SCHOOL FOOD GUIDELINES

SCHOOL FOOD GUIDELINES

SCHOOL

FOOD GUIDELINES

for school food providers Second Edition

HEALTHY STUDENTS HEALTHY SCHOOLS

www.livinghealthyschools.com

2

School Food Guidelines

The Departments of Health and Community Services and Education have been working closely with the school districts and regional health authorities to help create healthy school environments.

In 2006, School Food Guidelines for Caterers and Administrators was released as a document to help school food providers sell and/or serve healthy meals and snacks in schools. These guidelines were used as the basis for the development of School District Healthy Eating/Nutrition Policies. The

Healthy Eating School Resource Manual was also developed to help schools administer School

District Healthy Eating/Nutrition Policies.

In 2008, School Food Guideline resources were updated to reflect new recommendations from the revised Canada’s Food Guide. In addition, nutrition criteria were developed for fat, sodium, sugar, fibre, calcium and iron.

For more information on the School Food Guidelines contact your District’s School Health Promotion

Liaison Consultant or the Regional Nutritionist at your

Regional Health Authority Office

The following publications and websites were used to prepare these guidelines:

• School Food Guidelines for Administrators and Caterers, NL 2006

• Eat Smart! School Program: www.eatsmart.web.net

• Feeding the Future: School Nutrition Manual

• www.calgaryhealthyregion.ca/schoolnutritionhandbook

• Call to Action: Creating a Healthy School Nutrition Environment: www.osnpph.on.ca

• Healthy Schools, Healthy Children Nutrition Guidelines: www.porcupinehu.on.ca/schools/school_health.html

• Health Canada, Food and Nutrition: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-guide-aliment/index-eng.php

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 3

Table of Contents

Healthy Eating in Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Food Allergies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Canada’s Food Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5

Foods to Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Serving Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8

Tips for Healthy Eating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

How to Promote Vegetables and Fruit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

How to Prepare Healthier Meals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

How to Read Nutrition Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

The Serve Most and Serve Moderately System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Guidelines for the Vegetable and Fruit Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Guidelines for the Grain Products Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Guidelines for the Milk and Alternatives Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Guidelines for the Meat and Alternatives Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Preparing, Selling and/or Serving Mixed Dishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

School Food Guideline Food Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-22

Healthy Choices for All Occasions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Healthy Vending Machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Snacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Setting up a Canteen Service Using the School Food Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Brand Name Food List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Food/Beverage Item Review Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Preparing Food Safely . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-30

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Healthy Eating in Schools

Healthy eating can result in:

• better overall health

• lower risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, certain types of cancer and osteoporosis

• a healthy body

• feeling and looking better

• more energy

• stronger muscles and bones

You already know the importance of eating healthy. You know good nutrition and daily physical activity help school aged children stay healthy.

In 2006, school food guidelines were developed as a part of

Healthy Students Healthy Schools to create a supportive environment for healthy eating. The School Food Guidelines have now been updated to provide additional guidance for making healthy food choices.

The School Food Guidelines include a detailed list of food and beverages that can be sold and served in your school. These items have been grouped according to their nutritional value.

This information is found in a series of charts on page 12 to 19.

Food Allergies

Some schools may have food restrictions if there is a student with a life-threatening food allergy. Check with the school principal for policies regarding food allergies. The public health nurse can also provide advice on maintaining an “allergy aware” environment.

Canada’s Food Guide

Use these guidelines everywhere, every day

• for breakfast, lunch and snacks

• in the cafeteria, canteen and vending machines

• at staff and school council meetings

• at sporting events and school celebrations. (school tournaments, winter carnivals)

• in staffrooms and classrooms

• for fundraising activities

• for parent and community get-togethers

In 2007, Canada's Food Guide was updated. Eating Well with

Canada’s Food Guide provides ideas and tips for making healthy food choices each day.

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 5

Focus on Four Food Groups Milk and Alternatives

Vegetables and Fruit

Key nutrients found in this food group include fibre, vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, iron, B vitamins and magnesium. Fresh, frozen, canned, cupped or dried vegetables and fruit, and 100% fruit and vegetable juices are included in this food group.

Key nutrients found in this group include vitamin A, D, protein, zinc, magnesium, riboflavin and vitamin B12. Milk products such as skim, 0.5%, 1% or 2% white or chocolate milk, fortified soy beverages, lower fat yogurts and lower fat cheeses are easy snack and meal choices to offer at school. Milk and yogurt with a fat content of 2% or less milk fat (M.F.) and cheeses with 21% or less M.F. are considered lower fat milk products.

Canada’s Food Guide recommends that we:

• eat at least one dark green and one orange vegetable each day

• choose vegetables and fruit prepared with little or no added fat, sugar or salt

• choose vegetables and fruit more often than juice

Canada’s Food Guide recommends that we:

• drink skim, 0.5%, 1% or 2% milk each day

• select lower fat Milk and Alternatives

Grain Products

Key nutrients found in this food group include iron,

B vitamins, zinc and magnesium. Grain products, particularly whole grains, are a source of fibre and typically low in fat. Fibre rich foods can help people feel full and satisfied. A diet rich in whole grains may also help reduce the risk of heart disease.

Canada’s Food Guide recommends that we:

• make at least half of our grain products whole grain each day

• choose grain products that are lower in fat, sugar or salt

Basis of Canada’s Food Guide

Canada's Food Guide encourages people to choose foods lower in fat, sugar and salt.

The School Food Guidelines have been updated to reflect

Canada’s Food Guide. Using the guidelines you can create healthy menus for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack times.

No one food provides all the nutrients needed for good health.

Bananas, for example, contain potassium, but little iron.

Cooked, dried beans contain iron but no vitamin C. So mix it up before you serve it up. Use Canada’s Food Guide to create nutritious combinations so your students and staff get excited about healthy eating today.

You’ll find a copy of Canada’s Food Guide in the back of this booklet.

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Meat and Alternatives

Key nutrients found in this food group include protein, iron, vitamin A, vitamin B and zinc. The fat content of meat varies widely. Processed meats such as salami, bologna, pepperoni and wieners, are higher in fat and salt. Fish, poultry and lean cuts of beef, pork and lamb are better choices (cooked with little or no added fat).

