Directive 058: Oilfield Waste Management Requirements

Directive 058: Oilfield Waste Management Requirements
Directive 058
Directive 058: Oilfield Waste
Management Requirements for the
Upstream Petroleum Industry
February 1, 2006
On June 17, 2013, the Energy Resources Conservation Board was succeeded by the
Alberta Energy Regulator (AER). As part of this succession, the title page of this directive
was changed to carry the AER logo. However, no changes were made to the main body of
this directive.
Application Requirements for Activities Within the Boundary of a Regional
Plan
The AER is legally obligated to act in compliance with any approved regional plans under the
Alberta Land Stewardship Act. To ensure this compliance, the AER is requiring any applicant
seeking approval for an activity that would be located within the boundary of an approved
regional plan to meet the requirements below. These requirements will be formally
incorporated into the directive at a later date.
A) For an activity to be located within the boundary of an approved regional plan, the
applicant must assess
I)
whether the activity would also be located within the boundaries of a designated
conservation area, a provincial park, a provincial recreation area, or public land area
for recreation and tourism and, if so, whether the mineral rights associated with the
activity are subject to cancellation;
II) whether the activity is consistent with the land uses established in the applicable
regional plan or with any of the outcomes, objectives, and strategies in that same
plan; and
III) how the activity is consistent and complies with any regional trigger or limit
established under the management frameworks detailed under the applicable
regional plan or any notices issued in response to the exceedance of a regional
trigger or limit.
B) The applicant must retain the information for requirement A at all times and provide it on
request unless otherwise indicated below. The information must be sufficient to allow the
AER to assess an application under the applicable regional plan.
C) The applicant must submit the information from requirement A if the proposed activity to
be located within the boundary of an approved regional plan
I)
is also within the boundaries of a designated conservation area, a provincial park, a
provincial recreation area, or a public land area for recreation and tourism;
II) is inconsistent with the land uses established in the applicable regional plan or any
of the outcomes, objectives, and strategies in that same plan;
III) may result in the exceedance of a trigger or limit or contravene a notice issued in
response to an exceedance of a trigger or limit; or
IV) is “incidental” to previously approved and existing activities.
D) If any of the criteria in requirement C are met, the application must be submitted as
nonroutine.
E) If the applicant believes that its proposed activity is permitted under the applicable
regional plan because it is incidental to previously approved and existing activities, the
applicant must provide information to support its position.
The AER has no authority to waive compliance with or vary any restriction, limitation, or
requirement regarding a land area or land use under a regional plan. Applicants that wish to
seek this type of relief must apply directly to Alberta’s Land Use Secretariat established
under the Alberta Land Stewardship Act. The stewardship minister may, on application and
by order, vary the requirements of a regional plan. For more information, contact Alberta’s
Land Use Secretariat by phone at 780-664-7972 or by e-mail to [email protected]
For more information on the requirements above, refer to Bulletin 2014-28: Application
Requirements for Activities within the Boundary of a Regional Plan or e-mail
[email protected] This bulletin rescinds and replaces Bulletin 2012-22: Application
Procedures for Approval of Activities Located In or Near the Boundaries of the Lower
Athabasca Regional Plan, which is an earlier bulletin that was issued regarding the AER’s
compliance with approved regional plans under the Alberta Land Stewardship Act.
Directive 058
Oilfield Waste Management
Requirements for the Upstream
Petroleum Industry
November 1996, incorporating change of
February 1, 2006
Appendix 8.1 and 8.2 replaced by Section 4 of
Directive 030
ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION BOARD
Directive 058: Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Petroleum Industry
November 1996
Published by
Energy Resources Conservation Board
640 – 5 Avenue SW
Calgary, Alberta
T2P 3G4
Telephone: 403-297-8311
Fax: 403-297-7040
[email protected]
Web site: www.ercb.ca
Table of Contents
PART A
Policies and Responsibilities ................................................... 1
1.0
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
2.0
Responsibilities and Enforcement ......................................... 2
2.1
2.2
3.0
Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.
Waste Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ·. 2
2.
Waste Receiver ............................................ 2
Enforcement .................................................... 3
1.
EUB .................................................... 3
2.
AEP .................................................... 3
Importation of Oilfield Waste ............................................ 4
PARTB
Waste Characterization and Classification ......................................... 5
4.0
Introduction to Waste Characterization ..................................... 5
4.1
4.2
4.3
5.0
Procedures for ClassifYing Waste ......................................... 9
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
6.0
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Responsibilities ................................................. 5
Transportation Requirements ....................................... 6
General Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Dangerous Oilfield Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Dangerous Oilfield Waste Containers ................................. 9
Small Volumes ................................................. 10
Mixing and Dilution ............................................. 10
Wastes Banned from Disposal via Injection into Pipeline Systems ................ 12
6.1
Banned Waste Types ............................................ 12
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
11
PARTC
Waste Manifesting and Tracking ............................................... 15
7.0
Introduction ......................................................... 15
7.1
8.0
Manifesting ......................................................... 17
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
8.6
8.7
8.8
8.9
9.0
Background ................................................... 17
When to Use a Manifest .......................................... 17
1.
EUB Alberta Oilfield Waste Manifest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.
Federal Manifest (Regulated by AEP in Alberta) ................. 18
General Manifest Requirements .................................... 19
Permits for Equivalent Level of Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Mixed Wastes ................................................. 19
Waste Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Manifesting System ............................................. 19
Reconciliation of Discrepancies- EUB Manifest ....................... 20
I.
Serious Discrepancies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.
All Discrepancies ......................................... 20
Retention of Manifests ........................................... 21
Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
9.1
9.2
10.0
System Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Generator Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
1.
Oilfield Waste Disposition Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2.
Report Submission and Processing Information .................. 26
3.
Reporting Oilfield Wastes Not Listed in Waste Management Table ... 27
Waste Accounting .................................................... 29
10.1
10.2
Measurement ................................................. :29
Units for Manifesting and Waste Disposition Report .................... 29
PARTD
11.0
Oilfield Waste Management Facilities ..................................... 31
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
11.5
Introduction ................................................... 31
Siting Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Safety Issues .................................................. 32
Waste Characterization ........................................... 33
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) ............................. 33
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
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11.6
11.7
11.8
11.9
12.0
Waste Storage Areas/Facilities and Waste Transfer Stations .................... 37
12.1
12.2
12.3
12.4
13.0
Introduction .... ·............................................... 40
General Requirements ........................................... 41
Groundwater Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Class Ia Wells Accepting Upstream and Downstream Fluids .............. 41
Reporting and Record Keeping .................................... 41
Waste Processing Facilities ............................................. 42
14.1
14.2
14.3
14.4
15.0
Introduction ................................................... 37
Storage Areas .. ·................................................ 37
Waste Storage Facilities and Transfer Stations ......................... 38
Reporting and Record Keeping .................................... 38
1.
Monthly Documentation .................................... 38
Annual Report ..........................•................ 39
2.
Surface Facilities Associated with Disposal Wells ............................ 40
13.1
13.2
13 .3
13.4
13.5
14.0
Design and Operation ............................................ 33
Site Assessment and Groundwater Protection .......................... 34
Record Keeping ................................................ 35
Closure ....................................................... 35
Introduction ................................................... 42
General Requirements ........................................... 42
Groundwater Monitoring ......................................... 42
Reporting and Record Keeping .................................... 43
Oilfield Landfills ..................................................... 44
15.1
15.2
15.3
15.4
15.5
15.6
15.7
Introduction ...... ·............................................. 44
AEP Regulated Landfills Versus Oilfield Landfills ..................... 44
Disposal of Oilfield Waste at AEP Regulated Landfills .................. 44
General Requirements for Oilfield Landfills ........................... 45
Landfill Siting Criteria ........................................... 45
Design and Operation ............................................ 47
1.
Design Requirements ...................................... 47
2.
Operating Procedures ...................................... 47
Oilfield Landfill Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
1.
Class Ia Oilfield Landfill ................................... 51
2.
Class Ib Oilfield Landfill ...................... ·............. 52
3.
Class IT Oilfield Landfill .................................... 53
4.
Class Ill Oilfield Landfill ................................... 54
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas lndustf'{
November, 1996
iv
15.8
Waste Criteria ................................................. 55
1.
Waste Deposition Limitataions ............................... 55
2.
Dangerous Oilfield Waste ................................... 55
15.9 Monitoring and Analysis ......................................... 57
15.10 Reporting Requirements .......................................... 58
1.
Annual Reports ........................................... 58
2.
Record Keeping .......................................... 58
3.
Closure, Post-Closure, and Reclamation Requirements ............. 59
16.0
Biodegradation ...................................................... 63
16.1
16.2
16.3
17.0
Introduction ................................................... 63
On-Site Land Treatment of a Single Application of Oilfield Waste
on an Active Oil and Gas Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
1.
Introduction ............................................. 64
2.
Assessment Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
3.
Information Documenation .................................. 67
Biocell and Biopile Treatment or Facilities ........................... 68
1.
Introduction ............................................. 68
2.
General Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
3.
Siting .................................................. 69
4.
Design anct Operation ...................................... 69
5.
Reporting and Record Keeping ............................... 73
6.
Closure ................................................. 74
Thermal Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
17.1
17.2
17.3
17.4
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Thermal Treatment Facilities Requiring Approval to Operate ............. 76
1.
Siting Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
2.
Waste Feed Restrictions .................................... 76
3.
Design Parallleters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
4.
Operating Practices ........................................ 77
5.
Residuals Management ..................................... 78
6.
Emissions Criteria ........................................ 79
7.
Test Burns and Compliance Tests ............................. 80
8.
Monitoring and Reporting .................................. 81
Campsite Incinerators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Small Batch Feed Incinerators ..................................... 83
1.
Siting . ; ................................................ 84
2.
Waste Feed Restrictions .................................... 84
3.
Design Parameters ........................................ 84
4.
Operating Practices ........................................ 90
5.
Emission Criteria ......................................... 91
6.
PerfollD.ance Test ......................................... 92
7.
General Information Requirements ............................ 92
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
17.5
8.
Information Documentation ................................. 93
Mobil Thermal Treatment Units .................................... 93
1.
Jurisdiction .............................................. 93
2.
Operation at Oil and Gas Facilities ............................ 93
3.
Notification of Operations .................................. 94
PARTE
Application Requirements for Oilfield Waste Management Facilities ................... 95
18.0
Overview of the Application Requirements ................................. 95
19.0
Environmental Impact Assessments ....................................... 98
20.0
Financial Security
....................................................
99
.
.
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5
20.6
20.7
21.0
General Information Requirement in Applications ........................... 104
21.1
21.2
21.3
21.4
21.5
22.0
Application Introductory Information ...............................
Assessment Information .........................................
Site Information ...............................................
Development Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Closure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
104
104
105
107
107
Waste Storage Facilities and Transfer Stations- Specific Application Information .. 109
22.1
23.0
Introduction ................................................... 99
Facilities Requiring Financial Security ............................... 99
Determination of Financial Security ................................ 100
Adjustment of Security . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
1.
New Facilities ........................................... 101
2.
Facilities Undergoing Expansion/Changes ........ ·............. 102
3.
Facilities Undergoing Closure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
4.
Facilities Which are Sold or Transferred ....................... 102
Acceptable Fonns of Security ..................................... 102
Forfeiture of Security ........................................... 102
Renewal of Security ............................................ 103
Design and Operational Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Surface Facilities Associated with Waste Disposal Wells- Specific Application
Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ill
23.1
Design and Operational Procedures ................................ 111
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November.1996
vi
24.0
Waste Processing Facilities- Specific Application Information ................. 113
24.1
25.0
Oilfield Landfills- Specific Application Information ......................... 115
25.1
25.2
26.0
Design and Operational Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Thermal Treatment Facilities - Specific Application Information ............... 120
27.1
28.0
Design and Operational Procedures ................................ 115
Reclamation Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Biodegradation Facilities- Specific Application Information ................... 118
26.1
27.0
Design and Operational Procedures ................................ 113
Design and Operational Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Other Waste Management Technologies .................................. 122
PARTF
Other Waste Management and Disposal Options ..................... : ............ 123
29.0
Spreading of Oily By-Products to Roads .................................. 123
29.1
29.2
29.3
29.4
29.5
29.6
29.7
29.8
30.0
123
123
124
125
125
126
127
131
Drilling Waste Management ........................................... 134
30.1
30.2
31.0
Introduction ..................................................
Oily By-Product Materials .......................................
Characterization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Application Depth ... ·. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mixing of By-Product Materials ....................................
Sam.pling ....................................................
Analyses ....................................................
Approval Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drilling Sump Wastes .......................................... 134
Other Drilling Wastes .......................................... 134
Waste Transport by Pipelines ........................................... 135
31.1
31.2
31.3
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Appropriate Wastes for Disposal via Injection into Pipeline Systems ....... 135
Communication ............................................... 136
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
Vll
32.0
Radioactive Contaminated Oilfield Wastes ................................ 137
32.1
32.2
Control and Disposal of Recirculated Radioactive
Contaminated Frac Sand ........................................ 137
Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials ......................., .... 138
PARTG
APPENDICES ........................................................· . . . 139
Appendix 1.0- References .................................................. 139
Appendix 2.0- Definitions .................................................. 145
Appendix 3.0- Recommended Test Methods .................................... 151
Appendix 4.0- Requirements for Site Assessment and Groundwater Protection .......... 169
4.1
4.2
Introduction ..................................................
Site Assessment ...............................................
1.
Regional Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.
Site Investigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.
Site Specific Data .. ~ .....................................
4.
Site Assessment Results ...................................
4.3
System Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
1.
2.
4.4
169
169
170
171
171
173
Strategy of Well Placement . . : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Monitoring Well Construction and Installation .................. 174 .
Monitoring and Reporting ....................................... 175
1.
2.
Initial Information Submission .............................. 175
Routine (Annual) Monitoring and Reporting ................... 176
Appendix 5.0- Calculation of the Reynold's Number .............................. 179
Appendix 6.0- Waste Minimization ........................................... 181
6.1
6.2
Introduction ..................................................
Waste Minimization Strategies ....................................
1.
Reduce ................................................
2.
Reuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.
Recycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.
Recover ...............................................
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
181
182
182
182
183
183
November. 1996
viii
Appendix 7.0- Waste Listings ............................................... 185
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
Listed Wastes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unlisted Wastes ...............................................
Changes to Oilfield Waste Management Table ........................
Waste Management Table .......................................
185
185
185
187
Appendix 8.0- Oilfield Waste Disposition Report ................................. 215
8.1
Instructions to Complete Oilfield Waste Disposition Report ............. 216
1.
2.
3.
8.2
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Waste Details ........................................... 216
Disposal Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Computer Data Format ......................................... 219
TABLES
Table 4.1a- Properties of Dangerous Oilfield Waste ................................. 7
Table 4.1b- Dangerous Oilfield Waste Types ...................................... 8
Table 9.1 -Reportable Oilfield Wastes ~ ........................................ 28
Table 15.1 -Performance Standards for Landfills .... : ............................. 49
Table 17.1 - Stack Discharge Limits ............................................ 79
Table 17.2- Classification and Design Data of Wastes to be Incinerated ................. 86
Table 17 3 - Stack Emmission Units for Small Batch Feed Water Incinerators ............ 92
FIGURES
Figure4.1
Figure 5.1
Figure 8.1
Figure 8.2
Figure 8.3
Characterization versus Classification ................................ 5
Classification of Oilfield Wastes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Manifest (Front Page) ........................................... 22
Manifest (Back Page) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Manifest Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas lndusuy
November. 1996
FOREWORD
On 3 December 1992, a multi-stakeholder Steering Committee was established to oversee the
work of several subcommittees that jointly prepared a draft of oilfield waste management
requirements for the Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB), now the Alberta Energy
and Utilities Board (EUB). These requirements were implemented on 1 September 1993 when
the ERCB assumed jurisdiction for the regulation of upstream oilfield wastes.
The draft report, Recommended Oilfield Waste Management Requirements, and
IL 93-8 were a compilation of the:
Alberta Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act (EPEA) and Regulations,
Alberta Environmental Guidelines,
Requirements written into Licences to Operate,
Oil and Gas Conservation Act and Regulations, and
ERCB Informational Letters, Interim Directives, and General Bulletins.
Following the release of the document, a new Steering Committee was established in
January 1994 to oversee a broad public/government/industry review of the Recommended
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements. Individuals who served on the Steering Committee
are:
Don Beamer, Chairman
Silver Lupul
Scott McClure
Kim Johnson
Harvey Hittel
Tim Taylor
Ken Byram
Ross Huddleston
Myles Kitagawa
Richard Chant
Alberta Energy and Utilities Board
Alberta Environmental Protection
Alberta Special Waste Management Corporation
Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers
Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers
Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers
Alberta Oilfield Treating and Disposal Association
Environmental Services Association of Alberta
Toxic Watch Society
Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development
Input was also provided by Alberta Health and the Health Unit Association.
Following the completion of the review in April1994, the Steering Committee compiled the
responses and identified areas of the document that required further work. As the review of each
area was completed, either by a subcommittee or independently by the EUB, the information
was tabled with the Steering Committee for ratification and consolidation into the requirements.
. As a result, some of the requirements within this document, Oilfield Waste Management
Requirements for the Upstream Petroleum Industry, represent new policy.
The Steering Committee would like to thank all of those who worked on the subcommittees and
especially Susan Halla, Steve Skarstol, and Meg Bures of the EUB for their extensive work on
various subcommittees and in compiling much of the document.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
PART A
POLICIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
1
Part A
Policies and Responsibilities
1.0
Introduction
This document addresses a wide range of waste management issues that apply to oilfield wastes.
It represents a consolidation of information on all oilfield waste management matters that come
under the jurisdiction of the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) and other issues which
indirectly affect the management of wastes that are produced by the upstream oil and gas
industty in Alberta. ·
The principles and purpose of these requirements are to:
•
Descnoe the EUB's expectations on how the Alberta upstream oil and gas industty
should manage oilfield wastes.
•
Identify the oilfield waste management responsibilities of the licensee and/or approval
holder.
•
Promote waste vofwne minimization involving reuse, recycle, reduce, and recover
philosophies.
•
Require the recording, retention, and submission of oilfield waste information that will
assist in compliance with waste management practices.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
2
2.0
Responsibilities and Enforcement
2.1
Responsibilities
1.
Waste Generator.
The oilfield waste generator (i.e. licensee and/or approval holder) is responsible
for ensuring that:
2.
•
these requirements are followed,
•
waste minimization.is considered when appropriate,
•
oilfield wastes are properly characterized,
•
appropriate treatment and disposal practices are utilized,
•
the capabilities and limitations of any waste treatment and disposal
method are known,
•
accurate and complete waste documentation and manifesting is
maintained,
•
waste carriers and receivers have been informed of the oilfield waste's
properties, and
•
the required approvals and operational requirements are in place for any
on-site handling, treatment, and disposal method.
Waste Receiver
The oilfield waste receiver is responsible for ensuring that:
•
the required approvals and operation requirements are in place for any onsite waste handling, treatment, and disposal method,
•
the capabilities and limitations of their treatment and disposal facilities are
known and waste generators are informed of the limitations,
•
only waste is received for which their facility is approved to handle,
•
accurate and complete waste documentation and manifesting is
maintained,
•
their operations are in compliance with licences and approvals, and
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. l996
•
2.2
equipment and operating practices are upgraded as necessary to comply
with changes in regulatory requirements.
Enforcement ·
1.
EUB
The EUB believes that enforcement is one part of a total program of regulation,
information, distribution, and enforcement, all of which are designed to achieve:
'~n
energy industry that understands, respects, and meets or
exceeds regulations and standards often through the
implementation ofself-imposed guidelines. "
This vision states clearly that compliance is the responsibility of the energy
industry. The EUB expects that all industry players will understand its
requirements and have an infrastructure in place to ensure compliance. At the
same time, the EUB believes that, on occasion, enforcement of regulations will
also be required to ensure compliance and to meet the vision of the enforcement
policy, as explained in the BUB's Enforcement Brochure, issued August 1996.
2.
AEP
Oilfield waste facilities are specifically excluded from requiring an approval
under Alberta Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act (EPEA). Some
waste facilities may be part of a larger site, such as a sour gas plant, which also
requires an approval from Alberta Environmental Protection (AEP). Because of
this exclusion, the waste facilities will not be subject to the EPEA Waste Control
Regulation. They may be subject to Environmental Protection Orders (EPOs)
and Enforcement Orders '(EOs) under a variety of sections ofEPEA, including
the Contaminated Sites section. EPOs are issued to persons deemed
"responsible", and if the conditions of the order are not met, an EO under Section
200 ofEPEA may be issued along with the associated fines.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
4
3.0
Importation of Oilfield Waste
1.
Wastes generated outside of Alberta resulting from the exploration and
production of oil and gas and exhibit the properties that would classify the wastes
as:
•
dangerous waste in accordance with the Transportation of Dangerous
Goods Act (TDG),
•
hazardous waste in accordance with EPEA, and
•
dangerous oilfield waste in accordance with Section 5.0 of this
document:
(a)
shall not be imported into Alberta for the purpose of direct
disposal, or
(b)
shall not be imported into Alberta for the purpose of treatment or
disposal at EUB approved facilities,
(c)
may be imported into Alberta for the purpose of treatment,
proVided the wastes are directed into the Alberta Special Waste
Management System, which is under the jurisdiction of AEP, and
(d)
shall not be temporarily stored in Alberta for a period that exceeds
30days.
·
2.
Wastes that are generated outside of the province of Alberta during the
exploration and production of oil and gas and do not exhibit the properties that
would classify the wastes as dangerous wastes, hazardous wastes, or
dangerous oilfield wastes may be imported into Alberta for purpose of treatment
·
and/or disposal.
3.
Licensees and/or Approval Holders of facilities under the jurisdiction of the EUB
wanting to receive wastes identified in point (2) above, must:
(a)
for existing facilities, apply to the EUB to amend the current facility
approval or licence to allow the receipt of imported wastes, or
(b)
for proposed facilities, include in their application for approval to
construct and operate, the intention to receive imported wastes streams
and the waste source.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
PARTB
WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AND ClASSIFICATION
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
5
PartB
Waste Characterization and Classification
4.0
Introduction to Waste Characterization
4.1
Overview
The waste generator is responsible for properly characterizing each waste (see
Table 4.la, Properties ofDangerous Oilfield Wastes). The waste characterization is then
used in assessing the appropriate handling, treatment, and disposal of that waste. Waste
characterization is the assessment of the physical, chemical, and toxicological
characteristics (i.e. properties) of a waste. There are two primary reasons for
characterization:
•
to determine the dangers relating to transportation on public. roads, and
•
to determine the environmental consequences of the waste so that a disposal or
management option that appropriately deals with those consequences may be
used.
Once an oilfield waste has been characterized, it can be classified into one of two
classifications; dangerous oilfield waste (DOW) or non-dangerous oilfield waste (nonDOW) (see Table.4.1a, Properties ofDangerous Oilfield Wastes and Table 4.1b,
Dangerous Oilfield Wastes). Recommended test methods for waste characterization are
provided in Appendix 3.0, Recommended Test Methods.
Figure 4.1
Characterization versus Classification
wlde._ provides
Characterization
?
Identifies the waste's physical, chemical,
and toxicological characteristics
4.2
bfol'lllatlo• for
tewastH'
Oassification
?
Identifies as per regulatory requirements
if a waste is DOW or non-DOW
Responsibilities
It is expected that all reasonable efforts will be made by the waste generator to minimize
the production of wastes prior to addressing the issue of disposal (refer to Appendix 6.0,
Waste Minimization). The EUB strongly encourages the conservation of resources
through minimization prior to the disposal of residual wastes.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
6
In all cases, it is the responsibility of the waste generator to ensure that each waste has
been properly identified, characterized and handled, treated, and disposed in a proper
manner.
4.3
Transportation Requirements
The Federal Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act and Regulations (TDG) identifies
requirements for the tran~ortation of dangerous goods. The Alberta Department of
Transportation and Utilities (ATU) administers TDG within Alberta utilizing the
provincial Transportation of Dangerous Goods Control Act and Regulations (TDGC).
Licensees and/or approval holders should ensure that their personnel have proper TDG
training.
DOWs which are transported on public roads must be manifested as per the requirements
in Part C, Waste Manifesting and Tracking. A waste's shipping name, product
identification number (PIN), transportation class, and other important information
necessary for manifesting DOWs can be found in the schedules of the TDG regulations.
A number of the waste handling and transportation classifications have been identified
for wastes listed in Section 7.4 of Appendix 7.0, Waste Management Table.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
7
Table 4.1a
Properties of Dangerous Oilfield Wastes
Flammability
•
•
Spo.ntaneous Combustion
Potential
.
Waste has a flashpoint less than 61 °C.
Waste ignites and orooa2ates combustion in a test sample.
Waste generates heat at a mte greater than it loses heat and reaches the
auto-iJ:!llition tem~ture.
Water Incomoatibility
•
Waste ~enemtes flammable or exolosive JZaSes in contact with water.
Oxidizing Potential
•
Waste contributes oxygen for combustion at a mte that is equal to or
greater than that provided by either ammonium persulphate, potassium
perchlorate or ootassium bromate.
•
Waste has an oral toxicity LD50 not greater than 5 000 mglkg.
Waste has a dermal toxicity LD50 not greater than 1 000 mglkg.
Waste has an inhalation toxicity LC50 not greater than 10 000 mg/m3
at normal atmospheric pressure.
Toxicity
•
•
.
Corrosivity
•
Waste has a oH value less than 2.0 or ~eater than 12.5.
PCB Content
•
Waste contains polychlorinated biphenyls at a concentration equal to
or sueater than 50 m2/ke.
Leachate Toxicity
•
Waste is a liquid or a solid that passes a 9.5 mm mesh opening, or a
friable solid that ~be reduced by grinding in a mortar and pestle to a
particle size that passes a 9.5 mm mesh opening, or a niixture of these,
and
i)
it contains at a concentration of 100 mg/L or higher any
substance listed in Table 1 of the Schedule to the Alberta
Users Guidefor Waste Managers, published by AEP,
ii)
the leachate contains any substance listed in Table 2 of the
Schedule to the Albena Users Guide for Waste Managers, in
excess of the concentrations listed in Table 2, or
contains any of the following substances in a concentration
iii)
greater than 0.001 mg!L:
hexachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxins
pentachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxins
tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxins
hexachloro-dibenzofurans
pentachloro-dibenzofurans
tetrachloro-dibenzofurans.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
8
Table 4.1b
Dangerous Oilfield Wastes
Dangerous Oilfield Wastes
The following are dangerous oilfield wastes:
i)
ii)
waste types listed in Table 3 of the Schedule to the Alberta Users
Guide for Waste Managers, published by AEP,
· commercial products or off-specification }XOducts listed in Part A of
Table 4 of the Schedule to the Alberta Users Guide for W08te
Managers,
iii)
commercial products or off-specification products listed in Part B of
Table 4 of the Schedule to the Alberta Users Guide for Waste
Managers,
iv)
wastes with any of the properties as per Table 4.la, Properties of
Dangerous Oilfield Wastes, or
v)
containers as identified in Section 5.3, Dangerous Oiffield Waste
Containers.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November.-1996
9
5.0
Procedures for Classifying Wastes
5.1
General Procedure
Wastes must be classified as either DOW or non-DOW based on the criteria outlined in
Table 4.1a, Properties ofDangerous Oilfield Wastes and Table 4.lb, Dangerous Oilfield
Wastes. Figure 5.1, Classification ofOilfield Waste, is a graphical representation of the
classification procedure for detennining whether an oilfield waste is dangerous or nondangerous.
Sufficient historical data exists for some waste streams whereby common acceptable
treatment and disposal practices have been established. These oilfield waste streams are
included in Section 7.4 of Appendix 7.0, Waste Management Table. It is important for
generators to understand that Section 7.4 of Appendix 7.0 does not cover all cases and
testing may be required before detennining appropriate treatment and disposal methods.
Where classification of a waste is unclear, refer to AEP's Alberta Users Guide for Waste
Managers for further information.
5.2
Dangerous Oilfield Waste
Oilfield wastes with any of the properties defined in Table 4.1a or are·classified as a
DOW as per Table 4.1b are considered dangerous oilfield wastes. These wastes may
have a variety of properties with varying safety and environmental consequences.
Properties may include flammability, pyrophoric characteristics, oxidizing potential,
water incompatibility, toxicity, corrosivity, etc. Wastes with these properties require
special attention to ensure they are handled, treated, and disposed of properly. Test
methods for the properties identified in Table 4.1a can be found in Appendix 3.0,
Recommended Test Methods.
5.3
Dangerous Oilfield Waste Containers
Figure 5.1, Classification ofOilfield Waste, also includes information regarding the
procedure to classify oilfield waste containers. Further information on containers is
described below.
1.
Any container or collection of containers with an aggregate internal volume
greater than 5 litres (L) must be handled and disposed of as DOW if:
(a)
it contains a substance listed in Part A of Table 4 of the Schedule to the
Alberta Users Guide for Waste Managers, published by AEP, and it is not
an empty container, or
(b)
it contains or did contain a substance listed in Part B of Table 4 of the
Schedule to the Alberta Users Guide for Waste Managers and it is not a
rinsed empty container.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
10
2.
An empty container means a container that contains less than 2.5 centimetres
(em) of residue remaining at the bottom of the container or less than 3 per cent of
the original contents, whichever is the lesser amount.
3.
5A
A rinsed empty container means a container that has been rinsed three times using
for each rinse a clean solvent that is in an amount equal to 10 per cent of the
container volume and that is capable of removing the contained waste, or an
equivalent method. If it is not tested, the rinsate should be classified the same as
the container waste or the rinse solvent, whichever is more stringent.
Small Volumes
For the puq>oses of these requirements, oilfield wastes (other than those substances listed
in Part B of Table 4 of the Schedule to the Alberta Users Guide for Waste Managers
published by AEP) are not considered dangerous if they are produced at any single site in
an amount less than 5 kilograms (kg) per month if a solid or 5 litre (L) per month if a
liquid, and the total quantity accumulated does not exceed 5 kg or 5 L at any time.
5.5
Mixing and Dilution
Oilfield waste must not be mixed with any solid or liquid for the primary puq>ose of
dilution to avoid any Alberta regulatory requirements.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
11
Figure 5.1
Classification Of Oilfield Waste
Start Here
I
Is the waste
Yes
specifically listed In No
+
Usted as a dangerous
oilfield waste?
Yes.,.
No
,,
~
Classtncatrbn via AEP
Alberta Users Guide tor
Waste Managers
.,.
Appendix 7.0
Classification vta
Appendix 7.0
Ustedasa
non-dangerous oBfteld
waste?
~
If testing is
conducted, meets
anyofthe
requirements for
dangerous oilfield
waste In Section 5.2,
Tables 4.1 a or 4.1 b?
Ys:, J.as
Ustedin
*TableS?
-
~
No
,r
~
No
*Table4?
No~~
,,
,,
Listed as "testing
required' or "see
i/4
comments'?
~
Yes
requirements for
dangerous oilfield waste
In Section 5.2/Table4.1a
orTable4.1b?
SectionS
v-
Usted In Part B of
*Table4?
No
Yes
Meets any of the
(See Section s.s
Usted In Part A of
No
,,
c~amnn
nnoo-dow
,,
,.
\..
,, ...
Notes.•
Yes
~
,
-
Meets any of the
requirements for
dangerous oilfield waste
in Section 5.2/Table 4.1a?
No
**Dangerous
Ollfteld Waste
TOG classification
still required
Non-Dangerous
Oilfield Waste
-
*
Refers to schedules listed at 1tle back of 1tle
Alberta Users Guide for Waste Managers.
- Not considered DOW if produced at a single
site In volumes <5 kg or <5 L per month
and does not exceed 1tlls amount at any
time when accumulated (does not apply to
Part B, Table 4listed wastes in the Alberta
Users Guide for Waste Managers).
• Classify container rinsate as per container
waste or the rinse solvent, whichever Is more
stringent
• For complete classification requirements sse
Section 5.2, Tables 4.1 a and 4.1 b and
Section 5.3 for containers.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
12
6.0
Wastes Banned from Disposal via Injection into Pipeline Systems
Upstream oilfield wastes that can be separated from the production stream and can be harmful to
downstrean oil handlers must not be diluted by injection into pipelines. Pipelines must not be
thought of as a "mixing vessel" for waste dilution.
For safety, environmental, corrosion, operational, and economic reasons, the oilfield wastes
identified in this subsection are banned from direct injection into any pipeline system. The
rationale for this decision is based on the wastes':
non-hydrocarbon content,
chemical composition,
water content,
solids content, and/or
the availability of practical, cost effective waste treatment methods.
6.1
Banned Waste Types
•
All motor, engine, driver, and compressor hydrocarbon and synthetic lubricating
oils, unless specific written agreements have been made with the receiving
refinery. Alternative acceptable waste management methods such as recycling
and reclaiming are available. It is the responsibility of the pipeline company to
confirm that the wastes were received by the refinery.
•
All non-hydrocarbon based wastes.
•
All solid wastes.
•
All non-hydrocarbon based drilling fluids.
•
All fracturing sands.
•
All radioactive wastes.
•
All halogenated solvents and halogenated organic chemicals (i.e. organic
chlorides).
•
All water based wastes including, but not limited to, produced water, acid water,
process water, water based methanol hydrotest fluids, other water based bydrotest
fluids, wash fluids, boiler blowdowns, filter wash fluids, and oily water.
•
All chemical based sludges including, but not limited to, glycol sludges, gas
sweetening sludges, and other process sludges.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
13
•
All chemical wastes, whether ''unused" pure, spent, or contaminated. This
includes, but is not limited to, all caustics, acids, laboratory chemicals, PCBs, gas
sweetening agents, non-hydrocarbon based surface and downhole treating
chemicals, glycols, methanol, and treating or softening salts.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
PARTC
WASTE MANIFESTING AND TRACKING
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
15
Parte
Waste Manifesting and Tracking
7.0
Introduction To Waste Manifesting and Tracking
This section outlines the manifesting and tracking requirements for generators and receivers of
oilfield waste in Alberta.
An integral component of proper waste management is the use of documents (manifests) to
ensure wastes are safely transported and received at their intended point of treatment and/or
disposal.
Waste tracking is an equally important component of proper waste management. For the
pmpose of these requirements, waste tracking refers to a system by which the handling,
movement, treatment, and disposal of wastes are monitored by the waste generator.
7.1
System Summary
Dangerous oilfield waste (DOW) transported on public roads in Alberta must be
manifested (see Section 8.2, When to Use a Manifest). The BUB's Alberta Oilfield
Waste Manifest is to be used for the transportation ofDOWs within Alberta. If the
oilfield waste is transported into or out of Alberta (i.e. crosses a provincial or federal
border), generators must classify, name, and label their waste in compliance with IDG.
This includes usage of the federal manifest (regulated by AEP in Alberta). The EUB
Oilfield Waste Manifest is replaced by the federal manifest for shipments of oilfield
waste into or out of Alberta.
Oilfield waste generators must implement a waste tracking system that ensures the
quantities and characteristics of all generated wastes, both dangerous and non-dangerous,
as well as their final treatment and disposal methods are known. Generators are
responsible for the safe and proper handling, treatment, and disposal of all generated
waste.
Selected licensees and/or approval holders of wells or other facilities will be required to
prepare an annual oilfield waste disposition report. These reports must contain
summarized information pertaining to the type, quantity and ultimate treatment and/or
disposal of oilfield wastes, including those treated and/or disposed on-site. Some oilfield
wastes are exempt from this waste disposition report requirement. All DOWs must be
included. In addition, Table 9.1, Reportable Oilfield Wastes, lists the other waste types,
which may or not be dangerous, that must be included in the waste dispostion report. All
miscellaneous DOWs, as well as any miscellaneous non-DOWs which represent a risk to
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
16
the environment or public safety, must be reported. There is a section in Section 7.4 of
Appendix 7.0, Waste Management Table, for miscellaneous waste codes which can be
used to report these unlisted waste types.
The reporting requirements identified in this section in no way exclude generators or
receivers from any other requirements outlined in EUB legislation, Interim Directives,
Informational Letters, or General Bulletins.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
17
8.0
Manifesting
8.1
Background .
Manifests include specific information about the waste, its source and its destination.
These documents provide detailed information to first responders in the event of an
accident, and serve as a tool for confirming that shipments of dangerous wastes are
properly handled, transported, and disposed.
Many oilfield wastes are classified as dangerous waste (see Section 5.2, Dangerous
Oilfield Waste) and are required to be manifested if transported on public roads (see
Sction 8.2, When to Use a Manifest). The EUB Alberta Oilfield Waste Manifest was
designed to meet the document requirements ofTDG for shipments of DOW occurring
entirely within Alberta.
The Alberta Oilfield Waste Manifest is a 5- page EUB form (see Figure 8.1, Manifest,
[Front Page}). This form will be available from Information Services (EUB) on the
ground floor of the Energy Resources Building. SpeCific instructions for the completion
of the Alberta Oilfield Waste Manifest are also included with each manifest (see
Figure 8.2, Manifest, [Back page]).
82
When to Use a Manifest
1.
EUB Alberta Oillield Waste Manifest
(a)
The BUB Alberta Oilfield Waste Manifest must be completed and
accompany the waste shipment when transporting DOWs on public roads
in Alberta. The shipment must occur entirely within the province of
Alberta. This includes shipments transported to AEP approved facilities.
For shipments not occurring entirely within the province of Alberta, the
federal manifest (regulated by AEP in Alberta), must be used (see federal
manifest section).
(b)
The BUB Alberta Oilfield Waste Manifests are not required for the
following:
i)
when the quantity of DOW transported does not exceed 5 kg or
5 L,
ii)
when the waste is a non-DOW*,
*
companies wishing to use the BUB Alberta Oilfield Waste
Manifest as a tracking document for non-DOWs must
indicate on the manifest that the waste is non-dangerous.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
18
Copies of the manifests completed for non-DOWs are not
to be sent to the EUB.
iii)
when the oilfield wastes are treated/disposed on-site,
iv)
when the waste is uncontaminated produced water (contaminants
which would make the produced water a DOW, must not be
present),
v)
when the DOW is transported from the site of origin to another
site, provided the licensee or approval holder ofboth sites are the
same, and
vi)
2.
•
the person in charge of the vehicle transporting the DOW
displays on the vehicle a placard that corresponds to the
placard set out as Figure 19 in Part IT of Schedule V of the
Federal Regulations, and
•
the shipment is accompanied by a shipping document that
shows the hazard class, the emergency response contact,
the total mass or volume of the DOWs to which the
· shipping document relates, and the number of packages
where applicable, or
when the manifest documentation requirements for the DOWs are
exempted by a valid and appropriate Permit for Equivalent Level
of Safety (see Section 8.4, Pennitsfor Equivalent Level ofSafety).
Federal Manifest (Regulated by AEP in Alberta)
The following waste shipments require completion of the federal manifest (copies
submitted to AEP and/or Environment Canada):
(a)
DOWs transported across provincial/territorial/international boundaries
(copies must be submitted to the appropriate Federal and/or State and/or
Provincial governments, as required), and
(b)
DOWs, which have been received at a transfer station approved by AEP
for the receipt of industrial waste, and which are subsequently
consolidated and transported for treatment and/or disposal (copies of the
federal manifest must be submitted to AEP). When DOWs are received at
AEP approved transfer stations, they are considered "Industrial Wastes"
for the purpose of further transportation.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
19
8.3
General Manifest Requirements
Notwithstanding the requirements of Section 8.2, When to Use a Manifest, a manifest is
required for each load of DOW being transported. However, where a single truck must
make several trips to move the entire quantity of a specific oilfield waste, a single
manifest may be used with attachments documenting each load. Where more than one
truck is used to move a quantity of the specific oilfield waste, each truck must carry a
manifest, with attachments for repeat trips if necessary.
If the information requirements in any particular case exceed the limitations of the
manifest, it is acceptable to use attachments provided their existence is indicated on the
manifest.
Note: Copies of all attachments must be made for, and kept with each page to which
they. apply.
8.4
Pennits for Equivalent Level of Safety
TDG allows a Permit for Equivalent Level of Safety to be granted to a waste generator
(or association) for the purpose of reducing manifest documentation requirements where
appropriate. The Alberta Department of Transportation and Utilities (ATU) may grant
such a permit upon receipt of a satisfactory application.
·
8.5
Mixed Wastes
Shipments of mixed wastes comprised of several waste types must be manifested as the
most dangerous waste contained if the individual quantities of each waste type are not
known. Indicate the total volume of the waste on the manifest. The waste generator
should indicate on the manifest or attachment the waste types included in the mixed
waste shipment.
8.6
Waste Identification
The shipping name identified on the EUB Alberta Oilfield Waste Manifest, which is ~ed
to describe the waste, must be determined in accordance with TDG. The corresponding
oilfield waste code must be determined from Section 7.4 of Appendix 7.0, Waste
Management Table. In all cases, the product identification number (PIN) identified on
the manifest must correspond to TDG.
8.7
Manifesting System
Figure 8.3, Manifesting Procedure, shows the responsibilities of all parties relative to
manifesting, along with the movement and distribution of the manifest document.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
20
8.8
Reconciliation of Discrepancies - EUB Manifest
Discrepancies between waste details entered by the waste generator in Part A of the EUB
manifest and waste details entered by the receiver in Part C of the manifest-must be
reconciled by the generator.
1.
