Silicon Imaging SI-1280F MegaCamera™ 1.3 Million Pixel

Silicon Imaging SI-1280F MegaCamera™ 1.3 Million Pixel
Silicon Imaging
SI-1280F MegaCamera
1.3 Million Pixel Progressive Scan Digital Camera
Revision 1.7
May 16, 2004
1.3 Million Pixels
6.7um Square Pixel
1280 x 1024 Sensor
Full-Frame Shutter
Windowing and Subsampling
30~3000 Frames per Second
12 Bit Digital Sampling
Mono or Bayer Color
CameraLink Interface
**** Company Confidential ****
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 1 of 1
Company Confidential
INTRODUCTION
Silicon Imaging is proud to continue its innovation in ultra-high speed
machine vision camera. Driven by the growing demand for consumer
Digital Still Cameras, CMOS sensors are continuing to break technical
barriers and surpass the performance characteristics of CCD’s in many
photonic, imaging and consumer applications. By utilizing a single highly
integrated CMOS device, which incorporates Megapixel sensing areas,
timing generation, signal processing and high bandwidth outputs, Silicon
Imaging has developed a very compact, low-power, ultra high speed
Megapixel digital camera system.
1280 x 1024 Megapixel Imaging - Ultra Speed
The SI-1280F is the worlds first 1.3 Million pixel Full-Frame Shutter, alldigital CMOS camera capable of running at video rates of 50
frames/second at its full 1280 x 1024 resolution and over 500 frames/per
second at 320 x 240 resolution. The entire package is only 45 x 52 x
50mm (33 x 40mm x 22mm in PCB) and is small enough to placed on a
robot for semiconductor machine vision inspection, embedded into a
portable medical instrumentation for cell biology or placed in an aerial
drones for remote surveillance.
12-Bit Pixel Clock Sampling – Sub-Pixel Accuracy
The MegaCamera uses 12-Bit digitizers to sample the pixel data at up to
60MHz to achieve 50 Frames/sec data throughput at its full Megapixel
resolution. Converting the pixel data directly to digital at the sensor head
eliminates pixel-sampling jitter and enables accurate sub-pixel metrology,
image analysis and improved live video reconstruction.
Full-Frame Triggered Shutter – Stop the Motion
Most common CMOS sensors only have a “Rolling Shutter” to control the
exposure time for each line in the image. This method can produce
unwanted motion tilts or jagged edges, as each row ends integration after
the previous one above it. The SI-1280F provides a Full-Frame triggered
shutter, which completely stops any motion artifacts by exposing all pixels
simultaneously and holding the exposed value until it is progressively
readout.
FEATURES
Dual Slope Exposure - “Super-Dynamic Range”
The SI-1280F can be used in a dual slope bi-linear mode, extending the
useful dynamic range in scenes where detail in bright areas are to be
preserved at the same time as maintaining details in darker regions. In
normal linear response, a camera requires a short exposure to keep the
bright areas from saturation. However, the darker regions of the
image would not have enough time to integrate charge. If the exposure is
set longer the detail in the dark areas will become visible by the brighter
areas will become saturated. The dual-slope operation combines the
transfer of nominal integration time (steep slope, high sensitivity) with the
transfer curve obtained from a short electronic shutter (shorter exposure
time, lower sensitivity), into a single exposing operation.
3000 Frames per Second - Windowing & Subsampling
Ideal for object tracking and high-speed Motion analysis, the SI-1280 is
capable of generating imagery at over 3000 frames per second by
reducing the size of the readout image (ex. 100x100). This windowed
Region-of–Interest (ROI) can be moved dynamically, creating an entirely
electronic pan/tilt/zoom function within the camera field-of-view.
CameraLink
Digital Interfaces
An industry standard forum has adopted CameraLink , for low cost
connectivity and cablingof cameras and frame grabbers at very high
speeds (over 1.2GB/sec). The SI-1280F-CL utilizes the high speed
CameraLink interface to output 1280 x 1024 12 bit data at 60MHz, or
over 50 frames per second (865 Mbits/second) continuously to a frame
grabber. The single cable includes image data, vertical and horizontal
synch, LVDS Triggering and 9600 baud Serial communication. As this
camera complies with the standard, it is compatible with many popular
frame grabber and image processing hardware devices and fiber-optic
extender for extended distance transmission.
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
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• 1280 x 1024 Resolution (1.3 Million Pixels)
• Full Frame Triggered Shutter, Progressive scan
• 2/3” Imaging Format , 6.7um Square Pixel
• Windowing and Subsampling
• 12 Bits per Pixel, 60MHz Sampling
• High Speed Readout (30 ~ 3000FPS)
• Region-of-Interest (ROI) windowing
• Progressive Rolling Shutter Mode
• 1usec~4sec Precision High Speed Shutter
• Long Integration (up to n-Frame Times)
• Programmable Gain, Offset, Clock, Shutter & ROI
• External Clock Synchronization (FrameLock)
• Monochrome & Color Bayer RGB Models
• 5VDC Low Power, Small Package
• C-Mount Housing or PCB versions
• CameraLink Interface
Company Confidential
Camera Architecture Overview
The MegaCamera
SI-1280F consists of 6 major component sections, which are built on two circuit boards.
1.) 1.3 Megapixel Sensor
2.) Digital Clock Synthesizer
3.) 12-Bit Digitizing System
4.) Microprocessor
5.) CameraLink Interface
6.) Power Regulation
7.) Trigger & Clock Controls
Register
Programming
5VDC Power Supply
& Trigger Controller
VIDEO
CLOCK
LVAL
ChannelLink
MUX 28 : 4
PLL & Timing
Generator
LVDS
FVAL
DVAL
uP
Control
LVDS
1280 x 1024
6.7 x 6.7um
12 Bit A/D
Processor
MDR-26
SI-1280F Camera Block Diagram
PCB OEM Version
44 x 33 x 14mm - 2PCB
Actual size
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
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1.)
1.3 Megapixel CMOS Image Sensor (1280 x 1024)
The MegaCamera SI-1280F utilizes a proprietary 1.3 Million Full-Frame Shutter high-speed CMOS image
sensor. Each pixel is 6.7um square, ideal for image processing, and the entire array fits the 2/3” format for flexible
optic choices. This reduction in process geometry allows for both an increase in transistors and fill factor without
compromising performance, plus offers more advanced readout controls, greater speeds and lower power
dissipation. This new sensor technology offers a more responsive pixel design with added circuitry for increased
dynamic range, greater sensitivity, decreased fixed pattern noise and low dark current for long exposure
applications. Unlike CCD which leak charge to adjacent pixels when the registers overflows (blooms), the SI1280F provides inherent anti-blooming protection in each pixel, so that there is no blooming.
