adobe® premiere® pro

adobe® premiere® pro
ADOBE® PREMIERE® PRO
Help and tutorials
October 2013
Contents
What’s New................................................................................................................................................... 1
What’s new in Premiere Pro CC October 2013 release (version 7.1).................................................................................... 2
What’s new in Premiere Pro CC July 2013 release (version 7.0.1)...................................................................................... 12
What’s New in Adobe Premiere Pro CC June 2013 release (version 7.0)........................................................................... 19
New features in Premiere Pro CC June 2013 release (version 7.0)..................................................................................... 30
What’s New in Adobe Media Encoder CC 7.1...................................................................................................................... 36
Premiere Pro getting started tutorials................................................................................................................................................... 39
Workspace and workflow............................................................................................................................ 40
Workspaces.......................................................................................................................................................................... 41
Setting up your system......................................................................................................................................................... 47
Sync settings........................................................................................................................................................................ 54
Setting up your system......................................................................................................................................................... 57
Working with Panels............................................................................................................................................................. 64
Preferences.......................................................................................................................................................................... 67
Basic workflow...................................................................................................................................................................... 71
Cross-platform workflow....................................................................................................................................................... 75
Direct-Link workflow between Premiere Pro and SpeedGrade............................................................................................ 76
Cross-application workflows................................................................................................................................................. 81
Adobe Dynamic Link............................................................................................................................................................. 87
Using the Source Monitor and Program Monitor.................................................................................................................. 90
Multi-Camera editing workflow..............................................................................................................................................98
Control surface support...................................................................................................................................................... 103
Keyboard shortcuts in Premiere Pro CC.............................................................................................................................105
Project setup............................................................................................................................................. 118
Creating and changing projects.......................................................................................................................................... 119
Archiving projects............................................................................................................................................................... 122
Trim or copy your project.................................................................................................................................................... 123
Importing footage...................................................................................................................................... 125
Transferring and importing files.......................................................................................................................................... 126
Importing assets from tapeless formats.............................................................................................................................. 133
Importing still images.......................................................................................................................................................... 136
Importing sequences, clip lists, libraries, and compositions............................................................................................... 139
Importing digital audio.........................................................................................................................................................141
Importing XML project files from Final Cut Pro................................................................................................................... 143
Support for growing files..................................................................................................................................................... 146
Capturing and digitizing...................................................................................................................................................... 147
Capturing DV or HDV video................................................................................................................................................ 154
Capturing HD video............................................................................................................................................................ 155
Capturing content for DVD..................................................................................................................................................156
Batch capturing and recapturing......................................................................................................................................... 157
Create clips for offline editing............................................................................................................................................. 162
Digitizing analog video........................................................................................................................................................ 163
Working with timecode........................................................................................................................................................165
Managing assets....................................................................................................................................... 169
Customizing the Project panel............................................................................................................................................ 170
Organizing assets in the Project panel............................................................................................................................... 176
Managing metadata............................................................................................................................................................ 185
Working with aspect ratios.................................................................................................................................................. 189
Monitor overlays................................................................................................................................................................. 193
Working with markers......................................................................................................................................................... 197
Monitoring assets...................................................................................................................................... 204
Using the Source Monitor and Program Monitor................................................................................................................ 205
Playing assets.....................................................................................................................................................................213
Using the Waveform monitors and vectorscope................................................................................................................. 216
Using the Reference Monitor.............................................................................................................................................. 219
Editing sequences and clips..................................................................................................................... 220
Creating and changing sequences..................................................................................................................................... 221
Creating and playing clips...................................................................................................................................................235
Adding clips to sequences.................................................................................................................................................. 237
Working with clips in a sequence........................................................................................................................................244
Working with offline clips.................................................................................................................................................... 248
Relinking offline media........................................................................................................................................................250
Trimming clips.....................................................................................................................................................................253
Editing multi-camera sequences.........................................................................................................................................274
Source patching and track targeting................................................................................................................................... 282
Multi-Camera editing workflow............................................................................................................................................283
Edit from sequences loaded into the Source monitor......................................................................................................... 288
Rearranging clips in a sequence........................................................................................................................................ 290
Working with clips in a sequence........................................................................................................................................294
Rendering and previewing sequences................................................................................................................................298
Closed Captioning.............................................................................................................................................................. 301
Modifying clip properties with Interpret Footage................................................................................................................. 306
Synchronizing audio and video with Merge Clips............................................................................................................... 307
Creating special clips (synthetics)...................................................................................................................................... 310
Trimming clips (CS5 and CS5.5)........................................................................................................................................ 313
Correcting mistakes............................................................................................................................................................ 326
Remove alerts with the Events panel................................................................................................................................. 327
Synchronizing audio and video with Merge Clips (CS5.5 and later)................................................................................... 328
Editing audio............................................................................................................................................. 331
Overview of audio and the Audio Track Mixer.................................................................................................................... 332
Working with clips, channels, and tracks............................................................................................................................ 340
Editing audio in a Timeline panel........................................................................................................................................ 347
Recording audio..................................................................................................................................................................351
Adjusting volume levels...................................................................................................................................................... 354
Recording audio mixes....................................................................................................................................................... 358
Monitor clip volume and pan using Audio Clip Mixer.......................................................................................................... 360
Multiple stereo assignments for tracks to multichannel masters........................................................................................ 362
Advanced mixing................................................................................................................................................................ 363
Editing and mixing audio in Adobe Audition....................................................................................................................... 366
Editing audio in Adobe Soundbooth................................................................................................................................... 367
Panning and balancing....................................................................................................................................................... 368
Titling and the Titler.................................................................................................................................. 371
Creating and editing titles................................................................................................................................................... 372
Creating and formatting text in titles................................................................................................................................... 375
Drawing shapes in titles...................................................................................................................................................... 379
Add images to titles............................................................................................................................................................ 383
Working with text and objects in titles................................................................................................................................. 384
Fills, strokes, and shadows in titles.................................................................................................................................... 387
Rolling and crawling titles................................................................................................................................................... 390
Titler text styles................................................................................................................................................................... 391
Effects and transitions.............................................................................................................................. 393
About effects....................................................................................................................................................................... 394
Applying, removing, finding, and organizing effects........................................................................................................... 398
Viewing and adjusting effects and keyframes.....................................................................................................................401
Applying effects to audio.....................................................................................................................................................403
Working with audio transitions............................................................................................................................................ 407
Effect presets...................................................................................................................................................................... 409
Stabilize motion with the Warp Stabilizer effect.................................................................................................................. 412
Color correction and adjustment......................................................................................................................................... 415
Adjustment Layers.............................................................................................................................................................. 434
The rolling shutter repair effect........................................................................................................................................... 436
Three-way Color Corrector effect....................................................................................................................................... 437
Audio effects and transitions reference.............................................................................................................................. 439
Creating common results.................................................................................................................................................... 445
Duration and speed............................................................................................................................................................ 447
Effects and transitions reference........................................................................................................................................ 454
Eliminate flicker...................................................................................................................................................................493
Interlacing and field order................................................................................................................................................... 494
Modifying and customizing transitions................................................................................................................................ 496
Motion: position, scale, and rotate a clip.............................................................................................................................500
Transition overview: applying transitions............................................................................................................................ 504
Animation and keyframes......................................................................................................................... 508
Adding, navigating, and setting keyframes......................................................................................................................... 509
Moving and copying keyframes.......................................................................................................................................... 515
Controlling effect changes using keyframe interpolation.................................................................................................... 517
Optimize keyframe automation........................................................................................................................................... 520
Compositing.............................................................................................................................................. 521
Compositing, alpha channels, and adjusting clip opacity................................................................................................... 522
Blending modes.................................................................................................................................................................. 525
Exporting................................................................................................................................................... 527
Workflow and overview for exporting.................................................................................................................................. 528
Formats exported directly from Premiere Pro..................................................................................................................... 531
Export to Panasonic P2 format........................................................................................................................................... 532
Exporting OMF files for Pro Tools.......................................................................................................................................533
Export a still image............................................................................................................................................................. 535
Exporting to DVD or Blu-ray Disc....................................................................................................................................... 536
Smart rendering.................................................................................................................................................................. 538
Working with Adobe SpeedGrade...................................................................................................................................... 539
Working with Adobe Prelude.............................................................................................................................................. 541
Exporting for the Web and mobile devices......................................................................................................................... 542
Exporting projects for other applications.............................................................................................................................545
Exporting to videotape........................................................................................................................................................ 547
What's New
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What's new in Premiere Pro CC October 2013 release (version 7.1)
This document describes the new and changed features in the Premiere Pro CC October 2013 release (version 7.1).
For information on what's new in the earlier Creative Cloud updates of Premiere Pro, see What's New in Premiere Pro CC July 2013 release
(7.0.1) and What's New in Premiere Pro CC June 2013 release (7.0).
Direct-Link workflow between Premiere Pro and SpeedGrade
Editing finesse enhancements
Transitions and effects
Metadata display in Monitor Overlays
Closed Captioning enhancements
Multi-Camera workflow improvements
Support for new camera formats
New and changed preferences
New and changed keyboard shortcuts
Other enhancements
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Direct-Link workflow between Premiere Pro and SpeedGrade
The new Direct-Link feature provides a tighter and more efficient workflow between Premiere Pro and SpeedGrade.
Using Direct Link, you can send or open a Premiere Pro project directly in SpeedGrade, apply color grading, and send it back to Premiere Pro.
The Direct-Link workflow eliminates the need to export and import projects, deal with interchange formats, or any kind of file conversions.
For more details, see Direct-Link workflow between Premiere Pro and SpeedGrade.
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Editing finesse enhancements
Render multiple sequences
This feature was voted the Just Do It (JDI) feature at IBC 2013. See this video for more information about JDI features.
Premiere Pro now lets you render multiple sequences at once instead of doing it one at a time. In the Project panel, select the sequences that you
want to render, and select Sequence > Render Effects In Work Area.
For more information about how to render a sequence, see Rendering and previewing sequences.
Ripple Sequence Markers
In earlier versions of Premiere Pro, sequence markers were fixed on your timeline. When you deleted a part of a clip and closed the gap using
ripple-delete, or inserted a clip using insert-edit, your markers wouldn't move with the clip.
Premiere Pro now lets you use Ripple Sequence Markers to let your markers ripple upstream or downstream when cutting or trimming in your
timeline. For example, after an insert-edit, any sequence markers after the insertion point ripple downstream. Similarly, after a ripple-delete, any
sequence markers after the last deleted frame ripple upstream.
To turn on or off Ripple Sequence Markers, select Marker > Ripple Sequence Markers.
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Improvements to sequence markers
The following improvements have been made to sequence markers:
In previous versions of Premiere Pro, when you clicked a marker, the playhead automatically jumped to a marker's location. Premiere Pro
now lets you move the playhead to a different location on the Timeline, and then drag the marker to snap to it.
While dragging a marker in the Timeline, you can watch a preview of the clip in the Program Monitor to show where you are dragging the
marker to.
Back button added to Media Browser
The Media Browser provides a Back button
that lets you quickly go to the previous directory that you browsed through.
You can click the Back button several times to easily navigate through a complex directory structure.
Sequences displayed as thumbnails in Icon view
Premiere Pro now displays sequences as thumbnails in the Icon view. Earlier, to view a sequence, you opened the sequence in the Timeline or in
the Source Monitor.
Like for other media, the Hover Scrub feature is available even for sequences displayed in the Icon view. That is, when you place your cursor over
a sequence icon, the clip plays backwards or forwards as you drag your mouse.
End Of Media Indicator
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When the playhead goes past the last frame of media on the Timeline and there is no clip after that, a black frame appears along the right edge of
the last frame of a clip or sequence.
The End Of Media Indicator is always turned on, and appears for media clips in the Program Monitor, Source Monitor, and the video area of the
Project panel.
A. End of Media indicator
Add Edit command overrides track targeting
When you use the Add Edit command, the command overrides track targeting and applies the command to all selected clips under the playhead.
With this enhancement, you don't have to target each track individually to get the desired result.
Edit-to-Tape dialog supports J, K, L keyboard playback shortcuts
Premiere Pro now supports J, K, and L playback keyboard shortcuts in the Edit To Tape dialog.
Select File > Export > Tape (Serial Device) to open the Edit To Tape dialog. You can press the J, K, and L keys to control the playback. J rewinds
the playback, L fast forwards it, and K pauses it. The speed of forward or reverse increases each time you press J or L.
Increased playback speed for J, K, L keyboard shortcuts
J, K, L playback keyboard shortcuts now provide faster speeds of 1x, 2x, 4x, 8x, 16x, and up to 32x.
Note: Playback performance may vary depending on hardware, video frame resolutions, and video codecs.
Set negative speed values for reverse playback
To play clips backward, you can now enter negative speed values in the Clip Speed/Duration dialog.
1. In a Timeline panel or Project panel, select one or more clips.
2. Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS) the clip, and select Speed/Duration.
3. In the Clip Speed/Duration dialog box, enter a negative speed value. For example "-50".
When you enter a negative speed value, the Reverse Speed checkbox gets selected automatically.
Channel layout selection during QuickTime export
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While exporting QuickTime movies with sound media, Premiere Pro lets you select 5.1 or 8 audio channel layouts contained in the QuickTime
movies.
1. In the Export Settings dialog, select the Audio tab.
2. Under Channel Layout, the channel order metadata is displayed. You can select the channel layouts that you want to export.
Note: To be able to select the channel layouts to export, ensure that you set Audio Codec to Uncompressed, and Audio Track Layout to 5.1 or 8
channels. Otherwise, the Channel Layout shows as "Unlabeled".
New metadata columns
Premiere Pro now lets you display two new columns of metadata in the Project panel:
Sound TimeCode
Sound Roll
To display these columns, open the Metadata Display dialog by selecting Metadata Display from the Project panel menu. Select the check boxes
next to Sound Roll and Sound TimeCode.
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Transitions and effects
New options for Clip Name effect
The Clip Name effect now provides different options to label clips and display them on screen. You can display the sequence name, project name,
or filename by selecting from these options:
Sequence Item Name
Project Item Name
File Name
Timecode effect enhancements
The Timecode effect automatically matches the Time Display parameter (or timebase) to the source clip.
Copy and paste transitions to multiple edit points
You can add a transition quickly to several edit points within your sequence by copying and pasting the transition. This feature is helpful if you’ve
changed a transition’s default settings and want to use the modified transition again.
1. With the transition selected in the Timeline, copy the transition by selecting Edit > Copy or the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+C (Win) or Cmd+C
(Mac).
2. Select multiple edit points in the sequence by dragging a marquee around the edit points, or by using the Shift key with any trim tool.
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3. Paste the transitions by selecting Edit > Paste, or by using the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+V (Win) or Cmd+V (Mac).
Some important points:
If you paste a transition without selecting edit points, the transitions are pasted to edit points at or near the playhead, without overriding track
targeting.
If a selected edit point already has a transition, and:
if the pasted transition is different from the existing one, then the transition type changes but preserves the existing transition's duration
and alignment. For example, pasting a Cross Dissolve transition over a Barn Door transition.
if the pasted transition is the same as the existing transition, then the duration and alignment are changed. For example, both are Cross
Dissolve transitions.
A copied transition’s alignment is preserved if it's set to one of the presets, but not if it has a custom setting.
Individual Reset buttons for Effect parameters
You can now reset specific parameter values of an effect without resetting the other parameter values.
In the Effects panel, each parameter value has a Reset Parameter button that you can use to reset the parameter to the default value.
To reset all the parameter values in an Effect, click the Reset Effect button next to the effect name.
A. Reset Effect B. Reset Parameter
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Metadata display in Monitor Overlays
Premiere Pro lets you display metadata of your choice as overlays in the Program monitor and Source Monitor.
You can display the following metadata as overlays:
Source clip timecode
Edit point indicators
Media Limit indicators
Marker comments
Other metadata, like clip name, multi-camera angle, and sequence timecode
You can turn overlays on or off by selecting Overlays from the pop-up menu in the Program Monitor or Source Monitor. The Overlay Settings
dialog lets you specify the display of overlays, which you can customize and apply as overlay presets.
For more information on using overlays, see Monitor Overlays.
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Closed Captioning enhancements
Include embedded captions on project import
If your project contains files with embedded closed captions, Premiere Pro imports the closed caption data into the project. To detect and import
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embedded closed caption data in an embedded closed caption file, select the preference to import the closed caption data into your project. In the
Preferences dialog, under Media, select the Include Captions On Import check box.
One-time scanning of embedded Closed Caption data
When working with closed captions, Premiere Pro optimizes performance by scanning the media file for closed caption data only for the first time
you open that file. Premiere Pro does not rescan for closed caption data when you open that file later.
Note: For QuickTime movie files (.MOV) with embedded closed captions, Premiere Pro rescans the file every time you open the file.
Support for captions in MXF files
Premiere Pro supports reading and writing captions for MXF OP1a files. The captions are read from and written to the SMPTE 436M ancillary data
track in the MXF OP1a file.
Support for CEA-708 captions
Premiere Pro supports importing and exporting CEA-708 captions. CEA-708 closed caption files can be exported as a Sidecar file with a .mcc or
.xml filename format. Or you can embed the CEA-708 captions within the SMPTE 436M ancillary data track in MXF OP1a files.
Enhanced support for embedded captions in QuickTime Movies
Earlier, support for reading embedded captions in QuickTime movies was limited based on the video codec. For example, MPEG-2 and H.264
video codecs were not supported. Now, Premiere Pro reads captions in QuickTime movies regardless of the video codec used.
Support for DFXP files
Premiere Pro now lets you import caption files with a *.dfxp filename extension.
DFXP caption files are XML-based files. So besides viewing the captions in the Captions panel, they are also viewable from a text editor.
For more information on using Closed captions, see Closed Captioning workflow in Premiere Pro.
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Multi-Camera workflow improvements
Display camera angles as track names or clip names
When creating a multi-camera source sequence, you can display the camera names as clip names or track names. These options are available in
addition to the default option of enumerated camera names like camera 1, camera 2, and so on.
The options are available in the Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog box under Camera Names.
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Depending on the Camera Names option that you select, the camera angles are displayed as track names, clip names, or camera numbers in the
Source Monitor. To view the multi-camera sequence in the Source monitor, right-click the sequence and select Multi-camera.
Camera angles displayed as clip names in the Source monitor
Organize and select camera angles to view in monitor's multi-camera mode
Premiere Pro lets you organize and select the angles to view in the Source Monitor's multi-camera mode.
From the Source monitor's pop-up menu, select Edit Cameras.
In the Edit Cameras dialog box, all the clips are listed in the original order that they were arranged in the sequence tracks. You can drag-and-drop
the clips to change the sequence order. You can also enable or disable the clips by selecting or deselecting them.
Multi-Camera Viewing Mode displays full playback on the Program monitor
The Program monitor's Multi-Camera Viewing Mode now displays a fully composited output like the regular playback mode. The Multi-Camera
mode can display any applied effects during playback.
Quick multi-camera editing based on sync timecode
Premiere Pro lets you perform quick multi-camera edits based on sync timecode.
Press the modifier key Ctrl (Win) or Cmd (Mac) while switching source clips to match frame to the timecode at the current playhead position.
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Import Multiclip sequences from Final Cut Pro
You can export a Multiclip project from Final Cut Pro, and import the Final Cut Pro project XML files into Premiere Pro. In Premiere Pro, the
Multiclips sequences appear as multi-camera sequences with all the Final Cut Pro project settings intact.
For more information on the mult-camera workflow, see Multi-Camera editing workflow.
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Support for new camera formats
File formats supported for import
Premiere Pro supports importing the following new camera formats:
Apple ProRes 64-bit
Blackmagic Cinema DNG
Native MJPEGs (1DC)
RED DRAGON with ROCKET-X
Panasonic AVC Ultra Long GOP (Group of Pictures)
Phantom Cine
Sony RAW (F65, F55, F5, FS700)
Sony XAVC Long GOP
Some important points:
You can import uncompressed Cinema DNG files from Blackmagic Cinema Cameras directly into Premiere Pro. You can select multiple
Cinema DNG files as one clip and import them as unified A/V clips.
Once you import the Cinema DNG files into Premiere Pro, you can use the Media browser to view thumbnails, scrub, or hover-scrub the files.
You can also open the DNG files in the Source monitor. Or browse through the DNG files in Windows Explorer (Windows) or Finder (Mac
OS).
File formats supported for export
Premiere Pro supports exporting the following new camera formats:
Panasonic AVCI-100 50p, 60p
Panasonic AVCI-200
Sony XAVC Intra
Support for 64-bit QuickTime export
Premiere Pro supports the following new video and audio codecs that let you export QuickTime movies in a 64-bit process.
Video codecs
Apple ProRes codecs (Mac OS 10.8 and later only)
Apple ProRes 422, 422 (HQ), 422 (LT), 422 (Proxy), 4444
DV codecs
DV/NTSC 24p
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DV25 NTSC, PAL
DV50 NTSC, PAL
DVCPRO HD 1080i50, 1080i60, 1080p25, 1080p30, 720p50, 720p60
YUV codecs
Uncompressed YUV 10 bit 4:2:2, 8 bit 4:2:2
Apple None codecs
Uncompressed RGB 8 bit, 24 bit, 32 bit
Audio codecs
Uncompressed
Important notes:
If a movie uses an unsupported combination of audio and video codecs, the QuickTime 64-bit export reverts to a QuickTime 32-bit export.
Examples of unsupported combinations could be a supported video codec and an unsupported audio codec, or a supported audio codec
and an unsupported video codec.
On Windows, even if QuickTime for Windows is not installed, you can export QuickTime movies in a 64-bit process for the supported
codecs.
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New and changed preferences
Preference to change trim type
Premiere Pro provides you with an option to change the trim type of a previously selected edit point.
In the Preferences dialog box, under Trim, select Allow Current Tool To Change Trim Type Of Previously Selected Edit Point.
When you select this preference, clicking an edit point that's already selected changes the trim type to that of the current tool. You can also change
the trim type at any edit point irrespective of whether the cursor is positioned over the edit point or not. This preference is selected by default.
If you deselect the preference, you cannot change the trim type of an edit point that's already selected unless you press the Alt/Opt (Mac) or
Shift (Win) modifier keys.
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New and changed keyboard shortcuts
New keyboard shortcut to open General Preferences dialog
(Mac only) The keyboard shortcut "Cmd + ," can now open the Preferences dialog, focusing on the General preference category.
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Other enhancements
Improved performance for MJPEG files
Premiere Pro shows improved performance while playing MJPEG (Motion JPEG) movie files from the Canon EOS 1DC camera.
Support for QuickTime Reference legacy file format
Premiere Pro can now import QuickTime reference movies in MPEG 422 file format.
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Enhanced BlackMagic Cinema Camera support
You can import CinemaDNG footage from BlackMagic Cinema Cameras directly into Premiere Pro. Based on the footage metadata, Premiere Pro
applies a neutral color tone curve to the imported CinemaDNG footage by default. You can then apply a range of adjustments within Premiere Pro
to modify the color appearance.
Adobe After Effects and Adobe SpeedGrade import footage from BlackMagic Cinema Cameras differently than Premiere Pro. For example, when
you import CinemaDNG footage directly into SpeedGrade, no tone curve is applied. SpeedGrade preserves the unmodified raw pixel values of the
footage, letting you modify the exposure and apply color balance as required. When you import CinemaDNG footage directly into After Effects, a
default color tone curve is applied to optimize the raw color appearance of the CinemaDNG footage.
When you use the CinemaDNG footage in a cross-product workflow, the footage is handled identically to Premiere Pro. For example, when you
use the Direct Link between Premiere Pro and SpeedGrade, or open a Premiere Pro project in SpeedGrade, the neutral color tone that Premiere
Pro applies is preserved in SpeedGrade. Similarly, when you use the Dynamic Link between Premiere Pro and After Effects, Premiere Pro’s
neutral color tone is preserved in After Effects.
Note: From either After Effects or Premiere Pro, when you copy and paste CinemaDNG footage to the other’s Project panel, the footage may
appear different in each application.
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11
What's new in Premiere Pro CC July 2013 release (version 7.0.1)
Premiere Pro CC October 2013 release (version 7.1) is now available. For information about the new and changed features in this release, see
this What's New article.
This document describes the new and changed features in the Premiere Pro CC July 2013 release (version 7.0.1). For information on what's new
in the earlier Creative Cloud update of Premiere Pro, see What's New in Premiere Pro CC June 2013 release (version 7.0).
Editing finesse enhancements
Create a unique title by duplicating a sequence title
Enhancements to "Lift or Extract" feature
Copy, Cut, Clear works on In/Out points
Enable/disable clips using Enable Clip command
Matching frames using clip selection
Relinking offline sequences
Enhanced EDL Export dialog
Reveal in Project from Source Monitor
Linked Selection toggle button available from Timeline
Reveal in Finder from Timeline
Default start timecode preference
Drag and preview files in Source Monitor
Match Frame enhancements
Easily identify offline clips from Timeline
New Tone Settings dialog
Open Closed Caption clips from Captions panel
Source Settings dialog accessible from Timeline
Auto-save improvements
Improved time-lapse support when adding clips to a sequence
New preferences
New and changed keyboard shortcuts
Note: These features are available for Creative Cloud members only. To join Adobe Creative Cloud, see Adobe Creative Cloud.
To the top
Create a unique title by duplicating a sequence title
You can now use a keyboard shortcut to quickly create a new sequence title based on the current sequence title in the Timeline.
In the Timeline, press Alt (Win) or Option (Mac OS) and drag a current title. A new unique title is created. Using the keyboard shortcut in the
Timeline creates the same result as using the New Title Based on Current Title option in the Titler.
The newly created title is not a duplicate of the original title and does not reference the original master clip. Any revisions made to this new title
are not reflected in the original title or its instances.
Some important points:
The Copy/Paste feature continues to use the workflow where duplicate instances are created and linked back to the original master title clip.
Besides the methods already mentioned, there are other methods to create a duplicate title. For example, you can use the Match Frame
feature in the track item to load the master clip title in the Source monitor. You can then edit the title back into the sequence, or find the
original master clip title manually and edit that into the sequence.
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Enhancements to "Lift or Extract" feature
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The Lift or Extract feature in Premiere Pro lets you easily move portions of selected clips from one sequence to another.
In previous versions, Premiere Pro required you to set both an In and Out point to define the range to be "Lifted" or "Extracted". For a quick look at
how this feature worked earlier, read this tutorial from Clay Asbury.
The Lift or Extract feature is now enhanced to work when either an In point or an Out point is set. When only an In point is set, Lift or Extract
works on the segment starting from the In point and ending at the sequence end. When only an Out point is set, Lift or Extract works on the
segment from the beginning of the sequence to the Out point.
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Copy, Cut, Clear works on In/Out points
The Cut, Copy, Clear functions in Premiere Pro work on targeted tracks that have In or Out points set in that range. You can use these functions
without selecting specific clips in the sequence.
If you set only an In point, then an In/Out range is not required. The Cut, Copy, Clear functions work on the targeted tracks from the In point to the
end of the sequence. Similarly, when you set only an Out point, the Cut, Copy, Clear functions work on the targeted tracks from the beginning of
the sequence to the Out point.
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Enable/disable clips using Enable Clip command
You can now quickly toggle between the states of enabled clips. While previewing edits, this feature helps you switch back and forth between two
different playback results.
When you select multiple clips with mixed settings, you can use the Enable Clip command as a toggle to enable/disable the clip. For example, if
Clip A is enabled and Clip B is disabled, selecting both clips together and using Enable Clip results in disabling Clip A and enabling Clip B.
To use the Enable Clip command, right-click (Win) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) a clip in the Timeline, and select Enable from the context menu.
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Matching frames using clip selection
In previous versions of Premiere Pro, the Match Frame command used Track Targeting to identify the clip in the Timeline to match. Now, clip
selection supersedes track targeting. When you select a clip, Match Frame ignores track targeting, and matches to the frame under the playhead in
the selected clip.
Some important points:
When you select a clip, ensure that you place the playhead on a frame within the selected clip. If the playhead is placed on a frame outside
the selected clip, Track Targeting is used, and the frame on the topmost targeted track is matched.
When you select multiple clips, the playhead is placed over more than one clip. The Match Frame command then matches the topmost clip.
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Relinking offline sequences
The Link Media command is now available for offline sequences. This command lets you relink all the media used in a specific sequence without
having to relink all the media in the project.
Using the Link Media command
1. Right-click (Win) or Ctrl-click (Mac) an offline sequence and select Link Media from the context menu. All the clips used in that sequence
appear in the Locate Media dialog.
2. Relink the offline sequences just as you would relink any selection of offline clips.
Alternatively, in the Timeline panel, right-click (Win) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) a sequence tab, and select Link Media from the context menu.
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Enhanced EDL Export dialog
13
In previous versions of Premiere Pro, you manually deleted key tracks and transitions to create simple EDL (Edit Decision List) files. You can now
exclude key tracks and transitions directly from the EDL Export dialog.
The EDL export dialog includes two new options that let you include or exclude key tracks and transitions.
Include Key Track
Include Transitions
By default, the Include Key Track option is deselected and the Include Transitions option is selected.
To export an EDL without transitions or key clips, deselect Include Transitions or Include Key Track. The transitions and V2 clips are retained in
the sequence.
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Reveal in Project from Source Monitor
A clip displayed in the Source Monitor can be easily located in the Project panel.
Load a clip in the Source monitor and right-click (Windows) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) a clip in a sequence, and choose Reveal In Project. Premiere
Pro then locates the source clip in the Project panel and selects it.
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Linked Selection toggle button available from Timeline
Premiere Pro provides a Linked Selection command that can be applied to all open sequences in the Timeline panels. You can use the Linked
Selection command as a toggle that you can turn on and off. Linked Selection is turned on by default.
The Linked Selection command is available as a button from the Timeline, and from the Sequence menu. You can also assign a keyboard shortcut
to this feature.
When Linked Selection is turned on, clicking a linked clip in the Timeline automatically selects all the associated tracks. For example, if you click
the video part of a linked A/V clip, the audio is automatically selected.
When Linked Selection is turned off, only the single track item that you click is selected, and not all the associated tracks.
You can temporarily override a toggle state by pressing Alt (Win) or Opt (Mac) while selecting the track. For example, if Linked Selection is turned
on, and you press Alt (Win) or Opt (Mac) while selecting a linked clip, only the single track that you click is selected.
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Reveal in Finder from Timeline
This feature lets you select a sequence clip and locate its linked media file on disk.
The Reveal in Explorer (Win) or Reveal In Finder (Mac OS) command is available in the clip context menu. When you choose this command for a
selected clip, the Finder or Explorer folder containing the clip's linked media file is opened and the selected file is brought to the front.
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Default start timecode preference
Premiere Pro lets you change the start time of sequences from 00:00:00:00 to a start time of your choice. You can set the specified start time as
the default start time.
In the Timeline panel menu, select Start Time. In the Start Time dialog, enter the start time, and select Set As Default For Future Sequences. The
start time that you enter will be the default start time for all new sequences.
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Drag and preview files in Source Monitor
You can now preview files more easily by just dragging the files from a Finder (Mac OS) or Explorer (Win) window directly into the Source monitor.
The preview is similar to previewing clips from the Media Browser before importing them into the project.
A new project is created for the clips that you drag into the Source monitor; the clips are not automatically imported into the current open project.
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Match Frame enhancements
The Match Frame feature now lets you match frames from the Source monitor to the source files of a sequence. With this enhancement, you don't
have to first open the sequence in the Timeline and match frames from there.
For a Multicamera sequence, Match Frame first opens the selected camera source clip in the Source monitor. If either regular sequences or
multicamera sequences are nested, additional Match Source Frame commands open all source sequences until the correct source file is opened.
For example, the Match Frame command first opens the multicamera source sequence in the Source monitor. The next use of the Match Frame
command opens the original source camera clip for the selected angle in the Source monitor.
Note: When the Program monitor is in Multicamera mode, the lowest targeted track is displayed in the monitor. In this mode, the rule to "Match
Frame From" is reversed, and the lowest track is used. To override this behavior, select a clip on the desired track to match frame from.
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Easily identify offline clips from Timeline
In previous versions of Premiere Pro, an offline clip appeared in red in the Timeline only on expanding the track. Now, all offline clips appear in
red, even without expanding the track. This enhancement lets you easily locate offline clips from the Timeline.
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New Tone Settings dialog
Premiere Pro provides a new Tone Settings dialog that lets you create Bars and Tones clips at -20dB amplitude.
Using the Tone Settings dialog
1. Double-click a Bars and Tones clip to open the Tone Settings dialog.
2. In the Tone Settings dialog, specify the audio settings.
Select Steady Tones to create a Bars and Tones clip at any desired frequency.
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Select Identify Channels to create a Bars and Tones clip that adheres to EBU audio standards.
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Open Closed Caption clips from Captions panel
You can now double-click a captions clip in the Captions panel, and view the contents of the clip. If the Captions panel is already open, Premiere
Pro brings the Captions panel into focus.
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Source Settings dialog accessible from Timeline
For clips that offer source settings, such as RED and Arri Raw, you can access the Source Settings dialog directly from the Timeline.
In the Timeline, right-click (Win) or Ctrl-click (Mac) a clip in the sequence, and select Source Settings from the context menu.
Note: Source Settings adjustments are applied to master clips. When you adjust the source settings of a clip in a sequence, the settings are
applied to its master clip and any other instances used in that sequence.
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Auto-save improvements
In previous versions of Premiere Pro, even if you specified Auto-Save to execute at regular intervals, if an activity occurred at the specified interval,
Auto-Save was blocked. Now, if Auto-Save is blocked by activity, it is put on hold, and retriggered during the next period of inactivity.
In earlier versions, Premiere Pro executed an auto-save when there were unsaved changes in the currently opened project. The potential
consequence of that was leaving a project open with unsaved changes for a long enough period led to all the auto-save versions becoming
identical, wiping out potentially useful versions to roll back to.
Now, if the system goes idle for a period beyond the interval setting, no further Auto Save files are generated until Premiere Pro detects changes
to the project file. This change conserves the maximum number of auto-saves per project, and saves only the useful archived versions.
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Improved time-lapse support when adding clips to a sequence
When you add clips created from still images to a sequence, you can specify the duration of clips (in frames).
To do so, in the Automate To Sequence dialog, under Still Clip Duration, select Frames Per Still and enter the number of frames.
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New preferences
Turn-off automatic restarting of playback
By default, Premiere Pro plays a clip or sequence until the end and stops on the last frame. When you press the spacebar (initiating Play again),
the playhead automatically jumps to the beginning and restarts playback from there.
You now have a preference that lets you turn off the feature of automatically restarting playback from the beginning. To do so, go to the
Preferences dial box, under the General category, deselect At Playback End, Return To Begin When Restarting Playback.
Note: This preference applies to both clip and sequence playback. The preference controls playback in all the panels where playback can be
initiated, like Timeline, Source and Program monitors, Audio Track Mixer, and Effect Controls.
Set focus to Timeline after inserting, overwriting edits
Premiere Pro provides a preference to control focus on the Timeline after performing Insert/Overwrite edits. Selecting this preference automatically
sets focus to the Timeline after each edit. You can quickly preview your edits without manually setting focus to the Timeline.
The Set Focus To Timeline After Performing Insert/Overwrite Edits preference is available under the General category in the Preferences dialog
box. The preference is deselected by default.
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New and changed keyboard shortcuts
Navigate edit points in Source monitor
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You can use Up and Down arrow keys to navigate to Begin/End and In/Out points in clips loaded into the Source monitor.
This navigation feature works on both individual clips or sequences loaded in the Source monitor.
For clips, the navigation steps through Clip Start, In point, Out point, and Clip End. For sequences, the navigation steps through Sequence Start,
all individual edit points within the sequence (on all tracks), and Sequence End. The In/Out points for sequences are ignored.
Some important points:
You can continue to use the Up and Down arrow keys to select the next and previous clips in the Timeline.
In previous versions of Premiere Pro, the Up and Down arrow keys navigated to next/previous clip markers in the Source monitor. With this
update, to navigate to the next clip marker, use Shift+M. To navigate to the previous marker, use Ctrl+M (Win) or Shift+Cmd (Mac).
Clear In and Out points in Project panel
You can now use keyboard shortcuts to clear the In, Out, or In and Out markers from multiple selected clips in the project, instead of doing it one
clip at a time.
You use the same Marker menu keyboard shortcuts that you use in the Timeline, Monitor, and other panels.
Results
Win
Mac
Clear In
Ctrl+Shift+I
Opt+I
Clear Out
Ctrl+Shift+O
Opt+O
Clear In and Out
Ctrl+Shift+X
Opt+X
Toggle focus between Source and Program monitors
You can set a keyboard shortcut to toggle focus between Source and Program monitors. You can use this shortcut to set focus on individual panel
focus shortcuts without using a Mouse.
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What's New in Adobe Premiere Pro CC June 2013 release (version
7.0)
Premiere Pro CC October 2013 release (version 7.1) now available. For information about the new and changed features in this release, see
this What's New article.
Adobe® Premiere® Pro CC offers several new features and enhancements that enrich your digital video editing experience. Read on for a quick
introduction to the new features and links to resources offering more information.
IMPORTANT: Apart from the features listed in this article, Premiere Pro CC includes several useful features that help you be more productive
when using Premiere Pro. For more information, see New features in Premiere Pro CC June 2013 (version 7.0).
Premiere Pro CC new features overview
Sync Settings using Adobe Creative Cloud
Adobe Anywhere integration
User Interface improvements
Relinking offline media
Duplicate frame detection
Closed Captioning
Editing finesse enhancements
Audio enhancements
Color-related enhancements
Extending the power of Adobe Premiere Pro
New and changed keyboard shortcuts
Other changes
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Sync Settings using Adobe Creative Cloud
The new Sync Settings feature enables users to sync their preferences, presets, and settings to the Creative Cloud.
If you use Premiere Pro on multiple machines, the Sync Settings feature makes it easy for you to keep those settings synchronized across the
machines. The syncing happens via your Adobe Creative Cloud account. All the settings are uploaded to your Creative Cloud account, which can
be downloaded and applied on the other machine.
For more information, see Sync settings in Premiere Pro CC.
Adobe Anywhere integration
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Adobe Anywhere lets video teams effectively collaborate and access shared media across standard networks. You can you use local or remote
networks to simultaneously access, stream, and work with remotely stored media. Heavy file transfers, duplicate media, and proxy files are not
required.
To use Adobe Anywhere in Premiere Pro, select File > Adobe Anywhere > Sign In. Enter the required information in the Adobe Anywhere Sign In
dialog box.
For more information, read about Adobe Anywhere for Video, or watch this video:
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User Interface improvements
High-resolution viewing and improved overall user experience
Premiere Pro now provides HiDPI support for an enhanced viewing experience with a high-resolution user interface. HiDPI displays are available
on the newest monitors like Apple’s Retina Mac computers, including the new MacBook Pro models.
Other improvements to the user interface include:
Improved title and action-safe guides
Switching between video and audio waveforms with one click
Toggling tool tips on and off
Enhanced viewing experience with HiDPI support
A. View video or audio in one-click B. Enhanced titling and action-safe guides
Redesigned Timeline with customizable track headers
Premiere Pro now has a redesigned Timeline panel that is customizable, letting you choose what to display, and lets you have immediate access
to controls.
You can now work more quickly and efficiently with track controls for volume and pan, recording, and audio metering.
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Redesigned Timeline
The track headers in the Timeline panel are now customizable, allowing you to determine which controls are displayed. Since the controls are
different for the video and audio tracks, there are separate Button Editors for each track type.
Right-click a video or audio track and select Customize. Then drag-and-drop buttons as required. For example, you can select the Track Meter
control and drag it into your audio track.
You can easily edit source sequences into other sequences without nesting. You can also copy effects from one clip to another with enhanced
paste attributes.
Community resources:
Video tutorial by Josh Weiss: The redesigned Timeline panel
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Relinking offline media
You can often move, rename, or transcode files to different formats. Premiere Pro helps you locate and relink such files with the new Link Media
dialog box.
A. Locate missing media
When you open a project containing offline media, the Link Media dialog provides information like filename, last known path, and metadata
properties. Using all this information, Premiere Pro lets you quickly locate and relink the media, bringing them back online for use in your project.
For more information, see Relinking offline media.
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Duplicate frame detection
Premiere Pro identifies clips that are used in a timeline more than once in the same sequence by displaying duplicate frame markers. A duplicate
frame marker is a colored stripe indicator that runs across the bottom of a clip for each duplicated frame.
To turn on duplicate frame markers, Click Timeline Display Settings, and select Show Duplicate Frame Markers.
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Show duplicate frame markers
Premiere Pro assigns a color automatically to each master clip that has a duplicate clip. Up to ten different colors are assigned. After ten colors are
used, the tenth color is reused.
For example, say, you've used multiple cameras to shoot a sporting event. You may use different shots of the crowd all through the show. If you
use the same crowd shot more than once, then duplicate frame detection alerts you to the duplicate clip by displaying a colored stripe across it.
Note: Duplicate frame markers are not available for still images and time remapping.
Community resources:
Video tutorial by Josh Weiss: Duplicate frame indicators
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Closed Captioning
You can now work with closed caption text within Premiere Pro without the need for separate Closed Captioning authoring software.
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Closed Captioning tools in Premiere Pro
A. Display closed captions with content B. See captions on the Timeline
You can import Closed Caption text, link it to the appropriate clips, edit the text, and adjust durations in the timeline from within Premiere Pro.
When you're done, export your sequence to tape, or to Adobe Media Encoder, with embedded closed captions or as a separate Sidecar file.
For more information about working with closed captions in Premiere Pro, see Closed Captioning.
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Editing finesse enhancements
Auto-sync multiple camera angles
The new Multicamera mode displays the multicamera editing interface inside the Program Monitor. You can create ready-to-edit sequence from
clips shot from different angles with multiple cameras or from different takes of a particular scene.
You can use the Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence option to combine clips that have common In or Out points or overlapping timecode into a
multicamera sequence. You can create a multicamera source sequence from a bin of clips. When creating a multicamera sequence, there is now
an Offset Audio By control, with a range of -100 to +100 frames.
For more information, see Create multi-camera source sequence.
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Use the Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence option to automatically match multiple camera angles
Auto-sync clips using audio waveforms
Premiere Pro also lets you can merge clips by using audio waveforms. You can use audio recorded from a second source to automatically sync
and create multicamera and merged clips using audio waveforms.
Source Patching and Track Targeting
Source patching and track targeting has been redesigned for faster and more efficient editing. You can now patch sources for insert and overwrite
editing, or targeting tracks for Copy/Paste, Match Frame, and other edit operations in just a single click.
You can create presets for common patching scenarios, letting you reconfigure the Timeline with a single command.
For more information, see Source patching and track targeting.
Edit unnested sequences into destination sequences
You can now edit source sequences into other sequences, keeping the original source clips and track layout intact. This feature lets you use
segments of other sequences containing individual source clips, edit points, transitions, and effects, much like copy/paste.
A "Nest Source Sequence" toggle command lets you toggle between nested and unnested behavior. The "Nest Source Sequence" toggle
command is available from the Timeline header's source indicators context menu.
For more information, see Edit from sequences loaded into the Source monitor.
Join Through Edits
You can now join through edits in your clips using the new Join Through Edits feature.
In the Timeline panel, select the edit points in your clip that you want to join. Then, right-click (Win) or Ctrl-click (Mac) the selected edit points and
select Join Through Edits from the context menu.
Through edit indicators are displayed on extraneous edits that do not cause a break in the original frame sequence of the clip. When you use Join
Through Edits for a through edit, Premiere Pro heals the cut and recreates a longer clip from the contiguous parts.
Snapping Razor tool
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You can now snap the playhead to items when you drag it over the Timeline. When snapping is enabled, the Razor tool is selected, and the cursor
snaps to any snapping target including the playhead.
To use the multi-razor tool over all tracks, press the Shift key. To ignore track items, press the Alt key (Windows) or Option (Mac OS).
New Snap Playhead preference
Snap Playhead In Timeline When Snap Is Enabled is a new preference option that controls the behavior of the playhead when scrubbing. When
you select this preference, the playhead snaps to every edit point.
This preference option is available under the General preferences category in the Preferences dialog box.
Naming nested sequences
When you create a nested sequence with the Timeline's Nest command, the Nested Sequence Name dialog box appears. You can enter a name
of your choice for the nested sequence.
To use the Nested Sequence command, right-click (Win) or Ctrl-click (Mac) a clip in the Timeline panel and choose Nest from the context menu.
Trim-to-zero duration
Trim a clip to zero duration using the keyboard or mouse. For more information, see this video tutorial by Josh Weiss.
Enhanced Paste attributes
The Paste Attributes dialog box lets you easily add and move audio and visual effects across multiple clips.
After copying a clip containing effects, the dialog box lets you select which effect you want to paste into the destination clip selected in the
Timeline.
If the video or audio clips have any additional user-applied effects, these effects are also available for selection. You can select a group of effects
or specific effects.
For more information, see this video tutorial.
Playhead moves to edit point after a ripple-delete
When you ripple-delete clips in the Timeline panel, the playhead automatically moves to the beginning of the edit point, instead of remaining in
place. You can immediately replace the edit without having to first reposition the playhead.
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Audio enhancements
Renamed Audio Mixer panel
The Audio Mixer panel is now renamed the Audio Track Mixer. This name change helps you distinguish the Audio Track Mixer from the new Audio
Clip Mixer panel.
Audio Track Mixer
The pop-up menu in the Audio Track mixer is redesigned to display the audio plug-ins in categorized subfolders for a faster selection.
Enhanced Timeline track header
A horizontal Audio meter is now available in the audio track headers.
Audio Meter
Two new controls are available in the Timeline's customizable track header area to adjust the pan and track volume for audio tracks.
Multiple stereo assignments for tracks to multichannel masters
You can now assign a mono or standard track to multiple pairs of channels in a multichannel master. In the panner assignment dialog, set the
stereo channel pairs you want to assign to a track.
For more information, see Multiple stereo assignments for tracks to multichannel masters.
New Clip Mixer panel
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The Audio Clip Mixer lets you monitor and adjust the volume and pan of clips in sequence when the Timeline panel is in focus. Similarly, when the
Source Monitor panel is in focus, the Audio Clip Mixer lets you monitor clips in the Source Monitor.
Audio Clip Mixer
To access the Audio Clip Mixer, choose Window > Audio Clip Mixer from the main menu.
For more information, see Monitor clip volume and pan using Clip Mixer.
Audio waveform changes
Audio waveforms now appear similar to the waveforms in Adobe Audition. In addition, Audio waveforms now appear in nested sequences. You can
return to standard audio waveforms in the panel menu.
You can also use a label color for your audio waveforms. In the Timeline panel, select Audio Waveforms Use Label Color.
New Audio Plug-ins manager and audio plug-ins
The Audio Plug-ins manager is available to work with your audio effects. You can access the Audio Plug-In Manager menu from the Audio Track
Mixer and Effects panels. You can also access the Audio Plug-In Manager from the Audio Preferences dialog.
Premiere Pro now supports third-party VST3 plug-ins. On the Mac, you can also use Audio Units (AU) plug-ins.
Multi-channel QuickTime export
When exporting multi-channel master sequences, the Export Media dialog's Audio Channel setting changes to a pop-up menu. This menu lets you
select the channels to be included in the export.
Control surface support
Premiere Pro now lets you interactively mix audio with control surfaces that use the EUCON and Mackie protocols. You can also use third-party
tablet-based controllers that support these protocols.
To connect your controller to Premiere Pro, select Control Surface in the Preferences dialog box. Choose the controller protocol from the Device
Class menu.
Use the faders, knobs, and buttons on these devices to control Track Mixer faders and parameters, such as track pan and balance. You can
connect supported devices, such as Avid MC Artist and Mackie XT and assume control of the Track Mixer.
For more information, see Control surface support.
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Color-related enhancements
Integration of Lumetri Deep Color Engine
Premiere Pro now includes the Lumetri Deep Color Engine. You can instantly apply SpeedGrade .look files and pre-made Lookup Tables (LUTs)
to your sequences from within Premiere Pro.
Use the new integrated Looks browser in the Effects panel to apply preset color grading effects, or to locate exported .looks from SpeedGrade or
LUTs from other systems.
For more information, see Apply SpeedGrade color-correction within Premiere Pro.
The Looks Browser integrated in Premiere Pro
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Extending the power of Adobe Premiere Pro
Adobe Story panel
The new Adobe Story panel in Premiere Pro lets you import scripts created in Adobe Story, along with associated metadata to guide your editing.
You can quickly navigate to specific scenes, locations, dialogue, and characters as you work. You can use Speech To Text search to find the clips
you need and edit to the script within the Premiere Pro editing environment.
Adobe Exchange panel
The Adobe Exchange panel integrated with Premiere Pro lets you easily browse, install, and find support for the latest plug-ins and extensions.
Select Window > Extensions > Adobe Exchange to open the Adobe Exchange panel. You can find both free and paid extensions.
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New and changed keyboard shortcuts
Select next and previous clips in a sequence
The Select Next Clip and Select Previous Clip keyboard shortcuts let you quickly navigate relative to the current clip selection and select an
adjacent clip in the sequence.
Select clips under playhead or within In-Out range
To provide two slightly different keyboard-driven workflows, there are two new keyboard shortcuts for selecting clips in the sequence: Select Clip at
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Playhead and Select In to Out.
Move selected clips to different tracks
Use the Nudge Clip Selection Up and Nudge Clip Selection Down keyboard shortcuts to move selected clips up or down to different tracks.
For the complete list of available keyboard shortcuts, see Keyboard shortcuts in Premiere Pro CC.
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Other changes
GPU processing changes
You can now enable OpenCL or CUDA processing on any card that meets minimum requirements (1-GB RAM, basic shader tests).
CUDA support for NVIDIA Kepler 2000 and 4000 Dual GPU support for NVIDIA cards for export performance enhancement are now available.
OpenCL processing is now available on Windows for cards that meet the basic requirements.
Support for mezzanine codecs, native formats
Industry-standard mezzanine codecs and native video formats, such as the following, are now available within Premiere Pro:
Native MXF-wrapped DNxHD
Apple ProRes (decode only on Windows)
Sony XAVC
Panasonic AVCi200
Enhanced import/export workflows for Avid and Final Cut Pro projects
You now have an enhanced and improved workflow when importing or exporting Avid or Final Cut Pro projects. You can import AAF projects with
much higher fidelity, and with support
for more video formats, including DNxHD.
Export to Tape (Serial Device)
When a serial device is connected, you can export your edited sequence onto videotape directly from your computer, for example, to create a
master tape. To do so, select File > Export > Tape (Serial Device).
Note: The Export to Tape (Serial Device) feature requires a third-party SDI tape export solution. Premiere cannot natively export to tape using
Serial Device control.
For information about the many other new features, see New features in Premiere Pro CC.
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29
New features in Premiere Pro CC June 2013 release (version 7.0)
Apart from the features listed in What's New in Premiere Pro CC June 2013 (version 7.0), Adobe® Premiere® Pro CC includes many other useful
features.
Here is a list of the new features in Premiere Pro CC, categorized by work area:
Editing and Timeline-related
Transitions and effects
Audio
Exporting
Project Management
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Editing and Timeline-related
Add or delete a track using context menu commands
You can add or delete a single track with a context menu command. Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS) in the track header area and
select Add Track or Delete Track. This command is in addition to the previous commands Add Tracks and Delete Tracks, which opens a dialog
box for adding and deleting multiple tracks.
Toggle tool tips on or off
A Show Tool Tips preference is available in the General Preferences dialog box to turn tool tips on or off.
Command to enable or disable video preview through Mercury Transmit
You can assign a keyboard shortcut to toggle video preview through Mercury Transmit on and off. To do so, select Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts. In
the Keyboards Shortcuts dialog box, select Enable Transmit, and assign a keyboard shortcut.
Double-click to expand or collapse tracks in the Timeline
Double-click in the empty area to the right of the Timeline track header buttons. You can increase the size of this target by dragging the header
divider to the right.
New Timeline Track Height presets
New Timeline Track Height presets are now available from the Presets browser.
Automatically import an exported frame or movie into a project
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The Import Into Project option lets you automatically import an exported frame or movie back into the current open project. The following export
options are supported:
Still frame export
Direct export
Queued export (using Adobe Media Encoder)
Media Browser browses through Premiere Pro project files
Use the Media Browser to browse through your Premiere Pro project file (.prproj), and access all the bins, sequences, and clips contained in the
project. You can also hover-scrub the clips, and import a bin, clip, or sequence.
Copy command enhanced to operate on a range in a sequence
The existing Copy command (Edit > Copy, Ctrl+C (Windows), Command+C (Mac OS)) is enhanced when used in the Timeline panel. If there are
no clips or keyframes selected, and an In Point or Out Point is set, then the range of time between the In point and Out point is copied to the
clipboard.
Customizable number of Undo levels
In the History panel's pop-up menu, you can choose a custom number of Undo steps, from 10 to 100.
Keyboard shortcuts to move clips in the Program Monitor (modifying Position property)
When you are in direct-manipulation mode in the Program Monitor (the mode in which you can drag the clip to position it spatially), you can use
the arrow keys to modify the clip's Position property. Each press of an arrow key moves the clip 1 pixel in the corresponding direction. Holding
Shift makes each press of an arrow key move the clip 10 pixels.
Hard and soft subclips are now available
Hard subclips prevent accidental trimming into media outside the subclip boundaries. Soft subclips allow trimming to any portion of the original
master clip's media.
Earlier, subclips had “hard” in- and out-points, limiting flexibility when you needed more head or tail frames for video cross-dissolves or audio
crossfades. You can now create subclips with “soft” edits in Premiere Pro, meaning you are no longer limited to the original in- and out-points in
the subclips.
For more information, see this video:
Customizable Timeline
The Timeline is customizable, including show/hide markers, effects, through edits and duplicate frame markers.
Out-of-sync indicators for audio and video
Out-of-sync indicators now appear for audio and video when they are unlinked and moved out of sync
Insert and Overwrite sequences as nests or individual clips
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You can now insert or overwrite sequences as nests or individual clips.
Marker search
You can now search markers in the Marker panel. Go to Next/Previous clip marker in the Timeline. The Next/Previous Marker commands now
navigate to both sequence and clip markers in the Timeline.
Set Marker duration
To quickly set the Marker duration, Alt-click (Win) or Option-click (Mac) a Marker icon in the Source Monitor, Program Monitor, or Timeline. A
duration of one frame is set. You can adjust the frame duration by clicking and dragging the handles on either sides of the frame.
Setting Marker duration in the Program Monitor
Community resource:
Blog by Clay Asbury: Ten favorite features in Adobe Premiere Pro CC
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Transitions and effects
Clip Name Effect
The new Clip Name effect renders the clip name in the program, with position, size, and transparency as specified in the effect's controls. This
effect is GPU-accelerated.
GPU-accelerated Wipe and Slide transitions
The Wipe and Slide video transitions are accelerated by the GPU when you are using a GPU video card that Premiere Pro CC uses for CUDA or
OpenCL processing.
Render Selection command to render selected clips
Select Sequence > Render Selection to render a preview file for the duration between the In point of the first selected clip to the Out point of the
last selected clip.
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Trim transitions symmetrically
Dragging the edge of a transition now trims it symmetrically on each side of the cut point. To trim only one side, hold down the Shift key as you
drag.
New Edge Feather effect during Crop
The Crop function in the Effects Control panel (Window > Effect Controls) now has an Edge Feather feature that provides a feathered edge effect
to the cropped video. From the Effect Controls panel, click the Edge Feather button under Crop and enter a value for the feather effect.
The edges of the cropped video display a feather effect:
Before and After applying Edge Feather Crop effect
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Audio
Switch between video and audio waveforms in the Source Monitor
To view the audio waveform for your clip in the Source Monitor panel, click the Drag Audio Only button at the bottom. Click the Drag Video Only
button to switch back to the video view.
Context menu command for showing audio time units
Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS) in a time ruler and select Show Audio Time Units to enable or disable display of audio time units.
Commands for increasing and decreasing clip volume
The following commands have entries in the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box:
Increase Clip Volume (by 1 dB)
Increase Clip Volume Many (by 6 dB)
Decrease Clip Volume (by 1 dB)
Decrease Clip Volume Many (by 6 dB)
New Rectified audio waveform
The new Rectified Audio Waveform feature provides you another way of viewing an audio waveform:
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Rectified audio waveform and Standard audio waveform
The Rectified Audio Waveform option is turned on by default. You can turn it off by deselecting Rectified Audio Waveforms in the Timeline panel's
pop-up menu.
Rectified Audio Waveform option in the Timeline pop-up menu
Other enhancements
Audio output mapping preferences for Mercury Transmit
Audio waveforms generated for nested sequences
Keyboard shortcuts to change pan values
Ability to open an audio plug-in effect dialog from clips in a sequence
Ability to toggle audio on and off during scrubbing
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Exporting
Smart rendering improvements
Export performance for QuickTime files such as Pro-Res 422 has been accelerated.
QuickTime audio export with individual tracks
When exporting multi-channel master sequences, the Export Media dialog's Audio Channel setting changes to a pop-up menu that allows you to
select audio channels to be included in the export.
16-bit DPX support
16-bit DPX support has been added to Premiere Pro CC.
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Project Management
Custom location for Auto-save folder
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In the Scratch Disks tab of the Project Settings dialog box and New Project dialog box, there is a Project Auto Save control. You can use this
control to specify the location of the Auto-save folder. The default setting is Same As Project.
Preference to skip the Welcome screen when launching Premiere Pro
In the General preferences category, you can select Show Welcome Screen or Open Most Recent from the At Startup pop-up menu. If the
preference is set to Open Most Recent, the last project in use is reopened. If the last project in use cannot be located (for example, because it's
been deleted), then the Welcome screen is opened.
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What's new in Adobe Media Encoder CC 7.1
This article describes the new and changed features in Adobe Media Encoder CC 7.1 release. See the What's new in AME CC document for
information on changes in the AME CC 7.0 release.
Improvements to AVCI export
GPU acceleration
DNxHD presets
Interpret footage
Native Premiere Pro and Prelude project loading
FCP XML support
Sync settings
Effects settings
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Improvements to AVCI export
The export performance of MXF OP1a AVCI has been greatly improved. AME now uses the MainConcept AVCI codec for this format and as a
result the files are rendered faster. The following options have been added:
AVCI100 1080p50
AVCI100 1080p60
AVCI200
XAVC Intra HD (1020x1080)
XAVC Intra 4K(3840x2160)
XAVC Intra 4K(4096x2160)
All the above formats are smart rendering enabled.
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GPU acceleration
Adobe Media Encoder now takes advantage of GPU for rendering purposes. Both CUDA and OpenCL are supported. The latest release of AME
uses the GPU for the following renders:
Scaling (HD to SD; SD to HD)
Timecode filter
Pixel format conversions
Deinterlacing
If you are rendering a Premiere Pro project, AME will use the GPU render preference you have set for the project. All GPU rendering capabilities
of Premiere Pro are utilized. The limited set of GPU renderable tasks in AME is only for renders that originate in AME.
If you are rendering a sequence with native sequence support, the GPU setting in AME is used and the project setting is ignored. In this case, all
GPU rendering capabilities of Premiere Pro are utilized directly in AME.
If your project contains 3rd party VSTs, the GPU setting in the project is used. The sequence is encoded through PProHeadless just as in earlier
versions of AME. If Enable Native Premiere Pro Sequence Import option is unchecked, PProHeadless will always be used and the GPU setting is
used.
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DNxHD presets
DNxHD MXF OP 1a presets have been renamed to better align with how Avid resolutions are named in other applications. Due to this change,
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DNxHD presets imported from previous versions of AME CC may not match the newer versions.
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Interpret footage
Frame rates that are set lower than the default rate within the interpret footage dialog now properly render a smooth succession of frames. Earlier
versions of Media Encoder would improperly repeat the last frame to fill the end of the clip.
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Native Premiere Pro and Prelude project loading
AME now loads Premiere Pro and Prelude projects natively which means that the projects are loaded faster.
The new Import dialog lets you select multiple sequences from a single project.
Note: If a Premiere Pro sequence contains offline media, you will be notified before encoding begins. Offline media cannot be relinked using
AME. If your project has offline media, relink it in Premiere Pro before importing it in AME.
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FCP XML support
Final Cut Pro (FCP) XML files are now supported in AME. There is no mechanism for relinking the media. If you want to relink the media, open the
project in Premiere Pro first.
FCP XML files from FCPX are different from the original FCP XML files and are not supported at this time.
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Sync settings
AME now supports Sync Settings, a feature found in several Creative Cloud applications including Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects. If you
work on Creative Cloud applications on two machines, you probably want to maintain the same application settings on both your machines.
Through the Sync Settings feature, you can upload the settings to your Creative Cloud account from one machine and download and apply them
on your second machine.
The following preferences can be synced to the Creative Cloud:
1. Application Preferences
2. Workspace Layout
3. Keyboard Shortcuts
4. User Presets
The Sync Settings in AME work in the same way as in After Effects and Premiere Pro.
See the Sync Settings in AME article for detailed information.
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Effects settings
The following new effects have been added to the Effects tab in the Export Settings dialog box:
Lumetri Look (SpeedGrade .look and LUT)
Image Overlay
Name Overlay
Timecode Overlay
See the article on Effects settings for detailed information about each of the effects.
Effect settings are automatically included in presets unless you disable the Save Effect Settings checkbox when saving a preset. GPU acceleration
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helps to speed up all the new effects.
Note: The Effects tab replaces the Filters tab found in previous versions of AME. The Gaussian Blur filter has also been removed.
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Premiere Pro getting started tutorials
What is Premiere Pro
Adobe TV (Jun. 17, 2013)
video-tutorial
Overview of Adobe Premiere Pro CC
Adobe TV (Jun. 17, 2013)
video-tutorial
Learn Premiere Pro CC video tutorials
Adobe TV (Jun. 17, 2013)
video-tutorial
Creative Cloud for Video
video-tutorial (Jun. 17, 2013)
Getting Started with Adobe Premiere Pro
troubleshooting (Jul. 31, 2013)
Learn the Ins and Outs of Premiere Pro CC
article (Jun. 17, 2013)
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Workspace and workflow
40
Workspaces
Import a workspace with a project
Customizing workspaces
Brighten or darken the interface
The 2-up editing workspace
For an overview of the Premiere Pro interface, see this introduction to panels and workspaces from Peachpit Press.
For an overview of the Premiere Pro interface, see this video from Learn By Video and Video2Brain by Maxim Jago.
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Import a workspace with a project
Workspace selections and customizations made in a project are saved in the project file. By default, Premiere Pro opens projects in the current
workspace. However, you can instead open a project in the workspace last used with it. This option is particularly helpful if you often rearrange the
workspace for each project.
If you import a project and the workspace is empty, close the project. Deselect Import Workspace From Projects. Import the project again, and
select an existing workspace for the project.
Before opening a project, select Window > Workspace > Import Workspace From Projects.
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Customizing workspaces
About workspaces
Adobe video and audio applications provide a consistent, customizable workspace. Although each application has its own set of panels (such as
Project, Metadata, and Timeline), you move and group panels in the same way across products.
The main window of a program is the application window. Panels are organized in this window in an arrangement called a workspace. The default
workspace contains groups of panels as well as panels that stand alone.
You customize a workspace by arranging panels in the layout that best suits your working style. As you rearrange panels, the other panels resize
automatically to fit the window. You can create and save several custom workspaces for different tasks—for example, one for editing and one for
previewing.
You can use floating windows to create a workspace more like workspaces in previous versions of Adobe applications, or to place panels on
multiple monitors.
In these two tutorials Andrew Devis from Creative Cow shows how to use different workspaces, and how to customize your workspace.
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Example workspace
A. Application window B. Grouped panels C. Individual panel
Choose a workspace
Each Adobe video and audio application includes several predefined workspaces that optimize the layout of panels for specific tasks. When you
choose one of these workspaces, or any custom workspaces you’ve saved, the current workspace is redrawn accordingly.
Open the project you want to work on, choose Window > Workspace, and select the desired workspace.
Dock, group, or float panels
You can dock panels together, move them into or out of groups, and undock them so they float above the application window. As you drag a
panel, drop zones—areas onto which you can move the panel—become highlighted. The drop zone you choose determines where the panel is
inserted, and whether it docks or groups with other panels.
Docking zones
Docking zones exist along the edges of a panel, group, or window. Docking a panel places it adjacent to the existing group, resizing all groups to
accommodate the new panel.
Dragging panel (A) onto docking zone (B) to dock it (C)
Grouping zones
Grouping zones exist in the middle of a panel or group, and along the tab area of panels. Dropping a panel on a grouping zone stacks it with other
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panels.
Dragging panel (A) onto grouping zone (B) to group it with existing panels (C)
Dock or group panels
1. If the panel you want to dock or group is not visible, choose it from the Window menu.
2. Do one of the following:
To move an individual panel, drag the gripper area in the upper-left corner of a panel's tab onto the desired drag zone.
Drag panel gripper to move one panel
To move an entire group, drag the group gripper in the upper-right corner onto the desired drop zone.
Drag group gripper to move entire group
The application docks or groups the panel, according to the type of drop zone.
Undock a panel in a floating window
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When you undock a panel in a floating window, you can add panels to the window and modify it similarly to the application window. You can use
floating windows to use a secondary monitor, or to create workspaces like the workspaces in earlier versions of Adobe applications.
Select the panel you want to undock (if it’s not visible, choose it from the Window menu), and then do one of the following:
Choose Undock Panel or Undock Frame from the panel menu. Undock Frame undocks the panel group.
Hold down Ctrl (Windows®) or Command (Mac OS®), and drag the panel or group from its current location. When you release the
mouse button, the panel or group appears in a new floating window.
Drag the panel or group outside the application window. (If the application window is maximized, drag the panel to the Windows taskbar.)
Resize panel groups
When you position the pointer over dividers between panel groups, resize icons appear. When you drag these icons, all groups that share the
divider are resized. For example, suppose your workspace contains three panel groups stacked vertically. If you drag the divider between the
bottom two groups, they are resized, but the topmost group doesn’t change.
To quickly maximize a panel beneath the pointer, press the accent key. (Do not press Shift.) Press the accent key again to return the panel to
its original size.
1. Do either of the following:
To resize either horizontally or vertically, position the pointer between two panel groups. The pointer becomes a double-arrow
.
To resize in both directions at once, position the pointer at the intersection between three or more panel groups. The pointer becomes a
four-way arrow
.
2. Hold down the mouse button, and drag to resize the panel groups.
Dragging divider between panel groups to resize them horizontally
A. Original group with resize icon B. Resized groups
Open, close, and scroll to panels
When you close a panel group in the application window, the other groups resize to use the newly available space. When you close a floating
window, the panels within it close, too.
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To open a panel, choose it from the Window menu.
To close a panel or window, press Control-W (Windows) or Command-W (Mac OS), or click its Close button
.
To see all the panel tabs in a narrow panel group, drag the horizontal scroll bar.
To bring a panel to the front of a group of panels, do one of the following:
Click the tab of the panel you want in front.
Hover the cursor above the tab area, and turn the mouse scroll wheel. Scrolling brings each panel to the front, one after another.
Drag tabs horizontally to change their order.
To reveal panels hidden in a narrow panel group, drag the scroll bar above the panel group.
Drag horizontal scroll bar to see all panels in narrow group
Working with multiple monitors
To increase the available screen space, use multiple monitors. When you work with multiple monitors, the application window appears on one
monitor, and you place floating windows on the second monitor. Monitor configurations are stored in the workspace.
Save, reset, or delete workspaces
Save a custom workspace
As you customize a workspace, the application tracks your changes, storing the most recent layout. To store a specific layout more permanently,
save a custom workspace. Saved custom workspaces appear in the Workspace menu, where you can return to and reset them.
Arrange the frames and panels as desired, and then choose Window > Workspace > New Workspace. Type a name for the workspace, and
click OK.
Note: (After Effects, Premiere Pro, Encore) If a project saved with a custom workspace is opened on another system, the application looks for a
workspace with a matching name. If it can’t find a match (or the monitor configuration doesn’t match), it uses the current local workspace.
Reset a workspace
Reset the current workspace to return to its original, saved layout of panels.
Choose Window > Workspace > Reset workspace name.
Delete a workspace
1. Choose Window > Workspace >Delete Workspace.
2. Choose the workspace you want to delete, and then click OK.
Note: You cannot delete the currently active workspace.
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To the top
Brighten or darken the interface
You can lower the brightness, as when working in a darkened editing suite or when making color corrections. Changing the brightness affects
panels, windows, and dialog boxes but does not affect scroll bars, title bars, and menus that aren’t inside panels. In addition, the change doesn’t
affect the application background on Windows.
1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Appearance (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Appearance (Mac OS).
2. Drag the User Interface Brightness slider to the left or right. Click Default to restore the default brightness level.
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The 2-up editing workspace
In Premiere Pro, the 2-up workspace refers to the large Source Monitor and Program Monitor found at the top of the interface. This arrangement
allows you to focus more on the images, and less on the user interface.
The 2-up editing workspace and the Preview Area
You can view the Preview Area by choosing the panel menu > Preview Area in the Project panel.
The 2-up workspace and the Media Browser
In the 2-up interface, the Project panel covers up the Media Browser, so it is not apparent that you can drag items from the Media Browser into
the Project panel. To drag media from the Media Browser to the Project panel, do the following:
1. Select the items you wish to import in the Media Browser.
2. Drag the items to the Project tab.
Media is then imported into the Project panel.
You can also import items from the Media Browser by selecting media and then choosing File > Import From Media Browser. You can also choose
Import from the context menu.
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Setting up your system
Set up a DV or HDV system
Set up an SD-SDI, HD-SDI, or component system
Set up a file-based system
Set up an S-Video or composite system
Specify the default audio device
Specify ASIO device settings (Windows only)
Specify whether to render audio when rendering video
Specify the duration for preroll and postroll pauses
Specify scratch disks to improve system performance
Move or clean the Media Cache Database
Optimize rendering for available memory
For Premiere Pro system requirements, see the Adobe website.
For lists of various categories of hardware compatible with Adobe Premiere Pro, see the Adobe website.
Jeff Sengstack provides detailed tips for optimizing a computer system and Premiere Pro for performance on the Adobe website.
To run a series of performance tests on your computer system and determine how to optimize for performance with Premiere Pro, see this page.
This thread on the Premiere Pro forum provides recommendations for setting up disk drives for optimum performance and reliability.
For details about CUDA processing, the Mercury Playback Engine, and GPU processing, see this thread on the Adobe Premiere Pro user-to-user
forum.
This thread on the Premiere Pro user-to-user forum includes several experienced users’ suggestions for practical system requirements for Adobe
Premiere Pro.
See this page for resources about optimizing performance.
See this video for an After Effects and Premiere Pro performance workshop from video2Brain.
See this video for a performance tip: stopping software not relevant to your work.
See the FAQ entry: “What computer and components should I buy for Premiere Pro?” for advice about a good computer system for editing.
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Set up a DV or HDV system
DV/HDV setup
A. Computer and computer monitor B. 6-pin FireWire port and connector C. 4-pin FireWire port and connector D. DV/HDV camcorder E. RCA
jacks and plugs for L (white) audio, R (red) audio, composite video (yellow); jack and plug for S-Video (y/c) F. HDMI port and
connector G. Television monitor
With this setup, you can capture audio and video from a DV or HDV source. You can monitor the signal on a TV monitor while editing. Finally, you
can export any sequence back to videotape.
1. Connect the DV or HDV camcorder or VTR to the computer using a FireWire cable.
2. Connect the camcorder or VTR to the television monitor with an S-Video or RCA video cable and RCA audio cables, or an HDMI cable.
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3. Set the camcorder or VTR to VTR or Play mode.
4. (For HDV camcorders or VTRs only) Make sure the device is in DV playback mode for DV projects, or HDV playback mode for HDV
projects. See the user manual for your device for details.
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Set up an SD-SDI, HD-SDI, or component system
SDI/component setup with breakout box
A. Computer and computer monitor B. (Optional) A/V breakout box C. XLR jacks and plugs for L & R audio D. RS232/422 port and
connector E. BNC jacks and plugs for Y/Pb/Pr component video, BNC jack, and plug for SDI video F. HD/SD VTR G. BNC jacks and plugs for
Y/Pb/Pr component video, BNC jack, and plug for SDI video H. RCA jacks and plugs for L (white) & R (red) audio I. Speakers J. Television
monitor
With this setup you can capture audio and video from an SD-SDI, HD-SDI, or component video device (camcorder or VTR). You can monitor the
signal on a TV monitor while editing. Finally, you can export any sequence back to the camcorder or VTR.
This setup requires either an SDI or component PCI card installed in the computer. Alternatively, it requires an external SDI or component device
connected to the computer via FireWire. Either an internal card or an external device would provide ports, usually with BNC connectors, capable of
receiving SDI or component video signals.
Some SDI and component PCI cards come with breakout boxes which provide ports for the SDI or component signals. Some breakout boxes also
provide ports for genlock. Others provide the necessary outputs directly on the card.
1. Connect the SD-SDI, HD-SDI, or component device to the computer or breakout box using SDI or component video cables. A single cable
with BNC connectors carries SDI video, but three separate cables with BNC connectors carry component video signals. Run video cables
from the video outputs of the computer or breakout box to the video inputs of the device. Also run video cables from the video outputs of the
device to the video inputs of the computer or breakout box.
2. Connect the SD-SDI, HD-SDI, or component device to the computer or breakout box using XLR audio cables. Run audio cables from the
audio outputs of the computer or breakout box to the audio inputs of the device. Also run audio cables from the audio outputs of the device
to the audio inputs of the computer or breakout box.
3. Do one of the following:
Connect the serial device control port (RS-422 or RS-232) on the camcorder or VTR with the serial port (Windows) or USB port (Mac
OS) on the computer. Use the Pipeline Digital ProVTR cable for RS-232/422-controlled devices.
If your system has a breakout box with a serial device control port (RS-422 or RS-232), connect the serial device control port on the
device with this port on the breakout box. Do not connect the serial control port on the device with the serial or USB port on the
computer. Some breakout boxes require a standard serial 9-pin D-Sub cable instead of the Pipeline Digital ProVTR cable. Consult the
documentation from the manufacturer of the breakout box.
Note: Native serial device control is available in Windows only.
4. Connect the deck or camcorder to the television monitor with component video cables and to amplified speakers with RCA audio cables.
5. Put the camcorder or deck into VTR or Play mode.
6. In Premiere Pro, select File >New > Sequence.
7. In the Available Presets area of the New Sequence dialog box, select the SDI or component preset that matches the format of your source
footage. Premiere Pro does not provide these presets. Manufacturers of SDI cards, component capture cards, and other devices provide
these presets. The presets must be installed with those cards and devices.
8. Type a name in the Sequence Name box. Then click OK.
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Set up a file-based system
File-based system
A. Card reader, drive, or camcorder for P2, XDCAM HD, XDCAM EX, or AVCHD media B. Computer and computer monitor C. Audio cables
running to speakers or amplifier D. Speakers E. TV monitor F. BNC connectors for component or SDI video cables to TV monitor (alternative
to “G”) G. HDMI connector for audio-video cable to TV monitor (alternative to “F”)
With this setup, you can import or transfer audio and video files from card readers, drives, or tapeless camcorders recorded in any of the following
digital video file formats:
Panasonic P2
XDCAM HD
XDCAM EX
AVCHD
AVC-I
You can also preview video on a high-definition TV monitor, if your computer has one of the following:
a high-definition capture card,
a display card with component, SDI or HDMI outputs.
1. Connect the card reader, disk drive, or camcorder to the computer, typically with a USB 2.0 cable. Check the manual for your device for
details.
2. Connect the output of the computer sound card to computer speakers or audio amplifier.
3. Connect the video outputs from the capture card, breakout box, or display card to the TV monitor using component, SDI, or HDMI cables.
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Set up an S-Video or composite system
S-Video/composite setup
A. Computer and computer monitor B. Ports and connectors for FireWire, USB 2.0 C. A/D converter D. Jacks and plugs for RCA composite
video, S-Video (y/c) E. RS 232/422 port and connector F. RCA jacks and plugs for L (white) and R (red) audio G. Analog camcorder, analog
VTR H. RCA jacks and plugs for L (white) audio, R (red) audio, and composite video (yellow); jack and plug for S-Video (y/c) I. Television
monitor
With this setup, you can capture audio and video from an analog camcorder or VTR. You can monitor the video signal on a TV monitor while
editing. Finally, you can export any sequence back to the camcorder or VTR.
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To convert the analog source signal to a digital file the computer can read, this setup requires an analog/digital (A/D) converter, or digitizer. You
can use any of the following to digitize the video signal:
an internal digitizer, installed in the computer,
an external digitizer, connected to the computer,
a digital camcorder or VTR capable of digitizing an incoming analog signal.
1. Connect the analog camcorder or VTR to the digitizer using S-Video or RCA video cables. Run video cables from the video outputs of the
computer or its interface to the video inputs of the device. Also run video cables from the video outputs of the device to the video inputs of
the computer or its interface.
2. Connect the analog camcorder or VTR to the digitizer using XLR or RCA audio cables. Run audio cables from the audio outputs of the
digitizer to the audio inputs of the device. Also run audio cables from the audio outputs of the device to the audio inputs of the digitizer.
3. (Optional. For an analog camcorder or VTR with an RS-422 or RS-232 port. Windows only) Connect the serial device control port on the
camcorder or VTR with the serial port on the computer or digitizer using the Pipeline Digital ProVTR cable.
Note: Native serial device control is available in Windows only.
4. Connect the analog camcorder or VTR, or the digitizer, to the television monitor with an S-Video or RCA video cable, and RCA or XLR
audio cables.
5. Put the analog camcorder or deck into VTR or Play mode.
6. In Premiere Pro, select File >New > Sequence.
7. In the Available Presets area of the New Sequence dialog box, select the preset that matches the format of your A/D converter. Do not
match the source footage. For example, if you use a DV camcorder or A/DV converter to convert the analog signal, choose a DV preset.
8. Type a name in the Sequence Name box. Then click OK.
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Specify the default audio device
1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Audio Hardware (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Audio Hardware (Mac OS), and set the following
options:
Select an output device from the Default Device menu.
Select a buffer size from the Buffersize menu (Mac OS).
2. Click OK.
Audio Hardware Settings (Windows only)
When you click ASIO Settings in the Audio Hardware panel of the Preferences dialog box, Premiere Pro opens the Audio Hardware Settings dialog
box, which contains an Input tab, and an Output tab.
Enable Devices Determines which connected audio device is routed into and out of Premiere Pro. If the device is an ASIO device, select the
ASIO drivers for the device. If the sound card does not have manufacturer-supplied ASIO drivers, choose Premiere Pro WDM Sound for this
setting. To enable a device, be sure to install an up-to-date driver for the device (Windows.) If you want to input more than two stereo channels or
monitor 5.1 surround audio, the device driver must comply with the ASIO (Audio Stream Input Output) specification. If it does not, only stereo
inputs and outputs are available, regardless of the number of hardware inputs and outputs that are connected.
Buffersize Specifies the size of the buffer, in kilobytes, that Premiere Pro uses for recording audio.
Device 32-bit Recording/Playback On the Input tab, check Device 32-bit Recording to record audio in 32-bit samples. On the Output tab, check
Device 32-bit Playback to enable 32-bit playback.
Note: If you have trouble hearing audio, see the TechNote: “No sound during playback of video or audio clips.”
Set up a USB microphone (Mac OS)
1. In the Audio Midi Setup application in Utilities, go to Audio > Open Aggregate Device Editor.
2. Check each of the following:
Your USB microphone.
An additional input device, for example, Line In.
An output device
3. Select this new aggregate device within Premiere Pro's Audio Hardware Preference panel.
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Specify ASIO device settings (Windows only)
1. Choose Edit >Preferences > Audio Hardware.
2. Click ASIO settings. Specify the ASIO settings for the selected device.
Note: The device and driver you use determine the settings in this dialog box, not Adobe Premiere Pro. See the documentation for the
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ASIO device and driver you use.
3. In the Audio Hardware Settings dialog box, select the Input tab.
4. Check the boxes next to the names of any devices you want to enable.
5. Check Device 32-bit Recording if you want to record 32-bit audio.
6. Drag the Samples slider to set the size of the buffer.
7. Click OK.
Specify whether to render audio when rendering video
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You can specify whether Premiere Pro renders audio previews by default.
Select Sequence > Render Effects In to Out, or Sequence > Render In to Out. These commands are used you have set In and Out points to mark
the area to render audio previews, rather than the work area bar.
Rendering audio previews could improve playback performance, but could take additional time when you select either of these commands.
1. Select Edit > Preferences > General (Windows), or Premiere Pro > Preferences > General (Mac OS).
2. Select or deselect Render Audio When Rendering Video.
3. Click OK.
Specify the duration for preroll and postroll pauses
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You can set the length of preroll and postroll for clip and sequence previews in the General pane of the Preferences dialog box.
Note: The Preroll and Postroll fields are different from the Preroll setting in the Device Control pane of the Preferences dialog box. The Preroll
setting in the Device Control pane affects the control of external devices such as VTRs and camcorders.
1. Select Edit > Preferences > General (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > General (Mac OS).
2. In the Preroll and Postroll fields, type in the number of seconds for each.
3. Click OK.
Specify scratch disks to improve system performance
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When you edit a project, Premiere Pro uses disk space to store files required by your project. Premiere Pro stores captured video and audio,
conformed audio, and preview files. Premiere Pro uses conformed audio files and preview files to optimize performance, allowing real-time editing,
32-bit floating-point quality, and efficient output.
All scratch disk preferences are saved with each project. You can select different scratch disk locations for different projects. If you reopen an
earlier project after editing another project with different scratch disk locations, Premiere Pro will seek out the files belonging to the earlier project
at the scratch disk locations you chose for that project.
If you delete preview files or conformed audio files for a project, Premiere Pro automatically recreates them when you reopen the project.
By default, scratch disk files are stored where you save the project. The scratch disk space required increases as sequences become longer or
more complex. For best performance, dedicate a hard disk or disk strictly for your media assets. Choose a disk for the assets other than the disk
where you keep your project file, operating system files, or the files for applications. That way your media disks can access and play media files as
fast as possible, without having to access other files. Use the Project > Project Settings > Scratch Disks command to specify which disks Premiere
Pro uses for media files. Choose scratch disks when you set up a new project.
In terms of performance, it’s best to dedicate a different disk to each asset type, but you can also specify folders on the same disk. You can
specify unique scratch disk locations for each of the following types of files:
Captured Video Video files that you create using File > Capture.
If you transfer video files to a scratch disk folder before creating the project for them, specify the folder containing the video files for Captured
Video.
Captured Audio Audio files that you create using File > Capture, or by recording through the Audio Mixer as when recording a voice-over.
Video Previews Files created when you use the Sequence > Render In to Out, export to a movie file, or export to a device. If the previewed area
includes effects, the effects are rendered at full quality in the preview file.
Audio Previews Audio preview files are created by all of the following commands:
Sequence > Render In to Out
The Clip > Audio Options > Render And Replace command
Use export to a movie file
Export to a DV device
If the previewed area includes effects, they are rendered at full quality in the preview file.
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Specify scratch disks
You set up scratch disks in the Scratch Disk pane of the Preferences dialog box. Before changing scratch disk settings, you can verify the amount
of free disk space on the selected volume. by The amount appears in the box to the right of the path. If the path is too long to read, position the
pointer over the path name. The full path appears in a tool tip.
1. Choose Project > Project Settings > Scratch Disks.
2. Identify a location for each type of file named in the dialog box. Premiere Pro creates a subfolder named for each file type (for instance,
Captured Video) and stores the folder’s associated files in it. The menu lists three default locations:
My Documents (Windows) or Documents (Mac OS) Stores scratch files in the My Documents folder (Windows) or Documents folder (Mac
OS).
Same As Project Stores scratch files in the same folder where the project file is stored.
Custom Allows you to specify a location of your choosing. Choose Custom, then click Browse and browse to any available folder.
Optimizing scratch disk performance
For optimum performance, follow these guidelines:
If your computer has only one hard disk, consider leaving all scratch disk options at their default settings.
Set up scratch disks on one or more separate hard disks. In Premiere Pro, you can set up a separate scratch disk for each type of media.
For example, you can set up one disk for captured video and another for captured audio.
On Windows, specify only partitions formatted for the NTFS file format as scratch disks. On Mac OS, use partitions formatted for Mac OS
Extended. FAT32 partitions are not recommended for video. They do not support large file sizes.
Note: Third-party tools are available that allow NTFS drives to work with Mac OS. See Tuxera NTFS for Mac, and Paragon NTFS for Mac.
On Mac OS, disable journaling for best performance.
Specify your fastest hard disks for capturing footage and storing scratch files. You can use a slower disk for audio preview files and the
project file.
Specify only disks attached to your computer. A hard disk located on a network is usually too slow. Avoid using removable media because
Premiere Pro always requires access to scratch disk files. Scratch disk files are preserved for each project, even when you close the project.
They are reused when you reopen the project associated with them. If scratch disk files are stored on removable media and the media are
removed from the drive, the scratch disk is not available to Premiere Pro.
You can divide a single disk into partitions and set up partitions as scratch disks. However, partioning doesn’t improve performance because
the single drive mechanism becomes a bottleneck. For best results, set up scratch disk volumes that are physically separate drives.
You can capture audio and video to separate drives, if supported by the format codec. (The native DV and HDV capture in Premiere Pro
does not support capturing audio separate from video.) Set the locations for new files by choosing Edit > Preferences > Scratch Disks
(Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Scratch Disks (Mac OS). If you don’t change the defaults, all files captured or created by
Premiere Pro are stored in the same folder in which it stores the project files.
Online resources for improving system performance
See this forum thread for advice from experienced users on setting up disks for a video editing system.
For a collection of videos and articles about making Premiere Pro work faster can be found on this blog post.
See this video to learn about hard disk setup for optimum performance in Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects.
To learn how to format a disk as NTFS on Windows, see this web page on the Microsoft site.
To learn how to format a disk as HFS+ on Mac OS, see this page from the kenstone.net website. The information on this page is valid for Mac OS
X 10.4-10.7
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Move or clean the Media Cache Database
When Premiere Pro imports video and audio in some formats, it processes and caches versions of these items that it can readily access when
generating previews. Imported audio files are each conformed to a new .cfa file, and MPEG files are indexed to a new .mpgindex file. The media
cache greatly improves performance for previews, because the video and audio items do not need to be reprocessed for each preview.
Note: When you first import a file, you may experience a delay while the media is being processed and cached.
A database retains links to each of the cached media files. This media cache database is shared with Adobe Media Encoder, After Effects,
Premiere Pro, Encore, and Soundbooth, so each of these applications can each read from and write to the same set of cached media files. If you
change the location of the database from within any of these applications, the location is updated for the other applications, too. Each application
can use its own cache folder, but the same database keeps track of them.
Choose Edit > Preferences > Media (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Media (Mac OS), and do one of the following:
To move the media cache or the media cache database, click the respective Browse, button.
To remove conformed and indexed files from the cache and to remove their entries from the database, click Clean. This command only
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removes files associated with footage items for which the source file is no longer available.
Important: Before clicking the Clean button, make sure that any storage devices that contain your currently used source media are
connected to your computer. If footage is determined to be missing because the storage device on which it is located is not connected, the
associated files in the media cache is removed. This removal results in the need to reconform or reindex the footage when you attempt to
use the footage later.
Cleaning the database and cache with the Clean button does not remove files that are associated with footage items for which the source files
are still available. To manually remove conformed files and index files, navigate to the media cache folder and delete the files.
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Optimize rendering for available memory
By default, Premiere Pro renders video using the maximum number of available processors, up to 16. However, some sequences, such as those
containing high-resolution source video or still images, require large amounts of memory for the simultaneous rendering of multiple frames. These
sequences can force Premiere Pro to cancel rendering and to give a Low Memory Warning alert. In these cases, you can maximize the available
memory by changing the rendering optimization preference from Performance to Memory. Change this preference back to Performance when
rendering no longer requires memory optimization.
1. Select Edit > Preferences, and select Memory in the Preferences dialog box.
2. In the drop-down list next to Optimize Rendering For, select Memory.
3. Click OK, close Premiere Pro, and reopen the project for the new preference to take effect.
More Help topics
Legal Notices | Online Privacy Policy
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Sync settings
New in Premiere Pro CC
When you work with Adobe® Premiere® Pro on multiple machines, managing and syncing preferences, presets, and libraries between them can
be time-consuming, complex, and error-prone.
The new Sync Settings feature lets you sync your general preferences, keyboard shortcuts, presets, and libraries to the Creative Cloud. For
example, if you use more than one computer, the Sync Settings feature helps keep settings synchronized across machines.
You can also download and use settings on a computer that contains a copy of the software licensed to a different user. This feature lets multiple
users work with their own personal settings on the same computer. For example, freelance editors working during different shifts in a postproduction facility.
Syncing happens through your Adobe Creative Cloud account. The settings are uploaded to your Creative Cloud account and then downloaded
and applied on the other computer. You must initiate the sync manually. It does not happen automatically, and it cannot be scheduled.
Sync Settings using Adobe Creative Cloud
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Initiating Sync
On first launch, you can initiate the sync by selecting Sync Settings Now from the Welcome screen. Or you can select File > [your Adobe ID] >
Sync Settings Now.
The Adobe ID associated with the product's license is used to identify the user. If you haven't already created and uploaded settings for this
application, the local settings are
uploaded to the cloud by default.
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Sync settings from a different account
You can choose to sync the settings from a different Adobe ID instead of the Adobe ID associated with the product license used on the computer
you're working on.
To use a different Adobe ID to sync the settings, select Use Settings From a Different Account from the Welcome screen. Or select File > [your
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Adobe ID] > Use Settings From a Different Account.
Enter the Adobe ID and password. The settings for that Creative Cloud account are downloaded and applied, and the user name appears in the
Welcome Screen.
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Managing Sync
Clear Settings
You can clear all settings and revert to default settings. Select Edit > [your Adobe ID] > Clear Settings.
Note: If you select Clear Settings while a project is open, Premiere Pro saves and closes the current project to proceed.
Specify Sync preferences, and manage sync conflicts
The Preference dialog box lets you specify the sync setting options. For example, you can choose to have only keyboard shortcuts stored in the
Creative Cloud, and not sync the other preferences and settings on a computer.
The Preference dialog box also lets you choose what to do when a sync conflict occurs.
Sync settings To specify what gets synchronized, Select File > [your Adobe ID] > Manage Sync Settings. Or open Sync Settings in the
Preferences dialog box (Edit > Preferences > Sync Settings).
Note: To sync your settings successfully, change the settings only from within the application. The sync settings feature does not sync files
manually placed in the preferences folder location.
Select the options to sync preferences and settings. Synchronizable preferences are not dependent on computer or hardware settings.
Preferences/Settings
Workspace Layouts
Keyboard Shortcuts
Note: Keyboard shortcuts created for Windows only sync with a Windows computer. Mac OS keyboard shortcuts only sync with a Mac OS
computer.
When Syncing When you initiate a sync, the modification date between the local settings and the settings stored in the Creative Cloud is
compared. If modification dates do not match, a sync conflict is detected.
You can specify what action to take when a sync conflict occurs by selecting from the following:
Ask My Preference
Always Upload Settings
Always Download Settings
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When you select Ask My Preference, the Sync Settings dialog opens, prompting you to upload or download your settings.
Upload Settings: Syncs settings from your computer to Creative Cloud.
Download Settings: Syncs settings from Creative Cloud to your computer, overwriting the local version with the Creative Cloud version of settings.
Automatically clear settings on application quit Select this preference option to clear the sync settings every time you quit Premiere Pro. On
next launch, the default settings are used.
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Legal Notices | Online Privacy Policy
56
Setting up your system
Set up a DV or HDV system
Set up an SD-SDI, HD-SDI, or component system
Set up a file-based system
Set up an S-Video or composite system
Specify the default audio device
Specify ASIO device settings (Windows only)
Specify whether to render audio when rendering video
Specify the duration for preroll and postroll pauses
Specify scratch disks to improve system performance
Move or clean the Media Cache Database
Optimize rendering for available memory
For Premiere Pro system requirements, see the Adobe website.
For lists of various categories of hardware compatible with Adobe Premiere Pro, see the Adobe website.
Jeff Sengstack provides detailed tips for optimizing a computer system and Premiere Pro for performance on the Adobe website.
To run a series of performance tests on your computer system and determine how to optimize for performance with Premiere Pro, see this page.
This thread on the Premiere Pro forum provides recommendations for setting up disk drives for optimum performance and reliability.
For details about CUDA processing, the Mercury Playback Engine, and GPU processing, see this thread on the Adobe Premiere Pro user-to-user
forum.
This thread on the Premiere Pro user-to-user forum includes several experienced users’ suggestions for practical system requirements for Adobe
Premiere Pro.
See this page for resources about optimizing performance.
See this video for an After Effects and Premiere Pro performance workshop from video2Brain.
See this video for a performance tip: stopping software not relevant to your work.
See the FAQ entry: “What computer and components should I buy for Premiere Pro?” for advice about a good computer system for editing.
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Set up a DV or HDV system
DV/HDV setup
A. Computer and computer monitor B. 6-pin FireWire port and connector C. 4-pin FireWire port and connector D. DV/HDV camcorder E. RCA
jacks and plugs for L (white) audio, R (red) audio, composite video (yellow); jack and plug for S-Video (y/c) F. HDMI port and
connector G. Television monitor
With this setup, you can capture audio and video from a DV or HDV source. You can monitor the signal on a TV monitor while editing. Finally, you
can export any sequence back to videotape.
1. Connect the DV or HDV camcorder or VTR to the computer using a FireWire cable.
2. Connect the camcorder or VTR to the television monitor with an S-Video or RCA video cable and RCA audio cables, or an HDMI cable.
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3. Set the camcorder or VTR to VTR or Play mode.
4. (For HDV camcorders or VTRs only) Make sure the device is in DV playback mode for DV projects, or HDV playback mode for HDV
projects. See the user manual for your device for details.
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Set up an SD-SDI, HD-SDI, or component system
SDI/component setup with breakout box
A. Computer and computer monitor B. (Optional) A/V breakout box C. XLR jacks and plugs for L & R audio D. RS232/422 port and
connector E. BNC jacks and plugs for Y/Pb/Pr component video, BNC jack, and plug for SDI video F. HD/SD VTR G. BNC jacks and plugs for
Y/Pb/Pr component video, BNC jack, and plug for SDI video H. RCA jacks and plugs for L (white) & R (red) audio I. Speakers J. Television
monitor
With this setup you can capture audio and video from an SD-SDI, HD-SDI, or component video device (camcorder or VTR). You can monitor the
signal on a TV monitor while editing. Finally, you can export any sequence back to the camcorder or VTR.
This setup requires either an SDI or component PCI card installed in the computer. Alternatively, it requires an external SDI or component device
connected to the computer via FireWire. Either an internal card or an external device would provide ports, usually with BNC connectors, capable of
receiving SDI or component video signals.
Some SDI and component PCI cards come with breakout boxes which provide ports for the SDI or component signals. Some breakout boxes also
provide ports for genlock. Others provide the necessary outputs directly on the card.
1. Connect the SD-SDI, HD-SDI, or component device to the computer or breakout box using SDI or component video cables. A single cable
with BNC connectors carries SDI video, but three separate cables with BNC connectors carry component video signals. Run video cables
from the video outputs of the computer or breakout box to the video inputs of the device. Also run video cables from the video outputs of the
device to the video inputs of the computer or breakout box.
2. Connect the SD-SDI, HD-SDI, or component device to the computer or breakout box using XLR audio cables. Run audio cables from the
audio outputs of the computer or breakout box to the audio inputs of the device. Also run audio cables from the audio outputs of the device
to the audio inputs of the computer or breakout box.
3. Do one of the following:
Connect the serial device control port (RS-422 or RS-232) on the camcorder or VTR with the serial port (Windows) or USB port (Mac
OS) on the computer. Use the Pipeline Digital ProVTR cable for RS-232/422-controlled devices.
If your system has a breakout box with a serial device control port (RS-422 or RS-232), connect the serial device control port on the
device with this port on the breakout box. Do not connect the serial control port on the device with the serial or USB port on the
computer. Some breakout boxes require a standard serial 9-pin D-Sub cable instead of the Pipeline Digital ProVTR cable. Consult the
documentation from the manufacturer of the breakout box.
Note: Native serial device control is available in Windows only.
4. Connect the deck or camcorder to the television monitor with component video cables and to amplified speakers with RCA audio cables.
5. Put the camcorder or deck into VTR or Play mode.
6. In Premiere Pro, select File >New > Sequence.
7. In the Available Presets area of the New Sequence dialog box, select the SDI or component preset that matches the format of your source
footage. Premiere Pro does not provide these presets. Manufacturers of SDI cards, component capture cards, and other devices provide
these presets. The presets must be installed with those cards and devices.
8. Type a name in the Sequence Name box. Then click OK.
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Set up a file-based system
File-based system
A. Card reader, drive, or camcorder for P2, XDCAM HD, XDCAM EX, or AVCHD media B. Computer and computer monitor C. Audio cables
running to speakers or amplifier D. Speakers E. TV monitor F. BNC connectors for component or SDI video cables to TV monitor (alternative
to “G”) G. HDMI connector for audio-video cable to TV monitor (alternative to “F”)
With this setup, you can import or transfer audio and video files from card readers, drives, or tapeless camcorders recorded in any of the following
digital video file formats:
Panasonic P2
XDCAM HD
XDCAM EX
AVCHD
AVC-I
You can also preview video on a high-definition TV monitor, if your computer has one of the following:
a high-definition capture card,
a display card with component, SDI or HDMI outputs.
1. Connect the card reader, disk drive, or camcorder to the computer, typically with a USB 2.0 cable. Check the manual for your device for
details.
2. Connect the output of the computer sound card to computer speakers or audio amplifier.
3. Connect the video outputs from the capture card, breakout box, or display card to the TV monitor using component, SDI, or HDMI cables.
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Set up an S-Video or composite system
S-Video/composite setup
A. Computer and computer monitor B. Ports and connectors for FireWire, USB 2.0 C. A/D converter D. Jacks and plugs for RCA composite
video, S-Video (y/c) E. RS 232/422 port and connector F. RCA jacks and plugs for L (white) and R (red) audio G. Analog camcorder, analog
VTR H. RCA jacks and plugs for L (white) audio, R (red) audio, and composite video (yellow); jack and plug for S-Video (y/c) I. Television
monitor
With this setup, you can capture audio and video from an analog camcorder or VTR. You can monitor the video signal on a TV monitor while
editing. Finally, you can export any sequence back to the camcorder or VTR.
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To convert the analog source signal to a digital file the computer can read, this setup requires an analog/digital (A/D) converter, or digitizer. You
can use any of the following to digitize the video signal:
an internal digitizer, installed in the computer,
an external digitizer, connected to the computer,
a digital camcorder or VTR capable of digitizing an incoming analog signal.
1. Connect the analog camcorder or VTR to the digitizer using S-Video or RCA video cables. Run video cables from the video outputs of the
computer or its interface to the video inputs of the device. Also run video cables from the video outputs of the device to the video inputs of
the computer or its interface.