Serious Discrepancies
If the receiver notes a serious discrepancy regarding the quantities or
characteristics of the waste shipped relative to what was received, the receiver
hours of the time
received. A serious discrepancy is one which may have resulted in an impact to
the environment (i.e. spills, leakage, waste does not arrive at intended receiver) or
one where the waste received diffe~s significantly from the waste sent by the
generator. In cases where a serious discrepancy is the result of an action by the
transporter (i.e. ac~ident, leak, etc.) the transporter must notify the generator
within 24 hours of the occurrence. In the event of being notified of or becoming
aware of a serious discrepancy, the waste generator must notify the EUB as soon
as possible by the quickest, most effective means available (during normal work
hours, 8:00 am-4:30pm, Monday to Friday, phone the Waste Manifest
Coordinator, Facilities Division, Calgary Office and during weekends or
evenings, phone the appropriate EUB Field Office).
must notify the generator and the transporter within 24
The EUB does not have jurisdiction over many of the waste disposal facilities
(AEP approved) or the transporters. As a result, the EUB expects the waste
generators to have procedures in place between themselves and the transporters
and receivers regarding this 24 hour notification requirement.
2.
All Discrepancies
The Generator is to send the completed Page 1 of the manifest to the EUB within
60 days of the shipment date. In situations where the generator is not able to
reconcile any discrepancy within 60 days from the date of shipment, the EUB
Waste Manifest Coordinator must be notified.
It is recognized that the accurate measurement of waste quantities in the field is
difficult and may vary depending on the waste type and method of
containment/transportation. Waste generators must use sound judgement when
recording waste quantities on the manifest and when reconciling discrepancies
(see Section 10.0, Waste Accounting, for additional information on
measurement).
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
21
8.9
Retention of Manifests
Manifest copies and supporting documentation must be retained by all parties (generator,
transporter, and receiver) for a minimum of two years from the date of shipment. All
documentation is subject to EUB audit.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
~ EI.J B
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Alberta Oilfield Waste Manifest
Alberta Energy and Utilities Board
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Alberta Authority Responsible for Oilfield Waste Manifests· ALBERTA ENERGY AND untmES BOARD
Facilities Division
640 • 5 Avenue SW, Calgary, Alberta T2P 3G4
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MANIFEST INSTRUCTIONS
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(1)
3
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Distribution:
I Generator completes PART Aand has Transporter complete PART B. Generetor detaches end retelns Plitt 5 (blue).
2. Trensporter carries Pages I (while), 2 (yelow), 3 (pinkl & 4 (goldenrod) with shipment end giVH them to the Receiver. Note: If 1 urlftldlscrep~ncy II tile rasult of an 1ctlvlty by the Transporter (e.1. truck splftl the Transporter
must nodly the Gen11etor within 24 houre.
Receiver completes PART c. noting any discrepancies, then returns Page 4 (goldenrod) to Transporter end Pages 1 (whiteI and 2 (yelowl to Generator (to lie eent no hllr than 30 deya after the waste shipment date) and retains
Page 3 (pink). Note: If 1 udmd dlscrepency Ia noted, the Generator and Transporter must•• notllled within 24 houre.
4. Upon being notified ot a serious discrepancy or receipt at Piiies 1 (whiteland 2 (ytllow), Generator Investigates any discrepancies noted by the Receiver and takes conectiveection. Tha EUII must lie notlfled lmmedletetr If 1 udmd
dlscrapencyls noted. If tha •-•tor camot rtconcHt dlscte,.nclla wlthlniD deya after the dati of tile Willi shipment. the EUe must lie noUfted. Investigation resuhs end corrective ection are to ba reported in Pert D
(or Attachment). Generator sends page I (white) to the EUB It• lie etnl111lellr lhMI 10 dlya after tile waste ahlpment datal.
5. Companies wishing to usa the menilestlor non·dangtrous oilfield wastes must lncficale on thlmarn1estthll the wasta Is nofHIInllerous. Coplla of the menlfests used for Oftly no!Hianglfoua elltllld wntes 1111111.1o be unt
totheEUII.
d'
.....
NOTE: AI parties must retain MANIFEST copies end supporting dale lor a minimum ol2 years.
Part I • Ttansportar (Cenler)
: :r
Completion: some information ~sled below may not be eppliceble In el situations.
Identify C"'"'MIY Name,lluslnesa Addrna, Dele, Truck Unit No., and Tellphone and Fax Numlrlf.•
• Print N-and Sllftlonn.
(1)
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Part A· Generator (Consignor)
ldenltfy Company Nme, Operator Code (EUB assigned codes), and Business Address.
Identify SCMJrce SHaloclllon (reported as UD ·Sac· Twp ·lit• • W..l.lllllery,facllty Code (EIJB assigned
codes), and Operator Code (llcancee/Wasta Generator may ba different thin fecility operator).
Identify Intend ad ~ecelver,llualness Addreu, flacelvlnt Sltelocatlo11 (reported as
LSD· Sac· Twp • ftge • W M.)and flacelvlnt latt.ry,facllity Code (EUB or AEP assigned codes).
ldenttfy if the wasta is Non Dangerous (N)er Dangerous (D).
Shipping Nami/Descrlfdon of W1111 ·From Trensportation ol Dangerous Goods Raguletlons (TOO).
Alblfll Permit No. ·Obtained from Allerta Transportation & lllilitles.
Identify Wasta Code (EUB assigned codes· 111 Appendix 7.0 ol Guide 511.
TOGA/PIN and Clmlftcallon· Obtelnad from TOO.
Packlnl GrCMJp:
I • Very Dangerous
H • Dangerous
Ill • Moderately Dangerous
Handlinl Coda. See Part CReceiver (Consignee) for epproprleta Handling Code.
Quantity Shipped· Report to neernt 0 I m' or D. I tonne.
Indicate Units olshipment (I • tonne, m • m1).
ldenttfy OtVNallf/Solid% where epplicabll.
Sptcltl Handflng/Emllgtncy lnatructions ·Self Explanetory.
ldenltly Date, Time Shipped, end Scheduled Anini Dlle.
Print Name, Ttlephonl/fuJCduler Num.. re, and Silll lorm.
Identify 24 Hour Emergency Tellphone NII!Mer.
Part D. Genaretor (Consignor)
Upon receipt ol pages I (while) & 2 (yelowl· Enter Discrepancy flaconcllllllon Detalla (if any) and
Correctlva Action
• Print Name, Date, Telephone No., end Sllftlonn.
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Part C• flectlver (Consltnll)
Identify Com,any Name and lluslnna Ad4ren.
Identify flecelvln1 Sltelaclllott (reported as UD ·Sec· Twp ·fill· W M),
lllllery,fecllty Code (EUB or AEP assigned codes), and O,.ratlf Code.
llllantlty flactlved • Report to nearest 0.1 m1 or 0 I tonne.
lndicete Units of shipment (I z tonna, m • m1).
Identify OIW#IIIf/Solld% whera applicable
Handllnl Code. Enler code lor method of hl~ng: (refer to Definitions In Appendix I 0 of Guide 58).
11 SIDrlittFacility
12 ThtnnaiTreatment
12 Transfer Stetlon (specify Intended trntmenVdisposlll
13 Biodegradation facility
13 Oilfield Waste Processing facility
14 Small OtHteld Westelncinerator
04 Class Ia Disposai Wei
15 Used 0~ Recycler
15 Class lb Disposal Wei
11 Recycfing Facility (excludtng used oill
II Class I Disposal Wei
17 Swan Htls facility
11 Cavtrn
II Road Spreading
II Class lalandfil
II Biode<,Jradalion (on site I
It Class llltllldlil
20 Burial (on·sitel
II Class llltllldlil
21 Other (specrlyl
II Class IH landftl
TreMJOrler Decontamlnlled • Enter Yes or No.
If Handllnl Code 021121 • Specify· Describe traatmenVdisposll (i e ,locatiowmethodl
Identify Dallend Time flectlved
Identify Dlsctepancln- Self Explanatory
Print Name and Telephone Number, and Sign form.
24
Figure 8.3
Manifesting Procedure
Generator
)
I.
• Completes Part A
• Has Transporter
completed Part B
• Retains Page 5
• Gives remaining
pages of Manifest to
Transporter
I
• Receives Pages 1
and 2 from Receiver
• Notlftes EUB
Immediately of any
serious discrepancies
•Investigates and
reconciles any
discrepancies
• Completes Part 0
• Retains Page 2
• Sends Page 1 to EUB
within 60 days of
shipment date
(
.
~
(
)
1
-...
• Receives Page 1 from
Generator
(
Transporter
I
• Completes Part B
• Carries Manifest with
waste shipment
•
~ Gives Manifest to
Receiver
• Receives Page 4 from
Receiver after
completion of Part C
• If serious
discrepancy, contacts
the Generator within
24 hours.
EUB
Receiver
J
--.
_., • Completes Part C upon
-
•
•
•
•
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
receipt of waste
shipment
Returns Page 4 to
Transporter within so
days of waste shipment
date
Retains Page 3
r-Returns Pages 1 and 2
to Generator within 30
days of waste shipment
date
Hserious discrepancy,
contacts
Generator/Transporter
within 24 hours.
November. 1996
25
9.0
Tracking
9.1
Background
Waste tracking is required from the time of initial generation of the waste through to
final disposition (cradle to grave). The effective tracking of oilfield waste is essential to
aid the waste generator in ensuring the proper handling, treatment, and disposal of
oilfield wastes. The tracking system must enable the generator to demonstrate
compliance.
92
Generator Responsibilities
Waste generators are responsible for tracking their wastes from "cradle to grave". In
keeping with this philosophy, generators must be aware of the quantities and types of
waste they generate, bow they are handled, and where and bow they are ultimately
disposed. Therefore, in the case of waste being delivered to a facility between the
generator's site and the final disposal site (delivery to a transfer station), the waste
generator is responsible for obtaining details of final disposition from the transfer station
operator. The generator is responsible for ensuring appropriate treatment and disposal
of the waste occurs.
·
All waste generators are required to implement and maintain a waste tracking system.
The development and type of system used is solely their choice and preference. All
tracking systems must be effective and capable of displaying due diligence. The system
must also be capable of providing information required for the oilfield waste disposition
report (see below)~
Tracking system data is to be maintained for a minimum of two years and is subject to
EUB audit.
1.
Oilfield Waste Disposition Reports
The oilfield waste disposition report is a summary of the types and quantities of
disposed oilfield wastes, the point(s) of generation/consolidation and the specific
disposal method(s) utilized. All DOWs and many non-DOWs which are
treated/disposed must be included.
Specific licensees and/or approval holders of wells or other facilities will be
selected each year and notified that their annual oilfield waste disposition report
for the previous calendar year must be submitted to the EUB. Companies
selected will be notified by 15 January and will be given until28 February to
comply with this request. Therefore, the EUB expects that all licensees and/or
approval holders of wells or other facilities will collate their tracking data to
enable the 43-day request for the report to be met. Furthermore, at anytime after
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
26
28 February of each year, the EUB could request the annual report (or portion
thereof), from any company. This company would be given only 30 days to
comply.
2.
Report Submission and Processing Information
(a)
The oilfield waste disposition report must inclutie summary data which
identifies all the sources (facilities or locations) of waste disposed.
Sources include:
i)
point of generation - the facility or location where the waste was
generated. This refers to sites where waste was treated/disposed
on-site or sent directly for disposal.
ii)
point of consolidation - the facility or location where the waste
was consolidated from a number of sites prior to disposal.
(b)
The waste disposition report must include summary data regarding the
waste types, quantities disposed and disposal method(s) utilized.
(c)
All DOWs as well as those wastes listed in Table 9.1, Reportable Oilfield
Wastes, which are disposed, including those treated and/or disposed onsite, are to be included in the waste disposition report. Miscellaneous
DOWs and non-DOWs which represent a risk to the environment or
public must also be included in the report. Oilfield waste treated in-situ
does not have to be reported.
(d)
Appendix 8.0, Oilfield Waste Disposition Report, shows the required data
elements for the oilfield waste disposition report. Descriptions of the data
elements can be found in Section 8.1 of Appendix 8.0,lnstructions to
Complete the Oilfield Waste Disposition Report. The report computer
data format can be found in Section 8.2 of Appendix 8.0, Computer Data
Format. This is the format the file must be in for submission to the EUB.
(e)
Requested waste disposition reports must be submitted to the EUB on 3:5"
computer diskettes. Paper copies of reports will not be accepted.
(f)
Reprocessing fees will be charged for errors, missing data, and
late/missing reports.
(g)
The waste generator must include in their report, any waste disposed by
service companies which was generated in association with the generator's
operations.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
27
3.
Reporting Oilfield Wastes Not Listed in Waste Management Table
(Section 7.4 of Appendix 7.0)
Section 7.4 of Appendix 7.0, Waste Management Table, is a reasonably
comprehensive list of oilfield wastes generated in the upstream oil and gas
industry. However, some wastes generated in the oil and gas industry will not be
captured by this list. A section in the Waste Management Table has been
included for Miscellaneous Wastes. These wastes are based on the TDG class
system (i.e. Class 4 for flammable solids). The main purpose of this section is to
provide waste codes und~r which these wastes can be tracked and reported. The
generator selects the miscellaneous waste code which corresponds to the TDG
class of the waste and then uses this code for reporting.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
28
Table 9.1
Reportable Oilfield Wastes
All DOWs must be included in the annual oilfield waste disposition report. Additionally, the
following oilfield wastes which may or may not be dangerous, must be included in the report.
Non-DOW that are not included in this list, but are specified in the Waste Management Table,
Section 7.4 of Appendix 7.0 are exempted from the waste disposition report unless they are
determined to be dangerous.
This list is only for the annual oilfield waste disposition report requirement. (It is not intended
to be used for classifying oilfield wastes.)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Absorbants
Activated Carbon
Asbestos
Boiler Blowdown Water
Catalyst (non•sulphur)
Catalyst (sulphur)
All Contaminated Debris and Soils
Crude Oil/Condens.ate Emulsions (Residuals after treatment)
Desiccant
Filters (media) • water treatment
Filters • air pollution control
Filters • lube oil
Frac Sand (radioactive and non•radioactive)
Glycol Solutions (no heavy metals)
Hydraulic and Transmission Oils
Incinerator Ash (if incinerated material is reportable)
Ion Exchange Resin
Ion Exchange Resin Regenerant Liquids
Lubricating Oil
Pigging Waste
Contaminated solids less than 50 ppm Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)
Produced Sand
Sludges • (flare pit, hydrocarbon, lime, process, and sulphur)
Sweetening Agents • (solids and liquids)
Treater Hay
Wash Fluids (organic)
Water•Process (with organic chemicals)
Water•Process (neutralized solutions with heavy metals)
Water•Produced (if contaminants are present which make the solution a DOW)
Well Workover Fluids
Wood • chemically treated/cooling tower
Unlisted Wastes (if they present a risk to the environment or the public)
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
29
10.0
Waste Accounting
10.1
Measurement
The accurate measurement of waste is often difficult, if not impossible, due to the varied
nature of waste and the difficulties caused by the presence of solid materials. The best
available measurement technology for the given circumstances should be utilized.
Whenever possible, volume determinations should be made using metres, tank gauges or
weigh scales. In situations where the use of such devices is not possible, estimated
volumes should be based on the dimensions of the container used to store or transport the
waste.
Where appropriate, the components of a waste should also be determined (i.e. oil, water,
and solids). Representative samples should be centrifuged to determine the proportionate
quantities of each component.
102
Units for Manifesting and Waste Disposition Report
The oilfield waste disposition report and the EUB oilfield manifest require the waste to
be reported in either tonnes or cubic metres. Often the waste is contained in drums or
other various containers which can make quantity determination difficult. The following
criteria is suggested to enable consistent reporting:
1.
Drummed liquid waste: For the manifesting and reporting requirements, sum
the volume of waste in all the drums and convert to m3•
Example: 6 drums ofliquid waste (205litre drums).
Calculation: 6 drums x 205 Udrumx 1m3/1000 L = 1.23 m 3•
2.
Drummed solid waste: For the manifesting and reporting requirements, sum the
weight of waste in all the drums and convert to tonnes. If the density of the solid
waste is known, calculate using the actual density.
If the weight of the solid waste is not known, assume the density =1 kg/L
Using the assumption of 6 drums (205 L each)
Calculation: 6 drums x 1 kg/L x 205 L/drum x 1 tonne/1000 kg= 1.23
tonnes.
3.
Bulk packaged waste: For other bulk packaged wastes, report the solid waste in
tonnes and liquid waste in cubic metres. If the weight of the bulk solid waste is
unknown but the volume of the container is known apply 1 L = 1 kg for general
conversion/estimation.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
PARTD
OILFIELD WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
31
PARTD
11.0 Oilfield Waste Management Facilities
11.1
Introduction
The purpose of this section is to outline the general requirements for oilfield waste
management facilities to ensure that public health and the environment are adequately
protected and that the site can be readily restored for the next intended land use.
An oilfield waste management facility may consist of one or more of the following
components:
waste storage area/facility,
waste transfer station,
waste processing facility,
surface facilities associated with waste disposal wells,
waste disposal well (Class Ia or Ib),
cavern,
landfill,
biodegradation facility,
thermal treatment facility, and
other oilfield waste management technology or facility.
Applicants considering any of the waste management components listed above should
review the following subsections, 11.2 - 11.9, for general requirements that are
applicable to all oilfield waste management components/facilities. Although the text
tends to refer to waste management facilities, the general requirements are also
applicable to licensees and/or approval holders who intend to integrate a waste
management component into an BUB approved oil and gas or oil sands facility.
Additional requirements that are specific to a particular type of waste management
component/facility are addressed in Sections 12 to 17. These sections also indicate
whether the integration of a waste management component into an existing BUB
approved facility requires notification or application. Refer to Part E for the information
that is required in an application for approval to construct and operate an oilfield waste
management facility.
11.2
Siting Issues
Siting considerations must be incorporated into the design of oilfield waste management
facilities. The following site related factors must be considered when locating a possible
site for an oilfield waste management facility:
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
32
11.3
1.
minimizing the risk of environmental damage including any impact to the quality
of surface water and groundwater, and the health of humans, animals, and plants
during construction, operation, and closure of the facility,
2.
avoid drainage ways and areas subject to seasonal flooding,
3.
not to be located within 100 metres (m) of the normal high water mark of a body
of water, permanent stream, or water well used for domestic purposes, and
4.
avoid environmentally sensitive areas or areas where the public is directly
impacted.
Safety Issues
1.
An oilfield waste management facility shall be designed, constructed, and
operated such that it complies with the regulations stipulated under the following
Acts and associated Regulations:
Oil and Gas Conservation Act,
Occupational Health and Safety Act (and the Workplace Hazardous
Material Information System),
Safety Codes Act (Alberta Fire Code), and
Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act.
2.
Notwithstanding the requirements stated in Section 11.3 (1), oilfield waste must
be handled in such a manner that it does not:
(a)
(b)
(c)
produce fugitive air emissions or uncontrolled gases which exceed AEP
Ambient Air Quality Guidelines,
produce uncontrolled fumes or gases sufficient to pose .a risk of fire or
explosion, or
threaten public health, safety, or the environment through other means.
3.
A perimeter fence shall be installed to prevent public and wildlife access to the waste
management facility.
4.
An oilfield waste management facility shall bear signs as per Section 6.020 and
Schedule 12 of the Oil and Gas Conservation Regulations, at the entrance of the
facility identifying facility name, operator name, emergency phone number, and legal
description.
5.
All waste management facilities shall comply with equipment spacing requirements
identified in Sections 8.030 (2), 8.080 (2) and (3), and 8.090 of the Oil and Gas
Conservation Regulations.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
33
6.
A corporate response plan shall be maintained on-site at all times which describes
appropriate measures to follow in the event of any emergency such as a fluid spill,
tank fire or any other hazard. Employees must be trained in respect to nonnal and
emergency situations. All phone numbers and contacts should be updated
periodically. For infonnation regarding preparation of a corporate-level response
plan, refer to ID 91-2, Preparation of Corporate Level Response Plan, or any
subsequent publication issued.
7.
Licensees and/or approval holders must ensure their facilities meet the Noise
Control Directive, ID 94-4.
8.
As per Infonnational Letter IL 96-10, A Memorandum of Understanding Between
Alberta Environmental Protection and the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board
Regarding Coordination ofRelease Notification Requirements and Subsequent
Regulatory Response, all unrefined product spills must be reported to the local
EUB field office. Refined product and chemical spills are the responsibility of
the Pollution Control Division of AEP.
11.4
Waste Characterization
Licensees and/or approval holders of waste management facilities are responsible for
knowing the capabilities and limitations of their treatment technologies and as such, must
only accept wastes exhibiting the properties their facility is approved to handle.
Generally, this will require waste characterization, unless the stream is sufficiently well
known through either prior testing or an in depth knowledge of the origin of waste.
Refer to Appendix 3.0 for Recommended Test Methods.
11.5
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)
It is the applicant's responsibility to determine the need for an EIA. AEP is the
government agency responsible for the EIA process. Refer to section 19.0,
Environmental Impact Assessments, for the administrative process to follow.
11.6
Design and Operation
Licensees and/or approval holders must design and operate the facility to minimize
impact to the air, groundwater, surface water, or soils on or around the site. The
following factors must be taken into consideration at the design stage and during
operation of the facility:
1.
Material storage in accordance with EUB ID 95-3 and Guide G-55, Storage
Requirements for the Upstream Petroleum Industry. This includes adherence to
the construction, secondazy containment, leak detection, and weather protection
provisions outlined for above-ground tanks, underground tanks, oily waste
storage facilities, containers, and bulk pa~s.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
34
2.
Provision of surface water run-on and run-off control systems. The surface water
run-off control system must be able to accommodate the volume of water from a
1 in 10 year, 24-hour storm. Collected surface run-off water can be:
(a)
used in the facility process if a water diversion permit is obtained from
the Water Resources Division of AEP,
(b)
surface di~charged provided it is field tested and meets the following
criteria prior to being released, in a controlled fashion, to adjacent lands:
i)
ii)
iii)
iv)
v)
vi)
vii)
(c)
11.7
chloride content: 500 mg!L maximum (i.e. test strips),
pH: 6.0 to 9.0, (i.e. test strips and/or meter readings),
no visible hydrocarbon sheen,
no other chemical contamination,
landownerconsent
water must not be able to flow directly into any watercourse, and
each release must be recorded including the pre-release test data
and the estimated volume of water released, or
deep well disposed.
3.
Provisions to control odours during receiving, processing, treating, and disposing
of waste materials. If the facility is approved to handle sour fluids, extra
precautions must be in place to ensure that odours are controlled.
4.
Acceptance of only characterized materials that the facility's process is capable of
handling. This may involve analyzing the waste materials prior to acceptance.
Licensees and/or approval holders should implement a quality controVquality
assurance program to verify composition of incoming waste materials.
5.
Development of a waste management plan for the handling and disposing of
residuals (i.e. solids and liquids) resulting from the process. Licensees and/or
approval holders must ensure that residuals are characterized, and appropriate
disposal methods/options are selected based on the characterization.
Site Assessment and Groundwater Protection
Certain oilfield waste management facilities will be required to have in place a
monitoring system that will provide an early indication of potential groundwater impact.
This may involve implementation of a comprehensive groundwater monitoring program
for the site.
The waste management or disposal methods described in the following sections will
indicate if groundwater monitoring is required for that specific method. When it is
required, background data shall be submitted to the EUB as part of the application for
approval of the facility. Once established, the groundwater monitoring system shall be
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
35
sampled twice per year and the results must then be compiled into an annual report.
Refer to Appendix 4.0, Requirements for Site Assessment and Groundwater Protection.
11.8
Record Keeping
The approval holder of an oilfield waste management facility shall:
11.9
1.
retain copies of all dockets for materials received and shipped for a minimum of
2 years,
2.
where applicable, retain groundwater and leachate monitoring information for a
minimum of 5 years, and
3.
keep copies of approvals at each facility.
Closure
It is expected that with good operating practices, the site on which an oilfield waste
management facility is situated will be capable of being reclaimed to conditions suitable
for the next intended land use. The EUB IT., 96-3, Suspension and Reclamation of
Upstream Oil and Gas Facilities, introduces a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)
that outlines an agreement reached between AEP and the EUB on these activities.
As per the MOU, all decontamination and land reclamation activities, regardless of
whether the sites are active or inactive, are the regulatory responsibility of AEP. If
contamination has· occurred, licensees and/or approval holders are required to contact
AEP directly to determine if further delineation or remediation is required. Licensees
and/or approval holders must conm;Ut with AEP regarding appropriate remediation
criteria and any in situ remediation work. Any materials excavated during remediation
activities (i.e. contaminated soil) must be treated and/or disposed in a manner that is
satisfactory to AEP. It is expected that this document will be used as a basis for storage,
treatment, and disposal of the contaminated material. Options that are available include
on-site treatment, sending the material to an AEP or EUB approved waste facility, or any
other treatment/disposal method as directed or approved by AEP.
At the time of closure of either part or the whole facility, all inventories must be
eliminated, surface equipment and structures must be dismantled, and if applicable,
pipelines and wells must be properly abandoned. Complete closure of an oilfield waste
management facility, as a minimum, shall involve:
1.
elimination of the inventory,
2.
dismantling of the structures and equipment,
3.
abandoning wells or pipelines in accordance with EUB requirements,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
36
4.
conducting a detailed site assessment which shall clearly identify potential
sources, nature and extent of any contamination,
5.
implementation of a reclamation program that will render the site compatible with
the next intended land use,
6.
implementation of a post closure monitoring program, if necessary, and
7.
documentation of the work undertaken, including independent verification to
ensure that the reclamation objectives were achieved.
Prior to implementation of the reclamation program, companies need to consult with
AEP regarding remediation objectives for the site.
It is expected that waste management components constructed on EUB approved oil and
gas or oil sands facilities will be closed along with the production facilities or in some
situations, when the sites are going through partial closure. Therefore, with the
exception of fixed incinerators that require an approval and landfills, financial assurance
will not be required for waste management components integrated into EUB approved
production facilities.
The application process for an oilfield waste management facility which is to be
constructed and operated on a stand-alone site, requires the applicant to submit a plan
detailing how both planned or unplanned closure of the facility or any part of it, at any
point during its active life would be performed. If the application is approved, the
company will be required to post financial security to cover the cost of planned or
unplanned closure (refer to Section 20.0, Financial Security).
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
37
12.0 Waste Storage Areas/Facilities and Waste Transfer Stations
12.1
Introduction ·
The purpose of this section is to identify the requirements for the storage of oilfield
wastes at either an operating production facility or at a stand-alone facility that is
dedicated to the storage of oilfield wastes.
Oilfield wastes, whether dangerous or non-dangerous, are generally stored in one of three
locations:
•
in a storage area on an EUB approved oil and gas or oil sands facility,
•
at a waste storage facility (stand-alone site) operated by an oil and gas company
for collection of their own wastes, or
•
at a waste transfer station operated by an independent company as a third party
waste receiver.
Filter and container crushing, as well as liquid removal by gravity settling can be
performed at a storage area or facility, or at a waste transfer station. However, if there is
any additional waste treatment being performed, then the facility is referred to as a waste
processing facility and the requirements of Section 14.0, Waste Processing Facilities,
apply.
Waste treatment means to apply any method, technique or process, including, without
limitation, neutralization and stabilization, that is designed to change the physical,
chemical, or biological character or composition of a substance.
Operating approvals are required for storage facilities and transfer stations. A storage
area on an EUB approved oil and gas or oil sands facility would be included under the
facility approval. The application requirements to obtain an approval for storage
facilities, transfer stations, and waste processing facilities are contained in Part E.
12.2
Storage Areas
Waste storage areas are defined as sites on existing EUB approved oil and gas or oil
sands facilities used for the purpose of collecting oilfield wastes or oily wastes from one
or more of a company's facilities. The licensee and/or approval holder of the facility on
which the storage area is located must be the same as that of the facilities from which the
collected wastes are generated.
The storage areas must meet the requirements of EUB ID 95-03 and the accompanying
Guide G-55, Storage Requirements for the Upstream Petroleum Industry.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
38
Licensees and/or approval holders constructing a storage area on an existing EUB
approved production facility must, as outlined in EUB Guide G-55, submit written
notification to the local EUB Field office. Licensees and/or approval holders who intend
to integrate a storage area with a new production facility shall include the following
information in the facility application:
•
•
•
•
12.3
design of the storage area,
type(s) and volume(s) of stored materials,
duration of storage, and
final disposaVtreatment methods of the stored waste materials.
Waste Storage Facilities and Transfer Stations
A stand-alone facility, which has been constructed for the purpose of collecting and
storing oilfield wastes until volumes are sufficient for economic transfer to treatment and
disposal facilities, is considered either a storage facility or a transfer station.
A waste storage facility is considered a first party receiver (i.e. receives only those
wastes generated by one oil and gas company, but can come from various sites). The
licensee or approval holder of the storage facility must be the same as that of the facilities
from which the wastes are collected. A waste transfer station is considered a third
party receiver (i.e. receives wastes generated by various companies and from various
sites).
Waste storage facilities and transfer stations shall comply with the requirements (siting,
safety, waste characterization, EIA., design and operation, record keeping, and closure)
outlined in Section 11.0, Oilfield Waste Manag~ent Facilities.
If dangerous oilfield wastes are being stored, a comprehensive groundwater monitoring
program must also be implemented. Refer to Appendix 4.0, Requirements for Site
Assessment and Groundwater Protection.
12A
Reporting and Record Keeping
In addition to the record keeping requirements outlined in Section 11.8, Record Keeping
the following requirements also apply:
1.
Monthly Documentation
Operators ofwa8te storage facilities and waste transfer stations must document
the following information and retain it on-site for a minimum of 2 years. The
following information must be made available to EUB staff upon request:
(a)
a balance of opening inventory for each month,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
39
2.
(b)
for each receipt of waste material, the volume, source, generator, type
(characterization), and date received, and
(c)
a closing inventory balance for each month identifying total volumes of
waste materials received, volumes of waste materials sent for treatment
and/or disposal, and the name and location of the treatment and/or
disposal facility.
AnnuaiReport
Licensees and/or approval holders of waste transfer stations must summarize the
monthly information and prepare an annual report by the 31 March of each year.
This report, which must be retained on site for a minimum of2 years and be ·
made available to EUB staff upon requeSt, shall contain as a minimum:
(a)
monthly totals of each waste type received,
(b)
monthly totals of each waste type sent for treatment and/or disposal, and
the name and location of the treatment and/or disposal facility, and
(c)
a sumnuuy of the r~sults of groundwater monitoring (if any).
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
40
13.0 Surface Facilities Associated with Disposal Wells
13.1
Introduction
The purpose of this section is to outline environmentally sound operating practices and
principles for surface facilities that receive upstream oilfield wastes prior to deep well
injection and are not covered under an existing EUB facility approval.
The deep well disposal of oilfield waste fluids involves the regulatozy requirements for
both the disposal well and the surface facility that is associated with the disposal well.
Surface facilities include above ground tanks, underground tanks, and any container or
group of containers with an aggregate volume larger than 1 cubic metre, as well as
associated piping, processing equipment, and pumps.
Requirements for the disposal wells are contained in EUB IL 94-2, Guide G-51, Injection
and Disposal Wells, Well Classifications, Completion, Logging, and Testing
Requirements.
Specific disposal well regulations are contained in the Oil and Gas Conservation
Regulations Sections 8.040 (water disposal requirements) and 15.070 (application
requirements).
Surface facilities used for the receipt of industrial wastes (i.e. downstream wastes such as
those generated at refineries or petrochemical plants) prior to deep well injection, as well
as the waste streams being disposed down the well, must be approved by AEP. The plan
to manage any residuals (solids or organics) that separate from the industrial wastes
fluids within the surface facilities (tanks) must also be approved by AEP.
The requirements for the surface facilities used for the receipt of upstream oilfield wastes
prior to injection down waste disposal wells are addressed in this section.
An approval for a surface facility associated with a waste disposal well is required when:
•
•
the disposal well is a stand alone Class Ia or Ib well, or
the surface facilities associated with the well are not covered by an EUB facility
approval.
Disposal wells tied into a pipeline originating from an approved waste processing facility
will not require a surface facilities approval, provided there is no additional tankage at
the well site. The application for approval of surface facilities associated with a waste
disposal well can be made in conjunction with the disposal well application.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
41
Class Ia wells can be approved for the disposal of oilfield and/or industrial fluids. Class
Ib wells are typically approved for the disposal of produced water, specific common
oilfield waste streams, and waste streams meeting specific criteria as outlined in Guide
G-51.
Any solid or organic fractions that separate from the waste fluids within the surface
facilities (tanks) associated with disposal wells must be treated and/or disposed of
appropriately.
132
General Requirements
Surface facilities that receive upstream oilfield wastes and are associated with waste
disposal wells, and are not covered under existing EUB facility approval, shall comply
with the requirements (siting, safety, waste characterization, design and operation, record
keeping, and closure) outlined in Section 11.0, Oilfield Waste Management Facilitities.
13.3
Groundwater Monitoring ·
Surface facilities associated with a Class Ia well, must have a comprehensive
groundwater monitoring program in place. Refer to Appendix 4.0, Requirements for Site
Assessment and Groundwater Protection.
13.4
Class Ia Wells Accepting Upstream and Downstream Fluids
Class Ia wells which receive fluids generated within the upstream petroleum industty as
well as waste fluids generated within other industries (downstream), must segregate the
upstream fluids from the industrial fluids. The surface facilities used for the receipt of
industrial wastes, the industrial waste streams, and the plans to manage any residuals
must be approved by AEP.
Skim oil from the upstream tanks may enter the crude oil stream provided it is sent to an
approved oilfield waste processing facility for treatment prior to entering the pipeline for
sales, or the protocol outlined in Section 31.0, Waste Transport by Pipelines is followed.
Any tank bottoms must be sent to an EUB or AEP approved facility for treatment and/or
disposal.
13.5
Reporting and Record Keeping
In addition to the record keeping requirements outlined in Section 11.8, Record Keeping
the following requirements also apply.
The S-18 form, Monthly Injection/Disposal Statement, shall be used to report the source,
volume, and type of all wastes disposed by deep well injection, for both Class Ia and
Class Ib wells. Any recovered crude oil must also be reported.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
42
14.0 Waste Processing Facilities
14.1
Introduction
The purpose of this section is to provide minimum requirements for the design and
operation of an oilfield waste processing facility.
Waste processing means to apply any method, techriique, or process that is designed to
change the physical, chemical, or biological character or composition of a substarice.
A waste processing facility is defined as a system of surface equipment designed for the
purpose of collecting and treating oilfield waste material from any gas, oil, oilfield, or oil
sands operation.
The techniques or methods applied by facilities designed specifically for the recovexy of
crude oil often include a combination of retention time, gravity separation, heat
application, chemical application, mechanical mixing, centrifuging, and water washing.
A cavern is typically approved as a disposal well. In cases where waste streams are
injected into the cavern for purposes of separation and oil recovexy, it will also require
approval as a waste processing facility.
Other waste processing facilities include those designed to collect oilfield waste and
apply methods or techniques to reduce volumes, alter chemical characteristics, and/or
remove dangerous components prior to final disposal.
Waste processing facilities accepting wastes generated within the upstream petroleum
industxy only require approval from the EUB. Facilities that accept a combination of
upstream and downstream waste or industrial waste only require approval from AEP and
do not require EUB approval.
14.2
General Requirements
All oilfield waste processing facilities shall comply with the requirements (siting, safety,
waste characterization, EIA, design and operation, site assessment and groundwater ·
protection, record keeping, and closure) outlined in Section 11.0, Oilfield Waste
Management Facilities.
14.3
Groundwater Monitoring
Licensees and/or approval holders of oilfield waste processing facilities must implement
a comprehensive groundwater monitoring program for their site (refer to Appendix 4.0,
Requirement$ for Site Assessment and Groundwater Protection).
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
43
14.4
Reporting and Record Keeping
In addition to the record keeping requirements outlined in Section 11.8, Record Keeping,
the following requirements also apply.
The operator of a waste processing facility will be required by the approval to operate, to
submit a S-25 form, Monthly Waste Plant Statement. This report as a minimum shall
include:
1.
an opening monthly inventory balance of wastes, residuals (liquids and solids),
and/or products (recovered crude oil),
2.
type, volume, origin, generator of each receipt of waste material,
3.
the volume and deliveries (name and location of facility) of residuals and/or
recovered crude oil, and
4.
a closing monthly inventory balance of wastes, residuals (liquids and solids),
and/or products (recovered crude oil).
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November;1996
44
15.0 Oilfield Landfills
15.1
Introduction
The purpose of this section is to establish the minimum requirements for the design and
operation of oilfield landfills, and to identify the types of non-EUB regulated landfills
which may accept oilfield waste.
Oilfield landfills are:
•
operated by an oil and gas company for the purpose of disposing of oilfield
operations,
wastes produced from their
•
operated as part of an oilfield waste processing facility for the purpose of
disposing of residual wastes resulting from their treatment process, or
•
operated by an independent company for the purpose of disposing of third party
waste generated by the upstream petroleum industcy.
own
An oilfield landfill shall not receive municipal, non-upstream petroleum nor other
industrial wastes. All oilfield landfills, including those to be integrated into an EUB
approved production facility, require approval from the BUB to construct or expand.
The application requirements to obtain the approval are contained in Section 21.0,
Genera/Information Required in Applications, and Section 25.0, Oilfield Landfills·
Specific Application.Information.
15.2
AEP Regulated Landfills Versus Oilfield Landfills
The Government of Alberta recently approved the transfer of regulatory responsibility
for municipal waste management facilities from the Public Health Act to the
Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act (EPEA). AEP's Code of Practice for
Landfills establishes the requirements for Class II and Class mlandfills receiving less
than 10 000 tonnes of waste per year, and will form the basis for approvals for larger
landfills.
In order for there to be a consistent approach toward the design of landfills and the
landfilling of waste in Alberta, EUB oilfield landfill requirements are consistent with the
Waste Control Regulation ofEPEA and AEP's Code of Practice for landfills.
15.3
Disposal of Oilfield Waste at AEP Regulated Landfills
The disposal of oilfield waste at AEP regulated landfills, which are designed primarily
for other sources or types of waste, such as municipal waste, may not be an effective use
of that landfill's capacity, and may represent a potential environmental problem
depending on the specific characteristics of the waste.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
45
If a waste generator wishes to dispose of their oilfield waste at a landfill which is not
under the jurisdiction of the EUB, the onus is placed on the waste generator to ensure
that the destination landfill is of appropriate design and is approved to accept the type of
waste in question (refer to Subsection 15.8, Waste Criteria and Section 2.1,
Responsibilities).
The disposal of any liquid oilfield waste in landfills is prohibited.
Dangerous oilfield waste shall only be deposited in appropriately designed EUB
approved oilfield landfills, or AEP regulated landfills which are approved to accept
hazardous waste.
15.4
General Requirements for Oilfield Landfills
All oilfield landfills shall comply with the general requirements in Section 11.0, Oilfield
Waste Management Facilities.
15.5
Landfill Siting Criteria
In addition to the general siting criteria in Section 11.2 for all oilfield waste management
facilities, the following criteria also apply:
1.
Prior to construction or lateral expansion of a landfill, the approval holder shall
ensure the following:
(a)
Ari investigation shall be designed and conducted by a professional
geologist or engineer registered y.rith the Association of Professional
Engineers, Geologi~ts, and Geophysicists of Alberta (APEGGA) to assess
the geological and hydrogeological conditions specific to the landfill and
its surrounding area,
(b)
After an investigation is designed and conducted in accordance with
Section 15.5(1)(a), a landfill design shall be prepared by a professional
geologist or engineer registered with APEGGA, and the approval holder
shall construct the landfill according to the design,
(c)
The approval holder shall conduct a soil survey to determine the depth and
volume of topsoil and subsoil available at the landfill site, and
(d)
Prior to construction or lateral expansion of a landfill, the approval holder
shall determine storage locations of salvaged topsoil, and measures to be
taken to prevent the use or loss of salvaged topsoil during storage.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
46
2.
No person shall construct or operate an oilfield landfill within:
(a)
300m of the shore of a natural area that permanently contains water, such
as a river, lake, or creek,
(b)
300 m of the shore of a man-made surface feature that permanently
contains water, such as an irrigation canal or drainage ditch, but not a
roadside ditch, dugout, or reservoir,
(c)
wetlands, critical wildlife habitats, or areas immediately adjacent, where
the natural drainage from the landfill would flow directly onto the wetland
or critical wildlife area,
(d)
100 m of any land subject to slope failure which would compromise the
landfill's structural integrity, or any other land with similar unsuitable
characteristics, or
(e)
300 m of the perimeter of a wellhead protection zone of a municipal or
community water supply.
3.
The topography in the immediate vicinity of the landfill site shall be level to
gently rolling. Terrain with steep slopes, ravines, gullies and coulees, low-lying
areas, flood plains and lake shores are unsuitable.
4.
The approval holder shall ensure that no waste is deposited within 100m of a
highway, railroad right-of-way, municipal road, or street.
5.
The following geological and hydrogeological criteria shall be applied when
choosing a site for an oilfield landfill. The site shall not be within:
(a)
30m vertically of an aquifer,
(i)
(ii)
6.
capable of yielding water meeting domestic use quality standards,
and
having a transmissivity of5 x 10-4m2/sec or greater,
(b)
10 m vertically of fractured bedrock, or
(c)
a recharge area of an unconfined aquifer.
The bottom of a landfill trench or cell shall be at least 1.5 m above the seasonal
high water table.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
47
15.6
Design and Operation
Oilfield landfills are divided into four classes (Class Ia, Ib, II, and III). Design
Requirements and Operating Procedures apply to all classes of oilfield landfills. The
specific waste streams that may be disposed in each class of landfill are outlined in
Section 15.8, Waste Criteria.
Approval holders are cautioned that if they intend to construct a new oilfield
landfill to accept dangerous oilfield waste, it should be designed to comply with
Class Ia criteria.
1.
Design Requirements
In addition to the design and operation requirements listed in Section 11.6 for all
waste management facilities, the following requirements also apply:
2.
(a)
Reclamation design and the proposed post reclamation use of the landfill
site must be incorporated into the overall design of the landfill, starting at
the initial site assessment phase.
(b) .
