JUNE, 1961 - American Radio History
r1
JUNE, 1961
50¢
'14.0
?Ill
HI
RCA announces
major advance
in Tube Technology,
assuring
a
IMPROVED
PERFORMANCE
AND LONGER LIFE
IN RECEIVING TUBES...
X
3
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[M
From RCA -which in recent months has brought you the
revolutionary nuvistor tube, the dramatic Novar receiving
tube, new super -strength metallized ceramics, the vacuum melted cathode, and S -311 high- dissipation plate material
-now comes the latest in a proud list of contributions to
tube making: "DARK HEATER ".
The "DARK HEATER" is a key to greatly extended life and
improved performance of receiving tubes.
The "DARK HEATER" operates at greatly reduced temperatures-as much as 350 °K below the 1500 to 1700 °K
of the "White" heater. The unique dark surface radiates
heat more efficiently and improves the transfer of heat to
the cathode. Thus the required cathode temperature is
attained with the heater operating temperature lowered to
approximately 1350 °K.
For more information on what this dramatic advance in heater design
can mean to you in your equipment, see your RCA Field Representative.
The Most Trusted Name in Electronics
RADIO CORPORATION OF AAIERIC.A
SPECIFIC AD ANTAGES TO YOU INCLUDE:
H ATER LIFE -Heater wire strength is much greater at lower
operating t mperatures. For example, a reduction of 350 °K in
operating t mperature results in a 50% increase in ultimate tensile
strength of he wire, and a reduction of as much as 25% in internal
stresses wh h may occur during heater cycling.
REDUCED LIK LIHOOD OF HEATER FAILURE -The smaller thermal change
during heat r cycling, and the greatly reduced operating tempera tures mini ize the tendency toward recrystallization and burnout.
CONSTANT H ATER CURRENT -The `DARK HEATER" exhibits an exceptionally sta le current characteristic throughout its life. This feature
is especially esirable in maintaining a constant cathode temperature.
REDUCED HE TER -CATHODE LEAKAGE AND HUM -AC leakage and hum
are signific, ntly reduced through the use of the `DARK HEATER ".
This impro ement is most startling because it eliminates "spike" or
pulse leaka e currents sometimes present in other heaters. In addiLion, the red Iction of heater temperature serves to reduce both AC
and DC lea age from heater to cathode, and heater emission to
other tube e ectrodes.
IMPROVED M CHANICAL STABILITY -The cooler operation of the "DARK
HEATER" mi imizes changes in heater shape during life, reducing
the possibili y of heater damage and heater shorts.
GREATER SAF TY IN VOLTAGE RATINGS -Cooler heater operation pro vides a grea er margin of safety in present H -K voltage ratings.
EXTENDED
ES: East: 744 Broad St.,'Newark 2, New Jersey, HUmboldt 5 -3900
Midwest: Suite 1154, Merchandise Mart Plaza, Chicago 54, III., WHitehall 4 -2900
Washington Boulevard, Los Angeles 22, Calif., RAymond 3 -8361
West: 6801 Ea
RCA FIELD OFFI
TUNE, 1961
VOL. 45, No.
RAPE)
Successor te
.
Est.
6
19111
C. G. McPROUD
Editor and Publisher
AUDI
DAVID SASLAW
Managing Editor
JANET M. DURGIN
Production Manager
HENRY A. SCHOBER
Business Manager
SANFORD L. CAHN
Advertising Director
EDGAR E. NEWMAN
Circulation Director
Representatives
Bill Pattis & Associates,
6316 N. Lincoln Ave.,
Chicago 45, Ill.
James C. Galloway,
6535 Wilshire Blvd.,
Los Angeles 48, Calif.
Contributing Editors
EDWARD TATNALL CANBY
JOSEPH GIOVANELLI
HAROLD LAWRENCE
CHARLES A. ROBERTSON
CHESTER SANTON
AUDIO
What Hath FCC Wrought ? 18
An FM Multiplex Stereo Adaptor 21
FM Stereo-The General Electric System 24
"Reflection Coupler" Gives Stereo Spread
AUDIO Visits the London Show
30
35
David Saslaw
Daniel R. von Recklinghausen
Antal Csicsatka and
Robert M. Linz
Leon J. Knize
AUDIO
Light Listening
Record Revue
Jazz and All That
8
50
60
Articles
Reviews
Chester Santon
Edward Tatnall Canby
Charles A. Robertson
AUDIO
Fisher Loudspeaker System
Lafayette Power Amplifier Kit
Neumann Professional Stereo Cartridge
Neumann Automatic Turntable
Viking Stereo Tape Recorder
Crosby AM -FM Stereo Receiver
42
44
46
46
48
48
Profiles
XP -4
KT -550
DST
PA2a
76- Compact
R80
AUDIO in
Audioclinic 2
Letters 6
Audio ETC 10
Editor's Review 16
About Music 62
New Products 64
New Literature 67
Book Review 68
Industry Notes 73
Advertising Index 74
M EM
Genera
Joseph Giovanelli
Edward Tatnall Canby
Harold Lawrence
"Noise Reduction"
dealer's
showroom!
The Sherwood S -8000
$299.50
For complete information write
AUDIO
(title registered
Pat. Oie.) is published monthly by Radio Megasines, Inc. , Henry A. Schober, President; C. G. McProud, Secretary. Executive
and Editorial Offices, 204 Front St.. Mineola, N. Y. Subscription rates-U. S.
Possessions, Canada, and Mexico, $4.00 for one year, $7.00 for two years; all
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1961 by Radio Magazines, Inc. Second Class postage paid at Lancaster, Pa.
1IDJ
U. S.
a
.
C4.,
RADIO MAGAZINES, INC., P. O. Box 629, MINEOLA, N. Y.
Postmaster,: Send Form 3579 to AUDIO, P. O. Box 629, Mineola, N. Y.
AUDIO
has it
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Be first
at your
first FM Stereo
Multiplex receiver.
BEE
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Multiplex!
Sherwood
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INITITYII oP
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You wanted
FM Stereo
JUNE, 1961
La %
department 6A
SHERWOOD ELECTRONIC
LABORATORIES, INC.
4300 N.California
Ave.,Chicago18,Illinois
AU Oloclin ic
...
No. 4
"OUR NEW SOUND RADIATOR"
The bombardment over the past few years of
sophisticated and crackpot cabinets and speaker
systems, reminds me of the legend of "The Emperor's Clothes." Like the myopic citizens in this
fairy tale we have kidded ourselves. We have been
clubbed to insensibility by ad writers of "revolutionary" enclosures "new discoveries" and "the
final break -through';. I too have been admiring the
Emperor's fine clothes, when in reality, as the
child pointed out, the Emperor was stark naked.
Over the past few years I have had occasion to
test some three hundred cabinet designs. These were
mostly variations of the bass reflex and the closed
infinite baffle types. Measurements were taken of
competitive designs, models of patented enclosures,
etc. I have tested all manner of ports, ducted and
unducted enclosures, collateral resonating cavities,
cabinets having flapper valves, others filled with
helium, some having rubber membranes and vibrating panels and dozens and dozens of different
shapes and cabinet configurations. Some of these
were submitted to us by hopeful inventors such as
one simulating a scaled -up model of a human
larynx; others were of our own conception.
It recently struck me that of all the hundreds of
measurements in my file, not a single one concerned
a simple flat baffle, or an open -back enclosure! I
too had been dazzled by the Emperor's hypothetical
adornments. Amateurs and schoolboys had been taking over the engineers' sovereignty.
It sometimes happens that certain theoretical
shortcomings prevent for years the introduction of
a device without it ever being tested under practical
conditions. For instance, the open back or flat
bafflle speaker has had no acceptance among designers became our textbooks tell us that such a baffle
results in the disappearance of low frequencies due
to cancellation of front and rear waves, and that its
bass cuts off at 18 db per octave. When measured
outdoor or in an anechoic room there is a very substantial loss of low frequencies perpendicular to the
axis of the speaker. Thus, the radiation contour
for uniform output has the appearance of a figure
`8'. This class of flat open back speaker is known as
a di -pole radiator because it is assumed to propagate
sound in two narrow opposing beams.
Recently, listening to one of our experimental
speakers incorporatmg certain of the foregoing
principles and mounted on a 21" x 25" baffle set in
a 4 inch frame, we were surprised at the quantity
and quality of the bass. Measurements in our
anechoic sound room indeed showed low frequency losses which did not correspond to what we
heard in a semi-live listening area. Further response measurements in a living room showed an
entirely different and enhanced picture. Normal
room reflections and the inevitable low frequency
standing waves developed what seemed to be a
360 degree sound field.
We found an abundance of clean bass and instead of two beams of sound, we could place cur
favorite armchair in any position with very little
change in quality or level.
Naturally, these listening virtues merited further
objective studies and we have come up with a really
realistic speaker using the oldest of baffle principles,
but with certain changes in concept for which
patents have been applied. The Emperor wears no
phony clothes.
We have added refinements to produce a broad
band resonant area; we keep distortion to an insignificant value. The final effective resonance is
that of the free air resonance of the speakers themselves, as a given speaker can resonate no lower.
There is no stiffening action of confined air as in
closed-back cabinets. There is no cavity resonance
due to the air-mass -stiffness as in closed -back systems. There are no mid -frequency reflections bouncing around inside the cabinet which usually shows
up as mid-range peaks and dips. There are no
vibrating panels, no reflecting surfaces, no gimmicks or hog -wash. We have simply gone native.
More information at my lecture, next A.E.S. Convention.
If you are interested in this speaker write me for
literature on Audax Sonoteer Model CA-70.
AUDAX, Inc., Div. of Rek -O-Kut Co., Inc.
Engineering Dept.
38 -19 108th St., Corona 68, N. Y.
Manufacturers of Fine Speakers
2
?A
JOSEPH GIOVANELLI'I have had to handle a tremendous your problems with sound reproduction,
rather than to phone me as some of you
amount of correspondence from readers.
have done in the past. I can give you better
Because of the amount, some questions
help by mail.
will not be answered as soon as I ould
Now to the work at hand...
like, or as soon as you would like to riceive
them. I don't want to rush my work bePhase reversal in Preamplifiers
cause I wish to give you all the same strviee
I have tried to give you from the inception
Q. It is obvious that you can make a
of this question- answering service. The
switching circuit at the speaker terminals
questions which will take the longest to of a power amplifier which can serve to
answer are those where diagrams must be
reverse the phase of one speaker useful
drawn, and those with schematics accom- for stereo. However, you just can't reverse
hear
will
panying them. Bear with me-you
output terminals of a preamplifier, if that
from me as soon as possible.
is where you want to introduce the phase
All letters are acknowledged and all ques- reversal. Some preamplifiers do have this
tions answered regardless of the suitability feature. How is it accomplished? Name
of the material for use in the column. This
Withheld.
way all can have a chance at getting the
A. You are, of course, correct in your
help you need.
statement that merely reversing the leads
Another thing which can slow down my of one of the output connectors of the prereply to you and to many others, top, are amplifier will not give the desired result.
those letters which do not contain a The ground terminal of the preamplifier
stamped, self- addressed envelope. Ií you will be connected to the hot input terminal
figure the time it takes to address enveof the amplifier, and tremendous amounts
lopes and to put stamps on them, you can
of hum would be the result. If the impesee that much time will be lost which could
dance of the amplifier and preamplifier
be spent answering your question. Of were very low, perhaps the hum factor
course, those of you in foreign countries
could be minimized, but it is really too
probably cannot comply with this request, much of a chance to take.
partly because of the lack of reciprocal
Fortunately, there is a way around the
postal agreements and partly because of problem. In a power amplifier this same
extra
the
of
airmailing
expense
added
the
least it does when
problem comes up
envelope. Naturally, I do not expect you
this
power amplifier is
of
stage
the
output
people to include a stamped, self -addressed
a push -pull configuration. In order to openvelope with your material. But the rest erate the push -pull amplifier in the proper
of you-please send it to me. Thanks very
manner, a 180 degree phase difference must
much.
appear between the grids of the stage. This
A special thanks, too, to those re ders
phase difference must, however, be so arwho have written me lately merely t say
that the two voltages composing it
that the material I sent them was of help ranged
amplitudes. This condition is
are
at
equal
would
know
that
you
nice
to
to them. It is
use of a phase inverter, or
by
the
achieved
wrote
take the trouble to say that what I
splitter since this
was of help. All too often we write only more properly a phase invert the phase,
stage does not merely
when we have some complaint, and it is
two signals in proper phase
very nice to know that there are thoso who but provides
relationship.
I
will write just to say thank you. To you
However, aren't these the very same consay "thank you ".
The
Along this same line, I am very happy ditions we want in our preamplifier?
that
this is the very
is
of
course,
answer
few
very
receive
that
I
to
say
be
able
to
don't necesletters critical of the approach I take in thing we want, except that we
signals
simulhave
both
to
want
sarily
conducting "Audioclinic ". This is really
have to do, therefore, is
very surprising to me considering the tre- taneously. All we
mendous number of letters I answer and to make use of the well -known cathodyne
half of the load for
the even larger numbers of people around phase splitter, in which
circuit and half
in
the
cathode
is
the
stage
the world who read this column.
of it is in the plate circuit. If each of
O yes, one more thing. I would appreciate
this phase
it if you local readers would write me about these impedances is made low,
splitter could be used as the output stage of
the preamplifier rather than the cathode
is 3420 Newkirk Ave., Brooklyn 3, N.P.
NOTE:
-
-at
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
r
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Outsells-because it
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Never before has there been a record playing unit with so
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the
realization of everything desired in a record playing device.
Garrard, with over 40 years of manufacturing experience,
and with its highly developed production and quality -control
procedures, holds the Type A to precision tolerances, providing positive assurance of excellent performance. See the
Type A at your dealer. Ask him to reserve one for you. $79.50
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AUTOMATIC TURNTABLE
GARRARD'S
TYPE A
LABORATORY
What makes the Type A unique? Please read these features:
The Type
A tone arm is
the only true dynamicallybalanced arm on an automatic unit. It has a sliding counterweight and a built -in
calibrated scale to set and insure correct stylus tracking
A
force.. You may use any cartridge, whether designated as
professional or otherwise, with assurance that this arm
will track the stereo grooves perfectly at the lowest
pressure recommended by the cartridge manufacturer.
The turntable is
full -
sized, heavily
weighted (6 lbs.), balanced, cast and polished. It is actually two turntables
balanced together -a drive table inside
and a non -ferrous cast table outside
and separated by a resilient foam barrier to damp out vibration.
-
The new Laboratory
Series Motor is
a
completely shielded
4 -pole shaded motor
developed by Garrard especially for
the Type A turntable system. It insures true musical pitch and clear
sustained passages without wow,
flutter, or magnetic hum.
great plus feature is
automatic play withA
-out
compromise.
Garrard's exclusive
pusher platform changing mechanism
makes the Type A fully automatic, at
your option, and affords the greatest
convenience, reliability in operation
and protection to records available.
Fcr your copy of the comparator guide, write Dept. GF -t t, Garrard Sales Corp., Port Washington, N. Y.
world's finest
follower so often employed. The output
terminals would be connected between
ground and the "hot" side of a single pole
double throw switch. Position A could be
connected to the cathode circuit coupling
capacitor, and position B could be wired
to the plate circuit coupling capacitor.
Naturally, you do need the coupling capacitors to prevent the d.e. voltage from appearing in the output. Position A would
be phase normal, and position B would be
"phase reversed".
The other channel in the preamplifier
would have the conventional cathode f ollower in its output stage. A cathode f ollower does not invert the phase of the signal
feeding it; neither will the phase be inverted in the cathode half of the phase
splitter, and this is why position A of the
switch gives you "phase normal ". This
assumes, of course, that the preamplifier
contains the same number of stages per
channel, and this is most often true.
Negative feedback
Q. Many voltage amplifier circuits achieve
negative feedback by connecting the feedback from the output of the second stage
to the cathode of the first stage. Well, I
guess I should have said that the output of
the second stage is taken from the plate.
Anyway, I can't see how this will give you
negative feedback, and I will explain why.
I think I can do this best by showing the
signal on one half of a cycle. Let's say
that the grid goes positive. This means that
the cathode of the first stage will also go
positive because the tube is drawing more
plate current than it did with zero signal.
This makes the plate of the stage go negative for the same reason. This negative
voltage is passed to the grid of the next
stage, and everything is reversed, with the
plate of that stage going positive. The output from this plate circuit is fed to the
cathode making the cathode go even more
positive than before, and this should increase the signal to the next stage and so
on. What do you think? Allen Sullivan, San
WEATHERS PROFESSIONAL
STEREO PICK-UP SYSTEM
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It took five years of painstaking research and uncompromising design
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Your present Weathers FM or regular system can
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version Kit
Francisco, California.
A. Your tracing of the signal is correct
in all particulars. However, the conclusions
drawn from what you have observed are
incorrect, and I shall try to explain why.
Let's say for argument's sake that the grid
of the first stage is directly connected to
ground. Suppose that I introduce a signal
between the cathode and ground, across
the same cathode resistor to which you
(Continued on page 71)
THE NEW KLH MODEL TEN
SPEAKER SYSTEM
Is smaller than our other models,
Costs less than our other ¡node's,
Operates with a 12 watt amplifier,
And - lias the KLH sound.
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Write for free folder and name of your nearest dealer to:
WEATHERS INDUSTRIES
A division of Advance Industries, Inc.
66 E. Gloucester Pike, Barrington, N.
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J.
Circle 4A
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KLH RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
:30 CROSS
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Circle 4B
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
4 TRACK & 2 TRACK STEREOPHONIC RECORDER
Here, through your fingertips, you take complete control of
sound, blending it to magnificent perfection.
A great symphony to record? With this superb instrument
you are a professional. Touch your stereo level controls
feel that sensitive response. Dual V.U. Meters show precision
readings as you augment the strings, diminish the brass. The
richness of that low resonance is captured with your bass
boost. The strength and delicacy of every sound -now yours
to command.
-
On Sale only at authorized dealers, known for integrity.
SONY SUPERSCOPE
The tapeway to Stereo
Four and two track, stereo and monophonic,
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dozen more professional features is truly the
ultimate in tape recorder engineering. $399.50,
300
-
complete with two dynamic microphones, two
extended range stereo speakers all in one portable case. For custom mounting, $349.50.
Other new Recorders from world- famous SONY:
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Complete with F-7 dynamic microphone.
282 -SL $199.50 -4 and
262 -D $89.50
-A
complete 4 and 2 track
stereo recording and playback tape transport.
-
$99.50 Bantam transistorized precision
dual -track monophonic recorder. Complete with
F -7 dynamic microphone.
101
For literature and name of nearest franchised dealer, write Superscope, Inc., Dept. 7, Sun Valley, California.
AUDIO
o
JUNE, 1961
5
FOR
LETTERS
magnificent sonn
Conversions to "Interconversions"
SIR :
For the case where output declines with
frequency due to a simple RC equalization circuit, the article on "Intereonversions
in Equalization Terminology" in the March
issue presents the following formula to
convert the loss at the 3 -db-down point, f,
to the loss at 10,000 cps:
db loss =20 log
I10'f
.I
1
+1
A simpler formula is:
(10,00
db loss =10 log
This has two advantages. It eliminates
obtaining the square root of the quantity
under the radical sign, and it is easier to
multiply by 10 than by 20.
Letting F represent the loss at a desired
frequency, a generalized statement of the
formula is:
r
db loss =10 log
[
(f
`s
f +1
Where the equalization circuit produces
rising output with frequency, the formula
may be converted to:
db gain =10
HERMAN BURSTEIN,
TARZIAN TAPE
280 Twin Lane E.,
Wantagh, N.Y.
Triode Transformers
engineered for highest fidelity
High Output-can accept signals
with dynamic range to realize the
full potential of even the finest
professional equipment.
Wide -Range Response-virtually
flat response for all recording frequencies.
Low Distortion-distortion is less
than 2%% at maximum record level
as measured by Navy Specification W -T-0061.
High Uniformity-uniformity within a 1200 -foot reel is within plus
db. A new oxide foror minus
mula and special selectivity of
oxides protect recording heads
from wear and prevent abrasion.
Humidity and Temperature Pro-
tection- special
coating, priming, and binding techniques help
keep Tarzian tape in new condition longer in ordinary good tape
storage conditions.
SIR :
Given great sound in the first place, Tarzian
Tape will keep it for you, and give it back
undiminished and undistorted. It is a tape
of truly professional fidelity, worthy of your
most valued recordings, at a price that lets
you use it for all your work (or play).
The proof is in the listening... of course.
But you can see the smooth, tightly bonded
oxide surface that doesn't flake, that does
run smoothly without abrasion and without
contributing to wow or flutter. Hold a reel
to the light. You can see that Tarzian Tape
is wound on the reel at perfect tension.
You'll find a written replacement guarantee
in every box. The box is well made, with
ample identification space. You'll see that
the tape is factory sealed in a plastic bag,
with labels and a tape -end clip included.
Try Tarzian Tape. Summon the keenest
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Tarzian Tape has what they, and you, will
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1 mil acetate. Ask your dealer. If he cannot
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see that your needs are promptly supplied.
Helpful new booklet free on request:
"The Care and Feeding of Tape Recorders."
Note: Tarzian Tape on Du Pont Mylar base
will be available shortly. Your inquiry is invited.
SARKES TARZIAN, INC.
World's Leading Manufacturers of TV and FM :Tuners Closed Circuit TV Systems Broadcast
Magnetic Recording Tape Semiconductor Devices
Equipment Air Trimmers FM Radios
In Canada,Cross Canada Electronics, Waterloo, Ont.
Circle 6A
6
Referring to the article "Triode Operation of the 88's" by Robert M. Voss and
Robert Ellis in the March issue, readers
will be interested to learn that Messrs.
Partridge Transformers Ltd., of England
do manufacture an output transformer especially designed for KT88's in triode operation.
This transformer, Number 3 of the CFB
series, represents the perfection of the
popular WWFB /0 series by the use of new
materials and techniques. Use is made of
the latest grain- oriented strip -wound "C"
cores. This component is intended for
equipment reproducing the full audio band
width with the very lowest distortion of
any kind. The complete unit is hermetically
sealed for all climates.
ULTRA ELECTRONICS, LTD.,
(Sole Partridge U.S. Agents)
East 60th St.,
New York 22, N.Y.
235
"Third Man" Search
SIR :
For some time I have been looking for a
stereo tape recording (four- track, 71/2 ips)
of the "Third Man Theme." I am searching for the song as it was played in the
movie, "The Third Man," with the zither
and accompanying instrumentation. I am
certain that if anyone can help me, you
should be able to. If the song is not available on tape, then perhaps it is available
on stereo record, and I could dub a tape
from this.
If any of your readers has such a tape
or record, I would appreciate learning of
its source.
LT. COL. DAYTON F. BROWN,
MAGNETIC TAPE DIVISION BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA
Export: AdAuriema, Inc., N.Y.
log[(-f) 1]
II
Hq. PACAF,
P. O. Box 227, APO 953,
San Francisco, California
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
announces its new
complete line of
PROFESSIONAL
AUDIO PRODUCTS
Here are only a few of the modern Langevin components
designed expressly for the critical requirements of
3 Dimensional Sound Recording and Reproduction.
Model AM- 5116 -B
POWER AMPLIFIERS
complete line from 8 watts to 50 watts,
built for continuous, year in, year out
duty cycle. Cabinet and Rack Mounting.
$105.00 Professional
Net, with tubes
A
4
LOW LEVEL AMPLIFIERS
Miniaturized Plug -in, ultra low noise
Model AM- 138S -G
Model 101 -D
50 Watts, with
-
-
8 watts, with
and
dependable. Preamplifiers, Program amplifiers an Boosters.
tubes
$150.05
Professional Net.
tubes
$279.60
Professional Net.
PROGRAM EQUALIZERS- miniaturized
tubes required. Passive
miniaturized printed circuit
networks give variable hi -lo
equalization at 40, 100, 3, 5,
No
VU METERS AND PANELS
and 10 kcps in
EFFECTS FILTERS
2 Models Hi -pass
10
panel mounting assemblies
410
only 41/e inches deep.
inches of
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AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
7
Ai
HT-
;
track recording, with Les playing all the guitars, appeared first on a solely mono basis in
the spring of 1959. For some reason, Columbia Records decided not to bring out a stereo
version at that time. Exactly two years later,
the stereo disc comes along. I'll wager that
the same 1959 master tape was used for this
release. If such was the case, we now have an
excellent illustration of the superiority a
master tape still enjoys over the recording
that is sold to the public. Using top -grade
equipment of his own design, Les Paul has
always turned out master tapes of exceptional
transient response. Now that stereo lets us
listen to each separate guitar as they form a
line across the listening area, we can appreciate the know -how applied in this special
field.
CHESTER SANTON
The symbol Cr indicates the United
Stereo Tapes 4 -track 71/z ips tape
number.
Peter Sellers and Sophia Loren
Angel S 35910
This recording apparently was a spare time
project that evolved while Sellers and Miss
Loren were filming "The Millionairess." No
material from the film was used in the recording sessions held in London and Rome but the
zany songs are in keeping with the mood
established before the cameras. The high
points of the album, for me at any rate, are
the unfailing antics of Peter Sellers. His imitation of Alec Guiness is one of the very best
things he's done on records. In Ukulele Lady
we encounter a comprehensive recreation of a
corny song hit of the Twenties. The nasal
vocal refrain is made doubly convincing with
the deliberate application of old -style groove
clicks and record wow. The cleverest stunt on
the record will have listeners seeking a four speed turntable in order to figure out what
Sellers did to Gershwin's Lady Be Good at a
recording speed of 16% rpm. The result Is
quite amusing at normal speed. Those in a
position to try the slower playback will discover that, oddly enough, the orchestral accompaniment makes sense at both speeds.
Wild Stereo Drums
Capitol ST 1553
Ever since the day when percussion recordings exploded on the industry's sales charts,
there has been speculation relating to the day
when all major labels might have to join the
parade and issue albums with dots all over
them. Most of the majors, although unwilling
to succumb to the dot treatment, have been
issuing a steady stream of percussion releases. Capitol, in this album, presents an interesting study in reluctance. The jacket's
front cover carries a low -key photo of a
kettledrum but the reverse side blossoms with
a faint harvest of dots. They're barely visible
at arm's length but will convey the message
to the fellow who refuses to buy a percussion
release unless dots are somewhere in evidence.
Along with other responsible labels these days,
Capitol has gone about the task of recording
a melange of skins (big -band drummers, Latin
rhythm specialists, and drill -field cymbals and
drums) with the conventional tools of the
trade. The Tower men in Hollywood placed
their faith in the simple virtues of good range
in frequency and dynamics -and let it go at
that. The large drums are as full throated as
any you'll hear on stereo disc. Perhaps the
best clue to the honesty in the engineering
approach is the unique quality of the uppermost region of the celesta and the tiny Chinese cymbal tree. Easily made strident with
an unsuitable mike or recording curve, these
instruments emerge from the speakers with
the innocent yet penetrating shyness of the
real thing. The record begins with a trio of
drummers rousing the countryside from a
vantage point in Billy May's orchestra. In the
*le Forest
N. Y.
8
Ave., Hastings -on- Hudson,
Farewell to
World War
Peter Nero: Pianoforte
RCA Victor LSP 2334
Victor has launched a new pop pianist with
enough on the ball to dethrone one or two
ranking keyboard favorites. It seems to l3e an
axiom in the record business that a good -selling pianist can take care of most of thei bills
of an average -size firm. If he keeps u the
pace set in his first release, twenty-six [yearold Peter Nero should have the 24th street
mortgage paid off in no time. With a (Confideuce that only an adequate grounding i the
classics can provide, Nero plunges into b$llads
and swing favorites with equal verve. T ere's
an unforced exhilaration in his style that
spreads to the accompanying orchestra epnder
the direction of Marty Gold. He interw-1 ayes
My
a fleeting reference to Rachmaninoff
Funny Valentine and a longer span of Copin
in Night and Day, RCA's engineering department has fallen into step with a piano p ckup
that is remarkably clean. If you're still har-
BRM.
boring doubts about the capability o the
stereo disc in reproducing a close -up ano,
try this one with one of the cartridg s of
flatter response introduced in recent m ths.
Played with a pickup that slopes off abr'ptly
in the high end, this is just another i;nio
record. A genuinely wide -range pickup or a
design that has been on the market for only
six or eight months may change your mind
about the record-and the performer.
Bobby Hackett: Dream Awhile
Columbia CS 8402
No sooner had some of us concluded that
nothing new was left up the sleeves of the
record industry, when Columbia comes along
with a release which, in stereo at least, establishes a most refreshing combination of sound.
First, they decided to flood a spacious organ
studio with the several layers of tonelfurnished by a four- manual Wurlitzer pipe organ.
Atop these layers was then placed the glo' ing
sound of Bobby Hackett's trumpet. This mewhat improbable combination works su risingly well. With stereo maintaining the natural dispersion of sound, there is less, pile
up of sound from the organ and the tru
pet
has every chance to hold its own. The ballads,
understandably, were selected for easy
flow and Glenn Osser's
arrangements ar the
final touch in an unexpected feast.
and Mary Ford: Lover's Luau
Columbia CS
86
Les Paul's first stereo record has a rather
unusual history. It offers a good clue to the
wide gap that separates the master tapes and
the commercial disc in these formative yNyears
of the two -channel medium. This track -uponLes Paul
Formula
Riverside 95022
Fighter Planes in Action
Riverside 95508
These recent specialties from Riverside are
bound to have intense appeal in some quarters. "Farewell to a Formula" contains the
sounds of 21/2-litre Grand Prix cars as recorded at Riverside, California in preparation
for their final competition appearance. In
time, the cars' last race, held on the twentieth of November in 1960, is sure to be a day
of increasing historical importance to followers of the Maserati, Cooper, Lotus, and
Pepe Dominguin and Les Baxter workouts for
Latin percussion, the abrupt left -right separation depends more on deployment of manpower in the studio than upon channel switching at the console. The only concession to special effects occurs in the two segments featuring drummer Dick Harrell. There, cow r ry to
normal practice, the drum parts Nn re recorded first. Other instrumental parts were
scored later and then recorded over the initial
track. In this way, they end up accompanying
the drums.
it
a
I
Anyone who has read fictional or historical
accounts of the aerial dogfights of World War
I will find fascinating listening in the other
Riverside stereo album. Aviation buffs who
have concentrated on that romantic era will
go into an " Immelmann turn" the first time
they spot the record jacket in a store window.
Planes of that vintage in operating condition
are prized collectors' items. Heard in the air
or on the ground in their original state are
six of the most famous and widely used engines of the war. The Sopwith "Camel," Pfalz
D -12, Standard J -1, Nieuport 28, and Curtis
JN4D are represented. Bold stereo underlines
the crochety individualism of motors that
range from the 90 horsepower Curtis "Jenny"
trainer to the 420 -horsepower Liberty engine
used in the English De Haviland DH -4 which
later became America's first air mail plane.
Persuasive Percussion, Vol. 3
Command O RS 4T 817
the tape fan appears
basis,
over
-all
On an
to be several months behind the record collector in keeping up with trends that dominate the music market. This Command series
may be old hat to the disc buyer who likes to
keep abreast of things but the bing-bang boys
are still going strong on tape. The spring pop
releases have been dominated by the Command and Time labels and the end is not yet
in sight. The venturesome tape user, if his
will power is low enough, can now lose himself in such exotic items as "Gypsy Strings"
and "Percussion." The third volume of "Persuasive Percussion" offers, at least, the stability of seasoned performers. These include Doc
Severinsen and Mel Davis, trumpets ; guitarist Tony Mattola, the trombone of Bobby
Bryne and a percussion section featuring Don
Lamond, Cliff Leeman, Artie Maortti and Sol
Gubin. Willie Rodriquez was in charge of the
Latin hardware.
Deutschmeister Band: Sousa Marches
Westminster © WTC 145
This entire production leaves something to
be desired in normal listening pleasure. Part
of the problem lies in the decision of the small
Deutschmeister band to record a program
that is more ambitious than those which first
established its reputation in this country. The
band's normal repertory -one in which it
the completely unpretenstands unique
tious march music of Central Europe played
with the gusto of a group not expecting to be
taken too seriously by holiday strollers in
search of light diversion. When the Deutsch meisters buckle down to serious stuff intended
-is
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
FIS
i
PX-IOO
E
Multiplex Stereo Adapter
WITH EXCLUSIVE
'S'evreo
Swam,
You've read the thrilling news that the F.C.C. has finally approved Multiplex Stereo broadcasting on FM! Starting June 1st FM radio stations will be
permitted to broadcast multiplex stereo-and FISHER is ready with the adapter
you will need to enjoy this remarkable new stereo service!
The FISHER MPX-100 has the exclusive `Stereo Beacon' that eliminates all confusion locates the MPX broadcasting station immediately! One of the two
jewel lights on the front panel is the 'Stereo Beacon' which flashes brightly
whenever the tuning indicator reaches a station that is broadcasting in multiplex
stereo! The second jewel light indicates when the unit is in operation. Only
FISHER has 'Stereo Beacon!'
-
Use This Coupon
MPX- I 00 is self-contained and self -powered . It can be used
with Fisher FM tuners, receivers and other tuners having
wide -band ratio -detector design with MPX output. It can
be placed side -by -side with your present tuner or amplifier.
No additional inputs to your amplifier are necessary because of the feed-through connections of the MPX -100.
The stereo balance control on the front panel permits easy
adjustment to achieve optimum stereo separation and balance.
$89.50
if
Name
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AUDIO
International Corp,
171
JUNE, 1961
Madison Ave., N.
Y. 16, N.
Y.
In
MPX -100 and Fisher tuners.
Ell
s
EXPORT: Tclesco
FISHER RADIO CORPORATION
44th Drive, Long Island City 1, N. Y.
Please send complete literature on the
21 -29
City
State
Canada. Canadian Marconi
9
NO BETTER SOURCE FOR SPECIALIZED
TRANSFORMERS THAN THE EXPERTS AT
PEERLESS
for a heavyweight band, they're in for trouble.
They are certainly out of their element in
these twelve Sousa marches. The wayward
changes in tempo within a given march, however ingratiating they may be in an Austrian
novelty, are quite out of place in the sober
step of a Sousa favorite. Neither are the technical elements of this tape all that they might
be. The stereo separation is logical enough
but the distortion is on the pronounced side.
Esquivel: Infinity in Sound, Vol.
2
RCA Victor LSP 2296
Since 1935, Peerless has been the pioneer- designing and manufacturing
transformers of the highest reliability to most-exacting specifications of the
electrical and electronics industries. A policy of creative engineering, precision construction and rigid quality control has given Peerless acknowledged
leadership particularly in the design of specialized units. Pioneering in
miniaturization, Peerless has also established the industry standards for
reliability in sealing and ruggedness of packaging. Products range from
units 1/10 cubic inch to more than 20 cubic feet, from fractional voltages
to 30,000; from less than 1 cycle to almost a half megacycle; in 1, 2 and
3 -phase or phase -changing configurations. Constructions cover the range
from open -frame to potted, hermetically-sealed and vacuum -impregnated
units. Whatever your transformer needs, Peerless can design to your specification and deliver in quantity. In addition to the units shown here, Peerless
has solved these special problems:
-
Miniature Inductance Unit, 4.85 henrys ( ±7 %) at 150 ma, DC
Miniature 400 -cycle Filament Power Transformer for airborne operation
Miniature Power Transformer, 3- phase, 400 cps to 1, 2 and 3 -phase
Miniature Audio Input Transformer, low -level input
Miniature Hermetically-Sealed Output Transformer, 400 cps, high level
LOW VOLTAGE, HIGH CURRENT AUDIO
OUTPUT TRANSFORMER 16595
Single- phase, oil- immersed unit rated at
power level of 26KVA. Frequency response
of -.5 db from 20 cps to 5 KC. Above resonant frequency, at 28 KC, attenuation slope
and phase shift are smooth and without
irregularity. Suited to such applications as
driving high -power shaker tables.
`
20 -20 PLUS SHIELDED INPUT
TRANSFORMER K-241 -D
Small size for such superb performance. Frequency
response,
db: 10 to 25,000 cps. Primary balanced to attenuate longitudinal currents in excess
of 50 db. Secondary may be used single -ended or
in push -pull. Electrostatic shield between primary
and secondary has 90 db electromagnetic shield1
Winterhalter Goes South of the Border
RCA Victor LSP 2271
Latin- American favorites and reverberation
figure prominently in these releases. In his
second volume devoted to imagination unbridled for stereo, Esquivel demonstrates that
he has been finding amusement in recent
trends in novelty records. There is certainly
more than a suggestion of humor in the way
he treats some of the favorite tricks of arrangers-for -stereo these days. The injection
of comedy may make more palatable the otherwise familiar stunts in the placing of voices
and instruments for maximum two -channel
surprise. Some of the tunes are so loaded
with far -out harmonies, all the clever touches
may not be apparent the first time. Latin specialties such as El Negro Zumbon, Baia, and
Espana Cani receive their share of spoofing
along with swing standards. Esquivel takes
particular pleasure in pointing up, by means
of imitating voices, some of the sillier sounds
we've generally taken for granted in today's
instrumentals. Although the illusion of space
is somewhat more contrived than usual,
the arrangement of Time on My Honda does
fill every foot of the recording area with the
sound of ticking-some of it real, the rest
produced by the orchestra. Esquivelians
should find this one of his best releases.
