Hardware Interface Description

Hardware Interface Description
BGS2-E/BGS2-W
Version:
DocId:
01.301
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Hardware Interface Description

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
2

Document Name:
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
Version:
01.301
Date:
2011-04-07
DocId:
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Status
Confidential / Released
GENERAL NOTE
THE USE OF THE PRODUCT INCLUDING THE SOFTWARE AND DOCUMENTATION (THE "PRODUCT") IS SUBJECT TO THE RELEASE NOTE PROVIDED TOGETHER WITH PRODUCT. IN ANY
EVENT THE PROVISIONS OF THE RELEASE NOTE SHALL PREVAIL. THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS
INFORMATION ON CINTERION PRODUCTS. THE SPECIFICATIONS IN THIS DOCUMENT ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AT CINTERION'S DISCRETION. CINTERION WIRELESS MODULES GMBH
GRANTS A NON-EXCLUSIVE RIGHT TO USE THE PRODUCT. THE RECIPIENT SHALL NOT TRANSFER, COPY, MODIFY, TRANSLATE, REVERSE ENGINEER, CREATE DERIVATIVE WORKS; DISASSEMBLE OR DECOMPILE THE PRODUCT OR OTHERWISE USE THE PRODUCT EXCEPT AS
SPECIFICALLY AUTHORIZED. THE PRODUCT AND THIS DOCUMENT ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS
IS" BASIS ONLY AND MAY CONTAIN DEFICIENCIES OR INADEQUACIES. TO THE MAXIMUM
EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW, CINTERION WIRELESS MODULES GMBH DISCLAIMS
ALL WARRANTIES AND LIABILITIES. THE RECIPIENT UNDERTAKES FOR AN UNLIMITED PERIOD
OF TIME TO OBSERVE SECRECY REGARDING ANY INFORMATION AND DATA PROVIDED TO HIM
IN THE CONTEXT OF THE DELIVERY OF THE PRODUCT. THIS GENERAL NOTE SHALL BE GOVERNED AND CONSTRUED ACCORDING TO GERMAN LAW.
Copyright
Transmittal, reproduction, dissemination and/or editing of this document as well as utilization of its contents and communication thereof to others without express authorization are prohibited. Offenders will be
held liable for payment of damages. All rights created by patent grant or registration of a utility model or
design patent are reserved.
Copyright © 2011, Cinterion Wireless Modules GmbH
Trademark Notice
Microsoft and Windows are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the
United States and/or other countries. All other registered trademarks or trademarks mentioned in this document are property of their respective owners.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 2 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
Contents
112

Contents
0
Document History ...................................................................................................... 9
1
Introduction ............................................................................................................... 10
1.1
Related Documents ......................................................................................... 10
1.2
Terms and Abbreviations ................................................................................. 10
1.3
Regulatory and Type Approval Information ..................................................... 14
1.3.1 Directives and Standards.................................................................... 14
1.3.2 SAR requirements specific to portable mobiles .................................. 17
1.3.3 Safety Precautions.............................................................................. 18
2
Product Concept ....................................................................................................... 19
2.1
Key Features at a Glance ................................................................................ 19
2.2
BGS2-E/BGS2-W System Overview................................................................ 21
2.3
Circuit Concept ................................................................................................ 22
3
Application Interface................................................................................................. 23
3.1
Operating Modes ............................................................................................. 24
3.2
Power Supply................................................................................................... 25
3.2.1 Minimizing Power Losses ................................................................... 25
3.2.2 Measuring the Supply Voltage (VBATT+) ........................................... 26
3.2.3 Monitoring Power Supply by AT Command ........................................ 26
3.3
Power Up/Power Down Scenarios ................................................................... 27
3.3.1 Turn on BGS2-E/BGS2-W .................................................................. 27
3.3.1.1 Switch on BGS2-E/BGS2-W Using ON Signal.................... 27
3.3.1.2 Suppressing Unintentional Pulses on ON Signal Line ........ 29
3.3.1.3 Turn on BGS2-E/BGS2-W Using the RTC (Alarm Mode) ... 30
3.3.2 Restart BGS2-E/BGS2-W ................................................................... 30
3.3.2.1 Restart BGS2-E/BGS2-W via AT+CFUN Command........... 30
3.3.2.2 Restart BGS2-E/BGS2-W Using EMERG_RST.................. 31
3.3.3 Signal States after Startup .................................................................. 32
3.3.4 Turn off BGS2-E/BGS2-W .................................................................. 34
3.3.4.1 Switch off BGS2-E/BGS2-W Using AT Command .............. 34
3.3.5 Automatic Shutdown ........................................................................... 36
3.3.5.1 Thermal Shutdown .............................................................. 36
3.3.5.2 Undervoltage Shutdown ...................................................... 37
3.3.5.3 Overvoltage Shutdown ........................................................ 37
3.4
Automatic GPRS Multislot Class Change ........................................................ 38
3.5
Power Saving................................................................................................... 39
3.5.1 No Power Saving (AT+CFUN=1) ........................................................ 39
3.5.2 NON-CYCLIC SLEEP Mode (AT+CFUN=0)....................................... 39
3.5.3 CYCLIC SLEEP Mode AT+CFUN=7 .................................................. 40
3.5.4 CYCLIC SLEEP Mode AT+CFUN=9 .................................................. 40
3.5.5 Timing of the CTS Signal in CYCLIC SLEEP Modes.......................... 40
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 3 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
Contents
112

3.5.6
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.12
3.13
3.14
3.15
3.16
3.17
Wake up BGS2-E/BGS2-W from SLEEP Mode.................................. 42
3.5.6.1 Wake-up via RTS0 and RTS1
(if AT+CFUN=0 or AT+CFUN=9)......................................... 43
Summary of State Transitions (except SLEEP Mode) ..................................... 43
RTC Backup..................................................................................................... 44
SIM/USIM Interface.......................................................................................... 45
Serial Interface ASC0 ...................................................................................... 47
Serial Interface ASC1 ...................................................................................... 50
Analog Audio Interface..................................................................................... 52
3.11.1 Microphone Inputs and Supply ........................................................... 52
3.11.2 Loudspeaker Output ........................................................................... 54
GPIO Interface ................................................................................................. 55
I2C Interface ..................................................................................................... 57
PWM Interfaces ............................................................................................... 59
Status LED....................................................................................................... 59
Behavior of the RING0 Line (ASC0 Interface only).......................................... 60
Power Indication Circuit ................................................................................... 61
4
Antenna Interface...................................................................................................... 63
4.1
Antenna Installation ......................................................................................... 64
4.2
RF Line Routing Design................................................................................... 65
4.2.1 Line Arrangement Examples............................................................... 65
4.2.1.1 Embedded Stripline ............................................................. 65
4.2.1.2 Micro-Stripline ..................................................................... 66
4.2.2 Routing Example................................................................................. 70
4.2.2.1 Interface to RF Connector................................................... 70
5
Electrical, Reliability and Radio Characteristics.................................................... 71
5.1
Absolute Maximum Ratings ............................................................................. 71
5.2
Operating Temperatures.................................................................................. 72
5.3
Reliability Characteristics ................................................................................. 73
5.4
Pad Assignment and Signal Description......................................................... 74
5.5
Power Supply Ratings...................................................................................... 82
5.6
Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part .............................................. 83
5.6.1 Setting Audio Parameters by AT Commands ..................................... 83
5.6.2 Audio Programming Model ................................................................. 84
5.6.3 Characteristics of Audio Modes .......................................................... 85
5.6.4 Voiceband Receive Path..................................................................... 86
5.6.5 Voiceband Transmit Path.................................................................... 87
5.7
Antenna Interface Specification ....................................................................... 88
5.8
Electrostatic Discharge .................................................................................... 89
6
Mechanics, Mounting and Packaging ..................................................................... 90
6.1
Mechanical Dimensions of BGS2-E/BGS2-W.................................................. 90
6.2
Mounting BGS2-E/BGS2-W onto the Application Platform .............................. 92
6.2.1 SMT PCB Assembly ........................................................................... 92
6.2.1.1 Land Pattern and Stencil ..................................................... 92
6.2.1.2 Board Level Characterization.............................................. 94
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 4 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
Contents
112

6.2.2
6.2.3
6.3
Moisture Sensitivity Level ................................................................... 94
Soldering Conditions and Temperature .............................................. 95
6.2.3.1 Reflow Profile ...................................................................... 95
6.2.3.2 Maximum Temperature and Duration .................................. 96
6.2.4 Durability and Mechanical Handling.................................................... 97
6.2.4.1 Storage Conditions.............................................................. 97
6.2.4.2 Processing Life.................................................................... 98
6.2.4.3 Baking ................................................................................. 98
6.2.4.4 Electrostatic Discharge........................................................ 98
Packaging ........................................................................................................ 99
6.3.1 Tape and Reel .................................................................................... 99
6.3.1.1 Orientation........................................................................... 99
6.3.1.2 Barcode Label ................................................................... 100
6.3.2 Shipping Materials ............................................................................ 101
6.3.2.1 Moisture Barrier Bag ......................................................... 101
6.3.2.2 Transportation Box ............................................................ 103
6.3.3 Trays ................................................................................................. 104
7
Sample Application................................................................................................. 105
7.1
Blocking against RF on Interface Lines ......................................................... 107
8
Reference Approval ................................................................................................ 109
8.1
Reference Equipment for Type Approval ....................................................... 109
8.2
Compliance with FCC and IC Rules and Regulations ................................... 110
9
Appendix.................................................................................................................. 111
9.1
List of Parts and Accessories......................................................................... 111
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 5 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
Tables
112

Tables
Table 1:
Table 2:
Table 3:
Table 4:
Table 5:
Table 6:
Table 7:
Table 8:
Table 9:
Table 10:
Table 11:
Table 12:
Table 13:
Table 14:
Table 15:
Table 16:
Table 17:
Table 18:
Table 19:
Table 20:
Table 21:
Table 22:
Table 23:
Table 24:
Table 25:
Table 26:
Table 27:
Table 28:
Table 29:
Table 30:
Table 31:
Table 32:
Table 33:
Table 34:
Table 35:
Table 36:
Directives ....................................................................................................... 14
Standards of North American type approval .................................................. 14
Standards of European type approval............................................................ 14
Requirements of quality ................................................................................. 15
Standards of the Ministry of Information Industry of the
People’s Republic of China ............................................................................ 15
Toxic or hazardous substances or elements with defined concentration limits 16
Overview of operating modes ........................................................................ 24
Signal states................................................................................................... 32
Temperature dependent behavior.................................................................. 36
Wake-up events in NON-CYCLIC and CYCLIC SLEEP modes .................... 42
State transitions of BGS2-E/BGS2-W (except SLEEP mode) ....................... 43
Signals of the SIM interface (SMT application interface) ............................... 45
DCE-DTE wiring of ASC0 .............................................................................. 48
DCE-DTE wiring of ASC1 .............................................................................. 50
GPIO assignment........................................................................................... 55
Power indication circuit .................................................................................. 61
Return loss in the active band........................................................................ 63
Absolute maximum ratings............................................................................. 71
Board temperature ......................................................................................... 72
Ambient temperature according to IEC 60068-2 (w/o forced air circulation).. 72
Ambient temperature with forced air circulation (air speed 0.9m/s) ............... 72
Summary of reliability test conditions............................................................. 73
Pad assignments............................................................................................ 75
Electrical description of application interface ................................................. 76
Power supply ratings...................................................................................... 82
Audio parameters adjustable by AT command .............................................. 83
Voiceband characteristics (typical)................................................................. 85
Voiceband receive path.................................................................................. 86
Voiceband transmit path ................................................................................ 87
Antenna interface specifications .................................................................... 88
Measured electrostatic values........................................................................ 89
Reflow temperature ratings ............................................................................ 95
Storage conditions ......................................................................................... 97
EMI measures on the application interface .................................................. 108
List of parts and accessories........................................................................ 111
Molex sales contacts (subject to change) .................................................... 112
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 6 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
Figures
112

Figures
Figure 1:
Figure 2:
Figure 3:
Figure 4:
Figure 5:
Figure 6:
Figure 7:
Figure 8:
Figure 9:
Figure 10:
Figure 11:
Figure 12:
Figure 13:
Figure 14:
Figure 15:
Figure 16:
Figure 17:
Figure 18:
Figure 19:
Figure 20:
Figure 21:
Figure 22:
Figure 23:
Figure 24:
Figure 25:
Figure 26:
Figure 27:
Figure 28:
Figure 29:
Figure 30:
Figure 31:
Figure 32:
Figure 33:
Figure 34:
Figure 35:
Figure 36:
Figure 37:
Figure 38:
Figure 39:
Figure 40:
Figure 41:
Figure 42:
Figure 43:
Figure 44:
Figure 45:
Figure 46:
Figure 47:
Figure 48:
Figure 49:
Figure 50:
BGS2-E/BGS2-W system overview ............................................................... 21
BGS2-E/BGS2-W block diagram ................................................................... 22
Power supply limits during transmit burst....................................................... 25
Position of reference points BATT+and GND ................................................ 26
ON circuit sample........................................................................................... 27
ON timing ....................................................................................................... 28
Sample circuit to suppress spikes or glitches on ON signal line .................... 29
Emergency restart timing ............................................................................... 31
Switch off behavior......................................................................................... 35
Timing of CTS signal (example for a 2.12 s paging cycle)............................. 41
Beginning of power saving if CFUN=7 ........................................................... 41
RTC supply variants....................................................................................... 44
External SIM card holder circuit ..................................................................... 45
VDIG controlled power supply domain........................................................... 47
Serial interface ASC0..................................................................................... 48
ASC0 startup behavior ................................................................................... 49
Serial interface ASC1..................................................................................... 50
ASC1 startup behavior ................................................................................... 51
Single ended microphone connection ............................................................ 53
Differential Microphone connection................................................................ 53
Line Input ....................................................................................................... 53
Differential loudspeaker connection ............................................................... 54
Line output connection ................................................................................... 54
GPIO startup behavior ................................................................................... 56
I2C interface connected to VCC of application ............................................... 57
I2C interface connected to V180 or V285....................................................... 57
I2C startup behavior ....................................................................................... 58
Status signalling with LED driver.................................................................... 59
Incoming voice call......................................................................................... 60
Incoming voice call......................................................................................... 60
URC transmission .......................................................................................... 60
Power indication circuit .................................................................................. 62
Antenna pads (bottom view) .......................................................................... 64
Embedded Stripline with 65µm prepreg (1080) and 710µm core .................. 65
Micro-Stripline on 1.0mm standard FR4 2-layer PCB - example 1 ................ 66
Micro-Stripline on 1.0mm Standard FR4 PCB - example 2............................ 67
Micro-Stripline on 1.5mm Standard FR4 PCB - example 1............................ 68
Micro-Stripline on 1.5mm Standard FR4 PCB - example 2............................ 69
Pouting to application‘s RF connector - top view ........................................... 70
Numbering plan for connecting pads (bottom view)....................................... 74
Audio programming model ............................................................................. 84
BGS2-E/BGS2-W– top and bottom view........................................................ 90
Dimensions of BGS2-E/BGS2-W (all dimensions in mm) .............................. 91
Land pattern (top view) .................................................................................. 92
Recommended design for 110 micron thick stencil (top view) ....................... 93
Recommended design for 150 micron thick stencil (top view) ....................... 93
Reflow Profile ................................................................................................. 95
Carrier tape .................................................................................................... 99
Reel direction ................................................................................................. 99
Barcode label on tape reel ........................................................................... 100
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 7 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
Figures
112
Figure 51:
Figure 52:
Figure 53:
Figure 54:
Figure 55:
Figure 56:
Figure 57:
Figure 58:
Figure 59:

Moisture barrier bag (MBB) with imprint.......................................................
Moisture Sensitivity Label ............................................................................
Humidity Indicator Card - HIC ......................................................................
Small quantity tray........................................................................................
Tray to ship odd module amounts................................................................
Trays with packaging materials....................................................................
Schematic diagram of BGS2-E/BGS2-W sample application ......................
EMI circuits...................................................................................................
Reference equipment for Type Approval .....................................................
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 8 of 112
101
102
103
104
104
104
106
107
109
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
0 Document History
9
0

Document History
Preceding document: "BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description" Version 00.100b
New document: "BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description" Version 01.301
Chapter
What is new
5.4
Marked pad 64 as AGND pad in Figure 40.
5.4, 6.1
Updated layout for module‘s center pads.
6.2.1.1
Updated section Land Pattern and Stencil.
6.3.3
New section on Trays.
7
Revised Figure 57 to show only two BATT+ pads.
Preceding document: "BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description" Version 00.100a
New document: "BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description" Version 00.100b
Chapter
What is new
2.1
Added module weight.
3.2.2
Added Figure 4.
6.2.1.1
Updated section Land Pattern and Stencil.
6.2.3.1
Updated section Reflow Profile.
6.3.1
Added tape and reel dimensions.
6.3.1.1
Added Figure 48.
Preceding document: "BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description" Version 00.100
New document: "BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description" Version 00.100a
Chapter
What is new
3.16
Revised RING0 behavior.
6.1
Updated Figure 43.
New document: "BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description" Version 00.100
Chapter
What is new
--
Initial document setup.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 9 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
1 Introduction
18
1

Introduction
This document1 describes the hardware of the Cinterion BGS2-E/BGS2-W module that connects to the cellular device application and the air interface. It helps you quickly retrieve interface specifications, electrical and mechanical details and information on the requirements to be
considered for integrating further components.
1.1
[1]
[2]
[3]
Related Documents
BGS2-E/BGS2-W AT Command Set
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Release Note
Application Note 48: SMT Module Integration for BGS2-E/BGS2-W
1.2
Terms and Abbreviations
Abbreviation
Description
ADC
Analog-to-digital converter
AGC
Automatic Gain Control
ANSI
American National Standards Institute
ARFCN
Absolute Radio Frequency Channel Number
ARP
Antenna Reference Point
ASC0/ASC1
Asynchronous Controller. Abbreviations used for first and second serial interface of
BGS2-E/BGS2-W
B
Thermistor Constant
BER
Bit Error Rate
BTS
Base Transceiver Station
CB or CBM
Cell Broadcast Message
CE
Conformité Européene (European Conformity)
CHAP
Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol
CPU
Central Processing Unit
CS
Coding Scheme
CSD
Circuit Switched Data
CTS
Clear to Send
DAC
Digital-to-Analog Converter
DAI
Digital Audio Interface
dBm0
Digital level, 3.14dBm0 corresponds to full scale, see ITU G.711, A-law
DCE
Data Communication Equipment (typically modems, e.g. Cinterion GSM module)
1. The document is effective only if listed in the appropriate Release Notes as part of the technical
documentation delivered with your Cinterion product.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 10 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
1.2 Terms and Abbreviations
18

