Section 3 Audio Visual. - University of Canterbury

Section 3 Audio Visual. - University of Canterbury
Design Standards
August 2016: Issue 2
Section 3
Audio Visual.
www.canterbury.ac.nz/learningresources
Standards in the Design Guide Suite
Design Standard Guidelines Index:
01
General
02
Architecture
03
Audio Visual
04
Civil
05
Communication Cabling
06
Design for access and mobility
07
Documentation Standards
08
Electrical
09
Environmentally Sustainable Design (ESD)
10
Fire and Life Safety
11
Interior Design
12
Hydraulics
13
Infrastructure
14
Landscaping
15
Lifts
16
Mechanical
17
Metering and Controls
18
Security
19
Signage and Wayfinding
20
Structure
Contents
3.1 Overview
3.1.1
3.1.2
Purpose
1
Modern Learning Space Technology Systems
1
3.2 Design Concepts
2
3.2.1
Teaching Space Types
2
3.2.2
Sightlines, Size & Screen Specifications
2
3.2.3
Speech Reinforcement
4
3.2.4
Assistive Learning Systems
4
3.2.5
Internet / Network Access
4
3.2.6
Projector Placements
4
3.3 Materials & Equipment
`
1
20
3.5.1
Labelling
20
3.5.2
Asset Tagging
20
3.5.3
Network Naming
20
Appendix A – Wiring & Setup Standards
21
Appendix B – Touch Panel Design
27
Appendix C – Cabling Specification
31
Appendix D – Systems Acceptance Forms
34
Compliance Checklist
35
5
3.3.1
Projectors
5
3.3.2
Flat Panel Displays
5
3.3.3
Resident Computer
5
3.3.4
Laptop / Guest Device Connectivity
6
3.3.5
Video Matrix Switchers
6
3.3.6
Confidence / Annotation Monitors
7
3.3.7
Document Cameras
7
3.3.8
Media Players (Blu-ray/DVD)
7
3.3.9
Audio Input
7
3.3.10
Audio Output
8
3.3.11
Video Cameras
9
3.3.12
Video Conferencing Systems
9
3.3.13
Telephones
9
3.3.14
Whiteboards
9
3.3.15
Network Switches
9
3.3.16
Cabling
9
3.3.17
Fibre Optic
3.3.18
Audio Visual Cables
3.3.19
Equipment Housing
10
3.3.20
Power
11
3.3.21
Ventilation
11
3.3.22
Control Systems
11
3.3.23
Interface to Building Management Systems
12
3.3.24
Control Signalling
12
3.4 Installation Requirements
3.5 Numbering & Labelling
9
10
13
3.4.1
Electrical & Power
13
3.4.2
Cable Management
13
3.4.3
Software & Code
15
3.4.4
RMS Enterprise Server
16
3.4.5
Commissioning & Handover
16
3.4.6
Documentation
18
3.4.7
Sign Off & Handover
18
3.4.8
Post-Installation Processes
18
3.4.9
Maintenance & Warranty
18
3.1 Overview
3.1
Overview
3.1.1
Purpose
This document describes and defines the recommended
Audio Visual technology specifications for the successful
implementation or upgrade of learning and teaching
spaces within the University of Canterbury. It represents
the minimum standards expected for teaching space
design and installation on campus.
This section of the Design Standard Guidelines is intended
to be read and applied during design in conjunction with
Section 01 – General and any project specific brief and
agreements.
Modern
Systems
3.1.2
Learning
Space
Technology
The University is committed to providing modern learning
space technology systems which support the ability to:
● Display images and video on a presentation wall that may
be adequately assimilated by all participants in the room
● Amplify audio content or spoken word that is able to be
●
●
●
●
●
clearly understood by all participants in the room. To allow
for the amplification of any participant in class, large and
medium teaching and learning spaces may be provisioned
with handheld, lapel and fixed microphones. Speech audio
can be recorded and is replayed via speakers distributed
throughout the room.
Easily control services in the room without the need for a
high level of training or assistance
Display presentations and material from input devices
such as; a resident computer, laptops, mobile devices,
document camera, and other sources as required
Allow students to interact using wireless mobile devices
Support new methods of teaching which also allow for the
use of more flexible delivery by being able to annotate
over content, participate in active learning sessions, invite
remotely located participants and speakers ‘electronically’
into class, and record presentation content.
Allow presenters to easily access or bring their own
content into the learning space.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 1 of 36
3.2 Design Concepts
3.2
Design Concepts
3.2.1
Teaching Space Types
Where possible, dual image projection is provided to
support simultaneous display of complimentary image
material e.g. PowerPoint with document camera image.
Furniture layouts are concentrated together to maximise
seating capacity. Typical tiered spaces will have rows that
are arranged in rising tiers, ensuring clear viewing lines to
the front for rows seated behind others. Capacities can
range from 60 to beyond 400 seats.
Below are the following categories that are currently
defined and associated with teaching spaces with audio
visual technology, and a breakdown of the minimum
standards in equipment and services in each category.
These category types align with the University timetabling
booking system to allow users to select the type of audio
visual requirements they need when they are requesting a
room booking on campus.
3.2.1.1
3.2.1.4
In order for the University to benefit in standardisation,
cost effectiveness, safety, consistency, and effective
support to spaces, all audio visual related requests for
installations either in scope or out of scope need to have
the involvement of Audio Visual Services, and all nonstandard solutions must be approved by Audio Visual
Services on a case-by-case basis before either
procurement or work commences.
AV Low – Meeting Rooms & Small Teaching
Spaces
Small teaching or meeting rooms can range in size from 5
– 30 students. These spaces are equipped with fixed or
flexible furniture. The focus of the technology and furniture
in these spaces is to support small group teaching,
meetings, collaboration or research sessions.
3.2.1.5
Small teaching or meeting spaces have either a flat panel
screen or a projection display. General control will be via a
button / touch panel. Equipment is located in either mobile
cabinet units, behind televisions, or in credenzas on the
wall. Other tools available in small spaces are web video
conferencing; whiteboard or annotatable surfaces, a Wi-Fi
network, and provision for cables and power to connect to
the display.
AV
Low
AV
Med
AV
High
AV Control Touch / Button Panel
Single Display
Integrated Equipment
Dual Display
Laptop Input (VGA & HDMI)
Resident Computer
Document Camera
AV Medium – Seminar & Teaching Spaces
DVD Player
Seminar rooms with AV presentation systems typically
range in sizes from 25 – 60 students. Flat-floored spaces
equipped with flexible furniture (movable tables and chairs)
can be configured on the fly at the start of class by teacher
and students to support whole class instruction, group
work, class discussion, and other collaborative learning
styles.
Front of House Speakers
Standard seminar rooms typically include a single
projection display and a small lectern with a variety of
inputs including resident pc, document, camera, and
laptop and mobile device inputs.
Presentation Lectern
Technology in seminar rooms should not interfere or
disrupt the collaborative nature of the spaces e.g. projector
screens are not placed in front of whiteboards, nor should
cabling restrict furniture or lectern movement.
3.2.1.3
Summary Table
Equipment / Services
Portable technology such as LCD trolleys and a wireless
keyboard & mouse enable flexible use of small spaces and
provide group focused sessions that do not concentrate on
one presenter. This also avoids fixed hardware allowing for
movement in and also out of the room.
3.2.1.2
Non-Standard Spaces and Solutions
Speech Reinforcement Speaker
System
Handheld Microphone
Wireless Microphone(s)
Annotation Tablet Monitor
Lecture Capture
Non Integrated Equipment
Portable/Wall-mounted
Whiteboards
AV High – Small & Large Lecture Theatres /
Teaching Spaces
Lecture theatres are widely regarded as effective, efficient
space to support the delivery of teaching content ‘face to
face’ to larger audiences. The dominant focus of a lecture
theatre is presentation of instructional materials to an
audience for the purpose of teaching and learning. Other
common uses include information meetings, conferences,
events, and public lectures. While lecture theatres allow
for little versatility of use i.e. contemporary collaborative
group work, they are suited where audience focus is
towards a lecturer and electronic presentation content.
Services
Telephone
3.2.2
Standard presentation tools in lecture theatres include
large projection display screens and a lectern equipped
with presentation tools i.e. resident computer, media
players, speech microphones and lecture capture ability.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Internet Access (wired)
Internet Access (wireless)
Sightlines, Size & Screen Specifications
The following guidelines may assist in accomplishing a
minimum standard of viewing comfort for viewers of
displayed images within a teaching space from all seating
positions provided.
The term ‘displayed images’ used here includes any
images projected from ‘data video projectors’, flat display
panels (e.g. LED TVs), and also applies to the use of any
white board and annotation surfaces.
Page 2 of 36
3.2 Design Concepts
3.2.2.1
Viewing Size & Distance
Viewing surfaces must be of sufficient size to facilitate
comfortable reading of printed characters from any viewing
position in the room. Typically the farthest seats of an
auditorium could be considered the least advantaged.
Consequently determination of screen size for a space
should not be an arbitrary decision, but rather the result of
applying the following size rule (based on PISCAR
ANSI/InfoComm 3M standards and AETM guidelines).
● Maximum viewing distance = 5.3 x Image Height
● Closest Viewing Distance = 2 x Image Height
Diagonal Screen Size
Veiwable
Width & Height
Maximum
Viewing
Distance
2.1m (84”)
1.8m x 1.1m
6m
3.3m (130”)
2.8m x 1.8m
9.5m
7.6m (300”)
6.5m x 4.0m
21.2m
3.2.2.3
All room seating arrangements and screen selections shall
be designed in accordance with these parameters. Areas
where an adequately large screen size is prohibitive and/or
an optimal seating arrangement is not achievable, an
additional relay screen(s) towards the rear or the room
should be considered.
3.2.2.2
Viewing Angle Limits
A vertical viewing angle maximum of 15 degrees exists
where no viewer should be looking upwards at any angle
greater than 15 degrees (from parallel to the floor) to the
centre of a displayed image. This rule usually applies to
viewers seated closer to a displayed image.
Image, Screen & Ceiling Heights
Factors which inform the height at which an image is
placed on the presentation wall include the ability of
viewers to see all (or most) of a displayed image over and
above a lectern, and other viewers heads whom are
seated in forward rows.
Factors which may improve viewing of an image for
viewers seated behind the front row include; use of a
larger image, staggered or tiered seating rows.
The minimum distances from the floor to the bottom of the
projected screen image shall apply to the following types:
● Flat Floored Teaching Spaces = No less than 1.2m
● Tiered Teaching Spaces = No less than 1.35m or more
Flat floored teaching spaces are particularly challenging
i.e. where the guidelines above are observed, it is difficult
to seat more than 30 - 32 students at desks sized at
1400long x 700wide in front of a single display in a flat
floored space before less than 50% of a displayed image
is not visible to the back row without much moving of
heads and kneeling on chairs.
Ceiling height is an important factor for architects when
designing a teaching space. While the equation between
the following parameters can be a difficult challenge to
space design project teams to balance – the outcome is
critical to the effective performance of a space.
● Acceptable image size for the viewing length and viewing
requirements of a space
● Image positioned high enough on the media wall to suit
viewers toward the rear rows
● Front row viewing positions compliant with a vertical
viewing angle maximum of 15 degrees
The table below is provided as a ‘quick reference’ guide:
The maximum horizontal angle of which a viewing surface
is presented to a viewer is 45 degrees. At angles which
exceed this, text appears horizontally compressed and
becomes increasingly difficult to read with increased angle.
The 45 degree angle is measured from a perpendicular
axis at each outside edge of the image creating a 90
degree viewing cone. All seating should be positioned
within this cone.
Where a space employs more than one screen, this same
guideline is applicable to each seating location’s position
being within the acceptable 90 degree viewing cone of
every image display surface being used in the room.
Where space and aesthetics permit, angling side by side
display surfaces inward may assist with ensuring all
seating positions locate within 90 degree viewing cones of
each display surface.
Distance
to
Furthest
Audience Member
Required Ceiling Height
<7.5m
2.7m
7.6m – 8m
2.8m
8.1m – 8.5m
2.9m
8.6m – 9.1m
3.0m
9.2m – 9.6m
3.1m
9.7m – 10.1m
3.2m
10.8m – 11.2m
3.4m
11.8m – 12.2m
3.6m
12.9m – 13.3m
3.8m
13.9m – 14.4m
4.0m
For every 475mm extra, add 100mm ceiling height
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 3 of 36
3.2 Design Concepts
Projection Surface
3.2.2.4
The University has a preference for framed premium
project screen kit material surfaces on walls, Projecting
images directly on to a flat painted presentation surface in
teaching spaces is also an option. Framed material kits
and painted projection surfaces reduce the amount of
mechanical infrastructure in the room and increase the
flexibility for future projection standards.
Wired access options in teaching spaces to the University
network will be available via the resident computer and a
network cable on the lectern.
Drop-down screen (whether manual or motorized) are to
be used as a secondary means.
For wireless access connections to the University network
and the internet, users will need to authenticate with valid
University credentials to the available wireless network.
Speech Reinforcement
3.2.3
Internet / Network Access
3.2.5
For wired access connections to the internet, users will
need to authenticate with valid the University credentials
by using such applications like ‘Internet Enabler’
Projector Placements
3.2.6
Implementation of a well configured speech reinforcement
system (distributed ceiling loudspeaker or beam steering
column arrays) can go a long way to improving speech
intelligibility to an audience in problematic spaces.
It is important to ensure that equipment is placed in the
best possible area of any audio visual install so as to
provide a clean, safe, and practical teaching space. Below
outlines some of the key areas.
Speech reinforcement is playback of presenter’s speech
captured by microphone and replayed to the audience.
Microphones in a large teaching space include a lectern or
podium microphone, wireless lavalier (lapel) microphones,
and wireless handheld microphones.
All installed projectors and associated equipment need to
be accessible relatively easily in the unlikely event of
needing to quickly replace the projector, or for
maintenance tasks.
As a first preference where possible, projectors are to be
mounted in the ceiling at the manufacturers recommended
projection distance to obtain the best possible image. If
this is unable to be achieved due to not being able to
easily access the projector, then an alternate solution such
as placing the projector at the rear of the lecture theatre
and using telescopic lenses is acceptable.
Speech is replayed via beam steering speakers or ceiling
speakers located above the audience. To reduce the
likelihood of feedback issues, do not position speech
reinforcement speakers directly over the lectern area.
The system must be capable of producing a suitable
acoustic gain so that even quietly spoken presenters can
be heard clearly in all parts of the space. Tiered spaces
may have speakers configured in rows where volume
levels can be adjusted according to the distance between
listener and ceiling speaker.
When compared to program speakers used for speech
reinforcement, the distributed ceiling speaker model
increases speech intelligibility by:
Projector placement types should be discussed and
decided on a case-by-case basis with Audio Visual
Services due to the diversity of different room types on
campus, as well as the core needs of the teaching space.
The key benefits of this placement are:
● Reducing the overall amount of sound energy required into
●
Booth / Projection Room / Bio Box Projectors
3.2.6.1
● Projector is installed at the rear of theatre where noise and
a space thereby reducing room reverberation and
increasing system headroom (gain before feedback)
Ensuring speech from ceiling speakers heard by an
audience is always louder than room reverberation
heat are kept away from audience
● The use of ladders or elevated platform working surfaces
are not required to perform maintenance or replacements
The key risks of this placement are:
3.2.4
Assistive Learning Systems
● Expensive long throw lenses may be required to achieve
suitable image size on viewing surface
Assistive Listening Systems are to be provided in all
teaching spaces with audio visual systems and all publicly
accessible rooms with audio reinforcement that seat more
than 250 people to comply with the New Zealand Building
Code of Compliance. The University may choose to install
Assistive Listening Systems in spaces below this number
and will be considered on a case by case basis according
to the needs of the room and users.
All installed Assistive Listening Systems at the University
shall be designed by contracted experts in accordance
with AS60118.4-2007 standards.
● Often telescopic lenses have fixed focal length with no
●
●
●
3.2.6.2
Assistive Listening Systems shall be provided to deliver
audio coverage. Depending on the building and room type
variables, consideration must be taken in deciding the best
hearing solution. For new buildings, inductive loops are
preferable. For existing buildings, other solutions may be
more cost effective due to issues on installing inductive
loops into existing spaces. This will be determined on a
case-by-case situation. Assistive Listening Systems are
not to interfere with any other AV equipment within the
teaching space.
Rooms with Assistive Listening Systems shall be clearly
labelled. If the loop coverage is less than the entire room
then the coverage area must be marked on the sign.
zoom adjustment - making achieving the correct image
size difficult
Expensive long throw lens may not be compatible with
future projector replacement choices
Loss of brightness inverse 2 law
Persons moving in front of projector may cast shadows on
image surface
Ceiling mounted Projectors
The key benefits of this placement area:
● Closer to viewing surface for crisper brighter image
● Projector brightness power requirement less
● Can utilise standard zoom lenses as supplied with
projector
The key risks of this placement are:
● Under-slung weight above audience is potential risk during
seismic event
● Ladders required for service
● Service only possible when space is not booked for
teaching
● Having to relocate services, which may be in projection
path between lens and image surface i.e., light fittings.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 4 of 36
3.3 Materials & Equipment
Projector screens shall always have a 16:10 aspect ratio
and shall provide approximately uniform reflectance out to
beyond 60 degrees off-axis.
Materials & Equipment
3.3
All equipment is to be chosen from the approved
Equipment List refer Section 01 – General, Appendix A
for details.
Motorised projection screens are to be linked to the
Facilities Management BMS control system which can be
accessed via the AMX KNX gateway.
Projectors
3.3.1
Enclosures and casing for motorised, recessed projector
screens must be used and factored into any design where
possible to minimise the visual appearance. The motorised
screens shall have a motor mounted inside the roller with
noise silencer, oiled for life, automatic thermal overload
cut-out, integral gears, capacitor and an electric brake to
prevent castings. It shall have pre-set but adjustable limit
switches to automatically stop the picture surface in the up
and down positions. The roller is to be of rigid metal, and
mounted on vibration and noise absorbing supports.
All aspect ratio of installed projectors at the University shall
be 16:10, and native resolution must be WXGA
(1280x800) or WUXGA (1920x1200).
All new projectors must either have a greater brightness
lamp output of 5000 ANSI lumens, or should achieve
PISCR (Projected Image System Contrast Ratio)
standards in accordance to ANSI/InfoComm 3M-2011.
The lens ratio should be close to 2:1, (i.e. 4 metres back to
obtain a 2 metre wide image), unless the particular venue
dictates otherwise. However when the installation of the
projector is undertaken, correct measurement and
checking using the projector’s own throw distance
calculators are essential to determine exact positioning.
●
●
●
The projector shall have Ethernet control capability and
provide access to the in-built webpage interface of the
projector. Projector selection should take into account:
Long lamp life solutions with the ability to easily replace a
lamp without needing to dismount projector
The ability to access detailed information of projector stats
via a webpage interface
Remote monitoring and control for issue resolution
Screen fabric shall be flame and mildew resistant with
matte white picture surface with black masking borders.
Screen end caps shall be heavy duty, and installed to
cover exposed roller pins.
3.3.1.2
Larger teaching spaces (generally ‘AV High’ category
rooms) are to be equipped with two side-by-side projectors
as standard. This provides for dual display presentations
of various types and provides a fall-back safety net should
one projector fail. Images must be adjusted to exactly the
same height and size as each other.
Smaller teaching rooms such as ‘AV Low’ & ‘AV Medium’
category rooms may be equipped with a single projector.
In addition, the following minimum requirements are
required for any projector purchase at the University
3.3.1.1
Single / Dual Projector Setups
Meeting rooms may be equipped with either a single
projector or single flat screen panel depending on the size,
natural room light, and user needs.
Attributes
Minimum Requirements
Brightness
5000 ANSI lumens
Native Aspect Ratio
16:10
Resolution
1280 x 800
Contrast
Minimum 3500:1
Attributes
Minimum Requirements
Compatibility Aspect
Ratio
4:3, 16:9, 16:10
Native Aspect Ratio
16:9
Resolution
Full HD 1920 x 1080p
Compatibility
Resolution
640 x 480 – 1900 x 1200
Compatibility Aspect
Ratio
4:3, 16:9, 16:10
Digital Input Terminals
DVI-D or HDMI
Compatibility Resolution
640 x 480 – 1900 x 1200
Control Inputs
Ethernet
Digital Input Terminals
HDMI
HDCP Compliant
Yes
Control Inputs
Ethernet
Fan Noise
Less than 39 dBA
HDCP Compliant
Yes
Zoom / Focus / Lens
Shift
Vertical lens shift.
Motorised Focus and Zoom
Lens preferable
Energy Star Power Rating
8 or above
Manufacturers
Warranty
3 years minimum
3.3.2
Flat Panel Displays
LED TV screens are the only acceptable flat panel display.
All LED displays installed must be able to be controlled via
IP over Ethernet .
3.3.3
Projector Screens & Surfaces
For teaching spaces that will use a flat projection wall
surface, a premium screen material frame kit is to be used
in the first instance where possible. If projecting on to a
surface, the projection surface must be finished in flat
matte white paint. Zero-gloss matte pure white paint shall
always be used. No colour tints are acceptable. A high
industry grade quality plaster finish including paintwork
must be used to ensure the best surface finish possible.
The wall must be flat and vertical with no bows.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Resident Computer
A resident desktop computer is to be permanently
integrated into the lectern. Resident computers are
supplied by the ICTS Services and all support is provided
by the ICT Service Desk who are contactable on ext. 6060.
The resident computer will be imaged by ICTS with the
currently supported lecture theatre image used inside
teaching spaces. The general software and hardware
support of this computer will be provided by ICTS.
Page 5 of 36
3.3 Materials & Equipment
Attributes
Minimum Requirements
Supported Aspect Ratio
SXGA, WXGA, WUXGA
Video Card Resolutions
1024 x 768 – 1920 x 1200
Digital Input Terminals
DisplayPort and/or HDMI
Analog Input Terminals
DVI-A or VGA (RGB D-sub
15 pin)
HDCP Compliant
Yes
USB 3.0 Compliant
Yes
Operating Noise
Less than 29 dBA
USB DVD Drive
Yes
Manufacturers Warranty
3 years minimum
3.3.5
The monitor, keyboard & mouse shall be placed on the
working surface of the lecture theatre desk. The keyboard
and mouse are to be hard wired and connected to the rear
USB ports of the resident computer in the lectern. The
mouse should be a laser mouse and capable of working
on a variety of different lectern surfaces.
The computer is to be mounted securely within the lectern
rack shelf via Velcro stripping so as to keep it firmly in
place, but also easy to swap out the computer in the event
of a failure.
Easy access will need to be provided to allow users to
access the USB DVD drive, USB ports and computer
power on/off button. This will generally be done by having
a hole section cut out of the door on the lectern.
Video Matrix Switchers
The University currently supports two types of video matrix
switchers – small scaled and large scaled input / output.
Small scaled video matrix switchers are to be used in ‘AV
Low’ & ‘AV Medium’ category teaching spaces, whilst large
scaled video matrix switchers are to be used in ‘AV High’
teaching spaces.
Attributes
AV Low & AV Medium
Minimum Requirements
Video Input Numbers /
Types
2 x analog (RGB,
Component, S-video,
Composite)
4 x HDMI (HDCP compliant)
Video Input Resolution
Range
640x480 to 1600x1200 and
1920x1200* NTSC, PAL,
SECAM, 480i, 480p, 576i,
576p, 720p, 1080i, 1080p
Video Output Numbers
/ Types
2 x HDMI (HDCP compliant)
Video Output
Resolution Range
(scaled)
SXGA, WXGA, WUXGA,
720p, 1080p
Audio Input Numbers /
Types
6 Stereo line balanced or
unbalanced
2 Mono mic/line balanced or
unbalanced (with available
phantom power)
Both DisplayPort / HDMI and DVI-I
display output
capability are essential to providing compatibility with both
newer digital based AV video matrix equipment as well as
older analogue based VGA video matrix equipment.
Audio
output
from
the
computer
by
either
DisplayPort/HDMI or stereo line level L+R audio output via
a 3.5mm jack is essential to provide audio for computerbased content.
4 Stereo, de-embedded
from HDMI
Audio Output Numbers
/ Types
The computer may also run other approved University
hardware USB peripheral devices such as wireless mouse,
keyboard sets, webcams. USB ports at the front of the
computer should remain unpopulated and available for
users to plug in devices easily.
Laptop / Guest Device Connectivity
3.3.4
All teaching spaces and meeting rooms shall be equipped
with laptop and mobile device input capability. These
inputs shall be via:
● Analog connection - VGA DB15 connector and 3.5 mm
●
stereo jack plug for audio.
Digital Connection – HDMI connector
1 Balanced or unbalanced
stereo (variable)
1 Balanced or unbalanced
stereo; can be configured as
stereo or two independently
mixed mono channels
Line-in or USB on the resident computer can be used for
recording/video conferencing using computer applications.
The resident computer needs to be at an acceptable
ambient noise level (no excessive fans!)
1 x Twisted Pair (DXLink
solution)
2 HDMI embedded
Built-in video scaling
Yes
Fully HDCP compliant
Yes
Built in EDID
Management
Yes
Phantom Power for
microphones
Yes
Built-in Stereo Amplifier
Yes
Web management
Interface
Yes
LAN & RS-232
controllable
Yes
Manufacturer Warranty
5 years minimum
An Ethernet network connection shall also be required
alongside the video and audio inputs as well as a power
plug. Lectern built-in leads for these connections are to be
made available and must be retractable cables to avoid
cable congestion on the lectern surface.
Users of laptops that only have DisplayPort / MiniDisplayPort as their video output are responsible for
providing their own adapter for connecting to the University
standard teaching space AV cables.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 6 of 36
3.3 Materials & Equipment
Attributes
AV High Video Switcher
Minimum Requirements
Video Input Numbers /
Types
4 x analog (RGB,
Component, S-video,
Composite)
3.3.7
A document camera is an input video visualiser device and
often replaces an overhead projector. It has higher
resolution than an overhead projector and allows the user
to project text, photos or three-dimensional objects on a
screen in the classroom.
6 x HDMI (HDCP compliant)
Video Input Resolution
Range
640x480 to 1600x1200 and
1920x1200* NTSC, PAL,
SECAM, 480i, 480p, 576i,
576p, 720p, 1080i, 1080p
Video Output Numbers
/ Types
4 x HDMI (HDCP compliant)
Video Output
Resolution Range
(scaled)
SXGA, WXGA, WUXGA,
720p, 1080p
Audio Input Numbers /
Types
10 Stereo line balanced or
unbalanced
Document Cameras
The University accepts only high quality document
cameras. The benefits of a high-resolution colour
document camera enable the near picture perfect display
of printed matter, handwritten annotations, and objects.
Document Cameras are to be mounted on the right hand
side of the lectern where possible and must be able to be
secured firmly to the lectern or desk for usage and security
purposes.
1 x Twisted Pair (DXLink
solution)
2 Mono mic/line balanced or
unbalanced (with available
phantom power)
Attributes
Minimum Requirements
Lens
CMOS lens
Frame Rate
30 fps (in all types of
lighting scenarios)
Native Signal Output
Full HD 1080p
Converted Output
Signals
UXGA (1600x1200), SXGA
(1280x1024), XGA
(1024x768), SVGA
(800x600), 720p HD
(1280x720), WXGA
(1280x800), WUXGA
(1920x1200)
Support for
Transparencies
Yes
Support for whiteboard
marker surface
Yes
Anti-theft Device
Kensington Lock
Light Source
Yes (must display excellent
image in dark environments
by only using built-in light
source)
Digital Input Terminals
HDMI
Control Inputs
LAN
4 Stereo, de-embedded
from HDMI
Audio Output Numbers
/ Types
1 Balanced or unbalanced
stereo (variable)
1 Balanced or unbalanced
stereo; can be configured as
stereo or two independently
mixed mono channels
2 HDMI embedded
3.3.6
Built-in video scaling
Yes
Fully HDCP compliant
Yes
Built in EDID
Management
Yes
Phantom Power for
microphones
Yes
Built-in Stereo Amplifier
Yes
Optical Zoom
12x
Web management
Interface
Yes
Power Requirements
PoE preferable
Manufacturer Warranty
3 years minimum
LAN & RS-232
controllable
Yes
Manufacturer Warranty
5 years minimum
3.3.8
A USB DVD player will be provided alongside any resident
pc. Playback will be through VLC software available on the
pc.
Confidence / Annotation Monitors
A ‘confidence’ monitor(s) for presenters to view their own
content during a presentation will be on the lectern top.
This monitor can be a standard computer screen or an
annotation tablet. Where identified as required, an
annotation tablet monitor will be supplied and installed as
part of the audio visual system.
Media Players (Blu-ray/DVD)
Stand-alone DVD, Blu-ray, & VCR players will not be
installed in new or upgraded teaching spaces.
3.3.9
A standard confidence computer monitor should be
securely attached to the lectern top and the wires neatly
cabled. An annotation monitor should be secured to the
lectern in a way that still allows tilt adjustment for comfort
and presenter height differences.
Audio Input
Use of microphones in large teaching spaces increases
the ability of all audience members to understand and
comprehend words spoken during the presentation.
Audience members using an Assistive Listening System
will only hear words spoken if a microphone is utilised.
Microphone use is mandatory if recording content or
participating in web based video conferencing.
The minimum size screen is a 20” wide computer screen
or annotatable tablet. The computer screen must be able
to support a 16:10 aspect ratio.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 7 of 36
3.3 Materials & Equipment
3.3.9.1
Wireless Radio Microphone Frequencies
Each radio microphone shall have its own dedicated radio
channel allocated, such that the channel does not clash
with any other channel in the venue or in any other venue
within range. Allocated channels shall be recorded in the
University of Canterbury radio microphone channel
allocation Microphone Map register.
3.3.9.4
A gooseneck podium microphone is to be installed on the
lectern to reinforce presenter’s speech and for recording.
3.3.10
3.3.9.2
3.3.10.1
A wireless lapel microphone system consisting of a
cardioid condenser lapel microphone connected to a
belt/pocket worn RF transmitter pack, and a RF receiver
installed into the equipment rack shall be the standard at
the University.
Some venues will require more than one wireless lapel
microphone as with venues supporting conferences to
provide flexibility.
Users adjust volume levels via the lectern mounted touch
control panel or button interface.
Audio playback should be free from perceptible noise from
any source whether air-borne interference or machine
oriented.
3.3.10.2
When not in use, the lapel microphone must be able to be
easily stored and charged in a dockable battery charging
station.
3.3.9.3
Speech Reinforcement Equipment
Low-level distributed audio systems are the preferred
option for speech reinforcement. A well-designed ceiling
array using quality drivers must be used wherever possible
with partial overlap of speaker coverage.
Wireless microphones must not interfere with any WiFi
channels using 2.4 / 5 Ghz.
Remote monitoring back to the RMS Enterprise Server of
the wireless microphone units and battery status levels are
essential.
Program Audio
Program audio must be delivered by stereo speaker
enclosures that are wall mounted. They are to be located
on either side of the screen, at least half way between
screen edge and the side wall, i.e. closer to the side wall
than to the screen, so as to leave the viewing area and its
surrounds uncluttered. The dispersion pattern and power
output must be chosen to suit each space. Speaker
enclosures are to be focused to the centre of the venue.
Wireless Lapel Microphone
The wireless system transmission frequency must be
compatible with New Zealand audio frequency standards
and should be operated within a legal radio frequency
range, clear of 3G/4G telecommunication transmissions,
digital TV transmissions, and free from local interference.
Ideally the units operate within a selectable range of
frequencies appropriate for NZ.
Audio Output
Meeting rooms and teaching areas with video based
displays shall always be provided with audio playback
capabilities. Source or content playback known as
program audio shall typically be provided via a set of
stereo Front of House (FOH) speakers. Areas requiring
speech reinforcement shall be provisioned with
appropriate separate speakers.
Channels shall be allocated and recorded according to the
required Audio Visual Services process.
Any person or persons using a wireless microphone
transmitter and receiver on campus that is not owned by
Audio Visual Services must first contact Audio Visual
Services to ensure that no interference is made on the UC
chosen frequencies.
Lectern / Podium Microphone
High quality white flush
assemblies are preferred.
3.3.10.3
mount
speaker
and
grill
Amplifiers
By preference, the University shall specify “All-in-One”
video/audio/controller matrix systems with built in
amplifiers suitable for the venue. This will assist in heat
and noise reduction and also improve energy efficiency
and environmental impact objectives for the University.
Wireless Handheld Microphone
A handheld wireless microphone consisting of a hypercardioid handheld microphone with built in RF transmitter,
and RF receiver module which is installed into the
equipment bay rack shall be the standard at the University.
If an inbuilt amplifier solution for the room is not sufficient,
then the use of an additional high-efficiency fan-less digital
power amplifier is to be used.
Some venues will require more than one wireless
handheld microphone as with venues supporting
conferences to provide flexibility.
3.3.10.4
The wireless system transmission frequency must be
compatible with New Zealand audio frequency standards
and should be operated within a legal radio frequency
range, clear of 3G/4G telecommunication transmissions,
digital TV transmissions, and free from local interference.
Ideally the units operate within a selectable range of
frequencies appropriate for NZ.
3.3.10.5
Audio Processing & Echo Cancellation
The details of this section have yet to be fully completed.
Please consult with Audio Visual Services on this section
in the meantime.
When not in use, the handheld microphone must be able
to be easily stored and charged in a dockable battery
charging station.
Remote monitoring back to the RMS Enterprise Server of
the wireless microphone units and battery status levels are
essential.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Assistive Listening System Equipment
The loop shall consist of using two core (minimum 2.5mm2
cable) which is spiralled out and clipped under each row of
seats. The total length should be not less than 30m and no
more than 80 m and should be placed according to the
consultant’s documentation. Care should be given to avoid
crosstalk between adjacent rooms. Both ends of the loop
cable must be taken back to the lectern rack leaving 4
metre tails.
Page 8 of 36
3.3 Materials & Equipment
3.3.11
3.3.11.1
Video Cameras
3.3.16.1
A ceiling or wall mounted PTZ (pan, tilt, zoom) IP camera
located at the room rear. Uses include presentation
recording and remote assistance. Use as main camera for
lecture capture and web conferencing with University’s
recording solution.
The University currently standardise on CAT6A twisted
pair cabling. No other type of twisted pair cabling shall be
used on campus unless authorized by the ICTS Network
Team Leader. Refer to Section 05 – Communication
Cabling for further details.
Camera output shall consist of various video formats over
TCP/IP, as well as AV output formats. Camera PTZ
motion are to be controllable on pre-sets via lecture
theatre AV control system, of which may recall minimum of
4x PTZ pre-sets stored on the camera. An appropriate
digital video output is useful where cameras are expected
to be connected to a recording appliance.
Where possible, all audio visual signals shall be distributed
over the same twisted pair structured cabling system in
use by IT networks, with the exception of powered audio
cabling between amplifiers and speakers and inter-device
cabling co-located within the audio visual rack. 3.3.16.2
The recording status, ability to pause and stop as well as
video preview and countdown timer shall be available on
the touch panel.
Cost considerations may determine that it is more
appropriate to run dedicated AV cables (eg. HDMI)
between a projector and a lectern. Twisted pair cabling
should still be run at the same time in conjunction with the
dedicated cables to future proof the room as additional
cable runs are much cheaper to do at the same time rather
than having to do a retro-install.
All audio inputs for the room need to be able to be
captured and sent to the Echo 360 capture appliance.
All audio connections to the Echo360 box shall only be
balanced stereo.
3.3.13
Approved Cat6A patch leads must be used on HDBaseT
connections to ensure a complete Cat6A run from a video
matrix switcher to a data projector. All other connections
that do not rely on HDBaseT can utilise Cat5e patch leads.
Video Conferencing Systems
The details of this section have yet to be fully completed.
Please consult directly with Audio Visual Services on this
section in the meantime.
3.3.16.3
A telephone in each teaching space is mandatory to allow
staff and users to gain easy phone access to the ICT
Service Desk, as well as for emergencies. A University
standard analogue telephone shall be provisioned in each
teaching space as close to the lectern as possible without
interfering with other AV equipment in the room.
The AV Contractors will need to work closely with the
Telecommunications Contractor to ensure that STP cables
are used and terminated correctly.
Telephones may be installed directly into the lectern, or
may be installed on a wall nearby a lectern.
3.3.14
3.3.16.4
Twisted pair cabling for AV must terminate directly onto
RJ45 patch-panels in the AV rack patch panel for fixed
lectern installations. For mobile lecterns, cables are
permitted to terminate at the floor box.
Whiteboards
Network Switches
The details of this section have yet to be fully completed.
Please consult with Audio Visual Services on this section
in the meantime.
3.3.17
All network switches and other networking appliances will
be provided and setup by University network staff only. No
exceptions.
For details on how to correctly patch AV equipment to the
right specified ports on any University network switch,
please refer to Appendix A.
3.3.16
Termination / Cable Colour / Labelling
Twisted pair cabling for AV must be identified as such with
the approved labelling affixed to the RJ45 wall plate.
The details of this section have yet to be fully completed.
Please consult with Audio Visual Services on this section
in the meantime.
3.3.15
Shielded (STP) & Unshielded (UTP)
All local CAT6A cable that will be transmitting AV video
signals shall be shielded twisted pair (STP) and terminated
properly and according to industry standard. By industry
standard, it is best practice to use shielded twisted pair
(STP) when using twisted pair cabling for transmitting AV
signals across it to avoid any crosstalk and potential power
interferences.
Telephones
In accordance to ICT Network policy, is it essential that the
telephone wiring is connected directly back to the central
network communications room. Under no circumstances
should a telephone be connected via a local patch
connection solution.
Transmitters/Receivers vs Dedicated AV Cable
Native audio, video and control signals shall be distributed
to/from local AV devices via twisted pair transmitters/
receivers (signal converters). Only approved twisted pair
transceivers shall be used to convert the native audio,
video and control signals for twisted pair delivery.
Lecture Capture (recording)
Where an Echo360 capture appliance is installed, all video
signals are to be scaled to WXGA unless specified
otherwise.
3.3.12
Twisted Pair
Cabling
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Fibre Optic
Fibre optic cabling should only be used on cable runs that
may jeopardise maximum twisted pair cable lengths,
and/or where there will likely be a high risk of power
interference near where AV cabling will need to be run.
Consultation and approval from the Audio Visual Services
Team Leader will need to be given in writing for fibre
cabling to be run. Consideration into fibre transmitters and
receivers will need to also be factored into the AV
schematics of the install to ensure a successful AV
solution for the teaching space.
Page 9 of 36
3.3 Materials & Equipment
3.3.18
3.3.18.7
Audio Visual Cables
Direct device-to-device HDMI cables may be used subject
to the following mandatory requirements:
The following cables are approved for installation at the
University:
Outside of a rack lectern
or cabinet and going
between AV devices
Inside of a rack lectern or
cabinet
Twisted Pair (UTP & STP)
Twisted Pair (UTP & STP)
HDMI
HDMI
Speaker wire
DVI
● Maximum end-to-end length 20m
● No joins
● Category 2 “High Speed” compliant cable (i.e. certified to
340 MHz and 10.2 Gbit/s)
VGA (only when
connecting to analog AV
equipment
● Type A (19 pin) connectors
● Where wall-plates are employed overall end-to-end length
must still fit within the 20m limit (15m + 5m fly-leads) and
maintain “High Speed” performance. Otherwise, digital
video HDbaseT over TP shall be used (see below).
3.3.18.8
Audio cable types as
necessary
The following white paper shall be referred and adhered to
whenever HDBaseT signals will be run via twisted pair.
http://www.amx.com/assets/whitepapers/CablingforSucces
swithDXLink.WhitePaper.pdf
Note: VGA, Analog, or Coaxial based cables shall not be
used for dedicated cable runs outside of any AV rack,
lectern, or cabinet unless specifically approved.
3.3.18.2
3.3.18.10 VGA
VGA solutions are no longer supported in new installs and
teaching spaces.
3.3.18.11 Fly-Leads on Lectern / Wall
Fly leads to connect in laptops and mobile devices will be
provided in each lectern with the ability of retracting back
to avoid any unnecessary cable clutter.
Ceiling Speaker Cabling
Provide 100 volt line cabling to all ceiling speaker outlet
locations. Supply and install speaker cabling to all speaker
outlet locations. Speaker cabling shall be 14AWG 2 core
high performance cabling.
3.3.18.12 Small AV Components
Transceivers, amplifiers, power-supply units and other
electronics shall not be installed in inaccessible locations
and are not to be installed:
Ceiling speakers shall be cabled in rows off a main
speaker wire line back to the lectern.
The ceiling end of the cable shall be left terminated and
coiled within the ceiling void with the location clearly
identified on the as-build drawings allowing future
relocation to the first ceiling speaker position.
For ceilings with no service access, a service loop for each
speaker
in
ceiling
must
be
provided
for
maintenance/repair. This should allow for the speaker to
be lowered to ground level for servicing.
3.3.18.5
● In or behind floor-boxes
● Within walls (e.g. behind wall-plates)
● In ceilings where difficult to access
3.3.19
Equipment Housing
3.3.19.1
Lecterns
Microphone Cabling
Supply and install microphone cabling to all microphone
connection locations. Microphone cabling shall be Belden
8723 or equivalent.
3.3.18.6
DVI
DVI cabling shall be DVI-D Dual Link and based on the
manufacturer’s specifications of connectivity to a device.
Front of House Speaker Cabling
Provide front of house speaker cabling to all front of house
speakers. Speaker cabling shall be 14AWG 2 core high
performance cabling.
3.3.18.4
3.3.18.9
USB Subsystems
Provide USB 2.0 (or 3.0 when available) cabling for
connecting such devices as USB flash drives to the
resident PC inside of the lectern.
3.3.18.3
It is the responsibility of the AV Contractor to liaise with the
Telecommunications Contractor to ensure that these
standards are met
RS-232 System Control Cabling
RS-232 system control is only to be used if Ethernet
control is not an option. RS-232 to RJ45 adapter variations
must be used to provide flexibility and ease of connectivity.
HDBaseT
HDBaseT shall always use Cat6A or better twisted pair
and shall follow manufacturers’ recommendations
regarding use of STP or UTP.
Speaker wire
3.3.18.1
HDMI
Line Level Cabling
Supply and install line level cabling to all audio input
connection locations. Line level cabling shall be Belden
8723.
The presentation lectern provides an ergonomic, standing
height work surface with a ‘confidence’ monitor for
presenters to view their own content as well as a touch
panel control system allowing presenters to manage
content delivery and space with ease.
The lectern should be equipped to house all local services
and connectivity for the teaching space.
Such items to be housed inside and on the presentation
lectern include:
● Resident computer and easy access USB device
connectivity to computer
● Touch Control Panel
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 10 of 36
3.3 Materials & Equipment
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
Document Camera
Confidence monitor on moveable monitor arm
Keyboard & Mouse (hard-wired)
Wireless and / or Lectern microphone and charging station
Device and power connectivity for analog and digital
laptops, mobile devices, UC network, and 3.5mm stereo
audio
Telephone, but not necessarily on the lectern
Any control, audio, or networking components required to
aid in services within the room
3.3.19.5
AV High Category
3.3.20
Power
Note all AV equipment shall be securely mounted in a
manner which shall provide access to equipment and
connections for testing, and allow sufficient cable room for
the doors to open and close without disturbing the cables
or plugs.
3.3.19.2
Rack Cabinets
Internal rack cabinets located within presentation lecterns
shall typically be installed by the lectern manufacturer.
A rack mountable power board 1RU/2RU shall be used as
a source for connecting all AV devices.
Racks shall be a standard 19” rack with vented top panel
and front and rear metal doors (unless otherwise specified)
are required. This shall meet International standard
IEC60297.
Under no circumstances will the University allow the use of
double adaptors or domestic grade power boards in any
AV teaching space installation.
For all rack cabinet installations, a minimum of 600mm in
depth is required. For external rack cabinet installations, a
minimum of 18RU in height is required.
Ventilation
3.3.21
For the protection and safe operation of audio visual
equipment, the maximum allowable operating temperature
for any audio visual rack, lectern, cabinet, or credenza
fitted to house equipment must not exceed 40 degrees C.
It is the contractor’s responsibility to ensure sufficient air
flow and ambient temperature will maintain the equipment
within this limit.
Regardless of location, there must be sufficient ventilation
(air flow) to prevent temperature rise beyond equipment
manufacturer’s specifications.
A patch panel(s) shall be located at the top or bottom of
each rack. The patch panels shall be provided and
installed by the Telecommunications Contractor in
accordance with ICTS Networks team.
The solution must provide necessary air-flow / cooling so
that equipment remains within manufacturers’ specified
temperature limits. Use of low-noise or low revolution inrack fans is permitted only as a final resort.
It is the AV contractor’s responsibility to advise the
communications cabling contractor of the minimum
quantity of outlets required in every audio visual rack.
3.3.19.3
6.3
Placement of Equipment in Lecterns &
Racks
The following illustrations show the recommended
placement of audio visual equipment with the different
types of teaching spaces categories.
3.3.19.4
There should be sufficient gaps between AV equipment in
the rack to allow adequate ventilation.
AV Low & Medium Category
Where equipment is to be fitted into an existing rack,
cabinet or credenza supplied by the University, the
contractor will work with the audio visual team to ensure
that sufficient airflow to the equipment can be established.
3.3.22
Control Systems
3.3.22.1
AMX Control Panels
The AMX Netlinx® system is the standard control system
utilised at the University. The AV Contractor shall provide
suitably sized AMX Control Systems to enable the central
control of audio visual equipment for specified rooms.
Controllers shall be sized according to their overall control
requirements and can either be incorporated as an ‘All in
One Presenter’ AMX product, or can be a separate
dedicated AMX controller depending on the scale of install.
The Control Panel shall typically be interfaced to the
following items of equipment:
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Projectors
Projector Lifts
Motorised projector screens
Document Cameras
Media Players
Audio DSPs
Microphones
LCD screens
Page 11 of 36
3.3 Materials & Equipment
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
3.3.22.2
The preferred method is to connect to any potential
existing motion sensors installed in the room via the
University BMS.
Video Cameras
Lecture Capture Appliances
Video & Audio Matrix Switcher systems
Sound reinforcement systems
Touch screen control panels
Lighting dimmers
Motorised Blinds
Air Conditioning Units
Upon entry to the space, the system should be
programmed to turn on the lighting and to wake the touch
panel. After an hour of no activity, the system is to shut
down the audio visual equipment. This “Shut Down”
routine will return all equipment back into a standby mode
and turn off all lighting within the venue with the exception
of the Resident PC, lecture capture device, and AMX
controller which must remain powered on at all times.
Touch Panels
The touch screen shall provide facilities to fully control all
audio, data and video functions via the standardized
University touch panel interface touch screen menus from
within the room.
Order of preference, and further limited for use as
specified in maximum cable length section
●
●
●
●
●
The touch screen control panel shall be capable of
controlling all equipment specified. The contractor shall
design the layout of buttons and controls on this touch
screen using the approved UC layout.
An ongoing provision should be provided at no-charge to
the university for revisions of the ‘control system software
application’ and the ‘custom programmed control system
operating code’ as and when released for a period of two
(2) years.
3.3.22.3
Control Signalling
3.3.24
3.3.24.1
Only University standard Ethernet switches may be used.
These may be installed in AV racks as required and
require ICTS Network approval.
Button panels shall be provided and interfaced to the
equipment control system and are generally found in ‘AV
Low’ category teaching spaces at the University.
Connection to the University network shall be via the patch
panels located within the audio visual rack and cross
patched into the University network switches via the rack
mounted patch frame provided by the Telecommunications
Contractor.
The button panel shall provide facilities to fully control all
audio, data and video functions. The button panel shall be
capable of controlling all equipment specified. The
contractor shall design the layout of buttons and controls
on this touch screen using the approved University layout.
3.3.23
3.3.24.2
Wireless
Wireless shall not be used for AV control signalling.
3.3.24.3
Interface to Building Management Systems
The University run and operate a Building Management
System (BMS) throughout many buildings on campus. This
system uses the KNX protocol.
3.3.23.1
Ethernet
Ethernet is the preferred method of connection and must
be delivered to all panels using approved patch leads.
Button Panels
An ongoing provision should be provided at no-charge to
the University for revision to the ‘control system software
application’ and the ‘custom programmed control system
operating code’ as and when released for a period of one
(1) year.
Ethernet (IP based)
RS-232 (via local CAT6A HDbaseT TX/RX)
RS-232 (via local CAT6A dedicated cable)
Contact closure
Self-adhesive IR
RS-422, RS-232, RS-485
Where possible, RS-232 to CATx adapters should be used
at either end of the cable. For installations that require this
to be hard-wired, it shall be installed using University data
network standard CATx UTP cable as shown below.
If a teaching space due for install or upgrade is in a
building that has a BMS installed, then it is required that
the AV Contractor utilises this.
Conductor
RS-422
RS-232
Blue / White
TxD+
TxD
The AV Contractor shall provide all necessary control
wiring, control equipment and interface equipment as
required. It shall be the AV Contractor’s responsibility to
fully coordinate the interface requirements between the
various parties (e.g. Facilities Management) to ensure
complete functioning of these controls.
Blue
TxD-
Gnd
Brown / White
RxD+
RxD
Brown
RxD-
Gnd
Motion Detection
A suitable motion detector(s) shall be installed into every
automated space. The motion detector should be able to
reliably detect the smallest amount of motion in any part of
the room, for example the amount of motion caused by a
few people sitting still watching a movie. Multiple detectors
can be used if this is not achievable with a single detector
and these should cover entry/exits, lecturers and
front/middle audience.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 12 of 36
3.4 Installation Requirements
3.4
Installation Requirements
3.4.1
Electrical & Power
Unless agreed to in writing, or in specific project contracts,
no one other than approved University electricians are
authorised to modify or add to any power related cabling,
circuitry, or equipment on the University campus.
equipment shall be bonded to the cabinet ground bus with
copper wire or braid equivalent to at least #14 AWG.
3.4.2
Cable Management
3.4.2.1
Cable Segregation
The minimum segregation requirements from power
cables in accordance with AS2834 shall be observed for
all audio visual cabling including earthing cabling.
All equipment must be electrically safety tested and tagged
prior to handover. It is the responsibility of the AV
contractor to organize and arrange for this to happen prior
to sign off.
3.4.1.1
Circuit Rating kVA
@ < 415V AC
Unshielded
Power Cables
Shielded
Power Cables
≤1
300 mm
25 mm *
The AV Contractor shall connect all AV devices to the
dedicated power feed designated to the lectern and
projector.
≥1≤2
450 mm
50 mm
≥2≤5
600 mm
150 mm
A 19” AC power rack rail shall be provided in the lectern to
connect all AV equipment to.
>5
1500 mm
300 mm
AC Power
* Interposing insulating barrier or earthed, continuous
metal barrier required.
AC power wiring must be run separately from signal cable
and all power circuit cabling.
3.4.1.2
Power Boards
Only approved industry-grade power boards are to be
used to ensure proper power termination between a power
socket from a floor box or wall into the lectern. No power
double adapters or domestic-grade power boards are to be
used as part of any installation or upgrade.
3.4.1.3
The audio visual contractor shall co-ordinate his works
with and the works of other trades to ensure segregation
requirements are maintained throughout the audio visual
cabling installation.
3.4.2.2
Cable joiners must NOT be used in any cable.
Wherever a change of direction occurs in cable/conduit
runs, cables and conduits shall be curved with a minimum
inner radius of bend as prescribed in the manufacturer’s
specification or 8 times the cable diameter, whichever
greater.
Grounding
Equipment grounding shall include all cable and
installation hardware. All audio visual equipment shall be
connected to earth ground via internal building wiring,
according to NZ Electrical Regulation Codes.
Where cables of different sizes run together the minimum
radius of bend for all cables should be that applicable to
the largest cable in the group.
All audio visual designated circuits within an installation
shall all be derived from the same load centre and
maintain the same neutral and earth relationship
throughout the installation.
The AV Contractor shall ground all contractor installed
equipment to eliminate all shock hazard and to minimize,
to the maximum extent possible, all ground loops, common
mode returns, noise pickup, cross-talk, etc.
Cable Joins & Bends
Cables not installed within conduits should be anchored
immediately before the start and after the finish of the
bend.
3.4.2.3
System
The AV Contractor shall ground all OFE to earth ground,
via an approved electrical ground with wires run inside of
the building, to eliminate all shock hazards. The number of
ground connections shall be kept to a minimum. In all
cases, total ground resistance shall be 0.1 Ohm or less.
The use of conduit, signal duct, or cable trays as system or
electrical ground is not acceptable.
Under no conditions shall the AC neutral, either in a power
panel or in a receptacle outlet, be used for system control,
sub-carrier or audio reference ground.
Cabinet Bus
A common ground bus of at least #10 AWG solid copper
wire shall extend throughout each equipment cabinet and
be connected to the system ground. Cable Length Limits
Maximum cable lengths differ depending on technology
and shall not exceed the maximum cable length standards
at the University. All copper cabling must remain within the
one earthing zone of the one building. No exceptions. Only
optical fibre may be run between buildings or (where a
physical building is comprised of multiple electrically
independent ‘buildings’) between power system earthing
zones.
Cable Type
Maximum Length
HDBaseT
over CAT6A
or better
100m end to end including allowance
for all fly-leads and patch-leads
HDMI
20m end to end including allowance
for all fly-leads and patch-leads.
Regardless of length, it must meet or
exceed HDMI “High Speed”
(Category 2) Standard i.e. certified to
340 MHz and 10.2 Gbit/s end to end
VGA
Refer to cable manufacturer’s
specifications
Analog AV
over CAT6A
Refer to cable manufacturer’s
specifications
Equipment
Self-grounding equipment enclosures, racks or cabinets,
that provide original equipment manufacturer certified
functional ground connections through physical contact
with installed equipment, are acceptable otherwise
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 13 of 36
3.4 Installation Requirements
10/100/1000
Mbit/s
Ethernet over
CAT5e or
better
100m end to end including allowance
for all fly-leads and patch-leads
RS-232 over
any CAT6A
TP
50m end to end including allowance
for all fly-leads and patch-leads, or
manufacturer’s recommended
maximum cable specifications if using
active or embedded tx/rx devices
RS-422 over
any CAT6A
TP
200m end to end including allowance
for all fly-leads and patch-leads, or
manufacturer’s recommended
maximum cable specifications if using
active or embedded tx/rx devices
RS-485 over
any CAT6A
TP
200m end to end including allowance
for all fly-leads and patch-leads, or
manufacturer’s recommended
maximum cable specifications if using
active or embedded tx/rx devices
Line level
audio –
balanced
(STP)
<1 dB attenuation at 10 kHz end to
end with matched (low-Z ~100Ω)
drive; high-Z (>1kΩ) termination.
Line level
audio –
unbalanced
(coax)
<1 dB attenuation at 10 kHz end to
end with matched (low-Z ~100Ω)
drive; high-Z (>1kΩ) termination.
Figure 8
speaker wire
Round-trip impedance <10% of
speaker impedance. Both resistive
impedance (measured at DC) and
inductive impedance measured at
1kHz, e.g. if speaker resistance is 8Ω
over 0Hz to 1kHz then cable AWG
must deliver less than 0.8Ω round-trip
impedance, i.e. single conductor endto-end 0.4Ω
The floor boxes are to be a minimum 300 mm x 300 mm
sized and deep enough to be able to house all the services
required for the desk. Two empty 32 mm conduits as a
minimum with draw wires should be provided to a floor box
to enable future expansion. All floor ducts are to have
removable lids.
There are to be no twisted pair extenders or receivers
installed into any floor boxes. Extenders should always be
located in the lectern or rack cabinet.
Wall & Cupboard Plates
3.4.2.6
All audio visual cabling shall terminate on suitable
connectors and plates (excluding where noted), both in the
field and at the equipment side. The connectors shall be
mounted on suitable plates and labelled to identify the
function of all terminations.
Plates to be mounted in the field or in floor boxes shall
match power and communications plates.
Securing, Mounting, & Supporting
3.4.2.7
The following methods shall be used when securing,
mounting, and supporting any type of AV cable within a
teaching space:
● A velcro-based cable tie solution is the approved method
●
●
Tray Support Systems
3.4.2.4
Tray systems and supports where used shall comply with
the following requirements:
●
● Trays carrying audio visual cabling shall maintain
segregation from other services;
● Trays shall have a minimum clearance or stand off from
●
●
●
walls of 25 mm to allow suitable cable fasteners to be
used;
Trays shall provide a minimum vertical open working
space of 150 mm;
Changes in tray direction shall be made using
commercially pre-made standard formed bends compatible
with the main tray;
Bolts or sharp objects shall not protrude through the cable
bearing surface;
All external cabling is to be covered using white tubular
braided sleeving. Joints in the tray shall be butted and
present a smooth finish to the cable bearing surface.
3.4.2.5
Floor Boxes
Floor boxes are to be used underneath where any lectern
will be housed. This removes any potential tripping
hazards of cables, and provides a clean solution for the
room with or without a lectern present. For teaching
spaces that have two projector installs, two floor boxes
may need to be used side by side to ensure there is
adequate space for AV and power cabling to each of them.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
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●
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for securing and tying AV cables together. Care must be
given to ensure that cables are neat and tidy and
professionally bundled together inside a rack, lectern, or
cabinet, as well as other items that expose cabling to or
from an AV device in the teaching space.
Audio visual cabling should be supported on cable tray or
catenaries in ceiling spaces. Cables support ties should be
attached to catenaries at 200mm intervals ensuring Velcro
ties are firm but do not distort or apply undue pressure to
the cables in any way.
Catenary wires shall be galvanised steel of 2.5 mm
diameter minimum, securely fixed to the building structure
at each end and supported at intermediate points as
required. Catenary wires shall support cables clear of all
structures, services and other equipment. Provide
turnbuckles of suitable size to permit future adjustment.
A service loop is required for audio visual cabling within
the rack, projector and speakers (this will allow for future
re-termination). A gentle drip loop is required at each
termination for strain relief of the cable, between the
termination point and where secured to the threaded rod in
the rack.
All cables shall be provided with strain-relief slack and
tether solution. Slack shall be sufficient to allow equipment
disconnection without dismantling the tether.
Cables shall NOT be embedded directly in concrete or
plaster.
For large cable bundles that need to be secured together,
WHITE techflex cable sleeve shall be used to provide a
neat and tidy solution eg. Cable bundle between project
and ceiling tile.
Cable ‘mouse’ grommets in ceiling tiles and lectern desk
are permitted. The use of similar coloured grommets to the
surface where they will be installed shall be used.
Zip-up or twisted based plastic cable ties shall NOT be
used to tie up any cable bundles.
Any AV device that requires securing, mounting, or
supporting should use a manufacturer’s supplied rackmount, rack-mount kit, rack-mount tray, surface-mount kit,
under-table mount kit, or custom 3rd party mount kit.
Self-adhesive Velcro should only be used as a way of
securing, mounting, or supporting if all of these other
options above are not available.
Page 14 of 36
3.4 Installation Requirements
All fixings, fastenings and supports shall be of adequate
strength and arranged to ensure the installation against
mechanical failure under normal conditions of use and
wear and tear.
3.4.2.10
All redundant or disused cabling and wall plates must be
completely removed upon any upgrade to a teaching
space, unless such cable is correctly installed and
terminated at both ends in a manner that complies with
this Standard and will still be of use.
Cable bundles shall not obstruct installation and removal
of equipment in equipment racks.
Apart from twisted pair cables, all other cabling, including
inter-device cables, shall comply with the requirements
outlined above.
It is the responsibility of the
Contractor to remove old cabling.
3.4.3
3.4.2.8
Cable Protection
Where building features make it necessary to run cable
through block walls or concrete slabs and the like, any
such cable shall be protected within PVC conduit.
All cables shall be protected where they pass through any
openings, gaps, holes etc., by ensuring that surrounding
surfaces are smooth and free of sharp edges etc., and that
holes are bushed where necessary with close fitting plastic
bushes.
Where programming is undertaken by the AV Contractor,
programs shall be written to conform with current
programming techniques to interact with the University
RMS Enterprise Server and be compiled for each room.
The table below indicates data and power cabling
requirements for all audio visual components.
Projector
Twisted
Pair
Outlets
Power
Outlets
(SSO)
2
1
Flat Panel
Screen
2
1
Document
Camera
1
1
Resident PC
1
1
Laptop
Connection
1
1
Table
Microphones
1
0
Audio DSP
1
1
Prior to sign off at the completion of the contract, all source
and/or compiled code, and documentation written for the
operation of a facility, shall be delivered in electronic copy
for each room in a format readily programmable.
Notes
1 x Video &
Control
1 x LAN /
Spare
Software & Code
Compiled programming files must be immediately
available for reloading in the event of equipment failure or
for minor/major revisions being applied.
Cable Provisioning
Device
/
Cabling
Requirements
Telecommunications
The AV Contractor must provide control panel and system
code specifically engineered to deliver constant and
reliable operation. The importance of reliability cannot be
emphasised enough. Typically lecture theatres are booked
for teaching from 8.00am through to 6.00pm with only 10
minute breaks between classes. Opportunities for
emergency maintenance during business hours are often
non-existent. Programmed maintenance has to be
reserved until student breaks/holidays.
Where cables are liable to environmental damage, they
shall be protected in a suitable manner.
3.4.2.9
Decommissioned Cabling
3.4.3.1
1 x Video &
Control
1 x LAN /
Spare
Framework
The AV Contractor must ensure that programing is based
on a mature framework layer which has seen service in a
similar lecture theatre environment for at least 12 months
(i.e. not fresh code written to a ‘clean canvas’).
Code should be assembled following a proven, standardsbased methodology. The AV Contractor is to ensure that
each room or sub system (where more than 1 room) is
programmed in an identical manner using standard
labelling, layout and resources etc. to aid streamlining of
fault finding and future upgrade paths.
The framework must support the following:
1 RJ45 per 2
microphones
● Fast response to commands
● Control support for all the University mainstream AV
auxiliary ‘plug in’ devices (including VC and Recording)
● Hot swap-ability of a limited number of University
Wireless
Microphone
Receivers
1
1
Projector
Lifter
1
1
● Framework code must support full functionality of RMS
1
● Logical upgrade path to accommodate additional
nominated backup AV devices - without requiring code
revision, re-compilation, e.g. various brand/models of
projectors, DVD players and VC Codec’s etc.
Enterprise that is in use at UC
Motorised
Projection
Screen
1
Video
Camera
2
1
1x video
1x LAN
Lectern Rack
/ AV Rack
12
2
1x24 port
patch panel
1/2 terminated
functionality
● Availability of control system generated logs for monitoring
and debugging system faults.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
● Future user interface improvements may be identified
through usability testing. It is highly desirable that any
usability improvements can be readily rolled out to all
teaching spaces through routine software upgrades
Page 15 of 36
3.4 Installation Requirements
Application Layer
3.4.3.2
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
The Control Functionality Overview outlines the Audio
Visual System functionality that is required. Listed below
are examples of control functionality to be provided. This
list is a brief summary and is not exhaustive.
Full function control of all source components, display
units, processing devices and switching electronics.
Per function status feedback indicating active/passive
modes of operation.
Separate program and microphone audio level control with
mute function.
Default audio playback levels for each audio source.
Touch Control Panel layout to include user screens.
Raise and lower projection screens and motorised blinds
Four (4) main lighting pre-sets with independent control for
the separate lighting zones and or circuits.
Four (4) pre-sets for each installed remote controllable
video camera.
Automatic system shutdown.
Audio visual system reset and standby.
Remote monitoring interface.
●
●
●
●
The AV Contractor is responsible for furnishing all test
equipment required to test the system in accordance with
the parameters specified. Unless otherwise stated, the test
equipment shall not be considered part of the system. The
AV Contractor shall furnish test equipment of accuracy
better than the parameters to be tested.
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
Note every effort is required of the AV contractor to
replicate the features and functionality of the existing
University standard control system. This is essential to
maintaining a continuity of system ‘look and feel’ across
the University wide network of presentation venues.
RMS Enterprise Server
3.4.4
Testing and commissioning results shall demonstrate
performance within the accepted criteria. Prior to starting
the tests, the AV Contractor shall check:
The complete installation is strictly in accordance with the
specification.
All materials are in proper working order.
All instruments to be used for the testing are suitable for
the purpose and have been calibrated by an IANZ
accredited laboratory within 6 months of the start of the
test.
The commissioning checklists are available for recording
all testing information and results.
For every teaching space that has an AMX controller
device installed, it shall be required to connect to the
University AMX Remote Management Server (RMS) to
monitor and maintain; lecture theatres, teaching spaces,
meeting rooms, other associated audio visual devices
supported by Audio Visual Services.
The AV Contractor will require the following test equipment
to be able to accurately carry out acceptance testing:
HDMI signal genera lot and analyser
VGA signal generator
Impedance meter
Media for each installed device
Network cable tester
Light meter
Oscilloscope
Spectrum Analyzer
Signal Level Meter
Volt-Ohm Meter
SPL Meter
Sine wave and random Noise Generator
Assistive Listening Systems test kit
Portable Appliance Tester (PAT)
3.4.5
Commissioning & Handover
All test equipment used by the AV Contractor will be within
calibration expiry
3.4.5.1
Testing & Commissioning
Failure of any part of the systems that precludes
completion of that system’s testing shall be cause for
retesting of that entire system and shall be rescheduled at
the convenience of the University.
●
●
●
Appropriate commissioning of equipment and systems will
be carried out by the AV Contractor to ensure that the asdesigned performance, functionality and reliability of
equipment and systems are proven and documented prior
to any project sign off and handover. 3 sign-off stages by
Audio Visual Services staff are required to be carried out
prior to handover.
Termination: Inspection that proper termination has been
carried out on all cabling.
Equipment install: Inspection that the right equipment has
been installed in the correct way.
Operation and training: Space is shown to be operating
correctly.
3.4.5.2
Checklists will be provided. It is mandatory that the
supplied checklist is completed and signed by all
participants before any work is considered for signoff.
Testing and commissioning shall be carried out prior to
completion to clearly demonstrate and record that the
installation meets the specified performances and have
been successfully commissioned as a complete and
integrated installation.
The AV Contractor shall supply all necessary testing
equipment, measuring instruments and the appropriately
skilled labour required for conducting the tests. Testing
and commissioning results shall be recorded on Test
Sheets, the sheets signed and dated, and submitted for
review prior to sign off and handover.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Education,
Transfer
Training, & Product
Knowledge
The AV contractor must provide education, training and
knowledge transfer services to the University technical
support staff with Audio Visual Services.
The AV contractor shall provide the services of a
technician familiar with the functions, equipment and
operation of the entire system to conduct a (1) one hour
training and knowledge transfer session for each project
install. Instruction shall include:
● Corrective and preventive maintenance of each system’s
equipment components
● Detailed instructions and processes on how to hot swap
each item upon failure
● Web interface and user interface setup details
● Any other support information that will be useful for Audio
Visual Services acting as a first line of support
This shall take place on campus at an agreed date no later
than (2) two weeks after an installation is operational and
the Acceptance Tests have been completed.
Page 16 of 36
3.4 Installation Requirements
Device
Projector
Document Camera
Audio DSP
Parameter
Units
Threshold
Alert Type
Lamp Hours
Hours
1950
Maintenance
Communicating
Yes/No
30 secs
Control System
Power Status
On/Off
-
Equipment Usage
Input
HDMI / Comp1 / etc
-
Equipment Usage
Lamp Mode
Standard / Eco
-
Equipment Usage
Image Mute
On/Off
-
Equipment Usage
Communicating
Yes/No
30 secs
Control System
Light
On/Off
-
Equipment Usage
Communicating
Yes/No
30 secs
Control System
Mic Mute
On/Off
-
Equipment Usage
Control / Touch Panel
Online
Yes/No
-
Equipment Usage
Lighting
Communicating
Yes/No
30 secs
Control System
Room Light Preset
Master Controller
Video / Audio Matrix
Switcher
Motion Sensor
Wireless Mic Receiver
Lecture Capture
-
Equipment Usage
Power
On/Of
-
Equipment Usage
Communicating
Yes/No
30 secs
Control System
Service Mode
Normal / Maintenance
-
Maintenance
Communicating
Yes/No
30 secs
Control System
Laptop Source Signal
Yes/No
-
Equipment Usage
Laptop Source Usage
Hours
-
Equipment Usage
Resident PC Source Signal
Yes/No
-
Equipment Usage
Resident PC Source Usage
Hours
-
Equipment Usage
Doc Camera Source Signal
Yes/No
-
Equipment Usage
Doc Camera Source Usage
Hours
-
Equipment Usage
Media Player Source Signal
Yes/No
-
Equipment Usage
Media Player Source Usage
Hours
-
Equipment Usage
Audio Output Level
% number
-
Equipment Usage
Audio Mute
Yes/No
-
Equipment Usage
Communicating
Yes/No
30 secs
Control System
Movement
Minutes till shutdown of
projectors
35 mins from
9pm – 7am
Equipment Usage
Communicating
Yes/No
30 secs
Control System
RF Mute
On/Off
-
Equipment Usage
Battery Level
%
-
Equipment Usage
Battery Status
Low
30 secs
Equipment Usage
Communicating
Yes/No
30 secs
Control System
Recording
Yes/No
-
Equipment Usage
Recording Usage
Hours
-
Equipment Usage
Media Player
Communicating
Yes/No
30 secs
Control System
Air Conditioning
Power
On/Off
-
Equipment Usage
Screen
State
Up/Down
-
Equipment Usage
Video Conferencing
Communicating
Yes/No
30 secs
Control System
Call Rate
Kbps
-
Equipment Usage
In a Call
Yes/No
-
Equipment Usage
Connected
Hours
-
Equipment Usage
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 17 of 36
3.4 Installation Requirements
Online Fault Reporting
3.4.8.2
Documentation
3.4.6
The AV contractor must have a robust online fault
reporting system in place whereby the AV Project Manager
can log and track faults online, obtain reports, and manage
the maintenance of the AV system after installation and
commissioning is completed.
Documentation shall include any item or quantity of items,
computer discs, as-installed drawings, equipment,
maintenance, and operation manuals, and each original
equipment manufacturer materials needed to completely
and correctly provide the systems documentation as
required by this document and explained herein.
Project documentation is to be submitted to the UC Project
Manager in electronic format before handover and signoff.
Project documentation consists of the following:
These reports are used for discussion at regular
University/AV Contractor account management and
service meetings.
Maintenance & Warranty
3.4.9
The University requires a single point of responsibility for
AV system issues in addition to maintenance technicians
who are familiar with the design and functionality of the
systems installed who can respond in a timely fashion to
system issues and upgrades.
● Provide copies of all system diagrams and as-built
●
●
●
diagrams in both AutoCAD (.dwg) files and Adobe Acrobat
Portable Document Format (.PDF) files
Editable versions of all configuration files for any digital
signal processing (Audio DSP) along with any associated
software required for editing those files
E-Copies
of
equipment
user
manuals,
installation/integration manuals, test reports, warranties
and commissioning progress record sheets
Schedule of equipment supplied with serial number or
service tags and all other submittals
The AV Contractor shall have a contractual relationship or
technical
certification
with
respective
equipment
manufacturers and shall be authorized by that equipment
manufacturer to pass through the manufacturer’s
certification and equipment warranty to the university.
Guarantee Period of Service
3.4.9.1
3.4.7
Sign Off & Handover
The AV Contractor shall guarantee that all provided
material and equipment will be free from defects,
workmanship, and will remain so for a period of (1) one
year from date of final acceptance of the system by the
University. The AV Contractor shall provide original
equipment manufacturer’s equipment warranty documents,
to the UC Project Manager that certifies each item of
equipment installed conforms to each original equipment
manufacturer’s published specifications.
Prior to completion, the AV Contractor will notify the AV
Project Manager four days prior to substantial completion
of the work. An inspection will be performed to determine
the completeness of the work and a punch list will be
provided to the AV Contractor. All test reports, certificates
and inspections records shall be submitted to the AV
Project Manager.
Final handover and signoff of work will be tracked in the
Commissioning and Signoff Document. Any installation
that does not meet the standards presented in this
document will need a signed off exemption from Audio
Visual Services staff before it is completed.
The university shall have the ability to contact the AV
Contractor and original equipment manufacturers for
emergency maintenance and logistic assistance, remote
diagnostic testing, and assistance in resolving technical
problems at any time. This contact capability shall be
provided by the AV Contractor and each equipment
manufacturer at no additional cost to the university.
A ‘Scope of Works’ and checklists must be signed off by all
parties.
Response Times During the Warranty Period
After completion of all punch list items, submissions and
final clean-up, the AV Project Manager will issue an
acceptance letter to the AV Contractor.
3.4.8
Post-Installation Processes
3.4.8.1
Local Support
The AV Contractor shall include a detailed statement of
warranty on the entire system and the individual pieces of
equipment with a minimum 10 hours per day, 5 days per
week, one-hour phone response for initial fault diagnosis,
and a two-hour onsite call out response provided by a
qualified technician as a standard on all audio visual
system components and control system programming.
The AV contractor must be able to provide support directly
from a Christchurch base.
The overall installed ‘AV turn key’ system's warranty
including full service shall be for a minimum of twelve (12)
months, from the date of Acceptance of the complete
system. Software shall be warranted for two (2) years from
the date of Acceptance.
During the warranty period, any AV contractor responsible
for any work or equipment that falls within the operational
jurisdiction of Audio Visual Services shall agree that initial
fault finding may be necessary to be carried out by Audio
Visual Services technical staff. This requirement covers
those situations where it may not be possible for the
contractor to reach the site within a reasonable amount of
time. The contractor shall then provide the required follow
up warranty service.
AV contractors must indicate whether they can offer direct
support or have an arrangement with a third party vendor.
If the technical support is provided through a third party,
details will need to be provided of their expertise,
qualifications, and length of relationship with this third
party.
AV contractors must support all supplied hardware and
guarantee direct access to the required technical skills for
ongoing support of the AV system provided.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
The University’s AV Project Manager is the AV
Contractor’s reporting and contact official for system fault
calls during the warranty period.
●
●
Due to the nature of the University’s core business, the AV
Contractor shall respond to and correct onsite system fault
calls during the standard work week within the following
response times:
A phone response within one-hour of a fault report for
initial diagnosis for any faults notified.
An onsite maintenance call visit within one working day of
its report for routine system faults. A routine system fault is
considered a system fault which causes a single interface,
or component to be inoperable, but which does not render
the AV system as a whole inoperable for presentations or
teaching
Page 18 of 36
3.4 Installation Requirements
● A priority onsite maintenance call visit within two hours of
its report for an emergency system fault. An emergency
system fault is considered a system fault which causes the
entire display or audio system to be inoperable at anytime
If a system component failure cannot be corrected within
four hours (exclusive of the standard work time limits), the
AV Contractor shall be responsible for providing alternate
items of equipment. The alternate equipment and/or
systems shall be operational within a maximum of four
hours after the four hour system fault trouble shooting time
and restore the effected location operation to meet the
system performance standards. If any sub-system or major
system fault cannot be corrected within one working day,
the AV Contractor shall furnish and install compatible
substitute equipment returning the system or subsystem to
full operational capability, as described herein, until repairs
are complete.
On-site Visits During One Year Guarantee Period
The university has an expectation that the AV solutions
provided will perform operationally as specified for a
minimum of 99.5% of planned operating time throughout
the year.
The AV Contractor is encouraged to visit the AV
installation at regular intervals throughout the guarantee
period to verify its operation and functionality and to
proactively perform preventative maintenance, with the
prior approval of the AV Project Manager.
Access to the installation space must be scheduled in
advance with the University through Audio Visual Services
administration to book and confirm space availability.
The AV Contractor shall maintain accurate up to date
records on their online fault reporting system and provide
the AV Project Manager with a written report itemising
each deficiency found and the corrective action performed
during each required visit or official reported system fault
call.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 19 of 36
3.5 Numbering & Labelling
3.5
Numbering & Labelling
3.5.1
Labelling
All cables, data outlets, video and audio outlets shall be
labelled with a label conforming to University requirements
for each application. All audio visual cables should be
labelled at both ends in a plain text format indicating the
source and destination.
Asset Tagging
3.5.2
The AV contractor will provide the following information on
each AV equipment item for the University to supply asset
tags prior to installation.
● Serial Number
● MAC address (for all network devices associated to the
●
●
●
●
●
equipment)
Purchase Order Number
Purchase Order Date
Make
Model
Part Number
3.5.3
Network Naming
3.5.3.1
Hostnames & DNS Entries
AV equipment requiring network connectivity shall be
provisioned and centrally configured according to the
University Network Hostname standards prior to being
commissioned onto the University network.
A list of all devices intended for IP communication shall be
given to Audio Visual Services by the AV Contractor prior
to any connections being made. AV Contractors shall
provide MAC addresses for all such devices to Audio
Visual Services no later than one (1) week prior to
installation.
The university accepts the following devices to be able to
be used for IP communications over their networks. An
example of this for a single projector located room 210 in
the James Hight building would be:
IP Device
Naming Standard
AV Controller
<support dept>-<building>-<room
number>-ctrl-<device
number>.canterbury.ac.nz
AV
Touch
Button Panel
Video
Switcher
/
<support dept>-<building>-<room
number>-panel-<device
number>.canterbury.ac.nz
Matrix
<support dept>-<building>-<room
number>-matrix-<device
number>.canterbury.ac.nz
Projector
<support dept>-<building>-<room
number>-proj-<device
number>.canterbury.ac.nz
Document
Camera
<support dept>-<building>-<room
number>-doc-<device
number>.canterbury.ac.nz
Flat
Panel
Display Screen
<support dept>-<building>-<room
number>-display-<device
number>.canterbury.ac.nz
Audio DSP
<support dept>-<building>-<room
number>-audio-<device
number>.canterbury.ac.nz
Video Conference
Codec
<support dept>-<building>-<room
number>-vcu-<device
number>.canterbury.ac.nz
Wireless
Receiver
<support dept>-<building>-<room
number>-mic-<device
number>.canterbury.ac.nz
Mic
Video Camera
<support dept>-<building>-<room
number>-cam-<device
number>.canterbury.ac.nz
Power
Distribution Unit
<support dept>-<building>-<room
number>-pdu-<device
number>.canterbury.ac.nz
DXLink
transceiver
<support dept>-<building>-<room
number>-dxlink-<device
number>.canterbury.ac.nz
av-jh-210-proj-1.canterbury.ac.nz
Prior to signoff of a completed install or upgrade, the audio
visual contractor shall confirm all IP addresses and
patching details to Audio Visual Services in written
electronic format.
The following table shall be used for defining hostnames
for AV devices.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 20 of 36
Appendix A – Wiring & Setup Standards
Appendix A – Wiring & Setup
Standards
Below are the current standards for setting up the various
types of AV equipment on campus. These must be
followed and adhered to.
AMX DVX-3150 Matrix Switcher
Video Input/Output Setup
Ref. No.
Input No.
Connected Device
1
Input 1
From Laptop VGA Input
2
Input 2
Spare
3
Input 3
Spare
4
Input 4
Spare
5
Input 5
From Resident Computer
6
Input 6
From Laptop HDMI Input
7
Input 7
From Document Camera
8
Input 8
From Bluray / DVD Player
9
Input 9
Spare
10
Input 10
Spare
11
Outputs 1, 3
DX link to Projector (output 1 = left projector & output 3 = right projector)
12
Outputs 2, 4
HDMI to Lecture Capture Device (output 1 = primary video & output 3 = secondary)
13
Output 1, 3
To Lectern monitor (output 2 = primary monitor & output 4 = secondary monitor)
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 21 of 36
Appendix A – Wiring & Setup Standards
Configuration – Video Out
Configuration – Video In
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 22 of 36
Appendix A – Wiring & Setup Standards
Configuration - System
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 23 of 36
Appendix A – Wiring & Setup Standards
Audio Input / Output Setup
Ref. No.
Input No.
Connected Device
1
Input 11
From DSP Mixer
2
Input 12
Spare XLR input connected from patch panel
3
Input 13
Spare XLR input connected from patch panel
4
Input 14
Spare XLR input connected from patch panel
5
Output 2
To Lecture Capture Appliance
6
Output 3
To Resident Computer Line In
7
Output 4
To Assistive Listening System Amplifier
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 24 of 36
Appendix A – Wiring & Setup Standards
Configuration – Audio Out
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 25 of 36
Appendix A – Wiring & Setup Standards
Echo 360 Wiring
The following wiring solution must be used when connecting a balanced audio connection to the Echo 360 capture appliance. For
further details – please refer to:
http://confluence.echo360.com/display/40/Audio+Bare+Wire+Block+Diagram+for+the+EchoSystem+SafeCapture+HD
Cisco SG300 Network Switch
Network Port no.
Network
Connected Device via Ethernet
1
UC
Resident Computer
2
UC
Laptop guest network cable
3
UC
Lecture Capture Appliance
4
AV VLAN
Matrix Switcher
5
AV VLAN
Touch Panel
6
AV VLAN
Document Camera
7
AV VLAN
Wireless Receiver Unit 1
8
AV VLAN
Audio Mixer Unit
G9
AV VLAN
G10 (Uplink)
Back to network communications switch (always use far right uplink port)
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 26 of 36
Appendix B – Touch Panel Design
Appendix B – Touch Panel Design
The following pictures illustrate the type and style of layout that the University currently adopts for its user interface for touch panels.
Start & Welcome Page
Resident PC Page – before selecting the projector output
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 27 of 36
Appendix B – Touch Panel Design
Laptop Page
Laptop / HDMI Page
Document Camera Page
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 28 of 36
Appendix B – Touch Panel Design
Disc Page – For DVDs, Blu-rays, and CD-Roms
Shutdown
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 29 of 36
Appendix B – Touch Panel Design
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 30 of 36
Appendix C – Cabling Specification
Appendix
C
Specification
–
Cabling
The following is a compiled list of information and
specifications relating to cabling standards which have
been adopted in many Universities in New Zealand and
Australia. Please use this as a reference and a guide.
Cable Specification Table
Signal
Type
Cable
Type
Approved
Cables
Mic Level
Screened
Twisted Pair
Line Level
Screen
Twisted Pair
Speaker
Level
70/100V
Line
Max
dist.
Cat6
DVI/HDMI
+ RS-232
Cat6
USB
Cat6
iCron Ranger
2101/2104
HD Base
T
Cat6
e.g.
AMX
DX Link
Composite
+ Audio
S-Video +
Audio
Componen
t + Audio
VGA/RGB
+ A + RS232
HDMI/DVI
+ RS-232
Multimode
Audio
Twisted Pair
50m*
Pair
Belden 8471
50m*
VGA
+
Audio
RGBHV
VGA
Audio
multi
Coaxial
Coaxial
Composite
S-Video
(YC)
Componen
t (YPbPr)
+
Coaxial
multi
Coaxial
Multi Pair
MCP3S
Infra-red
I/O
Relay
Contact
Closure
USB
Pair
Pair
SV
Belden 8761
Belden 8761
Belden 8761
FOX
ATEN UE250
(x4 max)
Multimode
Cable Bend Radius
60m
60m
60m
60m
To maintain cabling performance integrity care should be
taken when bending cables around corners to conform to
cabling pathways and conduits. Bending a cable beyond
its intended design can alter its internal structure, causing
impedance variation from specification and thus altering
signal transmission characteristics, or in the extreme,
damage to the cable.
Cable Bend Radius Specification
5m/2
0m
The following specification should be adhered to for all AV
cable installations.
Cable Type
Bend Radius*
Single core
4x
UTP (Cat5/Cat6)
4x
Multi pair cable
10x
Fibre optical
10x
Cables in tension
20x
* times cable diameter
Signal Separation
Power
Pair
Belden 8471
Cat6
refer
University
Communicati
ons Cabling
Specification
Extron MTP
AV RCA
Kramer Y.
Extron MTP
SV RCA
Cat6
FOX
15m
1000
m
1000
m
RS-485
S-Video +
Audio
Multimode
FOX
2000
m
2000
m
2000
m
2000
m
** 30m = 1080p and above. 60m = 1080i and below
Belden 9536
MCP3S
Cat6
Multimode
FOX
15m
Multi Pair
Multi Pair
Composite
+ Audio
Multimode
Extron
2G AV
Extron
2G AV
Extron
2G AV
Extron
4G VGA
10m
10m
20m
RS-232
RS-422
12VDC
UTP
Cat6
100
m x8
hops
Generic
Generic
T.E. VGFAM-M-20
T.E. VGA-AM-M-15
Belden
7789A
Belden
1505A
Belden
1505A
Belden
7789A
Control
USB
30m/
60m*
*
100m
Magenta
600m
Infinea
MHDX
* run lengths exceeding stated maximums must be
calculated with consideration for signal, proximity to
interference sources and configuration
Video
HDMI
DVI
VGA
100m
300m
Fibre Optic
Belden
1503A,
Belden 8723
Belden
1503A,
Belden 8723
Belden 8477
Digital
Digital
VGA
Kramer
Kramer TP125/126
Magenta
XRTx-SA
Extron
DVI201xi
VGA/RGB
+ A + RS232
50m*
300m
300m
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Signal integrity is a critical factor in any AV system design.
Signals which are compromised by extraneous outside
interference invariably create issues when the signal is
reproduced.
Electromagnetic interference (EMI) in a cabling sense is
characterised by the induction of noise into a signal, which
may often stay with the signal throughout the entire signal
path until it is finally reproduced for the viewer/listener
audience.
Interference can affect audio and video signals adversely.
Unbalanced lower voltage signals are more susceptible to
EMI.
Page 31 of 36
Appendix C – Cabling Specification
Signal Groupings
Recommended Separation
AV Cable Labelling Specifications
Microphone audio
300mm
The following specifications should be adhered to for all
AV cable installations.
Line audio
300mm
Text Size: 8pt or 8mm height minimum
Speaker audio
300mm
Label Type: adhesive or bonded
Video
300mm
Label Location: both ends of the cable, at or within
100mm of the end of the cable
Control, data and
communications
300mm
Power (DC)
300mm
Power (AC)
1000mm*
Label Orientation: towards service entrance view (for AV
racks and lecterns)
Labelling Nomenclature: As below, numbers correspond
as per documented cable schedule
* cross AV and electrical power cables at perpendicular 90
degree angles to one another. This has the effect of
collapsing EMI fields where cables cross and avoids
radiated EMI interference.
Cable Type
Naming Convention
Audio - mic, line,
speaker, utp
A001, A002, A003... ~
Video - composite,
component,
svideo, vga, dvi, utp
V001, V002, V003... ~
Combined AV hdmi, udm, display
port, utp, fibre
AV001, AV002, AV003... ~
Common cable management pathways include cable duct
(often referred to as ‘tray’) and conduit. Short runs of
cabling may also be supported on catenary wire.
Control
rs232/422/485, relay,
i/o, ir
C001, C002, C003... ~
Consideration should be given to the number of cables,
weight and signal types for a given cable run. Observation
of signal types separation, cable bend radius and proximity
to power cabling are necessary. Conduit maximum fill
capacity guidelines are provided below.
Data - usb, ps/2
D001, D002, D003... ~
Network - Ethernet
category
cabling
cat5/6/7
N001, N002, N003... ~
Power - dc supply
P1, P2, P3... ~
Future - any
F1, 2, 3... ~
Cable Pathways
Cable pathways are a significant aspect of cabling
management.
Planning is required to ensure cable
management is simple, prevents damage to cabling,
preserves signal integrity and allows for future expansion
and service access.
AV Cabling Conduit Specification
The following specification should be adhered to for all AV
cabling installations.
AV Rack
Cable conduit/duct should have a minimum 50mm
diameter
Number of Cables
Maximum Fill*
1
53%
With so many different cable and signal types within such
confined areas as AV equipment racks and lecterns,
special consideration is required for effective management
of them all. Cable separation by signal type, labelling,
termination, lacing and bend radius are factors for
consideration along with cable security, over hang and
cable length.
2
31%
AV Rack Cabling Specifications
3 + **
41%
The following specification should be adhered to for all AV
Rack and Lectern installations.
* Maximum fill of total conduit/duct area
** to avoid cable jam when running 3 of the same cables,
conduit/duct area should not fall between a ratio of 2.8 and
3.2 times the total cross-sectional area of the cables
Labelling
In order to effectively manage signal cabling and their
pathways, it is important to accurately label cables and
record pathway, source and destination details in an
organised cable schedule. Cable schedules can assist to
show grouping of cables sharing a common path and
highlight similar cable types within groups.
Availability of accurate cabling labelling, schematic
diagrams and cable schedules can facilitate fast and
effective trouble shooting, cable tracking and adding
additional cabling for future expansion.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
● Cables entering a rack or lectern should be firmly secured
to cabinet casing at the cable entry point for tension relief
● Cables entering a rack or lectern should be firmly secured
to cabinet casing at the cable entry point for tension relief
● Cable paths should be established throughout the cabinet
●
●
interior, typically rising up cabinet side walls while securing
to fixtures or cable duct/tray before crossing on to
horizontal lacing bars providing the shortest practicable
run distance between cabinet entry and device connection
while observing guidelines regarding grouping cables by
signal type and segregation distance between disparate
types.
Cables should be secured with Velcro ties every 300mm or
less
Where possible, cables should be terminated to length
with enough over hang to allow device connection with
tension.
Page 32 of 36
Appendix C – Cabling Specification
● Rack chassis and any connection panels within must be
grounded to a common electrical earth point.
● Multiple rack chassis should be earth bonded where
possible
Cable Termination
Cable termination usually refers to the terminating of a
bare cable to a plug or jack which then plugs or connects
to a device to receive and transmit signals.
Improper or poor cable termination can reduce the quality
of a signal, create instability in a system or even result in
no signal getting through a connector.
AV systems described here include a wide variety of
cabling and signals many of them utilising their own unique
type of connector which come in a large variety of shapes
and sizes from tightly bonded HDMI plugs to clamping
bares wires under screw terminal phoenix connectors.
Many connector types have their own tools and methods
associated with their termination.
To ensure signal
integrity and reliability cable termination should be
performed by skilled technicians with appropriate tooling
and resources.
Cat/5/6/7 Cable Specifications
Details for Cat5e, Cat6 and Cat7 cabling currently
specified for use in your institution should be referenced
from your Telecommunication Cabling Specification (or
equivalent
standard)
maintained
by
your
telecommunications and networks department.
AV Wall Plates and Connection Panels
AV wall plates and connection panels are the front line of
any systems interface with users, allowing connection and
display of content from a variety of devices, or in the case
of an AV technician, to output signals for use with external
devices.
These points of connectivity are often embedding into
furniture, lecterns, wall surfaces and equipment racks.
Special consideration must be given to design and
provision of these panels such as; ergonomics, ease of
use, labelling, electrical safety, robustness and reliability
and types of connections.
AV Wall plate and connection panels specifications
The following specifications should be adhered to for all
AV cable installations.
Type
Connections
Laptop
VGA + phono L+R (x2) inputs
Laptop with
interactive
whiteboard, eBeam,
Webcam
VGA + phono L+R (x2) + USB
inputs
iPad, Android
tablets
VGA + phono L+R (x2) via
adaptor
or HDMI via adaptor
Analogue AV
Phono x3 (R, W, Y) inputs
Digital AV
HDMI input
Network/Data
1 outlet per staff device
connection
Power 240VAC
1 outlet per device connection
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 33 of 36
Appendix D – Systems Acceptance Forms
Appendix
D
–
Acceptance Forms
Systems
Purpose and Use
Use this appendix to record details about the status of a
newly provisioned audio visual system and room
environment relating to effectiveness for use as a teaching
and learning venue/system.
The appendix is a series of tables listing form, functionality
and performance levels normally expected from a typically
functioning teaching and learning room outfitted with an
audio visual system.
Use the prompts offered as a guide to evaluate the
readiness and suitability of the systems for teaching and
environment control supplied. For ease of reviewing this
document by others it’s recommended the following details
are recorded:
● Provide type, make, model and serial number of items
where requested
● Provide information on aspects of the AV system or
environment that might negatively impact on teaching and
learning performance by reporting on any systems,
devices or functionality which:
o appears to be absent
o performs or functions differently to expectation
o items supplied which differ to that requested in the
specification used
● An “Additional Comments” row is provided at the bottom of
each table for notes and comments.
Suggestion: For ease of review, enter markings for items,
issues or system attributes which do not reach
acceptance. Use highlighter or bold contrasting coloured
rings for marking and adding notes.
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 34 of 36
Compliance Checklist
Submitting Consultant:
Design Stage:
Teaching Space Types
3.2.2
Sightlines, Size & Screen Specifications
3.2.3
Speech Reinforcement
3.2.4
Assistive Learning Systems
3.2.5
Internet / Network Access
3.2.6
Projector Placements
3.3
Materials & Equipment
3.3.1
Projectors
3.3.2
Flat Panel Displays
3.3.3
Resident Computer
3.3.5
Video Matrix Switchers
3.3.6
Confidence / Annotation Monitors
3.3.7
Document Cameras
3.3.8
Media Players (Blu-ray/DVD)
3.3.9
Audio Input
3.3.10
Audio Output
3.3.11
Video Cameras
3.3.12
Video Conferencing Systems
3.3.13
Telephones
3.3.14
Whiteboards
3.3.15
Network Switches
3.3.16
Cabling
3.3.17
Fibre Optic
3.3.18
Audio Visual Cables
3.3.19
Equipment Housing
Section 03 – Audio Visual
Compliance Checklist
1.0
Section 01 – General
#
All Clauses
3.1
Overview
3.1.1
Purpose
3.1.2
Modern Learning Space Technology Systems
3.2
Design Concepts
3.2.1
Complies
Not Applicable
Date:
Does Not Comply
Project Name:
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Comments:
Page 35 of 36
Compliance Checklist
Design Stage:
Not Applicable
Submitting Consultant:
Does Not Comply
Date:
Complies
Project Name:
3.3.20
Power
3.3.21
Ventilation
3.3.22
Control Systems
3.3.23
Interface to Building Management Systems
3.3.24
Control Signalling
3.4
Installation Requirements
3.4.1
Electrical & Power
3.4.2
Cable Management
3.4.3
Software & Code
3.4.4
RMS Enterprise Server
3.4.5
Commissioning & Handover
3.4.6
Documentation
3.4.7
Sign Off & Handover
3.4.8
Post-Installation Processes
3.4.9
Maintenance & Warranty
3.5
Numbering & Labelling
3.5.1
Labelling
3.5.2
Asset Tagging
3.5.3
Network Naming
Section 03 – Audio Visual
Compliance Checklist
Comments:
Date:
Acceptable
University Reviewer:
Acceptable subject to comments
Signed:
Resubmission required
University of Canterbury – 03. Audio Visual – Design Standard Guidelines
August 2016: Issue 2
Page 36 of 36
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