MAY/1 965 - American Radio History

MAY/1 965 - American Radio History

Ine;seagmeeme:fee alaat4ifreq4./

MAY/1

965

60¢

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CABLES

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Circle 100 on Reader Service Card

AUDIO

HENRY A.

SCHOBER

Business Manager

SANFORD

L.

CAHN

Advertising Director

EDGAR

E.

NEWMAN

Circulation Director

Representatives

Bill

Pattie

&

Associates,

4761

West Touhy Ave.,

Lincolnwood

46,

Ill.

James

C.

Galloway,

6535

Los

Wilshire Blvd.,

Angeles

48,

Calif.

Warren

Birkenhead, Inc.,

No.

25, 2- chome, Shiba Hama- matsu

-cho,

Minato -ku, Tokyo,

Japan

Portable Console for Broadcast or

Recording

Discotheque

19

Without

Microphones 24

Calibrated

Stereo

Unit

-Part

2

26

Flat

Audio Cables 30

Light

Listening 6

Record Revue 38

Jazz and

All

That 46

Scott Model 260

Solid

-State Amplifier 32

Bogen Turntable 34

EICO

Solid

-State FM- Stereo Receiver 44

AUDIO

May, 1965 Vol. 49, No. 5

Successor to

RAD10

,

Est 1911

C. G.

McPRouD

Publisher

DAVID SASLAW

Editor

JANET

M.

DURGIN

Production Manager

Contributing Editors

EDWARD TATNALL CANBY

JOSEPH GIOVANELLI

HAROLD LAWRENCE

CHESTER SANTON

HERMAN BURSTEIN

BERTRAM STANLEIGH

LARRY ZIDE

AUDIO

AUDIO

Chester Santon

Edward

Tatnall Canby

Bertram Stanleigh

AUDIO

Articles

John Whitacre

Robert Hazelleaf

Raphael

F.

Ehat

Reviews

Profiles

Model 260

B

-62

Model

3566

AUDIO in

General

Joseph Giovanelli Audioclinic

2

Letters 4

About Music

8

Audio ETC

10

Editor's

Review 16

Tape Guide

36

New

Literature

37

New Products 40

InZide AUDÌO 42

Advertising Index 56

Harold Lawrence

Edward Tatnall Canby

Herman

Burstein

Larry Zide

s

AUDIO (title registered

U. S.

Pat.

Off.) is published monthly by

Radio Maga- zines, Inc., Henry

A. Schober, and Editorial

Offices, 204

President;

C. G.

McProud, Secretary. Executive

Front St.. Mineola,

N. Y. Subscription rates

-U.

S.,

Possessions, Canada, and Mexico, $5.00 for other countries

$6.00

Blanchard Press Inc., Garden City,

N.T. one copies

All year,

$9.00 for two years; all

60t.

Printed rights reserved. in U.S.A. at

Entire contents copyrighted 1965 by

Mineola, N.Y. and

Radio Magazines,

Inc. Second Class postage paid at additional mailing offices.

RADIO MAGAZINES, INC.,

P. O. Box 629, MINEOLA,

N.

Y.

Postmaster: Send Form

3579 to AUDIO,

P. O. Box 629, Mineola, N.

Y. o,

\

Q,

&a,4

MAY,

1965

Number

21 in a series by of discussions

Electro -Voice engineers

TRANSISTORS

COME OF

AGE

JACK

BURCHFIELD

Chief Engineer

Loudspeakers

Despite the relative newness of many design parameters for the technology, transistorized high fidelity and amplifiers have become relatively stable

"standard."

Unfortunately, these so- called standard circuits too often tend to represent the extremes in design philosophy without regard for the usable benefits to the consumer.

To follow proven either a high

-cost exceeds techniques may well result in

"ultimate" approach that vastly the needs of home music systems, or in a low -cost below approach that performs significantly the capabilities of present

-day tube -type units.

In an effort to provide optimum quality to useful benefits to the user it necessary and desirable to depart in several essential ways from in

"tried

-Electro and true"

-related

-Voice circuit found design its new line of high -fidelity amplifiers and receivers.

For instance, a complementary emitter -follower driver stage is employed in the

E -V 66 amplifier.

Since resulting idling current is extremely low, and current is drawn only in proportion to the signal, heat generation is extremely low. Even more is important the reduced danger of burning out the power stages due to to the non -technical user, however, momentary shorts or overloads. This circuitry has made possible the use of slo -blo fuses which provide full protection, but reduce the need for frequent fuse changing when accidental over- loads or shorts occur.

Another distinguishing characteristic of the driver circuit of these new amplifiers is its hexifilarwound transformer. The winding is carefully designed to reduce leakage inductance, and the extended high frequency response of these amplifiers is a direct result of the performance of this critical com- ponent.

A unique tone control circuit also distinguishes the

E

-V

66 amplifier. Variation in volume control settings change the source impedance feeding the tone control circuitry. No effect on response can be noted when the amplifier is set for

"flat" oper- ation. However, as tone controls are advanced and volume lowered, the permissible amount of tone control action is increased. Thus, advanced set- tings of the tone controls (often essential at low levels ing for realistic reproduction) are automatically reduced as volume is increased. Ease of maintain- uniform response at every level is increased, with automatic safeguards against excessive equal- ization at high levels. More than adequate tone compensation is available at every volume.

Innovation in design requires, as a corollary, a thorough testing program. The testing of the

E -V

66 can only be described as abusive. Despite un- usual extremes of cessive heat, physical violence and ex- electrical demands on input and output cir- cuits, the designs were proved exceptionally stable.

This stability, in turn, benefits the high fidelity enthusiast directly, by assuring optimum perform- ance despite less than perfect ambient conditions.

It also serves to reduce the incidence of repairs and maintenance required to an absolute minimum.

For technical data on any

E

-V product, write:

ELECTRO- VOICE, INC.,

Dept. 553A

602

Cecil St., Buchanan, Michigan

49107

gleCZ'

SETT,NG NEW

STANDARDS

,N SOUND

Circle 104 on

Reader Service Card

1

..................................

COMING

'.

"WWWW

AUDIO CLINIC

Joseph Giovanelli

2

ARTICLES

Calculus Made Difficult.

D. R.

Butterly. Most en- gineers find calculus difficult,

quite but

this

article

il-

lustrates

a

technique

for making it impossible.

Are

Tapes Long- Lived?

Jahn

T.

Mullin. An

expert and pioneer

in

the tape

field takes

direct

aim at this controversial and dif- ficult topic. Many miscon- ceptions are thoroughly exploded.

Reversible Speakers.

Abraham

B.

Cohen. Rever- sible sound systems

require

the speakers to

be both speaker and microphone.

PROFILES

KLH Stereo Amplifier

and Tuner,

Models

16 and

18

Altec 604E Speaker

In

the June

Issue

On the newsstands, at your favorite audio dealer's, or in your own mailbox

S o

Send questions to:

Joseph Giovanelli

2819

Newkirk

Ave.

Brooklyn, N. Y.

Include stamped, self- addressed envelope.

Vertical and Lateral

Performance

Cartridge

Q. All available arms and cartridges are intended for stereophonic use, yet many of us still use monophonic discs.

In order to play both mono and stereo records, cartridge manufacturers recom- mend that the coils in the stereo cart- ridge be paralleled.

I wonder whether this arrangement is proper. I made up a unit, using minibox, a SPDT slide switch, a and three phono jacks wired as in Fig.

1.

I wanted to be able to prove whether paralleling of proper. the cartridge elements is

Playing a mono record, with the slide switch in the

"mono" position, one de- termines which of the two cables from the arm is

"lateral" because the mono record is recorded laterally. There should be no vertical response.

For comparison's sake, with the de- termined laterial cable plugged into the lateral jack, one obtains an output one volt.

By reversing the cables of and plugging the vertical cable into the lateral jack, no signal should be present except possibly for noise and the grit in the bottom of the record groove.

However, the cartridge does respond laterally via

40 the vertical coil, at about per cent of the output from the lateral coil, with the lateral cable in the lateral jack.

How come? The repro- duction is not good, but yet it does respond. What happens to the sepa-

MONO o

VERT.

IN

STEREO

LAT.

IN

Fig.

1.

®

MONO

OUT ration that manufacturers of cartridges talk about? Isn't the cartridge made so that the lateral modulations of a mono- phonic disc are only impressed on the lateral coil and not on the vertical?

It would appear that cartridge manu- facturers have a big job cut out for them, for one cannot refute that play- ing a monophonic record, with the cart- ridge paralleled, the response should be only from and through the lateral coil.

Any response from the form of noise the vertical coil is in and added distortion, which to my thinking should not be present.

Conversely, if one had a vertically recorded disc, would not the latter coil also respond?

I think this proves my contention that the playing of a monophonic disc demands that the vertical coil be grounded to provide clean reproduc- tion, and disproves the paralleling theory of playing monophonic records.

Adolph Hoefer, Clayton, Missouri.

A.

Let us first examine the con- struction of a stereo record. Assume that a groove is being cut with no modulation. Now let us modulate the right channel. If you could observe this modulation with a microscope, you would note wall was that the right -hand being modulated 45 groove degrees from vertical while the left wall will contain little or no modulation. The degree to which the left wall is modu- lated is a measure of the separation of stereo channels in the particular cutting system used to make the record under discussion.

If, now, we modulate the left channel and omit modulation of nel, the right chan- the pattern will reverse so that the lefthand groove wall will be modulated but not the righthand groove wall.

If we take the modulation and feed it simultaneously into both channels, making sure modulation of that the modulation ditions would prevail. The output, is identical in character, one of two con- or the groove, would be vertical or horizontal depending upon the phase relationship between the modulation applied to the two chan- nels. of

(If the modulation phase, the resulting modulation will

( is applied out

Continued on page 49)

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

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4441144

Famous for

LETTERS

REVERBERATION

.

wow

LIEDERKRANZ HALL

in New York City

For years Liederkranz Hall was world renowned for its remarkable acoustic effects and consequently was in constant demand for

But even

Liederkranz Hall had its it recording. limi- tations! Engineers could not always con- trol the reverberation quality and time.

However if you wanted to record in Lied

- erkranz

Hall today it would be impossi- ble because, as with marks, it's destined

But

...

most old land- for destruction. don't fret, don't worry!

There's a much more practical, effec- tive, and less expensive method to add controlled reverberation to your sound.

Now reverberation comes in a com- pact, portable attractive and rack mountable package

241/2' high by

19" wide in

.

. .

THE

FAIRCHILD

REVERBERTRON

Unique Features of the FAIRCHILD REVERBERTRON

Variable reverb out expensive servo mechanisms network provided.

Electronic time control

Solid state components Rack mountable

Portable Three time periods instantly and noiselessly selectable

Remote control with-

Mixing

4 world

Used by studios throughout the for its natural reverberation ef- fects, the FAIRCHILD

REVERBER-

TRON'S possible reasonable for price now every studio to makes have it the production plus of controlled, flexible and natural reverberation.

Priced at only

$985

Write to

Fairchild

-

professional audio products the pacemaker in

-

for complete details.

FAIRCHILD

RECORDING EQUIPMENT CORPORATION

10-40

45th

Ave., Long Island City

1,

N.Y.

Circle

105 on

Reader Service Card

He's

On

Sui:

Our

Side

Your April

1965 issue response in

"Editors Review" to

Elliott Sanger's letter (page

4) in the same issue was greatly appreciated, much needed, and well done.

I have no doubt but

that

separate programming on AM and FM, for those commercial broadcast stations now duplicating programming, involves a significant investment in terms of equipment alone, let alone program- ming costs. However, although licen- sees in have been allowed some terms of latitude past duplication (which did stimulate development of an FM au- dience to some degree), there is now no reason why licensees should not be required to conform to requirements intended to bring about more effective use of the existing commercial broad- cast spectrum. After all, the spectrum is extremely crowded. Surely there is no longer a public need for this dupli- cation of

AM and FM programming.

Licensees, such as Mr.

Sanger's

WQXR, have a may right to complain and be expected to desire continua- tion of a situation that is to their advantage, but we must bear in mind that the freedom which they were given was neither a right nor guaran- teed to continue indefinitely, nor is it now in the listener's interest: most ef- fective use of the spectrum allocated for commercial purposes. The F.

C. C. proposals aren't flawless,

but

they should prove to be a practical ap- proach to a problem of effective spec- trum allocation. Let us see how this proposed solution works. Practice will point to refinement needed.

In his April issue letter,

Mr. Sanger generalized regarding the characteris- tics of his listeners, citing these gen- eralizations as one support for his argu- ment against the

F.

C. C. proposals, and here

I strongly disagree with him.

Speaking as an ticular field authority in this par-

-I

am a "WQXR listener"

-I

positively do not expect nor want the same programming on

AM and FM, but rather the reverse. Since

Mr. San- ger chose to cite WQXR as the good example, this listener must differ again: although WQXR is one of the two best (Mr. Sanger forgets the program- ming of

WPAT

New York at certain hours) com- mercial "good music" stations in the area on

AM

(but

WQXR occupies this position only by it is one of the worst on FM default),

(where it suffers by comparison because of rela- tively unimaginative programming, steadily increasing commercialization, and long -term heavy emphasis on the

"personality cult" in function)

. the announcing

To conclude my major argument,

Mr.

Sanger says

"The announced purpose of the separation policy is to give greater variety of programming to the listener.

There is no need for this in

New

York." Mr. Sanger would indeed seem to be saying that he can see no need for greater variety in program- ming to serve his own marketing area.

This is surely a memorable, truly a re- markable, and an even astonishing statement to come from the pen of an

AM -FM station executive vice presi- dent

-and

a very illuminating state- ment.

MICHAEL

M.

MEYERS

25

.NUTMAN PLACE

WEST ORANGE, N. J.

07052

Open Letter to a

Crushed Box

(

Last month

Mr.

Sutherland of

Elec- tro

-Voice apologized for their having failed

Mr.

Canby's wastepaper carton test.

Mir.

Canby replies.)

SIR:

I have just gone into executive con- ference with myself and have voted you a vote of thanks for your letter and also a memorandum to the effect that

I hope you do not send me your 473 dif- ferent varieties of carton, and

I must warn you, moreover, that if you do, there will be nobody at home. Perma- nently. good

ED CANBY

P. S.

The EV speakers arrived in per- fect condition

-and

so did the cartons, but as you say, the cartons aren't much without the stuff inside them.

Addendum to "Sound at

Fair"

SIR:

It is of special interest

World's Fair

that

some exhibits used home -type rather than industrial equipment to pro- vide high -quality sound.

I only know about asked the exhibits for which we were to supply speakers, but I am sure there were others.

For example, the Crystal Palace fashion show used

16

AR -2a speakers and Dyna power amplifiers; the stu- dios of station WTFM, broadcasting from the Fair, used

12 AR -3's; the

Minnesota Pavilion used

12

AR-4's and

2

AR -3's; and a jazz group on

'Bour- bon Street" used

8 AR

-2a's.

There were also three exhibits de- voted specifically to high fidelity: the silent

IHF

display, the H.H. Scott exhibit in the

Belgian Village, and the

AR

Music Room in

Center. the Better Living

The latter demonstrated

(and will again in

1965) the equipment of

(Continued on page

49)

AUDIO MAY,

1965

SOMEDAY, THERE

MAY

BE

OTHER FULLY

AUTOMATIC

TAPE RECORDERS

LIKE

THE

NEW CONCORD

994

(WHY

WAIT?)

The

994 gives you automatic programming. Plays or records automatically three different ways.

Stops by itself where you want it

to.

Threads itself automatically. And, the 994 is available now!

`

With the transistorized

994, Concord introduces a new dimension to tape recording.

Some might call ization, some might call

it

automation.

We

it

think modern- of

it

as

convenience

You

-in playing, in recording,

stopping, in threading, in hours of in

starting and uninterrupted

listening.

can't

compare

it

to

anything

because the

994 is as differ-

ent

from the conventional stereo recorder as the old crank-

type

Gramophone is from the modern record changer.

AUTOMATIC PROGRAMMING. gram the

994 to play or record one side of a

tape from

You

can pro- beginning to end and stop

automatically.

Or, to play /record first one side of the tape, reverse, side, then stop automatically.

Or, to

record forward and back, forward

back, continuously, as long as you like

-an

or all day. You may change direction of

play the other play/ and

hour, six hours,

tape any

time you

like by merely pressing the direction change buttons.

These

same lighted buttons automatically show you direc- tion of

tape

travel.

PUSH

-BUTTON KEYBOARD.

The operating controls are lit- erally

at

your fingertips. recorder you can operate waving, and with one threading,

that's

This hand!

even simpler is

As the one

without arm

far as

-the

994 threads itself automatically.

After all this, we

We

didn't just

stop in designing the

994.

kept

going. As a result, the

994 offers superb perform- ance and every conceivable feature required for your lis- tening and recording pleasure. Here's a brief sample:

three speeds with automatic equalization, four profes-

sional heads, two VU meters, digital

tape

counter, cue

control, sound

-on-

sound, exclusive Concord Trans

-A-

'1ì ack

recording,

15

-watt stereo amplifier, professional

record /monitoring system.

The

994 may also be used as

a portable

PA system,

with

or without simultaneous taping.

TWO -WAY STEREO SPEAKERS.

The split

lid of the

994 houses a

pair

of

true

two -way speaker systems, each containing a tweeter, woofer,

and

crossover net-

work.

A

pair of highly sensitive dynamic micro-

phones is included.

The

994 is priced under

$450.* An identical recorder,

Model

990 comes without speakers or microphones and is priced under

$400.

*

Both are wait? Drop

in

for a

at

your dealer's demonstration and find now. So

out

why for your- self what fully automatic tape recording by

Concord is all about!

Or, for complete information, write Dept. A

-5.

For Connoisseurs of Sound

CONC

O

CONCORD

003)

R

I

ELECTRONICS CORPORATION,

1935

Armacost Avenue,

Los Angeles,

California

90025

IN CANADA: Magnasonic Industries, Ltd., Toronto /Montreal

Other Concord models from

$50 to $800.

994

*Prices slightly higher in Canada,

THE SIGNATURE

OF

QUALITY

Tape Recorders

/Industrial

Sound Equipment

/Dictation

Systems

/Communications

Devices /Closed Circuit Television

Circle 106 on Reader Service Card

AUDIO 5

MAY. 1965

Announcing

The

New

LIGHT

LISTENING

Chester Santon

FAIRCHILD

h

F

-22

Condenser

Microphone

New advanced design with low -noise field effect transistor!

The FAIRCHILD

F

-22 Condenser Microphone uses a field effect transistor as the microphone pre- amplifier.

This field effect transistor has an ex- tremely high input impedance that complements the high impedance characteristics of the con- denser capsule for an outstanding improvement in signal -to -noise ratios.

No complicated

RF cir- cuitry is used in an effort to improve signal-to- noise ratios.

The absence of vacuum tubes elimi- nates the problem of noise, microphonics, and

'the expensive periodic replacement of the tube.

The FAIRCHILD

F

-22 provides the user most often needed with the pickup pattern

-cardiod

-with outstanding front to back cancellation character- istics thereby making it ideal for broadcast,

TV, sound re- enforcement and recording. Extremely low hum susceptibility allows easy use in a vari- ety of operating fields and the basic high sensi- tivity of the

F

-22 allows integration into a variety of circuits and a variety of studio and field operating conditions.

A new convenience

The

F

-22

...

the

F

-22 is self -powered. eliminates the bulky, heavy, cumbersome remote power supply associated with conventional condenser microphones. The

F

-22, as illustrated, is complete

-just plug into a studio audio line and you have the smoothest, cleanest sound pos- sible.

This self- contained power supply allows new ease of operation in studio work and in field assignments. The use of a field effect transistor with its low noise and low current drain require- ments allows the operation of the

F

-22 with long life mercury cells. The use of minimal parts and the use of missile

-grade components throughout assure the user of continuous quality.

By breaking away from traditional condenser microphone design and using the latest in solid state -field effect transistor technology and micro- circuitry,

FAIRCHILD is able to produce this qual- ity condenser microphone at an astonishingly low and sensible price, thereby putting the ultimate microphone quality within the reach of every sound engineer.

Write to

Fairchild priceS219

-

the pacemaker in professional audio products

-

for complete details.

FAIRCHILD

RECORDING EQUIPMENT CORPORATION

10 -40

45th

Ave., Long Island

City

1,

N.Y.

Maile

Serenaders: Evening in the

Islands

Warner

Bros.

WS 1584

It would seem magazine is that the influence of this making itself felt even in a place as far off as

Hawaii. Here is a stereo disc of exceptional technical competence re- corded in

Hawaii for Warner Brothers by a local firm called Hula Records. This Hono- lulu outfit can hardly be called a byword among record customers in the

U.S. market yet the work it turns out puts to shame the efforts of some of our fanciest labels. The sound here has all the crystalline crispness of the best Warner releases, automatically placing it near the very top of the list of

American labels still turning out a decent product. Hawaiian engineers were not the only free -lance artists involved in this proj- ect. The six native musicians who make up the

Maile Serenaders appear under that name only on records. They have been drawn from the major performing groups on the islands. Ukulele, bass and three types of guitar -each instrumentalist fea- tured here obviously deserves the top rating he enjoys in the island.

Dinah

Shore:

Lower Basin Street

Re- visited

Reprise

RS

6150

The Lower

Basin Street style of music making shows no sign of dying out while

Dinah Shore remains within reach of a microphone.

It doesn't seem possible that

25 years have gone by since

Dinah hit last- ing fame on the NBC radio series known as

"The Chamber Music Society of Lower

Basin Street."

What is there in the distinc- tive Shore voice and style-that time simply does not affect?

She sounds as fresh and re- laxed in as she this revisit to Lower Basin Street did when many of us listened to the original radio series on a weekly basis. The album points up a fact perhaps forgotten by devotees of the old tion to the old Dixie radio show. In addi- standards, the program offered a fresh and nonchalant treatment of current songs of the day in a singularly appealing style. The saine idea has been carried over to this find album. Interspersed with Basin Street

Blues, Chloe and Bye Bye

Blues, are relaxed arrangements of modern tidbits such as

More and Do -Re -Me from

"The Sound of

Music."

All returns should be as happy as this one.

Bravo Jankowski

Mercury

SR

60993

Mercury's affiliation with the Philips label, one of

Europe's largest, offers dual dividends in this release. Anyone seeking

Circle

107 on

Reader Service Card an album of unassuming background music delivered in the current continental style will find it here as pianist Horst Jankowski, age 28, leads a choir and orchestra in his own novelty arrangements. The other divi- dend is the opportunity to hear what Ger- man recording engineers are doing with their latest gear. It's easy to make a judg- ment of contemporary German sound in this stereo recording because Mercury did not tamper with the original recording curve when it turned out the disc for Amer- ican consumption. In playback

I was able to indulge in the rare luxury of flat tone control settings without being driven out of the room by screaming highs and fake bass. This is a thoroughly clean job at level settings considerably higher than one can endure on some

American

( and

European) discs of a pop nature. The odd mix of tunes

-Nola rubbing shoulders with Parlez

Moi and Toselli's Serenade

-may give the record some difficulty in finding a specific audience but any true audiophile should be pleased with what he hears.

I

Had a

Ball

(Original

Broadway

Cast)

Mercury OSC 6210

With good musicals as rare as they are these days, it doesn't take much persuasion to talk a large record company into backing a show in order to get release rights to the original cast album.

If a show score or cast lineup displays any merit before rehearsals, the major disc firms are quick to put in their bids and the production appears in due time on one of three labels

-RCA,

Columbia or

Capitol. For reasons that be- come plain when you hear this album, the three companies usually most interested in show casts passed up this Buddy Hackett musical comedy. Mercury Records, how- ever, was willing to wager that comedian

Hackett has a following large enough to justify release of his first major effort. In one sense,

Broadway the label is performing a public service in gambling where the others showed no interest. Not having seen the show,

I don't know how many numbers

Buddy Hackett has in the stage presenta- tion. On aware the record the listener is scarcely that Hackett is the star of the show.

He appears in no more than three songs. Of these, only Dr.

Freud offers any semblance of a vehicle for his visual comedy style.

There are ballads aplenty

(

Can

It

Be Possi- ble? and Almost) to keep romantic leads

Richard Kiley and Karen Morrow busy but the score just doesn't have enough to sell a

Hackett record with so little Hackett on it.

(Continued on page 14)

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

-1

'10

1965

-

This is

Bill Smith's

New Bozak Speaker.

It

Cost

$251*

1967-

This is

Bill Smith's

New Bozak Speaker.

It

Cost

$94.50*

1969

-

This is

Bill Smith's

New Bozak Speaker.

It

Cost

$82.00*

Though young and just getting start in the business world, Bill a has an ear for music.

He wants the very best loudspeaker he can afford now, without losing his investment later.

His wife,

Mary, wants which she can be proud. furniture of

Wisely, they choose the tasteful

Ital- ian

Provincial enclosure designed to house a full

Bozak

B

-305 speaker system.

In it they have mounted a single two -way Bozak coaxial

B

-207A speaker.

Things are going well.

Bill and Mary just moved into a new house.

Their living room is big enough to take advantage of a broadened sound source, with its increased realism.

While both secretly believe it to be difficult to improve the sound from their

Bozak, they add a second

B

-207A coaxial speaker.

It's easy panel and

- just remove a pre -cut insert the speaker. Total cost $94.50.

To their surprise, they find a new measure of presence, of musical de- light, in their

Bozak.

/AI

H® ion

ii0

0A

Bill just had another raise. Mary completely refurnishes their home, but finds that the quiet dignity of the Bozak cabinet still adds charm to her living room.

They take the final step toward their dream of convert listening perfection.

They their speakers to a three

-way system by adding a

Bozak

B

-209B mid -range speaker and a three

-way crossover network. Again, they simply remove a er. panel and insert the speak-

Total cost, $82.00.

Now they have achieved their goal.

They have the complete

Bozak

B

-305 speaker system which they couldn't afford when they were first married.

Meanwhile, they've enjoyed years of musical pleasure.

/AIMO i50Oil

\Mfr. liOOil

Yes.

CAN LOUDSPEAKERS

Thanks to Bozak's ing

uncompromising policy of build- all speaker components

to the same

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a

Bozak

without fear of

mismatch.

REALLY

GROW? today build

- even

though you can't afford

it

- and toward

it as

your

needs increase.

Meanwhile, your

musical

pleasure begins with

the

first

Bozak

component.

Why

not

gratify your

musical taste now.

- beginning

Our catalog

shows

you how. Your dealer will prove

it.

Thus,

you

can select the Bozak

of your dreams

*All prices shown are current prices and are subject to change at any time. Prices slightly higher in the South and Far West.

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

DARIEN

CONNECTICUT

Circle 109 on Reader Service Card

Export: Elpa Marketing Industries, Inc.

New Hyde Park New York

7

THIS

BOO!

IS

FOR

YOU

ABOUT

MUSIC

Harold

Lawrence

1

8

This book is for the hobbyist and technician who wants to know the plain and

simple

approach to

TROUBLESHOOTING HIGH FIDELITY

AMPLIFIERS.

Written by

Mannie Horowitz, his

fact -filled, illustrated chapters

spell out the most direct approach to curing both, vacuum tube and transistorized amplifier ills. Every- thing from instruments and test procedures, to servicing transis- torized stereo amplifiers, is cov- ered in a writing style that it easy to read and absorb. makes

This

BOOK is

FOR

PROFIT!

TROUBLESHOOTING

AMPLIFIERS was

HIGH

FIDELITY written specifically for the service technician and the audio hobbyist who specializes

or wants to specialize

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A wealth of information

-makes

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Use convenient coupon below, just enclose your remittance

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TROUBLESHOOTING

HIGH FIDELITY AMPLIFIERS, by

Mannie

Horowitz.

NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

7ONE-

STATE_: _

Around 1678 a London charcoal hawker converted the loft above his coal house into a music room. He tuned up his Ruckers virginal and small five

- stop organ, weekly and put on a series of public concerts.

Coffee was served at a penny a cup, and customers who were "willing to take a hearty

Sweat [had] the Pleasure of hearing many notable performers in the charm- ing Science of

Musick."

We have come a long way from those informal chamber music parties, which were among the earliest public concerts in history. Nowadays audiences file into concert halls ranging in size from small auditoriums like

Judson Hall, to Phil- harmonic Hall at Lincoln Center, to hear pianists, string quartets, violinists, harpsichordists, and other soloists and chamber groups, play music originally composed for the more intimate at- mosphere of an aristocratic salon or a charcoalmonger's loft.

A critic recently compared the experience of a attending guitar recital at Philharmonic Hall with that of peering down at a fly in a

Grand Canyon gorge.

Chamber music concerts like these erect a barrier between audience and performer.

Seen from the sunken or- chestra seats or the distant balconies of most concert halls, the musicians on stage often appear remote and inacces- sible, and the spectator cannot fail to

Fig.