Hugo Winterhalter confines his efforts to
domestic and imported Latin tunes but the
over -all effect of the album is definitely North
American. This is the lush approach carried
to an extreme. Then too, in the processing,
the whole thing tends to get out of hand. By
the time they finish schmaltzing up the sound,
the guy with a decent system is hard put to
recognize the familiar characteristics of violins and cellos. Webster Hall, the scene of the
recording, does not possess the acoustic quality heard on this record.
The Three Suns: Fever and Smoke
RCA Victor LSP 2310
The deluge of percussion stereo recordings
has created more than one problem for established performers in the popular field. With
a new breed of customer clamoring for the
cheap thrills of arbitrary stereo separation,
many of the name groups in the business have
been faced with an unhappy choice. They
could remain on the inactive list until the
rage had run its course or they could attempt
to get in the swim through modification or
abandonment of their past formula. Events of
the past months have tended to elbow out of
the market some artists who have provided
variety and change of pace.
(Continued on page 28)
ing. Maximum operating level, +8 dbm.
Whatever your transformer needs, Peerless engineers can design
to any military or commercial specification and manufacture in
any quantity. See REM for complete catalogue of standard units
or write for information to Dept. A -6 -PE.
PEERLESS
Al
ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS
DIVISION OF ALTEC LANSING CORPORATION
6920 McKinley Avenue, Los Angeles 1, California
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AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
New Invention Gives
Totally New Sound!
FISHER
XP.-4
Here is the
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speaker design in years! The conventional
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OUTSTANDING FEATURES OF THE XP -4
SPEAKERS: Four. 12" woofer with twoinch voice coil. Two 5' mid -range speakers (AcoustiGlas- packed.) One two -inch
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Controls for middle and high frequencies.
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AUDIO
Telmto International Corp.,
JUNE, 1961
FI4ER XP -2
Three high -compliance speakers,
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THE
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11
If both a stereo hi fi band and one or
more background music bands were to be
carried piggyback on a single FM transmission via multiplex, there just didn't
seem to be any way in which they could
keep out of each other's hair and yet remain uncompromised in sound quality.
Even the reasonable compromise in the
assigned bandwidths prepared by Editor
MeProud was still based on the premise
that we had to have both stereo and background music, on the same broadcast signal, imposed in the same manner and thus
still potentially subject at least to acciden-
U Io
-
tal interference.
Edward atnallCanby
duced consoles. The fact is, of cours , that
component -style radio is all very fin , but
radio itself, i.e., broadcasting, can't get
along only on components. If we Ore to
Well, the first glossy photo of a real,
have broadcasting of any sort, it must be
honest -to- goodness FM- multiplex stereo adapter has just come in the mail (cost based on components plus mass -produced
equipment. Period.
$99.50), the F.C.C. decision on stereo broadThe broadcast system that will be succast is still a breathless bit of news-and cessful
must provide a dual basis:
it seems I made another of my left -handed (a) theobviously
means for top -quality sound, in
prophesies. (A left -handed prophesy is one
broadcast and in the reception, and
that was written before but published the
(b) simultaneously, the means for simple,
after the fact.) I said last month that low
-cost, mass -production receiving bquipmaybe broadcast stereo would be this ment.
season's coming hi fi sensation. It will be,
AM radio has never, except in special
as witness this issue of AUDIO, given over
cases and special areas, provided the full
to the good news that took so long in top
-quality potential in actual practice, but
coming.
has fulfilled the mass-production aspect
in
look
elsewhere
of
course
You will
admirably. That's why AM still horses
AUDIO for the technical description of the
along, in spite of TV and FM combined.
it
lying
had
if
haven't
you
wining system,
FM broadcast, mono, has done an ad 'rable
files
for
or
so
already.
your
a
year
around in
job from the beginning on the first prop(My General Electric press release on this osition -top quality sound for top 1960.)
of
me
in
the
spring
system came to
reception. Unfortunately, FM's
It is my business to take the wide view quality
mass -production capabilities were underimplicato
the
may
as
and observe what I
played at the beginning, and the medium
tions.
almost went under for good. (I was in on
For
it
delighted.
Well frankly, I am
near -debacle myself ; I lost a good
that
three
which
seems to me that a situation
job right after the war when the FM boom
inreal
"mess,"
years ago looked like a
failed to materialize as predicted.)
soluble unless either an existing industry
Now, happily, in the last few years FM
stations
were to be wiped out (the music
has found itself, partly boosted up by inbackbroadcasting multiplexed restaurant
creasing component sales and the general
ground material on a subscription basis),
impact of the idea of hi fi, but also buoyed
broador unless the quality of FM stereo
an increasingly solid mass -production
casting were to be seriously compromised, by
in the receiver area. Now-who'd
basis
parties
has instead been resolved with all
it even ten years ago' ?-we
have
guessed
have
our
happy. We have found a way to
FM -AM pocket radios, not
have
transistor
cakes and eat them too, without comto mention all other sizes. Sound quality
promise, or so I gather at this point. And
not exactly the strong point in these
the method is ingenious to the point of is
models. Their mere existence proved my
wonderment -why didn't somebody think
of it earlier, back in the acrimonious days point, that quality broadcast depends on
non-quality mass- production reception
of the Crosby -Halstead arguments?
FM, then, is on solid ground at 1 t, in
Genius, to paraphrase the familiar phrase,
And meanwhile stereo,
is an infinite capacity to be simple. If I the mono medium.
-handsome progress,
am right, the men at G.E.- Zenith (I'll in spite of its not -very
slowly taken over more and more
make no distinctions) are to be congratu- has
ground, everywhere but in radio. Th perlated for just that sort of simplicity. They sistence
of the clumsy AM -FM stereo broadfigured a way to avoid all the clashes and
casts and a few FM -FM arrangements
conflicts and compromises and counter -acthat the missing link of broadcast
cusations of the rival camps that first tried shows
stereo has been a very real one. Aftdr all,
to launch stereo broadcasts three years it is the last link in the chain of 1liked
back, and, it seems, their system is possibly elements that includes stereo discs, tereo
superior even to the best of the original tape, tape recorders and players, the home
propositions. Hard to believe.
hi fi component system and mass -pro need
stereo "hi fi" (quotes are traditional with
me). (You'll note that we now have another
Components Plus . . .
new noun in the business. A few ears
back, "hi fi" became "the hi fi "; no one
You'll probably read that the prime fea- goes out and buys a "stereo.")
ture of the now- accepted G.E.-Zenith
system is that it requires only a relatively Compromises
inexpensive conversion unit, the multiplex
Thus, to go back to my earlier poin , the
decoder, utilizing only a single tube in its
simplest arrangement. True, this is a big new stereo broadcast system faced the two
advantage. It's a vital one in view of the vital requirements that would son chow
huge importance in radio of the mass have to be met, both of them-top qi ality
market, both the small mass -produced radio throughout, plus adaptability for ine pensets and the millions of large, mass -pro- sive mass -production receiver equipm t.
THE GOOD NEWS
STEREO BROADCAST
I!
12
What nobody saw, at that time, was the
brilliant possibility-so simple -that if we
could multiplex these two different and
competing signals -one hi fi music, the
other mood music -by different systems
upon the same FM broadcast carrier, there
would be no interference. The two would
not recognize each other, nor, so to speak,
be aware of each other's existence, though
part of the same basic signal wave. This
was the blindingly happy G.E.-Zenith
idea. The question was merely -how. And
it must have taken a while to work out the
details, since this system did not appear
in public and before the F.C.C. until a
good while after the earlier proposals.
Again, I refer you to more detailed explanations elsewhere, but just marvel with
me at the neatness of the very concept
itself Put your second stereo signal,
(the difference signal), onto the main
carrier via an amplitude modulated sub carrier, suppress the carrier, and use the
remaining AM sidebands to frequency modulate the main FM carrier. Then, higher up
(you have to 75 kc), put the background
music signal on the same carrier via the
present FM multiplexing. Thus the two will
be mutually exclusive; the detector that
brings one of these signals to life can't
even "hear" the other signal at all. It's
wonderful!
:
It Looks Like This
As the Boss explained the inner details
to me (he's the best teacher I've ever run
into), the FM stereo transmission under
the new system will look like this
give it to you in my lay words, just as a
side -prop to the more proper engineering
accounts elsewhere.
From 50 to 15,000 cps, on the FM carrier
is the main or sum channel, receivable as
a standard FM mono transmision. At
19,000 cps there's a control "synch" signal,
to grab the local oscillator (producing the
subcarrier) in the home multiplex receiver,
similar to the TV arrangement. That oseillator runs at 38,000 cps, the second harmonic of the control signal.
Then from 23,000 to 53,000 cps, still on
the FM main transmission, is the vital AM
multiplexed signal, 15,000 cps wide on each
side of the 38,000 cps AM carrier frequency, suppre,sed at the transmitter
only the side bands go out on the air.
What? said I, the sides without the
middle'? Sounds to me like a bottle of milk
without the bottle. Yet so it is.
The oscillator in your home receiver puts
back the 38,000 cps, synchronized by that
19,000 cps control tone. And the simple
fixed AM detector just tunes in on it, removing an AM sound -signal.
And `way, 'way up in the FM stratosphere, still on that same main FM carrier,
going on up to the limit, 75,000 cps, is the
piggyback FM- multiplexed background
music signal, different music, for different
-I'll
-
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
TRANSISTORIZED
4 -TRACK STEREO TAPE DECK
MODEL RP -100W
Completely assembled, wired and tested.
$395.00
MODEL RP -100K
Semi -kit includes a completely assembled
and tested transport, electronics in kit
$289.95
form.
Perfected 4 -track stereo /mono recording, 4
& 2 track playback. True high fidelity transistor electronics, individual for record &
playback, plus separate record & playback
heads permitting off-the-tape monitor. 2
recording level meters, mixing, mic & level
controls, switched sound -on -sound record.
ing. Electrodynamically braked supply &
takeup reel motors; hysteresis synchronous capstan motor. Individual solenoids
for pinch -roller & tape lifters. All- electric,
interlocked push-button transport control &
dedicated
interlocked safety "record" pushbutton.
to
..w
-
Precision tape guidance & sweep loading
no pressure pads. No slurring or tape
bounce problems. Digital turns counter.
Vertical or horizontal mounting. Modular
plug -in construction. An original, exclusive EICO product designed & manufactured in U. S. A. (patents pending).
,,, ,,, ,,,,
perfection
NEW
. .
LINE..
.
stereo tuners on one corn pact chassis. Easy -to- assemble: prewired,
prealigned RF and IF stages for AM and
FM and AM
)feteo 9e:
n ...a ..
..
9Md0
w M
10 te
0
e
a
FM. Exclusive precision prewired EYE TRONIC® tuning on both AM and FM.
FM TUNER
Switched AFC (Automatic Frequency Control). Sensitivity: 1.5uv for 20db quieting.
Frequency Response: 20-15,000 cps±ldb.
AM TUNER
Switched "wide" and "narrow" bandpass.
High Q filter eliminates 10 kc whistle.
Sensitivity: 3uv for 1.0V output at 20db
S/N ratio. Frequency Response: 20-9,000
cps ( "wide "); 20.4,500 cps ( "narrow ").
10
too
FM LEVEL
FM TUNtNG
AM LEVEL
SELE::TCIF
FM -AM STEREO TUNER
1(it
$89.95
Includes Metal Cover and FET
OFEICO
AM TUNING
ST96
Wired $129.95
STEREO.
®
.
.
BOTH AMPLIFIERS: Complete stereo cen-
ters plus two excellent power amplifiers.
Accept, control, and amplify signals from
any stereo or mono source.
ST70: Cathode -coupled phase inverter circuitry preceded by a direct -coupled voltage
amplifier. Harmonic Distortion: less than
1% from 25.20,000 cps within 1db of 70
watts. Frequency Response: +%db 10.
50,000 cps.
ST40: Highly stable Williamson -type power
amplifiers. Harmonic Distortion: less than
1% from 40.20,000 cps within 1 db of 40
watts. Frequency Response: -!r/2db 12.
25,000 cps.
70 -WATT INTEGRATED STEREO AMPLIFIER ST70
Kit $94.95
Includes Metal Cover
Wired $149.95
Over 2 MILLION EICO instruments in use.
Most EICO Dealers offer budget terms.
40 -WATT INTEGRATED STEREO AMPLIFIER ST40
Kit $79.95
Includes Metal Cover
Wired $129.95
(LyL.Zr
l
There's an EICO for your every stereo /mono need. Send for FREE catalog.
A -6
EICO, 3300 N. Blvd., L.I.C. 1, N. Y.
Send free 32 -page catalog & dealer's name
Send new 36 -page Guidebook to HI -FI for
which enclose 25¢ for postage & handling.
I
6
Name
q)
Address
City
Zone .... State
dd 5% in West.
HICiÌTiÜI!LITS
Listen to the EICO Hour, WABC -FM,
N. Y.
95.5 MC, Mon. -Fri., 7:15 -8 P.M. © 1961 by EICO, 33 -00 N. Blvd., L. I. C. 1, N. Y.
Export Dept, Roburn Agencies Inc., 431 Greenwich St., New York 13, N. Y.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
13
Silky Tone
from
Orient
iV
E AT
rof
n
VS -600
Moving Magnet Type Stereo
Cartridge
New type 4-coil Moving Magnet
Stereo cartridge with smoothest
response from 30 eps. to 20.000 eps.
and it has more than 25 dB channel
separation from 1000 eps. to 10.000
eps.
High Output Voltage, high compliance, low mass plus exclusive symmetrical push -pull design for the
minimum recording weariness and
the lowest distortion.
GA -12
Professional Stereo 1Y" Tone Arm
Engineered for resonace -free tracing
at -12 gr. stylus force. Plug -in heads
have 4 terminal -tips so that any
type of cartridge can be mounted.
1
P -68H
Professional 4 Speed Turntable
This remarkable 4 speed turntable,
with synchronous hysteresis motor,
guarantees optimum performance
of stereo reproduction.
Specification :
Turntable ; 127 diameter
aluminum diecasting
Speed ;
16 -3/4, 33 -2/3, 45, 78
rpm.
Power consumption ; 15 watts
S /N; 45 db, minimum
Wow; 0.25% maximum
NEAT
NEAT ONKYO DENKI CO., LTD.
4- 1chome,
14
Kanda, Hatago -cho, Chiyoda -ku,
Tokyo. Japan
receivers. It's far away from the to er FM
signal, whose top is 15,000 cps. nd it
can't even hear the AM signal that fits
in between. Neat, neat, neat!
No interference, top stereo quality (5015,000 cps on both the sum and difference
signals) and everybody happy. Cheap receivers too, or so I hear, in spite Of that
$99.50 job I mentioned. That is -cheap
equipment is inherently possible and satisfactory within its own sphere of operations.
Mighty important, I tell you, even if the
top product does cost $100, self -powered.
Imagine if it cost $99.50 to buy any stereo
adapter. Or even $39.50. It won't, if all
goes well.
Now there's only one pay -off to mention
here. I wonder just how many hopefully
thinking audiofans have jumped to a conclusion that is as likely as a short circuit
in a wet distributor. Namely, that AM for
the second (difference) stereo cha nel is
bad, because it'll be subject to stae and
noise (whereas the main signal,
M, is
immune to the noise) ?
This, of course, was one of the most
violent objections most of us had o the
old FM-AM stereo broadcasts, one 'stereo
channel via the FM transmitter and the
other via AM. The noise, in one channel
but not in the other, was far more distracting than the difference in tonal quality
between the two channels.
Do we have that problem again here, with
FM and AM both in use
Of course not! I almost fell into this
trap myself, but managed to save myself
and my reputation just before I sprawled.
This AM is multiplexed upon a carrier FM
signal; it doesn't exist in "free air"1 so to
speak. The receiver picks up only the FM
signal, carrying with it three different
messages. The AM part is purely internal,
if you see what I mean. So-no static.
Sure, sure, elementary ; but I'll bet a lot
of folks get tangled up on this little point,
just the same.
*
*
*
*
Sometimes I wonder what it must be like
to be a "lay" member of that august body,
the F.C.C. The explanations that must go
on, with millions of dollars hanging on
every word! Lay or no, I'd say that the
new F.C.C. has done a good job this time,
seeing a good thing when it was presented,
coming to a relatively quick decision in
view of the "recency" (as Mr. Harding
might say, he of that famous word; normalcy) -the recency of the new set -up.
We'll all be talking more, much more,
about the forms of equipment that are now
likely for stereo broadcast and the forms
of stereo entertainment that may cro up.
That, of course, is very much within my
own province and if anybody around here
wants a guy who knows the technical ropes
of stereo and the parallel ropes of its pain
signal -the art of music -I'm all set to
produce stereo music broadcasts galore. I
can even explain sum and differences to
the folks "out thar," if I have to. That
takes explainin', let me tell you, especially
to Aunt Mamie, who thinks "stereo" is
something she saw in the movies, with a
giant screen.
Have recorder, can edit. End of plug.
THOSE "STEREO"
PHONES AGAIN .
.
.
I am really not happy about this to -do
over the so- called "stereo" headphones. I
have incurred the annoyance of a number
of manufacturers of two -channel phones
by suggesting what is surely the plain
truth, that these phones do not give a
stereo sound, but rather a binaural sound,
(each channel going exclusively to one ear)
which is more or less realistic according to
the widely varying methods of stereo recordings now being practiced. The sound
may be lovely, exciting, a superb new sensation, it may be far superior to mono
sound through headphones, and indeed it
is. But it isn't stereo, and that is that.
Yet, for solid commercial reasons, the
name stereo being what it is these days,
this wrong terminology goes right along.
I'm looking at an ad for a complete component music system right now, from a
large metropolitan music store. Stereo amplifier/FM tuner. Stereo speaker system,
two separate units. Stereo turntable, plays
stereo and monophonic records. And stereo
headphones. "If you've never heard stereo
through quality headphones, we know you're
in for a thrill."
Very possibly. I don't mean at all to
split hairs, nor to run down the genuine
pleasure which many people have found in
this "stereo" listening. Indeed, I've always
been a headphone man, as many a reader
knows, and I'm frankly delighted that
this very useful form of listening has
staged such an unexpected comeback. For
years, the mere idea of headphones had
been anathema to any salesman -only
libraries and laboratories, schools, language
centers and the like have used the devices,
for purely practical reasons. But for home
enjoyment- heavens no! Not commercial.
Well, they are commercial now, and a
good thing. As I've already suggested, when
home recording enthusiasts begin to discover the absolutely astonishing qualities
of true binaural recording, listened to only
via earphones (you'll need batteries of
them, for the whole family), then I think
the two- channel phone business is really
going to spurt. The time is near enough
-it's practically now. This particular plug
of mine is absolutely hoary with age by
this time.
Meanwhile, there are stereo recordings
and there are 'phones. I keep receiving a
steady spate of inquiries as to that "Bauer
circuit" that converts headphones into
simulated stereo receptors, and have dutifully sent them on to Mr. Bauer ; but I
have not heard further as to available
commercial versions of his simple circuit.
It seems to me that the answer to the whole
question of "stereo" headphone listening
is to be found in this circuit. Just install
it in your phones-or your tape recorder,
as an alternative stereo amplifier 'phone
output-and then go right ahead and call
the 'phones stereo. Correct.
What sounds good and what doesn't via
the "stereo" 'phones is a quite interesting
question. Stereo has many forms today and
only the basic fact that two channels of
sound are heard through two loudspeaker
systems holds them all together. In the
miking, the sky's the limit-from two mikes
inches apart and built into the same case
all the way out to those elaborate multi mike five -dimensional set -ups that are now
used, mainly in this country, for operas
and the like. (One recording session I saw
had about forty operating mikes, including
a separate mono network.)
Listening is a subjective thing in respect
to the effect of stereo recording via 'phones
Some like it, some don't. (Even true binaural recording has a remarkably different impact on different people. I've been
recording my own Canby Singers in binaural as a rehearsal aid-some singers
just say umph at the earphone playback,
others, when the 'phones are put on their
heads, simply go straight up in the air and
yell in amazement!) It is thus quite likely
(Continued on page 61)
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
Quaii(j Control at AR
The frequency response of every AR speaker is checked in an anechoic chamber before it is shipped.
(Many other tests, of course, are also made.) Acoustic Research is one of the very few companies in
the history of loudspeaker manufacturing, so far as we know, that have followed this rigorous practice.
Silvano Cannavacciuolo, AR inspector, checks a speaker response curve at one of AR's anechoic chambers. The response curves of the individual drivers
in the system he is testing have already been recorded and found acceptable at the main anechoic chamber.
The purpose of such careful quality control is to make sure, as far as is possible, that AR speakers
provide natural reproduction of music, without rattles, buzzes, distortion, or pseudo -hi-fi exaggerations.
Prices are from $89. to $225.
Until now, AR speakers have been sold under a one -year guarantee covering
materials, labor, and freight to and from the factory.
On the basis of our field experience we are now able to extend this guarantee
to five years. The extension is retroactive, and applies to any AR speakers
bought since 1956.
AR speakers are on demonstration at AR Music Rooms, on the west balcony
of Grand Central Terminal in New York City, and at 52 Brattle Street in
Cambridge, Massachusetts. No sales are made or initiated at these showrooms.
ACOUSTIC RESEARCH. INC..
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
24 Thorndike St.,
Cambridge 41, Mass.
15
EDITOR'S REVIEW
THE STEREO DECISION
AFTER MONTHS of more or less patient waiting,
high fidelity fans throughout the country were
rewarded with the decision of the Federal Communications Commission on FM Stereo on April 19th.
Now that the one system has been selected, we may
all begin with our experiments toward building our
own, or -and probably much simpler-start saving up
the pennies to purchase one. At least, there is no
further doubt as to which system we shall be using,
and it is quite likely that some of the industry's
laboratories are working overtime in the search for
the "most for the least."
The choice of a single set of standards for the
transmission of the signal does not mean that only
term which distinguishes
one type of " decoder "
from detector and discriminator, neither of which the
device really is-will work. In fact, we already know
of three different methods of doing the job, and there
are undoubtedly several more. In any case, we are
presenting as much information in this issue as we
could possibly acquire in just three weeks from decision to presstime. At least we didn't say "ALL
ABOUT FM- STEREO" on the front cover.
Starting on page 18, Managing Editor Saslaw gives
us the background, delineates the actual F. C. C. order
which specifies the standards, and describes both
transmitting and receiving circuits with particular
attention to the Zenith decoder. On page 21, Daniel
von Recklinghausen, H. H. Scott chief engineer, delves
into mathematics and shows how the signal can be
developed by any one of three methods, and how one
of the methods can be used as the decoder. On page
24, Antal Csicsatka and Robert M. Linz who did much
of the development work at General Electric, describe
the G -E decoder, along with still further background
information. On the whole, we feel that this issue will
serve as a sort of high -level primer to familiarize the
audiofan with all of the aspects of FM stereo.
It appears that there are several difficult problems
in making a decoder work with a minimum of distortion. That is to be expected -we have most recently
gone through it with color television, and those circuits
are certainly complicated enough ; and before that it
was plain old black and white television (remember
when there were 30 tubes in a TV set ?) and so on as
far back as radio itself. There is not much doubt
that the first decoders -and they will be in the form
of "adapters" to be used with existing tuners -will
work, and the integrity of the manufacturers guarantees that. By the same token, it is certainly likely
that the device will be simplified appreciably, particularly for complete radio sets, since their standards
of performance will not approach those of component
tuners and receivers.
The transmitting standards are quite severe, and
rightly so. It is interesting to note that the frequency
response of the main and subcarrier channels must
-a
16
be mainta ned within less than 0.5 db throughout the
range fropi 50 to 15,000 cps, and that the phase
difference must be held within three degrees at the
transmitt . These standards are certain to ensure
that the ttansmitted signal will be all that we could
ask of it-1" it is now only necessary that our decoders
be as goo as the transmitters.
As tote advantages of FM stereo, very little need
be said. 0 e of the greatest, as we see it, is that it will
sible to tape some good stereo music from
the air. Heretofore about all we could do was to
play reco ded tapes, or to dub from stereo records.
We shoul soon be able to begin building up a stereo
tape libra y, just as many of us have done on mono
over the ast ten years or so. We hope we can look
forward t more live stereo broadcasting of good
music tha is currently available on mono, but that
will depe
on the listener reaction and the number
of stereo r ceivers that are in use.
Anybod' can speculate about anything-some prognosticator claim this is the end of the phonograph
record, others that there will be a great boom in new
tuners and receivers, in loudspeakers, and in tape
recorders. We doubt that the phonograph record will
ever pass into the discard, at least within our lifetime. We honestly feel that there will be a considerably increased interest in FM reception, and that the
over -all eff et on the audio industry will be good. We
are not at all pessimistic, nor are we over-optimistic.
We just to k forward to further infusion of the desire
for good music because of FM stereo, and this will
give us a greater variety of programs from which to
choose our musical entertainment.
now be p
SEASON'S EVENTS BRING NEW KITS
This has been a busy Spring, what with hi -fi shows
in Washington, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and
London (vie missed the one in Paris altogether), and
then the F. C. C. decision followed closely by the
convention of the National Association of Broadcasters, also in Washington. But of the many things
we have seen at all the shows, the one that impressed
1000 -watt AM
us most was a kit to end all kits
transmitter in kit form.
This item was shown by Bauer Electronics Corporation at the NAB show, but we shall refrain from
Profiling it, even though it does save some $1300 for
an average of about 55 hours of assembly time. Can't
do that well with any kits we have seen heretofore.
Another surprising idea in the kit department is
Heath's latest, a garage door opener. What won't
they think up next? With prefabricated houses, instant mashed potatoes, prepared canvasses for oil
painting by the numbers, and even boats of glass
fiber cloth, why shouldn't General Motors bring out
a do- it-youself Cadillac ?
We'd be glad to Profile one of them!
-a
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
Exclusive
Assurance
of
Qtlallty
» I.;I. Itts;;>i:.',
NVIOt>NI
Walter
Stanton
O.
of
Only the Stanton Fluxvalve
can provide the exclusive
and patented features
which make it the
finest pickup available.
The significance of a document
... a
conferring exclusive
rights and privileges on an individual to
manufacture and vend an invention both
new and useful
further signifies a
most important responsibility upon that
individual.
LETTERS PATENT
...
1.1 Is
40\
NI
t
\t)).
t
.
I
,
.1
I) IN I
!'1111 111.
11
.,
.1
1
t.,Yt.ti
Endowed with this responsibility,
PICKERING & COMPANY
pioneered
-
through their outstanding participation
in stereophonic development the
,1'itA 11.,I)t: -IIIIr,
STANTON STEREO FLUXVALVE, the very
I) It) ., 14,It:1Y" 1:,lit7 first (and only) stereo cartridge incorporating the revolutionary T -GUARD stylus.
-
%I
111.1
r,l1a!a+
o1, his heirs
Si ;VI.:NTI:I:\' vH:Ait;
Is
II
Ils4alt3ail
But this was only the beginning -through
continued development-major advances
in stereo pickup design were brought
about by the use of PICKERIING & COMPANY'S long experience
special skills
and exclusive techniques.
...
I ~Ixc>v!
'I-llr:
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Thus; less than one year after the intro1'I)IC 1)7'Sit IV,* I It(Aí etAK[Nt:. i'ti11ti duction of the stereo record, PICKERING
& COMPANY introduced the MODEL 380
'l'Ill: iA"17't:l) .197'.,7g:!+.
STANTON STEREO FLUXVALVE. And, in a
few short months, the 380 earned its
reputation from the experts as
"The finest stereo pickup ever tested ".
-
Isn't it time you found the true answer
to stereo as it was meant to be?
urge you to go to your dealer for
WE
TV a 380 FLUXVALVE DEMONSTRATIONwe know you will find its quality of per-
formance almost beyond belief.
FOR THOSE WHO
CAN HEAR THE DIFFERENCE
ickering
for more than a decade-the world's most
experienced manufacturer of high fidelity
pickups...supplier to the recording industry.
PICKERING & CO., INC., PLAINVIEW, NEW YORK
í'/'
The Stanton Fluzvalve and Stereo Flu :valve are patented
(and patente are pending) in the United States. Greet
Britain, Cenada. Japan and other countries throughout the
.
.wa...._
world.
What Hath
FCC Wrought?
Before the
FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
Washington 25, D.C.
In th. Matter of
FCC 61 -524
3143
)
)
Amendment of Part 3 of the Ccemieaiun's
)
Rules and Regulations to Permit FY
)
Broadust Stations to To.nm it
Stereophonic Programs on a Multiplex Basie )
DOCKET NO. 13506
REPORT AND ORDER
By the Commission:
The Coolies/on on March 22, 1955 released a Report and Order in
Docket No. 30832 (FCC 55-340) which adopted rules providing for the issuance
of Subsidiary Communications Authorisations (SCA'.) to PN broadcaster.-Section 3.293 et seq. After a few years of operation under these rules, it
became evident that multiplex techniques could be employed for additional
ueee beyond the limited news, manic, time, and weather" format prescribed
Accordingly, a Notice of Inquiry was released on July 8, 1958
therein.
(Docket No. 12517; FCC 58-635) for the propose of exploring possible
additional uses of FM multiplexing.
1.
DAVID SAS LAW
After several
years of study, the FCC has finally
decided upon a system of FM stereo. The system
approved has the capability of achieving fidelity
as high as is now available with monophonic FM
broadcasts. Here are some details-
the FCC
made known its decision to permit
FM stereo broadcasting commencing June 1. The decision, although actively sought for many years, seems to
have caught many people by surprise.
The surprise does not center about
multiplexing as such, but rather the
system chosen by the FCC. On the one
hand there have been comments implying that the chosen system is "not as
good" as one of the systems not chosen.
On the other hand, there have been comments to the effect that many FM
tuners were rendered "obsolete" because
of the FCC decision. Actually these reactions are quite natural considering
the enthusiasm with which particular
systems were championed and the unusual lack of factual information about
the system chosen. At this point it might
be well to point out that the Zenith -GE
system performed as well as the best of
the systems not selected, and in addition
is essentially more flexible (able to retain the existing commercial FM multiplex, SCA) than the runner -up system
(Crosby). As for the fear that some
types of tuners would be unable to be
adapted to stereo operation, this is just
not so. More about both of these points
ON APRIL 20TH OF THIS YEAR,
later.
Exactly What
Is
the New Stereo System?
First of all it should be noted that the
FCC merely established what is to be
transmitted, not how it is to be achieved.
In essence, what was approved was a
basic equation which defines the signal
to be transmitted (for the exact equation
see the Daniel von Recklinghausen article on page 21). In addition, the FCC
defined the transmission standards for
this basic signal in order to ensure high
Managing Editor, AIIDlo.
18
2.
A preliminary ma/nation of the comments submitted in response to
the Notice. of Inquiry in Docket No. 12517 demonstrated a widespread interest
in the subject of PY eter,ophonie broadoaetiog by means of subcarrier multiples trammmiseion in conjunction with main channel operation. Accordingly,
the Commission on March 12, 1959 released a Further Notice of Inquiry
(FCC 59-21.) which enlarged the scope of the proceedings under Docket No.
12517 to afford interested persons en opportunity to submit data and
opinions directed specificaly to the matter of FM stereophonic broadcasting.
3.
Industries
(88ES
During the pendency of the Notice of Inquiry, the Electronic
tereophoaic Radio Committee
on organised the Nati
tiooal s
..
'
quality broadcasts (from a technical
viewpoint). Following is the section of
FCC Docket 13506 wherein the transmission standards are defined
:
§
3.322 Stereophonic Transmission¡
Standards.
(a) The modulating signal for the
main channel shall consist of the suns
of the left and right signals.
(b) A pilot subcarrier at 19,000 cyeles plus or minus 2 cycles shall be
transmitted that shall frequency modulate the main carrier between the limits
of .8 and 10 per cent.
(e) The stereophonic subcarrier shall
be the second harmonic of the pilot subcarrier and shall cross the time axis
with a positive slope simultaneously
I
with each crossing of the time axis by
the pilot subearrier.
(d) Amplitude modulation of the
stereophonic subearrier shall be used.
(e) The stereophonic subearrier shall
be suppressed to a level less than one
per cent modulation of the main carrier.
(f) The stereophonic subearrier shall
be capable of accepting audio frequencies from 50 to 15,000 cycles.
(g) The modulating signal for the
stereophonic subearrier shall be equal
to the difference of the left and
signals.
(h) The pre -emphasis characteristics
of the stereophonic subchannel shall lbe
identical with those of the main channel with respect to phase and amplitude
at all frequencies.
(i) The sum of the side bands resulting from amplitude modulation of fhe
stereophonic subearrier shall not ca use
a peak deviation of the main carrier in
excess of 45 per cent of total modulation (excluding SCA subcarriers) when
only a left (or right) signal exists;
simultaneously in the main channel, the
deviation when only a left (or right)
signal exists shall not exceed 45 per cent
of total modulation (excluding SCA
subcarriers).
(j) Total modulation of the main
carrier including pilot subearrier and
SCA subcarriers shall meet the requirements of Section 3.268 with maximum
modulation of the main carrier by all
SCA subcarriers limited to 10 per cent.
(k) At the instant when only a positive left signal is applied, the main
channel modulation shall cause an upward deviation of the main carrier frequency; and the stereophonic subearrier
and its sidebands signal shall cross the
time axis simultaneously and in the
same direction.
(1) The ratio of peak main channel
deviation to peak stereophonic subchannel deviation when only a steady state
left (or right) signal exists shall be
within plus or minus 3.5 per cent of
unity for all levels of this signal and
all frequencies from 50 to 15,000 cycles.
(m) The phase difference between the
zero points of the main channel signal
and the stereophonic subearrier side bands envelope, when only a steady
state left (or right) signal exists, shall
not exceed plus or minus 3 degrees for
audio modulating frequencies from 50
to 15,000 cycles.
NOTE: If the stereophonic separation between left and right stereophonic
channels is better than 29.7 decibels at
audio modulating frequencies between
50 and 15,000 cycles, it will be assumed
that paragraphs (1) and (m) of this
section have been complied with.
(n) Crosstalk into the main channel
caused by a signal in the stereophonic
subehannel shall be attenuated at least
40 decibels below 90 per cent modulation.
(o) Crosstalk into the stereophonic
subehannel caused by a signal in the
main channel shall be attenuated at least
40 decibels below 90 per cent modulation.
(p) For required transmitter performance, all of the requirements of
Section 3.254 shall apply with the exception that the maximum modulation
to be employed is 90 per cent (excluding
pilot subearrier) rather than 100 per
cent.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
(q) For electrical performance standards of the transmitter and associated
equipment, the requirements of Section
3.317 (a) (2), (3), (4) and (5) shall
apply to the main channel and stereophonic subchannel alike, except that
where 100 per cent modulation is referred to, this figure shall include the
pilot subearrier.
LEFT
-
PRE EMP HAS IS
L
DELAY LINE
AUDIO MATRIX
RIGHT-
PREE
MP H AS IS
ce
FM
EXCITER
58 KC
38 KC AM
SUFF. CARRIER
L-R
L+R
LOW PASS
MODULATOR
PILOT GENERATO
FILTER
L -R
FM Stereo
Previously we indicated that the FCC
had approved the forni and the technical standards for the stereo signal, not
how it would be achieved. The distinction is quite significant. For instance,
the approved system is known as the
GE- Zenith system. Both GE and Zenith
have on file with the FCC diagrams of
proposed methods for producing the
signal in the desired form. Both diagrams happen to be essentially similar
as to method of signal generation. (Compare Fig. 1 in this article with Fig. 1
in the article by Csicsatka and Linz,
page 24.) Does this mean that this
method must be used by all broadcasters?
Definitely not.
There are at least two fundamentally
different methods for achieving the
standard signal. One of them is the type
illustrated by GE and Zenith and described in the Csicsatka and Linz article, the other system is described at
length in the von Recklinghausen article.
To summarize the two methods, the
GE- Zenith technique requires a matrix
wherein the sum and difference signals
are achieved. The sum signal is fed to
the FM exciter after a suitable time delay (to keep it in step with the difference
signal which follows a somewhat different path). The difference signal, on the
other hand, goes through a 38,000 -cps
suppressed carrier AM modulator and
then to the FM exciter. Of course, both
the sum and difference signals are properly pre -emphasized (before the matrix
in the GE diagram, after in the Zenith),
and the difference signal is filtered to
eliminate the harmonics of the carrier.
