Pre-Match Instructions - Football Federation Victoria

Pre-Match Instructions - Football Federation Victoria
R eferees
T echnical
C ommittee
Advice on Pre-Match
Instructions
FIFA Laws of the Game - Law 5 – The Referee - states that the Referee:
enforces the Laws of the Game
controls the match in cooperation with the assistant referees and, where applicable, with the fourth official
Prior to the commencement of each game, the referee must provide both Assistants (and if available, Fourth
Official) with pre-match instructions covering duties, and requirements in certain situations. Amongst other
things, the pre-match instructions should also allocate responsibilities, and inform the Assistant Referees
where to stand and how to act in certain situations.
The advice given here generally covers situations when there are three qualified match officials available, the Referee and his two
Assistant Referees. Information has also been provided on what instructions to provide a club official at the back of this document.
It is best for each referee to create a standard brief to use at most games, and then add on anything additional that is peculiar to each
game.
First and foremost the Assistant Referees should carry out their duties based on the requirements of Law 6 (The Assistant Referees).
Pre-match instructions should take place in private, but not necessarily in the Referee's changing room.
The referee should create a cooperative environment and show a positive attitude towards the Assistant Referees when delivering
instructions. As the team leader, this is an ideal opportunity to develop a positive relationship.
It is important that these instructions are delivered without interruption; however, if interruptions occur then maintain concentration
throughout.
All members of the team should concentrate 100 percent before, during and after the match and remain fully alert and aware at all
times. For example...
Even when play is furthest from the AR; be totally focused and 'switched on', always be ready for any eventuality and to 'expect the
unexpected'. Do not be distracted by comments from the crowd. Avoid responding to crowd comments, as they will probably provoke
further comments. If the ball goes over the touchline near to the AR, leave it for the players to bring back, even if it is very close to the
AR; an AR’s eyes should always be focused on the players at all times. Never make a comment that may commit me to a particular
course of action; because this may put the referee in an impossible position and cause unnecessary embarrassment
BEFORE THE MATCH
Pitch Inspection
Warming up routine
Senior Assistant Referee
and Junior Assistant
Referee (Fourth Official, if
applicable)
Players' equipment check
Match Records
Entry onto the field of play
and goal net checks
DURING THE MATCH
Assist, don't insist
Today’s Priorities
Gestures
On the same wavelength
Eye contact
Flag technique
Ball in and out play
Restarts
Flagging for a Law 12 offence
o Free kicks close to the penalty area
o Free Kicks - controlling the 9.15 m
distance
o Offences missed by the Referee
Dealing with mass confrontation
When a goal has been scored
Offside
Throw-ins
Corner Kicks
Goal kicks
Goalkeeper releasing the ball from his hands
Penalty Kicks
Obvious incorrect decision made by the
Referee
Substitutions
Bleeding and checking player's equipment
Advantage
Managing the Technical Area Occupants
Timekeeping
Tactical Preparation
Any Questions or points of clarification
AFTER THE MATCH
Exiting the field of play
Avoid comments on the field
Completing the Match Sheet
Any Questions or points of
clarification
Advice to Referees on Pre-Match Instructions
FFV Referee’s Manager Chris Bambridge
Final March 2012
Pre-Match Explanations:
The information shown below is a baseline on which you can structure your own briefing notes. It provides a very good
standard briefing that covers all of the main Refereeing points required in a standard game of football. Each briefing is
broken down into three sections - BEFORE THE MATCH: DURING THE MATCH: AFTER THE MATCH:
Section 1: BEFORE THE MATCH:
When the referee delivers his/her instructions, he/she should provide the opportunity for questions at any time during these instructions
to clarify any uncertainty.
Pitch Inspection (Opportunity to Impress)
Where possible this should be done early and not whilst a game is in progress. It should be carried out in a purposeful and serious way, not
a stroll. Things to look for are pitch markings & conditions, nets and corner flags, benches, technical area, 4th official area (if applicable),
stretcher, etc.
