Australian Cricket`s Playing Policies and Community Guidelines

Australian Cricket`s Playing Policies and Community Guidelines

Australian Cricket’s

Playing Policies and

Community Guidelines

Contents

Welcome

Overview

The Game

Fun

The Spirit of Cricket

Fair Play

Cricket Etiquette

The Spirit of Cricket Award

Six Steps to Inclusion

Cricket for People with a Disability

Anti-Racism Code

Best Practice Tips

Cricket Websites

Club Websites

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MyCricket and MyCricket Scorer Apps

Information Sites

Player Pathways

Australian Cricket Pathway

Game Formats

Format Summary

MILO in2CRICKET Coaching Philosophy

Junior Competition Formats

Senior Competition Formats

Representative Cricket

Helping Junior Cricketers

Deal with Missing Out

Bowling Workload Guidelines

Developing Youth Pace Bowlers

Codes of Behaviour

The Australian Way

Codes of Behaviour

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29

30

32

33

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34

Online Registration Payments 35

Communication and Insurance

Help and Support 35

Workload Guidelines for Playing and Training 36

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42

Considerations for Parents

Remember, when Coaching

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10

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Coach, Umpire & Volunteer Pathways

Coaching Pathways

MILO in2CRICKET and

MILO T20 Blast Coordinator

Community Coach

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Representative Coach

High Performance Coaching Program

Cricket Coaches Australia (CCA)

Umpiring Pathways

Volunteers Pathways

The Benefits of Volunteering

Safety and Legal Considerations

Promoting Safety in Cricket

Risk Management

Cricket Match Day App

Injury Prevention

RICER

Safety Tips for Cricket

The STOP Safety Method

Safety and Injury Prevention

Safety in Nets

Bowling Machine Etiquette

Helmets

Club and Member Protection 59

Child Protection and Screening of Volunteers 59

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51

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52

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50

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Umpire Safety

National Club Risk Protection Program

Ground and Weather Conditions

Lightning Safety

Lightning 30/30 Rule

Weather and Unprepared Wickets

Heat and Hydration

Sun Protection

Guidelines for Fluid Replacement 63

National Community Cricket Facilities Guidelines 64

Eleven steps to becoming a connected community club

Developing Relationships with Government

65

Local Government Strategy

A Model Cricket Club

Acknowledgment of Country

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Welcome

It is my pleasure to introduce you to the ‘Well Played’ document that is designed for players, volunteer coaches, officials, teachers and parents who need to administer cricket to ensure it is safe, fun and inclusive for all Australians.

It’s an essential element of any volunteer’s cricket toolkit.

The feedback we received from the cricket community indicated that Associations, Clubs, schools and the community wanted a means of quickly referencing key issues and guidelines around playing the game.

‘Well Played’ will assist you to:

»

Make cricket fun and inclusive for all;

»

Adopt appropriate codes of behaviour for all cricket participants;

»

Foster the spirit and etiquette of cricket;

»

Understand a child’s development

»

Implement appropriate game formats;

»

Develop safety guidelines and principles.

‘Well Played’ provides you with guidelines to implement best practices in training and matches for players of all ages and abilities.

Adopting the guidelines and game formats provided in ‘Well Played’ will go a long way to ensuring that the quality and enjoyment of the cricket experience in

Australia will continue to grow and prosper.

Long live cricket!

James Sutherland

Chief Executive Officer, Cricket Australia

Overview

Cricket today is one of the most popular sports in Australia, currently with over

1.2 million participants.

Part of its popularity and appeal is the unique characteristics, traditions and values that define the game.

Australian cricket has a vision to be Australia’s favourite sport. To achieve this vision, the game needs to be relevant, accessible and inclusive, it must be a sport for all Australians - a sport that truly reflects Australia’s culturally diverse society by attracting new fans and players to the game.

CRICKET HAS ALWAYS BEEN AN IMPORTANT

PART OF AUSTRALIAN CULTURE. WITH OUR

SOCIETY IN A CONSTANT STATE OF CHANGE,

IT IS BECOMING INCREASINGLY IMPORTANT

THAT CRICKET WELCOMES EVERYONE.

About one in four Australians were born overseas and at least 43% of people have at least one overseas-born parent.

(Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics)

With Australia’s multicultural population increasing, it can no longer be taken for granted that cricket will have an automatic place in

Australian culture.

As a leading global sport, cricket captivates and inspires people of every age, gender, cultural background and ability, while building bridges between continents, countries and communities.

Clubs and Associations that create a welcoming environment for Australia’s diverse population will often find that they will attract more members.

Australian cricket has continued to improve its access to a widerange of non-traditional participants, including women, Indigenous communities, people of non-English speaking backgrounds and people with disabilities. This can range from disability teams competing at an international level, to the National Indigenous

Cricket Championship – a tournament for Indigenous Australians.

This document provides you with guidelines to implement best practices in training and matches to excite players of all ages and abilities.

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The Game

The spirit of cricket

Australians are justifiably proud of the place sport has in their daily lives. However, what is equally

Fun

important to all of us involved in cricket is the way the game is played and the manner in which all participants conduct themselves.

Cricket can be a highly competitive game, however it is important to always play within the Laws of Cricket

The following elements will guide you in applying the spirit of the game and fostering fun, healthy and the spirit of the game. Laws of Cricket can be and effective development of the spirit within your found by visiting the MCC website:

For cricket to continue to be Australia’s favourite sport, the game needs to stay relevant, accessible and inclusive to all

Australians. This is especially true at the introductory level, where the first experience of the game needs to be a positive one.

www.lords.org/mcc/laws-of-cricket/laws

cricket community.

The ‘Spirit of Cricket’ is fostered by the values that you (as a volunteer administrator, coach, teacher, parent or player) bring to your team, Club and the game itself.

Tips for Clubs

Acknowledge players and recognise the efforts of those playing in the right spirit!

Fun is the major motivator for children to play sport.

In surveys where youngsters are asked why they play sport, the number one reason is always the same - ‘to have fun’.

Winning is on the list, but it is placed behind having fun. Children like to compete, but for the fun and excitement of competing, not just to win.

Fair play

According to the Laws of Cricket, umpires are the sole judges of fair and unfair play. The umpires may intervene at any time and it is the responsibility of the captain or coach to take action where required.

JUNIOR COACHES SHOULD NOT BE MEASURED

ON WIN–LOSS RATIOS, BUT RATHER ON

HOW MANY PLAYERS WISH TO CONTINUE

TO PLAY THE FOLLOWING SEASON.

Tips for Clubs

Help young players understand the

‘Spirit of Cricket’ message with messages on display in the Club rooms and in communications to parents and players.

How to create an atmosphere of fun within a team:

»

» Look»at»things»from»the»child’s»perspective» and»understand»what»they»see»as»fun;

»

» Training»sessions»and»match»formats» should»provide»maximum»activity,»»skill» development»and»enjoyment;

» » Create»opportunities»for»all» skill»and»ability»levels;

»

» Be»well-planned,»organised»and»resourced»

(including»with»adequate»equipment);

»

» Avoid»isolation-type»punishments,»such» as»laps»around»oval,»push-ups,»etc;

»

» Praise»in»public.»However,»never» criticise»in»front»of»their»peers.

The captain and coach are responsible at all times for ensuring that play is conducted within the spirit of the game and within the Laws.

Captains, coaches and umpires together set the tone for the conduct of a cricket match.

Every player is expected to make an important contribution by playing the game in good spirit and fairness.

Examples of where a player fails to comply with the instructions of the umpire include:

» Criticising, by word or action, the decisions of an umpire;

» Showing dissent;

»

Behaving in a manner which might bring the game into disrepute.

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Respect

The spirit of the game involves respect for:

»

Your opponents

» Your captain, coach and team

» The role of the umpires

»

The traditional values of cricket

Within the Spirit of Cricket, there are certain unwritten laws or practices that should be followed as a means of respecting the game, your opponents and your team.

It is against the spirit of the game to:

»

Dispute an umpire’s decision by word, act or gesture.

» Direct abusive language towards an opponent or umpire.

»

Participate in cheating.

Such instances include:

»

Appealing when knowing the batter is not out.

»

Advancing towards an umpire in an aggressive manner when appealing.

» Seeking to distract an opponent, either verbally or by harassment, with persistent clapping or unnecessary noise under the guise of enthusiasm and motivation of one’s own side.

Umpires Managing the match

Umpires are authorised to intervene in cases of:

» Time wasting

»

Damaging the pitch

»

Dangerous or unfair bowling

» Tampering with the ball

» Any other action that they consider to be unfair

Tips for Clubs

Put up a welcome sign on the opposition change rooms. As the home team, clearly mark the opposition’s area of change rooms and make an effort to provide an overview of facilities. Place signage specifically welcoming the opposition.

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Cricket etiquette

It was Sir Donald Bradman who suggested that “it is the responsibility of all those that play the game (the custodians) to leave the game in a better state than when they first became involved.” Here are some ideas to encourage and foster accepted levels of cricket etiquette amongst junior cricketers.

Toss of the coin

»

The home team captain tosses the coin - the opposition captain calls;

»

The toss of the coin should be out on the pitch to be played upon;

» Captains should always shake hands prior and after the toss.

Entering the playing field for commencement of play

»

Umpires are always the first to enter the playing field;

»

The fielding side then takes the field, led by their captain. The two batters enter after the fielding team.

During play

» The batting team should sit together on the sidelines, where shade is available

(except where individuals may be warming up in preparation for batting);

»

It is normally the responsibility of the batting side to keep any score board up-to-date.

Leaving the field

» The batters are always first to leave the playing field;

»

The fielding team follows the batters.

Reserve Player

»

The reserve player must be dressed in playing apparel;

» If there are only 11 cricketers in a team (that is, no 12th player) the batting side should have someone in playing apparel at all times who can be utilised should the need for a substitution arise;

»

Players who are performing 12th player duties must know their role and be prepared. For example, knowing the times at which drinks are to be taken, being alert to requests from players for sun-screen, jumpers, towels, ice, first-aid, etc.

Tips for Clubs

Acknowledge any player milestone with a cheer and presentation after the game.

Bowlers’ and fielders ground marking

When marking their run-up, bowlers should refrain from damaging the grass or surface.

This is in the interests of the participants and also as a sign of respect for those responsible for preparing the surface. The same applies to fielders who mark the ground as an indication of their positions on the field.

Acknowledgement of milestones

» Fielding teams should always acknowledge 50s and 100s by opposition batters by clapping or sincere verbal acknowledgement;

»

Players should acknowledge bowling achievements such as five wickets and hat-tricks by clapping or sincere verbal acknowledgement;

»

After the game, all players should acknowledge the opposition and match officials by shaking hands.

Support staff and spectators

» The home team captain is to invite the umpires, opposition captain, and team for an appropriate post-match gathering to present a Spirit of Cricket award and reflect on the game to foster friendship;

»

Coaches, administrators, parents, teachers and spectators should respect the nature of the game and accept that it is the responsibility of umpires and the team captains to conduct a match in the appropriate manner. Any noise from the sidelines (other than appropriate recognition of good performance or effort), or any signals or form of communication to players is not in the best interests of the game;

»

Any communication can be via the 12th player at drinks breaks or during breaks in play where teams leave the field;

» Barracking from the sidelines should always be of a positive nature;

» Coaches should not enter the field of play except where a medical issue or similar arises.

It may be appropriate however, for coaches to take a greater role in assisting captains in matches involving children under 12 years.

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The Spirit of

Cricket award

The coach of one team votes for one player on the opposing team to recognise their fair play. The Award at the end of the season should be considered a prestigious award.

The Award can be named after a prominent cricket person in the region, or someone who epitomises the Spirit of Cricket and can be given out at all the cricket

Associations in every grade around the country.

For example “The winner of the

“George Bailey Award for WRJCA under 17’s for this year is ...”.

Many cricketers would be proud to win this award.

Six Steps to Inclusion

For more information on the “A Sport For All” Resource go to

www.community.cricket.com.au/a-sport-for-all

STEP ONE

Look inwards: Educate and create a welcoming environment

STEP TWO

Build understanding and competence in leaders

STEP THREE

Know your local community

STEP FOUR

Look 0utwards: partner and communicate

STEP FIVE

First engagement

STEP SIX

Retain and champion

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Cricket for people with a disability

Moorabbin Cricket Club in the Victorian Sub District

Cricket Association (VSDCA) are a great example of a mainstream cricket club who have many cricketers with an intellectual disability integrated into their mainstream teams and also have teams specifically for cricketers with an intellectual disability that compete in the Melbourne All Abilities Cricket Association

(MAACA).