Abbreviation
Description
DCS 1800
Digital Cellular System, also referred to as PCN
DRX
Discontinuous Reception
DSB
Development Support Box
DSP
Digital Signal Processor
DSR
Data Set Ready
DTE
Data Terminal Equipment (typically computer, terminal, printer or, for example, GSM
application)
DTR
Data Terminal Ready
DTX
Discontinuous Transmission
EFR
Enhanced Full Rate
EGSM
Enhanced GSM
EIRP
Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power
EMC
Electromagnetic Compatibility
ERP
Effective Radiated Power
ESD
Electrostatic Discharge
ETS
European Telecommunication Standard
FCC
Federal Communications Commission (U.S.)
FDMA
Frequency Division Multiple Access
FR
Full Rate
GMSK
Gaussian Minimum Shift Keying
GPIO
General Purpose Input/Output
GPRS
General Packet Radio Service
GSM
Global Standard for Mobile Communications
HiZ
High Impedance
HR
Half Rate
I/O
Input/Output
IC
Integrated Circuit
IMEI
International Mobile Equipment Identity
ISO
International Standards Organization
ITU
International Telecommunications Union
kbps
kbits per second
LED
Light Emitting Diode
Li-Ion/Li+
Lithium-Ion
Li battery
Rechargeable Lithium Ion or Lithium Polymer battery
Mbps
Mbits per second
MMI
Man Machine Interface
MO
Mobile Originated
MS
Mobile Station (GSM module), also referred to as TE
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 11 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
1.2 Terms and Abbreviations
18

Abbreviation
Description
MSISDN
Mobile Station International ISDN number
MT
Mobile Terminated
NTC
Negative Temperature Coefficient
OEM
Original Equipment Manufacturer
PA
Power Amplifier
PAP
Password Authentication Protocol
PBCCH
Packet Switched Broadcast Control Channel
PCB
Printed Circuit Board
PCL
Power Control Level
PCM
Pulse Code Modulation
PCN
Personal Communications Network, also referred to as DCS 1800
PCS
Personal Communication System, also referred to as GSM 1900
PDU
Protocol Data Unit
PLL
Phase Locked Loop
PPP
Point-to-point protocol
PSK
Phase Shift Keying
PSU
Power Supply Unit
PWM
Pulse Width Modulation
R&TTE
Radio and Telecommunication Terminal Equipment
RAM
Random Access Memory
RF
Radio Frequency
RMS
Root Mean Square (value)
RoHS
Restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic
equipment.
ROM
Read-only Memory
RTC
Real Time Clock
RTS
Request to Send
Rx
Receive Direction
SAR
Specific Absorption Rate
SAW
Surface Accoustic Wave
SELV
Safety Extra Low Voltage
SIM
Subscriber Identification Module
SMD
Surface Mount Device
SMS
Short Message Service
SMT
Surface Mount Technology
SRAM
Static Random Access Memory
TA
Terminal adapter (e.g. GSM module)
TDMA
Time Division Multiple Access
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 12 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
1.2 Terms and Abbreviations
18
Abbreviation
Description
TE
Terminal Equipment, also referred to as DTE
Tx
Transmit Direction
UART
Universal asynchronous receiver-transmitter
URC
Unsolicited Result Code
USSD
Unstructured Supplementary Service Data
VSWR
Voltage Standing Wave Ratio
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 13 of 112

2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
1.3 Regulatory and Type Approval Information
18
1.3
Regulatory and Type Approval Information
1.3.1
Directives and Standards

BGS2-E/BGS2-W is designed to comply with the directives and standards listed below.
It is the responsibility of the application manufacturer to ensure compliance of the final product
with all provisions of the applicable directives and standards as well as with the technical specifications provided in the "BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description".1
Table 1: Directives
1999/05/EC
Directive of the European Parliament and of the council of 9 March 1999
on radio equipment and telecommunications terminal equipment and the
mutual recognition of their conformity (in short referred to as R&TTE Directive 1999/5/EC).
The product is labeled with the CE conformity mark
2002/95/EC
Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council
of 27 January 2003 on the restriction of the use of certain
hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment (RoHS)
Table 2: Standards of North American type approval1
CFR Title 47
Code of Federal Regulations, Part 22 and Part 24 (Telecommunications,
PCS); US Equipment Authorization FCC
UL 60 950-1
Product Safety Certification (Safety requirements)
NAPRD.03 V5.6
Overview of PCS Type certification review board Mobile Equipment Type
Certification and IMEI control
PCS Type Certification Review board (PTCRB)
RSS132 (Issue2)
RSS133 (Issue5)
Canadian Standard
1. Applies for the quad band module variant BGS2-W only.
Table 3: Standards of European type approval
3GPP TS 51.010-1
Digital cellular telecommunications system (Phase 2); Mobile Station (MS)
conformance specification
ETSI EN 301 511 V9.0.2
Candidate Harmonized European Standard (Telecommunications series)
Global System for Mobile communications (GSM); Harmonized standard
for mobile stations in the GSM 900 and DCS 1800 bands covering essential requirements under article 3.2 of the R&TTE directive (1999/5/EC)
(GSM 13.11 version 7.0.1 Release 1998)
GCF-CC V3.40
Global Certification Forum - Certification Criteria
1. Manufacturers of applications which can be used in the US shall ensure that their applications have a
PTCRB approval. For this purpose they can refer to the PTCRB approval of the respective module.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 14 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
1.3 Regulatory and Type Approval Information
18

Table 3: Standards of European type approval
ETSI EN 301 489-1
V1.8.1
Candidate Harmonized European Standard (Telecommunications series)
Electro Magnetic Compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Electro Magnetic Compatibility (EMC) standard for radio equipment and services; Part 1: Common Technical Requirements
ETSI EN 301 489-7
V1.3.1
Candidate Harmonized European Standard (Telecommunications series)
Electro Magnetic Compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Electro Magnetic Compatibility (EMC) standard for radio equipment and services; Part 7: Specific conditions for mobile and portable radio and
ancillary equipment of digital cellular radio telecommunications systems
(GSM and DCS)
EN 60950-1:2006
Safety of information technology equipment
Table 4: Requirements of quality
IEC 60068
Environmental testing
DIN EN 60529
IP codes
Table 5: Standards of the Ministry of Information Industry of the People’s Republic of China
SJ/T 11363-2006
“Requirements for Concentration Limits for Certain Hazardous Substances in Electronic Information Products” (2006-06).
SJ/T 11364-2006
“Marking for Control of Pollution Caused by Electronic
Information Products” (2006-06).
According to the “Chinese Administration on the Control
of Pollution caused by Electronic Information Products”
(ACPEIP) the EPUP, i.e., Environmental Protection Use
Period, of this product is 20 years as per the symbol
shown here, unless otherwise marked. The EPUP is valid only as long as
the product is operated within the operating limits described in the Cinterion Wireless Modules Hardware Interface Description.
Please see Table 6 for an overview of toxic or hazardous substances or
elements that might be contained in product parts in concentrations
above the limits defined by SJ/T 11363-2006.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 15 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
1.3 Regulatory and Type Approval Information
18

Table 6: Toxic or hazardous substances or elements with defined concentration limits
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 16 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
1.3 Regulatory and Type Approval Information
18
1.3.2

SAR requirements specific to portable mobiles
Mobile phones, PDAs or other portable transmitters and receivers incorporating a GSM module
must be in accordance with the guidelines for human exposure to radio frequency energy. This
requires the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of portable BGS2-E/BGS2-W based applications
to be evaluated and approved for compliance with national and/or international regulations.
Since the SAR value varies significantly with the individual product design manufacturers are
advised to submit their product for approval if designed for portable use. For European and US
markets the relevant directives are mentioned below. It is the responsibility of the manufacturer
of the final product to verify whether or not further standards, recommendations or directives
are in force outside these areas.
Products intended for sale on US markets1
ES 59005/ANSI C95.1 Considerations for evaluation of human exposure to Electromagnetic
Fields (EMFs) from Mobile Telecommunication Equipment (MTE) in the
frequency range 30MHz - 6GHz
Products intended for sale on European markets
EN 50360
Product standard to demonstrate the compliance of mobile phones with
the basic restrictions related to human exposure to electromagnetic
fields (300MHz - 3GHz)
1. Applies for the quad band module variant BGS2-W only.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 17 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
1.3 Regulatory and Type Approval Information
18
1.3.3

Safety Precautions
The following safety precautions must be observed during all phases of the operation, usage,
service or repair of any cellular terminal or mobile incorporating BGS2-E/BGS2-W. Manufacturers of the cellular terminal are advised to convey the following safety information to users
and operating personnel and to incorporate these guidelines into all manuals supplied with the
product. Failure to comply with these precautions violates safety standards of design, manufacture and intended use of the product. Cinterion Wireless Modules assumes no liability for
customer’s failure to comply with these precautions.
When in a hospital or other health care facility, observe the restrictions on the use of
mobiles. Switch the cellular terminal or mobile off, if instructed to do so by the guidelines posted in sensitive areas. Medical equipment may be sensitive to RF energy.
The operation of cardiac pacemakers, other implanted medical equipment and hearing aids can be affected by interference from cellular terminals or mobiles placed close
to the device. If in doubt about potential danger, contact the physician or the manufacturer of the device to verify that the equipment is properly shielded. Pacemaker
patients are advised to keep their hand-held mobile away from the pacemaker, while
it is on.
Switch off the cellular terminal or mobile before boarding an aircraft. Make sure it cannot be switched on inadvertently. The operation of wireless appliances in an aircraft is
forbidden to prevent interference with communications systems. Failure to observe
these instructions may lead to the suspension or denial of cellular services to the
offender, legal action, or both.
Do not operate the cellular terminal or mobile in the presence of flammable gases or
fumes. Switch off the cellular terminal when you are near petrol stations, fuel depots,
chemical plants or where blasting operations are in progress. Operation of any electrical equipment in potentially explosive atmospheres can constitute a safety hazard.
Your cellular terminal or mobile receives and transmits radio frequency energy while
switched on. Remember that interference can occur if it is used close to TV sets,
radios, computers or inadequately shielded equipment. Follow any special regulations
and always switch off the cellular terminal or mobile wherever forbidden, or when you
suspect that it may cause interference or danger.
Road safety comes first! Do not use a hand-held cellular terminal or mobile when driving a vehicle, unless it is securely mounted in a holder for speakerphone operation.
Before making a call with a hand-held terminal or mobile, park the vehicle.
Speakerphones must be installed by qualified personnel. Faulty installation or operation can constitute a safety hazard.
IMPORTANT!
Cellular terminals or mobiles operate using radio signals and cellular networks.
Because of this, connection cannot be guaranteed at all times under all conditions.
Therefore, you should never rely solely upon any wireless device for essential communications, for example emergency calls.
Remember, in order to make or receive calls, the cellular terminal or mobile must be
switched on and in a service area with adequate cellular signal strength.
Some networks do not allow for emergency calls if certain network services or phone
features are in use (e.g. lock functions, fixed dialing etc.). You may need to deactivate
those features before you can make an emergency call.
Some networks require that a valid SIM card be properly inserted in the cellular terminal or mobile.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 18 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
2 Product Concept
22
2
Product Concept
2.1
Key Features at a Glance
Feature

Implementation
General
Frequency bands
Dual band (BGS2-E): GSM 900/1800MHz
Quad band (BGS2-W): GSM 850/900/1800/1900MHz
GSM class
Small MS
Output power (according
to Release 99, V5)
Class 4 (+33dBm ±2dB) for EGSM850 (quad band only)
Class 4 (+33dBm ±2dB) for EGSM900
Class 1 (+30dBm ±2dB) for GSM1800
Class 1 (+30dBm ±2dB) for GSM1900 (quad band only)
Power supply
3.3V to 4.5V
Operating temperature
(board temperature)
Normal operation: -30°C to +85°C
Restricted operation: -40°C to -30°C, +85°C to +90°C
Physical
Dimensions: 27.6mm x 18.8mm x 2.7mm
Weight: approx. 3 g
RoHS
All hardware components fully compliant with EU RoHS Directive
GSM/GPRS features
Data transfer
GPRS:
• Multislot Class 8 (dual band) or 10 (quad band)
• Full PBCCH support
• Mobile Station Class B
• Coding Scheme 1 – 4
CSD:
• V.110, RLP, non-transparent
• 2.4, 4.8, 9.6, 14.4kbps
• USSD
PPP-stack for GPRS data transfer
SMS
Point-to-point MT and MO
Cell broadcast
Text and PDU mode
Storage: SIM card plus 25 SMS locations in mobile equipment
Transmission of SMS alternatively over CSD or GPRS. Preferred mode can
be user defined.
Fax
Group 3; Class 1
Audio
Speech codecs:
• Half rate HR (ETS 06.20)
• Full rate FR (ETS 06.10)
• Enhanced full rate EFR (ETS 06.50/06.60/06.80)
• Adaptive Multi Rate AMR
Handsfree operation, echo cancellation, noise suppression,
7 different ringing tones/melodies
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 19 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
2.1 Key Features at a Glance
22
Feature

Implementation
Software
AT commands
Hayes 3GPP TS 27.007, TS 27.005, Cinterion
AT commands for RIL compatibility
Microsoft™ compatibility RIL for Pocket PC and Smartphone
SIM Application Toolkit
SAT Release 99
TCP/IP stack
Protocols: TCP server/client, UDP, HTTP, FTP, SMTP, POP3
Access by AT commands
Firmware update
Generic update from host application over ASC0 or ASC1.
Interfaces
Module interface
Surface mount device with solderable connection pads (SMT application
interface).
Land grid array (LGA) technology ensures high solder joint reliability and
provides the possibility to use an optional module mounting socket.
For more information on how to integrate SMT modules see also [3]. This
application note comprises chapters on module mounting and application
layout issues as well as on additional SMT application development equipment.
2 serial interfaces
ASC0:
• 8-wire modem interface with status and control lines, unbalanced, asynchronous
• Adjustable baud rates: 1,200bps to 230,400bps
• Autobauding: 1,200bps to 230,400bps
• Supports RTS0/CTS0 hardware handshake and software XON/XOFF
flow control.
• Multiplex ability according to GSM 07.10 Multiplexer Protocol.
ASC1:
• 4-wire, unbalanced asynchronous interface
• Adjustable baud rates: 1,200bps to 230,400bps
• Supports RTS1/CTS1 hardware handshake and software XON/XOFF
flow control
Audio
1 analog interface (with microphone feeding)
UICC interface
Supported SIM/USIM cards: 3V, 1.8V
External SIM card reader has to be connected via interface connector (note
that card reader is not part of BGS2-E/BGS2-W)
GPIO interface
GPIO interface with 10 GPIO lines. The GPIO interface is shared with an
I2C interface, LED signalling and PWM functionality.
Antenna
50
Power on/off, Reset
Power on/off
Switch-on by hardware signal ON
Switch-off by AT command (AT^SMSO)
Automatic switch-off in case of critical temperature and voltage conditions.
Reset
Orderly shutdown and reset by AT command
Special features
Real time clock
Timer functions via AT commands
Phonebook
SIM and phone
TTY/CTM support
Integrated CTM modem
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 20 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
2.2 BGS2-E/BGS2-W System Overview
22
2.2
BGS2-E/BGS2-W System Overview
DAC (PWM)
STATUS
5
I2C
GPIO
2
GPIO
interface
I2C / GPIO
2
BGS2
PWM / GPIO
1
Application
LED / GPIO
Audio
RTC
POWER
8
4
1
CONTROL
SIM card
On
1
SIM interface
Serial interface
Emergency reset
1
ASC1
Serial modem
interface
Backup supply
2
ASC0
5
2
AUDIO
1 2 1
Microphone feeding
Power supply
23
ANTENNA
1
Antenna
Figure 1: BGS2-E/BGS2-W system overview
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 21 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
2.3 Circuit Concept
22
2.3

Circuit Concept
Figure 2 shows a block diagram of the BGS2-E/BGS2-W module and illustrates the major functional components:
Baseband block:
• GSM baseband processor and power management
• Stacked flash/PSRAM memory
• Application interface (SMT with connecting pads)
GSM RF section:
• RF transceiver (part of baseband processor IC)
• RF power amplifier/front-end module inc. harmonics filtering
• Receive SAW filters
RF power amplifier/
Frontend module
Antenna
interface
Control
RX
SAW
filter
RX
SAW
filter
POWER
GPIO
I2C
PWM
STATUS
Switching
regulator
Transceiver
RF-Linear
regulator
26MHz
BB-Linear
regulator
GSM processor and
power management
Serial
interface
SIM
Emergency
reset
RTC supply
Control
Data & Adress bus
32kHz
Serial
interface
On
Memory
interface
RTC
Serial
modem
interface
GPIO
Audio
Measurement
Audio
ADC
SIM
interface
NOR Flash/PSRAM
Figure 2: BGS2-E/BGS2-W block diagram
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 22 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3 Application Interface
62
3

Application Interface
BGS2-E/BGS2-W is equipped with an SMT application interface that connects to the external
application. The host interface incorporates several sub-interfaces described in the following
sections:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Power supply - see Section 3.2
RTC backup – see Section 3.7
SIM/USIM interface - see Section 3.8
Serial interface ASC0 - see Section 3.9
Serial interface ASC1 - see Section 3.10
Analog audio interface - see Section 3.11
GPIO interface - see Section 3.12
I2C interface - Section 3.13
PWM interfaces - Section 3.14
Status Control - LED: Section 3.15, RING line: Section 3.16, Power indication: Section 3.17
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 23 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.1 Operating Modes
62
3.1