Warming up routine:
The whole team should take part in the warm-up unless there is a reason. The whole team should be uniform when warming up. The
referee sets the warm up and provides the AR’s with an opportunity to do specific AR exercises. This imparts a strong message of
cooperation that can be built on during the game. It should be a 10-15 minute warming up routine 25 minutes before kickoff and then
return to the changing room to make final preparations at least 10 minutes before kick-off.
The pre-match warm up should be an opportunity to impress, be positive, uniform, professional and the perception should demonstrate
upright body Language a smile, calm and in control
Senior Assistant Referee and Junior Assistant Referee:
Allocate duties to both Assistants. For example the Senior Assistant Referee is to patrol the 'Technical Area' side of the field of play, and the
Junior Assistant Referee to patrol the far-side touchline throughout the game. The Senior Referee will replace the referee in cases of injury.
Both should take out all equipment, including whistle, coin and notebook.
Fourth Official:
Note: If there a Fourth Official, they should also be asked to carry a whistle, coin notebook and cards, keep a complete record of the game,
monitor and control the Technical Areas, inform the Senior Assistant of substitution requests, look after the replacement match balls and
look out for any serious incidents that have been missed by the match officials.
Players' equipment check:
This can be done in a number of ways. The Senior Assistant Referee can check the home team players' equipment preferably in the change
room or as they come out of their changing room, or gather in the race before entering the field of play. Please avoid checking players on
the field or around the centre circle. Check for correct undershorts, undershirts, shin pads jewellery, Goalkeepers jerseys or any damaged
studs. Complete the inspection properly, as this will be the first contact that you have with players therefore important to set a good
example early. The Junior Assistant Referee could check the away team players' equipment preferably in the change room or as they come
out of their changing room, or gather in the race before entering the field of play. The referee should also be in attendance, to sort out any
problems. If feasible another way to do this is that all three officials do the equipment check together. Senior AR starts on the left side and
Junior AR starts on the right side.
Match Records:
Both Assistant Referees must keep a record of the game. The AR who is closest should record and the AR who is furthest should be an
additional set of eyes during the game, and to keep a look out for misconduct. Matters for recoding could be who kicks off, substitutes, the
goals scored, and any cautions/sending off details etc.
Entry onto the field of play and goal net checks:
The officiating team should walk out together at the beginning of each half, with both AR’s on either side of the referee with flags held
unfurled in the outside hand. It very important, when the team walks onto the field of play, that they generate a very positive impression
of their commitment towards this match.
When they get about 20 metres onto the field of play, the referee should give a nod to break away and either or take the balls to each half
way line and or check the goal nets. The AR’s should then come back to meet the referee in the centre. In the first half, the referee should
take charge and introduce the AR’s to the captains, and then complete the coin tossing ceremony. Before each AR breaks away to check
nets and take up position with the second last defender, the team should shake hands just to show everyone that there are three teams
here today.
Refer to the Directive on the Ceremonial Coin Toss Procedure for further information.
Advice to Referees on Pre-Match Instructions
FFV Referee’s Manager Chris Bambridge
Final March 2012
Section 2. DURING THE MATCH:
Assist, don't insist:
Offer assistance to the referee at all times and try not to interfere with what the referee is doing.
Today’s Priorities:
The AR’s priorities include assessing offside situations, and indication of the ball in and out of play. Support the referee in all other
situations where advice and input can improve and enhance the overall decision-making ability and control of the game.
Gestures:
Avoid making any obvious gestures; however, a discreet hand signal on occasions can be used to clarify a decision.
On the same wavelength:
Try to be in tune with my style of Refereeing, so that all operate on the same wavelength. This may vary throughout the game depending
on circumstances. For example, if you see the referee applying strict Law to keep control of a difficult game, then the AR’s should do the
same. However, if a phase of play warrants it, then the referee may be more relaxed about how he/she interpret the Laws, in this case,
follow the referees relaxed style also.
Eye contact:
When the ball is in (or approaching) the AR’s zone, this should increase the state of alertness. The referee will be making lots of eye contact
with the AR so teamwork is crucial. For some disciplinary issues, the use discreet hand signals to describe the offence may be useful. If
consultation is needed then the AR should advance 2-3 metres onto the field of play if necessary (e.g. if you are near to the Technical
Areas), otherwise remain on the touchline. When the ball comes into the AR’s zone, the AR should locate where the referee is and be more
'switched on' and prepared to react, especially if the referee is some distance away and catching up with play!