2. Connect the analog camcorder or VTR to the digitizer using XLR or RCA audio cables. Run audio cables from the audio outputs of the
digitizer to the audio inputs of the device. Also run audio cables from the audio outputs of the device to the audio inputs of the digitizer.
3. (Optional. For an analog camcorder or VTR with an RS-422 or RS-232 port. Windows only) Connect the serial device control port on the
camcorder or VTR with the serial port on the computer or digitizer using the Pipeline Digital ProVTR cable.
Note: Native serial device control is available in Windows only.
4. Connect the analog camcorder or VTR, or the digitizer, to the television monitor with an S-Video or RCA video cable, and RCA or XLR
audio cables.
5. Put the analog camcorder or deck into VTR or Play mode.
6. In Premiere Pro, select File >New > Sequence.
7. In the Available Presets area of the New Sequence dialog box, select the preset that matches the format of your A/D converter. Do not
match the source footage. For example, if you use a DV camcorder or A/DV converter to convert the analog signal, choose a DV preset.
8. Type a name in the Sequence Name box. Then click OK.
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Specify the default audio device
1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Audio Hardware (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Audio Hardware (Mac OS), and set the following
options:
Select an output device from the Default Device menu.
Select a buffer size from the Buffersize menu (Mac OS).
2. Click OK.
Audio Hardware Settings (Windows only)
When you click ASIO Settings in the Audio Hardware panel of the Preferences dialog box, Premiere Pro opens the Audio Hardware Settings dialog
box, which contains an Input tab, and an Output tab.
Enable Devices Determines which connected audio device is routed into and out of Premiere Pro. If the device is an ASIO device, select the
ASIO drivers for the device. If the sound card does not have manufacturer-supplied ASIO drivers, choose Premiere Pro WDM Sound for this
setting. To enable a device, be sure to install an up-to-date driver for the device (Windows.) If you want to input more than two stereo channels or
monitor 5.1 surround audio, the device driver must comply with the ASIO (Audio Stream Input Output) specification. If it does not, only stereo
inputs and outputs are available, regardless of the number of hardware inputs and outputs that are connected.
Buffersize Specifies the size of the buffer, in kilobytes, that Premiere Pro uses for recording audio.
Device 32-bit Recording/Playback On the Input tab, check Device 32-bit Recording to record audio in 32-bit samples. On the Output tab, check
Device 32-bit Playback to enable 32-bit playback.
Note: If you have trouble hearing audio, see the TechNote: “No sound during playback of video or audio clips.”
Set up a USB microphone (Mac OS)
1. In the Audio Midi Setup application in Utilities, go to Audio > Open Aggregate Device Editor.
2. Check each of the following:
Your USB microphone.
An additional input device, for example, Line In.
An output device
3. Select this new aggregate device within Premiere Pro's Audio Hardware Preference panel.
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Specify ASIO device settings (Windows only)
1. Choose Edit >Preferences > Audio Hardware.
2. Click ASIO settings. Specify the ASIO settings for the selected device.
Note: The device and driver you use determine the settings in this dialog box, not Adobe Premiere Pro. See the documentation for the
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ASIO device and driver you use.
3. In the Audio Hardware Settings dialog box, select the Input tab.
4. Check the boxes next to the names of any devices you want to enable.
5. Check Device 32-bit Recording if you want to record 32-bit audio.
6. Drag the Samples slider to set the size of the buffer.
7. Click OK.
Specify whether to render audio when rendering video
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You can specify whether Premiere Pro renders audio previews by default.
Select Sequence > Render Effects In to Out, or Sequence > Render In to Out. These commands are used you have set In and Out points to mark
the area to render audio previews, rather than the work area bar.
Rendering audio previews could improve playback performance, but could take additional time when you select either of these commands.
1. Select Edit > Preferences > General (Windows), or Premiere Pro > Preferences > General (Mac OS).
2. Select or deselect Render Audio When Rendering Video.
3. Click OK.
Specify the duration for preroll and postroll pauses
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You can set the length of preroll and postroll for clip and sequence previews in the General pane of the Preferences dialog box.
Note: The Preroll and Postroll fields are different from the Preroll setting in the Device Control pane of the Preferences dialog box. The Preroll
setting in the Device Control pane affects the control of external devices such as VTRs and camcorders.
1. Select Edit > Preferences > General (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > General (Mac OS).
2. In the Preroll and Postroll fields, type in the number of seconds for each.
3. Click OK.
Specify scratch disks to improve system performance
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When you edit a project, Premiere Pro uses disk space to store files required by your project. Premiere Pro stores captured video and audio,
conformed audio, and preview files. Premiere Pro uses conformed audio files and preview files to optimize performance, allowing real-time editing,
32-bit floating-point quality, and efficient output.
All scratch disk preferences are saved with each project. You can select different scratch disk locations for different projects. If you reopen an
earlier project after editing another project with different scratch disk locations, Premiere Pro will seek out the files belonging to the earlier project
at the scratch disk locations you chose for that project.
If you delete preview files or conformed audio files for a project, Premiere Pro automatically recreates them when you reopen the project.
By default, scratch disk files are stored where you save the project. The scratch disk space required increases as sequences become longer or
more complex. For best performance, dedicate a hard disk or disk strictly for your media assets. Choose a disk for the assets other than the disk
where you keep your project file, operating system files, or the files for applications. That way your media disks can access and play media files as
fast as possible, without having to access other files. Use the Project > Project Settings > Scratch Disks command to specify which disks Premiere
Pro uses for media files. Choose scratch disks when you set up a new project.
In terms of performance, it’s best to dedicate a different disk to each asset type, but you can also specify folders on the same disk. You can
specify unique scratch disk locations for each of the following types of files:
Captured Video Video files that you create using File > Capture.
If you transfer video files to a scratch disk folder before creating the project for them, specify the folder containing the video files for Captured
Video.
Captured Audio Audio files that you create using File > Capture, or by recording through the Audio Mixer as when recording a voice-over.
Video Previews Files created when you use the Sequence > Render In to Out, export to a movie file, or export to a device. If the previewed area
includes effects, the effects are rendered at full quality in the preview file.
Audio Previews Audio preview files are created by all of the following commands:
Sequence > Render In to Out
The Clip > Audio Options > Render And Replace command
Use export to a movie file
Export to a DV device
If the previewed area includes effects, they are rendered at full quality in the preview file.
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Specify scratch disks
You set up scratch disks in the Scratch Disk pane of the Preferences dialog box. Before changing scratch disk settings, you can verify the amount
of free disk space on the selected volume. by The amount appears in the box to the right of the path. If the path is too long to read, position the
pointer over the path name. The full path appears in a tool tip.
1. Choose Project > Project Settings > Scratch Disks.
2. Identify a location for each type of file named in the dialog box. Premiere Pro creates a subfolder named for each file type (for instance,
Captured Video) and stores the folder’s associated files in it. The menu lists three default locations:
My Documents (Windows) or Documents (Mac OS) Stores scratch files in the My Documents folder (Windows) or Documents folder (Mac
OS).
Same As Project Stores scratch files in the same folder where the project file is stored.
Custom Allows you to specify a location of your choosing. Choose Custom, then click Browse and browse to any available folder.
Optimizing scratch disk performance
For optimum performance, follow these guidelines:
If your computer has only one hard disk, consider leaving all scratch disk options at their default settings.
Set up scratch disks on one or more separate hard disks. In Premiere Pro, you can set up a separate scratch disk for each type of media.
For example, you can set up one disk for captured video and another for captured audio.
On Windows, specify only partitions formatted for the NTFS file format as scratch disks. On Mac OS, use partitions formatted for Mac OS
Extended. FAT32 partitions are not recommended for video. They do not support large file sizes.
Note: Third-party tools are available that allow NTFS drives to work with Mac OS. See Tuxera NTFS for Mac, and Paragon NTFS for Mac.
On Mac OS, disable journaling for best performance.
Specify your fastest hard disks for capturing footage and storing scratch files. You can use a slower disk for audio preview files and the
project file.
Specify only disks attached to your computer. A hard disk located on a network is usually too slow. Avoid using removable media because
Premiere Pro always requires access to scratch disk files. Scratch disk files are preserved for each project, even when you close the project.
They are reused when you reopen the project associated with them. If scratch disk files are stored on removable media and the media are
removed from the drive, the scratch disk is not available to Premiere Pro.
You can divide a single disk into partitions and set up partitions as scratch disks. However, partioning doesn’t improve performance because
the single drive mechanism becomes a bottleneck. For best results, set up scratch disk volumes that are physically separate drives.
You can capture audio and video to separate drives, if supported by the format codec. (The native DV and HDV capture in Premiere Pro
does not support capturing audio separate from video.) Set the locations for new files by choosing Edit > Preferences > Scratch Disks
(Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Scratch Disks (Mac OS). If you don’t change the defaults, all files captured or created by
Premiere Pro are stored in the same folder in which it stores the project files.
Online resources for improving system performance
See this forum thread for advice from experienced users on setting up disks for a video editing system.
For a collection of videos and articles about making Premiere Pro work faster can be found on this blog post.
See this video to learn about hard disk setup for optimum performance in Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects.
To learn how to format a disk as NTFS on Windows, see this web page on the Microsoft site.
To learn how to format a disk as HFS+ on Mac OS, see this page from the kenstone.net website. The information on this page is valid for Mac OS
X 10.4-10.7
To the top
Move or clean the Media Cache Database
When Premiere Pro imports video and audio in some formats, it processes and caches versions of these items that it can readily access when
generating previews. Imported audio files are each conformed to a new .cfa file, and MPEG files are indexed to a new .mpgindex file. The media
cache greatly improves performance for previews, because the video and audio items do not need to be reprocessed for each preview.
Note: When you first import a file, you may experience a delay while the media is being processed and cached.
A database retains links to each of the cached media files. This media cache database is shared with Adobe Media Encoder, After Effects,
Premiere Pro, Encore, and Soundbooth, so each of these applications can each read from and write to the same set of cached media files. If you
change the location of the database from within any of these applications, the location is updated for the other applications, too. Each application
can use its own cache folder, but the same database keeps track of them.
Choose Edit > Preferences > Media (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Media (Mac OS), and do one of the following:
To move the media cache or the media cache database, click the respective Browse, button.
To remove conformed and indexed files from the cache and to remove their entries from the database, click Clean. This command only
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removes files associated with footage items for which the source file is no longer available.
Important: Before clicking the Clean button, make sure that any storage devices that contain your currently used source media are
connected to your computer. If footage is determined to be missing because the storage device on which it is located is not connected, the
associated files in the media cache is removed. This removal results in the need to reconform or reindex the footage when you attempt to
use the footage later.
Cleaning the database and cache with the Clean button does not remove files that are associated with footage items for which the source files
are still available. To manually remove conformed files and index files, navigate to the media cache folder and delete the files.
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Optimize rendering for available memory
By default, Premiere Pro renders video using the maximum number of available processors, up to 16. However, some sequences, such as those
containing high-resolution source video or still images, require large amounts of memory for the simultaneous rendering of multiple frames. These
sequences can force Premiere Pro to cancel rendering and to give a Low Memory Warning alert. In these cases, you can maximize the available
memory by changing the rendering optimization preference from Performance to Memory. Change this preference back to Performance when
rendering no longer requires memory optimization.
1. Select Edit > Preferences, and select Memory in the Preferences dialog box.
2. In the drop-down list next to Optimize Rendering For, select Memory.
3. Click OK, close Premiere Pro, and reopen the project for the new preference to take effect.
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Working with Panels
Navigate the panels
Display any panel full-screen
Display panel options
Display context and panel menus
Tools panel and Options panel
Clip details in the Info panel
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Navigate the panels
You can use keyboard shortcuts to activate panels in rotation.
Do one of the following:
To activate panels in rotation to the right, press Ctrl+Shift+. (period) (Windows), or Control+Shift+. (period) (Mac OS).
To activate panels in rotation to the left, press Ctrl+Shift+, (comma) (Windows), or Control+Shift+, (comma) (Mac OS).
Kevin Monahan provides instructions and keyboard shortcuts for activating panels in this blog post.
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Display any panel full-screen
You can expand any panel to display it in full-screen mode, and toggle back to normal view. You can do so with the current panel in focus or the
panel you are hovering over with your mouse.
1. Hover your mouse over the panel you want to maximize.
2. Press the accent key (`). Typically, this key lies just to the left of the numeral one (1) key. Some see this key as the back quote key, or the
tilde key. Press the accent key once more to restore the panel size.
You can also maximize a selected panel by choosing Window > Maximize Frame. To restore the panel size, choose Window > Restore
Frame Size. You can also press Shift+accent to maximize the panel size of a selected panel. Press the accent key to toggle the panel size
of a panel you are hovering over with the mouse.
Note: When Adobe Premiere Pro is installed on a computer with a non-U.S. keyboard, the Maximize Or Restore Frame Under Cursor
command might be mapped to a key other than the accent key. The key for Maximize Or Restore Frame Under Cursor (and its counterpart,
Maximize or Restore Active Frame) is listed in the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box. To find it, select the Adobe Premiere Pro Defaults set.
Then, select Application from the menu. Scroll down past the Help heading to Maximize or Restore Frame Under Cursor and set the most
appropriate keyboard shortcut.
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Display panel options
Click the panel menu icon
in the upper-right corner of the panel.
You can open a panel menu even when the panel is minimized.
In Photoshop, you can change the font size of the text in panels and tool tips. In the Interface preferences, choose a size from the UI Font Size
menu.
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Display context and panel menus
In addition to choosing from the menus at the top of your screen, you can choose from context menus, which display commands relative to the
active tool or selected item. Panel menus display commands relative to the active panel.
To display panel menus, click the button
in the upper-right corner of the panel.
To display context menus, right-click a panel.
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Tools panel and Options panel
When you open the Options panel, it opens by default in the horizontal docking area running just under the menu bar, forming the Options bar.
You can undock, move, and redock the Options panel like any other panel. By default, the Options panel contains a menu of workspaces and a
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link to CS Services. You can also dock the Tools panel to the Options panel.
Tools
When you select a tool, the pointer changes shape according to the selection. For example, when you select the Razor tool and position the
pointer over a clip in a Timeline panel, the icon changes to a razor
. However, the Selection tool icon can change to reflect the task currently
being performed. In some cases, pressing a modifier key (such as Shift) as you use a tool changes its function, and its icon changes accordingly.
Select tools from the Tools panel, or use a keyboard shortcut. You can resize the Tools panel and orient it vertically or horizontally.
Note: The Selection tool is the default tool. It’s used for everything other than specialized functions. If the program isn’t responding as you expect,
make sure that the Selection tool is selected.
Toolbox
A. Selection tool B. Ripple Edit tool C. Rate Stretch tool D. Slip tool E. Pen tool F. Hand tool G. Track Select tool H. Rolling Edit
tool I. Razor tool J. Slide tool K. Zoom tool
Select any tool to activate it for use in a Timeline panel by clicking it or pressing its keyboard shortcut. Let the cursor hover over a tool to see its
name and keyboard shortcut.
Selection Tool The standard tool for selecting clips, menu items, and other objects in the user interface. It’s generally a good practice to select
the Selection Tool as soon as you are done using any of the other, more specialized, tools. For more information about using the Selection Tool,
see Select one or more clips.
Track Selection Tool Select this tool to select all the clips to the right of the cursor in a sequence. To select a clip and all clips to the right in its
own track, click the clip. To select a clip and all clips to its right in all tracks, Shift-click the clip. Pressing Shift changes the Track Selection Tool
into the Multi-track Selection Tool. For more information about using the Track Selection Tool, see Select one or more clips and Delete all clips on
one track.
Ripple Edit Tool Select this tool to trim the In or Out point of a clip in a Timeline. The Ripple Edit Tool closes gaps caused by the edit and
preserves all edits to the left or right of the trimmed clip. For more information about using the Ripple Edit tool, see Making rolling and ripple edits
or this video tutorial about the Ripple Edit Tool by Andrew Devis
Rolling Edit Tool Select this tool to roll the edit point between two clips in a Timeline. The Rolling Edit Tool trims the In point of one and the Out
point of the other, while leaving the combined duration of the two clips unchanged. For more information about using the Rolling Edit tool, see
Making rolling and ripple edits or this video tutorial about the Rolling Edit Tool by Andrew Devis.
Rate Stretch Tool Select this tool to shorten a clip in a Timeline by speeding up its playback, or to lengthen it by slowing it down. The Rate
Stretch Tool changes speed and duration, but leaves the In and Out points of the clip unchanged. For more information about using the Rate
Stretch Tool, see Change clip speed and duration with the Rate Stretch tool or this video about the Rate Stretch Tool by Andrew Devis..
Razor Tool Select this tool to make one or more incisions in clips in a Timeline. Click a point in a clip to split it at that precise location. To split
clips in all tracks at that location, Shift-click the spot in any of the clips. For more information about using the Razor Tool, see Split or cut one or
more clips with the Razor tool or this video about the Razor Tool by Andrew Devis.
Slip Tool Select this tool to simultaneously change the In and Out points of a clip in a Timeline, while keeping the time span between them
constant. For example, if you have trimmed a 10-second clip to 5 seconds in a Timeline, you can use the Slip Tool to determine which 5 seconds
of the clip appear in the Timeline. For more information about using the Slip Tool, see Make slip and slide edits or this video about the Slip Tool by
Andrew Devis.
Slide Tool Select this tool to move a clip to the left or right in a Timeline while simultaneously trimming the two clips that surround it. The
combined duration of the three clips, and the location of the group in the Timeline, remain unchanged. For more information about using the Slide
Tool, see Make slip and slide edits or this video about the Slide Tool by Andrew Devis.
Pen Tool Select this tool to set or select keyframes, or to adjust connector lines in a Timeline. Drag a connector line vertically to adjust it. Ctrl-click
(Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) on a connector line to set a keyframe. Shift-click noncontiguous keyframes to select them. Drag a
marquee over contiguous keyframes to select them. For more information about using the Pen Tool, see Select keyframes.
Hand Tool Select this tool to move the viewing area of a Timeline to the right or left. Drag left or right anywhere in the viewing area.
Zoom Tool Select this tool to zoom in or out in a Timeline viewing area. Click in the viewing area to zoom in by one increment. Alt-click (Windows)
or Option-click (Mac OS) to zoom out by one increment. For more information about using the Zoom Tool, see Navigate in a sequence.
Open the Options panel
Select Window > Options.
Dock the Tools panel to the Options panel
1. In the Tools panel, click the panel menu icon.
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2. Select Dock In Options Panel.
Undock the Tools panel from the Options panel
In the Options panel, click the dotted area to the left of Selection Tool.
Premiere Pro removes the Tools panel from the Options panel, and returns the Tools panel to the location it had before docking to the Options
panel.
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Clip details in the Info panel
The Info panel displays several data about a selected item, and timecode information for clips under the current-time indicator in the Timeline.
At the top of the panel, information is displayed for the current selection. This information varies depending on its media type, the active panel,
and so on. For example, the Info panel displays information unique to an empty space in a Timeline panel, or a clip in the Project panel.
Video Indicates frame rate, frame size, and pixel aspect ratio, in that order.
Audio Indicates sample rate, bit depth, and channels, in that order.
Tape Indicates the name of the tape.
In Indicates the In point timecode of the selected clip.
Out Indicates the Out point timecode of the selected clip.
Duration Indicates the duration of the selected clip.
The section below the current selection data contains the timecode values for the active sequence and for clips in each of its video and audio
tracks. These values are displayed in a stacking order that matches the Timeline for easy visual correlation. Video track timecodes are displayed
with the highest track number on top, and audio tracks are displayed with the highest track number on the bottom. The only time this section is
blank is when all sequences are closed.
When a track is added to or deleted from the current sequence, the Info panel updates to accurately display the number of tracks in the sequence.
There is no limit on the number of tracks displayed. Similarly, when the user switches to a different sequence, the Info panel updates to display the
correct number of tracks in that sequence.
The Info panel displays timecode for the current selection and for all track items under the current-time indicator. When the playhead crosses a
blank area in the timeline, no timecode value is displayed for that track, but the track label remains visible and undimmed. The vertical stack layout
of the timecodes is easily correlated with the physical layout of the tracks in the sequence.
The Info panel
A. Name of selected clip B. Data for selected clip C. Tape name D. Sequence timecode locations of clip Start and End points E. Name of
active sequence F. Source timecode location in selected clip of current-time indicator G. Source timecode location in clips on video tracks of
current-time indicator H. Source timecode location in clips on audio tracks of current-time indicator
Note: You can change the default behavior of some of the panels in the Preferences dialog box. See Preferences.
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Preferences
Change preferences
General preferences
Appearance preferences
Audio Preferences
Audio Hardware preferences
Audio Output Mapping preferences
Change the Auto Save settings
Capture preferences
Device Control preferences
Label Colors preferences
Label Defaults preferences
Media preferences
Memory preferences
Playback Settings preferences
Sync Settings
Titler preferences
Trim preferences
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Change preferences
You can customize the look and behavior of Premiere Pro, from determining the default length of transitions to setting the brightness of the user
interface. Most of these preferences remain in effect until you change them. The preferences you set for scratch disks, however, are saved with
your projects. Whenever you open a project, it automatically defaults to the scratch disks you selected for it when you set up that project.
To open the Preferences dialog box, choose Edit > Preferences (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences (Mac OS), and select the
category of preferences you wish to change.
To restore default preference settings, hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) while the application is starting. You can release the Alt
key or Option key when the splash screen appears.
To restore default preference settings and plug-in cache at the same time, hold down Shift-Alt (Windows) or Shift-Option (Mac OS) while the
application is starting. Release the Shift-Alt keys or Shift-Option key when the splash screen appears.
Preferences are stored in the following location:
For Windows: <drive>\Users\<username>\AppData\Roaming\Adobe\Adobe Premiere Pro
For Mac OS: <drive>/Users/<username>Library/Preferences/com.adobe.AdobePremierePro.plist
This excerpt from the Adobe Premiere Pro Classroom in a Book explains how to set up projects, sequences, and preferences when getting started
with Premiere Pro. See Selecting Settings, Adjusting Preferences, and Managing Assets in Adobe Premiere Pro.
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General preferences
In the General pane of the Preferences dialog box, you can customize settings for everything from playback preroll duration to bin behaviors.
Preroll and postroll settings are found in Edit > Preferences > Playback (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Playback (Mac OS).
There is a preference for Timeline mouse scrolling. You can choose vertical or horizontal scrolling. By default, mouse scrolling is horizontal
for Windows and vertical for Mac OS. For Windows, press the Ctrl key to switch to vertical scrolling.
You can specify whether Adobe Premiere Pro, by default, displays timeline playback by page scroll, by smooth scroll, or no scroll. In page
scrolling, each new view of the timeline appears after the playhead moves offscreen. In smooth scrolling, the playhead remains in the middle
of the screen, while the clips and time ruler move by.
You can specify whether Adobe Premiere Pro, by default, shows clip keyframes, clip volume, handles, keyframes, track keyframes, track
volume, or to hide keyframes for audio tracks. Select the desired option from the New Timeline Audio Tracks menu.
You can specify whether Adobe Premiere Pro, by default, shows opacity handles, keyframes, or neither for video tracks. Select the desired
option from the New Timeline Video Tracks menu.
Bin behavior when double-clicking on a bin, or double-clicking with the Shift or Option keys can be controlled in the Bins preference.
You can choose to show the match sequence settings to clip dialog.
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Appearance preferences
In the Appearance pane of the Preferences dialog box, you can set the overall brightness of the user interface.
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Audio Preferences
Automatch Time The Automatch Time preference specifies the time, in the Audio Mixer, for any control that has been adjusted to return to its
previous setting. Affected controls are Volume, Pan, Effect and Send parameter knobs in Audio, Submix and (except sends) Master track.
Automatch Time preference affects properties in Touch mode, and in Read mode for effects with keyframes.
5.1 Mixdown Type Specifies how Premiere Pro mixes source channels to 5.1 audio tracks.
Play Audio While Scrubbing Enables audio scrubbing. You can create a keyboard shortcut called “Toggle Audio During Scrubbing” to toggle
audio scrubbing on or off while scrubbing. Using a keyboard shortcut is preferable to returning to the Preferences dialog box each time you want to
turn audio scrubbing on or off.
Mute Input During Timeline Recording Check this box to prevent monitoring of the audio inputs while recording the timeline.
Default Track Format Defines the type of track in which the clip audio channels are presented when a clip is added to a sequence—Mono,
Stereo, Mono As Stereo, or 5.1.
Mono Maps the source audio channels so that they’re placed on separate mono audio tracks. For example, when you select Mono from
the Default Track Format menu, Premiere Pro maps each source channel to a separate mono track on capture or import. If you capture
from a stereo source with this setting, Premiere Pro maps each of the source channels to a separate monaural track. You can apply the
Mono track format to clips containing any number of audio channels. Importing a file containing 5.1 channels maps them to six audio
tracks. When you add the clip to the sequence, the clips on the separate mono tracks remain linked together.
Stereo Maps the source audio channels so that paired channels are placed on stereo audio tracks. You can apply the Stereo track format
to clips containing any number of audio channels. If the clip doesn’t contain an even number of channels, a silent channel is created. The
silent channel is paired with the unpaired channel when the clip is added to a sequence.
Mono As Stereo Maps the source audio channels so each is placed on a stereo audio track. Premiere Pro duplicates the audio from
each mono source channel and places it in the left and right channels of a stereo track. You can apply the Mono As Stereo format to clips
containing any number of audio channels.
5.1 Maps the source audio channels so that one or more groups of six channels are placed into separate 5.1 surround audio tracks. If the
number of source channels is not a multiple of six, Premiere Pro creates a 5.1 surround audio track with silence on one or more
channels.
Linear Keyframe Thinning Creates keyframes only at points that don’t have a linear relationship to the start and end keyframes. For example,
suppose you are automating a fade from 0 dB to –12 dB. With this option selected, Premiere Pro creates keyframes only at the points that
represent an increase in value from the beginning (0 dB) and ending (–12 dB) keyframes. If you don’t select this option, Premiere Pro may create
several incremental keyframes of identical values between those two points, depending on the speed at which you change the value. This option is
selected by default.
Minimum Time Interval Thinning Creates keyframes only at intervals larger than the value you specify. Enter a value between 1 and 2000
milliseconds.
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Audio Hardware preferences
In the Audio Hardware pane of the Preferences dialog box, you specify the computer audio device and settings, including the ASIO settings
(Windows only), or buffer size setting (Mac OS only) that Premiere Pro uses for recording audio.
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Audio Output Mapping preferences
In the Audio Output Mapping pane of the Preferences dialog box, you specify the target speaker in your computer sound system for each
supported audio channel.
Note: Adobe Audition users will need to use Audio Output Mapping preferences to that 5.1 clips will output Ls, Rs, C, and LFE channels in the
same order as Audition.
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Change the Auto Save settings
By default, Premiere Pro automatically saves your project every 20 minutes and retains the last five versions of the project file on the hard disk.
You can revert to a previously saved version at any time. Archiving many iterations of a project consumes relatively little disk space because
project files are much smaller than source video files. It’s best to save project files to the same drive as your application. Archived files are saved
in the Premiere Pro Auto-Save folder.
1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Auto Save (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Auto Save (Mac OS).
2. Do any of the following, and then click OK:
Select Automatically Save Projects, and type the number of minutes you would like between saves.
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For Maximum Project Versions, enter the number of versions of a project file you want to save. For example, if you type 10, Premiere Pro
saves the ten most recent versions.
3. Click OK.
Note: Premiere Pro will only execute an auto save when there are unsaved changes in the currently opened project. This also applies when the
program is in the background or minimized. The potential consequence for leaving a project open with unsaved changes for a long enough period
of time is that eventually all of the auto save versions will become identical, wiping out potentially useful versions to roll back to. Adjust this
preference according to your workflow or close Premiere Pro when you will be working on other applications for an extended period of time.
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Capture preferences
Controls how Premiere Pro transfers video and audio directly from a deck or camera. (None of the other project settings options affect capturing.)
The contents of this panel depend on the editing mode. If you’re capturing DV footage, use the default DV capture settings. When DV/IEEE 1394
Capture is the selected capture format, no options are available because the options are automatically set to the IEEE 1394 standard. Additional
capture formats and options appear if you install other software, such as software included with a capture card certified to be compatible with
Premiere Pro.
Note: For P2 DVCPRO 50 and P2 DVCPRO HD projects, the Capture Format setting is not relevant, because the assets are captured and
recorded directly to the P2 card as digital files by the camera.
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Device Control preferences
In the Device Control pane of the Preferences dialog box, you specify the settings Premiere Pro uses to control a playback/recording device, such
as a VTR or camcorder.
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Label Colors preferences
In the Label Colors pane of the Preferences dialog box, you can change the default colors and color names. You can label assets with these
colors and color names in the Project panels.
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Label Defaults preferences
In the Label Defaults pane of the Preferences dialog box, you can change the default colors assigned to bins, sequences, and different types of
media.
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Media preferences
Indeterminate Media Timebase Specifies the framerate for imported still-image sequences.
Timecode Specifies whether Premiere Pro shows the original timecode imported clips, or assigns new timecode to them, starting at 00:00:00.
Frame Count Specifies whether Premiere Pro assigns a 0, or a 1 to the first frame of an imported clip, or assigns a number by timecode
conversion.
Write XMP ID To Files On Import Check this box to write ID information into XMP metadata fields.
Enable Clip And XMP Metadata Linking Check this box to link clip metadata to XMP metadata, so that changing one changes the other.
Growing Files Premiere Pro supports growing files for OP1A MXF files. The preference allows users to opt whether Premiere automatically
refreshes as they grow, and if so, how frequently. This preference allows you to edit with these files in your project immediately.
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Memory preferences
In the Memory pane of the Preferences dialog box, you can specify the amount of RAM reserved for other applications, and for Premiere Pro. For
example, as you reduce the amount of RAM reserved for other applications, the amount of RAM left available for Premiere Pro increases.
Some sequences, such as those containing high-resolution source video or still images, require large amounts of memory for the simultaneous
rendering of multiple frames. These assets can force Premiere Pro to cancel rendering and to give a Low Memory Warning alert. In these cases,
you can maximize the available memory by changing the Optimize Rendering For preference from Performance to Memory. Change this
preference back to Performance when rendering no longer requires memory optimization.
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Playback Settings preferences
In the Playback Settings pane of the Preferences dialog box, you can select the default player for audio or video, and set preroll and postroll
preferences. You can also access device settings for third-party capture cards.
Premiere Pro uses the player to play media from clips and sequences for the following:
Source Monitor
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Program Monitor
the preview area at the top of the Project panel
Trim mode
Trim Monitor
Multi-Camera Monitor
the video transition preview in the Effect Controls panel.
You can choose the default player for your computer, or a third-party plug-in player for Premiere Pro. Third-party players are installed with some
capture cards.
Set up DV and third-party devices for output by clicking the Settings button. If a third-party capture card is installed, click the Settings button to
daccess the Mercury Transmit dialog box for video formats, and pixel formats.
A checkbox is available for disabling video output when in the background.
Choose an audio device in the Audio Device menu.
Preroll and postroll preferences are included in Playback Settings preferences instead of General preferences.
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Sync Settings
When you work with Adobe® Premiere® Pro on multiple machines, managing and syncing preferences, presets, and libraries between them can
be time-consuming, complex, and error prone.The new Sync Settings feature lets you sync your general preferences, keyboard shortcuts, presets,
and libraries to the Creative Cloud. For more information, see Sync Settings in Premiere Pro CC.
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Titler preferences
In the Titler pane of the Preferences dialog box, you can change the letters Premiere Pro shows in the Titler Style Swatches panel and in the font
browser.
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Trim preferences
The Trim Monitor includes Large Trim Offset buttons. Clicking one of these buttons moves a trim point earlier or later. In the Trim pane of the
Preferences dialog box, you can specify the number of frames that the Large Trim Offset buttons move trim points.
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Basic workflow
The steps you take in editing video, from import or capture through final output, make up your workflow. The basic workflow describes the most
general steps you would take with most projects. Specific types of workflows, such as the P2 workflow or the cross-platform workflow, explain the
noteworthy settings, variations, or issues specific to each type.
Reviewing the entire workflow for a production before creating a project and first sequence can help you optimize Adobe Premiere Pro for the
needs of that production. It can also help you plan for the special needs your production has at any particular step. For example, if you learn,
before you begin, the parameters of your footage, you can select the best sequence presets for your production.
For resources relating to optimizing your computer system, your workflow, and Premiere Pro so that you can get the most done in the least time
see this blog post on the After Effects Region of Interest.
Whether you use Adobe Premiere Pro to edit video for broadcast, DVD, or the web, you’re likely to follow a workflow like the one outlined below.
For Adobe recommended tutorials on basic workflow, scroll to the bottom of this page.
Before you begin editing
Before you begin editing in Premiere Pro, you will need footage to work with. You can either shoot your own footage, or work with footage that
other people have shot. You can also work with graphics, audio files, and more.
Many projects you work on do not need a script. However, sometimes you work from or write a script, especially for dramatic projects. You can
write your script and organize your production details with Adobe Story.
While you shoot, organize your shots and take log notes. You can also adjust and monitor footage as you shoot, capturing directly to a drive.
It is important to note that using Adobe Story is not necessary for editing with Adobe Premiere Pro. Writing a script, and making notes on the set
are optional steps to help organize a project before you get started.
Get started editing
After you have acquired footage, follow the steps to get started editing with Premiere Pro.
1. Start or open a project
Open an existing project, or start a new one from the Premiere Pro Welcome screen.
If you are starting a new project, the New Project dialog launches. From the New Project dialog, you can specify the name and location of the
project file, the video capture format, and other settings for your project. (See Creating and changing projects.) After you have chosen settings in
the New Project dialog, click OK.
After you have exited the New Project dialog, the New Sequence dialog will appear. Choose the sequence preset in the dialog that matches the
settings of your footage. First, open the camera type folder, then the frame rate folder (if necessary), and then clicking a preset. Name the
sequence at the bottom of the dialog, and then click OK.
If you need help choosing a sequence preset, see this FAQ entry: “How do I choose the right sequence settings.”
To open an existing project, click on a link under Open A Recent Item in the Premiere Pro Welcome screen. After clicking a link, the project will
launch.
For an overview of Premiere Pro, see this video.
To get started editing quickly with Premiere Pro, see this video from Video2Brain and Learn by Video, presented by Maxim Jago.
2. Capture and import video and audio
For file-based assets, using the Media Browser you can import files from computer sources in any of the leading media formats. Each file you
capture or import automatically becomes a clip in the Project panel.
Alternatively, using the Capture panel, capture footage directly from a camcorder or VTR. With the proper hardware, you can digitize and capture
other formats, from VHS to HDTV.
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Project panel and Capture panel
You can also import various digital media, including video, audio, and still images. Premiere Pro also imports Adobe® Illustrator® artwork or
Photoshop® layered files, and it translates After Effects® projects for a seamless, integrated workflow. You can create synthetic media, such as
standard color bars, color backgrounds, and a countdown. (See About capturing and digitizing.)
You can also use Adobe® Bridge to organize and find your media files. Then use the Place command in Adobe Bridge to place the files directly
into Premiere Pro.
In the Project panel, you can label, categorize, and group footage into bins to keep a complex project organized. You can open multiple bins
simultaneously, each in its own panel, or you can nest bins, one inside another. Using the Project panel Icon view, you can arrange clips in
storyboard fashion to visualize or quickly assemble a sequence.
Note: Before capturing or importing audio, ensure that Preferences>Audio>Default Track Format is set to match the desired channel format.
3. Assemble and refine a sequence
Using the Source Monitor, you can view clips, set edit points, and mark other important frames before adding clips to a sequence. For
convenience, you can break a master clip into any number of subclips, each with its own In and Out points. You can view audio as a detailed
waveform and edit it with sample-based precision. (See Source Monitor and Program Monitor overview.)
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A: Source Monitor, B: Program Monitor, C: Timeline panel
You add clips to a sequence in a Timeline panel by dragging them there or by using the Insert or Overwrite buttons in the Source Monitor. You can
automatically assemble clips into a sequence that reflects their order in the Project panel. You can view the edited sequence in the Program
Monitor or watch the full-screen, full-quality video on an attached television monitor. (See Timeline panels and Adding clips to a sequence.)
Refine the sequence by manipulating clips in a Timeline panel, with either context-sensitive tools or tools in the Tools panel. Use the specialized
Trim Monitor to fine-tune the cut point between clips. By nesting sequences—using a sequence as a clip within another sequence—you can create
effects you couldn’t achieve otherwise.
4. Add titles
Using the Premiere Pro full-featured Titler, create stylish still titles, title rolls, or title crawls that you can easily superimpose over video. If you
prefer, you can modify any of a wide range of provided title templates. As with any clip, you can edit, fade, animate, or add effects to the titles in a
sequence. (See Titling and the Titler.)
Titler
5. Add transitions and effects
The Effects panel includes an extensive list of transitions and effects you can apply to clips in a sequence. You can adjust these effects, as well as
a clip’s motion, opacity, and Variable Rate Stretch using the Effect Controls panel. The Effect Controls panel also lets you animate a clip’s
properties using traditional keyframing techniques. As you adjust transitions, the Effect Controls panel displays controls designed especially for that
task. Alternatively, you can view and adjust transitions and a clip’s effect keyframes in a Timeline panel. (See Transition overview: applying
transitions and Apply effects to clips.)
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Effects panel in filtered view, Effect Controls panel, and Program Monitor
6. Mix audio
For track-based audio adjustments, the Audio Track Mixer faithfully emulates a full-featured audio mixing board, complete with fade and pan
sliders, sends, and effects. Premiere Pro saves your adjustments in real time. With a supported sound card, you can record audio through the
sound mixer, or mix audio for 5.1 surround sound. (See Mixing audio tracks and clips.)
7. Export
Deliver your edited sequence in the medium of your choice: tape, DVD, Blu-ray Disc, or movie file. Using Adobe Media Encoder, you can
customize the settings for MPEG-2, MPEG-4, FLV, and other codecs and formats, to the needs of your viewing audience. (See Types of
exporting.)
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Cross-platform workflow
You can work on a project across computer platforms. For example, you can start on Windows and continue on Mac OS. A few functions change,
however, as the project moves from one platform to the other.
Sequence settings You can create a project on one platform and then move it to another. Premiere Pro sets the equivalent sequence settings for
the second platform, if there is an equivalent. For example, you can create a DV project containing DV capture and device control settings on
Windows. When you open the project on Mac OS, Premiere Pro sets the appropriate Mac DV capture and device control settings. Saving the
project saves these Mac OS settings. Premiere Pro translates these settings to Windows settings if the project is later opened on Windows.
Effects All video effects available on Mac OS are available in Windows. Windows effects not available on the Mac appear as offline effects if the
project is opened on the Mac. These effects are designated “Windows only” in Premiere Pro Help. All audio effects are available on both
platforms. Effect presets work on both platforms (unless the preset applies to an effect not available on a given platform).
Adobe Media Encoder presets Presets created on one platform are not available on the other.
Preview files Preview files made on one platform are not available on the other. When a project is opened on a different platform, Premiere Pro
rerenders the preview files. When that project is then opened on its original platform, Premiere Pro renders the preview files yet again.
High-bit-depth files Windows AVI files containing either 10-bit 4:2:2 uncompressed video (v210), or 8-bit 4:2:2 uncompressed video (UYVU) are
not supported on Mac OS.
Preview rendering The playback quality of unrendered non-native files is not as high as playback quality of these files on their native platforms.
For example, AVI files do not play back as well on Mac OS as they do on Windows. Premiere Pro renders preview files for non-native files on the
current platform. Premiere Pro always renders preview files in a native format. A red bar in the timeline indicates which sections contain files
needing rendering.
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Direct-Link workflow between Premiere Pro and SpeedGrade
New in the October 2013 release of Premiere Pro CC (version 7.1) and SpeedGrade CC (version 7.1)
About Direct Link
Edit and grade Premiere Pro sequences with Direct Link
Open Premiere Pro projects directly in SpeedGrade
Limitations in Direct-Link mode
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About Direct Link
The Direct-Link workflow is a new and integrated edit-and-grade workflow between Premiere Pro CC and SpeedGrade CC.
In the past, to use SpeedGrade to color grade your footage from Premiere Pro, you rendered and exported your sequences to SpeedGrade either
as DPX still image sequences or edit decision lists (EDLs). After completing color grading in SpeedGrade, you exported the projects as standalone video files back into Premiere Pro for more editing.
Direct Link offers a fast and efficient alternative to this workflow. Leveraging the power of the Mercury Playback Engine, Direct Link lets you send
or open Premiere Pro projects directly in SpeedGrade. You can color grade Premiere Pro sequences in SpeedGrade and send it back to Premiere
Pro in a few clicks.
To achieve optimal performance when using Direct Link, use an NVIDIA CUDA graphics card with GPU acceleration on Windows. For more
information about Adobe-certified NVIDIA graphics cards, see the Tech specs.
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Edit and grade Premiere Pro sequences with Direct Link
The Direct-Link workflow lets you roundtrip Premiere Pro projects between editing and grading without time-consuming or complex tasks like
rendering and conforming.
Premiere Pro-SpeedGrade Direct-Link workflow
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Step 1: Select Premiere Pro sequence
Select the Premiere Pro sequence that you want to color grade.
Note: Ensure that you have selected the sequence in the Timeline or Project panel.
Step 2: Send sequence to SpeedGrade using Direct Link
Using Direct Link, you can send a sequence from an open Premiere Pro project directly to SpeedGrade without exporting the project.
To use Direct Link, select File > Direct Link To Adobe SpeedGrade.
Step 3: Choose to open sequence in SpeedGrade
When you select the Direct-Link workflow, Premiere Pro prompts you to save changes to the project in Premiere Pro and open it in SpeedGrade.
Click Yes.
Step 4: Selected sequence opens in SpeedGrade
Premiere Pro closes, and SpeedGrade opens the sequence in its Timeline, which uses the same familiar track layout as Premiere Pro.
In the SpeedGrade Timeline, you can see all the clip edit points, transitions, and layers.
Project Timeline in SpeedGrade
Step 5: Color grade the sequence using grading and mask tools
Within SpeedGrade, you can color grade the sequence using Looks and Masks. The Looks that you apply in SpeedGrade will appear as Lumetri
presets when you reopen the sequence in Premiere Pro.
If a Lumetri Look has already been applied in Premiere Pro, it's available in the SpeedGrade Timeline, where you can adjust its parameters.
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A. Premiere Pro project sequence B. Premiere Pro sequence color graded in SpeedGrade
The Direct-Link workflow has been designed to let you focus on the color correction and grading tasks when you are in SpeedGrade. Because of
this focus, only the Color and Look tabs in SpeedGrade are available in the Direct-Link mode. For more details, see Direct-Link workflow
limitations.
Step 6: Send the color graded sequence to Premiere Pro for editing
When you finish color grading your sequence in SpeedGrade, save and reopen the sequence in Premiere Pro for final output or further editing.
Click the Direct Link to Adobe Premiere Pro icon in the upper left of the SpeedGrade user interface.
The color graded sequence opens in Premiere Pro with all color grading fully intact.
Color grading and masks applied in SpeedGrade are visible in Premiere Pro as Lumetri effects. In Premiere Pro, you can turn these Lumetri
effects on or off for each clip and for each adjustment layer individually using the Effects Controls panel.
You continue editing or export your sequence for final output in Premiere Pro.
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Open Premiere Pro projects directly in SpeedGrade
You can open native Premiere Pro projects directly in SpeedGrade, apply color grading changes, and reopen the project in Premiere Pro.
The SpeedGrade Welcome screen lets you:
Open a recently accessed Premiere Pro project (.pproj)
Open a Premiere Pro project (.pproj)
Create a new SpeedGrade project (.IRCP)
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When you open a Premiere Pro project, the Sequence Importer dialog opens showing all the sequences contained in the project. Select a
sequence to open.
Note: SpeedGrade cannot open more than one Premiere Pro sequence at the same time.
Within SpeedGrade, you can apply primary and secondary color correction, apply Looks and Masks, and do all the required color grading.
Note: You cannot send SpeedGrade (.IRCP) projects back to Premiere Pro. To use Direct Link you need to start with a Premiere Pro project
(.pproj).
Some important points:
From within SpeedGrade, you can view and adjust Premiere Pro adjustment layers, and also view any transitions applied to the sequence.
All the color grading that you apply in SpeedGrade is available automatically in Premiere Pro. There is no need to export the .look files.
Working with offline media
When you open a Premiere Pro project with missing media files in SpeedGrade, you cannot link and locate the offline media like you would in
Premiere Pro.
To relink the offline media, you must bring the the project back to Premiere Pro.
Working with After Effects Compositions
There are several ways to use After Effects Compositions in your Premiere Pro project:
Replace a clip in Premiere Pro with an After Effects Composition
Link to an After Effects Composition using Adobe Dynamic Link
Import an After Effects Composition (AEP file) into a Premiere Pro project
Irrespective of which method you use, you can open a Premiere Pro sequence containing After Effects Compositions directly in SpeedGrade.
SpeedGrade opens the sequence in Direct-Link mode, from where you can color grade the compositions just as you would color grade any
Premiere Pro sequence.
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Limitations in Direct-Link mode
The Direct-Link workflow has been designed such that you focus only on the color correction and grading workflows within SpeedGrade.
Given this focus, there are specific things to consider while using SpeedGrade in the Direct-Link mode:
To use Direct Link, you start with a Premiere Pro project (.pproj). You cannot send SpeedGrade projects (.IRCP) to Premiere Pro in the
Direct-Link mode.
In the Direct-Link mode, you cannot render your Premiere Pro projects within SpeedGrade. You send the projects back to Premiere Pro for
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rendering. So, the Render and Results tabs are unavailable when using Direct Link.
SpeedGrade can open only one Premiere Pro sequence at a time, and not multiple sequences at once. To open a different sequence in the
project, open the Sequence Importer dialog by clicking
in the SpeedGrade Timeline.
You cannot launch the Media Browser to browse through media, so the Media tab is unavailable when using Direct Link.
You cannot add clips to the Premiere Pro sequence within SpeedGrade. You have to bring the project back to Premiere Pro to edit the
sequence.
You cannot adjust audio or use the Pan & Scan functions. So, Stereo 3D, Audio, and Pan And Scan tabs are unavailable when using Direct
Link.
If you apply the Warp Stabilizer effect on a Premiere Pro sequence, ensure that the analysis is complete before sending the sequence to
SpeedGrade using Direct Link. Otherwise, an error message appears.
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Cross-application workflows
Edit a clip in its original application
Working with Photoshop and Premiere Pro
Copy between After Effects and Adobe Premiere Pro
Working with Adobe Premiere Pro and Adobe Flash
Working with Adobe Story and Adobe Premiere Pro
Working with Encore and Premiere Pro
Working with Final Cut Pro and Adobe Premiere Pro
Working with Avid Media Composer and Premiere Pro
You can use various other Adobe applications to enhance or modify the assets used in a Premiere Pro project. Also, you can use Premiere Pro to
edit projects begun in other applications.
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Edit a clip in its original application
In Premiere Pro, the Edit Original command opens clips in the applications associated with their file types. You can edit clips in the associated
applications. Premiere Pro automatically incorporates the changes into the current project without replacing files. Similarly, Premiere Pro
sequences placed in other applications, such as Adobe After Effects can be opened with the host product’s Edit Original command.
1. Select a clip in either the Project panel or Timeline panel.
2. Choose Edit > Edit Original.
You can export a movie from Premiere Pro with the data necessary for the Edit Original command. In the Export Movie Settings dialog
box, choose Project from the Embedding options menu.
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Working with Photoshop and Premiere Pro
If you use Photoshop to create still images, you can use Premiere Pro to make them move and change. You can animate an entire image or any
of its layers.
You can edit individual frames of video and image sequence files in Photoshop. In addition to using any Photoshop tool to edit and paint on video,
you can also apply filters, masks, transformations, layers styles, and blending modes. You can paint using the Clone Stamp, Pattern Stamp,
Healing Brush, or Spot Healing Brush. You can also edit video frames using the Patch tool.
In Photoshop, with the Clone Stamp, you can sample a frame from a video layer and paint with the sampled source onto another video frame. As
you move to different target frames, the source frame changes relative to the frame from which you initially sampled.
After making edits, you can save the video as a PSD file, or you can render it as a QuickTime movie or image sequence. You can import any of
these back into Premiere Pro for further editing.
If you use Premiere Pro to create movies, you can use Photoshop to refine the individual frames of those movies. In Photoshop, you can do any of
the following:
Remove unwanted visual elements.
Draw on individual frames.
Use the superior selection and masking tools to divide a frame into elements for animation or compositing.
Online resources for Premiere Pro and Photoshop workflow
Franklin McMahaon provides a video tutorial that demonstrates creating a title in Photoshop for use in Premiere Pro in this video tutorial from
Layers Magazine.
This Premiere Pro tutorial video by Phil Hawkins at Infinite Skills shows how to import files between Photoshop and Premiere Pro.
Jarle Leirpoll shows how to automate production of lower thirds with Photoshop and Premiere Pro in this article on the ProVideo Coalition
website.
Comparative advantages for specific tasks
The strengths of Premiere Pro lie in its numerous video editing features. You can use it to combine Photoshop files with video clips, audio clips,
and other assets. You can use the Photoshop files, for example, as titles, graphics, and masks.
In contrast, Photoshop has excellent tools for painting, drawing, and selecting portions of an image. The Photoshop Quick Selection tool and
Magnetic Lasso tool make it easy to create a mask from a complex shape. Rather than hand-drawing a mask in Premiere Pro, consider doing this
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work in Photoshop. Similarly, if you are applying several paint strokes by hand to get rid of dust, consider using the Photoshop paint tools.
The animation and video features in Photoshop Extended include simple keyframe-based animation. Premiere Pro, however, provides quite a bit
more keyframe control over various properties.
Exchanging still images
Premiere Pro can import and export still images in many formats. For greatest versatility, however, use the native Photoshop PSD format when
transferring individual frames or still image sequences from Photoshop to Premiere Pro.
When you import a PSD file into Premiere Pro, you can choose whether to import it as a flattened image, or with its layers separate and intact.
It is often a good idea to prepare a still image in Photoshop before importing it into Premiere Pro. Examples of such preparation include correcting
color, scaling, and cropping. It is often better to change a source image in Photoshop than to have Premiere Pro perform the same operation many
times per second as it renders each frame for previews or final output.
In Photoshop, you can create a PSD document that is set up correctly for a specific video output type. From the New File dialog box, select a Film
& Video preset. In Premiere Pro, you can create a PSD document that matches your composition and sequence settings. Choose File > New >
Photoshop File.
Exchanging movies
You can no longer exchange PSD video files with Photoshop, however, you can render a movie directly from Photoshop and then import it back
into Premiere Pro. For example, you can create a QuickTime movie from Photoshop that can then be imported into Premiere Pro.
Color
Premiere Pro works internally with colors in an RGB (red, green, blue) color space. If you want to edit video clips you create in Photoshop in
Premiere Pro, create the clips in RGB.
If you want to broadcast the final movie it is best to ensure, in Photoshop, that the colors in your image are broadcast-safe. Assign the appropriate
destination color space—for example, SDTV (Rec. 601)—to the document in Photoshop.
Create and edit Photoshop files
You can create a still Photoshop file that automatically inherits the pixel and frame aspect ratio settings of your Premiere Pro project. You can also
edit any still image file in a Premiere Pro project in Photoshop.
Create a Photoshop file in a project
Choose File > New > Photoshop File.
Photoshop opens with a new blank still image. The pixel dimensions match the project’s video frame size, and image guides show the title-safe
and action-safe areas for the project.
Edit a still image file in Photoshop
From within a project, you can open an image file in most formats that Adobe Photoshop supports. Premiere Pro does not import files in CMYK or
LAB color formats.
1. Select a still-image clip in either the Project panel or Timeline panel.
2. Choose Edit > Edit In Adobe Photoshop.
The file opens in Photoshop. When you save the file, changes are available in the Premiere Pro project.
Copy between After Effects and Adobe Premiere Pro
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From the After Effects Timeline panel, you can copy layers based on audio or video footage items (including solids) and paste them into the
Adobe Premiere Pro Timeline panel.
From the Adobe Premiere Pro Timeline panel, you can copy assets (any items in a track) and paste them into the After Effects Timeline
panel.
From either After Effects or Adobe Premiere Pro, you can copy and paste footage items to the other’s Project panel.
Note: You can’t, however, paste footage items from the After Effects Project panel into the Adobe Premiere Pro Timeline panel.
If you want to work with all clips or a single sequence from an Adobe Premiere Pro project, use the Import command instead to import the project
into After Effects.
Use Adobe Dynamic Link to create dynamic links, without rendering, between new or existing compositions in After Effects and Adobe Premiere
Pro. (See About Dynamic Link.)
Copy from After Effects to Adobe Premiere Pro
You can copy a layer based on a footage item from an After Effects composition and paste it into an Adobe Premiere Pro sequence. Adobe
Premiere Pro converts these layers to clips in the sequence and copies the source footage item to its Project panel. If the layer contains an effect
that is also used by Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe Premiere Pro converts the effect and all of its settings and keyframes.
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You can also copy nested compositions, Photoshop layers, solid-color layers, and audio layers. Adobe Premiere Pro converts nested compositions
to nested sequences, and solid-color layers to color mattes. You cannot copy shape, text, camera, light, or adjustment layers to Adobe Premiere
Pro.
1. Start Adobe Premiere Pro (you must start Adobe Premiere Pro before you copy the layer in After Effects).
2. Select a layer (or layers) from the After Effects Timeline panel.
Note: If you select multiple layers and the layers don’t overlap in After Effects, they’re placed on the same track in Adobe Premiere Pro. On
the other hand, if the layers overlap in After Effects, the order in which you select them determines the order of their track placement in
Adobe Premiere Pro. Each layer is placed on a separate track, and the last selected layer appears on Track 1. For example, if you select
layers from top to bottom, the layers appear in the reverse order in Adobe Premiere Pro, with the bottom-most layer on Track 1.
3. Choose Edit > Copy.
4. In Adobe Premiere Pro, open a sequence in the Timeline panel.
5. Move the current-time indicator to the desired location, and choose either Edit > Paste or Edit > Paste Insert.
Results of pasting into Adobe Premiere Pro
When you paste a layer into an Adobe Premiere Pro sequence, keyframes, effects, and other properties in the copied layer are converted as
follows:
After Effects item
Converted to in Adobe Premiere Pro
Notes
Audio volume property
Channel Volume filter
Blending modes
Blending modes supported by
Adobe Premiere Pro are converted
Effect properties and keyframes
Effect properties and keyframes, if the
effect also exists in Adobe Premiere Pro
Expressions
Not converted
Layer markers
Clip markers
Masks and mattes
Not converted
Stereo Mixer effect
Channel Volume filter
Time Remap property
Time Remapping effect
Time Stretch property
Speed property
Speed and time stretch have an inverse
relationship. For example, 200% stretch in
After Effects converts to 50% speed in
Adobe Premiere Pro.
Transform property values and keyframes
Motion or Opacity values and keyframes
The keyframe type—Bezier, Auto Bezier,
Continuous Bezier, or Hold—is retained.
Source settings for R3D source files
Source settings for R3D source files
Adobe Premiere Pro lists unsupported
effects as offline in the Effect Controls
panel. Some After Effects effects have the
same names as those in Adobe Premiere
Pro, but since they’re actually different
effects, they aren’t converted.
Copy from Adobe Premiere Pro to After Effects
You can copy a video or audio asset from an Adobe Premiere Pro sequence and paste it into an After Effects composition. After Effects converts
assets to layers and copies the source footage items into its Project panel. If the asset contains an effect that is also used by After Effects, After
Effects converts the effect and all of its settings and keyframes.
You can copy color mattes, stills, nested sequences, and offline files, too. After Effects converts color mattes into solid-color layers and converts
nested sequences into nested compositions. When you copy a Photoshop still image into After Effects, After Effects retains the Photoshop layer
information. You cannot paste Adobe Premiere Pro titles into After Effects, but you can paste text with attributes from the Adobe Premiere Titler
into After Effects.
1. Select an asset from the Adobe Premiere Pro Timeline panel.
2. Choose Edit > Copy.
3. In After Effects, open a composition in the Timeline panel.
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4. With the Timeline panel active, choose Edit > Paste. The asset appears as the topmost layer in the Timeline panel.
Note: To paste the asset at the current-time indicator, place the current-time indicator and press Ctrl+Alt+V (Windows) or
Command+Option+V (Mac OS).
Results of pasting into After Effects
When you paste an asset into an After Effects composition, keyframes, effects, and other properties in a copied asset are converted as follows:
Adobe Premiere Pro asset
Converted to in After Effects
Notes
Audio track
Audio layers
Audio tracks that are either 5.1 surround
or greater than 16-bit aren’t supported.
Mono and stereo audio tracks are
imported as one or two layers.
Bars and tone
Not converted
Blending modes
Converted
Clip marker
Layer marker
Color mattes
Solid-color layers
Crop filter
Mask layer
Frame Hold
Time Remap property
Motion or Opacity values and keyframes
Transform property values and keyframes
Keyframe type—Bezier, Auto Bezier,
Continuous Bezier, or Hold—is retained.
Sequence marker
Markers on a new solid-color layer
To copy sequence markers, you must
either copy the sequence itself or import
the entire Adobe Premiere Pro project as
a composition.
Speed property
Time Stretch property
Speed and time stretch have an inverse
relationship. For example, 50% speed in
Adobe Premiere Pro is converted to 200%
stretch in After Effects.
Time Remapping effect
Time Remap property
Titles
Not converted
Universal counting leaders
Not converted
Video and audio transitions
Opacity keyframes (Cross dissolve only)
or solid-color layers
Video effect properties and keyframes
Effect properties and keyframes, if the
effect also exists in After Effects
After Effects doesn’t display unsupported
effects in the Effect Controls panel.
Volume and Channel Volume audio filters
Stereo mixer effect
Other audio filters are not converted.
Source settings for R3D source files
Source settings for R3D source files
Note: When you import a Premiere Pro project into After Effects, features are converted in the same manner as they are converted when copying
from Premiere Pro to After Effects.
Working with Adobe Premiere Pro and Adobe Flash
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Adobe Premiere Pro is a professional tool for editing video. If you use Adobe Flash Professional to design interactive content for websites or
mobile devices, you can use Adobe Premiere Pro to edit the movies for those projects. Adobe Premiere Pro gives you professional tools for frameaccurate video editing, including tools for optimizing video files for playback on computer screens and mobile devices.
Adobe Flash Professional is a tool for incorporating video footage into presentations for the web and mobile devices. Adobe Flash offers
technological and creative benefits that let you fuse video with data, graphics, sound, and interactive control. The FLV and F4V formats let you put
video on a web page in a format that almost anyone can view.
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You can export FLV and F4V files from Adobe Premiere Pro. You can embed those files into interactive websites or applications for mobile devices
with Adobe Flash. Adobe Flash can import sequence markers you add in an Adobe Premiere Pro sequence as cue points. You can use these cue
points to trigger events in SWF files on playback.
If you export video files in other standard formats, Adobe Flash can encode your videos within rich media applications. Adobe Flash uses the latest
compression technologies to deliver the greatest quality possible at small file sizes.
Working with Adobe Story and Adobe Premiere Pro
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The Adobe Story panel in Premiere Pro CC lets you import scripts created in Adobe Story, along with associated metadata to guide your editing.
From within the Adobe Story panel, you can access all the scripts you have in your Story account.
To open the Adobe Story panel from within Premiere Pro, select Window > Adobe Story.
You can quickly navigate to specific scenes, locations, dialogue, and characters as you work. You can use Speech To Text search to find the clips
you need and edit the script within the Premiere Pro editing environment.
You can also attach an Adobe Story scene directly to clips in Premiere Pro by following these steps:
1. Select Window > Adobe Story to open the Adobe Story panel from within Premiere Pro.
2. Drag the scene that you want to attach from the Adobe Story panel and drop it on the required clip in the Project panel.
For an overview of all the features in Adobe Story, see this video.
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Working with Encore and Premiere Pro
Note: For information on installing and using Encore CS6 with Premiere Pro CC, see this blog and video.
Using Adobe Encore CS6 and Adobe Premiere Pro, you can burn a single sequence to DVD or Blu-ray Disc. You can burn each sequence in your
project to a separate DVD or Blu-ray Disc. First, add all the content you want to include on a disc into a sequence. After you edit the sequence,
perform the following tasks:
Add Encore chapter markers
You can add Encore chapter markers in a Adobe Premiere Pro sequence. You can send the Encore chapter markers, along with the sequence to
Encore.
In Encore, if you create an AutoPlay DVD, the Encore chapter markers become scene markers. When viewing the DVD, pressing the Previous
button or Next button on the remote control skips backward or forward to the next of these markers. If you create a DVD or Blu-ray Disc with
menus, you can link scene buttons on the menus to the Encore chapter markers.
Send to Encore or to an MPEG-2 file
You can send a whole sequence, or any portion of a sequence, from Adobe Premiere Pro to Encore. From Encore, you can burn the sequence
directly to a DVD without menus, or add menus and buttons before burning. From Encore, you can export the project in any of the following forms:
you can burn the project to disc,
you can save the project to a DVD image file,
you can save the project to a set of DVD folders,
you can save the project to DVD master files on DLT tape.
you can export the project to a SWF file for posting on the web.
Alternatively, using the MPEG2-DVD format, you can export a DVD-compliant MPEG-2 file from Adobe Premiere Pro. You can use the MPEG-2
file in most DVD-authoring applications.
Choose a menu template
Encore templates are predesigned menus that come in several styles. Buttons on the templates automatically link to chapter markers placed in the
sequence. Encore creates additional submenus as necessary to accommodate all the chapter markers in a sequence.
Note: AutoPlay DVDs do not have menus. Do not choose a template for AutoPlay DVDs.
Customize the menu template
Edit titles, change graphics, or add video for background in Encore. You can also use video in button thumbnails by specifying a section of a clip to
play in the button.
Preview the disc
Check the functionality and the look of your DVD or Blu-ray Disc menus in the Preview DVD window.
Burn the disc
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With a DVD or Blu-ray Disc burner installed or connected, you can burn your content to disc. You can save the compressed files to a folder for
playback from a computer hard drive. You can also save an ISO image to distribute or burn to a DVD.
Note: Encore creates DVDs that conform to DVD-video format. It does not create data or audio DVDs.
Working with Final Cut Pro and Adobe Premiere Pro
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You can import Final Cut Pro project XML files into Premiere Pro. For more information, see Importing XML project files from Final Cut Pro. You
can export Premiere Pro project files as Final Cut Pro XML files.
For more information, see Export a Final Cut Pro project XML file.
For more information about workflows possible between Final Cut Pro and Premiere Pro, see Open workflows with Final Cut Pro and Avid
software.
Joost van der Hoeven provides a video tutorial on the Adobe website that demonstrates exchanging information between Final Cut Pro and
Premiere Pro using XML projects.
Premiere Pro and Final Cut Pro 7 (and earlier) can share Final Cut Pro XML files for data exchange. To exchange information between Final
Cut Pro X and Premiere Pro, you can use a third party tool called "Xto7." For more information on using this tool, see here.
See this page for several documents that make the transition from Final Cut Pro to Premiere Pro easier.
Note: An exported XML file from Premiere Pro can be imported into some versions of Final Cut Express, as well.
Working with Avid Media Composer and Premiere Pro
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For information about the workflows possible between Premiere Pro and Avid Media Composer, see Open workflows with Final Cut Pro and Avid
software.
In this video tutorial, Maxim Jago presents the round-tripping workflow with Avid Media Composer.
More Help topics
Import 3D layers from Photoshop
Understanding the script to screen workflow
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Adobe Dynamic Link
Adobe Dynamic Link
About Dynamic Link
Dynamic Link performance
Create and link to After Effects compositions with Dynamic Link
Delete a dynamically linked composition or clip
Modify a dynamically linked composition in After Effects
Create an After Effects composition from clips in Premiere Pro
Offline compositions and Dynamic Link
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Adobe Dynamic Link
Premiere Pro CS6 and later has improved Dynamic Link that is faster, more stable, and includes the removal of the limitation of Dynamic Link to
only work within a suite (i.e., Dynamic Link will now work between applications purchased as individual products).
Note: Adobe Dynamic Link still works in Adobe Production Premium CS6, Adobe Master Collection CS6.
For details about Adobe Dynamic Link in Premiere Pro CS6 and After Effects CS6, see this video by Todd Kopriva and video2brain.
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About Dynamic Link
In the past, sharing media assets among post-production applications has required you to render and export your work from one application before
importing it into another. This workflow was inefficient and time-consuming. If you wanted to change the original asset, you rendered and exported
the asset again. Multiple rendered and exported versions of an asset consume disk space, and they can lead to file-management challenges.
Dynamic Link offers an alternative to this workflow. You can create dynamic links between After Effects, Adobe Premiere Pro, and Encore.
Creating a dynamic link is as simple as importing any other type of asset. Dynamically linked assets appear with unique icons and label colors to
help you identify them. Dynamic links are saved in projects generated by these applications.
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Dynamic Link performance
A linked clip can refer to a complex source composition. Actions you perform on the complex source composition require additional processing
time. After Effects takes time to apply the actions and make the final data available to Adobe Premiere Pro or Encore. In some cases, the
additional processing time delays preview or playback.
To reduce playback delays, do one of the following:
take the linked composition offline
disable a linked clip to temporarily stop referencing a composition
render the composition and replace the dynamically linked composition with the rendered file
If you commonly work with complex source compositions, try adding RAM or a faster processor.
Note: A linked After Effects composition will not support Render Multiple Frames Simultaneously multiprocessing. See Improve performance by
optimizing memory, cache, and multiprocessing settings.
Create and link to After Effects compositions with Dynamic Link
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You can create After Effects compositions, and dynamically link to them, from Adobe Premiere Pro or Encore. You can also dynamically link to
existing After Effects compositions from Adobe Premiere Pro or Encore.
Create a composition from clips in Adobe Premiere Pro
You can replace selected clips in Adobe Premiere Pro with a dynamically linked After Effects composition based on those clips. The new
composition inherits the sequence settings from Adobe Premiere Pro.
1. In a sequence, select the clips you want in the composition.
2. Right-click any of the selected clips.
3. Select Replace With After Effects Composition.
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Create a dynamically linked composition from Adobe Premiere Pro or Encore
Creating a new dynamically linked composition from Adobe Premiere Pro or Encore launches After Effects.After Effects then creates a project and
composition with the dimensions, pixel aspect ratio, frame rate, and audio sample rate of the originating project. (If After Effects is already running,
it creates a composition in the current project.) The new composition name is based on theAdobe Premiere Pro or Encore project name, followed
by Linked Comp [x].
1. In Adobe Premiere Pro or Adobe Encore, choose File > Adobe Dynamic Link > New After EffectsComposition.
2. If the After EffectsSave As dialog box appears, enter a name and location for the After Effects project, and click Save.
When you create a dynamically linked After Effects composition, the composition duration is set to 30 seconds. To change the duration,
select the composition in After Effects, choose Composition > Composition Settings. Click the Basic tab, and specify a new value for
Duration.
Link to an existing composition
For best results, match composition settings (such as dimensions, pixel aspect ratio, and frame rate) to the settings in the Adobe Premiere Pro or
Encore project.
Do one of the following:
In Adobe Premiere Pro or Encore, choose File > Adobe Dynamic Link > Import After Effects Composition. Choose an After Effects project file
(.aep), and then choose one or more compositions.
In Adobe Premiere Pro or Encore, choose an After Effects project file and click Open. Then choose a composition in the displayed dialog box
and click OK.
Drag one or more compositions from the After EffectsProject panel to the Adobe Premiere Pro Project panel or the Encore Project panel.
Drag an After Effects project file into the AdobePremiere Pro Project panel. If the After Effects project file contains multiple compositions, the
Import Composition dialog box opens.
Note: You can link to a single After Effects composition multiple times in a single Adobe Premiere Pro project. In an Adobe Encore project,
however, you can link to an After Effects composition only once.
If you create a dynamically linked composition from Encore, turn off subpicture highlight layers in After Effects, so that you can control their display
in Encore.
Dynamically linked After Effects compositions
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Delete a dynamically linked composition or clip
You can delete a linked composition from an Encore project if the composition isn’t used in the project. You can delete a linked composition from
an Adobe Premiere Pro project at any time, even if the composition is used in a project.
You can delete linked clips from the timeline of an Adobe Premiere Prosequence or from an Encore menu or timeline at any time.
In Adobe Premiere Pro or Encore, select the linked composition or clip and press the Delete key.
Modify a dynamically linked composition in After Effects
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Use the Edit Original command in Adobe Premiere Pro or Encore to modify a linked After Effectscomposition. Once the composition is open in
After Effects, you can change the composition without having to use the Edit Original command again.
1. Select the After Effects composition in the AdobePremiere Pro or Encore Project panel, or choose a linked clip in the Timeline, and choose
Edit > Edit Original.
2. Change the composition in After Effects. Then, switch back to Adobe Premiere Pro or Encore to view your changes.
The changes made in After Effects appear in Adobe Premiere Pro. Adobe Premiere Pro stops using any preview files rendered for the clip before
the changes.
Note: You can change the name of the composition in After Effects after creating a dynamic link to it from Adobe Premiere Pro.
Adobe Premiere Pro does not update the linked composition name in the Project panel. Adobe Premiere Pro does retain the dynamic link,
however.
Create an After Effects composition from clips in Premiere Pro
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You can replace a selection of clips in a sequence in Premiere Pro with an After Effects composition based on those clips. The composition inherits
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the sequence settings from Premiere Pro and maintains a dynamic link to After Effects. You can edit the composition in Premiere Pro or in After
Effects.
1. In a sequence, select the clips you want in the composition.
2. Right-click any of the selected clips.
3. Select Replace With After Effects Composition.
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Offline compositions and Dynamic Link
Adobe Premiere Pro and Encore display dynamically linked compositions as offline in any of the following circumstances:
You’ve renamed, moved, or deleted the After Effects project that contains the composition.
You’ve purposely taken the composition offline.
You’ve opened the project that contains the composition on a system on which Production Premium or Master Collection isn’t installed.
You’re working with a project trimmed by the Adobe Premiere Pro Project Manager. Project Manager does not move the After Effectssource
compositions to the trimmed project folder. Move the composition manually.
Offline compositions appear with an Offline icon
in the Adobe Premiere Pro Project panel. In Encore, the thumbnail preview displays the Offline
icon when an offline asset is selected in the Project panel. If you’re working with an offline composition, you can relink it to the original After Effects
composition. You can also choose to relink a linked composition to a different source composition.
Take a dynamically linked composition offline
If you are experiencing jerky playback, you can take a dynamically linked composition offline. Also, you can share your project without having to
open it on a system with Production Premium or Master Collection installed. You can take a dynamically linked composition offline. When you take
a composition offline, you sever the dynamic link with After Effects. The linked composition is replaced in the Project panel with an offline
composition.
You can temporarily suppress a linked clip in Adobe Premiere Pro by selecting the clip and choosing Clip > Enable. To relink the clip, choose
Clip > Enable again (a check mark next to the command indicates that the clip is enabled).
1. In Premiere Pro, select the composition in the Project panel.
2. Choose Project > Make Offline.
Relink a dynamically linked composition
Do one of the following:
In Adobe Premiere Pro, select the composition and choose Project > Link Media. In thedisplayed dialog box, select an After Effects project.
Adobe Premiere Pro automatically relinks the composition.
In Encore, right-click the composition and choose Locate Asset. In the Locate Asset dialog box, locate the composition you want to link to,
and then click Select (Windows) or Open (Mac OS).
More Help topics
Adobe Dynamic Link
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Using the Source Monitor and Program Monitor
Source Monitor and Program Monitor overview
Open or clear a clip in the Source Monitor
Navigate clips in the Source menu in the Source Monitor
Using the Source Monitor and Program Monitor time controls
View safe zones in the monitors
Choose fields in the Source and Program Monitors
Choose a display mode
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Source Monitor and Program Monitor overview
The Source Monitor plays back individual clips. In the Source Monitor, you prepare clips that you want to add to a sequence. You set In points and
Out points, and specify the clip’s source tracks (audio or video). You can also insert clip markers and add clips to a sequence in a Timeline panel.
The Program Monitor plays back the sequence of clips that you are assembling. It’s your view of the active sequence in a Timeline panel. You can
set sequence markers and specify sequence In points and Out points. Sequence In points and Out points define where frames are added or
removed from the sequence.
Each monitor contains both a time ruler and controls to play back and cue the current frame of a source clip or sequence. Set In and Out points,
go to In and Out points, and set markers. Insert and Overwrite buttons are available in the Source Monitor, and Lift and Extract buttons are
available in the Program Monitor, by default. Each monitor also contains an Export Frame button for creating a still from a single frame of video.
The Source Monitor
A. Time code B. Zoom scroll bar C. Scaling options D. Playhead E. Drag video F. Drag audio G. Resolution H. Settings button I. Button editor
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The program monitor
A. Timecode B. Playhead C. Scaling options D. Zoom scroll bar E. Resolution F. Settings button G. Button editor
For details about changes to the Source monitor, Program monitor, Timecode, and Timeline panels, see this video by Todd Kopriva and
video2brain.
Customizing the monitor panel button bar
By default, the most useful buttons are displayed along the bottom of the Source and Program Monitors. However, you can add more. Click "+" at
the lower right of a monitor to open the button editor. Add buttons to the button bar by dragging them from the button editor. Up to 2 rows of
buttons can be added. Spaces to separate groups of buttons can also be dragged to the button bar. To remove a button, drag it away from the
button bar. To turn off all buttons, go to the panel menu and deselect "Show Transport Controls."
Roll over any button with the mouse to see its keyboard shortcut.
Setting display quality for the Source and Program Monitors
Some formats are difficult to display in full-motion playback, due to their high compression or high data rate. A lower resolution permits faster
motion playback, but at the expense of display image quality. This tradeoff is most visible when viewing AVCHD and other H.264 -codec based
media. Below full resolution, these formats have error correction turned off, and artifacts are common during playback. These artifacts, however,
do not show up in exported media.
Providing separate playback and pause resolutions gives you more control over your monitoring experience. With high-resolution footage, you can
set playback resolution to a lower value (for example, 1/4) for smooth playback, and set the pause resolution to Full. These settings allow you to
check the quality of focus or edge details when playback is paused. Scrubbing puts the monitor in playback resolution, not pause resolution.
Not all resolutions are available for all sequence types. For Standard Definition sequences, such as DV, only Full and 1/2 are available. For many
HD sequences up to 1080 frame size, Full, 1/2, and 1/4 are available. For sequences with frame sizes larger than 1080, such as RED, more
fractional resolutions are available.
Note: If your previews are rendered at a resolution below the sequence resolution, the playback resolution is actually a fraction of the preview
resolution. For example, you can set your preview files to render at 1/2 the sequence frame size (1/2 resolution) and your playback resolution to
1/2 resolution. The rendered previews play back at 1/4 of original resolution (assuming that the resolution of the original media matched the
sequence resolution).
Set the display quality for the Source Monitor and Program Monitor
Note: You can assign keyboard shortcuts to playback resolutions.
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1. Do one of the following:
Right click the image in the Source Monitor or Program Monitor.
Click the Panel Menu icon in the Source Monitor or Program Monitor.
Click the Settings button in the Source Monitor or Program Monitor.
2. Do one of the following:
To set playback resolution, select Playback Resolution.
To set paused resolution, select Paused Resolution.
3. From the menu, select the resolution desired.
For an explanation and tips on speeding up previews in Premiere Pro, see this video on the video2brain website.
Change magnification
The Source Monitor and Program Monitor scale video to fit into the available area. You can increase the magnification setting for each view to see
the video in more detail. You can also descrease the magnification setting to see more of the pasteboard area around the image (to adjust motion
effects more easily, for example).
1. Choose a magnification setting from the Select Zoom Level menu (to the right of the current time display) in the Source Monitor or Program
Monitor.
In the Source Monitor, percentage values refer to the size of the source media. In the Program Monitor, percentage values refer to the
image size specified by the sequence settings. Fit scales the video to fit in the monitor’s available viewing area.
2. To change the visible area of a monitor, use the monitor’s scroll bars to change the visible area of the video image. Scroll bars appear when
the current size of the monitor can’t contain the entire image.
Dropped frame indicator
Both the Source and the Program Monitor have the option to display an icon (resembling a "Stop Light") that indicates whether frames are being
dropped during playback. The light should start green and change to yellow when dropped frames occur and reset on each playback. A tooltip will
indicate the dropped frame count.
To enable the dropped Frame indicator for the Source or Program Monitor, enable Show Dropped Frame Indicator in the panel menu, or the
Settings menu.
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Open or clear a clip in the Source Monitor
To view and edit source clips listed in the Project panel or individual clip instances in a sequence, open the clips in the Source Monitor. The
Source menu, accessed from the Source Monitor tab, lists open clips.
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1. To open a clip, do any of the following:
Double-click the clip in the Project or Timeline panel, or drag a clip from the Project panel to the Source Monitor. The clip appears in the
Source Monitor and its name is added to the Source menu.
Drag multiple clips or an entire bin from the Project panel into the Source Monitor, or select multiple clips in the Project panel and
double-click them. Clips are added to the Source menu in the order in which they were selected, and the last clip selected appears in
the Source Monitor.
Choose the name of the clip you want to see from the Source menu (click the triangle to the right of the current clip’s name on the
Source tab to make the menu appear).
Choosing a clip to view from the Source menu
The Source menu lists master clips by name. Clips opened from a sequence are listed by their sequence name, clip name, and starting
time in the sequence.
2. To clear a clip from the Source Monitor, in the Source menu, choose Close to clear or Close All to clear all clips.
You can also close all clips and the Source Monitor itself by clicking the Close button in the Source Monitor tab.
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Navigate clips in the Source menu in the Source Monitor
You can set keyboard shortcuts for navigating multiple clips loaded into the Source Monitor. Keyboard shortcuts can speed toggling of clips,
skipping to the first or last clip, or closing one or all the clips in the Source Monitor popup menu.
1. Select Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Keyboard Shortcuts (Mac OS).
The Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box opens.
2. In the dialog box, click the triangle next to Panels, and then click the triangle next to Source Monitor Panel to reveal the keyboard shortcuts
for that panel.
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3. Set keyboard shortcuts for any of the following commands:
Source Clip: Close
Source Clip: Close All
Source Clip: First
Source Clip: Last
Source Clip: Next
Source Clip: Previous
4. Click OK.
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Using the Source Monitor and Program Monitor time controls
The Source Monitor has several controls for moving through time (or frames) in a clip. The Program Monitor contains similar controls for moving
through a sequence.
A. Current time display B. Playhead C. Zoom scroll bar D. Time Ruler E. Duration display
Time rulers Display the duration of a clip in the Source Monitor and sequence in the Program Monitor. Tick marks measure time using the video
display format specified in the Project Settings dialog box. You can toggle the time rulers to display timecode in other formats. Each ruler also
displays icons for its corresponding monitor’s markers and In and Out points. You can adjust the playhead, markers, and the In and Out points by
dragging their icons in a time ruler.
Time ruler numbers are off by default. You can turn the time ruler numbers on by selecting Time Ruler Numbers in the panel menu of the
Source or Program Monitors.
Playhead Shows the location of the current frame in each monitor’s time ruler.
Note: The playhead was formerly called the "current-time indicator" (CTI).
Current time displays Show the timecode for the current frame. The current time displays are at the lower left of each monitor’s video. The
Source Monitor shows the current time for the open clip. The Program Monitor shows the sequence’s current time. To move to a different time.
Alternatively, click in the display and enter a new time, or place the pointer over the time display and drag left or right. To toggle display between
full timecode and a frame count, Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) the current time in either monitor or a Timeline panel.
Duration display Show the duration of the open clip or sequence. The duration is the time difference between the In point and the Out point for
the clip or sequence. When no In point is set, the starting time of the clip or of the sequence is substituted. When no Out point is set, the Source
Monitor uses the ending time of the clip to calculate duration. The Program Monitor uses the ending time of the last clip in the sequence to
calculate duration.
Zoom scroll bars Zoom scroll bars correspond with the visible area of the time ruler in each monitor. You can drag the handles to change the
width of the bar and change the scale of the time ruler below. Expanding the bar to its maximum width reveals the entire duration of the time ruler.
Contracting the bar zooms in for a more detailed view of the ruler. Expanding and contracting the bar is centered on the playhead. By positioning
the the mouse over the bar, you can use the mouse wheel to contract and expand the bar. You can also scroll the mouse wheel in the areas
outside of the bars for the same expanding and contracting behavior. By dragging the center of the bar, you can scroll the visible part of a time
ruler without changing its scale. When you drag bar, you are not moving the playhead, however, you can move the bar and then click in the time
ruler to move the playhead to the same area as the bar. A zoom scroll bar is also available in the Timeline.
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Note: Changing the Program Monitor’s time ruler or zoom scroll bar does not affect the time ruler or viewing area in a Timeline panel.
Viewing Source and Program Monitor controls
You can show or hide controls from the panel menus of the Source and Program Monitors. For example, you may wish to hide transport controls if
you know the J-K-L keyboard shortcuts for playback to gain more space to view your media.
Select or deslect the option in the panel menu to show or hide the following:
Transport controls
Markers
Time ruler numbers
Dropped frames indicator
Access to many of the same commands for showing and hiding controls can also be found in the Settings button on each monitor.
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View safe zones in the monitors
A. Action safe zone B. Title safe zone
Safe zone guides are for your reference and are not included in previews or export.
Click the Settings button below the Source Monitor or Program Monitor and choose Safe Margins. You can also choose Safe Margins from
the panel meu of the Source Monitor or Program Monitor.
The standard action- and title-safe margins are 10% and 20%, respectively. However, you can change the dimensions of the safe zones
in the Project Settings dialog box. (See Project Settings dialog box.)
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Choose fields in the Source and Program Monitors
You can set the Source Monitor and Program Monitor to display the first field, second field, or both fields for interlaced footage. The settings in the
Source Monitor are disabled when a progressive clip is opened in it. The settings in the Program Monitor are disabled when the active sequence
uses a progressive sequence preset.
1. In the Source Monitor or Program Monitor, click the panel menu button
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.
2. Select Display First Field, Display Second Field, or Display Both Fields according to your need.
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Choose a display mode
You can display normal video, the video’s alpha channel, or one of several measurement tools.
In the Source Monitor or Program Monitor, click the Settings button, or click the panel menu and choose a display mode setting:
Composite Video Displays the normal video.
Alpha Displays transparency as a grayscale image.
All Scopes Displays a waveform monitor, vectorscope, YCbCr Parade, and RGB Parade.
Vectorscope Displays a vectorscope that measures the video’s chrominance, which includes hue and saturation.
YC Waveform Displays a standard waveform monitor, which measures the video’s luminance in IRE.
YCbCr Parade Displays a waveform monitor that measures the Y, Cb, and Cr components of the video separately, in IRE.
RGB Parade Displays a waveform monitor that measures the R, G, and B components of the video separately, in IRE.
Vect/YC Wave/YCbCr Parade Displays a waveform monitor, vectorscope, and YCbCr Parade.
Vect/YC Wave/RGB Parade Displays a waveform monitor, vectorscope, and RGB Parade.
Program Monitor set to Vect/YC Wave/YCbCr Parade
A. Waveform monitor B. YCbCr Parade C. Vectorscope
To use the waveform monitor and vectorscope displays most effectively, view them with the Reference Monitor ganged to the Program Monitor.
See Reference Monitor.
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Multi-Camera editing workflow
Enhanced in Premiere Pro CC October 2013 release (version 7.1)
About the multi-camera editing workflow
Multi-camera editing workflow
Using the Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog box
Organize and select camera angles to view in monitor's multi-camera mode
Mark clips for synchronization
Import Multiclip sequences from Final Cut Pro
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About the multi-camera editing workflow
Adobe® Premiere® Pro lets you create a multi-camera source sequence using clips from multiple camera sources. You can synchronize clips by
manually setting In points, Out points, or clip markers. Or you can use audio-based syncing to accurately align clips in a multi-camera sequence.
The Multi-Camera mode in the Program Monitor lets you edit clips shot on multiple cameras from different angles. To display the multicamera
editing interface inside the Program Monitor, select Multi-Camera from the pop-up menu in the Program Monitor. The Program monitor's MultiCamera mode displays a fully composited output like the regular playback mode, displaying any applied effects during playback.
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Multi-camera editing workflow
1. Create a project
Click New Project from the Premiere Pro Welcome screen, or select File > New Project.
In the New Project dialog box, enter a name for the project, and click OK to accept the defaults.
2. Import footage
Select File > Import. In the Import dialog box that appears, navigate to the directory containing your video and audio files. Select the files to import,
and click Open.
To select a range of files all at once, click the first file and Shift-click the last file while selecting all the files in between.
3. Create a multi-camera source sequence.
You can create a multicam source sequence in the following ways:
Select a bin containing assets and choose a sync method from the Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog. All clips in the bin are
processed based on the sync method and ordered alpha-numerically in each resulting source sequence.
Select assets manually and choose a sync method from the Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog. The order in which you selected
the clips determines the order in the resulting source sequence.
To use the Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog, select your clips or bin from the Project panel. Then, right-click (Win) or Ctrl-click (Mac)
the selected clips and select Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence from the context menu.
For more information on specifying the settings in the Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog, see Using the Multi-Camera Source Sequence
dialog box.
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4. Create a multi-camera target sequence.
Edit the multi-camera source sequence in a target sequence.
To create a target sequence, with the multi-camera source sequence selected in the Project panel, select File > New > Sequence From Clip. You
can also right-click (Win) or Ctrl-click (Mac) on the multi-camera source sequence and select New Sequence From Clip from the context menu.
Premiere Pro creates a new multi-camera target sequence, and opens it in the Program Monitor and Timeline panel.
5. Enable multi-camera editing in the Program Monitor.
To enable the multi-camera target sequence for multi-camera editing, select Multi-Camera from the pop-up menu in the Program Monitor. The
Program Monitor is now in Multi-Camera mode.
In the Multi-Camera mode, you can view the footage of all cameras simultaneously and switch between cameras to choose footage for the final
sequence.
6. Enable recording of multi-camera edits.
Click the Multi-Camera Record toggle button on. If the button is not visible in the button bar, click "+" at the lower right corner of the Program
Monitor to open the Button editor. Drag-and-drop the Multi-Camera Record button to the button bar.
7. Edit the multi-camera sequence.
In the Program Monitor or Timeline panel, press the spacebar or click the Play-Stop toggle button to begin playback. While the sequence is
playing, press the number key on the main keyboard to cut to the camera with that number. For more information about using keyboard shortcuts,
see Keyboard shortcuts for multi-camera editing.
The active camera’s clip has a red border around it in the multi-camera view in the Program Monitor as follows:
8. Adjust and refine edits.
After you have recorded your multi-camera edit, You can do the following:
Rerecord the final sequence and substitute clips with footage from one of the other cameras.
Edit the multi-camera source sequence like any other sequence—using the standard editing tools and techniques, adding effects,
compositing using multiple tracks, including adjustment layers.
Change cameras after they have already been recorded.
Cut to a new angle.
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You can use keyboard shortcuts for multi-camera editing. You can use the number keys to switch cameras as the multi-camera sequence
plays. The keyboard shortcuts can also be used to change angles after completing a multi-camera edit. For more information, see Multi-camera
keyboard shortcuts.
9. Export the multi-camera sequence.
With the sequence active in the Program Monitor or Timeline panel, select File > Export > Media. Specify the export settings and click Export, or
click Queue to send the sequence to Adobe Media Encoder for encoding. For more information, see Workflow and overview for editing.
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Using the Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog box
Use the Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog to combine clips that have common In/Out points or overlapping timecode into a
multicamera sequence. You can also combine clips using audio waveforms and markers.
Multi-Camera source sequence name
You can name your multi-camera source sequence after your primary video or audio clip in the sequence. From the pop-up menu, select the
appropriate option to append "Multicam" or a custom name to the primary video or audio name.
Alternatively, select Custom from the pop-up menu, and enter a custom name in the text box.
Synchronize Point
Before creating a multi-camera source sequence using In points, Out points, or clip markers as the synchronization point, you mark clips for
synchronization. For more information, see Mark clips for synchronization.
In Points, Out Points
Mark the sync points using In Points or Out Points before creating the multi-camera source sequence.
Timecode
Select the Timecode option to synchronize the clips if they were recorded with timecode in sync with each other.
Select the Create Single Multicam Source Sequence option to combine the clips into a single multi-camera sequence. Select this option
when the coverage from the individual shots has gaps, and you want to create a sequence that preserves the gaps. If you do not select this
option, only overlapping clips are combined and clips with no overlaps are left unused.
Select Ignore Hours if each clip has timecode that starts at a different hour but otherwise overlaps in timecode.
Premiere Pro lets you perform quick multi-camera edits based on sync timecode. Press the modifier key Ctrl (Win) or Cmd (Mac) while switching
source clips to match frame to the timecode at the current playhead position.
Clip Marker
Select the Clip Marker option to sync the clips using clip markers that are manually added to common sync points.
Audio
Select the Audio option to synchronize the clips automatically based on the audio waveforms. You can use audio recorded from a second source
to automatically sync and create multicamera and merged clips using audio waveforms.
If a separately recorded audio track is out of sync with the video clip, you can add a frame offset using the Offset Audio by option. You can
enter video frames in the range -100 to +100 for sync offset for the audio-only clip.
Use the Move Source Clips to Processed Clips bin option to move the generated source clips to a Processed Clips bin. If a Processed Clips
bin does not exist, Premiere Pro creates one before moving the clips into it. Clips that did not meet the synchronization criteria are left
outside the Processed Clips bin. This option makes it easy to identify clips that were not used in the resulting multicam source sequence.
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Audio sequence settings
Sequence Settings determines how the audio tracks in the source sequence are populated, how the panning and channel assignments are set
and whether they are muted.
Select Camera 1 when only the audio from Camera 1 is used in the editing sequence. Multicam editing is enabled for only the video portion
of the source sequence.
If you use A/V clips to create this sequence, the audio tracks for all audio associated with video 1 are unmuted. Other audio in the source
sequence is muted.
If you use audio-only clips with video or A/V clips, the audio-only clips are placed in the topmost tracks, and are unmuted. Other audio (from
any linked clips) is muted and placed in lower tracks. The channel assignments and panning of each track are set to transfer each source
channel to independent output channels (up to 32). The number of unmuted channels of source audio determines the number of active
output channels of the sequence.
Note: You cannot use the audio follows video option in editing sequences created with this setting, because the audio portion is not
multicam-enabled.
Select All Cameras to use all audio channels in the source clips. This setting is similar to the Camera 1 setting. Only the video portion of the
source sequence is multicam-enabled. Audio-follows-video is not supported for this setting. All audio is unmuted (up to 32 channels). The
number of unmuted channels of source audio determines the number of active output channels of the sequence.
Select Switch Audio when you want the audio to switch with its linked video. This setting unmutes all audio. It enables multicam editing on
both the video and audio of the source sequence, when the audio follows video setting is enabled in the Program monitor. This setting also
maps multi-mono source audio into a single adaptive audio track. In addition, the audio-follows-video editing setting switches this single track
with the video. If audio-only clips are included in the selection of clips, the audio-only clips are placed in tracks below any linked clips. Empty
video tracks are created to match up with every audio-only track.
Select Custom Preset when only the audio from Camera 1 is used in the editing sequence, and you want to use a sequence preset for the
source sequence. This setting treats audio channels the same as the Camera 1 setting. It mutes all audio channels except the ones
associated with Camera 1. Choosing this setting enables the Sequence Preset pop-up menu, where you can select from a list of all
previously saved sequence presets.
For more information, see this video by Josh Weiss on multi-camera editing using audio-based syncing.
Audio Channels Preset
The Audio Channels preset determines how the resulting source sequence is mapped. Details include, the type and number of audio tracks that
are dropped when the source sequence is nested into the editing sequence.
Note: For the resulting source sequence to map correctly with the audio channels, the number of tracks in the source clips should not be greater
than the channels associated with the preset you choose.
Automatic: Reads the audio type of the first clip and uses this mapping
Mono: Maps to as many mono channels as there are output channels in the source sequence.
Stereo: Maps to stereo tracks based on the number of output channels in the source sequence.
5.1: Maps to 5.1 tracks based on the number of output channels in the source sequence.
Adaptive: Maps to Adaptive based on the number of output channels in the source sequence.
Camera Names
When creating a multi-camera source sequence, you can display the camera names as clip names or track names. These options are available in
addition to the default option of enumerated camera names like camera 1, camera 2.
Depending on the Camera Names option that you select, the camera angles are displayed as track names, clip names, or camera numbers in the
Source Monitor. To view the multi-camera sequence in the Source monitor, right-click the sequence and select Multi-camera.
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Organize and select camera angles to view in monitor's multi-camera mode
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Premiere Pro lets you organize and select the angles to view in the Source Monitor's multi-camera mode.
From the Source monitor's pop-up menu, select Edit Cameras.
In the Edit Cameras dialog box, all the clips are listed in the original order that they were arranged in the sequence tracks. You can drag-and-drop
the clips to change the sequence order. You can also enable or disable the clips by selecting or deselecting them.
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Mark clips for synchronization
If clips are synchronized by timecode (jam-synched) at the shooting location, you do not need to mark clips for synchronization.
Before creating a multi-camera source sequence, it is important to mark clips for synchronization. Open each clip and then do one of the following
at the sync-point:
Mark an In Point at a sync-point at the beginning of a clip. For example, mark an In point where the clapperboard (slate) is clapped at the
head of a clip.
Mark an Out point at a sync-point at the end of a clip. For example, mark an Out point where the clapperboard is clapped at the tail of a clip.
Make a clip marker at a sync-point at any point during a clip. For example, if there is action at any point during a clip that can be used as a
sync-point, like an audio cue, cymbal crash, camera flash, and so on. Rename each marker so that they are identically named for
synchronization. Type the same clip marker name for each clip in the Marker dialog box, and then click OK. (See Add markers in the
Timeline)
Timecode can also be used to synchronize clips, and it does so automatically. However, timecode must be identical on all clips for them to
synchronize properly. If the timecode is identical on all the clips you plan to synchronize, you do not need to mark clips for synchronization. If you
use the hours value in source timecode as a camera designator, select the Ignore Hours option to use only minutes, seconds, and frames to
synchronize clips.
To stamp identical timecode on all clips, you can either record the cameras with jam-synched timecode on location, or modify the timecode for
each clip in Premiere Pro. (See Set timecode manually for a clip.).
To the top
Import Multiclip sequences from Final Cut Pro
You can export a Multiclip project from Final Cut Pro, and import the Final Cut Pro project XML files into Premiere Pro. In Premiere Pro, the
Multiclips sequences appear as multi-camera sequences with all the Final Cut Pro project settings intact.
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102
Control surface support
New in Premiere Pro CC
Adobe® Premiere® Pro provides a hardware control interface that lets you connect hardware control devices with the application. The hardware
control interface supports Mackie and Eucon protocols.
After configuring your devices, you can control Premiere Pro's editing environment using buttons, knobs, and faders on the devices.
To the top
Setting Control Surface preferences
Use the Control Surface preferences dialog to configure your hardware control device.
To access the Control Surface preferences dialog, select Edit > Preferences > Control Surface.
Control Surface Preferences dialog
Under Device Class, select either Eucon, Mackie, or both. Mackie allows for further configuration. After you select the connected device, the
hardware transport controls are synchronized with the Track Mixer controls in real time.
To the top
Control Track Mixer using Control Surface
Faders: Adjust faders in the Track Mixer using the control surface faders. For best results, ensure that the fader placement on the control surface
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accurately matches the placement of the fader in the Track Mixer. Any movement of the fader control in the Track Mixer affects the fader of the
control surface. Control surfaces usually have a limited number of faders. Sometimes, the number of tracks in your sequence exceed the number
of corresponding control surface faders. In this case, navigate additional tracks using the bank and nudge buttons on the control surface. The bank
buttons navigate to the next set of tracks in the project.
Meters: Some control surfaces display track meters. Avid displays track meters for mono, stereo, 5.1 tracks.
Track Name: Control surfaces also display track names. However, depending on the device, there can be a limit to the number of characters in
the track name that the control surface can display.
Automation Mode: Mackie devices let you toggle between Off, Read, Latch, Touch, and Write states for each track in your sequence.
Pan/Balance control: Use the Pan and Balance knob to control pan and balance for each track in your sequence.
Mute: The Mute button on the control surface (On button on Avid devices) mutes the corresponding track in your sequence.
Record: The Rec/Ready button on Mackie devices or the Auto Rec button on Avid devices enables recording for the corresponding track in your
sequence.
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104
Keyboard shortcuts in Premiere Pro CC
Premiere Pro CC default keyboard shortcuts
Multi-Camera (keyboard shortcuts)
Project panel (keyboard shortcuts)
Timeline panel (keyboard shortcuts)
Titler (keyboard shortcuts)
Trim Monitor panel (keyboard shortcuts)
Find keyboard shortcuts
Customize or load keyboard shortcuts
Remove shortcuts
Printing keyboard shortcuts
Print a spreadsheet of the keyboard shortcuts
Print a PDF of the keyboard shortcuts
Many commands have keyboard shortcut equivalents, so you can complete tasks with minimal use of the mouse. You can also create or edit
keyboard shortcuts.
To the top
Premiere Pro CC default keyboard shortcuts
Results
Windows
Mac OS
Project/Production...
Ctrl+Alt+N
Opt+Cmd+N
Sequence...
Ctrl+N
Cmd+N
File
Bin
Cmd+/
Title...
Ctrl+T
Cmd+T
Open Project/Production...
Ctrl+O
Cmd+O
Browse in Adobe Bridge...
Ctrl+Alt+O
Opt+Cmd+O
Close Project
Ctrl+Shift+W
Shift+Cmd+W
Close
Ctrl+W
Cmd+W
Save
Ctrl+S
Cmd+S
Save As...
Ctrl+Shift+S
Shift+Cmd+S
Save a Copy...
Ctrl+Alt+S
Opt+Cmd+S
Capture...
F5
F5
Batch Capture...
F6
F6
Import from Media Browser
Ctrl+Alt+I
Opt+Cmd+I
Import...
Ctrl+I
Cmd+I
Ctrl+M
Cmd+M
Ctrl+Shift+H
Shift+Cmd+H
Export
Media...
Get Properties for
Selection...
Exit
Ctrl+Q
Edit
Undo
Ctrl+Z
Cmd+Z
105
Redo
Ctrl+Shift+Z
Shift+Cmd+Z
Cut
Ctrl+X
Cmd+X
Copy
Ctrl+C
Cmd+C
Paste
Ctrl+V
Cmd+V
Paste Insert
Ctrl+Shift+V
Shift+Cmd+V
Paste Attributes
Ctrl+Alt+V
Opt+Cmd+V
Clear
Delete
Forward Delete
Ripple Delete
Shift+Delete
Shift+Forward Delete
Duplicate
Ctrl+Shift+/
Shift+Cmd+/
Select All
Ctrl+A
Cmd+A
Deselect All
Ctrl+Shift+A
Shift+Cmd+A
Find...
Ctrl+F
Cmd+F
Edit Original
Ctrl+E
Cmd+E
Make Subclip...
Ctrl+U
Cmd+U
Audio Channels...