Figure 2 shows the block diagram of
an AM modulator (Zenith proposal)
which will generate the 15,000 -cps-wide
sidebands around the 38,000 -cps carrier
(which is suppressed) and, at the same
time, provide the 19,000 -cps pilot signal. The method used in this modulator
is to mix the output of two crystal oscillators to provide the 38,000 -cps carrier, or, by a 2/1 division, the 19,000
cps pilot. The pilot is then added to the
sidebands which remain after the carrier
is suppressed and the combined signal
passed through a linear- phase-shift low pass filter. If we refer back to the FCC
specifications we note that the maximum
difference permitted between the main
and subchannel is 3 degrees. For this
reason, care had to be exercised to avoid
introduction of unwanted phase shift.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
4
PILOT
7500 cps
Broadcasting
Z
38 KC
+19 KC
SCA
AMPLIFIER
PRE£MPHAS
AUDIO
67 KC
PAS
SLOW
FILTER
RAND
SURCARRER
GENERATOR
3`
PASS
1TEA
Fig. 1. Block diagram of Zenith proposal for achieving the stereophonic signal.
possible that the matrixing method is
much easier to integrate with existing
equipment. Most likely this is the reason
most of the emphasis has been placed
on the matrixing method. It is also possible that the time- division method is
not as well known as it should be.
This is especially true in a system such
as this wherein the paths for the main
and subchannel are not identical.
On the other hand, the second method
for generation of the standard signal is
far less critical as to phase shift. This
system is a time -division multiplex
switching system between left and right
stereophonic program channels. In this
system a switching device alternately
takes the whole left or the whole right
signal. In a way it is rather difficult to
understand how switching rapidly between the two inputs will produce the
standard equation, but the fact of the
matter is that it does produce it. In actuality, the form of the standard equation is the key to its derivation; it is
essentially a Fourier expansion of two
variables. That is, if we were to take any
two independent variables and expand
them mathematically we would arrive at
substantially the same equation. According to Carl Eilers of Zenith Radio Corp.
(who worked on it), the idea for the now
accepted system had its inception
through mathematical analysis of the
time- division multiplex signal. Strangely
enough, in its own presentation, Zenith
did not propose this method of signal
generation. Instead they proposed the
system shown in Fig. 1. As far as we
know at present, H. H. Scott, Inc. is the
only proponent of the time -division
method of signal generation on a practical basis; they have announced the
availability of equipment utilizing this
principle. Although on the surface this
method is much more sophisticated from
an engineering viewpoint, it is quite
Receiving FM Stereo
Just as there are two fundamentally
different methods for transmitting the
stereo signal, there are an equal number
of methods for receiving it. It might be
said that these methods are "mirror
images" of the transmission systems;
they essentially reverse the procedure of
the broadcast station.
For example, let us consider the matrixing method. The sum signal is derived from a matrix and, except for
some normal processing, is transmitted
in that form. Referring to the block diagram of the GE adapter (Fig. 2 in the
Csicsatka and Linz article) we can see
that the receiver just reverses this proc
ess. The difference signal, however
must first be recovered from the side bands in which it was transmitted. This
involves reinserting the 38,000 -cps carrier which was suppressed at the transmitter and then separating the audio
from the carrier. In order to reinsert the
carrier precisely where it should be, the
19,000 cps pilot is used; either to synchronize a local 38,000 -cps oscillator or
directly in a doubler circuit. We know
that this pilot will give us the precise
time location we need since it was transmitted with the signal. Then we can demodulate. The difference signal is now
.
AUDIO
38KC AM
BODE
LINEAR
PHASE
xTAI.
OSC.
BALANCED
.SMG
CATHODE
FOLLOWER
ALJDULATC
MIXER
ADDER.
-LOW PASS-AMPLIFIER
I FILTER/
LOW PASS
FILTER
54 KC
40LITPLIT
MPLIF ER
V
2/1 REGEN
DIVIDER
MIXER
(PILOT)
F,_
XTAL 1
OSC,
19KC
Fig. 2. AM modulator and 19,000 -cps pilot generator.
19
Is
DEE MPHASe
STANDARD
RATIO
MOD.
FM TUNER
DETECTOR
CATHODE
F OLLOWER
F-5771(71C
DEF
PASS-
'
L£CI1ON
PLATES
CATHODE
FO .G WIR
ti`CNO
CATHODE
LEFT
FOLLOWER.
FILTER I
A
u
19KC
FILTER
F_
CATtiÈ;)
19KC
OSCILLATOR
4
384(CC
F ILTER
FOLLOWER.
nal degraded'? The answer is no-and
in fact this was one of the important
reasons for selecting the GE- Zenith
system. The following excerpt from FCC
Docket 13506 indicates that the degradation is only experienced in the stereo
channel (system 4-4A is the Zenith -GE
system, 1 is the Crosby system) :
RaGHT
BANDPASS
Fig. 3. Block diagram of Zenith time -division adapter.
ready for matrixing to recover the original left and right signals which started
the whole process.
The switching (time -division) method,
used in the receiver, is a "mirror image"
of the time-division transmission method
although there are several ways of effecting the time division. Figure 3 is the
block diagram of the method used by
Zenith and H. H. Scott uses another
method as shown in Fig. 4 of the von
Recklinghausen article. In both cases
the switching is synchronized by a 38;
000 -cps signal derived from the 19,000 cps pilot. The H. H. Scott adapter is
explained in detail by Mr. von Recklinghausen. A schematic of the Zenith
adapter is given in Fig. 4. In reality
very little explanation is necessary for
this system once the time-division method
of generation is clear; the receiver is
only required to switch between signals
at the precise rate used in broadcasting
to reverse the process and extend the
original left and right signals. The
switching rate (as explained by von
Recklinghausen) is 38,000 cps, the second harmonic of the pilot signal.
The natural question now is whether
the matrix receiver will operate with a
signal generated by the time -division
method and vice versa. The answer to
this, of course, is that the signal generated by both the matrixing and time division methods is exactly the same in
the air; the receiver sees the same signal
no matter which method is used to generate it. I must admit, however, that to
date I have never actually "heard" the
time -division method (I did attend a
demonstration of the matrixing method),
but then how many people have'?
the Monophonic Signal Degraded?
In our enthusiam for the marvels of
FM stereo, we tend to overlook the fact
that many people will want to continue
receiving monophonic FM programs for
some time. Will they "pay the piper"
for those who wish to have stereo now.
In other words, is the monophonic sig-
uation made more difficult by the fact
that in stereophonic transmission more
energy is concentrated near the
ges
of the passband than heretofore. In act,
a well -designed FM tuner, wheth r it
uses a ratio detector or Foster -Seely
discriminator, can have a sufficintly
wide bandwidth to handle stereophonic
transmission under the rules adopted.
The key words here are "well- designed."
Certainly a poorly designed tuner with
a discriminator will probably yield unacceptable distortion with stereophonic
signals. But the fact of the matter is
that such a tuner will provide distórted
monophonic signals too. A poorly designed FM tuner, even with a ratio detector, will also provide unacceptable
distortion. This whole matter can be
summed up by noting that a high-quality tuner will provide a high- quälity
signal, whereas a poor-quality unit will
distort -no matter what system of FM
detection is used. In other words, the
existing high -quality FM tuner is not
15.
tems,
In comparing FM stereophonic sysit is customary to use as the stand-
ard of comparison the signal -to -noise
ratio obtained with monophonie transmission and reception for a given
amount of transmitted power and other
specified conditions, including height of
antenna, transmission path and receiver
sensitivity. When stereophonic transmission is substituted under the same
set of conditions, the main carrier output and subearrier output at the receiver
will have reduced signal -to-noise ratios.
The amount of reduction depends upon
a number of transmission parameters,
including the subearrier frequency, the
frequency swing of the main and sub carriers and the deviation of the main
carrier caused by the subearrier or sub carriers. The calculated loss of signal to -noise ratio, compared to monophonie
transmission and reception for each
.
System is :
Monophonic
System
1
System 4-4A
less than 1 db
(Continued on page .28)
receiver output
obsolete.
6
db
B+
19KC
í
38KC
10C,
AMPLIFIER
B
6AUSA
3
B+
Existing Equipment
Now to return to the apprehensions
expressed by some people about the
forced obsolescence of some existing
tuners. Apparently it was felt that
tuners that use Foster-Seely type discriminators would be unable to be
adapted. The reality of the situation is
that there is no valid technical reason
for this fear. It has been stated that
discriminators of the Foster -Seely type
are inherently too narrow in bandwidth
to handle FM stereo transmission, a sit-
20
(300v)
67KC
6458
PASS
.500W
FILTER
LEFT
CUT
RIGHT
Fig. 4. Simplified schematic of Zenith adapter.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
An FM Multiplex Stereo Adaptor
DANIEL
R.
VON RECKLINGHAUSEN
This adaptor utilizes time- division to achiieve stereophonic FM reception; a method
whereby switching rather than matrixing is used to recover the left and right signals.
and consider able field testing, the Federal Communications Commission has set the
specifications for the compatible stereophonic signals to be transmitted from
a single FM station. The system chosen
transmits the sum of the left, A, and
right, B, input channels on the frequency modulated main carrier. The
difference between A and B amplitude
modulates a 38,000 cps subcarrier with
the subcarrier itself suppressed. The
subcarrier signals in turn frequency
modulate the main carrier. A 19,000 cps
signal is also transmitted for stereo deAFTER YEARS OF STUDY
modulator synchronization.
These and other pertinent specifications can be obtained from the FCC
rules and regulations. Written in legal
and engineering language, they are clear
to the engineer engaged in this type of
work but not necssarily enlightening to
persons unfamiliar with the proceedings
of the National Stereophonic Radio
Committee (which performed the majority of the work of analyzing and
testing the various stereo broadcasting
schemes proposed).
The recording and reproduction of
stereophonic signals had its inception in
the 1920's and 1930's, then described as
binaural signals. It was only natural
that the attention of scientists and
engineers was also focused on means of
transmitting these signals to remote
points. Carrier current telephony over
cables and also radio links were investigated intensively.
The stereophonic system chosen by the
FCC may be accomplished by the time
multiplex system shown in Fig. 1. Here,
the input of a cable or radio link is
switched rapidly between the two inputs
A and B. The output of the cable or
radio link is also switched rapidly to the
* Chief Research Engineer, H. H. Scott,
Inc., Maynard, Mass.
1
SWITCH SYNCHRONIZATION
r
C
I
I
HbA
I
CABLE OR
INPUT
RADIO LINK
o
CH.
Fig.
a
OA
OUTPUT
o-O
CH.
B
1.
CH.
Basic time
AUDIO
B
multiplex stereo system.
JUNE, 1961
CH. A INPUT SIGNAL A(t)
CH.
B
INPUT SIGNAL B(t)
Fig. 2. Waveforms
in basic time multiplex system.
COMPOSITE SIGNAL E,(t)
CH. A OUTPUT
CH.
B
OUTPUT
- 52.
I
SWITCHING PERIOD
two output terminals. Switch synchronization has to be provided so that the
channel A input signals will not accidentally appear in the channel B output.
The signal waveforms of such a system
are shown in Fig. 2. Here, the input
signals, A(t), and B(t), are switched
at a rate fy to the link. The composite
signal Eo (t) now shows portions of the
two input signals in quick succession
and a good representation of the two
input signals is evident. If the lead containing the composite signal is then
switched in synchronism and at the
proper time to the two output leads, the
channel A and B output waveforms result. These waveforms can contain all
the information present in the original
two signals. The highest input frequency
which can be transmitted by such a
method is exactly equal to one half the
,-witching rate, fs.
Mathematically, the composite signal,
=
F5
E0(t), by switching A(t) and B(t) at
a rate
Eo(t)
f,=w
=
:
[A(t) +B(t)1 +2 [A(t) B(t) ]
L
{ cos
becomes
oit 1/3
2
alla
cos 3w8t -F1/5 cos 5wyt
I
I
.
.
)
Eq. (1)
where A(t) and B(t) are the instantaneous input signals, A and B, as a
function of time. It can be seen from
this that the sum of the input signals is
transmitted directly. This is also the
compatible monophonic signal which can
be utilized without any further demodulation. The difference between the input signals appear as amplitude modulation of a series of odd harmonics of
the switching rate f s.
The composite signal might be utilized for modulation of an FM broadeast station. However, the transmission
of the higher harmonics of the switch21
turn requires a gain adjustment of the
subcarrier signal by-2 prior to detection
SPECTRUM
LEVEL
2FS
FS
FREQUENCY
3F
S
Fig. 3. Spectrum of basic time multiplex system.
ing frequency would result in radiation
of signal components from the station
outside its allotted 200,000 cps bandwidth, assuming 15,000 cps audio response with inputs switched at a 38,000 cps rate.
Restriction of bandwidth to include
only the audio frequencies of A and B,
and the first order sidebands of the
switching frequency, results in the basic
specification of the present multiplex
system. This also has the benefit of a less
stringent bandwidth requirement along
with only slightly changed effective
signal -to -noise ratio or change in separation due to phasing errors of the sub carrier employed for detection.
To be able to utilize the full amplitude handling capability of the radio
channel (i.e. maximum deviation capability of an FM transmitter), the
relative amplitude ratio of the main
channel, A +B and subchannel, A - B,
has to be changed to give the composite
signal E (t) which now has been made
standard :
E(t)= [A(t) +B(t)]+
[A (t) -B (t)] cos
Eq. (2)
The composite signal can be generated by at least three different methods.
The first one uses a switching modulator and a phase -linear low -pass filter.
The second method would employ a two
channel square law modulator acting on
the two input signals. The third method
would require the use of an audio matrix network (with transformers or resistors) and a suppressed carrier modulator. Here, two separate outputs could
be obtained : the main channel output
w8t
for direct modulation of the FM transmitter and the stereo subchannel for
modulation of the FM transmitter at a
later stage of multiplication where
higher frequency modulation is possible.
The third method is most likely to be
incorporated in FM transmitters employing phase modulation in conjunction with a frequency-to -phase correcting network and proper audio delay
equalization to correct for the envelope
delay of the early stages of the transmitter.
Receiving the Stereo Signal
The above discussion of modul tion
methods along with the mathema ical
description of the signal waveform ,and
its development leads to several met ods
for separating the composite stereo signal into its left and right components.
If the composite signal of Eq. (2) is
passed through a square law demodulator driven by a waveform [1 +2I' cos
cost], the left channel output will be
equal to 2A(t) plus fundamental and
second harmonic of the reinserted sub -
carrier, f8=--2a
The right channel put-
put 2B (t) can be obtained by driving a
second square law demodulator with a
waveform [1 -2 cos cost].
Since good square law detectors are
difficult to come by in practice, a linear
detector driven with a large reinserted
subcarrier,
can also be used. This, in
effect, uses a square wave for demodulation which gives the detector a multi-
f
plying function [1
±
4
cos cost]. This in
n
or the same gain adjustment of the difference signal after detection.
A third method of detection would
employ the use of a bandpass filter for
the selection of the subcarrier sidebands
in addition to the use of a suppressed
carrier AM detector and a resistive sum
and difference audio matrix network
with proper main channel audio delay.
All of these stereo detection schemes
have one common advantage and one
common disadvantage. The advantage
is that they are relatively economical in
parts cost, employing only two diodes
or a beam deflection tube (such as 6ÁR8)
for demodulation. The disadvantage is
that all of these detectors produce a very
large output at the subcarrier frequency,
f. (38,000 cps), and its harmonics (76;
000 cps, 114,000 cps, etc.). These are
removed only with difficulty by filtering
without disturbing audio frequency response. This, in itself, is not harmful,
since these frequencies are above the
range of human hearing. However, these
signals, if not filtered out, will tend to
overload amplifiers and tweeters because
of reduced power handling capability
at high frequencies. The result is considerably higher distortion. More serious
is that the bias frequencies of tape recorders fall in the frequency range of
the subcarrier frequency and its harmonics. It is made poorer by the increased amplification of tape recorder
circuits to compensate for the required
tape pre- emphasis and high-frequency
losses of the tape. Whistle tones known
as "birdies" are the result of subcarrier
signals causing tape overload. Therefore, it is absolutely necessary that subcarrier frequencies are prevented from
appearing at the audio outputs of the
multiplex adaptor.
In the H. H. Scott adaptor, the subcarrier is balanced out by means of balanced bridge demodulators and a 15,000
cps sbirp cutoff filter is used at the
CH. A
OUTPUT
WIDEBAND
o
AMPLIFIER
AUDIO
AMPLIFIER
LOW PASS
INPUT
0-I~
FROM
AMPLIFIER
FILTER
53KC
I9KC
EMIR
DEMOD.
EFFICIENCY
BALANCE
SYNC_
AAUP Mt
LE
FM DETECTOR
./EL
AUDIO
AMPLIFIER
BALANCED
BRIDGE
DEMOD,
Fig. 4. Block
22
diagram of
H. H. Scott
DEEMP
WIDEBAND
IsKC
AMPLIFIER
LOW PASS
FILTER
S
o
CH. B
OUTPUT
type 335 multiplex adaptor.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
Fig. 5. Front view
of H. H. Scott
adaptor.
audio outputs. This effectively eliminates
any of the subcarrier frequencies at
this point.
The forerunners of the multiplex
stereo system chosen by the FCC have
been described by a magazine writer as
"the Radio Manufacturers' Dream". This
writer was correct in his estimate since
this system allows radio manufacturers
to design sets of relatively modest cost
which produce stereo of some sort. However, to produce high quality stereo
worthy of the name "High Fidelity" a
great deal of engineering and complex
circuitry has to be expended in both
tuner and multiplex adaptor design. For
example, to achieve 30 db of separation,
the phase response of the tuner -adaptor
combination may not differ more than
± 3 degrees between main and subchannel
at all modulating frequencies. Similarly,
the ampltude response may not vary
more than ± 0.3 db, and the phasing of
the subcarrier with respect to the pilot
carrier has to be constant at all r.f. input levels. For this reason, it is extremely important that the tuner and
adaptor match each other and have a
wide and phase -linear response including the required connecting cable. Any
level controls connected between the
tuner's multiplex output and the stereo
demodulator circuitry will have a severe
effect on phase and frequency response.
Similarly, the frequency and phase response of the audio circuitry of existing
tuners is not controlled closely enough
to use the tuners regular audio output
and maintain high separation between
left and right outputs while deriving
the subchannel information separately.
For these and other reasons, almost
all adaptors derive both main and sub channel information directly from the
tuner's multiplex output circumventing
all audio stages of the tuner. The wide band ratio detectors used in most high
fidelity tuners have a sufficiently wide
bandwidth, wide frequency response,
and low internal impedance to permit
the use of up to a 3 -foot connecting
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
cable with negligible effect on amplitude
and phase response. To maintain good
low- audio -frequency separation, it was
found necessary to maintain the low
input impedance of the
adaptor in excess of 50 megohms. Suffrequency
ficient amplification had to be provided
in the adaptor to produce a 2.5 -volt
minimum output at 100 per cent modulation of either left or right channel
from the relatively low output of the
wideband detector (0.3 volt typical at
75,000 cps deviation).
The
Adaptor
Figure 4 shows the block diagram of
the H. H. Scott type 335 Multiplex
Adaptor. The signal from the FM detector (multiplex output) is first amplified in a high -input- impedance stage
and then passed through a phase -linear
filter attenuating frequencies above 53,000 cps. This removes any background
music signals from the stereo demodulator inputs. A narrow band and noise immune 19,000 cps filter selects the pilot
carrier. After further amplification it
synchronizes the 38,000 cps subcarrier
oscillator. All tuned circuits are temper-
ature compensated so that the oscillator
exhibits a warmup drift of only .01 per
cent in the absence of a pilot carrier,
the 38,000 cps subcarrier oscillator remains phase locked to the pilot signal
so that maximum separation is maintained at all r.f. signal levels. Measurements with a wave -analyzer have shown
that separation of left and right audio
signals is maintained even with such low
r.f. signals that the signal -to -noise ratio
makes listening impossible.
The output of the 53,000 cps low -pass
filter and the 38,000 cps oscillator drive
the two balanced bridge stereo demodulators. Two wideband amplifiers following the demodulators have a common
efficiency- balance circuit (as required by
the difference of Eq. (1) and (2) above).
This assures best separation. The deemphasis and 15,000 cps cutoff circuits
are in the separate audio channels rather
than ahead of the demodulator or matrix networks. By this method, any component tolerance will not affect channel
separation as it otherwise would. A
stereo level control with low impedance
output amplifiers complete the actual
adaptor circuit.
A number of circuit refinements have
been incorporated in this self-powered
adaptor. A front panel switch permits
listening to either multiplex stereo or
AM -FM stereo broadcasts if an AM -FM
stereo tuner is the signal source. Other
switches engage noise filter circuits permitting stereo listening of weak signals
with reduced noise and full frequency
response or full separation. Both stereo
amplifier and stereo tape recorder outputs are provided.
The FCC -approved system can be received with extremely simple adaptors
that will provide adequate results with
inexpensive FM radios and tuners. Fortunately, for the more demanding music
listener it is possible to design a multiplex equipment with the same high engineering standards found in our wide band tuners.
Fig. 6. Top -rear
view of H. H. Scott
adaptor.
23
FM Stereo -The General Electric
System
ANTAL CSICSATKA and ROBERT M. LINZ'
Here, in abbreviated form, is an explanation of the General Electric
FM stereo system by two of the engineers responsible for it.
In addition, a description of a one -tube stereo adapter is given.
of the FM
stereophonic broadcasting system
adopted by the Federal Communications Commission are that it satisfies
all the requirements the Commission set
forth and can operate with a one -tube
adapter to produce stereophonic sound
from a conventional tuner and stereophonic amplifier.
An examination of system specifications ( Table I) quickly enlightens the
serious listener to the capabilities of the
adopted system. In particular, reference
is made to the fully separated stereo
(30 db from 50- 15,000 cps), while maintaining existing monophonic distortion
requirements.1
The transmitter2 is most easily explained with reference to the block diagram of Fig. 1. The left, L, and right, R,
signals are developed conventionally and
then pre-emphasized separately before
being fed to the matrix where the sum
(L +R) and difference (L
are produced. The L +R signal is fed directly
to the FM modulator in the usual
fashion to frequency modulate the main
carrier thus providing one portion of
the stereophonic signal while simultaneously serving as the compatible monophonic signal. The L R signal is fed
into a balanced modulator where proportional sidebands are generated above
and below the subcarrier frequency of
38,000 cps. The subcarrier is automatically suppressed, but the L R sidebands
frequency modulate the main carrier.
It should be noted that the carrier input to the balanced modulator comes
from frequency doubling the input of a
19,000 -cps oscillator. A parallel output
from the same 19,000 -cps oscillator goes
into the FM modulator to act as the
pilot carrier.
THE KEY CHARACTERISTICS
R)
TABLE
I
SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS
L + R audio (FM modulating main carrier)
50- 15,000 cps audio band
Main Channel
90 per cent maximum main carrier deviation
Standard 75 µsec. Pre-emphasis
L
Subchannel
38,000 cps suppressed carrier AM subcarrier (FM modulating
main carrier)
50- 15,000 cps audio band
90 per cent maximum main carrier deviation
19,000 cps pilot carrier (FM modulating main carrier 8 -10 per cent)
Standard 75 µsec. pre- emphasis
Separation between Left and Right Signals -30db between 50 and 15,000 cps
Distortion- Maintain existing FCC requirements
R
The receiver operates generally as depicted in the block diagram of Fiig. 2,
and is conventional to the discriminator
output which is, however, taken ahead
of any de- emphasizing networks. The
L + R signal in an existing monophonic
receiver would produce a compatible
program, but in the stereophonic receiver
it is fed directly to the matrix. The
L R sidebands and the pilot signal
which are near or above the rane of
normal hearing would not be head in
the monophonic receiver. However, in
the stereophonic receiver they must be
decoded to produce the L R }audio
signal. This takes place when the
19,000 -cps pilot signal is filtered, and
doubled to recover the 38,000 -cps subcarrier which is in turn added with the
LEFT
FILTER
filtered sidebands to form normal amplitude modulation. This is detected to
produce L R audio for the matrix.
The matrix outputs, after passing
through separate de- emphasis networks,
are then the original left and right
stereophonic signals.
A study of the spectrum of signals
appearing in a discriminator output will
help in understanding the system. Such
a spectrum is shown in Fig. 3. Shown is
a monophonic or what would normally
be the 50- 15,000 -cps audio program, and
the SCA signal (storecasting) with the
SCA subcarrier at 67,000 cps and maximum deviation of 6700 cps by the SCA
program.
Also shown is the stereophonic signal which is made up of a lower sideband
AND
FREE MP HAS IS
CIRCUITS
L+R
MATRIX
COMBINED ADDER
AN
L+R
D
TIME
DELAY
+
STANDARD
M
TRANSMITTER
L-R
SUBTRACTER
AUDIO
19KC PILOT
SIDEBAIDS+
(WITH MULTIPLEX
PROVIS ION)
L-R
* Radio Receiver Department, General
Electric Company, Utica, New York.
1 FCC "Report and Order," April 20,
1961.
2 Comments by the General Electric Company to FCC Docket 13506, October 28,
1960.
24
RIGHT
FILTER AND
PREEMPHAS IS
CIRCUITS
19KC CRYSTAL
OSCILLATOR
AND L-R
SIDEBAND
GENERATOR
TIME
DELAY
Fig. 1. Block diagram of stereo FM transmitter.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
H. H.
Scott first again!
Wide -Band Multiplex Adaptor
FCC approves multiplex! And H. H. Scott is now producing the world's first Multiplex Adaptor for Wide -Band
tuners. Now you can listen to exciting FM stereo multiplex broadcasts simply by adding the new H. H. Scott
335 Wide -Band Multiplex adaptor to your H. H. Scott
tuner, regardless of age or model.
'-
,
+c
,..
Self powered design eliminates complex installation and possible misalignment of FM Tuner . . . All
connections external.
Special circuitry permits high quality tape recording of multiplex
stereo programs.
Only H. H. Scott adaptors use famous Wide-Band design
which permits receiving both main and multiplex channels with lower distortion and greater fidelity than is
possible with conventional circuitry. H. H. Scott's years
of experience in engineering multiplex circuitry assures
you equipment of highest technical standards.
The 335 Wide -Band Multiplex Adaptor has these im-
portant advantages:
1. Wide -Band circuits permit receiving the full dynamic
frequency range, both on main and on multiplex channels, even in weak signal areas.
2. New switching methods allow you to fully control
multiplex reception from the adaptor itself. You can
receive either FM, FM Multiplex or AM -FM Stereo
(if an AM -FM Stereo tuner is used) simply by operating the controls on the adaptor.
3. Adaptor is self-powered
no need for taking power
from your tuner and possibly reducing component life.
4. All connections between tuner and adaptor are
external. No need for making internal connections
and upsetting tuner alignments. Connect it yourself
in minutes, no tools
IN
required.
-
H. H. SCOZ,rr
Coming Soon!
A Complete Wide-Band
FM Multiplex Stereo Tuner
.H.H.SCOTT
stereornastcr
9T6pLV
Ndit
SELECTN
,_,.V
..wf *TS
^WOtn.O Nutn+..ta Ao^n.ew
Adaptor Defeat switches Adaptor
completely out of system so you
can receive AM -FM stereo broadcasts on your AM -FM Stereo tuner.
Noise Filter removes
both stereo channels.
noise from
Full Stereo
separation maintained.
Master Control: Position for regular
multiplex
stereo; for multiplex
stereo with noise filter on sub channel only (main channel frequency response unaffected); for
regular FM broadcasts.
TECHNICAL INFORMATION: This Wide -Band adaptor can be used ONLY with
H. H. Scott Wide -Band tuners. It may be used with all H. H. Scott tuners
without any modifications: 300; 310 A, 8, C and D; 311 A, B, C & D;
314; 320; 330 A, B, C & D; 331 A, B, and C; 399, LT 10. Connecting cables
supplied. Self powered AC. Styling matches all H. H. Scott tuners. Complete
instructions furnished. Standard H. H. Scott panel height. Dimensions 7' W
x 51/4" H x 13" D in accessory wood or metal case. ;99.95.
Note to
H. H. Scott tuner owners: We do not recommend using any other adaptor
with H. H. Scott Wide -Band tuners.
L +R
L
STANDARD
FM
-R DOUBLE
SIDEBAND
LEFT
AMPLIFIER
BANDPASS
-
ETECTOR
MATRIX
FILTER
--fDEEMPHASIS
DISCRIMINATOR
'
OUTPUT
AUDIC
--IDEEMPHAS IS FO--
23 -53KC
TUNER
because one is producing peak main carrier deviation while the other is zero,
and vice versa. Thus, the monophonic
listener experiences a signal-to -noise loss
of less than 1 db.
This interleaving effect arises from
the fact that the sum of two variables
(L + R) is high when their difference
(L - R) is low and vice versa. Since the
amplitude of the sideband envelope produced by the L -R signal is directly
proportional to L - R, this relationship
between a sum of two variables and their
difference is maintained and the main
channel and subchannel will interleave.
Perhaps a reference to Fig. 4 will help
in developing an understanding of this
phenomenon. In Fig. 4 (A) represents
the L signal input; (B) shows an imag-
AUDIO
RíGHT AUDIC
I9KC FILTER
Fig. 2. Block
DOUBLER
AMPLIFIER
38KC
diagram of stereo
FM
receiver
from 23,000 to 38,000 cps and an upper
sideband of 38,000 to 53,000 cps, plus
the 19,000 -cps pilot.
Interleaving
There are important advantages for
suppressing the carrier and transmitting
a subharmonic pilot. One of these results in an interleaving effect which permits a 90 per cent maximum deviation on
the main channel as well as 90 per cent
on the subchannel, with the other 10
per cent in each case being reserved for
the pilot carrier.
Interleaving, or nesting, of the L +13
main channel signal and the L -R generated sidebands is one of the most interesting and important aspects of the
newly adopted system.
Because of this effect, 90 per cent of
normal deviation can be used on the
main channel, and also the subchannel,
PRE -STEREO
ADDITION FOR STEREO
L *R
UP TO 9D%
SCA-
MODULATION
1040
PILOT
L -R DOUBLE SIDEBAND
SUPPRESSED CARRIER- UP TO 90%
MODULATION CF MAIN CARRIER
Interleav+R and
sidebands.
4.
ing of
L
(D) L-R
;,1iÍ1
lukq
1111
Ilpi"
T
(E) L-R SIDEBANDS
(F) L+R
L-R
SIDEBANDS
26
53,000
l
67,000 +6700
Fig. 3. Spectrum of signals appearing at output of discriminator.
Fig.
101'
38,000
FREQUENCY (CPS)
(B) RIGHT INPUT
;
OF
MAIN CARRIER
1
15,000 19,000 23,000
T
IIhl 1i8
10%
MODULATION
OF
MAIN CARRIER
A
(A) LEFT INPUT
FM BROADCASTS
-
R
L
inary square wave pulse on R, used for
illustrative purposes ; (C) shows L + R
(sine wave plus pulses) ; (D) shows the
L -R (sine wave minus pulses) ; (E)
shows the L -R subcarrier sidebands
and (F) the composite signal (minus
the pilot for illustrative purposes) consisting of L + R and the L -R sidebands
that would be the signal fed to the FM
modulator. Note that its peak amplitude
is not greater than the peak amplitude
of L + R or the L -R sidebands. Also
observe that there is a depression
(caused by - R, the pulse) in the L -R
sidebands, while there is a simultaneous
peak (caused by + R, the pulse) on the
I, + R signal. When they add to form
the composite, the L + R peak fills the
L -R sideband depression.
If the subearrier carrier is suppressed,
the main and subchannels can have peak
FM deviations limited only by the necessity to provide for the pilot carrier.
Another advantage of the 19,000 -cps
pilot can best be explained at this time.
Note that the 19,000-cps pilot falls in a
clear channel portion of the discriminator output, with the L + R audio 4000
cps below and the L -R lower sideband
4000 cps above. It will be recognized
that this affords the use of relatively
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
Rest
bz/
Blindfold Test
THE WIDELY ACCLAIMED
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TE2
In the moment of truth, impartiality
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In a recent test, both the widely
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"rated" systems costing much
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Be sure to hear the TF -3 and TF -2
they may well be the "best buy" for
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o
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In Canada: Renfrew Electric Co., Ltd., Toronto
In Mexico: Universal De Mexico, S.A., Mexico, D.F.
LOUDSPEAKERS
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
27
AMPLIFIER
DOUBLER -AMPLIFIER
DETECTOR
MATRIX
DEEMPHASIS
LIGHT LISTENING
L+R
(from page 10)
38KC BANDPASS
L-R
LEFT
1/2 12AT7
38KC
TUNED
RIGHT
Fig. 5. Simplified schematic of one -tube
simple filter circuits in the receiver for
isolating the pilot signal so that is may
be doubled to recover the subearrier.
This is an important feature of the system and is one of the primary reasons
that a simple one -tube adaptor can be
employed.
Circuit Description
Figure 5 is a schematics of a doubler
circuit which employs a tuned doubler
amplifier to recover the subcarrier from
the pilot.
The discriminator output from a tuner
is applied to the control grid of the
12AT7 amplifier. The plate of this tube
provides an amplified output signal
which is applied, via an amplitude adjusting potentiometer and a time delay
network, to the L + R signal input line
of the matrix.
The output signal of the 12AT7 is also
attenuated by a resistive voltage divider
and is applied via a bandpass filter4 to
the input of the detector. The filter is
tuned to provide a bandpass from 23,000
to 53,000 cps with the series arm displaying an "anti-resonance" at the SCA
frequency which, for the NSRC field
tests, was 67,000 cps. If the "anti -resonance" is not designed into the filter, an
annoying whistle may be heard because
of mixing between the 67,000 -cps SCA
subearrier and harmonics of the stereo
subearrier.
The output signal of the 12AT7 is
also fed, via a resistor or capacitor, to
the pilot filter, which is shown tuned
to the pilot signal frequency of 19,000
cps. The output of the filter is coupled
to the grid of the second triode of the
12AT7. This tube is operated as a
doubler -amplifier.
The plate is connected to a circuit
which is tuned to double the frequency
of the pilot (38,000 cps). This frequency- doubled signal is applied, via a
secondary on the coil of the tuned cir3
Reply Comments by the General Elec-
trie Company to FCC, November 7, 1961.
4 "Reference Data for Radio Engineers,"
Federal Tel. and Radio Corp., 1948, p. 176.
28
adapter.
cuit or a capacitor, to the input o the
detector.
The detector consists of a pair of rectifiers connected to the input with opposite polarities, as shown. Filte capacitors and resistors are respect vely
connected between the output elect odes
of the detector rectifiers and groun&.
The matrix circuit contains the resistor bridge shown. It is important to note
that stereo separation is dependent on
the degree of balance of this bridge.
The de- emphasis network comprises
the usual resistor and capacitor providing the standard 75 iisec de- emphasis.
The output signals, L and R, are tken
after the de- emphasis.
It should be noted that the ou put
impedance of this one -tube devic is
quite high, and, also, that the inse ion
Æ
loss will range from 6 to 10 db.
WHAT HATH
FCC?
(from page 20)
Subcarrier
output
Left signal
output
Right signal
output
15 db
23 db,
13 db
20 db,
13 db
20 db
The Three Suns, a fixture for decades
among the outfits offering light background
music, have now felt it necessary to add a seasoning of percussion to their arrangements.
In their latest album, the old standbys -electric organ and accordian-are surrounded by
marimba, vibraphone, kettledrum, and Chinese
gong. In a further departure, a Salvation
Army drum has been pressed into service.
Listeners whose recollection of the Suns goes
back to their hotel broadcasts will find little
left of the early casual style. The arrangements by Charles Albertine generate steam in
every phase. Wild wrinkles show up in the
Colonel Bogey March but his original composition Smoke offers tthe greatest reward to
those who insisted on good bass response in
their right playback channel.
The Fantastic Raymond Shelley
Columbia CS 8393
Normally, Columbia doesn't introduce a new
member on its roster of organists with an
album title as extravagant as this one. My
curiosity, therefore, centered on the artist as
I started to play this release. I was already
reasonably certain that the recording job on
this theatre organ would be a good one. A
favorite in my collection of auditorium acoustics-in- stereo is Columbia CS 8230 ( "Ashley
Miller at Radio City Music Hall "). Possibly
the first aspect of this recording to strike the
listener is the rhythmic command of a Wurlitzer exhibited by Raymond Shelley. I would
hesitate to call it fantastic but a few measures of the opening selection, I Got Rhythm,
explains the acclaim that greeted his appearance at the Detroit convention of the American Guild of Organists in 1960. Among the
delegates assembled in that city's Fox Theatre
on that occasion was Columbia's well -known
organist in the classical field, E. Power Biggs.