The array has 1280 pixels on a line and 1024 rows, which result in a 4:3 aspect ratio. By using the windowing
feature, a 16:9 aspect ratio (eg. 1280x 720) or 1:1 aspect ratio (1024 x 1024) are available. At smaller ROI sizes
(eg. 128 x 128) frame rates in excess of 1000fps. It supports both triggered shutter capture, for stopping motion of
high speed objects and rolling-shutter for continuous live video output.
The SI-1280F MegaCamera achieves high data rates by simultaneously accessing two adjacent pixels at a time
and reading them out sequentially. This means horizontal dimensions such as Width and Starting column for an
ROI are set in increments of 2. These pixel values feed thru a gain & offset amplifier and then to an external 12-Bit
A/D Converter to produce 4095 possible levels. In a color model, a Bayer filter covers each of the pixels to
produce a pattern of values which represent the color information which must be processed and interpolated to
obtain an RGB value per pixel. The 12-bit output format from the camera is identical for monochrome and color
models.
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SI-1280F Sensor Specifications
Value
Units
Remarks
Resolution
1280 x 1024
pixels
B&W or RGB-Bayer
Pixel pitch
6.7
µm
Square pixel
Pixel type
4 transistor
Active Pixel
Allows for Rolling & synchronous shutter
2/3”
"
8.6 x 6.9mm
20
12
uV/electron
uV/electron
@ pixel
@ sensor output
Sensitivity
332
1.85
4.74
V per Ws/m2
V / lux-s
V / lux-s
Average White Light
2
Visible band (180lx =1 W/m )
2
Visible + NIR ( 70lx =1 W/m )
Output Swing
1
1.8
V
V
Unity gain
Maximum Output signal
120,000
e-
100,000 due to non-linearity region.
1.2V @12uV/e-
Noise electrons
80-90
70-80
ee-
Synchronous shutter
Rolling Shutter
Dynamic range
64
dB
120000:85 = 1400 Synchr Shutter
120000:75 = 1600 Rolling Shutter
Average QE x FF
20~25
%
Peak 30% (see curve)
Dark Current @ RT
2100
5900
PA/cm
e-/s
Optical Cross talk
8
%
< 0.5
%
PRNU
10
% p-p
1.1% RMS
Parasitic sensitivity
<1
%
sensitivity of storage node during readout
Dual-slope
yes
multiple slopes
dynamic range expansion
Pixel rate
40
MHz
Nominal (20~60MHz Programmable)
Optical format
Conversion Gain
Saturation charge
FPN
Shutter
Spectral Sensitivity
Operating Temp
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
2
Auto saturation time is 10~20sec
Crosstalk to nearest neighbor
rolling, snapshot
400 ~ 1000
nm
0 ~ 60
Degree C
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With degradation of dark Current
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SI-1280F QE Performance
The QE lines are lines of equal Quantum efficiency (see curve below). This curve includes effects of non-sensitive
areas in the pixel, e.g. interconnection lines. The sensor is light sensitive between 400 and 1000 nm. The peak
QE*FF is approximately 25% between 500 and 700 nm. In view of a fill factor of 50%, the QE is thus larger than
50% between 500 and 700 nm. For example, at the wavelength of +/- 660nm the spectral response is 0.13 A/W
and between 20% and 30% QE or approximately 25% for QE*FF. If we divide the Fill factor of approximately 50%
we get a QE of approximately 50%.
SI1280F Spectral Response Curve
For instance the SI-1280F has a FF of approximately 0.5 and a QE of 50%, the sensor will generate 1 electron is
of photo current every 4 photons falling on 1 pixel. This electron is converted in a voltage in the pixel by the
Voltage Conversion factor = 12 uV/e-. So for 1 electron 12 uV will be generated at the output transistor. The real
sensitivity measured at the analog output is given by this value: 332 V.m2/W.s. This means that when light with an
2
intensity of 1 W/m falls on a pixel and the integration time is set to 1ms, 332mV will be generated at the output
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
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Pixel Linearity Response Curve
The above figure shows the pixel response curve in linear response mode. This curve is the relation between the
electrons detected in the pixel and the output signal. This curve was measured with light of 600 nm, with an
integration time of 19.6 ms (40 MHz pixel rate; unity gain). The resulting voltage/electron curve is independent of
these parameters. The voltage to electrons conversion gain is 12 µV/electron (measured in unity gain). Note that
the upper part of the curve (near saturation) is actually a logarithmic response. This logarithmic part of the
response is not FPN corrected by the on-chip offset correction circuitry.
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
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2.)
12-Bit Digital Sampling System
A 12-Bit Analog-to-digital (A/D) converter samples each pixel value and quantizes it into 4095 levels, as it is
clocked out of the sensor. Pixel clock sampling ensures precise measurement of the photonic charge without the
jitter and sampling uncertainty associated with traditional analog video systems, such as RS-170 and CCIR. The
produces images which can deliver improved photometry accuracy and sub-pixel metrology. The use of 12-bit
converters versus traditional 8 or 10-bit systems further enhances the image dynamic range. The combination of
12-bit vertical resolution and pixel clock sampling provide precise sub-pixel measurement accuracy (ex. 1/20
pixel).
3.)
Digital Clock Synthesizer
A wide range a master clock frequencies (eg. 20 to 60MHz) can by precisely generated using the Digital Clock
Synthesizer. The Frame Grabber, which is used with the camera, must be capable of receiving 12bit at 60Mhz to
achieve the highest data rates. Without any byte packing of the 12-bit word the data rate would be 120MHz (2pixel
x 2bytes/pixel x 60MHz). In standard 32Bit/33MHz PCI computers the maximum data rate directly to host memory
is usually below120Mbytes/sec (from 132MB/sec bus) without system interrupts. However, 100MB/sec is more
reasonable rate to achieve with other system devices operating (eg. display, clock, mouse etc.). Under these
condition the 12-bit data can be mapped to 8-bits/pixel to reduce the bus traffic or the clock rate can be reduced to
and still maintain 12bits/pixel. The frequency of the clock synthesizer can be set by serial command. A table with
associated clock frequency is found in the serial programming section of the manual. Due to minimum frequency
restriction on the digital transmission link, the pixel clock frequency cannot be lower than 20Mhz.
4.)
Embedded Microprocessor
A microprocessor in the camera provides the control interface between the PC and the functional block in the
camera (Sensor, Clock Synthesizer, Register Memory, Channel Link Interface & Serial port (CameraLink). The
Microprocessor receives commands thru the LVDS level serial port and issues commands to the other devices. It
also can store preset values for camera setting, which can be recalled with single ASCII character commands.