A comprehensive groundwater monitoring program (see Appendix 4:0,
Requirements for Site Assessment and Groundwater Protection) must be·
included in the design, operation, and decommissioning of an oilfield
landfill. Data reflecting background conditions must be obtained prior to
commencement of operation. Groundwater monitoring during the
operational life of the landfill, as well as after closure of the lan~ll, must
provide sufficient information to assess and quantify potential impact on
the surrounding groundwater. Evidence of adverse impact shall result in
implementation of remedial action.
(c)
During the construction phase of the landfill, the approval holder may be
required to provide evidence that exhibits compliance with the proposed
design criteria. The evidence may be in the form of engineering and
geological studies, survey plots, technical data, or other means.
(d)
A financial assurance program is required for the life of the landfill,
including post closure reclamation (see Section 20.0, Financial Security).
Operating Procedures
(a)
The approval holder shall develop, maintain, and implement an operations
plan that ensures landfill operations are consistent with the design and
includes as a minimum:
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
48
(i)
operational procedures such as waste control, soil cover
operations, surface water management, and nuisance controls,
(ii)
waste acceptance procedures and policies,
(iii)
an emergency response program covering fires, releases, and medical
concerns, and
(iv)
for Class Ia, Ib, and II landfills, a remediation program to be
implemented if groundwater quality fails to meet performance
standards set out in Section 15.6(2)0).
(b)
JncompatJ.ole wastes shall be disposed in a manner that does not create
hazardous conditions.
(c)
Approval holders of Class Ia, Ib, and II landfills shall cover wastes with at
least 15 em of soil, or an alternative cover material approved by the EUB,
to control litter, prevent sp~ead of fires, minimize propagation of disease
vectors, reduce odours, and minimize infiltration of moisture. Waste shall
be covered within at least:
(d)
(i)
30 days from the last cover operation at landfills that receive less
than 1 000 tonnes of waste per year,
(ii)
15 days from the last cover operation at landfills that receive
between 1 000 and 3 000 tonnes of waste per year,
(iii)
7 days from the last cover operation at landfills that receive
between 3 000 and 5 000 tonnes of waste per year, and
(iv)
48 hours from the last cover operation at landfills that receive
between 5 000 and 10 000 tonnes of waste per year.
If soil is used as cover material, the approval holder is not required to
apply the required soil cover during the period between 15 November and
15 April, if the necessacy soil cover material cannot reasonably be
obtained.
(e)
The EUB may require increased frequency of cover, where deemed
necessary.
(f)
The approval holder for a Class III landfill shall cover wastes as necessary
to control nuisances such as litter, fires, disease vectors, odors, and dust.
(g)
The landfill shall be operated to minimize production of leachate, and
prevent the uncontrolled release of leachate from the site.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
49
(h)
Water that accumulates in a landfill trench shall be removed to avoid
contact with the waste.
(i)
Leachate, contaminated surface water, and contaminated groundwater
shall be treated and appropriately disposed.
(j)
Throughout the active life and post-closure period of a Class Ia, Ib, or II
landfill, the approval holder shall ensure that the groundwater quality
meets the performance standards listed in Table 15.1 in the uppermost
formation(s) at all groundwater monitoring wells.
Table 15.1
Performance Standards for Landfills
IParameter
IConcentration or Level
Total dissolved solids
2 OOOmg/L
Chloride
250mg!L
Sodium
200mg!L
Sulphate
500mg!L
Electrical Conductivity
2dS/m
Total Metals
CCME Interim Assessment Criteria for Water
Mineral Oil and Grease
site-specific
pH
6.5 to 8.5 units
(k)
The approval holder shall ensure that each groundwater monitoring well
location includes one groundwater monitoring well designed to allow
collection of groundwater samples from the uppermost formation(s).
(1)
The EUB may require the approval holder to construct and maintain
additional groundwater monitoring wells at each groundwater monitoring
well location, if there is more than one significant uppermost formation
underlying the landfill site.
(m)
The EUB may require the approval holder to construct and maintain
additional groundwater monitoring wells, if it is deemed necessary due to
the size, area, or hydrogeology of the landfill, or the nature of the waste
proposed to be accepted at the landfill.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
50
(n)
(o)
The groundwater monitoring wells for a Class ll landfill shall be:
(i)
at least 20 m inside the property boundary, and
(ii)
at least 10 m but not more than 60 m from the designed boundary
of the landfill.
During construction and operation of a landfill, the approval holder shall
selectively salvage and stockpile all topsoil as follows:
(i)
all topsoil stockpiles shall be located on undisturbed topsoil in a
location that is not affected by the landfill operations,
(ii)
topsoil shall not be used to meet daily cover requirements, and
(iii)
all topsoil stockpiles shall be contoured, stabilized, and seeded to
prevent soil loss by wind and water erosion.
(p)
A system must be in place to measure quantities of waste being placed in
the oilfield landfill. Weigh scales are one method (refer to
Section 15.10(l),Annual Reports).
(q)
Approval holders of oilfield landfills shall institute a program for
detecting and preventing the disposal of dangerous wastes at Class ll or
Class III landfills. Approval holders of Class III landfills shall institute a
program for detecting and preventing the disposal of dangerous oilfield
wastes and non-inert wastes at the landfill. For example, by:
•
randomly· inspecting incoming loads to ensure that they do not
contain wastes that are not authorized for the landfill, and by
maintaining records of these random inspections at the landfill,
and.
•
Continuous supervision of all off-loading operations and training
landfill personnel to recognize potentially dangerous oilfield
wastes.
(r)
Burning of wastes at oilfield landfills is prohibited.
(s)
The approval holder shall post signs at the landfill boundary providing the
following information:
(i)
the name of the approval holder,
(ii)
the landfill class,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
51
(iii)
any waste restrictions, and
(iv)
telephone numbers for:
the approval holder,
the local fire department,
Alberta Environmental Protection, Pollution Emergency
Response Team (1-800-222-6514)
applicable EUB Field Centre address and phone number,
and
the local police department.
15.7
(t)
The approval holder shall ensure that fires are extinguished immediately
upon detection.
(u)
The approval holder shall establish and maintain litter controls to
minimize the escape of litter and shall retrieve litter that is washed or
blown onto adjacent properties or accumulates on the landfill site.
(v)
The approval holder shall use artificial or natural barriers to control public
access to the landfill and prevent unauthorized vehicular traffic and illegal
dumping of wastes.
(w)
The approval holder shall ensure that no waste is deposited between the
property line and the designated boundaty of the landfill.
(x)
The approval holder must notify the EUB immediately in writing if
dangerous oilfield waste is discovered at a Class II landfill, or if
dangerous oilfield waste or non-inert waste is discovered at a Class ill
oilfield landfill.
Oilfield Landfill Classes
1.
Class Ia Oilfield Landfill
This class of oilfield landfill can accept solid oilfield waste, both dangerous and
non-dangerous, provided that the waste criteria in Section 15.8 are met. A
Class Ia oilfield landfill shall include, as a minimum, the following engineered
features:
(a)
Two liners ofwhich at least one is a geo-synthetic liner. The liner used
for primary containment must be compatible with all potentially accepted
waste types, and must exhibit .hydraulic conductivity of 1 x 1o-s m/sec or
less. Liners used for secondaty containment must be compatible with all
potentially accepted waste types and must exhibit hydraulic conductivity
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
52
of 1 x 1o-s m/sec or less. An engineered compacted clay liner, if used as
secondary containment, shall have a minimum thickness of 0.5 m.
2.
(b)
The approval holder shall ensure that the natural geologic materials
surrounding the secondary containment, together with the local
hydrogeologic flow regime shall be sufficient to retard the movement of
any potential containments.
(c)
A leachate collection and removal system above the primary liner.
(d)
A leak detection system between the two liners.
(e)
A run-on control system to prevent flow onto the active portion of the
landfill for events up to at least the peak discharge from the larger of a 1
in 25-year storm or snow melt event.
(f)
A run-off control system for the active portion of the landfill to collect
and control at least the run-off water volume resulting from the larger of a
1 in 25-year storm or snow melt event.
(g)
A site specific groundwater monitoring system consisting of groundwater
monitoring wells located in areas hydraulically upgradient and
downgradient of the landfill. The completion of the observation wells
shall be at adequate depths to provide an indication of the impact of the
landfill on water-bearing zones.
(h)
The landfill shall be developed and managed to prevent the production of
leachate by minimizing the am.Ount of moisture that enters the waste fill.
(i)
A suitable gas detection, interception, and venting or recovery system,
where gas generation is expected, so that all emissions meet AEP Ambient
Air Quality Guidelines.
Class lb Oilfield Landfill
This class of oilfield landfill can accept solid oilfield waste, both dangerous and
non-dangerous, provided that the waste criteria in Section 15.8 are met. A
Class Ib oilfield landfill shall include, as a minimum, the following engineered
features:
(a)
Primary containment consisting of a geosynthetic or engineered,
compacted clay liner which is compatible with all potentially accepted
wastes, and has a hydraulic conductivity of 1 x 1o-s m/sec or less.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
53
(b)
The approval holder shall ensure that natural geologic materials
surrounding the primary containment, together with the local
hydrogeolgic flow regime, shall be sufficient to retard the movement of
any potential containments.
(c)
A leachate collection and removal system above the primary liner.
(d)
A run-on control system to prevent flow onto the active portion of the
landfill for events up to at least the peak discharge from the larger of a 1
in 25-year storm or snow melt event.
(e)
A run-off control system for the active portion of the landfill to collect
and control at least the run-off water volume resulting from the larger of a
1 in 25-year storm or snow melt event.
(f)
A site spec:fic groundwater monitoring system consisting of groundwater
monitoring wells located in areas hydraulically upgradient and
downgradient of the landfill. The completion of the observation wells
shall be at adequate depths to provide an indication of the impact of the
landfill on water-bearing zones.
. (g)
The landfill shall be developed and managed to prevent the production of
leachate by minimizing the amount of moisture that enters the waste fill.
(h)
3. ·
A suitable gas detection, interception, and venting or recovery system,
where gas generation is expected, so that all emissions meet AEP Ambient
Air Quality Guidelines.
Class II Oilfield Landfill
This class of oilfield landfill can accept only non-dangerous solid oilfield waste.
A Class IT oilfield landfill shall include, as a minimum, the following engineered
features:
(a)
Primary containment consisting of a geosynthetic or engineered,
compacted clay liner which is compatible with all potentially accepted
wastes, and has a hydraulic conductivity of 1 x 1o-s m/sec or less, and a
leachate collection and removal system.
(b)
A run-on control system to prevent flow onto the active portion of the
landfill for events up to at least the peak discharge from the larger of a 1
in 25-year storm or snow melt event.
(c)
A run-off control system for the active portion of the landfill to collect
and control at least the run-off water volume resulting from the larger of a
1 in 25-year storm or snow melt event.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
54
(d)
A groundwater monitoring system consisting of at least one groundwater
monitoring well location hydraulically upgradient from the landfill, and
two groundwater monitoring well locations hydraulically downgradient
from the landfill. The completion of the obseiVation wells shall be at
adequate ~epths to provide an indication of the impact of the landfill on
water-bearing zones.
(e)
The landfill shall be developed and managed to prevent the production of
leachate by minimizing the amount of moisture that enters the waste fill.
(f)
A suitable gas detection, interception, and venting or recovery system,
where gas generation is expected, so that all emissions meet AEP Ambient
Air Quality Guidelines.
(g)
An approval holder constructing or expanding a Class II landfill may
develop a landfill design with an alternate feature to that required in
Section 15.7(3Xa) if:
(i)
the following hydrogeological conditions are met:
there is a 5 m thick layer of a clayey deposit having a
hydraulic conductivity less than 1 X 10-8 m/sec immediately
beneath all waste disposed at or below the original grade,
and
the hydraulic conductivity of the natural geologic materials
beneath the clayey deposit is less than 1 X 10-8 m/sec to a
depth of at least 6 m beneath the clayey deposit or provides
equivalent protection, or
(ii)
4.
the approval holder provides evidence in writing to the EUB that
groundwater quality will not exceed the performance standards set
out in Table 15.1 at all groundwater monitoring wells.
Class Ill Oilfield Landfill
This class of oilfield landfill can accept only non-dangerous, chemically inert and
non-leachable, solid oilfield wastes. Examples include demolition debris,
concrete, asphalt, glass, cement returns, scrap metal, brush and non-chemically
treated dry timber or wood. A Class ill oilfield landfill shall include as a
minimum, the following features:
(a)
Construction that provides for containment of the waste disposed.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
55
15.8
(b)
a run-on control system to prevent flow onto the active portion of the
landfill for events up to at least the peak discharge from the larger of a
1 in 25-year storm or snow melt event.
(c)
A run-off control system for the active portion of the landfill to collect
and control at least the run-off water volume resulting from the larger of a
1 in 25-year storm or snow melt event;
(d)
Materials should be crushed, chipped, or otherwise broken into small
pieces to facilitate compaction.
(e)
Groundwater monitoring may be required, where deemed necessary by the
EUB.
Waste Criteria
1.
2.
Waste Deposition·Limitations
(a)
Landfilling of liquid oilfield wastes is prohibited,
(b)
Oilfield wastes may be deposited in landfills approved by AEP, such as
landfills commonly descn'bed as municipal, regional, or industrial
landfills, provided that the landfill has design criteria appropriate for the
oilfield wastes being disposed,
(c)
It is the responsibility of the waste generator to determine the
characteristics of the waste. Based on that infonnation, and the
corresponding landfill design characteristics specified in Sections 15.6 and
15.7, the waste generator must then determine which class of oilfield
landfill or AEP approved landfill has the appropriate design criteria for
that type of waste, and
(d)
Solid dangerous oilfield wastes shall only be deposited in an approved
Class Ia or Ib Oilfield Landfill, or an AEP regulated landfill which is
approved to accept hazardous wastes.
Dangerous Oilfield Wastes
Only the following types of dangerous oilfield waste may be disposed in Class Ia
or Class Ib oilfield landfills, or AEP regulated landfills which are approved to
accept hazardous waste, as outlined in Section 15 .6, Oilfield Landfill Classes.
(a)
Solid dangerous oilfield waste containing one or more halogenated
· organic compounds in a combined concentration less than 1 000
milligrams per kilogram (mglkg) of which no more than 50 mglkg is
polychlorinated biphenyl; or
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
56
(b)
Solid dangerous oilfield waste containing one or more of the following
compounds in a combined concentration less than 1 000 mglkg:
-
acetone,
benzene,
n-butyl alcohol,
carbon disulphide,
cresol and cresylic acid,
cyclohexanone,
ethyl acetate,
ethyl benzene,
ethyl ether,
isobutanol,
methanol,
·methyl ethyl ketone,
nitrobenzene,
2-nitropropane,
pyridine,
toluene,
xylene, or
(c)
dangerous oilfield waste with a pH greater than 12.5, or
(d)
Any substance or mixture of substances that ignites and propagates
combustion according to the test methods that describe spontaneously
combustible dangerous wastes, provided that those substances or mixtures
of substances are not liable to ignite and propagate combustion under the
conditions of disposal, and are not liable to emit flammable gases under
the conditions of disposal, or
(e)
Solid dangerous oilfield waste producing a waste extract which contains
one or more of the following substances in a concentration less than the
value for that substance shown below:
arsenic
beryllium
cadmium
chromium (Ct)
lead
mercury
nickel
selenium
silver
thallium
500mglkg,
100mglkg,
100 mglkg,
500 mg/kg,
500 mglkg,
20mglkg,
500mglkg,
200mglkg,
100 mglkg,
200 mglkg.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
57
15.9
Monitoring and Analysis
1.
The approval holder shall conduct groundwater monitoring on a semi-annual
basis as required by the EUB throughout the active life, and by AEP throughout
the post-closure period of the landfill. The approval holder shall analyze the
samples for the parameters set out in Section 15.6(2)(j). The post-closure period
of a landfill is defined as the period of 25 years from the final closure of a
landfill, or as long as leachate that does not meet the performance standards for
landfills (listed in Table 15.1), is generated at a landfill after final closure.
2.
The EUB may:
(a)
require that groundwater samples be analyzed for parameters other than
those set out in Section 15.6(2)(j),
(b)
change the frequency of groundwater monitoring and analysis required
under section 15.9(1), or
(c)
require the approval holder to install additional groundwater monitoring
wells where it is deemed necessary due to the characteristics of waste
received at the landfill, changes in groundwater quality at the landfill, or
other evidence that suggests an impact on groundwater quality.
3.
Where groundwater at the landfill fails to meet the performance standards set out
in Section 15.6(2)(j), the approval holder shall notify the EUB and shall
implement the groundwater remediation plan developed under
Section 15.6(2)(a)(iv).
·
4.
Where groundwater monitoring is required, the approval holder shall:
5.
(a)
ensure that all groundwater monitoring wells are protected from damage
and are locked except when being sampled, and
(b)
clean, repair, or replace groundwater monitoring wells, which have been
damaged or are no longer able to produce representative groundwater
samples, prior to the next scheduled sampling date.
The approval holder shall conduct analyses of samples collected to meet these
requirements in the following manner:
(a)
for water and leachate samples, in accordance with the recommended test
methods listed in Appendix 3.0, and
(b)
for solid wastes samples, in accordance with the recommended test
methods listed in Appendix 3.0.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
58
15.10 Reporting Requirements
1.
Annual Reports
The approval holder of an oilfield landfill will be required by the approval to
operate, to prepare by 31 March of each year, a report ·containing the following
items and to make it available to EUB staff upon request:
2.
(a)
the type and volume of each major waste stream that was placed in the
landfill, and the loQations of disposal of wastes requiring special handling,
(b)
the groundwater monitoring data pursuant to Appendix 4.0, Requirements
for Site Assessment and Groundwater Protection,
(c)
survey records and as-built records for the landfill showing the location
and development of excavations, fill areas, final grades and structural
components,
(d)
the current version of design and operation plans for the landfill,
(e)
records of random inspections carried out under Section 15.6(2)(q), ·
(t)
records of personnel training carried out under Section 15.6(2)(q),
(g)
copies of any notices given to the EUB under Section 15.6(2Xx) regarding
hazardous or non-inert waste,
(h)
results of gas monitoring,
(i)
records of the quality of surface water released to the environment,
G)
volumes of leachate generated, if any, characterization of the leachate and
the method of disposal,
(k)
an interpretation of the requested data which should include identification
of any change in the quality of the groundwater, and
(1)
a remedial plan to correct any changes identified in (k) above.
Enforcement action may result if remedial action has not been instituted in
a timely fashion.
Record Keeping
In addition to the record keeping requirements outlined in Section 11.8, the
approval holder shall maintain the following records until the end of the postclosure period:
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
59
3.
(a)
waste generator identification, type of major waste stream, volume, and
approximate location where the material was landfilled, and
(b)
initial site assessment groundwater sample data.
Closure, Post-Closure, and Reclamation Requirements
The reclamation plan, as laid out during the initial design of the landfill, is to be
incorporated throughout the operational life of the landfill. Prior to final closure
of the landfill, the approval holder shall notify the EUB in writing of the intent to
close the landfill. The approval holder shall begin closure no later than 180 days
after the landfill or trench reaches its final design elevation, and complete closure
no later than 180 days after the beginning of closure.
The post-closure period of a landfill is defined as the period of 25 years from the
final closure of a landfill, or as long as leachate that does not meet the
performance standards for landfills (listed in Table 15.1) is generated at a landfill
after final closure.
Upon final closure of landfills, the jurisdiction transfers to AEP for post-closure
and reclamation requirements. Upon final closure of the landfill, the following
components must be included, and/or any other requirements deemed necessary
by AEP:
(a)
The approval holder must maintain records of the type of materials buried
on-site, and the burial location and depth. These records shall be made
available to AEP staff upon req~est.
(b)
All monitoring and analysis data shall be made available to AEP staff on
request.
(c)
The closure and reclamation plan, which is laid out during the initial
design of the landfill and submitted as part of the original application,
shall be completed and include the following information:
(i)
a description of the proposed final cover system, and the
installation methods, and procedures,
(ii)
an estimate of the maximum quantity of wastes on-site over the
active life of the landfill,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
60
(iii)
a description of how the following elements have been or will be
dealt with:
the final use of the reclaimed areas,
drainage restoration,
soil replacement,
final cover slopes,
erosion control,
revegetation and conditioning of the site, and
subsidence remediation.
(d)
(e)
(iv)
a schedule for completing closure and reclamation, and
(v)
a detailed landfill site assessment which shall clearly identify
landfill impacts, nature, and extent of any contamination.
At closure of the landfill or any trench, the approval holder shall install a
final cover system designed to and constructed to:
(i)
provide long term minimization of migration of liquids through the
closed landfill,
(ii)
function with minimum maintenance,
(iii)
minimize erosion or abrasion of the cover, and
(iv)
accommodate settling and subsidence and be resistant to
burrowing activity of animals and root penetration so that the
cover's integrity is maintained.
The approval holder shall ensure that the final cover system meets the
following requirements, and shall construct the layers in the following
order:
(i)
the final cover system shall include a barrier layer of 0.6 m of a
maximum permeability of 1 x 10"7 m/sec, or of alternate material
that will achieve equivalent protection,
(ii)
subsoil shall be placed as the second layer of the final cover
system and salvaged topsoil as the third layer of the final cover
system as follows:
required subsoil shall be spread evenly over the barrier
layer, and
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
61
all salvaged topsoil shall be spread evenly over the replaced
subsoil,
(iii)
the depths of the replaced topsoil and subsoil shall be equal to the
depths determined at the landfill site prior to its construction, or
shall meet the following minimum requirements:
for pasture or recreational uses, 0.20 m of topsoil and
0.35 m of subsoil, and
for cultivated land use or forestry, 0.20 m of topsoil and
0.80 m of subsoil,
(iv)
after the subsoil and topsoil are replaced,
water permeability and rooting in topsoil or subsoil shall
not be restricted, and
vegetation shall be established with a suitable seed mixture
compatible with the intended land use,
(v)
(f)
(g)
the final cover system shall have a final topography that ensures
that water does not pool over the landfill area with a minimum
final grade of 5 per cent, and a maximum final grade of 30 per
cent.
Following final closure of the landfill, the approval holder shall notify the
EUB in writing, verifying that:
(i)
closure has been completed in accordance with the closure and
reclamation plan and these requirements, and
(ii)
the landfill area is compatible with the proposed end land use.
After final closure of the landfill and during the post-closure period, the
approval holder shall:
(i)
maintain the integrity of the final cover system and diversion and
drainage structures, and make repairs to the cover system as
necessary to correct the effects of settling, subsidence, erosion, or
other events,
(ii)
maintain, operate, and monitor the groundwater monitoring, leak
detection, leachate collection, and gas venting or recovery systems,
where such systems or structures are installed,
·
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
62
(iii)
protect and maintain surveyed benchmarks, and
(iv)
anything else deemed necessary by AEP.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
63
16.0 Biodegradation
16.1
Introduction
The purpose of this section is to establish minimum requirements for the design and
operation of techniques and facilities used for the biodegradation of oilfield wastes.
These requirements will ensure that:
•
effective waste treatment occurs rather than dilution,
•
there is minimal potential for the transfer of contaminants to another medium, and
•
extensive clean-up of the facility or treatment site will not be necessary at the
time of closure.
The biodegradation techniques and facilities addressed by this document include:
•
on-site land treatment of a single application of hydrocarbon contaminated soil or
pit/pond sludge, and
•
biocelllbiopile treatment or facilities.
Land treatment, biopile, and biocell are techniques commonly used to aerobically
biodegrade hydrocarbon contaminated soils and sludges. Biodegradation is a catabolic
process conducted by soil residing microorganisms, in which hydrocarbon is used as a
source of carbon to satisfy the microorganisms' energy and cellular growth needs.
As the process is microbiologically driven, the strategy for successful biodegradation
involves optimizing conditions for microbial activity, such as temperature, pH, moisture,
nutrient, and oxygen levels. In addition, the hydrocarbon must be biodegradable and not
toxic to the microorganisms. Carbon dioxide, water, and non-toxic residue compounds
are the expected products of the microbiological process.
As oilfield wastes can contain more than one type of contaminant, some of which may be
poorly degradable or non-degradable, the potential for successful biodegradation of
oilfield wastes varies. Within the upstream petroleum industty, hydrocarbon
contaminated soils and sludges have been successfully biodegraded. Biodegradation
success is typically greatest when the hydrocarbon contaminant consists of low molecular
weight aromatics and aliphatics. Hydrocarbon contaminants containing a large fraction
of asphaltenes or nitrogen and sulphur rich heterocyclic compounds may take a long time
to degrade and may even produce toxic intermediates.
Sites receiving multiple applications of oilfield wastes are considered dedicated land
treatment facilities, which in the past the EUB approved as a component or type of
oilfield waste management facility. In late 1995 a task group was established to review
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
64
and update the AEP document Guidelines for Land Treatment ofIndustrial Waste. The
EUB is a member of this task group and during the interim, while these guidelines are
being revised to reflect today's legislation, policy, and environmental science, the EUB
will not accept, review, or approve any applications for new dedicated land treatment
facilities. However, previously approved dedicated land treatment facilities will be
allowed to continue to operate provided they are operated in accordance with their EUB
approval. As well, during this interim period the EUB will not accept, review, or
approve applications for the expansion of existing approved land treatment facilities.
16.2
On-Site Land Treatment of a Single Application of Non-Refined Hydrocarbon
Contaminated Soil or Pit/Pond Sludge on an Active Oil and Gas Site
1.
Introduction
Land treatment is defined as a planned and controlled mixing of the waste and
surface soil in which the inherent soil processes are used to biodegrade,
transform, and assimilate waste constituents. The oilfield wastes that are
appropriate for this technique are limited to non-refined hydrocarbon
contaminated soils resulting from spills/leaks and non-refined hydrocarbon
contaminated pit/pond sludges. As previously described in section 11.9, all
decontamination and land reclamation activities, regardless of whether the sites
are active or inactive, are the regulatory responsibility of AEP. Approval holders
and licensees must comply with the one-time-only land treatment protocol
descnoed in the following subsections unless otherwise directed or approved by
AEP. Approval holders and licensees wanting to deviate from this protocol (i.e.
use a risk approach or Tier II approach) must obtain approval from AEP.
Considerations for using land treatment include:
•
The wastes must be suscepttole to biodegradation in the soil environment,
create no offensive odours at the site boundaries, and not pollute
groundwater.
•
On-site land treatment is limited to those situations where non-refined
hydrocarbon contaminated soils resulting from spills/leaks and nonrefined hydrocarbon contaminated pit/pond sludges are land treated in a
single application of the waste.
•
The wastes must be land treated on the site on which they were generated
and the licensee or approval holder of the site must address the procedures
in the following sub-sections to ensure that no adverse environmental or
health consequences occur.
•
On-site land treatment operations must not compromise the ability to
restore the site to meet reclamation certification requirements.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November.1996
65
•
Land treatment is not an option if more than one application is required to
accommodate the volume of waste.
Licensees and/or approval holders of oil and gas sites must keep in mind that
other treatment and disposal options such as soil washing, solvent extraction,
biopile, biocell, thermal treatment, stabilization/solidification, and approved
landfill disposal may be more applicable in some situations.
2.
Assessment Information
Approval holders or licensees are not required to submit applications or
information to the EUB for on-site, one-time land treatment operations occurring
on active oil and gas sites. The approval holder or licensee of the site must
document thei~ activities, and supply this documentation to EUB or AEP staff
upon request.
Because inappropriate spreading of wastes on land can damage soil that currently
is not degraded, approval holders or licensees must ensure that on-site land
treatment operations will not compromise future land capability. The framework
described in this section is guided by the environmental objective ofpresetvation
or restoration of equivalent capability of the land and is designed to minimize the
occurrence ofunnecessacy environmental damage. It is not acceptable, in the
process of dealing with a volume of concentrated waste to create a second, larger
albeit less concentrated, contaminated site.
Appropriate and comprehensive site and waste characterization are required to
determine whether the site and receiving soil are conducive to land treatment and
whether the waste is susceptible to biodegradation. Parameters that have proven
to be of concern historically include hydrocarbon content, salt content, pH, metal
concentrations, and environmentally persistent compounds such as halogenated
organics.
A representative sample of the waste and receiving soil must, as a minimum, be
analyzed for the following:
•
pH
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
electrical conductivity (EC)
major soluble ions (Ca, Mg, Na, and Cl,)
total metals (as per AEP Tier I Criteria)
sodium adsorption ratio (SAR)
texture (soil only)
bulk density (waste only)
hydrocarbon concentration (waste only)
extractable organic halogen (waste only)
assessment of the waste for suitability of biodegradation
(i.e. hydrocarbon fractionation, treatability study, waste characterization)
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
66
On-site land treatment of oilfield waste as once-only application is possible if the
following factors are met:
(a)
· The waste material contains less than 2 ppm organic halogen.
(b)
The land treatment site does not have a slope that exceeds 5 per cent and
is at least 100 meters away from any permanent body of water.
(c)
The receiving soil (0-15 em depth) does not exceed AEP Tier I Criteria
for EC, SAR, metals, and pH.
(d)
The maximum depth of the treatment zone must be at least 1 metre above
the seasonally high water table. For groundwater protection the hydraulic
conductivity of the subsurface soil below the treatment zone should be
low. It is recommended that the subsoil exhibit a hydraulic conductivity
of 10-s em/sec or less.
(e)
Available area of receiving soil will result in a maximum spread rate of 75
kg waste per square metre (750 tonne per ha) or a waste to soil mix ratio
of 1:4 by volume. This rate of application is not to be exceeded.
Contaminated materials in excess of this capacity must be dealt with by
other treatment means.
(f)
After mixing the waste material with the receiving soil (assuming
maximum mixing depth of 15 em) the treatment zone meets the following:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
(v)
maximum metal concentration does not exceed AEP Tier I
Criteria,
EC does not exceed 4 dS/m,
maximum hydrocarbon concentration does not exceed 2 percent by
mass,
SAR. does not exceed 6 (Note: if waste material alone does not
exceed 2 then SAR. determination after mixing is not required),
and
pH is between 6.5 and 8.5.
(g)
The maximum predicted time required to reduce the hydrocarbon
concentration in the treatment zone to less than 0.1 per cent by mass does
not exceed 5 years.
(h)
Application of wastes does not occur during the period from October 15 to
the next April 30, during rainfall periods, or at other times when the soil is
saturated with water, ice-covered, snow-covered, or frozen.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
67
3.
lnfonnation Documentation
Information to verify that the factors listed in points (a) through (h) in
subsection 2, Assessment Information above have been met, must be documented.
Other information that must be documented for on-site land treatment of a single
application of oilfield waste includes:
(a)
soil horizon used for the treatment zone (Note: Land treatment conducted
on subsoils, i.e. C horizon, may have reduced potential in meeting the 0.1
per cent hydrocarbon treatment target.),
(b)
soil classification of the treatment site to the subgroup level (Agriculture
Canada Expert Committee on Soil Survey 1987},
·
(c)
number, location, and depth of samples taken to characterize the treatment
area,
(d)
sketch of the site identifying the treatment area and other key features
such as slope, topography, and drainage features,
(e)
area of land availab~e for land treatment,
(f)
volume of waste land treated (cubic metres),
(g)
waste application rate,
(h)
date of application,
(i)
photo of the treatment area,
(j)
estimated biodegradation period (years),
(k)
description of application method and depth of application,
(1)
amendments added to the treatment area (types, rates, and frequency), and
(m)
confirmation treatment zone analyses (hydrocarbon concentration, pH,
and EC) to verify successful biodegradation.
The documented information must be retained until a reclamation certificate for
the site has been issued, and must be made available to EUB or AEP staff upon
request.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
68
16.3
Biocell and Biopile Treatment or Facilities
1.
Introduction
Biocell or oiopile techniques refer to the processes where oilfield wastes are
biologically degraded in a contained and controlled environment, whether it is in
an impermeable cell structure or piled on an impermeable liner. These techniques
should be considered as alternatives to land treatment.
Biopile and biocell treatments may be of particular interest when:
•
Site conditions are not suitable for land treatment.
•
The volume of waste precludes one-time, on-site land treatment.
•
Biodegradation of the organic contaminant is an intermediate step to make
the waste suitable for another treatment or disposal option.
•
The waste is intended to be used as fill material after successful
biodegradation (i.e. material is excavated, treated, and then replaced).
Once the biodegradation process is complete the material must be removed from
the contained system and forwarded for further treatment or disposal, or returned
to the originating site to be used as fill material if it meets acceptable criteria.
Biocells and biopiles must not be used for final disposition of waste materials.
2.
General Requirements
Approval holders or licensees choosing to use biocells or biopiles for a one-time,
on-site treatment of an oilfield waste on an active oil and gas or oil sands site are
not required to apply to the EUB for approval. However, approval holders or
licensees must document their activities including the system design, the type,
volume, and characterization of the waste treated, and the final disposition of the
treated material. Upon request, this information must be made available to EUB
staff.
.
Approval holders or licensees constructing permanent biocells or biopiles on an
existing EUB approved oil and gas or oil sands site for the purpose of
biodegrading oilfield wastes generated at one or more of that approval holder's or
licensee's facilities must submit an application for approval of modification to the
facility. The application for modification shall address the information required
in Section 26.0, Biodegradation Facilities- Specific Application Information.
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69
Permanent biopiles or biocells constructed on a stand alone site require EUB
approval as an oilfield waste management facility. Facilities that accept material
from various sites as well as various companies will be considered third party
waste receivers.
While this section outlines the primary criteria considered appropriate for biocell
or biopile treatment, operators should refer to Sections 21.0 and 26.0 for the
information req'Q.ired in an application for approval to construct or operate an
oilfield biocell or biopile.
All biopiles and biocells shall comply with the requirements (siting, safety, waste
characterization, design and operation, record keeping, and closure) outlined in
Section 11.0, Oilfield Waste Management Facilities.
3.
Siting
Although conducting the biodegradation process in a controlled system minimizes
the potential for the transfer of contaminants to the soil, groundwater, and
perhaps even the atmosphere, biopiles and biocells shall comply with the siting
requirements outlined in Section 11.2, Siting Issues. In addition, potential sites
shall be chosen so that the seasonally high water table is at least 1 metre below
the base or bottom of the biopile or biocell.
4.
Design and Operation
Although the key treatment process occurring within biocells and biopiles is
biodegradation of the organic contaminant, if designed for it, these facilities may
also be potentially used to leach and collect water soluble contaminants, such as
salts, from the waste.
Biopiles typically are constructed on grade (the ground surface) and the waste
material is laid in a pile or in windrows on an impervious liner or base pad. The
material may be aerated by physically turning over the pile or windrows.
Nutrients and moisture may be topically applied, or some designs may
incorporate perforated pipes throughout the pile as the waste material is being laid
down for the purpose of adding air, nutrients, or moisture. Some designs may
also cover the pile for collection of off-gases such as highly volatile organics or
C02 •
Monitoring the C02 level can provide insight to the activity levels of the
microorganisms responsible for biodegradation and may aid in determining when
additional nutrients, air, or moisture is required or when the degradation process
is nearing completion.
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Within the scope of this document, the main difference between a biopile and a
biocell is that a biocell consists of a walled containment system that may be
constructed on grade or below grade. The waste material is then laid within the
containment system.
In addition to the general design and operation requirements outlined in
Section 11.6, Design and Operation the following requirements also apply.
(a)
Biopiles and Biocells Used for One-Time Treatment
Biopiles and biocells used for a one-time, on-site treatment of oilfield
waste shall, as a minimum, consist of a containment device and a leachate
collection system.
(i)
Containment Device
The containment device shall consist of a curbed (at least 15 em in
height) impermeable liner that is chemically resistant to the
material being treated and exhibits a hydraulic conductivity of
1o-7 em!sec or less (i.e. an engineered compacted clay liner with a
minimum thickness of O.Sm, a minimum of 30 mil geosynthetic
liner, or current accepted standards), or of a steel, plastic,
:fibreglass reinforced plastic, or concrete vessel.
(ii)
Leachate Collection System
The leachate collection system shall be designed to allow for the
collection of any generated leachate, or in systems open to the
atmosphere, precipitation.
Note: In situations where the soil conditions of the lease exhibit
limited permeability (i.e. hydraulic conductivity of
10-6 em/sec or less) and the contaminants within the waste
material are relatively non-leachable, the waste material
may be biodegraded on a prepared surface of the lease.
This includes preparation of a base for the containment
system (i.e. removal of A horizon and B horizon soils, and
preparation of the C horizon soil for the base pad) and
incorporation of the leachate collection system.
To use this option operators must verify that the hydraulic
conductivity of the prepared surface is 10-6 em/sec or less and
assess the leachability of the waste. The waste material must not
exceed an EC of 4 dS/m, SAR of 6, and hydrocarbon
concentration of 2 per cent by mass. As well, a leachate of the
waste prepared using the TCLP method, must not exceed the
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
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71
concentrations for BTEX and metals (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Pb,
Hg, Mo, Ni, Se, Zn) in the CCME Interim Assessment Criteria for
Water.
(b)
Permanent .Biopiles and Biocells
Permanent biopiles and biocells shall consist of a:
•
primaiy containment device, a secondary containment system, a
leachate collection system, and a leak detection system, or
•
primaiy containment device, a leachate collection system and a
groundwater monitoring system.
(i)
Primary Containment Device
The primaiy containment device for a biocell shall consist of a
impermeable liner or a steel, plastic, fibreglass reinforced plastic,
or concrete tank or vault, while that for a biopile may consist of a
curbed (at least 15 em in height) impermeable liner or a curbed
asphalt or concrete base pad.
Licensees and/or approval holders must be able to verify that liners
used for primaiy containment meet the criteria specified in
Section 16.3(4Xa)(i), on Containment Devices.
(ii)
Secondary Containment System
The secondary containment system shall consist of an
impermeable clay or synthetic liner that is chemically resistant to
the material being treated and exhibits a hydraulic conductivity of
10-6 em/sec or less (i.e. 0.5 metres or more of an engineered
compacted compacted clay liner, a minimum of30 mil
geos}rnthetic liner or current accepted standards). Licensees and/or
approval holders must be able to verify that the liner meets the
above criteria.
(iii)
Leachate Collection System
The leachate collection system shall meet the requirements
outlined in Section 16.3(4)(a)(ii), on Leachate Collection System.
(iv)
Leak Detection System
Licensees and/or approval holders must be able to monitor the
interstitial space between the primaiy containment device and the
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
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72
secondary containment device to ensure the primary containment
device is not leaking (i.e. incorporation of engineered seepage
pathways flowing to a monitoring well).
When the biopile or biocell is in use, the leak detection system
must be sampled on a monthly basis and if any liquid is present, it
must be field tested for pH, chlorides, hydrocarbon odour, and
visible hydrocarbon sheen. If there is indication of a problem
from the monthly tests, then laboratory analysis should be
performed for verification and then followed by appropriate
corrective measures if necessary.
(v)
Groundwater Monitoring
Applicants wishing to construct a permanent biopile or biocell that
consists of only a primary containment system and leachate
collection system shall be required to incorporate into the design, a
groundwater monitoring system that will provide an early
indication of potential groundwater impact. Refer to
Appendix 4.0, Requirements for Site Assessment and Groundwater
Protection.
(c)
Other Operational Requirements
The following operational requirements also apply to all biopiles and
biocells (permanent as well as those used for one-time treatment):
(i)
Prior to treatment, a representative sample of the oilfield waste
must, as a minimum, be analyzed for the following:
pH
EC
major soluble ions (Ca, Mg, Na, and Cl,)
total metals (as per AEP Tier I Criteria)
hydrocarbon concentration
extractable organic halogens
(ii)
The success of the treatment shall be verified by analyzing the
treated material for the parameters listed in point (i) above. If the
original analyses indicated that levels of salts, metals, or
extractable organic halogens were not a problem then those
parameters may not have to be repeated. Depending upon the final
disposition the treated material may require further testing. It is
the responsibility of the licensee and/or approval holder of the site
on which the treatment system is located to characterize the
material to verify it's suitability for final disposition.
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73
(iii)
In the event of any volatile or particulate emissions, the operator
shall incorporate adequate controls to mitigate any potential
problems.
5.
Reporting and Record Keeping
In addition to the record keeping requirements outlined in Section 11.8, Record
Keeping the following requirements also apply.
Licensee and/or approval holders of sites on which biopiles and/or biocells
(permanent or one-time) are constructed shall, for each volume of oilfield waste
biodegraded, document the following information and retain it on site for a
minimum of two years beyond the date the biodegraded material was removed
from the treatment system. The following information must be made available to
EUB staff upon request:
(a)
the type, volume, origin, generator, and analyses, as per 16.3(4)(c)i), of
the waste material,
(b)
the types and application rates of any amendments added to enhance the
biodegradation process,
(c)
the volume of any leachate collected and how it was disposed,
(d)
the analyses of the treated material, as per 16.3(4)(c)ii), to verify the
material meets the criteria for the next treatment or disposal option,
(e)
where the treated material was transferred (name and location of the site
or facility) for final disposition or for further treatment,
(f)
if applicable, the leak detection results, and
(g)
if applicable, the groundwater monitoring results (which must be retained
for a minimum of five years).
Note: The EUB Calgary office and AEP must be notified if any of the
monitoring results indicate a concern. The notification shall descnoe:
the parameters that changed,
the investigative work conducted, and
any remedial or corrective work that has occurred or is proposed.
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74
6.
Closure
In addition to the closure requirements outlined in Section 11.9, licensees and/or
approval holders of sites that have used a biocell or biopile for a one-time, on-site
treatment of oilfield waste will be required after biodegradation is complete, to
remove the treated material, to dismantle the biocell or biopile, and to return the
site of the treatment area to equivalent land capability. Operators will be required
to document their closure activities, and to retain this information for a minimum
of two years beyond the date equivalent land capacity was achieved. This
information must be made available to EUB and AEP staff upon request.