His enthusiastic endorsement of Shelley to the
"home office" made possible this recording in
the same setting. The Fox Theatre Wurlitzer
was one of five installations designed by
Jesse Crawford back in the late Twenties
when a hundred thousand dollars could buy
one whale of a four -manual. All the trimmings were included -two sets of cathedral
chimes, three xylophones, two marimba -harps,
drums, traps, and percussion galore. Restored
by a group of volunteers who worked after
the theatre closed for the night, the organ
provides a wonderful palette for staples such
as Birth of the Blues, Brazil, Misty, and The
Band flayed On.
Brown: The Lerner and Loewe Band Columbia CS 8394
book
When show music reaches the popularity
enjoyed by the Lerner and Loewe productions,
it is sure to be put to a variety of uses. Here
it is made to serve as dance music while Les
Brown raids the rosters of four top "L and
L" shows-"Camelot," "My Fair Lady,"
"Gigi," and "Brigadoon." Those familiar with
the original cast recordings may be tempted
to wonder what on earth the Les Brown arrangers accomplished with only reeds and
brasses at their disposal in spelling out the
appeal of the tunes. One addition to the band
was worked out for this occasion-the tuba of
Phil Stephens. Arrangers Hill, Barket, and
Comstock have used the five saxes, five trumpets and five trombones of the band with easy
flexibility. They have converted to dance
tempo such disparate items as Follow Me
from "Camelot" and Get Me to the Church on
Time from "My Fair Lady." The crisp beat
and relaxed discipline of the Brown crew is a
pleasure to hear in Columbia's realistic sound.
This is the straight- from -the -shoulder impact
of a good band playing in a live studio. Coursing through a bona fide sound system, an unvarnished job such as this can sound twice
as effective as the fussed -over novelties of
the moment.
Les
16. It will be observed that System 1
has the greater loss in signal to noise
ratio for monophonic reception and the
lesser loss for stereo; conversely, System 4-4A has a smaller loss for monophonic reception and a greater loss, for
stereo. Both the monophonic and stereo
losses for System 4-4A would be greater
if SCA subcarrier frequencies were hlso
used.
Clearly the public has been served by
this FCC decision
not only preserves
the existing monophonic transmission,
but in addition provides the new din ension of stereo.
Our title paraphrases the statement
made at the inauguration of the t lephone which ushered in a new er . I
trust this decision by the FCC may be
as momentous for FM broadcasting. IE
-it
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
"exciting!" says Julie London.
T's the Best!"
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STEREO
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comb ries these advanced features:
4Track Stereo Record 'Play
2 -Track Stereo Playba.:k
4Trck MonaJral Record ay
DLaI Head Outputs
Dual Pre -Amp Ou:puts
Cua Pcwer Amplifier Outputs
Dual Stereo Speakers / Portable
Recessed handle and
iertical operation idyl
or custorr installation. $399,50
I'
ONLY
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Please send me:
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Los Angeles 38, California
I
Roberts Stereo Tape Information Kit contaming 39 stereo and monaural applications. I
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D The name of my nearest dealer.
i] I want a free, no- obligation demonstration.
I
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City
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
State
29
"Reflection Coupler" Gives
Stereo Spread
LEON
J.
KNIZE
By radiating the sound from the rear of a cabinet and using the wall as a diffuser
to spread the sound, a remarkably good illusion is presented to the listener.
STEREO REPRODUCTION firmly
established as a technical possibility -and, in fact, an electronic
miracle as far as the outputs from the
two amplifier channels are concernedthe next problem centers around the need
for converting these ideal, let us say,
electrical signals into a reasonable facsimile of the original acoustical environment. The simplest solution is the use of
two conventional loudspeakers systems
spaced a finite distance apart. This finite
distance, however, seems to vary with
each individual selection and with each
type of microphoning, and unless the
two loudspeaker systems are placed on
some movable "trolley" so that their
spacing may be altered to suit each recording situation, it is likely that the
reproduction will bear little resemblance
to the original performance. Let us look
into the reasons for this.
We can agree that the only way to
judge whether reproduction of music is
occurring accurately or inaccurately is
to go back to the original live performance. If it is not our intention to recreate this performance as closely as
possible, the use of the word "reproduction" as applied to recordings of music
is entirely wrong. The word itself describes what we are trying to do.
WITH
* President, Scott Radio Laboratories,
Inc., 241 West St., Annapolis, Md.
1. Sound reaching the listener from
single performer in a typical stage is
composed of direct sound from the instrument and reflected sound from the top
and from the back and side walls. In addition, there are other reflections from
the listening area itself.
Fig.
a
30
We know that sound waves, hen
leaving an instrument or other s ce,
travel in all directions. This means that
in any normal concert hall (or for that
matter, any location in which music
originates) reverberation begins oz the
stage (or in the performing area) even
when only a solo instrument or voice
is involved. The sound traveling upwards into the "shell" of the stage or the
ceiling of the performing area will scatter off the ceiling; the sound traveling
to the back will scatter off the back of
the stage; and that to the right or left
will be reflected from the sides, s in
Fig. 1
fi
By far the major portion of the sound
reaching any person in the audience will
be this scattered sound, even if this person were sitting somewhere in the audience where the direct sound reached him
before it struck the walls, floor, ce' mg,
or some other object in the listening
area. Basically, therefore, we must divide our auditorium or room into (a)
the playing area, and (b) the listening
area.
The playing area creates sound that
is largely reverberant in
nature; that is
to say, it has struck a reflecting surface
before it leaves the playing area. The
listening area creates sound that is entirely reverberant in nature. We must
add to this the fact that the rate of attenuation of direct sound is the same indoors as it is outdoors. The direct sound
will reach a person far back in a listening area not at all, or at least reduced
from the strength it had at its source. A
reverberant sound, however, can leave a
reflecting surface at practically the same
intensity at which it impinges upon this
surface. Therefore, a sound hitting a
flat surface which is reflective enough
to return this sound at its full intensity
will reach the listening area almost as
strong as the direct sound is, and when
the sound is reflected from many points
at once, as it may well be, the totalh reflected sound can be considerably greäter
than the direct sound.
Now consider a listening area that
has more than one voice or more than
one instrumentalist, as in Fig. 2. Here
we have a more complex phenomenon
occurring, since there are many sound
sources simultaneously sending sound
energy in all directions. Obviously these
sound waves mix together and form a
sort of turbulence. Just as obviously a
large proportion of this sound mixture
and reverberation occurs inside the playing area, so one might say that this reverberant and turbulent sound leaves
the playing area in a body very much
like fog or smoke; that is, it is diffused
over the entire front area of the stage,
both vertically and horizontally. Figure 3
shows an "apparent source" plane which
might well be a sound -transparent screen
at the front of the playing area. The X's
show the apparent sources of both direct and reflected sound, and it will be
assumed by the listener that his virtual
sound source, or screen, is the actual
source of the sound. The listener hears
various intensities and directions of
one were suffisound sources which
ciently skillful and if sufficient channels
were available for the equipment-could
be duplicated by a multiplicity of loudspeakers in the plane of the sound
screen. Therefore, it must be admitted
that the sound leaving the playing area
-assuming the use of a conventional
stage and not the top of a mountain
is not limited to direct sound, but is a
composite of direct sound and reflected
sound of differing intensities and directions. Once this condition is recognized
by the listener-and by the loudspeaker
designer-the problem of creating the
illusion of sound coming from a typical
-if
-
Fig 2. Sound reaching the listener from a
group of performers is still more diffused
than in the case of a single performer.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
s
,
1,'
;V.,.,
,
APPARENT
SOURCE
datMt
A-
.
',..
:__-'':.
="°`v"rf'
LISTENING
PLAYING
í,AREA
(A)
APPARENT SOURCE
APPARENT SOURCE
PLAYING
AREA
Fig. 5. Since the loudspeaker system is a compact unit in itself, it can readily be housed in a cabinet with sufficient room
(C)
(B)
remaining for equipment and record storage.
Fig. 3. If all of the sound -both direct and reflected -could be
measured at an imaginary plane, and then reproduced with
the same directivity and intensity, the imaginary plane would
serve as the virtual source. The problem remains as to how
to transfer the imaginary plane into the listener's home.
playing area is considerably simplified.
All that is necessary is to cause the
sound to be distributed over a large
area, either by means of a large number
of loudspeakers covering an entire wall
or by some more practical method.
Living Room Conditions
In the home we have a listening area
which is generally somewhat smaller
than the listening area at the usual live
performance. It is well nigh impossible
to duplicate the conditions of any given
live listening area in the home, and completely impossible to duplicate all of
them. Ideally, however, following the
logic of our discussion on live performance playing and listening areas, if
we can divide the listening area from
the playing area we can coupe much
closer to the reality of the original performance.
Let us go back to this diffused turbulent wall of acoustic energy which leaves
the front of a stage -the imaginary
sound -transparent screen at the front
of the playing area. It would seem that
the first ingredient in duplicating the
live performance would be to create such
a wall of diffused turbulent acoustic
energy, since this would then give us
the feeling of the front of a playing
area. However, with microphones placed
relatively close to the source of sound,
the resultant recording has relatively
little reverberation in it. One channel
differs from the other primarily in intensity. The exact reproduction of these
two recorded signals has practically
none of the reverberation which existed
at our imaginary plane, in most instances. Yet the reproduction from the
recording must of necessity be limited
to the direct (and reflected) sound
which reached the relatively close microAUDIO
JUNE, 1961
phones, and these limited signals are
all the information which is offered
to the loudspeakers in the home or
other listening area. The reverberant
and stereophonic effect which the playing area lends to a performance is to a
large extent missing, since at best we
are capturing only a portion of the wall
of diffused acoustic energy with microphones placed in the usual positions.
If it were possible to take this imaginary plane of acoustic energy and
transfer it to the listening area, we
should then have re- created the original
effect as heard by a listener at the live
performance. In addition to the reverberant energy present at this imaginary
wall, we add the reverberation of the
listening area, with the result that we
have arrived at a remarkably good facsimile of the original performance. All
that remains now is to design a loudspeaker system which is capable of reproducing this imaginary sound source
in the home or listening area.
The "Reflection Coupler" Stereo Speaker
System by Scott of Annapolis
Having thus determined the requirements of a suitable stereophonic loudspeaker system, it only remains to
fulfill them as closely as possible. By
utilizing a wall of the room as a diffraction surface for diffusing and reverberating the acoustic energy coming from
the loudspeakers, the Scott Radio Labs
"Reflection Coupler" Speaker System
succeeds in reproducing the conditions
necessary to the imaginary sound screen,
and thus in re- creating the original
sound source in a listening area of
limited size. Instead of the sound appearing to come from two "holes in the
wall," it appears to be spread out all
over the wall behind the loudspeaker
system. Instead of an instrument appearing to be in its normal position
when the listener is on the center line between the two loudspeakers, but moving
to the left or right as the listener moves
to the left or right, the instrument appears to come from the same point on
the wall regardless of where the listener
is. We have, in effect, moved the perfor-
Fig. 4. External appearance of one of the benches available to house the Scott of Annapolis "Reflection Coupler" system. Note that it does not "look like a loudspeaker."
31
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Fig. 6. Internal construction of the Reflection Coupler loudspeaker system. (A), plan
view; (B), rear elevation; and (C), section through (A) at X-X.
mers so that the playing area appears
to be just back of the wall. Thus it is
apparent that the loudspeaker system
has re- created the diffused and turbulent wall of acoustic energy which was
represented at the plane of the imaginary "sound screen," and the illusion of
the individual positions of the instruments remains the same no matter how
the listener moves around the room.
This seems to be the ultimate objective
of the system insofar as the distribution
of sound is concerned. It is important,
however, that the loudspeaker system
should be of a size and configuration
which would be acceptable in the average home, and-in the opinion of the
average housewife -that it should not
"look like a loudspeaker." How well the
latter objective has been achieved should
be readily apparent from Figs. 4 and 5,
which show one of the benches that may
be used to house the loudspeaker system,
and a console model which can house
the complete hi -fi system and still provide some storage space for records.
How well the first objective has been
achieved can be judged only by listening.
The loudspeaker system by itself is
32
a completely integrated unit housed in
a box approximately 42 inches long, 16
inches deep, and 9 inches high, and containing two woofers and two mid- and
high -frequency speaker units. in the
most expensive models, it also contains
two super -tweeter units, relieving the
mid -high unit from the chore of reproducing frequencies above 2000 cps. All
of the sound comes out of the back of
the cabinet, and nothing about the unit
"looks like a loudspeaker," much less
two of them.
The woofer section employs two 12inch cones, each in 0.9 cu-ft. enclosures
and loaded both front and back by slots,
with the back slot being common to both
channels, resulting in a mixing of the
very low frequencies. The slot design is
such that front and back pressure leaves
are equalized to bring them into phase,
and also to damp the outputs of the
low-frequency radiators effectively. The
horn aspect of the combined front and
back slots help greatly in creating a
unit of high efficiency, as will be noted
from the output figures.
The high -frequency cones are mounted
directly into the back of the cabinet and
radiate into the molded plastic "reflection couplers," whence the sound is directed upward and outward against the
wall behind the speaker. The two sound
patterns from the couplers mix between
the two channels near the center at some
distance above the cabinet itself, resulting in a very noticeable sound spread
without any tendency toward a "hole
in the middle." This sound spread completely eliminates any "ping -pong" effect, which is considered most unpleasant to music lovers, yet it gives a definite
feeling of location to stereo reproduction. This was clearly demonstrated at
the Washington High Fidelity Show
where the unit was shown to the public
for the first time. Two small speaker
cabinets of conventional bookshelf dimensions were placed alongside one of
the combined speaker -equipment consoles. Most listeners appeard to be
thoroughly surprised when the small
cabinets were picked up and shown to
be empty boxes. Blindfold tests by experienced listeners as well as by laymen
have consistently resulted in selection
of the Scott of Annapolis "Reflection
Coupler" speaker system as the best for
sound distribution in stereo demonstrations.
Construction
Figure 6 shows the general principles
of construction of the speaker system.
The same basic unit is used in both the
separate speaker systems and in the
consoles. In the figure, (A) shows the
plan view, (B) shows the rear elevation,
and (C) shows a section through (A).
Note that the plane of the "baffle" on
which the woofers are mounted is at an
angle with the bottom of the housing
so as to provide a smoother impedance
match between the cone and the mouth
of the slot.
The appearance of the back of a
finished cabinet is shown in Fig. 7, with
the two Reflection Couplers in place.
The exact shaping of these plastic reflectors is important in providing proper
(Continued on page 69)
Fig. 7. Rear view of the loudspeaker system showing the placement and shape of the
mid -high reflectors.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
MANUFACTURERS OF THE
WORLD'S FINEST TAPE RECORDERS
Presents the New
Sb]RIhYS 90
A
product of 14 years of excellence in tape recorder
manufacture, Concertone's new Series 90 represents
a
major breakthrough of the finest caliber instru-
ments into the lower- priced equipment field. Designed
for rugged reliability under continuous performance
conditions the Series 90 meets exacting broadcast
requirements as well as those of the finest custom
installations for recording studios, industries and
audiophiles. Featuring
a
dynamic new tape transport
and advanced electronics, the Series 90 offers the
revolutionary new Concertone "Edit- O- Matic" and
our exclusive flutter filtering system. Available in
monophonic full or half track
versions
-
- stereo
2- or 4 -Track
the Series 90 brings you the ultimate in
professional recorders.
Conce,-tone's electronic "keyboard" with illuminated
mode indicator permits remote operation of the Series 90.
O
-
64;
a-s
... .
,
Available in studio consoles or portable case.
For vertical or horizontal rack mounting.
Look at all the professional features to be found in the new
an instrument that assures recording perfecSeries 90
tion and versatility unheard of except in the costliest tape
...
recorders.
CHANNEL INPUT MIXER Separate gain controls for each input
signal permit recording from two
different sources simultaneously,
mixing sounds for proper balance. Optional plug -in transformers provide flexibility in matching
input impedances.
2
INTRODUCING THE CONCERTONE "EDIT -O- MATIC "a The countless advantages of high speed search, cueing and editing are demonstrated in
Concertone's exclusive new EDIT -O- MATIC.
High speed "SEARCH" enables quick cueing
HI
SPEED
MANUAL
up to the approximate location desired on
the tape. A flip of the "CUE" switch brings
the tape into contact with the heads and
simultaneously releases the brakes for easy
manual cueing to the exact spot. A simple
"mark and measure" scale pinpoints the
CUE
precise portion of the tape to be edited.
EXCLUSIVE CONCERTONE FLUTTER FILTERING SYSTEM
Developed by Concertone, this
unique and exclusive system virtually elimi
nates spurious vibrations and troublesome
tape flutter. A dynamically balanced flywheel
combined with a viscous damped tape tension arm provides silken- smooth tape handling and recordings virtually free from
variations in pitch caused by any components in the tape path.
DYNAMIC NEW TAPE TRANSPORT
Features 3 -motor direct drive system
utilizing heavy duty hysteresis synchronous drive motor. Band type
self- energizing brakes coupled with
induction torque motors provide ut-
most in tape handling reliability.
All components precision mounted
on IA" aluminum alloy top plate
to provide lifelong alignment and
dependability. Simplified design permits easy accessibility for minimum
maintenance when required.
REEL SIZES Handles all reel sizes from
5" to 101/2" with torque adjustment compensating for differences in reel diameter.
Torque change switch is mounted on deck
front plate for easy accessibility. Changes
tension on both supply and take up reels.
STEREO VERSATILITY Accommodates
up to 4 heads for maximum versatility.
VU METER Large professional 4,4"
VU meter with true ballistics calibrated to meet VU standards.
Stereo Models 93 two -track and 93 -4
four-track each contain 4 triple -shielded
magnetic heads with playback selector
switch allowing user to choose correct
stereo playback head for optimum performance. Multichannel erase head provides separate erase for each track
affording easy monophonic and sound on -sound recording.
Separate selector switch for reading Bias, Record and Output levels.
Illuminated face for easy viewing.
Automatic Cut -Off
Record Indicator Lights
Automatic Tape Lifters
A -B
Front Panel Equalization Control
Relay- Solenoid Operation
Cannon Connectors
Optional Remote Control
Built -in 600 Ohm Output
Two- or four -track stereo
Monitoring
Professional Specifications
Tape Speeds
Timing Accuracy
Frequency Response
Signal -to -Noise Ratio
Full Track:
Stereo:
Total Harmonic Distortion
Crosstalk Ratio
Flutter and Wow
Rewind and Fast Forward
Start and Stop Time
Input Impedance
7.5 -15 ips or 3.75
-7.5
99.8% or better over
1
ips.
Output Impedance
hour run.
40 -15000 cps ±2db at 15 ips.
40 -12000 cps ±2db at 7.5 ips.
50- 7500 cps ±2db at 3.75 ips.
55db at 7.5 and 15 ips.
50db at 3.75 ips.
50db at 7.5 and 15 ips.
45db at 3.75 ips.
Recording a 400 cps signal
inducing 2% distortion, erasing
the signal and playing back
the erased portion of the tape.
Output Level
Dimensions
Weight
Power Requirements
600 ohm balanced with
terminating switch to allow connection to high impedance input.
+4dbm at zero VU.
Reserve gain to +8dbm.
Transport: 19" x 153/4" x 8 ".
Amplifier: 19" x 51/4" x 81/4".
Transport: 48 lbs.
Amplifier: 12 lbs.
Monophonic Recorders:
Approx. 280w, 115V, 60 cps.
Stereo Recorders:
Approx. 320w, 115V, 60 cps.
Less than 2% at zero VU.
50db.
Less than .1% rms at 7.5 and 15 ips.
Less than .3% rms at 3.75 ips.
90 seconds for 2400 ft.
.5 second.
High impedance unbalanced;
50, 250, or 600 ohm
balanced or unbalanced with
plug -in transformers.
Dealer inquiries invited
For your nearest Concertone dealer
write:
AMERICAN CONCERTONE, INC.
A
DIVISION OF ASTRO- SCIENCE CORPORATION
9449 West Jefferson Boulevard
Telephone UPton
Culver City, California
0 -7245
For the
first time in four years,
AUDIO visits the International
Audio Exposition
Proof that people still go to audio shows is offered by the
crowds during the four day successor to the "London Audio Fair"
A LONDONER, two representatives of AUDIO
started out on the evening of April 6, 1961 to see the
Fifth International Audio Exposition. While the distance was somewhat greater than any Londoner had to go,
it was no longer a trip than was required of, for example
Gilbert Briggs, who came the 225 miles from Yorkshire in
LIKE MANY
a motor car, with an elapsed time of almost eight hours
(he drives slow). All we- AUDIO'S editor, C. G. McProud,
and its photographic consultant, Mort Weldon-had to do
was to cue up in the approved London fashion at New
York's Idewild Airport and board Flight 2 of Pan American
World Airways at 8 :00 p. m. Of course, it was already
2 :00 on the morning of April 7 in London, and the show
was thoroughly closed for the night, but we went anyway.
There'll always be a tomorrow, we felt.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
And there was. After some six hours and forty minutes
of wondering whether we had yet taken off (that's the
trouble with Pan Am's jets, they are so- o -o -o-o smooth)
we looked outside and there was London Airport North
scarcely changed from when we first saw it in 1953. Managing to be last off the plane (it was such a pleasant ride we
were loath to get off, particularly considering the refreshments) we ran square into a Pan American photographer,
John North, with his camera pointed our way complete
with flash which was undoubtedly necessary in the early
morning haze. After due consideration, we decided he was
there to secure evidence in Pan Am's favor in case we fell
clown the landing stairway. His evidence we now have,
and it appears on our front cover for this month. We did
make it down the stairway uneventfully, had a short ride
-
35
in a Pan Ain bus, and were set down in a lounge where we
waited until they had assembled the requisite number of
immigration officials. We succeeded in convincing them we
were not go ng to stay over three months, that we were
tourists, and that we were going to stay in some hotel in
London (nei her of us knew then which one), and they
stamped our passports and let us through to the customs
Hotel Russell, in Russell Square, was the
day International Audio Exposition. Not
of hotels, it had the advantage of high
walls. Furthermore, the food and service
e
to Room
AUDIO
scene of the four -
the most modern
ceilings and solid
were impeccable.
No 25$
FIDELITY
'
11111111
FINUTT
John Ridley, head of the British Audio Fidelity Records organisation, was on the scene in the booth and demonstration
room -seemingly at the same time -and still found it possible
to present "Adventure in Sound" on Saturday and Sunday
evenings to tell as entertainly as possible the story of Stereo.
36
authorities.
Now if anyone ever wants to be treated like a gentleman,
here is the lace for him, at least if he is an American
citizen. We made feeble passes with our keys for the
luggage lock while we were explaining that we had no
gifts for anyone in the United Kingdom, that we had no
more than 200 cigarettes nor more than 50 cigars nor more
than one pond (avoirdupois) of tobacco, and before we
got the locks open, the luggage all had chalk marks on it
and we were shunted out, but gracefully. Later we learned
that one pound (sterling) does not buy one pound (avoirdupois) of smokable tobacco in London.
After acquiring some spendable money at the bank's
counter in the airport exchange for some U. S. green, we
ran into another traveling convenience -Pan American
"happened" to have a car going into the city and would
gladly give us a lift (ride, that is, not elevator) to our
respective hotels. This, we were told, doesn't happen to
everyone--on y to those who consent to having their pictures
taken. So 141 got into the car with a driver who insisted
on driving of the left side (most Americans say "wrong"
side, but who's to shy which is right and which is wrong'?)
of the road all the way to the city. That, we found out,
was customay in England, even though they go through
revolving d rs just like we do, counterclockwise. We
mention that because we noticed later in Sweden that
even though they drive on the left side of the road there,
they do, at least, remain consistent and go around revolving door clockwise -even though their cars are all
left -hand dri a cars just like we use in the U. S.
And thus ended our experience with Pan American
before the show.
Although the high fidelity show idea originated in the
United State, it must be admitted that the variations introduced by C. Rex- Hassan, Festival Director, have much
in their favor. Instead of the usual exhibit rooms where
everyone congregates to ask questions of the attendants as
Malone, applications engineer for Ampex (Great Britain) Limited, puts the 960 through its paces with stereo music
reproduced through a pair of 2010 amplifier speakers. He
also had a 351 on exhibit.
C. T.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
well as hear the demonstrations, practically all of the
exhibitors use two spaces-one a booth in the Exhibit
Hall where nothing is heard except the questions of the
visitors and the answers of the attendants, and the other
a typical hotel -room exhibit where the equipment is demonstrated aurally. This has mixed blessings, of course. While
the listeners to demonstrations are not annoyed by the
conversations between visitors and attendants, it is also
necessary that the exhibitors staff two places. At any rate,
the crowds are distributed, and considerably more people
can get the information they want with a minimum of
disturbance, be it answers or Ansermet. And somehow, we
can't visualize Americans cueing up docilely to await their
turn in the demonstration room, even though we have seen
some of this in the early U. S. shows. But it works in
London, and it works well. In fact, during the four days
of the show, the turnstiles counted 39,143 visitors-which
exceeds, we believe, any U. S. show to date. We presented
ourselves dutifully to Mr. Rex- Hassan, affectionately called
The Colonel, were received with the honor and fanfare we
expected, and were promptly hustled off to lunch where we
encountered ninny more of our old acquaintances. Lunch
over, we finally got around to seeing the second day of the
show.
Space does not permit the entire portrayal of the
booths, rooms, and personalities that we visited, but the
products that are most familiar to U. S. readers are represented in these pages.
AKG (Alcustiche u. Kino -Geräte GmbH)
One of the largest manufacturers of microphones in the
world, AKG showed a new miniature condenser microphone
which weighs only two ounces. This unit, Model C60, can be
fitted with either cardioid or omni- directional heads, and is
powered by a rechargeable battery pack or by a line operated
supply unit.
Ampex
All U.S. readers are familiar w:th the 960 and 970, both of
which are available in Britain, and undoubtedly almost everyone would like to have a 350 series recorder for his home system.
These models were shown along with the amplifier- speaker units
designed for hone use, as well as For "location" monitoring.
DFMONS1R.iTEC
ROO,
is
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
Statesman. Which maybe he should be.
Ill
15
for Goodmans Industries, Ltd.,
kept busy almost continuously explaining the wide variety
of loudspeakers, driver units, horns, and other paraphernalia so dear to the audiofan.
Leslie Watts, Export Manager
Gilbert A. Briggs, the Grand Old Man of British Audio, and
well known to every audiofan in the world. Late on Sunday
afternoon, Mr. Briggs stepped out on one of the balconies
for a bit of fresh air just as we came into his room. He consented to pose for this study which successfully masks his
good humor and whimsicality and turns him into an Elder
Harold J. Leak (left), of amplifier, pickup, and now loudposes with the Managing Director of the show
organization, C. Rex-Hassan, whom we met for the first
but probably not last -time.
speaker fame,
-
37
THIS
A STEREOPHONIC
DEMONSTRATION
IS
A
errofraPh
MODEL
808
FEEDING
120 LOUDSPEAKERS
2 VITAVOX DU
AMPLIFIER
VIA QUAD 22 STEREO
Audio Fideli'y
"The little Company with the BIG sound" has established
itself in Britain in a short two years -possibly aided by the
fact that Ridley, head of the offshoot of Sid Frey's American
enterprise, is himself an Englishman and thus is not faced with
the language difficulties that others might encounter. We all
remember hin fondly from his presentations in both New York
and Los Angeles.
Ferrograph
This year marks the introduction of the Series 5 Ferrograph
which have a number of refinements which further enhance the
usefulness and quality of these instruments. While the company
has gone on record saying that the four -track system is not
regarded by it as a true high -fidelity system of operation, it
has acceded to demand and produced a four -track head for
playback only. So far, however, no provision is made for recording the narrcwer tracks.
Garrard
The well known Model A and the compact Model 210 were
both shown, along with the 4HF, the TPA -12 arm, and the
SPG -3 stylus force gauge. Here, too, were the 301 transcription
motor -available with a stroboscopic turntable. This is a desirable feature with a record playing turntable that has the
adjustable speeds that are so useful to trained musical ears.
Goodmans
The exhibi -s of this company presented a large line of fullrange loudspeakers in 12 -, 10, 91/2 -, and 8 -in. sizes, 12 -in. woofers, pressure type high-frequency units, and mid- and high frequency ho -ns. In addition, there was a full line of complete
systems in er closures, and the AIM acoustical resistance units
for use in home constructed cabinets.
Leak
Richard Merrick, Managing Director of Ferrograph, relieves
some of his demonstration personnel and puts on his own
selling pitch. While Ferrograph policies are serious and conservative, Dick is only serious when he is extolling his
products.
The line cf Leak amplifiers and preamplifiers is too well
known in the U.S. to warrant special description, but they were
all there in force and demonstrated to their usual high standard
of excellence.
Lowther
Further stsps "towards perfection" were shown by Donald
Chave of Lowther-one of them being a new Aeousta enclosure
which bears a striking resemblance to the "CW" horn -type
enclosure des3ribed in these pages by D. P. Carlton some time
ago. We are pleased to find this unit available commercially.
Also on view was a new symmetrical, push -pull, transformerless transistor amplifier.
W. Mortimer, Chief Research Engineer to Garrard and
to his friends, was on hand to make sure that all of
the technical questions would be answered correctly. With
most of these products he maintains the air of a proud father,
E.
"Monty"
as he
38
well might.
Shure Brothers phono arms and pickups, as well as the microphones, were among the few U.S. products represented. But
they drew the same interest in London as they have consistently done in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco,
Chicago, and other U.S. cities.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
Lustraphone
A wide range of microphones is produced by this company,
including "Steromic" stereo units, studio ribbon velocity models,
and general purpose moving -coil units, covering practically
every possible requirement for high -quality microphones for
home, PA, and professional use. Also shown were transistor
mixer units, floor and table stands, and a line of matching
transformers.
Quad
Doubling as Managing Director and relief operator for his
demonstration room, Peter Walker presented his practically
timeless Quad amplifiers and tuners and his newer Quad electrostatic loudspeakers. The quality of his reproduction and the
excellent choice of demonstration material made this one of the
aural attractions of the entire show.,
Reflectograph
A tape recorder not yet introduced in the U.S., the Reflectograph makes an excellent bridge between the high quality home
machine and the true professional recorders. In several models
to cover quarter- and half -track applications in mono and
stereo uses, these machines offer superb reproduction for the
critical user. Also available is a deck which can serve as a playback instrument alone for dubbing or for those who wish only
to reproduce recorded tapes.
Sony
The entire line of home -type tape recorders was shown and
demonstrated, most of them having different type numbers than
those employed in the U.S., even though the machines were the
same. For professional users, the C 37A condenser microphone
was shown -probably to incite the desire to own one, as do so
many recording studios.
Tannoy is seen and heard everywhere in Britain -but nary a
member of the demonstration staff could be found for this
picture.
Vitavox
According to Mr. L. Young, Director of Vitavox, their line of
Klipsch- licensed enclosures is unexcelled for mono reproduction,
while for stereo the new Hallmark system makes it possible to
get two speakers into the home at once. Vitavox also showed
microphones, horns, and dividing networks of professional
quality.
Wharfedale
Most of the Wharfedale designs in cabinets differ so greatly
in appearance from those sold in the U.S. that it would be folly
to describe them. The same acoustic principles appear in both,
however, and the performance is what would be expected from
Mr. Briggs' products.
P. Merrick (left) and A. J. Williams of Wilmex (Distributors) Ltd. talk over a new reel of Irish Tape. Merrick is
Director
the son of Ferrograph's Merrick, which results in mutual aid
for their respective businesses.
professional tape recorder which can be used for
broadcast on 71/2 and as a pocket memory on 17/s, is discussed here by Sales Manager S. Duer (left) and J. Harrison,
sales representative. The company also makes a unique
dictating machine.
Fi -Cord, a
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
Sales Director S. Macadie (right) and L. B. Cash, representative, stand in readiness as the doors opened for the second
day of the show. They showed a wide line of well built
components.
39
In
the Connoisseur room,
Ralph West,
well known British audio authority (left),
and E. Emerson of the company watch
George R. Pontzen, technical manager for
Lustraphone, is kept busy demonstrating
recordings made through the company's
microphones.
With an all -new Reflectograph stereo recorder to show, Brian Arbib points out
the features of most interest.
rug up new ones after the manner of
brainstorming. Then, too, we met old
friends again- Donald Aldous, well
known writer on audio and founder member of the British Sound Recording
Association, as well as technical editor
of Record Review; Percy Wilson, who
edits the technical section of "The
Gramophone," and John Gilbert, one of
his experienced audio writers; Andrew
Reid and Joan Cutting, who handle
public relations for the Radio Show in
the fall; and, of course, H. A. Hartley
who was one of the first exporters of
lei -fi loudspeakers to the U. S., and
Mrs. Hartley. There is never enough
time to see everybody, do the requisite
amount of shopping, and see some more
of London.
But we did manage to do some of the
latter. On our last day, we engaged a
taxi driver to show us Limehouse, got
too far from the City proper, and
arrived at the airport three minutes
after our plane was scheduled to leave
and we found that it had already left
and who expects planes to be that close
to schedule. So we waited until noon the
next day -not risking a trip back to the
city but remaining at the airport hotel
-and took Pan Am's Flight 101 instead of Flight 1, and 101 was exactly
on time, too. On time at departure, that
is, and thirty minutes early on arrival,
making the westward crossing in seven
hours and ten minutes. But with a good
lunch on the way, the seven hours
seemed like nothing at all.
We did find our excuse for visiting
the London Audio Exposition, and our
photographer, Mort Weldon, got most
of the pictures we wanted, so now we
have eleven months to think up some
excuse to go to the next one. See you
the stroboscope on a new Connoisseur
turntable. Also shown was a new loudspeaker of practical dimensions.
Old and New Friends Week
A trip to London is always the occasion for meeting with newcomers to
the industry, as well as those who have
visited the U. S. in former years to
attend our own shows, and this trip
was no exception. This year, however,
we finally made the acquantance of our
own counterpart in England, Mr. Miles
Henslow, who is editor and publisher of
Hi -Fi News, the oldest hi -fi magazine
there, and of The Tape Recorder-only
two years old-and of the Hi-Fi Year
Book since 1956. As is usual with audiominded people, Rex -Hassan, Henslow,
and ourselves succeeded in finding something to talk about for hours, comparing
publishing and exhibiting problems in
our respective countries, getting ideas
from each other, and collectively think-
In
the
S.
M.
-
there/
E.
booth, A. Rooertson-Aikman, Managing Director,
and W. J. Watkinson stand by to
pass out information.
The back door of the Russell Hotel. Ac-
tually this is where the 39,143 people
passed into the hotel to see the show
they came out the front door. But here
were many non -exhibitors passing out
circulars, so your pockets were full before you even got inside.
-
40
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
Never before so much performance, versatility
and styling in a speaker as small
in size as it is in price!
NEW
ELECTRO -VOICE
Model P-415 (8 -ohms) $37.00 List
Model PAIS -45 (45 -ohms) $3J.25 List
Model PAI5T (70.7- via transformer) $35.00 List
...
Small enough to be hidden
with
a voice that can't be missed
Now, from Electro- Voice -home of
major PA speaker improvements since
!
-
World War II comes the most effective
solution to many sound problems. It's
the exciting new PAIS! Features a driver
located right up front -in the horn mouth
itself-to eliminate one of the "bends"
of ordinary reentrant horns
and to
...
insure wider range and smoother high
frequency response!
And the PAIS is uniquely easy to install
and service. Special swivel mount permits
installation anywhere ... while the driver's
front location makes field replacement
unusually quick and simple. Installations
are neater, too, when you use the PAW'
with its optional 70.7 -volt transformer
built right in!
FURTHER PROOF THE SMART MOVE IS TO ELECTRO- VOICE
Write for full specs
on the PALS today!
Better check these other PÁ15 features:
Modest size (6" x 9" x 9% ') to fit anywhere.
Highest power- handling capacity in its class.
Smoothly rising response for better penetration,
less feedback.
Rectangular shape for best dispersion, minimum
wasted power.
8 -ohm or 45 -ohm impedances availabi,
ELECTRO- VOICE, INC.
Commercial Products Division, Dept. 616A
Buchanan, Michigan
gLererelez'
EQ UI PMENT
Emmaiz00
.00®0
nefi
L-Lqi
PROfI U
FISHER XP -4
SPEAKER SYSTEM
The Fisher XP-4 is a three-way speaker
system consisting of four speakers in a
bookshelf -size enclosure. Despite these innocent sounding words, there are many surprising facets to this speaker system.