Operating Modes
The table below briefly summarizes the various operating modes referred to in the following
chapters.
Table 7: Overview of operating modes
Normal operation GSM/GPRS SLEEP
Various power save modes set with AT+CFUN command.
Software is active to minimum extent. If the module was
registered to the GSM network in IDLE mode, it is registered
and paging with the BTS in SLEEP mode, too. Power saving can be chosen at different levels: The NON-CYCLIC
SLEEP mode (AT+CFUN=0) disables the AT interface. The
CYCLIC SLEEP modes AT+CFUN=7 and 9 alternatingly
activate and deactivate the AT interfaces to allow permanent access to all AT commands.
GSM IDLE
Software is active. Once registered to the GSM network,
paging with BTS is carried out. The module is ready to send
and receive.
GSM TALK
Connection between two subscribers is in progress. Power
consumption depends on network coverage individual settings, such as DTX off/on, FR/EFR/HR, hopping
sequences, antenna.
GPRS IDLE
Module is ready for GPRS data transfer, but no data is currently sent or received. Power consumption depends on
network settings and GPRS configuration (e.g. multislot settings).
GPRS DATA
GPRS data transfer in progress. Power consumption
depends on network settings (e.g. power control level),
uplink/downlink data rates, GPRS configuration (e.g. used
multislot settings) and reduction of maximum output power.
Power Down
Normal shutdown after sending the AT^SMSO command.
Only a voltage regulator is active for powering the RTC. Software is not active.
Interfaces are not accessible.
Operating voltage (connected to BATT+) remains applied.
Alarm mode
Restricted operation launched by RTC alert function while the module is in Power
Down mode. Module will not be registered to GSM network. Limited number of AT
commands is accessible.
See the following sections for the various options of waking up BGS2-E/BGS2-W and proceeding from one mode to another.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 24 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.2 Power Supply
62
3.2

Power Supply
BGS2-E/BGS2-W needs to be connected to a power supply at the SMT application interface
(2 lines each BATT+ and GND).
The power supply of BGS2-E/BGS2-W has to be a single voltage source at BATT+. It must be
able to provide the peak current during the uplink transmission.
All the key functions for supplying power to the device are handled by the power management
section of the analog controller. This IC provides the following features:
•
•
•
•
Stabilizes the supply voltages for the GSM baseband using low drop linear voltage regulators and a DC-DC step down switching regulator.
Switches the module's power voltages for the power-up and -down procedures.
Delivers, across the VEXT line, a regulated voltage for an external application. This voltage
is not available in Power-down mode.
SIM switch to provide SIM power supply.
3.2.1
Minimizing Power Losses
When designing the power supply for your application please pay specific attention to power
losses. Ensure that the input voltage VBATT+ never drops below 3.3V on the BGS2-E/BGS2-W
board, not even in a GSM transmit burst where current consumption can rise (for peaks values
see the power supply ratings listed in Section 5.5). It should be noted that BGS2-E/BGS2-W
switches off when exceeding these limits. Any voltage drops that may occur in a transmit burst
should not exceed 400mV.
The module switches off if the minimum battery voltage (VBattMin) is reached.
Example:
VBattLowLimit = 3.3V
DDropMax = 0.4V
VBattMin = VBattLowLimit + DDropMax
VBattMin = 3.3V + 0.4V = 3.7V
Figure 3: Power supply limits during transmit burst
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 25 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.2 Power Supply
62
3.2.2
Measuring the Supply Voltage (VBATT+)
To measure the supply voltage VBATT+ it is possible to define two reference points GND and
BATT+. GND should be the module’s shielding, while BATT+ should be a test pad on the external application the module is mounted on. The external BATT+ reference point has to be
connected to and positioned close to the SMT application interface’s BATT+ pads 5 or 53 as
shown in Figure 4.
Reference point BATT+:
External test pad connected
to and positioned closely to
BATT+ pad 5 or 53.
Reference point GND:
Module shielding
External application
Figure 4: Position of reference points BATT+and GND
3.2.3
Monitoring Power Supply by AT Command
To monitor the supply voltage you can also use the AT^SBV command which returns the value
related to the reference points BATT+ and GND.
The module continuously measures the voltage at intervals depending on the operating mode
of the RF interface. The duration of measuring ranges from 0.5s in TALK/DATA mode to 50s
when BGS2-E/BGS2-W is in IDLE mode or Limited Service (deregistered). The displayed voltage (in mV) is averaged over the last measuring period before the AT^SBV command was executed.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 26 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.3 Power Up/Power Down Scenarios
62
3.3
Power Up/Power Down Scenarios
In general, be sure not to turn on BGS2-E/BGS2-W while it is beyond the safety limits of voltage
and temperature stated in Chapter 5. BGS2-E/BGS2-W would immediately switch off after having started and detected these inappropriate conditions. In extreme cases this can cause permanent damage to the module.
3.3.1
Turn on BGS2-E/BGS2-W
BGS2-E/BGS2-W can be started as described in the following sections:
• Hardware driven switch on by ON line: Starts Normal mode (see Section 3.3.1.1).
• Wake-up from Power Down mode by using RTC interrupt: Starts Alarm mode (see Section
3.3.1.3).
3.3.1.1
Switch on BGS2-E/BGS2-W Using ON Signal
When the operating voltage BATT+ is applied, BGS2-E/BGS2-W can be switched on by means
of the ON signal.
If the operating voltage BATT+ is applied while the ON signal is present, BGS2-E/BGS2-W will
be switched on automatically. Please note that if the rise time for the operating voltage BATT+
is longer than 12ms, the module startup will be delayed by about 1 second.
Please also note that if there is no ON signal present right after applying BATT+, BGS2-E/BGS2W will instead of switching on perform a very short switch on/off sequence (approx. 120ms) that
cannot be avoided.
The ON signal is a high active signal and only allows the input voltage level of the VDDLP signal. The following Figure 5 shows an example for a switch-on circuit (an alternative switch-on
possibility is shown in Figure 57).
VDDLP
RTC backup
100k
100k
ON
Figure 5: ON circuit sample
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 27 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.3 Power Up/Power Down Scenarios
62

It is recommended to set a serial 1kOhm resistor between the ON circuit and the external capacitor or battery at the VDDLP power supply. This serial resistor protection is necessary in
case the capacitor or battery has low power (is empty).
Please note that the ON signal is an edge triggered signal. This implies that a micro-second
high pulse on the signal line suffices to almost immediately switch on the module, as shown in
Figure 6. The following Section 3.3.1.2 describes a sample circuit that may be implemented to
prevent possible spikes or glitches on the ON signal line from unintentionally switching on the
module.
Please also note that if the state of the ON signal is coupled to the state of the VDDLP line or
that if the ON signal otherwise remains active high after switch on, it is no longer possible to
switch off BGS2-E/BGS2-W using the AT command AT^SMSO. Using this command will instead automatically restart the module.
BATT+
VDDLP
ON
A high impulse starts the module up
V 180
V 285
EMERG_ RST
Figure 6: ON timing
If configured to a fixed bit rate (AT+IPR0), the module will send the URC “^SYSSTART” which
notifies the host application that the first AT command can be sent to the module. The duration
until this URC is output varies with the SIM card and may take a couple of seconds, particularly
if the request for the SIM PIN is deactivated on the SIM card.
Please note that no “^SYSSTART” URC will be generated if autobauding (AT+IPR=0) is enabled.
To allow the application to detect the ready state of the module we recommend using hardware
flow control which can be set with AT\Q (see [1] for details). The default setting is AT\Q0 (no
flow control) which shall be altered to AT\Q3 (RTS/CTS handshake). If the application design
does not integrate RTS/CTS lines the host application shall wait at least for the “^SYSSTART”
URC. However, if the URC is not available (due to autobauding), you will simply have to wait
for a period of time (at least 2 seconds) before assuming the module to be in ready state and
before entering any data.
Please note that no data must be sent over the ASC0 interface before the interface is active
and ready to receive data.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 28 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.3 Power Up/Power Down Scenarios
62
3.3.1.2
Suppressing Unintentional Pulses on ON Signal Line
Since the ON signal is edge triggered and a microsecond high pulse on the signal line suffices
to almost immediately switch on the module, it might be necessary to implement a circuit on
the external application that prevents possible spikes or glitches on the signal line from unintentionally switching on the module. Figure 7 shows an example for such a circuit.
VDDLP
RTC backup
100k
10k
100k
220nF
100k
ON
Figure 7: Sample circuit to suppress spikes or glitches on ON signal line
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 29 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.3 Power Up/Power Down Scenarios
62
3.3.1.3

Turn on BGS2-E/BGS2-W Using the RTC (Alarm Mode)
Another power-on approach is to use the RTC, which is constantly supplied with power from a
separate voltage regulator in the power supply processor. The RTC provides an alert function,
which allows the BGS2-E/BGS2-W to wake up whilst the internal voltage regulators are off.
This procedure only enables restricted operation, referred to as Alarm mode. It must not be
confused with a reminder message that can be activated by using the same AT command, but
without switching off power.
Use the AT+CALA command to set the alarm time. The RTC retains the alarm time if BGS2-E/
BGS2-W was powered down by AT^SMSO. Once the alarm is timed out and executed, BGS2E/BGS2-W enters Alarm mode. This is indicated by an Unsolicited Result Code (URC) which
reads:
^SYSSTART ALARM MODE
Note that this URC is the only indication of the Alarm mode and will not appear when autobauding AT+IPR=0 was activated (due to the missing synchronization between DTE and DCE upon
start-up). Therefore, it is recommended to select a fixed baudrate before using the Alarm mode.
In Alarm mode the module is deregistered from the GSM network and only a limited number of
AT commands is available. For a table showing the availability of AT commands depending on
the module‘s operating mode please refer to [1].
For the module to change from Alarm mode to full operation (normal operating mode) it is possible to use the AT+CFUN command or to switch on the module using the ON signal. The latter
must be implemented in your host application as described in Section 3.3.1.1.
3.3.2
Restart BGS2-E/BGS2-W
After startup BGS2-E/BGS2-W can be re-started as described in the following sections:
• Software controlled reset by AT+CFUN command: Starts Normal mode (see Section
3.3.2.1).
• Hardware controlled reset by EMERG_RST line: Starts Normal mode (see Section 3.3.2.2)
3.3.2.1
Restart BGS2-E/BGS2-W via AT+CFUN Command
To reset and restart the BGS2-E/BGS2-W module use the command AT+CFUN. You can enter
the command AT+CFUN=,1 or 1,1 or 7,1 or 9,1. See [1] for details.
If configured to a fix baud rate (AT+IPR0), the module will send the URC "^SYSSTART" to
notify that it is ready to operate. If autobauding is enabled (AT+IPR=0) there will be no notification. To register to the network SIM PIN authentication is necessary after restart.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 30 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.3 Power Up/Power Down Scenarios
62
3.3.2.2

Restart BGS2-E/BGS2-W Using EMERG_RST
The EMERG_RST signal is internally connected to the central GSM processor. A low level for
more than 10ms sets the processor and with it all the other signal pads to their respective reset
state. The reset state is described in Section 3.3.3 as well as in the figures showing the startup
behavior of an interface.
After releasing the EMERG-RST line, i.e., with a change of the signal level from low to high,
the module restarts. The other signals continue from their reset state as if the module was
switched on by the ON signal.
System
started
Reset
state
Firmware
initialization
BATT+
VDDLP
ON
V180
V285
>10ms
EMERG_RST
Internal
reset
System
started again
Figure 8: Emergency restart timing
It is recommended to control this EMERG_RST line with an open collector transistor or an open
drain field-effect transistor.
Caution: Use the EMERG_RST line only when, due to serious problems, the software is not
responding for more than 5 seconds. Pulling the EMERG_RST line causes the loss of all information stored in the volatile memory. Therefore, this procedure is intended only for use in case
of emergency, e.g. if BGS2-E/BGS2-W does not respond, if reset or shutdown via AT command fails.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 31 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.3 Power Up/Power Down Scenarios
62
3.3.3
Signal States after Startup
Table 8 lists the states each interface signal passes through during reset and firmware initialization.
The reset state is reached with the rising edge of the EMERG_RST signal - either after a normal
module startup (see Section 3.3.1.1) or after a reset (see Section 3.3.2.2). After the reset state
has been reached the firmware initialization state begins. The firmware initialization is completed as soon as the ASC0 interface lines CTS0, DSR0 and RING0 as well as the ASC1 interface
line CTS1 have turned low (see Section 3.9 and Section 3.10). Now, the module is ready to
receive and transmit data.
Table 8: Signal states
Signal name
Reset state
Firmware initialization
CCIN
T / 100k PD
I / 100k PD
CCRST
L
O/L
CCIO
L
O/L
CCCLK
L
O/L
CCVCC
T / PU_B
O/L
RXD0
T / 2 x PU_A
O/H
TXD0
T / 2 x PU_A
I
CTS0
PD_B
O/H
RTS0
T / 10k PU
I / 10k PU
RING0
T / 10k PU
O / H, 10k PU
DTR0
T / PD_A
T / PD_A
DCD0
T / PU_A
T / PU_A
DSR0
T / PD_C
T / PD_C
RXD1
T / PD_B
O/H
TXD1
T / PD_B
I
CTS1
T / PD_B
O/H
RTS1
T / PU_A
I / PU_A
GPIO1
T / PU_B
T / PU_B
GPIO2
T / PU_B
T / PU_B
GPIO3
T / PU_B
T / PU_B
GPIO4
T / PU_A
T / PU_A
GPIO5 / LED
T / PU_A
T / PU_A
GPIO6 / PWM2
T / PU_B
T / PU_B
GPIO7 / PWM1
T / PU_B
T / PU_B
GPIO8
T / PU_B
T / PU_B
GPIO9 / I2CDAT
T / OD
T / OD
GPIO10 / I2CCLK
T / 5k PU / OD
T / 5k PU / OD
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 32 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.3 Power Up/Power Down Scenarios
62

Abbreviations used in above Table 8:
L = Low level
H = High level
L/H = Low or high level
T = Tristate
I = Input
O = Output
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
OD = Open Drain
PD_A = Pull down, 103µA at 1.75V
PD_B = Pull down, 51µA at 1.75V
PD_C = Pull down, 27µA at 1.75V
PU_A = Pull up -102µA at 0.05V
PU_B = Pull up -55µA at 0.05V
PU_C = Pull up -31µA at 0.05V
Page 33 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.3 Power Up/Power Down Scenarios
62
3.3.4

Turn off BGS2-E/BGS2-W
To switch the module off the following procedures may be used:
• Normal shutdown procedure: Software controlled by sending the AT^SMSO command over
the serial application interface. See Section 3.3.4.1.
• Automatic shutdown: See Section 3.3.5
- Takes effect if under- or overvoltage is detected.
- Takes effect if BGS2-E/BGS2-W board temperature exceeds a critical limit.
3.3.4.1
Switch off BGS2-E/BGS2-W Using AT Command
The best and safest approach to powering down BGS2-E/BGS2-W is to issue the AT^SMSO
command. This procedure lets BGS2-E/BGS2-W log off from the network and allows the software to enter into a secure state and safe data before disconnecting the power supply. The
mode is referred to as Power Down mode. In this mode, only the RTC stays active.
Before switching off the device sends the following response:
^SMSO: MS OFF
OK
^SHUTDOWN
After sending AT^SMSO do not enter any other AT commands. There are two ways to verify
when the module turns off:
• Wait for the URC “^SHUTDOWN”. It indicates that data have been stored non-volatile and
the module turns off in less than 1 second.
• Also, you can monitor the V180/V285 pads. The low state of these pads definitely indicates
that the module is switched off.
Be sure not to disconnect the operating voltage VBATT+ before the URC “^SHUTDOWN” has
been issued and the V180/V285 pads have gone low. Otherwise you run the risk of losing data.
While BGS2-E/BGS2-W is in Power Down mode the application interface is switched off and
must not be fed from any other voltage source. Therefore, your application must be designed
to avoid any current flow into any digital pads of the application interface.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 34 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.3 Power Up/Power Down Scenarios
62

AT^SMSO
System power down procedure
Power down
BATT+
VDDLP
ON
V180
V285
EMERG_RST
Figure 9: Switch off behavior
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 35 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.3 Power Up/Power Down Scenarios
62
3.3.5

Automatic Shutdown
Automatic shutdown takes effect if any of the following events occurs:
• the BGS2-E/BGS2-W board is exceeding the critical limits of overtemperature or undertemperature
• undervoltage or overvoltage is detected
The automatic shutdown procedure is equivalent to the power-down initiated with the
AT^SMSO command, i.e. BGS2-E/BGS2-W logs off from the network and the software enters
a secure state avoiding loss of data.
3.3.5.1
Thermal Shutdown
The board temperature is constantly monitored by an internal NTC resistor located on the PCB.
The values detected by the NTC resistor are measured directly on the board and therefore, are
not fully identical with the ambient temperature.
Each time the board temperature goes out of range or back to normal, BGS2-E/BGS2-W instantly displays an alert (if enabled).
• URCs indicating the level "1" or "-1" allow the user to take appropriate precautions, such as
protecting the module from exposure to extreme conditions. The presentation of the URCs
depends on the settings selected with the AT^SCTM write command (for details see [1]):
AT^SCTM=1: Presentation of URCs is always enabled.
AT^SCTM=0 (default): Presentation of URCs is enabled during the 15 second guard period
after start-up of BGS2-E/BGS2-W. After expiry of the 15 second guard period, the presentation will be disabled, i.e. no URCs with alert levels "1" or ''-1" will be generated.
• URCs indicating the level "2" or "-2" are instantly followed by an orderly shutdown. The presentation of these URCs is always enabled, i.e. they will be output even though the factory
setting AT^SCTM=0 was never changed.
The maximum temperature ratings are stated in Section 5.2. Refer to Table 9 for the associated
URCs.
Table 9: Temperature dependent behavior
Sending temperature alert (15s after BGS2-E/BGS2-W startup, otherwise only if URC presentation
enabled)
^SCTM_B: 1
Board close to overtemperature limit.
^SCTM_B: -1
Board close to undertemperature limit.
^SCTM_B: 0
Board back to non-critical temperature range.
Automatic shutdown (URC appears no matter whether or not presentation was enabled)
^SCTM_B: 2
Alert: Board equal or beyond overtemperature limit. BGS2-E/BGS2-W switches off.
^SCTM_B: -2
Alert: Board equal or below undertemperature limit. BGS2-E/BGS2-W switches off.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 36 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.3 Power Up/Power Down Scenarios
62
3.3.5.2