Flag technique:
As soon as the team leaves the changing rooms, please unfurl your flag. AR’s should make sure that they hold the flag in the hand nearest
to the field of play and switch hands whenever there is a change direction so that the flag is visible to the referee at all times. When facing
the field of play, always hold the flag in the hand closest to where the referee is positioned. As a general rule, always show as much of the
flag (unfurled) towards the referee - even when standing still. This makes it much easier for the referee to locate you out of the corner of
his/her eye.
When signalling, stop running and make eye contact and raise the flag with a deliberate (not exaggerated) motion. Use the hand that will
be used for the next signal in sequence, and towards the restart direction. If you need to change hands, change hands low down before
you raise your flag. If you signal that the ball has gone out of play, continue the signal until the referee has either acknowledged it or
signalled him/herself.
The AR should try to allow themselves some thinking time before signalling, as this will minimise stopping play unnecessarily or denying
possible advantage situations from developing.
Ball in and out play:
Let the referee know when the ball leaves the field of play by using the flag signal showing the correct restart and direction. If you are
unsure of the direction, just indicate that the ball is out of play by playing the flag above your head and the referee will make the call.
Restarts:
Wherever the referee stops play, or delays play for whatever reason, try to remember what the restart was. The referee may need
reminding when the game is restarted, especially after an injury.
Flagging for a Law 12 offence:
The AR should use the 'wait and see' technique in order to allow play to continue if there is a possible advantage for the referee to apply. It
is important that eye contact is made with the referee.
Before indicating for a foul, take into account where the referee is in relation to the incident, or whether he/she is actively seeking
assistance. Ask yourself, do I need to get involved? But have the courage to make important call or decisions even if it may influence the
outcome of the match.
To distinguish it from the signal for offside, when a foul occurs out of the view of the referee, make eye contact, place the flag in the hand
that indicates the free kick direction and then raise it.
Free kicks close to the penalty area. (So-called Ceremonial Free Kicks):
The referee will control the ball and organizing the defensive wall. Let the referee know if the ball is moved illegally if his/her back is
turned. Take up a position in line with the second last defender to check the offside line, and be ready to follow the ball by moving down
the touchline towards the corner flag if there is a direct shot on goal to keep an eye on the goal line.
Free Kicks - controlling the 9.15 m distance:
When a free kick or a throw-in has been awarded close to the AR, help the referee by ensuring that the opponents retreat the required
distance. Use the 3 step process to achieve this; firstly use your voice to move the wall back, if that does not work, secondly walk to the ball
and use your voice and if that does not work then move to where you believe the 9.15 metres is and direct the player to this point. It would
be best, if you can avoid having to enter the field of play in order to achieve this.
Advice to Referees on Pre-Match Instructions
FFV Referee’s Manager Chris Bambridge
Final March 2012
Offences missed by the Referee:
Please signal for any fouls that the referee misses. If the AR is in a better position and the referee has clearly not acted on the offence, or
the AR has additional information concerning the offence (for example, unsporting behaviour or violent conduct) raise your flag to bring
this to the referee’s attention. Give the referee some indication of what the foul was, and indicate with your flag, the direction for the
restart of play. If you have time before signalling for a foul, look towards the referee, to see if he/she has already seen the incident, and is
about to act on it. In other words, let the referee have the first bite! This is particularly important if a penalty kick is considered.
If you deem a foul worthy of more punishment than just a free kick, point to your top pocket with your free hand, and let the referee take
it from there. If need be the referee should come over and consult the AR.
Note: Some Referees ask their Assistants to 'tap their pocket' if they think a card should be issued, but use it carefully and whatever signal is
used, choose a method that will not easily communicated to the players.
If there is any disciplinary action to take, make sure that the AR can identify the offender(s) and what the exact nature of the incident was.