Melbourne Deaf Cricket Club are an excellent example of a club that is predominantly for cricketers who are deaf or hard of hearing who play in a mainstream competition (Eastern Cricket Association) against hearing (mainstream) teams. There are also many examples of cricketers who are deaf who are playing mainstream cricket, some as high as Premier Cricket,

First XI level. Similar cricket programs are also offered in South Australia, Queensland, Western Australia,

Tasmania, NT and the ACT.

Cricket also offers a pathway for people with a disability to progress to national and international level and represent their state or territory and

Australia. The All Abilities National Cricket

Championships were first conducted in March 2015 and from 2016, will include three divisions comprising a Blind Cricket division, Deaf Cricket division and a division for cricketers with an Intellectual Disability.

These state based teams will compete for the crown of National Champions of their division. Visit the website link below to see the 2015 All Abilities

Championships in action and the impact they had on the players and everyone else involved.

www.cricketa.us/allabilitiesvideo

The Australian Blind Cricket team, Australian Deaf

Cricket team and Australian Team for Cricketers with an Intellectual Disability regularly compete in international competitions such as world cups and other series against international teams both in Australia and abroad. The opportunity to travel overseas to places such as South Africa, India,

England, Sri Lanka and the Caribbean (among others), is one of many benefits for cricketers with a disability who reach this level.

If you have (or know of someone with) a disability that would be interested in getting involved in cricket as a player, coach, umpire or volunteer, please visit

www.playcricket.com.au

or contact our Disability

Cricket Officer, Aaron Dragwidge on (03) 9653 9990 or [email protected]

Cricket is a sport for all Australian’s including those with a disability. In November 2015 Cricket

Australia launched its inaugural Community Engagement Framework which included the National

All Abilities Cricket Strategy for Game and Market Development. This strategy aims to significantly increase participation amongst people with a disability and can be found at:

www.cricketa.us/allabilitiesbrochure

In the first instance, cricketers with a disability are encouraged to join mainstream cricket clubs which are inclusive and accepting of all Australian’s. In fact

Cricket Australia has recently launched the A Sport

For All Resource and Training Program which is aimed at educating Australian Cricket staff, cricket clubs and associations how to make our clubs and cricket programs more inclusive of all Australians including those with a disability. The A Sport For All Resource

and Training Program can be found at:

www.community.cricket.com.au/clubs/a-sport-for-all

We also recognise however, that not all people with a disability will be able to join a mainstream club or may prefer to join a program, team or club that specifically caters for cricketers with a disability. Cricketers who are blind or have low vision are a great example of this.

Blowfly Cricket is a fantastic example of a program predominantly for kids with a disability. The program which is run at several locations in New South Wales and is expanding at a rapid rate, has had some incredible success stories including examples of kids who were non-verbal, speaking for the first time.

The amazing story of Mark Rushton (Blowfly Cricket founder) and Blowfly Cricket can be seen at:

www.cricketa.us/blowflycricket

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Anti-Racism

Code

Cricket Australia has adopted an Anti-Racism Code that governs national competitions.

The Code states that a player will not engage in any conduct, act towards or speak to any other player in a manner which offends, insults, humiliates, intimidates, threatens, disparages or vilifies another player, umpire, official, spectator or any other person on the basis of that person’s race, religion, culture, colour, descent, national or ethnic origin.

Guidelines exist for breaches of the Code. For example, in some instances it may result in the withdrawal of coaching accreditation.

Circumstances where players (children and adults) are involved with a breach of the Code should be dealt with seriously, and remedial action should be a mandatory requirement by Clubs and Associations.

The Member Protection Policy (MPP) provides some guidance on how to deal with these situations and can be found on the ClubAssist website:

www.clubassist.cricket.com.au

In more serious cases, a conciliation procedure should be considered and conducted by a representative of the Equal Opportunity Commission in the State/

Territory where the breach has purportedly occurred.

The conciliation should involve the complainant, the umpire/officials who initiated the complaint, the respondent and supporting documentation.

A complaint should:

» be in writing,

» outline the circumstances of the allegations made, and

» be accompanied, if possible, by any supporting documentation, including witness statements or video evidence.

In the instance where players are in breach of the

Code, an emphasis on educating the player to understand the Code should be paramount.

Any remedial action or sanctions should be appropriate to the age and understanding of the player in question.

Member Protection

Information Officers

Member Protection Information Officers (MPIOs) play an important role in ensuring sport is safe, fair and inclusive. MPIOs are the first point of contact for many sports Clubs and Associations for any person considering making a complaint under the sports

Member Protection policy. The MPIO training has two elements – an online prerequisite course and a face to face workshop.

Cricket Australia’s Member Protection Policy is available via link below. (Each State and Territory has a similar policy aligned to Cricket Australia’s MPP.)

www.clubassist.cricket.com.au

Best Practice

Tips

Ensure each player receives a sincere

Nurture new m

Once in the tea buddy system t embers. m, use a o assist integration. Make

Club cap presen into a major ce tation remony involving coach and captain.

Deal positively with barriers, including apply ing for grants for groups with special requirements.

Celebrate achievements of all Club members.

Provide leadership opportunities for all groups, including captain/ vice captain, committee roles and event management.

Invite Local

Council reps to be involved in events.

Establish close school relationships.

Visit schools, assist with clinics, build relationships with key influencers including PE teachers, principals and P&C.

Maintain a positive culture.

Reinforce this regularly from

Work closely with

Local Council, including appointing a council liaison officer with regular tabled correspondence.

Ask, include, sh are, announce – bri ng new members into decisionmaking process

.

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CRICKET WEBSITES

Recruit new players playcricket.com.au

Each year, prior to registrations opening up, a national marketing campaign is conducted to encourage more people to play cricket - no matter who they are, where they come from or whether they’ve ever picked up a bat or ball.

People interested in playing cricket can visit playcricket.com.au where they can connect with their local Club. Search details are pulled from

MyCricket so it’s vital for your Club to have up-todate and relevant contact details, club offerings and registration details within the system.

Recruiting new players to your club has never been easier thanks to a range of free PlayCricket posters, flyers and advertising templates that can be tailored with your own Club details. These easyto-use templates are now available in

MyCricket

Administration > Resources > PlayCricket

Marketing Support.

Club Websites

MyCricket offers a FREE website with a modern layout to all Clubs and Associations.

The template and structure of the website is already set up so you don’t need to be an IT guru to maintain and manage the site.

Benefits

»

Integrates with results, ladders, fixtures and statistics housed on MyCricket.

»

Allows you to promote and recognise sponsors.

»

Follow LIVE scores if matches are being scored and synced with the MyCricket Scorer app.

»

Integrates with your Club’s Facebook & Twitter feeds.

Sample websites:

www.fitzroydoncastercc.com.au

www.wcc.nsw.cricket.com.au

www.waca.wa.cricket.com.au

For more information on how to set up your FREE website, please visit our MyCricket Support website.

MyCricket Community community.cricket.com.au

The MyCricket Community is the new online hub for everybody in the cricket community.

Whether you are a player, coach, umpire or Club volunteer – there is something here for you.

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MyCricket Scorer App

Available on iPad, iPhone & Android Tablets/Phones, the MyCricket Scorer app has been designed to help Clubs score matches live and upload scorecards directly into MyCricket.

If the option of match syncing has been enabled, friends, supporters and the opposition can follow matches LIVE on MyCricket websites as well as the MyCricket App.

The MyCricket Scorer app is revolutionising Club cricket in Australia by using a hand- held device to score your matches!

New features and improvements:

» » NEW»PDF»Scorecards

» » Improved»edit/undo»balls»process

»

» Improved»sync»process

»

» Social»sharing»from»scoring»screen»

(Facebook/Twitter)

TIP 1:

»»Use»MyCricket»Scorer»in»‘DEMO’»mode»for» practice/pre-season»matches.

TIP 2:

»»Associations»are»strongly»encouraged»to» mandate»the»use»of»the»MyCricket»Scorer»App» to»score»top»grades.»This»increases»access»to» real-time»match/player»scores»for»their»premier» grade,»whilst»removing»the»manual»entering» scorecards»after»a»day’s»play.

MyCricket App

If your cricket Club or Association is using MyCricket, then all of your season fixtures, scorecards, ladders, player stats and much more will be available within the app.

The MyCricket app is perfect for players, families, administrators and supporters involved in local Club cricket.

Features:

»

» The»app»can»be»personalised»to»your»favourite»Club.

»

» News»&»event»feeds.

» » Follow»LIVE»scores»if»matches»are»being» scored»with»the»MyCricket»Scorer»app.

»

» Venue»mapping.

»

» Sync»the»fixture»to»your»calendar.»

Administrators can also use the app to:

»

» Select»teams.

»

» Enter»match»results.

» » Confirm»or»dispute»match»results.

» » Send»email»and»SMS»messages.

Tips for Clubs

USE YOUR MOBILE DEVICES LONGER with a solar battery charger.

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Tips for Clubs

Download the MyCricket Scorer App and upload scores from the app back into

MyCricket. Removes the tedious task of manually entering scorecards.

Apple and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc. Google play is a trademark of Google Inc.

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Information Sites

There are a number of internal and external websites that provide resources to assist engaging and supporting diverse communities.

Player Pathways

Club Assist

www.clubassist.cricket.com.au

The Club Assist website is designed to provide useful information on administration, club management, volunteers, community engagement, insurance, policies, facilities and funding.

MyCricket Community

www.community.cricket.com.au

The home of Community Cricket in Australia.

Find current information on players, clubs, umpires, coaches, schools and the Australian Cricket Pathway.

Play by the Rules

www.playbytherules.net.au

Provides education, information and resources for individuals and organisations to ensure that sport is safe and free from discrimination and harassment.

MySchool

www.myschool.edu.au

My School enables you to search detailed profiles of Australian schools simply by entering a school’s name, suburb or postcode.

Sports Community

www.sportscommunity.com.au

The Sports Community website has a wide range of resources such as information around managing volunteers, promotions and marketing, running events, social media and a variety of templates and checklists. The website also includes information on fundraising and grants.

CultureMate

www.culturemate.com.au

CultureMate provides personalised access to key demographic information and community organisations in your region as well as cultural learning resource that compliments the A Sport for All resource.

For login information please contact Aaron Dragwidge at

Cricket Australia on 03 9653 9990 or

[email protected]

Our Community

www.ourcommunity.com.au

The Our Community website has resources for not-forprofit organisations. There is information covering a wide range of areas, from insurance and risk management, sample policy documents, grants and fundraising, marketing resources and leadership.

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Australian Cricket Pathway

The Australian Cricket Pathway is divided into three stages - Foundation, Talent and Elite &

Mastery. A number of guiding principles should be considered in developing players throughout the player pathway.

»

» In»the»early»years,»building»foundation»skills» are»critical.»The»Pathway»aims»to»sequentially» build»skills»at»the»key»times»of»human» development»to»maximize»this»learning;

» » The»focus»is»on»holistic»development»of» each»individual»so»that»players»gather» skills»in»the»key»areas»-»mental,»tactical» and»physical»-»along»the»journey;

»

» The»ability»of»the»individual»to»adapt»and» perform»is»assessed»throughout»the»pathway;

»

» The»player’s»progress»to»a»more»difficult» competition»is»based»on»skill»rather»than»purely»age;

»

» Development»and»learning»is»not»linear»and,» therefore,»competency»levels»will»also»be»in» a»state»of»flux»as»the»player»develops.

This»document»provides»further»information»on»the»

Foundation»stages»as»the»majority»of»cricket»is»played» at»this»stage»of»the»Player»Pathway.

»

For further details visit »

community.cricket.com.au/australian-cricket-pathway

»

»

»

»

»

»

6 Key Areas

Clear and attractive

Enjoyment

Skills and capabilities

Aligned competitions and talent ID

Resources

Coaching and umpiring

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Australian Cricket Pathway

Backyard to baggy green

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Game

formats

It is important to offer game formats that are suited to the developmental stage and competency of the player.

There are a variety of modified games that cater to the development needs of players that will enhance their development, and also keep them interested and excited. Players should not move onto the next level of competition until they have the appropriate skill level to cope with the format.

We also recommend that consideration should be given to girls’ competitions and how they might be different from a “traditional” boys competition. We should not default to trying to fit girls competitions into how a boys competition runs, which is not necessarily what girls want.

Refer to the A Sport for All resource for

more information found under Clubs at

www.community.cricket.com.au

Cricket Australia recommends game formats and playing conditions to sequentially increase the complexity of the game for children to play.

The critical role of Junior Associations and Clubs is to provide competitions that adopt appropriate formats that promote skill development, fun and cater for a range of abilities. Clubs should assess skill and place players in the appropriate level of competition.

» Ensure players have the opportunity to experience all aspects of the game.

»

Provide junior cricketers with two varying competitive game formats where possible.

Teams comprising players of average ability should play the game format recommended herein for their age group (notionally ‘b’ grade).