Before exploring these facets we would
like to dwell for a moment upon the visual
appearance of this system. In our opinion
the visual appearance of a bookshelf
speaker system is of great importance.
Although not as important as the sound
quality, we must remember that one of the
raisons d'etre for the bookshelf system is
the reaction against the unsightly large
speaker systems. In addition a bookshelf
speaker system is meant to be placed at eye
level, and to be constantly in view.
The view provided by the XP -4 is indeed
handsome. The unit we reviewed was finished in oiled walnut, and although we
must admit a certain partiality towards
oiled walnut, it certainly conveys a feeling
of luxury.
The four speakers comprising the XP -4
system are a relatively long travel bass
speaker (with some revolutionary features
which we will go into later), a pair of cone
type mid -range speakers, and a hemispherical tweeter with wide -angle dispersion.
Over -all system balance may be adjusted
to fit the individual home environment by
means of a high- and low-frequency balance control at the rear of the speaker
enclosure.
Bass Speaker Design
The normal speaker construction consists of a magnet, a voice coil which drives
the cone; the cone, of course; and a metal
basket which provides rigid support for
the cone at both ends. Provision must be
made for making sure that the cone and
voice coil remain in proper relation to the
magnet at all times. The bass speaker of
the XP -4 system is essentially the same
structure that we have just described except that instead of using a metal basket,
the speaker enclosure itself has become the
basket for the speaker. It sounds startlingly simple, doesn't it? Instead of mounting the speaker cone to a basket, the cone
is mounted through a surround directly to
the front baffle. Obviously, in this respect
alone, it is probably a money -saving in-
Our reason for saying this is that the basket
of the conventional speaker undoubtedly
vibrates and transmits unwanted vibrations
back to the suspension of the speaker
cone. Because of the size of the basket and
the distances involved it would probably
affect the low- frequency end of the s'aund
spectrum. By removing the basket and
having the vibrations now travel th ugh
the greatly increased path of the encl sure
sides, which of course are wood, the vibrations are essentially damped out. If nothing
else, this should make the response
smoother. (More about this when we talk
about the performance of the system.)
Naturally if this system is to work well
over a period of time, there can b no
warpage n the `wooden basket." Obvi sly,
one of the virtues of an extremely 1eavy
metal basket is that it does not warp e silt',
and thus keeps the speaker cone in a correct position for a long period of time,
indefinitely in many cases. Thus we can conjecture that the enclosure would be extremely well built with precautions taken
to avoid warpage. Without being able to
see within the XP -4 enclosure, we did note
that it is extremely heavy construction,
and seemed to be much heavier than many
comparable speaker systems. It weighs
some fifty pounds, and the enclosure is only
241/2 x 14 x 12% -in.
Performance
Reviewing speaker systems is at the
same time the most frustrating yet the
most enjoyable of the reviewer's tasks. It
is enjoyable because it necessitates long
periods of listening to familiar music; and
Fig.
3
1
ADDENDA
ADC -1 Stereo Cartridge
Audio Dynamics Corporation calls our
attention to an error made in the May
PROFILE where it was stated that the compliance claimed by the manufacturer for
the ADC -1 Stereo Cartridge was 10 x 10-0
instead of the figure of 20 x 10 -6, at which
current models are rated. Although the
figure given was excellent, it was still far
below the actual value claimed for it.
Sherwood S -2200
Although it probably fooled no one, we
stated in the April issue that "from the
standpoint of sensitivity, Sherwood need
take a back seat." Of course we meant
.. Sherwood need not take a back seat."
If it were not so obvious, we would be
thoroughly embarrassed.
of course familiar music means music that
we like to listen to. On the other hand, it
is frustrating because we do realize that
we are injecting our own personal taste
and prejudices. We mention this merely
to caution the prospective purchaser that
insofar as speaker evaluation is concerned,
our science is not as "scientific" as we
would like it to be. Naturally, we can certainly discern gross distortions or limitations, but as yet we have not been able to
distinguish between fine speaker systems
except on the basis of personal preference.
This brings us to the XP -4. As we noted
previously, we would suspect that the new
construction for the bass reproducer would
provide smoother responses in the lower
frequency. To our ear this was so. Although
the frequency range extended down to only
30 cps, it handled this range exceedingly
well and in a very smooth manner. At first
the mid -range seemed somewhat thin, and
there was a slight edge in voice reproduction. After some knob twirling with the
balance controls at the rear of the high enclosure, we were able to reduce this problem. Obviously when the balance was set
at the factory, it was set to suit some individual whose preferences were different
from ours. The XP-4 handled high frequencies exceptionally well, and with excellent dispersion.
In summation, therefore, the Fisher
XP -4 speaker system provides fine sound
from a bookshelf -sized enclosure whose appearance will be an asset to most modern
decors. In addition the new patented
speaker design makes this system lower
in cost than previous comparable systems.
F-22
Fisher XP -4
-way speaker
system.
novation, but what about performance? Is
it really a valuable innovation as far as
performance of the system is concerned?
Although we were not able to corroborate
it, it would seem to us that this design
would eliminate some peaks and valleys
in the low- frequency response of the system.
42
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
In
stereo receivers specifications alone can be deceiving. How then, do you recognize quality? Plug in
seconds you'll hear
it- quality that can be measured not only by specifications but by your own
a
Pilot 654
-and
in
ears as well! You'll hear brilliant
new cla-ity in every musical performance, thanks to the low 0.5% harmo.ic distortion of this powerful new ste-eophonic receiver.
The 654 combines separate FM and AM tuners, 60 watts of power, and a total of 15 operational controls in one compact unit, no
larger than many tuners. The Pilot 654 is the ideal way to set up your home stereo system. Simply hook up
a
pair of speakers and
-
turntole, and enjoy sound reproduction of incomparable beauty. Special features of the Pilot 654: coil- operating chassis
UL listeI -for safe custom installation. Rumble filter, scratch filter, :ape mmitor, and automatic shut -off. Pilot's exclusive
a
Stereo -P us Curtain -of -Sound third speaker terminal can be used for simultaneous remote
monophonic performance, or three speaker Curtain of Sound. Cornplete with handsome brass and black enclosure, only $299.50.Seethe
FOUNDED 1919
654, or 30 watt Pilot 602 at $249.50, at your authorized Pilot dealer.
ANY SIMILARITY BETWEEN THE PILOT 654 AND OTHER STEREO RECEIVERS
D
H
ALL PILOT TUNERS AND STEREO RECEIVERS HAVE MULTIPLEX JACKS. PILOT'S MULTIPLEX ADAPTOR WILL SOON
BE AVAILABLE FOR RECEPTION OF FM MULTIPLEX STEREO. FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION WRITE PILOT RADIO
CORPORATION, 37 -34 36th STREET, LONG ISLAND CITY, N.Y.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
43
LAFAYETTE KT -550
POWER AMPLIFIER KIT
The KT -550 is a 100 -watt (50 watts per
channel) stereo power -amplifier kit. Without question this kit is a prime example of
the recent trend towards more powerful
amplifiers and quality without compromise.
We have taken notice of this latter trend
several times in the recent past; it is certainly natural that we take special cognizance of things we like. Indeed, and in
fact more important, the consumer has also
shown approval for this trend. In any case,
the KT -550 is an excellent amplifier which
builds easily, certainly within the capabilities of almost any constructor.
As a side note we would like to point out
that the KT -550 is most attractive in appearance. Normally when we think of such
a functional instrument as an amplifier,
we are not interested in its appearance.
This is especially true since most of the
time amplifiers are placed in some cubbyhole where they will not be seen. Be that
as it may, this particular amplifier with its
two -tone brown body and gold instrument
panel is quite handsome in appearance, and
deserves mention even though it be forever more hidden from sight. At least,
when you must service it, there will be
some joy in looking at it.
Circuit Description
One of the important new developments
which has contributed greatly to the
quality of recent amplifiers has been the use
of multiple feedback loops. In the past the
feedback consisted of a single loop, usually
from the voice coil back to the input stage
of the amplifier. With this technique the
amount of feedback usually was limited to
about 20 db. Higher amounts of feedback,
which of course would reduce distortion,
would also cause the amplifier to become
unstable. With multiple-loop techniques,
however, if one stage has twice the distortion of another, twice as much feedback
is applied around it. This permits the use
of larger total feedback without sacrificing
stability. In the KT -550 six feedback loops
are used with a total feedback of over
50 db. Referring to the schematic, Fig. 3,
we will trace a signal as it proceeds through
Channel A. The input signal enters at J,
and is fed to the grid of the pentode section VA,, (a 6BR8A) which acts as a voltage amplifier. The output of Vib is connected to the grid of V, (6CL6) one of the
driver tubes. The output of V,,, is also
connected to the grid of V,s (triode section of 6BR8A). Vib is adjusted by means
of plate -to -grid feedback to provide a gain
of unity. The signal appearing at the output of Vib is therefore equal in level to the
OZZZ72/1
Fig. 3. Over -all schematic of
signal fed to V,, but 180 deg. out of phase.
This reversed -phase signal is then applied
to the grid of the other driver tube, V,.
The outputs of tubes V, and V, are fed
to the grids of the push -pull power output
tubes V, and V, respectively. The newly
developed 7027A beam-power output tube
is used with fixed bias. To compensate for
changes in tube parameters, and to avoid
the use of matched pairs, an indicating
meter and bias and balance controls have
been incorporated. Bias controls
and
R,, can be adjusted to provide the proper
indication on the meter which will ensure
that 174 and V, are drawing the same
amount of current. In this manner both
tubes are made to operate at the same
quiescent point, and are therefore "d.c.
balanced."
Dynamic or "a.c. balancing" is accomplished by adjustment of R,,. The control
changes the plate loads of V, and V, causing the voltage at the grids of V, and V,
to change correspondingly. During adjustment the meter is connected across the two
cathode resistors
and R,,. If the tubes
are perfectly balanced when an a.c. signal
is applied to the input of the amplifier, the
meter will indicate zero. A 60 -cps 20 -watt
test signal is supplied from a test jack at
the rear of the chassis. All bias and balance controls are conveniently located on
R
R
KT -550.
the front panel of the amplifier. The power
supply consists of four silicon diode rectifiers in a voltage doubler circuit, and a fifth
silicon diode and an R -C filter provide
rectification and filtering for the bias -voltage supply to the output tubes of both
channels.
Construction
The KT -550 is an unusually easy amplifier kit to construct. This is the result of
the use of printed circuit boards for the
major portion of the wiring. As a result
of the reduced amount of soldering and
wiring it took us just a shade under six
hours to construct this kit. This came to
two nights' work in practical terms.
A contributing factor to the extremely
easy construction is the manual accompanying this kit. It is certainly one of the most
concise, clear, and easy -to- understand manuals that we have encountered for a power
amplifier kit. Of special value in this manual are the pictorials and instructions describing how to solder connections to
switches and to the printed circuit board.
These are areas where the novice constructor commonly has difficulties.
On the whole the manual is excellent, as
we noted, but we did discover four or five
inaccuracies although they were of the sort
which are easy to detect during construction. There was one error (not in the
manual) which was somewhat more serious
however. We discovered that a hole had
not been drilled in one of the circuit
boards. Although this was not especially
serious for us-we just went ahead and
drilled a hole with the proper size drill
the novice, however, would probably be
quite alarmed especially since most of the
components had already been mounted to
the board by the time this was discovered.
The novice would probably hesitate before
drilling for fear of ruining all the work
that he had done up to that point. We
don't blame him.
Although not of vital importance, we
would recommend that kit manufacturers
include the plastic nut starters which are
included in one manufacturer's kits. They
could not possibly cost more than a few
pennies, and yet they are probably the
-
Fig.
2.
KT -550
Lafayette
power am-
plifier.
44
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
ALL-WEATHER
ALTEC 50A
"B1-ACOUSTIC"
HORN SYSTEM
...
$57.00
ALTEC 707A "FOUR -IN -ONE"
STEREO CENTER
ALTEC 834A "MONTEREY"
SPEAKER SYSTEM
$
$387.00 INCLUDING CABINET
$169.00 UNFINISHED:
174.00 FINISHED FOUR SIDES
ALTEC
835A
JR." SPEAKER
"MONTEREY
SYSTEM
$84.00
$89.50
ALTE[
UNFINISHED
FINISHED
FOUR SIDES
ALTEC 309A'AM /fM
STEREO TUNER
$216.00 INCLUDING CABINET
LANSING CORPORATION
'
*.-,,,....
ALTEC 353A STEREO AMPLIFIERPREAMPLIFIER
ING çAlaINET; ...;
ALTEC 836A
"LIDO" SPEAKER SYSTEM
$125.00 FINISHED FOUR SIDES
$245,90
ENJOY YOUR HI FI OUTDOORS THIS SUMMER!
Whether it's work or play or plain relaxation, you'll have more fun
this summer with outdoor high fidelity by ALTEC. For a permanent
outdoor installation, try the ALTEC 50A Horn -the wide range
outdoor speaker that is completely weather -proofed for any climate. For portable outdoor high fidelity, take your pick of ALTEC
compact speaker systems -they offer superior reproduction yet are
light enough for easy portability. (You can enjoy your ALTEC
compact indoors when you are not using it outdoors!)
And here's a practical point to remember: With new ALTEC
stereo amplifiers as part of your central indoor hi fi system, you
need no separate amplification to power an outdoor speaker! Each
ALTEC amplifier features an auxiliary speaker tap so that you may
enjoy one or more extra speakers anywhere in the house or yard.
PERMANENT:
ALTEC 50A "Bi-Acoustic" Horn offers smoothest, widest frequency response of any competitively priced all- weather speaker! Made of heavy,
double-reinforced Fiberglas. Comes with universal mounting bracket for
easy mounting in any direction and to any surface or structure.
PORTABLE:
ALTEC 834A "Monterey" Speaker System features guaranteed 40-22,000
cps frequency range. Finished on four sides in walnut, blond, mahogany,
or fruitwood for use vertically or horizontally. 14" H, 26" W, 141/2" D.
FREE! Get the new 1961 ALTEC Stereo Catalog and informative Loudspeaker Enclosures Brochure at your Professional ALTEC High Fidelity
Consultant's or write Dept. A-6.
©
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
1961 ALTEC LANSING CORPORATION
ALTEC 835A "Monterey Jr." Speaker System is a smaller version of the
834A. Guaranteed 45- 18,000 cps frequency range. 1114 H, 2314" W,
111/a" D.
"Lido" Speaker System boasts beautiful styling and sound
to match. Available in walnut or mahogany, the "Lido" is 12%8" H, 26"
ALTEC 836A
W, 12%8" D.
ALTEC STEREO COMPONENTS INDOORS
POWER A SPEAKER OUTDOORS:
ALTEC 707A Stereo Center combines four hi fi components in one slim line package: AM and FM tuners (same sensitivity as 309A below), 40
watt -per-channel (stereo prog. pk. pwr.) amplifier, dual- channel control
preamp with 9 inputs, 6 outputs, plus facilities for stereo center speaker
and auxiliary speakers indoors or out.
ALTEC 309A AM /FM Stereo Tuner and 353A Stereo Amplifier -Preamplifier
are look-a -like mates that offer a harmony of styling and engineering
balance. The 309A features (FM) 2 mv max. sens. (equivalent to 1.0 mv,
ref. 72 ohm antenna), 2.9 mv for 20 db quiet. sens (equivalent to 1.45
mv, ref. 72 ohm antenna); ±1 db 20- 20,000 cps freq. response and (AM)
3.2 mv max. sens.
The 353A provides 14 stereo or mono inputs, 6 outputs plus matricing
network for 3- channel stereo and auxiliary speakers anywhere in the
house or yard. 100 watts stereo prog. pk. pwr., 50 watts rms contin,;
freq. response ± 1.0 db 20- 20,000 cps at 25 watts ± 0.5 db 10-30,000
cps at 1 watt.
/
NOTE: The tuners above are fully wired for FM Multiplex Converter.
WEE
ALTEC LANSING CORPORATION
A Subsidiary of Ling -Temco Electronics, Inc.
1515 South Manchester Ave., Anaheim, Calif.
New York
Los Angeles
45
most convenient tool we have found for
mechanical assembly. We recommend this
as an inexpensive way to the "heart" of
the kit builder.
Performance
The published specifications for the KT550 are unusually fine, well up amongst
the top -quality amplifiers available. This
amplifier met every one of its published
specifications. For example, we found frequency response from 20- 30,000 cps to be
within 0.25 db at 50 watts output. Harmonic distortion was 0.12 per cent at 1,000
cps and 50 watts output. We measured IM
distortion at 0.4 per cent, and hum and
noise at 90 db below 50 watts.
In view of the excellent performance
and easy construction, we would recommend
this amplifier to any audiofan who is
F-23
willing to pay for performance.
NEUMANN DST PROFESSIONAL
STEREO CARTRIDGE
The Neumann name is one which is
highly familiar to the professional in the
recording industry. They have been making
professional condenser microphones and
disc- mastering lathes for thirty years. On
the other hand, the audiofan would have
had little opportunity during these years
to become familiar with this name because
until now the company has never produced
a consumer item. In fact as we understand
it, this is not truly a consumer item in that
it was designed and is still used, as a
monitor for a Neumann- Teldec stereo disc cutting system.
As we can note from Fig. 4 the DST is
more than a cartridge, it actually is an entire plug-in head. For that reason it is only
suitable for certain arms: namely the SME
and the ESL arms, as well as the Neumann
arm with which it was originally designed
to operate. It should be noted that the
SME arm should be the model with the
anti -skating feature. The reason for the
latter requirement for the tone arm is that
the DST requires a stylus force of four to
five grams compared with the less-than -onegram required for many currently avail-
able cartridges. The relatively high stylus
force and the extremely low friction of the
SME arm combine to cause the arm to
"skate" toward the center of the record.
One might question whether the DST
with its high stylus force would cause unusually heavy record wear. Apparently this
just isn't so. We observed a record which
had been played with a DST over a hundred times and there was no appreciable
record wear noticeable -or audible either,
for that matter. The secret to this extremely low record wear is the highly polished diamond used in the stylus. Of
course, all things being equal, a stylus
force of four grams will certainly produce
more wear than a stylus force of one gram
or less. But apparently all things are not
equal. We can speculate that other styli
may not be as highly polished as the DST
seems to be.
Performance
From its highly professional background
we would expect the DST to be highly professional in performance. We were not dis-
appointed. The frequency response from
10-20,000 cps was within ± 2 db. The channel separation at 1000 cps was 29 db and
at 15,000 cps it was 23 db. One unusual
appearing feature of the DST is that the
stylus arm and indeed the entire underside of the cartridge is covered by a sheet
of rubber-like material so that the stylus
tip is the only component observable underneath the cartridge. Apparently this
sheet supplies a certain amount of stress
to the stylus and also protects it from dust.
In a listening test the DST produced
some of the cleanest sounds we have beard
in some time. In fact it is so free from
coloration that it actually takes a little bit
of getting used to. We must admit however
that perhaps some of the excellent sound
might be attributed to the professional
Neumann equipment we used in conjunction with the cartridge; namely the auto matie turntable model PA2a and the model
WV -2 preamplifier. In summation, therefore, the Neumann DST stereo cartridge
is truly a professional unit in all respects.
F -24
NEUMANN AUTOMATIC
TWO -SPEED TURNTABLE
This is the turntable used for testing
the Neumann DST cartridge. This turntable is high in quality and in price
seemingly natural relationship. An unusual feature of this turntable is its small
size. The mounting plate is only 141/2 x 12
in. The arm, as we can observe from Fig.
5, is proportionately small.
The turntable is built on a solid cast
plate. The hysteresis drive motor on the
one hand, and the turntable and the arm on
the other, are separately shock mounted
on this plate. Rotation of the motor is
transmitted by means of a rubber belt to
two idlers, either of which-depending on
the setting of the speed selector switch
is brought to bear against the inner rim of
the turntable and thus driving it. When
the speed selector switch is in its neutral
position, both wheels are free.
Next to the speed selector switch is the
tone arm lever. Bringing this lever forward causes the pickup to lower slowly to
the disc until it gently sinks into the
groove. Moving the same lever gently to
the right raises the arm just as slowly
while leaving the motor rotating. The tone
arm is also raised at the end of a record,
or when the speed selector switch is manually depressed. For easy location of the
disc's starting grooves, a detent in the
tone arm rest automatically locates the
stylus directly over the lead -in groove of
the standard 7 -, 10 -, and 12 -in. diameter
records.
The Neumann PA2a automatic turntable
is obviously built to professional standards. It hardly need be stated how low
wow and flutter is (0.1 per cent rms). In
addition this is one of the most ruggedly
built units to cross our path in a long
time. Previously we noted how small this
entire unit is, and yet without base it
weighs twenty -five pounds. It is rather
difficult to point out all of the attributes
which make this an unusually fine turntable. In reality, one need only look at the
unit to see how carefully and metieulously it has been constructed. This is
definitely a unit for those who want professional performance and are willing to
F-25
pay professional prices.
-a
-
Fig. 4 (left). Neumann DST stereo cartridge.
Fig. 5. Neumann automatic
46
2 -speed
integrated turntable.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
pioneer
Features of STEREPHONE SH -100
Its price is surprisingly low.
The tone quality is highly excellent (reproduction range : 30- 15,01)0 cps).
The tone quality of the low range, in particular, _s no lesa excellent
than the sound reproduced with a high -quality hi -fi system.
It is extremely rich in volume, but the volume control provided allows
you to enjoy the reproduction at the most desirable volume.
The stereophonic sense can be adjusted from binaural to m:naural.
The needle pressure is adjustable from 3 to 6 grams. Moreover, zcnstant
needle pressure is maintained by means of a special sprang which
completely prevents damage to the records.
A special protective mechanism is provided. In this mechanism the
needle point does not come out until the record begins to revolve.
Three to four persons may listen to the reproduction if an adap :or is used.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
fleither.,,rrt p
C
i i er
áLxo ud
ea
p ote 5H-1
lere
_.
stereophonic reproduction unit far beyond numan
That is PIONEER'S STEREPHONE SH -100.
!
STEREPHONE is a device which conveys the sound cut in the record groove directly
to human ear. If STEREPHONE is used, you will need neither amplifier nor loud -<'
speaker. If you have a record player or a phonomotor capable of revolving recorded
discs, you will be able to enjoy stereophonic reproduction by using this STEREPHONE.
We invite you NOW to enjoy to your heart's content, stereophonic music full of
presence by using the PIONEER STEREPHONE.
A new -system
been developed
FUKUIN ELECTRIC, LIMITED
5 Otowa:ha 6- chome, Bunkyo -ku, Tokyo, Japan
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
47
Fig. 7. Crosby R80 AM -FM stereo receiver.
Fig. 6 (left). Viking "76 Compact" stereo tape
recorder.
ECC85) and a reflex triode converter
ECC85) with a variable capacitance
type semiconductor a.f.e diode. Three i.f.
stages are followed by a discriminator employing a pair of 1N541 diodes for FM
detection. A printed -circuit board is employed for the FM section. The 300 -ohm
antenna input is balanced.
The AM section consists of an r.f.
pentode (6BA6) followed by a pentagrid
converter (6BE6) and 6BA6 i.f. stage and
a 1N541 detector. A rotatable ferrite loop stick is built in.
The amplifier accepts inputs from a variety of low- and high -level sources; phono
(both magnetic and ceramic) and tape
head are the low-level inputs, and tuner
and auxiliary are the high -level inputs.
The low -level inputs are preamplified in a
12AX7 which features 20 db feedback
(1/2
(1/2
THE VIKING "76 COMPACT"
STEREO TAPE RECORDER
The Viking "76 Compact"
is indeed
aptly named. Measuring 13 x 13 -in. across
the front panel and requiring only 614 -in.
behind the panel, this unit certainly is appropriate for today's ever -smaller and ever-
crowded equipment cabinents. We have
often wondered which came first, smaller
cabinets or smaller equipment. It's sort of
like the old chicken -and -egg riddle. No
matter, the end result is smaller units which
are easier to locate in today's cramped
quarters.
Lest anyone be misled into thinking that
small size means small performance, we
would like to make it clear that size and
performance are not necessarily related, at
least in tape recorders. One need only examine any one of several professional, portable, battery- operated recorders to dispel
this unwarranted notion.
The "76 Compact" is a 2 -speed (3% and
71/2 ips) tape recorder and playback machine. It records only quarter -track tapes,
stereo or mono. A recording preamplifier
is incorporated in the unit and features
two VU meters as shown in Fig. 6.
Operating controls of this unit have been
reduced to the minimum. For example, to
play back one need only operate two knobs,
one knob for setting the machine to the
play position, and the other to start the
forward motion of the tape. For recording,
the only additional operation required is
to adjust the individual level control knobs
while observing the VU meters.
There are two sets of inputs, one set on
the front panel for high-impedance microphones and tape heads, and the other set
on the rear panel for high -level inputs
such as tuners and so on. Jacks are provided on the back panel for playback head
output, and monitoring.
A single motor is utilized for all drive
functions, power being transmitted through
a round, cloth covered, flexible belt. Motion is transmitted to the capstan by
means of a heavy, balanced turntable.
Performance
A resent trend in tape recorder design
has been to raise the bias frequency to extend the frequency range of the unit. For
example, the bias frequency of the "76
Compact" is 80,000 cps, which is the fifth
48
harmonic of 16,000 cps, the latter being
for all practical purposes the upper mit
of this machine at 71/2 ips. The sated
frequency response, both in recordin and
playback, is 25- 16,000 cps at 7% ips, plus
or minus 3 db. Our measurements corroborated this, except that we mea ured
own
3 -db down at 13,000 cps and 4 -db
at 16,000 cps. Signal -to -noise ratio w s 59
db and the playback -head output wal 2.2
my at 1000 cps.
In sum then the Viking "76 Compact" is
a compactly sized and priced tape recorder
and playback instrument which would integrate well with modern, compact reproF -26
duction systems.
CROSBY R80 AM -FM
STEREO RECEIVER
Over the past few years the name Crosby
has become well known as the developer of
a FM- stereo multiplex system. Although
the particular stereo system championed
by Dr. Crosby was not adopted, it is quite
obvious that he still is one of the leading
experts in this field. The R80 is a good
example of this knowledge in that it contains full provision for FM stereo with
the exception of an adapter appropriate
for the system adopted by the F.C.C. All
controls necessary to operate an all FM
stereo system have been incorporated and
are available at the front panel, in consideration of the probability that the
adapter need only be a relatively small
"black box," the audiofan will find the
R8O ready for stereo when he wishes to
have it.
The Crosby R80 is classified as a receiver
because it contains an 80 -watt (music
power) stereo amplifier (dual 40) in addition to separate AM and FM tuners and
sufficient controls to suit the most avid
knob twister. In addition, it uses a twin
"magie eye" tube which is used either as
a tuning indicator or as a two -channel program- level indicator.
The appearance of the R8O seems to
have been inspired by the space age; the
control knobs remind us of the intake of
a jet engine and the plastic lens over the
tuning dials resembles the airfoil of a
rocket. The R80 is shown in Fig. 7 in a
wood enclosure.
The FM section contains a shielded front
end consisting of a grid -fed r.f. amplifier
equalization circuits for magnetic cartridge
and tape -head playback. This stage utilizes
d.c. on the heater. The high -level inputs
enter the circuit at this point and all
signals are fed to the grid of a 1/2 12AU7
(tone control) and from there to a 1/2
12AX7 (voltage amplifier). Next the signal goes to a 12AX7 phase splitter and
finally to the push -pull, self-biased, 7591
output tubes. Over -all feedback 17 db per
channel.
It should be noted that the circuitry of
the R80 offers many control features which
provide exceptional flexibility of operation
although the fundamental circuit is quite
conventinal. One would suspect, just from
examination of the tuner circuits, that the
R80 is not in the "super-sensitive" category. Of course, extreme sensitivity is required in very few locatioins. Indeed, all
of the high-sensitivity sets have a "local"
switch which reduces signal level to avoid
overloading the tuner.
Performance
As a receiver the Crosby R8O performs
quite well. Frequency response is plus or
minus 2 db from 20-40,000 cps and power
response is plus or minus 0.5 db from
40- 20,000 cps at 40 music watts per channel. Residual hum and noise in 88 db below 35 watts. Harmonic distortion in the
AM section is less than 1 per cent. In the
FM section harmonic distortion is less than
0.75 per cent at 100 per cent modulation
with a 10 µv input.
All these statistics add up to performance at a relatively modest price. The
Crosby R80 is well equipped to be the
"nerve center" of a home music system.
F-27
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
THE
A.E.S.
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Price subject to change within thirty days
of the issuance of this magazine
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
49
RECORD REVUE
Edward Tatnall Canny
Don't Miss This One
Copland: Billy the Kid; Rodeo. New
York Philharmonic, Bernstein.
Columbia MS 6175 stereo
Nobody, but nobody, can play Copland
like Bernstein. This is for my ear the
finest coupling of these two pleasantly
jazzy works so far to hit records; they
positively titillate, and Columbia's newstyle stereo is wonderfully grateful to
the music.
heavy and slightly old-fashioned performance,
Stravinsky's "Le Sacre" is lithe, sharply defined, fast, economical ; compared to Ddrrti's
steel-hammer approach, Stravinsky's is all
grace and poetry. Those who know the music
will find many unusual bits of emphasis and
of phrasing in the composer's own version.
"Petrouchka" has similar qualities though on
first hearing I felt somehow that the real
showpiece of the album is "Le Sacre "
performance in a thousand-whereas "Petrouchka" is a top performance among others
-a
not radically inferior.
Again, Columbia's new -sound stereo, close -in
but with a perfect rounded sense of space. is
beyond any comparing. I loved it.
Bartok: Piano Concerto No. 1; Rhapsody
CLASSIC MODERN
Stravinsky Conducts, 1960. (Le Sacre du
Printemps; Petrouchka; "Apropos of Le
Sacre "-comment by Stravinsky). Columbia Symphony Orch., Stravinsky.
Columbia D3S 614 (3) stereo
(mono: D3L 300)
What a whale of a spectacular this is ! As
in others of the sort, the music is only one
element among many in the package. As
usual, the decor is varied and colorful, the
Information and illustration enough to keep
you busy for hours. But this documentary,
unlike a good many earlier spectaculars, is
full of vital stuff, an astonishingly thorough
presentation of the man Stravinsky -by himself. He conducts, lie speaks at length, he
writes personal reminiscences most of which
are brand new and of historical importance,
for all their chatty flavor. It is, in this new
medium, a sort of interview-in- depth, a self revelation that is complemented by the superbly played definitive readings of the music
In terms of the conductor's own present-day
thinking.
As for the "personal appearance" of Stravinsky himself, it is amazingly successful. The
trick is its generous length. The first few
moments of his speech are halting, not easily
intelligible in his thick, half- French half Russian accent. But as the grooves slide by he
warms up and before long his account of the
famous "scandal" at the first performance of
"Le Sacre" in Paris, first -hand and highly
animated, is on its way to become, before your
very ears, a unique musical document already
of enormous value but surely destined for
even more extraordinary usage in the future.
Imagine Mozart talking to you for a quarter
hour in your living room
As for "Le Sacre" and "Petrouchka ", you'll
find here one of those rare instances when a
skilled body of performing musicians is
audibly electrified to greatness under the impact of a great personality, outdoing even its
own virtuosity. You can cut the musical
tension here with a knife, but every bit of it
is functional, for my money far more so than
in the famous Toscanini ensembles of the
past. The precision here is just unbelievable,
even in this day of virtuoso orchestral playing.
In comparison with Ansermet's somewhat
!
*
50
780 Greenwich St., New York 14, N.Y.
for Piano and Orch. Sudwestfunk Orch.
Baden -Baden, Reinhardt.
Vox
PL
11.350 mono.
It's hard to believe that this Is the first
recording of a major work of Bartok't ma-
turity, his Piano Concerto of 1926.
We have been through a topsy -turvy ra in
music this last quarter century, where the
once -violently-dissonant composers of the
brash 1920s gradually toned down their mature output and became more acceptable.
Thus in the case of Bartok, as with Proltofieff,
Hindemith, Copland and many another, it is
his latest music that is best known. Only
now are we progressing backwards into the
music of the brassy Twenties, as with increasing distance we discover for our own
ears that it really isn't as different froin the
later music as we had thought.
The "Concerto for Orchestra" is the most
popular Bartok piece, one of his last; but
recently we have moved back from the entle
"Third Piano Concerto" to the wild and ooly
"Second Concerto" -now comes the " irst ",
even wilder and woolier, but (as w now
hear) all the better for hi fi and in the istening not really so different from more fa iliar
Bartok-. This concerto does, to be sure, hang
and bang in true Twenties style but you'll
also hear many an endearing bit of the "Concerto for Orchestra" of almost twenty years
later-and the similarity to the now well known "Sonata for Two Pianos and percussion" and that even better known hi fi miracle,
"Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta"
will be immediately clear. In short, this unfamiliar Bartok will turn out to be remarkably
familiar as a member of the Bartok musical
fa mily.
The early "Rhapsody," from 1904 whn the
composer was only 23, is one of the a big,
splashy pieces of pure derivitiveness that borrows from everybody in sight yet manages also
to foreshadow much of the mature style of the
composer. This piece is all Liszt, all Hungarian Rhapsody, with strong touches of
Brahms, César Franck, Strauss. But' it is
very often unmistakeably Bartok too, as of
much later, and though the music is longwinded in its youthful exuberance it is effective and entertaining. Quite a guy, this young
Bartok.
The "First Concerto" gets a somewhat
rough playing. understandably in a first recorded performance, the rhythms ofte hesttant and unsteady. Practice makes p rfect.
But the big sense of the music is easilf conveyed, the hi fi is excellent and the spirit
right
throughout. The early "Rhapsody ",
more predictable, gets a polished and splashy
performance, just right for it.
I don't know whether this is available in
stereo ; mine came in mono format.
Bartok: Concerto for Orchestra; Dance
Suite. Concertgebouw Orch. of Amsterdam, Haitink.
Epic BC 1129 stereo
(mono: LC 3772)
It is astonishing to find how many aspects
this late Bartok Concerto can reveal, under
varying conductors and orchestras. It seems to
have summed up, belatedly (1943), a whole
century of composition, from Beethoven
through the whole Romantic period and on
past Tchaikowsky into the satirical ribaldry
of the Twenties and the restoration of a sort
of neo- Romanticism in the Thirties. All this
is in the music, and each element is there to
be emphasized according to taste ; the concerto -like flexibility of the score is such that
the most varied treatments still leave it intact
in balance and expressive power.
This recording, thus, presents a sound that
is quite new to me. It puts forward elements
in the score that I seem never to have heard,
though they were there all the time. Where
Fritz Reiner makes this a work of ultra -hightension modernism, where Ansermet gives it
an almost Brahmsian old- fashionedness, the
Concertgebouw under Haitink plays a sort of
high -level Tchaikowsky
mean Tchaikowsky
at his razor -edge best. The implied comparison is between the concerto treatment of solo
voices within the orchestra in the Bartok and
the sharply similar treatment of the Tchaikowsky orchestra in his big works. The two
men, after all, were both masters of detail
within a large symphony orchestra, both
could achieve massiveness, or lightness and
transparency, within the big aggregation of
instruments.
There is, of course, a certain quality of
honest conservatism here
is good in such
-I
-it
a well- rounded performance (though it can
be dull in less fortunate circumstances). The
themes and melodies are taken full-value and
with leisure, each given all the time it can
use for its best impact, and this adds to the
Tchaikowsky flavor ; for the Bartokian tension under this same moderate approach is,
again, remarkably like that of Tchaikowsky.
Only in the high -speed last movement is the
music somewhat out of its element. Reiner
does it even faster but maintains a tempered
steel sharpness even so ; here there is incipient confusion and orchestral floundering.
The earlier "Dance Suite" (1923) is also
slightly out of place in this moderate and
thoughtful orchestral milieu ; it is better
played where the snazzy, brassy, jazzy elements can have fuller play. Even at their most
eloquent the Dutch are seldom jazzy. Not in
symphonic music, anyhow.
Bloch: America (1927). Symphony of the
Air, American Concert Choir, Stokowski.
Vanguard VSD 2065 stereo
This "epic Rhapsody in three parts ". dedicated to Abraham Lincoln and Walt Whitman,
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
IAAF AUDIO FIDELITY.
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DFM Series (Mono) -$4.98 /DFS Series (Stereo) -$5.95
Mono and Stereo album catalogs: Dept. A5, AUDIO FIDELITY INC., 770 11th Ave., New York 19, N. Y.
JUNE, 1961
51
the musical testament of an old -line immigrant from Europe, a much -beloved Jewish
composer who left the Old Country for our
"promised land" and hereby thanks America
for all that it means to him. The music is
built around a number of familiar American
tunes ; it is pictorial, heroic, sentimental,
touching in its honesty -and about as unpalatIs
able today as you can possibly imagine. Alas,
the very vehemence of its defenders (including Stokowski) betrays, I think, a pretty sure
doubt as to its musical value. Frankly, I
found it perfectly awful, though this does not
one bit reduce my admiration for the man
himself nor for the feeling that led to such a
heroic monstrosity.