Shift+G
Shift+G
Speed/Duration...
Ctrl+R
Cmd+R
Insert
,
,
Overwrite
.
.
Enable
Shift+E
Shift+Cmd+E
Link
Ctr+l
Cmd+l
Group
Ctrl+G
Cmd+G
Ungroup
Ctrl+Shift+G
Shift+Cmd+G
Render Effects in Work
Area/In to Out
Enter
Return
Match Frame
F
F
Add Edit
Ctrl+K
Cmd+K
Add Edit to All Tracks
Ctrl+Shift+K
Shift+Cmd+K
Trim Edit
T
T
Extend Selected Edit to
Playhead
E
E
Apply Video Transition
Ctrl+D
Cmd+D
Apply Audio Transition
Ctrl+Shift+D
Shift+Cmd+D
Apply Default Transitions
to Selection
Shift+D
Shift+D
Lift
;
;
Extract
'
'
Zoom In
=
=
Zoom Out
-
-
Next in Sequence
Shift+;
Shift+;
Previous in Sequence
Ctrl+Shift+;
Opt+;
S
S
Clip
Sequence
Go to Gap
Snap
Marker
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Mark In
I
I
Mark Out
O
O
Mark Clip
X
X
Mark Selection
/
/
Go to In
Shift+I
Shift+I
Go to Out
Shift+O
Shift+O
Clear In
Ctrl+Shift+I
Opt+I
Clear Out
Ctrl+Shift+O
Opt+O
Clear In and Out
Ctrl+Shift+X
Opt+X
Add Marker
M
M
Go to Next Marker
Shift+M
Shift+M
Go to Previous Marker
Ctrl+Shift+M
Shift+Cmd+M
Clear Current Marker
Ctrl+Alt+M
Opt+M
Clear All Markers
Ctrl+Alt+Shift+M
Opt+Cmd+M
Left
Ctrl+Shift+L
Shift+Cmd+L
Center
Ctrl+Shift+C
Shift+Cmd+C
Right
Ctrl+Shift+R
Shift+Cmd+R
Tab Stops...
Ctrl+Shift+T
Shift+Cmd+T
Templates...
Ctrl+J
Cmd+J
Next Object Above
Ctrl+Alt+]
Opt+Cmd+]
Next Object Below
Ctrl+Alt+[
Opt+Cmd+[
Bring to Front
Ctrl+Shift+]
Shift+Cmd+]
Bring Forward
Ctrl+]
Cmd+]
Send to Back
Ctrl+Shift+[
Shift+Cmd+[
Send Backward
Ctrl+[
Cmd+[
Reset Current
Workspace...
Alt+Shift +0
Opt+Shift +0
Audio Clip Mixer
Shift+9
Shift+9
Audio Track Mixer
Shift+6
Shift+6
Effect Controls
Shift+5
Shift+5
Effects
Shift+7
Shift+7
Media Browser
Shift+8
Shift+8
Program Monitor
Shift+4
Shift+4
Project
Shift+1
Shift+1
Source Monitor
Shift+2
Shift+2
Timelines
Shift+3
Shift+3
F1
F1
Type Alignment
Select
Arrange
Window
Workspace
Help
Adobe Premiere Pro
Help...
Keyboard...
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Add Tracks to Match
Source
Clear Poster Frame
Ctrl+Shift+P
Opt+P
Cut to Camera 1
Ctrl+1
Ctrl+1
Cut to Camera 2
Ctrl+2
Ctrl+2
Cut to Camera 3
Ctrl+3
Ctrl+3
Cut to Camera 4
Ctrl+4
Ctrl+4
Cut to Camera 5
Ctrl+5
Ctrl+5
Cut to Camera 6
Ctrl+6
Ctrl+6
Cut to Camera 7
Ctrl+7
Ctrl+7
Cut to Camera 8
Ctrl+8
Ctrl+8
Cut to Camera 9
Ctrl+9
Decrease Clip Volume
[
[
Decrease Clip Volume Many
Shift+[
Shift+[
Expand All Tracks
Shift+=
Shift+=
Export Frame
Ctrl+Shift+E
Shift+E
Extend Next Edit To
Playhead
Shift+W
Shift+W
Extend Previous Edit To
Playhead
Shift+Q
Shift+Q
Show/Hide Tracks...
Ctrl+Alt+T
Opt+Cmd+T
Loop
Ctrl+L
Cmd+L
Meter Input(s) Only
Ctrl+Shift+I
Ctrl+Shift+I
Record Video
V
V
Record Audio
A
A
Eject
E
E
Fast Forward
F
F
Go to In point
Q
Q
Go to Out point
W
W
Record
G
G
Rewind
R
R
Step Back
Left
Left
Step Forward
Right
Right
Stop
S
S
Backspace
Delete
New Custom Bin
Ctrl+/
Cmd+/
Delete Custom Item
Backspace
Delete
Step Backward
Left
Left
Step Forward
Right
Right
Panels
Audio Mixer Panel Menu
Capture Panel
Effect Controls Panel
Menu
Remove Selected Effect
Effects Panel Menu
History Panel Menu
108
Delete
Backspace
Delete
Open in Source Monitor
Shift+O
Shift+O
Parent Directory
Ctrl+Up
Cmd+Up
Select Directory List
Shift+Left
Shift+Left
Select Media List
Shift+Right
Shift+Right
Loop
Ctrl+L
Cmd+L
Play
Space
Space
Go to Next Edit Point
Down
Down
Go to Previous Edit Point
Up
Up
Play/Stop Toggle
Space
Space
Record On/Off Toggle
0
0
Step Back
Left
Left
Step Forward
Right
Right
Loop
Ctrl+L
Cmd+L
Selection Tool
V
V
Track Select Tool
A
A
Ripple Edit Tool
B
B
Rolling Edit Tool
N
N
Rate Stretch Tool
R
R
Razor Tool
C
C
Slip Tool
Y
Y
Slide Tool
U
U
Pen Tool
P
P
Hand Tool
H
H
Zoom Tool
Z
Z
Result
Windows
Mac OS
Go to Next Edit Point
Down
Down
Go to Next Edit Point on Any Track
Shift+Down
Shift+Down
Go to Previous Edit Point
Up
Up
Shift+Up
Shift+Up
Go to Selected Clip End
Shift+End
Shift+End
Go to Selected Clip Start
Shift+Home
Shift+Home
Go to Sequence-Clip End
End
End
Go to Sequence-Clip Start
Home
Home
Increase Clip Volume
]
]
Tools
Multi-Camera (keyboard shortcuts)
Go to Previous Edit Point on Any
Track
109
Increase Clip Volume Many
Shift+]
Shift+]
Maximize or Restore Active Frame
Shift+`
Shift+`
`
`
Minimize All Tracks
Shift+-
Shift+-
Play Around
Shift+K
Shift+K
Play In to Out
Ctrl+Shift+Space
Opt+K
Play In to Out with Preroll/Postroll
Shift+Space
Shift+Space
Play from Playhead to Out Point
Ctrl+Space
Ctrl+Space
Play-Stop Toggle
Space
SpaceRecord Voiceover
Reveal Nested Sequence
Ctrl+Shift+F
Shift+T
Ripple Trim Next Edit To Playhead
W
W
Q
Q
Select Camera 1
1
1
Select Camera 2
2
2
Select Camera 3
3
3
Select Camera 4
4
4
Select Camera 5
5
5
Select Camera 6
6
6
Select Camera 7
7
7
Select Camera 8
8
8
Select Camera 9
9
9
Select Find Box
Shift+F
Shift+F
Select Clip at Playhead
D
D
Select Next Clip
Ctrl+Down
Cmd+Down
Select Next Panel
Ctrl+Shift+.
Ctrl+Shift+.
Select Previous Clip
Ctrl+Up
Cmd+Up
Select Previous Panel
Ctrl+Shift+,
Ctrl+Shift+,
Set Poster Frame
Shift+P
Cmd+P
Shuttle Left
J
J
Shuttle Right
L
L
Shuttle Slow Left
Shift+J
Shift+J
Shuttle Slow Right
Shift+L
Shift+L
Maximize or Restore Frame Under
Cursor
Ripple Trim Previous Edit To
Playhead
110
Shuttle Stop
K
K
Step Back
Left
Left
Step Back Five Frames - Units
Shift+Left
Shift+Left
Step Forward
Right
Right
Step Forward Five Frames - Units
Shift+Right
Shift+Right
Toggle All Audio Targets
Ctrl+9
Cmd+9
Toggle All Source Audio
Ctrl+Alt+9
Opt+Cmd+9
Toggle All Source Video
Ctrl+Alt+0
Opt+Cmd+0
Toggle All Video Targets
Ctrl+0
Cmd+0
Toggle Audio During Scrubbing
Shift+S
Shift+S
Toggle Full Screen
Ctrl+`
Ctrl+`
Toggle Multi-Camera View
Shift+0
Shift+0
Toggle Trim Type
Shift+T
Ctrl+T
Trim Backward
Ctrl+Left
Opt+Left
Trim Backward Many
Ctrl+Shift+Left
Opt+Shift+Left
Trim Forward
Ctrl+Right
Opt+Right
Trim Forward Many
Ctrl+Shift+Right
Opt+Shift+Right
Trim Next Edit to Playhead
Ctrl+Alt+W
Opt+W
Trim Previous Edit to Playhead
Ctrl+Alt+Q
Opt+Q
Result
Windows
Mac OS
Workspace 1
Alt+Shift+1
Opt+Shift+1
Workspace 2
Alt+Shift+2
Opt+Shift+2
Workspace 3
Alt+Shift+3
Opt+Shift+3
Workspace 4
Alt+Shift+4
Opt+Shift+4
Workspace 5
Alt+Shift+5
Opt+Shift+5
Workspace 6
Alt+Shift+6
Opt+Shift+6
Workspace 7
Alt+Shift+7
Opt+Shift+7
Workspace 8
Alt+Shift+8
Opt+Shift+8
Toggle Control Surface Clip Mixer
Mode
Project panel (keyboard shortcuts)
111
Workspace 9
Alt+Shift+9
Opt+Shift+9
Zoom to Sequence
\
\
Extend Selection Up
Shift+Up
Shift+Up
Move Selection Down
Down
Down
Move Selection End
End
End
Move Selection Home
Home
Home
Move Selection Left
Left
Left
Move Selection Page Down
Page Down
Page Down
Move Selection Page Up
Page Up
Page Up
Move Selection Right
Right
Right
Move Selection Up
Up
Up
Next Column Field
Tab
Tab
Next Row Field
Enter
Return
Open in Source Monitor
Shift+O
Shift+O
Previous Column Field
Shift+Tab
Shift+Tab
Previous Row Field
Shift+Enter
Shift+Return
Thumbnail Size Next
Shift+]
Shift+]
Thumbnail Size Previous
Shift+[
Shift+[
Toggle View
Shift+\
Shift+\
Result
Windows
Mac OS
Add Clip Marker
Ctrl+1
Timeline panel (keyboard shortcuts)
Clear Selection
Backspace
Delete
Decrease Audio Tracks Height
Alt+-
Opt+-
Decrease Video Tracks Height
Ctrl+-
Cmd+-
Increase Audio Tracks Height
Alt+=
Opt+=
Increase Video Tracks Height
Ctrl+=
Cmd+=
Nudge Clip Selection Left Five
Frames
Alt+Shift+Left
Shift+Cmd+Left
Nudge Clip Selection Left One
Frame
Alt+Left
Cmd+Left
112
Nudge Clip Selection Right Five
Frames
Alt+Shift+Right
Shift+Cmd+Right
Nudge Clip Selection Right One
Frame
Alt+Right
Cmd+Right
Ripple Delete
Alt+Backspace
Opt+Delete
Set Work Area Bar In Point
Alt+[
Opt+[
Set Work Area Bar Out Point
Alt+]
Opt+]
Show Next Screen
Page Down
Page Down
Show Previous Screen
Page Up
Page Up
Slide Clip Selection Left Five
Frames
Alt+Shift+,
Opt+Shift+,
Slide Clip Selection Left One
Frame
Alt+,
Opt+,
Slide Clip Selection Right Five
Frames
Alt+Shift+.
Opt+Shift+.
Slide Clip Selection Right One
Frame
Alt+.
Opt+.
Slip Clip Selection Left Five
Frames
Ctrl+Alt+Shift+Left
Opt+Shift+Cmd+Left
Ctrl+Alt+Left
Opt+Cmd+Left
Slip Clip Selection Right Five
Frames
Ctrl+Alt+Shift+Right
Opt+Shift+Cmd+Right
Slip Clip Selection Right One
Frame
Ctrl+Alt+Right
Opt+Cmd+Right
Result
Windows
Mac OS
Arc Tool
A
A
Bold
Ctrl+B
Cmd+B
Decrease Kerning by Five Units
Alt+Shift+Left
Opt+Shift+Left
Decrease Kerning by One Unit
Alt+Left
Opt+Left
Decrease Leading by Five Units
Alt+Shift+Down
Opt+Shift+Down
Decrease Leading by One Unit
Alt+Down
Opt+Down
Decrease Text Size by Five Points
Ctrl+Alt+Shift+Left
Opt+Shift+Cmd+Left
Decrease Text Size by One Point
Ctrl+Alt+Left
Opt+Cmd+Left
Ellipse Tool
E
E
Slip Clip Selection Left One Frame
Titler (keyboard shortcuts)
113
Increase Kerning by Five Units
Alt+Shift+Right
Opt+Shift+Right
Increase Kerning by One Unit
Alt+Right
Opt+Right
Increase Leading by Five Units
Alt+Shift+Up
Opt+Shift+Up
Increase Leading by One Unit
Alt+Up
Opt+Up
Increase Text Size by Five Points
Ctrl+Alt+Shift+Right
Opt+Shift+Cmd+Right
Increase Text Size by One Point
Ctrl+Alt+Right
Opt+Cmd+Right
Insert Copyright Symbol
Ctrl+Alt+Shift+C
Opt+Shift+Cmd+C
Insert Registered Symbol
Ctrl+Alt+Shift+R
Opt+Shift+Cmd+R
Italic
Ctrl+I
Cmd+I
Line Tool
L
L
Nudge Selected Object Down by
Five Pixels
Shift+Down
Shift+Down
Nudge Selected Object Down by
One Pixel
Down
Down
Nudge Selected Object Left by
Five Pixels
Shift+Left
Shift+Left
Nudge Selected Object Left by
One Pixel
Left
Left
Nudge Selected Object Right by
Five Pixels
Shift+Right
Shift+Right
Nudge Selected Object Right by
One Pixel
Right
Right
Nudge Selected Object Up by Five
Pixels
Shift+Up
Shift+Up
Nudge Selected Object Up by One
Pixel
Up
Up
P
P
Position Object(s) to Bottom Title
Safe Margin
Ctrl+Shift+D
Shift+Cmd+D
Position Object(s) to Left Title Safe
Margin
Ctrl+Shift+F
Shift+Cmd+F
Position Object(s) to Top Title Safe
Margin
Ctrl+Shift+O
Shift+Cmd+O
Rectangle Tool
R
R
Rotation Tool
O
O
Selection Tool
V
V
Type Tool
T
T
Underline
Ctrl+U
Cmd+U
Path Type Tool
Pen Tool
114
Vertical Type Tool
C
C
Wedge Tool
W
W
Trim Monitor panel (keyboard shortcuts)
Result
Windows
Mac OS
Focus Both Outgoing and Incoming
Alt+1
Opt+1
Focus on Incoming Side
Alt+3
Opt+3
Focus on Outgoing Side
Alt+2
Opt+2
Loop
Ctrl+L
Cmd+L
Alt+Shift+Left
Opt+Shift+Left
Trim Backward by One Frame
Alt+Left
Opt+Left
Trim Forward by Large Trim Offset
Alt+Shift+Right
Opt+Shift+Right
Trim Forward by One Frame
Alt+Right
Opt+Right
Trim Backward by Large Trim
Offset
To the top
Find keyboard shortcuts
Find the keyboard shortcuts for a tool, button, or menu command by doing any of the following:
For a tool or button, hold the pointer over the tool or button until its tool tip appears. If available, the keyboard shortcut appears in the tool tip
after the tool description.
For menu commands, look for the keyboard shortcut at the right of the command.
For the most-used keyboard shortcuts not shown in tool tips or on menus, see the tables in this article. For a complete list of default and
current shortcuts, choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Keyboard Shortcuts (Mac OS)
Use the search field in the Keyboard Customization dialog box to find specific commands quickly.
For information about using Apple Final Cut Pro or Avid Media Composer keyboard shortcuts in Adobe Premiere Pro, customizing keyboard
shortcuts, and to move custom keyboard shortcuts to a different system, see this video by Kevin Monahan and Karl Soule on AdobeTV.
To the top
Customize or load keyboard shortcuts
You can set shortcuts to match shortcuts in other software you use. If other sets are available, you can choose them from the Set menu in the
Keyboard Customization dialog box.
1. For customizing keyboard shortcuts, choose one of the following:
In Windows, choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts
In Mac OS, choose Premiere Pro > Keyboard Shortcuts
115
2. In the Keyboard Customization dialog box, choose an option from the menu:
Application Displays commands found in the menu bar, organized by category.
Panels Displays commands associated with panels and menus.
Tools Displays a list of tool icons.
3. In the Command column, view the command for which you want to create or change a shortcut. If necessary, click the triangle next to the
name of a category to reveal the commands it includes.
4. Click in the item’s shortcut field to select it.
5. Type the shortcut you want to use for the item. The Keyboard Customization dialog box displays an alert if the shortcut you choose is
already in use.
6. Do one of the following:
To erase a shortcut and return it to the command that originally had it, click Undo.
To jump to the command that previously had the shortcut, click Go To.
To simply delete the shortcut you typed, click Clear.
To re-enter the shortcut you typed previously, click Redo.
7. Repeat the procedure to enter as many shortcuts as you want. When you’re finished, click Save As, type a name for your Key Set, and click
Save.
Note: The operating system reserves some commands. You cannot reassign those commands to Premiere Pro. Also, you cannot assign
the plus (+) and minus (-) keys on the numeric keypad because they are necessary for entering relative timecode values. You can assign the
minus (–) key on the main keyboard, however.
To the top
Remove shortcuts
1. Do one of the following:
In Windows, choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts
In Mac OS, choose Premiere Pro > Keyboard Shortcuts
2. Do one of the following:
To remove a shortcut, select the shortcut you want to remove, and click Clear.
To remove a set of shortcuts, choose the key set from the Set menu and click Delete. When prompted in the warning dialog box, click
Delete to confirm your choice.
To the top
Printing keyboard shortcuts
116
Many editors like to have a keyboard shortcuts document they can search and refer to. Premiere Pro offers a way to copy and paste keyboard
shortcuts into a document, and then print. There are also pages in Help documentation that you can print, or save as a PDF.
Whether you are copy and pasting into a document, printing a PDF, or inspecting the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box, it is important to note the
available commands that are mappable to the keyboard. You can engage in a much more keyboard driven workflow by adding new keyboard
shortcuts.
Print a spreadsheet of the keyboard shortcuts
You can paste the lists of keyboard shortcuts from the Keyboard Customization dialog box into a text document, like a spreadsheet, from which
you can print. The advantage of the copy and pasting method is that you can view your customized keyboard shortcuts, as well. If you select Final
Cut Pro, Avid Media Composer, or Custom keyboard shortcuts, then those keyboard shortcuts are the ones that are printed.
Do one of the following:
Press Ctrl+Shift, and then choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts (Windows).
Press Command+Shift, and then choose Premiere Pro > Keyboard Shortcuts (Mac OS).
Click the Clipboard button.
Start a new document in a text editor, or spreadsheet program.
Paste the contents of the clipboard into the document.
Save the document and then print it out.
Print a PDF of the keyboard shortcuts
You can print out a PDF of the existing keyboard shortcuts in the following Help articles:
Premiere Pro CC (Windows)
Premiere Pro CC (Mac)
Open the keyboard shortcuts article in a web browser and print it out.
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117
Project setup
118
Creating and changing projects
Create a project
Review project settings
Project Settings dialog box
Open a project
Delete a project file
Moving a project to another computer
A project file stores information about sequences and assets, such as settings for capture, transitions, and audio mixing. Also, the project file
contains the data from all of your editing decisions, such as the In and Out points for trimmed clips and the parameters for each effect. Premiere
Pro creates a folder on your hard disk at the start of each new project. By default, this is where it stores the files it captures, the preview and
conformed audio files it creates, and the project file itself.
For every project you create, Premiere Pro creates a project file. This file contains the settings you select for each sequence in the project, as well
as crucial data about the assets, edit decisions, and effects used in the project.
Premiere Pro doesn’t store video, audio, or still image files in the project file—it stores only a reference to each of these files, a clip, which is
based on the filename and location of the file at the time you imported it. If you later move, rename, or delete a source file, Premiere Pro can’t find
it automatically the next time you open the project. In this case, Premiere Pro displays the Where Is The File dialog box.
By default, every project includes a single Project panel. This acts as a storage area for all clips used in the project. You can organize a project’s
media and sequences using bins in the Project panel.
A project may contain multiple sequences, and the sequences within a project may differ from one another in their settings. Within a single project,
you can edit individual segments as separate sequences, and then combine the segments into a finished program by nesting them into a longer
sequence. Similarly, you can store multiple variations of a sequence, as separate sequences, in the same project.
Note: There’s no need to save copies of a project when creating different segments or versions of the same video program. Simply create new or
duplicate sequences within a single project file.
Online Resources
Andrew Devis shows how to set up a new project and sequence in this getting-started video on the Creative Cow website.
Maxim Jago explains project settings and demonstrates the process of starting up a new project in this video from “Getting Started with Premiere
Pro” from Video2Brain.
This chapter from the “Adobe Premiere Pro Classroom in a Book” series explains how to set up projects, sequences, and preferences when getting
started with Premiere Pro.
Maxim Jago shows how to create a new project and sequence in this video from Video2Brain.
Get free project templates and more from Jarle Leirpoll’s Premiere Pro blog.
To the top
Create a project
Projects may contain more than one sequence, and the settings for one sequence may differ from that of another. Premiere Pro will prompt you for
settings for the first sequence every time you create a new project. However, you can cancel this step to create a project containing no sequences.
1. (Optional) If you plan to capture video from a device, connect the device to your computer using an IEEE 1394 or SDI connection. Then turn
the device on, and do one of the following:
If the device is a camera, set it to the playback mode, which may be labeled VTR or VCR.
If the device is a deck, make sure that its output is set properly.
Note: Don’t set a camera to any of the recording modes, which may be labeled Camera or Movie.
2. Either choose New Project on the Welcome screen that appears when Premiere Pro starts up or, after the application is open, choose File >
New > Project.
3. Browse to a location where you want to save the project file, name the project, and click OK.
Note: Whenever possible, specify a location and name that you won’t have to change later. By default, Premiere Pro stores rendered
previews, conformed audio files, and captured audio and video in the folder where you store the project. Moving a project file later may
require moving its associated files as well.
4. Do one of the following:
Select a preset, or customize settings, for the first sequence of the project. For more information, see Create a sequence. Then, click
OK.
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To create a project without a sequence, click Cancel.
5. (Optional) If you want to change where Premiere Pro stores various types of files, specify the scratch disk locations. See Specify scratch
disks to improve system performance.
Note: Premiere Pro supports high bit-depth (greater than 8 bits per channel) video necessary for editing standard and high definition
footage.
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Review project settings
All project settings apply to the whole project, and most can’t be changed after a project is created.
After you begin working in a project, you can review project settings, but you can change only a few of them. You can access these settings
through the Project Settings dialog box.
1. Choose Project > Project Settings > General, or Project > Project Settings > Scratch Disks.
2. View or change settings as needed.
3. Click OK.
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Project Settings dialog box
General
Video Rendering and Playback Specifies whether the software or hardware function of the Mercury Playback Engine is enabled or not. If a
qualified CUDA card is installed, the choice for hardware rendering and playback with the Mercury Playback Engine will be enabled. For more
information about CUDA, Mercury Playback Engine and Premiere Pro, see this post on the Premiere Pro Work Area blog.
Title Safe Area Specifies how much of the frame edge to mark as a safe zone for titles, so that titles aren’t cut off by television set overscan. A
rectangle with cross hairs marks the title-safe zone when you click the Safe Margins button in the Source Monitor or Program Monitor. Titles are
usually assumed to require a wider safe zone than action.
Action Safe Area Specifies how much of the frame edge to mark as a safe zone for action so that action isn’t cut off by television set overscan. A
rectangle marks the action-safe zone when you click the Safe Margins button in the Source Monitor or Program Monitor.
Display Format (Video and Audio) For information about video and audio display formats, see their entries under General Settings in Sequence
presets and settings.
Capture Format For information about setting the capture format, see Set capture format, preferences, and tracks.
Scratch Disks
For information about designating scratch disks, see Specify scratch disks to improve system performance.
Online Resources
See this video tutorial by Andrew Devis on the Creative Cow website for information about the choices users must make in the Welcome screen,
and the New Project and New Sequence dialog boxes after opening Premiere Pro.
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Open a project
Premiere Pro for Windows can open project files created with earlier versions of Premiere Pro or Adobe Premiere 6.x. You can open only one
project at a time. To transfer the contents of one project into another, use the Import command.
Use the Auto Save command to automatically save copies of your projects in the Premiere Pro Auto-Save folder.
You may encounter missing files as you work on a project. You can continue working by substituting offline files as placeholders for the missing
files. You can edit using offline files, but you must bring the originals back online before rendering your movie.
To bring a file back online after the project is open, use the Link Media command. You can continue working without having to close and reopen
the project.
1. Choose File > Open Project.
2. Browse to the project file and select it.
3. Select Open.
4. If the Where Is The File dialog box opens, locate the file using the Look In field, or choose one of the following in the Where Is The File
dialog box:
Find Launches the Windows Explorer (Windows) or Finder (Mac OS) search feature.
When moving a project and assets to a different machine, you can edit the file path in the project file so that Premiere Pro finds the files
associated with the project automatically. Open the PRPROJ file in a text editor, or in an XML editor like Dreamweaver. Search for the file
path that was used when the project was on the previous machine. Replace it with the file path on the new machine.
Skip Replaces a missing file with a temporary offline clip for the duration of a session. When you close your project and then reopen it, you
see a dialog box that asks you to locate the file or allows you to skip it again.
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Skip All Like Skip, Skip All replaces all missing files with temporary offline files.
Important: Select Skip or Skip All only when you are certain that you want to rework all the instances where the file is used in the project.
If you want to keep the file in the project but can’t locate it at the moment, use Offline instead.
Skip Previews Stops Premiere Pro from searching for any preview files already rendered for the project. This allows the project to load
faster, but you may need to render parts of its sequences for best playback performance.
Offline Replaces a missing file with an offline clip, a placeholder that preserves all references to the missing file everywhere in the project.
Unlike the temporary offline clip created by Skip, the one generated by Offline persists between sessions, so you won’t have to locate
missing files every time the project is opened.
Offline All Like Offline, Offline All replaces all missing files with persistent offline files.
Note: Do not delete source files while you are using them as clips in a Premiere Pro project unless they were captured using device control, and
you plan to recapture them. After you deliver the final movie, you can delete source files.
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Delete a project file
1. In Windows Explorer (Windows) or Finder (Mac OS), browse to the Premiere Pro project file, and select it. Project files have a .prproj
filename extension.
2. Press Delete.
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Moving a project to another computer
To move a project to another computer where you want to continue editing, you must move copies of all the assets for the project to the second
computer, as well as the project file. The assets should retain their file names and folder locations so that Premiere Pro can find them and relink
them to their clips in the project automatically.
Make certain, also that the same codecs you used for the project on the first computer are also installed on the second computer. For more
information about moving a project and its assets to another computer, see Trim or copy your project.
More Help topics
www.adobe.com/go/learn_dv_primer_dvbasics_en
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Archiving projects
The Premiere Pro Project Manager can help facilitate an efficient workflow by performing two functions: reducing the storage needs of a project,
and consolidating the files associated with a project.
Using Project Manager, you can create a version of your project, called a trimmed project, that references only the material used in your
sequences. Also, you can specify which sequences to include in the trimmed project. You need not include all of them. Trimmed projects are
saved under a unique name in the standard Premiere Pro project file format (.prproj).
In the trimmed project, file references are modified so that the project refers only to the portions of the footage items, including offline clips, that
you used in sequences. You can instruct Project Manager to copy the relevant portions of the source media files to serve as the source files for
the trimmed project; or you can have the trimmed project list the footage items as offline, so that you can capture them from videotape. (The latter
method is useful when employing an offline/online editing workflow, in which you replace low-quality footage used for editing with high-quality
footage used for export.) Using either method, you reduce storage requirements by using only the media you need to create and export the
sequences in the project; you can archive or delete the original source media.
The Project Manager can also help you consolidate, or collect, a project. Collecting files copies the current project and all of its associated media
files to a single location. You can use this feature to gather a project’s source media files when they are stored in various locations, and to prepare
a project for sharing or archiving.
When you create a trimmed project and source files, keep the following things in mind. The Project Manager copies only portions of source
footage used in sequences. However, you can specify the number of extra frames, or handles, the new footage includes, so that you can still
make minor edits in the trimmed project. The new footage retains the and reel number of the original captured footage. If one or more subclips
share frames with another subclip, the Project Manager creates a footage file that contains only those shared frames. The Project Manager also
copies the still image sequences used in the original project. Still images, titles, and generated footage, such as color bars and counting leaders,
are also retained, but not trimmed. Offline clips are trimmed.
When either trimming or collecting a project, you can specify whether the new project retains any of the unused clips from the original project.
Project Manager does not trim the source footage for multi-camera sequences. As the nested sequence contains all the source footage, Project
Manager does not trim any of that source footage.
Project Manager does not carry all effects into a trimmed project. Check your trimmed project carefully before discarding the source project.
Certain Long GOP formats cannot be trimmed by the Project Manager.
Note: Project Manager retains any effect keyframes and clip markers that exist beyond the In and Out points of a trimmed clip.
Online Resources
See this excerpt from Adobe Premiere Pro Classroom in a Book series, which explains managing assets in a project, including using the Project
Manager.
Franklin McMahon from franklinmcmahon.com shows how to trim, copy, and archive projects with the Project Manager in this video on the Layers
Magazine website.
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Trim or copy your project
1. Choose Project > Project Manager.
2. In the Source pane of the Project Manager window, check the box next to each sequence you want to include in your trimmed project. To
check all boxes, Shift-click any one box.
Note: Nested sequences are not automatically added to the trimmed sequences. If the sequence(s) you are trimming contain nested
sequences, you also need to include these nested sequences in the selection so they are included in the trimmed project.
3. Select one of the following:
Create New Trimmed Project to create a new version of the current project that refers only to the footage you used in the selected
sequences
Collect Files and Copy to New Location to copy and consolidate the footage you used in the selected sequences.
Note: Project Manager does not copy and collect After Effects compositions that are dynamically linked to an Adobe Premiere Pro project.
Project Manager does save the Dynamic Link clip in the trimmed project as an offline clip, however.
4. Select any of the following options, if available.
Note: The options that are available depend on the option you choose in the previous step.
Exclude Unused Clips Specifies that Project Manager will not include, or copy, media you did not use in the original project.
Make Offline Specifies that Project Manager denote as “offline” any footage that you can recapture later. When you select this option,
Project Manager retains reel names and timecode to facilitate quick batch capture. Selecting this option is especially useful if you used low
resolution footage in your original project, or if you are archiving a project. This option is available only if Create New Trimmed Project is
selected. Selecting this option will have no effect on MXF files, as their Reel Names will remain empty and as this media cannot be
recaptured by batch recapturing.
Note: When recapturing footage using offline clips from a trimmed project, source clips that do not match the current sequence settings are
recaptured at their original settings, not the current sequence settings. To override this behavior, click Override Clip Settings in the Batch
Capture dialog box and specify the settings that you want for all captured clips. However, this option is rarely necessary for capturing DV
footage.
Include Handles Specifies the number of frames to retain before the In point and after the Out point of each trimmed clip. For example, a
value of 30 means that 30 frames are retained before the In point, and 30 frames are retained after the Out point. Handles function as extra
frames that allow for additional minor adjustments to the edits in the new project.
Note: Some formats, such as Long GOP based media files, cannot trim media, or add handles.
Include Preview Files Specifies that effects you rendered in the original project remain rendered in the new project. When not selected, the
new project occupies less disk space, but the effects are not rendered. This option is available only if you select Collect Files And Copy To
New Location.
Include Audio Conform Files Ensures that the audio you conformed in the original project remains conformed in the new project. When not
selected, the new project occupies less disk space, but Premiere Pro conforms the audio again when you open the project. This option is
available only if you select Collect Files And Copy To New Location.
Rename Media Files To Match Clip Names Renames the copied footage files with the same names as your captured clips. Select this
option if you rename your captured clips from within the Project window and want the copied footage files to have the same name. (Captured
files that you import, especially those captured using scene detection, may not have intuitive names, so you may want to rename them from
within the Project window.) This option ensures that the filename of the actual captured footage is updated to reflect the new name in the
Project window, greatly simplifying the organization of your footage files. Selecting this option for an MXF file will not change the User Clip
Name in the file’s XML; however, it will change the filename of the clip copied for the trimmed project to match the clip name shown in the
project panel.
Note: If you rename captured clips, and then select the Make Offline option, the subsequent copied project retains and displays the original
filename, not the new name.
Project Destination Designates where Project Manager saves the files you specified. Click Browse to navigate to a location other than the
default. When creating a trimmed project, Project Manager creates a folder named “Trimmed_[Project Name]” and saves the trimmed project
and other files you specified, such as trimmed footage files into the folder. When copying a project, Project Manager creates a folder named
“Copied_[Project Name]” and copies the project, footage files, and other files you specified into the folder.
Note: If a folder already exists with a name identical to the project you are trimming, Project Manager appends a number to the name. For
example, identically-named successive projects may have appendages of “_001, _002, _003, _004,....”
Disk Space Displays a comparison between the size of the current project’s files and the estimated size of the trimmed or copied files. Click
Calculate to update the estimate.
5. Click OK.
When trimming a project or copying and collecting files, the Project Manager does not produce a P2-compliant MXF file structure for media files
that came from a P2 source.
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The following online resources are available for more information about trimming or copying your project:
Franklin McMahon demonstrates a few features for preparing a movie for export and review, including details about trimming a project in this
video on the Layers Magazine website.
Andrew Devis shows you how to trim and store your projects with the Project Manager in this video on the Creative Cow website.
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Importing footage
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Transferring and importing files
Supported file formats
About file formats
About transferring files
About importing files
Import files with the Media Browser
Import files with the Import commands
Import files using Adobe Bridge
Start Adobe Bridge from Adobe Premiere Pro
Import files from Adobe Bridge
Channel support
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Supported file formats
Premiere Pro can import many video and audio formats. Premiere Pro can import files in the formats listed, provided the codec used to generate a
specific file is installed locally. Most of these software modules are installed automatically with Premiere Pro.
See the PDF Supported video and animation file formats for a basic list of supported file formats for import.
Supported video and animation file formats
3GP, 3G2
ASF (Netshow, Windows only)
AVI (DV-AVI, Microsoft AVI Type 1, and Type 2)
DV (raw DV stream, a QuickTime format)
FLV and F4V
Note: Premiere Pro can import FLV files with video encoded using the On2 VP6 video codec. Premiere Pro, however, can’t import FLV files with
video encoded with the Sorenson Spark video codec. As with any unsupported format, transcode the file to a format that Premiere Pro can import.
GIF (Animated GIF)
M1V (MPEG-1 Video File)
M2T (Sony HDV)
M2TS (Blu-ray BDAV MPEG-2 Transport Stream, AVCHD)
M4V (MPEG-4 Video File)
MOV (QuickTime Movie, requires QuickTime 7 for import of non-native QuickTime files; in Windows, requires QuickTime player)
Note: The fully featured version of QuickTime 7 Pro is not installed in Mac OS X 10.7 by default. If you are using Mac OS X 10.7, go to this page
to download the proper version (QuickTime Player 7.66 for Mac OS X v.10.6.3). For more information see the article, "Install QuickTime 7 Pro with
Lion.”
MP4 (QuickTime Movie, XDCAM EX)
MPEG, MPE, MPG (MPEG-1, MPEG-2), M2V (DVD-compliant MPEG-2)
MTS (AVCHD)
MXF (Media eXchange Format; P2 Movie: Panasonic Op-Atom variant of MXF, with video in DV, DVCPRO, DVCPRO 50, DVCPRO HD,
AVC-Intra; XDCAM HD Movie, Sony XDCAM HD 50 (4:2:2), Avid MXF Movie), and native Canon XF
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Note: You can preview Native Canon XF files in the Media Browser, and the use of metadata is supported.
R3D (RED camera)
Adobe Premiere Pro supports RED Digital Cinema (R3D) files, including new color science support (REDcolor2, REDgamma2,
REDlogFilm, etc.) and better curves and levels user interface. For a summary of the features for RED (R3D) footage, including RMD and
Red Rocket card support, see this video by Video2Brain or this blog post.
Adobe has also released a preview version of advanced RED importer software that adds support for RED EPIC footage for Premiere
Pro, as well as the following features:
Ability to rotate and flip footage based on the camera orientation flag in R3D metadata
Support for Echo port in R3D Source Settings dialog box, so that RED preview can be sent out to an external monitor
Increased size of RED R3D Source Settings dialog on large monitors
HDR track selection and HDR blend support
SWF
Note: SWF files can be imported with an alpha channel. Audio is not retained. Interactive content and scripted animation are not retained.
Animation defined by keyframes in the main, top-level movie is retained.
VOB
WMV (Windows Media, Windows only)
Note: Render Type 1 AVI clips before previewing from a DV device. To render a Type 1 AVI clip, add it to a sequence in a DV project, and
preview it.
Supported audio file formats
AAC
AC3 (including 5.1 surround)
AIFF, AIF
ASND (Adobe Sound Document)
AVI (Video for Windows)
BWF (Broadcast WAVE format)
M4A (MPEG-4 Audio)
mp3 (mp3 Audio)
MPEG, MPG (MPEG Movie)
MOV (QuickTime; requires QuickTime player)
MXF (Media eXchange Format; P2 Movie: Panasonic Op-Atom variant of MXF, with video in DV, DVCPRO, DVCPRO 50, DVCPRO HD,
AVC-Intra; XDCAM HD Movie, Sony XDCAM HD 50 (4:2:2), Avid MXF Movie)
WMA (Windows Media Audio, Windows only)
WAV (Windows WAVeform)
Supported still-image and still-image sequence file formats
Premiere Pro supports 8bpc (4 bytes per pixel) and 16bpc (8 bytes per pixel) still-image files.
AI, EPS
BMP, DIB, RLE
DPX
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EPS
GIF
ICO (Icon File) (Windows only)
JPEG (JPE, JPG, JFIF)
PICT
PNG
PSD
PSQ (Adobe Premiere 6 Storyboard)
PTL, PRTL (Adobe Premiere title)
TGA, ICB, VDA, VST
TIF
Supported video project file formats
AAF (Advanced Authoring Format)
AEP, AEPX (After Effects project)
CSV, PBL, TXT, TAB (batch lists)
EDL (CMX3600 EDLs)
PLB (Adobe Premiere 6.x bin) (Windows only)
PREL (Adobe Premiere Elements project) (Windows only)
PRPROJ (Premiere Pro project)
PSQ (Adobe Premiere 6.x storyboard) (Windows only)
XML (FCP XML)
Note: Premiere Pro on Mac OS imports projects from version CS3 onwards. You need the Windows version to open projects from earlier versions
and save them as a current one.
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About file formats
Some filename extensions—such as MOV, AVI, MXF, FLV, and F4V—denote container file formats rather than denoting a specific audio, video, or
image data format. Container files can contain data encoded using various compression and encoding schemes. Premiere Pro can import these
container files, but the ability to import the data that they contain is dependent on the codecs (specifically, decoders) installed.
By installing additional codecs, you can extend the ability of Premiere Pro to import additional file types. Many codecs installed into the operating
system (Windows or Mac OS) work as a component inside the QuickTime or Video for Windows formats. Contact the manufacturer of your
hardware or software for more information about codecs that work with the files that your specific devices or applications create. If Premiere Pro
does not import your file, see this FAQ video tutorial, "Why can't Premiere Pro import my file?" for an explanation.
Video and still-image files that you want to import must not be more than the maximum dimensions allowed. For more information on maximum
dimensions in Premiere Pro, see the Premiere Pro Work Area blog.
Community resources:
Adobe provides workflow guides for P2, RED, XDCAM, AVCCAM, and DSLR cameras and footage on the Adobe website.
Colin Brougham explains how Premiere Pro works natively with tapeless media (no transcoding) in this article and video series on the ProVideo
Coalition website.
For more information about RED (R3D) digital cinema and Canon XF improvements in Premiere Pro, read this post on the Premiere Pro work area
blog.
For an excellent explanation of importing files into Premiere Pro, see this excerpt from "An Editor's Guide to Premiere Pro," entitled, "Importing
Media into Adobe Premiere Pro."
For information about shooting and capturing high-quality audio and video, see “Shooting and Capturing Great Video Assets”.
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About transferring files
Transferring projects from other computers
When transferring project files, such as After Effects project files, Premiere Pro project files, or Final Cut Pro project files from another computer to
the computer on which you import those project files into Premiere Pro, make sure that you transfer all the assets associated with the project files.
Keep the project files, and their associated assets, on the destination computer in folders that have names and folder structures identical with files
on the computer of their origin.
Transferring assets from file-based media
It is possible to edit assets residing on file-based media, such as P2 cards, XDCAM cartridges, SxS cards, or DVDs. However, Premiere Pro
performs faster if you first transfer the assets to a local hard disk. Using Windows File Explorer (Windows) or Finder (Mac OS), transfer files from
file-based acquisition media. Then, import the files on the hard disk into Premiere Pro projects.
When transferring files to hard disk from file-based media, transfer the folder containing all related files and all of its subfolders. Keep the folder
structure intact. For example, when transferring files from AVCHD file-based media, transfer the BDMV folder and all its contents. When
transferring files from DVCPRO HD media, transfer the CONTENTS folder and all its contents. When transferring files from XDCAM EX media,
transfer the BPAV folder and all its contents. When transferring files from DVD, transfer all the contents of the VIDEO_TS folder, and if it exists, all
the contents of the AUDIO_TS folder.
Transfer video files from file-based media into the same folder you specify for captured video with the project scratch disk settings.
The folder structure for AVCHD assets
The folder structure for DVCPRO HD assets
The folder structure for XDCAM EX assets
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The folder structure for DVD-video assets
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About importing files
For a video overview of the ways to import assets into Premiere Pro, see the Adobe website.
Importing is different from capturing. The Import command brings files that are already on your hard disk or other connected storage device into
your project. Importing files makes them available to a Premiere Pro project. Premiere Pro lets you import numerous types of video, still images,
and audio. Finally, you can export a Premiere Pro project from After Effects, and import it into Premiere Pro.
You can import video, audio, and still files in various file formats into a Premiere Pro project. You can import a single file, multiple files, or an entire
folder. Frame sizes cannot exceed 16 megapixels.
If you have spanned clips, be sure to import them via the Media Browser instead of importing them through the File menu.
If the software you use to create art doesn’t let you specify pixels as a unit of measure, try specifying points.
For a basic tutorial on importing, editing, and then exporting a file, see this video by Clay Asbury.
In Premiere Pro, you can import files by using the Media Browser or the Import command. You can also place files into Premiere Pro from Adobe
Bridge.
Premiere Pro indexes certain types of files and transcodes others after importing them. You cannot edit these types fully until these processes are
completed. The filename of a clip appears in the Project panel in italics until it has been fully indexed or transcoded.
To import files that Premiere Pro does not support natively, install the appropriate capture card or third-party plug-in software. For more
information, check the manual that came with the installed card or plug-in.
You can also import files and folders by dragging them from Windows Explorer (Windows) or Finder (Mac OS) into the Project panel. On
Windows Vista, if the User Account Control (UAC) is activated, Windows disables drag-and-drop from Windows Explorer, or any program, to
any program running in Administrator mode. You run Premiere Pro in Administrator mode for plug-in activation, special disk access, and
network permissions. To enable drag-and-drop while running Premiere Pro in Administrator mode, disable the UAC. In Windows Control Panel,
select User Accounts. Disable UAC for the selected user.
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Import files with the Media Browser
The Media Browser makes it easy to browse to files, and to find them by their type. Unlike the Import dialog box, the Media Browser can be left
open, and docked, like any other panel. The Media Browser gives you quick access to all your assets while you edit. Also, you can use the Media
Browser to import clips copied from video storage media such as P2 cards, SxS cards, XDCAM disks, and DVDs. When you import an asset
Premiere Pro leaves it in its current location, and creates a clip in the Project panel that points to it. By default, Premiere Pro writes XMP files to
the directory where the media files are located, but you can turn off this behavior in Preferences. For best performance, first transfer files from their
file-based media to a local hard disk. Then, import them into Premiere Pro projects from the hard disk.
1. Select Window > Media Browser.
2. To browse to the desired files, do one of the following:
To open a folder recently opened, click the triangle in the Recent Directories menu, and select the folder.
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In the list of hard drives and folders in the Media Browser, click the triangles next to folder names to open them.
3. To view only files of certain types, click the triangle in the Files Of Type menu, and select a file type. To select an additional type, open the
menu again and make another selection. Repeat until all desired types have been selected.
4. Select one or more files from the list of files. To select more than one non-contiguous file, Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS)
the filenames. To select more than one contiguous file, Shift-click the filenames.
5. Do one of the following:
Select File > Import From Browser, or right-click the file in the Media Browser and select Import. Alternatively, you can drag the file from
the Media Browser into the Project panel, or drag the file from the Media Browser into a Timeline.
The Media Browser imports the file into the Project panel.
Right-click the file in the Media Browser and select Open In Source Monitor. Alternatively, double-click the file in the Media Browser to
open it in the Source Monitor.
The Media Browser opens the file in the Source Monitor.
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Import files with the Import commands
Note: While you can import clips directly from file-based media connected to your computer, it is best to first transfer clips from these media to a
hard disk. Then, import them from the hard disk. For more information about transferring files, see About transferring files
Choose File > Import. You can select multiple files.
To import a recently imported file, choose File > Import Recent File > [filename]. (The filename doesn’t appear if Premiere Pro preferences
have been reset.)
To import a folder of files, choose File > Import. Locate and select the folder, and then click Import Folder. The folder, with its contents, is
added as a new bin in the Project panel.
For instructions on importing a numbered still-image sequence as a clip, see Importing numbered still-image sequences as one clip.
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Import files using Adobe Bridge
You can import files into Premiere Pro from Adobe Bridge.
Start Adobe Bridge from Adobe Premiere Pro
For a video on using Adobe Bridge, see www.adobe.com/go/vid0090.
Do one of the following:
Choose File > Browse In Adobe Bridge.
Select a file in the Project panel, then choose File > Reveal in Adobe Bridge.
Import files from Adobe Bridge
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1. Start Adobe Bridge from Premiere Pro.
2. In Adobe Bridge, double-click the clip.
Premiere Pro imports the clip into the Project panel.
You can also drag clips from the Adobe Bridge Content panel directly into the Premiere Pro Project panel.
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Channel support
Premiere Pro supports four-channel assets. Every processed pixel in the render pipeline uses four channels. When Premiere Pro processes a
three-channel asset, such as DV, HDV, or MPEG footage, Premiere Pro automatically converts it to a four-channel asset. Premiere Pro converts a
three-channel asset when you add an effect or transition to the asset.
Premiere Pro supports 10-bit color depth, sometimes useful for editing standard and high-definition footage.
Selecting a sequence preset
Specify scratch disks to improve system performance
Capturing and digitizing
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Importing assets from tapeless formats
Import assets from file-based sources with Media Browser
About spanned clips
File-based camcorders from various manufacturers record video and audio into files of specific formats organized within specific directory
structures. These formats include Panasonic P2 camcorders, Sony XDCAM HD and XDCAM EX camcorders, Sony CF-based HDV camcorders,
and AVCHD camcorders.
Camcorders recording in any of these formats typically record to hard disks, optical media, or flash memory media, not to videotape. These
camcorders and formats are therefore called file-based, or tapeless, rather than tape-based.
The video and audio from a file-based camcorder are already contained in digital files. No capture or digitizing step is necessary to bring them into
Premiere Pro. Reading the data from the recording media and converting it to a format that can be used in a project is instead called ingest.
Premiere Pro ingests files in any of these file-based formats from any of their media.
Adobe provides workflow guides for P2, RED, XDCAM, AVCCAM, and DSLR cameras and footage on the Adobe website.
XDCAM and AVCHD formats
You can find the video files from XDCAM HD camcorders in the CLIP folder, written in the MXF format. XDCAM EX camcorders write MP4 files
into a folder named BPAV.
For information about the XDCAM format, see this PDF document on the Sony website.
AVCHD video files are in the STREAM folder. For more information about the AVCHD format, see the AVCHD website
The Panasonic P2 format
A P2 card is a solid-state memory device that plugs into the PCMCIA slot of a Panasonic P2 video camera, such as the AG-HVX200. The digital
video and audio data from the video camera is recorded onto the card in a structured, codec-independent format known as MXF (Media eXchange
Format). Specifically, Premiere Pro supports the Panasonic Op-Atom variant of MXF, with video in DV, DVCPRO, DVCPRO 50, DVCPRO HD, or
AVC-I formats. A clip is in the P2 format if its audio and video are contained in Panasonic Op-Atom MXF files. These files are located in a specific
file structure.
The root of the P2 file structure is a CONTENTS folder. Each essence item (an item of video or audio) is contained in a separate MXF wrapper
file. The video MXF files are in the VIDEO subfolder, and the audio MXF files are in the AUDIO subfolder. XML files in the CLIP subfolder contain
the associations between essence files and the metadata associated with them.
Note: Premiere Pro does not support proxies recorded by some Panasonic P2 camcorders in P2 card PROXY folders.
For your computer to read P2 cards, it needs the appropriate driver, which you can download from the Panasonic website. Panasonic also
provides the P2 Viewer application, with which you can browse and play media stored on a P2 card.
Note: To use certain features with P2 files, you first change the file properties from read only to read and write. For example, to change the
timecode metadata of a clip using the Timecode dialog box, you first set the file properties to read and write. Use the operating system file explorer
to change file properties.
Avid capture format
Avid editing systems capture footage to MXF files, generally into a folder called Avid Media files, with audio captured into discreet files separate
from the video files. When you import Avid video files, Premiere Pro automatically imports their associated audio files. However, it is simpler to
import Avid project files, in Advanced Authoring Format (AAF), than to identify and import individual Avid MXF video files.
DVD format
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DVD camcorders and DVD recorders capture video and audio into MPEG-encoded VOB files. VOB files are written into a VIDEO_TS folder.
Optionally, ancillary audio files may be written into an AUDIO_TS folder.
Note: Premiere Pro and Premiere Elements, do not import or decrypt encrypted DVD files.
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Import assets from file-based sources with Media Browser
You can import assets into Premiere Pro directly from tapeless media. However, it is more efficient to transfer tapeless media contents to a hard
disk before importing. Also, playback performance is much better from a dedicated internal hard drive or RAID than from a camera or memory card
reader. Larger icons are available to preview clips in the Media Browser. You can scrub, and hover scrub to preview your footage more easily
before importing it. For details, see Working in Icon view.
Use the Media Browser, instead of File > Import, to import files from tapeless sources. The Media Browser assembles the relevant files into
coherent clips, and does not import irrelevant non-media files sometimes found in the folders of tapeless media.
You can drag selected assets directly into the Project panel from the Media Browser. You can also select assets, and then choose File > Import
from Media Browser, or right-click and then choose Import from the context menu.
The default workspace has the Project panel and the Media Browser docked into the same panel. It is not apparent that you can drag clips into
the Project panel in this workspace configuration, but you can. To import assets into the Project panel from the Media Browser, select the clips
you wish to import, and then drag them to the Project tab. The assets will then be imported.
1. (Optional) Transfer the entire contents of one or more P2 cards, Sony Compact Flash cards, XDCAM media, XDCAM EX SxS cards, hard
disk camcorders, DVDs, or AVCHD media to a hard disk. For information about transferring these media, see About transferring files.
Note: For XDCAM EX, copy the entire BPAV folder and its contents, not just one MP4 file at a time.
2. If the Media Browser is not already open, select Window > Media Browser.
Note: You can dock or group the Media Browser like any other panel in Premiere Pro.
3. Browse to the folder containing the media files.
The Media Browser shows a thumbnail or icon (depending on the format) and shot name for each shot in the folder. The Media Browser
automatically aggregates spanned clips and shot metadata from the subfolders into single clips for any of these formats. The Media Browser
shows different sets of metadata for different formats.
4. (Optional) To preview a shot before importing it, double-click the shot in the Media Browser.
Premiere Pro plays the clip in the Source Monitor without importing it into the Project panel.
5. Either select File > Import From Browser, drag clips from the Media Browser into the Project panel, or drag clips from the Media Browser
into a timeline.
The asset or assets are imported into the Project panel as whole clips.
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About spanned clips
When a shot or take is recorded requiring more than the file size limit of a medium, a file-based camcorder starts another file, and continues
recording the shot to that file without interruption. This is referred to as clip spanning because the shot spans more than one file or clip. Similarly, a
file-based camcorder sometimes spans a shot across clips on different cards or disks, if the camcorder has more than one card or disk loaded. It
records the shot until it runs out of room on the first medium, then starts a new file on the next medium with available space, and continues
recording the shot to it. Although a single shot or take can be recorded to a group of multiple spanned clips, it is designed to be treated as a single
clip.
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For P2 and XDCAM EX, Premiere Pro imports all of the spanned clips within a single shot or take as a single clip. It will import all the clips within a
shot on a card when you select any one of them, provided none of the spanned clips is missing and the relevant XML is present. When one or
more spanned clips are missing from a shot, Premiere Pro will import one or more of them depending on where the missing clips fall within the
shot.
To import a group of spanned clips, select one of them to import all of them. If you select more than one spanned clip, you will import duplicates of
the whole group of spanned clips as duplicate clips in the Project panel.
If the group of spanned clips itself spans two P2 or XDCAM EX cards, copy the full directory trees from them both to same-level folders on the
hard disk before importing. For P2 media only, you can alternatively import clips spanning two P2 cards if both cards are simultaneously mounted
to your computer.
Colin Brougham explains how Premiere Pro works natively with tapeless media (no transcoding) in this article on the ProVideo Coalition website.
Importing tapeless assets in Media Browser
Create an HDV or HD sequence
Export to Panasonic P2 format
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Importing still images
Preparing still images before importing
Importing Photoshop and Illustrator files
Import images as an image sequence
You can import individual still images into Premiere Pro or import a series of still images as a sequence. You can import still images from Adobe
applications such as Photoshop and Illustrator. For information about the still-image formats that Premiere Pro imports, see File formats supported
for import.
An imported still image uses the duration specified in the Still Image preferences. You can change the duration of a still image in a sequence.
The maximum frame size that can be imported for still images and movies is 256 megapixels, with a maximum dimension of 32,768 pixels in either
direction. For more information, see this post on the Premiere Pro Work Area blog.
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Preparing still images before importing
Before you import a still image into Premiere Pro, prepare it as completely as possible to reduce rendering time. It’s usually easier and faster to
prepare a file in its original application. Consider doing the following:
Make sure that the file format is supported by the operating system you plan to use.
Set the pixel dimensions to the resolution you will use in Premiere Pro. If you plan to scale the image over time, set image dimensions that
provide enough detail at the largest size the image has in the project.
For best results, create files with a frame size at least as large as the frame size of the project so that you don’t have to scale up the image in
Premiere Pro. Scaling an image larger than its original size can cause loss of sharpness. If you plan to scale up an image, prepare it at a
larger frame size than the project’s. For example, if you plan to scale up an image 200%, prepare the image at double the project frame size
before you import it.
Crop the parts of the image that you don’t want to be visible in Premiere Pro.
If you want to designate areas as transparent, create an alpha channel or use the transparency tools in applications such as Photoshop or
Illustrator.
If final output will be shown on standard television screens, avoid using thin horizontal lines (such as 1-pixel lines) for images or text. These
may flicker as a result of interlacing. If you must use thin lines, add a slight blur so that the lines appear in both video fields. See Interlaced
video, noninterlaced video, and progressive scanning.
Save the file using the correct naming convention. For example, if you plan to import the file into Premiere Pro in Windows, use a threecharacter filename extension.
When you prepare still images in applications that support color management, such as Photoshop, colors may appear more consistent
between the application and Premiere Pro if you prepare images in a video-friendly color space, such as sRGB or NTSC RGB.
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Importing Photoshop and Illustrator files
You can import files from Adobe Photoshop 3.0 or later, or from Adobe Illustrator. You can control how layered files are imported. Empty
(transparent) areas of nonflattened files are transparent when imported into Premiere Pro, because the transparency is stored as an alpha channel.
This lets you import graphics and superimpose them over clips in other tracks with no extra effort.
You can import layered Photoshop files either with selected layers imported as individual clips into a bin, with selected layers imported as individual
clips into a bin and sequence, or with selected layers merged into a single video clip.
Also, you can import Photoshop files that contain video or animations if they are saved from Photoshop in timeline animation mode.
Note: Individual layers moved from a Photoshop composition into a Premiere Pro project may not behave as expected.
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Import a layered Photoshop file
When you import a layered file saved in Photoshop file formats, you can choose how to import the layers in the Import Layered File dialog box.
Note: Some Photoshop layer attributes aren’t supported, such as special blending modes and the Knockout option. For best results, use basic
transparency and opacity in Photoshop. Adobe Premiere Pro does support most Photoshop blending modes.
Premiere Pro imports attributes that were applied in the original file, including position, opacity, visibility, transparency (alpha channel), layer
masks, adjustment layers, common layer effects, layer clipping paths, vector masks, and clipping groups. Photoshop exports a white background
as opaque white, whereas it exports a checkerboard background as a transparent alpha channel when exporting to a format that supports alpha
channels.
Importing layered Photoshop files makes it easy to use graphics created in Photoshop. When Premiere Pro imports Photoshop files as unmerged
layers, each layer in the file becomes an individual clip in a bin. Each clip’s name consists of the layer name followed by the name of the file that
contained it. Each layer is imported with the default duration you select for still images in Preferences.
You can import Photoshop files containing video or animations like any other Photoshop file. Since each layer is imported at the default still-image
duration, the imported video or animation may play back at a speed different from that of its source in the Photoshop file. To make the speed
match, change the still image default duration before importing the Photoshop file. For example, if the Photoshop animation was created at 30 fps
and the Premiere Pro sequence frame rate is 30 fps, set the still image default duration in Premiere Pro to 30 frames in Preferences.
The options you select in the Import Layered File dialog box determine how the layers in the video or animation are interpreted on import into
Premiere Pro.
From the Import dialog box, when you select a Photoshop file containing layers for import, the Import Photoshop Document dialog box opens. The
Import As menu gives you these options for ways to import the file:
Merge All Layers Merges all layers, importing the file into Premiere Pro as a single flattened PSD clip.
Merged Layers Merges only the layers you select into Premiere Pro as a single, flattened, PSD clip.
Individual Layers Imports only the layers you select from the list into a bin containing one clip for each source layer.
Sequence Imports only the layers you select, each as a single clip. Premiere Pro also creates a sequence containing each clip on a separate
track, and deposits all these into their own bin in the Project panel. Choosing Sequence allows you to select one of the following options from the
Footage Dimensions menu:
Document Size Changes the frame size of the clips to match the frame size specified in the Sequence Settings dialog box.
Layer Size Matches the frame size of the clips to the frame size of their source layers in the Photoshop file.
Note: When you import one layer as a single clip, its name in the Project panel consists of the layer name followed by the original filename.
Importing Illustrator images
You can import an Adobe Illustrator still-image file directly into a Premiere Pro project. Premiere Pro converts path-based Illustrator art into the
pixel-based image format used by Premiere Pro, a process known as rasterization. Premiere Pro automatically anti-aliases, or smooths, edges of
the Illustrator art. Premiere Pro also converts all empty areas into an alpha channel, so that empty areas become transparent.
If you want to define the dimensions of the Illustrator art when it is rasterized, use Illustrator to set crop marks in the Illustrator file. For information
about setting crop marks, see Illustrator Help.
Even though the layers in Illustrator are merged in Premiere Pro you can edit the layers by selecting the clip and choosing Edit > Edit Original.
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Import images as an image sequence
You can import an animation contained in a single file, such as an animated GIF. You can also import a sequence of still-image files, such as a
TIFF sequence, and automatically combine them into a single video clip; each still image becomes one frame of video. Importing a sequence is
useful for animations exported as an image sequence by applications like After Effects. The images in the series cannot include layers. For
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information on layers and flattening, see the application’s documentation.
1. Set the framerate for the still-image sequence. Select Edit > Preferences > Media (Windows), or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Media.
Then, select a framerate from the Indeterminate Media Timebase menu. Click OK.
2. Make sure that each still-image filename contains an equal number of digits at the end and has the correct file extension—for example,
file000.bmp, file001.bmp, and so forth.
3. Choose File > Import.
4. Locate and select the first numbered file in the sequence, select Image Sequence, and click Open (Windows) or Import (Mac OS). When
Image Sequence is selected, Premiere Pro interprets each of the numbered files as a single frame in a video clip.
Change speed and duration for one or more clips
Create and edit Photoshop files
Scale assets
Working with Photoshop and Premiere Pro
Media preferences
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Importing sequences, clip lists, libraries, and compositions
Import clips from Adobe OnLocation projects using the Media Browser
Importing earlier Premiere Pro projects
Import selected sequences from Premiere Pro projects
Import a Premiere Elements project (Windows only)
Importing libraries (Windows only)
Importing After Effects compositions
Import CMX3600 EDL projects
Import clips from Adobe OnLocation projects using the Media Browser
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In Adobe OnLocation, you can set In and Out points on clips. When you import a clip from an Adobe OnLocation project using the Media Browser,
Premiere Pro retains these In and Out markers. You can mark the good segments of clips in Adobe OnLocation, and select only the good
segments for importing into Premiere Pro.
1. (Optional) If necessary, copy the Adobe OnLocation project and clips to the machine running Premiere Pro.
2. (Optional) If the Media Browser is not open, select Window > Media Browser to open it.
3. In the Media Browser, browse to the desired Adobe OnLocation project file, and select it.
4. From the View As menu, select Adobe OnLocation Project.
The clips contained in the selected Adobe OnLocation project file appear in the pane on the right side of the Media Browser. You can sort
clips by their metadata fields.
5. Select the clips desired.
6. Do one of the following:
Select File > Import From Media Browser,
In the Media Browser, right-click any of the selected clips. Select Import.
Drag the clips to the Project tab, and they are then imported.
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Importing earlier Premiere Pro projects
You can add the contents of a project made with earlier version of Premiere Pro on either Mac OS or Windows. In addition, on Windows, you can
import a project made with earlier versions of Premiere Pro, or Premiere 6.0 or 6.5. The imported project’s clips and sequences are added to the
Project panel in a bin named after the imported project. The bin hierarchy of the imported project is maintained within its new bin. Discontinued
transitions and effects are not maintained. Use caution when importing a project into another project with a different time base or audio sample
rate, because these differences may affect edit positioning and audio quality.
Importing a project into another project is the only way to transfer its complete sequence and clip information.
Also, you can open projects made with Premiere Pro for Windows, including any contents that may have been imported from earlier versions, in
Premiere Pro for Mac OS.
Note: In earlier versions of Adobe Premiere, storyboards were stored in files independent of project files. Premiere Pro contains all storyboard
features within the Project panel. On Windows, you can import storyboard files created in earlier versions by choosing File > Import.
Import selected sequences from Premiere Pro projects
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You can import one or more sequences of your choosing from another Premiere Pro project.
To make the assets for a sequence easy to import with the sequence, first consolidate the project that contains the sequence. Collect the files
and copy them to a new location with the Project Manager.
1. Select File > Import, and browse to the project file containing the desired sequence or sequences, and select them.
2. Click Open.
3. In the Import Project dialog box, choose whether to import the entire project or selected sequences, and click OK.
4. In the Import Premiere Pro Sequence dialog box, select each sequence you want to import, and click OK.
Import a Premiere Elements project (Windows only)
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1. Select File > Open Project.
2. Browse to an Adobe Premiere Elements project file, with file extension PREL.
3. Click Open.
Premiere Pro converts the Premiere Elements project file to a Premiere Pro project file.
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Importing libraries (Windows only)
Adobe Premiere 6.5 supports containers called libraries, which store clips from one or several projects in files. A library (PLB) is a file apart from
any project file. Although Premiere Pro doesn’t directly support libraries, it allows you to import PLB library files, in Windows only. A library converts
to a bin when you import it into a Premiere Pro project. To store a set of clips to make them available for other projects, simply save a project that
contains the clips, and import that project into other projects.
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Importing After Effects compositions
You can import After Effects compositions like any other supported file type by using the File > Import command. You can export a Premiere Pro
project file from After Effects and open it for editing in Premiere Pro. You can also copy and paste layers and assets between Premiere Pro and
After Effects.
You can create or import After Effects compositions by using Adobe Dynamic Link. You can also select clips in a Premiere Pro timeline and replace
them with an After Effects composition via Adobe Dynamic Link. Adobe Dynamic Link allows changes made to a file in either application to appear
in both, instantaneously, without a need for rendering.
To move an After Effects project from another computer to the one on which you are running Premiere Pro, make sure to move all the files
associated with the After Effects project.
Import After Effects compositions
1. Do one of the following:
Select File > Import, and browse to the desired AEP file.
Select File > Adobe Dynamic Link > Import After Effects Composition.
2. Select the AEP file and click Open.
If the After Effects project contains more than one composition, the Import After Effects Composition dialog opens.
3. Select one or more compositions. Shift-click to select contiguous compositions. Ctrl-click (Windows), or Command-click (Mac OS) to select
non-contiguous clips.
Premiere Pro imports the selected After Effects compositions and places them into the Project panel. If you selected more than one composition.
Premiere Pro creates a bin with the name of the AEP file, and places the compositions within that bin.
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Import CMX3600 EDL projects
You can import project files in the EDL file format.
1. Select File > Import, and browse to the project file containing the desired EDL file, and select it.
2. Click Open.
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Importing digital audio
Using audio from audio CDs
Using compressed audio formats
Using audio from Adobe Soundbooth
Audio sample rates supported
Conforming audio
You can import digital audio clips stored as audio files or tracks in video files. Digital audio is stored on computer hard disks, audio CDs, or digital
audio tape (DAT) as binary data readable by computers. To keep quality as high as possible, transfer digital audio files to your computer via digital
connections. Avoid digitizing the analog outputs from your audio sources through your sound card.
Note: To capture an audio-only file from a digital video source, choose Audio from the Capture menu in the Logging pane of the Capture panel.
Premiere Pro does not support audio-only capture for some formats, such as HDV.
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Using audio from audio CDs
You can use CD audio (CDA) files in a project, but before you can import them into Premiere Pro, you need to convert them to a supported file
format, such as WAV or AIFF. You can convert CDA files using an audio application such as Adobe® Audition®.
Note: Make sure that you own the copyrights or have licensed the copyrights to any audio tracks you use.
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Using compressed audio formats
Music stored in formats such as MP3 and WMA are compressed using a method that removes some of the original audio quality. To play back
compressed audio, Premiere Pro must decompress the file and may need to resample it to match your output settings. Although Premiere Pro
uses a high-quality resampler for this purpose, the best results come from using an uncompressed or CD audio version of the audio clip whenever
possible.
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Using audio from Adobe Soundbooth
You can use Adobe® Soundbooth™ to perform advanced audio editing. If you export the audio from Adobe Soundbooth to an audio file format
compatible with Premiere Pro, you can import the audio into Premiere Pro projects.
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Audio sample rates supported
Premiere Pro natively supports these audio sample rates:
8000 Hz
11025 Hz
22050 Hz
32000 Hz
44100 Hz
48000 Hz
96000 Hz
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Conforming audio
Premiere Pro processes each audio channel, including audio channels in video clips, as 32-bit floating-point data at the sequence sample rate.
This processing assures maximum editing performance and audio quality. Premiere Pro conforms certain types of audio to match the 32-bit format
and the sequence sample rate. If conforming is required, it is done when a file is imported into a project for the first time. Conforming takes some
time and disk space. A progress bar appears at the lower right of the Premiere Pro window when conforming begins. Premiere Pro saves
conformed audio in CFA audio preview files. You can determine where to save these audio preview files by specifying a Scratch Disk location for
Audio Previews in the Project Settings dialog box.
You can work with audio files, even applying effects to them, before they are fully conformed. However, you can preview only the parts of the files
that have been conformed. You cannot hear unconformed sections on playback.
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These rules determine which types of audio get conformed:
Uncompressed audio
Premiere Pro does not conform audio in uncompressed clips that were recorded in one of the natively supported sample rates, when you use
these clips in sequences with matching sample rates.
Premiere Pro does conform audio in uncompressed clips when you use them in sequences with non-matching sample rates. However no
conforming is done until you export the sequences or create audio preview files.
Premiere Pro does conform audio in uncompressed formats that were not recorded in a natively supported sample rate. In most of these
cases, it will upsample the audio either to the nearest supported sample rate, or to a supported sample rate that is an even multiple of the
source audio sample rate. For example, it will upsample an 11024Hz source to 11025Hz, since that is the nearest supported rate, and there
is no supported rate that is an even multiple of 11024.
Compressed audio
Premiere Pro does conform all compressed audio, such as audio found in mp3, WMA, MPEG, or compressed MOV files. It conforms this
audio at the sample rate of its source file. For example it will conform a 44100Hz mp3 file at 44100Hz. However, if the conformed audio is
used in a sequence with a non-matching sampling rate, as when a 44100Hz clip is used in a 44000Hz sequence, the audio will play back at
the sample rate of the sequence without further conforming.
Premiere Pro does not conform a file that was conformed in one sequence when you import it into another sequence with the same audio sample
rate, so long as you haven’t moved or renamed the file since it was conformed. Premiere Pro keeps the location of the conform files for all files it
has conformed in the Media Cache Database.
To avoid conforming, use audio editing software, or transcoding software, to convert your files to natively-supported uncompressed formats at
the supported sampling rates.
In addition to conforming some files, Premiere Pro also creates a PEK file for any file containing audio when it is first imported into a project. It
uses these PEK files for drawing the audio waveforms in Timeline panels. Premiere Pro stores PEK files in the location specified for Media Cache
Files through the Media pane of the Preferences dialog box.
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Importing XML project files from Final Cut Pro
Import an XML file from Final Cut Pro
Final Cut Pro clip data
Final Cut Pro effects and transitions
Final Cut Pro composite modes
Final Cut Pro Multiclips
You can import entire projects, selected clips, or selected sequences that you export from Final Cut Pro as XML files. In Premiere Pro, bins and
clips have the same hierarchies and names that they have in the Final Cut Pro source projects. Also, Premiere Pro retains the sequence markers,
sequence settings, track layout, locked tracks, and sequence timecode start points of Final Cut Pro source projects. Premiere Pro imports text from
the Final Cut Pro Text generators into Premiere Pro titles.
Note: You cannot import native Final Cut Pro project files, only XML files exported from Final Cut Pro. You can export Final Cut Pro XML files
from Premiere Pro. The effects that are tranlated from Premiere Pro are the same as those that are imported from a Final Cut Pro XML f ile.
Joost van der Hoeven provides a video tutorial on the Adobe website that demonstrates exchanging information between Final Cut Pro and
Premiere Pro using XML projects.
Premiere Pro and Final Cut Pro 7 (and earlier) can share Final Cut Pro XML files for data exchange. To exchange information between Final
Cut Pro X and Premiere Pro, you can use a third party tool called "Xto7." For more information on using this tool, see here.
For a list of items in Premiere Pro that are translated from a Final Cut Pro XML file, see Final Cut Pro clip data, Final Cut Pro effects and
transitions, Final Cut Pro composite modes, and Final Cut Pro Multiclips. Also, see the PDF, Appendix D: Working with Final Cut Pro from the
Editor's Guide to Premiere Proby Richard Harrington, Robbie Carman, and Jeff Greenberg for more information.
Robbie Carman explains the process of exporting a Final Cut Pro project and then importing it into Premiere Pro in this video tutorial on AdobeTV.
Information about reading errors in the Translation Report is included.
Additional resources about importing Final Cut Pro projects are linked to from this article on the Adobe website.
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Import an XML file from Final Cut Pro
1. Export an XML file from Final Cut Pro. For more information, see Final Cut Pro Help.
2. In Final Cut Pro, close the source project.
3. In Premiere Pro, select File >Import.
4. Browse to the XML file, and click Open.
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Final Cut Pro clip data
Clip data in the Description, Scene, ShotTake, and LogNote fields in Final Cut Pro appear in the clip metadata fields with the same names in
Premiere Pro.
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Final Cut Pro effects and transitions
Premiere Pro retains the basic motion and opacity effects, and motion and opacity keyframes, from Final Cut Pro source projects. Additionally,
Premiere Pro converts some Final Cut Pro effects and transitions according to the following tables:
Conversion of Final Cut Pro video effects
Final Cut Pro effect
Premiere Pro effect
Crop
Crop
Eight-Point Garbage Matte
Eight-Point Garbage Matte
Four-Point Garbage Matte
Four-Point Garbage Matte
Gaussian Blur (provided the channel selection in Final Cut Pro is
Alpha+RGB.)
Gaussian Blur
Luma Key
Luma Key
Three-Way Color Corrector
Three-Way Color Corrector
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Conversion of Final Cut Pro video transitions
Final Cut Pro transition
Premiere Pro transition
Dip To White
Dip To White
Dip to [color]
Dip To Black
Edge Wipe transitions
Wipe, with the wipe direction rounded to the closest of the eight
Premiere Pro supported directions.
Other video transitions
Cross Dissolve
Conversion of Final Cut Pro audio effects
Final Cut Pro audio effect
Premiere Pro audio effect
Audio level values and keyframes
Audio clip volume values and keyframes
Audio pan values and keyframes
Track pan values and keyframes
Low Pass Filter
Lowpass
High Pass Filter
Highpass
Band Pass Filter
Bandpass
Conversion of Final Cut Pro audio transitions
Final Cut Pro audio transition
Premiere Pro audio transition
Cross Fade (0 dB)
Constant Gain
Cross Fade (+3 dB)
Constant Power
Other transitions
Constant Power
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Final Cut Pro composite modes
Premiere Pro retains the basic motion and opacity effects, and motion and opacity keyframes, from Final Cut Pro source projects. Premiere Pro
converts Final Cut Pro composite modes according to the following table:
Final Cut Pro mode
Premiere Pro mode
Normal
Normal
Add
Linear Dodge (Add)
Subtract
Not supported
Difference
Difference
Multiply
Multiply
Screen
Screen
Overlay
Overlay
Hard Light
Hard Light
Soft Light
Soft Light
Darken
Darken
Lighten
Lighten
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Travel Matte Alpha
Not supported
Travel Matte Luma
Not supported
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Final Cut Pro Multiclips
Premiere Pro converts uncollapsed Final Cut Pro Multiclips, with as many as four inputs, to Multi-camera sequences. Premiere Pro converts
collapsed Multiclips to individual clips.
Note: Premiere Pro issues a warning when you try to import a Multiclip with more than four inputs.
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Support for growing files
Growing files are those that grow in duration after they are ingested. Adobe® Premiere® Pro supports growing files for those needing that
workflow.
Supported codecs for growing files include:
AVCI50/100
IMX30/40/50
RDD9-compliant XDCAM HD 50/35/25/18
QuickTime wrapped files in these formats are supported in Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.2), and later
Support for growing files to automatically refresh, and how often they should refresh, is available in Media Preferences. The updated duration can
be viewed in the Source Monitor. See Media Preferences for details.
Ingesting or capturing media for growing files can only take place if Premiere Pro can read the volume (Premiere Pro can read footage from a unc
path ("//somewhere/something"), but the drive must be mapped ("H:\somewhere\something"). The file can then be imported using the File > Import
command. You can then edit with these clips as you normally would any other clip.
See this blog post for more details about support for growing files in Premiere Pro.
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Capturing and digitizing
About capturing and digitizing
System requirements for capturing
Set capture format, preferences, and tracks
Capture from stereo sources to mono tracks
File size limits
Set up device control
Disable device control
Capture without device control
Capture with device control
Determine whether your device is online
Log clips with automatic scene detection
Common capture issues
Andrew Devis demonstrates capturing and batch capturing from miniDV tape using Adobe Premiere Pro in this video tutorial on the Creative Cow
website.
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About capturing and digitizing
To bring footage that is not already in the form of a file or set of files into a Premiere Pro project, you can capture it, or digitize it, depending on the
type of source material:
Capture You capture digital video from a live camera or from tape: you record it from the source to the hard disk. Many digital camcorders and
decks record video to tape. You capture the video from tape to the hard disk before using it in a project. Premiere Pro captures video through a
digital port, such as a FireWire or SDI port installed on the computer. Premiere Pro saves captured footage to disk as files, and imports the files
into projects as clips. You can use Adobe After Effects to start Premiere Pro and start the capture process. Alternatively, you can use Adobe
OnLocation to capture video.
Digitize You digitize analog video from a live analog camera source or from an analog tape device. You digitize the analog video, convert it to
digital form, so your computer can store and process it. The capture command digitizes video when a digitizing card or device is installed in the
computer. Premiere Pro saves digitized footage to disk as files, and imports the files into projects as clips.
For a video tutorial on capturing and importing assets, see www.adobe.com/go/vid0231.
Note: While capturing footage, you can monitor audio levels in the Audio Master Meters panel.
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System requirements for capturing
To capture digital video footage, your editing system needs the following components:
For DV or HDV footage, one of the following:
an OHCI-compliant IEEE 1394 (FireWire, i.Link) port or capture card
a non-OHCI-compliant IEEE 1394 capture card with presets, drivers, and plug-ins written specifically for Premiere Pro.
For HD or SD footage playable on a device with SDI or component outputs, a supported HD or SD capture card with SDI or component
inputs.
For HD or SD footage stored on media from file-based camcorders, a device connected to your computer capable of reading the respective
media.
For recording audio from analog sources, a supported audio card with an analog audio input.
A codec (compressor/decompressor) for the type of footage you want to capture. Premiere Pro has its own codecs for importing DV and HDV
footage. Plug-in software codecs are available for other types. Hardware codecs are built in to some capture cards.
A hard disk capable of sustaining the data rate for the type of footage you want to capture.
Sufficient disk space for the captured footage.
Note: Your operating system or hard disk format could limit the length of a captured clip.
A project that was created using a preset in the New Project dialog box in which all settings match the footage you plan to capture.
Note: Some DV and HDV camcorders require a connection to their power adapters to activate their IEEE 1394 ports. Other camcorders go into
sleep mode or demo mode if left in the camera mode without tape activity for a period. To avoid these problems, connect your camcorder to its
power adapter when setting it up for capturing or dubbing video. If the camcorder goes into demo mode with the power adapter connected, disable
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this feature using the camcorder menu system.
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Set capture format, preferences, and tracks
Use the Capture panel (choose File > Capture) to capture digital or analog video and audio. This panel includes a preview, which displays video
being captured, and controls for recording with or without device control. The Capture panel also contains a Settings pane for editing your capture
settings, and a Logging pane for logging clips for batch capturing. For convenience, some options available in the Capture panel are also available
in the Capture panel menu.
You can control certain source devices, such as camcorders and decks, directly from the Capture panel. Your computer must have an IEEE1394,
RS-232, or RS-422 controller compatible with Premiere Pro. If your source device lacks any of these interfaces, you still use the Capture panel.
You must cue, start, and stop your source device using its controls.
Note: When not capturing in Adobe Premiere Pro, close the Capture panel. The Capture panel assumes primary focus, so leaving it open while
editing or previewing video disables output to the source device. Leaving the Capture panel open also may decrease performance.
Capture panel
A. Status area B. Preview C. Tabs D. Panel menu E. Transport controls
Specify capture settings
1. With a project open, choose File > Capture, and select the Settings tab.
2. In the Capture Settings pane, click Edit.
3. In the Capture Settings dialog box, select an option from the Capture Format menu.
4. Click OK.
Note: When capturing DV formats, Premiere Pro will use QuickTime as the container for the DV codec in Mac OS and AVI is used for
Windows. When capturing HDV, Premiere Pro will use MPEG as the format. For other formats, you must use a video capture card for
digitizing or capturing. See Digitizing analog video and Capturing HD video.
Set capture preferences
1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Capture (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Capture (Mac OS).
2. Specify whether you want to cancel capture on dropped frames, report dropped frames, or generate a batch log file.
3. Specify whether to use device control timecode. If a device controller is installed, Premiere Pro can record the timecode supplied by the
controller instead of recording any timecode written to the source tape.
Select tracks for capture
1. To open the Capture panel, select File > Capture.
2. In the Capture panel, click the panel menu.
3. Select Record Video, Record Audio, or Record Audio and Video, depending on the option desired.
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Capture from stereo sources to mono tracks
You can capture from sources containing stereo or 5.1 audio channels so that each audio channel maps to its own mono audio track
automatically. The Mono Default Track Format preference enables this behavior for footage captured from multi-channel sources, and for imported
multi-channel files. For more information about audio channel mapping, see Mapping source and output audio channels.
1. Select Edit > Preferences > Audio (Windows), or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Audio (Mac OS).
2. In the Source Channel Mapping pane of the Preferences dialog box, select Mono from the Default Track Format menu.
3. Click OK.
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File size limits
Premiere Pro does not limit the size of files. However, your capture card, operating system, or hard disk can set such a limit. Check your capture
card and hard disk documentation for information on support of large files.
The format of your hard disk greatly affects its ability to handle large files. FAT32 formatting limits each file to 4 GB, or about 18 minutes of DV
footage. NTFS formatting does not limit file size. It is best to use NTFS-formatted disks as the scratch disks where you capture video and for the
target hard drives where you export video files. However, other components of your video editing system can limit file size.
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Set up device control
You can use device control to manage and automate video capture and to export sequences to tape. Device control lets you precisely control
devices, such as decks and camcorders, with capture and batch capture controls. With device control, you can use the Capture panel to log each
clip and then use the Batch Capture command to record logged clips automatically.
Premiere Pro controls devices through its built-in support of IEEE 1394 (FireWire, i.Link) and third-party support for RS-232 and RS-422
controllers. Regardless of type, if your device isn’t automatically recognized, you can set it up manually. Before setting up device control, make
sure that you have a tape deck or camcorder that supports external device control, and a cable that connects the device to your controller,
computer, or both.
Set up a project for device control
Some device control settings are available when you choose Edit > Preferences > Device Control (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences >
Device Control (Mac OS). Others are in the Device Control section at the bottom of the Settings pane of the Capture panel. Device control settings
apply to the entire project.
1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Capture (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Capture (Mac OS).
2. Select one or more of the Capture options. If you are using a device controller that generates its own timecode, select Use Device Control
Timecode. Use Device Control Timecode replaces the unreadable timecode recorded on the tape with the controller’s timecode. Click OK.
3. If you want to save captured clips to a specific bin in a project, first open the project . Before capturing, make sure that the bin exists in the
Project panel.
4. Choose File > Capture.
5. In the Settings panel, click Edit to verify that the capture format specified in the Capture Settings dialog box is appropriate for your device.
Click OK.
Note: Not all formats have options for capture settings. For example, the HDV format has no options.
6. In the Capture Locations section of the Settings panel, make sure that the disk drives you designate for captured video and audio have
sufficient free space. If you want to change the locations, click the corresponding Browse button, set the location, and click OK.
7. In the Device Control section, if device control has not been set up, choose a device from the Device menu. Click Options to set it up.
Options vary depending on the device; see the documentation for your device driver.
8. Test the device control buttons in the Capture panel to verify that they work. If video preview is supported for the format, make sure that you
see video in the preview.
9. Click Logging. In the Setup area, choose Audio, Video, or Audio And Video from the Capture menu depending on what you want to capture.
Select a bin from the Log Clips To list if needed. By default, the Project panel is selected in the Log Clips To field.
10. Enter information into the Clip Data area as needed. This information is saved in the metadata of the clip.
Note: To avoid confusion, make sure that the tape name is unique. Some types of device control software ask you to specify the Tape
Name setting each time you insert a new tape. The other Logging Data options aren’t required.
Set up a device for device control
Premiere Pro supports the control of devices such as camcorders and VTRs. Premiere Pro controls DV and HDV devices by way of IEEE 1394
(FireWire, i.Link) connections. Premiere Pro controls serially-controlled devices by way of third-party RS-232 or RS-422 controllers installed on the
computer.
1. To open the Device Control Preferences dialog box, choose Edit > Preferences > Device Control (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences
> Device Control (Mac OS).
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2. Select the type of device you want to control from the Devices menu.
3. Click Options.
4. (Optional) If you are connecting a DV or HDV device, make your selections from the Video Standard, Device Brand, Device Type, and
Timecode Format menus. In the Device Type menu, if your particular model is not listed, do one of the following:
select a model from the same family (if known),
leave at Standard,
click Go Online For Device Info.
5. If you are connecting a serial device, make your selections from the Protocol, Port, Time Source, and Time Base menus. Check either or
both checkbox selections available for the Protocol you choose.
6. (DV/HDV Device Control only) Click Check Status. Premiere Pro displays one of the following statuses:
Offline Premiere Pro does not see your device. Check all your connections and settings.
Detected Premiere Pro sees your device but cannot control the tape (possibly because there is no tape inserted).
Online Premiere Pro sees your device and can control the tape.
7. Click OK.
8. In the Device Control section of the Settings pane, specify the following options as needed:
Preroll Time Indicates how much before the In point Premiere Pro starts playing the tape before capture. The appropriate value varies
depending on the device you are using.
Timecode Offset Indicates the number of frames to adjust the timecode embedded in the captured video. Set the offset so that the
timecode corresponds with the timecode number of the same frame on the source tape.
Select a device for device control
1. In the Capture panel, select the Settings tab.
2. From the Device menu, select the type of device you want to control .
3. Click Options.
4. (Optional) If you are connecting a DV or HDV device, make your selections from the Video Standard, Device Brand, Device Type, and
Timecode Format menus. In the Device Type menu, if your particular model is not listed, do one of the following:
select a model from the same family (if known),
leave at Standard,
click Go Online For Device Info.
5. If you are connecting a serial device, make your selections from the Protocol, Port, Time Source, and Time Base menus. Check either or
both checkbox selections available for the Protocol you choose.
6. (DV/HDV Device Control only) Click Check Status. Premiere Pro displays one of the following statuses:
Offline Premiere Pro does not see your device. Check all your connections and settings.
Detected Premiere Pro sees your device but cannot control the tape (possibly because there is no tape inserted).
Online Premiere Pro sees your device and can control the tape.
7. Click OK.
8. In the Device Control section of the Settings tab, specify the following options as needed:
Preroll Time Indicates how much before the In point Premiere Pro starts playing the tape before capture. The appropriate value varies
depending on the device you are using.
Timecode Offset Indicates the number of frames to adjust the timecode embedded in the captured video. Set the offset so that the
timecode corresponds with the timecode number of the same frame on the source tape.
Calibrate an RS-422 or RS-232 device (third-party only)
1. Select File > Export > Export To Tape.
2. Click Options.
3. Enter the number of offset frames, as appropriate for your device, to the Delay Movie Start, Manual Edit Timing, and Preroll boxes.
Control an RS-422 or RS-232 device (third-party only)
1. Select Edit > Preferences > Device Control.
2. From the Devices menu, select Serial Device Control.
3. Click Options.
4. In the VTR And Port Control section, select a protocol and port for your device.
5. In the Time Control section, select a time source and timebase for your device.
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Device controls in the Capture panel
You can use the controls in the Capture panel to operate the device as you log clips. The jog control
lets you navigate quickly to nearby
lets you change the speed of the tape as you play it forward or backward. The Record button
lets you begin a
frames. The shuttle control
manual capture.
when the tape is stopped, the device rewinds the tape at full speed. If you rewind when the tape is playing or
If you press the Rewind button
paused, the device rewinds while displaying video in the preview.
when the tape is stopped, the device moves the tape forward at full speed. If you fast forward when the
If you press the Fast Forward button
tape is playing or paused, the device moves the tape forward while displaying video in the preview.
button, the tape
If you press the Previous Scene button, the tape shuttles to the previous start point and pauses. If you press the Next Scene
shuttles to the start point of the next scene and pauses.
Note: Previous Scene and Next Scene are supported for DV in Windows only, and not supported for HDV for either Windows or Mac OS.
You can also press the J, K, and L keys to control your device. J rewinds the tape; L fast forwards it, and K pauses it. The speed of forward or
reverse increases each time you press J or L. To rewind or forward one frame at a time, hold down K and press J or L once. To slowly rewind or
forward, hold down K+J or K+L.
To operate Capture panel controls using the keyboard, see the tool tips in the Capture panel. You can change the shortcuts by choosing Edit >
Keyboard Customization. To shuttle a tape quickly to a specific frame type its timecode into the Capture Panel’s current timecode field, to the
lower left of the monitor. Press Enter (Windows) or Return Mac OS).
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Disable device control
1. Open the Device Control Preferences dialog box by doing one of the following:
Choose Edit > Preferences > Device Control (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Device Control (Mac OS).
In the Capture panel, click Settings.
2. From the Devices menu, choose None.
3. Click OK.
Note: When device control is disabled, start playback on the device manually.
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Capture without device control
If you do not have a device that Premiere Pro controls, you can capture video manually. You manually operate both the playback device controls
and the Capture panel controls in Premiere Pro.
Note: Preview HDV footage on an external TV monitor, or, if the source is a camcorder, on the camcorder viewfinder while shuttling, logging, and
capturing on Mac OS. The preview pane in the Capture panel shows the words Previewing On Camera.
1. Make sure that the deck or camcorder is properly connected to your computer.
2. Choose File > Capture.
3. (Mac OS) If a QuickTime Capture Settings dialog box opens, choose video and audio settings appropriate to your project.
These settings are preserved for the project, but you can set them again for each new project.
4. In the Setup area of the Logging pane, choose your media type from the Capture menu.
5. Use the controls on the deck or camcorder to move the videotape to a point several seconds before the frame where you want to begin
capturing.
6. Press the Play button on the deck or camcorder, and then click the red Record button in the Capture panel.
7. Record a few seconds beyond the end of the footage you need, to provide room for editing. Press the Esc key to stop recording.
When the Save Captured File dialog box appears, enter logging data and click OK. The new file is listed in the Project panel and is saved to
the disk location specified in the Settings pane of the Capture panel.
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Capture with device control
After a device and the project are set up properly, you can begin capturing clips using device control. You can capture an entire tape or you can
mark In and Out points for each clip, and then capture the clip. You can log In and Out points for any number of clips and have Premiere Pro
capture as many as you like in a batch. Premiere Pro supports FireWire device control, but supports serial device control by third-party drivers
only.
Note: On Mac OS, preview HDV footage on an external TV monitor, or, if the source is a camcorder, on the camcorder viewfinder while shuttling,
logging, and capturing. The preview pane in the Capture panel shows the words Previewing On Camera.
Note: When capturing with In and Out points, the earliest allowable time for the In point is 2 seconds. If the provided In point is earlier, it will be
automatically adjusted to start at 2 seconds.
For details about capturing tape from an AJA device and setup in Premiere Pro, see this video by Walter Biscardi.
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Capture an entire tape or portion of a tape
1. Choose File > Capture.
2. (Mac OS) If a QuickTime Capture Settings dialog box opens, choose video and audio settings appropriate to your project.
These settings are preserved for the project, but you set them again for each new project.
3. In the Capture panel, make sure that the device is online, as indicated above the preview.
4. Insert a tape into the device. Premiere Pro prompts you to name the tape. Be sure not to give any two tapes the same name.
Including a unique number in the name can help you avoid using the same name twice.
5. In the Setup area of the Logging pane, choose the media type from the Capture menu.
6. Rewind the tape to its beginning, or to the beginning of the portion you want to capture.
7. To create a separate file (Windows) or a subclip (Mac OS) for each new scene on the tape, select Scene Detect in the Capture area.
8. You can capture frames that extend beyond the In and Out points of each clip. Enter the number of frames in the Handles box in the Capture
area.
9. Click Tape.
10. To stop capturing at the end of a portion, click the Stop button. Otherwise capturing stops when the tape comes to its end.
Select and capture a clip
1. Choose File > Capture.
2. (Mac OS) If a QuickTime Capture Settings dialog box opens, choose video and audio settings appropriate to your project.
These settings will be preserved for the project, but you may need to set them again for each new project.
3. In the Capture panel, make sure that the device is online, as indicated above the preview.
4. Insert a tape into the device. Premiere Pro prompts you to name the tape. Be sure not to give any two tapes the same name.
5. In the Setup area of the Logging pane, choose the media type from the Capture menu.
6. Use the controls in the Capture panel to move to the first frame you want to capture, and click Set In. Then move to the last frame you want
to capture, and click Set Out.
Note: If capturing HDV footage on Mac OS, you must preview on an external TV monitor or camcorder viewfinder while logging. The
preview pane in the Capture panel will show the words Previewing On Camera.
7. If you want to capture frames that extend beyond the In and Out points of each clip, enter the number of frames in the Handles setting of the
Capture section.
8. Click the In/Out button in the Capture area of the Logging pane to capture the clip.
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Determine whether your device is online
1. Select File > Capture.
2. (Mac OS) If a QuickTime Capture Settings dialog box opens, choose video and audio settings appropriate to your project.
These settings will be preserved for the project, but you may need to set them again for each new project.
3. Select the Settings tab in the Capture panel.
4. In the Device Control area of the Settings tab, click Options.
5. In the DV/HDV Device Control Settings dialog box, click Check Status.
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Log clips with automatic scene detection
Scene Detect can greatly speed up the process of logging clips. As you capture video, Scene Detect logs a clip wherever there is a break in a
tape Time/Date stamp. With Scene Detect, Premiere Pro automatically captures a separate file (Windows) or creates a master clip with a subclip
(Mac OS) at each scene break. On Mac OS, Premiere Pro places the subclips in a new bin. Scene Detect works whether you capture an entire
tape or just a section between specific In and Out points. Scene Detect creates clips even between defined In and Out points, if it detects a scene
break.
Scene Detect logs scenes for batch capturing without altering the tape’s progress. It also logs scenes that occur across timecode breaks.
Tracy Peterson provides a video tutorial that demonstrates automatic scene detection on the Adobe website.
In the Capture panel, do either of the following:
Click the Scene Detect button
below the image.
Select Scene Detect in the Capture area of the Logging pane.
Note: Scene detection works for DV, HDV 1080i, and HDV 720p footage.
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Common capture issues
If you run into problems while capturing digital footage, refer to Premiere Pro Help or the documentation for your camera, deck, or capture card.
For more information, check Troubleshoot digital video capture and playback. The following are common issues that may arise when you capture
digital video:
If your device (camera or deck) goes into sleep mode, close and then reopen the Capture panel; or close the Capture panel, turn the device
off and back on, and then reopen the Capture panel. You can disable sleep mode on many cameras by connecting them to AC power and
ejecting the tape.
If video looks grainy in the Capture panel or Monitor panel, Premiere Pro may have decreased display quality to preserve capture quality.
Video is captured and stored at the quality you determine and always plays at that quality on an NTSC or PAL monitor. On slower systems,
Premiere Pro may lower the quality of the capture preview in order to ensure that sufficient CPU resources are available for full-quality
capture.
If the video image does not appear in the Capture panel, verify your device control and capture settings. Then, leaving the device on, restart
Premiere Pro.
If captured audio and video are not in sync, make sure that sections of tape weren’t skipped (left unrecorded) between shots. Blank tape
areas lack timecode, which may cause interruptions in the camera time mode. When you capture the blank area, the camera doesn’t transmit
valid frames, but time continues to be marked.
If no audio is recording, try playing a source through the computer’s sound input and speaker system without recording. If you can’t hear it,
the audio source may not be connected properly or audio parameters may not be set properly. Check hardware connections, Sounds And
Audio Devices in the Windows Control Panel, and mixer settings, and refer to the documentation for your sound card. In Premiere Pro, select
Edit > Preferences (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences (Mac OS), and check the settings for Audio, Audio Hardware, and Audio
Output Mapping.
When shuttling, logging, and capturing HDV footage on Mac OS, the preview pane in the Capture panel will remain blank. You must preview
this footage on an external TV monitor or, when the source device is a camcorder, on its viewfinder.
More Help topics
Importing footage into Premiere Pro
Troubleshoot digital video capture and playback
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Capturing DV or HDV video
You can capture audio and video from a DV or HDV device by connecting the device to your computer with a FireWire cable. Premiere Pro records
the audio and video signal to the hard disk and controls the device through the FireWire port.
You can capture DV or HDV footage from XDCAM or P2 devices. You can capture through SDI ports if your computer has a supported third-party
capture card or device installed. Also, your computer must have the respective drivers.
In a sequence made with one of the DV or HDV presets, the capture settings are set for DV Capture or HDV Capture, respectively. You can,
however, change the capture settings to either DV or HDV from within the Capture panel in an established project.
You can choose whether to preview DV video in the Capture window during preview and capture. You can also preview HDV footage in the
Capture window, in Windows only. However, you cannot preview HDV footage in the Capture window during capture. Instead, the word Capturing
appears in this window during HDV capture.
Important: You can transfer and import DVCPRO HD assets, XDCAM HD, and XDCAM EX assets, and AVCHD assets from their media without
capturing. Capturing takes longer than transferring, and does not preserve all metadata. For more information, see Importing assets from tapeless
formats.
More Help topics
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Capturing HD video
You can capture audio and video from an HD device with an SDI port. Your computer must have a supported SDI capture card, and its drivers and
software installed. Similarly, you can capture HD footage from XDCAM SDI sources provided a supported XDCAM capture card is installed, along
with its respective driver. Correct installation adds HD presets to the Available Presets pane of the New Sequence dialog box. It also adds HD
formats to the Capture Format menu on the General tab of the Project Settings dialog box.
You typically connect the HD device to your computer by connecting its SDI ports by coaxial cable with BNC connectors. To provide device control
(Windows only), you also connect the serial port on the device with an RS422 or RS-232 port on the computer. See the setup instructions
provided by the capture card manufacturer.
For details about capturing tape from an AJA device and setup in Premiere Pro, see this video by Walter Biscardi.
Important: You can transfer and import DVCPRO HD assets, XDCAM HD and XDCAM EX assets, and AVCHD assets from their media without
capturing. Capturing takes longer than transferring, and does not preserve all metadata. For more information, see Importing assets from tapeless
formats.
More Help topics
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Capturing content for DVD
DVD content is compressed according to DVD specifications so that it plays reliably on a wide range of players. When preparing content for a DVD
project, pay attention to frame size and frame rate, so that content retains its quality in the transition to DVD.
For best results, make sure that you capture or record according to these specifications:
Frame size NTSC standard 720x480 or PAL standard 720x576. If your project uses a different frame size, Premiere Pro scales it automatically.
Frame rate 29.97 fps (NTSC) or 25 fps (PAL); alternatively, 23.976 (NTSC) for 24p. All footage in a single project must be of the same frame
rate.