1.

Gotham

Baroque Ensemble per- forms at a concert party in the Bowman

Suite of the Hotel Biltmore. (Photo by

L.

B.

Fink.) be affected by this separation. But place the music lover on the same level as the performer, and in the same room

(most concert halls consist of two dis- tinct

`rooms': stage and auditorium) and he is at once of drawn into the sphere the performance.

A bassoonist and pianist recently played a short program of works by Mozart, Hindemith and

Weber for some friends at a private studio. The audience was thrilled to hear the unlikely duo, but their excite-

4 ment stemmed less from the perform- ance than from the impact of hearing these instruments at close range and in an intimate setting.

To the average music lover, the words

"chamber music" suggest austerity, monotony, and the esoteric. Concerned with this image, a public acceptance of pair of part

-time impresarios set out to cultivate a wider what some have called "the music of friends." They noted with gratification the signs the rigid that patterns of concert -giving may be breaking up: at a

Greenwich Village coffee house

Britton's probably no larger than

London loft, a pianist per- formed Mozart and Bach to a bearded and blue -jeaned audience; programs of experimental music are staged in cold- water flats in Lower New

York; and, of course, there are the perennial series of

A chamber music at the Frick

Museum. year ago,

Edgar

S.

Feldman, an in-

- surance broker, and William

S.

Boal, an assistant manager at Time -Life en- terprises, rented the Bowman Suite of

New

York's

Biltmore Hotel to produce a subscription series of Friday evening concerts, or

"concert- parties."

In the mirrored ballroom, some 400 persons may sip drinks at tables arranged in

ì

horseshoe fashion around a small plat- form for the musicians. The living room lamps that provide light for the players' musical parts add to the intimate at- mosphere the impresarios are trying to achieve. "We acquired the lamps first to compensate for the room's inade- quate lighting," explained

Mr.

Feldman,

"then we found to our delight that they enhanced the `home' effect."

Each concert -party is conducted in three movements.

The first is the

Re- ception starting at

8:00 P.M., during

(

Continued on page 48)

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

Introducing

3

new additions

to

the widely acclaimed

Stratophonic

Series the totally new

sound

is why

...

h arm an kardon

Stratophonic is largest

-selling the all- transistor stereo receiver today

Clean, pure, spacious sound in stereo

... a sound never before achieved

...

is

the reason

for

the great popularity

of

the three

Stratophonic FM stereo receivers introduced last

Fall. Freed at last from the heat and distortion

of

tubes and output transformers, the majestic Stratophonics

offer

Sound Unbound in your

choice of

IHFM

music powers from

36

to

75

watts, at prices

from

$279*

to

$469

*.

And

now,

with the addition

of

the three

new

components shown at right, the Stratophonic

line in-

cludes

six

100%

sollid

-state instruments for every listening

wish.

Harman

-Kardon,

Inc., Philadelphia, of

The Jerrold

Corporation.

Pa.

19132. A

subsidiary

LEADER IN SOLID -STATE STEREO COMPONENTS

Circle

111 on

Reader

Service Card

Model

SR -400 36-

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AM in

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-fi system in addition to

FM stereo.

Solid

-state and trim, the new SR -400 gives you a D'Arsonval tuning meter, auto- matic stereo indicator light, front -panel controls for hi and lo cut, contour, off

/on/

volume, speaker balance, treble and bass, program selection; tape- recorder output; two convenience outlets.

$309

*.

Model

SA

-2000 All-

Transistor Integrated

Stereo Amplifier. 36 power (18

(

±1 watts per channel). Response flat

-db at

1 watt, watts IHFM music normal listening level) from

8 to

25,000 cps. pling

Direct speaker cou- without output transformers results in speaker damping factor of 25:1.

Complete controls and stereo headphone jack.

$159*

(exclusive of excise tax).

Mode1ST

-2000

AB-

Transistor

AM

/FM Stereo

Tuner.

No tubes (not even nuvistor tubes) to cause heat, drift, or distortion. This fine tuner handles strong input signals without overload or crosstalk. Multiplex

25 db. Usable FM

AM sensitivity

2.9 av IHFM. sensitivity

50 tav

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$199

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*Prices slightly higher in the West. closures optional.

Walnut en-

AUDIO FTC.

Edward Tatnall Canby

FOUR

TRACKS UNDERGROUND

There are worlds within worlds, these days, even in audio. Merchandizers spend thousands, just like everybody else, trying to pin them down via mar- keting research

-to

get their itching fingers on a few more pulses and maybe sell a few more products.

And yet the unrehearsed, un -re- searched bits of info that we stumble onto, now and then, can sometimes show up more of those little worlds than we might have thought even ex- isted. Take a letter between two friends that was passed on to me recently by a third friend. It's about tape, home tape, tape from the point of view of some

- thing called the

Tape Underground.

The Underground, of course, is that vast unofficial exchange of taped sound that is now world -wide and which no tape manufacturer can admit to know- ing about, since it involves matter of copyrights, et al.

But this isn't the point I have in mind at the moment

-let's

take all that for the little granted.

What interests me is the side -comment in this letter, concerning and the present state tape of 4- machines track.

I don't know either correspondent, the one who writes, apparently from some such place as

Hawaii, and the one who gets the letter, who might be living anywhere in the world where Americans are found. But their mutual story un- folds immediately. They are both home tape amateurs, both music lovers, and both members of the world

-wide Tape

Underground.

"Dear

Bill, (Name falsified here, de- liberately.) The tape arrived Saturday morning. Many thanks. I was able to reproduce it very well and enjoyed the

Flagstad songs (Wesendonck). I've been wanting them for some time and it was a pleasure to the

St. sari, get them. For some reason

Matthew

Passion which, you is on LP repressed from 78 rpm

- does not have the same quality but it certainly is a pleasure to have the voice of the immortal

Ferrier in such a work.

The Robert Frost poems I am not fa- miliar with, but they were much appre-

ciated-

particularly by Dorothy."

That sets the scene, doesn't it? These two boys are hep on classical music and many other things to be found in such lovely for quantity on

LP records, all ripe their larcenous recorders.

No com- punctions about most of us in that

-not

one bit!

As the field are well aware, this little side

-show is actually one of the biggest hobbies in the whole tape area and it accounts for a whale of a lot of our business

-that

is, the sale of tape recording equipment and of raw tape itself.

(

Though a vast` amount of erased tape recirculates in these Under- ground circles, to the frustration of tape sellers.)

After a side

-paragraph having to do with a tidal wave scare (thereby locating the source of the letter as

Ha- waii)

, our friend gets down to the real point of his letter, which is the interest- ing part for us. Seems the writer is an old hand in tape exchange, while the receiver of the letter must be fairly new at the game. He wants information, this

Bill character. And so our writer, who shall be called John, proceeds to give it.

"NOW, in choosing a recorder, type of tape

-

IT ALL DEPENDS

ON

WHAT YOU WANT TO DO

IT.

WITH

If you want to have a fine one and go clown town sionally made and buy

4

-track profes- tapes

-or

make your own recordings and play 'em back ON

YOUR

OWN MACHINE, then a

4- track machine is fine.

ON

HAND, if you are in

THE OTHER the Tape Exchange

Underground,

4

-track is

DYNAMITE."

O -oh. I some of can see the hackles rising on our professional readers.

Sorry, can't help it.

That's what the guy says.

(It

was about here that

I myself began thinking, hey, maybe somebody ought to print this letter.)

"I would never use a 4

-track machine

-under

present conditions (February

1965), with my English correspondent, the guy who sends me those marvelous

Handel operas, etc., screaming his head off, and all the Old Pros swearing they'll never use 'em. They're justified, too, because

4

-track on one fellow's ma- chine might be 1000th of an inch off on some other fellow's and you have plenty of crosstalk.

AS A

MATTER all

4

-track

OF

ACTUAL FACT, there

IS crosstalk on tapes but it's below the nor- mal "annoyance point" when played back on machines with IDENTICAL

ALIGNMENT, FACING and HEAD

POSITIONING."

Well, there's the Underground view- point, as of this very year. It harks back only too familiarly to many an argu- ment that raged among us in the pro- fessional field back when

4

-track tape first appeared.

Obviously, alignment in all its phases is much more crucial in

4

-track taping than in the earlier for- mats, two -track and full

-track. The guy is right in general terms.

But is this really an up

-to

-date obser- vation, or does it reflect lag that is the usual time

- inevitable among consumers?

First, equipment -in -use always ranges back in time and brand new equip- ment is always in the minority.

Sec- ond, ideas, there is the persistence of older perhaps already out -dated.

We need merely think back to every new development in this and similar areas where one is the standards of precision have been upped. Always, the older system allows more leeway, the newer more subject to troubles of mis- alignment, etc. etc. I'm thinking not only of tape but, of course, of the LP record itself

-which

suffered the same sort of criticism in its early years as compared to the then more "reliable"

78 system.

Can't we all (us middle -aged people) remember it? The

33

-rpm speed was al- most impossible to stabilize short of big, expensive, bulky pro equipment. The microgroove was two delicate, the play- ing cartridges too gross selves too delicate

-or

else them-

-for

home use. The needle skipped, the pitch wavered and

I don't know what else.

But with the passing of years, we im- proved the LP system, with all its pre- cision.

We improved the

8

-mm home movies system similarly. We improved

35 -mm still pictures, until the blow -ups were plenty good enough for anybody, amateur or pro.

Progress does progress, given time.

Is it to be so much different with tape?

Is there any reason why

4

-track tape shouldn't in the end be just as reliable as 2

-track tape and, before it, full- track?

I would assume, as

I'm sure most pros in the field also assume, that

4

-track for the home is today well on the way to reliability and to changeability so that illusive inter- important to the Tape

Underground. There's still room for a a lot of healthy progress. Look at the newly exact parameters already on home market in such devices as the the

Revere cartridge tape recorder with its tiny thin tape and

1J ips speed.

Also the demonstrated accomplishments of numerous 1965 recorders at similar slow speeds, as shown at the Hi this year. We'll see

Fi

Shows plenty more pre- cision. as

However

-let's

keep an eye on things they are NOW, out in the

field-

10

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

After two months of what Popular Science described as the most extensive listening tests ever made by any magazine," a panel of experts chose components for stereo systems in several price categories.

The components in the highest rated system were to be the best available no matter what the price.*

"Where there was a more expensive component that produced a detectable improvement in sound," stated Popular Science authors

Gilmore and

Lockett, it was chosen."

AR -3 speakers and the

AR turntable were the choices for Popular Science's top system.

The Popular Science panel was not alone in

Hi

-Fi

Tape Systems its fiindings. Two other magazines

-Bravo! and

-

selected components for the best possible stereo system;

AR -3 speakers and

THE AR

-3's

WERE

CHOSEN AS

BEST.

REPRINTED COURTESY

OF POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY

.1063

BY POPULAR SCIENCE

PUBLISHING

COMPANY, INC. ti

Two of Popular Science's live-member panel check speakers.

AUDIO

the

AR turntable were the choices in each case. Gentlemen's Quarterly chose the

AR turntable for its top

($3,824) system, but relegated

AR

-3's to its "medium- cost" ($1,273) system. (The complete lists of selected components, as they appeared in these four magazines, are avaolable on request.)

The

AR turntable by regardless of price. itself has been reviewed by leading authorities as the best in the entire field

Yet you can spend many times the price of these

AR components.

AR -3 speakers are $203 to $225 each, depending on finish (other models from

$51), and the two

-speed

AR turntable is

$78 including arm, base, and dust cover.

"Speakers limited to

"compacts" for reasons of practicality iin the home.

ACOUSTIC RESEARCH, INC.,

24 Thorndike Street,

Cambridge, Massachusetts 02141

Circle

112 on Reader Service Ca-d

MAY,

1965

11

with all that accumulated back- infor- mation going around, and all those older

4

-track machines still at work. Our friend John goes on esting idea further.

An inter

-

-he

thinks that only younger people go for

4

-track tape. His feeling is they don't know any better.

Lack of experience. I'm not so sure. Couldn't it be that these younger kids keep up with the times a bit more enthusiastically, and so veer more quickly towards the newer systems as development? they improve with

"Now, for the purposes of economy that you mentioned

-four

different sets of material on one tape,

-there

are a bunch of younger fellows in the Under- ground who are using

4

-track machines for this purpose -economy and space

-

BUT

-note

this

-THEY

ARE ALL

'WAY think

UNDER 30 years of age and I that experience in EXCHANGE will ultimately force them back to 2- track. However they do good work, they REVERE the quality of and tape that

I send to them."

Well, anyhow, now we know that

John is over

30.

He's one of those Ex- perienced guys all right. He goes on about the problems of playback:

"Of course

-they

can play my tapes on their

4

-track machines BUT WHEN

THEY SEND TAPE TO ME, they have to use tracks

VIRGIN TAPE and record on

l

and

4, leaving the two center tracks blank. Now don't think that is

ALL of the picture. Tape so recorded

-and

your Flagstad to me is so record- ed

-sound

weak and fuzzy because I'm getting only half of what I normally would get. Have, therefore, to play them on a special transport where I can

"position" of that

34 the head to get the full effect

track..."

Well now just a minute, John, hold on. if

You're going overboard a bit. Natch, you're going to play

4

-track on a 2- track machine you'll have to fix things up somehow; but why blame the sys- tem? To be sure, there's an incompat- ibility.

It was, alas, necessary and in- evitable if we were to have a new arrangement which would take advan- tage of tape progress to allow more sound on less tape

-for

useful commer- cial ends and a widening of home tape potential.

If you're going to play

4

-track tapes, then for goodness sake play them on 4- track heads. There is no other way.

Well, now we know that this letter's recipient,

Bill, uses 4- track. The cat is out of as the bag! Bill is a 4- tracker, where- older, wiser John, writing this letter, is an old- fashioned 2- tracker.

"(I

can) generally get pretty good effects from

34

-track tracks tape recorded on

I

and

4.

BUT DON'T KID

YOURSELF

-two

track is

BETTER

-

and FULL TRACK is much better still.

...

If it's economy (you want) you can, like these young guys, put four different sets of material on one tape, but don't ever kid yourself that you won't get crosstalk (if you listen carefully in the quiet spots) and DON'T EVER KID

YOURSELF THAT YOUR CORRES-

PONDENTS WON'T GET PLENTY

OF CROSSTALK unless their machines are identical to the 1000th part of an inch."

OK,

John, I get the message. I'm not even trying to kid myself. As a matter of fact, tape being reasonably cheap if you shop carefully,

I do all my own tape exchanging at

732 ips full -track and

I write in

"PLAY big letters on each reel

ON

ANY

-

MACHINE,

4-

TRACK,

2

-TRACK OR

FULL -TRACK,

AT

732 ips."

So you see

I'm an old con- servative, even more so than

John. And yet

I do not accept his reasoning as final, nor will you. Things are improv- ing. They'll go on improving.

But what really makes me marvel, in all this fine discussion, is one huge, enormous, positively staggering omis- sion.

STEREO!

For Heaven's sake

-hasn't

the Under-

4'375

DYNAMOM

THE

GAU

TO CHECK

TENSION

AN

.5

AVAILABLE

. . grams to 2000

(10 models)

3/32

ounces to 70

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COMPACT STEREO

SPEAKER SYSTEM

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small size with presence

Dimensions

Nominal power rating

Peak power (music and speech)

Frequency range

Impedance switch for variable adjustment

9-

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AUDIO,

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Isophon,

Box

Circle 114 on

Reader Service Card

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

12

301

SCHERR

ARMSTRONG AVENUE

CHICAGO 44, ILL.

-

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Circle

113 on Reader Service Card

Mr.

Saul

Marantz discusses his revolutionary new model

10

-B

FM

Stereo

Tuner

Q.

Mr. quite

Marantz, your new

10 -B tuner is revolutionary.

Do you feel it will obsolete all other tuners?

Mr.

Marantz: In one sense, yes. The per- formance of this tuner is so dramatically

superior

to

conventional tuners that

anyone who does not wants the model

10 -B. or needs perfect reception today has no choice

Its superiority,

necessarily

but to

FM use however, obsolete conven- tional tuners.

Rolls Royce, of course, makes superior cars, but they haven't obsoleted Chevrolets.

Q.

Is this superior performance ible to the average listener? discern-

Mr.

Marantz: ence is quite conventional able to pick up and reproduce which could match disc

Very much dramatic.

tuners

so.

As back system quality is generally excellent.

The differ- you know, have never the quality been broadcasts of a the broadcast fine tape playback system. This has often been blamed on broadcasting qual- ity. But the new

10

-B disproves ory. or

It

reproduces disc or a tape with the same clarity and separation as if played through a play-

-

proving

that

this the- of a

broadcast

Q.

Is this nals also? true with weak broadcast sig-

Mr.

10

-B

Marantz: will reach

ventional

Yes.

55 microvolts! This is

tuners

db

In

quieting better than most con- will

fact

the

reach

at

at

model only

3

1000 microvolts. With a 25 microvolts station the

Model

10

-B reaches a phenomenal

70 db quieting which is about

20 db better

than

most

conventional tuners

can achieve means

at that

any signal with the

strength.

Model

10

-B will be excellent reception even in

This there fringe areas, particularly so because of the tun- er's high sensitivity, its extremely sharp selectivity and reduced susceptibility to multipath effects, which on other tuners cause distortion.

Q.

How plished? are such improvements accom-

Mr. Marantz: tion is

The answer to

that

ques- very complex, because the

10 -B is

far

more

than

an improved tuning sys- tem; cept

it

is a completely new design con-

with many technical innovations

developed by Marantz engineers.

Q. Can you give us some examples?

Mr. Marantz: example,

Yes. contains

The RF section,

for a

balanced -bridge di- ode mixer sensitive

-a the first technique used in modern

radar

designs to eliminate major source of noise, harmonic distor- tion and other spurious commercial application

The passband,

interference.

The whole

RF circuit is balanced- tuned, using a precision tuning capacitor with four double sections, for tion of spurious images.

For the critical oped of the "Butterworth," or phase- linear fil- ter.

This new concept provides a number of is

IF further

strip, we've distinct characteristics essential good tion and results. phase

-

-linear for extremely low distor- especially

at

for reduc- devel-

for

example, high frequencies a

- it

remains essentially phase -linear

at

all signal levels.

Cutoff slopes beyond the passband are extremely steep, allowing unprecedented selectivity; effects of quire it is much less subject to the multipath, and

it

doesn't re- realignment with tube changes or aging.

The old standby coupled

IF

cir- cuits currently in use do not have any of these characteristics.

Q.

Are there any innovations designed specifically for multiplex?

Mr.

Marantz:

Yes.

For multiplex recep- tion we've developed our own unique variation of stereo demodulator, which permits phase correction to maintain

a

very advanced order of stereo separa- tion throughout the whole audio band.

Q.

What is the purpose of the tuning and multipath indicator?

Mr. so

Marantz: is

This versatile its present, making antenna for best reception. modulating.

Also,

it

oscilloscope device single trace easily understood stories. a of station tuned exactly the passband.

The users can check stereo

It

to height easy to is tells many shows the center of tern shows the signal strength.

The in- dicator shows how much multipath is adjust the

It

when the pat- shows if the station is creating distortion by over

- technically informed

separation

of transmissions, discs and other sources.

Q.

And how soon will available in the model

10 -B be quantities?

Mr.

Marantz:

The

Model

10

-B is a labo-

ratory instrument

of extremely high quality which will never be mass pro- duced in the usual sense. However, pro- duction has been stepped up fourfold and all back- orders are now being filled by

Marantz franchised dealers.

IF Passband phase linearity retains and sharp slopes at any signal strength for low distor- tion, sharp selectivity.

Conventional mutually

- coupled

IF circuits change characteristics drastically depending on signal strength. i

1

1

QQ

-

-

F

MARANTZ MULTIPATH

/TUNING

INDICATOR

Station tuning is simply Multipath

(Ghosts) shows and by accurately adjusted centering the trace. up as tuning is

'wiggles' smooth. on the trace. Antenna is simply rotated until trace

MARANTZ, INC., SUBSIDIARY OF

SUPERSCOPE

5

INC., SUN VALLEY, CALIF.

Circle 115 on

Reader Service

Card

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

13

silicon power

FM

MULTIPLEX STEREO

RECEIVER

LUXURY MODEL

transistor

ground discovered stereo yet?

Evidently not. Too soon.

Don't these guys remem- ber that the entire reason for the 4 -track system in the first place was to make tape possible? a workable stereo home

Two tracks in each direction, with stereo and reasonable economy too?

Don't they ever stop to think that nowadays there are literally dozens of thousands of stereo LP records (whoops

-shouldn't

be saying is found every sort of sound and music imaginable? And may I say to them, sort of sidewise (for of course possibly condone

this...)

on which

I

can't

larceny...)

, that in my most seasoned and professional opinion, as a long -time listener and a trained musician, at least 90 percent of these records gain in tive power via

I'm astonished their communica- the stereo transduction. that there isn't as yet

stereo-if

there a

Tape Underground in isn't. Anyhow, our writer John and his correspondent Bill obviously aren't in- volved. Maybe the answer is that all the guys who do STEREO 4

-track cor- responding are under

20 years of age.

More power to them,

I

say. Off the record, of course.

KENWOOD stereo introduces the ultimate the never

- before

-possible luxury in solid powered by SILICON

TRANSISTORS state to provide pleasure of an unsurpassed wide frequency range

...

a dynamic, clear, authentic sound reproduction with utopian quality.

TK -80

SPECIFICATIONS

AMPLIFIER

SECTION

Total Music Power:

RMS

Power: (0.9

%' harmonic distortion at

1Kc per channel)

Frequency Response:

80 watts (IHF Standard)

32 watts /32 watts

I

um and Noise:

Bass Control:

Treble Control:

Input Sensitivity:

Loudness Control:

20

-

15

-

60,000 cps

120,000 cps

±1 db

±3 db

Phono output

-60 db, AUX

±10 db (50 cps)

±10 db (10,000 cps)

MAG 1.5 mV,

Tape HD 1.5mV, AUX

100mV

+10 db

50 cps,

+5

(at Volume Control

-

72 db below rated db 10,000 cps

-30 db)

-

FM

TUNER SECTION

Usable

Signal

Sensitivity: to Noise Ratio:

Image Rejection:

SCA

Rejection:

Capture Ratio:

Stereo Separation:

Frequency

Drift:

Special

Circuit:

1.8 microvolts (IHF Standard)

60 db (at 100% modulation lmV input)

55 db

50 db

2 db

38 db at

1Kc

0.02% without

AFC

Automatic switching FM

Stereo Tuner,

Automatic

Mono Stereo

Indicator, Output

Selector

Switch, Silicon Power

Transistor

Main

Amplifier,

Tape

Monitor,

Muting Circuit.

50

-

60 cps,

110

-

120

Width

173/4 volts

",

Height 513/í6",

Depth 14"

30 lbs.

special

KENWOOD features

TWO STEREO SPEAKER SETS AND

EAR

PHONE

SWITCHING:

TK

-80 provides speaker output terminals and power for two (2) sets of stereo speakers plus stereo headset jack.

Front -panel switching permits easy selection of either speaker set, both sets, or ear phones.

POWER

TRANSISTOR PROTECTION

CIRCUIT (U.S. Patent pending)

AUTOMATIC MONO /STEREO

INDI-

CATOR WITH ILLUMINATED PIN-

POINT TUNING: Prnrvssional, minated pinpoint illu- tuning meter shows maximum reception of FM broadcasts red and while blue lights automati- cally indicate mode.

ILLUMINATED PROGRAM! SOURCE

INDICATOR: Lights indicate in- stantly whether program selector is at FM, Phono, Tape HD or AUX.

Power

Consumption:

Dimensions:

Net Weight:

SMOOTH

PRECISION TUNING:

KENWOOD's signed larger flywheel is de- for smoother, exact tuning of FM broadcasts.

INTER -STATION

MUTING CIRCUIT suppresses inter station noise.

- the sound approach to

quality

EpKENWOOO

ELECTRONICS,

INC.

Los

New

Angeles

York

Office: 3700

South Broadway Place,

Los

Angeles, Calif. 90007,

Office: 212

Fifth Avenue, New

York, N.Y. 10010, Murray

Hill

3

ADams

-1115

2.7217

LIGHT LISTENING

(from page

6)

Fred

Waring

Concert

Pennsylvanians:

In

Reprise

RS

6148

This album took me back about thirty years or so to a was day when show business not dominated by television.

In his coast -to -coast tours, Fred Waring is still leading his

Pennsylvanians in a theatre show similar to those give in many of us saw him the Thirties.

Now, for the first time in his disc career, Waring had recording engineers on hand when he played a typical concert engagement. The locale happened to be Lake Charles, Louisiana but it could have been any one of 150 cities he appears in during the course of an annual tour. Ob- servers who have argued that television has created a more sophisticated audience throughout the country will have a job ex- planing the enthusiastic reception Lake

Charles gives even to the cornier routines in the concert. Waring's soloist, chorus and orchestra appear in a fast -paced omelet of entertainment that covers pop- folk, jazz -of- sorts, movie tunes, a smattering of the classics and a familiar hymn for the finale.

The program may be theatrical in the ex- treme but the milking by Reprise is too close -in to convey a

Waring stage prespec- tive in the sound. The chorus sounds con- siderably smaller than it should while sing- ing into its own mike. Each component of the large and diversified Waring ensemble is pinpointed at the expense of the aural sense of the whole.

Æ

Circle 116 on Reader Service

Card

MAY,

1965

14

AUDIO

r

HARVEY RADIO

CO.,

INC.

103

West 43rd Street

/New

York,

N.Y.

10036/(212) JUdson

2

-1500

Federal Electronics, Inc. (Subsidiary)

/

Vestal Parkway, Vestal,

N.Y.

I

(607)

Plonee,

8

-8211

"Anything, anywhere, anytime, always"

is

Harvey's other name. From the most sophisti- cated tape decks to the smallest replacement parts for professional broadcast and studio re- cording equipment. All from the greatest names in the business.

No need to hunt when you can call

Harvey

-collect

Your

-

from anywhere in the

U.S.

first

order will demonstrate the depend- ability of

America's oldest distributor of profes- sional equipment. Phone or write today.

Always on hand: A.D.C. ALTEC

AMPEX A.P.I.

CANNON

CBS LABORATORIES DAVEN ELECTRO-

VOICE LANGEVIN

MCINTOSH NEUMANN

PULTEC

R.C.A. SENNHEISER UNIVERSAL AUDIO

Circle

118 an Reader Service Card

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

15

EDITOR'S

REVIEW

AUDIO

PIONEER

PASSES

AWAY

AN IMPORTANT

ERA in

the history

of audio engi-

neering

is

ended;

C.

J.

LeBel,

pioneer, Secretary

of

the

Audio

Engineering

Society,

and

inde-

fatigable worker

for

the audio engineering

profession

died

on April

13.

He

was

admired

by all who knew him,

and respected

for his incisive

and

fearless voice.

He

will

be

missed.

Born Dec.

16,

1905 in New

York

City, C. J.

LeBel

attended the

Mass.

Inst. of

Tech.,

and received

a B.S. in

1.926 was a

and an

M.S. in

E.E. in

1927.

From

1927

-29

he research physicist with Raytheon,

Inc.

working

on lamps

and

rectifiers.

In

1929 -1932

he

was a

research engineer with

Sylvania

Electric Products and worked

on lamps, ozone tubes.

From

1932 -37

he worked

as a

consultant

on

sound recording problems. From

1937-

1942 he was

Chief Engineer, and

from

1940 -1965,

Vice

President,

of Audio Devices, Inc.

where he worked

on

lacquer recording blank

discs

and magnetic recording

tape. From 1942 -45

he

was Chief

Engineer

of

The

Maico

Company working

on

hearing

aids,

hearing test equipment,

electronic stethoscope

and

a surgeon's

metal

locator.

In

1945 -46

he

was a

Project

Engineer

at

Cambridge Instrument

Co.,

working

on

hearing

aids

and electronic

stethoscopes.

In the

years

1946 -47 he

worked

as

electronic consultant, Damage

Control Project, at

Steven's

Institute

in a

study

of ships' motion. Finally, from 1947 -1965

Engineer

of

Audio

Instrument

Co.,

Inc.

he

was Chief

He

was listed in "American Men of

Science," "Who's

Who in

Mr.

the East,"

"Who Knows

LeBel was a Fellow of

-and

What." the

Audio

Engineering

Society; a ca;

Member

of

the

Acoustical Society of

Ameri- an Active

member

of

Society of

Motion

Pictures

&

Television

Engineers; and

a

Fellow of

the

Radio

Club

of

America.

Books

he had authored

are

"Fundamentals

of Mag- netic Recording" cordings"

and

"How to Make Good

Tape

Re-

both published

by Audio Devices, Inc.

and both best

sellers.