Canada’s Food Guide recommends:

• meat alternatives such as beans, lentils and tofu often

• eating at least two food guide servings of fish each week

• selecting lean meat and alternatives prepared with little or no added fat or salt

Foods to Limit

Canada’s Food Guide recommends limiting foods and beverages that are high in calories, fat, sugar or salt (sodium) such as cakes and pastries, chocolate and candies, cookies and granola bars, donuts and muffins, ice cream and frozen desserts, french fries, potato chips, nachos and other salty snacks, fruit-flavoured drinks, soft drinks, sports and energy drinks, and sweetened hot or cold beverages.

These foods provide fewer of the nutrients needed for growth and development and can fill a child’s stomach so they do not have room for the nutritious foods they need.

Ideas for healthy alternatives to foods and beverages high in calories, fat, sugar or salt:

Instead of … Try…

Ice cream Freezing yogurt or 100% fruit or vegetable juice in a popsicle tray

Potato chips

Fruit flavoured drinks

Choosing plain popcorn or homemade baked pitas

Adding lime or lemon to your water or choose milk, fortified soy beverage or

100% vegetable or fruit juice

Donuts Making your own low fat mini muffins with added fibre

Cakes and pastries A baked apple with cinnamon, graham crackers or fruit and yogurt to satisfy your sweet tooth

French fries Baking strips of potato or sweet potatoes in your oven with a small amount of oil, herbs and spices

Nachos

Candy

A small amount of cheese (1½ oz.) melted on wholegrain baked pitas

100% dried vegetable or fruit snacks

Suitable anytime

• plain water

• herbs & spices

Suitable for use in small amounts

• honey, jam, jelly – 1 tbsp/15 mL

• syrups – 2 tbsp/30 mL

• whipped cream – 1-2 tbsp/15-30 mL

• non-dairy whipped toppings – 1-2 tbsp/15-30 mL

• butter – 1 tsp/5 mL

• ketchup, mustard 1-2 tbsp/15-30 mL

• relish, pickles – 1-2 tbsp/15-30 mL

• margarine (non-hydrogenated) – 1 tsp/5 mL

• sour cream (low fat or light) – 2 tbsp/30 mL

• mayonnaise-type dressing (low fat) – 1-2 tsp/5-10 mL

• cream cheese (low fat or light) – 2 tbsp/30 mL

• salad dressing (low fat or light) – 2 tbsp/30 mL

• gravy, lower fat, homemade, canned or powdered –

2 tbsp/30 mL

• barbeque sauce – 1 tbsp/15 mL

• soy sauce – 1 tbsp/15 mL (look for reduced sodium)

• sweet and sour sauce – 1 tbsp/ 15 mL

• cranberry sauce – 1 tbsp/ 15 mL

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 7

Serving Sizes Keep Serving Sizes Handy!

A Food Guide Serving is a reference amount of food. It helps you understand how much food is recommended every day from each of the four food groups.

The number of servings needed each day depends on:

• age

• body size

• activity level

• gender

Vegetables and Fruit

• 1 cupped hand is about

1/2 cup (125 mL), this is 1

Canada Food Guide serving of fresh, frozen or canned vegetables and fruit

• 2 cupped hands is about

1 cup (250 mL), this is 1 Canada

Food Guide serving of leafy vegetables

In some cases, a Food Guide Serving may be close to what you eat, such as an apple. In other cases, such as rice or pasta, you may serve yourself more than one Food Guide Serving.

Grain Products

• fist size is about 1 cup (250 mL), this is 2 Canada Food Guide servings of Grain products

CAUTION:

SUPER SIZED

PORTIONS

Meat and Alternatives

• palm size (small hand) is about 90 g (3 oz), this is slightly larger than 1 Canada Food Guide

Meat and Alternative serving of

75 g (2.5 oz)

Milk and Alternatives

• 2 thumbs is about 50 g (1 1/2 oz), this is 1 Canada Food Guide serving of cheese

• 1 cup (250 mL) is 1 Canada

Food Guide serving of milk

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Suggested Canada Food Guide Servings

AGE GENDER SERVINGS per day

SERVINGS at school

Vegetables and Fruit

4-8

9-13

14-18

14-18 boys and girls boys and girls boys girls

5

6

8

7

2-3

2-4

3-5

2-5

Grain Products

4-8

9-13

14-18

14-18 boys and girls boys and girls boys girls

Milk and Alternatives

4-8

9-13

14-18

14-18 boys and girls boys and girls boys girls

Meat and Alternatives

4-8

9-13

14-18

14-18 boys and girls boys and girls boys girls

1

1-2

3

2

2

3-4

3-4

3-4

4

6

7

6

0 -1

1

1-2

1

1

1-3

1-3

1-3

1-3

2-4

2-5

2-4

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 9

Tips for Healthy Eating

Using the School Food Guidelines is a great way to provide healthy choices in schools. Here are tips for selling and/or securing healthier food choices each day.

How to Promote Vegetables and Fruit

• include a vegetable and/or fruit as part of any daily special meal offer

• offer fruit cups in the school canteen, cafeteria and vending machines

• set up a salad bar or make pre-made salads, start with once per month or once per week

• try new vegetables like baked sweet potato, vegetable stir fry, spinach salad with low fat dressings and toppings

• offer homemade vegetable soups that provide 1-2 servings from the Vegetables and Fruit food group

• offer 100% dried fruit or vegetable snacks

• use berries and fruit in yogurt parfaits for lunch or recess

• make vegetables appealing to students by cutting them up and offering low fat dressing for dipping

• offer daily vegetable and fruit specials with creative names that will be appealing to students

• offer 100% fruit juice or vegetable juice, for example – apple, orange, grapefruit, pineapple, tomato

How to Prepare Healthier

Meals

• cook with little or no added fat, where possible – use a non-stick fry pan or grill, or lightly spray with cooking oil

• prepare meat, fish and poultry by poaching, steaming, stewing, baking, roasting, broiling, barbequing or grilling, without added fat

• keep meat, fish and poultry portions at 2.5 oz.

(75 grams), which is equal to 1 serving of the Meat and

Alternatives food group

• use leaner cuts of meat and drain additional fat

• trim all visible fat from meat

• remove the skin from poultry

• use low fat/low calorie sauces for flavouring

• prepare a low fat gravy

• use low fat salad dressings

• use smaller amounts of lower fat salad dressing when making sandwiches such as egg, tuna, and chicken salad

• serve Meat and Alternatives such as baked beans or homemade pea soup, bean burritos, vegetable/lentil/barley soup more often

• offer baked potatoes in place of french fries and include special toppings like salsa, lower fat sour cream or sprinkling of lower fat cheese and/or vegetarian “bacon” bits

• use “home prepared” oven baked, seasoned potato strips or wedges or low fat fries

• serve salad dressings on the side

• use smaller amounts of low fat dressing when mixing coleslaw

• replace shortening or lard in a recipe with non-hydrogenated margarine or oil

Tasty Tip

Vegetables and fruits are easier for children to eat if they are cut into bite-sized portions. Try orange or melon wedges, a small bunch or container of grapes, 1/2 banana, carrot coins or sticks, turnip sticks, celery sticks, zucchini rings or sticks, broccoli or cauliflower pieces (with low fat dip, if desired).