Aspect ratio 4:3 or 16:9 (widescreen).
Audio bit depth 16 bits.
Audio sample rate 48 kHz.
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Batch capturing and recapturing
About logging clips
Log clips for batch capturing
About batch capturing
Choosing batch-capture settings
Batch capture clips
Troubleshooting batch capturing
Import and export batch lists
Recapture clips
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About logging clips
You can specify which shots you want to use from source tapes by logging them as a set of offline clips for later capture. If you set device-control
options in the Preferences dialog box to remotely control your camera or deck, you can create offline clips by using the clip-logging controls in the
Capture panel, and then use the Batch Capture command to capture the logged clips automatically.
If you have a list of In and Out points, you can log them manually without a device online; simply enter each shot’s In and Out points and click the
Log Clip button. You can also log frame numbers using a separate logging or spreadsheet program and then import the spreadsheet into Premiere
Pro as a list of offline clips.
You can also log clips interactively: you can set In points and Out points while the source tape is playing.
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Log clips for batch capturing
1. In the Capture panel, make sure that your device is online, as indicated above the preview.
2. Insert a tape into your device. Premiere Pro prompts you to name the tape. Be sure not to give any two tapes you log the same name.
3. Use the controls in the Capture panel to move to the first frame in your first shot, and click the Set In button. Then move to the last frame in
the shot and click the Set Out button.
4. In the Setup area of the Logging pane, choose your media type from the Capture menu.
5. If you want to capture some frames extending beyond the In and Out points of each clip, enter the number of frames for these handles in the
Handles setting of the Capture section.
6. Click the Log Clip button in the Timecode area of the Logging pane to log the clip you identified. Name the clip when prompted. Premiere
Pro logs the clip by placing an offline clip for it in the Project panel.
7. Repeat steps 2 through 6 to log each shot you want to batch capture.
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Capture panel with Logging active
When logging HDV and other Long GOP formats, be sure to add handles in the Handles setting of the Capture section. Because of the nature
of Long GOP formats, inaccuracy in actual media content is possible. Adding handles assures that you have the proper frames needed for
editing and, if need be, recapturing.
Log clips interactively
1. Make sure that your device is connected and in VTR or VCR (not Camera) mode, and then choose File > Capture.
2. In the Logging pane, enter the settings you want to use as the defaults for Setup and Clip Data.
3. Play the tape. Click Set In or Set Out at any time, even as the tape plays. Repeat as necessary.
4. When you are satisfied with the In and Out points, click Log Clip, verify the clip data, and click OK.
You can make slight timecode adjustments by using the plus sign (+) or minus sign (–). For example, to add five frames to the end of the
Out point, select the entire Out point timecode, type +5, and press Enter/Return.
Tips for logging clips interactively
Set options on the Logging pane of the Capture panel. Premiere Pro uses the current data in the Setup and Clip Data sections as defaults
for subsequent logged clips. If you want to log a series of clips into the same bin with similar logging data, save work by specifying clip data
before you start logging the series. When you click the Log Clip button, a dialog box appears so that you can accept or change the clip data.
In the Clip Data section, specify a tape name. Premiere Pro asks for this name every time you begin batch capturing.
The Clip Name in the Clip Data section progresses in numerical increments automatically. For example, if you want to number a series of
clips with clip names starting with Car Chase, enter “Car Chase 01,” making sure that the clip name ends with the number. Subsequent
logged clips default to the next number, such as “Car Chase 02.”
You can change Capture panel settings at any time. For example, if you see the action changing as the tape plays back, you can get ready to
capture the new upcoming action by selecting a different bin to log subsequent clips into or by typing a different name for Description or
Scene. You don’t have to stop the tape as you change settings.
You can operate the device and log clips using the keyboard. See the tool tips for Capture panel controls, or choose Edit > Keyboard
Customization to view or change the shortcuts.
You must click Log Clip to create a new offline clip. This pauses the tape as you confirm the clip data for the new offline clip.
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About batch capturing
Premiere Pro supports batch capturing—automatic, unattended capture of multiple clips from a controllable device. You can define a batch by
selecting a group of clips you have logged. These appear as offline (placeholder) clips in the Project panel or in a bin. You can capture any
number of logged offline clips by selecting them and choosing File > Batch Capture. When you begin capture, Premiere Pro automatically re-sorts
entries by tape name and timecode In points so that they’re captured as efficiently as possible.
To save time by reducing the number of clips you log manually, consider using Scene Detect. See Log clips with automatic scene detection.
When you want to batch capture a set of logged offline clips, select them in the Project panel and choose File > Batch Capture. If you organized
offline clips into bins, you can batch capture an entire bin by selecting the bin.
Premiere Pro can capture video in the background so that you can perform other tasks during capture. When you start either a manual capture or
batch capturing in Premiere Pro, you can minimize the Premiere Pro application or switch to another application without stopping capture. After you
restore the Premiere Pro window, you can click anywhere inside it to halt capture. However, be aware that frames may drop out if you perform a
system-intensive task while capturing. The chance of dropping frames is lower on a high-performance system, such as one with dual processors.
Note: Batch capturing is not recommended for the first and last 30 seconds of your tape because of possible timecode and seeking issues.
Capture these sections manually.
Preparing for batch capturing
A. Clips selected for capture B. Capture Settings option
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Choosing batch-capture settings
A batch list of logged clips appears as a list of offline clips in the Project panel. If you plan to capture many clips, you may want to create bins in
the Project panel in advance so that you can log each set of offline clips directly into its own bin. When you batch capture, the offline clips are
replaced by captured clips, maintaining the bin organization you set up in advance.
By default, the settings that Premiere Pro uses to batch capture offline clips are the capture settings of the project. If an offline clip has its own
capture settings, Premiere Pro uses the clip settings when capturing it; the resulting clip maintains its capture settings so that it can easily be
recaptured using the same settings. For example, if an offline clip has HDV as its format and the format specified in the project capture settings is
DV, Premiere Pro captures the clip in HDV unless you change the clip capture settings. You can override clip capture settings by choosing the
Override Capture Settings option in the Batch Capture dialog box.
Determine whether an offline clip has capture settings
You can determine whether an offline clip already has its own capture settings.
In the Project panel, scroll right to the Capture Settings column. If the column is hidden, choose Metadata Display from the Project panel menu.
Then click the triangle next to Premiere Project Metadata to expose column names. Select Capture Settings. Click OK.
If an offline clip has its own capture settings, its box in this column has a check mark.
Change capture settings for an offline clip
You can change capture settings for an offline clip. For example, you can capture the clip at a resolution higher than it had when it first was
captured or logged.
1. Select the clip in the Project panel,
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2. Choose Clip > Capture Settings > Set Capture Settings.
The Capture Settings dialog box opens.
3. See Specify capture settings.
Remove capture settings from an offline clip
1. In the Project panel, select the clip.
2. Choose Clip > Capture Settings > Clear Capture Settings.
By default, Premiere Pro captures this clip with the project capture settings.
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Batch capture clips
1. Select the offline clips that you want to capture, and then choose File > Batch Capture.
2. In the Batch Capture dialog box, do any of the following:
Choose Capture With Handles and enter the number of frames for the handles if you want to capture frames beyond the In and Out
points identified for each clip in the batch.
Note: The number of frames you enter here will be added to the number you set for handles in the Capture panel.
Choose Override Capture Settings if you want to replace the capture settings of individual clips in the batch with the project’s default
settings.
3. Verify that the deck and source videotape are set up properly for capture, and then click OK.
4. In the Insert Tape dialog box, insert the requested tape and click OK. If you are capturing from multiple tapes, be ready to insert them when
prompted.
5. If you want to stop batch capturing, click the Stop button in the Capture panel, or press the Esc key.
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Troubleshooting batch capturing
You can perform trouble-free batch capturing if device control and the project’s capture settings are set up properly and if the offline clips you
logged are consistent and free of conflicting data. If you encounter problems with batch capturing, make sure that all clips you want to batch
capture are set up with the proper settings:
The Status of each clip must be Offline. Verify the status in the Project panel List view. If a clip is not offline, select it in the Project panel and
choose Project > Unlink Media. If you select multiple clips and some are online, Premiere Pro captures the offline clips only.
Tape Name, Media Start, and Media End must be specified in the Edit Offline File dialog box for each offline clip. As long as one selected
offline clip contains these settings, the Batch Capture command is available, but only clips with all three settings are captured. If necessary,
verify this in the Project panel List view or double-click each offline clip to edit settings.
Recording video, audio, or both must be supported by the selected capture device. For example, audio isn’t captured if the capture device
doesn’t capture audio. If settings exist that can’t be captured, batch capturing stops and the Capture Settings Error dialog box appears.
The filename of each clip (as specified in the Capture Settings dialog box) must not duplicate the filename of an existing clip. If necessary,
double-click each offline clip to verify that its name is unique. If you select an offline clip with a duplicate name for batch capturing, Premiere
Pro slightly alters the name of that clip when it captures it. In this way, it avoids overwriting the other file with the same name.
To manage capture errors when the Capture Settings Error dialog box appears, do one of the following:
To fix the capture settings for any clips in the list, select one or more files in the list and click Edit Settings.
To omit the clips with invalid capture settings and proceed with the rest of the batch capture, click Skip. Clips you skip are removed from the
list and are not captured.
To stop batch capturing, click Cancel. No clips are captured.
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Import and export batch lists
You can import batch lists in a variety of file formats: tab-delimited text (TXT), comma-separated value (CSV), TAB, and PBL. When imported,
each entry in the text batch list appears as an offline clip in the Project panel. You can also export offline clips as a CSV batch list so that you can
transfer a logged clip list between projects and workstations. To see the format of a batch list, export it and open the file in a text editor such as
Notepad or in a spreadsheet application. A batch list text file may come from sources such as Adobe Premiere 6.5, logging utilities such as
Pipeline Autolog, or custom video-production software that uses a database or spreadsheet program to generate a batch list.
When you import a batch list, the order of fields in the list must be as follows: tape name, In point, Out point, clip name, and comment. When you
export offline clips as a batch list, Premiere Pro orders the fields as follows: tape name, In point, Out point, clip name, log note, description, scene,
and shot/take. Exported field data is exported from the corresponding columns in the List view of the Project panel.
To import a batch-list timecode log, open a project and choose Project > Import Batch List. Locate and select the file, and click Open.
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To export a batch-list timecode log, select the files that you want to log. Then choose Project > Export Batch List. Specify a filename and
location, and click Save.
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Recapture clips
You can recapture clips in an existing project using batch capturing. Clips can be recaptured only if they have been unlinked from their source
files, becoming offline clips; if they have names in their Tape Name fields; and if their source medium contains timecode.
1. If you want to override the capture settings for any clip that you intend to recapture, set the clip’s Capture settings.
2. In the Project panel, select all the clips you want to recapture. If you want to select clips in different bins, use List view, which lets you view
multiple bins.
3. Choose Project > Make Offline. The selected clips are dissociated from their current source files.
4. In the Make Offline dialog box, specify whether the source media files are to remain on disk or be deleted.
5. With the offline clips still selected, choose File > Batch Capture. Adjust the settings as necessary.
6. Verify that the deck and source videotape are set up properly for capture, and then click OK.
7. After recapturing is complete, save the project.
You can recapture offline merged clips. The merged clip will not become an online clip until all the component clips are captured.
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Create clips for offline editing
Create low-resolution clips for offline editing
Replace low-resolution clips with high-resolution clips for online editing
For online editing, you edit clips at the level of quality required for the final version of the video program. This is the default method of working in
Premiere Pro. Online editing works well when the speed and storage capacity of the host computer are adequate to the demands of the video
formats used. For example, most modern computers can handle the data rate of DV in full resolution. They may be challenged, however, by the
greater demands of, for example, HDV or HD footage. For many videographers, that’s where offline editing comes in.
In offline editing, after capturing high-resolution clips, you make low-resolution copies of them for editing purposes. After editing, you replace the
low-resolution footage associated with the clips with the high-quality original footage. You can finish, render, and export your final product in highresolution. Editing the low-resolution clips allows standard computers to edit excessively large assets, such as HDV or HD footage, without losing
performance speed. It also lets editors use laptop computers to edit—for example, while on location.
You may edit a project with the high-resolution footage remaining online throughout the project. On the other hand, you may edit in a two-phase
workflow. You make your initial creative decisions with the high-resolution footage offline. Then you bring the high-resolution footage back online
for fine-tuning, grading, and color correction.
You can complete an offline edit of, for example, an HD project with Premiere Pro, and then export your project to EDL for transfer to an editing
system with more powerful hardware. You can then perform the final online edit and rendering, at full resolution, on the more powerful hardware.
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Create low-resolution clips for offline editing
1. Capture or import assets into the Project panel at full resolution.
2. In the Project panel, click the New Bin button, and name a bin for your low-resolution clips.
3. Launch Adobe Media Encoder, and add all the clips for your project to the Adobe Media Encoder Queue.
4. In Adobe Media Encoder, click Settings.
5. Change the format and other settings to the format and settings for a lower-resolution format.
6. Click the filename in the Output Name field, and browse to the folder you created for your low-resolution clips.
7. Click OK.
8. Click Start Queue.
Adobe Media Encoder encodes clips in the low-resolution format, and, by default, retains the filename of the original clips in the filenames of
the encoded clips.
Note: When creating low-resolution clips for offline editing with Adobe Media Encoder, clips with two audio channels are created even if
you have four or more audio channels on your footage. This problem is a limitation of Adobe Media Encoder, so use an alternate tool if the
other audio channels are to be preserved.
9. In the Premiere Pro Project panel, open the bin you created for low-resolution clips. Import the low-resolution clips into this bin.
10. Edit the project using the low-resolution clips.
Replace low-resolution clips with high-resolution clips for online editing
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You can replace low-resolution copies of assets with the original high-resolution so that you can render a project at full resolution.
1. Select Clip > Replace Footage. Browse to the original high-resolution clip that has the same filename as the low-resolution clip you
selected, and select it. Click Select.
2. Repeat the previous two steps for each low-resolution clip used in the project.
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Digitizing analog video
About capture card settings
Digitize analog video
In order to edit video shot in an analog format, you must first digitize it. You can digitize it by routing the video signal through either a digital
camcorder that can digitize on the fly or a digitizing device installed in your computer. Alternatively, you can dub the analog footage to a digital
format, and then capture the video from a digital device through a capture card as any other digital source. Depending on your equipment, you
may be able to digitize analog video from any of several signal types, including component video, composite video, and S-Video. Some third-party
digitizers provide device control. They connect to your source device through RS-232 or RS-422 ports, enabling you to control the device through
Premiere Pro’s Capture panel and to perform batch capturing. Refer to the instructions included with your camcorder and digitizer/capture card.
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About capture card settings
Some of the capture settings you see in Premiere Pro may be from the plug-in software that came with your digitizer/capture card. Because of the
differences among brands of cards, specific options and supported formats can vary. This complex relationship between video capture cards and
Premiere Pro can make it difficult to identify which part of the system is responsible for a particular option or problem. Adobe, as well as most
capture card manufacturers, provides troubleshooting documents online that can help you determine whether an option or problem is related to the
video capture card and its software or to Premiere Pro. Check the Premiere Pro website and the capture card manufacturer’s website for
troubleshooting resources.
Most of the supported capture cards install a settings file (preset) that you can select in the Premiere Pro New Project dialog box, in the Load
Preset pane. This preset automatically sets all capture settings for optimal support of your capture card. For best results, use your capture card’s
preset, if provided, and don’t change the capture settings in the Custom Settings pane.
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Digitize analog video
1. Exit from Premiere Pro.
2. Connect the analog device’s video and audio outputs to the digital device’s (digitizer, digital camcorder or digital deck) analog inputs.
3. If the digital device is an external digitizer, deck, or camcorder, connect its FireWire or SDI port to the computer’s.
4. If the third-party digital device is a digitizer with device controls (and has device drivers for Premiere Pro), connect its device control port
(RS-232 or RS-422) with the same type port on the analog device.
5. Turn on the analog source and the digitizing device.
6. If the digitizing device is a camcorder, put it into VTR, VCR, or Play (not Camera) mode.
7. Set the input selection control on the digitizing device to the correct analog input.
8. Start Premiere Pro.
9. When the Welcome screen appears, do one of the following:
To start a new project using a capture card, click New Project, select the capture card’s preset (if available) from the Load Preset pane,
and click OK.
To open an existing project using a capture card, select an existing project that was set up with the capture card’s preset.
To start a new project using an external device, such as a camcorder or deck, to digitize, click New Project, select a DV or HDV preset
that matches your target television standard and format, and click OK.
To open an existing project using an external device, such as a camcorder or deck, to digitize, select an existing project that was set up
with the correct DV or HDV preset.
10. (Optional) Specify how Premiere Pro maps the audio channels from the digitizing device to audio tracks. Select Edit > Preferences > Audio
(Windows), or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Audio (Mac OS). In the Source Channel Mapping pane, select an audio channel format from
the Default Track Format menu.
11. Choose File > Capture.
12. In the Capture panel, carefully check the settings on the Settings pane. If you need to change them, click Edit. (If you’re using a capture
card, the settings are provided by the card manufacturer’s plug-in software, not by Premiere Pro, and vary according to the capture card’s
brand and model. See the documentation for the software driver provided by the capture card manufacturer.)
13. Do one of the following:
If the digital device offers no device control, cue up your source using the analog device’s own controls. Press Play on the analog device
in the Capture panel.
and click the Record button
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If the digital device offers device control, capture or log footage using the Capture panel’s controls, as you would with a digital source.
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Working with timecode
About timecode
Choose timecode display format
Change how timecode is displayed
Stripe tape or replace timecode
Capturing timecode
Set timecode manually for a clip
Enter timecode
View timecode as a burn-in
View source timecode in the Program Monitor
View timecode in the Timecode panel
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About timecode
Many camcorders and high-end video decks record timecode, which marks specific frames with unique addresses. Timecode is important
whenever you want to capture exactly the same frames that were identified or captured previously, as in the following tasks:
You want to log clips before you capture them.
You plan to capture clips using batch (automated) capture.
You want to recapture clips because the original files became corrupted or were deleted.
You plan to export sequences to another system by using EDL.
You’re using a system in which you edit quickly with low-resolution captures, and later recapture the clips at full resolution and quality for the
final version.
You plan to synchronize captured video with audio recorded separately.
Unlike the numbers on time counters found in home VCRs, timecode is recorded onto videotape as part of the video signal. If footage lacks
timecode, you can add it by copying it with a camera or deck that writes timecode. You can then log or capture the video from that device.
For best results, timecode should run continuously from the beginning to the end of the tape; it shouldn’t restart from zero anywhere in the middle.
In editing, if you log a capture In point such as 00:00:01:09 but that number occurs on the tape two or three times because of timecode restarts,
Premiere Pro can’t be certain which 00:00:01:09 is the place to start its capture. It can easily capture the wrong clips from tapes with discontinuous
timecode.
To ensure unbroken timecode, you need to either shoot it continuously or stripe your tape with it before shooting.
To ensure that you always shoot continuous timecode, record at least 5 seconds of extra video past the end of the action in any shot. If you
review a clip in the camera, be sure to rewind the tape back into that 5-second margin before recording again. Your camcorder reads the
timecode from the frame on which you stop and begins recording timecode with the very next frame number when you start your next shot. Be
careful; if you leave a gap between the last frame of the previous shot and the first frame of the next, the camcorder begins writing timecode at
00:00:00:00 again.
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Choose timecode display format
By default, Premiere Pro displays the timecode for any clip that was originally written to the source medium. If a frame has timecode 00:00:10:00
on tape, the timecode displayed for it after it has been captured is 00:00:10:00. Source timecode often makes logging clips easy. Source timecode
is shown for a clip regardless of the timebase of the sequences in which it is used. When the timebase of the clip differs from the timebase of the
sequence, source timecode can make logging footage easier. For example, a clip shot in 24p has a timebase of 30 fps and 30 fps timecode.
Premiere Pro shows the original 30 fps timecode for that clip, even though it is used in a sequence with a timebase of 23.976. However, you can
change this default to instead show the timecode for every clip starting at 00:00:00:00.
Also, you can determine how Premiere Pro displays the frame count when a Frames or Feet And Frames display is chosen for a panel. You can
make the frame count for every clip start at 0 or at 1, or you can have it converted from the source timecode. If a frame in a 30 fps clip has a
source timecode of 00:00:10:00 the Timecode Conversion option gives this frame number 300. Premiere Pro converts 10 seconds at the 30 fps
frame rate to 300 frames.
1. Select Edit > Preferences > Media (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Media (Mac OS).
2. In the Timecode menu, choose one of the following:
Use Media Source Shows the timecode recorded to the source.
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Start At 00:00:00:00 Starts timecode shown for every clip at 00:00:00:00.
3. In the Frame Count menu, choose one of the following:
Start At 0 Numbers every frame sequentially, with the first frame numbered 0.
Start At 1 Numbers every frame sequentially, with the first frame numbered 1.
Timecode Conversion Generates frame number equivalents of the source timecode numbers.
4. Click OK.
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Change how timecode is displayed
You can change the timecode display format in any panel where timecode is shown in hot text.
1. (Optional) To display timecode in audio units (Audio Samples or Milliseconds), click the panel menu button
select Show Audio Time Units.
in the panel desired, and
2. Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) a hot text timecode display to toggle through any of these timecode formats that are
available. The last two are available only if you select Show Audio Time Units in the panel menu.
Drop-frame timecode
Non-drop-frame timecode
Frames
Feet+Frames 16 mm
Feet+Frames 35 mm
Audio Samples
Milliseconds
The timecode display format for the Program Monitor (including the instance in the Trim Monitor) and Timeline panels always match one another.
Changing the display format in one of these panels changes it in the other.
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Stripe tape or replace timecode
You can ensure continuous timecode by recording timecode onto the tape before you use it. This process is called striping the tape. Striping is not
necessary if you follow recommended shooting practices, but it can protect you from accidentally breaking timecode by miscuing a tape in your
camera.
Stripe a tape with timecode
1. Place an unused tape in the camera. It should have no timecode.
2. If you’re using a camera for striping, attach the lens cap and disable audio recording.
3. Ensure that all camera settings (particularly the audio sample rate) are exactly the same as the settings you will use when you shoot. Use
all these same settings whenever shooting on that tape.
4. Begin recording. Let the camera or deck run until the entire tape has been recorded.
5. Before you record video on a striped tape, play about 30 seconds of it from the beginning. Verify that the camcorder is reading the timecode
you striped before you start shooting. The 30-second empty lead on the tape also helps in batch capturing.
Check your camera’s settings whenever changing tapes, especially when reinserting a tape you had begun shooting previously. Though
you may want to use different settings for different tapes, it’s best to use the same settings from beginning to end of each tape. These
should match the settings used when first striping that tape.
Replace DV timecode
If your source footage is in DV format and its timecode isn’t continuous, you can replace its timecode by making a DV copy, or dub, of the tape.
The DV device making the copy records new timecode that is continuous, so you can then log and capture video, with the new timecode, from the
copy.
Note: This technique does not work when dubbing to the DVCAM format or using a Panasonic AG-DV2500 as the record deck.
1. Load the DV tape you shot into a DV camcorder or deck for playback, and fully rewind it.
2. Load a new tape into a second camcorder or deck, which you will use to record a copy.
3. If the recording device includes an option to record video with the timecode from your original tape, be sure that this option is disabled. See
the operating instructions for the device for information on this option.
4. If the recording device is digital, connect it to the DV source device using a digital cable, such as IEEE 1394 or SDI. This will make a fullquality copy.
5. Connect the recording device to a television monitor.
6. Set both devices to VTR mode.
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7. Make sure that the recording device is set to record from the digital port.
8. Begin recording the new tape and then start your original tape playing. Let the camcorders or decks run until the entire original tape has
been copied.
Note: Scene Detect recognizes the starting and stopping points for each shot by looking for jumps in the timestamps. Because copying a
tape this way creates a single clip with a continuous timestamp, you can’t use Scene Detect when you capture the copy in Premiere Pro.
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Capturing timecode
The timecode of source video is captured when you use device control. Timecode capture with controllable analog devices depends on the
precision of your tape deck. If your tape deck cannot read the timecode accurately, you may have to calibrate your system or manually assign the
timecode to your movie by matching frames.
Note: Timecode is visible in the tape counter only on equipment that can recognize timecode, unless the timecode has been burned in or
recorded over the picture in a copy of the tape. Most analog home VCRs cannot read or write timecode.
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Set timecode manually for a clip
You can change the timecode from that recorded by Premiere Pro. For example, you captured footage from a DV copy of a Hi8 tape originally
recorded with RCTC (Rewritable Consumer Time Code). The DV copy, and the video files on your computer copied from it, carry the DV timecode,
not the original RCTC. For convenience in referencing shot logs made for the original Hi8 tape, you want to reset the timecode to the original
RCTC numbers.
1. Select the clip in the Project panel.
2. Choose Clip > > Modify > Timecode, specify options as needed, and click OK.
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Enter timecode
As you capture and edit video, you enter timecode values many times. For example, you enter timecode values to set In and Out points for clips
and to navigate a Timeline panel. Premiere Pro provides many ways to enter timecode.
In Premiere Pro, the duration between the In and Out points includes the frames indicated by the timecode. For example, if you enter the same
timecode for the In and Out points of a clip, the duration of the clip is one frame. When entering timecode, you can substitute periods for colons or
type numbers without punctuation. Premiere Pro interprets the numbers you type as hours, minutes, seconds, and frames.
To set a specific timecode, select the timecode, type a new timecode, and then press Enter/Return.
To adjust the current timecode by dragging, drag the timecode horizontally. For example, to set an earlier timecode, drag to the left.
To adjust the current timecode by using a relative value, type the plus sign (+) or minus sign (–) and the number of frames to add or subtract.
For example, to subtract five frames from the current timecode, select the entire timecode, type –5, and then press Enter/Return.
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View timecode as a burn-in
You can display clip timecode within the video preview of the clip by applying the Timecode effect to that clip. You can display timecode within the
video preview of any part of a sequence by applying the Timecode effect to a transparent video clip. then trim the transparent video clip for the
period when you want the timecode visible. Onscreen timecode is commonly referred to as burn-in timecode. It is used in rough edits and proofs to
give frame-accurate reference points to editors and their collaborators.
View clip timecode as a burn-in
1. In the Effects panel, click the triangle next to the Video Effects bin to open it. Then, click the triangle next to the Video bin to open it.
2. Drag the Timecode effect and drop it onto a clip in a sequence.
3. Click the Effect Controls panel to make the panel active.
4. Click the triangle next to Timecode to expose the options for this effect.
5. Adjust the options as needed.
View sequence timecode as a burn-in
1. At the bottom of the Project panel, click the New Item icon . Select Transparent Video.
Note: You can use an adjustment layer instead of transparent video to carry the timecode effect.
2. Drag the transparent video clip to an empty track in the sequence higher than all other video tracks.
3. In the Effects panel, click the triangle next to the Video Effects bin to open it. Then, click the triangle next to the Video bin to open it.
4. Drag the Timecode effect and drop it onto the transparent video clip.
5. Click the Effect Controls panel to make the panel active.
6. Click the triangle next to Timecode to expose the options for this effect.
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7. Adjust the options as needed.
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View source timecode in the Program Monitor
You can display the source timecode in the Program Monitor preview for clips in a sequence as you edit:
If you trim a clip, the clip’s source timecode is displayed.
If you perform a slide edit, the new source media In and Out points for the adjacent clips are displayed.
If you perform a slip edit, the clip’s new source media In and Out points are displayed.
Choose Timecode Overlay During Edit from the Program Monitor panel menu. A check mark indicates that the command is selected.
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View timecode in the Timecode panel
You can view timecode in the Timecode panel. To view the Timecode panel, choose Window > Timecode.
You can view the following in the Timecode panel:
If you have the Source panel selected, the Timecode panel will display source timecode.
If you have the Timeline panel, or the Program panel selected, you can choose to display sequence timecode, or source timecode from the
panel menu. You can choose which audio or video track’s timecode to display from the panel menu, as well.
To increase the size of the Timecode panel, drag the lower right corner of the window outward.
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Managing assets
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Customizing the Project panel
Change Project panel views
Working in List view
Working in Icon view
Customize List view columns
Select format for timecode display in the Project panel
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Change Project panel views
After you obtain an asset, its name appears in the Project panel. The Project panel lists detailed information about each asset in your project. You
can view and sort assets in either List view or Icon view. List view displays additional information about each asset. You can customize the
information it displays to meet the needs of your project.
See the video tutorial: Introducing the Project panel by Maxim Jago and Learn by Video for more details about the settings and controls in the
Project panel.
A. List view B. Zoom slider C. Automate to sequence D. Find E. New Bin F. New item G. Clear H. Icon view I. Clip used in a sequence J. Clip
contains both audio and video K. Playhead for scrubbing the thumbnail
To change from one view to another, click the List View
View > List or View > Icon from the Project panel menu.
button or the Icon View
button at the bottom of the panel. Alternatively, select
To the top
Working in List view
To sort items in List view, click the column heading by which you want to sort the items. If bins are expanded, items sort from the top level
and down the Project panel hierarchy. To reverse the sort order, click the column heading again.
To hide or show the thumbnail viewer and clip information, choose View > Preview Area from the Project panel menu.
To hide or show thumbnails, choose Thumbnails from the Project panel menu. Change the size of the Thumbnails by dragging the Zoom
slider.
Hovering over clips with the mouse provides a tool tip with information about the clip.
Hovering over columns with the mouse, provides a tool tip with information about the column.
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Working in Icon view
Video tutorial: Hover Scrub
Learn more about the Hover Scrub feature,
and how you can scale your thumbnails
from very small to large.... Read More
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The Icon view in Premiere Pro has the following features:
Use the Zoom slider to increase or decrease the size of icons. Icons can be zoomed to a large scale so that you can view the contents of
your media more easily.
To scrub through the contents of a clip, do one of the following:
Move (but do not click and drag) the cursor across the thumbnail of the movie clip. This action is called "Hover Scrub". Hover scrubbing
is most valuable for quickly previewing the contents of a clip before you edit it into a sequence.
Turn off Hover Scrub in the Project panel menu, or press Shift + H.
When Hover Scrub is off, you can press the Shift key to temporarily enable Hover Scrubbing.
Use the keyboard shortcuts I and O to set In and Out points for the clip while hover scrubbing.
While hovering over a portion of a clip, double-click the icon, and the clip loads into the Source Monitor where the pointer was
hovering. With this technique, Insert or Overwrite edits can be quickly made to the timeline.
Click the icon. Drag the playhead across the slider to scrub the clip.
After clicking the slider on the thumbnail, a clip playhead appears. You can:
Drag the playhead to see clip contents, or to monitor audio.
Use J-K-L keyboard shortcuts to shuttle through the clip.
Use the keyboard shortcuts I and O to set In and Out points for the clip while paused or shuttling. After marking clips with an In
and Out point, a yellow bar shows where the In and Out points are located.
To set a poster frame for the icon, drag the playhead or shuttle to the desired frame, and then press the Shift+P (Windows) or Command+P
(Mac OS) keys. To clear the poster frame, press the Ctrl+Shift+P (Windows) or Option+P (Mac OS) keys.
To view if the clip has been used in a sequence, hover over the filmstrip icon with the mouse and view the tool tip. The indicator also shows
how many times the clip is used in the sequence.
To locate the clip in a sequence, click the filmstrip icon and choose the sequence and sequence location (in timecode) from the context
menu. The playhead will jump to the clip in the proper sequence.
To arrange items in Icon view, drag a different location in the grid. As you drag, a vertical bar indicates where the item will be located. If you
drag an item to a bin, the item goes into the bin.
You can see the entire duration of a clip when Hover Scrubbing thumbnails left to right. At the left of a thumbnail is a clip's Media Start point,
and to the right is its Media End point. When you move the mouse outside the boundaries of the clip, or focus is set away from the Project
panel, the thumbnail resets to the poster frame. No audio is played during hover scrubbing.
If you are using a MacBook Pro, you can pinch and zoom the Multi-Touch trackpad to resize thumbnails in the Project panel and Media
Browser.
You can use Icon view to arrange clips in "storyboard" order, and then use the Automate To Sequence feature to move the storyboard into a
sequence. See this video tutorial by Franklin McMahon on the Layers Magazine website for details.
Sort icons in the Icon view
To sort icons in the Icon view, click the Sort Icons button
at the bottom of the Project panel. A list of sort options appears:
User Order: Lets you sort the icons in any order that you want by dragging around the icons.
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List View Sort: Sorts the icons in the sort order chosen in the List view. For example, if you sorted the clips by "Media duration" in the List
view. When you switch to the Icon view, the sort order is retained and the icons are also sorted by media duration.
You can sort using commonly used metadata properties like Name, Label, Media Type, and such. You can select the sort order as ascending
or descending.
For a quick tutorial on how to sort icons in the Icon view, see this video by Josh Weiss of retooled.net.
Sort options in the Icon view
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Customize List view columns
The columns of metadata in the Project panel List view tell various things about the assets listed. The Project panel can display any XMP
metadata fields you choose, not only the clip data fields. You can select which metadata columns Premiere Pro displays, add properties to
schema, and change the order of columns. Premiere Pro saves your choice of columns in the project file. The same selection of columns appears
in the Project panel whenever you open the project.
Edit the display of columns in the Project panels
1. Choose Metadata Display from the Project panel menu, and do any of the following:
To display all the columns in a metadata schema in the Project panels, check the box next to the schema name.
To display columns selected from one or more schemas, click the triangles next to the schema names to open them. Then, check the
boxes next to the names of the columns you want to display.
Note: If you can’t locate or change a property in the Metadata Display dialog box, Adobe Premiere Pro locks the property, so that you
cannot change it. For example, you can delete properties you added, but not the properties built in to the Adobe Premiere Pro project
metadata.
2. Click OK.
Rearrange columns
In the List view of the Project panel, drag the column header horizontally to the desired position.
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Change the width of a column
In the List view of the Project panel, position the mouse over a dividing line between column headings. When the Column Resize icon
appears, drag horizontally.
Sort by a column
In the List view of the Project panel, click a column name to switch between ascending and descending sorts based on the content of that
column.
Add a column
1. Choose Metadata Display from the Project panel menu.
2. Click Add Property.
3. Type a name for the column.
4. Choose a type:
Integer columns can contain only whole numbers.
Real columns can contain decimals up to two digits.
Text columns can contain any text you enter.
Boolean columns provide the option for Boolean terms.
5. Click OK, and click OK again.
List view columns
The names of most of the Project panel columns are self explanatory. Following are definitions for the less obvious ones:
Name By default, displays the asset filename. You can change the name the asset uses within the project. You cannot remove the Name field
from the List view.
Label Color that helps identify and associate assets.
Media Duration Length of the source file, expressed in the currently specified Display option.
Note: In Premiere Pro, the In point and Out points specify all durations in any panel including the frames. For example, setting the In point and
Out point to the same frame results in a duration of one frame.
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Video Duration The duration of the video component of a clip. To determine video duration, the difference between the video In point and Out
point is calculated. Premiere Pro then incorporates any relevant adjustments, such as changes to clip speed.
Audio Duration The duration of the audio component of a clip. To determine audio duration, the difference between the audio In point and Out
point is calculated. Premiere Pro then incorporates any relevant adjustments, such as changes to clip speed.
Video Info The frame size and aspect ratio of the asset, and whether an alpha channel is present.
Video Usage The number of times the video component of an asset is used in the project sequences.
Audio Usage The number of times the audio component of an asset is used in the project sequences.
Tape Name The name of the source tape, as entered when the clip was logged or captured.
Description Optional description of the asset, entered when the clip was logged or captured.
Comment Optional comment, entered when the asset was logged or captured, intended for identification and sorting purposes.
Log Note Field for optional text entered through the Capture panel or Edit Offline File dialog box.
File Path Location of the file on disk, expressed as a folder path.
Capture Settings Indicates whether a file has capture settings assigned in Premiere Pro.
Status Whether an asset is online or offline. If a clip is offline, Status also indicates why.
Offline Properties Whether the source of an offline clip contains video, audio, or both.
Scene Field for scene name entered through the Capture panel or the Edit Offline File dialog box. It can be helpful to use scene names from a
script here to help organize your work.
Shot/Take Field for shot name, or take name entered using the Capture panel or through the Edit Offline File dialog box.
Good Indicates preferred assets.
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Select format for timecode display in the Project panel
By default, Premiere Pro displays timecode for clips in the Project panel in the format selected in Preferences. You can change this default,
however, to any other timecode display format.
1. Select Project > Project Settings > General.
2. In the Video section of the Project Settings dialog box, select a timecode format from the Display Format menu.
3. Click OK.
For information about the Project Panel, see this series of four video tutorials by Andrew Devis on the Creative COW website:
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Project Panel: Organizing, Automating, and Searching
Project Panel: New Items and Templates
Project Panel: Preferences and Bin Structures
Project Panel: Importing Footage
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Organizing assets in the Project panel
Working with bins
Adding and deleting bins
Change bin behaviors
Bin tips
Label assets
Rename assets
Rename a clip
Rename an original source file
Jump to an asset in the Project panel
Find assets in the Project panel
Find assets matching criteria
Finding clips with Face Detection
Identify clips containing faces
Find clips containing faces
Remove assets from a project
Remove an asset from the Project panel
Remove unused assets from the Project panel
Define a different thumbnail for clips
Edit cells in the Project panel
Viewing clip properties
View clip properties
Viewing field order for clips
Determining if a clip has interlaced or progressive scanning
Change the frame rate of clips
To the top
Working with bins
The Project panel can include bins, which you can use to organize project contents in much the same way as folders in Windows® Explorer or
Mac OS® Finder. Bins can contain source files, sequences, and other bins.
As your project grows, you can make new bins to contain those items. While it is not absolutely necessary to create and use bins (especially with
short-form projects), most editors find them indispensable for staying organized.
You may want to use bins in the following ways:
To store offline clips for batch capture.
To store main sequences and backup sequences.
To organize files by type, such as video, still images, and audio files.
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A. Bin in a bin B. List view C. Icon view D. Zoom slider E. Automate to sequence F. Find G. New bin H. New item I. Clear
These are the default behaviors of bins in the Project panel. You can change the last three bin default behaviors by editing bin behavior in general
preferences.
To learn more about working with bins, see the video tutorial, Enhanced Bins In Premiere Pro CS3, on the Creative COW website.
Adding and deleting bins
To add a bin, click the New Bin button
Command+/ (MacOS).
at the bottom of the Project panel. You can also use the keyboard shortcut Control+/ (Windows) or
To delete one or more bins, select the bins and click the Delete icon
selecting one or more bins, and then pressing the Delete key.
at the bottom of the Project panel. You can also delete bins by
See the entire series of video tutorials about the Project panel by Andrew Devis on the Creative Cow website.
Project Panel 1 - Organizing, Automating, and Searching in the Project Panel
Project Panel 2 - New Items and Templates
Project Panel 4 - Importing Footage
Article: How to work with bins
Antony Bolante shows you how to work with
bins in Premiere Pro.... Read More
by Antony Bolante
http://www.lynda.com/Antho...
http://premiere.digitalmedianet.com/articles/...
Antony Bolante is a video editing, and
motion graphics instructor and is a former
contributor to the Premiere Pro Help
system.
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177
Double-click to open a bin in its own dockable panel.
Change bin behaviors
While working in a project, you will sometimes want to change the way you view your bins. In standard layout, you can see the hierarchy of your
entire project, which is useful. However, sometimes you want to open a bin in its own tab, or open in a new panel. That way, you can focus on the
clips in a particular bin, sort clips in storyboard order in icon mode, or search for clips within a bin by typing in the search field.
Some editors like the bin window overlapping the interface, while others prefer to see bins open in place, or in new tabs.
To open a bin in its own floating panel, in place, or in a new tab, do the following:
To open a bin in its own floating panel, double-click the bin. This panel can be docked or grouped like any other panel.
To open a bin in place, Ctrl-double-click (Windows) or Command-double-click (Mac OS) the bin.
To open a bin in a new tab, Alt-double-click (Windows) or Option-double-click (Mac OS) the bin.
You can change the default behaviors of Project panel bins by editing the Bins preferences.
1. Select Edit > Preferences > General (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > General (Mac OS).
2. In the Bins area, select options from the menus for Double-Click, + Ctrl (Windows) or + Command (Mac OS), and + Alt (Windows) or + Opt
(Mac OS).
3. Click OK.
Bin tips
To move an item into a bin, drag the item to the Bin icon. You can move bins into other bins to nest them. Dropping an item into a bin does
not automatically open the bin.
To display the contents of a bin, in List view, click the triangle beside the Bin icon to expand it, or double-click the bin.
To show the contents of an enclosing (parent) bin when you’re viewing only the contents of a nested bin, click the Parent Bin button
Project panel. You can continue to click this button until the top-level contents of the Project panel appear.
in the
To open or close more than one bin at a time, Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac OS) multiple selected bins.
If you click New Bin multiple times in a row, each new bin is nested inside the previous new bin.
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Label assets
Labels are colors that help you identify and associate assets. You assign and view labels in the Project panel. Label colors mark assets in the
Project panel’s Label column and in a Timeline panel.
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To assign a label to an asset, select a clip in the Project panel, choose Edit > Label, and choose a color.
To select all assets with the same label, select an asset that uses the label and choose Edit > Label > Select Label Group.
To edit label names or colors, choose Edit > Preferences > Label Colors (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Label Colors (Mac
OS). Click a color swatch to edit a color.
To set default labels for a media type, choose Edit > Preferences > Label Defaults (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Label
Defaults (Mac OS).
Note: Label defaults affect assets you add to the Project panel from the time you change the defaults; the command doesn’t change label colors
for assets already in the Project panel. To change label colors for assets already in the Project panel, use the Edit > Preferences > Label Colors
(Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Label Colors (Mac OS) command.
To the top
Rename assets
All files in your project are stored on your hard disk as individual files. Only a reference to each file is added to the Project panel in Premiere Pro.
Whenever you rename a clip in Premiere Pro, the original file and filename remain untouched on your hard disk.
When changing the name of your clip, the name of the source file does not reflect the change. Some users suggest entering the desired clip
name in the “Description” Column instead so that the clip name and source file naming scheme is maintained. The drawback is that the clip
name is not descriptive in the Timeline panel or in the Project panel in icon view. You decide which system would be more advantageous to
your workflow.
Rename a clip
You can change the name for a clip. Premiere Pro stores the clip name with the other clip properties in the project file. Changing the name of a
clip does not change the filename of the source file for the clip.
Note: To automatically store the new name also in the Title field of the Dublin Core metadata schema, first link the Clip Name property. See Link
clip data to XMP metadata.
1. In the Project panel, select the clip.
2. Do one of the following:
In the Project panel, choose Clip > Rename, type the new name, and press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
In the Project panel, click the Name field, type the new name, and press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
In the Metadata panel, click the triangle next to Clip to show the clip properties fields. Type the new name into the Name field, and press
Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
The Rename command is available when you right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS) a clip in the Project panel, or in a Timeline.
Rename an original source file
Quit Premiere Pro and rename the file on the desktop.
The next time you open the project, Premiere Pro launches a dialog.
1. Navigate to the file that you renamed and select it in the dialog.
2. Click Open
3. Premiere Pro launches with the file relinked to the renamed source file.
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Jump to an asset in the Project panel
1. Select the Project panel.
2. Type the first letter of the name of the desired clip.
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Find assets in the Project panel
1. In the Project panel, select one of these options from the In menu:
All Searches all metadata.
Visible Searches only the metadata fields visible in the Project panel.
Text Transcript Searches only the Speech To Text metadata field.
2. Do one of the following:
Place the cursor in the Find box in the Project panel.
Select the Project panel, and press Shift+F.
3. (Optional) Click the magnifying glass icon in the Find box to see a menu listing the most recently searched terms.
4. Type the term for which you want to search.
The Project panel shows only assets that match the search criteria. The magnifying glass menu suggests search terms. The suggestions
include any misspellings present in clip metadata. This feature allows you to find errors and correct them.
The menu updates dynamically as you type each new letter.
When you open a bin while a search term is in the Find box, Premiere Pro copies this search term into the new Find box. The filtering
persists for the opened bin.
5. (Optional) Click a suggestion to initiate a search for that term.
6. Click the Close icon
to end the search and show all assets.
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Find assets matching criteria
For more detailed searches, you can locate any assets in your project that meet criteria you specify. For example, you can search for a video clip
that has a certain word in its Name column and a phrase in its Comment column.
1. Do one of the following:
Click the Find icon
at the bottom of the Project panel.
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Select the Project panel, and press Ctrl + F (Windows), or Command + F (Mac OS).
2. In the Find dialog box, select the name of the columns to search from the menus under Column.
3. Select the appropriate operators from the menus under Operator.
4. Type in the characters you want to find in the specified columns in their respective Find What fields.
5. If you’re searching for two criteria simultaneously, do one of the following:
To find assets that match both criteria, select All from the Match menu.
To find assets that match either criteria, select Any from the Match menu.
6. Click Find.
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Finding clips with Face Detection
You can find clips containing faces if you first use Face Detection to identify them.
Identify clips containing faces
Identify clips that contain faces, so that you can later filter the Project panel for clips containing faces.
Note: Content analysis works on all supported media types, including still images. Face detection is enabled for merged clips if at least one of the
component clips contains video.
1. To select one or more clips for face detection, do one of the following:
Select a clip in the Project panel. Choose Clip > Analyze Content.
In the Project panel, right-click a selected clip and choose Analyze Content.
The Analyze Content dialog box appears.
2. Check Face Detection. Choose from High, Medium, or Low quality (High gives the best results, while Low is fastest), and then click OK.
Adobe Media Encoder opens with the selected clips in its encoding queue, and analyzes the selected clips. A green checkmark appears in
the Status column for each clip that has been analyzed.
3. Close the Adobe Media Encoder window.
Find clips containing faces
You can filter the Project panel to show only clips containing faces. First identify the clips that contain faces using Face Detection.
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1. Do one of the following:
Click the magnifying glass in the Find box and choose Find Faces,
Choose Edit > Find Faces.
The Project panel displays only clips containing faces. All bins remain visible in this filtered view to allow you to drag clips to them.
2. To clear the filter, click the X on the right side of the Find box.
The Project panel displays all clips.
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Remove assets from a project
You can remove assets you don’t need from the Project panel without removing them from your hard disk.
Remove an asset from the Project panel
Select the item and press the Delete key.
The file remains on the hard disk
Note: When you use the Project > Make Offline command, you have the option of deleting the actual source file along with its reference in the
project. (See Working with offline clips.)
Remove unused assets from the Project panel
You can remove assets you haven’t used in a Timeline panel from the Project panel.
Do one of the following:
Sort the Project panel List view by the Video Usage or Audio Usage columns to identify unused clips, and then select and delete them.
Choose Project > Remove Unused.
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Define a different thumbnail for clips
You can change the poster frame of clips in Icon view. By default, the first frame of a clip appears in the thumbnail viewer and in other places in
the project where the thumbnail is displayed. You can override the default thumbnail by designating any clip frame as a poster frame.
To set a poster frame for the icon, drag the playhead or shuttle to the desired frame, and then press the Shift+P (Windows) or Command+P (Mac
OS) keys.
For more information, see Working in Icon view.
The thumbnail viewer in the Preview Area of the Project panel is hidden by default. Enable it in the panel menu of the Project panel.
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Edit cells in the Project panel
You can edit the data in the editable cells, whether for clip properties or XMP metadata, for any clip in the Project panel. Premiere Pro stores data
written to XMP metadata cells in the source files. However, it stores data written to clip properties cells in the project file, not into the source files.
Clip properties data do not travel with the source files, and they are readable only by Premiere Pro.
By default, the Project panel displays only the clip properties. To write data that Premiere Pro stores in the source files, first add metadata
columns to the Project panel display. See Customize List view columns.
1. Do one of the following:
In the List View of the Project panel, click an icon to the left of a filename to select a clip. Press Tab repeatedly, until the desired editable
cell is highlighted, and switched to editing mode.
Click in an editable cell.
2. Type the data you want to replace the data already in the cell, if any.
3. Do one of the following:
To save the new data, and to highlight the next cell for the same clip, press Tab.
To save the new data, and to highlight the previous cell for the same clip, press Shift+Tab.
To save the new data, and to highlight the same cell in the next clip, press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
To save the new data, and to highlight the same cell in the previous clip, press Shift+Enter (Windows), or Shift+Return (Mac OS).
Note: In Icon View of the Project panel, press Tab to highlight the filename of the next asset and to place it in editing mode.
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Viewing clip properties
Premiere Pro includes clip analysis tools that you can use to evaluate a file in any supported format stored inside or outside a project. For example,
after producing a video clip to be streamed from a web server, you can use clip analysis tools to determine whether a clip you exported has an
appropriate data rate for Internet distribution.
The Properties panel provides detailed information about any clip. For video files, analyzed properties can include the file size, number of audio
channels, duration, frame rate, audio sample rate, average data rate, and codecs. The Properties panel will not show all these properties for every
clip. The data shown in the Properties panel is determined by the file format of the clip being examined.
View clip properties
Do one of the following:
If the clip is in the Project panel, select it to display a subset of its properties in the preview area at the top of the Project panel.
If the clip is in the Source Monitor, Timeline panel, or Project panel, select it and choose File > Get Properties For > Selection.
If the clip is not in the project, choose File > Get Properties For > File. Locate and select the clip you want to analyze, and then click
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Open.
You can also view clip properties in the Source Monitor, Timeline panel, or Project panel by right-clicking (Windows) or Control-clicking
(Mac OS) a clip and choosing Properties.
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Viewing field order for clips
You can determine the field order for a clip in the Preview Area of the Project panel. In the Preview Area, and next to the clip, you can view
information about the clip. Next to the timecode information, the field order is listed.
LFF indicates a lower-field first field order for the clip.
UFF indicates a upper-field first field order for the clip.
The Preview Area is hidden by default. Enable it in the panel menu of the Project panel.
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Determining if a clip has interlaced or progressive scanning
You can determine if a clip has interlaced or progressive scanning in the Preview Area of the Project panel. In the Preview Area, and next to the
clip, you can view information about the clip. Next to the timecode information, an indicator for interlaced or progressive scanning can be seen.
"i" indicates the clip has interlaced scanning
"p" indicates the clip has progressive scanning
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Change the frame rate of clips
You can use the Interpret Footage command to change the frame rate that Premiere Pro assumes for a clip. When changing the frame rate of a
clip, audio is changed, in addition to the video. Changing the frame rate changes the original duration proportionally. For example, if you set a 10second, 24-fps clip to 48 fps, it becomes half as long, with a new duration of 5 seconds. Clip frame rate is reconciled with the sequence frame
rate. For example, if you change a 24-fps clip in a 24-fps sequence to 48 fps, the sequence displays only every other frame of the clip.
You can also change clip speed and duration by choosing the Clip > Speed/Duration command for a clip selected in a Timeline panel. However,
such a change affects only that clip instance in a Timeline panel. Using the Interpret Footage command changes how a file is interpreted
throughout a project.
1. In the Project panel, right-click the desired clip.
2. Select Modify > Interpret Footage, and do one of the following:
Select Use Frame Rate From File,
Select Assume This Frame Rate, and type the number of frames per second.
3. Click OK.
Creative COW: Enhanced Bins In Premiere Pro CS3
Find and group effects
Create a custom sequence preset
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Managing metadata
About the Metadata panel and XMP
About the Metadata panel in Premiere Pro
About file, clip, and project XMP metadata
Using clip metadata and file metadata
Edit XMP metadata
Search XMP metadata
Show or hide XMP metadata
View clip data in the Metadata panel
Link clip data to XMP metadata
To the top
About the Metadata panel and XMP
To streamline your workflow and organize your files, use XMP metadata. Metadata is a set of descriptive information about a file. Video and audio
files automatically include basic metadata properties, such as date, duration, and file type. You can add details with properties such as location,
director, copyright, and much more.
With the Metadata panel, you can share this information about assets throughout Adobe video and audio applications. Unlike conventional clip
properties, which are limited to only one application’s Project or Files panel, metadata properties are embedded in source files, so the data
automatically appears in other applications. This sharing of metadata lets you quickly track and manage video assets as they move through your
production workflow.
Note: Properties in the Metadata panel also appear in Adobe Bridge, providing additional details that help you quickly browse assets.
For a video about the Metadata panel, see the Adobe website.
About schemas and properties
A metadata schema is a collection of properties specific to a given workflow. The Dynamic Media schema, for example, includes properties like
Scene and Shot Location that are ideal for digital video projects. Exif schemas, by contrast, include properties tailored to digital photography, like
Exposure Time and Aperture Value. More general properties, like Date and Title, appear in the Dublin Core schema. To display different
properties, see Show or hide XMP metadata.
For information about a specific schema and property, hover the pointer over it in the Metadata panel. For most items, a tool tip appears with
details.
About the XMP standard
Adobe applications store metadata using the Extensible Metadata Platform (XMP). XMP is built on XML, which facilitates the exchange of
metadata across a variety of applications and publishing workflows. Metadata in most other formats (such as Exif, GPS, and TIFF) automatically
transfers to XMP so you can more easily view and manage it.
In most cases, XMP metadata is stored directly in source files. If a particular file format doesn’t support XMP, however, metadata is stored in a
separate sidecar file.
Project assets without corresponding files don’t support XMP. Examples from Adobe Premiere Pro include Bars and Tone, Universal Counting
Leader, Color Matte, Titles, Black Video, and Transparent Video.
To customize the creation and exchange of metadata, use the XMP Software Development Kit. For more information about XMP, see
Extensible Metadata Platform.
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About the Metadata panel in Premiere Pro
The Metadata panel shows both clip-instance metadata and XMP file metadata for a selected asset. Fields under the Clip heading show clipinstance metadata: information about a clip selected in the Project panel, or in a sequence. Clip instance metadata is stored in the Premiere Pro
project file, not in the file to which the clip points. Only Premiere Pro reads clip instance metadata not, other applications. However, in Premiere
Pro you can link some clip metadata fields with XMP metadata fields. This option allows applications outside Premiere Pro to access the clipbased metadata by way of the XMP fields.
If you never use subclips and never import multiple instances of master clips, then each clip in your project is unique. You can use XMP File
properties exclusively, so all your metadata is recorded into the source file, visible to other applications. Alternatively, you can use the traditional
Clip properties, but turn linking on for all of them. Premiere Pro automatically copies the clip data into the matching XMP properties from that point
on.
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Fields under the File and the Speech Transcript headings show XMP metadata. Using Speech Search, you can transcribe words spoken in a clip
to text. Then search the text to find where a specific word is spoken in the clip. For more information about using Speech Search, see Analyze
speech for text XMP metadata.
For more information about XMP metadata, see the overview on the Adobe web site.
For more information about XMP metadata, see the white paper on the Adobe web site.
The Metalogging workspace
The Metalogging workspace is for entering metadata after importing, capturing, or digitizing media into Premiere Pro. The Project panel and the
Metadata panels are maximized to make entering metadata easier.
To enable the Metalogging workspace, choose Window>Workspace>Metalogging.
Phil Hawkins has details about the Metalogging workspace in this video tutorial from Infinite Skills.
Frankin McMahon shows you how to use the Metalogging workspace in this video tutorial from Layers Magazine.
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About file, clip, and project XMP metadata
For the most part, Adobe video and audio applications deal with XMP metadata very similarly. Some small distinctions exist, however, reflecting
the unique workflow stage that each application addresses. When using applications in tandem, an understanding of these slightly different
approaches can help you get the most out of metadata.
Adobe OnLocation and Encore provide one set of metadata properties for all assets. However, Adobe Premiere Pro, After Effects, and
Soundbooth divide the Metadata panel into separate sections for different asset types.
Adobe Premiere Pro Separates metadata in these sections:
Clip Displays properties for clip instances you select in the Project panel or Timeline panel. This metadata is stored in project files, so it
appears only in Adobe Premiere Pro.
File Displays properties for source files you select in the Project panel. This metadata is stored directly in the source files, so it appears in
other applications, including Adobe Bridge.
After Effects Separates metadata in these sections:
Project Displays properties for the overall project. If you select Include Source XMP Metadata in the Output Module Settings dialog box,
this information is embedded into files you output from the Render Queue.
Files Displays properties for source files you select in the Project panel. (If you select a proxy, properties for the actual file appear.)
ForAfter Effects, both Project and File properties are stored directly in files, so you can access this metadata in Adobe Bridge.
Soundbooth Separates metadata in these sections:
File Displays properties for the currently displayed audio or ASND file. This metadata is stored directly in such files, so it appears in other
applications. (Adobe Bridge, however, does not display metadata for ASND files.)
Clip Displays properties for multitrack clips you select in the Editor panel. This metadata is stored in the containing ASND file, so it
appears only in Soundbooth.
Adobe Premiere Pro and Soundbooth also provide a Speech Analysis section with metadata that appears only in those applications.
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Using clip metadata and file metadata
XMP file metadata is information about a source file stored in the source file. Clip metadata is information about a clip, stored in a Premiere Pro
project file. In Premiere Pro, any number of clips can point to the same source file. For example, a group of subclips, each with different In points
and Out points, point to the same source file. Also, if you import a file twice, but give each imported clip a different name, both clips point to the
same source file.
Use the XMP metadata fields to store data that applies to the source file, and all clip instances that point to it. Use the clip metadata fields to store
data specific to each unique clip. Link clip metadata fields to XMP metadata fields when you want clip metadata copied to the source file. Do not
link a clip metadata field to an XMP metadata field for more than one clip pointing to the same source file, however.
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Edit XMP metadata
In Adobe video applications, similarly named properties are linked in the Metadata and Project panels. However, the Metadata panel provides
more extensive properties and lets you edit them for multiple files simultaneously.
Note: Instead of a Project panel, Soundbooth uses the Files panel.
1. Select the desired files or clips.
2. In the Metadata panel, edit text or adjust values as needed.
If you selected multiple items, the panel displays properties as follows:
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If a property matches for all items, the matching entry appears.
If a property differs, <Multiple Values> appears. To apply matching values, click the text box, and type.
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Search XMP metadata
1. Select the files or clips you want to search.
2. In the search box at the top of the Metadata panel, enter the text you want to find.
The list of metadata collapses to reveal only properties that contain your search string.
3. (Adobe Premiere Pro only) To navigate through the search results, click the Previous and Next buttons
press Tab.
4. To exit the search mode and return to the full list of metadata, click the close button
to the right of the search box, or
to the right of the search box.
Metadata panel
A. Before search, all properties appear B. After search, only properties with search string appear. In Adobe Premiere Pro, Previous and Next
buttons navigate through search results.
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Show or hide XMP metadata
To optimize the Metadata panel for your workflow, show or hide entire schemas or individual properties, displaying only those that you need.
1. From the options menu
for the Metadata panel, select Metadata Display.
2. To show or hide schemas or properties, select or deselect them from the list.
Save, switch, or delete metadata sets
If you use multiple workflows, each requiring different sets of displayed metadata, you can save sets and switch between them.
1. From the options menu
for the Metadata panel, select Metadata Display.
2. Do any of the following:
To save a customized set of displayed metadata, click Save Settings. Then enter a name, and click OK.
To display a previously saved set of metadata, select it from the menu.
To delete a previously saved set of metadata, select it from the menu, and click Delete Settings.
Create schemas and properties
If you have a unique, customized workflow that the default metadata options don’t address, create your own schemas and properties.
1. From the options menu
for the Metadata panel, select Metadata Display.
2. Click New Schema, and enter a name.
3. In the list, click Add Property to the right of the schema name.
4. Enter a property name, and select one of the following for Type:
Integer Displays whole numbers that you drag or click to change.
Real Displays fractional numbers that you drag or click to change.
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Text Displays a text box (for properties similar to Location).
Boolean Displays a check box (for On or Off properties).
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View clip data in the Metadata panel
You can show or hide clip information in the Metadata panel like any other metadata. Premiere Pro saves clip information in the schema named
Premiere Project Metadata.
For more information about showing or hiding metadata schemas, see Show or hide XMP metadata.
1. Do one of the following, if necessary:
If the Metadata panel is not open, select Window > Metadata.
If the contents of the Metadata panel are hidden behind another panel, click the Metadata tab to bring the panel forward.
2. Click the panel menu button in the Metadata panel, and select Metadata Display.
3. Click the triangle next to Premiere Project Metadata to view all the clip information fields.
4. Do one of the following:
Check the Premiere Project Metadata box to display all clip information,
Check only the boxes near the names of the clip information fields you want to display.
5. Click OK.
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Link clip data to XMP metadata
In the Metadata panel, the Clip property value fields are internal. They reside in the Premiere Pro project file, and are readable by Premiere Pro
alone. However, some of the property value fields in the Clip section have a link option box next to them. After you select the link option, Premiere
Pro automatically enters the information that you enter into the Clip value field into a corresponding XMP field.
When you select the link option, the metadata panel links a clip data field to an XMP metadata field in one of the schema. Selecting this option
does not copy existing clip data into XMP fields. Premiere Pro does copy any clip data added after the link is made into the linked XMP fields. In
most cases, the XMP field has the same name as the clip data field linked to it. In the following two cases, the XMP fields have names different
from the clip data fields linked to them:
Clip data field name
XMP field name
Name
Title (in Dublin Core schema)
Log Note
Log Comment (In Dynamic Media schema)
1. In the Metadata panel, drag the scroll bar under the Clip heading downward until you see the fields with empty link buttons to the right.
2. Click the link buttons near any fields you want to link to XMP metadata.
A chain icon appears in the link button
for any linked field.
More Help topics
XMP metadata in Creative Suite 4 Production Premium
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Working with aspect ratios
About aspect ratios
Using assets with various aspect ratios
Fix aspect ratio distortion
Correct individual aspect ratio misinterpretations
Correct recurring aspect ratio misinterpretations
Common pixel aspect ratios
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About aspect ratios
An aspect ratio specifies the ratio of width to height. Video and still picture frames have a frame aspect ratio, and the pixels that make up the
frame have a pixel aspect ratio (sometimes referred to as PAR). You record video for television in either a 4:3 or 16:9 frame aspect ratio.
Additionally, different video recording standards use different pixel aspect ratios.
You set the frame and pixel aspect ratios for a Premiere Pro project when you create it. Once these ratios are set, you cannot change them for
that project. You can, however, use assets created with different aspect ratios in that project.
Premiere Pro automatically tries to compensate for the pixel aspect ratio of source files. If an asset still appears distorted, you can manually
specify its pixel aspect ratio. Reconcile pixel aspect ratios before reconciling frame aspect ratios, because an incorrect frame aspect ratios can
result from a misinterpreted pixel aspect ratio.
Frame aspect ratio
Frame aspect ratio describes the ratio of width to height in the dimensions of an image. For example, DV NTSC has a frame aspect ratio of 4:3 (or
4.0 width by 3.0 height). A typical widescreen frame has a frame aspect ratio of 16:9. Many cameras that have a widescreen mode can record
using the 16:9 aspect ratio. Many films have been shot using even wider aspect ratios.
A 4:3 frame aspect ratio (left), and wider 16:9 frame aspect ratio (right)
When you import clips shot in one frame aspect ratio into a project that uses another frame aspect ratio, you decide how to reconcile the different
values. For example, two common techniques are used for showing a 16:9 movie on a 4:3 standard television. You can fit the entire width of the
16:9 movie frame within the 4:3 television frame. This placement leaves black bands above and below the movie frame, called letterboxing.
Alternatively, you can fill the 4:3 frame vertically with the entire height of the 16:9 frame. Then, you pan the horizontal position of the 16:9 frame
within the narrower 4:3 frame so that important action always remains inside the 4:3 frame. This techniques is called pan & scan. In Premiere Pro,
you can implement either technique by using Motion effect properties such as Position and Scale.
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NTSC displays
A. 16:9 NTSC footage B. DVD player display using original widescreen format on widescreen TV screen C. 16:9 image on a 4:3 TV screen
cropped using automatic pan and scan D. 16:9 image on a 4:3 TV screen using automatic letterboxing to reduce overall frame size and display
entire image
Pixel aspect ratio
For a video that explains the basics of pixel aspect ratios, see the Adobe web site.
Pixel aspect ratio describes the ratio of width to height of a single pixel in a frame. Pixel aspect ratios vary because different video systems make
various assumptions about the number of pixels required to fill a frame. For example, many computer video standards define a 4:3 aspect ratio
frame as 640 pixels wide by 480 pixels high, which results in square pixels. Video standards such as DV NTSC define a 4:3 aspect ratio frame as
720x480 pixels, which results in narrower, rectangular pixels because where more pixels lie within the same frame width. The computer video
pixels in this example have a pixel aspect ratio of 1:1 (square). The DV NTSC pixels have a pixel aspect ratio of 0.91 (nonsquare). DV pixels,
which are always rectangular, are vertically oriented in systems producing NTSC video and horizontally oriented in systems producing PAL video.
Premiere Pro displays clip pixel aspect ratio next to the clip image thumbnail in the Project panel.
If you display rectangular pixels on a square-pixel monitor without alteration, images appear distorted; for example, circles distort into ovals.
However, when displayed on a broadcast monitor, the images appear correctly proportioned because broadcast monitors use rectangular pixels.
Premiere Pro can display and output clips of various pixel aspect ratios without distortion. Premiere Pro attempts to automatically reconcile them
with the pixel aspect ratio of your project.
You could occasionally encounter a distorted clip if Premiere Pro interprets pixel aspect ratio incorrectly. You can correct the distortion of an
individual clip by manually specifying the source clip pixel aspect ratio in the Interpret Footage dialog box. You can correct similar
misinterpretations of groups of same-size files by editing the file Interpretation Rules.txt.
Pixel and frame aspect ratios
A. 4:3 square-pixel image displayed on 4:3 square-pixel (computer) monitor B. 4:3 square-pixel image interpreted correctly for display on 4:3 nonsquare pixel (TV) monitor C. 4:3 square-pixel image interpreted incorrectly for display on 4:3 non-square pixel (TV) monitor
Premiere Pro CS3 and earlier used pixel aspect ratios for standard-definition video formats that ignore the concept of clean aperture. By not
accounting for the fact that clean aperture differs from production aperture in standard-definition video, the pixel aspect ratios used by After Effects
CS3 and earlier were slightly inaccurate. The incorrect pixel aspect ratios cause some images to appear subtly distorted.
Note: The clean aperture is the portion of the image that is free from artifacts and distortions that appear at the edges of an image. The
production aperture is the entire image.
For details about the corrected pixel aspect ratios in Premiere Pro CS4 and later (as well as other applications), see the Adobe web site.
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Using assets with various aspect ratios
Premiere Pro automatically attempts to preserve the frame aspect ratio of imported assets, sometimes changing the pixel aspect ratio, the frame
dimensions, or both so that the asset does not appear cropped or distorted when used in a sequence. Some assets contain metadata that allows
Premiere Pro to make the calculations automatically and precisely. For assets lacking this metadata, Premiere Pro applies a set of rules to
interpret pixel aspect ratio.
When you capture or import NTSC footage with the ATSC frame size of 704x480, the D1 frame size of 720x486, or the DV frame size of 720x480,
Premiere Pro automatically sets the pixel aspect ratio for that asset to D1/DV NTSC (0.91). When you capture or import footage with the HD frame
size of 1440x1080, Premiere Pro automatically sets the pixel aspect ratio for that file to HD 1080 Anamorphic (1.33). When you capture or import
PAL footage with the D1 or DV resolution of 720x576, Premiere Pro automatically sets the pixel aspect ratio for that file to D1/DV PAL (1.094).
For other frame sizes, Premiere Pro assumes that the asset was designed with square pixels and changes the pixel aspect ratio and frame
dimensions in a way that preserves the asset image aspect ratio. If the imported asset is distorted, you can change the pixel aspect ratio manually.
When you drag an asset into a sequence, Premiere Pro centers the asset in the program frame by default. Depending on its frame size, the
resulting image could be too small or overcropped for the needs of the project. If so, you can change its scale. You can do this manually or have
Premiere Pro do it automatically whenever you drag an asset into a sequence.
It is always a good idea to make sure that files are interpreted correctly. You can read asset frame dimensions and pixel aspect ratio near the
preview thumbnail and in the Video Info column of the Project panel. You can also find this data in the asset Properties dialog box, the Interpret
Footage dialog box, and the Info panel.
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Fix aspect ratio distortion
The sequence settings preset you choose when you create a sequence sets the frame and pixel aspect ratios for the sequence. You can’t change
aspect ratios after you create the sequence, but you can change the pixel aspect ratio that Premiere Pro assumes for individual assets. For
example, if a square-pixel asset generated by a graphics or animation program looks distorted in Premiere Pro, you can correct its pixel aspect
ratio to make it look right. By ensuring that all files are interpreted correctly, you can combine footage with different ratios in the same project. Then
you can generate output that doesn’t distort the resulting images.
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Correct individual aspect ratio misinterpretations
1. Right-click the still image in the Project panel.
2. Select Modify > Interpret Footage.
3. Select an option in the Pixel Aspect Ratio section, and click OK.
4. Select one of the following:
Use Pixel Aspect Ratio From File Uses the original aspect ratio saved with the still image.
Conform To Lets you choose from a list of standard aspect ratios.
Note: When using Photoshop to generate images for use in video projects, it’s best to use the Photoshop preset named for the video format
you’ll use. Using the preset ensures that your images are generated with the correct aspect ratio.
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Correct recurring aspect ratio misinterpretations
Premiere Pro automatically assigns pixel aspect ratios to files according to a file of rules. If a specific type of image is consistently misinterpreted
(distorted) when you import it, you can change the relevant rule.
1. Open a text editor.
2. From within the text editor, go to the Premiere Pro Plug-ins folder.
3. Open the file named Interpretation Rules.txt.
4. Edit the rule that you want to modify, and choose Save.
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Common pixel aspect ratios
Square pixels
Pixel aspect ratio
When to use
1.0
Footage has a 640x480 or 648x486 frame
size, is 1920x1080 HD (not HDV or
DVCPRO HD), is 1280x720 HD or HDV,
or was exported from an application that
doesn’t support nonsquare pixels. This
setting can also be appropriate for footage
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that was transferred from film or for
customized projects.
D1/DV NTSC
0.91
Footage has a 720x486 or 720x480 frame
size, and the desired result is a 4:3 frame
aspect ratio. This setting can also be
appropriate for footage that was exported
from an application that works with
nonsquare pixels, such as a 3D animation
application.
D1/DV NTSC Widescreen
1.21
Footage has a 720x486 or 720x480 frame
size, and the desired result is a 16:9 frame
aspect ratio.
D1/DV PAL
1.09
Footage has a 720x576 frame size, and
the desired result is a 4:3 frame aspect
ratio.
D1/DV PAL Widescreen
1.46
Footage has a 720x576 frame size, and
the desired result is a 16:9 frame aspect
ratio.
Anamorphic 2:1
2.0
Footage was shot using an anamorphic
film lens, or it was anamorphically
transferred from a film frame with a 2:1
aspect ratio.
HDV 1080/DVCPRO HD 720, HD
Anamorphic 1080
1.33
Footage has a 1440x1080 or 960x720
frame size, and the desired result is a 16:9
frame aspect ratio.
DVCPRO HD 1080
1.5
Footage has a 1280x1080 frame size, and
the desired result is a 16:9 frame aspect
ratio.
More Help topics
AE CS4: New pixel aspect ratios
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Monitor Overlays
New in Premiere Pro CC October 2013 release (version 7.1)
Monitor Overlays display important metadata information superimposed on the Source Monitor and Program Monitor. You can view information like
source timecode information, marker comments, and edit point indicators on the monitor in context with the clip or sequence.
Monitor Overlays are easily customizable letting you select and control which metadata is displayed and where. You can also create overlay
presets to quickly switch to different layouts or metadata content.
Display metadata as overlays
Specify overlay settings
Using and customizing overlays
Display overlays in Multi-Camera View
Import, export, and create overlay presets
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Display metadata as overlays
You can display the following metadata as overlays:
Source Timecode
Marker comments
Sequence Clip Name
Project Clip Name
File Name
Edit Point Indicators
Media Limit Indicators
Multi-Camera Sources
You can turn overlays on or off by selecting Overlays from the pop-up menu in the Program Monitor or Source Monitor. You can also click the
Settings button in the Program Monitor or Source Monitor.
When you turn overlays on, source clip timecodes and marker comments are displayed by default. When you scrub the clip or pause playback,
the overlays show the relative metadata for whatever frame the Current Time Indicator (CTI) is on. Markers and Indicators are displayed
depending on where the CTI is placed.
Note: Overlays are displayed only when the monitor is in Composite Video display mode.
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Specify overlay settings
Use the Overlay Settings dialog to control which overlays are displayed on the Program and Source Monitors.
Select Overlay Settings > Settings from the Program Monitor pop-up menu to open the Overlay Settings dialog. The list of available presets is also
displayed as a submenu when you select Overlay Settings > Settings from the Program Monitor pop-up menu.
The Overlay Settings dialog displays the metadata fields in the same way as they align on the monitor. So you can intuitively know the placement
of the overlays on the monitor.
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Alignment of the selected metadata fields matches the overlays placement on the monitor
The overlays are displayed in the following four quadrants on the monitors: Left, Right, Top Middle and Bottom Middle. The quadrants scale with
the sizing of the monitor. While the quadrants can change in absolute size, their placement and relative size is constant.
In the default layout preset, the overlays are displayed to visually match the correct clip in a stack of clips in the sequence. For example, Source
Timecodes overlays for clips in the sequence are displayed in a persistent vertical stack, matching the clips displayed in the video and audio
tracks in the Timeline.
A. Media Limit indicator B. End Of Media indicator C. Metadata aligned Right, Bottom Middle, and Top Middle D. Source Timecode aligned Left E.
Edit Point indicator
Source Timecode Displays the Timecode value for the original source clip irrespective of where the playhead is located in the sequence.
Video tracks are denoted as V1, V2, V3, and audio tracks are denoted as A1, A2, A3. This information matches what is shown in the Info panel.
By default, this information is displayed in the left side of the Source and Program monitors.
Media Limit Indicators Indicate the first or last frame of media in the sequence, and are turned on by default.
When the playhead is on the first or last frame of a clip in a sequence, a striped column appears along the left edge of the first frame or the right
edge of the last frame.
Media Limit indicators are useful when viewing multiple clips in a sequence in the Program Monitor.
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End Of Media Indicators When the playhead goes past the last frame of media on the Timeline and there is no clip after that, a black frame
appears along the right edge of the last frame of a clip or sequence.
Edit Point Indicators Indicate the edit points for sequences, and are turned on by default.
When the playhead is on the In or Out point of a clip, a yellow-colored angular bracket appears at the bottom edge of the clip frame. If there is a
gap between two clips in a sequence, Edit Point indicators appear on the left or right edge of the clip to indicate either In or Out points.
Marker comments When you add a marker to your clip or sequence, you can display the clip marker and sequence marker comments as
overlays. The overlay displays the comments concatenated to the marker name.
Note: The clip marker overlay shows the different tracks in the clip. The Sequence Marker overlay does not show all the individual tracks in the
sequence but shows it as a single marker overlay.
Action and Title Safe Area Safe area control settings, which were earlier available from the Monitors' pop-up menu, are now available in the
Overlay Settings dialog.
To enable or disable Safe Margins, select Safe Margins from the pop-up menu in the Monitor. Specify the Safe Margin settings in the Overlay
Settings dialog.
Enable overlays for Transmit Select Enable Overlays For Transmit to send overlays for display to an external monitor.
Enable overlays during playback Select Enable Overlays During Playback to display the overlays on the monitor while playing the footage.
Text Size The Text Size setting determines how large the type appears in the overlay. If you select a large text size, and there is not enough
space on the monitor to display the text, the text can get truncated.
Opacity The Opacity setting determines the degree to which the overlay conceals or reveals the monitor display. A layer with 1% opacity is
nearly transparent while a layer with 100% opacity is opaque.
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Display overlays in Multi-Camera View
When creating a multi-camera source sequence, you can select the Camera Names option in the Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog
box. Depending on the Camera Names option that you select, the camera angles are displayed as track names, clip names, or camera numbers in
the Source Monitor. For more information, see Multi-Camera workflow improvements.
In the Multi-Camera View mode, you can display up to two metadata properties selected in the Overlay Settings dialog. For example, in the
Overlay Settings dialog, you can select Camera Name and Source Timecode to display as follows:
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Camera Name and Source Timecode displayed as overlays in Multi-Camera view
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Import, export, and create overlay presets
You can save your customized overlay settings as overlay presets. Overlay presets let you quickly switch to different layouts or metadata content.
Create and save an overlay preset
In the Overlay Settings dialog, specify the settings that you want, and click the Save Preset icon
. Enter a name to save and apply the preset.
Export, import, and delete presets
To export a preset, select the preset from the Preset drop-down list and click the export icon
. Enter a name for the preset, select the
location to save the exported preset, and click Save. The preset is exported with a *.olp filename extension.
To import a preset, click the Import preset icon
import.
, and navigate to the Premiere Pro preset file (*.olp filename extension) that you want to
To delete a preset, select the preset from the Preset drop-down list, and click the Delete preset icon
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.
Working with markers
Markers
Markers panel
Add markers in the Timeline
Add markers to clips
Find, move, and delete markers
Display marker comments
Sharing markers with After Effects, Encore, and Flash
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Markers
Markers indicate important points in time and help you position and arrange clips. You can use a marker to identify an important action or sound in
a sequence or clip. Markers are for reference only and do not alter the video.
The following types of markers are available in Premiere Pro:
Marker
Description
Comment
A comment or note about the selected part of the Timeline.
Flash Cue Point
Flash cue points can be used to trigger events or navigate
interactive
content meant to be played back with Adobe Flash
technology.
Web Link
Add a URL that provides more info about the selected part of
the movie clip.
Chapter Marker
If you are using Encore CS6, Encore reads these markers as
chapter points when you export to Encore using File > Adobe
Dynamic Link > Send To Encore. In Encore, you can link
chapter points to buttons in menus. Also, viewers can use the
chapter advance buttons on their DVD remote controls to
navigate through chapter points. Premiere Pro automatically
places an Encore chapter marker, labeled Chapter 1, at the
beginning of each sequence you create. You can rename the
chapter marker in Encore.
You can name Encore markers as you place them. The name
you enter in Premiere Pro appears as the label for a button in
the main menu or scenes menu in Adobe Encore CS6.
Note: For information on installing and using Encore CS6 with
Premiere Pro CC, see this blog and video.
You can add markers to a sequence, or to a source clip. Markers are color coded for their better identification.
Marker indicators
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A. Comment marker B. Flash point marker C. Chapter marker D. Web link marker
Markers on the Marker and Timeline panels
A. Comment marker B. Flash cue point marker C. Encore chapter marker D. Web link marker E. Movie sequence F. Movie clip G. Markers on the
Timeline
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Markers panel
Use the Marker panel (Window > Markers) to see all the markers in an open clip or sequence. Details associated with clips such as color-coded
tags, In points, Out points, and comments are displayed. Clicking a clip thumbnail in the Markers panel moves the playhead to the location of the
corresponding marker.
Click a marker in the Markers panel, and then the playhead moves to that position of marker in the Timeline.
A marker on a clip or in a sequence shows the In and Out points in the Marker panel. You can scrub the In or Out point to turn the marker from a
single frame in time to one covering a range of time.
In this video by Todd Kopriva and video2brain, learn more about using markers in Premiere Pro. Get an overview of Adobe Prelude and note how
markers can be imported from Prelude to Premiere Pro.
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Add markers in the Timeline
You can add markers on the Source monitor, Program monitor, or on the Timeline. Markers added to Program monitor are reflected in the
Timeline. Similarly, markers added to the Timeline are reflected on the Program Monitor.
In Premiere Pro, multiple markers can be added, allowing a user to add multiple notes and comment on clips on the same location in the Timeline.
1. Move the playhead to the point where you want to add a marker.
2. Select Marker > Add Marker, or press the M key.
You can set specialty markers, as well.
To set an Encore Chapter Marker, choose Marker > Set Encore Chapter Marker.
To set a Flash Cue Marker, choose Marker > Set Flash Cue Marker.
3. To edit the marker, double-click the marker icon to open the Marker dialog box.
You can create a keyboard shortcut to open the Marker dialog box.
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4. Set any of the following options:
Name Type a name for the marker.
Duration Drag the duration value or click the value to highlight it, type a new value, and press Enter/Return. When using markers for URL
links and chapter markers, you can set sequence markers to be longer than one frame in duration. Set sequence markers longer than one
frame in duration, for example, when setting markers in Premiere Pro that you want to convert to cue points in FLV files.
Comments Type a comment you want associated with the marker.
Encore Chapter Marker Check this box if you want to make the marker an Encore chapter marker.
Web Link Check this box if you want to associate the marker with a hyperlink.
URL This field is enabled only when Web Link is checked. Enter the address of the web page you want to open.
Note: When the movie is included in a web page and the marker is reached in the movie, the web page automatically opens. Web links
work only with supported formats such as QuickTime.
Frame Target This field is enabled only when Web Link is checked. Enter the target frame for a web page if using an HTML frameset.
Flash Cue Point Check this box to make the marker a cue point in Adobe Flash.
Type This field is enabled only if Flash cue Point is selected. Check Event to create a Flash Cue Point marker that triggers an event. Check
Navigation to create a Flash Cue Point marker that is used for navigation only.
Plus and Minus buttons Click Plus (+) to add a Flash cue point, and to give it a name and value. Click Minus (-) to remove a Flash Cue
point.
Name This field is enabled only if Flash Cue Point is selected. Type a name for your Flash cue point.
Value This field is enabled only if Flash Cue Point is selected. Type a value for your Flash cue point.
5. To enter comments or specify options for other sequence markers, click Prev or Next.
Note: DVD authoring programs such as Encore adhere to DVD guidelines that restrict the proximity of chapter links. When setting markers
for use as chapter links, make sure to space them at least 15 frames apart, or by the amount your authoring software requires. Otherwise,
your authoring program could move the chapter links automatically.
6. Click OK.
For more information about how Flash Cue Point markers work in Premiere Pro, see the following video by Chad Perkins on Adobe TV.
For information about working with Flash and Adobe Premiere Pro, see this article in Flash documentation.
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Add markers to clips
Markers can be added to clips in the Source Monitor, or selected clips in the Timeline.
To add a marker to a clip in the Source Monitor, do the following:
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1. Open the clip in the Source Monitor from the Timeline or the Project panel.
2. Place the Playhead where you want to place the marker.
3. Choose Marker > Add Marker, or press M.
The marker is added to the clip.
To add a marker to a clip in the Timeline, do the following:
1. Set up a keyboard shortcut for "Add Clip Marker" in Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts (Windows), or Premiere Pro > Keyboard Shortcuts (Mac OS).
2. Select the clip.
3. Place the Playhead where you want to place the marker.
4. Press the keyboard shortcut you just created for "Add Clip Marker."
The marker is added to the clip.
You can inspect the marker dialog box by double-clicking the marker in the Source Monitor.
Add an unnumbered clip marker (CS5.5, and earlier versions)
1. Do one of the following:
To add a marker to a source clip, double-click the clip in the Project panel to open it in the Source Monitor.
To add a marker to a clip in a sequence, double-click the clip to open it in the Source Monitor.
2. In the Source Monitor, move the current-time indicator
to the location where you want to set the marker.
3. Do one of the following:
Click the Set Unnumbered Marker button
.
Select Marker > Set Clip Marker > Unnumbered.
Add an unnumbered sequence marker (CS5.5, and earlier versions)
1. In a Timeline panel, move the current-time indicator to the location where you want the marker.
2. Do one of the following:
Click the Set Unnumbered Marker button in the Program Monitor
button to open the Marker dialog box as you set it.)
or a Timeline panel
. (Double-click the Set Unnumbered Marker
Select Marker > Set Sequence Marker > Unnumbered.
To insert unnumbered markers while a clip or sequence plays, press the asterisk key (*) on the numeric keypad whenever you want to
insert a marker.
Add a numbered marker (CS5.5, and earlier versions)
1. Do one of the following:
To set a clip marker, open a clip in the Source Monitor or select the clip in a Timeline panel.
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To set a sequence marker, select the Program Monitor or Timeline panel.
2. Move the current-time indicator to where you want to set the marker.
3. Choose Marker > Set Clip Marker or Marker > Set Sequence Marker, and choose an option in the submenu:
Next Available Numbered Sets a numbered marker using the lowest unused number.
Other Numbered Opens a dialog box in which you can specify any unused number from 0 to 99.
Create markers in the Effect Controls panel
In the Effect Controls panel, you can view all of the markers that you created in the Timeline panel. You can also add markers to your sequence to
designate where you would like to place effects in the Effect Controls panel. In addition, you can create and manipulate markers directly in the
Effect Controls panel.
1. Drag the playhead to the place where you want to create a marker.
2. Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS) in the timeline ruler. Then, select Add Marker, or press the M key.
Note: In Premiere Pro CS5.5, and earlier, select Set Sequence Marker, and then choose the type of marker you want to set.
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Find, move, and delete markers
You can find markers by using the marker navigation tools. You can move them from their original locations by dragging them, or you can delete
them altogether.
Navigate among markers
1. Click the marker icon.
2. Do one of the following:
Select Marker > Go to Next Marker.
Select Marker > Go to Previous Marker.
In Premiere Pro CS5.5 and earlier, do one of the following:
Select Marker > Sequence Marker > Go to Next.
Select Marker > Sequence Marker > Go to Previous.
Go to a clip or sequence marker in a Timeline panel (CS5.5, and earlier versions)
Do one of the following:
To cue the playhead to a clip marker, select the clip in the sequence and choose Marker > Go To Clip Marker > [marker].
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To cue the playhead to a sequence marker, select the Program Monitor or Timeline panel, choose Marker > Go To Sequence Marker >
[marker].
Move a marker
Do one of the following:
To move a clip marker in a clip that’s in a sequence, open the clip in the Source Monitor and drag the Marker icon
Monitor’s time ruler. (You can’t manipulate clip markers in the Timeline panel).
in the Source
To move a sequence marker, drag the marker in a Timeline panel or the Program Monitor’s time ruler.
Dragging a marker in the Source or Program Monitor’s time ruler moves the corresponding marker icon in a Timeline panel.
Note: Sequence markers in a nested sequence appear as clip markers (with a slightly different color) in the parent sequence and in the
Source Monitor. To adjust a nested marker, open the nested sequence in a Timeline panel, and then drag the marker.
Delete a marker
1. Do one of the following:
To delete a clip marker, cue the playhead to the clip marker, and then open the clip in the Source Monitor.
To delete a sequence marker, cue the playhead to the marker.
2. To clear a marker, select Marker > Clear Current Marker.
Note: In Premiere Pro CS5.5, and earlier, selct Marker > Clear Sequence Marker, and choose one of the following options from the
submenu:
Current Marker Deletes the marker at the current time.
All Markers Deletes all markers in either the clip or sequence.
Numbered Deletes a numbered marker from a list of all numbered markers.
Note: You can’t remove a sequence marker by dragging it away from the time ruler.
Clear a marker by right-clicking (Windows), or Ctrl-clicking (Mac OS) on a marker, and then choose Clear Current Marker from the
context menu.
In Premiere Pro CS5.5, and earlier, you can clear a sequence marker by right-clicking (Windows), or Ctrl-clicking (Mac OS) on a marker,
and then choose Sequence Marker > Clear Current from the context menu.
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Display marker comments
Once a marker is set, hovering over it in the time ruler produces a tool tip which displays the marker information. You can quickly scan marker
contents without opening the Marker dialog box.
The sequence marker tool tip displays the following information on up to four items:
Marker name (optional, shown only if entered)
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Timecode start (always displayed)
Duration (optional, shown only if the marker has a duration)
Comment text (optional, shown only if entered)
Note: When the Show Audio Time Units option is selected, the tool tips show marker location and duration in audio time units instead of timecode
units.
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Sharing markers with After Effects, Encore, and Flash
You can share markers between Premiere Pro, Adobe Encore, and Adobe Flash in any of the following ways.
When you import a Premiere Pro project into After Effects, After Effects converts the sequence markers to composition markers.
When you copy a sequence from a Premiere Pro Project panel and paste it into After Effects, the resulting composition keeps the sequence
markers as composition markers, and the clip markers as layer markers. The copy-and-paste operation therefore preserves the markers in
the way you would expect.
When you export a sequence from Premiere Pro through Adobe Media Encoder into a container format, such as AVI, the sequence markers
are saved into the file as XMP temporal metadata. When you use the video file as the source for a layer, After Effects converts these
sequence markers to layer markers.
When you create an After Effects composition through Dynamic Link in Premiere Pro, After Effects does not preserve the sequence markers
and clip markers.
Encore chapter markers added to a sequence in Premiere Pro will appear as chapter markers in Encore when the host clip is exported from
Premiere Pro using the File > Adobe Dynamic Link > Send To Encore command.
Sequence markers in clips exported from Premiere Pro appear as cue points in Adobe Flash projects if they contain text in their Chapter
fields. The cue point data in the Chapter field of a sequence marker in Premiere Pro are encoded as XML. For the XML protocol required, see
Flash Help.
Note: Add text to a chapter marker in Adobe Premiere Pro for that chapter marker to appear as a cue point in Adobe Flash projects.
Using Markers in Adobe Premiere Pro
Converting metadata and markers to cue points
Create a dynamically linked composition from Premiere Pro or Encore
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Monitoring assets
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Using the Source Monitor and Program Monitor
Source Monitor and Program Monitor overview
Open or clear a clip in the Source Monitor
Navigate clips in the Source menu in the Source Monitor
Using the Source Monitor and Program Monitor time controls
View safe zones in the monitors
Choose fields in the Source and Program Monitors
Choose a display mode
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Source Monitor and Program Monitor overview
The Source Monitor plays back individual clips. In the Source Monitor, you prepare clips that you want to add to a sequence. You set In points and
Out points, and specify the clip’s source tracks (audio or video). You can also insert clip markers and add clips to a sequence in a Timeline panel.
The Program Monitor plays back the sequence of clips that you are assembling. It’s your view of the active sequence in a Timeline panel. You can
set sequence markers and specify sequence In points and Out points. Sequence In points and Out points define where frames are added or
removed from the sequence.
Each monitor contains both a time ruler and controls to play back and cue the current frame of a source clip or sequence. Set In and Out points,
go to In and Out points, and set markers. Insert and Overwrite buttons are available in the Source Monitor, and Lift and Extract buttons are
available in the Program Monitor, by default. Each monitor also contains an Export Frame button for creating a still from a single frame of video.
The Source Monitor
A. Time code B. Zoom scroll bar C. Scaling options D. Playhead E. Drag video F. Drag audio G. Resolution H. Settings button I. Button editor
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The program monitor
A. Timecode B. Playhead C. Scaling options D. Zoom scroll bar E. Resolution F. Settings button G. Button editor
For details about changes to the Source monitor, Program monitor, Timecode, and Timeline panels, see this video by Todd Kopriva and
video2brain.
Customizing the monitor panel button bar
By default, the most useful buttons are displayed along the bottom of the Source and Program Monitors. However, you can add more. Click "+" at
the lower right of a monitor to open the button editor. Add buttons to the button bar by dragging them from the button editor. Up to 2 rows of
buttons can be added. Spaces to separate groups of buttons can also be dragged to the button bar. To remove a button, drag it away from the
button bar. To turn off all buttons, go to the panel menu and deselect "Show Transport Controls."
Roll over any button with the mouse to see its keyboard shortcut.
Setting display quality for the Source and Program Monitors
Some formats are difficult to display in full-motion playback, due to their high compression or high data rate. A lower resolution permits faster
motion playback, but at the expense of display image quality. This tradeoff is most visible when viewing AVCHD and other H.264 -codec based
media. Below full resolution, these formats have error correction turned off, and artifacts are common during playback. These artifacts, however,
do not show up in exported media.
Providing separate playback and pause resolutions gives you more control over your monitoring experience. With high-resolution footage, you can
set playback resolution to a lower value (for example, 1/4) for smooth playback, and set the pause resolution to Full. These settings allow you to
check the quality of focus or edge details when playback is paused. Scrubbing puts the monitor in playback resolution, not pause resolution.
Not all resolutions are available for all sequence types. For Standard Definition sequences, such as DV, only Full and 1/2 are available. For many
HD sequences up to 1080 frame size, Full, 1/2, and 1/4 are available. For sequences with frame sizes larger than 1080, such as RED, more
fractional resolutions are available.
Note: If your previews are rendered at a resolution below the sequence resolution, the playback resolution is actually a fraction of the preview
resolution. For example, you can set your preview files to render at 1/2 the sequence frame size (1/2 resolution) and your playback resolution to
1/2 resolution. The rendered previews play back at 1/4 of original resolution (assuming that the resolution of the original media matched the
sequence resolution).
Set the display quality for the Source Monitor and Program Monitor
Note: You can assign keyboard shortcuts to playback resolutions.
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1. Do one of the following:
Right click the image in the Source Monitor or Program Monitor.
Click the Panel Menu icon in the Source Monitor or Program Monitor.
Click the Settings button in the Source Monitor or Program Monitor.
2. Do one of the following:
To set playback resolution, select Playback Resolution.
To set paused resolution, select Paused Resolution.
3. From the menu, select the resolution desired.
For an explanation and tips on speeding up previews in Premiere Pro, see this video on the video2brain website.
Change magnification
The Source Monitor and Program Monitor scale video to fit into the available area. You can increase the magnification setting for each view to see
the video in more detail. You can also descrease the magnification setting to see more of the pasteboard area around the image (to adjust motion
effects more easily, for example).
1. Choose a magnification setting from the Select Zoom Level menu (to the right of the current time display) in the Source Monitor or Program
Monitor.
In the Source Monitor, percentage values refer to the size of the source media. In the Program Monitor, percentage values refer to the
image size specified by the sequence settings. Fit scales the video to fit in the monitor’s available viewing area.
2. To change the visible area of a monitor, use the monitor’s scroll bars to change the visible area of the video image. Scroll bars appear when
the current size of the monitor can’t contain the entire image.
Dropped frame indicator
Both the Source and the Program Monitor have the option to display an icon (resembling a "Stop Light") that indicates whether frames are being
dropped during playback. The light should start green and change to yellow when dropped frames occur and reset on each playback. A tooltip will
indicate the dropped frame count.
To enable the dropped Frame indicator for the Source or Program Monitor, enable Show Dropped Frame Indicator in the panel menu, or the
Settings menu.
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Open or clear a clip in the Source Monitor
To view and edit source clips listed in the Project panel or individual clip instances in a sequence, open the clips in the Source Monitor. The
Source menu, accessed from the Source Monitor tab, lists open clips.
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1. To open a clip, do any of the following:
Double-click the clip in the Project or Timeline panel, or drag a clip from the Project panel to the Source Monitor. The clip appears in the
Source Monitor and its name is added to the Source menu.
Drag multiple clips or an entire bin from the Project panel into the Source Monitor, or select multiple clips in the Project panel and
double-click them. Clips are added to the Source menu in the order in which they were selected, and the last clip selected appears in
the Source Monitor.
Choose the name of the clip you want to see from the Source menu (click the triangle to the right of the current clip’s name on the
Source tab to make the menu appear).
Choosing a clip to view from the Source menu
The Source menu lists master clips by name. Clips opened from a sequence are listed by their sequence name, clip name, and starting
time in the sequence.
2. To clear a clip from the Source Monitor, in the Source menu, choose Close to clear or Close All to clear all clips.
You can also close all clips and the Source Monitor itself by clicking the Close button in the Source Monitor tab.
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Navigate clips in the Source menu in the Source Monitor
You can set keyboard shortcuts for navigating multiple clips loaded into the Source Monitor. Keyboard shortcuts can speed toggling of clips,
skipping to the first or last clip, or closing one or all the clips in the Source Monitor popup menu.
1. Select Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Keyboard Shortcuts (Mac OS).
The Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box opens.
2. In the dialog box, click the triangle next to Panels, and then click the triangle next to Source Monitor Panel to reveal the keyboard shortcuts
for that panel.
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3. Set keyboard shortcuts for any of the following commands:
Source Clip: Close
Source Clip: Close All
Source Clip: First
Source Clip: Last
Source Clip: Next
Source Clip: Previous
4. Click OK.
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Using the Source Monitor and Program Monitor time controls
The Source Monitor has several controls for moving through time (or frames) in a clip. The Program Monitor contains similar controls for moving
through a sequence.
A. Current time display B. Playhead C. Zoom scroll bar D. Time Ruler E. Duration display
Time rulers Display the duration of a clip in the Source Monitor and sequence in the Program Monitor. Tick marks measure time using the video
display format specified in the Project Settings dialog box. You can toggle the time rulers to display timecode in other formats. Each ruler also
displays icons for its corresponding monitor’s markers and In and Out points. You can adjust the playhead, markers, and the In and Out points by
dragging their icons in a time ruler.
Time ruler numbers are off by default. You can turn the time ruler numbers on by selecting Time Ruler Numbers in the panel menu of the
Source or Program Monitors.
Playhead Shows the location of the current frame in each monitor’s time ruler.
Note: The playhead was formerly called the "current-time indicator" (CTI).
Current time displays Show the timecode for the current frame. The current time displays are at the lower left of each monitor’s video. The
Source Monitor shows the current time for the open clip. The Program Monitor shows the sequence’s current time. To move to a different time.
Alternatively, click in the display and enter a new time, or place the pointer over the time display and drag left or right. To toggle display between
full timecode and a frame count, Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) the current time in either monitor or a Timeline panel.
Duration display Show the duration of the open clip or sequence. The duration is the time difference between the In point and the Out point for
the clip or sequence. When no In point is set, the starting time of the clip or of the sequence is substituted. When no Out point is set, the Source
Monitor uses the ending time of the clip to calculate duration. The Program Monitor uses the ending time of the last clip in the sequence to
calculate duration.
Zoom scroll bars Zoom scroll bars correspond with the visible area of the time ruler in each monitor. You can drag the handles to change the
width of the bar and change the scale of the time ruler below. Expanding the bar to its maximum width reveals the entire duration of the time ruler.
Contracting the bar zooms in for a more detailed view of the ruler. Expanding and contracting the bar is centered on the playhead. By positioning
the the mouse over the bar, you can use the mouse wheel to contract and expand the bar. You can also scroll the mouse wheel in the areas
outside of the bars for the same expanding and contracting behavior. By dragging the center of the bar, you can scroll the visible part of a time
ruler without changing its scale. When you drag bar, you are not moving the playhead, however, you can move the bar and then click in the time
ruler to move the playhead to the same area as the bar. A zoom scroll bar is also available in the Timeline.
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Note: Changing the Program Monitor’s time ruler or zoom scroll bar does not affect the time ruler or viewing area in a Timeline panel.
Viewing Source and Program Monitor controls
You can show or hide controls from the panel menus of the Source and Program Monitors. For example, you may wish to hide transport controls if
you know the J-K-L keyboard shortcuts for playback to gain more space to view your media.
Select or deslect the option in the panel menu to show or hide the following:
Transport controls
Markers
Time ruler numbers
Dropped frames indicator
Access to many of the same commands for showing and hiding controls can also be found in the Settings button on each monitor.
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View safe zones in the monitors
A. Action safe zone B. Title safe zone
Safe zone guides are for your reference and are not included in previews or export.
Click the Settings button below the Source Monitor or Program Monitor and choose Safe Margins. You can also choose Safe Margins from
the panel meu of the Source Monitor or Program Monitor.
The standard action- and title-safe margins are 10% and 20%, respectively. However, you can change the dimensions of the safe zones
in the Project Settings dialog box. (See Project Settings dialog box.)
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Choose fields in the Source and Program Monitors
You can set the Source Monitor and Program Monitor to display the first field, second field, or both fields for interlaced footage. The settings in the
Source Monitor are disabled when a progressive clip is opened in it. The settings in the Program Monitor are disabled when the active sequence
uses a progressive sequence preset.
1. In the Source Monitor or Program Monitor, click the panel menu button
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.
2. Select Display First Field, Display Second Field, or Display Both Fields according to your need.
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Choose a display mode
You can display normal video, the video’s alpha channel, or one of several measurement tools.
In the Source Monitor or Program Monitor, click the Settings button, or click the panel menu and choose a display mode setting:
Composite Video Displays the normal video.
Alpha Displays transparency as a grayscale image.
All Scopes Displays a waveform monitor, vectorscope, YCbCr Parade, and RGB Parade.
Vectorscope Displays a vectorscope that measures the video’s chrominance, which includes hue and saturation.
YC Waveform Displays a standard waveform monitor, which measures the video’s luminance in IRE.
YCbCr Parade Displays a waveform monitor that measures the Y, Cb, and Cr components of the video separately, in IRE.
RGB Parade Displays a waveform monitor that measures the R, G, and B components of the video separately, in IRE.
Vect/YC Wave/YCbCr Parade Displays a waveform monitor, vectorscope, and YCbCr Parade.
Vect/YC Wave/RGB Parade Displays a waveform monitor, vectorscope, and RGB Parade.
Program Monitor set to Vect/YC Wave/YCbCr Parade
A. Waveform monitor B. YCbCr Parade C. Vectorscope
To use the waveform monitor and vectorscope displays most effectively, view them with the Reference Monitor ganged to the Program Monitor.
See Reference Monitor.
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Playing assets
Play video in the Source Monitor and Program Monitor
Continuous Playback
Play a sequence or clip with preroll and postroll pauses
Jog or shuttle playback
Move to a different frame in the Source Monitor and Program Monitor
Using the J, K, and L keys to shuttle video
Match a frame with its source
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Play video in the Source Monitor and Program Monitor
The Source Monitor and Program Monitor contain several controls that resemble the playback controls on a video deck. Use the Source Monitor
controls to play or cue a clip. Use the Program Monitor controls to play or view the active sequence.
Most playback controls have keyboard equivalents. When you want to use keyboard shortcuts to control playback, make sure that the monitor you
want is active. Click the video image in the monitor you want to activate.
The playback controls are customizable with the use of the Button Editor. If the button you wish to use is not available, click the “+” sign in the
lower right of the monitor. After the Button Editor launches, you can drag the button of your choice into the button bar. For more information see
Customizing the monitor panel button bar.
Note: When using keyboard shortcuts to move in a time ruler, make sure the panel you want is active. (Japanese-language keyboards only) To
use these keyboard shortcuts on a Japanese-language keyboard, make sure your keyboard is in direct input mode, rather than Japanese input
mode.
Do any of the following:
To play, click the Play button , or press L or the spacebar. (To stop, click the Stop button
spacebar toggle between Play and Stop.)
or press K or the spacebar. The button and the
To play in reverse, press J.
To play from the In point to the Out point, click the Play In To Out button
To play an entire clip or sequence repeatedly, click the Loop button
deselect it and prevent looping.
.
, and then click the Play button
To play from the In point to the Out point repeatedly, click the Loop button
button
again to deselect it and prevent looping.
. Click the Loop button
, and then click the Play In To Out button
again to
. Click the Loop
To play forward at increasing speeds, press L repeatedly. For most media types, clip speed increases from one to two to three to four times.
To play backward at increasing speeds, press J repeatedly. For most media types, backward clip speed increases from one to two to three to
four times.
To advance one frame, hold down the K key and tap the L key.
To retreat one frame, hold down the K key and tap the J key.
To play forward in slow motion, press Shift+L.
To play backwards in slow motion, press Shift+J.
To play around the current time, from two seconds before the playhead to two seconds after the playhead, Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click
(Mac OS) the Play In To Out button. Pressing Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) changes the button to the Play Around button
. The Play
Around button is available to drag into the button bar.
See this article by Clay Asbury on the Premiumbeats.com website for using the Play Around button and Loop button to assist dynamic
trimming in the Timeline.
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Continuous Playback
Playback continues unless the user specifically issues a Stop command. This feature supports real-time adjustment of common editing actions. For
example, you could adjust video effects while you are playing back in a loop. Here are some of the actions that do not stop playback:
Keyframing of effects
Interface items
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Timeline items
Metadata entry
Audio parameters
Titling
Zooming in and out of the timeline
Switching away from the application
In this video by Todd Kopriva and video2brain, see how to quickly apply effects to adjustment layers and how to modify effect properties while a
sequence continues to play.
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Play a sequence or clip with preroll and postroll pauses
You can preview a clip or sequence with preroll and postroll pauses.
1. Do one of the following:
Click on a Sequence tab to make a sequence active, and preview it in the Program monitor.
Double-click a clip in the Source panel or in a Timeline to preview it in the Source monitor.
2. Press Shift+spacebar.
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Jog or shuttle playback
Do one of the following:
Drag the shuttle slider left to play backward, or right to play forward. Playback speed increases as you drag the slider farther from its center
position. Releasing the slider returns it to the center position and stops playback.
Drag the jog disk left or right, past the edge of the controller if necessary. If you drag to the edge of the screen without reaching the end of
the clip or sequence, you can continue from the same time position by dragging from the jog disk again.
Shuttle and jog controls
A. Shuttle Slider B. Jog Disk
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Move to a different frame in the Source Monitor and Program Monitor
Do any of the following:
To advance one frame, click the Step Forward button
, or hold down the K key and tap the L key, or press the Right Arrow key.
To advance five frames, Shift-click the Step Forward button
To jump back one frame, click the Step Back button
, or press Shift+ the Right Arrow key.
, or hold down the K key and tap the J key, or press the Left Arrow key.
To jump back five frames, Shift-click the Step Back button
, or press Shift+ the Left Arrow key.
To jump to the next marker, click the Go To Next Marker button
in the Source Monitor.
To jump to the previous marker, click the Go To Previous Marker button
in the Source Monitor.
To jump to a clip’s In point, select the Source Monitor, then click the Go To In Point button
.
To jump to a clip’s Out point, select the Source Monitor, then click the Go To Out Point button
.
Hover the mouse pointer over the Source Monitor, or Program Monitor. Turn the mouse wheel to move frame by frame forward or backward.
Click the current time display of the monitor you want to cue, and type the new time. You don’t need to type colons or semicolons. Numbers
under 100 are interpreted as frames.
To jump to the previous edit point in a sequence’s targeted audio or video track, click the Go To Previous Edit Point button
in the Program
Monitor, or press the Up Arrow key with a Timeline panel or Program Monitor active. Add the Shift key modifier to jump to the previous edit
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point for all tracks.
To jump to the next edit point in a sequence’s targeted audio or video tracks, click the Go To Next Edit Point button in the Program
Monitor, or press Down Arrow key with a Timeline panel or Program Monitor active. Add the Shift key modifier to jump to the previous edit
point for all tracks.
To jump to the beginning of the sequence, select the Program Monitor or Timeline and press Home, or click the Go To In Point button
the Program Monitor.
To jump to the end of the sequence, select the Program Monitor or Timeline and press End, or click the Go To Out Point button
Program Monitor.
in
in the
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Using the J, K, and L keys to shuttle video
You can quickly and accurately move through frames in a sequence using the J, K, and L keys. You can also use the keys to shuttle through icons.
The J key always moves the playhead in reverse and the L key always moves it forward. The K key is a modifier and stop playback key. Press J to
move backward at normal speed, press J and K to move backward slowly, or press K and tap the J key to move back a frame at a time. The K
and L keys work in the same way to move forward. For more information about using the J, K, and L keys for playback, see this video by Richard
Harrington on the Creative Cow web site.
If you require more finely tuned control with the J, K, and L keys, particularly to hear audio better, do the following:
After shuttling forward with the K and L keys, press Shift+L to play forward slightly faster. Press Shift+L again to play faster.
After shuttling in reverse with the J and K keys, press Shift+J to play in reverse slightly faster. Press Shift+J again to play faster in reverse.
You can press Shift+L and Shift+J up to five times to fine-tune the speed of playback.
If you are playing back too quickly, press the opposite keyboard shortcut to slow playback. For example, if you were playing back too quickly
forward, press Shift+J to slow playback down by one increment.
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Match a frame with its source
While editing in a Timeline panel, you can find the source frame for any frame in a sequence clip and display it in the Source Monitor. Also, you
can find the source frame for any frame in a nested sequence, display it in the Source Monitor, and jump to its location in the source sequence.
1. Click the header of the track where the sequence clip is located, to target the track.
If more than one track is targeted, Premiere Pro will match the frame in the highest targeted track.
2. In a Timeline panel, position the playhead over the desired frame in a clip.
Note: If the source clip for the frame in the sequence clip is already open in the Source Monitor or listed in the Source menu, the Source
Monitor will display the last frame you viewed in the clip. To match the frame, close the clip in the Source Monitor before typing the Match
Frame or Reveal Nested Sequence keyboard shortcut.
3. Do one of the following:
Press the F key.
Choose Sequence > Match Frame.
For a clip in a nested sequence, type the keyboard shortcut for Reveal Nested Sequence, Ctrl-Shift-T (Windows), or Shift-T (Mac OS) by
default.
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Using the Waveform monitors and vectorscope
View a scope
Vectorscope
YC Waveform
YCbCr Parade
RGB Parade
Premiere Pro has a vectorscope and waveform monitors (YC Waveform, YCbCr Parade, and RGB Parade) to help you output a video program
that meets broadcast standards and also assist you in making adjustments based on aesthetic considerations, such as color corrections.
For decades, video production and duplication facilities have used waveform monitors and vectorscopes to accurately evaluate video levels—
specifically, color and brightness.
A vectorscope measures the chrominance (color components) of a video signal, including hue and saturation. A vectorscope maps a video’s color
information onto a circular chart.
The traditional waveform monitor is useful in measuring the brightness, or luminance component, of a video signal. In Premiere Pro, the waveform
monitors can also display chrominance information. The waveform monitor works something like a graph. The horizontal axis of the graph
corresponds to the video image from left to right. Vertically, the waveform displays the luminance levels, and optionally, the chrominance levels.
Andrew Devis shows how to find and understand the Vectorscope in Premiere Pro in this video tutorial on the Creative Cow web site.
Andrew Devis shows how to find and understand the YC Waveform Monitor in Premiere Pro in this video tutorial on the Creative Cow web site.
Jeff Sengstack explains how to work with the YC Waveform Monitor and the Vectorscope in his article, “Streamlining Color Correction in Premiere
Pro” on the Pro Video Coalition web site.
Maxim Jago introduces the Waveform Monitor for color adjustments in Adobe Premiere Pro in this video on the video2brain web site.
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View a scope
You can view a vectorscope, YC waveform, YCbCr Parade, and an RGB Parade scope either individually or grouped in the Reference Monitor,
Program Monitor, or Source Monitor.
1. Depending on whether you want to view a scope for a master clip or sequence clip, do one of the following:
Double-click the clip in the Project panel.
In a Timeline panel, position the playhead in the sequence you want.
2. (Optional) Choose Reference Monitor from the Window menu if you selected a clip in a Timeline panel.
3. Choose any of the following from either the Reference Monitor, Program Monitor, or Source Monitor menu:
All Scopes Displays the Vectorscope, YC Waveform, YCbCr Parade, and RGB Parade scopes in one monitor.
Vectorscope Displays a vectorscope for viewing the chrominance in the video.
YC Waveform Displays a waveform monitor for viewing luminance and chrominance information.
YCbCr Parade Displays a scope with luminance (Y) and color difference (Cb and Cr) information.
RGB Parade Displays a scope showing the red, green, and blue components in the video.
Vect/YC Wave/YCbCr Parade Displays the Vectorscope, YC Waveform, and YCbCr Parade scope in one monitor.
Vect/YC Wave/RGB Parade Displays the Vectorscope, YC Waveform, and RGB Parade scope in one monitor.
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Vectorscope
The Vectorscope displays a circular chart, similar to a color wheel, that shows the video’s chrominance information. Saturation is measured from
the center of the chart outward. Saturated, vivid colors produce a pattern some distance from the center of the chart, while a black-and-white
image produces only a dot at the center of the chart. The particular color, or hue, of the image determines the direction (angle of the pattern).
Small target boxes indicate where fully saturated magenta, blue, cyan, green, yellow, and red (present in a color bars test pattern) should
appear. In NTSC video, chrominance levels should not exceed these target areas.
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Vectorscope
A. Target boxes B. Image profile
The Vectorscope has the following controls:
Intensity Adjusts the brightness of the pattern display. It does not affect the video output signal.
75% Default position. Use to check video input in which standard 75% intensity bars, like those in Premiere Pro, are used.
100% Shows the entire range of video signal chrominance. Use with video input containing 100% intensity bars.
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YC Waveform
The YC Waveform displays a graph showing the signal intensity in the video clip. The horizontal axis of the graph corresponds to the video image
(from left to right) and the vertical axis is the signal intensity in units called IRE (named for the Institute of Radio Engineers).
The YC Waveform displays luminance information as a green waveform. Bright objects produce a waveform pattern (bright green areas) near the
top of the graph; darker objects produce a waveform toward the bottom. For NTSC video in the United States, luminance levels should range from
7.5 to 100 IRE (sometimes referred to as the legal broadcast limit). Japan’s implementation of NTSC standards permits a luminance range from 0
to 100 IRE. Generally, luminance and chroma values should be about the same and distributed evenly across the 7.5 to 100 IRE range.
The YC Waveform also displays chrominance information as a blue waveform. The chrominance information is overlaid upon the luminance
waveform.
You can specify whether the YC Waveform displays both luminance and chrominance information, or just luminance information. For a video on
reading a waveform monitor, see www.adobe.com/go/vid0238.
YC Waveform with the chroma control enabled
A. IRE units B. Luminance (green) waveform C. Chrominance (blue) waveform D. Range of signal components
The YC Waveform has the following controls:
Intensity Adjusts the brightness of the waveform display. It does not affect the video output signal.
Setup (7.5 IRE) Displays a waveform that approximates the final analog video output signal. Deselecting this option displays the digital video
information.
Chroma Displays both chrominance in addition to luminance information. Deselecting this option displays only the luminance.
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YCbCr Parade
The YCbCr Parade scope displays waveforms representing levels of the luminance and color difference channels in the video signal. The
waveforms appear in a graph one after another.
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The Intensity control adjusts the brightness of the waveforms. It does not affect the video output signal.
Note: Cb and Cr are the color difference channels in a digital video signal. Cb is blue minus luma and Cr is red minus luma. Y represents luma.
YCbCr Parade scope
A. Values B. Y (luminance) waveform C. Cb waveform D. Cr waveform E. Range of signal components
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RGB Parade
The RGB Parade scope displays waveforms representing the levels of the red, green, and blue channels in a clip. The waveforms appear in a
graph one after another, in parade fashion. This scope is useful for viewing the distribution of the color components in a clip. The levels of each
color channel are measured proportionately to each other using a scale of 0 to 100.
The Intensity control adjusts the brightness of the waveforms. It doesn’t affect the video output signal.
RGB Parade scope
A. Values B. R waveform C. G waveform D. B waveform E. Range of signal components
More Help topics
Vectorscope on Premiere Pro Wikia
Reading a waveform monitor
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Using the Reference Monitor
Open a Reference Monitor
Gang the Reference Monitor and Program Monitor
The Reference Monitor acts like a secondary Program Monitor. You can use a Reference Monitor to compare different frames of a sequence side
by side, or to view the same frame of a sequence using different viewing modes.
You can cue the frame of a sequence displayed in the Reference Monitor independently from the Program Monitor. This way, you can cue each
view to a different frame for comparison—to use the color matching filter, for example.
Alternatively, you can gang the Reference Monitor and Program Monitor together, so that they both show the same frame of a sequence and move
in tandem. This is especially useful for color-correcting tasks. By setting the Reference Monitor’s viewing mode to a waveform monitor or
vectorscope, you can make adjustments to the color corrector or any other video filter more effectively.
Using a Reference Monitor to aid in setting video levels
You can specify the Reference Monitor’s quality setting, magnification, and viewing mode just as you would in the Program Monitor. Its time ruler
and viewing area bar also work the same. But because it’s for your reference and not for editing per se, the Reference Monitor contains controls
for cueing to frames, not for playback or editing. When you gang the Reference Monitor and Program Monitor together, you can use the Program
Monitor’s playback controls. You may open only one Reference Monitor.
Andrew Devis shows how to correct brightness and contrast, and use of the Reference Monitor in this video on the Creative Cow web site.
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Open a Reference Monitor
In the Window menu, choose Reference Monitor. The Reference Monitor opens in a separate panel. If you want, you can drag the Reference
Monitor’s tab into a drop zone next to the Source Monitor.
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Gang the Reference Monitor and Program Monitor
You can gang the Reference Monitor and the Program Monitor so that both always monitor the same frame.
Do one of the following:
In the Reference Monitor, click the Gang To Program Monitor button
.
In the Reference Monitor’s panel menu, choose Gang To Program Monitor.
In the Program Monitor’s panel menu, choose Gang To Reference Monitor.
Both Monitors show the same frame. Moving the playhead
playheads in the other two to the same frame.
in either the Reference Monitor, the Program Monitor, or the Timeline will move the
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Editing sequences and clips
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Creating and changing sequences
Timeline panels
Navigate in a sequence
Work with tracks
Set track display
Create a sequence
Create a custom sequence preset
Change sequence settings
Change sequence preview resolution settings
Create a widescreen sequence
Create an HDV or HD sequence
Create a sequence with uncompressed video playback
Create a sequence for RED camera footage
24p sequences
Start a mobile device sequence
Using multiple sequences
Nest sequences
In Premiere Pro, you specify the settings for each sequence, trim your clips, and assemble clips in sequences.
Every Premiere Pro project can contain one or more sequences, and each sequence in a project can have settings different from the settings for
the others. For example, one project can contain one sequence optimized for 30-fps widescreen DV assets, another for standard 24-fps DV
assets, and still another for HDV footage.
You assemble and rearrange sequences in one or more Timeline panels, where their clips, transitions, and effects are represented graphically. You
can open a particular sequence on a tab in a Timeline panel among other sequences, or keep it by itself in its own dedicated Timeline panel.
A sequence can consist of multiple video and audio tracks running parallel in a Timeline panel. Multiple tracks are used to superimpose or mix
clips. A sequence must contain at least one video track and one audio track.
Sequences with audio tracks must also contain a master audio track, where the output of regular audio tracks is directed for mixing. Multiple audio
tracks are used to mix audio. You can specify the type of audio channels supported by each audio track and decide how they are sent to a Master
audio track. To achieve even greater control over the mixing process, you can create submix tracks.
Andrew Devis shows how to create a new sequence using a clip’s known dimensions in this video tutorial on the Creative Cow web site.
Andrew Devis shows how to create a new sequence from a clip’s dimensions by dragging a clip to the New Item button in the Project panel in this
video tutorial. The default scale to sequence size function is also discussed.
This chapter from the “Adobe Premiere Pro Classroom in a Book” explains how to set up projects, sequences, and preferences when getting
started with Premiere Pro.
See this video on the Creative Cow web site by Andrew Devis for information about “Editing Source Footage with Effects Already Applied.
For information about editing tools, see the chapter “Using editing tools: rolling, ripple, slip, slide, lift, and extract” from Premiere Pro Classroom in
a Book series.
For more information about getting started with editing in Premiere Pro, see this video by Learn by Video and video2brain by Maxim Jago.
For resources about getting started with editing in Premiere Pro, see this blog post by Kevin Monahan.
“FAQ: How do I choose the right sequence settings?”
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Timeline panels
A single Timeline panel appears in a frame in the lower central portion of the screen when you first launch Premiere Pro, open any of its default
workspaces, or create a project. You can remove all sequences from a Timeline panel, or add multiple sequences to it, each appearing as a tab
within that Timeline panel. You can also open multiple Timeline panels, each within its own frame, with each containing any number of sequences.
You can show or hide items by selecting, or deselecting them in the Timeline panel menu. These items include: time ruler numbers, and the work
area bar.
Open additional Timeline panels
You can open more than one Timeline panel if you have more than one sequence in a project.
1. Open more than one sequence. For more information about opening sequences see Open a sequence.
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Each will appear in its own tab in the default Timeline panel.
2. Drag a sequence tab and drop it into another docking area.
The sequence tab appears in a new Timeline panel.
Open a sequence in a Timeline panel
You can open one or more sequences in a Timeline panel.
In the Project panel, double-click the sequence you want to open.
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Navigate in a sequence
A Timeline panel contains several controls for moving through the frames of a sequence.
Time ruler Measures sequence time horizontally. Tick marks and numbers indicating the sequence time are displayed along the ruler and change
according to the level of detail at which you view the sequence. By default these tick marks and numbers are based on the timecode display style
specified in the Display Format field of the New Sequence dialog box (although you may toggle to a counting method based on audio samples).
Time ruler numbers are off by default. Enable timecode numbers by selecting Time Ruler Numbers in the Timeline panel menu. The time ruler also
displays icons for markers and the sequence In and Out points.
Playhead (Formerly called the Current-Time Indicator or CTI.). Indicates the current frame displayed in the Program Monitor. The current frame
displays in the Program Monitor. The playhead is an orange triangle in the ruler. A vertical line extends from the playhead to the bottom of the time
ruler. You can change the current time by dragging the playhead.
Current time display Shows the timecode for the current frame in a Timeline panel. To move to a different time, click in the time display and enter
a new time, or place the pointer over the display and drag left or right. You can change the display between timecode and the simple frame count
by Ctrl-clicking (Windows) or command-clicking (Mac OS) the current time in either a monitor or a Timeline panel.
Zoom scroll bar Located at the bottom of the Timeline panel, this bar corresponds with the visible area of the time ruler in the Timeline. The
Source Monitor, and Program Monitor also have zoom scroll bars. You can drag the handles to change the width of the bar and change the scale
of the time ruler. Expanding the bar to its maximum width reveals the entire duration of the time ruler. Contracting the bar zooms in for a more
detailed view of the ruler. Expanding and contracting the bar is centered on the playhead. By positioning the mouse over the bar, you can scroll
the mouse wheel to expand and contract the bar. You can also scroll the mouse wheel in the areas outside of the bars for the same expanding
and contracting behavior. By dragging the center of the bar, you can scroll the visible part of a time ruler without changing its scale. When you
drag bar, you are not moving the playhead, however, you can move the bar and then click in the time ruler to move the playhead to the same
area as the bar. Gestures for Mac OS are supported for the zoom scroll bar.
Work area bar Specifies the area of the sequence that you want to render previews, or to define a region you plan to export. The work area bar is
located in the lower portion of the time ruler. You can drag the edges of the work area bar, or use keyboard shortcuts to set the work area in a
sequence. For details, see Define the work area for rendering.
The work area bar is not visible by default. To return the work area bar to the Timeline, enable it from the panel menu by selecting Work Area Bar.
When the work area bar is enabled, commands for Render Effects in Work Area, and Render Entire Work Area are available in the Sequence
menu. You can now use In and Out points for most things the Work Area does, so you can keep it hidden and use In and Out points for rendering
an area of the Timeline, or for marking an area to export for encoding.
Zoom controls Change the scale of the time ruler to increase or decrease the number of frames visible within the current viewing area. The zoom
controls are located at the bottom left of a Timeline panel.
Source track indicator Represents a video or audio track of the clip in the Source Monitor. Place into the head of the Timeline track where you
want to insert or overwrite the source clip track.
In this Premiere Pro tutorial in the Creative Cow web site, Richard Harrington gives some quick tips on how to navigate the timeline quickly while
controlling your video clips like a pro.
Position the playhead in a Timeline panel
Do any of the following:
In the time ruler, drag the playhead or click where you want to position the playhead.
Drag in the current time display.
Click in the current time display, type a valid time, and press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
Use any playback control in the Program Monitor.
Press the Left or Right Arrow key to move the playhead
increments of five frames.
in the direction you want. Press Shift while pressing the arrow keys to move in
Move the playhead using timecode
Click the timecode value, type a new time, and press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS). Do not use the number pad on Mac OS. You can
use any of the following shortcuts when entering timecode:
Omit leading zeros For example, 0;0;12;3 becomes 00;00;12;03.
Omit semicolons (NTSC) or colons (PAL) For example, 1213 becomes 00;00;12;13 for NTSC projects, and 00:00:12:13 for PAL projects.
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Enter values that exceed the normal values For example, with 30 fps timecode, if the playhead is at 00;00;12;23, and you want to move 10
frames ahead, you can change the frame number to 00;00;12;33. The playhead moves to 00;00;13;03.
Include a plus sign (+) or minus sign (–) A plus sign or minus sign before a number moves the playhead ahead or back a specified number of
frames. For example, +55 moves the playhead ahead 55 frames.
Add a period A period before a number specifies an exact frame number, rather than its timecode value. For example, .1213 moves the playhead
to 00;00;40;13 in an NTSC project, and to 00:00:48:13 in a PAL project.
You can also position the Selection tool over the timecode value and drag to the left or right. The farther you drag, the more quickly the
timecode changes.
Snap to clip edges and markers
Shift-drag the playhead in a Timeline panel.
Zoom into or out of a sequence in a Timeline panel
Do one of the following:
With the Timeline panel active, to zoom in, press +. To zoom out, press -.
, and then click or drag a marquee selection around the part of the sequence you want to see in more
To zoom in, select the Zoom tool
, and then Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac OS) an area in a Timeline panel.
detail. To zoom out, select the Zoom tool
Use the zoom scroll bar. To zoom in, drag the ends of the viewing area bar closer together. To zoom out, drag them farther apart.
Press the Alt key (Windows) or Option key (Mac OS) and turn the mouse scroll wheel to zoom and out at the mouse pointer’s position.
You can pinch to zoom the Multi-Touch trackpad to zoom in and out of the sequence.
(Roman and Russian keyboards only) To zoom out so that the entire sequence appears in a Timeline panel, press the backslash (\) key. To
zoom in to the view you had before pressing the backslash key, press the backslash key again.
Scroll horizontally in a sequence in a Timeline panel
When you have a long sequence of clips, many of them are out of view. If you need to work on a clip that is out of view, you need to scroll
horizontally in your sequence in the Timeline panel. For each of these commands, the Timeline panel need not be selected, however, your mouse
should hover over the Timeline panel.
Scroll the mouse wheel.
Use the Page Up key to move left and the Page Down key to move right.
Press the Alt key (Windows), or Command key (Mac OS), and then turn the mouse wheel.
Drag the zoom scroll bar at the bottom of the Timeline panel left or right.
On Apple MacBook Pro computers, move two fingers horizontally on the Multi-Touch trackpad to navigate the sequence horizontally.
Scroll vertically in a sequence in a Timeline panel
When video or audio clips are stacked up in tracks on the timeline, they can sometimes be hidden from view. If you need to work on a clip that is
out of view, you need to scroll vertically in your sequence in the Timeline. Do one of the following to scroll vertically in a sequence in the Timeline.
For each of these commands, the Timeline panel need not be selected, however, your mouse should hover over the Timeline panel.
In the right of the Timeline panel drag up or down in the scroll bar.
Place the mouse pointer anywhere in the Timeline panel and turn the mouse wheel.
On Apple MacBook Pro computers, move two fingers vertically on the Multi-Touch trackpad to navigate the sequence vertically.
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Work with tracks
The video and audio tracks in a Timeline panel are where you arrange clips, edit them, and add special effects. You can add or remove tracks as
needed, rename them, and determine which to affect by a procedure.
Add tracks
New video tracks appear above existing video tracks, and new audio tracks appear below existing audio tracks. Deleting a track removes all clips
in the track but does not affect source clips listed in the Project panel.
Note: You can add any number of tracks, limited only by your system’s resources.
1. With a Timeline panel active, choose Sequence > Add Tracks.
2. In the Add Tracks dialog box, do any of the following:
To add tracks, type, or drag the hot text to, the number of tracks you want to add in the Add field for video, audio, and audio submix
tracks.
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To specify the placement of added tracks, choose an option from the Placement menu for each type of track added.
To specify the type of audio or submix track you want to add, choose an option from the Track Type menu for audio and audio submix
tracks. (For more about audio channel types, see Audio tracks in a sequence.)
3. Click OK.
Note: An audio track can accept only audio clips that use the matching channel type—mono, stereo, or 5.1. If you’re not sure what kind of
audio your clips use, select the clip in the Project panel and read its information in the preview area.
You can add a track as you add a clip to the sequence. See Add a track while adding a clip.
Andrew Devis shows how to add and remove tracks in this video tutorial on the Creative Cow web site.
Delete tracks
You can delete one or more tracks at a time, whether video or audio.
1. With a Timeline panel active, choose Sequence > Delete Tracks.
2. In the Delete Tracks dialog box, check the box for each type of track you want to delete.
3. For each checked item, specify which tracks you want to delete in its menu.
Rename a track
1. Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) the track's name and choose Rename.
2. Type a new name for the track, and press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
Specify the tracks to change with Sync Lock
You can determine which tracks will be affected when your perform an insert, ripple delete, or ripple trim operation by enabling Sync Lock on
those tracks. Tracks which have a clip that is part of the operation will always shift regardless of their sync-lock state, but the other tracks will shift
their clip content only if their sync lock is enabled. With an insert edit, for example, if you want all the clips to the right of the edit on Video 1 and
Audio 1 to shift to the right while leaving all the clips on Audio 2 in place, enable Sync Lock on Video 1 and Audio 1.
Do one of the following:
To enable Sync Lock for selected tracks, click the Toggle Sync Lock box at the head of each video and audio track you want to be affected
by the edit.
To enable Sync Lock for all tracks of a particular type, video or audio, Shift-click the Toggle Sync Lock box at the head of any track of that
type.
The Sync Lock icon
will appear in the box, and Sync Lock will be enabled for those tracks.
Note: To disable Sync Lock on one or more tracks, click, or Shift-click for all tracks of a type, the Toggle Sync Lock box again so that it contains
no Sync Lock icon.
Andrew Devis shows how to use Sync Lock and track targeting in this video tutorial on the Creative Cow web site.
Franklin McMahon shows a good application of Sync Lock in this video on the Layers Magazine web site.
Prevent changes with Track Lock
Locking an entire track is useful for preventing changes to any clips on that track while you work on other parts of the sequence. In a Timeline
panel, a pattern of slashes appears over a locked track. Although clips in a locked track cannot be modified in any way, they are included when
you preview or export the sequence. If you want to lock both a video track and a track with corresponding audio, lock each track separately. When
you lock a target track, it is no longer the target; source clips cannot be added to the track until you unlock it and target it again.
You can lock a track to prevent it from shifting when you perform insert edits.
Click in the Toggle Track Lock box to display the Lock icon
next to the track name.
Exclude tracks in a sequence
You can exclude video or audio clips in any track from previews and export. Clips in excluded video tracks appear as black video in the Program
Monitor and in output files. Clips in excluded audio tracks are not output to the Audio Mixer, to the speakers, or to output files.
Note: Excluding a track with the Eye icon does not exclude it from outputs. If excluded tracks hold clips that run before or after clips on nonexcluded tracks, black video will appear before or after the last clips in the non-excluded tracks. To trim this ending black video from the output
files, set the In point and Out point as desired in the Export Settings dialog box.
Click to hide the Eye icon
(for video) or the Speaker icon (for audio) at the left edge of the track. (Each icon is a toggle switch. Click its box
again to display the icon and include the track.)
Note: To exclude all video or all audio tracks, Shift-click to hide the Eye icon
(for video) or the Speaker icon (for audio). This excludes all
tracks of the same type. (Each icon is a toggle switch. Shift-click its box again to display all the icons and include the tracks.)
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Set track display
You can customize the tracks in a Timeline panel in several ways. You can expand or collapse tracks to display or hide track controls. Choosing
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from several display options, you can control how video and audio clips appear on a track. In addition, you can change the size of the header area
or move the boundary between the video and audio tracks to display more tracks of either type.
Expand and resize a track
You can expand a track to display track controls. Increase the height of a track to better see icons and keyframes or to display larger views of
video track thumbnails and audio track waveforms.
1. To expand or collapse a track, click the triangle to the left of the track name.
2. To resize the track, position the pointer in the track header area between two tracks so that the height adjustment icon
drag up or down to resize the track below (for video) or the track above (for audio).
appears, and then
Collapsed tracks always appear at the same height and cannot be resized.
You can expand an audio track to use the audio fade line for either individual clips in that track or for the entire audio track.
Set the display style of the video track
1. Expand the track by clicking the triangle next to the track name.
at the left corner below the track name, and choose an option from the menu:
2. Click the Set Display Style button
Show Head Only Displays a thumbnail image at the beginning of the clips in the expanded track.
Show Frames Displays thumbnail images along the entire duration of the clips in the expanded track. The number of thumbnail frames
corresponds to the time units displayed in the time ruler.
Show Name Only Displays the name of clips in the expanded track, without thumbnail images.
Show Head And Tail Displays a thumbnail image at the beginning and end of clips in the expanded track.
Set the default keyframe display of video tracks
You can determine whether new video tracks show all keyframes, hide all keyframes, or show opacity handles, by default when they are created.
1. Select Edit >Preferences > General (Windows), or Premiere Pro > Preferences > General (Mac OS).
2. In the New Timeline Video Tracks drop-down menu, select the option desired.
3. Click OK.
Set the default keyframe display of audio tracks
You can determine whether new audio tracks hide all keyframes, or show Clip Keyframes, Clip Volume, Track Keyframes, or Track Volume, by
default when they are created.
1. Select Edit >Preferences > General (Windows), or Premiere Pro > Preferences > General (Mac OS).
2. In the New Timeline Audio Tracks drop-down menu, select the option desired.
3. Click OK.
Set the display style of the audio track
1. Expand the track by clicking the triangle next to the track name.
2. Click the Set Display Style button
, and choose an option from the menu:
Show Waveform Displays audio waveforms in clips.
Show Name Only Displays the name of audio clips without waveforms.
Note: For information about viewing and adjusting keyframes in video and audio tracks, see View keyframes and graphs.
Resize the track header section
Position the pointer over the right edge of the track header (where track names are listed) so that the resize icon
appears, and then drag the
right edge.
The icons at the top of the track header limit its minimum width. The maximum width is about twice the minimum width.
Adjust visible area of video and audio tracks
1. Either in the track header area on the left or between the scroll bars on the right, position the pointer between the Video 1 and Audio 1
tracks.
2. When the height adjustment icon appears
, drag up or down.
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Create a sequence
In many cases, you want to create a sequence that matches the characteristics of the primary assets (clips) that you’ll be editing. You can create a
sequence that matches the characteristics of an asset by dragging the asset to the New Item
button at the bottom of the Project panel.
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You can also create a sequence by using a sequence preset. The sequence presets included with Premiere Pro include the correct settings for
common types of assets. For example, if you have footage mostly in DV format, use a DV sequence preset.
If you plan to specify lower quality settings for output (such as streaming web video), don’t change your sequence settings. Instead, change your
export settings later.
For information about learning the parameters of your assets, see Selecting a sequence preset.
When all the parameters of your assets do not match all the settings of any preset do one of the following. In the Sequence Presets tab of the
New Sequence dialog box,
select a preset with most settings matching the parameters of the assets you want to edit, then select the Settings tab, and customize the
preset so that its settings match the asset parameters exactly,
without selecting a preset, select the Settings tab of the New Preset dialog box. Select Custom from the Editing Mode menu, and customize
the settings until they match the parameters of your assets.
If your computer has a capture card compatible with Premiere Pro, the Available Presets list shows presets optimized for the card, in some cases.
The sequence settings must be correct when you create the sequence. Once a sequence is created, some sequence settings, such as the
timebase settings, are locked. This locking prevents unwanted inconsistencies that could result from changing sequence settings later.
1. Do one of the following:
Select File > New > Sequence
In the Project panel, click New Item
. Then select Sequence.
2. On the Sequence Presets tab, select a preset from the Available Presets list.
3. Type the name of the sequence, and then click OK.
You can create a new sequence from a selected clip by one of the following methods:
Drag and drop a clip onto the New Item button.
Choose File > New > Sequence from Clip.
Note: When a merged clip is used to create a new Sequence from Clip, there may be empty stereo audio tracks, depending on the media
format. You may delete these empty stereo audio tracks, if you wish.
You can create a sequence from a selected clip which matches its attributes by doing the following:
1. Create a new sequence. Any sequence preset can be used. You can also open an existing sequence.
2. Drag a clip into the sequence. Premiere Pro detects if the attributes of the clip match the sequence settings.
3. If the attributes do not match, a Clip Mismatch Warning dialog box launches with the message, “The clips does not match the sequence
settings. Change sequence to match the clip’s settings?”:
Choose “Change Sequence Settings” if you want to create a new sequence with attributes that match the clip. This technique is the one
to do if you are creating a new sequence from scratch. If there are existing clips in the sequence, they will be conformed with the new
sequence settings.
Choose “Keep Sequence Settings” if you want the clip to be conformed to play back in the existing sequence.
There is also an “Always Ask” check box available.
See the video tutorial, “Changing the Sequence to Match a Clip,” by Todd Kopriva and video2brain for details about changing or keeping
sequence settings when dragging a clip into a sequence. He also gives suggestions on a better workflow for creating a new sequence from a
clip.
Ever had some footage and weren’t sure which sequence preset to use? Now, there’s an easy trick featuring the New Item button to get started
editing natively. Karl Soule shows you how in this video tutorial.
Andrew Devis demonstrates how to create a sequence with settings that match those of a footage item in this video tutorial on the Creative COW
web site.
“FAQ: How do I choose the right sequence settings?”
Sequence presets and settings
All sequence settings apply to the whole sequence, and most cannot be changed after a sequence is created.
When creating a sequence, you can select from among the standard sequence presets. Alternatively, you can customize a group of settings, and
save the group in a custom sequence settings preset. If you want full control over almost all the sequence parameters, start a new sequence and
customize its settings.
After you begin working in a sequence, you can review sequence settings, but you can change only a few of them. Choose Sequence > Sequence
Settings to view the settings you can change.
Creating a sequence opens the New Sequence dialog box. The New Sequence dialog box contains three tabs, each with a number of settings:
Sequence Presets, General, and Tracks.
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Andrew Devis demonstrates how to create a sequence with settings that match those of a footage item in this video tutorial on the Creative COW
web site.
Robbie Carman explains how to customize sequence settings to speed up renders in this video tutorial.
“FAQ: How do I choose the right sequence settings?”
Sequence Presets options
Available Presets are groups of sequence settings. Premiere Pro comes with several categories of sequence settings presets installed: AVC-Intra,
AVCHD, Digital SLR, DV-24p, DV-NTSC (North American standard), DV-PAL (European standard), DVCPRO50, DVCPROHD, HDV, Mobile &
Devices, XDCAM EX, XDCAM HD422, and XDCAM HD. These contain the correct settings for the most typical sequence types. Use the AVCIntra, DVCPRO50, and DVCPROHD sequence settings presets to edit AVC-Intra or DVCPRO material shot on Panasonic P2 video cameras. For
DV25 material recorded in Panasonic P2 format, use a preset for DV-NTSC or DV-PAL, depending on the television standard of the footage.
For more information about international television standards, see the video tutorial, lynda.com Digital Video Principles - Video standards.
Settings
The settings tab in the New Sequence dialog box control the fundamental characteristics of the sequence.
Choose settings that conform to the specifications for the type of output intended for your project. For example, if your target output is DV NTSC,
use the DV NTSC editing mode. Changing these settings arbitrarily often results in a loss of quality.
Editing Mode Determines the following:
the video format used for preview files and playback,
the timebases available,
the compression methods which appear in the Video Settings panel,
the display formats available.
Choose an Editing Mode option that best matches the specifications of your target format, preview display, or capture card.
The editing mode does not determine the format of your final movie. You specify output settings when you export.
The Custom editing mode allows you to customize all of the other sequence settings.
DV video and audio use standardized settings that are specified automatically when you select either DV editing mode. When you use a DV
editing mode, avoid changing the Timebase, Frame Size, Pixel Aspect Ratio, Fields, and Sample Rate settings.
Note: (Windows only) To access the Uncompressed UYVY 422 8-Bit codec or the V210 10-bit YUV codec, select Desktop for the Editing Mode.
Timebase Specifies the time divisions Premiere Pro uses to calculate the time position of each edit. In general, choose 24 for editing motionpicture film, 25 for editing PAL (European standard) and SECAM video, and 29.97 for editing NTSC (North American standard) video. The frame
rate of the video you play back or export from sequences is not the same as its timebase. However, timebase and frame rate are often set to the
same value. The options listed for Timebase vary according to the editing mode you select.
Playback Settings For information about Playback Settings, see Preview on a television monitor via camcorder or deck.
Frame Size Specifies the dimensions, in pixels, for frames when you play back sequences. In most cases, match the frame size for your project to
the frame size of your source files. Do not change the frame size to compensate for slow playback. Instead, choose a different quality setting from
the Project panel menu. Alternatively, you can adjust the frame size of final output by changing export settings.
The maximum frame size for a sequence is 10,240x8,192. More information on maximum image sizes is found here.
Pixel Aspect Ratio Sets the aspect ratio for individual pixels. Choose Square Pixels for analog video, scanned images, and computer-generated
graphics, or choose the format used by your source. If you use a pixel aspect ratio different from the pixel aspect ratio of your video, the video
often gets rendered with distortion.
Fields Specifies the field order, or which field of each frame is drawn first. If you work with progressive-scan video, select No Fields (Progressive
Scan). Many capture cards capture fields regardless of whether the source footage was shot with progressive scan. (See Interlaced video,
noninterlaced video, and progressive scanning)
Display Format (Video) Premiere Pro can display any of several formats of timecode. You can display the project timecode in a film format, for
example, if you are editing footage captured from film. You can display timecode in simple frame numbers if your assets came from an animation
program. Changing the Display Format option does not alter the frame rate of clips or sequences—it changes only how their timecodes are
displayed. The time display options correspond to standards for editing video and motion-picture film. For Frames and Feet + Frames timecodes,
you can change the starting frame number to match the time-counting method of another editing system you use.
The options made visible in the Display Format field depend on the Editing Mode selected. You can choose from the following Display Format
options, depending on which editing mode is selected:
30-fps Drop-Frame Timecode Reports time in hours, minutes, seconds, and frames, separating units with semicolons. Drop-frame
timecode assumes a rate of 30 frames per second (fps), but skips some numbers by design. To accommodate the NTSC actual frame rate
of 29.97 fps, drop-frame timecode skips, or drops, two frame numbers each minute except every tenth minute. Using drop-frame timecode
drops timecode numbers, not the actual frames of video. Use drop-frame timecode for output to NTSC videotape.
30-fps Non Drop-Frame Timecode Reports time in hours, minutes, seconds, and frames, separating units with colons. It assumes a rate
of 30 fps and does not drop frame numbers. Use for output to computer displays via the web or CD-ROM.
24-fps Timecode Reports time in hours, minutes, seconds, and frames; separating units with colons. Use for 24p footage and to output to
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24-fps formats for film and DVD distribution.
25-fps Timecode Reports time in hours, minutes, seconds, and frames, separating units with colons. Use for output to PAL videotape.
Feet + Frames 16mm Reports time in feet and frames, assuming the frame rate of 16mm film: 40 frames per foot. Use for output to
16mm film.
Feet + Frames 35mm Reports time in feet and frames, assuming the frame rate of 35mm film: 16 frames per foot. Use for output to
35mm film.
Frames Reports time solely in a running count of frames. Does not assign measurements of either time or spatial length. Use to output
sequential stills such as those generated for an animation or DPX film editor.
Note: When working with NTSC video assets, use 30-fps drop-frame timecode. This format conforms with the timecode base inherent in NTSC
video footage and displays its duration most accurately.
Sample Rate (Audio) In general, higher rates provide better audio quality when you play back audio in sequences, but they require more disk
space and processing. Resampling, or setting a different rate from the original audio, also requires additional processing time and affects the
quality. Try to record audio at a high-quality sample rate, and capture audio at the rate at which it was recorded.
Display Format (Audio) Specifies whether audio time display is measured using audio samples or milliseconds. Display Format applies when
Show Audio Time Units is selected in the Source Monitor or Program Monitor menu. (By default, time is displayed in frames, but it can be
displayed in audio units for sample-level precision when you are editing audio.)
Video Previews settings Video Previews settings determine the file format, compressor, and color depth Premiere Pro uses for preview files and
playback of clips and sequences.
Among the various options, you can reduce the frame size of previews. This reduction permits faster and easier playback of formats with large
frame sizes, such as HD and RED.
Preview File Format Select a file format that gives the best quality previews while keeping rendering time and file size within tolerances
acceptable for your system. For certain editing modes, only one file format is available.
Codec Specifies the codec used for creating preview files for the sequence.
(Windows only) The Uncompressed UYVY 422 8-bit codec and the V210 10-bit YUV codec match the specifications for SD-SDI and HDSDI video respectively. Select one of them if you intend to monitor or output to one of these formats. To access either of these formats,
first choose the Desktop Editing Mode.
Note: If you use a clip without applying effects or changing frame or time characteristics, Premiere Pro uses the original codec of the clip
for playback. If you make changes that require recalculation of each frame, Premiere Pro applies the codec that you choose here.
Width Specifies the frame width of video previews, constrained by the pixel aspect ratio of the original media.
Height Specifies the frame height of video previews, constrained by the pixel aspect ratio of the original media.
Reset Clears existing previews and specifies full size for all following previews.
Maximum Bit Depth Maximizes the color bit depth, up to 32 bpc, to include in video played back in sequences. This setting is often not
available if the selected compressor provides only one option for bit depth. You can also specify an 8-bit (256-color) palette when
preparing a sequence for 8-bpc color playback, such as when using the Desktop editing mode for the web or for some presentation
software. If your project contains high-bit-depth assets generated by programs such as Adobe Photoshop, or by high-definition
camcorders, select Maximum Bit Depth. Premiere Pro then uses of all the color information in those assets when processing effects or
generating preview files.
Maximum Render Quality Maintains sharp detail when scaling from large formats to smaller formats, or from high-definition to standarddefinition formats. Maximum Render Quality maximizes the quality of motion in rendered clips and sequences. Selecting this option often
renders moving assets more sharply.
At maximum quality, rendering takes more time, and uses more RAM than at the default normal quality. Select this option only on systems
with sufficient RAM. The Maximum Render Quality option is not recommended for systems with the minimum required RAM.
Maximum Render Quality often makes highly compressed image formats, or those containing compression artifacts, look worse because of
sharpening.
Note: For best results with Maximum Render Quality, select Memory from the Optimize Rendering For menu in preferences. For more
information, see Optimize rendering for available memory.
Save Preset Opens the Save Settings dialog box, where you can name, describe, and save your sequence settings.
Save and name your sequence settings even if you plan to use them in only one project. Saving settings creates a backup copy of the settings
to which you can revert in case someone accidentally alters the current sequence settings.
Tracks settings
Controls the number of video tracks and the number and type of audio tracks for new sequences you create.
Master Sets the default channel type for the Master track in new sequences to Mono, Stereo, 5.1 surround, or 16 Channel.
Note: If you must change sequence settings that are unavailable, you can create a sequence with the settings you want. Then move the contents
of the current sequence into it.
Selecting a sequence preset
To ensure that a sequence is created to match the characteristics of an asset, drag the asset in the Project panel to the New Item button at the
bottom of the Project panel. This prevents many mistakes that are made when entering sequence settings incorrectly or choosing the wrong
sequence preset.
A sequence can contain different types of assets, in different formats, and with various different parameters. However, Premiere Pro performs best
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when the settings for a sequence match the parameters of most of the assets used in that sequence. To optimize performance and reduce
rendering times, find out the following parameters for the primary assets you want to edit before creating a sequence. After learning the asset
parameters, you can create a sequence with settings to match. Before capturing assets from a tape-based device, learn these parameters also, so
that you can select the correct capture settings.
recording format (for example, DV, or DVCPRO HD)
file format (for example, AVI, MOV, or VOB
frame aspect ratio (for example, 16:9, or 4:3)
pixel aspect ratio (for example, 1.0, or 0.9091)
frame rate (for example, 29.97 fps, or 23.976 fps)
time base (for example, 29.97 fps, or 23.976 fps)
fields (for example, progressive or interlaced)
audio sample rate (for example, 32 Hz, or 48 Hz)
video codec
audio codec
You can use the Properties panel to discover many of these parameters for your assets. See Viewing clip properties. Alternatively, you can use a
third-party application, such as the freeware, MediaInfo, or GSpot Codec Information Appliance. To find the codecs used to generate a file, you
can also choose Window > Show Movie Inspector in Apple QuickTime Player.
Assets can use codecs not supported natively by Premiere Pro. Often, you can edit these assets after installing the relevant codecs. However,
beware of installing untested codecs that may themselves introduce severe problems with your computer system.
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Create a custom sequence preset
To customize most sequence settings, you must start a new sequence, select an existing preset, and change its settings.
Every editing mode does not support every possible frame rate. To create a custom preset with, for example, a 23.976 fps frame rate, select
“Custom” as the Editing Mode. Then, select 23.976 frames/second from the Timebase menu.
1. Choose File > New > Sequence, or, in the Project panel, click the New Item button
and select Sequence.
2. In the Sequence Presets tab of the New Sequence dialog box, select the preset that most closely matches your video footage or the
requirements of your capture card.
Note: If you plan to create a custom sequence with Custom settings (accessed in the Editing Mode drop-down list), there is no need to
select a preset before clicking the Settings tab.
3. Modify the settings on the General or Tracks tabs to meet the needs of your project.
4. Click Save Preset.
5. Name the preset, and, if desired, describe it. Then click OK.
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Change sequence settings
You can change some of the settings for an existing sequence. Note that, depending on the Editing Mode selected, some of the settings will be
fixed.
1. Do one of the following:
Select Sequence > Sequence Settings.
In the Project panel, right-click a sequence, and select Sequence Settings.
2. Select the desired settings on the General tab. For more information, see Sequence presets and settings.
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Change sequence preview resolution settings
You can choose the video preview format and resolution in the Sequence Settings dialog box. Choose a resolution lower than the sequence frame
size to play back previews in real time that the computer cannot play back at full frame size. During editing, Premiere Pro renders all previews at
the specified preview size and scales them to the frame size of the sequence.
1. Select the sequence for which you want to change preview settings. Then, select Sequence > Sequence Settings.
2. In the Video Previews pane of the Sequence Settings dialog box, adjust the frame width and height values.
3. (Optional) To restore the frame size back to the original frame size for that sequence preset, click Reset.
Note: Some sequence presets have only one file format and codec choice.
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Create a widescreen sequence
You can edit widescreen footage shot in DV, HDV, or HD formats. To display and play back widescreen assets correctly, you must set your
sequence settings to accommodate widescreen assets.
1. Select File > New > Sequence.
2. Select a preset that matches your footage. Do one of the following:
For DV footage, select one of the DV-NTSC or DV-PAL presets with Widescreen in its name. These use horizontal pixels (with pixel
aspect ratios of 1.2 for NTSC and 1.422 for PAL).
For an HDV project, select an HDV preset using HD Anamorphic 1080 (pixel aspect ratio 1.333) or Square pixels (pixel aspect ratio 1.0).
For an HD project, select one of the presets provided with your HD capture card.
3. Enter a name in the Sequence Name field and click OK.
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Create an HDV or HD sequence
You can edit HDV footage or HD footage in 720p, 1080p, or 1080i. When creating a new sequence for these formats, select or create the preset
that best matches the specifications of your source footage.
The DVCPROHD presets included with are for editing material recorded to MXF files with a Panasonic P2 camcorder. Premiere Pro has presets
also for AVCHD, XDCAM HD, and XDCAM EX. Additional HD sequence presets are usually installed into Premiere Pro when an HD capture card
that supports Premiere Pro is installed.
For HDV footage, create and save a custom preset with settings to match the settings of your footage. For more information about creating custom
sequence presets, see Create a custom sequence preset.
For best playback performance, it is sometimes helpful to render HD footage when you first place it into a sequence.
1. Select File > New > Sequence.
To edit DVCPROHD 720p footage shot at 25fps (e.g. 25pN native mode footage from PAL versions of the Panasonic HVX200 camera),
choose the DVCPROHD 720p 50p preset. Then, select the General tab. Then, from the Timebase drop-down menu, select
25.00frames/second.
The New Sequence dialog box opens with the Sequence Preset tab selected.
2. Select a preset that matches your footage.
3. (Optional) To set the number of channels in the Master audio track, select the Tracks tab. In the Master menu in the Audio pane, select one
of the following:
Mono Outputs a single mono channel.
Stereo Outputs two mono channels with stereo panning intact.
5.1 Outputs four mono channels respecting the Left-Front, Right-Front, Left-Rear, and Right-Rear panning.
4. Enter a location and name for the project file and click OK.
Note: In Windows, you can create a custom project preset for previewing uncompressed 10-bit or uncompressed 8-bit footage. For more
information, see Create a sequence with uncompressed video playback in Premiere Pro Help.
Create a sequence with uncompressed video playback
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For the highest quality previews of sequences on an SDI card or device connected to an external monitor, you should use one of the
uncompressed formats for preview files. Uncompressed 8-bit (4:2:2 YUV) is particularly suitable for projects meant for SD output, while
Uncompressed 10-bit (4:2:2 YUV) is best for projects meant for HD. Additionally, with Uncompressed 10-bit (4:2:2 YUV) and high bit-depth color
rendering Premiere Pro will make use of the color information in 10-bit assets and will upsample other assets in a sequence to generate 10-bit
preview files. Premiere Pro delivers the best preview performance when using these preview file formats on a system with a supported SD-SDI or
HD-SDI card installed.
Both these uncompressed formats do subsample video files at 4:2:2 YUV, but unlike the other file formats available for preview files, they do not
then run the video data through a compressor. They are called uncompressed because they do not add this second layer of compression, and
thereby retain much higher color depth in the previews than the compressed formats. As a consequence, uncompressed preview files can be quite
a bit larger than compressed preview files.
1. Select File > New > Sequence.
2. In the New Sequence dialog box, click the General tab.
3. From the Editing Mode menu, choose Desktop.
4. In the Timebase menu, choose the desired frame rate, such as 24, 25 or 29.97 frames/second.
5. In the Video section, choose the desired settings for Frame Size, Pixel Aspect Ratio, Fields, and Display Format. For example, 1920 x 1080,
Square Pixels (1.0), No Fields (Progressive Scan), and 30 fps Drop-Frame Timecode.
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6. In the Audio section choose the desired settings for Sample Rate and Display Format.
7. In the Video Previews section, choose one of these sets of preview file formats and codecs, depending on your system:
For Windows, choose Preview File Format: Microsoft AVI and Codec: None (alternatively choose Uncompressed UYVY 422 8bit).
For Mac OS, choose Preview File Format: QuickTime and Codec: None (alternatively choose Uncompressed YUV 10 bit 4:2:2 or
Uncompressed YUV 8 bit 4:2:2).
You may see different file format and codec choices depending on your optional hardware capture/playback card.
8. (Optional) Check the Maximum Bit Depth check box if your system supports 10-bit or greater formats.
9. (Optional) If you plan to use uncompressed playback again, click Save Preset, give the preset a name and description, and click OK.
10. Enter a name for the sequence and click OK.
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Create a sequence for RED camera footage
1. Select File > New > Sequence.
2. On the Sequence Presets panel of the New Sequence dialog box, select a RED R3D preset that matches your footage.
3. Enter a name in the Sequence Name field and click OK.
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24p sequences
About 24p footage and sequences
Footage acquired from a camcorder or by film transfer, at roughly 24 non-interlaced (progressive) fps is called 24p footage. This footage emulates
film in its picture quality and depiction of movement because the 24p frame rate is very close to that of motion-picture film, and each frame is built
from progressive lines (not from interlaced half-frame fields). 24p formats have become popular among low-budget digital filmmakers because they
lend a film look to its subjects.
To create a DV 24p sequence in Premiere Pro, you select the DV-24p sequence preset that matches the format and frame aspect ratio of your
footage. You can import files and capture footage as usual.
Premiere Pro includes two alternate 24p pulldown schemes for DV 24p: Repeat Frame and Interlaced Frame. Both options convert 24p footage so
that it plays back at 29.97 fps, but there are subtle visual and performance differences between them. You can select one of these options in the
New Sequence settings when starting a new DV-24p sequence, or change it in an existing sequence.
If you edit DV-24p footage in a sequence based on one of the standard Premiere Pro DV-NTSC presets, Premiere Pro uses a 24p DV pulldown
scheme to convert the footage to 29.97 fps interlaced video for playback to standard NTSC devices. You would use this method, for example, to
export your DV 24p movie to a standard NTSC format for mastering to tape or broadcasting.
If you edit 24p footage in a sequence based on one of the DV-24p presets, Premiere Pro, by default, manages the 24p pulldown scheme, so that
the video can be exported for playback on 24p NTSC devices. This allows you to export the movie to a file in a 24p format. You would use this
method, for example, to export your movie to a DVD for playback on DVD players and TV monitors that support 24p formats.
You can use the Adobe Media Encoder to export a 24p movie from Premiere Pro to Adobe Encore. You can open it in Encore, author your DVD,
then master and burn the project as a 24p MPEG-2 stream. The resulting DVD exhibits no interlacing artifacts on 480p-capable (progressivescan-capable) DVD players and televisions. Alternatively, you can export a DV 24p project into a format, such as still-image sequences,
appropriate for transfer to film.
Note: Premiere Pro accepts 24p and 24pA footage only from cameras using these schemes.
Not all 24p source media has a pulldown, nor does it necessarily require it. Many new formats are 24 progressive-native, (24pn).” No pulldown
scheme is applied to make them compatible with 30 fps video. Some P2 formats, all XDCAM and XDCAM-EX formats, and most AVCHD 24p
formats are progressive native.
About 3:2 and 24pA pulldown
When you transfer 24-fps film to 29.97-fps video, you use a process called 3:2 pulldown, in which the film frames are distributed across video
fields in a repeating 3:2 pattern. The first frame of film is copied to fields 1 and 2 of the first frame of video, and also to field 1 of the second video
frame. The second frame of film is then spread across the next two fields of video—field 2 of the second video frame and field 1 of the third frame
of video. This 3:2 pattern is repeated until four frames of film are spread over five frames of video, and then the pattern is repeated.
The 3:2 pulldown process results in whole frames (represented by a W) and split-field frames (represented by an S). The three whole video frames
contain two fields from the same film frame. The remaining two split-field frames contain a video frame from two different film frames. The two splitfield frames are always adjacent to each other.
The phase of 3:2 pulldown refers to the point at which the two split-field frames fall within the first five frames of the footage. Phase occurs as a
result of two conversions that happen during 3:2 pulldown: 24-fps film is redistributed through 30-fps video, so each of four frames of 24-fps film is
spread out over five frames of 30 (29.97)-fps video. First, the film is slowed down 0.1% to match the speed difference between 29.97 fps and 30
fps. Next, each film frame is repeated in a special pattern and mated to fields of video.
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When you apply 3:2 pulldown to footage, one frame of the film (A) is separated into two or three interlaced video fields (B) which are grouped into
video frames containing two fields each.
It’s important to remove 3:2 pulldown from video footage that was originally film, so that effects you add synchronize perfectly with the original
frame rate of film. Removing 3:2 pulldown reduces the frame rate by 1/5: from 30 to 24 fps or from 29.97 to 23.976 fps. Reducing the frame rate
also reduces the number of frames you have to change.
Premiere Pro also supports Panasonic DVX100 24p DV camera pulldown, called 24p Advance (24pA). This format is used by some cameras to
capture 23.976 progressive-scan imagery using standard DV tapes.
Chris Meyer provides links to resources about pulldown in this article on the ProVideo Coalition web site.
Create a 24p sequence
1. Select File > New > Sequence.
2. From the Available Presets list on the Sequence Presets tab, choose the 24p preset that matches the frame aspect ratio and audio sampling
rate of most of your footage. 24p presets are located in the DV-24p, DVCPRO50 > 480i, DVCPROHD > 1080i, and DVCPROHD > 720p
folders.
3. Select a location, type a name for your sequence, and click OK.
Note: If you capture 24p footage, Premiere Pro recognizes the footage as 24p and treats it accordingly, regardless of your sequence settings.
Set 24p playback options
You set playback settings when you create a new sequence.
1. Choose File > New >Sequence.
2. In the New Sequence dialog box, click the General tab.
3. Click Playback Settings.
4. In the 24p Conversion Method pane, select one of the following options:
Repeat Frame (ABBCD) Duplicates frames where necessary to maintain 29.97 fps playback. This option uses fewer CPU resources.
Interlaced Frame (2:3:3:2) Combines the frames in a telecine-like scheme to maintain 29.97 fps playback. This option produces smooth
playback but uses more CPU resources.
5. Click OK in the Playback Settings dialog box, and click OK in the New Sequence dialog box.
Disable 24p pulldown to simulate film-video transfer
By default, Premiere Pro uses a 24p pulldown scheme to play back 24p DV footage at 29.97 fps in a project based on one of the NTSC presets.
You can disable the pulldown scheme to give your movie the look of a film transferred to video or broadcast, without frame interpolation.
1. Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS) a 24p clip in the Project panel.
2. Select Modify > Interpret Footage.
3. Under Frame Rate, select Remove 24p DV Pulldown.
4. Click OK.
Additionally, you can apply any of a number of third-party film-look plug-in effects to the master sequence. These plug-ins can often perform
telecine-style conversion, or add grain or color correction to simulate various film stocks. Pay close attention to lighting and, during shooting,
use tripods and do slow pans to create the appearance of using a heavy film camera. Attention to these details gives your project more of a film
look.
Display 24p source timecode
When you import 24p footage, Premiere Pro treats it as 23.976 fps progressive footage. Because of this, when you work with 24p footage in a 24p
project, the timecode is displayed as 24 fps. However, the camera records and logs 24p footage in 30 fps non-drop-frame timecode. When you log
24p footage for capture, you log clips according to the camera’s timecode count of 30 fps non-drop-frame timecode.
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For example, a clip that you log for capture may have an In point of 00:01:00:28. However, as an offline clip in a 24p project, the In point is shown
as 00:01:00:23. In addition, mixing non-drop-frame footage with drop-frame footage can cause larger differences in timecode display between the
project and the clip, with minutes, seconds, and entire durations seemingly out of sync. Be aware of these discrepancies as you edit.
If you use 30 fps non-drop-frame timecode for projects containing 24p footage, Premiere Pro drops every fifth frame from the 24p footage
timecode count. When you view the properties of your 24p clip, the frame rate is shown as 23.976, but the timebase as 29.97. If you’d prefer to
read a clip’s original timecode, do the following:
1. Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS) the clip in the Project panel.
2. Select Modify > Interpret Footage > Use Frame Rate from File.
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Start a mobile device sequence
You can edit video for delivery to mobile phones, portable media players, and other portable devices. Selecting a project preset that matches the
requirements of the target device is the easiest way to get started. When you are done editing your movie, use Adobe Media Encoder to encode it
with the audio and video characteristics correct for the target devices.
1. Do one of the following:
From the Welcome screen, click New Project.
Select File > New > Project.
2. In the New Project dialog box, click OK.
3. In the New Sequence dialog box, select the Sequence Presets tab.
4. Select the Mobile & Devices presets folder. Do one of the following:
To edit a movie aimed exclusively at devices supporting 3GPP video at frame sizes of 176x144 or 88x72, select the CIF, QCIF, QQCIF
preset.
To edit a movie for distribution on the web or on mobile devices that can display 4:3 video at frame sizes of 320x240 or 128x96, select
the iPod, QVGA, Sub-QCIF preset.
5. Enter a name in the Sequence Name field and click OK.
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Using multiple sequences
A single project can contain multiple sequences. Different sequences within the same project can have different settings. You select settings for
each sequence when you create it, but you can change some of these settings after a sequence is created.
To switch sequences, in the Program Monitor or in the Timeline panel, click the tab of the sequence you want to use. The sequence becomes
the front most tab in both panels.
To view a sequence in a separate Timeline panel, drag the Sequence tab away from the panel to an empty area. Ctrl-drag (Windows), or
Command-drag (Mac OS) to prevent the panel from docking.
To open a sequence in the Source Monitor, press Ctrl/Command and double-click the sequence in the Project panel. In the Timeline panel,
press Ctrl/Command and double-click a nested sequence.
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Nest sequences
You can nest sequences within sequences—to any depth—to create complex groupings and hierarchies. You can nest a sequence into another
having a different timebase, frame size, and pixel aspect ratio settings. A nested sequence appears as a single, linked video/audio clip, even
though its source sequence can contain numerous video and audio tracks.
You can select, move, trim, and apply effects to nested sequences as you would to any other clip. Any changes you make to the source sequence
are reflected in any nested instances created from it.
The ability to nest sequences enables you to employ a number of time-saving techniques and to create effects that otherwise would be difficult or
impossible:
Reuse sequences. When you want to repeat a sequence—particularly a complex one—you can create it once, and then simply nest it in
another sequence as many times as you want.
Apply different settings to copies of a sequence. For example, if you want a sequence to play back repeatedly but with a different effect each
time, just apply a different effect to each instance of the nested sequence.
Streamline your editing space. Create complex, multilayered sequences separately; then add them to your main sequence as a single clip.
This not only saves you from maintaining numerous tracks in the main sequence, but also potentially reduces the chances of inadvertently
moving clips during editing (and possibly losing sync).
Create complex groupings and nested effects. For example, although you can apply only one transition to an edit point, you can nest
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sequences and apply a new transition to each nested clip—creating transitions within transitions. Or you can create picture-in-picture effects,
in which each picture is a nested sequence, containing its own series of clips, transitions, and effects.
When nesting sequences, keep in mind the following:
You cannot nest a sequence within itself.
You cannot nest a sequence containing a 16-channel audio track.
Actions involving a nested sequence may require additional processing time, because nested sequences can contain references to many
clips, and Premiere Pro applies the actions to all of its component clips.
A nested sequence always represents the current state of its source. Changing the content of the source sequence is reflected in the content
of nested instances. Duration is not directly affected.
A nested sequence clip’s initial duration is determined by its source. This includes empty space at the beginning of the source sequence, but
not empty space at the end.
You can set a nested sequence’s In and Out points as you would other clips. Trimming a nested sequence does not affect the length of the
source sequence. Also, subsequently changing the source sequence’s duration does not affect the duration of existing nested instances. To
lengthen the nested instances and reveal material added to the source sequence, use standard trimming methods. Conversely, a shortened
source sequence causes the nested instance to contain black video and silent audio (which you may need to trim off the nested sequence).
Nest a sequence in another sequence
Drag a sequence from the Project panel or Source Monitor into the appropriate track or tracks of the active sequence, or use any of the editing
methods for adding a clip.
Note: You will not have to render audio before editing a nested sequence.
Create a nested sequence from a selection of clips
1. In a sequence, select one or more clips that you want to send to a nested sequence.
2. Do one of the following:
Select Clip > Nest.
Right-click the selection, and select Nest.
Premiere Pro cuts the selected clips from the sequence, sends the selected clips to a new sequence, and nests the new sequence in the original
sequence, starting at the location of the first selected clip.
Open the source of a nested sequence
Double-click a nested sequence clip. The source of the nested sequence becomes the active sequence.
Reveal a source frame from a nested sequence
If you want to reveal a clip in a nested sequence (for example, to edit it), you can quickly open the source sequence at the exact frame you want to
reveal.
1. In the Timeline panel, target the track in which a nested sequence is located by clicking the header of that track. If you target multiple tracks,
the targeted track that is on top is used to select the nested sequence.
2. Drag the playhead to the frame of the nested sequence that you want to reveal in its original sequence.
3. Press Ctrl+Shift+F (Win) or Shift+T (Mac) to open the source sequence in the Timeline panel, with the playhead at the frame you specified in
the nested sequence.
4. Double-click the clip where the playhead rests to open the clip in the Source Monitor.
More Help topics
Viewing clip properties
Troubleshoot file formats and codecs
File formats supported for import
Closed captioning basics (Adobe Encore Help)
Closed captioning on Wikipedia
Legal Notices | Online Privacy Policy
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Creating and playing clips
Source clips, clip instances, subclips, and duplicate clips
Duplicate a clip
Creating subclips
Play back a clip in the Project panel
In Premiere Pro, you create clips by importing files, duplicating clips, or making subclips. You create a clip instance by using a clip in a sequence.
Source clips, clip instances, subclips, and duplicate clips
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In Premiere Pro, a clip points to a source file. Trimming a clip, or editing it in any way, does not affect the source file. For example, if you import a
30-minute file into Premiere Pro, you create a 30-minute clip that points to that source file. If you trim the clip to a five-minute duration, the 30minute source file remains on your hard disk, but the clip refers only to a five-minute section of it. Premiere Pro stores information about clips in
clip metadata fields in project files, but stores information about source files in XMP metadata fields.
You can trim source clips, clip instances, subclips, or duplicate clips. You can trim all types of clips in sequences in much the same way. The clip
types differ in the following ways:
Source (master) clip The clip originally imported into the Project panel. It is listed in the Project panel only once by default. If you delete a source
clip from the Project panel, all of its instances are also deleted.
Clip instance A dependent reference to a source clip, used in a sequence. Each time you add a clip to a sequence, you create another instance
of the clip. A clip instance uses the name and source file reference used by its source clip. While clip instances are not listed in the Project panel,
they are differentiated in the Source Monitor menu if you open instances there. The Source Monitor menu lists instances by name, sequence
name, and In point.
Subclip A section of a master clip that references the master clip’s media file. Use subclips to reference discreet sections of long master clips.
(See Creating subclips.)
Duplicate clip An independent copy of a source clip, which you create manually using the Edit > Duplicate command. You can also create a
duplicate clip by importing the same file more than once. Unlike a clip instance, a duplicate clip maintains its own reference to the original clip’s
source file on disk and exists as an additional clip in the Project panel. Premiere Pro does not delete a duplicate clip when you delete its original
from the Project panel. Master and duplicate clips can be renamed independently.
Franklin McMahon explains how to use subclips in this video from Layers Magazine.
For more details, see Andrew Devis’ tutorial, “Subclips: What? Why? How?”
See also Andrew Devis’ tutorials, “Understanding the Source Panel tools.”
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Duplicate a clip
1. In the Project panel, select a clip, and choose Edit > Duplicate.
2. To rename the duplicate clip, select it, choose Clip > Rename, and type a new name for the clip.
You can also create a duplicate clip by copying and pasting it in the Project panel (or its folders), by Ctrl-dragging (Windows) or
Command-dragging (Mac OS) a clip in the Project panel.
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Creating subclips
A subclip is a section of a master (source) clip that you want to edit and manage separately in your project. You can use subclips to organize long
media files.
You work with subclips in a Timeline panel as you do with master clips. Trimming and editing a subclip is constrained by its start and end points.
However, you can set new In and Out points for a subclip, as long as they fall between the original In and Out points you set for the subclip when
you create it from the master clip.
Subclips reference the master clip’s media file. If you delete a master clip or take it offline and keep its media on disk, the subclip and its instance
remain online. If you take the original media off disk, the subclip and its instances go offline. If you relink a master clip, its subclips remain linked to
the original media.
If you recapture or relink a subclip, it becomes a master clip, and all ties to the original media are broken. The recaptured media includes the
subclip’s referenced portion of the media only. Any instances of the subclip are relinked to the recaptured media.
You cannot make the following types of clips into subclips:
Selections of multiple clips
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Titles, still images, synthetic clips
Sequence clips
Grouped clips
To use a master clip and its subclips in another project, import the project that contains the clips.
You can create a subclip from any merged clip in the same way you would any other subclip. The Master Clip Start timecode is the earliest
timecode of the component clips. The Master Clip End timecode is the latest timecode of the component clips. The Convert to Master Clip check
box is disabled.
Create a subclip from the Project panel
You can create a subclip from source clips or other subclips that are made up from a single media file.
1. Double-click a clip in the Project panel to open it in the Source Monitor.
2. In the Source Monitor, set In and Out points for the subclip. Either or both the In point and Out point must differ from the source clip In point
and Out point.
3. Do one of the following:
Choose Clip > Make Subclip, enter a name for the subclip, and click OK.
Ctrl-drag (Windows) or Command-drag (Mac OS) the clip to the Project panel. Type a name for the subclip, and click OK.
The subclip appears in the Project panel with a Subclip icon
,
,
,
. The icon varies depending on the media type.
4. (Optional) To retain the original In and Out points in the master clip, reset them in the Source Monitor while previewing the master clip.
You can also convert a master clip into a subclip by selecting the source clip in the Project panel or Source Monitor, choosing Clip > Edit
Subclip, and setting media start and end times for the subclip.
Create a subclip from a Timeline panel
You can create subclips from a Timeline panel.
Do one of the following:
Ctrl-drag (Windows) or Command-drag (Mac OS) a clip instance from a sequence into an open bin in a Project panel. Type a name for the
subclip, and click OK.
Right-click a clip instance in a sequence, and select Make Subclip. Type a name for the subclip, and click OK.
Adjust media start and end times of a subclip
1. Select the subclip in the Project panel.
2. Choose Clip > Edit Subclip.
3. Edit the Subclip Start and End timecode fields.
Note: If you select an instance of a subclip in the Project panel, you cannot set new Start and End points that lie within the instance Start and
End points. This limit prevents losing frames that are used in the sequence.
Convert a subclip to a master clip
1. Select the subclip in the Project panel.
2. Choose Clip > Edit Subclip.
The converted clip retains the master clip start and end times that are listed in the Edit Subclip dialog box.
3. Select Convert To Master Clip, and then click OK.
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Play back a clip in the Project panel
You can use the preview area at the top of a Project panel to preview individual clips.
1. Select the clip.
2. Press the Play button on the thumbnail viewer. The Play button becomes a Stop button. Press Stop to stop playback. (Playing the clip in
the thumbnail viewer does not affect Source Monitor views.)
You can also play back clips in icon view in the Project panel. To do this:
1. In the Project panel, click the Icon View button.
2. Select the clip by clicking on it.
3. To play, press L or the spacebar. (To stop, click the Stop button, or press K or the spacebar. The button and the spacebar toggle between
Play and Stop.) To play in reverse, press J.
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Adding clips to sequences
Adding clips to a sequence
Open a sequence
Targeting tracks
Drag video and audio to a sequence
Drag video only or audio only to a sequence
Add a track while adding a clip
Insert a clip into a sequence
Overwrite a clip into a sequence
Insert or Overwrite by dragging a clip to the Program panel
Make three-point and four-point edits
Add clips to a sequence automatically
Mixing clip types in a sequence
Replace one clip with another in a Timeline
Replace the source footage for a clip
Set or remove sequence In and Out points
Set sequence start time
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Adding clips to a sequence
You can add clips to a sequence in the following ways:
Drag the clip from the Project panel or Source Monitor to a Timeline panel or the Program Monitor.
Use the Insert and Overwrite buttons in the Source Monitor to add clips to a Timeline panel. Or use the keyboard shortcuts associated with
those buttons.
Automatically assemble a sequence from the Project panel.
Drag the clip from the Project panel, Source panel, or Media Browser into the Program monitor.
An overwrite edit adds a clip by replacing any frames already in a sequence starting from the edit point and extending for the length of the clip.
Overwrite is the default method when dragging a clip to a sequence or when rearranging clips in a sequence.
With an insert edit, adding a clip to the sequence forces any clips later in time to shift forward to accommodate the new clip. When dragging a clip,
press the Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) key to shift into insert mode.
If one or more tracks is locked, an insert edit shifts clips in all unlocked tracks. To prevent an insert edit from shifting clips in a track, lock the
track. Alternatively, click the Sync Lock button in the header of every track you want to shift.
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Open a sequence
In a Project panel, double-click a sequence.
The sequence opens in a Timeline panel.
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Targeting tracks
A sequence may contain several video and audio tracks. When you add a clip to a sequence, it is important to assign which track or tracks it is to
be edited to. You can target one or more tracks, for both audio and video. Target tracks depending on the editing method you use: editing from the
Source Monitor, dragging, or copy/pasting to the timeline.
In advance of making an insert or overwrite edit, you can map the tracks of a clip loaded in the Source Monitor to one or more tracks of a
sequence by dragging the source track indicator representing each of the source clip’s tracks into one or more selected tracks of the
sequence. Audio source track indicators can be placed only in audio tracks matching the source clip’s channel configuration. For example,
the audio track indicator for a stereo clip can be placed only in a stereo track in a sequence. After the tracks are targeted, edit the clip by
pressing the Insert or Overwrite buttons (or use the shortcuts).
When you drag a clip to a sequence as an insert or overwrite edit by dragging, you target the track automatically by dropping the clip into the
track. You do not need to specify tracks in advance. A drag edit is an overwrite edit by default. If you are performing an insert edit with the
clip, press Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) as you drag. As you make the edit, triangles appear showing the affected tracks.
When you add clips to a sequence by pasting, (or keyboard shortcuts), you must specify target tracks in advance. You can target more than
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one video track or more than one audio track at a time. Also, you can choose to target a video track only or an audio track only. Click the
track or tracks you want to target in the track header area of a Timeline panel. The track header area for a targeted track appears
highlighted.
You can also assign keyboard shortcuts to some track targeting commands.
If you overwrite a clip, only the clips in targeted tracks are affected, whether you drag the clip or use a Source Monitor’s Overwrite button.
If you insert a clip, the clip goes into the targeted tracks, and clips in any unlocked tracks where the source clip lands shift to accommodate the
insertion. You can specify other tracks to also shift by enabling Sync Lock on them.
To insert a clip and not shift clips in other tracks, Ctrl-Alt-drag (Windows) or Command-Option-drag (Mac OS) the clip into the track.
You can drag video clips to any video track; however, you can drag audio clips only to a compatible audio track. Audio clips can’t be added to the
master audio track or submix tracks, and they can be placed only on audio tracks of the matching channel type: mono, stereo, or 5.1 (see Audio
tracks in a sequence).
Clips with linked video and audio can be dragged to either a video or an audio track, but the clip’s video and audio components appear separately,
in the appropriate corresponding tracks.
Note: You can drag a clip to any unlocked, compatible track in a sequence, no matter which tracks are currently targeted. You can’t target a
locked track. Locking a target track deselects it as the target.
For more information about targeting and patching tracks in Premiere Pro, see this video by Learn by Video and Video2Brain by Maxim Jago.
Andrew Devis shows how to use Sync Lock and track targeting in this video on the Creative COW website.
Frank Rohmer provides a video tutorial on the Adobe website that explains mapping source tracks to target tracks.
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Drag video and audio to a sequence
By default, when dropped into a sequence, the video and audio components of linked clips appear in corresponding tracks (for example, Video 1
and Audio 1), unless the audio channel type of the clip is incompatible with the target track. In this case, the linked audio appears in the next
compatible track, or a compatible track is created automatically.
Note: An audio clip dragged to an incompatible track automatically shifts to the next compatible track, even if the track is occupied by another
audio clip. Therefore, take care not to disturb clips already in the sequence.
However, you can alter this behavior by holding the Shift key while you drag.
Note: For information about creating tracks that are compatible with your assets, see Work with tracks and Create a custom sequence preset.
The Program Monitor can help you determine where to position a clip you’re adding to a sequence. During an overwrite edit, it displays the frames
in the sequence adjacent to the new clip’s head and tail. During an insert edit, it displays the frames adjacent to the insertion point.
1. (Optional) Open a clip in the Source Monitor, and mark its In and Out points. (See Working with In and Out points.)
If you don’t want to set In and Out points, you can drag the clip directly from a bin or the preview thumbnail in the Project panel.
2. To make clip edges align when you drag them, make sure that the Snap button
is active in a Timeline panel.
3. Do one of the following:
To drag the video and audio portions of a clip to specific tracks, drag the clip from the Source Monitor or Project panel into a Timeline.
When the video portion of the clip lies above the desired video track, press and hold Shift. Continue holding shift, and drag downward
past the bar separating video and audio tracks. When the audio portion of the clip lies above the desired audio track, release the mouse
and release Shift.
To drag the video portion of a clip to the Video 1 track and the audio to any audio track, drag the clip from the Source Monitor or Project
panel past the line that separates the video tracks from the audio tracks. Drop the clip above the audio track where you want the audio
portion to land. The video portion of the clip will remain in the Video 1 track, and the audio portion lands in the desired audio track.
To perform an overwrite edit, drag the clip from the Source Monitor or Project panel to an appropriate track in a Timeline panel at the
point you want the clip to start. The destination area is highlighted, and the pointer appears with the Overwrite icon
.
To perform an insert edit, Ctrl-drag (Windows) or Command-drag (Mac OS) the clip from the Source Monitor or Project panel to an
appropriate track in a Timeline panel at the point you want the clip to start. The destination area is highlighted, and the pointer appears
with the Insert icon
. Arrows appear at the insertion point in all tracks.
To perform an insert edit and shift only target tracks, Ctrl+Alt-drag (Windows) or Command+Option-drag (Mac OS) the clip from the
Source Monitor or Project panel to an appropriate track in a Timeline panel at the point you want the clip to start. The destination area is
highlighted, and the pointer appears with the Insert icon
added.
. Arrows appear at the insertion point only in the tracks to which the clip is
(Roman keyboards only) To zoom into or out of a clip as you drop it into a Timeline panel, drag and press the equal sign key (=) to
increase the zoom factor or press the minus sign key (–) to decrease it. Do not use the keys on the number pad.
The clip will land in a Timeline panel, and a Timeline panel will become active, making it easy to playback the clip just added to the
sequence.
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Note: You can also drag, or Ctrl-drag (Windows) or Command-drag (Mac OS), a clip into the Program Monitor to overwrite or insert a clip. Make
sure the track you want is targeted in a Timeline panel and the playhead is at the location where you want to add the clip in the sequence. To
prevent an insert edit from shifting clips in any track, turn off Sync Lock for that track, or alternatively, lock the track.
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Drag video only or audio only to a sequence
You can add the video track, the audio tracks, or both types of tracks of a clip to a sequence. When you drag a clip from the Project panel or from
the main viewing area of the Source Monitor, you automatically add both types of tracks. If you want to add only one type of track, add it from the
Source Monitor.
1. Double-click a clip in a Project panel or Timeline panel to open it in the Source Monitor.
2. In the Source Monitor, do one of the following:
To drag all audio and video tracks of the clip, drag from anywhere inside the main viewing area.
To drag only the video track of the clip, drag from the Drag Video Only icon
.
To drag only the audio tracks, first target in the Timeline panel the tracks you want to receive the clip audio tracks. Then map the audio
tracks you want to use to the target audio tracks. Then, drag from the Drag Audio Only icon .
Note: Drag Video Only and Drag Audio Only are not buttons. They are icons that provide a place to click when starting the respective drag
operations.
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Add a track while adding a clip
Drag a clip from the Project panel or Source Monitor into the blank space above the topmost video track (for a video or linked clip) or below the
lowest audio track (for an audio or linked clip). Premiere Pro adds an audio track, a video track, or both, depending on the content of the source
clip.
Note: If the sequence doesn’t have an unlocked track of the correct media type (for example, a stereo audio track for a stereo source clip), a new
track is created to accommodate the clip.
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Insert a clip into a sequence
1. Double-click a clip in a Project panel or sequence to open it in the Source Monitor.
2. Place the playhead at the point in the sequence where you want to insert the clip.
3. In the Timeline panel, click the headers of the tracks where you want to insert the source clip’s components to target them.
4. Drag the source clip track indicators to the headers of the tracks where you want to insert the source clip’s components.
5. Click the Sync Lock box in the header of any track you want to shift as a result of the insertion.
Note: Any track that is either targeted or sync-lock-enabled will be affected by Insert; only non-targeted tracks with Sync Lock disabled will
be unaffected. If a track has no source track indicator, or if the track is not targeted but is operated on because its Sync Lock is enabled,
then an empty track background will be inserted on that track at the CTI for the duration of the source clip
6. In the Source Monitor, click the Insert button
.
The audio and video components of the clip will be inserted into the tracks selected at the playhead. Clips to the right of its location on its own
track and tracks with Sync Lock enabled will shift to the right by the length of the inserted clip.
Need help understanding how to do an insert or overlay (overwrite) edit? Check out this video by Lynda.com and Chad Perkins.
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Overwrite a clip into a sequence
1. Double-click a clip in a Project panel or sequence to open it in the Source Monitor.
2. Place the playhead at the point in the sequence where you want to overwrite the clip.
3. Click the headers of the tracks where you want to overwrite the source clip components to target them.
4. Drag the source clip track indicators to the headers of the tracks where you want to overwrite the source clip components.
Note: During an overwrite edit, if a targeted track has no source track indicator, then an empty track background will be inserted on that
track for the duration of the source clip, removing any previous contents at that location
5. In the Source Monitor, click the Overwrite button
.
The audio and video components of the clip will be overlaid onto the tracks selected at the playhead.
Need help understanding how to do an insert or overlay (overwrite) edit? Check out this video by Lynda.com and Chad Perkins.
Insert or Overwrite by dragging a clip to the Program panel
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You can select and drag a clip from the Project panel, Source panel, or Media Browser into the Program monitor. When doing so, an overlay
appears in monitor to provide a visual depiction of Overwrite versus Insert edits. A tool tip appears to describe the modifier key used to toggle
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between these different types of edits. To perform an Insert or Overwrite edit by dragging a clip to the Program panel, do the following:
Drag-and-drop to overwrite edit (default drag, no modifier).
Drag-and-drop to Insert edit (hold down Command/Ctrl key modifier).
The clip, or clips that can be dragged to the Program panel can either be from the Project panel, or the Media Browser. They can be AV, video
only, or audio only clips.
When a clip is dragged from the Project panel or the Media Browser into the Program monitor's video display area, the Overwrite overlay appears
by default when no modifier key is held down. A tool tip is displayed underneath the clip's thumbnail image, to drop (mouse release) to create an
overwrite edit, and that holding down the Command/Ctrl key creates an insert edit instead.
Multiple clips dragged to the Program monitor do not display a multiple clip stack icon. The file stack clip icon does not truly depict the number of
clips being dragged.
When the modifier key is held down, the overlay updates to display the Insert edit overlay. You can toggle back and forth between the
Overwrite/Insert modes in the middle of the drag-and-drop action. Hold down the modifier key and the overlay displays update.
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Make three-point and four-point edits
The Source and Program Monitors provide controls to perform three-point and four-point edits—standard techniques in traditional video editing.
In a three-point edit, you mark either two In points and one Out point, or two Out points and one In point. You don’t have to actively set the fourth
point; it’s inferred by the other three. For example, in a typical three-point edit you would specify the starting and ending frames of the source clip
(the source In and Out points), and when you want the clip to begin in the sequence (the sequence In point). Where the clip ends in the sequence
—the unspecified sequence Out point—is automatically determined by the three points you defined. However, any combination of three points
accomplishes an edit. For example, sometimes the point where a clip ends in a sequence is more critical than where it begins. In this case, the
three points include source In and Out points, and a sequence Out point. On the other hand, if you need the clip to begin and end at particular
points in the sequence—say, perfectly over a line of voice-over narration—you could set two points in the sequence, and only one point in the
source.
Maxim Jago explains and demonstrates three-point edits in this video.
In a four-point edit, you mark source In and Out points and sequence In and Out points. A four-point edit is useful when the starting and ending
frames in both the source clip and sequence are critical. If the marked source and sequence durations are different, Premiere Pro alerts you to the
discrepancy and provides alternatives to resolve it.
Make a three-point edit
1. In a Project panel, double-click a clip to open it in the Source Monitor.
2. Click the headers of the tracks in a Timeline panel into which you want to add the clip to target them.
3. In the Timeline, drag the source track indicators to the headers of the tracks into which you want the clip components to fall.
4. In the Source and Program Monitors, mark any combination of three In and Out points.
5. In the Source Monitor, do one of the following:
To perform an insert edit, click the Insert button
.
To perform an overwrite edit, click the Overwrite button
.
Make a four-point edit
1. In a Project panel, double-click a clip to open it in the Source Monitor.
2. Click the headers of the tracks in a Timeline panel into which you want to add the clip to target them.
3. In the Timeline, drag the source track indicators to the headers of the tracks into which you want the clip components to fall.
4. Using the Source Monitor, mark an In point and an Out point for the source clip.
5. In the Program Monitor, mark an In point and an Out point in the sequence.
6. in the Source Monitor, do one of the following:
To perform an insert edit, click the Insert button
To perform an insert edit and shift clips in target tracks only, Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac OS) the Insert button
To perform an overwrite edit, click the Overwrite button
.
.
7. If the marked source and program durations differ, select an option when prompted:
Change Clip Speed (Fit to Fill) Maintains the source clip’s In and Out points, but changes the clip’s speed so that its duration matches the
duration determined by the sequence In and Out points.
Trim Clip’s Head (Left Side) Automatically changes the source clip’s In point so that its duration matches the duration determined by the
sequence In and Out points.
Trim Clip’s Tail (Right Side) Automatically changes the source clip’s Out point so that its duration matches the duration determined by the
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sequence In and Out points.
Ignore Sequence In Point Disregards the sequence In point you set, and performs a three-point edit.
Ignore Sequence Out Point Disregards the sequence Out point you set, and performs a three-point edit.
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Add clips to a sequence automatically
You can quickly assemble a rough cut or add clips to an existing sequence. The clips added can include the default video and audio transitions.
For a video tutorial that demonstrates the creation of a rough cut using the Automate To Sequence command, see the Adobe website.
1. Set In and Out points to define each clip’s starting and ending points.
2. Arrange clips in the Project panel. You can add the clips to the sequence in either the order you select them, or in the order that they are
arranged in a bin in icon view. You can also add sequences or clips in nested bins.
You can arrange clips in a bin in storyboard fashion by setting the Project panel to icon view. (See Change Project panel views.)
3. Select the clips in the Project panel. Either Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) them in the order you want or by dragging a
selection marquee around them.
4. In the Project panel, click the Automate To Sequence button
.
5. Set the following options in the Automate To Sequence dialog box, and then click OK:
Ordering Specifies the method used to determine the order of the clips when they are added to the sequence. If you choose Sort Order,
clips are added in the order they’re listed in the Project panel: from top to bottom in List view; or from left to right, top to bottom in Icon view.
If you choose Selection Order, clips are added according to the order in which you selected them in the Project panel.
Placement Specifies how clips are placed in the sequence. If you choose Sequentially, clips are placed one after another. If you choose At
Unnumbered Markers, clips are placed at unnumbered sequence markers. Choosing At Unnumbered Markers makes the Transitions options
unavailable.
Method Specifies the type of edit to perform. Choose Insert Edit to add clips to the sequence starting at the sequence’s current time using
insert edits, which shift existing clips forward in time to accommodate the new material. Choose Overwrite Edit to use overwrite edits, which
allow the new material to replace clips already in the sequence.
Note: The Automate To Sequence command disregards target tracks and always uses the lowest available video and audio tracks. For
example, if Video1 and Audio1 are locked, it will automate to Video 2 and Audio 2, or the lowest audio track with the correct channel type.
Clip Overlap Specifies the duration of the transition and how much to adjust the clips’ In and Out points to compensate for it when Apply
Default Audio Transition or Apply Default Video Transition is selected. For example, a value of 30 frames trims the clips’ In and Out points
15 frames at each edit, where a 30-frame transition is added. The default value of this option is 15 frames. A menu lets you set the units to
frames or seconds.
Apply Default Audio Transition Creates an audio crossfade at each audio edit, using the default audio transition (defined in the Effects
panel). This option is available only when audio tracks are present in selected clips, and the Placement option is set to Sequentially. It has
no effect when the Clip Overlap option is set to zero.
Apply Default Video Transition Places the default transition (defined in the Effects panel) at each edit. This option is available only when
the Placement option is set to Sequentially, and has no effect when the Clip Overlap option is set to zero.
Ignore Audio Ignores the audio in clips selected to be automated to the sequence.
Ignore Video Ignores the video in clips selected to be automated to the sequence.
The Adobe Tutorials website has this article has this article about the Automate to Sequence command and storyboard style editing called "Edit
Storyboard Style.”
For more information about creating slide shows by adding clips to a sequence automatically in Premiere Pro, see this video by Video2Brain by
Jan Ozer.
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Mixing clip types in a sequence
You can mix clips with different frame rates, frame aspect ratios, and frame sizes in the same sequence. For example, if you drop an HD clip into a
sequence in an SD project, the clip will be letter-boxed and scaled to the SD frame size automatically. Similarly, if you drop an SD clip into a
sequence in an HD project, the clip will be pillar-boxed automatically.
A render bar will appear above any clip in a Timeline panel with attributes not matching the sequence settings. The render bar indicates that those
clips will have to be rendered before final output. However, it doesn't necessarily indicate these clips can't be previewed in real-time. If a yellow
render bar appears above the clip, Premiere Pro can probably play it back in real time without rendering. If, however, a red render bar appears
above the clip, Premiere Pro probably can not play it back in real time without rendering.
A clip with a frame rate different from the frame rate of the sequence will play back from a sequence at the frame rate of the sequence.
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Replace one clip with another in a Timeline
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You can replace one clip in a Timeline panel with another from the Source Monitor or a bin, retaining any effects that were applied to the original
clip in a Timeline.
Using one of the following keyboard modifiers, drag a clip from the Project panel or Source Monitor onto a clip in a Timeline panel:
To use the In point of the new clip, Alt-drag (Windows) or Option-drag (Mac OS). You may use the In point of the new clip, for example, if
you have already trimmed it to start at the desired point of the action.
To apply the In point of the original clip to the new clip, Shift-Alt-drag (Windows) or Shift-Option-drag (Mac OS). You may apply the In point
of the original clip to the new clip, for example, if the new clip was shot synchronously with the original clip using another camera. In this
case, applying the In point from the original clip will start the new clip from the same point in the action.
In a Timeline, clip position and effects are preserved, and any effects that were applied to the original clip are applied to the replacement clip.
You can also replace a clip in a Timeline by selecting it, selecting a replacement clip in a bin or the Source Monitor, and then selecting Clip >
Replace With Clip > [replacement type].
Here is a tutorial on using Match Frame with "Replace with Clip" by Clay Asbury.
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Replace the source footage for a clip
You can replace the source footage for any clip in the Project panel. Replacing the source footage for a clip links it to a new source file. All
instances of the clip and its subclips are retained in the Project panel and Timeline, with their In and Out points, and any applied effects, intact.
However, the clip becomes linked to the replacement footage instead of its original footage. You can easily replace, for example, placeholder
footage with final footage, or footage with a soundtrack in one language with identical footage with a different-language soundtrack, and keep all
the same edits that were made with the original footage.
1. In the Project panel, select the clip for which you want new source footage.
2. Select Clip > Replace Footage.
3. In the Replace Footage For dialog box, browse to the file containing the replacement footage.
4. To rename the clip with the replacement footage filename, check Rename Clip To Filename.
5. Click Select.
Note: You cannot use the Edit > Undo command to undo a footage replacement. However, you can use the Clip > Replace Footage command
again to relink a clip to its original source file.
For more information about Replacing Source Footage, see this video from Learn By Video and Video2Brain by Maxim Jago.
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Set or remove sequence In and Out points
You can use In and Out points in a sequence to help you place and rearrange clips.
Note: Sequence In and Out points are automatically removed when you perform a lift or extract edit from the Program Monitor.
Set sequence In and Out points
1. Navigate to the In point in a Timeline panel and click the Set In Point button
in the Program Monitor.
2. Navigate to the Out point in a Timeline panel and click the Set Out Point button .
You can move the In and Out points together without affecting the duration by dragging the In/Out Grip (textured area at the center of the
shaded span between the In and Out points) in the Program Monitor or Timeline panel.
Set sequence In and Out points around a selection
1. In a Timeline panel, select one or more clips, or a gap, in the sequence.
2. Choose Marker > Mark Selection. This sets sequence In and Out points that match the selection’s In and Out points.
To set sequence In and Out points that match a clip’s In and Out points, select Marker > Mark Clip.
This command is particularly useful when replacing or removing clips in the sequence using three- and four-point editing methods. (See
Make three-point and four-point edits.)
Remove sequence In and Out points
1. Make sure that the sequence is open in the Program Monitor.
2. Choose Marker > Clear Sequence Marker, and then choose an option to clear the In point, the Out point, or both.
You can also clear an In or Out point by Alt-clicking (Windows) or Option-clicking (Mac OS) the Set In button or the Set Out button .
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Set sequence start time
By default, each sequence’s time ruler starts at zero and measures time according to the timecode format you specified in the Display Format field
of the New Sequence dialog box General tab. However, you can change the starting time of the sequence’s time ruler. For example, you may want
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to set the start time to match a master tape, which typically begins at 00;58;00;00, to accommodate a two-minute leader before the standard
program start time of 01;00;00;00.
In a Timeline panel menu, choose Start Time, and enter a starting timecode, and click OK. (The starting time must be a positive number.)
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Working with clips in a sequence
Find a clip in any sequence with Clip Usage
View the source of a sequence clip in the Project panel
Analyze speech for text XMP metadata
Enable or disable a clip
Group clips
Snap clips
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Find a clip in any sequence with Clip Usage
Note: You can also see the number of times a clip has been used by making the Video Usage column visible in the Project panel. For more
information, see Add a column
.You can see whether any clip in the Project panel has been used in a project, the number of uses, and the location of each use, with the Clip
Usage menu. The Clip Usage triangle appears next to the thumbnail viewer only if the selected clips has been used in a sequence.
1. Select a clip in the Project panel.
2. Toward the top of the project panel, next to the thumbnail for the clip, click the Clip Usage triangle on the Movie line next to the pixel aspect
ratio.
A popup menu will show the timecode location for the clip for any sequence in which it is used.
3. Click the desired location.
The desired sequence panel will move forward and the playhead will jump to the location of the clip.
View the source of a sequence clip in the Project panel
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Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) a clip in a sequence, and choose Reveal In Project.
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Analyze speech for text XMP metadata
Adobe Premiere Pro and Soundbooth analyze spoken words and generate text metadata. You can edit and search text metadata like any other
metadata properties. You can then navigate to the times at which specific words are spoken, to better align edits, advertising, and subtitles.
The speech analysis feature can use any of several language-specific and dialect-specific libraries, such as libraries for Spanish and UK English.
To download more language-specific and dialect-specific libraries, see this link on the Adobe website.
In Premiere Pro the Speech Analysis feature is also available for clips when there is at least one component audio clip in the merged clip. Users
can choose to analyze all audio tracks in a merged clip, or a single one.
To analyze speech in all tracks, do one of the following:
Set the File pop up menu to “All Files”, and then click the Analyze button in the Speech Analysis section of the Metadata panel.
Select the merged clip, and then choose Clip > Analyze Content.
Note: You can analyze multiple merged clips, multiple clips, or a combination of both by selecting the clips, and then choose Clip >
Analyze Content.