At

Raytheon

his first

patent turned out to be

one of

fundamental patents

on

the fluorescent lamp (the

much litigated "LeBel

Patent

")

.

At Audio Devices LeBel was

active

in

the

first

automatic machine production

of

lacquer recording

16 discs in America, discs.

and

in

American

application

of these

Audio Devices rose from "nothing" to

the largest

American

maker

of

lacquer

discs in one

year and

still is

the

largest. He

supervised development

of

the

first

Audiotape magnetic recording tape. He

also

helped write many sound recording standards.

At

the

Maico

Company LeBel applied psychoacous

-- tics to

hearing aid

design.

It

was

here, at

Maico,

that he helped write the

first

standard

on

methods

of

measuring performance

of

hearing

aids

and developed the

Maico

Stethetron, the

first

really

successful elec-

tronic stethoscope.

At

the

Audio

Instrument

Co.,

Inc. LeBel

developed an intermodulation meter with

extremely low

internal

leakage,

capable

of

reading

very low values of IM.

Subsequently he developed logarithmic

amplifiers

(

loggers) which are used

to

convert linear recorders to

a

db

scale.

These utilize

a

highly developed and patented instant acting varsitor

convertor. He also

developed

a

magnetic tape

time delay

recorder

using sliding

heads

to

adjust

delay time.

AUDIO MAY,

1965 o-

Nine

out of

ten

musical people

prefer

the

sound of

Pickering,

Nearly all musical people prefer natural sound..

And natural sound begins with

Pickering. Right where the stylus meets the groove.

Any of the new Pickering

V -15 stereo cartridges will repro- duce the groove, the whole groove and nothing but the groove.

That's why a

Pickering can't help sounding natural and the rest of the reproducing equipment are quality. if the record of equally high

To assure four different

Pickering

V -15 pickups, each designed for a specific compatability with your stereo equipment, there are application.

The V- 15AC

-1 is for conventional record changers, where high output and heavier tracking forces are required. the

V- 15AT

-1 is for lighter tracking in the newer automatic turntables.

The even more compliant

V- 15AM

-1 is ideal for professional -type manual turntables. And the

V15AME

-1' with elliptical stylus is the choice of the technical sophisticate

No who demands the last word in tracking ability. other pickup design is quite like the Pickering

V

-15.

The cartridge weighs next to nothing (5 grams) in order to take full advantage of low

-mass tone arm systems. Pickering's ex- clusive Floating

Stylus and patented replaceable

V -Guard stylus assembly protect both the record and the diamond.

But the real payoff car hear the difference. is in the sound. At least for those who

Picken

For

Plainview,

L. i., N.Y.

those

who can

hear the g difference.

WIN

a $1000 stereo system

See your hi

-fi or any of

125 other prizes!

To become dealer for entry blanks and full details. eligible, simply identify the musical people pictured above.

Crde

119 on Reader Service Care

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

17

"Compare thase

S

-9000

100 watts at

' specs."

Power output

Power band for both channels

12- 25,000 cps. is at

150

1% watts at

'

I.M. distortion. Continuous sine -wave power output (two channels) Is distortion.

Hum and noise: Phono -70c b,

Tuner -80db. Sensitivity: Phono 1.8mv,

Tuner 0.25-. Other Sherwood all -Silicon Solid -State amplifiers are the S-

9900, 90

-watts music power

("

$229.50 an= the S -9500, 50 watts music cower

0"

$179.50.

7''J'iY'14'a:`1YW;MYU1.1'. Y4i'f4'4:CYltk:

C

--_--

;:

A

;

:

'0',+

,yE

_

. - t a

,(

SHERWOOD

S

-9000

150

-WATT AMPLIFIER CIRCUITRY

Y

A

.211

.

_.

.

tr

iris.

Sherwooc

-9000

Solid -State

150

-watt emplifier j29',

How dare

we

sag

Sherwood is the best

The dictionary defines

"dare" as

"to challenge one to pass a test." The Sherwood

S

-9000

AIL-

SILICON Solid -State 150

-watt com- bination zeam3- amplifier consistently passes tests against any competitors' products. These tests can involve either the accuracy of its

150

-watt power rating, the design of its Baxendall type controls, the reliability and coolness of its

Al.-Silicon circuitry,

(rated at l75; than

' /a %). the flatness of frequency response (

±Mdb), the elimination of hum and noise its lack of distortion

(-

80db), or the sensitivity of its phono p-eamp ifier

(1.8mv),

How dare we say

Sherwood is the best? We can because comparative specifications, together with the experts' opinions and listening tests confirm again- and -again that Sherwood is the best!

Dept.

5A

Sherwoot flsctronic Laboratories, Inc., 4300

North California Ave., Chicago,

Illinois

60618

Circle 117 on Reader

Se

-vice

Card

18

AUDIO MAY,

1965

Portable

Console for

Broadcast or

Discothèque

JOHN WHITACRE*

dedicated engineer is constantly

A

searching for ways to improve his equipment. He strives to make it more compact, lightweight, and at- tractive while retaining all the desirable features displayed in earlier models.

WILS engineers are no exception.

They were intrigued with transistor circuits when the first CK -722's ap- peared on the market. Their experi- ments have uncovered many ways broadcast equipment can be improved using transistors instead of vacuum tubes.

The all

-transistor console you see in

Fig.

1 is one indication how successful their experiments have been turning out.

The sponsor's reaction when the console is room is placed in his store or show- one of surprise at how attractive a broadcasting unit can be built. At the same time, our engineers testify how easy the console can be moved from place

-to- place, set up, and taken down after a broadcast. Maintenance records over the past two years indicate a good history of reliability and low mainte- nance costs.

What about fidelity? Using the same equipment we employ in making

"proof-of-performance" measurements on our broadcasting system, we re- corded the following measurements:

An over -all audio frequency response of

°Chief Engineer, Station WILS, Lan- sing, Mich.

RADIO

VV

+

LS

50 cps to 15,000 cps various tones into

±2db

feeding the either the microphone channels or employing a CBS test rec- ord on each turntable channel. Harmon- ic distortion was no greater than

1.8 per cent from 50 cps to 15,000 cps, the low

Hum and other extraneous noise meas- ured being 0.7

-52

db per cent at 1000 cps. below a zero db output level. All measurements were taken with channel controls and the master gain control set in to

3 o'clock on their normal operating range, this range being from

10 o'clock the master gain control and

9 o'clock to

5 o'clock on the chan- nel control.

The microphone preamplifiers and the first stage of the program amplifier determined how much audio overload- ing could occur before distortion be- came objectionable.

Components in these amplifiers have been selected to give us

12 db of overload protection.

So far we have considered beauty, mobility, and fidelity. What have we done to make it convenient for the operator?

(

See the operator's eye view at the beginning of the article.) considerable amount of time was

A spent observing our operators in action. We talked with them and asked for their ideas. Their observations and sugges- tions were tempered with our past ex- perience in designing audio consoles.

The design formula became:

"Fit the electronic and mechanical into apparatus the space remaining after the com- forts and conveniences of are satisfied." the operator

1320

Í

Fig.

1.

Portable broadcast console and discothèque.

The

Cabinet

Having read this far, may

I assume you would like to build this console?

Let's start by building the cabinet. Ob- serving all the photos will be helpful.

Those parts visible to an audience are cut from

%

-in. walnut plywood. The bottom is cut from

%

-in. fir plywood

All cabinet joints are mitred, blocked, and glued. Sometimes it was found helpful to nail the blocks into place after they were "buttered" with glue and put in position. Two pieces of solid walnut were glued in place on the cabinet near each end of the operator's panel.

Solid of walnut was used instead wood tape because it was reasoned these areas could be easily damaged.

Don't forget to cut out the leg braces and round the ends of these pieces of plywood to follow the contour of the folding legs. Gerber folding legs are fastened to the underside of the cabinet with wood screws. Cut one set of fold- ing legs

%

-in. set. shorter than the other

Place

%

-in. blocks of wood between this set of legs and the cabinet bottom.

Failing to do this, one set of legs will not fold over the other to a fully closed position. Use wood screws to fasten the plywood leg braces in place.

I recommend some type of leg- leveling device be installed in the ends of the

Gerber legs so the cabinet can be lev- eled if less encountered. than ideal conditions are

Three coats of

Vitrolene are applied to the cabinet to give it a durable, handsome varnish

-like finish. Use a fine grade of steel wool to smooth the sur- face of before applying successive coats

Vitrolene. After the surface is com- pletely dry, apply a good grade of furniture polish.

Because of its superior wearing quali- ties, anodized aluminum was selected for the operator's panel and the end panel.

A piano hinge is now riveted to the bottom edge of the operator's panel. Secure this hinge to the leading edge of the cabinet with wood screws.

Both panels are now ready for you to install parts on them. When every-

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

19

I

"009

311HtA

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I l9

13^

C,r'f..Y1 aca

311H^

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N/VN.

Lla

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68

9921

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CC

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8821 c8a

1L)

6£a s6a a) o u a)

>

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C u

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C o u a)

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N

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S u

(/)

CV

.

O)

.. lJ..

PARTS LIST FOR FIG.

2

RESISTORS:

1

/2w

UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED

RI: 150,000w

R2:

150,000u

R3: 100u

R4:

100.,

R5:

R6:

10,000w

62,000w,

5%

R7:

200u, 5%

R8:

7500w, 5%

R9:

43,000w,

5%

R10:

12,000u

R11:

R12:

15,000u

7500u,

5%

R13:

R14:

R15:

24,000w,

5%

4700u

100,000u

(CA -1041 OHMITE

POT.)

ß16:27,000u

R17:

R18:

R19:

R20:

100,000u

12,000u

15,000w

7500u, 5%

R21:82004(

R22:

4700u

R23:

100,000u

(CA -1041 OHMITE

POT.)

R24:

36,000w, 5%

R25:

36,000u,

R26:

R27:

10,000u

240u,

5%

5%

R28:

110w, 5%

R29:68u

R30:

R31:

68u

1300u, 5%

ß32:68u

R33:

68u

R34:

4300u,

5%

R35:

750w,

5%

R36:

10,000u

R37:

R38:

10,000w

200u,

5%

R39:

R40:

7500w, 5%

62,000u, 5%

R41:

43,000u,

5%

R42:

R43:

12,000u,

5%

15,000u

R44:

7500u,

5%

R45:

4700u

R46:

24,000w, 5%

R47:

100,000u

(CA -1041 OHMITE

POT.)

ß48:2200u

R49:

27,000u

R50: 27,000w

R51:

470u

R52:47,000u

R53:

470,000u

R54:

R55:

R56:

1000u

10,000u

10,000u

(CENTRALAB

B

-11

R57:

POT.)

2200u

R58:

47,000u

R59: 47000J

R60: 22w,

2w

R61: 3300w

R62:

1200u,

1 w

R63:

R64:

15,000u

7500w,

5%

R65: 8200w, 5%

R66:

510u,

5%

R67:

6800u

R68:

R69:

270,000w

15,000u

R70: 5600(J

R71:

15,000u

R72:

270,000(J

R73:

15,000w

R74: 270w

R75:

100,000w

(CA -1041 OHMITE

POT.)

R76:

2200u

R77:

R78:

R80:

3

22,000w

27,000u

ß80:300OO u, lOw

R81:

R82:

100,000u

10,000u

R83:

2200u

R84:

10,000u

(I.R.C.

013 -116

C

-6307,

PCT)

R85:

6800u

R86:

R87:

220u

39,000u

R88:

560u, 1w

R89: 1w,

2w

R90:

R91:

6800u

270,000u

R93:

5600w

R94

:270000,u

R95:15,000:4

R97: 25

R97:

15,000w

R98:

R99:

100,000w

22,000u

R100:

27,000u

R101: 3900w

R102:

100,000u

(CENTRALAB,

AUDIO TAPER)

R103: 5000w

(CENTRALAB

B

-11)

CAPACITORS

Cl: 25pí, 15v,

SP

TE- 1157,1

C2:

150pf, 15v,

SP TE

-1163

C3:

25 pf, 15v,

SP

TE- 1157,1

C4: 100pí, 15v,

SP TE

-1162

C5:

25 pf, 15v,

SP

TE- 1157,1

C6:

25pf, 25v,

SP TE

-1207

C7:

25 pf,

15 v,

SP

TE- 1157,1

C8: 150pf,

15 v,

SP TE

-1163

C9: 25pf, 25v,

SP TE

-1207

CIO:

25 pf, 15v,

SP

TE- 1157,1

CI1: 25pí,

15v,

SP

TE- 1157,1

C12:100pf, l5v,

SP TE

-1162

C13: 100pf, 25v,

SP TE

-1211

C14:

25 pf, 15v,

SP

TE- 1157,1

CIS: 150pf, 15v,

SP TE

-1163

C16:

25pí, 15v,

SP

TE- 1157,1

C17:

C18:

100pí, 15v,

100pí, 25v,

SP TE

-1162

SP

TE-121

1

C19: 25 pf, 15v,

SP

TE- 1157,1

C20:

25Pf, 25v,

SP TE

-1207

C21:

C22:

10pí, 15v,

SP TE

-1155

25pí, 25v,

SP TE

-1207

SP

=SPRAGUE CL= CENTRALAB

C23: 150pf, 15v,

SP TE

-1163

C24:

25 pf,

15v,

SP

TE- 1157,1

C25:

25 pf, 15v,

SP

TE- 1157,1

C26: 100Ní,

25v,

C27:

25 pf, 15v,

SP TE

SP

-1211

TE- 1157,1

C28:

2pí, 25v,

SP TE

-1201

C29:

C30:

0.05 pf, 10v,

CL UK 10 -503

2pí,

25 v,

SP TE

-1201

C31:

C32:

100pf, 25v,

SP TE

-1211

5µf, 15v,

SP TE

-1152

C33: 25 pf, 15v,

SP

TE- 1157,1

C34:

100pf, 25v,

SP TE

-1211

C35: 25 pf, 15v,

SP

TE- 1157,1

C36

C37:

:25pf,

15v,

SP

TE- 1157,1

2pf, 25v,

SP TE

-1201

C38:

0.05pf,

10v, CL UK 10-50.3

C39:

C40:

2pf, 25v,

SP TE

-1201

100pí, 25v,

SP TE

-1211

C41: 5 pf, 25v,

SP

TE-I

202

C42: 0.1

C43: pf,

0.1 pf,

50v,

50v,

CL CK

CL

CK

-104

-104

C44: 100pí, 25v,

SP TE

-1211

MISCELLANEOUS

D1:

DIODE, INTERNATIONAL

RECTIFIER

5A4

TI:

TRANSFORMER, UTC

OUNCER

(0

-12)

T2: TRANSFORMER, INTERSTAGE

(GATES 478- 0053 -000)

13: TRANSFORMER, OUTPUT

(GATES

478-

0122

-000)

SPI: SPEAKER,

GUAM 27A06Z12,

2

3/4"

SWI, 5, 7: SWITCHES, SWITCHCRAFT 3036-L

SW2,

51,

2:

3, 4, 6: SWITCHES, SWITCHCRAFT 30312

-L

CANNON

MICROPHONE

RECEPTACLE XLR

-3 -13N

J1,

2:

PHONO JACK,

SWITCHCRAFT 3501 -FP

J3, 4:

PHONO JACK,

SWITCHCRAFT

L

-11

PLI,

2: METER

LAMPS, 11829

Ml:

VU METER, SIMPSON 110470,

MODEL 142, A

SCALE

RLY1: RELAY, SPEAKER

MUTING,

POTTER -BRUMFIELD KM

-11D

FS1:

FANNING

STRIP,

CINCH -JONES

10

-160

-R

KNOBS:

LANGEVIN

TYPE

K

-108,

RCA

MEDIUM

(2

BLACK,

2

BLUE,

I

YELLOW,

1

RED)

Pl:

MONITOR INPUT,

RCA TYPE

PIN -PLUG

P2:

P.A. VOLUME CONTROL PLUG,

CINCH -JONES

P303

CCT

SW8, 9:

MICROSWITCH, CUING

SWITCH,

I15M1,

WITH J5

-2

ACTUATOR

01,

2, 3, 7, 8,

11, 12,

16, 17:RCA2N104

Q4, 5, 6: G.E. 2N44

09,

10:

G.E.

2N508

Q13,

14: RCA

2N109

Q15: RCA 2N301

TRANSISTOR SOCKETS:

CINCH -JONES

2H3 (16)

TURNTABLES: QRK MODEL 12

VECTOR BOARD:

195G43

CUT TO SIZE

TERMINALS: USECO

/2000 -B

VITROLENE:

MINNESOTA PAINTS,

INC.,

MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

4 thing is installed on the end panel, use wood screws to fasten it to the inside of the cabinet opening provided for it. In- stall all parts on the operator's panel except the turntable potentiometers.

Make a "U" shaped aluminum bracket and mount the two potentiometers and two microswitches on it. They are posi- tioned so when a flat area is filed in the side of the potentiometer shaft, the microswitch is mounted so its lever rests in the flat area when the pot is turned off.

This is called a

"cue- pot

".

The completed assembly is operator's fastened to the panel with shaft bushings through the

"U" bracket holding the sub -assembly to convenience the front panel. The provided lets the operator cue -up records anytime the turntable potentiometer is turned off without hav- ing to actuate another switch. The PRO-

GRAM, AUDITION, and GROUND busses should be installed on tie -points screwed down to each switch, as shown in Fig.

5. position to the auxiliary input on the end

-panel by

SW,. This gives us two inputs for the price of one preamplifier.

A 50 db fixed pad is inserted ahead of the preamplifier when it is used for a

0

di

ne

^

5203

FUSE

LOCATED

ON END PANEL

SW201

F201

T201

T202

D20

2

0204

+uI

D205

R231

Q211

e

D206

u

tape recorder, remote line, or third turn.. table input. Transformer

T

-1 provides a

500 -ohm to 2000 -ohm impedance match and isolates the input from possible d.c. leakage across

C.

0210

R233

I?J

The

Electronics

Lets make a quick tour of the schem- atic diagram

(

Fig. 2) before starting to build the Vector board amplifiers. Start- ing in the upper left -hand corner, we have the

AUX

/MIC

-2 preamplifier. The frequency response, temperature stabil- ity, and low distortion exhibited by this amplifier are excellent. Its input is switched from the

No.

2 microphone

TURNTABLES

AND

AMPLIFIERS

115 v.o.c.

OUTLETS INSIDE CABINETS

P202

2

3_5_

4-

6-

Fig.

3.

Power supply schematic. (Parts

List on

Page 22)

2

3

7

8

9

10

TB201

00 e e e e e

+1.3 d. c.

}

24 d.c.

GND

e

0

0

-e

00

RLY202

RLY201

V f7

0 c

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

21

0201

R204

V

-20.5 ló

`,)

C205

0203

R214

0202

10 co

C208

p0204

C202

R209 o

éc

3

2

1

VOLUME CONTROL

SOCKET

R243

-23

0205

0

t e

0207

2N169A

10,2

0208

C213

0209

-10.2

RLY

201

3-

5-

S202

MUTED

SPEAKER

J203

J202

r

---^--

P201

J204

G

J205

W

L o

SPEAKER

ON

END PANEL

_

J

22

RESISTORS

1

/2w

UNLESS LISTED

OTHERWISE

R201:

750,000w,

5%

R202: 39,000w

R203:

6800

R204:

2200

R205:

R206:

750,000u, 5%

10,000u

R207:

10,000w

R208: 100w

R209:

100,000w

R210:

10,000w

R211:

R212:

10,000w

750,000 w,

5%

R213: 100w

R214:

2000w

R215:

47,0000

R216: 10,000w

R217: 2700w

R218:

3300w

R219:

R220:

300w, 5%

1000w

R221: 2700w

R222:

39,000 w

R223: 2700 w

R224: 150w

R225: 100w

R226:

100w, THERMISTOR,

FENWAL KB21J1

R227: 270w

R228: 270w

R229:

7.5w, FUSIBLE

RESISTOR

R230: 10w,

10w

R231: 1000w

R232:

10,000w

R233:

50w, 10w

R234:

3000w, 5%

R235:

1000w, LINEAR POT.

R236:

3000w, 5%

R237:

10w,

12238:56w,

R239:

2w

2w

250w, 10w

R240:

R241:

22w,

2w

20,000w, 5%

R242:

470, 000 w

R243: 3300w

CAPACITORS

C201:

0.05 pf,

CE

NTRALA

B

TYPE DD503

C202:

50pí, 25v,

SPRAGUE

TE

-1290

C203:

C204:

500pí, 25v,

SPRAGUE

TVA-1 209

100pí,

25v,

SPRAGUE

TE

-1211

C205:

C206:

C207:

0.47pí, 200v,

SPRAGUE 2TM

-P47

0.22pí, 200v,

SPRAGUE 2TM

-P22

2pí, 50v,

SPRAGUE

TE

-1302

C208:

C209:

5pf, 50v,

SPRAGUE

TE

-1202

50pf, 25v,

SPRAGUE TE

-1209

1800pf, ARCO ELEMENCO DM-

19

-182i

C210:

C211:

C212:

50pí, 25v,

SPRAGUE TE

-1209

100pf, 15v,

SPRAGUE TE

-1162

C213:

1600 pf, 50v,

MALLORY TYPE

068

C214:500pf, 25v,

SPRAGUE

TVA

1209

C215:

500pf, 25v,

SPRAGUE TVA 1209

C216:

500pf, 25v,

SPRAGUE

TVA

1209

C217:

0.22pí, 200y,

SPRAGUE

2TM -P22

MISCELLANEOUS

0201

-206: DIODE, INTERNATIONAL RECTIFIER

5A4

D207: ZENER DIODE, 1N3022 -B

T201: POWER TRANSFORMER,

MERIT

P

-2963,

T202: BIAS TRANSFORMER, MERIT

P

-2944,

25.2v

6.3v

1

A

3A

SW201:

DPDT

TOGGLE

5201:

VOLUME CONTROL SOCKET, CINCH

-JONES

S

-303 AB

5202: POWER

SOCKET, CINCH -JONES

5

-306 AB -

5203: A. C. PLUG

S204:

A.C.

SOCKET

5205:

A.

C. SOCKET

RLY:201: SPEAKER

MUTING RELAY,

POTTER

-BRUMFIELD KM

-11D

F201:

0.5

AMP LINE

FUSE

F202: LAMP d. c. SUPPLY FUSE

TB201:

TERMINAL BOARD

P201: UNMUTED

SPEAKER

PLUG,

CINCH -JONES

13A

P202: POWER PLUG,

CINCH -JONES

P203: MUTED SPEAKER

PLUG,

P

-306

CINCH -JONES 13A

J201: AUDIO INPUT SOCKET, CINCH -JONES 81A

J202: UNMUTED

SPEAKER

OUTLET, CINCH -JONES

81A

J203: MUTED

SPEAKER OUTLET,

J204: PHONE

CINCH -JONES 81A

JACK (UNMUTED

SPEAKER)

ON

SIDE

PANEL, SWITCHCRAFT LI1

J205:PHONE JACK (PA DRIVE) ON

SIDE

PANEL

SWITCHCRAFT

LII

TRANSISTOR SOCKETS:

Q201

-206:

RCA

2N109

CINCH -JONES 2H3

Q207: G.E. 2N169A

0208-

211

*:

CA

-2D2.

*THESE TRANSISTORS

MAY

BE

OBTAINED FROM

MINNEAPOLIS-

HONEYWELL,

BOXI61, UNION,

NEW JERSEY

AT $1.50

EACH.

Fig. 4.

Amplifier schematic.

PARTS LIST

FOR FIG. 3 and 4

The next preamplifier down on left is used solely to amplify the the audio voltage generated by the microphone mounted on top of the console.

It is identical with the preamplifier just de- scribed, except it has no input trans- former. Although the characteristic in- put impedance of the preamplifier is around 2000 ohms, little change in fre- quency response or loss in signal level is experienced using a 150 -ohm micro- phone. The difference in signal level amounts to about 5 db.

Thanks to the many fine articles technical written about equalized phono preamplifiers, we signing the two had no difficulty de- appearing directly be- low the microphone preamplifiers.

They have an excellent

RIAA playback re- sponse when used with a

Shure M3D cartridge. Parallel the outputs of this stereo cartridge for monophonic use.

These amplifiers also have low distortion and excellent temperature stability.

Our program amplifier appears in the upper right hand corner of the sche- matic. below

The earphone amplifier is directly the program amplifier.

It is an intermediate -gain amplifier designed to amplify audio appearing on the

PRO-

GRAM, AUDITION, busses to busses or

EXTERNAL INPUT earphone volume operate at a level of level.

-20

The db.

A level much too low for satisfactory ear- phone listening.

AUDIO MAY,

1965

Adl

Last, in the bottom -right corner is the cue amplifier.

An amplifier designed to raise the cue buss audio level to about

200 milliwatts and feed the small Quam speaker, it produces adequate volume for cueing even in noisy locations.

We are ready to build the Vector board amplifiers. Space does not per- mit me to show complete parts place- ment for these amplifiers, however it is not nearly as critical as in tube am- plifiers. Although it consumes more area, it was found advantageous to all put parts on one side of the board and wire up interconnections on the oppo- site side.

Useco

#2000

-B terminals are swaged into place on each Vector board to pro- vide tie -points and inter- connecting terminals. Those displayed across the front edge of the boards are used as terminals for the inputs, power leads, and outputs for the various amplifiers.

However, there are two exceptions where this could not be done.

On the turntable preamplifiers, the input is brought out to a pin jack near the rear edge of the board. Along of the front edge the program amplifier, from left

-to- right, are the input, master volume con- trol, and power terminals. corner and going

Turning the up along the side of the cabinet, we have the meter voltage drive for pad, the earphone amplifier, and the program amplifier output ter- minals.

All Vector board amplifiers are mounted above the cabinet bottom on two wooden strips. They are directly below the operator's panel for conven- ient servicing, if necessary.

Fig.

5. Chassis before turntables are installed. solid hook -un wire.

The tnrntahlnc power supply, and the a.c. distribution strip in the bottom of the console were wired with plastic lamp cord.

All wiring and interconnecting com- pleted, install the turntables and tone arms, microphone, and copy rack.

When you apply power to the con- sole for the first time, it is wise to mon- itor the

-24

volt supply.

Be prepared to remove power from voltage doesn't come up to or more immediately. If this should happen, remove

S.

the console if the from

-20

the volts power supply by unfastening plifier chassis from the power am- the panel and pull- ing it away from the power supply.

Also, remove the

-24

volt lead on

TB,

that feeds voltage to the Vector ampli- fiers.

If this doesn't clear the trouble, it is in the power supply and is most likely

Q2,,.

After you have cleared the trouble, adjust

IL

for a final voltage reading of

-24

volts. panel. Locations of the major are shown in Fig.

7. parts

Everything having been built and installed except the turntables, it be- comes a relatively easy task intercon- necting the amplifiers, power supply, end -panel, and operator's panel. Follow your schematic diagrams and the var- ious illustrations carefully. Note how we have harnessed the audio cables leaving the operator's panel and laced them to- gether so as to form just two large cables.

You should use two -pair, stranded, shielded, audio cable for all audio runs. Power connection on the end panel were made using

No. 20

CUE

AMP

EARPHONE

AMP

MIC

PREAMP

MIC

Operation

To check console out the operation of the under normal programming conditions, the

MASTER gain control should be set to

3 o'clock,

LEFT

T.T. RIGHT

T. T.

PROGRAM

PREAMP

PREAMP

AMP

T2 the

MONITOR volume to

10 o'clock,

TURNTABLE channels to

12 o'clock,

Mic channels to

2 o'clock. The

CUE volume control should be wide open and the

PHONES volume to nearly wide open. Channel switches should all be placed in the

(Continued on page

52)

Fig. 6. Closeup of the Vector boards showing placement in cabinet.

J 203

J202

C213 t

0206

C208

1202

The

Amplifier

and Power Supply

Our amplifier is rated at

10 watts.

Heat sinks must be provided for power output and voltage regulating trans- istors. For this reason, the amplifier and power supply were built on two alumi- num chassis and secured to a common

0201

J201

Q202 0203

5201

0204 Q205 Q207 0209

Fig.

7.

Closeup of power amplifier and power supply chassis showing placement of major components.

Fuses are on bottom to facilitate replacement.

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

23

Recording

Without

Microphones

ROBERT

HAZELLEAF

Transducers on the

instrument eliminate recording

acoustics.

Lester

M.

Barcus and John Berr\

, of

Long Beach, Calif., do not believe in microphones. The primary function of a disc or tape, they believe, is to pro- vide a facsimile of a musical perform- ance. To them, ambient studio sound, whether tolerated as a necessary evil or elevated by the term

"concert hall presence," is tortion. nothing more than dis-

They have devised a called technique the

Barcus -Berry Direct Record- ing Process. Instead of microphones, it uses a transducing system that acquires its signal directly from the bridge of a stringed instrument, from the mouth- piece or reed of brass, from the vibrat- ing element of percussion.