Several digital I/O or analog sampling signals are available on the processor from PCB header points for custom
OEM applications.
5.)
CameraLink Interface
Camera Link is a new digital transmission method designed by imaging component manufacturers as an easy and
standard way to connect digital cameras to frame grabbers. The Camera Link specification includes greater than
1.2Gb/sec data transmission as well as camera control and asynchronous serial communications all on a single
cable with high-density 26pin connector. Only two connections are required to quickly interface your digital
camera to a multitude of frame grabbers. This standardization will ultimately reduce cost of high performance
digital cameras through open market competition and a simple migration path to faster and higher resolution
systems.
As a standard that has been defined by industry members, Camera Link provides the following benefits:
•
Standard Interface: Every Camera Link product will use the same cable and signaling. Cameras and
frame grabbers can easily be interchanged using the same cable.
•
Simple Connection: Only two connections will be required to interface a camera and frame grabber:
Power and Camera Link.
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•
Lower Cost: Because Camera Link is an industry-wide standard, consumers will be able to take
advantage of lower cable prices.
•
Smaller connectors & cables: The technology used in Camera Link reduces the number of wires
required to transmit data over traditional LVDS or RS-422 parallel interfaces, allowing for smaller cables.
Smaller cables are more robust and less prone to breakage.
•
Higher data rates: The technology used in Camera Link has a maximum data rate of 2.3GB/s, for use in
the most demanding high definition, high frame rate and line scan.
CameraLink Camera Signal
This section provides definitions for the signals used in the Camera Link interface. The standard Camera Link
cable uses a MDR 26-pin connector (3M Part# 10226-6212VC)provides the following signaling:
•
Video Data (4 Pairs using 28:4 Mux, 24 Video, 4 Control)
•
Camera control signals (1 Pair)
•
Serial communication (2 Pairs)
•
Power (3 pair) – Optional Control signals 2, 3, 4
Video Data
The 24 bit image data (2 words x 12 bit) and 4 control bits are transmitted over only 4 differential pairs using a 28:4
multiplexer (National Semiconductor DS90CR285 Channel Link device). The Four enable signals are defined as:
• FVAL—Frame Valid (FVAL) is defined HIGH for valid lines.
• LVAL—Line Valid (LVAL) is defined HIGH for valid pixels.
• DVAL—Data Valid (DVAL) is defined HIGH when data is valid.
• Spare— A spare has been defined for future use.
All four enables are provided on the camera, via the Channel Link chip. The unused data bits are tied to a known
value by the camera. For more information on image data bit allocations, see page 11, CameraLink Base
Configuration Bit Assignment Configuration.
Communication
Two LVDS pairs have been allocated for asynchronous serial communication to and from the camera and frame
grabber. Cameras and frame grabbers should support at least 9600 baud. These signals are
• SerTFG—Differential pair with serial communications to the frame grabber.
• SerTC—Differential pair with serial communications to the camera.
The serial interface operates at 9600 baud, one start bit, one stop bit, no parity, and no handshaking. For
applications requiring high serial throughput, such as real time windowing update at over 200FPS, the camera can
support a serial link mode at 57kbs (not specified in CameraLink spec). The frame grabber serial communication
must be set to match this speed.
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Camera Control Trigger Signals & Power
Four LVDS pairs are reserved for general-purpose camera control. They are defined as camera inputs and frame
grabber outputs. Camera manufacturers can define these signals to meet their needs for a particular product. The
signals are:
• Camera Control 1 (CC1) - Used to do triggered image capture
• Camera Control 2 (CC2) for external master clock (optional)
Tajimi RO3-PB3M – POWER CABLE
5VDC Power Supplies
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3-PIN Power & TTL Trigger Input Wiring
3-Pin Power Cable
3-Pin Power & Trigger-In Cable
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PhotoEye Trigger and Power Connection
Note: TTL-Trigger input signal is active low (10usec min low-pulse). The CC-1 will trigger on
logic high or true. Please be sure CC-1 is in logic false or low state when using the external
TTL-trigger or continuous triggers will occur.
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Power-On Communication & Presets
Initial State
When the power is first applied to the camera the camera will load its default (Preset #1) settings and will be
generating live video and a serial status message. Preset #1 can be overwritten thru programming commands.
Once Preset#1 is overwritten it will be the new power-on default setting.
If the Frame Grabber supports a serial terminal mode the following menu will appear:
100: Booted
108: CameraLink SI1280F 3.06.08
120:C2010610 Sensor tag
190:66633035 Configuration code
's' - status
Returns the firmware version, clock configuration word, Sensor Tag, and FPGA Configuration code. Camera
output example:
108: CameraLink SI1280F 3.06.08
110:306882 Clock
120:C2010610 Sensor tag
190:66633035 Configuration code
Default Settings
When first turned on, the SI1280F will be in the default mode, which will be 11.5 fps Full Frame Readout at 40MHz
master clock. See serial programming section for details on changing formats.
Full Resolution, Rolling Shutter, Single-slope, 40MHz
Resolution =
Clock =
Frame Rate =
Integration =
Global Gain =
1280 x 1023
40MHz
11.5 FPS
1022 Rows
1.8
Note: The Black Level Offset and Balance (Register 9 and a) must be loaded for correct image balance in either
triggered or Rolling Shutter operation (see page 24).
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Serial Communication & Protocol
The SI1280F is capable of mode programming through its serial interface. Commands are sent from the
CameraLink frame grabber to the camera. The commands are processed by the micro controller and
communicated to various devices in the camera including the sensor, digital clock synthesizer and the Flash
memory inside the microprocessor itself.
The communication uses an asynchronous serial format, similar to RS232, but is transferred to the camera using
LVDS as part of the CameraLink interface specification.
Format:
Rate:
Data Bits:
Parity:
Interface:
Asynchronous, ASCII
9600
8 + 2 Stop bits
No Parity
Serial LVDS (thru CameraLink)
The baud rate is set to 9600 and 8 data bits with no parity. This is the format set by the CameraLink standard.
However, faster rates can be set by the factory and coordination with the Frame Grabber supplier.
Serial Commands
There are two types of commands Single character and Register String (multiple characters followed by Carriage
Return). Once the camera receives the string ending with a <CR> it will respond. For each command, there is a
corresponding action and response from the camera.
Single Character commands
“s”
Camera status including firmware version, clock configuration word, sensor tag and
CPLD configuration codes.
“f”
Arm Frame capture. Trigger frame capture if already armed.