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How to Read Nutrition Labels

Use the information on the nutrition facts table to determine if a food fits into the Serve Most or Serve Moderately category, as described in the next section.

The nutrition facts table located on most food and beverage packaging can help you make healthier choices for your students.

Food packages display ingredient lists. All ingredients found in the food item are listed from the largest to the smallest amount

(by weight). This list is very important if you are interested in a specific ingredient.

Healthy foods have the calories and nutrients needed.

Compare similar foods and make healthy food choices.

The nutrition facts are based on a specific amount of food – the serving or serving size. The serving size is shown by the word

“per” followed by the amount in the serving. For example,

“125 mL”, or “1/2 cup”, or “90 grams”, or “3 crackers”, or “1

(single) package”.

Also, look for the following % Daily Value information to make a healthier choice.

5 % or less LOW for fat, sodium (salt) or cholesterol

10 % or less LOW for saturated and trans fat combined

15 % or more HIGH source of calcium, vitamin A, iron or fibre

30 % or more HIGH source of vitamin C

The Serving Size

% Daily Value tells you at a glance if there is a lot or a little of a nutrient in that serving size of the food.

You can quickly compare similar products by using the %DV.

The Nutrition Facts label lists Calories (energy) & 13 core nutrients. Some labels may list more.

The number after the nutrient is the actual amount of the nutrient in that serving size of the food. Even if the amount of nutrient is zero, it is listed.

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 1 1

The Serve Most and Serve

Moderately System

How do you determine if a food or beverage is a healthy choice?

The Serve Most and Serve Moderately system can help you make the healthiest food choices for your students.

All foods served and/or sold in school must come from the Serve

Most and Serve Moderately categories, with the majority of items (50% or greater) from the Serve Most category for each food group per day.

In the event where there are limited Serve Most items in a particular food group (e.g., Serve Most grain products for vending machines) Serve Moderate choices may be offered as long as each item is matched with a Serve Most choice from any of the other three Canada Food Guide food groups.

Serve Most foods are:

• generally lower in added fat and/or sugar and/or salt

• sources of nutrients (e.g., vitamins, minerals, protein and fibre)

• included in one of the four food groups of Canada’s Food

Guide

Serve Moderately foods are:

• sometimes lower in fibre and/or higher in fat, sugar, salt and/or calories, generally as a result of processing

• sources of nutrients. (i.e., vitamins, minerals and protein but generally lower in fibre)

• included in one of the four food groups of Canada’s

Food Guide

Specific nutrition criteria are provided for both the Serve Most and Serve Moderately categories. On the following pages you will find tables which identify food and beverage items for each of the four food groups and mixed dishes.

Water

Did you know?

Water itself is a nutrient, and is an important part of healthy eating. Canada’s

Food Guide states: “Satisfy your thirst with water”. Water promotes hydration without adding calories to the diet. Students should drink more water in hot weather or when they are being active.

Tasty Tip: Provide lemon, lime or orange wedges and jugs of cold water for kids at school.

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Guidelines for the Vegetable and Fruit Group

- Serve Most

FOOD ITEM REFERENCE

AMOUNT

*

TOTAL FAT

(g)

SATURATED

FAT (g)

Vegetables & fruit - frozen, canned, fresh, dried, bottled, bowls

Vegetable & fruit juices frozen, canned, fresh, bottled, tetra-pak

Vegetables with sauce

Vegetable soups

Potato/sweet potato homemade or commercial

Fruit leathers/bars

1 medium or

125 mL (1/2 cup)

250 mL (1 cup)

85 g (3 oz)

30 g (1 oz)

Less than or equal to 3 g

Less than or equal to 1 g

Guidelines for the Vegetable and Fruit Group

- Serve Moderately

FOOD ITEM REFERENCE

AMOUNT

*

TOTAL FAT

(g)

SATURATED

FAT (g)

Vegetables & fruit - frozen, canned, bottled, bowls

Vegetable & fruit juices - frozen, canned, bottled, tetra-pak

Vegetables with sauce

Vegetable soups

1 medium or

125 mL (1/2 cup)

250 mL (1 cup)

Less than or equal to 4 g

Less than or equal to 1 g

Potato/sweet potato homemade or commercial

Fruit leathers/bars

85 g (3 oz)

30 g (1 oz)

*

Reference Amounts do not always refer to the serving size of the container/package or the amount of a food/beverage a child can eat/drink. Also, Reference Amounts are used to indicate the nutrient content within a measured amount of food/beverage and the nutritional quality of the item (i.e., Serve Most/Serve Moderately).

These foods are sweet and tend to stick to teeth, increasing the risk of tooth decay unless teeth are brushed soon after the food is eaten. When these foods are eaten with meals, rather than snacks, the risk of tooth decay is lower.

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 1 3

TRANS FAT

(g)

Less than 0.2 g

SODIUM

(mg)

Less than or equal to

480 mg

SUGARS

(g)

100 % vegetables and/or fruit

(‘sugar’ is not on the ingredient list)

Canned vegetables may have a small amount of added sugar

COMMENTS

Choose local vegetables and fruit when in season

Vegetables and fruit contain naturally occurring sugars.

Therefore, choose Serve Most vegetables and fruit that contain no added sugar.

Choose foods with the following health claims on the nutrition label: “100 % vegetables and fruit”, “no added fat”, and/or

“no added salt”

TRANS FAT

(g)

Less than 0.2 g

SODIUM

(mg)

Less than or equal to

480 mg

Less than or equal to 720 mg

Less than or equal to

480 mg

SUGARS

(g)

100 % vegetables and/or fruit must be the first and/or main ingredient, may be packed in juice or light syrup

100 % Vegetables and/or fruit (‘sugar’ is not on the ingredient list)

Canned vegetables may have a small amount of added sugar

COMMENTS

Products in this category should be made with 100 % vegetables and/or fruit

Homemade soups generally contain less sodium than canned soups or mixes

1 4

Guidelines for the Grain Products Group

- Serve Most

FOOD ITEM REFERENCE TOTAL FAT

AMOUNT

*

(g)

SATURATED

FAT (g)

Whole grain breads slice, roll, bagel, pita, etc.