By coaxial cable, the energy is transmitted to a mixing panel, then split between an

Ampex 300 tape recorder and toring section that employs a a moni- high

- fidelity amplifier and loudspeaker sys- tems.

For years Barcus worked with vir- tually every type of microphone, amplifier and loudspeaker produced, always reaching an almost- but -not- quite plateau.

John Berry was introduced to him through a mutual friend about five years ago, bringing to the partnership a well- developed talent as a concert violinist and a passionate interest in seeing his instrument reproduced to a musician's satisfaction.

Fig.

1.

Violist

Louis Kievman at record- ing session for

Dvorak Quintet. Though instrument is completely redesigned, weight and dimensions of traditional viola are retained.

Fig. 2. ry and

John Ber-

Marshall

Sosson, violins;

Roland Bundock, bass;

Kurt Rener, cello; and Louis

Kievman, violist.

They began anew. Microphones were tried again, using every conceivable technique. The men met the same prob- lems that plague every record company, large or small.

(Repeat records is their

b

Fig.

3.

John

Berry demonstrates

"plugged

-in" violin.

Pickup element is concealed in bridge and body of instru- ment. company.) Electric guitar pickups were tried and discarded, although persons introduced to the new system usually suspect them as the secret.

Contact microphones, too, came in for a share of attention, but they re- produced everything.

A violin or cello was heard in its entirety, including every obnoxious scratching and scrap- ing, the sound of the artist's chin rub- bing on its rest and his fingers popping on the fingerboard.

Then came the concept that a vi- brating string's energy can be captured at its source. Two tiny wires were placed in a violin bridge, an electronic unit was voila! added to the circuit and

Recording was direct. So were several phenomena of dubious benefit.

Barcus and Berry spent days reliving some of the lesser contact microphone problems, along with the body noises inherent in close -heard fiddle.

For a violinist, John Berry took a drastic step, one that ihas lured musician, scientist and crackpot alike into an acoustic morass, when he be- came an accomplice to redesigning the instrument.

"Stripped of its glamour," Barry explains, "all the art in a del Jesu

Guarnerius or a fine

Stradivarius is confined to an the chest, which serves as acoustic amplifier, nothing more." of

"Therefore," he continues,

"a string proper quality, tension, gauge and length can sound only like a violin string, provided it can be amplified sufficiently."

Proof is in

Repeat's Opus I, an ex- perimental rendition of standard melo- dies using two violins, viola, cello, bass, piano and guitar. The direct process captured all the sound normally heard by a concert -goer in about fourth row, center orchestra.

The new string family seeks to nul-

Iffy all the false resonances, dead spots and notes that must be given special attention by a violinist. In redesigning, the partners built instruments of hard- wood.

Fingerboard, length and

"feel" were retained

-all

serving merely as an anchor for strings.

The new instruments, looking much like something to of be seen in modern art, were first a gallery dubbed

24

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

"Violectras," a name later dropped at the suggestion of musicians who have worked with the new recording system.

"They sound as they're supposed to," the artists said, "so why fool with the name ?"

Repeat's second release, Gentle Jazz, uses redesigned violin, bass, piano and guitar, along with a new development, once called the "Baritone Violectra."

The same size as a fiddle, but with much heavier strings, the baritone in- vades the register of the cello with the facility of execution of the smaller instrument.

It has possibilities tran- scending mere novelty.

A brand new piano might be sug- gested for a brand new process, but pianist- arranger Fred Valdez furnished a 60- year

-old Chickering grand in the interests of science.

Here again, all the partners wanted were strings, a place to anchor them, and the transducing system.

First to go was the sounding board, unceremoniously ripped out and dump- ed.

Tonal effect is unnoticed. The three -string unisons were reduced to two for simplicity in with no deterioration quality, except when unamplified.

Without the monitoring system, the instrument is barely heard. The sustain- ing pedal mechanism was altered so that, when depressed, only those notes in use are sustained.

Dampers remain on the others, eliminating unwanted sympathetic vibration. The muting pedal, which usually shifts hammers from three strings to two, now shifts to one, adding a slightly different sound to traditional piano tone. Natural- ly, the instrument is prepared to record

r

in full stereo. The effect is not lost on pianists when they try their first arpeggio.

Reeds, brass fewer problems and percussion caused than strings.

As men

- tioned, the pioneers decided on the mouthpiece as the pickup point on winds, except for the flute family, in which the end plug is used.

"If you blow a horn with a clarinet mouthpiece," Barcus suggests, "it will sound more like a horn instrument. Sound is than any reed made by the reed or lips, with the body of serving to the instrument change quality and pitch.

There's nothing for us at the bell or in the body."

"The direct process calls for a little more push," recording artist Nash says.

"The sax, for example, doesn't give the illusion of playing itself. But I'm well satisfied with process and its the accuracy of the quality."

After engineering the transfer from tape to disc of

Opus I and Gentle Jazz,

J. J.

Ferree of

United

Recorders said,

"I first thought it might be just another gimmick, but now I'm sure it's out of

Fig. 6. Reed man

Ted Nash's phone mouthpiece is alto

"transduced" saxo- from tiny wires directly under reed. Horn mouthpiece wiring begins immediately under lip. Notches are made, then re- filled after wire is added. that category. We did find that only top equipment will do the job of mak- ing a good transfer.

With an absolute lack of studio sound, you'must be sure you don't add any mechanical noise in the mastering process."

Another facet of the system brought out in making discs is the energy con- tained on the original tape. While heavy bass tones will often cause groove jump- ing, it's seldom that mid -ranges exhibit the effect. On

Rural Rhythm, the sharp tap of a wood block had to be tenderly handled.

With the earliest recordings, Barcus and Berry happily learned that most of the problems found in conventional methods were eliminated.

"We have absolute control," they declare "We can record from strength, capturing sounds never before repro- duced. From there we must subtract.

Our criterion is established by musicians, our sole judges." the

A recording session is informality itself.

A listening room serves as the studio. On a warm day, doors remain open with no in thought given jet aircraft the

Long Beach landing pattern, passing diesel trucks or as tortured rubber drivers miscalculate a traffic signal a few yards away.

Only the sounds of the instruments reach the tape recorder. Since the sound until amplified, musicians re- designed violin family produces little have had to adjust to hearing themselves on the monitoring loudspeakers several feet away. Naturally, with instant playback, retakes are cut to a minimum.

Kurt Reber, first cellist with the

Los

Angeles Philharmonic, recalls,

"The adjustment was a problem, at first, since we're used to hearing an instru- ment as well as feeling it.

But with an opportunity to practice beforehand, and the sound coming over the speakers just as we hear it, we managed to adapt.

What surprised me was the way you can `crank on' the volume without dis- tortion."

Reher, who worked on

Opus I, also appears on Dvorak's

Quintet in G major, Op.

77, with John Berry and

Marshall

Sosson, violins; Louis Kiev - men, viola, and Roland Bundock, bass.

"For the first time," Bundock says,

"people can hear real fundamental tone from a bass fiddle. And it's wonderful doing the job yourself without an engi- neer `riding gain'."

Marshall Sosson quickly reached a decision shared by everyone who has worked with direct recording: "There just isn't any place to hide. Nothing can be done to help a bad note or faulty execution."

The firm's partners are the first to admit that a premium is placed on musical competence. It just happens that that's exactly what they want, and one of the reasons all the artists to date have been symphony, motion -pic- ture and

/or

recording studio men.

Engineering a direct- recorded session is accomplished by

(Continued on page 55)

(1) pushing the

Fig.

3.

Redesigned cello, guitar, mixing panel and Ampex 300

Cables lead to three -channel stereo piano. tape recorder.

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

25

Calibrated

Stereo Control

Unit

RAPHAEL

F.

EHAT

PART

TWO

The Hi -Fi

Heart

What we are after now is a means for recording and reproducing high quality stereophonic signals in as quantitative a manner as to be within financial reason.

This is clearly a high fidelity set -up, but with added requirements not presently available commercially. Since a tape re- corder is required and never includes within its confines the complete circuit, its relation to the consideration.

The rest is the very first author agrees with

PHONO

PREAMP

With Eq'r

Control

(JUMPER PROVIDED WHEN

TAPE RECORDER REMOVED)

\

LOUDNESS OR

\ VOLUME b

+

CATHODE

FOLLOWER

TONE

CONTROLS

FM/AM

TUNER

CATHODE

FOLLOWER

OUTPUT TU

POWER

AI.'P

TV TUNER

OR OTHER

SOUND

SOURCE

CONTROL

IN OUT

TAPE RECORDER

(Automatically connects in- put to output when turned off

Fig.

1.

Incorporating a tape recorder into music system.

26

AUXILIARY

SOURCE

TAPE RECORDER

PHONO

PREAMP

EQUALIZER

POWER SWITCH

Z

O

Z

O

TUNER

AND

MULTIPLEX

DEMODULATOR f

,>

í. o

A.C.

LINE

VU

METER o

0.96 v RMS

Ov

D.C.

TI

LINE

LEVEL

SOURCE

PREAMP

V4A

ADDED TO

TAPE RECCrkDER

1

0.99vRMS

=

O v

D.C.

MONITOR AMP

RECORD

AMP

SOURCE

VI >2A

V2B

TAPE RECORD

AMP

WITH HIGH BOOST

MIC

LEVEL

KIG

MIC

PREAMP

VIA

V6B

V6A

o

PLAYBACK

HEAD f

4

á2

Y m ua g x s3

TAPE

MOVEMENT

o

RECORD

HEAD

V3

ERASE

HEAD

BIAS

OSC.

1.35

RM.,

(ONLY

FRONT PANEL CONTROLS LISTED)

STEREO

CONTROLS INCLUDING

S2

CHANNEL SELECTOR

S3

SIGNAL PHASE

54

CHANNEL

REVERSE

55

CONTOUR

S5

GAIN (N

OR

+10)

P1

SEPARATION RATIO ADJUST

P2

CHANNEL BALANCE

P3 LEVEL

/LOUDNESS

0.68v

RMS

Ol,

02

03

04

05

0.445 v RMS

TONE CONTROLS

S7 BASS

TURNOVER

58 TREBLE

TURNOVER

P6 BASS SLOPE

P7 TREBLE SLOPE

BAUER

EARPHONE

KIC c

CIRCUIT

`

1l-

.22 pf

50mv

RMS 620

6.8k

T2 t

E

BIAS

o-

OUTPUT TO

SPEAKER

AMP

AND

CENTER

CHANNEL

MIXER

O

ó m3

Z

0.56v

.MS (FLAT) o

60 TO 600o LOAD o0.8TO8wLOAD

2;-..^.

á0

02

K1A

TO OTHER

CHANNEL

CALIBRATED SEPARATION RATIO

DETECTOR CIRCUIT INCLUDES:

510 METER SELECTOR

511 METER

(MODE)

SELECTOR

(CHANNEL)

P17 SEPARATION RATIO CALIBRATE

CONTROL

Fig.

2. Block diagram of system.

AUDIO MAY,

1965 e

LEVELS

TAKEN WITH SEPARATION

AND

BALANCE CENTERED, LEVEL FULL

INPUTS FROM

TAPE RECORDER

+L

L

O

-L

1=

COMMON

2=

REVERSE PHASE

3=

DIRECT PHASE

0.99v

0 v D. C.

R

+n

O

R

U

°

ó

3

I

CHANNEL

S2

CHANNEL

I LEFT

ONLY

2

3

STEREO

RIGHT

ONLY

PHASE

+L+R

(NARROW)

P1L

2500 u

C.T.

_

S

+L+R

(WIDE)

+L

CCW

2200e

+R+L

(NARROW)

2200 u

P1R

2500 u

C.T.

CCW

I

2200e

"V

I

-L+R

(WIDE)

-R

L

I

I o--

NORMAL

I

REVERSE

S3

PHASING

2200 u

BALANCE

CCW

CW

CCW

P2L

0

80v

DVD.C:

R0=3745

MAX. o

CCW

I

Ñ

1° b. ló

ZI-

P2R

CW

CLIPPING

LEVEL

0.8v

HERE

P3L

50k

LOG

0.445v

Ov

D.C.

I

1430k

R.

EACH CHANNEL ti

151 k

MAX. 43k MIN.

50k

LOG

P3R

430 k

R

OUTPUTS

TO

TONE

CONTROL

I.2

O

_re'

0--

1

NORMAL

{REVERSE

54 SPEAKERS

`v1C1R

0.05

55

O

r

ó o-y

CIL

C2R

.

005

CONTOUR

OFF

ON C2L

70s.

005

0.05

L

R

CHANGES

REQUIRED IN

52 TO HANDLE PUSH

Ampex's

Ross Snyder7 on how to inte- grate a tape recorder into a hi

-fi system.

His gospel, good as new after

10 years, is simple; install the tape recorder be- tween the program selector and tone controls with optional bypass connection.

Figure

1

(Fig.

8 of the original article) is our basic block diagram before the ad- dition of requirements that prompt the present article. Note that the recorder is in series with the signal path, so feed- back howl will never occur due to an in- advertent slip of a knob twiddler's fin- gers, yet when none of its functions are required it is simply shut off.

Don't let the simplicity of this arrangement fool you. See how many control units you can name where this pattern is clearly stated in the instructions and unmistakeably implied on the schematic.

7

Ross H. into the page

49.

Snyder "Building Simplicity

Hi -Fi System,"

AUDIO,

Oct. 1955,

Fig.

3.

Stereo controls.

The

Augmented

Control Unit

Figure

2 shows

Mr.

Snyder's arrange- ment enlarged upon to include the author's present needs and also to show in the outline form what he considers to be best arrangement for internal tape recorder circuits. The tape /source pot is preferred to an AFB switch for con- venience with the variable level signals one always has to contend with.

With a semi -log taper on each side of center tap it is virtually as fast to use in prac- tice as a switch. Following the recorder, the stereo controls

(Fig.

3) work their way from a

1 kilohm input impedance up to 50 kilohms output into the tone control buffer

(Fig. 4).

They include a separation controls modified to operate at approximately

1 kilohm impedance level and integrated with a balance con- trol at approximately

3750 ohms.

The relatively low balance control impedance s

Ralph Glasgal,

"A Dimension Control for Stereo," Electronics

World,

April

1961, page

56. obviates the need of an impedance drop- ping amplifier into the contour networks and level control. This saves several transistors but requires an undistorted output from the higher than usual tape recorder a few db for a line level signal.

Some tape recorder output stages may require "beefing up" to be compatible.

The tone control (Fig.

5) is an adapta- tion of the Baxandall feedback circuit along the lines of the modification de- scribed by Barhydt10 in which he offers switched control of turnover frequencies and continuous adjustment of slopes be- tween the asymptotes. The impedance level was reduced by a factor of

4.7 for compatibility with the active networks and different ranges of turnover selec- tions were calculated

( complete informa- tion on this is included in the reference).

9 ness

J.

P. Wentworth, "An Improved

Loud-

Control,"

AUDIO,

Jan.

1958, page

30. lo Hamilton

Barhydt,

"A

Feedback

Tone Control page

18.

Circuit,"

Ammo, Aug. 1956,

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

27

-10v

SIGNAL

LEVELS ARE RMS, CORRESPOND TO

40 mv OUTPUT AT

05 (1.55v

RMS ACROSS 60w)

ADJUST

P4

FOR Ov

BETWEEN

XAND

Y

ADJUST

P5

FOR Ov

D.C.

AT

Q1

BASE

IN

0.445 v

OvD.C.

N

47k*

FROM

'LEVEL

CONTROL

S6

+10

20k

75k

.001

05

OUTPUT

=4v

P

-P

LOADED BY

300u

0.3 mA

-9v

D. C. f

0.9 mA

)

01A

2N2712

0.685 v

-4.8v D.C.

100k

-4.8v

D.C.

6200 u

3

TO TONE

CONTROL

NETWORK

Q1

2N508

.12v D.C.

C3

47pf 10v

+10v

`THIS 47k

RESISTOR

IS

THE

SAME

ONE SHOWN

CONNECTED TO THE SLIDER OF

P3

ON

THE

STEREO

CONTROLS SCHEMATIC

T.P. a db

O

0.435 0

REF.

(2

0.0054

0.545

+1.96

-5v

P6

S7B

S88

+10v

ó

á

TO

TONE

NETWORK

+10v

E o

2.

2 pf

35v o

" o

-D

ó

O

02

2N169

(EFFECTIVE LOAD OF

03

INPUT CIRCUIT)

KIA

S p

7150u

TO

BAUER CIRCUIT

EFFECTIVE LOAD 250

CCW

COLL. EMITT

RES. RES.

9100u 4300u

10k 4800u

3

3

4600u

NOM.

2 o

250 pf

6v

-10v

Fig.

6.

Second stage design. (above)

Fig. 4.

Linearized first stage. (left)

The

Collector Follower

Here is the first stumbling block in the circuit design.

For maximum portability it was decided to build the new control unit into the tape recorder assembly, the available space measuring

3 x 5 x

17 inches, hardly enough to avoid over

-

(Continued on page 54)

INCREASE

Q1A

2N2712

01

2N508

11

0.68v

RMS

-4.8v

D. C.

0-----4.--1Al1--411

100k

10

0--41

90-vo

7o -

S7A

0

80-

0

6

0

5

4 O

30

20

1

0

C8

m

510píI

TO 01

BASE

10v

1000pí

P6

CW

5

MEG

LOG

BASS

SLOPE

57 BASS

TURNOVER

POS. 11,

58

TREBLE

TURNOVER

` POS. 1,

MAX.

BOOST

MAX. DROOP

POS. 6, FLAT

7

C61

2000pf

I ro

C5 n

4000pfT 8200pfr

S8A

N a n

O O O O

3

6200 u

-4.8v D.C.

3

Cl1

300p'fr o o

0

0

C11

C12 w

510pf

Ñ

C W

ú

900

P7

1

MEG

CCW LOG

TREBLE SLOPE

pl.'

S8B

O

0 0

0 0 0

FOR ELECTRON TUBE

VERSION

SEE

AUDIO

AUGUST,

1956, p.18 i-10v

C9

180 p'fr

-o

l

*-0

2

41-0

3

*-0

4

+10v

EFFECTIVE

LOAD

Q3

INPUT CIRCUIT

i

7150u

-1-

SPEAKERS

KlA

PHONES

TO

BA UER

CIRCUIT

7150u LOAD

-_Z:1,54_0100 k

0

0

10

O

11

C13

1500;fr

-IOv

57B

-4.Bv D.C.

P8T

10k

+10v

C14

2.2pf

35v

-4.8 v D. C.

Or'"

0.56v

RMS

s'0v

D.C.

02

2N

169

Fig. 5.

Transistor version of Baxandall tone control (Barhydt modification).

HOBSON'S CHOICE?

ENEVER

AGAIN!

Ii, in 1631, the horse means No you went to rent a horse from Thomas Hobson at

Cambridge, England, you took that stood next to the door. And no other. Period. Hence, Hobson's Choice

Choice.

And, as recently as

1961, if you went to buy a true high fidelity stereo phono cartridge, you bought the

Shure

M3D

Stereo Dynetic.

Just as the critics and musicians did.

It was ac- knowledged as the ONLY choice for the critical listener.

Since then, Shure has developed several models of their

Stereo Dynetic cartridges

-each

designed for optimum performance in specific kinds of systems, each designed for a specific kind of porte

-monnaie.

We trust this

Shure brief recitation of the significant features covering the various members of the cartridge family

will

help guide you to the best choice for you.

THE CARTRIDGE

V-1 5

M55E

M99

ITS FUNCTION,

ITS FEATURES

...

The ultimate!

15° tracking and Bi- Radial Ellip- tical stylus reduces Tracing (pinch effect), IM and

Harmonic Distortion to unprecedented lows. Scratch -proof. Extraordinary quality con- trol throughout. Literally handmade and in- dividually tested.

In a class by itself for repro- ducing music from mono as well as stereo discs.

IS YOUR BEST SELECTION

If your tone

(either with arm tracks manual or at

11/2 grams or less automatic turntable)

-

and if you want the very best, regardless of price, this is without question your cartridge.

It is designed for the purist ist whose

...

the perfection

- entire system must be composed of the finest equipment in every category. Shure's finest cartridge. $62.50.

,

Designed to give professional performance!

Elliptical diamond stylus and new 15° vertical tracking angle provide freedom from distor- lion.

Low Mass. Scratch

-proof. Similar to

V -15, except that it is made under standard control conditions. quality

If you seek outstanding performance and your tonearm will track at forces of

3/4 to

1Vs grams, the

M55E will satisfy

-beautifully.

Will improve the sound from your high actually fidelity system! (Unless you're using the V

-15,

Shure's finest cartridge.)

A special value at

$35.50.

A premium quality cartridge at a modest price.

15° tracking angle conforms to the 15° RIAA and EIA proposed standard cently adopted by most recording companies.

IM and

Harmonic distortion cutting angle re- are remarkably low gated in

. cross

-talk between channels is ne- critical low and mid -frequency ranges.

If you track between

3/4 and

11/2 grams, the

M44

-5 with

.0005" stylus represents a best

-buy investment. If you track between

11/2 and

3 grams, the M44

-7 is for you

...

particularly if you have a great

Both have number

"scratch- proof"

Either model under

$25.00. of older retractile records. stylus.

A top -rated cartridge featuring the highly compliant

N21D tubular stylus.

Noted for its sweet,

"singing" quality throughout the audi- ble spectrum and especially its singular re- creation of clean mid -range sounds (where most of the music really "happens ".) Budget- priced, too.

For

2 to

21/2 gram your present set -up than

$20.00, it is tracking. sounds

Especially

"muddy." fine

At if less truly an outstanding buy.

(Also, if you own regular M7D, you can up- grade it for higher compliance and lighter tracking by installing an N21D stylus.)

A unique

Stereo -Dynetic cartridge head shell assembly for

Garrard and

Miracord automatic turntable owners. The cartridge counterbalancing springs

"floats" on

...

makes the stylus scratch

-proof "bounce."

.

.

. ends tone arm

If floor vibration is a problem.

Saves your records. Models for Garrard Laboratory Type

"A ",

AT -6, AT -60 and

Model

50 automatic turntables and

Miracord Model

10 or

10H turntables. Under

$25.00 including head shell,

.0007" diamond stylus.

A best

-seller with extremely musical and trans- parent sound at rock -bottom price.

Tracks at pressures as high as 6 grams, as low as

3 grams.

The original famous

Shure

Dynetic Cartridge.

If cost is the dominant factor.

Lowest price of any Shure Stereo

Dynetic cartridge (about

$16.00)

Can be

...

with almost universal application. used with any changer. Very rugged.

M3D

--

HIGH FIDELITY PHONO CARTRIDGES... WORLD STANDARD

WHEREVER SOUND QUALITY

Shure Brothers, Inc.,

222

Hartrey

Ave., Evanston, Illinois

IS

PARAMOUNT

Circle

120 on Reader Service Card

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

29

30

A new "Scotchflex" flat cable sys- tem, designed especially for custom stereo, hi -fi, intercom or background music systems has been introduced by

3M Company. Similar to a station wir- ing system currently used by many telephone companies, "Scotchflex" au- dio flat cable

No. 800 is a 4- conductor,

No. 22 AWG stranded wire, embedded in a flat vinyl strip, with an adhesive backing that will adhere to any clean, relatively smooth, firm surface.

"Scotchflex"

No.

800 was designed for the sound engineer who needs a slightly heavier system to carry an ex- tra load, or operate over extended dis- tances. It is adaptable to nearly every type of music or intercom arrangement and to any room or building.

A series of accessories for termina- tion, splicing and transition connec- tions complete the package. Included are "Scotchflex"

No. 728 terminals,

4- post transition devices for connecting amplifiers or speakers to to the cable sys- tem; No.

729 splice units with which splice flat cable when extending the main system; No.

730 plugs and re- ceptacles, to connect amplifiers or speakers into the system; and

No. 731 corner covers, to protect and secure corners made with the cable.

Although the

No. 800 audio flat cable system is primarily a

4- conduc- tor system, it may be modified for long run applications where resistance be- comes too high through the adjacent wires to provide use of shorting bars, which parallel connect lent of a 19- gauge,

2-

The shorting bars are provided with individual terminals or connectors.

With the use of conductor the

No. the equiva- system.

729 splice unit accessory, any length of cable or cable layout is possible.

By using

No. 728 terminal or ceptacle, any number the of

No. 730 speakers the re- can be connected to an intercom or back- ground music system. Greater use of a limited number of speakers can be made by prepositioning the

No. 730 receptacle units about the room or office and then plugging in speakers as desired at one or several locations. No stripping of wires is necessary for in- stallation. Splices in connections in the cable and the special terminal blocks are made with the

"U- Element" connector, which makes an electrically efficient, tion simply by

The

No. 800 audio flat cable system has a amperes ance of mechanically strong connec- pressing in place. rated current capacity per conductor,

-.016

ohms with a of

4.5 resist- per conductor foot at

68 deg. F. The system is chemically inert to moisture and most common solvents, once applied to a dry surface.

The insulation material is self extin- guishing and may be any common house painted over with paint.

Æ

Fig.

1.

FM dipole at ceiling.

Flat

Audio

Cables

Fig.

2.

& 3.

Connecting high fidelity amplifier to speaker (left and above).

Fig. 4,

5,

6.

Connecting

P.

A. speaker at Bethany Hospital in Kansas

City, Kansas.

(Installation by Tele- Music, Inc.)

MAY,

1965

AUDIO

y

If it wasn't for this monstrous

1,400 lb.,

$1,740

"Voice of the Theatre

843A 838B A7W, A?-500W

you could these probably never afford

to

enjoy the no- compromise big sound of

FULL

-S z

z

E

IA

`

KCB speaker

systems

from

Alter

Because their no- distortion mid

-range (with highs and lows to match) which embraces 90% of all musical material would be beyond the reach of anybody except people in the industry: the recording and broadcast studios, and the networks. Most of whom use them. (Who else in the hi

-fi industry can make a claim like this?

Manufacturer

A,

B,

E, F,

F,

J, K, K, L, P, Q,

S. T. U, W ?)

And maybe even these discriminating speaker buyers couldn't afford to help us amortize the research and development costs of developing

P1,.AYBACK systems like our beautifully furni- ture- styled 843A "Malibu';

838B

"Carmel'; and

A7W. Thank goodness they (and you) don't have to.

Theatre owners the world over have done it already. Ever since 1945, when Altec introduced the first (and only) commercially

- available speaker systems approved by the

Research Council of the Academy of Motion

Picture Arts and Sciences.

So unless you have room for two of our 1,400 lb. "Voice gest you

PLAYBACK, of the Theatre" Systems, we'd sug- consider the only next best systems like thing: the ones available to recording and broadcast studios and you at the same reasonable, R&D- prepaid prices.

For example, the new Altec 843A "Malibu" is a bargain at $356.00 because it contains speaker components that are nearly identical to our giant two -way theatre models: two low fre- quency speakers, a horn

-loaded high frequency driver with low crossover. and a two -section dividing network. The "Malibu" is first and foremost a beautifully hand -crafted furniture piece tailored into a space -saving upright wal- nut enclosure room.

For a that will do credit to any living horizontal version of the same thing, try the 838B "Carmel" at

$346.50.

Or, for

$384.00, you can own the new

Altec A7W which is identical, in every way but looks, to our famous "baby" "Voice of the

Theatre" the

NEW!

DZ=A30

ENERGIZER!

Specially designed

This for people who like over -emphasized instrumental bass. extreme low pass filter connects between amplifier output and speaker input. Suitable for use only with high efficiency speakers. Price:

$30.00

A7.

The difference is that the A7W comes in walnut finish, while the

A7 comes in a rather spartan utility cabinet (though at only $288.00 who will complain?) fm built

-in installations.

Other full -size Altec Speaker Systems available from $2t4.50 for nado" to $411.00 the space- saving

841B'Coro-

What more can we tell you? Just to "A -B" these

PLAYBACK systems against anything and everything you can find at your nearby leading

Altec Distributor's.

In the meantime, get your copy of Hi

/Fi

Stereo Review's Great Debate: "Is a good big speaker better than a good little speaker?" The affirmative, quite own naturally, is presented by our

Chief Engineer of Acoustics

/Transducers,

Alexis Badmaieff. The negative is presented by a well

-known manufacturer of little speakers.

So find are out for yourself why full

-size speakers now the rage. Merely write Dept.

A -5.

.,965

AlC

ALE

ALTEC

LANSING

CORPORATION

L

`Z7A

Subsidiary of

Ling

-

Temco- Vought, Inc.

ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA

All prices shown exclusive of applicalsle Federal Excise Tax.

