1 Y-Cable Protection” section on page 9-90.
9.17 Termination Modes
Transponder and muxponder cards have various SONET and SDH termination modes that can be
configured using CTC (see the “Provision Transponder and Muxponder Cards” chapter in the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide). The termination modes are summarized in Table 9-43.
Table 9-43
Cards
Termination Modes
Termination Mode
All TXP, MXP, and Transparent Termination
OTU2_XP cards,
Section Termination
with the exception of
the MXP_2.5G_10G
card (see next section
of this table)
Line Termination
Description
All the bytes of the payload pass transparently through the cards.
The SONET transport overhead (TOH) section bytes and the SDH
regenerator section overhead (SOH) bytes are terminated. None of these
SOH bytes are passed through. They are all regenerated, including the
SONET TOH section DCC (SDCC) bytes and the SDH regenerator section
DCC (RS-DCC) bytes. In the section termination mode, the SONET TOH
line and SDH multiplex section overhead bytes are passed transparently.
In line termination mode, the section and line overhead bytes for SONET
and the overhead bytes for the SDH multiplex and regenerator sections are
terminated. None of the overhead bytes are passed through. They are all
regenerated, including the SONET SDCC and line DCC (LDCC) bytes and
the SDH RS-DCC and multiplexer section DCC (MS-DCC) bytes.
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9.18 SFP and XFP Modules
Table 9-43
Termination Modes (continued)
Cards
Termination Mode
MXP_2.5G_10G
1
Description
Transparent Termination All client bytes pass transparently except the following: B1 is rebuilt, S1 is
rewritten, A1 to A2 are regenerated, and H1 to H3 are regenerated.
Section Termination
The SONET TOH section bytes and the SDH regenerator section overhead
bytes are terminated. None of these section overhead bytes are passed
through. They are all regenerated, including the SONET TOH section DCC
bytes and the SDH RS-DCC bytes. In the section termination mode, the
SONET TOH line and SDH multiplex section overhead bytes are passed
transparently.
Line Termination
In the line termination mode, the section and line overhead bytes for
SONET and the overhead bytes for the SDH multiplex and regenerators
sections are terminated. None of the overhead bytes are passed through.
They are all regenerated, including the SONET SDCC and LDCC bytes and
the SDH RS-DCC and MS-DCC bytes.
1. Clients operating at the OC48/STM16 rate are multiplexed into an OC192/STM64 frame before going to OTN or DWDM.
For TXP and MXP cards, adhere to the following conditions while DCC termination provisioning:
•
For SDCC/RS-DCC provisioning, the card should be in the Section/RS-DCC or Line/MS-DCC
termination mode.
•
For LDCC/MS-DCC provisioning, the card should be in the Line/MS-DCC termination mode.
For more information on enabling termination modes, see the procedures for changing card setting in the
“Provision Transponder and Muxponder Cards” chapter of the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure
Guide.
9.18 SFP and XFP Modules
SFPs and 10-Gbps SFPs (XFPs) are integrated fiber optic transceivers that provide high-speed serial
links from a port or slot to the network. For more information on SFPs/XFPs and for a list of SFPs/XFPs
supported by the transponder and muxponder cards, see the Installing the GBIC, SFP, SFP+, XFP, CXP,
and CFP Optical Modules in Cisco ONS Platforms.
In CTC, SFPs/XFPs are called pluggable port modules (PPMs). To provision SFPs/XFPs and change the
line rate for multirate PPMs, see the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
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10
Node Reference
This chapter explains the ONS 15454 dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) node types that
are available for the ONS 15454. The DWDM node type is determined by the type of amplifier and filter
cards that are installed in an ONS 15454. The chapter also explains the DWDM automatic power control
(APC), reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexing (ROADM) power equalization, span loss
verification, and automatic node setup (ANS) functions.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Note
In this chapter, “OPT-BST” refers to the OPT-BST, OPT-BST-E, OPT-BST-L cards, and to the
OPT-AMP-L and OPT-AMP-17-C cards when they are provisioned in OPT-LINE (optical booster)
mode. “OPT-PRE” refers to the OPT-PRE card and to the OPT-AMP-L and OPT-AMP-17-C cards
provisioned in OPT-PRE (pre-amplifier) mode.
Chapter topics include:
•
10.1 DWDM Node Configurations, page 10-1
•
10.2 Supported Node Configurations for OPT-RAMP-C Card, page 10-19
•
10.3 Supported Node Configurations for PSM Card, page 10-22
•
10.4 Multishelf Node, page 10-25
•
10.5 Optical Sides, page 10-27
•
10.6 Configuring Mesh DWDM Networks, page 10-37
•
10.7 DWDM Node Cabling, page 10-48
•
10.8 Automatic Node Setup, page 10-64
•
10.9 DWDM Functional View, page 10-71
10.1 DWDM Node Configurations
The ONS 15454 supports the following DWDM node configurations: hub, terminal, optical add/drop
multiplexing (OADM), reconfigurable OADM (ROADM), anti-amplified spontaneous emission
(anti-ASE), line amplifier, optical service channel (OSC) regeneration line, multishelf nodes, and node
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Node Reference
10.1.1 Hub Node
configurations for mesh networks. All node configurations can be provisioned with C-band or L-band
cards except the OADM and anti-ASE nodes. These nodes require AD-xB-xx.x or AD-xC-xx.x cards,
which are C-band only. All node configurations can be single-shelf or multishelf.
Note
The Cisco TransportPlanner tool creates a plan for amplifier placement and proper node equipment.
Note
To support multiple optical sides in mesh DWDM networks, east and west are no longer used to reference
the left and right sides of the ONS 15454 shelf. If a network running a previous software release is
upgraded to this release, west will be mapped to A and east to B. In two-sided nodes, such as a hub or
ROADM node, Side A refers to Slots 1 through 6 and Side B refers to Slots 12 through 17. Terminal
nodes have one side labeled “A,” regardless of which slots have cards installed. For more information
about configuring the ONS 15454 in mesh DWDM networks, see the “10.6 Configuring Mesh DWDM
Networks” section on page 10-37.
10.1.1 Hub Node
A hub node is a single ONS 15454 node equipped with two TCC2/TCC2P cards and one of the following
combinations:
•
Two 32MUX-O cards and two 32DMX-O or 32DMX cards
•
Two 32WSS cards and two 32DMX or 32DMX-O cards
•
Two 32WSS-L cards and two 32DMX-L cards
•
Two 40-WSS-C or 40-WSS-CE cards and two 40-DMX-C or 40DMX-CE cards
Note
The 32WSS/32WSS-L/40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE and 32DMX/32DMX-L/40-DMX-C/
40-DMX-CE cards are normally installed in ROADM nodes, but they can also be installed in hub
and terminal nodes. If the cards are installed in a hub node, the 32WSS/32WSS-L/
40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE express ports (EXP RX and EXP TX) are not cabled.
A dispersion compensation unit (DCU) can also be added, if necessary. Figure 10-1 shows a hub node
configuration with 32MUX-O and 32DMX-O cards installed.
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10.1.1 Hub Node
Figure 10-1
Hub Node Configuration Example with 32-Channel C-Band Cards
DCU
DCU
Air ramp
96421
OPT-BST E
OPT-PRE E
32MUX-O
32DMX-O
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM E
AIC-I
OSCM W
TCC2/TCC2P
32DMX-O
32MUX-O
OPT-PRE W
OPT-BST W
Figure 10-2 shows a 40-channel hub node configuration with 40-WSS-C cards installed.
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Node Reference
10.1.1 Hub Node
Figure 10-2
Hub Node Configuration Example with 40-WSS-C Cards
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
Air ramp
159452
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP or MS-ISC-100T
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM or Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank or TXP/MXP or MS-ISC-100T
40-DMX-C
40-WSS-C
OPT-PRE or TXP/MXP
OPT-BST or OSC-CSM
Figure 10-3 shows the channel flow for a hub node. Up to 32 channels from the client ports are
multiplexed and equalized onto one fiber. Then, multiplexed channels are transmitted to the OPT-BST
amplifier. The OPT-BST output is combined with an output signal from the OSCM card and transmitted
to the other side.
Received signals are divided between the OSCM card and an OPT-PRE card. Dispersion compensation
is applied to the signal received by the OPT-PRE amplifier, and it is then sent to the 32DMX-O card,
which demultiplexes and attenuates the input signal.
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10.1.2 Terminal Node
Hub Node Channel Flow Example
OPT-PRE
32DMX-0
Client
equipment
DCU
Line
OPT-BST
32MUX-0
32MUX-0
DCU
Line
32DMX-0
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
OSCM
TCC
TCC2
OSCM
AIC-I
West side
East side
96426
Figure 10-3
10.1.2 Terminal Node
A terminal node is a single ONS 15454 node equipped with two TCC2/TCC2P cards and one of the
following combinations:
•
One 32MUX-O card and one 32DMX-O card
•
One 32WSS card and either a 32DMX or a 32DMX-O card
•
One 32WSS-L card and one 32DMX-L card
•
One 40-WSS-C or 40-WSS-CE card and one 40-DMX-C or 40-DMX-CE card
•
One 40-MUX-C and one 40-DMX-C or 40-DMX-CE card
Cards in the terminal nodes can be installed in Slots 1 through 6 or Slots 12 through 17. The side where
cards are installed is always assigned as Side A. Figure 10-4 shows an example of a terminal
configuration with a 2MUX-O card installed. The channel flow for a terminal node is the same as the
hub node (Figure 10-3).
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Node Reference
10.1.2 Terminal Node
Figure 10-4
Terminal Node Configuration With 32MUX-O Cards Installed
DCU
Available
Air ramp
96422
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
TCC2/TCC2P
Available
AIC-I
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
32DMX-O
32MUX-O
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
Figure 10-5 shows an example of a terminal configuration with a 40-WSS-C card installed.
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Node Reference
10.1.2 Terminal Node
Figure 10-5
Terminal Node Configuration with 40-WSS-C Cards Installed
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
Air ramp
159455
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP or MS-ISC-100T
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM or Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank or TXP/MXP or MS-ISC-100T
40-DMX-C
40-WSS-C
OPT-PRE or TXP/MXP
OPT-BST or OSC-CSM
Figure 10-5 shows an example of a terminal configuration with a 40-MUX-C card installed.
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Node Reference
10.1.3 OADM Node
Figure 10-6
Terminal Node with 40-MUX-C Cards Installed
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
Air ramp
159456
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP
Blank or TXP/MXP or MS-ISC-100T
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM or Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank or TXP/MXP or MS-ISC-100T
Blank or TXP/MXP
40-MUX-C
OPT-PRE or TXP/MXP
40-DMX-C
OPT-BST or OSC-CSM
10.1.3 OADM Node
An OADM node is a single ONS 15454 node equipped with cards installed on both sides and at least one
AD-xC-xx.x card or one AD-xB-xx.x card and two TCC2/TCC2P cards. 32MUX-O/40-MUX-C or
32DMX-O/40-DMX-C/40-DMX-CE cards cannot be installed in an OADM node. In an OADM node,
channels can be added or dropped independently from each direction and then passed through the
reflected bands of all OADMs in the DWDM node (called express path). They can also be passed through
one OADM card to another OADM card without using a TDM ITU-T line card (called optical
pass-through) if an external patchcord is installed.
Unlike express path, an optical pass-through channel can be converted later to an add/drop channel in an
altered ring without affecting another channel. OADM amplifier placement and required card placement
is determined by the Cisco TransportPlanner tool or your site plan.
OADM nodes can be amplified or passive. In amplified OADMs, booster and preamplifier cards are
installed on bode sides of the node. Figure 10-7 shows an example of an amplified OADM node
configuration. In addition, OADM nodes can be asymmetric. Amplifiers may be installed in one side,
but not the other. Or preamplifiers may be installed in one side, and a booster in the other.
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10.1.3 OADM Node
Figure 10-7
Amplified OADM Node Configuration Example
DCU
DCU
Air ramp
96423
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
OADM or mux/demux
OADM or mux/demux
OADM or mux/demux
OADM
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
AIC-I
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
OADM
OADM or mux/demux
OADM or mux/demux
OADM or mux/demux
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
Figure 10-8 shows an example of the channel flow on the amplified OADM node. Since the
32-wavelength plan is based on eight bands (each band contains four channels), optical adding and
dropping can be performed at the band level and/or at the channel level (meaning individual channels
can be dropped).
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Node Reference
10.1.3 OADM Node
Figure 10-8
Amplified OADM Node Channel Flow Example
TCC
TCC2
AIC-I
OSCM
OSCM
DCU
Line
AD-yB-xx.x AD-1C-xx.x
OPT-PRE
By
Ch
Line
AD-1C-xx.x AD-yB-xx.x
Ch
By
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
OPT-BST
DCU
4MD-xx.x
4-ch
mux
4-ch
demux
4-ch
mux
96427
4-ch
demux
4MD-xx.x
Figure 10-9 shows an example of a passive OADM node configuration. The passive OADM node is
equipped with a band filter, one four-channel multiplexer/demultiplexer, and a channel filter on each side
of the node.
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10.1.3 OADM Node
Figure 10-9
Passive OADM Node Configuration Example
Air ramp
96424
OSC-CSM
OADM
OADM or mux/demux
OADM or mux/demux
OADM or mux/demux
OADM or mux/demux
TCC2/TCC2P
Available
AIC-I
Available
TCC2/TCC2P
OADM or mux/demux
OADM or mux/demux
OADM or mux/demux
OADM or mux/demux
OADM
OSC-CSM
Figure 10-10 shows an example of traffic flow on the passive OADM node. The signal flow of the
channels is the same as the amplified OADM, except that the OSC-CSM card is used instead of the
OPT-BST and OSCM cards.
Passive OADM Node Channel Flow Example
TCC
TCC2
Line
AD-xB-xx.x AD-1C-xx.x
By
Ch
AIC-I
Line
AD-1C-xx.x AD-xB-xx.x
Ch
By
OSC
OSC
OSC-CSM
OSC-CSM
4MD-xx.x
4MD-xx.x
4-ch
demux
4-ch
mux
4-ch
demux
4-ch
mux
96428
Figure 10-10
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10.1.4 ROADM Node
10.1.4 ROADM Node
A ROADM node adds and drops wavelengths without changing the physical fiber connections. A
ROADM node is equipped with two TCC2/TCC2P cards and one of the following combinations:
•
Two 32WSS cards and, optionally, two 32DMX or 32DMX-O cards
•
Two 32WSS-L cards and, optionally, two 32DMX-L cards
•
Two 40-WSS-C or 40-WSS-CE cards and, optionally, two 40-DMX-C or 40-DMX-CE cards
Transponders (TXPs) and muxponders (MXPs) can be installed in Slots 6 and 12 and, if amplification is
not used, in any open slot.
Note
Although not required, 32DMX-O can be used in an ROADM node. Cisco TransportPlanner
automatically chooses the demultiplexer card that is best for the ROADM node based on the network
requirements.
Figure 10-11 shows an example of an amplified ROADM node configuration with 32DMX cards
installed.
Figure 10-11
ROADM Node with 32DMX Cards Installed
DCU E
DCU W
Air ramp
115230
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
32WSS
32DMX
Available
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
AIC-I
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
Available
32DMX
32WSS
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
Figure 10-12 shows an example of an amplified ROADM node configuration with 40-WSS-C cards
installed.
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DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
OPT-BST or OSC-CSM
OPT-PRE or TXP/MXP
40-WSS-C
40-DMX-C
Blank or TXP/MXP or MS-ISC-100T
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM or Blank
AIC-I
OSCM or Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank or TXP/MXP or MS-ISC-100T
40-DMX-C
40-WSS-C
OPT-PRE or TXP/MXP
OPT-BST or OSC-CSM
159453
ROADM Node with 40-WSS-C Cards Installed
Figure 10-12
10-13
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Chapter 10
10.1.4 ROADM Node
Air ramp
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Node Reference
10.1.4 ROADM Node
Figure 10-13 shows an example of an ROADM node with 32WSS-L and 32DMX-L cards installed.
Figure 10-13
ROADM Node with 32WSS-L and 32DMX-L Cards Installed
DCU
DCU
Air ramp
151737
OPT-BST-L or OSC-CSM
OPT-PRE
OPT-AMP-L
MMU
32-DMX
32WSS-L
Available
32DMX-L
TCC2P
OSCM or Blank
AIC-I
OSCM or Blank
TCC2 M
32DMX-L
Available
32WSS-L
32-DMX
MMU
OPT-BST-L or OSC-CSM
OPT-PRE
Figure 10-14 shows an example of an ROADM optical signal flow from Side A to Side B. The optical
signal flow from Side B to Side A follows an identical path through the Side B OSC-CSM and 32WSS
or 40-WSS-C cards. In this example, OSC-CSM cards are installed so OPT-BSTs are not needed.
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Node Reference
10.1.5 Anti-ASE Node
Figure 10-14
ROADM Optical Signal Flow Example
Side B
32WSS
Side B
OPT-PRE
Side B
Line
Side A
32WSS
32R_OAM
80/20
1
2
Side B
32DMX
4
3
6
5
Add
1 slot
32-ch
demux
OSC
OSC
Drop
5
6
3
32R_OAM
Side B
OSC-CSM
1
80/20
Side A
32DMX
2 slots
2
4
2 slots
1 slot
Side A
OPT-PRE
Side A
Line
Side A
OSC-CSM
115228
Add
32-ch
demux
Drop
1
The OSC-CSM receives the optical signal. It separates the optical service channel from the optical payload and sends the
payload to the OPT-PRE module.
2
The OPT-PRE compensates for chromatic dispersion, amplifies the optical payload, and sends it to the 32WSS or
40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE.
3
The 32WSS or 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE splits the signal into two components. The 80 percent component is sent to the
DROP-TX port and the 20 percent component is sent to the EXP-TX port.
4
The drop component goes to the 32DMX card or 40-DMX-C/40-DMX-CE card where it is demultiplexed and dropped.
5
The express wavelength aggregate signal goes to the 32WSS or 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE on the other side where it is
demultiplexed. Channels are stopped or forwarded based upon their switch states. Forwarded wavelengths are merged
with those coming from the ADD path and sent to the OSC-CSM module.
6
The OSC-CSM combines the multiplexed payload with the OSC and sends the signal out the transmission line.
10.1.5 Anti-ASE Node
In a mesh ring network, the ONS 15454 requires a node configuration that prevents ASE accumulation
and lasing. An anti-ASE node can be created by configuring a hub node or an OADM node with some
modifications. No channels can travel through the express path, but they can be demultiplexed and
dropped at the channel level on one side and added and multiplexed on the other side.
The hub node is the preferred node configuration when some channels are connected in pass-through
mode. For rings that require a limited number of channels, combine AD-xB-xx.x and 4MD-xx.x cards,
or cascade AD-xC-xx.x cards. See Figure 10-8 on page 10-10.
Figure 10-15 shows an anti-ASE node that uses all wavelengths in the pass-through mode. Use
Cisco TransportPlanner to determine the best configuration for anti-ASE nodes.
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Node Reference
10.1.6 Line Amplifier Node
Figure 10-15
Anti-ASE Node Channel Flow Example
TCC
TCC2
AIC-I
OSCM
OSCM
DCU
Express path open
Line
B1
Ch
Line
Ch
B1
DCU
4-ch
demux
4-ch
mux
4-ch
demux
4-ch
mux
96429
4MD-xx.x
4MD-xx.x
10.1.6 Line Amplifier Node
A line amplifier node is a single ONS 15454 node that is used to amplify the optical signal in long spans.
The line amplifier node can be equipped with one of the following sets of cards:
•
Two OPT-PRE cards, two OPT-BST cards, and two OSCM cards
•
Two OPT-PRE cards and two OSC-CSM cards
•
Two OPT-AMP-17-C cards and two OSCM cards
Attenuators might also be required between each preamplifier and OPT-BST amplifier to match the
optical input power value and to maintain the amplifier gain tilt value.
Two OSCM cards are connected to the OPT-BST cards to multiplex the OSC signal with the pass-though
channels. If the node does not contain an OPT-BST card, OSC-CSM cards must be installed instead of
OSCM cards. Figure 10-16 shows an example of a line amplifier node configuration using OPT-BST,
OPT-PRE, and OSCM cards.
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10.1.7 OSC Regeneration Node
Figure 10-16
Line Amplifier Node Configuration Example
DCU
DCU
Air ramp
96425
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
Available
Available
Available
Available
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
AIC-I
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
Available
Available
Available
Available
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
10.1.7 OSC Regeneration Node
The OSC regeneration node is added to the DWDM networks for two purposes:
•
To electrically regenerate the OSC channel whenever the span links are 37 dB or longer and payload
amplification and add/drop capabilities are not present. Cisco TransportPlanner places an OSC
regeneration node in spans longer than 37 dB. The span between the OSC regeneration node and the
next DWDM network site cannot be longer than 31 dB.
•
To add data communications network (DCN) capability wherever needed within the network.
OSC regeneration nodes require two OSC-CSM cards, as shown in Figure 10-17. The cards are installed
in each side of the shelf.
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Chapter 10
Node Reference
10.1.7 OSC Regeneration Node
Figure 10-17
OSC Regeneration Line Node Configuration Example
DCU
DCU
Air ramp
115232
OSC-CSM
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
TCC2/TCC2P
Available
AIC-I
Available
TCC2/TCC2P
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
OSC-CSM
Figure 10-18 shows the OSC regeneration line node signal flow.
Figure 10-18
OSC Regeneration Line Node Flow
Fiber
Fiber
Side A
Side B
COM-TX
Side A
Side B
COM-RX
Side B
OSC-CSM
Side A
Side B
Line-TX
Side A
OSC-CSM
Fiber
Fiber
Side A
Side B
COM-TX
Side A
Side B
Line-RX
115255
Side A
Side B
COM-RX
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10.2 Supported Node Configurations for OPT-RAMP-C Card
10.2 Supported Node Configurations for OPT-RAMP-C Card
The OPT-RAMP-C card can be equipped in the following NE type configurations:
•
C-band odd systems:
– C-band terminal site with 32-MUX-O and 32-DMX-O cards
– C-band hub node with 32-MUX-O and 32-DMX-O cards
– C-band fixed OADM node
– C-band line site
– C-band 32-channel reconfigurable OADM (ROADM)
– C-band terminal site using a 32-WSS and 32-DMX cards
– C-band flexible terminal site using AD-xC cards
– C-band hub node using a 32-WSS and 32-DMX cards
– C-band 40-channel ROADM
– C-band terminal site using a 40-WSS-C and 40-DMX-C cards
– C-band terminal site using 40-MUX-C and 40-DMX-C cards
– C-band hub node using a 40-WSS-C and 40-DMX-C cards
– C-band up to 4 degree mesh node
– C-band up to 8 degree mesh node
– C-band multiring/mesh with MMU node
– C-band 4 degree multiring/mesh node (MMU based)
•
C-band odd and even systems:
– C-band 64-channel terminal site
– C-band 72-channel terminal site
– C-band 80-channel terminal site
– C-band 64-channel hub site
– C-band 72-channel hub site
– C-band 80-channel hub site
– C-band 64-channel ROADM site
– C-band 72-channel ROADM site
– C-band 80-channel ROADM site
The following amplifier cards are defined as booster or preamplifiers:
•
Booster:
– OPT-BST
– OPT-BST-E
– OPT-AMP-17-C
– OPT-AMP-C
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10.2.1 OPT-RAMP-C Card in an Add/Drop Node
•
Preamplifier:
– OPT-PRE
– OPT-AMP-C
– OPT-BST
– OPT-BST-E
Note
When the booster is not needed, it must be replaced with an OSC-CSM card.
The maximum number of shelves that can be aggregated in a multishelf node are:
•
Eight, if the MS-ISC-100T switch card is used.
•
Twelve, if an external Catalyst 2950 switch is used.
10.2.1 OPT-RAMP-C Card in an Add/Drop Node
When the OPT-RAMP-C card is equipped in an add/drop node, the booster amplifier is mandatory and
cannot be replaced by an OSC-CSM card. The preamplifier is an OPT-BST, OPT-BST-E, or OPT-AMP-C
card, and must be cabled as a unidirectional card. Note that the COM-TX and LINE-RX ports must not
be used for any other connections.
Figure 10-19 shows the OPT-RAMP-C card in an add/drop node.
Figure 10-19
OPT-RAMP-C Card in an Add/Drop Node
When required, a DCN extension can be used on A/D Side (i). Side(i) can be equipped with the following
cards:
•
WSS + DMX
•
AD-xC
•
WXC + MUX + DMX
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10.2.2 OPT-RAMP-C Card in a Line Site Node with Booster Amplification
10.2.2 OPT-RAMP-C Card in a Line Site Node with Booster Amplification
The OPT-RAMP-C card can be equipped in a line site node with a booster amplifier in the following
configurations:
•
The OPT-BST and OPT-BST-E can be used as booster in a line site node with OPT-RAMP-C. The
booster cards need to be cabled as bidirectional units. Figure 10-20 shows the OPT-RAMP-C card
in a line site configuration.
Figure 10-20
•
The OPT-AMP-C can be used as a booster in a line site node with OPT-RAMP-C and needs to be
cabled as a bidirectional unit. An additional DCU unit can be equipped between the OPT-AMP-C
DC ports. Figure 10-21 shows a line site configured with OPT-AMP-C and an additional DCU unit.
Figure 10-21
•
OPT-RAMP-C Card in a Line Site Configuration
Line Site Configured with OPT-AMP-C
A line site can be configured with OPT-RAMP-C on one side only. Figure 10-22 shows the line site
configured with OPT-RAMP-C on side A only. The booster is configured on side B.
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Chapter 10
Node Reference
10.3 Supported Node Configurations for PSM Card
Figure 10-22
Line Site with OPT-RAMP-C On One Side
In all configurations, the booster amplifier facing the OPT-RAMP-C card is mandatory for safety
reasons.
10.3 Supported Node Configurations for PSM Card
The PSM card supports the following node configurations:
•
10.3.1 Channel Protection
•
10.3.2 Multiplex Section Protection
•
10.3.3 Line Protection
10.3.1 Channel Protection
In channel protection configuration, the PSM card is used in conjunction with a TXP/MXP card. The
PSM card in a channel protection configuration can be used in any site apart from a terminal site.
Figure 10-23 shows the DWDM functional view of a PSM card in channel protection configuration.
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10.3.1 Channel Protection
Figure 10-23
PSM Channel Protection Configuration
Side A
LINE-TX
Fiber stage
card
LINE-RX
Side A
COM-RX
COM-TX
COM-TX
COM-RX
Side B
A/D stage
card
DROP-TX
W-RX
EXP-RX
EXP-TX
EXP-TX
EXP-RX
ADD-RX
A/D stage
card
COM-RX
COM-TX
COM-TX
COM-RX
Fiber stage
card
LINE-RX
LINE-TX
DROP-TX
ADD-RX
W-TX
Side B
P-TX
P-RX
50/50 Splitter
1X2 Switch
PSM
Working path
COM-RX
COM-TX
Protect path
RX
Trunk port
TXP/MXP
243087
TX
In this configuration, the COM-RX and COM-TX ports of the PSM card are connected to the TXP/MXP
trunk ports. This configuration is applicable to an n-degree MSTP node, for example, a two-degree
ROADM, an n-degree ROADM, or an OADM node. The example block diagram shows a two-degree
node with Side A and Side B as the two sides. The Side A and Side B fiber-stage block can be DWDM
cards that are used to amplify transmitted or received signal (see the “10.5.1.1 Fiber Stage” section on
page 10-29 for the list of cards). The Side A and Side B add/drop stage block can be DWDM cards that
can add and drop traffic (see the “10.5.1.2 A/D Stage” section on page 10-31 for the list of cards).
In the transmit direction, the traffic originating from a TXP/MXP trunk port is split by the PSM card on
to the W-TX and P-TX ports. The W-TX and P-TX ports are connected to the ADD-RX ports of the
add/drop stage cards in Side A and Side B respectively. The add/drop stage cards multiplex traffic on
Side A and Side B line ports that become the working and protect paths respectively.
In the receive direction, the W-RX and P-RX ports of the PSM card are connected to the DROP-TX ports
of the add/drop stage cards on Side A and Side B respectively. The add/drop stage cards demultiplex
traffic received from Side A and Side B line ports that are the working and protect paths respectively.
The PSM card selects one of the two input signals on the W-RX and P-RX ports to be transmitted to the
COM-RX port of the PSM card.
Note
All traffic multiplexed or demultiplexed by the two add/drop stage cards is not protected.
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10.3.2 Multiplex Section Protection
10.3.2 Multiplex Section Protection
The PSM card performs multiplex section protection when connected between a
multiplexer/demultiplexer card in a terminal site. The multiplexer/demultiplexer stage can be built using
WSS and DMX or 40MUX and 40DMX cards. The terminal sites can be 50/100 Ghz band. The number
of supported channels can therefore be 32/40 or 72/80.
Figure 10-24 shows the block diagram of a PSM card in multiplex section protection configuration.
Figure 10-24
PSM Multiplex Section Protection Configuration
Working Path Amplifier
Side A Mux/Demux
TXP/MXP
COM-TX
DROP-TX
PSM
COM-RX
TX
Trunk
port
RX
COM-RX
ADD-RX
COM-TX
COM-TX
LINE-TX
COM-RX
LINE-RX
W-RX
50/50
Splitter
W-TX
1X2
Switch
P-TX
P-RX
Protect Path Amplifier
COM-TX
LINE-TX
COM-RX
LINE-RX
Protect path
243088
Working path
In the transmit direction, the traffic originating from a TXP trunk port is multiplexed by the Side A
multiplexer. The PSM card splits traffic on to the W-TX and P-TX ports, which are independently
amplified by two separated booster amplifiers.
In the receive direction, the signal on the line ports is preamplified by two separate preamplifiers and the
PSM card selects one of the two input signals on the W-RX and P-RX ports to be transmitted to the
COM-RX port of the PSM card. The received signal is then demultiplexed to a TXP card.
The presence of a booster amplifier is not mandatory. However, if a DCN extension is used, the W-TX
and P-TX ports of the PSM card can be connected directly to the line. The presence of a preamplifier is
also not mandatory.
Note
The PSM card cannot be used with Raman amplification in a line protection or section protection
configuration.
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10.3.3 Line Protection
10.3.3 Line Protection
In a line protection configuration, the working and protect ports of the PSM card are connected directly
to the external line. This configuration is applicable to any MSTP node that is configured as a terminal
site. The multiplexer/demultiplexer stage can be built using WSS and DMX or 40MUX and 40DMX
cards. The terminal sites can be 50/100 Ghz band. The number of supported channels can therefore be
32/40 or 72/80.
Figure 10-25 shows the block diagram of a PSM card in line protection configuration.
Figure 10-25
PSM Line Protection Configuration
Side A Mux/Demux
TXP/MXP
COM-TX
DROP-TX
Side A Amplifier
COM-TX
LINE-TX
PSM
COM-RX
TX
Trunk
port
COM-RX
ADD-RX
Working path
Protect path
COM-RX
LINE-RX
COM-TX
50/50
Splitter
W-TX
1X2
Switch
P-TX
P-RX
243089
RX
W-RX
In the transmit direction, the traffic originating from a transponder trunk port is multiplexed by the Side
A multiplexer and amplified by a booster amplifier. The Line-TX port of the amplifier is connected to
the COM-RX port of the PSM card. The PSM card splits traffic received on the COM-RX port on to the
W-TX and P-TX ports, which form the working and protect paths.
In the receive direction, the PSM card selects one of the two input signals on the W-RX and P-RX ports
to be transmitted to the COM-RX port of the PSM card. The received signal is then preamplified and
demultiplexed to the TXP card.
The presence of a booster amplifier is not mandatory. However, if a DCN extension is used, the COM-RX
port of the PSM card is connected to the multiplex section. The presence of a preamplifier is also not
mandatory; the COM-TX port of the PSM card can be connected to the demultiplexer.
Note
The PSM card cannot be used with Raman amplification in a line protection or section protection
configuration.
10.4 Multishelf Node
An ONS 15454 node provisioned as a multishelf node can manage up to 12 subtending shelves as a single
entity.
Note
The reason for extending the number of subtending shelves from eight to 12 is to accommodate and
manage the new optical and DWDM cards that operate in the even band frequency grid.
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10.4 Multishelf Node
The node controller is the main shelf; its TCC2/TCC2P cards run multishelf functions. Each subtending
shelf must be equipped with TCC2/TCC2P cards, which run the shelf functions. For internal data
exchange between the node controller shelf and subtending shelves, the node controller shelf must be
equipped with redundant MS-ISC-100T cards or, as an alternative, the Catalyst 2950 switch. Cisco
recommends using the MS-ISC-100T cards. If using the Catalyst 2950, it is installed on one of
multishelf racks. All subtending shelves must be located in the same site at a maximum distance of 100
meters or 328 feet from the Ethernet switches used to support the communication LAN. Figure 10-26
shows an example of a multishelf node configuration.
Figure 10-26
Multishelf Node Configuration
PDP
Storage
"Y" Cable 15216
"Y" Cable 15216
Patch panel
Patch panel
DCU 15216
Air Ramp
MSTP - TXP/MXP
MSTP - TXP/MXP
Air Ramp
Air Ramp
MSTP - TXP/MXP
MSTP - TXP/MXP
Air Ramp
Air Ramp
MSTP ETSI
- TXP/MXP
MSTP - TXP/MXP
or MSPP
MSTP ETSI
- TXP/MXP
MSTP - TXP/MXP
or MSPP
MSTP - DWDM
Air Ramp
Storage
Air Ramp
145236
MSTP - TXP/MXP
A multishelf node has a single public IP address for all client interfaces (Cisco Transport Controller
[CTC], Transaction Language One [TL1], Simple Network Management Protocol [SNMP], and HTTP);
a client can only connect to the node controller shelf, not to the subtending shelves. The user interface
and subtending shelves are connected to a patch panel using straight-through (CAT-5) LAN cables.
The node controller shelf has the following functions:
•
IP packet routing and network topology discovery occur at the node controller level.
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10.4.1 Multishelf Node Layout
•
Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) is centralized on the node controller shelf.
The subtending shelves have the following functions:
•
Overhead circuits are not routed within a multishelf node but are managed at the subtending
controller shelf only. To use overhead bytes, the AIC-I must be installed on the subtending shelf
where it is terminated.
•
Each subtending shelf will act as a single shelf node that can use as timing source line, TCC/TCC2P
clock, or building integrated timing supply (BITS) source lines.
10.4.1 Multishelf Node Layout
Multishelf configurations are configured by Cisco TransportPlanner and are automatically discovered by
the CTC software. In a typical multishelf installation, all optical units are equipped on the node
controller shelf and TXP/MXP cards are equipped in the aggregated subtended shelves. In addition, all
empty slots in the node controller shelf can be equipped with TXP/MXP cards. In a DWDM mesh
network, up to eight optical sides can be configured with client and optical cards installed in different
shelves to support mesh and ring-protected signal output.
Note
When a DWDM ring or network has to be managed through a Telcordia operations support system
(OSS), every node in the network must be set up as multi-shelf. OLA sites and nodes with one shelf must
be set up as "multi-shelf stand-alone" to avoid the use of LAN switches.
10.4.2 DCC/GCC/OSC Terminations
A multishelf node provides the same communication channels as a single-shelf node:
•
OSC links terminate on OSCM/OSC-CSM cards. Two links are required between each ONS 15454
node. An OSC link between two nodes cannot be substituted by an equivalent generic
communications channel/data communications channel (GCC/DCC) link terminated on the same
pair of nodes. OSC links are mandatory and they can be used to connect a node to a gateway network
element (GNE).
•
GCC/DCC links terminate on TXP/MXP cards.
The maximum number of DCC/GCC/OSC terminations that are supported in a multishelf node is 48.
10.5 Optical Sides
From a topological point of view, all DWDM units equipped in an MSTP node belongs to a side. A side
can be identified by a letter (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, or H), or by the ports (called as side line ports, see
10.5.2 Side line ports, page 10-32) that are physically connected to the spans. An MSTP node can be
connected to a maximum of 8 different spans. Each side identifies one of the span the MSTP node is
connected to.
Note
Side A and Side B replace “west” and “east” when referring to the two sides of the ONS 15454 shelf.
Side A refers to Slots 1 through 6 (formerly “west”), and Side B refers to Slots 12 through 17 (formerly
“east”). The line direction port parameter, East-to-West and West-to-East, has been removed.
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10.5.1 Optical Side Stages
Sides are viewed and managed from the Provisioning > WDM-ANS > Optical Sides tab in CTC, shown
in Figure 10-27.
Figure 10-27
Optical Side Tab
10.5.1 Optical Side Stages
All MSTP nodes can be modelled according to Figure 10-28.
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10.5.1 Optical Side Stages
Interconnecting Sides Conceptual View
Side C
Figure 10-28
B
Si
d
e
e
D
d
Si
Fiber
Stage
A/D
Stage
Interconnecting
sides I/F
Side E
Side A
TXP/MXP Stage
H
Si
159460
Side G
F
Si
de
de
According to Figure 10-28, each MSTP node side includes DWDM units that can be conceptually
divided into three stages.
•
Fiber stage—The set of DWDM cards with ports that directly or indirectly face the span.
•
A/D stage—The add/drop stage.
•
TXP/MXP stage—The virtual grouping of all TXP or MXP cards with signals multiplexed or
demultiplexed to and from the physical fiber stage.
10.5.1.1 Fiber Stage
The fiber stage includes DWDM cards that are used to amplify transmitted or received signal and cards
that are used to add optical supervision channel. The fiber stage cards are:
•
Booster amplifier cards that directly connect to the span, such as:
– OPT-BST
– OPT-BST-E
– OPT-BST-L
– OPT-AMP-C, when provisioned in OPT-LINE (booster amplifier) mode
– OPT-AMP-L, when provisioned in OPT-LINE (booster amplifier) mode
– OPT-AMP-17-C, when provisioned in OPT-LINE (booster amplifier) mode
•
Preamplifier cards, such as:
– OPT-PRE
– OPT-AMP-C, when provisioned in OPT-PRE (preamplifier) mode
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10.5.1 Optical Side Stages
– OPT-AMP-L, when provisioned in OPT-PRE (preamplifier) mode
– OPT-AMP-17-C, when provisioned in OPT-PRE (preamplifier) mode
•
OSC cards, such as:
– OSCM
– OSC-CSM
•
OPT-RAMP-C card
Table 10-1 shows the commonly deployed fiber stage layouts supported by DWDM mesh nodes. In the
table, OPT-BST includes the OPT-BST, OPT-BST-E, and OPT-BST-L cards. OPT-AMP includes the
OPT-AMP-L and OPT-AMP-17-C cards configured in either OPT-PRE or OPT-LINE mode.
Note
Table 10-1
In the table, L and C suffix is not reported because C-band and L-band amplifiers cannot be mixed in the
same layout.
Supported Fiber Stage Configurations
Layout Cards
A
B
OPT-BST <-> OPT-PRE/OPT-AMP
(OPT-PRE mode)
OPT-AMP (OPT-BST mode) <->
OPT-PRE/OPT-AMP (OPT-PRE mode)
Configurations
•
OPT-BST OSC ports connected to OSCM OSC ports or
OSC-CSM LINE ports
•
OPT-BST LINE ports connected to the span
•
OPT-BST COM-TX ports connected to OPT-AMP (OPT-PRE
mode) or OPT-PRE COM-RX ports
•
OPT-AMP (OPT-PRE mode) or OPT-PRE LINE-TX or
COM-TX ports connected to the next stage (for example, a
40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE COM-RX port in a ROADM node)
•
OPT-BST COM-RX ports connected to the next stage (for
example, a 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE COM-TX port in a
ROADM node)
•
OPT-AMP (BST) OSC ports connected to OSCM OSC ports or
OSC-CSM LINE ports
•
OPT-AMP (BST) LINE ports connected to the span
•
OPT-AMP (BST) COM-TX ports connected to OPT-AMP
(PRE)/OPT-PRE COM-RX ports
•
OPT-AMP (PRE)/OPT-PRE LINE-TX/COM-TX port
connected to the next stage (for example, a
40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE COM-RX port in a ROADM node)
•
OPT-AMP (BST) COM-RX port connected to the next stage
(for example, a 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE COM-TX port in a
ROADM node)
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10.5.1 Optical Side Stages
Table 10-1
Supported Fiber Stage Configurations (continued)
Layout Cards
C
OSC-CSM <->
OPT-PRE/OPT-AMP(OPT-PRE mode)
D
E
F
Configurations
OPT-BST
OPT-AMP (OPT-BST mode)
OSC-CSM
•
OSC-CSM LINE ports connected to the span
•
OSC-CSM COM-TX ports connected to OPT-AMP COM-RX
ports
•
OPT-AMP(PRE)/OPT-PRE LINE-TX/COM-TX port
connected to the next stage (for example,
40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE COM-RX ports in ROADM)
•
OSC-CSM COM-RX port connected to the next stage (for
example, a 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE COM-TX port in a
ROADM node)
•
OPT-BST OSC ports connected to OSCM OSC ports or
OSC-CSM LINE ports
•
OPT-BST LINE ports connected to the span
•
OPT-BST COM ports connected to the next stage (for example,
a 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE COM port in a ROADM node)
•
OPT-AMP OSC ports connected to OSCM OSC ports or
OSC-CSM LINE ports
•
OPT-AMP LINE ports connected to the span
•
OPT-AMP COM ports connected to the next stage (for
example, a 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE COM port in a ROADM
node)
•
OSC-CSM LINE ports connected to the span
•
OSC-CSM COM ports connected to the next stage (for
example, a 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE COM port in a ROADM
node)
10.5.1.2 A/D Stage
The A/D stage includes DWDM cards that can add and drop traffic. The A/D stage is divided into three
node types:
•
Mesh nodes—ONS 15454 nodes configured in multishelf mode can connect to eight different sides.
For more detail on mesh node, see 10.6 Configuring Mesh DWDM Networks, page 10-37.
•
Legacy—Half of a ROADM node or an OADM node with cascaded AD-xB-xx-x or AD-xC-xx.x
cards
•
Non-A/D—A line node or a side that does not have A/D capability is included in the A/D stage
Stages are built by active cards and patchcords. However, the interconnecting sides are completed by the
mesh patch panels (four-degree patch panel or eight-degree patch panel) in mesh nodes, or by patchcords
connected to EXP-RX/EXP-TX ports in legacy nodes.
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10.5.2 Side line ports
10.5.2 Side line ports
Side line ports are ports that are physically connected to the spans. Side line ports can be:
•
All ports terminating the fiber stage and physically labeled as LINE, such as ports on the following
cards:
– Booster amplifier (OPT-BST, OPT-BST-E, or OPT-BST-L cards, and the OPT-AMP-C,
OPT-AMP-L, or OPT-AMP-17-C cards when provisioned in OPT-LINE mode)
– OSC-CSM
– OPT-RAMP-C
•
All ports that can be physically connected to the external span using DCN terminations, such as:
– Booster amplifier LINE-RX and LINE-TX ports
– OSC-CSM LINE-RX and LINE-TX ports
– 40-WXC-C COM-RX and COM-TX ports
– MMU EXP-A-RX and EXP-A-TX ports
•
All ports that can be physically connected to the external span using DCN terminations in a line
node, such as:
– Preamplifier (OPT-PRE card and the OPT-AMP-C, OPT-AMP-L, or OPT-AMP-17-C cards
when provisioned in OPT-PRE mode) COM-RX and COM-TX ports
– Booster amplifier COM-TX port
– OSC-CSM COM-TX port
•
All ports that can be physically connected to the external span using DCN terminations in a
40-channel MUX/DMX terminal node, such as:
– 40-MUX-C COM-TX port
– 40-DMX-C COM-RX port
•
All ports that can be physically connected to the external span when PSM cards implement line
protection:
– PSM W-TX and W-RX ports
– PSM P-TX and P-RX ports
Note
PSM card will support two sides A(w) and A(p).
10.5.3 Optical Side Configurations
You can use the following Side IDs depending on the type of node layout:
•
In legacy nodes (that is, a node with no provisioned or installed 40-WXC-C cards), the permissible
Side IDs are A and B only.
•
In four-degree mesh nodes with four or less 40-WXC-C cards installed, the permissible Side IDs are
A, B, C, and D.
•
In eight-degree mesh nodes, with eight or less 40-WXC-C cards installed, the allowed Side IDs are
A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H.
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10.5.3 Optical Side Configurations
Side IDs are assigned automatically by the system when you create default internal patchcords in CTC
or when you import the CTP XML configuration file into CTC. You can create a side manually using
CTC or TL1 if the following conditions are met:
Note
•
You use a permissible side identifier, A through H.
•
The shelf contains a TX and an RX side line port (see “10.5.2 Side line ports” section on
page 10-32).
•
The side line ports are not connected to an internal patchcord.
Cisco does not recommend that you manually create or modify ONS 15454 sides.
The following tables show examples of how Side IDs are automatically assigned by the system for
common DWDM layouts.
Table 10-2 shows a standard ROADM shelf with Sides A and B provisioned. The shelf is connected to
seven shelves containing TXP, MXP, ADM-10G, GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards.
Table 10-2
Multishelf ROADM Layout Example
Shelf
Slots 1–6
Side
Slots 12–17
Side
1
WSS+DMX
A
WSS+DMX
B
2
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
3
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
4
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
5
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
6
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
7
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
8
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
Table 10-3 shows a protected ROADM shelf. In this example, Side A and B are Slots 1 through 6 in
Shelves 1 and 2. 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE/40-DMX-C or 40-WSS-CE/40-DMX-CE cards are installed in
Sides A and B. Slots 12 through 17 in Shelves 1 and 2 contain TXP, MXP, ADM-10G, GE_XP,
10GE_XP, GE_XPE, or 10GE_XPE cards.
Table 10-3
Multishelf Protected ROADM Layout Example
Shelf
Slots 1–6
Side
Slots 12–17
Side
1
WSS+DMX
A
TXP/MXP
—
2
WSS+DMX
B
TXP/MXP
—
3
TXP/MXP
n/a
TXP/MXP
—
4
TXP/MXP
n/a
TXP/MXP
—
5
TXP/MXP
n/a
TXP/MXP
—
6
TXP/MXP
n/a
TXP/MXP
—
7
TXP/MXP
n/a
TXP/MXP
—
8
TXP/MXP
n/a
TXP/MXP
—
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10.5.3 Optical Side Configurations
Table 10-4 shows a four-degree mesh node. Side A is Shelf 1, Slots 1 through 6. Side B and C are Shelf 2,
Slots 1 through 6 and 12 through 17, and Side D is Shelf 3, Slots 1 through 6. 40-WXC-C cards in line
termination mode are installed in Sides A through D.
Table 10-4
Multishelf Four-Degree Mesh Node Layout Example
Shelf
Slots 1–6
Side
Slots 12–17
Side
1
WXC Line
Termination
A
TXP/MXP
—
2
WXC Line
Termination
B
WXC Line
Termination
C
3
WXC Line
Termination
D
TXP/MXP
—
4
TXP/MXP
n/a
TXP/MXP
—
5
TXP/MXP
n/a
TXP/MXP
—
6
TXP/MXP
n/a
TXP/MXP
—
7
TXP/MXP
n/a
TXP/MXP
—
8
TXP/MXP
n/a
TXP/MXP
—
Table 10-5 shows a protected four-degree mesh node example. In the example, Sides A through D are
assigned to Slots 1 through 6 in Shelves 1 through 4.