“v”
Arm live video trigger mode. Trigger with CC-1 or ‘c’ command
“c”
Exit from single Frame capture mode and return to continuous or command mode
“h”
Change to high-speed serial mode for operation at 57.6kbaud.
“t0”
Normal trigger Mode (default)
“t1”
High-speed Low latency Trigger Mode
*** Note: All commands must terminate with a <cr> (carriage return).
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Register String commands
These are multiple character string commands with a common format.
Command
Description
Parameters
Response
lc xxxxxx <cr>
Load Clock Register
(See clock table)
xxxxxx = 6 hex values from table
114: Clock updated
ly r xxx <cr>
Load Sensor Registers
Loads registers 0 to b with 12bit
values, which are sent as 3 hex
characters
r = register number 0~b
xxx = x000~xFFF (0~4095)
104: Sensor updated
x = 1~6 (one hex character)
le1 = stores preset #1
AA = slot (00 ~FF
YY = Memory (00-10)
XX = 14 bit value (00~ F
The first two bits (MSBs) of the first
byte and of every odd byte are not
stored.
106: Preset updated
Load EEPROM preset value
***overwrites factory values
'
luAA[YYXXx16]' Load upper/user memory
7k-Bytes. Configured in 256
slots. Each slot has 16 memory
locations of14bits for
le x <cr>
lr xxxx
Read back user/upper memory
ln xxxx
Load new program
*** Note: All commands must terminate with a <cr> (carriage return). Hex characters are lower case, no spaces.
Register Command Format
Each command may be entered through the Terminal communication mode from the frame grabber software. All
ASCII characters sent should be lower case and no spaces between characters. The string is terminated with a
carriage return <cr>. Hex numbers are sent as ASCII characters: 0Fh is sent as “0F” character. There are no
spaces between characters being sent in strings.
Sensor register commands are sent “lyrxxxyyzz......<cr>” . The ly stands for load sensor array and must be sent
as lower case. The “r” is the address of the first byte to be changed. The “xxx”, “represents three HEX values that
are to be loaded into each register. The sequence must end with a carriage return.
The following is an example of a 10-character command string
ly 1 2 3 4 <cr>
| | | | |
I----Carriage return
| | | | L--- 1 character, last nibble
| | | L_____1 character, middle nibble
| | L_______ 1 Character first nibble
| L__________ 1 Character, Register number: From 0 to b.
L______________ 2 Character, Register Command: Load Sensor Register
This command will load the WIDTH register “1” with hex “234” The resulting value loaded into the Width register is
“234” or 564 in decimal. The width value is modulo2 and therefore represents 564 * 2 = 1128 pixels..
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Digital Clock Synthesizer Programming
The SI-1280F has a Digital Clock Synthesizer capable of generating a range of frequencies from 20MHz to
60MHz. The pixel data output rate is the same as the sampling clock rate. The clock frequency is set by the “lc”
Register String command. A range of preset frequencies are listed below:
Clock
MHz
Command Clock Rate
lc306886
20 MHz
Frame Rate
1280x1024 1280 x 700 800 x 600 640x480
14
20
35
53
320x200
177
200 x 150
381
128x128
562
lc30b689
25 MHz
17
25
44
66
222
476
703
lc37cb8f
30 MHz
20
30
53
79
266
571
843
lc35d40b
35 MHz
24
35
61
92
310
667
984
lc306882
40 MHz
40
70
762
1124
45 MHz
45
79
105
119
355
lc35e709
27
31
399
857
1265
lc34b689
50 MHz
34
50
88
132
443
55
60
96
145
1405
1546
105
158
488
532
952
1048
1143
1686
lc34b688
55 MHz
38
lc36cb8f
60 MHz
41
Note: The factory can generate the command to achieve a targeted clock rate.
Sample Command:
The clock frequency is programmed by the “lc” command with by 6 HEX characters. An example is:
“lc36cb8f <cr>” This will request a clock value of 60MHz.
The response to a command will be:
114: Clock updated
There are multiple setting to achieve each frequency. Some might be better than others for a particular application.
Frame Rate Calculation
To calculate the frame rate for any clock rate the equation is:
(
clock rate(Hz)
)
( # of columns + 150) * ( # of rows)
Example:
=
# Frames Per Second (fps)
What is the frame rate, at 60MHz clock rate for an image size of 800 x 600?
60 x 106
( 800 + 150) * ( 600 )
=
105 Frames Per Second (fps)
*** Subsampling frame rates are based on the resulting size of the subsampled image or window.
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Sensor Register Programming
There are ten registers in the SI-1280F, which control the sensor readout, timing and signal output level. These
are programmed through register commands. All sensor registers are 12 bits in length and are represented by 3
hex characters. The command format is:
ly r xxx <cr> r = Register number
xxx = values 0 to 4095 or 000 to fff in hex.
The values to load in each register are described in the following table:
Register
0
Function
Shutter Mode
Rolling Shutter (RS) or
Triggered Shutter (TS)
1
Width
(pixels in row / 2) – 1
2
Height
# of rows –1
3
Exposure Time
Rolling Shutter
Exp = Height – Register 3
Triggered Shutter
Exp = Exposure clocks
Values
005 : Live Rolling Shutter
004 : Trigger Shutter, TB1
105 : Live RS, Dual-Slope1
044 : Trigger Shutter, TB2
205 : Live RS, Dual-Slope2
084 : Trigger Shutter, TB3
305 : Live RS, Dual-Slope3
0c4 : Trigger Shutter, TB4
000 ~ 27fh
(0 ~ 640 columns * 2) - 1
Image Width = 2 * (value + 1). Ex. For 1280, load 639 (0x27f)
000 ~ 3feh
(values: 0~1022 )
Set to: # of rows –1
For Rolling Shutter the max # rows should be set to 1023 (1022).
For long exposures, the height may be programmed to 0xfff (4095)
to increase frame time with exposure times longer than 1024.
Rolling Shutter:
000~fff (values: 0~4095 row times)
Exposure = Height – value (eg. 1024 – 24 = 1020 rows)
Exposure time is in number of rows (must be less than Height)
Triggered Shutter: 000~fff (values: 0~4095 exposure clocks)
Exposure clock value is based on Reg 0 (TB1-4) & camera clock
Exposure = (value - 4) * expsoure clocks at Time-Base
Exposure Clock (TB1) = 32 clocks = 800nsec @ 40MHz
Exposure Clock (TB2) = 64 clocks = 1.6 usec @ 40MHz
Exposure Clock (TB3) = 128 clocks = 3.2 usec @ 40MHz
Exposure Clock (TB4) = 256 clocks = 6.4 usec @ 40MHz
000 ~ 280h
(0 ~ 640 columns * 2)
Begin = 2 * value or Begin = 0 ~1280 Mod2
4
Begin_Column (X-origin)
5
Begin_Row
(Y-origin)
000 ~ 400h
6
Begin_Row
(same as 5)
000 ~ 400h
(0~1024)
– set to same value as Reg5!