Dealing with mass confrontation:
If a mass confrontation arises, the AR should come along the touchline to observe, and enter the field of play if the referee summons you
or if it is obvious that the referee needs help. Form a triangle around the scene. The referee will identify the instigators, the Junior Assistant
Referee will look out for players joining and inflaming the situation from the immediate area, and the Senior Assistant Referee will firstly
manage the Technical Areas and then look out for players coming in from a distance to inflame the situation. Make a mental note of who
does what, and aim to identify at least one offender from each team - any others are a bonus. Do not write any notes during the
confrontation, but observe.
When a goal has been scored:
When a goal has been scored, make eye with the referee and sprint quickly down the touchline 25-30 yards towards the halfway line
without raising your flag. In borderline cases where a goal has been scored, but the ball appears to remain in play, first raise your flag to
attract the attention of the referee, and then run away quickly 25-30 yards down the touchline. Supplement this by pointing with a hand
towards the halfway line.
If the ball has not entered completely into the goal and play continues as normal because a goal has not been scored, make eye contact
with the referee and if necessary (apart from retaining any signal already given) use a discreet hand signal. The referee will then continue
as normal, and if needed will consult the AR further.
Offside:
Keep in line with the second last defender or the ball if it is nearer the goal line if it is nearer than the second last defender, and always face
the field of play. Offside’s are the responsibility of the AR’s at all times. Use the "Wait and See" technique before a flag is raised. It’s better
to be slightly late and correct, than to be too quick and wrong. If the AR decides that an offside player becomes 'active' raise the flag, if he
remains 'non active', refrain from flagging. If the AR is not sure, then always give the 'benefit of doubt' to the attacking team.
If there is s possibility of a collision between the goalkeeper and an attacker, do not delay raising an offside flag; get it up as quick as you
can so the referee can stop play much sooner.
There are three elements to being actively offside. This is can be referred to as 'POG'.
Interfering with Playing,
Interfering with an Opponent or
Gaining an advantage by being in that position.
When the AR raises an offside flag, use the right hand (FIFA guidelines), make eye contact with the referee and stand 'square-on' to the
field of play. If the referee does not immediately see the flag, keep signalling until it has been recognised or the ball is clearly in control of
the defending team. Let the referee know at the end of each half - if he/she has missed any signals.
Whenever possible, face the field of play and move sideways (crab) up and down the touchline when monitoring a slow moving offside line
as this gives you a much better view.
If the referee wants to keep play going to the advantage of the defending team following an offside flag signal, he/she should acknowledge
the AR with a raised arm. When this is done drop your flag immediately.
Whenever the AR signals for offside, raise the flag high, make eye contact with the referee, and then lower your flag to indicate where the
offside was located. Retain the flag signal until the ball is positioned correctly and then the AR should make his/her way to the restart
position."
Throw-ins:
If it is a clear throw-in, show the direction whenever the ball goes out along the whole of the touchline. In the AR’s half, the referee should
generally go with the AR and in the referees half the AR should follow his/her direction. If the referee is not sure and the AR has a better
angle, the AR should assist with a quick glance and direction. If the AR has any doubts about the direction and the referee is unable to lead
you, award the throw-in to the attacking team, or just raise your flag, make eye contact with the referee and follow his/her direction.
Either way, deliver the flag positively and with confidence, using a sharp, crisp, clear signal, then the decision will be more readily accepted
as correct.
If the AR signals one way and the referee signal’s the other, just drop the flag immediately, and the throw will be taken in the direction
given by the referee.
On very tight decisions, when the ball stays in play, give the referee a discreet hand signal if possible. If the referee misses your throw-in
signal, retain it until it has been acknowledged and taken action.
When a throw-in has been awarded close to the AR, ensure that the opponents retreat the required 2 metre distance; don't have to enter
the field of play to do this.
The AR should monitor the correct placement of feet when a player takes a throw-in and the referee should look for hand faults.