Table 10-5
Multishelf Four-Degree Protected Mesh Node Layout Example
Shelf
Slots 1–6
Side
Slots 12–17
Side
1
WXC Line
Termination
A
TXP/MXP
—
2
WXC Line
Termination
B
TXP/MXP
—
3
WXC Line
Termination
C
TXP/MXP
—
4
WXC Line
Termination
D
TXP/MXP
—
5
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
6
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
7
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
8
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
Table 10-6 shows a protected four-degree mesh node example. In the example, Sides A through D are
assigned to Slots 1 through 4 in Shelves 1 through 4, and TXP, MXP, ADM-10G, GE_XP, 10GE_XP,
GE_XPE, or 10GE_XPE cards are installed in Shelves 1 through 4, Slots 12-17, and Shelves 5 through
8, Slots 1 through 6 and 12 through 17.
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10.5.3 Optical Side Configurations
Table 10-6
Multishelf Four-Degree Protected Mesh Node Layout Example
Shelf
Slots 1–6
Side
Slots 12–17
Side
1
WXC Line
Termination
A
TXP/MXP
—
2
WXC Line
Termination
B
TXP/MXP
—
3
WXC Line
Termination
C
TXP/MXP
—
4
WXC Line
Termination
D
TXP/MXP
—
5
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
6
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
7
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
8
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
Table 10-7 shows a four-degree mesh node provisioned as an upgrade. In the example, Sides A through
D are assigned to Slots 1 through 4. and 12 through 17 in Shelves 1and 2. 40-WXC-C cards in XC
termination mode are installed in Sides A and B, and 40-WXC-C cards in line termination mode are
installed in Sides C and D.
Table 10-7
Multishelf Four-Degree Mesh Node Upgrade Layout Example
Shelf
Slots 1–6
Side
Slots 12–17
Side
1
WXC XC
Termination
A
WXC XC
Termination
B
2
WXC Line
Termination
C
WXC Line
Termination
D
3
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
4
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
5
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
6
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
7
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
8
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
Table 10-8 shows an eight-degree mesh node. In the example, Sides A through H are assigned to Slots 1
through 6 in Shelf 1, Slots 1 through 6 and 12 through 17 in Shelves 2 through 4, and Slots 1 through 6
in Shelf 5. 40-WXC-C cards in line termination mode are installed in Sides A through H.
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual, R9.0
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10-35
Chapter 10
Node Reference
10.5.3 Optical Side Configurations
Table 10-8
Multishelf Eight-Degree Mesh Node Layout Example
Shelf
Slots 1–6
Side
Slots 12–17
Side
1
WXC Line
Termination
A
TXP/MXP
—
2
WXC Line
Termination
B
WXC Line
Termination
C
3
WXC Line
Termination
D
WXC Line
Termination
E
4
WXC Line
Termination
F
WXC Line
Termination
G
5
WXC Line
Termination
H
TXP/MXP
—
6
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
7
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
8
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
Table 10-9 shows another eight-degree mesh node. In the example, Sides A through H are assigned to
Slots 1 through 6 in all shelves (Shelves 1 through 8). 40-WXC-C cards in line termination mode are
installed in Sides A through H.
Table 10-9
Multishelf Four-Degree Mesh Node Upgrade Layout Example
Shelf
Slots 1–6
Side
Slots 12–17
Side
1
WXC Line
Termination
A
TXP/MXP
—
2
WXC Line
Termination
B
TXP/MXP
—
3
WXC Line
Termination
C
TXP/MXP
—
4
WXC Line
Termination
D
TXP/MXP
—
5
WXC Line
Termination
E
TXP/MXP
—
6
WXC Line
Termination
F
TXP/MXP
—
7
WXC Line
Termination
G
TXP/MXP
—
8
WXC Line
Termination
H
TXP/MXP
—
Table 10-10 shows a four-degree mesh node with a user-defined side. Because the software assigns sides
consecutively, and because the mesh node is four-degrees, the side assigned to Shelf 5, Slots 1 through 6
is “Unknown.”
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual, R9.0
10-36
78-18377-02
Chapter 10
Node Reference
10.6 Configuring Mesh DWDM Networks
Table 10-10
Multishelf Four-Degree Mesh Node User-Defined Layout Example
Shelf
Slots 1–6
Side
Slots 12–17
Side
1
WXC Line
Termination
A
TXP/MXP
—
2
TXP/MXP
—
WXC Line
Termination
C1
3
WXC Line
Termination
D
TXP/MXP
—
4
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
5
WXC Line
Termination
U2
TXP/MXP
—
6
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
7
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
8
TXP/MXP
—
TXP/MXP
—
1. User-defined
2. Unknown
10.6 Configuring Mesh DWDM Networks
ONS 15454 shelves can be configured in mesh DWDM networks using the 40-WXC-C wavelength
cross-connect cards, multishelf provisioning, and the 40-channel patch panel, four-degree patch panel,
and eight-degree patch panels. ONS 15454 DWDM mesh configurations can be up to four degrees (four
optical directions) when the four-degree patch panel patch panel is installed, and up to eight degrees
(eight optical directions) when the eight-degree patch panel is installed. Two mesh node types are
available, the line termination mesh node and the cross-connect (XC) termination mesh node.
10.6.1 Line Termination Mesh Node
The line termination mesh node is installed in native Software Release 9.0 mesh networks. Line
termination mesh nodes can support between one and eight line terminations. Each line direction
requires the following cards: 40-WXC-C, 40-MUX-C, 40-DMX-C or 40-DMX-CE, a preamplifier and
a booster. Within this configuration, the following substitutions can be used:
•
The 40-MUX-C cards can be replaced with 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE cards.
•
The OPT-BST cards can be replaced with OPT-AMP-17-C (in OPT-BST mode) and/or OPT-BST-E
cards.
•
The OPT-PRE can be replaced with an OPT-AMP-17-C (in OPT-LINE mode) card.
Each side of the line termination mesh node is connected as follows:
•
The 40-WXC-C COM-RX port is connected to the preamplifier output port.
•
The 40-WXC-C COM-TX port is connected to the booster amplifier COM-RX port.
•
The 40-WXC-C DROP TX port is connected to the 40-DMX-C or 40-DMX-CE COM-RX port.
•
The 40-WXC-C ADD-RX port is connected to the 40-MUX-C COM-TX port.
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual, R9.0
78-18377-02
10-37
Chapter 10
Node Reference
10.6.1 Line Termination Mesh Node
•
The 40-WXC-C EXP-TX port is connected to the mesh patch panel.
•
The 40-WXC-C EXP-RX port is connected to the mesh patch panel.
Figure 10-29 shows one shelf from a line termination node. (Examples of line termination nodes in
four-degree and eight-degree mesh networks are shown in Figure 10-36 on page 10-45 and Figure 10-37
on page 10-46.)
Figure 10-29
Line Termination Mesh Node Shelf
DCU-xxx
DCU-xxx
Air ramp
159331
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
40-WXC-C
40-MUX-C
40-DMX-C
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
AIC-I
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
40-DMX-C
40-MUX-C
40-WXC-C
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
Figure 10-30 shows a functional block diagram of one line termination side using 40-WXC-C and
40-MUX-C cards.
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual, R9.0
10-38
78-18377-02
Chapter 10
Node Reference
10.6.1 Line Termination Mesh Node
Figure 10-30
Line Termination Mesh Node Side—40-MUX-C Cards
Drop
OSCM
DCM
40-DMX-C
40WXC
70/30
OPT-PRE
to/from
PP-MESH-4
or PP-MESH-8
40-MUX-C
Add
159332
AMP-BST
Figure 10-31 shows a functional block diagram line termination side using 40-WXC-C and 40-WSS-C
cards.
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual, R9.0
78-18377-02
10-39
Chapter 10
Node Reference
10.6.1 Line Termination Mesh Node
Figure 10-31
Line Termination Mesh Node Side—40-WSS-C Cards
Drop
OSCM
40-DMX-C
DCM
40-WXC-C
70/30
OPT-PRE
to/from
PP-MESH-4
or PP-MESH-8
AMP-BST
40-WSS-C
159333
70/30
Add
Figure 10-32 shows a functional block diagram of a node that interconnects a ROADM with MMU cards
with two native line termination mesh sides.
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual, R9.0
10-40
78-18377-02
Chapter 10
Node Reference
10.6.1 Line Termination Mesh Node
Figure 10-32
Line Termination Mesh Nodes—ROADM With MMU Cards
DROP
Node A
OSCM
DROP
xxDMX
DCM
xxDMX
ADD
OPT-BST
xxWSS
70/30
Line
MMU
OPT-PRE
MMU
Line
OPT-PRE
70/30
OPT-BST
xxWSS
DCM
ADD
OSCM
TCC
DCN
Extension
Node B
40-WXC-C
40-WXC-C
TCC
AMP-17-C
AMP-17-C
PP-MESH-4
OSCM
DCM
OPT-BST
40-WXC-C
70/30
OPT-PRE
OPT-PRE
Line
70/30
40-WXC-C
OPT-BST
DCM
40-MUX-C
ADD
40-DMX-C
DROP
40-MUX-C
ADD
OSCM
40-DMX-C
DROP
159336
Line
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual, R9.0
78-18377-02
10-41
Chapter 10
Node Reference
10.6.2 XC Termination Mesh Node
10.6.2 XC Termination Mesh Node
The XC termination mesh node, shown in Figure 10-33, is the second mesh node type. It is used to
upgrade a non-mesh node to a mesh node or to interconnect two non-mesh nodes. The XC termination
mesh nodes contain the following cards:
•
40-WXC-C cards
•
OPT-AMP-17-C cards configured in OPT-PRE mode
The XC termination mesh node is connected as follows:
•
The 40-WXC-C COM-RX port is connected to the MMU EXP-A-TX port.
•
The 40-WXC-C COM-TX port is connected to the MMU EXP-A-RX port.
•
40-WXC-C EXP-TX port is connected to the OPT-AMP-17-C COM-RX port.
•
40-WXC-C EXP-RX port is connected to the OPT-AMP-17-C COM-TX port.
•
The 40-WXC-C EXP-TX port is connected to the mesh patch panel.
•
The 40-WXC-C EXP-RX port is connected to the mesh patch panel.
Figure 10-33
XC Termination Mesh Node Shelf
DCU-xxx
DCU-xxx
Air ramp
159700
OPT-AMP-xx
OPT-AMP-xx
40-WXC-C
40-WXC-C
TCC2
Blank
Blank
Blank
TCC2
40-WXC-C
40-WXC-C
OPT-AMP-xx
OPT-AMP-xx
10.6.3 Mesh Patch Panels and Shelf Layouts
ONS 15454 mesh topologies require the installation of a four-degree patch panel (PP-MESH-4) or
eight-degree patch panel (PP-MESH-8). If the four-degree patch panel is installed, mesh topologies of
up to four degrees can be created. If the eight-degree patch panel patch panel is installed, mesh
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual, R9.0
10-42
78-18377-02
Chapter 10
Node Reference
10.6.3 Mesh Patch Panels and Shelf Layouts
topologies of up to eight degrees can be created. The four-degree patch panel contains four 1x4 optical
splitters, and the eight-degree patch panel contains eight 1x8 splitters. Each mesh patch panel contains
a 2x8 splitter that is used for the test access transmit and receive ports. Figure 10-34 shows a block
diagram for the four-degree patch panel.
Figure 10-34
Four-Degree Patch Panel Block Diagram
LC connector
MPO connector
COM RX
from all
directions
#4
1x4
splitters
EXP TX
to all
directions
Test
Access
TX Ports
2x4
splitter
159335
Test Access
RX Port
At the mesh patch panel, the signal is split into four signals (if four-degree patch panel is used) or eight
signals (if an eight-degree patch panel is used). Figure 10-35 shows the signal flow at the four-degree
patch panel. 40-WXC-C cards connect to the four-degree patch panel at the EXP TX and COM RX ports.
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual, R9.0
78-18377-02
10-43
Chapter 10
Node Reference
10.6.3 Mesh Patch Panels and Shelf Layouts
Figure 10-35
Four-Degree Patch Panel Signal Flow
Test Access Test Access
TX Ports
RX Port
EXP TX
40-WXC-C
PP-MESH-4
COM RX
EXP TX
40-WXC-C
COM RX
EXP TX
COM RX
40-WXC-C
159334
40-WXC-C
EXP TX
COM RX
The mesh patch panels interconnect 40-WXC-C cards to create mesh networks, including four-degree
and eight-degree mesh topologies. In addition, shelves with 40-WXC-C cards can be configured with
mesh patch panels to create multiring, MMU-based mesh nodes. 40-WXC-C cards can be installed in
ROADM nodes with MMU cards to upgrade a two-degree MMU-based ROADM node into four-degree
or eight-degree mesh nodes. Figure 10-36 shows the ROADM node with MMU cards configuration after
it has been upgraded into a four-degree mesh topology.
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual, R9.0
10-44
78-18377-02
TXP
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
TXP
TXP
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
40WXC
40DMX
40MUX
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank
AIC-I
TCC2/TCC2P
40DMX
Blank or TXP
40WXC
Blank or TXP
40MUX
Blank or TXP
Blank or TXP
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-BST
TXP
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40DMX
TXP
40MUX
TXP
Blank
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
Blank
AIC-I
or TXP
Blank
TXP
OPT-BST
Blank or TXP
TXP
OPT-PRE
Blank or TXP
TXP
40WXC
Blank or TXP
TXP
40MUX
Blank or TXP
TXP
40DMX
Blank or TXP
TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-BST
TXP
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40DMX
TXP
40MUX
TXP
OSCM
Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
Blank
AIC-I
40DMX
TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40MUX
TXP
TXP
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-BST
TXP
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40DMX
TXP
40MUX
TXP
OSCM
Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
Blank
AIC-I
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40MUX
TXP
OSCM
Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
40DMX
TXP
40MUX
TXP
TXP
40WXC
TXP
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-BST
TXP
TXP
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
TXP
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40MUX
TXP
40DMX
TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM
Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40DMX
TXP
40MUX
TXP
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-BST
TXP
or TXP
Blank
OPT-BST
Blank or TXP
OPT-PRE
Blank or TXP
40WXC
Blank or TXP
40MUX
Blank or TXP
40DMX
Blank or TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
40WXC
40DMX
40MUX
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
Blank or TXP
Blank or TXP
Blank or TXP
40WXC
Blank or TXP
40MUX
Air ramp
Air ramp
OSCM
Blank
AIC-I
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40MUX
TXP
Air ramp
Air ramp
40DMX
TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
PP-MESH-4
40DMX
TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
Air ramp
Air ramp
Air ramp
Air ramp
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
MS-ISC-100T
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
MS-ISC-100T
40MUX
40WXC
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
159337
Layout for ROADM Node with MMU Cards and Four-Degree Mesh Topology
Figure 10-36
10-45
78-18377-02
Node Reference
Chapter 10
10.6.3 Mesh Patch Panels and Shelf Layouts
The following figures show different mesh configurations at the shelf level. Figure 10-37 shows a basic
four-degree mesh node layout based on the shelf configuration shown in Figure 10-29 on page 10-38.
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual, R9.0
Four-Degree Line Termination Mesh Node Layout
Figure 10-37
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
40WXC
40DMX
40MUX
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank
AIC-I
Blank or TXP
Blank or TXP
Blank or TXP
40WXC
Blank or TXP
40MUX
Blank or TXP
40DMX
Blank or TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
40WXC
40DMX
40MUX
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank
AIC-I
Blank or TXP
Blank or TXP
Blank or TXP
40WXC
Blank or TXP
40MUX
Blank or TXP
40DMX
Blank or TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-BST
TXP
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40DMX
TXP
40MUX
TXP
OSCM
Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
Blank
AIC-I
40DMX
TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40MUX
TXP
TXP
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-BST
TXP
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40DMX
TXP
40MUX
TXP
OSCM
Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
Blank
AIC-I
40DMX
TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
TXP
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
TXP
OSCM
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM
Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40DMX
TXP
40MUX
TXP
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-BST
TXP
TXP
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
TXP
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40MUX
TXP
40DMX
TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM
Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
40DMX
TXP
40MUX
TXP
TXP
40WXC
TXP
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-BST
TXP
or TXP
Blank
OPT-BST
Blank or TXP
OPT-PRE
Blank or TXP
40WXC
Blank or TXP
40MUX
Blank or TXP
40DMX
Blank or TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
40DMX
40MUX
40WXC
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
Blank or TXP
Blank or TXP
Blank or TXP
40WXC
Blank or TXP
40MUX
MS-ISC-100T
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
Air ramp
Air ramp
40DMX
TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
TXP
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
TXP
Air ramp
Air ramp
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40MUX
TXP
PP-MESH-4
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40MUX
TXP
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
Air ramp
Air ramp
Air ramp
Air ramp
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
Node Reference
Chapter 10
78-18377-02
10-46
MS-ISC-100T
40MUX
40WXC
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
159338
10.6.3 Mesh Patch Panels and Shelf Layouts
Figure 10-38 shows a protected four-degree mesh node layout based on the shelf configuration shown in
Figure 10-29 on page 10-38.
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Reference Manual, R9.0
Chapter 10
Node Reference
10.6.4 Using a Mesh Node for Local Add/Drop Channel Management
Figure 10-38
Four-Degree Protected Line Termination Mesh Node Layout
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
Air ramp
Air ramp
Air ramp
Air ramp
40DMX
TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40MUX
TXP
TXP
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
TXP
40DMX
TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40MUX
TXP
TXP
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
TXP
OSCM
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM
Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
40DMX
TXP
40MUX
TXP
TXP
40WXC
TXP
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-BST
TXP
TXP
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
TXP
TXP
40WXC
TXP
40MUX
TXP
40DMX
TXP
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM
Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
40DMX
TXP
40MUX
TXP
TXP
40WXC
TXP
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-BST
TXP
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
40WXC
40MUX
40DMX
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
AIC-I
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
40DMX
40MUX
40WXC
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
Blank or TXP
Blank or TXP
Blank or TXP
40WXC
Blank or TXP
40MUX
MS-ISC-100T
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
MS-ISC-100T
40MUX
40WXC
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
PP-MESH-4
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
Air ramp
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
Air ramp
Air ramp
Air ramp
159339
OSCM
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM
Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
40DMX
TXP
40MUX
TXP
TXP
40WXC
TXP
OPT-PRE
TXP
OPT-BST
TXP
Blank or TXP
Blank or TXP
Blank or TXP
40WXC
Blank or TXP
40MUX
MS-ISC-100T
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank
AIC-I
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
MS-ISC-100T
40MUX
OPT-PRE
40WXC
OPT-BST
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
40MUX
40WXC
40DMX
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
AIC-I
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
40WXC
40DMX
40MUX
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
OPT-BST
OPT-PRE
40MUX
40WXC
40DMX
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM
AIC-I
OSCM
TCC2/TCC2P
40WXC
40DMX
40MUX
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
10.6.4 Using a Mesh Node for Local Add/Drop Channel Management
Normally, a multidegree mesh node uses four or eight 40-WXC-C cards and a four- or eight-degree patch
panel. Each of the 40-WXC-C cards uses a 40-MUX-C card to add wavelengths going to the span and a
40-DMX-C or 40-DMX-CE card to drop wavelengths coming in from the span. The 40-MUX-C and
40-DMX-C or 40-DMX-CE cards connect to their respective TXP or MXP cards. In this new local
add/drop channel management configuration, at least one of the directions of a multidegree node can be
used to manage local add/drop traffic. The advantage of this configuration is to consolidate all of the
TXP, MXP, 40-MUX-C, and 40-DMX-C or 40-DMX-CE cards where they are needed for adding or
dropping wavelengths locally. Figure 10-39 shows an example of how to set up a local add/drop
configuration.
By setting up network elements (NE) as shown in the figure, it is possible to connect the transmit ports
of TXP or MXP cards to a 40-MUX-C card and then connect the output of the 40-MUX-C card to an
OPT-BST card, which then connects to a preferred 40-WXC-C card in an NE that has been set up as a
four-degree or eight-degree mesh node. Through software configuration, the wavelengths entering the
preferred 40-WXC-C card can be selectively sent out through a multidegree patch panel and the other
40-WXC-C cards in that NE in any desired outbound direction. In the inbound direction, any of the
wavelengths entering the NE through the 40-WXC-C cards and multidegree patch panel can be
selectively routed to the preferred 40-WXC-C card facing the NE containing an OPT-PRE card and a
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Node Reference
10.7 DWDM Node Cabling
40-DMX-C or 40-DMX-CE card. These wavelengths are then sent along to the corresponding TXP/MXP
receive port. The NEs are in separate shelves with separate IP addresses and communicate through DCN
extensions.
The advantage of this configuration is that all of the transponder cards, 40-MUX-C cards, and
40-DMX-C or 40-DMX-CE cards can be located in a single NE, which then communicates with a second
mesh NE containing only 40-WXC-C cards and a multidegree patch panel. Normally, each 40-WXC-C
card in the multidegree node would have its own 40-MUX-C and 40-DMX-C or 40-DMX-CE card and
corresponding TXP/MXP cards. Using this new configuration, the extra 40-MUX-C cards, 40-DMX-C
or 40-DMX-CE cards, and corresponding TXP and MXP cards are eliminated. You now also have a
dedicated NE from which you can send and receive wavelengths to and from any desired direction in the
multidegree node. In addition, the wavelengths and the direction in which they leave the node are
reconfigurable through software and require no manual recabling.
An example of using a mesh node for local add/drop channel management is shown in Figure 10-39.
Figure 10-39
Local Add/Drop Management Using Two Network Elements
10.7 DWDM Node Cabling
DWDM node cabling is specified by the Cisco TransportPlanner Internal Connections table. The
following sections provide examples of the cabling that you will typically install for common DWDM
node types.
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Node Reference
10.7.1 OSC Link Termination Fiber-Optic Cabling
Note
The cabling illustrations shown in the following sections are examples. Always install fiber-optic cables
based on the Cisco TransportPlanner Internal Connections table for your site.
10.7.1 OSC Link Termination Fiber-Optic Cabling
OSC link termination cabling include the following characteristics:
•
The OPT-BST and OSC-CSM cards are the only cards that directly interface with the line (span)
fiber.
•
The OSCM card only carries optical service channels, not DWDM channels.
•
The OSCM and OSC-CSM cards cannot both be installed on the same side of the shelf (Side B or
Side A). You can have different cards on each side, for example an OSCM card on Side A and an
OSC-CSM card on Side B.
•
When an OPT-BST card and an OSC-CSM card are both used on the same side of the node, the
OPT-BST card combines the supervision channel with the DWDM channels and the OSC-CSM card
acts as an OSCM card; it does not carry DWDM traffic.
•
If an OPT-BST and an OSCM card are installed on Side B, the Side B OPT-BST OSC RX port is
connected to the Side B OSCM TX port, and the Side B OPT-BST OSC TX port is connected to the
Side B OSCM RX port.
•
If an OPT-BST and an OSC-CSM card are installed on Side B, the Side B OPT-BST OSC RX port
is connected to the Side B OSC-CSM LINE TX port, and the Side B OPT-BST OSC TX port is
connected to the Side B OSC-CSM LINE RX port.
•
If an OPT-BST and an OSCM card are installed on Side A, The Side A OPT-BST OSC TX port is
connected to the Side A OSCM RX port, and the Side A OPT-BST OSC RX port is connected to the
Side A OSCM TX port.
•
If an OPT-BST and an OSC-CSM card are installed on Side A, the Side A OPT-BST OSC TX port
is connected to the Side A OSC-CSM LINE RX port, and the Side A OPT-BST OSC RX port is
connected to the Side A OSC-CSM LINE TX port.
Figure 10-40 shows an example of OSC fibering for a hub node with OSCM cards installed.
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Node Reference
10.7.1 OSC Link Termination Fiber-Optic Cabling
SF
INPUT 1
B
FAIL
FAIL
FAIL
FAIL
ACT
ACT
ACT
ACT
SF
SF
SF
SF
MON
CRIT
MAJ
MIN
REM
INPUT 4
REM
SYNC
OUTPUT 1
SYNC
ACO
OUTPUT 2
ACO
MON
INPUT 3
COM
DC
LINE
46.1 - 50.1
54.1 - 58.1
TX
TX
RX
TCP/IP
CALL
TX
RX
ACT
TCP/IP
COM
COM
ACT
COM
RX
MON
COM
LINK
RING
7
8
RS-232
LOCAL OW
LINK
MON
RS-232
TX
54.1 - 58.1
6
RING
CALL
TX
5
LAMP TEST
46.1 - 50.1
3
54.1 - 58.1
54.1 - 58.1
ACO
STATUS
RX
TX
46.1 - 50.1
46.1 - 50.1
DC
LAMP TEST
38.1 - 42.1
CONTACT
ACO
RX
OUTPUT 4
4
2
38.1 - 42.1
38.1 - 42.1
38.1 - 42.1
RX
TX
RX
COM
OUTPUT 3
TX
MIN
COM
INPUT 2
A
TX
FAIL
PWR
RX
SF
TX
ACT
SF
TX
FAIL
ACT
SF
RX
FAIL
ACT
RX
FAIL
OSC
30.3 - 34.2
30.3 - 34.2
TX
RX
B
RX
MON
TX
A
MAJ
MON
TX
RX
COM
TX
RX
OSC
SF
CRIT
TX
RX
FAIL
PWR
RX
SF
OPT
BST
OPT
PRE
32MUX-0
TX
ACT
SF
32DMX-0
RX
FAIL
ACT
SF
TCC2
OSCM
AIC
30.3 - 34.2
FAIL
ACT
SF
OSCM
30.3 - 34.2
FAIL
ACT
RX
FAIL
LINE
1
TCC2
32DMX-0
32MUX-0
UC
OPT
PRE
UC
OPT
BST
DCU-xxx East
TX
DCU-xxx West
TX
TX
RX
Fibering OSC Terminations—Hub Node with OSCM Cards
RX
Figure 10-40
EXPRESS OW
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 +
9
10 +
11
13
14
15
16
17
P
115710
P
12
1
Side A OPT-BST LINE RX to Side B OPT-BST or
OSC-CSM LINE TX on adjacent node
5
Side B OSCM TX to Side B OPT-BST OSC RX
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Node Reference
10.7.2 Hub Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
2
Side A OPT-BST LINE TX to Side B OPT-BST or
OSC-CSM LINE RX on adjacent node
6
Side B OSCM RX to Side B OPT-BST OSC TX
3
Side A OPT-BST OSC TX to Side A OSCM RX
7
Side B OPT-BST LINE TX to Side A OPT-BST
or OSC-CSM LINE RX on adjacent node
4
Side A OPT-BST OSC RX to Side A OSCM TX
8
Side B OPT-BST LINE RX to Side A OPT-BST
or OSC-CSM LINE TX on adjacent node
10.7.2 Hub Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
The following rules generally apply to hub node cabling:
•
The Side A OPT-BST or OSC-CSM card common (COM) TX port is connected to the Side A
OPT-PRE COM RX port or the Side A 32DMX-O/40-DMX-C/40-DMX-CE COM RX port.
•
The Side A OPT-PRE COM TX port is connected to the Side A 32DMX-O/40-DMX-C/40-DMX-CE
COM RX port.
•
The Side A 32MUX-O/32WSS/32WSS-L COM TX port is connected to the Side A OPT-BST or
Side A OSC-CSM COM RX port.
•
The Side B 32MUX-O/32WSS/32WSS-L COM TX port is connected to the Side B OPT-BST or
Side B OSC-CSM COM RX port.
•
The Side B OPT-BST or Side B OSC-CSM COM TX port is connected to the Side B OPT-PRE COM
RX port or the Side B 32DMX-O/32DMX COM RX port.
•
The Side B OPT-PRE COM TX port is connected to the Side B 32DMX-O/32DMX COM RX port.
Figure 10-41 shows an example of a hub node with cabling. In the example, OSCM cards are installed.
If OSC-CSM cards are installed, they are usually installed in Slots 1 and 17.
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Node Reference
10.7.2 Hub Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
DCU-xxx West
FAIL
FAIL
FAIL
FAIL
ACT
ACT
ACT
ACT
SF
SF
SF
SF
MON
CRIT
MIN
REM
INPUT 4
REM
SYNC
OUTPUT 1
SYNC
ACO
OUTPUT 2
ACO
TX
RX
TX
CALL
4
2
3
ACT
ACT
TCP/IP
5
TCP/IP
CALL
6
7
8 +
9
10 +
12
13
COM
RX
10
7
14
15
16
17
P
115422
P
11
MON
TX
6
EXPRESS OW
9
COM
LINK
RING
5
4
RX
LINK
COM
RX
MON
COM
2
RS-232
LOCAL OW
COM
TX
1
1
RX
54.1 - 58.1
54.1 - 58.1
RING
RS-232
8
LINE
46.1 - 50.1
54.1 - 58.1
TX
46.1 - 50.1
TX
LAMP TEST
46.1 - 50.1
46.1 - 50.1
DC
TX
LINE
ACO
STATUS
LAMP TEST
DC
CONTACT
ACO
RX
OUTPUT 4
54.1 - 58.1
38.1 - 42.1
RX
TX
RX
COM
38.1 - 42.1
OUTPUT 3
COM
INPUT 3
MON
MAJ
MIN
TX
B
RX
INPUT 1
INPUT 2
A
TX
SF
TX
FAIL
PWR
TX
SF
RX
ACT
SF
TX
FAIL
ACT
SF
RX
FAIL
ACT
OSC
FAIL
RX
30.3 - 34.2
30.3 - 34.2
TX
RX
B
RX
MON
TX
A
MAJ
MON
TX
RX
COM
TX
RX
SF
CRIT
3
OSC
FAIL
PWR
TX
SF
OPT
BST
OPT
PRE
32MUX-0
30.3 - 34.2
ACT
SF
32DMX-0
38.1 - 42.1
FAIL
ACT
SF
TCC2
OSCM
AIC
30.3 - 34.2
FAIL
ACT
SF
OSCM
38.1 - 42.1
FAIL
ACT
RX
FAIL
RX
TCC2
32DMX-0
32MUX-0
UC
OPT
PRE
DCU-xxx East
UC
OPT
BST
TX
TX
RX
Fibering a Hub Node
RX
Figure 10-41
1
Side A DCU TX to Side A OPT-PRE DC RX 1
6
Side B 32DMX-O COM RX to Side B OPT-PRE
COM TX
2
Side A DCU RX to Side A OPT-PRE DC TX 1
7
Side B 32MUX-O COM TX to Side B OPT-BST
COM RX
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Node Reference
10.7.3 Terminal Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
3
Side A OPT-BST COM TX to Side A OPT-PRE
COM RX
8
Side B OPT-PRE COM RX to Side B OPT-BST COM
TX
4
Side A OPT-BST COM RX to Side A 32MUX-O
COM TX
9
Side B DCU TX to Side B OPT-PRE DC RX 1
5
Side A OPT-PRE COM TX to Side A 32DMX-O
COM RX
10
Side B DCU RX to Side B OPT-PRE DC TX1
1. If a DCU is not installed, a 4-dB attenuator loop, +/– 1 dB must be installed between the OPT-PRE DC ports.
10.7.3 Terminal Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
The following rules generally apply to terminal node cabling:
•
A terminal site has only one side (as compared to a hub node, which has two sides). The terminal
side can be either Side B or Side A.
•
The terminal side OPT-BST or OSC-CSM card COM TX port is connected to the terminal side
OPT-PRE COM RX port or the 32DMX-O/40-DMX-C/40-DMX-CE COM RX port.
•
The terminal side OPT-PRE COM TX port is connected to the terminal side
32DMX-O/40-DMX-C/40-DMX-CE COM RX port.
•
The terminal side 32MUX-O/40-MUX-C COM TX port is connected to the terminal side OPT-BST
or OSC-CSM COM RX port.
10.7.4 Line Amplifier Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
The following rules generally apply to line amplifier node cabling:
•
The line amplifier node layout allows all combinations of OPT-PRE and OPT-BST cards and allows
you to use asymmetrical card choices in Side A-to-Side B and Side B-to-Side A configurations. For
a given line direction, you can configure the four following possibilities:
– Only preamplification (OPT-PRE)
– Only booster amplification (OPT-BST)
– Both preamplification and booster amplification (where a line amplifier node has amplification
in at least one direction)
– Neither preamplification nor booster amplification
•
If a Side A OPT-PRE card is installed:
– The Side A OSC-CSM or OPT-BST COM TX is connected to the Side A OPT-PRE COM RX
port.
– The Side A OPT-PRE COM TX port is connected to the Side B OSC-CSM or OPT-BST COM
RX port.
•
If a Side A OPT-PRE card is not installed, the Side A OSC-CSM or OPT-BST COM TX port is
connected to the Side B OSC-CSM or OPT-BST COM RX port.
•
If an Side B OPT-PRE card is installed:
– The Side B OSC-CSM or OPT-BST COM TX port is connected to the Side B OPT-PRE COM
RX port.
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10.7.4 Line Amplifier Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
– The Side B OPT-PRE COM TX port is connected to the Side A OSC-CSM or OPT-BST COM
RX port.
If an Side B OPT-PRE card is not installed, the Side B OSC-CSM or OPT-BST COM TX port is
connected to the Side A OSC-CSM or OPT-BST COM RX port.
•
Figure 10-42 shows an example of a line amplifier node with cabling.
FAIL
PWR
SF
INPUT 1
B
REM
SYNC
OUTPUT 1
SYNC
ACO
OUTPUT 2
ACO
MON
MON
INPUT 4
COM
6
LAMP TEST
LINE
TX
5
TX
RX
TX
RX
RING
CALL
RS-232
1
TX
ACO
STATUS
TX
CONTACT
ACO
TX
RX
OUTPUT 4
DC
COM
SF
TX
MIN
REM
OUTPUT 3
DC
ACT
SF
MAJ
INPUT 3
LAMP TEST
FAIL
ACT
CRIT
MIN
4
FAIL
COM
INPUT 2
A
RX
SF
TX
ACT
SF
RX
FAIL
ACT
SF
RX
MAJ
TX
RX
FAIL
ACT
LINE
RX
FAIL
OSC
TX
B
CRIT
MON
RX
TX
TX
OSC
RX
COM
3
A
OPT
BST
RX
SF
RX
FAIL
PWR
OPT
PRE
TX
SF
TCC2
OSCM
RX
ACT
SF
AIC
OSCM
UC
FAIL
ACT
MON
FAIL
RX
TCC2
OPT
PRE
UC
OPT
BST
DCU-xxx East
TX
DCU-xxx West
TX
TX
RX
Fibering a Line Amplifier Node
RX
Figure 10-42
RS-232
7
LOCAL OW
LINK
LINK
RING
ACT
ACT
TCP/IP
TCP/IP
CALL
2
8
EXPRESS OW
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 +
10 +
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
P
115423
P
9
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Node Reference
10.7.5 OSC Regeneration Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
1
Side A DCU TX to Side A OPT-PRE DC RX 1
5
Side A OPT-BST COM RX to Side B OPT-PRE
COM TX
2
Side A DCU RX to Side A OPT-PRE DC TX 1
6
Side A OPT-BST COM RX to Side B OPT-PRE
COM TX
3
Side A OPT-BST COM TX to Side A OPT-PRE
COM RX
7
Side B DCU TX to Side B OPT-PRE DC RX1
4
Side A OPT-PRE COM TX to Side B OPT-BST
COM RX
8
Side B DCU RX to Side B OPT-PRE DC TX1
1. If a DCU is not installed, a 4-dB attenuator loop, +/– 1 dB, must be installed between the OPT-PRE DC ports.
10.7.5 OSC Regeneration Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
The following rules generally apply to OSC regeneration node cabling:
•
The Side A OSC-CSM COM TX port connects to the Side B OSC-CSM COM RX port.
•
The Side A OSC-CSM COM RX port connects to the Side B OSC-CSM COM TX port.
•
Slots 2 through 5 and 12 through 16 can be used for TXP and MXP cards.
Figure 10-43 shows an example of an OSC regeneration node with cabling.
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Node Reference
10.7.5 OSC Regeneration Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
Fibering an OSC Regeneration Node
TCC2
OSC
CSM
FAIL
FAIL
FAIL
PWR
ACT
SF
SF
A
OSC
CSM
FAIL
FAIL
PWR
ACT
B
SF
SF
A
INPUT 1
CRIT
MAJ
INPUT 2
MAJ
MIN
INPUT 3
MIN
REM
INPUT 4
REM
SYNC
OUTPUT 1
SYNC
ACO
OUTPUT 2
ACO
CRIT
UC
TCC2
AIC
ACT
B
SF
UC
Figure 10-43
OUTPUT 3
OUTPUT 4
CONTACT
ACO
ACO
STATUS
LINK
4
ACT
LINE
RING
ACT
TCP/IP
6
EXPRESS OW
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 +
10 +
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
P
115484
P
9
5
TCP/IP
CALL
2
1
TX
TX
TX
RX
RS-232
LOCAL OW
LINK
LINE
RX
COM
3
RS-232
1
TX
TX
CALL
COM
RX
RING
RX
MON
TX
RX
LAMP TEST
MON
RX
LAMP TEST
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Node Reference
10.7.6 Amplified or Passive OADM Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
1
Side A OSC-CSM LINE RX to Side B
4
OSC-CSM or OPT-BST LINE TX on adjacent
node
Side A OSC-CSM COM RX to Side B OSC-CSM
COM TX
2
Side A OSC-CSM LINE TX to Side B
5
OSC-CSM or OPT-BST LINE RX on adjacent
node
Side B OSC-CSM LINE RX to Side A OSC-CSM or
OPT-BST LINE TX on adjacent node
3
Side A OSC-CSM COM TX to Side B
OSC-CSM COM RX
6
Side B OSC-CSM LINE TX to Side A OSC-CSM or
OPT-BST LINE RX on adjacent node
10.7.6 Amplified or Passive OADM Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
The two sides of the OADM node do not need to be symmetrical. On each side, Cisco TransportPlanner
can create one of the following four configurations:
Note
•
OPT-BST and OPT-PRE
•
OSC-CSM and OPT-PRE
•
Only OSC-CSM
•
Only OPT-BST
Amplified OADM nodes contain OPT-PRE cards and/or OPT-BST cards. Passive OADM nodes do not.
Both contain add/drop channel or band cards.
The following rules generally apply for OADM node express path cabled connections:
•
TX ports should only be connected to RX ports.
•
EXP ports are connected only to COM ports in between AD-xC-xx.x or AD-xB-xx.x cards that all
belong to Side B (that is, they are daisy-chained).
•
EXP ports are connected only to COM ports in between AD-xC-xx.x or AD-xB-xx.x cards that all
belong to Side A (that is, they are daisy-chained).
•
The EXP port of the last AD-xC-xx.x or AD-xB-xx.x card on Side A is connected to the EXP port
of the first AD-xC-xx.x or AD-xB-xx.x card on Side B.
•
The OPT-BST COM RX port is connected to the nearest (in slot position) AD-xC-xx.x or
AD-xB-xx.x COM TX port.
•
The OPT-PRE COM TX port is connected to the nearest (in slot position) AD-xC-xx.x or
AD-xB-xx.x COM RX port.
•
If OADM cards are located in adjacent slots, the TCC2/TCC2P card assumes that they are connected
in a daisy-chain between the EXP ports and COM ports as noted previously.
•
The first Side A AD-xC-xx.x or AD-xB-xx.x card COM RX port is connected to the Side A
OPT-PRE or OSC-CSM COM TX port.
•
The first Side A AD-xC-xx.x or AD-xB-xx.x card COM TX port is connected to the Side A
OPT-BST or OSC-CSM COM RX port.
•
The first Side B AD-xC-xx.x or AD-xB-xx.x card COM RX port is connected to the Side B
OPT-PRE or OSC-CSM COM TX port.
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Node Reference
10.7.6 Amplified or Passive OADM Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
•
The first Side B AD-xC-xx.x or AD-xB-xx.x card COM TX port is connected to the Side B
OPT-BST or OSC-CSM RX port.
•
If a Side A OPT-PRE is present, the Side A OPT-BST or OSC-CSM COM TX port is connected to
the Side A OPT-PRE COM RX port.
•
If an Side B OPT-PRE is present, the Side B OPT-BST or OSC-CSM COM TX port is connected to
the Side B OPT-PRE COM RX port.
The following rules generally apply for OADM node add/drop path cabled connections:
•
AD-xB-xx.x add/drop (RX or TX) ports are only connected to the following ports:
– 4MD-xx.x COM TX or 4MD-xx.x COM RX ports
– Another AD-xB-xx.x add/drop port (a pass-through configuration)
•
An AD-xB-xx.x add/drop band port is only connected to a 4MD-xx.x card belonging to the same
band.
•
For each specific AD-xB-xx.x card, the add and drop ports for that band card are connected to the
COM TX and COM RX ports of the same 4MD-xx.x card.
•
The AD-xB-xx.x and 4MD-xx.x cards are located in the same side (the connected ports all have the
same line direction).
The following rules generally apply for OADM node pass-through path cabled connections:
•
Pass-through connections are only established between add and drop ports on the same band or
channel and in the same line direction.
•
AD-xC-xx.x or AD-xB-xx.x add/drop ports must be connected to other AD-xC-xx.x or AD-xB-xx.x
add/drop ports (as pass-through configurations).
•
Add (RX) ports must be connected to drop (TX) ports.
•
4MD-xx.x client input/output ports must be connected to other 4MD-xx.x client input/output ports.
•
A Side A AD-xB-xx.x drop (TX) port is connected to the corresponding Side A 4MD-xx.x COM
RX port.
•
A Side A AD-xB-xx.x add (RX) port is connected to the corresponding Side A 4MD-xx.x COM TX
port.
•
An Side B AD-xB-xx.x drop (TX) port is connected to the corresponding Side B 4MD-xx.x
COM RX port.
•
An Side B AD-xB-xx.x add (RX) port is connected to the corresponding Side B 4MD-xx.x COM TX
port.
Figure 10-44 shows an example of an amplified OADM node with AD-1C-xx.x cards installed.
Note
Figure 10-44 is an example. Always install fiber-optic cables based on the
Cisco TransportPlanner Internal Connections table for your site.
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Node Reference
10.7.6 Amplified or Passive OADM Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
FAIL
PWR
ACT
A
ACT
SF
B
SF
SF
INPUT/OUTPUT
B
FAIL
FAIL
FAIL
FAIL
ACT
ACT
ACT
ACT
SF
SF
SF
SF
MAJ
MIN
MON
A
CRIT
UC
MAJ
FAIL
ACT
B
CRIT
MON
TX
A
MIN
COM
8
TX
COM
RX
OSC
TX
RX
COM
DC
TX
LINE
LOW
ACT
9
3
15
TCP/IP
16
13
EOW
RING
5
2
TX
RX
RING
TX
LINK
ACT
4
11
RS-232
DCC-B
EXP
TX
RX
TX
RS-232
LINK
TCP/IP
2
10
RX
TX
RX
7
DCC-A
14
COM
EXP
RX
6
TX
RX
UDC-B
1
1
TX
RX
RX TX
LAMP TEST
UDC-A
RX
ACO
DWDM
TX
ACO
TX
RX
CLIENT
ACO
15xx.xx
RX TX
TX
SYNC
ACO
CLIENT
REM
SYNC
LAMP TEST
LINE
RX
DCC
DWDM
COM
TX
RX
COM
3
OSC
RX
TX
TX
15xx.xx
RX
RX
TX
RX
ACC
REM
TX
SF
FAIL
PWR
FAIL
FAIL
PWR
OPT
BST
RX
SF
OPT
PRE
TX
ACT
SF
AD-1C
-XX.X
RX
FAIL
ACT
SF
TXP
MR
2.5G
TX
FAIL
ACT
SF
TCC2
OSCM
RX
FAIL
ACT
AIC-I
OSCM
TX
FAIL
RX
TCC2
TXP
MR
2.5G
MON
AD-1C
-XX.X
MON
OPT
PRE
UC
OPT
BST
DCU-xxx East
RX
DCU-xxx West
TX
TX
RX
Fibering an Amplified OADM Node
RX
Figure 10-44
12
4
5
6
7
8 +
9
10 +
12
13
14
15
16
17
P
115424
P
11
1
Side A DCU TX to Side A OPT-PRE DC RX 1
9
Side A AD-1C-xx.x EXP RX to Side B AD-1C-xx.x
EXP TX
2
Side A DCU RX to Side A OPT-PRE DC TX 1
10
Side B TXP_MR_2.5G DWDM RX to Side B
AD-1C-xx.x (15xx.xx) TX
3
Side A OPT-BST COM TX to Side A OPT-PRE
COM RX
11
Side B TXP_MR_2.5G DWDM TX to Side B
AD-1C-xx.x (15xx.xx) RX
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Chapter 10
Node Reference
10.7.6 Amplified or Passive OADM Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
4
Side A OPT-BST COM RX to Side A AD-1C-xx.x
COM TX
12
Side B AD-1C-xx.x COM RX to OPT-PRE COM TX
5
Side A OPT-PRE COM TX to Side A AD-1C-xx.x
COM RX
13
Side B AD-1C-xx.x COM TX to OPT-BST COM RX
6
Side A AD-1C-xx.x (15xx.xx) RX to Side A
TXP_MR_2.5G DWDM TX
14
Side B OPT-PRE COM RX to Side B OPT-BST
COM TX
7
Side A AD-1C-xx.x (15xx.xx) TX to Side A
TXP_MR_2.5G DWDM RX
15
Side B DCU TX to Side B OPT-PRE DC RX1
8
Side A AD-1C-xx.x EXP TX to Side B AD-1C-xx.x
EXP RX
16
Side B DCU RX to Side B OPT-PRE DC TX1
1. If a DCU is not installed, a 4-dB attenuator loop, +/ 1 dB, must be installed between the OPT-PRE DC ports.
Figure 10-45 shows an example of a passive OADM node with two AD-1C-xx.x cards installed.
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Node Reference
10.7.6 Amplified or Passive OADM Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
Fibering a Passive OADM Node
SF
FAIL
FAIL
PWR
SF
A
TX
RX
SF
SF
B
INPUT 1
CRIT
INPUT 2
MAJ
MIN
INPUT 3
MIN
REM
INPUT 4
REM
SYNC
OUTPUT 1
SYNC
ACO
OUTPUT 2
ACO
15xx.xx
OUTPUT 3
OUTPUT 4
CONTACT
ACO
FAIL
FAIL
ACT
ACT
SF
SF
ACO
STATUS
LAMP TEST
COM
ACT
ACT
TCP/IP
RX
TX
LINE
LINK
RING
4
TX
TX
COM
RX
EXP
LINK
COM
TX
RS-232
LOCAL OW
TX
RX
TX
RX
RS-232
LINE
RX
TX
RX
TX
CALL
3
EXP
COM
RX
RING
RX
MON
MON
TX
RX
LAMP TEST
RX
A
MAJ
CRIT
UC
FAIL
PWR
ACT
B
UC
ACT
SF
OSC
CSM
TX
FAIL
ACT
AD-1C
-XX.X
RX
FAIL
TCC2
AIC
TX
TCC2
AD-1C
-XX.X
OSC
CSM
15xx.xx
Figure 10-45
TCP/IP
CALL
EXPRESS OW
1
1
5
2
6
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 +
9
10 +
12
13
14
15
16
17
P
115425
P
11
1
Side A OSC-CSM COM TX to Side A AD-1C-xx.x
COM RX
4
Side A OSC-CSM EXP RX to Side B AD-1C-xx.x
EXP TX
2
Side A OSC-CSM COM RX to Side A AD-1C-xx.x
COM TX
5
Side B AD-1C-xx.x COM TX to Side B OSC-CSM
COM RX
3
Side A OSC-CSM EXP TX to Side B AD-1C-xx.x
EXP RX
6
Side B AD-1C-xx.x COM RX to Side B OSC-CSM
COM TX
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Node Reference
10.7.7 ROADM Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
10.7.7 ROADM Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
The following rules generally apply to ROADM node cabling:
•
The Side A OPT-BST or OSC-CSM COM TX port is connected to the Side A OPT-PRE COM RX
port.