Cereals - cold or hot

Cereals with added 100% dried fruit pieces - cold or hot

Cooked whole grain rice, bulgur or quinoa

Cooked whole grain pasta or couscous

Cereal bars or granola bars, cookies, biscuits, snack bags and packages, chips, crackers, muffins, pretzels and popcorn

30 g of dry product or

125 mL cooked

Less than or equal to 3 g

Less than or equal to 0.5 g

TRANS FAT

(g)

Less than 0.2 g

SODIUM

(mg)

Less than or equal to

240 mg

Guidelines for the Grain Products Group

- Serve Moderately

FOOD ITEM REFERENCE TOTAL FAT

AMOUNT

*

(g)

SATURATED

FAT (g)

TRANS FAT

(g)

Breads - slice, roll, bagel, pita, etc.

Cereals - cold or hot

Cereals with added 100% dried fruit pieces - cold or hot

Cooked whole grain rice, bulgur or quinoa

Cooked whole grain pasta or couscous

Cereal bars or granola bars, cookies, biscuits, snack bags and packages, chips, crackers, muffins, pretzels and popcorn

30 g of dry product or

125 mL cooked

Less than or equal to 5 g

Less than or equal to 1 g

Less than 0.2 g

SODIUM

(mg)

Less than or equal to

480 mg

*

Reference Amounts do not always refer to the serving size of the container/package or the amount of a food/beverage a child can eat/drink. Also, Reference Amounts are used to indicate the nutrient content within a measured amount of food/beverage and the nutritional quality of the item (i.e., Serve Most/Serve Moderately).

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 1 5

FIBRE

(g)

Greater than

1 g

Greater than or equal to 2 g

SUGARS IRON

(g) (% DAILY VALUE)

Less than or equal to 7 g

Less than or equal to 9 g

Less than or equal to 17 g

Greater than or equal to 8 %

Greater than or equal to 20 %

Less than or equal to 1 g

Greater than or equal to 2 %

Less than or equal to 6 g

Greater than or equal to 3 %

COMMENTS

Health Canada recommends making at least half of your grain products whole grain each day

Cereals containing fruit pieces may be high in naturally occurring sugars (raisins). Choose cereals with fruit pieces made from 100 % real fruit

Try serving a variety of grains such as whole grain spaghetti, couscous salad, wild rice, etc.

FIBRE

(g)

Greater than

0 g

SUGARS IRON

(g) (% DAILY VALUE)

Less than or equal to 7 g

Less than or equal to 9 g

Less than or equal to 17 g

Greater than or equal to 6 %

Greater than or equal to 6 %

Less than or equal to 2 g

Greater than or equal to 2 %

COMMENTS

Choose grain products that say

“low in fat”, “low in salt”,

“source of fibre” or “trans fat free”

Cereals containing added nuts or seeds may have additional total fat

Less than or equal to 12 g

Greater than or equal to 2 %

1 6

Guidelines for the Milk and Alternatives Group

- Serve Most

FOOD ITEM

White Milk - Skim, 0.5%, 1%, 2%,

UHT or fortified soy beverage

Hot or cold beverages, milkshakes, flavoured or yogurt types

REFERENCE

AMOUNT

*

250 mL

(1 cup)

TOTAL FAT

(g)

SATURATED & TRANS

FAT COMBINED (g)

Less than or equal to 4 g

Saturated Fat plus Trans Fat

Minigo and yogurts

Less than or equal to 5 g

100 g

(3.5 oz)

Puddings - cups or instant

Cheese and cheese strings e.g., hard cheese

30 g

(1 oz)

Less than or equal to 21% Milk Fat

Guidelines for the Milk and Alternatives Group

- Serve Moderately

FOOD ITEM

Chocolate milk - Skim, 0.5%,

1%, 2%, UHT or fortified soy beverage

Hot or cold beverages, milkshakes, flavoured or yogurt types

Minigo and yogurts e.g., containers or tubes

Puddings - cups or instant

Cheese and cheese strings e.g., hard cheese

Cheese, processed e.g., slices and spreads

Frozen milk products e.g., ice milk, frozen yogurt

REFERENCE

AMOUNT

*

250 mL

(1 cup)

100 g

(3.5 oz)

30 g

(1 oz)

30 g

(1 oz)

125 mL

(1/2 cup)

TOTAL FAT

(g)

Less than or equal to 6 g

SATURATED & TRANS

FAT COMBINED (g)

Less than or equal to 5 g

Saturated Fat plus Trans Fat

Less than or equal to 35 % Milk Fat

Less than or equal to 6 g

Less than or equal to 5 g

Saturated Fat plus Trans Fat

UHT - Ultra High Temperature

*

Reference Amounts do not always refer to the serving size of the container/package or the amount of a food/beverage a child can eat/drink. Also, Reference Amounts are used to indicate the nutrient content within a measured amount of food/beverage and the nutritional quality of the item (i.e., Serve Most/Serve Moderately).

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 1 7

SODIUM

(mg)

Less than or equal to

300 mg

SUGARS

(g)

Less than or equal to

16 g

CALCIUM

(% DAILY VALUE)

Greater than or equal to 30 %

Greater than or equal to 20 %

Greater than or equal to 10 %

COMMENTS

Puddings must be made with milk or fortified soy beverages as the main ingredient

Pudding mixes should be made by adding milk or fortified soy beverages, but no additional sugar

Choose cheese made from skim or partially skim milk when making meals and snacks

SODIUM

(mg)

Less than or equal to

500 mg

SUGARS

(g)

Less than or equal to

28 g

CALCIUM

(% DAILY VALUE)

Greater than or equal to 30 %

Greater than or equal to 20 %

COMMENTS

Greater than or equal to 8 %

Choose milk products with milk as first ingredient

Serve Moderately milk products may contain small amounts of artificial sweeteners

Processed cheese is generally high in sodium

1 8

Guidelines for the Meat and Alternatives Group -

Serve Most

FOOD ITEM

Meat, fish, poultry** (or alternative) fresh or frozen

Breaded chicken, fish**

REFERENCE

AMOUNT

*

75 g

(2.5 oz)

100 g

(3.5 oz)

TOTAL FAT

(g)

Less than or equal to 10 g

Less than or equal to 12 g

SATURATED

FAT (g)

Meat, fish, poultry, canned**

Deli meats (or alternative)