Advice to Referees on Pre-Match Instructions
FFV Referee’s Manager Chris Bambridge
Final March 2012
Corner Kicks:
When signalling for a corner kick, point the flag towards the base of the corner flag. Try to firstly make eye contact with the referee, and
place the flag in the hand nearest to the goal line, and in the best position for the referee to see it easily. In tight decisions, when the ball
completely crosses the goal line but it still appears to be in play, raise the flag high, and then point it towards the base of the corner flag.
When the ball crosses the goal line far from your position, raise the flag and follow the referee’s decision.
Take a position behind the corner flag in line with the goal line. Check that the ball is correctly placed inside the corner arc. If the referee is
delaying the corner kick to deal with pushing inside the penalty area, the AR should stand in front of the ball until the referee is ready;
otherwise do not interfere with the kicker.
Goal kicks:
If the ball is not placed correctly inside the goal area, and the AR is unable to communicate this to the goalkeeper, stand still, make eye
contact with the referee and if needed raise the flag. Once the ball is placed correctly, move up the touchline adjacent to the edge of the
penalty area, and then to the offside monitoring position, which is a priority in any case. If the second last defender takes the goal kick,
move directly to the edge of the penalty area. Give more emphasis to reaching the offside monitoring position quicker, rather than
remaining next to the penalty area.
Use a clear flag signal to indicate a goal kick, by facing the field of play and making eye contact with the referee. Use the hand that is
nearest to the goal line when flagging for a goal kick, as this will increase eye contact with the referee.
Goalkeeper releasing the ball from his hands:
As with goal kicks, watch the first few occasions in each half to make sure that the goalkeeper is releasing the ball within the penalty area.
If the goalkeeper is getting close to infringing, let him know by giving him a verbal warning. Stay alongside the goalkeeper if there is an
opponent close to him. Once the ball has been released, sprint to check the offside line, which is a priority in any case.
Penalty Kicks:
On most occasions, the referee will probably award a penalty before the AR indicates. So before any signal for a penalty is made, make eye
contact and look to see where the referee is. If he/she has seen the incident, allow him/her the first chance to make the decision to award
the penalty. If the incident occurs out of the referees line of sight or if he/she is a long distance away or has not taken any action, make
sure the AR is 100% sure that it is a penalty kick offence before a signal is given.
To indicate a penalty kick, two options exist. Option 1 - if the referee is looking at the incident then reinforce his/her decision by sprinting
to the corner flag, stand still, make eye contact as well as nod and place the flag in your right hand beside you. Option 2 - if the referee
does not see the incident then the AR will need to inform the referee by raising your flag high, sprinting to the corner flag, standing still,
making eye contact as well as nodding and place the flag in your right hand beside you.
If the infringement occurs just outside of the penalty area, rather than inside, take up a position on the touchline boundary adjacent to just
outside of the penalty area line and raise a free kick flag. When the referee stops play, he/she will look over to, and consult the AR if
necessary. The referee should also deal with any players that approach the AR.
To monitor a penalty kick, The AR should position themselves where the penalty area line intersects the goal line. If the goalkeeper
blatantly moves off the goal line before the ball has been played, and a goal has not been scored, stand still and raise your flag. If the
penalty has been taken correctly, make eye contact with the referee to check that he/she agrees, and then go quickly backwards to the
touchline by the shortest practicable route.
Obvious incorrect decision made by the Referee:
If you notice the referee makes a blatant mistake, such as issuing two yellow cards to the same player without sending him off, or a red or
yellow card to the wrong player, you must let the referee know immediately by vigorous flagging, or even by entering the field of play to
vocally warn him. Do not let the referee re-start the game without telling him/her. The other Assistant Referee (or 4th official) should if
necessary, also assist if needed.
Substitutions:
The Senior Assistant Referee must manage all substitution requests, even if the AR has to run from the corner flag - this ensures that there
is no confusion about which substitute has come on during the game. Use the approved flag signal to indicate a substitution.
If the referee misses a substitution flag because he/she is looking the other way, the Junior Assistant Referee should also raise the
substitution flag to bring this to the referee’s attention. Both can also use their voice if the referee is nearby.
Ensure that all substitutes enter at the halfway line, and not until the outgoing player has completely left the field of play.
Keep a note of the substitutes' numbers as they occur.