If an ‘a’ grade division is sustainable in that age group, this policy suggests adopting the format recommended for the age group above the age group in question, i.e. ‘a’ division in under-12s would play the recommended under-13 format.

Please note that for the under-12 and above age groups, this policy also recommends that representative cricket is played.

»

Mandate participation by all players by rotating the batting order, and setting a maximum number of overs per bowler.

» Mandate smaller boundary sizes to allow more boundaries to be scored.

Playing opportunities

Indoor Cricket

Outdoor Cricket

MILO in2CRICKET

MILO T20 Blast

T20

Junior Club Cricket

Senior Club Cricket

Schools

Veterans

Over 60s

Over 70s

National tours

International tours

»

Put in place fielding restrictions to allow more gaps in the field.

»

Ensure both teams bat and bowl on the same day; therefore quarters cricket for two-day matches.

» Mandate rotation of fielders through all fielding positions, particularly at the lower age group levels.

» Mandate free interchange of players, (i.e. if a player can only play one day of a two-day match they are able to be replaced with no restrictions.)

»

Consider most appropriate scheduling,

(i.e. weekend v weekday, twilight, whole season v eight weeks, etc.)

»

Where appropriate ensure all game formats comply with Australian cricket’s playing policies and guidelines.

It is also important for Clubs to explore social and recreational forms of cricket. Midweek twilight competitions, Super 8s and six-a-side cricket are short form modified rules that are flexible, and maximise participation so that participants may experience a fun cricket match in a short time frame.

Children may wish to specialise in various components of cricket or in one sport. Be aware that the risks of early specialisation may include:

»

Possible injuries resulting from overuse;

» Overtraining;

» Boredom and loss of interest for the infrequent participants.

22

PL AYCRICKE T.COM.AU

Key principles of junior format progression:

Summary

» » Focus»is»on»enhancing»players’» enjoyment»and»retention»by:»

»

» Encouraging»players»to»compete»at»their»

skill level

(age»is»indicative»only).

»

» Graduated»player»numbers»to»

increase activity levels

»for»all»players»by»providing» more»space»on»field»and»game»opportunities.

»

»

Graduated complexity of match formats

»to»support»skill»development.

» » Providing»

options of game duration

to»suit»players»and»families.

»

» Formats»are»aligned»to»the»Australian»Cricket»

Pathway»competency»framework.

» » Representative»cricket»is»designed»to»stretch» the»best»players.»This»includes»inter-Association,»

Regional,»State»and»National»Championships.

»

» Coach»development,»accreditation»and»skills»are» aligned»to»the»formats»and»level»of»the»player.»

»

» Coaching»resources»are»consistent» with»the»Australian»Cricket»Pathway» framework»and»support»development»of» player»skills»throughout»the»formats.»

»

» Female»pathways»can»use»same»formats» however,»the»progression»may»be»different» depending»on»experience»and»numbers»of» players.»Note:»National»Representative»for»

Female»U15»Championships»play»format»3B.

Australian Cricket Pathway

roles

COACHES’ ROLE

Teach skills as per Australian Cricket Pathway – prepare for next level

CLUBS’ ROLE

Endorse and advocate

Australian Cricket Pathway philosophy

Provide environments that are fun, and maximise participation and development

Base all sessions on games, what to do, not how to do it

Endorse and adopt MyCricket and PlayCricket websites

Train and support accredited coaches

Key measure: players returning next season

Provide feedback to Associations, States and Territories and Cricket Australia

ASSOCIATIONS’ ROLE

Endorse and adopt recommended formats for each level

Promote Australian Cricket Pathway philosophies to attract and retain players

Support volunteers with training

Support coaches with volunteers to create fun playing environment

Actively promote resources and MyCricket website in communication

coaches.cricket.com.au

COMMUNIT Y.CRICKE T.COM.AU

23

Game Formats

LEVEL

INDICATIVE AGE

PURPOSE

SUMMARY

Cricket Australia is now seeking feedback on the proposed junior format/s.

Please send all feedback to Nick Hatzoglou, Manager - Club Cricket, Cricket Australia: [email protected]

FOUNDATION (0)

5-8 yo

FUNDAMENTALS

MILO in2CRICKET Program

FOUNDATION (1A)

7-12 yo

INTRODUCTION

MILO T20 Blast Program

FOUNDATION (1B)

7-10 yo

TRANSITION

20 over

SKILL OBJECTIVES

» Track and trap balls

» Throw, pass & catch balls

» Hit moving balls

» Bowl with straight arm

COACH

GAME TYPE

BALL

TIME

MANDATORY

PROTECTIVE

EQUIPMENT

BOUNDARY

PITCH TYPE

AND LENGTH

OVERS

TEAM

INNINGS

BATTING

BOWLING

FIELDING

DISMISSALS

Accredited MILO in2CRICKET Coordinator

Skills Program

Rubber MILO in2CRICKET two tone ball

60 mins

BATTING

WICKETKEEPING

BOWLING/FIELDING

FIELDING IN CLOSE

None required

» Judge, respond and hit moving ball

» Run between wickets with judgement & calling

» Bowl over 15m

» Catch and throw over 15m

» Hit moving ball on two sides of field

» Run between wickets with judgement & calling

» Bowl over 18m with straight arm within batters reach

» Catch and throw >15m

Accredited MILO T20 Blast Deliverer

MILO T20 Blast Program and Skills Zone

Rubber MILO T20 Blast two tone ball

90 mins

Protective equipment should be minimal if using rubber ball

Up to 30m from centre of pitch

On outfield 15m length

16 overs per team (96 balls)

8 players per team

1 innings per team

Accredited Community Coach

20 overs

Modified ball such as Incrediball

/ Softaball up to 142g

120 mins

Suggest introduction of the following protective equipment: Helmet, Pads. Gloves, Protector

Suggested introduction of the following protective equipment: Helmets

None

None

Min 40m - Max 45m

On outfield 18m length

20 overs per team (120 balls)

8 players per team

1st innings 10 overs

2nd innings of 10 overs

Four overs per batting pair

2nd chance if no-ball or wide is bowled the batter receives underarm ball from coach. Double scoring zone straight to encourage straight hitting

Five overs per batting pair

All players to bowl

Two overs per player

Maximum 6 balls per over

Bowlers to bowl from one end

Rotation of fielders

No fielders within 10m of batter and stumps, except wicket-keeper

No - batters change ends if dismissed, no LBW

All players to bowl

2 bowlers x 1 over (the 2 players that wicketkeep)

6 bowlers x 3 overs each

Max 8 balls per over

Bowlers to bowl from one end

WK 2 players x 10 overs each

Rotation of fielders

No fielders within 15m of batter or each other, with the exception of wicketkeeper (to encourage singles)

All dismissals, except LBW

FOUNDATION (2A)

10-12 yo

PLAYING

20 over

» Hit moving ball on two sides of field with horizontal and vertical bat shots

»

Run between wickets with judgement & calling

» Bowl over 19m with straight arm and within batters reach

»

Catch and throw > 20m

» Encourage field settings to be outfield and infield to provide space in front and behind fielders

Accredited Community Coach

20 overs

Modified or 142g based on pitch type Outfield (modified); hard wicket (142g)

120 mins

Helmet, Pads, Gloves, Protector,

Optional: Thigh pads, Chest guard

Helmet, Pads, Gloves, Protector. Optional: Mouthguard

None

Fielding in close not permitted

Min 40m - Max 50m

Option of outfield or hard surface 19m length

20 overs per team (120 balls)

8 players per team

1 innings of 20 overs each per team

1st half of season: Rotating batting order. When dismissed or have faced 20 balls, leave field and re-join batting order. No limit on number of outs in an innings to encourage adventurous play.

2nd half of season: Rotating batting order game to game. Retire at

20 balls. Retired batters can return when all others have batted, in the order they retired. Dismissed batters do not bat twice.

All players to bowl

2 bowlers x 1 over (the 2 players that wicketkeep)

6 bowlers x 3 overs each

Max 8 balls per over

Bowlers to bowl from one end

WK 2 players x 10 overs each

Rotation of fielders

No fielders within 15m of batter or each other with the exception of wicketkeeper (to encourage singles)

All dismissals, including LBW

FOUNDATION (2B)

10-12 yo

PLAYING

30 over

» Hit moving ball on two sides and infront and behind wicket

» Judge and respond with a range of horizontal and vertical bat shots

» Judge where and when runs can be scored

» Bowl over 20.1m (Standard length) with straight arm and within batters reach

» Catch and throw > 25m

»

Apply skills over extended period of time as the game lengthens

Accredited Community Coach

30 overs

142g

240 mins

Helmet, Pads, Gloves, Protector.

Optional: Thigh pads, Chest guard

Helmet, Pads, Gloves, Protector. Optional: Mouthguard

None

Fielding in close not permitted

Min 40m - Max 50m

Hard wicket 20.1m standard pitch length

30 overs per team (180 balls)

8 players per team

1st innings of 15 overs

2nd innings of 15 overs

Retire 30 balls

Retired batters can return when all others have batted, in the order they retired

6 bowlers x 4 overs

2 bowlers x 3 overs (the 2 players that wicketkeep)

Max 8 balls per over

Bowlers to bowl from one end for block of 5 overs

Rotation of fielders

WK 2 players x 15 overs each

No fielders within 15m of batter or each other, with the exception of wicketkeeper (to encourage singles)

All dismissals, including LBW

24

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COMMUNIT Y.CRICKE T.COM.AU

25

Game Formats

LEVEL

INDICATIVE AGE

PURPOSE

SUMMARY

SKILL OBJECTIVES

COACH

GAME TYPE

BALL

TIME

MANDATORY

PROTECTIVE

EQUIPMENT

BOUNDARY

PITCH TYPE & LENGTH

OVERS

TEAM

INNINGS

BATTING

BOWLING

FIELDING

DISMISSALS

Cricket Australia is now seeking feedback on the proposed junior format/s.

Please send all feedback to Nick Hatzoglou, Manager - Club Cricket, Cricket Australia: [email protected]

FOUNDATION (3B)

13-14 yo

PLAYING & COMPETING

20 overs

FOUNDATION (3A)

13-14 yo

PLAYING & COMPETING

40 overs

»

Respond to pace and spin from back and front foot hitting ball into space and scoring runs

» Judge where and when runs can be scored

»

Bowl with pace / spin with control of line and length

» Field and catch in all positions on the field

»

Throw > 30m

» Wicket-keeper to catch the ball from pace and spin deliveries

»

Captain to make tactical decisions with guidance

»

Respond to pace and spin from back and front foot hitting ball into space and scoring runs

» Judge where and when runs can be scored

»

Bowl with pace / spin with control of line and length

» Field and catch in all positions on the field

»

Throw > 30m

» Wicket-keeper to catch the ball from pace and spin deliveries

»

Captain to make tactical decisions with guidance

Accredited Community Coach

Limited overs (20 overs)

Leather 156g male and 142g female

180 mins (3 hrs)

BATTING

Helmet, Pads, Gloves, Protector, Thigh pad.

Optional: Chest guard, Arm guard

WICKETKEEPING

Helmet, Pads, Gloves,

Protector, Mouthguard

BOWLING/FIELDING

None

FIELDING IN CLOSE

Fielding in close not permitted

Min 40m - Max 50m

Hard wicket

20.1m standard pitch length

20 overs per team (120 balls)

10 players per team

1 innings of 20 overs

Retirement 30 balls

Retired batters can return when all others have batted, in the order they retired

Max 4 overs

5 players minimum must bowl

No fielders within 10m, with the exception of slips, gully and wicketkeeper

All dismissals

FOUNDATION (4A)

15+ yo

COMPETING

20 overs

»

Respond to pace and spin from back and front foot attacking and defending the ball to score runs

» Judge where and when runs can be scored

»

Bowl with pace / spin controlling variations of line and length

» Field and catch in all positions on the field

»

Throw > 45m

» Wicket-keeper to catch the ball from pace and spin deliveries to take wickets

»

Captain to make tactical decisions with feedback

Accredited Community Coach

Representative Coach (for Representative cricket)

Limited overs (40 overs)

Leather 156g male and 142g female

300 mins (5 hrs)

Helmet, Pads, Gloves, Protector, Thigh pad.

Optional: Chest guard, Arm guard

Helmet, Pads, Gloves, Protector, Mouthguard

None

Fielding in close not permitted

Min 45m - Max 55m

Hard wicket or Turf is possible

20.1m standard pitch length

40 overs per team (240 balls)

11 players per team

1st innings of 20 over

2nd innings of 20 overs

Option to play 1 innings of 40 overs in second half of season to graduate to longer formats

Accredited Community Coach

Limited overs (20 overs)

Leather 156g male and 142g female

180 mins (3 hrs)

Helmet, Pads, Gloves, Protector, Thigh pad.