7
Subsampling
None: 000 off. No Subsampling
Mono : 06c Subsmaples 2:1 in X and Y
Color: 024 Subsmaples 2:1 in pairs for Bayer pattern: RG, GB
8
Gain
Unity: 050
(Gain = 1)
Gain : 040 ~ 04f (Gain 1.4 ~ 10x – see table)
9
Black Level
(128 levels)
000~07f
(0 – 127 levels)
a
Black Level Fine (120 levels)
000~07f
(0 - 127 levels)
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(0~1024)
Company Confidential
Full Frame & Window Programming
The frame size and readout position is selected through the programming of registers 1,2,4,5 and 6.
Full Frame Programming
The following are the default register settings, which output the full 1280 x 1024 resolution image:
Register 1 – Width
Set to the number of columns in the image divided by 2. The default width is 1280 horizontal pixels:
ly 1 27f <cr>
1280 decimal/2 - 1 = 639d = 27f hex
Register 2 – Height
Set to the number of rows in image -1. The default height is 1023 rows. Register is set to 1022.
ly 2 3fe <cr>
1022 decimal = 3fe hex.
(Note: be sure to set the exposure less or equal to Height)
Register 4 – Begin_Column
Set to the starting column count for a window divided by 2 (set to 0 by default)
ly 4 000 <cr>
Set origin to 0 decimal/2 = 0.
Register 5 - Begin_Row
Set to the starting row count for a window (set to 0 by default)
ly 5 400 <cr>
Set origin to 0.
Register 6 - Begin_Row (Always set equal to register 5)
ly 6 400 <cr>
Set origin to 0 again.
Window Programming – Image Size & Position
To place a 640 x 480 window in the middle of the sensor,
ly 1 140
ly 2 1df
ly 4 0a0
ly 5 100
ly 6 100
Set WIDTH to ( 640 / 2 ) – 1 = 319
Set HEIGHT to (480 – 1) = 479
Set BEGIN_COLUMN to 320/2
Set BEGIN_ROW to 256
Set BEGIN_ROW same as Reg5!
(0x13Fh)
(0x1DFh).
(0x0A0h).
(0x100h).
As shown in the adjacent picture, registers 1 and 2 set the size
of the display window. Register 4 sets the column start
location and registers 5 and 6 set the row start location.
Column and Row end do not need to be entered as they are
the sum of the start and size of the window.
To move the window to the bottom right corner of the sensor,
ly 4 140
ly 5 200
ly 6 200
Set BEGIN_COLUMN to 640/2
(0x140h).
Set BEGIN_ROW to 512
(0x200h).
Set BEGIN_ROW same as Reg5! (0x200h).
Note: other custom commands can be used to move the window at high speeds – please consult the factory.
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 18 of 18
Company Confidential
Rolling Shutter, Live Video ( Register 0)
The SI1280F MegaCamera supports both Rolling Shutter and Full Frame shutter. In Rolling shutter, each line in
the image has the same amount of integration, however the start and end time of integration is shifted in time as
the image is scanned (rolled) out of the sensor array. The name is due to the fact that effect is similar to a curtain
shutter of a SLR film camera. Although it is a pure electronic operation, the shutter seems to slide over the image.
x
Reset sequence
Line number
Read line
Reset line
y
x
Time axis
Frame time
y
Integration time
An object, which moves during the typical 1/30sec readout time, can display a stretched or skewed perspective, in
the direction of motion. For example, a vertical line can appear tilted if the object moves several horizontal pixels
during readout. The faster the object moves the larger the tilt. The crispness or detail of the line will be determined
by the shutter speed (integration time). It will not appear smeared if the shutter speed is shorter than the full frame
time. This artifact can be minimized by maintaining the shortest possible readout time (fast clock). The benefit of
rolling shutter mode, is that exposure and readout are overlapping, enabling full frame exposures without reducing
frame rate. In addition, this mode has slightly better noise canceling than trigger-shutter readout.
Exposure Time - Shutter Speed Programming (Register 3)
For Rolling Shutter mode, the value programmed into register 3 and the master clock are the basis for the
exposure.
Row Time
Exposure
= (# of pixels in Row + 150) * clock rate
= Row_Time * (Height - Register 3)
The following is a table of commands to set shutter speeds in Register 3, based on full image size (1280 x 1024).
Shutter
Speed
1/30
1/50
1/60
1/100
1/250
1/500
1/1000
1/5000
Number of Rows
35.8u sec/row (40MHz)
932
559
466
280
112
56
28
6
Register Value
(1024 – # of rows)
92
465
558
744
912
968
996
1018
Register Command
ly3 xxx <cr>
05c
1d1
24c
2e8
390
3c8
3e4
3fa
** Note: Exposure_Time must be set less than the number of rows in the frame (Height: Register 2).
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 19 of 19
Company Confidential
Full-Frame Trigger-Shutter Mode
The Full-Frame Triggered shutter mode (aka: synchronous, global & snapshot shutter) is used to stop the motion
of high-speed objects. Unlike Rolling-Shutter, the entire imager (frame) is exposed at the same time (ie. all pixels
begin and stop exposure at the same). After the image is stored in the pixel array, it is readout progressively, one
row at a time.
COMMON SAMPLE&HOLD
Flash could occur here
COMMON RESET
Line number
Time axis
Integration time
Burst Readout time
This operation is similar to a progressive scan CCD camera with triggered shutter. However, another exposure
cycle cannot begin until the image has completed the readout process.
To program Trigger-Shutter Mode and arm the camera for a trigger:
ly0 004 <cr> Set Full-Frame Trigger Shutter Mode, Exposure Range #1
ly3 0ff <cr> Set Exposure Time register to 255. Counts = 255-4 = 251
f
<cr> Arm Trigger
A trigger can be issued in any of the following 3 methods:
1. CC-1 Trigger (Camera Control 1)
Logic High Trigger
2. 3-pin TTL input (level sensi
Logic Low Trigger
3. “f <cr>”, command on the cameralink serial port.
A “c” command must be used to return the camera to continuous output Rolling-Shutter mode. This command
will also set Register 0 to single-slope exposure mode. After a ‘c’ command reg 0 commands can be issued to
change to multi-slope operation.