Just prior to kick off, the referee and AR should record numbers of the substitutes in their notebooks.
If substitutes need to warm up, please ask them to do so behind the AR, and not along the touchline in the half furthest away.
Bleeding and checking player's equipment:
If a player leaves the field to adjust his/her equipment or to have a bleeding wound treated, please check that the equipment has been
corrected and any blood issues dealt with. The referee should always check but the AR can assist in this process by making sure that it has
been dealt with, before the player comes back onto the field of play.
Advice to Referees on Pre-Match Instructions
FFV Referee’s Manager Chris Bambridge
Final March 2012
Advantage:
Signalling, deciding and applying the advantage clause is at the prerogative of the referee so do not indicate advantage to players by
making any verbal or hand signals. If the referee is unsighted and the AR sees a foul, try to give the referee a 'hidden' signal that a foul has
occurred. If the referee does not see the foul and it is a minor foul, apply the 'spirit of the advantage clause' and keep play going - and only
flag the foul if the advantage does not ensue within 2 to 3 seconds.
Managing the Technical Area Occupants:
Adopt a low key approach initially, but be assertive when necessary. Deal with any minor misconduct by being assertive and polite. Ignore
most of the banter, but bring to the referee’s attention of any inappropriate language such as anything that it abusive or insulting directed
at the Referee, at the Assistant Referees or players, clearly aimed at destroying the game or inciting the players. Remember exactly what
was said.
Do not get distracted. If the AR needs to call the referee over, wait until play reaches a natural stop, place your flag across your chest and
wait until the referee comes over. The two officials should discuss (away from others) what has happened, and then the referee should
deal with any problems. If the referee needs to approach the Technical Area both should do so together. The AR should stand alongside the
referee, facing the field of play with your back to the 'Bench', keeping an eye on the players on the field of play. The referee should do all
the talking, but listen for any reaction, which may need to be mentioned in any report.
As a general rule of thumb, if there is trouble brewing with the Technical Area occupants, use a gradually assertive stepped approach, for
example:
1. Ask them politely to behave.
2. Tell them assertively that the Laws of the Game require them to behave responsibly and that they have already been warned,
3. Warn them that next time, you will summon the Referee; and finally,
4. Report them to the referee. At this point the referee MUST eject the offender (and not behind the fence but to the clubrooms).
Timekeeping:
This depends on the referee however, the Junior Assistant Referee is able to keep his/her watch running continuously, and the Senior
Assistant Referee is to stop and start his/her watch to correspond to stoppages allowed by the referee; as a general rule this will be for
injuries, substitutions and blatant time wasting.
In the last three minutes of each half, be prepared to provide the referee with a discrete hand signal of time. Try to signal when the referee
is looking towards the AR as the half draws to a close.
Tactical Preparation
This is an area that can be discussed whilst the officiating team is getting ready. The following are areas that could be discussed:
The importance of the game
Use of pitch markings
Reading the game
Rivalry & previous games
Systems of play (4-4-2)
Time-wasting
Result needed, goal difference
Formations (flat back four, sweeper)
Time of the match
Size of the Pitch
Match ups
Identifying / dealing with the squeaky wheel
Condition of the pitch
Knowing player tendencies
Injuries or designed to interrupt flow
Weather & its impact (Heat, rain, wind.)
Styles of play
Advice to Referees on Pre-Match Instructions
FFV Referee’s Manager Chris Bambridge
Final March 2012
Section 3. AFTER THE MATCH:
Exiting the field of play
As soon as the referee blows the whistle to end a half, sprint to meet up with the referee as quick as possible. The refereeing team must
wait until all of the players and team officials have left the field of play, before the officiating team leaves. If there is any expected trouble
brewing, let the referee do all the speaking, whilst the two AR’s closely monitor what is going on. Note: you walked onto the field together,
so you must walk off together!
If a Fourth Official is present then they should not come onto the field of play, but rather managed the movement of the Technical Area,
and then wait for the officiating team at the exit point so that all preceded to the changing rooms together.