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75
17.0 Thermal Treatment
17.1
Introduction
The purpose of this section is to establish the minimum requirements for the design and
operation of fixed thermal treatment facilities and to provide general information for
non-fixed thermal treatment facilities used to treat oilfield wastes.
Thermal treatment is an effective method for removing organic components in oilfield
waste and includes:
incineration,
thermal oxidation,
thermal desorption,
thermal phase separation, and
thermal distillation recovery.
In these requirements, thermal treatment refers to:
Any process involving the use of heat to remove contaminants from, or destroy
contaminants in, an oilfield waste material.
The treatment may involve destruction, recovery or reduction of the contaminants and/or
the was~ material in which it is found. Although these requirements were developed
based on the above removal and destruction technologies, the requirements will apply,
where applicable, to other thermal treatment technologies as they become commercially
available in Alberta.
Thermal treatment techriologies and facilities addressed in this section include small
batch feed incinerators, campsite incinerators, and fixed thermal treatment facilities.
•
Small batch feed incinerators, which are not allowed to burn more than ten tonnes
of waste per month, and campsite incinerators operating at oil and gas or oil sands
facilities do not require approval from the EUB provided they meet the criteria ·
specified in Sections 17.3 and 17.4.
•
All other fixed thermal treatment facilities, operating at oil and gas, oil sands, or
oilfield waste management facilities must be approved by the EUB; refer to
Part E, for information required in the application for approval to construct and
operate a thermal treatment facility.
•
Non-dangerous oilfield waste may be incinerated at AEP regulated incinerators
that are approved to incinerate non-hazardous or hazardous wastes. The
incinerator must also be approved to accept third party waste.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
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76
•
Dangerous oilfield waste may be incinerated at AEP regulated incinerators that
are approved to incinerate hazardous wastes. The incinerator must also be
approved to accept third party waste.
The use of AEP approved mobile thermal treatment units on oil and gas facilities is
discussed in Section 17.5, Mobile Thermal Treatment Units.
17.2
Thermal Treatment Faci~ities Requiring Approval to Operate
This subsection applies to fixed thermal treatment facilities that do not meet the criteria
descn"bed for small batch feed or campsite incinerators. An application containing
information outlined in Part E, must be submitted to the EUB. Successful applicants will
receive an "Oilfield Thermal Treatment Facility Approval" from the EUB. No on-site
construction work or test bums shall commence prior to receiving the approval.
Thermal treatment facilities shall comply with the requirements (siting, safety, waste
characterization, EIA, design and operation, site assessment and groundwater protection,
record keeping, and closure) outlined in ~ection 11.0, Oilfield Waste Management
Facilities.
1.
Siting Issues
Siting of thermal treatment facilities must consider the following issues:
regional geology,
hydrogeology,
topography,
set-back distances,
adjacent land uses,
future land uses,
environmental sensitive areas, and
public impact.
In addition to the general siting requirements in Section 11.2, Siting Issues for all
oilfield waste management facilities, special consideration should be given to air
quality issues and dispersion characteristics in the local area.
2.
Waste Feed Restrictions
Certain waste feed restrictions may be identified in an approval depending on the
thermal treatment technology and process being used (i.e. a limitation could be
placed on the halogenated organics content in the waste feed stream). These
restrictions will be individually reviewed for each application.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
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77
Waste feed streams must not contain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The
waste stream should be classified in accordance with Part B, Section 5.0,
Procedures for Classifying Waste and must not contain detectable PCBs using the
test method selected from Appendix 3.0, Recommended Test Methods.
3.
Design Parameters
The application for approval must specify the key parameters which would
indicate the successful destruction or removal of contaminants and the success of
pollution control equipment. The limiting operating values of these parameters
must be identified with a discussion of why the identified limits apply.
For traditional incineration technologies this may include:
primary chamber temperature,
prlmaiy chamber pressure,
afterburner temperature,
afterburner residence time,
afterburner excess oxygen,
treated material residence time, and
exit temperatures.
For thermal desorption technologies some or all of the previous may apply, as
well as:
gas exit temperature from the vapour cooler, and
carbon bed pressure drop.
4.
Operating Practices
(a)
Waste Handling and Storage
Waste materials must be stored in accordance with the EUB ID 95-03 and
Guide G-55 Storage Requirements for the Upstream Petroleum Industry.
Stored waste volumes must not exceed six months processing volume.
Written operating practices must be maintained at the operating site which
identify the receiving, unloading and segregation practices for all potential
waste streams.
(b)
Operating and Safe Work Procedures
In addition to a corporate emergency response plan, written operating
procedures must be maintained on-site which address start-up, shutdown,
emergency shutdown, and other safe work procedures as required. These
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
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78
procedures must be designed to control the emission or discharge of
contaminants or untreated material during start-ups and shut downs.
(c)
Upsets
All equipment must be equipped with an automatic alarm system to be
triggered when preset levels of the key design parameters are not met.
Alarms must be designed to provide an indication of impending upset
conditions. Written operating practices detailing the appropriate response
to each alarm must be maintained on site.
(d)
Feed Conditioning
Conditioning of the feed, such as a thorough mixing with processed or
uncontaminated materials is acceptable, provided that the mixing is done
for operational purposes. To ensure compliance with the operating
approval, waste stream characterization must be performed prior to feed
conditioning. However, dangerous oilfield wastes must not be mixed with
any solid or liquid for the primary purpose of dilution to avoid any
Alberta regulatory requirement.
5.
Residuals Management
Subject to characterization ofboth the solid and liquid residual materials
produced from thermal treatment operations, reuse, recycle or disposal options
may be chosen. Part B, Section 5.0, Procedures for Classifying Waste gives
guidance on how to conduct this characterization. Licensees and/or approval
holders of thennal treatment processes must ensure that they inform the oilfield
waste generator of the capabilities of their system so that the generator can assess
the liabilities associated with the treated material.
(a)
Solid Residuals
Providing the residual material meets AEP Tier I Criteria, suitable options
include using it as on-site fill material or as landfill cover material. If
treatment did not occur on-site, ash or treated soils may be returned to the
oilfield waste generator's site.
The use of treated materials as landfill cover must not contravene any
conditions in the AEP or EUB landfill licence or approvals and may
require written agreement of AEP or EUB ..
Ash or. processed soils may be landfilled provided it is tested and meets
the requirements of Section 15.0, Oilfield Landfills.
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79
(b)
Liquid Residuals
Liquid residuals should be collected and reused in the process as much as
possible. Collected liquids which will not be reused may be recycled as
long as the characteristics of the material meet all receiver specifications
for that product stream. Cooling water may be treated and released to
surface provided that it is tested and meets the criteria in
Section 11.6(2)(b), Design and Operations prior to a controlled release.
Alternatively, liquids may be injected into waste disposal wells approved
to handle the liquids or they may be disposed in any other manner
approved by the EUB.
6.
Emissions Criteria
Operations at thermal treatment facilities must not result in environmental
damage or risk to public safety. Typically, facilities will be expected to achieve
the emission levels identified in the following table.
Table 17.1- Stack Discharge Limits (at 11 per cent Oxygen)
Parameter
Hydrogen Chloride
Particulates
Visible Emissions - Opacity
Emission Limit
75mg/Rm3
20m~
5 per cent (averaged over 6 consecutive
minutes)
Carbon Monoxide
57mg/Rm3
Dioxins and Furans
0.5 mg/Rm3
Sulphur Dioxide
260mg/Rm3
Oxides ofNitrogen
400mg/Rm3
Destruction and Removal Efficiency 99.99 per cent
mg/RmJ-
milligrams per dry cubic metre at a reference pressure of
1 atmosphere and reference temperature of 25 o C.
Stack emission levels for a facility are dependent on a number of parameters
which include:
volume of waste being treated,
type of waste being treated,
technology being used, and
site specific requirem~nts.
Applicants should consult the following guidelines to identify the specific
emissions criteria which pertains to their thermal treatment process in developing
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
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80
their application information. Supporting data must be provided with
explanations for the choice of criteria.
7.
•
National Guidelines for Hazardous Waste Incineration Facilities, Design
and Operating Criteria, Volume 1. Canadian Council of Ministers of the
Environment, March 1992.
•
Operating and Emissions Guidelines for Municipal Solid Waste
Incinerators. Report CC:ME-TS/WM-TRE003. June, 1989.
Test Burns and Compliance Tests
For further details on requirements for test bums or compliance tests, refer to the
''National Guidelines for Hazardous Waste Incineration Facilities, Design and
Operating Criteria, Volume 1", Canadian Council of Ministers of the
Environment, March 1992.
(a)
TestBums
The main objective of a test bum is to acquire quantitative data that will
be representative of the actual thermal treatment operations. These tests
are conducted to ensure that the facility can properly treat the waste and
meet all performance requirements and contaminant emission limits.
Successful completion of a test bum will be a condition of an EUB
approval to operate. The application for approval to construct and operate
a thermal treatment facility must outline the test bum protocol that will be
followed. Information in the application should include:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
(v)
waste type(s) and source(s),
waste feed characterization, including the sampling and analysis
methods used,
parameters to be monitored in all effluent streams, including
sampling and analysis methods used,
operating parameters such as temperature, air flow rate, mass flow
rate, waste feed rate, residence time, total hydrocarbons and
combustion and destruction efficiencies (if applicable), and
the time period over which the test will be conducted.
Further testing may also be required for approved facilities if the operator
wishes to:
change the facility design or operating conditions,
alter the waste feed stream matrix, or
if the principle contaminants in the waste feed changes.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
81
(b)
Compliance Testing
Compliance testing may be required on certain approved thermal
treatment facilities. The need for compliance tests will depend on the
thermal treatment technology being used and other factors such as the
monitoring procedures at the facility. The purpose of conducting these
tests is to ensure that the facility continues to comply with existing
standards and the requirements identified in the facility approval.
The need to conduct compliance testing and the procedures and
requirements to follow during a test will be determined for each individual
facility. The frequency of testing will be identified in the facility
approval.
8.
Monitoring and Reporting
In addition to the record keeping requirements in Section 11.8 Record Keeping,
for all oilfield waste management facilities, the following requirements also
apply.
(a)
Inspections
Daily inspections of the facility must be conducted to detect leakage,
spills, corrosion, hot spots, and malfunctions. Equipment shall be
examined for wear and signs of leaks. Results of these inspections should
be reeorded in the daily operations log with operational changes made to
correct deficiencies.
(b)
Process and Stack Emission Monitoring
The key parameters which indicate the successful destruction or removal
of contaminants and successful pollution control operations should be
monitored on a continuous basis. Where continuous monitoring is not
employed, alternative monitoring or operational methods which would
prevent operating upsets must be identified in the application.
Ambient air quality monitoring may also be required by the specific
treatment facility approval.
(c)
Groundwater Monitoring
A comprehensive groundwater monitoring program must be included in
the design, operation, and decommissioning of a thermal treatment facility
that requires approval to operate from the EUB.
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82
(d)
Monthly Documentation
Licensees and/or approval holders of thermal treatment facilities must
document the following information and retain it on-site for a minimum
of two ye~s. The following information must be made available to EUB
staff upon request:
(i)
(ii)
a balance of opening inventory (waste materials and residuals) for
each month,
· for each receipt of waste material, the volume, source, generator,
type (characterization), and date received,
(e)
(iii)
the volume of waste material thermally treated (daily) including
the volume of residuals generated (liquids and solids),
(iv)
the daily operational information from the continuous process and
emission monitors, including identifying and briefly explaining
any occurrences lasting more than 60 minutes where operating
parameters or emission limits were not met,
(v)
a closing inventory balance for the month identifying total
volumes of waste materials received, total volume thermally
treated, total volume of waste material waiting for treatment,
volume of residuals sent for disposal, and the name and location of
the disposal facility, and volume of residuals stored on site, and
(vi)
copies of all analyses conducted for the purposes of feed
characterization.
Annual Report
Licensees and/or approval holders of thermal treatment facilities must
summarize the monthly information and prepare an annual report by
March 31 of each year. This report which must be retained on site for a
minimum of 2 years and made available to EUB staff upon request, shall
contain as a minimum:
(i)
the amount of material processed, including sub-totals for different
waste streams,
(ii)
a listing of the types of contaminants processed,
(iii)
the amount of residual materials disposed and the disposal method,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
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83
17.3
(iv)
a description of the performance of the air pollution control
equipment,
·(v)
a summary of the process monitoring results,
(vi)
a general description of operations, and
(vii)
a summary of the results of groundwater monitoring programs (if
any).
Campsite Incinerators
Portable incinerators having a burning capacity ofless than 90.7 kglhrwhich are used to
dispose of kitchen camp wastes from drilling and exploration sites do not require an
approval from the ElJB. The EUB advises the use of these campsite incinerators in areas
where access to an approved disposal site is not available.
The incinerator shall:
1.
be capable of burning the waste to an inert ash,
2.
incorporate a stacK of suitable height and an effective spark arrestor,
3.
be maintained in good operating condition such that warped components, leaks,
refractory, or other damage is repaired as soon as is practicable,
4.
be provided with underfire air, and
5.
be provided with overfire air for all incinerator types excepting controlled air
units.
Considerations should be given to the requirements of the Air Emissions Regulation
(AR 124/93).
17A
Small Batch Feed Incinerators
Basic principles of good incinerator design have been used to develop the following
criteria. No formal approval from the EUB is required for these small incinerators to
operate on oil and gas or oil sands sites, provided that all the requirements of this
guideline are met. The 'licensee and/or approval holder of the oil and gas or oil sands site
is required to send notification to the main EUB (Calgary) office. The notification
should identify the company name, location of the site, the approximate volumes of
waste types I, IT, and Ill (refer to Table 17.2), and filter material that will be batch
incinerated at the site, and that all of the requirements of this section will be met.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
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84
1.
Siting
These guidelines apply to small non-mobile incinerators owned and operated by
the waSte generator. Facilities where oilfield waste incineration is occurring must
be located a minimum of 1.5 km from any residents or public facility, unless
otherwise approved by the EUB.
The surface terrain of the incinerator site shall allow for the prompt and effective
clean up of all materials that may spill or leak during waste storage and disposal
operations. The clean-up materials should be disposed of in the incinerator.
Maximum ground level ambient pollutant concentrations shall not encompass any
occupied dwelling, watercourse, food processing establishment, farm building
with livestock; or feedlot and feed processing or handling establishment.
2.
Waste Feed Restrictions
The feedstock for the small oilfield incinerators described in this section is
limited to waste types I, II and ill (as listed on Table 17.2) and oilfield filter
material. Oilfield filter material is defined as all types of disposable filters from
oil and gas production operations including vehicle filters, oil pads, and
absorbents used iii maintenance of such operations. These wastes must be
generated on the oil and gas site where the small incinerator is located, or if the
incinerator is located on a battery or gas plant, wastes can be accepted from
associated well sites, provided these sites have the same licensee as the site on
which the incinerator is located.
The incinerators are to be used for batch feed only with a limit of one charge per
day. The maximum allowable percentage of filter material (by weight) in any
one charge is 50 per cent. Filter material must be burned with waste types I, II or
ill so as not to e~ceed the 50 per cent limit. Continuous flow through the
incinerator is prohibited. A maximum volume of 10 tonnes of waste per month
may be incinerated.
3.
Design Parameters
(a)
Feed System
Manual feed systems for batch loading the incinerator is the basis of these
guidelines. Applicable OH&S regulations must be complied with when
handling the wastes. The incinerator should be sized such that not more
than one charge per day is required to handle the waste quantities. A
safety system to warn of firing or a high temperature in the primary
chamber when loading is required. The incinerator should not be loaded
if the primary temperature is above the boiling point of any of the waste's
liquid residue.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
85
(b)
(c)
Primary Chamber
(i)
The volume of the primary chamber should be designed to allow
for a total heat release rate of between 445,000 kJ/h/m3 (12,000
BTU/h/fr) and 670,000 kJ/h/m3 (18,000 BTU/h/fr). A heat
release rate of over 670,000 kJ/h/m3 (18,000 BTU/h/fr) is not
recommended for use in the design as this may lead to
uncontrolled conditions, resulting in high particulate emissions and
the discharge of incomplete combustion products to the
environment.
(ii)
The hearth area should be designed to allow a burning rate of 58.578.0 kglh/m2 (12-16lb/h/fr).
(iii)
The floor should have a recessed area or otherwise have the ability
to contain liquid drippings from filters thus allowing incineration
during the cycle.
(iv)
Temperature in the primary chamber should be maintained in the
range of 400-760°C. Avoiding temperature peaks above 760°C
will minimize excursions in gas velocities, thereby reducing ash
cany-over and particulate emissions. Care should be taken to
ensure the primary temperature is always above the auto-ignition
temperature of the waste, especially low heating value wastes.·
(v)
The external casing of the chamber should be designed to maintain
a maximum temperature of 70-90°C. This can be accomplished
with the use of refractory and/or insulation materials. Where
appropriate, an expanded metal shield or other suitable means of
shielding should be installed for the protection of personnel.
(vi)
The temperature in the primary chamber should be controlled by a
sensor located at the breaching. When water-wet or low heating
value wastes (<6000 kJ/kg) are incinerated, the sensor should be
connected to a system to provide automatic temperature control
through a modulating or on/off primary chamber burner.
Secondary Chamber
(i)
The temperature in the secondary chamber should be designed
with an operating temperature of not less than 1000°C during the
incineration cycle.
(ii)
The incinerator should be designed to provide no less than 6 per
cent residual oxygen on a dry basis in the flue gas exhaust from the
secondary chamber.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
86
TABLE17.2
Classification And Design Data Of Wastes To Be Incinerated
Typo of
Delcriptim
Principal Compcoeau
Appl"mtimale
Compoliti011%
by Weight
Moilllll'e
Contcot%
(Delisn
Maximum)
(Aver-age)
Incambumble
Solids%
k1 Value I*' ka of
:Rcfbae as Fired
(Delisn Minimum)
lloquirM MimBumerlllput('t.W
!*'ksWau)
llubbilh
Combustible waite, ptpcr cartms,
rags, wood ICI"Ip5, floor aweepinp;
domeatic, COIIliDI!rCW indultrial
llubbilh
(80-100)
Gubage
(20-80)
25
10
15000
0
llubbilh
(35-80)
Garbage
(65-20)
so
7
10000
1.3
Garbage
(65 -100)
llubbilh
(0-35)
70
s
5815
1.9
100 animal and
62
9
2300
7.5
Dcpcodcnt 011
predaninant
Mull be
determined by
compollliliU.
W&I!CI
Wa~e
I*
IOIII'CCI.
n•
:Rcfbae
llubbiJh and prbase; reaidealial
IO\II'CCI.
DI*
Gubage
Animal lk. vegetable wailea,
reata\ll'ants, hocell, markeu;
Inatituti011al, commercial, and club
IOili'CC&.
w••
Animal aolida
WUiel
Careauea, crg1111, aolid organic
WUICI; hoapital, laboratory abaaoir,
animal pound, and limi1ar iource&.
Gaseous liquid
or ICDli-liquid
Industrial proceu wai!CI (tara,
ptinta, aolvCDll, tilmcl).
mdorgmie
v
.bwnm mille
Variable
WUICI
VI
Variable
Must be detenaiDDd
by W&IIM awvey.
awvey.
Scmi-aolid
Combultiblcs r:qulring hearth,
and aolid
retort, or grate burning equipment
Dcpcodcnt 011
prcmoninant
Mull be
determined by
.(rubbillh,J)lutica. wood wai!CI).
-~enta.
wai!CI~,
Must be determined
by . . . . aurvey.
*
The above figures are recommended for use in computing heat release, burning rate, velocity and
other details of incinerator design.
**
Type IV wastes require a "heated hearth" type of incinerator.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
•87
(iii)
The secondary chamber should be designed for a gas residence
time of not less than 1 second at 1000°C. This residence time is to
be based on the volume of the secondary chamber from the flame
from to the location of the temperature sensing device. These
calculations or a vendor guarantee must be available on-site for
inspection by EUB staff.
(iv)
The residence time of gases in, the combustion chamber may be
calculated using the following formula:
Where:
VT = total volumetric flow rate in m3/sec at 1000°C
VP
volumetric flow rate of dry combustion products at
=
IOoooc
V = volumetric flow rate of moisture at 1000°C
m
(v)
Therefore, the active chamber volume required to achieve onesecond retention time is the volume in m3 from the equation (VT)
in the above formula. ("Dead" areas with little or no flow should
not be included in the retention volume). It should be noted that in
sizing the secondary chamber to meet the one-second retention
time required, the-length of the chamber should be calculated from
the flame front to the location of the temperature sensing device.
(vi)
The temperature in the secondary chamber should be controlled by
a sensor located at a point representing one second retention time
from the flame front or final air injection points. The sensor
should be connected to a system to provide automatic temperature
control and it should also regulate the modulating secondary
chamber burner.
(vii)
The refractory surface of the secondary chamber should be heated
over a minimum period of half an hour, prior to feeding waste into
the incinerator, to ensure optimum conditions for the destruction of
any volatile organic compounds.
(viii) The external casing of the secondary chamber should be designed
to maintain maximum temperature of 70-90°C by means of
insulation and refractory. For the protection of personnel, an
expanded metal shield or other suitable means of protection should
also be installed on the casing.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
88
(d)
(e)
(f)
Turb~ence
(i)
Gas turb~ence is an important parameter in the design of
incinerators and can be achieved by a high combustion gas
velocity, tangential air injection, abrupt changes in flow direction,
and the installation of combustion gas restrictions (e.g. orifices,
checker work, or baffles).
(ii)
Turb~ence is diffic~t to quantify; however, use of the Reynolds
number (Re) has been suggested to provide an indication of the gas
phase turb~ence in the incinerator. An example of the calculation
of the Reynold's Number is provided in Part F, Appendix 5.0.
(iii)
Preferred designs wo~d have a calculated Reynolds number in the
secondary chamber over 10 000 to ensure turb~ent flow. Lower
numbers plus other turb~ence adding features may be adequate.
The secondary burner must be designed as per the following
combustion air requirements. These calculations or a vendor
guarantee must be available on-site for inspection by EUB staff.
Combustion Air ~quirements
(i)
For starved-air incinerators, air into the primary chamber sho~d
be supplied at 30 to 80 per cent of that required for stoichiometric
combustion. Primary air supply must be through multi ports to
ensure air distribution through the waste.
(ii)
The air supply in the secondary chamber of all incinerators sho~d
be able to provide excess air at 40 to 150 per cent of that
theoretically required during the peak burning rate.
(iii)
The combustion air supply should be automatically adjustable with
a Temperature Recorder Control System to maintain the set
temperatures in the primary and secondary chambers of the
incinerator.
Burners
(i)
The burners must be able to maintain a stable flame throughout the
range of pressures, input rates, and fuel/air ratios experienced in
the primary and secondary chambers.
(ii)
The primary burner sho~d be designed:
to supply a minimum of 80 per cent of the total heat input
of the incinerator design capacity;
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
89
to modulate to a low "holdfire" setting to protect the burner
throughout the incineration cycle.
(iii)
The bumer(s) in the primary chamber should be:
located at a downward angle to provide maximum
impingement of the flame onto the wastes. The alignment
of the burner(s) should not allow the flame to impinge on
the refractory walls or on other burner(s);
set to maintain a temperature of 400-760°C in the primary
chamber once the bum cycle is initiated;
constructed with a sealed casing to eliminate the flow of
tramp air into the chamber.
(iv)
The burner(s) in the secondary chamber should be:
mounted to promote thorough mixing plus flame and air
penetration throughout the whole chamber. The alignment
of the burner(s) should not allow the flame to impinge on
the refractory walls or on other burner(s);
set to maintain a temperature of not less than 1000 o C in the
secondary chamber at all times;
fully modulated with a low ''holdfire" setting to ensure a
flame throughout the incineration cycle.
(g)
Process Monitoring/Control
(i)
One, preferably two, viewports should be installed in the primary
chamber immediately behind the burners to facilitate visual
inspection of the burn. The location should be selected to reduce
particulate impingement, so that the viewport will remain
relatively clean.
(ii)
A Temperature Controller should be used to control the primary
and secondary temperature by:
turning off or reducing the heat input from the burner; and
turning off, tln:ottling back, or increasing the air supply.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
90
(iii)
(h)
4.
All incinerators should be equipped with continuous primary and
secondary temperature monitoring equipment on-line for the full
cycle of operations. Recording is not required.
Incinerator Stack
(i)
For natural draft systems, calculations for stack design should be
b~ed on a secondary chamber gas temperature of 1000°C. If
substantial heat losses through the stack are expected, such losses
should be taken into account in determining the average stack
temperature and the available draft. Equivalencies to these
procedures will be considered.
(ii)
The stack height should be calculated to provide a minimum
available draft of 6.3 mm (0.25 in) water gauge (W.G.) at the
breaching. The latter is an absolute minimum draft provision for
all natural draft incinerators and must result in a draft of at least
2.5 mm (0.1 in) W.G. at the burner air inlets. Perry's Chemical
Engineers' Handbook outlines procedures for calculating stack
draft. Equivalencies to these procedures will be considered.
(iii)
Each incinerator stack height shall be designed to comply with the
EPEA Ambient Air Objectives as amended from time to time and
the anticipated stack emissions which follow in sub-section 17 .4.5.
A study using an approved air modeling program shall be required
in order to show that the incinerator stack is in compliance. Worst
case calculations will be required to determine the necessary stack
height incorporating topography, structures, and tree height.
Emissions to be studied are S02, HCl, NOx and particulates. The
results of this study shall be maintained on-site and available for
EUB inspection.
Operating Practices
(a)
Operator Training
Incinerator operators should be properly trained and be familiar with all
the manufacturer's operating procedures for the unit.
(b)
Inspections
Incinerators should be visually inspected before each burn. Ensure
primary holes are clear of any buildups.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
9-1
(c)
Waste Handling and Record Keeping
Waste should be categorized by weight and logged prior to charging to
ensure that the design feed rate is not exceeded and to maintain a record of
the quantities of waste processed. Source and description of wastes
should be recorded and retained at the incineration site for a minimum of
two calendar years. Therefore, all records are maintained as 12-month
groups.
(d)
Waste Charging
Waste should be charged into the incinerator during operation or until the
full .cool down cycle has been completed. Filters must not be stored in the
primary chamber prior to incineration to avoid excessive liquid draining
from them.
(e)
Incinerator Preheating
The secondary chamber should be· heated to operating temperature prior to
the ignition of the primary chamber, to ensure optimum conditions for the
destruction of the waste.
(f)
5.
Ash, Removal, and Disposal
(i)
Ash resulting from the incineration of waste may contain
significant levels ofheavy metals. Therefore, care should be
exercised in disposing of incinerator ash. Metal filter cores may
be recovered and sent to scrap metal recyclers.
(ii)
The incinerator ash should be evaluated according to the TCLP
leachate test specified in Part F, Appendix 3.0. Ash passing the
leachate test can be sent to an approved landfill and disposed of
with due regard to Section 15.0, Oilfield Landfills.
(iii)
The incinerator ash should be stored and transported in enclosed
containers.
Emission Criteria
The anticipated stack emissions are listed in the following table:
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
92
TABLE17.3
Stack Emission Limits For Small Batch Feed Waste Incinerators
Parameter
Particulates
Hydrogen Chloride
Carbon Monoxide
Sulphur Dioxide
Opacity
*
Emission Limit*
230mg/Rm?
75mg/Rm?
57mg/Rm3
0.15 kg ofS02perkg ofwaste consumed up to a maximum
of 100 kg of so2 per day
20 percent
The emission limits are based on the maximum one-hour average
concentrations that are calculated on a dry basis corrected to 11 per cent
oxygen at 25°C and 101.375 kPa.
The anticipated incinerator stack emissions are determined within the stack, based
on approved sampling and analytical protocol. All stack sampling facilities and
survey methods shall comply with the requirements described in the document
entitled Stack Sampling Code (Ref. 89) as amended from time to time and issued
by the Standards and Approvals Divisions of Alberta Environmental Protection.
6.
Performance Test
Testing of incinerator emissions are based on the design processing capacity of
the incinerator while processing oilfield wastes. The performance test is to be
done once only, within 90 days of initial start-up.
Primary and secondary temperature versus time profile must be recorded.
Incinerator cycles and testing periods must be superimposed upon the profile.
Additional testing details are outlined in Section 7 of the document entitled
Guidelines for Design and Operation ofRefuse Incinerators in Alberta as
amended from time to time and issued by Alberta Environmental Protection.
7.
General Information Requirements
The licensee and/or approval holder of the oil and gas site shall for each new
installation prepare a report containing the following items, retain it on-site for as
long as the incinerator is on the site, and provide it to the EUB upon request:
(a)
a copy of such plans, specifications, and technical infonnation as may
reasonably be required to determine compliance with the provisions of
Section 17.4,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
93
· 8.
(b)
a description of the waste to be incinerated, identified according to a waste
survey and the types of waste listed in Table 17.2, and the average and
maximum percentage by weight of each type. The description should also
·include the maximum batch charging rate and the maximum amount of
waste to be incinerated daily. Refer to application information and details
per the document entitled "Guidelines for Design and Operation of Refuse
Incinerators in Alberta" for further guidance with respect to the
information that should be contained in this report,
(c)
the results of the performance test done within 90 days of initial start-up,
as described in the previous section, and
(d)
a description of the disposal option used for the ash resulting from the
incineration ofwastes.
lnfonnation Documentation
The approval holder or licensee of an oil and gas or oil sands site on which a
small batch feed incinerator is located shall document the following information
and retain if on site for a minimum of 2 years. Upon request, this information
must be made available to EUB staff.
17.5
(a)
for each batch of waste incinerated, the weight, volume, waste type,
source, date incinerated, and volume residuals generated, and
(b)
any daily operational, inspection, and maintenance information.
Mobile Thennal Treatment Units
1.
Jurisdiction
The EUB does not cUrrently issue approvals for mobile thermal"treatment units.
These facilities will continue to be under the jurisdiction of Alberta
Environmental Protection (AEP).
2.
Operation at Oil and Gas Facilities
Mobile thermal treatment units which either have received approval from or have
been registered with AEP may operate at oil and gas facilities provided that:
(a)
All thermal treatment operations comply with the operating requirements
of the existing oil and gas facility,
(b)
All operations are in accordance with the thermal treatment approval or
registration conditions from AEP. Dangerous oilfield wastes must only be
treated by units approved by AEP to treat hazardous waste,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
94
(c)
Only wastes from the site where the unit is located at may be treated or, if
the site is a battecy or gas plant, wastes from the associated well sites
provided these sites have the same licensee as the site on which the
· incinerator is located, and
(d)
If the operation of a mobile unit is expected to exceed a time period of six
months, the possible impacts of the operation must be reviewed in
consultation with the EUB Calgacy office.
It is the responsibility of the licensee and/or approval holder of the oil and gas or
oil sands site to ensure that on-site operations involving mobile thermal treatment
units do not result in any contravention of the approval issued for the oil and gas
production facility. This includes compliance with the above requirements a)
through d) and any further restrictions which may be dictated by specific site
conditions. ·
3.
Notification of Operations
The licensee and/or approval holder of the oil and gas facility shall, 30 days prior
to commencement of thermal treatment operations, submit to the main EUB
Calgacy office, w~tten notification containing the following:
(a)
the location of the oil and gas site on which the mobile unit will be
located,
(b)
the company/operator of the mobile unit and the AEP license/approval or
registration number,
(c)
the volumes, types, and sources of the wastes to be treated by the mobile
unit,
(d)
the final disposition of the treated material, and
(e)
the duration ofthe activity.
The licensee and/or approval holder of the oil and gas or oil sands facility shall
ensure that all landowners and residents within 1.5 kilometers are notified of the
details of the intended activity at least 30 days prior to commencement of thermal
treatment operations. Note: If the operating licence for the mobil thermal
treatment unit also identifies conditions for public notification, then the most
stringent public notification requirements must be met.
The local EUB area office shall be notified by the Licensee and/or Approval Holder
of the oil and gas facility of the details of the intended activity at least 48 hours prior
to commencement of thermal treatment operations. In practice, it would be
advisable to notify the EUB area office at the same time as the public are notified.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
PARTE
APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR
OILFIELD WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
95
PartE
Application Requirements for Oilfield Waste Management Facilities
18.0
Overview of the Application Requirements
I
The purpose of this section is to outline the information that needs to be addressed in an
application for approval to construct and operate an oilfield waste management facility.
An oilfield waste management facility may consist of one or more of the following
components:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
waste storage area/facility,
waste transfer station,
waste processing facility,
waste disposal well (class Ia or lb),
surface facilities associated with waste disposal wells,
landfill,
biodegradation facility (biopiles or biocells),
thennal treatment facility, and
other oilfield waste management technology or facility.
Applicants considering any of the waste management components listed above should
review $e applicable sections of Part D, Oilfield Waste Management Facilities, for
design and operation requirements.
When the proposed waste management component is to be constructed on an existing
EUB approved oil and gas or oil sands facility, the type of component as well as the
volume and characteristics of the waste material to be handled, will dictate whether
notification or application is required. Applicants should refer to th~ applicable section
in Part D for more details. Applicants who intend to integrate a waste management
component with a new oil and gas or oil sands facility shall include the appropriate
information for the waste management component with the facility application. When
appropriate, the waste management component will be covered in the facility approval..
Unless otheiWise approved by the EUB, the wastes treated by the waste management
component must be generated on the oil and gas or oil sands site where the component is
located. If the component is located on a battery or gas plant, wastes can be accepted
from associated well sites provided the well sites have the same licensee as the site on
which the waste management component is located. In the situation where the waste
management component is located on a wellsite and the wellsite is a satellite of a battery,
wastes generated at the battery and its associated wells may be treated at the waste
management component provided the licensee of the wellsite and the battecy are the
same. Closure of the waste management component will be included in the overall
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
96
facility closure, with the exception of landfills and fixed thermal treatment facilities other
than small batch feed and campsite incinerators, financial assurance will not be required.
When the proposed waste management component is to be constructed on a stand-alone
site, the applicant must obtain approval from the EUB to construct and operate an oilfield
waste management facility. Oilfield waste management facilities can be first party or
third party waste receivers as outlined in their approval to operate.
With the exception of Class Ia waste disposal wells, EUB approved waste management
facilities shall only accept wastes generated in the upstream petroleum industry. Receipt
of downstream and other industrial wastes is prohibited at EUB approved facilities.
Applicants interested in accepting both oilfield wastes and downstream or other industrial
wastes must seek direct approval from AEP.
All applicants for any oilfield waste management facilities must address the information
requested under Section 21.0, General Information, which includes introductory,
assessment, site, development, and closure information.
•
Introductory Information includes the name of the applicant, the name and
location of the facility, and the waste handling, treatment, or disposal method(s)
described within the application.
•
Assessment Information pertains to information required to assess the impact and
necessity of the proposed facility. Section 19.0, Environmental Impact
Assessments, addresses the possible requirement for an EIA for a proposed
facility.
•
Site Information pertains to a description of the topography, soil, geology, and
hydrogeology of the site as determined by a site assessment. Applicants are
required to conduct a site assessment for all waste management facilities. For
some facilities, applicants will also be required to design and implement a
groundwater monitoring program based on the site assessment information. Refer
to Appendix 4.0, Requirements for Site Assessment and Groundwater Protection.
•
Development Information pertains to public consultation which includes obtaining
approval from the local authority for the proposed development, as well as
informing the public about the proposed facility and giving them the opportunity
to communicate any concerns. Companies are encouraged to begin public
involvement and communication activities well before submission of any
application to the EUB. Refer to EUB Informational Letter, IL 89-4, Public
Involvement in the Development ofEnergy Resources.
•
Closure Information includes an estimate of the expected lifespan of the facility, a
plan to close the facility during any point of its operational lifetime, and a
financial assurance program to cover the estimated cost of closure activities.
Refer to Section 20.0, Financial Security, and EUB IL 96-3, Suspension and
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
97
Reclamation of Upstream Oil and Gas Facilities, and the attached MOU that
outlines the agreement reached between AEP and EUB on these activities.
In addition to the general information, the applicant must address the design and
operation of waste management and disposal method(s) proposed for the facility, as listed
in Sections 22.0 to 28.0.
Other application considerations include:
•
Three copies of the application must be submitted to the Applications Groups
within the Facilities Division of the EUB.
•
All applications will be registered and the applicant will be invoiced for the
registration fee. If the application is deficient or incomplete, it will be returned to
the applicant.
•
The level of detail in any application should reflect the scope and complexity of
the proposed development.
•
The licensee, approval holder, applicant or owner shall retain, for the life ofthe
facility, copies of the details of their application, and verification that the as:-built
characteristics of the facility comply with the required design criteria, and make
this information available to EUB staff upon request.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
98
19.0
Environmental Impact Assessments
The EUB believes that oilfield wastes must be regulated in a manner that is equivalent to the
way industrial wastes are regulated under the Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act
(EPEA). Therefore, an applicant proposing to construct and operate an oilfield waste
management facility may be required to prepare an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)
report on the project, especially if dangerous oilfield wastes are to be handled.
Applicants proposing to construct and operate or to utilize the following methods to treat or
dispose oilfield waste, are required to contact Alberta Environmental Protection (AEP) and the
EUB to determine the need for an EIA: ·
•
a fixed incinerator that accepts dangerous oilfield waste, and
•
a landfill that accepts dangerous oilfield waste.
This communication should be done early in the process, before the application for the oilfield
waste management facility is filed with the EUB.
As the characteristics that designate a waste regulated under EPEA as hazardous, are the same as
those that classify oilfield waste as dangerous, the requirement to consult with AEP and the. EUB
regarding the need for an EIA is also extended to other proposed facilities that are intended to
handle, treat, or dispose dangerous oilfield waste.
Enquiries regarding the EIA process should be directed to AEP, EIA Review Branch Head. The
Director of Environmental Assessment will determine if further consideration for a proposed
activity is needed under the Environmental Assessment process as outlined in EPEA under
Part 2, Division 1, Environmental Assessment (Mandatory and Exempted Activities) Regulation
AR 111193 and Environmental Regulation AR 112/93. The characteristics of the proposed
activity and the wastes associated with it will be considered by the Director in deciding if
assessment under EPEA is needed.
If AEP decides that an EIA is required, the EIA report should be filed with the application to the
EUB for the proposed facility.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
99
20.0
Financial Security
20.1
Introduction
The purpose of this section is to provide information regarding financial security
requirements for oilfield waste management facilities.
The EUB has identified the need for a financial secl¢-ty system for oilfield waste
management facilities regulated by the EUB. Financial security is required to ensure
adequate resources will be available for the eventual decommissioning and reclaiD.ation
of these facilities.
Financial security will be required for each stand-alone oilfield waste management
facility as well as for all EUB approved landfills and fixed thermal treatment facilities
(excludes small batch feed and campsite incinerators).
The financial security system for oilfield waste management facilities will be
administered by the EUB. The amount required will be based on the estimated cost of
reclamation and the associated post-closure monitoring of the facility (as descnoed in the
closure portion of the initial application). The EUB requires that each oilfield waste
management facility have its own financial security in place.
20.2
Facilities Requiring Financial Security
The following oilfield waste management facilities require financial security:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
oilfield waste storage facility,
oilfield waste transfer station,
surface facilities associated with disposal wells that require approval as outlined
in Part D, Section 13.0, Suiface Facilities Associated with Waste Disposal Wells,
oilfield waste processing facilities,
all EUB approved oilfield landfills,
permanent biodegradation facilities (treats third party waste or are on a standalone site), and
fixed thermal treatment facilities other than small batch feed and campsite
incinerators.
In some cases, oilfield waste management components will be incorporated onto an
existing approved oil and gas or oil sands facility site. Costs of closure of these waste
management components will be included in the overall closure of the facility, and
therefore, with the exception of landfills and fixed thermal treatment facilities other than
small batch feed and campsite incinerators, financial assurance will not be required.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
100
Waste treated by the waste management component must be generated on the site where
the component is located, or if the component is located in a battery or gas plant, wastes
can be accepted from associated well sites provided the well sites have the same licensee
as the site on which the component is located.
The following oilfield waste management components/options do not require financial
security:
•
•
•
•
•
oilfield waste storage area,
land treatment (on-site, one-time)
biocells or biopiles (on-site, see biodegradation section),
campsite incinerators, and
small batch feed incinerators (burn less than 10 tonnes per month).
In cases where a facility requiring financial security already has posted security through
another mechanism (i.e. security posted under EPEA requirements), the licensee and/or
approval holder is responsible to identify this duplication to the EUB. If it is determined
that the facility in question already has sufficient financial security in place through
another mechanism, the EUB will not require additional financial security.
20.3
Determination of Rnancial Security
Financial security is to be provided by the applicant of the oilfield waste management
facility. The amount of financial security required will be established based on the
closure information provided to the EUB as part of the initial application for an oilfield
waste management facility. In the case of existing facilities, the amount can be
established from information provided in the original application. The approval holder
may be required to provide further closure and ·cost information if the original
information is out of date or incomplete.
The following is a procedure for determining the amount of financial security required:
1.
An estimate of the total cost for reclamation must be provided by the applicant as
part of the initial application for approval. This must also include any costs
associated with post-closure monitoring and reporting. For existing facilities the
closure information provided in the original application may have to be updated
and/or expanded.
2.
The estimated costs will be reviewed by the EUB and through consultation with
the applicant/approval holder, the amount of financial security will be
determined.
3.
The applicant will be required to post the required amount of security before
approval to operate will be given.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
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101
4.
In the case of existing facilities, once the EUB has determined the amount of
security required, the applicant/approval holder will have 60 days to put the
financial security in place in order to continue to operate.
20.4
Adjustment of Security
There are several situations which may affect the required amount of security, these
include:
•
changes in the cost of future reclamation requirements,
•
changes in the operations of a facility (see below),
•
the land or any portion of it is reclaimed at the facility (see below),
•
the closure plan is amended, and
•
any other circumstances that may affect the cost of reclamation.