(e.g., ham/poultry/beef/ veggie turkey/pepperoni/salami)

Pea soup, beans or legumes

75 g

(2.5 oz)

Less than or equal to 3 g

Less than or equal to 2 g

175 mL

(3/4 cup)

Nuts, peanut or nut butters and seeds (if school policy permits)

50 mL

(1/5 cup)

No added fat

(i.e., only naturally occurring)

Guidelines for the Meat and Alternatives Group -

Serve Moderately

FOOD ITEM

Meat, fish, poultry** (or alternative) fresh or frozen

Breaded chicken, fish**

REFERENCE

AMOUNT

75 g

(2.5 oz)

*

100 g

(3.5 oz)

TOTAL FAT

(g)

Less than or equal to 12 g

Less than or equal to 15 g

SATURATED

FAT (g)

Meat, fish, poultry, canned**

Deli meats (or alternative)

(e.g., ham/poultry/beef/ veggie turkey/pepperoni/salami)

Pea soup, beans or legumes

75 g

(2.5 oz)

Less than or equal to 3 g

175 mL

(3/4 cup)

Less than or equal to 4 g

Less than or equal to 4 g

Guidelines for the Meat and Alternatives Group -

May serve or sell 1 item

FOOD ITEM

Wieners, sausages, and bologna

REFERENCE

AMOUNT

50 g

(1.75 oz)

*

TOTAL FAT

(g)

Less than or equal to 10 g

SATURATED

FAT (g)

Less than or equal to 2 g

TRANS FAT

(g)

Less than 0.2 g

*

Reference Amounts do not always refer to the serving size of the container/package or the amount of a food/beverage a child can eat/drink. Also, Reference Amounts are used to indicate the nutrient content within a measured amount of food/beverage and the nutritional quality of the item (i.e., Serve Most/Serve Moderately).

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 1 9

TRANS FAT

(g)

SODIUM

(mg)

COMMENTS

Less than 0.2 g Less than or equal to 480 mg

Choose lean or extra lean cuts of meat with visible fat removed

Salmon contains very high amounts of the good kind of fats, omega-3 fatty acids

TRANS FAT

(g)

SODIUM

(mg)

COMMENTS

Less than 0.2 g Less than or equal to 720 mg

Choose items that list Meat and Alternatives as the first ingredient

from this list per week

SODIUM

(mg)

IRON

(% DAILY VALUE)

Less than or equal to 720 mg

Greater than or or equal to 4 %

COMMENTS

Per serving, these items are higher fat choices and generally offer lower protein

** If meat, fish or poultry item has greater than 20 g of carbohydrate then this item is considered a mixed dish, and must be evaluated based on the ‘Mixed Dish Criteria’

CAUTION FOOD ALLERGIES

Check with your school for guidelines and policies

2 0

Preparing, Selling and/or

Serving Mixed Dishes

What is a mixed dish?

When foods from two or more food groups are combined, a

“mixed dish” is the result.

Serving and/or selling pre-made dishes using the School Food Guidelines

• Pre-made mixed dishes are convenience foods that may require heating before serving.

• There is often no control over the ingredients in pre-made mixed dishes.

• Choose pre-made mixed dishes that are lower in fat, low in saturated fat, trans fat free, lower in salt and a source of fibre.

Making mixed dishes from scratch

• Foods should come from the Serve Most category whenever possible.

• When making a dish from scratch (e.g., sandwich, pizza) apply the Serve Most or Serve Moderately criteria to each ingredient.

• If a dish contains all Serve Most ingredients, it is considered a Serve Most mixed dish.

• If a dish contains all Serve Moderately ingredients, it is considered a Serve Moderately mixed dish.

• If a dish contains Serve Most ingredients and one Serve

Moderately ingredient, it is considered a Serve Moderately mixed dish.

• Use lower salt or lower sodium sauces or soups; check the nutrition facts panel on packages of foods for sodium content.

Examples of mixed dishes include:

• casseroles – chili, spaghetti & meat sauce, beef stew, goulash, stir fry with rice

• soups – vegetable beef or chicken, chicken and rice, chicken noodle

• dishes containing cheese – lasagna, meat pizza, cheese pizza, macaroni & cheese

• sandwich type dishes – wraps, pitas, subs, quesadilla, fajitas, tacos, burritos, bread & filling

• breaded chicken and fish products – chicken or fish, nuggets, fingers, burgers

• salads – chef, taco, chicken strips, bean, other salads containing a serving of Meat or Alternatives

Guidelines for the Mixed Dishes - SERVE MOST

Reference Total Fat Sodium Fiber Iron

Amount (mg) (g) (% Daily

Value)

Per single serving as indicated on the nutrition label

Less than 30% of

Daily Value (DV) *

(choose products that are trans fat free and lower in saturated fat)

Less than or equal to

720 mg

Greater than or equal to

4 g

Greater than 10%

Guidelines for the Mixed Dishes - SERVE

MODERATE

Reference Total Fat Sodium Fiber Iron

Amount (mg) (g) (% Daily

Value)

Per single serving as indicated on the nutrition label

Less than 30% of

Daily Value (DV) *

(choose products that are trans fat free and lower in saturated fat)

Less than or equal to

960 mg

Greater than or equal to

2 g

Greater than 2%

* % Daily Value (DV) is located on Right Hand Side of the

Nutrition Facts Panel.

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 2 1

School Food Guideline Food

Groups

Here is more general information on why foods have been put in the different categories of Serve Most and Serve Moderately.

For more information on the rationale for the School Food

Guidelines, please go to www.livinghealthyschools.com.

Vegetables and Fruit

• Canned vegetables may have added salt and a small amount of added sugar (i.e., less than or equal to 4 g).

• “Fruit” drinks, ades, cocktails, beverages and punches are not included because they contain additional sugars, water and flavourings which are not present in 100% fruit juice.

Meat and Alternatives

• Meat and Alternatives in the Serve Most list are good sources of protein and other nutrients and are lower in fat and sodium.

• Meat and Alternatives in the Serve Moderately list are foods that are generally higher in fat and/or salt, but do provide some of the nutrients found in the Meat and Alternatives food group.

• Nuts and seeds are high in fat, but also provide important nutrients; limit serving size to 1/4 cup (60 mL). Check your school district healthy eating/nutrition policy for regulations on serving and/or selling nuts and seeds in schools.

Grain Products

• Grain products in the Serve Most list are whole grain, provide a source of fibre and are naturally lower in fat

Milk and Alternatives

• Milk and Alternatives on the Serve Most list are the best sources of calcium and are lower in fat per serving.