•
The Side A OPT-PRE COM TX port is connected to the Side A 32WSS COM RX port.
•
The Side A OPT-BST or OSC-CSM COM RX port is connected to the Side A 32WSS COM TX port.
•
The Side A OPT-BST (if installed) OSC TX port is connected to the Side A OSCM RX port.
•
The Side A OPT-BST (if installed) OSC RX port is connected to the Side A OSCM TX port.
•
The Side A 32WSS EXP TX port is connected to the Side B 32WSS EXP RX port.
•
The Side A 32WSS EXP RX port is connected to the Side B 32WSS EXP TX port.
•
The Side A 32WSS DROP TX port is connected to the Side A 32DMX COM RX port.
•
The Side A 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE DROP TX port is connected to the Side A 40-DMX-C or
40-DMX-CE COM RX port.
•
The Side B OPT-BST or OSC-CSM COM TX port is connected to the Side B OPT-PRE COM RX
port.
•
The Side B OPT-PRE COM TX port is connected to the Side B 32WSS COM RX port.
•
The Side B OPT-BST or OSC-CSM COM RX port is connected to the Side B 32WSS COM TX port.
•
The Side B OPT-BST (if installed) OSC TX port is connected to the Side B OSCM RX port.
•
The Side B OPT-BST (if installed) OSC RX port is connected to the Side B OSCM TX port.
•
The Side B 32WSS DROP TX port is connected to the Side B 32DMX COM RX port.
•
The Side B 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE DROP TX port is connected to the Side B 40-DMX-C or
40-DMX-CE COM RX port.
Figure 10-46 shows an example of an amplified ROADM node with cabling.
Note
Figure 10-46 is an example. Always install fiber-optic cables based on the Cisco
TransportPlanner Internal Connections table for your site.
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Node Reference
10.7.7 ROADM Node Fiber-Optic Cabling
FAIL
FAIL
FAIL
ACT
ACT
ACT
ACT
SF
SF
SF
SF
MAJ
REM
SYNC
OUTPUT 2
ACO
MON
INPUT 4
OUTPUT 1
ACO
COM
COM
ADD RX
RX
38.1-44.5
TX
DROP
12
TX
54.1-60.6
RX
COM
RX
TCP/IP
CALL
EXP
9
ACT
ACT
TX
LINK
RING
RX
LOCAL OW
LINK
RX
46.1-52.5
TX
46.1-52.5
54.1-60.6
RS-232
RS-232
TCP/IP
10
TX
CALL
RX
TX
RX
46.1-52.5
54.1-60.6
RX
TX
TX
RX
EXP
38.1-44.5
38.1-44.5
38.1-44.5
ADD RX
46.1-52.5
TX
DROP
LAMP TEST
RING
6
COM
ACO
STATUS
LAMP TEST
54.1-60.6
DC
TX
LINE
4
CONTACT
TX
TX
RX
OUTPUT 4
ACO
COM
COM
COM
OUTPUT 3
5
14
OSC
MIN
13
MON
CRIT
INPUT 3
SYNC
REM
FAIL
TX
B
RX
INPUT 1
INPUT 2
A
TX
SF
RX
FAIL
PWR
TX
SF
RX
ACT
SF
TX
FAIL
ACT
SF
TX
FAIL
ACT
MIN
TX
RX
FAIL
LINE
30.3-36.6
30.3-36.6
TX
TX
TX
B
MAJ
MON
RX
COM
RX
OSC
A
CRIT
3
RX
SF
MON
2
FAIL
PWR
OPT
BST
OPT
PRE
RX
SF
32WSS
TX
ACT
SF
32DMX
30.3-36.6
FAIL
ACT
SF
TCC2
OSCM
AIC
DC
FAIL
ACT
SF
OSCM
30.3-36.6
FAIL
ACT
TCC2
UC
32DMX
32DMX
FAIL
RX
1
32WSS
OPT
PRE
UC
OPT
BST
DCU-xxx East
RX
DCU-xxx West
TX
TX
RX
Fibering a ROADM Node
RX
Figure 10-46
11
EXPRESS OW
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 +
9
10 +
12
13
14
15
16
17
P
115473
P
11
1
Side A DCU TX to Side A OPT-PRE DC RX 1
8
Side A 32WSS EXP RX to Side B 32WSS EXP TX
2
Side A DCU RX to Side A OPT-PRE DC TX
1
9
Side B 32DMX COM RX to Side B 32WSS DROP TX
3
Side A OPT-BST COM TX to Side A OPT-PRE
COM RX
10
Side B 32WSS COM RX to Side B OPT-PRE
COM TX
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Node Reference
10.8 Automatic Node Setup
4
Side A 32WSS COM TX to Side A OPT-BST
COM RX
11
Side B 32WSS COM TX to Side B OPT-BST
COM RX
5
Side A 32WSS COM RX to Side A OPT-PRE
COM TX
12
Side B OPT-BST COM TX to Side B OPT-PRE
COM RX
6
Side A 32DMX COM RX to Side A 32WSS DROP TX 13
Side B DCU RX to Side B OPT-PRE DC TX1
7
Side A 32WSS EXP TX to Side B 32WSS EXP RX
14
Side B DCU TX to Side B OPT-PRE DC RX1
1. If a DCU is not installed, a 4-dB attenuator loop, +/–1 dB must be installed between the OPT-PRE DC ports.
10.8 Automatic Node Setup
Automatic node setup (ANS) is a TCC2/TCC2P function that adjusts values of the variable optical
attenuators (VOAs) on the DWDM channel paths to equalize the per-channel power at the amplifier
input. This power equalization means that at launch, all channels have the same amplifier power,
independent from the input signal on the client interface and independent from the path crossed by the
signal inside the node. This equalization is needed for two reasons:
•
Every path introduces a different penalty on the signal that crosses it.
•
Client interfaces add their signal to the ONS 15454 DWDM ring with different power levels.
To support ANS, integrated VOAs and photodiodes are provided in the following cards:
•
AD-xB-xx.x card express and drop paths
•
AD-xC-xx.x card express and add paths
•
4MD-xx.x card add paths
•
32MUX-O card add paths
•
32WSS/40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE/40-WXC-C add and pass through paths
•
32DMX-O card drop paths
•
32DMX, 40-DMX-C, 40-DMX-CE card input port
•
40-MUX-C card output port
•
PSM card input and output ports (both working and protect path)
Optical power is equalized by regulating the VOAs. Based on the expected per-channel power, ANS
automatically calculates the VOA values by:
•
Reconstructing the different channels paths.
•
Retrieving the path insertion loss (stored in each DWDM transmission element).
VOAs operate in one of three working modes:
•
Automatic VOA Shutdown—In this mode, the VOA is set at maximum attenuation value. Automatic
VOA shutdown mode is set when the channel is not provisioned to ensure system reliability in the
event that power is accidentally inserted.
•
Constant Attenuation Value—In this mode, the VOA is regulated to a constant attenuation
independent from the value of the input signal. Constant attenuation value mode is set on VOAs
associated to aggregated paths.
•
Constant Power Value—In this mode, the VOA values are automatically regulated to keep a constant
output power when changes occur to the input power signal. This working condition is set on VOAs
associated to a single channel path.
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10.8 Automatic Node Setup
ANS calculates the following VOA provisioning parameters:
•
Target attenuation
•
Target power
To allow you to modify ANS values based on your DWDM network requirements, provisioning
parameters are divided into two contributions:
•
Reference Contribution—(Display only) This value is set by ANS.
•
Calibration Contribution—This value can be set by the user.
To complete the equalization, ANS requires the following information:
•
The order in which DWDM cards are connected together on the express paths.
•
The number of channels that are add or dropped.
•
The number of channels and/or bands that are configured as passthrough.
ANS assumes that every DWDM port is associated to one on the node side. The port-to-side association
is based on node layout deriving from provisioned (or automatically calculated) internal patchcords.
From CTC or TL1 you can:
•
Calculate the default connections on the NE.
•
Retrieve the list of existing connections.
•
Retrieve the list of free ports.
•
Create new connections or modify existing ones.
•
Launch ANS.
After you launch ANS, one of the following statuses is provided for each ANS parameter:
•
Success - Changed—The parameter setpoint was recalculated successfully.
•
Success - Unchanged—The parameter setpoint did not need recalculation.
•
Unchanged - Port in IS state—ANS could not modify the setpoint because the ports in an IS state.
•
Not Applicable—The parameter setpoint does not apply to this node type.
•
Fail - Out of Range—The calculated setpoint is outside the expected range.
•
Fail - Missing Input Parameter—The parameter could not be calculated because the required
provisioning data is unknown or not available.
Optical patchcords are passive devices that are modeled by the two termination points, each with an
assigned slot and port. If user-provisioned optical patchcords exist, ANS checks that the new connection
is feasible (according to internal connection rules) and returns a denied message if the user connection
violates one of the rules. ANS requires the expected wavelength to be provisioned. When provisioning
the expected wavelength, the following rules apply:
•
The card name is generically characterized by the card family, and not the particular wavelengths
supported (for example, AD-2C-xx.x for all two-channel OADMs).
•
At the provisioning layer, you can provision a generic card for a specific slot using CTC or TL1.
•
Wavelength assignment is done at the port level.
•
An equipment mismatch alarm is raised when a mismatch between the identified and provisioned
value occurs. The default value for the provisioned attribute is AUTO.
ONS 15454 ANS parameters set the values required for the node to operate successfully.
Cisco TransportPlanner calculates the ANS parameters based on the requirements for a planned network.
Cisco TransportPlanner exports the parameters to an ASCII, NE Update file. The NE Update file can
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Chapter 10
Node Reference
10.8 Automatic Node Setup
then be imported by CTC to automatically provision the node for the network. All ANS parameters can
be viewed and manually modified from the node view Provisioning > WDM-ANS > Provisioning tab,
shown in Figure 10-47.
Figure 10-47
WDM-ANS Provisioning
Parameter
Value Origin Note
159349
Selector
The Provisioning > WDM-ANS > Provisioning tab presents the following information:
•
Selector—Presents the ANS parameters in a tree view. Clicking the + or – expands or collapses
individual tree elements. Clicking a tree element displays the element parameters in the table on the
right. For example, clicking the node name at the top displays all the node ANS parameters. Clicking
Rx > Amplifier displays the amplifier receive parameters only.
•
Parameter—displays the parameter name.
•
Value—Displays the parameter value. Values can be modified manually, although manual
modification of ANS parameters is not recommended. If ANS could not calculate a parameter,
“Unknown” is displayed in the Value column.
•
Origin—Indicates how the parameter was calculated:
– Default—The value is the default setting provided with the node.
– Imported—The value was set by importing the CTP XML file.
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10.8 Automatic Node Setup
– Provisioned—The value was manually provisioned.
– Automatic—The value is automatically calculated by the system using the Installation without
MP or the Raman provisioning wizard. For more information on how to provision using a
wizard, see the “DLP-G468 Configure the OPT-RAMP-C Card” task in the Cisco ONS 15454
DWDM Procedure Guide.
•
Note—Displays information for parameters that could not be calculated, that is, parameters with
Unknown appearing in the Value column.
Table 10-11 shows the following information displayed for ANS parameters on the Provisioning >
WDM-ANS > Provisioning tab.
Table 10-11
Side
i
1
•
Side—The optical side, which can be A (Slots 1 through 6) or B (Slots 12 through 17) for DWDM
nodes in non-mesh DWDM networks, or A, B, C, D, E, F, G, or H for nodes in DWDM mesh
networks.
•
Rx/Tx—Indicates whether the parameter is transmit or receive.
•
Category—The parameter category as displayed in the ANS parameter tree.
•
Min—Minimum value in decibels.
•
Max—Maximum value in decibels.
•
Def—Default value in decibels. Other defaults include MC (metro core), CG (control gain),
U (unknown).
•
Optical Type—Parameter optical type: T (Terminal), FC (flexible channel count terminal),
O (OADM), H (hub), L (line amplifier), R (ROADM), or U (unknown).
Provisioning > ANS-WDM > Provisioning Tab Parameters
Rx/Tx Category
Parameters
Min
Max
Def
Optical Types
—
Network
Type
Network Type
—
—
MC
U, T, FC, O, H, L, R
Rx
Amplifier
Side i.Rx.Amplifier.Tilt
0
30
0
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Side i.Rx.Amplifier.Gain
0
30
0
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Side i.Rx.Amplifier.Ch Power
–10
17
2
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Side i.Rx.Amplifier.Working Mode
—
—
CG
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Side i Rx.Power.Far End
–50
30
U
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Side i Rx.Power.Add&Drop - Input Power
–50
30
14
T, FC, O, H, R
Side i.Rx.Power.Add&Drop - Drop Power
–50
30
14
T, FC, O, H, R
Side i.Rx.Power.Band n.Drop Power
(where n = 1–8)
–50
30
14
FC, O
Side i.Rx.Power.Channel n.Drop Power Side B
(where n = 1–322 or 1–403)
–50
30
14
T, H, R
Power
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Node Reference
10.8.1 Raman Setup and Tuning
Table 10-11
Side
Provisioning > ANS-WDM > Provisioning Tab Parameters (continued)
Rx/Tx Category
Parameters
Min
Max
Def
Optical Types
Side i.Rx.Raman.Expected Raman Gain
0
12
0
T, O, L, R
Side i.Rx.Raman.Expected Raman EDFA Per
Channel Power
–50
30
2
T, O, L, R
Side i.Rx.Raman.Expected Raman Stage Output
Power
–50
30
–14
T, O, L, R
Side i.Rx.Raman.Raman Ratio
0.0
100.0 0
T, O, L, R
Side i.Rx.Raman.Raman Power
100
450
200
T, O, L, R
–50
30
U
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Side i.Rx.Threshold.Channel LOS Threshold
–50
30
U
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Side i Rx Amplifier In Power Fail Th
–50
30
—
Side i Rx Working and Protect Combined Power
–50
30
–14
T
Amplifier
Side i.Tx.Amplifier.Tilt
0
30
0
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Side i.Tx.Amplifier.Gain
0
30
0
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Side i.Tx.Amplifier.Ch Power
–10
17
2
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Side i.Tx.Amplifier.Working Mode
—
—
CG
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Side i.Tx.Power.Add&Drop - Output Power
–50
30
14
T, FC, O, H, R
Side i.Tx.Power.Add&Drop - By-Pass Power
–50
30
14
H
Side i.Tx.Threshold.Fiber Stage Input Threshold
–50
30
U
0
60
60
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Side i.W.Rx.Min Expected Span Loss
0
60
60
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Side i.P.Rx.Max Expected Span Loss
0
60
60
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Side i.P.Rx.Min Expected Span Loss
0
60
60
T, FC, O, H, L, R
Raman
Thresholds Side i.Rx.Threshold. LOS Threshold
Tx
Power
Threshold
4
i (w) Rx
i6(p)
Rx
—
Side i.W.Rx.Max Expected Span Loss
—
5
1. Where i = A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H
2. If 32-channel cards are installed
3. If 40-channel cards are installed
4. Working side, displayed only if you have provisioned a PSM card in line protection configuration
5. Protected side, displayed only if you have provisioned a PSM card in line protection configuration
6. If working and protected sides are not present, the Max Expected Span Loss and Min Expected Span Loss parameters are displayed without the W and P
prefix.
10.8.1 Raman Setup and Tuning
Raman amplification occurs in the optical fiber and the consequent Raman gain depends on the
characteristics of the span (attenuator presence, fiber type, junctions, etc.). Since 2 Raman pumps at 2
different wavelengths are used to stimulate the Raman effect, not only is the total signal power
calculation significant, but the right mix of power to ensure gain flatness is crucial. These setpoints of
the total Raman power and Raman ratio can be configured on the OPT-RAMP-C card in three ways:
•
Raman installation wizard
•
CTP XML file
•
CTC/TL1 interface
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10.8.1 Raman Setup and Tuning
For information on how to configure the setpoints on the OPT-RAMP-C card, see the Cisco ONS DWDM
Procedure Guide.
Raman amplification on OPT-RAMP-C cards depends on the optical fiber installed. Therefore, Raman
total power and Raman ratio values calculated using the Raman installation wizard via CTC is more
accurate than the values provisioned by loading the CTP XML file. For this reason, the value provisioned
using the wizard cannot be overriden by the CTP XML file. However, the values provisioned by the
wizard or the CTP XML file can be overriden by manually provisioning the parameters.
Once the Raman installation is completed, a report of the status of Raman configuration on a node in the
OPT-RAMP-C card can be viewed in the Maintenance > Installation tab when you are in card view. See
Figure 10-48.
Figure 10-48
View Raman Configuration Status
The Installation tab displays the following fields:
•
User—Name of user who performed the Raman pump configuration.
•
Date—Date when the Raman pump configuration was performed.
•
Status
– Tuned—Installation wizard configured the Raman pump successfully.
– Not Tuned—Raman configuration on the span is not present, or a fiber cut has occured but the
link is not restored.
– Fiber Cut Restore—A fiber cut restoration procedure was successfully performed and shows the
data.
– Raman Force Tuned—The Raman gain values were forcibly applied and shows the data.
•
S1Low (dBm)—See Table 10-12.
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10.8.1 Raman Setup and Tuning
•
S1High (dBm)—See Table 10-12.
•
S2Low (dBm)—See Table 10-12.
•
S2High (dBm)—See Table 10-12.
•
Power (mW)—Total Raman power setpoints.
•
Ratio—Raman pump ratio setpoint.
•
Gain—Expected Raman gain as calculated by the wizard.
•
Actual Tilt—Expected Raman tilt as calculated by the wizard.
•
Fiber Cut Recovery—Fiber cut has occurred, but restoration of the fiber cut link is pending.
•
Fiber Cut Date—Date when the fiber cut happened.
The Raman pump is equipped with two different Raman pumps transmitting powers (P1 and P2) at two
different wavelengths  1 and  2. During installation, the two pumps alternatively turn ON and OFF at
two different power values. 1 and 2 signals are used as probes at the end of spans to measure Raman
gain efficiency of the two Raman pumps separately.
The example in Figure 10-49 on page 10-70 shows the Raman gain on an OPT-RAMP-C card in Node
B that was measured by setting the wavelength and power measurements as follows:
 1=1530.33 nm signal probe at Node A
 2=1560.61 nm signal probe at Node A
P1 = 1425 nm power at Node B
P2 = 1452 nm power at B
Plow = 100 mW
Phigh = 280 mW
Pmin = 8 mW
Pmax = 450 mW
Figure 10-49
Raman Gain on Node B
The S1low, S1high, S2low, and S2low values in the Maintenance > Installation tab are based on the
power values read on the LINE-RX port of Node B.
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Table 10-12
Example of Raman Power Measurements
Input
P1
P2
Raman Power at Node B
 1=1530.33 nm at
Plow = 100 mW
Pmin = 8 mW
S1low
Node A
Phigh = 250 mW
Pmin = 8 mW
S1high
 2=1560.61 nm at
Pmin = 8 mW
Plow = 100 mW
S2low
Node A
Pmin = 8 mW
Phigh = 250 mW
S2low
10.9 DWDM Functional View
DWDM functional view offers a graphical view of the DWDM cards and the internal connections
between them in an MSTP node. The functional view also shows cards and connections for multidegree
MSTP nodes (up to eight sides). To navigate to the functional view of a DWDM node, use the following
navigational path in CTC when you are in node view:
Provisioning > WDM-ANS > Internal Patchcords > Functional View
An example of the functional view for an eight-sided node is shown in Figure 10-50.
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10.9.1 Navigating Functional View
Figure 10-50
Functional View for an Eight-Sided Node
240752
Side A
Fit to View
Zoom Out
Zoom In
Select
10.9.1 Navigating Functional View
The functional view has two main panes. The upper pane contains a tree view of the shelves and a
graphical view of the shelf equipment. The lower pane describes alarms and circuits in a tabular format.
The upper pane in Figure 10-50 is divided into a left pane and a right pane. The left pane shows a tree
structure view of the shelf or shelves in the MSTP system. You can expand the tree view of a shelf to
show the slot usage in that shelf. The right-hand pane is a graphical view of the sides in the shelf. In the
case of Figure 10-50, there are eight sides (A through H). Side A is located as shown in the figure. All
of the cards in each side are grouped together.
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10.9.2 Using the Graphical Display
The meanings of the icons in the upper right corner are as follows:
Note
•
Select—use this icon to select a graphical element in the graphical view pane.
•
Patchcord—Use this icon to create an internal patchcord between cards.
The Patchcord icon is not functional for Software Release 8.5.
•
Zoom In/Zoom Out—Use these icons to zoom in or zoom out in the graphical display pane.
•
Fit to View—Use this icon to have the graphical view fit the space available on your screen.
The bottom pane can be used to display alarms (using the Alarms tab) or Circuits (using the Circuits tab).
Clicking the Alarms tab displays the same information as the Alarms tab in the network, node, or card
view. Clicking the Circuits tab displays the same information as the Alarms tab in the network, node, or
card view.
10.9.2 Using the Graphical Display
This section explains how to use the graphical portion of the display to gather information about the
cards and ports.
10.9.2.1 Displaying a Side
Double-click a side to show the details of that side. For example, if you double-click Side A in
Figure 10-50, the result is as shown in Figure 10-51.
Figure 10-51
Side A Details
6
8
7
9
1
2
3
5
240759
4
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10.9.2 Using the Graphical Display
The green arrows in the diagram represent the DWDM optical path within the selected side. The optical
path in this instance is summarized as follows:
1.
The light enters the OPT-BST card LINE-RX port from the optical span.
2.
The path continues out of the OPT-BST card COM-TX port to the COM-RX port of the OPT-PRE
card.
3.
The OPT-PRE card sends the optical signal out of its COM-TX port to the 40-WXC COM-RX input
port.
4.
The 40-WXC card sends the signal to be locally dropped out of its DROP-TX port to the
40-DMX/40-DMX-CE card COM-RX port.
5.
The 40-DMX/40-DMX-CE card sends the dropped signal out on one of its multifiber push on (MPO)
connectors to the block labeled MPO. When you expand the MPO block (double-click it or
right-click it and select Down), you will see a muxponder (MUX) card inside the MPO block. One
of the eight optical fibers in the MPO cable is connected to the MUX trunk port.
6.
The optical signal from the trunk port of the MXP card inside the MPO block enters the 40-MUX
card at one of its five MPO connectors.
7.
The 40-MUX card sends the optical signal out of its COM-TX port to the ADD-RX port of the
40-WXC card.
8.
The added signal from the MXP gets sent out on the COM-TX port of the 40-WXC card to the
COM-RX port of the OPT-BST card.
9.
Finally, the OPT-BST card sends the optical signal out onto the span from its LINE-TX port.
10.9.2.2 Displaying Card Information
In the functional view graphical pane, you can double-click a card to bring up the usual CTC card view.
You can also move the mouse over a card to display information about the card. For example, when the
mouse is placed over the OPT-BST card in Side A, the tooltip text displays sh1/s1 (OPT-BST), indicating
that the OPT-BST card for Side A is located in Shelf 1, Slot 1. See Figure 10-52.
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10.9.2 Using the Graphical Display
Figure 10-52
Side A OPT-BST Card Shelf and Slot Information
10.9.2.3 Displaying Port Information
Move the mouse over a port on a card to display information about the port. For example, when the
mouse is placed over the top left port of the 40-MUX card in Side A, the tooltip text displays
CARD_PORT-BAND-1-RX, indicating that the 40-MUX port being pointed to is for the first band of
wavelengths (wavelengths 1 to 8) to be added into the optical path at the 40-MUX card. These
wavelengths come into the 40-MUX card from a transponder (TXP) or muxponder (MXP) on an MPO
connector, which contains eight integrated optical fibers. See Figure 10-53.
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10.9.2 Using the Graphical Display
Figure 10-53
Side A 40-MUX Port Information
10.9.2.4 Displaying Patchcord Information
Move the mouse over a patchcord to see the state of the output and input port associated with that
patchcord. See Figure 10-54.
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10.9.2 Using the Graphical Display
Figure 10-54
Patchcord Input and Output Port State Information
10.9.2.5 Displaying MPO Information
To show the details inside an MPO block, double-click it or right-click it and select Down. When the
detailed view is visible, right-click inside the MPO block and select Upper View to collapse the block.
When you move the mouse over the MPO block, the associated wavelengths are displayed as a tool tip
(see Figure 10-55).
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10.9.2 Using the Graphical Display
Figure 10-55
MPO Information
10.9.2.6 Alarm Box Information
Within the side display, an alarm box is shown that gives the alarm count for the Critical, Major, and
Minor alarms that affect that side. This alarm summary is only for the side, and is different from the
alarms under the Alarms tab, where all of the alarms for the system are summarized. If an alarm under
the Alarms tab appears that has to do with Side A, for example, only the appropriate alarm count in the
Alarm box for Side A is incremented. The alarm counts in the Alarm boxes for the other nodes (B
through H) are not incremented. In the graphical view of a side, the card icon or port icon changes color
to reflect the severity of an alarm associated with the card (red, orange, or yellow). The color of the MPO
block reflects the color of highest alarm severity for the elements in the MPO block.
10.9.2.7 Transponder and Muxponder Information
All of the TXP and MXP cards connected with patchcords are grouped together under the MPO icon. In
node shown in Figure 10-50, there is an MXP card in Side A that is connected to the 40-MUX card and
to the 40-DMX/40-DMX-CE card. The MXP card is connected through the 40-MUX card to the add port
on the 40-WXC card and it is also connected through the 40-DMX/40-DMX-CE card to the drop port on
the 40-WXC card. To view the connections to the MXP card from the 40-MUX card, double-click the
MPO icon. Figure 10-56 shows the MPO icon before double-clicking it and Figure 10-57 shows the
result after double-clicking it.
Note
In the case of a protected TXP (TXPP) or MXP (MXPP) card, the card icon has a label indicating the
active trunk and the protected trunk.
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10.9.2 Using the Graphical Display
Figure 10-56
Side A MPO Connection to an MXP Before Double-Clicking
240760
MPO block
MXP card
Side A MPO Connection to an MXP After Double-Clicking
240761
Figure 10-57
MPO connector
10.9.2.8 Changing the Views
When you right-click inside of a side view, a shortcut menu allows you to do the following (see
Figure 10-58):
•
Fit to View—Fits the side view into the available display space.
•
Delete Side—Deletes the selected side.
•
Rotate Left—Rotates the side 90 degrees counterclockwise (all connections are maintained).
•
Rotate Right—Rotates the side 90 degrees clockwise (all connections are maintained).
•
Horizontal Flip—Flips the side horizontally (all connections are maintained).
•
Vertical Flip—Flips the side vertically (all connections are maintained).
After you have selected Fit to View for a side, you can right-click in the side view to bring up a new
menu with the following selections (see Figure 10-59):
•
Go to Upper View—Returns to the previous view.
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10.9.2 Using the Graphical Display
•
Perform AutoLayout—Optimizes the placement of the cards and the connections between them.
Figure 10-58
Side A View Options
Figure 10-59
Side A View Options (after Selecting Fit to View)
10.9.2.9 Selecting Circuits
When the Circuits tab is selected, the circuits for the functional view are shown. The patchcord lines in
the graphical display are normally black in color. A patchcord line becomes green only when you select
a circuit associated with the patchcord that carries the selected circuit.
10.9.2.10 Displaying Optical Path Power
To show the optical power present in an optical path, move the mouse over the desired optical path (green
line). A tooltip shows the power along the optical path in dBm (see Figure 10-60).
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10.10 Non-DWDM (TDM) Networks
Figure 10-60
Optical Path Power
10.10 Non-DWDM (TDM) Networks
Non-DWDM (TDM) Networks take synchronous and asynchronous signals and multiplexes them to a
single higher bit rate for transmission at a single wavelength over fiber. When the node is configured as
a Non-DWDM Network, the supported MSTP cards — amplifiers, transponders, and muxponders, are
used in the standalone mode. MSTP applications like Circuit Provisioning, NLAC and APC are not
supported in amplified TDM networks. For more information on how to configure a node as a
Non-DWDM network, see the “NTP-G320 Configure the Node as a Non-DWDM Network” section in
“Turn Up a Node” chapter in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
When the node is configured as a Not-DWDM network, all the amplifiers are configured by default with
the following values:
•
Working mode = Control Gain
•
Channel Power Ref. = +1dBm.
Booster(LINE) amplifiers enable optical safety when used in Non-DWDM. ALS configuration is set to
“Auto Restart” by default. A manual restart request is therefore needed to turn up the bidirectional link,
in addition with an appropriated cabling (bi-directional) of LINE TX/RX ports.
In NOT-DWDM mode, you must configure significant optical parameters and thresholds before
launching the ANS application. For information on how to configure the amplifier, see the “DLP-G693
Configure the Amplifier” section in “Turn Up a Node” chapter in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Procedure Guide. For information on how to configure the PSM behavior, see the “DLP-G694 Configure
the PSM” section in “Turn Up a Node” chapter in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
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10.10 Non-DWDM (TDM) Networks
When the ANS application is launched, amplifier ports move into IS state and Gain Setpoint is
automatically calculated by the card, after initial APR cycle. Gain Setpoint must be equal to MAX [Min
Gain Setpoint of the card ; (Power Ref-Pinput)]; where Pinput is the optical power value at the ingress
port (COM-RX) of the amplification stage.
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11
Network Reference
This chapter explains the ONS 15454 dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) network
applications and topologies. The chapter also provides network-level optical performance references.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Note
In this chapter, “OPT-BST” refers to the OPT-BST, OPT-BST-E, OPT-BST-L cards, and to the
OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-C, and OPT-AMP-17-C cards when they are provisioned in OPT-LINE (optical
booster) mode. “OPT-PRE” refers to the OPT-PRE card and to the OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-C, and
OPT-AMP-17-C cards provisioned in OPT-PRE (pre-amplifier) mode.
Note
OPT-BST-L, 32WSS-L, 32DMX-L, and OPT-AMP-L cards can only be installed in L-band-compatible
nodes and networks. OPT-BST, OPT-BST-E, 32WSS, 32DMX, 40-DMX-C, 40-DMX-CE, 40-MUX-C,
40-WSS-C, 40-WSS-CE, 40-WXC-C, OPT-AMP-C, OPT-AMP-17-C, and OPT-RAMP-C cards can
only be installed in C-band-compatible nodes and networks.
Chapter topics include:
•
11.1 Network Applications, page 11-2
•
11.2 Network Topologies, page 11-2
•
11.3 Network Topologies for the OPT-RAMP-C Card, page 11-9
•
11.4 Network Topologies for the PSM Card, page 11-9
•
11.5 Optical Performance, page 11-10
•
11.6 Automatic Power Control, page 11-10
•
11.7 ROADM Power Equalization Monitoring, page 11-16
•
11.8 Span Loss Verification, page 11-17
•
11.9 Network Optical Safety, page 11-19
•
11.10 Network-Level Gain—Tilt Management of Optical Amplifiers, page 11-32
•
11.11 Optical Data Rate Derivations, page 11-37
•
11.12 Even Band Management, page 11-39
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11.1 Network Applications
11.1 Network Applications
Cisco ONS 15454 nodes can be provisioned for metro core DWDM network applications. Metro core
networks often include multiple spans and amplifiers, so the optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) is the
limiting factor for channel performance.
Within DWDM networks, the ONS 15454 uses a communications protocol, called Node Services
Protocol (NSP), to communicate with other nodes. NSP automatically updates nodes whenever a change
in the network occurs. Each ONS 15454 DWDM node can:
•
Identify other ONS 15454 DWDM nodes in the network.
•
Identify the different types of DWDM networks.
•
Identify when the DWDM network is complete and when it is incomplete.
11.2 Network Topologies
The ONS 15454 DWDM network topologies include ring networks, linear networks, and mesh networks.
11.2.1 Ring Networks
Ring networks support hubbed, multi-hubbed, any-to-any, and mesh traffic topologies.
11.2.1.1 Hubbed Traffic Topology
In the hubbed traffic topology (Figure 11-1), a hub node terminates all the DWDM channels. A channel
can be provisioned to support protected traffic between the hub node and any node in the ring. Both
working and protected traffic use the same wavelength on both sides of the ring. Protected traffic can
also be provisioned between any pair of optical add/drop multiplexing (OADM) nodes, except that either
the working or the protected path must be regenerated in the hub node.
Protected traffic saturates a channel in a hubbed topology, that is, no channel reuse is possible. However,
the same channel can be reused in different sections of the ring by provisioning unprotected multihop
traffic. From a transmission point of view, this network topology is similar to two bidirectional
point-to-point links with OADM nodes.
For more information about hub nodes, see the “10.1.1 Hub Node” section on page 10-2.
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11.2.1 Ring Networks
Figure 11-1
Hubbed Traffic Topology
Hub
Amplified OADM
Passive OADM
Line amplifier
OSC
Passive OADM
90995
Amplified OADM
OSC
Amplified OADM
11.2.1.2 Multihubbed Traffic Topology
A multihubbed traffic topology (Figure 11-2) is based on the hubbed traffic topology, except that two or
more hub nodes are added. Protected traffic can only be established between the two hub nodes.
Protected traffic can be provisioned between a hub node and any OADM node only if the allocated
wavelength channel is regenerated through the other hub node. Multihop traffic can be provisioned on
this ring. From a transmission point of view, this network topology is similar to two or more
point-to-point links with OADM nodes.
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11.2.1 Ring Networks
Figure 11-2
Multihubbed Traffic Topology
Hub
Amplified OADM
Passive OADM
Line amplifier
OSC
Passive OADM
Hub
90998
Amplified OADM
OSC
11.2.1.3 Any-to-Any Traffic Topology
The any-to-any traffic topology (Figure 11-3) contains only reconfigurable OADM (ROADM) nodes
(with or without optical service channel [OSC] regeneration) or optical amplifier nodes. This topology
potentially allows you to route every wavelength from any source to any destination node inside the
network.
See the “10.1.4 ROADM Node” section on page 10-12 for more information.
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11.2.1 Ring Networks
Figure 11-3
Any-to-Any Traffic Topology
ROADM
ROADM
ROADM
OSC
ROADM
ROADM
115730
ROADM
OSC
11.2.1.4 Meshed Traffic Topology
The meshed traffic topology (Figure 11-4) does not use hubbed nodes; only amplified and passive
OADM nodes are present. Protected traffic can be provisioned between any two nodes; however, the
selected channel cannot be reused in the ring. Unprotected multihop traffic can be provisioned in the
ring. A meshed ring must be designed to prevent amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) lasing. This is
done by configuring a particular node as an anti-ASE node. An anti-ASE node can be created in two
ways:
•
Equip an OADM node with 32MUX-O cards and 32DMX-O cards. This solution is adopted when
the total number of wavelengths deployed in the ring is higher than ten. OADM nodes equipped with
32MUX-O cards and 32DMX-O cards are called full OADM nodes.
•
When the total number of wavelengths deployed in the ring is lower than ten, the anti-ASE node is
configured by using an OADM node where all the channels that are not terminated in the node are
configured as “optical pass-through.” In other words, no channels in the anti-ASE node can travel
through the express path of the OADM node.
For more information about OADM nodes, see the “10.1.3 OADM Node” section on page 10-8. For
more information about anti-ASE nodes, see the “10.1.5 Anti-ASE Node” section on page 10-15.
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11.2.2 Linear Networks
Figure 11-4
Meshed Traffic Topology
Anti-ASE
Passive OADM
Amplified OADM
Line amplifier
OSC
Passive OADM
Amplified OADM
90997
Amplified OADM
OSC
11.2.2 Linear Networks
Linear configurations are characterized by the use of two terminal nodes, east and west. The 32-channel
terminal nodes can be equipped with a 32MUX-O card and a 32DMX-O card, or with a 32WSS card and
a 32DMX or 32DMX-O card. The 40-channel terminal nodes can be equipped with a 40-MUX-C card
and a 40-DMX-C/40-DMX-CE card or a 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE card with a 40-DMX-C/40-DMX-CE
card. OADM or line amplifier nodes can be installed between the two terminal nodes. Only unprotected
traffic can be provisioned in a linear configuration. Figure 11-5 shows five ONS 15454 nodes in a linear
configuration with an amplified and a passive OADM node.
Figure 11-5
Linear Configuration with an OADM Node
OSC
Line amplifier
Amplified OADM
Passive OADM
East terminal
90996
West terminal
OSC
Figure 11-6 shows five ONS 15454 nodes in a linear configuration without an OADM node. See the
“10.1.2 Terminal Node” section on page 10-5 for more information.
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11.2.3 Mesh Networks
West terminal
Linear Configuration without an OADM Node
Line amplifier
OSC
Line amplifier
Line amplifier
East terminal
96639
Figure 11-6
OSC
A single-span link is a type of linear configuration characterized by a single-span link with
preamplification and post-amplification. A single-span link is also characterized by the use of two
terminal nodes, east and west. Only unprotected traffic can be provisioned on a single-span link.
Figure 11-7 shows ONS 15454s in a single-span link. Eight channels are carried on one span.
Single-span link losses apply to OC-192/STM-64 LR ITU cards. The optical performance values are
valid assuming that the sum of the OADM passive node insertion losses and the span losses does not
exceed 35 dB.
Figure 11-7
West terminal
Single-Span Link
OSC
East terminal
90999
~130/150 km
OSC
11.2.3 Mesh Networks
A mesh network can be native or multiring. In a native mesh network (Figure 11-8), any combination of
four-degree and eight-degree mesh nodes can work together. Four-degree mesh nodes transmit an optical
signal in four directions, while an eight-degree mesh node transmits an optical signal in eight directions.
For additional information about mesh nodes, see the “10.6 Configuring Mesh DWDM Networks”
section on page 10-37. The intermediate nodes are ROADM nodes. In a mesh node, all wavelengths can
be routed through four (four-degree mesh node) to eight (eight-degree mesh node) different optical line
termination ports using a 40-WXC-C card without any optical-electrical-optical (OEO) regeneration. It
is possible to combine 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE, 40-WXC-C, and 32WSS cards in the same mesh
network without impacting system performance. For nodes equipped with 32WSS cards, the maximum
system capacity is 32 channels. Terminal sites are connected to the mesh network as a spur.
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11.2.3 Mesh Networks
Figure 11-8
Mesh Network
N-degree
mesh
ROADM
Terminal
N-degree
mesh
N-degree
mesh
N-degree
mesh
ROADM
OLA
ROADM
N-degree
mesh
N-degree
mesh
ROADM
Terminal
159494
N-degree
mesh
In a multiring mesh network (Figure 11-9), several rings are connected with four-degree or eight-degree
mesh nodes. The intermediate ROADM nodes are equipped with MMU cards. All wavelengths can be
routed among two or more rings using a 40-WXC-C card without any optical-electrical-optical (OEO)
regeneration. As in a native mesh network, is possible to combine 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE, 40-WXC-C,
and 32WSS cards in the same multiring network without impacting system performance. For nodes
equipped with 32WSS cards, maximum system capacity is limited to 32 channels. A terminal node is
connected to a multiring node as a spur.
For information on node configurations for both native mesh and multiring networks, see the
“10.6 Configuring Mesh DWDM Networks” section on page 10-37.
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11.3 Network Topologies for the OPT-RAMP-C Card
Figure 11-9
Multiring Network
DCM-xxx
DCM-xxx
Air ramp
159453
OPT-BST or OSC-CSM
OPT-PRE or TXP/MXP
40-WSS-C
40-DMX-C
Blank or TXP/MXP or MS-ISC-100T
TCC2/TCC2P
OSCM or Blank
AIC-I
OSCM or Blank
TCC2/TCC2P
Blank or TXP/MXP or MS-ISC-100T
40-DMX-C
40-WSS-C
OPT-PRE or TXP/MXP
OPT-BST or OSC-CSM
11.3 Network Topologies for the OPT-RAMP-C Card
The OPT-RAMP-C card can be equipped in any of the following network topologies:
•
Open (hubbed) ring network
•
Multi-hubbed ring network
•
Closed (meshed) ring network
•
Any-to-any ring network
•
Linear network topology
•
Point-to-point linear network topology
•
Multi-ring network
•
Mesh network
•
Hybrid network
For more information about the OPT-RAMP-C card, see Chapter 4, “Optical Amplifier Cards.”.
11.4 Network Topologies for the PSM Card
The PSM card supports the following network topologies:
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11.5 Optical Performance
•
The PSM card in a channel protection configuration is supported in all network topologies except
linear networks as it is not possible to configure a working and protect path.
•
The PSM card in a multiplex section protection configuration supports linear point-to-point network
topologies.
•
The PSM card in a line protection configuration supports the following network topologies:
– Linear point-to-point in a single span network (if the OSC card is used).
– Linear point-to-point multispan network if a DCN extension is used (on all spans). In this case,
the maximum number of span links can be divided into three according to the DCN extension
optical safety requirements.
11.5 Optical Performance
This section provides optical performance information for ONS 15454 DWDM networks. The
performance data is a general guideline based upon the network topology, node type, client cards, fiber
type, number of spans, and number of channels. The maximum number of nodes that can be in an
ONS 15454 DWDM network is 16. The DWDM topologies and node types that are supported are shown
in Table 11-1.
Table 11-1
Supported Topologies and Node Types
Number of Channels
32 channels
Fiber
SMF-28
1
E-LEAF2
TW-RS
3
Topologies
Node Types
Ring
Hub
Linear
Active OADM
Linear without OADM
Passive OADM
Terminal
Line
OSC regeneration
16 channels
SMF-28
Ring
Hub
Linear
Active OADM
Linear without OADM
Passive OADM
Terminal
Line
OSC regeneration
8 channels
SMF-28
Linear without OADM
Terminal
Line
1. SMF-28 = single-mode fiber 28.
2. E-LEAF = enhanced large effective area fiber.
3. TW-RS = TrueWave reduced slope fiber.
11.6 Automatic Power Control
The ONS 15454 automatic power control (APC) feature performs the following functions:
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11.6.1 APC at the Amplifier Card Level
Note
•
Maintains constant per-channel power when desired or accidental changes to the number of channels
occur. Constant per-channel power increases optical network resilience.
•
Compensates for optical network degradation (aging effects).
•
Simplifies the installation and upgrade of DWDM optical networks by automatically calculating the
amplifier setpoints.
APC algorithms manage the optical parameters of the OPT-BST, OPT-PRE, OPT-AMP-17-C, 32DMX,
40-DMX-C, 40-DMX-CE, OPT-BST-L, OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-C, and 32DMX-L cards.
Amplifier software uses a control gain loop with fast transient suppression to keep the channel power
constant regardless of any changes in the number of channels. Amplifiers monitor the changes to the
input power and change the output power proportionately according to the calculated gain setpoint. The
shelf controller software emulates the control output power loop to adjust for fiber degradation. To
perform this function, the TCC2/TCC2P needs to know the channel distribution, which is provided by a
signaling protocol, and the expected per-channel power, which you can provision. The TCC2/TCC2P
compares the actual amplifier output power with the expected amplifier output power and modifies the
setpoints if any discrepancies occur.
11.6.1 APC at the Amplifier Card Level
In constant gain mode, the amplifier power out control loop performs the following input and output
power calculations, where G represents the gain and t represents time.
Pout (t) = G * Pin (t) (mW)
Pout (t) = G + Pin (t) (dB)
In a power-equalized optical system, the total input power is proportional to the number of channels. The
amplifier software compensates for any variation of the input power due to changes in the number of
channels carried by the incoming signal.
Amplifier software identifies changes in the read input power in two different instances, t1 and t2, as a
change in the traffic being carried. The letters m and n in the following formula represent two different
channel numbers. Pin/ch represents the input power per channel.
Pin (t1)= nPin/ch
Pin (t2) = mPin/ch
Amplifier software applies the variation in the input power to the output power with a reaction time that
is a fraction of a millisecond. This keeps the power constant on each channel at the output amplifier, even
during a channel upgrade or a fiber cut.
The per-channel power and working mode (gain or power) are set by automatic node setup (ANS). The
provisioning is conducted on a per-side basis. A preamplifier or a booster amplifier facing Side i is
provisioned using the Side i parameters present in the node database, where i - A, B, C, D, E, F, G, or H.
Starting from the expected per-channel power, the amplifiers automatically calculate the gain setpoint
after the first channel is provisioned. An amplifier gain setpoint is calculated in order to make it equal
to the loss of the span preceding the amplifier itself. After the gain is calculated, the setpoint is no longer
changed by the amplifier. Amplifier gain is recalculated every time the number of provisioned channels
returns to zero. If you need to force a recalculation of the gain, move the number of channels back to
zero.
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11.6.2 APC at the Shelf Controller Layer
11.6.2 APC at the Shelf Controller Layer
Amplifiers are managed through software to control changes in the input power caused by changes in
the number of channels. The software adjusts the output total power to maintain a constant per-channel
power value when the number of input channel changes.
Changes in the network characteristics have an impact on the amplifier input power. Changes in the input
power are compensated for only by modifying the original calculated gain, because input power changes
imply changes in the span loss. As a consequence, the gain to span loss established at amplifier start-up
is no longer satisfied, as shown in Figure 11-10.
Figure 11-10
Using Amplifier Gain Adjustment to Compensate for System Degradation
Node 2
P out1
in2 P
P out2
L
G1
G2
159501
Node 1
In Figure 11-10, Node 1 and Node 2 are equipped with booster amplifiers and preamplifiers. The input
power received at the preamplifier on Node 2 (Pin2) depends on the total power launched by the booster
amplifier on Node1, Pout1(n) (where n is the number of channels), and the effect of the span attenuation
(L) between the two nodes. Span loss changes due to aging fiber and components or changes in operating
conditions. The power into Node 2 is given by the following formula:
Pin2 = LPout1(n)
The phase gain of the preamplifier on Node 2 (GPre-2) is set during provisioning in order to compensate
for the span loss so that the Node 2 preamplifier output power (Pout-Pre-2) is equal to the original
transmitted power, as represented in the following formula:
Pout-Pre-2 = L x GPre-2 x Pout1(n)
In cases of system degradation, the power received at Node 2 decreases due to the change of span
insertion loss (from L to L'). As a consequence of the preamplifier gain control working mode, the
Node 2 preamplifier output power (Pout-Pre-2) also decreases. The goal of APC at the shelf controller
layer is simply to detect if an amplifier output change is needed because of changes in the number of
channels or to other factors. If factors other than changes in the number of channels occur, APC
provisions a new gain at the Node 2 preamplifier (GPre-2') to compensate for the new span loss, as shown
in the formula:
GPre-2' = GPre-2 (L/ L') = GPre-2 + [Pout-Pre-2 –Exp(Pout-Pre-2)]
Generalizing on the above relationship, APC is able to compensate for system degradation by adjusting
working amplifier gain or variable optical attenuation (VOA) and to eliminate the difference between the
power value read by the photodiodes and the expected power value. The expected power values are
calculated using:
•
Provisioned per-channel power value
•
Channel distribution (the number of express, add, and drop channels in the node)
•
ASE estimation
Channel distribution is determined by the sum of the provisioned and failed channels. Information about
provisioned wavelengths is sent to APC on the applicable nodes during circuit creation. Information
about failed channels is collected through a signaling protocol that monitors alarms on ports in the
applicable nodes and distributes that information to all the other nodes in the network.