The stuff is dismally dated, in the true
sense of that word ; its whole approach and
language is of a sort that is now meaningless,
except perhaps in a misguided local affair of
patriotic pageantry. The musical construction that might give it permanence is so
flimsy, the style such a hodge -podge, the
extra -musical dramatics so distracting, that
GRADO
not even Stokowski's magic can pull i t together.
You will not find any reputable mue ician
who will admit this in public, of course. 3loch
was one of the great inspirations for A merican music in its budding years of this ce itury
and his name is sacrosanct. But if you e pect
a work of patriotic fervor -be warned . The
going is heavy.
At the end of the big piece, a short ex cerpt
from an actual speech by Bloch conce ning
this work gives his own patriotic feeling ;s, in
reasonably intelligible fi. Interesting.
]
Claire de Lune (Debussy Piano Recital).
Philippe Entremont.
Columbia MS 6214 stereo
(mono: ML 5614
Piano Colors of Ravel. Leonard Pennorio.
Capitol SP 8533 stereo
Here are two of the younger generation
pianists, each busy re-interpreting major
"Truly the world's finest..."
slices of the two big French "modernists" of
the early part of our century. The albums are
curiously significant for piano listeners in
general as well as piano players.
Philippe Entremont, to be sure, represents
a much newer concept of pianism than Pen nario- though perhaps neither would be aware
of it. Pennario is one of the postwar pianists
of the "hard" school
basic piano premise
carried over from the Twenties, that the instrument is percussive in our day, that pianism must be stern, strong, dry in color, as
contrasted to the melting, thundering grandeur of the older days. Though he has moved
into more subtle expressions than this might
imply, Pennario's playing is still of a slightly
austere power, tempered with Hollywood urbanity. He has grown in spite of Hollywood
and a play -anything slickness of technique
now widely appreciated. His Ravel, thus, is
good for the strong, stern underpinnings of
advanced harmonic language that were Ravel's assets ; his austerity is in tune with the
composer's in such exquisitely controlled evocations as the Pavane for a Dead Princess and
the Tombeau de Couperin suite. The more violent Ravel is sparingly touched upon in this
record, nor is it as good, for Pennario's steeliness is not warm, whereas that of Ravel is
white -hot.
Pennario's "refined artistry" (as per the
cover blurb) could be innately excellent for
Ravel if he could only give more of his own
passionate complexity to it. He has the stuff,
-a
but perhaps the Hollywoodish slickness is not
easy to put off-least of all when it has been
so successful.
Entremont is of the newer generation that
suddenly plays the piano gently, all soft and
trusting, young pianists who again use the
pedal practically taboo for these many years
-and eschew the hard tones of percussion.
Like Glenn Gould, he mastered the classics
first-Beethoven and Mozart. His Debussy is
trusting and straightforward and thus a
pleasure to hear, but it is less sophisticated
and in a way less mature than Pennario's
polished Ravel. Compared to the Debussy of
the great Gieseking. Entremont's is of an
advanced student, turning master but not yet
sure of the larger shapes and emotions.
His Reflets dans l'eau is pedalled and shimmering, his Minstrels gently jazz. But the
big, clanging moments of Debussy sonority
are a bit forced perhaps in sheer honesty.
For Debussy was a shrewd promoter of piano
trickery and it takes a master like Gieseking
to cover up the lurking banalities behind his
stunning moments. I like Entremont.
-
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PAST AND PRESENT
Gregorian Chants -Good Friday; Septuagesima. Choir of the Monks of the Abbey
of Saint Pierre de Solesmes.
London OS 25229/30 stereo
Solesmes in France has lately been distinguished for being near Le Mans, where auto
racers tear their cars apart. Le Mans was
there all along ; but long previously Solesmes
had an enviable world-wide reputation as the
center for the restoration of Gregorian chant
to its original form, after many centuries of
gradual corruption. The monks even devised moveable type for this old music and
back in the 19th century printed the first of
those huge volumes of chant that are now the
official sources for Catholic Gregorian music.
In the first decade of electrical recording.
these monks issued a monumental series of
78's which were my own introduction to this
music.
In comparison with several other recent
LP's of Gregorian music I've been hearing
one from Germany and another from the
U.S.A., the Solesmes monks sound older, sing
with a very slightly more romantic approach
and produce a peculiarly lovely slightly nasal
tone that would seem to be of French origin.
Their singing is deliberate, with a good deal
of emphasis and quite a bit of swelling and
dying away on individual tones. The pitch is
no less than superb -in a half hour of unaccompanied singing they do not slip. (Try it
yourself-just play the beginning of side 1 of
the "Good Friday" disc, then the very end.)
I particularly enjoyed the first part of the
Good Friday music, which is an exposition of
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
the Good Friday story (in Latin, of course)
somewhat reminiscent of the Lutheran "Passion drama" as set by Bach -three voices
alternate, one of them an Evangelist, one the
"Synagoga ", and the third Christ himself.
The Evangelist is somewhat neutral, while the
other two have more individuality, one singing higher, one lower. The entire story is told
in terms of an exquisitely balanced series of
short chant formulae, repeated dozens of
times to new words. The serene, utterly musical confidence of these individual voices is
something to marvel at and should move any
listener.
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Distler: Die Weihnachtsgeschichte (The
Christmas Story). Norddeutscher Sing kreis, Wolters.
Barenreiter Musicaphon BM 30 L 1302
This poignant, restrained modern setting of
the Christmas story for unaccompanied chorus
and solo voices looks back beyond Bach, perhaps to the "Christmas Story" of Heinrich
Schütz in the early part of the 17th century.
Its composer enjoyed only a brief musical
fame ; the growing Nazi dominance and increasing militarism of the Thirties in Germany was wholly alien to his nature -as is
abundantly clear in his sensitive music-and,
if my slightly faulty German is correct, he
endured only the first half of the war before
committing suicide in final desperation.
His music is hardly forward- looking and, I
suppose, could be called introspective to the
point of near -decadence. On paper, perhaps.
But there are times when it Is good to look
backward, to revere, preserve, make newly
fruitful those traditions of the past that are
threatened with horrible extinction in a
world of terror. Great art has often come from
such a situation and has been duly honored,
the equal of any innovation.
The gentle Christmas story is told here
mainly by an unaccompanied solo narrator (as
in Schütz), who is surrounded in the music
by others -an angel, Mary, King Herod, Simeon ; the quiet flow of their voices is taken up
here and there by the choir, unaccompanied,
which sings a series of lovely choral variations on the familiar Christmas tune Lo, How
a Rose e'er Blooming (Es ist ein Ros' entaprungen) as well as brief contrapuntal motets
on portions of the story's text.
The mood is quiet and reverent throughout,
the music far removed, as indeed it must be,
from the rigors of daily life and the grating
coarseness of the Nazi regime's years of expansion. How else, surely, must the story of
Christmas be told, today as then? If you
would like to bank up some moments of
Christmas peace in advance, against next
year's department store Xmas rush, put aside
this disc and bring it out next December.
o
Deller's Choice. Alfred Deller, countertenor, with Gustave Leonhardt, harpsichord and organ.
Vanguard BGS 5038 stereo
Vanguard's immense success with Alfred
Deller has led to a few recent releases not
exactly on the highest plane, though pleasing
-yet this new recording, far from exhausting the Deller repertory, is one of his very
best to date.
It is entirely of songs to harpsichord or
organ (with a fiddle and cello here and
there) ; the music is superb, the singing
inimitable -there is no one I know of who
can do it as well -and the variety of material
is remarkable, the interest well sustained. (A
solo harpsichord or organ piece now and then
breaks the monotony of the same voice.) Best
of all, Deller controls his vocal instrument
more beautifully and rigorously than I remember hearing it before, with scarcely a
tone anywhere of his earlier yawpish sort. His
sense of pitch is exquisite. Few singers can
match it. His feeling for purely musical drama
and the dignity of simple expression is flawless.
The music ranges back and forth, mainly
English but with complementary Italian and
German items ; there is a Bach and a Handel,
a brace of virtually brand new 17th century
English works (to most of us) by such as
Humfrey, Blow, Weldon, an unusual ornamented version of a madrigal by Cipriano de
Itore, decked out fifty years afterwards as a
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
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scholarly illustration on paper of the elaborate ad lib additions that singers then made
to other printed music. (My own Canby Singers has performed the original madrigal). Who
but Alfred Deller could sing these ornaments
today in such a musical fashion?
The high spot of the recording (as in Del ler's work as a whole) is his Purcell, in this
case the Elegy on the Death of Queen Mary
(The Queen's Epicedium) of 1695. Purcell was
a counter -tenor too and doubtless sang this
piece himself; Deller's sympathy for Purcell's
difficult and unaccustomed vocal music is
extraordinary. It's an experience to hear him.
and to realize what sheer genius there was in
this British composer.
Lotte Lehmann -Opera Recital (Great Recordings of the Century).
Angel COLO 112
Those who remember Lotte Lehmann in her
later career as one of the finest of all lieder
singers will recall how we used to talk abut
her -"she doesn't have much of a voice, .ut.
" and so on. That's the fate of all sin:. rs
whose musical minds outlast their phys al
powers!
If you've heard Lehmann's 78 rpm Siegli de
my memory is right -or her famous
" Rosenkavalier" recordings of the same pe od
(COLH 110 -111), you'll scarcely be surpr'_ed
at this set of short operatic "singles" f .m
the high times of her earlier career, 1;27
through 1933. She had a great voice then as
well as the familiar and fascinating Lehm nn
personality, so sincere, so dramatic, so d dicated to her music.
On these two sides are nine famous 78 ec
ords with orchestra and only two, Korn old
and d'Albert, are of less than top mus cal
calibre -but she makes them shine too. he
best are Beethoven ( "Fidelio "), W
i'Freischütz "), and the two Strau ses
( "Fledermaus" and "Ariadne auf Naxos ') ;
she was a pure German singer, who did en
-if
her French and Italian opera in German. A
touching and revealing article by the present
Lehmann, "Listening to My Old Records ", is
the nicest part of the excellent accompanying
booklet.
-
Schubert: Trio No. 2 in E Flat, Op. 100.
Rudolph Serkin, Adolf Busch, Hermann
Busch. (Recorded in 1935).
Angel COLH 43
For a good many years, Adolf Busch and
bis pianist son -in -law Rudolph Serkin performed together, both in chamber music and
in works for orchestra, with a good deal of
the éclat that now goes to such as Alexander
Schneider and Pablo Casals. In their chamber
music, brother Hermann Busch played cello,
as brother Mischa Schneider has played to his
brother's fiddle.
I can remember many a Busch -Serkin event
myself, and the familiar impact of Adolf
Busch's fiddle, not always accurate and often
over -emphatic but always musical, is a sound symbol of an era for those of us who enjoyed
his then -new small orchestra "Baroque" concerts and recordings-presaging the great
movement of today towards "authentic" older
music. His were among the earliest of the
sort in this country, though the idea was
nothing new in Germany.
Serkin is still with us as a leader ; instantly, the compelling power of his piano
leadership will strike you in this famous old
recording. A human dynamo of music For all
his later career, I suspect that these relatively youthful moments of superb Schubert
playing have not been surpassed by him. By
himself, Adolph Busch was often too heavy,
too Germanic for an American taste. Serkin
on his own was nervously tense. Together,
these two associates held each other to the
optimum, and the eloquent but circumspect
playing of Hermann Busch made for the perfect trio.
After a quarter century, the playing here
has an oddly old- fashioned eloquence, free of
that unyielding tension that is so marked in
our music today. This is the way Schubert
ought to be played, I'm tempted to say
knowing perfectly well that each age finds its
own way to play any music that may be
lucky enough to survive from an earlier period This is one of the glorious ways that
Schubert has been played, anyhow, during the
135 -odd years since this music was composed.
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Beethoven: Two Romances for Violin and
Orch. Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto.
Arthur Grumiaux; Concertgebeow Orchestra, Kaitink.
Epic BC 1120 stereo
(mono: LC 3762)
I tried this record mainly for the two lovely
Beethoven "Romances," old favorites of mine
for years past. They aren't often played because they do not fit in any standard category- they are short, simple- songs. but require a full orchestra as well as a soloist.
It was good to hear the music again, but I
felt that these performances were somewhat
hurried,ml.ssing that sublime slowness that is
especially Beethoven's in such music. These
move along too fast for the proper musical
impact, losing the dignity, the impressive
simpleness, that can be projected, and has
been in other recordings. The music is more
important, I think, than these players are allowing it to be. It is the very best of a type
of expression that Beethoven particularly
liked in his early -middle period.
The Mendelssohn Concerto is well and
lightly played with a good balance between
solo and orchestra, no unnecessary hoopla, a
tine fiddle tone from Grumiaux. Even without
trying the dozens of other available versions,
I'd be willing to settle for this one. (See
following.)
Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto.
Bruch: Violin Concerto No. 1. Nathan
Milstein; Philharmonia Orch., Barzin.
Capitol SP 8518 stereo
about hi -fi tubes
for hi -fi circuitry
-Hold it Here's another Mendelssohn,
which out of curiosity I compared directly
with the preceding, featuring Arthur Grumi!
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
aux and the Dutch orchestra. (Note that
these two are perhaps the two highest -rating
orchestras in the world.)
The Capitol (E.M.I.) sound is sweeter and
smoother than Epic's (Philips of Holland)
and the performance is more mellifluous, to
the point of being a bit slick. It's interesting
that the Mendelssohn orchestra is peculiarly
tough to capture in stereo against a solo
violin, and Capitol's Philharmonic is distinctly subdued and "backgroundish" here.
more so than the Concertgebeouw in the Epic
recording though both versions subordinate
the orchestra to the prominent solo violin.
Yes, I distinctly prefer the Epic recording.
It is slightly rougher, but in the direction of
real sincerity and musical expressiveness. As
a matter of fact, the coordination and cooperation between solo and orchestra is better than between Milstein and his very expert
orchestra man, Leon Barzin. Ilifferences are
slight in outward detail, but I sense rather
definitely that the Milstein -Barzin cooperation was somewhat routine, if highly skilled,
whereas the Grumiaux- Haitink collaboration
(Haitink is one of the two permanent conductors of the Concertgebeouw) is a working
ensemble of real expressivity.
All of which is to say that my first impulse, as of the above -to settle for the Epic
recording
sustained in subsequent comparison here.
-is
Mozart: Symphonies No. 25 ( "Little G
Minor "), No. 36 ( "Linz "). Pro Musica
Orch., Klemperer.
Vox PL 11.820
If I am right, these recordings are out of
an earlier Vox catalogue, put down when Otto
Kletnperer did not yet have his present elder statesman reputation, that has so felicitously
come his way in the last four years, during
which his Angel recordings have made him
famous on records. Klemperer went through
an unfortunate period in late middle life but
his return to "full production" has been the
more extraordinary. A comparison of the two
cover photographs of the man will perhaps
suggest the change; the side face on the front
shows the wise, contemplative aspect of
a great musical mind, the front face on
the back of the album shows the nervous, high
strung, slightly fanatical look of his less suc-
cessful period.
The Mozart symphonies show both aspects
of this conductor. They are, indeed, taut,
rather tense in the performance. But in spite
of it, the masterful understanding of shape
and line comes through. Comparison can be
made with Klemperer's Angel recording of
the No. 25 with the Philharmonia.
The sound of these is quite acceptable,
though somewhat on the wooden side, lacking
in upper sheen. If they are as old as I think.
in the original, Vox has done an excellent
job of refurbishing.
ECHT- AND NEO- BAROQUE
Bach: Sonatas Nos. 3 and 4 for Violin
and Keyboard, in E Major, C Minor. Hans -
heinz Schneeberger, violin; Eduard Muller, harpsichord.
Barenreiter Musicaphon
BM 25 R 902 (10 ")
The German -Swiss firm that rides the bear
( Bärenreiter) is now being imported hereabouts and I'm lucky enough to be on their
reviewer list. Their product is ultra-German
in the highest sense -even to that typically
complicated file number on the record, as well
as the somewhat chastely designed soft record cover (quite lovely, even so) and, most
important, the marvelously played Bach.
It takes a German understanding, I sometimes think, to play this ultra- German composer as he must be played. In particular, this
violinist is unbelievabley "right"-his instrument is subordinated to the whole music
both in the playing and in the recorded
sound (which places him somewhat off -mike
for a beautiful blend with the harpsichord),
his fingering and bowing as precisely accurate
as though the tones were played on an organ,
his phrasing superbly musical, making even
(cm/filmed on page 68)
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JUNE, 1961
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55
when he joined Eubie Blake's Baltimore baud
at the age of twelve. In fact, he left recording studios a quarter- century ago, returning
only recently to play guitar on a Prestige LP
featuring Lonnie Johnson. Chris Albertson,
who rediscovered both men through his jazz
program on a Philadelphia radio station,
switched labels since then and is now producing for Riverside. And Snowden is back playing banjo, just as he did when he first met
Duke Ellington in Washington, D. C. Their
two careers ran parallel for several years,
and Snowden is credited with bringing the
younger man to New York. All the tunes recall those roistering Prohibition days at the
Kentucky Club, Barron Wilkins, Small's Paradise, and the Bamville Club, where gangsters
mingled with the upper crust and the bands
played Dein' The New Lowdown, Diga Diga
Doo, and Tishomingo Blues. But the banjo
was on the way out by repeal, and Snowden
CHARLES A. ROBERTSON
STEREO
Jesse Fuller: The Lone Cat
Good Time Jazz 510039
Railroading and its associated sounds stir
the imagination of amateur enthusiasts as
.
well as professionals, and by now the piece
of track which has never seen a portable tape
recorder is lonely indeed. The deep throb of
the newest diesel monster is harnessed to test
stereo equipment, while distant whistles of
the last steam locomotives are being faithfully documented for space -age posterity. Before the first microphone was posted beside a
roadbed, however, blues artists had already
passed by, on the way picking up the rhythmic pulse of cars in motion and putting it
into songs about the trip. That these practitioners often heard as much as any microphone and more is ably demonstrated by
Jesse Fuller, who acts as a one -man band to
tell of three separate journeys on his first
stereo performance.
Although the blues are full of railroad lore,
with only subject matter of an amatory or
monetary nature turning up more frequently,
such purely descriptive pieces are usually set
apart and designated as train blues. Early
blues artists made them into individual
specialties and always had one ready to roll.
Fuller started learning as a youngster when
working "on transportation" a half- century
ago in an Alabama lumber camp, rode the rods
throughout the South, and once held an annual pass on the Southern Pacific. He boasts
of catching freight trains running thirty miles
an hour with a guitar strapped on his back,
and his fingers are still fleet enough to hit a
better gait. It would come as no surprise to
learn that Fuller is the only man alive who
can estimate the speed of a train from a
song's tempo.
Rather than work against the sound of the
rails. passengers on the old sidedoor pullman cars picked tunes and adjusted their
playing to conform to the basic rhythm
patterns. Fuller controls the pace by taking
a position at the throttle of the fotdella -an
instrument of his own invention consisting
of a big six -string bass viol which he operates
with his left foot through a system of pedals
and levers. Counter -rhythms are played on
guitar, and signals for crossings come from
either harmonica or kazoo attached to a
harness worn around his neck so that he can
shift from one to the other at will. Bridges
and switches are marked by his right foot
working a home-made "hat" cymbal. Fuller
is fully occupied by the time everything is
going at once, but the drivers are rolling and
a live, breathing locomotive moves at his command. A crack transcontinental express pulls
out on Leaving Memphis, Frisco Bound, while
the local tracks are used on a novelty tune,
The Monkey And The Engineer. And hardworking logging trains climb over the hills
on Beat It On Down The Line.
A senior member of the blues fraternity.
Fuller has roots in the post- reconstruction
South where he was born 63 years ago, and
his experience is by no means limited to railroading. In fact, his first airplane flight, from
73.E
56
The Parkway, Mamaroneck, N. Y.
Liverpool to Belfast, and admiring faits who
carried him on their shoulders, served him
better than a train ride which took him to
the Newport Folk Festival a day late. The
ability to entertain Douglas Fairbanks won
him a job soon after World War I as extra
during the filming of "The Thief of Bagdad,"
and other epics. By that time his style of
vocalizing and guitar playing was fully formed,
and later improvements in the way of greater
proficiency and added instruments all fit in.
Today Fuller's music is an authentic vaicc
from the past, even though he nurses an ambition to appear on the Ed Sullivan show.
When describing New Corrine, he still sees a
country road and a girl no older than she
was in 1915. Also included are a superb
Guitar Blues, and a mournful Down 1-Pmu'
Waltz.
When future citizens of other planets attempt to gain an inkling of what railroad
travel was like by listening to locomotive
recordings, much of the romance will be
missing unless they also hear Fuller and some
of his fellows performing train blues. Some
modern singers try to update the idiom with
references to Cadillac cars, rockets, and circling satellites, but they must look elsewhere
for a beat. As long as the blues are sung and
played, some performer will be taking an old
coal- burner on down the line. All of Fuller's
sounds are relayed without resort to overdubbing, tape editing, or channel switching,
and Roy DuNann's stereo setup helps un-
tangle the assorted instruments. Fuller, indefatigable to the last, concludes with a lively
buck and wing across the studio.
Jon Hendricks: Evolution Of The Blues
Columbia CS8383
Song
Like any good blues, the story Jon Hendricks told last fall at the Monterey Jazz
Festival is a purely personal one that bothers
little with published histories. On this slightly
shortened version, which was recorded in
Hollywood a week after the concert, he speaks
in terms youngsters can easily understand
about plain truths their elders should never
forget. To him the blues are a living language
of today, with a growing future and an unburied past, and he believes everyone should
hear and know the messages carried in the
old songs and the new. Musical examples are
selected with this view in mind, and assisting
vocalists include Hanna Dean and gospel
choir, Big Miller and Jimmy Witherslioon.
Hendricks is heard in three songs which he
wrote especially for the recorded performance,
and two should be encored in another context
soon
calypso They Stopped On The Way,
and the amusing Aw, Gai. The Ike Isaacs
Trio, his regular accompanying group with
Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross, is joined by
Ben Webster, Pony Poindexter, and Bobby
Gibbons. Every school board should he required to inve =t in several copies.
-a
Elmer Snowden: Harlem Banjo
Riverside RLP9348
One of the happiest sounds anywhere is
the banjo playing of Elmer Snowden on this
date, the first to be held under his own name
in a professional career dating hack to 1912
went with it.
He remained musically active, however, and
kept his wrist flexible by playing with such
Philadelphia youngsters as Ray and Tommy
Bryant. The last named brother renews the
association as bassist in the quartet, and the
drummer is Jimmy Crawford. Harlem stride
piano is the rightful complement for this sort
of banjo playing, and the veteran Cliff Jackson proves to be a perfect partner. Snowden's
single- string solos are pure delights, and
engineer Ray Fowler catches nuance on Ellington's Clam Blues, and It Don't Mean A
Thing. If the designers of stereo spectaculers
and television producers are really looking
for the authentic sound of the Twenties.
Jackson and Snowden are the men to see.
Toshiko Mariano Quartet
Candid 9012
Toshiko Akin ushi and Charlie Mariano
formed their quartet a year ago, shortly after
they were married, and have welded it into
the unique and invigorating unit heard here
in the interim. The first Japanese to win a
reputation as a jazz musician, Toshiko came
to this country five years ago on a scholarship from Berklee School in Boston. Work in
clubs and close association with various jazz
greats hastened her progress until now she is
a thoroughly developed jazz pianist. Her husband was featured as an alto sexist in the
Charlie Parker style with Stan Kenton, but
has since thrown off shackling influences.
Both retain a certain identity by writing
original material, and each claims ownership
of two compositions in the present set. How
much of the individuality is real and how
long it can be kept separate are matrimonial
questions best left unanswered. But Mariano
becomes as much involved in Toshiko's lyrical
Long Yellow Road, as she does in her bus band's waltz theme on When You Meet Her.
The remaining number is a moving realization
of Deep River, and brings Mariano to the fore.
Gene Cherico, bass, and drummer Eddie Marshall complete the quartet. Bob d'Orleans
engineered the date.
Johnny Dankworth with the London Philharmonic Orchestra: Collaboration
Roulette SR52059
While critics and musicians in this country
and in Germany were raising considerable
fuss the last few years about the union of
jazz and classical forms, the British went
about the same bit of business quietly and
with little fanfare. Johnny Dankworth's modern jazz orchestra and the London Philharmonic first met in concert at Royal Festival
Hall on June 2, 1959, and the experience
proved mutually rewarding enough to bear
repetition on several subsequent occasions.
Furthermore, composers of both persuasions
were given commissions and encouraged to
join forces in preparing new works as the
concerts continued. The two introduced here,
with Hugo Rignold as conductor, succeed in
drawing both units together more closely than
is usually the case in such marriages. Dank worth, who later answered an invitation to
bring his entourage over for the Newport
Jazz Festival, paired up with Matyas Seiber
to produce Improvisations For Jazz Band And
Symphony Orchestra. The five-part Rendezvous, a collaboration of David Lindup and
Leonard Salzedo, visits such international
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
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JBL products are manufactured by
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AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
57
YEARS
OF HIGH
FIDELITY
It was 1927... Amos and Andy had not yet
become a national pastime ... and radio
listeners were more familiar with a catwhisker than with a vacuum tube. Yet it
was in this year 1927 that the concept of
high fidelity was born.
It was brought to life by a company of unusual vision, a group of skilled radio engineers who early foresaw the day when
people would no longer be content with
the mere reproduction of sound, but who
would demand that it be reproduced with
the highest possible degree of fidelity.
That degree of fidelity was amazingly high,
even in 1927, for those listeners fortunate
enough to own an SR -7, the first audio
product made by the young Sargent Rayment Company. There are still SR -7s in
existence today, capable of functioning
perfectly, after a third of a century.
The principles laid down in 1927
good today. Testifying to
still hold
their basic
soundness, S -R components over the years
have always out- performed and out-lived
ordinary units. Backing this up is the
strongest, longest guarantee in hi -fi history. Any S-R unit you buy today is guaranteed for 15 months, on a pro -rated, moneyback basis (except for tubes, which carry
a 1 -year warranty, 4 times longer than
normal).
introduced
1021.;,;6-'''''
SR -7,
in 1927
SR-1040,
introduced in 1960
If you've not yet had an opportunity to
learn about Sargent-Rayment's "seven steps
to superior reproduction," check today with
your dealer. And if you're planning a component system, ask him for a copy of the
S -R High Fidelity Planning Folder.
/
SARGENT-RAYMENT
CO.
462 Hester Street, San Leandro 3, California
30 Rockefeller Plaza, Suite 3, New York 20, N.Y.
58
points as West African "Highlife," the gospel church, contrasting Peruvian rhythms,
and London's own South Bank.
The show is very nearly given away at the
start, as the first item programed turns out
to be Stravinsky's Ebony Concerto, written
in 1945 for the Woody Herman Herd. What
follows is in the same general tradition, with
a bow or two in the direction of Darius Milhaud, and should attract an equally large
and cosmopolitan audience. That a tradition
can be said to exist in this sort of endeavor
indicates how quickly jazz moves along.
Soloists from the jazz contingent make certain that time marches just as fast, and Rig nold conducts with a light, airy tread. A
spacious recording hall was employed, and
percussive effects on the stereo version are
sufficiently spectacular without aid of chahnelswitching fakery. The managements oil the
Boston Pops and Lewisohn Stadium coi erts
might take heed and brighten summer fa: e by
scheduling these works, or commission o hers
from similar composing teams in this cou itry.
Art Farmer: Art
Argo LP678
Since organizing the Jazztet a year ago,
co-leaders Art Farmer and Benny Golson have
worked to make the unit a winner and are
being repaid by growing approval in clubs
from coast -to- coast. So far, they have just
missed achieving the same success in the
studio together, perhaps because everyone
concerned wanted the first two Jazztet LP's
to act as showcases. Neither seems to worry
quite so much when recording apart, and
mundane affairs are far away as Farmer
meanders effortlessly through this grati yang
set of ballads. Whether sales reach a in llion
copies or a dozen appears to be of no co cern
as long as he knows the playing is his best.
Farmer can create the same introsp tive
mood on trumpet as Miles Davis, yet ph ases
so distinctively that he is never called a avis
imitator. He also searches out neglected s ngs,
rescuing I'm A Fool To Want You, Yo nger
Than Springtime, and Goodbye, Old Girl.
Pianist Tommy Flanagan is an equally lucid
partner, and Golson contributes Out Of The
Past. Jazztet members Tommy Williams, bass,
and drummer Albert Heath complete the quartet. Engineer Tommy Nola's stereo setting
maintains the warm and intimate qualities.
Jimmy Smith: Home Cookin'
Blue Note ST84050
Having won a reputation for igniting the
Hammond organ with conflagrations fiery
enough to singe rare porterhouse, Jimmy
Smith turns on the back burners to slowly
cook a mess of blues until thoroughly done.
The menu was inspired by the homey co fines
of a restaurant which Kate Bishop operates
near the backstage entrance to Ha em's
Apollo Theatre, but the proper amou t of
seasoning is entirely up to Smith and has assistant chefs. Smith works at a leisurely pace,
carefully testing each concoction at every
stage preparation, and anyone in search of
short -order cooking had better look elsewhere.
The main dishes are See See Rider, and
Smith's own Messin' Around, with Kenny
Burrell, guitar, and Percy France, tenor sax,
supplying the extra touches. Burrell also
brings along two recipes of his own- a tasty
Sugar Hill, and a well turned Come On Baby.
Everything is nicely spread out in the stereo
version, and engineer Rudy Van Gelder never
lets the hearty organ sound overpower Bur rell's softer rhythm passages.
George Shearing with Nancy Wilson: The
Capitol ST1524
Swingin's Mutual
Aretha Franklin with The Ray Bryant Trio
Columbia CS8412
If record companies still think the only
way to launch a new, young singer is to hire
an expensive arranger and large studio band,
these two albums should go a long way toward
disproving the theory. Nancy Wilson has two
previous Capitol albums to her credit and
some favorable reviews, but the freedom enjoyed here with the George Shearing Quintet
was never hers before. The lightly swinging
background is just what she needs to deliver
a buoyant Things We Did Last Summer, and
a sultry All Night Long. A claim that the date
came about because of mutual admiration is
easier to believe after listening to the pianist's flexible response to the singer's slightest
whim. They also apportion the program quite
sensibly, and the Quintet performs half the
numbers alone, reprising Lullaby of Birdland,
Blue Lou, and Margie Hyams' Don't Call Me.
Aretha Franklin's debut LP is even more
informal,with a steady stream of jazzmen
strolling in and out to give the whole affair
a party atmosphere. The eighteen -year -old
miss began singing in her father's gospel choir
in Detroit when she was eight, and alumnus
Sam Cooke is helping to further her new
career in night clubs and theaters. Ray Byrant
is another who lends encouragement, and his
piano is a great help on the adult -sounding
Over The Rainbow, and By Myself. Some
numbers are frankly directed at the teenage
market, and the lists of hit singles are already registering Love Is The Only Thing, and
Today I Sing The Blues. This last tune comes
from Curtis Lewis, who gets into both albums
with All Night Long. Having satisfied both
age groups, the singer plays her own brand of
gospel piano on Won't Be Long, and Who
Needs You? Among the invited guests are
Tyree Glenn, Al Sears, Quentin Jackson, and
Lord Westbrook.
Sid Cooper: Percussive
Jazz, Vol.
2
Audio Fidelity DFS7007
Of the sum total of seventeen musicians
engaged in decoding Sid Cooper's arrangements on this date, fourteen belong to the
rhythm section and all are kept fully occupied. The area around and in between stereo
speakers is filled with flying sounds that take
off like rockets or soar gracefully about before disappearing into outer space. Anything
as simple and direct as a ping in one speaker,
followed by a pong in the other, is now hopelessly old-fashioned among the stereo buffs
who have become addicted to lots of percussive action. Cooper performs triple duty, providing charts for the musicians, charts for
the engineers, and finally charting a safe
course for readers of liner notes. An arranger's job is no longer limited to keeping
a band -leader happy, and electronic computers
soon may take over.
Cooper picks tunes that are resistant to
rugged treatment, featuring Bobby Rosengarden's rosin-coated bongo drums and Sol
Gubin's cow bell on Moanin', and Don Arnone's guitar on his own Percussion-Aire.
Some positions are filled twice over, with
organists Sy Mann and Nick Tagg, pianists
Buddy Weed and Andy Ackers, vibists Harry
Breuer and Eddie Costa, and Tony Mottola
as the other guitarist. That non-percussion:eta Doc Severinsen, Bobby Alexander, and
throughout should be qualified enough for an
an astronaut diploma.
Limerick Party
Cook 1074
As the special dispensation granted to make
this recording at an annual meeting of the
Benevolent Society for the Preservation of
Ancient Rhymes & Limerix may never be
granted again, all serious collectors are advised to eavesdrop while they can. The group
assembles at the chairman's home the weekend before Ash Wednesday, and there seems
to be no reason to doubt that this is the
seventieth meeting
you believe such things
happen in Emory Cook's New England at all.
Some rhymes on the yearly report are quite
venerable, others are told with a new twist,
and a few are recent enough to include references to Loas and electronic brains. They are
-if
told with varying degrees of inhibition as
the proceedings get underway, by people who
left their last names at the door, and with
increasing frankness after 1 A. M. By then,
dissident members are adjourning to more
daring recitals in an outside hallway, and
the host finally is left to conduct the meeting
alone.
Even of the next chairman is willing to
chance a similar fate, the stereo version will
probably cause the barring of all microphones
in the future. Quite a few members will become aware for the first time of what a fourfoot parabola can do when they hear themselves in conversations that were presumably
held far from any electronic device. These
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
amusing asides crop up all over the room and
fill interludes on the agenda. The principal
stereo mikes must compete with a public address system unfortunately, and a vocal quartet sounds like a rock -and -roll group. Of
course, it could happen that the members will
elect Emory took permanent engineer and
purchase tap/ orders to rehearse for future
meeting.
The Belafonte Folk Singers At Home And
Abroad
RCA Victor L5P2309
Members of the Belafonte Folk Singers
always act as though the call to solo comes
from an unexpected inner urge that can be
satisfied only by bursting into full -throated
song. This effect is patently calculated and
results from the planning of Robert DeCormier, who conducts the group and works hard
to make every performance appear spontaneous and unrehearsed. It all sounds like a plot
to fool the public, but DeCormIer's goal is
much more difficult to attain. He hopes each
of his charges will find it impossible not to
become emotionally involved in the role assigned, and audiences are well aware when
the transition from acting is successfully accomplished. The fact that it occurs frequently
can also be attributed to experience with the
unpredictable Harry, whose absence gives the
soloists an open track on this occasion. Roy
Thompson is featured on .liuleakinaer Blues,
San Suso, and tl/l, White !I arse. Ned Wright
takes over on Dida'I I1 Rain. Bob Harter on
Poor Boy, and Joli Gonsalves on Tanga.
Too much stereo movement is never allowed
to rock the boat in an excellent Webster Hall
recording by Bob Simpson and Ray Hall.
MONO
Bob Wilber: Blowin' The Blues
Away
Classic Jazz CJ9
This LP is the outgrowth of a Music Minus
One session organized to prepare a survey of
the blues for younger aspirants and provide a
refresher course for any older players who
want to brush up on the latest trends at
home. The nine easy lssions also are offered
in alternate versions, with either Bob Wilber
or Clark Terry laying out, trader the heading
"Evolution of the Blues (MMO100S)," and
touch briefly on such current subjects as the
blues waltz, soul jazz, Latin rhythms, and the
gospel church. Both experts on their respective horns are heard sermonizing at top form
here, and a less instructive project might
have resulted in the title "Clark Terry Sings."
Disclosing a vocal talent hitherto unrevealed
on records, the former Ellington trumpet star
bursts forth in a robust entreaty of his own
called Please, Blues Go .-I way From Here,
delivered in a style reminiscent of the late
Oran "Lips" Page. Terry works at present
for Quincy Jones, a leader who wants his
new band to acquire a group personality the
public can readily identify. Now that Terry's
secret is out, Jones had better take advantage
of his blues shouting before alert record companies start talking contract.
Wilber, who speaks of the rest of the quintet in laudatory terms on the liner notes,
takes credit for planning the date and notating the missing parts in scores furnished with
each M\lO set, but any references to his own
playing are omitted. Such modesty is wholly
unwarranted, especially in view of his ability
to span all periods of jazz on either clarinet
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AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
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or tenor sax, and a style unlarded with eccentricities makes him an ideal mentor. Besides, who else would think of going to L har
for a blues waltz? Pianist Dick Wells ood
contributes The Maryland Farmer, and Baptist Blues. Bassist George Duvivier is always
reliable. and Panama Francis sticks to the
basic ingredients in displaying a beat that
sells millions of records. Thanks to clarity of
Dave Hancock's recording, novices will have
no trouble following any instrument.