Circle

121 on Reader Service Card

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

31

32

H.

EQUI

PMEN1

H. SCOTT

PROFI

260

MODEL

SOLID

-STATE

AMPLIFIER

With the appearance of more and more transistorized amplifiers, it seems likely that descriptive literature may soon resort to the terminology employed in the automotive industry, for "cool" and "compact" are certain to be used.

For whatever else transistors have of- fered in the amplifier category

-and

that is plenty

-they

can be compact, and they certainly run cool.

The new Scott 260 is also compact.

Matching other Scutt components in general appearance and size (most re- quire the same panel cutout -4% x

14% in.) it offers a full -size 80 watts

( music power) as a fitting companion to the already well -accepted line of Scott tun- ers

-and

particularly the 312

-and

still runs cool enough as not to require any excessive precautions

As a about ventilation. matter of fact, it dissipates only 25 watts of heat at standby, and radiates less heat than a

100 -watt lamp under full power.

In appearance, the

260 could be a conventional tube amplifier except for its size.

The panel is

4% x 15 in. and it requires a depth of 13 in. from the front of the mounting panel.

A dividing line separates four switches and a volume

- control knob at the top from the less

- used controls such as input, selector, bass, treble, balance, and and power switches in the the speaker lower half.

The upper switches are

TAPE, RUM-

BLE, SCRATCH, and

VOLUME /LOUDNESS.

The

INPUT switch has four positions

-

TAPE HEAD, PHONO, TUNER, and

EXTRA, the latter being a welcome change from

U the usual

"Aux."

The selector switch of- fers seven positions -BAL L,

BAL R,

MONO, STEREO, REVERSE STEREO, L

IN-

PUT, and

R

INPUT.

The

"BAL" positions are a

Scott fea- ture which combines signals from both channels and feeds them only to either

L or

R speakers, permitting an accurate balance adjustment between them. The

L and

R inputs select the input from either channel and feeds it monophon- ically to both speakers. The other posi- tions are self

-explanatory.

Next in line across the bottom are the dual -concentric bass and controls treble tone providing separate control of the channels yet permitting easy control over both channels at once when de- sired. tion is

The last knob on the bottom sec- the balance control. The remain- der of the section is occupied with the speaker and power switches, a pilot lamp, and a stereo headphone jack

-an

especially desirable feature in these days of headphone popularity.

The rear panel mounts a power fuse and two speaker fuses, two convenience receptacles

-one

switched and the other not jack, jacks,

- a derived center -channel phono tape recorder feed and output four pairs of inputs for

TAPE

HEAD, PHONO, TUNER, and

"EXTRA."

Also included are a grounding terminal, a slide switch for each channel to adjust for speaker impedance- either

8 and

16 ohms or 4 ohms, and a three

-position slide switch to adjust phono input sen- sitivity.

These last three switches are especially desirable, since the user may have two speakers with different im- pedances-or perhaps he wishes to par- allel another speaker to feed a different

Fig.

1.

H. H.

Scott

Model 260 solid

- state amplifier. location, and thus requires a different output impedance-and not all phono cartridges are of the same output level, though many amplifiers make no provi- sion for this condition. In the 260, the

SENSITIVITY which adjust switch has three positions the amplifier

(by a change in the preamp feedback circuit) to give rated output at

3 -, 5

-, or

9

-mv inputs, respectively. In tion of the least -sensitive posi- the switch, preamp overload is satisfactorily high at

63 mv, while there is still adequate gain in the most- sensi- tive position for the lowest -level car- tridges. The

9 mv position will be fine for most cartridges. This phono overload point has become the first parameter we measure, since we have some units which have been encountered disappoint- ing in this figure. It is our opinion that the preamp overload signal should be at least 40 mv, since tridges with average car- and records, this value is reached more than occasionally. This measure- ment is made at

1000 cps, and the over- load point diminishes rapidly as fre- quency is lowered.

Circuit Description

The two channels of the

260 are, of course, identical, and each employs 11 transistors, mostly silicons. The preamp section uses three

-two

2N2926's and one 2N2613 or

2N508A. is provided in

Equalization the feedback circuit, as is also the sensitivity change previously described. This is followed by one sec- tion of the input switch and the tone

- control amplifier, which uses two more

2N2926's. The tone control circuit is similar to the Baxandall in that the fre- quency discrimination is provided by feedback.

The scratch and rumble filters are also incorporated in this section. The driver section comes next, and employs three selected 2N3053's and one 2N-

398B, the latter a

PNP unit used as a phase reverser. This section feeds the single -ended push -pull output stage us- ing a

3235's matched pair of 2N3055's or 2N- mounted on a large heat sink.

Bias and balance adjustments for the output section are provided in the driver amplifier. No transformers are employed in the audio circuits, and though this somewhat complicates the design, it does result in a fine amplifier with a minimum of phase shift through- out.

The accommodation for differing speaker impedances is a switchable net- work in the feedback circuit from out- put to the base of the first transistor in the driver section. Coupling to the speaker from the common point of the output pair is by means of a

2000

-4

capacitor to give good low- frequency response. has an

The derived center channel impedance of

4700 ohms, the value of a resistor to ground from this point, which is fed by an 82,000

-ohm

MAY,

1965

AUDIO

Wait

till

you play

your

/'l11(Illh1

/Illl /irI g(lid

and your

FRESCOI3ALOÌ

TOCCATAS with the world's

only

true

1onghaii

L

(C-AV_<CQW-FeCQ e

cartridge.

And if you can't wait-.

Stanton Magnetics,

Inc.

Plainview,

L.

I.,

N.Y.

Gentlemen:

I

give up. What is

a

longhair cartridge?

1

L

Name

Address

City

State

A,

Stallton

Circle

122 on

Reader Service Card

Minn

AAAV

,oAs

33

resistor from the two speaker lines.

The speaker terminals are fused to prevent any damage to case of a the output stages in short in the leads

-an

open circuit makes no difference, apparently, since the speaker switch simply opens the circuit without substituting a dum- my load.

The headphone jack is fed through a

220 -ohm resistor from each speaker lead.

The power supply uses two silicon rectifiers, 2250 µf of capacitive filtering, and one 27 -volt Zener diode to stabilize the low -level stages.

Performance

As we have learned to expect with

Scott equipment, the 260 lives up to its specifications

-even

exceeding them in places. We measured 0.8 per cent total harmonic distortion at 45 watts

(sine

- wave) output, while the specifications claim only 30 watts. With both chan- nels operating simultaneously, we meas- ured 40 watts per channel at

0.8 per cent THD. At the more usual output level of around one with efficient speakers

watt-

adequate

-we

measured a

THD of only 0.15 per cent, which is certainly exceptionally good. IM was less than

1 per cent at rated power (60 and 7000 cps,

4:1)

. is

A signal of approximately 0.5 volts available to feed a tape recorder, and rated output from the amplifier is achieved with only

2 mv input from a tape head.

3, 5, and

9 mv, respectively, will provide rated output from the phono input at three settings of the sensitivity switch, while the high level inputs require approximately 0.5 volts for is the same output. The scratch filter down about

7 db at 10,000 cps, com- mencing to roll off at 3500 cps.

The rumble filter is down

11 db at 50 cps, with the effect commencing at

125 cps. about

Loudness compensation meas- ured

8.7 db at 50 cps, and the tone con- trols provide a boost and cut of 10.5 db at

10,000 cps, and 13.3 db boost and cut at 30 cps.

These symmetrical figures betoken considerable care in the selection of values in the tone -control circuits, and the over

-all design appears to be con- servatively done

-both

electrically and mechanically.

Listening and

Operation

Until someone finds out how to de- rive adequate aesthetic pleasure from meters or an oscilloscope, the ultimate proof of a hi

-fi component is in the lis- tening. Second to this is how it handles.

If an amplifier sounds good but is poorly arranged or difficult to operate or the switches are the volume and tone controls have the wrong taper, the user is likely to become disenchanted after a few hours of even delightful listening.

The 260 has "nice manners" in op- eration and we certainly could find no fault whatever in its handling. We were pleased at the solid bass, resulting largely from the high damping factor

that

seems to be the reason for the so- called "transistor sound," which might be described as a

"tightness" or "dry- ness." This a type of sound results from complete elimination of loudspeaker hangover. High- frequencies from such instruments as violins and oboes have a silky smoothness which is pure joy to hear in any reproduction.

Now may be the time for all good audiofans to convert to solid

-state am- plifiers

-and

if you are thinking of buy- ing any amplifier, the 260 is bound to be a most satisfactory choice. Circle

208.

BOGEN

B

-62

TURNTABLE

The Bogen

B

-62 is not a new turn- table; rather it is a significant updating of a well established system. Its direct ancestor was the

B

-61, a unit that es- tablished a good reputation for itself at a very modest price.

The differences between the. B -61 and

B

-62 are not obviously visible: The arm has been redesigned so accommodate a that it can wider range of cart- ridge weights at the lowest stylus forces; the stylus force adjustment has been altered; the cartridge shell is metal instead of plastic. Otherwise, this is much the same unit as before.

The

B

-62 is an integrated unit. That is, the arm and turntable are irrevoc- ably married to each other.

The arm is of a static balance type, stylus force comes from unbalancing the arm for the required downward force. The on- off switch is linked to an arm lift de- vice that is completely disconnected when the arm is in play position.

The turntable is really unique. It consists of a

7

%

-lb. non -ferrous platter that is driven by a four

-pole motor. The motor is linked to the platter by a puck drive on the underside of the platter

(not its rim).

Accordingly the under- side of the platter is accurately ma- chined and polished. Of major interest is the shaft from the motor that drives the puck.

Instead of the usual step diameters for shaft is a the various speeds, this tapered shaft with three steps,

Fig. 2.

62

Bogen

B-

Turntable each step tapered

( there are actually four speeds

-33

and 45 are on one step)

.

The result is continuously varia- ble speeds. Steps are provided for prac- tical purposes, the shaft would have to be too long without speed change is them. Continuous provided from just be- low 33 to a bit over 80 rpm.

The value of this speed control is obvious to the music lover. Particularly, if he plays along or has a collection of older non

-standard speed discs. Precise pitch control is his.

At the same time,

Bogen recognizes that fishing for an exact speed is tea, so not everyone's cup of they provide four click -in stops for the four popular speeds.

The

Tests

As received, the

Bogen

B

-62 was right on speed at 120 volts: at

130 v it

it

became

1.5 per was only 0.5 it became 2.0 cent fast; at 100 volts per cent slow; at

85 volts per cent slow.

These are very satisfactory sus- voltage figures speed regulation -ver- indeed. And remem- ber that the table can be adjusted to exact accuracy regardless of voltage.

Flutter measured 0.09 per cent while wow was 0.40

Rumble per cent. measured

25 db based on

3.54 cm

/sec recorded velocity at

1 kc.

However, oscilloscope checks showed that the rumble was all well below 20 cps

Arm low.

(centered around

15 cps). tracking error was moderately

With an

Empire 880P cartridge, we measured

1 degree per inch as the arm moved inward. Maximum error at a 6 in. diameter was just under

3 de- grees. Arm resonance was very low in frequency (10 cps) and was

+5

db.

This places it well below the range of recorded music and should cause no performance problems at all.

Listening tests were made to find how far the ear could confirm these measurements. Rumble is inaudible, mono or stereo. Piano tones were pure without audible flutter or wow.

The arm tracked well at the lowest recom- mended forces.

This table sells for a mere $64.95.

It is solidly built, and appears extremely reliable. And, it performs quite well in- deed.

Circle 209 on Reader Service Card

(Continued on page 44)

34

AUDIO MAY,

1965

WHEN

KOSS

REK-O-KUT

PLEDGE

THEMSELVES

TO

QUALITY,

HERE'S WHAT

THEY

MEAN

When John

C.

Koss discussed

purchased control of

Rek-

O

-Kut,

he

"quality"

with

Sid Simonson (Rek

-O

-Kut Manufac-

turing

Vice -President) and

Hal Dennis (Rek

-O

-Kut

Sales Vice

President). "There's

a

reason why everyone

Rek

-O

-Kut as the very

thinks of finest

in single -play

turntables. There's

a reason why every respects

Rek

-O

-Kut audio engineer in the business knows and

equipment,"

said Koss.

"The reason,"

Simonson explained, we paid

"is that for

over 25 years,

particular attention to

purchase of parts and raw

materials.

Then we tooled

for

absolute precision in

machining

and assembly. If something

wasn't perfect,

we scrapped

it!"

"Good,"

and said Koss,

"that's

what

I do

with our

headphones

that's

what

I want

continued

with our

turntables." that's

what is now being done at the Milwaukee plant.

And

STEREOPHONES

$45.00

REK TURNTABLE

$165.00

Truly a professional

20,000 cps. Impedance: 50 ohms to be used with

4, 8, or

16 ohm outputs. attachment. instrument.

Frequency response: 30- and

Fluid -filled ear cushions for positive seal comfort over long listening periods. Highest quality driv- ers mounted in acoustically designed chambers provide un- usually smooth frequency response. Equipped for boom mike

Three speed. Noise level: -59 db below average recording level. Wow and duty

Hysteresis Synchronous motor for constant speed and

"hush" flutter: 0.385% performance.

On

-off

RMS. signal

Custom -built, heavy indicator.

Write for complete details and specifications on all Koss and

RekOKut products.

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

KOSS REK-O-KUT

2227

N. 31ST STREET

Circle

123 on Reader Service Card

MILWAUKEE

8, WIS.

35

grid resistance is over 250,000 ohms.

In view of the high impedance of the

BK1091, you would have to make extra sure that stray capacitance (of the cable, and such) between the head and the following tube is kept to a minimum.

Plastic- Coated Tape

HERMAN

(Note:

To facilitate a prompt rein!!. please enclose a stamped, self -addressed envelope with your question.)

Herman Burstein

280

Twin Lane E., Wantagh,

N.Y.

Neither

Eye nor VU Says He

Q.

I cannot seem to understand why there should be any argument for either the

VU meter or the magic eye tube as a record level indicator. if

It seems to me that the tape recorder is correctly adjusted, there should be available a gain control setting, consistent with the "average" vol- ume of the material being recorded, which will safely record any momentary peaks that come along. A lot of material being taped cannot be monitored for peaks before recording, so it seems only reasonable most recording is done with the that level in- dicator set for "normal" when "average" volume is being fed to the recorder.

Is there anything wrong with this reasoning?

If not, what is the continuing fuss about?

A.

In a tape recorder of good quality and employing a

VU meter to indicate record- that ing level, this meter is adjusted so

O VU corresponds to about

1 per cent harmonic distortion

( at 400 cycles

).

This leaves about 6 to

8 db safety margin for that the meter, being a me- signal peaks chanical device, cannot follow.

In fact, however, signal peaks may be as much as

20 db above the average or indicated value. How are you to know? The answer is: experience. The experienced recordist, knowing what is apt to occur with different kinds of music and perhaps different re- cording sites, will alter his recording level accordingly. That is, in one situation he that the may adjust recording gain so meter never or hardly ever goes above

O VU; in another situation he might keep below allow

-3

VU; in still the meter to hit another he might

+3

VU.

Furthermore, using a professional or semi

-professional tape recorder, one can monitor the signal on that has just been put the tape. Thus one can use the evidence of his ears as to how high the recording gain control may be set.

Lacking sufficient experience or the monitoring facility

( which requires separate record and play- back heads and tape amplifiers), one can turn to a magic eye to indicate whether peaks are being recorded at too high a level.

Let me describe a recent experience to

BURSTEIN

Q. Is magnetic tape With microthin plas- tic coating over the oxide more satisfactory than the uncoated type?

A. I have had no personal experience with the microthin plastic coating.

My guess is that there may be some loss of treble response, particularly at lower tape speeds, owing to the separation between the tape and the heads due to the plastic coating. illustrate the point.

I was at the home of a friend who owns a tape recorder equipped with a VU meter. However, this machine cannot record and play simultaneously.

The owner had recorded an hour program of classical music, taken from phono discs and interspersed with his comments. There were many passages in one of his selections which contained distressing distortion, yet the operator had been careful

VU to keep the meter below

O.

A check of the phono no disc which had been copied revealed comparable distortion on the disc.

The simple fact was not been an that the VU meter had adequate guide in setting record level for the program material in question.

You state taped cannot be monitored for maximum you are that "a lot peaks before recording." of

I material being doubt this. If recording from microphone or phono disc, certainly you can experiment in advance in order to set recording level properly. If you are recording from radio, you can preset your recording level on the basis of that the program material preceding which you want to record; it is un- likely levels guard that the station will change carefully against doing so. its peak from one program to the next by a serious amount; in fact, stations generally

Head

Matching

Q.

In your article in Audio in

July 1958 you describe the use of a

Brush BK1090 low- impedance head

(550 millihenries) for both record and playback. Why isn't a transformer for matching the tube input necessary during playback? The

BK1091 is a high

Brush

-impedance head. Would- n't that work as well?

What circuit changes would be necessary if this were used in- stead of the BK1090?

A.

The Brush

BK1090 is a high -impe- dance head, while the

BK1091 can be

Use of described as extra -high impedance. a step

-up transformer between the

BK1090 and a tube grid would entail serious danger treble loss due to winding capacitance of of the transformer.

Use of a

BK1091 for play- back would have the advantage ing a of present- higher signal to the tube and resulting the in a better signal -to -noise ratio. On other hand, the

BK1091 has too high an impedance to be used satisfactorily recording, where relatively for substantial audio current and bias current are re- quired. In playback, no circuit changes would be required in substituting a

BK1091 for a BK1090, if the following

Unusual

Specs

Q. One review of a particular machine puzzles me.

After giving an over -all excel- lent report on this machine it concludes with (what

I consider) a very poor IM tortion figure, stated as 5 per cent at

VU review said this type of that this figure equipment. figures over

1 or 2 is

I have normal been dis-

-10

and 18 to

30 per cent at

0

VU.

The for a hi -fi fan for some time now, and distortion percent tend to alarm me.

Also, as a

I don't understand normal recording this

-10

level. On my

VU present machine I would have considerable tape hiss if

I attempted to record at such a low level.

Could you specifications for me. please elucidate these

0

A.

I believe

VU that this particular machine's reading corresponds to 3 per cent harmonic distortion

( at 400 cps ), in which case IM distortion of 18 to 30 per cent seems only of

5 to

10 moderately excessive; a figure per cent would be more in line with what can be expected of a high quality tape recorder. On the other hand, if I am wrong and this machine's

0 VU reading corresponds to

1 per cent harmonic distortion

( which is the proper way of calibrating a VU meter for tape record- ing), then

18 to 30 percent IM is quite excessive.

The reference to

-10 VU as a normal recording level assumes that most of the material recorded will be about 10 db below the peaks. Ordinarily you would set recording level so that the meter to read

0

VU. the peaks cause

It comes as a harsh surprise to most audio fans that

IM reaches much greater heights in the case of a tape recorder than in any other electronic component. But this is

IM a fact. Whereas we seldom encounter greater

1 or 2 per cent in preamps, power amplifiers, tuners, and so on, IM

20, percentages frequently reach

5, 10, and even more on tape. Great be exercised in care must setting record level low enough to avoid excessive IM, yet high enough to maintain a good signal -to -noise ratio. One of the reasons that commercially recorded tapes have not gained a more favorable reception is because of the high amount of distortion on them due to the effort to maintain a high signal -to -noise ratio. is

It should be clear that the distortion essentially due to the tape rather than to the electronics of the tape machine.

Æ

MAY,

1965

36

AUDIO

NEW LITERATURE

Electronic Projects Catalog.

Henry

Francis

Parks

Laboratory offers a free catalog of the many electronic projects plete plans for a wide that range they of offer. Com- items, such as amplifiers, spot welders, a theremin, moisture meter, impedance meter and ultra sonic power generator are offered. The catalog lists the item, gives a brief description and suggests the ease or difficulty of the project. Circle

220

Tape

Manufacture and

Use. This free booklet from Eastman Kodak treats such subjects as the sound recording process, frequency response, bias, sensitivity, sound brilliance, output, signal

-to -noise ratios, base other mechanical properties of tape for audio use. Although primarily aimed at print

-through, materials and the advanced amateur sound recordist, the

24

-page booklet is written in explanatory language designed

'help the casual tape user to to better understand the magnetic processes, thereby achieving better recordings.

Title of the publication is

"Some

Plain Talk From Kodak about

Sound Record- ing Tape." Circle

221

If you are in a

R

CHING?

current, or even not

-so- current, issue of a magazine

SEA tracking down a technical article

- do it the easiest way with

-

LECTRODEX, the original radio -electronic magazine index. In only minutes you can locate the subject you want, and it costs you only pennies per issue of LECTRODEX.

For more than a decade, librarians, engineers teachers, students, researchers, hobbyists and technicians in the radio

-TV- electronic fields have referred to LECTRODEX for information about articles from amplifiers to zener diodes.

LECTRODEX covers more than twenty

-five publications in the radio and electronics fields and is published as a all cumulative index throughout the year with the 6th or last issue as an Annual which may be kept as a bi- monthly permanent record of radio- electronics and related articles published that year.

ECTRODEX

Available by subscription only:

One

(1) Year

$3.00

-

-

-

Two

(2) Years

$5.50

Viking of Minneapolis,

Two New

Publica- tions. "High Fidelity Decorating with an

88

-Stereo

Compact" is the title of a new brochure that includes general recommendations for com- ponent placement and photographs of stylish home installations. It is available at no cost.

Owners of

88 series Viking machines can now receive, for

$1.00, a complete service manual.

Theory of operation, installation, trouble shoot- ing and complete mechanical and electronic serv- ice information is covered in detail. Diagrams and a complete parts list extend the usefulness

,tóf the manual.

LECTRODEX

P.O. Box 629

Mineola,

New York

Subscription Rates:

U.S.

&

Possessions

$3.00 for six issues; $5.50 for twelve issues; all other countries

$3.50 for six issues.

Please enter my subscription for

LECTRODEX.

I enclose

$ for a issue subscription.

Name

Address

City

Zone State

The

First

Book of its

Kind

-No

Other Like

It!

Record Review Index. The Polart

Record

Reviews (including tape) has

Index to just been released for the year

1964. This is a comprehen- sive listing of all record and recorded tape reviews published during the past year in twelve of the leading review magazines

(including

Auoso).Listings are by composer or category, whichever is obviously appropriate. Popular re- short life are not cordings judged to have a kncluded on the basis of having no reference value. However, extensive reference listings are given to categories entitled "Pop and

Jazz,"

"Foreign," and "Shows." In all eases, the list- ing for a particular subjest will give the maga- zine(s), issue(s) and page number(s).

Cost of this

48

-page booklet is $1.50.

.,

TV

Distribution System Handbook.

Jerrold

Corporation is offering a

50

-page manual that provides

150 easy -to- understand sample layouts of typical TV distribution systems used in rela- tively small installations. The book is designed for the serviceman who would like to enter, or expand his activities, in this lucrative field.

Complete information on antennas, cabling, divi- tap

-off are provided. Ample graphs

" sion and and tables are provided to allow calculation of

.gable loss, db conversion and other parameters of distribution system operation. This revised and updated edition of a manual, originally published in

1959, is available for

$1.00.

Tape Recording Books. "Tape Recording the

Sounds of

Your Life" is the title of a

128

-page book that describes in depth typical

And outdoor recording techniques. Vacations,

'weddings, zoos, holidays, home parties, creative indoor sound are some of the subjects covered. List price is

$1.35.

"How to Get the

Most Out of Your Tape

Recorder" is a second

128

-page book, also with a

$1.35 list.

It covers dubbing, radio recording, slide and film synchronization, sound effects, hobby

-tape clubs, and the legalities of ucts of

Robins Industries. certain types of record copying. Both books are prod-

SOUND in

the

THEATRE

by Harold

Burris

-Meyer and Vincent

Mallory

Nothing like

SOUND in the

THEATRE has ever been published. It is the first book to set forth in authoritative detail what you can do with sound by electronic control, and how to do it whenever the source (singer, musician, speaker, etc.) and the audience are present together. The book develops the re- rived systems and equipment specifications.

Complete procedures are given for: Planning, assembling, and testing sound control installa- tions-

Articulating sound control with other elements of production formances

-

-Rehearsals and per-

Operation and maintenance sound control equipment. of quirements for electronic sound control from the necessities of the performance, acteristics of the audience the char-

(hearing and psy- choacoustics), and the way sound is modified by environment, hall, and scenery. Sound

THE

AUTHORS

During the past thirty years, the authors have developed the techniques of sound control in opera, open-air amphi- theatres, theatres on

Broadway, theatres on- the -road and concert halls and night clubs, in

Holly- sources are considered for their susceptibility of control and need for it, and the many tech- niques for applying electronic sound control

`are described and illustrated in thirty -two spe-

`

problems. From these problems are de-

RADIO`

MAGAZINES, INC.

Dept.

2

Post Office Box

629

Mineola, New York

` off- Broadway, in wood and in the laboratory.

Some of used in broadcast and recording as well ances where an audience is present. From have come

An invaluable reference an in. dispensable guile for anyone working in the neatre a com plete technological thesaurus for their techniques are as in perform- their laboratory notably successful applications of sound con- trol to psychological warfare and psychological screening. the engineer, architect, designer, technician, student, and teacher concerned with the reinforcement of sound and speech.

I am enclosing my

Send my copy of remittance for $6.95

SOUND in the

THEATRE postpaid.

(No

C.O.D., all books sent postpaid in and possessions, Canada, and Mexico.

Add 50e for Foreign orders.)

U.S.A.`

Name

Address

City

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

Zone

_

State

RECORD REVUE

Tatnall

Edward

Canby*

POTPOURRI

Mexico:

A

Album.

Columbia

Records Legacy

Columbia

LS

1016 stereo

This enormous book

-album, with some

66 big pages of color and print, in both

English and Spanish throughout, comes with a single slim record to keep it techni- cally in the recording area

-it's

practically in the art -picture

-book format. Plushy pro- duction: Goddard Lieberson is the pro- ducer and that slightly pompous word

"Legacy" is attached to the project.

I've scarcely had time to do more than look admiringly through the big book, with its pictures in color and black and white and its decorative text layout.

Like all these projects, the quantity of material is enormous and the detail

-work is formid- able. The book is called "Mexico:

Its Cul- tural

Life in Music and Art." The music?

Well, whaddya know. It's that old Col

- lumbia album of Mexican orchestra -chorus arrangements, engineered by Carlos Cha- vez, which first appeared in 1940 in con- nection with the Museum of Modern Art exhibit "Twenty Centuries of Mexican Art" in

New

York.

If I'm right, the

78 album reappeared on an early LP. Now it has been done all over in stereo with the inde- fatigible Chavez still at the helm.

The stuff is pretty dated nowadays

-a

mixture of 1930s -modern and hepped -up popular music, with some intriguingly unimportant imaginary

Aztec music

(on real Aztec instruments) concocted by Cha- vez. I always liked the sentimental "La

Paloma Azul" in its lush chorus arrange- ment by Chavez.

I still do. But some of the other items are overly pretentious high- brow stuff;

I suspect that the Mexicans themselves have gone this now much further than and may be just a hit embarrassed by it all, in spite of Columbia's best inten- tions, and Chavez's. How about

1965,

Columbia? It's later than

1940.

Valle del Locomotora de

Vapor.

Mobile Fidelity

MF 14 (2) stereo

Darn it, I do like a bit of railroad now and then. But these

RR buffs, you can't stop them. Now

Mexico to find they've had to move to steam

-and

they come back with two full LPs of the stuff, in one album!

Let's face it. To a non

-buff like me, steam is steam, Mexican or otherwise.

(

In fact, these engines are U.S. -made, most or all.

)

The Mexicans do blow their whistles a'plenty, though.

(

Was it

'specially for the tape recorder,

I always ask myself ?) And they talk

Mexican, i.e. Spanish, every now and then. Beyond that, I'd have to let the experts describe this big album, which seems as if it might be what the doctor ordered.

800th

Anniversary Album

Notre

-

Dame de Paris, 1163 -1963.

(Music by Campra, Desvignes, Vierne, Coch- ereau.)

Choir of Notre

Lamoureux Orch.,

P.

-Dame, soloists,

Cochereau, organ.

Philips

PHS

900 -039 stereo

What an astonishing record! Two tons of stereo equipment, miles of cables, intercom

TV and phone, 20 mikes

-but

what really counts is the

800- year -old cathedral itself, the heroine of it all. Four works are heard, all composed for the cathedral itself, the oldest

( very young in terms of the build- ing's age) being a

Psalm by Campra, of the French -Baroque eighteenth century.

Then there's a

Napoleonic celebration -piece by Desvignes, right out of the Beethoven

"Eroica" Symphony in its style

(1809

), a neo- Romantic bit by Vierne and, finally, a piece by the present organist,

M.