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11.6.2 APC at the Shelf Controller Layer
ASE calculations purify the noise from the power level reported from the photodiode. Each amplifier can
compensate for its own noise, but cascaded amplifiers cannot compensate for ASE generated by
preceding nodes. The ASE effect increases when the number of channels decreases; therefore, a
correction factor must be calculated in each amplifier of the ring to compensate for ASE build-up.
APC is a network-level feature that is distributed among different nodes. An APC domain is a set of
nodes that is controlled by the same instance of APC at the network level. An APC domain optically
identifies a portion of the network that can be independently regulated. An optical network can be
divided into several different domains, with the following characteristics:
•
Every domain is terminated by two node sides. The node sides terminating domains are:
– Terminal node (any type)
– ROADM node
– Hub node
– Cross-connect (XC) termination mesh node
– Line termination mesh node
•
APC domains are shown in both Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) and Transaction Language One
(TL1).
•
In CTC, domains are shown in the network view and reported as a list of spans. Each span is
identified by a node/side pair, for example:
APC Domain Node_1 Side A, Node_4 Side B
+ Span 1: Node_1 Side A, Node_2 Side B
+ Span 2: Node_2 Side A, Node_3 Side B
+ Span 3: Node_3 Side A, Node_4 Side B
•
APC domains are not refreshed automatically; instead, they are refreshed using a Refresh button.
Inside a domain, the APC algorithm designates a master node that is responsible for starting APC hourly
or every time a new circuit is provisioned or removed. Every time the master node signals APC to start,
gain and VOA setpoints are evaluated on all nodes in the network. If corrections are needed in different
nodes, they are always performed sequentially following the optical paths starting from the master node.
APC corrects the power level only if the variation exceeds the hysteresis thresholds of +/– 0.5 dB. Any
power level fluctuation within the threshold range is skipped since it is considered negligible. Because
APC is designed to follow slow time events, it skips corrections greater than 3 dB. This is the typical
total aging margin that is provisioned during the network design phase. After you provision the first
channel or the amplifiers are turned up for the first time, APC does not apply the 3 dB rule. In this case,
APC corrects all the power differences to turn up the node.
To avoid large power fluctuations, APC adjusts power levels incrementally. The maximum power
correction is +/– 0.5 dB. This is applied to each iteration until the optimal power level is reached. For
example, a gain deviation of 2 dB is corrected in four steps. Each of the four steps requires a complete
APC check on every node in the network. APC can correct up to a maximum of 3 dB on an hourly basis.
If degradation occurs over a longer time period, APC compensates for it by using all margins that you
provision during installation.
If no margin is available, adjustments cannot be made because setpoints exceed the ranges. APC
communicates the event to CTC, Cisco Transport Manager (CTM), and TL1 through an APC Fail
condition. APC clears the APC fail condition when the setpoints return to the allowed ranges.
APC can be manually disabled. In addition, APC automatically disables itself when:
•
An Hardware Fail (HF) alarm is raised by any card in any of the domain nodes.
•
A Mismatch Equipment Alarm (MEA) is raised by any card in any of the domain nodes.
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11.6.3 Managing APC
•
An Improper Removal (IMPROPRMVL) alarm is raised by any card in any of the domain nodes.
•
Gain Degrade (GAIN-HDEG), Power Degrade (OPWR-HDEG), and Power Fail (PWR-FAIL)
alarms are raised by the output port of any amplifier card in any of the domain nodes.
•
A VOA degrade or fail alarm is raised by any of the cards in any of the domain nodes.
•
The signaling protocol detects that one of the APC instances in any of the domain nodes is no longer
reachable.
The APC state (Enable/Disable) is located on every node and can be retrieved by the CTC or TL1
interface. If an event that disables APC occurs in one of the network nodes, APC is disabled on all the
other nodes and the APC state changes to DISABLE - INTERNAL. The disabled state is raised only by
the node where the problem occurred to simplify troubleshooting.
APC raises the following minor, non-service-affecting alarms at the port level in CTC, TL1, and Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMP):
•
APC Out of Range—APC cannot assign a new setpoint for a parameter that is allocated to a port
because the new setpoint exceeds the parameter range.
•
APC Correction Skipped—APC skipped a correction to one parameter allocated to a port because
the difference between the expected and current values exceeds the +/– 3 dB security range.
•
APC Disabled—APC is disabled, either by a user or internal action.
After the error condition is cleared, the signaling protocol enables APC on the network and the APC
DISABLE - INTERNAL condition is cleared. Because APC is required after channel provisioning to
compensate for ASE effects, all optical channel network connection (OCHNC) and optical channel client
connection (OCHCC) circuits that you provision during the disabled APC state are kept in the
Out-of-Service and Autonomous, Automatic In-Service (OOS-AU,AINS) (ANSI) or
Unlocked-disabled,automaticInService (ETSI) service state until APC is enabled. OCHNCs and
OCHCCs automatically go into the In-Service and Normal (IS-NR) (ANSI) or Unlocked-enabled (ETSI)
service state only after APC is enabled.
11.6.3 Managing APC
The APC status is indicated by four APC states shown in the node view status area:
•
Enabled—APC is enabled.
•
Disabled—APC was disabled manually by a user.
•
Disable - Internal—APC has been automatically disabled for an internal cause.
•
Not Applicable—The node is provisioned to Not DWDM, which does not support APC.
You can view the APC information and disable and enable APC manually on the Maintenance >
DWDM > APC tab. See Figure 11-11 for an example of how the information is displayed.
Caution
When APC is disabled, aging compensation is not applied and circuits cannot be activated. Do not
disable APC unless it is required for specific maintenance or troubleshooting tasks. Always enable APC
as soon as the tasks are completed.
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11.6.3 Managing APC
Figure 11-11
Automatic Power Control
APC state
The APC subtab provides the following information:
•
Position—The slot number, card, and port for which APC information is shown.
•
Last Modification—Date and time APC parameter setpoints were last modified.
•
Parameter—The parameter that APC last modified.
•
Last Check—Date and time APC parameter setpoints were last verified.
•
Side—The side where the APC information for the card and port is shown.
•
State—The APC state.
A wrong use of maintenance procedures (for example, the procedures to be applied in case of fiber cut
repair) can lead the system to raise the APC Correction Skipped alarm. The APC Correction Skipped
alarm strongly limits network management (for example, a new circuit cannot be turned into IS). The
Force APC Correction button helps to restore normal conditions by clearing the APC Correction Skipped
alarm.
The Force APC Correction button must be used under the Cisco TAC surveillance since its misuse can
lead to traffic loss.
The Force APC Correction button is available in the Card View > Maintenance > APC tab pane in CTC
for the following cards:
•
OPT-PRE
•
OPT-BST-E
•
OPT-BST
•
OPT-AMP-C
•
OPT-AMP-17C
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11.7 ROADM Power Equalization Monitoring
•
AD-xB
•
AD-xC
This feature is not available for the TL1 interface.
11.7 ROADM Power Equalization Monitoring
ROADM nodes allow you to monitor the 32WSS, 40-WSS-C/40-WSS-CE, and 40-WXC-C card
equalization functions on the Maintenance > DWDM > ROADM Power Monitoring > Optical Side n-n
tab, where n-n is A-B, C-D, E-F, or G-H (Figure 11-12). The tab shows the input channel power (Padd),
the express or pass-through power (Ppt) and the power level at output (Pout).
Figure 11-12
ROADM Power Monitoring Subtab
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11.8 Span Loss Verification
11.8 Span Loss Verification
Span loss measurements can be performed from the Maintenance > DWDM > WDM Span Check tab
(Figure 11-13). The CTC span check compares the far-end OSC power with the near-end OSC power. A
Span Loss Out of Range condition is raised when the measured span loss is higher than the maximum
expected span loss. It is also raised when the measured span loss is lower than the minimum expected
span loss and the difference between the minimum and maximum span loss values is greater than 1 dB.
The minimum and maximum expected span loss values are calculated by Cisco TransportPlanner for the
network and imported into CTC. However, you can manually change the minimum and expected span
loss values.
CTC span loss measurements provide a quick span loss check and are useful whenever changes to the
network occur, for example after you install equipment or repair a broken fiber. CTC span loss
measurement resolutions are:
•
+/– 1.5 dB for measured span losses between 0 and 25 dB
•
+/– 2.5 dB for measured span losses between 25 and 38 dB
For ONS 15454 span loss measurements with higher resolutions, an optical time domain reflectometer
(OTDR) must be used.
Note
From Software Release 9.0 onwards, span loss measurement is performed using C-band channels,
whenever available instead of OSC signals. Software Release 9.0 is not interoperable with earlier release
versions that are only OSC based. Therefore, span loss measurement cannot be done on a span if the
adjacent nodes are running different software release versions; for example one node running Software
Release 8.0 or earlier and the second node running Software Release 9.0 or later.
11.8.1 Span Loss Measurements on Raman Links
Span loss measured when Raman amplification is active is less accurate. The span loss is corrected by
the Raman gain and Raman noise.
Span loss on a Raman link is measured in the following states:
•
Automatically during Raman link setup (without Raman amplification)
•
Automatically during fiber cut restore (without Raman amplification)
•
Automatically during creation of the first channel (without Raman amplification)
•
Periodically or upon user request (with Raman amplification)
CTC reports three values in the Maintenance > DWDM > WDM Span Check tab (Figure 11-16 on
page 11-26):
•
Estimated Measure with Raman—Estimated span loss with Raman pump turned ON.
•
Installation Measure with Raman Off—Measures span loss when Raman pump is turned OFF during
Raman installation.
•
Latest Measure with Raman Off—Measures span loss with Raman pump turned OFF; shows latest
available values.
The first measurement request must be triggered by the user and subsequent measurements are
performed automatically on an hourly basis.
A Span Loss Out of Range condition is raised under the following conditions:
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11.8.1 Span Loss Measurements on Raman Links
•
Span loss is greater than the maximum expected span loss + resolution
•
Span loss is less than the minimum expected span loss – resolution
The minimum and maximum expected span loss values are calculated by Cisco Transport Planner for the
network and imported into CTC. However, you can manually change the minimum and expected span
loss values.
Note
During Raman installation using a wizard, the Span Loss Out of Range alarm is not raised when the out
of range condition is raised. In such a case, the wizard fails and an error message is displayed, and the
span is not tuned.
CTC span loss measurements provide a quick span loss check and are useful whenever changes to the
network occur, for example after you install equipment or repair a broken fiber. CTC span loss
measurement resolutions are:
Figure 11-13
•
+/– 1.5 dB for span loss measurements between 0 and 26 dB
•
+/– 2.0 dB for span loss measurements between 26 and 31 dB
•
+/– 3.0 dB for span loss measurements between 31 and 34 dB
•
+/– 4.0 dB for span loss measurements between 34 and 36 dB
WDM Span Check Tab
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11.9 Network Optical Safety
11.9 Network Optical Safety
If a fiber break occurs on the network, automatic laser shutdown (ALS) automatically shuts down the
OSCM and OSC-CSM OSC laser output power and the optical amplifiers contained in the OPT-BST,
OPT-BST-E, OPT-BST-L, OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-C, OPT-AMP-17-C, and OPT-RAMP-C cards, and
the TX VOA in the protect path of the PSM card (in line protection configuration only). (Instead, the
PSM active path will use optical safety mechanism implemented by the booster amplifier or OSC-CSM
card that are mandatory in the line protection configuration.)
The Maintenance > ALS tab in CTC card view provide the following ALS management options for
OSCM, OSC-CSM, OPT-BST, OPT-BST-E, OPT-BST-L, OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-C, OPT-AMP-17-C,
OPT-RAMP-C and PSM (on the protect path, only in line protection configuration) cards:
•
Disable—ALS is off. The OSC laser transmitter and optical amplifiers are not automatically shut
down when a traffic outage loss of signal (LOS) occurs.
•
Auto Restart—ALS is on. The OSC laser transmitter and optical amplifiers automatically shut down
when traffic outages (LOS) occur. It automatically restarts when the conditions that caused the
outage are resolved. Auto Restart is the default ALS provisioning for OSCM, OSC-CSM, OPT-BST,
OPT-BST-E, OPT-BST-L, OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-C, OPT-AMP-17-C, OPT-RAMP-C and PSM
(on the protect path, only in line protection configuration) cards.
•
Manual Restart—ALS is on. The OSC laser transmitter and optical amplifiers automatically shut
down when traffic outages (LOS) occur. However, the laser must be manually restarted when
conditions that caused the outage are resolved.
•
Manual Restart for Test—Manually restarts the OSC laser transmitter and optical amplifiers for
testing.
11.9.1 Automatic Laser Shutdown
When ALS is enabled on OPT-BST, OPT-BST-E, OPT-BST-L, OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-C,
OPT-AMP-17-C, OPT-RAMP-C, PSM (on the protect path, only in line protection configuration),
OSCM, and OSC-CSM cards, a network safety mechanism will occur in the event of a system failure.
ALS provisioning is also provided on the transponder (TXP) and muxponder (MXP) cards. However, if
a network uses ALS-enabled OPT-BST, OPT-BST-E, OPT-BST-L, OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-C,
OPT-AMP-17-C, OPT-RAMP-C, PSM (on the protect path, only in line protection configuration),
OSCM, and OSC-CSM cards, ALS does not need to be enabled on the TXP cards or MXP cards. ALS
is disabled on TXP and MXP cards by default and the network optical safety is not impacted.
If TXP and MXP cards are connected directly to each other without passing through a DWDM layer,
ALS should be enabled on them. The ALS protocol goes into effect when a fiber is cut, enabling some
degree of network point-to-point bidirectional traffic management between the cards.
If ALS is disabled on the OPT-BST, OPT-BST-E, OPT-BST-L, OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-C,
OPT-AMP-17-C, OPT-RAMP-C, PSM (on the protect path, only in line protection configuration),
OSCM, and OSC-CSM cards (the DWDM network), ALS can be enabled on the TXP and MXP cards to
provide laser management in the event of a fiber break in the network between the cards.
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11.9.2 Automatic Power Reduction
11.9.2 Automatic Power Reduction
Automatic power reduction (APR) is controlled by the software and is not user configurable. During
amplifier restart after a system failure, the amplifier (OPT-BST, for example) operates in pulse mode and
an APR level is activated so that the Hazard Level 1 power limit is not exceeded. This is done to ensure
personnel safety.
When a system failure occurs (cut fiber or equipment failure, for example) and ALS Auto Restart is
enabled, a sequence of events is placed in motion to shut down the amplifier laser power, then
automatically restart the amplifier after the system problem is corrected. As soon as a loss of optical
payload and OSC is detected at the far end, the far-end amplifier shuts down. The near-end amplifier
then shuts down because it detects a loss of payload and OSC due to the far-end amplifier shutdown. At
this point, the near end attempts to establish communication to the far end using the OSC laser
transmitter. To do this, the OSC emits a two-second pulse at very low power (maximum of 0 dBm) and
waits for a similar two-second pulse in response from the far-end OSC laser transmitter. If no response
is received within 100 seconds, the near end tries again. This process continues until the near end
receives a two-second response pulse from the far end, indicating the system failure is corrected and full
continuity in the fiber between the two ends exists.
After the OSC communication is established, the near-end amplifier is configured by the software to
operate in pulse mode at a reduced power level. It emits a nine-second laser pulse with an automatic
power reduction to +8 dBm. This level assures that Hazard Level 1 is not exceeded, for personnel safety,
even though the establishment of successful OSC communication is assurance that any broken fiber is
fixed. If the far-end amplifier responds with a nine-second pulse within 100 seconds, both amplifiers are
changed from pulse mode at reduced power to normal operating power mode.
For a direct connection between TXP or MXP cards, when ALS Auto Restart is enabled and the
connections do not pass through a DWDM layer, a similar process takes place. However, because the
connections do not go through any amplifier or OSC cards, the TXP or MXP cards attempt to establish
communication directly between themselves after a system failure. This is done using a two-second
restart pulse, in a manner similar to that previously described between OSCs at the DWDM layer. The
power emitted during the pulse is below Hazard Level 1.
APR is also implemented on the PSM card (on the protect path, only in line protection configuration).
In the PSM line protection configuration, when a system failure occurs on the working path (cut fiber or
equipment failure, for example), the ALS and APR mechanisms are implemented by the booster
amplifier or the OSC-CSM card. Alternately, when a system failure occurs on the protect path, and ALS
Auto Restart is enabled on the PSM card, a sequence of events is placed in motion to shut down the TX
VOA on the protect path, and then automatically restart it after the system failure is corrected. During
protect path restart, the TX VOA on the protect path operates in pulse mode and limits the power to
+8 dBm so that the Hazard Level 1 power limit is not exceeded on protect TX path.
Warning
Note
In the event that ALS is disabled, a larger amount of invisible laser radiation might be emitted from
the end of the unterminated fiber cable or connector. Do not view the end of the fiber directly with
optical instruments. Viewing the laser output with certain optical instruments (for example, eye
loupes, magnifiers, and microscopes) within a distance of 100 mm may pose an eye hazard.
If you must disable ALS, verify that all fibers are installed in a restricted location. Enable ALS
immediately after finishing the maintenance or installation process.
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11.9.3 Network Optical Safety on OPT-RAMP-C Card
Note
For the line amplifier to start up automatically, disable the ALS on the terminal node that is
unidirectional.
11.9.3 Network Optical Safety on OPT-RAMP-C Card
Optical safety on the OPT-RAMP-C card is implemented in the RAMAN-TX and COM-TX ports.
RAMAN-TX will report safety settings associated to the Raman pump while the COM-TX port will
report safety settings associated with the embedded EDFA.
11.9.3.1 RAMAN-TX Settings on Raman Pump
The Raman pump is automatically turned off as soon as the LOS alarm is detected on the LINE-RX port.
The Raman pump is automatically turned on at APR power every 100 secs for a duration of 9 seconds at
a pulse power of at 8 dBm, as soon as the LINE-RX port is set to IS-NR/unlocked-enabled.
Note
Optical safety cannot be disabled on the OPT-RAMP-C card and cannot be disabled on OSCM cards
when connected to a OPT-RAMP-C card.
The system periodically verifies if the signal power is present on the LINE-RX port. If signal power is
present, the following occurs:
•
Pulse duration is extended.
•
Raman pumps are turned on at APR power, if the laser was shut down.
The Raman power is then moved to setpoint if power is detected for more than 10 seconds. During
Automatic Laser Restart (ALR) the safety is enabled. The laser is automatically shut down if LOS is
detected on the receiving fiber. In general Raman pump turns on only when Raman signals are detected.
However, the Raman pump can be configured to turn on to full power even when OSC power is detected
for more than 9 seconds on OSC-RX port.
11.9.3.2 COM-TX Safety Setting on EDFA
EDFA is shutdown automatically under the following conditions:
•
The Raman pumps shut down.
•
An LOS-P alarm is detected on the COM-RX port.
If EDFA was shut down because of Raman pump shut down, the EDFA restarts by automatically turning
on the EDFA lasers as soon as the Raman loop is closed.
•
Pulse duration: 9 seconds
•
Pulse power: 8 dB (maximum APR power foreseen by safety regulation)
•
Exit condition: Received power detected on the DC-RX port at the end of APR pulse. If power is
detected on DC-RX (so DCU is connected) EDFA moves to set-point; otherwise, it keeps 9 dB as
the output power at restart
•
EDFA moves to the power set point when power is detected on the DC-RX port.
If EDFA was shutdown because of an LOS-P alarm. The EDFA restarts by automatically turning on the
EDFA laser as soon as an LOS-P alarm on the COM-RX port is cleared, and the Raman loop is closed.
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11.9.4 Fiber Cut Scenarios
Warning
•
Pulse duration: 9 seconds
•
Pulse power: 8 dB (maximum APR power foreseen by safety regulation)
•
Exit condition: Received power detected on the LINE-RX port at the end of the APR pulse
All ONS 15454 users must be properly trained on laser safety hazards in accordance with IEC 60825-2,
or ANSI Z136.1.
11.9.4 Fiber Cut Scenarios
In the following paragraphs, four ALS scenarios are given:
•
11.9.4.1 Scenario 1: Fiber Cut in Nodes Using OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E Cards, page 11-22
•
11.9.4.2 Scenario 2: Fiber Cut in Nodes Using OSC-CSM Cards, page 11-24
•
11.9.4.3 Scenario 3: Fiber Cut in Nodes Using OPT-BST-L Cards, page 11-26
•
11.9.4.4 Scenario 4: Fiber Cut in Nodes Using OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-C, or OPT-AMP-17-C
(OPT-LINE Mode) Cards, page 11-27
•
11.9.4.5 Scenario 5: Fiber Cut in Nodes Using DCN Extension, page 11-29
•
11.9.4.6 Scenario 6: Fiber Cut in Nodes Using OPT-RAMP-C Cards, page 11-30
11.9.4.1 Scenario 1: Fiber Cut in Nodes Using OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E Cards
Figure 11-14 shows nodes using OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E cards with a fiber cut between them.
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11.9.4 Fiber Cut Scenarios
Figure 11-14
Nodes Using OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E Cards
Node A
Side B
Node B
Side A
OPT-PRE
1
11
X
7
10
2
OSCM
8
9
8
P
P
P
2
3
OSCM
6
P
4
12
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E
P
OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E
120988
5
13
= power monitoring photodiode
= logical AND function
Two photodiodes at Node B monitor the received signal strength for the optical payload and OSC signals.
When the fiber is cut, an LOS is detected at both of the photodiodes. The AND function then indicates
an overall LOS condition, which causes the OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E transmitter, OPT-PRE transmitter,
and OSCM lasers to shut down. This in turn leads to an LOS for both the optical payload and OSC at
Node A, which causes Node A to turn off the OSCM, OPT-PRE transmitter, and OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E
transmitter lasers. The sequence of events after a fiber cut is as follows (refer to the numbered circles in
Figure 11-14):
1.
Fiber is cut.
2.
The Node B power monitoring photodiode detects a Loss of Incoming Payload (LOS-P) on the
OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E card. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
3.
On the OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E card, the simultaneous LOS-O and LOS-P detection triggers a
command to shut down the amplifier. CTC reports an LOS alarm (loss of continuity), while LOS-O
and LOS-P are demoted. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
4.
The OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E card amplifier is shut down within one second.
5.
The OSCM laser is shut down.
6.
The OPT-PRE card automatically shuts down due to a loss of incoming optical power.
7.
The Node A power monitoring photodiode detects a LOS-O on the OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E card and
the OSCM card detects a LOS (OC3) at the SONET layer. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Troubleshooting Guide.
8.
The Node A power monitoring photodiode detects a LOS-P on the OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E card.
Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
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11.9.4 Fiber Cut Scenarios
9.
On the OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E, the simultaneous LOS-O and LOS-P detection triggers a command
to shut down the amplifier. CTC reports an LOS alarm (loss of continuity), while LOS-O and LOS-P
are demoted. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
10. The OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E card amplifier is shut down within one second.
11. The OSCM laser is shut down.
12. The Node A OPT-PRE card automatically shuts down due to a loss of incoming optical power.
When the fiber is repaired, either an automatic or manual restart at the Node A OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E
transmitter or at the Node B OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E transmitter is required. A system that has been shut
down is reactivated through the use of a restart pulse. The pulse is used to signal that the optical path has
been restored and transmission can begin. For example, when the far end, Node B, receives a pulse, it
signals to the Node B OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E transmitter to begin transmitting an optical signal. The
OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E receiver at Node A receives that signal and signals the Node A
OPT-BST/OPT-BST-E transmitter to resume transmitting.
Note
During a laser restart pulse, APR ensures that the laser power does not exceed Class 1 limits. See the
“11.9.2 Automatic Power Reduction” section on page 11-20 for more information about APR.
11.9.4.2 Scenario 2: Fiber Cut in Nodes Using OSC-CSM Cards
Figure 11-15 shows nodes using OSC-CSM cards with a fiber cut between them.
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11.9.4 Fiber Cut Scenarios
Figure 11-15
Nodes Using OSC-CSM Cards
Node A
Side B
Node B
Side A
1
11
X
9
2
OSC
7
8
P
3
OSC
7
P
P
2
6
P
4
10
OSC-CSM
OSC-CSM
P
120987
5
= power monitoring photodiode
= logical AND function
Two photodiodes at the Node B OSC-CSM card monitor the received signal strength for the received
optical payload and OSC signals. When the fiber is cut, LOS is detected at both of the photodiodes. The
AND function then indicates an overall LOS condition, which causes the Node B OSC laser to shut down
and the optical switch to block traffic. This in turn leads to LOS for both the optical payload and OSC
signals at Node A, which causes Node A to turn off the OSC laser and the optical switch to block
outgoing traffic. The sequence of events after a fiber cut is as follows (refer to the numbered circles in
Figure 11-15):
1.
Fiber is cut.
2.
The Node B power monitoring photodiode detects a LOS-P on the OSC-CSM card. Refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
3.
On the OSC-CSM, the simultaneous LOS-O and LOS-P detection triggers a change in the position
of the optical switch. CTC reports a LOS alarm (loss of continuity), while LOS-O and LOS-P are
demoted. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
4.
The optical switch blocks outgoing traffic.
5.
The OSC laser is shut down.
6.
The Node A power monitoring photodiode detects a LOS-O on the OSC-CSM card. Refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
7.
The Node A power monitoring photodiode detects a LOS-P on the OSC-CSM card. Refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
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11.9.4 Fiber Cut Scenarios
8.
On the OSC-CSM, the simultaneous LOS-O and LOS-P detection triggers a change in the position
of the optical switch. CTC reports a LOS alarm (loss of continuity), while LOS-O and LOS-P are
demoted. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
9.
The OSC laser is shut down.
10. The optical switch blocks outgoing traffic.
When the fiber is repaired, either an automatic or manual restart at the Node A OSC-CSM card OSC or
at the Node B OSC-CSM card OSC is required. A system that has been shut down is reactivated through
the use of a restart pulse. The pulse indicates the optical path is restored and transmission can begin. For
example, when the far-end Node B receives a pulse, it signals to the Node B OSC to begin transmitting
its optical signal and for the optical switch to pass incoming traffic. The OSC-CSM at Node A then
receives the signal and tells the Node A OSC to resume transmitting and for the optical switch to pass
incoming traffic.
11.9.4.3 Scenario 3: Fiber Cut in Nodes Using OPT-BST-L Cards
Figure 11-16 shows nodes using OPT-BST-L cards with a fiber cut between them.
Figure 11-16
Nodes Using OPT-BST-L Cards
Node A
Side B
Node B
Side A
OPT-AMP-L
1
11
X
7
10
2
OSCM
8
9
8
P
P
P
2
3
OSCM
6
P
4
12
OPT-AMP-L
OPT-BST-L
P
OPT-BST-L
145950
5
13
= power monitoring photodiode
= logical AND function
Two photodiodes at Node B monitor the received signal strength for the optical payload and OSC signals.
When the fiber is cut, an LOS is detected at both of the photodiodes. The AND function then indicates
an overall LOS condition, which causes the OPT-BST-L transmitter and OSCM lasers to shut down. This
in turn leads to an LOS for both the optical payload and the OSC at Node A, which causes Node A to
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11.9.4 Fiber Cut Scenarios
turn off the OSCM OSC transmitter and OPT-BST-L amplifier lasers. The sequence of events after a fiber
cut is as follows (refer to the numbered circles in Figure 11-16):
1.
Fiber is cut.
2.
The Node B power monitoring photodiode detects an LOS-P on the OPT-BST-L card. Refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
3.
On the OPT-BST-L card, the simultaneous LOS-O and LOS-P detection triggers a command to shut
down the amplifier. CTC reports an LOS alarm (loss of continuity), while LOS-O and LOS-P are
demoted. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
4.
The OPT-BST-L card amplifier is shut down within one second.
5.
The OSCM laser is shut down.
6.
The OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-C, or OPT-AMP-17-C card automatically shuts down due to a loss of
incoming optical power.
7.
The Node A power monitoring photodiode detects an LOS-O on the OPT-BST-L card and the OSCM
card detects an LOS (OC3) at the SONET layer. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Troubleshooting Guide.
8.
The Node A power monitoring photodiode detects an LOS-P on the OPT-BST-L card. Refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
9.
On the OPT-BST-L, the simultaneous LOS-O and LOS-P detection triggers a command to shut down
the amplifier. CTC reports an LOS alarm (loss of continuity), while the LOS-O and LOS-P are
demoted. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
10. The OPT-BST-L card amplifier is shut down within one second.
11. The OSCM laser is shut down.
12. The Node A OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-C, or OPT-AMP-17-C card automatically shuts down due to
an LOS for the incoming optical power.
When the fiber is repaired, either an automatic or manual restart at the Node A OPT-BST-L transmitter
or at the Node B OPT-BST-L transmitter is required. A system that has been shut down is reactivated
through the use of a restart pulse. The pulse indicates the optical path is restored and transmission can
begin. For example, when the far end, Node B, receives a pulse, it signals to the Node B OPT-BST-L
transmitter to begin transmitting an optical signal. The OPT-BST-L receiver at Node A receives that
signal and signals the Node A OPT-BST-L transmitter to resume transmitting.
Note
During a laser restart pulse, APR ensures that the laser power does not exceed Class 1 limits. See the
“11.9.2 Automatic Power Reduction” section on page 11-20 for more information about APR.
11.9.4.4 Scenario 4: Fiber Cut in Nodes Using OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-C, or OPT-AMP-17-C (OPT-LINE
Mode) Cards
Figure 11-17 shows nodes using OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-C, or OPT-AMP-17-C (in OPT-LINE mode)
cards with a fiber cut between them.
Note
A generic reference to the OPT-AMP card also refers to the OPT-AMP-L, OPT-AMP-17-C or
OPT-AMP-C cards.
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11.9.4 Fiber Cut Scenarios
Figure 11-17
Nodes Using OPT-AMP Cards
Node A
Side B
Node B
Side A
1
10
X
9
2
OSCM
8
7
P
3
OSCM
8
P
P
2
6
P
4
11
OPT-AMP-L
P
OPT-AMP-L
145949
5
= power monitoring photodiode
= logical AND function
Two photodiodes at Node B monitor the received signal strength for the optical payload and OSC signals.
When the fiber is cut, an LOS is detected at both of the photodiodes. The AND function then indicates
an overall LOS condition, which causes the OPT-AMP-L card amplifier transmitter and OSCM card
OSC lasers to shut down. This in turn leads to an LOS for both the optical payload and OSC at Node A,
which causes Node A to turn off the OSCM card OSC and OPT-AMP-L card amplifier lasers. The
sequence of events after a fiber cut is as follows (refer to the numbered circles in Figure 11-17):
1.
Fiber is cut.
2.
The Node B power monitoring photodiode detects an LOS-P on the OPT-AMP-L card. Refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
3.
On the OPT-AMP-L card, the simultaneous LOS-O and LOS-P detection triggers a command to shut
down the amplifier. CTC reports an LOS alarm (loss of continuity), while LOS-O and LOS-P are
demoted. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
4.
The OPT-AMP-L card amplifier is shut down within one second.
5.
The OSCM card laser is shut down.
6.
The Node A power monitoring photodiode detects an LOS-O on the OPT-AMP-L card and the
OSCM card detects an LOS (OC3) at the SONET layer. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Troubleshooting Guide.
7.
The Node A power monitoring photodiode detects an LOS-P on the OPT-AMP-L card. Refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
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11.9.4 Fiber Cut Scenarios
8.
On the OPT-AMP-L card, the simultaneous LOS-O and LOS-P detection triggers a command to shut
down the amplifier. CTC reports an LOS alarm (loss of continuity), while LOS-O and LOS-P are
demoted. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
9.
The OPT-AMP-L card amplifier is shut down within one second.
10. The OSCM card laser is shut down.
When the fiber is repaired, either an automatic or manual restart at the Node A OPT-AMP-L card
transmitter or at the Node B OPT-AMP-L card transmitter is required. A system that has been shut down
is reactivated through the use of a restart pulse. The pulse indicates the optical path is restored and
transmission can begin. For example, when the far end, Node B, receives a pulse, it signals to the Node B
OPT-AMP-L card transmitter to begin transmitting an optical signal. The OPT-AMP-L card receiver at
Node A receives that signal and signals the Node A OPT-AMP-L card transmitter to resume transmitting.
Note
During a laser restart pulse, APR ensures that the laser power does not exceed Class 1 limits. See the
“11.9.2 Automatic Power Reduction” section on page 11-20 for more information about APR.
11.9.4.5 Scenario 5: Fiber Cut in Nodes Using DCN Extension
Figure 11-18 shows a fiber cut scenario for nodes that do not have OSC connectivity. In the scenario,
references to the OPT-BST cards refers to the OPT-BST, OPT-BST-L, OPT-BST-E, and the OPT-AMP-L,
OPT-AMP-C and OPT-AMP-17-C cards when provisioned in OPT-LINE mode.
Figure 11-18
Fiber Cut With DCN Extension
Node A
Side B
Node B
Side A
7
1
X
6
P
2
5
P
4
P
159799
3
= power monitoring photodiode
= logical AND function
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11.9.4 Fiber Cut Scenarios
Two photodiodes at Node B monitor the received signal strength for the optical payload. When the fiber
is cut, an LOS is detected on the channel photodiode while the other one never gets a signal because the
OSC is not present. The AND function then indicates an overall LOS condition, which causes the
OPT-BST amplifier transmitter to shut down. This in turn leads to a LOS for the optical payload at
Node A, which causes Node A to turn off the OPT-BST amplifier lasers.
The sequence of events after a fiber cut is as follows (refer to the numbered circles in Figure 11-18):
1.
Fiber is cut.
2.
The Node B power monitoring photodiode detects an LOS on the OPT-BST card. Refer to the Cisco
ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide for LOS troubleshooting procedures.
3.
On the OPT-BST card, the LOS detection triggers a command to shut down the amplifier. Refer to
the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide for alarm troubleshooting procedures.
4.
The OPT-BST card amplifier is shut down within one second.
5.
The Node A power monitoring photodiode detects a LOS on the OPT-BST card. Refer to the Cisco
ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide for alarm troubleshooting procedures.
6.
On the OPT-BST, the LOS detection triggers a command to shut down the amplifier. Refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide.
7.
The OPT-BST card amplifier is shut down within one second.
When the fiber is repaired, a manual restart with 9 sec restart pulse time (MANUAL RESTART) is
required at the Node A OPT-BST transmitter and at the Node B OPT-BST transmitter. A system that has
been shut down is reactivated through the use of a 9 sec restart pulse. The pulse indicates that the optical
path is restored and transmission can begin.
For example, when the far end, Node B, receives a pulse, it signals to the Node B OPT-BST transmitter
to begin transmitting an optical signal. The OPT-BST receiver at Node A receives that signal and signals
the Node A OPT-BST transmitter to resume transmitting.
Note
During a laser restart pulse, APR ensures that the laser power does not exceed Class 1 limits. See the
“11.9.2 Automatic Power Reduction” section on page 11-20 for more information about APR.
11.9.4.6 Scenario 6: Fiber Cut in Nodes Using OPT-RAMP-C Cards
Figure 11-18 shows a fiber cut scenario for nodes that do not have OSC connectivity. In the scenario,
OPT-RAMP-C cards are provisioned in OPT-LINE mode.
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11.9.4 Fiber Cut Scenarios
Figure 11-19
Nodes Using OPT-RAMP-C Cards
Node A
Node B
1
3
9
8
15
2
4
7
11
10
14
LINE-TX Raman remnant pump photodiode
OSC-RX photodiode
LINE-RX C-band photodiode
272075
COM-RX C-band photodiode
Raman pumps
Embedded EDFA
The following types of photodiodes monitor the received signal strength for the optical payload:
•
OSC-RX photodiodes
•
LINE-RX C-Band photodiode
•
Line-TX Raman pump photodiode
•
COM-RX C-Band photodiode
The sequence of events after a fiber cut is as follows (refer to the numbered circles in Figure 11-19):
1.
Fiber is cut in the direction of Node B to Node A.
2.
On Node A, the RAMAN-Rx port detects an LOS-R alarm on the OPT-RAMP-C card. Refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide for LOS-R troubleshooting procedures.
3.
On the OPT-RAMP-C card, the LOS-R alarm triggers a command to shut down the Raman Pump on
Node A.
4.
On Node B, the Raman-Rx port detects an LOS-R alarms.
5.
The LOS-R alarm triggers a command to shut down the Raman pump on Node B.
6.
Simultaneously, an LOS alarm is detected on Node B, LINE-RX port.
7.
The LOS alarm triggers a command to shut down the embedded EDFA.
8.
The LINE-RX port detects a LOS alarm and causes the booster amplifier to shut down.
9.
On Node A, the LINE-RX port detects a LOS alarm and triggers a command to shut down the
embedded EDFA and then the Booster amplifier.
Automatic Laser Restart (ALR) on the Raman pump is detected as soon as the fiber is restored. This turns
both the Raman pumps to ON state, on both nodes. When power on the Raman pump is restored, it turns
on the embedded EDFA also. The booster amplifiers on both Node A and Node B detects power on
LINE-RX port. This restarts the booster amplifier. Once the APR cycle is completed, all the lasers move
to full power.
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11.10 Network-Level Gain—Tilt Management of Optical Amplifiers
Note
During a laser restart pulse, APR ensures that the laser power does not exceed Class 1 limits. See the
“11.9.2 Automatic Power Reduction” section on page 11-20 for more information about APR.
11.10 Network-Level Gain—Tilt Management of Optical
Amplifiers
The ability to control and adjust per-channel optical power equalization is a principal feature of
ONS 15454 DWDM metro core network applications. A critical parameter to assure optical spectrum
equalization throughout the DWDM system is the gain flatness of erbium-doped fiber amplifiers
(EDFAs).
Two items, gain tilt and gain ripple, are factors in the power equalization of optical amplifier cards such
as the OPT-BST and OPT-PRE. Figure 11-20 shows a graph of the amplifier output power spectrum and
how it is affected by gain tilt and gain ripple.
Figure 11-20
Effect of Gain Ripple and Gain Tilt on Amplifier Output Power
Amplifier Output Spectrum
2
0
Gain Tilt
-2
-4
Gain Ripple
1530.3
1550
Wavelength [nm]
1560.6
134393
Per-Channel power [dB]
4
Gain ripple and gain tilt are defined as follows:
•
Gain ripple is random and depends on the spectral shape of the amplifier optical components.
•
Gain tilt is systematic and depends on the gain setpoint (Gstp) of the optical amplifier, which is a
mathematical function F(Gstp) that relates to the internal amplifier design.
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11.10.1 Gain Tilt Control at the Card Level
Gain tilt is the only contribution to the power spectrum disequalization that can be compensated at the
card level. A VOA internal to the amplifier can be used to compensate for gain tilt.
An optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) is used to acquire the output power spectrum of an amplifier. The
OSA shows the peak-to-peak difference between the maximum and minimum power levels, and takes
into account the contributions of both gain tilt and gain ripple.
Note
Peak-to-peak power acquisition using an OSA cannot be used to measure the gain tilt, because gain
ripple itself is a component of the actual measurement.
11.10.1 Gain Tilt Control at the Card Level
The OPT-BST and OPT-PRE amplifier cards have a flat output (gain tilt = 0 dB) for only a specific gain
value (Gdesign), based on the internal optical design (see Figure 11-21).
Figure 11-21
Flat Gain (Gain Tilt = 0 dB)
Gdesign
VOA att = 0
0dB
dB
1
0
Gain Tilt = 0 dB
-1
-2
Gain Ripple ~ 2dB
-3
1528
1536
1544
Wavelength [nm]
1552
1560
134394
Per Channel Power [dB]
2
If the working gain setpoint of the amplifier is different from Gdesign, the output spectrum begins to
suffer a gain tilt variation.
In order to compensate for the absolute value of the increase of the spectrum tilt, the OPT-BST and
OPT-PRE cards automatically adjust the attenuation of the VOA to maintain a flat power profile at the
output, as shown in Figure 11-22.
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11.10.2 System Level Gain Tilt Control
Figure 11-22
Effect of VOA Attenuation on Gain Tilt
4
Per Channel Power [dB]
2
G < G design
VOA att adjustment
VO
A at
= 0d
B
0
-2
VOA att = G design - G
-4
-6
1536
1544
1552
1560
Wavelength [nm]
134395
1528
The VOA attenuator automatic regulation guarantees (within limits) a zero tilt condition in the EDFA
for a wide range of possible gain setpoint values.
Table 11-2 shows the flat output gain range limits for the OPT-BST and OPT-PRE cards, as well as the
maximum (worst case) values of gain tilt and gain ripple expected in the specific gain range.
Table 11-2
Flat Output Gain Range Limits
Amplifier
Card Type
Flat Output
Gain Range
Gain Tilt
(Maximum)
Gain Ripple
(Maximum)
OPT-BST
G < 20 dB
0.5 dB
1.5 dB
OPT-PRE
G < 21 dB
0.5 dB
1.5 dB
If the operating gain value is outside of the range shown in Table 11-2, the EDFA introduces a tilt
contribution for which the card itself cannot directly compensate. This condition is managed in different
ways, depending the amplifier card type:
•
OPT-BST—The OPT-BST amplifier is, by design, not allowed to work outside the zero tilt range.
Cisco TransportPlanner network designs use the OPT-BST amplifier card only when the gain is less
than or equal to 20 dB.
•
OPT-PRE—Cisco TransportPlanner allows network designs even if the operating gain value is equal
to or greater than 21 dB. In this case, a system-level tilt compensation strategy is adopted by the
DWDM system. A more detailed explanation is given in 11.10.2 System Level Gain Tilt Control,
page 11-34.
11.10.2 System Level Gain Tilt Control
System level gain tilt control for OPT-PRE cards is achievable with two main scenarios:
•
Without an ROADM node
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11.10.2 System Level Gain Tilt Control
•
With an ROADM node
11.10.2.1 System Gain Tilt Compensation Without ROADM Nodes
When an OPT-PRE card along a specific line direction (Side A-to-Side B or Side B-to-Side A) is
working outside the flat output gain range (G > 21 dB), the unregulated tilt is compensated for in spans
that are not connected to ROADM nodes by configuring an equal but opposite tilt on one or more of the
amplifiers in the downstream direction. The number of downstream amplifiers involved depends on the
amount of tilt compensation needed and the gain setpoint of the amplifiers that are involved. See
Figure 11-23.
Figure 11-23
System Tilt Compensation Without an ROADM Node
SPAN 1 = 25 dB
DCU
OPT-PRE
OPT-BST
Tilt Reference = 0
Provisioned Tilt
134396
GOPT-PRE > 21dB
Unregulated Tilt
SPAN 2 = 15 dB
The proper Tilt Reference value is calculated by Cisco TransportPlanner and inserted in the Installation
Parameter List imported during the node turn-up process (see the “Turn Up a Node” chapter in the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide). For both OPT-PRE and OPT-BST cards, the provisionable
Gain Tilt Reference range is between –3 dB and +3 dB.
During the ANS procedure, the Tilt value for the OPT-BST or OPT-PRE card is provisioned by the
TCC2/TCC2P card (see Figure 11-24). The provisioned Tilt Reference Value is reported in the CTC
OPT-PRE or OPT-BST card view (in the Provisioning > Opt. Ampli. Line > Parameters > Tilt Reference
tab).
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11.10.2 System Level Gain Tilt Control
Figure 11-24
Cisco TransportPlanner Installation Parameters
11.10.2.2 System Gain Tilt Compensation With ROADM Nodes
When a ROADM node is present in the network, as shown in Figure 11-25, a per-channel dynamic gain
equalization can be performed. Both gain tilt and gain ripple are completely compensated using the
following techniques:
•
Implementing the per-channel VOAs present inside the 32WSS card
•
Operating in Power Control Mode with the specific power setpoint designed by
Cisco TransportPlanner
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11.11 Optical Data Rate Derivations
Figure 11-25
System Tilt Compensation With an ROADM Node
SPAN 2
SPAN 1 = 25 dB
SPAN 3
SPAN 4
DCU
OPT-PRE
Per-channel
Power Equalization
Tilt Reference = 0
134397
GOPT-PRE > 21dB
Unregulated Tilt
OPT-BST
32 WSS
11.11 Optical Data Rate Derivations
This section discusses the derivation of several data rates commonly used in optical networking.
11.11.1 OC-192/STM-64 Data Rate (9.95328 Gbps)
The SONET OC-1 rate is 51.84 Mbps. This rate results from a standard SONET frame, which consists
of 9 rows of 90 columns of 8-bit bytes (810 bytes total). The transmission rate is 8000 frames per second
(125 microseconds per frame). This works out to 51.84 Mbps, as follows:
(9) x (90 bytes/frame) x (8 bits/byte) x (8000 frames/sec) = 51.84 Mbps
OC-192 is 192 x 51.84 Mbps = 9953.28 Mbps = 9.95328 Gbps
STM-64 is an SDH rate that is equivalent to the SONET OC-192 data rate.
11.11.2 10GE Data Rate (10.3125 Gbps)
10.3125 Gbps is the standard 10 Gbps Ethernet LAN rate. The reason the rate is higher than 10.000 Gbps
is due to the 64-bit to 66-bit data encoding. The result is 10 Gbps x 66/64 = 10.3125 Gbps. The reason
for 64-bit to 66-bit encoding is to ensure that there are adequate data transitions to ensure proper
operation of a clock and data recovery circuit at the far end. Additionally, the encoding assures a data
stream that is DC balanced.
11.11.3 10G FC Data Rate (10.51875 Gbps)
The Fibre Channel rate is based on the OC-192 rate of 9.95328 Gbps, with the addition of 64-bit to 66-bit
encoding and WAN Interconnect Sublayer (WIS) overhead bytes.
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11.11.4 ITU-T G.709 Optical Data Rates
The rate is derived from the basic 9.95328 Gbps OC-192 rate. First, it has the 64-bit to 66-bit encoding
added, which brings it to the 10.3125 Gbps rate (10 Gbps x 66/64 = 10.3125 Gbps). Beyond that, the
WIS overhead is added, which is an additional two percent on top of the 10.3125 Gbps. This yields:
10.3125 Gbps x .02 = 0.20625 Gbps
10.3125 Gbps + 0.20625 Gbps = 10.51875 Gbps
11.11.4 ITU-T G.709 Optical Data Rates
To understand optical networking data rates, an understanding of the ITU-T G.709 frame structure,
shown in Figure 11-26, is needed.