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 20 of 20
Company Confidential
Trigger Timing
Trigger Detection:
Exposure Start:
Vertical Blanking
Normal Trigger (t0):
= ~12usec min pulse
High-Speed trigger (t1):
CC-1
= ~100nsec
(Active High)!
External TTL
= 1usec +/- 500 nsec (Active Low)!
Time from trigger detect to start of Integration:
4 Exposure clocks (see table “Trigger-Shutter Exposure Time”)
3.2usec @ 40MHz(TB1) = 4 * (32 * 25ns)
none
High-Speed Low-Latency Trigger Mode (1usec ~12usec)
The Serial commands '
t1'and '
t0'change between the default ('
t0'
) and High Performance Trigger mode ('
t1'
). In
Normal trigger mode (‘t0’), which is the default mode, the microprocessor interprets the trigger. The trigger must
last at least 12us wide, the polling interval. During the polling interval, the sensor is continuously being reset for
optimum pixel reset with limited ambient charge.
In High Speed Low latency Trigger mode (‘t1’), the hardware interprets the trigger and no additional resets are sent
to the sensor.. This mode is necessary if an integration time less then 12us is to be used. This mode also
achieves low ambiguity between the time of the trigger and the start of integration time.
t1
t0
<cr>
<cr>
Change to high-performance trigger mode
Return to normal trigger mode.
Using the high-performance trigger mode when long delays occur between exposures can result in background
offset with fixed pattern non-uniformity.
Note: TTL-Trigger input signal is active low (10usec min low-pulse). The CC-1 will trigger on logic high or true.
Please be sure CC-1 is in logic false or low state when using the external TTL-trigger or continuous triggers will
occur.
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
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Company Confidential
Trigger-Shutter - Exposure Timebase (Register 0)
There are 4 ranges of exposure settings, which can be selected. Each range, counts multiple systems clocks (32,
64, 128, or 256) to obtain an exposure clock. The number of exposure clocks is programmed by Exposure
(Register 3).
The following table shows a possible range of exposures in each timebase.
TB
Range
1
Clocks per
Exposure
32
Exposure Range
20MHz
1.6 us ~ 6.6 ms
Exposure Range
40MHz
800ns ~ 3.3 ms
Exposure Range
60MHz
533ns ~ 2.2 ms
Trigger Shutter
Range Selection
ly0 004 <cr>
2
64
3.2 us ~ 13.1 ms
1.6 us ~ 6.6 ms
1.0 us ~ 4.4 ms
ly0 044 <cr>
3
128
6.4 us ~ 26.2 ms
3.2 us ~ 13.1 ms
2.1 us ~ 8.7 ms
ly0 084 <cr>
4
256
12.8 us ~ 52.4 ms
6.4 us ~ 26.2 ms
4.3 us ~ 17.5 ms
ly0 0c4 <cr>
Trigger-Shutter Exposure Time (Register 3)
To set the exposure time in trigger shutter mode, a timebase range (Reg 0) and exposure count (Reg 3) must be
programmed. The value in the Exposure Register, is set to 4 counts higher than the desired exposure. For
example, to se the shortest exposure time of one count, program the exposure register to 5 (ly3 005 <cr>). The
following is a table of Shutter Speeds examples, based on a 40MHz system clock:
Shutter
Speed
1/ 30
msec
33
Timebase
Range
4
Exposure clock
Value at 40Mhz
6.4 usec
Exposure
Count+4
5,212
Register String
Command ly3 xxx
Too Large!
Timebase
Ly0 xxx
error
1/ 50
20
4
6.4 usec
3,129
c39
0c4
1/ 60
17
4
6.4 usec
2,608
a30
0c4
1/ 100
10
3
3.2 usec
3,129
c39
084
1/ 250
4
3
3.2 usec
1,254
4e6
084
1/ 500
2.0
1
800 nsec
2,504
9c8
004
1/ 1,000
1.0
1
800 nsec
1,254
4e6
004
1/ 5,000
0.2
1
800 nsec
254
0fe
004
1/ 10,000
0.1
1
800 nsec
129
081
004
1/ 100,000
0.0
1
800 nsec
17
011
004
To arm a Trigger-Shutter with a 1/250 shutter speed:
ly0 0c4 <cr>
ly3 4e6 <cr>
f
<cr>
Set trigger Exposure Range #3 (3.2usec per count)
Set Exposure Register to 4msec = 3.2us * 1250. Add 4 = 1254 (0x4e6h)
Arm Trigger
Conitnous Rolling Shutter Mode
To switch to live continuous rolling shutter mode, send the command:
c
<cr>
This will exit the single frame trigger mode and begin to output continuous video.
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 22 of 22
Company Confidential
Dual Slope Super-Dynamic Range Expansion
The SI-1280F and SI-6407F can be used in a dual slope bi-linear mode, extending their useful dynamic range in
scenes where detail in bright areas are to be preserved at the same time as maintaining details in darker regions.
Short Exposure
Long Exposure
Dual-Slope
The image on the right has been captured in dual slope mode. Observe the detail visible both indoors (ie. under
the table, Macbeth chart) and through the window (trees and houses).
In normal linear response a camera requires a short exposure to keep the bright areas from saturation. However,
the darker regions of the image would not have enough time to integrate charge (yellow curve). If the exposure is
set longer the detail in the dark areas will become visible by the brighter areas will become saturated (pink curve).
The dual-slope operation (blue curve) combines the transfer of nominal integration time (steep slope, high
sensitivity) with the transfer curve obtained from a short electronic shutter (shorter exposure time, lower
sensitivity), into a single exposing operation (i.e. without the need to combine two different images). This Superdynamic function is accomplished by clipping (or reseting) the brighter image data part way through the exposure
at a “kneepoint” and then allowing the image to continue exposing. This allows a longer time for the darker
regions to exposuse and a short re-exposure of the bright areas to be combined in the single image. The
'
kneepoint” in the resulting bi-linear electro-optical transfer can be positioned by adjusting the reset level and the
time of reset during exposure.
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 23 of 23
Company Confidential
Dual-Slope Rolling-Shutter
In order to enable dual-slope with rolling-shutter live operation, select one of the 3 kneepoints or reset levels.
Register 0
Programming
ly0 000h
ly0 105h
ly0 205h
ly0 305h
Dual Slope
Kneepoint
none
1
2
3
recommended
-
Then set the time to switch from Exposure1 to Exposure2 using the exposure register (REG3). The total exposure
time for both exposure segments is the total frame time.
Long Exposures
For longer exposure times than 50msec(20MHz & TB4) in triggered shutter mode, please consult the factory.