Cocher- reau, all immersed in the darnest 20- second reverberation

( well, almost

) you ever heard!

In stereo it's appalling, stop listening. but you can't

Musically,

I works are all regret to say, the two oldest that matter very much.

(

But what will they say in another

800 years?)

The Campra is first

-rate of its newly -popu- lar sort, with solos, choir boys, tutti, the bass continuo pounded out in giant el- ephant tones by fifty double bases and the organ pedals,

32 -foot.

So it sounds anyhow.

But very musical, in spite of the drastic means taken to make musical sense in the big echo. The Desvignes is unimportant but a real period piece; sounds sort of like the

Arche de

Triomphe with Napoleon himself striding beneath it, crowned in laurel! The less said better, except about the rest, the that some listeners will like the big noise, both Vierne and Cochereau.

Organist

at Play.

John Ledwon.

Alpha M7700 mono (also stereo)

(5965 West Blvd.,

Los

Angeles 43)

Wow! I somehow missed this in passing

-the

music isn't my dish but this kid, who started on the Mighty Wurlitzers at eleven and is around fourteen here, is the most finished past master at this stuff

I ever heard. Whew! Sounds like he'd been at it for thirty years.

All sorts of weird noises in this Mighty

W., including a remote -control piano, played off the organ keyboard.

(

Also honky tonk, harpsichord, mandolin.

)

Not to mention sleighbells, cow bells, Boat

Whistle, Fire Gong, Surf,

Trolley

Bell,

Bird Whistles and Horse's Hooves.

What an antique.

Electronic age P.S. All sounds were re- corded on the organ itself except for two notes.

They came

-ugh

-from a

Hammond.

Taped in, I presume. Coupla dead pipes?

Auscultation of the Heart.

J. B.

S.

Barlow and W. A. Pocock.

O'Reilly, commentator.

London

X

5873

Thump- thump. Slrrrp. Thump -thump.

Slrrrp. Somebody's heart is about to give way.

This amazing record just goes to show how far the

LP in all its majesty has gone these days.

A very professional sounding young

Britisher speaks here, analyzing

( with plenty of medical terminology

) just what is going on in the numerous and appallingly loud pumpings of these damaged hearts and normal ones, all beating furiously at the business of keeping somebody alive from minute to precious minute. Rather a terrifying sound for the uninitiated.

All sorts of are heart troubles and actions heard and discussed. Most is utterly be- yond anyone but an M.D. though a few light moments intrude themselves timidly, like a the sound billed as

"Cooing dove ".

Not bit funny, really.

If you want to listen for yourself, London has copies. No stereo.

Æ

SUPPORT

YOUR

MENTAL

HEALTH

ASSOCIATION

}

38

AUDIO

MAY, 1965

It

took guts to

even

think of making

a

low -cost speaker line to University's high qual- ity standards. But

-the chal- lenge paid off!

Rugged one -piece die-

cast basket

Massive ring magnets

2" long -throw voice coil

Electroplated metal parts to prevent distortion and assure long life

Shallow depth styling

Unique

2

-step suspension

1

-

University Mustang

-an

All

-

American top quality high fidrlity speaker

so good,

it ies the same unparal- leled

5

year backs up all warranty that

University prod- ucts. And there

is a

full line of Mustangs, with prices starting at

a low, low

$19.50.

You've just got to

see

it

and

hear it to believe it. Hold

a

Mustang in your hand

... immediately

you

will recog- nize the high quality con- struction that has made

University

a

leader

in

its field for more than

35 years the same

... quality design that won first prize

in a

recent national competition.

No

comparably priced speaker

can

match the high quality performance of

a

Mustang.

Prove

it to yourself.

Go

to your dealer

and

listen

to a

Mustang.

You

will know why everyone

says,

"University sounds better."

Get

the full

Mustang story

-

plus

new Guide to

Compo- nent Stereo! Write

Dept.

R55

g,,,,,,_

A

UNIVERSITY.

DIVISION Of LINO IEMCISVOOGNS

INC

9500

West Reno, Oklahoma City, Okla

Circle

125 on Reader Service Card

12

Mustang

M

-12T

"Three

-Way with Sphericon

Super Tweeter

-The whole speaker only $32.00

A GREAT NEW BREED

BY UNIVERSITY

NEW

Automatic Two -Way

Tape Stereo. The in Concertoné s series of

"Reverse

-o-

Matic" latest tape recorders is the

Model 801.

This is a 3/4-track stereo recorder with three -motor drive. Auto- matic reversal play and record is provided through six heads, three for each direction, plus a symmetrical center -capstan drive. Record and playback preamplifiers are solid state. Operation

PRODUCTS

Compact Phone Jacks. Switchcraft has an- nounced a new series of compact,

1

4" jacks designed for use in applications requiring com- plete insulation between jack sleeve and metal mounting board. Called the Insulated HI

-D

Jax

Series

110, the new units are only %" square and utilize a molded, threaded nylon bushing for level lower than virgin tape. The 150

-A will also demagnetize tape heads, guide posts, bear- ings and other tape recorder parts that could insulation between sleeve and panel. By in- tegrally moulding this nylon bushing with a brass insert, a continuous sleeve contact is jack's sleeve and achieved between the phone the mating sleeve of the plug. Five models three -conductor types in open, closed and double closed are standard available. These include two- and circuits. Eighteen other types able on special order. Circle 203. are avail- is by a pushbutton and remote control is available as an optional portable extra. carrying

The recorder case is containing built -into a stereo amplifier and stereo speakers.

Two microphones are also included.

Available as a deck (Model

802) for

$379.95.

The

801 lists for $449.95.

Circle

200.

Deluxe Stereo Receiver. The Kenwood KW-

55A is an

AM

/FM /MX receiver with a host of interesting features. The

FM tuner features

1.8 av sensitivity and nuvistor lights on the front front end. Colored panel indicate the mode of operation.

A stereo indicator lamp glows when the set "senses" a multiplex broadcast. Silent, automatic, electronic switching changes the set from mono to stereo mode.

The amplifier portion

Capacitor Tester. Designed to make measure- ments on a detect practical

Model 801 checks all trolytics, picking up defects cuit performance. A special balanced -bridge circuit tests electrolytics up to 2000

µf. It can marginal basis, this new

B &

K capacitors, including elec- electrolytics that that will affect cir- should be re- placed and predicts the life expectancy of any alter a tape recording if they were to he netized. The netize watches, tools, and any email magnetized metal parts. unit aLso can be used to mag- demag-

Designed for eery, hand -held opera- tion and housed in a plastic case, the

110

-A is provided with an eight -foot gray

-vinyl line cord.

List is $18.95.

Circle 266.

New fidelity

Speakers.

A new series of low -cant high

- speaker components has been dubbed, by

University, half

-wild horse indigenous to Texas, New ico and Oklahoma).

In line with this they described as a new breed of

They range

"Mustang" (for in price from size from 8" to a 12" full the small, hardy,

Mex- are spirited components.

$19..90 to $32.00 in three

-way system. protides a total of

17 watts per channel rms power will at

1 per cent THD. The preamp section accommodate magnetic inputs from phono or tape heads, with a sensitivity tone control is provided

10 of db

1.5 at mv. Full

50 and

10,000 cps), as well as rumble and scratch filters, loudness compensation, AFC defeat, and a separate power on-off.

23 tubes and are used.

Power consumption is 200

8 diodes watts, weight is 30 pounds and dimensions are

171/(s" x

5

13/16" x

14

".

Price is $239.95.

Circle 201.

Decorator Speaker System. Accent colors only are part of the modern styling built into the new Utah PRO speaker system. The grille cloth can be changed in seconds by snapping in alter- nate pre- covered boards.

Blue, orange, persim- mon, beige tweed, and cane panels are offered. electrolytic rated circuit leakage test eliminates the need remove a capacitor make actual leakage re- sistance measurements. Tests are made voltage circuits so read directly. at to

3 volts or snore. An in- to on low - that transistor units may be

Higher voltages can

Size is 5" x 8" x 12% ". also be used.

Net price is $99.95.

Circle

204.

Speaker Placement

Aid. The

Jensen Manu- facturing Company announces the availability of a valuable new design tool for the profes- sional sound system layout engineer. Large

14" x 20" as transparent

Isosonie plastic templates known

Contour

Charts show the sound coverage of the Jensen

CALSTAR

TM

Column

Speakers

Model 55 and

Model 1010.

These be transparent templates can placed directly over the architect's elevation drawing regardless of scale to indicate the cor- rect location and tilt angle for these column speakers to attain any desired audience erage. Jensen Technical Bulletin

No. 45, upon request, "Speaker System Layout is cov- free

Easy with Jensen Isosonic Contour

Charts" describes these templates and how to use them. This bulletin includes small size reproductions of the isosonic contour charts for these two col- umn speakers which can be used for speaker system layout although not as conveniently as with the large of two transparent transparent templates. The set templates with are available in a mailing tube for

$1.00

Post- paid. Jensen Mfg. Co., 6601 S.

Chicago

38,

Ill. instructions

Laramie Ave.,

As for the speakers themselves,

(12" x 12" x 24

") contain woofer in a sealed enclosure. The 8" mid and

31/2" tweeter are a 10" separately the cabinets high -compliance

-range sealed to pre- vent interaction with the other drivers. The complete system

(with one grille cloth) sells for about

$100.00.

Circle 202.

Bulk Tape

Eraser. The

Eraser. release of an old standby among the

Model 150 -A

Magneraser unit

This recorded tape will bulk is erase actually a a re- tape recordists,

Junior Bulk Tape full reel of in seconds, providing a noise

Among other new speaker products released

LTV

University is a new professional

3 by

-way speaker system here illustrated.

Measuring

23

9/16" x 153/x" x 121/4", it is designed for bookshelf or floor placement. Response is claimed at

4000

28- 22,000 cps cps with crossovers at

600 watts. Consumer price is $1.29.00.

Circle 207. and and power .handling capability is 40

40

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

I want to be able to relax. Send me all the literature on

McIntosh products. please check

C 22 tube stereo preamp

C

24 solid state preamp

MR

71 fm stereo tuner

MC 225 stereo power amp

MC 240 stereo power amp

MC 275 stereo power amp

MR

67 fm stereo tuner

MA 230 stereo amp /preamp

MX

110 stereo tuner /preamp

McIntosh

Lab., inc.

6

Chambers

St.,

Binghamton,

N.

Y.

NAME

STREET

CITY

STATE

WANT

TO

FEEL...

`younger

more

SM

more

-^eitiwv

..

..........

and

DYNAMIC

:...

...............................

6-2.!

buy a

fljtjf0j

Will a McIntosh make me younger, more handsome, smarter, more exciting, and dynamic?

No.

But

it

will let you relax.

Then you won't care

if

you are younger, more handsome, smarter, more exciting, and dynamic.

Circle

126 on

Reader Service Card

AUDIO

MAY,

1965 41

*1)

i

INZIDE

AUDIO

LARRY ZIDE

HIGH

FIDELITY SYSTEMS

A

User's

Guide by Roy

F.

AR classic work

Allison

-

for novices (and perhaps be con- sulted secretly by professionals). From the

Bergen Evening Record:

"completely basic

..

.

If this doesn't give you a roadmap into the field of hi

-fi, nothing will."

From The

Ameri- can Record Guide:

Vol.

2 explains how components work than how to use them, but rather it presupposes no

Mayer writes in esquire:

Martin technical or mathematical background.

"far introduction to the subject ever written

- best literate, intelligent and, of course, immensely knowledgeable." From

HiFi

/Stereo

Review:

Roy

"really expert guidance

Allison's

"High

Fidelity Systems

-A

User's Guide" at $1

..

.

I would strongly urge this book as prerequisite reading for anyone contemplating hi

-fi pur- chases."

From

High Fidelity: "welcome addition to the small but growing body of serious litera- by

Library Vol.

1

70 pp., illus., paper $1.00

A layman's practical guide to high stallation.

We think fidelity in- that it will become a ture on home music systems."

From Electronics

Illustrated:

"To my mind, this is the best basic book now available on high fidelity."

REPRODUCTION

Edgar

Villchur

AR

Library Vol. 2 93 pp., illus., paper $2.00

"just the books to satisfy that intellectual itch for deeper understanding."

RADIO MAGAZINES, INC.

P.

0.

Box

629, Mineola, N. Y.

Please send me

Edgar

Sound" at $2

I enclose $ der, in bills, money or- or check only. (All prices post- paid.)

NAME

ADDRESS

OF

SOUND

the following:

Villchur's "Reproduction of

Previously, we have some ship its

As aspects of the between the ultimate master, written about complex relation- audio industry and the customer. The connecting link in this relationship is the retailer. After all, one who sells audio has grown, so have the number of dealerships. There are many small establishments, to be sure, it is but the retailing giants

( and there are only a few) who dominate

Now, most prices to the the small price manufacturers the industry. offer better quantity buyer. This puts independent at an immediate disadvantage since he cannot pos- sibly purchase products by the hun- dred to get the best price. So, he must either sell at a higher price or take a reduced profit if he is to stay alive against the dealer is the the product. the chain store.

Another Choice

He has one other choice. He can be- come a franchise store. This is some- thing new in audio but it is certainly not a new idea. Howard Johnson, Car - vel and others have been doing just that all along. Many of their establish- ments throughout the country are not centrally owned, they are the private property of a local individual. They are a small business that is given the ad- vantage of a big dealer through the device of a franchise. This has come to retail audio.

My interest in this subject was re- cently aroused by an that a

New York retailer who had sev- eral stores of his own in announcement the area was starting a franchise program. This deal- er is the Audio Exchange.

His specialty is, as the name implies, the trade -in.

Audio Exchange has an enviable re- putation as a source for used audio equipment and as a dealer in new mer- chandise as well. His reputation was natural demonstration built by careful, of components under simulated living room conditions and a thoroughly com- petent and extensive service facility.

I spent part of an afternoon recently with William Colbert, energetic Pres- ident of the Audio Exchanges, discuss- ing his approach to expansion via the franchise route.

It must be established that Audio Ex- change is a newcomer to franchise hav- ing begun with their first non -owned store in November

1964.

We talked, then, mostly about future plans, par- what they held for the con- ticularly sumer. Bill

Colbert feels very enthu- siastic about the future of franchising.

He sees it as a benefit for all.

I am inclined to agree.

Audio Exchange is, by necessity, con- fined to of the Greater Metropolitan Area

New York

City. Beyond this area their reputation decreases, as does the desirability of their franchise.

If a local retailer on

Long Island wanted to enlarge his business he might investigate becoming an Audio Ex- change franchisee. If he sought this out, he would find out the following:

That he must be a substantial and reliable business, or risk

(if a new firm)

, before he will receive a fran- chise. His competence will be investi- gated. If he passes muster he can that Audio Exchange logo outside. hang

What does he get? a

He can buy all his merchandise from central source. Since source buys in the central quantity, it gets the best price. This is passed onto the franchisee.

He thus gets the bulk price even though he may only purchase one piece. And, in the case of limited- distribution fair

- trade lines, he has direct access.

But, he must be authorized by the manu- facturer for these special lines.

It's easy to understand that a finicky manufac- turer would tend to approve an Audio

Exchange outlet where he might not otherwise want to open up a particular area.

The franchisee does not have to buy from Audio Exchange. If he prefers, he can buy directly from the manu- facturer. Wherever he gets the best price.

The franchisee also participates in regional advertising by Audio

Ex- change without actually paying for it.

And, the local store will directly benefit from any advantage that central buying can accrue. If Audio Exchange can a special deal, all buy the stores will have it.

Last, and most important, the

Audio

Exchange house label components are available to will to say the dealer an item local dealer. This ques- tion of house labels is a big one. You hear more about this. Suffice it that a house label offers the that is non -competitive.

Only an Audio Exchange store can a

Colbert speaker. And, house sell brands offer the consumer a good value since they are often sold as leader items, or because of mass purchase and low ad- vertising cost, can actually be sold for less than standard brands.

The consumer, our long suffering friend, who visits an Audio Exchange franchisee is, for all practical purposes, at an Audio Exchange store.

That deal- er's trade -in and trade -back policies are open to him. And, Audio Exchange service is open to him. The local fran- chisee may, or may not, have service of his own, but central service is avail-

71' r-.

MAY,

1965

42

AUDIO

able.

Many outlying stores cannot afford

(or get) a high -priced technician

/audio

specialist. The local man, picks up the phone and stumped, he is just talking to the chief serviceman in New

York.

Another Plan

From Audio Exchange, I went to

Lafayette

Radio in Syosset, New

York.

Lafayette is one of the giants, long es- tablished as a major mail order house and direct retailer. Their catalog has made them a national dealer so it was no surprise to find that their involve- ment with franchising was on a nation- al scale. Lafayette now has been at it for four years. They have

167 franchise stores, spread all over the country.

Their modus operandi is quite similar to Audio Exchange. The dealer gets his merchandise at a good price from

Lafayette, though not always at the maximum discounts.

This brings up the question of does what the franchisee pay Lafayette or

Audio Exchange for using their name.

A the privilege of percentage of gross sales.

A

Lafayette franchisee has the availa- bility of the entire catalog at their dis- posal. This goes far beyond high

- fidelity components, and gets into the electronic parts business as well. And

Lafayette has an extensive house label system, again well beyond the compo- nent business alone.

It was pointed out to me at Lafayette that franchising makes it possible for a locality to have a

Lafayette store that otherwise would not have been. It would not pay for a major distributor/ retailer to go into a small town in, say,

Kentucky. But a local business man can make a go of it. We have already pointed out the advantages of the fran- chise to the dealer. For the consumer,

} in that

Kentucky town, he has the

Lafayette catalog on display in his town. chisees

Lafayette requires of its fran- that they maintain equipped service shops and in general adhere to minimum care standards beyond mere sale of a component. the s

I've looked for may cost the local the loopholes in this franchise gimmick.

I can't find them. It dealer personal iden- tity. Joe's Audio Shoppe now becomes

Audio Exchange or operated by etc

Lafayette

Radio

(and only in small letters, "owned and benefit. er choice and often lower price. manufacturer benefits by selling more amplifiers. No as

").

But the dealer does

The consumer benefits by great- wonder Lafayette

The could franchise so many stores in only four years. I would not be surprised if Au- dio Exchange, on its own scale, does well. In fact, I would the franchise bandwagon.

It's a sure winner.

Æ

not be sur- prised indeed, if more companies climbed on

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

MORE NEW STUDIO EQUIPMENT FROM ALTEC

LATEST

ATTENUATOR

LESS THAN

1

RESISTANCE,

UPKEEP,

LINE

LONGER

ACHIEVES

MILLIOHM

CONTACT

LOWER NOISE, EASIER.

LIFE

The hoped -for possibility has developed into working reality

-

we've managed to come up with the finest attenuators yet developed. More than 300 types are available with either solder terminals or as plug -ins either

rotary or

straight

-lines, and in such categories as mixers, cali-

brated

controls, calibrated grid control pots, VU range extenders decade attenuators, impedance matching networks, decade resistors faders, and stereo new Altec

pan

potentiometers. And they're all listed in tip e

Attenuator

Catalog which we've printed as a convenien t reference for your aid.

A

LITTLE ABOUT

A LOT

OF

IMPORTANT IMPROVEMENTS

You might like to know how some of these improved attenuators were engineered.

For

instance, "coin" silver, which is normally used to make brushes, contains copper and is subject to oxidation sulfides. Silver sulfide

-

reducing con- ductivity and raising noise level, among other things.

So we've made

our

brushes of "fine" (pure) silver because it doesn't oxidize

-

it does not reduce conductivity; in fact, it actually has a helpful lubricity.

We use dual brushes on all our attenuators

-- both rotary and straight -line models. They are independently sprung and so guided as to eliminate

"stumble"

from contact to contact.

ADDED DEVELOPMENTS

Our new

attenuator

line is designed so that we'll be able to gang up to

8 of them in tandem, enabling you to operate the whole group with one control. We've produced rotary attenuators

that

will give you more steps in less space. How? Instead of putting them in the conven- tional round cans

-we're

building ours in square ones. And we're using the corners (space

that

previously went to waste) for the wiring.

DON'T

FORGET THE CATALOG

The new Altec log we

Attenuator

Cata- mentioned above has all the technical characteristics and

other relevant data on

the new line. We'll be delighted to send it to you. So write today, Dept..

AB5.

©

ALTEC

1965 AL

ALTE[

L

A N

S

Ni

G

LANSING

A

Division of

LL'V

Ling Altec, Inc.

A

N

A

H

E

I

M

,

C

A

L

I

F O R N

I

A

Circle

128 on

Reader Service Card

43

IN

úD

1'\

1

EQUIPMENT

Y1

4,n c`

(from page 34)

EICO SOLID STATE

FM-

STEREO RECEIVER,

MODEL

3566

The

EICO Model 3566 is complete- ly solid state FM-stereo receiver, de- signed as a kit but available factory assembled, which has successfully tack- led many of the problems which we find had plagued early solid

-state designs. Thus that the 3566 decreases in dis- tortion as power decreases; at normal listening levels distortion is as low as any unit we have encountered, and far lower than most. Also the ability to handle a wide dynamic range in low

- level stages is surprisingly good.

For example the phono input, with a sen- sitivity of 4 mv, does not start clipping until the signal becomes

78 mv.

With a sensitivity of 12 my clipping doesn't start until 240 mv.

(The 3566 can be set for either sensitivity by removing or replacing a jumper.) the conveniences provided by

Some of the EICO

3566 are: Automatic,

'7)---S\

PROFILE

S

Z f.a a

61" i

,"

JEDER SPRACHE,

NUR

1

c-.0lo

7341

BESSEREN,

KLAREREN

UND

NATURTREUEN TON!

TRANSLATED FROM

ANY LANGUAGE:

"ONLY TANDBERG TAPE RECORDERS OFFER

BETTER, CLEARER, MORE NATURAL

SOUND" the last word in stereo and monaural excel- lence the world over. At franchised dealers every- where from $208.60 to $498.00

ONE YEAR

GUARANTEE

°Tandberg

OF AMERICA. INC.

P.O. Box 171, 8

.Tandbery

BIETET

Third Avenue, Pelham, N.

Y. o silent switching between FM stereo and mono; automatic indication of stereo transmission by means of a light; ad- justable and defeatable muting; de- featable afc; loudness compensation; tape monitor; and a front panel head- phone jack.

In addition, the tuning dial is extremely well laid out and lit.

Circuit Description

Tuner: The FM front end and i.f. section are are separate assemblies which apparently supplied as a unit and the transistors are not identified. How- ever, from the schematic we note transistors in three the front end, the r.f. input stage being in the common base configuration. The converter is straight- forward. Following the front end as- sembly is sists of the i.f. assembly which con- four stages and the ratio de- tector, with taps for afc, tuning in- dicator and muting. The multiplex as- sembly contains ten transistors, all of them 2N2672's except for a single

2N1304 in the indicator circuit. The multiplex is classified as a time division type.

Amplifier: The power amplifier good example of is a the

RCA output cir- cuit which has become mon circuit available. sistors are the most com-

The output tran-

2147's, two per channel, driven by a transformer, which in turn is driven by a

2N2613. The driver transformer is driven by permit a much wider the emitter of the transistor (low impedance) so that the transformation ratio can be 1:1 and bandwidth trans- former. Tone controls are Baxandall type, utilizing a feedback network for input stage is boost or cut. The phono quite straightforward, incorporating a the input stage

DTG110 transistor for and a

2N2613 for the second stage, with a feedback network from the out- put of the second to the emitter of the first, the network incorporating the re- quired equalization. High level inputs the inte- such as tape, or auxiliary, or gral tuner bypass the phono preamp.

There is no tape equalization provided, so a that the tape input must be from recorder with a built

-in preamp.

Power Supply: The power supply of the 3566 provides electronically reg- ulated voltage to the entire set except for the amplifier power output stage, which really doesn't require regulation.

Transistors

(three) are used to regulate the various supply sections, apparently quite successfully to judge by perform- ance.

The Kit

The kit version of the 3566 is de- signed to require absolutely no adjust-

Circle 129 on Reader

Service

Card

MAY,

1965

44

AUDIO

4

*

-.* ment. This is achieved by having the front end, i.f., and multiplex sections factory assembled and adjusted, each on its own circuit board. The amplifier section, and preamplifier are complicated, in

The transistors are safeguarded, and the use of sockets to solder to them directly.

The manual is also un- spite of the switching. assembly eased, by for the transistors instead of having quite clear and de- tailed, with to a good deal of space given oversized illustrations. We were particularly happy to note pletely removed from that the op- eration and service sections were corn- tion; two the assembly sec- separate manuals are pro- vided.

In fact, precisely the operation manual is the same as provided for fac- tory assembled units. And rightly so.

Performance

Amplifier: The amplifier watts per channel rms provided

25 with an load and both channels driven; with a 4 -ohm load it put out

29

8

-ohm watts mis, with only one channel driven; ohms it provided 27 watts

ris,

both channels driven. Distortion measured

0.4 per cent at measured

0.33

25 from 20- 12,000 cps; per watts at rms,

12.5 cent; at

1

8 at ohms, watts it watt

16

0.13

Fig. solid

-

3. state

EICO

FM - stereo receiver per cent,

20- 18,000 cps.

Intermodula- tion was

1 per cent

7000,

4:1),

0.25

at

25 watts per cent at

1

(

60- watt.

Frequency response was within

1 db from

10 to

63,000 cps. Hum and noise measured

69 db below

10 my on phono.

At the most sensitive position of the phono jumper, sensitivity was

4 mv.

At other inputs sensitivity was 190 mv.

With an 8

-ohm speaker connected to from 20- 20,000 cps and observed to the speaker terminals, we swept the waveform on an oscilloscope in order determine whether the amplifier re- acted were well with a reactive load such as it would normally encounter. Results quite excellent. We did not at- tempt a capacitive load, but experience with this type of circuit leads us to believe there would not be any diffi- culty.

Tuner: Sensitivity, channel separation was 39 db; ratio was 4.5 db; harmonic distortion

0.45

IHF, is

2.2

µv; capture

1 per cent; audio response within db from 20- 15,000 cps; AM rejection

43 db; crossmodulation index,

Listening tests reveal

61 db. that the

3566 fine is a good buy performer and an extremely at its kit

(factory assembled at $350) dling of music is livering a firm price of about

$230

.

Its han- most enjoyable, de- but full bottom end and smooth response of throughout the rest the range.

As a tuner, we were impressed with its ability to quite handle strong signal, an ability which early solid

-state tuners a also impressed with its generally good handling and satisfactory all didn't share. We were price. low noise level. product at a very

A very attractive

Circle

209

"NEUMANN

CONDENSER MICROPHONES COMPLETE

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

OUR SUCCESS FORMULA.

Operations at Columbia

Records, rank reports

Vincent

J.

Liebler, Director of Technical talent bination!"

NEUMANN and rapport through

NEUMANN producer and sound control room engineers achieve

NEUMANN mikes.

Microphones inspire confidence, command professional respect

It's a winning com- for their predictable, consistently reliable performance. And above technician admire

...

N.

Y. them for that

..

our

Columbia and innumerable studios the world over.

That's why we find a forest of

U

-67s and

M -49s in top total all...artist, exclusive the sound of success! Proven at this studio...why

NEUMANN or outside application. you make ail who depend need

NEUMANN. Got a the right decision. on particular

GOTHAM

For is recording

Condenser Microphone suitable for a problem? There living is a always ready to help more for any information inside write:

C-

O

T

H

A

2

AUDIO

CORPORATION

WEST 46 STREET,

NEW YORK, N.Y., 10036

212

-00-5

-4111

In Canada: i -Mar Electronics Ltd.,

P.O.

Box 158,

Don Mills, Ontario

Circle

130 on

Reader Service Card

®1965

GGTnAM

AUDIO CORPORATION

."

45

D

YNACO

STEREODYNE m stereo phono cartridge by B

&0

'' one of the truly musical pickups"

With the exception of loud- speakers, no part of your music system affects its

quality

as much as the choice of a phonograph

cartridge.

Specifications

and

test

re- ports, while helpful, cannot

substitute for

a

thorough listening evaluation

in mak- ing so

crucial

a decision.

The Stereodyne

III

is the latest refinement by

E.

R.

Madsen of Bang and Olufsen, who

first

recognized the im- portance of a

15°

standardizing

on

stylus

angle. In sepa- rate arms, as well as in the

better

changers, its

clearly superior sound will

be apparent.

Wide, smooth response

Lower

distortion

Less

crosstalk

Lowest hum (by a

Replaceable

mile!) stylus

15°

vertical

angle

just $19.95

Be

sure

you listen to this

cartridge at your audio specialist's showroom

DYNACO INC.

3912 POWELTON AVENUE

PHILADELPHIA,

PA.