Avoid comments on the field
Refrain from passing comment on any aspect of the game, until the refereeing team has taken the opportunity to consult with each other
in the privacy of a dressing room. Do not invite anyone into the dressing room, as this is the referee’s prerogative. If a visitor enters, let the
referee do the talking unless invited.
Any Questions or points of clarification
Are there any questions or has the referee missed anything?
Comparing books for the Match Sheet
It is crucial that the officiating team confer on all results to make sure that the match sheet is accurate. If there has been an incident
where the referee that issued a RED CARD. BOTH the referee and the assistant referees MUST submit a report to the
th
appropriate authority. (If a 4 official is present the he/she too must report the matter).
Summary:
There may be other briefing areas to consider: security, policing, crowd control, floodlighting, media relations, photographers and many
more topics to be covered in your brief, and you will always need to read the Rules of each Competition to look out for other topics to
include in your brief, such as the number of occupants allowed in the technical area, where to inspect players' equipment and FFV
protocols etc...............
The briefing you give to your Assistant Referees is not a list of orders; it should be a two-way communication between you and your two
Assistants (and Fourth Official if he is present). Listen and discuss and clarify any queries from them. The pre-match brief should not be
overly long, but approximately of 5-10 minutes duration.
Advice to Referees on Pre-Match Instructions
FFV Referee’s Manager Chris Bambridge
Final March 2012
R eferee’s
T echnical
C ommittee
Pre-Match Instructions for
a Club Assistant
FIFA Laws of the Game - Law 5 – states that The Referee:
 enforces the Laws of the Game
 controls the match in cooperation with the assistant referees and, where applicable, with the fourth official
Prior to the commencement of each game, the referee must provide both club assistants with pre-match instructions
covering duties and requirements. Firstly do not accept:
A) Players as assistants (This is an FFV rule)
B) Persons younger than the game being refereed
C) Persons that will not be running the whole game
Speak to club team managers before the game to ascertain who will be your club assistant referee.
Have them available at least 5 minutes before start of game.
Where possible arrange to meet the Assistant Referee and give these instructions in private in your dressing room.
Give instructions to both at same time.
Note their names in your notebook
The referee should create a cooperative environment and show a positive attitude towards the Assistant Referees when
delivering instructions. As the team leader, this is an ideal opportunity to develop a positive relationship.
It is important that these instructions are delivered without interruption; however, if interruptions occur then maintain
concentration throughout.
In under age matches persons acting as an Assistant Referee must not be younger than the players of the participating
teams.
CLUB ASSISTANT REFEREES Referee Checklist WHAT DO I SAY TO CLUB ASSISTANTS?
1
My name is _____________ and thanks for your assistance in refereeing this game with me.
2
Please take you own forwards right wings.
3
If the ball goes completely over the touchlines and out of play then raise your flag and point in the direction you
think it should be given. If unsure look at me and follow my directions.
4
With offside decisions stay in line with the second last defender and only if the player receiving the ball is active
and interfering with play then raise the flag. (Remember it is the referee’s prerogative to accept or reject the
decision)
5
In accordance with the Laws of the Game I will either accept your decision or acknowledge the signal and play on.
If I overrule some decisions please don’t get upset with me and just place flag down by your side.
6
I am required to control all other decisions so do not flag for free kicks or other incidents. If you see an injured
player please raise your flag to bring it to my attention.
7
Please do not talk to spectators or officials during the game whilst you are acting as an AR.
8
Please do not coach players during the game while you are acting as an AR.
9
Do you have you any questions???? And please enjoy your game
10 After the game shake your Assistant Referees hand, collect your flags and thank them for their assistance.
Acknowledgements
This information has been taken from a range of sources – FIFA Laws of the Game 2009/2010, Julian Carosi’s International Newsletter – The Corsham
Referee which can be found on www.CorshamRef.org.uk, FFV – Coaching Panel Instructions re AR’s Produced by Jim Zafirou and resources created by Jim
Ouliaris for the 2009 Talented Officials Program in Victoria. Some of this information has been modified to suit local circumstances.
Advice to Referees on Pre-Match Instructions
FFV Referee’s Manager Chris Bambridge
Final March 2012
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