To analyze a specific track for speech, set the File pop up menu to the component audio clip you wish to analyze, and then click the Analyze
button in the Speech Analysis section of the Metadata panel.
Note: Useful results from speech analysis require good audio quality. Background noise significantly reduces accuracy. To remove such noise,
use the tools and processes in Soundbooth.
Dan Ebberts provides a tutorial on the Adobe website that demonstrates the use of XMP metadata features. The tutorial shows how to convert
speech to text metadata and create a simple video player with which you can navigate to the places where words are spoken.
For more information, see the video tutorial Using Speech Search to Speed Editing.
For a video demonstrating the use of script (screenplay) information from Adobe Story to improve the accuracy of speech analysis, see the Adobe
website.
Jeff Sengstack provides a video overview of a speech search workflow involving Adobe Story, OnLocation, Premiere Pro, Encore, and Flash
Player on the Lynda.com website.
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This video from Video2Brain describes editing workflow in Premiere Pro using speech metadata from Adobe Story.
This video by Jason Levine shows an overview of Adobe Story and Premiere Pro integration.
For more information about how Adobe Premiere Pro integrates with Adobe Story, see this blog post in the Premiere Pro work area.
Jeff Greenberg explains in the following video how to enhance the speech recognition with keywords and scripts.
Analyze speech to create text metadata
1. Select a file or clip.
2. At the bottom of the Metadata panel, click Analyze Speech, or Analyze (Adobe Premiere Pro).
3. Set the Language and Quality options, and select Identify Speakers if you want to create separate speech metadata for each person.
Note: Speech Search can use any of several language-specific and dialect-specific libraries, such as libraries for Spanish and UK English.
4. Click OK.
The spoken words appear in the Speech Analysis section.
5. To retain the speech metadata, save the project.
If you import files with a speech metadata intoAfter Effects, each word appears as a layer marker on layers based on these footage items.
Navigate to a specific word in speech metadata
1. In the Speech Analysis section, select the word.
Timecode In and Duration indicate the precise location and length of your selection.
2. To hear the selection, click either Play or Loop Playback. (The latter option repeatedly plays the selected word, with some preroll and
postroll.)
Edit speech metadata
In the Speech Analysis section, do any of the following:
To correct a word, click it, and type.
To insert, delete, merge, cut, or copy words, right-click an existing word, and choose a command from the context menu.
Copy text from speech metadata to the clipboard for use in a text editor
Right-click the transcript, and choose Copy All.
Improve speech analysis with reference scripts
Accuracy of the speech to text conversion depends on the clarity of the spoken words and the quality of the recorded dialog. Dialog recorded in a
noisy environment or with poor microphone placement cannot produce highly accurate results even with a reference script. You can nevertheless
use a reference script to improve speech analysis. A reference script is a text document containing dialog similar to the dialog recorded in your
assets.
There are two types of reference scripts:
A script that contains similar dialog, but was not necessarily written for the current project. For example, a series of medical training scripts
for different products can be combined into a single text document. You can use this text document as a reference script. With this type of
reference script, speech analysis produces results more accurate than it does when using only the default language models.
A script that matches the recorded dialog. This type of reference script provides the highest accuracy possible. For example, you can use the
script that the talent read during the shoot as a reference script. Alternatively, you could use a transcript typed from the assets for the
purposes of close captioning.
Speech Analysis supports reference scripts only in the UTF-8 encoded text format, including Adobe Story scripts, which have the .astx filename
extension.
The closeness of the match between the embedded script text and the recorded dialog determines the accuracy of matched-script text. If 100%
accuracy is important, edit and revise the script text first. Ensure that the script matches the recorded dialog before using it as a reference script.
Note: To make reference scripts available in Soundbooth, first complete the steps below in Adobe Premiere Pro.
1. From the Reference Script menu in the Analyze Content dialog box, choose Add.
2. In the displayed dialog box, browse to the reference script text or .astx file, select it, and click Open.
3. In the Import Script dialog box, type a name for the reference script, and select the language of the script.
Note: You can view the text of the file in a scrolling window.
4. Select Script Text Matches Dialog only if the imported script covers the recorded dialog verbatim. For example, if the reference script is the
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script from which the talent read their lines, select Script Text Matches Dialog. Select this option even if the recorded dialog is shorter than
what the script file covers.
5. Click OK.
The Import Script dialog closes, and the reference script is selected in the Reference Script menu.
6. Click OK.
Improve speech analysis with Adobe Story scripts
Speech analysis is more accurate if Adobe Story script data is associated with a clip. Adobe Premiere Pro automatically uses the Adobe Story
script as a reference script. When Adobe Premiere Pro finds enough matches with the embedded script, it replaces the analyzed speech text with
the embedded script text. Adobe Premiere Pro carries over the correct spelling, proper names, and punctuation from the reference script, benefits
that standard speech analysis cannot provide.
To find and fix more errors, you can make side-by-side comparisons of the text of the Adobe Story script with the text of the speech analysis. If a
clip has a Story script attached to it, the script is displayed in the Embedded Adobe Story Script view in the Speech Analysis section of the
Metadata panel. Compare the script displayed in this view to the results of the speech analysis displayed in the Analysis Text view below it.
Note: The Embedded Adobe Story Script view is read only. You can't perform editing operations in it.
To attach an Adobe Story script to a clip or clips:
1. Match the scene number of the clips to the scene numbers in the Adobe Story script. Adobe Premiere Pro needs the information so that it
can match the clips to the correct scenes in the script. You can assign scene numbers to clips in the Project panel or the Metadata panel.
2. Select one or more clips in the Project panel, right-click and choose Attach Script File or select File > Adobe Story > Attach Script file.
Note: An Adobe Story script cannot be attached to a Merged Clip. If, however, a Story script was attached to a component clip prior to the merge,
the merged clip may be analyzed using the previously attached Story script.
You can also import an Adobe Story script into OnLocation and then import the shots into Adobe Premiere Pro with the script metadata.
OnLocation produces a list of shot placeholders for each scene. Either record these shots using OnLocation during production, or link the
placeholder shots to their respective video files when you import the video files into OnLocation. In either case, OnLocation embeds the text for
each shot from the original script into the metadata of the shot, and the information is retained when the shot is imported intoAdobe Premiere Pro.
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Enable or disable a clip
You can disable a clip while you try out a different editing idea, or to shorten processing time when working on a complex project. Disabled clips
do not appear in the Program Monitor or in a preview or video file that you export. As long as you have not locked the track containing a disabled
clip, you can still make changes to it. If you want to disable all clips on the same track, exclude the entire track instead. See Targeting tracks.
Select one or more clips in a Timeline panel and choose Clip > Enable. A check mark next to the command indicates that the selected clips is
enabled. Disabled clips appear dimmed in a Timeline panel.
Since it is a common duty for editors to enable and disable clips, it is recommended that you create a custom keyboard shortcut for this task.
See Customize or load keyboard shortcuts.
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Group clips
You can group multiple clips so that you can move, disable, copy, or delete them together. Both audio and video tracks of a linked clip are
included when you group it with other clips.
You can’t apply clip-based commands, such as the Speed command, or effects to the group, though you can select individual clips in the group
and apply effects.
You can trim the exterior edges of the group (the head of the first clip in a group or the tail of the last clip), but you can’t trim any of the interior In
and Out points.
To group clips, select multiple clips, and choose Clip > Group.
To ungroup clips, select a group clip, and choose Clip > Ungroup.
To select one or more clips in a group of clips, Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac OS) a single clip in a group. Shift+Alt-click (Windows)
or Shift+Option-click (Mac OS) to select additional clips in a group.
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Snap clips
To make it easier to align clips with one another or with particular points in time, you can activate the snap feature. With Snap on, when you move
a clip, it automatically aligns with, or snaps to, the edge of another clip, a marker, the start or end of the time ruler, or the playhead. When you
drag a portion of a clip vertically into another track, it will snap to its original time location in the new track. Snapping also helps to ensure you don’t
inadvertently perform an insert or overwrite edit when dragging. As you drag clips, a vertical line with arrows appears and indicates when clips are
aligned.
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Enable and disable the snap feature
At the upper left of a Timeline panel under the Sequence tab, click the Snap button
to select it. Click it again to deselect it.
Snap a clip to a clip edge, marker, or playhead
1. Make sure that the Snap button
is selected in a Timeline panel.
2. Drag the edge of a clip close to the edge of another clip or a marker or the playhead. A vertical line appears when alignment occurs.
You can toggle the snap feature using a keyboard shortcut (S) even during an editing operation, such as moving or trimming a clip.
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Speech to text enhancements
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Working with offline clips
Create an offline clip
Edit an offline clip
Relink an offline clip
Convert an online clip to an offline clip
An offline clip is either a clip that has been unlinked from its source file, or a logged clip that you still have to capture. Offline clips contain
information about the source files they represent, and they give you flexibility when actual files are not available. If an offline clip appears in a
Timeline panel, “Media Offline” appears in the Program Monitor and in the track.
When you log clips from a tape, Premiere Pro automatically creates offline clips containing the exact information required to capture the clips later.
You can also create offline clips manually. Use offline clips in situations such as the following:
Clips are logged but not yet captured. Because offline clips behave like captured clips, you can organize the logged offline clips in the Project
panel. You can even lay out sequences with them in a Timeline panel before the offline clips are captured. When the offline clips are
captured (or located, if they are already captured but missing), they replace the corresponding offline clips.
You want to capture logged clips using device control or batch capturing. In Premiere Pro, a batch-capture list is a set of offline clips;
selecting specific offline clips sets them up for batch capturing.
You want to recapture clips used in the project. Recapturing clips requires making the online clips offline by using the Make Offline
command.
A source file is unavailable when you open a project, so that Premiere Pro can’t locate it automatically and you can’t locate it manually.
Premiere Pro provides Offline and Offline All buttons in this case.
Note: Online and offline clips in Premiere Pro are not related to the concepts of online and offline editing.
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Create an offline clip
You can create an offline clip, that is, a placeholder clip for footage you capture later.
1. In the Project panel, click the New Item button
at the bottom of the panel and choose Offline File from the menu.
The Offline File dialog box opens.
2. For Contains, select whether you want to capture Video, Audio, or Audio And Video from the source footage.
3. For Audio Format, select the format that matches the audio format of your source footage: Mono, Stereo, or 5.1.
4. For Tape Name, type the name of the tape containing the source video for the offline clip.
5. For File Name, type the name of the file as you want it to appear on disk when you capture it using Premiere Pro. If you’re creating an offline
clip for a source file that is captured but isn’t on your computer yet, type the name of that file.
6. Fill in Description, Scene, Shot/Take, and Log Note as needed.
7. Enter the timecode for the Media Start and Media End points. Set these points for the entire untrimmed clip, including any extra handle
frames you’ll need for editing and transitions.
Note: To be eligible for capture, an offline clip must contain at least a tape name, filename, and Media Start and Media End settings.
It is not possible to create an offline merged clip from scratch.
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Edit an offline clip
You can edit an offline clip. You can give it new start and end points, tape name and filename, and a new audio format. You can specify whether it
contains audio only, video only, or audio and video. When an edited offline clip is placed in sequences, it retains the updated settings. These
updated settings also are used for subsequent batch capture.
1. Do one of the following in a Project panel:
Double-click the offline clip,
Select the offline clip. Then choose Clip > Edit Offline.
You can assign a keyboard shortcut to the Clip > Edit Offline command.
The Edit Offline File dialog box opens.
2. Edit settings as needed, and then click OK.
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Note: You cannot edit ‘contains’ or ‘audio format’ for an offline clip if it is located in the timeline.
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Relink an offline clip
You can link an offline clip to a source file, even to a source file different from the one from which the offline clip was made. The linked source file
appears anywhere the offline clip is used in a project. It is possible, for example, to edit an online clip in a sequence, make its source offline, and
link the offline clip to another source file. The new source appears in the sequence wherever the original one did.
You can link offline clips to video files, audio files, and still-image files. However, you cannot link an offline clip to a still-image sequence different
from its original source file. Instead, import new still-image sequences, and place them into timelines manually.
You can link an offline clip containing audio to a source file containing no audio. Premiere Pro deletes the audio track in all instances of the
relinked clip from the project.
Note: To link the audio of a new source file, the source file must have the same type of audio track as the offline clip. For example, if the offline
clip has a stereo audio track, you cannot link it to a source file with a monaural audio track.
1. In the Project panel, select one or more offline clips.
2. Choose Project > Link Media.
3. Select the source file, and click Select.
Note: If you selected more than one offline clip, the Link Media To dialog box appears in turn for each clip you selected. The title bar of the
dialog box gives the filename for each offline clip. Relink the correct source file to each offline clip. If all of the offline clips selected point to
media in the same folder, the Link MediaTo dialog asks for the first file, then links the selected offline clips to all the files in the same folder
as the file selected. If you link to a file from a different project, and if that project has the same folder structure and folder names as the first
project, the Link Media To dialog box asks for the first file, and then links the selected offline clips to all the files in the other project.
4. (Optional) If you selected a source file containing no audio to link to an offline clip containing audio, the Media Mismatch dialog box appears.
Do one of the following:
To delete the audio track from all instances of the offline clip from the project click OK.
To cancel linking to the source file, and retain the audio track in all instances of the offline clip, click Cancel.
In the Project panel, you can choose Clip>Make Offline for any merged clip. When making any merged clip offline, all component clips will also be
become offline. However, you can use the Relink command to link to the desired tracks, while leaving others offline.
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Convert an online clip to an offline clip
1. In the Project panel, select one or more online files.
2. Choose Project > Make Offline.
3. Select one of the following options:
Media Files Remain On Disk Makes the selected files offline in the project but doesn’t erase the source files from the disk.
Media Files Are Deleted Makes the selected files offline in the project and erases the source files from the disk.
Note: If you recapture a clip using the same filename as a file remaining on disk, the original file is replaced. To preserve original clips
without changing their names, move them to another folder or disk, or specify different filenames for the clips you recapture.
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Relinking offline media
New in Premiere Pro CC
Locating and linking offline files
Relink offline media automatically
Manually locate and relink offline media
When an imported clip is moved, renamed, or deleted outside Premiere Pro, the clip becomes an offline clip. Offline clips are represented by the
'Offline Item' icon in the project panel, and “Media Offline” appears in the timeline sequence, Program Monitor, and elsewhere as follows:
Offline Clips displayed in the Project panel
Offline media displayed in the Timeline and Program Monitor
Premiere Pro helps you locate and relink offline media by using the Link Media and Locate File dialog boxes. When you open a project containing
offline media, the Link Media workflow lets you locate and relink the offline media, bringing them back online for use in your project.
For more information on offline files, see Working with offline clips.
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Locating and linking offline files
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When you open a project with missing media files, the Link Media dialog box gives you visibility into files that have broken links and helps you
locate and link your files quickly.
The Link Media dialog box displays the clip name used in the project, as well as the linked filename of the media. The Link Media dialog box also
displays the complete path of folders that stored the offline media.
For example, when you import a clip into a project for the first time, the clip uses the media filename by default. Later, even if you rename the clip,
Premiere Pro can help you locate the clip even if the media file is offline. Depending on how you want to handle the offline files, you can specify
the required search criteria and Match File properties.
Match File Properties
To help effectively locate missing media, you can select properties like File Name, File Extension, Media Start, and Tape Name. You can also
select metadata properties like Description, Scene, Shot, and Log Note.
When you click Locate, the Locate File dialog box displays matches depending on the selected Match File Properties. Therefore, to match and link
media, you need to select at least one property under Match File Properties.
The combination of Match File Properties that you select should uniquely identify each media file from the set of files being relinked.
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Relink offline media automatically
Premiere Pro automatically finds and links offline media where possible. In the Link Media dialog box, the Relink Others Automatically option is
selected by default.
Note: Premiere Pro tries to relink the offline media with as little user-input as possible. If Premiere Pro can automatically relink all missing files
when opening the project, you do not see the Link Media dialog box.
The Align Timecode option is also checked by default to align the media file's source timecode to the clip being linked.
If you don't want to link all of your media, do one of the following:
Select some files and click Offline. Only the selected files are made offline.
Click Offline All. All the files excluding the files that have already been located are made offline.
Click Cancel. All the files listed in the Link Media dialog are made offline.
At any point later, you can open the Link Media dialog box and relink the offline clips in your project by doing one of the following:
Select the offline clip in the Timeline, and select Clip > Link Media.
Right-click or Ctrl-click the clip in the Timeline, and select Link Media from the context menu.
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Manually locate and relink offline media
You can manually find and reconnect the media that Premiere Pro is unable to automatically relink. To do so, in the Link Media dialog box, click
the Locate button.
The Locate File dialog opens with the closest existing directory showing up to three levels. If no exact match is found, the directory is displayed
considering where the file should have been, or the same directory location as the previous session.
The Locate File dialog displays the file directory listing using the Media Browser user interface by default.
Locate File dialog box
Note: If you want to locate the files using your computer's file browser, deselect Use Media Browser To Locate Files in the Link Media dialog box.
You can manually search for a file within the Locate File dialog by clicking Search. Looking at the Last Path can help you locate the exact missing
file easily and quickly.
You can edit the Path field. If necessary, you can copy the full path or a segment of the path from the Last Path string, and paste it into the
Path field. This option is especially useful to quickly help locate the path to the missing file.
To help you narrow down your search results, the Locate File dialog also provides you with advanced filter options, like displaying specific file
types and selecting Display Only Exact name Matches. In addition, you can switch from a list view to a thumbnail view for a visual confirmation of
a specific media file.
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Trimming clips
Working with In and Out points
Working with audio clips in the Source Monitor
View audio waveforms
Scrub the audio waveform in the Source Monitor
Zoom in or out on an audio waveform in the Source Monitor
Working with clips in the Source Monitor
Open a clip in the Source Monitor
Open and view recent clips from the Source Monitor
Set In points and Out points in the Source Monitor
Move In point and Out point together
Adjusting edit points in the Source Monitor
Cue to an In point or Out point
Cue to the previous or next edit
Remove source clip In point or Out point
Timeline trimming
Selecting edit points
Performing a Timeline trim
Trim with the selection tool
Trim with the playhead
Making ripple and rolling edits in the Timeline
About ripple and rolling edits
Make a rolling edit using the Rolling Edit tool
Make rolling edits (extend edits) with the playhead
Make a ripple edit using the Ripple Edit tool
Make slip and slide edits
Make a slip edit
Slip a clip with keyboard shortcuts
Make a slide edit
Slide a clip with keyboard shortcuts
Nudging clips
Making split edits
Work in trim mode
Video tutorial: Dynamic Trimming and Editing with the Keyboard
Slip and slide edits in trim mode
Asymmetrical trimming
Work in the Trim Monitor
Open or close the Trim Monitor
Display the edit point you want to trim
Preview the edit in the Trim Monitor
Cancel an edit
Set trim preferences
Make a rolling edit using the Trim Monitor
Make a ripple edit using the Trim Monitor
Trim with Speech Analysis
To the top
Working with In and Out points
Setting a clip’s In and Out points is a process called marking. You define the first frame you want to include in a sequence by marking that frame
as the clip’s In point. Then you define the last frame you want to include by marking it as the Out point. In a typical workflow, you mark In and Out
points for a clip in the Source Monitor.
Adjusting a clip's In and Out points after it is already edited into a sequence is called trimming. Typically, you trim clips to adjust how they play
back in a sequence. For example, as you view the edit, you want to cut to the incoming clip a little sooner than you originally planned while
marking clips. To fix that problem, trim the clip using trimming tools in Premiere Pro.
You can trim clips by dragging the edge of a clip. A clip's "edge" is a clip’s In or Out point, or edit point. Several specialized tools and techniques
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allow you to trim an edit point. These tools and techniques allow you to trim more easily and accurately, reducing the number of steps involved and
maintaining the integrity of the sequence.
You can perform trimming tasks to selected edit points of a clip, or selected edit points from multiple clips. There are new icons for the tools, and
when selecting edits with trim tools, the edit point is highlighted with a color related to the trim you perform.
You can use keyboard shortcuts on selected edit points to trim clips in the timeline. Trimming in Premiere Pro has a keyboard driven workflow, as
there are keyboard shortcuts for every trimming task. See Timeline trimming.
You can use Trim Mode to help you dynamically trim edit points using buttons, or keyboard shortcuts. You can use the J-K-L keys to dynamically
trim clips. See Work in Trim Mode.
You can trim clips in the Speech Analysis pane of the Metadata panel, setting In points and Out points on selected spoken words.
There are many keyboard shortcuts available for the job of trimming, however, a number of them aren't set by default. Go to Edit > Keyboard
Shortcuts (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Keyboard Shortcuts (Mac OS) to set trimming shortcuts.
To the top
Working with audio clips in the Source Monitor
You can work with audio clips, and audio from audio and video clips in the Source Monitor. You can view audio waveforms, scrub audio
waveforms, and zoom in and out on audio waveforms.
View audio waveforms
When opening an audio clip in the Source Monitor, audio waveforms appear automatically. When opening an audio and video clip in the Source
Monitor, you can also view audio waveforms.
To view audio waveforms in an audio and video clip, choose Audio Waveforms from the monitor's panel menu.
You can view the audio waveforms for clips containing multiple audio channels when opening them in the Source Monitor.
Scrub the audio waveform in the Source Monitor
In the Source Monitor, drag to the left or right anywhere on the waveform.
The playhead appears where you click and the audio clip is played, forward or backward, at the speed at which you drag across, or scrub,
the clip.
Zoom in or out on an audio waveform in the Source Monitor
You can zoom into an audio waveform in the Source Monitor to better identify locations for markers, In points, or Out points.
1. Double-click an audio clip in the Project panel to open it in the Source Monitor.
2. To zoom in horizontally, drag either end of the zoom scrolling bar that runs below the time bar in the Source Monitor.
The waveform of all channels, and the time bar, will expand or contract horizontally.
3. To zoom in vertically, do one of the following:
To zoom in on a single channel, drag either end of the vertical zoom bar that runs next to the decibel ruler on the right side of the
Source Monitor.
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To zoom in on all channels simultaneously, Shift-drag either end of the vertical zoom bar that runs next to the decibel ruler on the right
side of the Source Monitor.
The waveform of one or all channels, and the decibel ruler, will expand or contract vertically.
In Apple MacBook Pro computers, you can move two fingers on the trackpad vertically or horizontally on the zoom scroll bar to zoom in and
zoom out on audio waveforms. To scrub audio, move two fingers vertically or horizontally anywhere in the Source Monitor except the zoom
scroll bar.
Return to default vertical zoom level
Double-click the vertical zoom bar.
Return to previous vertical zoom level
After returning to the default zoom level, double-click the vertical zoom bar.
To the top
Working with clips in the Source Monitor
The Source Monitor panel holds versatile tools, and methods for working with clips. You can use tools and techniques to set, move, or remove In
and Out points, cue the playhead to any of these points, or preview the frames at their locations.
Open a clip in the Source Monitor
To open a clip in the Source Monitor, do one of the following:
Double-click the clip in the Project panel.
Double-click the clip in a Timeline panel.
Open and view recent clips from the Source Monitor
You can load more than one clip at a time in the Source Monitor. However, you can view only one clip at a time. Recently loaded clips are
available from a menu at the top of the Source Monitor.
1. In the Source Monitor tab, click the downward-pointing triangle to open the tab menu.
2. Select the name of the clip you want to view.
Note: You can assign keyboard shortcuts for selecting and closing clips in the Source Monitor.
Set In points and Out points in the Source Monitor
To set an In Point or Out point in the Source Monitor, do any of the following:
To mark an In point, drag the playhead to the frame you want. Then click the Mark In Point button , or press the I key.
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To mark an Out point, drag the playhead to the frame you want. Then click the Mark Out Point button , or press the O key.
After you mark In and Out points, you can always change your mind before you edit the clip into the sequence. Drag the In or Out points to a
new position in the time ruler. You can also drag the playhead to a new frame and use the Mark In or Mark Out buttons to set new In or Out
points.
Move In point and Out point together
Do one of the following:
For a video or audio clip, in the Source Monitor time ruler, drag the In/Out Grip (textured area at the center of the shaded span between
the In and Out points). Make sure that you drag the textured area; otherwise, you simply cue the playhead.
Dragging the In/Out Grip for a video clip or track
For an audio clip, you can also drag the In/Out Grip, or the grey area between the In point and Out point above the waveform to the left
or right.
Dragging the audio In/Out Grip for an audio clip or track
The In and Out points move together, keeping the duration between them constant.
This technique also works with sequence In and Out points using the Program Monitor or a Timeline panel.
Adjusting edit points in the Source Monitor
Sometimes, adjusting In and Out points after a clip is in the Timeline is necessary. If you open a clip from the Timeline into the Source Monitor,
you can drag the In/Out Grip in the Source Monitor to set new locations for the In and Out points. This technique is useful for using a different
section of a clip in the Timeline. In fact, it is one way to perform a Slip edit.
Note: Viewing in and out frames this way works only with clips that you’ve opened in the Source Monitor from a sequence.
1. Set the In and Out points in the Source Monitor.
2. Edit the clip into the Timeline.
3. Double click the clip to load it into the Source Monitor.
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4. Drag the In/Out Grip (textured area at the center of the shaded span between the In and Out points), as you did in the section, Move In point
and Out point together.
Cue to an In point or Out point
You use the Source Monitor to cue a frame for a clip and the Program Monitor to cue the current frame for a sequence.
Do one of the following:
To cue the current time to an In point, click the Go To In Point button
.
To cue the current time to an Out point, click the Go To Out Point button
.
Cue to the previous or next edit
You can use the Down arrow key for the Go To Next Edit Point command and the Up arrow key for the Go To Previous Edit Point command. This
command works across all tracks, selected or not.
Note: You can also use buttons to go to the next edit in any of the targeted tracks in the Timeline, click the Go To Next Edit Point button
go to the previous edit in any of the targeted tracks, click the Go To Previous Edit Point button .
and, to
The Go To Next Edit Point and Go To Previous Edit Point buttons are not available by default, however, they can be placed alongside the other
playback controls with the button editor.
Remove source clip In point or Out point
Double-click a clip in the Project panel to open it in the Source Monitor.
Note: Timeline clip instances are not source clips. It is not possible to remove In points or Out points from timeline clips which have been loaded
in the Source monitor.
Choose from the following three commands:
Marker > Clear In
Marker > Clear Out
Marker > Clear In and Out
Note: You can also Alt-click (Windows), or Option-click (Mac OS) the Mark In button or the Mark Out button in the Source Monitor to clear an In
or Out.
To the top
Timeline trimming
For quickly trimming clips, do so in the Timeline. You can use a combination of trim tools and keyboard shortcuts to select and adjust edit points.
You can select edit points and adjust them using the mouse, keyboard shortcuts, or the numeric keypad.
Video tutorial: Trimming in Premiere Pro
Watch this video for an overview of the
Trimming features in Premiere Pro.... Read
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This video tutorial by Todd Kopriva and video2brain shows you how to edit quickly and precisely with the keyboard, including the new trim mode,
dynamic trimming commands, and J-K-L trimming commands. Learn how to apply these techniques to your work in this video.
This video tutorial by Maxim Jago and video2brain shows you how to trim faster and easier in the Timeline in Premiere Pro.
Selecting edit points
Before you can use timeline trimming techniques in Premiere Pro, it is important to select edit points for clips in the Timeline first. You can select
edit points with the mouse, or by using keyboard shortcuts.
Selecting edit points with the mouse
Clicking with the mouse to select an edit point in the Timeline uses the location of the mouse cursor, the active trim tool, and the modifier keys.
Note: Dragging, as opposed to clicking and releasing the mouse to select an edit point, both selects an edit point and performs the trim.
Selection tool: Clicking the edit point with the Selection tool chooses a Trim In or Trim Out edit point selection, depending on which side of
the edit point you click. If you Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) on the edit point with the Selection tool, the cursor displays a
Ripple Edit or Rolling Edit tool. Moving the Trim In or Trim Out points is called a regular edit.
Ripple Edit tool: Clicking the edit point with the Ripple Edit tool chooses a Ripple In or Ripple Out edit point selection, depending on the
side of the edit point you click. If you use Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) on the edit point with the Ripple Edit tool, the
cursor shows the Ripple Edit or Rolling Edit tool and chooses Trim Out, Rolling, or Trim In depending on which side of the edit point you
click.
Rolling Edit tool: Clicking the edit point with the Rolling Edit tool selects both sides of the edit point. If the Ctrl-click (Windows) or
Command-click (Mac OS) modifier is held with the Rolling Edit tool, the cursor shows the Ripple Edit or Rolling Edit tool and chooses Ripple
Out, Rolling, or Ripple In, depending on which side of the edit point you click.
Edit cursors for the various edit types
A. Regular Edit cursor B. Regular Edit cursor C. Ripple Edit cursor D. Ripple Edit Cursor E. Rolling Edit Cursor
Note: Track targeting does not affect selection of edit points when using the mouse.
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Using modifier keys with trim tools
Use the Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) modifier key to override normal linked
only select the edit point that is clicked. This technique is useful for setting up a split edit (L or J-cut).
Use the Shift modifier key to add or remove other edit points to the current selection.
You can combine both the Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) key and Shift to ignore linked clip selection while adding or removing other edit
points from the current selection.
Choose Edit > Preferences > Trim (Windows), or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Trim (Mac OS), to set the Allow Selection tool to choose
Rolling and Ripple trims without modifier key. This changes the way that the Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) modifier key
works with the Selection tool. If the preference is checked, then the use of the modifier key is inverted.
Trimming in Timeline gaps
You can select the edit point of an empty gap between clips and use timeline trimming commands.
Regular Trim: This technique works the same as selecting the clip side of the edit point for the opposite direction. For example, selecting a Trim
Out on the right side of an empty gap is equivalent to selecting the Trim In of the adjacent clip.
Rolling Trim: If one side of the edit point is an empty gap then it behaves the same as a regular trim.
Ripple Trim: Trimming the gap would move the edit point and shift all trailing clips. Trimming the gap includes the adjacent clip, in a different
position but with its In point remaining the same.
Trim type context menu
You can also select an edit point (or change the trim type of an existing edit point) by rightmenu that appears. The menu contains the following items:
Ripple Trim In
Ripple Trim Out
Rolling Edit
Trim In
Trim Out
Apply Default Transitions
Select multiple edit points
Multiple selection of edit points is possible, including more than one per track. Use the Shift key with any trim tool to select additional edit points.
You can also drag to select multiple edit points. To select multiple edit points, drag a marquee around a group of clips. A Ripple Out trim type is
always chosen, but can be changed after the selection is made with a keyboard shortcut (Shift-T (Windows), or Ctrl-T (Mac OS).), or select Ripple
Trim In from the context menu.
You cannot drag a marquee around the first edits in the timeline with the Ripple Edit tool, however, you can with the Rolling Edit tool, and then
switch the trim function with the keyboard shortcut (Shift-T (Windows), or Ctrl-T (Mac OS).).
You can select more than one edit point per track, choosing all the edit points within the marquee selection box. Use the Shift modifier key to add
or remove other edit points to the selection. The Program Monitor switches to trim mode automatically as soon as the marquee selection is
complete.
To select multiple edit points at the very beginning of a sequence as a Ripple In edit, drag a marquee around the clips with the Rolling Edit tool,
and then press Shift+T (Windows), or Ctrl+T (Mac OS) to toggle to a Ripple In edit selection.
If there are other edit points selected besides the one that you click, then they all change their type to the selected type. The Apply Default
Transitions menu item applies the current default video or audio transition to each of the currently selected edit point locations.
Keyboard shortcuts for edit point selection
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There are keyboard shortcuts for selecting edit points that use the playhead position and track targets.
Note: Unlike selecting with the mouse, edit points on linked clips are not automatically selected unless the associated tracks are also targeted.
Select Nearest Edit Point There are 5 "Select Nearest Edit Point" shortcuts you can assign in the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box, one for each
type of trim:
Select Nearest Edit Point as Ripple In
Select Nearest Edit Point as Ripple Out
Select Nearest Edit Point as Trim In
Select Nearest Edit Point as Trim Out
Select Nearest Edit Point as Rolling
If the playhead is not already at an edit point, it is moved to the nearest edit point either forward or backward. Then the edit points at the playhead
on all targeted tracks are added to the current edit point selection, using the type of trim for the particular shortcut. You can use the menu item (or
shortcut) for Deselect All to deselect edit points before using these shortcuts to start a new selection.
Go to Next Edit Point and Go to Previous Edit Point Moves the playhead to the closest next or previous edit point on the targeted tracks. They
maintain edit point selection at the playhead on targeted tracks, using the same type of trim as the previous selection. When there is no active edit
point selection, these shortcuts only move the playhead.
In trim mode, you can move to the next and previous edit points with the same shortcuts without leaving trim mode and edit points remain
selected.
Go to Next Edit Point on Any Track and Go to Previous Edit Point on Any Track Moves the playhead to another selected edit point, except
that all tracks are considered, not only targeted tracks. The playhead is moved, but edit points do not move. This shortcut exits trim mode.
Toggle Trim Type Cycles between the types of trims in the current edit point selection. Using the keyboard shortcut Shift+T (Windows), or Ctrl+T
(Mac OS), the cycling order is Ripple Out, Ripple In, Trim Out, Trim In, and rolling. The trim type is changed from the current type to the next type
in the order, wrapping back to Ripple Out from Rolling.
Performing a Timeline trim
Trims can be performed in the Timeline three different ways:
The edit points can be dragged with the mouse to a new position in time.
Keyboard shortcuts can be used to trim all selected edit points to the right or the left by one or more frames.
Type frame amounts the numeric keypad with "+" and "-" and the Enter key to trim all the selected edit points forward, or backward.
When using the numeric keypad to type a number of frames to trim, you do not need to type the "+" sign when entering positive numbers.
The keyboard shortcuts and the +/- keypad entry can also be used in the Program Monitor in trim mode. In addition, there are several buttons and
other user interface elements such as the video displays in the Program Monitor that can be used to perform a trim during trim mode. See Working
in trim mode.
You can only trim a clip longer until you encounter another clip in the same track, and you cannot perform a trim beyond the duration of the media
in the clip. When trimming multiple tracks, you can trim until either you encounter another clip in the same track, or you reach the duration of the
shortest clip in the group.
Performing ripple trims can cause clips on different tracks to get out
tracks shift during a ripple trim. Out-of-sync indicators draw in the visible part of a clip in the Timeline, not just at the head of the clip. That way, if
you zoom in or scrolling so that the head isn't visible, you can still see that a clip is out-of-sync with its linked parts.
Trim by dragging with the mouse
After selecting one or more edit points, you can simply drag the edit point selection in the Timeline to perform a trim. While dragging, the cursor
changes to the appropriate trim type based on the edit point that is clicked to start the drag.
When dragging an edit point with the mouse in the Timeline, the trim snaps to other edit points, markers, and the playhead if the Snap button is
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on. There is also an existing keyboard shortcut to toggle snapping on or off that can be used during dragging.
Trim with keyboard shortcuts
The following keyboard shortcuts perform a trim whenever there is an active edit point selection, even if you are not in trim mode. If the full amount
of the trim cannot be performed, the allowable amount is used and a tool tip indicates that the trim is blocked or limited by media or minimum
duration.
Trim Backward and Trim Forward Moves the edit points by one frame in the specified direction (left for backward, and right for forward).
Trim Backward Many and Trim Forward Many Moves the edit points by five frames, or some other number of frames which is settable in the
large trim offset preference. To change the large trim offset, choose Edit > Preferences > Trim (Windows), or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Trim
(Mac OS), and then enter a new amount of frames for large trim offset.
Extend Selected Edit to Playhead Moves the selected edit point which is nearest the playhead to the position of the playhead, much like a
rolling edit.
Note: The existing Extend Previous Edit to Playhead and Extend Next Edit to Playhead are still available, since they operate on clips on targeted
tracks without needing an active edit point selection.
Ripple Trim Previous Edit to Playhead and Ripple Trim Next Edit to Playhead Ripple trims the previous or next edit point to the Playhead.
You do not need to select an edit point to perform a ripple trim to playhead edit. Like the Extract command, a ripple trim to playhead edit does not
affect clips on other tracks that are locked or not sync-locked, but all other tracks will have the region ripple-deleted. Sequence In and Out points
are not affected.
Note: A ripple trim to the playhead at the beginning or ending of a clip is sometimes called "Top and Tail" in editing terminology.
Trim with numeric keypad entry
You can specify a numeric offset using the numeric keypad whenever there is an active edit point selection, even if you are not in trim mode.
When the Timeline is active, the current timecode indicator on the left becomes a text box that shows the numbers that are typed on the numeric
keypad. The "+" key moves the trim forward to the right, increasing in time (you can omit the "+" key, and type a number). The "
trim backward to the left, decreasing in time. The numeric offset is typically a small number of frames, so any number from 1 to 99 is treated as
frames. If you want to specify a timecode, then use the numeric period key "." to separate the minute:second:frame parts for timecode entry. Press
the numeric keypad Enter key to perform the trim using all of the currently selected edit points.
When the Program Monitor is in trim mode, then you can also use the numeric keypad to perform a trim when the Program Monitor is active.
See this article by Clay Asbury on the Premiumbeats.com website for using the Play Around button and Loop button to assist dynamic trimming in
the Timeline.
Trim with the selection tool
You can change a clip’s In point or Out point by dragging its edit point with the selection tool in a Timeline panel. As you drag, the current In or Out
point appears in the Program Monitor. A tool tip displays the number of frames that you are trimming: a negative value if you are dragging the
edge toward the beginning of the sequence and a positive number if you are dragging toward the end of the sequence. You cannot trim past the
original In and Out points of the source footage.
Click the selection tool
and do one of the following:
To edit the In point, drag the left edge of the clip once the Trim-in icon
appears.
To edit the Out point, drag the right edge of the clip once the Trim-out icon
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appears.
Trimming a clip
Trimming in this way affects only a single clip's edit point and doesn’t affect adjacent clips. As you trim with the Selection tool, a gap in
the Timeline is left behind. To trim multiple edit points at once or to shift adjacent clips, see Making ripple and rolling edits in the Timeline
and Make slip and slide edits.
Press Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) using the Selection tool to switch to the Ripple Edit tool.
Note: To trim only one track of a linked clip, press Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) as you click with a Trim icon. You do not need to hold
down the Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) key once you initiate the trim.
Trim with the playhead
You can trim a clip in a sequence to the location of the playhead. However, set up these keyboard shortcuts to do so first:
Trim In Point To Playhead
Trim Out Point To Playhead
Select Nearest Edit Point as Trim In
Select Nearest Edit Point as Trim Out
To set keyboard commands for trimming, see Customize or load keyboard shortcuts.
To the top
Making ripple and rolling edits in the Timeline
In Premiere Pro, you can perform a ripple or rolling edit directly on the tracks in the Timeline, using Trim mode, or the Trim Monitor.
About ripple and rolling edits
When you want to adjust the cut, or edit point, between two clips, use variations of simple trimming known as ripple edits and rolling edits. By
using specialized tools, make adjustments in a single action that would otherwise require multiple steps to accomplish. When you perform ripple
and rolling edits with trim tools, the affected frames appear in the Program Monitor side by side. Keyboard shortcuts are available for ripple and
rolling edits. Furthermore, the edit point is selected when you click it with a Ripple Edit or Rolling Edit tool.
Program Monitor and Timeline during a rolling edit
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Rolling edit
A rolling edit trims an adjacent Out point and In point simultaneously and by the same number of frames. This action effectively moves the edit
point between clips, preserving other clips’ positions in time and maintaining the total duration of the sequence. Pressing Alt (Windows) or Option
(Mac OS) when you begin to perform a rolling edit overrides video and audio linking, allowing you to create a split edit (L-cut or J-cut).
In this rolling edit, the edit point is moved earlier in time—shortening the previous clip, lengthening the next clip, and maintaining the program
duration.
Ripple edit
A ripple edit trims a clip and shifts subsequent clips in the track by the amount you trim. Shortening a clip by ripple editing shifts all clips after the
cut back in time; conversely, extending a clip shifts the clips that follow the cut forward in time. When you’re making a ripple edit, empty space on
one side of the cut is treated as a clip and shifts in time just as a clip would be. Pressing Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) when you begin to
perform a ripple edit ignores the link between video and audio.
Make a rolling edit using the Rolling Edit tool
1. Select the Rolling Edit tool
.
2. In a Timeline panel, drag left or right from the edge of the clip you want to change. The same number of frames added to the clip are
trimmed from the adjacent clip. Alt-drag (Windows) or Option-drag (Mac OS) to affect only the video or audio portion of a linked clip.
Timeline panel during (above) and after (below) a roll edit
Make rolling edits (extend edits) with the playhead
You can move the In point or Out point of a clip in a sequence to the playhead, without leaving gaps in the sequence. This type of editing is
sometimes called extending an edit, or using extend edit commands.
Make a rolling (extend) edit to the playhead
Do the following:
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1. Click a track header to target the track containing the clip you want to trim.
2. Drag the playhead to the location in the sequence to which you want to extend the clip In point or Out point.
3. Click the Rolling Edit tool, and then select the edit point.
4. Choose Sequence > Extend Selected Edit to Playhead, or press E.
Note: If there is not enough media to extend to the playhead, Premiere Pro extends the clip to the end of the available media.
Make a ripple edit using the Ripple Edit tool
1. Select the Ripple Edit tool
.
2. In a Timeline panel, position the pointer over the In or Out point of the clip you want to change until the Ripple-in icon
or the Ripple-out
appears, and drag left or right. Subsequent clips in the track shift in time to compensate for the edit, but their durations remain
icon
unchanged. Alt-drag (Windows) or Option-drag (Mac OS) to affect only the video or audio portion of a linked clip.
Timeline panel during (above) and after (below) a ripple edit
When using the Selection tool, you can toggle from the Trim-in or Trim-out icon to a Ripple edit icon by pressing the Ctrl (Windows) or
Command (Mac OS) key. Release Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) to revert to the Selection tool.
To the top
Make slip and slide edits
Just as ripple and rolling edits allow you to adjust a cut between two clips, slip and slide edits are useful when you want to adjust two cuts in a
sequence of three clips. When you use the Slip or Slide tool, the Program Monitor displays the four frames involved in the edit side by side, except
when editing audio only.
Program Monitor and Timeline during a slide edit
Though Slip and Slide tools are typically employed on the center of three adjacent clips, each tool functions normally even if the clip is adjacent to
a clip on one side and blank space on the other.
Make a slip edit
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A slip edit shifts a clip’s In and Out points forward or backward by the same number of frames in a single action. By dragging with the Slip tool,
you can change a clip’s starting and ending frames without changing its duration or affecting adjacent clips.
In this slip edit, a clip is dragged left, moving its source In and Out points later in time.
1. Select the Slip tool
.
2. Position the pointer on the clip you want to adjust, and drag left to move the In and Out points later in the clip, or drag right to move the In
and Out points earlier in the clip.
Premiere Pro updates the source In and Out points for the clip, displaying the result in the Program Monitor and maintaining the clip and
sequence duration.
Slip a clip with keyboard shortcuts
You can use keyboard shortcuts to slip a clip in a Timeline. To slip a clip using keyboard shortcuts, select a clip (or multiple clips), and then do the
following:
To slip clip selection left five frames:
Press Ctrl+Alt+Shift+Left (Windows).
Press Option+Shift+Command+Left (Mac OS).
To slip clip selection left one frame:
Press Alt+Shift+Left (Windows).
Press Option+Command+Left (Mac OS).
To slip clip selection right five frames:
Press Ctrl+Alt+Shift+Right (Windows).
Press Option+Shift+Command+Right (Mac OS).
To slip clip selection right one frame:
Press Alt+Shift+Right (Windows).
Press Option+Command+Right (Mac OS).
For more information about slipping clips with keyboard shortcuts, see this video by Todd Kopriva and video2brain.
When performing a slip edit with keyboard shortcuts, it is helpful to have the playhead placed on the clip you are slipping so that you can see
the slip edit being performed. You can use this method to align a video action with an audio cue.
Make a slide edit
A slide edit shifts a clip in time while trimming adjacent clips to compensate for the move. As you drag a clip left or right with the Slide tool, the Out
point of the preceding clip and the In point of the following clip are trimmed by the number of frames you move the clip. The clip’s In and Out
points (and hence, its duration) remain unchanged.
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In this slide edit, a clip is dragged left so that it starts earlier in the sequence, shortening the preceding clip and lengthening the following clip.
1. Select the Slide tool
.
2. Position the pointer on the clip you want to adjust, and drag left to move the Out point of the preceding clip and the In point of the following
clip earlier in time, or drag right to move the Out point of the preceding clip and the In point of the following clip later in time.
When you release the mouse, Premiere Pro updates the In and Out points for the adjacent clips, displaying the result in the Program Monitor
and maintaining the clip and sequence duration. The only change to the clip you moved is its position in the sequence.
Slide a clip with keyboard shortcuts
You can use keyboard shortcuts to slide a clip in a Timeline. To slide a clip using keyboard shortcuts, select a clip (or multiple clips), and then do
the following:
To slide clip selection left five frames:
Press Alt+Shift+, (Windows).
Press Option+Shift+, (Mac OS).
To slide clip selection left one frame:
Press Alt+, (Windows).
Press Option+, (Mac OS).
To slide clip selection right five frames:
Press Alt+Shift+. (Windows).
Press Option+Shift+. (Mac OS).
To slide clip selection right one frame:
Press Alt+. (Windows)
Press Option+. (Mac OS).
For more information about sliding clips with keyboard shortcuts, see this video by Todd Kopriva and video2brain.
Nudging clips
You can move clips forward or backward in the Timeline by one frame at a time, or by a large frame offset. This command is called "nudging".
When you are nudging a clip (or multiple clips), you are moving it forward, or backward in the timeline. When the clips being nudged are next to
another clip, it overwrites clips as you nudge.
To nudge clips, select a clip (or multiple clips), and then do the following:
To nudge the clip selection 5 frames to the left:
Press Alt+Shift+Left (Windows).
Press Command+Shift+Left (Mac OS).
To nudge the clip selection 1 frame to the left:
Press Alt+Left (Windows).
Press Command+Left (Mac OS).
To nudge a clip 5 frames to the right:
Press Alt+Shift+Right (Windows).
Press Command+Shift+Right (Mac OS).
To nudge clip selection one frame to the right:
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Press Alt+Right (Windows).
Press Command+Right (Mac OS).
For more information about nudging clips with keyboard shortcuts, see this video by Todd Kopriva and video2brain.
Making split edits
You can create a split edit by unlinking the video from the audio in adjoining clips in a sequence, and then trimming audio separately from video so
that the video of one overlaps the audio of the other. Typically, a rolling edit (or extend edit) is used for this task.
Pressing Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) when you begin to perform a rolling edit temporarily unlinks video and audio, allowing you to more
easily create a split edit (L-cut or J-cut).
To the top
Work in trim mode
Trim mode is the state where the Program Monitor is in a special trim mode configuration. Certain keyboard shortcuts, button clicks, and J-K-L
playback perform a trim operation, like a ripple or rolling edit. These behaviors are all part of dynamic trimming. Timeline trimming serves many
purposes, and you can trim in it dynamically, but trim mode is ideal for fine-tuning an edit. While working in trim mode, you trim by adding or
subtracting frames from the edit point as the edit plays back in a loop in dynamic fashion.
Note: It is not necessary to loop playback in trim mode to refine edit. Some editors prefer to pause playback, and then click buttons, (or use J-K-L
keyboard shortcuts), and then begin looping again.
Editors use trim mode for such tasks as, refining dialogue, pacing a chase scene, or creating split edits.
For information about how to operate J-K-L scrubbing, see this page in Premiere Pro Help.
Speed trimming workflow in Premiere Pro by using the J-K-L keys, see how in this video by Maxim Jago and Learn by Video.
See this article by Clay Asbury on the Premiumbeat.com website for more information about using Trim Mode in Premiere Pro.
Trim mode interface
The Program Monitor automatically switches some of its buttons and the user interface to show a simplified 2-up display when in trim mode. It
switches back to the standard Program Monitor configuration when exiting trim mode.
Within the Program Monitor, the video plays in a 2-up configuration, temporarily expanding and covering both left and right sides with a single
video view. The trim buttons and shift counters are placed directly below the video. All of the sequence's video tracks are composited together and
the audio heard during playback is all of the sequence's audio tracks mixed together. The playhead loops in the Timeline during playback so that
you can see the range of time that is being played.
A. Outgoing edit point B. Outshift counter C. Trim backward many D. Trim backward E. Add default transition F. Trim forward G. Trim forward
many H. Inshift counter I. Trim type Indicator J. Incoming edit point
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Entering trim mode
Prior to entering trim mode, a good strategy is to select one or more edit points with a trim tool in the Timeline. These selected edits remain intact
once you enter trim mode. You can also enter trim mode without selecting edits ahead of time.
To enter trim mode, do one of the following:
Choose Sequence > Trim Edit (or press the T key).
If there is an active edit point selection, the playhead moves to the nearest selected edit point. If there is no edit point selected, then the
playhead automatically moves to the nearest edit point on the targeted tracks. Edit points are selected on the targeted tracks with the trim
type set to a rolling edit regardless of the currently active tool. If the Program Monitor is already in trim mode, then press the T key to toggle
out of trim mode.
Double-click an edit point with the Selection, Ripple Edit, or Rolling Edit tools in the Timeline.
Shift-select, or marquee
selected edit point and setting the Program Monitor to trim mode with the tool's trim type.
You can now trim clips in trim mode. To begin trimming, see Reviewing trims.
When double-clicking an edit point that has already been selected, be sure to use the same tool and same modifier keys that you used to
initially select the edit point, since the first click reselects the edit point based on the standard selection rules. The Program Monitor appears in
trim mode automatically.
In the Timeline, you can select additional edit points within the same sequence and remain in trim mode. You can also make changes in the
Timeline such as zooming in/out, scrolling, or changing track height, and remain in trim mode. If you are already in trim mode, you can use the
keyboard shortcuts for Go to Next Edit Point and Go to Previous Edit Point and select new edit points and remain in trim mode. If you are not in
trim mode, then these shortcuts move the playhead rather than select edit points.
To exit trim mode, see Exit trim mode.
Reviewing trims
To review the currently applied trims while the edit point selection is still active and you are in trim mode, press the Play button, or the Spacebar.
The playback loops around the current edit point selection, playing from a specified prerolling time before the first edit point and ending a specified
postrolling time after the last edit point. The prerolling and postrolling settings are set in Edit > Preferences > Playback (Windows), or Premiere Pro
> Preferences > Playback (Mac OS).
To stop playback, press the Play button or keyboard shortcut again, and the playhead is moved to the selected edit point nearest wherever you
stop.
J-K-L dynamic trim
When in trim mode, you can use combinations of the three shuttle keyboard shortcuts (J-K-L) to play the clips and perform a trim based on the
location of the playhead when playback stops. For details about using keyboard shortcuts for shuttling, see Using the J, K, and L keys to shuttle
video.
The type of the edit point at the playhead is used to determine which side is played. For Ripple Out or Trim Out, the left side view is played. For
Ripple In or Trim In, the right side view is played. For a rolling edit, both sides are played.
If you reach the media limit of the trim (no more heads or tails), playback pauses but the trim is not performed until you explicitly stop playback
with the Shuttle Stop shortcut. This technique allows you to play back or single
frame for the trim.
You can dynamically trim footage one frame at a time using J-K-L shortcuts. First select the edit point, then press the K key, and then tap
either the J, or the L keys.
Refining Trims in trim mode
While playing in trim mode using Play (which begins playback in a loop), you can make further refinements to the selected edit points using
buttons or keyboard shortcuts. Each time the loop plays back footage, you can modify the trim by clicking buttons, or pressing shortcuts. Each trim
you perform is immediately committed to the sequence. The edits update in the Timeline, although the resulting change only appears in the
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Program Monitor on the next loop. Continue to adjust and review the edit until you are satisfied with the trim.
Move on to trimming the next edit point by using the Go to Next Edit Point or Go to Previous Edit Point shortcuts (the Up Arrow, and Down Arrow
keys), or stop playback, if you have finished.
Use the following techniques to refine your trim:
Use the Trim Forward and Trim Backward buttons to trim by one frame at a time. The keyboard shortcuts for trimming forward or backward
by one frame at a time are as follows:
Press Ctrl+Left to trim backward. Press Ctrl+Right to trim forward (Windows).
Press Option+Left, to trim backward. Press Option+Right to trim forward (Mac OS).
Use the Trim Forward Many and Trim Backward Many buttons to trim by multiple frames at a time. The keyboard shortcuts for trimming
forward or backward by multiple frames at a time are as follows:
Press Ctrl+Shift+Left to trim backward. Press Ctrl+Shift+Right to trim forward (Windows).
Press Option+Shift+Left, to trim backward. Press Option+Shift+Right to trim forward (Mac OS).
Use the numeric keypad "+" or "-" offset entry to trim by the specified numeric offset.
Use the Apply Default Transitions to Selection button to add the default audio and video transitions to the edit point.
Use the Edit > Undo and Redo menu commands or shortcuts to change the trims during playback.
A typical editing workflow would be to first assemble the sequence using insert and overwrite edits. Then, refine your trims by moving from one
edit to the next in trim mode, using shortcuts.
Trim tools in trim mode
Within the trim mode interface, and when playback is paused, use any trim tool, including the Selection tool, to drag across a clip to trim. If you
drag over either clip, a ripple trim is performed. If you drag between the two clips, a rolling trim is performed. If you drag the Selection tool with the
Ctrl key (Windows), or Command key (Mac OS) held down on the outgoing clip, a regular trim is performed on that side of the edit. If you drag with
the same modifier key held down on the incoming clip, a regular trim is performed on that side of the edit.
The behavior of dragging across clips in trim mode on the edit point is the same as it is with the trim tools in the Timeline. Dragging to the left
trims backwards, and dragging to the right trims forward.
Exit trim mode
Trim mode requires that at least one edit point is selected and that the playhead is positioned at one of the selected edit points. Any action that
clears the edit point selection or moves the playhead away from an edit point exits trim mode.
To exit trim mode, do one of the following:
Click the Timeline.
Use the Sequence > Trim Edit menu command, or press the T key.
Close the Program Monitor with a menu item, keyboard shortcut, or workspace panel operation.
Scrub the playhead, or use any other Timeline or Program Monitor navigation command that moves off a selected edit point such as Step
Forward or Step Backward.
Select or drag clips, or select or change any other object in the Timeline.
Switch focus to another sequence.
Keyboard shortcuts for trim mode
The Play/Stop Toggle keyboard shortcut starts or stops the playback. It is available when you are in trim mode, and defaults to the Spacebar
key.
Use the Trim Forward and Trim Backward shortcuts to trim by one frame at a time.
Use the Trim Forward Many and Trim Backward Many shortcuts to trim by the Large Trim Offset frames at a time (the default is set to five
frames). The Large Trim Offset value can be changed in Edit > Preferences > Trim (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Trim (Mac
OS).
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Trimming and the History panel
The History panel shows each trim adjustment as an individual entry, whether using the keyboard, clicking one of the buttons or using J-K-L
shortcuts. Entering or exiting trim mode does not change the entries in the History panel, so you can still undo one or more of the trim adjustments
that were made during any trim mode session.
Slip and slide edits in trim mode
Since more than one trim edit point can be selected on a single track, it is possible to set up slip and slide edits by choosing a pair of opposing
ripple edit points on the same track. After the edit points are set up, you can use keyboard shortcuts to complete the trim either in the timeline, or
trim mode. Edit points can be Shift-selected to slip and slide multiple clips at the same time, as well.
Slip edit in trim mode
For details about slip edits with the Slip tool, see Making a slip edit.
To slip an edit using keyboard shortcuts, do the following:
1. Select the Ripple Edit tool.
2. Click the edit points at the In and Out point of the clip. Choose a Ripple In, followed by Ripple Out.
3. Enter trim mode by pressing T.
4. Use keyboard shortcuts, or press buttons to perform a slip edit while looping playback.
You can also use this technique in the Timeline. Press the keyboard shortcuts for Trim Forward or Trim Backward, or use the numeric keypad.
Slide edit in trim mode
For details about slide edits with the Slide tool, see Making a slide edit.
To slide an edit in trim mode, do the following:
1. Select the Ripple Edit tool.
2. Click the edit points at the In and Out point of the clip. Choose a Ripple Out, followed by Ripple In.
3. Enter trim mode by pressing T.
4. Use keyboard shortcuts, or press buttons to perform a slide edit while looping playback.
You can also use this technique in the Timeline. Press the keyboard shortcuts for Trim Forward or Trim Backward, or use the numeric keypad.
Asymmetrical trimming
Asymmetrical trimming can be performed in both the Timeline and in trim mode. An asymmetrical trim is when a combination of Ripple In and
Ripple Out edit points are selected on different tracks with one edit point selected per track. If there is more than one edit point selected per track,
all edit points move in the same direction.
The duration of the trim is the same on all tracks for each asymmetrical trim operation, but the direction that each edit point trims left or right may
be different.
The primary direction of the trim determines the primary edit point. The primary direction of trim is determined by clicking a tool, using a
keyboard shortcut, or clicking a button, and is the same on all tracks for each edit point that matches the primary trim type.
The edit points that do not match the primary edit point type trim in the opposite direction. See Specifying Primary Direction for Asymmetrical
Trims in the Timeline for details about how the primary edit point for an asymmetrical trim is determined.
Notice that the direction of the shifting of the trailing clips left or right are the same on all tracks, which help to keep all tracks in sync. This shifting
is due to the fact that the tail of the trimmed clip moves in a different direction for a Ripple In versus a Ripple Out edit point.
For example, if you drag an edit point to the right by ten frames with the Ripple Edit tool, then ten frames are added to the other edit points that
are set up as a Ripple Out points. Conversely, ten frames are subtracted from edit points set up as Ripple In points.
Note: These edit points do not actually move, but reveal more of the head material of the clip. Trailing clips on all tracks shift to the right by ten
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frames.
Combinations of Trim In and Trim Out trims are not considered asymmetrical even if the side of the edit point differs, since the movement of the
edit point is always in the same direction and there is no shifting of trailing clips.
Specifying Primary Direction for Asymmetrical Trims in the Timeline
For asymmetrical trims using the mouse in the Timeline, the primary direction is applied to the edit point that is dragged. If you select an edit point,
and then drag, it determines the direction and the primary trim type. For example, if you click the mouse to set up a Ripple In trim on Video 1 and
drag to the left, then all the Ripple In edit points that are selected on any track trim to the left and all the Ripple Out edit points trim to the right.
When using keyboard shortcuts for timeline trimming, the primary trim type is used from the previous mouse drag or trim mode operation, if the
edit point is still selected. If the edit point is no longer selected (or you never used the mouse or trim mode to trim with the primary type), then the
edit point on the highest-numbered video track with a selected edit point, or the lowest
points, is used as the primary type. Its direction is specified by the particular keyboard shortcut.
To the top
Work in the Trim Monitor
The Trim Monitor displays clip In and Out points at a cut so that you can see precisely which frames you are cutting. The left monitor shows the
outgoing clip to the left of the edit point, and the right monitor shows the incoming clip to the right of it.
Open or close the Trim Monitor
To open the Trim Monitor, select Window > Trim Monitor.
To close the Trim Monitor, click the close box
of the Trim Monitor.
Display the edit point you want to trim
1. In the Trim Monitor, click the Select Video Or Audio Track button.
2. Select the track you want to edit from the menu.
Preview the edit in the Trim Monitor
To preview the edit once, click the Play Edit button
.
To preview the edit repeatedly, enable the Loop button
and then click the Play Edit button.
Cancel an edit
Press Ctrl+Z (Windows) or Command+Z (Mac OS), or use the History palette.
Set trim preferences
You can set the number of frames that are trimmed when you use the Multiple-Frame Trim-in button
.
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or the Multiple-Frame Trim-out button
Choose Edit > Preferences > Trim (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Trim (Mac OS).
Make a rolling edit using the Trim Monitor
1. In the Trim Monitor, click the Select Video Or Audio Track button and select the track you want to edit.
2. Click in the Sync Lock box in the header of any track you want to shift when the rolling edit is made.
3. In a Timeline, place the playhead at the edit point. This will display the edit point in the Trim Monitor.
4. Do any of the following:
Position the pointer between the video images so that it changes into the Rolling Edit tool
; then drag left or right.
Drag the center timecode display left or right.
Drag the center jog disk left or right.
Click the timecode display between the views, type a valid timecode number to trim the edges of both clips to that frame, and press
Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
Select the boxed number above the center jog disk, type a negative number to trim both clips left or type a positive number to trim both
clips right, and press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
Click the button that corresponds with the number of frames you want to edit. The –1 and –5 buttons trim both clips left; +1 and +5 trim
both clips right.
Note: The large trim offset number is 5 frames by default, but you can set it to any number by specifying a number in the trim preferences.
Choose Edit > Preferences > Trim (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Trim (Mac OS).
Make a ripple edit using the Trim Monitor
1. In the Trim Monitor, click the Select Video Or Audio Track button and select the track you want to edit.
2. Click in the Sync Lock box in the header of any track you want to shift when the ripple edit is made.
3. In a Timeline, place the playhead at the edit point. This will display the edit point in the Trim Monitor.
4. Do any of the following:
Position the pointer in the left or right image so that it becomes the Trim-out icon
to ripple-edit the corresponding clip.
or Trim-in icon
Drag the timecode display under the left or right image to trim the corresponding clip.
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respectively, and drag left or right
Drag the left or right jog disk to trim the corresponding clip.
Drag the Outgoing Out Point icon
in the left view’s time ruler, or drag the Incoming In Point icon
in the right view’s time ruler.
Drag the Out Shift or In Shift timecode number left or right to ripple-edit the corresponding clip.
Click the left clip’s timecode display (for the left clip’s Out point) or the right clip’s timecode display (for the right clip’s In point), type a
valid timecode number to trim the corresponding clip to that frame, and press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
Click the Out Shift display (for the left clip’s Out point) or the In Shift display (for the right clip’s In point), type a negative number (to trim
left) or a positive number (to trim right), and press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
Franklin McMahon shows Ripple Edit, Rolling Edit, Slip, and Slide tools in this video on the Layers Magazine website.
Note: The Trim Monitor is available in Window > Trim Monitor, but it does not work with selected edit points in the Timeline. The Trim Monitor is
still useful for audio waveform trimming, and provides a method for trimming and monitoring a single track. However, Premiere Pro Trim Mode is a
better environment to trim than using the Trim Monitor.
To the top
Trim with Speech Analysis
You can add In and Out points to speech analysis text to select a portion of a master clip. You can insert or overwrite the selected portion directly
from the Speech Analysis section of the Metadata panel.
1. In the Speech Analysis section of the Metadata panel, select a word.
2. Do one of the following:
To set the word as an In point, click Mark In.
To set the word as an Out point, click Mark Out.
Premiere Pro sets In points at the beginnings of words, and Out points at the ends of words. Premiere Pro highlights the range between the
In point and Out point in the Speech Analysis section of the Metadata panel.
Online resources for the Trim Monitor
Here's a link to the section with the shortcuts for the Trim Monitor panel.
See Andrew Devis' tutorial “Learning the Tools 5: The Trim Monitor” on the Creative COW website.
See Andrew Devis' tutorial “Learning the Tools 1: Trim & Ripple Edit” on the Creative COW website.
Karl Soule shows how to use the Trim Monitor in Adobe Premiere Pro in this video tutorial.
For more information about trimming clips in the Trim Monitor, see this excerpt from An Editor's Guide to Premiere Pro by Richard Harrington,
Robbie Carman, and Jeff Greenberg.
This video by Paul Joy shows some of the shortcuts for the Trim Monitor, as well as making it clear that it's what customers want to be taught
about.
Adding clips to sequences
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Editing multi-camera sequences
Enhanced in Premiere Pro CC
For more information on the multi-camera source sequence enhancements in Premiere Pro CC, see Create multi-camera source sequences.
About multi-camera editing
Mark Clips for Synchronization
Create a multi-camera source sequence
Enabling audio in the multi-camera source sequence
Mapping mono track audio in a multi-camera source sequence
Create a multi-camera target sequence
About the Multi-Camera Monitor
Display the Multi-Camera Monitor
Record multi-camera edits
Play nested multi-camera clips in the Program Monitor
Play clips in the Multi-Camera Monitor
Change a camera angle
Cut to a camera angle
Rerecording a multi-camera target sequence
Adjust multi-camera edits in the Timeline
Insert or overwrite clips in a multi-camera sequence
To the top
About multi-camera editing
You can use the Multi-Camera Monitor to edit footage from multiple cameras, simulating live camera switching. Any type of media can be used in
a multi-camera editing session, including footage from video camcorders, from DSLR cameras and from still images.
You can edit footage for as many camera angles that your system can play back. You can add more than one clip per track to accommodate
camera stops. In addition to being able to edit more than four angles in a multi-camera edit, setting up a multi-camera source sequence is much
easier.
Keyboard shortcuts for multi-camera editing are assigned to the first nine number keys for the first nine cameras, by default. The number keys can
pressed to switch cameras as the multi-camera sequence plays. The keyboard shortcuts can also be used to change angles after completing a
multi-camera edit. See Change a camera angle.
You can cut to a new camera angle in a multi-camera sequence, as well. This action creates an edit point and switches the angle simultaneously.
Cutting to a new angle is usually done after a multi-camera edit is made. Cutting in a new angle is useful for adding b-roll, or a reaction shot.
Press the Ctrl key (Windows), or Command key (Mac OS) modifier and the number keys. See Cut to a camera angle.
There are 16 assignable keyboard shortcuts for selecting and switching cameras in the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box.
Note: Performance for multi-camera editing is format-specific, storage bandwidth must be sufficient for the number of cameras being used.
This video tutorial by Richard Harrington and Lynda.com shows how the multi-cam editing process has been expanded to include more camera
angles and a dynamic multi-cam source monitor. It also shares some computer considerations to keep in mind when editing multi-cam footage.
Video Tutorial: Multicamera Improvements
In this video by Todd Kopriva and
video2brain, you'll see just how easy it is to
create a new multicamera sequence and
switch between camera angles.... Read
by Todd Kopriva
http://blogs.adobe.com/pre...
274
More
Todd Kopriva is the Product Manager for
Customer Advocacy and Community
Engagement for digital video products at
Adobe Systems, Inc.
http://www.video2brain.com/en/lessons/multica...
Contribute your expertise to
Adobe Community Help
You assemble the multi-camera media by selecting marked video and audio clips and then synchronizing them in a multi-camera source
sequence. This multi-camera source sequence is then edited into a target sequence. The Multi-Camera Monitor controls the editing of the target
sequence.
Before editing a multi-camera sequence, it is important that all cameras have a common synchronization point (sync-point). When shooting a multicamera production:
Make sure each camera records a sync point. Shooting a common sync-point can be done with all cameras shooting a clapperboard, using a
camera flash, or other technique, at the same time.
Keep each camera recording to maintain synchronization.
After you capture, or ingest footage in Premiere Pro, use the following workflow to edit the footage:
1. Mark clips for synchronization.
Mark the sync point with In Points, Out Points, clip markers, or reassign the sync point for each camera to a specific timecode. (See Mark clips for
synchronization.).
If clips are synchronized by timecode (jam-synched) at the shooting location, you do not need to mark clips for synchronization.
2. Create the multi-camera source sequence.
A multi-camera source sequence contains the synchronized clips on different tracks. (See Creating a multi-camera source sequence).
3. Create the multi-camera target sequence.
Edit the multi-camera source sequence in a target sequence. You create the target sequence by editing the multi-camera source sequence into a
new sequence. Then you enable the multi-camera source sequence in the target sequence for multi-camera editing. (See Create a multi-camera
target sequence.)
4. Record the multi-camera edits.
In the Multi-Camera Monitor, you can view the footage of all cameras simultaneously and switch between cameras to choose footage for the final
sequence. (See Record multi-camera edits.)
5. Adjust and refine edits.
After you have recorded your multi-camera edit, You can do the following:
Rerecord the final sequence and substitute clips with footage from one of the other cameras.
Edit the multi-camera source sequence like any other sequence—using the standard editing tools and techniques, adding effects,
compositing using multiple tracks, including adjustment layers.
Change cameras after they have already been recorded.
Cut to a new angle.
(See Rerecording a multi-camera target sequence and Adjust multi-camera edits in the Timeline.)
275
Video tutorial: Multicam In Premiere Pro
Julio Cesar Roa shows you steps to edit
multicamera footage in Premiere Pro.
Premiere Pro supports an unlimited number
of camera angles, depending in the
capability of your computer.... Read More
by Julio Cesar Roa
http://vimeo.com/user37889...
Julio Cesar Roa is a video editor living in
Beverly Hills, New South Wales,
Australia.
http://vimeo.com/38573242
Contribute your expertise to
Adobe Community Help
To the top
Mark Clips for Synchronization
Before creating a multi-camera source sequence, it is important to mark clips for synchronization. Open each clip and then do one of the following
at the sync-point:
Mark an In Point at a sync-point at the beginning of a clip. For example, mark an In point where the clapperboard (slate) is clapped at the
head of a clip.
Mark an Out point at a sync-point at the end of a clip. For example, mark an Out point where the clapperboard is clapped at the tail of a clip.
Make a clip marker at a sync-point at any point during a clip. For example, if there is action at any point during a clip that can be used as a
sync-point, like an audio cue, cymbal crash, camera flash, and so on. Rename each marker so that they are identically named for
synchronization. Type the same clip marker name for each clip in the Marker dialog box, and then click OK. (See Add markers in the
Timeline)
Timecode can also be used to synchronize clips, and it does so automatically. However, timecode must be identical on all clips for them to
synchronize properly. If the timecode is identical on all the clips you plan to synchronize, you do not need to mark clips for synchronization. If you
use the hours value in source timecode as a camera designator, select the Ignore Hours option to use only minutes, seconds, and frames to
synchronize clips.
To stamp identical timecode on all clips, you can either record the cameras with jam-synched timecode on location, or modify the timecode for
each clip in Premiere Pro. (See Set timecode manually for a clip.).
To the top
Create a multi-camera source sequence
After the clips are marked, select them in the Project panel and use the Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence menu command to create a new
multi-camera source sequence. A dialog box allows you to synchronize clips and creates the multi-camera source sequence. To create a multicamera source sequence, do the following:
1. Choose Clip > Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence.
2. Choose the appropriate synchronization method:
In Points Synchronizes clips at their In points.
Out Points Synchronizes clips at their Out points.
Timecode Synchronizes clips to the specified timecode.
Clip markers Synchronizes clips to the specified clip marker.
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3. Click OK.
A new multi-camera source sequence is created in the same bin as your source footage. The icon for a multi-camera source sequence is
different from a regular sequence icon. After the sequence is created, it is important to enable audio in the multi-camera source sequence.
See Enabling audio in the multi-camera source sequence.
After you create a multi-camera source sequence, you can continue to add more camera angles to it.
To the top
Enabling audio in the multi-camera source sequence
By default, Premiere Pro only enables audio channel one in the multi-camera source sequence. For multi-camera editing workflow, enable each
audio track manually before editing the target sequence. To enable audio tracks for the multi-camera source sequence, do the following:
1. Open the multi-camera source sequence by selecting the multi-camera source sequence icon in the Project panel, right-click (Win) or Ctrlclick (Mac OS) the icon, and then choose Open In Timeline.
2. The Timeline opens. Select the audio tracks, and then enable the other audio tracks by clicking the Toggle Track Output button for each
audio track.
3. Now that all audio tracks are enabled, you can close the sequence.
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Mapping mono track audio in a multi-camera source sequence
If you are recording with a camera that records audio on to separate mono tracks (such as a Panasonic camera that shoots P2 media), you can
route these tracks to an adaptive track that can handle multiple audio tracks. Doing so makes it much simpler to handle audio in multi-camera
editing. To route mono track audio in a multi-camera source sequence, do the following.
1. In the Project panel, select clips for the multi-camera source sequence.
2. Choose Clip > Modify > Audio Channels
3. The Audio Channels dialog box launches, allowing you to see the location of the tracks. Audio channel one is the default for the clip. If the
primary audio was recorded on another channel, you can map it to audio channel one. See Change the source audio channel mapping for
one or more clips.
4. Choose Channel Format > Adaptive
5. Click OK
6. Open the multi-camera source sequence by selecting the multi-camera source sequence icon in the Project panel, right-click (Win) or Ctrlclick (Mac OS) the icon, and then choose Open In Timeline.
7. In the Timeline, select the audio tracks, and then enable the other audio tracks by clicking the Toggle Track Output button for each audio
track.
8. Now that all audio tracks are enabled, you can close the sequence and move forward with the multi-camera edit.
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Create a multi-camera target sequence
1. Choose the multi-camera source sequence icon in the Project panel and open the multi-camera source sequence. Right-click (Windows) or
Ctrl-click (Mac OS) the icon and select New Sequence From Clip from the context menu, or choose File > New > New Sequence From Clip.
2. The multi-camera source sequence is now located in the target sequence. For the Audio Follows Video workflow, the audio track needs to
be enabled.
To enable audio, do the following:
a. Unlink audio from video by selecting the clips and then choosing Clip > Unlink.
b. Right-click (Win) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) on the audio portion of the clip, and then choose > Multi-Camera > Enable.
The multi-camera target sequence is now enabled correctly, and can be edited in the Multi-Camera Monitor. See Record multi-camera edits.
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About the Multi-Camera Monitor
The Multi-Camera Monitor plays the footage from each camera and a preview of the final edited sequence. When you record the final sequence,
you click a camera preview to make it active and record footage from that camera. The active camera is indicated by a yellow border when in
playback mode and a red border when recording.
The Multi-Camera Monitor includes the standard playback and transport controls and keyboard shortcuts. The Play Around button
around the edit point in the preview display, including any preroll and postroll frames specified in General Preferences.
plays
In the Multi-Camera Monitor, clips are displayed in a grid. The grid automatically adjusts to the track count with a minimum grid size of 2 x 2. For
example, if there is one track, the multicam grid is 2 x 2. If there are seven cameras, the grid is 3 x 3. If there are 16 cameras, the grid is 4 x 4.
Turn time ruler numbers on and off in the Multi-Camera Monitor panel menu.
You can also use the Multi-Camera Monitor to change angles, and cut to new angles in multi-camera target sequences. See Change a camera
angle, and Cut to a camera angle.
Note: If the Multi-Camera Monitor displays the same frame in large previews on both the left and right side, the current clip is either not a multicamera clip or a multi-camera clip that is not enabled.
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Display the Multi-Camera Monitor
Select the multi-camera target sequence in a Timeline panel, and then choose Window > Multi-Camera Monitor.
The Multi-Camera Monitor launches with cameras separated in a grid.
To hide the recorded sequence preview and display only the camera previews, deselect Show Preview Monitor from the Multi-Camera
Monitor panel menu.
To resize the Multi-Camera Monitor, drag an edge or corner.
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Record multi-camera edits
You record a multi-camera edit in the multi-camera target sequence you have already assembled. (See Mark clips for synchronization, Create a
multi-camera source sequence, and Create a multi-camera target sequence.).
1. Select the multi-camera target sequence in a Timeline panel, and then choose Multi-Camera Monitor from the Window menu.
2. In the Multi-Camera Monitor, click the downward-pointing triangle next to Video 1 to open the Select Video Track menu. Select the video
track containing the multi-camera nested sequence. Then click the downward-pointing arrow next to Audio 1 to open the Select Audio Track
menu. Select the audio track containing the multi-camera nested sequence.
These are set to Video 1 and Audio 1 by default. In a typical workflow, you do not have to change these.
3. To record audio from the selected camera to the audio track, select Audio Follows Video in the Multi-Camera Monitor panel menu. Deselect
this option to record audio from the audio track selected in the source sequence. By default, the selected audio track is track one.
Note: In order to retain audio from more than one track simultaneously, mix all the desired tracks to a single track in the source sequence,
select the resulting audio track, and deselect the Audio Follows Video option.
4. In the Multi-Camera Monitor, click the Record On/Off Toggle button
.
Note: You can also switch into record mode during playback by clicking a camera preview in the Multi-Camera Monitor.
5. Click the playback button in the Multi-Camera Monitor to start playing the video from all cameras.
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The footage from the active camera is recorded in the multi-camera target sequence. A red border indicates the active camera, and the
large preview shows the content you are recording.
6. To switch to another camera and record its content, click its small preview in the Multi-Camera Monitor.
You can switch cameras using a keyboard shortcut. The 1 through 9 keys correspond to each camera. More shortcuts are available for
assignment in the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box.
7. When you are done recording, click the Stop button or the Record button to get out of recording mode. You can then use the playback
controls to preview your sequence without recording over it.
The target sequence is updated to show the edit points where each camera switch occurs. Camera 1 is the default track in the target
sequence. No recording occurs, so no edit points are created until you switch cameras. Each clip in the target sequence is labeled with the
camera number (MC1, MC2).
Another method is to not use the Record button or play through the sequence, but to simply move the playhead to the frame you want and
select a new camera.
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Play nested multi-camera clips in the Program Monitor
1. Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) the nested multi-camera sequence in a Timeline.
2. From the menu, select Multi-Camera, and make sure Enable is checked.
3. Select Multi-Camera again, and select the camera desired for viewing in the Program Monitor.
4. Do one of the following:
Use the playback controls in the Program Monitor.
Use the playback keyboard shortcuts (spacebar, J, K, L).
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Play clips in the Multi-Camera Monitor
1. Select the track header of the video track containing the clips in the multicamera target sequence, and then select Window > Multi-Camera
Monitor.
2. Do one of the following:
Use the playback controls in the Multi-Camera Monitor.
Use the playback keyboard shortcuts (spacebar, J, K, L).
A yellow border around a camera preview indicates the active camera. If you click a camera preview, the border turns red and you’ll begin
recording that camera footage to the sequence.
Note: The Multi-Camera Monitor previews the targeted video only. Effects applied to the target sequence don’t display in the Multi-Camera
Monitor, though effects applied to the source sequence do. To preview a multi-camera sequence with target-sequence effects applied, as well as
any additional video and audio tracks, preview it in the Program Monitor.
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Change a camera angle
If you are not satisfied with a particular angle after editing a multi-camera session, you can change the angle. Do the following:
1. Position the playhead on the edit that you wish to change.
2. Switch the active camera by clicking the camera’s preview in the Multi-Camera Monitor. You can also switch angles by pressing the number
keys.
Note: No recording occurs until you switch the active camera.
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Cut to a camera angle
You can cut to a new angle within a clip after you have recorded a multi-camera edit.
To cut to a new angle within a clip, place the playhead where you want to cut to. In the Multi-Camera Monitor, select the new camera angle by
Ctrl-clicking (Windows) or Command-clicking (Mac OS) the camera's preview, or by pressing Ctrl (Windows), or Command (Mac OS) and the
number keys.
The new angle is cut into the multi-camera sequence.
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Rerecording a multi-camera target sequence
If you are not satisfied with your multi-camera edit, you can reedit the sequence. To restore your multi-camera target sequence, choose Edit >
Undo. After your multi-camera sequence is restored, you can rerecord it. See Recording multi-camera edits.
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Adjust multi-camera edits in the Timeline
Do either of the following:
To change the camera in a multi-camera target sequence, select a clip in the Timeline and choose Clip > Multi-Camera > Camera
[1,2,3,4].
To change an angle or cut to a new angle using other methods, the Multi-Camera Monitor is needed. See Change a camera angle, and Cut
to a camera angle.
Use any of the standard editing tools to make changes in a Timeline panel. For example, a roll trim could be used to adjust the edit
points.
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Insert or overwrite clips in a multi-camera sequence
You can make edits to a multi-camera sequence from the original camera clips. For example, if one camera recorded a presenter and another
recorded a screen of presentation slides, you can intersperse shots of the presentation slides. You can use this technique as an alternative to
rerecording sections of the multi-camera sequence.
1. Double-click the multi-camera target sequence in a Timeline panel to open it in the Source Monitor.
Like the Multi-Camera Monitor, the Source Monitor displays footage previews of the original camera shots.
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2. Click the display for the footage you want to add to the sequence. The active display has a yellow border.
3. Choose the clip source that you want to edit (video, audio, or both) and drag the clip to a Timeline panel, or use the Insert or Overwrite
buttons in the Source Monitor.
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Source patching and track targeting
New in Premiere Pro CC
Adobe® Premiere® Pro lets you use source patcher presets to control insert and overwrite operations on your clips. This feature simplifies the edit
workflow, without taking away your ability to overwrite an empty gap.
Premiere Pro decouples source indicators from target tracks. Premiere Pro uses Source track indicators for the Insert and Overwrite operations. It
uses track targets for Paste, Match Frame, Go To Next/Previous Edit, and other edit operations.
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Using source patchers and source track indicators
Source patchers have three states: On, Off, Black/Silent. One patch is displayed for each video and audio track for the item in the Source monitor.
When an item is in the On state, the corresponding track is included in an edit operation.
When the track is in the Off state, edit changes are not reflected in the track.
When the track is in the Black/Silent state, a gap appears on the track instead of placing the source material.
Single-click a source indicator to toggle between the On and Off states. Press the Alt key to toggle to the Black/Silent state. Press Alt + Shift to
apply the operation to all source indicators of the same media type.
You can drag an assigned source track indicator and assign it to another track:
If the source track indicator is disabled, dragging it enables the indicator.
If the source track indicator is enabled already, dragging the indicator doesn't change its state.
If the destination track has another source track indicator, the two indicators swap tracks.
You can drag source indicators of the same type (audio or video) simultaneously while maintaining the relative vertical spacing between the two.
Press Shift while you click and then drag an assigned source track indicator.
If you click an empty source track indicator, the closest indicator above moves down to the track. If there is no indicator above, the closest
indicator below moves up to the track.
If you press Alt/Opt while clicking an empty source track indicator, the closest indicator below moves up to the track. If there is no indicator
below, the closest indicator above moves down to the track.
When there aren't enough tracks to display the source tracks, the last clip track contains a + icon in the source indicator column. If you click the
icon, new tracks are added to match the source.
Keywords: Video patching, track targeting, targeting tracks, video editing, source patching, source sequences
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Multi-Camera editing workflow
Enhanced in Premiere Pro CC October 2013 release (version 7.1)
About the multi-camera editing workflow
Multi-camera editing workflow
Using the Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog box
Organize and select camera angles to view in monitor's multi-camera mode
Mark clips for synchronization
Import Multiclip sequences from Final Cut Pro
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About the multi-camera editing workflow
Adobe® Premiere® Pro lets you create a multi-camera source sequence using clips from multiple camera sources. You can synchronize clips by
manually setting In points, Out points, or clip markers. Or you can use audio-based syncing to accurately align clips in a multi-camera sequence.
The Multi-Camera mode in the Program Monitor lets you edit clips shot on multiple cameras from different angles. To display the multicamera
editing interface inside the Program Monitor, select Multi-Camera from the pop-up menu in the Program Monitor. The Program monitor's MultiCamera mode displays a fully composited output like the regular playback mode, displaying any applied effects during playback.
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Multi-camera editing workflow
1. Create a project
Click New Project from the Premiere Pro Welcome screen, or select File > New Project.
In the New Project dialog box, enter a name for the project, and click OK to accept the defaults.
2. Import footage
Select File > Import. In the Import dialog box that appears, navigate to the directory containing your video and audio files. Select the files to import,
and click Open.
To select a range of files all at once, click the first file and Shift-click the last file while selecting all the files in between.
3. Create a multi-camera source sequence.
You can create a multicam source sequence in the following ways:
Select a bin containing assets and choose a sync method from the Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog. All clips in the bin are
processed based on the sync method and ordered alpha-numerically in each resulting source sequence.
Select assets manually and choose a sync method from the Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog. The order in which you selected
the clips determines the order in the resulting source sequence.
To use the Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog, select your clips or bin from the Project panel. Then, right-click (Win) or Ctrl-click (Mac)
the selected clips and select Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence from the context menu.
For more information on specifying the settings in the Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog, see Using the Multi-Camera Source Sequence
dialog box.
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4. Create a multi-camera target sequence.
Edit the multi-camera source sequence in a target sequence.
To create a target sequence, with the multi-camera source sequence selected in the Project panel, select File > New > Sequence From Clip. You
can also right-click (Win) or Ctrl-click (Mac) on the multi-camera source sequence and select New Sequence From Clip from the context menu.
Premiere Pro creates a new multi-camera target sequence, and opens it in the Program Monitor and Timeline panel.
5. Enable multi-camera editing in the Program Monitor.
To enable the multi-camera target sequence for multi-camera editing, select Multi-Camera from the pop-up menu in the Program Monitor. The
Program Monitor is now in Multi-Camera mode.
In the Multi-Camera mode, you can view the footage of all cameras simultaneously and switch between cameras to choose footage for the final
sequence.
6. Enable recording of multi-camera edits.
Click the Multi-Camera Record toggle button on. If the button is not visible in the button bar, click "+" at the lower right corner of the Program
Monitor to open the Button editor. Drag-and-drop the Multi-Camera Record button to the button bar.
7. Edit the multi-camera sequence.
In the Program Monitor or Timeline panel, press the spacebar or click the Play-Stop toggle button to begin playback. While the sequence is
playing, press the number key on the main keyboard to cut to the camera with that number. For more information about using keyboard shortcuts,
see Keyboard shortcuts for multi-camera editing.
The active camera’s clip has a red border around it in the multi-camera view in the Program Monitor as follows:
8. Adjust and refine edits.
After you have recorded your multi-camera edit, You can do the following:
Rerecord the final sequence and substitute clips with footage from one of the other cameras.
Edit the multi-camera source sequence like any other sequence—using the standard editing tools and techniques, adding effects,
compositing using multiple tracks, including adjustment layers.
Change cameras after they have already been recorded.
Cut to a new angle.
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You can use keyboard shortcuts for multi-camera editing. You can use the number keys to switch cameras as the multi-camera sequence
plays. The keyboard shortcuts can also be used to change angles after completing a multi-camera edit. For more information, see Multi-camera
keyboard shortcuts.
9. Export the multi-camera sequence.
With the sequence active in the Program Monitor or Timeline panel, select File > Export > Media. Specify the export settings and click Export, or
click Queue to send the sequence to Adobe Media Encoder for encoding. For more information, see Workflow and overview for editing.
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Using the Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog box
Use the Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog to combine clips that have common In/Out points or overlapping timecode into a
multicamera sequence. You can also combine clips using audio waveforms and markers.
Multi-Camera source sequence name
You can name your multi-camera source sequence after your primary video or audio clip in the sequence. From the pop-up menu, select the
appropriate option to append "Multicam" or a custom name to the primary video or audio name.
Alternatively, select Custom from the pop-up menu, and enter a custom name in the text box.
Synchronize Point
Before creating a multi-camera source sequence using In points, Out points, or clip markers as the synchronization point, you mark clips for
synchronization. For more information, see Mark clips for synchronization.
In Points, Out Points
Mark the sync points using In Points or Out Points before creating the multi-camera source sequence.
Timecode
Select the Timecode option to synchronize the clips if they were recorded with timecode in sync with each other.
Select the Create Single Multicam Source Sequence option to combine the clips into a single multi-camera sequence. Select this option
when the coverage from the individual shots has gaps, and you want to create a sequence that preserves the gaps. If you do not select this
option, only overlapping clips are combined and clips with no overlaps are left unused.
Select Ignore Hours if each clip has timecode that starts at a different hour but otherwise overlaps in timecode.
Premiere Pro lets you perform quick multi-camera edits based on sync timecode. Press the modifier key Ctrl (Win) or Cmd (Mac) while switching
source clips to match frame to the timecode at the current playhead position.
Clip Marker
Select the Clip Marker option to sync the clips using clip markers that are manually added to common sync points.
Audio
Select the Audio option to synchronize the clips automatically based on the audio waveforms. You can use audio recorded from a second source
to automatically sync and create multicamera and merged clips using audio waveforms.
If a separately recorded audio track is out of sync with the video clip, you can add a frame offset using the Offset Audio by option. You can
enter video frames in the range -100 to +100 for sync offset for the audio-only clip.
Use the Move Source Clips to Processed Clips bin option to move the generated source clips to a Processed Clips bin. If a Processed Clips
bin does not exist, Premiere Pro creates one before moving the clips into it. Clips that did not meet the synchronization criteria are left
outside the Processed Clips bin. This option makes it easy to identify clips that were not used in the resulting multicam source sequence.
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Audio sequence settings
Sequence Settings determines how the audio tracks in the source sequence are populated, how the panning and channel assignments are set
and whether they are muted.
Select Camera 1 when only the audio from Camera 1 is used in the editing sequence. Multicam editing is enabled for only the video portion
of the source sequence.
If you use A/V clips to create this sequence, the audio tracks for all audio associated with video 1 are unmuted. Other audio in the source
sequence is muted.
If you use audio-only clips with video or A/V clips, the audio-only clips are placed in the topmost tracks, and are unmuted. Other audio (from
any linked clips) is muted and placed in lower tracks. The channel assignments and panning of each track are set to transfer each source
channel to independent output channels (up to 32). The number of unmuted channels of source audio determines the number of active
output channels of the sequence.
Note: You cannot use the audio follows video option in editing sequences created with this setting, because the audio portion is not
multicam-enabled.
Select All Cameras to use all audio channels in the source clips. This setting is similar to the Camera 1 setting. Only the video portion of the
source sequence is multicam-enabled. Audio-follows-video is not supported for this setting. All audio is unmuted (up to 32 channels). The
number of unmuted channels of source audio determines the number of active output channels of the sequence.
Select Switch Audio when you want the audio to switch with its linked video. This setting unmutes all audio. It enables multicam editing on
both the video and audio of the source sequence, when the audio follows video setting is enabled in the Program monitor. This setting also
maps multi-mono source audio into a single adaptive audio track. In addition, the audio-follows-video editing setting switches this single track
with the video. If audio-only clips are included in the selection of clips, the audio-only clips are placed in tracks below any linked clips. Empty
video tracks are created to match up with every audio-only track.
Select Custom Preset when only the audio from Camera 1 is used in the editing sequence, and you want to use a sequence preset for the
source sequence. This setting treats audio channels the same as the Camera 1 setting. It mutes all audio channels except the ones
associated with Camera 1. Choosing this setting enables the Sequence Preset pop-up menu, where you can select from a list of all
previously saved sequence presets.
For more information, see this video by Josh Weiss on multi-camera editing using audio-based syncing.
Audio Channels Preset
The Audio Channels preset determines how the resulting source sequence is mapped. Details include, the type and number of audio tracks that
are dropped when the source sequence is nested into the editing sequence.
Note: For the resulting source sequence to map correctly with the audio channels, the number of tracks in the source clips should not be greater
than the channels associated with the preset you choose.
Automatic: Reads the audio type of the first clip and uses this mapping
Mono: Maps to as many mono channels as there are output channels in the source sequence.
Stereo: Maps to stereo tracks based on the number of output channels in the source sequence.
5.1: Maps to 5.1 tracks based on the number of output channels in the source sequence.
Adaptive: Maps to Adaptive based on the number of output channels in the source sequence.
Camera Names
When creating a multi-camera source sequence, you can display the camera names as clip names or track names. These options are available in
addition to the default option of enumerated camera names like camera 1, camera 2.
Depending on the Camera Names option that you select, the camera angles are displayed as track names, clip names, or camera numbers in the
Source Monitor. To view the multi-camera sequence in the Source monitor, right-click the sequence and select Multi-camera.
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Organize and select camera angles to view in monitor's multi-camera mode
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Premiere Pro lets you organize and select the angles to view in the Source Monitor's multi-camera mode.
From the Source monitor's pop-up menu, select Edit Cameras.
In the Edit Cameras dialog box, all the clips are listed in the original order that they were arranged in the sequence tracks. You can drag-and-drop
the clips to change the sequence order. You can also enable or disable the clips by selecting or deselecting them.
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Mark clips for synchronization
If clips are synchronized by timecode (jam-synched) at the shooting location, you do not need to mark clips for synchronization.
Before creating a multi-camera source sequence, it is important to mark clips for synchronization. Open each clip and then do one of the following
at the sync-point:
Mark an In Point at a sync-point at the beginning of a clip. For example, mark an In point where the clapperboard (slate) is clapped at the
head of a clip.
Mark an Out point at a sync-point at the end of a clip. For example, mark an Out point where the clapperboard is clapped at the tail of a clip.
Make a clip marker at a sync-point at any point during a clip. For example, if there is action at any point during a clip that can be used as a
sync-point, like an audio cue, cymbal crash, camera flash, and so on. Rename each marker so that they are identically named for
synchronization. Type the same clip marker name for each clip in the Marker dialog box, and then click OK. (See Add markers in the
Timeline)
Timecode can also be used to synchronize clips, and it does so automatically. However, timecode must be identical on all clips for them to
synchronize properly. If the timecode is identical on all the clips you plan to synchronize, you do not need to mark clips for synchronization. If you
use the hours value in source timecode as a camera designator, select the Ignore Hours option to use only minutes, seconds, and frames to
synchronize clips.
To stamp identical timecode on all clips, you can either record the cameras with jam-synched timecode on location, or modify the timecode for
each clip in Premiere Pro. (See Set timecode manually for a clip.).
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Import Multiclip sequences from Final Cut Pro
You can export a Multiclip project from Final Cut Pro, and import the Final Cut Pro project XML files into Premiere Pro. In Premiere Pro, the
Multiclips sequences appear as multi-camera sequences with all the Final Cut Pro project settings intact.
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Edit from sequences loaded into the Source monitor
New in Premiere Pro CC
Adobe® Premiere® Pro lets you load sequences into the Source monitor, and edit them in the Timeline panel keeping the original source clips on
all tracks intact. This way, the sequence doesn't become a single nested sequence clip. You can now use segments of other sequences containing
individual source clips, edit points, transitions, and effects, much like copy/paste.
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Using Nest Source Sequence
Use the Nest Source Sequence toggle option in the Source Indicator context menu to control how source sequences are edited into the current
sequence. Toggle the option off to edit source sequences into the current sequence with individual clips on multiple tracks, edit points, and
transitions. This type of editing resembles a copy/paste operation. Toggle the option on to edit source sequences into the current sequence as a
nested sequence clip.
Because sequences can contain multiple video tracks, the source indicators in the Timeline's track headers now display all source tracks, including
multiple video tracks. You can choose the video tracks to edit into the timeline when you load a sequence into the Source monitor.
Tracks, even if empty, in the source sequence are available as source tracks in the patch bay when the sequence is loaded in the Source monitor.
In addition, editing an empty segment from the source sequence into another sequence doesn't affect the target sequence.
Example
Here is an example of a sequence containing three video tracks and four audio tracks loaded into the Source monitor. The source tracks are
visible in the Timeline's source indicator column (far left).
Editing source sequences
Important notes
You can rearrange Source indicators. Premiere Pro remembers the last arrangement (patching order), as it does for regular clips.
Premiere Pro displays all source tracks in the sequence that you load into the Source monitor.
During drag editing, Premiere Pro ignores track targeting to let you place clips on any track.
You can load a sequence containing a nested sequence clip into the Source monitor. The sequence remains a nested sequence clip when
you edit it into a different sequence.
Premiere Pro copies the effects and transitions in source clips to the destination sequence, along with the clips.
Keywords: Source sequences, track targeting, editing sequences, sequence editing, source tracks, source track indicator, drag and drop editing
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Rearranging clips in a sequence
Move clips
Split or cut one or more clips with the Razor tool
Lift and paste frames
Extract and paste frames
Delete clips and close gaps simultaneously
Delete gaps between clips
Find gaps in sequences and tracks
Copy and paste at the playhead
Copy and paste clips by dragging in the Timeline
Delete all clips on one track
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Move clips
You can place clips in playback order to create a sequence in a Timeline panel. You can also change the order of clips once they are there,
replace them, remove them, or insert additional clips.
Move clips in a Timeline panel
You can drag a clip and place it in an empty spot or snap it to another clip. You can also insert and overwrite clips that you move. Watch the
translucent rectangle that represents the clip’s duration as you drag it. To move multiple clips, select a range of clips, or move a group of clips. A
tool tip displays the amount of time moved as you drag. The window displays a negative number if you drag the clip toward the beginning of the
sequence, and a positive number if toward the end.
Overwrite is the default mode and is indicated by the Overwrite icon
you drop a clip performs an insert edit. The Insert icon
when dragging clips. Pressing Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) as
appears when you drag clips while pressing Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS).
By default, you can change the track location of either portion of a clip, audio or video, by dragging that portion. The other portion will remain in its
original track. You can change this behavior, however, either by pressing Shift while you drag, or by dragging vertically across the bar that
separates the video tracks from the audio tracks. When you drag a part of a clip vertically into a new track, it will snap to its original time location
in the new track, if Snap is turned on.
Do one of the following:
To move the audio portion of a clip to a different track, drag the audio portion of the clip vertically to the destination audio track.
To move the video portion of a clip to a different track, drag the video portion of the clip vertically to the destination video track.
To move the video portion of a clip to Video 1 and move the audio portion to a different audio track, drag the video portion downward past
the bar separating video and audio tracks. The video portion will remain in Video 1 while the audio portion will land in the audio track where
you drop it.
To move the audio portion of a clip to Audio 1 and move the video portion to a different video track, drag the audio portion upward past the
bar separating video and audio tracks. The audio portion will remain in Audio 1 while the video portion will land in the video track where you
drop it.
To place the video and audio portions of a clip into tracks you specify, drag the video portion to the destination video track. Press and hold
Shift. This will pin the video portion to the specified video track. Continue holding Shift and drag downward past the bar separating video and
audio tracks. Release the mouse and release Shift when the audio portion of the clip lies over the destination audio track.
To overwrite other clips, drag one or more clips and drop them on the track where the other clips are located.
To move only one track of a linked clip, press Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) and drag the part of the clip, audio or video, you want to
move. You do not need to hold the Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) key after you initiate the edit. The video and audio will lose sync.
To insert, drag one or more clips, and press Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) as you release the mouse button and drop the clip or
clips into a new location. Clips in all tracks to the right of the drop point shift to the right of the inserted clips. A gap remains in the track from
which you move the inserted clips.
Move clips using the keypad
You can change the position of a clip in a sequence by typing the number of frames that you want to move.
1. Select the clip in the sequence.
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2. Using your numeric keypad with Num Lock on, type + (plus) and the number of frames that you want to move the clip to the right, or type (minus) and the number of frames you want to move the clip to the left. Then, press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
If any gaps exist between clips, those gaps are filled first. Then, the selected clip overwrites adjacent clips by the remaining number of
frames.
Move clips to a different track
Drag the audio portion or video portion of a clip up or down into the track you want. Only the portion of the clip you drag will move into a new
track.
Note: When dragging audio, you can drop it into the next compatible track, or if one doesn’t exist (for example, if you are dragging stereo audio
and only a mono track exists), a new one is created.
Rearrange clips in a Timeline panel
A useful variation of insert and overwrite edits in a Timeline panel is known as the rearrange edit. A rearrange edit extracts a clip and inserts it into
its new location. However, only clips in the destination track are shifted; clips in other tracks are not affected. This technique lets you quickly
change the order of clips in a sequence, a task that would otherwise require additional steps. When you perform a rearrange edit, the Rearrange
icon
appears.
Drag a clip; then press Ctrl+Alt (Windows) or Command+Option (Mac OS) as you drop it to a new location.