SPOTS
BEFORE
Bud Freeman All -Stars featuring
Prestige/Swingville 2012
Shorty Baker
When Bud Freeman played with Tommy
Dorsey, the sound of his tenor -sax characterized the band almost as much as the leader's
trombone, and things never seemed the same
after he left. His choice of harmonies and
distinctive way of phrasing, which set the
style for the entire sax section, always
pleased dancers. Jazz listeners were just as
satisfied, despite a preference for the longer
and meatier solos he recorded with small
groups of displaced Chicagoans. There are no
Chicage boys in this quintet, and Freeman
takes the label at face value to play like the
old Dorsey sax section once did at the Hotel
Commodore. As an extra incentive, pianist
Claude Hopkins heads a rhythm section that
makes the whole affair even more agre able
to dancers.
Only a brief audition of the lyric wiles of
Freeman and partner Howard "Shorty" Baker
are needed to stretch the Dorsey analooy a
point further. The trombonist, as jaz man
rather than leader, might consider their cunning manner of surrounding the melody a
more fitting tribute than all the posthumous
big-band recreations. The sentimental touch
never bears too heavily on S'posin', Love Me
Or Leave Me, and But Not For Me. Baker
recalls his days as a leading light in Ellington's trumpet section on Shorty's Bluest' but
heads in the direction of Sy Oliver on Hector's Dance. Another original titled Move On,
an excursion into current soul jazz, turns
out to be a detour for Everybody Lovez My
Baby. Now that LP's based on the Jonah
Jones formula are glutting the market, perhaps the time is right for an equally swinging approach from a different corner.
The
YOUR
EYES?
Cherry spots, that is?
Of all the precautions taken to insure
long-life and maximum performance in
high -fidelity circuits, conservative tube
operation is possibly the most important.
Yet this rule is often ignored in an
attempt to squeeze higher wattage from
the circuit.
You can often see the result, in the form
of "cherry spots" on the tube, indicating
significantly shortened tube life.
The Bix Beiderbecke Legend
RCA Victor LPM2323
You can often also hear the result in the
George Avakian, who prepared a threevolume set of reissues on Columbia to tell a
form of distortion, drift, and noise.
You'll never see
a
cherry spot in
good part of the Bix Beiderbecke story, cona
Sargent-Rayment high fidelity tuner or
amplifier. Years of experience have taught
S -R
that following tube manufacturers'
recommendations not only makes good
engineering sense, but also permits
S -R
to guarantee its products 15 months, and
tube life
a
full year, four times normal.
Ask your dealer about Sargent- Rayment's
"seven steps to superior
and,
if
you're planning
tem, ask for
a
a
copy of the
reproduction,"
component sysS -R
High Fidelity
Planning Folder.
tinues to investigate the cornetist's c reer,
dipping into RCA Victor vaults this time and
his latest report adds appreciably to the factual side of the legend. One important piece
of evidence is a previously unreleased Jean
Goldkette before 1926, even though this par corded at the Detroit Athletic Club on November 24, 1924. Uncovered in 1960, it proves
without doubt that Beiderbecke played with
Goldkette before 1926, even though this particular solo lost him the job for two years.
Charles Edward Smith relates just how it
happened in the accompanying four-page
brochure and several revealing bits of information from Paul Mertz and Pee Wee R ssell
are also printed for the first time. aken
together, these features add up to an ssential album, and the excerpts included from
Paul Whiteman days and recording groups
are merely that much extra frosting on the
cake. Additional collector's treats are alternate masters of choruses with Whiteman on
Changes, and Lonely Melody.
Josh White: Spirituals & Blues
Elektra EKL193
The sudden burst of interest in young and
old blues singers on the part of record, companies
-84
SARGENT-RAYMENT
CO.
462 Hester Street, San Leandro 3, California
30 Rockefeller Plaza, Suite 3, New York 20, N.Y.
60
is just
the
spur Josh
White n
eded,
and he digs into his material with reewed
vigor. Even while enjoying an international
reputation that weathered changing m isical
trends, he must have felt lonely from want
of competition. That he thrives on it as well
as any other blues singer is evident by his
strong, prideful treatment of such stories as
Black Snake, Silicosis Blues, and Southern
Exposure. Langston Hughes is the writer of
the vivid lyrics to Red Sun. Five spirituals
are delivered with gentleness and hope. The
singer sets his own pace on guitar and never
forces the beat into a false fervor. Bill Lee,
bass, and drummer Walter Perkins are the
accompanists, and Dave Jones engineered the
date.
Songs Of Memphis Slim And "Wee
Willie"
Dixon
Folkways FA2385
Previous albums by this seasoned pair of
blues singers have presented one or the other
as featured vocalist, leaving the odd man out
of the billing but not completely out of the
picture. This time they share and share alike,
taking turns at recalling favorite tunes, inserting alternate verses or joining in together
on the choruses. A musical tour of some of
the cities and places best known to itinerant
blues singers is included at no extra charge.
In fact, three separate ways of getting to
Kansas City are outlined in graphic phrases
attributed to Jim Jackson, Big Bill Broonzy,
and Willie Lovefield. A rolling piano solo by
Memphis Slim, with a boogie bass from Dixon,
sets the train in motion and prepares for a
visit to a Chicago House Rent Party. A
stopover at a Dallas racetrack involves a
bet on a horse called Old Stewball, and the
result gives rise to the lament Unlucky. They
even ask Have You Ever Been In Nashville
Pen?
Anyone still unacquainted with these two
amiable characters will find this an ideal
introduction. Once the preliminaries are out
of the way, the acquisition of additional LP's
under their individual names is inevitable.
The Curtis Counce Group: Carl's Blues
Contemporary M3574
Organized in Los Angeles in 1956, the Curtis
Counce Group was about three years ahead of
its time and disbanded shortly after the death
of Carl Perkins, the pianist in whose memory
this album is dedicated. The reputations of the
surviving members continue to grow, particularly that of Frank Butler, who just now is
gaining the recognition he deserves. A drum
solo lasting nearly five minutes demonstrates
why Jo Jones calls him "The greatest drummer
in the world." Counce recently toured Australia as bassist with Benny Carter, while Harold
Land is heading his own group. Land's tenor
sax is heard to good advantage on I Can't Get
Started, and trumpeter Jack Sheldon contributes Pink Lady. This 1957 session was the last
for both the group and Perkins, with a long
ad -lib blues by the pianist as a high point. His
solos, and those of Gerald Wilson on trumpet,
are topical and soulful enough to bring the
group offers from any of several clubs today.
Epic LA16003
King Oliver
Johnny Dodds And Kid Ory
Epic LA16004
A prospering record club is evidently the
reason for the repackaging of these essential
collections. Epic reissued them on LP once
before, but a new audience and market has
developed in the last few seasons. The dozen
King Oliver sides date from 1923, when the
New Orleans cornetist was trading chase
choruses with Louis Armstrong at Chicago's
Lincoln Gardens. With the sessions held the
same year for Gannett now available on Riverside, his Creole Jazz Band at its greatest is
thoroughly documented on LP.
Johnny Dodds, who headed his own group
on clarinet at the neighboring Kelley's Stables
after leaving Oliver, recorded under the New
Orleans Wanderers name with Kid Ory in
1926. Believing the cornetist to be Armstrong,
collectors placed a high premium on the
records. Later proof that the fine blues choruses are the work of George Mitchell does
nothing to impair the value of the performances. The Chicago Footwarmers and Dixieland Thumpers, with Natty Dominique on
trumpet, are among the other Dodds' groups
represented. Charles Edward Smith provides
ample notes in each case, and the remastering
from Columbia and Okeh originals is carefully done. Let's hope all the club members
buy copies. Perhaps Epic will then bring over
the Clarence Williams Blue Five LP, featuring Armstrong and Sidney Bechet, which its
affiliate Philips has released in England.
2£
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
AUDIO ETC
f
nun pall(
,
,
that you may, indeed, be in for a thrill, as
the ad says, when you try your first 'phones.
Or you may merely be mildly amused.
Some of you may even be distressed, as
I have been, by unreal and "out of focus"
effects, as described in my earlier discussion.
What I would like to add here is merely
that the effects upon the ears vary greatly
from one recording to the next, according
to the microphoning used. None of the
microphone systems were intended for reproduction with one channel exclusively
going to each ear; all were meant to be
heard via the cross -relating spread of
stereo speakers, each ear hearing both
speakers, as disparate sound sources in
space.
But if you treat those mikes as surrogate
ears, which is what happens in earphone
listening, you may by accident or chance
receive a very interesting signal. Or a very
garbled and nonsensical one. It all depends.
Cross-Mike and M -S
I suspect that the European stereo recordings that are made via the M -S system,
two mikes in one ease plus a matrixing
circuit, or by the simple cross -mike arrangement, two mikes at an angle and close
together, will provide some very realistic
THE MOST
SOUGHT -AFTER
STEREO
RECORDING..
binaural listening-perhaps better than the
actual stereo via loudspeakers. (I am not
very enthusiastic about this rather mild
stereo, where the two- channel effect through
speakers is so genteel as to be an almost
inaudible step away from straight mono
sound.) Two mikes in this European arrangement make two tolerably good and
well-placed ears, and that's all you need.
It sounds terrific!
Indeed, recordings of this sort could well
account for much of the genuine pleasure
reported by- earphone "stereo" listeners,
and for the lack of unpleasantly noticeable
falseness or fatigue effects. These listeners, to be sure, aren't hearing stereo; but
they are hearing something even better,
real binaural, or a very good semblance
of it.
On the other hand, a recording made via
twenty or thirty mikes, in and out of isolation booths, blended through two -channel
reverb, artificial or otherwise, is just not
binaural in any conceivable sense! Like
trying to look at a scene through one of
those new Japanese kaleidoscopes. Multiple
images, overlapping, beautiful but
least
in this sort of fancy stereo sound-incomprehensible.
To tell the truth, the analogy is dangerous, because in the kaleidoscope you do
not usually try to discern reality of any
sort (though you can, if you work hard at
it) ; whereas in "stereo" listening via
'phones you are necessarily trying hard to
create a mental image of a musical performance, as we always do in any listening
to reproduced music -and you are fighting
against a raft of dizzy, incompatible, contrary- minded sounds, near and far, throw-
-at
ing the two ears out of gear and every
which way. Exciting, but quickly exhausting, conducive to severe ear strain if your
listening imagination is at all subtle.
Come to think of it, the way to fix up
your 'phones (you manufacturers and you
home tinkerers) is to install a variable
Bauer circuit, adjustable to compensate as
well as possible for these large differences
in stereo recording. Leave it to Mr. B. to
cite the variables; maybe an on -off switch
would be plenty. Variable or no, though,
I don't honestly think you should rest your
'phones in peace on your head until you
have figured out this little problem some
way or another. Worth your attention.
9.
*
Let me add a quick and necessary postscript: In terms of loudspeaker listening
I am all in favor of the highly tricked -up
stereo now being used in some classical recordings and feel that, though sometimes
it goes too far, in general the tricks have
added a great deal to the purely musical
effectiveness of the stereo medium.
The development is reasonable and honest, for we must not forget that all recording is based on illusion, via the unique laws
that apply to the recorded medium. We do
not try for a literal concert sound, nor for
an exactly transcribed "live" performance,
but rather for the soul of that performance,
the meaning and sense of it, in terms of
recording.
The "laws" of stereo are many and
varied and more is found out about then
every day. But nobody has yet claimed
that for true binaural hearing we need
more than two ears, and those more than a
head's distance apart.
NOT FOR SALE
-The Orchestra
... The Instruments- No. LS661
The most ambitious, musically sound, entertaining and informative
privately commissioned recording to date. It shows how each instrument (and instrumental choir) emanates from the orchestra in the
correct spatial relation to all other instruments. Conceived and supervised by Dr. Kurt List, winner of the Grand Prix du Disque, for Westminster. Vienna State Opera Orchestra. Includes works of Cimarosa,
Debussy, Dittersdorf, Handel, Haydn, Lalo, Mozart, Rachmaninoff,
Respighi, Rimski - Korsakov, Tchaikovsky, Wagner, Weber. No one
can buy this record
is yours only with the purchase of the Shure
products listed below:
-it
Only Shure would commission such
for they know full well that Shure
are equal to its incredible range and
ments. They are the lowest cost,
STERE O
SHURE
-
a technically demanding record
Stereo Dynetic Phono Cartridges
stereo channel separation requireyet most critical components in
quality stereo. They are completely accurate and honest
throughout the entire audible sound spectrum.
a gift to you when you buy the one indispen-
...
sable accouterment to perfect sound re- creation
.
WESTMINSTER
LIMITED
EDITION
You receive the Westminster/Shure disc at no charge with the purchase
of a Shure Professional Cartridge (M3D $45.00*; M3D with N2 D
stylus $47.25 *), Custom Cartridge (M7D $24.00 *; M7D with N21 D
stylus $36.75*), Shure Integrated Tone Arm and Cartridge (M212,
M216 $89.50 *) or Professional Tone Arm
(M232 $29.95 *; M236 $31.95 *).
*Audiophile net
SHURE BROTHERS, INC.
222 Hartrey Ave., Evanston, III., Dept. KKK
Offer limited. Full details at high fidelity dealers.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
61
our
components
are
not
so
hot
We mean
The Score Screen -Innovation In The Concert Hall
CONCERT HALL
procedure being almost
as rigid as Latin declensions, the
that literally, and fact is, we're
proud of it:
No high
HAROLD LAWRENCE
fidelity unit can be expected to
slightest departure from customary
practice invariably arouses comment; Such
was the case when the Canadian violinist,
Hyman Bress, gave his second New York recital early this year. There was nothing unorthodox about the program, which in luded
works by Mozart, Brahms, Prokofie , and
Schoenberg. The deviation occurred uring
the performance of Schoenberg's F ntasy,
Op. 47, when slides of the music's welve
pages were projected on the Town Hall
movie screen. The picture was large enough
to be seen clearly from most parts of the
hall so that score readers in the audience
could follow the intricate notation. This
visual device won Bress two add tional
paragraphs in the New York Tim 's reYork
view, a headline story in the Ne
Herald Tribune, and an article (with
photograph) in Time.
Although Bress believes the score screen
is primarily aimed at modern repertory, it
this
is interesting to speculate on ho
classroom technique would affect oncert
life were it be used on a broader scale.
First, it would bring about the em gence
of a new class of worker, the music 1 pro jectionist-a sort of cinematic page urner.
Replacing the warning bell in the rojeetion booth would be copies of the scores
to be performed down on the stage. The
duties of the musical projectionist will be
much more demanding than those of his
movie counterpart, who only has to change
(reels) every eleven (or twenty -two)
minutes. Shortly after the score projectionist becomes a regular part of the
musical scene, performers and concert
managers will come to realize that the
slide system, though perfectly adequate
from the utilitarian standpoint, is cumbersome and inflexible. While few or no
"turns" occur in a Scarlatti sonat or in
movements of a Bach solo violin artita,
the opening of Ravel's Daphnis and Chloe
(Suite No. 2), with its two -bar' pages
flashing by every five seconds like telegraph posts on a railroad journey, would
set a brutal pace for the projectionist
and Lord help him if he gets his slides
-
provide long, reliable performance unless
its components are completely stable.
This is why Sargent -Rayment design
engineers take extreme care to minimize
heat dissipation within the chassis of
S-R
tuners, control centers, and amplifiers.
For example, all heat-producing resistors
are mounted on top of the chassis, rather
than inside, which effectively prevents
the internal ambient temperature from
rising and damaging sensitive components.
.
Try the hand heat test on conventional
equipment, then on Sargent -Rayment.
We guarantee
S-R
will be cooler by far.
,
Ask your dealer about Sargent-Rayment's
"seven steps to superior reproduction,"
and,
if you're planning
tem, ask for
a
a
component sys-
copy of the S-R High Fidelity
Planning Folder.
SARGENT - PAYMENT CO.
462 Hester Street, San Leandro 3,
30
62
Rockefeller Plaza, Suite
California
3, New York 20,
N.Y.
-
mixed up!
One remedy for this state of affairs
would be the moving scroll me od, a
"horizontal teleprompter" used n the
Japanese film, Gate of Hell. He e, the
score would travel across our field of
vision in a tempo consistent with that
of the music as performed. Operated by
a skillful projectionist, the effec could
be quite musical.
The score screen will provide r ch opportunities for the musician wit pedagogical tendencies. The pianist who is ever
*
26 W. 9th St., New York 11, ' . Y.
on the alert for inner voices now will be
able to spotlight his "discoveries" by means
of three techniques: arrow, zoom, or color.
The arrow, employed for years by a publisher of study scores, is a crude indicator.
Zooming is a familar device in our camera conscious age, but one which, with repeated use, brings on vertigo or mal de
mer. That leaves color. Of the three, this
is easily the most artistic method: a
colored counter -melody would be detected
at once, without the necessity of injecting
any non-musical signpost.
Beyond merely -pointing up melodic
lines, color could also be used to enhance
moods, reflect degrees of intensity, and
separate strands of a complicated orchestral work. In Rhapsody in Blue, the entire
page might be drenched in the title color,
projected on the screen in varying shades.
The opening clarinet cadenza could begin
in , a pale baby blue, and rise up to a
deep ultramarine at the climax of the
glissando. And think of what color could
do for Schoenberg's Five Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 16, with its "pointilliste" instrumental texture! Why, if colored scores
took hold, they might become to music
what color -coded wires are to the electrieian, except that color associations of
course, would be left strictly in the hands
of the performer.
There are other ways of suggesting
mood without altering the notation. Take
Chopin's "Raindrop" Prelude, for example:
the repeated A Flats could be made to fall,
glistening, on the page as the pianist plays
them. (Remember the old movie singalongs : "Follow the Bouncing Ball "t)
Turning from notation to general esthetics, the darkened stage is a pleasant
concomitant of the score screen. Let's
face it, there are some performers whose
physical attributes clash with their musical
talents. Now the public would be able to
hear Glenn Gould (the first to come to
mind) without having to watch his now
celebrated twists and fidgets.
The question arises as to what to do
about between- movement pauses. Should
the last page remain in view, or should
the next be projected to prepare for the
music to come. I hope the concert halls
will not adopt the Italian movie theatre
practice of showing commercials between
parts of a film.
We might then have slides reading
This score may be purchased at the "X"
Music Shop in either full or miniature
size. Visit the "X" Music Shop tomorrow.
Or, "Z" records exclusively for "Y"
Records. And other timely reminders.
The larger concert halls had best prepare
to buy the giant screens. The normal
screen, while perfectly adequate for most
pre -20th century music, falls down nom-
-
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
pletely when confronted with, say, Schoen berg's Gurre -Lieder, which is scored for
4 piccolos, 4 flutes, 3 oboes, 2 English
horns, 7 clarinets, 3 bassoons, 2 contrabassoons, 10 horns, 7 trumpets, 7 trombones, 5 tubas 6 kettledrums, bass drum,
cymbals, triangle, glockenspiel, snare drum,
tenor drum, xylophone, rattle, several
large iron chains, gong, 4 harps, celesta,
and full string complement. There are
also 6 soloists, 3 four -part men's choruses,
and an eight -part mixed chorus. This is
definitely in the Vista- Vision class.
As Hyman Bress must have realized on
the morning after the recital, the score
screen can be a risky business for the performer. The critics were quick to point
out that the young instrumentalist was
not always in full command of the notes,
and that he failed to follow the spirit of
the dynamic indications. We are entitled
to assume that few in the audience, including the critics, were well enough acquainted
with the work to detect any musical
lapses, without having recourse to the
score screen. But with standard repertory,
total (or near -total) recall is a necessary
part of the critic's equipment. Nevertheless, the score screen could prove enlightening to the layman and, by way of being a
reminder, to the critic as well. The Love
Duet from Act I of "Bohème" is a case in
point. The final note dies out, pianissimo,
as Mimi and Rodolfo go out into the
Parisian night. In most performances,
however, both tenor and soprano are reluctant to leave the stage quietly, preferring instead to swell out to a grand
fortissimo. With the score screen plainly
in view, and indicating pp, would the
singers now (lare to flout the composer's
intentions? (Don't answer that question.)
Transposing arias is a common practice
in the opera house. The star with a brilliant upper register may raise the pitch
for his key aria in order to exploit this
facet of his voice; the aging singer may,
on the other hand, wish to lower certain
arias when he finds he cannot produce the
top notes. All this is not lost on the few
members of the audience who possess absolute pitch. The others will not suspect
anything by merely checking the score
screen. Why not then install a headphone
on the back of each seat to transmit the
"A" to curious "relative pitchers"?
The performer need not regard the score
screen as a mute monitor. It could easily
save his concert sonic evening when, as
sometimes happens to the best of musicians,
memory lapse strikes.
1E
How
long
will they
go
strong?
Years! Any Sonotone "Ceramike"" stands up to all
kinds of mistreatment ... yet stays "fidelity" itself.
Until a few years ago, mikes were variable. If they were "hi -fi," chances
were they were delicate. If they were sturdy, they didn't reproduce as well
as they could. Then came the Sonotone "Ceramike" series.
All "Ceramikes" are shock -proof, impact -proof, shatter -proof, heat -proof
and "bad -treatment " -proof. They will work even if you immerse them in
water. The ceramic transducer at the heart is immune to changes of temperature and humidity. Extensive factory tests insure you that every
"Ceramike" will keep on perfcrming at its peak no matter what!
And fidelity? Look below, for specifications that would do anybody proud.
If you want trouble -free, dependable performance and an installation that
lasts for years, look into "Ceramikes" first.
Specifications for Complete "Ceramike" Line
CM -10A -For
tape recorders, etc.
Frequency response
THE NEW KLH MODEL TEN
SPEAKER SYSTEM
Is smaller than our other models,
Costs less than our other models,
Operates with a 12 watt amplifier,
And - has the KLH sound.
Frequency response
200 to 8,000 cps
Sensitivity
-63.5 decibels ±tub
CM- 17A- "Flex- Mike ". For audio -visual labs, etc.
50 to 11,000 cps
-56 decibels ±2db
Sensitivity
CM -11A -Where greater sensitivity is desired
Frequency response
80 to 9,000 cps
Sensitivity
-53 decibels ±2db
CM-710A-For stereo taping
Frequency response
50 to 11,000 cps
Sensitivity
-56 decibels ±2db
CM-7I1A -For stereo taping, also greater sensitivity
Frequency response
80 to 9,000 cps
Sensitivity
-53 decibels ±2db
CM -12A -For long lead installations -PA systems, etc.
with push -to -talk switch
Frequency response
Frequency response
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
Speakers
decibels ±2db
citizen's band use
-
100 to 6,000 cps
decibels ±2db
CM-31- Coiled Cord. For communication use
Frequency response
100 to 6,000 cps
Sensitivity
-49 decibels ±2db
CM-32- Standard Cord & Plug. For tape recordings
Frequency response
80 to 9,500 cps
Sensitivity
-49 decibels ±2db
-
-
S ono t one
Leading Makers of Cartridges
-56
-49
Sensitivity
®
KLH RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
30 CROSS STREET, CAMBRIDGE 39. MASSACHUSETTS
50 to 11,000 cps
Sensitivity
CM- 30- Coiled Cord, Switch. For
C
R
APPLICATIONS DIVISION,
DEPT.
Tape Heads
Canada, conta
Mikes
t Atlas
Radio Corp., Ltd., Toronto
Electronic Tubes
Batteries
63
NEW PRODUCTS
Automatic Turntable. Combining the advantages of a high quality turntable with
the ease and convenience of the automatic
record playing mechanism, the new Mira cord Studio -H introduced in this country
by Benjamin Electronic Sound Corp., is
claimed to be the only automatic turntable
with hysteresis motor. The tone arm features an adjustable counterbalance, for
adjustment of stylus force. The turntable
is 12 -in. in diameter, and is constructed in
one piece of a non -ferrous material. It is
Dual Trace Osilloscope Kit. Keyn
Radio Shack's entrance into the kit
(on a large scale anyhow) the new
Trace Oscilloscope kit which sells fo
than $80.00 is the first available
i.
Ming
field
Dual
less
i
kit
form as well as the first available at a
cost of under several hundred do Mars.
Because of its ability to observe two
signals simultaneously, it is possible with
this oscilloscope to observe, for exa nple,
dynamically balanced and weighs seven
pounds. Of especial value to those desiring the convenience of automatic mecha-
nisms is the pushbutton operation. One
need merely press the button indicating
the appropriate record size. The Studio -H
will accomodate 7 -, 10- and 12-in. records.
In addition, the Studio -H is extremely
handsome in appearance; satin chrome
finish on all machine parts, and baked
enamel finish on the table deck and other
services. The plug -in head accepts all
cartridges now in use. Also available is
the lower priced Miracord Studio, which
features a heavy-duty, shaded four-pole
induction motor in place of the hysteresis
motor. The Studio -H is priced at $99.50;
the Studio is $79.95. Benjamin Electronic
Sound Corp., Corona, N. Y.
F -1
Automatic Repeat Tape Recorders. Featuring a "Magic Memory" automatic repeat, the new Roberts Models 440 and 144
DPA repeat all or any part of the tape by
simply pushing the "repeat" button and
setting the "repeat" knob back to the desired position. Complete 1800 feet tape
rewind takes just sixty seconds; thus
with the "Magic Memory" these Roberts
amplifier input and output at the same
time. This of course is a great converience
and benefit in testing amplifiers and similar equipment where the testing involves
observing how well a. piece of equipment
handles a standard signal. Features include push -pull vertical and hori2ontal
amplifiers, cathode follower inputs and a
five inch screen; over-all size is 314 x
8% x 81/2- inches. This kit is sold with detailed assembly and operating instructions
and a money -back guarantee. Radio Shack
Corp., 730 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
17, Mass.
F -3
leader can be spliced into a roll of tape
at intervals to check the performance of
a recorder, or it can be used as a leader.
As the Strobe tape passes through the
tape recorder, it is exposed to the flickering light. If the lines appear to stand
still, the drive system is running at the
correct speed. If the lines seem to advance, the drive system is running too
fast, and if they seem to lag, the drive
system is running too slow. By making
an endless loop of the Strobe tape, the
speed of the capstan can be tested. The
Strobe tape kit is packaged in a clear polyethylene package complete with instructions. It lists for $2.00. Robins Industries
P-4
Corp., Flushing, N. Y.
60 -Watt Stereo Amplifier. Featuring
fifteen front panel controls and switches
and twelve inputs, the new Sherwood
Model S -5500 amplifier provides 25 watts
(music power) per channel. Included in
the front panel controls are 12 db /octave
rumble and scratch filters (effective at
all inputs), friction locked bass and treble
controls (each channel separately or both
channels simultaneously), function switch,
selector, stereo balance and individual
gain, loudness, tape monitor switch, loudness in -out switch, phase-reverse switch
and stereo -reverse switch. To facilitate
home or professional type stereo tape recording, two cathode follower outputs and
front panel tape monitoring switch combine to give complete recording flexibility.
Hum and noise is 80 db below 24 watts
(radio input) and 60 db below 24 watts
(phono input). Frequency response is plus
=
Tape Strobe Kit. Designed to aid the
tape recorder owner in checking the speed
of his drive system, a new tape strobe and
light kit, Model TK -5 has been made
available by Robins Industries. The kit
consists of five twenty-five -inch le igths
of non -magnetic leader tape with stroboscopic markings, and a small neon light
which flickers 120 times per second The
.i.
E &
LiG T KIT
iar
or minus one db, 20- 40,000 cps; I. M. distortion is 1.5 per cent, and harmonic distortion is 0.5 per cent at 24 watts continuous. Damping factor of five assures
optimum performance with today's low efficiency speaker systems. Dimensions
are 4 x 141 x 14 inches; price is $159.50
(less case). Sherwood Electronic Laboratories, Inc., 4300 N. California Ave., Chicago 18, Ill.
P -5
Stereo Tape Recorder. Manufactured in
western Germany, the new Körting Model
MT -158S is a four -track stereo recorder playback machine with features unusual
in its category. A three -head machine,
the Körting permits synchronized dubbing.
You can actually hear the first recording
while the second recording is being added.
In addition the recording is modified
recorders can play for a full nine hour
period with just six 60- second silent invals during that time. The Model 440
comes complete with power amplifiers
and forward facing stereo speaker system,
and is priced at $699.50. The 144 DPA is
identical to the 440 except that it comes
without the built -in power amplifiers and
speakers. It is priced at $649.50. Roberts
Electronics, Inc., 829 N. Highland AveF-2
nue, Los Angeles, California.
64
AUDIO
JUNE. 1961
the wonderful
new Bozak
companion speaker
that goes
the
with the
party
playmate
playroom
On floor, table, or hung on a
wall, the new Bozak BARD is
the life of the parti! Singly
or in pairs for stereo, the
BARD provides ample volume
without distortion, )vercoming high -level "partir noise"
without stridency.
patio
Good music multiplies the
pleasures of outdoor sociability, and the handily portable BARD makes it easy to
provide. The sturdy stand is
always steady on flagstones
or uneven surfaces.
pool
No need to leave the music
behind when you go for a dip!
And if you forget ab nut your
BARD and leave it out over
night, don't worry
com-
-it's
pletely weatherproof!
The new Bozak BARD is the ideal supplementary loudspeaker- easily
portable, strikingly decorative, and typically Bozak in the fine musical
quality of its sound! Its unique appearance reflects its unique design,
fully utilizing the advantages of the hemisphere
one of the most
perfect infinite -baffle enclosures. Many other exciting features- universal stand -up or hang -up base. plug -in connection, completely weatherproof construction, decorator styling!
-
,lt your Bozak Franchised Dealer, or write.
T
H
AUDIO
E
V
JUNE, 1961
E
R
Y
B
E
S
T
I
N
M
U
S
I
C
65
rather than the input signal. Because of
the head construction and other circuit
features, a recording can take place on
one track while the other is playing back
independently. Tape speeds are 3% and
71/2 ips and wow and flutter are less than
plus or minus 0.2 per cent at 71/2 ips.
Other features of the machine are recording -level indicator, automatic shut -off,
and a low -noise transistor input stage.
The Körting MT -158S comes in an attractive carrying case and weighs twenty nine pounds. Kimberly International Ltd.,
TRONICALLY PAT
346 W.
NEUMANN M -49B CONDENSER MICROPHONE
SYSTEM... ANOTHER OF THE WORLD- RENOWNED
THE
NEUMANN MICROPHONES ... PERFORMANCE STANDARDS BY WHICH ALL OTHERS ARE JUDGED...CONTIN -
-
UOUSLY VARIABLE ELECTRONICALLY CONTROLLED
DIRECTIONAL CHARACTERISTICS.
COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS
FURNISHED ON REQUEST.
WILL BE
44th St., New York
36, N. Y.
F -6
Electronic Organ Kit. Featuring simplicity which will permit persons with no
previous experience in music or electronics to put together a full -sized organ
in their spare time. The Schober Electronic organ kits, when assembled, are
as fine and as technically perfect as any
commercial factory -built organ, at a saving of over fifty per cent. The Schober
Consolette Model (shown) is the only full
range organ that is smaller than a spinet.
It is only 38 -in. wide. Nevertheless it is
not a scaled down miniature. It has two
61 -note keyboards, 22 stops and 13 pedals.
Its commercial value is more than $1800.
All that is needed to build the kits are
-
PROMPTLY
GOTHAM AUDIO CORPORATION
2 WEST 46th STREET, NEW YORK 36, N. Y.... COlumbus 5-4111
1710 N . LA BREA , HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIF.... H011ywood 8 -4111
The First Book of its Kind -No Other Like
SOUND in
the
It!
THEATRE
by Harold Burris -Meyer and Vincent Mallory
Nothing like SOUND in the THEATRE
has ever been published. It is the first
book to set forth in authoritative detail what
you can do with sound by electronic control,
and how to do it whenever the source (singer,
musician, speaker, etc.) and the audience are
present together. The book develops the requirements for electronic sound control from
the necessities of the performance, the characteristics of the audience ( hearing and psychoacoustics), and the way sound is modified
by environment, hall, and scenery. Sound
sources are considered for their susceptibility
of control and need for it, and the many techniques for applying electronic sound control
are described and illustrated in thirty -two specific problems. From these problems are de-
RADIO
MAGAZINES, INC.
Dept. 2
Post Office Box 629
Mineola, New York
`
An
THE AUTHORS
During the past thirty years, the authors have developed
the techniques of sound control in opera, open-air amphitheatres, theatres on Broadway, theatres on- the -road and
off-Broadway, in concert halls and night clubs, in Hollywood and in the laboratory. Some of their techniques are
used in broadcast and recording as well as in performances where an audience is present. From their laboratory
have come notably successful applications of sound control to psychological warfare and psychological screening.
invaluable reference
- an
in-
dispensable guide for anyone
(No C.O.D., all books sent postpaid in
and possessions, Canada, and Mexico.
Add 50e for Foreign orders.)
Nome
Address
Zone
-
I
working in the theatre -a com.
plete technological thesaurus for
the engineer, architect, designer,
technician, student, and teacher
concerned with the reinforcement
I am enclosing my remittance for $10.00
Send my copy of
SOUND in the THEATRE postpaid.
Q4
rived systems and equipment specifications.
Complete procedures are given for: Planning,
assembling, and testing sound control installations- Articulating sound control with other
elements of production -Rehearsals and performances
Operation and maintenance of
sound control equipment.
State
of sound and speech.
U.S.A.`
simple hand tools, which most people
usually have available. An additional feature of the Schober kits is that the individual may not only assemble the organ
as fast or as slowly as he desires, but
he may pay for the organ while he is
building it one kit at a time, with a
starting investment as little as $18.94.
Also available are the Schober Concert
Organs, which are suitable for churches,
schools, theatres, or auditoriums. This
model meets the specifications of the
American Guild of Organists, and represents a commercial value of $3,000 to
$4,000. The company offers interested persons a 10 -in. LP demonstration record for
$2.00, which clearly shows the quality of
performance of both models of Schober
organs. The $2.00 cost is refunded with
the first order for a Schober kit. Schober
Organ Corporation, 43 West 61st Street,
New York 23, N. Y.
F -7
40-Watt Stereo Amplifier. Engineered
for the control and reproduction of all
stereo or monophonic sources, the Lafayette LA-240 provides 20 watts in each
channel and is equipped with terminations
for eight- or sixteen -ohm speakers. Full
range of controls includes independent
concentric bass and treble controls, continuously variable separation control
which allows adjustment from full stereo
to full monophonic, individual volume control for each channel, loudness switch,
rumble filter, mode switching, selector
switch plus individual hum balance controls for each channel. Inputs consist of
five stereo pairs (aux., tuner, ceramic
phono, mag -phono tape head). Outputs
include dual tape -out and dual eight- and
sixteen -ohm speaker terminals. Power out-
put of the LA-240 is 20 watts per channel
at less than one per cent total harmonic
distortion at 1000 cps, less than 0.25 per
cent at 14 watts, and less than 0.12 per
cent at one watt. Intermodulation distortion is .075 per cent at one watt and
0.34 per cent at 10 watts. Frequency re-
sponse at full output is 50- 70,000 cps, plus
or minus one db. Sensitivity for full output at 1000 cps is 0.75 volts for high level
inputs and 5.5 my for low level inputs.
Hum and noise is 78 db below full output
for high -level inputs and 50 db below for
low -level inputs. Supplied with enclosure
and legs, the LA -240 is priced at only
$79.95. Supplied with a gold finished cover
and an ivory and gold front panel with
gold -metal knobs. Layayette Radio, 16508 Liberty Ave., Jamaica 33, N. Y. P -8
NEW LITERATURE
8i-Pi Component Brochure. A new revised edition of its high fidelity component
brochure was announced by Shure Brothers, Inc. Several new components are featured in the publication, along with illustrations and specifications of standard
models in the Shure line of photograph
cartridges, tone arms, and other high fidelity equipment. Among the new components
listed is the N21D tubular stylus which is
available in combination with the Shure
M3B and M7D stereo Dynetic cartridges.
Also new in the catalog is the stereo conversion preamplifier Model M -65, designed
to provide equalization with amplification
for concersion of ceramic inputs to magnetic inputs. The brochure is available
through high fidelity dealers or by mail
request. Shure Brothers, Inc., 222 Hartrey
Ave., Evanston, Ill.
F -9
Does the music from your high fidelity system sound clouded by noise? Faithful reproduction requires that records be scrupulously clean.