Any of the above circumstances may require the approval holder to reassess the amount
of required security. The EUB expects that the operator will undertake this reassessment
on an as-needed basis.
·
Adjustments will also be required on an annual basis to account for inflation as per the
current annual Alberta Inflation Rate (Statistics Canada). For interest bearing securities
where the interest is enough to cover the inflation rate, this will be considered adequate.
The EUB may also increase or decrease the amount of security required to reflect the
current closure and post-closure costs. In the case where the EUB has increased the
security amount, the facility approval holder will have 60 days to comply. In the case
where the amount is decreased, the facility approval holder can modify the specific
facility security.
Additionally, the approval holder may apply to the EUB to have their closure plans and
associated costs adjusted based on changing site conditions, operating procedures, etc.
The approval holder must make this request in writing.
The financial security process to be followed when facilities are built, purchased, sold, or
changed is as follows:
1.
New Facilities
Approvals for new facilities will be cpntingent on the approval holder posting
adequate financial security prior to the start-up of the facility. The amount of the
security is based on the cost of closure specified in the application and approved
bytheEUB.
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102
2.
Facilities Undergoing Expansion/Changes
Changes to the closure plan must be submitted as part of an application for
modification of the facility. The plan must include amendments to the closure
and post-closure cost with the expansion/changes in place. Depending on the
amount of security that the changes represent, the EUB will decide whether
adjustments are required immediately or can be deferred until the next security
anniversary date.
3.
Facilities Undergoing Closure
Following the confirmation from AEP that the clean-up objectives for the next
intended land use have been achieved, the EUB will notify the approval holder
that the amount of security required for that facility will be reduced accordingly.
It should be noted that the amount required for post-closure monitoring, if
required, may be held back to ensure that the monitoring is conducted.
4.
Facilities Which are Sold or Transferred
The financial security for the approval holder selling the facility will not be
returned until the approval for transfer is given by the EUB. The purchasing
company will be required to post security for this facility before the approval will
be transferred.
20.5
Acceptable Forms of Security
Security must be in one or more of the following forms payable to the EUB:
20.6
•
cash,
•
irrevocable letters of credit, performance bonds or security bonds in a form
acceptable to the EUB, or
•
any other form acceptable to the EUB.
Forfeiture of Security
Security provided for a facility may be forfeited if the operator/approval holder:
I.
fails to commence and complete reclamation in a timely fashion at the facility,
2.
fails to meet reclamation standards specified in the closure plan,
3.
fails to renew an existing security before its expiry date or fails to adjust the
security amount for inflation (refer to Section 20.7, Renewal ofSecurity),
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
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103
4.
fails to accolint for changes in the closure plan,
5.
has not complied with an order or direction of the EUB or AEP, or
6.
becomes insolvent.
The EUB will provide prior notice to the operator of its intention to collect on the
security for reasons identified in points 1, 2, 4, and 5 above.
The forfeited security is held by the EUB in an interest bearing trust account. Interest
earned less administrative fees will be added to the security. The funds will be used to
reclaim and perform post-closure monitoring of the facility(s) in question as well as to
pay any administrative fees. If any money remains in the security after the reclamation
and post-closure monitoring of the facility(s) has been completed, the EUB will pay the
excess amount back to the approval holder of the facility(s). Where the amount of the
forfeited security and interest is insufficient to pay for the cost of the reclamation and
post-closure care of the facility(s) including administrative fees, the approval holder
remains liable for the balance.
20.7
Renewal of Security
For securities with expiry dates, the EUB requires replacement securities to be in place
30 days prior to the expity of the previous security (new security must account for
inflation).
For securities with no expity date, adjustments to account for inflation must also be in
place 30 days prior to the anniversary date of the security.
The EUB expects the approval holder to keep track of renewal dates.
The EUB will not notify approval holders when securities are due to be renewed. If the
new/adjusted security is not put in place, the EUB will collect the present security and
subsequently notify the approval holder of this action (see Section 20.6, Forefeiture of
Security). If a suitable security is put in place at a later date, the approval holder may
apply to the EUB for a return of any money not used for reclamation and post-closure
monitoring back to the approval holder, less administrative fees.
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104
21.0
General Information Required in Applications
The purpose of this section is to identify the general information that is required in all
applications to construct and operate an oilfield waste management facility. In addition, specific
application information is required as per Sections 22.0 to 28.0.
21.1
Application Introductory Information
The following introductory information shall be provided:
21.2
(a)
date of application,
(b)
name, address, and phone number of the applicant,
(c)
name, address, and phone number of the operator (if different from above),
(d)
the name of the facility,
(e)
the legal land description of the facility site,
(f)
current land use and zoning,
(g)
proposed construction commencement and completion date,
(h)
proposed date of commencement of operations,
(i)
a discussion of the applicant's technical and financial qualifications that are
pertinent to the design, construction, and operation of any part of a waste
management facility,
(j)
a list of the sections that will be included in the application (waste storage,
transfer station, surface facility associated with a waste disposal well, waste
processing, landfill, biodegradation, thermal treatment, and other), and
(k)
an indication of whether an application for a waste disposal well or a cavern that
will be associated with the project proposed in this application has been submitted
totheEUB.
Assessment Information
To assess the impact and necessity of the _proposed facility the applicant shall, where
applicable, provide:
(a)
a general description of the proposed facility,
(b)
an analysis of the need for the facility including:
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November. 1996
105
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
21.3
the geographical area the facility will service and the streams that will be
accepted (include whether the facility is intended to handle wastes
generated only by the applicant, (i.e. first party), or wastes generated by
·Various companies; (i.e. third party),
historical statistics and production forecasts for oilfield wastes in the area,
and
the technical, environmental, and economic benefit of building a new
facility,
(c)
the criteria used to select the proposed site, as well as any alternative sites
considered,
(d)
a description of the potential positive and negative environmental, social,
economic, and cultural impacts of the proposed facility,
(e)
the plans developed to mitigate and monitor the potential negative impacts
identified,
(f)
the plans developed to minimize the production or release into the environment of
substances that may have an adverse effect,
(g)
a response indicating whether the Director of Environmental Assessment has
determined if an EIA is necessary for the proposed facility, or a response
descnoing the reasoning the applicant used to determine that an EIA was not
necessary, and
(h)
any other information the EUB may require.
Site Information
A concise summary outlining the information obtained from the site assessment (refer to
Appendix 4.0, Requirements for Site Assessment and Groundwater Protection). This
concise summacy must include:
(a)
a facility plot plan at an appropriate scale that clearly identifies:
(i)
site topography, surface drainage patterns, local recharge and discharge
areas, type of vegetation, and tree cover,
(ii)
on-surface or buried pipelines, utility lines, conduits, pits, or tanks,
(iii) buildings, loading facilities, or storage areas,
(iv) disposal or source wells,
(v)
existing or abandoned monitoring wells or standpipes,
(vi) any areas containing buried fill material or waste,
(vii) any areas of known extensive or frequent spills, and
(viii) horizontal direction of shallow groundwater flow,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
106
(b)
the location of all surface waters and inferred areas of groundwater discharge
within a 3 km radius of the site,
(c)
a summary of local groundwater and surface water users within a 3 km radius of
the site,
(d)
a summacy of the regional hydrogeology and geology for the area in which the
site is located as derived from existing data in the public domain,
(e)
the description of the soil including the following:
(i)
(ii)
the physical characteristics of the soil including thickness, texture, internal
drainage characteristics, evidence of fracturing, and an estimate of the
moisture content, and
the background.chemical characteristics of the soil, including pH,
electrical conductivity, major extractable ions, cation exchange capacity,
total metals, per cent hydrocarbon, and sodium adsorption ratio,
(f)
a description of how the quality of the surface and subsurface soil will be
monitored,
(g)
for those facilities that require groundwater monitoring, site specific infonnation
as determined during the drilling and installation of monitoring wells, including
the following:
the desc~ption of the surficial geology, including the type and thickness
of strata,
(ii)
the depth of the shallowest water bearing strata (depth of the water table)
and the hydraulic conductivity of this zone, including raw test data and
method of analysis,
(iii) the horizontal and vertical directions, rates, and approximate velocities of
the groundwater flow,
(iv) a description of the quality of the groundwater including, as a minimum,
the initial results obtained for pH, electrical conductivity, major ions, total
metals, and mineral oil and grease,
(v)
the depth, location, and type of any contaminant encountered, the
probable source of the contaminant, and acknowledgement that AEP has
been contacted regarding the contamination,
(vi) the rationale for the location, depth, and screened interval for each
monitoring well,
(vii) a description of the construction materials and completion details for each
well,
(viii) methods employed to develop the wells,
(ix) sampling and testing procedures, and
(x)
the ground level elevation, casing top elevation, depth to water, depth of
well, and screened interval for each well, presented in a tabular form,
(i)
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
107
21A
(h)
a description of how the surface run-off water will be controlled, accumulated,
and discharged including, if applicable, the pond or dike design and sizing
calculation for containment of a 1 in 10 year, 24-hour storm, and the path taken
by the surface run-off discharge,
(i)
a description of how the quality of the ambient air will be monitored, and
(j)
any other information the EUB may require.
Development Information
Information relating to the development of the site Shall, where applicable, include:
(a)
written confirmation indicating that the landowner has consented to the
construction and operation of the facility,
(b)
verification that approval (a developmentpennit) from the local authority has
been obtained or is in the process of being obtained,
(c)
a description of the consultative process undertaken to inform the public of the
proposed development in accordance with EUB IL 89-4, Public Involvement in
the Development ofEnergy Resources including:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(d)
21.5
the names of the landowners/occupants personally contacted within a 0.5
km radius of the proposed facility and any concerns they had regarding
the pr~posed development,
·
a copy of the information package delivered to all landowners/occupants
within a 1.5 km radius of a proposed sweet facility and a 2.0 km radius of
a proposed sour facility, or to any interested party, as well as any resulting
concerns about the proposed development, and
a map showing the landowner/occupant of all lands withfu a 1.5 km
(sweet) or 2.0 km (sour) radius of the facility, and
any other information the EUB may require.
Closure
A discussion regarding closure of the facility shall, where applicable, include:
(a)
a description of the plan developed to perform any planned or unplanned closure
of the facility, or any part of it, at any point during its active life including:
(i)
(ii)
an estimate of the maximum inventory (wastes and products) expected onsite and how these inventories will be eliminated,
an estimate of the time, required to eliminate inventories, and
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
108
(iii)
•
a schedule of closure activities including the elimination of inventories,
the dismantling of surface equipment, the abandonment of wells or
pipelines, and the reclamation of the facility site,
(b)
a description of the proposal developed for post-closure monitoring if required,
(c)
an estimate, in current dollars, of the cost of planned or unplanned closure and of
post-closure monitoring or site maintenance,
(d)
the financial assurance the applicant can demonstrate to cover the cost of facility
closure and post-closure care (refer to Section 20.0, Financial Security),
(e)
an estimate of the expected year of final closure of the facility,
(f)
the expected land use and zoning of the site after effective closure, and
(g)
any other information the EUB may require.
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109
22.0
Waste Storage Facilities and Transfer Stations - Specific Application Information
The purpose of this section is to identify the specific information which is required in an
application to construct and operate a waste storage facility or transfer station.
General information, which is also required with the application, is contained in Section 21.0.
For ope111tional information, reference should also be made to Part D, Section 12.0, Waste
Storage Areas/Facilities and Waste Transfor Stations.
·
22.1
Design and Operational Procedures
Details on the design features and operational procedures shall, where applicable,
include:
(a)
a description of the oilfield waste streams that will be accepted for storage
including their source and anticipated annual volumes,
(b)
a description and scale diagram of the facility design in accordance with BUB
ID 95-3 and Guide G-55, Storage Requirements for the Upstream Petroleum
Industry, including:
·
·
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
(v)
(vi)
(c)
a description of the operational procedures including:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(d)
the location, size, and construction material of all storage containment
devices, including the materials to be stored within,
the secondaly containment system and its capacity,
the leak detection system and the sampling program established for it,
including the sampling frequency and the parameters the samples will be
tested for,
if applicable, the corrosion monitoring system,
the management or control of inventory to minimize spills or overflows,
and
the location, size, and equipment spacing of all heating, pumping, and
compressing equipment.
the method of receiving, appropriately segregating, storing, and handling
the various oilfield wastes,
the estimated retention time of the various oilfield wastes in the facility,
and
the method of removing and transporting oilfield wastes to an approved
facility for treatment and/or disposal, and the name of the
treatment/disposal facility,
a description and example of the method in which material balances will be kept,
identifying receipt to disposition of all waste materials,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
110
(e)
a description of the security measures with respect to unauthorized dumping or
entry by unauthorized persons, livestock, or wildlife,
(f)
a description of the operational safety procedures in place, as well as the
contingency plan developed to respond to emergencies such as fires or the
accidental release of fluids or fugitive air emissions,
(g)
the qualifications with respect to training and certification required by employees,
and
·
(h)
any other information the EUB may require.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
111
23.0
Surface Facilities Associated with Waste Disposal Wells - Specific Application
Information
The purpose of this section is to identify the specific information which is required in an
application to construct and operate a surface facility associated with a waste disposal well.
General information, which is also required with the application, is contained in Section 21.0.
For operational information; reference should also be made to Part D, Section 13.0, Suiface
Facilities Associated with Waste Disposal Wells.
Operators seeking approval for a waste disposal well should first refer to EUB 1L 94-2 and EUB
Guide G-51 for completion, logging, testing, monitoring, and application requirements. These
references identify the types of wastes that can be injected down the various classes of disposal
wells. Guide G-51 does not, however, outline the requirements for any surface facilities
associated with the well. Therefore, operators applying for approval of a Class Ia or Ib waste
disposal well that will not be located on an existing EUB approved site, but will have surface
facilities (i.e. receiving tanks) associated with the well, will be required to include the
information outlined in this section on surface facilities, in the application for the disposal well.
Whenever possible, a joint approval will be given for both the disposal well and the surface
facilities.
23.1
Design and Operational Procedures
Details on the design features and operational procedures shall, where applicable,
include:
(a)
a description of the oilfield waste streams that will be accepted for deep well
disposal, including their source and anticipated annual volumes,
(b)
a description and scale diagram of the surface facilities associated with the
disposal well in accordance with EUB ID 95-3 and Guide G-55, Storage
Requirements for the Upstream Petroleum Industry, including:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
(v)
(vi)
the location, size, and construction material of all storage containment
devices,
the secondary containment system and its capacity,
the leak detection system and the sampling program established for it,
including frequency and the parameters the samples will be tested for,
if applicable, the corrosion monitoring system,
the tank inventory control systems to minimize spills or overflows, and
the location, size, and equipment spacing of all, heating, pumping, and
compressing equipment,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
112
(c)
a description of the operational procedures including:
(i)
(ii)
(d)
a description and example or the accounting procedures from the receipt to
disposition of all materials. This description shall include, but not be limited to:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(e)
the method of receiving the wastes, and for those Class Ia wells approved
to accept industrial as well as oilfield wastes, the method used to segregate
the wastes, and acknowledgement that AEP has approved the industrial
waste streams, the surface facilities used to receive them, and the plan
developed to manage any residuals (solids or organics) that separate from
the fluids, and
the method of removing residuals, such as oil or solids that separate from
the upstream waste fluids and the method used to treat or dispose the
residuals including the name of the treatment/disposal facility,
the methods used to verify the composition and volume of incoming
materials,
the procedure used to measure and account for all fluids injected into the
well, and
the procedure used to measure and account for all fluids injected into the ·
well and any crude oil recovered from the upstream side,
· a description of the security measures with respect to unauthorized dumping or
entry by unauthorized persons, livestock, or wildlife,
(f)
a description of the operationar safety procedures in place, as well as the
contingency plan developed to respond to emergencies such as fires or the
accidental release of fluids or fugitive air emissions,
(g)
the qualifications with respect to training and certification required by employees,
and
(h)
any other information the EUB may require.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
113
24.0
Waste Processing Facilities- Specific Application Information
The purpose of this section is to identify the specific application information which is required
in an application to construct and operate a waste processing facility.
General information, which is also required with the application, is contained in Section 21.0.
For operational information, reference should also be made to Part D, Section 14.0, Waste
Processing Facilities.
24.1
Design and Operational Procedures
Details on the design features and operational procedures shall, where applicable,
include:
(a)
a description of the oilfield wastes that will be accepted for processing or
treatment and their anticipated annual volumes,
(b)
a description of the treatment and process technologies to be used including the
specifications of the receiving, inlet measuring, treating, separating, and recycling
equipment, and their minimum and maximum flow capacities, retention times,
and operating pressures and temperatures. For those facilities that have an
integrated custom treating facility, identify any common and unique equipment,
(c)
an estimate of the annual volume of freshwater to be used in the operation of the
facility and the fresh water source, including where applicable, a copy of the
groundwater diversion permit or water withdrawal permit,
(d)
a process flow schematic showing:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(e)
all the separation vessels, measurement points, vessel relief valves and
piping, vessel drains, and fuel lines, etc.,
the minimum and maximum operating pressures and temperatures for
each vessel, and
the common and separate equipment for those facilities that will include a
custom treating facility,
a scale diagram showing:
(i)
(ii)
the location, size, and equipment spacing of all separating, heating,
pumping, and compressing equipment, including those common or unique
to an integrated custom treating facility, and
the location, size, and construction material of all storage facilities and
dikes, including those common or unique to an integrated custom treating
facility,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
114
(f)
a description of the plans developed to monitor any leakage from tanks and other
containment devices including, where applicable:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
the leakage monitoring system, including sampling frequency and test
parameters,
the corrosion monitoring system, and
the management or control of tank inventory to minimize spills or
overflows,
(g)
a discussion of the method proposed for the disposal of solid waste and sludge
material (for off-site disposal identify the operator, name, and location of the
facility that will be used),
(h)
a discussion of the method proposed for the disposal of liquid waste (for off-site
disposal identify the operator, name, and location of the facility that will be used),
(i)
a description and example of the accounting procedure from the receipt to
disposition of all products. This description shall include, but not be limited to:
(i)
(ii)
(j)
the methods used to verify the composition and volume of the incoming
streams, and
the procedure used to measure and account for any recovered oil, water,
and solids. (Note: Oil recovered from an integrated custom treating
facility must be accounted separately from the oil reclaimed from the
wastes.), and
any other uiformation the EUB may require.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
115
25.0
Oilfield Landfills - Specific Application Information
The purpose of this section is to identify the specific information which is required in an
application to construct and operate an oilfield landfill.
General information, which is also required with the application, is contained in Section 21.0.
An application to construct or expand an oilfield landfill must address each of the requirements
listed in Part D, Section 15.0, Oilfield Landfills, with regard to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Landfill Siting Criteria,
Design Requirements,
Operating Procedures,
Required Engineer Features of Class Ia, lb, ll or ill Oilfield Landfills,
Waste Criteria,
Monitoring and Analyses,
Reporting Requirements, and
Closure, Post-Closure and Reclamation Requirements.
25.1
Design and Operational Procedures
In addition to the above information, an application to construct or expand an oilfield
landfill must also clearly state the following infoimation based on the class of oilfield
landfill being applied for:
(a)
the Class of the proposed oilfield landfill, and whether third party wastes will be
received by the landfill,
(b)
a description of the oilfield waste streams to be placed in the landfill, including
their source, and anticipated annual volumes,
(c)
a description of the on-site waste handling methods,
(d)
the method for measuring and accounting for the volumes of waste received,
(e)
a description and discussion of the type of landfill design being proposed (above
ground, shallow entombed or conventional),
(f)
a description and discussion of the landfill development method being proposed
cell, trench or area,
(g)
the method for placing the waste into the landfill,
(h)
a plot and schematic cross-section of the proposed landfill, including the location
of the trench or cell in relation to the seasonal high water table,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
116
(i)
a description of the physical and cheinical properties of any engineering
containment systems (liners), and all other material underlying the landfill,
including surficial deposits and bedrock, as well as a discussion of the ability of
these materials (natural or installed) to retard the movement of contaminants and
their compatibility with the oilfield wastes being landfilled,
(j)
a description of the above-liner leachate control and handling system, including
the monitoring protocol, testing frequency, and disposal destination of the
leachate,
(k)
a description of any below-liner leak detection system, including the monitoring
protocol, and testing frequency,
(1)
a description of the surface run-off and run-on control systems,
(m)
an outline of any proposed gas interception, venting or recovery systems, and a
description of how odours and fugitive emissions will be monitored, handled, and
mitigated,
(n)
a description of all proposed cover material including physical, and chemical
properties,
(o)
a description of the quality assurance and quality control methods to be employed
to ensure proper site engineering and installation practices are followed, including
a description of how the hydraulic conductivity and integrity of all liners will be
verified during construction,
(p) . a description of the security measures with respect to entry by unauthorized
persons, livestock or wildlife, or with respect to unauthorized dumping,
252
(q)
a description of the operational safety procedures in place, as well as the
contingency plan developed to respond to emergencies such as fires or fugitive air
emissions,
(r)
the qualifications with respect to training and certification required by employees,
and
(s)
any other information the EUB may require.
Reclamation Plan
A reclamation plan, laid out during the initial design of the landfill and incorporated
throughout the operational life of the landfill, shall include:
(a)
a description of the reclamation design and proposed post-reclamation use of the
landfill site,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
117
(b)
a description of how this design was incorporated into the initial site assessment,
and how it will be incorporated into the overall operation of the landfill,
(c)
a description ofhow the leachate collection, leak detection, groundwater
monitoring, and gas interception, venting or recovery systems will continue to be
maintained and operated, and
(d)
any other information the BUB or AEP may require.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
118
26.0
Biodegradation Facilities- Specific Application Information
The purpose of this section is to identify the specific application information which is required
in an application to construct and operate a biodegradation facility.
General information, which is also required with the application, is contained in Section 21.0.
For operational information, reference should also be made to Part D, Section 16.0,
Biodegradation.
26.1
Design and Operational Procedures
Details on the design features and operational procedures shall, where applicable,
include:
(a)
a description of the oilfield wastes to be accepted for biodegradation including
their source, anticipated annual volumes, and typical chemical and physical
characteristics,
(b)
a description of the proposed biodegradation technique including the volume that
will be treated at one time, any amendments that will added, and the anticipated
degradation period for a volume of waste,
(c)
a description and example of the accounting procedure from receipt to disposition
of all products.
(d)
a description of the intended uses or disposition of the treated material,
(e)
a description ofhow any generated leachate will be handled and/or disposed,
(f)
a description and scale diagram of the design of the biodegradation system
including:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
(v)
(g)
the primacy containment device,
the secondaiy containment device,
the leachate collection system,
the leak detection system, and
the groundwater monitoring system, if applicable,
a scale diagram of the facility site showing the following in relationship to the
biodegradation system:
(i)
(ii)
location, size, and equipment spacing of any separating, heating, pumping,
and compressing equipment, and
location, size, and construction of any storage facilities,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
119
(h)
a description of how fugitive air emissions will be monitored,
(i)
a description of the operational safety procedures in place at the facility, as well
as the contingency plan developed to respond to emergencies such as fires, the
accidental release of fluids, or fugitive air emissions,
(j)
the qualifications with respect to training and certification required by employees,
(k)
a description of the security measures with respect to unauthorized dumping or
entty by unauthorized persons, livestock, or wildlife, and
(1)
any other information the EUB may require.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
120
27.0
Thermal Treatment Facilities- Specific Application Information
The purpose of this section is to identify the specific application information which is required
in an application to construct and operate a thermal treatment facility.
General information, which is also required with the application, is contained in Section 21.0.
For operational information, reference should also be made to Part D, Section 17.0, Thennal
Treatment.
27.1·
Design and Operational Procedures
Based on the thermal treatment technology (incineration or thermal desorption) being
applied for, details on the design features and operational procedures shall, where
applicable, include:
(a)
a description of the oilfield waste streams that will be accepted for thermal
treatment including their source, characterization, composition, and anticipated
annual volumes,
(b)
a description ofthe design and manufacturer's specifications ofthe incinerator
including the make, model, number, chamber type, rated capacity, and charging
method,
(c)
the limiting design and operating values of the parameters, if applicable, listed
below and a discussion of why the identified limits apply:
(i)
(ii)
primary chamber temperature, pressure, design volume, and hearth area,
secondaty chamber temperature, pressure, and retention time,
(iii) primary air injection,
(iv) secondaty air injection,
(v)
auxiliary burner(s) type, primary ignition, secondaty afterburner, timer
cycle, supply fuel, and type of flame failure control,
(vi)
minimum destruction and removal efficiency,
(vii) combustion performance parameters including minimum oxygen level,
maximum carbon monoxide levels, and minimum incinerator operating
temperature, and
(viii) stack emission levels for opacity, hydrogen chloride, particulate, dioxin
and furan, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and sulphur
dioxide,
(d)
a description of the incinerator stack including its diameter, height above grade,
height above roof, distance from the ijearest building and the building's height,
height of other obstructions, spark arrester, sampling ports provided, and
pollution control equipment,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
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121
(e)
a description of process monitoring system for the incinerator and of the
continuous emissions monitoring system for the stack,
(t)
a scale drawing of the incinerator showing its internal dimensions, burner
locations, charging doors, size and location of test openings, temperature control,
and temperature recording device,
(g)
a description of the testing to be conducted to ensure the required destruction and
removal efficiencies and emission limits will be met,
(h)
a description of the operational procedures including:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
the method of receiVing, storing, and preparing waste for incineration,
a list of the gaseous and particulate substances and their volumes that will
be released into the environment as a result of the incinerator's operation,
as well as the methods by which the substances will be released and the
operational steps taken to reduce the volumes released, and
a discussion of the method proposed for the disposal or treatment of the
liquid and solid residue or ash generated by the incinerator,
(i)
a scale diagram of the facility showing the location, size, and material
specification of all equipment and surface improvements;
G)
a description and example of the accounting procedure from receipt to disposition
of all products,
(k)
a description of the operational safety procedures in place at the facj]ity, as well
as the contingency plan developed to respond to emergencies such as fires or
fugitive air emissions,
(1)
the qualifications with respect to training and certification required by employees,
(m)
a description of the security measures with respect to unauthorized dumping or
entry by unauthorized persons, livestock, or wildlife, and
(n)
any other information the EUB may require.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
122
28.0
Other Waste Management Technologies
Applicants wishing to apply for an oilfield waste management technology not described in the
previous sections shall provide information on the design features, operational procedures and
monitoring systems applicable to the waste management technology. The details provided
should reflect the scope and complexity of the proposed development.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
PARTF
OTHER WASTE MANAGEMENT
AND
DISPOSAL OPTIONS
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements ·tor the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
123
Part F
OTHER WASTE MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL OPTIONS
29.0
Spreading of Oily By-Products to Roads
29.1
Introduction
The purpose of this section is to establish the minimum requirements and criteria for
applying oily by-products materials to road surfaces.
The intent of these requirements is to ensure that environmental considerations
surrounding the safe and responsible application of oily by-products to road surfaces are
addressed.
Approval holders or licensees of oil and gas facilities must maximize the recovecy and
conservation of resources and minimize the amount of oily by-product material
generated. Licensees and approval holders producing this material are strongly
encouraged to review their respective handling and disposal techniques in consideration
of alternate oil reclamation programs. Good operating practices used in the management
of storage facilities for oily by-products such as minimizing the volumes of produced
water and other oilfield wastes entering these facilities. The removal of free water will
greatly assist in meeting the criteria set ~ut in this section.
The EUB considers the application of oily by-product materials to public or private roads
as an acceptable management option available to the oil and gas industcy. The oily byproduct materials, which are typical of that recovered or generated during in-situ oil
sands and heavy oil production operations in northeast Alberta, is a resource valued by
local communities when applied to permanent roads in accordance with criteria set out in
these requirements. A joint industcy, government, and scientific task force has been
investigating and researching this matter for many years. Their research has shown that if
applied appropriately, this material poses minimal environmental impact and safety risks.
The use of oily by-products in agricultural product storage areas, feed lots, or temporacy
lease roads is prohibited.
29.2
Oily By-Product Materials
Oily by-product material is considered materials containing oil or bitumen generated
during heavy oil production and typically consists of mainly sand and slop oil.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
124
29.3
Characterization
Oily by-product material may be applied to road surfaces if the following
characterization criteria are met:
1.
No free water. Every effort should be made to ensure water on the surface or
lying within the storage facilities is recovered prior to removing the oily byproduct material for application to roads.
2.
Oil shall be of a density greflter than 920 kg/m3 • Material with less than 5 per
cent residual hydrocarbon is unacceptable as road mix.
3.
pH~
4.
Total salts (calculated as a loading limit):
6.
Na
Cl
5.
s 5 500 kglha, and
s 7 000 kglha.
Total metals (concentration in sample):
Cd
Hg
Pb
Ni
Cu
Zn
s 3 mglkg,
s 0.8 mglkg,
s 375 mglkg,
s 150 mg/kg,
s 150 mglkg, and
s 600 mglkg.
Note: The above metal concentrations have been derived from the CGME
Criteria for metals in agricultural applications. They are intended to be
used as a screening tool or flag. The limits will be used to assess
whether the metal concentrations as derived from the analytical
methodologies are within the expected limits for those metals. If metal
concentrations are noted in excess of the above limits, the licensee and/or
approval holder of the oil and gas facility may be asked to provide an
explanation prior to approval being granted. Licensee and/or approval
holders who repeatedly exceed the limits will be required to carry out a
detailed investigation as to the cause.
6.
The material must not contain halogenated hydrocarbons, hazardous chemicals,
refined or lube oils, drilling waste, flare pit sludges, or deleterious substances
such as filters, rags, vegetation, or other debris including significant volumes of
contaminated agricultural soils.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
125
29.4
Application Depth
The maximum depth of application of material is limited to the smallest of the
"Calculated Application Depths" determined for Na and Cl using the following formula:
4
d (em) = L x 10
DxC
where:
=
d
L=
depth (em) - calculated.
loading rate (kglha)- specified in Section 29.3(4) for
NaandCl,
D = density of sample (kg/m3) - determined by
laboratory, and
C = concentration Na and/or Cl (mglkg) - determined by
laboratory.
Note: Application method for oily by-product materials are set out in the
SaskatchwanlAlberta Waste Disposal Cooperative report, Alberta
Recommended Practices for Road Swfacing and Dust Suppression
Techniques.(revised July 1994). This report is available through
EUB Field Offices. The ~ount of material that can be applied to
roads, as calculated above, must also be consistent with that report.
Industry must adopt these as minimum acceptable oily by-product
application methods.
29.5
Mixing Of By-Product Materials
If the material to be used for road sJracing or dust suppression is a combination of two
or more oily by-product streams (i.e. from a number of different storage facilities), each
must be sampled and analyzed in accordance with the methods prescnoed. The limiting
factor for application of the aggregate material will be dependent on loading limits ofNa
and Cl noted in Section 29.4, Application Depth, assuming metals are within the
established limits. Therefore, the limiting application depth of the oily by-product
materials used in the final mix will be calculated as follows:
d (em) =
L x 104
(Dl
X
Cl
X
Pl)
+
(D2
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
X
C2
X
P2)
November. 1996
126
where:
d
L
maximum application depth (em) - calculated,
loading rate (kglha)- specified in Section 29.3(4)
forNa and Cl,
density of first substance (kg/m3) - determined by
laboratory,
concentration Na or Cl (mg!kg)- in first
substance determined by laboratory,
proportion of first substance in the final mixture,
density of second substance (kg/m3) - dete~ed
by laboratory,
concentration Na or Cl (mglkg) - in second
substance determined by laboratory, and
proportion of second substance in the final
mixture.
=
=
D1 =
C1 =
P1 =
D2 =
C2 =
P2 =
Example calculation from data sheet:
Notes
Sample#
Sand
Slop Oil
1
1
2
2
Density
Concentration
(kg/m3)
(JD2/k£)
1792
Na=3300
Cl=5640
Na=3350
Cl =6900
1052
Calculated Depth of
Application
9.30cm
5.97 em
15.6 em
9.64cm
Assume the mix will contain 70 per cent sand and 30 per cent slop oil by volume.
In this example, Cl is the limiting factor in both samples (5.97 em in #1 and 9.64 em in
#2). lfNa was the limiting factor in one s~ and Cl in the other, the mixing depth
calculation would have to be repeated for botliNa and Cl. The smaller of the two
calculated application depths would be the limiting factor for the composite mix.
Using the equation above :
d (em)=
7000 kg/ha X 104 / { (1792 kg/m3 X 5640 mg/kg X 0. 70) + (1 052
kg/m3 x 6900 mglkg x 0.30)} = 7.56 em
The mix of 70 per cent sand and 30 per cent slop oil can be applied 7.6 em deep.
29.6
Sampling
Appropriate sampling methods must be used to obtain a representative sample from each
storage facility or container whose contents are to be used in the disposal project in
question. Sub-samples from the field containers (usually 20L polyethylene pails) should
be prepared following the protocol below:
•
visually examine the sample, record ratio of free water to solids,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
127
•
•
•
•
2!1.7
decant and discard any free water in the sample container,
remove all large rocks, twigs, or vegetation,
homogenize the remaining oily by-product material, and
collect a 2 kg aliquot of the homogenized sample and place in a clean glass jar
(1 L) with a teflon-lined lid. Store the sample at 4°C. Collect sub-samples from
the 1 L glass jar for the required analyses.
Analyses
The following analyses are required for the characterization of the oily by-product
material:
METHOD
PARAMETERS
*1.9 (sample: water) Water Soluble Extract
pH, Specific Conductance, Chloride,
Sodium
* Composition Analysis (Dean Stark)
%water, % solids, % hydrocarbon
*Total Metals (US EPA 3050 (SW 846))
cadmium, mercury, lead, nickel, copper,
zinc
Specific Gravity (Standard Methods for the
Examination of Water and Waste water,
APHA, AWW~ WPCF, 16th Ed.
Washington, 1985. Method 213 E.)
Density of oily by-products resembling
sludges.
Specific Gravity (American Society for
Testing and Materials, Washington.
"Standard Method for Specific Gravity of
Soils", Designation D 854- 83).
Density of granular oily by-products such as
oil sands and silts.
*
A description of the unique analytical methods is included in this section. The
remaining methods can be found in the cited sources.
A standardized reporting format has also been developed to ensure consistency in
chemical analyses and units of measurement (see attached Oily By-Product
Characterization for Road Disposal Data Sheet). Use this form to report all data.
1.
1:9 Water Soluble Extract Analyses Oily By-Product Material for
Application to Roads (tentative)
This method as described specifically relates to water soluble extracts on oily byproduct material which are being considered for application to roads, and is
intended for the determination of pH, specific conductance, chloride, and sodium.
The sample is shaken with demineralized water at a 1:9 (sample: water) ratio for
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
128
several hours and then allowed to stand overnight. Analyses are carried out on
the clarified aqueous portion. Data are expressed as milligrams of constituent per
kilogram of original material as received.
(a)
Procedure
(i)
Prepare a 1:9 (sample: water) mixture by weighing 100 grams,
± O.lg (to an accuracy of± 0.1g) ofhomogenized oily by-product
material into a 2 litre glass jar with a teflon lined lid. Add 900 ml
demineralized water.
(ii)
Shake on a mechanical shaker for 2 hours.
(iii)
Allow to stand overnight at 4°C.
(iv)
Decant supernate - if supernate portion of sample is extremely
turbid with suspended solids, clarification may be carried out by
filtering supernate through a coarse (5 u) pure cellulose filter
paper. Cany out pH and specific conductivity measurements on
the supernate. Follow instrument manufacturers recommended
procedures.
(v)
Filter a portion of the supernate through 0.45 u cellulose accetate
filter paper. Cany out chloride and sodium analyses on the
supernate by Ion Chromatography and Atomic Absorption
Spectrophotometry respectively, following manufacturers
recommended procedures.
Note: Other approved analytical methodology may be. used, such
as titrimetric or colorimetric procedures for chloride
determinations, and flame emission or Inductively Coupled
Plasma Emmission for sodium determinations.
(b)
Data Generation and Calculations
(i)
Report pH values in pH units and Specific Conductance in dS/m
on the liquid supernate.
(ii)
Report chloride and sodium values in mg/L obtained from the
liquid supernate and then calculate the concentration of these
elements in mglkg appearing in the original sample "as received"
(i.e. mg!L (from supernate) x 9 mglkg).
=
(iii)
Use the standard report form as supplied (see attached, Oily Byproduct Characterization for Road Disposal Data Sheet) to report
all data.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
129
(iv)
2.
Calculate the loading value for sodium and chloride in kglha by
following the calculation as outlined on the data sheet. This
provides a loading value in kg of constituent per hectare of road
surface.
Dean Stark Anaiysis for Oily By-Products
Dean Stark analysis is used to determine the hydrocarbon, water, and solids
contents of oily by-product samples by using a toluene reflux to separate these
components. Condensed solvent and water are continuously separated in a
distillation trap, with the water being retained in the trap. The solvent is recycled
through the extraction thimble of the extraction apparatus to dissolve the
hydrocarbon. The solids remaining in the thimble after extraction are measured
gravimetrically, the water content is measured by volume in the trap, and the
hydrocarbon content is calculated from this data.
(a)
Apparatus
(i)
Condenser- approximately 400 mm long with a 24/40 standard
taper joint.
(ii)
Distillation trap -with 24/40 standard taper joints, constructed so
that the water is separated from the solvent, and the solvent is
recycled back into the distillation apparatus.
(iii) . Distillation flask - a 1 Litre 45/50 standard taper single necked
flash.
(iv)
(b)
Extraction Thimble- Whatman 85 x 200 mm cellulose thimble,
single thickness.
Procedure·
(i)
Dry the thimbles in the drying oven for a minimum of 8 hours.
Cool the thimbles in the desiccator for a minimum of20 minutes,
weigh to the nearest 0.001 g. Record this weight as the initial dry
weight of the thimble.
(ii)
Ensuring that the sample is homogeneous, add approximately 30 to
40 g of sample to the thimble, weigh to the nearest 0.001 g.
Record this as the weight of the thimble plus sample.
(iii)
Assemble the distillation apparatus, ensure that all joints are
vapour tight.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
130
(iv)
With water flowing through the reflux condensers, turn the hot
plate or heating mantle to a medium heat setting, this will start the
reflux.
(v)
The toluene will boil and immerse the thimble in hot vapour. As
the material in the thimble is heated, the water in the sample will
be vaporized and be carried along with the hot solvent vapours to
the condenser where they will be cooled and fall back into the
distillation trap. The water will fall to the bottom of the trap, and
the solvent will be recycled back into the distillation apparatus.
The hydrocarbon portion of the sample will be dissolved in the hot
solvent vapour, and drip from the bottom of the thimble.
(vi)
The extraction is complete when the water level in the trap remains
constant, and the solvent dripping from the thimble is clear.
Depending on the nature of the sample, this may take from 1 to 8
or more hours.
(vii)
Terminate the extraction and allow the solvent and apparatus to
cool.
(viii) Measure the volume of water that is retained in the distillation trap
to the nearest 0.1 ml. Record this volume as the volume of water.
(ix)
Dismantle the distillation apparatus and remove the thimble.
(x)
Dty the thimbles in the drying oven for a minimum of 8 hours.
Cool the thimbles in the desiccator for a minimum of 20 minutes,
weigh to the nearest 0.001 g. Record this weight as the final
weight of the thimble.
(c)
Data Generation and Calculations
% Solids
% Water
=
.§__
w
v
w
=-
X
100
x 100
% Hydrocarbon = 100 - (% Solids + % Water)
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
131
Where:
s
=
v
=
w
=
the final weight of the solids after
the reflux is completed,
the volume of water retained in the
trap, ml, the density of water is
assumed to be 1.0 kg/L, and
the sample weight (initial weight
of thimble+ sample)- (initial weight
of the thimble).
=
Use the standard report form as supplied (see attached Oily
By-product Characterization for Road Disposal Data
Sheet) to report all data.
3.
Acid Digestion of Sediments, Sludges, and Soils - US EPA 3050 (SW846)
A representative 1-2 g (wet weight) sample is digested in nitric acid and hydrogen
peroxide. The digestate is then refluxed with either nitric acid or hydrochloric
acid. Dilute hydrochloric acid is used as the final reflux acid for the ICP or flame
analysis of Cd, Pb, Ni, and V. Dilute nitric acid is employed as the final dilution
acid for furnace AA analysis of Cd and Pb. A separate sample shall be dried for a
solids determination.
(a)
Procedure
Follow the EPA method with the exception of drying or grinding the
sample prior to digestion.
(b)
29.8
Data Collection and Calculations
(i)
Calculate the concentrations for Cd, Hg, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb in
mglkg in the original sample "as received".
(ii)
Use the standard report form as supplied (see attached Oily Byproduct Characterization for Road Disposal Data Sheet) to report
all data.
Approval Process
1.
Industry will sample and analyze the material to be spread on the roads or
driveways.
2.
If material is acceptable for road applications, the operator will provide the
following information to the recipient (local authority or landowner) and the
EUB:
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
132
(a)
completed copy of the oily by-product characterization for road disposal
data sheet signed by a representative from the laboratory and the operator,
and
(b)
a letter which identifies the source of the material and that it was sampled
and analyzed properly and that it meets EUB requirements.
3.
The operator shall have written consent that the recipient (local authority or
landowner) agrees to have oily by-product spread on the road or driveway.
4.
At the end of the season the EUB will enter the information onto the database and
will provide a summary to the Counties and MDs. A copy of the program for the
new database will be made available to the companies for their use. The
company can maintain their own database and submit the information to the EUB
on disk.
·
5.
Each County and MD will submit a list of operators that have applied oily byproduct to roads to the EUB.
6.
The EUB will compare the database to the County and MD records and will
follow-up any discrepancies.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
133
Oily By-Product Characterization For Road Disposal Data Sheet
Laboratory Name:
Date Received:
Date Analysed:
Lab Sample Number:
Field Sample Number:
Company:
Source:
(i.e. ecology pit, desand tank etc.)