Undervoltage Shutdown
If the measured supply voltage is no more sufficient to set up a call the following URC will be
presented:
^SBC: Undervoltage.
The message will be reported, for example, when you attempt to make a call while the voltage
is close to the shutdown threshold of 3.3V and further power loss is caused during the transmit
burst. In an idle state, the shutdown threshold is the sum of the module’s minimum supply voltage (3.3V) and the value of the maximum voltage drop resulting from earlier calls. This means
that in an idle state the actual shutdown threshold may be higher than 3.3V. Therefore, to properly calculate the actual shutdown threshold application manufacturers are advised to measure
the maximum voltage drops that may occur during transmit bursts.
This type of URC does not need to be activated by the user. It will be output automatically when
fault conditions occur.
3.3.5.3
Overvoltage Shutdown
The overvoltage shutdown threshold is 100mV above the maximum supply voltage VBATT+
specified in Table 24.
When the supply voltage approaches the overvoltage shutdown threshold the module will send
the following URC:
^SBC: Overvoltage
This alert is sent once.
When the overvoltage shutdown threshold is exceeded the module will shut down cleanly.
This type of URC does not need to be activated by the user. It will be output automatically when
fault conditions occur.
Keep in mind that several BGS2-E/BGS2-W components are directly linked to BATT+ and,
therefore, the supply voltage remains applied at major parts of BGS2-E/BGS2-W. Especially
the power amplifier is very sensitive to high voltage and might even be destroyed.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 37 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.4 Automatic GPRS Multislot Class Change
62
3.4

Automatic GPRS Multislot Class Change
Please note that automatic GPRS multislot class change applies only for the quad band module
variant BGS2-W:
Temperature control is also effective for operation in GPRS Multislot Class 10. If the board temperature increases to the limit specified for restricted operation (see Section 5.2 for temperature limits) while data is transmitted over GPRS, the module automatically reverts from GPRS
Multislot Class 10 (2Tx) to Class 8 (1Tx). This reduces the power consumption and, consequently, causes the board’s temperature to decrease. Once the temperature drops to a value
of 5 degrees below the limit of restricted operation, BGS2-W returns to the higher Multislot
Class. If the temperature stays at the critical level or even continues to rise, BGS2-W will not
switch back to the higher class.
After a transition from Multislot Class 10 to Multislot 8 a possible switchback to Multislot Class
10 is blocked for one minute.
Please note that there is not one single cause of switching over to a lower GPRS Multislot
Class. Rather it is the result of an interaction of several factors, such as the board temperature
that depends largely on the ambient temperature, the operating mode and the transmit power.
Furthermore, take into account that there is a delay until the network proceeds to a lower or,
accordingly, higher Multislot Class. The delay time is network dependent. In extreme cases, if
it takes too much time for the network and the temperature cannot drop due to this delay, the
module may even switch off as described in Section 3.3.4.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 38 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.5 Power Saving
62
3.5

Power Saving
SLEEP mode reduces the functionality of the BGS2-E/BGS2-W module to a minimum and,
thus, minimizes the current consumption to the lowest level. Settings can be made using the
AT+CFUN command. For details see below and [1]. SLEEP mode falls into two categories:
• NON-CYCLIC SLEEP mode AT+CFUN=0
• CYCLIC SLEEP modes, selectable with AT+CFUN=7 or 9.
IMPORTANT: Please keep in mind that power saving works properly only when PIN authentication has been done. If you attempt to activate power saving while the SIM card is not inserted
or the PIN not correctly entered (Limited Service), the selected <fun> level will be set, though
power saving does not take effect. For the same reason, power saving cannot be used if BGS2E/BGS2-W operates in Alarm mode.
To check whether power saving is on, you can query the status of AT+CFUN if you have chosen CYCLIC SLEEP mode.
The wake-up procedures are quite different depending on the selected SLEEP mode. Table 10
compares the wake-up events that can occur in NON-CYCLIC and CYCLIC SLEEP modes.
3.5.1
No Power Saving (AT+CFUN=1)
The functionality level <fun>=1 is where power saving is switched off. This is the default after
startup.
3.5.2
NON-CYCLIC SLEEP Mode (AT+CFUN=0)
If level 0 has been selected (AT+CFUN=0), the serial interface is blocked. The module shortly
deactivates power saving to listen to a paging message sent from the base station and then
immediately resumes power saving. Level 0 is called NON-CYCLIC SLEEP mode, since the
serial interface is not alternatingly made accessible as in CYCLIC SLEEP mode.
The first wake-up event fully activates the module, enables the serial interface and terminates
the power saving mode. In short, it takes BGS2-E/BGS2-W back to the highest level of functionality <fun>=1.
In NON-CYCLIC mode, the falling edge of the RTS0 or RTS1 lines wakes up the module to
<fun>=1. To efficiently use this feature it is recommended to enable hardware flow control
(RTS/CTS handshake) as in this case the CTS line notifies the application when the module is
ready to send or receive characters. See Section 3.5.6.1 for details.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 39 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.5 Power Saving
62
3.5.3

CYCLIC SLEEP Mode AT+CFUN=7
The functionality level AT+CFUN=7 is referred to as CYCLIC SLEEP modes. The major benefit
of all CYCLIC SLEEP modes is that the serial interface remains accessible, and that, in intermittent wake-up periods, characters can be sent or received without terminating the selected
mode.
The CYCLIC SLEEP modes give you greater flexibility regarding the wake-up procedures: For
example, in all CYCLIC SLEEP modes, you can enter AT+CFUN=1 to permanently wake up
the module. In mode CFUN=7, BGS2-E/BGS2-W automatically resumes power saving, after
you have sent or received a short message, made a call or completed a GPRS transfer. Please
refer to Table 10 for a summary of all modes.
The CYCLIC SLEEP mode is a dynamic process which alternatingly enables and disables the
serial interface. By setting/resetting the CTS signal, the module indicates to the application
whether or not the UART is active. The timing of CTS is described below.
Both the application and the module must be configured to use hardware flow control (RTS/
CTS handshake). The default setting of BGS2-E/BGS2-W is AT\Q0 (no flow control) which
must be altered to AT\Q3. See [1] for details.
Note: If both serial interfaces ASC0 and ASC1 are connected, both are synchronized. This
means that SLEEP mode takes effect on both, no matter on which interface the AT command
was issued. Although not explicitly stated, all explanations given in this section refer equally to
ASC0 and ASC1, and accordingly to CTS0 and CTS1.
3.5.4
CYCLIC SLEEP Mode AT+CFUN=9
Mode AT+CFUN=9 is similar to AT+CFUN=7, but provides two additional features:
• The time the module stays active after RTS was asserted or after the last character was
sent or received, can be configured individually using the command AT^SCFG. Default setting is 2 seconds like in AT+CFUN=7. The entire range is from 0.5 seconds to 1 hour,
selectable in tenths of seconds. For details see [1].
• RTS0 and RTS1 are not only used for flow control (as in mode AT+CFUN=7), but also
cause the module to wake up temporarily. See Section 3.5.6.1 for details.
3.5.5
Timing of the CTS Signal in CYCLIC SLEEP Modes
The CTS signal is enabled in synchrony with the module’s paging cycle. It goes active low each
time when the module starts listening to a paging message block from the base station. The
timing of the paging cycle varies with the base station. The duration of a paging interval can be
calculated from the following formula:
4.616 ms (TDMA frame duration) * 51 (number of frames) * DRX value.
DRX (Discontinuous Reception) is a value from 2 to 9, resulting in paging intervals from 0.47
to 2.12 seconds. The DRX value of the base station is assigned by the network operator.
Each listening period causes the CTS signal to go active low: If DRX is 2, the CTS signal is
activated every 0.47 seconds, if DRX is 3, the CTS signal is activated every 0.71 seconds and
if DRX is 9, the CTS signal is activated every 2.1 seconds.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 40 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.5 Power Saving
62

The CTS signal is active low for 4.6 ms. This is followed by another 4.6 ms UART activity. If the
start bit of a received character is detected within these 9.2 ms, CTS will be activated and the
proper reception of the character will be guaranteed. CTS will also be activated if any character
is to be sent.
After the last character was sent or received the interface will remain active for
• another 2 seconds, if AT+CFUN=7
• or for an individual time defined with AT^SCFG, if AT+CFUN=9. Assertion of RTS has the
same effect.
In the pauses between listening to paging messages, while CTS is high, the module resumes
power saving and the AT interface is not accessible. See Figure 10 and Figure 11.
Figure 10: Timing of CTS signal (example for a 2.12 s paging cycle)
Figure 11 illustrates the CFUN=7 modes, which reset the CTS signal 2 seconds after the last
character was sent or received.
Figure 11: Beginning of power saving if CFUN=7
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 41 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.5 Power Saving
62
3.5.6
Wake up BGS2-E/BGS2-W from SLEEP Mode
A wake-up event is any event that causes the module to draw current. Depending on the selected mode the wake-up event either switches SLEEP mode off and takes BGS2-E/BGS2-W
back to AT+CFUN=1, or activates BGS2-E/BGS2-W temporarily without leaving the current
SLEEP mode.
Definitions of the state transitions described in Table 10:
Quit
=
BGS2-E/BGS2-W exits SLEEP mode and returns to AT+CFUN=1.
Temporary =
BGS2-E/BGS2-W becomes active temporarily for the duration of the event
and the mode specific follow-up time after the last character was sent or
received on the serial interface.
No effect =
Event is not relevant in the selected SLEEP mode. BGS2-E/BGS2-W does
not wake up.
Table 10: Wake-up events in NON-CYCLIC and CYCLIC SLEEP modes
Event
Selected mode
AT+CFUN=0
Selected mode
AT+CFUN=7 or 9
No effect
No effect
Quit + flow control
Mode 7: No effect, RTS is
only used for flow control
Mode 9: Temporary + flow
control
Unsolicited Result Code (URC)
Quit
Temporary
Incoming voice or data call
Quit
Temporary
Any AT command
(incl. outgoing voice or data call, outgoing
SMS)
Not possible
(UART disabled)
Temporary
No effect
No effect
AT+CNMI=1,1 (= displays URC upon receipt
of SMS)
Quit
Temporary
GPRS data transfer
Not possible
(UART disabled)
Temporary
RTC alarm2
Quit
Temporary
AT+CFUN=1
Not possible
(UART disabled)
Quit
Ignition line
RTS0 or RTS1
(falling edge)
1)
Incoming SMS depending on mode selected
by AT+CNMI:
AT+CNMI=0,0 (= default, no indication of
received SMS)
1. See Section 3.5.6.1 on wake-up via RTS.
2. Recommendation: In NON-CYCLIC SLEEP mode, you can set an RTC alarm to wake up BGS2-E/
BGS2-W and return to full functionality. This is a useful approach because, in this mode, the AT interface
is not accessible.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 42 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.6 Summary of State Transitions (except SLEEP Mode)
62
3.5.6.1
Wake-up via RTS0 and RTS1 (if AT+CFUN=0 or
AT+CFUN=9)
During the CYCLIC SLEEP mode 7, the RTS0 and RTS1 lines are conventionally used for flow
control: The assertion of RTS0 or RTS1 indicates that the application is ready to receive data
- without waking up the module.
If the module is in CFUN=0 mode the assertion of RTS0 and RTS1 serves as a wake-up event,
giving the application the possibility to intentionally terminate power saving. If the module is in
CFUN=9 mode, the assertion of RTS0 or RTS1 can be used to temporarily wake up BGS2-E/
BGS2-W for the time specified with the AT^SCFG command (default = 2s). In both cases, if
RTS0 or RTS1 is asserted while AT+CFUN=0 or AT+CFUN=9 is set, there may be a short delay until the module is able to receive data again. This delay depends on the current module
activities (e.g. paging cycle) and may be up to 60ms. The ability to receive data is signalized
by CTS0 and CTS1. It is therefore recommended to enable RTS/CTS flow control, not only in
CYCLIC SLEEP mode, but also in NON-CYCLIC SLEEP mode.
3.6
Summary of State Transitions (except SLEEP Mode)
The table shows how to proceed from one mode to another (grey column = present mode, white
columns = intended modes)
Table 11: State transitions of BGS2-E/BGS2-W (except SLEEP mode)
Further mode  Power Down
Normal mode
Alarm mode
Present mode
Power Down mode
---
ON >10ms at VDDLP
level
Wake-up from Power Down
mode (if activated with
AT+CALA)
Normal mode
AT^SMSO
EMERG_RST > 10ms
AT+CALA followed by
AT^SMSO. BGS2-E/
BGS2-W enters Alarm
mode when specified time
is reached.
Alarm mode
AT^SMSO
AT+CFUN=x,1 or
ON >10ms at VDDLP
level
---
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 43 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.7 RTC Backup
62
3.7
RTC Backup
The internal Real Time Clock of BGS2-E/BGS2-W is supplied from a separate voltage regulator
in the power supply component which is also active when BGS2-E/BGS2-W is in Power Down
mode and BATT+ is available. An alarm function is provided that allows to wake up BGS2-E/
BGS2-W without logging on to the GSM network.
In addition, you can use the VDDLP pad to backup the RTC from an external capacitor. The
capacitor is charged from the internal LDO of BGS2-E/BGS2-W. If the voltage supply at BATT+
is disconnected the RTC can be powered by the capacitor. The size of the capacitor determines
the duration of buffering when no voltage is applied to BGS2-E/BGS2-W, i.e. the greater the
capacitor the longer BGS2-E/BGS2-W will save the date and time. The RTC can also be supplied from an external battery (rechargeable or non-chargeable). In this case the electrical
specification of the VDDLP pad (see Section 5.4) has to be taken in to account.
Figure 12 shows an RTC backup configuration.
Module
LRTC
GSM processor and
power management
RTC
Application interface
BATT+
VDDLP
1k
Capacitor
GND
Figure 12: RTC supply variants
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 44 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.8 SIM/USIM Interface
62
3.8
SIM/USIM Interface
The baseband processor has an integrated SIM/USIM card interface compatible with the ISO/
IEC 7816 IC Card standard. This is wired to the host interface in order to be connected to an
external SIM card holder. Five pads are reserved for the SIM interface. BGS2-E/BGS2-W supports and automatically detects 3.0V as well as 1.8V SIM cards.
The CCIN pad serves to detect whether a tray is present in the card holder. Using the CCIN
pad is mandatory for compliance with the 3GPP TS 11.11 (Rel.99) recommendation if the mechanical design of the host application allows the user to remove the SIM card during operation.
Table 12: Signals of the SIM interface (SMT application interface)
Signal
Description
CCCLK
Chipcard clock, various clock rates can be set in the baseband processor.
CCVCC
SIM supply voltage from PSU-ASIC
CCIO
Serial data line, input and output.
CCRST
Chipcard reset, provided by baseband processor
CCIN
Input on the baseband processor for detecting a SIM card tray in the holder.The default
level of CCIN is low (internal pull down resistor, no card inserted). It will change to high level
when the card is inserted. To take advantage of this feature, an appropriate contact is
required on the cardholder. Ensure that the cardholder on your application platform is wired
to output a high signal when the SIM card is present.
The CCIN pad is mandatory for applications that allow the user to remove the SIM card during operation.
The CCIN pad is solely intended for use with a SIM card. It must not be used for any other
purposes. Failure to comply with this requirement may invalidate the type approval of BGS2E/BGS2-W.
The figure below shows a circuit to connect an external SIM card holder.
V180
CCIN
CCVCC
4k7
SIM
220nF
1nF
CCRST
CCIO
CCCLK
Figure 13: External SIM card holder circuit
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 45 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.8 SIM/USIM Interface
62

It is recommended that the total cable length between SMT application interface pads on
BGS2-E/BGS2-W and the connector of the external SIM card holder must not exceed 100mm
in order to meet the specifications of 3GPP TS 51.010-1 and to satisfy the requirements of EMC
compliance.
To avoid possible cross-talk from the CCCLK signal to the CCIO signal be careful that both
lines are not placed closely next to each other. A useful approach would be to use a separate
SIM card ground connection to shield the CCIO line from the CCCLK line. A GND line may be
employed for such a case.
Notes: No guarantee can be given, nor any liability accepted, if loss of data is encountered after
removing the SIM card during operation.
Also, no guarantee can be given for properly initialising any SIM card that the user inserts after
having removed a SIM card during operation. In this case, the application must restart BGS2E/BGS2-W.
If using a SIM card holder without detecting contact please be sure to switch off the module
before removing the SIM Card or inserting a new one.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 46 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.9 Serial Interface ASC0
62
3.9
Serial Interface ASC0
BGS2-E/BGS2-W offers an 8-wire unbalanced, asynchronous modem interface ASC0 conforming to ITU-T V.24 protocol DCE signalling. The electrical characteristics do not comply with
ITU-T V.28. The voltage level of the ASC0 interface can be configured to either 1.8V or 2.85V:
• If the VDIG signal (i.e., application interface pad 10) is connected to the V180 line (i.e.,
application interface pad 35) the ASC0 interface starts up with a 1.8V signal level.
• If the VDIG signal (i.e., application interface pad 10) is connected to the V285 line (i.e.,
application interface pad 22), the ASC0 interface runs with a 2.85V signal level.
The voltage level configuration of the ASC0 interface also has an impact on the I2C interface.
The I2C interface is also in the power supply domain configured by the VDIG signal (see Section 3.13).
For electrical characteristics of the interface signals please refer to Section 5.4.
Module
V180
Jumper or
direct
connection
V285
or
ASC0 interface
Modem status
Application interface pads
Power
supply
domain
VDIG
I2C interface/
GPIO9/10
Serial interface
ASC0
I2C interface/
GPIO9/10
Figure 14: VDIG controlled power supply domain
BGS2-E/BGS2-W is designed for use as a DCE. Based on the conventions for DCE-DTE connections it communicates with the customer application (DTE) using the following signals:
• Port TXD @ application sends data to the module’s TXD0 signal line
• Port RXD @ application receives data from the module’s RXD0 signal line
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 47 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.9 Serial Interface ASC0
62