Figure 11-26
ITU-T G.709 Frame Structure
1
Sub Row 3
Sub Row 2
Sub Row 1
Columns: 1
239 240
Info Bytes
Info Bytes
Info Bytes
255
RS (255, 239)
RS (255, 239)
RS (255, 239)
17
3825
4080
Rows: 1
2
Info Bytes
Payload
FEC
159457
3
4
Each of the sub-rows in Figure 11-26 contains 255 bytes. Sixteen are interleaved horizontally
(16 x 255 = 4080). This is repeated four times to make up the complete ITU-T G.709 frame.
The Reed Solomon (RS) (255,239) designation indicates the forward error correction (FEC) bytes. There
are 16 FEC, or parity, bytes. The ITU-T G.709 protocol uses one overhead byte and 238 data bytes to
compute 16 parity bytes to form 255 byte blocks—the RS (255,239) algorithm. Interleaving the
information provides two key advantages. First, the encoding rate of each stream is reduced relative to
the line transmission rate and, second, it reduces the sensitivity to bursts of error. The interleaving
combined with the inherent correction strength of the RS (255,239) algorithm enables the correction of
transmission bursts of up to 128 consecutive errored bytes. As a result, the ITU-T G.709 contiguous burst
error correcting capability is enhanced 16 times above the capacity of the RS(255,239) algorithm by
itself.
ITU-T G.709 defines the Optical Transport Unit 2 (OTU2) rate as 10.70923 Gbps. ITU-T G.709 defines
three line rates:
1.
2,666,057.143 kbps—Optical Transport Unit 1 (OTU1)
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2.
10,709,225.316 kbps—Optical Transport Unit 2 (OTU2)
3.
43,018,413.559 kbps—Optical Transport Unit 3 (OTU3)
The OTU2 rate is higher than OC-192 because the OTU2 has to carry overhead and FEC bytes in its
frame; the bits must be sent faster to carry the payload information at the OC-192 rate.
The ITU-T G.709 frame has two parts. Two are similar to a SDH/SONET frame:
1.
Overhead area for operation, administration, and maintenance functions
2.
Payload area for customer data
In addition, the ITU-T G.709 frame also includes FEC bytes.
11.11.4.1 OC-192 Packaged Into OTU2 G.709 Frame Data Rate (10.70923 Gbps)
In this case, an OC-192 frame is being transported over a OTU2 G.709 frame, which adds the benefit of
FEC. The OC-192 data rate (9.95328 Gbps) must increase in order to transport more bytes (OC-192 plus
ITU-T G.709 overhead plus ITU-T G.709 FEC bytes) in the same amount of time. In an OTU2
transmission, 237 of the 255 bytes are OC-192 payload. This means the resultant data rate is:
9.95328 x 255/237 = 10.70923 Gbps
11.11.4.2 10GE Packaged Into OTU2 G.709 Frame Data Rate (Nonstandard 11.0957 Gbps)
Encapsulating Ethernet data into an OTU2 G.709 frame is considered nonstandard. The goal is to add
the benefit of ITU-T G.709 encapsulation to achieve better burst error performance. However, this means
adding overhead and FEC bytes, so more bytes must be transmitted in the same amount of time, so the
data rate must increase. The new date rate is:
10.3215 x 255/237 = 11.0957 Gbps
11.11.4.3 10G FC Packaged Into OTU2 G.709 Frame Data Rate (Nonstandard 11.31764 Gbps)
Encapsulating Fibre Channel in an OTU2 frame is considered nonstandard. The rate is higher than the
10.51875 rate because OTU2 includes FEC bytes. The bits must run at a faster rate so that the payload
is provided at the standard Fibre Channel rate. The rate is:
10.51875 x 255/237 = 11.31764 Gbps
11.12 Even Band Management
With the introduction of the following cards, it is now possible to transport 72, 80, 104, or 112
wavelength channels in the same network:
•
40-WSS-CE (40-channel Wavelength Selective Switch, C-band, even channels)
•
40-DMX-CE (40-channel Demultiplexer, C-band, even channels)
By using these new cards along with the 40-WSS-C and 40-DMX-C cards (which handle 40 C-band odd
channels), the 32WSS and 32DMX cards (which handle 32 C-band odd channels), and the 32WSS-L and
32DMX-L (which handle 32 L-band odd channels), it is possible to cover 80 C-band channels (40 even
and 40 odd channels) and 32 L-band odd channels, for a maximum of 112 channels. The following
channel coverage combinations are possible:
•
72 C-band channels, using the 32WSS, 32DMX, 40-WSS-CE, and 40-DMX-CE cards
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11.12 Even Band Management
•
80 C-band channels, using the 40-WSS-C, 40-DMX-C, 40-WSS-CE, and 40-DMX-CE cards
•
104 channels (32 L-band odd channels and 72 C-band channels), using the 32WSS-L and 32DMX-L
cards as a set to cover 32 L-band odd channels and the 32WSS, 32DMX, 40-WSS-CE, and
40-DMX-CE cards as a set to cover 72 C-band odd and even channels
•
112 channels (32 L-band odd channels and 80 C-band even channels), using the 32WSS-L and
32DMX-L cards as a set to cover 32 L-band odd channels and the 40-WSS-C, 40-DMX-C,
40-WSS-CE, and 40-DMX-CE, cards as a set to cover 80 C-band odd and even channels
The following node topologies are available for even channel management or odd-plus-even channel
management:
•
Terminal node
•
Hub node
•
ROADM node
•
OSC regeneration and optical line amplification node
The external ONS 15216-ID-50 module is a 50 GHz/100GHz optical interleaver/deinterleaver that is
required to combine or separate odd and even C-band channels. This module increases capacity by
combining two optical data streams into a single, more densely spaced stream. The module can be used
in multiplexer mode to combine two 100-GHz optical signal streams into one 50-GHz stream, and in
demultiplexer mode to separate the 50-GHz stream into two 100-GHz streams.
The ONS 15216-SC-CL module is an external C-band and L-band splitter/combiner module that
combines and separates the C-band odd/even channels and the L-band odd channels.
An example of a 104-channel C-band plus L-band ROADM node is shown in Figure 11-27 on
page 11-41. There are 72 C-band even channels and 32 L-band odd channels. The signal flow from the
left side of the diagram to the right side is given in the following steps. The signal flow from the right
side to the left is identical.
1.
All the C-band and L-band signals enter the ONS 15216-SC-CL.
2.
When the signals exit the ONS 15216-SC-CL, the 72 C-band even and odd channel signals are sent
to the upper set of blocks and the 32 L-band odd channel signals are sent to the lower set of blocks.
3.
The 72 C-band even and odd channel signals pass through a preamplifier, then through an
ONS 15261-ID-50 and wavelength selective switch (WSS). Only the channels to be dropped are sent
to the demultiplexer (DMX) block. There are two such sets of blocks, one set for the 32 odd C-band
channels, and one set for the 40 even C-band channels.
4.
The 32 L-band odd channel signals pass through a preamplifier, then through two 32-channel
wavelength selective switch (32WSS-L) cards. Only the channels to be dropped are sent to the
32-channel demultiplexer (32DMX-L) card.
5.
At the upper set of blocks, the ONS 15261-ID-50 deinterleaves the 32 C-band odd channels from
the 40 C-band even channels. The 32 C-band odd channels are routed through the top blocks (two
32WSS cards and one 32DMX card), while the 40 C-band even channels are routed through the
lower blocks (two 40-WSS-CE cards and one 40-DMX-CE card).
6.
When a signal enters a 32WSS-L or 40-WSS-CE card, it is split. Part of the signal (the channels that
are to be dropped) goes to the32 DMX-L card or 40-DMX-CE card so that channels can be dropped
for use by the client equipment. The other part of the signal goes to the next 32WSS-L card or
40_DMX-CE card, where the channels can be passed through or blocked, and channels can be added
to the stream from the client equipment.
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11.12 Even Band Management
7.
Figure 11-27
After the channels leave the last 32WSS-L card or 40-WSS-CE card, the C-band even and odd
channels are interleaved back into a single stream by the ONS 15216-ID-50 module, sent through a
booster amplifier, and then they enter the ONS 15216-SC-CL module, where they are combined with
the L-band signals from the lower set of blocks and sent out onto the optical fiber.
104-Channel C-Band plus L-Band ROADM Node
32WSS
32WSS
1 . . . . . . . 32
Add Odd Channels
Drop Even Channels
1 . . . . . . . 40
40-DMX-CE
40-WSS-CE
40-WSS-CE
Drop Odd Channels
1 . . . . . . . 32
Preamp
32WSS-L
Booster
Amplifier
Preamp
40-DMX-CE
1 . . . . . . . 40
Drop Even Channels
32DMX-L
Booster
Amplifier
1 . . . . . . . 32
Drop Odd Channels
Add Even Channels
1 . . . . . . . 40
1 . . . . . . . 40
Add Even Channels
L-Band Odd
Channels
32DMX
C-Band
Even and Odd
Channels
Add Odd Channels
1 . . . . . . . 32
L-Band Odd
Channels
Booster
Amplifier
C-Band/L-Band Splitter/Combiner (ONS 15216-SC-CL)
Booster
Amplifier
Add Odd Channels
1 . . . . . . . 32
32WSS-L
Preamp
1 . . . . . . . 32
Add Odd Channels
32DMX-L
1 . . . . . . . 32
Drop Odd Channels
240638
C-Band/L-Band Splitter/Combiner (ONS 15216-SC-CL)
Preamp
32DMX
Interleaver/Deinterleaver (ONS 15216-ID-50)
C-Band
Even and Odd
Channels
Interleaver/Deinterleaver (ONS 15216-ID-50)
Drop Odd Channels
1 . . . . . . . 32
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11.12 Even Band Management
An example of a 112-channel C-band plus L-band ROADM node is shown in Figure 11-28. It operates
in a similar manner to the 104-channel ROADM node shown in Figure 11-27 on page 11-41, except that
there are 40 odd C-band channels instead of 32.
Figure 11-28
112-Channel C-Band plus L-Band ROADM Node
40-WSS-C
40-WSS-C
1 . . . . . . . 32
Add Odd Channels
Drop Even Channels
1 . . . . . . . 40
40-DMX-CE
40-WSS-CE
40-WSS-CE
Drop Odd Channels
1 . . . . . . . 32
32DMX-L
32WSS-L
1 . . . . . . . 32
Add Odd Channels
Booster
Amplifier
Preamp
40-DMX-CE
1 . . . . . . . 40
Drop Even Channels
Preamp
Booster
Amplifier
1 . . . . . . . 40
Drop Odd Channels
Add Even Channels
1 . . . . . . . 40
1 . . . . . . . 40
Add Even Channels
L-Band Odd
Channels
40-DMX-C
C-Band
Even and Odd
Channels
Add Odd Channels
1 . . . . . . . 32
Booster
Amplifier
L-Band Odd
Channels
C-Band/L-Band Splitter/Combiner (ONS 15216-SC-CL)
Booster
Amplifier
Add Odd Channels
1 . . . . . . . 40
32WSS-L
Preamp
32DMX-L
1 . . . . . . . 32
Drop Odd Channels
240639
C-Band/L-Band Splitter/Combiner (ONS 15216-SC-CL)
Preamp
40-DMX-C
Interleaver/Deinterleaver (ONS 15216-ID-50)
C-Band
Even and Odd
Channels
Interleaver/Deinterleaver (ONS 15216-ID-50)
Drop Odd Channels
1 . . . . . . . 40
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12
Optical Channel Circuits and Virtual Patchcords
Reference
This chapter explains the Cisco ONS 15454 dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) optical
channel (OCH) circuit types and virtual patchcords that can be provisioned on the ONS 15454. Circuit
types include the OCH client connection (OCHCC), the OCH trail, and the OCH network connection
(OCHNC). Virtual patchcords include internal patchcords and provisionable (external) patchcords
(PPCs). This chapter also describes 12.3 End-to-End SVLAN Circuit that can be created between
GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, or 10GE_XPE cards.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454" refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
12.1 Optical Channel Circuits
The ONS 15454 DWDM optical circuits provide end-to-end connectivity using three OCH circuit types:
•
Optical Channel Network Connections (OCHNC)
•
Optical Channel Client Connections (OCHCC)
•
Optical Channel Trails (OCH Trails)
A graphical representation of OCH circuits is shown in Figure 12-1.
Figure 12-1
Optical Channel Circuits
Transponder
Muxponder
To client
R-OADM
R
OADM
R-OADM
R OADM
DWDM
Network
Transponder
Muxponder
To client
OCH Trail
OCH CC
333333
OCH NC
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12.1.1 OCHNC Circuits
12.1.1 OCHNC Circuits
OCHNC circuits establish connectivity between two optical nodes on a specified C-band wavelength.
The connection is made through the ports present on the wavelength selective switches, multiplexers,
demultiplexer, and add/drop cards. In an OCHNC circuit, the wavelength from a source OCH port
ingresses to a DWDM system and then egresses from the DWDM system to the destination OCH port.
The source and destination OCH port details are listed in Table 12-1.
Table 12-1
OCHNC Ports
Card
Source Ports
Destination Ports
32WSS
ADD-RX
—
CHAN-RX
—
—
CHAN-TX
CHAN-RX
CHAN-TX
32WSS-L
40-WSS-C
40-WSS-CE
32MUX-O
40-MUX-C
32DMX-O
32DMX
32DMX-L
40-DMX-C
40-DMX-CE
4MD
AD-1B-xx.x
AD-4B-xx.x
AD-1C-xx.x
AD-4C-xx.x
12.1.2 OCHCC Circuits
OCHCC circuits extend the OCHNC to create an optical connection from the source client port to the
destination client port of the TXP/MXP cards. An OCHCC circuit represents the actual end-to-end client
service passing through the DWDM system.
Each OCHCC circuit is associated to a pair of client or trunk ports on the transponder (TXP), muxponder
(MXP), GE_XP (in layer-1 DWDM mode), 10GE_XP (in layer-1 DWDM mode), or ITU-T line card.
The OCHCCs can manage splitter protection as a single protected circuit. However, for the Y-Cable
protection, two OCHCC circuits and two protection groups are required.
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12.1.3 OCH Trail Circuits
12.1.3 OCH Trail Circuits
OCH trail circuits transport the OCHCCs. The OCH trail circuit creates an optical connection from the
source trunk port to the destination trunk port of the Transponder (TXP), Muxponder (MXP), GE_XP,
10GE_XP, or ITU-T line card. The OCH trail represents the common connection between the two cards,
over which all the client OCHCC circuits, SVLAN circuits or STS circuits are carried.
Once an OCHCC is created, a corresponding OCH Trail is automatically created. If the OCHCC is
created between two TXP, MXP, GE_XP, or 10GE_XP cards, two circuits are created in the CTC. These
are:
One OCHCC (at client port endpoints)
One OCH trail (at trunk port endpoints)
If the OCHCC is created between two TXPP or two MXPP cards, three circuits are created in the CTC.
These are:
•
One OCHCC (at client port endpoints)
•
Two OCH Trails (at trunk port endpoints)
One for the working and other for the protect trunk.
Note
On a TXP, MXP, and GE_XP card (in layer 1 DWDM mode), additional OCHCC circuits are created
over the same OCH trail.
Note
On a TXP, MXP, GE_XP (in layer 1 DWDM mode), and 10GE_XP (in layer 1 DWDM mode) card, the
OCH trail cannot be created independently, and is created along with the first OCHCC creation on the
card. However, on a GE_XP card (in layer-2 DWDM mode), 10GE_XP card (in layer-2 DWDM mode),
and ADM_10G card, an OCH trail can be created between the trunk ports for the upper layer circuits
(SVLAN in GE_XP/10GE_XP and STS in ADM_10G). No OCHCC is supported in these cases.
If the OCHCC is created between two ITU-T line cards, only one trunk port belongs to the OCHCC at
each end of the circuit. Table 12-2 lists the ports that can be OCHCC and OCH trail endpoints.
Table 12-2
OCHCC and OCH Trail Ports
Card
OCHCC
OCH Trail
TXPs
Any client port
Any trunk port
Any trunk port
Any trunk port
MXPs
GE_XP
10GE_XP
ADM-10G
ITU-T line cards:
•
OC48/STM64 EH
•
OC192 SR/STM64
•
MRC-12
•
MRC-2.5-12
•
MRC-2.5G-4
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12.1.4 Administrative and Service States
Figure 12-2 shows the relationships and optical flow between the OCHCC, OCH trail, and OCHNC
circuits.
Figure 12-2
Optical Channel Management
OCN
Port
Back
Panel
Client
Port
OCN Line Card
OCH
RX
LINE TX
OCH
TX
LINE RX
Trunk
Port
TXP/MXP
Optical Shelf
STS/VT
OCHNC
OCHCC
Back
Panel
OCH
RX
LINE TX
OCH
TX
LINE RX
Trunk
Port
ITU-T Line Card
Optical Shelf
159473
OCH Trail
12.1.4 Administrative and Service States
OCHCCs, OCH trails, and OCHNCs occupy three different optical layers. Each OCH circuit has its own
administrative and service states. The OCHCCs impose additional restrictions on changes that can be
made to client card port administrative state.
The OCHCC service state is the sum of the OCHCC service state and the OCH trail service state. When
creating an OCHCC circuit, you can specify an initial state for both the OCHCC and the OCH trail
layers, including the source and destination port states. The ANSI/ETSI administrative states for the
OCHCC circuits and connections are:
•
IS/Unlocked
•
IS,AINS/Unlocked,AutomaticInService
•
OOS,DSBLD/Locked,disabled
OCHCC service states and source and destination port states can be changed independently. You can
manually modify client card port states in all traffic conditions. Setting an OCHCC circuit to
OOS,DSBLD/Locked,disabled state has no effect on OCHCC client card ports.
An OCH trail is created automatically when you create an OCHCC. OCH trails can be created
independently between OCH-10G cards and GE_XP and 10GE_XP when they are provisioned in
Layer 2 Over DWDM mode. The OCH trail ANSI/ETSI administrative states include:
•
IS/Unlocked
•
IS,AINS/Unlocked,automaticInService
•
OOS,DSBLD/Locked,disabled
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12.1.4 Administrative and Service States
You can modify OCH trail circuit states from the Edit Circuit window. Placing an OCH trail
OOS,DSBLD/Locked,disabled causes the following state changes:
•
The state of the OCH trail ports changes to OOS,DSBLD/Locked,disabled.
•
The OCHNC state changes to OOS,DSBLD/Locked,disabled.
Changing the OCH trail state to IS,AINS/Unlocked,automaticInService causes the following state
changes:
•
The state of the OCH trail trunk ports changes to IS/Unlocked.
•
The OCHNC state changes to IS,AINS/Unlocked,automaticInService.
The OCH trail service state is the sum of the OCHCC trunk port state and the OCHNC (if applicable)
state. Changing the client card trunk ports to OOS,DSBLD/Locked,disabled when the OCH trail state
IS/Unlocked will cause the OCH trail state to change to OOS,DSBLD/Locked,disabled and its status to
change to Partial.
The OCHNC circuit states are not linked to the OCHCC circuit states. The administrative states for the
OCHNC circuit layer are:
•
IS,AINS/Unlocked,AutomaticInService
•
OOS,DSBLD/Locked,disabled
When you create an OCHNC, you can set the target OCHNC circuit state to IS/Unlocked or
OOS,DSBLD/Locked,disabled. You can create an OCHNC even if OCHNC source and destination ports
are OOS,MT/Locked,maintenance. The OCHNC circuit state will remain
OOS-AU,AINS/Unlocked-disabled,automaticInService until the port maintenance state is removed.
During maintenance or laser shutdown, the following behavior occurs:
•
If OCHNCs or their end ports move into an AINS/AutomaticInService state because of user
maintenance activity on an OCHCC circuit (for example, you change an optical transport section
(OTS) port to OOS,DSBLD/Locked,disabled), Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) suppresses the
loss of service (LOS) alarms on the TXP, MXP, GE_XP, 10GE_XP, or ITU-T line card trunk ports
and raises a Trail Signal Fail condition. Line card trunk port alarms are not changed, however.
•
If TXP client or trunk port are set to OOS,DSBLD/Locked,disabled state (for example, a laser is
turned off) and the OCH trunk and OCH filter ports are located in the same node, the OCH filter
LOS alarm is demoted by a Trail Signal Fail condition.
OCHCCs are associated with the client card end ports. Therefore, the following port parameters cannot
be changed when they carry an OCHCC:
•
Wavelength
•
Service (or payload type)
•
Splitter protection
•
ITU-T G.709
•
Forward error correction (FEC)
•
Mapping
Certain OCHCC parameters, such as service type, service size, and OCHNC wavelength can only be
modified by deleting and recreating the OCHCC. If the OCHCC has MXP end ports, you can modify
services and parameters on client ports that are not allocated to the OCHCC. Some client port
parameters, such as Ethernet frame size and distance extension, are not part of an OCHCC so they can
be modified if not restricted by the port state. For addition information about administrative and service
states, see Appendix B, “Administrative and Service States.”
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12.1.5 Creating and Deleting OCHCCs
12.1.5 Creating and Deleting OCHCCs
To create an OCHCC, you must know the client port states and their parameters. If the client port state
is IS/Unlocked, OCHCC creation will fail if the OTN line parameters (ITU-T G.709, FEC, signal fail bit
error rate (SF BER), and signal degrade bit error rate (SD BER) on the OCHCC differ from what is
provisioned on the trunk port. The port state must be changed to OOS-DSLB/Locked,disabled in order
to complete the OCHCC.
If you delete an OCHCC, you can specify the administrative state to apply to the client card ports. For
example, you can have the ports placed in OOS,DSBLD/Locked,disabled state after an OCHCC is
deleted. If you delete an OCHCC that originates and terminates on MXP cards, the MXP trunk port states
can only be changed if the trunk ports do not carry other OCHCCs.
12.1.6 OCHCCs and Service and Communications Channels
Although optical service channels (OSCs), generic communications channels (GCCs), and data
communications channels (DCCs) are not managed by OCHCCs, the following restrictions must be
considered when creating or deleting OCHCCs on ports with service or communication channels:
•
Creating an OCHCC when the port has a service or a communications channel is present—OCHCC
creation will fail if the OCHCC parameters are incompatible with the GCC/DCC/GCC. For
example, you cannot disable ITU-T G.709 on the OCHCC if a GCC carried by the port requires the
parameter to be enabled.
•
Creating a service or communications channel on ports with OCHCCs—OCHCC creation will fail
if the GCC/DCC/GCC parameters are incompatible with the OCHCC.
•
Deleting an OCHCC on ports with service or communications channels—If an OSC/GCC/DCC is
present on a TXP, MXP, GE_XP, 20GE_XP, or ITU-T line card client or trunk port, you cannot set
these ports to the OOS,DSBLD/Locked,disabled state after the OCHCC circuit is deleted.
12.2 Virtual Patchcords
TXP, MXP, TXPP, MXPP, GE_XP, 10GE_XP, and ADM-10G client ports and DWDM filter ports can
be located in different nodes or in the same single-shelf or multishelf node. ITU-T line card trunk ports
and the corresponding DWDM filter ports are usually located in different nodes.
OCHCC provisioning requires a virtual patchcord between the client card trunk ports and the DWDM
filter ports. Depending on the physical layout, this can be an internal patchcord or a provisionable
(external) patchcord (PPC). Both patchcord types are bidirectional. However, each direction is managed
as a separate patchcord.
Internal patchcords provide virtual links between the two sides of a DWDM shelf, either in single-shelf
or multishelf mode. They are viewed and managed on the Provisioning > WDM-ANS >
Internal Patchcords tab (Figure 12-3).
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12.2 Virtual Patchcords
Figure 12-3
Internal Patchcords Tab
CTC calculates internal patchcords automatically after you click the Default Patchcords button on the
Internal Patchcords tab. However, some internal patchcords cannot be calculated because of the card
types that are installed and/or the card positions within a shelf. These internal patchcords must be created
manually. For example, internal patchcords related to optical bypass circuits must be manually
provisioned. When you create an internal patchcord manually, the Internal Patchcord Creation wizard
asks you to choose one of the following internal patchcord types:
Note
•
OCH-Trunk to OCH-Filter—Creates an internal patchcord between the trunk port of a TXP, MXP,
GE_XP, 10GE_XP, or ITU-T line card, and an OCH filter card (wavelength selective switch,
multiplexer, or demultiplexer).
•
OTS/OCH to OTS/OCH—Creates an internal patchcord between two OTS OCH ports.
If an OTS-to-OTS PPC is created between nodes, it will no longer function if the node Security Mode
mode is enabled (see the “DLP-G264 Enable Node Security Mode” task in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Procedure Guide). The reason for this is that if the Secure mode is enabled, it is no longer possible for
the DCN extension feature to use the LAN interface to extend the internal network (due to the network
isolation in this configuration mode). The result is that the topology discovery on the OTS-to-OTS PPC
no longer operates.
Table 12-3 shows the internal patchcord OCH trunk, OCH filter, and OTS/OCH ports.
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12.2 Virtual Patchcords
Table 12-3
Internal Patchcord Ports
Card
OCH Trunk Ports
OCH Filter Ports
OTS/OCH Ports
TXPs
Any trunk port
—
—
—
—
COM-TX
MXPs
GE_XP
10GE_XP
ADM-10G
ITU-T line cards
OPT-BST
OPT-BST-E
COM-RX
OPT-BST-L
OSC-TX
OSC-RX
OPT-AMP-17-C
—
—
OPT-AMP-L
COM-TX
COM-RX
OSC-TX1
OSC-RX1
DC-TX1
DC-RX1
OPT-PRE
—
—
COM-TX
COM-RX
DC-TX
DC-RX
OSCM
—
—
OSC-CSM
COM-TX
COM-RX
OSC-TX
OSC-RX
32MUX
—
Any CHAN RX port
COM-TX
—
Any CHAN TX port
COM-RX
32MUX-O
40-MUX-C
32DMX
32DMX-L
32DMX-O
40-DMX-C
40-DMX-CE
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12.2 Virtual Patchcords
Table 12-3
Internal Patchcord Ports (continued)
Card
OCH Trunk Ports
OCH Filter Ports
OTS/OCH Ports
32WSS
—
Any ADD port
COM-TX
32WSS-L
COM-RX
40-WSS-C
EXP-TX
40-WSS-CE
EXP-RX
DROP-TX
40-WXC-C
—
—
ADD-RX
DROP-TX
COM TX
COM RX
MMU
—
—
EXP A TX
EXP A RX
1. When provisioned in OPT-PRE mode.
PPCs are created and managed from the network view Provisioning > Provisionable Patchcord (PPC) tab
(Figure 12-4), or from the node view (single-shelf mode) or multiself view (multishelf mode)
Provisioning > Comm Channel > PPC tab.
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12.2 Virtual Patchcords
Figure 12-4
Network View Provisionable Patchcords Tab
PPCs are required when the TXP, MXP, GE_XP, 10GE_XP, ADM-10G, or ITU-T line card is installed
in a different node than the OCH filter ports. They can also be used to create OTS-to-OTS links between
shelves that do not have OSC connectivity. PPCs are routable and can be used for network topology
discovery by Open Shortest Path First (OSPF). GCCs and DCCs are not required for PPC creation. When
you create a PPC, the PPC Creation wizard asks you to choose one of the following PPC types:
•
OCH-Trunk to OCH-Trunk—Creates a PPC between two OCH trunk ports on TXP, MXP, GE_XP,
10GE_XP, ADM_10G, or ITU-T line cards.
•
OTS to OTS—Creates a PPC between two OTS ports. This option establishes data communications
network (DCN) connectivity between nodes that do not have OSCM or OSC-CSM cards installed
and therefore do not have OSC connectivity. CTC selects the OTS ports after you choose the
origination and termination sides.
•
OCH-Trunk to OCH-Filter—Creates a PPC between a OCH trunk port on a TXP, MXP, GE_XP,
10GE_XP, ADM-10G, or ITU-T line card and an OCH filter port on a multiplexer, demultiplexer,
or wavelength selective switch card.
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12.2 Virtual Patchcords
Table 12-4 shows the PPC OCH trunk, OCH filter, and OTS ports.
Table 12-4
Provisionable Patchcord Ports
Card
OCH Trunk Port
OTS Port
OCH Filter Port
TXPs
Any trunk port
—
—
—
COM RX1
—
MXPs
GE_XP
10GE_XP
ADM-10G
ITU-T line cards
OPT-BST
OPT-BST-E
LINE RX
OPT-BST-L
LINE TX
OPT-AMP-17-C
—
COM RX2
—
COM TX3
OPT-AMP-L
LINE RX3
LINE TX3
OPT-PRE
—
COM RX4
COM TX
OSC-CSM
—
—
4
COM RX1
—
LINE RX
LINE TX
32MUX
—
—
Any CHAN RX port
—
—
Any CHAN TX port
—
—
Any ADD port
—
COM RX
—
32MUX-O
40-MUX-C
32DMX
32DMX-L
32DMX-O
40-DMX-C
40-DMX-CE
32WSS
32WSS-L
40-WSS-C
40-WSS-CE
40-WXC-C
COM TX
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12.3 End-to-End SVLAN Circuit
Table 12-4
Provisionable Patchcord Ports (continued)
Card
OCH Trunk Port
OTS Port
OCH Filter Port
MMU
—
EXP A RX
—
EXP A TX
1. Line nodes only.
2. When Card Mode is OPT-PRE.
3. When Card Mode is OPT-LINE.
4. Line nodes with two OPT-PRE cards and no BST cards installed.
For OCH trunk to OCH filter PPCs, the following rules and conditions apply:
•
GCC and DCC links are not required to create a PPC.
•
PPCs can be created for preprovisioned or physically installed cards.
•
The OCH trunk and OCH filter ports must be on the same wavelength. CTC checks the ports for
wavelength compatibility automatically during PPC provisioning.
•
For OC-48/STM-16 and OC-192/STM-64 ITU-T line cards, the wavelength compatibility check is
performed only when the cards are installed. The check is not performed for preprovisioned cards.
•
For all other preprovisioned cards, a wavelength compatibility check is not performed if card is set
to First Tunable Wavelength. The wavelength is automatically provisioned on the port, according to
the add/drop port that you chose when you created the PPC.
For OCH-trunk to OCH-trunk PPCs, the following rules and conditions apply:
•
Patchcords can be created on preprovisioned or physically installed cards.
•
Trunk-to-trunk connections require compatible wavelengths if the port is equipped. A check is
automatically performed during patchcord provisioning to ensure wavelength compatibility of ports.
•
For connections involving one or more preprovisioned ports, no compatibility check is performed.
12.3 End-to-End SVLAN Circuit
An end-to-end SVLAN circuit can be created between GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, or 10GE_XPE
cards through a wizard in CTC. SVLAN circuits created this way are only a snapshot of the SVLAN
settings (NNI and QinQ) of each card in the network. If an end-to-end SVLAN circuit is created via CTC
and the SVLAN settings of the cards are changed manually, CTC does not update the SVLAN circuit
created with the new settings. To update the SVLAN circuit in CTC, the circuit must be refreshed.
However, any changes made to subtended OCH trail circuits are reflected in the SVLAN circuit in CTC.
If an OCH trail becomes incomplete and the current SVLAN circuit snapshot has some SVLAN circuits
that are using it, they remain incomplete. If the snapshot contains incomplete SVLAN circuits and an
OCH trail circuit becomes available, the incomplete SVLAN circuit snapshot in CTC appears to be
complete.
SVLAN circuits are stateless circuits; an administrative or service state need not be set.
The following rules and conditions apply to end-to-end SVLAN circuits:
•
GE_XP, 10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards must be provisioned in L2-over-DWDM mode
•
SVLAN database must be loaded with the SVLAN
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12.3 End-to-End SVLAN Circuit
•
SVLAN circuits are routed through OCH trail circuits or PPC; Trunk to Trunk (Layer 2). Therefore,
before creating an SVLAN circuit, make sure that the subtended OCH trail circuits between GE_XP,
10GE_XP, GE_XPE, and 10GE_XPE cards or PPC links are created.
•
For protected SVLAN circuits, create a ring (through OCH trail circuits), define a master node, and
enable the protection role.
For information on how to create end-to-end SVLAN circuit, see the “NTP-G203 Create End to End
SVLAN Circuits” procedure in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
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12.3 End-to-End SVLAN Circuit
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13
Cisco Transport Controller Operation
This chapter describes Cisco Transport Controller (CTC), the software interface for the
Cisco ONS 15454. For CTC setup and login information, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Procedure Guide.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Chapter topics include:
•
13.1 CTC Software Delivery Methods, page 13-1
•
13.2 CTC Installation Overview, page 13-4
•
13.3 PC and UNIX Workstation Requirements, page 13-4
•
13.4 ONS 15454 Connections, page 13-7
•
13.5 CTC Window, page 13-8
•
13.6 Using the CTC Launcher Application to Manage Multiple ONS Nodes, page 13-20
•
13.7 TCC2/TCC2P Card Reset, page 13-23
•
13.8 TCC2/TCC2P Card Database, page 13-23
•
13.9 Software Revert, page 13-24
13.1 CTC Software Delivery Methods
ONS 15454 provisioning and administration is performed using the CTC software. CTC is a Java
application that is installed in two locations: it is stored on the TCC2 or TCC2P card and it is downloaded
to your workstation the first time you log into the ONS 15454 with a new software release. You can also
log into CTC using the CTC launcher application (StartCTC.exe). Refer to the “13.6 Using the CTC
Launcher Application to Manage Multiple ONS Nodes” section on page 13-20 for more information.
13.1.1 CTC Software Installed on the TCC2/TCC2P Card
CTC software is preloaded on the ONS 15454 TCC2/TCC2P cards; therefore, you do not need to install
software on the TCC2/TCC2P cards. When a new CTC software version is released, use the
release-specific software upgrade document to upgrade the ONS 15454 software on the TCC2/TCC2P
card.
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13.1.1 CTC Software Installed on the TCC2/TCC2P Card
When you upgrade CTC software, the TCC2/TCC2P cards store the new CTC version as the protect CTC
version. When you activate the new CTC software, the TCC2/TCC2P cards store the older CTC version
as the protect CTC version, and the newer CTC release becomes the working version. You can view the
software versions that are installed on an ONS 15454 by selecting the Maintenance > Software tabs in
node view (single-shelf mode) or multishelf view (multishelf mode) (Figure 13-1).
Figure 13-1
Maintenance tab
159507
Software tab
CTC Software Versions, Node View (Single-Shelf Mode)
Select the Maintenance > Software tabs in network view to display the software versions installed on all
the network nodes (Figure 13-2).
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13.1.2 CTC Software Installed on the PC or UNIX Workstation
Figure 13-2
CTC Software Versions, Network View
159505
Maintenance tab
13.1.2 CTC Software Installed on the PC or UNIX Workstation
CTC software is downloaded from the TCC2/TCC2P cards and installed on your computer automatically
after you connect to the ONS 15454 with a new software release for the first time. Downloading the CTC
software files automatically ensures that your computer is running the same CTC software version as the
TCC2/TCC2P cards you are accessing. The CTC files are stored in the temporary directory designated
by your computer operating system. You can use the Delete CTC Cache button to remove files stored in
the temporary directory. If the files are deleted, they download the next time you connect to an
ONS 15454. Downloading the Java archive (JAR) files for CTC takes several minutes depending on the
bandwidth of the connection between your workstation and the ONS 15454. For example, JAR files
downloaded from a modem or a data communications channel (DCC) network link require more time
than JAR files downloaded over a LAN connection.
During network topology discovery, CTC polls each node in the network to determine which one
contains the most recent version of the CTC software. If CTC discovers a node in the network that has
a more recent version of the CTC software than the version you are currently running, CTC generates a
message stating that a later version of the CTC has been found in the network and offers to install the
CTC software upgrade. After the node view appears, you can upgrade CTC by using the Tools >
Update CTC menu option. If you have network discovery disabled, CTC will not seek more recent
versions of the software. Unreachable nodes are not included in the upgrade discovery.
Note
Upgrading the CTC software will overwrite your existing software. You must restart CTC after the
upgrade is complete.
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13.2 CTC Installation Overview
13.2 CTC Installation Overview
To connect to an ONS 15454 using CTC, you enter the ONS 15454 IP address in the URL field of
Netscape Navigator or Microsoft Internet Explorer. After connecting to an ONS 15454, the following
occurs automatically:
1.
A CTC launcher applet is downloaded from the TCC2/TCC2P card to your computer.
2.
The launcher determines whether your computer has a CTC release matching the release on the
ONS 15454 TCC2/TCC2P card.
3.
If the computer does not have CTC installed, or if the installed release is older than the
TCC2/TCC2P card’s version, the launcher downloads the CTC program files from the TCC2/TCC2P
card.
4.
The launcher starts CTC. The CTC session is separate from the web browser session, so the web
browser is no longer needed. Always log into nodes having the latest software release. If you log
into an ONS 15454 that is connected to ONS 15454s with older versions of CTC, or to
Cisco ONS 15327s or Cisco ONS 15600s, CTC files are downloaded automatically to enable you to
interact with those nodes. The CTC file download occurs only when necessary, such as during your
first login. You cannot interact with nodes on the network that have a software version later than the
node that you used to launch CTC.
Each ONS 15454 can handle up to five concurrent CTC sessions. CTC performance can vary, depending
upon the volume of activity in each session, network bandwidth, and TCC2/TCC2P card load.
Note
You can also use TL1 commands to communicate with the Cisco ONS 15454 through VT100 terminals
and VT100 emulation software, or you can telnet to an ONS 15454 using TL1 port 3083. Refer to the
Cisco ONS SONET TL1 Command Guide or Cisco ONS 15454 SDH and Cisco ONS 15600 SDH TL1
Command Guide for a comprehensive list of TL1 commands.
13.3 PC and UNIX Workstation Requirements
To use CTC for the ONS 15454, your computer must have a web browser with the correct Java Runtime
Environment (JRE) installed. The correct JRE for each CTC software release is included on the
Cisco ONS 15454 software CD. If you are running multiple CTC software releases on a network, the
JRE installed on the computer must be compatible with the different software releases.
When you change the JRE version on the JRE tab, you must exit and restart CTC for the new JRE version
to take effect. Table 13-1 shows JRE compatibility with ONS 15454 software releases.
Table 13-1
JRE Compatibility
ONS Software Release
JRE 1.2.2
Compatible
JRE 1.3
Compatible
JRE 1.4
Compatible
JRE 5.0
Compatible
ONS 15454 Release 4.5
No
Yes
No
No
ONS 15454 Release 4.6
No
Yes
Yes
No
ONS 15454 Release 4.7
No
No
Yes
No
ONS 15454 Release 5.0
No
No
Yes
No
ONS 15454 Release 6.0
No
No
Yes
No
ONS 15454 Release 7.0
No
No
Yes
Yes 1
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13.3 PC and UNIX Workstation Requirements
Table 13-1
JRE Compatibility (continued)
ONS Software Release
JRE 1.2.2
Compatible
JRE 1.3
Compatible
JRE 1.4
Compatible
JRE 5.0
Compatible
ONS 15454 Release 7.2
No
No
Yes
Yes1
ONS 15454 Release 8.0
No
No
No
Yes
ONS 15454 Release 8.5
No
No
No
Yes
ONS 15454 Release 9.0
No
No
No
Yes
1. JRE 1.4.2 is the preferred version which is included in the software CD
Note
To avoid network performance issues, Cisco recommends managing a maximum of 50 nodes
concurrently with CTC. The 50 nodes can be on a single DCC or split across multiple DCCs. Cisco does
not recommend running multiple CTC sessions when managing two or more large networks.
To manage more than 50 nodes, Cisco recommends using Cisco Transport Manager (CTM). If you do
use CTC to manage more than 50 nodes, you can improve performance by adjusting the heap size; see
the “General Troubleshooting” chapter of the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide. You
can also create login node groups; see the “Connect the PC and Log Into the GUI” chapter of the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
Table 13-2 lists the requirements for PCs and UNIX workstations. In addition to the JRE, the Java
plug-in is also included on the ONS 15454 software CD.
Table 13-2
Computer Requirements for CTC
Area
Requirements
Notes
Processor
(PC only)
Pentium 4 processor or equivalent
A faster CPU is recommended if your
workstation runs multiple applications
or if CTC manages a network with a
large number of nodes and circuits.
RAM
512 MB RAM or more
A minimum of 1 GB is recommended if
your workstation runs multiple
applications or if CTC manages a
network with a large number of nodes
and circuits.
Hard drive
20 GB hard drive with 100MB of free space CTC application files are downloaded
required
from the TCC2/TCC2P to your
computer. These files occupy around
100MB (250MB to be safer) or more
space depending on the number of
versions in the network.
Operating
System
•
PC: Windows 2000 with SP4, Windows Check with the vendor for the latest
patch/Service Pack level
XP with SP2, Windows Vista SP1,
Windows Server 2003 SP2
•
Workstation: Solaris versions 9 or 10
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13.3 PC and UNIX Workstation Requirements
Table 13-2
Computer Requirements for CTC (continued)
Area
Requirements
Java Runtime JRE 5.0
Environment
Notes
JRE 5.0 is installed by the CTC
Installation Wizard included on the
Cisco ONS 15454 software CD. JRE 5.0
provide enhancements to CTC
performance, especially for large
networks with numerous circuits.
Cisco recommends that you use JRE 5.0
for networks with Software R9.0 nodes.
If CTC must be launched directly from
nodes running software R7.0 or R7.2,
Cisco recommends JRE 1.4.2 or JRE
5.0. If CTC must be launched directly
from nodes running software R5.0 or
R6.0, Cisco recommends JRE 1.4.2.If
CTC must be launched directly from
nodes running software earlier than
R5.0, Cisco recommends JRE 1.3.1_02.
Web browser
•
PC:Internet Explorer 6.x or Netscape
7.x
•
UNIX Workstation: Mozilla 1.7,
Netscape 4.76, Netscape 7.x
For the PC, use JRE 5.0 with any
supported web browser. Cisco
recommends Internet Explorer 6.x. For
UNIX, use JRE 5.0 with Netscape 7.x or
JRE 1.3.1_02 with Netscape 4.76.
Netscape 4.76 or 7.x is available at the
following site:
http://channels.netscape.com/ns/browse
rs/default.jsp
Internet Explorer 6.x is available at the
following site:
http://www.microsoft.com
Cable
User-supplied CAT-5 straight-through cable —
with RJ-45 connectors on each end to
connect the computer to the ONS 15454
directly or through a LAN.
User-supplied cross-over CAT-5 cable to the
DCN port on the ONS 15454 patch panel or
to the Catalyst 2950 (multishelf mode).
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13.4 ONS 15454 Connections
13.4 ONS 15454 Connections
You can connect to the ONS 15454 in multiple ways. You can connect your PC directly to the
ONS 15454 (local craft connection) using the RJ-45 port on the TCC2/TCC2P card or, for the ANSI
shelf, using the LAN pins on the backplane (the ETSI shelf provides a LAN connection via the RJ-45
jack on the MIC-T/C/P Front Mount Electrical Connection [FMEC]). Alternatively, you can connect
your PC to a hub or switch that is connected to the ONS 15454, connect to the ONS 15454 through a
LAN or modem, or establish TL1 connections from a PC or TL1 terminal. Table 13-3 lists the ONS
15454 connection methods and requirements.
Table 13-3
Method
ONS 15454 Connection Methods
Description
Requirements
Local craft Refers to onsite network connections
between the CTC computer and the
ONS 15454 using one of the following:
Corporate
LAN
•
The RJ-45 (LAN) port on the
TCC2/TCC2P card
•
The RJ-45 (LAN) port on the patch panel
(multishelf mode)
•
Port 23 or 24 of the Catalyst 2950
(multishelf mode)
•
The LAN pins on the ONS 15454
backplane (ANSI)
•
The RJ-45 jack on the MIC-T/C/P
FMEC (ETSI)
•
A hub or switch to which the ONS 15454
is connected
Refers to a connection to the ONS 15454
through a corporate or network operations
center (NOC) LAN.
If you do not use Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol (DHCP), you must
change the computer IP address, subnet
mask, and default router, or use automatic
host detection.
•
The ONS 15454 must be provisioned
for LAN connectivity, including IP
address, subnet mask, and default
gateway.
•
The ONS 15454 must be physically
connected to the corporate LAN.
•
The CTC computer must be connected
to the corporate LAN that has
connectivity to the ONS 15454.
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13.5 CTC Window
Table 13-3
ONS 15454 Connection Methods (continued)
Method
Description
Requirements
TL1
Refers to a connection to the ONS 15454
using TL1 rather than CTC. TL1 sessions can
be started from CTC, or you can use a TL1
terminal. The physical connection can be a
craft connection, corporate LAN, or a TL1
terminal.
Refer to the Cisco ONS SONET TL1
Reference Guide or the Cisco ONS 15454
SDH and Cisco ONS 15600 SDH TL1
Reference Guide.
Remote
Refers to a connection made to the
ONS 15454 using a modem.
•
A modem must be connected to the
ONS 15454.
•
The modem must be provisioned for
the ONS 15454. To run CTC, the
modem must be provisioned for
Ethernet access.
13.5 CTC Window
When you log into a single-shelf ONS 15454, the CTC window appears in node view (Figure 13-3).
When you log into a multishelf ONS 15454, meaning that two or more ONS 15454 shelves are
configured to operate as one node, the multishelf view (Figure 13-4) appears in the CTC window. The
window includes a menu bar, a toolbar, and a top and bottom pane. The top pane provides status
information about the selected objects and a graphic of the current view. The bottom pane provides tabs
and subtabs to view ONS 15454 information and perform ONS 15454 provisioning and maintenance
tasks. From the CTC window, you can display the other ONS 15454 views. In single-shelf mode, these
are the network, node, and card views. In multishelf mode, these are the network, multishelf, shelf, and
card views.
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13.5 CTC Window
Figure 13-3
Node View (Default Login View for Single-Shelf Mode)
Menu bar
Tool bar
Status area
Top pane
Graphic area
Tabs
Subtabs
159506
Bottom pane
Status bar
Figure 13-4
Multishelf View (Default Login View for Multishelf Mode)
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13.5.1 Summary Pane
13.5.1 Summary Pane
The Summary pane on the left has the following fields:
•
Node Addr—IP address of the node.
•
Booted—The Booted field indicates one of the following:
– Date and time of the node reboot. The node reboot is caused by complete power cycle, software
upgrade, or software downgrade.
– Date and time of reset of the control cards one after the other.
•
User—Login user name.
•
Authority—Security level of users. The possible security levels are Retrieve, Maintanence,
Provisioning, and Superuser.
•
SW Version—CTC software version.
•
Defaults—Name provided to identify the defaults list.
13.5.2 Node View (Multishelf Mode), Node View (Single-Shelf Mode), and
Shelf View (Multishelf Mode)
Node view, shown in Figure 13-3, is the first view that appears after you log into a single-shelf
ONS 15454. Multishelf view, shown in Figure 13-4, is the first view that appears after you log into a
multishelf ONS 15454. The login node is the first node shown, and it is the “home view” for the session.
Multishelf view and node view allow you to manage one ONS 15454 node. The status area shows the
node name; IP address; session boot date and time; number of Critical (CR), Major (MJ), and Minor
(MN) alarms; name and security level of the current logged-in user; software version; and network
element default setup.
In a multishelf mode, up to 12 shelves operate as a single node.
Note
The reason for extending the number of subtending shelves from eight to 12 is to accommodate and
manage the new optical and DWDM cards that operate in the even band frequency grid.