• A Canada Food Guide Serving of milk is 1 cup (250mL).

• Milk products in the Serve Moderately list are higher in fat and/or sugar but are still sources of calcium (e.g., chocolate milk, has the same nutrients as white milk, but contains added sugar and flavouring, and thus is in the

Serve Moderately list).

• Processed cheese is generally higher in sodium. Choose cheese products with less than 300mg of sodium most often.

• Cream cheese and sour cream do not provide as much calcium as milk.

2 2

Foods Not Included Under

Serve Most and Serve

Moderately

These foods are not found in Canada’s Food Guide and are generally low in nutrients and may be high in fat, sugar, salt, caffeine and/or calories. They tend to be highly processed foods that often are deep fat fried, or are high in hydrogenated/trans fats or sodium. These foods do not contribute to a healthy school nutrition environment.

• banana chips (dried)

• cakes/cupcakes

• candy

• chocolate (including dark and light variations)

• gum

• cheese puffs and other cheese flavoured crisps

• croissants

• eggnog

• egg rolls

• energy bars or meal replacement bars

• energy drinks

• flavored water (that contains artificial sweeteners and/or sugar)

• “fruit” drinks, ades, cocktails, beverages and punches

• fruit gels/jelly dessert

• ice cream treats, with added candy, cookie pieces, etc.

• instant dry soup mixes and single serve soup mixes

• instant noodles

• marshmallows

• pastries, donuts, pies

• popsicles

• potato chips/corn chips/wheat chips, more than 5 g fat per

30 g serving

• scrunchions

• sherbet

• soft drinks/diet soft drinks (pop)

• sports drinks

• tea, coffee, iced tea

What are energy drinks?

Energy drinks are beverages that claim to stimulate and energize the user. They contain high amounts of caffeine. It may be listed as caffeine, guarana, or yerba mate on the label.

Examples of energy drinks include:

• Monster ®

• Red Bull Energy Drink ®

• Full Throttle ®

• Hype ®

• Jolt ®

• Rockstar ®

• SoBe Adrenaline Rush ®

Why should energy drinks not be sold and/or served in schools?

Energy drinks should not be sold and/or served at school. Most energy drink labels caution that children should not consume these beverages. These drinks are not good choices at any time, especially during or after athletic events. Rather than rehydrating the body, they can actually lead to dehydration.

Health Canada recommends drinking plain water to re-hydrate your body after physical activity, especially in the heat.

There are concerns about the consumption of energy drinks because students who drink them may have trouble concentrating in class. The effects on children of the large amount of caffeine and other ingredients that may be added to energy drinks are unknown.

What are the health risks of too much caffeine?

Over consumption of caffeine through beverages such as energy drinks can cause the following negative symptoms:

• dehydration

• increased urination

• headaches

• rapid heartbeat

• irritability and nervousness

• trouble sleeping

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 2 3

Healthy Choices for All

Occasions

Valentine’s Day

Healthy snacks and beverages listed below are choices to consider for school events (sports event, parent-teacher meeting, student or school council meeting, concerts, special lunch days and special snack days):

• vegetable trays with low fat dip

• fruit trays, with or without low fat dip

• low fat regular or mini muffins

• pretzels with less than 480 mg sodium per serving

• popcorn, light or plain

• bread sticks

• whole grain bagels, plain or toasted

• whole grain breads, plain or toasted – try new types like rye, pumpernickel

• sandwiches made with different whole grain breads

• pita pockets

• wraps

• pizza wedges or mini pizzas: try vegetable or Hawaiian

(rather than salami/ pepperoni), and use lower fat cheese

• seeds – sunflower or pumpkin

• nuts

• cheese cubes or strings

• yogurt

• yogurt tubes

• 100% fruit or vegetable juices

• fruit leather or fruit/vegetable bars, 100% dried fruit and/or vegetable, no sugar added

• plain water

• milk, white or flavoured, skim, 0.5%, 1% or 2%

• smoothies (skim, 1% or 2% M.F. milk or yogurt blended with fruit chunks)

• salad bar (offer a variety of vegetables and salads, dips)

• potato, white or sweet, baked, with lower fat topping. (i.e.

salsa, light sour cream)

• meatballs, lean meat, in spaghetti sauce

Heart Shaped Pizzas (pre-made whole grain pizza dough, pizza sauce, mozza cheese, large heart shaped cookie cutter): Cut pizza dough into heart shapes. Spread sauce on dough and top with cheese. Bake until cheese is melted.

Berry Lovely Smoothie: strawberry yogurt, mixed berries - fresh or frozen strawberries, blueberries, etc., frozen orange juice concentrate. Combine in a blender and mix until smooth.

Valentines Day Fruit and Veggie Platter: serve red or pink fruit or vegetables with yogurt or low fat dip.

Halloween

Trick-or-treat Parfait: plain or vanilla yogurt, orange fruit, whole grain cereal. Fill small parfait glasses halfway with yogurt. Add a layer of fruit and cereal. Spoon in the remaining yogurt and add another layer of fruit and cereal. Refrigerate until serving time.

For frozen parfaits, freeze the yogurt and fruit.

BooBerry Shake: blueberries, 100% apple juice, vanilla ice milk or low fat frozen yogurt, skim, 0.5%, 1% or 2% milk, pinch of ground cinnamon. Place all ingredients in a blender. Pulse until berries are cut up and then blend on medium/high until smooth. Serve immediately.

Pumpkin Faces: English muffins, melted cheddar cheese and raisins. Melt grated cheese on English muffins and arrange raisins to make the eyes, nose and mouth.

2 4

Christmas

Holiday Pita Chips with Salsa: Whole grain pita bread cut into wedges and baked in the oven until lightly browned and crispy.

Serve with low fat dips such as herbed hummus, yogurt, guacamole, fat-free sour cream or salsa.

Holiday Fruit Wreath: green fruit (sliced kiwi, green grapes, honey dew melon) and red fruit (strawberries, red grapes, pomegranate). Arrange green fruit in the shape of a wreath and then decorate with red fruit. Place a container of yogurt for dipping in the centre.