Figure 15: Serial interface ASC0
Features:
• Includes the data lines TXD0 and RXD0, the status lines RTS0 and CTS0 and, in addition,
the modem control lines DTR0, DSR0, DCD0 and RING0.
• ASC0 is primarily designed for controlling voice calls, transferring CSD, fax and GPRS data
and for controlling the GSM module with AT commands.
• The DTR0 signal will only be polled once per second from the internal firmware of BGS2E/BGS2-W.
• The RING0 signal serves to indicate incoming calls and other types of URCs (Unsolicited
Result Code). It can also be used to send pulses to the host application, for example to
wake up the application from power saving state. See [1] for details on how to configure the
RING0 line by AT^SCFG.
• Configured for 8 data bits, no parity and 1 stop bit.
• ASC0 can be operated at fixed bit rates from 1,200 bps to 230,400 bps.
• Autobauding supports bit rates from 1,200 bps to 230,400 bps.
• Supports RTS0/CTS0 hardware flow control and XON/XOFF software flow control.
Table 13: DCE-DTE wiring of ASC0
V.24 circuit DCE
DTE
Pad function
Signal direction
Pad function
Signal direction
103
TXD0
Input
TXD
Output
104
RXD0
Output
RXD
Input
105
RTS0
Input
RTS
Output
106
CTS0
Output
CTS
Input
108/2
DTR0
Input
DTR
Output
107
DSR0
Output
DSR
Input
109
DCD0
Output
DCD
Input
125
RING0
Output
RING
Input
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 48 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.9 Serial Interface ASC0
62
The following figure shows the startup behavior of the asynchronous serial interface ASC0.
Power supply active
Start up
Reset
state
Firmware
initialization
Command interface
initialization
Interface
active
ON
Internal
reset
EMERG_RST
V180 / V285
TXD0
Pull up PU_A *)
RXD0
Pull up PU_A *)
RTS0
Pull up PU 10k *)
CTS0
Pull down PD_B *)
DTR0
Pull down PD_A*)
DSR0
Pull down PD_C *)
DCD0
Pull up PU_A *)
RING0
Pull up PU 10k *)
*) For pull-up and pull-down values see Table 8.
Figure 16: ASC0 startup behavior
Please note that no data must be sent over the ASC0 interface before the interface is active
and ready to receive data (see Section 3.3.1.1).
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 49 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.10 Serial Interface ASC1
62
3.10

Serial Interface ASC1
BGS2-E/BGS2-W offers a 4-wire unbalanced, asynchronous modem interface ASC1 conforming to ITU-T V.24 protocol DCE signalling. The electrical characteristics do not comply with ITUT V.28. The electrical level of the ASC1 interface is set to 1.8V. For electrical characteristics
please refer to Table 23.
BGS2-E/BGS2-W is designed for use as a DCE. Based on the conventions for DCE-DTE connections it communicates with the customer application (DTE) using the following signals:
• Port TXD @ application sends data to module’s TXD1 signal line
• Port RXD @ application receives data from the module’s RXD1 signal line
Figure 17: Serial interface ASC1
Features
• Includes only the data lines TXD1 and RXD1 plus RTS1 and CTS1 for hardware handshake.
• On ASC1 no RING line is available. The indication of URCs on the second interface
depends on the settings made with the AT^SCFG command. For details refer to [1].
• Configured for 8 data bits, no parity and 1 or 2 stop bits.
• ASC1 can be operated at fixed bit rates from 1,200 bps to 230,400 bps. Autobauding is not
supported on ASC1.
• Supports RTS1/CTS1 hardware flow control and XON/XOFF software flow control.
Table 14: DCE-DTE wiring of ASC1
V.24 circuit
DCE
Line function
Signal direction
Line function
Signal direction
103
TXD1
Input
TXD
Output
104
RXD1
Output
RXD
Input
105
RTS1
Input
RTS
Output
106
CTS1
Output
CTS
Input
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
DTE
Page 50 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.10 Serial Interface ASC1
62
The following figure shows the startup behavior of the asynchronous serial interface ASC1.
Power supply active
Start up
Reset
state
Firmware
initialization
Command interface
initialization
Module
active
ON
Internal
reset
EMERG_RST
V180 / V285
TXD1
Pull down PD_B *)
RXD1
Pull down PD_B *)
RTS1
Pull up PU_A *)
CTS1
Pull down PD_B *)
*) For pull-up and pull-down values see Table 8.
Figure 18: ASC1 startup behavior
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 51 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.11 Analog Audio Interface
62
3.11

Analog Audio Interface
BGS2-E/BGS2-W has an analog audio interface with a balanced analog microphone input and
a balanced analog earpiece output. A supply voltage and an analog ground connection are provided at dedicated pads.
BGS2-E/BGS2-W offers six audio modes which can be selected with the AT^SNFS command.
The electrical characteristics of the voiceband part vary with the audio mode. For example,
sending and receiving amplification, sidetone paths, noise suppression etc. depend on the selected mode and can be altered with AT commands (except for mode 1).
Please refer to Section 5.6 for specifications of the audio interface and an overview of the audio
parameters. Detailed instructions on using AT commands are presented in [1]. Table 27 summarizes the characteristics of the various audio modes and shows what parameters are supported in each mode.
When shipped from factory, all audio parameters of BGS2-E/BGS2-W are set to audio mode
1. This is the default configuration optimised for the Votronic HH-SI-30.3/V1.1/0 handset and
used for type approving the Cinterion Wireless Modules reference configuration. Audio mode
1 has fix parameters which cannot be modified. To adjust the settings of the Votronic handset
simply change to another audio mode.
In transmit direction, all audio modes contain internal scaling factors (digital amplification) that
are not accessible.
3.11.1
Microphone Inputs and Supply
The differential microphone inputs MICP and MICN present an impedance of 50kOhm and
must be decoupled by capacitors (typical 100nF). A regulated power supply for electret microphones is available at VMIC. The voltage at VMIC is rated at 2.2V and available while audio is
active (e.g., during a call). It can also be controlled by AT^SNFM. It is recommended to use an
additional RC-filter if a high microphone gain is necessary. It is also recommended to use the
AGND line for grounding the microphone circuit. AGND provides for the same module ground
potential the analog circuits of the module refer to. AGND must not be connected to the system
GND anywhere. Otherwise, high GSM burst peak currents will flow across the AGND line causing GSM humming in the uplink audio signal.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 52 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.11 Analog Audio Interface
62
The following figures show possible microphone and line connections.
470
2k2
2k2
VMIC
100nF
MICP
+
Module
10µF
MICN
100nF
5k6
AGND
Figure 19: Single ended microphone connection
1k
1k
VMIC
100nF
MICP
10µF
+
Module
MICN
1k
100nF
1k
AGND
Figure 20: Differential Microphone connection
100nF
MICP
~
Module
MICN
100nF
Figure 21: Line Input
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 53 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.11 Analog Audio Interface
62
3.11.2

Loudspeaker Output
BGS2-E/BGS2-W provides a differential loudspeaker output EPP/EPN. The output is able to
deliver a voltage of 3.2Vpp at a load resistance of 16Ohm. If it is used as line output (see Figure
23), the application should provide a capacitor decoupled differential input to eliminate GSM
humming. A first order low pass filter above 4kHz may be useful to improve the out-of-band signal attenuation. A single ended connection to a speaker or a line input should not be realized.
The following figures show the typical output configurations.
EPP
Module
EPN
Figure 22: Differential loudspeaker connection
EPP
+
_
Module
EPN
Figure 23: Line output connection
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 54 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.12 GPIO Interface
62
3.12

GPIO Interface
BGS2-E/BGS2-W offers a GPIO interface with 10 GPIO lines. Some GPIO lines are shared
with other interfaces, such as I2C interface (see Section 3.13), Status LED (see Section 3.15)
and the PWM functionality (see Section 3.14). All functions are controlled by dedicated AT
commands.
The following table shows the configuration variants of the GPIO pads. All variants are mutually
exclusive, i.e. a pad configured as GPIO is locked for alternative use.
Table 15: GPIO assignment
GPIO
I2C
PWM
Status LED
Voltage domain
GPIO1
V180
GPIO2
V180
GPIO3
V180
GPIO4
V180
GPIO5
Status LED
V180
GPIO6
PWM2
V180
GPIO7
PWM1
V180
GPIO8
V180
GPIO9
I2CDAT
VDIG
GPIO10
I2CCLK
VDIG
Each GPIO line can be configured for use as input or output. The GPIO related AT commands
are the following: AT^SPIO, AT^SCPIN, AT^SGIO, AT^SSIO. A detailed description can be
found in [1].
When the BGS2-E/BGS2-W starts up, all GPIO lines are set to high-impedance state after initializing, as described in Section 3.3.3. Therefore, it is recommended to connect external pullup or pull-down resistors to all GPIO lines you want to use as output. This is necessary to keep
these lines from floating or driving any external devices before all settings are done by AT command (at least AT^SPIO, AT^SCPIN), and after closing the GPIOs again.
The power supply domain voltage level for GPIO1 to GPIO8 is 1.8V. GPIO9 and GPIO10 are
in the VDIG power supply domain which can be configured to either a 1.8V or a 2.85V voltage
level (for details see Section 3.9; Figure 14). I2CCLK (GPIO10) has an internal 5kOhm pull-up
resitor, I2CDAT (GPIO9) requires an external pull-up resistor.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 55 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.12 GPIO Interface
62
The following figure shows the startup behavior of the GPIO interface. With an active state of
the ASC0 interface (i.e. RING0, CTS0 or CTS1 are at low level) the initialization of the GPIO
interface lines is also finished.
Power supply active
Start up
Reset
state
Firmware
initialization
Command interface
initialization
Interface
active
ON
Internal
reset
EMERG_RST
V180 / V285
GPIO1, 2, 3
Pull up PU_B *)
GPIO4, 5
Pull up PU_A *)
GPIO6, 7, 8
Pull up PU_B *)
GPIO9
Open Drain (pull up)
GPIO10
Open Drain (pull up)
CTSx
RING0
*) For pull-up values see Table 8.
Figure 24: GPIO startup behavior
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 56 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.13 I2C Interface
62
3.13
I2C Interface
The signal lines of the I2C interface are shared with the GPIO9 and GPIO10 signal pads and
are activated by means of AT command. For details see [1]: AT^SSPI.
The voltage level configuration for the ASC0 interface has an impact on the I2C interface since
the I2C interface is in the same VDIG controlled power supply domain. If the ASC0 voltage level
is set to 1.8V, the I2C interface pads have the same voltage level (see Figure 14).
I2C is a serial, 8-bit oriented data transfer bus for bit rates up to 400kbps in Fast mode. It consists of two lines, the serial data line I2CDAT (GPIO9) and the serial clock line I2CCLK
(GPIO10). The module acts as a single master device, e.g. the clock I2CCLK is driven by the
module. I2CDAT is a bi-directional line. Each device connected to the bus is software addressable by a unique 7-bit address, and simple master/slave relationships exist at all times. The
module operates as master-transmitter or as master-receiver. The customer application transmits or receives data only on request of the module.
The I2C interface can be powered from an external supply or via the V180/V285 line of BGS2E/BGS2-W. If connected to the V180/V285 line, the I2C interface will be properly shut down
when the module enters the Power Down mode. If you prefer to connect the I2C interface to an
external power supply, take care that VCC of the application is in the range of V180/V285 and
that the interface is shut down when the EMERG_RST signal goes low.
In the application I2CDAT and I2CCLK lines need to be connected to a positive supply voltage
via a pull-up resistor. For electrical characteristics please refer to Table 23.
Module
Application
R pull up
R pull up
VCC < VDIG
5k pull up
VDIG
I2CCLK
I2CCLK
I2CDAT
I2CDAT
GND
GND
Figure 25: I2C interface connected to VCC of application
Module
Application
R pull up
R pull up
5k pull up
VDIG
I2CCLK
I2CCLK
I2CDAT
I2CDAT
GND
GND
Figure 26: I2C interface connected to V180 or V285
Note: Good care should be taken when creating the PCB layout of the host application: The
traces of I2CCLK and I2CDAT should be equal in length and as short as possible.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 57 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.13 I2C Interface
62
The following figure shows the startup behavior of the I2C interface. With an active state of the
ASC0 interface (i.e. RING0, CTS0 or CTS1 are at low level) the initialization of the I2C interface
is also finished.
Power supply active
Start up
Reset
state
Firmware
initialization
Command interface
initialization
Interface
active
ON
Internal
reset
EMERG_RST
V180 / V285
I2CCLK
Open Drain
(internal 5k pull up)
(external pull up)
I2CDAT
Open Drain
(external pull up)
CTSx
RING0
Figure 27: I2C startup behavior
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 58 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.14 PWM Interfaces
62
3.14
PWM Interfaces
BGS2-E/BGS2-W offers two PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) interfaces, which can be used, for
example, to connect buzzers. The PWM1 line is shared with GPIO7 and the PWM2 line is
shared with GPIO6 (for GPIOs see Section 3.12). GPIO and PWM functionality are mutually
exclusive.
The startup behavior of the lines is shown in Figure 24.
To open and configure a PWM output use the AT^SWDAC command. For details refer to [1].
3.15
Status LED
The GPIO5 line at the SMT application interface can be configured to drive a status LED which
indicates different operating modes of the module (for GPIOs see Section 3.12). GPIO and LED
functionality are mutually exclusive.
To take advantage of this function connect an LED to the GPIO5/LED line as shown in Figure
28. The LED can be enabled/disabled by AT command. For details refer to [1]: AT^SSYNC.
VCC
R3
GPIO5/
LED
LED
R1
R2
GND
GND
Figure 28: Status signalling with LED driver
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 59 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.16 Behavior of the RING0 Line (ASC0 Interface only)
62
3.16
Behavior of the RING0 Line (ASC0 Interface only)
The RING0 line is available on the first serial interface (ASC0). The signal serves to indicate
incoming calls and other types of URCs (Unsolicited Result Code).
Although not mandatory for use in a host application, it is strongly suggested that you connect
the RING0 line to an interrupt line of your application. In this case, the application can be designed to receive an interrupt when a falling edge on RING0 occurs. This solution is most effective, particularly, for waking up an application from power saving. Note that if the RING0 line
is not wired, the application would be required to permanently poll the data and status lines of
the serial interface at the expense of a higher current consumption. Therefore, utilizing the
RING0 line provides an option to significantly reduce the overall current consumption of your
application.
The behavior of the RING0 line varies with the type of event:
• When a voice call comes in the RING0 line goes low for 1s and high for another 4s. Every
5 seconds the ring string is generated and sent over the RXD0 line. If there is a call in progress and call waiting is activated for a connected handset or handsfree device, the RING0
line switches to ground in order to generate acoustic signals that indicate the waiting call.
4s
4s
RING0
1s
Ring
string
1s
Ring
string
1s
Ring
string
Figure 29: Incoming voice call
•
Likewise, when a data or fax call is received, RING0 goes low. However, in contrast to voice
calls, the line remains low. Every 5 seconds the ring string is generated and sent over the
RXD0 line.
5s
5s
RING0
Ring
string
Ring
string
Ring
string
Figure 30: Incoming voice call
•
All other types of Unsolicited Result Codes (URCs) also
cause the RING0 line to go low, however for 1 second only.
RING0
1s
URC
Figure 31: URC transmission
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 60 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.17 Power Indication Circuit
62
3.17
Power Indication Circuit
In Power Down mode the maximum voltage at any digital or analog interface line must not exceed +0.3V (see also Section 5.1). Exceeding this limit for any length of time might cause permanent damage to the module.
It is therefore recommended to implement a power indication signal that reports the module’s
power state and shows whether it is active or in Power Down mode. While the module is in
Power Down mode all signals with a high level from an external application need to be set to
low state or high impedance state. The sample power indication circuit illustrated in Figure 32
denotes the module’s active state with a low signal and the module’s Power Down mode with
a high signal or high impedance state.
The following Table 16 lists two different configurations for the module’s interfaces, depending
on the power supply domain specified with VDIG. The cases differ in the power supply voltage
level configured for the ASC0, ASC1, I2C and GPIO interface lines and the possibility of back
powering through the used interface lines from an external application:
•
If all interface lines operate within the V180 power supply domain (i.e., VDIG connected to
V180), the V285 power supply voltage line is not prone to back powering. The power indication circuit is therefore controlled by the power supply voltage line V285.
If the ASC0 and I2C interface lines operate within the V285 power supply domain (i.e., VDIG
connected to V285), the V180 power supply voltage line is not prone to back powering. The
power indication circuit is therefore controlled by the power supply voltage line V180.
•
Table 16: Power indication circuit
Interface
VDIG = V180
VDIG = V285
Voltage level at interface
Voltage level at interface
ASC0 lines
1.8V
2.85V
ASC1 lines
1.8V
1.8V
I C lines
1.8V
2.85V
GPIO lines
1.8V
1.8V
2
Voltage control for power V285 controlled
indication circuit
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
V180 controlled
Page 61 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
3.17 Power Indication Circuit
62
External power
supply (e.g., 3.0V)
10k
V285
(V180)
Power
indication
10k
(4.7k)
4.7k
Figure 32: Power indication circuit
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 62 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
4 Antenna Interface
70
4