Optional: Chest guard, Arm guard

Helmet, Pads, Gloves, Protector.

Optional: Mouthguard

None

Helmet, Protector, Shin pads (optional)

Min 45m - Max 55m

Hard wicket or turf if possible

20.1m standard pitch length

20 overs per team (120 balls)

11 players per team

1 innings of 20 overs

No retirement

Max 8 overs per day (4 per spell)

5 players minimum must bowl

Retirement 40 balls

Retired batters can return when all others have batted, in the order they retired

Max 4 overs

5 players minimum must bowl

No fielders within 10m, with the exception of slips, gully and wicketkeeper No fielders within 10m, with the exception of slips, gully and wicketkeeper

All dismissals All dismissals

FOUNDATION (4B)

15+ yo

COMPETING

50 overs

» Respond to pace and spin bowlers from back and front foot attacking and defending the ball to score runs & plan an innings

»

Assess game situation and determine where and when runs can be scored

» Execute pace delivery as controlling line, length and swing

»

Execute spin delivery as planned controlling pace, loop and angle

» Field and catch in all positions on the field

»

Throw > 45m

» Wicket-keeper to catch ball to save runs and take wickets

»

Captain to make tactical decisions and lead the game in all areas (players and spirit)

Accredited Community Coach

Representative Coach (for Representative cricket)

Limited overs (50 overs)

Leather 156g male and 142g female

360 mins (6 hrs)

Helmet, Pads, Gloves, Protector, Thigh pad.

Optional: Chest guard, Arm guard

Helmet, Pads, Gloves, Protector.

Optional: Mouthguard

None

Helmet, Protector, Shin pads (optional)

Min 50m - Max 60m

Turf wicket preferred

20.1m standard pitch length

50 overs per team (300 balls)

11 players per team

1 innings of 50 overs

Option to play 2 innings of 25 overs

No retirement

Max 10 overs (6 over spell)

5 players minimum must bowl

No fielders within 10m, with the exception of slips, gully and wicketkeeper

All dismissals

26

PL AYCRICKE T.COM.AU

COMMUNIT Y.CRICKE T.COM.AU

27

Indoor cricket

Cricket Australia is now seeking feedback on the proposed junior format/s.

Please send all feedback to Paul Milo, Manager - Indoor Cricket, Cricket Australia: [email protected]

Indoor cricket is a fast-paced game played on synthetic turf inside a netted court.

Every player bats, bowls and fields, making it an ideal game for players wanting high involvement regardless of their skill level.

GAME FORMATS

(IDEAL GAME TYPES)

BALL (IDEAL SIZE AND TYPE)

PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

COURT SIZE

TEAM

BATTING

BOWLING

FIELDING

PITCH LENGTH

DISMISSALS

(LBW INCLUDED)

6 & 8 A SIDE

1 innings per side

12 -16 overs per innings

Recognised brand of indoor cricket ball

Minimum: Batting Gloves Protector

Length 28-30m

Width 10.5 – 12m Height 4 -4.5m

6 -8 players

Each player must bat. Batsmen bat in pairs for a period of 4 overs. When dismissed, batsmen lose 5 runs but continue to bat.

Players must bowl 2 overs each. In the event of the fielding side being short, the bowlers to complete the missing players overs.

There must be no more than half the fielders in each half of the court.

Fielders cannot enter the 3m exclusion zone prior to the batsmen playing the ball.

Standard pitch 20.12m

As per rules of outdoor cricket. Players can be caught off the netting. LBW will only be introduced if a batsmen fails to play a shot.

MIXED

Recognised brand of indoor cricket ball

Minimum: Batting Glove Protector

Length 28-30m

Width 10.5 – 12m Height 4 -4.5m

6-8 players

No more than 3 players of same gender in 6 a side.

No more than 4players of same gender in 8 a side.

Each player must bat. Batsmen bat in pairs for a period of 4 overs. Each pair must contain 1 x male and 1 x female batter.

When dismissed, batsmen lose 5 runs but continue to bat.

Players must bowl 2 overs each. Male and female bowlers must alternate. In the event of the fielding side being short of numbers, the batting side nominates the bowlers to complete the missing players overs.

There must be no more than half the fielders in each half of the court.

Fielders cannot enter the 3m exclusion zone prior to the batsmen playing the ball.

Standard pitch 20.12m

As per rules of outdoor cricket. Players can be caught off the netting. LBW will only be introduced if a batsmen fails to play a shot.

Format Summary

50

40

30

20

10

0

ENVIRONMENT

INDICATIVE AGE

INDICATIVE

AGE ONLY

7-10 YEARS

10-12 YEARS

13-14 YEARS

15 + YEARS

CLUB & SCHOOL

7-10 years

CLUB & SCHOOL

10-12 years

REP CLUB & SCHOOL

13-14 years

REP

CLUB AND SCHOOL CRICKET

T20 STREAM

MILO T20 Blast Program (1A)

20 over (2A)

20 over (3A)

20 over (4A)

ROOKIE STREAM

20 over (1B)

30 over (2B)

40 over (3B)

50 over (4B)

CLUB & SCHOOL

15 years+

REP

REPRESENTATIVE CRICKET

PRO STREAM

Nil

40 over (3B)

50 over (4B)

50 over (4B)

28

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COMMUNIT Y.CRICKE T.COM.AU

29

MILO in2Cricket

Coaching Philosophy

The MILO in2CRICKET program is designed for boys and girls from 5 to

8 years old. It is a fast, fun and active program that emphasises maximum participation, and basic motor and cricket skill development. It is experiencebased and builds its foundations on the essentials for life-long involvement in physical activity and sport.

MILO in2CRICKET Coaching Philosophy

The Experience

Fun

Energetic

Social

The Essentials

FUNdamentals

Cricket Skills

Game Sense

The Essentials

Cricket Skills FUNdamentals Game Sense

Movement

Skills

Manipulative

Skills

Fitness

Components

Body awareness

»

Balance

»

Landing

»

Ready position

»

Falling

»

Stopping

»

Dodging

Travelling

»

Running

30

»

Jumping

»

Leaping

»

Galloping

»

Hopping

»

Skipping

»

Rolling

»

Sending

Throwing

»

(overarm)

Throwing

(underarm)

»

Hitting

»

Receiving

Catching

»

Stopping

»

Trapping

Cardio-

Vascular

»

Endurance

Flexibility

»

Stength

»

Speed

»

Agility

PL AYCRICKE T.COM.AU

Batting

»

Watch the ball

»

Move according to line /length

» of the ball

Free swing of the bat

Bowling

»

Grip

»

Approach

»

Delivery

Fielding

»

Watch

» the ball

Catch and contain the ball

»

Throw the ball

Attack

»

Score runs

»

Placement and distance of ball hit

»

Avoid getting out

Defence

»

Stopping runs

»

Scoring runs

»

Make hitting the ball difficult

»

Get batsman out

»

Take Wickets

MILO in2CRICKET Coaching Philosophy

The Experience The Essentials

Fun FUNdamentals

The following diagram shows the breakdown of the essentials under three key areas:

FUNdamentals

that form the basis of movement ‘literacy’ and prepare

Social

Cricket Skills

that develop sport ‘literacy’ related to the game of cricket.

Game Sense

that develops game ‘literacy’ or understanding of the purpose and objectives of the games we play.

The Essentials

FUNdamentals Cricket Skills Game Sense

Movement

Skills

Body awareness

»

Balance

»

Landing

»

Ready position

»

Falling

»

Stopping

»

Dodging

Travelling

»

Running

»

Jumping

»

Leaping

»

Galloping

»

Hopping

»

Skipping

»

Rolling

Manipulative

Skills

Fitness

Components

»

Sending

Throwing

(overarm)

»

Throwing

(underarm)

»

Hitting

»

Receiving

Catching

»

Stopping

»

Trapping

Cardio-

Vascular

»

Endurance

Flexibility

»

Stength

»

Speed

»

Agility

Batting Bowling

»

Watch the ball

»

Move according to line /length

» of the ball

Free swing of the bat

»

Grip

»

Approach

»

Delivery

Fielding

»

Watch

» the ball

Catch and contain the ball

»

Throw the ball

Attack

»

Score runs

»

Placement and distance of ball hit

»

Avoid getting out

Defence

»

Stopping runs

»

Scoring runs

»

Make hitting the ball difficult

»

Get batsman out

»

Take Wickets

COMMUNIT Y.CRICKE T.COM.AU

31

Compare senior formats Compare junior formats

Junior Competition Senior Competition

MILO T20 BLAST GIVES KIDS

THEIR FIRST EXPERIENCE OF

PLAYING GAMES OF CRICKET IN

A FUN AND SOCIAL SETTING.

Features

»

For boys and girls aged 7-12

» For kids with basic cricket skills

» Play modified games of cricket

»

90 minute games

»

8 week program

» All equipment provided

» Fun and safe environment

»

Bonus player pack upon registration

KIDS PLAY ORGANISED GAMES OF

CRICKET AT THEIR LOCAL CLUB

- AN OPPORTUNITY FOR YOUR

KIDS TO MAKE NEW FRIENDS!

Features

»

For boys and girls aged 9-17

» For kids with basic cricket skills

» Play games of cricket

»

Game formats and length vary

»

Full cricket season

» Some equipment may be provided

» Fun and active

»

Club & school environment

INDOOR CRICKET IS A FUN AND

SOCIAL WAY FOR PLAYERS TO GET

ACTIVE WITH THEIR FRIENDS OR

FAMILY ANY TIME OF THE YEAR.

Features

»

For boys and girls aged 9-17

» For kids with basic cricket skills

» Play indoors - never washed out!

»

All games last just over an hour

»

Seasons start regularly throughout the year

» Bring own bat - balls provided

» Fun and active - specially designed softer balls

»

Everyone gets a chance to bat and bowl

32

PL AYCRICKE T.COM.AU

PLAY ORGANISED

GAMES OF CRICKET AT

THE LOCAL CLUB.

Features

»

For men, women and talented young players

» Various divisions to cater for all abilities

» It’s cricket with various formats played, including T20, One Day and Two Day cricket

»

Games can range from 2 to 6 hours

»

Experienced umpires may be provided

» Full cricket season offered

» Many clubs offer equipment

»

Fun, social and active

»

Club environment

INDOOR CRICKET IS A FUN AND

SOCIAL WAY FOR PLAYERS TO GET

ACTIVE WITH THEIR FRIENDS OR

FAMILY ANY TIME OF THE YEAR.

Features

»

For men and women

» Various divisions to cater for all abilities

» Play indoors - never washed out!

»

All games last just over an hour

»

Experienced umpires provided

» Seasons start regularly throughout the year

» Bring own bat - balls provided

»

Fun action-packed matches

»

Everyone gets a chance to bat and bowl

COMMUNIT Y.CRICKE T.COM.AU

33

Representative cricket

A wonderful feature of many cricket programs is the opportunity provided to players of ‘like ability’ to stretch their skills and represent their region or Association.

The responsibility to ensure this is a positive and developmental experience for all players is crucial. Please consider the following to ensure you have a better process and program.

»

Ensure you appoint accredited coaches.

»

Ensure you communicate the opportunity to trial to your entire target group.

» Ensure you communicate the trial times and dates, what to bring and expectations, giving people adequate time to prepare.

» Ensure you provide adequate opportunity for every person trialling to show their credentials to all the selectors.

»

Make sure you communicate next steps to players and parents after each session.

»

Use the website to communicate selections and all training times.

» Selectors should allow enough time for any questions at the completion of the session.

» Sometimes you may have 150 players trialling for 13 spots. There will be a lot of disappointed players.

Consider how we say “No” in these cases. Be mindful that players and parents will want to know why their son or daughter has missed out. Be prepared to provide sincere and adequate feedback.

The challenge is to provide a “respectful no” and for the fortunate 13, well that’s a lot easier.

Helping junior cricketers deal with missing out

Cricket in Australia should be about having fun and striving to get the best out of yourself and, at the same time, making new friends and developing as a person. Navigating through the highs and lows of Representative cricket can be a character test for administrators, coaches, umpires, parents and cricketers.

Below is a list of helpful points that can make this journey more respectful for all.

»

Missing out can be good for junior cricketers, as long as it is explained why they missed out.

»

You players can learn to manage disappointment while going through it.

» Children grow stronger when they overcome their setbacks.

» Coaches and parents should talk through reasons for missing out and discuss possible outcomes.

»

»

»

»

The feedback should be age appropriate. Keep things simple and avoid burdening a younger child with concepts he or she doesn’t understand.

Your attitude can make a huge difference to how a child reacts.

Help children recognise times in the past when they bounced back from disappointment.

Laugh together - humour is a great coping mechanism.

Source: Adapted from an article by Michael Grose (Sunshine Heights Primary School newsletter)

34

PL AYCRICKE T.COM.AU

Online registration and payments

Cricket Australia provides Clubs on online payment system in partnership with Commonwealth Bank.