High Speed Serial Mode (57.6KBaud)
For applications requiring high speed register updates, such as adaptive ROI moving, the SI1280 camera now
includes the '
h'command option, to increase the serial port speed from the default 9600 baud rate up to 57.6
kbaud. The camera will continue to boot at 9600 baud, but when given the command “h <cr>”, it will announce it'
s
intent to go to 57.6kbaud at 9600 (“152: serial to 57.6kbaud”), then pause for a few seconds, then send a
message at high speed.
Serial framing errors, or overruns will cause the camera to "fault" back to 9600 baud, at which time it will send a
fault message at 9600 baud (“159: serial rate fault”).
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 24 of 24
Company Confidential
Sub-sampling
The entire imager is output by skipping groups of pixels. This enables a complete Field of View (FOV) to be seen
at reduced resolution and higher frame rates. For example, a 1280x1024 15ps imager can be output in 2x
subsampling in both horizontal and vertical direction to achieve the same FOV at 640 x 512 at 60fps.
Gain Setting Commands – Register 8
There are 16 choices of Gain (040h~04fh) and a fixed unity gain setting (050h). The values are as follows:
Gain
1.00
1.41
1.62
1.88
2.17
2.52
2.92
3.38
3.90
4.50
5.17
5.93
6.76
7.86
8.64
9.61
10.69
To set a gain of 4.5:
ly 8 042 <cr>
Command
ly8 xxx <cr>
050
040
041
042
043
044
045
046
047
048
049
04a
04b
04c
04d
04e
04f
Set gain to 1.88.
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
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Company Confidential
Black Reference Setting – Registers 9 and A
The black reference level is set via two registers using the 7 Least significant bits, to provide 128 steps for coarse
and 128 fine adjustment levels. :
Register 9 – Black Level
000~ 07f
(values 0~128)
Load black offset with 65 (a typical value for Rolling Shutter at Gain 1.88)
Load black offset with 85 (a typical value for Trigger Shutter at Gain 1.88)
ly9 041 <cr>
ly9 055 <cr>
Register a – Black Balance
000~ 07f
(values 0~128).
Load black offset (fine) with 85.
lya 055 <cr>
Each register controls a digital to analog converter (DAC) that adjust the offset reference voltage of the output
amplifier. By adjusting this reference, the black level of the image can be set to zero to maximize intra-scene
dynamic range. The Black Balance adjusts the offset between odd and even columns.
The black level output from the sensor will shift, based on gain and exposure value settings. In color mode, the
Black level Red and Green interpolated values should be adjusted so that they match. Otherwise, incorrect color
correction matrix values will be applied.
Live Register Programming
Once the camera is running in LIVE Rolling shutter, all the sensor control and clock registers can be modified.
•
•
•
•
Clock
Exposure
Window Size & Position
Gain & Offset
The sensor register values are loaded at the next top of frame and will not interrupt the video timing. It is therefore
possible to have different set of values for every image output from the camera. However, it can take up to 1
additional frame time to see certain results dependant on where in the frame cycle time the command is sent.
The clock frequency change command will take effect immediately, during the frame time. The Clock change is
not internally synchronized to the frame readout, as it is usually set for the application and not changed on the fly.
However, the clock rate change can be synchronized using PC software by simply sending the command
Example Register Programming
The following are the serial program settings to obtain 320 x 240 at 25MHz:
lc30b689\r
ly0005\r
ly109f\r
ly20ef\r
ly3000\r
ly4000\r
ly5000\r
ly6000\r
ly7000\r
ly8047\r
ly9032\r
ya050\r
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Set clock to 25MHz
Rolling Shutter Mode (Single Slope)
Width / 2 - 1 ( (320/2) - 1 = 159 (0x9f)
Height -1 = 239
Full frame Time of Exposure (Rolling Shutter)
Start Column = 0
Start Row
Start Row (same as 5)
Subsampling Off
Gain = 3.9
Black Offset = 50 (0x32)
Column Offset = 80 (0x50)
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Company Confidential
Response Codes
000:XXXX
Sensor Chip ID. This is sent at boot time, and also when the status
command is issued.
0XX:XXXXXX...
Sensor registers. This message gives the address and contents of a chip
register. 16 bytes of register data will be sent on each line.
100: Booted
This is the first string sent when the Camera boots. It will later be
augmented with a firmware version number.
102: Default loaded
A message sent a boot time after the sensor and clock have been
programmed.
104: Sensor updated
A response that follows the "ly..." command.
106: Preset updated
A response that follows the "le..." command.
108: CameraLink SI1280F
2.12.30
Output by the ‘s’ status command.
Identifies the camera model, interface and firmware version
110: XXXXXX
Output by the ‘s’ status command. It gives the current clock setting.
Clock
114: Clock updated
A response that follows the "lc..." command.
120: XXXX
Output by the ‘s’ status command. It provides the factory serial number.
Sensor Tag
152: serial to 57.6kbaud
Response to an ‘h’ command
159: serial rate fault
A serial framing error occurred in high-speed serial mode. Camera will
return to default 9600 baud.
190: XXXX Configuration
Code
Output by the ‘s’ status command. It gives the current configuration.
501: Unrecognized
Command
The first character of the command line input is unrecognized.
503: Invalid Input
There are multiple forms of the 503 message code. They represent invalid
input other then the command specifier, such as "ly..." commands which
include to many characters of input, or not enough to fill the specified data
byte count.
Further input was given while the camera was still processing the previous
input
505: busy
601: Loaded preset #1
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
A response to “1” command. Preset #1 was loaded.
Page 27 of 27
Company Confidential
602: Loaded preset #2
A response to “2” command. Preset #2 was loaded.
603: Loaded preset #3
A response to “3” command. Preset #3 was loaded.
605: help menu
All of the lines of the help menu begin with code 605.
702: Single frame
This message is sent after the camera enters single frame mode, and again
after each frame is sent.
703: Leave single frame
This message is sent after the camera exits single frame mode and enters
continuous frame mode.
802: Dual Slope
This message is sent after the camera enters dual slope synchronous
shutter mode
803: Leaving Dual Slope
This message is sent after the camera exits dual slope synchronous shutter
mode and enters continuous frames normal rolling shutter mode.
Binary to Hex (ASCII) Table
Binary
0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
1000
1001
1010
1011
1100
1101
1110
1111
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Hex in ASCII
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
a
b
c
d
e
f
Page 28 of 28
Company Confidential
SI-1280F
CameraLink Frame Grabber
Hardware Interface Notes
1.
Data Configuration – 12bits x Single-Tap
The 12bit data is duplicated on both A & B outputs, to simplify Frame Grabber testing and integration.
2.