Antenna Interface
The RF interface has an impedance of 50Ω. BGS2-E/BGS2-W is capable of sustaining a total
mismatch at the antenna lines without any damage, even when transmitting at maximum RF
power.
The external antenna must be matched properly to achieve best performance regarding radiated power, modulation accuracy and harmonic suppression. Antenna matching networks are
not included on the BGS2-E/BGS2-W module and should be placed in the host application if
the antenna does not have an impendance of 50Ω.
Regarding the return loss BGS2-E/BGS2-W provides the following values in the active band:
Table 17: Return loss in the active band
State of module
Return loss of module
Recommended return loss of application
Receive
> 8dB
> 12dB
Transmit
not applicable
> 12dB
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 63 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
4.1 Antenna Installation
70
4.1
Antenna Installation
The antenna is connected by soldering the antenna pad (RF_OUT, i.e., pad #59) and its neighboring ground pads (GND, i.e., pads #58 and #60) directly to the application’s PCB. The antenna pad is the antenna reference point (ARP) for BGS2-E/BGS2-W. All RF data specified
throughout this document is related to the ARP.
53
52
54
GND
55
51
50
49
48
47
46
45
44
43
42
41
40
39
38
37
36
35
34
32
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
31
RF_OUT
56
30
GND
57
29
58
89
90
91
92
85
86
87
88
28
59
27
60
26
61
81
82
83
25
84
24
62
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
23
63
64
67
68
69
70
71
72
22
73
21
65
66
33
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Figure 33: Antenna pads (bottom view)
The distance between the antenna RF_OUT pad (#59) and its neighboring GND pads (#58,
#60) has been optimized for best possible impedance. On the application PCB, special attention should be paid to these 3 pads, in order to prevent mismatch.
The wiring of the antenna connection line, starting from the antenna pad to the application antenna should result in a 50Ω line impedance. Line width and distance to the GND plane needs
to be optimized with regard to the PCB’s layer stack. Some examples are given in Section 4.2.
To prevent receiver desensitization due to interferences generated by fast transients like high
speed clocks on the application PCB, it is recommended to realize the antenna connection line
using embedded Stripline rather than Micro-Stripline technology. Please see Section 4.2.1 for
an example.
For type approval purposes, the use of a 50Ω coaxial antenna connector (U.FL-R-SMT) might
be necessary. In this case the U.FL-R-SMT connector should be placed as close as possible
to BGS2-E/BGS2-W‘s antenna pad.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 64 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
4.2 RF Line Routing Design
70
4.2
RF Line Routing Design
4.2.1
Line Arrangement Examples

Several dedicated tools are available to calculate line arrangements for specific applications
and PCB materials - for example from http://www.polarinstruments.com/ (commercial software)
or from http://web.awrcorp.com/Usa/Products/Optional-Products/TX-Line/ (free software).
4.2.1.1
Embedded Stripline
This below figure shows a line arrangement example for embedded stripline with 65µm FR4
prepreg (type: 1080) and 710µm FR4 core (4-layer PCB).
Figure 34: Embedded Stripline with 65µm prepreg (1080) and 710µm core
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 65 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
4.2 RF Line Routing Design
70
4.2.1.2
Micro-Stripline
This section gives two line arrangement examples for micro-stripline.
Micro-Stripline on 1.0mm Standard FR4 2-Layer PCB
The following two figures show examples with different values for D1 (ground strip separation).
Application board
Ground line
Antenna line
Ground line
Figure 35: Micro-Stripline on 1.0mm standard FR4 2-layer PCB - example 1
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 66 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
4.2 RF Line Routing Design
70
Application board
Ground line
Antenna line
Ground line
Figure 36: Micro-Stripline on 1.0mm Standard FR4 PCB - example 2
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 67 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
4.2 RF Line Routing Design
70
Micro-Stripline on 1.5mm Standard FR4 2-Layer PCB
The following two figures show examples with different values for D1 (ground strip separation).
Application board
Ground line
Antenna line
Ground line
Figure 37: Micro-Stripline on 1.5mm Standard FR4 PCB - example 1
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 68 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
4.2 RF Line Routing Design
70
Application board
Ground line
Antenna line
Ground line
Figure 38: Micro-Stripline on 1.5mm Standard FR4 PCB - example 2
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 69 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
4.2 RF Line Routing Design
70
4.2.2
4.2.2.1

Routing Example
Interface to RF Connector
Figure 39 shows the connection of the module‘s antenna pad with an application PCB‘s coaxial
antenna connector. Please note that the BGS2-E/BGS2-W bottom plane appears mirrored,
since it is viewed from BGS2-E/BGS2-W top side. By definition the top of customer's board
shall mate with the bottom of the BGS2-E/BGS2-W module.
Pad 1
Figure 39: Pouting to application‘s RF connector - top view
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 70 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5 Electrical, Reliability and Radio Characteristics
89
5
Electrical, Reliability and Radio Characteristics
5.1
Absolute Maximum Ratings
The absolute maximum ratings stated in Table 18 are stress ratings under any conditions.
Stresses beyond any of these limits will cause permanent damage to BGS2-E/BGS2-W.
Table 18: Absolute maximum ratings
Parameter
Min
Max
Unit
Supply voltage BATT+
-0.3
+6.0
V
Voltage at all digital lines in Power Down mode
-0.3
+0.3
V
Voltage at digital lines 1.8V domain in normal operation
-0.3
+2.2
V
Voltage at digital lines VDIG domain (1.8V) in normal operation
-0.3
+2.2
V
Voltage at digital lines VDIG domain (2.85V) in normal opera- -0.3
tion
+3.3
V
Voltage at SIM interface, CCVCC 1.8V in normal Operation
-0.3
+2.2
V
Voltage at SIM interface, CCVCC 2.85V in normal Operation -0.3
+3.3
V
Voltage at analog lines in normal operation
-0.3
+3.0
V
Voltage at analog lines in Power Down mode
-0.3
+0.3
V
VDDLP
-0.3
+2.5
V
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 71 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.2 Operating Temperatures
89
5.2
Operating Temperatures
Please note that the module’s lifetime, i.e., the MTTF (mean time to failure) may be reduced, if
operated outside the restriced temperature range. A special URC reports whether the module
enters or leaves the restriced temperature range (see [1]; AT^SCTM).
Table 19: Board temperature
Parameter
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
Normal operation
-30
+25
+85
°C
Restricted operation
-40 to -30
+85 to +90 °C
1
Automatic shutdown
Temperature measured on BGS2-E/BGS2-W
board
<-40
---
>+90
°C
1. Due to temperature measurement uncertainty, a tolerance of ±3°C on the thresholds may occur.
Table 20: Ambient temperature according to IEC 60068-2 (w/o forced air circulation)
Parameter
Min
GSM Call @ max. RF-Power
Typ
Max
Unit
-40
+75
°C
GPRS Class 8 @ max. RF-Power
-40
+75
°C
GPRS Class 10 @ max. RF-Power (quad band only)
-40
+60
°C
Max
Unit
Table 21: Ambient temperature with forced air circulation (air speed 0.9m/s)
Parameter
Min
Typ
GSM Call @ max. RF-Power
-40
+80
°C
GPRS Class 8 @ max. RF-Power
-40
+80
°C
GPRS Class 10 @ max. RF-Power (quad band only)
-40
+70
°C
See also Section 3.3.5.1 for information about the NTC for on-board temperature measurement, automatic thermal shutdown and alert messages.
Note that within the specified operating temperature ranges the board temperature may vary
to a great extent depending on operating mode, used frequency band, radio output power and
current supply voltage.
When data are transmitted over GPRS the quad band module variant automatically reverts to
a lower Multislot Class if the temperature rises to the limit specified for normal operation and,
vice versa, returns to the higher Multislot Class if the temperature is back to normal. For details see
Section 3.4.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 72 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.3 Reliability Characteristics
89
5.3

Reliability Characteristics
The test conditions stated below are an extract of the complete test specifications.
Table 22: Summary of reliability test conditions
Type of test
Conditions
Standard
Vibration
Frequency range: 10-20Hz; acceleration: 5g
Frequency range: 20-500Hz; acceleration: 20g
Duration: 20h per axis; 3 axes
DIN IEC 60068-2-61
Shock half-sinus
Acceleration: 500g
Shock duration: 1msec
1 shock per axis
6 positions (± x, y and z)
DIN IEC 60068-2-27
Dry heat
Temperature: +70 ±2°C
Test duration: 16h
Humidity in the test chamber: < 50%
EN 60068-2-2 Bb
ETS 300 019-2-7
Temperature
change (shock)
Low temperature: -40°C ±2°C
High temperature: +85°C ±2°C
Changeover time: < 30s (dual chamber system)
Test duration: 1h
Number of repetitions: 100
DIN IEC 60068-2-14 Na
Damp heat cyclic
High temperature: +55°C ±2°C
Low temperature: +25°C ±2°C
Humidity: 93% ±3%
Number of repetitions: 6
Test duration: 12h + 12h
DIN IEC 60068-2-30 Db
Temperature: -40 ±2°C
Test duration: 16h
DIN IEC 60068-2-1
Cold (constant
exposure)
ETS 300 019-2-7
ETS 300 019-2-5
1. For reliability tests in the frequency range 20-500Hz the Standard’s acceleration reference value was
increased to 20g.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 73 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.4 Pad Assignment and Signal Description
89
5.4
Pad Assignment and Signal Description
The SMT application interface on the BGS2-E/BGS2-W provides connecting pads to integrate
the module into external applications. Figure 40 shows the connecting pads’ numbering plan,
the following Table 23 lists the pads’ assignments.
53
52
51
50
49
48
47
46
45
44
43
42
41
40
39
38
37
36
35
34
54
32
55
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
31
56
30
57
29
58
89
90
91
92
85
86
87
88
28
59
27
60
26
61
81
82
83
25
84
24
62
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
23
63
64
67
68
69
70
71
72
22
73
21
65
66
33
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Supply pads: BATT+
Analog audio pads
GPIO pads
Supply pads: Other
ASC0 pads
ADC pad
Control pads
ASC1 pads
RF antenna pad
GND pads
SIM pads
Do not use
16
17
18
19
20
Figure 40: Numbering plan for connecting pads (bottom view)
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 74 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.4 Pad Assignment and Signal Description
89
Table 23: Pad assignments
Pad no.
Signal name
Pad no.
Signal name
Pad no.
Signal name
1
VMIC
23
Do not use
45
GND
2
EPN
24
DSR0
46
GND
3
EPP
25
DTR0
47
GND
4
GND
26
DCD0
48
GND
5
BATT+
27
GPIO9/I2CDAT
49
GND
6
GND
28
GPIO10/I2CCLK
50
GND
7
ADC1
29
TXD1
51
GND
8
ON
30
RXD1
52
GND
9
GND
31
RTS1
53
BATT+
10
VDIG
32
CTS1
54
GND
11
RXD0
33
EMERG_RST
55
GND
12
CTS0
34
GND
56
GND
13
TXD0
35
V180
57
GND
14
RING0
36
GPIO8
58
GND
15
RTS0
37
GPIO7/PWM1
59
RF_OUT
16
38
GPIO6/PWM2
60
GND
17
VDDLP
CCRST
39
GPIO5/LED
61
GND
18
CCIN
40
GPIO4
62
GND
19
CCIO
41
GPIO3
63
GND
20
CCVCC
42
GPIO2
64
AGND
21
CCCLK
V285
43
GPIO1
GND
65
MICP
66
MICN
67-106
GND1
22
44
1. The pads 67-106 are centrally located and should be connected to Ground except for pad 98 that is only
required for factory tests. Pad 98 must not be connected to the external application, but should be left
open.
Signal pads that are not used should not be connected to an external application.
Please note that the reference voltages listed in Table 24 are the values measured directly on
the BGS2-E/BGS2-W module. They do not apply to the accessories connected.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 75 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.4 Pad Assignment and Signal Description
89

Table 24: Electrical description of application interface
Function
Signal name
IO
Signal form and level
Comment
Power
supply
BATT+
I
VImax = 4.5V
VInorm = 4.0V
VImin = 3.3V during Tx burst on board
I  1.35A, during Tx burst (GSM)
Lines of BATT+ and GND
must be connected in
parallel for supply purposes because higher
peak currents may occur.
n Tx = n x 577µs peak current every
4.616ms
Minimum voltage must
not fall below 3.3V including drop, ripple, spikes.
Ground
Application Ground
Normal operation:
VOnorm = 1.80V ±3%
IOmax = -10mA
V180 or V285 may be
used for application circuits.
SLEEP mode Operation:
VOSleep = 1.80V ±5%
IOmax = -10mA
If unused keep line open.
Power
supply
GND
External
supply
voltage
V180
O
CLmax = 100nF
V285
O
VOnorm = 2.85V +1.5%, -2%
IOmax = -10mA
Not available in Power
Down mode. The external digital logic must not
cause any spikes or
glitches on voltage V180
or V285.
CLmax = 100nF
Ignition
Emergency
restart
RTC
backup
ON
I
EMERG_RST I
VDDLP
RI  32k±15%, CI  1nF
VIHmax = VDDLP + 0.5V
VIHmin = 1.2V at ~40µA
VILmax = 0.4V
___|¯_¯_¯_¯_ high impulse
This line must be driven
high by an open drain or
open collector driver connected to VDDLP. See
Section 3.3.
RI  1k, CI  1nF
VOHmax = 1.9V
VIHmin = 1.35V
VILmax = 0.3V
This line must be driven
low by an open drain or
open collector driver connected to GND.
~~|___|~~ low impulse width > 10ms
If unused keep line open.
I/O VOnorm = 2.3V ±5%
IOmax = 2mA
VImax = 2.4V
VImin = 1.0V
IItyp = 8µA
SIM card
detection
CCIN
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
I
This signal switches the
module ON.
RI  110k
VIHmin = 1.45V at I = 15µA,
VIHmax= 1.9V
VILmax = 0.3V
Page 76 of 112
It is recommended to use
a serial resistor between
VDDLP and a possible
capacitor. See 3.3.1.1.
If unused keep line open.
CCIN = High, SIM card
inserted.
If unused keep line open.
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.4 Pad Assignment and Signal Description
89

Table 24: Electrical description of application interface
Function
Signal name
IO
Signal form and level
Comment
3V SIM
Card Interface
CCRST
O
VOLmax = 0.20V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 2.40V at I = -2mA
VOHmax = 2.90V
Maximum cable length or
copper track to SIM card
holder should not exceed
100mm.
CCIO
I/O VILmax = 0.60V
VIHmin = 1.95V
VIHmax = 2.90V
VOLmax = 0.20V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 2.40V at I = -2mA
VOHmax = 2.90V
1.8V SIM
Card Interface
CCCLK
O
VOLmax = 0.20V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 2.40V at I = -2mA
VOHmax = 2.90V
CCVCC
O
VOmin = 2.80V
VOtyp = 2.85V
VOmax = 2.90V
IOmax = -30mA
CCRST
O
VOLmax = 0.20V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 1.50V at I = -2mA
VOHmax = 1.90V
CCIO
I/O VILmax = 0.37V
VIHmin = 1.22V
VIHmax = 1.90V
VOLmax = 0.20V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 1.50V at I = -2mA
VOHmax = 1.90V
CCCLK
O
VOLmax = 0.20V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 1.50V at I = -2mA
VOHmax = 1.90V
CCVCC
O
VOmin = 1.75V
VOtyp = 1.80V
VOmax = 1.85V
IOmax = -30mA
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 77 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.4 Pad Assignment and Signal Description
89

Table 24: Electrical description of application interface
Function
Signal name
IO
Signal form and level
Comment
Digital
Power
Supply
VDIG
I
VImin = 1.75V
VImax = 2.90V
IImax = 50mA
ASC0 and I2C power supply input.
Serial
Interface
ASC0
VDIG connected to V180, i.e., VDIG = 1.80V
RXD0
O
TXD0
I
CTS0
O
DTR0
I
DSR0
O
DCD0
O
RTS0
I
VILmax = 0.20V at I = -280µA
VIHmin = 1.20V at I = -160µA
VIHmax = 1.90V
RING0
O
VOLmax = 0.30V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 1.40V at I = -40µA
VOHmax = 1.90V
Connect this line to the
external power supply
voltage V180 or V285.
See also Section 3.9.
If unused keep line open.
VOLmax = 0.20V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 1.50V at I = -2mA
VOHmax = 1.90V
VILmax = 0.34V
VIHmin = 1.30V
VIHmax = 1.90V
VDIG connected to V285, i.e., VDIG = 2.85V
Serial
Interface
ASC1
RXD0
O
TXD0
I
CTS0
O
DTR0
I
DSR0
O
DCD0
O
RTS0
I
VILmax = 0.30V at I = -380µA
VIHmin = 1.96V at I = -80µA
VIHmax = 2.90V
RING0
O
VOLmax = 0.30V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 2.40V at I = -40µA
VOHmax = 2.90V
RXD1
O
TXD1
I
VOLmax = 0.20V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 1.50V at I = -2mA
VOHmax = 1.90V
RTS1
I
CTS1
O
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
VOLmax = 0.20V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 2.40V at I = -2mA
VOHmax = 2.90V
VILmax = 0.56V
VIHmin = 2.05V
VIHmax = 2.90V
If unused keep line open.
VILmax = 0.34V
VIHmin = 1.30V
VIHmax = 1.90V
Page 78 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.4 Pad Assignment and Signal Description
89

Table 24: Electrical description of application interface
Function
2
IC
Signal name
IO
Signal form and level
VDIG connected to V180, i.e., VDIG = 1.80V
I2CCLK
O
VOLmin = 0.4V at I = -3mA
I2CDAT
IO
VILmax = 0.5V
VIHmin = 1.3V
VIHmax = 2.25V
Rpullup >= 470 Ohm
VDIG connected to V285, i.e., VDIG = 2.85V
I2CCLK
O
VOLmin = 0.4V at I = -3mA
I2CDAT
IO
VILmax = 0.8V
VIHmin = 2.1V
VIHmax = 3.3V
Rpullup >= 820 Ohm
Comment
I2CDAT is configured as
Open Drain and needs a
pull-up resistor in the host
application.
According to the I2C Bus
Specification Version 2.1
for the fast mode a rise
time of max. 300ns is permitted. There is also a
maximum VOL=0.4V at
3mA specified.
The value of the pull-up
depends on the capacitive load of the whole system (I2C Slave + lines).
The maximum sink current of I2CDAT and
I2CCLK is 4mA.
If lines are unused keep
lines open.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 79 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.4 Pad Assignment and Signal Description
89