Refrigerated vending machine options:

• bottled water

• vegetable and 100% fruit juices

• veggies with low fat dressing

• skim, 0.5%, 1%, 2% white and chocolate milk

• yogurt

• sandwiches or ½ sandwiches

• whole or cut up and washed fruit

• fruit and berry parfaits made with yogurt

• whole grain bagels or buns

• cheese cubes and whole grain crackers

• hummus and veggies

• green salad with low fat dressing

• vegetable and 100% fruit juices Fruit and Veggie Skewers: red apples, green grapes, red and green pepper pieces, strawberries, fresh cherries, honey dew cubes, kiwi slices, sliced radishes, broccoli flowerets, mozzarella cheese cubes. Make skewers using various red and green fruits, veggies and a few small cheese cubes.

Snacks

Use the Serve Most/Serve Moderately system for healthy snack choices.

Santa Smoothies: blend a banana, fruit cup, yogurt, strawberries or 100% fruit, unsweetened.

Use the brand name food list on the Healthy Students Healthy

Schools website for ideas (www.livinghealthyschools.com)

Healthy Vending Machines

Nutritious choices for vending machines are available.

Snack foods are an important part of the food a child eats in a day and should be as nourishing as the foods offered for school breakfast and lunch. Many of the extra calories in traditional snack foods come from added fat. Children and youth should be given the opportunity to make healthier lower fat snack choices.

Non-refrigerated vending machine options:

• individual fruit cups or tins. (unsweetened)

• whole grain crackers

• arrowroot biscuits

• individual packages of melba toast, low fat crackers and bread sticks

• cereal bars

• granola bars

• fig bars

• nuts and/or seeds (if school permits)

• fruit leather or dried fruit/vegetable products,

100% fruit and/or vegetable, no sugar added

• lower fat, fibre rich muffins

• whole grain bagels or buns

The following ideas are suitable for snacks in canteens and some are suitable for vending machines. These snacks can also be offered at special occasion events. The serving size is not listed, but it is better to provide the smaller portioned products.

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 2 5

Serve Most

These foods have nutritional value and can be served as snacks anytime.

Serve Moderately

These foods have nutritional value but are higher in fat and/or sugar and/or salt.

Grain Products

• cold/ready-to-eat ceral

• hot/cooked ceral

• crackers, whole grain, low fat

• popcorn

• english muffin or 1/2 bagel whole grain, plain or toasted

Vegetables and Fruit

• 100% fruit or vegetable juices, unsweetened

• frozen 100% juice bars, unsweetened

• fruit, fresh – whole or cut in cubes/slices, with or without low fat dip

• fruit, canned in juice

• applesauce/fruit blends, unsweetened

• vegetables cut in circles, strips, florettes, etc.

Grain Products

• cereal, cold/ready-to-eat

• cereal, hot/cooked

• cereal bar/granola bar

• tea biscuit or scone, small

• touton

• muffin

• pancakes

• bread sticks

• cereal/pretzel mix

• cheese snack packs with pretzels or bread sticks

• english muffin or 1/2 bagel enriched white, plain or toasted

Vegetables and Fruit

• juice, 100% fruit or vegetable, sweetened

• fruit, canned in light syrup

Milk and Alternatives

• milk, skim, 0.5%, 1%, 2% white or chocolate

• yogurt, unsweetened, 2% or less M.F.

• cheese, hard, 21% or less M.F., packages or cubes

• cheese strings, 21% or less M.F.

• smoothies, commercial or homemade (2% or less M.F. white milk or unsweetened yogurt blended with unsweetened fruit)

Meat and Alternatives

• nuts, plain, spiced or salted

• seeds like sunflower or pumpkin

• soy nuts

• peanut butter

• tuna/salmon snack kits

• slices of cold meat

Milk and Alternatives

• milk, white, M.F.

• milk, flavoured, 2% or less M.F.

• yogurt, more than 2% M.F.

• yogurt and yogurt drinks, sweetened, 2% or less M.F.

• yogurt tubes

• cheese, regular

• cheese slices, processed

• cheese spread

• ice milk or soft serve

• frozen yogurt

• milk puddings, ready-to-serve, low fat

Meat and Alternatives

• nuts, plain, spiced or salted

• seeds like sunflower or pumpkin

• peanut butter

• tuna/salmon snack kits

• slices of cold meat

2 6

How Sweet it is

Choose desserts that provide nutritional value. Desserts can include a variety of choices such as the following tasty treats:

• fresh fruit

• fresh fruit salad

• fresh fruit chunks with yogurt dip

• fruit cups

• applesauce or fruit blends

• flavoured yogurt

• milk pudding

• baked custard

• parfait of yogurt and fruit (with granola topping)

• rice/tapioca pudding (made with lower fat milk)

• frozen yogurt or ice milk

• pizza (lower fat meat, vegetarian, lower fat cheese,

Hawaiian)

• rice bowls (teriyaki chicken)

• sloppy joes

• soft tortilla wraps

• soup station, with crackers or buns

• stew

• tacos (low fat baked shell, lower fat toppings)

• taco salad (low fat baked taco shell, green salad, taco meat)

• vegetable stir fry with rice

Suggestions for healthy lunches

• salads (mandarin orange chicken, chef, spinach, taco)

• burritos (bean, meat)

• cabbage rolls

• sandwich bar (a variety of breads, wraps, bagels, and fillings such as vegetables, lean meats, and salad fillings made with low fat salad dressing)

• macaroni and cheese

• quesadillas

• salad bar (variety of lettuce, vegetables, other toppings and low fat salad dressings)

• submarine sandwiches (lower fat meat and cheese with vegetables)

• chilli and bun

• casseroles (chicken rice, made with broth or lower fat cream sauce)

• curried meat/chicken/fish and rice

• falafel

• grilled cheese sandwich

• hamburgers/grilled chicken breast burgers

• kebab skewers/pork souvlaki

• pasta with meat sauce

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 2 7

Setting up a Canteen

Service Using the School

Food Guidelines

All schools may not have a cafeteria. The School Food

Guidelines can also be used when setting up a canteen.

Here is a canteen menu centered around combination items that can also be sold separately. It is based only on the Serve

Most foods.

Week 1

Week 2

Monday

Mini Muffins and Milk

Banana

Applesauce

Muffins

Milk

100% Juice

Plain Water

Tuesday

Orange

Wedges and

Yogurt

Wednesday

Mini Carrots and Dip

Orange

Wedges

Yogurt or yogurt tube (from

Serve

Most criteria)

Mini Carrots

Low Fat

Salad

Dressing

(for dip)

Milk

Thursday

Cut Fruit and Milk

Cut up fruit

(variety of fruit cut up served in individual bowls)

Milk

100% Juice 100% Juice

Milk

Plain Water Plain Water

100% Juice

Friday

*Toasted

English

Muffins

Whole

Grain

English

Muffins

Milk

100% Juice

Plain Water

Plain Water

Monday

Bananas and yogurt

Bananas

Tuesday

Mini Muffins and Milk

Mini Muffins

Yogurt

(from Serve

Most criteria)

Milk

100% Juice

Milk

Plain Water

Wednesday

Apples and

Cheese

Thursday

Fruit and

Milk

Apples

Cheese

Strings or hard cheese portions

(less than or equal to

21% M.F.)