How it works

1 2 3 4 5

ENTER

BANK ACCOUNT

DETAILS

ACTIVATE YOUR MILO

PROGRAMS AND SETUP

YOUR CLUB REGISTRATION

TYPES & FORMS

PARTICIPANTS

REGISTER

ONLINE

PARTICIPANTS

DETAILS ARE

UPDATED IN

MYCRICKET

PAYMENTS

ARE DEPOSITED

INTO CLUB

ACCOUNT

Benefits include:

»

Setup of the Online Registration system is FREE.

»

Payments are secure & deposited into your Club’s nominated bank account.

» Eases volunteer workload and the manual registration, collection of paperwork and payments.

» Reporting tools help you manage your online registrations and reconcile payments.

»

Manage your player/member database and their details from within MyCricket.

»

Facilitates use of email & SMS communication tools.

» Option to offer online registration without payment.

» Low service fee –

1.95%.

»

No service fee for MILO in2CRICKET and MILO T20 Blast registrations.

»

Registration forms that are easy to use on mobile phones.

Communication and Insurance

Help and Support

Communication

Sending communications through MyCricket via email & SMS is made easy. Messages can be directly targeted to specific groups through your Club/

Association member database (e.g. senior players, life members etc.).

Main Benefits:

»

Streamlines communications.

» Administrators do not have to use their personal email account.

»

Clubs/Associations can purchase SMS credits, and therefore volunteers won’t incur a personal cost with using their personal phone to send messages.

Tips for Clubs

Juniors to pay only one set of subscriptions per year, and one match payment per day irrespective of also participating at senior level.

Tips for Clubs

All monies received must be handed to the treasurer who will issue a receipt for every amount.

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35

Workload guidelines for playing and training

It is recommended that the following guidelines be adopted for junior cricketers’ training schedules.

SESSIONS PER WEEK*

BALLS PER SESSION

U-10 U-11 U-12 U-13 U-14 U-15 U-16 U-17 U-18 U-19

1

24

1

24

2

24

2

30

2

30

*Substitute at least one practice session for each additional match played in the week.

2

30

2

36

3

36

3

42

3

48

Bowling: guidelines for total weekly workload (under-14 to under-19 bowlers)

Research suggests that the total number of deliveries bowled in a week, and increasing the number of balls bowled from week-to-week too quickly (workload spike) can have an impact on the potential for injury.

For example, at first-class level (average age 27 years), it has been shown that total workloads of more than 170 balls per week can increase the risk of injury, and at a junior level, the number of bowling sessions per week, can also influence injury risk.

This is a potential area for concern in younger age groups when growth, motor development and physical maturity factors are taken into account.

For under-14 to under-19 bowlers, it is recommended that a sensible strategy is:

»

If 1 to 10 overs of match deliveries are bowled in a week, a bowler should follow the training guidelines above;

» If 11 to 20 overs of match deliveries are bowled in a week, a bowler should NOT bowl more than twice at training during that week;

»

If 21 to 30 overs of match deliveries are bowled in a week, a bowler should NOT bowl more than once at training during that week;

»

If 30 overs or more of match deliveries are bowled in a week, a bowler should NOT bowl at all at training during that week.

» As with any repetitive physical activity, there is a risk that injuries may still occur. If symptoms develop, particularly in the lower back, seek early medical assessment of the problem.

The above recommendations were developed with weekly Club/school cricket in mind and they are not necessarily appropriate for junior cricket carnivals, which may have children playing multiple days of cricket consecutively.

It should also be noted that coaches, administrators and parents should be aware of the training workloads and any other competition playing commitments in the 2–3 days leading up to, and immediately after, the aforementioned competitions/junior carnivals.

These recommendations have been developed with the junior cricket player’s best interest in mind.

Cricket Australia hopes that coaches and team managers can understand this and help to provide the safest possible environment for our junior players.

Detecting and managing

illegal bowling actions

Many young boys and girls experience difficulties with maintaining a bowling arm position within the

International Cricket Council’s range (0-15 degrees).

A high level of empathy should be applied to the handling of these cases.

Coaches, parents, umpires and managers of underage teams should respect the sensitive nature of this issue.

At the introductory level of the game, bowlers in this category should be assisted with the problem rather than have it highlighted.

Contact your relevant State/Territory Cricket

Association to assist with appropriate measures that will help manage such cases, or visit the illegal bowling action information on the Cricket Australia website:

www.community.cricket.com.au

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Bowling workload guidelines

The following is recommended to reduce the risk of injury and enhance the bowling development of junior cricketers, both in game and training situations.

5 to 12 years of age

»

Restrictions in place for player development

– all players to bowl in every match unless injured or at risk of injury;

» Six (6) legal balls per over with a maximum of eight (8)a balls in any one over, including wides and no-balls.

13 years and above

» Restrictions are in place predominately for safety, but also for development purposes;

» Maximum overs in a day includes all overs on that day and if a second innings commences on the same day, i.e. outright opportunity, restrictions still apply.

For players playing more than one match in a given day, the daily restrictions should still apply.

Rest periods

The minimum rest periods between spells for medium and fast bowlers will be at least the same number of overs bowled from the same end as the bowlers’ immediately concluded spell. For example, if the bowler has bowled 4 overs from that end, they would get at least 4 overs rest before bowling again.

Bowling restrictions summary

AGE

5-8 YEARS

UNDER 10

UNDER 11

UNDER 12

UNDER 13

UNDER 14

UNDER 15

UNDER 16

UNDER 17

UNDER 18

UNDER 19

BOWLING RESTRICTIONS FOR MATCHES

»

One over per bowler

» Maximum eight balls in any one over

» All players (unless injured or at risk of injury) minimum one over

» Two overs maximum each spell

» Four overs maximum for day

» Maximum eight balls in any one over

» All players (unless injured or at risk of injury) minimum one over

»

Three overs maximum each spell

» Six overs maximum for day

»

Maximum eight balls in any one over, including wides/no-balls

» All players (unless injured or at risk of injury) minimum one over.

»

Four overs maximum each spell

» Eight overs maximum for day

»

Maximum eight balls in any one over, including wides/no-balls

» Four overs maximum each spell

»

Eight overs maximum for day

» Five overs maximum each spell

»

10 overs maximum for day

» Five overs maximum each spell

»

12 overs maximum for day

»

Six overs maximum each spell

» 14 overs maximum for day

»

Six overs maximum each spell

» 16 overs maximum for day

»

Seven overs maximum each spell

» 18 overs maximum for day

»

Eight overs maximum each spell

» 20 overs maximum for day

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Developing youth pace bowlers

CONSIDERATIONS: THE BIG 3 FACTORS

1.

AGE

• GROWING BONES ARE

MORE

SUSCEPTIBLE TO INJURY

• SPINAL BONES

DON’T FULLY

MATURE UNTIL THE MID 20’S

2.

WORKLOAD

UNDERSTAND PREVIOUS LOADS

PLAN & MONITOR FOR EACH INDIVIDUAL

• AVOID LARGE LOAD SPIKES

3.

TECHNIQUE

COUNTER-ROTATION

GREATER THAN 35˚ IS A RISK

OTHER FACTORS

FITNESS INJURY HISTORY

35˚

BALL SPEED HEIGHT

• STRENGTH

• FLEXIBILITY

• ENDURANCE

• HEALTHY EATING

CONSIDER PREVIOUS

INJURY AS IT

PREDISPOSES

TO FUTURE INJURY

FASTER BOWLERS

GENERATE

HIGHER FORCES

THROUGH THE BODY

• UNDERSTAND GROWTH

RATE BY MEASURING

HEIGHT EVERY 6 MONTHS

• LOWER THE LOADS

AFTER A GROWTH SPURT

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Codes of Behaviour

Each of the Codes of Behaviour governing cricket have been developed in reference to the Australian Sports Commission and adapted to reflect the principles and Spirit of Cricket in Australia.

The Codes ensure that participants develop good sporting behaviours and have a positive cricket experience, which encourages them to remain involved in cricket throughout their lives.

Cricket Australia recommends the adoption of these Codes by Associations, their Clubs and schools, and to distribute the Codes to all appropriate groups at the commencement of the cricket season.

They should apply in addition to, rather than as a substitute for, any other codes that a school, Club or Association may have in place.

Coaches’

Code of Behaviour

The Coaches’ Code of Behaviour is a positive document for all coaches. It affirms a coach’s support for the concepts of responsibility, trust, competence, respect, safety, honesty, professionalism, equity and sportsmanship. The Code also provides a reference point for Clubs, parents, athletes, schools and employers for what they should expect of a coach in demonstrating appropriate standards of behaviour.

Safety and Health

of Participants

» Place the safety and welfare of the participants above all else.

»

Be aware of and support the Sport’s Injury

Management Plans and Return to Play Guidelines located at

www.community.cricket.com.au/clubassist

Honour

the sport

»

Act within the rules and spirit of cricket.

»

Promote fair play over winning at any cost.

» Respect the decisions of officials, coaches and administrators.

»

Show respect and courtesy to all involved with the sport.

»

Display responsible behaviour in relation to alcohol and other drugs.

Coaching excellence

» Help each person (athlete, official, etc) to reach their potential. Respect the talent, developmental stage and goals of each person, and encourage them with positive and constructive feedback.

» Encourage and support opportunities for people to learn appropriate behaviours and skills.

» Support opportunities for participation in all aspects of the sport.

» Treat each participant as an individual.

» Obtain appropriate qualifications and keep up-to-date with the latest coaching practices, and the principles of growth and development of participants.

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39

Integrity

»

» Act»with»integrity»and»objectivity,»and»accept» responsibility»for»your»decisions»and»actions.

»

» Ensure»your»decisions»and»actions»contribute» to»a»harassment-free»environment.

»

» Wherever»practical,»avoid»unaccompanied»and» unobserved»one-on-one»activity»(when»in»a» supervisory»capacity»or»where»a»power»imbalance» exists)»with»people»under»the»age»of»18.

» » Ensure»that»any»physical»contact»with»another» person»is»appropriate»to»the»situation»and» necessary»for»the»person’s»skill»development.

»

» Be»honest»and»do»not»allow»your»qualifications» or»coaching»experience»to»be»misrepresented.

»

» Never»advocate»or»condone»the»use»of» illicit»drugs»or»other»banned»performance» enhancing»substances»or»methods.

»

» Never»participate»in»or»advocate» practices»that»involve»match»fixing.

Respect

» » Respect»the»rights»and»worth»of»every»person,» regardless»of»their»age,»race,»gender,»ability,» cultural»background,»sexuality»or»religion.

»

» Do»not»tolerate»abusive,»bullying» or»threatening»behaviour.

Code of behaviour agreement form

All coaches wishing to become registered with

Cricket Coaches Australia (CCA) are required to sign an individualised coach’s code of behaviour agreement form.

This form requires coaches to:

»

Agree to abide by the Cricketer’s

Code of Behaviour.

»

Acknowledge that Cricket Australia may take disciplinary action against them, if they breach the Code of Behaviour.

» Acknowledge that disciplinary action against them may include de-accreditation.

SU

CC

ESS

PH

YS

ICA

L

EN

JOY

MEN

T

DE

VEL

OP

MEN

T

TEC

HNI

CA

L

CO

MP

ETI

TIV

ENE

SS

TAC

TIC

AL

ME

NTA

L

PERS

ON

AL

The Australian Way

National coaching philosophy and the basics

A clear, attractive and aligned player & coach pathway with learning environments that are fun, safe and high quality.

Attract, retain and develop cricketers at all levels with a focus on the basics to develop cricketers holistically.

“Tell them what you want them to do, not how to do it”

Don Bradman 1958

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Codes of Behaviour

Teachers

Code of Behaviour

Umpires

Code of Behaviour

»

Create opportunities to teach appropriate sports behaviour, as well as basic skills related to cricket;

»

For primary school children, give priority to free play through engaging activities and assist in further skill development cricket and inclusive modified games of cricket over highly structured competition;

»

Prepare young people for intra and inter school cricket competition by teaching them basic sport skills;

»

Make young people aware of the positive benefits of participation in cricket and sporting activities within their local community;

»

Compliment and encourage all participants;

»

Be consistent, objective and courteous when making decisions;

» Condemn unsporting behaviour and promote respect for all participants;

»

Emphasise the spirit of the game rather than the errors;

»

Encourage and promote rule changes which will make participation more enjoyable;

» Be a good sport yourself - actions speak louder than words;

»

Keep up-to-date with the latest available resources for umpiring and the principles of growth and development of young people;

KEEP UP-TO-DATE WITH

COACHING PRACTICES AND THE

PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL GROWTH

AND DEVELOPMENT. READ AND USE

THE LATEST AVAILABLE CRICKET

COACHING AND TEACHING RESOURCES:

WWW.COMMUNITY.CRICKET.COM.AU

YOU SET THE EXAMPLE.