Table 24: Electrical description of application interface
Function
Signal name
IO
Signal form and level
Comment
GPIO
interface
GPIO1
IO
If unused keep line open.
GPIO2
IO
VOLmax = 0.20V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 1.50V at I = -2mA
VOHmax = 1.90V
GPIO3
IO
GPIO4
IO
GPIO5
IO
GPIO6
IO
GPIO7
IO
GPIO8
IO
VILmax = 0.34V
VIHmin = 1.30V
VIHmax = 1.90V
VDIG connected to V180, i.e., VDIG = 1.80V
GPIO9, i.e.,
I2CDAT
IO
Input, Open Drain Output (no Pull up)
VILmax = 0.5V
VIHmin = 1.3V
VIHmax = 2.20V
VOLmin = 0.4V at I = -3mA
GPIO10, i.e.,
I2CCLK
IO
Input, Open Drain Output
RI  5kOhm ( internal Pull up)
VOLmin = 0.4V at I = -3mA
VOHmax = 1.90V
VDIG connected to V285, i.e., VDIG = 2.85V
GPIO9, i.e.,
I2CDAT
IO
Input, Open Drain Output (no Pull up)
VILmax = 0.8V
VIHmin = 2.1V
VIHmax = 3.3V
VOLmin = 0.4V at I = -3mA
GPIO10, i.e.,
I2CCLK
IO
Open Drain Output
RI  5kOhm ( internal Pull up)
VOLmin = 0.4V at I = -3mA
VOHmax = 2.90V
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 80 of 112
Please note that some
GPIO lines can be used
for functions other than
GPIO:
Status LED line: GPIO5,
PWM: GPIO6/GPIO7,
I2C: GPIO9/GPIO10.
GPIO9 has an open drain
output functionality only
and will need an external
pull-up resistor. With
VDIG connected to V180
the minimum value of this
external resistor should
be 750Ohm. With VDIG
connected to V285 the
minimum value should be
1.1kOhm.
GPIO10 also has an
open drain output functionality only, but with an
internal 5kOhm pull up.
With VDIG connected to
V180 the minimum value
of this external resistor
should be 860Ohm. With
VDIG connected to V285
the minimum value
should be 1.5kOhm.
For further details see
Section 3.12, Section
3.13, Section 3.14, Section 3.15.
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.4 Pad Assignment and Signal Description
89

Table 24: Electrical description of application interface
Function
Signal name
IO
Signal form and level
Comment
Analog
audio
interface
VMIC
O
VOtyp = 2.2V
Imax = 4 mA
Microphone supply for
customer feeding circuits
If unused keep line open.
EPP
O
EPN
O
MICP
I
MICN
I
Differential,
Typ. 3.4Vpp at 16 load
Typ. 4.5Vpp at no load
PCM level = +3dBm0, 1.02 kHz sine
wave
Balanced output for earphone or balance output
for line out
ZItyp = 50k
Vinmax = 0.8Vpp
(for 3dBm0 @ 0dB gain)
Balanced differential
microphone with external
feeding circuit (using
VMIC and AGND) or balanced differential line
input.
If unused keep line open.
Use coupling capacitors.
If unused keep lines
open.
AGND
ADC
ADC1
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
I
Analog Ground
GND level for external
audio circuits.
If unused keep line open.
RI = 1M
VI = 0V ... 1.2V
VIH max = 3.3V
If unused keep line open.
Page 81 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.5 Power Supply Ratings
89
5.5
Power Supply Ratings
Table 25: Power supply ratings1
Parameter
Description
Conditions
BATT+
Supply voltage
Voltage must stay within the min/ 3.3
max values, including voltage
drop, ripple and spikes.
Voltage drop during
transmit burst
Normal condition, power control
level for Pout max
Voltage ripple
Normal condition, power control
level for Pout max
@ f<250kHz
@ f>250kHz
IVDDLP
IBATT+
OFF state supply
current
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
4.0
4.5
V
400
mV
mVpp
85
25
RTC backup
@ BATT+ = 0V
@ VDDLP = 2.3V
8.0
µA
Power Down mode
45
µA
2
Average supply cur- SLEEP mode, GSM
rent
@ DRX = 2
@ DRX = 5
@ DRX = 9
mA
2.1
1.5
1.1
SLEEP mode, GPRS2
@ DRX = 2
@ DRX = 5
@ DRX = 9
2.2
1.5
1.2
IDLE mode 2
8.6
TALK mode GSM
GSM850/EGSM 9003
GSM 1800/19004
200
150
DATA mode GPRS 1 TX, 4 Rx
GSM 850/EGSM 9003
GSM 1800/19004
180
145
DATA mode GPRS 2 Tx, 3 Rx
GSM 850/EGSM 9003
GSM 1800/19004
330
260
Peak supply current Power Control Level
(during transmission
GSM 850/EGSM 9003
GSM 1800/19004
slot every 4.6ms)
1.30
0.95
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
A
1.35
0.97
1. GSM850 and GSM1900 bands are applicable for the quad band module variant BGS2-W only.
2. Measurements start 3 minutes after the module was switched ON,
Averaging times: SLEEP mode - 3 minutes; IDLE mode - 1.5 minutes,
Communication tester settings: no neighbour cells, no cell reselection etc.
3. Power control level PCL 5
4. Power control level PCL 0
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 82 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.6 Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part
89
5.6
Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part
5.6.1
Setting Audio Parameters by AT Commands
The audio modes 2 to 6 can be adjusted according to the parameters listed below. Each audio
mode is assigned a separate set of parameters.
Table 26: Audio parameters adjustable by AT command
Parameter
Influence to
Range
Gain range
Calculation
inBbcGain
MICP/MICN analog amplifier gain of
baseband controller before ADC
0...7
0...39dB
6dB steps, 3dB
between step 6
and 7
inCalibrate
Digital attenuation of input signal
after ADC
0...32767 -...0dB
20 * log (inCalibrate/
32768)
outBbcGain
EPP/EPN analog output gain of
baseband controller after DAC
0...3
6dB steps
outCalibrate[n]
n = 0...4
Digital attenuation of output signal
after speech decoder, before summation of sidetone and DAC present
for each volume step[n]
0...32767 -...+6dB
sideTone
Digital attenuation of sidetone is cor- 0...32767 -...0dB
rected internally by outBbcGain to
obtain a constant sidetone independent of output volume
0...-18dB
20 * log (2 * outCalibrate[n]/
32768)
20 * log (sideTone/
32768)
Note: The parameters inCalibrate, outCalibrate and sideTone accept also values from 32768
to 65535. These values are internally truncated to 32767.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 83 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.6 Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part
89
5.6.2

Audio Programming Model
The audio programming model shows how the signal path can be influenced by varying the AT
command parameters.
The parameters <inBbcGain> and <inCalibrate> can be set with AT^SNFI. All the other parameters are adjusted with AT^SNFO.
Figure 41: Audio programming model
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 84 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.6 Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part
89
5.6.3
Characteristics of Audio Modes
The electrical characteristics of the voiceband part depend on the current audio mode set with
the AT^SNFS command.
Table 27: Voiceband characteristics (typical)
Audio mode no.
AT^SNFS=
1 (Default
2
settings, not
adjustable)
3
4
5
6
Name
Default
Handset
Basic
Handsfree
Headset
User
Handset
Plain
Codec 1
Plain
Codec 2
Purpose
DSB with
Votronic
handset
Car Kit
Headset
DSB with
individual
handset
Direct
access to
speech
coder
Direct
access to
speech
coder
Gain setting via AT
command. Defaults:
inBbcGain
outBbcGain
Fix
Adjustable
Adjustable
Adjustable Adjustable Adjustable
4 (24dB)
0 (0dB)
1 (6dB)
2 (-12dB)
6 (36dB)
2 (-12dB)
4 (24dB)
0 (0dB)
0 (0dB)
0 (0dB)
0 (0dB)
0 (0dB)
Power supply
ON (2.2V)
ON (2.2V)
ON (2.2V)
ON (2.2V)
ON (2.2V)
ON (2.2V)
Sidetone
ON
--
Adjustable
Adjustable Adjustable Adjustable
Volume control
OFF
Adjustable
Adjustable
Adjustable Adjustable Adjustable
Echo control (send)
Cancellation
Cancellation
Cancellation
Cancellation
Cancellation
Cancellation
Noise suppression1
12dB
12dB
12dB
12dB
--
--
16mV
275mV
275mV
500mV
1160mV
1160mV
4.5Vpp
4.5Vpp
-
-
2
MIC input signal for
0dBm0 @ 1024 Hz
(default gain)
16mV
130mV
7.5mV
EP output signal in
mV rms. @ 0dBm0,
1024 Hz, no load
(default gain);
@ 3.14 dBm0
500mV
160mV
230mV
Sidetone gain at
default settings
20dB
-
17dB
20dB
1. In audio modes with noise reduction, the microphone input signal for 0dBm0 shall be measured with a
sine burst signal for a tone duration of 5 seconds and a pause of 2 sec. The sine signal appears as noise
and, after approx. 12 sec, is attenuated by the noise reduction by up to 12dB.
2. Signal for -2dBm0 (due to attenuation of uplink filter at 1kHz)
Note: With regard to acoustic shock, the cellular application must be designed to avoid sending
false AT commands that might increase amplification, e.g. for a high sensitive earpiece. A protection circuit should be implemented in the cellular application.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 85 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.6 Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part
89
5.6.4

Voiceband Receive Path
Test conditions:
• The values specified below were tested to 1kHz and 0dB gain stage, unless otherwise
stated.
• Parameter setup: gs = 0dB means audio mode = 5 for EPP to EPN, inBbcGain= 0, inCalibrate = 32767, outBbcGain = 0, OutCalibrate = 16384, sideTone = 0.
Table 28: Voiceband receive path
Parameter
Min
Differential output voltage (peak to peak)
Typ
Max
3.4
4.5
Unit
Test condition/remark
Vpp
16Ohm,
no load,
from EPPx to EPNx
gs = 0dB @ 3.14dBm0
Differential output gain
settings (gs) at 6dB
stages (outBbcGain)
-18
0
dB
Set with AT^SNFO
Fine scaling by DSP
(outCalibrate)
-
+6
dB
Set with AT^SNFO
Output differential
DC offset
-50
+50
mV
gs = 0dB, outBbcGain = 0 and -6dB
Differential output load
resistance
14

from EPP to EPN
150
pF
from EPP or EPN to AGND
+5
%
Variation due to change in temperature and life time
0.5
dB
for f < 3600 Hz
dB
for f > 4600 Hz
Allowed single ended
load capacitance
Absolute gain drift
-5
Passband ripple
Stopband attenuation
50
gs = gain setting
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 86 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.6 Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part
89
5.6.5
Voiceband Transmit Path
Test conditions:
• The values specified below were tested to 1kHz and 0dB gain stage, unless otherwise
stated.
• Parameter setup: Audio mode = 5 for MICP to MICN, inBbcGain= 0, inCalibrate = 32767,
outBbcGain = 0, OutCalibrate = 16384, sideTone = 0
Table 29: Voiceband transmit path
Parameter
Min
Typ
Input voltage (peak to peak)
MICP to MICN
Max
Unit
0.8
V
Test condition/Remark
Input amplifier gain in 6dB steps
(inBbcGain)1
0
39
dB
Set with AT^SNFI
Fine scaling by DSP (inCalibrate)
-
0
dB
Set with AT^SNFI
Input impedance MIC
50
k
Microphone supply voltage
2.2
V
Microphone supply current
4
mA
1. 3dB step between inBbcGain 6 and 7.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 87 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.7 Antenna Interface Specification
89
5.7
Antenna Interface Specification
Measurement conditions: Tamb= 25°C, VBATT+ nom = 4.1V.
Table 30: Antenna interface specifications1
Parameter
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
Frequency range
GSM 850
824
849
MHz
Uplink (MS  BTS)
E-GSM 900
880
915
MHz
GSM 1800
1710
1785
MHz
GSM 1900
1850
1910
MHz
Frequency range
GSM 850
869
894
MHz
Downlink (BTS  MS)
E-GSM 900
925
960
MHz
GSM 1800
1805
1880
MHz
GSM 1900
1930
1990
MHz
GSM 850
-102
dBm
E-GSM 900
-102
dBm
GSM 1800
-102
dBm
GSM 1900
-102
dBm
Receiver input sensitivity @ ARP
Under all propagation conditions according to
GSM specification
Receiver input sensitivity @ ARP
BER Class II <= 2.43% @ static input level
(no fading)
RF power @ ARP with 50 load
GSM 850
-107
dBm
E-GSM 900
-107
dBm
GSM 1800
-107
dBm
GSM 1900
-107
dBm
GSM 850
31
33
35
dBm
E-GSM 900
31
33
35
dBm
GSM 1800
28
30
32
dBm
GSM 1900
28
30
32
dBm
1. GSM850 and GSM1900 bands are applicable for the quad band module variant BGS2-W only.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 88 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
5.8 Electrostatic Discharge
89
5.8
Electrostatic Discharge
The GSM module is not protected against Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) in general. Consequently, it is subject to ESD handling precautions that typically apply to ESD sensitive components. Proper ESD handling and packaging procedures must be applied throughout the
processing, handling and operation of any application that incorporates a BGS2-E/BGS2-W
module.
Special ESD protection provided on BGS2-E/BGS2-W:
• SIM interface: Serial resistor and ESD protection diode
BGS2-E/BGS2-W has been tested according to group standard ETSI EN 301 489-1 (see Table 3)
and test standard EN 61000-4-2. The measured values can be gathered from the following table.
Table 31: Measured electrostatic values
Specification/Requirements
Contact discharge
Air discharge
SIM interface
 4kV
 8kV
Antenna interface
 4kV
 8kV
EN 61000-4-2
JEDEC JESD22-A114D (Human Body Model, Test conditions: 1.5 k, 100 pF)
ESD at the module
 1kV
n.a.
Note: Please note that the values may vary with the individual application design. For example,
it matters whether or not the application platform is grounded over external devices like a computer or other equipment, such as the Cinterion reference application described in Chapter 8.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 89 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6 Mechanics, Mounting and Packaging
91
6

Mechanics, Mounting and Packaging
The following sections describe the mechanical dimensions of BGS2-E/BGS2-W and give recommendations for integrating BGS2-E/BGS2-W into the host application. Also, a number of
files containing product model data in STEP format as well as Gerber data for the external application footprint are attached to this PDF. Please open the Attachments navigation panel to
view and save these files.
6.1
Mechanical Dimensions of BGS2-E/BGS2-W
Figure 42 shows the top and bottom view of BGS2-E/BGS2-W and provides an overview of the
board's mechanical dimensions. For further details see Figure 43.
Product label
Top view
Bottom view
Figure 42: BGS2-E/BGS2-W– top and bottom view
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 90 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6.1 Mechanical Dimensions of BGS2-E/BGS2-W
91

Figure 43: Dimensions of BGS2-E/BGS2-W (all dimensions in mm)
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 91 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6.2 Mounting BGS2-E/BGS2-W onto the Application Platform
104
6.2

Mounting BGS2-E/BGS2-W onto the Application Platform
This section describes how to mount BGS2-E/BGS2-W onto the PCBs (=printed circuit
boards), including land pattern and stencil design, board-level characterization, soldering conditions, durability and mechanical handling. For more information on issues related to SMT
module integration see also [3].
6.2.1
6.2.1.1
SMT PCB Assembly
Land Pattern and Stencil
The land pattern and stencil design as shown in Figure 44, Figure 45 and Figure 46 are based
on Cinterion characterizations for lead-free solder paste on a four-layer test PCB and a 110 respectively 150 micron thick stencil.
Figure 44: Land pattern (top view)
The below stencil design samples show that not all of the module‘s center ground pads will
have to be soldered to an external application. The remaining center ground pads however,
should be soldered to the application in order to improve solder joint consistency for all module
pads. The center ground pads are primarily intended for stabilizing purposes, and may show
some more voids than the application interface pads at the module's rim. This is acceptable,
since they are electrically irrelevant.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 92 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6.2 Mounting BGS2-E/BGS2-W onto the Application Platform
104

Figure 45: Recommended design for 110 micron thick stencil (top view)
Figure 46: Recommended design for 150 micron thick stencil (top view)
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 93 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6.2 Mounting BGS2-E/BGS2-W onto the Application Platform
104
6.2.1.2

Board Level Characterization
Board level characterization issues should also be taken into account if devising an SMT process.
Characterization tests should attempt to optimize the SMT process with regard to board level
reliability. This can be done by performing the following physical tests on sample boards: Peel
test, bend test, tensile pull test, drop shock test and temperature cycling. Sample surface
mount checks are described in [3].
It is recommended to characterize land patterns before an actual PCB production, taking individual processes, materials, equipment, stencil design, and reflow profile into account. For land
and stencil pattern design recommendations see also Section 6.2.1.1. Optimizing the solder
stencil pattern design and print process is necessary to ensure print uniformity, to decrease solder voids, and to increase board level reliability.
Daisy chain modules for SMT characterization are available on request. For details refer to [3].
Generally, solder paste manufacturer recommendations for screen printing process parameters and reflow profile conditions should be followed. Maximum ratings are described in
Section 6.2.3.
6.2.2
Moisture Sensitivity Level
BGS2-E/BGS2-W comprises components that are susceptible to damage induced by absorbed
moisture.
Cinterion’s BGS2-E/BGS2-W module complies with the latest revision of the IPC/JEDEC JSTD-020 Standard for moisture sensitive surface mount devices and is classified as MSL 4.
For additional MSL (=moisture sensitivity level) related information see Section 6.2.4 and
Section 6.3.2.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 94 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6.2 Mounting BGS2-E/BGS2-W onto the Application Platform
104
6.2.3
Soldering Conditions and Temperature
6.2.3.1
Reflow Profile
tP
TP
TL
tL
TSmax
TSmin
Temperature
tS
Preheat
Time
t to maximum
Figure 47: Reflow Profile
Table 32: Reflow temperature ratings
Profile Feature
Pb-Free Assembly
Preheat & Soak
Temperature Minimum (TSmin)
Temperature Maximum (TSmax)
Time (tSmin to tSmax) (tS)
150°C
200°C
60-120 seconds
Average ramp up rate (TSmax to TP)
3K/second max.
Liquidous temperature (TL)
Time at liquidous (tL)
217°C
60-90 seconds
Peak package body temperature (TP)
245°C +0/-5°C
Time (tP) within 5 °C of the peak package body
temperature (TP)
30 seconds max.
Average ramp-down rate (TP to TSmax)
6 K/second max.
Time 25°C to maximum temperature
8 minutes max.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 95 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6.2 Mounting BGS2-E/BGS2-W onto the Application Platform
104
6.2.3.2