After an exhaustive six -year test of record cleaning products, C. Victor Campos reports
in the authoritative American Record Guide: "The only product that I have found which
reliably cleans records is the `Dust Bug', marketed by Electro -Sonic Laboratories (ESL)."
The automatic, electrostatic record cleaner is only $5.75 (changer model $4.75). Greatly
increase the life of your entire record library for less than the cost of a single disc!
FOR LISTENING AT ITS BEST
Electro -Sonic Laboratories ' Inc
Dept. A6278'way- New York City 12
Circle 67A
Sujis-ui
TRANSFORMERS
Bonotone Audio and Electronic Products.
The new eight -page Sonotone catalog contains photos of all products with detailed
specifications for each. Included are Sono tone's latest ceramic phonograph cartridges, crystal cartridges, tone arms, magnetic (velocity) equalizers, mono and
stereo tape heads, and ceramic microphones. It also displays the Sonotone re-
chargeaable flashlight battery cartridges,
loudspeakers, and electronic tubes. Copies
are available free from Electronic Applications Division, Sonotone Corporation,
Elmsford, New York.
P -10
Electronic Test Instruments. The 1961
Hewlett -Packard Catalog of Electronic
Test Instruments is available. The 220 page catalog contains complete listings,
descriptions, and specifications of the more
than four hundred test instruments offered
by Hewlett- Packard Company. It also includes a sixteen -page descriptive listing
of the special systems and instrumentation produced by the company's Dymec
Division. Instruments are grouped by type
or function in the catalog. Each group is
preceded by application data which summarize the equipment offered, and discuss
latest measuring techniques. The catalog
is only available upon written request on
company stationery. Write to Harry J.
Lowenstein, Hewlett- Packard Company,
1501 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, California.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
Transformers for Transistor Circuits
Power Transformers
Input Transfomers
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sudden drama and even more delightful humor, are played as though we -all should know
it all long since, like "To be or not to be,"
or "The boy stood on the burning deck"
and surely for Viderck this music is precisely
that familiar. Not bad, by any means; but
you'll want several playings to get well into
the meat of this ever-so -solid roast beef music.
Gorgeously colored for your hi fi.
-
RECORD REVUE
(from page
55;,
136
STEREO DYN ES
Choose either the Stereodyne IL
(mounts in all standard arms) or
the slim, trim TA -12 arm -cartridge
combination for the most natural
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TA -12
$49.95 net
the fastest passages sound effortlessly relaxed,
expressing only the true tension of the musical design itself.
The slow movements are lovely, but it is in
the fast movements, usually both dogmatic
and choppy in execution, that these two players really excel. If you want to hear what
Bach really wrote down-try this disc.
Buxtehude: Cantatas "Cantate Domnor',
"Lauda Sion Salvatorem ". Kantorei Bar men-Gemarke, Kahlhöfer.
Barenreiter Musicaphon
BM 24 R 601 (10")
Fat little Buxtehude (I imagine him that
way) was the leading popular organ and
cantata composer of extreme Northern Germany, verging into Denmark, back in the days
of Bach's early youth and before. His music
was once patronizingly called "pre- Bach "
plenty of us are now finding that Bach, indeed, is more accurately post-Buxtehude ; for
many aspects of the Bach style depend directly upon Buxtehude's very great influence
in German Baroque music.
Buxtehude reminds me of the earlier paintings of Breughel, for his music has the same
buxom, jolly, peasant-like quality along with
the same superb sense for artistic desig for
color and line, and shape and thic ness.
Buxtehude is actually a far cry from Bach,
a more direct, earthy composer, muc less
the apotheosis of all music, more the common man's musician on the highest lane.
Once accustomed to his Baroque lan age,
rich and ornamented, nobody can rests him
long. And his music is ideal for the re 'orded
-
,
medium, too.
The little Bärenreiter Musicaphon disc has
two short cantatas by this pleasant master,
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both showing that fatness and healthy serenity which seems to have been Buxtebude's
best expression, both featuring the predominantly high voice quality of the period, pairs
of violins, pairs of sopranos, choirs of boy
trebles. The Cantate Domino is technically a
motet, which seems in this case to mean a
work for voices with organ and contino accompaniment, no orchestra -there is a rtain
magnificence that goes here with the Latin
text, notably the familiar "Sicut e t in
principio" (as it was in the Begining, orld
without end.)
Lauda Sion includes a typically early
Baroque instrumentation with the ine table
pair of fiddles, a viola da gamba, cello, ouble
bass plus organ. Assorted solos sing wi h the
chorus.
No doubt about it, the Germans can sing
their own music most beautifully. This
smooth, beautifully blended choir is assisted
by modest but excellent solos, my only reservation being a somewhat too metrical,
"time- beating" with a mild lack of good
phrasing. Our wobble- ridden American choirs
could take a leaf from this German notebook
!
Buxtehude: Complete Organ Works, vol.
2. Finn Vider¢, organ at St. John's, Vejle,
Denmark.
Washington WR 422
Above all, Buxtehude was an organist upon the finest organs ever built, in the very
heyday of organ literature. Inevitably, ltuxtehude thus sounds biggest and best and most
modern in the organ medium. The well known
Finn Vider0 (his early organ LPs are collectors' items) here gives him all the stature of
Bach himself.
There is a certain impetuous haste in
Vider4's present playing that betokens a
recognized master of this music who has so
long played it as to arrive at an economy
of expression that is almost too condensed
for the unaccustomed listener. The marvelous Buxtehude tricks, the square, buxom
themes, the plentitude of solid imitation. the
Handel- Beecham: Love in Bath. Royal
Philharmonic, Beecham.
Angel S -35504 stereo
I remember a Beecham recording of a part
of this ballet score under its stage title "The
Great Elopement," back in 78 days ; some
numbers have appeared in other Beecham
suites and a few items are well known on
their own, Beecham or no. But It is the late
Sir Thomas who is mostly the composer here
-not Handel.
Why fuss over authenticity in such a case?
There isn't a trace of it, not even to Handel's
own scores, which are lavishly rearranged and
in some cases re- composed, or fused together-as in the marriage of the familiar
"Largo" with a rhythmical figure quite definitely not from the "Largo" nor probably
from the same opera if from any Handel... .
Most of the music, even so, breezes along
pleasantly and with musical shaping, the
Beecham -built joints hardly showing at all,
the harmonies generally untampered -with except in the sequence of pieces, the orchestrations sublimely Beecham.
Beecham's ballet (never yet performed on
stage) was to be about a young lady who goes
to Bath and meets a young gallant, marries
him in spite of Papa. I've been reading Jane
Austen's "Northhangar Abbey" and I suspect
that Sir Thomas had been reading it too.
Striking similarity, and I had thought myself that the Austen pictures of Bath society
in the 18th century would make a marvelous
period play, or a color film like that memorable "Importance of Being Ernest" of a few
years ago .
Anyhow, give Sir Thomas credit for good
entertainment, plenty of Handelian tunefulness and only a reasonable amount of gross
2E
distortion.
BOOK REVIEW
Noise Reduction, Edited by Leo L. Ber-
anek, McGraw -Hill Book Company, Inc.,
New York, 1960, 452 pp. + x. $14.50.
Based on a series of special summer
programs on noise reduction at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, this
new book edited by Dr. Leo L. Beranek
provides a broad and detailed base for engineers and other technically trained personnel in the fields of noise measurement
and noise control. Dr. Beranek states in
his preface, "No effort has been made by
the authors to produce a handbook or an
inclusive compendium. Rather, this text
seeks to lead the reader by gradual steps
from the beginning of the subject on into
the more advanced aspects. Each man
with a noise problem should find assistance." Chapter 1 of the book titled "Some
History of Early References" provides a
review of the development of the techniques of noise reduction as they became
consolidated into a scientific field. This
chapter also contains a bibliography including 107 items. The book is then divided into four parts. Part 1 deals with
the elementary behavior of sound, the
decibel notation and its use in expressing
sound levels, the methods and instrumentation used for sound and vibration measurement. In this section the chapters on
selection of instrumentation written by
A. C. Pietrasanta and on the performance
of sound and vibration instrumentation
by G. W. Kamperman are particularly
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
noteworthy. The latter chapter contains
a number of excellent tables and charts
outlining the performance of a considerable number of sound and vibration
pickup devices and indicating instruments, and the cables required to connect
the pickup device to the amplifying or indicating instrument. Part 2, "Fundamentals Underlying Noise Control," contains
three chapters on the propagation of noise
both outdoors and in enclosures of various size. A chapter is devoted to both
theoretical and practical discussions of
porous acoustical materials. These materials are used in the variety of ways
for noise control purposes. The two most
familiar forms being acoustical tiles and
large sheets of glass fiberboard or blanket. The next chapters detail the transmission and radiation of acoustic waves
and the transmission of sound through
structures containing porous materials.
Although much of the material in these
two chapters has been published earlier
by Dr. Beranek, it has not been readily
available to engineers in the field in such
a well -integrated form. One chapter in
this section is devoted to acoustical materials for architectural uses and is written by Jack B. C. Purcell who is both
architect and acoustical consultant. The
chapter contains the usual tables of acoustical materials and illustrations of the
surface and suspension methods of such
materials. However, following this material, the author provides some recommendations on the control of reverberation in speech rooms through the use of
standard acoustical materials and some
illustrations which show the imaginative
use of acoustical materials for the architectural control of noise and reverberation. The next two chapters in this section deal with mufflers and discuss the
two general categories of mufflers, those
which do not contain materials such as
glass fiber, but consist mainly of tubes
and expansion chambers and are called
reactive mufflers. They are similar in
physical behavior to the reactive electrical networks such as constant k and mderived filters. While the second class of
mufflers, the dissipative mufflers, are
those which contain sound absorbing material and may be likened to those electrical networks which contain both resistive and reactive elements. The final chapter in this section contains a brief review
of the behavior of resilient vibration isolators applied to systems where the foundation is an infinitely large and rigid
mass as well as to the more likely situation where the foundation is somewhat
massive and not quite rigid. This is the
case most usually found in practice. Part
3 contains two chapters, "Damage Risk
Criteria for Hearing" and "Criteria for
Noise and Vibration in Buildings and Vehicles." These chapters provide a basic
review of the criteria by which tolerable
noise levels are set, thus providing a basis
for noise reduction design when combined
with the measured or predicted noise
levels, the determination of which has
been described in the earlier chapters.
Part 4, "Practical Noise Control," contains 5 chapters detailing practical applications of the material found in the
first three sections in the areas of ventilation, noise control, machine and shop
quieting, office and residential noise control, the control of jet noise and the control of noise in transportation. Three appendices contain the conventional tables
of decibels and pressure and power ratios,
a brief but excellent discussion of systems of units used in handling the mechanical aspects of acoustical problems,
and a table of conversion factors. In addition to the bibliography of Chapter 1,
each individual chapter includes a comprehensive list of references and suggestions for further reading. The book is well
illustrated and brings together in one
place much of the information assembled
and published by Dr. Beranek and his
colleagues in individual scientific papers
and technical reports.
The only major omissions appear to be
in the areas of the design of doors and in
the discussion of the influence of the fundamental flexural resonance of a vibrating panel on its sound transmission in the
low frequency region. These omissions
notwithstanding, this book is a most valuable contribution to the literature in a
highly specialized branch of acoustics. It
should prove of considerable value to
studio engineers striving to provide a
minimum background noise level in their
recording studios as well as to anyone involved with the design of noise control
features for residential construction, including both apartment houses and individual homes.
Lewis S. Goodfriend
REFLECTION COUPLER
(from page 32)
loading of the mid -high loudspeakers. cut into rectangular "blocks." The
These reflectors are thermo- formed from amount and configuration of these blocks
'/s -inch sheets of Plexiglass and attached
has considerable effect upon over -all perto the back of the cabinet with wood
formance, and is the result of a large
screws. It is only necessary that the amount of experimentation. Once detercabinet be located not less than two mined, however, the performance is
inches from the back wall for effective readily repeatable from one unit to
operation.
another.
All wood parts of the cabinet are
Made of % -inch plywood, and all joints
are made with glue in addition to wood Performance
screws, except for the bottom panel,
In the present era of low-efficiency
which is removable to permit access to loudspeakers, it is pleasant to note that
the woofers. Both woofers and mid - the Scott Radio Labs Reflection Coupler
high units are front mounted and gas - will give good performance with ten keted to prevent air leakage. The entire and fifteen-watt amplifiers without the
space behind the two woofers and the undesirable effects of amplifier overload.
portion of the center slot below the In technical terms, this loudspeaker
"baffle" boards is filled with predeter- system is capable of creating a listening
mined amounts of Ultralite glass wool level of 95 db-which is considerably
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
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A -440 120 watts KT-88, 6550
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(all with tapped primaries except A -440 which
has tertiary for screen or cathode feedback)
Write for complete data on Dynaco transformers including suggested circuits and modernisation of Williamson -type amplifiers to 50
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D
INC.
3912 Powelton Ave., Philadelphia 4, Pa.
69
"the best of
AUDIO
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A new compendium of AUDIO knowledge.
Here is a collection of the best of AUDIO -The AUDIOclinic
by Joseph Giovanelli...noted audio engineer and the original
high fidelity answer-man -EQUIPMENT PROFILES edited by
C. G. McProud...Editor of AUDIO. Here is a wealth cf hi -fi
and audio information. Answers to the most important issues
in high fidelity and a valuable reference on the performance of
leading makes of high fidelity components. Volume I $2.00
No. 120
THE 4th AUDIO ANTHOLOGY
$2.95 Postpaid
This is the biggest Audio Anthology ever!
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Covers planning, problems with decoration, cabinets and building hi -fi furniture. A perfect glide. $2.50 Postpaid.
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by Edgar \l. \ illchor
TAPE RECORDERS
TAPE RECORDERS AND TAPE RECORDING
by Harold D. Weiler
McPROUD HIGH FIDELITY OMNIBOOK
Prepared and edited by C. G. McProud,
publisher of Audi, and noted authority
and pioneer in the field of high fidelity.
Contains a wealth of ideas, how to's,
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Here is one single volume with the most comprehensive coverage of every phase of audio. Concise, accurate explanations
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TOTAL VALUE OF ALL FOUR BOOKS $10.40
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Your cost ONLY $5.00 POSTPAID'
$5.40
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Good only on direct order to Publisher
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AUDIO Bookshelf
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ZONE -STATE
HAVING TROUBLE
TRACKING DOWN
YOUR TAPES)
41,
KEEP TABS ON YOUR RECORDINGS WITH
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REEVES SOUNDCRAFT CORP.
Danbury, Conn.
Great Pasture Road
Circle 71A
higher than normal for typical listening
room use (except for the dyed- in -thewool hi -fi fans, who are snore likely to
run levels above 100 db) -with a power
input of 2 watts into the loudspeaker
system on monophonic material. This
level was measured in a typical living
room with plasterboard walls and with
the cabinet located four inches from the
wall and approximately in the center of
the longer wall. The room dimensions
were 16 by 20 feet, the floor covered by
a wool carpet laid over hair padding,
and with a sofa and two chairs of typical
upholstery. Medium- weight draperies
covered windows in one long wall and
one short wall.
Frequency -response measurements indicate the range of the unit to be essentially flat from 35 to 16,500 cps. This
figure is given to satisfy the curious,
for under no conditions can anechoic
chamber measurements be considered indicative of performance in a room. They
are, however, indicative of what the instrulnent puts out as acoustic energy
into the air under controlled conditions,
and as such may be compared with
similar figures given for other loudspeakers measured under comparable
conditions. The principal advantage of
the "Reflection Coupler" Stereo Speaker
System is that it eliminates the need for
two loudspeaker cabinets and instead
creates a truer image of the original
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unit, which makes it possible for the
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Æ
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Circle 71B
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FAIRCHILD
AUDIOCLINIC
TURNTABLE
You spent
(front page 4)
$450,000,000
took your feedback. If I make the cathode
positive by means of this signal, am I
really drawing more current, or am I causing the stage to draw less current! The
answer is that the stage will draw less current. Why 9 Well, look! The grid is
grounded as we have said. Let's say that
on bowling last year
131/2 tunes as much as you
gave to fight cancer
Shocking? Yes. And here's another
shocking fact: in 1961, cancer will
strike in approximately two out of
three homes.
Go bowling. It's fun. Enjoy yourself.
But when you spend fifty cents
to knock down pins- give as
much to the American Cancer
Society -to knock out cancer.
If you do that, you will be
giving $450,000,000 to fight
cancer this year. Thirteen and a
half times as much as last year!
Fight cancer with a checkup
and a check to the American
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THE NEW KLH MODEL TEN
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Is smaller than our other models,
Costs less than our other models,
Operates with a 12 watt amplifier,
And - has the KLH sound.
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KLH RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
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The 16 cubic feet of bass horn in the
KLIPSCHORN is the least size capable of full
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that size would be required if room corners
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Paul W. Klipsch's stubborn refusal to compro
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the cathode is one volt above ground. This
meets the condition that the grid must be
negative with respect to its cathode for
proper tube operation under Class .Ad conditions. If I remove the grid from ground
and apply a signal which will make it positive, or should I say more positive, the
potential between grid and cathode is reduced and more current will naturally flow,
and we will have the conditions you have
already described in your question. Good,
then let's return the grid to ground and
apply the signal only between the cathode
and ground, just as is done with the feedback signal from the plate of the second
stage. (Naturally, there can be no signal
from that plate now, so we will apply it
artificially, maybe even from a battery.
You can try all of this very easily, too, if
you want to take the trouble to breadboard
a stage, and you can watch all of th>á for
yourself.)
We'll make the cathode more positive.
The grid is grounded, so this is the same as
saying that the grid has been made more
negative. Remember that the grid is now
grounded so that if the cathode moves Imore
positive, the grid must, of necessity, be
more negative -not with respect to ground,
but with respect to its cathode and that is
the only thing which counts here.
For purposes of clarity I set the grid at
ground potential, but it could have been
at any potential with respect to ground. I
would imagine that in most instances it
would be positive with respect to ground.
It is true that the grid makes the cathode
go positive at such times but the Signal
from the second stage which appears at the
cathode also makes it, the cathode, go positive more than would have been true if the
grid alone were acting here. This extra
amount by which the cathode has gone positive with respect to ground-independent of
grid signal-will cause the grid to go more
negative, and this tends to reduce c thode
and plate current, making them tend to go
more negative. This, after a Ion way
around, is negative feedback for it is making the stage behave in a manner opposite
to that in which it would behave in the
absence of the feedback.
Æ
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first of the month preceding the date of Issue.
HIGH FIDELITY SPEAKERS REPAIRED
AMPRITE SPEAKER SERVICE
23rd St., New York 11, N. Y. CH 3-4812
168 W.
ENJOY PLEASANT SURPRISES? Then
write us before you purchase any hi -fi. You'll
be glad you did. Unusual savings. Key Electronics, 120 Liberty St., New York 6, N. Y.
CLoverdale 8 -4288.
LOW, LOW quotes : stereo tapes, components, recorders, HIFI, Roslyn 4, Pa.
Ampex, Concertone, Crown, Magnecord,
Norelco, Presto, Bogen, Tandberg, Sherwood,
Rek-O-Kut, Scott, Shure, Dynakit, others.
Trades. Boynton Studio, Dept. AM, 10 Pennsylvania Ave., Tuckahoe, N. Y.
PROMPT DELIVERY, we will not be undersold. Amplifiers, tape recorders, tuners, etc.
No catalogues. Air Mail quotes. Compare.
L. M. Brown Sales Corp., Dept. A, 239 E. 24
St., New York 10, N. Y.
SALE : 78 -rpm recordings. 1900-1950. Free
lists. Collections bought. P. 0. Box 155 (AU),
Verona, N. J.
BEST QUOTATIONS-components -sale
items. Bayla Co., Box 131 -0, Wantagh, N. Y.
COMPONENTS, recorders. Free wholesale
catalogue. Carston, 125 -N East 88th Street,
New York .28, N. Y.
DON'T BUY HI -FI components, kits, tape,
tape recorders until you get our low, low return mail quotes. "We guarantee not to be
undersold." Wholesale catalogue free. HiFidelity Center, 220U East 23rd St., New
York 10, N. Y.
MODERN BLOND OAK stereo pair Stromberg- Carlson's finest speakers at half price.
1/15 ", 1/12 ", 2 Wharfdale tweeters, 1 induction tweeter in cabinets 32" H x 38" W x 12"
D. Cost $419.00 each. Bargain at $400.00 for
both Perfect condition. H. White, 2123 Kenmore Avenue, Bethlehem, Pa.
!
PLAYER PIANO -recently reconditioned,
$150.00. Typewriter, office Underwood. Cost
$89.00. Sell $39.00. Local. Eugene Roy, 5 Hillside St., Haverhill, Mass.
SELL : 2 James B. Lansing 150 -4C woofers
used short time only, new price in Canada :
$150.00 each, sell for $75.00 : ditto 2 N4000
crossover networks (500 cps) : $110.00 each
for $55.00. N. Metal, 1947 West 7th Ave.,
Vancouver, British Columbia.
AR -1 woofer only, like new, with choke, 2%
lbs., Fiberglas, original invoice. AR -1 enclosure blueprints. No longer needed. $45.00.
Chris Hudson, 818 New England Drive, Westfield, N. J.
TAPE RECORDER
organized for pleasure
chases. Buy quantity
amplifiers, amplifiers,
f
join,
anager,
Texas.
15030
E.
HOBBY CLUB. Have
and to save in our puron tape recorders, pretuners. No charges to
Vickery,
Fort
Worth 4,
NORELCO "400" 4 -track recorder. Guaranteed unused. Factory carton, guarantee, accessories. Original price : $400.00. Best offer.
Allan Mandelstamm, 708 Richfield Drive,
Nashville 9, Tennessee.
AMPEX 3761 MIXER. Sigma manufactured.
balanced
Four balanced microphone inputs, new,
full
output. Discontinued model, brand
Stereo
now
$165.00.
$315.00,
warranty. Were
Co.,
version also available. Sigma Electric
Inc., 11 East 16th St., New York 3, N. Y.
AUDIO
JUNE, 1961
/Vated
THE FINEST OF ITS KIND . . .
Get more FM stations with the world's most
powerful FM Yogi Antenna systems.
To be fully informed,
send 250 for book
"Theme And Variations" by L. F B. Carini
and containing FM
Station Directory.
APPARATUS DEVELOPMENT CO.
WETHERSFIELD 9, CONN
Circle 73C
ELECTROSTATIC TWEETER
THRILLING
HI FREQUENCY
RESPONSE
ONLY $19.95
ORDER BY
MAIL
ieru
SOUND CORPORATIO
'
S.
1015
FIGUEROA
LOS ANGELES
CALIFORNIA
Circle 73D
CANADA
High Fidelity Equipment
Complete Lines
Complete Service
Hi -Fi Records
Components
-
and Accessories
',E
E;LECOO1
SYSTEMS
126 DUNDAS ST. WEST. TORONTO. CANADA
Circle 73E
A NOTE TO THE HI -FI BUYER
AIR MAIL us your requirements for
an IMMEDIATE WHOLESALE QUOTATION
Components, Tapes and Recorders
SHIPPED PROMPTLY AT LOWEST PRICES
WRITE TODAY FOR FREE CATALOG
190-A Lexington Ave.
unlimited New York 16, N.Y.
audio
Circle 73F
HAVE MONEY
TO BURN?
If not, you'll love our
low, low, hi -fi compoprices. Write for
free money- saving catalog A -12 and see!
nent
KEY ELECTRONICS CO.
120 Liberty St., N.Y. 6, N.Y.
Circle 73C
131n©
CLARITY
DUO PHONIC INDUCTOR
increases your
PRESENCE
JUNE, 1961
ton office.
American. Concertone Appoints Western
Division Sales Manager. Barton O. Williams has been appointed Western Division sales manager for American Concertone, Inc., a division of Astro- Science Corporation in Los Angeles, California.
Allen W. Greene Elected Daystrom VicePresident. Allen W. Greene, president
of
Heath Company, a subsidiary of Daystrom,
has been elected a corporate vice- president. Mr. Greene will continue as president of Heath Company, a post he has held
since 1959.
Precision Appoints Fleischman.
Fleischman has been appointed salesSidney
manager of Precision Apparatus Company,
Inc., a subsidiary of Pacotronics Inc. A
veteran of over twenty -five years in
electronics field, Mr. Fleischman will bethe
in
charge of marketing and sales for the precision test instrument line. He will also
handle sales for the Government, and special contracts.
Reeves Soundcraft Elects Vice- President. The election of Arthur J. Seiler as
vice -president and director of Reeves
Sonndcraft of Danbury, Connecticut, has
been announced by Hazard E. Reeves,
president. Mr. Seiler is also president of
Alloy Surfaces Company of Wilmington,
Delaware, a company recently acquired
by Reeves Soundcraft Corp.
At the same time Reevesound Company,
Inc., a subsidiary of Reeves Soundcraft
Corp., announced the appointment of
Michael. W. Chitty as chief engineer. Mr.
Chitty was formerly associated with Canadian Marconi, Limited, as division manager.
PACKAGE
HI
now hear this!
You are looking at the new ADC -1 stereo
cartridge. It is the most effortless cartridge
available today. You'll hear subtleties of
timbre and tone you never suspected were
in your discs. Hear it at your favorite dealer.
AUDIO DYNAMICS
CORPORATION
1677
ADC
CODY AVENUE
RIDGEW00D 27, N.Y.
Circle 73A
SAVEOWI4OT0
-24
Bogen DB212
W Stereo Amp.
Bogen B61- Turntable and Base
Shure M7D -Diam. Stereo Cart.
Two TF3- Jensen Spkr. Systems
All Interconn. Cables
for FREE
Quotations on
Send
YOUR COST $222.50
You Save
over 40%
Our policy: "We Will Not
.
.
.
FREE
$119.95
65.20
24.00
159.00
4.95
Regular Price $373.10
Your Package or
Single Component
us
.
HNFI
Be
.
$150.60
Undersold." Test
WHOLESALE CATALOG.
HI -FI RECORDING TAPE
7" Spools - Splice Free - Freq. Resp. 30.15KC
12A 1200' Acetate
18A 1800' Acetate
18M 1800' Mylar
3
-11
$1.29
1.79
2.09
2.69
12 -23 24&Up
$1.17 $ .99
1.59
1.45
1.99
1.85
24M 2400' Mylar
2.59
2.49
Any assortment permitted for quantity discount. Add 1St per spool postage. 10t 24
or more.
PRE- RECORDED TAPES
CANTO 2 8 4 Track. Write
RCA -VICTOR, BEL
for Complete Cataand Wholesale Discounts.
DELUXE TAPE SPICER Reg. $8.50 Special $3.95
STEREO HEADPHONES
WITH MATCH -UNIT
" 31.90
" 14.95
log
FREE,
FI
or SINGLE COMPONENTS
You'll find our prices low
DEPTH
400
on both STEREO 8. MONO systems
send for the facts
money bock guarantee
THE AUDIONICS CO.
8 West Walnut St., Metuchen, N. J. $29.90
Circle 73H
AUDIO
Tandberg Announces Enlarged Facilities. Tandberg of America, Inc. recently
announced plans for tripling facilities in
Oslo to meet increased demands from
American consumers for Tandberg stereo
and monophonic recorders. New facilities
include a nine -story building with increased research and manufacturing accommodations, as well as additional employee recreational facilities, including a
swimming pool.
Fanon. Acquires Masco Intercom Company. According to Salo Nachtigall, president of Fanon Electronic Industries, Inc.
"the acquisition of Masco by Fanon will
be of substantial benefit to both corporations. We anticipate effecting substantial
economies in general overhead and operational costs. It is our intention to maintain separate sales organizations for both
companies." Manufacturing operations and
general management of both Fanon and
Masco will be located at Fanon plant in
Newark, New Jersey.
Stan Neufeld, Distributor Sales Manager
for University Loudspeakers. Charles Ray,
general sales and merchandising manager
of University Loudspeakers, announced
the appointment of Stan Neufeld as distributor sales manager. Mr. Neufeld will
be responsible for sales covering all products in University's line of high fidelity
and public address components.
Shure Bros. Appoints. The appointment
of Ronald Boston as a manufacturer salesman was announced by Shure Bros. F. V.
Machin, Shure vice-president, stated that
Boston will handle special sales assignments under the direction of C. L. McCabe,
manufacturer sales manager in the Evans-
and service fast.
Write for our quotation
Center Industrial Electronics, Inc.
74 -A Cortlondt St.
Asseeseneeiw
New York 7, N. Y.
Circle 73K
"The House Of Low Low Prices"
220 -U East 23rd St., New York 10, N. Y.
Circle 73B
73
ADVERTISING
"Let Your Ears Be The Judge"
-
INDEX
Satisfaction
Guaranteed or Money Refunded with Lafayette's 15 -Day Free Home Trial
15
Acoustic Research, Inc.
A.
PICKERING 380C
CARTRIDGE
WITH
DIAMOND STYLUS
LAFAYETTE
SK -58
brilliance of stereo, featuring Lafayette's
remarkable LA -250A, 50 -watt stereo amplifier.
The dynamic
FREE EDGE
SPEAKERS
50 -WATT
STEREO PHONO SYSTEM
T L pFAYETTE'S
CRITERION LINE
I
70
73
51
73
73
Bozak
British Industries Corporation
65
Center Industrial Electronics, Inc.
Classified
73
3
99.50
44.50
29.85
3.95
5.00 Down
as HS- 103WX, plus 2
HS -103WX
59.00
HS-104WX
194.50
Down-
10.00
194.5
Fairchild Recording Equipment Corp.
Fisher Radio Corporation
Fukuin Electric Works
257.51
You 3ÓVE
Pacesetter of the High -Fidelity i7irenowned for its pert or- ;
dustry
mance. The ultimate for those who
...
.
demand the finest.
68, 69
13
71
Electronic Organ Arts, Inc.
Electro -Sonic Laboratories, Inc.
Electro- Voice, Inc.
Electro -Voice Sound Systems, Inc.
Lafayett
Eliptoflex Series Bookshelf Enclosures ii
mahogany, walnut, blonde or oiled wal
nut finish (specify finish).
Same
72
EICO
STEREO SYSTEM with mahogany
walnut or blonde changer base (specif
finish).
236.80
LAFAYETTE SPECIAL PRICE
10, 45
33, 34
54
73
Dynaco, Inc.
HI -FI
MATCHED COMPONENTS
Regular Catalog Price
49
72
Inc.
12" COAXIAL
OUR BEST STEREO SYSTEM BUY
LAFAYETTE LA -250A 50 -WATT STEREO AMPLIFIER
GARRARD RC210 4 -SPEED RECORD CHANGER
PICKERING 380C DIAMOND STEREO CARTRIDGE
LAFAYETTE WOOD CHANGER BASE
2 LAFAYETTE SK -58 FAMOUS FREE EDGE 12"
COAXIAL SPEAKERS @ 29.50 EACH
S.,
American Concertone, Inc.
Amperex Electronic Corp.
Apparatus Development Co.
Audio Bookshelf
Audio Dynamics Corporation
Audio Fidelity Records
Audionics Co., The
Audio Unlimited
(OPTIONAL)
LAFAYETTE
ELIPTOFLEX SERIES
BOOKSHELF ENCLOSURES
LAFAYETTE LA -250A
50-WATT STEREO AMPLIFIER
E.
Allied Radio Corp.
Altec Lansing Corporation
67
41
73
71
9,
11
47
Gotham Audio Corporation
Grado Laboratories, Inc.
Grommes, Division of Precision
Electronics, Inc.
66
52
Hi Fidelity Center
73
Jensen Manufacturing Company
27
53
73
73
KLH Research & Development
71
63,
4,
10,
59,
Corporation
72
Klipsch and Associates, Inc.
Key Electronics Co.
Kierulff Sound Corporation
NO
NEW! KT -550 100-WATT
KT -600A PROFESSIONAL
.
BASIC STEREO AMPLIFIER KIT
STEREO CONTROL CENTER
0
KT -550 In
Kit Form
134.50
KT -600A In Kit Form
LA-550
LA -600A
Completely Wired
79.5(
Completely Wired
1
34.50
184.50
5.00
Made in
U.S.A.
b.UU DOWn
-1db at 1 -Watt
Grain Oriented, Silicon Steel Transformers
Multiple Feedback Loop Design
Easy -To-Assemble Kit Form
new "Laboratory Standard" dual 50-watt amplifier guaranteed to outperform any basic stereo
amplifier on the market. Advanced engineering
A
Sensitivity 2.2 my for 1 volt out. Dual low impedance "plate follower" outputs 1500 ohms. Less
than .03% IM distortion; less than .1% harmonic
distortion. Hum and noise 80 db below 2 volts.
14x105/041/2 ". Shpg. wt., 16 lbs.
techniques plus the finest components ensure
flawless performance. Distortion levels so low
they are unmeasurable. Hum and noise better than
90 db below 50- watts. Complete with metal enclosure. 9'%x12Vz"D. Shpg. wt., 60 lbs.
MMMMMM
isominommoorimmonewounem
Lafayette Radio, Dept.
AF -1
Made In
U.$.A.
Response 5- 40,000 cps It 1 db.
Precise "Null" Balancing System
Unique Stereo and Monaural Control Features
Concentric Input Level Controls
Easy -To- Assemble Kit Form.
P.O. Box 190
Name
Address
1tiLL.
LOCATIONS
74
Neat Onkyo Denki Co., Ltd.
14
Pickering & Company, Inc.
Pilot Radio Corporation
43
Zone
RAD
=
JAMAICA 33, NEW YORK
State
N.Y.
BRONX 58, N.Y
NEWARK 2, N.J.
PLAINFIELD, N.J.
PARAMUS, N.J.
BOSTON 10, MASS
Coy. II
71
2
29
1
Tandberg of America, Inc.
Transis -Tronics, Inc.
Weathers Industries
NEW YORK 13, N.Y.
17
67
Sansui Electric Co., Ltd.
58, 60, 62
Sargent -Rayment Co.
6
Sarkes- Tarzian, Inc.
25
Scott, H. H., Inc.
Sherwood Electronic Laboratories, Inc.
61
Shure Brothers, Inc.
63
Sonotone Corp.
5
Inc.
Superscope,
Viking of Minneapolis, Inc.
City
7
57
University Loudspeakers, Inc.
Jamaica 31, New York
74
Lansing, James B., Sound, Inc
RCA Electron Tube Division
Reeves Soundcraft Corp.
Rek -O -Kut Company, Inc.
Roberts Electronics, Inc.
Down
Rated at 50 -Watts per Channel
Response from 2- 100,000 cps, 0,
Lafayette Radio
Langevin, a Division of Sonotec
Incorporated
AUDIO
59
Coy. IV
55
Cov. III
4
JUNE, 1961
tape your
stereo
wherever
you go
with...
Viking quality and portability, too
Viking stereo recording quality now goes portable!
The Stereo "Super -Pro" combines the famed Viking 85' deck
with dual RP62C Recording Playback Amplifiers. Permits remote
recording of half or quarter -track tapes with no compromise in
performance.
Your music system provides playback amplification and speakers.
Front panel contains dual microphone jacks, connectors for
headphone monitoring and high -level inputs for recording from
your music system as well.
Rugged and handsome, the "Super -Pro" is packaged in heavy duty case, covered in brown, scuff-resistant plastic with heavily
reinforced corners.
The Viking Stereo "Super -Pro" is available at authorized Viking
high fidelity dealers everywhere.
I!..,
27,11
"
Mk
VAN;ß
ng
9600 Aldrich
OF
MINNEAPOLIS, INC.
Avenue South. Minneapolis 20. Minnesota
The Viking Stereo "Super -Pro"
Half -track or quarter-track recording models.
Audiophile net $344.50 to $379.50 depending on head complement.
f
98
96
4
I
I
I
I
1
1
1
I
I
I
'I!I III IIIIII 'HI l!itI'll IIIIIII
30
40
50
106
104
102
100
I
60
III
I
I
OUT OF
1Cr
I
I
II;iL;I1;1;1;I Ill
70
80
90
TUNERS'.
FM
FM AFc
°OWEROFF
MUTING
I;
100
ON
OFF
RANGE
DISTANT
LOCAL
FUNCTION
TUNING
FM
... high fidelity's first all -transistor FM
Transis- Tronics. The TEC FM -15 is th
from
tuner is, quite naturally,
most efficient tuner on the market today. Double conversion provide;
far superior image rejection, significantly reducing interference from
unwanted signals. And because of its all- transistor circuitry, the FM -15
Long awaited
... finally
here
has no heat, no hum. no microphonics and exceptionally low power
requirements.
HEAR THE FM -15 WITH ITS PERFECT COMPANION, THE S -15
combination which truly
obsoletes all others. Hearing is believing. In the meantime ... write
Transis- Tronics for complete specifications on both units.
ALL-TRANSISTOR STEREO AMPLIFIER. Here is a
.+c.
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
MULTIPLEX
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