As you press Ctrl+Alt (Windows) or Command+Option (Mac OS), the Rearrange icon
shifts clips in the destination tracks only.
appears. Releasing the clip performs an insert edit that
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Split or cut one or more clips with the Razor tool
You can use the Razor tool to cut a clip into two clips, or to cut across clips in several tracks at once. Splitting a clip creates a new and separate
instance of the original clip, and any linked clips. The resulting clips are full versions of the original clip, but with different In and Out points.
Do any of the following:
To split a single clip or linked clip, select the Razor tool
, and click the point in the sequence where you want to split the clip.
To split only the audio or video portion of linked clips, Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac OS) with the Razor tool.
To split clips on targeted tracks, click the headers of the desired tracks to target them. Position the playhead where you want to split the clip
or clips, and choose Sequence > Add Edit. Alternatively, press Ctrl+K (Windows), or Command+K (Mac OS).
To split clips on all except locked tracks, lock any track containing a clip that you don’t want to split. Choose Sequence > Add Edit to All
Tracks . Press Ctrl+Shift+K (Windows), or Command+Shift+K (Mac OS). You can also Shift-click with the Razor tool to split all tracks at the
same point in a Timeline panel.
If you want to change effect settings over time, don’t split the clip; you can apply keyframes to a single clip instead.
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Lift and paste frames
You can remove or lift frames from a specified area of one or more tracks in a sequence, leaving a gap in their place. You specify the area with
sequence In and Out points. If only a part of a clip appears between the sequence In and Out points, that part will be lifted from the sequence
while the rest of the clip will remain. You can then paste the lifted frames anywhere in a sequence.
1. Use the controls in the Program Monitor to specify sequence In and Out points.
2. In the Timeline, click the headers of the tracks from which you want to lift frames to target them.
3. In the Program Monitor, click the Lift button
.
The frames that are lifted are placed on the system clipboard.
4. Click the header of the track into which you want to paste the lifted frames to target it.
5. Move the playhead to the location where you want to paste the lifted frames.
6. Select Edit > Paste.
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Extract and paste frames
You can extract frames from a specified area of one or more tracks in a sequence, leaving no gap in their place. You specify the area with a
sequence In Point and Out point. If only part of a clip appears between the sequence In point and Out point, Premiere Pro will extract only that
part of the clip from the sequence, letting the rest of the clip remain. After extracting, you can paste the extracted frames anywhere in a sequence.
1. Use the controls in the Program Monitor to specify sequence In and Out points.
2. In the Timeline, click the headers of the tracks from which you want to extract frames to target them.
3. Click the Sync Lock boxes in the headers of all tracks you want to shift when the gap is closed. The clips in tracks where Sync Lock is
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disabled will not shift.
4. In the Program Monitor, click the Extract button
.
The frames that are extracted are placed on the system clipboard.
5. Click the header of the track into which you want to paste the extracted frames to target it.
6. Move the playhead to the location where you want to paste the extracted frames.
7. Select Edit > Paste.
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Delete clips and close gaps simultaneously
When you delete a clip, you can close the gap it leaves behind at the same time. This is called a ripple delete.
1. In the sequence, select the clip or clips you want to delete. To select more than one clip, Shift-click the clips or drag a marquee over them.
2. Select Edit > Ripple Delete.
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Delete gaps between clips
When you delete space between clips in a Timeline, all clips in all unlocked tracks shift according to the duration of the gap. To prevent a track
from shifting during a ripple delete (or any insert or extract edit), lock the track. Alternatively, turn off Sync Lock on those tracks that you don't want
to shift.
In a Timeline, do one of the following:
Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) the gap between two clips, and choose Ripple Delete.
Select the gap between two clips, and choose Edit > Ripple Delete.
Select the gap between two clips, and press Delete.
To find more gaps in the sequence, see Find gaps in sequences and tracks.
If the ripple delete command fails, you may need to lock tracks that contain conflicting clips along the edit point.
To delete gaps between multiple clips, see this video tutorial by Ann Bens.
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Find gaps in sequences and tracks
You can find gaps of at least one frame in a sequence or a particular track of a sequence. Choose Sequence > Go To Gap and then choose one
of the following options:
Next in Sequence Finds the next gap to the right of the CTI that spans all tracks.
Previous in Sequence Finds the next gap to the left of the CTI that spans all tracks.
When one or more tracks are targeted, you can also choose one of the following options:
Next in Track Finds the next gap to the right of the CTI on the selected tracks.
Previous in Track Finds the next gap to the left of the CTI on the selected tracks.
The CTI moves to the position of the next or previous gap. The zoom level of the Timeline does not change, even if the gap is not visible at the
current magnification.
Note: Once Premiere Pro finds the last gap, choosing Next In Sequence, or Next in Track does nothing. Similarly, once Premiere Pro finds the
first gap, choosing Previous In Sequence, or Previous in Track does nothing.
Franklin McMahon demonstrates a few features for preparing a movie for export and review, including the “go to gap” command in this video on
the Layers Magazine website.
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Copy and paste at the playhead
You can copy and paste one or more clips at a time. The relative spacing (both horizontal spacing in time, and vertical spacing in tracks) of clips is
maintained. You paste and paste insert copies of clips into tracks you first target, at any new playhead locations.
1. Select one or more clips in the sequence, and choose Edit > Copy.
2. Click one or more tracks you want to target in the track header area of a Timeline panel.
3. In the Timeline panel, position the playhead at the point in the sequence where you want to paste a copy of the clips.
4. Do one of the following:
To overwrite the pasted clips, choose Edit > Paste.
To insert the pasted clips, choose Edit > Paste Insert.
The clip or clips are pasted into the sequence, and the playhead jumps to the end of the pasted clip or clips.
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Copy and paste clips by dragging in the Timeline
You can copy and paste clips by dragging them and holding down a modifier key to a different place in the Timeline.
To copy and paste clips to a new place in the Timeline, do the following:
1. Press the Alt (Windows), or Option (Mac OS) key.
2. Select one or more clips in the sequence, and then drag them to a new location in the Timeline. You can drag them horizontally or vertically.
After dropping the clips in a new location, they are duplicated.
When dragging clips with the Alt or Option key modifier in the Timeline, you can do the following:
You can duplicate either the video or audio portion of clips if you Alt-click (Windows), or Option-click (Mac OS) the clips, and then drag
them to a new place in the Timeline.
You can hold down the Alt key (Windows) or Option key (Mac OS) as you are dragging to copy and paste clips to a new place in the
Timeline.
If a clip is already selected, clicking Alt key (Windows) or Option key (Mac OS) will no longer select the audio or video portion of a clip,
the clip must be deselected first.
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Delete all clips on one track
1. Select the Track Select tool
.
2. Do one of the following:
To delete both the audio and video of linked clips, click the first clip in the track.
To delete only one track’s clips and not the linked counterparts, Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac OS) the track’s clips.
3. Press Delete.
Note: You can also delete a track along with everything it contains. See Work with tracks.
More Help topics
Legal Notices | Online Privacy Policy
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Working with clips in a sequence
Find a clip in any sequence with Clip Usage
View the source of a sequence clip in the Project panel
Analyze speech for text XMP metadata
Enable or disable a clip
Group clips
Snap clips
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Find a clip in any sequence with Clip Usage
Note: You can also see the number of times a clip has been used by making the Video Usage column visible in the Project panel. For more
information, see Add a column
.You can see whether any clip in the Project panel has been used in a project, the number of uses, and the location of each use, with the Clip
Usage menu. The Clip Usage triangle appears next to the thumbnail viewer only if the selected clips has been used in a sequence.
1. Select a clip in the Project panel.
2. Toward the top of the project panel, next to the thumbnail for the clip, click the Clip Usage triangle on the Movie line next to the pixel aspect
ratio.
A popup menu will show the timecode location for the clip for any sequence in which it is used.
3. Click the desired location.
The desired sequence panel will move forward and the playhead will jump to the location of the clip.
View the source of a sequence clip in the Project panel
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Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) a clip in a sequence, and choose Reveal In Project.
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Analyze speech for text XMP metadata
Adobe Premiere Pro and Soundbooth analyze spoken words and generate text metadata. You can edit and search text metadata like any other
metadata properties. You can then navigate to the times at which specific words are spoken, to better align edits, advertising, and subtitles.
The speech analysis feature can use any of several language-specific and dialect-specific libraries, such as libraries for Spanish and UK English.
To download more language-specific and dialect-specific libraries, see this link on the Adobe website.
In Premiere Pro the Speech Analysis feature is also available for clips when there is at least one component audio clip in the merged clip. Users
can choose to analyze all audio tracks in a merged clip, or a single one.
To analyze speech in all tracks, do one of the following:
Set the File pop up menu to “All Files”, and then click the Analyze button in the Speech Analysis section of the Metadata panel.
Select the merged clip, and then choose Clip > Analyze Content.
Note: You can analyze multiple merged clips, multiple clips, or a combination of both by selecting the clips, and then choose Clip >
Analyze Content.
To analyze a specific track for speech, set the File pop up menu to the component audio clip you wish to analyze, and then click the Analyze
button in the Speech Analysis section of the Metadata panel.
Note: Useful results from speech analysis require good audio quality. Background noise significantly reduces accuracy. To remove such noise,
use the tools and processes in Soundbooth.
Dan Ebberts provides a tutorial on the Adobe website that demonstrates the use of XMP metadata features. The tutorial shows how to convert
speech to text metadata and create a simple video player with which you can navigate to the places where words are spoken.
For more information, see the video tutorial Using Speech Search to Speed Editing.
For a video demonstrating the use of script (screenplay) information from Adobe Story to improve the accuracy of speech analysis, see the Adobe
website.
Jeff Sengstack provides a video overview of a speech search workflow involving Adobe Story, OnLocation, Premiere Pro, Encore, and Flash
Player on the Lynda.com website.
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This video from Video2Brain describes editing workflow in Premiere Pro using speech metadata from Adobe Story.
This video by Jason Levine shows an overview of Adobe Story and Premiere Pro integration.
For more information about how Adobe Premiere Pro integrates with Adobe Story, see this blog post in the Premiere Pro work area.
Jeff Greenberg explains in the following video how to enhance the speech recognition with keywords and scripts.
Analyze speech to create text metadata
1. Select a file or clip.
2. At the bottom of the Metadata panel, click Analyze Speech, or Analyze (Adobe Premiere Pro).
3. Set the Language and Quality options, and select Identify Speakers if you want to create separate speech metadata for each person.
Note: Speech Search can use any of several language-specific and dialect-specific libraries, such as libraries for Spanish and UK English.
4. Click OK.
The spoken words appear in the Speech Analysis section.
5. To retain the speech metadata, save the project.
If you import files with a speech metadata intoAfter Effects, each word appears as a layer marker on layers based on these footage items.
Navigate to a specific word in speech metadata
1. In the Speech Analysis section, select the word.
Timecode In and Duration indicate the precise location and length of your selection.
2. To hear the selection, click either Play or Loop Playback. (The latter option repeatedly plays the selected word, with some preroll and
postroll.)
Edit speech metadata
In the Speech Analysis section, do any of the following:
To correct a word, click it, and type.
To insert, delete, merge, cut, or copy words, right-click an existing word, and choose a command from the context menu.
Copy text from speech metadata to the clipboard for use in a text editor
Right-click the transcript, and choose Copy All.
Improve speech analysis with reference scripts
Accuracy of the speech to text conversion depends on the clarity of the spoken words and the quality of the recorded dialog. Dialog recorded in a
noisy environment or with poor microphone placement cannot produce highly accurate results even with a reference script. You can nevertheless
use a reference script to improve speech analysis. A reference script is a text document containing dialog similar to the dialog recorded in your
assets.
There are two types of reference scripts:
A script that contains similar dialog, but was not necessarily written for the current project. For example, a series of medical training scripts
for different products can be combined into a single text document. You can use this text document as a reference script. With this type of
reference script, speech analysis produces results more accurate than it does when using only the default language models.
A script that matches the recorded dialog. This type of reference script provides the highest accuracy possible. For example, you can use the
script that the talent read during the shoot as a reference script. Alternatively, you could use a transcript typed from the assets for the
purposes of close captioning.
Speech Analysis supports reference scripts only in the UTF-8 encoded text format, including Adobe Story scripts, which have the .astx filename
extension.
The closeness of the match between the embedded script text and the recorded dialog determines the accuracy of matched-script text. If 100%
accuracy is important, edit and revise the script text first. Ensure that the script matches the recorded dialog before using it as a reference script.
Note: To make reference scripts available in Soundbooth, first complete the steps below in Adobe Premiere Pro.
1. From the Reference Script menu in the Analyze Content dialog box, choose Add.
2. In the displayed dialog box, browse to the reference script text or .astx file, select it, and click Open.
3. In the Import Script dialog box, type a name for the reference script, and select the language of the script.
Note: You can view the text of the file in a scrolling window.
4. Select Script Text Matches Dialog only if the imported script covers the recorded dialog verbatim. For example, if the reference script is the
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script from which the talent read their lines, select Script Text Matches Dialog. Select this option even if the recorded dialog is shorter than
what the script file covers.
5. Click OK.
The Import Script dialog closes, and the reference script is selected in the Reference Script menu.
6. Click OK.
Improve speech analysis with Adobe Story scripts
Speech analysis is more accurate if Adobe Story script data is associated with a clip. Adobe Premiere Pro automatically uses the Adobe Story
script as a reference script. When Adobe Premiere Pro finds enough matches with the embedded script, it replaces the analyzed speech text with
the embedded script text. Adobe Premiere Pro carries over the correct spelling, proper names, and punctuation from the reference script, benefits
that standard speech analysis cannot provide.
To find and fix more errors, you can make side-by-side comparisons of the text of the Adobe Story script with the text of the speech analysis. If a
clip has a Story script attached to it, the script is displayed in the Embedded Adobe Story Script view in the Speech Analysis section of the
Metadata panel. Compare the script displayed in this view to the results of the speech analysis displayed in the Analysis Text view below it.
Note: The Embedded Adobe Story Script view is read only. You can't perform editing operations in it.
To attach an Adobe Story script to a clip or clips:
1. Match the scene number of the clips to the scene numbers in the Adobe Story script. Adobe Premiere Pro needs the information so that it
can match the clips to the correct scenes in the script. You can assign scene numbers to clips in the Project panel or the Metadata panel.
2. Select one or more clips in the Project panel, right-click and choose Attach Script File or select File > Adobe Story > Attach Script file.
Note: An Adobe Story script cannot be attached to a Merged Clip. If, however, a Story script was attached to a component clip prior to the merge,
the merged clip may be analyzed using the previously attached Story script.
You can also import an Adobe Story script into OnLocation and then import the shots into Adobe Premiere Pro with the script metadata.
OnLocation produces a list of shot placeholders for each scene. Either record these shots using OnLocation during production, or link the
placeholder shots to their respective video files when you import the video files into OnLocation. In either case, OnLocation embeds the text for
each shot from the original script into the metadata of the shot, and the information is retained when the shot is imported intoAdobe Premiere Pro.
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Enable or disable a clip
You can disable a clip while you try out a different editing idea, or to shorten processing time when working on a complex project. Disabled clips
do not appear in the Program Monitor or in a preview or video file that you export. As long as you have not locked the track containing a disabled
clip, you can still make changes to it. If you want to disable all clips on the same track, exclude the entire track instead. See Targeting tracks.
Select one or more clips in a Timeline panel and choose Clip > Enable. A check mark next to the command indicates that the selected clips is
enabled. Disabled clips appear dimmed in a Timeline panel.
Since it is a common duty for editors to enable and disable clips, it is recommended that you create a custom keyboard shortcut for this task.
See Customize or load keyboard shortcuts.
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Group clips
You can group multiple clips so that you can move, disable, copy, or delete them together. Both audio and video tracks of a linked clip are
included when you group it with other clips.
You can’t apply clip-based commands, such as the Speed command, or effects to the group, though you can select individual clips in the group
and apply effects.
You can trim the exterior edges of the group (the head of the first clip in a group or the tail of the last clip), but you can’t trim any of the interior In
and Out points.
To group clips, select multiple clips, and choose Clip > Group.
To ungroup clips, select a group clip, and choose Clip > Ungroup.
To select one or more clips in a group of clips, Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac OS) a single clip in a group. Shift+Alt-click (Windows)
or Shift+Option-click (Mac OS) to select additional clips in a group.
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Snap clips
To make it easier to align clips with one another or with particular points in time, you can activate the snap feature. With Snap on, when you move
a clip, it automatically aligns with, or snaps to, the edge of another clip, a marker, the start or end of the time ruler, or the playhead. When you
drag a portion of a clip vertically into another track, it will snap to its original time location in the new track. Snapping also helps to ensure you don’t
inadvertently perform an insert or overwrite edit when dragging. As you drag clips, a vertical line with arrows appears and indicates when clips are
aligned.
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Enable and disable the snap feature
At the upper left of a Timeline panel under the Sequence tab, click the Snap button
to select it. Click it again to deselect it.
Snap a clip to a clip edge, marker, or playhead
1. Make sure that the Snap button
is selected in a Timeline panel.
2. Drag the edge of a clip close to the edge of another clip or a marker or the playhead. A vertical line appears when alignment occurs.
You can toggle the snap feature using a keyboard shortcut (S) even during an editing operation, such as moving or trimming a clip.
More Help topics
Speech to text enhancements
Legal Notices | Online Privacy Policy
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Rendering and previewing sequences
Define the work area for rendering
Define the area for rendering using In and Out points
Render a preview file for a section of a sequence
Render audio when rendering video
Work with preview files
Play a sequence from start to finish
Scroll a sequence during preview
Previewing on a television monitor
Ensure that Adobe video applications use the same cached files
Premiere Pro attempts to play back any sequence in real time and at full frame rate. Premiere Pro usually achieves this for all sections that either
need no rendering or for which Premiere Pro already has rendered preview files. However, real-time, full frame-rate playback is not always
possible for complex sections without preview files: unrendered sections.
To play back complex sections in real time and at full frame rate, you may have to first render preview files for those sections. Premiere Pro marks
unrendered sections of a sequence with colored render bars. A red render bar appearing in the time ruler of a sequence indicates an unrendered
section that probably must be rendered in order to play back in real time and at full frame rate. A yellow render bar indicates an unrendered
section that probably does not need to be rendered in order to play back in real time and at full frame rate. Regardless of their preview quality,
sections under either red or yellow render bars should be rendered before you export them to tape. A green render bar indicates a section that
already has rendered preview files associated with it.
Sequences refer to preview files in much the same way as source media. If you move or delete preview files in the Windows or Mac file browser
rather than the Project panel, you’ll be prompted to find or skip the preview files the next time you open the project.
You can customize a sequence preset to allow previewing of uncompressed 10-bit or uncompressed 8-bit footage. For more information, see
Create a sequence with uncompressed video playback.
FAQ "Why is there a red or yellow bar in my sequence?"
See this article for details about what red, yellow, and green render bars mean and how they relate to playback and rendering previews.
See this blog post for information about RED Rocket support in Premiere Pro, which accelerates processing of RED (R3D) media.
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Define the work area for rendering
Do any of the following:
Drag the work area bar over the section you want to preview. Make sure that you drag the work area bar from its textured center; otherwise
you cue the playhead instead.
Drag the work area markers (at either end of the work area bar) to specify the beginning and end of the work area.
Position the playhead, and press Alt+[ (Windows) or Option+[ (Mac OS) to set the beginning of the work area.
Position the playhead, and press Alt+] (Windows) or Option+] (Mac OS) to set the end of the work area.
Double-click the work area bar to resize it to either the width of the time ruler, or the length of the entire sequence, whichever is shorter. To
define the whole sequence as the work area, the whole sequence must be visible in the Timeline panel.
When setting the work area bar to define an area for rendering, corresponding options appear in the Sequence menu: Render Effects in
Work Area, and Render Entire Work Area. A command for Delete Work Area Render Files is also available. These options will not appear in
the Sequence menu if the work area bar is not enabled.
Note: Position the pointer over the work area bar to display a tool tip that shows the work area bar’s start timecode, end timecode, and duration.
Define the area for rendering using In and Out points
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You can mark In and Out points to define an area for rendering:
Mark In and Out points for the area of the sequence that you plan to render.
When marking In and Out points to define an area for rendering, corresponding options appear in the Sequence menu: Render Effects In to
Out, and Render In to Out. A command for Delete Render Files In to Out is also available. These options will not appear in the Sequence
menu if the work area bar is enabled.
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Render a preview file for a section of a sequence
You can render any part of a sequence that falls under a red render bar. You can also define a section of the sequence you want to render by
setting In and Out points.
Render a preview file for a section of a sequence setting In and Out points:
1. Set In and Out points to mark the area you want to preview.
2. Choose Sequence, and select one of the following:
Render Effects In to Out Renders the sections of the video tracks lying within the In and Out points containing a red render bar.
Alternatively, press Enter.
Render In to Out Renders the sections of the video tracks lying within the In and Out points containing either a red render bar or a yellow
render bar.
Render Audio Renders a preview file for the sections of the audio tracks lying within the work area.
Note: You can set Premiere Pro to render the audio tracks whenever you render the video tracks. For more information, see Render audio
when rendering video.
The rendering time depends on your system resources and the complexity of the segment.
These options are not available if the work area is enabled.
To maximize the quality of motion in rendered preview files, check the Maximum Render Quality option in Sequence Settings. For more
information, see Settings.
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Render audio when rendering video
By default, Premiere Pro does not render audio tracks when you select either Sequence > Render Effects In Work Area, or Sequence > Render
Entire Work Area. However, playback may suffer when the data throughput of your disk drive cannot sustain the flow when mixing multiple
channels of audio and audio in a complex sequence. You can change this default so that Premiere Pro automatically renders audio previews
whenever it renders video previews.
1. Select Edit > Preferences > General (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > General (Mac OS).
2. Select or deselect Render Audio When Rendering Video.
3. Click OK.
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Work with preview files
When you render previews, Premiere Pro creates files on your hard disk. These preview files contain the results of any effects that Premiere Pro
processed during a preview. If you preview the same work area more than once without making any changes, Premiere Pro instantly plays back
the preview files instead of processing the sequence again. Premiere Pro stores the preview files in a folder you can specify. Similarly, preview
files can save time when you export the final video program by using the processed effects already stored.
Note: Adobe Media Encoder does not automatically use Premiere Pro preview files for encoding. To make use of the Premiere Pro preview files,
you must select the Use Previews option in Adobe Media Encoder for each encoding process.
To further save time, Premiere Pro maintains existing preview files whenever possible. Preview files move along with their associated segment of a
sequence as you edit your project. When a segment of a sequence is changed, Premiere Pro automatically trims the corresponding preview file,
saving the remaining unchanged segment.
When completely done with a project, delete preview files to save disk space.
Use preview files when rendering
In the Export Settings dialog box, check Use Previews.
Delete preview files
1. With a Timeline panel active, do one of the following:
To delete the render files only for a range of clips, adjust the Work Area bar so that it spans only the desired range. Then, choose
Sequence > Delete Work Area Render Files. Those preview files which have any part of their associated clip within the work area will be
deleted.
To delete all the render files for a sequence, choose Sequence > Delete Render Files.
You can set a keyboard shortcut for Delete Render Files and Delete Work Area Render Files.
2. When you are prompted, click OK.
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Play a sequence from start to finish
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In the Program Monitor, click the Play In To Out button
.
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Scroll a sequence during preview
You can set an option to automatically scroll a sequence when it is wider than the visible area in its Timeline panel.
1. Choose Edit > Preferences > General (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > General (Mac OS). Type the desired lengths in the
Preroll and Postroll fields.
2. Choose an option from the Timeline Playback Auto-Scrolling menu:
No Scroll Sequence doesn’t scroll.
Page Scroll Sequence scrolls through the visible area of a Timeline panel a page at a time. This is the option set by default.
Smooth Scroll playhead stays in the center of the visible area while the sequence scrolls under it.
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Previewing on a television monitor
You can display the sequence on any monitor connected to your computer. Previewing on a television monitor requires video hardware that
provides an appropriate video port for the monitor.
Previewing on a television monitor via video card
Some video cards and operating system software products support a television monitor independent of the computer desktop. Others support a
second computer monitor that is contiguous with the computer desktop so that it can also function as additional space for the application. See the
documentation that came with your video card and operating system.
Preview on a television monitor via camcorder or deck
If you’re editing a DV project, you can preview the sequence on a television monitor via your IEEE 1394 connection and camcorder or video deck.
Note: You may not be able to preview on a TV monitor via camcorders or decks in HDV mode. Set these, instead, to DV or Auto mode.
1. Make sure that the monitor is connected to the DV camcorder or deck and that the camcorder or deck is connected to your computer.
2. (For camcorder setup only) Set the camcorder to output to the monitor. Some devices detect this automatically, while others require you
choose a menu option.
3. In the Source Monitor or Program Monitor, click the panel menu button to the upper right, select Playback Settings, and choose the desired
options from the following.
Desktop Video Display During Playback Specifies whether or not to play back to the Program Monitor. Deselect this option to play back
only through the external monitor specified in the External Device option. If the External Device option is set to None, Desktop Video is
selected to ensure playback to the Program Monitor.
External Device Sets an external device through which to play back video.
Aspect Ratio Conversion Determines how pixel aspect ratio is converted for DV projects.
Desktop Audio Sets audio playback to the computer
External Device Audio Sets audio playback to a connected external audio device.
Export: External Device Enables export to tape for the specified device. This option doesn’t affect playback to an external device during
export.
Disable Video Output When Premiere Pro is in the Background Disables video to the external monitor if Premiere Pro is not the active
application on your desktop.
24p Conversion Method Specifies the conversion method for 24p footage. See Set 24p playback options.
There can be a slight delay between the playback on the desktop and the playback on a television via a camcorder/VCR. If the video and audio
seem out of sync, try to preview both video and audio through the same device.
Ensure that Adobe video applications use the same cached files
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Adobe video applications can automatically insert a unique document ID into each imported file. These unique IDs ensure that each application
accesses the same cached previews and conformed audio files, preventing additional rendering and conforming.
In the Media section of the Preferences dialog box (or the Metadata section for Soundbooth), select Write XMP IDs To Files On Import.
This setting is global—a change in one Adobe video application affects all the others. This setting also results in new file modification dates when
IDs are initially inserted.
To save rendering time when transferring a project to another computer, move both cached and original files.
More Help topics
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Closed Captioning
Enhanced in Premiere Pro CC October 2013 release (version 7.1)
Closed Captioning workflow in Premiere Pro
Step 1: Import Closed Caption files
Step 2: Display Closed Captions in the Source Monitor and Program Monitor panels
Step 3: Edit Closed Caption files
Step 4: Export Closed caption files
Closed Captioning workflow using third-party applications
Supported caption formats
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Closed Captioning workflow in Premiere Pro
Premiere Pro CC provides a full set of closed caption features.
You can import closed caption files into Premiere Pro, and add them to a sequence. You can edit the closed caption text, color, background, and
the timing. Once you finish editing, you can export the closed captions files as a closed caption "sidecar" file or embed them in a QuickTime movie
file.
Here is a typical workflow to import, edit, and export closed captions in Premiere Pro:
Step 1: Import Closed Caption files
Premiere Pro lets you import:
Stand-alone closed caption files or "sidecar" files
Files with embedded captions
You can import media with closed captions into your project in Premiere Pro just like you would import any other media by using one of the
following options:
Select File > Import
Import through the Media Browser using the file's context menu
Import the Closed Caption clip as a separate Closed Caption "sidecar" file
If the file contains embedded closed captions, Premiere Pro imports the closed caption data automatically into the project. To detect and
automatically import embedded closed caption data in an embedded closed caption file, select the preference to import the closed caption data
into your project. In the Preferences dialog, under Media, select the Include Captions On Import check box.
Note: When you import a QuickTime clip that contains embedded captions, the captions are automatically imported. If a QuickTime clip has an
accompanying "sidecar" caption file, then you import the "sidecar" file just like you import any other file.
Step 2: Display Closed Captions in the Source Monitor and Program Monitor panels
When you import closed caption clips into a project, the captions are displayed as caption blocks in the Captions tab.
To display the Closed Caption clips in the Source Monitor and Program Monitor, do one of the following:
Click "+" at the lower right of a monitor to open the button editor, and click the Closed Captioning Display button. You can add the Closed
Caption button to the button bar by dragging it from the button editor. You can also assign keyboard shortcuts to those commands.
In the Source or Program Monitor panel pop-up menu, select Closed Captioning Display > Enable.
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Displaying closed captions in the Source Monitor and Program Monitor
You can select the captioning standard for a caption clip loaded in the Source Monitor. In the Source Monitor panel pop-up menu, select Closed
Captioning Display > Settings. For example, you can select CEA-608, CEA-708, CC1, CC2, and so on. You can toggle the Closed Caption display
on and off.
The Closed Caption clip when linked to video behaves similar to a linked audio channel clip. The text clip is represented in the Timeline's source
indicators, and can be enabled/disabled or linked to any video track like other video clips.
When a track is expanded, the Closed Caption blocks in a caption clip are visible, along with End Of Caption (EOC) indicators that denote where
the Closed Caption blocks begin and end.
See all captions on the Timeline
Step 3: Edit Closed Caption files
The Captions tab in Premiere Pro lets you make word-level edits of the closed caption clips. You can also make changes to the timing and
formatting, like, text alignment, text color, from an intuitive user interface.
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A. Filter caption content B. Formatting toolbar C. Editable text blocks
Example usage scenario
Consider a scenario where you have a program that already contains closed captions. You may need to create a different version of the program,
say with a shorter duration, to add more commercials. In such a scenario, you can make the necessary edits using the Captions tab. The text clips
are visible from the timeline. From there, you can adjust the captions to be in proper sync with the media after any trims, ripple deletes, and
rearranging of segments.
Step 4: Export Closed caption files
After you finish editing or creating closed caption clips, you can do either of the following:
Export the sequence containing the closed caption clip to tape using third-party hardware that support closed caption encoding.
Export the closed caption tracks through Premiere Pro or Adobe Media Encoder using the Export Settings dialog. You can do so by following
these steps:
1. Load a closed caption asset in the Source Monitor or select it in the Project panel. You can also select a sequence in the Project panel, or
have the Timeline panel in focus.
2. Select File > Export > Media.
3. In the Export Settings dialog box, specify the following options:
Export options
Select one of the following export options:
Create Sidecar File
Embed in Output File (applicable for QuickTime movies only)
Format
Select one of the following file formats to export the closed caption data:
Scenarist Closed Caption File (.scc)
MacCaption VANC File (.mcc)
SMPTE Timed Text (.xml)
EBU N19 Subtitle (.stl)
Note: The default option for NTSC regions is SMPTE Timed Text, and for PAL regions, it is EBU N19.
Frame Rate
Depending on the format that you select, a list of supported frame rates are displayed in the Frame Rate pop-up menu. A default frame rate
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is chosen based on the known frame rate of the sequence that you are exporting.
Click Export to export the closed caption file.
Export Setting for Closed Captions
Alternatively, you can also click Queue to send the sequence into the Adobe Media Encoder queue.
With QuickTime exports, you have the option of embedding captions in the video file or exporting them to a sidecar file. With all other export
formats, you can export captions only as a separate sidecar file.
For more information, see Exporting Closed Caption files through Adobe Media Encoder.
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Closed Captioning workflow using third-party applications
If you are using any third-party captioning applications to create closed captions, here is a typical workflow you can follow:
Step 1: Export the sequence to a third-party captioning application
After you complete the video and audio editing in Premiere Pro, you export the sequence as a reference movie to a third-party Captioning
application.
This movie can be sent to a Captioning service bureau or a Captioning specialist, where the movie is used as a reference to create a closed
caption track from scratch. A third-party captioning application, like MacCaption from CPC, lets you create the closed caption track from scratch,
and then encodes the closed captioning data in the necessary format.
Step 2: Import Closed Caption files into Premiere Pro
Once you receive the Closed Caption file from a third-party Captioning application, you can import the file into your project in Premiere Pro.
Premiere Pro supports importing Closed Captioning files in .mcc, .scc, .xml, or .stl filename formats.
When you import a Closed Caption sidecar file into your project, a video-only clip is created containing the Closed Caption text blocks. You can
make any further adjustments to the text blocks to keep it in sync with your media, as required.
A Closed Caption sidecar file contains multiple caption streams, for example, CC1, CC2. When such a clip containing multiple caption streams is
added to a sequence, the Timeline shows separate track items for each stream. To switch among different caption streams, in the Captions tab,
select a stream from the Caption Stream pop-up menu.
Step 3: Export the edited video
Once the closed captions are in sync with the media, you can export the edited video along with the Closed Caption file. You can export closed
caption sidecar files and embedded QuickTime movies (QuickTime 608 captions) through Premiere Pro, as well as through Adobe Media Encoder.
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Supported caption formats
Premiere Pro supports reading and writing captions for MXF OP1a files. The captions are read from and written to the SMPTE 436M
ancillary data track in the MXF OP1a file.
Premiere Pro supports importing and exporting CEA-708 captions. CEA-708 closed caption files can be exported as a Sidecar file with a .mcc
or .xml filename format. Or you can embed the CEA-708 captions within the SMPTE 436M ancillary data track in MXF OP1a files.
Premiere Pro reads captions in QuickTime movies regardless of the video codec used.
Premiere Pro lets you import caption files with a *.dfxp filename extension.
DFXP caption files are XML-based files. So besides viewing the captions in the Captions panel, they are also viewable from a text editor.
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Modifying clip properties with Interpret Footage
Interpret footage
You can modify the properties of a clip by selecting options in the Interpret Footage dialog box.
For more information about using the Frame Rate options, see Change the frame rate of a clip.
For more information about using the Field Order options, see Change the field order of a clip.
For more information about using the Alpha Channel options, see Alpha channels and mattes.
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Interpret footage
1. In the Project panel, right-click (Windows) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) the clip for which you want to change a property.
2. Select Modify > Interpret Footage.
3. Select the options desired, and click OK.
Andrew Devis has provided a video tutorial on Interpreting Footage on the Creative COW website.
For more information about Interpreting Footage, see this video tutorial from Learn by Video and video2Brain by Maxim Jago.
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Synchronizing audio and video with Merge Clips
Merge clips in the Project panel
Merge clips in the Timeline panel
Synchronize clips in the Timeline panel
Editing with merged clips
Merged clips and the Metadata panel
Use timecode from an audio master clip to create a merged clip
Merged Clips limitations
Premiere Pro provides a method for synchronizing audio and video called Merge Clips. This will streamline the process by which users can sync
audio and video which have been recorded separately (a process sometimes called double-system recording). You’ll be able to select a video clip
and synchronize it with up to 16 channels of audio by using the “Merge Clips” command. Clips which make up the merged clip are referred to as
“component clips.”
Clips may be merged by group selecting them in the either the Project panel or the Timeline. The Merge Clips command may be invoked via
either the Clip menu or a contextual menu. It is a contextual command, so more than one clip must be selected in order to enable it.
You may merge one or multiple audio clips to a single video or AV clip. The total number of audio tracks permissable in a merged clip is 16,
including any combination of mono, stereo or surround 5.1 clips. A single mono clip counts as one track, a single stereo counts as two tracks, a
5.1 clip counts as six tracks.
Note: Creating a merged clip does not replace or alter the source clip(s).
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Merge clips in the Project panel
To merge clips in the Project panel, do the following:
1. Select the video clip you wish to merge audio clips to. Note that you can only have one video clip in any merged clip.
2. Shift or Control-click (Command-click for Mac OS) to select the audio-only clips you wish to merge with the video clip.
3. Do one of the following:
Choose Clip > Merge Clips
Right-click (Control-click for Mac OS), and then choose Merge Clips from the shortcut menu.
The Merge Clips dialog launches. Choose from one of the following options for the point of synchronization:
Based on the In point: For locating sync based on the In point, at the clap of the slate, for example.
Based on the Out point: For locating sync based on the Out point, at the clap of the tail slate, for example.
Based on matching timecode: For locating sync based on common timecode between the clips.
Based on clip markers: For locating a sync point based on a numbered clip marker in the middle of the shot. This function is disabled unless
all component clips have at least one numbered marker.
Click OK. Your merged clip will now appear in the Project panel, with a name that matches the video clip, or the top-most selected audio clip
(based on current sort order in the bin) if there is no video. “- Merged” is appended to the end of the new merged clip’s name. Users may rename
this item, if necessary.
Note: Audio-only clips may be merged with other audio-only clips; a video clip is not a requirement for a merged clip. Only one clip containing
video may be used.
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Merge clips in the Timeline panel
To merge clips in the Timeline panel, do the following:
1. Select the clips (if they are not already selected), and then do one of the following:
Drag the component clips into the Project panel.
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Choose Clip > Merge Clips.
The Merge Clips dialog launches.
2. Click OK. Your merged clip will now appear in the Project panel.
Note: Clips that are merged in the Timeline are synchronized from Clip Start for each component clip. To merge clips based on Clip End,
Timecode, or Numbered Marker, use the synchronize function prior to merging the clips.&nbsp;
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Synchronize clips in the Timeline panel
Synchronizing clips aligns multiple clips in the Timeline panel. After synchronizing the clips, you can create a merged clip.
To synchronize clips in the Timeline panel, first edit the clips into the Timeline panel, and then do one of the following:
Align the clips manually by dragging them into place until they are synchronized.
Align the clips using the Synchronize function. To do so, do the following:
1. Select the clips you wish to synchronize.
2. Choose Clip > Synchronize.
The Synchronize dialog launches. Choose from one of the following options for the point of synchronization:
Based on the Clip Start
Based on the Clip End
Based on matching timecode
Based on clip markers
Click OK. Your clips are now synchronized.
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Editing with merged clips
In general, working with merged clips is much like working with any other clip. There are some workflow differences that should be noted,
however.
Editing merged clips with gaps into the Timeline
There are implications to how merged clips behave when editing them into the timeline, specifically, if the clips contain “gaps” in their component
structure.
When there is another component clip available If an In or Out point is marked in a gap in the audio or video, and there is another component
clip available above or below that gap, a track is used for the gap when the merged clip is edited into the Timeline.
When no component clip is available Note that it is possible to merge audio and video and have places in the merged clip where there is no
other component clip in the gap. If you have marked and In or Out point in a gap such as this, you will receive a warning that states, “Invalid edit.
No media present in source clip’s marked In/Out range” when attempting to edit the merged clip into the Timeline. The “no drop” icon will appear if
you attempt to drag and drop the merged clip into the Timeline.
Note: Black will play for any gap in the video. Silence will play for the gap in audio, unless there is another component audio clip available on
another track.
Trimming merged clips
Trimming merged clips is much like trimming any other clip, save for the following exceptions:
During trimming, the trim is applied equally to component clips, preserving any offsets.
To trim the edge of a single component clip, users can temporarily break sync by holding down the Alt/Option modifier while dragging.
When trimming individual component clips, snapping occurs at the ends of other component when snapping is on.
Normal trimming rules apply; a merged clip can only be trimmed to the point where there is at least one frame remaining in any of the
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component clips.
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Merged clips and the Metadata panel
When a merged clip is created, the metadata for each of the component clips is copied into the Metadata panel. There are some differences for
displaying metadata for a merged clip. They are as follows:
Viewing metadata You can view the metadata a single component clip. To view the metadata for a component clip, choose the clip name from
the File popup menu. Its metadata will appear in the metadata panel.
Entering metadata You can enter metadata to a component clip or for the entire merged clip.
Set the File popup menu to the component clip you wish, and then enter metadata for the clip.
Set the File popup menu to All Files, and then enter metadata for the merged clip. Any data entered into a property will be entered into the
XMP for each of the component files that make up the merged clip.
Note: The All Files display acts like a multiple clip selection, where is displayed when the property values don’t match across the selection.
Similarly to ta multiple selection, when the display mode is set to All Files, any data entered into a property will be entered into the XMP of each
componenet file that make up the merged clip.
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Use timecode from an audio master clip to create a merged clip
you can use the timecode from an audio master clip to be used when you create a merged clip. You can also choose to omit the source camera
audio when creating a merged clip.
Do the following:
1. Select the video clip, and the audio clip that contains timecode.
2. Choose Clip > Merge Clips
3. In the Merge Clips dialog box, do one of the following:
4. To use timecode from an audio master clip to create a merged clip, click the “Use Audio Timecode from Clip” checkbox. Once it is checked,
choose the audio track you want to synchronize video with from the pop-up menu.
5. To delete source camera audio from a clip, click the “Remove Audio from AV Clip” checkbox.
6. Click OK
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Merged Clips limitations
The Replace Footage command does not work.
Attaching Adobe Story scripts, and then analyzing speech to text is not supported.
Note: If you attach an Adobe Story script to an audio clip prior to merging, then you can analyze speech to text after merging them. Select
either “All Files,” or the audio clip containing the script from the File pop-up menu in the Metadata panel, and then click the Analyze button.
Full audio channel mapping control in the merged clip is not supported.
Merged clip audio results in mono track audio only.Final Cut Pro XML and AAF interchange formats are not supported.
Auto-sync using audio waveforms, free-run timecode, time-of-day timecode, AUX timecode, or separate audio timecode is not supported.
Reveal in Adobe Bridge is not supported.
Once created, the merged clip cannot be re-synchronized, or adjusted. You must make a new merged clip.
Adjusting contents of a merged clip is not supported. However, if a particular component clip is deleted, the merged clip may be relinked.
Merged clips or parts of previously merged clips cannt be used to remerge or make a new merged clip. Only component clips may be used
to create a merged clip.
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Creating special clips (synthetics)
Create
Create
Create
Create
Create
Create
a counting leader (Windows only)
color bars and a 1-kHz tone
HD color bars and a 1-kHz tone
black video
a color matte
a transparent video clip
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Create a counting leader (Windows only)
If you plan to create film output from a sequence, you may want to add a counting leader. A counting leader helps a projectionist verify that audio
and video are working properly and are synchronized. You can create and customize a universal counting leader to add to the beginning of a
project. The leader is 11 seconds long.
1. In the Project panel, click the New Item button
at the bottom of the Project panel and choose Universal Counting Leader.
2. In the New Universal Counting Leader dialog box, set Width, Height, Timebase, Pixel Aspect Ratio, and Sample Rate to match these same
settings for the sequence in which you will use the counting leader. Click OK.
3. In the Universal Counting Leader Setup dialog box, specify the following options as needed:
Wipe Color Specifies a color for the circular one-second wipe area.
Background Color Specifies a color for the area behind the wipe color.
Line Color Specifies a color for the horizontal and vertical lines.
Target Color Specifies a color for the double circles around the numeral.
Numeral Color Specifies a color for the countdown numeral.
Cue Blip On Out Displays a cue circle in the last frame of the leader.
Cue Blip On 2 Plays a beep at the two-second mark.
Cue Blip At All Second Starts Plays a beep at the beginning of every second during the leader.
4. Click OK.
You can customize a counting leader clip by double-clicking it in the Project panel.
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Create color bars and a 1-kHz tone
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You can create a one-second clip containing color bars and a 1-kHz tone, as a reference for calibrating video and audio equipment.
1. In the Project panel, click the New Item button
at the bottom of the Project panel and choose Bars And Tone.
2. In the New Synthetic dialog box, set Width, Height, Timebase, Pixel Aspect Ratio, and Sample Rate to match these same settings for the
sequence in which you will use the bars and tone. Click OK.
Note: Some audio workflows must be calibrated at a specific tone level. The default level of the 1-kHz tone is -12 dB referenced to 0 dBFS. You
can customize the tone level to match your audio workflow by choosing Clip > Audio Options > Audio Gain with a clip selected. If you select the
bars and tone clip in the Project panel, you set the default gain level for new clip instances. If you select a clip in a Timeline panel, you change the
level for that clip instance only.
Franklin McMahon created this video tutorial on synthetic media: transparent video, color bars and tone, and color matte on the Layers Magazine
website.
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Create HD color bars and a 1-kHz tone
Premiere Pro has HD color bars that comply with ARIB STD-B28 standard for calibrating video output. Synthetic media also include a 1-kHz tone.
For HD bars and tone, do the following:
1. Choose File > New > HD Bars and Tone.
2. A dialog launches with settings based on the existing sequence. Change settings, or click OK to accept the settings.
In this video by Todd Kopriva and video2brain, you'll learn about the new HD color bars and tone, which comply with ARIB STD-B28, and how you
can use them in a sequence for output calibration.
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Create black video
Empty areas of a track appear black if no other visible clip areas are present on underlying video tracks. If necessary, you can also create clips of
opaque black video for use anywhere in a sequence. A black video clip behaves as a still image. To create a clip of a different color, use a color
matte. (See Create a color matte.)
1. In the Project panel, click the New Item button
at the bottom of the Project panel and choose Black Video.
2. If necessary, in the New Black Video dialog box, set Width, Height, Timebase, and Pixel Aspect Ratio to match these settings for the
sequence in which you will use the black video clip. By default, the duration of the new clip is set to five seconds. Click OK.
You can change the default duration of black video clips and other still image clips in the General pane of the Preferences dialog box. For
more information, see Change the default duration for still images.
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Create a color matte
1. In the Project panel, click the New Item button
at the bottom of the Project panel and choose Color Matte.
2. In the New Synthetic dialog box, set Width, Height, Timebase, and Pixel Aspect Ratio to match these settings for the sequence in which you
will use the color matte. Click OK.
3. In the Color Picker, select a color for the color matte, and click OK.
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Create a transparent video clip
Transparent Video is a synthetic clip just like Black Video, Bars and Tone, and Color Matte. It comes in handy when you want to apply an effect
that generates its own image and preserves transparency, such as the Timecode effect or the Lightning effect. Think of Transparent Video as
“Clear Matte.”
Eran Stern explains the purpose and use of transparent video clips in Adobe Premiere Pro in this video.
You cannot apply just any effect to Transparent Video—only those that manipulate the alpha channel. For example, these are some of the effects
you can use with a transparent video clip:
Timecode
Checkerboard
Circle
Ellipse
Grid
Lightning
Paint Bucket
Write-On
1. In the Project panel, click the New Item button
at the bottom of the Project panel and choose Transparent Video.
2. In the New Synthetic dialog box, set Width, Height, Timebase, and Pixel Aspect Ratio to match these settings for the sequence in which you
will use the transparent video. Click OK.
3. From the Project panel, drag the transparent video clip to the highest track in a sequence, stretch it as far as you want, and apply an effect
to it.
Some third-party lens flares and other effects that carry an alpha channel work with transparent video.
Keying effects
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Trimming clips (CS5 and CS5.5)
Working with In and Out points
Working with audio clips in the Source Monitor
Working with clips in the Source Monitor
Timeline Trimming (CS5.5, and earlier)
Making ripple and rolling edits
Make slip and slide edits
Making split edits
Work in the Trim Monitor
Trim with Speech Analysis
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Working with In and Out points
Setting a clip’s In and Out points is a process called marking. You define the first frame you want to include in a sequence by marking that frame
as the clip’s In point. Then you define the last frame you want to include by marking it as the Out point. In a typical workflow, you mark In and Out
points for a clip in the Source Monitor.
Adjusting a clip's In and Out points after it is already edited into a sequence is called trimming. Typically, you trim clips to adjust how they play
back in a sequence. For example, as you view the edit, you decide that you want to cut to the incoming clip a little sooner than you originally
planned while marking clips. To fix that problem, trim the clip using trimming tools in Premiere Pro.
You can trim clips by dragging the edge of a clip. A clip's "edge" is a clip’s In or Out point, or edit point. Several specialized tools and techniques
allow you to trim an edit point. These tools and techniques allow you to trim more easily and accurately, reducing the number of steps involved and
maintaining the integrity of the sequence.
You can fine-tune trim edits in a sequence in the Trim Monitor. The Trim Monitor’s layout is similar to the Source and Program Monitors, but the
Trim Monitor controls are optimized for precisely adjusting a cut point between clips in a sequence.
You can trim clips in the Speech Analysis pane of the Metadata panel, setting In points and Out points on selected spoken words.
There are many keyboard shortcuts available for the job of trimming, however, a number of them aren't set by default. Go to Edit > Keyboard
Shortcuts (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Keyboard Shortcuts (Mac OS) to set trimming shortcuts.
Online resources for basic trimming in Premiere Pro
Franklin McMahon shows Ripple Edit, Rolling Edit, Slip, and Slide tools in this video from the Layers Magazine website.
This excerpt from the “Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 Classroom in a Book” introduces the more advanced editing tools, including tools for rolling,
ripple, slip, slide, lift, and extract edits.
For more information about trimming clips, see this excerpt from An Editor's Guide to Premiere Pro by Richard Harrington, Robbie Carman,
and Jeff Greenberg.
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Working with audio clips in the Source Monitor
Scrub the audio waveform in the Source Monitor
In the Source Monitor, drag to the left or right anywhere on the waveform.
The playhead appears where you click and the audio clip is played, forward or backward, at the speed at which you drag across, or scrub,
the clip.
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Zoom in or out on an audio waveform in the Source Monitor
You can zoom into an audio waveform in the Source Monitor to better identify locations for markers, In points, or Out points.
1. Double-click an audio clip in the Project panel to open it in the Source Monitor.
2. To zoom in horizontally, drag either end of the horizontal zoom bar that runs above the time bar in the Source Monitor.
The waveform of all channels, and the time bar, will expand or contract horizontally.
3. To zoom in vertically, do one of the following:
To zoom in on a single channel, drag either end of the vertical zoom bar that runs next to the decibel ruler on the right side of the
Source Monitor.
To zoom in on all channels simultaneously, Shift-drag either end of the vertical zoom bar that runs next to the decibel ruler on the right
side of the Source Monitor.
The waveform of one or all channels, and the decibel ruler, will expand or contract vertically.
Return to default vertical zoom level
Double-click the vertical zoom bar.
Return to previous vertical zoom level
After returning to the default zoom level, double-click the vertical zoom bar.
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Working with clips in the Source Monitor
The Source Monitor panel holds versatile tools, and methods for working with clips. You can use tools and techniques to set, move, or remove In
and Out points, cue the playhead to any of these points, or preview the frames at their locations.
For more information about working with clips in the Source Monitor, in this excerpt from An Editor's Guide to Premiere Pro by Richard Harrington,
Robbie Carman, and Jeff Greenberg.
Open a clip in the Source Monitor
To open a clip in the Source Monitor, do one of the following:
Double-click the clip in the Project panel.
Double-click the clip in a Timeline panel.
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Open and view recent clips from the Source Monitor
You can load more than one clip at a time in the Source Monitor. However, you can view only one clip at a time. Recently loaded clips are
available from a menu at the top of the Source Monitor.
1. In the Source Monitor tab, click the downward-pointing triangle to open the tab menu.
2. Select the name of the clip you want to view.
Note: You can assign keyboard shortcuts for selecting and closing clips in the Source Monitor.
Set In points and Out points in the Source Monitor
To set an In Point or Out point in the Source Monitor, do any of the following:
To mark an In point, drag the playhead to the frame you want. Then click the Mark In Point button , or press the I key.
To mark an Out point, drag the playhead to the frame you want. Then click the Mark Out Point button , or press the O key.
After you mark In and Out points, you can always change your mind before you edit the clip into the sequence. Drag the In or Out points to a
new position in the time ruler. You can also drag the playhead to a new frame and use the Mark In or Mark Out buttons to set new In or Out
points.
Move In point and Out point together
Do one of the following:
For a video or audio clip, in the Source Monitor time ruler, drag the In/Out Grip (textured area at the center of the shaded span between
the In and Out points). Make sure that you drag the textured area; otherwise, you simply cue the playhead.
Dragging the In/Out Grip for a video clip or track
For an audio clip, you can also drag the In/Out Grip, or the grey area between the In point and Out point above the waveform to the left
or right.
Dragging the audio In/Out Grip for an audio clip or track
The In and Out points move together, keeping the duration between them constant.
This technique also works with sequence In and Out points using the Program Monitor or a Timeline panel.
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Adjusting edit points in the Source Monitor
Sometimes, adjusting In and Out points after a clip is in the Timeline is necessary. If you open a clip from the Timeline into the Source Monitor,
you can drag the In/Out Grip in the Source Monitor to set new locations for the In and Out points. This technique is useful for using a different
section of a clip in the Timeline. In fact, it is one way to perform a Slip edit.
Note: Viewing in and out frames this way works only with clips that you’ve opened in the Source Monitor from a sequence.
1. Set the In and Out points in the Source Monitor.
2. Edit the clip into the Timeline.
3. Double click the clip to load it into the Source Monitor.
4. Drag the In/Out Grip (textured area at the center of the shaded span between the In and Out points), as you did in the section, Move In point
and Out point together.
Cue to an In point or Out point
You use the Source Monitor to cue a frame for a clip and the Program Monitor to cue the current frame for a sequence.
Do one of the following:
To cue the current time to an In point, click the Go To In Point button
.
To cue the current time to an Out point, click the Go To Out Point button
.
Note: To go to the next edit in any of the targeted tracks in the Timeline, click the Go To Next Edit Point button
edit in any of the targeted tracks, click the Go To Previous Edit Point button .
and, to go to the previous
Remove source clip In point or Out point
1. Double-click a clip in the Project panel to open it in the Source Monitor.
Note: Timeline clip instances are not source clips. It is not possible to remove In points or Out points from timeline clips which have been
loaded in the Source monitor.
2. Choose from the following three commands:
Marker > Clear In
Marker > Clear Out
Marker > Clear In and Out
Note: In Premiere Pro CS5 and earlier, choose Marker > Clear Clip Marker and then choose an option to clear the In point, the Out point,
or both.
You can also clear an In or Out point by Alt-clicking (Windows) or Option-clicking (Mac OS) the Mark In button or the Mark Out button in
the Source Monitor.
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Timeline Trimming (CS5.5, and earlier)
Trim with Trim-in and Trim-out tools
You can change a clip’s In point or Out point by dragging its edge in a Timeline panel. As you drag, the current In or Out point appears in the
Program Monitor. A tool tip displays the number of frames that you are trimming: a negative value if you are dragging the edge toward the
beginning of the sequence and a positive number if you are dragging toward the end of the sequence. You cannot trim past the original In and Out
points of the source footage.
Click the selection tool
and do one of the following:
To edit the In point, drag the left edge of the clip once the Trim-in icon
appears.
To edit the Out point, drag the right edge of the clip once the Trim-out icon
appears.
Trimming a clip
Trimming in this way affects only a single clip's edit point and doesn’t affect adjacent clips. As you trim with the Selection tool, a gap in
the Timeline is left behind. To trim multiple edit points at once or to shift adjacent clips, see Making ripple and rolling edits and Make slip
and slide edits.
Press Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) as you drag using the Selection tool to switch to the Ripple Edit tool.
Note: To trim only one track of a linked clip, press Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) as you click with a Trim icon. You do not need to hold
down the Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) key once you initiate the trim.
Trim with the playhead
You can trim a clip in a sequence to the location of the playhead. However, set up these keyboard shortcuts to do so first:
Trim In Point To Playhead
Trim Out Point To Playhead
Note: In Premiere Pro CS5.5, the current-time indicator has been renamed as the playhead.
Set keyboard commands to trim with the playhead
1. Select Edit > Keyboard Customization
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2. Select [Custom] from the Set drop-down menu.
3. Select Application from the drop-down menu of keyboard command types.
4. Scroll down to Trim In Point To Playhead and Trim Out Point To Playhead.
5. Set keyboard shortcuts for Trim In Point To Playhead and Trim Out Point To Playhead.
Trim the In Point or Out Point to the playhead
1. Note: This edit function creates a gap in your sequence.
In the Timeline, click the track head, in the area near the track title, of one or more tracks containing the clip or clips you want to trim. This
targets the track or tracks. You can target video tracks, audio tracks, or both.
2. Drag the playhead to the place in a clip where you want to trim either the In or Out point.
3. Press the keyboard command you assigned to Trim In Point To Playhead or Trim Out Point To Playhead.
For more information about trimming with the playhead, see this excerpt from An Editor's Guide to Premiere Pro by Richard Harrington,
Robbie Carman and Jeff Greenberg.
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Making ripple and rolling edits
You can perform a ripple or rolling edit either directly on the tracks in the Timeline or using the Trim Monitor.
About ripple and rolling edits
When you want to adjust the cut, or edit point, between two clips, use variations of simple trimming known as ripple edits and rolling edits. By
using specialized tools, make adjustments in a single action that would otherwise require multiple steps to accomplish. When you perform ripple
and rolling edits with trim tools, the affected frames appear in the Program Monitor side by side.
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Program Monitor and Timeline during a rolling edit
Rolling edit
A rolling edit trims an adjacent Out point and In point simultaneously and by the same number of frames. This action effectively moves the edit
point between clips, preserving other clips’ positions in time and maintaining the total duration of the sequence. Pressing Alt (Windows) or Option
(Mac OS) when you begin to perform a rolling edit overrides video and audio linking, allowing you to create a split edit (L-cut or J-cut).
In this rolling edit, the edit point is moved earlier in time—shortening the previous clip, lengthening the next clip, and maintaining the program
duration.
Ripple edit
A ripple edit trims a clip and shifts subsequent clips in the track by the amount you trim. Shortening a clip by ripple editing shifts all clips after the
cut back in time; conversely, extending a clip shifts the clips that follow the cut forward in time. When you’re making a ripple edit, empty space on
one side of the cut is treated as a clip and shifts in time just as a clip would be. Pressing Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) when you begin to
perform a ripple edit ignores the link between video and audio.
Online resources for ripple and rolling edits
For more information about ripple and rolling trims, see this excerpt from An Editor's Guide to Premiere Pro by Richard Harrington, Robbie
Carman, and Jeff Greenberg.
See also Andrew Devis' tutorial on Creative COW entitled, “Learning the Tools 5: The Trim Monitor".
Make a rolling edit using the Rolling Edit tool
1. Select the Rolling Edit tool
.
2. In a Timeline panel, drag left or right from the edge of the clip you want to change. The same number of frames added to the clip are
trimmed from the adjacent clip. Alt-drag (Windows) or Option-drag (Mac OS) to affect only the video or audio portion of a linked clip.
Timeline panel during (above) and after (below) a roll edit
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Make rolling edits (extend edits) with the playhead
You can move the In point or Out point of a clip in a sequence to the playhead, without leaving gaps in the sequence. This type of editing is
sometimes called extending an edit, or using extend edit commands.
Setting up an extend edit
In Premiere Pro CS5, you first assign keyboard shortcuts in the Keyboard Customization dialog box. Then use the designated keyboard commands
to extend edits as rolling edits. The commands in the Keyboard customization are as follows:
Roll Previous Edit to CTI
Roll Next Edit to CTI
These commands are available after you assign shortcuts to them from the Keyboard Customization dialog.
In Premiere Pro CS5.5, the names of the commands have been renamed to match the common industry nomenclature, from “Roll Previous/Next
Edit to CTI” to “Extend Previous/Next Edit to the Playhead”. The extend edit commands are also in the Sequence menu by default.
Make a rolling (extend) edit to the playhead
1. Click a track header to target the track containing the clip you want to trim.
2. Drag the playhead to the location in the sequence to which you want to extend the clip In point or Out point.
3. In Premiere Pro CS5 or CS5.5, do one of the following:
To extend the clip’s In point to the playhead, press the keyboard command you assigned to Roll Previous Edit to CTI in Premiere Pro
CS5. For Premiere Pro CS5.5, choose Sequence > Extend Previous Edit to Playhead or press E.
To extend the clip’s Out point at the playhead, press the keyboard command you assigned to Roll Next Edit to CTI for Premiere Pro
CS5. For Premiere Pro CS5.5, choose Sequence > Extend Next Edit to Playhead or press Shift+E.
Note: If there is not enough media to extend to the playhead, Premiere Pro extends the clip to the end of the available media.
Make a ripple edit using the Ripple Edit tool
1. Select the Ripple Edit tool
.
2. In a Timeline panel, position the pointer over the In or Out point of the clip you want to change until the Ripple-in icon
or the Ripple-out
appears, and drag left or right. Subsequent clips in the track shift in time to compensate for the edit, but their durations remain
icon
unchanged. Alt-drag (Windows) or Option-drag (Mac OS) to affect only the video or audio portion of a linked clip.
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Timeline panel during (above) and after (below) a ripple edit
When using the Selection tool, you can toggle from the Trim-in or Trim-out icon to a Ripple edit icon by pressing the Ctrl (Windows) or
Command (Mac OS) key. Release Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS) to revert to the Selection tool.
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Make slip and slide edits
Just as ripple and rolling edits allow you to adjust a cut between two clips, slip and slide edits are useful when you want to adjust two cuts in a
sequence of three clips. When you use the Slip or Slide tool, the Program Monitor displays the four frames involved in the edit side by side, except
when editing audio only.
Program Monitor and Timeline during a slide edit
Though Slip and Slide tools are typically employed on the center of three adjacent clips, each tool functions normally even if the clip is adjacent to
a clip on one side and blank space on the other.
Make a slip edit
A slip edit shifts a clip’s In and Out points forward or backward by the same number of frames in a single action. By dragging with the Slip tool,
you can change a clip’s starting and ending frames without changing its duration or affecting adjacent clips.
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In this slip edit, a clip is dragged left, moving its source In and Out points later in time.
1. Select the Slip tool
.
2. Position the pointer on the clip you want to adjust, and drag left to move the In and Out points later in the clip, or drag right to move the In
and Out points earlier in the clip.
Premiere Pro updates the source In and Out points for the clip, displaying the result in the Program Monitor and maintaining the clip and
sequence duration.
Make a slide edit
A slide edit shifts a clip in time while trimming adjacent clips to compensate for the move. As you drag a clip left or right with the Slide tool, the Out
point of the preceding clip and the In point of the following clip are trimmed by the number of frames you move the clip. The clip’s In and Out
points (and hence, its duration) remain unchanged.
In this slide edit, a clip is dragged left so that it starts earlier in the sequence, shortening the preceding clip and lengthening the following clip.
1. Select the Slide tool
.
2. Position the pointer on the clip you want to adjust, and drag left to move the Out point of the preceding clip and the In point of the following
clip earlier in time, or drag right to move the Out point of the preceding clip and the In point of the following clip later in time.
When you release the mouse, Premiere Pro updates the In and Out points for the adjacent clips, displaying the result in the Program Monitor
and maintaining the clip and sequence duration. The only change to the clip you moved is its position in the sequence.
Online resources for slip and slide edits
Franklin McMahon shows Ripple Edit, Rolling Edit, Slip, and Slide tools in this video on the Layers Magazine website.
Andrew Devis demonstrates the slip and slide tools and gives a simple way to remember which is which in this video on the Creative COW
website.
For more information about slipping and sliding clips, see this excerpt from An Editor's Guide to Premiere Pro by Richard Harrington, Robbie
Carman, and Jeff Greenberg.
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Making split edits
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You can create a split edit by unlinking the video from the audio in adjoining clips in a sequence, and then trimming audio separately from video so
that the video of one overlaps the audio of the other. Typically, a rolling edit (or extend edit) is used for this task.
Pressing Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) when you begin to perform a rolling edit temporarily unlinks video and audio, allowing you to more
easily create a split edit (L-cut or J-cut).
For more information about creating split edits, see this excerpt from An Editor's Guide to Premiere Pro by Richard Harrington, Robbie Carman,
and Jeff Greenberg.
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Work in the Trim Monitor
The Trim Monitor displays clip In and Out points at a cut so that you can see precisely which frames you are cutting. The left monitor shows the
outgoing clip to the left of the edit point, and the right monitor shows the incoming clip to the right of it.
Open or close the Trim Monitor
To open the Trim Monitor, select Window > Trim Monitor.
To open the Trim Monitor, press the T key.
When you press the T key or use the menu command to open the Trim Monitor, the nearest edit is selected and the panel opens at the
same time.
To open the Trim Monitor in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 and later, select Sequence > Trim Edit.
To close the Trim Monitor, click the close box
of the Trim Monitor.
Display the edit point you want to trim
1. In the Trim Monitor, click the Select Video Or Audio Track button.
2. Select the track you want to edit from the menu.
Preview the edit in the Trim Monitor
To preview the edit once, click the Play Edit button
To preview the edit repeatedly, click the Loop button
.
and then click the Play Edit button.
Cancel an edit
Press Ctrl+Z (Windows) or Command+Z (Mac OS), or use the History palette.
Set trim preferences
You can set the number of frames that are trimmed when you use the Multiple-Frame Trim-in button
.
Choose Edit > Preferences > Trim (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Trim (Mac OS).
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or the Multiple-Frame Trim-out button
Make a rolling edit using the Trim Monitor
1. In the Trim Monitor, click the Select Video Or Audio Track button and select the track you want to edit.
2. Click in the Sync Lock box in the header of any track you want to shift when the rolling edit is made.
3. In a Timeline, place the playhead at the edit point. This will display the edit point in the Trim Monitor.
4. Step text
5. Do any of the following:
Position the pointer between the video images so that it changes into the Rolling Edit tool, then drag left or right.
Drag the center timecode display left or right.
Drag the center jog disk left or right.
Click the timecode display between the views, type a valid timecode number to trim the edges of both clips to that frame, and press
Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
Select the boxed number above the center jog disk, type a negative number to trim both clips left or type a positive number to trim both
clips right, and press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
Click the button that corresponds with the number of frames you want to edit. The –1 and –5 buttons trim both clips left; +1 and +5 trim
both clips right.
Note: The large trim offset number is 5 frames by default, but you can set it to any number by specifying a number in the trim preferences.
Choose Edit > Preferences > Trim (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Trim (Mac OS).
Make a ripple edit using the Trim Monitor
1. In the Trim Monitor, click the Select Video Or Audio Track button and select the track you want to edit.
2. Click in the Sync Lock box in the header of any track you want to shift when the ripple edit is made.
3. In a Timeline, place the playhead at the edit point. This will display the edit point in the Trim Monitor.
4. Do any of the following:
Position the pointer in the left or right image so that it becomes the Trim-out icon
to ripple-edit the corresponding clip.
or Trim-in icon
Drag the timecode display under the left or right image to trim the corresponding clip.
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respectively, and drag left or right
Drag the left or right jog disk to trim the corresponding clip.
Drag the Outgoing Out Point icon
in the left view’s time ruler, or drag the Incoming In Point icon
in the right view’s time ruler.
Drag the Out Shift or In Shift timecode number left or right to ripple-edit the corresponding clip.
Click the left clip’s timecode display (for the left clip’s Out point) or the right clip’s timecode display (for the right clip’s In point), type a
valid timecode number to trim the corresponding clip to that frame, and press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
Click the Out Shift display (for the left clip’s Out point) or the In Shift display (for the right clip’s In point), type a negative number (to trim
left) or a positive number (to trim right), and press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
Franklin McMahon shows Ripple Edit, Rolling Edit, Slip, and Slide tools in this video on the Layers Magazine website.
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Trim with Speech Analysis
You can add In and Out points to speech analysis text to select a portion of a master clip. You can insert or overwrite the selected portion directly
from the Speech Analysis section of the Metadata panel.
1. In the Speech Analysis section of the Metadata panel, select a word.
2. Do one of the following:
To set the word as an In point, click Mark In.
To set the word as an Out point, click Mark Out.
Premiere Pro sets In points at the beginnings of words, and Out points at the ends of words. Premiere Pro highlights the range between the
In point and Out point in the Speech Analysis section of the Metadata panel.
Online resources for the Trim Monitor
Here's a link to the section with the shortcuts for the Trim Monitor panel.
See Andrew Devis' tutorial “Learning the Tools 5: The Trim Monitor” on the Creative COW website.
See Andrew Devis' tutorial “Learning the Tools 1: Trim & Ripple Edit” on the Creative COW website.
Karl Soule shows how to use the Trim Monitor in Adobe Premiere Pro in this video tutorial.
Kevin Monahan explains trimming with keyboard commands in Adobe Premiere Pro in this blog post.
For more information about trimming clips in the Trim Monitor, see this excerpt from An Editor's Guide to Premiere Pro by Richard Harrington,
Robbie Carman, and Jeff Greenberg.
This video by Paul Joy shows some of the shortcuts for the Trim Monitor, as well as making it clear that it's what customers want to be taught
about.
Adding clips to sequences
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Correcting mistakes
Correct mistakes
History panel
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Correct mistakes
In case you change your mind or make a mistake, Premiere Pro provides several ways to undo your work. You can undo only those actions that
alter the video program; for example, you can undo an edit, but you cannot undo scrolling in a window.
Do one of the following:
To undo the most recent change, choose Edit > Undo. (You can sequentially undo as many as 32 recent changes made to the project in any
Premiere Pro panel.)
To jump to a specific state of the project since the project was opened, select an item in the History panel.
To undo all changes made since the last time you saved the project, choose File > Revert.
To undo changes made before the last time you saved a project, try opening a previous version of your project in the Premiere Auto-Save
folder, and then choose File > Save As to store the project in a location outside of the Premiere Auto-Save folder. The number of previous
versions saved depends on the Auto Save preference settings.
To stop a change that Premiere Pro is processing (for example, when you see a progress bar), press Esc.
To close a dialog box without applying changes, click Cancel.
To set all values in an applied effect back to the default values, click the Reset button for the effect in the Effect Controls panel.
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History panel
Use the History panel to jump to any state of the project created during the current working session. Each time you apply a change to some part of
the project, the new state of that project is added to the panel. You can modify the project from the state you select. History states aren’t available
for actions within the Capture panel.
The following guidelines can help you with the History panel:
Program-wide changes, such as changes to panels, windows, and preferences, are not changes to the project itself and so are not added to
the History panel.
After you close and reopen the project, the previous states are no longer available in the History panel.
The oldest state is at the top of the list, and the most recent one is at the bottom.
Each state is listed with the name of the tool or command used to change the project as well as an icon representing the tool or command.
Some actions generate a state for each panel affected by the action, such as the Titler. Actions you perform in such a panel are treated as a
single state in the History panel.
Selecting a state dims those below it, to indicate which changes will be removed if you work from the project at that state.
Selecting a state and then changing the project removes all subsequent states.
Do any of the following:
To select a state, click the name of the state in the History panel.
To navigate in the History panel, drag the panel’s slider or scroll bar; or choose Step Forward or Step Backward from the panel menu.
To delete a project state, select the state. Then choose Delete from the panel menu or click the Delete icon and click OK.
To clear all states from the History panel, choose Clear History from the panel menu.
More Help topics
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Remove alerts with the Events panel
Premiere Pro Events lists warnings, error messages, and other information you can use to identify and troubleshoot problems, particularly those
associated with plug-ins and other components from third-party developers. An alert icon , ,
on the status bar notifies you of an error.
Double-clicking the icon opens the Events panel, and clearing the associated item from the Events panel removes the icon from the status bar.
1. Do either of the following:
Double-click the alert icon in the status bar.
Choose Window > Events.
2. Do any of the following:
To learn more about an item in the list, select it and click Details.
To clear the events list, click Clear All.
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Synchronizing audio and video with Merge Clips (CS5.5 and later)
Merge clips in the Project panel
Merge clips in the Timeline panel
Synchronize clips in the Timeline panel
Editing with merged clips
Use timecode from an audio master clip to create a merged clip (CS6)
Merged Clips limitations
Premiere Pro CS5.5 and later features a new method for synchronizing audio and video called Merge Clips. This will streamline the process by
which users can sync audio and video which have been recorded separately (a process sometimes called double-system recording). You’ll be able
to select a video clip and synchronize it with up to 16 channels of audio by using the “Merge Clips” command. Clips which make up the merged
clip are referred to as “component clips.”
Clips may be merged by group selecting them in the either the Project panel or the Timeline. The Merge Clips command may be invoked via
either the Clip menu or a contextual menu. It is a contextual command, so more than one clip must be selected in order to enable it.
You may merge one or multiple audio clips to a single video or AV clip. The total number of audio tracks permissable in a merged clip is 16,
including any combination of mono, stereo or surround 5.1 clips. A single mono clip counts as one track, a single stereo counts as two tracks, a
5.1 clip counts as six tracks.
Note: Creating a merged clip does not replace or alter the source clip(s).
To see how to merge clips and synchronize audio and video tracks, see this video on the Video2Brain website,.
In this video, Jason Levine shows how to use the Merge Clips command, as well as demonstrating a few other improvements in Adobe Premiere
Pro CS5.5 and later.
For details about merged clips and dual-system sound in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 and later, see this blog post on the Premiere Pro work area.
Luisa Winters shows you how to use the new Merge Clips feature in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 and later in this video tutorial. You’ll learn how to
synch audio and video ingested from different sources, as in professional DSLR-based production.
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Merge clips in the Project panel
To merge clips in the Project panel, do the following:
1. Select the video clip you wish to merge audio clips to. Note that you can only have one video clip in any merged clip.
2. Shift or Control-click (Command-click for Mac OS) to select the audio-only clips you wish to merge with the video clip.
3. Do one of the following:
Choose Clip > Merge Clips
Right-click (Control-click for Mac OS), and then choose Merge Clips from the shortcut menu.
The Merge Clips dialog launches. Choose from one of the following options for the point of synchronization:
Based on the In point: For locating sync based on the In point, at the clap of the slate, for example.
Based on the Out point: For locating sync based on the Out point, at the clap of the tail slate, for example.
Based on matching timecode: For locating sync based on common timecode between the clips.
Based on clip markers: For locating a sync point based on a numbered clip marker in the middle of the shot. This function is disabled unless
all component clips have at least one numbered marker.
Click OK. Your merged clip will now appear in the Project panel, with a name that matches the video clip, or the top-most selected audio clip
(based on current sort order in the bin) if there is no video. “- Merged” is appended to the end of the new merged clip’s name. Users may rename
this item, if necessary.
Note: Audio-only clips may be merged with other audio-only clips; a video clip is not a requirement for a merged clip. Only one clip containing
video may be used.
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Merge clips in the Timeline panel
To merge clips in the Timeline panel, do the following:
Select the clips (if they are not already selected), and then do one of the following:
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Drag the component clips into the Project panel.
Choose Clip > Merge Clips.
The Merge Clips dialog launches.
Click OK. Your merged clip will now appear in the Project panel.
Note: Clips that are merged in the Timeline are synchronized from Clip Start for each component clip. To merge clips based on Clip End,
Timecode, or Numbered Marker, use the synchronize function prior to merging the clips.
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Synchronize clips in the Timeline panel
Synchronizing clips aligns multiple clips in the Timeline panel. After synchronizing the clips, you can create a merged clip.
To synchronize clips in the Timeline panel, first edit the clips into the Timeline panel, and then do one of the following:
Align the clips manually by dragging them into place until they are synchronized.
Align the clips using the Synchronize function. To do so, do the following:
1. Select the clips you wish to synchronize.
2. Choose Clip > Synchronize.
The Synchronize dialog launches. Choose from one of the following options for the point of synchronization:
Based on the Clip Start
Based on the Clip End
Based on matching timecode
Based on clip markers
Click OK. Your clips are now synchronized.
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Editing with merged clips
In general, working with merged clips is much like working with any other clip. There are some workflow differences that should be noted,
however.
Editing merged clips with gaps into the Timeline
There are implications to how merged clips behave when editing them into the timeline, specifically, if the clips contain “gaps” in their component
structure.
When there is another component clip available If an In or Out point is marked in a gap in the audio or video, and there is another component
clip available above or below that gap, a track is used for the gap when the merged clip is edited into the Timeline.
When no component clip is available Note that it is possible to merge audio and video and have places in the merged clip where there is no
other component clip in the gap. If you have marked and In or Out point in a gap such as this, you will receive a warning that states, “Invalid edit.
No media present in source clip’s marked In/Out range” when attempting to edit the merged clip into the Timeline. The “no drop” icon will appear if
you attempt to drag and drop the merged clip into the Timeline.
Note: Black will play for any gap in the video. Silence will play for the gap in audio, unless there is another component audio clip available on
another track.
Trimming merged clips
Trimming merged clips is much like trimming any other clip, save for the following exceptions:
During trimming, the trim is applied equally to component clips, preserving any offsets.
To trim the edge of a single component clip, users can temporarily break sync by holding down the Alt/Option modifier while dragging.
When trimming individual component clips, snapping occurs at the ends of other component when snapping is on.
Normal trimming rules apply; a merged clip can only be trimmed to the point where there is at least one frame remaining in any of the
component clips.
Merged clips and the Metadata panel
When a merged clip is created, the metadata for each of the component clips is copied into the Metadata panel. There are some differences for
displaying metadata for a merged clip. They are as follows:
Viewing metadata You can view the metadata a single component clip. To view the metadata for a component clip, choose the clip name from
the File popup menu. Its metadata will appear in the metadata panel.
Entering metadata You can enter metadata to a component clip or for the entire merged clip.
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Set the File popup menu to the component clip you wish, and then enter metadata for the clip.
Set the File popup menu to All Files, and then enter metadata for the merged clip. Any data entered into a property will be entered into the
XMP for each of the component files that make up the merged clip.
Note: The All Files display acts like a multiple clip selection, where <multiple values> is displayed when the property values don’t match
across the selection. Similarly to ta multiple selection, when the display mode is set to All Files, any data entered into a property will be
entered into the XMP of each componenet file that make up the merged clip.
Use timecode from an audio master clip to create a merged clip (CS6)
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In Premiere Pro CS6, you can use the timecode from an audio master clip to be used when you create a merged clip. You can also choose to omit
the source camera audio when creating a merged clip.
Do the following:
1. Select the video clip, and the audio clip that contains timecode.
2. Choose Clip > Merge Clips
3. In the Merge Clips dialog box, do one of the following:
To use timecode from an audio master clip to create a merged clip, click the “Use Audio Timecode from Clip” checkbox. Once it is
checked, choose the audio track you want to synchronize video with from the pop-up menu.
To delete source camera audio from a clip, click the “Remove Audio from AV Clip” checkbox.
4. Click OK
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Merged Clips limitations
The Replace Footage command does not work.
Attaching Adobe Story scripts, and then analyzing speech to text is not supported.
Note: If you attach an Adobe Story script to an audio clip prior to merging, then you can analyze speech to text after merging them. Select
either “All Files,” or the audio clip containing the script from the File pop-up menu in the Metadata panel, and then click the Analyze button.
Full audio channel mapping control in the merged clip is not supported.
Merged clip audio results in mono track audio only.
Final Cut Pro XML and AAF interchange formats are not supported.
Auto-sync using audio waveforms, free-run timecode, time-of-day timecode, AUX timecode, or separate audio timecode is not supported.
Reveal in Adobe Bridge is not supported.
Once created, the merged clip cannot be re-synchronized, or adjusted. You must make a new merged clip.
Adjusting contents of a merged clip is not supported. However, if a particular component clip is deleted, the merged clip may be relinked.
Merged clips or parts of previously merged clips cannt be used to remerge or make a new merged clip. Only component clips may be used
to create a merged clip.
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Editing audio
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Overview of audio and the Audio Track Mixer
Enhanced in Premiere Pro CC
In Premiere Pro CC, the Audio Mixer panel is renamed Audio Track Mixer. This name change helps you distinguish the Audio Track Mixer from the
new Audio Clip Mixer panel. For more information, see Audio Enhancements in Premiere Pro CC.
Working with audio
Audio tracks in a sequence
Channels in audio clips
Mixing audio tracks and clips
Processing order for audio
Making quick audio adjustments
View audio data
Audio Track Mixer overview
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Working with audio
In Adobe® Premiere® Pro, you can edit audio, add effects to it, and mix as many tracks of audio in a sequence as your computer system can
handle. Tracks can contain mono or 5.1 surround channels. In addition, there are standard tracks and adaptive tracks.
The Standard audio track can cope with both mono and stereo in the same track. That is, if you set your audio track to Standard, you can use
footage with different types of audio tracks on the same audio track.
You can choose different kinds of tracks for different kinds of media. For example, you could choose for mono clips to be edited only onto mono
tracks. You can choose for multichannel mono audio be directed to an Adaptive track by default.
To work with audio, first import it into a project or record it directly to a track. You can import audio clips or video clips that contain audio.
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After the audio clips are in a project, you can add them to a sequence and edit them just like video clips. You can also view the waveforms of
audio clips and trim them in the Source Monitor before adding the audio to a sequence.
You can adjust volume and pan/balance settings of audio tracks directly in the Timeline or Effect Controls panels. You can use the Audio Track
Mixer to make mixing changes in real time. You can also add effects to audio clips in a sequence. If you are preparing a complex mix with many
tracks, consider organizing them into submixes and nested sequences.
For advanced editing using Adobe Edition, select Edit > Edit in Audition.
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Audio tracks in a sequence
A sequence can contain any combination of the following audio tracks:
Standard The standard track replaces the previous stereo track type. It can accommodate both mono and stereo audio clips. Standard tracks can
contain both mono and stereo clips, but not adaptive or 5.1 clips. The standard track is used as the default preset for audio tracks.
Mono (monophonic) Contains one audio channel. If a stereo track is added to a mono track, the stereo track is converted to a mono track.
Adaptive The adaptive track can contain both mono and stereo tracks. With adaptive tracks, you can map source audio to output audio channels
in the way that works best for your workflow. This track type is useful for working with audio from cameras that record multiple audio tracks.
Adaptive tracks can also be used when working with merged clips, or multicam sequences. For more information, see this video.
5.1 Contains the following:
Three front audio channels (left, center, and right)
Two rear or surround audio channels (left and right)
A low-frequency effects (LFE) audio channel routed to a subwoofer speaker.
5.1 tracks can only contain 5.1 clips.
You can add or delete tracks at any time. Once a track is created, you can’t change the number of channels it uses. A sequence always contains
a master track that controls the combined output for all tracks in the sequence. The Tracks panel in the New Sequence dialog specifies the
following: The master track’s format, the number of audio tracks in a sequence, and the number of channels in the audio tracks
A sequence can contain two types of audio tracks. Regular audio tracks contain actual audio. Submix tracks output the combined signals of tracks
or sends routed to it. Submix tracks are useful for managing mixes and effects.
Each sequence is created with the designated number of audio tracks in a Timeline panel. However, Premiere Pro automatically creates new audio
tracks when you drop an audio clip below the last audio track in a Timeline panel. This feature is useful if the number of stacked audio clips
exceeds the available tracks in a sequence. It is also useful when the number of channels in an audio clip doesn’t match the number of channels
in the default audio tracks. You can also add tracks by right-clicking a track header and choosing Add Tracks, or by choosing Sequence > Add
Tracks.
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Channels in audio clips
Clips can contain one audio channel (mono), two audio channels—left and right (stereo), or five audio surround channels with a low-frequency
effects audio channel (5.1 surround). A sequence can accommodate any combination of clips. However, all the audio is mixed to the track format
(mono, stereo, or 5.1 surround) of the master track.
You can determine whether a stereo clip is placed on one or two tracks. Right-click a clip in the Project panel, and select Modify > Audio
Channels. If you choose to place a stereo clip across two tracks, the Clip Panners use their default behavior (left to left, right to right).
Premiere Pro lets you change the track format (the grouping of audio channels) in an audio clip. For example, you can apply audio effects
differently to the individual channels in a stereo or 5.1 surround clip. You can change the track format in stereo or 5.1 surround clips. In such
cases, the audio is placed on separate mono tracks when the clips are added to a sequence.
Note: You can change a master clip’s track format only before you add an instance of the clip to a sequence.
Premiere Pro also lets you remap the output channels or tracks for a clip’s audio channels. For example, you can remap the left channel audio in a
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stereo clip so that it’s output to the right channel.
Preserve matrix of 5.1 audio clip
To preserve the matrix of an imported 5.1 audio clip, use the clip in a 5.1 audio track in a sequence. To use the component channels as discrete
multi-mono tracks in a sequence, import or remap the clip into mono channels.
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Mixing audio tracks and clips
Mixing is blending and adjusting the audio tracks in a sequence. Sequence audio tracks can contain many audio clips, and the audio tracks of
video clips. Actions you perform when mixing audio can be applied at various levels within a sequence. For example, you can apply one audio
level value to a clip and another value to the track that contains the clip. A track containing the audio for a nested sequence can contain volume
changes and effects previously applied to the tracks in the source sequence. Values applied at all of these levels are combined for the final mix.
You can modify an audio clip by applying an effect to the clip or to the track that contains the clip. Consider applying effects in a planned,
systematic way to avoid redundant or conflicting settings on the same clip.
Chris and Trish Meyer provide an overview on the Artbeats website of how to mix and time multiple audio tracks for maximum clarity and storytelling impact.
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Processing order for audio
As you edit sequences, Premiere Pro processes audio in the following order, from first to last:
Gain adjustments applied to clips by using the Clip > Audio Options > Audio Gain command.
Effects applied to clips.
Track settings, which are processed in the following order: Pre-fader effects, pre-fader sends, mute, fader, meter, post-fader effects, postfader sends, and then pan/balance position.
Track output volume from left to right in the Audio Track Mixer, from audio tracks to submix tracks, ending at the master track.
Note: You can modify the default signal path with sends or by changing a track’s output setting.
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Making quick audio adjustments
Although Premiere Pro includes a full-featured Audio Track Mixer, there are times when many of these options are not required. For example,
when creating a rough cut from video and audio captured together from DV footage, output to stereo tracks, follow these guidelines:
Start with the Master meters and volume fader in the Audio Track Mixer. If the audio is too far below 0 dB or too high (the red clipping
indicator appears), adjust the level of clips or tracks as needed.
To temporarily silence a track, use the Mute Track button in the Audio Track Mixer or the Toggle Track Output icon in the Timeline panel. To
temporarily silence all other tracks, use the Solo button in the Audio Track Mixer.
When making audio adjustments of any kind, determine whether the change is applied to the entire track or to individual clips. Audio tracks
and clips are edited in different ways.
Use the Show/Hide Tracks command in the Audio Track Mixer menu to display only the information you want to see and save screen space.
If you aren’t using Effects and Sends, you can hide them by clicking the triangle at the left edge of the Audio Track Mixer.
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View audio data
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To help you view and edit the audio settings of any clip or track, Premiere Pro provides multiple views of the same audio data. You can view and
edit volume or effect values for either tracks or clips in the Audio Track Mixer or in a Timeline panel. Make sure that the track display is set to
Show Track Keyframes or Show Track Volume.
In addition, audio tracks in a Timeline panel contain waveforms, which are visual representations of a clip’s audio over time. The height of the
waveform shows the amplitude (loudness or quietness) of the audio—the larger the waveform, the louder the audio. Viewing the waveforms in an
audio track is helpful for locating specific audio in a clip.
To view a waveform, expand the audio track by clicking the triangle next to the audio track name.
View audio clips
You can view an audio clip’s Volume, Mute, or Pan time graphs and its waveform in a Timeline panel. You can also view an audio clip in the
Source Monitor, which is useful for setting precise In and Out points. You can also view sequence time in audio units instead of frames. This
setting is useful for editing audio at smaller increments than frames.
Do any of the following:
To view the audio waveform of a clip in a Timeline panel, click the triangle to the left of the audio track name and click the Toggle Track
Output icon . Then choose Show Waveform.
To view an audio clip in the Source Monitor when the clip is in a Timeline panel, double-click the clip.
To view an audio clip in the Source Monitor when the clip is in the Project panel, double-click the clip, or drag the clip to the Source
Monitor. If a clip contains video and audio, you can view its audio in the Source Monitor by clicking the Settings button and selecting
Audio Waveform.
View time in audio time units
In the Audio Track Mixer, Program Monitor, Source Monitor, or Timeline panel, choose Show Audio Time Units from the panel menu.
To see more volume detail when viewing an audio waveform in a Timeline panel, increase the track height. To see more time detail, view
time in audio units.
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Audio Track Mixer overview
In the Audio Track Mixer, you can adjust settings while listening to audio tracks and viewing video tracks. Each Audio Track Mixer track
corresponds to a track in the timeline of the active sequence and displays the Timeline audio tracks in an audio console layout. You can rename a
track by double-clicking its name. You can also use the Audio Track Mixer to record audio directly into a sequence’s tracks.
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Audio Track Mixer
A. Pan/balance control B. Automation mode C. Mute Track/Solo Track/Enable Track For Recording buttons D. VU meters and faders E. Track
name F. Clipping indicator G. Master VU meter and fader
By default, the Audio Track Mixer displays all audio tracks and the master fader, and the VU meters monitor output signal levels. The Audio Track
Mixer represents the tracks in the active sequence only, not all project-wide tracks. If you want to create a master project mix from multiple
sequences, set up a master sequence and nest other sequences within it.
Audio Track Mixer playback controls
A. Go To In Point B. Go To Out Point C. Play/Stop Toggle D. Play In To Out E. Loop F. Record
The Audio Meters panel duplicates the audio display of the Audio Mixer Master Meters. You can open a separate Audio Meters panel and dock it
anywhere in your workspace. The Audio Meters panel allows you to monitor audio even when the full Audio Mixer or the Master Fader section is
not visible.
Set fader to 0dB by double-clicking the fader.
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Audio Mixer
A. Show/Hide Effects and Sends B. Effects C. Sends D. Track Output Assignment E. Automation Mode
Modify the Audio Track Mixer
1. Choose any of the following from the Audio Track Mixer menu:
To display or hide specific tracks, choose Show/Hide Tracks, use the options to mark the tracks you want to see and click OK.
To display hardware input levels on the VU meters (not track levels in Premiere Pro), choose Meter Input(s) Only. If this option is
chosen, you can still monitor audio in Premiere Pro for all tracks that aren’t being recorded.
To display time in audio units instead of video frames, choose Show Audio Time Units. You can specify whether to view samples or
milliseconds by changing the Audio Display Format option in the General tab of the Project Settings dialog box. The Show Audio Time
Units option affects the time displays in the Audio Mixer, Source panel, Program panel, and Timeline panel.
To display the Effects And Sends panel, click the Show/Hide Effects And Sends triangle along the left side of the Audio Mixer.
Note: If you can’t see all the tracks, resize the Audio Mixer or scroll horizontally.
To add an effect or send, click the Effect Selection or Send Assignment Selection triangle in the Effects And Sends panel. Then choose
an effect or send from the menu.
2. Right-click the panel and use the menu to set the visual metering mode, peak display, valley indicator display, and decibel range.
Monitor specific tracks in the Audio Mixer
Click the Solo Track button for the corresponding tracks.
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Only the tracks with the Solo Track button enabled are monitored during playback.
Note: You can also silence a track using the Mute Track button.
Audio Meters panel
1. Select Window > Audio Meters.
Audio Meter panel
A. LED Meter (gradients in the meter panel) B. Solo channels C. Clipping indicator D. Peak indicator E. Valley indicator
2. Right-click the panel and use the options to do the following:
View peaks as static peaks or dynamic peaks. For dynamic peaks, the peak indicator is updated constantly with a three-second
threshold. For static peaks, the peak indicator displays the loudest peak until the indicator is reset or playback is restarted.
View valley indicators at low amplitude points.
View LED Meters (meter appears with color segments)
Set a decibel range from the available options
Note: The audio meters provide information about both the Source and Program monitors.
Set monitoring options for the Audio Meters panel
Right-click the Audio Meters panel, and choose a desired option from the menu.
Solo in Place Solo one or more channels without changing their speaker assignment. For example, soloing the right-surround in 5.1, you hear
only this channel out of the right-surround speaker. This option is available for all clips played in the Source monitor and for all sequences played
in the Timeline panel.
Monitor Mono Channels Allows you to listen to one specific channel out of both your stereo monitoring speakers, regardless of its assignment.
For example, monitoring an 8-channel adaptive clip in the Source monitor allows you to listen to channel 4 out of both the left and right speakers.
This option is available for the following:
Adaptive clips played in the Source monitor
Sequences with multi-channel masters played in either the Source monitor or the Timeline panel
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Monitor Stereo Pairs Only available for sequences with multi-channel masters played in the Timeline. For example, for an 8-channel multichannel master sequence, you can monitor just channels 3 and 4 out of the left and right speakers.
Note: Disabled channels are not displayed in the Source monitor or in the Audio Meters panel.
Customize a VST effect in an options window
1. Apply a VST plug-in effect to a track in the Audio Mixer.
2. Double-click the effect in the Effects And Sends panel.
Premiere Pro opens a separate VST editing window.
3. Customize the effect with the option controls.
Review project settings
Work with submixes
Work with tracks
Record audio from a microphone or another analog source
Routing audio to buses, sends, and the Master track
Adjusting gain and volume
Mix tracks in the Audio Mixer
Timeline panels
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Working with clips, channels, and tracks
Mapping source and output audio channels
Audio channel icons
Extract audio from clips
Render and replace audio
Break a stereo track into mono tracks
Use a mono clip as stereo
Placing sound from one channel of a stereo clip into both channels
Linking multiple audio clips
Link audio clips
Edit a multi-clip link in the Source Monitor
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Mapping source and output audio channels
Mapping the audio channels in clips determines the type and number of audio tracks in which they appear in a sequence. Also, mapping channels
determines their destination channels within the master track, and therefore in the final output file. For example, if you map channels 1 and 2 in a
stereo clip to the Left-Front and Right-Front channels in a 5.1-channel master track, the two source channels appear as a single 5.1-channel track
when placed into a sequence. They feed the Left-Front and Right-Front channels of the master track. When the final output is played through a
5.1-channel surround sound system, the original two channels play through the Left-Front and Right-Front speakers, respectively.
Karl Soule shows how to map audio channels in Premiere Pro in this video tutorial. This video is for editors dealing with footage using split-mono
tracks (voice on one track, ambient sound on another). This quick tutorial on audio channel mapping is a must-see.
By default, clip audio channels are mapped to the master track when they are captured or imported into a project. You can specify how Premiere
Pro maps them by selecting a Default Track Format in the Source Channel Mapping pane of the Audio Preferences dialog box. You can also
change how clip audio channels are mapped after importing them into a project.
Finally, you can specify which output channels Premiere Pro uses to monitor each audio channel. For example, you can monitor the left channel of
stereo tracks through the left-front speaker of your computer speaker system. Set this default in the Audio Output Mapping Preferences dialog box.
Map source audio channels on import
You can specify how Premiere Pro automatically maps clip audio channels to audio tracks and the Master Track on import or capture.
1. Select Edit > Preferences > Audio (Windows), or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Audio (Mac OS).
2. In the Audio Tracks section of the Audio Preferences dialog box, select a format from the Default Track Format menu.
3. Click OK.
Change the source audio channel mapping for one or more clips
1. Select one or more clips containing audio in the Project panel and choose Clip > Modify > Audio Channels.
Note: If you select more than one audio clip, make sure that the track format is the same for all the selected clips.
2. In the Audio Channels pane of the Modify Clip dialog box, do any of the following:
Select a format from the Channel Format list.
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To enable or disable an audio channel, select or deselect the Enable option for a source channel. When you add a clip to a sequence,
Premiere Pro adds only the enabled channels to a Timeline panel.
To map a source channel to a different output track or channel, drag a track or channel icon to another source channel row. This step
swaps the output channels or tracks for the two source channels.
Note: When you view a clip with remapped source channels in a Timeline panel, the tracks appear in ascending order. However, the
mapping determines their associated source channels.
To map less than six source channels to the output channels in 5.1 surround audio, drag the channel icon to another source channel
row. Alternatively, click the 5.1 Channel icon until the source channel is mapped to the desired output channel.
3. To preview the audio in a channel, select the source channel and click the Playback button or use the slider.
4. Click OK.
Note: You cannot modify audio channels of a merged clip. They must be mono by default. However, you can still reorder and enable/disable all of
the available audio channels from the component clips.
Map P2 clip audio for export to P2
You can export audio in P2 sequences back to their original four channels if you map clip audio channels to 5.1 channels correctly. You can export
to four channels, for example, if you want to transfer your final output file back to P2 media. Map the channels in your P2 clips before placing them
into a sequence, and before using the File > Export To Panasonic P2 command.
Note: If you leave P2 clips at their default mono channel mapping, use them in a sequence with a 5.1 master track, and export that sequence to
P2, the exported file contains audio only in the third and fourth channels.
1. Import the clips into a P2 project containing a sequence with a 5.1 master track.
2. In the Project panel, select the clip or clips you want to map.
3. Select Clip > Modify > Audio Channels.
4. Under Track Format, click 5.1.
5. If necessary, click the 5.1 channel icons until they map the four source channels in this way:
Ch. 1 to Left-Front Channel.
Ch. 2 to Right-Front Channel.
Ch. 3 to Left-Rear Channel.
Ch. 4 to Right-Rear Channel.
6. Click OK.
Map sequence audio channels to audio output device hardware channels
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You can specify the channel in a target hardware audio device for each channel in a sequence Master track. You map channels in the Audio
Output Mapping pane of the Preferences dialog box. Premiere Pro plays each sequence channel through the hardware channel you specify. For
example, your project could have a 5.1-channel sequence, but your system hardware might support only two channels. You could specify which of
the two hardware channels carries each of the six sequence channels.
16-channel sequences, however, remain mapped to 16 output channels if the selected hardware device has fewer than 16 channels. For example,
the selected device could have only two channels. You could then map only the first two channels of a 16-channel sequence to the two hardware
channels.
Note: In the Audio Output Mapping pane, you can map sequence channels to any supported hardware device installed in your computer, not only
the device currently activated. However, you see and hear the channel mapping you specify for a device only when the device is activated.
Mapping sequence audio channels to the device does not activate the device. To activate an audio hardware device, select it in Audio Hardware
preferences. For more information, see Specify ASIO device settings (Windows only).
To map sequence channels for a hardware device, you first select the device in the Map Output For menu. The list below the Map Output For
menu shows the hardware channels supported by the device chosen. You then map sequence channels to each hardware channel using channel
tiles.
For example, if you choose a third-party 16-channel audio device, the list shows 16 hardware channels. If you choose a stereo device, the list
shows only two hardware channels. Tiles to the right of each channel name in the list represent the three types of sequence channels you can
map to that hardware channel: stereo, 5.1, and 16-channel.
By default, Premiere Pro selects Premiere Pro WDM Sound (Windows), or Built-In (Mac OS) as the device. However, if your computer has a
supported third-party audio device installed, it appears in the Map Output For menu. Select the third-party device to make its supported channels
appear in the list.
1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Audio Output Mapping (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Audio Output Mapping (Mac OS).
2. In the Preferences dialog box, from the Map Output For menu, choose the driver for the device desired. By default, Premiere Pro selects
Premiere Pro WDM Sound (Windows) or Built-In (Mac OS).
3. Drag the desired sequence channel tile into line with the desired hardware channel in the list.
4. Click OK.
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Audio channel icons
These icons appear on the Audio Channels tab of the Modify Clip dialog box, and in the Audio Output Mapping dialog box.
The following icons indicate channel mapping for stereo mixes:
Left stereo channel
Right stereo channel
The following icons indicate channel mapping for 5.1 surround mixes:
Left front channel
Right front channel
Left surround channel
Right surround channel
Center front channel
Low frequency effects channel
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Extract audio from clips
You can extract audio from clips and generate new audio master clips in a project. The original master clips are preserved. Any source channel
mappings, gain, speed, duration, and interpret footage adjustments in the original master clips are applied to the new, extracted audio clips.
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1. In the Project panel, select one or more clips containing audio.
2. Choose Clip > Audio Options > Extract Audio.
Premiere Pro generates new audio files containing the extracted audio, with the word “Extracted” added to the end of the filenames.
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Render and replace audio
You can select an audio clip in a sequence and generate a new audio clip that replaces the one you selected. The new audio clip contains any
editing and effects you applied to the original sequence clip. If you trimmed the original sequence clip, the new clip contains only the trimmed
audio instead of the entire audio of the original master clip.