Location: Lsd
_
_
_
_
Oil
%
Solids
%
W M
Description:
(i.e. oilv sand, slon oil etc.)
sc
pH
Concentration
Na
%
mg/L
dS/M
Calculated Depth of
Application2
em
mg/kg
mWL
Density of Sample
Concentration
Cadmium/Cd
Mercury/H_g
· mg/kg
mglkg
em
Concentration
Concentration
Nickel/Ni
mg/kg
Zinc/Zn
.mglkg
Lead/Ph
Conoer/Cu
Maximum application depth _ _ _ _ _ em (least "Calculated Depth of Application" from above).
The undersigned hereby certifies that the information is accurate and in accordance with the requirements of
Section 29.0.
Signed: ----------(Laboratory) -----------(Operator)
1
2
Sample must not contain halogenated hydrocaibons, hazardous chemicals, refmed or lube oil, flare pit sludges: or deleterious substances such
as filten;, mgs, vegetation, and other debris including significant volumes of contaminated agricullUilll soils.
The calculated depth of application for each constituent is detCIJDined as follows:
d (em)
=
L X__
10 4
.;;;;...._
DxC
Where:
d =depth (em)- calculated
L =loading mte ~)-specified in Section 29.3 for Na and Cl
D = density of sample (kglm3)- dctennined by labomtocy
C concentilltion (mglkg) detennined by laboratocy
=
This represents the calculated maximum depth of oil sludge (prior to mixing with aggregate) allowed, without exceeding each parameter limit
specified in Section 29.3. Your JIUIXimum allowed application depth is the smallest of the two calculated values and total metals concentilltion
must not exceed these values specified in Section 29.3. You JJIIISt also follow the Recommended Standards of Practice.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
134
30.0 Drilling Waste Management
For regulatory purposes, there are two categories of wastes produced from drilling operations:
•
•
drilling sump wastes, and
other solid, liquid material wastes associated with the wellbore and the surface
equipment.
30.1
Drilling Sump Wastes
Drilling sump wastes are addressed in a separate EUB waste management document
entitled Drilling Waste Management Requirements (Guide 50). The disposal and
treatment protocols in this document are only applicable to drilling sump wastes and
must not be applied to other oilfield wastes.
The Drilling Waste Management Requirements (Guide 50) were developed with
comprehensive input and review from industry, government and the public sector under
the direction of the Drilling Waste Review Steering Committee (DWRSC).
This included collective workshops and public participation.
30.2
Other Drilling Wastes
The management of the other drilling wastes is ultimately the responsibility of the well
licensee.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
135
31.0 Waste Transport by Pipelines
31.1
Introduction
The purpose of this section is to promote effective and operationally sound waste
management practices that concern the disposal of waste into pipelines. Specifically, the
use of pipelines as a conduit for waste dilution is discouraged. Although this concern
primarily relates to crude oil pipelines, the information equally applies to natural gas
pipelines.
Historically, crude oil pipelines have routinely been used for the disposal of a number of
types of upstream petroleum industiy wastes. These waste types include tank bottom
sludges, lubricating oils, well servicing fracturing fluids, solvents, and other chemicals.
Although these wastes are often thought to be compatible with hydrocarbon liquids,
operational problems have occurred in pipeline systems and downstream refineries from
the cumulative effect of solids, metals, and other materials contained in the waste
streams. It is now apparent that the current pipeline specification of less than 0.5 per
cent BS & W (basic sediment and water) is singularly insufficient to control the quality
of materials injected into pipelines, thereby potentially creating significant downstream
waste management, process, and safety related issues.
As the authority to manage this subject does not fall under the jurisdiction of any one
party, a committee was formed in 1994 representing refiners, producers, pipeline
licensees, regulators, petroleum product suppliers, and waste facility operators.
31.2
Appropriate Wastes for Disposal via Injection into Pipeline Systems
It is recognized that the introduction of inappropriate wastes into crude oil pipelliies is a
waste management issue, as well as a crude quality issue which must be ·addressed
between the producers, pipeline licensees, and refinery companies. It is expected that
such issues will be routinely handled through contractual obligations between the parties
involved.
Hydrocarbons in waste liquid (i.e. fracturing fluids) may be of value to refinery
operations and under controlled conditions, may be safely handled by the pipeline and
refinery system. The following oilfield wastes may be injected into a pipeline system if
both of the following control conditions are met:
•
the waste has a usable hydrocarbon content and does not pose a downstream
handling problem, and
•
specific agreements have been arranged between the waste producer, the
pipeline licensee, and the refinery for which the specific waste volume is
destined (refer to Section 31.3, Communication).
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
136
Appropriate Waste Types
(if the above two conditions are met:)
31.3
•
Liquid pigging wastes.
*
Certain hydrocarbon based drilling fluids.
•
Certain hydrocarbon based surface and downhole treating chemicals.
•
Waste refined fuels including diesel and gasoline.
•
Well servicing fracturing fluids that are produced from the wellbore and are a
part of regular production. Fluids transferred as part of a production stream
will not require a specific agreement as identified above. Note: well servicing
fracturing fluids, whether residual, spent or unused, which have purposely been
isolated from the process production system (i.e. cannot be handled by surface
separation or treatment usually due to solids content) must not be disposed
directly into a pipeline system.
•
Non-halogenated organic solvents. Note: if a solvent is contaminated then the
control mechanism must address the contaminant, which may, in consultation
with the pipelines and refineries, determine whether it is a contaminant to the
pipeline and refinery system.
•
Crude oil emulsions.
•
The liquid component of all hydrocarbon based sludges provided it is not
contaminated by any of the banned waste types, identified in Section 6.1.
•
Certain other liquid hydrocarbon wastes that have a BS & W content greater
than 0.5 per cent, but still have a sufficient hydrocarbon content to be
acceptable, with agreement, by the pipeline licensee and refinery companies.
Communication
It is imperative that a cooperative communication process be established between
producers, pipeline licensees, and refiners to successfully manage oilfield wastes and to
help maintain the quality of Alberta's marketable crude oil.
Crude oil recovered from an oilfield waste treatment facility is not considered a waste as
per these requirements. Other oilfield waste management facility products which are
identified in the appropriate waste types list, are expected to be included in this
communication process.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
137
32.0 Radioactive Contaminated Oilfield Wastes
The purpose of this section is to establish the minimum requirements for the handling and
disposal of radioactive contaminated oilfield wastes.
32.1
Control and Disposal of Recirculated Radioactive Contaminated Frac Sand
These materials are regulated by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). Specific
details on how radioactive contaminated frac sands are handled and disposed should be
discussed with the AECB.
Licences issued by the AECB to all frac sand licensees normally contain the following
condition:
For disposal, sand labelled with a radioactive prescn'bed substance shall be:
1.
2.
3.
sent to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, after making prior arrangement,
sent, after making prior arrangements, to a facility possessing an appropriate
waste facility operating licence (WFOL) issued by the AECB, or
buried at the worksite under at least 30 em of soil, provided that the specific
activity is less than one scheduled quantity per kilogram of sand.
In all cases where the licensee uses the burial option, the contaminated material must be
buried in accordance with the AECB licence condition.
If the licensee does not agree to burial in accordance with the disposal conditions of their
licence, the AECB must be notified immediately of the following information:
1.
the details of the job including:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
2.
site,
amount and type of tracer,
# of tonnes of sand used,
# of tonnes of sand recirculated,
where the sand is to be stored,
intended fate of the material,
soil conditions on the site, and
whether it was an oil or water based frac, and
the names of the people responsible for:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
the well,
the contaminated sand,
the decision not to bury,
the transportation of the contaminated sand, and
the ultimate treatment or handling of the sand.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
138
In certain cases, the AECB may, upon request, issue written approval for the transfer of
oily, contaminated frac sand to a nearby site for burial where soil conditions are more
suitable. The AECB views the transport of radioactive contaminated frac sand as an
unnecessary hazard, subject to motor vehicle accident, containment leakage, and wind
spreading, all of which could potentially result in contamination of public thoroughfares,
private property, or equipment.
The following procedures are required by the EUB to handle and dispose radioactive
contaminated frac sands:
1.
If the material is to be buried on site, in accordance with the AECB licence, the
material must be buried in cl~y.
32.2
2.
If the material cannot be buried on site, the material must be disposed into an
approved Class Ia or Ib landfill.
3.
Oily by-product materials that contain radioactive materials may not be applied to
road surfaces.
Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials
Natura!J.y Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORMs) are not within the scope of the
Atomic Energy Control Act administered by the AECB. Jurisdiction for the control of
NORM rests with the individual provinces.
The Western Canadian NORM Committee produced a document entitled Guidelines for
the Handling ofNaturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) in Western Canada.
These guidelines provide some general assistarice on NORM management options. Not
all these options are available in Alberta.
The options are very general in nature and do not give specific criteria for the handling
treatment or disposal methods for the NORM material.
The EUB, together with stakeholders, will be developing specific NORM requirements.
Until such time as these requirements are developed, the EUB recommends that any
handling, treating, or disposing ofNORM material generally follow the guidelines
established by the NOR.¥ Committee document.
Copies of the NORM guidelines may be obtained from:
Alberta Labour, Professional and Technical Services
Occupational Health and Safety
9th Floor, 10808- 99 Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta TSK OGS
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
PARTG
APPENDICES
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
139
PARTG
APPENDICES
Appendix 1.0
References
A number of publications by the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) were published prior to
1 January 1996 under the Board's former name of the Energy Resources Conservation Board
(ERCB). Those publications are referred to in this reference list as having an ERCB publication
designation.
Enforcement
1
Province of Alberta, 1992. Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act, Section 20.0.
Importation
2
Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, EUB Informational Letter IL 96-1. "Interim Policy on
the Importation ofNon-Dangerous Oilfield Waste".
3.
Energy Resources Conservation Board, Informational Letter IL 94-23, 1994. "Interim Policy
on the Importation ofNon-Dangerous Oilfield Waste".
Waste Characterization
4.
Alberta Environmental Protection, March 1995. "Alberta Users Guide for Waste Managers".
5.
Government of Canada, 1992. Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act.
6.
Province of Alberta, 1992. Alberta Transportation of Dangerous Goods Control Act.
7.
Alberta Environment, EPS, 1983. "Guidelines for the Disposal of Sulphur Containing.Solid
Wastes".
8.
Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, 1990. "Production Waste Management
Handbook for the Alberta Petroleum Industry". Calgary, Alberta.
9.
Province of Alberta, 1993. Environmental Protection and Enhanceme1:1t Act, Waste Control
Regulation, Alberta Regulation 129/93.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
140
Waste Storage and Transfer Facilities
10.
Energy Resources Conservation Board, Interim Directive, ID 95-03. "Storage Requirements
for the Upstream Petroleum Industry...
11.
Energy Resources Conservation Board, 1995, Guide G-55, "Storage Requirements for the
Upstream Petroleum Industry...
. Surface Facilities Associated with Disposal Wells
12.
Energy Resources Conservation Board, Informational Letter, IL 94-2, ..Injection and
Disposal Wells; Well Classifications, Completion, Logging and Testing Requirements...
13.
Energy Resources Conservation Board, Guide G-51, 1994...Injection and Disposal Wells;
Well Classifications, Completion, Logging and Testing Requirements ...
Biodegradation
14.
Alberta Environmental Protection, Soil Protection Branch, 1992...Assessment and
Remediation of Earthen Pits Associated With Oil and Gas Production in Alberta, Draft 311 •
15.
Alberta Environment, EPS, 1988 ...Guidelines for Land Treatment of Industrial Waste".
16.
Beak Consultants Limited, 1981. 11 Landspreading of Sludges at Canadian Petroleum
Facilities... Petroleum Association for the Conservation of the Canadian Environment,
Report No. 81-5A
17.
Danielson, R. M., N. Okazawa, W. J. Ceroici, 1988. "Disposal of Oilfield Wastes by Land
Treatment: 1987 Studies on the Effects on the Environment and Implications for Future
Land Use... Canadian Petroleum Association and Environment Canada.
18.
Danielson, R. M., E. Peak, N. Okaqawa, W. J. Ceroici, 1990. "Disposal of Oilfield Wastes
by Land Treatment in Alberta: Summary Report on Feasibility, Environmental Risk
Assessments and Future Land Use... Canadian Petroleum Association and Environment
Canada.
19.
Danielson, R. M., 1994...Progress Report Bio-Reactor Project: Laboratory Tests to
Enhance the Biodegradation of Diesel Invert Mud Residues (DIMR)". Canadian Association
of Petroleum Producers.
20.
Environmental Research and Technology, Inc., 1983 ...Land Treatment Practices in the
Petroleum Industry ... American Petroleum Institute.
21.
Fujikawa, J.l., 1993. "Land Application of Industrial Wastes in Alberta: Philosophy and
Policy". Alberta Environmental Protection (Soils Protection Branch).
22.
Hinchee, R. E., Kittle, J. A., Reisinger, H. J., (ed) 1995. "Applied Bioremediation of
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
. 141
Petroleum Hydrocarbons". Battelle Press, Columbus, Ohio. A collection of papers derived
from the First, Second, and Third International In Situ and On-Site Bioreclamation
Symposia, which were held in 1991, 1993, and 1995 in San Diego, California.
23.
Hinchee, R. E., Sayles, G. D., Skeen, R. S., (ed) 1995. "Biological Unit Processes for
Hazardous Waste Treatment". Battelle Press, Columbus, Ohio. A collection of papers
derived from the First, Second, and Third International In Situ and On-Site Bioreclamation ·
Symposia, which was held in 1991, 1993, and 1995 in San Diego, California.
24.
Overcash, M. R. and Pal, D., 1979. "Design of Land Treatment Systems for Industrial
Wastes: Theory and Practice". Ann Arbor Science, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
25.
Peake, E., D. Connery, D. Holowachuk and W. Wiebe. 1985. "Land Treatment for the
Disposal of Oil Waste Sludges". The Canadian Petroleum Association and Alberta
Environment Research Trust.
Landfills
26.
Alberta Energy and Utilities Board Informational Letter IL 96-3, "Suspension and
Reclamation ofUpstream Oil and Gas Facilities".
27.
Alberta Environment, EPS, 1987. ..Guidelines for Industrial Landfills...
28.
Alberta Environmental Protection, 1996...Draft Code of Practice: Landfills...
12 August 1996.
29.
Alberta Environmental Protection, Land Reclamation Division, Conservation and
Reclamation Information Letter, June 1994. ''Burial ofMaterials On-Lease...
30.
Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment, 1991. ..National Guidelines for the
Landfilling ofHazardous Waste... Report CCME-WM!fRE-028E.
31.
Province of Alberta, 1996: Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act, Waste Control
Regulation, Alberta Regulation 192/96.
Thermal Treatment
32.
Alberta Environment, EPS, 1989. "Air Monitoring Directive- Monitoring and Reporting
Procedures for Industry".
33.
Alberta Environment, EPS, 1983. "Guidelines for Design and Operation of Refuse
Incinerators in Alberta".
34.
Alberta Environmental Protection, ERS, 1995. "Alberta Stack Sampling Code". Publication
Number: Ref. 89.
35.
Brunner, C. R., 1984. Incineration Systems. Van Nostrand Reihold Co.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
142
36.
Brunner, C. R., 1991. Hazardous Air Emissions from Incineration. Chapman and Hall.
Second Edition, New York.
37.
Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment, 1989. "Operating and Emissions
Guidelines for Municipal Solid Waste Incinerators". Report CCME-TSIWM-TRE003.
38.
Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment, 1992. ''National Guidelines for
Hazardous Waste Incineration Facilities, Design, and Operating Criteria, Volume 1".
39.
Corey, R C., (Editor) 1985. Principles and Practices of Incineration. Technomic Publishing
Company Inc.
40.
Cross, F. L. and Hesketh, H. E., 1989. Controlled Air Incineration. Wiliey-Interscience.
41.
Danielson, John A., (Editor) 1973. Air Pollution Engineering Manual, Second Edition, U.S.
EPA Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
42.
Department of Fisheries amd the Environment, 1978. Packaged Incinerators National
Emission Guidelines. The Canada Gazette, Part 1, November 25, 1978. pp. 7004-7008.
43.
Fisheries and Environment Canada, EPS, 1977. Air Pollution Emissions and Control
Technology: Pachaged Incinerator. Economic and Technical Review Report
BPS 3-AP-77-3.
44.
Ontario Ministry of the Environment. Environmental Approvals Branch, 1974. Criteria for
Incinerator Design and Operation. Revised.
45.
Ontario Ministry of the Environment, 1986.1ncinerator Design and Operating Criteria
Volume ll Biomedical Waste Incinerators.
46.
Ontario Ministry of the Environment, 1988. Guidance for Incinerator Design and Operation
Volume I General.
47.
Perry, R and Chilton, C., 1973. Chemical Engineering Handbook. Fifth Edition. McGrawHill Inc., New York.
48.
United States Environmental Protection Agency, 1977. Municipal Incinerator Enforcement
Manual, USEPA 340/1-76-073.
Spreading of Oily By-Products to Roads
49.
Department of Soil Science, 1977. The Reclamation of Agricultural Soils After Oil Spills,
Part 1: Research, University of Alberta.
50.
McKeague, J. A., 1978. Manual on Soil Sampling and Methods of Analysis Second edition.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
- 143
51.
Syncrude Canada Limited, 1979. "Syncrude Analytical Methods for Oil Sand and Bitumen
Processing".
Groundwater
52.
Alberta Environment, EPS., 1988. Guidelines for Land Treatment of Industrial Waste.
Appendix 2. Groundwater Evaluation and Details for Construction of Observation Wells.
. 53.
Aller, L., Bennet, T. W., Hackett, G., Petty, R J., Lehr, J. H., Sedoris, H.,
Nielson, D. M., and Denne, J. E., 1989. Handbook of Suggested Practices for the
Installation of Groundwater Monitoring Wells. National Water Well Association, Dublin,
Ohio, 398 pp.
·
54.
Driscoll, F. G., 1986. Groundwater and Wells. Johnson Division, St. Paul Minnesota.
1089 pp.
55.
Nielson, D. M., 1991. Practical Handbook of Groundwater Monitoring. Lewis Publishers
Inc., Chelsa, Michigan, 716 pp.
56.
United States Environmental Protection Agency, 1986. RCRA Groundwater Monitoring
Technical Enforcement Guidance Document; Office of Waste Programs Enforcement, Office
of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, OWSER-99501.1, United States Environmental
Protection Agency 317 pp. (These publications are all available through the National
Ground Water Association, Dublin, Ohio).
Closure
57.
Alberta Energy and Utilities Board Informational Letter IL 96-3, "Suspension arid
Reclamation ofUpstream Oil and Gas Facilities".
Environmental Impact Assessments
58.
Energy Resources Conservation Board General Bulletin GB 93-14. "Administrative
Procedures for Environmental Impact Assessments on Energy Projects".
59.
Energy Resources Conservation Board and Alberta Environmental Protection, November
1993. "Administrative Procedures for. Preparing an Environmental Impact Assessment".
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
"145
Appendix 2.0
Definitions
Aboveground Storage Tank:
A tank that sits on or above the ground surface and whose top and
complete external sides can be visually inspected.
Agent:
An agent is a person or corporation that assumes the same
responsibilities and obligations as the applicant. An agent must be
designated when the company seeking an approval does not have
a corporate office in Alberta. An agent assumes all legal
responsibilities for the applicant.
BS & W:
An acronym meaning ''basic sediments and water" which
commonly refers to settled solid and semi-solid components of
liquids in tanks and other containment vessels. BS & W is also
commonly referenced as S & W (sediments and water). BS & W
or S & W are determined using the ASTM Standard D4007 or the
API document Sediment and Water, Chapter 10, Section 3,
Determination of Water and Sediment in Crude oil by the
Centrifuge Method (Laboratory Procedure).
Biodegradation Facility:
Oilfield waste management facility utilizing biodegradation to
degrade oilfield waste. Examples include permanent biopiles and
biocells. On-site land treatment if a single application of oilfield
waste is not considered to be a biodegradati~n facility.
Closure:
Occurs when there is no further disposal and/or treatment of waste
at a waste management facility. Reclamation activities may still
be ongoing after closure.
Closure (Landfill):
Occurs when there is no further disposal of waste at the landfill,
and placement of a final cover is completed.
Compliance Test:
Evaluation of a thermal treatment process for the purposes of
obtaining operational data to determine if a process meets the
terms and conditions of regulatory approvals previously issued for
that treatment process and the approved waste(s) tested.
Requirements for compliance tests will be specified in the
operating approval for the thermal treatment process.
Container:
Any portable above ground containment device (i.e. drums, pails,
bags, boxes, totes, etc.) which has a capacity that does not exceed
1m3•
Containment Device:
See "Primary Containment Device" and "Secondary Containment
Device".
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
146
Dilution:
Mixing of a liquid or solid (waste) with another liquid or solid for
the primary pmpose of reducing the concentration of the original
liquid or solid (waste).
Environment:
All components of the earth including air, land, and water; all
layers of the atmosphere, all organic and inorganic matter and
living organisms, and interacting natural systems.
Filter Material:
All types of disposable filters from oil and gas production
operations, including vehicle'filters, oil pads, and absorbants used
in maintenance of such operations.
·
Fixed Thermal Treatment
Unit:
A thermal treatment unit which has been approved for operation
at one geographical location only and which cannot be move.d
without a near complete dismantling.
Generator:
See Waste Generator.
Halogenated:
The production of incorporating a halgen (i.e. fluorine, chlorine,
bromine, or iodine) into a chemical compound.
Incineration:
A thermal treatment process which destroys contaminants by
oxidation in a controlled environment, at temperatures which are
effective to reduce contaminants to ashes, inert gases, or vapours.
Inert Waste:
Any solid waste that, upon disposal to land, is not reasonably
expected to undergo physical, chemical and/or biological changes
to such as extent as to produce substances that may cause an
adverse effect. Examples include demolition debris, concrete,
asphalt, glass, cement returns, scrap metal, and dry timber or
wood that has not been chemically treated. Also known as Non·
reportable Waste.
Landfill:
A waste management facility at which waste is disposed by
placing it on or in land in a manner that minimizes adverse human
health and environmental effects, but does not include a land
treatment facility, a surface impoundment, a salt cavern, or a
disposal well. Oilfield landfills are a type of Oilfield Waste
Management facility, and are approved by the EUB to accept only
oilfield waste.
Land Treatment:
A planned and controlled mixing of the waste and surface soil in
which the inherent soil processes are used to biodegrade,
transform, and assimilate the waste constituents.
Leak Detection System:
A system designed for the early detection and collection of any
leakage from a primary containment device.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
147
Liquid:
A substance that-contains free liquids as determined by the US
EPA Method 9095 Paint Filter Liquids Test, Test Methods for
Evaulating Solid Wastes Physical/Chemical Methods (EPA
Publication No. SW 846).
Manifesting:
The use of documentation which must accompany shipments of
dangerous oilfield waste on public roads to assist first responders
in the event of an accident, and to confirm the proper shipment of
wastes.
Mobile Thermal Treatment
Unit:
A thermal treatment unit which can be moved in single ·or
multiple units between geographical locations and which has
received an approval to operate from Alberta Environmental
Protection which does not pertain to a fixed geographical location.
Monitoring Well:
A well used to monitor the detection of liquid leakage from an
underground primary or secondary containment device, or a well
placed into a specific zone to enable the sampling of groundwater
and to detect the presence of any leachate in the groundwater
aquifer or the unsaturated zone.
Oilfield Waste:
An unwanted substance (by the generator) or mixture of
substances that results from the construction, operation or
reclamation of a well site, oil and gas battecy, gas plant,
compressor station, crude oil terminal, pipeline, gas gathering
system, heavy oil site, oil sands site, or related facility.
Oily Waste:
A specific type of oilfield waste that contains oil or bitumen
generated primarily during heavy oil production and typically
consists of mainly sands and slop oil.
Operator Code:
The code assigned by the EUB to individual companies used to
identify the licensee of wells or pipelines or the holder of
approvals for batteries or other facilities.
Post-Closure Period:
The period of 25 years from :final closure of a landfill, or so long
as leachate that-does not meet the performance standards for
landfills (listed in Table 15.1) is generated at a land:fill after final
closure.
Primary Containment
Device:
A device used to physically contain materials produced,
generated, and used by the upstream petroleum industry.
Receiver:
See Waste Receiver.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
148
Reclamation:
The removal of equipment or buildings or other structures or
appurtenances, and/or the conducting of investigations to
determine the presence of substances, and/or the decontamination
ofbuildings, other structures, other appurtenances, land, or water,
and/or the stabilization, contouring, maintenance, conditioning or
reconstruction of the surface of land, and/or any other procedure,
operation or requirement specified in the regulations.
Residuals:
The material left after a treatment process and may include ash,
solids, water, and recovered contaminants.
Secondary Containment
Device:
An impetvious barrier placed between the primary containment
Sludge:
An accumulated free settling wet solid typically consisting of
device and the ground beneath and surround it, for the purpose of
containing and preventing any leakage from the primary
containment device from impacting the environment.
hydrocarbon, water, and inorganic sediments (i.e. sands, silts, etc.)
·where the BS & W exceeds 0.5 per cent
Small Quantity Exemption:
Oilfield wastes (other than those substances listed in Part B of
Table 4 of the Schedule to the Alberta Users Guide for Waate
Managers published by Alberta Environmental Protection), are
not considered dangerous and are exempt from the storage
requirements if they are produced at any single site in an amount
less than 5 Kg per month, if a solid, or 5 L per month, if a liquid,
and the total quantity accumulated does not exceed 5 Kg or 5 L at
anytime.
Solid:
A substance that does not contain free liquids and is not gaseous
at standard conditions.
Stand-alone Facility:
A facility constructed and operated on its own site.
Storage:
The holding of materials produced, generated, and used by the
upstream petroleum industry for a period of time until the
products or wastes are used, transported, treated, or disposed.
Storage Area:
See Waste Storage Area.
Storage Facility:
See Waste Storage Facility.
Tank:
A device designed to contain materials produced, generated, and
used by the upstream petroleum industry, which is constructed of
impervious materials that provide structural support and may
include such materials as concrete, plastic, fibreglass reinforced
plastic, or steel.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
. 149
Test Bum:
Operation of a thennal treatment process for the purpose of
obtaining operational data, to determine if a process meets
regulatory requirements. Test bums are required if the process
has not previously received regulatory approvals for the waste
tested.
Thennal Desorption:
'A thennal treatment process which applies a heat source to a
waste material to evaporate or volatilize contaminants from the
waste material. Contaminant vapours are then incinerated in an
oxidizing unit.
Thennaltijstillation
Recovery:
A thennal treatment process which applies a heat source to a
waste material to evaporate or volatilize the contaminants.
Contaminant vapours are then cooled, condensed, and collected.
Collected liquids may then be separated into oil and water phases.
Thennal Oxidation:
See Incineration.
Thennal Phase Separation:
See Thennal Lijstillation Recovery.
Transfer Station:
See Waste Transfer Station.
Treatment:
Any method, technique, or process that is applied to change the
physical, chemical, or biological character or composition of a
substance.
Underground Storage Tank:
A tank that is partially or completely buried and does not allow
for the visual inspection of the top, complete sides, and bottom of
the tank without excavation.
Uppermost Formation:
A continuous water saturated geological stratum or strata
including, but not limited to sand leases and acquifers, that is
projected to be the most probable pathway or pathways for lateral
transport of leachate.
Vaulted Storage Tank:
A tank that is contained in a concrete or other type of solid walled
space (i.e. vault) either below or above ground level. The vault
can be accessed through a manway or a top which is open to
atmosphere. It may or may not be possible to visually inspect the
tank on all sides.
Waste:
See Oilfield Waste.
Waste Generator:
The licensee and/or approval holder, or agent, as defined by the
records of the Board, of a well or other facility, over which the
Board has jurisdiction, which generates oilfield waste. Refer to
Section 2.1, Responsibilities.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
150
Waste Management Facility:
(Oilfield)
A facility whose operation is approved by the EUB and consists
of any or all of the following: waste processing facility, waste
storage facility/waste transfer station, surface facility associated
with disposal wells, biodegradation facility, oilfield landfill,
thermal treatment facility, or any other oilfield waste management
technology or facility.
Waste Receiver:
A person or party who accepts or receives oilfield waste for the
purpose of storage, consolidation, transfer, treatment, or disposal.
Refer to Section 2.1, Responsibilities.
Waste Storage Area:
(Oilfield)
A storage area is part of an operating EUB approved oil and gas
or oil sands facility. This is a designated area used to store
oilfield waste in containers, tanks, bulk pads, or lined earthen
excavations.
Waste Storage Facility:
(Oilfield)
A stand-alone storage facility dedicated to the collection of one
company's waste materials, until volumes are sufficient for an
economic transfer of the wastes to treatment/disposal facilities.
Waste Tracking:
A system for monitoring and recording the generation, handling,
treatement, and disposal of waste.
Waste Transfer Station:
A stand-alone storage facility that is used for the purpose of
collecting upstream oilfield wastes, generated by various
companies, until volumes are sufficient for an economic transfer
of the wastes to treatement/disposal facilities.
Waste Transporter:
A person or party who receives or takes control of oilfield waste
for the purpose of transportation.
Waste Treatment:
Any method, technique or process, including, without limitation,
neutralization and stabilization, that is designed to change the
physical, chemical, or biological character or composition of a
substance.
Watercourse:
The bed and shore of a river, stream, lake, creek, lagoon, swamp,
marsh, or other natural body of water, or a canal, ditch, reservoir,
or other man-made surface feature whether it contains or conveys
water continuously or intermittently.
Weather Protection:
A structure, protective coating or cover which ensures that the
physical integrity of primary containment devices are not
-compromised by the elements of nature.
Wellhead Protection Zone:
The surface and subsurface area through which groundwater
moves to reach a municipal or communal water supply well. The
horizontal extent of the wellhead protection zone corresponds to
the distance from the well to the boundary defined by a minimum
draw-down, based on the normal pumping rate ofO.l m from the
equilibrium groundwater level.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
151
Appendix 3.0
Recommended Test Methods
This section provides a listing of the recommended test methods for the analysis of water, soil,
sludges, hydrocarbons and waste for characterization purposes.
Test methods not listed in this section may also be considered, providing they can be validated
through collaborative studies, comparison to SRM (Standard Reference Materials), and statistical
analyses (precision, standard deviation data).
The Guidelines for Collaborative Study Procedure to Validate Characteristics ofa Method of
Analysis, in the appendix of AOAC. (1990), or Method Development and Evaluation, Method 1040
in APHA (1992), outlines steps that must be considered when preparing a collaborative study.
Analytical Methods; Reference Code Descriptions
1.
AOAC, "Official Method of Analysis, of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists",
current edition.
2.
APHA-AWWA-WEF, "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater",
current edition.
3.
ASTM, "American Society for Testing and Materials", current edition.
4.
Alberta Environmental Protection, "Methods Manual for Chemical Analysis of Water and
Wastes", Alberta Environmental Centre, Vegreville, Alberta; October 1987, AECV87-M1,
or latest edition.
5.
Alberta Environmental Protection, "Methods Manual for Chemical Analysis of Pesticides
and PCB Residues in Water and Wastes", Pollution Control Laboratory, Edmonton, Alberta,
1979.
6.
Carter, M. R, "Soil Sampling and Methods of Analysis", Canadian Society of Soil Science,
1993.
7.
Dionex Corporation Methods Manual.
8.
ENVIRODAT, Dictionary of Codes, Environment Canada.
9.
EPA, see US EPA.
10.
FSPA, "Method Manual for Forest Soil and Plant Analysis", Kalra, Y. P. and Maynard, D.
G., IRNOR-X-319, Forestry Canada.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
152 .
11.
McGill and Rowell, "Extraction of Oil from Soils", The Reclamation of Agricultural Soils
after Oil Spills, Department of Soil Science, University of Alberta.
12.
McKeague, J. A., "Manual on Soil Sampling and Methods of Analysis", Canadian Society of
Soil Science, 1978.
13.
NAQUADAT, Dictionary of Codes, Water Quality Branch, Environment Canada.
14.
SM (Standard Methods), see APHA.
15.
Syncrude, "Syncrude Analytical Methods for Oil Sand and Bitumen Processing", Syncrude
Canada Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta, 1979.
16.
TCLP, "Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure".
17.
TDGR, "Transportation ofDangerous Goods Regulation".
18.
US EPA, "Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste; Physical/Chemical Methods, SW-846",
1986 or latest edition.
19.
US EPA, "Environmental Protection Agency Regulations on Test Procedures for the
Analysis of Pollutants", 40 CFR 136, 1984.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
153
US EPA method 9095 Paint Filter Liquids
Liquids/Solids
Dispersible Fonn
Waste Control
Regulation 1(f)
Flammable Liquids
Waste Control
Regulation Schedule 1
Section 1(a)
3.1
3.2
Flammable
Waste Control Solids
Regulation Schedule 1
Section 1{a)
4
ASTM093-80
USEPAMETHOO 1010
Flammable Solids
Waste Control
Regulation Schedule I
Section l(b)
4.1
Readily Combustible Bum Test or Burning Rate Test -Interim Compilation of Test Methods
UnderTDOR
Flammable Solids
Waste Control
Regulation Schedule 1
Section 1(b) see also
14(2)(d)
4.2'
Test for Pyrophoric SubstiUlces or Test for Self Heating SubstiUlces - Interim Compilation ofTest
Methods Under TDOR
Os.ldlzlng Substances
Waste Control
Regulation Schedule 1
Section l(c)
5
Test for Solid Oxidizing SubstiUlces -Interim Compilation ofTest Methods Under TDOR
Poisonous Solids or Liquids
Waste Control
Regulation Schedule I
Section I
and
6.1
By review of specified references or previous knowledge
1Refer
As described in the Regulation and Part I of Alberta Users Guide for Waste Managers
3.3
ASTM056-79, or
ASTM 093-80, or
ASTM 03828-81, or
ASTM 03278-82
to Alberta Users Guide for Waste Managers, March 1995, Alberta Environmental Protection
154
ANALYTICAL
PARAMETERffEST
SECTIONWCR
CLASS
MEmOD
Toxic Gases
Waste Control
Regulation Schedule I
Section l(d)(iii)
2.3
By review of specified references or previous knowledge
Corrosive Solids or Liquids
Waste Control
Regulation Schedule I
Section 1(e)
8
Method 9040, 9041, 9045 SW-846 Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste, Physical/Chemical
Methods- US EPA
Polychlorinated Biphenyls or, Article•
containing PCB
Waste Control
Regulation Schedule 1
Section 1(f)
9.1
US EPA Method 8080A or ASTM D 3304 or A Method for the Analysis of Polychlorinated
Dibenzo-para-dioxins (PCDDs), and Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs), etc. 1/RM/3, May 1990
Environment Canada
Toxic Leachate Waste- containing...
Table 1
Waste Control
Regulation Schedule 1 ·
Section 1(g)(i)
9.2
Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) US EPA Reg 40CFR261 App II
Toxic Leachate Waste- containing...
Table2
Waste Control
Regulation Schedule 1
Section 1(g)(ii)
9.3
Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) US EPA Reg 40CFR261 App II
Toxic Leachate Waste- containing Dioxin
orFuran
Waste Control
Regulation Schedule 1
Section 1(g)(iii)
9.3
A Method for the Analysis of Polychlorinated Dibenzo-para-dioxins (PCDDs), and
Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs), etc. 1/RM/3, May 1990 Environment Canada or Reference
Method for the Analysis of Polychlorinated Dibenzo-para-dioxins (PCDDs), and Polychlorinated
Dibenzo fruans (PCDFs) in Pulp and Paper Mill Effiuents EPS 1/RM/19 Feb 1992 Environment
Canada
Waste Type 200 Spent Filters produced In
the fabric cleaning Industry where an
organic solvent Is used as the cleanlns
agent
Table 3 of the Schedule
to the Alberta User
Guide for Waste
Managers BUT see
Section 3(h) ofth~
WCR
9.3
Determine if the filters have been steam stripped in a steam cabinet with sparger for a period of 8
hours or more.
Waste Type 201 Spent Lubricating OU
and Undrained Lube Oil Filters Removed
from Intemal Combustion Engines
Table 3 of the Schedule
to the Alberta User
Guide for Waste
Managers BUT see
Section 3(h) of the
WCR
9.3
.
Calculated DE for filters
155
1
ANALYTICAL
PARAMETERffEST
SECTIONWCR
LandfiUable halogenated solids
Waste Control
Regulation Section
14(2)(a) Landfillable
Hazardous Wastes
Landfillable halogenated Uqulds
Waste Control
Regulation Section
14(2)(b) Landfillable
Hazardous Wastes
Landflllable nonhalogenated organic
compounds
Waste Control
Regulation Section
14(2)(c) Landfillable
Hazardous Wastes
Landfillable spontaneously combustible
hazardous waste
Waste Control
Regulation Section
14(2)(d) Landfillable
Hazardous Wastes
Landfil1able Uquld hazardous waste
containing metals
Waste Control
Regulation Section
14(2)(e) Landfillable
Hazardous Wastes
Landflllable solid hazardous waste
containing metals
Waste Control
Regulation Section
14(2)(f) Landfillable
Hazardous Wastes
Landfillable liquid hazardous waste
containing cyanide
Waste Control
Regulation Section
14(2)(g) Landfill able
Hazardous Wastes
(Liquid Cyanide)
CLASS
.
.
.
4.2
.
9.3
.
MEmOD
TCLP, General:
• extract the sample in n-hexane using EPA 3550:
·run the extract as per EPA 9076; or
• ethyl acetate or n-hexane extraction followed by combustion 8Ild microcolonnetric titration
·Specific compounds- EPA 8240 and 8270 (SW-846)
TCLP Petroleum Liquids: EPA 9076 for total halogenated organics, Alberta Environmental
Protection Ml 06.0 for PCBs
Water: EPA 9020 for total halogenated organics, Alberta Environmental Protection Al06.0 for
PCBs
PCB: analytical method involves the use of a gas chonnatograph with an electron capture detector.
The use of US EPA Method 8080A or AS1M D 3304 are recommended.
TCLP for cresols and cresylic acid: EPA 8270 following the acid extractables portions only, use
EPA 3510 or 3550 for sample extraction as appropriate.
For remainder of parameters (liquids and solids): EPA 8240 purge and trap GC/MS (3 additional
purge parameters) or GC/FID.
Test for Pyrophoric Substances or Test for Self-Heating Substances- Interim Compilation of Test
Methods Under TDGR
arsenic SM• 3114B, beryllium SM• 3120B, cadmium Naquadat No. 48011, chromium
hexavalent SM• 3500-CrD,lead Naquadat No. 8201, mercury SM* 3500 HgB, nickel Naquadat
No. 28011, selenium SM* 3114B, silver SM*3500-~gC, thallium SM* 3500-TIC, uranium
Dionex Method 48
Note SM*=Standard Method
Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) US EPA Reg 4CFR261. App ll
(for hazardous waste buried with garbage) or (modified for hazardous waste buried alone,
monofills)
Naquadat No. 06608L with auto colorimetric instrumentation
156
ANALYTICAL
PARAMETERffEST
SECTIONWCR
CLASS
METIIOD
Landfillable hazardous corrosive wastes
Waste Control
Regulation Section
14(2)(h) Landfillable
Hazardous Wastes
8
Method 9040,9041,9045 SW-846 Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste, Physical/Chemical
Methods
157
';,•
'
'
.:· .....
':'
(•
pH
10301
Combination Electrode/
pH meter
Specltlc Conductance
2041
Conductivity Meter
dSim
20111 (D)
ICP-AES
mgiL
0.006
APHA 3500 Ca (C); APHA 3120 (B); EPA 6010
20103 (D)
Atomic Absorption
mgiL
0.05
APHA3500Ca(B); EPA 7140
02010 (D)
EDTA Titrimetric
mgiL
0.5
APHA 3500 Ca (D)
12111 (D)
ICP-AES
mgiL
0.002
APHA 3500 Mg (C) ; APHA 3120 (B); EPA
6010
12102 (D)
Atomic Absorption
mgiL
O.ot
APHA 3500 Mg (B); EPA 7450; AOAC 974.27
19111 (D)
ICP-AES
mgiL
0.3
APHA 3500 K (C); APHA 3120 (B); EPA 6010
19102 (D)
Atomic Absorption
mgiL
0.1
APHA 3500 K (B); EPA 7610; AOAC 973.53;
19103 (D)
Flame Photometer
mgiL
0.02
APHA 3500 K (D)
11111 (D)
ICP-AES
mgiL
0.03
APHA 3500 Na (C); APHA 3120 (B); EPA
6010
11102 (D)
Atomic Absorption
mgiL
0.1
APHA 3500 Na (B); EPA 7770; AOAC 973.54
11103 (D)
Flame Photometer
mgiL
0.02
APHA 3500 Na (D)
17203 (D)
Automated Ferricyanide
Method (Colorimetric)
mg/L
0.1
APHA 4500 C1 (E); EPA 9250, 9251;
17209 (D)
'Ion Chromatography
mgiL
0.01
APHA 4500 Cl (F); APHA 4110 (B)
APHA 4500 W (B); AOAC 973.41; EPA 9040
APHA2510 (B), AOAC 973.40; EPA 9050
Major Ions
Calcium (Ca)
Magnesium (Mg)
Potassium (I<)
Sodium(Na)
Chloride (CI)
0.45 1-lffi Filtration
0.45 1-lffi Filtration
0.45 1-lm Filtration
0.45 1-lm Filtration
0.45 1-lm Filtration
Titrimetric
APHA 4500 Cl (B)
158
ANALYI'ICAL
PARAMETER/fEST
Nitrate {N03)
(Nitrate +Nitrite - N)
(Dissolved)
Sulfate (S04)
(Dissolved)
METHOD
PREPARATION
ENVIRODAT
CODE
INSTRUMENTATION
METHOD
UNITS
0.45 1-lm Filtration
1111n112
(N03+N02)
Cadmiwn Reduction/
Automated
mgiL
0.002/
APHA 4500 N03 (E, F)
7315 (N03)
Ion Chromatography
mgiL
0.01
APHA 4500 N03 (C); APHA 4110 (8)
7120
(N03+NO:z)
Automated Colorimetric:
HydraziDe Reduction
mgiL
16309
Ion Chromatography
mgiL
0.01
APHA 4500 S04 (8); APHA 4110 (8)
16306
Automated Mcthy1thymo1 Blue
Method
mgiL
0.2
APHA 4500 S04 (F); EPA 9036
ICP-AES
mgiL
Atomic Absorption
mgiL
Cold-Vapour Atomic
Absorption
mgiL
0.45 1-lm Filtration
Digestion:
Nitriclhydrochloric
EPA 3010, APHA 3030
Metals, Total
METHOD REFERENCE
APHA 4500 N03 (H)
APHA 3500 (C); APHA 3120 (8); EPA 6010
.