When you open a shelf from multishelf view, shelf view appears, which looks similar to node view but
does not contain the tabs and subtabs that are used for node-level operations.
13.5.2.1 CTC Card Colors
The graphic area of the CTC window depicts the ONS 15454 shelf assembly. The colors of the cards in
the graphic reflect the real-time status of the physical card and slot (Table 13-4).
Table 13-4
Multishelf View (Multishelf Mode), Node View (Single-Shelf Mode), and Shelf View
(Multishelf Mode) Card Colors
Card Color
Status
Gray
Slot is not provisioned; no card is installed.
Violet
Slot is provisioned; no card is installed.
White
Slot is provisioned; a functioning card is installed.
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13.5.2 Node View (Multishelf Mode), Node View (Single-Shelf Mode), and Shelf View (Multishelf Mode)
Table 13-4
Multishelf View (Multishelf Mode), Node View (Single-Shelf Mode), and Shelf View
(Multishelf Mode) Card Colors (continued)
Card Color
Status
Yellow
Slot is provisioned; a Minor alarm condition exists.
Orange
Slot is provisioned; a Major alarm condition exists.
Red
Slot is provisioned; a Critical alarm exists.
On the ONS 15454 ETSI, the colors of the FMEC cards reflect the real-time status of the physical FMEC
cards. Table 13-5 lists the FMEC card colors. The FMEC ports shown in CTC do not change color.
Note
You cannot preprovision FMECs.
Table 13-5
Multishelf View (Multishelf Mode) and Node View (Single-Shelf Mode) FMEC Color
Upper Shelf FMEC Color
Status
White
Functioning card is installed.
Yellow
Minor alarm condition exists.
Orange (Amber)
Major alarm condition exists.
Red
Critical alarm exists.
The wording on a card in node view (single-shelf mode) or shelf view (multishelf mode) shows the status
of a card (Active, Standby, Loading, or Not Provisioned). Table 13-6 lists the card statuses.
Table 13-6
Node View (Single-Shelf Mode) or Shelf View (Multishelf Mode) Card Statuses
Card Status
Description
Act
Card is active.
Sty
Card is in standby mode.
Ldg
Card is resetting.
NP
Card is not present.
Port color in card view, node view (single-shelf mode), and shelf view (multishelf mode) indicates the
port service state. Table 13-7 lists the port colors and their service states. For more information about
port service states, see Appendix B, “Administrative and Service States.”
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Table 13-7
Cisco Transport Controller Operation
Node View (Single-Shelf Mode) or Shelf View (Multishelf Mode) Card Port Colors and Service States
Port Color
Service State
Description
Cyan (blue)
Out-of-Service and Management, Loopback
(OOS-MA,LPBK) (ANSI)
Port is in a loopback state. On the card in node or shelf
view, a line between ports indicates that the port is in
terminal or facility loopback (see Figure 13-5 and
Figure 13-6). Traffic is carried and alarm reporting is
suppressed. Raised fault conditions, whether or not their
alarms are reported, can be retrieved on the CTC
Conditions tab or by using the TL1 RTRV-COND
command.
Locked-enabled,loopback (ETSI)
Cyan (blue)
Out-of-Service and Management, Maintenance
(OOS-MA,MT) (ANSI)
Locked-enabled,maintenance (ETSI)
Gray
Out-of-Service and Management, Disabled
(OOS-MA,DSBLD) (ANSI)
Port is out-of-service for maintenance. Traffic is carried
and loopbacks are allowed. Alarm reporting is
suppressed. Raised fault conditions, whether or not their
alarms are reported, can be retrieved on the CTC
Conditions tab or by using the TL1 RTRV-COND
command. Use this service state for testing or to suppress
alarms temporarily. Change the state to
IS-NR/Unlocked-enabled;
OOS-MA,DSBLD/Locked-enabled,disabled; or
OOS-AU,AINS/Unlocked-disabled,automaticInService
when testing is complete.
The port is out-of-service and unable to carry traffic.
Loopbacks are not allowed in this service state.
Locked-enabled,disabled (ETSI)
Green
In-Service and Normal (IS-NR) (ANSI)
Unlocked-enabled (ETSI)
Violet
Out-of-Service and Autonomous, Automatic
In-Service (OOS-AU,AINS) (ANSI)
Unlocked-disabled,automaticInService (ETSI)
The port is fully operational and performing as
provisioned. The port transmits a signal and displays
alarms; loopbacks are not allowed.
The port is out-of-service, but traffic is carried. Alarm
reporting is suppressed. The node monitors the ports for
an error-free signal. After an error-free signal is detected,
the port stays in this service state for the duration of the
soak period. After the soak period ends, the port service
state changes to IS-NR/Unlocked-enabled.
Raised fault conditions, whether or not their alarms are
reported, can be retrieved on the CTC Conditions tab or
by using the TL1 RTRV-COND command. The AINS
port will automatically transition to
IS-NR/Unlocked-enabled when a signal is received for
the length of time provisioned in the soak field.
Figure 13-5
Terminal Loopback Indicator
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13.5.2 Node View (Multishelf Mode), Node View (Single-Shelf Mode), and Shelf View (Multishelf Mode)
Figure 13-6
Facility Loopback Indicator
13.5.2.2 Multishelf View Card Shortcuts
If you move your mouse over cards in the multishelf view graphic, popups display additional information
about the card including the card type; the card status (active or standby); the type of alarm, such as
Critical, Major, or Minor (if any); the alarm profile used by the card; and for transponder (TXP) or
muxponder (MXP) cards, the wavelength of the dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) port.
13.5.2.3 Node View (Single-Shelf Mode) or Shelf View (Multishelf Mode) Card Shortcuts
If you move your mouse over cards in the node view (single-shelf mode) or shelf view (multishelf mode)
graphic, popups display additional information about the card including the card type; the card status
(active or standby); the type of alarm, such as Critical, Major, or Minor (if any); the alarm profile used
by the card; and for TXP or MXP cards, the wavelength of the DWDM port. Right-click a card to reveal
a shortcut menu, which you can use to open, reset, delete, or change a card. Right-click a slot to
preprovision a card (that is, provision a slot before installing the card).
13.5.2.4 Multishelf View Tabs
Table 13-8 lists the tabs and subtabs available in the multishelf view. The actions on these tabs apply to
the multishelf node and its subtending shelves.
Table 13-8
Multishelf View Tabs and Subtabs
Tab
Description
Subtabs
Alarms
Lists current alarms (CR, MJ, MN) for the
multishelf node and updates them in real time.
—
Conditions
Displays a list of standing conditions on the
multishelf node.
—
History
Session, Node
Provides a history of multishelf node alarms
including the date, type, and severity of each
alarm. The Session subtab displays alarms and
events for the current session. The Node subtab
displays alarms and events retrieved from a
fixed-size log on the node.
Circuits
Creates, deletes, edits, and maps circuits.
Circuits, Rolls
Provisioning
Provisions the ONS 15454 multishelf node.
General, Network, OSI, Security,
SNMP, Comm Channels, Alarm
Profiles, Defaults, WDM-ANS
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Table 13-8
Multishelf View Tabs and Subtabs (continued)
Tab
Description
Subtabs
Inventory
Provides inventory information (part number,
serial number, and Common Language
Equipment Identification [CLEI] codes) for
cards installed on all shelves in the multishelf
node. Allows you to delete and reset cards and
change the card service state.
—
Maintenance
Performs maintenance tasks for the multishelf
node.
Database, Network, OSI, Software,
Diagnostic, Audit, DWDM
13.5.2.5 Node View (Single-Shelf Mode) or Shelf View (Multishelf Mode) Tabs
Table 13-9 lists the tabs and subtabs available in node view (single-shelf mode) or shelf view (multishelf
mode).
Table 13-9
Node View (Single-Shelf Mode) or Shelf View (Multishelf Mode) Tabs and Subtabs
Tab
Description
Alarms
Lists current alarms (CR, MJ, MN) for the node —
or shelf and updates them in real time.
Conditions
Displays a list of standing conditions on the
node or shelf.
History
Session, Node
Provides a history of node or shelf alarms
including the date, type, and severity of each
alarm. The Session subtab displays alarms and
events for the current session. The Node subtab
displays alarms and events retrieved from a
fixed-size log on the node.
Circuits
Creates, deletes, edits, and maps circuits.
Circuits, Rolls
Provisioning
Provisions the ONS 15454 single-shelf or
multishelf node.
Single-shelf mode: General,
Network, OSI, Security, SNMP,
Comm Channels, Alarm Profiles,
Defaults, WDM-ANS
Subtabs
—
Multishelf mode: General,
Protection, Timing, Alarm Profiles
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13.5.3 Network View
Table 13-9
Node View (Single-Shelf Mode) or Shelf View (Multishelf Mode) Tabs and Subtabs
Tab
Description
Inventory
—
Provides inventory information (part number,
serial number, and CLEI codes) for cards
installed in the single-shelf or multishelf node.
Allows you to delete and reset cards and change
the card service state.
Note
Maintenance
Subtabs
Each card has bootstrap and boot code.
After the card is upgraded using the boot
code upgrade procedure, the bootstrap
version is displayed in the Inventory tab
in CTC; However, the boot code version
is not displayed in the Inventory tab.
Performs maintenance tasks for the single-shelf Single-shelf mode: Database,
or multishelf node.
Network, OSI, Software,
Diagnostic, Audit, DWDM
Multishelf mode: Protection,
Overhead XConnect, Diagnostic,
Timing
13.5.3 Network View
Network view allows you to view and manage ONS 15454s that have DCC connections to the node that
you logged into and any login node groups you have selected (Figure 13-7).
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13.5.3 Network View
Figure 13-7
Network in CTC Network View
Icon color indicates
node status
Dots indicate
selected node
96939
Bold letters indicate
login node, asterisk
indicates topology host
Note
Nodes with DCC connections to the login node do not appear if you checked the Disable Network
Discovery check box in the Login dialog box.
The graphic area displays a background image with colored ONS 15454 icons. A Superuser can set up
the logical network view feature, which enables each user to see the same network view.
13.5.3.1 Network View Tabs
Table 13-10 lists the tabs and subtabs available in network view.
Table 13-10
Network View Tabs and Subtabs
Tab
Description
Subtabs
Alarms
Lists current alarms (CR, MJ, MN) for the
network and updates them in real time.
—
Conditions
Displays a list of standing conditions on the
network.
—
History
Provides a history of network alarms including —
date, type, and severity of each alarm.
Circuits
Creates, deletes, edits, filters, and searches for —
network circuits.
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13.5.3 Network View
Table 13-10
Network View Tabs and Subtabs (continued)
Tab
Description
Subtabs
Provisioning
Provisions security, alarm profiles,
bidirectional line switched rings (BLSRs)
(ANSI), multiplex section-shared protection
rings (MS-SPRing) (ETSI), and overhead
circuits.
Security, Alarm Profiles, BLSR
(ANSI), MS-SPRing (ETSI),
Overhead Circuits, Provisionable
Patchcords
Maintenance
Displays the type of equipment and the status Software
of each node in the network; displays working
and protect software versions; and allows
software to be downloaded.
13.5.3.2 CTC Node Colors
The color of a node in network view, shown in Table 13-11, indicates the node alarm status.
Table 13-11
Node Status Shown in Network View
Color
Alarm Status
Green
No alarms
Yellow
Minor alarms
Orange
Major alarms
Red
Critical alarms
Gray with
Unknown#
Node initializing for the first time (CTC displays Unknown# because CTC has
not discovered the name of the node yet)
13.5.3.3 DCC Links
The lines show DCC connections between the nodes (Table 13-12). DCC connections can be green
(active) or gray (fail). The lines can also be solid (circuits can be routed through this link) or dashed
(circuits cannot be routed through this link). Circuit provisioning uses active/routable links. Selecting a
node or span in the graphic area displays information about the node and span in the status area.
Table 13-12
DCC Colors Indicating State in Network View
Color and Line Style
State
Green and solid
Active/Routable
Green and dashed
Active/Nonroutable
Gray and solid
Failed/Routable
Gray and dashed
Failed/Nonroutable
13.5.3.4 Link Consolidation
CTC provides the ability to consolidate the DCC, generic communications channel (GCC), optical
transmission section (OTS), and PPC links shown in the network view into a more streamlined view.
Link consolidation allows you to condense multiple inter-nodal links into a single link. The link
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13.5.4 Card View
consolidation sorts links by class, meaning that all DCC links are consolidated together, for example.You
can access individual links within consolidated links using the right-click shortcut menu.Each link has
an associated icon (Table 13-13).
Table 13-13
Icon
Link Icons
Description
DCC icon
GCC icon
OTS icon
PPC icon
Note
Link consolidation is only available on non-detailed maps. Non-detailed maps display nodes in icon
form instead of detailed form, meaning that the nodes appear as rectangles with ports on the sides. Refer
to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide for more information about consolidated links.
13.5.4 Card View
The card view provides information about individual ONS 15454 cards. Use this window to perform
card-specific maintenance and provisioning (Figure 13-8). A graphic showing the ports on the card is
shown in the graphic area. The status area displays the node name, slot, number of alarms, card type,
equipment type, card status (active or standby), card service state if the card is present, and port service
state (described in Table 13-7 on page 13-12). The information that appears and the actions that you can
perform depend on the card. For more information about card service states, refer to Appendix B,
“Administrative and Service States.”
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13.5.4 Card View
Figure 13-8
CTC Card View Showing a 40-WXC-C Card
159508
Card identification and status
Note
CTC provides a card view for all ONS 15454 cards except the TCC2/TCC2P card.
Use the card view tabs and subtabs shown in Table 13-14 to provision and manage the ONS 15454. The
subtabs, fields, and information shown under each tab depend on the card type selected.
Table 13-14
Card View Tabs and Subtabs
Tab
Description
Alarms
Lists current alarms (CR, MJ, MN) for the card —
and updates them in real time.
Conditions
Displays a list of standing conditions on the
card.
—
History
Provides a history of card alarms including
date, object, port, and severity of each alarm.
Session (displays alarms and events
for the current session), Card
(displays alarms and events retrieved
from a fixed-size log on the card)
Circuits
Creates, deletes, edits, and search circuits.
—
Subtabs
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13.6 Using the CTC Launcher Application to Manage Multiple ONS Nodes
Table 13-14
Card View Tabs and Subtabs (continued)
Tab
Description
Subtabs
Provisioning
Provisions an ONS 15454 card.
DS-N and OC-N cards: Line, Line
Thresholds (different threshold
options are available for DS-N and
OC-N cards), Elect Path Thresholds,
SONET Thresholds, SONET STS,
Alarm Profiles
TXP and MXP cards: Card, Line,
Line Thresholds, Optics Thresholds,
OTN, Alarm Profiles
DWDM cards (subtabs depend on
card type): Optical Line, Optical
Chn, Optical Amplifier, Parameters,
Optics Thresholds, Alarm Profiles
Maintenance
Performs maintenance tasks for the card.
Performance
Performs performance monitoring for the card. DS-N and OC-N cards: no subtabs
TXP and MXP cards: Optics PM,
Payload PM, OTN PM
(Not available
for the AIC-I
cards)
Inventory
Loopback, Info, Protection, J1 Path
Trace, AINS Soak (options depend
on the card type), Automatic Laser
Shutdown
DWDM cards (subtabs depend on
card type): Optical Line, Optical
Chn, Optical Amplifier Line, OC3
Line, Parameters, Optics Thresholds
(40-WSS, 40-WXC, OPT-PRE and OPT-BST
cards) Displays an Inventory screen of the
ports.
—
13.6 Using the CTC Launcher Application to Manage Multiple
ONS Nodes
The CTC Launcher application is an executable file, StartCTC.exe, that is provided on
Software Release 9.0 CDs for Cisco ONS products. You can use CTC Launcher to log into multiple ONS
nodes that are running CTC Software Release 3.3 or higher, without using a web browser. The CTC
launcher application provides an advantage particularly when you have more than one NE version on the
network, because it allows you to pick from all available CTC software versions. It also starts more
quickly than the browser version of CTC and has a dedicated node history list.
CTC Launcher provides two connection options. The first option is used to connect to ONS NEs that
have an IP connection to the CTC computer. The second option is used to connect to ONS NEs that reside
behind third party, OSI-based GNEs. For this option, CTC Launcher creates a TL1 tunnel to transport
the TCP traffic through the OSI-based GNE.
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13.6 Using the CTC Launcher Application to Manage Multiple ONS Nodes
The TL1 tunnel transports the TCP traffic to and from ONS ENEs through the OSI-based GNE. TL1
tunnels are similar to the existing static IP-over-CLNS tunnels, GRE, and Cisco IP, that can be created
at ONS NEs using CTC. (Refer to the Cisco ONS product documentation for information about static
IP-over-CLNS tunnels.) However, unlike the static IP-over-CLNS tunnels, TL1 tunnels require no
provisioning at the ONS ENE, the third-party GNE, or DCN routers. All provisioning occurs at the CTC
computer when the CTC Launcher is started.
Figure 13-9 shows examples of two static IP-over-CLNS tunnels. A static Cisco IP tunnel is created from
ENE 1 through other vendor GNE 1 to a DCN router, and a static GRE tunnel is created from ONS ENE 2
to the other vender, GNE 2. For both static tunnels, provisioning is required on the ONS ENEs. In
addition, a Cisco IP tunnel must be provisioned on the DCN router and a GRE tunnel provisioned on
GNE 2.
Figure 13-9
Static IP-Over-CLNS Tunnels
Central office
Other vendor
GNE 1
ONS ENE 1
OSI/DCC
Tunnel provisioning
IP/DCC
IP+ OSI
IP-over-CLNS
tunnel
Tunnel
provisioning
IP DCN
CTC
Other vendor
GNE 2
ONS ENE 2
IP/DCC
OSI/DCC
Tunnel
IP-over-CLNS
Tunnel
provisioning
tunnel
provisioning
140174
IP
Figure 13-10 shows the same network using TL1 tunnels. Tunnel provisioning occurs at the CTC
computer when the tunnel is created with the CTC Launcher. No provisioning is needed at ONS NEs,
GNEs, or routers.
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13.6 Using the CTC Launcher Application to Manage Multiple ONS Nodes
Figure 13-10
TL1 Tunnels
Central office
Other vendor
GNE 1
ONS ENE 1
OSI/DCC
IP/DCC
IP + OSI
Tunnel provisioning
TL1 tunnel
IP DCN
CTC
IP
Other vendor
GNE 2
ONS ENE 2
OSI/DCC
IP/DCC
140175
TL1 tunnel
TL1 tunnels provide several advantages over static IP-over-CLNS tunnels. Because tunnel provisioning
is needed only at the CTC computer, they are faster to set up. Because they use TL1 for TCP transport,
they are more secure. TL1 tunnels also provide better flow control. On the other hand, IP over CLNS
tunnels require less overhead and usually provide a slight performance edge over TL1 Tunnels
(depending on network conditions). TL1 tunnels do not support all IP applications such as SNMP and
RADIUS Authentication. Table 13-15 shows a comparison between the two types of tunnels.
Table 13-15
TL1 and Static IP-Over-CLNS Tunnels Comparison
Category
Static
IP-Over-CLNS
TL1 Tunnel
Comments
Setup
Complex
Simple
Requires provisioning at ONS NE, GNE, and DCN routers. For
TL1 tunnels, provisioning is needed at CTC computer.
Performance
Best
Average to
good
Static tunnels generally provide better performance than TL1
tunnels, depending on TL1 encoding used. LV+Binary provides
the best performance. Other encoding will produce slightly
slower TL1 tunnel performance.
Support all IP
applications
Yes
No
TL1 tunnels do not support SNMP or RADIUS Server IP
applications.
ITU Standard
Yes
No
Only the static IP-over-CLNS tunnels meet ITU standards. TL1
tunnels are new.
Tunnel traffic control
Good
Very good
Both tunnel types provide good traffic control
Security setup
Complex
No setup
needed
Static IP-over-CLNS tunnels require careful planning. Because
TL1 tunnels are carried by TL1, no security provisioning is
needed.
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13.7 TCC2/TCC2P Card Reset
Table 13-15
TL1 and Static IP-Over-CLNS Tunnels Comparison (continued)
Static
IP-Over-CLNS
Category
TL1 Tunnel
Comments
Potential to breach DCN Possible
from DCC using IP.
Not possible
A potential exists to breach a DCN from a DCC using IP. This
potential does not exist for TL1 tunnels.
IP route management
Expensive
Automatic
For static IP-over-CLNS tunnels, route changes require manual
provisioning at network routers, GNEs, and ENEs. For TL1
tunnels, route changes are automatic.
Flow control
Weak
Strong
TL1 tunnels provide the best flow control.
Bandwidth sharing
among multiple
applications
Weak
Best
—
Tunnel lifecycle
Fixed
CTC session
TL1 tunnels are terminated when the CTC session ends. Static
IP-over-CLNS tunnels exist until they are deleted in CTC.
TL1 tunnel specifications and general capabilities include:
•
Each tunnel generally supports between six to eight ENEs, depending on the number of tunnels at
the ENE.
•
Each CTC session can support up to 32 tunnels.
•
The TL1 tunnel database is stored locally in the CTC Preferences file.
•
Automatic tunnel reconnection when the tunnel goes down.
•
Each ONS NE can support at least 16 concurrent tunnels.
13.7 TCC2/TCC2P Card Reset
You can reset the ONS 15454 TCC2/TCC2P card by using CTC (a soft reset) or by physically reseating
the card (a hard reset). A soft reset reboots the TCC2/TCC2P card and reloads the operating system and
the application software. Additionally, a hard reset temporarily removes power from the TCC2/TCC2P
card and clears all buffer memory.
You can apply a soft reset from CTC to either an active or standby TCC2/TCC2P card without affecting
traffic. If you need to perform a hard reset on an active TCC2/TCC2P card, put the TCC2/TCC2P card
into standby mode first by performing a soft reset.
Note
When a CTC reset is performed on an active TCC2/TCC2P card, the AIC-I card goes through an
initialization process and also resets because it is controlled by the active TCC2/TCC2P card.
13.8 TCC2/TCC2P Card Database
When dual TCC2/TCC2P cards are installed in the ONS 15454, each TCC2/TCC2P card hosts a separate
database; therefore, the protect card database is available if the database on the working TCC2/TCC2P
fails. You can also store a backup version of the database on the workstation running CTC. This
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Cisco Transport Controller Operation
13.9 Software Revert
operation should be part of a regular ONS 15454 maintenance program at approximately weekly
intervals, and should also be completed when preparing an ONS 15454 for a pending natural disaster,
such as a flood or fire.
Note
The following parameters are not backed up and restored: node name, IP address, mask and gateway, and
Internet Inter-ORB Protocol (IIOP) port. If you change the node name and then restore a backed up
database with a different node name, the circuits map to the new node name. Cisco recommends keeping
a record of the old and new node names.
13.9 Software Revert
When you click the Activate button after a software upgrade, the TCC2/TCC2P card copies the current
working database and saves it in a reserved location in the TCC2/TCC2P card flash memory. If later
during the upgrade you need to revert to the original working software load from the protect software
load, the saved database installs automatically. You do not need to restore the database manually or
recreate circuits.
The revert feature is useful if the maintenance window in which you were performing an upgrade closes
while you are still upgrading CTC software. You can revert to the protect software load without losing
traffic. During the next maintenance window, you can complete the upgrade and activate the new
software load.
Circuits created or provisioning done after you activate a new software load (upgrade to a higher release)
will be lost with a revert. The database configuration at the time of activation is reinstated after a revert.
(This does not apply to maintenance reverts, such as Software R5.0.1 to Software R5.0.2, because
maintenance releases retain the database during activation.)
Caution
Cisco does not recommend reverting after changing provisioning on the node. Depending upon the
particular provisioning, reverting in this case can be traffic affecting.
To perform a supported (non-service-affecting) revert from a software release that you have just
activated, the release you revert to must have been working at the time you first activated the new
software on that node. Because a supported revert automatically restores the node configuration at the
time of the previous activation, any configuration changes made after activation will be lost when you
revert the software. Downloading the software release that you are upgrading to a second time after you
have activated the new load ensures that no actual revert to a previous load can take place (the
TCC2/TCC2P will reset, but will not be traffic affecting and will not change your database).
Note
To perform a supported software upgrade or revert, you must consult the specific upgrade document and
release notes for the release you are upgrading to (or reverting from).
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14
Security Reference
This chapter provides information about Cisco ONS 15454 users and security.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Chapter topics include:
•
14.1 User IDs and Security Levels, page 14-1
•
14.2 User Privileges and Policies, page 14-2
•
14.3 Audit Trail, page 14-8
•
14.4 RADIUS Security, page 14-9
14.1 User IDs and Security Levels
The Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) ID is provided with the ONS 15454 system, but the system does
not display the user ID when you sign into CTC. This ID can be used to set up other ONS 15454 users.
You can have up to 500 user IDs on one ONS 15454. Each CTC or TL1 user can be assigned one of the
following security levels:
•
Retrieve—Users can retrieve and view CTC information but cannot set or modify parameters.
•
Maintenance—Users can access only the ONS 15454 maintenance options.
•
Provisioning—Users can access provisioning and maintenance options.
•
Superusers—Users can perform all of the functions of the other security levels as well as set names,
passwords, and security levels for other users.
See Table 14-3 on page 14-7 for idle user timeout information for each security level.
By default, multiple concurrent user ID sessions are permitted on the node, that is, multiple users can
log into a node using the same user ID. However, you can provision the node to allow only a single login
per user and prevent concurrent logins for all users.
Note
You must add the same user name and password to each node the user accesses.
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14.2 User Privileges and Policies
Note
Maintenance, Provisioning, and Superusers must be properly trained on the hazards of laser safety and
be aware of safety-related instructions, labels, and warnings. Refer to the Cisco Optical Products Safety
and Compliance Information document for a current list of safety labels and warnings, including laser
warnings. Refer to IEC 60825-2 for international laser safety standards, or to ANSI Z136.1 for U.S. laser
safety standards. The Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide explains how users can disable laser
safety during maintenance or installation; when following these procedures, adhere to all posted
warnings and cautions to avoid unsafe conditions or abnormal exposure to optical radiation.
14.2 User Privileges and Policies
This section lists user privileges for each CTC task and describes the security policies available to
Superusers for provisioning.
14.2.1 User Privileges by CTC Task
Table 14-1 shows the actions that each user privilege level can perform in node view.
Table 14-1
ONS 15454 Security Levels—Node View
CTC Tab
Subtab
[Subtab]:Actions
Retrieve
Maintenance
Provisioning
Superuser
Alarms
—
Synchronize/Filter/Delete
Cleared Alarms
X
X
X
X
Conditions
—
Retrieve/Filter
X
X
X
X
History
Session
Filter
X
X
X
X
Node
Retrieve/Filter
X
X
X
X
Circuits
Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
X
X
Filter/Search
X
X
X
X
Complete/ Force Valid Signal/
Finish
—
—
X
X
Circuits
Rolls
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14.2.1 User Privileges by CTC Task
Table 14-1
CTC Tab
ONS 15454 Security Levels—Node View (continued)
Subtab
Provisioning General
Network
OSI
[Subtab]:Actions
Retrieve
Maintenance
Provisioning
1
Superuser
General: Edit
—
—
Partial
X
Multishelf Config: Edit
—
—
—
X
General: Edit
—
—
—
X
Static Routing: Create/Edit/
Delete
—
—
X
X
OSPF: Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
X
X
RIP: Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
X
X
Proxy: Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
—
X
Firewall: Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
—
X
Main Setup:Edit
—
—
—
X
TARP: Config: Edit
—
—
—
X
TARP: Static TDC:
Add/Edit/Delete
—
—
X
X
TARP: MAT: Add/Edit/Remove —
—
X
X
Routers: Setup: Edit
—
—
—
X
Routers: Subnets:
Edit/Enable/Disable
—
—
X
X
Tunnels: Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
X
X
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14.2.1 User Privileges by CTC Task
Table 14-1
CTC Tab
ONS 15454 Security Levels—Node View (continued)
Subtab
[Subtab]:Actions
Retrieve
Maintenance
Provisioning
Superuser
Security
Users: Create/Delete/Clear
Security Intrusion Alarm
—
—
—
X
Users: Change
Same user Same user
Same user
All users
Active Logins: View/Logout/
Retrieve Last Activity Time
—
—
—
X
Policy: Edit/View
—
—
—
X
Access: Edit/View
—
—
—
X
RADIUS Server:
Create/Edit/Delete/Move Up/M
ove Down/View
—
—
—
X
Legal Disclaimer: Edit
—
—
—
X
Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
X
X
Browse trap destinations
X
X
X
X
SDCC: Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
X
X
LDCC: Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
X
X
GCC: Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
X
X
OSC: Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
X
X
PPC: Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
X
X
LMP: General: Edit
X
X
X
X
LMP: Control Channels:
Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
—
X
LMP: TE Links:
Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
—
X
LMP: Data Links:
Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
—
X
Load/Store/Delete2
—
—
X
X
New/Compare/Available/Usage
X
X
X
X
Edit/Import
—
—
—
X
Reset/Export
X
X
X
X
Provisioning: Edit
—
—
—
X
Provisioning: Reset
X
X
X
X
Internal Patchcords:
Create/Edit/Delete/Commit/
Default Patchcords
—
—
X
X
Port Status: Launch ANS
—
—
—
X
Node Setup: Setup/Edit
X
X
X
X
Optical Side: Create/Edit/Delete X
X
X
X
Delete
—
—
X
X
Reset
—
X
X
X
SNMP
Comm Channels
Alarm Profiles
Defaults
WDM-ANS
Inventory
—
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14.2.1 User Privileges by CTC Task
Table 14-1
CTC Tab
ONS 15454 Security Levels—Node View (continued)
Subtab
[Subtab]:Actions
Retrieve
Maintenance
Provisioning
Superuser
Backup
—
X
X
X
Restore
—
—
—
X
Routing Table: Retrieve
X
X
X
X
RIP Routing Table: Retrieve
X
X
X
X
IS-IS RIB: Refresh
X
X
X
X
ES-IS RIB: Refresh
X
X
X
X
TDC: TID to NSAP/Flush
Dynamic Entries
—
X
X
X
TDC: Refresh
X
X
X
X
Download/Cancel
—
X
X
X
Activate/Revert
—
—
—
X
Diagnostic
Retrieve Tech Support Log
—
—
X
X
Audit
Retrieve
—
—
—
X
Archive
—
—
X
X
APC: Run/Disable/Refresh
—
X
X
X
WDM Span Check: Retrieve
Span Loss values/ Edit/Reset
X
X
X
X
ROADM Power Monitoring:
Refresh
X
X
X
X
PP-MESH Internal Patchcord:
Refresh
X
X
X
X
Install Without Metro Planner:
Retrieve Installation values
X
X
X
X
All Facilities: Mark/Refresh
X
X
X
X
Maintenance Database
Network
OSI
Software
DWDM
1. A Provisioning user cannot change node name, contact, location and AIS-V insertion on STS-1 signal degrade (SD) parameters.
2. The action buttons in the subtab are active for all users, but the actions can be completely performed only by the users assigned with the required security
levels.
Table 14-2 shows the actions that each user privilege level can perform in network view.
Table 14-2
ONS 15454 Security Levels—Network View
CTC Tab
Subtab
[Subtab]: Actions
Retrieve
Maintenance
Provisioning
Superuser
Alarms
—
Synchronize/Filter/Delete
cleared alarms
X
X
X
X
Conditions
—
Retrieve/Filter
X
X
X
X
History
—
Filter
X
X
X
X
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14.2.2 Security Policies
Table 14-2
ONS 15454 Security Levels—Network View (continued)
CTC Tab
Subtab
[Subtab]: Actions
Retrieve
Maintenance
Provisioning
Superuser
Circuits
Circuits
Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
X
X
Filter/Search
X
X
X
X
Complete/ Force Valid Signal/ —
Finish
—
X
X
Users: Create/Delete/Clear
Security Intrusion Alarm
—
—
—
X
Users: Change
Same User Same User
Same User
All Users
Rolls
Provisioning Security
Active logins:
—
Logout/Retrieve Last Activity
Time
—
—
X
Policy: Change
—
—
—
X
—
—
X
X
Compare/Available/Usage
X
X
X
X
Create/Edit/Delete/Upgrade
—
—
X
X
Create/Delete/Edit/Merge
—
—
X
X
Search
X
X
X
X
Provisionable
Patchcords (PPC)
Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
X
X
Server Trails
Create/Edit/Delete
—
—
X
X
VLAN DB Profile
Load/Store/Merge/Circuits
X
X
X
X
Add/Remove Rows
—
—
X
X
Download/Cancel
—
X
X
X
Diagnostic
OSPF Node Information:
Retrieve/Clear
X
X
X
X
APC
Run APC/Disable APC
—
—
—
X
Refresh
X
X
X
X
Alarm Profiles
BLSR (ANSI)
New/Load/Store/Delete
1
MS-SPRing (ETSI)
Overhead Circuits
Maintenance Software
1. The action buttons in the subtab are active for all users, but the actions can be completely performed only by the users assigned with the required security
levels.
14.2.2 Security Policies
Superusers can provision security policies on the ONS 15454. These security policies include idle user
timeouts, password changes, password aging, and user lockout parameters. In addition, Superusers can
access the ONS 15454 through the TCC2/TCC2P RJ-45 port, the backplane LAN connection, or both.
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14.2.2 Security Policies
14.2.2.1 Superuser Privileges for Provisioning Users
Superusers can grant permission to Provisioning users to perform a set of tasks. The tasks include
retrieving audit logs, restoring databases, clearing PMs, and activating and reverting software loads.
These privileges can be set only through CTC network element (NE) defaults, except the PM clearing
privilege, which can be granted to Provisioning users using CTC Provisioning> Security > Access tabs.
For more information on setting up Superuser privileges, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM
Procedure Guide.
14.2.2.2 Idle User Timeout
Each ONS 15454 CTC or TL1 user can be idle during his or her login session for a specified amount of
time before the CTC window is locked. The lockouts prevent unauthorized users from making changes.
Higher-level users have shorter default idle periods and lower-level users have longer or unlimited
default idle periods, as shown in Table 14-3.
Table 14-3
ONS 15454 Default User Idle Times
Security Level
Idle Time
Superuser
15 minutes
Provisioning
30 minutes
Maintenance
60 minutes
Retrieve
Unlimited
14.2.2.3 User Password, Login, and Access Policies
Superusers can view real-time lists of users who are logged into CTC or TL1 user logins by node.
Superusers can also provision the following password, login, and node access policies:
•
Password length, expiration and reuse—Superusers can configure the password length by using NE
defaults. The password length, by default, is set to a minimum of six and a maximum of 20
characters. You can configure the default values in CTC node view with the Provisioning > NE
Defaults > Node > security > password Complexity tabs. The minimum length can be set to eight,
ten or twelve characters, and the maximum length to 80 characters. The password must be a
combination of alphanumeric (a-z, A-Z, 0-9) and special (+, #,%) characters, where at least two
characters are nonalphabetic and at least one character is a special character. Superusers can specify
when users must change their passwords and when they can reuse them.
•
Locking out and disabling users—Superusers can provision the number of invalid logins that are
allowed before locking out users and the length of time before inactive users are disabled. The
number of allowed lockout attempts is set to the number of allowed login attempts.
•
Node access and user sessions—Superusers can limit the number of CTC sessions one user can have,
and they can prohibit access to the ONS 15454 using the LAN or TCC2/TCC2P RJ-45 connections.
In addition, a Superuser can select secure shell (SSH) instead of Telnet at the CTC Provisioning >
Security > Access tabs. SSH is a terminal-remote host Internet protocol that uses encrypted links. It
provides authentication and secure communication over unsecure channels. Port 22 is the default
port and cannot be changed.
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14.3 Audit Trail
14.3 Audit Trail
The Cisco ONS 15454 maintains a Telcordia GR-839-CORE-compliant audit trail log that resides on the
TCC2/TCC2P card. Audit trails are useful for maintaining security, recovering lost transactions and
enforcing accountability. Accountability refers to tracing user activities; that is, associating a process or
action with a specific user. This record shows who has accessed the system and what operations were
performed during a given period of time. The log includes authorized Cisco logins and logouts using the
operating system command line interface, CTC, and TL1; the log also includes FTP actions, circuit
creation/deletion, and user/system generated actions.
Event monitoring is also recorded in the audit log. An event is defined as the change in status of an
element within the network. External events, internal events, attribute changes, and software
upload/download activities are recorded in the audit trail.
The audit trail is stored in persistent memory and is not corrupted by processor switches, resets or
upgrades. However, if a user pulls both TCC2/TCC2P cards, the audit trail log is lost.
14.3.1 Audit Trail Log Entries
Table 14-4 contains the columns listed in Audit Trail window.
Table 14-4
Audit Trail Window Columns
Heading
Explanation
Date
Date when the action occurred
Num
Incrementing count of actions
User
User ID that initiated the action
P/F
Pass/Fail (whether or not the action was executed)
Operation
Action that was taken
Audit trail records capture the following activities:
•
User—Name of the user performing the action
•
Host—Host from where the activity is logged
•
Device ID—IP address of the device involved in the activity
•
Application—Name of the application involved in the activity
•
Task—Name of the task involved in the activity (view a dialog box, apply configuration, and so on)
•
Connection Mode—Telnet, Console, Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
•
Category—Type of change: Hardware, Software, Configuration
•
Status—Status of the user action: Read, Initial, Successful, Timeout, Failed
•
Time—Time of change
•
Message Type—Denotes whether the event is Success/Failure type
•
Message Details—Description of the change
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14.3.2 Audit Trail Capacities
14.3.2 Audit Trail Capacities
The system is able to store 640 log entries.When this limit is reached, the oldest entries are overwritten
with new events. When the log server is 80 percent full, an AUD-LOG-LOW condition is raised and
logged (by way of Common Object Request Broker Architecture [CORBA]/CTC).
When the log server reaches a maximum capacity of 640 entries and begins overwriting records that were
not archived, an AUD-LOG-LOSS condition is raised and logged. This event indicates that audit trail
records have been lost. Until the user off-loads the file, this event occurs only once regardless of the
amount of entries that are overwritten by the system.
14.4 RADIUS Security
Superusers can configure nodes to use Remote Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS)
authentication. RADIUS uses a strategy known as authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA)
for verifying the identity of, granting access to, and tracking the actions of remote users. To configure
RADIUS authentication, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
RADIUS server supports IPv6 addresses and can process authentication requests from a GNE or an ENE
that uses IPv6 addresses.
14.4.1 RADIUS Authentication
RADIUS is a system of distributed security that secures remote access to networks and network services
against unauthorized access. RADIUS comprises three components:
•
A protocol with a frame format that utilizes User Datagram Protocol (UDP)/IP
•
A server
•
A client
The server runs on a central computer typically at the customer's site, while the clients reside in the
dial-up access servers and can be distributed throughout the network.
An ONS 15454 node operates as a client of RADIUS. The client is responsible for passing user
information to designated RADIUS servers, and then acting on the response that is returned. RADIUS
servers are responsible for receiving user connection requests, authenticating the user, and returning all
configuration information necessary for the client to deliver service to the user. The RADIUS servers
can act as proxy clients to other kinds of authentication servers. Transactions between the client and
RADIUS server are authenticated through the use of a shared secret, which is never sent over the
network. In addition, any user passwords are sent encrypted between the client and RADIUS server. This
eliminates the possibility that someone snooping on an unsecured network could determine a user's
password.
14.4.2 Shared Secrets
A shared secret is a text string that serves as a password between:
•
A RADIUS client and RADIUS server
•
A RADIUS client and a RADIUS proxy
•
A RADIUS proxy and a RADIUS server
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14.4.2 Shared Secrets
For a configuration that uses a RADIUS client, a RADIUS proxy, and a RADIUS server, the shared
secret that is used between the RADIUS client and the RADIUS proxy can be different than the shared
secret used between the RADIUS proxy and the RADIUS server.
Shared secrets are used to verify that RADIUS messages, with the exception of the Access-Request
message, are sent by a RADIUS-enabled device that is configured with the same shared secret. Shared
secrets also verify that the RADIUS message has not been modified in transit (message integrity). The
shared secret is also used to encrypt some RADIUS attributes, such as User-Password and
Tunnel-Password.
When creating and using a shared secret:
•
Use the same case-sensitive shared secret on both RADIUS devices.
•
Use a different shared secret for each RADIUS server-RADIUS client pair.
•
To ensure a random shared secret, generate a random sequence at least 22 characters long.
•
You can use any standard alphanumeric and special characters.
•
You can use a shared secret of up to 128 characters in length. To protect your server and your
RADIUS clients from brute force attacks, use long shared secrets (more than 22 characters).
•
Make the shared secret a random sequence of letters, numbers, and punctuation and change it often
to protect your server and your RADIUS clients from dictionary attacks. Shared secrets should
contain characters from each of the three groups listed in Table 14-5.
Table 14-5
Shared Secret Character Groups
Group
Examples
Letters (uppercase and lowercase)
A, B, C, D and a, b, c, d
Numerals
0, 1, 2, 3
Symbols (all characters not defined as letters or
numerals)
Exclamation point (!), asterisk (*), colon (:)
The stronger your shared secret, the more secure the attributes (for example, those used for passwords
and encryption keys) that are encrypted with it. An example of a strong shared secret is
8d#>9fq4bV)H7%a3-zE13sW$hIa32M#m<PqAa72(.
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15
Timing Reference
This chapter provides information about Cisco ONS 15454 users and node timing. To provision timing,
refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Chapter topics include:
•
15.1 Node Timing Parameters, page 15-1
•
15.2 Network Timing, page 15-2
•
15.3 Synchronization Status Messaging, page 15-3
15.1 Node Timing Parameters
SONET timing parameters must be set for each ONS 15454. Each ONS 15454 independently accepts its
timing reference from one of three sources:
•
The building integrated timing supply (BITS) pins on the ONS 15454 backplane (ANSI) or
MIC-C/T/P coaxial connectors (ETSI).
•
An OC-N/STM-N card installed in the ONS 15454. The card is connected to a node that receives
timing through a BITS source.
•
The internal ST3 clock on the TCC2/TCC2P card.
You can set ONS 15454 timing to one of three modes: external, line, or mixed. If timing is coming from
the BITS pins, set ONS 15454 timing to external. If the timing comes from an OC-N/STM-N card, set
the timing to line. In typical ONS 15454 networks:
•
One node is set to external. The external node derives its timing from a BITS source wired to the
BITS backplane pins. The BITS source, in turn, derives its timing from a primary reference source
(PRS) such as a Stratum 1 clock or global positioning satellite (GPS) signal.
•
The other nodes are set to line. The line nodes derive timing from the externally timed node through
the OC-N/STM-N trunk (span) cards. The DWDM node normally derives timing from the line using
the OSCM or OSC-CSM card that are inside an OC-3/STM-1 channel.
You can set three timing references for each ONS 15454. The first two references are typically two
BITS-level sources, or two line-level sources optically connected to a node with a BITS source. The third
reference is usually assigned to the internal clock provided on every ONS 15454 TCC2/TCC2P card.
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Timing Reference
15.2 Network Timing
However, if you assign all three references to other timing sources, the internal clock is always available
as a backup timing reference. The internal clock is a Stratum 3 (ST3), so if an ONS 15454 node becomes
isolated, timing is maintained at the ST3 level.
The CTC Maintenance > Timing > Report tab show current timing information for an ONS 15454,
including the timing mode, clock state and status, switch type, and reference data.
Caution
Mixed timing allows you to select both external and line timing sources. However, Cisco does not
recommend its use because it can create timing loops. Use this mode with caution.
15.2 Network Timing
Figure 15-1 shows an ONS 15454 network timing setup example. Node 1 is set to external timing. Two
timing references are set to BITS. These are Stratum 1 timing sources wired to the BITS input pins on
the Node 1 backplane. The third reference is set to internal clock. The BITS output pins on the backplane
of Node 3 are used to provide timing to outside equipment, such as a digital access line access
multiplexer.
In the example, Slots 5 and 6 contain the trunk (span) cards. Timing at Nodes 2, 3, and 4 is set to line,
and the timing references are set to the trunk cards based on distance from the BITS source. Reference 1
is set to the trunk card closest to the BITS source. At Node 2, Reference 1 is set to Slot 5 because it is
connected to Node 1. At Node 4, Reference 1 is set to Slot 6 because it is connected to Node 1. At
Node 3, Reference 1 could be either trunk card because they are at an equal distance from Node 1.
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15.3 Synchronization Status Messaging
Figure 15-1
ONS 15454 Timing Example
BITS1
source
BITS2
source
Node 1
Timing External
Ref 1: BITS1
Ref 2: BITS2
Ref 3: Internal (ST3)
Slot 5
Slot 6
Slot 5
Slot 5
Slot 6
Slot 6
Node 2
Timing Line
Ref 1: Slot 5
Ref 2: Slot 6
Ref 3: Internal (ST3)
Slot 5
BITS1 BITS2
out
out
Third party
equipment
Node 3
Timing Line
Ref 1: Slot 5
Ref 2: Slot 6
Ref 3: Internal (ST3)
34726
Node 4
Timing Line
Ref 1: Slot 6
Ref 2: Slot 5
Ref 3: Internal (ST3)
Slot 6
15.3 Synchronization Status Messaging
Synchronization status messaging (SSM) is a SONET protocol that communicates information about the
quality of the timing source. SSM messages are carried on the S1 byte of the SONET Line layer. They
enable SONET devices to automatically select the highest quality timing reference and to avoid timing
loops.
SSM messages are either Generation 1 or Generation 2. Generation 1 is the first and most widely
deployed SSM message set. Generation 2 is a newer version. If you enable SSM for the ONS 15454,
consult your timing reference documentation to determine which message set to use. Table 15-1 and
Table 15-2 on page 15-4 show the Generation 1 and Generation 2 message sets.
Table 15-1
SSM Generation 1 Message Set
Message
Quality
Description
PRS
1
Primary reference source—Stratum 1
STU
2
Synchronization traceability unknown
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15.3 Synchronization Status Messaging
Table 15-1
SSM Generation 1 Message Set (continued)
Message
Quality
Description
ST2
3
Stratum 2
ST3
4
Stratum 3
SMC
5
SONET minimum clock
ST4
6
Stratum 4
DUS
7
Do not use for timing synchronization
RES
—
Reserved; quality level set by user
Table 15-2
SSM Generation 2 Message Set
Message
Quality
Description
PRS
1
Primary reference source—Stratum 1
STU
2
Synchronization traceability unknown
ST2
3
Stratum 2
TNC
4
Transit node clock
ST3E
5
Stratum 3E
ST3
6
Stratum 3
SMC
7
SONET minimum clock
ST4
8
Stratum 4
DUS
9
Do not use for timing synchronization
RES
—
Reserved; quality level set by user
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16
Manage Network Connectivity
This chapter provides an overview of ONS 15454 data communications network (DCN) connectivity.
Cisco Optical Networking System (ONS) network communication is based on IP, including
communication between Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) computers and ONS 15454 nodes, and
communication among networked ONS 15454 nodes. The chapter shows common Cisco ONS 15454 IP
network configurations and includes detailed data communications network (DCN) case studies that are
based on actual ONS 15454 installations. The chapter provides information about the ONS 15454 IP
routing table, external firewalls, and open gateway network element (GNE) networks.