19104

Circle 131 on Reader Service

Card

46

JAll

and all

that

Bertram Slanleigh

One of

ABC the most stimulating jazz la- bels is

Impulse

-the

cool division of

Paramount. Under the aegis of

Bob

Thiele, a veteran record executive and jazz enthusiast, Impulse has con- tributed a number of very important albums featuring musicians from main- stream to way out. And their perform- ances have usually been on that con- sistently high level that is only achieved under ideal studio conditions, when a group of first rate professionals who respect one another can play for each other in an atmosphere of serious music making without the distractions and influences of a noisy concert or night club audience.

Together with this sympathetic at- mosphere, Impulse exercises the kind of care in recording and pressing sults in that re- the utmost fidelity to the live performance in the finished product.

Most of their sessions axe engineered by Rudy van Gelder, a man whom

I know only from his discs and his repu- tation as a cutter of superior lacquers, but a man whom I admire more with eaoh Impulse waxing

I hear. At a time when most engineers have ceased to care about the quality of their mono tapings, van Gelder continues to make progress in this area, and I find myself in the rather surprising position having to admit that

I find of greater clar- ity and separation in most of his mono recordings then I can hear in the stereo sound of some of the mass production labels.

For its latest release, Impulse has inundated record enthusiasts with an even dozen of discs-

Most of them are up to the very highest standard that the artists involved have achieved to date, and in one very important in- stance

-the

new Coltrane album

-one

of the very greatest achievements of the jazz recording industry. his notes is impressive and uncomplicated.

Johann Sebastian Bach was another great musician with simple devotional concepts and complex musical ideas.

Coltrané music on this record consists of a four s part setting titled: Part

Part

I-

Acknowledgement,

II-

Resolution, Part

III -Pursuance and

Part IV

Jimmy Garrison, bass, and Elvin

Jones, drums, this

-

Psalms. McCoy work effiectively

Tyner, piano, with Coltrane throughout. My one reservation concerning deeply moving performance end of

Part I, but this is a is minor detail.

This record is one of the most eloquent performances ever committed to wax. the chanted repetition of the set's title at the

Archie Shepp: Four for

Trane

Impulse

Mono

A

71

In spite of the title and a credit on that John Coltrane is the album indicating co- producer with

Bob

Thiele, Archie Shepp emerges from this a carbon copy

Song of platter as a highly in- dividual tenor saxpphonist, rather than as

Coltrane. The four tunes referred to in the title ae

Niema, Syeeda's

Flute, Cousin Mary and Mr. Syms.

Each receives a vigorous workout in a flippant, extrovert style that is very much

Shepp's. But nothing matches Shepp's tune

Rufus

(

Swing his face at last to the wind, then his neck snapped.), a number that de- mands

-and

receives

-a

high keyed, in- tense performance. John Tchicai, alto,

Roswell

Rudd, trombone, and Charles

Mof- fett, drums, all work tightly with Shepp, and to but the album belongs to Archie bassist Reggie Workman who provides pensive, supple counter pattern a to Archie's spirited exposition. Leroi Jones' liner notes are as sensitive and evocative as these not- able performances. "This album," says the back cover, "will be a milestone in the his- tory of jazz music."

It is not an overstate- ment.

4

4

John Coltrane:

A Love

Supreme

Impulse

Mono

A

77

The deep sincerity of John Coltrane is manifest in the impact of his performances.

That his sincerity is grounded in deeply felt religious belief had not crossed my mind until

I encountered this new release to which Coltrane not only contributes pro- foundly moving performances set of devotional album notes but also a that are just as is deeply motivated even though the pen not his effective medium of expression.

The simple faith that Coltrane reveals in

The

Russian Jazz Quartet:

Happiness

Impulse

Mono

A

80

On August

15, 1961 two Russian musi- cians on tour in

Japan with a Soviet vaude- ville

U. S. troup presented themselves at the

Embassy in

Tokyo with a request for asylum.

It was their desire to come to the United States so that they could perform the kind of jazz that they were not permitted to play in the Soviet Union.

Following two months of debriefing in

Frankfurt, Germany, the

New York weeks of late in pair arrived in

October, and within two their arrival, they had not only met a sizable number of the jazz greats of

-

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

today,

Midney, alto and clarinet, and Igor Berukshtis, bass, the sists of but they had formed the group with which they are now heard in their first recording. In addition to the two young

Russians, Boris quartet con-

Grady Tate, drums, and Roger

Kell

- away, piano. On three of their first six recorded numbers, George

Ricci, 'cello, augments these forces. If not staggeringly original, these young men are at least suffi- ciently good to justify genuine interest their work as musicians, instead classified as of in being mere political curiosities. Mid

- ney swings freely in a relaxed, somewhat impressionistic manner, and Tate and

Kell

- away turn in the same sort of reliably sensitive performances either difficult to hear or is heard in mere doubling of the solo line in a manner does that they generally deliver. With the exception of a very low introduction on Remember, the 'cello is that sage. nothing to enhance the music's mes-

Possibly the stereo version brings out the 'cello sound more effectively.

All of the important solos are contributed by Midney who is also six the composer of four of the tunes on this set. He sounds like an earnest, inventive performer from whom we are likely to hear rather a bit in the near future. tion. Assisting

T

t

..

01 struments are Richard Williams, trumpet,

Mike Nock, displays not only exceptional precision also the kind of closeness in style ticipation of one anothers ideas for piano, Ernie Farrow, bass, and

James

Black, drums. Together, they make up a remarkably well coordinated team great ensemble playing. and that that but an- make

Milt

Jackson:

Jazz

'n

Samba

Impulse Mono A

70

With the assistance of Jimmy Heath, tenor, Connie

Kay, drums, Richard

Davis, bass, and further help from some miscell- aneous

Jackson instrumentalists and singer Lillian

Clark on several tracks, Vibraphonist izing numbers

Milt turns in some rhythmically tantal- that are sure to delight those cool characters who don't object to music with a pronounced dance beat. This is simply lively dance music played by jazz oriented musicians, perbly, and the Lillian Clark vocals on

Jazz 'n

Samba and but they swing su-

Kiss and

Run are a perfect amalgam of warmth and rhythmic agility. Joe

E. Ross, known to television admirers as Gunther Tootie of "Car

54

Where

Are You ?," is vocalist in an amus- ing novelty called the a witticism that will

Oo Oo Bossa Nova, doubtless be lost on future generations of TV audiences.

f

Johnny Hartman:

The Voice That

Is!

Hartman's rich, robust voice is coupled with superb instrumental accompaniments on his arrangements by

Bob

Hammer make effec- tive use man uses his flexible voice to number into an expression sonal his

Impulse Mono

A 74 second great album for Impulse. The of guitar and percussion, and Hart- interesting numbers are My Ship, by

Riego and Mortimer, and

Rogers and Hart's

Never Entered

My Mind. of a turn each very per- experience. One of his great virtues is ability to make his points without impairing the musical line or the meaning of the lyrics. To find so much latitude for individual statement without distorting the basic material is a very rare thing these days. But, ure are, then, singers of

Hartman's stat- indeed, rarities. The collection cov- ers a wide range of interesting but not overly familiar music. Among the more

It

J.

J.

Johnson:

Proof Positive

Impulse Mono

A

68

Here are six trombone solos in as many moods by the greatest living exponent of that instrument. Never has

Jay sounded better on discs or received such clean, ac- curate recording. Harold Mabern,

Jr., piano, ing

Arthur Harper,

Jr., bass, and Frank

Gant, drums, provide a brisk and

Blues but self effac- accompaniment on

Neo, Stella by

Star- light, Minor

Blues, My Funny Valentine

Waltz. McCoy Tyner, piano,

Richard

Davis, bass,

Elvin Jones, drums, and

Toots

Thielemans, guitar, speak out more individually on Lullaby of Jazzland, but none of these men rises to the exhalted heights of Johnson, and their attempts merely constitute an intrusion of medioc- rity into great music making. Happily this group is heard on only one tune. The rest of the platter is sheer magic.

A

Yusef Lateef:

Live at Pep's

Impulse Mono A

69

Here is the exception to the usual studio recording that we have come to expect from Impulse. The recording was made at

Pep's Musical Lounge in

Philadelphia, and it has istics many of the objectionable character- that plague all "live" jazz discs

- spoken introductions to the music, applause at the end of solos within the number, audience noise, etc.

But it must be ad- mitted (grudgingly) that this disc does offer exciting, alive insinuating a microphone into an even- ing's entertainment. In the course of his performances, oboe, argol struments are a twin reed instrument from

Syria

Mr. performances and shannas that

Lateef plays tenor go a long way toward justifying this technique of

-the

last two sax, in- ing a and another twin reed, oboe -like in- strument from India. He is also heard play- bamboo flute of his own construe-

Lionel Hampton:

You Better

Know

It!!!

Impulse Mono

A 78

The perennially welcome \1r. Hampton turns up with a quintet of grand old vet- erans: Clark Terry, trumpet,

Ben Webster, tenor, Hank

Jones, piano, Milt Hinton, bass, and

Osie Johnson, drums. Together they romp through a delightful collection that includes such splendid old numbers as

Ellington's Ring Dem

Bells,

Sweethearts

On Parade and the Goodman- Hampton

Pick

-A

-Rib. a trio of

Bobby Scott's Taste of Honey,

Hampton tunes: Vibraphone

Blues,

Tempo's Birthday, and Swingle Jingle,

Manny Albam's

Trick or Treat and Cute by Neal Hefti and Stanley Styne fill out the set. The results are a set of easy, re- laxed music delivered with mellow good spirits. It isn't very modern, of fun. 2E but it's lots

Al

.

AA

A

V

1

OA

DYNACO

introduces THE stereo recorder for the connoisseur

If you are one whose stringent requirements or passion for perfection has been convinced of the need to spend at least

$400 for a quality recorder, and if you have felt that nothing available to date for less than

$1000 could meet mands, then give your de- serious consid- eration to the Dynaco Beocord

2000.

Judge it first on absolute per- formance

-live

recording is the most exacting test for the com- plete in recorder

-then

its many exclusive luxuriate features:

3 stereo mixing inputs with slide

- type controls and plug

-in multiple mike conversion law impedance pled mike input transformer cou-

8 watt amplifiers for PA use, home music system, monitor speakers, or low impedance headphones pushbutton selection of echo, sound

-on- sound, and unique syn- chro monitoring from half the record head electronically protected fully tran- sistorized plug

-in electronics

3 speeds,

3 heads,

100 KC bias, synchronous drive

Only a comparative evaluation in use with the finest associated components will effectively dem- onstrate the superior perform- ance this and unique flexibility of superb instrument.

Write for full specifications and ask your dealer for a demonstration.

DYNACO

INC.

3912

Powelton

Avenue,

Philadelphia,

Pa.

Circle

132 on Reader Service Card

47

"Best

Sound

Ever

Heard"

NEW

ABOUT MUSIC

(front page 8)

Whether you use it.

EI(CO

3566

Solid State

FM /MPX

Automatic

Stereo

Tuner! Amplifier

Yes,

EICO letters are now coming customers who in the new 3566 solid state stereo from satisfied just finished building tuner /ampli- fier and they say the

EICO

3566 is giving them the best sound they ever heard.

We're very pleased at the response the 3566 has

The received, but we're not at all surprised.

3566 was designed to enter the highest quality class of solid state automatic stereo tuner class, there's

KIT:

/amplifiers there may be a has won it

-

$229.95

-

and certainly no hands down. walnut cabinet $14.95. that it quality contest does! in

While this top price contest.

EICO

WIRED:

$349.95 includes cabinet

Similarly powered class competitive brands in this start at above

$490 including cabinet.

But don't take anyone's word the specifications and listen to the 3566 at your authorized

EICO dealer. We feel dent that you'll agree a lot more

-the

than $229.95

EICO for it

(kit)

3566 or

-

is check confi- worth

$349.95

(wired), maybe even

$450.00 to $500.00.

112 Watts into

4

Ohms,

75

Watts into

8

Ohms

2 uy IHF sensitivity

38 -40 db separation

5-

60,000 cps response

Non

-falsing stereo indicator light

Automatic stereo switching

Interstation noise muting

0.15% Harmonic, 0.3% IM distortion

43 transistors,

19 diodes, 6 rectifiers

Whether you transistor build the

EICO

3566 semi

-kit sockets, and easy

-to- follow step -by- step wired, you'll be proud of its superb ease instructions of operation. plug

-- with pre -wired pre -aligned front

-end, 4 -stage

IF strip and time -multiplex circuit;

-

or buy the 3566 factory quality

-in and

If you can't get to an authorized

EICO dealer, write to

EICO direct, and we'll send you a beautiful full -color brochure that brings out all the beauty of the 3566 that you and your family will enjoy for years to come.

TIM,

Electronic Instrument

Co.

Inc.

131-

01,39th Avenue, Flushing,

N. Y.

11352

Send for

1965

Full -Line

Catalog

Name

Address

City

Z r

State

A-5

C

á which the guests get settled, order their drinks, and mingle. The second move- ment is the Concert itself: 8:45 -10:45.

The evening concludes with the Party, which gives tunity to meet the audience an oppor- the artists, and to discuss the concert with fellow guests. Mr.

Boal says there is absolutely no coughing during the second movement:

"All one can hear, and seldom at all, is a faint tinkling of an ice cube in a highball glass." last

Having attended a concert -party

February, I can vouch for the claim; the audience was noticeably quieter than its concert -hall counterpart. Prob- ably the informality of the event (drink- ing and smoking permitted during the concert unless singers object to the former) engenders a feeling of relaxa- tion along with on the music. a deeper concentration

April

9,

1964

String

17

The first concert -party took place on and featured

Quartet; the ments by Mozart the Lenox second was on

June and included works for wind instru- and

Beethoven. Both concerts were sold out. Following this, a subscription series of eight concert

- parties was scheduled, the last of which will be given on May

21.

The acoustics of the Bowman Suite are ideal for a chamber music: resonant, well -blended, yet detailed sound, with frequency re- remarkably smooth sponse.

The room measures

71

-feet long and 42 -feet wide, ceiling. A horseshoe with a 20 -foot terrace frames the lower ballroom floor on three sides, both areas accommodating 26 tables.

So far, the concert -party entrepre- neurs find that audiences enjoy the mix- ture of conviviality and chamber music.

The first concert -party,

Has it paid off?

Mr.

Feldman said, "cost about $1,200, including artistic and rental fees and other costs." ceeds from

The hotel gets the pro- the bar. Individual tickets cost $4.00 (or $3.75 in advance).

Feldman and Boal, who made a

Messrs. profit of

$30.00 on the first concert

- party, were afraid that their series might appeal mostly to classical Lonely

Hearts.

It turned out otherwise; doctors are among their heaviest subscribers.

But romance was in concert- party. ist of the air at the first

Peter Marsh, first violin- the Lenox

Quartet, met a young woman there and married her a week later. Commented

Mr. expected this sort of to our guests,

Feldman: We thing to happen but not to the per- formers."

Æ

Circle

133 on

Reader Service Card

48

as

a

manual turntable.. an automatic turntable... or automatic changer...

for mono or stereo, you enjoy the same gentle quality, the some flawless per=orm- once that has made

Miracord first choice in the finest consoles and component tems. sys-

Miracord brings out the best in your records, and preserves their quality for long- lasting enjoyment. Model

10H with hysteresis motor, $99.50; model

40 with

4

-pole induction motor,

$89:50; (less base and cartridge). At hi -fi dealers, or write:

r

BENJAMIN

M

I

RACOR

BENJAMIN ELECTRONIC SOUND CORPORATION

80

Swaim

Street

Westbury, N.Y.

Circle 134 on

Reader Service Card

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

LETTERS

(from page 4)

Use the

Ma g neraser

-

tlse

Ozígt«ae

a+cd atiP,C

tle

Beati

Quickly erases a reel of magnetic tape or sound film of any size or type. Erasure is

100% complete even on severely level overloaded tape.

Lowers background noise of unused tape

3 to 6 db. Also demagnetizes record -playback and erase heads. Only $24.00.

Two

Year

Guarantee. Available at your dealer's or write us.

:

.,

Vat

ULTRA

-SENSITIVE

FLUTTER METER

nl

, w

With built

-in Three -Range

Filter,

3 kc Test

High Gain

Oscillator,

Preamplifier and Limiter. Filter Ranges:

0.5 to 6 cps; 0.5 to 250 cps; 5 to 250 cps.

Designed for rapid visual indication of flutter and wow,

Meets standards set by the

IEEE

...

Condensed Specs.:

Input

Voltage, 0.001 to 300 Volts; Ranges,

0.01 to

3%;

Limiter Range, 20 db.; Oscil- lator (built -in), 3000 cycles; Net Price,

$495.00

.

Write for complete specifica- tions and free

12

-page booklet on

Flutter

AMPLIFIER CORP.

of

AMERICA

398 Broadway,

New York

13,

N. Y. WO 6

-2929

Circle

135 on Reader

Service

Card

8

out of

10

people

have

iatrophobia

It

is

easy to overcome.

AR, inals

Dyna, and Shure, and Audio

Orig- cabinets.

Rov F.

ALLISON

ACOUSTIC RESEARCH, INC.

24

THORNDIBE

STREET

CAMBRIDGE,

MASS.

02141

El

Cheapo

Power Supply

SIR:

In the El Cheapo

2 -30, the use of three diodes in the series string

Dl-

D2-D3

may cause excessive zero sig- nal current flow in a few cases. The use of only two diodes provides excel- lent temperature compensation, but un- fortunately results in serious crossover distortion. My suggestions are as fol- lows:

Check the zero signal current flow to the amplifier, one channel at a time, with a milliammeter.

If the zero signal current is less than

75 mils or so with three diodes, leave well enough alone.

If much one of greater than

75 mils, replace the diodes with a 50 -ohm pot set for minimum resistance. Adjust the pot for a zero signal current through the amp of about

50 mils, or until no crossover distortion is visible on a low level sine wave. Either adjustment works fine.

Once is the value of the pot determined, it may be replaced with a fixed resistor of equal value.

I've worked with silicon transistors so long, that my approach to tempera- ture problems is rather casual. Usually

I just spit on the case, and if it doesn't sizzle,

I don't worry about it.

Actually, the output transistors can run a couple of hundred mils without any trouble; the dissipation is only a couple of watts. But conceptually, why waste power?

Richard

R.

Moore

*Iatrophobia is fear of going to the you doctor. The cure starts when

lift

your phone and make an appointment

with

your doctor for a complete physical checkup. be

Half the cases of cancer could cured,

if

they were diag- nosed early and treated promptly. Your best cancer insurance is a health check- up every year.

Make that phone call now.

It might save your life.

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

AUDIO MAY.

1965

AUDIOCLINIC

(from page 2) be lateral; if the signals are in phase, the modulation will be vertical.)

It

may be difficult to visualize this

but

it is worth trying because it bears on your problem.

Notice that on a stereo record we do not have a vertical and a lateral chan- nel. We have two channels, equidistant from the vertical or the lateral plane.

The conventional cartridge has a simi- lar arrangement of coils or elements.

Each pickup channel is constructed to

N

EWCOM

B

TAKES

101/2" REELS

For imprtant recordïng as- signments you need the ease of operation, quick response, the completeness, rugged construction and dependability of the

Newcomb TX10. And you need the 101/2" reels.

Full size reels give you long playing time even with 1% mil tape. Professional tape thickness provides strength, minimum stretch, less print -through, easier splicing.

And for play- back you can splice pre- recorded tapes to give you hours of music. But most of all, you'll ap- preciate the quality of the sound and the way the

TX1.0's central joystick permits you to take charge of tape movement.

It's cybernetically engineered for intuitive operation. Below are some of the TX10's outstanding features:

Sound -on -sound

Monitor before record- ing or cif the tape

4

-digit counter

Two illuminated vu meters arranged pointer -to- pointer

Handles long microphone lines: built

-in provis- ions for plug -in Input transfomers

Uses Cannon connectors microphone

Hysteresis synchronous motor

Dynamically- balanced flywheel drive

Three heads

No pressure on heads pads

Two speeds

-71/z or

VA ips standards,

15 or on special order

72

Choice of 2- or

4

-track models

Push button speed change automatically provides speed

- frequency correction

Operates or vertically horizontally

100 kc bias and erase oscillators with indi- cator lights

Automatic shut -off

Positive record Inter- lock prevents accident- al erasure.

Differential braking on both reels

$750.00 less case

Carrying case, mounting hardware for rack or cabinet, portable

2 channel amplifier and reproducer systems are available

For a complete description of the

TX10, mail this coupon.

NEWCOMB AUDIO PRODUCTS CO. Dept.

6824

T

-5

Lexington Ave.,

Hollywood, Calif. 90038

Please send a free copy of Publication

TX4. name address city state zip

Cirde

136 on Reader Service Card

49

work best when the signal it 45 degrees from the vertical or lateral plane. One coil will

what do more you need in a microphone?

WHEN THE RCA

BK -5B

HAS

SO

MUCH,,, is applied to not produce elec- tromotive force; the other coil will when we play our groove just de- scribed.

If we play a laterally recorded groove, both coils will produce output, but not quite as much output as they would if the playback stylus moved at a

45 of degree angle.

The same holds true vertically recorded grooves.

Remember the way our cutting stylus acted when we reversed the phase of identical modulation of the two channels? Well, the same thing will happen when we change the phase of

IMPROVED CARDIOID PATTERN

The improved unidirectional character- istic provides an exceptionally uniform response over a wide range of frequen- cies, and attenuates unwanted sound from directions other than those the pickup angle. Ideal within for studio use.

SENSITIVE RIBBON ELEMENT

Uniform frequency response over entire audio spectrum. Effective range,

30 to

20,000 cps. Ribbon element also assures low hum pickup, immunity to tempera- ture and humidity variations.

You're looking at the business end of an RCA BK-

5B... a superb unidirectional studio

-ideal for all broadcast, public address and recording applications.

3- position voice -music switch provides damage optimum response for any application. Blast filter eliminates from sudden noises.

Inconspicuous TV gray finish. Exceptionally good shielding permits operation in high -hum fields.

ASK TO SEE THE BK

-5B AT YOUR NEAREST

AUTHORIZED RCA

MICROPHONE DISTRIBUTOR.

For complete specifications write

RCA

Commercial Engineering

Dept

E91 MC, 415

So.

5th St., Harrison, N.J.

RCA

ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND DEVICES, HARRISON, N.J.

The

Most Trusted

one coil with respect to the other in a playback system. When a highly modu- lated lateral recording is played, there is a tendency for the stylus to be pushed upward from the grooves at high frequencies. Thus, there is some vertical stylus motion on even a purely lateral record. This is part of the reason you hear some program level have the channels phased when for you vertical when playing a

If you lateral disc. want to see this experiment work out a little better, try to find a stereo disc which contains some vertical rumble or find a playback table which has it. Using either channel alone, you

Name in

CHOICE OF MOUNTING

Electronics

WITH

BOOM MOUNT

AND WIND SCREEN

DESK

OR

FLOOR

STAND will hear the rumble. Play the disc laterally and the rumble is greatly re- duced. can be

(Certain kinds of record scratch reduced by this same approach.)

Obtain a good stereo test disc and note the separation between the chan- nels.

It probably will run about

20 db or more at

1 kc. This is not perfect separation, partly because of the re- cording process and partly because of the playback process, as well as the manner in which the tonearm is mounted. Even with this seemingly poor separation, we obtain rather dra- matic stereophonic sound on some discs.

The degree of the stereophonic effect depends on the men behind the recording rather than upon the per- formance of perts say the equipment. Some ex- that if separation was no better than

12 db, stereo would be just as apparent as would be the case if much greater separation was achieved.

You'd be surprised how little separation is required in order to make a sound appear to be located on one side of a room or the other.

To repeat, the pickup is constructed with two orthogonal coils rather than a vertical and lateral coil.

If there was a vertical and a lateral coil, there would be no need to parallel them to obtain the desired cancellation of unwanted signals. All to use that would be needed is the lateral coil or the vertical coil as the case may be. It is only when these channels are combined properly that the cartridge as a whole can dis- criminate between lateral and vertical modulation.

There is still one point which may be troubling you. When you used a monophonic disc to determine which channel was the vertical channel and which was the horizontal channel, you were obtaining a definite difference in output between them. From what I have said already, there should not be a difference in output of one channel over the other because of the angular relationships between modulation of the coils and the the disc.

The difference in of output can be accounted for in one two ways.

Either the cartridge is defective or the tonearm is not truly vertical. If the tonearm is tilted to one side or the other, the cartridge will tend to be oriented in a vertical -lateral arrangement rather than the

45 -45 degree manner intended. Check this and try some other cartridges.

Coupling Two Power

Amplifiers

Q.

In setting up a disc recording, hecause of cost considerations and such,

I have chosen not to buy a new disc recording amplifier. However, I have a disc recording amplifier rated at 13.5 watts and a much older

PA amplifier which is quite linear and still in very good condition. The PA amplifier is

Circle 137 on Reader Service

Card

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

50

1

Ihe

4

J.

.4

tw

for

tapin q classics,

jazz, or pops...

choose

Or.'

the

brand that's

(hA

always

tops!

TARZ

/AN

i.

That tip

-top tape from Tarzian is as fine a brand as you can buy. We start with the finest, raw materials, use the most advanced manufacturing equip- ment, and apply strict quality control standards. Then we lab -test other brands, too

-so

we can honestly assure you that you can't do better.

You can do a lot worse, though. Off brands and "white box" tapes not only compromise quality, but may actually seriously damage the sensitive magnetic recording head in your tape deck.

For best results, always use brand

- name tape.

(We hope

you'll

choose

Tarzian.) And to triple your tape record- ing fun, buy it three reels at a time!

FREE:

When the music stops, to be

32 there's lots more fun had!

Write page booklet recording ideas. for of our tape

SARKES

TARZIAN,

INc.

World's

Leading Manufacturers of TV and FM

Tuners

Closed

Circuit

TV Systems

Air

Trimmers

Broadcast Equipment

Semiconductor Devices

MAGNETIC TAPE DIVISION

BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA

Export: Ad Auriemo,

Inc., N.Y.

Canada:

E. J.

Piggott

Enterprises Ltd., Toronto, Ont.

Cirde

138 on Readier Service Card

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

rated at

30 watts; it has been a good disc

-cutting amplifier. so

I want to couple the two amplifiers that

I

have a usable power of 40 watts or a little more to drive the cutter.

Because bath units have controls for mikes, phono, and such, how would I use these controls?

How do

I

couple the output of the

13.5 -watt watt unit? unit to the input of the 30-

Should

I use the mike or phono input on the 30 -watt unit?

Do I leave the volume control of the

You

can't

tell the difference between the

Oki

555 and any other stereo tape recorder

the controls of units are the

13.5 -watt unit? Both rated

20 to 20,000 cps. What can I expect in the way of response and distortion if both units are coupled together?

Both units have output taps of 8 and

16 ohms. The

30

-watt unit has a

70 -volt tap.

I am sound. tions? interested in clean, wide -range

What are your recommenda-

Name and address withheld.

A. You cannot couple the input of one amplifier to to the output of the other obtain more power. Let us see why this is true.

Amplifiers are rated as producing their full power when

X voltage is fed into the input. Increasing the

X voltage will not materially increase the power output of the amplifier but will materi- ally increase the amount of distortion produced by the amplifier.

Even if the device feeding this input is producing power, this power is not taken by the input. The input only uses the voltage developed across the power amplifier.

All is way the power from the driver amplifier being wasted. Thus, it is not in any added to the power of the driven amplifier.

The way amplifiers are usually con- nected to provide additional power is to connect speaker taps together and drive both amplifier inputs from a com- mon ever, are source. This is impractical, how- in your case because the amplifiers not matched.

This means that the phase relationship between them will not be zero degrees as is required for such an arrangement. Because of this, the power produced by these amplifiers will is not add up to form the sum of the powers of the two amplifiers. It actually possible that the total amount of power will be less than that supplied by your 30 -watt unit.

Fortunately, this is not important because you would not gain very much even if the two amplifiers could have been used as intended. The improve- ment in power output is considerably less than

3 db. This improvement is not a sufficient amount to warrant ex- perimenting further with combining your two amplifiers.

until:

You lift it. It's a remarkably lightweight complete portable stereo tape system.

So compact it weighs less

than

25 lbs.

You check for tubes.

It

has none.

It's

solid state (all trans - sistors

...

27 of them).

You hear it.

It

has

2 unique two -way speaker systems for cleaner stereo sound reproduction.

(4 speakers.)

You check its dependability.

It's

guaranteed for

1 full

year.t

And its price is less than you'd ex- pect to pay. $349.95*.

Oki has a fine choice of other solid

state tape recorders, starting

at

$129.95

*.