0.00005
APHA 3500 (8); APHA 3111 (8, C, D)
APHA 3500 Hg (8); APHA 3112 (8); EPA 7470·
Mercury (Hg)
Digestion:
Nitric/Sulphuric Acid
end
Persulfate/Pennanganate:
Free Cyanides (CN)
Undigested, Distillation
Oil and Grease2
Separatory funnel
extraction with freon
(APHA 5520 (D))
6524
Inftared Analysis
mgiL
Sepnratory funnel
extraction with n-hexane
or MTBE or Freon
6521
Gravimetric Analysis
mgiL
1
APHA 5520 (B)
Separatory funnel
extraction with freon:
Silica gel clean up
(APHA 5520 (F))
6579
Inftared Analysis
mg!L
0.2
APHA 5520 (C)
Oravimetric Analysis
mg!L
Total Petroleum
Hydrocarbon
(Minend Oll1111d GreMe)
2Due
1594
DETECI'.
LIMIT
APHA 4500 CN (E )
Colorimetric
APHA 5520 (C)
APHA 5520 (B)
to restrictions on the use and manufacture of freon, new methods are cwrently being developed for the analysis of Oil and Grease.
159
ANALYfiCAL
PARAMETERffEST
METHOD
PREPARATION
Total Organic Carbon
(fOC)
Phenols
ENVIRODAT
CODE
INSTRUMENTATION
METHOD
UNITS
DETECT.
LIMIT
METHOD REFERENCE
6001
Combustion-Infrared Carbon
Analyzer
mg/L
0.5
APHA 5310 (B); AOAC 973.47
Direct Photometric Method:
with4-AAP
mg/L
Automated Photometric
Method: with 4-AAP
mg/L
Total Dissolved Solids Dried at
180°C
mg/L
APHA 2540 (C)
8,10
Calculated
(Ca+Mg+Na+K+CI+
S04+N0,+(0.6 X Alkalinity))
mg/L
APHA 1030 (F)
8304
Closed Reflux/Colorimetric
mg/L
5
APHA 5220 (D)
8301
Closed Reflux/I'itrimetric
mg/L
1
APHA 5220 (C);
6005
Steam distillation
6537
Total Dissolved Solids·
(I'DS)
Chemical Oxygen
Demand (COD)
Filter thru glass fibre
filter (Watman 934 A/H)
orequiv.
K2Cr2o,~so4
Digestion
0.1
APHA 5530 (D)
0.001
EPA420.2
.
160
ANALYTICAL
PARAMETERffEST
METIIOD
PREPARATION
ENVmODAT
CODE
INSTRUMENTATION
METIIOD
UNITS
METIIOD REFERENCE
McKeague 3.21
Saturated Paste and
PaJte Extract
Water Saturation (o/o)
DETECT.
LIMIT
Saturated Paste
Gravimetric:
(Water content/Weight basis)
Texture
%
McKeague 3.21; McKeague 2.411; Carter
18.2.2
Hand Method
McKeague 4.8
Constant-Head Core Method
McKeague 2.51; Carter 55.2; EPA 9100
Falling-Head Core Method
Carter 55.3, EPA 9100
Hydraulic
Conductivity
Saturated Soil Sample
pH
Saturated Paste Extract
1:2 Soil in 0.01 M CaCI2
10317
pH Meter
McKeague 3.11, Carter 16.3; EPA 9045;
Saturated Paste Extract
1:2 Soil: Water
10316
pH Meter
McKeague 3.14, Carter 16.2; EPA 9045;
Saturated Paste Extract
2041
Conductivity Meter
dS/m
APHA 2510 (B); EPA 9050; Carter 18.3.1;
McKeague 4.1
Saturated Paste Extract
0.45 .urn Filtration
20111
ICP-AES
mg/L
APHA 3500 Ca {C); APHA 3120 (B); EPA
6010
20103
Atomic Absorbtion
mg/L
APHA 3500 Ca (B); EPA 7140
EDTA Titrimetric
mg/L
APHA 3500 Ca {D)
12111
ICP-AES
mg/L
APHA 3500 Mg (C); APHA 3120 (B); EPA
6010
12102
Atomic Absorbtion
mg/L
APHA 3500 Mg (B); AOAC 974.27; EPA
7450
19111
ICP -AES
mg/L
APHA 3500 K (C); APHA 3120 (B); EPA 6010
19102
Atomic Absorbtion
mg/L
APHA 3500 K {B); AOAC 973 53; EPA 7610
19103
Flame Photometer
mg/L
APHA 3500 K (D)
Electrical
Conductivity (EC)
Major Ions:
Calcium (Ca)
Magnesium (Mg)
Potassium (K)
Saturated Paste Extract
0.45 .um Filtration
Saturated Paste Extract
0.45 .um Filtration
161
1
ANALYTICAL
PARAMETERffEST
Sodium(Na)
Chloride (Cl)
METHOD
PREPARATION
ENVIRODAT
CODE
INSTRUMENTATION
METHOD
UNITS
Saturated Paste Extract
0.45 ,urn Filtration
11111
ICP-AES
mg/L
APHA 3500 Na (C); APHA 3120 (B); EPA
6010
11102
Atomic Absorbtion
mg!L
APHA 3500 Na (B); AOAC 973.54; EPA
7770
11103
Flame Photometer
mg/L_
APHA 3500 Na (D)
17203
Automated Ferricyanide
Method (Colorimetric)
mg!L
APHA 4500 Cl (E); EPA 9250, 9251
17209
Ion Chromatography
mg!L
APHA 4500 Cl (F); APHA 4110 (B)
mg!L
APHA 4500 Cl (B)
Saturated Paste Extract
0.45 ,urn Filtration
Titrimetric
Nitrate (N03)
(N03+N02)
Sulfate (SO~)
Saturated Paste Extract
0.45 ,urn Filtration
Saturated Paste Extract
0.45 ,urn Filtration
.
DETECT.
LIMIT
METHOD REFERENCE
1111 n112
(N03+NOJ
Cadmium Reduction/
Automated Cd Reduction
rng!L
APHA 4500 N03(E, F)
7315 (N03)
Ion Chromatography
rng!L
APHA 4500 N03(C); AP~ 411~ (B)
7120
(N03+NOJ
Automated Colorimetric:
Hydrazine Reduction
mg!L
APHA 4500 N03(H)
16309
Ion Chromatography
rng/L
APHA 4500 SO~ (B); APHA 4110 (B)
16306
Automated Methylthymol Blue
Method
mg/L
APHA 4500 S04 (F); EPA 9036
McKeague 2.411; Carter 51.2
Gravimetric Analysis: Oven
Dry
Water and Solids
Content
AvaUab1e Nutrients:
Ammonia Nitrogen
(NH3-N)
Nitrate Nitrogen
{N03-N + N0 2-N)
Extraction 2 N KCl
(Carter 4.4)
Extraction 2 N KCI
(Carter 4.3)
07505 (D)
Phenate Method;
Automated Phenate Method
mg!L
APHA 4500 NH3 (D, H); Carter 4.4
310
Ammonia S:lective Electrode
rng/L
APHA 4500 NH3(F, G);
1111 n112
(N03+N02)
Colorimetric Method
(Cadmium Reduction)
mglkg
APHA 4500 N03(E, F), McKeague 4.311;
Carter4.3
7315 (D)
Ion Chromatography
mg/L
APHA 4500 N03(C)
162
ANALYTICAL
PARAMETERffEST
Phosphorous,
extractable
(Orthophosphate)
INSTRUMENT~TION
METHOD
PREPARATION
ENVIRODAT
CODE
Mediwn Strength "Bray"
Extract
15255 (D)
Automated Ascorbic Acid~
Photometric
15317 (E)
Colorimetric/Autoanalyzer
7015
Phenate Method/Automated
mg/L
APHA 4500 NH3 (D,H)~ Carter 22.2
7012
Ion Selective Electrode
mg/L
APHA 4500 ~ (F, G)
15255
Automated Ascorbic Acid~
Photometric
mg/L
APHA 4500 P (F)~ AOAC 973.55, 973.56
Nitrogen, Total
(swn of ammonia,
nitrate and nitrite
nitrogen.)
Micro-Kjeldahl Digestion
APHA 4500 NoRa
Phosphorous, Total
Sodiwn Carbonate
Fusion
(Carter 23.2.2)
Cation Exchange
Capacity (CEC)
UNITS
DETECT.
METHOD REFERENCE
LIMIT
METIIOD
mg/L
APHA 4500 P (F)~ AOAC 973.55, 973.56
McKeague 4.43, McKeague 4.44, FSPA 13.1
Ammoniwn Acetate Saturation
McKeague 3.321; Carter 19.4
Sodium Acetate Saturation
McKeague 3.34
McKeague 3.26~ Carter 18.4.3
Sodium Adsorption
Ratio (SAR)
Saturated Paste Extract
Calculated From Soluble Ions
(Ca, Mg, and Na)
Metals, Total
Digestion: Nitric
Acicf.IH,02 {open beaker)
EPA 3050) or, Nitric
Acid (closed vessel
Microwave)
EPA3051
ICP-AES
mglkg
APHA 3500 (C); APHA 3120 (B); EPA 6010
Atomic Absorption
mglkg
APHA 3500 (B); APHA 3111 (B, C, D)
382 (E)
ICP -AES
mglkg
APHA 4500 B (D)~ APHA 3120 (B)~ EPA
6010; Carter 12.2.4
5106 (D)
Azomethine-H Method
mglkg
McKeague 4.61; Carter 12.2.2
5102 (D)
Curcumin Method
mglkg
APHA 4500 B (B); McKeague 4.62;
80051 (T)
Cold Vapour Atomic
Absorption
mglkg
APHA 3500 Hg (B); APHA 3112 (B);
EPA 7471;
Boron (B)
Mercury (Hg)
Hot Water Extraction
Digestion: Nitric Acid
(closed vessel
microwave) EPA 3051
Digestion: Acid/KMn04
163
I ANALYTICAL
PARAMETERffEST
I
Arsenic (As)
MEmo»
PREPARATION
ENVIRODAT
CODE
INSTRUMENTATION
MEmoD
UNITS
Digestion:
Nitric/Sulphuric Acid
33011 (T)
Continuous Hydride
Generation - Atomic
Absotption
mgiL
APHA 3500 As (B); APHA 3114 (C), EPA
7061
Digestion: Nitric
33009
Atomic Absorption Fwnace
Technique
mgiL
APHA 3500 As (B); APHA 3113 (B); EPA
7060
Aci~02
(EPA 3050) or, Nitric
Acid (EPA 3051)
Selenium (Se)
DETECT.
LIMIT
ICP-AES
MEmOD REFERENCE
APHA 3500 As (D); APHA 3120 (B); EPA
6010
Digestion:
Nitric/Sulphuric Acid
34011
Continuous Hydride
Generation- Atomic
AbSOiption
mgiL
APHA 3500 Se (C); APHA 3114 (C), EPA
7741
Digestion: Nitric
Acid!H:P2
(EPA 3050) or, Nitric
Acid (EPA 3051)
34009
Atomic AbSOiption Fwnace
Technique
mglkg
APHA3500 Se(H); APHA3113 (B); EPA
7740
APHA 3500 Se (I); APHA 3120; EPA 6010
ICP-AES
Separatory funnel
extraction with freon
(APHA 5520 (D))
Infrared Analysis
mg/kg
APHA 5520 (C)
Separatory funnel
Extraction with n-hexane
or MTBE or Freon
Gravimetric Analysis
mglkg
APHA 5520 (B)
Separatory funnel
extraction with freon:
Silica Gel Clean up
(APHA 5520 (F))
Infrared Analysis
mglkg
APHA 5520 (C)
Gravimetric Analysis
mglkg
APHA 5520 (B)
%0U
Soxhlet Extraction with
Methylene Chloride
Gravimetric Analysis
%
Total Organic Carbon
/Organic Matter
Wet Oxidation
Titration
mgiL
McKeague 3.613; Carter 21.2
Wet Combustion
Titration
%
McKeague 4.22
OU and Grease3
Total Petroleum
Hydrocarbon
2
(Mineral 011 and Greue)
3Due
0.01
EPA 3540; McGill and Rowell
to restrictions on the use and manufacture of freon, new methods are currently being developed for the analysis of Oil and Grease.
164
ANALYTICAL
PARAMETERffEST
METHOD
PREPARATION
Phenols
Extraction: NaOH
ENVIRODAT
CODE
6537
Bulk Density
INSTRUMENTATION
METHOD
UNITS
Direct Photometric Method:
with4-AAP
mg/L
Automated Photometric
Method: with 4-AAP
mgiL
Core Method: Mineral Soils
giL
DETECT.
METHOD REFERENCE
LIMIT
APHA 5530 (D)
0.001
EPA420.2
McKeague 2.2
165
MEmOD PREPARATION
INSTRUMENTATION
MEmOD
ANALYTICAL
PARAMETERffEST
MATRIX
Flash Point
Liquid/Soil
and Sludge
Closed Cup Pensky-Martens
Spontaneous Combustion
Liquid/Soil
and Sludge
Hot Circulating Oven @ 140 °C
(initial temp)
Transportation of Dangerous Goods
Regulation 3.4.3.5 Division 4.2
GC/MS, GC/FID, GCIPID
EPA 8015; EPA 8240
GC/MS, GCIFID, GCIPID
EPA 8000, EPA 8270
UNITS
oc
DETECI'.
LIMIT
MEmOD REFERENCE
AS1MD-93-77, EPA 1010
Screening Tests:
Light Aliphatic Compounds:
(Total Purgeable Hydrocarbons)
(C3- C14)
Total Extractable Hydrocarbons
(TEH)
(C1 - C30)
(C1 - C60)
Also referred to u Total Petroleum
Hydrocarbons (fPH) if cleanup is
employed
Liquid
Headspace (EPA 3810)
Soil/Sludge
Extraction: Methylene Chloride
(EPA5030)
Liquid
Extraction: Methylene Chloride,
Carbon disulphide, or acetone
(EPA 3510, 3520),
Cleanup: (EPA 3610)
Soil/Sludge
Soxhlet Extraction: Methylene
Chloride (EPA 3540)
Oil and Grease4 Liquid
(Cto+)
Soil and
Sludge
·1Due
Purge and Trap (EPA 5030)
Extraction: n-hexane, MTBE cir
Freon (APHA 5520 (D)).
Infrared Analysis
mg/L,
mg/Kg
APHA 5520 (C)
Soxhlet Extraction: Methylene
Chloride (EPA 3540)
Gravimetric Analysis
rng/L,
rng/Kg
APHA 5520 (B)
to restrictions on the use and manufacture of freon, new methods are currently being developed for the analysis of Oil and Grease.
166
ANALYTICAL
PARAMETER/fEST
Mineral Oil and Grease'
(Cio +)
MATRIX
METIIOD PREPARATION
INSTRUMENTATION
METIIOD
UNITS
Liquid/Soil
and Sludge
Extraction:· Freon:
Silica Oel Cleanup
(APHA 5520 {F))
Infrared Analysis
mg/L,
mg/Kg
APHA 5520 (C)
Gravimetric Analysis
mg/L,
mg/Kg
APHA 5520 (B)
Also referred to as Total Petroleum
Hydrocarbons (TPH) if analyzed by I.R..
DETECf.
LIMIT
METIIOD REFERENCE
Specific Tests:
Volatile Organic Compounds
(VOC)
Monocyclic Aromatics
(BTEX: C6 • C,)
.
Poly and Hetro-cyclic Aromatics
(PAH)
AsphaJteneJ
Purge and Trap (EPA 5030)
Liquid
OC/MS
EPA 8015; EPA 8240
OC/PID
EPA8020
Headspaoe (EPA 381 0)
SoiVSludge
Extraction: Methanol
(EPA5030)
Liquid
Purge and Trap (EPA 5030)
Headspaoe (EPA 3810)
SoiVSludge
Extraction: Methanol
(EPA5030)
Liquid
Extraction: Methylene Chloride
(EPA3510)
Cleanup: EPA 361 J, 3630,3640
OC/FID
EPA8100
SoiVSiudge
Soxhlet Extraction:
Methylene Chloride (EPA 3540)
Cleanup: EPA 3611, 3630, 3640
OC/MS: Capillluy Column
Technique
EPA8270
HPLC
EPA8310
.Gravimetric (Weight Basis)
Syncrude Method 5.1
Liquid/Soil
and Sludge
50ue to restrictions on
Extraction: Benzeneln-pentane
the use and manufacture of freon, new methods are currently being developed for the analysis of Oil and Grease.
167
ANALYTICAL
PARAMETERffEST
MATRIX
MEmOD PREPARATION
INSTRUMENTATION
MEmOD
Polychlorinated Blphenols
(PCB)
Liquid
Extraction: Methylene Chloride
(EPA 3510, 3520)
Cleanup (3620, 3650, 3660)
GC/Electron Capture Detection
EPA 8000; EPA 8080
SoiVSludge
Extraction: Acetone/Hexane
(EPA 3540, 3550)
Cleanup (3620, 3640, 3660)
Adsorbable Organic Halides
(AOX)
Liquid
Acidified (Nitric acid); Passed
through coluinn of OAC,
Washed, Combusted
Neutron Activation
EPA 9022, Helmke 1982
Extractable Organic Halides
(EOX)
SoiYSludge
Extraction: Ethyl Acetate,
Combusted
Microcoulometric-Titration
Detector
EPA9020
Liquid
Extraction: Cyclohexane-MfBE,
Washed, Combusted (Liquids can
also be passed through OAC and
then combusted)
GCJMS
EPA8240
UNITS
DETECT.
LIMIT
MEmOD REFERENCE
Halogenated Organics
Total Organic Halides
(TOX)
SoiVSludge
Solvent Scan (including):Acetone,
benzene, n-butyl alcohol, carbon
disulphide, cresols and cresylic acid,
cyclohexanone, ethyl acetate, ethyl
benzene, ethyl ether, isobutanol,
methanol, methyl ethyl ketone,
nitrobenzene, 2-nitropropane, pyridine,
1 toluene, xylene
Liquid
Direct Headspace
(EPA3810)
SoiVSludge
Extraction: Methanol/Water
FoJiowed by Direct Headspace
(EPA3810)
. 169
Appendix 4.0
Requirements for Site Assessment and Groundwater Protection
4.1
Introduction
The purpose of this appendix is to identify the minimum requirements for a site .assessment
and a groundwater monitoring program.
It is the operator's responsibility to:
•
deterrirlne if additional work beyond the minimum is required, and
•
to justify why the actions taken at a specific site are sufficient. Site assessments and
groundwater monitoring systems will be audited by EUB staff.
In the interest of protecting the environment, the EUB requires certain facilities under its
jurisdiction (i.e. oilfield waste management facilities) to have a monitoring system that will
provide an early indication of potential groundwater impact.
To properly design and implement an appropriate monitoring system, operators will be
required to first conduct a site assessment. However, if upon completion of the site
assessment it is concluded that groundwater monitoring will not provide sufficiently early
detection of contamination, alternative monitoring systems shall be implemented such as soil
vapour: surveys, soil sampling surveys, or shallow geophysical techniques (i.e. electrical
conductivity, electromagnetic, or ground penetrating radar ~eys).
Qualified expertise must be employed to:
•
evaluate hydrogeological and geological information,
•
conduct a site investigation and establish the hydrogeologic conditions for the site,
•
implement an appropriate monitoring system, and
•
interpret analytical results.
The design of a monitoring program should be based upon the information obtained from the
site assessment, and it should take into account the type of activity that has occurred or could
occur on that site.
42
Site Assessment
Site assessments must be conducted at a sufficient level of detail to allow for the
implementation of an appropriate monitoring program.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
170
Published reports, maps, aerial photographs, existing water well data, research papers, or any
other information available-in the public domain should be used to establish the regional
hydrogeologic setting within a 3 km radius of the facility site. The site geology and
hydrogeology should then be determined from on-site investigations.
The following outlines the minimum information that should be compiled and evaluated as
part of a site assessment. The information that must be submitted to the EUB is outlined in
the monitoring and reporting section.
1.
Regional Assessment
A.
Setting
A description of the regional setting including the following:
B.
(a)
a detailed scale topography map that includes all local surface water
bodies,
(b)
soil types and distn~ution, and
(c)
any nearby industrial facilities, waste transfer stations, landfills, etc.
that may affect quality or flow of groundwater.
Geology and Hydrogeology
A description of the geology (surficial deposits and underlying bedrock) and
hydrogeology of the area based on the following, if available:
C.
(a)
surficial geology maps,
(b)
bedrock topography/geology maps,
(c)
hydrogeologic maps and cross sections,
(d)
published reports, and
(e)
air photos.
Groundwater Use in the Area
Based on available information from government records (i.e. Groundwater
Information Centre of the Hydrogeology Branch of Alberta Environmental
Protection):
(a)
identify all surface and groundwater users within a 3 km radius of the
facility, and
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
171
(b)
2.
identify depths, specific yields, and water quality of aquifers.
Site Investigation
The objective of the site investigation is to reconcile the information gathered during
the regional assessment with the true site specific conditions.
Based on the regional assessment, the operator should have a preliminary
understanding of the soil characteristics, geology, and groundwater chemistry and
flow directions. These conditions along with knowledge of the type of activity that
either has taken place or will take place on the site, should be used to determine the
placement of the groundwater monitoring wells.
As the site assessment will be used to establish a baseline for further monitoring and
reporting, it is important that the initial site investigation includes a wide spectrum of
parameters and constituents. This assessment then becomes the baseline for all future
monitoring and reporting. From this broad list of parameters, the operator can then
choose a smaller list of "critical" parameters to monitor over the longer term. As a
minimum, the groundwater must ~e tested for the following parameters:
•
pH,
•
major ions,
•
electrical conductivity,
•
total metals, and
•
mineral oil and grease.
Refer to Section 4.3, System Design, for information on well placement and the
construction and installation of monitoring wells.
3.
Site Specific Data
On-site investigations during the drilling and installation stages of the monitoring
wells should provide the following site specific information:
(a)
surface and near surface features, such as natural slope of the site, existing or
potential sources of contamination and any manmade or natural features that
may act as conduits for contaminant migration, including:
(i)
site topography, locations of all surface water, and surface drainage
patterns,
(ii)
on-surface or buried pipelines, utility lines, conduits, pits, or tanks,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry .
November. 1996
172
(b)
(c)
(iii)
buildings, loading facilities, or storage areas,
(iv)
disposal or source wells,
(v)
existing or abandoned monitoring wells or standpipes,
(vi)
areas containing buried fill material or waste, and
(vii)
areas of known extensive or frequent spills,
a description ofthe soil characteristics including:
(i)
the geological parent materials, thickness, and type and depth of
genetic horizons,
(ii)
physical characteristics including texture, evidence of fracturing,
internal drainage characteristics, and an estimate of moisture content,
and
(iii)
background chemical characteristics including pH, electrical
conductivity, major extractable ions, cation exchange capacity, total
metals, percent oil, and sodium adsorption ratio,
a description of the hydrogeology including:
(i)
type, thickness, and distribution of each stratigraphic unit,
(ii)
depth of water table,
(iii)
estimate of the moisture content and its variation in the unsaturated
zone,
(iv)
measured hydraulic conductivity of the first saturated strata,
(v)
horizontal and vertical direction, rate, and approximate velocity of
groundwater movement, and
(vi)
local groundwater discharge and recharge areas, and
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
. 173
(d)
4.
a description of the groundwater quality from the initial sampling of the
monitoring wells including, as a minimum, the following:
(i)
pH,
(ii)
major ions,
(iii)
conductivity,
(iv)
total metals, and
(v)
mineral oil and grease.
Site Assessment Results
After the completion of the site assessment, the operator should be able to:
4.3
(a)
determine potential pathways of contaminant migration,
(b)
identify the depth, location, and type of any contaminant encountered, the
probable source, and the appropriate remedial actions to be undertaken,
(c)
assess whether monitoring the unsaturated zone alone or in concert with the
groundwater, or whether any other monitoring techniques, are warranted, and
(d)
assess whether additional groundwater monitoring wells are required.
System Design
1.
Strategy of Well Placement
Prior to the installation of monitoring wells, the site topography and local drainage
features can often provide an indication of the groundwater flow directions.
Techniques such as electromagnetic surveys, ground penetrating radar, and drivepoint wells, may be utilized to assist in the placement of the permanent monitoring
system. The following identifies the minimum requirements for a groundwater
monitoring system.
(a)
A minimum of four permanent monitoring wells must be installed during the
initial stage of a groundwater monitoring program.
(b)
Three shallow wells shall be installed to determine the depth and horizontal
direction of groundwater flow in the shallowest water bearing zone, typically
the permanent water table.
(c)
If a perched water table exists, additional wells will be required to monitor
this situation.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
174
(d)
Of the three shallow wells monitoring the permanent water table. one must be
placed hydraulically upgradient of the site and two downgradient. This
upgradient well should be situated to provide the best indication of
background (unimpacted) groundwater chemistty at the site.
(e)
A fourth monitoring well shall be installed beside the downgradient well most
likely to be impacted, and completed to allow the measurement of the vertical
hydraulic gradient.
If groundwater contamination is detected, subsequent monitoring wells may
be required to delineate the vertical and horizontal extent of contamination.
Care must be taken during the drilling and completion of all wells to ensure
that they do not serve as conduits for migration of contaminants.
2.
Monitoring Well Construction and Installation
A variety of drilling methods are available for the installation of monitoring wells.
The choice of method will often be dictated by the site conditions.
Recognized industry practices must be followed to ensure that:
•
contaminants are not introduced into the well during construction,
•
a minimum disturbance of subsurface materials occurs,
•
a representative sample can be collected, and that
•
no contaminants from zones other than the interval at which the well is
screened will be able to enter the well.
Information on appropriate monitoring well design, installation, completion,
development, and sampling procedures can be found in the references relating to site
assessment and groundwater protection, listed in Appendix 1.0, References. The
EUB expects operators, or their consultants, to implement monitoring systems in
accordance with industry standards.
Monitoring wells that are no longer used as part of the monitoring program (i.e. as a
result of damage or inappropriate placement) must be properly abandoned. Operators
must document their abandonment procedures and make them available to EUB staff
upon request.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
- 175
4.4
Monitoring and Reporting
1.
lnitiallnfonnation Submission
A concise summary outlining the information obtained from the site assessment and
the monitoring program implemented at the site must be submitted to the EUB. This
summary must include:
(a)
a facility plot plan at an appropriate scale that clearly identifies any features
listed in item 2.2.la), as well as the locations of the groundwater monitoring
wells and the horizontal direction of the shallow groundwater flow,
(b)
the location of all surface waters and inferred areas of groundwater discharge
within a 3 -km radius of the facility,
·
(c)
a summary of local groundwater and surface water users within a 3 km radius
of the facility,
(d)
a summary of the regional hydrogeology and geology for the area in which
the site is located, as derived from existing data in the public domain,
(e)
monitoring well c~nstruction, completion, and monitoring details including:
(f)
(i)
the rationale for the location, depth, and screened interval,
(ii)
a description of the construction materials and completion details,
(iii)
methods employed to develop the wells,
(iv)
sampling and testing procedures, and
(v)
the ground level elevation, casing top elevation, depth to water, total
depth of well, and screened interval for each well, presented in tabular
form,
site specific information, determined during the drilling and installation of the
monitoring wells, including the following:
(i)
the physical characteristics of the soil including thickness, texture,
internal drainage characteristics, evidence of fracturing, and an
estimate of the moisture content,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
176
.(g)
2.
(ii)
background chemical characteristics of the soil including pH,
electrical conductivity, major extractable ions, cation exchange
capacity, total metals, per cent oil, and sodium adsorption ratio,
(iii)
the description of the surficial geology, including the type and
thickness of the strata,
(iv)
the depth of the shallowest water bearing strata (depth of the water
table) and the hydraulic conductivity of this zone, including raw test
data and method of analysis,
(v)
the horizontal and vertical directions, rates and approximate velocities
of the ground\)'ater flow,
(vi)
a description of the quality of the groundwater including, as a
minimum, the initial results obtained for pH, electrical conductivity,
major ions, total metals, and mineral oil and grease, and
(vii)
the depth, location, and type of any contaminant encountered, the
probable source of the contaminant, and a discussion of the remedial
actions to be undertaken, and.
a discussion of whether any other monitoring techniques are warranted and
whether any other monitoring wells are required.
Routine (Annual) Monitoring and Reporting
Each groundwater monitoring system, once established, shall be sampled twice per
year, spring and fall. More extensive monitoring may be required in some instances
depending on the specific site and facility. The monitoring results must then be
compiled into an annual report. It is the responsibility of the operator of the facility
to ensure that the sampling is undertaken and the annual report is prepared.
Annual reports must be prepared for each facility with a groundwater monitoring
system and must be:
·
•
•
prepared by 31 March of each year,
•
retained on-site for a period of 5 years, and
•
made available to EUB personnel upon request.
The annual report must concisely detail the present monitoring results as well as
those from the previous 5 years.
The annual report shall contain the following:
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
177
(a)
a site map showing the locations of facility features and monitoring wells, as
well as the horizontal direction of the shallow groundwater flow,
(b)
a tabular compilation of the present and previous 5 years monitoring results
including groundwater elevation and analyses for each monitoring well,
(c)
a tabular compilation of the present and previous 5 years results from any
other monitoring technique employed (the map in item (a) above must be
modified. to reflect this monitoring technique),
(d)
a SUIIliila1Y of any work undertaken to augment the monitoring system,
(e)
an assessment of whether the monitoring results indicate potential
groundwater impact,
(f)
a discussion of any work undertaken to alleviate potential impacts identified
in item (e) above or of the status of any on-going work undertaken to alleviate
previously identified impacts, and
(g)
a trend analysis of the monitoring data to predict the potential for future
groundwater impairment.
If it is determined that the groundwater at the site has been impacted, the EUB must
be notified of this within 60 days of the sampling date.
Groundwater impact determination should utilize the trending analysis descnoed
above along with other statistical methods. For naturally occurring constituents, any
significant· deviations above nonnally expected seasonal fluctuations would be
considered important. The basis for this assessment would be the background levels
established from the initial site assessment. The presence of constituents not
normally found in groundwater, such as BTEX or phenols, must be reported. This
discussion must include a description of the impact, including the source of the
impact, any potential for off-site contamination, and a preliminary proposal to
address the problem.
It is expected that good practice will be applied in sampling and analysis. For
examples of methods of analysis, refer to Appendix 3.0, Recommended Test Methods,
and the references relating to site assessment and groundwater protection listed in
Appendix 1.0 References.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
179
Appendix 5.0
Calculation of the Reynold's Number
The Reynolds Number (Re) can·be determined as follows:
VD
Re = Ki
where V
=
average velocity in the secondary chamber used to calculate
residence time, m/s
D
=
diameter (or equivalent diameter) or flow stream in the
secondary chamber used to calculate residence time, m
Ki
=
kinematic viscosity, m2/s
As an example ofthis calculation, assume a secondary chamber has a wet gas flowrate of0.2 Nm3/s;
a square internal duct size of 0.61 x 0.61 m; and an equivalent diameter of 0.67 m and is 1 m long.
The gas flow is at a temperature of 1 000°C, and is at a velocity of 2.3 m/s. From Figure 1;
K=140 x 10-6 at 1 ooooc:
Therefore:
VD
Re=Ki
Rc = 2.3 m/1 x 0.67m
140 x lO_fm 2/S
= 11 000
This is greater than the minimum Re of 10 000 and turbulence can be assumed to·be adequate.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
180
Figure 1
Air Viscosity Versus Temperature
250
~
200
~
..E
•~
-a
~
150
b
~
1
100
!
Si2
/
50
v
v
~
/
~
v
l/
~
~
7
v
v
~
~
~
500
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
1000
1500
November. 1996
- 181
Appendix 6.0
Waste Minimization
6.1
Introduction
The purpose of this section is to describe waste minimzation philosophies and to promote an
active participation in waste minimization by alllice.nsees and/or approval holders.
Waste minimization is a continuous improvement practice. It is an ongoing process
involving the 4Rs (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, and Recover), and includes the full-cycle
assessment of environmental effects and the associated economic and technical feasibility of
the various management options.
The oil and gas industty is encouraged to promote waste minimization within their
operations. Because of the potentially significant volumes of waste which require handling
and disposal, the industry should ensure effective management strategies are employed to
minimize and effectively handle wastes in a diligent manner.
The 4Rs represent the minimization strategies that may be employed to reduce wastes
requiring disposal.
Reduction offers petroleum companies the greatest options for waste minimization and can
usually be applied on-site. The ultimate way to manage waste is to not produce it in the first
place, or to only produce envfronmentally non-reportable wastes which are easier and less
costly to dispose. Reuse can also be applied on-site. The o:r;t-site application of Recycle and
Recover are limited and usually require the use of an off-site waste contractor for waste
treatment.
The most effective waste management practice is to avoid the production of waste in
the first place.
Waste minimization provides:
•
savings in raw material and production costs,
•
a reduction in environmental implications (risk},
•
savings in time and energy,
•
lower waste treatment and disposal costs,
•
reduced liabilities,
•
improved corporate image, and
•
less employee exposure to hazardous materials.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
182
62
Waste Minimization Strategies
1.
Reduce
Waste reduction is the preferable option. It is best to produce as little waste as
possible by reducing the waste at source. In some cases, the production of the waste
can be totally eliminated. For example:
2.
•
Purchase chemicals in bulk to reduce container waste and the frequency of
possible spillage when handling.
•
Segregate process streams to minimize sludge or liquid production, and to
optimize reduction/recycle options.
•
Prevent leaks and spills to eliminate contaminated soils.
•
Dry sludges prior to treatment and disposal, thereby reducing the waste
volume and allowing easier dry waste disposal.
•
Train and motivate employees to practice waste reduction.
•
Improve material receiving, storage, and handling practices to reduce losses.
•
Install more efficient processing equipment or improve the operating
efficiency of existing equipment.
•
Analyze compressor and engine lubricating oils by a laboratory to determine
if an oil change is actually required.
•
Reduce the use of :filters in water injection streams, if possible.
•
Discontinue the use of treater hay from treater vessels.
•
Review the need for certain products in operations.
•
Use less hazardous substitutes for toxic products (i.e. the use of fresh water
gel drilling systems as opposed to invert muds, when possible).
Reuse
If a waste is produced, every effort should be made to reuse it, for example:
•
clean oil rags,
•
use reusable filters,
•
reuse filtered lube oil for chemical injection pumps, and
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
183
•
3.
filter gear lubricating oil to extend period of use.
Recycle
This option usually requires off-site contract services.
Although recylcing does help to conserve resources and reduce wastes, there are
economic and environmental costs associated with waste collection and recycling
processes. Recycling should only be used for wastes which cannot be reduced or
reused. Segregate all wastes that are to be recycled. Recycling examples include:
4.
•
Use waste acids for the neutralization of caustic wastes.
•
Recycling lube oil, glycol, solvents, unspent chemicals, batteries, paper,
metal, plastic containers, and glass.
Recover
This option usually requies off-site contract services.
Some wastes may contain recoverable substances that can be reused, for example:
•
Separating and recovering high l~vels ofhydrocarbons in wash water.
•
Recover oil from oily sludges.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
185
Appendix 7.0
Waste Listings
7.1
Usted Wastes
In all cases, it is the generator's responsibility to ensure that all wastes are characterized and
classified as well as treated and disposed of correctly. Wastes listed in Section 7.4 of
Appendix 7.0, Waste Management Table, have been characterized and classified based on
historical knowledge, previous testing, and a known origin of waste streams. The purpose of
this waste ~agement table is to provide waste generators with some common acceptable
practices and criteria. It provides a starting point for characterization, classification, and the
treatment/disposal of common oilfield waste streams.
In applying these clas·sifications, it is imperative that generators examine their own wastes to
determine if standard industcy practices have resulted in the production of the waste and that
their wastes fit the listed type. Any unusual operations, process, or site-specific conditions
may result in a change in a waste's characteristics. Where classification of a waste is unclear,
refer to .AEP'sAlberta Users Guide for Waste Managers for further information.
Waste generators are reminded to confirm with individual waste management facility
operators the specific waste streams their facilities are approved to accept.
12
Unlisted Wastes
Waste types not listed in Section 7.4 of Appendix 7.0, W~te Management Table, must be
classified according to Section S.O,Proceduresfor Classifying Waste. Based on the
characteristics of the waste, refer to the miscellaneous waste section in Section 7.4 of
Appendix 7.0 for the EUB waste code, and refer to Appendix 3.0, Recommended Test
Methods, for test methods.
7.3
Changes to Oilfield Waste Management Table
The Waste Management Table, Section 7.4 of Appendix 7.0, will be reviewed through a
government/industry committee from time to time to consider requests for changes to 'the
table.
Information required for this review will include:
•
scientifically or operationally documented information on why the change should be
made,
•
historical analysis of the typical waste stream and its variability,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
186
•
•
consideration of the safety and environmental consequences of the proposed
handling, treatment, and disposal of the waste, and
consideration of any concerns of the public, the regulatory agencies, and the petroleum
industry.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November. 1996
187
7.4
Waste Management Table
• It is the generators' responsibility to ensure wastes are treated and disposed of correctly. This table is based on wastes produced through the use of
standard industry practices. If unusual properties are suspected to exist or the characteristics are uncertain, the general characterization method
outlined in Section 6.2, Procedures for Classifying Waste, must be used.
• This table contains treatment and disposal infonnation. Other issues such as worker safety, material handling, and storage should also be
considered. References for these areas include CAPP'sProduction Waste Management Handbook, WHMIS and TDG. All requirements ofTDG
must be complied with.
• The use of the "Acceptable Practices" column does not result in the reclassification of a Dangerous Oilfield Waste or a waste indicated as "Testing
Required" to a Non-Dangerous Oilfield Waste.
• Where classification of a waste is unclear, refer to AEP's Alberta Users Guide for Waste Managers, for further information.
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Absorbents
[OILABS]
Testing
Required
Acid Solutions
(unneutralized)
[ACID]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
'Comments
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Regulations
flash point,
leachate
- Reuse via laundering/drycleaning
- Remove entrained liquids and
landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib or II landfill depending on
specific characteristics
- Thennal treatment
- Nonnally not a DOW (depending on
flash point or ignitability or leachate). If
BTBX > 1000 mg!kg, it cannot be
landfilled
- Use classification
according to
parent product
corrosivity, heavy
metals, flash point
(if hydrocarbon
present)
- Adjust pH prior to disposal (if
possible)
- Recover any hydrocarbons prior
to disposal
- Inject down BUB Class Ia
disposal well (pH 4.5 - 12.5)
- Inject down BUB Class Ib
disposal well (pH 6.0- 9.0) (if
heavy metal content meets
criteria outlined in EUB Guide
G-51)
- PhysicaVchemical treatment
- See BUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
188
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
OUfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Activated Carbon
[ACTCRB]
Testing
Required
- Class 4.2 UN1362
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
flash point,
leachate
DOW
- Reuse/regenerate
- Thennal treatment
N-DOW
- Reuse/regenerate
- Co-dispose (amendment) with
soil sterilant contaminated
materials
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib or II landfill depending on
specific characteristics
- This waste may be DOW depending on
leachate characteristics. IfBTEX > 1000
mglkg, it cannot be landfilled
N-DOW
Not TDG regulated
Asbestos
[ASBEST]
See
comments
-Waste White
Asbestos, Class
9.1, UN2590
- Waste Blue or
Brown Asbestos,
Class 9.1, UN2212
toxic airborne
fibres
- Wet to reduce aitbome dispersal
and double bag
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill (must be covered
immediately upon disposal)
- See AEP's Guidelines for the Disposal of
Asbestos Waste, August 1989
Batteries (Wet and
Dry Cell)
[BATT]
Wet CellDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
Dry CellNonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
(Unless
containing
KOH)
- Wet cell - Class
8(9.2), UN2794acid
UN2795 - alkali
- corrosivity,
leachate (heavy
metals)
- Recycle via battery recycler
- Remove liquids (wet batteries)
and neutralize
- Landfill containers at an
approved Class Ia, lb, or II
landfill (depending on battery
type)
- Alkaline batteries may be disposed of as
per "Gamage - Domestic Waste"
Oilfield Wastr
- Dry cell - not TDG
regulated (unless
KOH) (NI-Cd)
agement Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas lndustJy
•· ·'!!Tiber. 1900
189
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Boiler Blowdown
Water
[BLBDWT]
See
comments
- NotTDG
regulated (unless
contaminated with
a DOW)
Catalyst
(Non-Sulphur)
[CATNS]
Tes~ing
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
Required
Common
Criteria
leachate,
pyrophoric
characteristics
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
DOW
-Reuse
- Inject down EUB Class Ia or Ib
disposal well (depending on
heavy metals)
N-DOW
-Reuse
- Inject down EUB Class Ia or Ib
disposal well
- Surface discharge (must confonn
with discharge·criteria outlined
in Section 5.2.2 ofEUB Guide
G-55 and be cooled to below
50°C prior to discharge)
- Nonnally not a DOW (unless containing
Cr, V, or other additives)
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
DOW
- Reuse/regenerate
- Containerize and landfill at an
approved Class Ia or Ib landfill
N-DOW
- Reuse/regenerate
- Containerize and landfill at an
approved Class Ia, Ib, or II
landfill depending on specific
characteristics
- This waste may be DOW depending on
leachate characteristics. IfBTEX > 1000
mglkg, it cannot be landfilled
November, 1996
190
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Catalyst
(Sulphur)
[CATSU]
Testing
Required
Caustic Solutions
(unneutralized,
spent)
[CAUS]
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
leachate,
corrosivity,
pyrophoric
characteristics
- Reuse/regenerate
- Containerize and landfill at an
approved Class Ia, lb, or II
landfill depending on specific
characteristics (add lime as per
AEP guidelines)
- This waste may be DOW depending on
leachate characteristics. If BTEX > 1000
mglkg, it cannot be landfilled
- See AEP's Guidelines for the Disposal of
Sulphur Containing Solid Wastes,
March 1983
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Use classification
according to
parent product
corrosivity
- Adjust pH prior to disposal (if
possible)
- Inject down EUB Class Ia
disposal well (pH 4.5 - 12.5)
- Inject down EUB Class Ib
disposal well (ph 6.0- 9.0)
- Physical/chemical treatment
- May be Waste Type 203 (if used to clean
heat exchangers that possess leadcontaining materials [i.e. solder,
adhesives])
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
Cement (Returns
Dry)
[Cement]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- NotiDG
Regulated
Chemicals
(Inorganic)
[INOCHM]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
.