LVDS Serial Interface
The standard data rate is 9600 baud. (Faster rates, up to 57kbps can be programmed).
3.
CC-1 Trigger Interface
The camera is armed for capture modes via serial command. The CC-1 trigger is used to start the snap exposure
or live video output.
4.
PCI Bandwidth
The camera can operate at 60 Million Pixels per second. In 8-bit mode, this equates to 60MB/sec a sustained data
rate. In 12-bit mode, where 2 bytes per pixel are typically used, the maximum rate is 120MB/sec and may require
the use of a 66MHz PCI system. The data rate can be adjusted thru the on-board clock synthesizer.
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 29 of 29
Company Confidential
CameraLink Connection
MegaCamera to Frame Grabber Interface
26-PIN
26-PIN
CONNECTOR CONNECTOR
FROM
FRAME
CAMERA
GRABBER
SIGNAL NAME
PAIR
X0-
1-
2
25
X0+
1+
15
12
X1-
2-
3
24
X1+
2+
16
11
X2-
3-
4
23
X2+
3+
17
10
X3-
5-
6
21
X3+
5+
19
8
Xclk-
4-
5
22
Xclk+
4+
18
9
SerTC-
6-
20
7
SertTC+
6+
7
20
SerTFG-
7-
8
19
SerTFG+
7+
21
6
CC1-
8-
9
18
CC1+
8+
22
5
CC2-
9-
23
4
CC2+
9+
10
17
CC3-
10-
11
16
CC3+
10+
24
3
CC4-
11-
25
2
CC4+
11+
12
15
Gnd
Gnd
1
1
Gnd
Gnd
13
13
Gnd
Gnd
14
14
Gnd
Gnd
26
26
MDR-26 Connector
The camera uses the standard 3M MDR-26 connector specified in CameraLink specifications.
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
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Company Confidential
12-Bit CameraLink
Base Configuration Bit Assignment
CameraLink
Port Assignements
PORT/BIT
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
B0
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
C0
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
C7
12-bit x 2Ch
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
B8
B9
B10
B11
B0
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
National
DS90CR285MTD
Signal
Name
RX-00
RX-01
RX-02
RX-03
RX-04
RX-05
RX-06
RX-07
RX-08
RX-09
RX-10
RX-11
RX-12
RX-13
RX-14
RX-15
RX-16
RX-17
RX-18
RX-19
RX-20
RX-21
RX-22
RX-23
RX-24
RX-25
RX-26
RX-27
RX-CLK
Bit
Name
DO-0
DO-1
DO-2
DO-3
DO-4
DO-5
DO-6
DO-7
DO-8
DO-9
DO-10
DO-11
DE-8
DE-9
DE-10
DE-11
DE-0
DE-1
DE-2
DE-3
DE-4
DE-5
DE-6
DE-7
DE = Even Pixels DO = Odd Pixels
The ODD and EVEN Outputs
are identical on the SI-1280F.
Camera
Data Bit
DO-00
DO-01
DO-02
DO-03
DO-04
DO-07
DO-05
DO-08
DO-09
DO-10
DE-10
DE-11
D-11
DE-08
DE-09
DE-00
DE-06
DE-07
DE-01
DE-02
DE-03
DE-04
DE-05
SPARE
LVAL
FVAL
DVAL
DO-06
RX-CLK
Channel Link
Pin
27
29
30
32
33
34
35
37
38
39
41
42
43
45
46
47
49
50
51
53
54
55
1
2
3
5
6
7
26
The following are the pin numbers for the 28 signals
output from the National Semiconductor Channel
Link chip on the Frame Grabber:
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 31 of 31
Company Confidential
Channel Link Interface
CameraLink Cable
CameraLink Cable Ordering
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 32 of 32
Company Confidential
SI-1280F Mechanicals
FRONT VIEW
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
REAR VIEW
Page 33 of 33
Company Confidential
3 mm
SI1280F Senor Cover Glass Dimensions
33 mm
30 mm
Rotation of sensor is less
than 0.3 degrees
40 mm
Sensor mounting is within 0.2
mm of center of 4 holes
30 mm
Holes are 1.93 mm diameter
22
mm
Sensor Thickness
2.25 mm 0.23 mm
Sensor with Cover glass
2.90 mm 0.33 mm
PWB Thickness
1.57 mm
0.13 mm
Array surface above PWB
1.26 mm 0.105mm
Maximun tilt is 0.10 degrees
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 34 of 34
Company Confidential
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 35 of 35
Company Confidential
SI-1280FM
SAMPLE MONOCHROME IMAGE
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 36 of 36
Company Confidential
SI-1280FRGB
SAMPLE COLOR IMAGE
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 37 of 37
Company Confidential
SI1280F-RGB Cover Glass Filter Response
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 38 of 38
Company Confidential
www.siliconimaging.com
[email protected]
SI-1280FM
SI-1280FRGB
-CL
-X
-S
-S64
-PCB
1.3Mpixel Monochrome MegaCamera
1.3Mpixel Bayer Color MegaCamera
CameraLink Version
Add external clock sync trigger (specify modes)
Add PCI Frame Grabber & 2 Meter Cameralink Cable
Add 64/66Mhz Frame Grabber & 2 Meter Cameralink Cable
OEM PCB Version, No Case
Silicon Imaging reserves the right to make changes to its products or to discontinue any product or service without notice, and advises
customers to obtain the latest version of relevant information to verify, before placing orders, that information being relied on is current and
complete. No license, express or implied to any intellectual property rights is granted by this document.
Specific testing of all parameters of each device is not necessarily performed, except those mandated by government requirements.
CERTAIN APPLICATIONS USING SEMICONDUCTOR PRODUCTS MAY INVOLVE POTENTIAL RISKS OF DEATH, PERSONAL INJURY,
OR SEVERE PROPERTY OR ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE ("CRITICAL APPLICATIONS"). SILICON IMAGING PRODUCTS ARE NOT
DESIGNED, AUTHORIZED, OR WARRANTED TO BE SUITABLE FOR USE IN LIFE-SUPPORT DEVICES OR SYSTEMS OR OTHER
CRITICAL APPLICATIONS. INCLUSION OF SILICON IMAGING PRODUCTS IN SUCH APPLICATIONS IS UNDERSTOOD TO BE FULLY AT
THE CUSTOMER'
S RISK.
The Product described in this datasheet may contain design defects or errors known as errata which may cause the product to deviate from
published specifications. Current characterized errata are available upon request.
Copyright: Silicon Imaging, Inc., 2003
051604-rev 1.7
 Silicon Imaging , Inc. 2004
Page 39 of 39
Company Confidential
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