See and your Oki dealer. hear them now at

*manufacturer's suggested list price tone year parts,

6 months labor

r---

=IN

1111

AU565

Chancellor Electronics, Inc.,

457

Chancellor

Ave., Newark, New Jersey

Name

Address

City

State Zip

I

Circle 139 on

Reader Service Card

51

"PARDON

US

FOR

ASKING...but

Circle 140 on Reader Service Card

D

`A,p`L0

i

PO

114.

EXCO

A

Fß0

M

KùsIpMá

NE

.

DISCOTHEQUE

(from 23) have you auditioned these loudspeakers lately ?"

If you are partial to full concert hall sound, listen to the brilliant repertory of true tonal valves built into the "Mark V" and "Del Mar." Possibly we put in too many hidden values, but otherwise the extra measure which we believe essential might have been lost. We weren't willing to take a chance.

Are you?

MARK V

-

Dual crossover network. Frequency response 30 to 17,000 cycles.

14" wide x 261/2' high x

DEL

12" deep.

Oil walnut finish. 5169.95

MAR

-

Frequency response 40 to 15,000 cycles.

23%" wide x

233" high x

11'h" deep. Oil walnut finish. $79.50.

DEL

MAR II

...

$109.50 swoossiossexisis

LOUDSPEAKER

S

UTILITY VERSIONS OF BOTH THE

MARK

V AND DEL MAR

You can in system build your own cabinet or your own and be sure of true concert hall built. sound.

/

/WIER

INCORPORATED

2649 BRENNER DR.,

DALLAS 20, TEXAS

AND

ALL

YOU'RE LEFT WITH IS A GREAT

PROFESSIONALTAPE RECORDER

WITH 100 USES.

Here are just some of its many outstanding features: fully transistorized,

4 speeds, 4 heads, 4 chronized built

-in track stereo impulse

-4

track mono with built

-in and editing, automatic tape stop.

And don't forget.

DIA- mixer control

PILOT- stereo transmitter for fully automatic control of for both channels. Separate recording level controls for microphone and phono- graph, blending commentary and background music in one recording pass. multiplay, sound on sound, plus echo effects, pause control for click

-free stops syn- slide projectors and animated displays. AKUSTOMAT: you simply speak and the machine records, you stop speaking and the machine stops. No wasted tape.

SOUND BEGINS AND

ENDS

WITH

A

UHER TAPE

(PRONOUNCED

U

ERI

RECORDER.'martel

FOR COMPLETE PRODUCT LITERATURE AND YOUR NEAREST MARTEL DEALER WRITE

MARTEL ELECTRONICS

LOS ANGELES:

2356 SOUTH COTNER, NEW YORK CITY: 1199 BROADWAY, CHICAGO: 5445 NORTH LINCOLN AVENUE

Circle

141 on Reader Service

Card

52

PROGRAM of position with the exception

Mic-2 and MIc -1.

They should be be left in the neutral position.

Plug a speaker into the MUTED

&Ica jack on the end panel. Start a record playing on one of just its volume the turntables. Ad- until its peaks at

100 per cent on the vu meter. Momentarily actuate MIc

-1 switch to the

PROGRAM or AUDITION position. This should mute the speaker. Plug in a pair of ear- phones you. and adjust the volume to please

Turn the

TURNTABLE channel potentiometer all the way down to off.

You should hear the record playing over the cue speaker unless your con- trol room Mic-1 is turned on. Go through your

AUDITION side of the operation just like we have with the

PROGRAM side.

Although I haven't included

Rlyuus in my power amplifier, connections are available all the way from Mic-2 switch to the power amplifier chassis so you could install it to an adjacent studio mute a speaker in where you might station

Mx-2.

May I take this opportunity to point out some of the bonus features we've given you in this all- transistor audio console that are not immediately ap- parent? Something you can't appreci- ate from black and white photos is that different colored knobs were used to identify the channels. Yellow was used for the

MONITOR control, black for both

Mic-1 and Mic-2 controls, blue for both

TURNTABLES, and red for the

MASTER

We gain control. remembered to leave three feet of extra microphone cable on sole- the con- mounted microphone so the an- nouncer can remove the microphone from its stand and interview nearby guests.

Transistors were not soldered into the circuits except where it was neces- sary to use a heat sink.

The servicing engineer appreciates this.

Few, if any, commercial, portable, audio consoles feature auditioning pro- visions.

With this feature, announcers can check out a microphone, turntable, or even feed a system separate public address without interrupting the regular program.

Little has been said about the copy rack idea. But ask any announcer if he

*.c

/.

Fig. 8.

Closeup of end panel,

AUDIO MAY,

1965

4

A convenient service to AUDIO readers. by

Order mail

-

your books leisurely save time and

I travel,' we pay the postage.

Maintaining

Hi -Fi Equipment

Joseph

Marshall

A valuable reference anyone whose living or hobby is servicing hi -fi equipment. Outlines the professional approach servicing all types of for for hi- fi components. Covers trouble- shooting of elec- tronic, mechanical and acoustic problems. 224 pages.

No. 58 Paperback $2.90*

Designing and Building

Hi -Fi Furniture

Jeff Markel

Written by a professional hi

-fi furniture designer who has taught furniture design at leading col- leges, this book is an au- thentic reference of value to the hi-fi fan and pro- fessional custom builder.

Covers types ture of everything from woods to finishing for furni- the mechanically adept; de, sign principles, styles and arrangements for the decor minded. 224 pages.

No. 79 Paperback $2.90*

1111-11

;l1tR.NITOI1I:

.

McProud High Fidelity Omnibook

Prepared and edited

C. G. McProud, by publisher of Audio and noted au- thority and pioneer in the field of high fidelity.

Contains a wealth of ideas, how to's, to's, and when to's, ten so plainly that both engineer and layman can appreciate its valuable context. Covers problems cabinets and what writ- planning, with decoration, building hi- fi furniture.

A perfect guide.

No.115 $2.50*

The 5th AUDIO

Anthology

Edited by

C.

G. McProud, publisher of AUDIO.

An an- thology of the most signifi- cant articles covering: stereo recording and reproduction; stereo multiples; ments; stereo measure- construction and theory

5th is and a technology,

-

which appeared in AUDIO during 1958 and 1959.

The truly a collectors' item valuable reference for the professional engineer, teacher, student, hobbyist and hi -fi fan.

144 pages.

$3.50

"the best of AUDIO"

No. 125

-

edited by

C. G.

McProud

Tape Recorders and

Tape

Recording'

Harold

D. Weiler

E irE

RECORDERS sita

RECORDING

A complete book on home recording by the author of High Fidelity Simpli- fied. Easy learn the techniques re- quired for to read and professional results with home re- corders.

Covers room acoustics, microphone techniques, sound effects, editing and enthusiasts. splicing, etc.

Invaluable to recording

No.

112 Paper Cover $2.95

MONTHLY

A new compendium of

AUDIO knowledge.

Here is a best of AUDIO

AUDIO collection of the

Clinic

Giovanelli

. . by

.

-

The

Joseph noted audio engineer and the original high fidelity an- swer

-man

-

EQUIPMENT

PROFILES

McProud

AUDIO.

Here is a wealth of hi mation. Answers to the most high

-fi edited by C. G. and

.

Editor of audio infor- important issues in fidelity and able reference. a valu-

No. 124 Volume

I

$2.00*

SPECIAL!

SAVE

$5.00

Save

"best of almost 50% with this

AUDIO"

($2.00) collection of

5th

AUDIO books.

AUDIO ANTHOLOGY

($3.50)

McProud High Fidelity Omnibook

($2.50) and

Tape Recorders

&

Tape Recording ($2.95)

TOTAL VALUE ALL FOUR BOOKS

Your cost only

...

...

$5.95 Postpaid

$10.95

CIRCLE

05400

This offer expires June 30,

1965, and is good only on direct order to the Publisher.

"The AUDIO Cyclopedia"

Howard M. Tremaine

Here

Is one single volume with the most compre- hensive coverage phase of audio. accurate of every

Concise, explanations of all audio and hi -fi sub- jects. More than 7 years in preparation authoritative encyclope- dic work with question.

A

-the a most quick reference system instant answers to any vital unique plete reference book for com- for every audio engineer, techn clan, and serious audiophile.

1280 pages

3400 topics

1600 illustrations

No.123

$19.95*

The 6th AUDIO

Anthology

Edited by

C. G. McProud, publisher of

AUDIO.

Includes articles on the two most sig- nificant milestones in the field of high fidelity:

FM STEREO and TRANSISTORS IN AUDIO

EQUIPMENT.

A meaningful reference

A necessary book high for everyone in the fields of audio recording, broadcasting, man- ufacturing and servicing of components and fidelity pages. engineering, equipment. for enthusiast. the

144

No. 130 $3.95

AUDIOGUIDE

No. 12:i'

$1.00

By the editors of AUDIO, the original magazine about high fidelity.

A 1962-1963 product review of stereo high fidelity components. Valuable reference for the high fidel- ity enthusiast and hobbyist.

Part

I contains a Stereo a thorough discussion of the Problems of is a

Installation;

Part II complete treatise on

Selecting a Tape Recorder.

Indispensable to the prospec- tive buyer of stereo com- ponents and tape recorders.

Includes a section on where to buy various stereo hi -fi components and accessories.

156 pages.

High Fidelity Simplified

Harold

D.

Weiler

The complete hi

-fi story

-

answers all questions about tuners, changers, amplifiers, tope recorders, speakers, record ideas players, etc.

Lots of for custom installa- tions. Tells how to achieve concert hall reception in your borne. 216 pages.

No.

142

$3.30

11=2:31

AUDIO Bookshelf

-RADIO

MAGAZINES, INC.

P.

0.

Box

629, Mineola, New York

11502

Please send me the books

I full remittance of $ have circled below.

I am enclosing the

(No C.O.D. or billing.)

58

79

112

115 123

125 127

130

142

251

*All

U.S.A. and Canadian orders shipped postpaid.

124

05400

NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

ZIP

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

Getting

The

Most Out

Herman Burstein

Of Your Tape Recorder

Your

TAPE RECORDER

Written in

"plain talk" for the mon who has, or wishes to buy, a tape recorder. It answers the myriad ques- tions raised by tope record- ing enthusiasts. Its chapters cover every phase of opera- tion and maintenance

-from adding a tope recorder to the hi -fi system, to a thor- ough dissertation phones.

Lots of on micro- practical

Information on how to buy.

176 pages.

No.251

$4.25

53

doesn't think it is just as important as his microphone. We designed this one of la

-in. plastic.

It pivots at each end, allowing it to completely fold down over the turntables for moving purposes.

CLASMFIED

Rates:

In0 per word per insertion for noncommercial advertisements:

250 per word for commercial adver- tisements.

Rates are net, and no discounts will be allowed. Copy must be accompanied by remittance In full, and must reach the New

York office by the first of the month preceding the date of issue.

54

STEREO

CONTROL

(from page

28

)

HIGH FIDELITY SPEAKERS REPAIRED

AMPRITE SPEAKER SERVICE

168

W. 23rd

St., New York 11,

N. Y.

CH

3

-4812

V&UQVMJe

The only device in the world that will convert any tape recorder into a voice - actuated unit. Tape recorder records when you speak

...

turns off when you stop. Permits complete operation of recorder from a distance or when hands are busy. Ideal group without tools pause and all for conferences and activities. Installs

. no in seconds soldering. Has sensitivity controls to meet requirements.

Can be used as on

-off switch to control hi

-fi, CB or ham trans- mitters, electrical appliances, etc.

In leatherette case, complete with cord for battery- operated and transistor tape recorders. Under

$35.00

Made in USA

See your tape recorder dealer or write:

DEPT. AU -5

kinematix,

inc.

2040 W. Washington Blvd.,

Chicago, Illinois

60612

Area

Code

312 666

-0066

Circle

142 an

Reader Service Card crowding unless

The transistors are used.

Baxandall circuit utilizes an anode follower for the negative voltage feed- back used sirable for distortion reduction, a de- feature for the transistorized version. The first active stage in the control unit reduces the

50 kilohm out- put of the level control to approximately

900 ohms to feed the Baxandall network.

At the same time a gain of approx- imately 1.5 is realized to make up at low distortion part of the

8 db loss suf- fered through the stereo controls preced- ing it. Another transistor "collector fol- lower" (Fig.

6) is used to isolate the network from the output stage. Un- fortunately the

600 ohms output im- pedance desired here cuts the gain to approximately

0.8, so the output stage must loss. regain most of the passive circuit

An emitter follower was not re- sorted to here as to do that would de- stroy the

Baxandall network by remov- ing the virtual ground at the active element input terminal

(Q2 base). Mea- surements showed ized that the net unequal

- gain of

1.5 x 0.8 or 1.2 was satis- factory and gave the minimum count up to the special transistor output stage, six transistors being used (two chan- nels).

Design information for transistor anode followers is glaringly absent.

Many design equations were found, but they numbered almost as many as their originators.

None of them gave a con- fident kind prediction of a circuit using the of transistor parameter data avail- able to the average user.

After discussing this matter with another designer having previous experience in this area, we sus- pect the algebra of matrices lack. All for this transistor design equations, if not in matrix form, are approximations of that form, and the theory of matrices has not, as yet, been completely adapted for universal and easily applied transis- tor design.

There is also a lag in the parameter measurement field for best expressing parameter variations so that a matrix can handle them accurately.

The transistor anode followers used in this control unit were consequently de- signed by the old compromise method plus some published information.11

TO

BE CONTINUED at Wm. E. Owen,

Vol.

1,

No.

1

"Shunt Feedback

Video

Amplifier Design," Solid

-1960.

State Journal

Equations

9, 12, 15 and 22.

HARPSICHORD. Same as owned by

Phila- delphia Orchestra and

RCA

Victor. In kit form for home workshop assembly,

$150.

Clavichord kit,

$100.

Free brochure. Write:

Zuckermann

Harpsichords, Dept. R., 115

Christopher St., New

York

14,

N. Y.

LEARN WHILE ASLEEP. Hypnotize with recorder, phonograph! Details, strange catalog free. Sleep- ington.

Learning,

Box 24-AE,

Olympia, Wash-

FREE! Send

A5M components, for and lowest quotations on tape money- saving stereo catalog your individual recorder, or system require- ments. Electronic Values, Inc., 200

W.

20th

Street,

New

York, N. Y. 10011.

HI -FI COMPONENTS, guaranteed

'We

Will

15

-day money -back

Not tape

Be recorders,

Undersold guarantee.

Two ranty.

NO CATALOG.

QUOTATIONS at

Prices."

-year war-

FREE.

HI- FIDELITY CENTER,

1797

-V

1st

Avenue,

New York, N. Y. 10028

HI -FI SPEAKERS EXPERTLY REPAIRED

22

USED SPEAKERS BOUGHT

AUDIO

SPECIALTY TECHNICS.

Astor Place, New York 3,

N. Y.

AL

4

-2140

ELECTRONIC CHASSIS PUNCHING drilling service, panels cut, etc. Build azine article! Send chassis,

Hole

(16ths) diameters to to

4

", 504; sq.,

54 perimeter centers, allow clearances. or

W', that and mag- request estimate.

50; inch to 3/16. Steel 20ga. add 50 %. Mark sizes

Payment rial, minimum $2.00, under

2 lbs to in

11/_.

", 254; aluminum and with mate- returned post- paid. Metalwork, P. O.

Box

1372,

Cedar Rapids,

Iowa

52401

FOR CUSTOMIZED STEREO INSTALLA-

TION: High quality German -type U.S.-norm stereo components. Stereo-FM

-MPX receiver chassis has

4 wavebands, numerous professional features,

$79;

Compact stereo -changer with di- amond needle, studio-type automatic- manual play system, $19;

Complete package including 2

-12" heavy duty hi fidelity co-axials,

TERRA, P.

O.

Box 234, pre -tested freight

Dearborn, Michigan.

- free shipment, $117.

Superb performance!

SELL: Mahogany

AR3, like new, under war- ranty, approximately $135.

Fairchild

501 skate transcription arm.

Donald Bisbee,

South Roys

Avenue, Columbus,

Ohio, 43204. anti

-

685

SME

3009

Citation I, $135.

B200X, $15.

$15. with ADCl,

$85

Marantz

SB, $205.

Tandberg

Pair

6,

Dyna

$295.

Street, Cambridge,

Mass.

53 mikes,

$79.

Bozak

Wharfdale W /12

/FS,

$25 8

/FS /A,

Bradley,

84

Howard

MUSIMATIC:

FM music without commercials.

Easily connected to your tuner.

Don

Henderson Enterprises,

California.

$59.50 complete.

Box

343,

Reseda,

SELL: Miagnecord 728

-44.

3 latest heads and factory reconditioned. Not model new used since.

A superior machine in superior condition. $650.

O.

L. Ricker, 153

Michigan.

Lafayette S. E.,

Grand Rapids,

KLH Model

One's with

JANSZEN 130's. Two complete speaker systems of the highest quality and condition. Matched drivers in the finest oiled walnut cabinets. Indistinguishable from new.

Originally $1120, now $550. A rare opportunity.

Joseph

Cohen, 200

Woodside Avenue,

Winthrop,

Mass.

(More classified on page 55)

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

:

4

NOW ...PERFECT

FM

ELIMINATE

FM

INTERFERENCE!

With the Sensational

New!

FINCO

M BAND

PASS FILTER

ENGINEERED

TO

MOUNT ANYWHERE e et only pure

FM signals.

Use a inco

FM

Band Pass

Filter to stop terference and block anted signals from

T.V., and and otors, autos mps.

Size:

41/4" x vailable

Amateur at and out

Citizens transmitters, fluorescent

2" x your Finco

11 un-

".

Hi -Fi d ealer. Satisfaction guaranteed! odel

3007

Only

$6.95 List

THE

34

W.

FINNEY COMPANY

Interstate

St. Bedford, Ohio

RECORDING

(from page

25)

"on" button when a take begins, and

(2) pushing the

"off" button when it ends.

"We make a passage in test of the loudest the score," Berry explains,

`and determine our level by sound from the monitors rather than any indica- tion on VU meters. The musicians decide tonal structure, and we need. that's all

Several musicians have remarked that if Repeat does nothing else, taking the difficulties makes out of piano recording the process worth while. to a

But there seems to be much more it than that. Will it revolutionize recording? The answer to while in coming. Technically, revolution is here

-direct

that may be recording the is now fact.

But, as tions, the in so many revolu- public will make the decision.

PROFESSIONAL

AUDIO SYSTEMS,

INC.

transistorized mixing console components

101

MIC

PREAMP, l8dbm out

THD

<.4

%,

±.Sdb

20 -20Kc noise

/in-

120db. xformer in

$85.00

105 CUE

-LINE

AMP,

3

Watts at

THD<.8

%, S/N

85db

±.5db

20

-15 dbm

-20 KC, in. plug in

$89.00

100 PWR SUPPLY,

24V,

1

A ripple

<.5mV

$75.00 for details on custom consoles, phono or tape preomps write to:

PAS, 260

Audubon Ave.,

N. Y., N.Y. 10033

11H

Circle

147 on Reader Service Card

Circle

143 on Reader Service Card

MORE CLASSIFIED

WANTED:

Ampex

600 -2, 601 -2

Donald Bisbee,

685

Ohio. stereo recorder.

South

Roys Avenue, Columbus,

Fig.

4.

Pianist

-arranger

Fred Valdez at

60- year -old piano.

The instrument has no sounding board, but three cables lead to mixing panel and monitoring loudspeaker system.

FOR SALE: ACROSOUND

TO -350 output transformer, unused.

$50 plus postage and in- surance.

C.

Muckenfuss, tady, N.

Y.

892

Meadow, Schenec-

PRESSINGS

FROM YOUR TAPES. WHOLE-

SALE

PRICES SPECIALIZING

IN

SMALL

QUANTITIES. DUBLE DUBLYU

RECORDING

COMPANY,

217

Carton Avenue, Neptune, N. J.

07753.

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High Fidelity Equipment

Complete Lines

Hi -Fi Records

-

Complete

Service

Components and Accessories

E;LECOO10E

SOUND

SYSTEMS

DUNDAS

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CANADA

126

Circle

145 on Reader Service Card

SAVE YOUR

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OF

SAVE over

4O

%rii-nti

Each file holds a full year's copies.

Jesse Jones ume Files

Vol- for every publication.

Covered in durable leather like Kivar, title embossed in

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Satisfaction guaranteed

AUDIO

Attractive and practical for your home or office

3 for $7.00

6 for $13.00

ORDER

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order

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Full

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Nos York,

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146 on

Reader Service Card

ERSIN

WORLD'S

FINEST

MULTILORE

BUY IT AT RADIO-TV PARTS STORES

MULTILORE

SALES CORP. PORT WASHINGTON,

N. Y,

Circle

150 on Reader Service Card

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

55

LAFAYETTE

RADIO ELECTRONICS

NEW! LAFAYETTE 10 -WATT

COMPLETE AM -FM STEREO RECEIVER

Just Add Speakers and Enjoy

FM, FM and High

-Quality

AM

Reception

Stereo

ADVERTISING

INDEX

19950

99

0005W a

A powerful 70 -Watt Amplifier plus Complete amplifier plus a sensitive

FM

Tuner plus an FM

Stereo Tuner all on One Compact chassis

Amazing FM casts

Control Facilities plus

Tuned

Nuvistor a

"Front

Standard

Search" Circuit Signals Presence

AM

Pre-

-

"Stereo of Stereo Broad-

-End"

Imported

THE WIDELY ACCLAIMED

LAFAYETTE RK

-131A

TAPE RECORDER

FEATURING

-TRACK

STEREO PLAYBACK$

4

-TRACK MONAURAL RECORD

PLAYBACK

Acoustic

Research Inc.

Altec Lansing

Corporation

Amplifier Corp. of America

Audio Bookshelf

11

31, 43

49

53

Benjamin

Bozak

Electronic

British Industries

Sound

Corp.

Corp. ...

48

7

3

Classified

Concord Electronics Corp.

54

5

Dynaco, Inc.

46, 47

EICO Electronic Instr. Co.

Electro -Voice Inc.

___

48

.............. Coy.

IV,

I

Electro -Voice Sound Systems

Empire

Scientific

......

._

55

56

Fairchild Recording Equipment

Corp.

Finney Company

Frazier

Incorporated

4, 6

55

52

Garrard

Sales

Corp.

Gotham Audio Corporation

3

45

TAKES REELS

UP TO

7"

DYNAMIC

MICROPHONE

4. adaptable to stereo playback

With Electronic

Track Selector Switch, VU

Recording Level

Meter and Pause

Switch

For

Instant Editing

Includes Lightweight carrying case, dynamic microphone, output cable, 7 inch empty tape reel.

Two Speeds

-33/4

& 71/2 ips vides Instant

Stop for Editing

Heavy -Duty 6x4" PM

Speaker

Record Heads

Imported

Pause Lever Pro-

Specially Designed

Separate Erase and

FREE!

LAFAYETTE

RADIO ELECTRONICS

1965 CATALOG No. 650

516 Pages

Featuring Everything in

Hi -Fi

From the "World's Hi Fi

&

Electronics Center"

See the Largest Selection in

Our 44 -Year

History!

Mail the

Coupon for your

FREE

Lafayette Catalog.

1965

Lafayette

Radio

Electronics Dept.

P.O.

Box 10,

AE

-5

Syosset, L. I., N.

Y

11791

ÍI

(

Send me the

FREE

1965

Lafayette Catalog

1

El

O send me

#

(Prices do not include shipping charges)

65

Name

Address

I

City

State

ZZg

Circle 148 on

Reader Service Card

-,

56

Harman- Kardon, Inc.

Harvey Radio Co., Inc.

Hi Fidelity Center

Isophon

Kenwood Electronics, Inc.

Kinematix, Inc.

Koss Rek

-O -Kut

Lafayette Radio

LTV

University

Marantz Inc.

Martel Electronics

McIntosh Laboratory, Inc.

Multicore Sales

Corp.

Newcomb Products Co.

OKI- Chancellor Electronics

Pickering

&

Company, Inc.

Professional

Audio

Systems

9

15

55

14

54

35

56

39

13

52

41

55

17

55

Sarkes

Tarzian, Inc.

Scherr Tumico 12

Scott

H. H. Inc.

Sherwood

Electronic Laboratories,

Cov.

II

Inc.

18

Shure

Brothers Inc.

Stanton

51

29

33

Tandberg of America

12

49

51

RCA Electronic Components

&

Devices

Coy. III,

50

44

Who Says

Great Stereo

Components

Aren't

Decorator

Designed?

PJleet

the

new Empire Royal

Grenacjer...first speaker

system designed and engi- neered in sight and sound

for

stereophonic reproduc- tion. Lets you

sit

anywhere

-hear

everything. Its regal

shape projects

a

majestic sound unlike any you've

ever heard before.

A

15"

mass world's

magnet

loaded woofer, largest ceramic structure

and die

- cast

full

dispersion acous-

tc

lens allow you to enjoy the highest

fidelity

of mu- sic plus phenomenal stereo separation

from

anywhere in the room. Speaker place-

ment non- sound crifcal.

For

demonstration

a go

'round

to

your dealer or write or complete color

brochure.

Empire Scientific

Corp..

845 Stewart Ave., Garden

City. L. I., N.

Y.

Circle 108 on

Reader Service Card

AUDIO

MAY,

1965

TYPE

2N2148

TYPE

2N2147

This

circuit...

o o o with these

two

low

-cost

output transistors gives you audio power output

like

this

(25 watts

-virtual y flat from

8 to

30,000 cps!)

+5

DB

0

5

Iti

IOn,

IOKC 100KC

IOO',

1000n,

FREQUENCY

with total harmonic distortion like this

(less than

1%

from

11

cps to

15,000 cps at

25 watts)

1.5%

Oln,

IOn,

I

...plus the magic

I I

100n,

IOOOn,

FREQUENCY

I

I

IOKC

of "Transistor

I

IOOKC

Sound"

Hard to believe...but true!

RCA

Drift

-Field High -Power Audio

Transistors can put the difference of "transistor sound" into your high -fidelity amplifiers

-at low, low,cost!

Two

RCA

2N2147

Drift

-

Field germanium

P

-N -P transistors can deliver

25 watts audio output with modulation distortion and with essentially flat frequency less than 1% inter- response from

8 cps to 30 Kc.

Low cost is only part of the story.

Additional benefits

-as in all

RCA germanium audio transistors -include exceptional uniformity, high linearity, excellent stability, broad frequency response and high beta.

Positive proof: most of the originators

And at lower cost. of quality solid -state hi-fi units use the "new generation" of

RCA audio transistors now available deliver

RCA still audio transistors. better performance

RCA design channel your

Top Value

RCA

Field transistors and silicon rectifiers include all the solid -state devices you need virtually anything from

Representative. a

1.0- professional stereo amplifier.

Or watt

-per -channel

For

Components and Devices, Harrison, N.J. information commercial phonograph to a

35- watt

-per- oh specific types or the complete line, see write:

Commercial Engineering, Dept.

EZC-5

RCA to

Electronic

AVAILABLE

THROUGH YOUR RCA

DISTRIBUTOR

RCA ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND DEVICES, HARRISON,

N.

J,

The Most in

Trusted

Name

Electronics

Circle

101 on Reader Service Card www.americanradiohistory.com

How does this

7

FOOT

MONSTER help solve your sound problems?

.

©The giant microphone shown here is the biggest microphone in captivity

!

The Model

643 is also the most directional microphone sold today. It helped

E -V win the first

Academy Award for microphone design in

22 years.

But beyond this, the 643 has been one of our most effective field research tools, offering a far -reaching insight into the nature of directional microphones, and their applications.

An obvious result of 643 research is our unique

Model 642.

Same E -V CardilineTM principle

*, but

It reaches up to twice as far only

18 inches long. as any other broadcast unidirectional microphone to give you better long distance pickups than were dreamed possible a few years ago.

And this same basic research stimulated the development of our new

Model

668 cardioid micro- phone.

It uses the Continuously Variable -D® car

- dioid principle (a creative development from exclusive our

Variable -D patent

*) to provide smoother cardioid action

-plus

more versatility other boom microphone you can use.

-than

any

Model

642

$390.00

Model

666

$255.00

Model

665

$150.00

J

Model 668

$495.00

But let's not ignore the most popular professional cardioid microphone of all, the Model

666.

Here's where the Variable -D since principle got its start. And the introduction of our seven foot laboratory, the

666

-and

its companion, the

665

-has

been further refined to offer better performance and value than ever before.

From such startling microphones as the 643, come continuing basic improvements- and the tools you need to solve your most difficult sound problems.

Only E

-V provides this kind of design leadership. E -V microphones in your studio will give you a big head start toward better sound.

After all, we're at least seven feet ahead of everybody!

4

ELECTRO- VOICE, INC.

Dept. 551A,

Buchanan, Michigan 49107

SIcre

SETTING

NEW

STANDARDS IN SOUND

Cirdw 1n2 nn Render Service Card

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