Maximum Temperature and Duration
The following limits are recommended for the SMT board-level soldering process to attach the
module:
• A maximum module temperature of 245°C. This specifies the temperature as measured at
the module’s top side.
• A maximum duration of 30 seconds at this temperature.
Please note that while the solder paste manufacturers' recommendations for best temperature
and duration for solder reflow should generally be followed, the limits listed above must not be
exceeded.
BGS2-E/BGS2-W is specified for one soldering cycle only. Once BGS2-W is removed from the
application, the module will very likely be destroyed and cannot be soldered onto another application.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 96 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6.2 Mounting BGS2-E/BGS2-W onto the Application Platform
104
6.2.4

Durability and Mechanical Handling
6.2.4.1
Storage Conditions
BGS2-E/BGS2-W modules, as delivered in tape and reel carriers, must be stored in sealed,
moisture barrier anti-static bags. The conditions stated below are only valid for modules in their
original packed state in weather protected, non-temperature-controlled storage locations. Normal storage time under these conditions is 12 months maximum.
Table 33: Storage conditions
Type
Condition
Unit
Reference
Air temperature: Low
High
-25
+40
°C
IPC/JEDEC J-STD-033A
Humidity relative: Low
High
10
90 at 40°C
%
Air pressure:
70
106
kPa
IEC TR 60271-3-1: 1K4
IEC TR 60271-3-1: 1K4
Movement of surrounding air
1.0
m/s
IEC TR 60271-3-1: 1K4
Water: rain, dripping, icing and
frosting
Not allowed
---
---
Radiation:
1120
600
W/m2
ETS 300 019-2-1: T1.2, IEC 60068-2-2 Bb
ETS 300 019-2-1: T1.2, IEC 60068-2-2 Bb
Low
High
Solar
Heat
Chemically active substances
Not
recommended
IEC TR 60271-3-1: 1C1L
Mechanically active substances Not
recommended
IEC TR 60271-3-1: 1S1
Vibration sinusoidal:
Displacement
Acceleration
Frequency range
1.5
5
2-9 9-200
Shocks:
Shock spectrum
Duration
Acceleration
semi-sinusoidal
1
ms
50
m/s2
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
IPC/JEDEC J-STD-033A
mm
m/s2
Hz
Page 97 of 112
IEC TR 60271-3-1: 1M2
IEC 60068-2-27 Ea
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6.2 Mounting BGS2-E/BGS2-W onto the Application Platform
104
6.2.4.2

Processing Life
BGS2-E/BGS2-W must be soldered to an application within 72 hours after opening the MBB
(=moisture barrier bag) it was stored in.
As specified in the IPC/JEDEC J-STD-033 Standard, the manufacturing site processing the
modules should have ambient temperatures below 30°C and a relative humidity below 60%.
6.2.4.3
Baking
Baking conditions are specified on the moisture sensitivity label attached to each MBB (see
Figure 52 for details):
• It is not necessary to bake BGS2-E/BGS2-W, if the conditions specified in Section 6.2.4.1
and Section 6.2.4.2 were not exceeded.
• It is necessary to bake BGS2-E/BGS2-W, if any condition specified in Section 6.2.4.1 and
Section 6.2.4.2 was exceeded.
If baking is necessary, the modules must be put into trays that can be baked to at least 125°C.
Devices should not be baked in tape and reel carriers at any temperature.
6.2.4.4
Electrostatic Discharge
ESD (=electrostatic discharge) may lead to irreversable damage for the module. It is therefore
advisable to develop measures and methods to counter ESD and to use these to control the
electrostatic environment at manufacturing sites.
Please refer to Section 5.8 for further information on electrostatic discharge.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 98 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6.3 Packaging
104
6.3
Packaging
6.3.1
Tape and Reel
The single-feed tape carrier for BGS2-E/BGS2-W is illustrated in Figure 48. The figure also
shows the proper part orientation. The tape width is 44 mm and the BGS2-W modules are
placed on the tape with a 28-mm pitch. The reels are 330 mm in diameter with a core diameter
of 100 mm. Each reel contains 500 modules.
6.3.1.1
Orientation
Figure 48: Carrier tape
Reel direction of the
completely equipped tape
Direction into
SMD machine
View
direction
Pad 1
Pad 1
330 mm
44 mm
Figure 49: Reel direction
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 99 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6.3 Packaging
104
6.3.1.2

Barcode Label
A barcode label provides detailed information on the tape and its contents. It is attached to the
reel.
Barcode label
Figure 50: Barcode label on tape reel
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 100 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6.3 Packaging
104
6.3.2

Shipping Materials
BGS2-E/BGS2-W is distributed in tape and reel carriers. The tape and reel carriers used to distribute BGS2-E/BGS2-W are packed as described below, including the following required shipping materials:
• Moisture barrier bag, including desiccant and humidity indicator card
• Transportation box
6.3.2.1
Moisture Barrier Bag
The tape reels are stored inside an MBB (=moisture barrier bag), together with a humidity indicator card and desiccant pouches - see Figure 51. The bag is ESD protected and delimits moisture transmission. It is vacuum-sealed and should be handled carefully to avoid puncturing or
tearing. The bag protects the BGS2-E/BGS2-W modules from moisture exposure. It should not
be opened until the devices are ready to be soldered onto the application.
Figure 51: Moisture barrier bag (MBB) with imprint
The label shown in Figure 52 summarizes requirements regarding moisture sensitivity, including shelf life and baking requirements. It is attached to the outside of the moisture barrier bag.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 101 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6.3 Packaging
104

Figure 52: Moisture Sensitivity Label
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 102 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6.3 Packaging
104

MBBs contain one or more desiccant pouches to absorb moisture that may be in the bag. The
humidity indicator card described below should be used to determine whether the enclosed
components have absorbed an excessive amount of moisture.
The desiccant pouches should not be baked or reused once removed from the MBB.
The humidity indicator card is a moisture indicator and is included in the MBB to show the approximate relative humidity level within the bag. Sample humidity cards are shown in Figure 53.
If the components have been exposed to moisture above the recommended limits, the units will
have to be rebaked.
Figure 53: Humidity Indicator Card - HIC
A baking is required if the humidity indicator inside the bag indicates 10% RH or more.
6.3.2.2
Transportation Box
Tape and reel carriers are distributed in a box, marked with a barcode label for identification
purposes. A box contains two reels with 500 modules each.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 103 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
6.3 Packaging
104
6.3.3
Trays
If small module quantities are required, e.g., for test and
evaluation purposes, BGS2-E/BGS2-W may be distributed in trays. The small quantity trays are an alternative
to the single-feed tape carriers normally used. However,
the trays are not designed for machine processing. They
contain modules to be (hand) soldered onto an external
application (for information on hand soldering see [3]).
1:1,5
Figure 54: Small quantity tray
Trays are packed and shipped in the same way as tape carriers, including a moisture barrier
bag with desiccant and humidity indicator card as well as a transportation box (see also
Section 6.3.2).
Figure 55: Tray to ship odd module amounts
Figure 56: Trays with packaging materials
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 104 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
7 Sample Application
108
7

Sample Application
Figure 57 shows a typical example of how to integrate a BGS2-E/BGS2-W module with an application. Usage of the various host interfaces depends on the desired features of the application.
The audio interface demonstrates the balanced connection of microphone and earpiece. This
solution is particularly well suited for internal transducers.
Because of the very low power consumption design, current flowing from any other source into
the module circuit must be avoided, for example reverse current from high state external control
lines. Therefore, the controlling application must be designed to prevent reverse current flow.
Otherwise there is the risk of undefined states of the module during startup and shutdown or
even of damaging the module.
Because of the high RF field density inside the module, it cannot be guaranteed that no self
interference might occur, depending on frequency and the applications grounding concept. excluded that in some applications dependant on the grounding concept of the customer. The potential interferers may be minimized by placing small capacitors (47pF) at suspected lines (e.g.
RXD0, RXT0, VDDLP, and ON).
While developing SMT applications it is strongly recommended to provide test points
for certain signals resp. lines to and from the module - for debug and/or test purposes.
The SMT application should allow for an easy access to these signals. For details on
how to implement test points see [3].
The EMC measures are best practice recommendations. In fact, an adequate EMC strategy for
an individual application is very much determined by the overall layout and, especially, the position of components. For example, mounting the internal acoustic transducers directly on the
PCB eliminates the need to use the ferrite beads shown in the sample schematic.
Please note that BGS2-E/BGS2-W is not intended for use with cables longer than 3m.
Disclaimer
No warranty, either stated or implied, is provided on the sample schematic diagram shown in
Figure 57 and the information detailed in this section. As functionality and compliance with national regulations depend to a great amount on the used electronic components and the individual application layout manufacturers are required to ensure adequate design and operating
safeguards for their products using BGS2-E/BGS2-W modules.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 105 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
7 Sample Application
108
GSM
GND
RF
Module
1k
GND
ON
ON
(1.8V level)
100nF
EMERG_RST
Power supply
100nF
BATT+
33pF
VMIC
100k
RESET
100nF
Microphone
feeding
FB*
MICP
100nF
MICN
FB*
VDIG
VDIG
FB* = Ferrite beads
optimized for GSM
900MHz
AGND
V285
V180
V180
FB*
EPP
FB*
ASC1
GPIO1
GPIO2
8
GPIO3
ASC0
GPIO4
LED
GPIO6 (PWM)
GPIO7 (PWM)
*10pF
GPIO8
*10pF
Blocking**
GPIO5 (LED)
* add optional 10pF for SIM protection
against RF (internal Antenna)
GPIOs operate only with 1.8V level
ASC0 operates with
VDIG level
EPN
4
Blocking**
ASC0
ASC1 operates only with
1.8V level
Blocking**
ASC1
V180
VDIG
VDIG
CCIN
220nF
1nF
CCCLK
CCIO
I2CCLK (GPIO10)
I2CDAT (GPIO9)
All SIM components should be
close to card holder. Keep SIM
wires low capacitive.
4.7k
SIM
5k
4.7k
CCVCC
CCRST
I2C operates with VDIG level
GND
Blocking** = For
more details see
Section 7.1
Figure 57: Schematic diagram of BGS2-E/BGS2-W sample application
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 106 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
7.1 Blocking against RF on Interface Lines
108
7.1
Blocking against RF on Interface Lines
To reduce EMI issues there are serial resistors, or capacitors to GND, implemented on the
module for the ignition, emergency restart, and SIM interface lines (cp. Section 5.8). However,
all other signal lines have no EMI measures on the module and there are no blocking measures
at the module’s interface to an external application.
Dependent on the specific application design, it might be useful to implement further EMI measures on some signal lines at the interface between module and application. These measures
are described below.
There are five possible variants of EMI measures (A-E) that may be implemented between
module and external application depending on the signal line (see Figure 58 and Table 34). Pay
attention not to exceed the maximum input voltages and prevent voltage overshots if using inductive EMC measures.
The maximum value of the serial resistor should be lower than 1kOhm on the signal line. The
maximum value of the capacitor should be lower than 50pF on the signal line. Please observe
the electrical specification of the module interface and the application interface.
B2B
R
Application
Application
B2B
C
EMI measures B
EMI measures A
GND
B2B
R
Application
C
EMI measures C
L
B2B
Application
EMI measures D
GND
L
B2B
Application
C
EMI measures E
GND
Figure 58: EMI circuits
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 107 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
7.1 Blocking against RF on Interface Lines
108

The following table lists for each signal line at the SMT application interface the EMI measures
that may be implemented.
Table 34: EMI measures on the application interface
Signal name
EMI measures
A
CCIN
B
C
x
Remark
D
E
x
CCRST
x
CCIO
x
CCCLK
x
The external capacitor should be not higher
than 30pF. The value of the capacitor
depends on the external application.
RXD0
x
x
x
x
x
TXD0
x
x
x
x
x
CTS0
x
x
x
x
x
RTS0
x
RING0
x
DTR0
x
x
x
x
x
DCD0
x
x
x
x
x
DSR0
x
x
x
x
x
RXD1
x
x
x
x
x
TXD1
x
x
x
x
x
CTS1
x
x
x
x
x
RTS1
x
x
x
x
x
GPIO1
x
x
x
x
x
GPIO2
x
x
x
x
x
GPIO3
x
x
x
x
x
GPIO4
x
x
x
x
x
GPIO5/Status
x
x
x
x
x
GPIO6/PWM2
x
x
x
x
x
GPIO7/PWM1
x
x
x
x
x
GPIO8
x
x
x
x
x
GPIO9/I2CDAT
x
x
GPIO10/I2CCLK
x
x
V180
x
x
x
V285
x
x
x
VDIG
x
x
x
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
The rising signal edge is reduced with an
additional capacitor.
Page 108 of 112
2011-04-07

BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
8 Reference Approval
110
8
Reference Approval
8.1
Reference Equipment for Type Approval
The Cinterion Wireless Modules reference setup submitted to type approve BGS2-E/BGS2-W
is shown in the following figure:
Antenna
GSM / GPRS / UMTS
Base Station
GSM Antenna with 1m
cable
ASC0
PC
ASC1
SMA
SIM card
Power Supply
BGS2
DSB75
SMA
Evaluation module
extern connected via
flexible cable and
60to80 pin adapter
DSB75 adapter
for BGS2
BGS2
Audio
RF reference point on
60to80 pin adapter
Handset
Audio Test System
Figure 59: Reference equipment for Type Approval
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 109 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
8.2 Compliance with FCC and IC Rules and Regulations
110
8.2

Compliance with FCC and IC Rules and Regulations
The Equipment Authorization Certification for the Cinterion Wireless Modules reference application described in Section 8.1 will be registered under the following identifiers1:
FCC Identifier: QIPBGS2
Industry Canada Certification Number: 7830A-BGS2
Granted to Cinterion Wireless Modules GmbH
Manufacturers of mobile or fixed devices incorporating BGS2-W modules are authorized to use
the FCC Grants and Industry Canada Certificates of the BGS2-W modules for their own final
products according to the conditions referenced in these documents. In this case, an FCC/ IC
label of the module shall be visible from the outside, or the host device shall bear a second label
stating "Contains FCC ID QIPBGS2", and accordingly “Contains IC 7830A-BGS2“.
IMPORTANT:
Manufacturers of portable applications incorporating BGS2-W modules are required to have
their final product certified and apply for their own FCC Grant and Industry Canada Certificate
related to the specific portable mobile. This is mandatory to meet the SAR requirements for portable mobiles (see Section 1.3.2 for detail).
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by the party responsible for compliance
could void the user's authority to operate the equipment.
1. Applies only for the quad band module variant BGS2-W.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 110 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
9 Appendix
112
9
Appendix
9.1
List of Parts and Accessories

Table 35: List of parts and accessories
Description
Supplier
Ordering information
BGS2-E/BGS2-W
Cinterion
Standard module
Cinterion Wireless Modules IMEI:
Ordering number: L30960-N2200-A100 (BGS2-E)
Ordering number: L30960-N2210-A100 (BGS2-W)
Customer IMEI mode:
Ordering number: L30960-N2205-A100 (BGS2-E)
Ordering number: L30960-N2215-A100 (BGS2-W)
DSB75 Evaluation Kit
Cinterion
Ordering number: L36880-N8811-A100
DSB75 adapter for mounting
BGS2-E/BGS2-W evaluation
modules
Cinterion
Ordering number: L30960-N1801-A100
Evaluation Module
Cinterion
Ordering number: L30960-N2201-A100 (BGS2-E)
Ordering number: L30960-N2211-A100 (BGS2-W)
Votronic Handset
VOTRONIC
Votronic HH-SI-30.3/V1.1/0
VOTRONIC
Entwicklungs- und Produktionsgesellschaft für
elektronische Geräte mbH
Saarbrücker Str. 8
66386 St. Ingbert
Germany
Phone: +49-(0)6 89 4 / 92 55-0
Fax: +49-(0)6 89 4 / 92 55-88
Email: [email protected]
SIM card holder incl. push button
ejector and slide-in tray
Molex
Ordering numbers: 91228
91236
Sales contacts are listed in Table 36.
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 111 of 112
2011-04-07
BGS2-E/BGS2-W Hardware Interface Description
9.1 List of Parts and Accessories
112

Table 36: Molex sales contacts (subject to change)
Molex
For further information please click:
http://www.molex.com
Molex Deutschland GmbH
Felix-Wankel-Str. 11
4078 Heilbronn-Biberach
Germany
American Headquarters
Lisle, Illinois 60532
U.S.A.
Molex Singapore Pte. Ltd.
Jurong, Singapore
Phone: +65-268-6868
Fax: +65-265-6044
Molex Japan Co. Ltd.
Yamato, Kanagawa,
Japan
Phone: +1-800-78MOLEX
Fax: +1-630-969-1352
Phone: +49-7066-9555 0
Fax: +49-7066-9555 29
Email: [email protected]
Molex China Distributors
Beijing,
Room 1319, Tower B, COFCO Plaza
No. 8, Jian Guo Men Nei Street,
100005
Beijing
P.R. China
Phone: +81-462-65-2324
Fax: +81-462-65-2366
Phone: +86-10-6526-9628
Phone: +86-10-6526-9728
Phone: +86-10-6526-9731
Fax: +86-10-6526-9730
BGS2_HID_v01.301
Confidential / Released
Page 112 of 112
2011-04-07
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement