Introduction Table of Contents

Introduction Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Introduction
Introduction ............................... 3
Four Paths to Educational
Success ...................................... 5
Degree Planning
Degrees ...................................................... 6
Certificate Programs .................................. 6
Enrollment Information
Admissions ................................................. 7
Registration ................................................ 7
Transfer Information .................................. 8
Tuition and Fees ........................................ 8
Veterans’ Administration Standards
and Requirements ................................. 10
Final Exams .............................................. 11
Grades ....................................................... 11
Non-Traditional Ways to Earn Credit ..... 12
Graduation ............................................... 13
Commencement ....................................... 14
Honors ...................................................... 14
Student Records ....................................... 14
Transcripts ................................................ 14
Confidentiality of Student Records ......... 14
Student Services
Academic Advising ................................. 15
Assessment ............................................... 15
Career Resource Center ........................... 15
Counseling ............................................... 15
Disabled Student Services ....................... 15
Financial Aid ............................................ 15
Head Start ................................................ 16
International Student Services ................ 17
Job Center ................................................ 17
Computer-Equipped Labs ........................ 17
Library Media Center .............................. 18
Multi-Cultural Student Services ............. 18
Parking and Campus Security ................. 18
Student Child Care and Learning Center .. 18
Student Health Center ............................. 18
Student Programs ..................................... 18
Tutoring Program ..................................... 18
Veterans’ Administration Programs ........ 18
Women’s Center ....................................... 18
Workforce Training .................................. 19
Other Educational
Opportunities
Continuing Education Program ............... 20
High School Programs ............................. 20
Interdisciplinary Studies .......................... 21
International Programs ............................ 21
Parent Education ...................................... 21
Distance Learning Telecourses ............... 21
“TELOS”– Older Adults’ Program ......... 21
Women’s Center ....................................... 21
Campus Activities
Art Gallery ............................................... 23
Bookstore ................................................. 23
Bus Passes ................................................ 23
Dance ....................................................... 23
DEC .......................................................... 23
Drama ....................................................... 23
Fitness ...................................................... 23
Honor Society .......................................... 23
Model United Nations ............................. 23
Music ........................................................ 24
Planetarium .............................................. 24
Publications .............................................. 24
Radio Stations .......................................... 24
Sports Activities ....................................... 24
Student Clubs and Government .............. 24
Degrees and Certificates
General Requirements ............................. 25
Specific Requirements ............................. 25
Degrees & Certificates ............................ 28
Arts & Humanities
American Studies ..................................... 43
Art ............................................................ 44
Communications ...................................... 45
Dance ....................................................... 47
Drama ....................................................... 47
English ..................................................... 48
Foreign Languages .................................. 51
Foreign Language Alternative
Program (FLAP) ................................... 53
Interior Design ......................................... 53
Music ........................................................ 55
Philosophy ............................................... 57
Speech ...................................................... 58
Business
Accounting ............................................... 59
Administrative Office Systems ............... 60
Business Administration–
Transfer Program .................................. 61
Computer Science–Transfer Program ..... 61
General Business Management ............... 62
Information Technology .......................... 63
Marketing ................................................. 65
Real Estate ............................................... 65
Educational Development &
Health Sciences
Alcohol/Drug Studies .............................. 69
American Sign Language ........................ 71
Developmental Education ....................... 71
Diagnostic Ultrasound ............................. 71
Early Childhood Education ..................... 73
Education ................................................. 75
Fire Command
and Administration ............................... 75
Fire Investigation ..................................... 76
Fire Science ............................................. 76
Health ....................................................... 76
Home Economics ..................................... 77
Image ........................................................ 77
Independent Studies ................................. 77
Individual Development .......................... 77
Nuclear Medicine Technology ................ 77
Nursing– Associate Degree ..................... 78
Nursing–Continuing Nursing Education .. 80
Parent Education ...................................... 80
Physical Education .................................. 80
Radiation Therapy ................................... 83
Radiologic Technology ............................ 84
Recreation Leadership ............................. 86
Human Development ............. 87
Science
Astronomy ............................................... 89
Basic Science ........................................... 89
Biology ..................................................... 89
Botany ...................................................... 90
Chemistry ................................................. 90
Engineering .............................................. 91
Environmental Science ............................ 92
Geology .................................................... 92
Mathematics ............................................. 92
Meteorology ............................................. 94
Nutrition ................................................... 94
Oceanography .......................................... 94
Physics ..................................................... 94
Zoology .................................................... 95
Social Science
Administration of Criminal Justice ......... 96
Anthropology ........................................... 97
Economics ................................................ 98
Geography ................................................ 99
History .................................................... 100
International Studies .............................. 102
Media Communication
and Technology .................................. 103
Political Science .................................... 106
Psychology ............................................. 107
Sociology ............................................... 109
Washington Academy of
Languages
Interpreting ............................................. 110
Translation .............................................. 110
College Policies .................... 111
Administration and Faculty
The Board of Trustees ............................ 114
Administration and Faculty .................... 115
Academic Calendar .............. 121
Index ........................................ 123
Campus Map .......................... 124
1
Bellevue Community College 1997
Introduction
Published by
BELLEVUE COMMUNITY COLLEGE
March 1997
2
Introduction Introduction
Welcome to
BCC Letter from the President
Welcome to Bellevue Community College! We are glad that you are considering our
college as a step in reaching your educational and personal goals.
Our mission is to provide you with high-quality, innovative instruction; practical
training; up-to-date equipment; responsive student services; and enriching activities, all
in a positive environment and at an affordable price. At BCC you will find energetic,
committed instructors who take a genuine interest in their students. Small class sizes
ensure that you get the individual assistance and encouragement you need. We strive to
accommodate busy schedules with evening and weekend classes, and convenient
telecourse degree programs.
BCC offers a full spectrum of courses for students who plan to transfer to four-year
colleges and universities. Studies indicate that BCC transfer students do as well or better
as students who spent their freshman and sophomore years at baccalaureate schools.
Our occupational training programs offer a wide range of high-quality instruction and
hands-on experience to help students retrain for new jobs. Each of these programs is
kept relevant with the guidance of an advisory board of local practicing professionals.
We are especially excited about the NorthWest Center for Emerging Technologies,
which will be built, equipped and ready for students by winter of 1998. The new
building will house state-of-the-art computer labs and multimedia equipment rarely
found in a community college setting. Students will soon be able to earn an Associate
in Arts degree in Advanced Technology which will prepare them to launch into careers
in high-tech industries.
We want to give you the support you need to succeed at Bellevue Community College.
Assessment, counseling and financial aid can help you plan and finance your studies.
The math, writing and computer labs are open at convenient hours. Developmental
Education and English as a Second Language instruction offer vital basic skills
preparation. Multi-Cultural Services, Disabled Students Services and the Women’s
Center offer specialized assistance to help students reach their educational and personal
goals. On-site child care, work-study, employment resources and sports programs are
just some of the supportive features of campus life.
The college is strongly committed to cultural pluralism and is proud of its efforts to
attract a diverse student body, faculty and staff. The college’s vibrant international
student community adds a welcome global perspective.
Again, welcome, and thank you for your interest in our college. The faculty and staff
join me in wishing you the very best at BCC.
B. Jean Floten,
President
3
Introduction
College Mission,
Vision and Goals
Mission
Our mission at Bellevue Community College
is to:
■
provide an academic environment
which encourages students to become
responsible, analytical, creative and
productive citizens;
■
provide accessible services and educational programs that reflect excellence;
■
meet the changing educational needs of
our diverse community;
■
promote pluralism within our multicultural
society; and
■
be a leader and partner in the culture,
technology and business of our Eastside
community.
Vision
We visualize Bellevue Community College
as a place which:
■
provide curricula that enable students to
achieve competence in the outcome areas
identified by the college’s General
Education program.
■
provide lifelong educational experiences
within all college programs.
■
commit resources to the professional
development of college personnel.
TEAMWORK
foster a college community in which
individuals, campus committees and
organizations, and community groups
form mutually supportive relationships
and partnerships for the common good.
■
■
■
■
provide an educational and artistic center
which joins with the community to
foster cultural, civic, artistic, social,
environmental and economic development.
develop connections between the college
and the community in order to improve
the educational and financial bases of
the college.
incorporate developing technologies,
methods and ideas into instructional
programs and administrative services in
order to maintain relevant programs and
services.
■
places student learning at the center of all
we do;
■
values and respects diversity on campus
and within our community;
■
provides equal opportunities to all who
seek self-improvement through education;
■
aspires to excellence in academic and
professional achievement;
■
promote pluralism in all aspects of
college life.
■
values shared decision-making;
■
■
encourages creativity and innovation in
the college’s faculty and staff;
demonstrate support for policies within
our community that promote pluralism.
■
■
adapts to the changing demands in
educating our community; and
provide an environment that supports a
diverse student body, faculty and staff.
■
provides high quality services to students,
visitors and the community.
Goals
To support our mission and vision we
commit ourselves to these goals:
EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE
■ provide opportunities for students to
achieve diverse educational goals by
offering academic/transfer, occupational,
developmental and continuing education
programs.
4
PLURALISM
■ maintain a campus community in which
all constituencies have an active voice in
the decision-making process.
QUALITY SERVICE
provide the staff and systems necessary
to effectively assist students in making
appropriate decisions regarding their
educational options.
■
■
provide high quality library and media
services, instructional support services
and counseling services.
■
provide educational programs and services
which meet the complex and changing
needs of our community.
■
maintain the fiscal integrity of the college.
(adopted by the Board of Trustees, January 1994)
Affirmation of
Inclusion
Bellevue Community College is committed
to maintaining an environment in which
every member of the campus community
feels welcome to participate in the life of
the college, free from harassment and
discrimination.
We value our different backgrounds at BCC,
and students, faculty, staff members and
administrators are to treat one another with
dignity and respect.
(Adopted by the All College Council, June 1992)
Accreditation
Bellevue Community College is fully
accredited as an institution of higher
education by the Northwest Association
of Schools and Colleges, Commission on
Colleges. This accreditation was most
recently reaffirmed in 1995.
About This
Catalog
Every effort is made to ensure that the
information in this catalog is accurate at the
time of publication. Acknowledging that
policies, personnel, curricula and funding can
change, however, Bellevue Community
College reserves the right to amend, revise
or modify any provision printed in this
catalog. Because curricula are regularly
reviewed and revised, the college also
reserves the right to add or withdraw courses
without prior notification. This catalog is
therefore not to be regarded as an irrevocable
contract between the student and the college.
Four Paths Introduction
Four Paths to
Educational
Success
industry, student interests, availability of
resources and general education options.
Path 3 GENERAL STUDIES
Associate in Arts in General Studies
degree is designed for students who do
NOT plan to transfer to a baccalaureate
institution but wish to receive recognition
for completion of 90 credits in college
credit courses.
Skill Development
STUDENTS AND LEARNING
Students at Bellevue Community College
should expect to improve their ability to
■ communicate effectively;
■ reason quantitatively;
■ think critically;
■ value and communicate across other
cultures.
In the Learning Outcomes Assessment
Program we look at the work students produce
in the classroom and for student service
programs. We also interview students to find
out about their experiences at BCC and their
attitudes toward school and learning. Finally,
we interview teachers and staff. The
information we gather helps teachers discover
if their teaching techniques are successful, it
helps departments determine whether their
courses meet student needs, and it helps the
whole school improve its programs.
Path 1 ACADEMIC TRANSFER
EDUCATION
Associate in Arts and Sciences Degree
■
■
■
■
■
■
is designed for students who plan to
transfer to a baccalaureate college or
university.
requires completion of 90 college-level
credits within specified distribution areas.
conforms to the state wide Direct Transfer
Agreement endorsed by the Inter-College
Relations Council.
is accepted as fulfillment of the general
educational requirements by Washington
state baccalaureate institutions.
is not altered by special admission criteria
which may be established by a specific
baccalaureate institution.
grants junior status to students upon
admissions at institutions endorsing the
Direct Transfer Agreement.
Associate in Science Degree
■
requires students to complete a minimum
of 90 college-level credits in a program
that is precisely parallel with the lower
level (first two years) of a baccalaureate
degree plan at the institution to which they
expect to transfer.
■
is intended to prepare students for admission to a specific baccalaureate program.
■
does not necessarily meet the Direct
Transfer agreement guidelines.
■
has been awarded in the following major
disciplines:
• Business Administration
• Engineering
• Pre-Pharmacy
• Recreation Leadership.
Additional disciplines may be available, and
students must discuss specific transfer plans
with an advisor to plan their degree.
Students may transfer to a baccalaureate
institution prior to completing their degree.
Without the associate degree, however,
students risk losing credits which are
normally accepted within the degree or they
may lack general education requirements,
sometimes called general undergraduate
requirements (GUR’s). In order for the
Direct Transfer Agreement to apply, a student
must have completed 90 credits which are
applicable and transferable to the receiving
institution OR have completed the degree.
Path 2 OCCUPATIONAL
EDUCATION
Associate in Arts
degrees, with emphasis in certain program
fields, require completion of at least 90
college-level credits.
Certificates of Achievement
provide training in a focused program in a
specific occupational field and require 45
credits or more of prescribed courses.
Certificates of Accomplishment
provide dedicated training and require less
than 45 credits of specific courses.
Occupational program offerings and course
requirements listed in this catalog may be
altered by the college to reflect the needs of
courses do not lead to a degree or certificate, but are designed to develop or build
basic skills. Development of basic skills
is available for students requiring basic
reading, writing or mathematics. English
as a Second Language offers non-native
students an opportunity to learn English.
General Education Development (GED)
courses are available for students 19
years or older who may find it impossible
to enter the high school completion
program. Free courses are available to
prepare for the GED exam. The exam has
a minimal fee and is available through the
Assessment Office.
High School Completion
is for students who are 19 years of age or
older and would like to complete their high
school education. Credit toward the
diploma may be granted for work
completed in accredited secondary schools.
The student must complete 10 credits in
residence at BCC. The high school diploma
is accepted for admission to baccalaureate
colleges and is subject to the same conditions as the usual high school diploma.
Path 4 CONTINUING
EDUCATION
In our quickly changing world, education is
now a life-long process. BCC Continuing
Education offerings meet on-going learning
needs, after, or in between formal degrees.
These classes keep knowledge and skills
current without the constraints of working
for credit or degrees. Options range from
three-hour workshops to ten-week classes.
Content includes work-related and personal
enrichment subjects, with instruction
generally focused on immediate use. Students
may request a certificate of completion.
Continuing Education Units (CEU’s) are
available for some offerings.
Offerings are continually updated to meet
current needs. Course descriptions, schedules
and fees are published in the quarterly
schedules mailed to all district households,
and are also available by calling the
Continuing Education Office at 641-2263.
5
Degree Planning
Degree Planning
Degrees and
Certificates
Degrees
The following degrees offered at BCC require
at least 90 college-level credits for completion. Programs designated with a pound sign
(#) indicate selective admissions criteria:
Associate in Arts and Sciences
Associate in Science
Associate in General Studies
Associate in Arts
●
Accounting Paraprofessional
Administration of Criminal Justice
● Administrative Office Systems
• Office Management
● Diagnostic Ultrasound #
●
Early Childhood Education
● Early Childhood Special Education
●
Fire Command and Administration
● Fire Investigator
●
General Business Management
● Information Technology (previously
named Computer Information Systems)
• Programming
• Technical Support
● Interior Design (three-year program)
●
●
●
Certificate
Programs
International Business
Marketing Management
Media Communication and Technology
offers endorsements in:
• Computer Animation and Graphics
• Multimedia Design and Authoring
• Video-Computer Interface
• Video Production
• Web Authoring
● Nursing #
●
Radiation Therapy #
● Radiologic Technology #
Certificates offer short-term training in
a wide variety of areas and programs.
Certificates of Achievement require 45 or
more credits. The Certificates of Accomplishment require fewer than 45 credits. The
credits required for completion are shown
in parentheses.
Business Programs
Accounting
● Bookkeeping (30)
● Paraprofessional Accounting (45)
Administrative Office Systems
● Administrative Assistant (45)
● Business Software Applications (31)
● Word Processing (24)
General Business Management
● Entrepreneurship (30)
Information Technology
● Microcomputer Support Specialist (45)
● Programmer
• C (45)
• Client Server - Visual Basic (45)
Marketing
● Retail Management (30)
● Sales and Marketing (28)
●
●
●
6
Real Estate
• Appraisal
• Commercial Practices
• Escrow
• Mortgage Finance
• Residential Practices
• Title Insurance
Recreation Leadership
Early Childhood
●
●
Early Childhood Education (45)
Early Childhood Special Education (45)
Fire Command
●
Fire Command and Administration (45)
Health Sciences Programs
Alcohol/Drug Studies (61)
● Nuclear Medicine Technology (63)
● Radiation Therapy Technology (62)
●
Media Communication
and Technology
Graphics and Animation for
Multimedia (45)
● Multimedia Authoring (45)
● New Media: Studies in Emerging
Technologies (45)
● Video-Computer Interface (45)
● Video Production (45)
●
●
Web Authoring (45)
Real Estate
●
Appraisal (21.5)
Escrow (20)
● Mortgage Finance (23)
● Property Management (21)
● Real Estate (21)
• Title Insurance (20)
●
Washington Academy of
Languages
In cooperation with the Washington
Academy of Languages (WAL), BCC offers
credit for the certificate programs listed
below. Application for admission to these
programs must be made through WAL.
● Interpretation (22)
●
Translation (22)
Certificates of Completion
Students in Continuing Education courses
may request a certificate of completion
for any individual course, but must make
that request by the beginning of the first
class meeting.
Continuing Education
Units (CEU’s)
The Continuing Education Unit is a
nationally recognized unit of documentation
for participation in an organized continuing
education experience. Selected Continuing
Education offerings offer CEU’s and if
students meet performance criteria, they will
receive a CEU certificate.
Enrollment
Information
Degree
Planning
Enrollment
Information
Admissions
General admissions deadlines are:
Summer – May 31
Fall
– July 31
Winter – November 15
Spring – February 28
Eligibility
1. Bellevue Community College admits high
school graduates and adults 18 years of
age or older. Currently enrolled high
school students may take college courses
with written approval from their school
official. Applicants who do not meet these
criteria will be considered for admission
on a case-by-case basis.
2. Some college programs have selective
admissions, whereby not all applicants
who are qualified for admission into the
program can be accommodated. These
programs accept students in the fall ONLY
and publish their admissions requirements
no later than Spring Quarter. Students
should contact the Admissions Office or
the programs directly for entrance
requirements, deadlines and applications.
The following programs have selective
admissions:
● Diagnostic Ultrasound Technology
● Nuclear Medicine Technology
● Nursing
● Radiation Therapy Technology
● Radiologic Technology
Students applying for selective admissions
into a degree or certificate program must
meet different application deadlines and
entrance requirements and must follow the
guidelines prescribed by the specific
program. Students should contact the
Admissions Office or the programs for
application information.
Formerly Enrolled Students
In order to regain admission, students who
have not attended Bellevue Community
College for two consecutive quarters
(excluding Summer Quarter) must
complete the Application for Admission.
If a student takes a one quarter leave, their
continuing student status remains.
International Students
1.
Application Process
New Students
To gain general admission to Bellevue
Community College, prospective students
are required to complete the Application
for Admission, available in high school
offices and in the BCC Student Services
Center. New students will be admitted to
Bellevue Community College in the order
in which their admissions forms are
received. If the student has attended other
colleges or universities, official transcripts
are NOT REQUIRED until they apply
for graduation or request an official
evaluation of transferred-in credits.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
The college is authorized under federal
law to enroll non-immigrant aliens.
International students may enroll either in
the college’s credit programs (provided
they meet requirements) or in an intensive
English program (if they do not meet
English proficiency requirements).
International students are admitted to
regular credit programs upon meeting the
following requirements:
Complete and sign the International
Student Application for Admission.
Provide translated copies of all scholastic
records (e.g., high school, previous
college, language schools, etc.).
Provide Declaration and Certification of
Finances or a notarized Affidavit of
Support.
Submit a passport-sized photograph.
Once admitted, show proof of medical
insurance for each quarter of attendance,
or enroll for insurance at the time of
registration.
f. Provide a $35.00 (U.S. dollars) nonrefundable application fee.
g. Submit proof of English language
proficiency in one of the following ways:
■ score 500 or above on the TOEFL test; OR
■ demonstrate two years of successful
completion (GPA of 2.5 or higher) of
regular English courses in a US high
school, supplemented by a personal
interview; OR
■
transfer directly from BCC’s English
Language Institute upon successful
completion of Level 5, and pass BCC’s
waiver exam (including recommendation
from program faculty); OR
■
transfer from a US language institute,
college, or university with a GPA of 2.5
or higher.
2. International students are admitted to the
intensive English Program (the English
Language Institute) upon meeting the
following requirements:
a. Complete and sign the International
Student Application for Admission.
b. Pay the $150 application fee.
c. Provide certification of finances.
There are no established quarterly admission
deadlines for international students; however,
it is suggested that credit students apply at
least 60 days in advance of any given quarter
to ensure their applications will be considered.
Intensive English Program applications
should be submitted 30 days in advance of
the beginning of the quarter. International
students may apply for any quarter throughout the year, although the college may not be
able to admit all international credit students
applying for admission.
Registration
Credit Courses
1. New and former students (new to BCC or
returning after an absence of two or more
quarters) who will be taking credit courses
receive a registration appointment date
along with information on assessment and
registration. New and former students who
miss the quarterly admission application
deadlines register according to the last
four digits of their social security number.
The registration calendar is published in
the Quarterly Class Schedule.
7
Enrollment Information
2. Continuing Students (or those students
who have been absent for one quarter
only) register using the Touchtone
telephone system according to their
scheduled access time. System access
for adding or dropping courses ends on
the second day of each quarter. Students
choosing not to register through
Touchtone may do so in person the day
after their scheduled access.
Full time credit load
For academic purposes, 12 credit hours is
considered to be a full-time load. To
complete a degree program within two
years, a student should average 15 credit
hours per quarter.
Withdrawal, Dropping/
Adding Courses
Withdrawal from a course is the termination
of the student’s registration in that course.
Withdrawals do not require instructor’s
signature and are classified as official only
when the student withdraws via the Touchtone
telephone system, submits a completed
Schedule Change Form to the Registration
Office, or submits a signed request in writing.
There are consequences for failure to meet
deadlines; students should refer to the Grades
section of the catalog for additional
information on the “W” grade.
Continuing Education
(non-credit) courses
Registration for Continuing Education
courses takes place at any time after the
Quarterly Class Schedule is available and
through the second class meeting on a spaceavailable basis. Appointments are not
necessary. Continuing Education students
may register by mail, fax, e-mail or phone.
To enroll in more than 18 hours per
quarter, a student must have a 3.0
cumulative GPA. Students not meeting
this GPA requirement must request
permission from the Associate Dean of
Enrollment Services.
Transfer from
Other Colleges
and Universities
Official transcripts are ONLY required when
the student applies for graduation or for an
official evaluation of credits. Official
transcripts that are submitted with an
admission application are returned to the
student and become an unofficial transcript.
Registration appointments for continuing
students are based on total credits completed.
Therefore, students who have earned at least
45 credits towards their degree from
accredited institutions AND who are planning
to pursue a degree at BCC, are encouraged to
bring an unofficial copy of each of their
college transcripts to the Student Services
Center. Future registration appointments will
reflect the cumulative credits earned at other
institutions for as long as the student remains
a continuing student.
Transfer credits are:
■
applied to an associate degree at BCC for
a maximum of 60 credits.
■
used only as they apply toward a degree or
certificate.
■
applied to a certificate at BCC based on
program chair approval, for a maximum of
two-thirds of the credits required to
complete the certificate (certain programs
have a time limit in order for the credits to
apply).
Credit Loads
Definition
Credit is recorded in quarter hours. Each
quarter credit hour represents one 50minute period of class time each week for
a duration of 11 weeks, or the equivalent
in laboratory time, field work, or approved
independent study.
8
based on course and credit equivalency,
applicability to the program, and the
institution’s accreditation
■
normally accepted from institutions
accredited by an association equivalent to
the Northwest Association of Schools and
Colleges or from institutions accredited
through other regional accrediting
associations.
■
subject to approval by the Evaluations
Office.
Overload
3. Transfer Students must apply for
admission and follow the new and former
student process.
4. Late Registration is permitted only during
the first two business days of the quarter
during the academic year (Fall, Winter and
Spring Quarters) and during the first day
of the quarter during Summer Quarter.
■
■
accepted on official transcripts only,
including those electronically transmitted
directly from the institution.
Transfer to
Other Colleges
and Universities
Baccalaureate colleges and
universities:
■
normally accept transfer college-level
courses which are numbered 100 or above.
■
accept as part of a Transfer Associate
degree some courses not normally
transferable, such as occupational courses.
Occasionally, occupational classes are
accepted without a transfer degree, but
this should be carefully explored at the
institution to which the student will be
transferring.
■
usually limit the number of credits they
will accept from community college
transfer students to ninety (90) quarter
credits.
■
may not accept a course graded with a
“P” grade, credits earned by exam, or
Advanced Placement (AP) credits.
■
reserve the right to require a higher
admission GPA than the minimum
required for graduation at BCC and to
recompute a student’s accumulated gradepoint average in accordance with their
policies.
Tuition and Fees
Tuition and fees may be paid through VISA,
MasterCard, check or cash. Checks returned
because of stop payment will be charged $25,
and the student will be immediately withdrawn from all courses. All other returned
Enrollment Information
checks will result in a student being withdrawn after being notified of the reason for
withdrawal with a $15 fee for reinstatement.
After the third returned check, including
third-party personal checks, the privilege of
check-writing will be denied.
Students withdrawn for disciplinary reasons
will not be eligible for a refund. This policy
does not apply to Continuing Education noncredit courses or self-support courses (these
courses may have a separate refund listed in
the Quarterly Class Schedule).
The following tuition and fees are subject to
change by the Washington State Legislature.
Students should refer to the Quarterly Class
Schedule for the most current tuition rates. The
following are estimates based on 96-97 rates:
Refunds are processed after the third day of
the quarter. Students may request a refund
earlier by visiting or contacting the Cashier’s
Office. The College Calendar, published in
the Quarterly Class Schedule, identifies the
deadlines for each quarter. For Fall, Winter
and Spring Quarter withdrawals are refunded
as follows:
96-97 Tuition and Fee Rates
Credits
Resident
Non-Resident
1 or 2
$96.40
370.40
3
144.60
555.60
4
192.80
740.80
5
241.00
926.00
6
289.20
1,111.20
7
337.40
1,296.40
8
385.60
1,481.60
9
433.80
1,666.80
10-18
482.00
1,852.00
(1) below
(2) below
19 & over
(1) Residents will pay $482.00 plus $42.00
per additional credit
(2) Non-Residents will pay $1,852.00 plus
$179.00 per additional credit
Comprehensive Fee
The comprehensive fee is calculated in the
student’s tuition and fees charged during
registration and offers services for no
additional charge. These services include but
are not limited to parking, transcripts, catalog
and health services.
Other Charges
Fees for self-support, telecourses or
Continuing Education classes are listed with
the courses in the Quarterly Class Schedule.
Residency in the state of Washington is
not required for these classes, and students
are charged the amount listed regardless
of residency.
Tuition and Fee Refunds
Refunds are paid when a credit student
withdraws from the college OR when a credit
student withdraws from courses(s) that reduce
the total credits below 10. Certain fees are
non-refundable and are identified as such.
■
100% refund (minus $7 fee) PRIOR to the
third instructional day of the quarter.
■
80% refund (minus $7 fee) FROM the
third through the fifth instructional day of
the quarter.
■
50% refund (minus $7 fee) THROUGH
the twentieth calendar day of the quarter.
■
No refunds are given after the twentieth
calendar day.
For Summer Quarter withdrawals are
refunded as follows:
■
100% refund (minus $7 fee) PRIOR to the
second instructional day of the quarter.
■
80% refund (minus $7 fee) FROM the
second through the fourth instructional
day of the quarter.
■
50% refund (minus $7 fee) THROUGH
the twelfth calendar day of the quarter.
No refunds are given after the twelfth
calendar day.
Tuition and Fee Waivers
Tuition and Fee Waivers currently approved
by the Board of Trustees include:
1. GENERAL WAIVERS
Vocational Training over 18 credits
Waives overload fees for resident or nonresident students enrolled in more than 18
credits in a vocational or occupational
program.
Vietnam/Southeast Asian Veterans
Waives the difference between current
regular tuition and a frozen base rate (Fall
1977) for resident students who were on
active military duty in Southeast Asia
between August 5, 1964, and May 7, 1975,
and who were enrolled in a state of
Washington institution before May 7, 1990.
This waiver expires on June 30, 1997.
Persian Gulf Veterans
Waives the difference between current
regular tuition and a frozen base rate
(1990-91) for resident students who were
on active military duty in a Persian Gulf
combat zone. This waiver expires on June
30, 1997.
Children of Deceased or Disabled Law
Officers and Firefighters
Waives all or a portion of tuition and
services and activities fees.
Children of Deceased POWs and MIAs
Waives all or a portion of tuition and
services and activities fees.
Timber Workers
Waives State Board-approved resident and
non-resident tuition and services and
activities fees.
Student Scholarships
Waives all tuition and services and
activities fees for state-approved WAVE
and Scholars recipients selected prior to
June 1994.
Needy
Waives all or a portion of tuition and
services and activities fees for resident and
non-resident needy students as designated
by the Financial Aid Office.
High School Completion
Waives all or a portion of tuition and
services and activities fees for resident
students 19 years or older who are
enrolled in a high school completion
program.
Concurrent Enrollment with Other
Community Colleges
Allows interdistrict enrollment of resident
and non-resident students; regular tuition
rates apply.
2. WAIVERS OF NON-RESIDENT
DIFFERENTIAL IN TUITION
AND FEES:
Congressional Dependents
Waives all or a portion of the non-resident
differential.
Higher Education Employees
Waives all or a portion of the non-resident
differential for a higher education employee
residing in the state of Washington and
holding not less than a half-time appointment; also spouse and dependent children
of such employee.
9
Enrollment Information
High School Completion
Waives all or a portion of the non-resident
differential for non-residents enrolled in a
high school completion program.
in this state, whose parents or legal
guardians have been domiciled in the state
for a period of at least one year within the
five-year period before the student
graduates from high school, and who
enrolls in a public institution of higher
education within six months of leaving high
school, for as long as the student remains
continuously enrolled for three quarters or
two semesters in any calendar year; or
Military
Waives the non-resident differential and
adds a surcharge of 25% of the resident
operating fee for active duty personnel
stationed in Washington.
Refugees
Waives the non-resident differential and
adds a surcharge of 25% of the resident
operating fee for refugees, spouses, and
dependents.
3. SPACE-AVAILABLE WAIVERS
Seniors, credit and audit
Waives all or a portion of tuition and
services and activities fee with a maximum
registration fee of $5 for two classes.
■
A student shall be classified as “non-resident”
for tuition and fee purposes if he or she does
not qualify as a resident student under the
provisions stated above. In addition, a student
shall be classified “non-resident” if he or she:
■
will be financially dependent for the
current year or was financially dependent
for the calendar year prior to the year in
which application is made and who does
not have a parent or legal guardian who
has maintained a bona fide domicile in the
state of Washington for one year
immediately prior to the commencement
of the quarter for which the student has
registered;
■
attends an institution with financial
assistance provided by another state or
governmental unit or agency thereof
wherein residency in that state is a
continuing qualification for the financial
assistance, such non-residency continuing
for one year after the completion of the
quarter for which financial assistance is
provided. Such financial assistance relates
to that which is provided by another state,
governmental unit, or agency thereof for
direct or indirect educational purposes and
does not include retirements, pensions, or
other non-education-related income. A
student loan guaranteed by another state or
governmental unit or agency thereof on
the basis of eligibility as a resident of that
state is included within the term “financial
assistance”; or
BCC Employees
Waives all or a portion of tuition and
services and activities fee with a minimum
registration fee of $5.
Note: these waivers do not apply to Continuing Education and self-support courses.
Washington
State Residency
for Tuition
Purposes
In order for a student to be classified as a
resident of the State of Washington for
tuition and fee purposes, the student shall:
■
■
have established a bona fide domicile in
the state of Washington primarily for
purposes other than educational for a
period of one year immediately prior to
commencement of the quarter for which
the student has registered; and be
financially independent; or be a dependent
student one or both of whose parents or
legal guardians have maintained a bona
fide domicile in the state of Washington
for at least one year immediately prior to
commencement of the quarter for which
the student has registered; or
have spent at least 75 percent of both his or
her junior and senior years of high school
10
be the spouse or dependent of a person on
active military duty stationed in the state
of Washington.
■
is not a citizen of the United States of
America, unless the individual holds
permanent or temporary resident
immigration status, “Refugee-Parolee”
status, or “Conditional Entrant” status.
A person does not lose domicile in the state
of Washington by reason of residency in any
state or country while a member of the civil
or military service of this state or of the
U.S. if that person returns to the state of
Washington within one year of discharge
from said service with the intent to be
domiciled in the state of Washington.
Any resident dependent student who
remains in this state when such student’s
parents or legal guardians, having theretofore
been domiciled in this state for a period of
one year immediately prior to commencement of the first day of the quarter for which
the student has registered, move from this
state, shall be entitled to continue classification as a resident student so long as such
student is continuously enrolled during the
academic year.
If the student, or the parent in case of a
dependent student, has attended a Washington institution for more than six hours per
term anytime during the twelve months in
which residency is being established, state
law presumes the move to the state was
primarily for educational purposes and the
time of enrollment is NOT counted towards
the one year establishment of residence. If
the move to Washington was for purposes
OTHER than educational, proof must be
submitted of such.
Veterans’
Administration
Standards and
Requirements
BCC and its degree programs are approved
for students eligible for Veterans Administration Education benefits. Eligible veterans,
reservists or dependents of veterans who plan
to apply for benefits must contact the Veteran
Coordinator in the Financial Aid Office as
early as possible.
Certification of VA benefits will occur upon
acceptance to a VA-approved degree program
and when all pertinent documents are on file.
The eligible student can be certified only for
courses applicable to the declared degree
program. Students are expected to be enrolled
in college-level courses, although some
developmental courses (“deficiency courses”
Enrollment Information
in VA terminology) are permitted. Students
requiring deficiency courses will be reviewed
by the Veteran Coordinator.
Average Achievement
All VA benefit recipients are required to
enroll in at least six credits per quarter and
maintain academic progress by successfully
completing their courses with a 2.00 grade
point average. Students who fail to maintain
the minimum requirement may be placed on
probation when extenuating circumstances
occur. It is advisable to consult with the
Veteran Coordinator when the student
suspects they may fail to maintain academic
progress.
Immediately report to the Veteran Coordinator
any change in the program of study, credit
load, dependent status, address or other change
that may impact the student’s VA status.
Final Exams
It is the policy of Bellevue Community
College that final exams may be used only in
connection with the use of other evaluative
techniques throughout each period of
instruction, and no examination, including
the final exam, shall make up more than 33
percent of a student’s final grade. Consultation between the instructor and the student is
deemed desirable concerning the specific
results of examinations, quizzes, or other
evaluative techniques or circumstances.
Grades
Students may learn their grades via the
Touchtone telephone system approximately
10 days after the quarter ends, and grades are
mailed to students approximately 14 days
after the quarter ends.
C+
2.3 points per credit hour
C
2.0 points per credit hour
C-
1.7 points per credit hour
Minimum Achievement
D+
1.3 points per credit hour
D
1.0 point per credit hour
F
Students should be aware that each instructor
determines whether or not his/her respective
class will be evaluated utilizing the grade
of “F.”
Passing
P No points are calculated for a “P” grade,
which is issued in two separate instances;
for those courses institutionally recognized
as utilizing the “P” grade, and for courses
graded using “A” through “F” in which a
student elects to be evaluated Pass/Fail. In
the latter instance, all “P” grades must be
supported with traditional letter grades and
when the student fails to receive a grade
of “A” through “D,” a grade of “F” will
be granted and calculated into the grade
point average.
Courses which a student elects to take P/F
may not be used to satisfy distribution
requirements in the Arts and Sciences or
Science Degrees. A student must declare his/
her intention for a “P/F” grade within the
first 10 days of the quarter by filing the
request in the Registration Office.
Non-Credit
Z No points are calculated for this grade.
The instructor may, at his/her discretion,
utilize this grade rather than the “F” if a
student’s achievement does not merit the
awarding of credit for the course.
B+
3.3 points per credit hour
Official Withdrawal
B
3.0 points per credit hour
B-
2.7 points per credit hour
W Grading and recording for official withdrawals are different during the academic
year than during the Summer Quarter.
A
4.0 points per credit hour
A-
3.7 points per credit hour
Through the tenth day of the quarter, the
dropped course does not become part of
the transcript record.
■
After the tenth school day and through the
end of the seventh week of the quarter, the
grade of “W” will become part of the
student’s transcript record, regardless of
grade status at this time.
■
No official withdrawal will be permitted
after the start of the eighth week of the
quarter.
0 points per credit hour
High Achievement
Outstanding Achievement
■
Unsatisfactory Achievement
The “Z” grade – separate and distinct from
audit, course in progress, incomplete and
withdrawals – may be awarded at the
discretion of the instructor should a student
terminate a course without completing an
official withdrawal or should the student
fail, for any reason, to realize a minimal
achievement level required by the instructor
for awarding credit.
Bellevue Community College utilizes the
following grading system to reflect the
student’s achievements:
During Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters
withdrawals are recorded as follows:
During Summer Quarter withdrawals are
recorded as follows:
■
Through the sixth day of the quarter, the
dropped course does not become a part of
the transcript record.
■
After the sixth day and through the end of
the fifth week of the quarter, the grade of
“W” will become part of the student’s
transcript record, regardless of grade status
at this time. No official withdrawal will be
permitted after the start of the sixth week
of the quarter.
A student who finds it necessary to withdraw
completely from the college due to illness,
military reassignment or other bona fide
reasons must comply with the procedures
listed above.
The Associate Dean for Enrollment Services
may grant exceptions and authorize late
withdrawals due to extraordinary circumstances. Students must submit appeals for
exceptions in writing and provide documentation to support the claim of extraordinary
circumstances. Failure to submit a signed
appeal with supporting documentation may
result in the student receiving a failing grade
on the transcript and the student will forfeit
any refund which would otherwise be due.
Audit
N Not counted for credit or grade point
average. A student must declare his/her
intention to audit a course within the first
ten days of a quarter by filing the request
in the Registration Office.
Course in Progress
Y This symbol indicates a course which, by
authorization of the Executive Dean of
Educational Services, officially continues
beyond the terminal date of the present
11
Enrollment Information
quarter. Normally, the course is completed
and graded on or before the termination of
the subsequent quarter.
his/her designated alternate) and the
Executive Dean to change the terms of the
deficiency or the completion date.
Incomplete
I No points are calculated for this grade.
“I” indicates that the student has not
completed specific prescribed requirements for a course, generally for unforeseen reasons beyond the student’s control.
If a student has performed at a passing level
during the quarter but for some reason is
unable to complete the course requirements,
he/she may be given an “I” grade at the
course instructor’s discretion.
An “I” will not be posted to a transcript
unless the instructor’s grade sheet is
accompanied by a statement on the contractual
form which specifically indicates the work
the student must do to make up the deficiency. Both the instructor and the student
must sign the contractual form. The contract
must state the specifics of the deficiency and
the date by which the deficiency must be
resolved. Although the instructor may
designate a lesser amount of time, it is
recommended that the limitation for the
incomplete being fulfilled be established at
one quarter but never longer than one year, as
the college allows a maximum of one year
from the receipt of the incomplete. Three
copies of this contract shall be provided, with
copies going to the instructor, the student and
the Registrar. The nature of the deficiency
must be such that removal of an “I” grade is
not contingent on subsequent enrollment in
the same course by the student.
Whenever possible, an instructor should
designate a faculty alternate from within
the same discipline to act in their behalf in
resolving an “I” grade should subsequent
conditions prevent further direct contact
between the student and the original
instructor. In the event the original instructor
does not designate the required area alternate,
the program/department chair shall designate
one of their members to serve as such.
An “I” grade remains permanently on all
official records unless the deficiency stated
on the contractual form is resolved by the
student within the specified time period. An
“I” grade cannot be converted to non-credit.
At any time during the period allowed by the
contract for completion of the incomplete,
the student may petition the instructor (or
12
Changing a
Grade
If a student wishes to contest the accuracy of
a grade, it is important to consult with the
instructor involved immediately. Grades are
available via the Touchtone system
approximately 10 days after the quarter ends,
and are mailed to students approximately 14
days after the quarter ends.
The instructors receive an audit sheet of all
grades they have awarded in all classes
during the first ten days of the next regular
quarter. Errors may be noted on this audit
sheet, and corrected, with minimal problem
to the student. After the tenth day of the
following quarter, the student has only one
year in which to correct a grading error. If
the instructor is no longer employed at this
college, or is away from the campus for an
extended time, students wishing to correct a
grading error should talk with the division
chairperson of that faculty member. After
one year, grades are not changed except for
extraordinary reasons.
Repeating a
Course
Students who have completed a course and
are repeating the same course for the purpose
of improving their grade may repeat it two
more times. All grades will appear on the
academic transcript. In order for the highest
grade to be calculated into BCC’s GPA for
graduation purposes, the student must
complete a Repeated Class Request Form at
the Student Services Center. This request will
result in the lowest graded course(s) having a
grade identifier of “R” posted next to the
grade(s) in the permanent transcript. BCC’s
grade point average will exclude any course
that has a repeat grade identifier. Students
should be aware that other colleges and
universities may include repeated course
grades in their eligibility for admission and/
or graduation.
Non-Traditional
Ways to Earn
Credit
Advanced Placement
The Advanced Placement (AP) Program
is in effect at many high schools and is
recognized by Bellevue Community College.
Credit may be granted or placement into an
advanced course may be offered by the
college when an official AP examination
grade is submitted with a score of 3 or above.
Approval of AP varies throughout the
departments and students should pick up a
request for an Advanced Placement Credit
form at the Student Services Center.
The departments may choose to approve
credit to be transcripted as transferred-in “AP
credit” or the student may be assigned an
equivalent BCC course which would appear
with a grade on the student’s transcript. The
departments may also choose to allow for
course placement, which is the ability to use
AP as a prerequisite or to meet eligibility for
a course. This course placement would be
processed by the Assessment Office.
Credit By Examination
The college recognizes that students may
already have gained enough competence in a
particular area of study to make taking some
courses redundant. It may be possible to
receive credit for prior knowledge without
formally taking a course in that area.
Examinations for credit in courses offered by
Bellevue Community College may be taken
under the following conditions:
1. The student must be currently registered at
Bellevue Community College.
2. The student must have completed ten
quarter credit hours at BCC.
3. Individual departments or programs may
require that a student complete the next
highest sequential course before receiving
credit. However, a student cannot receive
credit by examination for a course if
he or she has already completed a more
advanced course in that subject area.
4. Students are not allowed to take an
examination for previously enrolled or
audited course at BCC.
Enrollment Information
5. If a student has already taken and failed an
examination for credit, they may not
repeat the examination.
6. International students cannot receive credit
by examination for 100 - 200 level courses
in their native languages.
7. Credits earned by examination may be
used to satisfy degree requirements, but
only 15 such credits are transferable.
These credits cannot be applied to meet
distribution requirements for the transfer
degree.
8. Credits earned by examination are
identified as such on the student’s
transcript and are not calculated into
the GPA.
9. Credit is allowed only for examinations in
which the student has received a grade of
“C” or better.
10. When applying for credit by examination,
the student must request an Approval for
Credit-by-Examination form in the
Registration Office.
11. If there is no exam available for that
course, the request may be denied. The
form is signed by the program chair and
returned to the Registration Office. If the
request is approved, the student is
referred with the form to an examiner.
12. After the student successfully completes
the examination, the examiner completes
and returns the form to the student. The
student must submit the completed form
to the Registration Office.
13. A fee equal to one-half the current tuition
and fee rate will be charged.
Running Start
The Running Start program is a partnership
between BCC and local high schools. The
program allows high school juniors and
seniors to enroll in BCC classes tuition free,
and earn college credits which also apply to
high school graduation requirements.
Students may enroll simultaneously in high
school and college classes, or solely in
college classes. The program offers eligible
high school students the opportunity to get a
head start on earning college credit.
College-in-the-High School
High School Students can earn dual high
school and college credit in a cooperative
program between local school districts and
Bellevue Community College. Students take
College-in-the-High School courses at their
own high school. The courses are taught by
carefully selected school district teachers
who work closely with BCC faculty mentors
and are designated as adjunct faculty of the
college. Students should make an appointment with their high school counselor to get
additional information about courses offered
at their high school.
Tech Prep
Tech Prep is a program that enables high
school students to request college-equivalent
credit for occupational/vocational courses
taken at a high school that has articulated an
agreement with the Northeast Tech Prep
Consortium. Prior to submitting an admission
application students should meet with the
appropriate program advisor to approve their
Tech Prep credits. In order to gain college
credit at BCC the following conditions must
be met: a) the high school course must be
articulated as a college-equivalent class, b)
the student must have received a “B” or
better grade, and c) the student must apply
for college-equivalent credit within two years
after their high school graduation.
Non-Traditional College
Program Credits or Military
Training
BCC may also recognize learning acquired in
the military or other non-traditional college
credit programs, and active military service
of one year or more may qualify as three
physical education credits. Students should
visit the Student Services Center to request
special forms and inquire as to the process
for evaluation of these credits.
The American Council on Education’s Guide
to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences
in the Armed Services is used as a reference
in assisting to determine the amount and type
of military credit which may be accepted.
Military credits will be evaluated only from
official military documents.
at BCC, 15 credits may be earned through
non-traditional or military courses. Course
acceptance and equivalency decisions are at
the discretion of the Evaluation Office or the
program chair (for occupational credits).
Non-traditional credits may only be accepted
as electives.
Graduation
Official transcripts must be attached to the
graduation application (transcripts which
may have been submitted with the admission
application cannot be used to satisfy this
requirement).
One graduation application for each degree
or certificate must be filed with a $10 fee.
Students may elect to graduate under the
provisions of the official catalog in force
either at the time they first entered the
program OR at the time they apply to
graduate, providing five years have not
lapsed and they have remained continuously
enrolled in the program. To ensure timely
notification of meeting graduation requirements, application deadlines are:
■
Summer and Fall Quarters – June 1;
■
Winter Quarter – November 1;
■
Spring Quarter – January 10.
Applications for graduation must be filed
two quarters prior to the end of the quarter in
which the student intends to graduate.
Students planning to graduate with a transfer
degree at the end of Spring Quarter who want
to receive an official evaluation of credits
before registering for Spring Quarter should
submit the graduation application by the last
day of Fall Quarter.
The absolute deadline for filing an application for graduation for Spring Quarter is
April 1. Failure to meet this absolute
deadline will result in denial of graduation
until the following quarter.
Participation in the commencement ceremony
does not imply that a degree or certificate will
be awarded. Final verification is made once
the quarterly grades are posted.
Diplomas are mailed approximately 12 weeks
after the quarter ends.
Of the maximum 60 credits which may be
transferred and applied to an associate degree
13
Enrollment Information
Commencement
Transcripts
During Spring Quarter, eligible students are
mailed instructions regarding participation in
the June commencement ceremony. Students
must meet application deadlines in order to
participate in commencement. The ceremony
is held in the gymnasium during the evening
of the final day of Spring Quarter. Graduates
of any quarter during the academic year,
from Summer through Spring Quarters, are
encouraged to participate.
In compliance with The Family Education
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, a transcript
of grades will be sent to a college, university
or other agency ONLY upon the student’s
written request. In-person requests are made
by completing a Transcript Request Form at
the Student Services Center. Requests may
also be made by faxing or mailing a written
request providing student name, ID number,
student signature and the name and address
of institution or agency to receive the official
transcript. Holds on permanent records
resulting from outstanding tuition and fees,
fines or college-owned material, must be
cleared before a transcript is released.
Honors
The college encourages students to achieve
the highest level of scholarship in pursuit of
their educational goals. Students who have
earned an Associate Degree or Certificate of
Achievement and have maintained at least a
cumulative grade-point average of 3.50 will
receive honors recognition in the printed
program at the June commencement. All
students graduating with honors will have
their degrees and transcripts marked with
“honors.” If a student has completed a
minimum of one-half of the required credits
for the award at BCC, credits and grades
transferred to BCC from other colleges and
universities are not included in the calculation
of the cumulative grade point average.
Student Records
Grades are mailed to students at the end of
each quarter. Access to student grades for the
preceding four quarters is available on the
Touchtone system. As soon as the current
quarter’s grades are posted, the oldest quarter
is dropped from Touchtone. Grades may be
withheld if any financial or other obligations
are not fulfilled.
With the exception of the student’s
permanent transcript, student enrollmentrelated records are not maintained beyond
one year from the last date of attendance.
14
Confidentiality
of Student
Records
Name of student, dates of attendance, degree
or awards received and athletic-related
statistics are considered public information.
All other information concerning the
student’s permanent educational record is
confidential and the conditions of its
disclosure are governed by the Family
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974,
as amended.
Student
Services
Enrollment
Information
Support Services for
Students at BCC
aid that are currently available include jobs,
loans and grants. The office reviews each
applicant’s needs and attempts to put together
a financial aid package which utilizes one or
more of the resources available.
Family Contribution &
Family Need
Bellevue Community College offers many
services to help the student attain their
educational and life goals. Counseling, job
referral, services to special populations and a
centralized student processing area are some
of the convenient features of Bellevue
Community College.
academic planning, as well as job search
strategies. Besides offering career informational materials, the Career Center offers three
software programs – SIGI Plus, Discover and
WOIS. There are career advisors available on
a drop-in (no appointment) basis to assist you
(See also: Job Center and Counseling)
Academic
Advising
Counseling
The Advising Center offers information
regarding the degrees and certificates offered
at BCC as well as information on other
community colleges and baccalaureate
institutions in the state of Washington.
Curriculum advisors are located on the
second floor of the Student Services Building.
(See also: Counseling)
Assessment
To help credit students succeed, BCC
strongly recommends participation in the Full
Assessment sessions offered. If you have
never attended college, contact the Assessment Office at 641-2243, or go to the second
floor of the Student Services Building, to
schedule an assessment for placement
purposes. English composition, reading and
certain math courses require placement for
registration. Some courses with listed
prerequisites may be satisfied through
assessment. Transfer students may or may
not need an assessment. The Assessment
Office will make that determination.
Career Resource
Center
The Career Resource Center offers information and guidance regarding career and
Free, short-term counseling is available to
registered BCC students through the
college’s Human Development Center (HDC).
Services available through HDC include:
career testing, decision-making regarding
career and life goals, fear of tests and new
situations, career classes/workshops, personal
counseling, academic counseling, college
survival classes and student advocacy.
Counselors are available by appointment and
drop-in. To schedule an appointment or find
out the drop-in hours, call the Human
Development Center. (See also: Academic
Advising, Career Resource Center and
Job Center)
Disabled Student
Services
Disabled Student Services provides
advising, counseling or referral to any
student with a disability. Accommodation
services are provided for those students with
special needs due to disabling conditions.
Documentation of disabling conditions may
be required. Accommodations should be
requested at least 20 days prior to need.
Financial Aid
The Financial Aid Office provides assistance
to those who are determined eligible, within
the limits of available resources. Sources of
The college subscribes to the federal formula
for determining eligibility. When a student
applies for student aid, the information
reported is used in a formula established by
the U.S. Congress. This formula calculates
Expected Family Contribution (EFC). This is
the amount the student and/or their family is
expected to contribute towards education for
three quarters. The EFC is then used in an
equation to determine financial need.
Cost of Attendance
- Expected Family Contribution
= Financial Need
The EFC is based on many factors, including
1996 income information. If the family’s
circumstances have changed dramatically
in 1997 (e.g. loss of job, death, separation,
etc.) students may wish to inquire in the
Financial Aid Office about special condition
requirements.
Cost of Attendance for 9 months
(Tuition listed are the 96-97 rates)
Living
Living
in
With
Parents Apartment
Tuition & Fees
$1,446**
$1,446**
Books & Supplies
618
618
Rent/Food/Utilities 1,884
4,830
Transportation
1,094
1,094
Misc./Personal
1,644
1,752
TOTALS
$6,686
$9,740
** non-resident tuition is $5,556 for
three quarters
Application Procedure
Applying for financial aid is a lengthy
process. The Financial Aid Office must
follow the rules and regulations set by the
federal and state governments. For priority
consideration, all required forms must be
completed and received in our office by
April 15, 1997. Forms and instructions
are available through the BCC Financial
Aid Office.
15
Student Services
Notification of Award
When awarded aid, students receive an
Award Notification by mail which indicates
the type and amount of award(s) offered for
each quarter. Students need only return the
Award Notification if they are rejecting
their award.
Enrollment Status
Unless students are awarded after they have
registered, awards are always based on fulltime attendance (12 or more credits per
quarter). If a student registers for less than 12
credits for any quarter where aid has been
offered, awards will be adjusted based on
their enrollment.
Disbursement of Funds
Check disbursements are made available at
the Cashier’s Office. The cashier will need a
signed and current Attendance Verification
Card (bright red form) and a picture
identification. Grant awards are disbursed by
a check payable to the student, after tuition
has either been deducted from the award or
paid by a third party on the student’s behalf.
Student Loan
Checks are available in the Cashier’s
Office five business days after the
disbursement date on the notice sent by
the lender, BUT no sooner than the first
day of the quarter for which the check is
issued. In addition, federal regulations
require a 30-day disbursement delay for
new students who are first-time borrowers.
Work Study
Checks are earnings paid according to the
employer’s payroll schedule. On-campus
students are paid once per month, usually
around the 15th day of the following
month.
Financial Aid Available:
Grants, Work Study and Loans
Federal Supplemental Educational
Opportunity Grant
Federal Supplemental Opportunity Grants
(FSEOG) are for undergraduates with
exceptional need, with priority given to
students who receive Federal Pell Grants.
Federal Pell Grant
Federal Pell Grants are for undergraduate
students who have not earned a bachelor’s
16
or professional degree. For many students,
Federal Pell Grants provide a foundation
of financial aid to which other aid may
be added.
Washington State Need Grant
This program is administered by the
Higher Education Coordinating Board
for eligible Washington state residents.
Eligibility is determined using state
guidelines which assess need through
analysis of income and family size.
BCC Grants and Tuition Waivers
According to state community college
regulations, a limited number of tuition
waivers and grants are made available to
financially needy state residents.
Work Study
A variety of jobs are made possible through
federal and state work study programs, and
also through institutional funds. Students
are employed in a wide range of positions
on campus, working as typists, landscapers,
lab assistants, library assistants, etc. Offcampus placement related to a student’s
program of study are also available in a
variety of public and private settings.
Placement may be obtained through the Job
Center on the second floor of the Student
Services Building.
Loans
Federal Family Education Loans (FFEL)
are made available through banks, credit
unions, and savings and loan associations
to students registered for at least six credits
per quarter. The standard repayment is $50
per month. In certain cases where financial
need is established by the office, interest is
paid by the federal government until six
months after the borrower is no longer
enrolled for the minimum six credits.
All loan requests require attendance at the
Loan Entrance Counseling Session. This
session provides valuable information
about your rights and responsibilities as a
borrower. For date and time of available
next sessions, please see the Financial
Aid Office.
Scholarships
A considerable number of private
scholarships are administered through the
college. In most cases, the recipient is
chosen by the donor. A limited scholarship
library is available in the Financial Aid
Office. Students who have Internet access
may also obtain scholarship information at
http://www.studentservices.com/fastweb/
Satisfactory Progress
Students applying for and/or receiving
financial aid are required to make and
maintain satisfactory academic progress in
their course of study. A copy of the policy is
made available to all financial aid applicants
and available in the Financial Aid Office.
The maximum time frame for a full-time
student to earn a degree and continue to
receive financial aid is nine quarters. This is
a maximum of 135 attempted credits.
Students who exceed 90 attempted credits are
required to submit an Educational Plan which
is completed with assistance from a program
or curriculum advisor. This plan helps
students enroll in the courses which directly
apply to their intended degree or certificate.
Refund & Repayment
When a student officially withdraws from all
classes or completes zero credits in any
quarter, they will be subject to refund and
possible repayment of the financial aid
received. Tuition refunds are first returned to
any federal aid received. The calculation
used to determine how much is to be repaid
by the student is based on the documented
number of weeks of attendance as provided
by the instructor. Therefore, it is important
that students officially withdraw and notify
the Financial Aid Office immediately when
they withdraw from all classes or stop
attending for extenuating circumstances.
Head Start
BCC has a unique Head Start Program which
provides a full-day, free early childhood
program for four-year-old children whose
eligible parents attend college or work. Head
Start is a federally funded family program
which provides developmental screening,
health screening, hot meals and a professional preschool staff.
Student Services
International
Student Services
International Student Services (ISS) provides
primary support for international students
who are enrolled in credit classes at BCC.
ISS also provides support services related to:
international student admissions, advising,
counseling, employment authorizations, club
and student-life, activities, credit evaluations/
reviews and student housing referrals.
Job Center
The Job Center is open to students and the
community. The Center is a co-location site
with the Bellevue Job Service Center. An
Employment Security employee works fulltime at the center. Information on full and
part-time positions is available. Students
who are eligible for Workforce Training can
also obtain information on Commissioner
Approved Training. (See also: Career
Resource Center)
ComputerEquipped Labs
Apple Computer Lab
The Apple Lab is equipped with Macintosh
computers, many with CD-ROM drives. A
wide variety of easy-to-use software
applications have been installed. Both laser
and color printers are available. Internet web
browsing is available on evenings and
weekends. Student lab assistants are available
to provide some assistance in the use of lab
computers. The lab is open to all students who
have paid a BCC Apple Lab access fee.
Students who have paid computer lab fees for
access to other BCC computer labs may also
use this lab on evenings and weekends.
AOS/PC Computer Labs
These labs are equipped with PC’s using the
Windows 95 Graphical User Interface (GUI).
Many have CD-ROM drives and multi-media
capability. Popular word-processing, spreadsheet and database software applications
have been installed. Laser printers are
available. Most computers have Internet
access. Student lab assistants are available to
provide some assistance in the use of lab
computers. These labs are open to all
students who have paid a BCC AOS/PC Lab
access fee.
Engineering/Design Lab
This lab is equipped with PC’s using the
Windows operating system. AutoCAD
software has been installed. Both laser
printing and large format ink jet printing are
available. Student lab assistants are available
to provide some assistance in the use of lab
computers. These labs are open to all
Engineering and Design students enrolled in
Engineering or Interior Design courses which
have a BCC computer access fee.
Information Technology Lab
This lab is equipped with PC’s using the
Windows operating system. Popular wordprocessing, spreadsheet and database
software applications as well as specialized
software used by students enrolled in BA,
CS and IT courses have been installed.
Programming languages and Client Server
technology are available for course work.
Laser printing is available. Lab computers
have Internet access. Intranet applications
will also be developed in various courses.
Student lab assistants are available to provide
some assistance in the use of lab computers.
This lab is open to all students enrolled in
BA, CS and IT courses which have paid a
BCC computer access fee. Other students
may have access upon approval of the lab
director and payment of a BCC computer
access fee.
Interactive Multimedia
Lab (IML)
This lab is equipped with both PC’s using the
Windows 95 Graphical User Interface (GUI)
and Macintosh computers. Lab computers
meet industry standards for multimedia
development. Two color flat bed scanners,
video capture equipment, and laser printing
are available. Specialized multimedia
development software has been installed on
all lab computers. Many lab computers have
Internet access. Student lab assistants are
available to provide some assistance in the
use of lab computers. These labs are open to
all students enrolled in Media Communication and Technology courses which have a
BCC computer access fee.
Math Lab
Math Lab professional and student tutors
provide free tutorial assistance on a drop-in
basis. The lab has additional resources, such
as computer tutorials, which may be used onlocation to supplement classroom activities.
Music Labs
These labs are equipped with both PC’s
using the Windows operating system and
Macintosh computers. Specialized music
software has been installed. Student lab
assistants are available to provide some
assistance in the use of lab computers.
These labs are open to all students enrolled
in music courses which have a BCC
computer access fee.
Reading Lab
The Reading Lab enables students at BCC to
register for credit while they become more
proficient readers. Students are tested to
determine reading vocabulary, comprehension
and rate. Appropriate computer programs and/
or other materials are provided to remedy
deficiencies. The goal of the Reading Lab is to
help students become successful, independent
readers who can confidently handle texts and
supplementary reading materials in their
classes. Students must be registered to utilize
Reading Lab services.
Technical Support Lab
This lab is equipped with both PC’s using the
Windows operating system and Macintosh
computers. This lab is used by students
enrolled in BCC’s Technical Support
Program to acquire hands-on networking and
hardware/software configuration experience.
It is open to all students enrolled in Technical
Support courses which have a BCC computer
access fee.
Writing Lab
The BCC Writing Lab assists students with
writing assignments from essays to term
papers. Lab assistants also help students
prepare resumes and scholarship applications.
Over 30 computers are available for use by
students enrolled in composition classes.
17
Student Services
Library Media
Center
The Library Media Center contains 45,000
books; microfilms; videotapes; over 500
magazines, newspapers and journals among
other resources. The On-Line Public Access
Catalog (OPAC) available on the main floor
offers information on the library’s collection
of print and non-print materials. Electronic
sources such as those on CD-ROM as well as
the Internet are accessed through several
computer workstations. Computers, projection
units, TV monitors and VCRs are available on
rolling carts for use in the classrooms. The
Library Media Center makes available study
rooms, media viewing rooms and a videoediting suite.
Multi-Cultural
Student Services
The goal of Multi-Cultural Services (MCS) is
to provide educational support and retention
services to students of color. MCS support
services include: admission and registration
assistance, academic assessment, financial
aid application assistance, advising and
personal counseling, student progress
monitoring, special study skills course,
consultation with instructors, campus and
community referral, cultural activities and
ethnic clubs.
Parking and
Campus Security
The college maintains over 2,500 student
parking spaces, with reserved areas for
carpools (3+ people per car) and disabled
drivers with state-issued permits. All students
are entitled to parking permits upon payment
of their comprehensive fees, and permits are
required between 6 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Campus Security enforces
traffic and parking regulations and can also
assist drivers with dead batteries and other
emergencies.
18
Student Child
Care and
Learning Center
Child care is available to BCC students with
children, 18 months to seven years of age.
The center provides affordable quality child
care with a full day preschool program. There
is a weekly fee for children 18 to 30 months
and a sliding scale for children three to seven
years old. The Student Child Care and Early
Learning Center at BCC is accredited by the
National Association for the Education of
Young Children. (See also: Head Start and
Parent Education Preschool)
Student Health
Center
The Student Health Center’s focus is health
promotion, disease prevention and wellness.
The staff is available for classroom and
campus-wide programs, as well as individual
student consultations.
Student
Programs
Student Programs provides campus exposure
to cultural, social, educational and physical
activities and events. The goal of Student
Programs is to enlighten, educate and
entertain BCC students through out-ofclassroom experiences. Student Programs
houses the following programs: ASBCC
student government, the Student Programming Board, Phi Theta Kappa, the ASBCC
used-textbook sale, the BCC Curriculum
Guide and the Student Union Information
Center. Student Programs also provides the
BCC student handbook at no cost. Handbooks are available around campus and have
information on campus services, programs,
departments, and college policies, codes, and
reports. Student Programs is located in the
Student Union Building.
Tutoring
Program
The Tutorial Program is designed for one-onone and group session tutoring for all college
credit courses. Students performing at a “C”
grade level or below are eligible for two
hours per week of individual tutoring. Group
sessions may be attended by students
performing at any grade level.
Veterans’
Administration
Programs
The Financial Aid Office coordinates
educational benefits available through the
Veterans’ Administration.
Women’s Center
The Women’s Center helps students and
members of the community to realize their
career and educational potential through:
physics and math study groups, financial aid
information and one-on-one scholarship
assistance, a transfer club, single parents’
group, a quarterly workshop series, and
information and referral to community
services.
A variety of career transition classes and
services are offered for men and women. The
Compass for Success class is a creative career
transition program designed for unemployed
workers seeking employment and training
options. The Women in Transition Program
provides an intensive career and life planning
class, follow-up classes and a mentoring program which connects participants with professional women in their chosen career field.
Student Services
Workforce
Training
Workforce Training is a partnership between
Washington State Employment Security
Department and the community and technical
colleges of Washington.
Workforce students:
■
are eligible for or currently receiving
unemployment insurance (UI), or
■
have exhausted UI benefits within the last
24 months.
■
pursue only Workforce-approved
vocational program or skill enhancement
classes for college credit.
Workforce Training Services include:
■
Guided career exploration and occupational assessment and self-service
computers for career guidance and
exploration at no cost to the students.
■
Dedicated BCC Workforce program and
financial aid advisors.
■
Compass for Success, a transition course
designed especially for unemployed
workers.
■
Limited assistance for tuition, books, child
care and travel.
■
Priority registration.
■
On-site Washington state Employment
Security representative.
■
BCC Job Center resources.
■
Work search assistance – resumes,
including electronic resumes, labor market
information, interviewing and more.
■
Referral and coordination with other
agencies.
19
OtherEducational
EducationalOpportunities
Opportunities
Other
BCC offers many educational opportunities
distinct from our traditional credit programs.
From non-credit Continuing Education
courses to college credit opportunities for
high school students, BCC is truly a
community resource with something to offer
people from all age groups and backgrounds.
Continuing
Education
Programs
Not interested in a degree? If you want a
class which focuses on your immediate needs,
doesn’t have grades, but does have great
instructors who are current in their field, try
our non-credit Continuing Education courses.
Our offerings range from three-hour workshops to ten-week classes – varied options
designed to fit your schedule and your
pocketbook. Pick from the largest, most
comprehensive selection of continuing
education courses found at any community
college in the region.
Arts & Personal Enrichment
Select from courses in drama, dance, music,
literature, art history, sculpture, crafts,
drawing, and painting. Students may also
meet personal needs through classes in
financial planning, sports and recreation,
science, home technologies, health and
fitness, family life, and travel.
Business & Professional
Development
Small Business
Begin a small business with free advising
from our Small Business Development
Counselor. Get help in promoting your
business’ growth with classes in finance,
marketing and management skills.
All professionals
Courses are available in communication,
supervisory skills, career planning, total
quality management, international business
and foreign languages for business.
Professional specialties
Keep up to date with information from
practicing professionals in manufacturing,
20
Other Educational
Opportunities
health care, non-profit management,
cabinetry, film and TV, among others.
Computers
Choose from over 300 offerings in the
latest software for people from cautious
beginners to proficient technical specialists.
Introductory courses, office applications,
desktop publishing, drawing, multimedia,
programming, networking and troubleshooting are all taught off-campus in
comfortable, state-of-the-art classrooms.
World Languages
Continuing Education offers non-credit
instruction in 25 different languages.
Many of the instructors are native or nativefluent. World languages also offers courses
taught in English on world cultures and
business practices.
High School
Programs
General Education
Development (GED)
BCC offers courses at no cost to prepare
students for the five-part General Education
Development exam. The GED test is available
at BCC for a small fee. Those who successfully complete the test will earn a Certificate
of General Education Development.
High School Completion
Students 18 years and older may elect to take
courses at BCC which satisfy the state of
Washington requirements for the high school
diploma. Participation in the High School
Completion Program requires that the student
make arrangements for their high school
transcript to be evaluated by the High School
Completion advisor who approves a tuition
waiver for participating students 19 years and
older. Students in this program are awarded
high school credit and college credit
simultaneously.
Running Start
Students classified as juniors or seniors in
Washington state’s public high schools may
apply to this program. Applications are
available in high school counseling offices. To
qualify, students must demonstrate proficiency
in college level English by taking the BCC
Assessment for English 101. Students must
also take the BCC Assessment for MATH
105/156 upon application. Qualified students
may elect to take all or some of their
remaining high school course work at the
college. Tuition for these students is paid by
their respective school districts.
College-in-the-High School
The College-in-the-High School is a
cooperative program between local school
districts and Bellevue Community College. It
allows high school students to take regular
college courses in their own high school. The
program offers basic, introductory-level
courses which are most often required in the
general pattern of freshman coursework at
Washington state’s four-year universities.
Students who successfully complete
coursework taken through the College-in-theHigh School program earn regular BCC
course credit that is recorded on an official
college transcript.
Tech Prep
Students from high schools that have 2 + 2
Tech Prep program articulation agreements
with Bellevue Community College may earn
occupational/vocational credit as outlined in
the program’s agreements. Earned credit will
be transcripted on the BCC permanent record
after the first quarter. BCC admissions
procedures and requirements must still be
met. Interested students may obtain the
necessary form from their high schools.
Other Educational Opportunities
Interdisciplinary
Studies
Parent
Education
Interdisciplinary courses are intense,
challenging and rewarding classes in which
several subjects are taught in concert.
Interdisciplinary classes create “learning
communities” where instructors team teach
and students spend a large percentage of their
time in small seminars.
Parent/child classes provide a quality early
childhood program combined with parent
participation and parent education. Initial
registration for each school year (SeptemberJune) begins in February and March, with
continuous registration until classes are full.
Parents enroll in one of the following five
programs: Parent/Infant Classes, Parent/
Pre-Toddler Observation, Parent/Toddler
Observation, Cooperative Preschools, or
Creative Development Discovery and Early
Activities Laboratories. Day and evening
classes are offered for each program.
International
Programs
The International Programs Division of
Bellevue Community College offers noncredit training to international students
through the following programs:
University Preparation/
Intensive English as a
Second Language
This program prepares students with TOEFL
scores of 499 or below to successfully enter
American colleges and universities.
International Business
Professions
Students in this one-year program learn
the basics of Western business through
classroom study and practical training
in industry.
University Summer Abroad
College and university-aged students study
English and American culture in these two to
four week programs. Weekly field trips and
homestays allow students to experience life
in America first-hand during their stay.
International Semester Abroad
This exchange program allows foreign
colleges to send students to Bellevue
Community College for six months of
customized training through International
Programs.
Distance
Learning
Telecourses
BCC Distance Learning opportunitites are
designed to provide academic college credit
classes for students whose educational
opportunities are limited by time or distance
constraints. Telecourses are offered on TCI
Cable via the College Channel (Channel 28)
from Bellevue Community College or on
video tapes available in the Library Media
Center. On-line courses are available via the
Internet and accessible through links to the
BCC Home Page (http://www.bcc.ctc.edu).
An associate degree can be earned solely
through Distance Learning courses, and
credits earned are transferable upon successful
completion of course requirements as
stipulated by each instructor. The cost per
credit hour is the same as other state resident
BCC academic courses plus an additional
licensing fee per course.
“TELOS” –
Older Adults’
Program
TELOS is a program for senior adults cosponsored by BCC and the Bellevue Parks
Department. Course offerings are selected by
a board of older adults, with low fees and a
social support network that extends beyond
the classes.
Women’s Center
The Women’s Center provides a variety of
information and referral services, educational
opportunities and support for students and
members of the community.
Student Services
■
Scholarship and financial aid information
■
Transfer Club
■
Single Parent’s Group
■
Math and Physics Study Groups
Compass for Success,
5 credit class
The Women’s Center in collaboration with
the Workforce Training Program offers this
creative career transition class designed for
unemployed workers seeking employment
and training options. The class provides
opportunity to do the following:
■
Assess interests and skills
■
Identify high-demand occupations
■
Develop a career path that matches
student’s skills and interests
■
Network with business and educational
representatives
■
Develop new computer and communication skills
21
Other Educational Opportunities
CONNECT! Career
Opportunities for Non Native
English speakers in Education
and Career Training
The C.O.N.N.E.C.T. class provides an
opportunity for non-native English speakers
to learn more about community opportunities
for employment and education, and to share
cross-cultural experiences. Curriculum
includes information on understanding the
educational system, strategies for obtaining
employment and discussion on overcoming
cultural barriers to obtaining employment.
Women in Transition
The Women’s Center offers a three-phase
program for women undergoing various life
transitions. It begins with an intensive 54hour class in Career and Life Planning which
includes interest and vocational testing, goalsetting and confidence building, job search
and college strategy skills-building.
Following the class are six weekly meetings
exploring the options and opportunities for
pursuing education and career goals in the
context of a healthy and balanced life.
Finally, in the mentoring phase of the
program, participants are matched with
professional women similar to the career
field they wish to pursue. Mentors and peers
from the Women in Transition program
create an infrastructure of support for women
striving to achieve their educational and
career goals.
Workshops
Students can learn the secrets of financial
security; how mediation, yoga, or journaling
can improve quality of life; how to communicate with loved ones or how to find natural
alternatives to hormone replacement. The
Women’s Center presents informative
workshops on all of these issues and many
more each quarter. Credit students may
attend these workshops at the discounted rate
of $5.00.
■
■
■
■
College Strategies
Creative Expression
Career Development
Personal Growth
■
Managing Personal Finances
Fitness, Health, and Safety
■
Communication
■
22
Student LifeOpportunities
Other Educational
Campus Activities
and Student Life
Food Services
In addition to offering high quality meals
throughout the day in the college cafeteria,
BCC Food Services also caters community
and college gatherings.
Honor Society: Phi
Theta Kappa
BCC is well known for the strength of its
academic programs, but we also offer many
extracurricular activities and benefits to
enhance student life. Arts, athletics and
special-interest activities are available in the
BCC community.
Art Gallery/Library
Gallery Space
The BCC Gallery Space provides the campus
and community with an opportunity to
experience a range of strong visual art. Shows
of works by present and former students,
faculty and nationally recognized artists are
presented on a rotating basis at the gallery.
Bookstore
Besides textbooks and school supplies for
classes, the BCC Bookstore, located in the
Student Services Building on the first floor,
carries candy, toiletries, greeting cards, small
gifts and BCC logo clothing.
Bus Pass Discount
METRO bus passes may be purchased by
students, staff and faculty at discounted
prices from the Cashier’s Office. METRO
bus schedules may be found in the Student
Union Building, or you may call 553-3000
for bus route schedules.
Dance
Eastside Moving Company
Dance Ensemble
Eastside Moving Company dancers work
with professional choreographers in jazz,
modern and ballet styles. A major production is held Spring Quarter in BCC’s
Carlson Theatre. Those participating earn
1-5 credits per quarter (see Dance 201-203).
Delta Epsilon Chi (DEC)
Delta Epsilon Chi, the post-secondary level
of national DECA, is a student organization
of instruction and training. DEC enhances the
value of education in marketing, merchandising and management, while preparing students
for careers in sales, advertising, finance,
retailing and wholesaling, fashion merchandising and many marketing-oriented
occupations. DEC provides opportunity for
leadership development, scholastic development, vocational understanding, organizational training and further development of
professional attitude and appearances.
Students attend state and national conferences
and are given the opportunity to network
with professionals from business and industry.
It is recommended that a student wanting to
participate in DEC enroll in Marketing 290 –
Marketing Activities.
Drama
Each spring, the Drama Department produces
a mainstage production. Plays of the past
have included “The Heidi Chronicles,” and
“Dangerous Liaisons.” Fall auditions are
open to the campus community. Credit may
be earned for participation in these productions, including construction and backstage
work. Professional directors and designers
from the Seattle area produce the plays.
The college also offers a “Stagefright”
Drama Club which presents three shows each
year: one complete play production during
Winter Quarter, and two scene productions
in the fall and spring. The club also holds
two workshops each quarter conducted by
theater professionals.
Fitness Center
Each student enrolled in the BCC Fitness
Center is given a physical assessment. This
information is used to prescribe an individual
workout program on the Super Circuit. The
Super Circuit provides an aerobic, strength
and endurance workout simultaneously.
Auxiliary hand weights and weight machines
as well as cardio-vascular machines
(treadmills, stair-steps, etc.) are available for
use in the Fitness Center.
Phi Theta Kappa, the national community/
junior college honor society, recognizes
student academic excellence and leadership
potential and gives members the opportunity
for involvement in various campus and
community service activities. An honors
theme is chosen at the annual Honors
Institute, which is held in June on university
campuses near major cities around the nation.
The honors theme is reflected in programs
developed by the various chapters. The
BCC chapter, Alpha Epsilon Rho, founded
in 1979, requires a 3.5 GPA for membership eligibility.
Model United Nations
Model United Nations is a program which
simulates activities of the United Nations
and other international organizations. The
simulation takes place over the course of
several days, during which students deliver
speeches consistent with their country’s point
of view, negotiate with other nations, and
write and vote on resolutions in an attempt
to find constructive solutions to many of the
major issues facing the world. Participants
develop a better understanding of international relations, the politics of other nations,
and how the United Nations conducts its
work. In addition, they examine a variety of
issues such as peacekeeping, disarmament,
economic development, environmental policy
and human rights and consider the impact
of political, economic, historical, social
and cultural factors on foreign policy and
international diplomacy. Each year the
National Model United Nations holds a
conference in New York open to all schools
in the United States and several foreign
countries. Those wishing to participate in
Model United Nations must enroll in
Political Science 121, Fall quarter, 1 credit;
Political Science 122, Winter quarter, 2
credits; and Political Science 123, Spring
quarter, 2 credits.
23
Student Life
Music
Choral Music Productions
BCC’s Symphonic Chorale and Celebration! Vocal jazz ensemble participate in
musical concerts, festivals, tours, studentled programs and performance venues at
BCC. Celebration! has been recognized as
an award-winning leader in the field of
vocal jazz at the state and regional levels.
Instrumental Music Productions
Instrumental Music Productions (IMP) is
allied with the course offering Music 106:
BCC Jazz Band. IMP is involved in
concerts (on and off-campus), tours,
festivals, retreats and recordings. Membership in the ensemble is by audition Fall
Quarter. Commitment is for the entire year.
Auditions may be given for available chairs
during the rest of the year. The IMP experience includes combos gathered from the
Jazz Band instrumentation. These combos
also tour and perform with the Jazz Band.
Planetarium
The Geer Planetarium is one of two
planetariums in Western Washington. It is
available to BCC students, visiting school
groups and, on a quarterly basis, public
groups. The night sky is projected onto the
domed ceiling of the planetarium by a
projector that is capable of replicating the
positions of the sun, moon, planets and stars
as they would appear in the actual sky.
Publications
Curriculum Guide
The Curriculum Guide, coordinated by the
Student Programs Office and developed
by student staff, offers basic information
about individual classes based on faculty
feedback. Information includes: types of
tests offered, class format and hours of
homework required.
Literary and Arts Annual: Arnazella
Arnazella staff welcome fellow students
who are interested in organizing and
publishing Arnazella, BCC’s literary and
arts publication, which features essays,
short stories, poetry and art from artists
and writers across the Northwest. Students
may earn up to 15 elective credits for the
academic year while they gain experience
in editing and publishing.
24
Student Newspaper: The Advocate
The Advocate is a student-run, weekly
publication which welcomes students
who have enthusiasm for news writing,
editing and advertising for print media.
An experienced faculty advisor provides
direction for Advocate staff. Advocate
staff participate by enrolling in either
Communications 141, 143, 144, 145,
146 or 299.
Intramurals and Sports Clubs
Aerobics, basketball, pickleball, volleyball
and weightlifting are just a few of the
midday activities offered through BCC
intramurals Fall, Winter and Spring
Quarters. Intramurals, planned and
implemented by students, staff and
faculty, are a great way to keep in shape
and meet people.
Student Clubs
Radio Station KBCS-FM 91.3
KBCS, 91.3FM, is a 2800-watt, listenersupported, non-commercial radio station
licensed to Bellevue Community College.
KBCS airs folk, jazz, blues and world music
along with a wide variety of news and
cultural affairs programming. All program
hosts are volunteers who love radio and
want to make listening to KBCS a constant
pleasure for listeners throughout the Puget
Sound area. To get a sample KBCS program
schedule, please call KBCS at 206-641-2427.
Sports Programs
Intercollegiate Athletics
Anyone attending BCC is welcome to
try out for BCC intercollegiate athletic
teams. Registered students attend games
free of charge. Equity in athletics data is
available for public inspection in the
Athletics Office, G100. BCC belongs to
the NWAACC (Northwest Athletic
Association of Community Colleges).
INTERCOLLEGIATE SPORTS
FALL
Women
Men
cross country
volleyball
cross country
soccer
WINTER
Women
Men
basketball
basketball
SPRING
Women
Men
track, tennis
golf, softball
track, baseball
tennis, golf
There are a variety of clubs on campus
reflecting student culture and activities.
The college encourages students who
wish to form clubs to contact the Student
Programs Office at 641-2296, for
chartering information.
Student Government: ASBCC
General elections are held every Spring
Quarter to elect the board of students who
represent the ASBCC – Associated Students
of Bellevue Community College (all
registered students automatically become
members of ASBCC). Participation on the
board offers students experience in campuswide policy development and activity
coordination.
The Student Programs Office, which houses
the ASBCC Board, organizes and funds
many campus clubs and activities.
Degrees & Certificates
Student Life
Degree and Certificate
Requirements
General
Requirements
In order to receive a degree or certificate
from BCC, students must fulfill the following
general requirements:
Dual Degrees
Students may earn an associate degree in
two different curricular programs at Bellevue
Community College. To qualify for a second
degree, the student must:
1. Complete the 90 or more credit hours
required for the first degree, and
1. BCC cumulative GPA of 2.00 (a higher
admissions GPA may be required by some
receiving institutions).
2. Complete all the specific course requirements of the second curricular program,
and
2. Credits and grades transferred to BCC
from other colleges and universities are
included in the calculation of the
cumulative GPA for graduation, unless the
student has completed at least one-half of
the requirements at BCC.
3. Complete at least 30 applicable quarter
credit hours in addition to the credits
earned to complete the initial degree.
3. Transfer credits with less than a “D” grade
are not counted to satisfy a graduation
requirement.
4. The last 10 credits must be completed at
BCC immediately preceding graduation.
Students have the following responsibilities
in successfully completing a degree or
certificate:
■
knowledge and understanding of college
policies;
■
ensuring that all necessary course
requirements have been met;
■
providing official transcripts of course
work to be transferred in from other
institutions;
■
providing appropriate course descriptions
for transferred courses from the year the
courses were taken;
■
timely filing of the graduation application;
■
meeting all financial obligations to
the college.
Petitions for waivers of any degree or
certificate requirements should be directed to
the chief academic officer or designee. The
Evaluations Office will provide advice on
this process.
Another option is that of earning a degree
plus a Certificate of Achievement. In order to
earn a certificate in conjunction with a degree,
the student must:
5. Completion of a minimum of 13 quarter
credit hours in basic skills to meet
Communication and Quantitative Skill
requirements.
6. The Communication Skills requirement is
a minimum of ten credits which includes
completion of two courses in English
composition totaling not less than six
credits, with any remaining credits in basic
speech or an additional writing course.
Composition courses at BCC that help meet
this requirement are COMM 141, ENGL
101, 102, 270, 271 and 272. If the student
is transferring composition course(s) from
another institution that total at least six
credits but do not reach the minimum
required ten credits, any SPCH 100 or
above course will satisfy this requirement.
7. The Quantitative Skills requirement has
two components:
a. Completion of Intermediate Algebra,
which is not included in the required
90 credits hours, may be satisfied
several ways:
■
completion of a college intermediate
algebra course,
1. Complete an additional 15 credit hours in
an approved program and/or
■
completion of high school mathematics
through second year algebra,
2. Complete the specific course requirements
of an established Certificate of Achievement or Certificate of Accomplishment
program.
■
placement above intermediate algebra
through BCC’s Assessment Office, or
■
completion of a college mathematics
course for which intermediate algebra is
a prerequisite.
Specific
Requirements
Associate in Arts and Sciences
(AAS) Degree
1. Completion of 90 quarter credit hours of
college-level transferable credit.
2. At least 30 of the 90 quarter credit hours
for the AAS degree must be completed in
residence at BCC.
3. Completion of 45 to 60 quarter credit
hours to satisfy the General Education
Distribution requirements. (See AAS
Distribution Requirement)
4. Completion of a minimum of 15 quarter
credit hours of fully transferable elective
courses, as defined by the receiving
institution.
b. Five credits of symbolic or quantitative
reasoning which may be in computer
science, statistics, mathematics, or other
discipline for which intermediate algebra
is a prerequisite. Students complete five
credits from the following BCC courses:
■
Philosophy 120
■
Mathematics 105, 120, 124
■
Mathematics 107 or Mathematics 156
■
Information Technology 110
8. Distribution Requirements are to be
satisfied from the areas of humanities,
social science and natural science and
must be selected from at least three
distinct disciplines with not more than 10
credits in any one discipline.
25
Degrees & Certificates
9. Distribution Requirements and Basic
Skills Requirements may not be taken
Pass/Fail. Courses with a “P” (pass grade)
may be used only to satisfy elective credit
requirements.
10. Courses in the 190’s and 290’s series may
NOT be used as distribution, they are to
be used as electives only.
11. Students may include their lower division
major discipline requirements in the
electives portion of the degree plan only,
and may not use them to satisfy
distribution requirements.
12. For humanities, no more than five credits
may be taken in performance/skills or
studio art classes.
13. For science, at least one laboratory course
must be included.
14. Developmental or remedial coursework is
not included in the 90 quarter credits.
15. Specific courses within one discipline
may be credited towards no more than
one distribution or skill area.
16. Within appropriate distribution areas,
students are encouraged to develop an
understanding of and sensitivity to cultural
pluralism by completing courses requiring
study of cultures other than their own.
17. Integrative, synthesizing courses and
programs, including interdisciplinary
courses and linked sequences of courses
are encouraged.
18. First year foreign language courses are
encouraged to include cultural aspects
of study.
AAS Pre-Majors
BCC Students pursuing a transfer degree may
declare at BCC the major they will be
pursuing at the baccalaureate institution.
Students apply these “pre-major” lower
division credits to the electives portion of the
transfer degree plan, and with few exceptions,
may not use them to satisfy distribution
requirements. The AAS degree allows the
student to satisfy freshman and sophomore
requirements at BCC as well as satisfying
some or all lower division coursework. The
following pre-majors are currently recognized at BCC. Asterisks (**) indicate that
specific additional requirements may be
needed; students must contact the departments
for further details:
26
Accounting
Agriculture
American Studies **
Anthropology
Archeology
Architecture( Urban Planning,
Landscape Design)
Art (includes Photography)
Astronomy
Biology
Botany
Business Administration **
Chemistry
Communications (includes
Radio, TV)
Computer Science
Dance
Drama
Dentistry
Ecology
Economics
Education
Engineering **
English
Environmental Studies
Ethnic Studies
Fisheries/Wildlife
Foreign Languages
Forestry
Geography
Geology
History
Home Economics
International Studies **
Journalism
Law
Librarian
Mathematics
Medicine
Medical Technology
Microbiology
Music **
Nursing
Oceanography/Marine Biology
Occupational Therapy
Pre-Pharmacy (Science Divison) **
Philosophy
Physical Education/Health Education
Physical Therapy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Recreation Leadership **
Social Work/Welfare
Sociology
Speech
Speech Therapy
Veterinary Medicine
Zoology
AAS Distribution Requirements
The course distribution lists are intended to
be descriptive and not prescriptive.
Humanities
Distribution Requirement (15-20 Credits)
may be selected from the following
disciplines:
American Studies
Anthropology 200 only
● Art (Art 108 is elective only)
● Communications EXCEPT 150
● Dance
● Drama
● Music
● English Literature EXCEPT 101, 102, 103,
105, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 275
● Foreign Language (200 level
recommended)
●
●
American Sign Language 135, 136, 137
(5-credit ASL classes only)
● History
● Philosophy EXCEPT 102,120
● Speech EXCEPT 225
●
Social Science
Distribution Requirement (15-20 Credits)
may be selected from the following
disciplines:
American Studies
Anthropology EXCEPT 200, 201
● Communications 150 only
● Economics
● General Business 101 only
● Geography EXCEPT 205, 206
● History
● International Studies
● Philosophy 102 only
● Political Science
● Psychology EXCEPT 102
● Sociology
● Speech 225 only
●
●
Degrees & Certificates
Science
Distribution Requirement (15-20 Credits)
may be selected from the following
disciplines. Field trip classes may not be used
for science distribution.
Select at least ONE of the following
laboratory sciences:
● Biology 100, 101, 102
● Biology 201, 202, 203, 250
● Botany 110, 111, 112, 113
● Chemistry 101, 102, 140, 150, 231, 232
● Environmental Science 250
● Geography 206
● Geology 101
● Oceanography 101
● Physics 114, 115, 116, 121, 122, 123
● Zoology 113, 114
Select UP TO THREE from the following
areas:
● Anthropology 201 only
● Astronomy EXCEPT 112, 180
● Biology EXCEPT 100
● Botany
● Chemistry (5-credit classes only)
● Environmental Science
● Geography 205, 206 only
● Geology
● Home Economics 130 only
● Math 105, 107, 200 or above
● Meteorology
● Oceanography
● Philosophy 120 only
● Physics EXCEPT 101
● Psychology 102 only
● Zoology
3. A maximum of three credits in an
activity PE.
4. No classes numbered below 100 level.
Associate in Science
Degree (AS)
1. At least 30 of the 90 quarter credit hours
for the AS degree must be completed in
residence at BCC.
2. Students are expected to complete a
program that is precisely parallel with the
first two years of a baccalaureate degree
plan at the institution to which they expect
to transfer.
3. Specific courses and standards to complete
the degree will depend on the transferring
institution requirements.
4. Students are not guaranteed the benefits
that accrue to the Associate in Arts and
Sciences Transfer degree, but students
often realize the same results since their
curriculum has paralleled that which is
required by the program at the institution
to which they intend to transfer.
1. A maximum of 15 free elective credits
TOTAL in occupational, technical, human
development courses, English 100, and
individual development classes.
2. Math 101 is ONLY allowable if taken
before Summer 1990.
5. Recommended total of 30 credits or
a minimum of ten credits each in
humanities, social science, and natural
sciences areas.
6. Although the degree may contain
transferable courses, the transferability
of courses remains the sole prerogative of
the institution to which students are
transferring.
Associate in Arts Degree (AA)
and Certificates
1. At least 30 of the 90 quarter credit hours
for the AA degree MUST be completed in
residence at BCC. At least one-third of the
required credits for a certificate MUST be
completed in residence at BCC.
2. Specific courses may be credited
toward no more than one requirement or
skill area.
5. Developmental or remedial coursework
may not be included to satisfy the 90
quarter credits.
3. Students must receive approval from
program chairs for course equivalencies or
requirements previously completed.
6. Specific courses within one discipline may
be credited towards no more than one
distribution or skill area.
4. Certain programs have provisions that
coursework completed to satisfy degree or
certificate requirements must be current.
Previously completed credits may have
exceeded the maximum length of time
which can lapse from time of completion
(whether the credits were completed at
BCC or at another institution).
7. Within appropriate distribution areas,
students are encouraged to develop an
understanding of and sensitivity to cultural
pluralism by completing courses requiring
study of cultures other than their own.
8. Integrative, synthesizing courses and
programs, including interdisciplinary
courses and linked sequences of courses
are encouraged.
Electives
Between 15-30 credits should be selected
within a student’s intended major (see AAS
Pre-Majors section). The following special
conditions apply:
4. Minimum completion of English 092 or
above AND Math 075 or above to satisfy
communication and quantitative skill
requirements.
Associate in Arts in General
Studies (AAGS)
5. The transferability of courses remains the
sole prerogative of the institution to which
students are transferring.
6. Specific course requirements for each
degree and certificate may be altered to
reflect the needs of industry and students
or availability of resources.
1. Completion of 90 quarter credit hours,
three of which are recommended to be
activity courses in physical education.
2. At least 60 credits must be taken from
courses numbered 100 or above.
3. At least 30 of the 90 quarter credit hours
for the AAGS degree must be completed
in residence at BCC.
27
Degrees & Certificates
Certificate of Accomplishment
Occupational Degrees and
Certificates by Program Area
Accounting
Paraprofessional
This program offers excellent academic
options for students to enter the growing field
of accounting through degree and certificate
programs. The Bookkeeping Certificate of
Accomplishment is designed to prepare
students for employment as full-charge
bookkeepers. The credits earned in the
certificate may be applied to the degree
program. The Paraprofessional Accounting
Certificate of Achievement emphasizes
practical skills for those who seek early
employment but may wish to work toward a
degree later. The Associate in Arts degree
provides a strong background in accounting
and business skills. The degree prepares
graduates for immediate accounting positions
and future supervisory roles in business and
government. Students are given a wellrounded background to allow rapid advancement to middle management level within
an organization.
Associate in Arts Degree
Paraprofessional Accounting
Course No.
ACCT 101
ACCT 102
ACCT 103
ACCT 135
ACCT 172
ACCT 234
ACCT 240
ACCT 250
ACCT 260
28
Course Name Credits Hrs
Survey of Accounting
5
Practical Accounting I
5
Practical Accounting II
5
Business Payroll Tax
Accounting
5
Integrated Accounting on
Microcomputer
5
Managerial Accounting
5
Advanced Computerized
Problems for Accounting
5
Intermediate Accounting
5
Accounting for Non-Profit
Agency
5
ACCT 270 Cost Accounting
ACCT 285 Federal Income Taxes
Choose one from the following:
AOS 161
Beginning Computer
Applications
OR
IT 105
Introduction to PCs
and Applications
AOS 165
Spreadsheet Applications:
Excel
ENGL 101 Written Expression
ENGL 270 Professional Report Writing
G BUS 101 Introduction to Business
G BUS 145 Business Mathematics
G BUS 202 Law and Business
GRAND TOTAL
5
5
5
Course No.
ACCT 102
ACCT 103
ACCT 172
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Practical Accounting I
5
Practical Accounting II
5
Integrated Accounting on
Microcomputer
5
G BUS 145 Business Mathematics
5
ACCT 135 Business Payroll Tax
Accounting
5
Choose one from the following:
5
AOS 161
Beginning Computer
Applications
OR
IT 105
Introduction to PCs
and Applications
GRAND TOTAL
5
5
5
5
5
5
90
Certificate of Achievement
Paraprofessional Accounting
Course No.
ACCT 101
ACCT 102
ACCT 103
ACCT 135
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Survey of Accounting
5
Practical Accounting I
5
Practical Accounting II
5
Business Payroll Tax
Accounting
5
AOS 165
Spreadsheet Applications:
Excel
5
Choose one from the following:
5
AOS 161
Beginning Computer
Applications
OR
IT 105
Introduction to PCs
and Applications
ENGL 101 Written Expression
5
G BUS 101 Introduction to Business
5
G BUS 145 Business Mathematics
5
GRAND TOTAL
Bookkeeping
45
30
Administration
of Criminal
Justice
This program is designed for students who
plan to pursue a career in law enforcement,
law, community-based social services and
other criminal justice related fields. The
Administration of Criminal Justice program
is currently divided into two tracks:
vocational and transfer. The vocational track
is designed for those who wish to achieve a
two-year degree and immediately enter the
occupational field of their choice. The
transfer degree is designed for those who
plan to either enter the occupational field of
their choice immediately upon graduation or
to continue their education at a baccalaureate
institution.
Employment opportunities in the criminal
justice field are projected to be strong in the
state of Washington and throughout the
nation. Prospective criminal justice
practitioners should be aware that stringent
entry level requirements exist. Applicants are
encouraged to consult with an advisor prior
to their entry into the program.
Degrees & Certificates
Associate in Arts Degree
Social Science Requirements
Law Enforcement Option
Choose 15 credits from the following:
ANTH 202 Cultural Anthropology
ADMCJ Core Requirements
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
ADMCJ 101 Survey of Law Enforcement
and Administration
5
ADMCJ 104 Introduction to Criminal Law 5
ADMCJ 200 Criminal Evidence and
Procedures – Police Officer 5
ADMCJ 206 Community Oriented
Policing
5
ADMCJ 260 Applied Ethics in
Criminal Justice
5
ADMCJ 271 Introduction to Criminology 5
TOTAL
Choose 20 credits from the following:
ADMCJ 102 Survey of Police
Organization and
Administration
5
ADMCJ 111 Principles of Criminal
Interrogation
5
ADMCJ 194 Special Topics in the
Criminal Justice System
5
ADMCJ 202 Principles of Criminal
Investigation
5
ADMCJ 220 Principles of Forensic
Examination
5
ADMCJ 253 Principles of Drug and
Alcohol Enforcement
5
ADMCJ 299 Individual Studies in the
Criminal Justice System
5
TOTAL
PSYCH 100 Introduction to Psychology 5
SOC 110
Introduction to Sociology
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
5
15
90
Administrative
Office Systems
TOTAL
5
Associate in Arts Degree
15
Office Management
5
Core Requirements
Written Expression
Interpersonal
Communication
The certificate programs enable students to
become computer literate, acquire basic word
processing skills, gain competency working
with the most current business software
applications, and learn to perform secretarial
functions. Credits earned in the certificate
programs may be applied toward the Office
Management degree. Degree graduates
develop additional skills in office administration and supervision, learn to assume
responsibility, exercise initiative, make
decisions and perform a full range of
office tasks.
5
20
ADMCJ 204 Criminal Procedure
ADMCJ 299 Individual Studies in the
Criminal Justice System
ADMCJ 294 Special Topics in the
Criminal Justice System
This program emphasizes the technological
changes occurring in the office, where
employment opportunities increase
dramatically for those who are computer
competent and skilled in operating a variety
of applications.
The certificate programs prepare students for
general office work in positions such as
administrative assistant, word processing
specialist, office assistant, secretary and
receptionist. The degree prepares students for
positions such as office manager; executive
and administrative assistant; office assistant
and secretary.
Electives – Corrections Option
TOTAL
American Government and
Politics
5
30
Electives – Law Enforcement Option
ENGL 102
SPCH 200
POLSC 102
5
5
5
10
Course No.
ACCT 101
ACCT 102
AOS 102
AOS 104
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Survey of Accounting
5
Practical Accounting I
5
Document Formatting
3
Keyboarding Review and
Speed Building
3
AOS 130
AOS 150
AOS 161
Machine Transcription
Office Administration
Beginning Computer
Applications
AOS 163
Microsoft Word on the PC
AOS 164
DOS/Windows 95
AOS 165
Spreadsheet Applications:
Excel
AOS 168
Database Applications:
Access
ENGL 101 Written Expression
ENGL 270 Professional Report Writing
Choose one from the following:
G BUS 101 Introduction to Business
OR
INTST 150 International Business
G BUS 145 Business Mathematics
G BUS 221 Human Resource
Management
MKTG 110 Client/Customer
Relations
Science
Approved Electives
GRAND TOTAL
3
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
90
Certificate of Achievement
Administrative Assistant
Course No.
ACCT 101
AOS 102
AOS 104
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Survey of Accounting
5
Document Formatting
3
Keyboarding Review and
Speedbuilding
3
AOS 130
Machine Transcription
3
AOS 150
Office Administration
5
AOS 161
Beginning Computer
Applications
5
AOS 163
Microsoft Word on the PC 5
AOS 164
DOS/Windows 95
5
AOS 165
Spreadsheet Applications:
Excel
5
ENGL 101 Written Expression
5
Approved Elective
1
GRAND TOTAL
45
29
Degrees & Certificates
Certificate of Accomplishment
Certificate of Achievement
Business Software
Applications
Alcohol And Drug Studies
Course No.
AOS 102
AOS 104
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
ALDAC 101 Survey of Chemical
Dependency
3
ALDAC 102 Psychological Actions of
Alcohol and Other Drugs 3
ALDAC 103 Introduction to Chemical
Dependency Counseling
3
ALDAC 105 Chemical Dependency
Counseling in the Family 3
ALDAC 106 Chemical Dependency
Counseling Techniques
3
ALDAC 108 Case Management of the
Chemically Dependent Client 3
ALDAC 150 Relapse Prevention
3
ALDAC 160 Cultural Diversity/Chemical
Dependency Counseling
3
ALDAC 204 Youth Chemical Dependency
Assessment Counseling
3
ALDAC 206 Group Process in Chemical
Dependency Treatment
3
ALDAC 207 HIV/AIDS Risk Intervention
for Counselors
2
ALDAC 212 Ethics in Chemical
Dependency Treatment
3
ALDAC 215 Chemical Dependency
and the Law
3
ALDAC 220 Additions Counseling
Clinical Practicum
3
AOS 161
AOS 163
AOS 164
AOS 165
AOS 168
Core Curriculum Requirements
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Document Formatting
3
Keyboarding Review and
Speedbuilding
3
Beginning Computer
Applications
5
Microsoft Word on the PC 5
DOS/Windows 95
5
Spreadsheet Applications:
Excel
5
Database Applications:
Access
5
GRAND TOTAL
31
Certificate of Accomplishment
Word Processing
Course No.
AOS 102
AOS 104
AOS 130
AOS 161
AOS 163
AOS 164
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Document Formatting
3
Keyboarding Review and
Speedbuilding
3
Machine Transcription
3
Beginning Computer
Applications
5
Microsoft Word on the PC 5
DOS/Windows 95
5
GRAND TOTAL
24
Alcohol and
Drug Studies
This certificate program provides the skills
and knowledge required for counseling in the
field of chemical dependency. Courses are
designed for the student who is completing
state-defined requirements to become a
chemical dependency counselor, and provide
the additional courses necessary for
certification. The program also offers
information for students needing to know
about chemical dependency and its effects
on the individual, the family and society.
TOTAL
General Education Requirements
ENGL 101 Written Expression
PSYCH 100 Introduction of Psychology
PSYCH 204 General Developmental
Psychology
SPCH 200
Interpersonal
Communications
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
Diagnostic
Ultrasound
This selective admissions degree program
provides didactic education and clinical
experience as preparation for employment
30
41
5
5
5
5
20
61
and national certification as a Diagnostic
Medical Sonographer, and is accredited by
the Commission on Accreditation of
Allied Health Education Programs. To be
considered for admission, students must
follow the guidelines published annually for
selective admissions.
The diagnostic sonographer or vascular
technologist is a highly skilled individual
qualified by academic and clinical experience
to provide diagnostic patient services using
ultrasound and related diagnostic techniques.
Graduates are eligible to take the American
Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonographers’
National Certification examination.
There are eight consecutive full-time
academic and clinical quarters, including
summers. Students enroll full-time throughout the duration of the program. Classroom
education includes a core curriculum of study
that places emphasis on acoustical principles;
properties and physics; pathophysiology;
abdominal, obstetrical and gynecological
sonography; echocardiology; and vascular
technology. Other topics of study include
neurosonography, intraoperative sonography
and patient care techniques.
Associate in Arts Degree
Diagnostic Ultrasound
First Year - Fall Quarter
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
DUTEC 105 Pathophysiology I
3
DUTEC 107 Human Cross-Sec Anatomy 7
DUTEC 110 Ultrasound I - Abdominal 4
DUTEC 170 Physics and Instrument I
3
TOTAL
First Year - Winter Quarter
DUTEC 106 Pathophysiology II
DUTEC 120 Ultrasound II - Obstetrics
DUTEC 130 Ultrasound III - Small Parts
DUTEC 135 Ultrasound Equipment I
DUTEC 171 Physics and Instrument II
TOTAL
First Year - Spring Quarter
DUTEC 112 Pathophysiology III
DUTEC 145 Ultrasound Equipment II
DUTEC 150 Basic Echocardiography
DUTEC 160 Ultrasound V - Vascular
17
3
5
4
2
3
17
3
4
3
3
Degrees & Certificates
DUTEC 180 Advanced Studies & Clinical
Application of DUTEC
3
to the last quarter. A program option is
offered in special education.
Certificate of Achievement
TOTAL
Students planning to enroll in early childhood
education should be aware that a criminal
history investigation will be required.
Course No.
ECED 171
16
First Year - Summer Quarter
DUTEC 101 Concepts of Patient Care
DUTEC 113 Pathophysiology IV
DUTEC 155 Ultrasound IV Echocardiography
Choose one from the following:
DUTEC 165 Ultrasound Equipment III
OR
DUTEC 181 Advanced Studies
Echo-Vascular
3
3
3
3
TOTAL
12
Second Year - Fall Quarter
DUTEC 210 Clinical Practicum I
15
TOTAL
15
Second Year - Winter Quarter
DUTEC 220 Clinical Practicum II
15
TOTAL
15
Second Year - Spring Quarter
DUTEC 230 Clinical Practicum III
15
TOTAL
15
Second Year - Summer
DUTEC 240 Clinical Practicum IV
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
15
15
122
Early Childhood
Education
This program prepares students to enter the
challenging field of working with children.
Degree and certificate programs are available
for students entering college for the first time
or seeking a second career. Graduates will find
opportunities for meaningful employment as
teachers in preschools or child care centers, or
as aides in kindergarten or primary grades, or
other occupations in which knowledge of the
young child is necessary.
Coursework includes observation, participation and practical experience. Students work
with children in a variety of settings.
Emphasis is placed on involving the student
in participation and observation from the first
Early Childhood Education
Associate in Arts Degree
Early Childhood Education
First Year
Course No.
ECED 171
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Introduction to Early
Childhood Education
5
ECED 172
Fundamentals of Early
Childhood Education
5
ECED 181
Children’s Creative
Activities
5
ENGL 101 Written Expression
5
HOMEC 256 Child Development and
Guidance
3
IT 105
Introduction to PCs and
Applications
5
PSYCH 100 Introduction to Psychology 5
SOC 110
Introduction to Sociology 5
Approved Electives
7
TOTAL
45
Second Year
ECED 191
Practicum in Early
Childhood Education
5
ECED 192
Practicum in Early
Childhood Education
5
ECED 193
Practicum in Early Childhood
Education
5
ECED 201
Parent Involvement in Early
Childhood Education
5
ECED 204
Child Health and Safety
3
HLTH 292 First Aid and CPR
4
Choose one from the following:
5
SPCH 100
Basic Principles of Oral
Communication
OR
SPCH 200
Interpersonal
Communication
OR
SPCH 225
Small Group Communication
Science
5
Approved Electives
8
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Introduction to Early
Childhood Education
5
ECED 172
Fundamentals of Early
Childhood Education
5
ECED 181
Children’s Creative
Activities
5
ECED 191
Practicum in Early
Childhood Education
5
ECED 192
Practicum in Early
Childhood Education
5
ECED 193
Practicum in Early
Childhood Education
5
ECED 201
Parent Involvement in
Early Childhood Education 5
ECED 204
Child Health and Safety
3
HLTH 292 First Aid and CPR
4
HOMEC 256 Child Development and
Guidance
3
GRAND TOTAL
45
Associate in Arts Degree
Early Childhood Special
Education
First Year
Course No.
ECED 131
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Orientation to the Special
Needs Child
5
ECED 171
Introduction to Early
Childhood Education
5
ECED 172
Fundamentals of Early
Childhood Education
5
ECED 181
Children’s Creative
Activities
5
ENGL 101 Written Expression
5
HOMEC 256 Child Development and
Guidance
3
IT 105
Introduction to PCs and
Applications
5
PSYCH 100 Introduction to Psychology 5
SOC 110
Introduction to Sociology 5
Approved Elective
2
TOTAL
45
45
90
31
Degrees & Certificates
Second Year
ASL 135
American Sign Language I 5
ASL 136
American Sign Language II 5
ECED 132
Techniques for Teaching
the Special Needs Child
3
ECED 135
Practicum for Special
Education
5
ECED 136
Practicum for Special
Education
5
ECED 201
Parent Involvement in
Early Childhood Education 5
ECED 204
Child Health and Safety
3
HLTH 292 First Aid and CPR
4
Choose one from the following:
5
SPCH 100
Basic Principles of Oral
Communication
OR
SPCH 225
Small Group Communication
Science Course
5
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
45
90
Certificate of Achievement
Course No.
ASL 135
ECED 131
Course Name Credit Hrs.
American Sign Language I 5
Orientation to the Special
Needs Child
5
ECED 132
Techniques for Teaching
the Special Needs Child
3
ECED 135
Practicum for Special
Education
5
ECED 136
Practicum for Special
Education
5
ECED 171
Introduction to Early
Childhood Education
5
ECED 172
Fundamentals of Early
Childhood Education
5
ECED 181
Children’s Creative
Activities
5
ECED 201
Parent Involvement in
Early Childhood Education 5
ECED 204
Child Health and Safety
3
HLTH 292 First Aid and CPR
4
HOMEC 256 Child Development and
Guidance
3
32
This program provides occupational specialty
and general education courses which assist
fire service personnel in improving
performance in their present assignments or
in preparing for future promotional
opportunities. Certain courses are also
appropriate for individuals who are either
working in related fields or interested in
exploring the fire service as a career.
The program curriculum was developed
through the cooperative efforts of the
Advisory Board and the State of Washington
Fire Command and Administration Advisory
Association under the guidelines of the state
standardized curriculum. Program courses
are usually held on-site at fire stations.
Courses for the degree and certificate are
reviewed regularly and may be revised to
meet NFPA requirements.
Associate in Arts Degree
Early Childhood Special
Education
GRAND TOTAL
Fire Command
& Administration
53
Fire Command and
Administration
First Year
Course No.
FCA 120
FCA 137
FCA 152
FCA 155
FCA 161
FCA 170
FCA 190
Couse Name
Credit Hrs.
Basic Fire Investigation
3
Fire Protection Systems
3
Building Construction
3
Fire Service Instructor
3
Incident Management I
3
Hazardous Materials I
3
Uniform Fire Code &
Inspection Procedures
4
PSYCH 100 Introduction to Psychology 5
CHEM 101 Introduction to Chemistry 5
ENGL 101 Written Expression
5
MATH 105 Precalculus I
5
Suggested Electives
6
TOTAL
Second Year
FCA 231
Fire Service Supervision
Choose one from the following:
FCA 232
Fire Service Management
OR
G BUS 241 Organization and
Management Skills
48
5
5
FCA 233
FCA 261
FCA 270
SOC 110
IT 101
Fire Service Administration
Incident Management II
Hazardous Materials II
Introduction to Sociology
Introduction to Information
Technology
ENGL 270 Professional Report Writing
Choose one from the following:
SPCH 100
Basic Principles of Oral
Communication
OR
SPCH 220
Introduction to Public
Speaking
Suggested Elective
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
5
3
3
5
5
5
5
4
45
93
Certificate of Achievement
Fire Command and
Administration
Course No.
FCA 120
FCA 137
FCA 152
FCA 161
FCA 170
FCA 190
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Basic Fire Investigation
3
Fire Protection Systems
3
Building Construction
3
Incident Management I
3
Hazardous Materials I
3
Uniform Fire Code &
Inspection Procedures
4
PSYCH 100 Introduction to Psychology 5
CHEM 101 Introduction to Chemistry 5
ENGL 101 Written Expression
5
MATH 105 Precalculus I
5
Suggested Electives
6
GRAND TOTAL
45
Associate in Arts Degree
Fire Investigation
Core Curriculum
FCA 120
FI 130
FCA 137
FCA 152
FCA 170
FCA 190
FI 220
Basic Fire Investigation
Investigative Interview
Techniques
Fire Protection Systems
Building Construction
Hazardous Materials I
Uniform Fire Code and
Inspection Procedures
Advanced Fire Scene
Investigation
3
2
3
3
3
4
4
Degrees & Certificates
FI 240
Crime Scene and Physical
Evidence
FI 250
Juvenile Fire Setter
FI 260
Arson Fraud Investigation
ADMCJ 104 Introduction to Criminal Law
ADMCJ 200 Criminal Evidence
Procedures – Police Officer
TOTAL
4
2
4
5
5
42
General Education Requirements
Math and Science
CHEM 101 Introduction to Chemistry
(Chemistry 100 may be an
acceptable substitution)
MATH 105 Precalculus I
(Math 099 may be an
acceptable substitution)
IT 101
Introduction to Information
Technology
Communications
ENGL 101 Written Expression
ENGL 270 Professional Report Writing
Choose one from the following:
SPCH 100
Basic Principles of Oral
Communication
OR
SPCH 220
Introduction to Public
Speaking
5
5
5
5
5
Social Science
PSYCH 100 Introduction to Psychology 5
SOC 110
Introduction to Sociology 5
TOTAL GENERAL EDUCATION
REQUIREMENTS
5
45
Elective Courses
Other college level courses as reviewed
and approved by Bellevue Community
College
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
5
5
92
General Business
Management
This program is designed as a powerful tool
to help students shift gears in careers,
enhance existing skills or obtain a strong,
The degree provides a strong and diverse
background for use in a variety of jobs.
Graduates will find opportunities in small
business operations, supervision, marketing
functions and product management. Many
graduates find employment in trainee
positions which lead to greater management
responsibility and advancement. The oneyear certificate is designed to prepare
students interested in pursuing entrepreneurial
opportunities.
Associate in Arts Degree
5
Arts and Humanities
ART 150
Basic Photo I
broad-based knowledge of manufacturing,
retail and service industries. The program
also promotes success in both profit and nonprofit organizations for a competitive edge in
today’s business climate.
General Business
Management
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
Choose one from the following:
5
AOS 161
Beginning Computer
Applications
OR
IT 105
Introduction to PCs and
Applications
Choose one from the following:
G BUS 101 Introduction to Business
OR
INTST 150 International Business
5
G BUS 145
Business Math
5
Choose one from the following:
ACCT 101 Survey of Accounting
OR
ACCTG 210 Fundamentals of Accounting
G BUS 120 Human Relations
MKTG 154 Principles of Marketing
Choose one from the following:
ACCT 102 Practical Accounting I
OR
ACCTG 220 Fundamentals of Accounting
5
G BUS 155 Basic Statistics – Descriptive
ENGL 101 Written Expression
Choose one from the following:
G BUS 202 Law and Business
OR
BA 200
Business Law – Legal
Foundations
G BUS 210 Stock Market Investment
Strategy
ACCT 234 Managerial Accounting
G BUS 221 Human Resource
Management
Choose one from the following:
MKTG 200 International Marketing
OR
MKTG 234 Advertising
G BUS 241 Organization and
Management Skills
Choose one from the following:
SPCH 100
Basic Principles of Oral
Communication
OR
Introduction to Public
Speaking
Science Elective
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
SPCH 220
GRAND TOTAL
5
90
Certificate of Accomplishment
Entrepreneurship
5
5
5
Choose one from the following:
5
ECON 100 Introduction to Basic
Economic Principles
OR
ECON 200 Introduction to Economics:
Macroeconomics
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
ACCT 102 Practical Accounting I
5
Choose one from the following:
5
AOS 161
Beginning Computer
Applications
OR
IT 105
Introduction to PCs
and Applications
G BUS 150 Entrepreneurship
5
G BUS 221 Human Resource
Management
5
MKTG 110 Client/Customer
Relations
5
MKTG 154 Principles of Marketing
5
GRAND TOTAL
30
33
Degrees & Certificates
Information
Technology
(Formerly named Computer
Information Systems)
This program offers students a selection in
either programming or technical support.
Skills are emphasized in four areas: communication skills (oral, written and listening),
specific technical skills, general business
skills and problem solving. Students are
encouraged to meet with program advisors to
select the most appropriate entry courses.
The Programming degree prepares graduates
to be entry-level programmer/analysts, with a
major emphasis in one of the following
programming languages: “C” and Visual
Basic/Client Server. The Technical Support
degree prepares graduates to provide
software technical support and includes a
required internship offering practical
experience in solving technical problems and
assisting clients.
Certificate programs are available for students
who have appropriate work experience or a
four-year degree. Many of the courses offered
can be used by the person who is already
employed, but requires further training.
Associate in Arts Degree
Information Technology Programming
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
Choose one from the following:
5
ACCT 101 Survey of Accounting
OR
ACCTG 210 Fundamentals of Accounting
ENGL 101 Written Expression
5
ENGL 270 Professional Report Writing 5
G BUS 101 Introduction to Business
5
MKTG 110 Client/Customer
Relations
5
IT 101
Introduction to Information
Technology
5
IT 105
Introduction to PCs
and Applications
5
IT 110
Introduction to
Programming
5
IT 127
Application Development
with VBA I
5
34
IT 129
IT 160
IT 235
IT 260
IT 290
Electives
Application Development
with VBA II
Systems Analysis
Operating Systems
Systems Design
Database Management
IT 239
5
5
5
5
5
5
Programming Skills Options
Choose from one of the following options for
a total of 15 credits :
15
IT 237
IT 238
IT 239
IT 245
IT 247
IT 249
90
Certificate of Achievement
C Programmer
Course No.
IT XXX
IT 160
IT 235
IT 245
IT 247
IT 249
IT 260
IT 290
ENGL 270
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Approved IT Elective
5
Systems Analysis
5
Operating Systems
5
Programming in “C”
5
Advanced “C” with Data
Structures
5
Programming in C++
5
Systems Design
5
Database Management
5
Professional Report Writing 5
GRAND TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
45
Certificate of Achievement
45
Associate in Arts Degree
Information Technology Technical Support
Course Name Credit Hrs.
DOS/Windows 95
5
Spreadsheet Applications:
Excel
5
AOS 168
Database Applications:
Access
5
ENGL 101 Written Expression
5
ENGL 270 Professional Report Writing 5
G BUS 101 Introduction to Business
5
IT 101
Introduction to Information
Technology
5
IT 105
Introduction to PCs
and Applications
5
IT 110
Introduction to Programming 5
IT 127
Application Development
with VBA I
5
IT 170
Problem Solving Strategies 5
IT 217
Microcomputer Hardware
and Software Installation
5
IT 219
Data Communications and
Networking
5
IT 235
Operating Systems
5
IT 293
Help Desk I
4
IT 294
Help Desk II
4
MKTG 110 Client/Customer Relations 5
Suggestive Electives
10
G BUS 291 Business Internship I
G BUS 292 Business Internship II
(Off-campus internship)
Client/Server - Visual Basic
Programming
GRAND TOTAL
Course No.
IT XXX
IT 160
IT 235
IT 237
Microcomputer Support
Specialist
IT 238
5
5
5
5
Course No.
AOS 164
AOS 165
Client Programming I
(Visual Basic)
Client Programming II
(Visual Basic)
SQL Server: Server
Programming
OR
Programming in “C”
Advanced “C” with Data
Structures
Programming in C++
GRAND TOTAL
IT 260
IT 290
ENGL 270
SQL Server: Server
Programming
Systems Design
Database Management
Professional Report Writing
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Approved IT Elective
5
Systems Analysis
5
Operating Systems
5
Client Programming I
(Visual Basic)
5
Client Programming II
(Visual Basic)
5
93
Certificate of Achievement
Course No.
AOS 164
AOS 165
Course Name Credit Hrs.
DOS/Windows 95
5
Spreadsheet Applications:
Excel
5
Degrees & Certificates
AOS 168
ENGL 270
IT 101
IT 170
IT 217
IT 219
MKTG 110
Database Applications:
Access
Professional Report Writing
Introduction to Information
Technology
Problem Solving Strategies
Microcomputer Hardware
and Software Installation
Data Communications
and Networking
Client/Customer
Relations
GRAND TOTAL
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
45
Interior Design
This three-year program offers a broadbased, professionally-relevant curriculum
that leads to a degree while challenging
students to achieve excellence. Graduates
successfully compete for jobs and function as
professional interior designers. The
curriculum is balanced with academic,
technical and practical instruction taught by
professionally-active faculty. In addition, two
internships that provide current work
experience in the field are required.
The courses outlined define the complete list
of required courses for the degree. The threeyear outline should serve as a guide for
students to develop a long-range plan that
takes into account a personal timetable,
work, family and other commitments; many
students take longer than three years to
complete the program. Electives must include
exposure to college-level courses in the
humanities, social sciences, math/science and
business. The department chair may review
and approve transfer credits from other
institutions to satisfy degree requirements.
Associate in Arts Degree
Interior Design
Course No.
ART 101
ART 110
ART 111
ART 112
ART 120
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Modern Architecture
and Design
5
Two-Dimensional Design 5
Design: Color
5
Three-Dimensional Design 5
Drawing I
5
Choose one from the following:
5
ART 201
History of Western Art
OR
ART 202
History of Western Art
ART 203
History of Western Art
5
ENGL 101 Written Expression
5
INDES 110 Textiles
5
INDES 140 Introduction to Interior
Design
3
INDES 150 History of Furniture
5
INDES 151 Twentieth Century Furniture 5
INDES 152 Furniture Design and
Construction
3
INDES 160 Graphic Communication I 5
INDES 162 Introduction to Computer
Aided Design
3
INDES 165 Visual Presentations
5
INDES 170 Interior Design I - Methods 5
INDES 180 Professional Practices I
3
INDES 181 Professional Practices II
3
INDES 185 Practicum in Interior Design 3
INDES 190 Materials and Construction 3
INDES 191 Lighting
3
INDES 260 Graphic Communication II 5
INDES 270 Interior Design II
5
INDES 271 Interior Design III
5
INDES 272 Interior Design IV
5
INDES 285 Practicum in Interior Design 3
First Year Electives (incl. ART 108)
6
Second Year Electives
5
Third Year Electives
15
GRAND TOTAL
143
business and human endeavors.
The degree provides a strong and diverse
emphasis with an interdisciplinary liberal arts
approach. Learning and understanding a
world view of economic, political, geographical, trade and business settings and
systems establishes a backdrop for international interests and development.
Associate in Arts Degree
First Year - Fall Quarter
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
INTST 150 International Business
5
ENGL 102 Written Expression
5
Choose one from the following:
5
ECON 100 Introduction to Basic
Economic Principles
OR
ECON 200 Introduction to Economics:
Macroeconomics
OR
ECON 201 Introduction to Economics:
Microeconomics
TOTAL
15
First Year - Winter Quarter
Choose one from the following:
5
ACCT 101 Survey of Accounting
OR
ACCTG 210 Fundamentals of Accounting
OR
ACCTG 220 Fundamentals of Accounting
G BUS 120 Human Relations
5
MKTG 154 Principles of Marketing
5
TOTAL
International
Business
The combination of International Business
and liberal arts is a unique curriculum aimed
to develop simultaneously both a specialized
knowledge in international business and a
general cultural sensitivity and understanding
of foreign cultures.
Economic and cultural activities in businesses,
institutions and organizations have increasingly encompassed global and international
interactions. The need for students to develop
broader and more diverse perspectives is
essential to growth and effectiveness in work,
15
First Year - Spring Quarter
HIST 120
Global History
GEOG 105 Geography of World Affairs
Advanced 1st Year Foreign
Language (103)
POLSC 103 International Relations
TOTAL
5
5
5
5
20
Second Year - Fall Quarter
Basic 2nd Year Foreign
Language Course (201)
5
G BUS 210 Stock Market Investment
Strategy
5
INTST 200 States and Capitalism: Origin
of Modern Global Systems 5
TOTAL
15
35
Degrees & Certificates
Second Year - Winter Quarter
Intermediate 2nd Year Foreign
Language Course (202)
5
ANTH 202 Cultural Anthropology
5
MKTG 200 International Marketing
5
INTST 201 Introduction to International
Political Economy
5
TOTAL
20
Second Year - Spring Quarter
Advanced 2nd Year Foreign
Language Course (203)
5
G BUS 241 Organization and Management
Skills
5
INTST 202 Cultural Encounters and
Tensions
5
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
15
100
Marketing
Management
This program prepares students for the
many opportunities that exist in the fields
of marketing. The degree programs offer
training in marketing management; certificate
programs offer short-term training in retail
management and sales and marketing.
Students are trained for entry level and
middle-management positions in business
including sales representative, sales manager,
marketing manager, department manager and
buyer. Related areas include advertising,
distribution, marketing research and
customer services. Students in the program
receive training in the functional areas of
business with specialized training in
marketing. The curriculum is balanced with
theoretical instruction and practical
applications. An evening program option
allows students to complete all the requirements in three years.
Associate in Arts Degree
Marketing Management
Course No.
ACCT 101
36
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Survey of Accounting
5
Choose one from the following:
ACCT 234 Managerial Accounting
OR
G BUS 241 Organization and
Management Skills
5
Choose one from the following:
AOS 161
Beginning Computer
Applications
OR
IT 105
Introduction to PCs
and Applications
5
Choose one from the following:
ENGL 092 Developmental English IV
OR
ENGL 101 Written Expression
G BUS 101 Introduction to Business
G BUS 120 Human Relations
G BUS 145 Business Mathematics
G BUS 202 Law and Business
MKTG 110 Client/Customer
Relations
MKTG 131 Principles of Professional
Selling
MKTG 135 Principles of Retailing
MKTG 154 Principles of Marketing
MKTG 200 International Marketing
MKTG 210 Marketing Research
MKTG 234 Advertising
SPCH 220
Introduction to Public
Speaking
Electives
Science Elective
5
GRAND TOTAL
5
30
Sales and Marketing
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
Choose one from the following:
5
AOS 161
Beginning Computer
Applications
OR
IT 105
Introduction to PCs
and Applications
MKTG 110
MKTG 131
5
5
5
5
5
3
5
5
5
5
5
5
8
5
91
Retail Management
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
ACCT 234 Managerial Accounting
5
Choose one from the following:
5
AOS 161
Beginning Computer
Applications
OR
IT 105
Introduction to PCs
and Applications
Human Relations
Client/Customer Relations
Principles of Retailing
Merchandise Management
Certificate of Accomplishment
Certificate of Accomplishment
G BUS 120
MKTG 110
MKTG 135
MKTG 236
GRAND TOTAL
5
5
5
MKTG 154
MKTG 234
SPCH 220
Client/Customer Relations 5
Principles of Professional
Selling
3
Principles of Marketing
5
Advertising
5
Introduction to Public
Speaking
5
GRAND TOTAL
28
Media
Communication
and Technology
This program is designed for students
interested in using, creating, and managing
high-quality media communication resources
to satisfy education, business, industrial and
personal communication needs. The primary
focus is on the production and utilization of
video, interactive multimedia and World
Wide Web digital technologies.
Instruction includes basic multimedia, video
and internet production techniques, intermediate and advanced studio and field video
production, digital media production such as
computer graphics and animation, multimedia
design and authoring, the integration of
computers and video, and the development of
digital “pages” for the World Wide Web. The
degree programs are offered with specific
endorsements which emphasize a production
specialty. The certificate programs offer shortterm options for students in various specialized media fields. Students considering
certificate programs should already have some
media production and computer skills.
Degrees & Certificates
Endorsement in Multimedia
Design and Authoring
Associate in Arts Degree
Media Communication and
Technology
Introductory Core Courses
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
ENGL 101 Written Expression
5
MEDIA 101 Exploring the Digital Future 5
Choose one from the following:
5
MEDIA 102 Techniques and
Technologies of Persuasion
OR
MEDIA 103 Media and Messages:
Media Literacy
OR
MEDIA 104 Multi-Cultural Media Images
MEDIA 105 Media Systems and
Technology
Choose two from the following:
MEDIA 110 Exploring the Internet
MEDIA 112 Introduction to Video
Production
MEDIA 121 Exploring Multimedia
TOTAL
5
10
Pre-Graduation Core Courses
MEDIA 245 Production Practice
5
MEDIA 248 Portfolio and Employment 5
MEDIA 250 Practicum in Media
Communications and
Technology
5
15
45
Endorsement in Computer
Animation and Graphics
Course No.
ART 110
ART 120
MEDIA 225
MEDIA 227
MEDIA 233
MEDIA 235
MEDIA 237
Electives
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Two-Dimensional Design 5
Drawing I
5
Digital Imaging for
Multimedia I
5
Graphics I: Basic Design
and Illustration
5
Digital Imaging for
Multimedia II
5
Animation for Multimedia I 5
Animation for Multimedia II 5
10
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
45
90
Endorsement in VideoComputer Interface
30
TOTAL
TOTAL CORE
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
MEDIA 216 Script Writing for Film,
Video and Multimedia
5
MEDIA 223 Multimedia Authoring I
5
MEDIA 225 Digital Imaging for
Multimedia I
5
MEDIA 227 Graphics I: Basic Design
and Illustration
5
MEDIA 229 Multimedia Authoring II:
Macromedia Director
5
MEDIA 235 Animation for Multimedia I 5
MEDIA 236 Authoring III: Scripting and
Interactivity
5
Electives
10
45
90
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
Choose one from the following:
5
MEDIA 210 Video Field Production
OR
MEDIA 212 Video Studio Production
MEDIA 220 Digital Video Editing
5
MEDIA 225 Digital Imaging for
Multimedia I
5
MEDIA 227 Graphics I: Basic Design
and Illustration
5
MEDIA 233 Digital Imaging for
Multimedia II
5
MEDIA 235 Animation for Multimedia I 5
MEDIA 237 Animation for Multimedia II 5
Electives
10
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
45
90
Endorsement in
Video Production
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
MEDIA 122 Introduction to Audio and
Recordings
5
MEDIA 210 Video Field Production
5
MEDIA 212 Video Studio Production
5
MEDIA 214 Immediate Video Production 5
MEDIA 216 Script Writing for Film,
Video and Multimedia
5
MEDIA 220 Digital Video Editing
MEDIA 227 Graphics I: Basic Design
and Illustration
Electives
5
5
10
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
45
90
Endorsement in Web Authoring
Course No.
MEDIA 220
MEDIA 223
MEDIA 225
MEDIA 227
MEDIA 229
MEDIA 230
MEDIA 238
Electives
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Digital Video Editing
5
Multimedia Authoring I
5
Digital Imaging for
Multimedia I
5
Graphics I: Basic Design
and Illustration
5
Multimedia Authoring I:
Macromedia Director
5
Web Authoring I
5
Web Authoring II
5
10
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
45
90
Certificate of Achievement
Graphics and Animation
for Multimedia
Course No.
ART 110
ART 120
MEDIA 121
MEDIA 225
MEDIA 227
MEDIA 233
MEDIA 235
MEDIA 237
MEDIA 250
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Two-Dimensional Design 5
Drawing I
5
Exploring Multimedia
5
Digital Imaging for
Multimedia I
5
Graphics I: Basic Design
and Illustration
5
Digital Imaging for
Multimedia II
5
Animation for Multimedia I 5
Animation for Multimedia II 5
Practicum in Media
Communication and
Technology
5
GRAND TOTAL
45
Certificate of Achievement
Multimedia Authoring
Course No.
MEDIA 121
MEDIA 220
MEDIA 223
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Exploring Multimedia
5
Digital Video Editing
5
Multimedia Authoring I
5
37
Degrees & Certificates
MEDIA 225 Digital Imaging for
Multimedia I
MEDIA 227 Graphics I: Basic Design
and Illustration
MEDIA 229 Multimedia Authoring II:
Macromedia Director
MEDIA 235 Animation for Multimedia I
MEDIA 236 Authoring III: Scripting and
Interactivity
MEDIA 250 Practicum in Media
Communication and
Technology
GRAND TOTAL
5
5
GRAND TOTAL
5
5
Certificate of Achievement
5
5
45
Certificate of Achievement
New Media: Studies in
Emerging Technologies
Course No.
MEDIA 101
MEDIA 110
MEDIA 121
MEDIA 220
MEDIA 223
MEDIA 225
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Exploring the Digital Future 5
Exploring the Internet
5
Exploring Multimedia
5
Digital Video Editing
5
Multimedia Authoring I
5
Digital Imaging for
Multimedia I
5
MEDIA 227 Graphics I: Basic Design
and Illustration
5
MEDIA 235 Animation for Multimedia I 5
COMM 201 History of Communication 5
GRAND TOTAL
MEDIA 250 Practicum in Media
Communication and
Technology
45
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
MEDIA 112 Introduction to Video
Production
5
MEDIA 122 Introduction to Audio and
Recording
5
MEDIA 210 Video Field Production
5
MEDIA 212 Video Studio Production
5
MEDIA 214 Immediate Video Production 5
MEDIA 216 Script Writing for Film,
Video and Multimedia
5
MEDIA 220 Digital Video Editing
5
MEDIA 245 Production Practice
5
MEDIA 250 Practicum in Media
Communication and
Technology
5
GRAND TOTAL
MEDIA 220 Digital Video Editing
MEDIA 225 Digital Imaging for
Multimedia I
MEDIA 227 Graphics I: Basic Design
and Illustration
MEDIA 235 Animation for Multimedia I
MEDIA 237 Animation for Multimedia II
38
5
5
5
5
5
45
Web Authoring
Course No.
MEDIA 110
MEDIA 121
MEDIA 223
MEDIA 225
MEDIA 229
MEDIA 230
MEDIA 238
MEDIA 250
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Exploring the Internet
5
Exploring Multimedia
5
Multimedia Authoring I
5
Digital Imaging for
Multimedia I
5
Graphics I: Basic Design
and Illustration
5
Multimedia Authoring II:
Macromedia Director
5
Web Authoring I
5
Web Authoring II
5
Practicum in Media
Communication and
Technology
5
GRAND TOTAL
This selective admissions, twelve-month, fulltime, certificate program is a cooperative
effort with Virginia Mason Medical Center,
where all classes are offered. To be considered
for admission, students must follow the
admissions guidelines published annually.
The curriculum prepares students to become
a nuclear medicine technologist, able to give
reassurance to patients who may be anxious
about their procedure or unfamiliar with the
world of nuclear medicine, explain medical
procedures and their risks, prepare and
administer radiopharmaceuticals, and
position patients for the imaging process.
Upon successful completion of this program
the student will be eligible for national
certification exams.
Certificate of Achievement
Nuclear Medicine Technology
Certificate of Achievement
MEDIA 227
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
MEDIA 112 Introduction to Video
Production
5
MEDIA 121 Exploring Multimedia
5
Choose one from the following:
5
MEDIA 210 Video Field Production
OR
MEDIA 212 Video Studio Production
45
Video Production
Certificate of Achievement
Video-Computer Interface
5
Nuclear
Medicine
Technology
45
Fall Quarter
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
NMTEC 200 Applied Anatomy
and Physiology
1
NMTEC 201 Physics of Nuclear Medicine 2
NMTEC 205 Lab Exercises I
1
NMTEC 210 Radiopharmacy
1
NMTEC 230 Clinical Education I
11
NMTEC 260 Clinical Nuclear Medicine I 1
TOTAL
17
Winter Quarter
NMTEC 202 Instrumentation
2
NMTEC 206 Lab Exercises II
1
NMTEC 231 Clinical Education II
11
NMTEC 240 Radiation Safety
1
NMTEC 261 Clinical Nuclear Medicine II 1
TOTAL
16
Spring Quarter
NMTEC 203 Computers In Nuclear
Medicine
NMTEC 232 Clinical Education III
NMTEC 241 Radiation Biology
2
11
1
TOTAL
14
Degrees & Certificates
Summer Quarter
NMTEC 211 Non-Imaging Studies
NMTEC 233 Clinical Education IV
NMTEC 275 Board Preparation
NMTEC 207 Lab Exercises III
1
13
1
1
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
16
63
First Year - Spring Quarter
NURS 102X Nursing III: Medical/
Surgical II
NURS 102Z Nursing III: Lab
BIOL 250
Microbiology
PSYCH 204 General Developmental
Psychology
TOTAL
Nursing
This selective admissions two-year program
is designed to prepare students to become
health care professionals who provide
quality, patient-centered nursing care. The
program is accredited by the National League
for Nursing and provides didactic education
and clinical experience in medical, surgical,
pediatric, psychiatric, maternity and
gerontological nursing.
In order to be considered for admissions,
students must follow the guidelines published
annually for selective admissions. Students
planning to enroll in this program should be
aware that a criminal history investigation
will be required and may affect their
continued enrollment.
Graduates are eligible to take the National
Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX).
Although students receive a degree, the
actual license to practice nursing in the state
of Washington is granted by the Department
of Licensing, Nursing Commission and
requirements for licensure are stipulated by
the Board.
Associate in Arts Degree
Nursing
First Year - Fall Quarter
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
NURS 100X Nursing I: Fundamentals
8
NURS 100Z Nursing I: Lab
4
ZOOL 113 Anatomy and Physiology 5
TOTAL
First Year - Winter Quarter
NURS 101X Nursing II: Medical/
Surgical I
NURS 101Z Nursing II: Lab
PSYCH 100 Introduction to Psychology
ZOOL 114 Anatomy and Physiology
TOTAL
17
7
5
5
5
22
Second Year - Fall Quarter
Choose from one of the following options
for a total of 7 credits:
NURS 210X Nursing IV: Pediatric
NURS 210Z Nursing IV: Lab
(Pediatric Nursing)
OR
NURS 211X Nursing V: Maternity
NURS 211Z Nursing V: Lab
(Maternity Nursing)
OR
NURS 212X Nursing VI: Psychiatric
NURS 212Z Nursing VI: Lab
(Psychiatric Nursing)
Elective
TOTAL
Second Year - Winter Quarter
Choose from two of the following
for a total of 14 credits:
NURS 210X Nursing IV: Pediatric
NURS 210Z Nursing IV: Lab
(Pediatric Nursing)
OR
NURS 211X Nursing V: Maternity
NURS 211Z Nursing V: Lab
(Maternity Nursing)
OR
NURS 212X Nursing VI: Psychiatric
NURS 212Z Nursing VI: Lab
(Psychiatric Nursing)
Choose one from the following:
SOC 110
Introduction to Sociology
OR
ANTH 202 Cultural Anthropology
Elective
TOTAL
6
6
5
5
22
7
NURS 213Z Nursing VII: Lab
NURS 214X Nursing VIII:
Gerontological Nursing
NURS 214Z Nursing VIII: Lab
(Gerontological Nursing)
Elective
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
6
3
2
5
20
116
Radiation
Therapy
This selective admissions program prepares
students for a highly technical and important
component in cancer treatment and cure. In
order to be considered for admissions,
students must follow the guidelines published
annually for selective admissions.
5
12
14
5
4
23
Second Year - Spring Quarter
NURS 213X Nursing VII: Contemporary
Nursing Issues
4
Radiation therapists are vital members of
cancer care teams, who administer radiation
treatments according to the prescription and
instruction of the radiation oncologist
(physician). Therapists use a variety of
therapeutic modalities in the treatment of
cancer, including high energy linear
accelerators and radioactive isotopes. They
also assist in treatment planning procedures
involving computerized treatment planning,
simulation and dosimetry, and are responsible for maintaining accurate treatment
records, assessing patient’s psychosocial
needs and providing support and comfort to
the patient.
The program is approved by the Joint Review
Committee on Education in Radiologic
Technology. The curriculum consists of eight
consecutive quarters, including summers, of
full-time class work combined with clinical
experience. Upon successful completion of
the programs students are eligible to take the
national examination for certification in
Radiation Therapy, which is administered by
The American Registry of Radiologic
Technologists.
Prior to admission, students must arrange
with at least two hospitals (preferably an
affiliate hospital) for a four-hour visit to its
radiation therapy department during a regular
work day. Students must have at least eight
hours of hospital visits. Please review a
current program brochure which will offer
39
Degrees & Certificates
the complete list of affiliate hospitals
students may choose to visit. This visit must
precede the student’s personal interview with
the admissions committee.
Associate in Arts Degree
Radiation Therapy
First Year - Fall Quarter
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
RADON 100 Introduction to Radiation
Therapy Technology
2
RADON 111 Clinical Education I
5
RADON 120 Nursing Procedures
2
RADON 195 Specific Topics in
RADON (Variable Credits) 4
TOTAL
First Year - Winter Quarter
RADON 101 Clinical Applications
RADON 103 Radiographic Techniques
RADON 112 Clinical Education II
RADON 230 Psychosocial Aspects of
Chronic Illness
13
Second Year - Spring Quarter
RADON 203 Clinical Dosimetry II
RADON 213 Clinical Education VII
RADON 222 Radiation Oncology
Technique III
RADON 224 Concept Integration
TOTAL
Second Year - Summer Quarter
RADON 214 Clinical Education VIII
RADON 225 Quality Assurance in
Radiation Therapy
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
3
8
2
2
15
13
1
14
107
Certificate of Achievement
Radiation Therapy
Second Year - Fall Quarter
RADON 201 Radiation Therapy Physics 3
RADON 211 Clinical Education V
8
RADON 220 Radiation Oncology
Technique I
3
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
RADON 100 Introduction to Radiation
Therapy Technology
2
RADON 101 Clinical Applications
2
RADON 201 Radiation Therapy Physics 3
RADON 202 Clinical Dosimetry I
3
RADON 203 Clinical Dosimetry II
3
RADON 211 Clinical Education V
8
RADON 212 Clinical Education VI
8
RADON 213 Clinical Education VII
8
RADON 214 Clinical Education VIII
13
RADON 220 Radiation Oncology
Technique I
3
RADON 221 Radiation Oncology
Technique II
2
RADON 222 Radiation Oncology
Technique III
2
RADON 224 Concept Integration
2
RADON 225 Quality Assurance in
RADON
1
RADON 230 Psychosocial Aspects of
Chronic Illness
2
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
TOTAL
First Year - Spring Quarter
RADON 102 Radiographic Physics
RADON 113 Clinical Education III
RADON 150 Pathology
RADON 240 Radiation Biology
2
2
5
2
11
2
5
4
3
TOTAL
14
First Year - Summer Quarter
RADON 114 Clinical Education IV
13
TOTAL
13
Second Year - Winter Quarter
RADON 202 Clinical Dosimetry I
RADON 212 Clinical Education VI
RADON 221 Radiation Oncology
Technique II
TOTAL
40
14
3
8
62
Radiologic
Technology
2
13
This selective admissions program prepares
the student to become a Diagnostic Radiologic
Technologist capable of carrying out the
responsibilities of the staff technologist; it
includes a general education background. The
program is approved by the Joint Review
Committee in Radiologic Technology. In
order to be considered for admission, students
must follow the guidelines published annually
for selective admissions.
The curriculum consists of combined class
work and clinical experience over eight
consecutive full-time quarters, including
summers. Upon successful completion of the
program, students are eligible to take the
National Registry examination for certification as a Radiological Technologist.
Associate in Arts Degree
Radiologic Technology
First Year - Summer Quarter
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
RATEC 101 Introduction to Radiologic
Technology
1
RATEC 107 Positioning and Related
Anatomy I
2
RATEC 110 Clinical Education I
3
RATEC 120 Nursing Procedures
2
TOTAL
First Year - Fall Quarter
RATEC 105 Introduction to Radiologic
Technique
RATEC 108 Positioning and Related
Anatomy II
RATEC 111 Clinical Education II
RATEC 125 Medical Terminology
TOTAL
First Year - Winter Quarter
RATEC 103 Principles of Radiographic
Exposure
RATEC 109 Positioning and Related
Anatomy III
RATEC 112 Clinical Education III
RATEC 127 Introduction to Sectional
Anatomy
TOTAL
First Year - Spring Quarter
RATEC 102 Radiographic Physics
RATEC 104 Advanced Radiographic
Procedures
RATEC 113 Clinical Education IV
TOTAL
8
2
3
6
1
12
3
3
6
2
14
5
4
6
15
Degrees & Certificates
Certificate Programs
Second Year - Summer Quarter
RATEC 210 Clinical Education V
13
TOTAL
13
Second Year - Fall Quarter
RATEC 211 Clinical Education VI
RATEC 220 Pathology I
RATEC 230 Quality Assurance
TOTAL
Second Year - Winter Quarter
RATEC 212 Clinical Education VII
RATEC 221 Pathology II
RATEC 240 Radiation Biology
and Protection
RATEC 295 Special Topics in RATEC
TOTAL
Second Year - Spring Quarter
RATEC 213 Clinical Education VIII
RATEC 207 Concept Integration
RATEC 296 Special Topics in RATEC
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
8
3
2
13
8
2
3
2
15
8
2
2
12
102
Real Estate
This program offers various degree and
certificate options for interested students,
current investors or real estate professionals.
The coursework provides the academic
background to deal with the real estate
marketplace. Students may choose from
several areas of expertise to assist or enhance
their specialty field.
Contact the Real Estate Resource Center for
the latest information on required courses for
completion of the following options:
Associate in Arts Degree
90 credits required for completion in:
• Appraisal
• Commercial Practices
• Escrow
• Mortgage Finance
• Residential Practices
• Title Insurance
First Year - Spring Quarter
ENGL 101 Written Expression
PE 266
Skills and Materials:
Individual/Dual Sports
RECED 290 Adaptive Recreation
Lab Science Elective
Credits required for completion are
noted in parenthesis.
• Appraisal (21.5)
• Escrow (20 )
• Mortgage Finance (23)
• Property Management (21)
• Real Estate (21)
• Title Insurance (20)
Recreation
Leadership
This program prepares graduates for
positions in city and county recreation,
medical institutions, industrial recreation,
camping, and various youth service
organizations. Recreational leaders assist in
planning, organizing and leading activities.
After completion of their associate degree
requirements, students will be prepared for
entry into the upper division courses at
four-year colleges or universities which
offer baccalaureate degrees in professional
recreation.
Associate in Arts Degree
2
3
5
TOTAL
15
Second Year - Fall Quarter
PE 290
Sports Officiating
Science Elective
Electives By Advisement
3
5
10
TOTAL
18
Second Year - Winter Quarter
PE 209
Skills and Materials of
Recreational Dance
RECED 274 Practicum in Social
Recreation
SOC 110
Introduction to Sociology
Electives By Advisement
2
2
5
6
TOTAL
15
Second Year - Spring Quarter
RECED 244 Camp Counseling
RECED 254 Practicum in Playground
Leadership
Electives by Advisement
3
5
7
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
Recreation Leadership
First Year - Fall Quarter
Course No. Course Name Credit Hrs.
HLTH 250 Health Science
5
HLTH 292 First Aid and CPR
4
PE 166
Skills and Materials in
Team Sports
2
RECED 154 Recreational Resources
5
TOTAL
16
First Year - Winter Quarter
PE 265
Skills and Materials:
Activities for the
Elementary Child
2
PSYCH 100 Introduction of Psychology 5
RECED 245 Recreational Use of Art
Crafts
3
SPCH 220
Introduction to Public
Speaking
5
TOTAL
5
15
15
94
Washington
Academy of
Languages
Translation and
Interpretation
Institute
This program is a cooperative effort between
Bellevue Community College and the
Washington Academy of Languages (WAL),
a non-profit institution accredited by the
Accrediting Council for Continuing
Education and Training. BCC provides credit
for two certificate programs, one in
interpretation and one in translation. Classes
meet at both WAL and BCC. Application for
41
Degrees & Certificates
INTRP 106
admission to these two certificate programs
must be made through WAL. Admissions
applications are accepted by WAL any time
during the year, but no later than two weeks
before the start of any quarter. Please call
(206) 682-4463 for further information.
Ethics and Business
Practice of Translation
and Interpreting
TOTAL
3
12
Interpreting
The programs are intended for bilingual
people of diverse educational backgrounds
who are interested in pursuing a career in
translation or interpretation. The primary
criterion for admission is high proficiency in
the candidate’s working language(s). The
certificate granted will be language specific.
Language Specific Requirements
INTRP 102
INTRP 107
INTRP 108
INTRP 111
Certificate of Accomplishment
Basic Interpreting Skills
Advanced Interpreting
Skills Level I
Advanced Interpreting
Skills II
Interpretation Practicum
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
Translation
3
3
3
1
10
22
Core Requirements
Course No.
INTRP 101
INTRP 104
INTRP 105
INTRP 106
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Introduction to
Translation and Interpreting 3
Technology for Translators
and Interpreters
3
Vocabulary Acquisition and
Terminology Research
3
Ethics and Business
Practice of Translation
and Interpreting
3
TOTAL
12
Translation
Language Specific Requirements
TRANS 103 Basic Translation Skills
TRANS 109 Advanced Translation
Workshop I
TRANS 110 Advanced Translation
Workshop II
TRANS 112 Translation Practicum
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
3
3
3
1
10
22
Certificate of Accomplishment
Work-Based
Experience
This is a learning opportunity for occupational programs in which actual on-the-job
experience is coordinated with academic
study as a means for providing students with
real life experience in their chosen fields.
Students register for individual study or
internship programs, and credits vary with
the number of work hours, meetings with
instructor and extent of project report
requirements.
Some courses may be repeated and at least
two quarters of participation is highly
desirable. Registration for some of these
courses is available throughout the quarter
depending on placement availability.
Program advisors plan work experiences with
students as part of their personal development, general education and occupational
training. Students must discuss work-based
experience availabilities with their program
advisors.
Interpretation
Core Requirements
Course No.
INTRP 101
INTRP 104
INTRP 105
42
Course Name Credit Hrs.
Introduction to Translation
and Interpreting
3
Technology for Translators
and Interpreters
3
Vocabulary Acquisition
and Terminology Research 3
Course titles are abbreviated in these
listings. Please see division sections for
complete titles.
Arts &Arts
Humanities
& Humanities
The Art of
Expression
The Arts and Humanities Division offers a widely diversified range of
American
Studies
The American Studies Program offers a
study of American thought and character.
Each course pursues a major theme and
leads students to explore this theme as it is
treated by several disciplines. Students are
encouraged to develop individual and
innovative projects incorporating ethnic and
regional studies and to investigate the future
implications of the topic. Instructors for
various departments teach in the program.
The courses are designed for both academic
transfer (for such majors as business,
international studies, art) and vocational
students to investigate the unique experience
of American culture and to gain that
broadening perspective as an aid to flexibility
in careers.
AMST 101
Introduction to American
Myth • V3-5
disciplines, through 11 programs and departments. These courses of
study are the traditional humanities: american studies; communications; English; French, German, Japanese, and Spanish languages;
philosophy; speech; fine and performing arts (art, dance, drama,
music); and an occupational program with kinship to the arts - Interior
Design. In addition, the English Department provides directors for the
Reading and Writing Labs.
AMST 114
American Film as Literature • 5
Introduces the critical study of the motion
picture as an expressive medium bearing
close affinities to the forms and styles of
literary art. Focus of study is on the featurelength film as a novelistic form; may also
examine documentary. Special focus upon
the American film’s history and cultural
tradition.
AMST 150
Mass Media in America • 5
Overviews American Studies by analyzing
the meanings and dimensions of the myth of
America as it appears in American life and
thought, considering the form of the myth in
literature, the arts and mass media. Course
would enable students to determine the basis
of their value system by careful attention to
critical thinking. Applications to most
disciplines will be considered.
Deals with organization, operation, and
control of the American mass media;
influence upon social organization, social
values, and social change; relations between
media and government, media and their
audiences. Credit given as humanities credit.
See COMM 150 for social science credit.
Either AMST 150 or COMM 150 may be
taken for credit – not both.
AMST 102
Introduction to American
Culture • 2
AMST 160
Introduction to American
Political Culture • 5
Overviews separate disciplines in relation to
a central theme in American Studies. One to
two weeks of presentations by faculty from
other disciplines depending on the central
theme requirements. Examples of themes:
American Myth in Life; Comparative
Culture: U.S. and Central America.
Emphasizes a multidisciplinary approach to
the understanding of the formation and
development of American political culture
and the various ways it has been interpreted
through time. Same as POLSC 160. Either
AMST 160 or POLSC 160 can be taken for
credit – not both.
AMST 180
Anthropology of American
Life • 5
Examines the nature of American culture
from the standpoint of the social sciences.
The historical origins of cultural and political
values, the effects of economic changes, and
the impact of mass culture on American
consciousness are among the issues
considered. Same as ANTH 180. Either
AMST 180 or ANTH 180 may be taken for
credit – not both.
AMST 200
Cultural Pluralism • 5
Course is designed to explore the role that
race, gender and class differences play in
our social, economic and political structure.
Examines the impact that racism, classicism,
and sexism have on our lives and our society.
AMST 260
Economic Development of the
U.S. • 5
Course analyzes the industrialization and
transformation of the U.S. economy from the
colonial period to the present. Major emphasis
will be on rapid transformations after the Civil
War, the Great Depression of the 1930’s, and
the contributions of the social attitude toward
immigrant and native groups. Prerequisite:
Recommend 30 prior college credits.
43
Arts & Humanities
AMST 285
American Humor • 5
Provides a history and analysis of American
humor. Topics may include: for the 19th
century - Down East, Old Southwest and
Literary Comedian; for the 20th century –
the Purple Cow and Columnists humorists.
Contemporary forms of humor such as
cartoons, cinema and stand-up comic routines
may also be included.
AMST 286
Popular Culture • 5
AMST 299
Individual Studies in American
Studies • V1-5
ART 103
American Art and
Architecture • 5
Covers directed reading, special projects, and
independent study by an individual student.
Looks at 5 regions of the U.S. with particular
attention to the rich cultural diversity that has
shaped the character of art and architecture of
each area.
Art
Declared art majors – students whose focus is
the studio arts (painting, photography, etc.),
commercial art, should take the courses
outlines as follows:
Analysis of popular culture forms in mass
media. Varying topics examined include:
western and romance novels, cartoons,
advertisements, folklore, film, musical
comedy and other contemporary forms.
First-Year foundation courses:
AMST 287
American Heroes • 5
Students who plan to transfer to a university
or art school should see an art advisor for
detailed schedule planning as early as
possible.
Investigates the American hero incorporated
within the American dream including the
different ideologies for men and women and
ethnic minorities. Interdisciplinary approach
indicates changing values of heroes in
literature, autobiography, history, film, art
and music.
AMST 288
Frontiers – Land and Space • 5
Explores land – wilderness, frontier, urban
development – and space as the major
symbol in the American myth. Historical
view from Puritan New England Promised
Land to twentieth-century space exploration
includes interdisciplinary perspective.
AMST 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in American
Studies • V1-5
Provides opportunity for focused study of
various American Studies topics by
capitalizing on the special knowledge of
college instructors. Appropriate subjects
could be American Women Artists,
American Stages in Life, Modernity in
America, Immigrant Women. Subject can be
influenced by student request and is
announced before each quarter.
44
ART 101, 108, 110, 111, 112, 120
Second-Year:
ART 201, 202, 203 and ten credits of studio
courses.
Prerequisites: Students should be aware that
many courses have prerequisites which must
be followed in all cases.
Admission to advanced studio courses is
dependent upon the successful completion of
both foundation and basic studio course work.
Check with your advisor or instructor to make
certain you have met the prerequisites.
Transferability: Students in doubt about
transferability of art courses from other
colleges and art schools to Bellevue
Community College should check with an
advisor in the Art Department.
Retention of student work: The College
reserves the right to retain, from each
student, as many as three items from each
class each quarter, without monetary
compensation.
ART 101
Modern Architecture and
Design • 5
Provides a look at the designed environment
and how various aspects of this environment
interrelate. Course includes a history of
design movements, styles and noted
designers since 1850, and surveys the fields
of architecture, planning, landscape,
industrial and interior design.
ART 105
Art Appreciation • V3-5
Offers slide lectures to illustrate the visual
components of art and artistic techniques.
Includes brief survey of art history. Offcampus assignments to gallery/museum
required. Suggested for non-art majors.
ART 108
Introduction to Hand/Power
Tools • 2
Introduction to the safe use of hand and
power tools in the wood shop, through
lectures, demonstrations, use and testing.
ART 110*
Two-Dimensional Design • 5
Teaches students the elements and principles
of two-dimensional design, with special
emphasis on creative problem-solving. Six
hours laboratory. Additional lab time required.
ART 111*
Design: Color • 5
Provides a continuation of principles used in
ART 110, with emphasis on color theory.
Students learn to use and mix paint,
understand environmental color and apply
these concepts to their design work. Six
hours laboratory. Additional lab time
required. Prerequisite: ART 110.
ART 112*
Three-Dimensional Design • 5
Basic course of three-dimensional thinking,
working with wood, acrylic, metal, etc.
Students will create objects using mass,
space, time and light. Additional lab time
required. Prerequisite: ART 108, 110,120.
ART 120*
Drawing I • 5
Instruction in visual and drawing skills.
Students work from objects and structural
* Use of this performance class in the distribution area of the Arts and Sciences transfer degree is limited to 5 credits.
Arts & Humanities
forms in the studio. Charcoal and pencil
primary media used. Six hours studio lab.
Additional lab time required.
ART 121*
Drawing II • 5
A continuation of ART 120. Includes
drawing the human figure from studio
model. Introduction of color media and
expressive drawing. Six hours lecture, lab
with additional outside work required.
Prerequisite: ART 120.
ART 150*
Basic Photo I • 5
Introduces basic camera handling, developing, printing and composition with black and
white film. Students should own a camera
with manual exposure control and are
expected to supply their own developing
tank, film, and photographic paper. Four
hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
ART 151*
Basic Photo II • 5
Provides advanced techniques in black and
white photography, with emphasis on creative
seeing and problem solving. Intro-duction to
the zone system. Four hours lecture, two hours
laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ART 150 or
permission of instructor.
ART 153*
Darkroom Laboratory
Techniques • 1
Includes darkroom privileges for students not
presently enrolled in a photography class.
Designed for students with a working
understanding of processes who wish to gain
experience in darkroom work. Prerequisite:
ART 150 or permission of instructor. Course
may be repeated for a maximum of three (3)
credits.
ART 199
Individual Projects in
Art • V1-3
Provides an opportunity for expansion of
individual skills beyond the regular curriculum. Students must have taken the appropriate
foundation level courses relative to the basic
studio course. Course may be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ART 201
History of Western Art • 5
ART 252*
Basic Color Photo • 5
Introduces art history terms and concepts.
History of the art of prehistoric Europe,
ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, Rome,
Byzantium and the Medieval period are
discussed with slide lectures.
Introduces basic color theory, processing
techniques of negative and positive materials
and color enlarging. Emphasis is on
establishing a firm technical base for the
creative approach to color photography.
Regular critique sessions on technique and
composition, as they apply to the process of
visual communication, are given. Prerequisite: ART 151 or permission of instructor.
ART 202
History of Western Art • 5
Offers a descriptive survey of the art of the
western world, Italian and Northern
Renaissance, Baroque and early 18th century
Europe.
ART 203
History of Western Art • 5
Offers a descriptive survey of the art of
Europe and America from the late 18th
through the 20th century.
ART 221*
Advanced Studio: Drawing • 5
Provides studio experience in drawing
beyond the basic courses. Six hours lecture,
lab with additional outside work required.
Prerequisite: ART 111, 121 and permission
of instructor.
ART 222*
Advanced Studio: Drawing • 5
Gives studio experience in drawing beyond
ART 221. Six hours lecture, lab with
additional outside work required. Prerequisite: ART 221 and permission of instructor.
ART 240*
Oil Painting • V3-5
An introduction to painting, with instruction
in modeling in light and shade composition,
color theory and technique. Six hours lecture,
lab with additional outside work required.
ART 242*
Advanced Studio: Painting • 5
Offers studio experience in painting beyond
ART 240. Course offered alternate years.
Prerequisite: ART 111, 121 and 240 or
permission of instructor.
ART 253*
Photo III • 5
Advanced exploration of the history and
techniques of photography with assignments
in creative solving of visual problems.
Prerequisite: ART 110, 151 or permission of
instructor.
ART 260*
Basic Ceramics I • 5
Gives the student the opportunity to work
primarily on hand building processes for high
fire clay bodies and glaze work. Limited
work on the wheel is included.
ART 261*
Basic Ceramics II • 5
A continuation of work done in Ceramics I
with more emphasis on the wheel. Prerequisite: ART 261.
ART 299
Individual Projects in
Art • V1-3
Provides an opportunity for expansion of
individual skills beyond the regular
curriculum. The student must have taken the
appropriate foundation level courses relative
to the basic studio course. Course may be
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission
of instructor.
Communications
COMM 101
Exploring the Digital Future • 5
Surveys the spectrum of global digital
communication, with emphasis on past,
present and future technologies; the effects of
* Use of this performance class in the distribution area of the Arts and Sciences transfer degree is limited to 5 credits.
45
Arts & Humanities
digital communication on our society; and
career opportunities in digital communication
fields. Emphasis is made on the computer
revolution, and its effect on daily life. Same as
MEDIA 101. Either COMM 101 or MEDIA
101 may be taken for credit - not both.
COMM 102
Techniques and Technology of
Persuasion • 5
Presents technological and communication
techniques of film, video and multimedia that
allow information to be targeted at specific
individuals and groups to create opinions,
generate sales, develop propaganda and other
forms of persuasion. Students have the
opportunity to test persuasion techniques
with simple media presentations. Same as
MEDIA 102. Either COMM 102 or MEDIA
102 may be taken for credit - not both.
COMM 103
Media and Messages: Media
Literacy • 5
Gives insight into the aesthetics of media
production through the study of production
techniques including lighting, editing, color,
audio and interactivity. Lectures include clips
from a variety of film, video and multimedia
resources as well as guest speakers to help
develop students’ interpretive skills in media.
Same as MEDIA 103. Either COMM 103 or
MEDIA 103 may be taken for credit – not both.
COMM 104
Multi-Cultural Media
Messages • 5
Develops students’ critical viewing skills to
analyze the origin, impact and meanings of
electronic and digital images from both a
personal and multi-cultural perspective.
Reviews the history and future of global
media networks and their effect on multicultural issues. Same as MEDIA 104. Either
COMM 104 or MEDIA 104 may be taken for
credit – not both.
COMM 141
Introduction to Media
Writing • 5
Introduces the fundamentals of reporting
(researching, covering events, interviewing);
and newswriting (story organization, style,
46
succinctness). Includes classroom instruction
and practical assignments to be submitted to
the student newspaper. Cannot be repeated
for credit. COMM 141 is equivalent to
ENGL 101. Prerequisite: Placement by
assessment into ENGL 101, or ENGL 092 or
093 at BCC with a “B-” or better.
COMM 142
Intermediate Reporting • 5
Improves skills in news gathering, interviewing and newswriting. Emphasizes investigation, research and team reporting. Fulfills
basic skills writing requirement for Arts and
Sciences Degree. Prerequisite: ENGL 101
and COMM 141.
COMM 143
Editing Techniques • 3
Deals with techniques and responsibilities of
newspaper editing; emphasizes copy reading,
headline writing. Prerequisite: COMM 141.
COMM 144
Newspaper Design • 3
Deals with newspaper design and coverage
strategies: headline schedules, page makeup,
assignment planning, and picture editing.
Prerequisite: COMM 141 and ENGL 101.
COMM 145
Advertising Staff • 3
Teaches typography, paste-up, design, sales,
and includes practical work on student
newspaper.
COMM 146
News Staff • 3
Offers more practical application of skills
developed in COMM 141 and COMM 142.
Typically involves 10 major reporting assignments per quarter. May be repeated twice.
COMM 150
Introduction to Mass Media • 5
Deals with organization, operation, and
control of the American mass media;
influence upon social organization, social
values and social change; relations between
media and government, media and their
audiences. Credit given as social science
credit. See AMST 150 for humanities credit.
Either AMST 150 or COMM 150 may be
taken for credit – not both.
COMM 161
Basic Broadcasting • 5
Develops announcing skills and audio
operations. Course includes preparation in
radio history and regulations and introduction
to commercials, news, production, and
station organization.
COMM 163
Radio Operations: Announcing/
Production • 5
Develops audio production skills and
improvement of voicing skills. Tape editing
and mixing are covered, and production
values are developed through class projects.
Prerequisite: COMM 161 and permission of
instructor.
COMM 201
History of Communication • 5
Development of communication from
prehistoric times to the present. Influence of
communication on historical changes in the
United States and in other nations. Covers
social and technological change.
COMM 220
Law of Mass
Communications • 5
Examines communication law with authoritative judicial reasoning on key principles. Most
cases are drawn from Supreme Court
decisions. Current issues and challenges to
established procedure are included. Recommend COMM 150 or COMM 201 or related
subjects; general interest in subject.
COMM 241
Photo Journalism • 3
Involves the use of photography in print
communications: conventional pictures
(portraits, group pictures, feature stories,
sports pictures) and special occasion
pictures. Publication values include news
angle, cut lines, legal constraints, cropping
and half-toning. Prerequisite: ART 150 and
permission of instructor.
COMM 245
Practicum in Journalism • 5
Provides practical work in community
journalism involving 10 hours per week
working on the staff of a local community
* Use of this performance class in the distribution area of the Arts and Sciences transfer degree is limited to 5 credits.
Arts & Humanities
newspaper under the supervision of one or
more departmental editors. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor. Enrollment only
by arrangement with the Communication
Program.
COMM 261
Radio News Broadcasting • 5
Offers writing, editing, producing, and
delivering news for radio. Prerequisite:
COMM 141, 161 and permission of instructor.
COMM 266
Practicum in Broadcasting • 5
Provides 10 hours a week spent working in a
local broadcast outlet. The course may be
repeated for a maximum of ten (10) credits.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
COMM 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in
Communications • V1-10
Allows students to pursue a specialized or indepth study of a particular subject relating to
communications. Prerequisite: Permission
of instructor.
COMM 299
Special Projects in
Communications • V1-5
Involves individual projects in broadcasting,
journalism and advertising, which will
enhance the knowledge, skills and experience
gained in specific communication courses. No
more than 10 credits may apply to an AAS
degree. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Dance
DANCE 130*
Jazz Technique I • 2
Consists of movement studies designed for
students interested in developing technique in
a highly energized theatrical style of jazz
dance.
DANCE 131*
Jazz Technique II • 2
Continues DANCE 130. Students are
expected to perform at a more advanced level
and pick up on the more subtle nuances of
style, rhythm, and dynamics. Prerequisite:
DANCE 130 or permission of instructor.
DANCE 132*
Jazz Technique III • 2
Emphasis is on improving technique and
expansion of movement vocabulary. Class is
designed to challenge the higher level intermediate dancer and bridge the gap between
Jazz Technique II and the Dance Ensemble
class. Students will explore and develop
advanced techniques and performance skills.
includes a company class, formal and
informal improvisation and solo or small
group work. Prerequisite: Audition and
permission of instructor.
DANCE 202*
Dance Ensemble II • V1-5
Continuation of Dance Ensemble I. Emphasis
is on rehearsing for specific dance works.
Choreographic experience is offered to those
with more experience and ability. Prerequisite: DANCE 201 or permission of instructor.
DANCE 133*
Jazz Technique IV • 2
DANCE 203*
Dance Ensemble III • V1-5
Emphasis is on improving technique and
expansion of movement vocabulary. The class
is designed to challenge the higher level intermediate dancer and bridge the gap between
Jazz Technique III and the Dance Ensemble
class. Students will explore and develop
advanced techniques and performance skills.
Continuation of Dance Ensemble II. Stress is
on performance. Students combine technical
and performing skills and experience the
production aspects of concerts. Prerequisite:
DANCE 202 or permission of instructor.
DANCE 140*
Ballet Technique I • 2
Introduction of principles, techniques and
vocabulary of classical ballet. Emphasis will
be on placement, flexibility, strength and
coordination for the beginning and advanced
beginning student.
DANCE 151*
Contemporary Dance I • 2
Introduces technique work at the bar and
center floor. The purposes of the course are:
to gain flexibility and strength and to extend
movement vocabulary. May be taken for PE
or DANCE credit.
Drama
DRAMA 101
Introduction to the Theater • 5
Surveys theater history starting with the
Greek theater. Course includes lecturediscussions, guest lectures and opportunity to
do one scene in class.
DRAMA 110
Scene Technology • 4
Intensive lecture/lab course in basic theories
and techniques of set and property construction and painting. Prerequisite: Concurrent
enrollment in DRAMA 290.
DANCE 152*
Contemporary Dance II • 2
DRAMA 112
Stage Lighting • 4
Continues Contemporary Dance I. Studies
technique to include longer and more
challenging movement combinations. If
uncertain of ability, confer with Dance
Program Advisor. Course may be repeated
for a maximum of six credits. May be taken
for PE or DANCE credit.
Intensive lecture/lab course in basic theories,
techniques and equipment in theater lighting.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in
DRAMA 290.
DANCE 201*
Dance Ensemble I • V1-5
Consists of a performing group of dancers.
Emphasis is on dance as an art form. Course
DRAMA 125
Great Plays • 5
An appraisal and analysis of great plays that
formulate changes in dramatic literature and
philosophy. Includes concept, story,
character, dialogue, and criticism with
reader’s theater component. Course is offered
on alternate years.
* Use of this performance class in the distribution area of the Arts and Sciences transfer degree is limited to 5 credits.
47
Arts & Humanities
DRAMA 126
Contemporary Theater • 5
Studies scripts written in the past five years.
Emphasis is on analysis of scripts and trends
of theater today with reader’s theater
component.
DRAMA 151
Acting: Improvisation • 5
Concentrates on working individually and
with others; developing interplay through
exercises focusing on developing a situation;
listening; playing objectives; and playing off
partner’s behavior.
DRAMA 152
Acting: Movement • 5
Concentrates on tuning the actors body;
fluidity, flexibility, agility and developing
specific skills such as stage fights, and
manipulation (mime). Work on specific
dramatic situations that incorporate both
character work and strenuous physical
activity.
DRAMA 153
Acting: Scene Study • 5
Involves working with text: character and
text analysis; rehearsal tools; acting one’s
age; playing against type, underplaying,
overplaying; rhythm, timing, pacing and
achieving an objective through work on
scenes and monologues.
DRAMA 161
Acting in the Media I • 5
The techniques of acting as they apply to the
electronic and film media. Students will learn
to be comfortable in front of a lens and oncamera believability. Scenes will be shot in
continuity style including masters, two shots,
over-the-shoulders and close-ups, and
students will take roles behind the camera.
DRAMA 200
Drama Colloquium • 3
This course is an in-depth analysis of the
history and literature of the period of the
annual drama production and a dialogue with
the director, designers and technical director
of the production. Prerequisite: Concurrent
enrollment in DRAMA 291.
48
DRAMA 251*
Advanced Acting: Scene
Study • 5
Rehearsal and classroom performance of
scenes from 19th century and contemporary
theater leading to a final in-class performance of selected scenes. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor and/or audition.
DRAMA 252*
Advanced Acting: Scene
Study • 5
Rehearsal and classroom performance of
scenes from dramatic literature of Greek and
Roman theater leading to a final performance
of selected scenes. Prerequisite: Permission
of instructor and/or audition.
DRAMA 253*
Advanced Acting: Scene
Study • 5
Rehearsal and classroom performance of
scenes from dramatic literature of leading
Elizabethan, 17th and 18th century theater
leading to a final in-class performance of
selected scenes. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor and/or audition.
DRAMA 280*
Studio Theater • 5
Lecture/Lab course focusing on the history,
analysis and performance of a play with
limited production values in the studio theater.
All members of the class will be cast in the
play. May be repeated for a maximum of 15
credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
DRAMA 290*
Technical Practice • 1
The course is offered as the crew component
of Drama 110 and 112. A minimum of 33
hours of backstage work on the studio theater
production is required.
DRAMA 291*
Theater Practicum • 2
Offers the student hands-on experience in the
production of the yearly main stage show, or
for advanced students, special projects on the
quarterly studio production. Prerequisite:
Concurrent registration in DRAMA 200 or
permission of instructor.
DRAMA 299
Individual Research • V1-5
Provides advanced individual study in the
areas of acting, stage, costume and lighting
design, publicity, playwriting, or directing.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
English
ENGL 071
Developmental English • 10
An intensive course in reading and writing
strategies for students placing below the
ENGL 092 or 093 level or below the ENGL
106 level. Students must also take one or two
credits of ENGL 080 (Reading Lab). The
Developmental English course sequence may
be started in any quarter and students should
register in the following manner: ENGL 071,
Summer; ENGL 072, Fall; ENGL 073,
Winter; ENGL 074, Spring. Courses may be
repeated until student tests into ENGL 092 or
093. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.
ENGL 072
Developmental English • 10
An intensive course in reading and writing
strategies for students placing below the
ENGL 092 or 093 level or below the ENGL
106 level. Students must also take one or two
credits of ENGL 080 (Reading Lab). The
Developmental English course sequence may
be started in any quarter and students should
register in the following manner: ENGL 071,
Summer; ENGL 072, Fall; ENGL 073,
Winter; ENGL 074, Spring. Courses may be
repeated until student tests into ENGL 092 or
093. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.
ENGL 073
Developmental English • 10
An intensive course in reading and writing
strategies for students placing below the
ENGL 092 or 093 level or below the ENGL
106 level. Students must also take one or two
credits of ENGL 080 (Reading Lab). The
Developmental English course sequence may
be started in any quarter and students should
register in the following manner: ENGL 071,
Summer; ENGL 072, Fall; ENGL 073,
Winter; ENGL 074, Spring. Courses may be
repeated until student tests into ENGL 092 or
093. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.
* Use of this performance class in the distribution area of the Arts and Sciences transfer degree is limited to 5 credits.
Arts & Humanities
ENGL 074
Developmental English • 10
register for DEVED 081 or an English
reading or writing course.
An intensive course in reading and writing
strategies for students placing below the
ENGL 092 or 093 level or below the ENGL
106 level. Students must also take one or two
credits of ENGL 080 (Reading Lab). The
Developmental English course sequence may
be started in any quarter and students should
register in the following manner: ENGL 071,
Summer; ENGL 072, Fall; ENGL 073,
Winter; ENGL 074, Spring. Courses may be
repeated until student tests into ENGL 092 or
093. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.
ENGL 092
Developmental English IV • 5
ENGL 080
Improving Reading Skills
(Reading Lab) • V1-2
Allows a student to work independently in the
Reading Lab. Each student works individually
under the supervision of the Reading Lab
Director and lab staff. Grades are Pass/Fail.
One hour credit equals 20 hours of lab work.
ENGL 089
Reading IV • 5
Pre-assigned students whose assessment
scores range from levels 8-11.9. Coordinated
with parallel reading lab sections, which
emphasize acquisition of vocabulary and
development of literal and inferential
comprehension skills. Prerequisite:
Placement by assessment.
ENGL 090
Strategies for Improving
Writing Skills • V1-5
An independent studies program that allows a
student to work individually on an area of
special need by arrangement with an
instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor.
ENGL 091
Basic Grammar and Sentence
Patterns • V2-5
Reviews parts of speech, verb tenses and
basic sentence patterns in context of
students’ own writing. Designed to help
students at all levels combat writer’s block
and understand what teachers say about their
writing. Open to native speakers and nonnative speakers. Prerequisite: Eligible to
Advanced editing skills and critical thinking
are emphasized. Major writing objectives
must be met not only in papers written
outside of class but in essays written, revised
and edited in a single class period. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.
ENGL 093
Composition for Non-Native
Speakers IV • 5
ESL students read, talk and write about major
contemporary issues. Advanced editing skills
and editing speed are emphasized not only in
papers written outside of class but in essays
written, revised and edited in a single class
period. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.
ENGL 101
Written Expression • 5
Includes a variety of writing modes. Students
learn that writing is a process. Instructors
may organize the course in any number of
ways so as to assist the student to achieve
clear, effective writing skills. Prerequisite:
Placement by assessment, or ENGL 092 or
093 with a “B-” or better.
ENGL 102
Written Expression • 5
Emphasizes summary skills, analysis of
sources, development of Library research
skills and a lengthy investigation of a thesis
in a research paper. Students critique various
styles of argumentation. Prerequisite:
ENGL 101.
ENGL 103
Accessing Information
Today • V1-3
Familiarizes students with accessing
information through a variety of general
reference sources, indexes and databases.
Also examines social and psychological
barriers to free access to information.
Recommend ENGL 101 placement.
ENGL 105
Mechanics of English, A
Survey • 5
College-level course emphasizing grammar,
usage, sentence structure, and punctuation.
The content and goals will be partly
determined by the needs of the participants.
Prerequisite: Placement by assessment, or
ENGL 092 or 093 with a “B-” or better.
ENGL 106
College Reading and
Analysis • 5
For the student who reads at levels 12-13.9.
This course emphasizes the development of
critical reading and thinking skills (analysis,
synthesis, evaluation) necessary for
successful completion of college level
courses in the humanities, social sciences
and sciences. Parallel lab emphasizes
vocabulary and comprehension skills.
Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.
ENGL 107
English As A Foreign
Language • 5
For non-native speakers only, after completion of 15 credits in English courses
numbered below 100. This course validates
foreign language development for non-native
speakers. Prerequisite: Permission of
Program Chair.
ENGL 108
English As A Foreign
Language • 5
For non-native speakers only, after completion of an additional 15 credits in English
courses numbered below 100. This course
validates foreign language development for
non-native speakers. Prerequisite: Permission
of Program Chair.
ENGL 110
Reading Poetry • 5
Introduces the student to the style, structure,
techniques and interpretation of poetry.
Students read major poets and emphasis is
placed on analysis and interpretation of
poems. Recommend ENGL 101 placement
or higher.
* Use of this performance class in the distribution area of the Arts and Sciences transfer degree is limited to 5 credits.
49
Arts & Humanities
ENGL 111
Reading Drama • 5
Students discover drama as literature. Includes
traditional and modern playwrights. Students
enjoy drama more fully through understanding
its conventions, styles and techniques.
Recommend ENGL 101 placement or higher.
ENGL 112
Reading Fiction • 5
Introduces a range of short fiction and one or
more novels. Emphasizes close reading
techniques for analysis, the qualities of
fictional literature and how they are achieved.
Recommend ENGL 101 placement or higher.
ENGL 114
The Film as Literature • 5
Introduces the critical study of the motion
picture as an expressive medium bearing
close affinities to the forms and styles of
literary art. Special focus upon cultural
tradition and values. Recommend ENGL
101 placement or higher.
ENGL 130
Introduction to Literature • 5
A course designed primarily for the evening
student. It is an introduction to the literary
genres: poetry, drama, fiction. Recommend
ENGL 101 placement or higher.
ENGL 131
Introduction to Literature • 5
A course designed primarily for the evening
student. It is an introduction to the literary
genres: poetry, drama, fiction. Recommend
ENGL 101 placement or higher.
ENGL 210
Introduction to European
Literature • 5
Intensively examines the fiction, drama, and
poetry from European cultures. Content
varies but mainly focuses on 19th and 20th
century works in translation. Recommend
ENGL 101 placement or higher.
ENGL 215
Folklore: Myth, Folktale and
Legend • 5
Surveys the stories of selected cultures in
order to discover common motifs and styles,
50
to explore relationships between cultural
perspectives and to examine theories
concerning origins and significance.
Recommend ENGL 101, 102 or a literature
course in the 100 series.
ENGL 221
Popular Literature • 5
Investigates the themes, conventions and
cultural assumptions of genre-based popular
literature. Individual instructor’s specific
focus is designated by added wording in
course title. Recommend ENGL 101, 102 or
a literature course in the 100 series.
ENGL 223
Children’s Literature • 5
An examination of the imaginative literature
that forms a part of children’s experience and
a portion of our larger literary heritage, with
attention to its moral, psychological and
political implications. Recommend ENGL
101, 102 or a literature course in the 100
series.
ENGL 231
Introduction to
Shakespeare • 5
Surveys the development of Shakespeare’s
dramatic and literary art. Through a lecture/
discussion structure, the course offers study
in representative comedies, tragedies,
romances and histories. Recommend prior
completion of ENGL 101, 102 or a literature
course in the 100 series.
ENGL 232
Introduction to
Shakespeare II • 5
Is a continuation of English 231 offering
comedies, tragedies and histories. Recommend prior completion of ENGL 101, 102 or
a literature course in the 100 series.
ENGL 241
The Bible as Literature • 5
A lecture/discussion course which explores
the oral and written traditions of literature in
the Old and New Testaments, emphasizing
the cultural, historic and literary aspects of
scripture. Recommend prior completion of
ENGL 101, 102 or a literature course in the
100 series.
ENGL 263
English Literature: Beowulf
Through Shakespeare • 5
Explores the relationship between language,
literature and cultural and intellectual context
in representative works of the period,
including Beowulf and works by Chaucer and
Shakespeare. Evaluation by tests and papers.
Recommend prior completion of ENGL 101,
102 or a literature course in the 100 series.
ENGL 264
English Literature: Donne
Through Johnson • 5
Surveys major literary figures, styles, and
themes of the 17th and 18th centuries,
including early periodicals and the beginnings of the English novel. Typically features
figures such as Donne, Milton, Pope,
Goldsmith, Jonson, Swift and Johnson.
Recommend prior completion of ENGL 101,
102 or a literature course in the 100 series.
ENGL 265
English Literature: Blake
Through Hardy • 5
Surveys the major Romantic (Blake,
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, the
Shelleys, Keats) and Victorian (Tennyson,
the Brownings, G. Eliot, Hardy, Arnold)
writers as they reflect the changing attitudes
of their time in literature and culture.
Recommend prior completion of ENGL 101,
102 or a literature course in the 100 series.
ENGL 266
English Literature: Twentieth
Century Writers • 5
Surveys modern British writers with
emphasis on major movements and figures,
including Eliot, Yeats, Conrad, Joyce,
Lawrence, Auden, Thomas, Woolf and
Forster. Recommend prior completion of
ENGL 101, 102 or a literature course in the
100 series.
ENGL 267
American Lit: Beginnings
Through Civil War • 5
Provides readings from authors such as
Edwards, Franklin, Thoreau, Hawthorne,
Melville, Twain and others, and considers
their respective contributions to the
* Use of this performance class in the distribution area of the Arts and Sciences transfer degree is limited to 5 credits.
Arts & Humanities
American literary scene. Recommend prior
completion of ENGL 101, 102 or a literature
course in the 100 series.
ENGL 273
Verse and Short Story Series
(Creative Writing) • 5
ENGL 281
Creative Writing
Conference • V1-5
ENGL 268
American Lit: Civil War to End
of World War I • 5
A fifteen credit sequence where students may
elect to take the entire sequence, or may take
any five credits within the sequence. English
273 focuses on the creative process in
general.
Allows students to contract with the
instructor to complete a particular kind of
piece of writing. Open to students who have
completed the creative writing series in either
fiction or poetry, with high achievement.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Gives readings in American literature
emphasizing the Realistic period and
including such writers as Dickinson, James,
Adams, Howells, Crane, Dreiser and Twain.
Recommend prior completion of ENGL 101,
102 or a literature course in the 100 series.
ENGL 269
American Lit: End of World
War I to Present • 5
Offers readings in American literature
emphasizing the expatriates and the
experimental, including such writers as
Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Steinbeck, Faulkner,
Flannery O’Connor, Stevens, Eliot, Roethke,
Lowell, Plath, Barth and Pyncheon.
Recommend prior completion of ENGL 101,
102 or a literature course in the 100 series.
ENGL 270
Professional Report Writing • 5
Incorporates organization, development and
expression of ideas with practical problems
in writing. Technical periodicals and
reference work with proper bibliographical
usage are emphasized. Computer use is
required. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
ENGL 271
Expository Writing • 5
Provides a chance for further development of
writing skills learned in ENGL 101 or 102.
Emphasis is on personal essays, information
and opinion papers, reviews, profiles, articles
based upon interviews and upon individual
projects. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
ENGL 272
Expository Writing • 5
Course is planned for those wishing to
continue work begun in ENGL 271.
Prerequisite: ENGL 271.
ENGL 274
Verse and Short Story Series
(Creative Writing) • 5
A fifteen credit sequence where students may
elect to take the entire sequence, or may take
any five credits within the sequence. English
274 focuses on the craft of writing poetry.
ENGL 275
Verse and Short Story Series
(Creative Writing) • 5
A fifteen credit sequence where students may
elect to take the entire sequence, or may take
any five credits within the sequence. English
275 focuses on the craft of writing short
fiction with emphasis on the short story.
ENGL 276
Women Writers • 5
Combines lecture/discussion to explore the
rich diversity of styles, themes and perspectives in women’s writings from the 12th to
the 20th centuries. Students will explore the
diversity of women’s experiences and
perspectives over time and within diverse
social contexts. Recommend prior completion of ENGL 101, 102 or a literature course
in the 100 series.
ENGL 279
King Arthur, The Round Table
and the Grail • 5
Explore the Celtic and medieval origins of the
legends of King Arthur through lecture, seminar discussions and writing. Were Arthur and
his knights real people? How have the stories
and characters evolved over time? What did
they mean in their original cultural context?
Recommend prior completion of ENGL 101,
102 or a literature course in the 100 series.
ENGL 294/295/296/297
Special Studies in
Literature • 5
Provides opportunity for focused study of
various literature utilizing the special
knowledge of instructors. Subject matter
can be determined by student request and is
announced before each quarter. May be
repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.
ENGL 299
Directed Reading and
Research • V1-5
Allows individual study of given authors or
areas of special interest by arrangement with
instructor. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
Foreign
Language
FRNCH 101
Beginning 1st-Year French • 5
The methods and objectives are primarily
audio-lingual, practice with cassettes being
an integral part of the course. Basic reading
and writing skills are gradually introduced.
FRNCH 102
Intermediate 1st-Year
French • 5
Is a continuation of FRNCH 101. Prerequisite: FRNCH 101 or permission of instructor.
FRNCH 103
Advanced 1st-Year French • 5
Is a continuation of FRNCH 102. Prerequisite: FRNCH 102 or permission of instructor.
* Use of this performance class in the distribution area of the Arts and Sciences transfer degree is limited to 5 credits.
51
Arts & Humanities
FRNCH 201
Basic 2nd-Year French • 5
Reviews French grammar for experienced
students. Introduces French life, history and
literature. Emphasis is given to the conditions
and situations of modern life, including
relevant historical and literary perspectives.
Prerequisite: FRNCH 103 or permission of
instructor.
FRNCH 202
Intermediate 2nd-Year
French • 5
Continues FRNCH 201. Prerequisite:
FRNCH 201 or permission of instructor.
FRNCH 203
Advanced 2nd-Year French • 5
Continues FRNCH 202. Prerequisite:
FRNCH 202 or permission of instructor.
GERM 101
Beginning 1st-Year German • 5
Methods and objectives are primarily audiolingual. Practice with cassettes is required.
GERM 102
Intermediate 1st-Year
German • 5
GERM 202
Intermediate 2nd-Year
German • 5
Continues GERM 201. Prerequisite: GERM
201 or permission of instructor.
GERM 203
Advanced 2nd-Year German • 5
Continues GERM 202. Prerequisite: GERM
202 or permission of instructor.
JAPAN 101
Beginning 1st-Year
Japanese • 5
A beginning course in contemporary Japanese.
Includes oral and written activities to assist in
the development of skills in listening,
speaking, reading, writing and cultural
awareness that will allow people to communicate, interact and negotiate meaning.
JAPAN 102
Intermediate 1st-Year
Japanese • 5
An intermediate first year course continuing
with the goals of JAPAN 101. Prerequisite:
JAPAN 101 or permission of instructor.
Continues GERM 101. Prerequisite: GERM
101 or permission of instructor.
JAPAN 103
Advanced 1st-Year
Japanese • 5
GERM 103
Advanced 1st-Year German • 5
An advanced first year course continuing
with the goals of JAPAN 102. Prerequisite:
JAPAN 102 or permission of instructor.
Continues GERM 102. Prerequisite: GERM
102 or permission of instructor.
GERM 104
Individualized 1st-Year
German • V1-10
Self-paced, self-directed learning of all
language skills. Variable credit course: 1 to
10 credits.
GERM 201
Basic 2nd-Year German • 5
Business, economic and scientific German
for the experienced student to increase
language versatility. Prerequisite: GERM 103
or permission of instructor.
52
JAPAN 194/195/196/197
Special Topics in
Japanese • V1-5
Provides opportunities for focused study by
students capable of devising, carrying out
and completing an independent program of
study under the supervision of an instructor.
JAPAN 201
Basic 2nd-Year Japanese • 5
A second year course designed to teach
students how to use language in real life
situations for varying communicative
purposes. Grammar is de-emphasized since
this is best learned outside class. Activities
are related to a main theme and students
practice listening, speaking, reading and
writing about the theme in an integrated
fashion. Acquisition of vocabulary is
paramount. Prerequisite: JAPAN 103 or
permission of instructor.
JAPAN 202
Intermediate 2nd-Year
Japanese • 5
A continuation class focusing on the same
goals as JAPAN 201. Prerequisite: JAPAN
201 or permission of instructor.
JAPAN 203
Advanced 2nd-Year
Japanese • 5
A continuation class focusing on the same
goals as JAPAN 202. Prerequisite: JAPAN
202 or permission of instructor.
SPAN 101
Beginning 1st-Year Spanish • 5
Is primarily audio-lingual in its methods and
objectives. Practice with video and audio
cassettes is an integral part of the course.
Basic reading and writing skills are gradually
introduced.
SPAN 102
Intermediate 1st-Year
Spanish • 5
Continues SPAN 101. Prerequisite: SPAN
101 or permission of instructor.
SPAN 103
Advanced 1st-Year Spanish • 5
Continues SPAN 102. Prerequisite: SPAN
102 or permission of instructor.
SPAN 201
Basic 2nd-Year Spanish • 5
Reviews Spanish grammar and is designed for
students who have a basic knowledge of all
four Spanish language skills: listening,
speaking, reading, and writing. Its aim is to
continue to reinforce and expand fluency in
Spanish while acquainting students with Spain
and the Spanish-speaking world. Emphasis is
given to the conditions and situations of
modern life, including relevant historical and
literary perspectives. Prerequisite: SPAN 103
or permission of instructor.
Arts & Humanities
SPAN 202
Intermediate 2nd-Year
Spanish • 5
Continues SPAN 201. Prerequisite: SPAN
201 or permission of instructor.
SPAN 203
Advanced 2nd-Year
Spanish • 5
Continues SPAN 202. Prerequisite: SPAN
202 or permission of instructor.
SPAN 299
Individual Studies in
Spanish • V1-5
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student.
Foreign
Language
Alternative
Program (FLAP)
Students who are interested in the FLAP
program register for the language of their
choice and for the designated hour and
location of that section. FLAP students have
a different emphasis on the basic four
language skills of comprehension, speaking,
reading and writing than regular language
classes. In their second year, they may expect
greater individualization of instruction as the
instructor offers materials more congruent
with student objectives, whether vocational
or academic.
These classes are designed for students:
■
who have the ability and want to share the
classroom activities within the same
structured units and earn 5 credits.
■
who had French, German or Spanish in the
past and need to review it in an individualized situation, earning 5 to 15 credits.
■
who need to review an appropriate section
or course offering so as to be able to sign
up for the highest sequential offering.
■
who want to review first-year college
grammar in one quarter in order to carry
on in foreign language study at BCC or the
transfer college of their choice.
In the second year, students may choose
academic or vocational tracks congruent with
their objectives, or a combination of both.
Emphasis is placed on oral expression
through the study of culture and civilization.
Special audio-visual materials are used to
meet the above objective. Students may also
have a choice of any individual approach
with a great emphasis on reading and writing
skills, as well as a grammar review.
The FLAP Program includes arrangements
through which we combine our second year
classes with our most advanced first-year
group each quarter.
Interior Design
INDES 110
Textiles • 5
Textiles is a comprehensive course covering
the information that designers need to know
for selecting and specifying textiles. It
includes a general, scientific study of natural
and synthetic fibers, yarns, fabric structure,
fabric finishes, application, regulations and
end-use performance. Information will be
conveyed via lecture/discussion and
laboratory work.
INDES 140
Introduction to Interior
Design • 3
Surveys Interior Design. Course is open to all
interested students and includes lectures,
discussions and slides, with assigned
readings and projects. Some topics include
color, space, form, light, furniture, windows,
floors and accessories.
INDES 150
History of Furniture • 5
Provides lectures, discussions and slides and
covers the dominant characteristics and
motifs of furniture from antiquity to the 20th
century. Class explains how people, social
conditions and technology influenced the
design of furniture in each period.
INDES 151
Twentieth Century Furniture • 5
Continues INDES 150 with same format.
Class includes study of furniture designers
and movements from Victorian period to
present. Furniture of each period is analyzed
in terms of human values, social conditions,
technology and design criteria.
INDES 152
Furniture Design and
Construction • 3
Is a studio course in which students will
design, draft and construct furniture and learn
about materials for the construction of
furniture, engineering basics, manufacturing
processes, joinery and finishes. Prerequisite:
ART 108, INDES 150, 151, 160 & 190 or
permission of instructor.
INDES 160
Graphic Communication I • 5
Introduces the variety of graphic tools,
techniques and conventions used for effective
visual communication in design. The course
focuses on three basic aspects of graphic
communication: architectural drafting,
lettering and freehand pencil sketching.
Prerequisite: ART 110 and 120.
INDES 162
Introduction to Computer Aided
Design • 3
Computer aided design using AutoCAD on
the PC. Covers important elements of CAD
systems, including hardware and software;
describes the role of CAD in graphic
communication, and discusses appropriate
applications for use in interior design.
Students use hands-on time in the CAD lab to
learn the capabilities of the system and to
create drawings in two dimensions. Prerequisite: INDES 160; AOS 161 or IT 105, or PCDOS experience, or permission of instructor.
INDES 165
Visual Presentations • 5
Introduces tools and techniques for
illustrative graphic presentations of design
ideas, concepts, and final products. Course
concentrates on relatively simple and rapid
techniques, in both black and white and
colored media, including graphite, ink,
53
Arts & Humanities
colored pencils, felt-tipped markers, pastel,
watercolor and collage, along with various
reproduction, transfer and mounting
techniques. Prerequisite: INDES 160 and
ART 111.
INDES 170
Interior Design I - Methods • 5
Applies the design process to the interior
environment and introduces fundamental
concepts for planning, organizing and
arranging spaces. It deals with space needs
based on human factors, activities and
priorities and concentrates on making the
best functional and aesthetic use of minimum
space. Prerequisite: ART 112, INDES 140
and 160.
INDES 175
Design Theory • 5
Introduces the exploration of philosophical
approaches to design and the weighing of
various aesthetic and judgmental concerns. It
deals with ideas related to the enclosure of
space and systems of organizing sequences of
space through conceptual exercises designed
to stimulate students’ critical thinking and
creative problem solving.
INDES 180
Professional Practices I • 3
Prepares students to work as professional
interior designers. Emphasis is on becoming
a residential interior designer. Provides
information about available resources and
services, responsibilities for working with
showrooms, service personnel, and clients.
Course also includes information about
managing a small business. Prerequisite:
INDES 170.
INDES 181
Professional Practices II • 3
Continues to prepare students for work as
professional interior designers. Emphasis is
on working with commercial interior design
firms. Students learn about aspects of
commercial interior design work, employment opportunities in the design industry,
and job search skills. Includes development
of portfolio and review. Prerequisite:
INDES 180.
54
INDES 185
Practicum in Interior
Design • 3
Information about specification, building
trades, building materials and methods is
included. Prerequisite: INDES 160 and 190.
Provides individually tailored experiences in
either residential or commercial interior
design. The student, with his/her advisor,
selects a work experience with future
employment expectations. Prerequisite:
INDES 170 or permission of instructor.
INDES 270
Interior Design II • 5
INDES 190
Materials and Construction • 3
Provides basic knowledge of the physical
components used in the building trades.
Industry-wide classification systems,
standards and resources, the basic physical
properties of building materials, and the
basics of building construction systems are
covered, along with interior finishing
systems, millwork and cabinetry, equipment,
and mechanical and electrical systems.
Prerequisite: INDES 140, 160 or concurrent.
INDES 191
Lighting • 3
An introduction to the design of lighting for
the interior environment. Information about
properties of light, perception and how we
see, natural and artificial light sources,
lighting devices and controls, and specific
design problems is included. Prerequisite:
INDES 160 and 190.
INDES 194/195/196/197
Special Topics in Interior
Design • V1-5
Allows the student to pursue a specialized or
in-depth study of a particular subject relating
to interior design. Supplements the information in the required courses in a subject area
in order to accommodate student interests.
The credits count as electives. Course may
be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits.
Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or
instructor.
INDES 260
Graphic Communication II • 5
Introduces specific professional applications
for graphic communication skills; delineates
the design and construction process, and
specifically deals with the technical drawings
needed by tradespersons for construction.
Focuses on the problem-solving discipline of
the design process and its application to any
interior design problem with special emphasis
on barrier-free and residential design. Involves
working with instructors, who are practicing
professionals, on a variety of professionallyrelevant interior design studio projects.
Prerequisite: INDES 165, 170 and 260 and
permission of Program Chair.
INDES 271
Interior Design III • 5
Focuses on the problem-solving discipline of
the design process and its application to any
interior design problem with special
emphasis on hospitality design, retail design
or design for public spaces. Involves working
with instructors, who are practicing
professionals, on a variety of professionallyrelevant interior design studio projects.
Prerequisite: INDES 165, 170 and 260 and
permission of Program Chair.
INDES 272
Interior Design IV • 5
Focuses on the problem-solving discipline of
the design process and its application to any
interior design problem with special emphasis
on commercial and office space planning.
Involves working with instructors, who are
practicing professionals, on a variety of
professionally-relevant interior design studio
projects. Prerequisite: INDES 165, 170 and
260 and permission of Program Chair.
INDES 285
Practicum in Interior
Design • 3
A second work-study experience that
provides the student with perspective on
interior design work opportunities similar to
the type desired in future employment.
Prerequisite: INDES 150, 160, 170.
* Use of this performance class in the distribution area of the Arts and Sciences transfer degree is limited to 5 credits.
Arts & Humanities
INDES 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in Interior
Design • V1-5
maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: Prior
enrollment in MUSIC 101 or permission of
Program Chair.
credits. Prerequisite: MUSIC 106 or
permission of instructor, ability to read music
and competency on student’s instrument.
Allows students to pursue a specialized or indepth study of a particular subject relating to
interior design. Supplements the information
in the required courses in a subject area in
order to accommodate student interests.
Course may be repeated for a maximum of
10 credits. Credits count as electives.
Prerequisite: Permission of Program Chair or
instructor.
MUSIC 102*
Community Band • 1
MUSIC 107
Fundamentals of Music • 5
Presents two existing community bands,
composed of high school graduates,
community members and college students
from the Bellevue/Renton area. The bands
meet once a week to rehearse symphonic
band literature. Membership for student open
by consent of director of band. Course may
be repeated for a maximum of six credits.
Prerequisite: Prior enrollment in MUSIC 102
or permission of Program Chair.
A lecture/demonstration class, which studies
the structure of music and its notation. Some
of these include reading and writing basic
pitch and rhythm notation, constructing
scales, chords and melodies. The course is
intended for non-majors with little or no
musical experience.
MUSIC 104*
Small Instrumental and Vocal
Ensembles • 2
A class that helps develop a more direct
awareness of music. Class emphasizes
listening in order to recognize how a
composer uses the musical materials to create
different effects. Studies include texture,
rhythm, melodic motion and shape, harmony,
instruments, form and its function.
INDES 299
Individual Studies in Interior
Design • V1-5
Studies selected topics or approved work
experience in the field of interior design
technology. May be repeated for a maximum
of 10 credits. Prerequisite: INDES major and
permission of instructor.
Music
Suggested minimum program for music
majors and minors is: FIRST YEAR: MUSIC
110, 111, 112 – First-Year Theory; MUSIC
140 – First-Year Private Instruction I; and
participation in at least one performing group
each quarter. SECOND YEAR: MUSIC 210,
211, 212 – Second-Year Theory; MUSIC 240
– Second-Year Private Instruction I and
participation in at least one performing group
each quarter.
MUSIC 100*
College Choir • 3
A performance class open to all students
interested in singing. Choir includes 5 hours
of rehearsal per week plus scheduled outside
rehearsals and performances. Course is
designed to promote understanding and skills
essential to group and choral singing. It may
be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.
MUSIC 101*
Community Symphonies • 1
Provides college credit for BCC students
playing in approved community or symphony
groups. Usual rehearsal time is one evening
per week. See Music Chair for approved
groups. Course may be repeated for a
Includes woodwinds, strings, brass and jazz
combos. Literature and performance are to
develop technique, independence of part, and
sensitivity. Two hours minimum rehearsal
per week is required. The course may be
repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, and for
vocal students only, concurrent enrollment in
MUSIC 100/200.
MUSIC 105*
Vocal Jazz and Recording
Ensemble • 3
A performance class that consists of a vocal
jazz ensemble selected by audition from the
membership of the college concert choir. This
group explores and develops the vocal
techniques, performance and recording skills
necessary to the contemporary recording
studio singer. It may be repeated for a
maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite:
Concurrent enrollment in MUSIC 100 and
prior enrollment in MUSIC 105, or entry code.
MUSIC 106*
Jazz Band • 3
A performance class open to all instrumentalists within the Stage Band instrumentation.
Auditions for available chairs are held during
the first week of the quarter. Emphasis is on
jazz improvisation, performance and
interpretation of Big Band jazz literature. The
course may be repeated for a maximum of 9
MUSIC 108
Listening to Music • 5
MUSIC 110
First-Year Theory • 5
A series of three courses which comprise the
first three quarters of a two-year, six-quarter
sequence of Music Theory. Primarily
intended for music majors but also for
students who wish to compose. The course
covers notation, rhythm, scales, keys,
intervals, chords, voicing, chord progression,
harmony and composition. Sight-singing and
ear-training are included as well. Prerequisite: A basic knowledge of music notation
and performance capability on an instrument
or voice.
MUSIC 111
First-Year Theory • 5
A series of three courses which comprise the
first three quarters of a two-year, six-quarter
sequence of Music Theory. Primarily
intended for music majors but also for
students who wish to compose. The course
covers notation, rhythm, scales, keys,
intervals, chords, voicing, chord progression,
harmony and composition. Sight-singing and
ear-training are included as well. Prerequisite: MUSIC 110 or equivalent.
* Use of this performance class in the distribution area of the Arts and Sciences transfer degree is limited to 5 credits.
55
Arts & Humanities
MUSIC 112
First-Year Theory • 5
A series of three courses which comprise the
first three quarters of a two-year, six-quarter
sequence of Music Theory. Primarily
intended for music majors but also for
students who wish to compose. The course
covers notation, rhythm, scales, keys,
intervals, chords, voicing, chord progression,
harmony and composition. Sight-singing and
ear-training are included as well. Prerequisite: MUSIC 111 or equivalent.
MUSIC 113
Survey of Music History
(Antiquity to 1800) • 5
A lecture/demonstration class that presents
an overview of the origins of music from its
earliest forms to its development as a major
art form by 1800. Course work includes
reading, research work on prominent
composers and styles and development of
some listening skills.
MUSIC 114
Survey of Music History (1800
to Present) • 5
A class that presents an overview of the
composers and music of the Romantic period
through the music of the 20th century. Course
work includes lectures, demonstrations,
listening exercises and research work on
composers and their most famous works.
Though this course begins where MUSIC 113
ends, it is intended to be non-sequential, and
does not require MUSIC 113 as a prerequisite.
MUSIC 120*
Class Voice (Group Vocal
Instruction) • 2
Is a studio class intended for major and nonmajor students having never received vocal
training on an individual basis. Prior knowledge of music notation is not necessary as it
is covered in the course. Voice science, vocal
production, pronunciation, style, music notation and some music literature are included.
MUSIC 122
Introduction to Audio and
Recordings • 5
Introduces basic audio for use in video and
computer media applications. Includes basic
56
sound characteristics, microphones, single
and multi-track recording techniques and
sound reinforcement and enhancement.
Students work on a production team to create
finished audio productions. Same as MEDIA
122. Either MUSIC 122 or MEDIA 122 can
be taken for credit – not both.
MUSIC 130*
Group Piano Instruction I • 2
Presents a studio class that prepares the
beginning music major for the eventually
required piano competency and provides
basic keyboard experience for non-majors.
Course includes basic music reading,
keyboard technique, interpretation and
simple chording.
MUSIC 131*
Group Piano Instruction II • 2
A studio class that expands basic keyboard
and music reading skills taught in MUSIC
130 to more keys, chord combinations and
performance of more complex compositions.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 130 or permission of
Program Chair.
MUSIC 140*
First-Year Private
Instruction I • 1
Provides individual studio instruction on all
instruments listed below with collegeapproved teacher. Beginning through
advanced levels are half-hour lessons weekly
for 10 weeks. Fee for private study is in
addition to normal college fees. Maximum 6
credits in three quarters. Prerequisite:
Permission of Music Chair.
Accordion
Baritone Horn
Bassoon
Cello
Clarinet
Classical Guitar/Mandolin
Double Bass
English Horn
French Horn
Flute
Folk Guitar/Jazz Guitar
Harp
Oboe
Organ
Percussion
Piano
Piano/Jazz-Popular
Saxophone
Trombone
Trumpet
Tuba
Violin/Viola
Voice
MUSIC 143*
First-Year Private
Instruction II • 2
Provides individual studio instruction at
advanced and intermediate levels for serious
music students. Forty-five minutes to one
hour lessons are held each week for ten
weeks with a college-approved instructor.
There is a fee for private study in addition to
normal college fees. Maximum 6 credits in
three quarters. Prerequisite: Permission of
Program Chair or instructor.
MUSIC 150
Music Technology • 5
Music 150 is a lecture/demonstration course
designed to familiarize students with
electronic and synthesized music. It presents
an overview of sound theory, description and
demonstration of hardware and software
presently available for music sequencing and
writing activities.
MUSIC 151
Midi Lab • 3
A lab experience designed to give MUSIC 150
graduates some hands-on opportunities to
create music on the equipment covered in the
lecture class. A minimum of three sequences
must be completed by quarter’s end.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 150 required; and music
theory, performance group recommended. It
may be repeated for a maximum of 18 credits.
MUSIC 153
Digital Recording
Production • 5
Course covers recording and editing skills as
they exist in the digital media. Digital
recording, computer-based mix down, digital
I/O, utilizing digital effects, and sampling
will be covered in a 24 channel ADAT and
direct-to-disk recording studio. Same as
MEDIA 153. Either MUSIC 153 or MEDIA
153 can be taken for credit – not both.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 122 or MEDIA 122.
* Use of this performance class in the distribution area of the Arts and Sciences transfer degree is limited to 5 credits.
Arts & Humanities
MUSIC 200*
College Choir • 3
MUSIC 211
Second-Year Theory • 3
Prerequisite: MUSIC 140 or 143; and
permission of instructor.
A performance class open to students
interested in singing and having completed
three quarters at the 100 level. Choir includes
5 hours of rehearsal per week plus scheduled
outside rehearsals and performances. Course
is designed to promote understanding and
skills essential to group and choral singing. It
may be repeated for a maximum of 18
credits.
Is a lecture/demonstration class that
continues 110, 111, 112 Music Theory
sequence. MUSIC 211 covers Neapolitan
chords, augmented 6th chords, chromatic
modulation, harmonic analysis and composition. Prerequisite: MUSIC 210.
MUSIC 299
Individual Projects in
Music • V1-3
MUSIC 205*
Vocal Jazz Ensemble • 3
Is a lecture/demonstration class that
continues 110, 111, 112 Music Theory
sequence. MUSIC 212 covers 20th century
compositional techniques: planning, jazz,
notation, extended tertian harmony, modes,
synthetic scales, pandiatonicism, quartal and
secondal harmony and more. Prerequisite:
MUSIC 211 or equivalent.
A performance class that consists of a vocal
ensemble selected by audition from the
membership of the college concert choir and
having completed three quarters at the 100
level. This group explores and develops the
vocal techniques, performance and recording
skills necessary to the contemporary
recording studio singer. It may be repeated
for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite:
Concurrent enrollment in MUSIC 100, prior
enrollment in MUSIC 105 or permission of
instructor.
MUSIC 206*
BCC Jazz Band • 3
A performance class open to all instrumentalists within the Stage Band instrumentation
having completed three quarters at the 100
level. Auditions for available chairs are held
during the first week of the quarter.
Emphasis is on jazz improvisation, performance and interpretation of Big Band Jazz
literature. The course may be repeated for a
maximum of 18 credits. Prerequisite: Prior
enrollment in MUSIC 106 or permission
of instructor.
MUSIC 210
Second-Year Theory • 3
Is a lecture/demonstration class that
continues 110, 111, 112 Music Theory
sequence. MUSIC 210 covers review of first
year theory techniques, secondary dominant,
modulation, linear embellishing, chords,
harmonic analysis, figured bass and
composition. Prerequisite: MUSIC 112 or
one year of college level music theory.
MUSIC 212
Second-Year Theory • 3
MUSIC 231
History of Jazz • 3
Provides a lecture/demonstration class that
surveys the development of jazz from its
origins through the 20’s, the big bands of the
Swing Era, the development of Bop, and
foundations of modern jazz to contemporary
experiments of recent years. This class is
usually offered once a year.
MUSIC 240*
Second-Year Private
Instruction I • 1
Presents individual studio instruction that
consists of half-hour weekly lessons with
college-approved teacher on all instruments
listed in MUSIC 140. A special fee, in
addition to normal college fees, is required.
Maximum of 3 credits in three quarters.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 104 or 143; and
permission of instructor.
MUSIC 243*
Second-Year Private
Instruction II • 2
Consists of individual studio instruction that
is a continuation of MUSIC 143 and is
intended for the serious music student. The
course consists of a minimum of 45 minutes
to one-hour lesson weekly for 10 weeks with
a college-approved teacher. A special fee, in
addition to normal college fees, is required.
Maximum 6 credits in three quarters.
An individual course of study with an
instructor in any area of music approved by
instructor. It includes at least 5 hours of
individual consultation with instructor, with a
summary paper, performance or presentation.
Credit levels vary with the nature of the
project. The course may be repeated for up to
12 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor.
Philosophy
PHIL 100
Introduction to Philosophy • 5
Investigates the problems and history of
philosophy through a careful study of some
original writings of the great philosophers on
issues of lasting importance.
PHIL 102
Contemporary Moral
Problems • 5
Provides philosophical consideration of some
of the main moral problems of modern
society and civilization such as abortion,
euthanasia, war and capital punishment.
Topics vary. Course transfers as social
science credit.
PHIL 115
Practical Reasoning • 5
Introduces concepts and methods useful for
practical analysis of arguments in everyday
contexts. Meaning, syllogisms, logical
diagrams, inductive and statistical inference,
informal fallacies, argument structure and
some beginning symbolic logic are included.
PHIL 120
Introduction to Logic • 5
Provides a thorough study of the formal
conditions of valid argumentation. The
student may profitably apply this knowledge
in all fields of inquiry. This course transfers
as a science credit. Prerequisite: Eligible to
register for ENGL 101 or PHIL 115.
* Use of this performance class in the distribution area of the Arts and Sciences transfer degree is limited to 5 credits.
57
Arts & Humanities
PHIL 267
Introduction to Philosophy of
Religion • 5
SPCH 199
Individual Studies in Speech
Communications • V1-5
Offers a systematic study of philosophical
writings designed to affect the understanding
of religion and the relation of religion to
truth, morality, good, and salvation.
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student.
Speech
SPCH 090
Developmental Speech • 3
Course is designed for non-native speakers of
English. Goals include increased speaking
and listening proficiency, confidence in the
multi-cultural classroom, and understanding
of cultural influences on communication
practices.
SPCH 100
Basic Principles of Oral
Communication • 5
Explores effective communication in the oneto-one, small group, and one-to-many
settings. Students analyze their communication skills and practice techniques to become
more effective. Course includes public
speaking experience.
SPCH 102
Survey of Speech
Communication • 5
SPCH 200
Interpersonal
Communication • 5
Course focuses on the analysis of interpersonal communication in relationships.
Perception, language, self-concept,
disclosure, listening and conflict are all
explored. Students will have the opportunity
to experience the concepts through class
activities.
SPCH 220
Introduction to Public
Speaking • 5
Course explores the essentials of effective
public speaking. Topic selection, research
methods, organization, analysis of material
and audience, use of visuals, and delivery
skills are all explored. Students will have the
opportunity to prepare and deliver various
types of speeches.
SPCH 225
Small Group
Communication • 5
Provides the learner with a basic understanding of speech communication. Course
includes a general overview of the communication process. Intrapersonal, interpersonal,
organizational and intercultural communication will be explored.
Course explores effective communication in
small groups. Various aspects of group
process will be explored including leadership, conflict management, decision making,
conformity and critical thinking. The student
will be involved in group experiences to test
group theories and practice group skills.
Transfers as social science credit.
SPCH 195
Special Topics in
Speech • V1-5
SPCH 230
Intercultural
Communication • 5
Course explores specific topics in the field of
speech communication not offered by the
core courses. Course content is announced in
the quarterly schedule. Students may retake
the course for credit as content changes. This
course may be repeated for a maximum of 15
credits.
Course studies the effect that culture has on
the communication process. Students will
learn about the different elements of cultures
and the influence of culture on language and
non-verbal communication. Students will
practice skills that contribute to intercultural
effectiveness.
58
SPCH 285
Nonverbal Communication • 5
Course examines non-verbal behavior and its
role in the communication process. Body
language, space, touch, dress and cultural
norms will all be explored. Students will
have the opportunity to examine their own
non-verbal communication and techniques
for increasing non-verbal sensitivities will be
explored.
SPCH 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in
Speech • V1-5
Offers the opportunity to explore specific
focuses in the field of speech communication
not offered by the core courses. Subjects may
include: parliamentary procedure, voice
improvement, forensics, expository speaking,
Greek and Roman rhetoric and contemporary
public address. Course contents are
announced in the quarterly schedule.
Students may retake the course for credit as
content changes. Course may be repeated for
a maximum of 15 credits.
SPCH 299
Individual Studies in Speech
Communications • V1-5
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student.
Arts & Humanities
Business
Preparing for the
High Performance
Workplace T
Accounting
ACCT 101
Survey of Accounting • 5
Introduction to fundamental concepts
involved in financial accounting. Focus is on
understanding financial statements and how
they are used in the management planning,
control and decision making process. Note:
For all vocational business majors.
ACCT 102
Practical Accounting I • 5
For reporting business transactions; makes
use of special journals, general and
subsidiary ledgers. Covers periodic
adjustments, closing procedures and
preparation of financial statements. Not
recommended for students transferring to
four-year colleges.
ACCT 103
Practical Accounting II • 5
Covers accounting procedures for corporations and partnerships; introduction to basic
analysis of financial statements; fundamentals of accounting for manufacturers, and cost
accounting. Not recommended for students
transferring to four-year colleges. Prerequisite: ACCT 102 or permission of instructor.
ACCT 135
Business Payroll Tax
Accounting • 5
Covers Payroll Tax Accounting in depth;
introduces students to Fair Labor Standards
Act, Social Security Act, payroll accounting
systems and operations. Preparation of Form
941, 940 and W-2’s. Students utilize a
computerized payroll system. Prerequisite:
ACCT 102 or permission of instructor.
he Business Division offers eight vocational programs and two academic
transfer degrees. Students can obtain Associate in Arts degrees
in the following vocational programs: Administrative Office Systems;
General Business Management; Information Technology – Programming;
Information Technology – Technical Support; Marketing Management;
Accounting Paraprofessional; and Real Estate.
The Business Division offers a wide array of educational opportunities in
several of its programs including short-term Certificates of Achievement
and/or Accomplishment, as well as internships. For more information,
contact the Business Division Office.
ACCT 172
Integrated Accounting on
Microcomputer • 5
Course applies specific accounting problems
to the microcomputer using pre-programmed
software to manage accounts receivable,
accounts payable, depreciation, payroll,
ledgers and to produce financial statements.
Prerequisite: ACCT 102 or permission of
instructor.
ACCT 199
Individual Studies in
Accounting • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student. Courses are arranged by individual
students with instructor. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
ACCT 234
Managerial Accounting • 5
Provides instruction in making business
decisions with the aid of managerial
accounting techniques; including various
aspects of short-range and long-range
financial planning. Emphasis is on management planning, control and solving business
problems using analytical tools. Same as
GBUS 215. Prerequisite: ACCT 101.
ACCT 240
Advanced Computerized
Problems for Accounting • 5
Introduces the accounting student to the use
of the PC to solve accounting problems.
Students create accounting applications using
various software programs. Prerequisite: First
year accounting courses or permission of
instructor.
ACCT 250
Intermediate Accounting • 5
Provides in-depth coverage of accounting
and its theoretical foundation. Covers FASB
standards and more advanced aspects of
accounting issues such as Cash Flow,
Revenue Recognition, Lease Accounting and
Advanced Financial Reporting issues.
Prerequisite: One year of accounting classes
or permission of instructor.
59
Business
ACCT 260
Accounting For Non-Profit
Agencies • 5
Overview of framework for accounting and
financial reporting for governmental and notfor-profit organizations. Fund accounting
work for general and special funds for
hospitals, United Way agencies, colleges,
universities and other governmental agencies.
Prerequisite: One year of accounting classes
or permission of instructor.
ACCT 270
Cost Accounting • 5
Covers the accounting fundamentals and
principles of cost accounting. Cost control is
studied by learning application of process,
job and standard cost procedures. Prerequisite: One year of accounting classes or
permission of instructor.
AOS 102
Document Formatting • 3
Provides experience in formatting and
producing documents found in a typical
business office: letters, memos, tables, forms
and reports. Prerequisite: Previous keyboarding experience required.
AOS 104
Keyboarding Review and
Speed Building • 3
Designed for the student who wishes to
increase keyboarding speed. Prerequisite:
Previous keyboarding and computer
experience required.
AOS 108
Keyboarding on the
Computer • 1
ACCT 285
Federal Income Taxes • 5
An intensive introductory keyboarding
course taught on personal computers.
Students learn to keyboard by touch and are
encouraged to increase speed and accuracy.
Introduces the student to the concepts and
preparation of personal federal income tax
returns. Prerequisite: One year of accounting
classes or permission of instructor.
AOS 130
Machine Transcription • 3
ACCT 299
Individual Studies in
Accounting • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student. Courses are arranged by individual
students with instructor. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
Administrative
Office Systems
AOS 101
Keyboarding I • 3
An introductory course in which students use
personal computers to develop basic
keyboarding and formatting skills. No
previous computer experience necessary.
60
Teaches students to use transcription
equipment and to develop good listening
skills. Spelling, grammar and punctuation
proficiency emphasized. Prerequisite:
Previous keyboarding and computer
experience recommended.
AOS 150
Office Administration • 5
Introduces modern office procedures and
prepares students to work successfully in a
variety of office situations. Prerequisite:
AOS 102 and computer experience.
AOS 161
Beginning Computer
Applications • 5
A beginning computer course in which the
student will learn to operate the IBM
compatible desktop personal computer. The
student will be able to identify the basic
‘hardware’ components of a computer system
and will also learn the difference between
applications software and system/operating
software. The student will learn how to use
an integrated software program which
includes word processing, electronic
spreadsheets, charting and electronic
databases.
AOS 163
Microsoft Word on the PC • 5
Beginning through advanced features of
Microsoft Word for Windows taught on IBM
PC or compatible computers. Formatting
skills emphasized. Prerequisite: Previous
computer experience.
AOS 164
DOS/Windows 95 • 5
Students learn to distinguish between and use
IBM’s systems software (DOS) and
Windows ’95 software. Prerequisite:
Previous computer experience.
AOS 165
Spreadsheet Applications:
Excel • 5
Explores the concepts of a spreadsheet and
shows how an electronic spreadsheet should
be planned, constructed and manipulated.
Provides students opportunities to solve
realistic problems using spreadsheet software
and helps them become more marketable to
the business community. Prerequisite:
Previous computer experience.
AOS 167
Desktop Publishing with
Pagemaker • 5
Introduces students to Aldus Pagemaker
software on the IBM-PC. This course covers
design and other elements necessary to
produce professional looking publications
such as newsletters, advertisements,
stationary and announcements. Prerequisite:
Previous computer experience.
AOS 168
Database Applications • 5
Introduces students to database software and
prepares them to work in an environment
where data is managed electronically. Basic
principles of form analysis and design,
creation, storing, retrieval and manipulation
of electronic files and report generation.
Prerequisite: Previous computer experience.
Business
AOS 170
Introduction to the Internet • 1
Introduction to the use of the internet.
Students access and use a variety of
resources and information, participate in
electronic communication and gain first hand
knowledge of the information superhighway.
AOS 199
Individual Studies in
AOS • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student. Courses are arranged by individual
students with instructor. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
Business
Administration–
Transfer
Program
ACCTG 210
Fundamentals of Accounting • 5
Includes the nature and social setting of
accounting; uses of accounting information;
introduction to basic accounting concepts;
and accounting procedures. The first
accounting course required of business
administration students planning to transfer
to a four-year college or university.
ACCTG 220
Fundamentals of Accounting • 5
Overviews basic concepts used in financial
reporting; interpretation of financial
statements. Prerequisite: ACCTG 210
receiving a “C” or better.
ACCTG 230
Basic Accounting Analysis • 5
Incorporates analysis and evaluation of
accounting information as part of the
managerial process of control, planning, and
decision making. Course concentrates on the
use of information by those managing the
business and making decisions. Prerequisite:
ACCTG 220 receiving a “C” or better.
ACCTG 245
Accounting Special
Projects • V1-3
Provides training in accounting for special
projects. Prerequisite: Entry code from
instructor.
ACCTG 295
Seminar in Accounting • 2
Studies special problems in accounting and/
or training of teaching assistants for ACCTG
210. Prerequisite: Entry code from instructor.
Computer
Science–Transfer
Program
CS 110
Introduction to Computers and
Applications • 5
ACCTG 296
Seminar in Accounting • 2
Computer competency: Components and
functions of computers; introduction to word
processing, electronic spreadsheets and data
base management systems. Broad overview
of computer concepts and applications.
Studies special problems in accounting and/
or training of teaching assistants for ACCTG
220. Prerequisite: ACCTG 210 and entry
code from instructor.
CS 120
Introduction to Fortran
Programming • 4
ACCTG 297
Seminar in Accounting • 2
Studies special problems in accounting and/
or training of teaching assistants for ACCTG
230. Prerequisite: ACCTG 220 and entry
code from instructor.
BA 200
Business Law – Legal
Foundations • 5
Examines legal institutions and processes;
law as a system of social thought and
behavior, a frame of order and authority
within which rival claims are resolved and
compromised; legal reasoning; the interaction
of law and business.
BA 240
Statistical Analysis • 5
Surveys techniques used in decision making
and research. Descriptive and inferential
statistics covered; probability, central
tendency, variability, normal and t-distributions, hypothesis testing and regression.
Transfers to four-year institutions in business,
health care, etc. Prerequisite: MATH 156 with
a “C” or better or entry code.
Includes programming and use of the
computer; pseudo code; problem organization; basic computer statements; real-world
applications. Prerequisite: MATH 105 with a
“C” or better or entry code.
CS 150
COBOL Programming • 5
Introduces ANS COBOL with emphasis on
structured coding techniques. Students
develop and code programs. COBOL verbs,
edits, updates, control breaks and table are
covered. Students write their own program
and run them on BCC’s computer on campus
outside of classroom hours. Prerequisite:
Previous computer experience or permission
of instructor.
CS 199
Independent Study in Computer
Science • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student. Courses are arranged by individual
students with instructor. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
CS 210
Fundamentals of Computer
Science I • 5
Introduction to computer science. Intended as
the first programming course for CS majors.
Design and implementation of algorithms;
programming in a structured, modular
61
Business
language. Emphasis on problem solving,
program design and style. Prerequisite:
MATH 105 with a “C” or better or entry code.
CS 211
Fundamentals of Computer
Science II • 5
Continuation of CS 210. Data structures,
programming and design techniques using a
structured modular language. Data structures
include arrays, records, lists, stacks queues,
binary trees, strings and sets. Other topics
include searching and sorting, abstract data
types, recursion and hashing. Prerequisite:
CS 210 or entry code from instructor.
CS 299
Independent Study in Computer
Science • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects and
independent study by an individual student.
General Business
Management
G BUS 101
Introduction to Business • 5
Examines the role of business in a modern
economy; its growth, structure, organization
and relationship to the environment. Business
firms; their objectives, functions and
management will also be looked at, as well as
problems of organization, decision-making,
controls and related aspects. Transfers as
social science for non-business majors.
G BUS 120
Human Relations • 5
Looks into the dynamics of the business
organization and its human resources.
Attitudes are examined to develop a positive
attitude toward the human element in
business. Topics include: motivation,
leadership, group dynamics, organization
theory, participatory management and
communication.
62
G BUS 130
Principles of Real Estate • 5
Entry level course designed for buyers,
sellers, investors and preparation for the
Washington State Salesperson’s Exam. Legal
titles and instruments, finance, appraisal,
contracts, agency, land economics. Sixty
clock hours. Same as R EST 130.
G BUS 145
Business Mathematics • 5
Presents practical problems in computing
simple and compound interest, present
values, annuities, amortization and other
applications of mathematics to business and
consumer financing.
G BUS 150
Entrepreneurship • 5
Deals with organizing and operating a small
business. Topics include: development of a
business plan, failure factors in small
business, source of capital, recordkeeping,
financial statements, taxation, marketing,
legal and regulatory issues and management
principles. Same as R EST 150.
G BUS 155
Basic Statistics –
Descriptive • 5
Introduces problems and methods of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and presenting
data as an aid to management decisionmaking. Also included: characteristics of
frequency distributions, central tendencies,
variability. Course is not recommended for
the transfer student. Prerequisite: GBUS 145
or permission of instructor.
G BUS 210
Stock Market Investment
Strategy • V1-5
Interactive competition that gives students a
hands-on opportunity to manage a stock
portfolio. Students begin with a fictional
$100,000 on account and 20 trades. Course
covers: money, capital markets, stocks,
bonds, fiscal and monetary policies, business
cycles and financial statement analysis.
G BUS 215
Management Accounting &
Financial Analysis Tech • 5
Provides instruction in making business
decisions with the aid of managerial
accounting techniques; including various
aspects of long-range and short-range
financial planning. Emphasis is on management planning, control and solving business
problems using analytical tools. Same as
ACCT 234. Prerequisite: ACCT 101.
G BUS 221
Human Resource
Management • 5
The functional areas of Human Resource
Management and the laws that govern this
field. Topics include: job analysis, recruitment, testing, interviewing, selection,
placement, training, wage and salary
administration, performance evaluation and
labor management, and introductory course
for the line or staff person.
G BUS 241
Organization and Management
Skills • 5
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student. Courses are arranged by individual
students with instructor. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
Details the principles of organization and
management as applied to both profit and
non-profit organizations. Realistic case
problems in business are used to help the
student apply principles to actual management problems. Same as FCA 232. Either
GBUS 241 or FCA 232 may be taken for
credit not both. Prerequisite: GBUS 120 and
210 or permission of instructor.
G BUS 202
Law and Business • 5
G BUS 291
Business Internship • 2
Surveys laws applicable to business transactions. Course emphasizes law of contract
sales, negotiable instruments and agency.
Provides students with skills necessary for an
effective job search. Topics covered include:
resumes, cover letters, interviews, job search
G BUS 199
Individual Studies in General
Business • V1-10
Business
and developing a portfolio. Grading is on a
credit/no credit basis. Prerequisite: Entry
code required.
G BUS 292
Business Internship II • V1-10
Continues GBUS 291. Students work at least
15 hours weekly in industry on projects
outlined during GBUS 291. Projects may
include: maintenance, coding, designing,
testing and running programs, or documentation. Students keep journals of time spent and
activities, as well as meeting weekly with
other students to discuss projects. Grading is
on a credit/no credit basis. Prerequisite: Entry
code required.
G BUS 299
Individual Studies in General
Business • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student. Courses are arranged by individual
students with instructor. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
Information
Technology
IT 101
Introduction to Information
Technology • 5
Survey course which covers most aspects of
information technology. Includes how
computers work, different types of computers, input and data storage devices, different
operating systems, ethics, data communications, systems analysis and design. Not a
‘hands-on’ course.
IT 105
Introduction to PCs and
Applications • 5
A hands-on, introductory, survey course on
computer applications. Covers Microsoft
Windows, Word, Excel and Access. Both
personal and business uses of the software
programs are covered.
IT 110
Introduction to Programming • 5
Use Visual Basic to learn fundamental
programming techniques. Design procedures
and write instructions for a computer to solve
business problems. Learn procedural
programming, develop a graphical user
interface in Windows, and work with events
and objects. Prerequisite: Placement by
assessment into college algebra, or MATH
092, 095, 099 or 101 with a “C” or better, or
entry code.
IT 127
Application Development with
VBA I • 5
Develop integrated solutions to business
problems using Access (database), Excel
(spreadsheet) and Word (word processor).
Emphasis on Visual Basic for applications to
store, retrieve, manipulate and display data.
Oriented to a programmer’s use of standard
software products. Prerequisite: IT 105 or
AOS 168 receiving a “C” or better. Eligible
for ENGL 089 or 092.
IT 129
Application Development with
VBA II • 5
Develop integrated solutions to business
problems using database (MS Access),
spreadsheet (MS Excel) and word processor
(MS Word) tools. Emphasis on Visual Basic
for applications to store, retrieve, manipulate
and display data. Oriented to a programmer’s
use of standard software products. Prerequisite: IT 127, eligible for ENGL 089 or 092.
IT 160
Systems Analysis • 5
Includes problem solving cycle, problem
identification, information gathering
techniques, structured analysis concepts,
report analysis, systems flow charts, decision
tables and data dictionary. In-depth initiation
to the system development life cycle.
Prerequisite: IT 101 plus eligibility for
ENGL 101 and 106.
IT 170
Problem Solving Strategies • 5
A lecture/lab combination. Presents a wide
variety of problem solving strategies to build
skill in problem solving. Emphasizes
creative/lateral thinking techniques and good
communication skills. Uses both technical
and non-technical problems to practice skill
development. Prerequisite: IT 105 and ENGL
101 eligibility recommended.
IT 199
Individual Studies in
Information
Technologies • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student. Courses are arranged by individual
students with instructor. Prerequisite: Entry
code required.
IT 217
Microcomputer Hardware &
Software Installation • 5
A lecture/lab combination. Students learn
basics of PC hardware installation and
configuration, and in-depth levels of DOS
and Windows configuration including
memory management. Topics on application
software installation/configuration, computer
boot process and memory management are
also covered. Prerequisite: IT 101 and 170.
IT 219
Data Communications and
Networking • 5
A lecture/lab combination. Covers hardware
and software components of a LAN, uses
Novel NetWare to gain hands-on experience
configuring a network. Focus is on network
hardware basics, network operating system
administration and configuration. Prerequisite: IT 101, AOS 164; IT 170 recommended.
IT 221
Desktop Media
Presentation • 5
Utilization of software and hardware for the
creation of computer-based presentations for
business, industry and education. Includes a
survey of equipment resources, software
applications, presentation planning and
design, development and execution. Also
includes the utilization of external, digital,
multimedia resources. Note: Basic computer
literacy essential.
63
Business
IT 223
Multimedia Authoring I:
Macromedia Director • 5
IT 237
Client Programming I (Visual
Basic) • 5
Covers the hardware requirements and
software application for the creation of
interactive multimedia materials as well as
the processes for multimedia development
including message design, interactive
authoring language, and the step-by-step
development of a multimedia application as
part of a production team. Prerequisite:
MEDIA 121 or permission of instructor.
Develop applications for client computers in a
client/server environment. Emphasis on data
validation, debugging and error handling, file
manipulation, and database management using
the data control. Use Multiple Document
Interface (MDI) forms. Prerequisite: IT 110 or
permission of instructor.
IT 227
Graphics I: Basic Design &
Illustration • 5
Introduces students to the basic theories,
principles and processes of computer-based
design and illustration as they apply to the
development of on-screen multimedia
applications. Acquaints students with the
illustration software (e.g. FreeHand) so they
can apply the principles in their own
creative endeavors. Note: Basic computer
literacy essential.
IT 229
Multimedia Authoring II:
Macromedia Director • 5
Provides students with practical experience
in the design and production of interactive
multimedia applications through the creation
of working interactive modules with
Macromedia Director, a common multimedia
authoring tool. Students work in teams to
create Director-based multimedia products.
Prerequisite: IT 223 or MEDIA 223 or
permission of instructor.
IT 235
Operating Systems • 5
Operating system concepts with emphasis on
definition, configuration and concepts.
Resource allocation and control of peripheral
devices. Learn to assess systems and make
use of their resources, applications and
utilities. Prerequisite: Computer experience
and previous programming experience.
64
IT 238
Client Programming II (Visual
Basic) • 5
Continue application development for client
computers with emphasis on database
operations using Data Access Objects.
Develop on-line transaction processing and
decision support system projects. Work with
Access, SQL Server and other databases.
Prerequisite: IT 237 or permission of
instructor.
IT 239
SQL Server: Server
Programming • 5
Programming the server in a client/server
environment. Create and manipulate
databases, tables and views. Ensure data
integrity with defaults, rules and triggers.
Develop stored procedures. Server and
security. Database tuning and troubleshooting. Prerequisite: IT 238 or permission
of instructor.
the techniques for their manipulation.
Prerequisite: IT 245 or equivalent experience.
IT 249
Programming in C++ • 5
Introduction to C++ language. Object-oriented
programming; data objects implemented as
classes; stream input/output; inheritance; and
templates. Programs will be designed, written,
tested and debugged. Prerequisite: IT 245 or
equivalent experience.
IT 250
COBOL II • 5
Continues COBOL I and emphasizes tables,
subroutines and file organization methods.
IT 260
Systems Design • 5
Continuation of the system development life
cycle introduced in IT 160. Students
complete a group project oriented to the
analysis of an existing system. Prerequisite:
IT 160 and eligibility for ENGL 102 and 106.
IT 265
COBOL III • 3
Provides practical experience by giving the
student existing programs to update and
document. Debugging, program testing,
validating changes, and core dumps are also
discussed. Emphasis is placed on practical
problems the programmer faces in industry.
Prerequisite: IT 250 receiving a “C” or better.
IT 245
Programming in “C” • 5
IT 290
Database Management • 5
Introduction to the C programming language.
Structured programming techniques are used
to solve general, scientific and mathematical
problems. Programs will be designed, coded,
tested and debugged. Prerequisite: Previous
computer experience and previous language.
Develop in-depth understanding of database
concepts and terminology, with emphasis on
the relational databases model. Understand
the role of Structured Query Language
(SQL), data modeling, and normalization of
database tables. A group project will be a
focus of the course. Prerequisite: Eligibility
for ENGL 102 or 106.
IT 247
Advanced “C” With Data
Structures • 5
Emphasis is on advanced ANSI/POSIX/X Open standards; i.e., techniques not peculiar to
any one particular architecture. Learn how to
best apply the capabilities of the language to
implement some advanced data structures and
IT 293
Help Desk I • 4
Required for and restricted to two-year
Information Technology Degree program.
Students intern at BCC’s Help Desk and
provide technical support to campus faculty
and staff via phone and on-site visits. First
Business
quarter of a two-quarter series. Academic
credit only, non-paying. Prerequisite: Entry
code required.
IT 294
Help Desk II • 4
Continuation of IT 293. Required for and
restricted to two-year Information Technology Degree program students. Students intern
at BCC’s Help Desk and provide technical
support to the campus faculty and staff via
phone and on-site visits. Academic credit
only, non-paying. Prerequisite: IT 293 and
entry code required.
IT 299
Individual Studies in
Information
Technology • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student. Courses are arranged by individual
students with instructor. Prerequisite: Entry
code required.
Marketing
MKTG 110
Client/Customer Relations • 5
Provides oral and written skill development
focusing on efficient ways to deliver quality
service to customers. Includes trouble
shooting, complaints, ethical issues and
company service policies/programs.
MKTG 131
Principles of Professional
Selling • 3
Study of the principles and techniques of
professional selling as a form of persuasive
communication basic to business relationships. Course uses cases, examples and reallife applications to bridge the gap from
theory to practice.
MKTG 135
Principles of Retailing • 5
Examines the fundamental principles and
practices of retail merchandising. Examines
types of retail outlets, location, layout, organization, profit planning and operating costs.
MKTG 154
Principles of Marketing • 5
Study of the business activities concerned
with planning, pricing, promoting and
distributing goods and services. Provides an
understanding of the role of marketing in our
economy and the processes used to make
business decisions.
MKTG 199
Individual Studies in
Marketing • V1-10
Allows students to explore in-depth areas of
special interest in marketing or an opportunity to receive credit for their current on-thejob experience. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor.
MKTG 200
International Marketing • 5
Focuses on strategies to incorporate the
marketing concept into global markets.
Topics include mode of entry, micro and
macro forces, barriers and restrictions and
cultural dynamics.
MKTG 210
Marketing Research • 5
Structure and use of marketing research as a
tool for managerial decision making. Includes
research objectives, methods and techniques
of research, analysis and interpretation of data
and creation of the report.
MKTG 234
Advertising • 5
Recognizes the place of advertising in
society and its relationship to marketing
activities and the communication process.
Includes media terminology, planning and
selection, copy writing and art direction.
MKTG 236
Merchandise Management • 5
Prepares students to effectively perform the
functions concerned with buying merchandise. Topics include customer demand,
budgeting, buying plans, market trips,
selection of merchandise. Prerequisite:
MKTG 135 and GBUS 145 recommended.
MKTG 290
Marketing Activities in
DECA • 3
A class/organization affiliated with National
DECA. Students develop occupational skills
and skills in leadership, communication,
human relations. Participation in community
service projects. Class is managed by a
chapter officer team and advisor.
MKTG 299
Individual Studies in
Marketing • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student. Courses are arranged by individual
students with instructor. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
Real Estate
R EST 130
Principles of Real Estate • 5
Entry level course designed for buyers/
sellers, investors and preparation for
Washington State Salesperson exam. Covers
legal titles and instruments, finance,
appraisal, contracts, agency and land
economics. Sixty clock hours.
R EST 131
Real Estate Finance • 3
Policies, problems and methods involved in
financing real property. Loans and lenders,
debt and security, money markets, financing
alternatives, institutional and government
sources. Thirty clock hours. Prerequisite:
R EST 130 recommended.
R EST 133
Real Estate Law • 3
Studies the principles of statutory and
common law governing interests in real
estate. Includes acquisition, encumbrances,
transfer, rights and obligations of the parties
and Washington State regulations. Thirty
clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 130
recommended.
65
Business
R EST 134
Real Estate Sales Practices • 3
The essentials of salesmanship and
advertising as they specifically relate to real
estate. The qualification of clientele, listing
and sales techniques and agreements, agency
relationships and time management. Thirty
clock hours.
R EST 135
Real Estate Forecasting and
Economics • 3
Forecasting techniques and urban economics
applied to the local real estate market. Student
is introduced to economic principles,
projecting tools and local data sources. These
are applied to a forecasting of supply and
demand in the real estate market. Thirty clock
hours. Prerequisite: R EST 130 recommended.
R EST 136
Real Estate Agency and
Ethics • 3
No professional agent or consumer can afford
to be ignorant of the potential liability that
exists with conflicting interests and multiple
agency representation. A five week study of
agency relationships and agency law followed
by a five week study of ethical considerations
in real estate. Thirty clock hours. Prerequisite:
R EST 130 recommended.
R EST 137
Real Estate Financial
Calculator • 1.5
Provides an introduction to calculator
function and input of data to achieve a
desired result. Incorporates basic real estate
investment and financial data together to
obtain investment strategy analysis.
Programming methods and key functions are
applied to the real estate strategy of
investments. Uses HP 12C.
R EST 140
Standards of Professional
Appraisal Practice • 1.5
Focuses on the requirements for ethical
behavior and competent performance set forth
in the Uniform Standards of Professional
Appraisal Practice in Washington State
regulations. Pass/Fail. Fifteen clock hours.
66
R EST 141
Foundations of Real Estate
Appraisal • 3
medium-size apartment structure. Thirty
clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 143 or
permission of instructor.
The introductory course required for appraiser
certification. Provides the foundation
necessary to progress through increasingly
complex courses. Designed to assist real estate
professionals gain a basic understanding of
appraisal. Thirty clock hours.
R EST 150
Real Estate Business
Management • 3
R EST 142
Appraising the Single Family
Residence • 3
Second course in the Appraiser Certification
series. Provides students with a working
knowledge of the procedures and techniques
required to estimate the market value of
single-family residential properties. Thirty
clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 141
recommended.
R EST 143
Real Estate Appraisal
Methods • 3
Third course of the Appraiser Certification
series. Focuses on the particular aspects of
property that create value. The methods used
to apply the sales comparison and cost
approaches are emphasized. Direct capitalization is demonstrated with emphasis on
expense/income analysis. Thirty clock hours.
Prerequisite: R EST 142 or permission.
R EST 144
Principles of Capitalization • 3
Fourth course in the Appraiser Certification
series. Procedures used to analyze data to
derive sound value estimates for incomeproducing properties. The assessment of
significance of available data; procedures to
derive necessary information; interpretation
and testing of mathematical calculations.
Thirty clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 143
or permission of instructor.
R EST 146
Appraising Apartments • 3
Fifth course in the Appraiser Certification
series. The appraisal of multi-family
dwellings. Market data, cost and income
approaches are used. Students are expected to
complete appraisal reports on a small and a
For real estate agents and those seriously
considering the field. The considerations and
strategies necessary to open one’s own
business. Valuable for 100% agents.
Required for Washington Brokers Exam.
Business planning and financing; site
location; technology; office management and
marketing; growth and strategic planning.
Recommend real estate agent’s license or
R EST 130.
R EST 151
Real Estate Brokerage
Management • 3
Required for Washington Brokers Exam.
Legal requirements and liabilities involved in
operating a real estate brokerage; trust
accounting and recordkeeping; recruitment
and training; agent retention and productivity. Recommend real estate agent’s license or
R EST 130.
R EST 160
Real Estate Escrow • 3
The basic concepts of closing a real estate
transaction. Title clearance prorations, lien
rights, escrow and agency law. Interrelationship of escrow, realty and lender. Problems
covered include: cash, contract, assumption,
conventional and government loans. Thirty
clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 130
recommended.
R EST 161
Advanced Real Estate
Escrow • 3
Designed for working and potential escrow
officers and closers. Following R EST 160,
this course enters into more complicated
areas of escrow. Exchanges, wraps, mobile
homes, personal property, equity interests,
condos and coops and various mortgage
closings are covered. Thirty clock hours.
Prerequisite: R EST 160 or permission
of instructor.
Business
R EST 165
Land Titles Insurance and
Clearance • 3
with the idiosyncrasies of lenders. Thirty
clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 130
recommended.
Designed for individuals entering the real
estate, mortgage, escrow or title insurance
fields. Title insurance and coverages, liens,
exceptions and clouds that affect real
property, formal and informal methods of
title clearance, legal rights and responsibilities are covered. Thirty clock hours.
Prerequisite: R EST 130 recommended.
R EST 172
Real Estate Loan Officer • 3
R EST 166
Land Titles: Examining • 3
The why, what, where and how of searching
land titles. Students compile all relevant data
from public records and examine the title for
all insurable and uninsurable matters
including liens, court matters and other
encumbrances. A ‘chain’ of title is constructed. Thirty clock hours.
R EST 167
Land Titles: Underwriting • 3
Through lecture and case study the course
covers title underwriting problems including:
encroachments, legal authority, marital
status, probate, liens, homestead, foreclosure,
bankruptcy, easements, wetlands and many
others. Risk, insurability and/or amelioration.
Thirty clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 166
or permission of instructor.
R EST 170
Mortgage Loan
Administration • 3
This course covers lending practices including
land development, construction, FHA/VA and
conventional financing. Various loans are
followed from underwriting, insuring, closing,
servicing, marketing and shipping. Thirty
clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 130
recommended or currently employed in
escrow or related mortgage field.
R EST 171
Mortgage Loan Processing • 3
For individuals considering employment in
the field of real estate, mortgage or escrow.
The nuts and bolts of processing various
types of conventional, FHA and VA
mortgages. Qualifying borrowers. Dealing
Prepares student for a career in mortgage
lending as a real estate loan officer. FNMA
applications and requirements. Basic loans
and consumer benefits. Qualifications of
borrowers, and the creation of a personal
marketing plan. Thirty clock hours.
Prerequisite: R EST 130 recommended.
R EST 230
Elements of Commercial Real
Estate • 3
Designed for the potential commercial
investor or agent. Course focuses on the
various types of commercial real estate
dealings and investments. Industrial, office
and retail leasing: investment, mobile home
and apartment sales are examined. Thirty
clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 130
recommended.
R EST 231
Commercial Real Estate
Finance • 3
The financing of various types of commercial
properties: retail, shopping centers, office
and industrial, land development, mobile
home parks, etc. Financing patterns and
methods. Leasehold and fee title financing.
Packaging the loan and lender negotiations.
Thirty clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 130
recommended.
R EST 233
Real Estate Exchanges • 1.5
Provides an introduction into basic real estate
exchange methods and formats while
identifying tax benefit procedures. Reviews
IRC 1031 and 1034 regulations, adjustment
of basis, identification of unlike property and
cash flow analysis methods.
R EST 235
Real Estate Investment
Strategy • 3
The fundamentals of analyzing real estate
investments. Covers the various elements in
the analysis process and their interrelationship. Students examine how the investments
and their changing characteristics might
relate to their own goals and financial
circumstances. Thirty clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 130 recommended.
R EST 240
Land Planning and
Development • 3
The study of the legislation, ordinances and
procedural requirements involved in land use
and development processes. Covers the areas
of zoning, subdivision, comprehensive
planning, environmental and land use
legislation, highest and best use, building and
land economics. Thirty clock hours.
Prerequisite: R EST 130 or permission of
instructor.
R EST 241
Advanced Land Planning and
Development • 3
Residential subdivision and commercial
development. Case studies, problem analysis
and income evaluation on site-specific
developments. Thirty clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 240 or permission of instructor.
R EST 251
Residential Property
Management • 4
Geared to the property manager, rather than
an on-site manager. Class meets outside of
classroom hours (7-10 hours) for development of an apartment management plan.
Students receive 5 elective credits from the
Institute of Real Estate Management toward
the Certified Property Manager designation.
Forty clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 130
recommended.
R EST 252
Commercial Property
Management • 3
Focuses on the application of the management and leasing processes of shopping
centers, office and medical buildings and
industrial properties. The student will gain a
background on the techniques of operating,
managing and leasing commercial properties.
Thirty clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 130
recommended.
67
Business
R EST 260
Commercial Escrow • 3
The third course in the escrow series. This
course deals with the escrowing of income
producing entities and non-standard
properties. Business escrow, industrial and
shopping complexes, developmental
properties and farm and land escrow. Thirty
clock hours. Prerequisite: R EST 160 and 161
or permission of instructor.
R EST 299
Individual Studies in Real
Estate • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student. Courses are arranged by individual
students with instructor. Prerequisite: Entry
code required.
68
Educational Development
Arts & Humanities
Health Sciences
Business
The Helping
Professions
The Educational Development and Health Sciences Division provides a
diverse array of program and course offerings.
Alcohol/Drug
Studies
ALDAC 101
Survey of Chemical
Dependency • 3
Provides an overview of drinking and drug
use, alcoholism and drug addiction, relevant
theories and research, definitions, treatment
rationale and modalities. Covers social,
psychological, physical and legal aspects of
chemical dependency.
ALDAC 102
Physiological Actions of
Alcohol & Other Drugs • 3
Covers the nature of alcohol and other
psychoactive drugs, including ingestion,
absorption, metabolism, action and
interaction. Includes the physiological and
psychological effects of alcohol and other
psychoactive drugs on the individual and the
consequences of use and abuse.
ALDAC 103
Introduction to Chemical
Dependency Counseling • 3
Introduces various counseling theories,
modalities and techniques used in the
treatment of chemical dependency. Covers
theory, understanding of process and skill
development. Provides a basic understanding
about counseling.
The health science programs of Nursing, Diagnostic Ultrasound, Radiologic Technology, Radiation Therapy and Nuclear Medicine provide
instruction and preparation to enable students to pass the licensing
examinations required for entry into these career areas. Classes and
workshops in Continuing Nursing Education assist registered nurses in
expanding their knowledge and skills in preparation for today’s changing
health care environment. Developmental Education courses and services
assist students in developing their basic and sometimes pre-college level
academic skills to the point that they can compete positively in collegiatelevel educational opportunities. The programs of Early Childhood Education, Home Economics and Parent Education provide skills and training
for students whose educational objectives are in parenting, child development and/or productive personal and family living concepts. The Alcohol
and Drug Studies courses and workshops prepare students for counseling
in substance abuse programs and offers continuing education opportunities. Preparation in American Sign Language assists students in developing specialized communication skills and applies as a foreign language
transfer course. The Fire Service programs are designed for fire-service
personnel seeking advancement and improved performance. Physical
Education, Recreation Leadership and Health provide the basis for
developing and maximizing fitness, health and safety competencies.
Educational and preparatory skill development programs for paraprofessional health care workers are available through the division.
ALDAC 105
Chemical Dependency in the
Family • 3
Addresses how families are impacted by
chemical use and discusses treatment
modalities designed to intervene in this
dysfunctional system. Provides opportunities
for counselors to clarify their own issues and
69
Educational Development & Health Sciences
understand their limitations when treating
families/clients. Prerequisite: ALDAC 101 or
coordinator permission.
ALDAC 106
Chemical Dependency
Counseling Techniques • 3
Didactically reviews the theories, practices
and techniques of chemical dependency
counseling and the counselor’s responsibilities and relationship to the client. Includes
some role playing and case review.
Prerequisite: ALDAC 101, 102, 103 or
coordinator permission.
ALDAC 108
Case Management: Chemically
Dependent Client • 3
Seminar to assist the counselor/health care
professional in case file management
(designed for drug and alcohol abuse
counselors). Prerequisite: ALDAC 106 or
coordinator permission.
ALDAC 150
Relapse Prevention • V1-3
Addresses the processes and behaviors
leading to alcohol/drug relapse. Provides the
chemical dependency counselor with
information on how to prevent relapse and
promote recovery for a client. Prerequisite:
ALDAC 106 or coordinator permission.
ALDAC 198
Seminar in ALDAC • V1-3
ALDAC 210
ADIS Instructor Training • 3
Includes seminars and workshops in alcohol/
drug studies for which college credit is
offered. Classes are announced in the
quarterly schedule.
Designed to teach chemical dependency
counselors or trainees how to conduct the
course required by the WAC for nonchemically dependent persons convicted of
driving while intoxicated. Attendance at all
sessions is required to earn a DASA
certificate. Prerequisite: ALDAC 101 and 102.
ALDAC 199
Individual Studies in Alcohol/
Drug Studies • V1-3
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student.
ALDAC 204
Youth Chemical Dependency
Assessment/Counseling • V1-3
Reviews signs, symptoms and patterns of
drug use and abuse, and provides useful
screening and evaluation methods applicable
to adolescent needs. Prerequisite: ALDAC
106 or coordinator permission.
ALDAC 206
Group Process in Chemical
Dependency Treatment • 3
Deals in theory and experientially with
dynamics, goals and methods of chemical
dependency group work. Group facilitating
skills are developed and enhanced. Prerequisite: ALDAC 106 or coordinator permission.
ALDAC 160
Cultural Diversity/Chemical
Dependency Counseling • V1-3
ALDAC 207
HIV/AIDS Risk Intervention for
Counselors • 2
Provides the knowledge and tools required
for cross-cultural counseling of chemically
dependent clients. Assists the student in
developing treatment strategies which
incorporate cultural elements and address
barriers to recovery.
Provides the DASA approved HIV/AIDS and
air/blood borne pathogens training, as one of
the requirements for Chemical Dependency
Counselor (CDC). To earn the DASA
certificate, students must attend all sessions.
Prerequisite: ALDAC 101
ALDAC 194/195/195/197
Special Topics in Alcohol/Drug
Studies • V.5-3
ALDAC 208
Overview of Mental Health and
DSM-IV • 3
Offers the opportunity to explore specific
topics not offered by the core courses in
alcohol/drug studies. Courses are announced
in the quarterly schedule.
Covers the assessment and treatment
strategies of the mentally ill, chemically
addicted client and familiarizes the student
with the DSM-IV and psychotropic
medications. Required for CCDC II or CDS
II certification. Prerequisite: ALDAC 106 or
coordinator permission.
70
ALDAC 212
Ethics in Chemical
Dependency Treatment • 3
Provides an overview of codes of ethics of
various disciplines and compares them to
Chemical Dependency Codes, such as
CDPWS and NAADAC. Helps the student
identify origins of personal and professional
values. Prerequisite: ALDAC 106 or
coordinator permission.
ALDAC 215
Chemical Dependency and the
Law • 3
This course is designed for alcohol/drug
abuse counselors to provide up-to-date
information on addictions and the law as
found in the Washington Administrative
Code. Prerequisite: ALDAC 106 or
coordinator permission.
ALDAC 220
Addictions Counseling Clinical
Practicum • 3
Field experience which provides training and
supervised work in an agency, treatment
facility or court probation. Prerequisite:
ALDAC 101, 102, 105, 106, 108, 206 and
207 or coordinator permission.
ALDAC 230
Advanced Chemical
Dependency Counseling
Tech • 3
Examines techniques for early and long term
treatment of chemical dependency with a
focus on effective treatment models
including the “developmental model of
recovery”, working with other addictions and
special and minority chemical dependency
populations. Prerequisite: ALDAC 101, 106,
206, 220 or coordinator permission.
Educational Development & Health Sciences
ALDAC 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in Alcohol/Drug
Studies • V.5-3
Offers the opportunity to explore specific
topics not offered by the core courses in
alcohol/drug studies. Courses are announced
in the quarterly schedule.
ALDAC 298
Seminar in ALDAC • V1-3
Includes seminars and workshops in alcohol/
drug studies for which college credit is
offered. Classes are announced in the
quarterly schedule.
ALDAC 299
Individual Studies in Alcohol/
Drug Studies • V1-3
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student.
Developmental
Education
DEVED 071
Strategies for Learning
Nursing Content Part I • 12
Developmental education course designed for
nursing students who are non-native speakers
of English. Focuses on development of four
skill areas (speaking, reading, writing and
listening) integrated into thematic modules
based on nursing content. Part I is an
intensive introductory pre-nursing course.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the ADN
nursing program.
DEVED 072
Strategies for Learning
Nursing Content Part II • 2
ASL 135
American Sign Language I • 5
Developmental education course designed for
nursing students who are non-native speakers
of English. Focuses on development of four
skill areas (speaking, reading, writing and
listening) integrated into thematic modules
based on nursing content. Part II builds on
Part I and is based on NURS 100 lectures,
readings and clinical experiences. Prerequisite: DEVED 071
Provides an introduction to the basic
vocabulary and grammar in ASL for the
beginning student. Focus is also directed on
the cultural aspects of deafness.
DEVED 073
Strategies for Learning
Nursing Content Part III • 2
American Sign
Language
ASL 136
American Sign Language II • 5
The course is designed for the student who
has an introductory knowledge of ASL. The
focus of the course is on the rules of
grammar, idioms, vocabulary building,
signing and reading of signs. Prerequisite:
ASL 135.
ASL 137
American Sign Language III • 5
Continues ASL 136. Emphasis is placed on
rules and syntax, introduction of Stokoe
rotation using a linguistic text as reference,
and use of illustrated techniques to describe
signs. Prerequisite: ASL 136.
Developmental education course designed for
nursing students who are non-native speakers
of English. Focuses on development of four
skill areas (speaking, reading, writing and
listening) integrated into thematic modules
based on nursing content. Part III builds on
Part II and is based on NURS 101 lectures,
readings and clinical experiences. Prerequisite: DEVED 072
DEVED 074
Strategies for Learning
Nursing Content Part IV • 2
based on NURS 102 lectures, reading
and clinical experiences. Prerequisite:
DEVED 073
DEVED 081/082
Strategies for Learning
English • 5
Course is designed for English-as-a-second
language students to prepare for credit
classes. Course emphasizes building reading
skills in the areas of comprehension and
vocabulary. Listening and speaking activities
are coordinated with the reading material.
Course may be taken for credit three times.
Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.
Diagnostic
Ultrasound
DUTEC 101
Concepts of Patient Care • 3
Prepares the student for patient care and
communication skills required in
sonography. Legal, ethical and psychological
aspects of patient care are emphasized.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
DUTEC 105
Pathophysiology I • 3
Studies the pathogenesis (sequence of events)
in the development of a disease. Emphasis is
placed on pathological conditions identifiable
with diagnostic imaging techniques. An
extensive review of normal physiology is
also presented. Prerequisite: ZOOL 113 and
114 and acceptance into the program.
DUTEC 106
Pathophysiology II • 3
A continuation of Pathophysiology I. The
course focuses on the disease process and
disease states relevant to obstetrics, gynecology and neurology. Prerequisite: DUTEC 105
and acceptance into the program.
Developmental education course designed for
nursing students who are non-native speakers
of English. Focuses on development of four
skill areas (speaking, reading, writing and
listening) integrated into thematic modules
71
Educational Development & Health Sciences
DUTEC 107
Human Cross-Section
Anatomy • 7
Presents the human anatomy in orthogonal
planes of cross-sectional longitudinal, coronal
and oblique. Emphasis is on correlation with
clinical diagnostic imaging techniques.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
DUTEC 110
Ultrasound I – Abdominal
Scanning and Techniques • 4
Studies basic ultrasound techniques and
terminology, as well as scanning techniques
of the abdomen. Emphasis is on both normal
and pathological states. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program.
DUTEC 112
Pathophysiology III • 3
A continuation of Pathophysiology II.
Emphasis is on the physiology and pathology
of the cardiovascular and the peripheral
vascular system. Prerequisite: Acceptance
into program or permission of instructor.
DUTEC 113
Pathophysiology IV • 3
Presents a continuation of Pathophysiology
III. Emphasis is on the physiology and the
pathology of the cardiovascular and cerebral
vascular lesions. Prerequisite: DUTEC 105,
106, 112 and acceptance into program or
permission of instructor.
DUTEC 120
Ultrasound II – Obstetrics &
Gynecological Tech • 5
Provides current theory and scanning
techniques for medical sonographers focusing
on obstetrics, gynecology procedures and
pathologies. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
DUTEC 130
Ultrasound III – Small Part &
Intraoperative Tech • 4
Emphasis is on anatomy and pathophysiology
of small human body parts. Intraoperative
scanning focuses on surgical procedures.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or
permission of instructor.
72
DUTEC 135
Ultrasound Equipment I • 2
Course covers knobology and annotation for
state-of-art diagnostic ultrasound equipment.
Prepares student for hands on live scanning.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or
permission of instructor.
DUTEC 145
Ultrasound Equipment II • 4
Course involves hands-on live scanning in
cardiac, vascular and gyn applications.
Prepares student for hospital based live
scanning on patients. Prerequisite: Acceptance
into program or permission of instructor.
DUTEC 150
Basic Echocardiography • 3
Studies basic ultrasound scanning techniques
of the heart. Emphasis is on anatomy,
physiology, pathology and echocardiographic
pattern recognition. Prerequisite: Acceptance
into program or permission of instructor.
DUTEC 155
Ultrasound IV –
Echocardiography • 3
Continues basic echocardiography. Emphasis
is on Doppler echocardiographic techniques
and congenital heart disease as it applies to
the practice of adult echocardiography.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or
permission of instructor.
DUTEC 160
Ultrasound V – Peripheral
Vascular Scanning
Technique • 3
Provides current theory and scanning
techniques for medical sonographers
focusing on Doppler techniques used to
diagnose peripheral vascular and cerebral
vascular disease. Prerequisite: Acceptance
into program or permission of instructor.
DUTEC 165
Ultrasound Equipment III • 3
Course involves hands on live scanning in
advanced vascular and gyn. Terminal
competency will be required to enter the
clinical practicum. Prerequisite: Acceptance
into program or permission of instructor.
DUTEC 170
Ultrasound Physics and
Instrumentation I • 3
Acoustical physics including heat energy,
light and sound, fluid dynamics wave theory
including reflection, refraction, resonance
and the Doppler effect. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program.
DUTEC 171
Ultrasound Physics and
Instrumentation II • 3
Continuation of DUTEC 170 and ultrasound/
tissue interaction, transducers, Doppler
techniques, bio effects and acoustic power
measurements, computers in ultrasonics and
quality assurance procedures. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program.
DUTEC 180
Advanced Studies & Clinical
Application of DUTEC • 3
Designed specifically for the student
entering clinical practicum in abdominal
and obstetrics/gynecology. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program or permission of
instructor.
DUTEC 181
Advanced Studies EchoVascular • 3
Specifically designed for the student entering
clinical practicum. Covers advanced studies
in echocardiology and vascular technology.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or
permission of program chair.
DUTEC 210
Clinical Practicum I • 15
Provides clinical experience in an ultrasound
department under the supervision of a
sonographer. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of all prerequisite coursework
with a passing grade of “C” or better and
acceptance into program.
DUTEC 220
Clinical Practicum II • 15
Provides clinical experience in an ultrasound
department under the supervision of a
sonographer. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of all prerequisite course work
Educational Development & Health Sciences
with a passing grade of “C” or better,
DUTEC 210 and acceptance into program.
DUTEC 230
Clinical Practicum III • 15
Provides clinical experience in an ultrasound
department with the supervision of a
sonographer. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of all prerequisite coursework with
a passing grade of “C” or better, DUTEC 210,
220 and acceptance into program.
DUTEC 240
Clinical Practicum IV • 15
Provides clinical experience in an ultrasound
department with the supervision of a
sonographer. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of all prerequisite coursework
with a passing grade of “C” or better,
DUTEC 210, 220 and 230 and acceptance
into program.
DUTEC 269
Physics Review • 2
Strong emphasis on physics and ultrasound
instrumentation. Prepares student for
certifying exams. Course highlights
mathematical analysis and physics theories.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
DUTEC 296
Special Topics – Vascular
Technology • 3
Provides current theory and scanning
techniques for medical sonographers focusing
on Doppler techniques used to diagnose
peripheral vascular and cerebral vascular
pathologies. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
DUTEC 299
Individual Studies – Diagnostic
Ultrasound • V1-12
Provides clinical experience in a diagnostic
imaging facility with the supervision and
direction of a medical sonographer or doctor
of medicine or osteopathy or associate
research fellow. Prerequisite: Permission of
program chair.
Early Childhood
Education
ECED 150
Special Experiences –
Childcare/Preschool
Teachers • V1-2
ECED 131
Orientation to the Special
Needs Child • 5
A sequence of courses designed to give
family day care, child care and preschool
teachers opportunities to explore different
skill areas of science, language, parent
contacts, child development and others.
Acquaints students with the educational,
social and developmental patterns of the
disabled child. The impact of a disability on
the child, on his family, and on his future is
also explored. Course includes lecture and
participation.
ECED 132
Techniques for Teaching the
Special Needs Child • 3
Overviews information related to systematic
instruction of children with special needs.
Subjects to be covered are initial and ongoing assessment, individualized education
programs, measurements and management of
child change and performance.
ECED 135
Practicum for Special
Education • 5
Presents supervised learning experiences in a
school setting for special needs children at
the primary or preschool level. Participation
is closely supervised by a qualified
instructor. Course includes seven hours
directed participation and two hours lecture.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ECED 136
Practicum for Special
Education • 5
Presents supervised learning experiences
in a specific school setting for special needs
children at the primary or preschool level.
Participation is closely supervised by a
qualified instructor. Course includes seven
hours directed participation and two hours
lecture. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ECED 151
Special Experiences –
Childcare/Preschool
Teachers • V1-2
A sequence of courses designed to give
family day care, child care and preschool
teachers opportunities to explore different
skill areas of science, language, parent
contacts, child development and others.
ECED 152
Special Experiences –
Childcare/Preschool
Teachers • V1-2
A sequence of courses designed to give
family day care, child care and preschool
teachers opportunities to explore different
skill areas of science, language, parent
contacts, child development and others.
ECED 171
Introduction to Early Childhood
Education • 5
Presents theories and practices of Early
Childhood Education, as well as observations
in preschools, day care centers, Headstart
agencies, kindergartens and elementary
schools.
ECED 172
Fundamentals of Early
Childhood Education • 5
Presents materials, methods and professional
practices relevant to the subject. Considers
the influence of the cultural environment on
the developing child. Course includes
laboratory participation.
73
Educational Development & Health Sciences
ECED 181
Children’s Creative
Activities • 5
Gives practical aspects of planning, selecting,
preparing and presenting creative curriculum
materials and activities to the young child.
Covers techniques of using creative activities
in group-time presentations. Laboratory
participation included.
ECED 183
Art Experiences for Early
Childhood Education • 3
Studies creativity and art in the development
of the young child. Provides experiences in
working with various media and materials as
used with the young child. Lecture,
discussion and participation are included.
ECED 184
Music for Children • 3
Focuses on developmentally appropriate
musical activities with emphasis on
movement, songs and simple dances.
Students learn basic skills on the audioharp
or other simple musical instruments. Lecture,
discussion and participation.
ECED 191
Practicum in Early Childhood
Education • 5
Focuses on lesson planning skills, visual
materials and audio-visual equipment as
teaching tools, and the implementation of
developmentally appropriate practices with
the young child. Gives supervised learning
experience in a specific school situation at
the primary levels or preschool, child care
center, or Headstart agency. Seven hours lab
time. Participation is closely supervised by a
qualified instructor. Prerequisite: Permission
of instructor.
ECED 192
Practicum in Early Childhood
Education • 5
Focuses on the understanding of children’s
learning processes involved in the acquisition
of language skills through a variety of
processes. Gives supervised learning
experience in a specific school situation at
the primary levels or preschool, child care
74
center, or Headstart agency. Seven hours lab
time. Participation is closely supervised by a
qualified instructor. Prerequisite: Permission
of instructor.
ECED 193
Practicum in Early Childhood
Education • 5
Focuses on multi-cultural, anti-bias
curriculum with the young child and
broadens the teacher’s perspectives in
embracing individual differences. Examines
the world outside the classroom to broaden
children’s perspectives. Prepares students for
entry into the world of work. Gives
supervised learning experience in a specific
school situation at the primary levels or
preschool, child care center, or Headstart
agency. Seven hours lab time. Participation is
closely supervised by a qualified instructor.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ECED 198
Special Seminar in Early
Childhood Education • V1-5
Studies selected topics or special seminars in
early childhood education. Course may be
repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ECED 199
Independent Studies in Early
Childhood Education • V1-5
Studies selected approved topics in the field
of early childhood education through
supervised independent work. Course may be
repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.
ECED 201
Parent Involvement in Early
Childhood Education • 5
Provides a lecture and discussion class in
interviewing techniques, emphasizing the
development of competency in parent
contacts. Skills learned involve the parent in
understanding the child’s home and school
environment. Community resources and
referral agencies are used.
ECED 203
Exploring Day Care
Curriculum • V1-5
Explores developmentally appropriate
curriculum used with the day care child.
Students learn through lecture, on-site
observations and participation, demonstration, videos, films and discussions; will
develop specific curriculum to use in
teaching.
ECED 204
Child Health and Safety • 3
Emphasizes setting up and maintaining a safe
and healthy learning environment for the
young child. Course content includes
information about the basic nutritional needs
of children, accident prevention in the home
and classroom, and the identification of good
health practices.
ECED 206
Childcare Management
Techniques I • 3
Provides an in-depth but practical look at the
fundamentals of directing a quality childcare,
early childhood education program.
ECED 207
Childcare Management
Techniques II • 5
This course is a continuation of ECED 206. It
is designed to continue building and
developing practical skills needed to be an
effective administrator in the various day
care fields. Prerequisite: ECED 206
recommended.
ECED 293
Basic Techniques & Ideas for
Preschool Teachers • 3
Explores fundamental aspects of preschool
techniques. Special topics explore new
approaches in the field. Resource speakers
include transitions, music, puppetry, science
and special techniques with the individual
child.
Educational Development & Health Sciences
ECED 295
Special Topics – Early
Childhood Education • V1-5
operations and fire stream development.
Includes a study of municipal water supply
systems and rural water supply operations.
safety considerations, personnel accountability and application of the management
process to a variety of emergency situations.
Studies selected topics or approved work
experience in the field of early childhood
education. The course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits.
FCA 120
Basic Fire Investigation • 3
FCA 170
Hazardous Materials I • 3
Includes determining fire origin, causes, and
spread; recognition of accidental and
incendiary fires; securing and preserving
evidence; witness interrogation, arson laws,
court procedures, coordination with other
agencies and compilation of reports.
Establishes a base on which all individuals
who find themselves in a command situation,
at a hazardous materials incident, will be able
to: identify the material involved, evaluate
the information gained from shipping papers,
and know where assistance can be obtained.
FCA 137
Fire Protection Systems • 3
FCA 177
Wild Land/Urban Interface • 3
Topics include water type fire extinguishing
sprinkler systems for special hazards and fire
alarm protection systems. Opportunity for
visits to local facilities that have fire
protection equipment and systems so that
critical appraisals may be made.
Designed to provide the student with the
necessary information and skills required to
contain fires that develop in open land such
as forests, grassland, wheat fields, and other
rural areas that may interface with urban/
suburban environments.
FCA 152
Building Construction • 3
FCA 190
Uniform Fire Code and
Inspection Procedures • 4
ECED 296
Special Seminar in Early
Childhood Education • 5
A study of selected topics or special seminars
in early childhood education.
ECED 298
Special Seminar in Early
Childhood Education • V1-5
Studies selected topics or special seminars in
early childhood education. Course may be
repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.
ECED 299
Independent Studies in Early
Childhood Education • V1-5
Studies selected approved topics in the field
of early childhood education through
supervised independent work. Course may be
repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.
Education
EDUC 110
Introduction to Education • 5
Details the history, development, purposes
and processes of education. Class sessions
and laboratory experiences are used to clarify
and focus feeling and thought involved in the
teaching-learning process.
Fire Command &
Administration
FCA 105
Fire Service Hydraulics • 3
Study of a branch of fluid mechanics dealing
with the mechanical properties of water at rest
and in motion. Emphasis is on the application
of the properties of water to fire suppression
Covers the classifications of buildings, what
a rated building is, and the fire and life safety
devices required by the Uniform Building
Code. Includes the installation of fire
assemblies and appliances.
FCA 155
Fire Service Instructor • 3
Primary emphasis is placed on the study,
application and evaluation of teaching/
instructional methodology and techniques
that can be used to present educational
information and skills. This course meets
NFPA 1041 standards.
FCA 160
Fire Tactics I • 3
The planning, implementation and evaluation
of basic fire tactics at the responding officer
level. Includes: pre-fire planning, size-up,
fire simulation, fire behavior, organizational
structures, strategy, resource requirements
and proper allocation of resources.
FCA 161
Incident Management I • 3
Study of emergency incident management at
the fire company level. Emphasizes basic
command structure and components, incident
A study of the Uniform Fire Code as it
applies to fire prevention inspections at the
fire company level and the relationship of the
UFC to the Uniform Building Code and other
recognized standards. Course provides a
realistic approach to field applications.
FCA 231
Fire Service Supervision • 5
This class provides current information on
the roles and responsibilities of company
officers through concepts, examples and
practice. Topics cover those skills necessary
for effective supervision, including goal
setting, delegation, counseling, coaching,
problem solving, decision making, total
quality management, leadership, communications and the supervisor’s role in labor
relations.
FCA 232
Fire Service Management • 5
Details the principles of organization and
management as applied to organizations.
Realistic case problems are used to help the
student apply principles to actual management problems in the fire service. Same as
G BUS 241. May take FCA 232 or G BUS
241 for credit - not both.
75
Educational Development & Health Sciences
FCA 233
Fire Service
Administration • V4-5
FI 240
Crime Scene and Physical
Evidence • 4
FS 111
Fundamentals of
Firefighting • 7
Focuses on the political and legal issues
related to fire service operation and
administration and how these apply to the
decisions required of a fire service administrator.
Course will familiarize the Fire Investigation
student with Washington State and Federal
laws regarding search and seizure. Topics
covered include: functions of crime
laboratories; concepts of physical evidence;
protection of the crime scene and techniques
for crime scene processing.
Introductory level training in basic skills.
Includes safety, communications, behavior of
fire, protective equipment, forcible entry,
introduction to ladders and hoses, fundamentals of water supply and rescue techniques.
FCA 261
Incident Management II • 3
Study of emergency incident management
process as it applies to emergency response
services at the disaster management level.
Emphasis to include advanced command
structure and components, pre-incident
planning and application of the management
process to a variety of large scale emergency
situations. Prerequisite: FCA 161.
FI 250
Juvenile Fire Setter • 2
A study of Washington State laws as they
pertain to the juvenile criminal offender.
Covers interview techniques; the function of
the juvenile justice system; and recognition
of the criminal and non-criminal juvenile fire
setter.
FCA 270
Hazardous Materials II • 3
FI 260
Arson Fraud Investigation • 4
Designed to assist the incident responder in
handling an incident involving hazardous
materials and discusses actions that can be
taken during a spill or fire situation involving
hazardous materials. Prerequisite: FCA 170.
Theory and case study of fraud and arson
fraud. Provides a set of procedures to use
when investigating arson fraud; indications to
look for and where to look to determine
motivation and method in arson fraud fires.
FS 113
Intermediate Firefighting • 8
A follow-up course to fundamentals of
firefighting. Continues the basic skills
training for fire service personnel. Includes
fire extinguishers, ventilation, ropes/knots,
ladders, salvage and sprinkler systems.
FS 115
Advanced Firefighting • 2.5
Final course in the basic skills training series.
Includes fire cause, multi-company
operations, foam agents, and fundamentals of
fire education and public relations.
FS 117
Hazardous Materials:
Recognition/Identification • .5
Fire Investigation Fire Science
Basic hazardous materials course for
emergency responders. Focuses on identification, recognition and resource information
available.
FI 130
Investigative Interview
Techniques • 2
FS 119
Live Fire Control • 2.5
Designed to familiarize the student with the
basic interview techniques used during a
criminal investigation. Covers techniques for
developing elements of a complete case
report, and for interviewing criminal suspects
and witnesses.
FI 220
Advanced Fire Scene
Investigation • 4
A study of advanced and very detailed fire
scene investigation and criminal case followup. Students will learn how to take data and
evidence from the fire scene and formulate a
case report for criminal prosecution.
76
FS 100
Introduction to Fire Service • 1
An initial exposure course that introduces the
student to the fire service. Included is typical
fire department structure, authority of the fire
chief and fire marshal as well as how fire
departments interface with other local, state
and federal agencies.
FS 101
First Responder • 3.5
Designed to help first responders deal with
medical emergencies with emphasis on the
first responder who responds in their own
vehicle with nothing more than a personal
first aid kit. Emphasizes the use of specialized equipment that may be brought to the
scene on a fire apparatus.
A live fire mini-series made up of flammable
liquid and liquefied petroleum gas training
for emergency responders. Focuses on
special techniques and equipment used to
control these emergencies. Lab performance
is required for all students.
Health
HLTH 120B
Basic Life Support/Adult and
Pediatric • 1
Provides knowledge and skills necessary for
successful treatment of victims of life
threatening cardiac/respiratory problems or
cardiac arrest.
Educational Development & Health Sciences
HLTH 250
Health Science • 5
IMAGE 271
MRI Clinical Practicum II • 12
Allows student involvement; health visitation
in the community; discussions on drugs;
health sexuality; marriage and family;
emotional problems; environment; physical
well-being consumer health; communicable
and degenerative diseases; and subjects
selected by students.
Clinical practicum is designed to provide
students with “hands-on” experience in the
clinical setting. Students will perform
designated tasks associated with MRI
scanning and procedures under direct and
indirect supervision. Completion of this
course will enable the student to begin work
at entry level position in a CT or MRI
department.
HLTH 292
First Aid and CPR • 4
A lecture laboratory course. The student may
meet requirements of both a Standard Red
Cross First Aid Certificate and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Certificate.
Independent
Studies
Home
Economics
IS 295
Independent Studies • V1-5
HOMEC 130
Human Nutrition • 5
Studies foods and nutrition in relation to
health and disease, and the processes by
which nutrients function in the human body.
Only one of the following courses which are
cross-listed can be taken for credit - HOMEC
130, BIOL 130 or NUTR 130.
HOMEC 256
Child Development and
Guidance • 3
Studies the physical, social, and emotional
development of the child from infancy to
adolescence and the guidance necessary for
optimal development.
Image
IMAGE 270
CT Clinical Practicum I • 12
Clinical practicum is designed to provide
students with “hands-on” experience in the
clinical setting. Students will perform
designated tasks associated with CT scanning
and procedures under direct and indirect
supervision. Completion of this course will
enable the student to begin work at entry
level position in a CT or MRI department.
Course work and project in specific studentinitiated topical areas. Approval of project
dependent upon thoroughness of initial
design, plan of student-faculty consultation
relative to learning objectives, progress and
evaluation. Process must be approved by the
Division Chair. Achievement level determined by nature of project. Each class may
be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Individual
Development
ID 080
Improving Reading Skills Lab Level 1 • V1-2
Allows a student to work in the Reading Lab
to improve reading skills. Skills are assessed
so that each student works on an individually
prescribed program of study, under the
supervision of the Reading Lab Director and
other lab staff. Grades will be a pass/fail. One
hour of credit equals 20 hours of lab work.
Nuclear
Medicine
Technology
NMTEC 200
Applied Anatomy and
Physiology • 1
Studies human anatomy and physiology as
they apply to nuclear medicine imaging.
Specific organ systems covered include
skeletal, circulatory, cardiac, pulmonary,
gastrointestinal, immune, excretory,
endocrine and central nervous systems.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or
permission of instructor.
NMTEC 201
Physics of Nuclear
Medicine • 2
Explores the basic science of nuclear
medicine, including types of radiation, halflife and radioactive decay, interactions of
radiation with matter, detection instruments,
production of radionuclides, statistics of
radiation counting and basic radiation
protection. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
NMTEC 202
Instrumentation • 2
An in-depth study of the nuclear medicine
gamma camera, covering basic electronics,
collimators, digital cameras, on-line
correction systems and necessary modifications needed to acquire tomographic studies.
Emphasis is placed on quality control and
troubleshooting camera problems. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission
of instructor.
NMTEC 203
Computers in Nuclear
Medicine • 2
Deals with the use of computers in nuclear
medicine, emphasizing analysis of static,
dynamic and tomographic images. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission
of instructor.
77
Educational Development & Health Sciences
NMTEC 205
Laboratory Exercises I • 1
NMTEC 230
Clinical Education I • 11
therapy. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
Provides hands-on experiences related to
the major topics of NMTEC 201 and 210.
Exercises include half-life determination,
radiation protection, dose calibrators, GeigerMuller meters, scintillation detectors, white
blood cell labeling and body mechanics.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or
permission of instructor.
Supervised instruction in all clinical aspects
of nuclear medicine technology, including
imaging, patient care, radiopharmacy,
camera quality control, and computer
analysis. Students are expected to advance
in proficiency according to a pre-defined set
of objectives. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program.
NMTEC 241
Radiation Biology • 1
NMTEC 206
Laboratory Exercises II • 1
NMTEC 231
Clinical Education II • 11
Offers exercises on all aspects of gamma
camera imaging, including collimators,
uniformity, resolution, sensitivity and image
enhancement, as well as dynamic and
tomographic techniques. A session is devoted
to the theory and practice of intravenous
injections. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
Supervised instruction in all clinical aspects
of nuclear medicine technology, including
imaging, patient care, radiopharmacy,
camera quality control and computer
analysis. Students are expected to advance
in proficiency according to a pre-defined set
of objectives. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program.
NMTEC 207
Laboratory Exercises III • 1
NMTEC 232
Clinical Education III • 11
Provides hands-on experiences related to the
major topics of NMTEC 211, including
calibration and precision analysis of pipettes,
use of an analytical balance, solution
preparation, Schilling test performance,
dilution assays, and several assays of blood
using radioimunoassay and immunoradiometric techniques. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program.
Supervised instruction in all clinical aspects
of nuclear medicine technology, including
imaging, patient care, radiopharmacy,
camera quality control and computer
analysis. Students are expected to advance
in proficiency according to a pre-defined set
of objectives. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program.
NMTEC 210
Radiopharmacy • 1
Studies all commonly used nuclear medicine
pharmaceuticals, their preparation, indications for use, dosages and contraindications.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or
permission of instructor.
NMTEC 211
Non-Imaging Studies • 1
Covers areas of nuclear medicine which
do not involve imaging per se, including
laboratory skills, Schilling tests, blood
volume determination and radioimunoassay.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program
or permission of instructor.
78
NMTEC 233
Clinical Education IV • 13
Supervised instruction in all clinical aspects
of nuclear medicine technology, including
imaging, patient care, radiopharmacy,
camera quality control and computer
analysis. Students are expected to advance
in proficiency according to a pre-defined set
of objectives. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program.
NMTEC 240
Radiation Safety • 1
Provides instruction in calculation of radiation
absorbed doses from nuclear medicine
procedures, personnel monitoring, radiation
safety principles, licensing of a nuclear
medicine department, handling and disposal
of radioactive materials and radionuclide
Focuses on the potential harmful effects of
radiation on humans. Topics include the
basic chemistry of radiation interactions in
living cells, the effects of large amounts of
radiation exposure and the potential long
term effects of accumulated radiation
damage. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
NMTEC 260
Clinical Nuclear Medicine I • 1
Presents nuclear medicine from the
standpoint of the nuclear medicine physician,
emphasizing the technical aspects and pitfalls
of nuclear medicine procedures. NMTEC 260
lectures are coordinated with NMTEC 200.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
NMTEC 261
Clinical Nuclear
Medicine II • 1
Presents nuclear medicine from the
standpoint of the nuclear medicine physician,
emphasizing the diagnosis of disease and
ways in which the technologist can improve
the physician’s ability to make a correct
diagnosis. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program.
NMTEC 275
Board Preparation • 1
Prepares the student for taking the NMTCB
exam by giving practice exams and providing
assistance as the student reviews all aspects
of nuclear medicine technology. Emphasizes
the practical application of the basic science
knowledge the student has gained through the
program. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
Nursing
NURS 100X
Nursing I: Fundamentals • 8
Serves as the framework for nursing theory.
Cognitive, psychomotor, assessment and
communicative skills are developed to assist
Educational Development & Health Sciences
the student to meet the biophysiological,
psychosocial needs of the client. Relevant
concepts in pharmacology and basic human
needs are discussed. Clinical experiences in
extended care facilities are utilized. This
course consists of two components: 100X and
100Z. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
NURS 100Z
Nursing I: Lab • 4
Cognitive, psychomotor, assessment and
communicative skills are developed to assist
the student to meet the biophysiological,
psychosocial needs of the client. Relevant
concepts in pharmacology and basic human
needs are discussed. Clinical experiences in
extended care facilities are utilized. This
course consists of two components: 100X and
100Z. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
NURS 101X
Nursing II: Medical/
Surgical I • 7
The first of three medical-surgical courses
focusing on acute and chronic health
dysfunctions in the adult client. Acute care
settings are utilized for clinical experience.
This course consists of two components:
101X and 101Z. Prerequisite: NURS 100,
ZOOL 113.
NURS 101Z
Nursing II: Lab • 5
Clinical laboratory. Prerequisite: NURS 100
and ZOOL 113.
NURS 102X
Nursing III: Medical/
Surgical II • 6
The second of three medical-surgical courses
focusing on acute and chronic health
dysfunctions associated with medicalsurgical nursing. Acute care settings are
utilized for clinical experience. The course
consists of two components: NURS 102X
and 102Z. Prerequisite: NURS 101, ZOOL
114, PSYCH 100.
implements nursing theory. Prerequisite:
NURS 101, ZOOL 114, PSYCH 100.
NURS 210X
Nursing IV: Pediatrics • 3
Focuses on the normal growth and development of the child and the fundamental
concepts underlying the care of hospitalized
children. Emphasis is placed on adaptation
and the maintenance of homeostasis for both
the family and child. Prerequisite: NURS
102, BIOL 250, PSYCH 204.
NURS 210Z
Nursing IV: Lab • 4
Clinical includes direct care of the hospitalized child plus observations of the developmentally delayed child and the well child.
Written work is part of the clinical experience. Prerequisite: NURS 102, BIOL 250,
PSYCH 204.
NURS 211X
Nursing V: Maternity • 3
Focuses on the care of the childbearing
family through the maternity cycle from
conception to post partum and care of the
newborn. Prerequisites: NURS 102, BIOL
250, PSYCH 204.
NURS 211Z
Nursing V: Lab • 4
Clinical experiences include communitybased observation as well as in-hospital
experiences in labor and delivery and mother/
baby care. Prerequisite: NURS 102, BIOL
250, PSYCH 204.
NURS 212X
Nursing VI: Psychiatric • 3
Focuses on the nurse’s therapeutic role in
maintaining and enhancing mental health,
and in meeting the needs of clients with
challenged emotional and/or cognitive
abilities which impair their day-to-day
functioning. Prerequisite: NURS 102, BIOL
250, PSYCH 204.
NURS 102Z
Nursing III: Lab • 6
NURS 212Z
Nursing VI: Lab • 4
Clinical Laboratory. Planned experiences in
health agencies which correlates with and
Acute inpatient psychiatric facilities and
various community-based mental health
programs provide opportunities to utilize the
nursing process in the provision of clientcentered care. Prerequisite: NURS 102,
BIOL 250, PSYCH 204.
NURS 213X
Contemporary Nursing
Issues • 4
The final course in medical surgical nursing.
Students integrate nursing theory from all
previous courses while providing comprehensive nursing care to a group of clients with
complex health problems. Elements of role
transition from student to an RN are
integrated. Acute care settings are utilized for
clinical experience. This course consists of
two components: NURS 213X and 213Z.
Prerequisite: Any two of the following:
NURS 210, 211 or 212.
NURS 213Z
Nursing VII: Lab • 6
Advanced medical-surgical nursing. Special
emphasis is on the health team, nursing
organizations, legal aspects of nursing and
professional licensing. Experience in
agencies focuses on community nursing, long
term illness and perspectives in nursing care.
Prerequisite: Any two of the following:
NURS 210, 211 or 212.
NURS 214X
Nursing VIII: Gerontological
Nursing • 3
Is an introduction to the care of the older
adult. The course includes the biological and
psychosocio-cultural aspects of aging with
emphasis on identification of deficits in basic
needs and how these deficits or problems
impact the client’s functional ability.
Prerequisite: Any two of the following:
NURS 210, 211, 212.
NURS 214Z
Nursing VIII: Gerontological
Nursing • 2
Clinical settings include community-based
as well as long term care facilities.
Prerequisite: Any two of the following
NURS 210, 211, 212.
79
Educational Development & Health Sciences
Nursing–
Continuing
Nursing
Education
PARED 135
Special Topics in Parent
Education • V1-5
Studies selected topics or special seminars in
parent education. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor.
The Continuing Nursing Education Program
is accredited by the American Nurses
Credentialing Center’s Commission on
Accreditation. All courses and workshops are
recognized at the state and national levels.
Offerings are designed to meet the needs of
registered nurses, facilitating learning the
updates, expands and enriches the role of the
nurse in health care. Courses are listed in the
quarterly class schedule.
Parent
Education
Fall
Win
Spr
Parent and Infant
011
021
031
Toddler
012
022
032
Child Study
013
023
033
Child Study
014
024
034
Child Study
015
025
035
Creative Activity
016
026
036
Parent Education is a community based
program dedicated to the understanding of
children of all ages. Parent and child learn
together in the Parent Education Child Study
Laboratories. Students will learn methods
and techniques through observation, active
participation and classes. Programs are
located throughout the Eastside, as well as on
main and upper campus. Registration for fall
classes begins in March of each year. Parents
may enroll in any one of the programs:
■
Parent/Infant Classes
■
Parent/Pre-Toddler Observation Classes
■
Parent/Toddler Observation Classes
■
Cooperative Preschools
■
Creative Development, Discovery, and
Early Activities Laboratories
Physical
Education
PE 101
Introduction to Health,
Physical Education &
Recreation • 3
Includes the various aspects of a professional
physical education career. Students are
expected to take this course their first quarter
or as soon as practical thereafter. History
and philosophies; personnel qualifications,
training and preparation opportunities;
organizations; and related fields are covered.
PE 102**
Aerobic Dance • 1
Improves muscle tone, flexibility and
endurance. Relaxation techniques, isometric
exercises and exercises for figure control are
included. The major portion of the course
consists of exercising to music.
PE 103**
Aerobic Exercise • 2
Provides cardiovascular improvement,
changes metabolism and burns body fat. This
fun exercise class is done to music the entire
period. A low impact option of coed aerobic
exercise is also available. This section
promotes cardiovascular benefit; fat burning;
and toning without the stress of jumping.
PE 106**
Beginning Golf • 1
Designed to provide the basic knowledge
needed for beginning golfers to play the
game of golf. This includes but is not limited
to grip, stance, swing, driving, putting and
approach shots, as well as the rules of golf
and golf etiquette.
PE 107**
Basketball • 1
Presents fundamentals of ball handling,
passing, shooting, pivoting, dribbling;
practice in basic elements of offensive and
defensive play; and rules.
PE 108**
Tennis • 1
Presents fundamental techniques of the serve,
forehand drive, backhand drive, volley, grip
and footwork; rules; and etiquette.
PE 109**
Pickleball • 1
Takes the beginner in pickleball through the
basic skills in both singles and double
pickleball and develops proficiency in play
and strategy.
PE 110**
Life Fitness Training • 2
Course will assist students to upgrade their
present levels of functioning in aerobic
capacity, major muscle strength and
endurance, flexibility, and body composition.
Each student will undergo testing prior to
participating in the training program.
PE 111**
Life Fitness Training • 2
Course will assist students to upgrade their
present levels of functioning in aerobic
capacity, major muscle strength and
endurance, flexibility and body composition.
Each student will undergo testing prior to
participating in the training program.
Prerequisite: PE 110.
PE 112**
Life Fitness Training • 2
Course will assist students to upgrade their
present levels of functioning in aerobic
capacity, major muscle strength and
endurance, flexibility and body composition.
Each student will undergo testing prior to
participating in the training program.
Prerequisite: PE 111.
PE 117**
Jogging • 2
Provides cardiovascular improvement, burns
body fat, and lifetime skills in aerobic
80
**PE activity courses which may be repeated for a maximum of two credits.
Educational Development & Health Sciences
fitness. Emphasis on stretching, safety,
motivation and enjoying jogging. Done in a
supportive environment, mostly on soft
terrain. Offered for the beginning jogger,
walker through competitive runner.
PE 118**
Volleyball • 1
Presents basic skills of serving, setting up
and spiking the ball; strategy of play in front
and back courts and at nets; and rules of
rotation, scoring and playing the sport.
PE 119**
Racquetball • 1
Offers beginning course for those individuals
who wish to enter into a new world of
racquetball through basic instruction, taking
the novice from the beginnings of racquetball
to game situations. Emphasis is placed on
acquiring basic skills, knowledge of rules,
and developing the ability to enjoy game
situations.
PE 120**
Karate • 1
Emphasizes the philosophy, as well as the
skills and etiquette of karate. The class
stresses the development of self-reliance and
self-confidence.
PE 121**
Intermediate Karate • 1
Offers intermediate skills and techniques of
Karate. Instruction and the practice in
defensive and offensive methods used in selfdefense is also provided. Prerequisite: PE
120 or instructor permission.
PE 122**
Badminton • 1
Gives the fundamental techniques; grips,
footwork, body balance, forehand and
backhand strokes, serves; rules; and
techniques of singles and doubles games.
PE 123**
Archery • 1
Presents the fundamental techniques of
stringing and handling a bow; handling an
arrow and shooting; safety; and upkeep
of equipment.
PE 125**
Skiing • 1
Provides fundamentals and skills in skiing;
mastery of techniques and knowledge of
skiing, emphasizing its recreational phase
with some instruction in competitive skiing;
rules and ethics; equipment; cold weather
survival; and first aid.
PE 176
Principles and Techniques of
Track and Field • 3
Designed to teach the techniques of all the
track and field events, and by active
participation in the events, help the student
gain proficiency and knowledge about track
and field.
PE 137**
Sports Conditioning • 2
PE 178
Intermediate Volleyball • 1
Provided to condition athletes for varsity
sports. The class includes general conditioning skills and techniques.
Challenges the better volleyball player by
learning new and better techniques of
serving, spiking, placement, and team play.
There is tournament play with two- to sixman teams. Prerequisite: PE 118.
PE 151**
Contemporary Dance I • 2
Introduces technique work at the bar and
center floor. The purposes of the course are:
to gain flexibility and strength and to extend
movement vocabulary. Open to men and
women. May be taken for PE or DANCE
credit.
PE 152**
Contemporary Dance II • 2
Continues Contemporary Dance I. Studies
techniques to include longer and more
challenging movement combinations. If
uncertain of ability, confer with Dance
Program Advisor. Course may be repeated
for a maximum of six credits. Open to men
and women. May be taken for PE or
DANCE credit.
PE 158**
Intermediate Tennis • 1
Covers techniques beyond those of beginning
tennis. Serve and volley is stressed along
with review of basic strokes. Strategy and
basic principles of doubles play is also
discussed.
PE 166
Skills and Materials in Team
Sports • 2
Provides practical experience in baseball,
basketball, field hockey, football, volleyball,
softball, soccer and touch football.
**PE activity courses which may be repeated for a maximum of two credits.
PE 198
Advanced Tennis • 1
Instructs students in the advanced techniques
of tennis. Strategy for singles and doubles are
thoroughly examined, along with instruction
on the lob, drop shot, overhead and other
advanced elements of tennis. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
PE 209
Skills and Materials of
Recreation Dance • 2
Allows practice of skills in folk, square and
social dance, and presents background,
terminology and rhythmic analysis of dances.
Methods of teaching and presenting dances
are also included.
PE 221
Fundamentals of Fast Pitch
Softball • 3
Designed to introduce coaching and playing
techniques with an emphasis upon current
concepts, materials and skill development in
women’s fast pitch softball.
PE 223
Fundamentals of Baseball • 3
Applies general teaching, coaching and
playing techniques for baseball with
emphasis upon current concepts, materials,
and skills in this area. Practical experience in
fundamentals of baseball and perfection of
these skills are also provided. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
81
Educational Development & Health Sciences
PE 224
Fundamentals of Basketball • 3
PE 234
Techniques in Golf • 3
Teaches modern techniques and methods of
basketball training and conditioning. Course
designed primarily for those students
interested in developing fundamental skills
for competitive basketball.
Designed for advanced golfers to review and
improve on the basics of golf to include grip,
swing, timing, approach shots, course
strategy, special lies, putting and the mental
approach to golf.
PE 225
Fundamentals of Soccer • 3
PE 240
Self Defense • 2
Applies general teaching, coaching and
playing techniques for soccer with emphasis
upon current concepts, materials and skills in
this area. Practical experience in fundamentals of soccer and perfection of these skills
are also provided.
This course in self defense is designed to
introduce self defense techniques and
applications that would be practical in a
variety of self defense situations. Along with
the training and development of self defense
applications, the class will be involved with
theory and learning general awareness
concerning personal safety.
PE 227
Fundamentals of Tennis • 3
Familiarizes students with necessary skills
and knowledge to be a competitive participant in the sport of tennis. Students learn
behavior and movements to prepare them for
on and off court action. Prerequisite: PE 198
or permission of instructor.
PE 230
Techniques of Basketball • 3
Presents an advanced class in the theories
and methods of modern basketball. Course
content covers such areas as philosophy,
program organization, training and conditioning, care and treatment of injuries, fundamentals, offensive and defensive play, game
strategy and psychology.
PE 231
Techniques in Volleyball • 3
Provides an advanced class in the theories of
volleyball. Topics include philosophy,
physiology, psycho-social aspects of human
movement involved in the sport.
PE 232
Techniques in Tennis • 3
Teaches an advanced class in the theories of
competitive tennis. Topics include philosophy, physiology, and psycho-social aspects
of human movement involved in the sport.
82
PE 245
Fundamentals of Volleyball • 3
Allows students to develop new and
advanced levels of movements and knowledge involved in the sport of volleyball.
Students learn skills and acquire knowledge
which prepares them for competitive
programs and coaching volleyball in physical
education and recreational settings.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
PE 264
Skills & Materials: Track/Field;
Weight Training • 2
Studies principles of training; development
of performance for each track and field
event; selection of individuals for the various
events; coaching philosophy; practice
organization; conducting meetings and
administrative problems. Principles and
methods of weight training, as well as
development of weight training programs are
covered.
PE 265
Skills & Materials: Activities
for the Elementary Child • 2
Deals with progressive activity skills for
games, relays, team activities; practical
instruction; and opportunity to analyze
performance of children of various ages.
PE 266
Skills & Materials: Individual
and Dual Sports • 2
Provides practical experience in archery,
bowling, badminton, golf, tennis, fencing,
track and field, wrestling and recreational
games.
PE 270
Principles of Athletic
Training • 3
Offers experience in the area of athletic
training for those entering the fields of
physical education, recreation and coaching.
Course content includes recognition of
athletic injuries, emergency care and
treatment, rehabilitation and experience in
treatment and prevention of injuries.
Prerequisite: HLTH 292 or permission of
instructor.
PE 271
Athletic Injury Management • 3
Provides information and development of
skills for follow-up after the initial recognition and treatment phase. Use of various
modalities: ice packs, hydroculator packs,
whirlpools, etc. are discussed as they relate to
different injuries. Rehabilitation programs for
regaining range of motion and strength;
functional tests to determine the athlete’s
readiness to return to action; use of protective
pads and advanced techniques of taping are
also discussed. Prerequisite: PE 270 or
permission of instructor.
PE 290
Sports Officiating • 3
Includes rules, mechanics, and procedures for
competitive sports; enforcement of rules, use
of signals; personal appearance and conduct;
public relation duties of officials; suggestions
for coaches; code of ethics; and qualifications for officials’ ratings.
Educational Development & Health Sciences
Radiation
Therapy
RADON 100
Introduction to Radiation
Therapy Technology • 2
This course is an orientation to the basic
concepts of radiation oncology including
modes of treatment, clinical application and
basic radiation protection. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program.
RADON 101
Clinical Applications • 2
Studies the basic principles and techniques
for calculation of monitor unit/minute
settings to administer radiation therapy
treatments. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program.
RADON 102
Radiographic Physics • 2
Studies the components of x-ray circuit
tubes, x-ray equipment, design and
application, test equipment, image intensification and cineradiography. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program.
be required. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program.
RADON 113
Clinical Education III • 5
The student receives approximately 16 hours
per week of supervised clinical instruction,
progressing through a competency-based
educational process. Evening or one Saturday
attendance may be required. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program.
RADON 114
Clinical Education IV • 13
Student receives 40 hours per week (for 11
weeks) of supervised clinical instruction
progressing through a competency-based
educational process. The student may be
assigned to a clinical education center
outside of the greater Seattle area. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
RADON 120
Nursing Procedures • 2
Explores general care of the patient with the
emphasis on the role of the radiation therapist
in various nursing situations. Medical
terminology, medical ethics and patient
lifting techniques are covered in this course.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
RADON 103
Radiographic Techniques • 2
RADON 150
Pathology • 4
Studies the prime factors of radiographic
technique. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program.
Acquaints the student with certain changes
which occur in disease and injury; and their
application to radiologic technology. Also
covered are basic concepts of oncologic
pathology. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program.
RADON 111
Clinical Education I • 5
Students receive an orientation to the hospital
setting. The student also receives 16 hours
per week of supervised clinical instruction at
one of the clinical education centers affiliated
with BCC Radon Program. Evening or
Saturday attendance may be required.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
RADON 112
Clinical Education II • 5
The student receives 16 hours per week of
supervised clinical instruction, progressing
through a competency-based educational
process. Evening or Saturday attendance may
RADON 194/195/196/197
Special Topics in Radiation
Therapy • V1-5
Course is designed to explore issues of
special interest to students and radiation
therapists. These courses can be used as
continuing education classes for certified
Radiation Therapy Therapists. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program.
RADON 199
Individual Study in Radiation
Therapy Technology • V1-5
Covers a variety of topics to acquaint the
radiation therapy student with the role of
radiation oncology in cancer management.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
RADON 201
Radiation Therapy Physics • 3
Topics include basic concepts of radiation
therapy physics, high energy treatment units,
interaction of ionizing radiation with matter,
measurement of radiation, brachytherapy
techniques, radioactive decay, and radiation
protection. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program.
RADON 202
Clinical Dosimetry I • 3
Topics include dose calculation methods
(Percentage Depth Dose, Tissue Air Ratio,
Tissue Maximum Ratio and Tissue Phantom
Ratio), radiation therapy treatment equipment
and basic treatment planning technique.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
RADON 203
Clinical Dosimetry II • 3
Topics include calculation of monitor unit
settings and treatment times, isodose
distributions, off-axis calculations and
special treatment planning techniques.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
RADON 211
Clinical Education V • 8
The student receives approximately 24 hours
per week of supervised clinical instruction
progressing through a competency-based
educational process. Attendance is also
required two evenings per quarter. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
RADON 212
Clinical Education VI • 8
The student receives approximately 24 hours
per week of supervised clinical instruction
progressing through a competency-based
education process. Attendance is also
required two evenings per quarter. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
83
Educational Development & Health Sciences
RADON 213
Clinical Education VII • 8
examination. Prerequisite: Acceptance
into program.
The student receives approximately 24 hours
per week of supervised clinical instruction
progressing through a competency-based
educational process. Attendance is also
required two evenings per quarter. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
RADON 225
Quality Assurance in Radiation
Therapy • 1
RADON 214
Clinical Education VIII • 13
Student receives 40 hours per week (for 11
weeks), of supervised clinical instruction
progressing through a competency-based
educational process. The student may be
assigned to a clinical education center
outside the greater Seattle area. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program.
RADON 220
Radiation Oncology
Technique I • 3
An introduction to the principles of cancer
management. This course provides information on cancer epidemiology, etiology,
detection, diagnosis, classification, treatment
and management of treatment side effects.
Other topics include an introduction to the
principles of chemotherapy and an introduction to the principles of hypothermia.
Selected sites of cancer will be studied.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
RADON 221
Radiation Oncology
Technique II • 2
A continuation of RADON 220 covering
additional sites of cancer. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program.
RADON 222
Radiation Oncology
Technique III • 2
A continuation of RADON 221 covering
additional sites of cancer. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program.
RADON 224
Concept Integration • 2
Comprehensive review of all areas in
preparation for sitting for the American
Registry of Radiologic Technologist
84
This course provides an introduction to the
concepts of a quality assurance program in
radiation therapy and provides specific
procedures for quality assurance testing.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
RADON 230
Psycho-Social Aspects of
Chronic Illness • 2
This course provides information on
psychosocial issues related to the care of
patients with chronic illness. Lectures, roleplaying and outside resources will be
utilized. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program.
RADON 240
Radiation Biology • 3
Covers the various types of radiation, their
interaction with matter and the effects of
those interactions in human tissue. Also
covers principles of radiation protection for
both occupational workers and the general
public. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program.
RADON 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in Radiation
Therapy • V1-5
Course is designed to explore issues of
special interest to students and radiation
therapists. These courses can be used as
continuing education classes for certified
Radiation Therapy Therapists. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program.
RADON 299
Individual Study in Radiation
Therapy Technique • V1-5
Covers a variety of topics to acquaint the
radiation therapist with the role of radiation
oncology in cancer management. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
Radiologic
Technology
RATEC 101
Introduction to Radiologic
Technology • 1
Covers medical ethics, types and operation of
radiology departments in hospitals. Also
included are basic radiation protection,
chemistry of film processing, methods of
processing and construction of film.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.
RATEC 102
Radiographic Physics • 5
Deals with components of x-ray circuits;
tubes; x-ray equipment, design and
application, troubleshooting and maintenance; test equipment, image intensification
and cineradiography and advanced imaging
procedures. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
RATEC 103
Principles of Radiographic
Exposure • 3
Studies the prime factors of radiologic
technique and other factors influencing
radiographic technique. Two hours lecture
and two hours of lab each week are included.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or
permission of instructor.
RATEC 104
Advanced Radiographic
Procedures • 4
Presents the theory and principles of the use
of contrast media in radiologic examinations
and special positioning. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program or permission of
instructor.
RATEC 105
Introduction to Radiographic
Technique • 2
Course introduces the concepts of electromagnetic radiation from the aspect of
developing a basic understanding of the
production and control of x-radiation. Also
included is the understanding of creation of
Educational Development & Health Sciences
the radiographic image and the factors that
contribute to the appearance of that image.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.
RATEC 107
Positioning and Related
Anatomy I • 2
Studies basic positioning principles and
terminology. Demonstration and lab
experience in positioning and related
anatomy of the chest, abdomen and upper
extremities plus film evaluation is included
with two hours lecture and two hours of lab
each week. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
RATEC 108
Positioning and Related
Anatomy II • 3
Provides demonstration and laboratory
experience in positioning and related
anatomy of the spine, pelvis and lower
extremities including film evaluation. Two
hours lecture and two hours lab each week.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or
permission of instructor.
RATEC 109
Positioning and Related
Anatomy III • 3
Gives demonstration and laboratory
experience in positioning and related
anatomy of the skull, facial bones, sinuses
and mastoids including film evaluation with
two hours lecture and two hours laboratory
each week. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
RATEC 110
Clinical Education I • 3
During this experience the beginning student
of RATEC is assigned to one of the clinical
education centers affiliated with the BCCRATEC program for 2 weeks, 40 hours per
week. The student receives an orientation to
hospital and department procedures,
participates in ancillary radiology activities
and observes and performs diagnostic
radiologic procedures. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of instructor.
RATEC 111
Clinical Education II • 6
Provides the second in a series of clinical
education courses. The student is assigned 19
hours per week at a clinical education center.
During this supervised experience, the
student observes and performs diagnostic
radiologic procedures. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program or permission of
instructor.
RATEC 112
Clinical Education III • 6
Provides the third in the series of clinical
education courses which demands 19 hours
per week at a clinical education center.
Specific performance objectives are provided
for the student. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
the program or permission of instructor.
RATEC 113
Clinical Education IV • 6
Presents the fourth in the series of clinical
education courses which demands 19 hours
per week at a clinical education center.
Specific performance objectives are provided
for the student. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
RATEC 120
Nursing Procedures • 2
Includes basic nursing procedures to acquaint
the radiologic technology student with
nursing procedures and techniques used in
general care of the patient with emphasis on
the role of radiologic technologist in various
nursing situations. Seven hours of AIDS
education and bloodborne pathogen
information is incorporated in this course.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or
permission of instructor.
RATEC 125
Medical Terminology • 1
Presents a systematic approach to medical
terminology by using a word building
process which utilizes word roots, combining
vowels, prefixes and suffixes. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program or permission of
instructor.
RATEC 127
Introduction to Sectional
Anatomy • 2
Expands the knowledge of anatomy through
the introduction of transverse and sagittal
orientation of anatomy. Normal anatomy of
the brain, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and neck
and spine are presented. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into the program.
RATEC 207
Concept Integration • 2
Comprehensively reviews all areas in
preparation for taking American Registry of
Radiologic Technologists exam. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program or permission of
instructor.
RATEC 210
Clinical Education V • 13
Is the fifth in the series of clinical education
courses which demands 40 hours per week
for 11 weeks. Specific performance
objectives are provided for the student.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or
permission of instructor.
RATEC 211
Clinical Education VI • 8
Teaches the sixth in the series of clinical
education courses which demands 24 hours
per week. Specific performance objectives
are provided for the student. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program or permission of
instructor.
RATEC 212
Clinical Education VII • 8
Provides the seventh in the series of clinical
education courses which demands 24 hours
per week. Specific performance objectives
are provided for the student. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program or permission of
instructor.
RATEC 213
Clinical Education VIII • 8
Is the eighth in the series of clinical education
courses which demands 24 hours per week.
Specific performance objectives are provided
for the student. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
85
Educational Development & Health Sciences
RATEC 220
Pathology I • 3
Acquaints the student with certain changes
which occur in disease and injury, and their
application to radiologic technology. Systems
covered include respiratory, skeletal,
gastrointestinal and urinary. Prerequisite:
Acceptance into program or permission of
instructor.
RATEC 221
Pathology II • 2
and facilities; organizations providing
recreational services; field trips, visitations,
visiting lecturers.
RECED 244
Camp Counseling • 3
An introduction to organized camping in
America. Studies qualifications and
responsibilities of the counselor; planning,
organizing, and operation of camping
programs. Practice leadership skills in a class
laboratory and camp setting.
A continuation of RATEC 220 designed to
acquaint the student with the etiology,
symptoms, prognosis and imaging of disease
processes of the cardiovascular, nervous,
hemoparetic, endocrine and reproductive
systems. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
RECED 245
Recreational Use of Art
Crafts • 3
RATEC 230
Quality Assurance • 2
RECED 254
Practicum in Playground
Leadership • 5
Presents the student with theory and practical
experience to develop a proficiency for
operating a successful quality assurance
program in a diagnostic radiology department.
The student should become aware of the
importance of such a program with respect to
rising costs of health care, radiation exposure
to patients, and improvement of the diagnostic
quality of films. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
RATEC 240
Radiation Biology and
Protection • 3
Covers the various types of radiation, their
interaction with matter and the effects of
those interactions. Emphasis is placed on
protection to be afforded the patient and the
technologist. Prerequisite: Acceptance into
program or permission of instructor.
Recreation
Leadership
RECED 154
Recreational Resources • 5
Historical, philosophical basis; theories of
play, economic importance; types of agencies
86
Covers various mediums of interest to age
groups, hobby interests, cost of equipment
and materials.
Methods and materials for leading playground activities. Techniques of program
planning, organization and operational
methods. Class includes directed on-the-job
experience.
RECED 274
Practicum in Social
Recreation • 2
Introduction to methods and materials used
for planning and conducting social activities.
Directed on-the-job experience in recreational activities with adults is included.
RECED 290
Adaptive Recreation • 3
An introduction to history and philosophy of
therapeutic recreation with a focus on the
setting and participant, and the design of a
program for special populations. Includes
visiting lecturers, field trips and on-the-job
experience.
Human
Development
Human
Development
Reaching Your
Potential
Human Development classes help students meet academic and personal
Human
Development
goals. These classes also offer students the opportunity to learn to help
other students as peer counselors.
HD 092
College Survival • 3
HD 120
Learning Strategies for Student
Success • V1-5
is scheduled to enhance personal awareness
and interpersonal skills. Prerequisite:
Interview and permission of instructor.
Covers the basic study skills and strategies for
learning that will enable students to handle
college level course work. Includes time
management, test taking, note taking and
memory techniques. Recommended for
students with reading skills below ENGL 089.
Provides students with the opportunity to
adopt effective study techniques and learning
strategies, explore and utilize campus
resources and develop the skills that support
college success. Recommend placement in
ENGL 089 or above.
HD 166
Peer Counseling II • 5
HD 101
Self-Esteem and Life Goals • 3
HD 140
Cultural Pluralism • V1-5
Includes theory and practice of positive selfesteem through small-group discussion,
structured exercises and readings. Emphasis
on changing cognitive beliefs and learning
behavioral skills that build self-confidence.
Course is designed to explore race, gender
and class differences in our social, economic
and political structure. It examines the impact
that racism, classism and sexism have on our
lives and our society.
HD 110
Stress Management • V1-3
HD 157
Assertive
Communication • V1-3
Course is based on the assumption that
learning to manage stress has lifelong
benefits for people. Course helps students to
identify stress to be more aware of stress
sources, and to understand the consequences
of stress in terms of thought processes,
feelings and actions. A variety of methods
for reducing unwanted stresses will be
discussed and practiced.
HD 115
Understanding Addictive
Behaviors • 3
Course presents a context for understanding
addictions of all kinds. Students will have the
opportunity to explore the forms and roots of
addictive behavior. Students will also
examine a unifying addictions model and
determine the implications that this model
has for recovery.
Course will help you to become more aware
of how you communicate and will present
you with life long skills that will enable you
to be more assertive in ways of your own
choosing. Assertiveness is behavior that
enables a person to communicate directly and
to get their needs met without denying the
rights of others.
The second course of a two-quarter
sequenced training program (see HD 165)
which provides higher level skills, more
comprehensive information and specific
training. A three to five hour per week
internship placement either on or off campus
is required in addition to regular class time.
One extended session (10 hours) is held for
personal growth and awareness. Prerequisite:
HD 165 and permission of instructor.
HD 173
Career Exploration • V1-5
Addresses concepts and skills relating to: 1)
self-assessment (interests, skills, values,
personality styles, etc.); 2) occupational and
career information and research; 3) career
planning and decision-making; and 4)
relation of career to educational and training
options. Career testing, career computers and
the job library are used; includes group
activities, guest speakers, informational
interviews, etc.
HD 165
Peer Counseling I • 5
HD 185
Managing Career
Change • V1-7
Provides the first course in a two-quarter
training program designed to prepare
students for peer counseling positions both
on and off campus. Students learn counseling/advising skills, knowledge of campus and
community services and programs, referral
skills and educational/career guidance
information. One extended session (10 hours)
Variable credit course designed for
Workforce Training students consisting of
four modules: career exploration; job search;
education/training orientation; study skills.
The purpose of the course is to assist career
transition. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor.
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Human Development
HD 190
Staying on Track • V1-5
Course designed for students of color and
students from nontraditional backgrounds.
Course will help students succeed in college
by developing the skills necessary for them
to reach their educational objectives and to
enhance their personal and cultural identity.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
HD 194/195/196/197
Special Topics in Human
Development • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit, and television courses. See
quarterly schedule for details.
HD 199
Individual Studies in Human
Development • V1-5
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. May be repeated for a maximum
of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission
of instructor.
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Science
Science
A Discovery in
Life’s Elements
The Science Division offers a variety of first and second year courses in
Astronomy
ASTR 101
Introduction to Astronomy • 5
Offers a general non-math survey of
astronomy including the moon, planets, solar
system, stars, galaxies and cosmology.
Classes will meet in the planetarium.
ASTR 199
Individual Studies in
Astronomy • V1-5
Deals with individual projects related to
planetarium/astronomy topics. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
ASTR 201
Observational Astronomy • 5
Presents a follow-up course to ASTR 101,
emphasizing observation and instrumental
techniques in the study of astronomy.
Attention is given to the scientific and
experimental process involved in the
investigation of celestial objects. The course
may include the use of the college telescope
and night observation. A good understanding
of basic mathematics is recommended.
Prerequisite: ASTR 101.
ASTR 299
Individual Studies in
Astronomy • V1-5
Deals with individual projects related to
planetarium/astronomy topics. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
engineering, life sciences, mathematics and physical sciences (including
developmental mathematics). These courses are used extensively as
program requirements across campus, as distribution credit in the natural
sciences and as prerequisites or requisites for a wide variety of majors.
Students should check courses for prerequisites, transferability, sequence
starts and other pertinent data prior to registration.
Basic Science
BASCI 098
Basic Science Skills • 5
Developmental course designed to prepare
students for success in introductory college
science courses. Content includes a cross
section of material relating to biology,
chemistry and physics, with the emphasis on
problem solving, terminology and study skills.
BASCI 106
Problem Solving Structure and
Methods • 5
Course focuses on good habits and methods
for solving problems in science courses. A
hands on introduction to optics, electricity and
motion will provide the context for learning
problem solving methods. Example problems
will be drawn from these topics and from
other real life situations. Same as PHYS 106.
Either BASCI 106 or PHYS 106 may be taken
for credit — not both. Prerequisite: MATH
092, 095 or 099 or permission of instructor.
Biology
BIOL 100
Introductory Biology • 5
An introduction to biology for the nonscience student, emphasizing fundamental
life processes and concepts common to all
living organisms, with the human example.
Emphasis is on biological applications in
today’s society. Laboratory included.
BIOL 101
General Biology • 5
Introduces major concepts of cell biology as
they relate to structural and functional analysis
of biological organization. Includes survey of
cell physiology, cell chemistry, cell structure,
cell reproduction, molecular biology, genetics
and evolution. Intended as an introduction to
BIOL 102 and a prerequisite to professional
programs. This course includes a laboratory.
Prerequisite: Strongly recommended CHEM
100 or CHEM 101 or BASCI 098; or one year
of high school chemistry.
BIOL 102
General Biology • 5
Surveys systems and processes of living
organisms. The diversity of organisms which
inhabit the world is studied. This course
includes a laboratory. BIOL 101 and BIOL
102 complete the general introduction to
biology for the non-major. Prerequisite:
BIOL 101 or permission of instructor.
BIOL 130
Nutrition and the Human
Body • 5
Studies human nutrition and health. Course
includes digestion and absorption of
nutrients, carbohydrates, fat, protein, vitamin
and mineral requirements. Food additives,
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Science
food fads and diet are also discussed. World
hunger is addressed. Only one of the
following courses which are cross-listed can
be taken for credit - BIOL 130, NUTR 130 or
HOMEC 130. Prerequisite: BIOL 101
strongly recommended.
BIOL 199
Special Problems • V1-5
Offers students the opportunity to investigate
special biological phenomena and taxa.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
BIOL 201
Introductory Biology for
Majors • 5
This is a course for science majors and preprofessional students. The major topics
covered are: cellular structure, metabolism
and energetics, genetic regulation and
development, diversity, vertebrate systems,
the nature and evolution of species,
taxonomy and ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL
101 and CHEM 140 or equivalent.
BIOL 202
Introductory Biology for
Majors • 5
This is a course for science majors and preprofessional students. The major topics
covered are: cellular structure, metabolism and
energetics, genetic regulation and development, diversity, vertebrate systems, the nature
and evolution of species, taxonomy and
ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 201.
BIOL 203
Introductory Biology for
Majors • 5
This is a course for science majors and preprofessional students. The major topics
covered are: cellular structure, metabolism and
energetics, genetic regulation and development, diversity, vertebrate systems, the nature
and evolution of species, taxonomy and
ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 202.
BIOL 250
Microbiology • 5
Explores the nature of bacterial cells,
bacterial process in nature, relationship of
microbes to humans and other living
organisms; the nature of viruses and some
90
aspects of modern microbiological research.
This course includes laboratory. Prerequisite:
BIOL 101 or permission of instructor.
Botany
BOTAN 110
Introductory Plant Biology • 5
Basic concepts in plant biology for the nonmajor, with emphasis on the attributes of
living plants, unity and diversity, plant
growth and reproduction. Current ideas on
agricultural, horticultural, medicinal uses,
biotechnology, ecology, conservation and
environmental issues are discussed.
Laboratories include greenhouse and field
studies.
BOTAN 113
Plant Identification and
Classification • 5
Topics covered include nomenclature,
classification, field study and laboratory
identification of the common plant families
with emphasis on the conspicuous flora of
Western and Central Washington. Laboratory
includes several local area and two full-day
field trips to Central Washington.
Chemistry
CHEM 100
Chemical Concepts • 5
Relatively non-mathematical approach to
chemical principles of dimensional analysis,
atomic and molecular structure, the
difference between chemical and physical
change, equilibrium, acids and bases, the
periodic table. Some general topics will be
included such as the social and environmental role of chemistry.
CHEM 101
Introduction to Chemistry • 5
Looks into simplified atomic and molecular
theory. Quantitative relationships in chemical
process, which require basic mathematical
skills, are presented, as well as the chemistry
of solutions, gases, and solids. This course
includes lecture/discussion and laboratory.
Prerequisite: MATH 085, 090 or 091.
CHEM 102
Introduction to Organic
Chemistry • 5
Presents organic and biochemistry. Emphasis
is on functional groups and reaction
synthesis. This course includes lecture/
discussion and laboratory. Prerequisite:
CHEM 101 or permission of instructor.
CHEM 103
Introduction to
Biochemistry • 5
Introduces the student to the structures and
functions of biochemical compounds. It
includes a study of biotechnology and uses
some of these new techniques in laboratory
work. Prerequisite: CHEM 101 and 102.
CHEM 140
General Inorganic and
Physical Chemistry • 5
Sequential lecture/discussion courses
including laboratory for science and
engineering students. These courses
quantitatively teach concepts including
atomic structure, stoichiometry, solutions,
gas laws, periodic law, bonding, molecular
orbital theory, colligative properties,
radioactivity, thermochemistry, equilibrium,
acids, base, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, kinetics, simple organic chemistry
and appropriate related topics. Prerequisite:
MATH 099 or equivalent and 1 year of high
school chemistry or CHEM 101.
CHEM 150
General Inorganic and
Physical Chemistry • 5
Sequential lecture/discussion courses
including laboratory for science and
engineering students. These courses
quantitatively teach concepts including
atomic structure, stoichiometry, solutions,
gas laws, periodic law, bonding, molecular
orbital theory, colligative properties,
radioactivity, thermochemistry, equilibrium,
acids, base, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, kinetics, simple organic chemistry
and appropriate related topics. Prerequisite:
CHEM 140 or equivalent.
Science
CHEM 160
General Inorganic and
Physical Chemistry • 5
Sequential lecture/discussion courses
including laboratory for science and
engineering students. These courses
quantitatively teach concepts including
atomic structure, stoichiometry, solutions,
gas laws, periodic law, bonding, molecular
orbital theory, colligative properties,
radioactivity, thermochemistry, equilibrium,
acids, base, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, kinetics, simple organic chemistry
and appropriate related topics. Prerequisite:
CHEM 150 or equivalent.
CHEM 199
Individual Studies in
Chemistry • V1-5
Offers individualized projects dealing with
chemistry-related problems. Course may be
repeated to a maximum of ten (10) credits.
This course may include laboratory work.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and
two quarters of college chemistry.
CHEM 231
Organic Chemistry • 5
Is for students planning two or three quarters
of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic
compounds are studied. Laboratory is
included. Prerequisite: Complete chemistry
series of CHEM 140, 150, 160.
CHEM 232
Organic Chemistry • 5
Provides a continuation of CHEM 231. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CHEM 231.
CHEM 233
Organic Chemistry • 4
Offers a continuation of the lecture portion
of CHEM 231 and 232. Topics include
functional groups and biologically important
compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 232.
CHEM 299
Individual Studies in
Chemistry • V1-5
Offers individualized projects dealing with
chemistry-related problems. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor and two quarters of
college chemistry.
Computer
Science
See Business Division
Engineering
ENGR 110
Engineering Orientation • 2
Includes lectures, discussions, and reading
assignments on the functions of engineering
and the various fields of the profession.
Offered on pass/fail basis only.
ENGR 111
Engineering Problems • 3
Introduces some engineering fundamental
principles, including dimensional analysis,
theory of measurements, vector algebra and
engineering statistics. The course is designed
to develop the ability to analyze and solve
problems related to engineering. Prerequisite:
MATH 120 or permission of instructor.
ENGR 123
Engineering Graphics • 4
Freehand sketching, lettering, scales, use of
instruments, drawing layout, orthographic
projection, pictorials, auxiliary views, section
views, dimensioning, descriptive geometry,
thread and fastener specifications and
tolerances. Includes communication of
technical information in engineering design
and research, and an introduction to
computer-aided drafting. A user fee of $5 for
computer time will be charged. Prerequisite:
MATH 092 or 099.
ENGR 125
Applied Descriptive
Geometry • 3
Treats the principles and techniques of
descriptive geometry and includes intersection and development revolution principles
and graphical solution of engineering
problems. Prerequisite: ENGR 123 or
permission of instructor.
ENGR 170
Fundamentals of Materials
Science • 4
Explores elementary principles underlying
the structure and properties of materials. The
properties of inorganic and organic materials
are related to atomic, molecular and
crystalline structure. Metals, ceramics, multiphase systems and natural and synthetic
polymeric materials are included. Mechanical
stress, electromagnetic fields, irradiation and
thermal and chemical changes are also
considered. Prerequisite: CHEM 150.
ENGR 200
Computer-Aided Drafting I • 3
Uses a commercial CAD software package to
introduce the fundamentals of drawing with a
CAD system. Students use drawing and
editing commands to create and revise a
variety of drawings. Includes description of
CAD systems, advantages, applications and
operational skills. Prerequisite: ENGR 123 or
permission of instructor.
ENGR 201
Computer Aided Drafting II • 3
Continuation of ENGR 200 with applications
involving more complex CAD techniques.
Prerequisite: ENGR 200 or permission of
instructor.
ENGR 210
Statics • 4
Principles of statics, vector algebra, forcecouple relationships, equilibrium analysis,
structures, area properties, beams and
friction. Vector algebra used throughout the
course. Prerequisite: PHYS 121 or MATH
126 or ENGR 111.
ENGR 215
Electrical Circuits • 4
Fundamental concepts of electrical science
are introduced. Resistors, sources, capacitors,
inductors and operational amplifiers are
presented as individual components and as
circuit systems. Solution methods using
simultaneous algebraic equations and
differential equations are applied. Prerequisite: PHYS 122 and MATH 238.
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Science
ENGR 220
Introduction to Mechanics of
Materials • 4
Introduces the concepts of stress, deformatic
and strain in solid materials. Development of
basic relationships between loads on
structural and machine elements such as rods,
shafts and beams, and the stresses, deflection
and load-carrying capacity of these elements
under tension, compression, torsion, bending
and shear forces. Prerequisite: ENGR 210.
ENGR 230
Dynamics • 4
Offers a general treatment of the dynamics
of particles and rigid bodies using vector
analysis. Kinematics, kinetics, momentum
and energy principles for particles and
rigid bodies are all considered, as well as
Euler’s Equations of Motion. Prerequisite:
ENGR 210.
ENGR 260
Thermodynamics • 4
Introduction to the basic principles of
thermodynamics, from a predominately
macroscopic point of view. Development of
the basic laws of thermodynamics together
with application to energy transformations
and state changes in engineering problems.
Prerequisite: Recommend CHEM 150 and
MATH 125.
ENGR 299
Individual Studies in
Engineering • V1-5
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
Environmental
Science
ENVSC 204
Ecology and the Biosphere • 5
Surveys the nature of ecosystems, including
the processes of energy flow, matter cycling,
climate, weather patterns, the organization
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and dynamics of natural communities and
the identification of current environmental
problems. This course provides a broad
picture of the basic processes changing
natural environments and reviews some
implication of ecosystem alterations
associated with human activities. Written
projects are a significant part of this course.
ENVSC 207
Field and Laboratory
Environmental Science • 5
Course provides opportunities to practice
current scientific methods of investigation
and analysis of a variety of environmental
elements. Includes approximately equal
components of field experiences and
laboratory exercises.
ENVSC 250
Puget Sound Ecology • 5
Explores the geological formation, present
physical characteristics, major biological/
ecological components, and the prominent
environmental issues of the Puget Sound.
Course includes lectures, labs, guest speakers
and field trips. Prerequisite: ENVSC 204
strongly recommended.
ENVSC 299
Individual Studies in
Environmental Science • V1-5
Allows the student to take up individual
projects dealing with environment-related
problems. Prerequisite: ENVSC 204 or
current enrollment in ENVSC 204 and
permission of instructor.
Geology
GEOL 101
Survey of Geology • 5
Studies the physical processes which have
been important throughout geological times,
both on and beneath the surface, in giving
the earth its present form. The course
includes field and laboratory study of
minerals and rocks.
GEOL 199
Individual Studies in
Geology • V1-5
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
GEOL 208
Geology of the Northwest • 5
Is a course in geologic processes, using local
examples to enable full understanding of the
evolution of present landscapes. The
approach is historical in nature and begins
with the oldest rocks and mountain chains.
Prerequisite: GEOL 101 or GEOG 206 or
permission of instructor.
GEOL 299
Individual Studies in
Geology • V1-5
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
Mathematics
Math Lab
The Math Lab Tutorial Center offers free
drop-in tutorial assistance to students
currently enrolled in courses offered by the
BCC mathematics program. The Math Lab is
located in C204. See the Student Services
chapter for more information about lab
services.
ID 270
Tutorial Practicum • 3
Offers students the opportunity to work as
tutors in a lab setting with a variety of students
and topics. ID 270 tutors provide assistance to
students seeking help and, in doing so,
reinforce their own skills in the subject matter.
Discussions/instruction of tutorial methods are
included. For more information contact the
Writing Lab Director or Math Lab Director.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Science
MATH 070
Basic Math for the Math
Avoiders • 5
Designed to build confidence and skills in
arithmetic and pre-algebra. Discussion of the
various symptoms related to math anxiety
and avoidance, as well as suggestions for
overcoming math anxiety, are incorporated
into the course. Topics include operations
with whole numbers, fractions, decimals and
percentages as well as geometry and prealgebra. This course is graded pass/fail.
MATH 075
Improving Basic Math
Skills • 5
Provides opportunity to improve math skills
through an individualized program. Topics
may include arithmetic, pre-algebra, and/or
beginning algebra. Course uses self/group
study format. Instructor provides guidance,
assistance and testing. May be repeated for
up to 10 credits. Not intended as a substitute
for MATH 092, 095, 099.
MATH 080
Elementary Algebra I • 5
First of a two-quarter sequence of basic
algebra using a lecture/workshop format.
Workshops provide self/group study and individual assistance. Intended for students with
little or no algebra. Includes linear equations,
exponents, polynomials, applications. Student
must also complete the second quarter MATH
085 to complete the equivalent of MATH 091.
Prerequisite: Basic arithmetic skills.
MATH 085
Elementary Algebra II • 5
Second of a two-quarter sequence of basic
algebra using a lecture/workshop format.
Topics include quadratic equations, rational
expressions, lines and graphs, systems of
equations, and radicals. Student must
complete both MATH 080 (or equivalent)
and MATH 085 to complete the equivalent of
MATH 091. Prerequisite: MATH 080 or
permission of instructor.
MATH 091
Combined Algebra I • 5
Covers the linear topics generally contained
in the usual elementary and intermediate
algebra courses. The arithmetic of signed
numbers, scientific notation, manipulation of
linear equations are presented, along with an
emphasis on linear functions, linear
modeling, and basic algebra in the context of
other disciplines.
MATH 092
Combined Algebra II • 5
Covers the non-linear topics generally
contained in the usual elementary and
intermediate algebra courses. The properties
of basic polynomials, quadratics, rational and
radical functions are presented. Exponential
and logarithmic equations and functions are
dealt with, in the context of other disciplines.
Prerequisite: MATH 091 with a “C” or better.
MATH 095
Intermediate Algebra for
Liberal Arts • 5
Offered as an alternative to the traditional
one-quarter MATH 099, Intermediate
Algebra, course. Designed specifically for
the liberal arts major. Primarily a lecture
course incorporating group work with an
emphasis on applications. Not intended for
business majors who will need MATH 156,
or other majors that require MATH 105.
Prerequisite: Placement by assessment, or
MATH 085 or 090 with a “B-” or better.
MATH 096
Using Graphing Calculators • 2
A course designed to teach students how to
use their graphing calculators. No particular
math prerequisites will be needed for the
examples we will use. The focus will be on
the calculator itself. Note: Requires TI
graphing calculator.
MATH 099
Intermediate Algebra • 5
Extends development of the axiomatic
approach through a course which includes a
study of mathematical systems, solution of
equations, inequalities, functions, exponents
and logarithms, and coordinate systems. It is
similar to second-year algebra in high school.
Prerequisite: Placement by assessment, or
MATH 085 or 090 with a “B-” or better.
MATH 105
Precalculus I • 5
Is a precalculus course with emphasis on
graphs and functions. It includes polynomial
functions, graphs, the theory of equations,
rational functions, exponential functions,
inverse functions and logarithmic functions.
Credit cannot be obtained for both MATH
105 and MATH 156. Prerequisite: Placement
by assessment, or MATH 092, 099 or 101
with a “B-” or better.
MATH 107
Mathematical Models and
Applications • 5
Some applications of contemporary
mathematics for liberal arts students:
networks, scheduling, data analysis, voting
methods. Additional topics will be selected
from linear programming, game theory,
growth and decay and fair division problems.
Readings of a cultural/historical nature
supplement problem solving. Prerequisite:
Placement by assessment, or MATH 092 or
095 or 099 or 101 with a “C” or better.
MATH 120
Precalculus II • 5
Functions as intensive preparation for the
MATH 124, 125, 126 sequence. It includes
functional trigonometry; polar coordinates;
translation and rotation of axes, as well as
plane analytic geometry; lines and planes in
space; quadric surfaces and non-linear
systems. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or “B”
average in 3.5 years of high school math.
MATH 124
Calculus I • 5
Introduces the ideas of limits, derivatives
and integrals. It includes techniques and
applications of derivatives of algebraic and
transcendental functions, and it begins the
concept of an antiderivative. Prerequisite:
MATH 120 or “B” average in 4 years of high
school mathematics.
MATH 125
Calculus II • 5
Continues the study of integration and
emphasizes applications and special techniques of integration. Transcendental functions are included. Prerequisite: MATH 124.
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Science
MATH 126
Calculus III • 5
have completed MATH 126, 205 and/or 238.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Meteorology
Emphasizes the study of infinite sequences
and series including power series. It includes
plane analytic geometry, graphing in polar
coordinates, and an introduction to vectors.
Prerequisite: MATH 125.
MATH 208
Introduction to Linear
Algebra • 5
METR 101
Introduction to the Weather • 5
MATH 156
College Algebra for Business
and Social Science • 5
Course required for all students who take
MATH 157. Includes graphs; non-trigonometric elementary functions; systems of
equations and inequalities; and probability.
Emphasis is on applications to business and
social science. Credit cannot be obtained for
both MATH 105 and MATH 156. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment, or MATH
092, 099 or 101 with a “B-” or better.
MATH 157
Elements of Calculus • 5
Course intended for students who wish only
a brief course in calculus, particularly those
who desire business and social science
applications. Surveys differential and integral
calculus. No more than five credits from
MATH 124 and MATH 157 may be counted
toward any degree. Prerequisite: MATH 156
or permission of instructor.
MATH 171
Introduction to Statistical
Analysis • 5
Explores the application of statistical data
and methods to business and economical
problems, with emphasis being placed on
descriptive measures, statistical inference
(probability, sampling, quality control),
and forecasting (correlation). Prerequisite:
MATH 156 or equivalent or permission
of instructor.
MATH 199
Individual Studies in
Mathematics • V1-5
Involves mathematical reading and/or
problem solving projects. Topics and format
to be arranged with a math instructor. Course
may be repeated for a maximum of 15
credits. Primarily intended for students who
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Introduces the vocabulary, algebra and
geometry of vector spaces in “R” and
function spaces. Matrix methods and vectors
are used to study systems of linear equations,
linear transformations and some applications.
Elementary theory of eigenvalues is
presented. Prerequisite: MATH 126 or
permission of instructor.
MATH 227
Several Variable Calculus • 5
Extends the concepts of calculus to vectorvalued functions and functions of several
variables. Partial derivatives are included.
Prerequisite: MATH 125.
MATH 238
Differential Equations • 5
Tools from algebra and calculus are used to
obtain explicit solutions to first order and
second order linear differential equations.
Substantial attention is paid to applications of
differential equations in modeling physical
situations. Power series methods and
numerical techniques are introduced in cases
where explicit solutions are unavailable.
Topics such as Laplace Transforms and
systems of differential equations are treated
as time permits. Prerequisite: MATH 126 or
permission of instructor.
MATH 299
Individual Studies in
Mathematics • V1-5
Involves mathematical reading and/or
problem solving projects. Topics and format
to be arranged with a math instructor. Course
may be repeated for a maximum of 15
credits. Primarily intended for students who
have completed MATH 126, 205 and/or 238.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
A quest into the workings of the weather.
Course discusses properties and processes of
the atmosphere. The whys of air pollution,
precipitation and severe storms; weather
analyses and forecasting; field trips; and
guest lecturers may be included.
Nutrition
NUTR 130
Nutrition and the Human
Body • 5
Studies human nutrition and health. Course
includes digestion and absorption of
nutrients, carbohydrates, fat, protein, vitamin
and mineral requirements. Food additives,
food fads and diet are also discussed. World
hunger is addressed. Only one of the
following courses which are cross-listed can
be taken for credit - BIOL 130, NUTR 130 or
HOMEC 130. Prerequisite: Recommend
BIOL 101, but not required
Oceanography
OCEAN 101
Survey of Oceanography • 5
An introduction to plate tectonics, physical
and chemical oceanography, marine biology
and environmental issues. Course includes
lab and/or field studies.
Physics
PHYS 101
Energy From Source to
Consumption • 2
Outlines the sources of today’s available
energy and how that energy is used (and
misused) throughout the world. Also,
described are the sources of energy that are
now considered to be “alternative” such as
solar, wind, tides and nuclear fusion.
Science
PHYS 106
Basic Concepts in Physics • 5
Basic concepts in physics designed for
students with no previous background in
physics but wish to take PHYSICS 114 or
121. This class will involve discovery of
physical concepts through hands-on work.
The topics to be covered include geometric
optics, electricity and motion. Prerequisite:
MATH 092, 095 or 099.
PHYS 114
General Physics • 5
Provides the fundamental concepts of physics
needed for allied health, building construction, biology, forestry, architecture and other
programs. Topics include units, kinematics,
vectors, dynamics, work and energy,
momentum, rotational motion and harmonic
motion. Includes a laboratory, and a lab fee
may be required. Prerequisite: MATH 120 or
equivalent. Prior completion of PHYS 106 is
recommended for students who have no
previous background in physics.
PHYS 115
General Physics • 5
Provides the fundamental concepts of physics
needed for allied health, building construction, biology, forestry, architecture and other
programs. Topics include heat, temperature,
thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism.
Includes a laboratory. Prerequisite:
PHYS 114.
PHYS 116
General Physics • 5
Provides the fundamental concepts of physics
needed for allied health, building construction, biology, forestry, architecture and other
programs. Topics include wave motions,
sound, light, geometric and physical optics,
relativity and modern physics. Includes a
laboratory. Prerequisite: PHYS 115.
PHYS 121
General Engineering
Physics • 5
Provides the necessary fundamentals for
science and engineering majors. Emphasis on
application of elementary classical physics to
real and practical problems. Laboratory serves
to acquaint students with the basic methods
and skills of experimental analysis (modeling,
errors, graphical analysis, etc.) and to prepare
students for future research problems. Topics
include mechanics, motion, Newton’s laws,
work, energy, momentum, rotation and
gravity. Course includes a lab. Prerequisite:
High school physics or equivalent and MATH
124 or permission of instructor.
PHYS 122
General Engineering
Physics • 5
Provides the necessary fundamentals for
science and engineering majors. Emphasis on
application of elementary classical physics to
real and practical problems. Laboratory
serves to acquaint students with the basic
methods and skills of experimental analysis
(modeling, errors, graphical analysis, etc.)
and to prepare the student for future research
problems. Topics include electricity and
magnetism, electrostatics, current electricity
circuits, magnetism induction, generation of
electricity, electromagnetic oscillations,
alternating currents and Maxwell’s equations
are discussed. Prerequisite: PHYS 121 and
MATH 125 or permission of instructor.
PHYS 123
General Engineering
Physics • 5
Provides the necessary fundamentals for
science and engineering majors. Emphasis on
application of elementary classical physics to
real and practical problems. Laboratory
serves to acquaint students with the basic
methods and skills of experimental analysis
(modeling, errors, graphical analysis, etc.)
and to prepare students for future research
problems. Topics include waves and optics,
simple harmonic motion, waves, sound, light,
optical instruments, interference, and
diffraction polarization. Prerequisite:
PHYS 122.
PHYS 299
Individual Studies in
Physics • V1-5
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
Zoology
ZOOL 113
Anatomy and Physiology • 5
Studies the structure and function of tissues,
organs and systems of the human body.
Both ZOOL 113 and 114 are needed for a
complete study of the anatomy and
physiology of all human systems. This course
includes a lab. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 and
CHEM 101 or permission of instructor.
ZOOL 114
Anatomy and Physiology • 5
Continues the study of tissues, organs, and
systems of the human body. Both ZOOL 113
and 114 are needed for a complete study of
the anatomy and physiology of all human
systems. Course includes a lab. Prerequisite:
ZOOL 113.
ZOOL 299
Special Projects in
Zoology • V1-5
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
PHYS 199
Individual Studies in
Physics • V1-5
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
95
Social Science
Social Science
The Human
Experience
The Division of Social Sciences and Telecommunications offers a variety
of first and second year courses in the areas of academic transfer and
occupational programs.
Departments in the academic transfer area include Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, International Studies, Political Science,
Psychology and Sociology. The division also offers two occupational
programs, one leading to an A.A. degree in Administration of Criminal
Justice and the second leading to an A.A. in Media Communication and
Technology. The Media Communication and Technology department
also offers a number of one-year certificate programs including Advanced
Video Production, Computer Graphics and Animation for Multimedia,
Multimedia Authoring, New Media: Studies in the Emerging Technologies,
Video-Computer Interface, Video Production and Web Authoring.
While most courses offered within the academic transfer departments are
used to fulfill degree requirements and distribution credits in the social
sciences, some fulfill requirements in the natural sciences and humanities.
These courses are also used as prerequisites or course requirements for
various programs and departmental majors across campus. Students should
check courses for prerequisites, transferability, sequencing and other pertinent data prior to registration.
The Telecommunications Program plans, designs, produces, delivers,
promotes and evaluates electronic media communications material that
enhances the lives of students, faculty, staff and community members. The
departments of the Telecommunications program include the Distance
Education Department, the college’s Channel 28 Television Services
Department, Media Communication and Technology Department and
Media Maintenance Department.
96
Administration
of Criminal
Justice
ADMCJ 101
Survey of Law Enforcement &
Administration • 5
Surveys the criminal justice process from
arrest through release including the
relationship with and responsibilities of the
police, prosecutor, courts, prisons, probation
and parole systems.
ADMCJ 102
Survey of Police Organization
& Administration • 5
Presents the structure of organization, staff
and line concepts, and chain of command in a
hierarchy with its advantages and limitations.
Surveys the model organizational charts for
agencies of varying sizes.
ADMCJ 104
Introduction to Criminal
Law • 5
Surveys the basic theories and concepts of
law pertaining to the criminal justice system.
Emphasizes reviewing the Revised Code of
Washington and specific state and federal
constitutional amendments.
ADMCJ 111
Principles of Criminal
Interrogation • 5
Reviews principles and techniques of
interviewing victims, witnesses and suspects
in a crime related situation and the detection
of deception. Covers application of certain
Amendments of the Constitution as they
apply to individuals charged with a criminal
offense.
Social Science
ADMCJ 194/195/196/197
Special Topics in the Criminal
Justice System • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for which college credit is offered. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
ADMCJ 198
Seminar in Criminal
Justice • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details.
ADMCJ 199
Individual Studies in Criminal
Justice System • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study. See current quarterly
schedule for details. Course may be repeated
for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
ADMCJ 200
Criminal Evidence &
Procedures-Police Officer • 5
seizures, right against self-incrimination and
post indictment right to counsel.
ADMCJ 206
Community-Oriented
Policing • 5
Presents an in-depth analysis of the
philosophy and strategies essential to
Community-Oriented Policing. Special
emphasis is given to the dynamics of the
interaction between the police and their
constituents and the impact of the police
role upon American society.
ADMCJ 220
Principles of Forensic
Examination • 5
Emphasizes the knowledge critical to aiding
successful completion of an investigator’s
duties during the course of an investigation
and reconstruction of a crime.
ADMCJ 253
Principles of Drug and Alcohol
Enforcement • 5
Surveys the patterns and processes relative to
the collection of both real and circumstantial
evidence in a criminal case, and an in-depth
survey of the legal processes from investigation through the trial process.
Studies the unique demands that alcohol and
drug offenses place on the criminal justice
system. Covers how the investigation,
information management, and prosecution of
alcohol and drug crimes differ from that of
other criminal offenses in both process and
procedure.
ADMCJ 202
Principles of Criminal
Investigation • 5
ADMCJ 260
Applied Ethics in Criminal
Justice • 5
Presents fundamental investigative techniques used within the criminal justice
system including the discovery, preservation,
and presentation of evidence, methods of
obtaining information, development of
informational sources and a brief survey of
criminal laboratory functions.
Presents an in-depth analysis of the
theoretical and applied association between
morality and the function of the criminal
justice process. Special attention is given to
the unavoidable ethical and legal dilemmas
regularly confronted by police.
ADMCJ 204
Criminal Procedure • 5
Study the evolution of the Fourth, Fifth,
Sixth and Fourteenth Amendments of the
U.S. Constitution and their impact on
contemporary police practices. Emphasis will
be placed on analysis of Supreme Court
decisions which pertain to arrests, searches,
ADMCJ 271
Introduction to Criminology • 5
Surveys legal definitions, types of criminal
behavior, trends and patterns, recidivism,
characteristics of offenders, environmental
influences, diagnostic methods, prediction,
theories of crime and delinquency prevention
and social policy.
ADMCJ 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in the Criminal
Justice System • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit, and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ADMCJ 298
Seminar in Criminal
Justice • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc. for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details.
ADMCJ 299
Individual Studies in Criminal
Justice System • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. May be repeated for a maximum of
15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor.
Anthropology
ANTH 100
Introduction to
Anthropology • 5
Studies human social and cultural relations,
the cultures and peoples of the past, and
language. This course is a general overview
of anthropology and deals with all parts of
the field without emphasizing some parts and
de-emphasizing others.
ANTH 180
Anthropology of American
Life • 5
Examines the nature of American culture
from the standpoint of the social. The
historical origins of cultural and political
values, the effects of economic changes and
the impact of mass culture on American
consciousness are among the issues
considered. Same as AMST 180. Either
ANTH 180 or AMST 180 may be taken for
credit – not both.
97
Social Science
ANTH 194/195/196/197
Special Topics in
Anthropology • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit, and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
ANTH 198
Seminar in
Anthropology • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details.
ANTH 199
Individual Studies in
Anthropology • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. May be repeated for a maximum of
15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor.
ANTH 200
Introduction to Linguistics • 5
Begins the scientific study of language,
semantics and communication, relationship
of linguistics to human behavior and the
mechanism of understanding and misunderstanding as related to the problem of
communication. Note: Transfers as
humanities credit only.
ANTH 201
Physical Anthropology • 5
Introduces the anthropological approach to
human biology. Course presents the basic
principles of genetics, the nature of primates,
the fossil evidences for human evolution, and
the study of the variation of living populations. Note: Transfers as natural science
credit only.
ANTH 202
Cultural Anthropology • 5
Introduces the theoretical principles involved
in the comparative study of human cultures.
Ethnographic studies are used to illustrate
both the unity and diversity of the ways of
humanity around the world.
98
ANTH 203
Comparative Religion • 5
Introduces the world’s religions. The history
of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism,
and Buddhism is presented in cultural
context. The relationship between these
major traditions and actual “folk” belief and
practices as shown through ethnographic
examples. Same as INTST 203. Either
ANTH 203 or INTST 203 may be taken for
credit -– not both.
ANTH 205
Principles of Archeology • 5
Surveys archeology and how it reconstructs
the cultures of the past; the development of
human cultures from the earliest cultures to
civilization.
ANTH 210
Indians of North America • 5
Analyzes the Indian groups of the North
American Continent, including Indians of the
Eastern Woodland, Great Plains, Southwest,
California, Great Basin, Northwest Coast,
Sub-arctic and Arctic. The course studies
their cultures before they were significantly
influenced by non-Indians: i.e., their
language, clothing and housing, religion,
social structure, tools and technology, and
economy.
ANTH 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in
Anthropology • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit, and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
ANTH 298
Seminar in
Anthropology • V1-10
details. May be repeated for a maximum of
15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor.
Economics
ECON 100
Introduction to Basic
Economic Principles • 5
Introduces students to economic thinking and
provides tools enabling them to understand
and/or evaluate the complex economic
problems encountered in modern society.
Business and Economic majors who plan to
transfer to a four-year institution should
generally take ECON 200/201 rather than
ECON 100.
ECON 194/195/196/197
Special Topics in
Economics • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
ECON 198
Seminar in Economics • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc. for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details.
ECON 199
Individual Studies in
Economics • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. May be repeated for a maximum of
15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor.
Will include seminars, workshops, etc. for
which college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details.
ECON 200
Introduction to Economics:
Macroeconomics • 5
ANTH 299
Individual Studies in
Anthropology • V1-10
Investigates current macroeconomic
problems: inflation, unemployment,
stagnation and international issues. Covers
major theories of business cycles and
examines economic policies aimed at
controlling inflation and unemployment in an
industrialized capitalist nation. It may also
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
Social Science
cover the development policies of underdeveloped countries. Note: Recommend thirty
(30) prior college credits.
ECON 201
Introduction to Economics:
Microeconomics • 5
Investigates pricing and production decisions
of firms, economic forces determining
wages, the structure of labor markets, and
distribution of income. Evaluates the means
and efficacy of government intervention in
markets. Applies economic reasoning to such
topics as environmental degradation, welfare
policy, tax systems, poverty and discrimination. Note: Recommend thirty (30) prior
college credits.
ECON 260
Economic Development of the
United States • 5
Analyzes the industrialization and transformation of the U.S. economy from the
colonial period to the present. Major
emphasis will be on rapid transformation
after the Civil War, the Great Depression of
the 1930’s, and the contributions of the social
attitude toward immigrant and native groups.
SAME AS AMST 260. Recommend thirty
(30) prior college credits.
ECON 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in
Economics • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
ECON 298
Seminar in Economics • V1-10
Will include seminars, workshops, etc. for
which college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details.
ECON 299
Individual Studies in
Economics • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects, and
independent study by an individual student.
See current quarterly schedule for details. May
be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Geography
GEOG 100
Introduction to Geography • 5
Surveys the concepts and methods of
geography by examining humankind’s
influence on the environment, as well as the
environment’s impact on humankind. Focus
will be on patterns and processes of world
climates, culture, population, urbanization,
economic activities and resources.
GEOG 102
World Regional Geography • 5
Studies world geographical relationships
which includes the analysis and interpretation
of the distribution of demographic, economic, political, social, and resource patterns
of the contemporary world; the processes
responsible for these distributions; and the
varying interrelationships from place to place
of these geographical patterns.
GEOG 105
Geography of World Affairs • 5
Is a geographical survey investigating the
interrelationships of selected economic,
demographic, social, political, cultural, and
environmental problems confronting the
contemporary world. Emphasis will be
placed on patterns, processes, and potential
solutions. Same course as INTST 105. Either
GEOG 105 or INTST 105 may be taken for
college credit – not both.
GEOG 194/195/196/197
Special Topics in
Geography • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit, and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
GEOG 198
Seminar in Geography • V1-10
Include seminars, workshops, etc. for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details.
GEOG 199
Individual Studies in
Geography • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
GEOG 200
Cultural Geography • 5
Is a spatial analysis investigating the
relationships of human settlement patterns
and the physical environment. Special
attention is given to cultural processes and
dynamic change.
GEOG 205
Weather, Climate, Vegetation,
Soils • 5
Surveys the patterns and processes of the
physical environment and its relationship to
humankind. This course will specifically
focus on the dynamic aspects of weather,
climates, vegetation and soils. Attention will
be given to the human significance of
different natural, as well as human-altered,
environments. Note: Transfers as natural
science credit only.
GEOG 206
Landforms and Landform
Processes • 5
Surveys the pattern and processes of the
physical environment and its relationship to
humankind. This course will specifically
focus on the dynamic aspects of landforms
and landform processes. Attention will be
given to the human significance of different
natural, as well as human-altered, landforms.
Transfers as laboratory science.
GEOG 207
Economic Geography • 5
Is an introductory geographical inquiry that
investigates the distribution of economic
activities and their impact upon the
environment. Consideration is given to
various components of production, exchange
and consumption of goods and services,
focusing on resource use, agriculture,
industrialization and urbanization.
99
Social Science
GEOG 250
Geography of the Pacific
Northwest • 5
Is a regional survey course, designed to
familiarize the student with elementary
geographical concepts and their application
to the Pacific Northwest. The course
concentrates on geomorphological and
climatological processes and their relationship to settlement patterns, population
dynamics and economic activities.
GEOG 258
Introduction to Map Reading &
Analysis • 5
Includes the interpretation of map symbols
and content at different scales: analysis of
different types of maps and charts: and
special uses of maps.
GEOG 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in
Geography • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit, and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
GEOG 298
Seminar in Geography • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc. for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details.
GEOG 299
Individual Studies in
Geography • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
History
HIST 101
History of Civilization: Cultural
Traditions • 5
Studies the historical foundation of
civilizations—Mesopotamia, Egypt, India,
100
China; economy, society, government,
religion, and culture; the elaboration of
culture and institutions in Greece, Rome, and
the Orient from 500 A.D. to 1000 A.D.; and
the fall of Rome and the rise of Christianity.
Note: May be used as social science or
humanities credit.
the growth of political parties, the industrial
revolution, political reform and the triumph
of liberal democracy, the growth and decay
of British military power, its rivalry with
Germany, and membership of the Common
Market. Note: May be used as social science
or humanities credit.
HIST 102
History of Civilization: Middle
Ages • 5
HIST 120
Global History • 5
Presents the progress and comparisons of
civilization of the post-classical world from
1000 A.D. to 1815 (Napoleon’s defeat). The
fall of Rome, the rise of Christianity and
Islam, medieval institutions, the Renaissance,
the rise of science, the age of explorations
and the National State from the great empires
in 500 A.D. to the shock of western arrival.
Note: May be used as social science or
humanities credit.
HIST 103
History of Civilization:
Contemporary World • 5
Studies Europe since the Enlightenment,
traces the Industrial Revolution, modern
ideologies, imperialism, the origins and
impact to the World Wars, the rise of new
nations, the Cold War, and the emergence of
today’s new global identities and relationships, conflicts, and present-day crises and
problems. Note: May be used as social
science or humanities credit.
HIST 110
English History to 1603 • 5
Traces the history of the British Isles from
the Roman Conquest to the establishment of
nation-state under Henry VIII and Queen
Elizabeth. The course will survey the rise of
Parliament, the English reformation, the
Hundred Years’ War, and life and culture in
the Middle Ages. Note: May be used as
social science or humanities credit.
HIST 115
English History: 1603 to
Present • 5
The history of the British Isles from the death
of Queen Elizabeth I to the present. The
course surveys the supremacy of Parliament,
the development of an unwritten constitution,
Surveys Comparative global history,
focusing on the relationships between the
cultures of the world, and noting developments in religion, law and technology on a
global basis, and the rise and fall of various
empires and cultures. Same as INTST 204.
Either HIST 120 or INTST 204 can be taken
for credit – not both.
HIST 135
History of the United States
Since 1940 • 5
Examines the critical social factors that have
altered American life in the last half-century.
Aspects of both formal and popular culture
are investigated as well as the most important
events of foreign and domestic policy. Note:
May be used as social science or humanities
credit.
HIST 194/195/196/197
Special Topics in
History • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit, and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
HIST 198
Seminar in History • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for detail.
HIST 199
Individual Studies in
History • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. May be repeated for a maximum of
15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor.
Social Science
HIST 201
U.S. History: Discovery To
Independence • 5
HIST 210
The Far East in the Modern
World • 5
HIST 242
The Age of Exploration and
Discovery • 5
Synthesizes the European heritage and
colonial experience and their effect in
forming distinctive American ideas and
institutions; also covers War of Independence
and formation of the Federal Union as a
reflection of this synthesis. Important aspects
such as religion, mercantilism, westward
expansion, colonial self-government, and
Anglo-American republican thought are
discussed. Note: May be used as social
science or humanities credit.
Examines the emergence of the Far East from
an age of exploitation to importance in
economic, political and cultural affairs of the
modern world. The course recognizes the
value systems of these cultures and of their
problems in today’s world and emphasizes
the 20th Century. China, India, Japan,
Southeast Asia and Korea are the countries
studied. Note: May be used as social science
or humanities credit.
Examines the role of great explorers in world
history from Marco Polo to David
Livingstone. Illuminates the factors which
give rise to the process of exploration and
discovery from medieval to modern times
and the impact on various peoples who
became part of a wider world community.
HIST 202
U.S. History: First Century of
Independence • 5
Examines the problems involved in creating a
new nation, the establishment of a federal
government and the formation of political
parties. Such developments as the democratization of American society, national,
expansion, the Civil War, and the impact of
industrialization are discussed. Note: May be
used as social science or humanities credit.
HIST 203
U.S. History: U.S. in the Global
Age • 5
Looks into the emergence of modern
American society. Examines the problems
created by industrialization and urbanization
seen in such movements of reform as
Populism, Progressivism and the New Deal.
Studies the emergence of the multi-cultural
society in an age of global interdependence.
Note: May be used as social science or
humanities credit.
HIST 207
Introduction to Intellectual
History • 5
Surveys the major currents of modern
western thought, examines the assumptions
and ideas extant before the Renaissance, and
demonstrates how new presuppositions about
the nature of the cosmos and humanity grew
after 1500. The course covers the Scientific
Revolution, the Enlightenment, nineteenth
century ideologies, and the philosophical
crisis of the twentieth century. Note: May be
used as social science or humanities credit.
HIST 212
Sport in America: A Social
History • 5
Surveys the role of sports in society. It
examines the development of games and
sports in the context of western history, with
an emphasis on what organized sports have
meant to American culture. Note: May be
used as social science or humanities credit.
HIST 223
Twentieth Century Russia • 5
Overviews the cultural, social, economic, and
political development of Russia and the
Soviet Union from the turn of the century to
the present, with particular emphasis on the
ideology, institutions, and practice of a
totalitarian state. Note: May be used as social
science or humanities credit.
HIST 230
Revolutions in the Modern
World • 5
Studies the forces which produce significant
changes in the social, economic, or political
ideas and institutions of a nation. An
understanding of the concept of revolution is
developed by comparing and contrasting
important “revolutions” such as those in
England, America, France, Russia, and
China. Same as POLSC 230. Either HIST
230 or POLSC 230 can be taken for credit –
not both. May be used as social science or
humanities credit.
HIST 245
The U.S. in World Affairs: 1898
to Present • 5
Deals essentially with this nation’s foreign
policy since its rise to world power status in
1898. The course will examine the external
determinants of foreign policy and the impact
of domestic political factors on that policy.
Note: May be used as social science or
humanities credit.
HIST 250
United States Military
History • 5
Overviews the major wars fought by the
United States and the political and strategic
conceptions that helped shape the national
response. Note: May be used as social
science or humanities credit.
HIST 264
Washington and the Pacific
Northwest • 5
Establishes the physical background of the
settlement of the area by aboriginal and white
inhabitants and traces the broad historical
themes and environmental factors that
influenced the development of the social,
economical and political structure of the
Pacific Northwest today. Note: May be used
as social science or humanities credit.
HIST 280
History of Africa • 5
Examines the history of the continent from
the early origins of the human species to the
present. Emphasis is given to the rise and fall
of ancient African kingdoms and civilizations; the impact of the wider world from
Greek and Roman times to the 20th Century
101
Social Science
and Africa’s role in international affairs.
Same as INTST 280. Either HIST 280 or
INTST 280 may be taken for credit – not
both. Note: May be used as social science or
humanities credit.
HIST 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in
History • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit, and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
HIST 298
Seminar in History • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for detail.
HIST 299
Individual Studies in
History • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. May be repeated for a maximum of
15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor.
International
Studies
INTST 105
Geography of World Affairs • 5
Is a geographical survey investigating the
interrelationships of selected economic,
demographic, social, political, cultural, and
environmental problems confronting the
contemporary world. Emphasis will be placed
on patterns, processes, and potential solutions.
Same as GEOG 105. Either INTST 105 or
GEOG 105 may be taken for credit – not both.
INTST 150
International Business • 5
Provides an overview of international
business and trade. Focuses on the interrelationships between technology, culture,
law and economics within the contemporary
global environments.
102
INTST 194/195/196/197
Special Topics in International
Studies • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit, and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
INTST 198
Seminar in International
Studies • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details.
INTST 199
Individual Studies in
International Studies • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
INTST 200
States & Capitalism: Origin of
Modern Global Systems • 5
Explores the origins, development and global
impact of the modern state system and sheds
light on the political consequence of
economic change under capitalist, socialist or
mixed auspices (time period: From 16th
century to the end of World War II).
INTST 201
Introduction to International
Political Economy • 5
Looks at the study of international economics
through the examination of major facets of
the post-World War II era, the analysis of the
post-war economic order and its crisis in the
1970’s-1980’s, North/South relations, the
post-war political order and its East/West
rivalry.
INTST 202
Cultural Encounters and
Tensions • 5
Deals with the contemporary world from a
cultural standpoint. Problems of intercultural
relations will be examined with particular
emphasis on divergent “world views”.
INTST 203
Comparative Religion • 5
Introduces world’s religions. The history of
Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and
Buddhism are presented in cultural context.
The relationship between these major
traditions and actual “folk” beliefs and
practices is shown through ethnographic
examples. Same as ANTH 203. Either
INTST 203 or ANTH 203 may be taken for
credit – not both.
INTST 204
Global History • 5
Surveys Comparative World History, focusing
on periods of history that saw great achievements in religion, ethics, law and technology.
Great personalities are emphasized. Same as
HIST 120. Either INTST 204 or HIST 120 can
be taken for credit – not both.
INTST 280
History of Africa • 5
Examines the history of the continent from
the early origins of the human species to the
present. Emphasis is given to the rise and fall
of ancient African kingdoms and civilizations; the impact of the wider world from
Greek and Roman times to the 20th Century
and Africa’s role in international affairs.
Same as HIST 280. Either INTST 280 or
HIST 280 may be taken for credit – not both.
INTST 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in International
Studies • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit, and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
INTST 298
Seminar in International
Studies • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details.
INTST 299
Individual Studies in
International Studies • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
Social Science
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
Media
Communication
and Technology
MEDIA 101
Exploring the Digital Future • 5
Surveys the spectrum of global digital
communication, with emphasis on past,
present and future technologies, the effects of
digital communication on our society and
career opportunities in digital communication
fields. Emphasis on the computer revolution
and its effect on daily life. Same as COMM
101. Either MEDIA 101 or COMM 101 may
be taken for credit – not both.
MEDIA 102
Techniques and Technology of
Persuasion • 5
Presents technological and communication
techniques of film, video, and multimedia that
allow information to be targeted at specific
individuals and groups to create opinions,
generate sales, develop propaganda and other
forms of persuasion. Students will have the
opportunity to test persuasion techniques with
simple media presentations. Same as COMM
102. Either MEDIA 102 or COMM 102 may
be taken for credit – not both.
MEDIA 103
Media and Messages: Media
Literacy • 5
Gives insights into the aesthetics of media
production through the study of production
techniques including lighting, editing, color,
audio and interactivity. Lectures include
clips from a variety of film, video and
multimedia resources as well as guest
speakers to help develop students’ interpretive skills in media. Same as COMM
103. Either MEDIA 103 or COMM 103 may
be taken for credit – not both.
MEDIA 104
Multi-Cultural Media
Images • 5
MEDIA 112
Introduction to Video
Production • 5
Develops students’ critical viewing skills to
analyze the origin, impact and meanings of
electronic and digital images and the
messages those images may portray, from
both a personal and a multi-cultural
perspective. Reviews the history and future
of global media networks and their effect on
multi-cultural issues. Same as COMM 104.
Either MEDIA 104 or COMM 104 may be
taken for credit – not both.
Introduces the basics of video production
utilizing a personal camcorder and video
editing equipment. Students study video
technologies, basic equipment operation,
video composition, basic lighting and audio,
production planning and visual storytelling.
Students work in groups to create video
projects utilizing post-production editing.
MEDIA 109
Computer Essentials for Digital
Media • 5
Course designed for students with minimal
computer skills or who have only used textbased software such as word processing and
database. Course has two major components.
The first part is designed to provide foundation skills in the use of both Macintosh and
PC/Windows computers. They will learn
operating systems, memory and settings
adjustments, file management procedures and
hierarchies for both computers. In addition,
students will learn how to navigate, access and
use networks, hard drives and peripheral
equipment such as scanners, CD-ROMS and
cartridge drives. In the second part, students
will design, plan and assemble informational
desktop presentations using presentation
software, clip art and clip media. Doing
presentations will require students to use
many sources of digital information and to put
components together in a cohesive computer
generated presentation. Students with more
extensive computer background may test out
of this course and be exempted.
MEDIA 110
Exploring the Internet • 5
Surveys the multimedia information and
communication capabilities available via
computer access to the “Internet”. Students
learn how to locate, access and retrieve a
variety of media including text, images,
audio and video as well as participate in the
utilization of “html” language to develop
World Wide Web resources. Note: Basic
computer literacy essential.
MEDIA 121
Exploring Multimedia • 5
Introduces the use of computers for creating
media applications, including an overview of
multimedia and hands-on introduction to
multimedia authoring, digital imaging, digital
illustration, digital audio, digital video, and
the creation of a complete multimedia
product as part of student production team.
Note: Basic computer literacy essential.
MEDIA 122
Introduction to Audio and
Recordings • 5
Introduces basic audio for use in video and
computer media applications. Includes basic
sound characteristics, microphones, single
and multi-track recording techniques and
sound reinforcement and enhancement.
Students work on a production team to create
finished audio productions. Same as Music
122. Either MEDIA 122 or MUSIC 122 can
be taken for credit – not both.
MEDIA 150
Cooperative Work Experience
in Media • V1-5
Cooperative work-study agreement between
the student, the media program and an offcampus employer to provide the student with
on-the-job training in media-related skills.
Does not substitute for MEDIA 250
Practicum Internship. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Chair and previous media
enrollment.
103
Social Science
MEDIA 153
Digital Recording
Production • 5
Course covers recording and editing skills as
they exist in the digital media. Digital
recording, computer-based mix down, digital
I/O, utilizing digital effects and sampling
will be covered in a 24 channel ADAT and
direct-to-disk recording studio. Same as
MUSIC 153. Either MEDIA 153 or MUSIC
153 can be taken for credit – not both.
Prerequisite: MEDIA 122 or MUSIC 122.
MEDIA 194/195/196/197
Special Topics in Media
Communications and
Technology • V1-10
Covers unusual course and self-support
classes for college credit. See current
quarterly schedule for details. Prerequisite:
Permission of Program Chair and previous
media enrollment.
MEDIA 198
Seminar in Media
Communication and
Technology • V1-5
Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details. Prerequisite:
Permission of Program Chair and previous
media enrollment.
MEDIA 199
Special Projects in
Media • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects
and independent study by an individual
student. Requires project proposal and
contract for completion. See current quarterly
schedule for details. Course may be repeated
for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of Program Chair and previous
media enrollment.
MEDIA 210
Video Field Production • 5
Is a continuation of MEDIA 112 in field
setting, including intermediate and advanced
shooting and editing techniques, field
lighting, field audio, production budgeting
and planning, script writing and
104
storyboarding. Students work in production
teams to create professional-quality video
productions. Prerequisite: MEDIA 112 or
permission of instructor.
MEDIA 212
Video Studio Production • 5
Is a continuation of MEDIA 112 in a video
production studio setting, including studio
production planning, studio lighting, studio
audio and basic video engineering. Students
participate in all crew positions including
floor director, camera operator, lighting and
audio technicians, technical director and
program director. Prerequisite: MEDIA 112
or permission of instructor.
MEDIA 214
Intermediate Video
Production • 5
Presents production techniques for a variety
of video applications including theatrical,
electronic news gathering, informational, and
documentary-style productions. Special
emphasis on pre-production planning and the
combination of studio and field production
into a final video presentation. Help produce
programming for college cable channel.
Prerequisite: MEDIA 112, 210 and 212; or
permission of instructor.
MEDIA 216
Script Writing for Film, Video
and Multimedia • 5
Presents the mechanics and format for the
creation of scripts and screenplays in film
and video as well as introduction to nonlinear writing styles needed for interactive
multimedia through the utilization of
example scripts, film and video clips and
multimedia products. Special emphasis on
the script writer’s role in pre-production
planning. Prerequisite: English 101 or
permission of instructor.
MEDIA 220
Digital Video Editing • 5
Introduces different computer-based video
editing technologies, including the creation of
digital video productions for inclusion in
multimedia applications such as Quicktime
and the creation of analog video productions
through the utilization of digital non-linear
editing technology. Prerequisite: MEDIA 112.
MEDIA 221
Desktop Media
Presentations • 5
Utilization of software and hardware for the
creation of computer-based presentations for
business, industry and education. Includes a
survey of equipment resources, software
applications, presentation planning and
design, development and execution. Also
includes the utilization of external, digital,
multimedia resources. Note: Basic computer
literacy essential.
MEDIA 223
Multimedia Authoring I • 5
Covers the hardware requirements and
software application for the creation of
interactive multimedia materials as well as
the processes for multimedia development
including message design, interactive
authoring language, and the step-by-step
development of a multimedia application as
part of a production team. Prerequisite:
MEDIA 121.
MEDIA 225
Digital Imaging for
Multimedia I • 5
Gives the student introductory experience in
bitmapped image processing including
acquisition, storage, retrieval, modification
and manipulation of digitized images as they
apply to utilization in interactive multimedia
products. Note: Basic computer literacy
essential.
MEDIA 227
Graphics I: Basic Design and
Illustration • 5
Introduces students to the basic theories,
principles and processes of computer-based
design and illustration as they apply to the
development of on-screen multimedia
applications. Introduces the fundamentals of
vector illustration software (e.g. FreeHand)
so students can apply the principles in their
own creative endeavors. Note: Basic
computer literacy essential.
Social Science
MEDIA 229
Multimedia Authoring II:
Macromedia Director • 5
Provides students with practical experience
in the design and production of interactive
multimedia applications through the creation
of working interactive modules with
Macromedia Director, a common multimedia
authoring tool. Students work in teams to
create Director-based multimedia products.
Prerequisite: MEDIA/IT 223 or permission
of instructor.
MEDIA 230
Web Authoring I • 5
Introduces the background issues, design
fundamentals and production techniques
employed in the authoring of World Wide
Web content. Prerequisite: MEDIA 110.
MEDIA 233
Digital Imaging for
Multimedia II • 5
Course gives students intermediate to
advanced experience in digital image
processing utilizing Adobe Photoshop or
similar software. It includes utilization of
layers, masks, channels and special effects in
bitmapped digital images. Prerequisite:
MEDIA 225.
MEDIA 235
Animation for Multimedia I • 5
Presents the tools and skills needed to create
simple animated objects utilizing different
two-dimensional animation techniques: flipcard animation, color-cycle animation, path
animation and cast animation. Animations
are joined to audio tracks to create complete
animated sequences. Basic three-dimensional
animation is introduced. Prerequisite:
MEDIA 225 or 227 or ART 120, or
permission of instructor.
MEDIA 236
Authoring III: Scripting and
Interactivity • 5
Introduces development skills in the
utilization of Lingo scripting language as
part of the multimedia authoring process.
Prerequisite: MEDIA 229.
MEDIA 237
Animation for Multimedia II • 5
Presents the tools and skills needed to create
three-dimensional animation using software
tools such as 3-D Studio. Students create
simple three-dimensional animations that
utilize wire-frame modeling, key frames,
light sources, camera placement, surface
materials and rendering. Prerequisite:
MEDIA 235 or permission of instructor.
MEDIA 238
Web Authoring II • 5
Develops an advanced understanding of the
industry issues, development fundamentals
and programming techniques involved in the
authoring of World Wide Web content.
Prerequisite: MEDIA 230.
MEDIA 245
Production Practice • 5
Provides students an opportunity to work
under the supervision of a professional oncampus producer to create video and
multimedia production for Bellevue
Community College faculty and administration, BCC Channel 28 television, and offcampus clients. Students are encouraged to
create materials for their personal portfolios
as well. Class may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of program chair.
MEDIA 248
Portfolio and Employment • 5
Allows the student to explore his/her
personal goals and directions and helps the
student in the development of a quality
personal resume and the design, development
and presentation of professional media
portfolio. Additional emphasis is made on
job search skills and strategies for video and
computer media employment. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
MEDIA 250
Practicum in Media
Communication and
Technology • 5
Student either participates in a 165-hour
internship with a professional media-related
company or organization to gain practical
experience in the production and manage-
ment of media resources; or the student
spends 165-hours creating a professional
quality media product that is evaluated by an
off-campus professional producer. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Chair.
MEDIA 252
Production System • 4
Covers the understanding of the systematic
approach to production management and
operation; understanding and diagramming
the systems within BCC-TV operations;
working effectively as a team member; use of
word processing software. Prerequisite:
Acceptance to Production Assistant
Certificate Program.
MEDIA 254
Technical Operation • 4
Covers set-up and operation of BCC-TV
studio and field equipment; including video
recorders, audio systems, lighting systems,
character generator, field cameras and
tripods, and editing systems. Introduction to
computer animation program and A/B-roll
linear editor also covered. Prerequisite:
Acceptance to Production Assistant
Certificate Program.
MEDIA 256
Production Practicum I • 4
Covers the functions for a camera operator,
audio technician, control room technician, or
other crew members for designated
productions. Also includes, operation of
various stations in the Channel 28 headend
(including duplication, computer graphics,
satellite downlinking). Prerequisite:
Acceptance to Production Assistant
Certificate Program.
MEDIA 262
Production Design • 4
Covers systems approach to the production
process, including design, treatments,
storyboards, publicity, budgets and scripts;
scouting locations and assembling a crew;
compiling and analyzing audience profiles,
impact and feedback; increasing audio, video
and post-production values; ethics and
integrity. Prerequisite: Acceptance to
Production Assistant Certificate Program.
105
Social Science
MEDIA 264
Computer-Video
Integration I • 4
Covers operation of computer animation
software to create function animations;
integration digital switcher into linear editing
system; operation of non-linear editor
system. Prerequisite: Acceptance to
Production Assistant Certificate Program.
MEDIA 266
Production Practicum II • 4
Covers the editing of programs for air on
linear and non-linear systems; functioning in
crew positions of technical director, floor
director, assistant producer and assistant
director; market, organize and operate video
conferences, including publicity publications
created on desktop publishing software.
Prerequisite: Acceptance to Production
Assistant Certificate Program.
MEDIA 272
Art of Directing • 4
Covers elements of directing, directing
fiction (including writing scripts, developing
characters, staging the actor and camera),
directing non-fiction (including interviews,
demonstration, new programs, commercials).
Prerequisite: Acceptance to Production
Assistant Certificate Program.
MEDIA 274
Computer-Video
Integration II • 4
Covers advanced design and applications of
computer animation program, word
processing program, and digital video
switcher for television and business.
Prerequisite: Acceptance to Production
Assistant Certificate Program.
MEDIA 276
Production Practicum III • 4
Students receive production ideas; interview
clients; establish target audience and
production purpose; establish production
timeline and budget; conduct content
research; manage production book; supervise
and direct location and studio production;
complete post-production requirements; and
evaluation program. Prerequisite: Acceptance
to Production Assistant Certificate Program.
106
MEDIA 282
Production Résumé • 3
Students will ascertain and develop
employment strategy; design a production
résumé to established specifications; compile
and edit a résumé videotape; write and
publish a written résumé; execute networking
strategy, and conduct job interviews.
Prerequisite: Acceptance to Production
Assistant Certificate Program.
MEDIA 299
Special Projects in
Media • V1-10
Covers directed reading, special projects and
independent study by an individual student.
See current quarterly schedule for details.
Course may be repeated for a maximum of 15
credits. Prerequisite: Permission of Program
Chair and previous media enrollment.
MEDIA 284
Professional Internship • 6
Political Science
Students will identify internship opportunities; secure an internship; complete a contract
of employment; and fulfill the requirements
of the internship. Prerequisite: Acceptance to
Production Assistant Certificate Program.
POLSC 101
Introduction to Politics • 5
MEDIA 286
Production Practicum IV • 3
Students will seek out and create multiple
production projects; work with the producer
to develop concepts; oversee the quality of
productions; evaluation results and audience
feedback. Prerequisite: Acceptance to
Production Assistant Certificate Program.
MEDIA 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in Media
Communications and
Technology • V1-10
Covers unusual course and self-support
classes for college credit. See current
quarterly schedule for details. Prerequisite:
Permission of Program Chair and previous
media enrollment.
MEDIA 298
Seminar in Media
Communication and
Technology • V1-5
Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details. Prerequisite:
Permission of Program Chair and previous
media enrollment.
Explores the origins and evolution of major
political concepts dating from ancient Greece
to the present. Incorporates political life in
the modern world and the ideas behind its
democratic and non-democratic forms.
POLSC 102
American Government and
Politics • 5
Presents the nature of constitutional
government in America in terms of the
theory and practices of democracy. Problems
of individual rights, popular representation
and responsible leadership are emphasized.
POLSC 103
International Relations • 5
Examines the struggle for power and peace
and present day methods by which affairs are
conducted between national states.
POLSC 104
State and Local
Government • 5
Introduces concepts of lobbying, executive
power and judicial selection and review on
the state level; political machines, race and
urban ecology on the local level.
POLSC 110
People of Color in the U.S.
Political System • 5
Studies the role that people of color play in the
American political system. Focuses on the
historical relationship of people of color and
political processes, people of color in urban
society, and sources of tension and frustration.
Social Science
POLSC 121
The United Nations • 1
Is a seminar-type class which covers the
present structure and purpose of the United
Nations organization. Prerequisite: A course
in political science.
POLSC 122
The United Nations • 2
Is a seminar-type class which covers the
present structure and purpose of the United
Nations organization. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
POLSC 123
The United Nations • 2
Researches a specific country and prepares
students to give a presentation at the National
Model United Nations Conference in New
York. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
POLSC 155
The American Presidency • 5
Examines the American Presidency, its
evolution, its occupants, and its place within
the American system. Topics include
presidential character, war, elections, the
economy and the Constitution.
POLSC 160
Introduction to American
Political Culture • 5
Emphasizes a multidisciplinary approach to
the understanding of the formation and
development of American political culture
and the various ways it has been interpreted
through time. Same as AMST 160. Either
POLSC 160 or AMST 160 can be taken for
credit – not both.
POLSC 170
Introduction to Political
Economy • 5
Emphasizes the interplay between politics
and economics and its consequences. The
course includes methodological and
theoretical concepts derived from political
science and economics in an attempt to
explain substantial issues.
POLSC 194/195/196/197
Special Topics in Political
Science • V1-10
POLSC 230
Revolutions in the Modern
World • 5
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit, and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
Studies the concept of revolution, comparing
and contrasting important “revolutions” such
as those in England, America, France, Russia
and China. Same as HIST 230. Either
POLSC 230 or HIST 230 can be taken for
credit – not both.
POLSC 198
Seminar in Political
Science • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc. for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for detail.
POLSC 199
Individual Studies in Political
Science • V1-10
Covers direct readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
POLSC 201
Introduction to Political
Theory • 5
Outlines those political and social theories
and values which are indispensable in
understanding political systems, governments, international conflicts and cooperation
in the present world. Note: May be taken as
social science or humanities credit.
POLSC 205
Introduction to Western
European Governments • 5
Studies Western liberal political institutions,
the welfare state and the Common Market,
focusing on Great Britain, France, Germany
and Sweden. Attention is given to theoretical and institutional-procedural aspects
characteristic of modern government
and society.
POLSC 206
Introduction to Governments:
Developing Nations • 5
Studies various development theories and
strategies of Russia, China, African and Latin
American nations with special emphasis on
problems of political development and
modernization.
POLSC 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in Political
Science • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit, and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
POLSC 298
Seminar in Political
Science • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for detail.
POLSC 299
Individual Studies in Political
Science • V1-10
Covers direct readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. May be repeated for a maximum
of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission
of instructor.
Psychology
PSYCH 100
Introduction to Psychology • 5
Emphasizes methodology, concepts,
principles of psychology, including
psychophysiology, sensation and perception,
learning and memory, motivation, development, emotion, health and stress, personality,
abnormalities, treatments and interactions.
PSYCH 102
Psychology as a Natural
Science • 5
Presents the biological aspects of research
methods, sensation, perception, learning,
memory, emotion and motivation, psychopa-
107
Social Science
thology, treatment and development.
Participation in demonstrations and
experiments may be required. Note:
Transfers as natural science credit only.
PSYCH 110
Applied Psychology • 5
Stresses application of psychological theory.
Students survey how psychology interfaces
with other disciplines focusing on how
psychologists perform their professional
functions in different settings.
PSYCH 194/195/196/197
Special Topics in
Psychology • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
PSYCH 198
Seminar in Psychology • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details.
PSYCH 199
Individual Studies in
Psychology • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
PSYCH 200
Abnormal Psychology • 5
Introduces the theories, diagnosis and
treatment of maladaptive behavior and
psychological disorders as defined by current
psychological practice. Field trips to
psychiatric institutions may be required.
Prerequisite: PSYCH 100.
Participating in demonstrations and projects
may be required.
PSYCH 204
General Developmental
Psychology • 5
Presents research and theories regarding
human growth and change across the life
span. Students will explore factors that affect
personality, cognitive, and physical
development from psychological and sociocultural perspectives. Participation in
demonstrations and projects may be required.
Prerequisite: PSYCH 100.
PSYCH 205
Introduction to Personality • 5
Examines the philosophical assumptions
concerning the nature of humankind. Focuses
on the mainstream theoretical schools of
psychology, specific theorists in detail, along
with psychometric techniques. Prerequisite:
PSYCH 100.
PSYCH 209
Fundamentals of Psychological
Research • 5
Covers theories, techniques, and application of
psychological research methodology;
literature review and hypothesis testing in a
variety of research paradigms, ranging from
uncontrolled field observation to laboratory
experiments. Issues which may effect research
results, data analysis and report writing are
covered. Prerequisite: PSYCH 100.
PSYCH 213
Elementary Psychological
Statistics • 5
Covers classification and reporting of data,
hypothesis testing and evaluation, and
probability theory. A survey of descriptive
statistics, inferential statistics and distribution-free tests will be presented. Prerequisite:
PSYCH 100.
PSYCH 203
Human Learning and
Performance • 5
PSYCH 240
Social Psychology • 5
Presents aspects of human performance
including operant and classical conditioning,
memory and conceptual processing,
language, sensation and perception.
Introduces the interaction between the social
context and the individual, emphasizing
aspects of social learning on attitudes,
perception and personality. Covers group
behavior, persuasion, conflict, attraction,
108
altruism and aggression. Same as SOC 240.
Either PSYCH 240 or SOC 240 may be taken
for credit – not both. Prerequisite: PSYCH
100 or SOC 110.
PSYCH 250
Cross-Cultural Psychology • 5
Examines psychological theories and
research from a cross-cultural perspective.
Highlights impact of culture on cognition,
development, emotion, motivation, sex roles,
disorders, group behavior, conflict,
stereotyping and prejudice.
PSYCH 257
Psychology of Sex
Differences • 5
Examines sex differences and similarities
from an interdisciplinary perspective,
including biological, psychological, social
and historical viewpoints. Perceived and
actual differences are analyzed in an attempt
to understand these differences. Communication styles, employment, education, mental
health and personal relationships are viewed.
PSYCH 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in
Psychology • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
PSYCH 298
Seminar in Psychology • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details.
PSYCH 299
Individual Studies in
Psychology • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. See current quarterly schedule for
details. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
Social Science
Sociology
SOC 105
Sociology of Black
Americans • 5
Addresses itself to the socio-historical
background of Black Americans, focusing on
Black culture, institutions, roles and
functions in larger political and stratification
systems, and the Black movement as a force
for social change.
SOC 110
Introduction to Sociology • 5
Surveys concepts, theories and research
about human groups.
SOC 170
Social Problems of
Contemporary Society • 5
Analyzes the social problems in contemporary societies. Course designed for the
entering student.
SOC 194/195/196/197
Special Topics in
Sociology • V1-10
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit, and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
SOC 198
Seminar in Sociology • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc. for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details.
SOC 199
Individual Studies in
Sociology • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. Instructor contract required. May be
repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
SOC 240
Social Psychology • 5
Introduces the interaction between social
structure and the individual. Same as PSYCH
240. Either SOC 240 or PSYCH 240 may be
taken for credit – not both. Prerequisite: SOC
110 or PSYCH 100 or ANTH 100 or
permission of instructor.
SOC 294/295/296/297
Special Topics in
Sociology • V1-10
SOC 255
Marriage and the Family • 5
Covers unusual courses, self-support classes
for college credit, and television courses. See
current quarterly schedule for details.
Examines the family as an institution and
mode for personal living, marital adjustment,
parent-child relationship, changing family
patterns and family organization. Same as
HOMEC 255. Either SOC 255 or HOMEC
255 may be taken for credit – not both.
Prerequisite: SOC 110 or PSYCH 100 or
ANTH 100 or permission of instructor.
SOC 256
Introduction to Sex and
Sexuality • 5
Analyzes the social bases of sexual
knowledge, attitudes and behavior. Emphasis
is on both academic and personal development. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or PSYCH 100
or ANTH 100 or permission of instructor.
SOC 298
Seminar in Sociology • V1-10
Includes seminars, workshops, etc. for which
college credit is offered. See current
quarterly schedule for details.
SOC 299
Individual Studies in
Sociology • V1-10
Covers directed readings, special projects,
and independent study by an individual
student. Instructor contract is required. May
be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
SOC 262
Racial and Ethnic Group
Relations • 5
Analyzes selected racial and ethnic group
relations in the world. Topics covered
include dominant and subordinate groups.
Prerequisite: One course in social science SOC 110 or PSYCH 100 or ANTH 100 or
permission of instructor.
SOC 265
The Urban Community • 5
Compares and analyzes the organization and
activities of urban communities. Major
problems presented by urban environments,
sources of change, and the effectiveness of
attempts at change are examined. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or ANTH 100 or POLSC 101
or POLSC 102 or permission of instructor.
SOC 270
Social Disorganization and
Deviant Behavior • 5
Studies the structure and process of deviance
in social groups. Contemporary and historical
perspectives are emphasized. Prerequisite:
SOC 110 or ANTH 100 or POLSC 101 or
POLSC 102 or PSYCH 100 or permission of
instructor.
109
Washington
Social
ScienceAcademy of Languages
Bilingual
Opportunities
This is a cooperative effort between Bellevue Community College and
Washington Academy of Languages, a non-profit accredited institution.
The programs are intended for bilingual students.
Interpreting
INTRP 101
Introduction to Translation &
Interpreting • 3
An introduction to translating and interpreting as a career, and for those who work with
translators and interpreters. Overview of the
field and skills necessary for the profession.
Covers general problems involved in
translating and interpreting.
INTRP 102
Basic Interpreting Skills • 3
Learn the building blocks of interpreting,
including analyzing, summarizing and
paraphrasing, listening comprehension,
shadowing, closure and note taking.
INTRP 104
Technology for Translators
and Interpreters • 3
An introduction to the equipment and
electronic tools currently used by professional
translators and interpreters. Learn the
limitations and advantages of MAHT
(machine-assisted human translation) and
HAMT (human-assisted machine translation).
INTRP 105
Vocabulary Acquisition and
Terminology Research • 3
Students will develop skills in terminology
research, dictionary usage and glossary
building. Basic terminology in the fields of
medicine, law, computers, business and
international trade will be covered.
110
INTRP 106
Ethics and Business Practice
of Translation and
Interpretation • 3
Learn the role of the interpreter and translator
in the business-conference, medical and
courtroom setting. Familiarize the student
with current business practices, i.e.,
determining fees and negotiating contracts.
INTRP 107
Advanced Interpreting Skills
Level I • 3
Translation
TRANS 103
Basic Translation Skills • 3
Learn basic translation techniques and the
process of translation. Includes a practical
review of the writing, editing and proofreading skills necessary to produce clear,
polished translations.
TRANS 109
Advanced Translation
Workshop I • 3
Provides students with repeated opportunities
for practical experience in the interpreting
modes necessary for working in different
settings.
Hands-on experience in the translation,
editing, and finalization of actual commercial texts. Texts are drawn from a variety of
fields including sci-tech, legal, commercial,
and medical. Emphasis is on professional
presentation. Included is a team translation
project.
INTRP 108
Advanced Interpreting
Skills II • 3
TRANS 110
Advanced Translation
Workshop II • 3
Provides students with repeated opportunities for practical experience in the interpreting modes necessary for working in
different settings. Simultaneous, consecutive and sight translation will be practiced
in different settings.
Provides students with repeated opportunities for practical experience in the
translation, editing and finalization of actual
commercial texts.
INTRP 111
Interpretation Practicum • 1
Supervised, 25-hour interpreter practicum
or mentorship with an agency, experienced
freelancer, corporation or at the student’s
work place, associated with a five-hour
professional seminar for participating
students.
TRANS 112
Translation Practicum • 1
Supervised, 25-hour translator practicum
or mentorship with an agency, experienced
freelancer, corporation, or at the student’s
work place. Associated with a five-hour
professional seminar for participating
students.
College Policies
College Policies
College Policies
Concerning Students
Students’
Rights and
Responsibilities
Social Security Number
Disclosure
Pursuant to Section 7 of Public Law 93-579
(commonly known as the Federal Privacy
Act), which became effective on September
27, 1975, notice is hereby given that
disclosure of a student’s social security
number for the purpose of admission and
registration at Bellevue Community College
is voluntary on the student’s part. However,
the State Board for Community and Technical
College’s record-keeping system requires
that each student have a unique nine-digit
number. For this reason, Bellevue Community College requests use of students’ social
security number rather than assigning each
student another nine-digit number. The
social security number is used as an identifier
in the college records system and is not
released to any federal, state or private
agency without the written consent of the
student. However, students who do not wish
to disclose their social security number may
ask the college to assign them another ninedigit student number.
Bellevue Community College will not deny
any individual any right, benefit or privilege
provided by law because of that individual’s
refusal to disclose his/her social security
number. Students who receive financial aid,
however, should be aware that federal law
requires them to provide their social security
numbers. Students who ask the college to
assign another ID number must pay tuition
and fees from their own resources.
Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act (Release of
Student Records)
Public Law 93-380, the Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 establishes
that the educational records of students
attending or having attended the college are
confidential and can be released only with
written permission of the student. However,
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy
Act authorizes the college to routinely
release directory information.
Information which may be released without
written permission of the student includes:
student’s name; student’s major field of
study; dates of attendance at Bellevue
Community College; degrees awarded the
student; awards received by the student;
participation in officially recognized
activities and sports; and weight and height
of members of athletic teams. No other
information may be released without the
student’s written permission except as
provided for in college policies on release of
student data. Students who are concerned
about the confidentiality of their records
should contact the Associate Dean of
Enrollment Services.
Bellevue Community College students have
the right to review their own records and to
petition for correction of erroneous
information in their records. Basic information is shown on a student’s transcript, an
unofficial copy of which can be requested
from the Student Services Center. The
Student Records Office can provide a list of
the types and locations of educational records
available at the college. Requests to review
the records should be made in writing to the
office having custody of the particular
records in question.
Student Financial Obligations
The college expects that students who receive
services for which a financial obligation is
incurred will exercise responsibility in
meeting these obligations. Appropriate
college staff are empowered to act in
accordance with regularly adopted procedures to carry out the intent of this policy,
and if necessary, to initiate legal action to
ensure that collection matters are brought to
a timely and satisfactory conclusion.
If a student fails to meet their financial
obligations to the college, the college may
block his/her admission or registration,
withhold academic transcripts, and/or refuse
to confer degrees until the obligation is met.
Returned Checks: Checks for tuition and fees
returned with a “stop payment” order will
result in the student being withdrawn
immediately from all their classes, and will
require a $25 reinstatement fee. All other
returned checks for tuition and fees will
result in the student being withdrawn from
their classes after being notified of the reason
for withdrawal, and will require a $15
reinstatement fee. If a student writes three
checks (including third-party checks) which
are returned, their privilege of check-writing
will be denied.
Student Code
The Bellevue Community College Student
Code, WAC 132H-120, spells out the rights
and responsibilities of all students. Copies of
the complete Student Code are available from
Student Services. Excerpts (student
responsibilities and prohibited activities) are
published in the Student Handbook. As stated
in the preamble to the code, admission to the
college carries with it the expectation that
students will:
■
■
■
■
■
respect the laws of the community, state
and nation;
adhere to college rules and regulations
which assure the orderly conduct of
college affairs;
maintain high standards of integrity and
honesty;
respect the rights, privileges and property
of other members of the college
community; and
not interfere with legitimate college
affairs.
Bellevue Community College may apply
sanctions or take other appropriate action only
when student conduct directly and significantly interferes with the college’s primary
educational responsibility of ensuring the
111
College Policies
opportunity of all members of the college
community to attain their educational
objectives and its subsidiary responsibilities of
protecting property, keeping records,
providing services and sponsoring nonclassroom activities such as lectures, concerts,
athletic events and social functions.
An atmosphere of learning and self-development is created by appropriate conditions in
the college community. The rights, freedoms
and responsibilities listed in the Student Code
are critical ingredients of the free, creative and
spirited educational environment to which the
students, faculty, and staff of Bellevue
Community College are committed.
Rights and freedoms specifically provided
under the Student Code include:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Academic freedom
Due process
Distribution and posting of literature
Off-campus speakers
Incidental sales
Commercial activities
Fund-raising
Actions specifically prohibited by the Student
Code include:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Being under the influence of alcohol
Possessing, using, selling or being under
the influence of narcotic drugs and
controlled substances
Illegal entry
Forgery or alteration of records
Illegal assembly
Malicious mischief
Failure to follow instructions
Physical abuse
Assault
Disorderly or abusive conduct
Possession or use of weapons
Lewd conduct
False alarms
Cheating and plagiarism
Sexual harassment
Theft or robbery
Unauthorized use of college property
Refusal to provide identification
Smoking in an area not designated for
smoking
False complaint.
112
Student Grievance Procedures
Students have the right to receive clear
information and fair application of college
policies, standards, rules and requirements
and are responsible for complying with them
in their relationships with college personnel.
The college has two procedures in place to
help resolve difficulties, complaints and
other grievances arising from a student’s
dissatisfaction with a college employee’s
performance or with a BCC policy or
procedure. The purpose of both procedures is
to enable a student to express and resolve
misunderstandings, complaints or grievances
in a fair and equitable manner. The Student
Academic Grievance procedure enables a
student to deal with problems regarding
grades and grading issues and policies.
(Since the evaluation of the course content
is exclusively within the province of the
instructor for a particular course, any adjustments or grade changes may be initiated only
by that instructor, or under extenuating
circumstances by the Dean of Instructional
Services, upon the approval of the college
president.) The Student Grievance Procedure
covers all issues not addressed as academic
grievances.
Both the academic and general grievance
procedures emphasize informal resolution,
with both the faculty or staff member and the
student making a good faith effort to resolve
the grievance on a one-to-one basis. If the
student determines that the complaint cannot
be resolved to their satisfaction with the
faculty member or employee concerned, the
student may contact the faculty member’s
division chair or the employee’s supervisor,
who will seek to facilitate a solution to the
grievance. If a meeting with the division
chair or the employee’s supervisor does not
produce results satisfactory to the student, he/
she may proceed with the filing of a formal
written complaint to the appropriate dean.
The formal complaint process for an
academic grievance involves a hearing before
the Student Academic Grievance Committee,
which is made up of four faculty members
and two students.
In most cases, formal complaints about
academic issues must be filed within two
consecutive quarters, and general complaints
must be filed within one academic quarter
after the incident which was the source of the
grievance. Complete information about
grievance procedures is available from the
Student Services Center.
Academic Freedom
Institutions of higher education are
conducted for the common good. The
common good depends upon a free search for
truth and its free expression. Students are
guaranteed rights of free inquiry, expression
and peaceful assembly upon and within
college facilities that are generally open and
available to the public. Students and other
members of the college community shall
always be free to express their views or
support causes by orderly means which do
not disrupt the regular and essential operation
of the college. Likewise, it is essential that
the faculty member be free to pursue
scholarly inquiry without undue restriction,
and to voice and publish conclusions
concerning the significance of evidence that
the faculty member considers relevant.
Faculty members are free to present their
ideas in the learning situation where they
have professional competence and responsibility. Each faculty member shall be free
from instructional censorship or discipline,
when that member speaks, writes or acts,
as long as they exercise academic responsibility. For example, all sides of controversial
issues should be exposed, and students
should be permitted to present freely their
own views even though these views may
clearly differ from those held by the
faculty member.
Equal Opportunity
Bellevue Community College does not
discriminate on the basis of race or ethnicity;
creed; color; national origin; sex; marital
status; sexual orientation; age; religion; the
presence of any sensory, mental, or physical
disability; or veteran status in educational
programs and activities which it operates.
BCC is prohibited from discriminating in
such a manner by college policy and by state
and federal law. All college personnel and
persons, vendors and organizations with
whom the college does business are required
to comply with applicable federal and state
statutes and regulations designed to promote
affirmative action and equal opportunity.
College Policies
Reasonable Accommodation
for Disabled Students
Bellevue Community College is committed
to providing each qualified disabled student
equal opportunity in accessing the benefits,
rights and privileges of college services,
programs and activities. These will be
provided in compliance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and State of
Washington Laws of 1994, chapter 105.
Under college policy based upon these laws,
no student shall, on the basis of his or her
disability, be excluded from participation in,
be denied the benefits of or otherwise be
subject to discrimination under any college
program or activity. To this end the college
will provide reasonable accommodations,
including core services, to qualified students
with disabilities. To receive appropriate
and timely reasonable accommodations,
students are responsible for requesting
accommodation and documenting the nature
and extent of their disability in accordance
with college procedures.
Reasonable accommodations include requests
for academic adjustments, such as modification of academic requirements and flexibility
in test-taking arrangements; adjustments in
nonacademic services and other rules; and
auxiliary aids and services. Appropriate
academic adjustments and/or reasonable
accommodations will be provided to qualified
students with disabilities during recruitment,
admissions, enrollment, registration, financial
aid, course work, academic counseling and
nonacademic programs and services.
Bellevue Community College will make
those modifications to its academic
requirements that (1) are necessary to ensure
that those requirements do not discriminate,
or have the effect of discriminating, against a
qualified student with a disability based on
that disability and (2) do not impose an
undue hardship on the college nor require
alteration of essential program requirements.
This procedure provides no additional rights
or obligations beyond those required by
applicable laws.
Students with concerns about reasonable
accommodation are encouraged to contact
the Disabled Students Services office or the
Associate Dean of Student Development
Services.
Sexual Harassment
It shall be the policy of Bellevue Community
College, consistent with efforts to respect the
dignity and integrity of both employees and
students, to provide an environment free of
sexual harassment.
Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination. It occurs in a variety of situations which
share a common element: the inappropriate
introduction of sexual activities or comments
into the work or learning situation. Often,
sexual harassment involves relationships of
unequal power, and contains elements of
coercion – as when compliance with requests
for sexual favors becomes a criterion for
granting work, study or grading benefits.
However, sexual harassment may also involve
relationships among equals, as when repeated
sexual advances or demeaning verbal behavior
have a harmful effect on a person’s ability to
study or work in the academic setting.
For general policy purposes, the term “sexual
harassment” may include, without limitation,
such behavior as unwelcome sexual
advances, requests for sexual favors and
other physical or verbal conduct and
expressive behavior of a sexual nature where:
■
Submission to such conduct is made
either explicitly or implicitly a term or
condition of an individual’s employment
or education;
■
Submission to or rejection of such
conduct by an individual is used as the
basis for academic or employment
decisions affecting that individual; or
■
Such conduct has the purpose or effect of
substantially interfering with an
individual’s academic or professional
performance or creating an intimidating,
hostile, or demeaning employment or
educational environment.
Each student is expected to be in an
appropriate mental and physical condition to
participate fully in the learning process.
The BCC Student Code specifically prohibits
being demonstrably under the influence of
any form of alcoholic beverage; possessing
or consuming any form of liquor or alcoholic
beverage except as a participant of legal age
in a student program, banquet or educational
program which has the special written
authorization of the college president; and
using, possessing, selling, or being under the
influence of any narcotic drug or controlled
substance as defined by law, except when the
use or possession of a drug is specifically
prescribed as medication by an authorized
medical doctor or dentist.
Smoking on Campus
In accordance with the Washington Clean
Indoor Air Act of 1985 (RCW 70.160) and in
recognition of the Executive Order Establishing Governor’s Policy on Smoking in State
Facilities, it is the policy of Bellevue
Community College to limit smoking in
college facilities and vehicles as follows:
■
Smoking is permitted outside of buildings
in clearly marked areas.
■
Smoking shall not be permitted in college
facilities (enclosed spaces) or college
vehicles.
■
Smoking in covered walkways surrounding Main and Upper Campuses shall be
restricted to designated smoking areas.
The college recognizes its moral, ethical and
legal responsibilities regarding sexual
harassment and will take appropriate action
to rid the institution of such conduct.
Drug-Free Campus
Bellevue Community College intends to
provide a drug-free, healthful, safe and
secure work and educational environment.
Each employee is expected to report to work
in an appropriate mental and physical
condition to perform their assigned duties.
113
Administration
College
Policies & Faculty
The Board of
Trustees of
Community College
District VIII
Mr. Robert J. Margulis, Bellevue, Chair
Ms. Ruthann Kurose, Mercer Island,
Vice Chair
Mr. Ron Gould, Mercer Island
Mr. J.C. (Dell) Jackson, Bellevue
Mrs. Sally Jarvis, Issaquah
Administration and Services of
Community College District VIII
B. Jean Floten, Chief Executive Officer
Bellevue Community College
Established 1966
Accredited by the Northwest Association of
Schools and Colleges
Administration
of Bellevue
Community College
B. Jean Floten, President
Elise Erikson, Executive Assistant &
Secretary to the President
Administrative Services
Donald N. Noble, Vice President
Donna Flanagan, Director of Finance
Susan L. Haro, Director of Campus
Operations
Valerie Hodge, Director of Institutional
Research
Catherine James, Director of the Bookstore
Karl Palo, Director of Security
Robert Southard, Director of Food Services
Deborah Townsend, Administrative
Assistant
Educational Services
Vacant, Executive Dean
Jean Sasaki, Assistant to the Executive
Dean
Continuing Education
Dr. Kae R. Hutchison, Dean
Dr. Adele Thorburn Becker, Director of
Work Related Programs
114
Administration
and Faculty
Sharon Carpenter, Interim Director
Daniel Eiben, Director of Customized
Training
Cheryll Leo-Gwin, Director of Arts &
Personal Enrichment
Human Resources
Lucy Parke Macneil, Vice President
Carolyn Tucker, Human Resources
Representative
Information Resources
Dr. Robert Edelbrock, Dean
Janice Falls, Administrative Assistant
Dr. David Gould, Director of Student Access
Computing
Gary Mahn, Director of Technology Services
Dr. Michael Talbott, Director of
Telecommunications
Myra Van Vactor, Director of Library Media
Center
Institutional Advancement
Nadine Troyer, Vice President
Richard Duval, Director of Marketing &
Communications
Sharon Kline, Director of Development
Instructional Services
Dr. James L. Bennett, Dean
Dr. Kae R. Hutchison, Dean
Dr. Joanne Murcar, Director of College
Placement and Workforce Training
Dr. Susan Quattrociocchi, Director,
Northeast Tech Prep Consortium
International Programs
Dr. Kae R. Hutchison, Dean
Jim Bergstrom, Coordinator, International
Training
Raoul J. Meilleur, Director of International
Programs
Susan G. Jamieson, Director of English
Language Institute
Seeko Jaswal, Coordinator, Marketing
Margaret Murphy, Coordinator, Special
Programs
NorthWest Center for Emerging
Technologies (NWCET)
Neil Evans, Executive Director
Dr. Douglas Brown, Associate Director
Michèle Royer, Senior Associate Planner
Julia Sickles, Administrative Assistant
Carol Mandt, Director of Education Projects
Jakkalavadika (Jack) Surendranath, Associate
Director
Manjari Wijenaike, Senior Associate
Planner
Marcia C. Williams, Project Director
Student Services
Tomás Ybarra, Dean
Tika Esler, Associate Dean of Enrollment
Services
Ron Taplin, Associate Dean of Student
Development
Linda D. Flory-Barnes, Director of MultiCultural Services
Harriet Baskas, Director of KBCS
Leslie Blackaby, Director of Financial Aid
& Student Employment
Faisal Jaswal, Director of International
Students
Judy Konopaski, Director of Child Care
Center
Cheryl Vermilyea, Director of Women’s
Resource Center
Division Chairs
Thomas R. Nielsen, Arts & Humanities
Lynne Scott, Educational Development &
Health Sciences
Jakkalavadika (Jack) Surendranath, Science
Dr. Michael L. Talbott, Social Sciences
Dr. Judy Eng Woo, Business
Program Chairs
ARTS & HUMANITIES DIVISION
Carolyn Bilby, Foreign Language
Dr. Roger A. George, Communication
Robert C. Jackson, Drama and Dance
Dalmen D. Mayer, Philosophy
Michael Meyer, English
Kimberly Pollock, American Studies
* indicates affiliated part-time faculty
Administration & Faculty
Dr. Robert Purser, Art
Connie Wais, Interior Design
Ken Wilson, Music
Alan Yabui, Speech
BUSINESS DIVISION
Richard Bratz, Business Administration
Transfer
Michael Gelotte, Computer Science
Kay Gough , General Business Management
Janice O. Gould, Administrative Office
Systems
Anne Jackson, Information TechnologyTechnical Support
Sandra J. Nesbeitt, Marketing Management
John W. Perry, Information TechnologyProgramming
Philip M. Walter, Paraprofessional
Accounting
Howard W. Wildin II, Real Estate
EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT &
HEALTH SCIENCES DIVISION
Julius B. Armstrong, Radiation Therapy
Technology
Joan P. Baker, Diagnostic Ultrasound
Technology
Cheryl Becker, Associate Degree Nursing
Linda Bennett, Developmental Education
Ron Harmon, Fire Command &
Administration
Harriet Newton, Physical Education/Health
and Recreational Leadership
Ronald S. Radvilas, Radiologic Technology
Gertrude C. Shepherd, Early Childhood
Education
Julie M. Soto, Director of Parent Education
Program
Linda S. Trippett, Director of Special Health
Care Programs & Fire Command
Administration
SCIENCES DIVISION
Dr. James Ellinger, Life Sciences
Frank Lee, Engineering
Catherine Lyle, Physical Sciences
B. David Stacy, Mathematics
SOCIAL SCIENCE DIVISION
Dr. Michael Caldero, Administration of
Criminal Justice
Mark Elliott, Director of Television
Services
Eric G. Haines, History
Dr. Steven Hamernyik, International Studies
A. Christopher James, Media
Communication & Technology
* indicates affiliated part-time faculty
Aslam Khan, Political Science
John S. Osmundson, Anthropology
Thornton A. Perry, Director of
Telecommunications/Distance Learning
Michael Righi, Economics
Douglas L. Roselle, Geography
Dr. Elaynne Rousso, Sociology
Dr. Helen K. Taylor, Psychology
Administrative
Staff and Faculty
Agassiz, Roderick A., Human Development
Services
B.A., University of Washington
M. Ed., Seattle University
*Anderson, Betty M., Sociology
B.S., M.A., University of Washington
Anderson, Marilyn D., Mathematics
B.S., University of Redlands
M.S., University of Washington
Anderson, Sandra, Dr.
B.S., Bemidji State University
M.A., Colorado State University
Ph.D., Northwest University
*Andrus, Pat, English
B.A., Nazareth College, Kalamazoo,
Michigan
M.F.A., Goodard College, Plainfield,
Vermont
*Apacible, Ricardo M. P., Psychology
B.A., M.A., University of St. Thomas
M. Ed., University of Washington
Armstrong, Julius B., Radiation Therapy
Technology (Chair)
B.S., City College, New York
M.B.A., Adelphi University
*Artimovich, Vicki, Art
B.A., M.A., University of Washington
Baker, Joan P., Diagnostic Ultrasound
Technology (Chair)
American Registry of Diagnostic Medical
Sonographers
Baskas, Harriet, Director of KBCS for
Student Services
B.A., Clark University
Beauvais, Chan, Information Technology
B.A., University of California at Santa
Barbara
Becker, Adele Thorburn, Dr., Director of
Work Related Programs for Continuing
Education
B.A., Michigan State University
M.A., Middlebury College
Ph.D., University of Illinois
Becker, Cheryl L., Associate Degree Nursing
(Chair)
B.S.N., University of Alaska
M.N., University of Washington
*Benezra, Lee D., Mathematics Lab
Teaching Assistant
B.S., University of Washington
Bennett, James L., Dr., Dean of Instructional
Services
B.A., Macalester College
M.S., Mankato State University
Ph.D., University of Washington
Bennett, Linda, Developmental Education
(Chair); English
B.A., M.A., Eastern Washington
University
Benz, Peggy, Media Communication and
Technology
M.A., University of Mexico
B.A., West Texas State University
Ph.D., University of San Francisco
*Berg, Carole A., Physical Science
B.S., Washington State University
M.S., Ed., University of Washington
Bergstrom, James E., Coordinator, Business
Outreach/International Programs
B.A., Pacific Lutheran University
M.Ed., University of Washington
Bilby, Carolyn P., Foreign Language (Chair)
B.A., Seton Hall University
M.A., Pennsylvania State University
*Black, Claude, Business Administration
Transfer; Paraprofessional Accounting
A.A., Bellevue Community College
B.A., Univeristy of Washington
M.B.A., City University
Blackaby, Leslie, Director of Financial Aid
& Student Employment for Student
Services
B.A., Seattle Pacific University
Bloomsburg, Pete, Mathmatics
B.S., University of Idaho
Bradley, Kathryn M., Library Media Center
B.S., The Creighton University
M.L.S., University of Washington
115
Administration & Faculty
Bratz, Richard, Business Administration
Transfer (Chair); Paraprofessional
Accounting
B.S., M.B.A., California State University
Bridwell, Virginia, Psychology
B.S., M.S., University of Alaska
Brown, Douglas, Dr., Associate Director for
NWCET; Physical Science
A.B., B.S., Oberlin College
Ph.D., University of Washington
*Brown, Scott, Writing Lab Teaching
Assistant
A.A., Bellevue Community College
Burke, Robert A., Speech
B.A., University of Washington
M.A., University of Hawaii
Burns-Lewis, Laura L., English
B.A., M.A., University of Washington
Burton, Carol, Life Sciences
B.S., University of Alaska
M.S., University of Hawaii
*Buxton, M. Lee, Speech
B.A., M.A., University of Washington
Caine, Peter F., General Business, Business
Administration Transfer Accounting
A.B., M.B.A., Stanford University
Caldero, Michael, Dr., Administration of
Criminal Justice (Chair)
B.A., Eastern Washington University
M.A., Ph.D., Washington State University
Canady, Sara, International Programs
B.A., Pacific University
M.A., Indiana University
Carpenter, Sharon, Director of Computer
Programs for Continuing Education
B.S., Oklahoma University
M.S., University of New Orleans
*Castell, Carolann C., Life Sciences;
Physical Education
B.S., Florida State University
*Chakoian, Martin H., English
B.A., University of Illinois
M.S., Univeristy of Washington
Cofer, Jeffrey, American Studies and English
B.A., Glassboro State College
M.A., Ohio University
Erickson, Elise, Executive Assistant &
Secretary to the President
B.A., University of Washington
Cowan, Susan C., General Business
B.S., University of Oregon
M.S., Oregon State University
Esler, Tika, Associate Dean of Enrollment
Services for Student Services
B.A., The Evergreen State College
Cross, Steven W., Human Development
Services
B.A., M.Ed., Ohio University
Evans, Neil, Executive Director for NWCET
B.A., M.B.A., Northwestern University
Curnutt, Larry A., Mathematics
B.A., M.S., Western Washington
University
*Dahlin, Karen, Human Development
Services
B.A., M.A., University of Washington
*Donaldson, Marla, Parent Education
B.A., Central Washington University
Driscoll, Laura , Speech
B.A., University of the Pacific
M.A., San Diego State University
Duval, Richard, Director of Marketing &
Communications
B.A., Washington State University
M.C., University of Washington
*Eacker, Sandra, English
B.S., Portland State
M.F.A., University of Alaska - Anchorage
Edelbrock, Robert, Dr., Dean of Information
Resources
B.A., M.A., National University
Ed.D., United States International
University
Eiben, Daniel F., Director of Customized
Training for Continuing Education
A.B., Middlebury College
*Eichner, Nancy, English
B.A., University of Maryland
M.A., University of Tübingen, W. Germany
Eischen, Sherry B., Special Events
Coordinator
Christiansen, Pauline Grabill, English
B.A., M.A., University of Washington
Ellinger, James, Dr., Life Sciences (Chair)
B.A., Kalamazoo College
M.A., Western Michigan University
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts,
Amherst
Clark, Douglas, International Programs
B.S., Iowa State University
M.A., University of Kansas
Elliott, Mark, Director of Television
Services for Instructional Services
B.A., Washington State University
Clark, J. Terence, Library Media Center
B.A., M.A., M.L.S., University of
Washington
*Epstein, Lawrence, Dr., Anthropology
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of
Washington
116
Falls, Janice, Administrative Assistant
B.A., San Jose State University
Felton, Sharon A., Multi-Cultural Services
R.N., Pasadena City College
B.A., University of California at Berkeley
M.Ed., University of Washington
*Femling, Frank, Paraprofessional
Accounting
B.S., Seattle University
Fieser, Robert, International Programs
B.A., M.A., University of Washington
Flanagan, Donna M., Director of Finance for
Administrative Services
B.S., M.B.A., City University
Flory-Barnes, Linda D., Director of MultiCultural Services for Student Services
B.A., Seattle University
M.Ed., University of Washington
Floten, B. Jean, President
B.A., M.S., Portland State University
*Fong, David, Dr., English
B.A., Stanford University
M.A., Columbia University
Ph.D., Stanford University
*Foote, K. Gael, Parent Education
B.A., University of Washington
Friedel, Fred E., History
B.S., M.A., University of Oregon
*Frauenheim, Marie, Parent Education
B.A., Mary Grove College
Gelotte, Michael, Computer Science
(Chair); Information Technology
B.M., M.S., Brigham Young University
George, Roger A., Dr., Communication
(Chair); English
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of
Washington
Gilliam, Rhonda, English
B.S.Ed., Austin State University
M.S., Texas Tech University
Gleason, Dale L., Music
B.A., University of Washington
M.Ed., Western Washington University
* indicates affiliated part-time faculty
Administration & Faculty
Gold, Melodye, Life Science
M.S., University of Wisconsin
A.B., Whitman College
*Heins, Donald M., Physical Science;
Learning Skills Laboratory Coordinator
B.A., Western Washington University
Goldsmith, James, English
B.S., Wright State University
M.A., University of Idaho
Henrickson, Marja, Foreign Language
M.A., B.A., North Texas State University
Goss, Arthur, Physics
B.S., M.S., Wright State University
Gough, Kay, General Business Management
(Chair); Marketing
B.S., Mississippi University for Women
M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi
Gould, David D., Dr., Business
Administration Transfer; General Business
B.A., M.B.A., Washington State University
J.D., University of Washington
Gould, Janice B., Administrative Office
Systems (Chair)
B.A., University of Washington
Green, Sally, Radiation Therapy Technology
B.S., James Madison University
R.R.(T), Swedish Hospital
Gruber, Ebtisam, Nursing
B.S., Cairo University
B.S., Indiana University
M.A., University of Washington
Habib, Berthe, Mathematics
B.A., M.A.T., M.S., University of
Washington
Haines, Eric G., History (Chair)
B.A., B.A., M.A., University of Natal
M.A., University of London
Hall, Christine, International Programs
B.S., Eastern Michigan University
M.S., New York State University
Hamernyik, Steven, Dr., International Studies
(Chair); Political Science
B.A., Portland State University
Ph.D., University of Washington
*Hansen, Kathleen I., Administrative Office
Systems
B.A., College of Idaho
M.A., University of Idaho
Harmon, Ron, Fire Command &
Administration (Chair)
B.A., James Madison University
Haro, Susan L., Director of Campus
Operations for Administrative Services
Heinrichs, Timothy, Dr., History
A.B., Harvard College
M.A., University of Utah
M.A., Ph.D., University of Washington
* indicates affiliated part-time faculty
*Hess, Virginia, English
A.A., Colorado Women’s College, Denver
B.A., M.A.T., University of Iowa
Hobbs, Robert, Physical Science
B.A., University of Colorado
M.A., Indiana University
*Hobbs, Sylvia H., Parent Education
B.S., Birkbeek College, University of
London
Hodge, Valerie, Director of Institutional
Research
B.A., Macalester College
M.A., University of Washington
Hoffer, Patricia, Nursing
B.S.N., University of Oregon
M.N., Univeristy of Washington
Hoffman, Dale T., Mathematics
B.A., Washington State University
M.S., University of Connecticutt
Huenefeld, William P., Small Business
Development Specialist
B.A., Cornell University
M.B.A., University of Chicago
Hurrell, Mary-Ann C., Nursing
B.S.N., University of Alberta
M.N., University of Washington
Hutchison, Kae R., Dr., Dean of Instruction;
Continuing Education, International
Programs
B.A., Whitworth College
M.A., Eastman School of Music of the
University of Rochester
Ph.D., The Fielding Institute
Jackson, Anne, Information TechnologyTechnical Support (Chair)
B.A. , University of California at Los
Angeles
Jackson, Robert C., Drama and Dance
(Chair); Theatre Manager
B.S., Northwestern University
M.F.A., University of Washington
James, Catherine, Director of the
Bookstore
B.A., Michigan State University
James, A. Christopher, Media
Communications & Technology (Chair)
B.A., Colorado College
M.Ed., Utah State University
Jamieson, Susan G., Director of English
Language Institute for International
Programs
B.A., Miami University
M.A., Washington University
Jangaard, Linda L., Business Administration
Transfer
B.A., M.B.A., University of California
Jaswal, Faisal, Director of International
Students for Student Services
A.A., Bellevue Community College
Jaswal, Seeko, Coordinator, International
Programs Marketing
A.A., Bellevue Community College
Jurji, E. David, Dr., Anthropology
B.A., Albright College
M.A., New York University
Ph.D., University of Washington
Kennedy, Jerrie L., English
B.A., M.A., Washington State University
Khan, Aslam, Political Science (Chair)
B.A., Gonzaga University
M.A., University of Washington
Kline, Sharon, Director of Development
for Institutional Advancement
B.A., University of Washington
Konopaski, Judy, Director of Child Care
Center for Student Services
B.S., University of Washington
Kotker, Joan G., English; Writing Lab
Director
B.A., M.A., Ohio State University
LaFond, Daniel J., Human Development
Services
B.A., St. Martins College
M.S.W., University of Washington
Laveglia, Jennifer L., Mathematics
B.S., Bowling Green State University
M.S., University of North Carolina
*Leber, Mary Reeves, Dr., Speech
B.S., M.A., University of Kansas
Ph.D., University of Washington
Lee, Frank, Engineering (Chair)
M.E., University of Washington
Lee, Harlan, Multi-Cultural Counselor
M.C., Arizona State University
M.E., Northern Arizona University
B.A., Glassboro State College
117
Administration & Faculty
Leeds, Linda A., English
B.A., Pomona College
M.A., Cornell University
Leighton, Gordon B., Dr., English
B.A., Bates College
M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia
Leo-Gwin, Cheryll, Director of Arts &
Personal Enrichment for Continuing
Education
B.F.A., M.F.A., University of Washington
*Lowry, Pamela R., Mathematics
B.A., M.A., University of Washington
Luark, Carolyn, Art; Art Gallery Director
B.A., Central Washington University
M.F.A., Washington State University
Mayer, Dalmen D., Philosophy (Chair)
B.A., M.A., University of Washington
*McElroy, Melvin L., Information
Technology
B.A., University of Colorado
McGlasson, Ruthmary, Educational Planning
Coordinator; Human Development
Services
B.S., M.Ed., University of Wisconsin
McKee, Carol, International Programs
B.A., M.S., Florida State University
Meehan, J. Timothy, Human Development
Services
B.A., Gonzaga University
M.A., University of Oregon
Nagi, Kuldeep, Information Technology;
Technical Support
M.S., University of Bombay
Nesbeitt, Sandra J., Marketing Management
(Chair); General Business
B.A., M.S., Eastern Washington University
Newton, Harriet, Physical Education and
Health Recreational Leadership (Chair)
B.S., Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts
Nielsen, Thomas R., Division Chair for Arts
& Humanities
A.A., Bellevue Community College
B.A., M.A., University of Washington
Meek, Donna, English
B.A., M.A., Ohio State University
Noble, Donald N., Vice President,
Administrative Services
B.A., University of Washington
M.P.A., Pacific Lutheran University
*Lyons, Elizabeth S.N., Physical Science
B.A., University of Alaska
Meilleur, Raoul J., Director of International
Programs
B.A., University of Washington
M.A., University of Paris
Norris, Rossie L., Human Development
Services
B.A., Southern University
M.Ed., University of Washington
Macneil, Lucy Parke, Vice President for
Human Resources
B.A., M.L., University of Washington
Melvoin, Peter, Sociology
B.A., University of Illinois
M.A., Arizona State University
*O’Donnell, Sue, Parent Education
B.S., University of Washington
Madigan, Mary L., Radiologic Technology
A.A., Bellevue Community College
American Registry of Radiologic
Technologists
Mercer, Gloria A., English
B.Ed., Seattle University
M.Ed., University of Washington
Lyle, Catherine, Physical Science (Chair)
A.A., Mt. San Antonio College
B.A., Pomona College
M.S., Tufts University
Mahn, Gary, Director of Technology
Services for Information Resources
B.S., Iowa State University
M.S.Ed., Mankato State University
Mandt, Carol L., Director of Education
Projects for NWCET
B.A., Whitman College
M.A., Washington State University
Marks, Suzanne, Administrative Office
Systems
B.A., Washington State University
Matsumoto, Akemi, Human Development
Services
B.A., University of Colorado
Ed.M., Oregon State University
Mattson, Norman, Facilities Project Officer,
Campus Operations
B.A., University of Houston
M.A., California Polytechnic Institute
Mauldin, Diane M., Life Sciences; Health
Sciences
B.A., M.A., University of Washington
118
Merz, Gary, Business AdministrationTransfer Accounting, Paraprofessional
Accounting
M.B.A., Golden Gate University-San
Francisco
B.A., Central Washington University
Meyer, Michael W., English (Chair)
B.A., Briar Cliff College
M.A., Marquette University
*Meyers, Linda, Parent Education
B.A., University of Washington
*Molvik, Nilmar L., Mathematics
B.S., M.Ed., Seattle Pacific College
Morgan, Susan L., Coordinator of Disabled
Student Services
B.A., Gonzaga University
Murcar, Joanne, Dr., Director of College
Placement and Workforce Training for
Instructional Advancement
M.A., Eastern Washington University
Ph.D., B.Ed., Gonzaga University
Murphy, Margaret, Coordinator, Special
Programs for International Programs
B.A., University of Washington
M.A., New York University
O’Rourke, Thomas, Assistant Director for
Technology Services
B.S., University of Washington
Osmundson, John S., Anthropology (Chair)
B.A., University of Washington
M.A., Washington State University
Palo, Karl, Director of Security
A.A., Bellevue Community College
*Paydar, Iraj, Dr., Political Science
B.A., M.A., Western Washington
University
Ph.D., University of Washington
*Penewell, Royal E., Mathematics
B.A., Western Washington University
Perkins, Terri M., Health Care Program
M.A., University of Washington
B.S., Northeastern University-Boston
Perry, John W., Information TechnologyProgramming (Chair)
B.A., University of Washington
M.B.A., Northwestern University
*Perry, Thornton A., Director of
Telecommunications/Distance Learning
for Instructional Services; History
B.A., M.A., Ohio State University
* indicates affiliated part-time faculty
Administration & Faculty
*Peterson, Carole E., Computer Science;
Information Technology; IT Lab Director
A.A., Bellevue Community College
B.A., University of Washington
B.A., Eastern Washington University
Roselle, Douglas L., Geography (Chair)
B.A., Western Washington University
M.S., Louisiana State University
Sickles, Julia, Administrative Assistant
for NWCET
B.A., University of Washington
Rostirolla, Jim, Physical Science (Chair)
B.A., M.A., San Francisco State University
Pfister, Franz J., Dr., Foreign Language
B.A., Bowling Green State University
M.A., University of Illinois
Ph.D., University of Washington
Rothman, B. Karen, English; Reading Lab
Director
B.A., Mississippi State College for
Women
M.A., Louisiana State University
M.A., California Luthern College
Soto, Julie M., Director for Parent Education
Program (Chair)
B.A., Washington State University
M.S., Seattle Pacific University
*Plunkett, Mark D., Life Sciences
B.S., Seattle Pacific University
M.S., Western Washington University
Polin, Anne, Diagnostic Ultrasound
Technology
B.S., Washington State University
Pollock, Kimberly, American Studies
(Chair); English
B.A., Shimer College
M.A., University of Southwestern
Louisiana
Pritchard, Thomas W., Administration of
Criminal Justice
B.A., Juris Doctor, University of
Washington
Pugh, Rose L., Mathematics; Math Lab
Director
B.S., M.S., Western Washington
University
Purser, Robert S., Dr., Art (Chair)
B.A., Central Washington University
M.F.A., University of Washington
Ph.D., University of Oregon
Quattrociocchi, Susan M., Dr., Northeast
Tech Prep Consortium Director
B.A., Oakland University
M.A., University of Michigan
Ph.D., University of Michigan
Radvilas, Ronald S., Radiologic Technology
(Chair)
B.S., University of Massachusetts
M.S., State University of New York
*Rasmussen, Darrell R., Mathematics
B.A., M.A., University of Montana
Ratener, Peter E., Mathematics
B.S., State University of New York
M.S., University of Washington
Richardson, Rosemary K., Life Sciences
B.S., University of Michigan
M.S., University of Washington
Righi, Michael E., Economics (Chair)
B.A., Holy Cross College
M.A., Columbia University
* indicates affiliated part-time faculty
Rousso, Elaynne, Dr., Sociology (Chair)
B.A., University of Michigan
M.A., Michigan State University
Ph.D., University of California
Southard, Robert, Director of Food
Services
Stacy, B. David, Mathematics (Chair)
B.S., California State Polytechnic College
M.A., California Polytechnic State
University
Steinert, Kathleen M., Life Sciences
B.A., M.A., California State University
Rowhani, Shahla, Technical Services/
Systems Librarian
M.S.L.S., University of Southern
California
*Storey, Mark, Philosophy
B.A., University of California at Santa
Barbara
M.A., University of Washington
Royer, Michèle, Senior Associate Planner
for NWCET
M.S., Ecole Superieure de’Electricite,
Orsay, France
Ph.D., University of Paris, Paris, France
M.B.A., University of St. Thomas, St.
Paul, Minnesota
Surendranath, Jakkalavadika (Jack),
Associate Director for NWCET; Divison
Chair for Science
B.S., University of Madras
M.S., Washington State University
Sage, Lynne S., Mathematics
B.A., M.Ed., Western Washington
University
Sasaki, Jean, Assistant to the Executive
Dean
B.A., University of Washington
Scott, Lynne, Division Chair for Educational
Development & Health Sciences
B.S.N., Marquette University
M.N., University of Washington
Seeman, Julianne, English
B.A., M.A., University of Washington
Sharpe, Donna, Human Development
Services
B.A., University of Washington
M.A., Seattle University
Shepherd, Gertrude C., Early Childhood
Education (Chair)
B.A., Colorado College
*Shook, Caroline M., Mathematics
B.A., Seattle University
Shuman, James E., NWCET
B.S., Northern Arizona University;
M.B.A., University of Washington
Susanka, Larry, Dr., Mathematics
B.S., University of Oregon
Ph.D., University of Minnesota
Talbott, Michael L., Dr., Division Chair for
Social Science
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of
Washington
Taplin, Ron, Associate Dean of Student
Development for Student Services
B.A., Washington State University
M.Ed., Idaho State University
M.B.A., Unversity of the Virgin Islands
Taylor, Helen K., Dr., Psychology (Chair)
B.A., Pomona College
M.A., Seattle University
Ph.D., University of Washington
Taylor, Kit Sims, Economics
A.B., University of California
M.A., University of Florida
Templin-Imel, Garnet, ABE/ESL
B.A., Pacific Lutheran University
M.A., University of Washington
Thorp, Mary, Nursing
B.S.N., M.N., University of Washington
*Tober, Marilyn, Mathematics
B.A., Ed.M., State University of New York
Tooley, Lynn E., Mathematics
B.S., M.S., University of Washington
119
Administration & Faculty
Townsend, Deborah, Administrative
Assistant for Administrative Services
B.A., Occidental College
M.A., California State University
M.A., University of California at
Los Angeles
Trippett, Linda S., Director of Special Health
Care Programs & Fire Command
Administration (Chair)
B.A., Albright College
M.S., George Mason University
Troyer, Nadine, Vice President for
Institutional Advancement
B.A., M.A., University of Washington
Walls, Francine E., Dr., Library Media
Center
B.A., Seattle Pacific University
M.A., M.L., University of Washington
Ed.D., Seattle University
Wilson, Ken, Music (Chair)
B.A., Western Washington University
M.M., Eastern Washington University
Walter, Philip M., Paraprofessional
Accounting (Chair)
B.B.A., M.S., Memphis State University
*Witter, Patricia L., Economics
B.A., Univeristy of Washington
B.Ed., University of Alberta
M.S., Iowa State University
Wanamaker, Dennis L., Dr., Psychology
B.A., M.Ed., Central Washington
University
Ed.D., Washington State University
Washburn, Ray C., Physical Education
B.A., Whitworth College;
M.Ed., Seattle University
*Witmer, Judith, Parent Education
B.A., University of Colorado
Woo, Judy Eng, Dr., Division Chair for
Business
B.A., University of Washington
M.P.A., Seattle University
Ph.D., University of Washington
Trujillo, Cecilia M., Physical Education
B.A., New Mexico Highlands University
M.S., University of Washington
Weir, Kristina H., Economics
B.A., M.A., University of Missouri
Woods, Ernest R., Physical Education
B.S., Washington State University
M.S., University of Southern California
Tucker, Carolyn, Human Resources
Representative
A.A., Bellevue Community College
*Weiss, Harriet M., English; Communication
B.A., Maryland University
M.A., San Diego State University
Wulff, Jon V., Philosophy
B.A., Washington State University
M.A., Ohio State University
Turcott, Margaret, Administrative Office
Systems
B.A., Western Washington University
M.E., University of Washington
Wesley, John, Art
B.A., Moorehead State College
Wyatt, Stanford, Jr., Interior Design
B.A., University of New Mexico
M.A., University of Pennsylvania
*Ummel, Deborah J., Mathematics
B.A., College of New Rochelle
M.A., University of Washington
Updegrove, Dana, Mathematics
B.S., Idaho State University
M.S., University of Tennessee
M. Div., Theological Seminary
Van Vactor, Myra, Director Library Media
Center for Information Resources
B.A., University of Phillipines
M.S., Columbia University
Vermilyea, Cheryl, Director of Women’s
Resource Center for Student Services
B.A., St. Olaf College
M.S., University of Wisconsin
Volland, Walter V., Dr., Physical Science
B.S., Long Beach State College
Ph.D., University of Washington
Wais, Constance, S., Interior Design (Chair)
B.A., California State University
*Walker, George C., Geography
B.A., (Hons.) University of Durham,
England
M.Ed., University of Newcastle uponTyne, England
Wallace-Hoffman, Bonnie, Drama
A.B., Cornell University
120
West, Woodley, English
B.S. Michigan State University
M.A. Harvard University
*Weston, Eleanor, English
B.A., University of Puget Sound
M.S., University of Washington
Weston, Terry L., Foreign Language
B.A., University of Washington
M.A., Thunderbird Graduate School of
International Management
White, Jeffery, English
B.A., The Evergreen State College
M.A., University of Washington
Yabui, Alan, Dr., Speech (Chair)
B.A., Kansas State University
M.A., University of Southern California
M.A., Wichita State University
M.A., San Diego State University
Ed.D., Montana State University
Ybarra, Tomás, Dean for Student Services
B.A., The Evergreen State College
M.A., The Evergreen State College
*Yeend, Camilla, English
B.A., Eastern Washington University
M.A., Central Washington University
*White, Kathleen, English
B.A., University of Washington
M.A., University of Houston
Wijenaike, Manjari, Senior Associate
Planner for NWCET
B.A., Dartmouth College
M.A., Boston University
Wildin, Howard W. II, Real Estate (Chair);
Director of Real Estate Resource Center
B.A., University of Washington
Williams, Marcia C., Project Director for
NWCET
B.A., Wheaton College
M.Ed., University of Washington
◆
indicates administrative exempt
* indicates affiliated part-time faculty
Index
A1997-1998
Bellevue Community College
SUMMER 1997 - SUMMER 1998
cademic Year
JUNE
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
1997
NOVEMBER
1997
APRIL
1998
Fri
Sat
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
Fri
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
Fri
Sat
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
22
29
16
23
17
18
24
25
19
26
20
27
21
28
30
1
2
9
16
23/30
Sum. Qtr.
Begins
Sat
3
4
10
11
17
24
11
No Class
18
25
5
12
6
13
7
14
8
15
5
12
6
6
Spr. Qtr.
Begins
13
7
14
1
2
3
4
8
9
10
11
15
16
10th day
of Qtr.
17
18
24
24
25
19
20
21
22
19
20
21
22
23
26
27
28
29
26
27
28
29
30
27
28
Holiday Holiday
17
No Class
JULY
1997
DECEMBER
1997
MAY
1998
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
Fri
Sat
1
4
5
4
5
6
1
2
2
8
3
Holiday
1
2
3
10
6
7
6th day
of Qtr.
8
9
10
11
12
7
8
9
Fall Qtr.
Ends
10
11
12
13
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
24
25
26
27
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24/31
25
26
27
28
29
30
20
27
21
28
22
23
29
30
24
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
10
17
24/31
4
11
18
25
5
12
6
13
13
Sum. Qtr.
Ends
19
26
20
27
26
31
AUGUST
3
25
7
14
21
28
21
28
22
29
23
30
Holiday Holiday
31
Holiday
1997
JANUARY
1998
JUNE
1998
Fri
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
Fri
Sat
2
3
9
10
Sat
1
2
8
9
15
22
29
16
23
30
1
4
5
7
7
2
3
4
5
6
8
9
10
11
12
13
6
11
12
13
14
15
10th day
of Qtr.
16
17
14
15
16
17
18
Spr. Qtr.
Ends
19
20
18
19
19
Holiday
20
21
22
23
24
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
26
27
28
8
1
Win. Qtr.
Begins
25
5
Holiday
29
16
30
31
28
29
29
Sum. Qtr.
Begins
19
30
SEPTEMBER
1997
FEBRUARY
1998
JULY
1998
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
Fri
Sat
5
6
6
7
1
Holiday
7
8
2
9
3
10
4
11
12
13
1
3
4
5
7
4
1
2
3
Holiday
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
16
16
17
6th day
of Qtr.
17
18
19
20
21
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
23
24
25
26
27
28
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
15
21
Fall Qtr.
Begins
23
24
25
26
27
22
28
29
30
22
2
Holiday No Class
OCTOBER
1997
MARCH
1998
AUGUST
1998
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
Fri
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu
Fri
5
6
7
1
2
8
3
Sat
3
4
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
10
11
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
17
17
10th day
of Qtr.
12
13
14
15
16
No Class
18
15
16
17
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
22
23
Win. Qtr.
Ends
26
27
28
29
30
31
29
30
31
24
Sat
1
2
3
4
5
6
13
7
8
18
19
20
21
9
10
11
12
Sum. Qtr.
Ends
13
14
15
25
26
27
28
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23/30
24
25
26
27
28
29
121
Notes
Index
122
Index
A
Academic Advising ............................. 15
Accounting Paraprofessional ......... 28, 59
Administration of Criminal Justice .. 28, 96
Administration and Faculty ............... 114
Administrative Office Systems ...... 29, 60
Admissions ............................................ 7
Alcohol/Drug Studies .................... 30, 69
American Sign Language .................... 71
American Studies ................................ 43
Anthropology ....................................... 97
Art ........................................................ 44
Assessment .......................................... 15
Astronomy ........................................... 89
B
Basic Science ....................................... 89
Biology ................................................ 89
Bookstore ............................................. 23
Botany ................................................. 90
Bus Pass Discount ............................... 23
Business Administration – Transfer
Program .......................................... 61
C
Career Resource Center ....................... 15
Certificate Programs .............................. 6
Changing a Grade ................................ 12
Chemistry ............................................ 90
College Mission, Vision and Goals ....... 4
Commencement ................................... 14
Communications .................................. 45
Computer Science ................................ 91
Computer Science–Transfer Program ... 61
Computer-Equipped Labs .................... 17
Confidentiality of Student Records ..... 14
Continuing Education Programs ......... 20
Counseling ........................................... 15
D
Dance ............................................. 23, 47
Degree and Certificate Requirements ... 25
Degrees .................................................. 6
Delta Epsilon Chi (DEC) ..................... 23
Developmental Education ................... 71
Diagnostic Ultrasound ................... 30, 71
Disabled Student Services ................... 15
Distance Learning Telecourses ............ 21
Drama ............................................ 23, 47
E
Early Childhood Education ........... 31, 73
Economics ........................................... 98
Education ............................................. 75
Engineering ......................................... 91
English ................................................. 48
Environmental Science ........................ 92
F
Financial Aid ....................................... 15
Fire Command & Administration ... 32, 75
Fire Investigation ................................. 76
Fire Science ......................................... 76
Fitness Center ...................................... 23
Food Services ...................................... 23
Foreign Language ................................ 51
Foreign Language Alternative
Program (FLAP) ............................. 53
G
General Business Management ..... 33, 62
Geography ........................................... 99
Geology ............................................... 92
Graduation ........................................... 13
H
Head Start ............................................ 16
Health .................................................. 76
High School Programs ......................... 20
History ............................................... 100
Home Economics ................................ 77
Honor Society: Phi Theta Kappa ......... 23
Honors ................................................. 14
Human Development ........................... 87
I
Image ................................................... 77
Independent Studies ............................ 77
Individual Development ...................... 77
Information Technology ................ 34, 63
Interdisciplinary Studies ...................... 21
Interior Design ............................... 35, 53
International Business ......................... 35
International Programs ........................ 21
International Student Services ............. 17
International Studies .......................... 102
Interpreting ........................................ 110
J
Job Center ............................................ 17
L
Library Media Center .......................... 18
M
Marketing Management ................. 36, 65
Mathematics ........................................ 92
Media Communication and
Technology ............................. 36, 103
Meteorology ........................................ 94
Model United Nations ......................... 23
Multi-Cultural Student Services .......... 18
Music ............................................. 24, 55
N
Non-Traditional Ways to Earn Credit .. 12
Nuclear Medicine Technology ....... 38, 77
Nursing .......................................... 39, 78
Nursing– Continuing Nursing
Education ........................................ 80
Nutrition .............................................. 94
O
Oceanography ...................................... 94
P
Parent Education ............................ 21, 80
Parking and Campus Security ............. 18
Philosophy ........................................... 57
Physical Education .............................. 80
Physics ................................................. 94
Planetarium .......................................... 24
Political Science ................................ 106
Psychology ........................................ 107
Publications ......................................... 24
R
Radiation Therapy ......................... 39, 83
Radio Station KBCS-FM 91.3 ............. 24
Radiologic Technology .................. 40, 84
Real Estate ..................................... 41, 65
Recreation Leadership ................... 41, 86
Registration ........................................... 7
S
Sociology ........................................... 109
Speech ................................................. 58
Sports Activities .................................. 24
Student Child Care and
Learning Center .............................. 18
Student Clubs ...................................... 24
Student Government: ASBCC ............. 24
Student Health Center .......................... 18
Student Records ................................... 14
Students’ Rights and
Responsibilities ............................ 111
T
TELOS ................................................. 21
Transcripts ........................................... 14
Transfer .................................................. 8
Transfer to Other Colleges and
Universities ....................................... 8
Translation ......................................... 110
Tuition and Fees .................................... 8
Tutoring Program ................................ 18
V
Veterans’ Administration Programs ..... 18
Veterans’ Administration Standards and
Requirements .................................. 10
W
Washington Academy of
Languages ............................... 41, 110
Washington State Residency for Tuition
Purposes .......................................... 10
Women’s Center ............................ 18, 21
Workforce Training ............................. 19
Z
Zoology ............................................... 95
123
Administration
Campus Map & Faculty
Parking Permits Required:
7 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Monday through Friday
N
Student &
Visitor Parking
J-4
148th Ave SE
J-5
J
J
J-2
J-1
Faculty / Staff Parking
J-3
SE 22nd
Reserved Parking
140
Upper Campus
Entrance
ve
th A
SE
Bellevue Community College
3000 Landerholm Circle SE
Bellevue, WA 98007-6484
Robinswood
Park
North Entrance
reek
ey C
SE 24th
Rd
9-E
Kels
th P
9-A
145
9-D
9-B
9-C
148th Ave SE
l SE
H-4: Conference House
“Telos”
ENTRANCE TO
MAIN CAMPUS
G
D-2
C-8
I-90 Overpass
Snoqualmie River Road
F-1
F-2
K-1
C
B
B B
C-7
C
C-5
C-4
C-3
P-7
E-3
E-2
4-B
A
D
7-B
E-1
B
C-6
H-1: Student
Child Care
7-A
2
A
4-A
P-6
C-2 P-5
B-1
KIOSK
1
E
B-2
Theatre
Mormon
Temple
3-A
6
D
Fire
Station
#2
To I-90
To Eastgate Park and Ride
C-1
K
Service
Station
derholm Circle SE
Security
General
Receiving
H-2: International Programs
H-5: International Programs
Metro
Bus
Stop
D-1
La
n
M
10-B
3-B
8
12
A
10-A
5
South Entrance
Rev. 9/95
124
C oa
l Cre e
k Rd
Not Drawn to Scale
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