Canned

Fruit( in fruit juice)

Milk

100% Juice

Plain Water

100% Juice

Milk

Plain Water

100% Juice

Plain Water

Friday

*Toast

Whole

Grain/

Whole

Wheat

Toast

Milk

100% Juice

Plain Water

*When serving toast, bagels etc, offer one to two spreads with it, for example, non-hydrogenated margarine and jam, etc.

Week 3

Monday

Cereal Mix

Mixture of

Serve Most cereal

(cheerios, shreddie type) and dried fruit like raisins served in baggies or individual cups.

Milk

100% Juice

Tuesday

Fruit

Cocktail and Yogurt

Fruit

Cocktail or other canned fruit in fruit juice.

Wednesday

Apple sauce and

Cheese

Yogurt

(containers or tubes) from Serve

Most category

Cheese

Strings (less than 21%

M.F.)

Milk

100% Juice

Thursday

Bananas and

Milk

Unsweetened apple Sauce

(available in individual portions)

Bananas

Milk

100% Juice

Plain Water

Milk

Plain Water

100% Juice

Friday

*Toasted

Bagels

Whole

Grain

Bagels

Milk

100% Juice

Plain Water

Plain Water

Plain Water

2 8

Brand Name Food List Preparing Food Safely

The Brand Name Food List was developed to help school food providers, school administrators, fundraisers, and parents/caregivers to choose healthy foods to sell and serve in schools and at school events. This list places common brand names of foods and beverages that you find in your local grocery store, supermarket or wholesaler into the Serve Most,

Serve Moderately and Not Included categories based on the criteria in the School Food Guidelines and the Nutrition Facts table located on the side of the food item.

It is important to practice safe food handling when preparing and serving foods. Properly preparing, storing or serving foods can prevent illnesses caused by ingesting disease-causing bacteria like Salmonella, Campylobacter, or E.coli. Cafeterias and canteens must be licensed and compliant with the Food Premises

Regulations.

The following should be considered when offering meals and snacks at school:

There are, however, many foods such as local vegetables and wholesome homemade meals that do not have a Nutrition

Facts table. These items can be very healthy choices. Therefore, the Brand Name Food List is not inclusive and should be used along with healthy choices from Canada’s Food Guide.

This list will be updated on a quarterly basis and can be found at the following web address: www.livinghealthyschools.com

Food/Beverage Item Review

Process

To determine if a particular food or beverage fits the School

Food Guidelines you can use the Food and Beverage Item

Review Process found on the www.livinghealthyschools.com

website. A team of Registered Dietitians across the province will determine if the item fits the School Food Guidelines and will post feedback on this site.

• Kitchen facilities must be used for food preparation only.

• It is recommended that at least one employee and/or volunteer, who has taken a food safety course, be on site when meals are prepared and served.

• Keep food handlers and servers at the lowest manageable number, and prohibit unauthorized people from entering the kitchen area.

• Sufficient refrigeration space must be available to keep perishable foods (e.g., milk, eggs, meats, fish, poultry) at 4˚C

(40˚F) or lower.

• Sufficient equipment must be available to keep hot foods at

60˚C (140˚F) or higher.

• Thermometers must be available to check cooling and cooking temperatures.

• A separate sink with supplies (liquid soap and paper towels) must be on-site for hand washing only. Hands should be washed frequently.

• At a minimum, the kitchen will need a double-compartment sink for washing and disinfecting (typically with a dilute bleach solution) utensils and dishes.

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 2 9

When food is consumed or prepared outside of the school cafeteria:

Food Safety

In the classroom: desks and counters should be cleaned before serving food. Students should wash their hands with soap and water before preparing and eating food.

Safe food is food that is served clean, hot or cold. The following food safety tips will help to avoid causing food-borne illness:

Foods from outside suppliers: should arrive at the appropriate temperature (e.g., hot if they are served hot and cold if they are served cold). Foods should be served within 1/2 hour after arriving at the school.

Clean

Hands, surfaces and utensils frequently.

Cook

All meats, poultry, fish and eggs to the proper internal temperature. Use a thermometer to check the temperature.

Outdoor events: If food is prepared at BBQ’s or picnics, use coolers containing ice or ice packs to keep cold foods cold.

Serve hot foods promptly. Food must also be protected from insects and dirt.

Lunches brought from home should be kept chilled in a refrigerator, with an ice pack, or a frozen juice box.

Chill

All perishables and leftovers promptly to reduce the growth of bacteria. Thaw frozen foods in a refrigerator, cold water, or a microwave oven, not at room temperature.

Separate

Different cutting boards should be used to separate: raw meats from raw fruits and vegetables; raw food from prepared foods.

Store raw meats on lower refrigerator shelves, below ready-toeat foods, to prevent dripping.

3 0

Food Temperature Guide

(Taken from the Food Retail and Food Services Code, 2001)

Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Temperature Needed

Refrigeration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4˚C (40˚F) or less

Freezing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minus 18˚C (0˚F) or less

Cooking:

Food mixtures containing poultry, eggs, meat, fish, or other potentially hazardous foods

. . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Temperature of 74˚C (165˚F) for 10 minutes

Pork, Lamb, Veal, Beef

(whole cuts). . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Temperature of 70˚C (158˚F)

Poultry . . . . . Internal Temperature of 85˚C (185˚F) for 15 seconds

Stuffing in Poultry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74˚C (165˚F)

Ground Meat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70˚C (158˚F)

Eggs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63˚C (145˚F) for 15 seconds

Fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70˚C (158˚F)

Reheating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74˚C (165˚F)

Hot Holding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60˚C (140˚F)

Cooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60˚C-20˚C (140˚-68˚F) within 2 hours,

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20˚C-4˚C (68˚F-40˚F) within 4 hours

To learn more about food safety, contact an environmental health officer at the nearest Government Services Centre or visit www.befoodsafe.ca

Notes

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 3 1

3 2

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 3 3

3 4

S C H O O L F O O D G U I D E L I N E S • 3 5

2009

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