Although ONS 15454 DCN communication is based on IP, ONS 15454 nodes can be networked to
equipment that is based on the Open System Interconnection (OSI) protocol suites. This chapter also
describes the ONS 15454 OSI implementation and provides scenarios that show how the ONS 15454 can
be networked within a mixed IP and OSI environment.
This chapter does not provide a comprehensive explanation of IP networking concepts and procedures,
nor does it provide IP addressing examples to meet all networked scenarios. For ONS 15454 networking
setup instructions, refer to the “Turn Up a Node” chapter of the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure
Guide.
Note
Unless otherwise specified, in this chapter “ONS 15454” refers to both ANSI and ETSI shelf assemblies.
Chapter topics include:
•
16.1 IP Networking Overview, page 16-2
•
16.2 IP Addressing Scenarios, page 16-2
•
16.3 DCN Case Studies, page 16-23
•
16.4 DCN Extension, page 16-37
•
16.5 Routing Table, page 16-39
•
16.6 External Firewalls, page 16-41
•
16.7 Open GNE, page 16-42
•
16.8 TCP/IP and OSI Networking, page 16-45
•
16.9 Link Management Protocol, page 16-49
•
16.10 IPv6 Network Compatibility, page 16-55
•
16.11 IPv6 Native Support, page 16-55
•
16.12 Integration with Cisco CRS-1 Routers, page 16-58
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16.1 IP Networking Overview
Note
To connect ONS 15454s to an IP network, you must work with a LAN administrator or other individual
at your site who has IP networking training and experience.
16.1 IP Networking Overview
ONS 15454s can be connected in many different ways within an IP environment:
•
They can be connected to LANs through direct connections or a router.
•
IP subnetting can create ONS 15454 node groups that allow you to provision nodes in a network that
are not connected with a data communications channel (DCC).
•
Different IP functions and protocols can be used to achieve specific network goals. For example,
Proxy Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) enables one LAN-connected ONS 15454 to serve as a
gateway for ONS 15454s that are not connected to the LAN.
•
Static routes can be created to enable connections among multiple CTC sessions with ONS 15454s
that reside on the same subnet with multiple CTC sessions.
•
ONS 15454s can be connected to Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) networks so ONS 15454 network
information is automatically communicated across multiple LANs and WANs.
•
The ONS 15454 proxy server can control the visibility and accessibility between CTC computers
and ONS 15454 element nodes.
16.2 IP Addressing Scenarios
ONS 15454 IP addressing generally has nine common scenarios or configurations. Use the scenarios as
building blocks for more complex network configurations. Table 16-1 provides a general list of items to
check when setting up ONS 15454s in IP networks.
Table 16-1
General ONS 15454 IP Troubleshooting Checklist
Item
What to Check
Link integrity
Verify that link integrity exists between:
•
CTC computer and network hub/switch
•
ONS 15454s (backplane [ANSI] or MIC-C/T/P [ETSI] wire-wrap pins or
RJ-45 port) and network hub/switch
•
Router ports and hub/switch ports
ONS 15454
hub/switch ports
If connectivity problems occur, set the hub or switch port that is connected to
the ONS 15454 to 10 Mbps half-duplex.
Ping
Ping the node to test connections between computers and ONS 15454s.
IP addresses/subnet
masks
Verify that ONS 15454 IP addresses and subnet masks are set up correctly.
Optical connectivity
Verify that ONS 15454 optical trunk ports are in service and that a DCC is
enabled on each trunk port.
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16.2.1 Scenario 1: CTC and ONS 15454s on Same Subnet
16.2.1 Scenario 1: CTC and ONS 15454s on Same Subnet
Scenario 1 shows a basic ONS 15454 LAN configuration (Figure 16-1). The ONS 15454s and CTC
computer reside on the same subnet. All ONS 15454s connect to LAN A, and all ONS 15454s have DCC
connections.
Figure 16-1
Scenario 1: CTC and ONS 15454s on Same Subnet (ANSI and ETSI)
CTC Workstation
16.2.2 Scenario 2: CTC and ONS 15454s Connected to a Router
In Scenario 2, the CTC computer resides on a subnet (192.168.1.0) and attaches to LAN A (Figure 16-2).
The ONS 15454s reside on a different subnet (192.168.2.0) and attach to LAN B. A router connects LAN
A to LAN B. The IP address of router interface A is set to LAN A (192.168.1.1), and the IP address of
router interface B is set to LAN B (192.168.2.1). The routers each have a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0.
On the CTC computer, the default gateway is set to router interface A. If the LAN uses Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol (DHCP), the default gateway and IP address are assigned automatically. In the
Figure 16-2 example, a DHCP server is not available.
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16.2.3 Scenario 3: Using Proxy ARP to Enable an ONS 15454 Gateway
Figure 16-2
Scenario 2: CTC and ONS 15454s Connected to Router (ANSI and ETSI)
LAN A
Int "A"
CTC Workstation
IP Address 192.168.1.100
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway = 192.168.1.1
Host Routes = N/A
Int "B" Router
IP Address of interface “A” to LAN “A” 192.168.1.1
IP Address of interface “B” to LAN “B” 192.168.2.1
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Host Routes = N/A
LAN B
Node #2
IP Address 192.168.2.20
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = 192.168.2.1
Static Routes = N/A
Node #1
IP Address 192.168.2.10
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = 192.168.2.1
Static Routes = N/A
Node #3
IP Address 192.168.2.30
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = 192.168.2.1
Static Routes = N/A
124245
Ring
16.2.3 Scenario 3: Using Proxy ARP to Enable an ONS 15454 Gateway
ARP matches higher-level IP addresses to the physical addresses of the destination host. It uses a lookup
table (called ARP cache) to perform the translation. When the address is not found in the ARP cache, a
broadcast is sent out on the network with a special format called the ARP request. If one of the machines
on the network recognizes its own IP address in the request, it sends an ARP reply back to the requesting
host. The reply contains the physical hardware address of the receiving host. The requesting host stores
this address in its ARP cache so that all subsequent datagrams (packets) to this destination IP address
can be translated to a physical address.
Proxy ARP enables one LAN-connected ONS 15454 to respond to the ARP request for ONS 15454s not
connected to the LAN. (ONS 15454 proxy ARP requires no user configuration.) For this to occur, the
DCC-connected ONS 15454s must reside on the same subnet as the LAN-connected (gateway)
ONS 15454. When a LAN device sends an ARP request to an ONS 15454 that is not connected to the
LAN, the gateway ONS 15454 (the one connected to the LAN) returns its MAC address to the LAN
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16.2.3 Scenario 3: Using Proxy ARP to Enable an ONS 15454 Gateway
device. The LAN device then sends the datagram for the remote ONS 15454 to the MAC address of the
proxy ONS 15454. The proxy ONS 15454 uses its routing table to forward the datagram to the non-LAN
ONS 15454.
Scenario 3 is similar to Scenario 1, but only one ONS 15454 (Node 1) connects to the LAN
(Figure 16-3). Two ONS 15454s (Node 2 and Node 3) connect to ONS 15454 Node 1 through the section
DCC. Because all three ONS 15454s are on the same subnet, proxy ARP enables ONS 15454 Node 1 to
serve as a gateway for ONS 15345 Node 2 and Node 3.
Note
This scenario assumes all CTC connections are to Node 1. If you connect a laptop to either ONS 15454
Node 2 or Node 3, network partitioning occurs; neither the laptop or the CTC computer can see all nodes.
If you want laptops to connect directly to end network elements (ENEs), you must create static routes
(see the “16.2.5 Scenario 5: Using Static Routes to Connect to LANs” section on page 16-8) or enable
the ONS 15454 proxy server (see “16.2.7 Scenario 7: Provisioning the ONS 15454 Proxy Server”
section on page 16-12).
Be aware that:
•
GNE and ENE 15454 proxy ARP is disabled.
•
There is exactly one proxy ARP server on any given Ethernet segment; however, there might be more
than one server in an ANSI or ETSI topology.
•
The proxy ARP server does not perform the proxy ARP function for any node or host that is on the
same Ethernet segment.
•
It is important in Figure 16-3 that the CTC workstation be located within the same subnet and on
the same Ethernet segment as the proxy ARP server.
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16.2.3 Scenario 3: Using Proxy ARP to Enable an ONS 15454 Gateway
Figure 16-3
Scenario 3: Using Proxy ARP (ANSI and ETSI)
C Workstation
Address 192.168.1.100
t Mcank also
t CTC
k t ARP
ti 255
255 255 0
You
useWproxy
to communicate
with hosts attached to the craft Ethernet ports of
DCC-connected nodes (Figure 16-4). The node with an attached host must have a static route to the host.
Static routes are propagated to all DCC peers using OSPF. The existing proxy ARP node is the gateway
for additional hosts. Each node examines its routing table for routes to hosts that are not connected to
the DCC network but are within the subnet. The existing proxy server replies to ARP requests for these
additional hosts with the node MAC address. The existence of the host route in the routing table ensures
that the IP packets addressed to the additional hosts are routed properly. Other than establishing a static
route between a node and an additional host, no provisioning is necessary. The following restrictions
apply:
•
Only one node acts as the proxy ARP server for any given additional host.
•
A node cannot be the proxy ARP server for a host connected to its Ethernet port.
In Figure 16-4, Node 1 announces to Node 2 and 3 that it can reach the CTC host. Similarly, Node 3
announces that it can reach the ONS 152xx. The ONS 152xx is shown as an example; any network
element can be set up as an additional host.
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16.2.4 Scenario 4: Default Gateway on CTC Computer
Figure 16-4
Scenario 3: Using Proxy ARP with Static Routing (ANSI and ETSI)
CTC Workstation
IP Address 192.168.1.100
Subnet Mark at CTC Workstation 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway = N/A
LAN A
Node #1
IP Address 192.168.1.10
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = Destination 192.168.1.100
Mask 255.255.255.0
Next Hop 192.168.1.10
Node #2
IP Address 192.168.1.20
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
Node #3
IP Address 192.168.1.30
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = Destination 192.168.1.31
Mask 255.255.255.255
Next Hop 192.168.1.30
124247
ONS 152xx
IP Address 192.168.1.31
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Ring
16.2.4 Scenario 4: Default Gateway on CTC Computer
Scenario 4 is similar to Scenario 3, but Nodes 2 and 3 reside on different subnets, 192.168.2.0 and
192.168.3.0, respectively (Figure 16-5). Node 1 and the CTC computer are on subnet 192.168.1.0. Proxy
ARP is not used because the network includes different subnets. For the CTC computer to communicate
with Nodes 2 and 3, Node 1 is entered as the default gateway on the CTC computer.
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16.2.5 Scenario 5: Using Static Routes to Connect to LANs
Figure 16-5
Scenario 4: Default Gateway on a CTC Computer (ANSI and ETSI)
CTC Workstation
IP Address 192.168.1.100
S b t M k t CTC W k t ti
255 255 255 0
16.2.5 Scenario 5: Using Static Routes to Connect to LANs
Static routes are used for two purposes:
•
To connect ONS 15454s to CTC sessions on one subnet connected by a router to ONS 15454s
residing on another subnet. (These static routes are not needed if OSPF is enabled. Scenario 6 shows
an OSPF example.)
•
To enable multiple CTC sessions among ONS 15454s residing on the same subnet.
In Figure 16-6, one CTC residing on subnet 192.168.1.0 connects to a router through interface A (the
router is not set up with OSPF). ONS 15454s residing on different subnets are connected through Node 1
to the router through interface B. Because Nodes 2 and 3 are on different subnets, proxy ARP does not
enable Node 1 as a gateway. To connect to CTC computers on LAN A, a static route is created on
Node 1.
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16.2.5 Scenario 5: Using Static Routes to Connect to LANs
Figure 16-6
Scenario 5: Static Route With One CTC Computer Used as a Destination (ANSI and ETSI)
Router
IP Address of interface ”A” to LAN “A” 192.168.1.1
IP Address of interface “B” to LAN “B” 192.168.2.1
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
LAN A
Int "A"
Int "B"
rkstation
68.1.100
55.255.0
2.168.1.1
es = N/A
LAN B
Node #1
IP Address 192.168.2.10
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
The destination and subnet mask entries control access to the ONS 15454s:
•
If a single CTC computer is connected to a router, enter the complete CTC “host route” IP address
as the destination with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.255.
•
If CTC computers on a subnet are connected to a router, enter the destination subnet (in this example,
192.168.1.0) and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0.
•
If all CTC computers are connected to a router, enter a destination of 0.0.0.0 and a subnet mask of
0.0.0.0. Figure 16-7 shows an example.
The IP address of router interface B is entered as the next hop, and the cost (number of hops from source
to destination) is 2.
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16.2.6 Scenario 6: Using OSPF
Figure 16-7
Scenario 5: Static Route With Multiple LAN Destinations (ANSI and ETSI)
outer #3
Router #2
Router #1
IP Address of interface ”A” to LAN “A” 192.168.1.1
IP Address of interface “B” to LAN “B” 192.168.2.1
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
NA
tion
100
55.0
.1.1
N/A
Int "A"
Int "B"
LAN B
Node #1
IP Address 192.168.2.10
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = 192.168.2.1
Static Routes
Destination 0.0.0.0
Mask 0.0.0.0
Next Hop 192.168.2.1
16.2.6 Scenario 6: Using OSPF
Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) is a link state Internet routing protocol. Link state protocols use a “hello
protocol” to monitor their links with adjacent routers and to test the status of their links to their
neighbors. Link state protocols advertise their directly connected networks and their active links. Each
link state router captures the link state “advertisements” and puts them together to create a topology of
the entire network or area. From this database, the router calculates a routing table by constructing a
shortest path tree. Routes are recalculated when topology changes occur.
ONS 15454s use the OSPF protocol in internal ONS 15454 networks for node discovery, circuit routing,
and node management. You can enable OSPF on the ONS 15454s so that the ONS 15454 topology is
sent to OSPF routers on a LAN. Advertising the ONS 15454 network topology to LAN routers
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16.2.6 Scenario 6: Using OSPF
eliminates the need to manually enter static routes for ONS 15454 subnetworks. Figure 16-8 shows a
network enabled for OSPF. Figure 16-9 shows the same network without OSPF. Static routes must be
manually added to the router for CTC computers on LAN A to communicate with Nodes 2 and 3 because
these nodes reside on different subnets.
OSPF divides networks into smaller regions, called areas. An area is a collection of networked end
systems, routers, and transmission facilities organized by traffic patterns. Each OSPF area has a unique
ID number, known as the area ID. Every OSPF network has one backbone area called “area 0.” All other
OSPF areas must connect to area 0.
When you enable an ONS 15454 OSPF topology for advertising to an OSPF network, you must assign
an OSPF area ID in decimal format to the ONS 15454 network. An area ID is a “dotted quad” value that
appears similar to an IP address. Coordinate the area ID number assignment with your LAN
administrator. All DCC-connected ONS 15454s should be assigned the same OSPF area ID.
Note
It is recommended that the number of ONS 15454s in an OSPF area be limited, because this allows faster
loading into a CTC an is less likely to incur any problems.
Figure 16-8
Scenario 6: OSPF Enabled (ANSI and ETSI)
Router
IP Address of interface “A” to LAN A 192.168.1.1
IP Address of interface “B” to LAN B 192.168.2.1
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
LAN A
Int "A"
rkstation
68.1.100
55.255.0
168 1 1
Int "B"
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16.2.7 Scenario 7: Provisioning the ONS 15454 Proxy Server
Figure 16-9
LAN A
Int "A"
rkstation
68.1.100
55.255.0
.168.1.1
es = N/A
Scenario 6: OSPF Not Enabled (ANSI and ETSI)
Router
IP Address of interface “A” to LAN A 192.168.1.1
IP Address of interface “B” to LAN B 192.168.2.1
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Static Routes = Destination 192.168.3.20 Next Hop 192.168.2.10
Destination 192.168.4.30 Next Hop 192.168.2.10
Int "B"
LAN B
Node #1
IP Address 192.168.2.10
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = 192.168.2.1
16.2.7 Scenario 7: Provisioning the ONS 15454 Proxy Server
The ONS 15454 proxy server is a set of functions that allows you to network ONS 15454s in
environments where visibility and accessibility between ONS 15454s and CTC computers must be
restricted. For example, you can set up a network so that field technicians and network operations center
(NOC) personnel can both access the same ONS 15454s while preventing the field technicians from
accessing the NOC LAN. To do this, one ONS 15454 is provisioned as a GNE and the other ONS 15454s
are provisioned as end ENEs. The GNE ONS 15454 tunnels connections between CTC computers and
ENE ONS 15454s, providing management capability while preventing access for non-ONS 15454
management purposes.
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16.2.7 Scenario 7: Provisioning the ONS 15454 Proxy Server
The ONS 15454 gateway setting performs the following tasks:
•
Isolates DCC IP traffic from Ethernet (craft port) traffic and accepts packets based on filtering rules.
The filtering rules (see Table 16-3 on page 16-17 and Table 16-4 on page 16-17) depend on whether
the packet arrives at the ONS 15454 DCC or TCC2/TCC2P Ethernet interface.
•
Processes Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) and Network Time Protocol (NTP) requests.
ONS 15454 ENEs can derive time-of-day from an SNTP/NTP LAN server through the GNE
ONS 15454.
•
Processes Simple Network Management Protocol version 1 (SNMPv1) traps. The GNE ONS 15454
receives SNMPv1 traps from the ENE ONS 15454s and forwards or relays the traps to SNMPv1 trap
destinations or ONS 15454 SNMP relay nodes.
The ONS 15454 proxy server is provisioned using the Enable proxy server on port check box on the
Provisioning > Network > General tab. If checked, the ONS 15454 serves as a proxy for connections
between CTC clients and ONS 15454s that are DCC-connected to the proxy ONS 15454. The CTC client
establishes connections to DCC-connected nodes through the proxy node. The CTC client can connect
to nodes that it cannot directly reach from the host on which it runs. If not selected, the node does not
proxy for any CTC clients, although any established proxy connections continue until the CTC client
exits. In addition, you can set the proxy server as an ENE or a GNE:
•
External Network Element (ENE)—If set as an ENE, the ONS 15454 neither installs nor advertises
default or static routes that go through its Ethernet port. However, an ENE does install and advertise
routes that go through the DCC. CTC computers can communicate with the ONS 15454 using the
TCC2/TCC2P craft port, but they cannot communicate directly with any other DCC-connected
ONS 15454.
In addition, firewall is enabled, which means that the node prevents IP traffic from being routed
between the DCC and the LAN port. The ONS 15454 can communicate with machines connected to
the LAN port or connected through the DCC. However, the DCC-connected machines cannot
communicate with the LAN-connected machines, and the LAN-connected machines cannot
communicate with the DCC-connected machines. A CTC client using the LAN to connect to the
firewall-enabled node can use the proxy capability to manage the DCC-connected nodes that would
otherwise be unreachable. A CTC client connected to a DCC-connected node can only manage other
DCC-connected nodes and the firewall itself.
•
Gateway Network Element (GNE)—If set as a GNE, the CTC computer is visible to other
DCC-connected nodes and firewall is enabled.
•
SOCKS Proxy-only—If Proxy-only is selected, firewall is not enabled. CTC can communicate with
any other DCC-connected ONS 15454s.
Note
If you launch CTC against a node through a Network Address Translation (NAT) or Port Address
Translation (PAT) router and that node does not have proxy enabled, your CTC session starts and initially
appears to be fine. However CTC never receives alarm updates and disconnects and reconnects every two
minutes. If the proxy is accidentally disabled, it is still possible to enable the proxy during a reconnect
cycle and recover your ability to manage the node, even through a NAT/PAT firewall.
Note
ENEs that belong to different private subnetworks do not need to have unique IP addresses. Two ENEs
that are connected to different GNEs can have the same IP address. However, ENEs that connect to the
same GNE must always have unique IP addresses.
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16.2.7 Scenario 7: Provisioning the ONS 15454 Proxy Server
Figure 16-10 shows an ONS 15454 proxy server implementation. A GNE ONS 15454 is connected to a
central office LAN and to ENE ONS 15454s. The central office LAN is connected to a NOC LAN, which
has CTC computers. The NOC CTC computer and craft technicians must both be able to access the
ONS 15454 ENEs. However, the craft technicians must be prevented from accessing or seeing the NOC
or central office LANs.
In the example, the ONS 15454 GNE is assigned an IP address within the central office LAN and is
physically connected to the LAN through its LAN port. ONS 15454 ENEs are assigned IP addresses that
are outside the central office LAN and given private network IP addresses. If the ONS 15454 ENEs are
collocated, the craft LAN ports could be connected to a hub. However, the hub should have no other
network connections.
Figure 16-10
Scenario 7: ONS 15454 Proxy Server with GNE and ENEs on the Same Subnet (ANSI
and ETSI)
Remote CTC
10.10.20.10
10.10.20.0/24
Interface 0/0
10.10.20.1
Router A
Interface 0/1
10.10.10.1
10 10
10 0/24for ONS 15454 GNEs and ENEs in the configuration shown in
Table 16-2 shows recommended
settings
Figure 16-10.
Table 16-2
ONS 15454 Gateway and End NE Settings
Setting
ONS 15454 Gateway NE
ONS 15454 End NE
OSPF
Off
Off
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16.2.7 Scenario 7: Provisioning the ONS 15454 Proxy Server
Table 16-2
Setting
ONS 15454 Gateway and End NE Settings (continued)
ONS 15454 Gateway NE
ONS 15454 End NE
SNTP server (if used) SNTP server IP address
Set to ONS 15454 GNE IP address
SNMP (if used)
Set SNMPv1 trap destinations to
ONS 15454 GNE, port 391
SNMPv1 trap destinations
Figure 16-11 shows the same proxy server implementation with ONS 15454 ENEs on different subnets.
The ONS 15454 GNEs and ENEs are provisioned with the settings shown in Table 16-2.
Figure 16-11
Scenario 7: ONS 15454 Proxy Server with GNE and ENEs on Different Subnets (ANSI
and ETSI)
emote CTC
0.10.20.10
10.10.20.0/24
Interface 0/0
10.10.20.1
Router A
Interface 0/1
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16.2.7 Scenario 7: Provisioning the ONS 15454 Proxy Server
Figure 16-12 shows the same proxy server implementation with ONS 15454 ENEs in multiple rings.
Figure 16-12
Scenario 7: ONS 15454 Proxy Server With ENEs on Multiple Rings (ANSI and ETSI)
Remote CTC
10.10.20.10
10.10.20.0/24
Interface 0/0
10.10.20.1
Router A
Interface 0/1
10.10.10.1
End NE
192.168.10.150/24
Gateway NE
10.10.10.200/24
End NE
192.168.10.250/24
End NE
192.168.60.150/24
End NE
192.168.10.200/24
End NE
192.168.80.250/24
End NE
192.168.70.200/24
Ethernet
Optical Fiber
124255
Gateway NE
10.10.10.100/24
10.10.10.0/24
Table 16-3 shows the rules the ONS 15454 follows to filter packets for the firewall when nodes are
configured as ENEs and GNEs. If the packet is addressed to the ONS 15454, additional rules (shown in
Table 16-4) are applied. Rejected packets are silently discarded.
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16.2.8 Scenario 8: Dual GNEs on a Subnet
Table 16-3
Proxy Server Firewall Filtering Rules
Packets Arriving At:
TCC2/TCC2P
Ethernet interface
DCC interface
Table 16-4
Are Accepted if the Destination IP Address is:
•
The ONS 15454 itself
•
The ONS 15454’s subnet broadcast address
•
Within the 224.0.0.0/8 network (reserved network used for standard
multicast messages)
•
Subnet mask = 255.255.255.255
•
The ONS 15454 itself
•
Any destination connected through another DCC interface
•
Within the 224.0.0.0/8 network
Proxy Server Firewall Filtering Rules
Packets Arriving At:
Are Rejected If:
TCC2/TCC2P
Ethernet interface
•
User Datagram Protocol (UDP) packets addressed to
the SNMP trap relay port (391)
DCC interface
•
Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) packets
addressed to the proxy server port (1080)
If you implement the proxy server, note that all DCC-connected ONS 15454s on the same Ethernet
segment must have the same gateway setting. Mixed values produce unpredictable results, and might
leave some nodes unreachable through the shared Ethernet segment.
If nodes become unreachable, correct the setting by performing one of the following:
•
Disconnect the craft computer from the unreachable ONS 15454. Connect to the ONS 15454
through another network ONS 15454 that has a DCC connection to the unreachable ONS 15454.
•
Disconnect all DCCs to the node by disabling them on neighboring nodes. Connect a CTC computer
directly to the ONS 15454 and change its provisioning.
16.2.8 Scenario 8: Dual GNEs on a Subnet
The ONS 15454 provides GNE load balancing, which allows CTC to reach ENEs over multiple GNEs
without the ENEs being advertised over OSPF. This feature allows a network to quickly recover from
the loss of GNE, even if the GNE is on a different subnet. If a GNE fails, all connections through that
GNE fail. CTC disconnects from the failed GNE and from all ENEs for which the GNE was a proxy, and
then reconnects through the remaining GNEs. GNE load balancing reduces the dependency on the launch
GNE and DCC bandwidth, both of which enhance CTC performance.
Note
Dual GNEs do not need special provisioning
Figure 16-13 shows a network with dual GNEs on the same subnet.
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16.2.8 Scenario 8: Dual GNEs on a Subnet
Figure 16-13
Scenario 8: Dual GNEs on the Same Subnet (ANSI and ETSI)
e CTC
20.10
10.10.20.0/24
rface 0/0
0.20.1
Router A
rface 0/1
0.10.1
10 10 10 0/24
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16.2.9 Scenario 9: IP Addressing with Secure Mode Enabled
Figure 16-14 shows a network with dual GNEs on different subnets.
Figure 16-14
Scenario 8: Dual GNEs on Different Subnets (ANSI and ETSI)
Remote CTC
10.10.20.10
10.10.20.0/24
Interface 0/0
10.10.20.1
Router A
0/1
0.1
Interface 0/2
10.20.10.1
16.2.9 Scenario 9: IP Addressing with Secure Mode Enabled
The TCC2 card and TCC2P card both default to repeater mode. In this mode, the front and back Ethernet
(LAN) ports share a single MAC address and IP address. TCC2P cards allow you to place a node in
secure mode, which prevents a front-access craft port user from accessing the LAN through the
backplane port. Secure mode can be locked, which prevents the mode from being altered. To place a node
in secure mode refer to the “DLP -G264 Enable Node Security Mode” task in the “Turn Up a Node”
chapter of the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. To lock secure node, refer to the "DLP-G265
Lock Node Security” task in the “Manage the Node” chapter of the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure
Guide.
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16.2.9 Scenario 9: IP Addressing with Secure Mode Enabled
16.2.9.1 Secure Mode Behavior
Changing a TCC2P node from repeater mode to secure mode allows you to provision two IP addresses
for the ONS 15454 and causes the node to assign the ports different MAC addresses. In secure mode,
one IP address is provisioned for the ONS 15454 backplane LAN port, and the other IP address is
provisioned for the TCC2P Ethernet port. Both addresses reside on different subnets, providing an
additional layer of separation between the craft access port and the ONS 15454 LAN. If secure mode is
enabled, the IP addresses provisioned for the backplane LAN port and TCC2P Ethernet port must follow
general IP addressing guidelines and must reside on different subnets from each other.
In secure mode, the IP address assigned to the backplane LAN port becomes a private address, which
connects the node to an operations support system (OSS) through a central office LAN or private
enterprise network. A Superuser can configure the node to hide or reveal the backplane's LAN IP address
in CTC, the routing table, or TL1 autonomous message reports.
In repeater mode, a node can be a GNE or ENE. Placing the node into secure mode automatically turns
on SOCKS proxy and defaults the node to GNE status. However, the node can be changed back to an
ENE. In repeater mode, an ENE’s SOCKS proxy can be disabled—effectively isolating the node beyond
the LAN firewall—but it cannot be disabled in secure mode. To change a node’s GNE or ENE status and
disable the SOCKS proxy, refer to the “DLP-G56 Provision IP Settings" task in the “Turn Up a Node”
chapter of the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
Caution
Enabling secure mode causes the TCC2P card to reboot; a TCC2P card reboot affects traffic.
Caution
The TCC2 card fails to boot when it is added as a standby card to a node containing an active TCC2P
card configured in the secure mode.
Note
If both front and backplane access ports are disabled in an ENE and the node is isolated from DCC
communication (due to user provisioning or network faults), the front and backplane ports are
automatically reenabled.
Figure 16-15 shows an example of secure mode ONS 15454 nodes with front-access Ethernet port
addresses that reside on the same subnet.
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16.2.9 Scenario 9: IP Addressing with Secure Mode Enabled
Figure 16-15
Scenario 9: ONS 15454 GNE and ENEs on the Same Subnet with Secure Mode
Enabled
Remote CTC
10.10.20.10
10.10.20.0/24
Interface 0/0
10.10.20.1
Router A
Interface 0/1
10.10.10.1
Figure 16-16 shows an example of ONS 15454 nodes connected to a router with secure mode enabled.
In each example, the node’s TCC2P port address (node address) resides on a different subnet from the
node backplane addresses.
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16.2.9 Scenario 9: IP Addressing with Secure Mode Enabled
Figure 16-16
Scenario 9: ONS 15454 GNE and ENEs on Different Subnets with Secure Mode
Enabled
Remote CTC
10.10.20.10
10.10.20.0/24
Interface 0/0
10.10.20.1
Router A
Interface 0/1
16.2.9.2 Secure Node Locked and Unlocked Behavior
Secure mode can be locked or unlocked on a node operating in secure mode. The default status is
unlocked, and only a Superuser can issue a lock. When secure mode is locked, the node’s configuration
(including Ethernet port status) and lock status cannot be changed by any network user. To have a secure
node’s lock removed, contact Cisco Technical Support to arrange a Return Material Authorization
(RMA) for the shelf assembly. See the “Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request”
section on page -lxv as needed. Enabling a lock makes a permanent change to the shelf’s EEPROM.
A node’s configuration lock is maintained if the active TCC2P card’s database is reloaded. For example,
if you attempt to load an unlocked node database onto a locked node’s standby TCC2P card for transfer
to the active TCC2P card (an action that is not recommended), the unlocked node’s status (via the
uploaded database) will not override the node’s lock status. If you attempt to load a locked database onto
the standby TCC2P card of an unlocked secure node, the active TCC2P card will upload the database. If
the uploaded defaults indicate a locked status, this will cause the node to become locked. If a software
load has been customized before a lock is enabled, all lockable provisioning features are permanently
set to the customized NE defaults provided in the load and cannot be changed by any user.
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16.3 DCN Case Studies
16.3 DCN Case Studies
The ONS 15454 network is managed over the IP DCN and the optical service channels (OSCs), DCCs,
and generic communications channels (GCCs). ONS 15454s perform many of the same functions as
Layer 3 routers because they manage traffic between the DCN network management system (NMS) and
the dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) optical networks.
This section provides case studies that show different ways an ONS 15454 network can be implemented
within the DCN. The case studies are based on actual field installations. They include the network
problem, the network topology created to solve it, IP addressing examples, and strengths and weaknesses
of the solution. Routing principles followed throughout the case studies include:
•
If the ONS 15454 is connected to a DCN router, the default gateway points to the router.
•
If the default gateway must advertise to the OSC/DCC/GCC network, a static route is added for the
default gateway.
•
If the network element (NE) is not connected to a DCN router, the default gateway is set to 0.0.0.0.
16.3.1 SOCKS Proxy Settings
SOCKS proxy (described in the “16.2.7 Scenario 7: Provisioning the ONS 15454 Proxy Server” section
on page 16-12) enables the ONS 15454 to serve as a proxy for connections between CTC clients and
ONS 15454 nodes connected by OSCs, GCCs, or DCCs. Although SOCKS proxy can make DCN
implementations easier, it should not be used when any of the following conditions exist:
•
Network management is based on SNMP and SNMP traps. The ONS 15454 can proxy SNMP traps,
but if a redundant DCN connection is required, trap duplication on the network management
platform will occur.
•
Telnet and debug session are required. These are not possible over SOCKS proxy.
•
Direct IP connectivity to every node is required.
If these conditions are not present and no requirement to have direct IP connectivity to every node exists
(that is, management is performed using CTC and/or Cisco Transport Manager [CTM]), Cisco
recommends that you use the SOCKS proxy only option for all nodes that connect to a DCN router.
16.3.2 OSPF
Activating OSPF (described in the “16.2.6 Scenario 6: Using OSPF” section on page 16-10) on the
ONS 15454 LAN interface is another option that can be used to create resilient DCN connections.
However, this option can only be enabled if every element in the network, from the NEs to the NOC,
runs OSPF. This is not always possible, for example, the DCN connections might be on a public network
out of the control of the organization using the ONS 15454 network. If you are considering enabling
OSPF on the LAN, the following limitations must be considered:
•
If OSPF is enabled on the LAN, the internal OSC/DCC/GCC OSPF area cannot be 0.0.0.0.
•
The ONS 15454 can act as an OSPF area border gateway and support OSPF virtual links. However,
virtual links cannot pass over the OSC/DCC/GCC network.
If all elements in the DCN network are not running OSPF, enabling OSPF on the LAN is very difficult
without creating isolated areas and/or segmentation of OSPF area 0. However, if the DCN network is a
full OSPF network, enabling OSPF on the LAN might be employed for resilient DCN networks.
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16.3.3 Management of Non-LAN Connected Multishelf Node
16.3.3 Management of Non-LAN Connected Multishelf Node
When using dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) multishelf management feature to
subtend shelves from a node controller shelf, the Node Controller must be specially provisioned in case
it does not have direct LAN reachability.
Non-LAN connected Multishelf nodes are not manageable from CTC unless SOCKS Proxy is enabled
on the node. In a GNE/ENE firewall configuration, non-LAN connected network elements must be set
up as end network elements (ENEs) if Firewall is required. If firewall is not required on the non-LAN
connected Multishelf node, then the node must be set up as SOCKS Proxy
LAN-connected network elements (LNEs) can be set up as gateway network elements (GNEs) or as
SOCKS proxies, depending upon network security requirements. If the GNE/ENE firewall feature is
required, the LNE must be set up as a GNE. If the design does not require the firewall feature but does
require all-IP networking, the LNE must be set up as a SOCKS proxy. For procedures to provision a node
or shelf as a GNE, ENE or SOCKS proxy, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
16.3.4 DCN Case Study 1: Ring Topology with Two Subnets and Two DCN
Connections
DCN Case Study 1 (Figure 16-17) shows an ONS 15454 ring (DWDM or SONET/SDH). The ring is
divided into two subnets and has two DCN connections for resiliency.
DCN Case Study 1: ONS 15454 Ring with Two Subnets and Two DCN Connections
192.168.100.0/24
192.168.200.0/24
Node 2
.79
Node 3
.78
Node 1
.80
Node 4
.77
.1
Router 1
.1
.2
.2
192.168.10.0/24
192.168.20.0/24
.1
NOC router
NMS
.113
Router 2
.1
.121
NOC LAN
10.58.46.64/26
159495
Figure 16-17
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16.3.4 DCN Case Study 1: Ring Topology with Two Subnets and Two DCN Connections
During normal operation, this configuration balances the management traffic load over the two available
DCN connections. If one of the two DCN connections fails, the second DCN connection maintains
accessibility so NE management can continue. However, if complete IP connectivity is required, for
example, for SNMP when SOCKS proxy cannot be used, connection resilience is difficult to achieve
because:
•
The ONS 15454 does not support route overloading. Configuring different routers with different
costs for the same network destination is not possible.
•
The ONS 15454 always tries to route traffic on the LAN interface when its link is up, and the link
on the NE connected to DCN router is always up.
•
If the DCN connection fails, the route is longer available.
One solution is to create a generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunnel to logically connect the remote
Router 1 and remote Router 2 using the OSC/DCC/GCC network (Figure 16-18). With the GRE tunnel,
both remote routers have an alternate path to reach the NOC network in case of DCN failure. However,
the alternate path might become overloaded on the routing tables, resulting in higher costs.
Figure 16-18
DCN Case Study 1: ONS 15454 Ring with Two Subnets, Two DCN Connections, and
GRE Tunnel
192.168.100.0/24
192.168.200.0/24
192.168.30.0/24
GRE Tunnel
.1
.2
.2
Router 1
.1
.2
192.168.10.0/24
Router 2
192.168.20.0/24
.1
NOC router
.1
.121
NMS
.113
NOC LAN
10.58.46.64/26
159496
.1
16.3.4.1 DCN Case Study 1 IP Configuration
The following sections show sample IP configuration at the routers and ONS 15454 nodes in DCN Case
Study 1.
16.3.4.1.1 NOC Router Configuration
Interface configuration:
interface Ethernet0/0
ip address 10.58.46.121 255.255.255.192
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet1/0
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ip address 192.168.20.1 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet2/0
ip address 192.168.10.1 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
Static routes with alternate paths at different costs:
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
classless
route 192.168.100.0
route 192.168.100.0
route 192.168.200.0
route 192.168.200.0
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0
192.168.10.2
192.168.20.2 10
192.168.20.2
192.168.10.2 10
16.3.4.1.2 Router 1 IP Configuration
Interface configuration:
interface Ethernet0/0
ip address 192.168.10.2 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet1/0
ip address 192.168.100.1 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
GRE tunnel interface configuration:
interface Tunnel0
ip address 192.168.30.1 255.255.255.0
tunnel source Ethernet1/0
tunnel destination 192.168.200.1
Static routes with alternate paths at different costs:
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
classless
route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.10.1
route 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 192.168.10.1
route 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 Tunnel0 10
route 192.168.200.0 255.255.255.0 Tunnel0 10
route 192.168.200.1 255.255.255.255 192.168.100.80
Note the host route to the peer Router 2 (192.168.200.1) points to the ONS 15454 network (through
192.168.100.80). This is required to set up the GRE tunnel. In this configuration, only the external route
to 10.0.0.0 (that includes the NOC network) is overloaded with the alternate path. However, overloading
might occur on this last-resort route.
16.3.4.1.3 Router 2 IP Configuration
Interface configuration:
interface Ethernet0/0
ip address 192.168.20.2 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet1/0
ip address 192.168.200.1 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
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16.3.4 DCN Case Study 1: Ring Topology with Two Subnets and Two DCN Connections
GRE tunnel interface configuration:
interface Tunnel0
ip address 192.168.30.2 255.255.255.0
tunnel source Ethernet1/0
tunnel destination 192.168.100.1
Static routes with alternate paths at different costs:
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
classless
route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.20.1
route 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 192.168.20.1
route 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 Tunnel0 10
route 192.168.100.0 255.255.255.0 Tunnel0 10
route 192.168.100.1 255.255.255.255 192.168.200.77
The host routing path to the Router 1 (192.168.100.1) points to the ONS 15454 network (by
192.168.200.77). This is required to set up the GRE tunnel. In this configuration, only the external route
to 10.0.0.0 (that includes the NOC network) is overloaded with the alternate path. However, overloading
the last-resort route might occur. Table 16-5 shows network settings on the four ONS 15454 nodes. The
static routes are created so the DCN-connected nodes advertise their capability to act as last-resort
routers.
Table 16-5
DCN Case Study 1 Node IP Addresses
Node
IP Address/Mask
Default Gateway
Static Routes:
Destination/Mask – Next Hop
Node 1
192.168.100.80/24
192.168.100.1
0.0.0.0/0 – 192.168.100.1
Node 2
192.168.100.79/24
0.0.0.0
—
Node 3
192.168.100.78/24
0.0.0.0
—
Node 4
192.168.100.77/24
192.168.100.1
0.0.0.0/0 – 192.168.200.1
16.3.4.2 DCN Case Study 1 Limitations
DCN Case Study 1 shows how a GRE tunnel can be created between two routers to create DCN
connection resiliency. While the resiliency is a benefit, when a DCN failure forces traffic to the GRE
tunnel, the path calculated by the ONS 15454 OSPF algorithm running in the OSC/DCC/GCC network
is no longer the shortest one. Subsequently, the round-trip delay time (RTT) might increase significantly
because the DCN protection in this configuration is transparent to the ONS 15454 network. The ONS
15454 continues to use the same routing table. In addition, if a DCN failure occurs, the routing path that
uses the GRE tunnel adds additional latency because of the number and length of OSC/DCC/GCC spans
that the tunnel has to travel over the ONS 15454 network.
This latency makes this DCN Case Study 1 solution difficult to scale to large networks. If this solution
is used and the network grows significantly, a larger number of DCN-connected NEs are required. For
example, the common rule in ONS 15454 DCN design is that all nodes should be within five section data
communications channel (LDCC)/regeneration section DCC (RS-DCC/OSC or eight line DCC (LDCC)
/multiplex section DCC (MS-DCC) spans from the network attached node. If Case Study 1 design is
implemented, the maximum span numbers should be cut in half. However, if the DCN Case Study 1
design is used in networks that have full IP routing, have connectivity to every NE, and require only
CTC/CTM management, the SOCKS proxy feature can be used to provide the same DCN connectivity
resilience.
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16.3.5 DCN Case Study 2: Linear Topology with DCN Connections on Both Ends
16.3.5 DCN Case Study 2: Linear Topology with DCN Connections on Both Ends
DCN Case Study 2, shown in Figure 16-19, shows a four-node linear topology with DCN connectivity
at both ends.
DCN Case Study 2: ONS 15454 Linear Topology with DCN Connections at Both Ends
Node 1
.80
Node 2
.79
Node 3
.78
Node 4
.77
.1
.2
.2
Router 1
.2
192.168.10.0/24
Router 2
192.168.20.0/24
.1
NOC router
.1
.121
NMS
.113
NOC LAN
10.58.46.64/26
159497
Figure 16-19
To maintain DCN resilience, static routes are used and a GRE tunnel is created between Router 1 and
Router 2 over the DCC/OSC/GCC optical link. In this example, all ONS 15454s are part of the same
subnet. Therefore, the Router 1 and Router 2 static route tables have more entries because alternate paths
must be configured for every host.
16.3.5.1 DCN Case Study 2 IP Configurations
The following sections provide sample IP configurations at routers and ONS 15454 nodes in
DCN Case Study 2.
16.3.5.1.1 NOC Router IP Configuration
Interface configuration:
interface Ethernet0/0
ip address 10.58.46.121 255.255.255.192
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet1/0
ip address 192.168.20.1 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet2/0
ip address 192.168.10.1 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
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16.3.5 DCN Case Study 2: Linear Topology with DCN Connections on Both Ends
Static routes with alternate paths at different costs:
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
classless
route 192.168.100.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.10.2
route 192.168.100.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.20.2 100
route 192.168.100.77 255.255.255.255 192.168.20.2
route 192.168.100.77 255.255.255.255 192.168.10.2 10
route 192.168.100.78 255.255.255.255 192.168.20.2
route 192.168.100.78 255.255.255.255 192.168.10.2 10
route 192.168.100.79 255.255.255.255 192.168.10.2
route 192.168.100.79 255.255.255.255 192.168.20.2 10
route 192.168.100.80 255.255.255.255 192.168.10.2
route 192.168.100.80 255.255.255.255 192.168.20.2 10
16.3.5.1.2 Router 1 IP Configuration
Site 1 router interface:
interface Ethernet0/0
ip address 192.168.10.2 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet1/0
ip address 192.168.100.1 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
GRE tunnel interface configuration:
interface Tunnel0
ip address 192.168.30.1 255.255.255.0
tunnel source Ethernet1/0
tunnel destination 192.168.100.2
Static routes with alternate paths at different costs:
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
classless
route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.10.1
route 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 192.168.10.1
route 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 Tunnel0 10
route 192.168.100.2 255.255.255.255 192.168.100.80
Note that the host routing path to the peer DCN router (Site 2, 192.168.100.2) points to the ONS 15454
network (by 192.168.100.80) that is required to set up the GRE tunnel. In this configuration, only the
external route to 10.0.0.0 (that include the NOC network) is overloaded with the alternate path, but
overloading of the last-resort route might also occur.
16.3.5.1.3 Router 2 IP Configuration
Interface configuration:
interface Ethernet0/0
ip address 192.168.20.2 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet1/0
ip address 192.168.100.2 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
GRE tunnel interface configuration:
interface Tunnel0
ip address 192.168.30.2 255.255.255.0
tunnel source Ethernet1/0
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16.3.6 DCN Case Study 3: Linear Topology with DCN Connections on Both Ends Using OSPF Routing
tunnel destination 192.168.100.1
Static routes with alternate paths at different costs:
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
classless
route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.20.1
route 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 192.168.20.1
route 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 Tunnel0 10
route 192.168.100.1 255.255.255.255 192.168.100.77
Note that the host route to the Router 1 (192.168.100.1) points to the ONS 15454 network (by
192.168.200.77). This is required to set up the GRE tunnel. In this configuration, only the external route
to 10.0.0.0 (that includes the NOC network) is overloaded with the alternate path. However, overloading
the last-resort route might also occur.
Table 16-6 shows network settings on the four ONS 15454 nodes. The static routes are created so the
DCN-connected nodes advertise their capability to act as last-resort routers.
Table 16-6
DCN Case Study 2 Node IP Addresses
Node
IP Address/Mask
Default Gateway
Static Routes:
Destination/Mask – Next Hop
Node 1
192.168.100.80/24
192.168.100.1
0.0.0.0/0 – 192.168.100.1
Node 2
192.168.100.79/24
0.0.0.0
—
Node 3
192.168.100.78/24
0.0.0.0
—
Node 4
192.168.100.77/24
192.168.100.1
0.0.0.0/0 – 192.168.200.1
16.3.5.2 DCN Case Study 2 Limitations
The linear configuration in DCN Case Study 2 does not effectively protect the management network
communication for every fiber failure because the DCN router is not notified of the failures. Therefore,
it continues to send packets on the low-cost path. This problem does not occur in ring topologies where
the fiber failure is internally protected from the optical ring network. However, the OSPF dynamic
routing protocol can be used over the DCN network to provide a solution to this problem. An OSPF
configuration is shown in DCN Case Study 3.
16.3.6 DCN Case Study 3: Linear Topology with DCN Connections on Both Ends
Using OSPF Routing
DCN Case Study 3 is the same linear topology as DCN Case Study 2 except OSPF routing is used on the
DCN network. This requires the OSPF active on LAN option, located on the node view (single-shelf
mode) or multishelf view (multishelf mode) Provisioning > Network > OSPF tab, to be enabled at the
end ONS 15454 nodes. In addition, OSPF must be running between Router 1, Router 2, and the NOC
router.
Because the DCN connection usually passes over a public network where OSPF is not always an option,
the connection between Router 1, Router 2, and the NOC router is configured as a GRE tunnel so OSPF
can run on the tunnel itself.
Figure 16-20 shows the linear configuration with the separate OSPF areas, the tunnel connections, and
the required OSPF virtual link. (The physical connections where the tunnels are passed are not shown in
the figure because they are not directly part of the actual routing path.)
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16.3.6 DCN Case Study 3: Linear Topology with DCN Connections on Both Ends Using OSPF Routing
Figure 16-20
DCN Case Study 3: ONS 15454 Linear Topology with DCN Connections at Both Ends
Using OSPF
192.168.100.0/24
Node 1
.80
Node 2
.79
Node 3
.78
Node 4
.77
Area 1
Area 100
Area 200
.1
.2
.2
Tunnel110
.2
Tunnel210
Router 1
Router 2
192.168.110.0/24
192.168.210.0/24
.1
Tunnel110
.1
Tunnel210
NOC router .121
Area 0
159498
NOC LAN
10.58.46.64/26
NMS
.113
16.3.6.1 DCN Case Study 3 IP Configurations
The following sections provide sample IP configurations at routers and ONS 15454 nodes for
DCN Case Study 3.