YOUR BEHAVIOUR AND COMMENTS

SHOULD BE POSITIVE AND SUPPORTIVE.

»

Help young people understand the differences between the junior cricket competition they participate in and professional sport;

» Help young people understand that playing by the rules is their responsibility;

»

Give all young people equal opportunities to participate in administration, coaching and umpiring, as well as playing;

» Respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person, regardless of their gender, ability, cultural background or religion;

»

Support the implementation of this document -‘Well Played: Australian Cricket’s

Playing Policies and Guidelines’.

» Place the safety and welfare of participants above all else;

»

Respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person regardless of their gender, ability, cultural background or religion;

»

Support the implementation of this document -‘Well Played: Australian Cricket’s

Playing Policies and Guidelines’.

Tips for Clubs

Have juniors as part of your Club committee.

Tips for Clubs

Conduct induction and information sessions for coaches and parents to clarify policies and expected behaviour

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Parents

Code of Behaviour

»

Do not force an unwilling child to participate in cricket;

»

Remember, children are involved in cricket for their enjoyment, not yours;

»

Encourage your child to play by the rules;

»

Focus on the child’s efforts and performance, rather than winning or losing;

»

Never ridicule or yell at a child for making a mistake or losing a game;

»

Remember that children learn best by example. Appreciate good performances and skillful play by all participants;

»

Support all efforts to remove verbal and physical abuse from sporting activities;

»

Respect officials’ decisions and teach children to do likewise;

»

Show appreciation for volunteer coaches, officials and administrators. Without them, your child could not participate;

»

Respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person regardless of their gender, ability, cultural background or religion;

»

Support the implementation of this document -‘Well Played: Australian Cricket’s

Playing Policies and Guidelines’.

Players

Code of Behaviour

»

Play by the rules;

»

Never argue with an umpire. If you disagree, have your captain, coach or manager approach the umpire in an appropriate manner during a break or after the game;

»

Control your temper. Verbal abuse of officials and sledging other players, and deliberately distracting or provoking an opponent, are not acceptable or permitted behaviours in cricket;

»

Work equally hard for yourself and your teammates. Your team’s performance will benefit and so will you;

»

Be a good sport. Applaud all good plays whether they are made by your team or the opposition;

»

Treat all players in cricket as you like to be treated. Do not bully or take unfair advantage of another competitor;

»

Cooperate with your coach, teammates and opponents. Without them there would be no competition;

»

Participate for your own enjoyment and benefit, not just to please parents, teachers or coaches;

»

Respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person regardless of their gender, ability, cultural background or religion.

Tips for Clubs

Organise for several people from your Club to become

Club Ambassadors.

Tips for Clubs

Celebrate a birthday, milestone, or reunion at the Club.

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CONSIDERATIONS for Parents

All parents want to make the right decisions for and with their child.

More tips for parents to nurture and support their child’s sporting development can be found at

www.ausport.gov.au/supporting/top_10_tips_for_parents

1 The importance of a strong base of fundamental movement skills for lifelong participation and performance in sport

2 The importance of deliberate play to skill development

3 The ‘familial advantage’ - parental and sibling influence on skill development

4 The importance of the right match of sport format and equipment for fun, promoting skill development and minimising injury

5 The importance of sport sampling before specialising

6 Smart practice

7 The value of observational learning to skill development

8 Self-regulation is an important skill for sport, and life!

9 Developing the ‘sport-ready’ athlete

10 Finding the right coach and club for your child

REMEMBER when coaching:

and respect all tho in cricket. This

includes opponents, coa ches, umpires, admini strators, parents and sp ectators.

Encourage your

players to do the same.

Remember that young people participate for pleasure and winning is only part of the fun.

Show concern and caution toward sick and injured players. Follow the advice of a physician when determining whether an injured player is ready to recommence training or competing.

Ensure that the time players spend with you is a positive experience.

Obtain appropriate qualifications and keep up-to-date with the latest cricket coaching practices and principles of growth and development of young people.

Never ridicule or yell at a young player for making a mistake or not coming first.

Operate within the rules and spirit of the game and teach your player s to do the same.

Respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person regardless of their gender, ability, cultural background or religion.

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Coach and volunteer

Pathways

Coaching pathways

Coaches are critical to ensuring all players have a positive and fun cricket experience in a safe learning environment.

Community coaches have a significant impact on players in the development of skills and ensuring they have the opportunity to make their dreams come true, from backyard to Baggy Green.

All coaches, including those MILO in2CRICKET and

MILO T20 Blast coordinators, school teachers, junior and senior Club coaches, have been identified as the most significant factor impacting on the continued participation in cricket of the players in their care.

Following is an outline of the coach accreditation pathway which provides your coaches with the support and knowledge to further develop participants at your Club or school.

MILO in2CRICKET and MILO T20 Blast Coordinator COURSE

»

» An»accredited»course»that»takes»three»hours.

» » Aimed»to»equip»adults»with»the»basic»skills»and» information»to»enable»them»to»be»confident»in» assisting»with»entry»level»cricket»programs.

» » Delivered»online»and»shaped»around»learning» through»reflection»of»practical»experience» and»the»sharing»of»information.

»

» Candidates»will»leave»confident»of» the»skills»required»to»safely»supervise» children»while»playing»cricket.

Community Coach course

The Community Coaching Course is designed for people coaching players at Club level, junior or senior.

Covers:

Coach Approach

– develop an understanding of the

Australian Way philosophy and where players fit on the Australian Cricket Pathway.

Scoring Runs

– training on how to teach players to score runs, off the front and back foot and how to stay in.

Taking Wickets

– how to teach players to take wickets and save runs by bowling pace and spin, and the latest catching and throwing approaches, including wicket keeping specialties.

Preparing to Perform

– how to include basic physical elements to training sessions, appropriate hydration for players and methods to motivate players.

Leading the Game

– how to coach captains to make decisions in response to the game situation and how to create leaders within the playing group.

Representative Coach course

The Representative Coaching Course is designed for people coaching players or teams at a representative level or pathway programs.

The course will extend the skills of a coach, teaching them how to progress players to enhance their skills and reach their goals.

Topics covered include: coaching The Australian

Way, developing players, identifying talent, exploring coaching philosophies, technicalities of scoring runs and taking wickets, principles of teaching and learning and coaching safely.

High Performance Coaching Program

The High Performance Coaching Program is Cricket

Australia’s flagship education program available to coaches in or entering the high performance areas of cricket, including grade/premier cricket, underage

State teams, senior State teams, national high performance teams or players.

An important element is the requirement for each coach to nominate a mentor with whom they will liaise throughout the 12 month assessment period.

Cricket Coaches Australia (CCA)

At all levels across Australian cricket, we want players to enjoy the game, develop skills, be competitive, have success and above all – have fun doing it! Cricket Australia recognises the significant role of coaches at all levels of the game and established Cricket

Coaches Australia.

Research over many years has indicated the impact a coach can have on enabling players to stay in the game. We also recognise that a coaching ‘course’ is only one step in the process of assisting coaches to become more proficient.

CCA has been established as a means to support coaches through the provision of ongoing development opportunities and ultimately through recognition of excellence at all levels of involvement.

CCA is a major source of coach education and recognition throughout the country.

CCA members can look forward to the following benefits:

»

Access to CCA seminars/workshops through state/territory cricket Associations.

»

Member benefits, such as exclusive

CCA branded merchandise.

»

Access to resources and information on the CCA website.

To become a member of CCA please visit

www.coaches.cricket.com.au

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Umpiring Pathways

The opportunity to remain active in the game is perhaps no better exemplified than through umpiring.

Umpiring provides the best ‘seat in the house’ for those who take it on. Club administrators, coaches and players are encouraged to explore involvement in umpiring.

The standard umpire accreditation is Cricket

Australia’s Representative Officiating course.

Enquiries should be directed to State Directors of

Umpiring or your local Umpire Association.

A first step in assisting new umpires, or those mums and dads who stand as umpires in junior games, is the

“Community Officiating” online training.

All Clubs and schools are encouraged to purchase this resource and to make it available to novice umpires.

They will very quickly learn the basics through this easy-to-use resource which can found at

www.community.cricket.com.au

Cricket Australia Umpire Pathway

Competitions Panels Assessment

ODIs Test 4th

International Panel

(3rd)

National Panel

Emerging Panel

State Panel

ICC Match Referee

Umpire High

Performance Panel

Umpire High

Performance Panel

Umpire High

Performance Panel

Tips for Clubs

Encourage all players to introduce themselves to the umpires and wish them luck.

Volunteers Pathways

Cricket Australia encourages everyone in cricket to adopt a best practice approach to volunteer involvement.

It is only by recruiting new volunteers, retaining volunteers who join our great game, and publicly recognising the enormous contribution that volunteers make, that we strengthen our game and further our vision of cricket being Australia’s favourite sport.

Why volunteer?

Roughly 4.4 million Australians make a difference in their local community by volunteering each year. Volunteers are the lifeblood of cricket in the community. Without volunteer involvement at all levels of the game, from people supporting firsttime juniors to the veterans of the game, many communities, Clubs and teams would cease to exist.

There are so many ways that you can be involved in cricket - through coaching, umpiring, scoring, administrating and more.

Recognising volunteers

First-Time Volunteer Certificate

Cricket Australia is committed to recognising the significant impact volunteers have on the wellbeing of our great game. Through our partnership with the Australian Cricket Society, we have introduced a recognition program to acknowledge first-time volunteers.

The program aims to identify volunteers within

Clubs and MILO in2CRICKET and MILO T20

Blast centres that have contributed in some way, whether it is through coaching, umpiring, administration or more.

Volunteer of the Year Awards

Each year, one volunteer from each

State and Territory is chosen to represent the countless number of volunteers helping to make cricket Australia’s favourite sport at one of the International

ODI matches.

50 Year Service to Cricket

Each year, Australian cricket recognises the outstanding contribution of volunteers who have provided 50 years of service to cricket. A gold plated

Cricket Australia branded pin in a velvet case is struck for each recipient in recognition for their 50 years of service. A certificate signed by the Chairman Cricket

Australia accompanies the pin.

Tips for Clubs

Award and recognise the coach and volunteers to help create the right environments.

Demonstrate the importance of positive behaviors and adults setting an example.

Tips for Clubs

Conduct an open day during your registration period. Welcome the local community to your Club.

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Benefits of volunteering

Volunteering can be rewarding for a host of reasons, such as:

Skill acquisition, such as communication and leadership skills

Meeting new people

Experiencing new challenges AND DEVELOPING Confidence

The ability to explore different sorts of career or job opportunities in a voluntary capacity

A written/verbal reference

Respect for differenT people and conditions

An increased sense of worth and accomplishment from making a difference

A stronger sense of community and decrease in social isolation

Learning new skills or using existing skills

Safety and legal considerations

Promoting safety

in Cricket

While there is an inherent safety risk in all sports, cricket is generally considered to be a safe game, particularly if there is the adoption and implementation of an injury prevention and safety program within your Association, Club or school.

To assist Associations, Clubs, schools and coaches adopt a consistent approach to managing the safety and injury risks within cricket, Cricket Australia has developed some recommended practices to provide a quick and comprehensive reference of guidelines to promote a safe approach to cricket at all levels.

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Risk management

Risk Management is a process of systematically identifying risks and eliminating or reducing the likelihood and consequence to the participants, sport and Club should they occur.

The development and implementation of a risk management plan that is compliant with cricket laws and policies, and appropriate for the nature and scale of the cricket Club environment is recommended. A risk management plan should aim to:

»

Reduce the frequency and severity of injuries; and

»

Position cricket as a safe sport.

The following steps can assist a Club or Association to identify risks and help provide a safe environment for all participants:

Step 5

Manage potential risks

(what will the Club do?)

Step 6

Monitor and review risks and procedures.

Step 1

Get support from committee and Club members/players

Step 2

Appoint a Risk Management Officer

Step 3

Identify potential risks

(what could go wrong?)

Step 4

Assess potential risks (what is the impact on the Club or Club members?)

Clubs owe a duty of care to their players, officials and spectators to provide a safe environment in which to train for, play and watch cricket. A great way to ensure your Club does this is to complete a matchday checklist. The checklist is a basic inspection tool that helps to identify safety concerns and record actions taken to reduce or eliminate such concerns. In the event of an incident, having a completed match day checklist can be hugely beneficial for demonstrating that this duty of care was discharged properly.

Cricket Match Day app

To assist with match day checks, JLT Sport have created a Cricket Match

Day app available on iOS and Android. The app provides an easy-to-use method of working through the necessary match day checks on issues such as playing surfaces, weather conditions, first aid provision and general hazard awareness. On completion of the checklist, the information recorded is stored in your phone or tablet and can be emailed to Club officials for record-keeping purposes. In addition, the completion of regular facility checks are also recommended.

For more information:

www.jltsport.com.au/cricketaustralia

Injury Prevention

Cricket is considered to be one of Australia’s safest sports. However, as with all physical activities, injuries can still occur. Establishing preventative measures and practices can greatly assist to minimise the number and severity of injuries.

When and where do cricket injuries occur?

One third

of cricket injuries to children occur during school hours.

Almost 20%

of injuries occur during training or practice.

Research findings of cricket injuries:

» Cricket injuries are mostly fractures (26.8%), strains – muscle/tendons (23.1%) and sprains – ligaments (19.6%);

» A direct blow from the ball injuring muscles, tendons and ligaments while batting, bowling and fielding is a common injury;

» 35% of all injuries are incurred while fielding, followed by 22% while batting and 14% while bowling;

»

Overuse injuries can occur, in particular back injuries to fast bowlers at the elite level and in young cricketers.

Source: Sports Medicine Australia & Sport Safe Australia

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Ricer

R

est,

I

ce,

C

ompression,

E

levation,

R

eferral

The first 48 hours are vital in the effective management of any soft tissue injury.

Injuries managed effectively in the first 48 hours will reduce the time spent on the sideline.

The immediate management should follow the RICER regime. This Regime should be used for all ligament sprains and muscle bruises (corks etc) – in fact, any bumps and bruises which occur in sport.

How

Place the athlete in a comfortable position, preferably lying down. The injured part should be immobilised and supported.

Rest

Why

If there is bleeding, activity will promote bleeding by increasing blood flow.

Ice

Compression

Elevation

Referral

The conventional methods are:

» Crushed ice in a wet towel/plastic bag

»

Immersion in icy water

» Commercial cold packs wrapped in wet towel

»

Cold water from the tap is better than nothing

Apply for 20 minutes every 2 hours for the first 48 hours

CAUTION:

» Do not apply ice directly to the skin as ice burns can occur

» Do not apply ice to people who are sensitive to cold or have circulatory problems

» Children have a lower tolerance to ice

Ice reduces:

» Swelling

»

Pain

» Muscle spasm

»

Secondary damage to the injured area

Apply a firm wide elastic bandage over a large area covering the injured parts, as well as above and below the injured part.

Raise injured area above the level of the heart at all possible times.

Compression:

»

Reduces bleeding and swelling

» Provides support for the injured part

Elevation:

»

Reduces bleeding and swelling

» Reduces pain

Early referral to a suitable qualified professional such as a doctor or physiotherapist for a definitive diagnosis and ongoing care.

the 

HARM

factors

H eat

A lcohol

Increases bleeding

Increases swelling

R unning

M assage

can make injury worse

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Safety tips for cricket

Implementing the following tips can help prevent injuries in cricket:

»

» Appoint»a»Risk»Management»Officer»to» consider»and»implement»these»safety»tips»as»a» minimum.»Good»preparation»is»important;

»

» Warm»up»and»stretch»before»and»regularly»during»a» cricket»session.»Bowlers,»particularly»fast»bowlers,» should»warm»up»before»their»bowling»session;

»

» Good»technique»and»practices» will»help»prevent»injury;

» » Restrict»the»number»of»overs»bowled»in»any»one» session.»The»actual»number»should»take»into» account»the»bowler’s»physical»maturity.»This»is» particularly»important»for»young»cricketers;

»

» Coaches»should»undergo»regular»re-accreditation» and»education»updates»to»ensure»they»have»the» latest»information»about»playing»techniques;

»

» Wear»appropriate»safety»equipment;

»

» Wear»body»padding»when»batting,»including» gloves»and»leg»pads»for»all»players»and»protectors;

» » When»batting,»wicket-keeping»or»fielding» in»close,»wear»a»cricket»helmet»(refer»to»the» helmet»guidelines»outlined»on»page»58);

»

» Wear»protective»gear»during»training» as»well»as»competition;

»

» Encourage»children»to»play»modified» cricket»programs»as»a»means»of» developing»good»technique;

»

» Wicket-keepers»to»wear»a»mouth»guard»(especially» in»junior»cricket),»in»addition»to»helmet»use;

» » Appoint»a»Club/school»safety»officer»and»develop» a»procedural»response»checklist»in»readiness» for»an»injury»that»may»occur»during»training» or»competition.»This»should»include»checking» that»the»first-aid»kit»for»the»Club/school»is» adequately»stocked»in»case»an»injury»occurring;

»

» Ensure»all»injured»cricketers»receive» adequate»treatment»and»full»rehabilitation» before»they»resume»participation;

»

» Where»possible,»ensure»a»qualified»first-aid»officer» or»sports»trainer»is»on»hand»to»treat»injured»players;

»

» Cricket»Australia»also»recommends»Clubs»have»an»

Automated»External»Defibrillator»(AED)»available.

S

TOP

The Stop

Safety Method

Once it has been established that there is no danger to the injured player’s life, the severity of the other injuries should be assessed using the STOP method.

T

ALK

O

BSERVE

P

REVENT

STOP THE PLAYER FROM

PARTICIPATING

OR MOVING

»

TALK TO

THE INJURED

PLAYER

What happened?

» How did it happen?

»

What do you feel?

» Where does it hurt?

»

Does it hurt anywhere else?

» Have you injured this part before?

OBSERVE

WHILST TALKING

TO THE PLAYER

General:

» Is the player distressed?

»

Is the player lying in an unusual position/posture?

Injury Site:

» Is there any swelling?

»

Is there any deformity?

» Is there any difference when compared to the other side/limb?

»

Is there tenderness when touched?

» Does it hurt to move the injured part?

PREVENT

FURTHER

INJURY

DON’T PANIC STAY COOL PROVIDE

A FEW WORDS OF

ENCOURAGEMENT IF

THE ANSWER TO ANY OF

THE ABOVE QUESTIONS

IS “YES” SEEK AN

ACCREDITED SPORTS

TRAINER OR QUALIFIED

FIRST AID SUPPORT.

PLAY ON

»

A FEW WORDS OF

ENCOURAGEMENT

WILL HELP

Monitor any such injuries.

» Minor injuries should also be managed using the RICER regime.

Source: Coaching Children, Australian Sports Commission

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Safety & injury prevention

A first aid diagram focused on the simple process for handling any emergency situation confidently and calmly.

D

ANGER

Ensure the area is safe for yourself, others and the patient

Emergencies

000

for an ambulance

R

ESPONSE

Check for response, ask name, squeeze shoulders

No Response

Send for help

Response

»

»

» make comfortable check for injuries monitor response

Call Triple Zero (000) for an ambulance or ask another person to make the call

S

END FOR HELP

»

Open mouth—if foreign material is present: place in the recovery position » clear airway with fingers

Open airway by tilting head with chin lift

A

IRWAY

B

REATHING

Check for breathing - look, listen and feel

C

PR

D

EFIBRILLATION

Source: Coaching Children, Australian Sports Commission

Not Normal

Breathing

Start CPR

Normal

Breathing

Place in recovery position

»

»

»

Monitor breathing

Manage injuries

Treat for shock

Start CPR - 30 chest compressions: 2 breaths

Continue CPR until help arrives or patient recovers

Apply defibrillator, if available, and follow voice prompts

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Safety in nets

» The coach or net supervisor should brief everyone prior to the commencement of training as to their responsibility towards the safety of themselves and their training partners.

» Players should not turn their backs to batters.

» When walking across nets, be mindful of batters batting and bowler’s run ups.

» Ensure no spectators are in the nets creating an unnecessary distraction and over-crowding.

» Brief batters to work on their skills not necessarily trying to hit every ball out of the park.

» Ensure bowlers are bowling from the correct lengths.

» Ensure all creases are marked correctly.

» Prior to training, scan the nets for any hazards.

For example, broken glass or little rocks on the wicket.

Bowling machine etiquette

»

Ensure the people using the bowling machine have had some training.

»

Ensure electrical cords are out of harm’s way and not a tripping hazard.

» The feeder should always allow the batter to nominate the ball speed.

»

It is recommended the batter commences with slower speed to work on technique.

»

The ball speed can be increased when the batter nominates and at a gradual rate.

»

Always test the first ball by the batter being out of the way.

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Helmets

Helmets are mandatory for junior club cricketers (18 years and younger), including when they are playing senior cricket. They must be worn when batting, keeping or fielding in close.

Cricket Australia also recommends all senior cricketers wear a helmet when batting, wicket keeping up to the stumps or fielding in close. (Note that junior cricketers are not permitted to field in close).

Any individual taking responsibility for players should take all reasonable steps to ensure that the above guidance is followed.

Helmets must be a specifically-designed, properly-fitted cricket helmet with a face guard. ‘Best of breed’ helmets are compliant with the new British Standard for helmet safety (BS7928:2013 specification for head protectors for cricketers). This

Standard supersedes the existing Australian Standard. Following an ICC directive, elite* cricketers in Australia are required to only wear helmets that are compliant with the new British Standard. As of the 2016/17 season, this is also a requirement for community cricketers.

Players should be aware that under the new British Standard, helmets can be tested against men’s and/or junior balls. Accordingly, players must wear helmets that have been tested against the type of ball they will be utilising in match and training conditions.

* Cricket Australia or State/Territory contracted players, members of Cricket Australia or State/

Territory squads, BBL/WBBL contracted players, members of underage state teams (male and female), and any player invited to train with any of those teams or squads.

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Club and member

protection

Member protection is a term used to describe the practices and procedures that protect an organisation’s members.

These include both individual members, such as players, coaches and officials, and the member organisations, such as Clubs, State Associations, other affiliated Associations and the national body.

The safety and well-being of cricket participants must be the number one consideration of all Clubs and Associations. Clubs and Associations must take all reasonable steps to ensure the safety and well-being of cricketers.

Member protection involves:

» Protecting members from harassment, abuse, discrimination and other forms of inappropriate behaviour.

» Adopting appropriate measures to ensure the right people are involved in an organisation, particularly in relation to those involved with juniors.

»

Providing education.

»

Promoting and modelling positive behaviour.

» Developing strategies to deal with allegations of harassment, abuse, etc.

Cricket Australia and the State/Territory Cricket

Associations each have a Member Protection Policy as part of their ongoing commitment to the health, safety and well-being of its staff, players, coaches and officials. Visit

clubassist.cricket.com.au

for more information.

Child protection and screening of volunteers

Children have a fundamental right to be safe from any form of abuse while involved in cricket.

This is a legal requirement as well as a moral obligation. Child protection requires a commitment from all levels of cricket to ensure the environment is safe for all children. This includes an awareness of the requirements and risks, a commitment to practices that minimise the risks, and the ability to appropriately respond to incidents of child abuse.

All coaches, umpires and volunteers who are in contact with children are required to complete a police check and/or reference check as required by

State law. It is acknowledged that volunteers, coaches and umpires are sometimes difficult to recruit and that checks may be unattractive to a well-meaning volunteer. However, the safety and well-being of

Australia’s cricketers must be the priority.

Related References.

ausport.gov.au

and click on the

Child Protection section for further information.

Umpire safety

Umpires should also consider what protective gear they feel is necessary for them.

Advancements in bat technology mean that the larger bats available today are capable of producing stronger and faster shots which may be directed towards the main umpire (or the square leg umpire).

This is particularly relevant for modified formats of the game such as T20 and Super Sixes, however also applies to traditional formats. Umpires should consider the use of shin pads, and some kind of facial/ head protection.

Tips for Clubs

Don’t leave recruitment of volunteers to the last minute - begin long before appointment time.

Tips for Clubs

When chairing a meeting attempt to get all attendees to contribute to the meeting.

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National Club Risk Protection

program

The National Club Risk Protection Program is a joint initiative of Cricket Australia and the State/

Territory Cricket Associations and has seen a number of financial benefits and savings provided to cricket Clubs across Australia.

The program was developed to help Clubs achieve appropriate and affordable insurance cover through a collective approach and greater purchasing power.

It is considered that every Club now has access to insurance at an affordable and consistent price.

The program provides competitively priced broad protection as outlined in this table:

POLICY

PUBLIC LIABILITY

ERRORS AND OMISSIONS LIABILITY

(FOR COACHES, UMPIRES AND MANAGERS ONLY)

PRODUCTS LIABILITY

CLUB MANAGEMENT LIABILITY

PERSONAL ACCIDENT

LOSS OF INCOME

COVER

$20m, $1,000 excess

$1m, $2,500 excess

$20m, $1,000 excess

$10m, variable excess

85 per cent Non-Medicare costs

$5,000 max, $50 excess

85 per cent of net weekly income up to a maximum of $500, 14 -day excess

EXAMPLE

Slip and trip

Negligent advice by coach/trainer

Faulty products sold by Club

Negligence in capacity of office bearers

Injuries sustained during Club activities

Income lost due to injury sustained during Club activity

It is important that Clubs register for insurance with the National Club Risk Protection Program and complete the online risk management module, and print their Certificate of Currency.

For further information, contact JLT

Sport on 1300 130 373 for assistance.

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Ground and weather conditions

Ground and weather conditions can have a significant impact on the safety and enjoyment of cricket at both junior and senior levels.

Sometimes, as is the case with weather, these conditions are somewhat unpredictable and uncontrollable. Appropriate care should be taken to avoid any weather-related injuries.

Lightning Safety

Lightning can occur during the Summer months in

Australia, when warmer weather and the increase in energy provided by the sun can combine to create more frequent thunderstorms.

Umpires, coaches and teachers should exercise a conservative approach to continuing play in the rain, where lightning is present or where the field conditions have reached a point where they pose danger to participants.

It is important that Clubs foster good working relationships with local government authorities to encourage a pro-active approach to the maintenance and improvement of your cricket facilities

Keep them informed in writing of any deteriorations and don’t forget to thank them when upgrades and repairs have been completed.

The hours of 2pm-6pm are also more likely to see thunderstorm activity than others – precisely when cricket is usually played. Despite these general trends, lightning can and does occur at all times of the year and at any time of the day or night. As such, there is a clear need for Clubs and Associations to have a welldeveloped lightning safety plan.

Clubs should nominate a person to be responsible for monitoring the weather before and during a match, and Associations should remind Clubs of the need to have in place appropriate arrangements for managing lightning safety. A variety of smartphone apps are available to help with accurate weather forecasts during a match.

Lightning

30/30 Rule

Should thunderstorms be prevalent on match day, the 30/30 rule should be used to determine whether play should be suspended and when it is safe to resume. Thunderstorms within 10km are deemed dangerous – the

30/30 rule is used to determine the distance to the storm so match officials can make the appropriate decisions.

Sound travels at a speed of around 1km every 3 seconds. When lightning is sighted, count the seconds between the flash of lightning and the sound of the thunder. If the time between flash and bang is less than 30 seconds, this means the storm is within 10km and is therefore close enough to be dangerous. Play should then be suspended for a minimum of 30 minutes, and must not resume until 30 minutes after the last audible thunder.

The safest structure during a thunderstorm is an enclosed building such as a Clubhouse, should one be available.

Alternatives are vehicles, with care taken to avoid any metal objects. Shelter should never be sought in open fields, or under trees or small open structures such as rain/picnic shelters. Metal fences, poles, clothes lines or antennas should be avoided. Metal must not be touched.

If a person is struck by lightning, immediately give first aid and call 000. Begin CPR if necessary and use an AED should one be available.

Points to remember:

»

Make sure your Club has a lightning safety plan.

»

Monitor the weather before and during match.

»

If thunderstorms occur, use the 30/30 rule to determine if the storm is less than 10km away.

»

Seek shelter in pre-arranged safe location.

»

Wait until 30 minutes after the storm has passed before resuming play.

»

If a person is struck, give first aid and call 000.

Begin CPR if necessary and use AED if available.

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Weather and unprepared wickets

As many are aware, cricket is a game played in most cases (excluding indoor cricket) outdoors, thus subjecting the participants to the elements.

This is even more so for those fortunate enough to be playing on turf wickets. Association administrators,

Club curators and everyone else involved have a responsibility to do their best to strive to get cricket played. It is very disappointing to have matches called off because wickets are not prepared or because of some hazard that could have been sorted out during the week. Our collective goal needs to ensure the fields of play, including wickets, are suitable for play.

It is acceptable that on some occasions that the weather or some freak situation warrants the match to be called off. We all understand this. However, too often the cricket is called off when a little extra diligence could have had everyone participating in the game.

Our position should always be to look to play providing it is safe.

Hydration

Due to the vast range of body composition, fitness, and states of acclimatisation represented in childhood and adolescence, no single recommendation on the volume of fluid to be consumed is appropriate.

Regular and effective drinking practices should become habitual to young athletes before, during, and after activity.

Heat

Climatic conditions vary throughout Australia and individuals’ tolerances of heat and humidity varies significantly.

Cricket Australia recommends that Clubs, schools and Associations apply commonsense guidelines to climatic conditions that exist within their respective regions and consult with the Sport Medicine Australia or health promotion organisation within their State or

Territory to assist in the development of local policies.

Further information can be found at Sports Medicine

Australia:

www.sma.org.au

HOT WEATHER

Players’ health must always be considered in the scheduling of matches.

Sports Medicine Australia recommends that for children and adolescents, activities should be postponed or cancelled if the temperature reaches the temperature as designated by the local or State

Association.

Action should be taken promptly by umpires and officials to cease play under any conditions that may be dangerous to the players and officials.

Sun

It is important that all involved with cricket take appropriate precautions to avoid sun damage.

protection

It is recommended that:

»

Sunscreen with an SPF of 30+ should be made available to players and officials, and reapplied as appropriate throughout competition.

» Players and officials wear appropriate clothing:

»

Players and officials wear a broad brimmed hat and long-sleeved shirts.

»

Light-coloured, loose-fitting clothes of natural fibres or composite fabrics with high absorption properties (high SPF rating) are the most appropriate clothing in mild and hot conditions.

»

Shaded areas are available at all grounds. If there are no trees, artificial shades such as umbrellas or similar should be used.

» Players and officials consider wearing appropriate sports eyewear.

Cricket Australia’s SunSmart policy is available for further information and advice on sun protection.

Visit

www.clubassist.com.au

for more information.

Guidelines

for fluid replacement

Drinks breaks occur every 30

– 60 minutes in all matches

(every 30 minutes in conditions of extreme temperature).

Water is the most appropriate drink for re-hydration. However, diluted cordial or sports drinks may be supplied.

Drinks should be available for individual players between drinks breaks. Umpires should be advised when additional drinks are sought and players should make every effort to ensure no time is wasted.

Players should be encouraged to have their own drink bottles.

This ensures that each player has access to an adequate level of replacement fluids and reduces the risk of contamination and viruses.

Where cups and a large container are supplied, cups should not be dipped into the container.

Used cups should be washed or disposed of after use.

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National Community

Cricket Facility Guidelines

The development of quality cricket facilities for training and playing is an important part in the overall enjoyment of the game for participants and spectators.

Cricket Australia has published a national specifications guide to help detail the preferred requirements and resources for the provision, improvement and enhancement of community cricket environments across Australia.

The guide is a means of quickly referencing key issues and guidelines around facility development and it is available through Club Assist:

www.clubassist.cricket.com.au

WWW.COMMUNITY.CRICKET.COM.AU/WELL-PLAYED

Eleven steps to becoming a connected community club

1

Open your minds.

2

Discuss and agree what is your purpose.

3

Be open to new skills, users/members, volunteers and partners.

4

Draw up a list of your current and potential community partners, their needs, your skills and contacts.

5

Take your ball and bat out into your community - go to galas, agricultural shows, shopping centres, parks and housing estates - be seen and meet people.

6

Design activities around community needs.

7

Identify Connectors both within and outside your Club (Connectors are people who can help link up with different groups).

Source Sports Marketing Network – Svend Elkjaer

8

Work out how to collaborate with other groups.

9

Organise the Big Launch - invite every single possible community partner both official and ‘unofficial’. Tell them about what you are currently doing, what you would like to do, what you are offering and can contribute (not what you want).

10

Set up a Community Board for your

Club with representatives - not just

VIPs but also ‘real’ people - from across the community to advise you on how best to engage and share value.

11

Invite ideas and suggestions, set in action and then follow up.

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Developing relationships with government

There are three tiers of government in Australia – Local, State and Federal.

The most important relationship for cricket Clubs and Associations will most often be with local government through councils.

It is important to be mindful of opportunities to engage with State and Federal government too, particularly Members of Parliament (MPs).

Government at all levels manage competing demands for attention and resources, including demands from other sports and community organisations for funding through grant programmes, and for the use of community facilities.

A positive working relationship with government will help you promote the growth and success of your

Club. Here are a few handy hints to help your Club work effectively with government.

» Identify the relationships you need to foster. For example, get to know your local council through the elected members and staff who manage your facilities.

»

You may like to nominate a Club representative to manage the relationship with council and other levels of government. If you don’t have a relationship with government, an initial meeting would be useful to discuss how your

Club can work effectively with government.

» Communicate with government to ensure they are informed about your Club, its activities and its needs. Send copies of Club newsletters and annual reports to councillors and MPs and, if necessary, have regular meetings.

» Involve government in your Club. Invite government representatives to Club functions and important fixtures.

» Demonstrate your appreciation for the facilities, services and support provided by government, particularly in the public arena.

»

Don’t just complain. Approach problems with solutions. Make an effort to understand the issues facing government and identify where you can work together for mutual benefit.

»

Align your priorities with government priorities where possible. Common ground is the best platform for a strong relationship.

» Be realistic. Understand that government manages a range of relationships and focus on what is achievable.

» Communicate, build relationships and raise your profile within the community. A good reputation in the community and amongst your neighbours will advance your standing with government.

Tips for Clubs

Write a letter to an Officer or

Mayor at local Council thanking them for their support of Cricket.

Local Government Strategy should include some of the following:

» » Club»Liaison»person/s»who»is»primarily» responsible»for»communicating»with»Council.

» » Invite»Councillors»to»special»Club»functions;» provide»them»the»opportunity»to»present»awards.

»

» Get»to»know»the»Councillors»including» the»Mayor,»Council»senior»officers,» recreation»&»maintenance»staff.

» » Acknowledge»the»work»of»Council»in» ensuring»cricket»is»able»to»be»played.

»

» Acknowledge»Council»publicly.

» » Clubs»assisting»and»participating»in»some»

Council»recreation»programs»and»Festivals.

»

» Clubs»to»attend»Council»sponsored» training»and»education.

»

» Use»social»media»to»acknowledge»

Council»good»work.

» » Recognise»Council»as»a»major»sponsor.

Tips for Clubs

Consider having a Local

Government strategy.

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A model cricket club...

1

Does not force juniors into a weekly commitment in seniors.

2

Ensures all its coaches have at least level 1 qualification.

3

Creates and maintains links with the local primary and secondary schools.

4

Offers different game formats - T20,

One Day and Two Day cricket - as well as mid-week, Friday Saturday and

Sunday options for match play.

5

Offers to assist the local school cricket team, team manager or coach.

6

Invites representatives from elite cricket Clubs in the area to attend special events, practice sessions and games.

7

Maintains and updates honour boards, including photographs.

8

Acknowledges the role local Council plays as a major sponsor of cricket.

9

Accesses promotional material available through the PlayCricket website.

10

Accesses the suite of MyCricket programs and offerings.

11

Ensures all media are aware of Club activities.

Tips for Clubs

Compile your Clubs history.

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67

Acknowledgement of country

We at Cricket Australia, through the Club Cricket Program and more broadly, would like to acknowledge Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islander Australians, past and present, and recognise the distinctive rights that Indigenous Australians hold as the original peoples of this land.

Cricket Australia supports initiatives that help build capacity, knowledge and strengthen relationships with Australia’s

Indigenous communities. Reconciliation with Australia’s traditional owners is an outcome that Cricket Australia supports.

Cricket Australia acknowledges the wonderful contribution

Indigenous communities and cricketers have made to this land we all call home – Australia.

68

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Contacts

For further information, please contact your State or Territory Association

CRICKET ACT

CRICKET NSW

CRICKET TASMANIA

QUEENSLAND CRICKET

CRICKET VICTORIA

NORTHERN TERRITORY CRICKET

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN CRICKET ASSOCIATION

WESTERN AUSTRALIAN CRICKET ASSOCIATION

CRICKET AUSTRALIA NATIONAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES MANAGER

CRICKET AUSTRALIA MANAGER OF CLUB CRICKET

02 6239 6002

02 8302 6000

03 6282 0400

07 3292 3100

03 9653 1100

08 8944 8900

08 8300 3800

08 9265 7222

03 9653 8826

03 9653 8861

Disclaimer

This document is published by Cricket Australia to provide general information only. Although every effort is made to ensure that information in this document is accurate, Cricket Australia is not responsible for the continued accuracy of the information, the application of that information or for any errors, omissions or inaccuracies in any information contained in this document.

The publication of information in this document does not constitute a representation or warranty either express or implied, that the information has been approved or tested by Cricket Australia or that it is suitable for general or particular use. Readers should exercise their own skill and care with respect to its use. Before relying on any information contained in this document, readers should carefully evaluate the accuracy, completeness, appropriateness and relevance of the information, and should obtain appropriate professional advice relevant to their particular circumstances.

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