- Crush material and bury on lease
with at least 1 meter of cover
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
lb, 1,1 or III landfill
- Incorporate material into gravel
on site or on entrance road
Dangerous when
wet, oxidizer,
toxicity,
corrosivity,
leachate
Oilfield Wastr · · 1agement Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas lndustJY
- Disposal practice will vary with
specific chemical (consideration
of compatability and solubility)
- Reuse/recycle when possible
- Contact chemical waste
· exchange
- Physical/chemical treatment
191
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Chemicals
(Organic)
[ORGCHM]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
Construction and
Demolition
Material
[CONMAT]
.
See
comments
- NotTDG
Regulated (unless
contaminated with
a DOW)
Contaminated
Debris and Soil
(Chemical/
Solvent)
[SOILCH]
Testing
Required
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
Flash point,
oxidizer, toxicity,
corrosivity,
leachate
- Disposal practice will vary with
specific chemical
- Reuse/recycle when possible
- Contact chemical waste
exchange
- PhysicaUchemical treatment
- Thermal treatment
DOW
- Decontaminate and reuse
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia
or lb landfill
N-DOW
:. Reuse
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
lb, II, or III landfill
flash point,
leachate, toxicity
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
Comments
- Normally not a DOW (unless
contaminated with a DOW)
- DisposaUtreatment based on
specific parameters of waste
- Thermal treatment
- PhysicaUchemical treatment
- Biodegradation
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill depending on
specific characteristics
November, 1996
192
Waste Management Table (cont•d)
EUB Waste Name
(Waste Code]
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Contaminated
Debris and Soil
(Crude OiV
Condensate)
[SOILCO]
See
comments
Contaminated
Debris and Soil
(Mercury/Metals)
[SOILHM]
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
- Class 4.1. UN
3175
flash point,
leachate
- Biodegradation on-site (or offsite at an approved facility)
- Send to an approved oilfield
waste processing facility for
hydrocarbon recovery
- Thennal treatment
- Normally not a DOW (depending on
flash point and BTEX content)
Testing
Required
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
leachate (heavy
metals), toxicity
- Physical/chemical treatment
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill depending on
specific characteristics (Hg < 20
mg/kg - waste extract)
Contaminated
Debris and Soil
(Pesticide/
Herbicide)
[SOILPT]
Testing
Required
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
toxicity, leachate
- On-site treatment (with activated
carbon)
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill depending on
specific characteristics
Contaminated
Debris and Soil
(Produced/Salt
Water)
[SOILPW]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- NotTDG
Regulated
Contaminated
Debris and Soil
(Refined
Fuels/Oils)
[SOILRO]
Testing
Required
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
Oilfield Was
- Consult the Industrial Vegetation
Management Association of Alberta's
Field Manual for Rehabilitating Soils
Aj]i!cted by Residual Herbicides,
April1987
- On-site treatment
- Send to an approved oilfield
waste processing facility for soil
washing
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill
flash point,
leachate
1agement Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
- Biodegradation on-site (or offsite at an approved facility)
- Send to an approved oilfield
waste processing facility
- Thennal treatment
•ember. 19$
193
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
(Waste Code]
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Contaminated
Debris and Soil
(Sulphur)
[SOILSU]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- NotTDG
Regulated (unless
contaminated with
a DOW)
Corrosion
Inhibitor/Oxygen
Scavenger
Solutions
[CORINH]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
Crude
Oil/Condensate
Emulsions
(residuals after
treatment)
[COEMUL]
See
comments
Dessicant
[DESICT]
Testing
required
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
- On-site treatment
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill (add lime to
neutralize at time of burial)
- See AEP's Guidelines for the Disposal of
Sulphur Containing Solid Wastes,
March 1983
heavy metals
- Inject down E~ Class Ib
disposal well (if heavy metal
limits are not exceeded)
- Inject down EUB Class Ia
disposal well (if heavy metal
· limits exceeded)
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
- Class 3, UN 1267
flash point,
leachate
- Send to an approved oilfield
waste processing facility
- Inject down EUB Class Ia or Ib
disposal well
- Cavern disposal
- Thennal treatment
- Biodegmdation facility
- Nonnally not a DOW (depending on
flash point and BTEX content)
- All reasonable efforts must be made to
recover hydrocarbon prior to disposal
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
DOW
-Class 9.3 NA 9500
corrosivity, flash
point, leachate
DOW
- Reuse/regenemte
- Containerize and landfill at an
approved Class Ia or lb landfill
N-DOW
- Reuse/regenemte
- Recycle (construction fill)
- Containerize and landfill at an
approved Class Ia, Ib or II
landfill
- This waste may be DOW depending on
leachate characteristics (BTEX). If
BTEX > 1000 mglkg, it cannot be
landfilled
Common
Criteria
N-DOW
- NotTDG
regulated
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
194
Waste Management Table (cont•d)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Dimethyl
Disulphide
Solutions
[DMDS]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Class 3, UN 2331
Drilling Sump
Materials (Gel
Chern)
[SUMPGL]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- NotTDG
Regulated
Drilling Sump
Materials
(Hydrocarbon)
[SUMPIN]
See
comments
- Dependent on
sped.fic waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Regulations
Drilling Sump
Materials (KCL)
[SUMPKC]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Regulations
Filter Backwash
Liquids (Gas
Sweetening)
[FLBWSW]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
.
Oilfield Was\
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
flash point,
toxicity
- Reuse ifpossible
- Return to supplier
- Inject down EUB Class Ia
disposal well
flash point,
leachate
leachate
.1agement Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas lndustiy
Comments
- Oisposal in accordance with
EUB Guide G- 50 (Revised)
- See EUB Guide G-50 (Revised) for
specific disposal requirements
- Disposal in accordance with
EUB Guide G-50 (Revised)
- Normally not a DOW (depending on
flash point and BTEX)
- Obtain EUB approval prior to disposal
- See EUB Guide G-50 (Revised) for
specific disposal requirements
- Disposal in accordance with
BUB Guide G-50 (Revised)
- See EUB Guide G-50 (Revised) for
specific disposal requirements
- Obtain EUB approval prior to disposal
- Inject down EUB Class Ia or Ib
disposal well
- See BUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
OOlber. 1996
195
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Filter Backwash
Liquids (Water
Treatment)
[FLBWWT]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- NotTDG
Regulated
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
-Reuse
- Recycle (Land irrigation)
- Return to source
- Inject down BUB Class Ia or Ib
disposal well
- See BUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
- High sediment and organic content
would require downhole injection
- Recycle (metal recovery)
- Thennal treatment
- Drain liquids, containerize to
prevent contact with air and
landfill at an approved Class Ia
or Ib landfill
- CAPP has developed a sampling and
testing protocol for waste filters
- Recovered entrained liquids are DOW
and should be recycled or injected down
an BUB Class Ia or Ib disposal well
- See BUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
.
Filters Glycol
[FILGLY]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
Filters (Media) Water Treatment
[FILWTT]
Testing
Required
- Dependent on·
specific waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Regulations
flash point,
pyrophoric
characteristics,
leachate
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
flash point,
leachate
,
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
DOW
- Reuse/regenerate
- Containerize and landfill at an
approved Class Ia or Ib landfill
N-DOW
- Reuse/regenerate
- Recycle (construction fill)
- Containerize and landfill at an
approved Class Ia, lb, or II
landfill depending on specific
characteristics
- This waste may be DOW depending on
leachate characteristics. IfBTBX > 1000
mglkg, it cannot be landfilled
November, 1996
196
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
(Waste Code]
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Filters - Air
Pollution Control
[FILAPC]
Testing
required
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
Filters - Gas
Sweetening
(MEA,DEA,
MDEA, Sulphinol)
[FILSWT]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
Filters - Lube Oil
(Waste Type 201)
[FILLUB]
Undrained
- Dangerou
s Oilfield
Waste
Drained
-NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
- Biodegradation
- Thermal treatment
- Landfill to an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill depending on
specific characteristics
-Normally not a DOW (depending on
leachate characteristics)
flash point,
pyrophoric
characteristics,
leachate
-Recycle (metal recovery)
- Thermal treatment
- Drain liquids, containerize to
prevent contact with air and
landfill at an approved Class Ia
or Ib landfill
- CAPP has developed a sampling and
testing protocol for waste filters
.. Recovered entrained liquids are DOW
and should be recycled or injected down
an EUB Class Ia or Ib disposal well
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
flash point,
leachate·
- Recycle (metal recovery)
- Thermal treatment
- Drain liquids, landfill at an
approved Class Ia or Ib landfill
- CAPP has developed a sampling and
testing protocol for waste filters
- Internal combustion engine lube oil
filters are N-DOW if they are fully
drained and have a drainage efficiency
(DE)>0.5
DE = Undrained weiaht- drained weiaht
Common
Criteria
Undrained weight - new filter weight
'
Oilfield Was<
oagement Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
- Recovered entrained liquids are DOW
and should be recycled or injected down
an EUB Class Ia or Ib disposal well
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
l''"'Yafllber, 1996
197
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Filters - Methanol
[FILMTH]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
Filters - Other
(Raw/Fuel Gas,
NGL's)
[FILOTH]
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
flash point,
leachate
- Recycle (metal recovery)
- Thennal treatment
- Drain liquids, landfill at an
approved Class Ia or lb landfill
- CAPP has developed a sampling and
testing protocol for waste filters
- Recovered entrained liquids are DOW
and should be recycled or injected down
an EUB Class Ia or lb disposal well
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
flash point,
pyrophoric
characteristics,
leachate
- Recycle (metal recovery)
- Thennal treatment
- Drain liquids, containerize to
prevent contact with air and
landfill at an approved Class Ia
or lb landfill
- CAPP has developed a sampling and
testing protocol for waste filters
- Recovered entrained liquids are DOW
and should be recycled or injected down
an EUB Class Ia or lb disposal well
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
Filters - Produced/
Process Water
[FILPWT]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Regulations
flash point,
pyrophoric
characteristics,
leachate
- Recycle (metal recovery)
- Thennal treatment
- Drain liquids, containerize to
prevent contact with air and
landfill at an approved Class Ia
or lb landfill
- CAPP has developed a sampling and
testing protocol for waste filters
- RecQvered entrained liquids may be
DOW and should be injected down an
EUB Class Ia or lb disposal well
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
Filters -Raw/ Fresh
Water
· [FILFWT]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- NotTDG
Regulated
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
lb, II, or III landfill
.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upst!lJam Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
198
Waste Management Table (cont•d)
EUB Waste Name
(Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Frac Sand- NonRadioactive
[FRCSND]
See
Comments
Frac SandRadioactive (Plus
other Radioactive
Diagnostic
Materials)
[FRSDR]
Garbage/Domestic
Waste [DOMWST]
Oilfield Wast
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
flash point,
leachate
- Recycle (return to supplier)
- Send to an approved oilfield
waste processing facility for
hydrocarbon recovery
- Containerize and landfill at an
approved Class Ia, Ib, or II
landfill depending on specific
characteristics
- Nonnally not a DOW (depending on
flash point or leachate characteristics). If
BTEX > 1000 mglkg, the waste cannot
be landfilled
See
Comments
- Class 7
leachate
- Recycle (return to supplier)
- Bucy on-site in accordance with
Atomic Energy Control Board
Guidelines
- See Part F, Section 31.0 for specific
disposal procedures
- Radioactive materials must not be
handled at a waste processing facility and
cannot be road disposed
- Radioactive frac sand is regulated by the
Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB).
AECB approval is required for any
transportation or disposal of the waste
- Waste may be DOW after radioactive
decay (heavy metal and radioactive tracer
leachate characteristics)
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- NotTDG
Regulated
1agement Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
- Implement the 4R's to reduce
volumes (see Appendix 6)
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, II, or III landfill
•· 'efllber, 1996
199
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
(Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Glycol Solutions
(Containing Lead
or other Heavy
Metals) (Waste
Type 202)
[GLYCHM]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
Glycol Solutions
(No Heavy Metals)
[GLYC]
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consult TDG
Regulations
flash point,
toxicity (heavy
metals)
-Recycle
- Inject down EUB Class Ia
disposal well (glycol < 40 per
cent by mass)
- Glycol solutions from vessels containing
lead solder
- Identified as Waste Type #202 in AEP's
Alberta Users Guidefor Waste
Managers, May 1995
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
Testing
Required
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
flash point,
toxicity
- Recycle
- Inject down EUB Class Ia or Ib
disposal well (glycol < 40 per
cent by mass)
- May be a DOW depending on flash point
and toxicity
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
Hydraulic and
Transmission Oil
[HYDOIL]
See
Comments
- NotmG
Regulated (unless
contaminated with
a DOW)
heavy metals
- Direct to a licensed lube oil
recycling finn
- Thennal treatment
- Nonnally not a DOW (depending on·
heavy metal content; i.e. Va, V)
Hydrotest Fluids Methanol
[METHNL]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
flash point,
toxicity
-Reuse
-Recycle
- Inject down EUB Class Ia or Ib
disposal well (organics < l 0 per
cent by mass)
- See EUB yuide G-51 for injection well
requirements
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
200
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Incinerator Ash
[INCASH]
Testing
Required
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Regulations
Ion Exchange
Resin
[IEXRES]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Regulations
- Containerize and landfill at an
approved Class Ia, Ib, or II
landfill
Ion Exchange
Resin Regenerant
Liquids
[IEXLIQ]
See
Comments
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Regulations
- Inject down EUB Class Ia
disposal well (pH 4.5 - 12.5)
- Inject down EUB Class lb
disposal well (pH 6.0- 9.0)
- Normally not a DOW (depending on pH)
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
Iron Sponge
[IRNSPG]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Class 4.2, UN1376
- Keep wet to avoid spontaneous
combustion; isolate from acidic
solutions
- Reuse/regenerate
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia
or Ib landfill (add lime or
equivalent at time of burial to
neutralize)
- Waste may be susceptible to spontaneous
combustion - this material should be kept
wet at all times
- See AEP's Guidelines for the Disposal of
Sulphur Containing Solid Wastes
Oilfield Wa~
.
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
leachate (heavy
metals)
DOW
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia
or Ib landfill
N-DOW
- Recycle (construction fill)
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill
- Physical/chemical treatment
pyrophoric
characteristics,
leachate
nagement Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas lmlustrt
Comments
•'"'Vember. 1996
201
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Lead Based
Products (H 2S
Sensing Tape)
[LDTAPE]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Class 6.1 (9.2),
UN1616
Lead Based
Products (Pipe
Dope/Greases)
[LDDOPE]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
Lubricating Oil
(Hydrocarbon and
Synthetic)
[LUBOIL]
Metal (Scrap)
[SMETAL]
Common
Criteria
«;ommon/Acceptable Practices
heavy metals (Pb)
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia
or Ib landfill
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
heavy metals (Pb)
- Recycle (if possible)
- Thermal treatment
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia
or Ib landfill
See
Comments
- Not·TDG
Regulated (unless
contaminated with
a DOW)
heavy metals,
flash point
See
Comments
- NotTDG
Regulated (unless
contaminated with
a DOW)
Comments
.
.
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
- Direct to a licensed lube oil
recycling facility
- Thermal treatment
- Normally not a DOW (depending on
heavy metal content; i.e. Va, V)
DOW
- Normally not a DOW (unless
contaminated with sulphur, chemicals,
oil, or other DOW wastes)
- Decontaminate and recycle via a
scrap metal dealer
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia
or Ib landfill
N-DOW
- Recycle via a scrap metal dealer
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
lb, II, or III landfill
November, 1996
202
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Naturally
Occurring
Radioactive
Materials - NORMs
[NORM}
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
Paints
[WPAINT]
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
- Class 7
toxicity
- General disposal guidelines as
- See Part F, Section 31.0 for specific
given in the Alberta Labour
disposal procedures
Guidelines Guidelines for the
- General guidelines for the handling and
Handling ofNaturally Occurring
disposal ofNORM waste have been
Radioactive Materials (NORM)
developed by the Western Canada
in Western Canada
NORM Committee. Guidelines for the
Handling ofNaturally Occurring
Radioactive Materials (NORM) in
Western Canada are available from
Alberta Labour
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Class 3, UN1263
(if flammable)
- Class 8, UN3066
(if corrosive)
toxicity, flash
point, heavy
metals
-
Pesticides/
Herbicides
[PSTHRB]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
toxicity
- Avoid excessive volumes
- Waste material exchange
programs
- Thennal treatment
- Approved toxic roundup (if
small volumes)
Pigging Waste
(Liquid and Wax)
[PIOWST}
Testing
Required
- Dependent on
specifiC waste
characteristics,
consult TOO
Regulations
flash point,
pyrophoric
characteristics
- Send to an approved oilfield
waste processing facility for
hydrocarbon recovery
- Theonal treatment
- Cavern disposal
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia
or Ib landfill (IllUit be solid)
Oilfield Was
'lCigement Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas lndustly
Comments
Physical/chemical treatment
Thennal treatment
Recycle (if possible)
Approved toxic roundup (if
small volumes)
- Utilize third party certified applicators
for the application and disposal of
pesticides when possible
•• "Yember. 1996
203
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Polychlorinated
Biphenyls (PCBs)
Askarel Liquids
[PCBLIQ]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Class 9.1, 9.2,
UN2315
Polychlorinated
Biphenyls (PCBs) Contaminated
Solids < 50 ppm
[PCBSLF]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- NotTDG
Regulated
Polychlorinated
Biphenyls (PCBs)Contaminated
Solids > 1000 ppm
[PCBSGI]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Class 9.1, 9.2,
UN2315
toxicity
- Direct to an approved hazardous
waste disposal facility
Polychlorinated
Biphenyls (PCBs) Contaminated
Solids > 50 ppm
and< 1000 ppm
[PCBSLI]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Class 9.1, 9.2,
UN2315
toxicity
- Direct to an approved hazardous
waste disposal facility
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia
or lb landfill
Polychlorinated
Biphenyls (PCBs) Fluorescent Light
Ballasts [PCBBAL]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Class 9.1, 9.2
UN2315
toxicity
- Direct to an approved hazardous
waste disposal facility
- Recycle metal component if
possible
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
toxicity
- Direct to an approved hazardous
waste disposal facility
Comments
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia
or lb landfill
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
204
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
(Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Rags
[OILRAG]
See
Comments
Salt Heat Medium
[SALT]
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
- NotTDG
regulated (unless
contaminated with
a DOW
- Reuse via laundering/drycleaning
- Remove entrained liquids and
landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill depending on
Specific characteristics
- Nonnally not a DOW (depending on
flash point or leachate). lfBTEX > 1000
mglkg, it cannot be landfilled
See
Comments
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
- Solubilize using an existing
aqueous waste stream and inject
down an BUB Class Ia or Ib
disposal well
- Physicallchemical treatment
- Nonnally not a DOW (unless a strong
oxidizer such as potassium or sodium
salts)
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
Sand - Produced
[SAND]
See
Comments
- Class4.1, UN3175
- Send to an approved oilfield
waste processing facility for
hydrocarbon recovery
- Recycle (other industrial uses)
- Use in road construction in
accordance with BUB IL 95-04
- Cavern disposal
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill depending on
specific characteristics
- Normally not a DOW (depending on
flash point or leachate characteristics). If
BTEX > 1000 mglkg, it cannot be
landfilled
Sludge - Cooling
Tower [SLGCTW]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specifte waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Regulations
- Physicallchemical treatment
- Cavern disposal
- May be Waste Type 204 if hexavalent
chromium used as a biocide in cooling
waters
.
Oilfield Wast
Common
Criteria
leachate (heavy
metals)
1agement Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
~·
-·-ember, 1996
205
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Sludge - Flare Pit
[SLGPIT]
Testing
Required
Sludge- Gas
Sweetening
Systems
[SLGSWT]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
flash point,
leachate, toxicity
- Disposal is based on specific
waste characteristics detennined
from analytical or historical data
- Disposal options include:
- physical/chemical treatment
- approved Class Ia, Ib, or II
landfill depending on specific
characteristics
- ·biodegradation (on-site or offsite at an approved facility)
- thennal treatment
- approved oilfield waste
processing facility
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Regulations
flash point,
leachate·
:. Disposal is based on specific
waste characteristics detennined
from analytical or historical data
- Disposal options include:
- physical/chemical treatment
- approved Class Ia or Ib landfill
- biodegradation
- thennal treatment
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
Comments
November, 1996
206
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
SludgeGlycol/Gas Drying
[SLGGLY]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
SludgeHydrocarbon
[SLGHYD]
Sludge - Lime
[SLGLIM]
Oilfield Wast
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
flash point,
leachate, toxicity
- Disposal is based on specific
waste characteristics detennined
from analytical or historical data
- Disposal options include:
- physical/chemical treatment
- biodegradation
- thennal treatment
- inject down BUB Class Ia or Ib
disposal well (glycol < 40 per
cent by mass)
Testing
Required
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
flash point,
leachate
- Disposal is based on specific
waste characteristics detennined
from analytical or historical data
- Disposal options include:
- approved oilfield waste
processing facility
- physical/chemical treatment
- biodegradation
- thennal treatment
- Approved Class Ia, lb, or II
landfill depending on specific
characteristics
Testing
Required
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Reg\! lations
corrosivity
- Co-dispose with sulphur
containing wastes or soil at an
approved Class Ia, lb, or II
landfill depending on specific
characteristics
·agement Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas lodustly
Comments
- DOW if pH> 12.5
•
qmbef,
1996
207
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
(Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Sludge - Process
[SLGPRO]
Testing
Required
Sludge- Sulphur
[SLGSUL]
Testing
Solvents/Residues
(Halogenated)
[SOLIIAL]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
flash point,
toxicity, leachate
Solvent/Residues
(Non-Halogenated
Aliphatic)
[SOLALP]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Regulations
flash point,
toxicity, leachate
R~uired
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Regulations
leachate
- Disposal is based on specific
waste characteristics detennined
from analytical or historical data
- Disposal options include:
- physicaVchemical treatment
- approved Class Ia, Ib, or II
landfill depending on specific
characteristics
- biodegradation
- thennal treatment
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Regulations
leachate,
- Co-dispose with slightly basic
wastes or soil at an approved
Class Ia, lb, or II landfill
depending on specific
characteristics
- Physical/chemical treatment
corro~ivity
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
- Recycle (regenerate, alternate
uses)
- Thennal treatment
Comments
- See AEP's Guidelines for the Disposal of
Sulphur Containing Solid Waste,
March 1983
.
- Recycle (regenerate, alternate
uses)
- Thennal treatment
November, 1996
208
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
(Waste Code]
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Solvents/Residues
(Non-Halogenated
Aromatic)
[SOLARO]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
Sweetening Agents
(Liquids)
[SWTLIQ]
See
Comments
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
- Inject down an BUB Class Ia, or
lb disposal well
- Nonnally not a DOW (depending on
leachate characteristics and flash point)
- See BUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
Sweetening Agents
(Solids)
[SWTSOL]
See
Comments
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill depending on
specific characteristics
- Nonnally not a DOW (depending on
leachate characteristics)
Thread Protectors Casing/Tubing
[THPROT]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- NotTDG
Regulated
- Reuse (return to pipe supplier)
-Recycle
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
lb, II, or Ill landfill
Treater Hay
[TRTHAY]
See
Comments
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
Oilfield Wast
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practice•
flash point,
toxicity, leachate
- Recycle (regenerate, alternate
uses)
- Thennal treatment
flash point,
pyrophoric
characteristics
1agement Requirements for the Upstre811' Oil and Gas Industry
- Direct to an approved oilfield
waste processing facility for
hydrocarbon recovery
- Thennal treatment
Comments
- May be a DOW depending on flash point,
or leachate characteristics
ember, 1996
209
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code]
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Wash Fluids Organic
[WSHORG]
Testing
Required
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
Wash Fluids Water [WSHWTR]
See
Comments
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consult TOG
Regulations
Testing
Required
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
Water- Process
(with Heavy
Metals)
[PWTRHM]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
.consult TDG
Regulations
Water- Produced
(Including Brine
Solutions)
[WATER]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- NotTDG
Regulated (unless
contaminated with
a DOW)
Water Process
(with Organic
Chemicals)
[PWTROR]
-
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
flash point,
halogenated
organics content,
toxicity
- Recycle (regenerate, alternate
uses)
- Recover hydrocarbons and inject
down EUB Class Ia or Ib
disposal well
- Thennal treatment
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
- Recover hydrocarbons and inject
down EUB Class Ia or Ib
disposal well
- Nonnally not a DOW (depending on
organic content, flash point, pH)
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
flash point,
halogenated
organics content,
toxicity
- Inject down EUB Class Ia
disposal well (pH 4.5 - 12.5)
- Inject down EUB Class Ib
disposal well (pH 6.0- 9.0)
·- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
heavy metals, pH
- Inject down EUB Class Ia
disposal well (pH 4.5 - 12.5)
- Inject down EUB Class Ib
disposal well (pH 6.0- 9.0) (if
heavy metal content meets
criteria outlined in EUB Guide
G-51)
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
- Recycle (waterflood)
- Recover hydrocarbons and inject
down BUB Class Ia, Ib, or II
disposal well
- See EUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
November, 1996
210
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
(Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Well Workover
Fluids [WWOFLD]
See
Comments
Wood (Chemically
Treated/Cooling
Tower)
[WOODCT]
See
comments
Oilfield Wast
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
corrosivity, flash
point
- Inject down BUB Class Ia
disposal well (pH 4.5 - 12.5)
- Inject down BUB Class Ib
disposal well (pH 6.0- 9.0)
- Recover any hydrocarbons prior
to disposal
- See BUB Guide G-51 for injection well
requirements
- Heavy metals are not nonnally a concern
for well servicing fluids
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations
heavy metals,
leachate
.,. Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill depending on .
specific characteristics
- Nonnally not a DOW (unless in
dispersed fonn and due to leachate
characteristics and/or pentachlorophenol
content)
1agement Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
J'
-·'fJilber. 1996
211
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code]
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Aerosol Cans
[EMTCON]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- NotTDG
Regulated
- Recycle (if possible)
- Ensure containers are empty and
landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill
Barrels, Pails
[EMTCON]
See
Comments
- Dependent on
previous contents,
consult.TDG
regulations
- Reuse/return to supplier
- Recycle (barrel/container
.
reconditioning)
-Rinse (see Section 5.3), crush
and landfill at an approved Class
Ia, Ib, or II landfill
Crude Oil Sample
Bottles [EMTCON]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Class 3, UN1267
-Reuse
- Recycle (commercial bottle
washing facility or a plastic/glass
recycling facility)
- Rinse and landfill at an approved
Class Ia, Ib, or II landfill
Cutting Oil Tubes
[EMTCON]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- NotTDG
Regulated
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill
Grease Cartridges
[EMTCON]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- NotTDG
Regulated
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
Empty Containe.rs
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
- Normally not a DOW (see Section 5.3)
- Containers must be completely empty
.
(see Section 5.3)
.
November. 1996
212
Waste Management Table (cont•d)
OUfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Mud SacksDrilling
[EMTCON]
NonDangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- NotiDG
Regulated
Paint Cans/Brushes
[EMTCON]
See
Comments
- NotTDG
Regulated (if dry)
toxicity
- Allow residue to dry and landfill
at an approved Class Ia, lb, or II
landfill
- Not a DOW if empty and dry
Pesticide/
Herbicide
Containers
[PSTCON]
Dangerous
Oilfield
Waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultTDG
Regulations or
supplier of
pesticide
toxicity
- Recycle (Pesticide container
collection site)
- Rinse (see Section 5.3), crush,
puncture and landfill at an
approved Class Ia, Ib, or II
. landfill with a designated
pesticide container collection site
- Containers must be completely empty
and rinsed (see Section 5.3)
Pipe Dope
Containers/
Brushes
[EMTCON]
See
Comments
- Dependent on
specific waste
characteristics,
consultiDG
Regulations
heavy metals
- Reuse (if possible)
- Rinse (see Section 5.3) and
landfill at an approved Class Ia,
Ib, or II landfill depending on
specific characteristics
- Not a DOW if empty and dry
Waste Compressed
or Liquified Gases
[WSTCGS]
Dependent
on specific
waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
-Class 2
dependent on
specific waste
- Dependent on specific waste
Waste Flammable
Liquid [WSTFLQ]
Dependent
on specific
waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
-Class 3
flammability
- Dependent on specific waste
EUB Waste Name
(Waste Code)
Common
Criteria
Com moo!Acceptable Practices
Comments
- Reuse (return to mud supplier)
- Landfill at an approved Class Ia,
lb, II, or III landfill
- Approved thennal treatment
Ml1cellaneou1 Wastes
Oilfield Was
1agement Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
•'"'Yeellber. 1900
213
Waste Management Table (coot' d)
EUB Waste Name
[Waste Code)
Oilfield
Class
Common
Transport Class
Waste Flammable
Solid
[WSTFSD]
Dependent
on specific
waste
Waste Oxidizing
Liquid [WSTOLQ]
Depe~dent
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
- Dependent on
specific waste
- Class4
flammability
- Dependent on specific waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
-Class 5
oxidizes
- Dependent on specific waste
on specific
waste
Waste Oxidizing
Solid
[WSTOSD]
Dependent
on specific
waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
-Class 5 ·
oxidizes
- Dependent on specific waste
Waste Poisonous
Liquid [WSTPLQ]
Dependent
on specific
waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
-Class 6
toxicity
- Dependent on specific waste
Waste Poisonous
Solid
[WSTPSD]
Dependent
on specific
waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
-Class 6
toxicity
- Dependent on specific waste
Waste Radioactive
Material
[WSTRDM]
Dependent
on specific
waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
-Class 7
toxicity
- Dependent on specific waste
Waste Corrosive
Liquid [WSTCLQ]
Dependent
on specific
waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
- Class 8
toxicity,
corrosivity
- Dependent on specific waste
Waste Corrosive
Solid
[WSTCSO]
Dependent
on specific
waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
-Class 8
corrosivity
- Dependent on specific waste
Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
Comments
.
November, 1996
214
Waste Management Table (cont'd)
[Waste Code)
OUfteld
Class
Common
Transport Class
WasteMiscellaneous
[WSTMIS]
Dependent
on specific
waste
- Dependent on
specific waste
-Class 9
EUB Waste Name
Common
Criteria
Common/Acceptable Practices
Comments
- Dependent on specific waste
• It is the generators' responsibility to ensure wastes are treated and disposed of correctly. This table is based on wastes produced through the use of
standard industry practices. If unusual properties are suspected to exist or the characteristics are uncertain, the general characterization method
outlined in Section 6.2, Procedures for ClassifYing Waste, must be used.
• This table contains treatment and disposal infonnation. Other issues such as worker safety, material handling; and storage should also be
considered. References for these areas include CAPP's Production Waste Management Handbook, WHMIS and TOO. All requirements ofTDG
must be complied with.
,
• The use of the "Acceptable Practices" column does not result in the reclassification of a Dangerous Oilfield Waste or a waste indicated as "Testing
Required" to a Non-Dangerous Oilfield Waste.
• Where classification of a waste is unclear, refer to AEP'sAlberta Users Guide for Waste Managers, for further information.
Oilfield Wast
~agement Requirements for the Upstream Oil and Gas Industry
·ember, 19$
This information from Directive 030 replaces Appendix 8.1 and 8.2 in Directive 058 (February 1, 2006)
4
Annual Oilfield Waste Disposition Reporting Instructions and Computer Data Format Changes
4.1
Instructions to Complete the Oilfield Waste Disposition Report
Overview
All licensees/approval holders (oilfield waste generators) are required to implement and
maintain a waste tracking system that is capable of providing the information required for the
Annual Oilfield Waste Disposition Report. The oilfield wastes are required to be tracked
from the initial point of generation through to the final disposition location (cradle to grave).
This report provides the EUB with annual summaries regarding the types and quantities of
oilfield wastes generated, the source of the oilfield waste, and the specific disposal or
treatment methods used. Licensees/approval holders that are selected to submit their annual
oilfield waste disposition report are required to prepare this report in accordance with
Directive 058: Oilfield Waste Management Requirements for the Upstream Petroleum
Industry (formerly Guide 58).
The following detailed information describes the changes to the table “computer data
format.”
Header Record Layout General Information
This section of the report is to identify the header record for the file. The following
information must be entered:
•
Record Type Code: Identifies the record type (submission by file or form) for the report
header.
•
BA Code: The code assigned by the EUB to individual companies to identify approval
holders or the licensee of wells, facilities, or pipelines.
•
Waste Generation Year: The year for which this oilfield waste disposition report
applies.
•
Report ID: Sequence associated to the waste generation year for the report.
Oilfield Waste Details
This section of the report is to identify all oilfield waste generation locations (e.g., facilities,
wells, batteries, pipelines) of each oilfield waste type generated and the total quantity that
was treated or disposed.
•
Licence Type: The licence type must be identified as well (W), pipeline (P), or facility
(F) to describe the licence type for the location where the oilfield waste was generated.
•
Licence Number: The licence number for the location where the oilfield waste was
generated.
•
Surface Location: The surface location of the well or facility. (For file uploads only,
either the surface location of the well or facility licence or the licence type and licence
number may be provided.)
•
Waste Code: EUB-assigned waste code for each specific type of oilfield waste reported.
EUB Directive 030: Digital Data Submission of the Annual Oilfield Waste Disposition Report (February 1, 2006) •
1
•
Waste Volume: Total quantity (up to 3 decimal places) of each specific oilfield waste
type that was transported off site for management or the volume treated on site during the
reporting period.
•
Waste Volume Adjustment: The adjustment quantity, positive or negative, is required
to balance the differences between the total quantities of each specific oilfield waste type
sent for management and quantities received at the management location, should the
quantities be different (up to 3 decimal places, e.g.,123456789.000). Negative numbers
are indicated with a negative sign (-).
•
Waste Volume Units: Units the oilfield waste type is reported in. Oilfield waste is to be
reported in either cubic metres or tonnes at 101.325 kPa and 15°C. (Note that if there are
quantities of a waste stream in both tonnes and cubic metres, two separate entries must
be made for that specific waste type.)
Disposal/Treatment Details
This section of the report is to identify the disposal or treatment methods used for each
specific oilfield waste type and the corresponding quantities managed.
•
Disposal/Treatment Method: Oilfield waste disposal or treatment method used for each
oilfield waste type reported.
•
Disposal/Treatment Volume: Total quantity (up to 3 decimal places) of oilfield waste
disposed or treated for the reported management method.
Disposal Methods
The purpose of this section of the report is to identify the disposal methods utilized for each
specific waste type and the corresponding quantities disposed.
Note: For each waste type, the total of the quantities identified for all the disposal methods
utilized must equal the total quantity disposed (reported under "Waste Details") plus or minus the
reported adjustments. For waste delivered to transfer stations prior to disposal, it is the
responsibility of the waste generator to obtain disposal details from the transfer station operator.
Those disposal details are to be indicated in this report.
• Waste Processing Facility: Include all waste delivered to oilfield waste processing
facilities for treatment prior to disposal.
• Disposal Wells: Include all waste delivered directly to disposal wells. Note: Do not
include waste delivered to an oilfield waste processing facility for treatment prior to
well disposal.
Class Ia Disposal Well: Directly disposed in a Class Ia disposal well.
Class Ib Disposal Well: Directly disposed in a Class Ib disposal well.
Class II Disposal Well: Directly disposed in a Class II disposal well.
Cavern: Directly disposed in a cavern.
•
Landfills: Include all waste delivered directly to landfills. Note: Do not include waste
delivered to an oilfield waste processing facility for treatment prior to landfill
disposal.
Class Ia Landfill: Directly disposed in a Class Ia landfill.
EUB Directive 030: Digital Data Submission of the Annual Oilfield Waste Disposition Report (February 1, 2006) •
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Class Ib Landfill: Directly disposed in a Class Ib landfill.
Class II Landfill: Directly disposed in a Class II landfill.
Class III Landfill: Directly disposed in a Class III landfill.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
4.2
Biodegradation Facility: Include all waste delivered directly to biodegradation
facilities. Note: Do not include waste delivered to an oilfield waste processing facility
for treatment prior to disposal at a biodegradation facility or waste treated on-site by
bioremediation processes.
Thermal Treatment: Include all waste delivered to or treated by fixed or mobile
incinerators except waste disposed of by small batch feed and campsite incinerators.
Used Oil Recycler: Include all waste delivered to facilities which collect used
lubricating oils for reprocessing or fuel blending.
Recycling Facility: Include all waste delivered to recycling facilities (excluding Used
Oil Recyclers).
Swan Hills: Include all waste delivered to the Swan Hills Hazardous Waste
Treatment Centre.
Small Oilfield Waste Incinerators: Include all waste disposed of by small batch
feed and campsite incinerators.
Biodegradation (On-site): Include all on-site waste treatment through
bioremediation including biocells/biopiles and land treatment (exclude in situ).
Road Spread: Include all waste disposed by road spreading.
Burial (On-site): Include all waste disposed by on-site burial.
Transborder: Include all waste shipped out of Alberta for disposal.
Others: Include waste treated/disposed utilizing disposal methods not listed above.
Computer Data Format
Field
Start Length
Format
Definition/Format/Usage
Header Record Layout–first row of upload file
Record Type Code
1
BA Code
3
9(3)
The code identifies the record type for the report header record.
The information appears only once for the entire upload file (e.g.,
001).
4
4
X(4)
EUB-assigned company code (e.g., 0338).
Waste Generation Year 8
4
9(4)
Year for which the report applies (01 Jan – 31 Dec) (e.g., 1996).
Report ID
8
9(8)
Sequence associated to the reporting year for the specific report
(leading zero fill) (e.g., 00000001).
(continued)
12
EUB Directive 030: Digital Data Submission of the Annual Oilfield Waste Disposition Report (February 1, 2006) •
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Field
Start Length
Format
Definition/Format/Usage
Detailed Record Layout–second and each subsequent row of upload file
Record Type Code
1
3
9(3)
The code identifies the record type for the report header record.
The information appears on the second and each subsequent
row of the entire upload file (e.g., 002).
BA Code
4
4
X(4)
EUB-assigned company code (e.g., 0338).
Waste Generation Year 8
4
9(4)
Year for which the report applies (01 Jan - 31 Dec) (e.g., 1996).
Report ID
8
9(8)
Sequence associated to the reporting year for the specific report
(leading zero fill) (e.g., 00000001).
12
Oilfield Waste Details–an additional row for each unique waste code for a licence
Licence Type
20
1
X(1)
This is the licence type as indicated as well (W), pipeline (P), or
facility (F) to describe the licence type for where the oilfield waste
was generated. Must enter W, P, or F.
Licence Number
21
9
X(9)
This is the licence number for the location where the oilfield
waste was generated (e.g., 0000001).
Surface Location
30
17
X(17)
This is the complete surface location for the licence (includes
Location Exception, LSD, Section, Township, Range, Meridian)
(e.g., 00-11-26-045-06W4).
Waste Code
47
6
X(6)
EUB-assigned waste code (see the on-line help to download a
list of waste codes).
Waste Volume
53
13
9(9)V3
Total quantity of each specific type of oilfield waste shipped or
treated (up to 3 decimal places) (e.g., 123456789.000).
Waste Volume
Adjustment
66
14
9(9)V3
The adjustment quantity, positive or negative, is required to
balance the differences between the total quantities of each
specific oilfield waste type sent for management and quantities
received at the management location, should the quantities be
different (up to 3 decimal places, e.g., 123456789.000). Negative
numbers are indicated with a negative sign.
Waste Volume Units
80
1
X(1)
Units the oilfield waste type is reported in (cubic metres or
tonnes). Must enter M or T.
Disposal/Treatment Details–an additional row for each unique disposal/treatment method for each oilfield
waste code for each licence
Disposal or Treatment
Method
81
2
X(2)
Disposal or treatment method used for each oilfield waste type
(see the on-line help to download a list of disposal or treatment
methods).
Disposal or Treatment
Volume
83
13
9(9)V3
Quantity of oilfield waste disposed or treated for the disposal or
treatment method used (up to 3 decimal places, e.g.,
123456789.000).
EUB Directive 030: Digital Data Submission of the Annual Oilfield Waste Disposition Report (February 1, 2006) •
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