16.3.6.1.1 NOC Router IP Configuration
Interface configuration:
interface Ethernet0/0
ip address 10.58.46.121 255.255.255.192
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet1/0
ip address 192.168.20.1 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
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!
interface Ethernet2/0
ip address 192.168.10.1 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Loopback0
ip address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
GRE tunnel interface configuration:
interface Tunnel110
ip address 192.168.110.1 255.255.255.0
tunnel source Ethernet2/0
tunnel destination 192.168.10.2
!
interface Tunnel210
ip address 192.168.210.1 255.255.255.0
tunnel source Ethernet1/0
tunnel destination 192.168.20.2
!
OSPF routing configuration:
router ospf 1
network 1.1.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0
network 192.168.110.0 0.0.0.255 area 100
network 192.168.210.0 0.0.0.255 area 200
area 100 virtual-link 192.168.100.80
area 200 virtual-link 192.168.100.77
!
Note that the OSPF virtual link to the end ONS 15454s is created to connect the DCC/OSC/GCC OSPF
area 1 to the backbone area 0. No static routes are defined on the NOC router.
16.3.6.1.2 Router 1 IP Configuration
Interface configuration:
interface Ethernet0/0
ip address 192.168.10.2 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet1/0
ip address 192.168.100.1 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
GRE tunnel interface configuration:
interface Tunnel110
ip address 192.168.110.2 255.255.255.0
tunnel source Ethernet0/0
tunnel destination 192.168.10.1
!
OSPF and static routing configuration:
router ospf 1
log-adjacency-changes
network 192.168.100.0 0.0.0.255 area 100
network 192.168.110.0 0.0.0.255 area 100
!
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16.3.6 DCN Case Study 3: Linear Topology with DCN Connections on Both Ends Using OSPF Routing
ip classless
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.10.1
16.3.6.1.3 Router 2 IP Configuration
Interface configuration:
interface Ethernet0/0
ip address 192.168.20.2 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet1/0
ip address 192.168.100.2 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
GRE tunnel interface configuration:
interface Tunnel210
ip address 192.168.210.2 255.255.255.0
tunnel source Ethernet0/0
tunnel destination 192.168.20.1
!
OSPF and static routing configuration:
router ospf 1
network 192.168.100.0 0.0.0.255 area 200
network 192.168.210.0 0.0.0.255 area 200
!
ip classless
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.20.1
Table 16-7 shows network settings on the four ONS 15454 nodes. The static routes are created so the
DCN-connected nodes can advertise their capability to act as last-resort routers.
Table 16-7
DCN Case Study 3 Node IP Addresses
Node
IP Address/Mask
Default Gateway
OSPF Configuration
Node 1
192.168.100.80/24
192.168.100.1
DCC/OSC/GCC area: 0.0.0.1
LAN area: 0.0.0.100
OSPF Area Range Table:
•
192.168.100.79/32 - Area 0.0.0.1
•
192.168.100.78/32 - Area 0.0.0.1
•
192.168.100.77/32 - Area 0.0.0.1
Virtual Link Table: 1.1.1.1
Node 2
192.168.100.79/24
0.0.0.0
DCC/OSC/GCC area: 0.0.0.1
OSPF disabled on LAN
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16.3.7 DCN Case Study 4: Two Linear Cascaded Topologies With Two DCN Connections
Table 16-7
DCN Case Study 3 Node IP Addresses (continued)
Node
IP Address/Mask
Default Gateway
OSPF Configuration
Node 3
192.168.100.78/24
0.0.0.0
DCC/OSC/GCC area: 0.0.0.1
OSPF disabled on LAN
Node 4
192.168.100.77/24
192.168.100.1
DCC/OSC/GCC area: 0.0.0.1
LAN area: 0.0.0.200
OSPF Area Range Table:
•
192.168.100.80/32 - Area 0.0.0.1
•
192.168.100.79/32 - Area 0.0.0.1
•
192.168.100.78/32 - Area 0.0.0.1
Virtual Link Table: 1.1.1.1
The OSPF virtual link requires its neighbor to be indicated with its router ID, not the physical or tunnel
interface connected to the network. Using a loopback interface on the NOC router makes the router ID
selection independent from real interface IP address.
16.3.6.2 DCN Case Study 3 Limitations
DCN Case Study 3 shows that OSPF can provide better DCN resilience and more efficient routing
choices, which results in better performance. OSPF also provides better network scalability. Some
limitations of using OSPF include:
•
OSPF introduces additional complexity, for example, provisioning the OSPF virtual links and
advertisement on the ONS 15454s and routers requires thought and planning.
•
OSPF must be enabled on the DCN connection between the NOC and the site routers. This can also
be done through GRE tunnels, as shown in this case study.
•
Planning and thought must be given to the separation of the OSPF areas. Creation of virtual links to
overcome the limitations described in the “16.3.2 OSPF” section on page 16-23 and to avoid
isolated areas and segmentation in the backbone area requires planning as well.
16.3.7 DCN Case Study 4: Two Linear Cascaded Topologies With Two DCN
Connections
DCN Case Study 4, shown in Figure 16-21, extends the simple linear topology shown in DCN Case
Study 3. However in this example, two linear DCN connections go to the same site router and all the
ONS 15454s are in the same subnet. A GRE tunnel logically connects the remote Router 1 and Router 2
over the OSC/DCC/GCC network, which is similar to the DCN Case Study 1 configuration
(Figure 16-18). The GRE tunnel provides the remote routers with an alternate path to reach the NOC
network in case a DCN failure occurs. However, the alternate paths might overload the router routing
tables and carry a higher cost because all alternate paths are host-based due to the fact the ONS 15454s
reside in the same subnet.
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16.3.7 DCN Case Study 4: Two Linear Cascaded Topologies With Two DCN Connections
Figure 16-21
DCN Case Study 4: Two Linear Cascaded Topologies with Two DCN Connections
192.168.100.0/24
Node 1
.80
Node 2
.79
Node 3
.78
Node 4
.77
.1
.2
.2
.2
192.168.10.0/24
Router 2
192.168.20.0/24
.1
NOC router
.1
.121
NMS
.113
NOC LAN
10.58.46.64/26
159499
Router 1
16.3.7.1 DCN Case Study 4 IP Configurations
The following sections provide sample IP configurations at the routers and ONS 15454 nodes for
DCN Case Study 4.
16.3.7.1.1 NOC Router IP Configuration
Interface configuration:
interface Ethernet0/0
ip address 10.58.46.121 255.255.255.192
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet1/0
ip address 192.168.20.1 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet2/0
ip address 192.168.10.1 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
Static routes with alternate paths at different costs:
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
classless
route 192.168.100.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.10.2
route 192.168.100.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.20.2 100
route 192.168.100.77 255.255.255.255 192.168.20.2 10
route 192.168.100.77 255.255.255.255 192.168.10.2 20
route 192.168.100.78 255.255.255.255 192.168.20.2
route 192.168.100.78 255.255.255.255 192.168.10.2 10
route 192.168.100.79 255.255.255.255 192.168.20.2
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16.3.7 DCN Case Study 4: Two Linear Cascaded Topologies With Two DCN Connections
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
route
route
route
route
route
192.168.100.79 255.255.255.255 192.168.10.2 10
192.168.100.80 255.255.255.255 192.168.10.2
192.168.100.80 255.255.255.255 192.168.20.2 10
192.168.200.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.20.2
192.168.200.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.10.2 100
16.3.7.1.2 Router 1 IP Configuration
Interface configuration:
interface Ethernet0/0
ip address 192.168.10.2 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet1/0
ip address 192.168.100.1 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
GRE tunnel interface configuration:
interface Tunnel0
ip address 192.168.30.1 255.255.255.0
tunnel source Ethernet1/0
tunnel destination 192.168.100.2
Static routes with alternate paths at different costs:
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
classless
route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.10.1
route 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 192.168.10.1
route 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 Tunnel0 10
route 192.168.100.2 255.255.255.255 192.168.100.80
route 192.168.100.77 255.255.255.255 Tunnel0 20
route 192.168.100.78 255.255.255.255 Tunnel0 10
route 192.168.100.79 255.255.255.255 Tunnel0 10
Note that the host routing path to the peer DCN router (Router 2, 192.168.100.2) points to the
ONS 15454 network (by 192.168.100.80). This is required to set up the GRE tunnel. In this
configuration, only the external route to 10.0.0.0 (that includes the NOC network) is overloaded with the
alternate path. However, overloading of the last-resort route could also occur.
16.3.7.1.3 Router 2 IP Configuration
Interface configuration:
interface Ethernet0/0
ip address 192.168.20.2 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Ethernet1/0
ip address 192.168.100.2 255.255.255.0
no ip directed-broadcast
GRE tunnel interface configuration:
interface Tunnel0
ip address 192.168.30.2 255.255.255.0
tunnel source Ethernet1/0
tunnel destination 192.168.100.1
Static routes with alternate paths at different costs:
ip classless
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.20.1
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16.4 DCN Extension
ip
ip
ip
ip
route
route
route
route
10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 192.168.20.1
10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 Tunnel0 10
192.168.100.1 255.255.255.255 192.168.100.79
192.168.100.80 255.255.255.255 Tunnel0 10
Note that the host routing path to the peer DCN router (Router, IP 192.168.100.1) points to the
ONS 15454 network (by 192.168.200.79). This is required to set up the GRE tunnel. In this
configuration, only the external route to 10.0.0.0 (that include the NOC network) is overloaded with the
alternate path. However, overloading the last-resort route is also possible.
Table 16-8 shows network settings on the four ONS 15454 nodes. The static routes are created so the
DCN-connected nodes can advertise their capability to act as last-resort routers.
Table 16-8
DCN Case Study 4 Node IP Addresses
Node
IP Address/Mask
Default Gateway
Static Routes:
Destination/Mask – Next Hop
Node 1
192.168.100.80/24
192.168.100.1
0.0.0.0/0 – 192.168.100.1
192.168.100.1/32 – 192.168.100.80
Node 2
192.168.100.79/24
192.168.100.2
192.168.100.2/32 – 192.168.100.79
Node 3
192.168.100.78/24
192.168.100.2
0.0.0.0/0 – 192.168.100.2
Node 4
192.168.100.77/24
0.0.0.0
—
16.3.7.2 DCN Case Study 4 Limitations
Many limitations described in the “16.3.4.2 DCN Case Study 1 Limitations” section on page 16-27 also
apply to this case study. However, the problems are less acute because of the DCN connection in the
middle of the optical network. For DWDM networks, increased latency might became a problem if the
linear topology has many spans with intermediate line amplifier or optical add/drop multiplexing
(OADM) nodes, which is sometimes done to cover long-distance connections. In this case, when one
DCN fails, management packets for nodes near the middle of the span travel 1.5 times the complete
point-to-point connection. The normal routing figure is 0.5. The full connection length of a GRE tunnel
is used as an alternate routing path.
16.4 DCN Extension
ONS 15454 DWDM networks require a communication channel to exchange data among the different
nodes within the network. Until Software Release 7.0, the only usable channel was the optical service
channel (OSC) provided by the OSCM and OSC-CSM cards. In a long DWDM metro network, usage of
OSC channel adds limitations in terms of cost and performance because the OSC channel maximum loss
is 37 dB.
The primary aim of the DCN extension feature is to remove the OSC constraint and leverage on already
available external DCN or traffic matrix that allows nodes to be reached without using an OSC channel.
You can connect two nodes in a DWDM network without using an OSC channel in the following two
methods:
•
Using external DCN
•
Using GCC/DCC
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16.4.1 Network Using OSC
The following sections describe the different communication methods and the factors to be considered
while provisioning the connectivity.
16.4.1 Network Using OSC
Figure 16-22 shows a point-to-point network that uses OSC as the communication channel.
Figure 16-22
Network Using OSC
CTC/Management
273877
OSC
DCN
Node A
Node B
In a network using OSC channel, it is possible to supervise all the nodes from the network operations
center (NOC) and all nodes can communicate with each other using the OSC channel. Network topology
discovery is automatic when you use an OSC channel.
16.4.2 Network Using External DCN
Figure 16-23 shows a point-to-point network that uses external DCN as the communication channel.
Figure 16-23
Network Using External DCN
CTC/Management
DCN
273878
Node connection relies on DCN
OTS to OTS PPC
Virtual connection
Node A
Node B
In a network using external DCN, it is possible to supervise all the nodes from the network operations
center (NOC) and all nodes can communicate with each other using external DCN. The NOC is
connected to each node through the external DCN. Since nodes do not have OSC connectivity, you must
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16.4.3 Network Using GCC/DCC
create an OTS-to-OTS PPC between the nodes. The OTS-to-OTS PPC creates a DCN connection
between the nodes. Refer to the “Create Circuits and Provisionable Patchcords” chapter in the Cisco
ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide for instructions on how to provision an OTS-to-OTS PPC.
16.4.3 Network Using GCC/DCC
Figure 16-24 shows a point-to-point network that uses GCC/DCC as the communication channel.
Figure 16-24
Network Using GCC/DCC
CTC/Management
Node A
GCC
273879
OTS to OTS PPC
Virtual connection
DCN
Node B
Node connection relies on GCC/DCC
In a network using GCC/DCC, one ONS 15454 node (for example, Node A) is provisioned as a gateway
network element (GNE). The NOC is connected only to the GNE. It is possible to supervise all the nodes
from the network operations center (NOC) and all nodes can communicate with each other using
GCC/DCC.
However in such a network, because of the absence of the embedded OSC channel, discovery of the
network topology is not automatic. You must manually provision the adjacency of nodes in order to
configure the correct topology. Refer to the “Create Circuits and Provisionable Patchcords” chapter in
the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide for instructions on how to provision DCN extension for
a network using GCC/DCC.
16.5 Routing Table
ONS 15454 routing information is displayed on the Maintenance > Routing Table tab. The routing table
provides the following information:
•
Destination—Displays the IP address of the destination network or host.
•
Mask—Displays the subnet mask used to reach the destination host or network.
•
Gateway—Displays the IP address of the gateway used to reach the destination network or host.
•
Usage—Shows the number of times the listed route has been used.
•
Interface—Shows the ONS 15454 interface used to access the destination. Values are:
– motfcc0—The ONS 15454 Ethernet interface, that is, the RJ-45 jack on the TCC2/TCC2P and,
for ANSI shelves, the LAN 1 pins on the backplane or, for ETSI shelves, the LAN connection
on the MIC-C/T/P.
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16.5 Routing Table
– pdcc0—An SDCC or RS-DCC interface, that is, an OC-N/STM-N trunk card identified as the
SDCC or RS-DCC termination.
– lo0—A loopback interface.
Table 16-9 shows sample routing entries for an ONS 15454.
Table 16-9
Sample Routing Table Entries
Entry
Destination
Mask
Gateway
Usage
Interface
1
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
172.20.214.1
265103
motfcc0
2
172.20.214.0
255.255.255.0
172.20.214.92
0
motfcc0
3
172.20.214.92
255.255.255.255
127.0.0.1
54
lo0
4
172.20.214.93
255.255.255.255
0.0.0.0
16853
pdcc0
5
172.20.214.94
255.255.255.255
172.20.214.93
16853
pdcc0
Entry 1 shows the following:
•
Destination (0.0.0.0) is the default route entry. All undefined destination network or host entries on
this routing table are mapped to the default route entry.
•
Mask (0.0.0.0) is always 0 for the default route.
•
Gateway (172.20.214.1) is the default gateway address. All outbound traffic that cannot be found in
this routing table or is not on the node’s local subnet is sent to this gateway.
•
Interface (motfcc0) indicates that the ONS 15454 Ethernet interface is used to reach the gateway.
Entry 2 shows the following:
•
Destination (172.20.214.0) is the destination network IP address.
•
Mask (255.255.255.0) is a 24-bit mask, meaning all addresses within the 172.20.214.0 subnet can
be a destination.
•
Gateway (172.20.214.92) is the gateway address. All outbound traffic belonging to this network is
sent to this gateway.
•
Interface (motfcc0) indicates that the ONS 15454 Ethernet interface is used to reach the gateway.
Entry 3 shows the following:
•
Destination (172.20.214.92) is the destination host IP address.
•
Mask (255.255.255.255) is a 32 bit mask, meaning only the 172.20.214.92 address is a destination.
•
Gateway (127.0.0.1) is a loopback address. The host directs network traffic to itself using this
address.
•
Interface (lo0) indicates that the local loopback interface is used to reach the gateway.
Entry 4 shows the following:
•
Destination (172.20.214.93) is the destination host IP address.
•
Mask (255.255.255.255) is a 32 bit mask, meaning only the 172.20.214.93 address is a destination.
•
Gateway (0.0.0.0) means the destination host is directly attached to the node.
•
Interface (pdcc0) indicates that a DCC interface is used to reach the destination host.
Entry 5 shows a DCC-connected node that is accessible through a node that is not directly connected:
•
Destination (172.20.214.94) is the destination host IP address.
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16.6 External Firewalls
•
Mask (255.255.255.255) is a 32-bit mask, meaning only the 172.20.214.94 address is a destination.
•
Gateway (172.20.214.93) indicates that the destination host is accessed through a node with IP
address 172.20.214.93.
•
Interface (pdcc0) indicates that a DCC interface is used to reach the gateway.
16.6 External Firewalls
This section provides information on firewall ports required for various type of connections that are
established with the NE (controller card). Also, there are examples of Access Control List (ACL) for
external firewall configuration that makes a connection feasible with the controller card.
16.6.1 Firewall Ports
Table 16-10 lists the ports that must be enabled to establish a communication channel with the
NE (controller card).
Table 16-10
Firewall Ports for Various Sessions
Session
Type
Session Description
Mode
Port Number
CORBA
CORBA listener port on the NE
Standard
57790 (default); user configurable to the Inbound
standard port 683 or any other port.1
Secure
57791 (default); user configurable to the
standard port 684 or any other port.
Standard Internet Inter-ORB Protocol
(IIOP) listener port on machine running
CTC
Standard
Dynamic (default); user configurable to Outbound
the standard port 683 or any other port.2
Secure
Dynamic (default); user configurable to
the standard port 684 or any other port.
SOCKS
CTC configured with SOCKS or GNE
—
1080
Inbound
HTTP
HTTP port on the NE
—
80
Inbound
3
Firewall ACL
HTTPS
HTTPS port on the NE
—
433
TL1
TL1 port on NE
Standard
3082, 3083, 2362
Secure
4083
Standard
161
Inbound
162 (default); user configurable to any
port between 1024 to 65535
Outbound
SNMP
SNMP listener port on NE
Inbound
Inbound
Secure
SNMP trap listener port on the machine
receiving the traps
Standard
Secure
1. To configure the port, see “DLP-G61 Provision the IIOP Listener Port on the ONS 15454” in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
2. To configure the port, see “DLP-G62 Provision the IIOP Listener Port on the CTC Computer” in the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
3. If this port is blocked, NE could take long time to initialize.
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16.6.2 ACL Examples
16.6.2 ACL Examples
The following access control list (ACL) example shows a firewall configuration when the proxy server
gateway setting is not enabled. In the example, the CTC workstation's address is 192.168.10.10. and the
ONS 15454 address is 10.10.10.100. The firewall is attached to the GNE; hence, inbound is from the
CTC to the GNE and outbound is from the GNE to CTC. The CTC Common Object Request Broker
Architecture (CORBA) standard port is 683 and the TCC CORBA default port on TCC is 57790.
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
remark
remark
permit
remark
remark
permit
remark
remark
permit
remark
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
workstation
access-list
access-list
access-list
101 remark
101 remark
101 permit
101 remark
(port 683)
100 remark
101 permit
101 remark
*** Inbound ACL, CTC -> NE ***
tcp host 192.168.10.10 host 10.10.10.100 eq www
*** allows initial contact with ONS 15454 using http (port 80) ***
tcp host 192.168.10.10 host 10.10.10.100 eq 57790
*** allows CTC communication with ONS 15454 GNE (port 57790) ***
tcp host 192.168.10.10 host 10.10.10.100 established
*** allows ACKs back from CTC to ONS 15454 GNE ***
*** Outbound ACL, NE -> CTC ***
tcp host 10.10.10.100 host 192.168.10.10 eq 683
*** allows alarms etc., from the 15454 (random port) to the CTC
***
tcp host 10.10.10.100 host 192.168.10.10 established
*** allows ACKs from the 15454 GNE to CTC ***
The following ACL example shows a firewall configuration when the proxy server gateway setting is
enabled. As with the first example, the CTC workstation address is 192.168.10.10 and the ONS 15454
address is 10.10.10.100. The firewall is attached to the GNE; hence, inbound is from the CTC to the GNE
and outbound is from the GNE to CTC. The CTC Common Object Request Broker Architecture
(CORBA) standard port is 683 and the TCC CORBA default port on TCC is 57790.
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
remark
remark
permit
remark
remark
permit
remark
remark
*** Inbound ACL, CTC -> NE ***
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
101
101
101
101
remark *** Outbound ACL, NE -> CTC ***
remark
permit tcp host 10.10.10.100 host 192.168.10.10 established
remark *** allows ACKs from the 15454 GNE to CTC ***
tcp host 192.168.10.10 host 10.10.10.100 eq www
*** allows initial contact with the 15454 using http (port 80) ***
tcp host 192.168.10.10 host 10.10.10.100 eq 1080
*** allows CTC communication with the 15454 GNE (port 1080) ***
16.7 Open GNE
The ONS 15454 can communicate with non-ONS nodes that do not support Point-to-Point Protocol
(PPP) vendor extensions or OSPF type 10 opaque link-state advertisements (LSA), both of which are
necessary for automatic node and link discovery. An open GNE configuration allows a GCC-based
network to function as an IP network for non-ONS nodes.
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16.7 Open GNE
To configure an open GNE network, you can provision GCC terminations to include a far-end, non-ONS
node using either the default IP address of 0.0.0.0 or a specified IP address. You provision a far-end,
non-ONS node by checking the Far End is Foreign check box during GCC creation. The default 0.0.0.0
IP address allows the far-end, non-ONS node to identify itself with any IP address; if you set an IP
address other than 0.0.0.0, a link is established only if the far-end node identifies itself with that IP
address, providing an extra level of security.
By default, the proxy server only allows connections to discovered ONS peers and the firewall blocks
all IP traffic between the GCC network and LAN. You can, however, provision proxy tunnels to allow
up to 12 additional destinations for SOCKS version 5 connections to non-ONS nodes. You can also
provision firewall tunnels to allow up to 12 additional destinations for direct IP connectivity between the
GCC network and LAN. Proxy and firewall tunnels include both a source and destination subnet. The
connection must originate within the source subnet and terminate within the destination subnet before
either the SOCKS connection or IP packet flow is allowed. A proxy connection is allowed if the CTC
client is in a source subnet and the requested destination is in the destination subnet. Firewall tunnels
allow IP traffic to route between the node Ethernet and pdcc interfaces. An inbound Ethernet packet is
allowed through the firewall if its source address matches a tunnel source and its destination matches a
tunnel destination. An inbound pdcc packet is allowed through the firewall if its source address matches
a tunnel destination and its destination address matches a tunnel source. Tunnels only affect TCP and
UDP packets.
The availability of proxy and/or firewall tunnels depends on the network access settings of the node:
•
If the node is configured with the proxy server enabled in GNE or ENE mode, you must set up a
proxy tunnel and/or a firewall tunnel.
•
If the node is configured with the proxy server enabled in proxy-only mode, you can set up proxy
tunnels. Firewall tunnels are not allowed.
•
If the node is configured with the proxy server disabled, neither proxy tunnels nor firewall tunnels
are allowed.
Figure 16-25 shows an example of a foreign node connected to the GCC network. Proxy and firewall
tunnels are useful in this example because the GNE would otherwise block IP access between the PC
and the foreign node.
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16.7 Open GNE
Figure 16-25
Proxy and Firewall Tunnels for Foreign Terminations
mote CTC
10.20.10
10.10.20.0/24
nterface 0/0
0.10.20.1
Router A
nterface 0/1
0.10.10.1
10.10.10.0/24
ENE
Figure 16-26 shows a remote node connected to an ENE Ethernet port. Proxy and firewall tunnels are
useful in this example because the GNE would otherwise block IP access between the PC and foreign
node. This configuration also requires a firewall tunnel on the ENE.
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16.8 TCP/IP and OSI Networking
Figure 16-26
Foreign Node Connection to an ENE Ethernet Port
mote CTC
0.20.10
10.10.20.0/24
nterface 0/0
0.10.20.1
Router A
nterface 0/1
0.10.10.1
16.8 TCP/IP and OSI Networking
ONS 15454 DCN communication is based on the TCP/IP protocol suite. However, ONS 15454s can also
be networked with equipment that uses the OSI protocol suite. While TCP/IP and OSI protocols are not
directly compatible, they do have the same objectives and occupy similar layers of the OSI reference
model. For detailed information about OSI protocols, processes, and scenarios, refer to the
“Management Network Connectivity” chapter in the ONS 15454 Reference Manual. OSI/MultiService
Transport Platform (MSTP) scenarios are provided in the following sections.
In OSI/MSTP Scenario 1 (Figure 16-27), an SDCC or RS-DCC carries an OC-N/STM-N signal from an
OSI-based third-party NE to a transponder (TXP) or muxponder (MXP) card on an ONS NE. It is carried
by GCC to a TXP/MXP card on another MSTP NE and then by SDCC or RS-DCC to a second third-party
NE. This scenario requires TXPs/MXPs whose client interfaces can be provisioned in section or line
termination mode. These include:
•
TXP_MR_2.5 and TXPP_MR_2.5 (when equipped with OC-N/STM-N SFPs)
•
TXP_MR_10G and TXP_MR_10E (when the client is configured as OC-192/STM-64)
•
MXP_2.5_10G and MXP_2.5_10E
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16.8 TCP/IP and OSI Networking
OSI has to be carried or tunneled to the other TXP/MXP card through an OSC termination, GCC
termination, or both. The third-party NMS has OSI connectivity to its NEs with the MSTP ONS NE
serving as the GNE for third-party vendor, OSI-based SONET equipment.
Figure 16-27
OSI/MSTP Scenario 1
Third party OSI
based NMS
DCN (IP/OSI)
MSTP
GNE
OSC
OSC
Other vendor
SONET/SDH
MSTP
MSTP
SDCC/RS-DCC
OSC
OSC
TXP/MXP
OSI over SDCC/RS-DCC
GCC
MSTP
TXP/MXP
Other vendor
SONET/SDH
137656
SDCC/RS-DCC
OSI over SDCC/RS-DCC
OSI/MSTP Scenario 2 (Figure 16-28) is similar to Scenario 1, except the MSTP NEs do not have
connectivity to an OSI NMS.
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16.8 TCP/IP and OSI Networking
Figure 16-28
OSI/MSTP Scenario 2
Other vendor
SONET/SDH
OSI over SDCC/RS-DCC
SDCC/RS-DCC
TXP/MXP
MSTP
OSC
Other vendor
SONET/SDH
OSC
SDCC/RS-DCC
TXP/MXP
MSTP
MSTP
OSC
OSC
MSTP
137657
OSI over SDCC/RS-DCC
OSI/MSTP Scenario 3 (Figure 16-29) shows the following:
•
OSI is carried over an SDCC or RS-DCC termination.
•
OSI has to be carried or tunneled to the other peer TXP/MXP through an OSC termination, GCC
termination, or both.
•
An OSS has IP connectivity to all the NEs.
•
The MSTP NE is a GNE for the third-party OSI-based SONET NEs. The MSTP NEs perform all
mediation functions.
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16.8 TCP/IP and OSI Networking
Figure 16-29
OSI/MSTP Scenario 3
IP OSS
DCN (IP)
MSTP
GNE
TXP/MXP
Other vendor
SONET/SDH
OSC
OSC
MSTP
MSTP
SDCC/RS-DCC
OSC
OSI over SDCC/RS-DCC
OSC
GCC
MSTP
TXP/MXP
Other vendor
SONET/SDH
137658
SDCC/RS-DCC
OSI over SDCC/RS-DCC
OSI/MSTP Scenario 4 (Figure 16-30) shows the following:
•
OSI is carried over an SDCC or RS-DCC termination.
•
OSI has to be carried or tunneled to the other peer TXP/MXP through an OSC termination, GCC
termination, or both
•
An OSS has IP connectivity to all the NEs through third-party NE network.
•
The MSTP NE is a GNE for the third-party OSI-based SONET NEs. The MSTP NEs perform all
mediation functions.
•
The third-party vendor NE is a GNE for the Cisco MSTP network.
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16.9 Link Management Protocol
Figure 16-30
OSI/IP Scenario 4
MSTP
GNE
TXP/MXP
Other vendor
SONET/SDH
OSC
OSC
MSTP
MSTP
SDCC/RS-DCC
OSC
OSI over SDCC/RS-DCC
OSC
GCC
MSTP
TXP/MXP
SDCC/RS-DCC
OSI over SDCC/RS-DCC
Other vendor
SONET/SDH
137659
CTM
DCN (IPP over
CLNS tunnel)
16.9 Link Management Protocol
This section describes Link Management Protocol1 (LMP) management and configuration. To
troubleshoot specific alarms, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide. To configure
LMP, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
Note
CTM support is not required for LMP.
LMP is used to establish traffic engineering (TE) links between Cisco ONS 15454 nodes or between
Cisco ONS 15454 nodes and selected non-Cisco nodes that use vendor-specific hardware.
16.9.1 Overview
LMP manages TE links between nodes through the use of control channels. TE links are designed to
define the most efficient paths possible for traffic to flow over a network and through the Internet. Traffic
engineering encompasses traffic management, capacity management, traffic measurement and modeling,
1. The LMP protocol is specified by the IETF in an Internet-Draft, draft-ietf-ccamp-lmp-10.txt, which was
published as a Proposed Standard, RFC 4204, (http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc4204.txt), on 2005-10-28.
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16.9.1 Overview
network modeling, and performance analysis. Traffic engineering methods include call routing,
connection routing, quality of service (QoS) resource management, routing table management, and
capacity management.
LMP manages TE links between peer nodes, such as two optical cross-connect (OXC) nodes. Peer nodes
have equivalent signaling and routing. LMP also manages TE links between a node such as an OXC and
an adjacent optical line system (OLS) node. An example of an OLS node is an ONS 15454 DWDM node.
Networks with routers, switches, OXC nodes, DWDM OLS nodes, and add/drop multiplexers (ADM)
use a common control plane such as Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) to provision
resources and provide network survivability using protection and restoration techniques. LMP is part of
the GMPLS protocol suite.
A single TE link can be formed from several individual links. Management of TE links can be
accomplished with in-band messaging, as well as with out-of-band methods. The following material
describes the LMP between a pair of nodes that manages TE links. LMP accomplishes the following:
•
Maintains control channel connectivity
•
Verifies the physical connectivity of the data links
•
Correlates the link property information
•
Suppresses downstream alarms
•
Localizes link failures for protection/restoration purposes in multiple types of networks
DWDM networks often use Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) and GMPLS as common-control
planes to control how packets are routed through the network.
LMP manages the control channel that must exist between nodes for routing, signaling, and link
management. For a control channel to exist, each node must have an IP interface that is reachable from
the other node. Together, the IP interfaces form a control channel. The interface for the control messages
does not have to be the same interface as the one for the data.
16.9.1.1 MPLS
MPLS provides a mechanism for engineering network traffic patterns that is independent of routing
tables and routing protocols. MPLS assigns short labels to network packets that describe how to forward
the packets through the network. The traditional Layer 3 forwarding mechanism requires each hop to
analyze the packet header and determine the next hop based on routing table lookup. With MPLS, the
analysis of the packet header is performed just once, when a packet enters the MPLS cloud. The packet
is then assigned to a stream known as a Label Switch Path (LSP), which is identified with a label. The
short, fixed-length label is an index into a forwarding table, which is more efficient than the traditional
routing table lookup at each hop. Using MPLS, both the control protocol (used to manage the LSPs) and
user data can be carried over the same bearer interfaces.
16.9.1.2 GMPLS
GMPLS is based on MPLS, with protocol extensions to support additional technologies, including time
division multiplexing (TDM) slots (such as SONET and SDH), wavelength division multiplexing
(WDM) wavelengths at Layer 1, and fiber. For MPLS, the control traffic (signaling and routing) can run
over bearer interfaces. This is not the case with GMPLS, where a separate control channel is used. The
GMPLS control channel is managed with LMP. With GMPLS, the control channels between two
adjacent nodes do not need to use the same physical medium as the data links between those nodes.
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16.9.2 Configuring LMP
16.9.2 Configuring LMP
Configuring LMP consists of the following four topics:
•
Control channel management
•
TE link management
•
Link connectivity verification
•
Fault management
16.9.2.1 Control Channel Management
Control channel management establishes and maintains control channels between adjacent nodes.
Control channels use a Config message exchange and a fast keep-alive mechanism between the nodes.
The latter is required if lower-level mechanisms are not available to detect control-channel failures. A
maximum of four LMP control channels can be supported.
The nodes initially exchange configuration messages (Config, ConfigAck, and ConfigNack), which are
used to exchange identifiers and negotiate parameters for the keep-alive protocol. The nodes then
perform a continuous rapid exchange of Hello messages, which are used to monitor the health on the
channel.
Note
The identifiers are Local Node Id, Remote Node Id, Local Control Channel Id, and Remote
Control Channel Id. The parameters are the HelloInterval and the HelloDeadInterval.
LMP out-of-fiber and LMP out-of-band control channels are supported and terminated on the shelf. An
out-of-fiber control channel includes using the control plane network (Ethernet) for the control channel
because Ethernet is separate from the fiber used for the data plane. An out-of-band control channel
includes using overhead bytes, such as the SDCC and LDCC bytes, for the control channel because
overhead bytes are separate from the payload. In-band means that the control messages are in the same
channel as the data messages; therefore, out-of-band refers to overhead bytes in the same fiber, separate
circuits dedicated to control messages in the same fiber (SONET/SDH circuits), or separate wavelengths
in the same fiber (DWDM).
Note
Overhead bytes are SDCC or LDCC for SONET networks, RS-DCC or MS-DCC for SDH
networks, and GCC or OSC for DWDM networks.
Out-of-band implies in-fiber, but not in-band. In-fiber means that the control messages are in the same
fiber as the data messages, and includes both in-band and out-of-band. Out-of-fiber means that the
control messages take a path separate from the data plane. This includes separate fiber and Ethernet.
The control channel management for a peer node to OLS link is the same as that for a link between two
peer nodes.
Note
The software supports gracefully taking a control channel down for administration purposes (refer to
Section 3.2.3 of the IETF LMP document). However, there is no provision for a graceful restart (refer to
Section 8 of RFC 4204).
•
Graceful means that the nodes participating in the control channel agree that the link should go
down. To gracefully take down a control channel, the node sets the ControlChannelDown flag in its
messages to the other node until either the HelloDeadInterval expires or the other node sends a
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16.9.2 Configuring LMP
message back with the ControlChannelDown flag set. In either case, the node then stops sending
messages for this control channel. Before a control channel is taken down, there should be a backup
control channel in place that can be used to manage the data links.
•
Non-graceful means that one of the nodes just stops sending messages. The other side would declare
a failure after the HelloDeadInterval, but would continue to send Hello messages to see if the control
channel will come back up.
16.9.2.2 TE Link Management
LMP ensures that links are grouped into TE links and that the properties of those links are the same at
both endpoints. This is called TE link management, or link property correlation.
Link property correlation is used to synchronize the TE link properties and verify the TE link
configuration. The link property correlation function of LMP aggregates one or more data links into a
TE link and synchronizes the properties of the TE link with the neighbor node. The procedure starts by
sending a LinkSummary message to the neighbor. The LinkSummary message includes the local and
remote Link Identifier, a list of all data links that make up the TE link, and various link properties. It is
mandatory that a LinkSummaryAck or LinkSummaryNack message be sent in response to the receipt of
a LinkSummary message, indicating agreement or disagreement with the link properties.
Note
A maximum of 256 LMP TE links is supported.
16.9.2.3 Link Connectivity Verification
Link connectivity verification is not supported in this release, but might be supported in the future.
16.9.2.4 Fault Management
Fault management is particularly useful when the control channels are physically diverse from the data
links. It is used for rapid notification regarding the status of one or more TE-link data channels. The use
of fault management is negotiated as part of the TE link’s LinkSummary exchange. Data links and TE
link failures can be rapidly isolated and fault management supports both unidirectional and bidirectional
LSPs. Transparent devices are useful because traditional methods for monitoring the health of allocated
data links might no longer be appropriate. Instead, fault detection is delegated to the physical layer (for
example, loss of light or optical monitoring of the data) instead of Layer 2 or Layer 3. Fault management
uses the ChannelStatus, ChannelStatusAck, ChannelStatusRequest, and ChannelStatusResponse
messages.
Note
The LMP Channel Activation/Deactivation Indication procedures are not supported; they are described
in the IETF LMP document, Sections 6.4 and 6.5.
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16.9.3 LMP WDM
16.9.3 LMP WDM
LMP manages traffic engineering links between peer nodes (nodes that are peers in signaling and/or
routing). The purpose of the LMP WDM extensions1 is to allow LMP to be used between an OXC node
and an adjacent DWDM OLS node. Figure 16-31 illustrates the relationship between LMP and
LMP-WDM. OXC 1 and OXC 2 are peer nodes whose control channel is managed with LMP.
LMP-WDM manages the control channel between an OXC node and an OLS node.
LMP and LMP-WDM Relationship
OXC 1
OLS 1
OLS 2
LMP-WDM
OXC 2
LMP-WDM
LMP
151937
Figure 16-31
When the two OLS nodes can communicate their configuration and the current state of their optical link
to the two peer nodes (OXC 1 and OXC 2) through LMP-WDM, network usability is improved through
the reduction of manual configuration and enhanced fault detection and recovery.
16.9.4 LMP Network Implementation
Figure 16-32 shows a network-level LMP implementation. It is an IP-plus-optical network, with
end-to-end routing based on MPLS and GMPLS. The primary network components are:
•
Routers
– Cisco Carrier Router System (CSR)
– Cisco Gigabit Switch Router (GSR)
•
An OXC node
•
Ultra long-haul (ULH) DWDM equipment
LMP and other features allow the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM node to fulfill the ULH DWDM role.
Figure 16-32 illustrates the relationship between the network components.
1. LMP-WDM extensions that allow management of links between a peer node and an adjacent OLS node are
described in the following IETF document: Internet-Draft, draft-ietf-ccamp-lmp-wdm-03.txt, published as a
Proposed Standard, RFC 4209 (http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc4209.txt), 2005-11-1
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16.9.4 LMP Network Implementation
LMP System Implementation
LMP
LMP
LMP-WDM
OXC
Cisco ONS 15454
MSTP
LMP
LMP-WDM
LSP 1
TXP
Mux/Demux
Cisco ONS 15454
MSTP
OXC
TXP
Mux/Demux
Router
(Cisco CRS)
Router
(Cisco CRS)
OXC
Cisco ONS 15454
MSTP
TXP
Mux/Demux
Cisco ONS 15454
MSTP
LSP 2
TXP
Mux/Demux
OXC
151936
Figure 16-32
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16.10 IPv6 Network Compatibility
16.10 IPv6 Network Compatibility
IPv6 simplifies IP configuration and administration and has a larger address space than IPv4 to support
the future growth of the Internet and Internet related technologies. It uses 128-bit addresses as against
the 32-bit used in IPv4 addresses. Also, IPv6 gives more flexibility in designing newer addressing
architectures.
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM can function in an IPv6 network when an Internet router that supports
Network Address Translation-Protocol Translation (NAT-PT) is positioned between the GNE, such as an
ONS 15454 DWDM, and the client workstation. NAT-PT is a migration tool that helps users transition
from IPv4 networks to IPv6 networks. NAT-PT is defined in RFC-2766. IPv4 and IPv6 nodes
communicate with each other using NAT-PT by allowing both IPv6 and IPv4 stacks to interface between
the IPv6 DCN and the IPv4 DCC networks.
Note
IPv6 is supported on Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Software R8.0 and later with an external NAT-PT router.
16.11 IPv6 Native Support
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Software R9.0 and later supports native IPv6. ONS 15454 DWDM can be
managed over IPv6 DCN networks by enabling the IPv6 feature. After you enable IPv6 in addition to
IPv4, you can use CTC, TL1, and SNMP over an IPv6 DCN to manage ONS 15454 DWDM. Each NE
can be assigned an IPv6 address in addition to the IPv4 address. You can access the NE by entering the
IPv4 address, an IPv6 address or the DNS name of the device. The IPv6 address is assigned only on the
LAN interface of the NE. DCC/GCC interfaces use the IPv4 address.
By default, when IPv6 is enabled, the node processes both IPv4 and IPv6 packets on the LAN interface.
If you want to process only IPv6 packets, you need to disable IPv4 on the node. Before you disable IPv4,
ensure that IPv6 is enabled and the node is not in multishelf mode.
Figure 16-33 shows how an IPv6 DCN interacts with and IPv4 DCC.
NMS
IPv6 Address:
3ffe:b00:ffff:1::2
ENE B
IPv6 Address:
3ffe:b00:ffff:1::3
IPv4 Address:
10.10.10.10
ENE C
IPv6 Address:
3ffe:b00:ffff:1::4
IPv4 Address:
10.10.10.20
IPv6-IPv4 Interaction
IPv6
DCN
DCC IPv4 Network
GNE A
IPv6 Address:
3ffe:b00:ffff:1::5
IPv4 Address:
10.10.20.40
ENE D
IPv6 Address:
3ffe:b00:ffff:1::6
IPv4 Address:
10.10.20.30
270827
Figure 16-33
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16.11.1 IPv6 Enabled Mode
You can manage MSTP multishelf nodes over IPv6 DCN. RADIUS, FTP, SNTP, and other network
applications support IPv6 DCN. To enable IPv6 addresses, you need to make the necessary configuration
changes from the CTC or TL1 management interface. After you enable IPv6, you can start a CTC or TL1
session using the provisioned IPv6 address. The ports used for all IPv6 connections to the node are the
same as the ports used for IPv4.
An NE can either be in IPv6 mode or IPv4 mode. In IPv4 mode, the LAN interface does not have an IPv6
address assigned to it. An NE, whether it is IPv4 or IPv6, has an IPv4 address and subnet mask.
TCC2/TCC2P cards do not reboot automatically when you provision an IPv6 address, but a change in
IPv4 address initiates a TCC2/TCC2P card reset. Table 16-11 describes the differences between an IPv4
node and an IPv6 node.
Table 16-11
Differences Between an IPv6 Node and an IPv4 Node
IPv6 Node
IPv4 Node
Has both IPv6 address and IPv4 address assigned Does not have an IPv6 address assigned to its craft
to its craft Ethernet interface.
Ethernet interface.
The default router has an IPv6 address for IPv6
connectivity, and an IPv4 address for IPv4
connectivity.
The default router has an IPv4 address.
Cannot enable OSPF on LAN. Cannot change
IPv4 NE to IPv6 NE if OSPF is enabled on the
LAN.
Can enable OSPF on the LAN.
Cannot enable RIP on the LAN. Cannot change
Can enable static routes/RIP on the LAN.
IPv4 NE to IPv6 NE if RIP is enabled on the LAN.
Not supported on static routes, proxy tunnels, and Supported on static routes, proxy tunnels, and
firewall tunnels.
firewall tunnels.
Routing decisions are based on the default IPv6
router provisioned.
16.11.1 IPv6 Enabled Mode
The default IP address configured on the node is IPv4. You can use either CTC or the TL1 management
interface to enable IPv6. For more information about enabling IPv6 from the CTC interface, see the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. For more information about enabling IPv6 using TL1
commands, see the Cisco ONS 15454 TL1 Command Guide.
16.11.2 IPv6 Disabled Mode
You can disable IPv6 either from the CTC or from the TL1 management interface. For more information
about disabling IPv6 from the CTC interface, see the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. For
more information about disabling IPv6 using TL1 commands, see the Cisco ONS 15454 TL1 Command
Guide.
16.11.3 IPv6 in Non-secure Mode
In non-secure mode, IPv6 is supported on the front and the rear Ethernet interfaces. You can start a CTC
or TL1 session using the IPv6 address provisioned on the on the front and rear ports of the NE.
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16.11.4 IPv6 in Secure Mode
16.11.4 IPv6 in Secure Mode
In secure mode, IPv6 is only supported on the rear Ethernet interface. The front port only supports IPv4
even if it is disabled on the rear Ethernet interface. For more information about provisioning IPv6
addresses in secure mode, see the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide. For more information on
secure mode behavior, see section 16.2.9 Scenario 9: IP Addressing with Secure Mode Enabled,
page 16-19.
16.11.5 IPv6 Limitations
IPv6 has the following configuration restrictions:
•
You can provision an NE as IPv6 enabled only if the node is a SOCKS-enabled or firewall-enabled
GNE/ENE.
•
IPSec is not supported.
•
OSPF/RIP cannot be enabled on the LAN interface if the NE is provisioned as an IPv6 node.
•
Static route/firewall/proxy tunnel provisioning is applicable only to IPv4 addresses even if the IPv6
is enabled.
•
In secure mode, IPv6 is supported only on the rear Ethernet interface. IPv6 is not supported on the
front port.
•
ONS platforms use NAT-PT internally for providing IPv6 native support. NAT-PT uses the IPv4
address range 128.x.x.x for packet translation. Do not use the 128.x.x.x address range when you
enable IPv6 feature.
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16.12 Integration with Cisco CRS-1 Routers
16.12 Integration with Cisco CRS-1 Routers
This section describes the integration of a Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM node with a Cisco CRS-1 router.
To troubleshoot specific alarms, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Troubleshooting Guide. To
provision end-to-end circuit connectivity between a DWDM node and a CRS-1 router, refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Procedure Guide.
This feature provides end-to-end circuit provisioning from one CRS-1 router to another CRS-1 router
passing through an MSTP network (without using GMPLS). In other words, you can use CTC to create
an OCH trail circuit that includes the CRS-1 nodes involved in the MSTP network. With this feature,
circuit provisioning is extended to the physical layer interface module (PLIM) trunk ports of the CRS-1
router.
For more information on the Cisco CRS-1 router, refer to the documentation set available at
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps5763/tsd_products_support_series_home.html.
16.12.1 Card Compatibility
The following CRS-1 DWDM PLIMs support this feature:
•
4-10GE-ITU/C
•
1OC768-ITU/C
The following ONS 15454 DWDM cards support this feature:
•
32MUX-O
•
32DMX-O
•
32WSS
•
32DMX
•
40-DMX-C
•
40-DMX-CE
•
40-MUX-C
•
40-WSS-C
•
40-WSS-CE
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16.12.2 Node Management
16.12.2 Node Management
Figure 16-34 depicts a typical network that includes DWDM nodes and CRS-1 routers.
Figure 16-34
Cisco ONS 15454 DWDM Node and Cisco CRS-1 Router Network
OCH Trail Circuit
A
Z
CTC
XML or CLI
XML or CLI
CRS1_B
CRS1_A
Internal
Interf