1. Select an audio clip in a sequence.
2. Choose Clip > Audio Options > Render And Replace.
A new audio clip is created and replaces the selected audio clip. The master clip (either audio clip or video clip containing audio) in the
Project panel is untouched.
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Break a stereo track into mono tracks
The Breakout To Mono command creates mono audio master clips from a clip’s stereo or 5.1 surround audio channels. Breaking out a stereo clip
results in two mono audio master clips—one for each channel. Breaking out a 5.1 surround clip results in six mono audio master clips—again, one
for each channel. Premiere Pro preserves the original master clip. The Breakout To Mono command does not create new files, only new master
clips with appropriate source channel mapping.
1. In the Project panel, select a clip containing stereo or 5.1 surround audio.
2. Choose Clip > Audio Options > Breakout To Mono.
The resulting audio master clips are given filenames reflecting the name of the original clip, followed by the channel names. For example,
when Premiere Pro creates two audio master clips from a stereo audio clip named Zoom, it names them Zoom Left and Zoom Right.
The Breakout To Mono command does not create linked clips. To create mono clips that are linked, use the Source Channel Mappings
command.
Note: The Breakout To Mono command works on items in the Project panel, not on clips in a sequence in the Timeline panel.
See Andrew Devis' tutorial “Changing Audio From Stereo to Dual Mono” on the Creative COW website.
Break all stereo tracks into mono tracks
Premiere Pro can automatically break out individual stereo and surround channels to discrete monaural clips as each clip is captured or imported.
1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Audio (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Audio (Mac OS).
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2. In the Source Channel Mapping area, choose Mono from the Default Track Format menu.
3. Click OK.
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Use a mono clip as stereo
You may sometimes find it useful to use a mono audio clip as a stereo clip. Using the Modify Clip dialog box, you can apply a mono clip to a pair
of left and right stereo channels.
1. In the Project panel, select a mono clip.
2. Choose Clip > Modify > Audio Channels.
3. In the Modify Clip dialog box, select Mono As Stereo, and then click OK.
Note: You can apply the Modify Clip command to a mono clip only in the Project panel, before the clip appears in a Timeline panel. You
can’t convert a clip instance to stereo when it’s used in a mono audio track.
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Placing sound from one channel of a stereo clip into both channels
If you have a stereo clip with sound recorded in only one channel, or if you have a stereo clip that has sound in one channel that you want to
replace with the sound from the other channel, you can use source clip channel mapping, the Fill Left audio filter, or the Fill Right audio filter.
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Linking multiple audio clips
You can link one video clip to multiple audio clips and you can link multiple audio clips together. When you link audio clips in a sequence, you link
only the instances of the master clips. The original master audio clips in the Project panel are untouched.
Linked clips remain synchronized as you move them or trim them in a Timeline panel. You can apply audio effects, including Volume and Panning
effects, to all channels in the linked clips. If you make an edit that moves one of the linked clips without moving the others, out-of-sync indicators
appear.
You can display and trim a multi-clip link in the Source Monitor. To view a track in the multi-clip link, choose from the Track menu. You can view
and play only one channel at a time in the Source Monitor. If the linked clips contain markers, the Source Monitor timeline displays markers only
for the displayed track. If the Source Monitor displays a multi-clip link from the Project panel, you can use the Overwrite or Insert buttons to add
the linked clips to separate tracks in a Timeline panel.
Choosing track of multi-clip link in Source Monitor
The Effect Controls panel displays all the video and audio tracks in a multi-clip link with the applied effects grouped together by track. You can
apply effects from the Effects panel to a specific group in the Effect Controls panel.
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Effects applied to audio tracks in multi-clip link displayed in Effect Controls panel
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Link audio clips
The audio clips must have the same channel type and each clip must be on a different track. If clips are already linked, such as an audio clip
linked to a video clip, they must be unlinked before you can create a multi-clip link.
1. If necessary, select each linked video and audio clip, or select multiple clips, and choose Clip > Unlink.
2. Do one of the following:
Shift-click to select each audio clip on separate tracks in a Timeline panel. You may also shift-click to select a video clip.
Shift-click to select more than one audio clip on separate tracks in a Timeline panel.
All audio clips must have the same track format (mono, stereo, or 5.1 surround).
3. Choose Clip > Link.
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Edit a multi-clip link in the Source Monitor
1. In a Timeline panel, double-click a linked clip.
2. Choose a track from the Track menu to display a specific channel.
3. (Optional) Specify the In and Out points for a track.
Specifying the In and Out points for a specific track applies the same amount of trimming to the In and Out points of the other linked tracks.
The In and Out points of linked tracks with different durations will be different. The In and Out points of linked clips are the same only if they
have identical durations.
Audio Preferences
Audio Output Mapping preferences
Fill Left, Fill Right effects
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Group clips
Link and unlink video and audio clips
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Editing audio in a Timeline panel
Set sample-based audio In and Out points
Link and unlink video and audio clips
Create split edits
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Set sample-based audio In and Out points
In and Out points are set at time-base divisions—that is, between video frames. Although frame-based edits are adequate for audio as well, some
audio edits require greater precision. For example, you may want to place an In point between two words in a sentence, but the tiny division
between words doesn’t conveniently fall between frames. Digital audio, however, isn’t divided into frames, but into audio samples, which occur far
more frequently. By switching the Source Monitor’s or sequence’s time ruler to audio samples, you can set more precise audio In and Out points.
Source Monitor set to display audio units for more precise editing of an audio clip
Switch a time ruler to audio units in the Source or Program Monitor
In the Source or Program Monitor panel menu, choose Show Audio Time Units.
Navigate audio in sample view
1. Switch the time ruler in the Source Monitor or Timeline panel to audio units.
2. To navigate, do one of the following:
Drag the current-time indicator
in the time ruler to navigate smoothly through the clip.
Click the Step Forward or Step Back buttons to move the current-time indicator
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one audio sample at a time.
3. Drag either end of the zoom scroll bar below the time ruler in the Source Monitor or Timeline panel.
Trim audio in sample view in a Timeline panel
1. In a Timeline panel menu, choose Show Audio Time Units. The time rulers in a Timeline panel and Program Monitor switch to a samplebased scale.
2. If necessary, expand the audio track containing the clip you want to edit, click the Set Display Style button
, and choose Show Waveform.
3. View the audio In point or Out point of the clip you want to edit in detail by dragging the zoom slider to the right.
4. Trim the clip by doing one of the following:
To adjust the In point, position the pointer over the left edge of the clip’s audio so that the trim head tool
right.
To adjust the Out point, position the pointer over the right edge of the clip’s audio so that the trim tail icon
right.
appears, and drag left or
appears, and drag left or
5. Use the waveform display or play the audio to make sure that you adjusted the In and Out points properly.
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Link and unlink video and audio clips
In the Project panel, clips that contain both video and audio appear as a single item, represented by . When you add the clip to the sequence,
however, the video and audio appear as two objects, each in its appropriate track (provided you specified both the video and audio sources when
adding the clip).
The video and audio portions of the clip are linked so that when you drag the video portion in a Timeline panel, the linked audio moves with it, and
vice versa. For this reason, the audio/video pair is called a linked clip. In a Timeline panel, each part of the linked clip is labeled with the same clip
name, which is underlined. The video is marked [V] and the audio is marked [A].
Ordinarily, all editing functions act on both parts of a linked clip. When you want to work with the audio and video individually, you can unlink them.
When you do, you can use the video and audio as though they were not linked; even the clip names no longer appear underlined or bear the [V]
and [A] labels. Even so, Premiere Pro keeps track of the link. If you relink the clips, they indicate whether they have been moved out of sync, and
by how much. You can have Premiere Pro automatically resynchronize the clips.
You can also create a link between previously unlinked clips. This is particularly useful if you need to synchronize video and audio that were
recorded separately.
Note: You can link video only to audio—you cannot link a video clip to another video clip. You can link a video clip to multiple audio clips, or
multiple audio clips together.
Here is a video tutorial from Andrew Devis on unlinking audio & video to edit them separately (J & L cuts).
For more information about linking and unlinking clips, see this excerpt from An Editor's Guide to Premiere Pro by Richard Harrington, Robbie
Carman and Jeff Greenberg.
Link or unlink video and audio
1. Do the following in a Timeline:
To link video and audio, Shift-click a video and audio clip, or a series of audio clips to select them, and then choose Clip > Link.
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To unlink video and audio, select a linked clip and choose Clip > Unlink.
To unlink video and audio from multiple clips, select the clips and choose Clip > Unlink.
Note: After unlinking a clip, video remains selected while audio becomes deselected.
2. (Optional) To use a set of linked clips multiple times, create a nested sequence from the set of synchronized clips, and place the nested
sequence in other sequences as desired. For more information, see Create a nested sequence from a selection of clips.
Edit tracks of linked clips individually
In a Timeline, Alt-click/Option-click either part of a linked clip, and then use any editing tool. When you have finished editing the clip, you can
reselect (click) the clip to edit it as a linked clip again. Alt/Option-dragging audio or video works well for adjusting a split edit.
Automatically synchronize clips that were moved out of sync
1. Right-click/Control-click the number that appears at the In point in a Timeline panel of the out-of-sync video or audio clip. (The number
indicates the amount of time the clip is out of sync with its accompanying video or audio clip.)
2. Choose one of the following options:
Move Into Sync Shifts the selected video or audio part of the clip in time to restore sync. Move Into Sync moves the clip without regard to
adjacent clips and overwrites any clips to regain sync.
Slip Into Sync Performs a slip edit to restore sync without moving the clip’s position in time.
For information about synchronizing multiple clips with each other for a multi-camera edit, see Synchronize clips with markers.
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Create split edits
Ordinarily, you set one In point and one Out point for a source clip. Even if it’s a linked clip (a clip containing video and audio tracks), In and Out
points apply to both tracks of the clip. Set in a sequence, the audio and video of the standard clip appear at the same time. Sometimes you want
to set the video and audio In or Out points independently, however, in order to create split edits (also known as L-cuts and J-cuts). When placed in
a sequence, a clip trimmed for a split edit will have its audio appear before its video, or its video before its audio.
A. Clip trimmed for J-cut B. Clip trimmed for L-cut
Create a split edit
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1. If necessary, click the triangle to the left of each track name in a Timeline panel to expand the audio tracks you want to adjust.
2. Select one of the clips involved in the split edit, and choose Clip > Unlink. Repeat for the other clip.
3. Select the Rolling Edit tool
from the Tools panel.
4. Starting at the audio edit point between the two clips, drag left or right.
Note: If nothing happens, make sure that before you start dragging, you position the pointer over the visible audio edit point, not over an
applied audio transition.
A common editing technique is to Alt/Option-drag a clip’s audio or video to quickly adjust a split edit. It’s a lot faster than going to a menu to
unlink a clip.
Set source In and Out points for a split edit
Although it’s common to create split edits after clips are assembled into a rough cut, it’s possible to trim clips for split edits in the Source Monitor
before adding them to the sequence.
1. Open a clip in the Source Monitor, and move the playhead to the frame you want to set as a video or audio In or Out point.
2. In the Source Monitor, choose Marker > Mark Split, and select Video In, Video Out, Audio In, or Audio Out.
3. Set the remaining video and audio In and Out points. (When you add the clip to a sequence, the video portion starts and ends at different
times than the audio.)
Create a nested sequence from a selection of clips
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Recording audio
Capturing analog audio
Set the location for captured audio
Preparing the audio input channel for recording
Record audio from a microphone or another analog source
Mute input during recording
You can record to an audio track in a new sequence or record to a new audio track in an existing sequence. The recording is saved as an audio
clip that’s added to your project.
Before recording audio, make sure that your computer has sound inputs. Premiere Pro supports ASIO (Audio Stream Input Output) devices
(Windows) and Core Audio devices (Mac OS). Many devices have connectors for connecting speaker, microphone cables, and breakout boxes.
If your computer has an ASIO or Core Audio device for connecting sound input devices, make sure that the sound device settings and input
volume level options are properly set. Refer to your operating system’s Help for details.
In Premiere Pro, set the default device options in the Audio Hardware Preferences for specifying the input channel used when recording.
Once you connect input devices and make all preliminary settings, you can use the Audio Track Mixer in Premiere Pro to record audio. Use
controls in the Audio Track Mixer to adjust the monitoring levels. An audio clip is created from the recording and is added to both the Timeline and
Project panels.
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Capturing analog audio
If you want to use audio that isn’t yet in digital form (for example, from an analog cassette or a live microphone), you need to digitize it through an
audio or audio/video digitizer/capture card.
The quality of digitized audio and the size of the audio file depend on the sample rate (the number of samples per second) and bit depth (the
number of bits per sample) of the digitized audio. Also, stereo audio requires twice as much disk space as mono audio. These parameters,
controlled in the Capture section of the Project Settings dialog box, determine how precisely the analog audio signal is represented in digital form.
Higher sample rates and bit depths reproduce sound at higher levels of quality, but with correspondingly larger file sizes. Capture audio at the
highest quality settings your computer can handle, even if those settings are higher than the settings you’ll specify for final export or playback. This
provides headroom, or extra data, that helps preserve quality when you adjust audio gain or apply audio effects such as equalization or dynamic
range compression/expansion. Although the DV format can record two independent stereo audio pairs, Premiere Pro can capture only one stereo
pair. It may be possible to select either stereo pair 1, stereo pair 2, or a mix of both, depending on the DV hardware you use. For details, see the
documentation for the DV hardware.
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Set the location for captured audio
1. Choose Project > Project Settings> Scratch Disks.
2. For Captured Audio, select a location and click OK.
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Preparing the audio input channel for recording
When you enable recording for a track, the track can record from the Default Device channel specified in the Audio Hardware section of the
Preferences dialog box. This dialog box includes the ASIO Settings button (Windows only), which you use to enable audio inputs connected to the
computer. Submix and master tracks always receive audio from tracks within the sequence, so recording and track input options are unavailable
for them.
Record audio from a microphone or another analog source
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1. Make sure that you have specified the Input audio device. For more information, see Specify the default audio device.
2. Make sure that the input device (microphone or other audio device) is connected properly to the computer or sound card.
If recording from a microphone, check the documentation for your computer or sound card to determine whether the microphone jack is
for a monaural or stereo microphone. Use the appropriate microphone for the jack. Noise, the loss of a channel, intermittent sound, and
no sound all can result from plugging a mono microphone into a stereo jack or a stereo microphone into a mono jack.
3. If recording from a microphone, turn off your computer speakers to prevent feedback and echo.
4. (Optional) If necessary, add an audio track to a Timeline appropriate for the number of channels you will record. For example, if you’re
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recording voice with a single monaural microphone, you should record to a mono audio track. See Work with tracks. A track will appear in
the Audio Track Mixer for each track you add to a Timeline.
5. In the Audio Track Mixer, click the Enable Track For Recording icon (“R” icon) for the track you added for your audio device.
6. Choose the recording input channel from the Track Input Channel menu.
Note: The Track Input Channel menu appears after you click the Enable Track For Recording icon.
7. Repeat steps 3 and 4 as necessary if you’re recording to multiple tracks.
8. (Optional) Create a new sequence.
Note: It’s also possible to record to an existing sequence. Doing so is useful for recording voice-overs. You can record your voice while
watching the playback of the sequence. When you record voice-overs to an existing sequence, it’s good practice to click the Solo Track icon
(“S” icon) in the Audio Track Mixer for the track that you’re recording to. Clicking the icon mutes the other audio tracks.
9. (Optional) Select the audio track that you want to record to.
10. (Optional) Adjust the levels on the input device to achieve the proper recording level.
11. Select Meter Input(s) Only in the Audio Track Mixer panel menu to meter only the sound card’s inputs.
12. Click the Record button
at the bottom of the Audio Track Mixer to enter Record mode.
Audio Track Mixer recording controls
A. Record Enable button for track B. Record button for Audio Track Mixer
13. Test the input levels by playing a selection from the analog source, or by having the narrator speak into the microphone. Watch the Audio
Track Mixer level meters to ensure that the input levels for record-enabled tracks are high but not clipping.
14. (Optional) When you finish testing, deselect Meter Input(s) Only in the Audio Track Mixer panel menu to meter the project’s audio tracks
also.
15. Click the Play button
to start recording.
16. If necessary, adjust the track volume slider up (louder) or down (quieter) as you record to maintain the monitor level you want.
The red indicators at the top of the VU meters light up if the audio is clipped. Make sure that the audio level isn’t loud enough to cause
clipping. Generally, loud audio registers near 0 dB, and quiet audio registers around -18 dB.
17. Click the Stop icon
to stop recording.
The recorded audio appears as a clip in the audio track and as a master clip in the Project panel. You can always select the clip in the
Project panel and rename or delete it.
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Mute input during recording
Muting input can prevent feedback or echo when the computer is connected to speakers.
1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Audio (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Audio (Mac OS).
2. Select Mute Input During Timeline Recording.
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Adjusting volume levels
Monitor volume level from Timeline, or Program Monitor
Monitor volume level while capturing
Specify whether to play audio while scrubbing
Adjusting gain and volume
Normalize one or more clips
Normalize the Master track
Adjust track volume with keyframes
Apply a volume level to several clips
Adjust volume in Effect Controls
Set track volume in the Audio Track Mixer
Mute a track in the Audio Track Mixer
Mix tracks in the Audio Track Mixer
Monitor volume level from Timeline, or Program Monitor
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You can monitor audio levels for clips in a Timeline panel.
1. If the Audio Master Meters panel is not open, select Window > Audio Meters.
2. Select the Program Monitor or a Timeline panel.
3. Do one of the following:
Press Space,
In the Program Monitor, click the Play Stop Toggle (Space) button
.
The Audio Meters panel displays the audio level for the Timeline.
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Monitor volume level while capturing
You can monitor audio levels while capturing DV or HDV footage.
1. If the Audio Meters panel is not open, select Window > Audio Meters.
2. Capture video from a DV or HDV source.
The Audio Meters panel displays the audio level for the captured footage.
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Specify whether to play audio while scrubbing
By default Premiere Pro plays the audio when you scrub any clip or sequence containing audio in the Source Monitor, Program Monitor, or a
Timeline. You can change this setting, if you prefer silent scrubbing.
1. Select Edit > Preferences > Audio (Windows), or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Audio (Mac OS).
You can assign a keyboard shortcut to the Preferences > Audio command. See Finding and customizing keyboard shortcuts.
2. Check or deselect Play Audio While Scrubbing, depending on the option desired.
3. Click OK.
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Adjusting gain and volume
Gain generally refers to the input level or volume in clips. Volume generally refers to the output level or the volume in sequence clips or tracks. You
can set gain or volume levels to make levels more consistent among tracks or clips, or to change the volume of a track or clip. Keep in mind,
however, that if the level of an audio clip was set too low when it was digitized, increasing the gain or volume might simply amplify noise. For best
results, follow the standard practice of recording or digitizing source audio at the optimum level; this practice allows you to concentrate on
adjusting track levels.
You use the Audio Gain command to adjust the gain level for one or more selected clips. The Audio Gain command is independent of the output
level settings in the Audio Track Mixer and Timeline panels, but its value is combined with the track level for the final mix.
You can adjust the volume for a sequence clip in the Effect Controls or Timeline panels. In the Effect Controls panel, you use the same methods
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to adjust the volume that you use to set other effect options. It’s often simpler to adjust the Volume effect in a Timeline panel.
You control track output levels in the Audio Track Mixer or a Timeline panel. Although you control track levels primarily through the Audio Track
Mixer, you can also do so using audio track keyframes in a Timeline panel. Because track keyframes represent mixer automation settings, they
affect output only if automation is set to Read, Touch, or Latch.
You can adjust the gain for an entire sequence with the Normalize Master Track command.
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Normalize one or more clips
1. Do one of the following:
You can adjust the gain of a master clip so that all instances of the clip added to a Timeline panel have the same gain level. Select the
master clip in the Project panel.
To adjust the gain of just one instance of a master clip already in a sequence, select the clip in a Timeline panel.
To adjust the gain of more than one master clip or clip instance, select the clips in a Project panel or sequence. In a sequence, Shiftclick the clips to select them. In a Project panel, Shift-click to select contiguous clips, or Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac
OS) to select non-contiguous clips.
2. Choose Clip > Audio Options > Audio Gain.
The Audio Gain dialog box opens and Premiere Pro automatically calculates the peak amplitude of the selected clips, reporting the
calculated value in the Peak Amplitude field. Once calculated, this value is stored for the selection. You can use this value as a guide for the
amount to adjust gain.
3. Select one of the following, set its value, and then click OK:
Set Gain To The default value is 0.0 dB. This option allows the user to set gain to a specific value. This value is always updated to the
current gain, even when the option is not selected and the value appears dimmed. For example, when the second option, Adjust Gain By, is
used to adjust the gain by -1 dB, the Set Gain To value would also update to show the resulting gain level. When the Audio Gain dialog is
opened for selected clips that have already had their gain adjusted, the current gain value is displayed in this field.
Adjust Gain By The default value is 0.0 dB. This option allows the user to adjust gain by + or - dB. Entering a value other than zero in this
field automatically updates the Set Gain To dB value to reflect the actual gain value applied to the clip.
Normalize Max Peak To The default value is 0.0 dB. Users can set this to any value below 0.0 dB. For example, a user may want to allow
for headroom and set this to -3 dB. This normalization option adjusts the maximum peak amplitude in the selected clips to the user-specified
value. For example, a clip with a peak amplitude of -6 dB will have its gain adjusted by +6 dB if Normalize Max Peak To is set to 0.0 dB. For
a multiple-clip selection, the clip with the maximum peak will be adjusted to the user-specified value, while the other clips will be adjusted by
the same amount, preserving their relative gain differences. For example, assume clip one has a peak of -6 dB, and clip two has a peak of 3 dB. Since clip two has the greater peak value, it will be adjusted by +3 dB to boost it to the user-specified gain of 0.0 dB, while clip one
also will be adjusted by +3 dB, boosting it to -3 dB, and preserving the gain offset between the two clips in the selection.
Normalize All Peaks To The default value is 0.0 dB. Users can set this to any value below 0.0 dB. For example, a user may want to allow
for headroom and set this to -3 dB. This normalization option adjusts the peak amplitude in the selected clips to the user-specified value.
For example, a single clip with a peak amplitude of -6 dB will have its gain adjusted by +6 dB if Normalize All Peaks To is set to 0.0 dB. For
a multiple-clip selection, each clip in the selection would have its gain adjusted by amounts necessary to boost them all to 0.0 dB.
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Normalize the Master track
You can set the peak volume level for the master track of a sequence. Premiere Pro automatically adjusts the fader for the whole master track
upward or downward. The loudest sound in the track achieves the value specified. Premiere Pro scales any keyframes on the master track upward
or downward, in proportion to the adjustment made in overall volume.
Note: Adobe Premiere Pro does not allow a volume adjustment that would raise the peak higher than 0 dB.
1. Select the sequence you want to normalize.
2. Select Sequence > Normalize Master Track.
3. In the Normalize Track dialog box, type an amplitude value in the dB field.
4. Click OK.
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Adjust track volume with keyframes
You can adjust the volume level of a whole clip or track, or have the volume change over time using the rubber band in an audio track of a
Timeline panel.
1. Expand the audio track view by clicking the triangle next to the audio track name.
2. In the audio track header, click the Show Keyframes button , and choose one of the following from the menu:
Show Clip Keyframes Lets you animate audio effects for a clip, including Volume Level.
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Show Clip Volume Lets you change only a clip’s Volume Level.
Show Track Keyframes Lets you animate many audio track effects, including Volume, Mute, and Balance.
Show Track Volume Lets you change only a track’s volume level.
3. If one of the Keyframes settings is selected, do one of the following:
If Show Clip Keyframes is selected, choose Volume > Level from the drop-down menu at the head of the clip in the audio track.
If Show Track Keyframes is selected, choose Track > Volume from the drop-down menu at the head of the clip in the audio track.
Volume adjustment is enabled by default.
Note: When you have audio keyframes displayed, you cannot move the audio clip to a different position in a Timeline. Hide the
keyframes or collapse the track in order to move audio clips.
4. Use either the Selection tool or the Pen tool to move the Volume level rubber band up (increase volume) or down (decrease volume).
at the location for each change, click the
Note: If you want the Volume effect to change over time, place the current-time indicator
Add/Remove Keyframe button in the audio track header, and drag the keyframe up (louder) or down (quieter).
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Apply a volume level to several clips
1. In the Timeline, adjust the volume of a single clip to the desired level.
2. Choose Edit > Copy.
3. Drag a marquee over the other clips you want to change.
4. Choose Edit > Paste Attributes.
Note: This procedure pastes all effects and attributes of the first clip selected, not just its volume settings.
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Adjust volume in Effect Controls
1. Select an audio clip in a sequence.
2. In the Effect Controls panel, click the triangle next to Volume to expand the effect.
3. Do any of the following:
Enter a value for the level. A negative value decreases the volume level and a positive value increases the volume level. A value of 0.0
represents the original clip’s volume level without adjustment.
Click the triangle next to Level to expand the effect options, and then use the slider to adjust the volume level.
A keyframe is automatically created at the beginning of the clip’s timeline in the Effect Controls panel.
4. (Optional) To change the Volume effect over time, move the current-time indicator and adjust the volume level graph in the Effect Controls
panel.
Each time you move the current-time indicator and make an adjustment, a new keyframe is created. You can also adjust the interpolation
between keyframes by editing the keyframe graph. Repeat as needed.
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Set track volume in the Audio Track Mixer
In the Audio Track Mixer, adjust the track’s volume setting.
Note: You can use this procedure when automation isn’t applied to a track. If levels vary over time because track automation keyframes are
already applied, you may be able to adjust the track level uniformly by sending it to a submix and setting the submix level.
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Mute a track in the Audio Track Mixer
Click the “M” icon in the Audio Track Mixer.
Note: Muting doesn’t affect pre-fader items such as effects and sends. Also, the state of the Mute Track button is subject to the automation
settings in effect. If you want to silence track output completely, click the track’s Speaker icon in a Timeline panel.
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Mix tracks in the Audio Track Mixer
You can set volume levels of two or more audio tracks, relative to one another, using the Audio Track Mixer. For example, you can raise the
volume of a narrator’s voice on one audio track while simultaneously decreasing the volume of the background music on another track. Also, you
can raise or lower the overall volume level of the complete mix, which contains the audio from all tracks selected. The Audio Track Mixer lets you
make these adjustments in real time while you listen to playback from desired tracks. By default, the Audio Track Mixer volume adjustments made
for each audio track are saved in Track Volume keyframes visible on that track in a Timeline panel. Volume adjustments made for the whole mix
are saved in Track Volume keyframes visible in the Master audio track in a Timeline panel.
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1. Select a sequence that contains audio in two or more audio tracks.
2. Select Window > Workspace > Audio.
The Audio Track Mixer panel appears in the central drop zone, with each audio track of a Timeline panel assigned to its own bus on the
mixer.
3. Choose Latch, Touch, or Write for all the tracks in the Audio Track Mixer you wish to modify.
4. In a Timeline panel, for each audio track, click the Show Keyframes button
from the drop-down menu.
5. Toward the bottom left of the Audio Track Mixer panel, click the Play button
. Then choose Show Track Keyframes, or Show Track Volume
to play the sequence and monitor its audio.
6. Move the volume slider for any audio track up or down to increase or decrease its volume as you monitor the sound.
7. Move the volume slider for the Master track up or down to increase or decrease the volume of the whole mix as you monitor the sound.
Track Volume keyframes appear in each of the tracks for which you made volume adjustments, including the Master track.
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Recording audio mixes
Record changes to sound tracks
Preserve a track property while recording an audio mix
Audio Track Mixer automation modes
Set Automatch Time for Touch mode and Read mode
Specify automated keyframe creation
Using the Audio Track Mixer, you can apply changes to audio tracks as a sequence plays back. You can instantly hear the results of any changes
you make. You can control the volume, pan, and mute settings of a track or its sends. You can control all effect options for track effects, including
the bypass setting.
The Audio Track Mixer records the changes as track keyframes in the audio tracks. It doesn’t make changes to the source clips.
It’s best to make adjustments to multitrack sequences one track at a time. Ride the controls on one track while playing a sequence. Then play it
again from the beginning while riding the controls on another track. The changes you made to the first track are preserved if you set the track’s
automation setting to Off or Read.
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Record changes to sound tracks
Each channel of the Audio track Mixer corresponds to an audio track in the Timeline. You can use the controls in each Audio Track Mixer channel
to record changes to its corresponding audio track. For example, to vary the volume level of clips in the Audio 1 track, use the Volume slider in the
Audio 1 channel of the Audio Track Mixer.
1. In a Timeline panel or Audio Track Mixer panel, set the current time to the point where you want to start recording automation changes.
Note: In the Audio Track Mixer, you can set the current time at the top left corner of the panel.
2. In the Audio Track Mixer, choose an automation mode from the Automation Mode menu at the top of each track you want to change. To
record changes, choose a mode other than Off or Read. (See Audio Track Mixer automation modes)
3. (Optional) To protect the settings of a property during the Write automation mode, right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS) an effect
or send and then choose Safe During Write from the menu.
4. In the Audio Track Mixer, do one of the following:
To start automation, click the Play button
in the Audio Track Mixer.
To play the sequence in a continuous loop, click the Loop button
.
To play from the In point to the Out point, click the Play In To Out button
.
5. As the audio plays back, adjust the options of any automatable property.
6. To stop automation, click the Stop button
.
7. To preview changes, change the current time to the beginning of your changes, and click the Play button
8. To view the keyframes you created, do the following:
a. Click the Show Keyframes button at the head of the audio track you changed, and select Show Track Keyframes.
b. Click the clip header toward the top left of an audio clip you changed, and choose from the drop-down menu the type of change you
recorded. For example, if you changed the volume, choose Track > Volume.
This step will show the keyframes you recorded with the Audio Track Mixer along the yellow change line. You can edit these keyframes like
any others in the Timeline.
Preserve a track property while recording an audio mix
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You can preserve the settings of a property while recording an audio mix, preventing a selected property from being edited. It protects that
property across all tracks in a sequence.
In the Effects And Sends panel for a track, right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS) an effect or send and choose Safe During Write from
the menu.
Note: Use the Audio Track Mixer to automate track properties only, not clip properties. You can edit clip keyframes by selecting the clip and using
the Effect Controls panel or Timeline panel.
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Audio Track Mixer automation modes
Automation modes are set in the menu at the top of each track. For example, drag a track’s volume fader or pan control during playback. When
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you replay the audio with the track’s automation menu set to Read, Touch, or Latch, Premiere Pro plays back the track with the adjustments you
made. As you make adjustments in channels of the Audio Track Mixer, Premiere Pro applies the changes to their respective tracks by creating
track keyframes in a Timeline panel. Conversely, audio track keyframes you add or edit in a Timeline panel set values (such as fader positions) in
the Audio Track Mixer.
For each audio track, the selection in the automation options menu determines the track’s automation state during the mixing process:
Off Ignores the track’s stored settings during playback. Off allows real-time use of Audio Track Mixer controls without interference from existing
keyframes. However, changes to the audio track aren’t recorded in Off mode.
Read Reads the track’s keyframes and uses them to control the track during playback. If a track has no keyframes, adjusting a track option (such
as volume) affects the entire track uniformly. If you adjust an option for a track that’s set to Read automation, the option returns to its former value
(before the current automated changes were recorded) when you stop adjusting it. The rate of return is determined by the Automatch Time
preference.
Write Records adjustments you make to any automatable track settings that aren’t set to Safe During Write, and creates corresponding track
keyframes in a Timeline panel. Write mode writes automation as soon as playback starts without waiting for a setting to change. You can modify
this behavior by choosing the Switch To Touch After Write command from the Audio Track Mixer menu. After playback stops or a playback loop
cycle is completed, the Switch To Touch After Write command switches all Write mode tracks to Touch mode.
Latch Identical to Write, except that automation doesn’t start until you begin adjusting a property. The initial property settings are from the
previous adjustment.
Touch Identical to Write, except that automation doesn’t start until you begin adjusting a property. When you stop adjusting a property, its option
settings return to their previous state before the current automated changes were recorded. The rate of return is determined by the Automatch
Time audio preference.
Set Automatch Time for Touch mode and Read mode
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When you stop adjusting an effect property in Touch mode, the property returns to its initial value. This is also the case while in Read mode if a
keyframe exists for the affected parameter. The Automatch Time preference specifies the time for an effect property to return to its initial value.
Automating audio changes in the Audio Track Mixer can create more keyframes than necessary in the audio track, causing a degradation in
performance. To avoid creating unnecessary keyframes, thereby ensuring both quality interpretation and minimal performance degradation, set the
Automation Keyframe Optimization preference. In addition to the other benefits, you can edit individual keyframes much easier if they are
assembled less densely in the track.
1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Audio (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Audio (Mac OS).
2. Enter a value for Automatch Time and then click OK.
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Specify automated keyframe creation
Automating audio changes in the Audio Track Mixer can create more keyframes than necessary in the audio track, degrading performance. To
avoid creating unnecessary keyframes, thereby ensuring both quality interpretation and minimal performance degradation, set the Automation
Keyframe Optimization preference. In addition to providing other benefits, this preference makes editing individual keyframes easier because they
are less densely arranged on the keyframe graph. For information about the Linear Keyframe Thinning and Minimum Time Interval Thinning
options, see Audio Preferences.
1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Audio (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Audio (Mac OS).
2. In the Automation Keyframe Optimizations pane, select Linear Keyframe Thinning, Minimum Time Interval Thinning, or both.
3. Click OK.
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Monitor clip volume and pan using Audio Clip Mixer
New in Premiere Pro CC
The Audio Clip Mixer lets you adjust the volume and pan of clips in the Timeline panel when the Timeline panel is in focus.
You can also monitor and adjust the volume and pan of clips in the Source monitor when it is in focus.
To access the Audio Clip Mixer, choose Window > Audio Clip Mixer from the main menu.
Audio Clip Mixer
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Exploring the Audio Clip Mixer
The Audio Clip Mixer acts as an inspector. Its faders are mapped to the clip volume level and the pan control is mapped to the clip panner.
When the Timeline panel is in focus, each clip under the playhead's current location is mapped to a channel in the Clip Mixer. For example, the
clip on the track A1 of the Timeline panel maps to the channel A1 of the Clip Mixer.
The Clip Mixer displays clip audio only when there is a clip under the playhead. When a track contains a gap, the corresponding channel in the
Clip Mixer is empty if the gap is under the playhead.
For example, in the timeline below, Track A2 is empty.
Track A2 empty
Because there is a gap under the playhead (track A2 empty), the Clip Mixer displays an empty channel A2.
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Clip Mixer with channel A2 empty
The Clip Mixer lets you adjust clip volume, channel volume, and clip pan. Channels in the Clip Mixer are scalable. The width of channels depends
on the number of tracks in the sequence and the width of the panel.
To see the channel volume, right-click/Ctrl-click the Clip Mixer and select Show Channel Volume from the context menu. The option is disabled by
default.
The keyframe button state determines the nature of changes you can make to the volume or panner.
If the keyframe button is pressed, while you adjust the volume or pan, you add a keyframe to the current playhead position. Alternatively, you
update the current keyframe, if there is a keyframe under the playhead.
If the keyframe button is not pressed, you move the current segment.
Community resources:
Video tutorial by Josh Weiss: Using the Audio Clip Mixer
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Audio Clip Mixer automation modes
You can set Automation modes for a track from the pop-up menu at the upper right of the Clip Mixer. For example, drag a track’s volume fader or
pan control during playback. When you replay the audio with the track’s automation menu set to Touch or Latch, Premiere Pro plays back the
track with the adjustments you made. As you make adjustments in channels of the Clip Mixer, Premiere Pro applies the changes to their respective
tracks by creating track keyframes in a Timeline panel. Conversely, audio track keyframes you add or edit in a Timeline panel set values (such as
fader positions) in the Clip Mixer.
For each audio track, you can select either of these options, which determines the track’s automation state during the mixing process:
Keyframe Mode Latch: Automation doesn’t start until you begin adjusting a property. The initial property settings are from the previous
adjustment.
Keyframe Mode Touch: Automation doesn’t start until you begin adjusting a property. When you stop adjusting a property, its option settings
return to their previous state before the current automated changes were recorded. The rate of return is determined by the Automatch Time
audio preference.
Keywords: Audio Clip Mixer, Clip Mixer, audio mixer, audio mixing, video clip mixer
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Multiple stereo assignments for tracks to multichannel masters
New in Premiere Pro CC
Adobe® Premiere® Pro lets you assign a mono or standard track to multiple channel pairs in a multichannel master.
Use the Audio Track Mixer to assign tracks to multiple channel pairs.
Click Window > Audio Track Mixer to display the Audio Track Mixer.
To assign channels, click the Direct Output Assignment button for the standard and mono tracks in the Audio Track Mixer.
Direct Output Assignment button
From the Assign Stereo Pairs dialog, set the stereo pairs you want to assign to a track. For example, you can assign stereo pairs 1+2 and 3+4.
Assigning stereo pairs to track
Keywords: Multichannel audio, multi channel stereo, audio mixing, audio mixer, channel assignments, audio channels
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Advanced mixing
Work with submixes
Route tracks with sends
Downmixing to fewer channels
Change 5.1 audio to stereo or mono
Routing track output
Route or turn off track output
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Work with submixes
A submix is a track that combines audio signals routed to it from specific audio tracks or track sends in the same sequence. A submix is an
intermediate step between audio tracks and the master track. Submixes are useful if you want to work with a number of audio tracks in the same
way. For example, you can use a submix to apply identical audio and effect settings to three tracks of a five-track sequence. Submixes can help
make the best use of your computer’s processing power by allowing you to apply one instance of an effect instead of multiple instances.
Like audio tracks that contain clips, submixes can be mono, stereo, or 5.1 surround. Submixes appear as fully functional tracks in both the Audio
Track Mixer and a Timeline panel—you can edit submix track properties just as you edit a track containing audio clips. However, submixes are
different from audio tracks in the following ways:
Submix tracks can’t contain clips, so you can’t record to them. Therefore, they don’t contain any recording or device input options or clip
editing properties.
In the Audio Track Mixer, submixes have a darker background than other tracks.
In a Timeline panel, submixes don’t have a Toggle Track Output icon
or a Display Style icon
.
Create a submix in a Timeline panel
1. Choose Sequence > Add Tracks.
2. Specify options in the Audio Submix Tracks section, and then click OK.
Simultaneously create a submix and assign a send
1. If necessary, display the effects/sends panel in the Audio Track Mixer by clicking the triangle to the left of an automation option’s menu.
2. Choose Create Mono Submix, Create Stereo Submix, or Create 5.1 Submix from any of the five sends list menus in the Audio Track Mixer.
Route a track’s output to a submix
In the Audio Track Mixer, select the submix name from the track output menu at the bottom of the track.
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Route tracks with sends
Each track contains five sends, located in the Effects And Sends panel in the Audio Track Mixer. Sends are often used to route a track’s signal to
a submix track for effects processing. The submix can return the processed signal to the mix by routing it to the master track, or it can route the
signal to another submix. A send includes a level knob that controls the ratio of the send track volume to the submix volume. This value is called
the wet/dry ratio, with “wet” referring to the effects-processed submix signal and “dry” referring to the signal from the send track. A wet/dry ratio of
100% indicates that the wet signal is output at full strength. The submix volume affects the wet signal, and the send track’s volume affects the dry
signal.
A send can be applied pre-fader or post-fader, and the outcome is that the track audio is sent either before or after the track’s volume fader is
applied. With a pre-fader send, adjusting the track fader doesn’t affect the output level from the send. A post-fader send maintains the wet/dry
ratio, fading the wet and dry signals simultaneously as you adjust the send track’s volume.
Note: You cannot assign a track send to the Master track in a 16-channel sequence.
Send a track to a submix
1. (Optional) To display the Effects And Sends panel in the Audio Track Mixer, click the Show/Hide Effects And Sends triangle at the left side of
the Audio Track Mixer.
2. In the Effects And Sends panel, do one of the following:
To send to an existing submix, click a Send Assignment Selection triangle and choose a submix name from the menu.
To create and send a new submix, click a Send Assignment Selection triangle and choose one of the following: Create Mono Submix,
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Create Stereo Submix, or Create 5.1 Submix.
Edit Send settings
1. (Optional) To display the Effects And Sends panel in the Audio Track Mixer, click the Show/Hide Effects And Sends triangle at the left of the
Audio Track Mixer.
2. In the Effects And Sends panel, click the Send Assignment Selection triangle and choose a send from the menu.
3. (Optional) Choose the send property you want to edit from the Selected Parameter menu below the selected send property control.
Choosing from Selected Parameter menu
4. Change the value of the property using the control knob above the Send Assignment Properties menu at the bottom of the sends list.
Work with sends
1. (Optional) To display the Effects And Sends panel in the Audio Track Mixer, click the Show/Hide Effects And Sends triangle at the left side of
the Audio Track Mixer.
2. Do any of the following:
To designate a send as a pre-fader or post-fader, right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS) a send and choose Pre-Fader or PostFader from the context menu.
To mute a send, click the Send Mute button
next to the send control knob for the selected send property.
To delete a send, choose None from the Send Assignment Selection menu.
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Downmixing to fewer channels
Whenever you route track output to a track or device with fewer channels, Premiere Pro must downmix the audio to the number of channels in the
destination track. Downmixing is often practical or necessary because a sequence’s audio may be played back on audio gear supporting fewer
audio channels than the original mix. For example, you might create a DVD with 5.1 surround audio, but some customers may use speaker
systems or televisions that support only stereo (2 channels) or mono (1 channel). However, downmixing can also occur in a project when you
assign track output to a track that has fewer channels. Premiere Pro provides a 5.1 Mixdown Type option that lets you choose how to translate 5.1
surround audio into stereo or mono audio. You can choose from various combinations of Front channels, Rear channels, and the LFE (lowfrequency effects, or subwoofer) channel.
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Change 5.1 audio to stereo or mono
1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Audio (Windows) or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Audio (Mac OS).
2. Choose a 5.1 Mixdown Type from the menu, and click OK.
Note: To preserve the integrity of left/right channel assignments, you can avoid using downmix options that include the LFE channel.
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Routing track output
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By default, track output is routed to the master track. You can also route the complete track signal to a submix track or master track by using the
Track Output Assignment menu at the bottom of each track in the Audio Track Mixer. The output signal contains all properties specified for that
track, including automation, effects, pan/balance, solo/mute, and fader settings. In the Audio Track Mixer, all submixes are grouped to the right of
all audio tracks. You can output a track to any submix, but to prevent feedback loops, Premiere Pro allows a submix to be routed only to a submix
to the right of it, or to the master track. The output menu lists only the tracks that follow these rules.
Note: It’s possible to create a send/return arrangement with an effects submix.
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Route or turn off track output
Do any of the following:
To route track output to another track, select a submix or Master from the Track Output Assignment menu at the bottom of each track in the
Audio Track Mixer.
To completely turn off track output, click the Toggle Track Output icon to hide the speaker icon for a track in a Timeline panel. This setting
causes the track to output no signal but doesn’t change its signal routing.
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Editing audio in Adobe Audition
Working with Adobe Audition
Adobe Audition lets you use advanced post-production techniques to create and edit audio. If you have installed Adobe Audition, you can apply the
Edit In Adobe Audition command to an audio clip.
When you apply the Edit In Audition command to an audio clip, the audio is extracted and the edits are made to a new clip containing the
extracted audio. The audio in the original master video clip is preserved.
When applying the Edit In Audition command to clips in a sequence, Premiere Pro renders the audio into a new audio clip that is imported into
Adobe Audition. If an In/Out range was marked in Premiere Pro, these markers become visible in Audition. When saved the clip is saved in
Audition, the edited clip replaces the original clip in the Premiere Pro Timeline panel. The original master clip in the Project panel is untouched.
Effects or markers applied to the original sequence clip are preserved in the edited clip.
You can edit the audio in Adobe Audition many times. For each subsequent edit in Adobe Audition, Premiere Pro sends the audio clip that it
created for the initial editing session.
From the Project panel, the Undo command deletes the extracted audio clip that’s been edited in Adobe Audition. For a clip in a sequence, the
Undo command reverses the render and replace actions by returning the original audio clip to the sequence. In this case, the newly created audio
file is not deleted from the Project panel.
Note: The Edit In Audition command is not available for Adobe Dynamic Link clips.
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Working with Adobe Audition
1. In a Project panel, select a clip or Sequence containing audio. You can also select a clip in the Timeline panel or the Timeline panel without
clips selected.
2. Select Edit > Edit In Adobe Audition and then select Clip or Sequence from the submenu. Audition launches.
3. Edit and save the clip or sequence in Audition.
4. Return to Premiere Pro. The audio file remains open in Audition until you close it.
For more information about working with Adobe Audition, see Adobe Audition Help.
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Editing audio in Adobe Soundbooth (CS5)
Edit audio in Adobe Soundbooth
Undoing edits made in Adobe Soundbooth
Adobe Soundbooth lets you use advanced techniques to edit audio. If you have installed Adobe Soundbooth, you can apply the Edit In Adobe
Soundbooth command to an audio clip.
Note: Adobe Soundbooth is to be used with Premiere Pro CS5 and earlier. To edit audio in Premiere Pro CS5.5 and later, use Adobe Audition.
Selecting an audio-only master clip, subclip, or clip instance in a timeline, and choosing Edit In Soundbooth > Edit Source File opens the source
file in Soundbooth. If an In/Out range was marked in Premiere Pro, these markers become visible in Soundbooth. When the file is saved in
Soundbooth, the original file on disk is overwritten and all instances of the master clip, its subclips and track items are updated automatically to
reflect the changes. The changes cannot be undone.
Selecting an audio-only or A/V master clip, subclip, or clip instance in a timeline, and choosing Edit In Soundbooth > Extract Audio extracts the
audio, and generates a new project item. Edits are made to this copy in Soundbooth. The original master clip is preserved in the project and on
disk.
Note: The Edit In Adobe Soundbooth command isn’t available for Adobe Dynamic Link clips.
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Edit audio in Adobe Soundbooth
1. In the Project panel or Timeline panel, select a clip containing audio.
2. Select Edit > Edit In Adobe Soundbooth, and choose one of the following:
Edit Source file lets Soundbooth record changes to the source file on which the master clip is based, and any sub-clips and clip instances
based on that master clip. Edit Source File works on audio-only clips, not those containing video.
Render And Replace renders a new audio clip that you edit in Adobe Soundbooth. The edited clip replaces the original clip in a Timeline
panel; the original master clip in the Project panel remains untouched. Effects or markers applied to the original sequence clip are inherited
by the edited clip. The new file appears in the Project panel in Premiere Pro.
Extract Audio copies the audio from the source clip into a new file that you can edit in Soundbooth. The new file appears in the Project
panel in Premiere Pro and opens in Adobe Soundbooth.
Note: Extract Audio doesn’t replace the original audio in a video master clip. If you add the video master clip to a sequence and you want
the edited audio to accompany the video, you need to unlink and delete the audio from the master clip, and then link the remaining video
with the edited audio.
3. Edit and save the clip in Soundbooth.
4. Return to Premiere Pro. The audio file remains open in Soundbooth until you close it.
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Undoing edits made in Adobe Soundbooth
In the Project panel, the Undo command deletes an extracted audio clip that has been edited in Soundbooth. For a clip in a sequence, the Undo
command reverses the Render And Replace actions by returning the original audio clip to the sequence. In this case, the newly created audio file
isn’t deleted from the Project panel.
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Panning and balancing
Panning and balancing in the Audio Track Mixer
Pan or balance a stereo track
Pan or balance a 5.1 surround track
Pan or balance a 16-channel track
Pan or balance a track in a Timeline panel
By default, all audio tracks output to the sequence master audio track. However, you can also create submix tracks. You can output audio from
any track to a submix track. You can then out put audio from a submix track to a Master Track. You can use an audio track as an input for a
submix track or for the Master Track. You can use a submix track as an output for an audio track and as an input for a Master Track. Different
tracks in the same sequence can have different numbers of channels. For example, you can send the output from a monaural audio track to a
stereo submix track, and then send the output from the stereo submix track to a 5.1-channel Master Track.
If the number of channels differs between an input track and its output track, you determine how much each of the channels in the input track
feeds each of the channels in its output track. For example, you can send 80 percent of the signal from a monaural audio track to the left channel
of a stereo submix track, and 20 percent to the right channel. This is balancing. You balance the audio to a stereo output track with Left/Right Pan
dials in the Audio Track Mixer. You balance the audio to a 5.1 output track with 5.1 Panner controls in the Audio Track Mixer.
In the Audio Track Mixer, a Left/Right Pan dial appears in a track only when you select a stereo track as the output for the track. A 5.1 Panner
control appears in a track only when you select a 5.1-channel track as the output for the track. The relation between the number of channels in an
audio track and the number of channels in the output track (often the master track) determines whether the pan and balance options are available
for an audio track.
Panning is the moving of audio from one output channel to another, over time. For example, if a car drives from the right side of a video frame to
the left, you can pan the channel containing the car audio so that it begins on the right side of the screen and ends on the left.
Note: If necessary, you can balance a clip by applying the Balance audio effect. Do so only after you determine that track balancing isn’t
sufficient.
In the Audio Track Mixer, the number of level meters in a track indicates the number of channels for that track. The output track is displayed in the
Track Output Assignment menu at the bottom of each track. The following rules determine whether a track’s audio can be panned or balanced in
its output track:
When you output a mono track to a stereo or 5.1 surround track, you can pan it.
When you output a stereo track to a stereo or 5.1 surround track, you can balance it.
When the output track contains fewer channels than in the other audio tracks, Premiere Pro downmixes the audio to the number of channels
in the output track.
When an audio track and the output track are mono or when both tracks are 5.1 surround, panning and balancing aren’t available. The
channels of both tracks correspond directly.
While the master audio track is the default output track, a sequence can also include submix tracks. Submix tracks can be both an output
destination of other audio tracks and an audio source to the master track (or other submix tracks). Therefore, the number of channels in a
submix track affects the pan or balance controls available in tracks that output to it, and the number of channels in the submix output track
affect whether panning or balancing is available for that submix track.
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Panning and balancing in the Audio Track Mixer
The Audio Track Mixer provides controls for panning and balancing. A round knob appears when a mono or stereo track outputs to a stereo track.
You rotate the knob to pan or balance audio between the left and right output track channels. A square tray appears when a mono or stereo track
outputs to a 5.1 surround track. The tray depicts the two-dimensional audio field created by 5.1 surround audio. You slide a puck within the tray to
pan or balance audio among the five speakers, which are represented by pockets around the edge of the tray. The tray also includes controls for
adjusting a 5.1 surround audio track’s center channel percentage and subwoofer volume. No pan control appears if a track outputs to a submix or
master track that contains the same number of channels or fewer; therefore, a pan or balance control is never available for a 5.1 surround track. A
master track doesn’t contain a pan or balance control because it’s never routed to another track. However, panning or balancing an entire
sequence is possible when you use the sequence as a track in another sequence.
You can vary the pan setting over time in the Audio Track Mixer, or in a Timeline panel by applying keyframes to a track’s Pan options.
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Panning and balancing controls
A. Stereo pan/balance knob B. 5.1 surround pan/balance tray C. Center percentage
For best results monitoring pan or balance settings, make sure that each of the computer or audio card’s outputs is connected to the correct
speaker, and make sure that positive and negative wires are connected consistently across all speakers.
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Pan or balance a stereo track
In the Audio Track Mixer, do one of the following:
Drag the pan control knob or the value below the knob.
Click the value below the pan control knob, type a new value, and press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
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Pan or balance a 5.1 surround track
1. In the Audio Track Mixer, click and drag the puck anywhere within the tray. To snap the puck to a left, right, or center channel, drag the puck
to a pocket along the edge of the tray.
2. Adjust the center channel percentage by dragging the center percentage knob.
3. If needed, adjust the LFE (subwoofer) channel level by dragging the knob above the Bass Clef icon
.
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Pan or balance a 16-channel track
When you select a sequence containing a 16-channel master audio track, Direct Output Assignment buttons appear above the sliders for each
track in the Audio Track Mixer. Click each of these buttons to assign each track channel to a destination channel in the master track.
Note: One Direct Output Assignment button appears in each track for every channel within that track. For example, a monaural track has a single
Direct Output Assignment button, while a 5.1 track has six Direct Output Assignment buttons.
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Selecting channel 12 for the output from the left-front channel of a 5.1 audio track
A. Direct Output Assignment buttons for a stereo track B. Direct Output Assignment buttons for a monaural track C. Direct Output Assignment
buttons for a 5.1 surround track
1. If the Audio Track Mixer is not open, select Window > Audio Track Mixer, and select the desired 16-channel sequence.
Direct Output Assignment buttons show to which Master track channel Premiere Pro automatically assigned the channels of the initial tracks.
As you create additional tracks, Premiere Pro automatically assigns their channels to channel 1, 1-2, or 1-6 in the 16-channel Master track,
depending on the number of channels within the new track.
2. In the Audio Track Mixer, for each channel in a track, click the Direct Output Assignment button, and select one of the 16 channels in the
Master track as the destination for that channel.
Note: You cannot assign track sends to the Master track in a 16-channel sequence.
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Pan or balance a track in a Timeline panel
1. In a Timeline panel, if necessary, expand a track’s view by clicking the triangle next to the track name.
2. Click the Show Keyframes button
, and choose Show Track Keyframes from the menu.
3. Click Track:Volume at the top left of the track and then choose Panner > Balance or Panner > Pan from the menu. (For 5.1 surround audio,
choose the dimension you want to edit from the Panner menu.)
4. (Optional) If you want to adjust the pan or balance effect over time, move the current-time indicator and click the Add/Remove Keyframe
icon .
5. Use the Selection tool or the Pen tool to adjust the level.
6. (Optional) If you’re adjusting the pan or balance effect over time, repeat steps 4 and 5 as necessary.
More Help topics
5.1 Surround Sound Mixing
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Titling and the Titler
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Creating and editing titles
Create new titles
Open, import, or export a title
About safe margins in the Titler
Choose, create, and import title templates
Show video behind the title
The Titler is a versatile tool enabling you to create, not just titles and credits, but animated composites as well.
The Titler is a collection of related panels. You can close the panels within the Titler without closing the Titler. You can dock the panels to each
other or to other parts of the interface. When the panels are not docked to the main workspace, they appear over the other panels, or float.
You can load more than one title into the Titler. You can choose the title you want to view by choosing its name in the Title tab menu. You can
reopen a title when you want to change it or to duplicate it and base a new version on it.
For a video tutorial introducing the Titler, see the Adobe website.
For instructions on creating new titles based on existing titles, and on creating new templates, see the video tutorial Working With Custom Titles by
Jon Barrie on the Creative COW website.
Philip Hodgetts provides tips for getting the best results when creating text or vector graphics for video in this article on the Creative COW website.
For additional tips, see "Best practices for text and vector graphics for video" in After Effects Help.
Maxim Jago explains and demonstrates how to create and composite titles in this video tutorial.
Maxim Jago shows you how to add fades, titles, and music to any video in this video tutorial.
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Create new titles
Create a title from scratch, or use a copy of an existing title as a starting point.
Create a title
1. Do one of the following:
Choose File > New > Title.
Choose Title > New Title and then choose a title type.
In the Project panel, press the New Item button
and choose Title.
2. Specify a name for the title and click OK.
3. Use the text and shape tools to create a file or to customize a template.
4. Close the Titler or save the project to save the title.
Note: Titles are added to the Project panel automatically and are saved as part of the project file.
Maxim Jago explains and demonstrates how to create and composite titles in this video from Video2Brain.
Clay Asbury created this video tutorial on creating titles in Premiere Pro.
Create a title based on the current title
1. In the Titler, open or select the title on which you want to base a new title.
2. In the Title Quick Properties panel, click New Title Based On Current Title
.
3. In the New Title dialog box, enter a name for the new title and click OK.
4. Change the new title as desired.
5. Close the Titler or save the project to save the title.
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Open, import, or export a title
Open a title for editing
Double-click the title in the Project panel or in a Timeline panel.
Note: Titles open in the Titler, not the Source Monitor.
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Import a title file
You can import a title file as you would any other source file.
1. Choose File > Import.
2. Select a title and click Open.
Note: In addition to importing Premiere Pro titles and Premiere Elements titles with the .prtl extension, you can import titles with the .ptl
extension, created in earlier versions of Adobe Premiere. The imported titles become part of the current project file.
Export a title as an independent file
You can export titles as independent files that use the .prtl filename extension.
1. In the Project panel, select the title you want to save as an independent file.
2. Choose File > Export > Title.
3. Specify a name and location for the title and click Save.
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About safe margins in the Titler
The title-safe and action-safe margins in the drawing area of the Titler designate the safe zones. These margins are enabled by default.
Safe zones are useful when you edit for broadcast and videotape. Most TVs overscan the picture. Overscanning places the outer edges of the
picture outside the viewing area. The amount of overscanning is not consistent across TVs. To ensure that everything fits within the area that most
TVs display, keep text within the title-safe margins. Keep all other important elements within the action-safe margins.
Note: If you are creating content for the web or for CD, the title-safe and action-safe margins do not apply to your project. The entire image is
displayed in these media.
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Choose, create, and import title templates
The title templates included with Premiere Pro provide numerous themes and preset layouts that make it quick and easy to design a title. Some
templates include graphics pertinent to certain subjects, such as new-baby or vacation themes. Others include placeholder text that you can
replace to create credits for your movie. Some templates have transparent backgrounds, represented by dark gray and light gray squares. You can
see your video beneath the title. Other templates are opaque.
You can easily change any element in the template by selecting the element and either deleting it or overwriting it. You can also add elements to
the template. After you modify the template, you can save it as a title file for use in current and future projects. Alternately, you can save any title
you create as a template.
You can also import title files from another Premiere Pro project as templates. If you share templates between computers, make sure that each
system includes all the fonts, textures, logos, and images used in the template.
If you do not have title templates, see this document. Although it says the document is for Encore, it also applies to Premiere Pro. After following
instructions, your title templates will be restored.
Note: When you apply a new template, its content replaces any content currently in the Titler.
Note: Before Premiere Pro 2.0, Premiere Pro saved all titles as independent files separate from the project file. You can import titles created in
older versions of Premiere Pro just as you import any footage. When you save the project, the imported titles are saved with the project.
Andrew Devis shows how to use, customize, and save title templates in this video tutorial on the Creative COW website.
Load a template for a new title
1. Choose Title > New Title > Based On Template.
2. Click the triangle next to a category name to expand it.
3. Select the template, and then click OK.
Import a saved title file as a template
1. With a title open, choose Title > Templates.
2. Choose Import File As Template from the Templates panel menu.
3. Select a file, and click Open (Windows) or Choose (Mac OS). You can import only Premiere Pro title files (.prtl) as templates.
4. Give the template a name and then click OK.
Set or restore a default template
1. With a title open, click the Templates button
and select a template.
To set the selected template as the default template, choose Set Template As Default Still from the Templates panel menu. The default
template loads each time you open the Titler.
To restore the default set of templates, choose Restore Default Templates from the Templates panel menu.
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2. Click OK.
Rename or delete a template
With a title open, click the Templates button
and select a template.
To rename the selected template, choose Rename Template from the Templates panel menu. Type a name in the Name box, and click OK.
To delete a template, choose Delete Template from the Templates menu, and then click OK.
Note: If you delete a template using this procedure, it is removed from the hard disk.
Create a template from an open title
1. With a title open, click the Templates button
2. Click the Templates menu button
.
. Choose Import Current Title As Template.
3. Enter a name for the title template, and then click OK.
Import a title template from Resource Central
You can import title templates from Resource Central into the Project Panel for use in Premiere Pro projects.
1. If the Resource Central panel is not already open, select Window > Resource Central.
2. In the Resource Central panel, click Templates.
3. Click the downward-pointing arrow to the right of the name of the desired template to download it.
When Premiere Pro finishes downloading the template, a green check mark appears to the lower-right of the template thumbnail.
4. Drag any template that has been downloaded from the Resource Central panel and drop it into the Project panel.
You can not drag a template from the Resource Central panel until Premiere Pro has downloaded it.
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Show video behind the title
You can view a frame of footage in the drawing area as you create the title. Viewing the frame helps you place elements in your title. The video
frame is for your reference only; it is not saved as part of the title.
Use the timecode controls in the Titler to specify the frame you want to display. The Titler displays the frame under the current-time indicator in the
active sequence. Setting the frame in the Titler also moves the current-time indicator in the Program Monitor and Timeline panel. Moving the
current-time indicator in the Program Monitor or Timeline panel changes the frame displayed in the Titler.
If you want to superimpose a title over another clip, add the title to the track directly above the clip. The title’s background becomes transparent,
revealing the image of clips in lower tracks.
In the Titler panel, select Show Video.
To change the frame interactively, drag the time value next to Show Video until the frame is visible in the drawing area.
To display the frame by specifying its timecode, click the time value next to Show Video and enter the frame’s timecode in the active
sequence.
Note: The Show Video value uses the same time display format specified in the project settings. For example, if 30-fps Drop-Frame
Timecode is specified in Project Settings, 30-fps Drop-Frame Timecode is displayed in Show Video.
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Creating and formatting text in titles
Enter text in titles
Format text in titles
Work with paragraph text
Create tab stops in titles
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Enter text in titles
When adding text to a title, you can use any font on your system, including Type 1 (PostScript), OpenType, and TrueType fonts. Installing
Premiere Pro (and other Adobe applications) adds fonts to the shared Adobe resources.
You can insert special characters, such as the © symbol, into point text or paragraph text. Copy the characters from a word processor or from
the Character Map accessory (Windows only) and paste them into the correct text location in the Titler.
You can copy and paste formatted text objects between the Premiere Pro Titler and other applications such as After Effects, Photoshop, Encore,
and Illustrator.
Depending on the tool you choose in the Titler, you can create point text or paragraph text. When you create point text, you specify an insertion
point where you want to begin typing. Typing continues on a single line unless you enable the word wrap feature. Word wrap continues the text on
a new line when it reaches the edge of the title-safe area. When you create paragraph text, you specify a text box in which the text fits. The text in
a text box wraps automatically within the borders of the box.
Dragging the corner handle of a point-text object scales the text, Dragging the corner of a text box reflows the text it contains. If a text box is too
small to contain the characters you type, you can resize it to reveal the hidden text. Text boxes that contain hidden characters have a plus sign (+)
on the right side of the box.
You can also create path text. Instead of following a straight baseline, path text follows a curve you create.
Text can be oriented horizontally or vertically along its baseline or path.
Andrew Devis provides a video tutorial on the Creative COW website that demonstrates formatting and styling text in the Titler.
Type text without boundaries
1. Open the Title Tools panel.
To type horizontal text, click the Type tool
.
To type vertical text, click the Vertical Type tool
.
2. In the drawing area, click where you want to begin, and then type the text.
Note: By default, text does not wrap. To make it wrap when it reaches the title-safe margin, choose Title > Word Wrap. When Word Wrap
is deselected, press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS) to begin a new line.
3. When you finish typing, choose the Selection tool and click outside the text box area.
Wrap text automatically
You can set the titler to wrap text within the title safe area automatically.
Select Title > Word Wrap.
Type horizontal or vertical text in a text box
1. Open the Titler Tools panel.
To type horizontal text, click the Area Type tool
.
To type vertical text, click the Vertical Area Type tool
.
2. In the drawing area, drag to create a text box.
3. Type the text. The text wraps when it reaches the boundaries of the text box.
4. When you finish typing, choose the Selection tool and click outside the text box.
Note: Resizing the text box resizes only the visible area of the box. The text remains the same size.
Type text along a path
1. In the Titler, click the Path Type tool
or the Vertical Path Type tool
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. Using the path type tools is similar to drawing with Pen Tool.
2. In the drawing area, click where you want the text to begin.
3. Click or drag to create a second point.
4. Continue clicking until you create the path shape you want.
5. Type the text. When you type, the text begins along the top or right edge of the path. If necessary, adjust the path by dragging the object
anchor points.
Note: Resizing the text box created in this mode resizes only the visible area; the text remains the same size.
6. When you finish, choose the Selection tool and click outside the text box.
Edit and select text
Using the Selection tool, double-click the text at the point you want to edit or begin a selection. The tool changes to the Type tool, and a cursor
indicates the insertion point.
To move the insertion point, click between characters or use the Left Arrow and Right Arrow keys.
To select a single character or group of contiguous characters, drag from the insertion point cursor to highlight the characters.
You can format selected text using controls in the Titler main panel, the Title Properties panel, or menu commands. To format an entire text or
graphic object, click the object and then modify its properties.
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Format text in titles
Some object properties—such as fill color and shadow—are common to all objects you create in the Titler. Other properties are unique to text
objects. Controls for font, font style, and type alignment are in the Titler panel above the drawing area. Other options are available in the Title
Properties panel and the Title menu of the main menu bar.
At any time, you can change the fonts that you use for your titles. The Font Browser displays all of your installed fonts using a set of default
characters, which you can customize.
When you choose a font in the Font Browser, it immediately applies to your title. The Font Browser remains open so that you can preview another
font.
Note: If you share title files with other users, make sure that their computers have the fonts that you used to create the shared title.
Specify a font
Select the text and do one of the following:
Choose Title > Font and choose a font from the menu.
In the Title Properties panel, click the Font Family triangle to open the drop-down menu, and select a font.
Change the letters that appear in the Font Browser
When you open the drop-down menus for Font Family and Font Style, the Font Browser appears, showing example characters set in the various
available fonts. You can determine which characters are used in the Font Browser.
1. Select Edit > Preferences > Titler (Windows), or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Titler (Mac OS).
2. Type the characters you would like displayed for Style Swatches (limit of two) and the Font Browser (limit of six) into their respective fields.
3. Click > OK.
Change the font size
Select the text and do one of the following:
Choose Title > Size and choose a font size.
Change the Font Size value in the Title Properties panel.
Change text orientation
1. Select a text object.
2. Choose Title > Orientation and select either Horizontal or Vertical.
Specify text properties
When you select any object in a title, its properties are listed in the Title Properties panel. Adjusting values in the panel alters the selected object.
Text objects possess unique properties, such as leading and kerning.
Note: Some text properties are not listed in the Title Properties panel. For example, you can set font, font style, and type alignment either in the
Titler panel or in the Title menu. The Title menu also includes options for orientation, word wrap, tabs, and inserting a logo into a text box.
1. Select the text object or range of text you want to modify.
2. In the Title Properties panel, click the arrow next to Properties, and set values. Some of the options include:
Font Specifies the font applied to the selected text object. To view a font in its typeface, use the Font Browser.
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Font Size Specifies the font’s size, in scan lines.
Aspect Specifies the horizontal scale of the selected font. This value is some percentage of the font’s natural aspect ratio. Values less than
100% narrow the text. Values above 100% widen the text.
Leading Specifies the amount of space between lines of type. For roman type, leading is measured from the baseline of one line of type to
the baseline of the next line. For vertical text, leading is measured from the center of one line of type to the center of the next line. In the
Titler, the baseline is the line underneath the text. You can apply more than one leading amount within the same paragraph. However, the
largest leading value in a line of type determines the leading value for that line.
Note: To turn the text baselines on or off, choose Title > View > Text Baselines. Text baselines appear only when you select the text
object.
Kerning Specifies the amount of space you add or subtract between specific character pairs. The value indicates the percentage of
character width between the character pairs. Place the cursor at the point where you want to adjust kerning.
Tracking Specifies the amount of space between a range of letters. The value indicates the percentage of character width between the
specified range of characters. The direction of the text tracking is based on the justification of the text. For example, center-justified text
tracks from the center. Adjusting the tracking is useful when your contiguous text has thick strokes that cause the characters to blend into
each other, making them hard to read. Adjust the tracking for all the text in a text box by selecting the text box and changing the Tracking
value. You can also adjust the tracking between specific contiguous characters by selecting only those characters and changing the Tracking
value.
Baseline Shift Specifies the distance of the characters from the baseline. Raise or lower the selected type to create superscripts or
subscripts. Changing the Baseline Shift value affects all characters. Adjust the baseline shift for all the text in a text box by selecting the text
box and changing the value. Adjust the baseline shift between specific contiguous characters by selecting only those characters and
changing the value.
Slant Specifies the slant of an object, in degrees.
Small Caps When selected, specifies that all selected objects appear in uppercase.
Small Caps Size Specifies the size of the small caps as some percentage of regular height. Adjusting this value changes the size of all
characters in the text object except for the leading character. A Small Caps value of 100% sets the text to all capitals.
Underline When selected, specifies that the selected text is underlined. This option is not available for text on a path.
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Work with paragraph text
Tools in the Titler make it possible to quickly resize and align paragraph text.
Change paragraph justification
Select a paragraph text object, and at the top of the Titler panel:
To justify text to the left of its text box, click Left
To center the text in its text box, click Center
.
.
To justify text to the right side of its text box, click Right
.
Reflow paragraph text
Select a paragraph text object.
Drag any handle of the paragraph text’s bounding box to resize the box.
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Create tab stops in titles
You can apply tabs in a text box in much the same way as you would in a word-processing program. Tabs are especially useful in creating
professional-looking rolling credits. You can set multiple tabs within a text box and press the Tab key to move the cursor to the next available tab
stop. You can specify a different justification option at each tab stop.
Note: Tabs work exclusively to align the characters within text objects. To align entire text or graphic objects, use the Align command.
Set and adjust a tab stop
1. Select a text box.
2. Choose Title > Tab Stops.
3. Align the “0” line in the Tab Stops ruler with the left edge of the selected text box.
4. Click the tab ruler above the numbers to create a tab. Drag the tab stop to adjust its position. As you drag, a yellow vertical line, or tab
marker, indicates the tab’s position in the selected text box.
To create a tab stop with left-justified text, click the Left Justify tab marker .
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To create a tab stop with center-justified text, click the Center tab marker .
To create a tab stop with right-justified text, click the Right Justify tab marker .
5. Click OK to close the Tab Stops dialog box. The selected text box contains the tab stops you specified.
Note: To make tab markers visible whenever selected (rather than only when the Tab Stops dialog box is open), choose Title > View > Tab
Markers.
Delete a tab stop
In the Tab Stops dialog box, drag the tab up, down, or off the tab ruler.
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Drawing shapes in titles
Create shapes
Change the shape of a graphic object or a logo
Draw straight segments with Pen Tool
Draw curves with Pen Tool
Adjust object anchor points and curves
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Create shapes
You can use the drawing tools in the Titler to create various shapes, such as rectangles, ellipses, and lines. The Titler includes standard pen tools
that resemble pen tools used in Illustrator and Photoshop.
Jon Barrie shows how to use the Titler in Adobe Premiere Pro to create feathered masks in this video on the Creative Cow website.
Titler tools panel
A. Pen Tool B. Rectangle C. Clipped Corner Rectangle D. Wedge E. Ellipse F. Rounded Corner Rectangle G. Rounded
Rectangle H. Arc I. Line
Select a shape tool.
Shift-drag to constrain the shape’s aspect ratio.
Alt-drag (Windows) or Option-drag (Mac OS) to draw from the center of the shape.
Shift+Alt-drag (Windows) or Shift+Option-drag (Mac OS) to constrain the aspect ratio and draw from the center.
Drag diagonally across the corner points to flip the shape diagonally as you draw.
Drag across, up, or down to flip the shape horizontally or vertically as you draw.
To flip the shape after you’ve drawn it, use the Selection tool to drag a corner point in the direction you want it to flip.
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Change the shape of a graphic object or a logo
1. Select one or more objects or logos in a title.
2. In the Title Properties panel, click the triangle next to Properties to expand its list, and then choose an option from the Graphic Type menu.
Note: When you change shapes, the original object anchor points often are lost. To reveal the object anchor points before or after changing
the shape, select the object with the Selection tool.
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Draw straight segments with Pen Tool
Draw straight lines by clicking Pen Tool in the drawing area. Pen Tool creates object anchor points connected by straight segments.
1. Select Pen Tool.
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2. Position the tip of the pen point where you want the straight segment to begin, and click to define the first object anchor point. The object
anchor point remains selected (solid) until you add the next point.
Note: The first segment you draw is not visible until you click a second object anchor point. Also, if lines extend from either side of the
point, you’ve accidentally dragged Pen Tool; choose Edit > Undo and click again.
3. Click again where you want the segment to end. (Shift-click to constrain the segment’s angle to multiples of 45°.) Pen Tool creates another
object anchor point.
4. Continue clicking Pen Tool to create additional straight segments. The last object anchor point you add appears as a large square, indicating
that it is selected.
5. Complete the path by doing one of the following:
To close a path, click the initial object anchor point. A circle appears underneath the pen pointer when it is directly over the initial object
anchor point.
To leave the path open, Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) anywhere away from all objects, or select a different tool in
the Tools panel.
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Draw curves with Pen Tool
Draw curved segments by dragging the object anchor points with Pen Tool. When you use the Selection tool to select an object anchor point
connecting curved segments, the segments display direction lines, which end in direction points. The angle and length of the direction lines
determine the shape and size of the curved segments. Moving the direction lines reshapes the curves. A smooth point always has two direction
lines that move together as a single, straight unit. When you drag the direction point of either direction line on a smooth point, both direction lines
move simultaneously. Pen Tool maintains a continuous curve at that object anchor point. In comparison, a corner point can have two, one, or no
direction lines, depending on whether it joins two, one, or no curved segments, respectively.
Corner point direction lines maintain the corner by working independently of one another. When you drag a direction point on a corner point’s
direction line, the other direction line, if present, does not move. Direction lines are always tangent to (perpendicular to the radius of) the curve at
the object anchor points. The angle of each direction line determines the slope of the curve. The length of each direction line determines the
height, or depth, of the curve.
1. Select Pen Tool.
2. Position the cursor where you want the curve to begin. Hold down the mouse button.
3. Drag to create direction lines that determine the slope of the curve segment you’re creating. In general, extend the direction line about one
third of the distance to the next object anchor point you plan to draw. Shift-drag to constrain the direction line to multiples of 45 °.
4. Release the mouse button.
Note: The first segment is not visible until you create the second object anchor point.
5. Position Pen Tool where you want the curve segment to end.
To create a C-shaped curve, drag in a direction opposite to the direction that you dragged to create the previous object anchor point.
Drawing second point in curves
A. Starting to drag second smooth point B. Dragging away from previous direction line, creating C-shaped curve C. Result after
releasing mouse button
To create an S-shaped curve, drag in the same direction that you dragged to create the previous object anchor point.
Drawing S curves
A. Starting to drag new smooth point B. Dragging in same direction as previous direction line, creating S-shaped curve C. Result after
releasing mouse button
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6. Continue dragging Pen Tool from different locations to create additional points.
To close the path, position Pen Tool over the first object anchor point. Click or drag to close the path.
To leave the path open, Ctrl-click anywhere away from all objects or select the Selection tool.
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Adjust object anchor points and curves
The Titler includes tools for modifying existing paths. You can add or delete object anchor points on a path. You can also move object anchor
points, and manipulate their direction lines to change the curve of adjacent line segments. You can specify not only the path’s thickness but also
the shape of each of its ending points. You can also specify its caps, and its corners, or joins.
Add an object anchor point to a path
1. Select the path.
2. Select Add Anchor Point Tool
.
To add an object anchor point without creating or manually adjusting a curve, click where you want to add an object anchor point.
To add an object anchor point and simultaneously move the new point, drag a spot on a path.
Delete an object anchor point
1. Select the path containing the object anchor point.
2. Select Delete Anchor Point Tool
.
3. Click the point that you want to delete.
Adjust an object anchor point
1. Select the path containing the object anchor point.
2. Select Pen Tool .
3. Position the cursor over the point. When the cursor becomes an arrow with a square next to it, drag the object anchor point to adjust it.
Convert object anchor points from one type to another
You can change the type of object anchor point you have created for a segment.
1. Select the path you want to modify.
2. Select Convert Anchor Point Tool
and position the cursor over the object anchor point that you want to convert.
To convert a corner point to a smooth point, drag a direction point out of the corner point.
To convert a smooth point to a corner point without direction lines, click the smooth point.
To convert a corner point without direction lines to a corner point with independent direction lines, first drag a direction point out of a
corner point. Dragging a direction point makes it a smooth point with direction lines. Release the mouse button, and then drag either
direction point.
To convert a smooth point to a corner point with independent direction lines, drag either direction point.
Note: To temporarily change Pen Tool into Convert Anchor Point Tool, position Pen Tool over an object anchor point, and press the Alt
key (Windows) or the Option key (Mac OS).
Change the curve of a segment
1. Select the path you want to modify.
2. Select Pen Tool and drag a segment to change its curve.
Note: Dragging a segment changes the curve by adjusting the direction lines at each end of the segment by the same amount. This
technique can change a straight segment into a curved one.
Set options for open and closed Bezier shapes
Select a line or an open or closed Bezier shape, and in the Title Properties panel, specify any of the following options:
Graphic type Adjusts open and closed Bezier shapes to standard shapes. Graphic type can also change a closed Bezier shape to an open one
and vice versa. Graphic type must be set to “Filled Bezier” to add fill to a closed shape. For more about adding fill to a closed shape, see Set a fill
for text and objects.
Line Width Specifies the path width, in pixels.
Cap Type Specifies the type of cap placed at the end of the paths. The Butt option caps paths with square ends. The Round option caps paths
with semicircular ends. The Square option caps paths with square ends that extend half the line width beyond the end of the line. This option
makes the weight of the line extend equally in all directions around the line.
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Join Type Specifies how the ends of adjoining path segments are joined. The Miter option joins path segments using pointed corners. The Round
option joins path segments using rounded corners. The Bevel option joins path segments using squared corners.
Miter Limit Specifies the point at which the join type switches from mitered (pointed) to bevel (square). The default miter limit is 4. At the default,
the join type switches from miter to bevel when the length of the point is four times the stroke weight. A miter limit of 1 results in a bevel join.
Note: You can apply the options described above to shapes you create with Pen Tool or Line tool. You can apply an inner or outer stroke to any
text or graphic object.
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Add images to titles
Place a logo in a title
Place a logo in a text box
Return a logo to its original size or aspect ratio
Use the Titler to place images in a title, such as adding a logo graphic. You can either add the image as a graphic element or place it in a text box
to become part of the text. The Titler accepts both bitmap images and vector-based artwork (such as art created with Adobe Illustrator). However,
Premiere Pro rasterizes vector-based art, converting it to a bitmap version in the Titler. By default, an inserted image appears at its original size.
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Place a logo in a title
1. Choose Title > Logo > Insert Logo.
2. Drag the logo to where you want it. If necessary, you can adjust the size, opacity, rotation, and scale of the logo.
Note: Insert a logo if you want the image to become part of the title file. If you want to use an image or moving video as a background only,
superimpose the title over a clip of the image or video.
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Place a logo in a text box
1. Using a type tool, click where you want to insert the logo.
2. Choose Title > Logo > Insert Logo Into Text.
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Return a logo to its original size or aspect ratio
Select the logo and choose either Title > Logo > Restore Logo Size or Title > Logo > Restore Logo Aspect Ratio.
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Working with text and objects in titles
Change the stacking order of objects in titles
Align and distribute objects in titles
Transform objects in titles
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Change the stacking order of objects in titles
An object is any shape or text box you create in the Titler. When you create objects that overlap each other, you can control their stacking order in
the Titler.
1. Select the object you want to move.
2. Choose Title > Arrange and then choose one of the following:
Bring To Front Brings the selected object to the top of the stacking order.
Bring Forward Switches the selected object with the object directly in front of it.
Send To Back Moves the selected object to the bottom of the stacking order.
Send Backward Switches the selected object with the object directly behind it.
Note: If your text or shape elements are densely stacked, selecting an element within the stack is difficult. You can use the Title > Select
command to navigate easily through the stacked elements to reach the target element.
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Align and distribute objects in titles
The Title Actions panel includes buttons to arrange objects in the drawing area. You can align, center, and distribute objects along horizontal or
vertical axes.
Title Actions Panel
A. Horizontal alignment buttons B. Vertical centering button C. Horizontal distribution buttons D. Vertical alignment buttons E. Horizontal
centering button F. Vertical distribution buttons
Center objects in titles
1. In the Titler, select one or more objects.
2. In the Title Actions panel, click the button for the type of centering you want.
Note: You can center objects using the Title > Position command and selecting the option you want. Additionally, you can choose Title >
Position > Lower Third to position the selected object along the bottom edge of the title-safe margin. To center an object both horizontally
and vertically within the drawing area, click both centering buttons.
Align objects in titles
An alignment option aligns selected objects to the object that most closely represents the new alignment. For example, for right alignment, all
selected objects align to the selected object that is farthest to the right.
1. In the Titler, select two or more objects.
2. In the Title Actions panel, click the button for the type of alignment you want.
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Distribute objects in titles
A distribution option evenly spaces selected objects between the two most extreme objects. For example, for a vertical distribution option, the
selected objects are distributed between the highest and lowest selected objects.
When you distribute objects of different sizes, the spaces between objects vary. For example, distributing objects by their centers creates equal
space between the centers—but different-sized objects extend by different amounts into the space between objects. To create uniform spacing
between selected objects, use the Horizontal Even Spacing or Vertical Even Spacing option.
1. In the Titler, select three or more objects.
2. In the Title Actions panel, click the button for the type of distribution you want.
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Transform objects in titles
You can adjust an object’s position, rotation, scale, and opacity—attributes collectively referred to as transform properties. To transform an object,
drag it to the drawing area, choose a command from the Title menu, or use controls in the Title Properties panel.
Adjust an object’s opacity
1. Select an object or group of objects.
2. Do one of the following:
In the Transform section of the Title Properties panel, adjust the Opacity value.
Choose Title > Transform > Opacity, type a new Opacity value, and click OK.
Note: The opacity property setting adjusts the opacity of objects within a title. You can set the overall opacity of the entire title in the
sequence as you would that of any video clip, using effects.
Adjust the position of objects
1. Select an object, or Shift-click to select multiple objects.
2. Do one of the following:
In the drawing area, drag any of the selected objects to a new position.
Choose Title > Transform > Position and type new X and Y Position values; then click OK.
In the Transform section of the Title Properties panel, enter values for X Position and Y Position.
Use the arrow keys to nudge the object in 1-pixel increments, or press Shift+arrow key to nudge the object in 5-pixel increments.
Choose Title > Position and choose an option to center the selected object or align its bottom edge with the bottom of the title-safe
margin.
Scale objects
Select an object, or Shift-click to select multiple objects.
To scale the width, drag any object’s left or right handles in the drawing area.
To scale the height, drag the object’s top or bottom handles in the drawing area.
To constrain the object proportions, Shift-drag the corner and side handles.
To scale and constrain the aspect ratio, Shift-drag any object’s corner handles.
To scale from the center, Alt-drag (Windows) or Option-drag (Mac OS) any object’s corner handles.
To set scale values in terms of percentages, choose Title > Transform > Scale, specify the values you want, and click OK.
To set scale values in terms of pixels, specify values for Width and Height in the Title Properties panel.
Note: Dragging the handles of a text object created with the Horizontal Type or Vertical Type tool changes its font size. If the scaling is not
uniform, the text’s aspect value also changes.
Change the rotation angle of objects
1. Select an object, or Shift-click to select multiple objects.
2. Do one of the following:
In the drawing area, place the cursor just outside any object’s corner points. When the cursor becomes the Rotate icon
direction you want to adjust the angle. Shift-drag to constrain the rotation to 45° increments.
Select the rotation tool
and drag any object in the direction you want.
Choose Title > Transform > Rotation, type a new Rotation value, and click OK.
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, drag in the
Enter a value for Rotation in the Title Properties panel, or expand the Rotation category heading and drag the angle control.
Distort an object or multiple objects
1. Select the object, or Shift-click to select multiple objects.
2. In the Properties section of the Title Properties panel, click the triangle next to Distort to show its X and Y options. Adjust the X value to
distort the text along the x axis. Adjust the Y value to distort along the y axis.
Note: Distort affects an entire graphic object’s horizontal (X) or vertical (Y) aspect. However, it affects each character in a text object
individually.
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Fills, strokes, and shadows in titles
Set a fill for text and objects
Fill type options
Add a sheen
Add a texture for text or object
Add a stroke to text or object
Change the listing order of strokes
Delete strokes from an object or text
Create a drop shadow
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Set a fill for text and objects
An object’s fill property defines the area within the contours of the object. Fill specifies the space inside a graphic object, or within the outline of
each character of a text object. You can fill an entire object or individual letters of type.
Note: If you add a stroke to an object, the stroke also includes a fill (see Add a stroke to text or object).
1. Select the object you want to fill.
2. In the Title Properties panel, click the triangle next to the Fill category and select the box next to the Fill category to set an option. Some
options include:
Fill Type Specifies whether and how color is applied within the contours of text or graphic object.
Color Determines the color of the fill. Click the color swatch to open a color picker, or click the eyedropper to sample a color from anywhere
on the screen. Color options vary according to the Fill Type specified.
Opacity Specifies the fill’s opacity, from 0% (transparent) to 100% (opaque). Set the opacity of an object’s fill color to set the opacity of
individual objects in a title. To set the opacity of the title as a whole, add it to a track in the Timeline above another clip. Adjust opacity as you
would for any other clip.
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Fill type options
Solid Creates a fill of uniform color. Set options as desired.
Linear Gradient or Radial Gradient Linear Gradient creates a linear, two-color gradient fill. Radial Gradient creates a circular, two-color gradient
fill.
The Color option specifies the beginning and ending gradient colors, which are displayed, respectively, in the left and right boxes, or color stops.
Double-click a color stop to choose a color. Drag the color stops to adjust the transition smoothness between the colors.
The Color Stop Color option and the Color Stop Opacity option specify the color and opacity of the selected color stop. Click the triangle above the
color stop you want to define and adjust as necessary. The Angle option (available for Linear Gradient only) specifies the angle of the gradient.
The Repeat option specifies the number of times to repeat the gradient pattern.
4-Color Gradient Creates a gradient fill composed of four colors, with a color emanating from each of the object’s corners.
The Color option specifies the color that emanates from each corner of the object. Double-click a box at any of the corners to choose a color for
that corner.
The Color Stop Color option and the Color Stop Opacity option specify the color and opacity of the lower-right corner. To select a color, do one of
the following:
Click the Color Stop Color palette to open the Color Picker. Then, select a color.
Click the Color Stop Color eyedropper, and click any color on the screen.
Bevel Adds a beveled edge to the background. Balance option specifies the percentage of the bevel that the shadow color occupies.
Eliminate Specifies that no fill or shadow is rendered.
Ghost Specifies that the shadow is rendered, but not the fill.
Eliminate and Ghost work best with objects that have shadows and strokes.
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Add a sheen
Add a sheen to any object’s fill or stroke. A sheen resembles a streak of colored light across the surface of an object. You can adjust a sheen’s
color, size, angle, opacity, and position.
1. Select the object.
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2. Select Sheen in the Title Properties panel.
3. Click the triangle next to Sheen and set its options.
Note: If the object’s texture obscures the sheen, deselect the Texture option in the Title Properties panel.
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Add a texture for text or object
You can map a texture to any object’s fill or stroke. To add a texture, specify a vector or bitmap file (for example, an Adobe Photoshop file), or use
one of several textures included with Premiere Pro.
1. Select the object.
2. In the Title Properties panel, click the triangle next to Fill or Strokes, then click the triangle next to Texture to reveal the options.
3. Click the Texture box.
4. Do one of the following:
Click the Texture swatch and select any image file on the hard disk.
Browse to Program Files/Adobe/Premiere Pro [version]/Presets/Textures (Windows) or Applications/Adobe/Premiere Pro
[version]/Presets/Textures (Mac OS) and select a texture. Then click Open (Windows) or Choose (Mac OS).
5. To specify how the texture scales, aligns, and blends with its associated object, set any of the remaining options:
Flip With Object Flips the texture horizontally and vertically when the object is flipped (by dragging the object anchor points over each
other).
Rotate With Object Rotates the texture in sync with the object.
Scaling Object X, Scaling Object Y Specifies how the texture is stretched along the x or y axis when applied to the object. The Texture
option doesn’t stretch the texture but applies it to the face of the object from the upper left corner to the lower right corner. The Clipped Face
option stretches the texture so that it fits the face, minus the area covered by any inner strokes. The Face option stretches the texture so
that it fits the face exactly. The Extended Character option considers strokes when calculating the area over which the texture is stretched.
For example, if you have a large, 20-pixel outer edge, the texture is stretched beyond the extents of the face. However, the texture is clipped
to the face and only the extents are adjusted.
Scaling Horizontal, Scaling Vertical Stretches the texture to the specified percentage. A single value can produce different results
depending upon other scaling choices you make. The range is from 1% to 500%; the default is 100%.
Scaling Tile X, Scaling Tile Y Tiles the texture. If the object is not tiled in a given direction, blank (alpha = 0) is used.
Alignment Object X, Alignment Object Y Specifies to which part of the object the texture aligns. Screen aligns the texture to the title and
not the object, letting you move the object without moving the texture. Clipped Face aligns the texture to the clipped area face (face minus
the inner strokes). Face aligns the texture to the regular face and does not consider the strokes in the extent calculation. Extended
Character aligns the texture to the extended face (face plus the outer strokes).
Alignment Rule X, Alignment Rule Y Aligns the texture to the top left, center, or bottom right of the object specified by Object X and
Object Y.
Alignment X Offset, Alignment Y Offset Specifies the horizontal and vertical offsets (in pixels) for the texture from the calculated
application point. This application point is calculated based on the Object X/Y and Rule X/Y settings. The range is –1000 to 1000, with a
default of 0.
Blending Mix Specifies the ratio of texture to regular fill that is rendered. The control’s range is –100 to 100. A value of –100 indicates that
no texture is used and the gradient dominates. A value of 100 uses only the texture. A value of 0 uses both aspects of the object equally.
Blending Mix also determines how the key of the ramp (set with the Fill Key option) and texture (set with the Texture Key option) are used.
Alpha Scale Readjusts the alpha value for the texture as a whole. This option allows you to easily make the object transparent. If the alpha
channel is properly ranged, this option acts like a transparency slider.
Composite Rule Specifies which channel of an incoming texture is used to determine the transparency. In most cases, the alpha channel is
used. However, if you use a black-and-red texture, you could impose transparency in the red areas by specifying the red channel
Invert Composite Inverts the incoming alpha values. Some textures have the alpha range inverted. Try this option if the area that is
supposed to appear solid is transparent.
Note: To remove a selected object’s texture, deselect Texture in the Title Properties panel.
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Add a stroke to text or object
You can add an outline, or stroke, to your objects. You can add both inner strokes and outer strokes. Inner strokes are outlines along the inner
edge of your objects, and outer strokes are outlines along the outer edge. You can add up to 12 strokes to each object. After you add the stroke,
you can adjust its color, fill type, opacity, sheen, and texture. By default, strokes are listed and rendered in the order you create them; however,
you can easily change that order.
1. Select the object.
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2. In the Properties section of the Title Properties panel, expand the Strokes category.
3. Click Add next to either Inner Stroke or Outer Stroke.
4. Set any of the following options:
Type Specifies the type of stroke you apply. Depth creates a stroke that makes the object appear to extrude. Edge creates a stroke that
encompasses the entire inner or outer edge of the object. Drop Face creates a copy of the object, which you can later offset and apply
values to.
Size Specifies the size of the stroke, in scan lines. This option is not available for the Drop Face stroke type.
Angle Specifies the offset angle of the stroke, in degrees. This option is not available for the Edge stroke type.
Magnitude Specifies the height of the stroke. This option is available only for the Drop Face stroke type.
Fill Type Specifies the type of fill for the stroke. All the fill types, including Sheen and Texture, work exactly like the Fill options.
Select and deselect stroke options to experiment with various combinations.
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Change the listing order of strokes
1. Select an object containing multiple strokes.
2. In the Title Properties panel, select the stroke you want to move.
3. Choose Move Up to move up the selected stroke one level in the list, or choose Move Down to move the selected stroke one level down in
the list.
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Delete strokes from an object or text
1. Select an object containing one or more strokes.
2. In the Titler, do one of the following:
To delete strokes from an object, select the object.
To delete strokes from text, click the Type Tool
, and then drag to select the text.
3. In the Title Properties panel, click the triangle next to Strokes to expand the category.
4. Expand Inner Strokes, Outer Strokes, or both.
5. Select either Inner Stroke or Outer Stroke.
6. Click Delete.
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Create a drop shadow
Add drop shadows to any object you create in the Titler. The various shadow options give you full control over color, opacity, angle, distance, size,
and spread.
1. Select an object.
2. In the Title Properties panel, select Shadow.
3. Click the arrow next to the Shadow option to set any of the values including:
Distance Specifies the number of pixels that the shadow is offset from the object.
Size Specifies the size of the shadow.
Spread Specifies how far the alpha channel boundaries of the object are extended before blurring. Spread is useful on small, thin features
such as cursive descenders or ascenders on typeface, which tend to disappear if you apply a significant blur.
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Rolling and crawling titles
Create a rolling or crawling title
Roll/Crawl Timing options
Convert a title to another type
Though static titles, graphics, and logos suffice for some projects, many others require titles that move across the screen. (Titles that move
vertically over the footage are called rolls. Titles that move horizontally are called crawls.)
Note: The length of the title clip in a Timeline panel determines the speed of the roll or crawl. The more you increase the title clip length, the
slower the movement.
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Create a rolling or crawling title
1. Do one of the following:
To create a rolling title, choose Title > New Title > Default Roll.
To create a crawling title, choose Title > New Title > Default Crawl.
2. Create the text and graphic objects for the rolling or crawling title. Use the Titler panel scroll bar to view offscreen areas of the title. When
the title is added to the sequence, the offscreen areas roll or crawl into view.
For rolling credits, create a long text box using the Area Type tool, and use alignment, tabs, and leading to adjust the formatting.
3. In the Titler panel, click the Roll/Crawl Options button
.
4. Specify the appropriate Direction and Timing options, and then click OK.
Note: You can specify a direction for crawling titles only.
Andrew Devis has this video tutorial on creating rolling titles.
Phil Hawkins goes step by step to show how to create and work with rolling credits in this Premiere Pro tutorial video.
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Roll/Crawl Timing options
Start Off Screen Specifies that the roll begins out of view and scrolls into view.
End Off Screen Specifies that the roll continues until the objects are out of view.
Preroll Specifies the number of frames that play before the roll begins.
Ease-In Specifies the number of frames through which the title rolls at a slowly increasing speed until the title reaches the playback speed.
Ease-Out Specifies the number of frames through which the title scrolls at a slowly decreasing speed until the roll completes.
Postroll Specifies the number of frames that play after the roll completes.
Crawl Left, Crawl Right Specifies the direction in which the crawl moves.
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Convert a title to another type
1. In the Titler Panel, select the text box you want to convert, and click the Roll/Crawl options button.
2. For Title Type, specify the type of title you want, and if necessary, specify Timing options.
3. Click OK.
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Titler text styles
Modify the style swatch display
Change the default characters in swatches
Create a style
Apply a style to an object
Specify the characters in the Title Styles panel
Delete, duplicate, or rename, a style
Manage style libraries
You can save a combination of color properties and font characteristics as a style, for later use. You can save any number of styles. Thumbnails of
all saved styles appear in the Title Styles panel, so you can quickly apply your custom styles across projects. Premiere Pro also includes a set of
default styles.
By default, Premiere Pro stores all saved styles as style library files that use the .prsl file extension. When you save a style library, you are saving
the entire set of styles that are displayed in the Titler.
The preset style library is stored in the following location:
(Windows) Program Files/Adobe/Premiere Pro [version]/Presets/Styles
(Mac OS) Applications/Premiere Pro [version]/Presets/Styles
Custom styles are stored in the following location:
(Windows) My Documents/Adobe/Premiere Pro/[version]/Styles
(Mac OS) Documents/Adobe/Premiere Pro/[version]/styles
If you share styles, make sure that the fonts, textures, and background files used are available on all systems.
The Current Style thumbnail always shows the properties that you have applied to the currently selected element.
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Modify the style swatch display
The Title Styles panel displays the default style library as well as style swatches you create or load. The display defaults to show large swatches
of sample text with the loaded style applied. However, you can choose to view your styles in small swatches or by the style name only.
In the Title Styles panel menu, choose one of the following:
Text Only Displays only the style name.
Small Thumbnails Displays only small swatches of sample text objects with the styles applied to them.
Large Thumbnails Displays only large swatches of sample text objects with the styles applied to them.
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Change the default characters in swatches
You can change the default characters that appear on the style swatches.
1. Choose Edit > Preferences > Titler (Windows), or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Titler (Mac OS).
2. In the Style Swatches box, type up to two characters that you would like to appear on the style swatches.
3. Click OK.
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Create a style
1. Select an object that has the properties you want to save as a style.
2. Do one of the following:
From the Title Styles panel menu, choose New Style.
Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS) in the Title Styles panel, and choose New Style.
3. Type a name for the style and click OK. Depending upon the display option you select, either a swatch displaying the new style or the new
style name appears in the Title Styles panel.
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Apply a style to an object
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1. Select the object to which you want to apply the style.
2. In the Title Styles panel, click the style swatch that you want to apply.
To prevent the font type in the style from being applied to the font in your title, Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac OS) the style
swatch.
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Specify the characters in the Title Styles panel
You can specify the characters that are shown in the Title Styles panel.
1. Select Edit > Preferences > Titler (Windows), or Premiere Pro > Preferences > Titler (Mac OS).
2. Type the characters you want to appear in the Title Styles panel into the Style Swatches field (limit of two).
3. Click OK.
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Delete, duplicate, or rename, a style
In the Title Styles panel, do any of the following:
To delete a style, select it, and then choose Delete Style from the Title Styles panel menu.
Note: This procedure deletes only the swatch or name from the display area. The style remains in the library. Use the Append Style Library,
Reset Style Library, or Replace Style Library command to display the style library again.
To duplicate a style, select it, and choose Duplicate Style from the Title Styles panel menu. A duplicate of the selected style appears in the
Title Styles panel.
To rename a style, select it, and choose Rename Style from the Title Styles panel menu. Type a new name, up to 32 characters, in the
Rename Style dialog box, and click OK.
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Manage style libraries
After you create a style, you can save it in a collection, or style library, with other styles. By default, the styles you create appear in the current style
library, but you can create new libraries in which to save styles. For example, you can delete the current library display, create new styles as you
work, and then save those styles in their own library.
In the Title Styles panel, do any of the following:
To restore the default style libraries, choose Reset Style Library from the Styles menu.
To save a style library, choose Save Style Library from the Styles menu. All styles visible in the Styles section are saved. Specify a name
and location for the style library file and click Save. Premiere Pro saves style library files with the extension .prsl.
To load a saved style library, select Append Style Library from the Title Styles panel menu. Then browse to the style library, select it, and
click Open (Windows), or Choose (Mac OS).
To replace a style library, choose Replace Style Library from the Title Styles panel menu. Browse to the style library that you want to use as
a replacement, select it, and click Open (Windows), or Choose (Mac OS).
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Effects and transitions
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About effects
Fixed effects
Standard effects
Clip-based and track-based effects
Effect plug-ins
GPU-accelerated effects
High-bit-depth effects
Premiere Pro includes a variety of audio and video effects that you can apply to clips in your video program. An effect can add a special visual or
audio characteristic or provide an unusual feature attribute. For example, an effect